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SCHOOL SCENE

A Special Supplement to the Sullivan County Democrat

A look at activities in the Livingston Manor School District SECTION L, MARCH, 2020 • CALLICOON, NY


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LIVINGSTON MANOR SCHOOL SCENE

SULLIVAN COUNTY DEMOCRAT

MARCH, 2020

The wild Willowemoc Creek, a classroom close to home conversely, about deposition, which is the process by which soil and rocks are transported and deposited here and there.

Livingston Manor's Willowemoc Creek, characterized by pools and riffles caused when water flows over rocks, is known to anglers for its abundance of brown and brook trout. Above the creek is Livingston Manor Central School, where high-schoolers study the comings and goings of the waterway.

STORY AND PHOTOS BY KATHY DALEY

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rom cold clear streams high in the Catskill Mountains, Willowemoc Creek dashes past Livingston Manor Central School as it heads for the Beaverkill River in Roscoe. Flooding problems notwithstanding, the beautiful waterway hosts the variety of trout sought by fly fishermen from all over the world. And so it follows that the Willowemoc also serves as home for the abundant insect life that trout depend on: mayflies, caddisflies and stoneflies. “It’s healthy, wonderful water,” says teacher Paul Favata, who routinely uses the creek as a high school classroom as the Willowemoc flows below school district property. In biology class, for example, kids

study macro-invertebrates, which are organisms that lack a spine and are large enough to be seen with the naked eye. Looking to count mayfly larvae, “We turn over rocks, rub off the bottom of the rock of its larvae to dislodge it and then downstream we catch the larvae in a net,” said Favata. After counting, students return the larvae to their proper place in the creek. In chemistry class, kids monitor the Willowemoc's temperature and pH factor, which is a measure of its acidity or alkalinity. They also study the stream for nitrates and phosphates, the components of fertilizers that can cause unhealthy algae growth, depleted oxygen and death of organisms. In Earth Science, students create stream profiles, measuring the depth of water and studying the stream bottom. They learn about erosion and,

School Scene ‘A look inside the Livingston Manor Central School’ Published by

Catskill-Delaware Publications, Inc. Publishers of the

(845) 887-5200 Callicoon, NY 12723 March 10, 2020 • Vol. CXXVIX, No. 78

GRANT MOVES SWIMMINGLY These days, school officials are keeping their fingers crossed about a likely grant involving students and the creek. The non-profit Trout Unlimited is partnering with Livingston Manor, Downsville and Roscoe school districts, along with students from Brooklyn and Harlem schools, in seeking a $32,000 grant from the National Fish and Wildlife Federation to gather data from the Willowemoc and Beaverkill. Trout Unlimited works to conserve freshwater streams and rivers where trout, salmon and other species live. Lillit Genovesi, classroom coordinator of Trout Unlimited's New York City

branch, said the project is likely to begin in the fall with students' classroom study of the life cycle of trout, including raising the fish in tanks. Then, students will study and survey the waterways. Finally, under professional supervision, they will remove invasive species, notably the pesky knotweed, along the banks. Dogwood, sycamore and black cherry are good replacements, Genovesi said. “We want students to have a passion for the outdoors,” said Genovesi, “to care for the streams and for the water supply.” At Manor, Paul Favata couldn't agree more. “Students grow more and learn more in a project, in the outdoors, rather than just in the classroom,” he said. “In the stream, they see all the interconnectedness. The Willowemoc is an amazing resource. They should know it and love it.”

Teacher Paul Favata, back row, far right, teaches the high school sciences at Manor CSD, including his class in Earth Science, here.

