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Front row: Nelda D. Fields, FACMPE, FHFMA; Debra A. Turner, CPA Back row: Charles E. Talbert III, CPA; Robert M. Moise, CPA; Bobby R. Creech, CPA

American Automated Payroll

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The Affordable Care Act and How We Can Help

he Affordable Care Act has been weighing heavily on the minds of business owners as they await more information regarding federal reporting and benefits requirements. AAP, a Summervillebased Payroll, HR and Benefit provider is proactively monitoring the ACA regulations so it can best assist businesses with reporting and compliance issues. “To assist our clients we continue to stay well informed about the ever-changing legislation associated with the ACA,” said Andrew Osborne, President. “There are so many unknowns.” The company has hosted workshops for clients and prospects, bringing in benefits specialists who can educate clients on forthcoming changes and what they mean for specific companies. One important aspect of the ACA, said Lisa Burnett, Vice President, is that many businesses aren’t aware of something called “common ownership.” There are specific regulations written about how to address ACA rules for companies that have common ownership. If two or more companies have a common owner or are otherwise related, these companies are combined for the purpose of determining whether they are subject to the Employer Shared

Responsibility thresholds. In addition to keeping companies compliant, AAP is adding a level of convenience to new hire paperwork. AAP can streamline the new hire process with options to provide electronic documents – I-9s, W-4s, E-Verify documentation – that can be filled out and submitted even before the employee’s first day on the job. This process creates a new hire file that can feed directly into the payroll system, eliminating redundant data entry and improving accuracy. Working with clients around the country, AAP is providing human resources tools, workers’ compensation, E-Verify, time and labor management, and 401(k) retirement solutions. The company’s goal is to create efficiencies for each of its clients and to help each business grow. “What we do each and every day is build relationships with our clients so they can rest assured that their payroll, HR and benefit compliance are handled properly and in a timely manner,” said Ashley Bond, Payroll Operations Manager. “Our goal is to help all of our clients get back to focusing on growing their business. We take care of the rest.” (350 words)

CONTACT INFO: TOP EXECUTIVE: 4000 Faber Place Clint Allen, North Charleston, SC 29405 President (843) 958-4511 www.charlestoncountydevelopment.com

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2015 Profiles in B usiness | Special Advertising Supplement

DATE FOUNDED: 2004 NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES: 60


The Graduate School at Charleston Southern University is adding a Master of Arts in Christian Studies this fall.

Former news anchor and CSU alum Warren Peper has joined the CSU staff as Director of the Graduate School.

Graduate School at Charleston Southern University

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Helping students achieve career goals

rom continuing education that enhances current skills in the workplace to learning something brand new, The Graduate School at Charleston Southern University has classes designed to help students achieve their career goals. Charleston Southern University’s offerings—online, on-campus or in a blended format—provide students with a balanced schedule between work, personal life and education. CSU’s flexible class times and small class setting result in personalized education in several degree programs: Master of Business Administration, Master of Arts in Organizational Leadership, Master of Science in Organizational Management, Criminal Justice, Education, Nursing, and new for fall 2015, a Master of Arts in Christian Studies and Master of Science in Computer Science, pending approval by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools Commission on Colleges. The Master of Arts in Christian Studies is a new program, enrolling students for Fall 2015. The degree curriculum is designed for pastors, church leaders and those interested in understanding the history and practice of the Christian faith. CONTACT INFO: 9200 University Blvd North Charleston, SC 29406 (843) 863-7057 www.charlestonsouthern.edu

The program is the first of its kind in the area, according to Warren Peper, Charleston Southern University’s director of the graduate school. Peper, a former television news anchor and 1974 graduate of Charleston Southern University, said the school continues to add disciplines based on the needs of the local workforce. The Master of Science in Computer Science was created to address specific needs in Charleston’s growing technology corridor. Classes are flexible and held at times that are convenient for parttime and full-time working students. Students can apply skills they learn in the graduate programs to their work immediately, which can lead to promotions or other job-related advancements. With flexible schedules and formats, earning a master’s degree at The Graduate School at CSU is an affordable, convenient option for those looking to improve their careers or start a new one. “We routinely hear great things about our alumni in the workplace,” Peper says. The graduate school enrollment team is happy to help with any questions about the many programs offered, including certificate programs. For more information visit charlestonsouthern. edu/graduateschool.

TOP EXECUTIVE: DATE FOUNDED: Warren Peper, 1964 Director of Graduate School NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES: 600 faculty and staff

Special Advertising Supplement | 2015 Profiles in Business

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A Note From the Publisher Profiles in Business Editor - Licia Jackson ljackson@scbiznews.com • 803.726.7546

Those of you who have been Business Journal readers all of these years most likely know this story, but for you newer readers, the origin of Profiles in Business bears repeating. Not long after we launched the Business Journal in 1995, businesspeople began asking us to include stories about their companies in our publication. As journalists, we always had to reply, “We can’t do that until you do something we can report as news.”

Associate Editor - Jenny Peterson jpeterson@scbiznews.com • 843.849.3145 Staff Photographer - Kim McManus kmcmanus@scbiznews.com • 843.849.3116 Senior Graphic Designer - Jane Mattingly production2@scbiznews.com • 843.849.3118 ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES Senior Account Executive - Sue Gordon sgordon@scbiznews.com • 843.849.3111 Senior Account Executive - Robert Reilly rreilly@scbiznews.com • 843.849.3107 Account Executive - Sara Cox scox@scbiznews.com • 843.849.3109 Account Executive - Bennett Parks bparks@scbiznews.com • 843.849.3126 CONTRIBUTING WRITERS Holly Fisher, Licia Jackson, Nike Kern, Allison Cooke Oliverius, Jenny Peterson CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS Kathy Allen, Kim McManus, Robbie Silver

President and Group Publisher - Grady Johnson

At the same time, many of those same people were asking if they could hire our advertising Grady Johnson copywriters to produce pieces they could use in brochures and marketing materials — but we were always too busy putting out the newspaper. Finally it dawned on us: Why not combine the two? And looking at the success of this year’s version of Profiles in Business, it seems the marriage has been a happy one. I hope these profiles give you some insight into the working lives of the people who make up the Charleston-area business community, because each and every one has a unique story to tell. Please accept my enthusiastic invitation to read the 2015 Profiles in Business, and I hope you will enjoy reading about this sample of Charleston business life as much as I do.

gjohnson@scbiznews.com • 843.849.3103 Vice President of Sales - Steve Fields sfields@scbiznews.com • 843.849.3110 Creative Director - Ryan Wilcox production1@scbiznews.com • 843.849.3117

Grady Johnson Publisher

Director of Audience Development - Rick Jenkins rjenkins@scbiznews.com • 864.235.5677, ext. 26 Event Manager - Kathy Allen kallen@scbiznews.com • 843.849.3113

SC Business Publications LLC A portfolio company of Virginia Capital Partners LLC Frederick L. Russell Jr., Chairman

Accounting Department - Vickie Deadmon vdeadmon@scbiznews.com • 864.235.5677, ext. 25

South Carolina’s Media Engine for Economic Growth

CUSTOM MEDIA DIVISION Director of Business Development - Mark Wright mwright@scbiznews.com • 843.849.3143 Account Executive - Mariana Hall mhall@scbiznews.com • 843.849.3105

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2015 Profiles in B usiness | Special Advertising Supplement

The entire contents of this newspaper are copyright by SC Business Publications LLC with all rights reserved. Any reproduction or use of the content within this publication without permission is prohibited. SCBIZ and South Carolina’s Media Engine for Economic Growth are registered in the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office.


Anyware Express LLC....................................................... 6

HITT Contracting Inc......................................................... 4

Beckham Insurance Group............................................... 9

John B. Kern International Law, LLC............................... 28

Berkeley Electric Cooperative......................................... 21

Landmark Construction.................................................. 16

BuzzOFF Termite & Pest Control..................................... 27

Low Country Case and Millwork, Inc.............................. 24

Charleston County Economic Development.................... 14

LS3P Architects.............................................................. 29

Charleston Defense Contractors Association.................. 22

Merit Professional Coatings............................................ 20

Charleston Southern University........................................ 1

MUSC Employee Assistance Program............................. 31

Construction Services Group.......................................... 19

Palmetto Commercial Properties.................................... 12

Costanzo Team Carolina One Real Estate....................... 13

Spherion......................................................................... 23

Crews Automotive Group................................................ 28

Spirit Communications................................................... 10

Freeland Construction Company, Inc................................ 7

Trace Staffing................................................................... 8

Hannah Solar Government Services............................... 18

Trident Technical College................................................ 11

Hayward Baker............................................................... 26

Verizon Wireless............................................................. 30

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The HITT team outside of the the Charleston International Airport’s Terminal Renovation and Improvement Project.

