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WELCOME To C h a r l e s t o n


Welcome, Valarie Frasier has been a licensed Real Estate Agent for the past 10+ years, helping her clients reach their real estate goals. As a REALTOR速 who lives up to and conducts business to a certain code of ethics, Valarie takes her profession very seriously. She realizes that real estate is an investment tool and that home ownership is the foundation to building personal financial wealth. Working with buyers and sellers, particularly those relocating, she takes the time to determine their real estate needs, shares the best options for purchasing or selling a home and then walks them through the process step by step. Valarie then takes care of all the details to ensure a smooth closing, all the while keeping in mind the market conditions that will impact their investment now and in the future. Valarie works tirelessly to meet your real estate goals. With a determined spirit and drive, she formulates a plan to meet your needs and works tirelessly to make sure your moving experience is worry free. With perseverance and expertise of the area, she has become a leader in her career as a real estate professional. She works by your side from consultation to closing, making sure no detail is unattended and the process is a smooth as possible.

Cell Phone: (843) 276-8614 Fax Phone: (866) 813-5031 Valarie.Frasier@CarolinaEliteRE.com www.ValarieSellsCharleston.com 1081 E. Montague Avenue, North Charleston SC 29405 Old Historic North Charleston District


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Determined To Meet Your Goals F

or Valarie, being a real estate professional is an extension of her drive to

empower others. She knows that when she helps clients buy or sell homes,

she is making a positive difference in their futures. Realizing this is one of her clientsâ&#x20AC;&#x2122; most important investments, she provides guidance and support, taking care to protect their best interests. Before beginning contact Valarie to find out your unique needs. 843.276.8614 | Valarie.Frasier@CarolinaEliteRE.com | www.ValarieSellsCharleston.com 1081 E. Montague Avenue, North Charleston SC 29405 | Old Historic North Charleston District




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PRMI NMLS: 3094. PRMI is an Equal Housing Lender. DISCLAIMER: Some products and services may not be available in all states. Credit and collateral are subject to approval. Terms and conditions apply. This is not a commitment to lend. Programs, rates, terms and conditions are subject to change without notice. South Carolina Department of Consumer Affairs, MLS-3094, as Element Funding MLS-3094 OTN#1. EQUAL HOUSING

OPPORTUNITY


S E CTION NA ME Photo/Courtesy of City of Charleston

»Welcome

The Charleston region is full of life, history and opportunity. You have probably already discovered this, as you are considering, or have already chosen, the region as your new home. On the surface, the region’s beauty is impossible to ignore. In fact, it’s probably one of the many things that attracted you to the area. Rivers serenely wind through scenic marshlands. Historic buildings are shaded by grand live oaks draped in Spanish moss. There are a lot of advantages to living in an area that’s easy on the eyes, whether you’ve set down roots in Summerville, Charleston, Mount Pleasant or somewhere in between. But much deeper than the region’s beauty is its history, which dates back to 1670 when the first English settlers arrived and established Charles Towne on the banks of the Ashley River. As a favorite destination for travelers, the Charleston region proudly celebrates its history and the people who have helped shape the area into what it is today. In addition, quality of life is something each community takes seriously. Schools are a high priority. New pedestrian and family-friendly neighborhoods are being built that mix seamlessly with established neighborhoods. There are abundant opportunities to experience arts, culture, outdoor recreation, shopping, dining and nightlife. We invite you to explore the region, get to know your neighbors and discover the charms of the Lowcountry. It won’t take long before you become immersed in the area’s progressive Southern culture and call Charleston your new hometown. We’re certainly glad you’re here. Welcome home.

INTRO | 1


We lc o me

»We’ve got it all

Why, thank you!

Charleston was named No. 1 tourist city in the United States in 2012 by

the recongnition in many areas. Here are

Conde’ Nast Traveler readers for the second year in a row. Here are a few

The Charleston area keeps racking up a few examples. We’re flattered...

reasons why: Atmosphere and Ambiance Day or night, Charleston’s atmosphere and ambiance beckon. Take a carriage ride to learn about the historic area, take in a beautiful sunset at a rooftop bar or venture to the beach to relax. Charleston gets into your soul and we think you’ll agree there’s nothing quite like it. Arts and History The Charleston area is the home of many firsts. The city was founded in 1670, and you can barely take a step in any direction without seeing a historic building, plantation or other landmark. From Rainbow Row and the Market downtown to Fort Moultrie on Sullivan’s Island, there is much to see and learn about. And the Charleston arts scene is surprisingly vibrant, as well. Performing and visual arts come together in the annual Spoleto Festival. Friendliness Our rankings as Friendliest City and Most Mannerly City are two things we’re proud of. We take life a little slower here in Charleston and extend to visitors and newcomers the same hospitality that the city’s founders did. It won’t be long before you too will be saying, “Welcome, y’all!” Lodging Want to stay in a historic inn? No problem. Like the beach with a golf course nearby? You can stay there too. Luxury hotel, bed and breakfast, marsh or ocean view, harbor or skyline vista? If you can dream it, we probably have it. Restaurants Charleston has become a hotspot on the gourmet scene. Chefs focus on using farm fresh produce and seafood straight from local waters. Lots of festivals and events feature our local cuisine, from spontaneous Food Truck Rodeos to the annual Wine and Food Festival. Shopping Pick up a handmade sweetgrass basket in the Market or shop the latest fashions on King Street downtown. Head out to the Tanger Outlets in North Charleston if you’re looking for a great deal, and swing by Town Centre in Mount Pleasant for trendy shops and locally owned boutiques. Whatever you’re looking for, you can probably find it here.

Charleston is the No. 1 tourist city in the world - Conde Nast, 2012 No. 1 U.S. city and top world destination - Conde Nast Traveler, Readers’ Choice Awards, 2012 A top 10 best place for jobs in the U.S. (among mid-sized metros) - Forbes, 2012 Top 10 Best Performing U.S. metros for high tech & economic growth   - Milken Institute, 2012 Charleston ranks No. 9 for job recovery among U.S. metros - Brookings Institution, 2012 No. 2 for overall business environment and overall labor climate in the nation  - Area Development, 2012 No. 2 for economic growth  (South Atlantic area) - Area Development, 2012 Top 10 U.S. destinations on the rise for 2012 - TripAdvisor.com, 2012 No. 2, top 10 downtowns - Livability.com, 2012 Third best weekend getaway destination -  U.S. News & World Report, 2012 Sources: Charleston County Economic Development, S.C. Department of Parks, Recreation & Tourism

2 | INTRO


Why I live here Welcome messages from our sponsors

“What makes Charleston a wonderful place to live, besides being a Charlestonian, is the beauty and culture of the city, topped only by the generosity and graciousness of its people. Around every corner there is a new adventure and memories to be made.” Mary Garcia Senior Vice President / City Executive, BNC Bank.

“I like living in Charleston because I love the water. Our waterfront is a wonderful resource for recreational and educational activities, as well as job opportunities. It is the perfect complement to the city’s landside charm.” McKenzie Hutaff, CMM The City Marina Company

SOUTH CAROLINA

“Coming from Chicago, our initial considerations weighed heavily upon climate and opportunity. Charleston exceeded our expectations in both realms with an events calendar, culinary scene, global awareness and civility that would rival large major cities. A morning commute that includes crossing the Ravenel Bridge is

“Our neighbors are very friendly and there is always something fun to do. Mount Pleasant is a beautiful place to spend time outdoors. My wife and I spend our free time enjoying the natural beauty of Mount Pleasant whether we are walking, biking or boating. For us, this is an easy place to have an active lifestyle.”

just icing on the cake!” Marino Cecchi Vice President of Mortgage, South Carolina Federal Credit Union

Blair Belk Vice President, Retail Services, Lincoln Harris

INTRO | 3


contents

2 Introduction to Charleston 3 Sponsors’ Welcome 8 Education in the Lowcountry 15 Higher Education 20 Market Facts/Economy 28 Health & Wellness

Photo/Courtesy of Kiawah Island Partners

»Welcome

» Living In 38 Historic Charleston 44 Mount Pleasant 46 Isle of Palms & Sullivan’s Island 48 North Charleston 50 West Ashley 54 James Island & Folly Beach 57 Johns Island 58 Daniel Island 60 Kiawah & Seabrook Islands 62 Summerville 65 Moncks Corner 67 Goose Creek

Volume 5

»Resource Guide

70 Sports & Recreation 76 Golf Courses 77 Dog Parks 78 Dining Out 80 Places to Stay 83 Alternative & Outdoor Venues 84 Arts Abound 88 Attractions & Tours 92 Calendar of Events 96 Newcomer Information & Map 6 | INTRO

Photo/Courtesy of Charleston County Parks and Recreation

2013


Photo/Ryan Wilcox

President and Group Publisher - Grady Johnson gjohnson@scbiznews.com • 843.849.3103 Vice President of Sales - Steve Fields sfields@scbiznews.com • 843.849.3110 Creative Director - Ryan Wilcox production1@scbiznews.com • 843.849.3117 Managing Editor - Andy Owens aowens@scbiznews.com • 843.849.3142 Director of Audience Development - Rick Jenkins rjenkins@scbiznews.com • 864.235.5677, ext. 26 Event Manager - Kathy Allen kallen@scbiznews.com • 843.849.3113 Audience Development & IT Manager - Kim McManus kmcmanus@scbiznews.com • 843.849.3116 Accounting Department - Vickie Deadmon vdeadmon@scbiznews.com • 864.235.5677, ext. 25 Special Projects Editor - Licia Jackson ljackson@scbiznews.com • 803.401.1094, ext. 206 Senior Copy Editor - Beverly Barfield bbarfield@scbiznews.com • 843.849.3115 Staff Photographer - Leslie Burden lburden@scbiznews.com • 843.849.3123 Senior Graphic Designer - Jane Mattingly production2@scbiznews.com • 843.849.3118

What are Market Facts and Lists?

Graphic Designer - Jean Piot production3@scbiznews.com • 843.849.3145 Graphic Designer - Andrew Sprague asprague@scbiznews.com • 843.849.3128 Data Research - Elizabeth Fonte efonte@scbiznews.com • 803.401.1094, ext. 207

Each year, the Charleston Regional Business Journal collects all kinds of data and facts about our region. These are presented in a visual way in Market Facts, which is published annually. In the following pages, you will be introduced to a sampling of this data presented in chart, graph and table format. You will also be treated to samples from our annual Book of Lists. The lists are just what they sound like: listings of businesses and other organizations by category. The information is ranked by number of employees or some other criteria, and details about each company are painstakingly gathered by our researchers. The Market Facts and lists published here are of interest to newcomers. We hope you enjoy both these added features to Intro Charleston.

Custom media DIVISION account executives Director of Business Development - Mark Wright mwright@scbiznews.com • 843.849.3143 Senior Account Executive - Sue Gordon sgordon@scbiznews.com • 843.849.3111 Senior Account Executive - Robert Reilly rreilly@scbiznews.com • 843.849.3107 Account Executive - Sara Cox scox@scbiznews.com • 843.849.3109 Account Executive - Bennett Parks bparks@scbiznews.com • 843.849.3126 Account Executive - Reneé Piontek rpiontek@scbiznews.com • 843.849.3105

South Carolina’s Media Engine for Economic Growth SC Business Publications LLC A portfolio company of Virginia Capital Partners LLC Frederick L. Russell Jr., Chairman

The entire contents of this newspaper are copyright by SC Business Publications LLC with all rights reserved. Any reproduction or use of the content within this publication without permission is prohibited. SCBIZ and South Carolina’s Media Engine for Economic Growth are registered in the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office. INTRO | 7


Education School Districts, p. 10 /// Private Schools, p. 13 /// Higher Education, p. 15

tadel

sy of The Ci

8 | INTRO

Photo/Courte

• Sponsored by •

Photo/Leslie Burden

T

he greater Charleston region has four school districts covering areas from downtown to suburban neighborhoods and rural communities. Each district offers a variety of school programs, including magnet and charter schools with specialized programs of study. Charleston County School District is the largest, serving some 45,000 students countywide. Students living in the city of Charleston, North Charleston and Mount Pleasant all attend Charleston County schools as well as those on James Island, Johns Island and Sullivan’s Island. Berkeley County School District serves almost 30,000 students in 40 schools that span the vast county. Students in such areas as Goose Creek, Hanahan, Daniel Island and Moncks Corner attend these schools. Dorchester County is divided into two districts. Dorchester School District Two serves Summerville and areas around it. Dorchester School District Four educates children in the more rural parts of the county, including St. George, Ridgeville and Harleyville. Details on each district are given on the pages that follow.


Ed ucatio n Photo/Berkeley County School District

Photo/Leslie Burden

Photo/Charleston County School District

The Gifted and Talented program serves academically advanced students. They are enrolled in classes to enrich and accelerate learning beyond the regular school curriculum, including in English and mathematics. In November 2012, Berkeley County voters passed a school improvement referendum that will construct and equip five new schools and renovate 29 other schools in the district. New schools include: • A new high school in the Daniel Island/Cainhoy area. • A new middle school in the Daniel Island/Cainhoy area. • A new elementary school in the Sheep Island Road area. • A new elementary school in the Tanner Plantation area. • A new elementary school in the FoxBank Plantation area.

Berkeley County School District 229 East Main St. Moncks Corner, SC 29461 843-899-8600 www.berkeley.k12.sc.us Superintendent: Rodney Thompson For a complete list of schools in Berkeley County School District, visit www.berkeley. k12.sc.us/Schools.cfm. To determine your neighborhood school based on home address, visit http://gis.berkeleycountysc.gov/ maps/school_system/. Berkeley County School District, the fourth largest school system in the state, serves more than 29,000 students and operates 40 schools, including eight high 10 | INTRO

schools, nine middle schools, 22 elementary schools and one alternative school. Berkeley County provides arts magnet schools at each level of elementary, middle and high school. Howe Hall Arts Infused Magnet School serves students in kindergarten through fifth grade who are selected through a lottery process. Howe Hall AIMS is a model site for arts infusion in South Carolina and was selected in 2007 as a Kennedy Center Creative Ticket School of Excellence and in 2010 as a National Blue Ribbon School. The Berkeley Center for the Arts at Goose Creek High School offers programs in creative writing, dance, orchestral strings, theater, visual arts, vocal music, and wind and percussion studies.

Charleston County School District 75 Calhoun St. Charleston, SC 29401 843-937-6300 www.ccsdschools.com Superintendent: Nancy J. McGinley For information on all the individual schools in the district along with information on registering your child in the district, visit www.ccsdschools.com/Schools/. To look up your neighborhood school based on home address, visit www.croppermap. com/charleston/. Charleston County School District is the second largest school system in South Carolina representing a blend of urban, suburban and rural schools over 1,000 square miles. The district serves about 45,000 students in 80 schools and several specialized programs. In Charleston County, each schoolaged child is assigned to a neighborhood school based on grade level and home address. In addition, the district offers


Educati on

» School District Overview ty

School District Map In Dorchester County, the districts divide along Eagle Drive, Indigo Road and Cummings Chapel Road. Dorchester County School District 4

Berkeley County School District

B

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k er

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un

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a Ch

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r r te r te o es Fou es Tw h h rc ct rc ct Do istri Do istri D D

2012 SAT Scores Critical Reading Math Writing Average Composite Score

482 495 466 1,443

486 489 468 1,442

495 498 470 1,463

470 438 424 1,332

2012 ACT Scores English Math Reading Science Mean Composite Score

Dorchester County School District 2

18.7 20.0 19.5 20.5 19.3 20.7 19.7 20.5 19.4 20.5

Charleston County School District

2012 State Report Card

specialized programs, magnet schools and charter schools, including such specialized programming as Montessori, international baccalaureate, single gender, militaryinfused, math and science, arts, and global studies programs. Charleston County School District’s current strategic plan, Charleston Achieving Excellence, centers on four priorities: literacy improvement; effective teaching and leadership; world-class schools and systems; and strategic partnerships. The district has three main goals: 1) Close the achievement gap. 2) Elevate achievement overall. 3) Raise the graduation rate.

Student Enrollment

Dorchester School District Two 102 Green Wave Blvd. Summerville, SC 29483 843-873-2901 www.dorchester2.k12.sc.us Superintendent: Joseph R. Pye For a complete list of schools, visit this shortened link: http://bit.ly/16PtumA. This web page has a list of schools for each subdivision. For questions about attendance zones and which neighborhood school your child would attend, call 843-873-2901. Dorchester School District Two is the largest employer in Dorchester County. The district serves more than 23,000 students

Absolute Rating Growth Rating

Good Good

School District

Enrollment

Berkeley

29,263

Charleston

43,255

Dorchester 2

22,596

Dorchester 4

2,267

Good Good

20.6 20.8 21.2 20.9 21.0

Excellent Good

15.9 16.7 18.2 16.6 17.0

Average Good

Source: S.C. Department of Education

Education of Population 25 and Older, by County Charleston

Dorchester

2000

Berkeley 2010

2000

2010

2000

2010

86,015

108,359

199,361

227,578

61,334

83,422

Less than 9th grade

6.2%

4.4%

5.9%

4.3%

6.1%

3.5%

9th-12th, no diploma

13.5%

9.3%

12.6%

8.3%

11.7%

7.6%

High school graduate

34.3%

36.2%

22.9%

23.5%

29.7%

30.5%

Some college, no degree

24.2%

22.9%

21.3%

19.1%

23.1%

23.7%

Associate’s degree

7.3%

8.9%

6.6%

7.3%

8.0%

10.6%

Bachelor’s degree

10.1%

12.8%

19.7%

24.1%

14.1%

16.1%

4.3%

5.5%

11.1%

13.4%

7.3%

8.0%

Population

Graduate or professional degree

Source: U.S. Census Bureau

INTRO | 11


Photo/Berkeley County School District

Ed ucatio n

schools in the district. In 2011-2012, Dorchester Two schools experienced the greatest improvement in student achievement with 17 of the 21 schools receiving an absolute rating of Excellent on the state report cards. Overall, the district earned an absolute rating of Excellent on the state report card. Only 27 of the 84 school districts in the state achieved the highest rating of Excellent. Dorchester School District Four 500 Ridge St. St. George, SC 29477 843-563-4535 www.dorchester4.k12.sc.us Superintendent: Jerry G. Montjoy For a complete list of schools, visit http://bit. ly/15mEvhf. To determine your neighborhood school zone, call the district office at 843-563-4535. in suburban Summerville through three high schools, six middle schools and 12 elementary schools plus an alternative program for grades 6 to 12 and an adult community education program. In November 2012, the community approved a $179 million School Improvement Referendum that will provide three new el-

12 | INTRO

ementary schools and a new middle school of the arts. It will also fund major expansions and renovations at five elementary and three middle schools. All three high schools will have classroom additions to accommodate increased career and technology programs. The new schools are scheduled to open in fall 2015 and will alleviate overcrowding at all

Dorchester School District Four is home to six schools â&#x20AC;&#x201C; three elementary schools, two middle schools and one high school â&#x20AC;&#x201C; serving a student population of about 2,500. The district offers honors/advanced placement, college prep, tech prep and occupational courses.


Educati on

Private Schools

For more lists subscribe to:

www.CharlestonBusiness.com

Ranked by Fall 2012 Enrollment School

Porter-Gaud School 300 Albemarle Road, Charleston, SC 29407 Pinewood Preparatory School 1114 Orangeburg Road, Summerville, SC 29483 Bishop England High School 363 Seven Farms Drive, Charleston, SC 29492 Ashley Hall 172 Rutledge Ave., Charleston, SC 29403 Palmetto Christian Academy 361 Egypt Road, Mount Pleasant, SC 29464 Christ Our King-Stella Maris School 1183 Russell Drive, Mount Pleasant, SC 29464 First Baptist School of Charleston 48 Meeting St., Charleston, SC 29401 Blessed Sacrament School 7 St. Teresa Drive, Charleston, SC 29407 Northside Christian School 7800 Northside Drive, North Charleston, SC 29420 Mason Preparatory School 56 Halsey Blvd., Charleston, SC 29401 St. John's Christian Academy 204 W. Main St., Moncks Corner, SC 29461 Cathedral Academy 3790 Ashley Phosphate Road, North Charleston, SC 29418 Coastal Christian Preparatory School 681 McCants Drive, Mount Pleasant, SC 29464

Phone

Website / Email

Fall Enrollment / Teachers

Grades Student:Teacher Ratio B

Administrator(s) / Year Founded

843-556-3620

www.portergaud.edu INP www.pinewoodprep.com admissions@pinewoodprep.com www.behs.com kbrownell@behs.com www.ashleyhall.org INP www.palmettochristianacademy.org lisas@palmettochristianacademy.org www.coksm.org INP www.fbschool.org INP www.scbss.org INP www.northsideministries.com/ncs INP www.masonprep.org INP www.sjcacavaliers.com INP www.cathedralacademy.com INP www.coastalchristian.org info@coastalchristian.org

897 94 750 70 700 55 660 80 650 71 600 60 477 43 350 27 343 32 328 47 315 31 310 26 260 33

1st through 12th 12:1 K3 through 12th 11:1 9th through 12th 13:1 Ages 2-5; K through 12th (girls) 8:1 Pre-K2 through 12th 12:1 Pre-K through 8th 17:1 K2 through 12th 11:1 K4 through 8th 13:1 K3 through 12th 13:1 1st through 8th 12:1 K3 through 12th 10:1 K4 through 12th 15:1 K3 through 12th 7:1

David DuBose Egleston 1867 Stephen M. Mandell 1952 Michael C. Bolchoz 1915 Jill Muti 1909 Mike E. Lindsey 1992 John Byrnes 1950 Thomas E. Mullins 1949 Roseann P. Tracy 1948 Cecil Beach 1975 John Wilcox Horlbeck 1964 Eric M. Denton 1966 R. Keith Brown 1999 Joe Hulsey 1953

843-873-1643 843-849-9599 843-722-4088 843-881-9967 843-884-4721 843-722-6646 843-766-2128 843-797-2690 843-723-0664 843-761-8539 843-760-1192 843-884-3663

INP=Information not provided. Because of space constraints, only the top-ranked companies are printed. For a full list of participating companies, visit www.scbiznews.com/data. Although every effort is made to ensure accuracy, errors sometimes occur. Email additions or corrections to lists@scbiznews.com, fax to 843-531-5402 or go to www.tinyurl.com/joinourlists. B Some schools include volunteers and part-time teachers in their student:teacher ratio.

Researched by Elizabeth Fonte

INTRO | 13


Ed ucatio n

Private Schools

For more lists subscribe to:

Ranked by Fall 2012 Enrollment

www.CharlestonBusiness.com

Phone

Website / Email

Fall Enrollment / Teachers

Grades Student:Teacher Ratio B

Administrator(s) / Year Founded

Ridge Christian Academy 2168 Ridge Church Road, Summerville, SC 29483

843-879-0544

www.ridgechristian.info INP

250 25

Birth through 12th 10:1

Gentry Ard 1997

Charleston Day School 15 Archdale St., Charleston, SC 29401

843-377-0315

www.charlestondayschool.org INP

217 35

1st through 8th 6:1

Brendan J. O'Shea 1937

Charleston Collegiate School 2024 Academy Drive, Johns Island, SC 29455

843-559-5506

www.charlestoncollegiate.org tfrank@charlestoncollegiate.org

215 31

Pre-K through 12th 6:1

Hacker G. Burr 1970

Charleston Catholic School 888 King St., Charleston, SC 29403

843-577-4495

www.charlestoncatholic.com INP

184 20

Addlestone Hebrew Academy 1639 Wallenberg Blvd., Charleston, SC 29407

843-571-1105

www.addlestone.org info@addlestone.org

140 33

Sundrops Montessori School 874 Walt Miller Road, Mount Pleasant, SC 29464

843-849-3652

www.sundropsmontessori.com info@sundropsmontessori.com

138 16

K4 through 8th 9:1 18 months through 8th 12:1 for Grades K-8; NAEYC ratios for Pre-K 3 months through 3rd 9:1

Fred McKay 1991 Susan Weintrob, Abby Levine 1956 Shannon Smith 1997

Miracle Academy Preparatory School 1019 Bethel Road, Russellville, SC 29476

843-567-4644

www.miracleacademy.org INP

125 5

K through 7th 12:1

Teresa S. Middleton 1996

Riverpointe Christian Academy 2508 Ashley River Road, Charleston, SC 29414

843-763-1600

www.riverpointechristian.org INP

125 16

K2 through 12th 8:1

Robert C. Jones Jr. 1967

Charleston Christian School 2234 Plainview Road, Charleston, SC 29414

843-556-4480

www.charlestonchristian.org lynnccs@bellsouth.net

64 11

K4 through 8th 6:1

Philip A. Weston 1981

St. John Catholic School 3921 St. John's Ave., North Charleston, SC 29405

843-744-3901

www.saintjohncatholicsc.org INP

60 10

K4 through 8th 6:1

Carole Anne White 1949

University School of the Lowcountry 690 Coleman Blvd., Mount Pleasant, SC 29464

843-884-0902

www.uslowcountry.org info@uslowcountry.org

60 16

3rd through 8th 4:1

Jason R. Kreutner 2007

Capers Preparatory Christian Academy 1941 Bees Ferry Road, Charleston, SC 29414

843-225-2892 www.caperspreparatorychristianacademy.com INP

59 6

K4 through 12th 10:1

Fayrine Brown 2003

School

INP=Information not provided. Because of space constraints, only the top-ranked companies are printed. For a full list of participating companies, visit www.scbiznews.com/data. Although every effort is made to ensure accuracy, errors sometimes occur. Email additions or corrections to lists@scbiznews.com, fax to 843-531-5402 or go to www.tinyurl.com/joinourlists. B Some schools include volunteers and part-time teachers in their student:teacher ratio.

14 | INTRO

Researched by Elizabeth Fonte


Educati on Photo/Courtesy of College of Charleston

Photo/Courtesy of The Citadel

Students enjoy class outdoors in the Cistern Yard at the College of Charleston.

Higher Education

W

hether you are a collegebound student, a college football fanatic, an employee or a resident interested in lectures and continuing education opportunities, there’s a good chance you will find what you are looking for in South Carolina’s higher education system. Enrollment has been on the rise in recent years. More than 248,000 students were enrolled in South Carolina’s public and independent two- and four-year institutions during the 2011-2012 school year. Founded in 1770, the College of Charleston is the city’s oldest institution. It is a nationally recognized public liberal arts and sciences university located in the heart of historic Charleston. Students attend class in centuries old buildings, and many spend their evenings working as waiters and bartenders — or pedaling tourists around in rickshaws. Because

of both their work ethic and spending power, the students are a vital part of Charleston’s thriving hospitality industry. The Citadel is another college with deep roots in Charleston. It’s not uncommon to spot a “knob” walking the Lowcountry’s streets. The freshman class is easily identified by the men’s shaved heads that resemble doorknobs — hence the nickname. A few dozen women also attend the military college, although females were not allowed until 1996. The school is unique because it offers a classic military education described as “intense, meaningful and academically strong.” It differs from the nation’s traditional military schools because students are not required to join the service upon graduation. The Medical University of South Carolina is one of the area’s premier hospitals and includes a strong teaching component.