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MARCH, 2020

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LIVINGSTON MANOR SCHOOL SCENE

SULLIVAN COUNTY DEMOCRAT

MARCH, 2020

Ride that bike, lift those weights: Manor gets healthy

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STORY AND PHOTOS BY KATHY DALEY

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hen it comes to fitness and wellness, “all the schools in Sullivan County are trying to step up their game,” says Livingston Manor Central School's Wellness Coordinator Joyce Hoag. But Manor is going even further by encouraging adults to get in shape too, notes Hoag, who teaches special education at the school. As of Feb. 10, the school’s fitness center comprised of two large, connected rooms chock full of equipment has welcomed adult residents of Livingston Manor on Mondays through Fridays from 5-7 p.m. Using equipment like free weights, exercise bikes, treadmills and more at the large workout center, they pay only $5 for the entire year, and that’s just in order to defray the cost of a special card to get in the door. Typically, the fitness center has attracted student physical education classes, a weight training class for kids, sports teams and teacher use. But the District wanted to reach out to the wider community. “Our school IS the town,” said Hoag. “A lot of people have strong connections to this building. They come to concerts and games. This is another avenue of reach-out for us.” Studies show that physical activity can impact cognitive skills along with better physical health. “Exercise contributes numerous benefits for brain function and for stress relief,” said Athletic Director Adam Larson. “Then there’s the obesity problem for adults and kids.

Free weights, exercise bikes, treadmills and more attract both students and adults to the fitness rooms at the school, said Joyce Hoag, Wellness Coordinator.

If we can play a part in going above and beyond the educational part, that's what we want.” The school district alerted residents to the new “community gym” option through its facebook page. “In the first two weeks alone, we had 27 registered residents,” said Steve DeFreitas, who has been hired as the personal trainer at the Center. He helps people learn to use the equipment and works one-on-one with them on particular problems like low back pain or meniscus tears on knees.


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Certified personal trainer Steve DeFreitas works with adults at the school's Fitness Center. The two-room workout room opened its doors to Livingston Manor grown-ups on Feb. 10.

At Left: The two-room comprehensive fitness center at Livingston Manor school includes this power systems trainer that looks like a jungle gym. ‘You can do whole body workouts,’ notes Athletic Director Adam Larson.

Empowering young people to care about the food they eat and where it comes from — A Single Bite at a time. Expanding our program throughout Sullivan County to provide even more students the opportunity to enjoy good health and reach their full potential.

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Certified as a personal trainer, DeFrietas also works as internal claims auditor for the Roscoe, Livingston Manor and Downsville school districts. DeFreitas also works with the maintenance department in the Roscoe Central School. A graduate of Livingston Manor High School, the certified trainer says community response to the fitness center has been terrific. “People are very excited, and many of them have come back multiple times,” DeFreitas said. “As we age, we lose muscle mass and our bones get brittle. Resistance training can reverse the effects of aging.” Access to not only top shelf equipment but to a personal trainer is so valuable, said Adam Larson. “As a school system, you want to be able to open your doors, welcoming community members,” said Larson. “Access to treadmills, ellipticals, bikes, free weights, kettle bells –– it's all right in their backyard now.”

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MARCH, 2020


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LIVINGSTON MANOR SCHOOL SCENE

SULLIVAN COUNTY DEMOCRAT

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There’s only one rule in the program: you must try ‘A Single Bite’ BY KATHY DALEY

T

he dining room at The Arnold House on Shandelee Road buzzed with activity. Wait staff hustled out Brussels sprout salads with greens, clementines, apples and sesame seeds. Out from the kitchen came chicken roasted with rosemary, parsley and thyme and a vegetable medley of asparagus, carrot, onion and garlic. But the hit of the luncheon appeared to be Potatoes Lyonnaise, which, the chef told the crowd, was made with baked potatoes that were then cooled, hand-sliced and grilled in bacon fat. “I liked the potatoes the best,” said Zoie Marks. Zoie and 26 other Livingston Manor

eighth graders feasted on foods they hadn’t tasted before, one bite at a time. Just to try something different. To open their minds as much as their taste buds. Sims Foster – raised and schooled in Livingston Manor where his parents both taught – and wife Kirsten were determined to do just that: acquaint students with the joy of healthy food, sometimes different and often unusual. After learning that Sullivan County ranks among the top unhealthy counties in New York State, Sims began connecting with Livingston Manor’s Family and Consumer Science teacher Mary Ellen Reynolds. In the fall of 2016, they launched ‘A Single Bite.’ The Fosters are known for Foster