HITT Contracting Inc:

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Focused on building first-class facilities

or nearly 20 years, HITT Contracting has been providing award-winning commercial construction in the Charleston area over a variety of market sectors. Since opening its first regional office in Charleston in 1998, Virginia-based HITT has earned a reputation for offering personalized attention with the backing and resources of one of the nation’s largest contractors. HITT is a trusted builder, providing award-winning commercial and turnkey construction with a thorough knowledge of local business practices. “Growth and success starts with delivering on your promises,” says Carson Knizevski, Senior Vice President. “We fortify relationships with clients by exceeding expectations through quality work, flexibility and the ability to meet compressed schedules.” HITT was established in 1937, starting in a small family house in Arlington, Virginia. It now has seven regional offices in the US and maintains more than 700 employees annually. The company first came to Charleston after winning a Navy contract. “Russell Hitt, the former president and current chairman, had the foresight to see Charleston as an emerging area,” Knizevski says. Through high-quality work, clear communication and a management style that is relationship-driven, HITT has been the contractor for many high-profile projects: the $180 million renovation of the Charleston

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International Airport’s Terminal Renovation and Improvement Project, the $15 million recently completed Memminger Elementary School in downtown Charleston, and the $22 million Addlestone Library at The College of Charleston. The firm has also done work with Boeing and other major players in the Charleston area. Expert project teams at HITT offer a wide range of background and experience in all types of commercial construction, including new corporate campus development, service and emergency work, as well as experience in the hospitality, health care and technology fields. “We do quite a bit of corporate office work, industrial and manufacturing projects, defense and security related work as well as higher education and K-12 facilities here in Charleston.” Knizevski says. “We have experience in aviation, hospitality, health care, corporate interiors, historic restorations and federal government projects.” Knizevski says the biggest asset for HITT is its people, evidenced by the number of satisfied repeat clients. “We’ve got a great team, and we often have clients request project team members they have worked with in the past,” Knizevski says. The company regularly participates in charitable initiatives and invests heavily in the well-being of its workforce. It prides itself on hiring the right people for each job. HITT’s mission includes being a good corporate citizen, using

2015 Profiles in B usiness | Special Advertising Supplement


The new construction of Memminger Elementary School, a two-story, 77,286-sf building located in downtown Charleston, was completed during the summer of 2013.

sustainable practices and forming lasting partnerships with clients and subcontractors. “We enjoy being involved early and assisting our clients through the entire process,“ Knizevski says. “We can take a job from cradle to grave, working closely with the design team, developing budgets and meeting clients’ needs. We pride ourselves in quality work and turning over a complete project that doesn’t have a handful of headaches for the end user.” As a debt-free construction company, HITT is able to pre-purchase supplies and materials and pay subcontractors in a reliable timely manner. It allows the company to partner with the best subcontractors in the Carolinas and further drive projects to timely completion, Knizevski says. HITT also employs cloud-based, fully-integrated project management technology that allows clients to receive real time information, such as progress photos, design changes, as well as cost and schedule information. “It’s another level of sophistication with clients,” Knizevski says. Since the inception of the Charleston office, HITT has expanded to have regional offices in Atlanta, South Florida, Baltimore, Denver and Dallas. “We have the backing of HITT, which has 78 years of experience and the resources of 700 people,” Knizevski says. “The company has a strong foundation. From purchasing to experience, we’re able to provide all the resources for a job and manage the risk for the client.” HITT has won countless awards for quality construction and contri-

CONTACT INFO: 2457 West Aviation Avenue, Suite 100 North Charleston, SC 29406 (843) 308-9400 www.hitt.com

TOP EXECUTIVE: Carson Knizevski, Senior Vice President

butions to the industry, including several industry awards from the Associated Builders and Contractors and prestigious PACE awards from the Charleston Regional Business Journal. HITT has achieved the distinction of being one of the nation’s best places to work and it’s routinely recognized for its safety practices. As a company-wide standard, HITT employs a dedicated superintendent on each project to ensure safety and timely delivery of quality construction. Looking towards the future, HITT is looking at projects 4 to 5 years out, especially with announcements of expansions from Daimler and Volvo in the Charleston area. “We see a lot of opportunities in Charleston, and we have a good core team,” Knizevski says. HITT is governed by a diverse group of executives and senior leaders that exemplify the characteristics that HITT strives for every day in serving clients – construction excellence, integrity, proven experience, and relationship-driven management. With the common goal of always improving the way that they do business, HITT principals have a passion for construction and foster a culture of high performance, responsibility and community building. With the resources to support any and all of their clients’ commercial general contracting needs, “we’ve been able to develop a reputation of trust with our clients through our delivery of quality construction time and time again,” Knizevski says. “On every project, our clients know we’re going to take care of them.”

DATE FOUNDED: 1998 NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES: 32

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Anyware Express celebrates the opening of its new warehouse space at the Palmetto Commerce Center in Ladson.

Anyware Express

Go-to logistics firm serving the Southeast

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aving just moved into its new location at the Palmetto Commerce Center in Ladson, Anyware Express is poised to accommodate clients with more warehouse space in addition to a variety of targeted port services from import/export logistics to expedited freight, service pick-up, delivery and long haul scenarios. “We are so excited about our new warehouse location at Palmetto Commerce,” says Adam Lawrence, president. “The new location will allow us to offer our clientele an array of transportation and warehousing solutions to accommodate just about any logistical challenge.” The company operates several warehouses around Charleston, totaling about 100,000 square feet. Lawrence has seen an uptick in automotive and medical manufacturing parts coming through his doors in recent months. His company picks up products or parts from companies, brings them to Anyware Express facilities, consolidates them into containers and then delivers them to the port for export, Lawrence says, noting that the company does the same process in reverse for imports. Anyware Express provides service to the entire state of South Carolina with locations throughout in addition to the Charlotte, Savannah and CONTACT INFO: 9016 Palmetto Commerce Pkwy North Charleston, SC 29456 (843) 225-6430 www.anywareexpress.com

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Atlanta metropolitan areas. Known for offering exceptional care and top-notch customer service, Anyware Express can be seen in the logistics arena in a number of roles using only the best equipment. By taking pride in its fleet and equipment its broad spectrum of customers receive the timely service they deserve and expect. “Cycling new equipment through our fleet and maintaining each vehicle to the highest standards results in our cargo, sprinter vans, straight trucks, tractor trailers, vans and flat beds to get where they are going safely and efficiently,” says Lawrence. With a mission to provide the highest quality customer service and satisfaction to each and every customer, Anyware Express works its motto, “For our customers and our people, we make it happen.” Run by a team of experienced, knowledgeable and committed professionals, the firm aims to provide fast, friendly and reliable service at competitive prices while touting 20 years of credibility and references. Anyware Express is your go-to logistics firm where a customer-friendly atmosphere exists to guide, advise and perform to meet the needs of a diverse clientele needing logistics professionals on their side. TOP EXECUTIVE: Adam Lawrence, President

2015 Profiles in B usiness | Special Advertising Supplement

DATE FOUNDED: 2006


Kenneth B. Canty, P.E.; President and CEO of Freeland Construction Company, Inc. and local Water Tower Demolition project at Joint Base Charleston in South Carolina

Freeland Construction

Finds success in government work, strategic partnerships

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enneth Canty relocated to the Lowcountry from Boston to perform work as a civil engineer who helped in building the Ravenel Bridge. He fell in love with Charleston and never left. After working locally for several years in the industry, Canty purchased Freeland Construction in 2008. His company has quickly become one of the most successful small construction companies in Charleston. After certification as a minority-owned Disadvantaged Business Enterprise (DBE) and 8(a) firm through the U.S. Small Business Administration, Freeland became a vital subcontractor to larger firms. Through the DBE program, Freeland Construction has successfully partnered with the “big” companies like Skanska and Turner on government projects of considerable size. “A lot of DBEs get pigeon-holed as subcontractors, but we act as a general contractor that can self-perform,” Canty says. Freeland Construction has now grown to 34 employees operating eight locations, including Washington, D.C., Boston and Orlando. The company handles work on commercial, governmental and industrial projects. Its work has included roads, bridges and storm drains; commercial renovations include repairing historic CONTACT INFO: 1629 Meeting Street Road Charleston, SC 29405 (843) 722-1740 www.freelandconstruction.com

TOP EXECUTIVE: Kenneth Canty, P.E. President & CEO

courthouses and railroad structures, and demolishing water towers at Charleston’s Air Force Base. “We’re continuing to grow in federal government infrastructure work,” Canty says. Freeland Construction recently diversified into construction management, currently assisting in managing a major project in Charleston, the renovation of the Galliard Auditorium. With an eye on the horizon, especially in future road construction and improvement projects, Freeland Construction continues to expand its operations and geographic coverage. The company won the Minority Business of the Year award in 2011 from the Small Business Administration and a Minority Business Award in 2012 from the Minority Business Development Agency, a subset of the Department of Commerce. Canty says his goal is for Freeland Construction to graduate from the DBE program and become completely independent. Canty says Freeland Construction might reach that goal as early as 2018. “The training wheels are off,” Canty says. “We’re positioning ourselves just like the big guys.” DATE FOUNDED: 2008 NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES: 34 (10 local)

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Trace Staffing Solutions Team

Trace Staffing Solutions

Providing Strategic Pieces for Business Success

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n today’s ever changing marketplace, employers are finding themselves in positions where growth happens quickly, good talent is needed immediately and successful productivity is based on topnotch employee performance. Trace Staffing Solutions is available to ensure that when growth occurs and personnel are needed, experts are just a call away so that business demands are met in a timely matter. “Our mission is to make available well-qualified and vetted candidates,” says Jim Pascutti, general manager of Trace’s independently owned Charleston office. “What we do best is manage the recruiting process while freeing our business clients to continue their momentum.” Offering a team of recruiting professionals with more than 50 years of experience, this team takes great pride in the services they provide by way of strong relationships that have been cultivated for years with both clients and candidates. Trace Staffing Solutions focuses on three areas of recruiting: Manufacturing and Distribution, Office Professional, and Legal. Under the Manufacturing and Distribution umbrella, Trace is able to source everything from engineering and management talent to assembly and production. The Office Professional division focuses on administrative and accounting needs while the Legal section provides sourcing for CONTACT INFO: 1064 Gardner Road, Suite 309 Charleston, SC 29407 (843) 277-6900 www.tracestaffing.com

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attorneys, paralegals, legal secretaries, and office support. All three divisions offer career search plans where clients can hire professional talent directly from Trace’s pool of skilled workers and find temporary and temporary-to-permanent employment options. Always business friendly, Trace Staffing offers all search assignments on a contingency basis. “Unless we produce a candidate you like, there is nothing to lose by engaging us in your recruiting plans,” says Pascutti. “Flexibility is always a part of our business model which we believe is critical in today’s ever-changing marketplace.” As your connection to creating a qualified workforce and discovering back office solutions, Trace Staffing offers a successful track record and strong commitment to helping companies find the right fit. The firm also offers extensive experience in payroll, accounting, HR and benefits administration. Always dedicated to connecting employers with a qualified workforce, providing high-quality temporary, temp-to-hire and direct hire employees as well as strategic services designed to enhance corporate return on investment, Trace’s professional menu of staffing solutions may be key to the success of your business. See for yourself by contacting, (843) 277-6900 or visit www.tracestaffing.com today. TOP EXECUTIVE: Jim Pascutti, General Manager

2015 Profiles in B usiness | Special Advertising Supplement

DATE FOUNDED: 2014 NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES: 11


Marshall Beckham, Michelle Musleve and Anita Prosser

Beckham Insurance Group Think Solutions. Think BIG.