South Carolina is home to 84 institutions of higher learning, including: •

Three research institutions

10 comprehensive teaching institutions

Four regional campuses of USC

16 technical colleges

24 independent senior institutions

Two two-year independent institutions

Two private professional schools

24 out-of-state degree granting institutions

INTRO | 15


Ed ucatio n

Photos/Courtesy

of The Art Instit

ute of Charlesto

n

Above: Students collaborate at the Art Institute of Charleston. Left: The future chefs of the Lowcountry learn their craft at the Art Institute of Charleston.

Its specialty degree programs include dental, graduate studies, medicine, nursing and pharmacy. It is also one of the region’s largest employers, and the research conducted there is a vital part of the region’s high-tech biomedical industry. The Charleston School of Law is a private institution located in downtown Charleston. While the school was founded in 2003, like most things in this city, it is steeped in history. In November 1825, a group of Charleston attorneys petitioned the S.C. General Assembly for a charter institution. The following year, the Forensic Club started offering law lectures, beginning the Southeast’s earliest law school. In 2002, prominent Charleston judges and attorneys set out to establish a law school that would continue the 19th century club’s tradition. The school earned accreditation in 2006 and graduated its first class the following year. The Charleston region is also home to several technical colleges that offer a host of two-year degrees and trade certifications. These include Trident Technical College, the region’s largest two-year school. Upon the Boeing Co.’s 2009 announcement that it would locate an assembly plant for

Graphic Design students at the Art Institute learn the skills they’ll need to enter the thriving design scene in Charleston. 16 | INTRO


Educati on

Colleges & Universities

For more lists subscribe to:

Ranked by Fall 2012 Enrollment Institution Trident Technical College 7000 Rivers Ave. North Charleston, SC 29406

www.CharlestonBusiness.com

Phone / Website Email

Enrollment / Faculty

Public/ Private

Top Three Undergraduate Majors, by Enrollment

Administrator Mary Thornley 1964

843-574-6111 www.tridenttech.edu infocenter@tridenttech.edu

17,224 335

Public

Associate in Arts Associate in Science Pre-Nursing

College of Charleston 66 George St. Charleston, SC 29424

843-805-5507 www.cofc.edu admissions@cofc.edu

11,723 547

Public

Biology Communication Psychology

P. George Benson 1770

The Citadel 171 Moultrie St. Charleston, SC 29409

843-225-3294 www.citadel.edu INP

3,502 170

Public

Business Administration Criminal Justice Political Science

John W. Rosa 1842

843-863-7050 www.charlestonsouthern.edu enroll@csuniv.edu

3,169 148

Private

Organizational Management Business Criminal Justice

Jairy C. Hunter Jr. 1964

843-792-2300 www.musc.edu eslweb@musc.edu

2,732 1,424

Public

Nursing Health Sciences Cardiovascular Perfusion Program

Raymond Greenberg 1824

843-266-7981 www.swu.edu charleston@swu.edu

1,737 52

Private

Business Administration Human Services Biology

Todd S. Voss 1906

843-727-3500 www.artinstitutes.edu/charleston aicscadm@aii.edu

600 23

Private

Culinary Arts Graphic Design Photographic Imaging

Newton Myvett 2006

843-614-4300 www.vc.edu INP

487 12

Private

Health and Medical Sciences Business Cosmetology

INP 2010

843-760-1324 www.webster.edu/charleston thomabet@webster.edu

436 0

Private

Business Management Information Technology Psychology

Elizabeth J. Stroble 1915

USC Darla Moore School of Business 153 Market St. Charleston, SC 29406

803-777-2730 www.moore.sc.edu gradinfo@moore.sc.edu

416 72

Public

International Business Accounting Management

Hildy J. Teegen 1970

Limestone College 4500 Leeds Ave., Suite 208 Charleston, SC 29405

843-745-1100 www.limestone.edu ptalbot@limestone.edu

150 4

Private

Business Administration Social Work Computer Science

Paula A. Talbot 1845

843-554-2111 www.saintleo.edu northcharleston@saintleo.edu

51 2

Private

Health Care Administration Business Management Administration and Logistics

Elizabeth Heron 2012

843-577-5245 www.buildingartscollege.us info@buildingartscollege.us

45 8

Private

Carpentry Timber Framing Ironwork

Colby Broadwater 2004

843-569-0889 www.centuracollege.edu admdirccha@centura.edu

INP 20

Private

Medical Assistant Medical Billing and Coding Massage Therapy

Ondrea Watkins 1969

843-414-0350 www.ecpi.edu INP

INP 34

Private

Technology Health Sciences Criminal Justice

James Weaver 2004

843-767-8912 www.erau.edu/charleston charleston@erau.edu

INP 2

Private

Aviation Management Professional Aeronautics Technical Management

John Johnson 2006

843-552-7320 www.wed.siu.edu INP

INP 14

Public

Education Business Family and Consumer Sciences and Health

INP 1973

843-554-7244 www.springfieldcollege.edu/shs INP

INP 7

Private

Human Services

Elsie W. Smalls 1885

843-746-5100 www.strayer.edu charleston@strayer.edu

INP 6

Private

Business Administration Criminal Justice Accounting

Colette Reid 2003

843-553-1175 www.voorhees.edu INP

INP 1

Private

Organizational Management Criminal Justice

Cleveland L. Sellers, Katherine R. Whitaker 1897

Charleston Southern University 9200 University Blvd. Charleston, SC 29406 Medical University of South Carolina 171 Ashley Ave. Charleston, SC 29425 Southern Wesleyan University Adult & Graduate Studies 4055 Faber Place Drive, Suite 301 Charleston, SC 29405 The Art Institute of Charleston 24 N. Market St. Charleston, SC 29401 Virginia College 6185 Rivers Ave. North Charleston, SC 29406 Webster University - Charleston Metropolitan Campus 5300 International Blvd. North Charleston, SC 29418

Saint Leo University - North Charleston Center 2430 Mall Drive, Suite 185 North Charleston, SC 29406 American College of the Building Arts 21 Magazine St. Charleston, SC 29401 Centura College 8084 Rivers Ave. North Charleston, SC 29406 ECPI University & Medical Careers Institute 7410 Northside Drive Charleston, SC 29420 Embry-Riddle Aeronautical University 101 W. Hill Blvd., Building 221 Charleston AFB, SC 29404 Southern Illinois University Workforce Education & Development 101 W. Hill Blvd., Building 221, Room 128 Charleston AFB, SC 29404 Springfield College 4390 Belle Oaks Drive, Suite 200 North Charleston, SC 29405 Strayer University 5010 Wetland Crossing North Charleston, SC 29418 Voorhees College (nontraditional continuing education program) 2070 Northbrook Blvd., Unit A-6 North Charleston, SC 29406

INP=Information not provided. Because of space constraints, only the top-ranked companies are printed. For a full list of participating companies, visit www.scbiznews.com/data. Although every effort is made to ensure accuracy, errors sometimes occur. Email additions or corrections to lists@scbiznews.com, fax to 803-253-6521 or go to www.tinyurl.com/joinourlists.

Researched by Elizabeth Fonte

INTRO | 17


Ed ucatio n Photos/Courtesy of College of Charleston

Above: Students check out the night sky at the College of Charleston Observatory. Left: The historic campus of the College of Charleston offers endless inspiration for art students.

18 | INTRO

its 787 Dreamliner in North Charleston, Trident Tech announced it would expand its aviation electronics programs and dedicate nearly 10,000 square feet of space for Boeing-related training programs at its main campus. Students also have the option of attending satellite campuses for specialty training, such as Embry Riddle Aeronautical University located at the Charleston Air Force Base. The Art Institute of Charleston opened in 2007 and is a branch of the Art Intitute of Atlanta. The programs it offers include commercial photography, culinary arts, fashion and retail management, graphic design and more. Charleston is also home to the American College of the Building Arts, which trains students in historical building trades such as ironwork or plaster. The Lowcountry Graduate Center in North Charleston is an organization that formed to help working professionals gain advanced degrees through collaboration between the stateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s colleges and universities. Despite myriad choices, South Carolina, like many states, is at a crossroads when it


Educati on Photo/Courtesy of MUSC

comes to higher education. Many exciting programs are under way here, including the South Carolina Centers for Economic Excellence program. The state created the Centers for Economic Excellence program in 2002 to provide incentives for the state’s research universities to raise capital from private sources to fund endowments for specialized research professorships. The professorships serve a unique role in helping cultivate critical public-private industrial partnerships and expanding the state’s knowledge base. At the same time, South Carolina is grappling with decreasing state funds and increased tuition costs. Without money for new facilities, demand in the coming years may outstrip capacity. And schools are constantly challenged with training students for the evolving high-tech industry. The good news is that university officials and lawmakers spend countless hours studying, debating and creating innovative ways to advance higher learning in South Carolina — without putting the financial burden on students and their families. The state’s colleges and universities — including many in the Lowcountry — offer

Aspiring students in class at the Medical University of South Carolina. a competitive education to traditional and returning students. They also help fuel the local economy by serving as some of the area’s largest employers, by luring students and families to town, and by fostering relationships with the community and businesses. The Low-

country’s institutions of higher learning are — and will continue to be — a major part of the cultural fabric of this region. For more information on higher education institutions in South Carolina, visit the S.C. Commission on Higher Education at www.che.sc.gov.

INTRO | 19


Market Facts Economic Drivers, p. 22 /// Area Information, p. 24 /// Real Estate, p. 26

» A region on the move

SOUTH CAROLINA 20 | INTRO

rden

• Sponsored by •

Photos/Leslie Bu

C

harleston’s economy has been growing and diversifying at a steady pace, with technology, engineering, architecture, service industries and health care ranking as the area’s fastest-growing job sectors. The emergence of technology startups heralds a growing knowledge economy and has earned Charleston the nickname “Silicon Harbor.” An economic driver for the entire state, the Port of Charleston has rebounded strongly after a dip in exports and imports during the recession. The S.C. State Ports Authority saw break-bulk cargo, which is cargo that doesn’t fit into molded containers, almost double to 1.24 million tons from 2009 to 2011. Ports, logistics, manufacturing and distribution companies account for a significant amount of economic activity in the Charleston region. As the housing market gradually recovers, the demand for commercial real estate and rental properties has surged. Construction has bounced back with an increase in building permits and the dollar value of the construction market. Financial institutions operating in the Charleston area represent more than 25% of the financial assets in banks across the state. The largest banking institution headquartered in the Charleston area, First Federal Savings and Loan, also holds the second-highest market share for the region. The largest market share is held by Wells Fargo Bank, which took over Wachovia Bank. In the pages that follow we give you a visual representation of some data on the Charleston market through Market Facts. Each year, the Charleston Regional Business Journal publishes Market Facts, data and facts about our region presented in chart, graph and table format. The information here is from the most recent Market Facts publication.


10:45am: Happy Hour begins.

Here in Mount Pleasant, we donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t limit our happiness to an hour. We let it stretch out wide â&#x20AC;&#x201C; from stunning sunrises and warm afternoons on the creek to midday picnics and technicolor sunsets. Which makes for happy days, months, and lifetimes. Call 843.884.8517 or experiencemountpleasant.com


Mark et Facts

Âť Economic Drivers

Here are some of the main drivers of economic activity in the area.

Boeing The economic landscape of the Lowcountry changed forever when Boeing announced it would be locating its second 787 final assembly plant in North Charleston. In April 2013 an incentive package was passed by the Charleston County Council which will bring an additional $1 billion investment and 2,000 more jobs to the area. Source: Charleston Regional Business Journal

Port of Charleston Charlestonâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s port is the eighth-largest in the U.S., behind its geographically nearest competitor, Savannah, Ga., which is ranked sixth in terms of the value of goods handled each year. The export value of BMW passenger vehicles through the Charleston port in 2011 was $7.4 billion. Those BMWs are made in the Upstate of South Carolina.

6,000+

Boeing employees in S.C.

S.C. State Ports Authority CARGO AND SHIPS

08 09 10 11 12

1,800,000 1,600,000 1,400,000 1,200,000 1,000,000 800,000 600,000 400,000 200,000

Pier Containers

22 | INTRO

YEAR

20-foot equivalent units

Pier tons

$5.9 billion

estimated economic impact in S.C.


Market Facts

Joint Base Charleston Joint Base Charleston, which was created Oct. 10, 2010, when the Naval Weapons Station and the Charleston Air Force Base merged into one military team, is the largest employer in the area. Prior to the merger, the Naval Weapons Station was the areaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s top employer, employing 13,000. Together they have 49 installation support functions, such as food services, legal support and law enforcement. The installation includes 23,777 acres, 37 square miles, 16 miles of shoreline, 38 miles of rail, and three miles of runway.

Hospitality & Tourism Hospitality and tourism pump millions of dollars into the Charleston economy each year and the business is a major driver of economic activity across South Carolina. The year-round tourist season in the Lowcountry pulls visitors from around the nation, region and world. The Charleston area supports a vibrant food and beverage sector with world-class cuisine and annual events, including the Charleston Wine and Food Festival and the annual Chefâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Feast among other festivals and events that include food. Retail shopping, performance culture, arts, conventions and history also are major draws for visitors coming by air, water and interstate and coastal highways. In fiscal year 2011, the Charleston area received nearly $8.9 million from accommodations taxes. The city of Charleston received the bulk of that tax money with more than $3.3 million. North Charleston, at No. 2, received nearly $1.7 million.

4.51 million The number of visitors to Charleston in 2011

351,349

Total number of cruise passengers in Charleston

$194

Average personal expenditure by tourists in Charleston in 2011 Source: Charleston Regional Business Journal INTRO | 23


Market Facts

» Area Information

Here is information about life in the Lowcountry and who’s living here.

24.8 min.

Commuting to Work

Mean Tra vel T to Work In ime the Charlest on MSA

The American Community Survey estimated the 2011 statistics of commuter behavior based on the 2010 Census.

– Car, truck or van (drove alone)

– Car, truck or van (carpooled)

– Public transportation (excluding taxicab) – Walked 0.7% 4.7% 0.3% 0.5% 7.8%

– Other means 4.5%

0.9% 4.0% 1.7% 2.3% 9.1%

– Bicycle

– Worked at home 3.6%

1.0% 1.0% 0.5% 10.9%

3.7%

Berkeley County

Charleston County

Dorchester County

81.5%

78.5%

83.1%

Total Commuters 80,712

Total Commuters 166,082

Total Commuters 56,617

Note: Dorchester County’s figures had not been estimated by the American Community Survey, so 2010 figures are used. Source: U.S. Census Bureau, American Community Survey, 2010 Means of Transportation to Work

Population Counts and Projections – Berkeley County

– Charleston County

– Dorchester County

400,000 350,000 300,000 250,000 200,000 150,000 100,000 50,000

0

2000

2010

2015

2020

2025

Source: S.C. Statistical Abstract as calculated by the S.C. Budget and Control Board and Office of Research and Statistics using figures provided by U.S. Census Bureau 24 | INTRO

2030


Market Facts

Top 10 FastestCharleston recognized Growing Job Sectors, as #1 U.S. metro for Brain Gain 2011, Charleston MSA Leads U.S. for growth over the past 10 years

in percentage of adults with college degrees. Category........................................ Total employed Contributing Factors: ............................................................... % chg 00-11 • Strong population growth – two times faster than the U.S. 1. Computer and Mathematical.....................6,060 • People want to live here – #24 for in-migration among .......................................................................... 91.8% U.S. metros 2. Architecture and Engineering...................7,550 • More students enrolled at area colleges and universities .......................................................................... 79.8% 3. Personal Care and Service........................8,100 .......................................................................... 68.4%

Source: 2012 Charleston Regional Economic Scorecard, Charleston Regional Development Alliance

4. Health Care Practitioners and Technical......21,460 .......................................................................... 67.1% 5. Business and Financial Operations........10,930 .......................................................................... 54.6% 6. Arts, Design, Entertainment, .....................2,630 Sports and Media.......................................... 40.6% 7. Office and Administrative Support..........49,470 .......................................................................... 38.7% 8. Health Care Support....................................7,650 .......................................................................... 38.3% 9. Sales and Related......................................31,970 .......................................................................... 32.5% 10. Legal.............................................................2,050 .......................................................................... 29.7% Source: U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics; compiled by Center for Business Research, Charleston Metro Chamber of Commerce

11% U.S.

24% CHARLESTON

The region’s population grew twice as fast as the U.S. from 2000 to 2011.

664,607

Total population for Berkeley, Charleston and Dorchester counties Source: U.S. Census Bureau INTRO | 25


Market Facts

» Real Estate

Here is information about life in the Lowcountry and who’s living here.

2012 real estate numbers Closed Sales

2,293

Closed Sales

Median Price

1,922

$167,000

Median Price

$167,500

Berkeley Dorchester

Closed Sales

5,937

Median Price

$228,500

Charleston Source: Charleston Trident Association of Realtors

Top Areas: New Construction Market Share in 2012 Johns Island.........................................................51.1% Goose Creek / Moncks Corner Area.................40.5% Wando / Cainhoy Area........................................30.1% Greater Summerville Area..................................28.9% Greater North Charleston...................................28.6% Dorchester Road Corridor..................................27.8% West Ashley Area................................................27.6% Daniel Island.........................................................25.2% Upper Mount Pleasant........................................23.7% Hanahan................................................................18.5% Downtown Charleston........................................11.4% Upper Charleston Peninsula..............................11.1% Hollywood / Ravenel / Meggett Area...............10.0% Lower Mount Pleasant..........................................7.5% James Island..........................................................7.4% Folly Beach.............................................................5.1% Edisto Area..............................................................3.1% Isle of Palms...........................................................1.6% Kiawah and Seabrook Islands.............................1.4% Rural Berkeley County..........................................0.0% St. George / Rural Dorchester County................0.0% Sullivan's Island.....................................................0.0%

Welcome to the Lowcountry $ 20 OFF IRUQHZUHVLGHQWV P L U M B I N G s H E AT I N G s A I R

limric.com s (843) 564-5066 Plumbing

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m arket facts

Days on the market in the Charleston area This chart uses a rolling 12-month average for each data point. .

Single-Family

Townhouse-Condo

140 130 120 110 100 90 80 70 Jan. 2008

Jan. 2009

Jan. 2010

Jan. 2011

Jan. 2012

Percent of original list price received in the Charleston area 92.8% 92.1%

90.4%

2008

90.6% 89.9%

-2.6%

+0.2%

-0.8%

+2.4%

2009

2010

2011

2012

Source: Charleston Trident Association of Realtors

Charleston Area Apartment Market 1,081

Central

1,022

James Island

3,045

7,496

Mt. Pleasant

West Ashley

Charleston Submarket Comparison of units

3,841

Goose Creek

7,489

Summerville

5,232

North Charleston

Source: Real Data, Charleston Apartment Index INTRO | 27


Health & Wellness Hospitals, p. 34 /// Urgent Care Centers, p. 35 /// Retirement Communities, p. 37

• Sponsored by •

28 | INTRO

s and Recreation Commission

W

e like to take things easy here in the Lowcountry, but that doesn’t mean we don’t give attention to a diet and activity level that contributes to our health and wellbeing. In this section you will read about all the reasons living here can help inspire you to healthy living. And when medical care is what you need, we offer the finest in physicians, clinics and hospitals. Charleston has long been home to some of the top hospitals in South Carolina. When you are moving to a new place, finding out about health care can be a challenge. In these pages, we give you a list of urgent care centers, hospitals and retirement communities with full information about each. We hope you’ll find our guide useful in helping you settle into a healthy lifestyle. It’s one of Charleston’s charms.

Photo/Charleston County Park

» Taking Care of You


H e alth & Well ness

B

eautiful weather, lots of outdoor activities, fresh food and, when you need it, top-notch medical care – what better combination could there be to encourage good health? Charleston is blessed with all these. And if you need a nudge to get started, there are organized efforts to help you. “It takes something different (for each person) to motivate them to make a behavior change,” said Susan L. Johnson, director of the Office of Health Promotion at Medi-

cal University of South Carolina. “Newcomers will be checking out resources like the bridge walk and the beaches. When you take advantage of the different activities, you start to feel a part of the community.” The weekends here offer so many fitness and health-related activities. There are fun runs, walks, cycling events, urban agriculture and farmers markets. “Lighten Up Charleston,” a joint effort of the mayor’s office and MUSC, encourages residents to get moving and improve

their diets. Participants can sign up on the website, lightenupcharleston.org, to get free information and track their own exercise, diet and weight loss. Local parks and recreation departments offer dozens of fitness classes and pro-

grams of all kinds. In a recent month, the Charleston County Parks and Recreation Commission, Parklands Foundation and MUSC teamed up for a Green Exercise pass. Those who bought a $10 T-shirt could be admitted free to more than 30 fitness classes in county parks during the month. But when you’re never more than five minutes from a park, you don’t have to wait for organized events to get exercise. “Exercise doesn’t have to be highly structured,” said Tim Scheett, assistant professor of exercise science at the College of Charleston. “Just take the kids to the park and play along with them.” The walk across the Arthur Ravenel Jr. bridge over the Cooper River or a jog along Folly Beach may be an inspiring choice, but there are plenty of beautiful sights to see all over the area. If you tire of walking in your own neighborhood, go downtown and walk through rows of historic homes, Scheett suggested. He also recommended taking the family to one of the many weekend festivals in the Lowcountry or nearby. Most are inexpensive or free to attend. “You spend the day walking around and before you know it, you’ve had three or four hours of exercise,” he said. Research shows that exercising outside – which you can do year round in Charleston – gives additional benefits, Johnson said. “You tend to stick with it more and there are mental health benefits. It also Photo/Courtesy of Town of Mount Pleasant

30 | INTRO


H e alth & W ellness Photo/Courtesy of Roper St. Francis

helps with circadian rhythms for people who work odd shifts. And it helps relieve stress.” Gardening – another year-round pastime – combines the virtues of exercise with fresh food. “Gardening is the same as moderate intensity exercise,” Scheett said. “It’s free exercise and it saves money.” MUSC has an urban farm that offers educational programs on gardening. And places like Boone Hall Plantation have events that focus on growing fresh food but also give the history behind it, Johnson said. There’s a spreading movement to encourage Lowcountry residents to eat fresh

and local. Farmers markets selling fresh produce, meats, baked goods and other items are popping up all over. The largest ones are at Marion Square downtown and in Mount Pleasant, Johnson said, and there is also a farmers market on the MUSC campus. CSA farms ( community-supported agriculture) deliver boxes of fresh food regularly to their customers during the growing season. Some of them can be found at the website lowcountrylocalfirst. org. This site offers a guide to farmers markets, purveyors and growers of produce. “There are always food events,” Johnson said. “We are trying to do live cooking events to show that healthy food tastes good.” One of these is the Cooking Well Invitational, in which hospital chefs compete in an event hosted by a celebrity chef. The

event is held at the Culinary Institute of Charleston. The culinary field is moving toward health and wellness, Johnson said, and that means even when you eat out at one of our many fine restaurants, you should find some healthy choices. When your quest for wellness means

INTRO | 31


Health & W e lln e ss Photo/Courtesy of MUSC

Dr. Frank McGowan Jr. visits with children at the Atrium at MUSC, one of the Lowcountry’s major hospitals. you need medical care, you’re in a good place. The Lowcountry is home to several major hospitals and many specialty clinics,

rehabilitation services, nursing homes and assisted living facilities. There are more than 2,100 licensed physicians practicing in Charleston, Dorchester and Berkeley counties. The area’s four biggest hospitals – Roper St. Francis, Medical University of South Carolina, Trident Health and East Cooper Medical Center – employ more than 15,000 workers. While medical centers were traditionally located in downtown Charleston, in recent years they have moved into suburban areas to provide patient care closer to home. Taken together, the Lowcountry has all the advantages you need for a healthy lifestyle. So go outside, get moving, and when you’re hungry, go shopping for some garden-fresh foods.

Make room for exercise in your busy day Always on the run with no time to exercise? Here are some tips for fitting exercise into your schedule: 1. Park in the farthest space from the office, grocery store or apartment so you will have to walk. 2. At work, take the long way to the coffee pot or restroom. Take a five-minute walk through the halls. 3. Opt for the stairs instead of elevators. 4. Keep a light pair of dumbbells in your desk and do arm exercises while reading e-mail. 5. Swap out your office chair for an exercise ball 10-20 minutes a day to work abs and other key muscles. 6. If your office setup allows it, look into getting a treadmill desk. You can walk on it at low speed while using the phone with a headset and while reading reports. 7. Spend an evening outdoors with your family. Take a walk on a greenway or on the beach. Build a sandcastle with the kids. 32 | INTRO

8. While your children are at ball practice, walk or jog around the field. Or try high-intensity interval training: do any kind of exercise hard and fast for 20-30 seconds, then rest for 10 seconds. Do this for four to five minutes, then take a rest and water break. Then repeat the process. If you do this 30 minutes every day, it will really improve your fitness. 9. Organize a parent-child game for the families of your child’s teammates. Encourage the parents to practice before the game. 10. Take your dog to a dog park, and walk the park while your dog runs.