Jesse Ouimet 2019 Intern for f Livingston Manor

Supply Hospitality, their raft of new inns and restaurants in famous old structures. But in local education circles, they are known for teaching where food actually comes from and how to make good food choices. The program begins with classes that introduce the concept of what's real and what's fake food-wise. Along with a chef from Foster Supply Hospitality, “we ask the students to take ‘A Single Bite’ of foods that perhaps they have never tried before: trout, beets, halloumi, venison, squash, quinoa, kale,” said Audrey Garro, executive director of ‘A Single Bite.’ The program then incorporates a local farm tour so students can experience, close to home, where real food originates. This year, the trip

“Mmmmmm,” says eighth grader Zoie Marks about the Potatoes Lyonnaise at a special lunch at The Arnold House on Shandelee Road in Livingston Manor.

took students to Justin Sutherland's organic farm in Parksville, where they learned about potato planting, growth and harvesting. Returning to the classroom, a ‘Single Bite’ professional reviews the themes and continues the discussion

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MARCH, 2020

into the seven other Sullivan County school districts will be completed by the year 2021. Reynolds noted that the program continues to touch student lives. “I have students who chose to go into BOCES’ culinary course in high school because of this,” she said. Reynolds, who taught at Manor for 14 years, will retire at the end of this school year. She and her husband own a farm in Downsville and she wants to spend more time there and with family. But, she said, ‘A Single Bite’ will continue to enliven her days. “I will help them do presentations,” said Reynolds. “‘A Single Bite’ was Sims’ and my baby, and I'm not walking away from it. I absolutely love it.” CONTRIBUTED PHOTOS

Family and Consumer Science teacher at Livingston Manor School, Mary Ellen Reynolds, will retire at the end of this school year. She has been instrumental in the popular A Single Bite Program since 2016, acquainting eighth graders with the wonders of healthy, creative food menus and new culinary experiences. She and her husband live on a farm in Downsville, NY, not far from Roscoe. Reynolds plans on staying connected with the A Single Bite project for years to come.

about healthy choices. A few more specially prepared dishes further expands students’ palettes, Garro said. Finally, the students sit for a proper lunch at one of Foster Supply Hospitality’s restaurants, where they hear from executive chefs and general managers who speak about food sources, preparation and their experience and passion for food. In February, the class took to The Arnold House in a big yellow school bus. Accompanying them were High School Principal Shirlee Davis and technology teacher Dave Hubert. “Listen to this,” marveled Davis at one point as the kids began digging into the special dishes. “They are eating and having conversations. They are actually talking to each other. I’m enjoying this.” Chef Clark Hoskin explained to the crowd key points. “The chicken is real, not chicken nuggets,” he said. “This is healthy food, not processed.” It won’t be long before eighth graders county-wide will experience the culinary learning and the fun. A planned expansion of ‘A Single Bite’

Join ‘a Single Bite’ in steering students toward smart eating Founded by Sims and Kirsten Foster, the program entitled A Single Bite seeks to teach why real food is important and to empower young people to choose to care about the food they eat and where it comes from. Serving the Livingston Manor Central School now, the program plans to expand its offerings to school districts throughout Sullivan County. Anyone interested in donating to the non-profit A Single Bite can make a donation to CFOS - Fund for A Single Bite and mailed to: A Single Bite, PO Box 595, Youngsville, NY 12791 A Single Bite is a component fund of the Com-

LIVINGSTON MANOR SCHOOL SCENE

munity Foundation of Orange and Sullivan. Contributions are tax-deductible to the full extent of the law. The objectives of A Single Bite are: • Consciousness - In a straightforward and non-patronizing way, to introduce children to the idea that food, where it comes from, and how it is delivered to them is an important choice. • Empowerment - To give these emerging leaders the permission to think about food, nutrition

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and the social engagement around eating in a way that encourages them to own their choices. We make real food cool. • Continued Growth - To provide a practical and logical toolbox of skills so that these young adults can stay the path of making smart choices around food and eating. For more information on A Single Bite and its mission, contact audrey@asinglebite.org or call 845-482-1030.