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s the health insurance marketplace continues to evolve, clients of the Beckham Insurance Group are benefiting from an array of complimentary added benefits as part of the agency’s commitment of delivering valuable solutions and first­‐class service to a client base of businesses of all sizes, individuals and families. The agency focuses on three practice areas: Employee Benefits, Health and Life Insurance. Offering a three-fold concept under the acronym BIG (Beckham Insurance Group), this agency, with more than 50 years of local experience, offers a proactive approach to educating and servicing their clientele every day. Under the umbrella of “The BIG Difference,” Beckham’s clients choose from an array of value added solutions at no cost including an innovative online HR Platform that businesses can use to integrate and simplify HR functions, Benefits Administration and Payroll. Items such as Onboarding and Offboarding, Benefits Enrollment, ACA Compliance, Employee Self Service, Mobile Apps and PTO tracking are all part of the agency’s commitment to client satisfaction. The BIG Difference also includes: Customized Benefit Booklets (a great communication tool for employers), Wellness Plans, Compliance Alerts and Templates, ACA Expertise and access to their benefits attorCONTACT INFO: 767 Coleman Boulevard, Suite 6 Mt. Pleasant, SC 29464 (843) 766‐3393 www.beckhaminsurancegroup.com

TOP EXECUTIVE: Marshall Beckham

ney. Human Resource outsourcing and a one-­‐stop online solution tool for all things HR are also included. Most importantly, the Beckham Insurance Group provides local, expert account management for all employee benefit clients including strategic guidance, client advocacy, local market knowledge, plan analytics, and employee support. Account management is truly the reason why many of Beckham’s employee benefit clients have been with the agency for decades and why they enjoy a strong referral business. Beckham’s individual health insurance clients benefit from a knowledgeable and professional staff that makes sure individuals purchase the right coverage with the proper network at the lowest price. The agency offers an online quoting engine that provides premium comparisons, access to every major insurance carrier, subsidy calculations, and network specifics. Those seeking life insurance options just log on to www.beckhamlifequote.com for free quotes on life policies from the seven most competitive life carriers available. Clients input their basic personal data and the amount of life insurance and then receive a listing of quotes by price and carrier. Beckham Insurance Group does the rest. Call (843) 766-3393 today. DATE FOUNDED: 1966 NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES: 4

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Spirit Communications Team

Spirit Communications

Home-Grown Company Provides Solutions for Charleston

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ith its roots firmly in South Carolina, Spirit Communications provides voice, data, Internet and fiber optic solutions along with a full suite of cloud services to businesses and government agencies across the Southeast. With its recent acquisition of SCANA Communications Inc., Spirit took control of 1,300 more miles of fiber, a very large percentage of it in the Charleston market. This move positions Spirit to offer additional services to business and government agencies in the Charleston area. The company’s growth is based on its fiber network, which allows it to enhance its traditional offerings and add new cloud based products and IT services. Spirit’s products are provided on a private, secure network, and the company expects to add new business as Charleston’s port and manufacturing continue to grow. Manufacturers need to transport operating standards and efficiency data to meet certification requirements, and Spirit has the ability to provide transport to their data facilities. Spirit Communications also manages a health care provider network, The PSPN, which serves medical offices and hospitals including Charleston’s Medical University of South Carolina. Although Spirit’s focus is fiber based solutions in Charleston, they

CONTACT INFO: 1500 Hampton St. Columbia, SC 29201 (800) 411-8167 www.spiritcom.com

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also offer EoC or Ethernet over copper, a technology that converts copper phone lines to high speed Ethernet. Spirit is known for its attention to customer service. Whenever you call, their goal is that you talk to a person, not a recording, and sales representatives follow up on these calls. The Charleston office has 20 full-time employees to assist customers. Headquartered in Columbia, Spirit Communications is owned by the 11 independent South Carolina telephone companies, who came together to launch the original version of Spirit in 1984. The company has built a strong relationship with state government and through its SC Light Rail which connects the research universities. It also operates PalmettoNet, a carrier’s carrier serving other major carriers with over 6,000 miles of fiber network in the Carolinas. Spirit has launched many innovative products including a partnership with a major wireless carrier to provide a secure wireless 4G access data backup for business accounts. Ranked among the top 35 privately held firms in South Carolina, Spirt serves thousands of customers in over 150 service locations throughout the Carolinas.

TOP EXECUTIVE: Bob Keane President and CEO

2015 Profiles in B usiness | Special Advertising Supplement

DATE FOUNDED: 1984 NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES: 225


Bob Walker, Vice-President of Trident Technical College’s Division of Continuing Education and Economic Development

Trident Technical College

Division of Continuing Education prepares local workforce

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hen companies are looking to train or re-train employees in specific skills, they don’t need to look any further than Trident Technical College’s Division of Continuing Education and Economic Development. With training and expertise in a large variety of real-world skills, such as business, health care, computer programming, product manufacturing, aerospace and advanced materials, employees seeking upto-date training can call on TTC. “There’s a big push to train new employees from entry-level and beyond,” says Bob Walker, Vice-President for Continuing Education and Economic Development at TTC. “We can offer just about anything.” That includes offering the latest in advanced manufacturing technology like composites training, assembly-line machines, electrical manufacturing, aerospace and aeronautical programs. Students learn skills in these fast-growing professions with accelerated hands-on training. Responding to the booming manufacturing industry in the state, Trident Technical College is developing a new $79 million S.C. Aero-

CONTACT INFO: 2001 Mabeline Rd North Charleston, SC (843) 574-6152 www.tridenttech.edu/ce

TOP EXECUTIVE: Bob Walker Vice-President, Division of Continuing Education and Economic Development

nautical Training Center. Plans call for the center to house not only the academic credit aeronautical programs but also several continuing education programs. The department looks at industry trends to determine what types of workforce skills are needed when planning new classes, and “we welcome any employer to call us,” Walker says. “Industries and individuals recognize the value of the training we offer. We had more than 14,300 registrations in continuing education classes last year alone.” Large companies in the area such as Boeing will need continuing workforce training in a variety of advanced skills. TTC works with the state on tax incentives for businesses which can pay for continuing education and certifications for employees. The college is also home to readySC and Apprenticeship Carolina programs. Instructors in the Continuing Education Division are experts in their fields and have the know-how to quickly develop programs for workforce training. Walker is excited about the future of TTC. “We adapt to what the industry needs,” he says. “We know how to put together programs, and we are always in touch with the marketplace.”

DATE FOUNDED: 1964 NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES: 35

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Palmetto Commercial Properties Team

Palmetto Commercial Properties LLC

Local, Independent Real Estate Firm Focuses on Service

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full-service commercial real estate firm, Palmetto Commercial Properties LLC was purchased in January by principals J. Edward Buxton, Richard B. Morse and Joseph J. Keenan III. “We are a local, independent, full service real estate firm,” Keenan says, noting that most competitors in the Charleston commercial real estate market are nationally affiliated firms. The company had a total project and transaction value of over $90,000,000 in 2014, and is anticipating another banner year in 2015. Palmetto Commercial Properties offers a full range of services. Its brokerage services include representation of landlord or tenant, buyer or seller. The company has development experience with retail, medical, hospitality, raw land, Class A office buildings, self-storage and industrial. With two full-time property managers, Palmetto has over 750,000 square feet and 25 properties in its management portfolio. Palmetto also offers consulting services in investment, land use, zoning and valuation. After many years in commercial real estate, the founding principals started Palmetto in 1996. Batson L. Hewitt, Joseph J. “Jay” Keenan, William H. Edlund, W. David Latimer and Carlyle Blakeney founded the CONTACT INFO: 578 East Bay St., Suite A Charleston, SC 29403 (843) 577-2550 www.pcpsc.com

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company, and all but Blakeney are still involved. Most of the company’s brokers have earned the prestigious Certified Commercial Investment Member (CCIM) designation. New principals Buxton, Keenan and Morse each have over 11 years with the company, and they have big plans for its future. “We have to adapt to changes in the CRE business and stay on top of technology,” Morse says. “We want to stay local and independent but also see the need to grow our company.” Buxton is a multiple CoStar Power Broker recipient and sits on the board of the CCIM State Chapter as well as the Charleston Trident Association of Realtors (CTAR) Commercial Investment Division (CID) board. Keenan was the 2012 president of CID, and is a past board member of CTAR-CID. He received the Leadership Award from CTARCID (and CTAR) in 2012. Morse is a consistent recipient of the CTAR Realtor of Distinction award. The brokers’ depth of experience brings strong value to their clients. “Part of the reason we were so excited about purchasing Palmetto is because we saw an opportunity to implement our business strategy in a company that was already proven and successful in the Charleston marketplace,” Keenan says. TOP EXECUTIVES: J. Edward Buxton, CCIM Richard B. Morse, CCIM Joseph J. Keenan III, CCIM Principals

2015 Profiles in B usiness | Special Advertising Supplement

DATE FOUNDED: 1996 NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES: 16


Lina Costanzo, Michelle Costanzo and Sally Maitland outside the Costanzo Team offices in Downtown Charleston.