INTRO | 33


H e alth & Well ness

Hospitals

For more lists subscribe to:

Ranked by No. of Licensed Beds

www.CharlestonBusiness.com

Phone / Website

Licensed Beds / 2012 Admissions

Active Staff Physicians / RNs

Administrator(s) / Year Founded

MUSC Medical Center 171 Ashley Ave. Charleston, SC 29425

843-792-1414 www.muschealth.com

709 35,295

891 2,566

Patrick Cawley, Raymond Greenberg 1824

Roper Hospital 316 Calhoun St. Charleston, SC 29401

843-724-2000 www.rsfh.com/roper

368 14,885

510 875

Matthew J. Severance, David Dunlap 1829

843-797-7000 www.tridenthealthsystem.com

296 21,260

309 757

Todd Gallati 1975

843-402-1000 www.rsfh.com

204 8,525

507 412

Allen Carroll, David Dunlap 1882

843-881-0100 www.eastcoopermedctr.com

132 5,000

458 217

Jason Alexander 1986

843-577-5011 www.charleston.va.gov

103 INP

278 411

Carolyn L. Adams, John S. Goldman 1966

843-747-5830 www.palmettobehavioralhealth.com

102 INP

INP INP

Daniel J. Body, Cherie Tolley 2000

843-832-5000 www.tridenthealthsystem.com

94 5,886

309 757

Louis Caputo 1989

843-606-7000 www.rsfh.com

85 1,433

280 101

David Dunlap, John Sullivan 2010

Kindred Hospital Charleston 326 Calhoun St., Third Floor Charleston, SC 29401

843-876-8340 www.khcharleston.com

59 INP

40 27

Jennifer Frye Sheets 1998

Roper Rehabilitation Hospital 316 Calhoun St. Charleston, SC 29401

843-724-2800 www.rsfh.com

52 16,542

0 0

David Dunlap, Matthew J. Severance 1992

843-820-7777 www.healthsouthcharleston.com

49 INP

2 34

Troy Powell 1994

Naval Health Clinic Charleston 3600 Rivers Ave. North Charleston, SC 29405

843-228-5489 www.nhchasn.med.navy.mil

20 INP

INP INP

Capt. Susan A. Widhalm, Capt. Celia H. Horton 1917

Moncks Corner Medical Center 401 N. Live Oak Drive Moncks Corner, SC 29461

843-761-8721 www.tridenthealthsystem.com

0 15,374

26 13

Ann Edlund 1986

843-899-7700 www.rsfh.com

0 14,061

621 18

David Dunlap, Brenda R. Myers 1992

843-953-6847 www.citadel.edu/infirmary/

0 INP

INP INP

Carey M. Capell 1843

Facility

Trident Health 9330 Medical Plaza Drive North Charleston, SC 29406 Bon Secours St. Francis Hospital 2095 Henry Tecklenburg Blvd. Charleston, SC 29414 East Cooper Medical Center 2000 Hospital Drive Mount Pleasant, SC 29464 Ralph H. Johnson VA Medical Center 109 Bee St. Charleston, SC 29401 Palmetto Lowcountry Behavioral Health 2777 Speissegger Drive Charleston, SC 29405 Summerville Medical Center 295 Midland Parkway Summerville, SC 29485 Roper St. Francis Mount Pleasant Hospital 3500 U.S. Highway 17 N. Mount Pleasant, SC 29466

HealthSouth Rehabilitation Hospital of Charleston 9181 Medcom St. Charleston, SC 29406

Roper St. Francis Medical Center Berkeley 730 Stony Landing Road Moncks Corner, SC 29461 The Citadel Infirmary 171 Moultrie St. Charleston, SC 29409

INP=Information not provided. Because of space constraints, only the top-ranked companies are printed. For a full list of participating companies, visit www.scbiznews.com/data. Although every effort is made to ensure accuracy, errors sometimes occur. Email additions or corrections to lists@scbiznews.com, fax to 843-531-5402 or go to www.tinyurl.com/joinourlists.

34 | INTRO

Researched by Business Journal staff


H e alth & W ellness

Urgent Care Centers

For more lists subscribe to:

www.CharlestonBusiness.com

Listed alphabetically A Doctor On Call P.A.

Doctors Care Mount Pleasant

Health First - Mount Pleasant

www.adoctoroncall.com admin@adoctoroncall.com 843-886-4402 1202-A Palm Blvd. • Isle of Palms, SC 29451 Hours: Mon.-Fri. 9 a.m.-5 p.m.; Sat. by appointment Doctor referrals, urgent care, general medical care, laboratory services, physicals, vaccines, minor surgery, cosmetic procedures. No. of Physicians: 1 Administrator(s): Kathy R. Malaney

www.doctorscare.com regina.sullivan@doctorscare.com 843-881-0815 631 Johnnie Dodds Blvd. • Mount Pleasant, SC 29464 Hours: Mon.-Fri. 8 a.m.-8 p.m.; Sat.-Sun. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Urgent, family and occupational care No. of Physicians: 2

www.healthfirstcares.com 843-572-5990 2863 U.S. Highway 17 N. • Mount Pleasant, SC 29466 Hours: Mon.-Sat. 8 a.m.-8 p.m. Urgent care No. of Physicians: 5

Doctors Care Northwoods

www.healthfirstcares.com 843-572-5990 8740 Rivers Ave. • North Charleston, SC 29406 Hours: Mon.-Sat. 8 a.m.-8 p.m. Urgent care and non-emergency services No. of Physicians: 3

Doctors Care Charleston West www.doctorscare.com regina.sullivan@doctorscare.com 843-402-6834 3424 Shelby Ray Court • Charleston, SC 29414 Hours: Mon.-Fri. 8 a.m.-8 p.m.; Sat.-Sun. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Urgent, family and occupational care No. of Physicians: 2

Doctors Care Dorchester Road www.doctorscare.com regina.sullivan@doctorscare.com 843-871-7900 10160 Dorchester Road • Summerville, SC 29485 Hours: Mon.-Fri. 8 a.m.-8 p.m.; Sat.-Sun. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Urgent, family and occupational care No. of Physicians: 2

Doctors Care Ivy Hall Highway 17 North www.doctorscare.com regina.sullivan@doctorscare.com 843-884-6424 3074 U.S. Highway 17 N. • Mount Pleasant, SC 29466 Hours: Mon.-Fri. 8 a.m.-8 p.m.; Sat.-Sun. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Urgent, family and occupational care No. of Physicians: 2

Doctors Care James Island www.doctorscare.com regina.sullivan@doctorscare.com 843-762-2360 743 Folly Road • Charleston, SC 29412 Hours: Mon.-Fri. 8 a.m.-8 p.m.; Sat.-Sun. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Urgent, family and occupational care No. of Physicians: 2

Doctors Care Moncks Corner www.doctorscare.com regina.sullivan@doctorscare.com 843-899-3870 459 U.S. Highway 52 N. • Moncks Corner, SC 29461 Hours: Mon.-Fri. 8 a.m.-8 p.m.; Sat.-Sun. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Urgent, family and occupational care No. of Physicians: 2

www.doctorscare.com regina.sullivan@doctorscare.com 843-572-7000 8091 Rivers Ave. • North Charleston, SC 29406 Hours: Mon.-Fri. 8 a.m.-8 p.m.; Sat.-Sun. 8 a.m.-5 p.m. Urgent, family and occupational care No. of Physicians: 2

Doctors Care Summerville www.doctorscare.com regina.sullivan@doctorscare.com 843-871-3277 410 N. Main St. • Summerville, SC 29483 Hours: Mon.-Fri. 8 a.m.-8 p.m.; Sat.-Sun. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Urgent, family and occupational care No. of Physicians: 2

Doctors Care West Ashley www.doctorscare.com regina.sullivan@doctorscare.com 843-556-5585 1851 Sam Rittenberg Blvd. • Charleston, SC 29407 Hours: Mon.-Fri. 8 a.m.-8 p.m.; Sat.-Sun. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Urgent, family and occupational care No. of Physicians: 2

Doctors Express www.urgentcare-westashley.com 843-619-3982 975 Savannah Highway, Suite 105 Charleston, SC 29407 Hours: Mon.-Fri. 8 a.m.-7 p.m.; Sat.-Sun. 9 a.m.-5 p.m. Acute illness, trauma, travel medicine, sports injuries, minor surgical care, lab services, occupational health, workers’ compensation, drug testing. No. of Physicians: 3

Health First - Charleston www.healthfirstcares.com 843-572-5990 1115 Savannah Highway • Charleston, SC 29407 Hours: Mon.-Sat. 8 a.m.-8 p.m. Urgent care No. of Physicians: 5

Health First - North Charleston

Health First - Summerville www.healthfirstcares.com 843-572-5990 1675 N. Main St. • Summerville, SC 29483 Hours: Mon.-Sat. 8 a.m.-8 p.m. Urgent care No. of Physicians: 5

Kiawah-Seabrook Medical & Urgent Care www.kiawahseabrookmedical.com 843-768-4800 345 Freshfields Drive, Suite J101 Johns Island, SC 29455 Hours: Mon.-Fri. 8 a.m.-5 p.m. (closed noon-1 p.m.), Sat. 8 a.m.-noon General family medicine and primary care, lab and X-ray services, urgent care and occupational medicine-worksite partners No. of Physicians: 2

MedCare Urgent Care Center www.medcareurgentcare.com 843-793-6093 1850 Sam Rittenberg Blvd. • Charleston, SC 29407 Hours: Mon.-Sun. 9 a.m.-9 p.m. Basic illness and injury, vaccinations and immunizations, flu shots, drug testing, workers’ compensation, IV fluids, X-ray, CT scan, electrocardiogram, physicals, occupational medicine, on-the-job injuries; in-house lab and pharmacy No. of Physicians: 5

MedCare Urgent Care Center www.medcareurgentcare.com 843-552-3629 8720 Dorchester Road • North Charleston, SC 29420 Hours: Mon.-Sun. 9 a.m.-9 p.m. Basic illness and injury, vaccinations and immunizations, flu shots, drug testing, workers’ compensation, IV fluids, X-ray, CT scan, electrocardiogram, physicals, occupational medicine, on-the-job injuries; in-house lab and pharmacy No. of Physicians: 5

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He alth & Well ness

Moncks Corner Medical Center www.tridenthealthsystem.com 843-761-8721 401 N. Live Oak Drive Moncks Corner, SC 29461 Hours: 24-hour emergency room Emergency, radiology, digital mammography, lab, primary care and specialty physicians, physical therapy, ultrasound, physical rehabilitation No. of Physicians: 10

Nason Medical Center www.nasonmedical.com 843-300-3500 319 Folly Road • Charleston, SC 29412 Hours: Mon.-Sun. 8 a.m.-8 p.m. Urgent and emergency medical care, workers’ compensation, imaging, lab services No. of Physicians: 10

Nason Medical Center www.nasonmedical.com 843-300-3500 4278 Ladson Road • Ladson, SC 29456 Hours: Mon.-Sun. 8 a.m.-8 p.m. Urgent and emergency medical care, workers’ compensation, imaging, lab services No. of Physicians: 10

Nason Medical Center www.nasonmedical.com 843-300-3500 1101 Bowman Road • Mount Pleasant, SC 29464 Hours: Mon.-Sun. 8 a.m.-8 p.m.

36 | INTRO

Urgent and emergency medical care, workers’ compensation, imaging, lab services No. of Physicians: 10

Nason Medical Center www.nasonmedical.com 843-300-3500 5133 Rivers Ave. • North Charleston, SC 29406 Hours: Mon.-Sun. 8 a.m.-8 p.m. Doctor referrals, urgent and emergency medical care, workers’ compensation, imaging, lab services No. of Physicians: 10

Nason Medical Center www.nasonmedical.com 843-300-3500 8901 University Blvd. • North Charleston, SC 29406 Hours: Mon.-Sun. 8 a.m.-8 p.m. Urgent and emergency medical care, workers’ compensation, imaging, lab services No. of Physicians: 10

Palmetto Urgent Care www.palmettoprimarycare.com/urgent-care-clinic 843-572-7727 2550 Elms Centre Road • North Charleston, SC 29406 Hours: Mon.-Sun. 7 a.m.-11 p.m. General medical care No. of Physicians: 7 Administrator(s): Edd P. Chariker

Roper Hospital Peds Plus www.ropersaintfrancis.com 843-402-2275 2095 Henry Tecklenburg Drive • Charleston, SC 29414 Hours: Mon.-Fri. 6-10 p.m., Sat.-Sun. 11 a.m.-6 p.m. Urgent care for pediatric patients No. of Physicians: INP Administrator(s): INP

Roper St. Francis After Hours Care www.rsfh.com/late 843-402-2273 Cross Creek Village, 325 Folly Road, Suite 101 Charleston, SC 29412 Hours: Mon.-Fri. 5-9 p.m.; Sat. 8 a.m.-4 p.m. After-hours primary and urgent care No. of Physicians: 13 Administrator(s): Elizabeth Handy

Windermere Family Medicine & Urgent Care www.windermerefamilymedurgentcare.com 843-766-9053 16 Windermere Blvd. • Charleston, SC 29407 Hours: Mon.-Thurs. 8 a.m.-7 p.m., Fri. 8 a.m.-5 p.m., Sat. 9 a.m.-noon Chronic disease management, eating disorders, smoking cessation, general wellness, urgent care No. of Physicians: 3 Administrator(s): INP


H e alth & W ellness

Retirement Communities

For more lists subscribe to:

Ranked by No. of Beds/Units in the Charleston Area

www.CharlestonBusiness.com

Activities

Transportation

Eric Hadley 1986

Sandy Stoll, Mark H. Lee 1892

Robin Miller 1958

Cris Gillespie 1983

Rich Lyon 2008

Ruth Walker 1967

Dan Clark, Lori Clark 2005

Durena Stinson 1993

Bryan Dee 1982

Barbara Werner 1999

Cathy Kilmer 1996

Lisa McLeod 1999

Martha Hitchman 1990

Laundry

C. William Trawick 1850

Library

Guest Apts.

General Store

Beds / Employees

Fitness Center

Administrator / Year Founded

Phone / Website

Salon/Barber

In-House Dr.

Services

843-762-3300 www.bishopgadsden.org

374 275

Sandpiper Retirement Community 1224 Village Creek Lane, Mount Pleasant, SC 29464

843-884-5735 www.premierseniorliving.com/sandpiper

340 300

Franke at Seaside 1885 Rifle Range Road, Mount Pleasant, SC 29464

843-856-4700 www.frankeatseaside.org

331 245

The Village at Summerville 201 W. Ninth North St., Summerville, SC 29483

843-873-2550 www.preshomesc.org/communities/ summerville

267 220

The Palms of Mount Pleasant 937 Bowman Road, Mount Pleasant, SC 29464

843-884-6949 www.thepalmsofmtpleasant.com

252 100

Somerby of Mount Pleasant 3100 Tradition Circle, Mount Pleasant, SC 29466

843-849-3096 www.somerbyofmtpleasant.com

247 100

White Oak of Charleston 9285 Medical Plaza Drive, Charleston, SC 29406

843-797-8282 www.whiteoakmanor.com

176 INP

Ashley Park Retirement Community 1451 Tobias Gadson Blvd., Charleston, SC 29407

843-571-6075 www.ashley-park.com

115 14

843-821- 5005 www.ra2.biz/hallmark/home.htm

88 155

843-875-9053 INP

88 INP

843-763-4055 www.brookdaleliving.com

84 INP

843-832-8481 www.royaloaksseniorcare.com

75 41

843-881-9809 www.sweetgrassvillageseniorliving.com

69 30

843-553-6342 www.thebridgeatcharleston.com

65 36

843-852-0505 www.thepalmettoscharleston.com

60 INP

843-884-4104 www.summitplaceofdanielisland.com

59 40

843-763-2242 INP

56 4

843-821-4122 www.magnoliasofsummerville.com

52 33

843-569-0025 www.midlandparkresidentialhomecare.com

52 9

Savannah House 1501 Secessionville Road, James Island, SC 29412

843-762-1396 www.alcco.com

40 30

Cypress House 205 Midland Parkway, Summerville, SC 29485

843-875-7163 www.alcco.com

Pinewood House 101 Centennial Blvd., Goose Creek, SC 29445

Company Bishop Gadsden 1 Bishop Gadsden Way, Charleston, SC 29412

Hallmark Healthcare Center 255 Midland Parkway, Summerville, SC 29485 Oakbrook Health & Rehabilitation Center 920 Travelers Blvd., Summerville, SC 29485 Horizon Bay Charleston 2030 Charlie Hall Blvd., Charleston, SC 29414 Royal Oaks Senior Care 950 Travelers Blvd., Summerville, SC 29485 Sweetgrass Village Senior Living Community 601 Mathis Ferry Road, Mount Pleasant, SC 29464 The Bridge at Charleston 2590 Elms Plantation Road, North Charleston, SC 29406 The Palmettos of Charleston 1900 Ashley Crossing Drive, Charleston, SC 29414 Summit Place of Daniel Island 320 Seven Farms Drive, Charleston, SC 29492 Sherman House 1635 Raoul Wallenberg Blvd., Charleston, SC 29407 Magnolias of Summerville 335 Midland Parkway, Summerville, SC 29485 Midland Park Residential Home Care 2712 Midland Park Road, North Charleston, SC 29406

Sweetgrass Court 1010 Anna Knapp Blvd., Mount Pleasant, SC 29464 Chardon Place Assisted Living 3455 Bohicket Road, Johns Island, SC 29455 Carter-May Home/St. Joseph Residence 1660 Ingram Road, Charleston, SC 29407 Liberty Cottages at Park West 3081 Rice Field Lane, Mount Pleasant, SC 29466

• •

• •

Megan Martin 2002

Sean Davis 2003

Donna Bailey 1984

Annette Youmans 2000

• •

Roger C. Singian 1997

Daryl Orage 1995

39 29

Kathryn Graham 1998

843-569-2520 www.alcco.com

39 34

Ashlee Legun 1997

843-971-7756 www.sweetgrasscourtseniorliving.com

38 25

Kelly Carleton 1997

843-768-4948 www.chardonplace.com

32 13

AnnaMarie Kulsicavage 1999

843-556-8314 www.sccatholic.org/catholic-charities

25 25

Janine Bauder 1929

843-881-7670 www.libertycottages.com

0 0

Deborah RiceMarko 2008

INP=Information not provided. Because of space constraints, only the top-ranked companies are printed. For a full list of participating companies, visit www.scbiznews.com/data. Although every effort is made to ensure accuracy, errors sometimes occur. Email additions or corrections to lists@scbiznews.com, fax to 843-531-5402 or go to www.tinyurl.com/joinourlists.

Researched by Business Journal staff

INTRO | 37


Living In Historic Charleston, p. 40 /// Mount Pleasant, p. 44 /// Isle of Palms & Sullivan’s Island, p. 46 North Charleston, p. 48 /// West Ashley, p. 50 /// James Island & Folly Beach, p. 54 Johns & Wadmalaw Islands, p. 57 /// Daniel Island, p. 58 /// Kiawah & Seabrook Islands, p. 60 Summerville, p. 62 /// Moncks Corner, p. 65 /// Goose Creek, p. 67

» Finding your home

N

ow that you have decided to make the Charleston area your new home, you’ll need to decide where you want to live. There are so many choices, and all have something to offer. You could live in the historic downtown, across the harbor in Mount Pleasant, in a suburban neighborhood or at the beach. You really can’t go wrong, whether you settle in booming North Charleston or neighborly Moncks Corner. In these pages, we tell you at length about each of the possibilities. We talk about the community, the history, the neighborhoods and businesses, with a touch of the lifestyle you can expect. To help you visualize, we show some photos of each area. And when you get ready to move in, you’ll find phone numbers and web sites to help you get settled. Enjoy!

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In coastal South Carolina, hurricanes sometimes threaten. The S.C. Department of Insurance offers help through SC Safe Home. This program awards grants of up to $5,000 in matching and nonmatching funds to assist homeowners in coastal communities in strengthening their properties against the severe winds associated with hurricanes and other natural disasters. To learn more, visit the web site, www.scsafehome.com or call 803-737-6209.

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38 | INTRO


Living in

Berkeley County

Historic Charleston

Dorchester County

The past shapes our present as new residential choices invite

Charleston County

A bit of history The city, originally named Charles Towne, was founded in 1670 in current day West Ashley and started with about 30 houses. It moved to the peninsula 20 years later and grew to encompass several

thousand inhabitants as it became a major trading center. After weathering several hurricanes and French and Spanish attacks during the 1700s, Charleston became a royal colony in 1721. Charleston began to take shape as a major city, adding cultural, residential and commercial aspects. Businesses popped up, such as the country’s first fire insurance company and one of the country’s first theaters. Several historic landmarks were built, including the East Bay warehouse district, which is now Rainbow Row; and lots were laid out in 1745 for the first neighborhood, Ansonborough. The first church services at St. Michael’s Episcopal Church on Broad Street were

“A rich history that is revealed in nearly all of its buildings.” 40

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Photo/Leslie Burden

Photo/Courtesy of City of Charleston

W

ith all the grace and charm of a Southern city, Charleston draws in visitors and residents with its historic charisma and waterfront panoramas. Stroll down King Street to browse boutiques, wander through art galleries in the French Quarter, or tour some of the city’s historic homes. The peninsula is home to a rich history that is revealed in nearly all of its buildings, streets and parks.

Left: Rainbow Row shows the pastel color palette of downtown Charleston. Above: Waterfront Park is a favorite stop for people walking around downtown.

Moving In

(all phone numbers are 843 area code, except where noted) City of Charleston: .....................................724-3745 www.charleston-sc.gov Charleston County School District: ........937-6300 UTILITIES City of Charleston building permits: .......724-3745 Charleston Water System:........................727-6800 S.C. Electric & Gas: ........................... 800-251-7234 Trash and recycling: .................................724-7364


Liv ing IN H istoric charleston Photo/Courtesy of City of Charleston

Downtown is a much sought-after location for newcomers who are attracted to its history, beauty and charming walkability.

Photo/Leslie Burden

Photo/Leslie Burden Photo/Leslie Burden

Top: St. Philipâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Church stands above the Charleston skyline. Far Left: St. Michaelâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s Church is one of the most visible steeples in town. Above: The Pineapple Fountain is a symbol of welcome. Left: One of the many iron gates made by famed blacksmith Philip Simmons.

INTRO | 41


held in 1761. It is now the oldest church building in the city. The Charleston Museum was established in 1773 as the first museum in what would become the United States. Several major Revolutionary battles unfolded around Charleston, and the city eventually fell under British control for two years before it was incorporated in 1783. The College of Charleston was granted a charter in 1785 and the school garners a large presence downtown to this day. In 1824, the Medical University of South Carolina was founded, becoming the first

Photo/Leslie Burden

L ivin g IN Historic charleston

medical school in the South. The MUSC campus and hospital occupy a large area on the peninsula's western side between Calhoun and Bee streets, where a cluster of other health care providers have hospitals, such as Roper St. Francis and the VA Medical Center. Despite a major earthquake in 1886 and Hurricane Hugo in 1989, Charleston still has some of the most historic homes and buildings in the South. A designated â&#x20AC;&#x153;historic districtâ&#x20AC;? preserves many residential properties.

Neighborhoods The housing options downtown range from the sprawling pastel-colored multimillion-dollar homes to new luxury condos overlooking the Ashley River. The median price of homes downtown is higher than surrounding areas. South of Broad is the neighborhood literally south of Broad Street that includes the often-photographed Battery and Waterfront Park. Full of large traditional homes, this area has some of the most expensive real estate in Charleston with most of the houses Photo/Ryan Wilcox

Above: Second Sunday is a monthly event, where King Street closes to traffic and pedestrians take over. Left: A cruise ship docks in Charleston Harbor.

42

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Liv ing IN H istoric charleston

April to December. The area also includes the Children’s Museum of the Lowcountry on Ann Street and the Charleston Museum on Meeting Street. Farther up the peninsula, Hampton Park Terrace and Wagener Terrace offer more affordable housing options with turn-of-thecentury and brick bungalow homes. The Citadel campus also falls in the Hampton Park area. The historic American Theater is on upper King Street, which has seen major revitaliza tion in recent years.