Livingston Manor native Sims Foster speaks to eighth graders about food that's cool, even when it's hot.

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Sulliva an BOCES Off fffers... fers .. . Career Care e er & Te echnical chnical Educat Education t ion Prog Pro o grrrams amss Specialized Specializ z e d Educ Educcat cational t ional Prog Pro o grrrams ams Adult Ad ultt & Contin Contt in nuing EEducat ducation att ion &m more e Jayla Elder gets giddy over a bowlful of salad that includes arugula, apples, Brussels sprouts, clementines and sesame seeds. In addition to eighth graders, the A Single Bite program has also begun to provide activities for 9-12 graders who had participated in the program earlier.

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Kids learn to be greener and cleaner in ‘sustainability’ class

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MARCH, 2020

Recycling and reducing the use of paper goods and other trash can go a long way toward helping the environment, one student at a time, says science teacher Rachel Smith.

STORY AND PHOTOS BY KATHY DALEY

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n a high school elective course for eleventh and twelfth graders, teacher Rachel Smith starts out by suggesting her students collect waste for one entire week: every milk carton, bottle, food wrapper, utensil, piece of paper they use. “They were shocked at how much they had collected,” said Smith. “We’re so used to throwing stuff out, we don't even recognize it as waste. This was a good learning experience.” The course called Sustainability takes place at 8:45 a.m. every other day for one school year, teaching the concept that the welfare of the environment and of future generations should guide today’s actions. It’s about providing the best for people and the environment, now and for the future. “At these ages, students are about to enter into the college realm and to make decisions on how they want to live,” said Smith. “This course is about making sustainable choices as they grow. (Otherwise) they might not see

the impact of their choices, globally.” Environmental sustainability encourages awareness not only of resource consumption but also the reduction of unnecessary waste through recycling, reusing and reducing. The fourth pillar in reducing trash is “refusing,” that is, not creating waste in the first place. “Here, we are working on lifestyle changes,” the teacher reflected. “In other words, use what you have already and then begin to transition to better choices.” For example, the U.S. manufacturing industry contributes to a great amount of waste. Perfectly good food, from chicken to pears to potatoes, can fail to meet the increasingly high specifications as the foodstuffs travel, one by one, on conveyor belts. Much food gets rejected and winds up in waste bins. “The way our food is produced is unsustainable,” Smith said. Then there’s our own unwitting waste. How often do we buy, say, a carton of fresh strawberries, lose track of its presence and then eventually toss it? “Purchase only what


SULLIVAN COUNTY DEMOCRAT

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you need,” the teacher tells her students. As they mature into adulthood, other sustainability options open up. For example, young people can unite with local farmers to buy good, fresh produce grown nearby. “Or give to a food bank,” said Smith. Food banks collect products from the food industry and food drives, and distributes them to food pantries, soup kitchens, and shelters that feed people in need. Soon, Livingston Manor Central School as a whole will gain more “greenness” by welcoming a relationship with the Sullivan County-based Hospitality Green, an environmental

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consulting company that also works with school districts. This spring, the Mountaindale firm will provide training and will launch a garbage reduction and recycling sorting system that encourages students to properly dispose of plastic-ware, milk cartons, glass and recyclables. Funding will come from the Carton Council of North America, which stresses the importance of recycling the cartons that hold milk, soup, juice, wine and broth. The Council also promotes recycling technology and local collection programs. Says Rachel Smith with a big smile: “Our entire school will be involved. We are very excited.”

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Amazed at the amount of paper stashed in such a small space, tenth grader Gabriella Martinez straightens out her locker.