The Costanzo Team

Brings Over 40 years of Experience to the Charleston Real Estate Market

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ina Costanzo and her daughter Michele Costanzo are a true real estate team; together they offer considerable experience that can satisfy any customer’s needs in the Charleston real estate market. They set themselves apart by offering a large range of services to a diverse clientele, from relocation, second homes, interior design and commercial services plus a combined 40 years of experience. The Team has a winning combination. “Relocation is a huge part of our business and will continue to be with the growth predicted for the Charleston area,” Lina says. “Our backgrounds and knowledge of the Tri-County area are extremely valuable.” This is a wonderful community to be a part of and we love to convey that to others moving here from elsewhere.” “We take a genuine interest in asking our clients about their lifestyle and work with them in figuring out their exact needs to insure they are pleased with their new home and location,” Michele says. Michele’s previous career as an interior designer helps give sellers CONTACT INFO: 49 Broad Street Charleston, SC 29401 (843) 414-2541

TOP EXECUTIVE: Lina and Michele Costanzo

an edge in staging and photographing properties for sale. Her design eye also benefits buyers who are interested in restoring or renovating. Annually each have consistently earned Realtor of Distinction status and hold multiple designations; Lina is a Senior Real Estate Specialist and Michele is a Certified Residential Specialist. The Costanzo team works in the downtown Charleston office of Carolina One Real Estate on Broad Street, where they get support from their team manager and closing coordinator, Sally Maitland. Kendra Calore, a new agent to the office, is tech-savvy, bringing in younger clients. Lina and Michele have consistently been in the Top Ten in volume sales of Carolina One and maintain an average of 50 listings at all times. Lina said the number of repeat clients and referrals is a true measure of their success. “It comes down to personal relationships,” she says. “Michele and I are always working with someone we’ve worked with in the past. It’s a true compliment when people want to work with us again or refer their friends and colleagues.” DATE FOUNDED: 2002 NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES: 4

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Jennifer Brown, Existing Industry Specialist with Charleston County Economic Development Department meets with Paul Welborn, Vice-President of Corporate and Government Relations with Streit USA Armoring LLC at Streit’s facility.

Charleston County Economic Development Department Helping businesses grow locally

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or over 20 years, the Charleston County Economic Development Department has been in the business of helping industry thrive in Charleston County. It starts with recruiting new businesses with all the great assets the Lowcountry has to offer, but it continues well beyond the opening day. The goal is not just getting businesses to come to the county, it’s getting them to stay and grow. The business retention staff is tasked with helping make them successful. Business retention staff members at the Charleston County Economic Development Department handle a variety of requests or issues. For example, a business may be looking to hire more employees or need resources with the ability to train employees in new skills. They may even require attention to overgrown drainage ditches that flood or congested intersections that hinder commerce. With a dedicated staff keen on problem-solving, the department likens itself to a “business concierge” service. “It’s like a one-stop shop,” says Merle Johnson, Charleston County Economic Development Deputy Director. “Contact us and we will tell you how to get what you need.” Johnson oversees the Charleston County Business Assistance Program, which involves extensive business visitation, expansion support, sector building and advice on incentives, financing and special events activities. The department offers its services free to Charleston County industries. Owners can contact the department with any issues or concerns and the county staff will work to make sure their needs are being ad-

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dressed. “We can recruit all day, but if businesses are not happy, they won’t stay,” says Jennifer Brown, the department’s Existing Industry Specialist. The department serves 70-80 existing companies a year with direct face-to-face contact and site visits. “Charleston County Economic Development has been an exceptional business ally,” says Paul Welborn, Vice-President of Corporate and Government Relations with Streit USA Armoring LLC Armored Vehicle Manufacturer. “When it comes to facilitating workforce training development and assistance with the expansion process, the Economic Development Department is just a phone call away. Their team meets and exceeds our expectations by fostering a working relationship that allows our company to grow and be successful.” One creative way the department has helped businesses grow is by connecting them with one another. One such success story involves a company that was importing a product from another state. The Economic Development Department found a business that makes the same product locally and connected the two. Now, rather than getting the product imported, commerce is now moving locally. “If we can help businesses grow by finding new customers and local suppliers, they will benefit,” says Brown. The department also created a roundtable group for tenants of Palmetto Commerce Industrial Park in North Charleston. After receiving feedback from tenants, the roundtable group was established, and

2015 Profiles in B usiness | Special Advertising Supplement


The Charleston County Economic Development booth at the annual DIG South event.

An industry luncheon is held each year for businesses to connect.

existing tenants can connect, get to know one another and consult on issues. While most of their site visits are for large companies, the Charleston County Economic Development is now making a concerted effort to reach out to smaller and medium-sized industries that are growing in Charleston County. These smaller businesses are vital to Charleston County’s success and often have their own unique set of challenges, Johnson says. “When we start talking to them, we see they’re expanding from 10 to 20 people—that’s a 100 percent increase,” Johnson says. “We find they can have problems with finding trained workforce or figuring out their tax bills.” The department hosts networking events for county industries and supports existing businesses through social media. Newsletters are emailed about relevant industry topics. “We have a Facebook page through the department and we’ll ‘like’ a business’s Facebook page and share their announcements,” Brown says. The department also posts changes in industry related legislation, pertinent events and workforce training opportunities. In support of our existing industry, Charleston County has also worked on improving roads and other infrastructure. When businesses grow and stay in the area, it improves the community with well-paying jobs. A robust number of existing businesses also makes the county more attractive to new businesses. “Without a robust business retention and expansion program, no company would want to locate here,” Brown says. “It’s a ripple effect for the whole community.” Johnson says business retention is the department’s No. 1 recruiting tool for new businesses. Showcasing businesses that are thriving and expanding is the best way to bring in new companies. Often, department staff will connect potential newcomers with existing businesses for a firsthand look at

doing business in the county. “Quality of life means a lot more coming from an existing plant manager,” Johnson says. On behalf of Charleston County Council, the Economic Development Department puts on an annual industry appreciation luncheon, inviting county industries as a “thank you” for investing in the local community. Companies are publically praised and celebrated for their involvement in the community and their contributions to economic development. These companies may also submit accolades to be shared during the program. The Economic Development Department has plans to expand the department to add a research component with statistics about business in the county and the economic impact. The department is also reaching out to the booming technology sector. “When we were looking to move our headquarters, Charleston County was incredibly helpful in our drive to be down on the peninsula,” says Nate DaPore, President and Chief Executive Officer of PeopleMatter. “I’m amazed at how innovative the area’s been in adapting to how PeopleMatter will continue to grow and fuel the success of Silicon Harbor. Charleston County’s commitment to economic development — in particular initiatives to attract top talent here — will accelerate growth in our tech community and help establish Charleston as the East Coast’s technology hub.” In the coming years, the department plans to continue its collaboration with the Charleston Digital Corridor, The Harbor Business Accelerator program, the South Carolina Research Authority and DIG South to assist growing technology companies in Charleston County. With the tools and problem-solving skills to handle industry questions, the Charleston County Economic Development Department is poised to make sure Charleston County industries reach and exceed their full potential.

CONTACT INFO: TOP EXECUTIVE: 4000 Faber Place SteveAllen, Dykes, Clint North Charleston, SC 29405 Director President (843) 958-4511 www.charlestoncountydevelopment.com

DATE FOUNDED: 2004 1993 NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES: 60 5

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The Owners, from left: Cindy Mixson, President; Ann Mixson, Chairwoman; Rick Mixson, Vice President.