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Photo/Leslie Burden

coming with a price tag in the millions. Walk down the streets in this quiet, storied neighborhood to catch a glimpse of traditional Charleston gardens and verandas. The French Quarter, above Broad Street, is bound by Market and Meeting streets and Waterfront Park. It is characterized by the many art galleries, cobblestone streets and restaurants that fill the area, and it is named for the French merchants who once occupied the area. Above the French Quarter is Ansonborough, the peninsula’s first neighborhood, although much of it was destroyed in a fire in 1838 and had to be rebuilt. Many of the houses have Greek Revival characteristics and were built by some of Charleston’s oldest family names, such as Joseph Legare and Edward McCrady. Harleston Village is another one of the old neighborhoods that was developed in 1770. It encompasses the area north of Broad Street to Calhoun Street. It includes Colonial Lake, which was set aside for public use in 1768 and is now used by joggers and dog walkers. The architecture includes Italian and Georgian, as well as styles that span the 18th, 19th and 20th centuries. Radcliffeborough is bound by King, Vanderhorst, Smith and Radcliffe streets and contains much of the College of Charleston campus. Many of the houses have Italian and Gothic Revival influences. To the west and north of Radcliffeborough are Cannonborough and Elliottborough, where homes are being renovated at a rapid rate. Close to MUSC, this area is popular with medical students and families who want a house downtown without the price of a lower-peninsula property. New developments are opening up residential spaces, such as the Midtown project, expected to help revitalize upper King Street with condominiums and single-family houses mixed in with commercial space. The recently constructed Bee Street Lofts offer views of the Ashley River. With their proximity to the Medical University of South Carolina, the lofts have been popular with physicians moving to the area. This injection of residential property has attracted several restaurants to the area. To the east of Radcliffeborough is the Mazyck-Wraggborough neighborhood, which stretches from King over to Washington Street. Anchoring the area is the landmark Marion Square, the 10-acre public park that houses a farmers market on Saturdays from


Living in

Berkeley County

Mount Pleasant

Dorchester County

Town across the harbor offers many residential options

Charleston County

44

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Photo/Courtesy of Charleston County Parks and Recreation

A

fter almost 250 years as “the sleepy town on the other side of the harbor,” Mount Pleasant forged its 20th century identity when the Grace Bridge opened in 1929, connecting it to Charleston and sparking a building boom that continues more than 80 years later. The Silas Pearman Bridge, built adjacent to the Grace Bridge, opened in 1966. Yet by the dawn of the 21st century, snarling traffic on those Cooper River bridges was choking the area’s prized quality of life. Things improved dramatically with the opening of the $650 million Arthur Ravenel Jr. Bridge, an eight-lane marvel that was greeted with fireworks and celebration on July 16, 2005. The enlarged bridge marked the beginning of a new era for the state’s fifth-largest municipality, now home to about 65,000. Despite its reputation as the suburban gateway to Charleston and the East Cooper beaches, the historic heart of Mount Pleasant can still be found near picturesque Shem Creek, where the local fishing fleet dock beside popular locally owned eateries. The Old Village, founded in 1680 and incorporated in 1837, sits on breezy bluffs that overlook the harbor just seaward of Shem Creek. Locals treasure its 18th century homes, its quaint Pitt Street commercial district and the neighborhood’s authentic shade-drenched ambiance. Residents and visitors alike enjoy trips to Alhambra Hall Park and the nearby Pitt Street Bridge, which once connected the town

The 1,250-foot-long Mount Pleasant Pier is part of the Memorial Waterfront Park and offers residents exceptional access to the Charleston harbor. to Sullivan’s Island by trolley but now offers views of Charleston Harbor and easy access to fishing and crabbing. Other glimpses of Mount Pleasant’s past can be found across town on scenic Long Point Road. On one side of the road, motorists may turn off and wander down a broad alley of oaks that leads to Boone Hall Plantation. Settled in 1743, this privately owned historic property has been open to the public for tours since 1955 yet remains a working plantation. Its “you-pick ’em” fields and seasonal events are beloved by local families. On the other side of Long Point Road, the Charles Pinckney National Historic Site interprets life at Snee Farm Plantation, home of one of the original signers of the U.S. Constitution. The U.S. Park Service staff makes a special effort to explain and preserve the region’s Gullah culture. Glimpses of that Gullah heritage can be seen along U.S. 17, where the area’s

“basket ladies” still make and sell the Lowcountry’s signature sweetgrass baskets from simple roadside stands. Efforts to honor and preserve traditions like sweetgrass basketry demonstrate an emerging sense of civic identity. After decades of rapid suburban growth, Mount

Moving In

(all numbers are 843 area code except where noted) Town of Mount Pleasant: .........................884-8517 www.tompsc.com Utilities Charleston County School District: ........937-6300 Town of Mount Pleasant building permits: ........................................884-1229 Mount Pleasant Water Works: ...............884-9626 S.C. Electric & Gas: ........................... 800-251-7234 Blue Flame Gas: ........................................884-2017 Trash and recycling: .................................884-8517


Liv ing IN M ount Pleasant Photos/Courtesy of the Town of Mount Pleasant

Above: Shem Creek is home to many restaurants, fish markets and shrimp boats. Left: I’on is a desirable neighborhood in the heart of Mount Pleasant. and pedal boat rentals. Patriots Point on Charleston Harbor boasts a state-run military museum that displays four World Pleasant began allocating building permits War II-era vessels and more than a dozen in 2005 and now puts greater emphasis on vintage aircraft. Patriots Point also connects to the Ravenel Bridge by way of Memorial planning. Waterfront Park, unveiled in 2009. The qualities the town guards today Mount Pleasant’s neighborhoods have helped convince Money magazine to name varying styles and offer residents a range Mount Pleasant as one of the Top 100 Best of choices. Places to Live in 2006 and 2010. Money The Tides, an upscale condominium magazine lists the average home value at community on Charleston Harbor, is around $287,000 and median household among the town’s newest. I’On, a new-urincome more than $95,000. Caring for others is also on the rise. East banist development off Mathis Ferry Road, Cooper Community Outreach, a volunteer is an award-winning neighborhood of organization that emerged in the aftermath beautiful homes, elaborate public spaces of Hurricane Hugo in 1989, operates social and mixed-use construction. Farther out, programs aimed at helping disadvantaged the sprawling new developments of Park people live healthier, more successful lives. West and Carolina Park are moving the A weekly farmers market on Tuesday after- geographic center of town more to the east. With people come businesses, most of noons from April to October gives access them oriented on either U.S. 17 or Coleto affordable, healthy food. man Boulevard. The town’s most prominent The town unveiled two new modern shopping area is Towne Centre, between hospitals in 2010. East Cooper Regional the Isle of Palms Connector and the end of Medical Center and Roper St. Francis Interstate 526. Mount Pleasant Hospital both opened that In keeping with tradition, the town loves year. a good festival. Mount Pleasant hosts fesFitness has also been on the upswing here since the new bridge opened in 2005 tivals for the arts, oysters, Scottish games, local foodies and children. Every April, the with a lane for bicyclists and pedestrians. Residents make extensive use of the town’s town turns out for the annual Blessing of the Fleet at Memorial Waterfront Park. The numerous parks, ballfields and gyms, and Christmas parade is a big draw, as is the recreational sports leagues are numerous. Cooper River Bridge Run, which attracts Palmetto Islands County Park, a 943runners and walkers by the tens of thouacre facility, has nature trails, picnic areas, sands each spring. a 50-foot observation tower, a water park INTRO | 45


Living in

Berkeley County

Isle of Palms & Sullivan’s Island

Dorchester County

Charleston County

For a day’s visit or a lifetime, islands’ beaches beckon

E

ast Cooper’s two beachfront islands are connected by one bridge but represent two distinct lifestyles. Sullivan’s Island lies at the entrance to Charleston Harbor and spent much of its history as a slave port. Its strategic position made it a key to the seaward defense of the city of Charleston and it was fortified well into the 20th century. To Charlestonians of the late 19th and early 20th century, Sullivan’s Island was the beach to which they escaped by boat when the summer heat grew unbearable. Today, the island’s military and beachretreat heritage give the place an elegantly shabby, slow-moving style that is unique among Southern beach communities. Islanders have adapted abandoned fortifications and disused buildings from Fort Moultrie’s sprawling past into creative living spaces and public uses. Victorian homes line shaded streets. About 2,000 people live on the 3.3-square-mile island, which remains a popular destination for beach-goers from Charleston and Mount Pleasant. But with no hotels, the beach is seldom crowded. Easements and strict regulations protect the island’s dunes and maritime forests, and its lighthouse, which began operation in 1962, was conveyed to the National Parks Service in 2008. Though Sullivan’s Island was home to two settlements in the 19th century, the neighboring Isle of Palms remained a remote, sparsely populated vacation spot until the early 20th century. A 50-room hotel opened in 1906, followed in 1912 by a beach pavilion and amusement park. First known as Hunting Island, and then Long Island, developers renamed it the Isle of Palms in 1913 to attract tourists. Development of the 5.6-square-mile island didn’t begin in earnest until the 1940s. 46

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The Sullivan’s Island lighthouse is a prominent landmark and has been in use since 1962.

The boom started in 1944 with the purchase of 1,300 acres by The Beach Co., which laid out roads and began building a mixture of vacation and affordable housing. The Ben Sawyer Bridge connecting Mount Pleasant to Sullivan’s Island completed the Charleston-to-IOP automobile link in 1945 and more growth followed. By the 1970s, developers turned their eyes toward a 1,600-acre tract and began construction of

MOVING IN

(all numbers are 843 area code except where noted) Isle of Palms City of Isle of Palms...................................886-6428 www.iop.net Charleston County School District..........937-6300 City of Isle of Palms building permits.....886-6522 UTILITIES Isle of Palms Water and Sewer...............886-6148 S.C. Electric & Gas............................. 800-251-7234 City of Isle of Palms trash and recycling....886-8956 Sullivan’s Island Town of Sullivan’s Island..........................883-3198 www.sullivansisland-sc.com Charleston County School District..........937-6300 Town of Sullivan’s Island building permits............ 883-5732 UTILITIES Sullivan’s Island water system................883-3947 S.C. Electric & Gas............................. 800-251-7234 Suburban Disposal....................................873-4810


Liv ing IN I sle of Palms & sullivan ’ s I sland Photos/Leslie Burden

what is today the gated Wild Dunes Resort. This exclusive community features two golf courses, extensive tennis facilities and a system of walking and bicycling trails. Hurricane Hugo destroyed 95% of the IOP’s buildings in 1989 and the influx of insurance cash led to a burst of luxurious gentrification. Today, the island has a population of more than 4,500 multimillion-dollar homes line the water, and its Front Beach commercial district bustles with restaurants and shops. The IOP’s Windjammer Lounge is a classic beachfront bar and music venue, and the annual Polar Bear Swim on Sullivan’s Island, which draws thousands of high-spirited bathers every New Year’s Day, originates at Dunleavy’s Pub in the island’s tiny downtown. Life on the islands offers distinct choices for those who can afford them — the upscale energy of the IOP versus the quirkier charms of Sullivan’s Island. Residents of both islands benefit from one of the state’s finest elementary schools, enjoy easy access to shopping via the Isle of Palms Connector and can often be spotted tooling around in their ubiquitous electric golf carts.

Above: Sullivan’s Island offers a lively mix of bars and restaurants to enjoy. Right: Many bird species call these barrier islands their home.

Life on the islands offers distinct choices. Isle of Palms exudes upscale energy while Sullivan’s Island maintains its quirkier charms. Photo/Courtesy City of Isle of Palms

Inset: Sea turtles that have been rehabilitated at the S.C. Aquarium are released at the Isle of Palms. Main: Docks line the Intracoastal Waterway on the back side of the Isle of Palms. INTRO | 47


Living in

Berkeley County

North Charleston

Dorchester County

Area is home to Boeing, ice hockey, concerts and conventions

Charleston County

The Cougars of North Charleston High School. 48

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Photos/Courtesy of City of North Charleston

N

orth Charleston is an area in transition. With industrial and military roots, the city in recent years has committed to redeveloping its central neighborhoods and reinventing itself as a trendy yet affordable place to live. The area north of Charleston was developed as plantations by early colonists, but after the Civil War, it grew into an industrial center. Just after the turn of the 20th century, the U.S. Navy targeted a huge swath of land along the Cooper River for a new naval base, and planned neighborhoods began to unfold to house workers, the military and their families. The North Charleston area boomed during World War II. The dynamic area incorporated as a city in 1972 and has expanded to include land in Charleston, Dorchester and Berkeley counties. In the 1990s, the federal government closed the navy base in North Charleston. The city of North Charleston has since partnered with developers to infuse new life into the areaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s historic neighborhoods. Redevelopment areas include Park Circle, a community of neighborhoods planned early in the 20th century. Residential developments in the works, such as Oak Terrace Preserve and Mixson, have earned a reputation for their sustainable building practices. Nearby Montague Avenue is a Main Street of the past alive again

Oak Terrace Preserve is one of the many neighborhoods to choose from in North Charleston.

"North Charleston continues to experience a resurgence of new communities, shopping areas and industries." with shops and restaurants. Redevelopment is ongoing on the former naval base as well, where once empty military buildings now bustle with art studios, private offices and other commercial activity collectively known as the Navy Yard at Noisette. North Charleston remains a center of business activity for the region, with many of the Charleston areaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s commercial and industrial employers located there. Boeing Co. announced plans in late 2009 to locate its second assembly line for its 787 Dreamliner in North Charleston. In 2011, South Carolina officials along with Boeing celebrated the completion of the assembly plant. One of the areaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s major attractions is the North Charleston Coliseum and Performing Arts Center and adjacent Charleston

Moving In

(all numbers are 843 area code except where noted) City of North Charleston: .........................554-5700 www.northcharleston.org Charleston County School District: ........937-6300 Utilities City of North Charleston building permits: ........... 740-2578 Charleston Water System: .......................727-6800 S.C. Electric & Gas: ........................... 800-251-7234 Trash and recycling: .................................745-1026


Liv ing IN N orth charleston

Photo/Matt Tomsic arleston

sy of City of North Ch

Photos/Courte

Area Convention Center. The complex is home to the Stingrays, a minor league hockey team, and is a venue for concerts, performances and meetings large and small. An $18 million expansion is under way for the coliseum that will include a new ticket window, upgraded box suites, better kitchen facilities and stage and sound improvements. Nearby shopping centers include the

Tanger Outlet Center and Northwoods Mall. The Charleston International Airport is also located in North Charleston. Interstate 26 forms a spine that begins in Charleston and runs through North Charleston toward Columbia. Interstate 526, which has terminal points in Mount Pleasant and West Ashley, reaches its peak in North Charleston.

Top: Boeing rolled out the first 787 Dreamliner built in North Charleston on April 27, 2012. Bottom left: Festivals and other family events are popular attractions. Bottom right: Residents enjoy eating outdoors at the award-winning EVO Pizzeria in the Park Circle neighborhood. There are many shops and restaurants that line the streets.

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Living in

Berkeley County

West Ashley

Dorchester County

One of the first suburbs has old plantations, visionary greenway

Charleston County

Photo/Leslie Burden

Moving In The Avondale Point area of West Ashley bustles with shops, salons, restaurants and bars.

(all phone numbers are 843 area code except

T

West Ashley/City of Charleston: .............724-3745 www.charleston-sc.gov

he area west of the Ashley River in Charleston is home to some of the areaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s oldest suburban neighborhoods and, a little farther out, some of the newest. West Ashley, as itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s called, also features a range of old and new shopping centers and restaurants, historic plantations and other attractions, and a unique outdoor walking trail.

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Neighborhoods closest to the Charleston peninsula were built in the 1920s through the 1950s. Among the older subdivisions are Old Windermere, Byrnes Down, Moreland, Avondale and The Crescent. Development continued through the 1970s and 1980s in neighborhoods farther out from the city, such as Northbridge, Northbridge Terrace and Wespanee Plantation. New residential development has continued

where noted)

Charleston County School District: ........937-6300 Utilities City of Charleston building permits: .......724-3745 Charleston Water System: .......................727-6800 S.C. Electric & Gas: ........................... 800-251-7234 Trash and recycling: .................................724-7364


Liv ing IN W est A shley

Photo/Kim McManus

West Ashley features a range of old and new neighborhoods and shopping centers, historic plantations and a unique greenway. Photo/Leslie Burden

Photo/Leslie Burden

Top: Magnolia Plantation was founded in 1676. The gardens opened to the public in 1870, the first to do so in America. Left: The Mellow Mushroom and the Voodoo Tiki Bar & Lounge are some of the restaurants in the Avondale area. Above: Some of the art commissioned by the chART Outdoor Initiative & Gallery, which consists of public community art spaces supporting contemporary artists working in the visual arts. INTRO | 51


Livin g IN W est Ashle y Photo/Ryan Wilcox

is a state park. When getting around by car, main highway corridors in West Ashley are U.S. 17, called Savannah Highway, and S.C. 61, also known as Ashley River Road. The two highways are connected by S.C. 7, also called Sam Rittenberg Boulevard. Interstates 526 and 26 connect West Ashley to North Charleston to the north and Mount Pleasant to the east. For those interested in seeing West Ashley by foot or bike, the West Ashley Greenway is a good option. This 10.5-mile walking and biking path weaves among residential areas and shopping centers and

through small marshy areas and swaths of trees. The trail starts near the South Windermere Shopping Center and stretches to Johns Island. Shopping is plentiful in West Ashley. The area is home to Citadel Mall, one of the areaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s two enclosed malls. Shopping centers anchored by national retailers and restaurants surround Citadel Mall, which is located just inside I-526 near the intersection of U.S. 17 and Sam Rittenberg Boulevard. West Ashley also includes eclectic shopping strips filled with many locally owned stores and eateries, such as the Avondale shopping area along U.S. 17.

Photo/Leslie

Photo/Kim McManus

in recent years, especially past the western boundary of Interstate 526, in neighborhoods like Shadowmoss and Carolina Bay. Long-ago residents of West Ashley have left behind several historic plantations and gardens that have been preserved and are open for tours. Magnolia Plantation, Middleton Place and Drayton Hall Plantation allow visitors to learn about the architecture and life of South Carolinians in the 1700s and the centuries following. Another historic destination in West Ashley is Charles Towne Landing, the site of the English settlement that would become the Carolina colony. The 664-acre attraction

Top: A beautiful sunset along the West Ashley Greenway

Burden

Left: A frog blends in at Magnolia Plantation. Right: The Oak Barrel Tavern is a regular stop for the residents of the Avondale neighborhood.

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Living on

Berkeley County

James Island & Folly Beach

Dorchester County

Looking for the beauty of nature? You'll find it here.

Charleston County

Photo/Leslie Burdern

J

 ames Island and Folly Beach, located just south of Charleston, represent a distinctly independent streak in the Lowcountry character. Long a semi-rural area, James Island has seen its population boom since the early 1990s and the opening of the James Island Connector, a bridge that links the island directly to the Charleston peninsula. James Island is bounded by Wappoo Creek, Charleston Harbor and the Stono and Folly rivers. Its network of marshes, inlets, sounds and creeks gives it one of the most scenic natural environments in the region. It was a strategic key to Charleston during the Revolutionary and Civil wars. The Confederate attack on Fort Sumter began in 1861 with a shot from the island's Fort Johnson, modern-day home of a stateof-the-art government marine science research facility. McLeod Plantation, with its alley of slave cabins visible from Folly Road near the foot of the Wappoo Bridge, stands near the entrance to the private Country Club of Charleston. The Riverland Terrace neighborhood, located between Maybank Highway and Wappoo Creek, features enormous live oaks and deeply shaded lanes. A nearby commercial district offers fine restaurants, antiques and the Terrace Theatre, the area’s only art-house cinema. Recreational options include the Charleston Municipal Golf Course and James Island County Park, a 643-acre facility with trails, fishing docks, a 50-foot climbing wall, kayak rentals, picnic areas and a campground. The park’s Splash Zone water park is extremely popular with fami-

Shrimp boats line the Folly River at sunset.

“A distinctly independent streak in the Lowcountry character.” lies during summer months, and the county park’s annual Holiday Festival of Lights attracts motorists on winter nights. James Island ends where Folly Road enters a marsh marked by the landmark “Folly Boat,” an abandoned hull that was deposited on the roadside by Hurricane Hugo. Locals have been painting messages on it ever since. Another treasured local landmark – Bowen’s Island Restaurant – sits

James Island’s enormous live oaks and deeply shaded lanes lead into Folly Beach, which is also called "The Edge of America." 54 | INTRO

Moving In

(all phone numbers are 843 area code unless otherwise noted) Town of James Island: .............................795-4141 www.jamesisland.sc.us City of Folly Beach: ...................................588-2447 www.cityoffollybeach.com Charleston County School District: ........937-6300 UTILITIES Building permits (Charleston): ................795-4141 Charleston Water System: .......................727-6800 S.C. Electric & Gas: ........................... 800-251-7234 James Island trash and recycling: .........795-9060 City of Folly Beach Public Works: ..........588-2447 Folly Beach trash and recycling: ............588-2447


Liv ing IN N o r th ch a rl esto n

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Photos/Leslie Burdern

Photos/Courtesy of CCPRC

Above: The dock at James Island County Park offers visitors a place to fish and launch a kayak. Top left: Rita's is one of the many lively restaurants on Folly Beach. Bottom left: The Edwin S. Taylor Folly Beach Fishing Pier at Folly Beach stretches 1,045 feet into the Atlantic, the second largest pier on the east coast.

on a tidal creek in a hummock of trees in the vast marsh between James Island and Folly Beach. Folly Beach calls itself “The Edge of America,” and the seven-mile island certainly seems to take the nickname seriously. The island celebrates its bars, fishing shacks, funky eateries and nefarious characters, and East Coast surfers swarm to the spot they call “The Washout” whenever an Atlantic swell pushes big waves ashore. A county-run 1,000-foot fishing pier marks the center of the island. The undeveloped eastern end of the island was the longtime site of a Coast Guard station. Morris Island, where the Union assault depicted in the movie Glory took place, lies across the inlet from the old Coast Guard station. The island has been heavily eroded, and the Morris Island Lighthouse has been surrounded by water for decades. Long described as the Lowcountry’s “poor man’s beach,” Folly’s signature shacks ceased to be affordable escapes for drifters, starving artists and beach bums a decade ago. Nonetheless, the island’s 2,300 year-round residents preserve its identity as a place where corporate homogenization hasn’t taken over – yet. 56 | INTRO


Liv ing on Jo h ns I sla nd

Living On

Johns & Wadmalaw Islands

Berkeley County

Dorchester County

These islands are among the Lowcountry’s last rural sea islands and where much of the area’s organic produce is grown.

Charleston County

Photos/Leslie Burdern

J

 hns Island, the Lowcountry’s last o remaining rural sea island, is a vast swath of land between James Island, the mainland west of Charleston and the private barrier islands of Kiawah and Seabrook. Its future is one of the most important undecided questions in the Lowcountry. The island grows much of the area’s fresh organic produce and is home to numerous farms, nurseries, packing houses and produce stands. And though its main transportation arteries are heavily trafficked, the island has miles of long, quiet, treelined roads that attract Lowcountry bicyclists. Traffic remains one of the island’s most pressing issues. Johns Islanders shot down a proposed Cross Island Expressway in the 1990s and are divided over a proposed extension to Interstate 526 that would cross the island en route to the James Island Connector, shortening the 30-minute commute to Charleston considerably. The debate continues, as opponents don’t want to trade their rural way of life for the suburban development better roads would bring. The island boasts The Angel Oak, believed to be one of the oldest trees east of the Mississippi. Said to be an estimated 1,500 years old, the oak is a graceful giant, 65 feet tall and more than 25 feet around. Owned by the city of Charleston, it is open to the public. Another local gem is the village of Rockville at the end of neighboring Wadmalaw Island. This remote, picturesque village plays host each August to the Rockville Regatta, an event that dates back more than 100 years and marks the end of the Lowcountry’s competitive sailing season. Horses raised for work, transportation or recreation have long been a part of life

The Charleston Tea Plantation on Wadmalaw Island produces the only tea grown in America. on the island. The public Mullet Hall Equestrian Center at Johns Island County Park (a largely undeveloped 738-acre tract) provides facilities for horse shows, plus 20 miles of riding trails. The Charleston Executive Airport is a small facility that offers convenience to resort visitors and flying lessons for locals. A 16,000-square-foot library, completed

Moving In

(all phone numbers are 843 area code unless noted) City of Charleston: .....................................724-3745 www.charleston-sc.gov Charleston County School District: ........937-6300 UTILITIES City of Charleston building permits: .......724-3745 Charleston Water System: .......................727-6800 S.C. Electric & Gas: ........................... 800-251-7234 Trash and recycling: .................................724-7364

in 2004, is the county’s largest branch. Much of the development on the island today is upscale, including The Preserve at Fenwick Hall. Other developments offer a mixture of affordable and luxury choices, varying from waterfront lots to Charlestonstyle urbanism to custom rural seclusion. The island’s central commercial district is located at the intersection of Main, Maybank and Bohicket roads. Johns Island is a stronghold of Gullah culture and holds a special place in the Lowcountry’s civil rights history. Native son Esau Jenkins, despite no formal education beyond fourth grade, understood in the 1950s and '60s that the future of the island’s black communities would depend on bootstrapping programs for their education and health. He and others founded “Citizenship Schools” that helped residents — many illiterate — qualify to vote, and their Sea Island Health Corp. brought doctors and nurses to rural corners that had never received proper care.

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Living on

Berkeley County

Daniel Island A master plan guides development of luxury neighborhoods

Dorchester County

Charleston County

Photos/Courtesy of Daniel Island Real Estate

Development on Daniel Island is guided by a master plan that was sponsored by the Harry Frank Guggenheim Foundation. The first modern houses were built in 1996. In 2007 the island was honored by the Urban Land Institute with their "Award for Excellence" for innovative and successful planning principals.

Moving In

(all phone numbers are 843 area code unless noted) Daniel Island: .............................................724-3745 www.danielisland.com Berkeley County School District: ...........899-8600 UTILITIES City of Charleston building permits: .......724-3745 Charleston Water System: .......................727-6800 S.C. Electric & Gas: ........................... 800-251-7234 Trash and recycling: .................................724-7364 58

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pass through Mount Pleasant or North Charleston to reach it. Though generally considered a bedroom community, the island’s daytime population swells to an estimated 8,500, thanks to employers such as software firm Blackbaud and the 34-acre campus of Bishop England High School, which moved to the island in 1998 after more than 80 years in downtown Charleston. he Lowcountry’s newest adHome prices range from the $300,000s dress is also one of its most to more than $3 million, with select lots sellattractive. Daniel Island has ing for upwards of $1 million. grown from an undeveloped Condominiums are available for less expanse of forest and farmland into a than $200,000, but the island’s network of thriving community of more than 5,000. public spaces, services, shopping, educaThe 4,000-acre island at the tip of the tion and amenities generally tends to put a Cainhoy Peninsula was essentially uninpremium on property values. Plans point habited when Interstate 526 crossed it in toward an eventual population of 15,000. the 1990s, linking the land between the Life on the island benefits from 23 miles Wando and Cooper rivers to the mainland for the first time. Development, guided by a of shoreline, much of it open to the public, master plan worked out in conjunction with and the extensive system of parks and the Guggenheim Foundation (which owned docks give neighborhoods plenty of public spaces and room to socialize. the island from 1947 to 1997), began in The island’s event calendar gets more the late 1990s. Today, the Daniel Island crowded every year, thanks in large part community spans nine neighborhoods, a to the Family Circle Cup Tennis Center (its central commercial district, more than 400 namesake women's tennis tournament is acres of public parkland, two golf courses, a professional soccer stadium and a world- played there each April) and Blackbaud Stadium, home pitch for the Charlesclass tennis facility. ton Battery Soccer Club. These modern Daniel Island is incorporated into the city of Charleston, even though it is located facilities are increasingly in demand for concerts and festivals. in Berkeley County and residents must

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Living On

Berkeley County

Kiawah & Seabrook Islands

Dorchester County

Life on private islands is like vacation every day

Charleston County

60 | INTRO

Photos/Courtesy of Seabrook Island Club

K

iawah and Seabrook islands, two private resort communities south of Charleston, offer a quality of life that includes world-class golf, upscale homes and breathtaking views of the Lowcountry’s landscape. Pottery found on Kiawah Island dates as far back as 4,000 years. Ownership of the island changed many times through the years from the Indians to the British and then to some of the earliest “Charlestonians.” Its history is linked to names you may already be familiar with: Gibbes, Vanderhorst and Middleton, to name a few. Development of the island loosely began in the 1950s when C.C. Royal, who made his fortune in the lumber business, purchased the island. He built a home for his wife and seven children and then sold 65 lots to friends. In 1974, the Kuwait Investment Co. purchased the island from Royal’s heirs and created a land plan that consisted of a resort and residential development. Kiawah Development Partners is currently the master developer of the island. Approximately 1,200 full-time residents inhabit the island, but the population swells in the spring and summer when about 600 of the island’s properties are rented. The island is also home to the Kiawah Island Golf Resort, which includes five public golf courses and two private courses; The Sanctuary, a AAA Five Diamond hotel; an award-winning spa; and several restaurants. In August 2012, the PGA Championship was played at the Kiawah Island Golf Resort. The PGA major brought more than $200 million of economic impact to the area, including millions of dollars worth of worldwide exposure. Outside of golf, the island also caters to tennis players and is a destination for runners each year during the annual Kiawah Island Marathon, held each December. Seabrook Island, just across the marsh from Kiawah Island, is a 2,200-acre mix of

Seabrook Island offers a family-friendly environment, as well as the opportunity to ride horses along the shores of the Atlantic. forest, salt marshes and beach. The island was discovered by settlers in 1666 and indigo and rice were its first cash crops. The island was first called Jones Island, then Simmons Island and finally Seabrook when it was purchased by William Seabrook in 1816. Originally developed in 1972 as a resort and conference center location, the island has evolved into a private oceanfront community. There are more than 2,500 properties on Seabrook Island and more than 700 families live on the island year round. There is no shortage of things to do on Seabrook Island, from golfing on two private courses, to playing tennis, horseback riding and boating. There are several restaurants to choose from also. Inhabitants of both islands place a high value on the environment and have made sure that the buildings are constructed in harmony with the natural surroundings.