On the Cover Left: Isabella Hokirk takes time from her assignment to give us a smile. Right: Landon Bowers is focused on his writing assignment.

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SULLIVAN COUNTY DEMOCRAT

MARCH, 2020

Spring is Coming! Great Ideas to Help Your Business Grow! EDUCATION

TOURISM

SCHOOL SCENE A Special Supplement to the Sullivan County Democrat

TAKE ONE FREE SECTION L MARCH, 2019

CALLICOON, NY

Catskills Take One Free

C O N F I D E N T I A L

SPRING 2019

Volume 18 Number 8

welcome to spring A look at activities in the Livingston Manor School District

Livingston Manor School Scene

Catskills Confidential Edition

Bethel Destination Guide

Ad Deadline: March 2 Publication Date: March 10

Ad Deadline: April 15 Publication Date: May 15

Ad Deadline: May 1 Publication Date: May 15

BUSINESS S P R I N G

HEALTH

To the People: Is 2019 the year? page 2E

winter weather

PRICELESS

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Eldred Preserve showing progress INSIDE: ...despite challenging SUNY Sullivan ready to change a student’s life page 5E Spring 2019 IDA update page 6E A bakery opening in Jeffersonville page 12E U-Haul opens new PA office pages 15E

REAL ESTATE

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home c ou n t r y

A Sullivan County Democrat publication APRIL, 2019

PRICELESS

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SCVA gearing up for busy summer page 16E Westchester Modular offers quality, affordability page 20E The Eldred Preserve will have 28 rooms available including three lodges, each with five rooms and five private cabins. Above, Lodge No. 1 is almost closed in and ready for inside finishing. BY FRED STABBERT III

F

or those who are frequent travelers of Route 55, south of White Lake, the large construction project which is being undertaken at the Eldred Preserve is hardly a secret. Large concrete walls have already been poured and workmen are busy putting the steel up for the inn and the restaurant. Chief Operating Officer Scott Samuelson said, “The building project is coming along very well, we are just struggling with the weather. We have to be realistic, March isn’t even over yet and

we all know what kind of weather that can bring.” Temperatures in the single digits have greeted workmen for much of early March and the minus 15 degree temperatures in February were also a challenge. But Myhren Builders, of Vernon Township, NJ, are working through it, raising steel on the restaurant as local

Please see ELDRED, page 4E Steel work is progressing in this view of the front of the main food service building, where the restaurant will be located.

Sullivan County Business Edge Ad Deadline: March 6 Publication Date: March 17

A Special Section of the Sullivan County Democrat,

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SULLIVAN COUNTY DEMOCRAT

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LIVINGSTON MANOR SCHOOL SCENE

Wildcats win Class D titles At right: The Livingston Manor Varsity Boys’ and Girls’ Basketball teams celebrate after winning Section 9 Class D titles. The boys defeated Chapel Field at SUNY Sullivan in a close 53-49 game. It is the boys second Section 9 championship in three years. They bounced back after an upset loss to Roscoe in last year’s title game. As for the Lady Wildcats, they won Class D outright by being the only team in the section to qualify for the postseason. It’s their second straight Class D championship. Both teams advanced to the state tournament and represented their schools with pride.

At right: Longtime and current Roscoe Varsity Boys Basketball Coach Fred Ahart, who also serves as the district’s athletic director, is nothing short of a legend. The Section recently chose to name the trophy which goes to the Class D championship, the Fred Ahart Trophy, in his honor. Following their win last Wednesday, Manor’s Patrick DiBartolo (far right) shared a special moment with Ahart and his wife Becky, a legendary coach in her own right. We congratulate both Manor basketball teams on a successful winter season, and to their seniors, best wishes in their future endeavors!

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Livingston Manor School Scene 2020  

Read about all the great things taking place within the Livingston Manor Central School District!

Livingston Manor School Scene 2020  

Read about all the great things taking place within the Livingston Manor Central School District!

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