Landmark Construction

A Proud Heritage of Quality Construction

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ith a number of employees having been with the company for more than 25 years, Landmark Construction is celebrating its 50-year anniversary as one of Charleston’s most respected civil site and industrial contractors. Founded in 1965 by Fred Mixson as a family business, Landmark employs professionals in every area and phase of the construction process and continues to grow. “Over the course of the last 50 years we have survived several economic recessions in addition to the normal stumbling blocks that all businesses experience, “says Rick Mixson, vice president. “The consistency of leadership, a professional staff, good clients and the quality construction that we deliver has kept us going all these years.” With Cindy and Rick Mixson, the family’s second generation at the helm, and the company’s matriarch, Ann Mixson, as chairwoman and financial adviser, this thriving Lowcountry business continues to succeed as a cornerstone in facilitating the booming commercial and industrial segments of Charleston’s economy. The firm excels with its civil site division focusing on site, road construction and utilities and its industrial construction arm working on concrete and plant maintenance projects. Offering a wide variety of construction services, Landmark boasts a healthy mix of substantial client projects that include both private and public contracts. Most recently they were hired by multi-national Fluor

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Corporation to provide site work grading, drainage, utilities and concrete work including electric duct bank, concrete building foundations and pads, and other specialty concrete work. The $225 million plant expansion will allow the client, Showa Denko Carbon in Ridgeville, to increase its production of graphite electrodes supplied to the global electric furnace steel industry. “My father would be proud of the business that he started in 1965 as a part-time venture,” says Cindy Mixson, president. “He started the firm while working two jobs while my mother was busy with another retail business that they were part owners in and doing Dad’s books on the side.” Today, Landmark’s logo has been redesigned to include the 50-year seal. The exciting Nexton project in Summerville is one of many largescale assignments that will add to Landmark’s growing legacy. The firm is an integral player in the first phases of Mead Westvaco’s Community Development and Land Management’s 4,500-acre mixed-use commercial, retail and residential development. Landmark’s scope of work includes clearing and grubbing the site, installing all erosion control features, earth moving and placement, storm drainage installation, as well as gravity and force main sewer installations, water line construction, cast-in-place concrete box culverts and roadway construction. The project paves the way for 6,000 homes and more than one million

2015 Profiles in B usiness | Special Advertising Supplement


The Leadership Team, from left: Mark Palmer, Jeff Bailey, Danny Raymond, Cindy Mixson, Rick Mixson, Ann Mixson, Sam Hayes, Sandra Davies and Michael Tucker.

square feet in commercial property. In addition, Landmark was responsible for preparing a Jedburg site for 1.1 million square feet of building pad for Tire Kingdom’s (now NTB’s) new regional distribution facility. On this project, Landmark cleared 121 acres and moved 1,000,000 cubic yards (CY) of earth for the building foundations. This included 800,000 CY of localized borrow material plus an additional 200,000 CY more introduced from off-site. Landmark placed an additional 20 feet of material on the building pad until settlement was completed. In all, a total of close to 2,000,000 CY of surcharge material was required for the completion of each building pad. Landmark constructed and stabilized the project’s vast parking area with more than 5,000 tons of cement while ponds built on the site required another 625,000 CY of sandy-clay material. Landmark also constructed sanitary utility trunk lines including a deep sewer lift station, a force main with air release valves, gravity sewer and manholes as well as water lines for the new facility as part of the project. Aside from Landmark’s prominence in the region’s workplace, they also are seen as highly committed to giving back to their community. Through a relationship with Metanoia, a not-for-profit Community De-

CONTACT INFO: 3255 Industry Drive North Charleston, SC 29418 (843) 522-6186 www.landmark-sc.com

TOP EXECUTIVES: Ann, Cindy and Rick Mixson

velopment Corporation located in the heart of the Chicora-Cherokee neighborhood in North Charleston, they are doing just that. “We helped them build their new offices and a career development center on Reynolds Avenue, “says Cindy Mixson. “We were delighted to contribute construction services and funds in addition to our sponsorship of their annual golf tournament fundraiser.” Metanoia focuses on finding strengths in neighborhoods and using them as building blocks for the eventual success of some of our region’s most distressed communities. By discovering and growing the neighborhood’s assets to create sustainable change in the neighborhoods, Metanoia listens to the residents that actually live in the communities. “The residents of a community are the real experts as to what is going on,” explains Rick Mixson. “Their firsthand knowledge of the neighborhoods allows for focusing in on the areas of opportunity that need the targeted investments.” As Landmark Construction turns the page at its half-century mark, the firm is poised for another 50 years of success centered on a community, state and region that has and will benefit from its commitment to excellence, both corporately and philanthropically.

DATE FOUNDED: 1965 NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES: 183

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Hannah Solar Government Services has six years of experience designing and installing solar photovoltaic systems such as those shown here.

Hannah Solar Government Services (HSGS) Veterans Leading the Way for America’s Energy Security

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ow is the perfect time for a business to consider adding solar to its energy mix, says Tripp Hathaway, Business Development Manager at Hannah Solar Government Services. This is due to the pending changes in South Carolina policies governing solar energy systems, the reduction in the cost of solar systems over the last several years, and the federal investment tax credit that is expected to be reduced after 2016. The average cost of solar energy systems has been reduced by over 50% in the last five years. Hannah Solar Government Services now provides the commercial market the same highly efficient solar power systems and quality of service that the company has been providing federal agencies such as the Department of Defense, NASA and the Veterans Administration. “There is a lot of very positive momentum now to support the investment of solar energy in South Carolina, and significant potential for South Carolina to become a major solar energy producing state over the next several years,” Hathaway said. A licensed South Carolina contractor, Hannah Solar Government Services is a solar photovoltaic installer, providing all of its engineering and design in-house, which executes projects smoothly and eliminates the cost of third party electrical engineering. Starting out with a new CONTACT INFO: 3297 Pacific St. North Charleston, SC 29418 (843) 718-1866 www.hsgs.solar

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customer, the company determines peak power needs and consumption. Next, the company engineers design a solution that reduces the cost of energy. “We can show what the break-even point is for the investment in solar energy systems as well as how much energy value the solar system is estimated to generate over the life of the solar system. Solar modules typically have a manufacturer’s warranty of at least 25 years,” Hathaway says. However, the solar industry’s expectation is that solar modules will continue to generate power for 40+ years. The company serves many different kinds of businesses, he says. All businesses with power expenses have the potential for operating cost savings with solar energy. Companies with significant power requirements, such as manufacturing or industrial businesses, are especially good types of businesses to invest in solar energy. Solar is also a great asset for utilities and energy cooperatives. Many utilities are investing in solar energy systems to support their overall power production requirements for their customers. Hannah Solar Government Services has seen rapid growth over the past year, with $17 million in contracts awarded so far for construction in 2015. TOP EXECUTIVE: COL Dave McNeil (U.S. Army Retired) President

2015 Profiles in B usiness | Special Advertising Supplement

DATE FOUNDED: 2010 NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES: 17


From left: Denise Smith, Accounting Manager; Victor Apat, Vice President;Caitlin Moody, Administrative Assistant; Karen Roberts, Administrative Assistant; Rebecca J. Taylor, Contracts Administrator; Andy Moody, Project Manager; Ron McCollum, President

Construction Services Group Inc.

Federal projects focus for this fast-growing construction firm

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onstruction Services Group Inc. (CSG) is excited about 2015. The company will celebrate their 10-year anniversary and completion of their new office on Ashley River Road. As a full-service general contractor in commercial private and federal sectors, CSG specializes in new construction, renovations and upfits for clients in health care, industrial, institutional, and retail industries, explains Ron McCollum, CSG’s president and CEO. Construction Services Group has several contracts with the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers at the various lakes and dams along the South Carolina-Georgia border. CSG also holds numerous contracts with the U.S. Department of Veterans Affairs and routinely works at VA hospitals in South Carolina. Though the majority of CSG’s projects are with government agencies, the company also builds and renovates offices, warehouses and other properties within the private sector. “We are a very fast-growing company right now,” McCollum said. With $10 million in gross revenue last year, Construction Services Group weathered the economic downturn that hit shortly after its founding and

CONTACT INFO: 1412 Ashley River Road Charleston, SC 29407 (843) 225-2527 www.csgcharleston.com

TOP EXECUTIVE: Ron McCollum, President

is now growing and expanding. Along with opening the new facility this fall, McCollum said the staff will continue to grow from its current 19 employees, which is an increase from 6 employees only two years ago. After working in construction for 20 years, McCollum opened his own business focusing on commercial construction projects. CSG is a Service Disabled Veteran Owned company and 40% of the employees are veterans as well. “We try to hire more veterans than anyone else. That way our company has a foundation of courtesy, uprightness, and good ethics,” says McCollum, a former marine. “They are just a good group of people you can count on.” With CSG’s volume of government work, having veterans on staff is beneficial. “They know what’s expected of them and are able to turn over a quality product in a short time,” he adds. With 10 years under his belt, McCollum says he’s looking ahead to passing the torch to his son, Andy Moody, current project manager and former Marine as well. “One day, I’ll walk out, hand him the keys and go fishing.”

DATE FOUNDED: 2005 NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES: 19

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Merit Professional Coatings, located in Mount Pleasant, offers a wide range of industrial coating, commerical painting and waterproofing services.

Merit Professional Coatings

Providing the finest level of coating application and craftsmanship

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erit Professional Coatings recently opened an office in Mount Pleasant, S.C., offering a range of industrial coating, commercial painting and waterproofing services to businesses in the Lowcountry. The company’s mission is “To do whatever it takes to exceed the customers’ expectations by providing them with the finest level of coating application and craftsmanship. We execute this mission by providing exceptional customer service with a dedication to quality that’s backed by strong operational systems.” With 21 years of experience, and locations in three other states, Merit Professional Coatings has established a reputation for going above and beyond when it comes to quality, service and performance. This rings true whether the project is a commercial building, 5-star hotel, medical facility, school or industrial project. Scott McCormack, managing member of the local office, says several things make the company stand out from the competition, beginning with its attention to detail. “I believe this comes from our experience in larger markets,” he says. “We’re used to what the larger projects require regarding project management, as well as the level of quality and customer CONTACT INFO: 1470 Ben Sawyer Blvd, Suite 100 Mount Pleasant, SC 29465 www.meritnow.com

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service that needs to be delivered.” Another advantage is the company’s size. With about 100 employees at the ready, Merit Professional Coatings is able to accommodate fast-paced, condensed schedules. In addition, Merit Professional Coatings ensures customers receive an accurate estimate and that each project is staffed properly. “We are different from other subcontractors. We don’t view ourselves as being in the ‘painting and waterproofing’ business,” McCormack says. “We are in the customer service business. It should be a given that you receive a great job. We deliver that job in a way that enables you to focus on your highest priorities, like serving your customer and making money instead of dealing with paint issues all day.” Merit Professional Coatings was founded in 1994 and has locations in Idaho, Florida, Texas and now South Carolina. Within these regions, the company has worked on some of the most prestigious buildings in each community, including sports stadiums, schools, high-rise condominiums, hotels, hospitals, retail malls, museums and manufacturing facilities. TOP EXECUTIVE: Scott McCormack, Managing Member

2015 Profiles in B usiness | Special Advertising Supplement

DATE FOUNDED: 1991 NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES: 20


Left: Dwayne Cartwright, preident and CEO. Berkeley Electric Cooperative is the largest electric cooperative in the state serving over 80,000 member accounts in Berkeley, Charleston and Dorchester counties.