MOVING IN (all area codes 843) Town of Kiawah Island: ............................768-0641 www.kiawahisland.org Town of Seabrook Island: ........................768-9121 www.townofseabrookisland.org Charleston County School District: ........937-6300 Utilities City of Charleston building permits: .......724-3745 Town of Kiawah Island Water: ................768-0641 Berkeley Electric: ......................................559-2458 Berkeley Propane: ....................................559-2458 Kiawah Trash and recycling: ...................768-0642 Seabrook Island trash and recycling: ...768-0061


Photo/Leslie Burdern

Liv ing oN K i awa h & s e a bro o k isla nd s

Above: Kiawah Island's Ocean Course played host to the 2012 PGA Championship. Rory McIlroy claimed the victory over the world's greatest golfers.

"World-class golf is played alongside upscale homes with breathtaking views."

Right: The Seabrook Island Club has more than 1,700 members. Since 2005 all new property owners are required to purchase a membership.

There are also plenty of opportunities to observe and study wildlife, whether strolling on the beach or exploring the waterways via kayak or canoe. Just 30 minutes away from Charleston, the islands are close enough for a day trip into the city. However, if shopping is your pleasure, there are several opportunities for excursions on both islands, as well as at Freshfields Village on neighboring Johns Island. Freshfields Village offers a variety of stores, from sporting goods to groceries, as well as several restaurants. Photos/Courtesy of Seabrook Island Club

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Living in

Berkeley County

Summerville

Dorchester County

Town is alive with family friendly festivals and natural beauty Photo/Kim McManus

Downtown Summerville bustles with shopping and eating options, many of which are locally owned and operated.

MOVING IN (all area codes 843 except where noted) Town of Summerville.................................871-0810 www.summerville.sc.us Dorchester District Two www.dorchester2.k12.sc.us Utilities Building permits .......................................851-5200 Town of Summerville trash.......................851-5210 Summerville CPW......................................871-0810 S.C. Electric & Gas............................. 800-251-7234 BellSouth............................................. 888-757-6500 Home Telephone Co...................................899-1111 Knology........................................................225-1000 Comcast............................................... 800-266-2278 Time Warner Cable............................ 866-892-7201 62 | INTRO

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ummerville is a community that still gathers at Town Square to celebrate the 4th of July and a place where Friday night high school football draws a spirited crowd. In early December, the holiday season is ushered in with an annual Christmas tree lighting downtown. In this modern Southern city, progress and preservation are inextricably intertwined, making it a dynamic and diverse place to live and work. Downtown Restoration, Enhancement and Management (D.R.E.A.M.), a nonprofit group spearheaded by local residents, has done much since its inception in 1992 to bring focus and support to Summerville and its historic downtown district. The commercial area is bustling again with unique shops,

Charleston County

a local bookstore, art galleries and eateries. Guerin’s Pharmacy — the oldest still operating in South Carolina — contains antiques, a full-service pharmacy and an old-style soda fountain that serves drug store classics such as cherry and vanilla Cokes, milkshakes and chili dogs. The Summerville Dorchester Museum documents cultural and natural history with a film and exhibits of the colonial settlers, early churches and architecture. More than 700 buildings have been placed on the National Register of Historic Places. Summerville traces its roots to the 1780s, when it was known as Pineland Village to plantation owners wanting to escape the swamp fever and insects of the Lowcountry summer. After being deemed by medical specialists in 1899 as one of the best areas in the world for lung and throat disorders, the area experienced a golden era, with special lodgings and resorts springing up to accommodate pulmonary patients. The most famous was Pine Forest Inn, which sometimes served as the Winter White House for Presidents William Howard Taft and Theodore Roosevelt. Today, Summerville is Dorchester County’s largest city with an estimated population of more than 43,000. Named one of the 50 best small towns in America by Kiplinger’s Personal Finance magazine, Summerville offers residents the best of both worlds in terms of quality of life and housing. Known for its stately Victorian homes, the city also offers the full spectrum of new construction options attracting families, business and military personnel to the area. Dubbed “Flower Town in the Pines,” Summerville still gets high


Liv ing IN Su mmerville Photo/Courtesy of City of Summerville Photo/Courtesy of City of Summerville

It's easy to see why Summerville has been dubbed 'Flowertown in the Pines.' marks for natural attributes. The Flowertown Festival draws more than 200,000 people every spring for a weekend dedicated to artisans and crafts amid the profusion of blooms in Azalea Park. This event is consistently ranked one of the Top 20 events in the Southeast by the Southeast Tourism Society. Azalea Park, a 12-acre oasis of ponds, paths, fountains and tennis courts, has also been the site for one of South Carolina’s premiere outdoor arts events, Sculpture in the South. This exhibit and sale of original sculpture typically features more than 30 artists from across the country representing a range of sculpture from Western to whimsical. During the event, patrons also can explore 22 permanent sculptures displayed in public places in Summerville. Summerville residents can take to the trails at nearby Givhans Ferry State Park, on the former site of an 18th-century ferry that once crossed the Edisto River. The park features camping, cabins, fishing, picnic areas and river access. At Francis Beidler Forest in Four Holes Swamp, shaded boardwalks wind through ancient groves of towering cypress and Pleistocene swamps. The forest — a National Natural Landmark — is protected and managed by the National Audubon Society and is the largest remaining virgin stand of bald cypress in the world. A popular destination for visitors, Summerville has nine hotels. It also has seven bed and breakfasts, including the Linwood Bed & Breakfast, built in 1883 by Julia Drayton Hastie, heiress to Magnolia Plantation. The Victorian mansion is surrounded by nearly two acres of award-winning landscaped gardens. The mansion itself is appointed with heart of pine floors, high ceilings, chandeliers,

Cutline

INTRO | 63


Photo/Leslie Burden

Named one of the best small towns in America, Summerville ranks high in natural attributes.

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Photo/Kim McManus

Victorian bays and triple sash windows, many with original glass. Summerville has plenty of fine and fun dining options. Across the board, restaurants use style and originality to create menus that appeal to an array of tastes. Summerville’s eateries include both chain and independently owned restaurants. Downtown, you’ll find an area called Short Central, a cobblestoned, pedestrian-only streetscape with shops and cafés just a block from Town Hall. A newcomer to downtown is Coastal Coffee Roasters, a coffeehouse that roasts and grinds coffee fresh onsite. On East Third North Street , Coastal Coffee Roasters uses organic, fair trade, Rainforest Alliance, bird friendly and Swiss water process certifications to create its coffee blends. For those interested in stocking up on ingredients to create a feast at home, Summerville’s farmers market is a popular event. It runs weekly on Saturdays from April to November and is located near

Town Hall. The market features artisanal foods and local produce. Adding to the town’s many things to do and places to go, Summerville officials have created a Sweet Tea Trail that promises an adventure in Southern hospitality through history, food and shopping. The trail tells the story of sweet tea’s birth in Summerville. It’s said that tea plants landed in Summerville in the late 1700s by way of the Ashley River. Andre Michaux, a French explorer and botanist, imported them along with varieties of camellias, gardenias and azaleas near Charleston at what is now known as

Middleton Place Plantation. In 1888, a wealthy scientific philanthropist acquired 600 acres in Summerville and established the Pinehurst Tea Plantation. The plants were eventually moved to a spot on Wadmalaw Island, which is now known as the Charleston Tea Plantation and is owned by Bigelow. It’s currently a functioning tea farm and the only place to produce black tea in the United States. Local bakeries are getting on the Sweet Tea Trail, offering patrons sweet tea cupcakes and sweet tea relish and jelly. Several antique and vintage stores are joining in, offering patrons a special opportunity to shop – and enjoy sweet tea – from 1-4 p.m. the second Sunday of each month. Officials are in the process of planning a Sweet Tea Festival to celebrate Southern traditions and, of course, sweet tea. From its Friday night football games to its annual festivals, Summerville is a place where rich history and progress mix seamlessly. Leaders focus on stimulating economic development in and around Summerville while making sure the Flower Town in the Pines does not lose its smalltown charm.


Liv ing IN Mo ncks co rner

Living in

Berkeley County

Moncks Corner

Dorchester County

Charleston County

Quiet, close-knit community also home to Google’s data center

Photo/Leslie Burden

Photo/Jim Huff

Google will spend another $600 million on a new data center facility in Berkeley County, company and government officials announced Jan. 18, 2013. The Old Santee Canal Park commemorates the historic canal system built from 1793 to 1800.

M

events are held at the depot throughout oncks Corner was a colonial the year, including the Fourth of July Street trading post with a history that dates back to 1735. It was Dance and Christmas festivities. Residents founded by landowner Thom- also can attend classes at the depot and rent it for special events. as Monck, for whom the town was named. Moncks Corner today has more than In 1853, Moncks Corner became an official 8,000 residents and is the Berkeley County scheduled stop on the North East Railroad and two buildings were subsequently built seat. The original downtown is populated with progressive shops and restaurants and to accommodate freight and passengers. the town has positioned itself for growth. The original train depot was destroyed Moncks Corner is home to the corporate ofby fire in 1915, and the existing building fice for Santee Cooper, a state-owned utility was constructed at the current site. The company. The area was selected by Google train depot was an important social landin 2007 as the site for a $600 million investmark for residents in the early 1900s, just as it is today. Officials renovated the historic ment for two data centers. Early in 2013, Google announced another $600 million building in 2000 to serve as the town’s investment to expand its current campus. visitor and cultural center. Special With the area’s growth, Moncks Corner’s neighborhoods offer residents a convenient location in a quiet community. Neighborhoods include Cypress Ridge, Fairmont South, Stoney Creek and

The Berkeley Blueways offer 20 canoeing and kayaking trails.

Foxbank Plantation. Foxbank Plantation is being developed on a former rice plantation of the same name. It spans 800 acres and includes community lakes, ponds and plenty of green space. Amenities include a swimming pool, parks and walking paths. There are several options for schools in Moncks Corner. Students attend public schools within the Berkeley County School District, which received 22 Palmetto Gold and Silver awards for excellence in 2012. Private schools also are available.

MOVING IN (all area codes 843 except where noted) Town of Moncks Corner............................719-7900 www.townofmonckscorner.sc.gov Berkeley County School District www.berkeley.k12.sc.us/ UTILITIES Berkeley Cable Television........................761-8188 Berkeley Electric Cooperative.................761-8200 Home Telephone Co...................................761-9101 Commission of Public Works ..................719-7965 Public Service Department......................719-7900 Sanitation Department..............................719-7900 Santee Cooper Electric Utility..................719-8000 INTRO | 65


L ivin g IN Mon cks corner

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Photo/Kim McManus

Moncks Corner’s proximity to area attractions, parks and more make it a match for residents who enjoy outdoor living. Old Santee Canal Park commemorates America’s first summit canal, which began operating in 1800. In addition to tours of the historic site, the park features the Berkeley County Museum and Heritage Center. Exhibits and artifacts portray the region’s history, including that of Brig. Gen. Francis Marion, who was also known as the “Swamp Fox” and was born near Moncks Corner. The museum also includes the history of Native Americans, colonial life, the Civil War and the Francis Marion National Forest. Cypress Gardens features boat rides through blackwater swamps and the Berkeley Blueways offer 20 canoeing and kayaking trails. Cypress Gardens hosts an annual Ukulele Festival. Now in its third year, the festival for enthusiasts includes ukulele and hula workshops, vendors and a free concert. It also offers boat jams, where ukulele players climb into boats, 10 to 12 per boat, and row around the swamp singing and jamming together. Mepkin Abbey, a former plantation perched on the river’s bluffs, now serves as home to a Trappist monastery with a garden and chapel open to the public. Visitors can tour the monastery and gardens, or take part in spiritual retreats. World-class waterskiing, wind surfing, sailing, boating and fishing are popular on Lake Moultrie, as well as the state’s largest lake, Lake Marion. The Palmetto Trail, a recreational trail that stretches statewide, takes trekkers off the beaten path for a closer experience with Southern fauna and wildlife. In addition to these options, the town broke ground on a 52-acre recreation complex in 2011 and expects phase one to be completed by the fall of 2013. The town is investing $5.4 million into phase one, which will include four lighted baseball fields, paved parking, a concession stand/press box, event signs, paved access road, an irrigation system and walking trails. Future plans include tennis courts and a recreation center with a basketball court, swimming pool, jogging track and community rooms. A farmers market, picnic areas and playgrounds are also in the future plans for the complex. The town’s close-knit community is looking ahead by focusing on maintaining a balance between continued growth and the preservation of its cultural amenities and small town character.

At Cypress Gardens visitors can experience the swamp environment in a row boat, on many walking trails and at the interpretive center.

Moncks Corner Town Park and Recreation Facility The town broke ground on a 52-acre recreation complex in 2011 and expects phase one to be completed by the fall of 2013.


Liv ing IN G o o se Creek

Living in

Berkeley County

Goose Creek

Dorchester County

New homes spring up where rice plantations once ruled

Charleston County

Photo/Courtesy of City of Goose Creek

MOVING IN (all area codes 843 except where noted) City of Goose Creek...................................797-6220 www.cityofgoosecreek.com Berkeley County School District www.berkeley.k12.sc.us/ UTILITIES Building permits.........................................797-6220 City of Goose Creek garbage.................824-2200 Comcast............................................... 800-266-2278 Time Warner Cable.......................... 866-892-7201 Berkeley Electric Cooperative.................761-8200 S.C. Electric & Gas..............................800-251-7234 Home Telecom.......................................... .277-7307 AT&T.......................................................855-258-1471 Berkeley County Water & Sewer............572-4400 Charleston Water System.........................727-6800

T

he magazine Bloomberg Businessweek reported in 2011, “Goose Creek is on our list of best places to raise kids for the second year in a row. There are more than a few reasons. This quiet, pretty suburb of Charleston has much to offer, from great parks to solid schools, to rolling bike trails.” Indeed, Goose Creek, located about 20 minutes outside Charleston, has become a very desirable place to live in the Lowcountry. It ranks as the state’s 12th largest municipality with more than 37,000 residents. While the exact origin of the city’s name is unknown, this area of the Lowcountry has been called Goose Creek since the late 1600s. Early settlers were planters from Barbados who brought with them knowledge of various crops, including rice and indigo. These crops were successfully

grown in the region for more than 100 years. Fast forward to 1961, when the city of Goose Creek was incorporated and farmlands in the area began to be sold and subdivided to accommodate the fast-growing area and subsequent housing boom. Today Goose Creek is the most densely populated city in Berkeley County. Its easy access to I-26 and its proximity to Charleston continue to make it a popular bedroom community in the region. Well-known housing developments include Crowfield Plantation and Cane Bay Plantation. Crowfield, a former rice plantation, spans 382 acres and includes residential housing, as well as commercial development, churches and schools. Its recreation amenities include a golf course and country club, lakes, hiking INTRO | 67


L ivin g IN Goose Creek

Photo/Courtesy of City of Goose Creek

Photo/Courtesy of Berkeley County School Distric t

and biking trails, and recreational areas. Cane Bay Plantation spans 4,500 acres and includes several neighborhoods — including Del Webb, an active adult living neighborhood — as well as schools, parks, playgrounds, athletic fields, hiking and biking trails, and retail centers. An up-and-coming neighborhood is Nexton, a 4,500-acre master planned

Opportunities for outdoor living in the Lowcountry are plentiful and Goose Creek is no different. The city’s recreation department has constructed several parks throughout the area featuring playgrounds, picnic areas and ball fields. Golf enthusiasts can enjoy 18 holes at Crowfield Golf and Country Club, which also has tennis and swimming.

“Goose Creek is home to the Naval Weapons Station, which is part of the Lowcountry’s largest employer, Joint Base Charleston.” development between Goose Creek and Summerville that will include offices, hotels, apartments, parks and trails, and many choices for dining, entertainment and shopping. A ground breaking was held in 2013 for the first building to be built, a 100,000-square-foot office building designed to achieve LEED certification. Part of the building will be occupied by MeadWestvaco Corp., which is developing the community with the Rockefeller Group.

There also are plenty of activities within a short drive of Goose Creek. Soccer enthusiasts can enjoy a Charleston Battery game at Blackbaud Stadium, or tennis fans can watch the annual Family Circle Cup tennis tournament, held each spring at the Family Circle Cup Center. Both stadiums are located on nearby Daniel Island in Berkeley County. Goose Creek is home to the Naval Weapons Station, which is part of the

Lowcountry’s largest employer, Joint Base Charleston. The Naval Weapons Station employs nearly 13,500. The base is the command center for the U.S. Navy’s Nuclear Power Training program. Other major employers in Goose Creek include aluminum manufacturers Alcoa Mount Holly and JW Aluminum, and lighting manufacturer Quoizel Lighting. Quoizel, founded in 1930 in New York, relocated its headquarters to a state-of-the-art 500,000-square-foot facility in Goose Creek. Google built a $600 million data center in 2008 in Mount Holly, which is between Goose Creek and Moncks Corner. In 2013, the Internet search engine announced it would invest another $600 million to build a second data center. In addition to creating jobs, Google has committed to playing a positive role in each of the communities where it operates facilities. Google’s website states it has given $932,000 to schools and nonprofits in South Carolina since 2009. It also awarded a $167,000 WiFi grant to Goose Creek to help implement a free WiFi network downtown. The WiFi network was incorporated into the redevelopment of Central Avenue downtown and complements improvements such as new sidewalks, buried power lines and street lamps. The improvements have been funded through tax dollars set aside to encourage growth in the area. Photo/Courtesy of City of Goose Creek


Liv ing IN N o r th ch a rl esto n

Living IN G oo se Creek


Sports & Recreation City of Charleston Recreation Department, p. 72 Charleston County Parks and Recreation Commission, p.73 North Charleston Parks and Recreation, p. 74 Mount Pleasant Recreation, p.75 /// Golf Courses, p. 76 /// Dog Parks, p. 77

Photo/Courtesy

» So many ways to have fun

70 | INTRO

Photo/Leslie Burden

• Sponsored by •

of CCPRC

O

ne of the best things about life in the Lowcountry is the myriad opportunities for outdoor activities. The weather is good most all year, and sports and recreational activities are there for the taking. You can join an organized team or take up an individual activity, such as kayaking or paddle boarding. Every community in the Charleston area has a welldeveloped sports and recreation program. In the pages that follow, we tell you about the recreation offerings for each city and town, with some of the highlights of the year. There is also a listing of other recreational possibilities beyond the municipal departments, such as bocce, roller derby or rugby. So, pick your favorite and get out there and enjoy yourself!


Liv ing IN N o r th ch a rl esto n


S P ORTS AND R ECR EAT I ON

City of Charleston Recreation Department » 823 Meeting St., Charleston, SC 29403 Laurie Yarbrough, director www.charlestoncity.info/recreation For an interactive map of city parks, go to www.charleston-sc.gov/interactivemap The City of Charleston Recreation Department serves downtown Charleston, James Island/ Folly Beach, Johns Island, West Ashley and Daniel Island.

» Sports offered: Soccer, tennis, football, baseball, softball, basketball, track, cross country, golf, fitness, wrestling, lacrosse, volleyball, aquatics, karate

» O  ther activities: Cheerleading, gymnastics, double dutch, camps, dance, yoga, cooking, art, environmental education, therapeutic recreation, bocce, bowling, Ultimate Frisbee, fencing

Top three citywide events of the year:

» E aster Eggstravaganza: held near Easter; egg hunt, activities, games, refreshments, Hampton Park

» C  elebration of Summer: mid-July; camps celebrate the end of summer camp with a themed party, Hampton Park

» T rick or Treat in the Park: just before Halloween; wear costumes and trick or treat at decorated cars; Hampton Park

A few places to check out Park hours are dawn to dusk unless otherwise posted. Some of the city’s popular parks are:

» H azel Parker Community Center and Playground 70 E. Bay St. camps, tennis and adult fitness

» B ees Landing Recreation Complex 580 Ashley Gardens Blvd. offering sports, arts and fitness

» James Island Recreation Complex 1088 Quail Drive camps and classes, and sports for all ages

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I

n the Lowcountry, outdoor living is a special draw. You can go surfing, kayaking, fishing or biking – all in the same weekend. But outdoor recreation is just the start. When you move your family to a new community, a concern may be whether your new hometown offers the sports and recreational activities your family enjoys. In the Lowcountry, you will find most activities are available, even some you might not expect, such as lacrosse and ice hockey. This section includes a listing of the offerings by the major parks and recreation departments in the area. The largest are City of Charleston, Mount Pleasant and North Charleston, but smaller departments such as Summerville and Isle of Palms also have a lot to offer. While recreation departments are set up to serve the residents of their communities, most allow non-residents to register for programs for

an added fee. Charleston County Parks and Recreation provides mostly individual parkbased activities, such as kayaking, climbing and water parks. The county program does run team sports in some of the rural areas that aren’t served by another department. Most parks offer programs for all ages, from preschool to senior adults. In general, permits are required to hold an event in a park; check with the local parks department to see what is needed. And if your interest runs to college or professional sports, the Charleston area has a lot to offer. Charleston Southern University, The Citadel and College of Charleston all have standout sports programs. The Lowcountry is home to three professional teams: the Charleston RiverDogs (baseball), a member of the New York Yan-


S P O RT S A N D RECREATION Photo/Courtesy of Kiawah Island Partners

Charleston County Parks and Recreation Commission » 861 Riverland Drive, Charleston 29412 843-795-4386 Tom O’Rourke, executive director www.ccprc.com A clickable map is available at www.ccprc.com/index.aspx?NID=8 Charleston County Parks and Recreation Commission provides park and recreation services but does not duplicate services provided by municipalities and other special recreation districts. The county commission has developed a countywide park system that emphasizes individual and family activities such as outdoor recreation, environmental education and public beach access. Charleston County Parks and Recreation runs rural recreation sports programs in areas not otherwise served at McClellanville (Lincoln High School), Johns Island (St. John’s High School) and Hollywood (Baptist Hill High School).

Photo/Courtesy of Family Circle Cup

Photo/Courtesy of The Sting Rays

» A ctivities: Summer camps, water parks, climbing wall, geocache parties, community education classes, group and corporate services, nature and history programs, outdoor adventure, youth and school programs, swimming lessons and water safety

Top events:

» H oliday Festival of Lights: kees farm system; the Charleston Battery (soccer) of the United Soccer Leagues; and the Carolina Stingrays (hockey), a member of the East Coast Hockey League affiliated with the Boston Bruins and Providence Bruins. And one more thing: The Family Circle Cup tennis tournament brings women’s tennis greats to Daniel Island every spring. For outdoor fun, Folly Beach is considered a top surfing destination on the East Coast, and you can check conditions at its storied “Washout” via webcam. Kayaking is a longtime favorite, in the blackwater rivers and swamps or quieter areas of Charleston Harbor. Outfitters along Shem Creek in Mount Pleasant cater to locals and tourists alike. Recreational boating and sailing are a local passion. Sailing has been popular since antebellum days. Each April hundreds of sailors take to Charleston Harbor

for Charleston Race Week, sponsored by the Charleston Ocean Racing Association. Deep sea fishing charters are available from Shem Creek and other locations. Locals fish off piers at Folly Beach or the Memorial Waterfront Park in Mount Pleasant, or net crabs in tidal creeks. Running has grown in popularity since the founding of the Cooper River Bridge Run in 1978. The Bridge Run takes place each April, attracting world-class 10K runners and tens of thousands of amateur athletes and walkers. The race begins in Shem Creek and finishes in downtown Charleston. The area’s flat roads make for fast cycling. The Lowcountry hosts a series of popular cycling events, including group rides and races. So, test out your old favorites or try something new. It’s all here.

family event held in November and December, James Island County Park Pet Fest: exhibits, demonstrations, experts, entertainment, competitions, held in April, Mount Pleasant Palmetto Islands County Park Charleston Sprint Triathlon Series: swim 600-yard freshwater lake; bike 12 miles; run 5K; separate dates in May, June, July and August; James Island County Park

» 

» 

A few places to check out Some of the most popular parks are » James Island County Park 871 Riverland Drive, James Island camping, challenge course, climbing wall, water park » CawCaw Nature and History Interpretive Center 5200 Savannah Highway, Ravenel » Folly Beach Fishing Pier 101 E. Arctic Ave., Folly Beach » Mount Pleasant Pier 71 Harry Hallman Blvd.

   

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S P ORTS AND R ECR EAT I ON Photo/Courtesy of College of Charleston

North Charleston Parks and Recreation » P.O. Box 190016

North Charleston, S.C. 29419 843-740-5814 Ed Barfield, recreation director www.northcharleston.org

North Charleston Parks and Recreation serves the city of North Charleston.

» Sports offered: Softball, baseball, tennis, basketball, football, soccer, wrestling, volleyball, track and field

» A ctivities: adult and senior fitness, after-school programs, aquatics, camps, ceramics, dance, disc golf, cheerleading

Top events:

» Senior Softball Classic: one of the largest tournaments on the East Coast, held in April

» Youth Pitch, Hit and Run: local competition held in April; winners advance to sectional competition

A few places to check out Among North Charleston’s gems are:

» R iverfront Park 1001 Everglades Drive on the Cooper River Beautiful views, a performance pavilion and meadow

» P ark Circle Butterfly Garden adjacent to Felix C. Davis Community Center 4800 Park Circle Butterflies and plants, picnics, walking paths

Other parks and recreation departments Isle of Palms Parks and Recreation 24 28th Ave., Isle of Palms, SC 29451 www.iop.net This department serves the Isle of Palms with basketball, volleyball, soccer and softball. Also offered are fitness, dance, karate, gymnastics, and camps. Events include the Sand Sculpting Contest, held each June; annual yard sale; Doggie Day at the Rec; the IOP Beach Run and the IOP Connector Run/Walk. 74 | INTRO

The College of Charleston Sailing Center www.sailing.cofc.edu features a fleet of over 53 boats.

Hanahan Recreation and Parks 1255 Yeamans Hall Road, Hanahan, SC 29410 www.cityofhanahan.com The department serves people of all ages in the city of Hanahan. Offered are basketball, football, flag football, baseball, softball, soccer, volleyball, wrestling, as well as T-ball, cheerleading, tumbling, camps and fitness. Summerville Parks and Recreation 843-851-5211 www.summerville.sc.us Among the sports offered are softball,

baseball, tennis, football and soccer. The town has a major sports center, the Jerry Blackwell Sports Complex, at 515 W. Boundary St. Also unique is the Sawmill Branch Canal Trail, a seven-mile trail through town. Goose Creek Recreation 843-569-4242 www.goosecreekrecreation.com Goose Creek Recreation serves residents with offerings at Goose Creek Community Center and Casey Community Center. Activities offered include baseball, T-ball, softball, golf, basketball, volleyball, football,

cheerleading, soccer, tennis, aquatics, fitness, gymnastics, yoga, art, music and karate. Moncks Corner Recreation Department 118 Carolina Ave., Moncks Corner 843-719-7900 The recreation department offers baseball, T-ball, football, soccer, basketball and softball. The town broke ground on a 52-acre recreation complex in 2011, with the first phase, including lighted ball fields and walking trails, expected to be complete by fall of 2013.