Berkeley Electric Cooperative: Powering up the Lowcountry

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or the past 75 years, Berkeley Electric Cooperative has had a simple mission: to provide safe, reliable and affordable energy to the Lowcountry. The non-profit, power cooperative delivers electricity to 87,000 meters serving businesses and individuals in Berkeley, Charleston and Dorchester Counties. Berkeley Electric Cooperative also assists businesses relocating or expanding in the Lowcountry. It helps with site selection, offers competitive rates and personalized attention. “We assist with finding locations to meet their needs and their power requirements,” says Dwayne Cartwright, president and CEO. “We have commercial and industrial sites available. With all the growth in housing and building, we work with developers to make sure we can deliver power when they are ready.” Berkeley Electric Cooperative works with developers on easements, area logistics and the installation of underground power lines. “We steadily maintain our complex energy system, making certain we are financially responsible to our members; we run a tight ship,” Cartwright says. The Cooperative also offers free energy audits to analyze power CONTACT INFO: PO Box 1234, 414 North Highway 52 Moncks Corner, SC 29461 (843) 719-8531 www.bec.coop

TOP EXECUTIVE: Dwayne Cartwright, President and CEO

usage. “We find ways businesses can save on energy costs which helps their bottom line. We help keep them profitable,” Cartwright says. Rather than customers, Berkeley Electric Cooperative employees consider everyone they serve as ‘members’ and owners of their energy cooperative. With 250 employees, Berkeley Electric Cooperative is the largest electric cooperative in the state. “We have a great team which has the heart and spirit to serve our members,” Cartwright says. “Berkeley Electric Cooperative is well-positioned to grow with Charleston’s expanding automotive and technology corridor,” Cartwright says. It also is a good steward of the environment, operating with the best safety practices. “We work hard to ensure our power system is operating in a safe and efficient manner,” Cartwright says. Berkeley Electric Cooperative is studying new energy sources including research in wind and solar power. “We want to make sure that what we’re promising is being delivered,” Cartwright says. “We have lots of options to assist businesses with either relocating or expanding. We want to be an integral part of their growth.” DATE FOUNDED: 1940 NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES: 250

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Joshua Hatter, Vice President of the CDCA and Senior Manager for Marketing and Business Development at General Dynamics Information Technology.

Charleston Defense Contractors Association Supporting vital defense community

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he Charleston Defense Contractors Association exists to protect local defense civil servants and contractors, who employ approximately 13,000 people with an estimated $4 billion economic impact each year. The association has been an advocate for the defense contracting community since 2002, when it began with 40 members as a response to the possible Base Realignment and Closure (BRAC) closing of Space and Naval Warfare Systems Center (SPAWAR), the Navy’s Information Dominance systems command in Charleston. The group successfully petitioned to keep SPAWAR open and preserved its highly-skilled workforce. The group remains an advocate for the industry, meeting with state and federal governments to develop and attract more defense-related business opportunities. “We coordinate trips to Washington D.C. and work with our congressional delegation,” says Joshua Hatter, Vice President of the CDCA and Senior Manager for Marketing and Business Development at General Dynamics Information Technology. “It’s all part of a long-term strategy to protect the defense community in the Lowcountry.” The association is a non-profit group run by volunteer board members who all work in the defense industry and have a vested CONTACT INFO: PO Box 61089 North Charleston, SC 29419 (843) 435-3080 www.charlestondca.org

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interest in keeping the local defense community thriving. Corporations and individuals are eligible to become members. With 245 corporate and affiliate members, CDCA has substantial influence in addressing issues and opportunities facing the Charleston-area defense community. It’s important to show strong numbers for the area’s defense community, as cities all over the world compete for government contracts, Hatter says. The group stays abreast of the BRAC commission’s plans for the industry. The Contracts Industry Council, a partnership formed with SPAWAR, meets monthly to discuss issues related to the contracting process. The group also collaborates with the local chapters of organizations such as Women in Defense (WID) and the Armed Forces Communications and Electronics Association (AFCEA). The CDCA hosts quarterly Small Business Industry Outreach Initiative (SBIOI) symposiums and a C5ISR summit each year. This year’s Government and Industry Partnership Summit will be held December 1-4, 2015. CDCA membership fees go back to the community in the form of philanthropic donations, internships, sponsorships and scholarships for students interested in the field, as well as major investment in protecting and preserving the defense industry in the Lowcountry. TOP EXECUTIVE: David Hamburger President, CDCA

2015 Profiles in B usiness | Special Advertising Supplement

DATE FOUNDED: 2002 NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES: 3 contract employees


Co-owners, Mary Barrineau and Pam Ueberroth

Spherion Recruiting and Staffing

Providing top talent for business partners in the Lowcountry

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pherion Recruiting and Staffing has been connecting top talent with top jobs in Charleston for 20 years. The full-service staffing agency provides temporary, contract and professional staffing for businesses across the Lowcountry. “We are a family-owned and operated Woman Owned Small Business that has built its foundation upon strong values of dedicated service, loyal relationships and tailored business solutions,” says Mary Barrineau, co-owner. After years of experience in the staffing industry, Pam Thompson Ueberroth knew the closing of the Naval Base would mean a major change for Charleston – and that it would be an ideal time to join the Charleston community with a staffing agency. She launched a staffing agency here in 1994. Over the course of the next five years, Barrineau, Ueberroth’s daughter, moved from Atlanta and began working with the business. In 2000, Norrell was acquired and became Spherion Staffing. Barrineau became co-owner with her mother and the all-women team has continued to make strides in the staffing industry. Clients turn to Spherion when they need top-quality staff without the hassle of endless searches. CONTACT INFO: 4995 LaCross Road, Suite 1050 North Charleston, SC (843) 554-4933 www.spherion.com

TOP EXECUTIVE: Mary Barrineau, Co-owner

“Our services give our business partners the competitive advantage they need to grow,” Barrineau says. Spherion provides executive searches, direct hire, contract staffing and workforce management while also helping clients with staffing needs in 3PL and distribution, warehouse, manufacturing, engineering, quality, call centers, collections, medical coding/billing, administrative and finance. Spherion provides on-site management and recruitment process outsourcing to make finding the right people as simple as possible. Spherion is also 100% compliant with the Affordable Healthcare Act. One of the benefits of using Spherion as the staffing agency of choice is the combination of a locally owned business and an international company. The seven full-time employees at Spherion know the staffing needs and expectations of businesses in the Lowcountry. They also have the benefit of the backing of an international staffing company with international resources. Since 2001, Spherion Charleston has been in the top 10% for growth of all Spherion offices. The team has been in the top three Executive Placement Awards since 2001 while being honored with a Multi-Million Dollar Growth Award and an On-Premise Management Award since 2005. DATE FOUNDED: 1994 NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES: 7

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Top: Medical casework at Charleston ENT in West Ashley. Bottom: Medical casework at MUSC Health East Cooper

Low Country Case & Millwork

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Celebrating 25 years of serving the Lowcountry

or the past 25 years, clients have called on Low Country Case & Millwork in Charleston for all of their high-end architectural millwork, custom commercial cabinetry, and state-of-the-art medical and industrial casework needs. The company offers high-quality, award-winning craftsmanship along with in-house manufacturing for turnkey customized construction and installation. “We build it, furnish all components and install everything ourselves,” says Vice-President and CEO David Stasiukaitis. The company operates out of a state-of-the-art 30,000 square-foot facility in Ladson. “A lot of companies in our industry subcontract out installation, but we don’t,” he says. “Our team is comprised of estimators, project managers, designers, builders, finishers, and installers. Everything is designed and built locally.” The ability and convenience of doing everything in-house was the goal of Robert Stasiukaitis, founder and president, when he started the company in 1990. Stasiukaitis, a former general contractor, wasn’t content with working through subcontractors and not having complete control over construction timelines and budgets. He had a passionate interest in cabin-

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etry and decided to leave general contracting in order to open a small wood shop with his brother Paul Stasiukaitis and brother-in-law Terry Hensley. “I liked doing woodwork, so I leased a small space along with some equipment,” he says. “We started out doing everything ourselves.” The company’s first big break was securing a project for Trident Construction, through a contact Robert made while attending church. “It was the first real commercial job I did, and today they’re still our biggest client; we’ve been working with them for 25 years,” Stasiukaitis says. “They took a chance on us and stepped in; I’m very grateful to Trident Construction.” Those humble beginnings began the journey to a portfolio of many high-end projects throughout Charleston, including the Kiawah Island Ocean Course, Country Club of Charleston, Hank’s Seafood, the Charleston City Market, and the Vendue Inn. Today, the company stands out with its reputation for high quality, custom work and meeting the most aggressive schedules. “When we get a job done on time and on budget, that means a lot to our clients,” Robert Stasiukaitis says. Through hard work and attention to both detail and quality, Low

2015 Profiles in B usiness | Special Advertising Supplement


Top: High-end millwork at a private club In Charleston. Bottom: Handsome renovations to the bar and lobby areas at Vendue Inn hotel in downtown Charleston.