S P O RT S A N D S ERECREATION CTION NA ME Photo/Leslie Burden

Mount Pleasant Recreation » 391 Egypt Road, Mount Pleasant 29464 843-884-2528, ext. 109 Ken Ayoub, director www.tompsc.com Mount Pleasant Recreation Department serves the town of Mount Pleasant.

Other Sports and Rec Sports Event Organizers, Volunteer Groups, Training Resources and Sports Facilities

» ARENA SPORTS

» FENCING Low Country Fencers and The Dueling Society of Charleston www.fencing.net

Arena City Soccer and Sports: http://site.arenacitysoccerandsports.com

» FOX HUNTING

» BADMINTON

» GYMNASTICS

Middleton Place Hounds Hunt Club www.middletonplacehounds.com

Charleston Badminton Group www.badmintoncharleston.com

Gymnastics Training Center www.charleston-gymnastics.com

» BEACH VOLLEYBALL

» HIKING

Charleston Beach Volleyball & Social Club: www.charlestonvolleyball.net

West Ashley Greenway Bike/Hike Trail http://www.sctrails.net/Trails/ MAPS/WAshGrnway%20map.html

» BOCCE

» ICE HOCKEY /SKATING

Charleston Bocce League www.bocceleague.com/Charleston. html

» BOXING

Carolina Ice Palace www.carolinaicepalace.com. Figure Skating Club of Charleston www.fscofcharleston.com

» KITEBOARDING

» ROCK CLIMBING (WALLS) Charleston County PRC ccprc.com Coastal Climbing coastalclimbing.com

» ROLLER DERBY Lowcountry Highrollers Women’s Derby team http://www.lowcountryhighrollers. com/ » RUGBY

» DODGEBALL

Charleston Sports & Social Club www.charlestonssc.com Arena City Soccer Sports http://site.arenacitysoccerandsports.com

» DOG SPORTS Low Country Dog Agility Club www.lowcountrydogagility.com

» POLO

Charleston Polo Club www.charlestonpolo.net Carolina Polo & Carriage Company; www.cpcc.com Hyde Park Polo Club hydeparkpoloclub.com

activities; at Alhambra Park

» B lessing of the Fleet and Seafood Festival: held in April; blessing of the fleet ceremony, boat parade, seafood sampling, music, arts and crafts; Memorial Waterfront Park

Places to check out

» SURFING

» OCEAN RACING Charleston Ocean Racing Association www.charlestonoceanracing.org

» Spring Carnival: held in May, children’s

» STAND UP PADDLE BOARD-

» LACROSSE

» MARTIAL ARTS Charleston Martial Arts http://chas-ma.com

Top events:

» M  ount Pleasant Junior Regatta: late sum-

» DANCE

Charleston Miracle League www.charlestonmiracleleague.org Special Olympics of the Lowcountry www.facebook.com/solowcountry Summerville Miracle League www.summervillemiracleleague.org

music, aquatics, kayaking, dance, skate park

» SCUBA DIVING Charleston Diving www.charlestondiving.com ING Charleston SUP Nation www.meetup.com/supnation

» DISABLED SPORTS

» A lso: Camps, art, therapeutic recreation,

» O  ld Village 5K Run, Walk,

SC Kiteboarding catchsomeair.us

Charleston Hurricanes Men’s Lacrosse Club www.eteamz.com/charlestonhurricanes Lowcountry Lacrosse Youth League (LLYL) www.mtpleasantrec.com

golf, soccer, softball, track, cross country, football, lacrosse, wrestling

Charleston Outlaws Rugby Football Club www.charlestonrugby.com Hurricanes Women RFC www.charlestonwomensrugby.org

Hurricane Boxing Club http://www.boxinggyms.com/hurricane.htm Ballroom Dance Club of Charleston www.ballroomdancecharleston.org Charleston Shag Club www.charlestonshagclub.com Islanders Shag Club www.islandersshagclub.com

» Sports offered: Tennis, baseball, basketball,

Southern South Carolina/Eastern Surfing Association http://ssc.surfesa.org

» ULTIMATE FRISBEE Charleston Ultimate Players Association www.charlestonultimate.net » UNDERWATER HOCKEY Charleston Blockaderunners www.charlestonblockaderunners. teamopolis.com

Stroller and Dog Jog: held in November starting at Alhambra Park; for all ages

mer, Hobcaw Yacht Club

Some of Mount Pleasant’s best-loved parks are:

» A lhambra Park 131 Middle St. Reception hall, waterfront green space, playground.

» M  ount Pleasant Memorial Waterfront Park 99 Harry Hallman Blvd. Waterfront park under the grand entryway into town. Beautiful views of Charleston; picnic space; playground.

» WAKEBOARDING & WATERSKIING Trophy Lakes Watersports Center www.trophylakes.com Source: Charleston Area Sports Commission

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S P ORTS AND R ECR EAT I ON Photo/Courtesy of Kiawah Island Partners

18

Golf Courses Berkeley

Charleston

» Berkeley Country Club at Exeter Plantation 772 Exeter Plantation Road Moncks Corner, SC 29461 Semiprivate 843-761-4653 www.berkeleycc.com

» Beresford Creek course at Daniel Island Club 600 Island Park Drive Daniel Island, SC 29492 Private, with event facilities 843-971-3555 www.danielislandclub.com

» Crowfield Golf & Country Club 300 Hamlet Circle Goose Creek, SC 29445 Public 843-764-4618 www.crowfieldgolf.com

» Bulls Bay Golf Club 995 Bulls Bay Blvd. Awendaw, SC 29429 Private 843-881-2223, ext. 14 www.bullsbaygolf.com

» Redbank Plantation Golf Course 2316 Redbank Road Goose Creek, SC 29445 Private 843-764-7802 www.facebook.com/redbankplantationgolfcourse

» Cassique 100 Old Cedar Lane Seabrook Island, SC 29455 Private 843-768-5752 www.kiawahislandclub.com

» Yeamans Hall Club 900 Yeamans Hall Road Hanahan, SC 29410 Private 843-747-8855 www.yeamanshallclub.com 76 | INTRO

» Charleston Municipal Golf Course 2110 Maybank Highway Charleston, SC 29412 Public 843-795-6517 www.charleston-sc.gov/golf

» Charleston National Golf Club 1360 National Drive Mount Pleasant, SC 29466 Semiprivate 843-884-4653 www.charlestonnationalgolf.com

» Crooked Oaks Golf Course 3772 Seabrook Island Road Seabrook Island, SC 29455 Private, with event facilities 843-768-2529 www.discoverseabrook.com

» Coosaw Creek Country Club 4110 Club Course Drive North Charleston, SC 29420 Semiprivate, with event facilities 843-767-9000 www.coosawcreek.com

» Dunes West Golf Club 3535 Wando Plantation Way Mount Pleasant, SC 29466 Semiprivate, with event facilities 843-856-9000 www.duneswestgolfclub.com

» Cougar Point Golf Club, Kiawah Island Golf Resort 1 Sanctuary Beach Drive Kiawah Island, SC 29455 Resort, with event facilities 843-266-4020 www.kiawahresort.com

» The Golf Club at Briar’s Creek 4000 Briar’s Creek Lane Johns Island, SC 29455 Private 843-768-3050 www.briarscreek.com

» Country Club of Charleston 1 Country Club Drive Charleston, SC 29412 Private 843-795-2312 www.countryclubofcharleston.com

» The Links at Stono Ferry 4812 Stono Links Drive Hollywood, SC 29449 Semiprivate, with event facilities 843-763-1817 www.stonoferrygolf.com


S P O RT S A N D RECREATION Photo/Courtesy of Kiawah Island Partners

» Ralston Creek at

» Wild Dunes

Daniel Island Club 600 Island Park Drive Charleston, SC 29492 Private, with event facilities 843-971-3555 www.danielislandclub.com

» The Ocean Course at Kiawah Island Golf Resort 1000 Ocean Course Drive Kiawah Island, SC 29455 Resort, with event facilities 843-266-4670 www.kiawahresort.com

» RiverTowne Country Club

Resort Links Course 5757 Palm Blvd. Isle of Palms, SC 29451 Semiprivate resort, with event facilities 843-886-2002 www.wilddunes.com

1700 RiverTowne Country Club Drive Mount Pleasant, SC 29466 Semiprivate, with event facilities 843-849-2400, ext. 2419 www.rivertownecountryclub.com

» Wrenwoods Golf Club 100 Cusabee Trail, No. 601 Joint Base Charleston, SC 29404 Semiprivate 843-963-1833 www.jbcharleston.com/wrenwoods-home

» Ocean Winds Golf Course

» Shadowmoss Plantation Golf Club 20 Dunvegan Drive Charleston, SC 29414 Semiprivate, with event facilities 843-556-8251 www.shadowmossgolf.com

Dorchester

3772 Seabrook Island Road Seabrook Island, SC 29455 Private, with event facilities 843-768-2529 www.discoverseabrook.com

» Osprey Point at Kiawah Island Golf Resort 1 Sanctuary Beach Drive Kiawah Island, SC 29455 Resort, with event facilities 843-266-4640 www.kiawahresort.com

» Snee Farm Country Club

» Patriots Point Links

» Turtle Point at Kiawah

1200 Club Drive Mount Pleasant, SC 29464 Private, with event facilities 843-884-8571 www.sneefarmcc.com

on Charleston Harbor 1 Patriots Point Road Mount Pleasant, SC 29464 Public, with event facilities 843-881-0042 www.patriotspointlinks.com

Island Golf Resort 1 Turtle Point Drive Kiawah Island, SC 29455 Resort, with event facilities 843-266-4050 www.kiawahresort.com

» The Plantation

» Wild Dunes

Course at Edisto 19 Fairway Drive Edisto Beach, SC 29438 Public, with event facilities 843-869-1111 www.theplantationcourseatedisto. com

Resort Harbor Course 5881 Palm Blvd. Isle of Palms, SC 29451 Public resort, with event facilities 843-886-2004 www.wilddunes.com

» The Golf Club at Wescott Plantation 5000 Wescott Club Drive Summerville, SC 29485 Public, with event facilities 843-871-2135 www.wescottgolf.com

» Legend Oaks Golf Club

118 Legend Oaks Way Summerville, SC 29485 Semiprivate, with event facilities 843-821-4077 www.legendoaksgolf.com

» Pine Forest Country Club

1000 Congressional Blvd. Summerville, SC 29483 Public 843-851-1193 www.pineforestcountryclub.com

» Summerville Country Club (Miler Golf Course) 400 Country Club Blvd. Summerville, SC 29483 Semiprivate, with event facilities 843-873-2210 www.summervillecountryclub.com

Photo/Courtesy of CCPRC

» Oak Point at Kiawah Island Golf Resort 4394 Hope Plantation Drive Kiawah Island, SC 29455 Resort, with event facilities 843-266-4100 www.kiawahresort.com

Dog Parks If you’ve brought your best friend along with you, you won’t want to leave him out of the fun. Here are some parks set up expressly for dogs and their owners. City of Charleston

Ackerman Park Dog Run, 55 Sycamore Drive Hampton Park Dog Run, corner of Rutledge Avenue and Grove Street Hazel Parker Dog Run, 70 E. Bay St. All dogs must be supervised at all times and may not be left unattended at any time.

Charleston County

James Island County Park, 871 Riverland Drive North Charleston Wannamaker County Park, 8888 University Blvd. Mount Pleasant Palmetto Islands County Park, 444 Needlerush Parkway All dogs must be up to date on vaccinations and must be under their owners’ supervision at all times.

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harleston loves to eat well The view is beautiful, the things to do are fun, the beach beckons – but soon after you get here (maybe even before), you’ll find yourself hungry. And luckily, there’s a world of good food to choose from. The signature dish of Charleston may be shrimp and grits. It’s so popular that most every restaurant has its own version, sometimes in a tomato sauce, other times in a cream sauce. The shrimp will be fresh from the sea and the grits ground in a nearby mill. It makes a filling meal that marries the two flavors perfectly. If grits aren’t on your menu of likes, then you might like to try Lowcountry boil. This hefty stew generally includes shrimp, sausage, corn and potatoes, but once again, everybody has their own version. Some recipes include oysters, fish or mussels, depending on the season. In any event, when the concoction is turned hot and steaming out onto a sideboard, you’ll find 78 | INTRO

your mouth watering. Speaking of oysters, there’s no better season of the year than oyster season – late fall through March – in our opinion. The plump bivalves roasted outside are the food of the gods. There’s just enough work involved to get them out of the shell. Immediately, you feel a connection to the sea. Seafood not your favorite? Then head out for barbecue. South Carolinians lay claim to originating mustard-based sauce, but many places offer a variety including vinegar-based and tomatoladen. The slow-smoked meat is the most important factor anyway. If your passion is fried chicken, then you’re in luck. Southern home cooking restaurants and even pickup places pride themselves on the tastiness of their chicken. And you’ll want to pair it with fresh biscuits and sweet tea. Charleston is home to dozens of topnotch restaurants. Eating out or meeting friends for drinks is treated with rever-

Photo/Leslie Burden

Dining Out C

ence here. Whenever there’s a contest for the best city for food, Charleston is in the running. If you’re feeling like something more casual, we’ve got that too. There’s no shortage of bar and grill, coffee shop and drive-in eateries. And you won’t have to look far for foodrelated events. The Charleston Wine and Food Festival and Taste of Charleston are just two of many.


Dining out Photo/Leslie Burden

Photo/Courtesy of Boone Hall Oyster Festival

Photo/Courtesy of Boone Hall Oyster Festival

Photo/Courtesy of Kiawah Island Partners

Opposite page: James Beard award-winning chef Sean Brock of Husk Restaurant Above left: The Lowcountry Oyster Festival is a perennial favorite of locals and visitors alike. Photo/Courtesy of Vendue Inn

Above right: Itâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s not all highbrow. The Diggity Doughnuts food truck purveys four-wheel smiles. Center left: Charleston is recognized as a world-class culinary destination. Center right: Our world class chefs strut their stuff at the annual Taste of Charleston. Bottom left: Donâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;t forget an old-fashioned Southern breakfast to get you started.

INTRO | 79


Places to Stay

C

harleston is a top travel destination – and that means plenty of places to stay the night when you’re visiting. You’ll find rooms available at historic inns and bed and breakfasts, beachfront resorts and everything in between. Wake to the sound of the ocean or the sight of yachts in the harbor. The Charleston area has the perfect accommodations for you and your family, whatever your needs.

And should you want to plan your wedding in Charleston, as hundreds of people do every year, there’s a whole list of possible venues awaiting you. They are also available for family reunions, meetings or conferences. In these pages, we give you a comprehensive list of hotels in the area, starting with those with the largest number of rooms. You’ll also find a list of the area’s alternative and outdoor venues for events.

Hotels

For more lists subscribe to:

Properties in the Charleston Area, Ranked by No. of Rooms Property Charleston Place 205 Meeting St. Charleston, SC 29401 Charleston Marriott 170 Lockwood Blvd. Charleston, SC 29403 Sheraton Charleston Airport Hotel 4770 Goer Drive North Charleston, SC 29406 Embassy Suites Airport/Convention Center 5055 International Blvd. North Charleston, SC 29418 The Sanctuary 1 Sanctuary Beach Drive Kiawah Island, SC 29455 Wild Dunes Resort 5757 Palm Blvd. Isle of Palms, SC 29451 Francis Marion Hotel 387 King St. Charleston, SC 29403 The Mills House Wyndham Grand Hotel 115 Meeting St. Charleston, SC 29401 DoubleTree by Hilton Hotel & Suites 181 Church St. Charleston, SC 29401 Courtyard Charleston Waterfront 35 Lockwood Drive Charleston, SC 29401 La Quinta Inn Riverview 11 Ashley Pointe Drive Charleston, SC 29407 Hampton Inn Charleston Historic District 345 Meeting St. Charleston, SC 29403 Hilton Garden Inn Charleston Airport 5265 International Blvd. North Charleston, SC 29418 Crowne Plaza Charleston Airport Convention Center 4831 Tanger Outlet Blvd. North Charleston, SC 29418 Renaissance Charleston Hotel Historic District 68 Wentworth St. Charleston, SC 29401 Radisson Hotel Charleston Airport 5991 Rivers Ave. North Charleston, SC 29406 Holiday Inn Charleston-Mount Pleasant 250 Johnnie Dodds Blvd. Mount Pleasant, SC 29464

www.CharlestonBusiness.com

Phone / Website Email

Rooms / Mtg. Rooms / Avg. Corp. Rate

843-722-4900 www.charlestonplace.com INP 843-723-3000 www.marriottcharleston.com mhrs.chsmc.sales@marriott.com 888-747-1900 www.sheratoncharleston.com INP 843-747-1882 www.embassysuitescharleston.com INP 843-768-6000 www.kiawahresort.com INP 843-886-6000 www.wilddunesmeetings.com groupsales@wilddunes.com 843-722-0600 www.francismarioncharleston.com info@thefrancismarion.com 843-577-2400 www.millshouse.com jayne.long@ihg.com 843-577-2644 www.charlestondoubletree.com INP 843-722-7229 www.marriott.com/chscy chscy@jhmhotels.com 843-556-5200 www.lq.com INP 843-723-4000 www.tinyurl.com/bpdrsv8 INP 843-308-9330 www.charlestonairport.stayhgi.com INP

440 32 $220 341 15 $139 289 14 $139 255 22 $169 255 15 $525 250 18 INP 235 14 INP 214 10 INP 212 10 $149 179 1 $119 175 INP INP 170 1 INP 168 7 $114

843-744-4422 www.crowneplaza.com/charlestonsc INP 843-534-0300 www.renaissancecharlestonhotel.com INP 843-744-2501 www.tinyurl.com/2azou4 INP 843-884-6000 www.himtpleasant.com INP

Sales Manager

General Manager / Year Founded

Free Wi-Fi, on-site restaurant, pool, 24-hour room service, fitness center, spa, business center

Charlie Wellman

Paul Stracey 1987

On-site restaurant, pool, fitness center, business center

Liza Edgerton

Patrick Rogers 2007

Free Wi-Fi, on-site restaurant, pool, airport shuttle, fitness center, business center On-site restaurant, pool, airport shuttle, fitness center, free breakfast, business center Free Wi-Fi, on-site restaurant, pool, 24-hour room service, airport shuttle, fitness center, spa, business center

INP

John Wong 1985

Wade Bryant

Peter Steketee 2000

Marty Couch

Bill Lacey 2004

Free Wi-Fi, on-site restaurant, pool, fitness center, spa, business center

Jody Harris

Frank Fredericks 1972

Free Wi-Fi, on-site restaurant, fitness center, spa, business center

Tressa Wright

Gayle Karolczyk 1924

Free Wi-Fi, on-site restaurant, pool, fitness center, business center

Tripp Hays

John Edwards 1853

On-site restaurant, fitness center, business center

Heidi Callahan

Michael Perry 1998

Free Wi-Fi, on-site restaurant, pool, fitness center, business center

Christine Greenleaf

J.R. Korst 1997

Free Wi-Fi, pool, fitness center, free breakfast, business center

INP

Brenda Peiper, Tony Sorrell 2007

Free Wi-Fi, pool, fitness center, free breakfast, business center

Tanya Reagor, Emily Zirpola

Kevin Eichman 1990

Free Wi-Fi, on-site restaurant, pool, airport shuttle, fitness center, business center

Jessica Bowman

Marcus Rogers 2002

166 4 $129

Free Wi-Fi, on-site restaurant, pool, airport shuttle, fitness center, business center

Cathy Mihalko

Mark Mitchell 2010

166 6 INP 159 6 $79 158 8 INP

On-site restaurant, pool, fitness center, business center

Susan Pearson

Brian Wander 2001

Free Wi-Fi, on-site restaurant, pool, 24-hour room service, airport shuttle, fitness center, business center

Stacie Lyman

Marzena Wyszynska 1977

Free Wi-Fi, on-site restaurant, pool, fitness center, business center

Amy Anderson, Sandra McLoone

Brian Rafferty 1988

INP=Information not provided. Because of space constraints, only the top-ranked companies are printed. For a full list of participating companies, visit www.scbiznews.com/data. Although every effort is made to ensure accuracy, errors sometimes occur. Email additions or corrections to lists@scbiznews.com, fax to 843-531-5402 or go to www.tinyurl.com/joinourlists.

80 | INTRO

Hotel Amenities

Researched by Business Journal staff


P laces to stay

Hotels

For more lists subscribe to:

Properties in the Charleston Area, Ranked by No. of Rooms Property Embassy Suites Historic Charleston 337 Meeting St. Charleston, SC 29403 Holiday Inn Express Charleston Downtown Ashley River 146 Lockwood Blvd. Charleston, SC 29403-5123 Residence Inn Charleston Airport 5035 International Blvd. North Charleston, SC 29418 The Village at Wild Dunes 5757 Palm Blvd. Isle of Palms, SC 29451 Holiday Inn Charleston Airport & Convention Center 5264 International Blvd. North Charleston, SC 29418 Aloft Charleston Airport & Convention Center 4875 Tanger Outlet Blvd. North Charleston, SC 29405 Tides Folly Beach 1 Center St. Folly Beach, SC 29439 Courtyard by Marriott Charleston-Mount Pleasant 1251 Woodland Ave. Mount Pleasant, SC 29464 Town & Country Inn & Suites 2008 Savannah Highway Charleston, SC 29407 Homewood Suites by Hilton Charleston Convention Center/Airport 5048 International Blvd. Charleston, SC 29418 Hyatt Place Charleston Airport/Convention Center 3234 W. Montague Ave. North Charleston, SC 29418 Charleston Harbor Resort & Marina 20 Patriots Point Road Mount Pleasant, SC 29464 Courtyard Charleston Coliseum 2415 Mall Drive North Charleston, SC 29412 SpringHill Suites by Marriott Downtown/Riverview 98 Ripley Point Drive Charleston, SC 29407 Home2 Suites by Hilton 3401 W. Montague Ave. North Charleston, SC 29418 Hampton Inn & Suites Charleston/West Ashley 678 Citadel Haven Drive Charleston, SC 29414 Hampton Inn & Suites Mount Pleasant/Isle of Palms 1104 Isle of Palms Connector Mount Pleasant, SC 29464 Holiday Inn Charleston Historic Downtown 425 Meeting St. Charleston, SC 29403 Residence Inn by Marriott Charleston Riverview 90 Ripley Point Drive Charleston, SC 29407 Quality Inn 7415 Northside Drive North Charleston, SC 29420 Holiday Inn Express & Suites Mount Pleasant 350 Johnnie Dodds Blvd. Mount Pleasant, SC 29464 Hampton Inn & Suites North Charleston/University Blvd. 2688 Fernwood Drive North Charleston, SC 26406 Hyatt Place North Charleston 7331 Mazyck Road North Charleston, SC 29406 Homewood Suites by Hilton Charleston / Mount Pleasant 1998 Riviera Drive Mount Pleasant, SC 29464

www.CharlestonBusiness.com

Phone / Website Email

Rooms / Mtg. Rooms / Avg. Corp. Rate

Hotel Amenities

Sales Manager

General Manager / Year Founded

843-723-6900 www.tinyurl.com/cnrwsrq INP

153 8 $169

Free Wi-Fi, on-site restaurant, pool, fitness center, free breakfast, business center

Dianne Parker, Emily Zirpola, Stephanie Massey

Donna Ford 1996

843-722-4000 www.charlestonhiexpress.com gm@charlestonhiexpress.com

153 1 INP

Free Wi-Fi, pool, fitness center, free breakfast, business center

Derek Astorino, Shannon Bevill

Rebecca Ruttiger 2013

843-266-3434 www.marriott.com/chsno INP 866-499-7142 www.wilddunesmeetings.com INP 843-576-0300 www.holidayinn.com/chastnairport INP 843-566-7300 www.aloftcharlestonairport.com sales@aloftcharlestonairport.com 843-588-6464 www.tidesfollybeach.com INP 843-284-0900 www.marriott.com/chscm juliana.shores@marriott.com 843-571-1000 www.thetownandcountryinn.com sales@thetownandcountryinn.com

150 4 INP 150 15 INP 142 5 $123 136 1 $99 132 5 INP 130 4 $139 129 6 $98

Free Wi-Fi, pool, airport shuttle, fitness center, free breakfast, business center, in-room kitchen Free Wi-Fi, on-site restaurant, pool, fitness center, spa, business center, in-room kitchen Free Wi-Fi, on-site restaurant, pool, airport shuttle, fitness center, business center

Alma Deveaux

John Masters 2004

Jody Harris

Frank Fredericks 2008

Betsay Painter

Daniel Blumenstock 2006

Jing Butler

Steve Spear 2008

Hope Johnston

Ken Merkel 1985

Ashley B. Miller

Cheryl M. Craven 2007

Free Wi-Fi, on-site restaurant, pool, fitness center

Stephen P. Clarke, Erin T. England

Demetrius E. Palassis 1984

843-735-5000 www.tinyurl.com/cbvonaw INP

128 4 INP

Free Wi-Fi, pool, airport shuttle, fitness center, free breakfast, business center, in-room kitchen

Josette Knisley

Cori Lovern 2008

843-302-8600 www.charlestonairport.place.hyatt.com INP 843-856-0028 www.charlestonharborresort.com reservations@charlestonharborresort.com 843-747-9122 www.marriott.com/chscn INP 843-571-1711 www.marriott.com/chssh julie.gerthoffer@fowlerhospitality.com 843-744-4202 http://home2suites3.hilton.com home2charleston@lbaproperties.com 843-573-1200 www.tinyurl.com/cqdaoga INP 843-856-3900 www.tinyurl.com/crnzoat erica.davis2@hilton.com 843-718-2327 www.stayincharleston.com sales@hihistoric.com 843-571-7979 www.marriott.com/chsri julie.gerthoffer@fowlerhospitality.com 843-572-6677 www.choicehotels.com/hotels/sc276 qualityinnssc276@yahoo.com 843-375-2600 www.hiemtpleasant.com INP

127 2 $119 125 9 $149 123 2 INP 123 2 $129 122 INP $119 121 3 $139 121 3 INP 120 3 $149 119 1 $137 118 1 $60 116 1 $89

Free Wi-Fi, restaurant, pool, airport shuttle, fitness center, free breakfast, business center

Jennifer Arnold

Vicki Wilkins 2010

Free Wi-Fi, on-site restaurant, pool, business center

Tracy Mitchell

Oliver Rooskens 1997

INP

Kevin Rhoton 1999

Julie Gerthoffer

Jennifer Hill 1999

Tom Brinkerhoff

Matthew Bartlett 2011

Free Wi-Fi, pool, fitness center, free breakfast, business center

Megan Owen

Chris Wernham 2001

Free Wi-Fi, pool, fitness center, free breakfast, business center

Erica Davis, Jennifer Hastey

John Boyd 1999

Free Wi-Fi, on-site restaurant, pool, fitness center, business center Free Wi-Fi, pool, fitness center, free breakfast, business center, in-room kitchen

Jewel Wellmon Oxner

David Nimmo 2013

Julie Gerthoffer

Rick Buggle 2000

Free Wi-Fi, pool, free breakfast, business center

Peggy Hyatt

Baiju Gajjar 2005

Free Wi-Fi, pool, fitness center, free breakfast, business center

Marianne McNeeley

Steve Lavelle 2009

843-735-7500 www.tinyurl.com/ctamrw3 INP

115 2 INP

Free Wi-Fi, pool, fitness center, free breakfast, business center

Tom Brinkerhoff

Anthony Smith 2009

843-735-7100 www.northcharleston.place.hyatt.com adrienne.jones@hyatt.com

113 2 $119

Free Wi-Fi, on-site restaurant, pool, fitness center, free breakfast, business center

Adrienne Jones

Marsha Ellsworth 2010

843-881-6950 www.tinyurl.com/c9pefr9 chshw_gm@hilton.com

107 2 INP

Free Wi-Fi, pool, airport shuttle, fitness center, free breakfast, business center, in-room kitchen

Franny Russell

Jennifer LaRue 2002

INP=Information not provided. Because of space constraints, only the top-ranked companies are printed. For a full list of participating companies, visit www.scbiznews.com/data. Although every effort is made to ensure accuracy, errors sometimes occur. Email additions or corrections to lists@scbiznews.com, fax to 843-531-5402 or go to www.tinyurl.com/joinourlists.

Free Wi-Fi, pool, airport shuttle, fitness center, business center Free Wi-Fi, on-site restaurant, pool, fitness center, business center Free Wi-Fi, on-site restaurant, pool, fitness center, business center

Free Wi-Fi, on-site restaurant, pool, airport shuttle, fitness center, business center Free Wi-Fi, pool, fitness center, free breakfast, business center, in-room kitchen Free Wi-Fi, pool, airport shuttle, fitness center, free breakfast, business center, in-room kitchen

Researched by Business Journal staff

INTRO | 81


P laces to stay

Hotels

For more lists subscribe to:

Properties in the Charleston Area, Ranked by No. of Rooms Property Quality Inn & Suites at Patriots Point 196 Patriots Point Road Mount Pleasant, SC 29464 Fairfield Inn & Suites Charleston Airport/Convention Center 4841 Tanger Outlet Blvd. North Charleston, SC 29418 Hampton Inn Charleston North 7424 Northside Drive North Charleston, SC 29420 Holiday Inn Express & Suites Charleston-Ashley Phosphate 7670 Northwoods Blvd. North Charleston, SC 29406 Wingate by Wyndham at Charleston Southern University 9280 University Blvd. North Charleston, SC 29406 Residence Inn Charleston North 7457 Northside Drive North Charleston, SC 29420 The Boardwalk Inn at Wild Dunes Resort 5757 Palm Blvd. Isle of Palms, SC 29451 Best Western King Charles Inn 237 Meeting St. Charleston, SC 29401 Residence Inn by Marriott Charleston Mount Pleasant 1116 Isle of Palms Connector Mount Pleasant, SC 29464 Best Western Sweetgrass Inn 1540 Savannah Highway Charleston, SC 29407 Country Inn & Suites 220 Holiday Drive Summerville, SC 29483 Holiday Inn Express-Moncks Corner 505 Rembert C. Dennis Blvd. Moncks Corner, SC 29461 The North Charleston Inn 2934 W. Montague Ave. North Charleston, SC 29418 Sleep Inn of Charleston 1524 Savannah Highway Charleston, SC 29407 Market Pavilion Hotel 225 East Bay St. Charleston, SC 29401 Sleep Inn North 7435 Northside Drive North Charleston, SC 29420 Vendue Inn 19 Vendue Range Charleston, SC 29401 Planters Inn 112 N. Market St. Charleston, SC 29401 Meeting Street Inn 173 Meeting St. Charleston, SC 29401 The Inn at Middleton Place 4290 Ashley River Road Charleston, SC 29414 HarbourView Inn 2 Vendue Range Charleston, SC 29401 French Quarter Inn 166 Church St. Charleston, SC 29401 Shem Creek Inn 1401 Shrimp Boat Lane Mount Pleasant, SC 29464 Fulton Lane Inn 202 King St. Charleston, SC 29401

www.CharlestonBusiness.com

Phone / Website Email

Rooms / Mtg. Rooms / Avg. Corp. Rate

Hotel Amenities

Sales Manager

General Manager / Year Founded

843-856-8817 www.choicehotels.com qisales@hgmhotels.com

103 2 $90

Free Wi-Fi, pool, free breakfast, business center

Lisa Crowley

Andrew Rhyne 1999

843-300-3100 www.marriott.com/chscs INP

102 2 $112

Free Wi-Fi, pool, airport shuttle, fitness center, free breakfast, business center

Jill Lovins

Dawn Wells 2010

843-820-2030 www.charlestonnorth.hamptoninn.com INP

102 1 $109

Free Wi-Fi, pool, fitness center, free breakfast, business center

Elaina England

INP 1999

843-553-1600 www.hiexpress.com/chastni-26 INP

98 1 INP

Free Wi-Fi, pool, fitness center, free breakfast, business center

Michelle Lewis

Cheryl Q. Clark 1999

843-553-4444 www.charlestonwingate.com gm@charlestonwingate.com

97 3 $89

Free Wi-Fi, pool, fitness center, free breakfast, business center

Nichole Felton

Ron Jaicks 2008

843-300-3636 www.residenceinncharlestonnorth.com INP 888-845-8880 www.wilddunesmeetings.com INP 843-723-7451 www.kingcharlesinn.com reservations@kingcharlesinn.com 843-881-1599 www.marriott.com/chsmp ashley.miller@marriott.com 843-571-6100 www.thesweetgrassinn.com brichards@charlestownehotels.com 843-285-9000 www.countryinns.com/summervillesc INP 843-761-5900 www.hiexpress.com/monckscorner INP 843-744-8281 www.northcharlestoninn.com jsiebold@charlestownehotels.com 843-556-6959 www.sleepinn.com/hotel/sc212 brichards@charlestownehotels.com 843-723-0500 www.marketpavilion.com INP 843-572-8400 www.sleepinn.com INP 843-577-7970 www.vendueinn.com INP 843-722-2345 www.plantersinn.com INP 843-723-1882 www.meetingstreetinn.com INP 843-556-0500 www.theinnatmiddletonplace.com INP 843-853-8439 www.harbourviewcharleston.com INP 843-722-1900 www.fqicharleston.com INP 843-881-1000 www.shemcreekinn.com rhemmen@charlestownehotels.com 843-720-2600 www.fultonlaneinn.com INP

96 1 $137 93 15 INP 91 INP $159 90 1 $159 87 INP $90 85 1 INP 84 1 $89 80 2 $60 74 INP $90 70 4 INP 68 0 INP 66 2 INP 64 2 $169 56 1 $129 54 1 $149 52 1 $199 50 2 $199 50 2 $129 45 2 $125

INP=Information not provided. Because of space constraints, only the top-ranked companies are printed. For a full list of participating companies, visit www.scbiznews.com/data. Although every effort is made to ensure accuracy, errors sometimes occur. Email additions or corrections to lists@scbiznews.com, fax to 843-531-5402 or go to www.tinyurl.com/joinourlists.

82 | INTRO

Free Wi-Fi, pool, airport shuttle, fitness center, free breakfast, Candace R. Pengra business center, in-room kitchen

Bill Carter, Candace Pengra 2012

Free Wi-Fi, on-site restaurant, pool, 24-hour room service

Jody Harris

Frank Fredericks 2006

Free Wi-Fi, pool, fitness center, business center

Casey Malmberg

Maureen Sheridan 1960

Free Wi-Fi, pool, fitness center, free breakfast, business center, in-room kitchen

Ashley B. Miller

Jennifer Bagwell 2002

Free Wi-Fi, pool, fitness center, free breakfast, business center

Bill Richards

Bill Richards 1982

Free Wi-Fi, pool, fitness center, free breakfast, business center

INP

Larry Smith 2004

Free Wi-Fi, pool, fitness center, free breakfast, business center

David Hansen

David Hansen 1997

Free Wi-Fi, pool, free breakfast, business center

Michele Holbert

Jimmy Siebold 1973

Free Wi-Fi, pool, fitness center, free breakfast, business center

Bill Richards

Bill Richards 2000

Free Wi-Fi, on-site restaurant, pool, fitness center, business center

Elania England

Gary Cohen 2002

Free Wi-Fi, airport shuttle, free breakfast, business center

Darrin Witt

Geoff Cipkala 2002

Free Wi-Fi, on-site restaurant, business center

INP

Ken Merkel 1975

Free Wi-Fi, on-site restaurant, business center

Rachel Sneed

Nick Saltmarsh 1912

Free Wi-Fi, free breakfast

Curt Saulisbury

Allen Johnson 1980

Free Wi-Fi, on-site restaurant, pool, free breakfast

INP

Abigail Martin 1987

Free Wi-Fi, free breakfast, business center

Karen Warley

Karen Warley 1998

Free Wi-Fi, on-site restaurant, free breakfast, business center

Karen Warley

Brent Gresham 2002

Free Wi-Fi, pool, free breakfast

Robbi Hemmen

Robbi Hemmen 1986

Free Wi-Fi, free breakfast

Jennifer Huber, Linn Lesesne

Lisa Anderson 1994

Researched by Business Journal staff


Alternative & Outdoor Event Venues Ranked by Maximum Capacity Venue Exchange Park 9850 U.S. Highway 78 Ladson, SC 29456 Charleston Maritime Center 10 Wharfside St. Charleston, SC 29401 Middleton Place 4300 Ashley River Road Charleston, SC 29414 Charleston Visitor Center & Bus Shed 375 Meeting St. Charleston, SC 29403 Candlelite Pavilion at Summerville Country Club 400 Country Club Blvd. Summerville, SC 29483 The Golf Club at Wescott Plantation 5000 Wescott Club Drive Summerville, SC 29485 Wild Dunes Resort 5757 Palm Blvd. Isle of Palms, SC 29451 St. James Church Event Center 1872 Camp Road Charleston, SC 29412 SpiritLine Cruises & Events 360 Concord St., Suite 201 Charleston, SC 29401 Founders Hall 1500 Old Towne Road Charleston, SC 29407 Legend Oaks Golf Club 118 Legend Oaks Way Summerville, SC 29485 RiverTowne Country Club 1700 RiverTowne Country Club Drive Mount Pleasant, SC 29466 The Wickliffe House 178 Ashley Ave. Charleston, SC 29403 Charleston Harbor Tours 32-C Laurens St. Charleston, SC 29401 Cypress Gardens 3030 Cypress Gardens Road Moncks Corner, SC 29461 Drayton Hall 3380 Ashley River Road Charleston, SC 29414 Legare Waring House 1500 Old Towne Road Charleston, SC 29407 The Citadel Beach House 4700 Palm Blvd. Isle of Palms, SC 29451 Carolina Girl Yacht 95 Ripley Point Drive Charleston, SC 29407 Cooper River Room 99 Harry Hallman Jr. Blvd. Mount Pleasant, SC 29464 Shadowmoss Plantation Golf Club 20 Dunvegan Drive Charleston, SC 29414 Sweetgrass Cultural Arts Pavilion 99 Harry Hallman Jr. Blvd. Mount Pleasant, SC 29464 Charleston Schooner Pride 360 Concord St. Charleston, SC 29401 Lowcountry Park Venues 423 King St. Charleston, SC 29403

For more lists subscribe to:

www.CharlestonBusiness.com

Phone / Website Email

Max. Capacity / Outdoor / Reception

Description

Top Local Official(s) / Year Founded

843-572-3161 www.exchangepark.org denise@exchangepark.org 843-853-3625 www.cmcevents.com olshinskia@charleston-sc.gov

50,000 50,000 50,000 4,000 4,000 450

Venue buildings, open land with pond, 70 acres of outside meeting space and 100 acres of parking space that can double as event space

Michael Carney, Denise Massey 1979

Downtown waterfront event and conference venue with space available for indoor and outdoor receptions and ceremonies; free parking available

Alysia Olshinski 1997

843-556-6020 www.middletonplace.org info@middletonplace.org

2,000 2,000 2,000

18th-century plantation, America's oldest landscaped gardens, house museum and plantation stableyards with indoor and outdoor reception sites

Randy Sonoski, Warren A. Cobb, Charles H.P. Duell 1741

843-724-7174 www.charlestoncvb.com binderr@charleston-sc.gov

1,500 1,500 300

Open, covered usable space

Russell A. Binder 1991

843-873-2210 www.summervillecountryclub.com INP

800 800 500

Outdoor covered pavilion with extended deck, prep kitchen, lighting, portable bars, wireless PA system, dance floor, tables, chairs; new outdoor patio extension suitable for oyster roasts, fundraisers

Lee Ray 2009

843-871-2135 www.wescottgolf.com jayboutin@bellsouth.net 843-886-6000 www.wilddunesmeetings.com groupsales@wilddunes.com 843-795-1623 www.saint-james.org INP 843-881-7337 www.spiritlinecruises.com sales@spiritlinecruises.com 843-852-2965 www.foundershallcharleston.com julieann@lowcountryparkvenues.com 843-821-4077 www.legendoaksgolf.com INP 843-849-2400, ext. 2419 www.rivertownecountryclub.com llovisone@rivertownecountryclub.com 843-571-1410 www.wickliffehouse.com INP 843-722-1112 www.charlestonharbortours.com sales@charlestonharbortours.com 843-553-0515 www.cypressgardens.info hgraham@berkeleycountysc.gov 843-769-2600 www.draytonhall.org info@draytonhall.org 843-852-2965 www.legarewaringhouse.com julieann@lowcountryparkvenues.com 843-953-6586 http://beachhouse.citadelalumni.org reserve@citadelalumni.org 843-818-2495 www.carolinagirlevents.com info@carolinagirlevents.com 843-852-2965 www.cooperriverroom.com julieann@lowcountryparkvenues.com 843-556-8251 www.shadowmossgolf.com golfpro@shadowmossgolf.com 843-852-2965 INP julieann@lowcountryparkvenues.com 843-722-1112 www.schoonerpride.com info@schoonerpride.com 843-852-2965 www.lowcountryparkvenues.com julieann@lowcountryparkvenues.com

600 500 500 600 500 600 550 500 550 400 INP 350 300 300 300 300 500 300 300 INP 300 300 300 300 250 INP 350 250 500 250 250 INP INP 250 250 250 250 300 250 150 INP 150 150 150 150 128 INP INP 50 50 50 49 INP 49 0 INP INP

Antebellum-style clubhouse with wraparound porch, hardwood floors, twin fireplaces and vaulted ceilings; 6,000-square-foot tented patio for weddings and outdoor events Host to a wide variety of indoor and outdoor meeting and event facilities; custom events with accommodations, catering services, team-building exercises, wellness programs, golf and tennis 22,000-square-foot facility for meetings with breakout sessions, including lighted, off-street parking, upholstered chairs, 60-inch round tables, meeting and serpentine tables, lighted stage; handicap-accessible

Pamela Huff 2000 Frank Fredericks 1972

Yacht fleet with four available for private charters, dinner cruise boat with full kitchen

Joyce Lowe 1961

Historically significant property along the banks of the Ashley River; new venue; state-of-the-art features; LEED Gold certified building; furniture; audiovisual system; catering kitchen; free parking

Julie Ann Oldham 2009

A semi-private golf and tennis club in Summerville

Jim Chickarello 1994

Plantation-style clubhouse with panoramic views of marshlands, live oaks and RiverTowne Country Club golf course

Laura Lovisone 2001

A Charleston town home located in Radcliffborough; Tea Room open for lunch 11 a.m.-3 p.m. Monday-Friday

Jeri Arazie 1850

Two charter and tour yachts, The Carolina Queen and The Carolina Belle, hosting events for two to 350 people

Drew Yochum 1989

170-acre swamp garden with swamparium, butterfly house, museum, boat tours and walking trails, three indoor meeting venues, outdoor gazebos

Heather C. Graham 1931

A National Trust historic site, circa 1738, the oldest unrestored plantation house and accredited museum in America open to the public

George W. McDaniel 1738

Historic home, avenue of oaks, free parking, catering kitchen, four bridal suites, groom's quarters, lagoon views

Julie Ann Oldham 2004

Oceanfront venue for company events, parties, weddings and receptions; indoor ballroom and outdoor pavilion available

Peter J. Calogrides 1942

Special-events yacht

Camille K. Berge 1978

Views of the Cooper River, Arthur Ravenel Jr. Bridge, Waterfront Park, pier

Julie Ann Oldham 2009

Available to host tournaments for up to 128 players; outdoor pavilion has seating for participants

Wayne Stonaker 1972

Available for evening rentals; views of the Cooper River and Arthur Ravenel Jr. Bridge

Julie Ann Oldham 2009

18th-century replica coastal trading schooner, with three masts, 2,200 square feet of sail and capacity for 49 passengers for corporate events, weddings, or any special event; daily and sunset sails offered

Drew Yochum 1989

Four special event venues in two parks, Mount Pleasant Waterfront Park and Charles Towne Landing State Historic Site

Julie Ann Oldham 2009

INP=Information not provided. Because of space constraints, only the top-ranked companies are printed. For a full list of participating companies, visit www.scbiznews.com/data. Although every effort is made to ensure accuracy, errors sometimes occur. Email additions or corrections to lists@scbiznews.com, fax to 843-531-5402 or go to www.tinyurl.com/joinourlists.

Yvonne Elaine Jordan 2009

Researched by Elizabeth Fonte & Beverly Barfield

INTRO | 83


Photo/Leslie Burden

arts abound The depth and breadth of Charleston’s arts scene just may surprise you. From established galleries and historic theaters to funky festivals and improv comedy, the Holy City and surrounding areas have it all. The following is just a small selection of what’s available to spark and satisfy your artistic cravings.

Visual arts

» Artistic Spirit Gallery

Artistic Spirit Gallery, located at the Navy Yard at Noisette, features well-known artists’ work and “outsider art” — pieces created by self-taught, emerging artists. Call for an appointment. 10 Storehouse Row, Charleston, 843-579-0149. www.artisticspiritgallery

» Carolina Galleries

This Church Street gallery focuses on two distinct periods in Charleston history: First, the Charleston Renaissance, which took place during the first half of the 20th century and features artwork inspired by the beauty and war-ravaged Lowcountry. And second, 21st-century Charleston, which includes more recent paintings that capture the personality of the region, from its historic streets to quintessential marsh scenes. 106-A Church St., 843-720-8622. www.carolinagalleries.com

» Charleston Fine

Art Dealers’ Association

Cedric Watson & Bijou Creole perform at the 2012 Spoleto Festival USA finale. 84 | INTRO

Created in 1999, the Charleston Fine Art Dealers’ Association now includes 13 galleries. The association hosts Palette and Stroll each July, an evening dedicated to fine art, cuisine and wine. It also hosts the Fine Art Annual, a weekend event held each November that features national artists and raises funds to support art programs in local schools. www.cfada.com


arts abound

Photo/Courtesy of Spoleto Festival USA

» City Gallery at Waterfront Park

The City Gallery presents six to eight exhibits each year focusing on contemporary visual arts created by local, regional, national and international artists. 34 Prioleau St., Charleston, 843-958-6484. http://citygalleryatwaterfrontpark.com/

» French Quarter

Gallery Association

Roughly 30 galleries are members of the French Quarter Gallery Association. The galleries stay open late the first Friday night in March, May, October and December for the very popular Art Walks. Free. 843-805-8052. www.frenchquarterarts.com

» Gallery Chuma

Specializing in the works of the Gullah people of coastal South Carolina, Gallery Chuma features Gullah art, books, crafts, storytelling, tours and food. 43 John St., Charleston, 843-722-7568. www.gallerychuma.com

» Gibbes Museum of Art

As Charleston’s only visual arts museum, the Gibbes also offers a variety of educational programs, group tours and art discovery walking tours. 135 Meeting St., Charleston. 843-722-2706. www. gibbesmuseum.org Photo/Courtesy of College of Charleston

Jared Grimes is a contemporary dancer who combines elements of tap, hip-hop and street jazz. His talents were featured at the 2013 Spoleto Festival USA.

» MOJA Arts Festival

Started in 1984, the annual MOJA Arts Festival is a celebration of African American and Caribbean arts and features music, visual art, storytelling, performances, crafts, children’s activities and more. 843-724-7305. www. mojafestival.com

» Halsey Institute

of Contemporary Art

Administered by the School of the Arts at the College of Charleston, the Halsey Institute of Contemporary Art was created to advocate, exhibit and interpret visual art, with an emphasis on contemporary art. 54 St. Philip St., Charleston, 843-9535680. http://halsey.cofc.edu/index.php

» New Perspectives Gallery

Features curated exhibitions by Charleston area artists and special exhibits during the Piccolo Spoleto Festival and MOJA Arts Festival. 180 Meeting St., Charleston, 843-958-6459.

» North Charleston City Gallery

Located in the common areas at the Charleston Area Convention Center, the North Charleston City Gallery

features exhibits that are rotated on a monthly basis. 5001 Coliseum Drive, North Charleston, 843-745-1087. www. northcharleston.org

» Piccolo Spoleto

Piccolo Spoleto was created in 1979 to coincide with the international Spoleto Festival USA and primarily features artists from the Southeast. Held at a variety of locations in downtown Charleston. 843724-7305. www.piccolospoleto.com

» Spoleto Festival USA

Held each spring since 1977, this 17-day festival features visual art exhibits and more than 120 performances from opera to jazz music. 843-722-2764; box office: 843-579-3100. www.spoletousa.org INTRO | 85


Arts ab o und Photo/Courtesy of Spoleto Festival USA

The Del McCoury Band perform at the Spoleto Festival USA finale.

Performing arts

» The Actors’ Theatre of South Carolina

www.actorstheatreofsc.org Founded in 1995 and headquartered in Charleston, members of the Actors’ Theatre travel the state presenting a full season of performances as well as acting classes. 843-588-9636.

» American Theater

www.pphgcharleston.com The American Theater opened in 1942 as one of Charleston’s premiere movie houses. It closed in 1977 and stood vacant for 20 years until it was revitalized and reopened in 2005 as a state-of-the-art meeting and conference facility. It also hosts a variety of performances, including Spoleto activities. 446 King St., Charleston. 843-853-0246.

» Charleston Ballet Theatre

www.charlestonballet.org During the last 20 years, the Charleston Ballet Theatre has achieved national recognition for its artistic and professional presentations of a range of works from classic to eclectic. 615 Johnnie Dodds Blvd., Mount Pleasant, 843-388-5888. 86 | INTRO

» Charleston Music Hall

www.charlestonmusichall.com Said to offer some of the best acoustics in Charleston, the Charleston Music Hall welcomes a variety of performers throughout the year from bluegrass to blues. 37 John St., Charleston.

» Charleston Stage

www.charlestonstage.com Charleston Stage, which calls the newly renovated Dock Street Theatre home, was founded in 1978 and is the state’s largest professional theatre company. 843-5777183.

» Charleston Symphony Orchestra

www.charlestonsymphony.com Founded in 1936, the Charleston Symphony Orchestra is known for its Masterworks and Pops series. The CSO also offers holiday performances and family concerts throughout the year. Concerts are held at various locations around Charleston including the Gaillard Auditorium and the Memminger Auditorium. 572 Savannah Highway, Suite 100, Charleston. 843-577-5967.

» The Dock Street Theatre

www.charlestoncity.info The historic Dock Street Theatre reopened after undergoing a three-year, $20 million renovation. The theatre originally opened in 1736 and was the first building in America built specifically for theatrical productions. It is a performance venue for Spoleto Festival USA and home of Charleston Stage. 135 Church St., Charleston. 843-720-3968.

» Flowertown Players

www.flowertownplayers.org This community theater presents a range of productions from musicals to serious dramas, as well as performances and classes just for children. 133 S. Main St., Summerville. 843-875-9251.

» Footlight Players Theatre

http://footlightplayers.net/ Since 1931, the Footlight Players Theatre has presented a variety of stage products and has become known as one of the top community theatres in the South. A typical season includes six performances. 20 Queen St., Charleston. 843-722-4487.


A rts abound

» The Gaillard

Municipal Auditorium

www.charlestoncity.info Built in 1968, the Gaillard hosts a multitude of events and performances from rock ‘n’ roll concerts to fashion shows. 77 Calhoun St., Charleston, 843-577-7400.

» The Have Nots! Comedy Improv

http://theatre99.com/ Called the longest-running show in Charleston, The Have Nots! cast has been together for 15 years and performed more than 1,200 shows. Local shows are held at Theatre 99, the group’s own theatre, as well as other locations throughout Charleston. 280 Meeting St., Charleston. 843-853-6687.

» Memminger Auditorium

Built in the 1930s as an auditorium for Memminger High School, the building stood vacant since the 1960s and was severely damaged by Hurricane Hugo. Spoleto Festival USA played a large part in the building’s recent $6 million renovation

and the facility reopened in 2008. Now used for a variety of performances from international artists performing as part of Spoleto, to local school groups. 56 Beaufain St., Charleston.

» North Charleston Coliseum and Performing Arts Center

www.coliseumpac.com The North Charleston Coliseum and Performing Arts Center have hosted numerous events from hockey games to Broadway shows throughout the year. The coliseum seats more than 13,000 for a concert performance. The Performing Arts Center seats 2,300. 5001 Coliseum Drive, North Charleston, 843-529-5011.

» PURE Theatre

www.puretheatre.org PURE Theatre performs at the Circular Congregational Church and has gained respect as a small professional theatre focusing on the works of contemporary playwrights. 150 Meeting St., Charleston, 843-723-4444.

» Sottile Theatre

http://sottile.cofc.edu/ The Sottile Theatre opened in 1922 as The Gloria Theatre and hosted the premiere of Gone With the Wind in 1939. It’s now the home of various performances, including Charleston Symphony Orchestra concerts and Spoleto Festival performances. 44 George St., Charleston, 843-953-5623.