Country Case & Millwork has grown into one of the premier casework and millwork manufacturers in South Carolina. The company has seen a remarkable 30 percent increase in growth over the last year alone. In addition to custom millwork, Low Country Case & Millwork also does plastic laminate cabinetry for commercial buildings and medical offices. It has furnished individual break rooms and copy rooms, as well as entire hospitals of casework. Low Country Case & Millwork also keeps up with trends and changes in the modern construction business. It has added staff members who are accredited in LEED building and other environmental practices. The company is currently working on a project using reclaimed wood from former horse stalls at Churchill Downs. The staff is knowledgeable about design elements and can help with consultation on any project. Low Country Case & Millwork uses the latest in computer aided design (CAD) and Cabinet Vision software to produce precise drawings for clients. It has hundreds of moulding profiles available and can match any existing profile. The company’s work has been showcased in national magazines

CONTACT INFO: 3270 Benchmark Dr. Ladson, SC 29456 (843) 797-0881 www.lowcountrymillwork.com

TOP EXECUTIVES: Robert Stasiukaitis, Founder and President; David Stasiukaitis, Vice-President and CEO

and has been recognized by the Architectural Woodwork Institute for the highest in industry standards. The company was named among the top 5,000 fastest-growing privately held companies in the U.S. by Inc. Magazine and recognized by SC Biz News with a Roaring 20s award four times. “The Charleston economy is exploding,” David Stasiukaitis says. “Some of the projects we are currently working on include two hotels, a marina, a car dealership, and a retirement community. Another large hotel is set to start next year. We’re working all over Charleston; there’s really no need to go out of town.” Low Country Case & Millwork is considering expanding to a new facility; it’s gradually outgrowing its current 30,000 square-foot space. The family-owned business includes Robert’s son, daughter-in-law, brother, two brother-in-laws, nephew and even Robert’s father, who still works and builds high-end furniture. “We’ve been fortunate to have built up a very large client base,” Robert Stasiukaitis says. “If they want it done nicely, they come to us to do just that. We’re the professionals that can make it work for them.”

DATE FOUNDED: 1990 NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES: 55

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Dan Holley, P.E. | Project Manager

Hayward Baker

Providing a solid foundation for projects across the Lowcountry

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or over 50 years, Hayward Baker has been helping people nationwide build a solid foundation for their homes and businesses. Based in Hanover, Md., the geotechnical construction company recently opened an office in Charleston offering a full range of preand post-construction foundation services. Hayward Baker is annually ranked No. 1 in the field by Engineering News-Record. Dan Holley, project manager at Hayward Baker’s new Charleston office, explained that during a construction project, a property owner or general contractor consults a geotechnical engineer to evaluate the ground conditions and lay out solutions for improvement. “We’re the one that builds those solutions,” Holley says. Hayward Baker’s services include foundation rehabilitation, settlement control, liquefaction mitigation, soil stabilization, slope stability and excavation support. “Hayward Baker constructs the best geotechnical construction solutions for projects in a cost-effective, timely and safe manner. We offer full design-build services for virtually any foundation application,” Holley says. “Subsurface conditions can vary greatly within a jobsite and the CONTACT INFO: 4 Carriage Lane, Suite 203 Charleston, SC 29407 (843) 804-4000 www.haywardbaker.com

26

characteristics of the soil in place play a crucial role in determining which geotechnical construction method is best. As the industry leader, we have the knowledge, experience and skill to make the right determination.” From offices in neighboring states, Hayward Baker has provided ground improvement services in the Lowcountry for over 25 years for many projects, including aviation and port facilities in addition to numerous commercial, industrial and government projects. In addition to large projects, Hayward Baker also provides solutions for smaller projects. “There is no project too small or too large for us,” Holley says. “In fact, the majority of our projects are relatively small commercial or light industry projects.” “What sets Hayward Baker apart from other companies is that we have national resources, but we operate like a small company; meaning our customers get the service they would expect from a small company, but we have unmatched construction and engineering resources” Holley adds. “Our clients also appreciate that we can take care of them no matter what the challenge or if conditions change during a project, since we offer the most complete range of services.” TOP LOCAL EXECUTIVE: Dan Holley, P.E. Project Manager

2015 Profiles in B usiness | Special Advertising Supplement

DATE FOUNDED: 1948 NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES: 1,600 (2 local)


Delano Francis, President

BUZZOFF Termite & Pest Control

A Young Company with Deep Roots in Lowcountry

W

hen you allow a company into your home to treat for termites or other pests, you want someone who truly understands the region’s problems. BUZZOFF Termite & Pest Control fits that requirement well, as its president is a Lowcountry native and the company’s employees have more than 30 years of experience in pest control. “Our story is extraordinary,” says Delano Francis, president of BUZZOFF. “We started in a bad economy (2008) and we were looking at how to give good service in a bad economy.” Francis and his business partners, attorney Edward Phipps and Scott Kafka, of BUZZOFF Mosquito, found that competitive pricing with excellence in service held the answer. BUZZOFF started by offering a CL-100, the inspection required when a house changes hands, for $75. “This was almost unheard of,” Francis says. With this marketing strategy, the CL-100 business established a great relationship with the Charleston area’s real estate professionals, which has led to more business. A licensed company with licensed employees, BUZZOFF offers competitive pricing on termite prevention and treatment, often 15% to 20% below other companies. And BUZZOFF’s customer service is stelCONTACT INFO: 418 King St. Mount Pleasant, SC 29464 (843) 216-1819 www.buzzofftpc.com

TOP EXECUTIVE: Delano Francis, President

lar. “Our services are same day to within 24 hours of a phone call,” Francis says. The company offers regular or one-time pest control, termite control and moisture control. BUZZOFF treats to control fleas, roaches, even bed bugs. The termite program can include a damage protection plan, up to $1 million of protection, with a baiting system or conventional liquid. Moisture control is becoming an increasingly important concern for homeowners, Francis says. BUZZOFF can install a sump pump or encapsulate the crawl space, adding a dehumidifier. The encapsulation aids in reducing moisture, which lessens conditions that attract termites and helps in rodent-proofing your home. For new construction, BUZZOFF can provide a termite treatment with Bora-Care, which protects the wood and foundation. Looking ahead, the company plans to add more home repair and contracting services. That way, when repairs are needed because of termite damage, BUZZOFF can provide them in-house. BUZZOFF has been voted one of the top three pest control companies in the East Cooper area, and is a member of both the South Carolina and Greater Charleston Pest Control Associations. DATE FOUNDED: 2008 NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES: 6

Special Advertising Supplement | 2015 Profiles in Business

27


John B. Kern, Esq.

John B. Kern International Law:

Experience and Reach in Transnational Business Law

A

fter practicing international business law in Charleston since 1994, John B. Kern continues to represent the interests of South Carolina companies and entrepreneurs in international contract matters and disputes throughout Europe and Asia. This year, Kern marks the 10th anniversary in which he has maintained a second office in San Marino – a financial center within Italy – that allows him to represent clients in Europe more effectively. “My work overseas took off years ago when a European company I had originally sued, settled with my client and then hired me to assist them in a number of their matters,” explains Kern. “They hadn’t seen an aggressive approach like mine before.” Since then Kern has been an advocate in more than 60 international arbitrations and has pursued debtors worldwide to protect his clients’ interests. Kern’s diligence has helped a number of South Carolina companies find resolution when facing great odds. “John has been representing our company in matters of international law for over six years,” says Harry Wechsler, president of Coastal Technologies, a Hampton County-based engineering and manufacturing firm. “From 2012 through 2014, he successfully represented our interest in a CONTACT INFO: 33 Calhoun Street, #141 Charleston, SC 29401 (866) 972-3835 www.jbkinternational.com

28

complicated international arbitration involving a large multinational corporation in Seoul, South Korea. In our opinion, John’s capabilities in international law are unmatched in our region.” Kern has assembled an impressive group of lawyers in a variety of international legal markets that he calls upon to assist his clients, allowing him to be able to extend the reach of his practice to major legal capitals as well as more obscure jurisdictions. “Each case and cultural setting presents different approaches to commercial relations,” says Kern. “You have to anticipate these points of view, understand the legal maneuvers and arguments available to foreign counterparties and anticipate or counter them in order to be successful.” Aside from representing South Carolina businesses, Kern also acts as the general counsel to the largest sports agency in Europe. He advises U.S. clients operating outside the United States as well as non-U.S. clients operating here on remaining compliant with U.S. tax laws. In 2013, Kern won a landmark federal case against the Internal Revenue Service on behalf of a professional accountant client wrongly accused of misconduct involving foreign transactions. TOP EXECUTIVE: John B. Kern, Esq.

2015 Profiles in B usiness | Special Advertising Supplement

DATE FOUNDED: 1994 NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES: 2


LS3P recently celebrated its 50th anniversary by visiting local schools to read a children’s book to over 5,000 children honoring founder Frank Lucas, FAIA. Written and illustrated by LS3P staff, “Lucas the Beaver” shows kids how architecture can help build a true spirit of community.