» Village Playhouse

www.thevillageplayhouse.com Open since 2001, the Village Playhouse and Repertory Company offer more than 150 nights of entertainment each season. Classics, as well as new dramas and musicals, can be experienced within a venue that features small, candlelit tables rather than auditorium seating. 730 Coleman Blvd., Mount Pleasant, 843856-1579.

For more about arts events in the area, visit this website: www.charlestonarts.org

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Photo/Courtesy of South Carolina Aquarium

» Avian

Conservation Center

4872 Seewee Road Awendaw, SC 29429 843-971-7474 info@avianconservationcenter.org www.thecenterforbirdsofprey.org Single Adult Admission: $12 Encounters with raptors from around the world during walking tours, flight demonstrations and natural history discussions

» Berkeley County Museum & Heritage Center

attractions and tours » Aiken-Rhett House

48 Elizabeth St. Charleston, SC 29403 843-723-1159 www.historiccharleston.org/ aiken-rhett Single Adult Admission: $10 Intact mansion and associated outbuildings demonstrating urban life in antebellum Charleston

» American

» Angel Oak Park

3688 Angel Oak Road Johns Island, SC 29455 843-559-3496 www.tinyurl.com/angeloaktree Admission: Free 65-foot-high live oak tree provides 17,000 square feet of shade; estimated by some to be more than 1,500 years old

» Avery Research Center

Military Museum

for African American History & Culture

2070 Sam Rittenberg Blvd., Unit 216 Charleston, SC 29407 843-577-7000 info@americanmilitarymuseum. org www.americanmilitarymuseum. org Single Adult Admission: $9 Hundreds of uniforms, artifacts and military miniatures covering all periods of U.S. history

125 Bull St. Charleston, SC 29424 843-953-7609 seharrel@cofc.edu http://avery.cofc.edu Admission: Free, donations accepted Archival repository, small museum, and cultural center for public programming relating to African-American Lowcountry history and Gullah culture

88 | INTRO

950 Stony Landing Road Moncks Corner, SC 29461 843-899-5101 www.gobcweb.com/recreation/ berkeleymuseum/berkeleymuseum.html Admission: Free with park admission Exhibits displaying Lowcountry culture and natural history; located in Old Santee Canal Park

» Boone Hall Plantation

1235 Long Point Road Mount Pleasant, SC 29464 843-884-4371 www.boonehallplantation.com Single Adult Admission: $17$19.50 One of America’s oldest working, living plantations, still growing fruits and vegetables; interprets plantation life in the 1800s

» Calhoun Mansion

14-16 Meeting St. Charleston, SC 29401 843-722-8205 calhounmansion@yahoo.com www.calhounmansion.net Single Adult Admission: $15 The largest privately owned house museum on the Charleston peninsula

» Carolina Ice Palace

7665 Northwoods Blvd. North Charleston, SC 29406 843-572-2717 www.carolinaicepalace.com Single Adult Admission: $6-$10 Two National Hockey Leaguesize ice skating rinks, sports

lounge, meeting rooms, pro shop, birthday party rooms, catering, figure skating, hockey

» Caw Caw

Interpretive Center

5200 Savannah Highway Ravenel, SC 29470 843-889-8898 www.ccprc.com Single Adult Admission: $1 654-acre site with intact rice fields, interpretive trails, exhibit center, wildlife

» The Center for Birds of Prey

4872 Seewee Road Awendaw, SC 29429 843-971-7474 www.thecenterforbirdsofprey. org Single Adult Admission: $12 Live birds of prey in a natural setting; information on the role birds of prey play in the environment

» Charles Pinckney National Historic Site

1254 Long Point Road Mount Pleasant, SC 29464 843-881-5516 FOSU_Information@nps.gov www.nps.gov/chpi Admission: Free Country estate of Charles Pinckney; Constitution history, archaeology, African-American history

» Charles Towne Landing State Historic Site

1500 Old Towne Road Charleston, SC 29407 843-852-4200 ctlandingsp@scprt.com www.charlestownelanding.travel Single Adult Admission: $7.50 Site of first permanent English settlement in the Carolinas

» Charleston Ballet Theatre 477 King St. Charleston, SC 29403 843-723-7334 www.charlestonballet.org Single Adult Admission: $30-$45 Professional dance company


Attracti o n and ev ents

Antiques Show

56 Beaufain St. Charleston, SC 29401 843-722-3405 www.historiccharleston.org Single Adult Admission: $15 More than 30 of the nation’s exhibitors represent American, Asian and European antiques from the 17th to early 20th centuries

» The Charleston Museum

360 Meeting St. Charleston, SC 29403 843-722-2996 www.charlestonmuseum.org Single Adult Admission: $10 America’s first museum, showcasing a variety of cultural and natural history artifacts relating to the South Carolina Lowcountry

» Charleston RiverDogs

360 Fishburne St. Charleston, SC 29403 843-723-7241 www.riverdogs.com Single Adult Admission: $7-$20 Minor league baseball; facility also hosts numerous non-baseball events, fundraisers and concerts

» Charleston Tea Plantation 6617 Maybank Highway Wadmalaw Island, SC 29487 843-559-0383 jknight@rcbigelow.com www.charlestonteaplantation. com Single Adult Admission: Factory tour free; trolley ride $10 Tea plantation with informational tours of the on-site factory and trolley rides designed to educate the public on the growing and processing of tea

» Coastal Carolina Fair

9850 U.S. Highway 78 Ladson, SC 29456 843-572-3161 office@coastalcarolinafair.org www.coastalcarolinafair.org

Photo/Courtesy of Patriots Point

» Charleston International

Single Adult Admission: $8 Fair that runs for 11 days starting the last Thursday in October

» Colonial Dorchester State Historic Site

300 State Park Road Summerville, SC 29485 843-873-1740 www.southcarolinaparks.com/ park-finder/state-park/725.aspx Single Adult Admission: $2; $1.25 for S.C. seniors Archaeological park on the site of Dorchester, an inland trading town on the Ashley River that flourished from 1697 through the Revolutionary War

» Cypress Gardens

3030 Cypress Gardens Road Moncks Corner, SC 29461 843-553-0515 hgraham@berkeleycountysc. gov www.cypressgardens.info Single Adult Admission: $10 170-acre swamp garden with swamparium, butterfly house, museum, boat tours and walking trails, three indoor meeting venues, outdoor gazebos

» Dock Street Theatre

mented 1790s African-American cemetery still in use

» Edisto Island Serpentarium

1374 S.C. Highway 174 Edisto Island, SC 29438 843-869-1171 www.edistoserpentarium.com Single Adult Admission: $14.95 Reptile zoo, new Edisto visitors center, fossil room

» Edmondston-Alston House

135 Church St. Charleston, SC 29401 843-720-3968 www.charleston-sc.gov Single Adult Admission: Varies Site of America’s first theater, houses the state’s largest professional acting company and is the centerpiece of Spoleto Festival USA

21 E. Battery St. Charleston, SC 29401 843-722-7171 www.edmondstonalston.com Single Adult Admission: $12 Built in 1825; contains furniture, silver, books, paintings and documents that remain in place much as they have for 150 years

» Drayton Hall

» Edwin S. Taylor Folly Beach Fishing Pier

3380 Ashley River Road Charleston, SC 29414 843-769-2600 info@draytonhall.org www.draytonhall.org Single Adult Admission: $18 Circa 1738, America’s oldest unrestored plantation house open to the public and docu-

101 E. Arctic Ave. Folly Beach, SC 29439 843-588-3474 www.ccprc.com Admission: $8 per vehicle Fishing pier, gift shop, restaurant, rental equipment available, tournaments, special events

» Exchange Park

9850 U.S. Highway 78 Ladson, SC 29456 843-572-3161 denise@exchangepark.org www.exchangepark.org Single Adult Admission: Varies per event 170-acre multipurpose event complex hosting a wide variety of special-event programming

» Folly Beach County Park

1100 W. Ashley Ave. Folly Beach, SC 29439 843-588-2426 www.ccprc.com Single Adult Admission: $7 per vehicle Park under reconstruction due to erosion. Visit CCPRC.com for more information.

» Fort Moultrie

1214 Middle St. Sullivan’s Island, SC 29482 843-883-3123 FOSU_Information@nps.gov www.nps.gov/fosu Single Adult Admission: $3 History of American seacoast defense from 1776 to 1947; visitor center with museum exhibits, film and bookstore

INTRO | 89


» Fort Sumter National Monument

340 Concord St. Charleston, SC 29401 843-577-0242 FOSU_Information@nps.gov www.nps.gov/fosu Single Adult Admission: $18 Ferries depart daily from Charleston and Mount Pleasant to tour the site of the opening battle of the Civil War Photo/Leslie Burden

Carriage Tours Carolina Polo & Carriage Co. The only carriage company in the city owned and operated by Charlestonians whose family has been in Charleston since the 1600s. 181 Church St., 16 Hayne St., Charleston. 843-577-6767. http://cpcc.com Classic Carriage Tours A carriage ride with Classic Carriage Tours will provide insight on the city of Charleston and a lesson in Southern culture. 10 Guignard St., Charleston. 843-853-3747. www.classiccarriage.com Old South Carriage Tours Guides dressed in Confederate uniforms will take you around the city, speaking of more than 300 years of Charleston’s history. 14 Anson St., Charleston. 843-723-9712. www.oldsouthcarriage.com Old Towne Carriage Co. Hop on a carriage ride that will take you through the historic market and past historic homes and buildings in a 25-30-block area. 20 Anson St., Charleston. 843-722-1315. www.oldtownecarriage.com Palmetto Carriage Works The oldest carriage company in Charleston, Palmetto Carriage Works covers a 30-block area of the historic district. Evening tours offered in the summer. 40 N. Market St., Charleston. 843-723-8145. www.carriagetour.com 90 | INTRO

» Galleons Lost

165 King St. Charleston, SC 29401 843-577-3862 info@galleonslost.com www.galleonslost.com Admission: Free Galleons Lost offers investment and museum quality maritime pirate treasure from the spice routes to China dated back to the 16th and 17th centuries in a unique gallery setting.

» Gibbes Museum of Art 135 Meeting St. Charleston, SC 29401 843-722-2706 www.gibbesmuseum.org Single Adult Admission: $9 Art collection, principally American works with a Charleston or Southern connection, on display; special exhibitions

» Heyward-Washington House

87 Church St. Charleston, SC 29401 843-722-2996 www.charlestonmuseum.org Single Adult Admission: $10 Built in 1772; home to Thomas Heyward Jr., signer of the Declaration of Independence; rented by George Washington in 1791

» Irvin-House

Vineyards & Winery

6775 Bears Bluff Road Wadmalaw Island, SC 29487 843-559-6867

www.charlestonwine.com Single Adult Admission: $4 tastings, winery

» Isle of Palms County Park

1 14th Ave. Isle of Palms, SC 29451 843-886-3863 www.ccprc.com Single Adult Admission: $8 per vehicle Dunes, boardwalk, showers, restrooms, lifeguards, vending, 350 parking spaces

» James Island County Park

871 Riverland Drive Charleston, SC 29412 843-795-7275 www.ccprc.com Single Adult Admission: $1 643-acre park with crabbing, fishing, biking, lagoon boating, dog park, playgrounds, shelters, climbing wall, cottages, campsites and challenge course

» James Island County Park Challenge Course

871 Riverland Drive Charleston, SC 29412 843-762-2172 www.ccprc.com/challengecourse Single Adult Admission: $20-$80 High and low ropes course for team-building; customized programs for all ages and abilities

» James Island County Park Climbing Wall

871 Riverland Drive Charleston, SC 29412 843-795-4386 www.ccprc.com/wall Single Adult Admission: $10-$12 50-foot climbing wall and 1,000-square-foot bouldering wall for supervised climbing

» James Island County Park Splash Zone

871 Riverland Drive James Island, SC 29412 843-795-7275 www.splashparks.com Single Adult Admission: $11.99 Two 200-foot slides, lazy river, Caribbean play structure, concessions, kiddie pool, lockers, lifeguards, vending

» Joseph

Manigault House

350 Meeting St. Charleston, SC 29403 843-723-2926 info@charlestonmuseum.org www.charlestonmuseum.org Single Adult Admission: $10 Example of Adam-style or Federal architecture, collection of American, English and French furnishings circa 1800, built in 1803

» Karpeles Manuscript Museum Library

68 Spring St. Charleston, SC 29403 843-853-4651 KMuseumChr@aol.com www.rain.org/~karpeles/ chasfrm.html Admission: Free Displays historical manuscripts on a wide variety of cultural, scientific, social, intellectual, economic, historical subjects

» Kiawah

Beachwalker Park

8 Beachwalker Drive Kiawah Island, SC 29455 843-768-2395 www.ccprc.com Single Adult Admission: $8 per vehicle Beach access park with 300 feet of ocean frontage, dressing areas, outdoor showers, restrooms and seasonal lifeguards


Attractio n s and Tours

» Magnolia

Plantation & Gardens

3550 Ashley River Road Charleston, SC 29414 843-571-1266 www.magnoliaplantation.com Single Adult Admission: $15 Pre-Revolutionary War plantation house with early American antiques, biblical garden, antebellum cabin, train tour, nature boat tour, slave cabin tour

» Mepkin Abbey

1098 Mepkin Abbey Road Moncks Corner, SC 29461 843-761-8509 www.mepkinabbey.org Single Adult Admission: $5 Gardens are open to the public

» Middleton Place

4300 Ashley River Road Charleston, SC 29414 843-556-6020 info@middletonplace.org www.middletonplace.org Single Adult Admission: $28 18th-century plantation, America’s oldest landscaped gardens, house, stableyards, Middleton Place Restaurant, museum shop, garden market and nursery

» Mount Pleasant Pier

71 Harry Hallman Blvd. Mount Pleasant, SC 29464 843-762-9946 customerservice@ccprc.com Single Adult Admission: Admission Free/$8 fishing fee 1,250-foot-long pier at the foot of the Ravenel Bridge featuring covered pavilion, cafe, gift shop, fishing equipment rentals, seating, restrooms

» Mullet Hall

Equestrian Center

2662 Mullet Hall Road Johns Island, SC 29455 843-768-5867 customerservice@ccprc.com www.ccprc.com A 738-acre host site for com-

petitive horse shows, festivals, events, exhibitions, and trail riding, with 20 miles of riding trails for horse owners

» The Nathaniel Russell House

51 Meeting St. Charleston, SC 29401 843-724-8481 www.historiccharleston.org/ russell Single Adult Admission: $10 Plasterwork ornamentation, geometrically shaped rooms, free-flying staircase, garden

» North Charleston & American LaFrance Fire Museum & Educational Center

4975 Centre Pointe Drive North Charleston, SC 29418 843-740-5550 info@legacyofheroes.org www.legacyofheroes.org Single Adult Admission: $6 The fire museum houses antique fire equipment and vehicles, an indoor play area and driving simulator

» Old Exchange Building

122 East Bay St. Charleston, SC 29401 843-727-2165 www.oldexchange.org Single Adult Admission: $8 Revolutionary War museum completed in 1771, featuring historical artifacts from Charleston’s Colonial, Revolutionary and Civil War periods

» Old Santee Canal Park

900 Stony Landing Road Moncks Corner, SC 29461 843-899-5200 parkinfo@santeecooper.com www.oldsanteecanalpark.org Single Adult Admission: $3 195-acre park on America’s first canal; boardwalks and trails lead through Biggin Creek; 11,000-square-foot interpretive center

» Palmetto Islands County Park

444 Needlerush Parkway Mount Pleasant, SC 29464 843-884-0832 www.ccprc.com Single Adult Admission: $1 943-acre nature-based park with playgrounds, trails, boating, biking, shelters, water park, special events

» Palmetto Islands County Park Splash Island

444 Needlerush Parkway Mount Pleasant, SC 29464 843-884-0832 www.splashparks.com Single Adult Admission: $7.99 200-foot slide, Cyclone swirling water ride, 16-foot otter slide, kiddie pool, sprays, waterfalls, geysers, vending

» Patriots Point Naval & Maritime Museum

40 Patriots Point Road Mount Pleasant, SC 29464 866-831-1720 www.patriotspoint.org Single Adult Admission: $18 Home of Patriots Point Naval and Maritime Museum, the USS Yorktown, Cold War Memorial and the only Vietnam Support Base Memorial in the U.S.

» The Powder Magazine

79 Cumberland St. Charleston, SC 29401 843-722-9350 Single Adult Admission: $3 Oldest public building between Virginia and Florida, circa 1713, stored gun powder in the early 1700s

» Sewee Visitor & Environmental Education Center

5821 U.S. Highway 17 N. Awendaw, SC 29429 843-928-3368 www.fws.gov/seweecenter www.fs.usda.gov/scnfs Admission: Free Center features tourist informa-

tion on recreational opportunities available in the Francis Marion National Forest Cape Romain National Wildlife Refuge

» South Carolina Aquarium

100 Aquarium Wharf Charleston, SC 29401 843-577-3474 sales@scaquarium.org www.scaquarium.org Single Adult Admission: $24.95 Aquarium featuring S.C. native species and other animals as well as traveling exhibits; works to inspire conservation of the natural world

» Spring Festival of Houses & Gardens

108 Meeting St. Charleston, SC 29401 843-722-3405 www.historiccharleston.org Single Adult Admission: $45 Series of tours showcasing Charleston architecture

» Wannamaker County Park

8888 University Blvd. North Charleston, SC 29406 843-572-7275 www.ccprc.com Single Adult Admission: $1 1,015-acre park, two playgrounds, 20-foot play hill, picnic sites with grills, open meadows, paved trails, boat rentals, water park, meeting space

» Whirlin’ Waters

Adventure Waterpark

8888 University Blvd. North Charleston, SC 29406 843-572-7275 www.splashparks.com Single Adult Admission: $19.99 27,000-square-foot wave pool, lazy river, treehouse play structure, kiddie pool area, sevenstory multislide complex, racer slides, vending, birthday parties To find out about more area attractions, visit: www.charlestoncvb.com INTRO | 91


FEBRUARY Photo/Leslie Burden

Charleston is a busy city – there’s always a race, festival or tour of homes going on. If it’s January, there must be oysters; if it’s spring, there must be a race over the bridge. You can count on it. Here are some of the main events that shape our year.

into early March, this festival celebrates the culinary history and culture of the Lowcountry. Foodies can enjoy dozens of events during the four-day event. Marion Square is the center of the action.

MARCH Photo/Leslie Burden

JANUARY

» Happy New Year, Charleston

This is a time to celebrate as only the Lowcountry knows how. There will be crowds everywhere as Charlestonians and visitors welcome the New Year at venues all over the area.

» Lowcountry Oyster Festival

www.charlestonrestaurantassociation.com Each January, two tractor trailer loads of oysters – more than 65,000 pounds – are brought in for the annual Lowcountry Oyster Festival at Boone Hall Plantation. Contests, live music and other activities are scheduled throughout the day, including an oyster shucking contest, oyster eating contest and a contest among local chefs for the best oyster recipe. 92 | INTRO

» Southeastern Wildlife Exposition

www.sewe.com Known for its world-class original art, diverse exhibits and animal demonstrations, the annual Southeastern Wildlife Exposition brings 120 artists and more than 350 exhibitors to venues throughout Charleston for a long weekend. Conservation exhibits, birds of prey and retriever demonstrations, and Dock Dogs are among the highlights.

» Charleston Wine and Food Festival

www.charlestonwineandfood.com Starting in late February and continuing

Photo/Courtesy of Charleston Bridge Run, Anna Pedone

Calendar of Events

» Charleston Fashion Week

www.charlestonfashionweek.com This week showcases emerging designers and modeling talent under the tents on Marion Square. More than 30 runway shows are featured. The latest trends from local designers and boutique owners are featured.


Cale n dar of ev ents

Photo/Leslie Burden

» Charleston Antiques Show

www.historiccharleston.org Each year in mid-March, collectors and enthusiasts are treated to an array of English, European and American antiques from dealers across the country. Visitors can learn through educational presentations and purchase furnishings, decorative and fine art, architectural elements, garden furniture, vintage jewelry and silver. Held at Memminger Auditorium, 56 Beaufain St.

» Spring Festival of Houses and Gardens www.historiccharleston.org Starting in late March, this monthlong event opens some of Charleston’s finest historic gardens and houses for touring. Let the Historic Charleston Foundation be your guide for one of the tours that give a rare chance for a glimpse inside private homes.

APRIL

» World Grits Festival

www.worldgritsfestival.com Who could resist a festival that’s all about grits? This family-oriented festival in St. George celebrates all forms of coarsely ground hominy and crowns a winner in the official Grits Rolling Contest.

» Summerville Flowertown Festival

www.flowertownfestival.org The three-day event showcases the beautiful blooming azaleas, wisteria and dogwood in Summerville, a northern suburb of Charleston. The festival brings a host of artisans, food vendors, children’s activities and musical performances. It is organized by the Summerville Family YMCA. Chef Ben Berryhill of Red Drum demonstrates cooking risotto.

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Calen dar o f events Photo/Leslie Burden

Photo/Courtesy of CHarleston Brigerun, Anna Pedone

» Cooper River Bridge Run

www.bridgerun.com Start in Mount Pleasant and run across the Cooper River on the expansive Arthur Ravenel Jr. Bridge. You’ll wind up in downtown Charleston. Held in late March or early April each year, the event features a popular world-class 10K run as well as a walk.

» Family Circle Cup

www.familycirclecup.com A partnership between the city of Charleston and Family Circle magazine helped build a state-of-the-art tennis center that brings this weeklong women’s tournament to Daniel Island each April. Watch the stars play for the Cup, then come back to play tennis or attend sports and cultural events.

MAY & JUNE Photo/Leslie Burden

A bird of prey takes the stage during the annual Southeastern Wildlife Exposition.

» Piccolo Spoleto USA

» Spoleto Festival USA

www.spoletousa.org Each year since 1977, dozens of music, dance and theater performances as well as visual arts exhibits have come to the Charleston area for Spoleto USA. The 17-day festival begins in late May and continues into June. It fills Charleston’s historic theaters, churches and outdoor spaces with more than 120 performances

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www.piccolospoleto.com This festival, running concurrently with Spoleto Festival USA, focuses primarily on artists from the Southeast, offering theater, music, visual arts, dance, ethnic culture presentations, comedy, crafts and film. It takes place at a variety of locations around Charleston.

JULY

» Fourth of July

www.patriotspoint.org Fireworks launched from the flight deck of an aircraft carrier at Patriots Point and a shoreside party with beach music make Independence Day in Charleston fun. Communities all over the area have their own celebrations. Sit on the beach and watch fireworks all around.

SEPTEMBER

» Taste of Charleston

www.charlestonrestaurantassociation.com In late September, Boone Hall Plantation in Mount Pleasant becomes the place to eat, as 50 of the Lowcountry’s favorite casual and fine dining restaurants serve samplesized portions and beer and wine. There’s also live entertainment, a waiters’ race and a special children’s area.

» MOJA Arts Festival

www.mojafestival.com In late September through early October, the MOJA Arts Festival celebrates African American and Caribbean arts. Featured are music, visual arts, storytelling, performances, crafts and children’s activities at various locations.


Cale n dar of ev ents

Photo/Leslie Burden

OCTOBER

» Fall Tour of Homes and Gardens

www.preservationsociety.org Charleston’s historic homes and gardens welcome visitors on a rotating basis, starting in late September through most of October. Over five weeks, you can experience history close up while helping the Preservation Society raise funds.

NOVEMBER & DECEMBER

» Holiday Festival of Lights

www.ccprc.com Experience the spirit of the holidays with millions of sparkling lights at James Island County Park. The display opens the second week of November and continues through New Year’s. There are more than 600 light displays, many reflected in the park’s waterways. For more events listings, visit this website: www.charlestoncvb.com

Many of Charleston’s events satisfy foodies with cooking demonstrations featuring local chefs.

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17

26

78

17A

Berkeley County

78

Dorchester County

Summerville

Goose Creek

17A

17A 52

61

17

165

Hanahan

33 41

North Charleston

17 7

642

526

Daniel Island

26

Mt. Pleasant 17

Ravenel

West Ashley

17

699

Isle of Palms

Charleston Sullivan's Island

30

Charleston County

162

517

703

James Island

Atlantic Ocean

164 700

Johns Island

171

Meggett Folly Beach Kiawah Island

174

Newcomer Information Seabrook Island

TELEPHONE AT&T 855-258-1471 www.att.com

Home Telephone Company 843-227-7307 www.hometelco.com

Knology 843-225-1000

www.knology.com

CABLE Comcast 800-266-2278

Santee Cooper 843-761-8000

Town of Mount Pleasant 843-884-8518

City of Goose Creek 843-797-6220, ext. 1

South Carolina Electric & Gas

City of North Charleston 843-745-1026

City of Isle of Palms 843-886-6148

Town of Sullivan’s Island 843-883-3198

James Island Public Service District 843-795-9060

www.santeecooper.com

800-251-7234 www.sceg.com

GARBAGE City of Charleston 843-724-7364

www.charlestoncity.info

City of Goose Creek 843-824-2200

www.tompsc.com

www.northcharleston.org

www.sullivansisland-sc.com

Town of Summerville 843-619-0800 www.summerville.sc.us

www.comcast.com

www.cityofgoosecreek.com

WATER AND SEWER

Knology 843-225-1000

City of Hanahan 843-529-3413

www.knology.com

www.cityofhanahan.com

Berkeley County Water & Sanitation Authority 843-572-4400

Time Warner Cable 866-892-7201

City of Isle of Palms 843-886-8956

www.timewarnercable.com

www.iop.net

ELECTRICITY AND NATURAL GAS

James Island Public Service District 843-795-9060

Berkeley Electric Cooperative 843-761-8200 www.becsc.com

Edisto Electric Cooperative 800-433-3292 www.edistoelectric.com 96 | INTRO

www.jipsd.org

Town of Moncks Corner 843-719-7900

www.townofmonckscorner.sc.gov

www.bcwsa.com/

Charleston Water System 843-727-6800 www.charlestonwater.com

Dorchester County Water and Sewer Dept. 843-563-0075, 843-832-0075 www.dorchestercounty.net

City of Folly Beach 843-588-2447

www.cityoffollybeach.com

www.cityofgoosecreek.com

www.iopwsc.com

www.jipsd.org

Town of Moncks Corner 843-719-7900

www.townofmonckscorner.sc.gov

St. John’s Water Co. 843-559-0186 www.stjohnswater.com

Town of Sullivan’s Island 843-883-5733 www.sullivansisland-sc.com

Summerville Commissioners of Public Works 843-871-0810 www.summervillecpw.com

Mount Pleasant Waterworks 843-884-9626

www.mountpleasantwaterworks.com


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