LS3P

Visionaries Working Towards a Greater Community

E

ngage, Design, and Transform. Meaningful words that capture the work of the visionaries at LS3P. For more than 50 years, the firm’s clients and communities have benefited from the thoughtful, respected designs evinced by this award-winning Charleston-based architecture, interiors and planning firm. “We are passionate about projects that elevate our community, “ says Marc Marchant, AIA, LEED AP, Charleston office leader, vice president and principal at LS3P. “We understand that the spaces we design contribute to the fabric of the community for generations to come. We believe that architecture can transform a community, from both micro and macro standpoints. We believe that design matters.” LS3P, nationally known for its dedication to clients and to design excellence, serves a diverse array of markets including military and government, K-12, higher education, health care, office, worship, aviation and transportation, interiors, and residential. With experts in each sector, the firm develops and shares specialized knowledge among all disciplines, allowing for cross-pollination of ideas for client success. In 2014, LS3P helped Trident Tech realize its dream of creating a

CONTACT INFO: 205 ½ King St. Charleston, SC 29401 843-577-4444 www.LS3P.com

TOP EXECUTIVE: Thom Penney, President and CEO Marc Marchant, Charleston Office Leader

state-of-the-art, $30 million Nursing and Science Building in North Charleston, allowing the institution to increase its nursing graduates from 650 to accommodating over 1,000 per year. The design team drew from its expertise in both higher education and health care design; today, many of these graduates serve the Charleston community in health care spaces also designed by LS3P. More recently, LS3P used its collaborative process in designing the 8-story Campus Center Apartments in the heart of the College of Charleston campus, in tandem with local developer Anthony McAlister and Holder Construction. The stylish mid-rise tower complemented both the historic district and the college’s needs. Completed in 12 months from design to occupancy, collaboration among owner, architect, contractor and city officials was key to project success. “We have had a long-term relationship with LS3P,” says Anthony McAlister, CEO of McAlister Development. “Campus Center Apartments was an extremely challenging, if not impossible, fast track project that would not have happened without the commitment and drive of the entire team.”

DATE FOUNDED: 1963 NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES: 256 (69 local)

Special Advertising Supplement | 2015 Profiles in Business

29


Verizon Wireless business consultants (from left): Lisa Beard, Travis Smith, Tara Key, Brandon Bailey, Lakisha Freeman-Lyles and David Shepp

Verizon Wireless

Creating Efficiency-Building Solutions for Charleston Businesses

V

erizon’s business team has built a reputation for providing expert advice to the Lowcountry business community on maximizing operational efficiency using customized wireless solutions. The team’s trademark is their collaborative approach. Sometimes referred to as the Internet of Things (IoT), business solutions from Verizon constantly relay information over the high-speed 4G LTE network so businesses can better monitor assets, provide new levels of customer service, receive real time marketing analytics, produce new revenue streams, efficiently allocate field teams and improve safety. David Owen is Verizon’s associate director of strategic sales based in Charleston, and he notes that when companies contact him it’s because of the trust Verizon’s business team has built within the community. “Each member of our team specializes in collaborating with a company and listening to their experiences,” he says. “We are ready to present a menu of options to help resolve the issue, and if a solution for a particular need doesn’t exist, we’ll create one.” Travis Smith, manager of Verizon’s business sales team in

CONTACT INFO: 873 Orleans Road, Ste. 101 Charleston, SC 29407 (843) 696-4500 www.verizon.com

30

Charleston, recounts working with the Charleston Area Convention and Visitor’s Bureau to design an innovative tourism kiosk to better connect businesses with tourists. “We worked with our technology partners to create a single platform that visitors can use to book restaurant reservations, carriage rides and harbor tours. For advertisers, the kiosk provides in-depth marketing insights that empower them to adjust their daily deals.” Verizon’s business team has also worked with the Charleston Police Department to implement a solution to link each squad car to a central database. The results have been impressive. Owen says, “officers suddenly had up-to-date information at their fingertips eliminating the need to radio back and forth with dispatch. One immediate benefit was that the police saw the length of the average traffic stop cut by twothirds from 15 minutes to five.” Verizon’s approach to working with local companies is simple, and according to Smith, it comes down to one thing, “we want to understand your business so we can work with you to find the best wireless solutions to meet your needs and the needs of your customers.”

BUSINESS SALES TEAM: DATE FOUNDED: Travis Smith, Business Sales 2000 Manager NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES: David Owen, Associate 4,218 in South Carolina Director, Enterprise Sales

2015 Profiles in B usiness | Special Advertising Supplement


Jeni Bowers Palmer, director of the MUSC EAP

MUSC Employee Assistance Program

W

Bringing expertise in mental health and human resources to S.C. organizations

ith a depth of background and a high level of expertise, the Medical University of South Carolina Employee Assistance Program is a unique mission of the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences. “The support we have received from the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences, which gives us access to nationally recognized psychiatrists and researchers, has been invaluable to providing cutting edge evidence-based care,” says Jeni Bowers Palmer, the director of MUSC EAP. MUSC EAP’s counselors are faculty members with the Department of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences and each has at least 20 years of clinical experience. In addition, they have all received specific training in employee assistance, with knowledge and skills in substance abuse and mental health care, work organizations, human resources and policies and procedures. All are Certified Employee Assistance Professionals (CEAP) or Employee Assistance Specialist (EAS-C), the only professional credentials denoting expertise in EAP knowledge and behavioral health in the workplace. The counselors have also developed expertise in team building, executive coaching and workplace violence prevention. The MUSC EAP can be customized to fit the needs of a company. It CONTACT INFO: 51 Bee St. Charleston, SC 29425 (843) 792-2848 www.eapnexus.com

provides assessment, referral, brief therapy sessions and educational workshops for employees. Management training is a key component to get the best return on investment in an EAP. “We know that managers spend a disproportionate amount of their time dealing with difficult employees, so we emphasize the importance of training for managers on how to use Employee Assistance as a management tool for productivity issues and how to recognize employees who may be in need of help for mental health or substance abuse issues,“says Palmer. Another distinction of MUSC EAP is that it feels much like having an in-house company program. Palmer states, “We want to be an integral part of the organization we are serving.” The counselors learn the company’s specific human resources policies and procedures and will serve on company committees as needed. On-site counseling, training, crisis management and consultation are offered. “The more we know about a company’s culture, the more we can help the employees meet performance expectations,” Palmer says. The EAP serves the employees of MUSC, and has worked with the U.S. Department of Agriculture, public works companies, municipal governments, law firms and the Charleston School of Law, among others.

TOP EXECUTIVE: Jeni Bowers Palmer Director, Clinical Assistant Professor, Dept. of Psychiatry and Behavioral Sciences

DATE FOUNDED: 1998 NUMBER OF EMPLOYEES: 6

Special Advertising Supplement | 2015 Profiles in Business

31


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Delta Air Lines

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s JetBlue Airline â&#x20AC;&#x201D; DCA D.C. â&#x20AC;˘ Washington, â&#x20AC;&#x201D; JFK â&#x20AC;˘ New York BOS â&#x20AC;˘ Boston â&#x20AC;&#x201D;

United Airline

s

D.C. â&#x20AC;&#x201D; IAD â&#x20AC;˘ Washington, ORD â&#x20AC;˘ Chicago â&#x20AC;&#x201D; â&#x20AC;&#x201D; EWR â&#x20AC;˘ Newark, N.J. IAH â&#x20AC;˘ Houston â&#x20AC;&#x201D; Â

US Airways

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Jan.

Mar. 167,849 April 258,729 May 279,072 June 241,038 July 250,592 Aug. 289,103 Sept. 157,428

Source: Charleston

County Aviation

Total traffic

Nov. 151,020 Dec. 132,340 0

Arrivals: 64

5 2,355,75 for 2013

Oct. 159,233

68 Departures:

HOSPITALITY & TOURISM

104,517

Feb. 116,992

*As of July 2014.

68

Authority

ric a traffic to histo ns Charleston-are ums, plantatio houses, muse 2013 s, and attraction

flights seasonally Total daily monthly/ Can change

Intelligence

County Aviation

2013

Southw

s American Airline

11,416 11,303

$4M

$2M

.36 $54,073,403 for 2013 Total receipts

For the first time, China surpassed Canada and Germany as the state's top import partner.

Top commoditie

Empty containers, drums,

Mar. $5.13M

1.75M 2013

$4.872B

United $1.368B Kingdom

Synthetic resins

$2.49M

Feb. $2.72M

2.25M

Germany $3.183B Mexico

cotton

Combined gross companies Jan.

Canada $3.711B

$2.221B

Fabrics, including raw

l car Airport renta 2013 activity, receipts of rental car

3.00M

S.C. ranked second in the export of automobiles to world markets.

Top 5 countr ies importing China

Paper and paperboard , including waste

port

l Air Internationa

Total pass

June $5.02M

to S.C. in 2013

Canada $2.618B Mexico

on Charlest engers

For the third consecutive 2.50M year, S.C. ranked first among U.S. states in tire export.

increase from the prior year

of Commerce

Top 5 countr ies exporting Germany $6.924B

Sponsored by 56 IMPORT/EXPORT & DISTRIBUTION

estonbusine EDUCATION | www.charl

3.9%

ed from S.C.

General cargo, miscellaneo

$42,000

1,350

$26.1 billion

Value of goods export

Annual increase in valueWood pulp of goods exported fromLogs and lumber the Port of CharlestonAuto parts to $26.1 billion.

$44,000

Berkeley

46

113 3

$50,000

1,500

Bureau

12

06

Average teach

s, 2013

score Average SAT

1,400

ago

07

$206K 50.81%

$10,000 20.8

22.6

11

$12,500

50,000

bal econom y

Source: S.C. Department

10

08

nditure, 2013

Student enro

Berkeley

09

Per-pupil expe

â&#x20AC;&#x201C; Students per teacher

X

Part of the glo

China

Card State Report Absolute Rating ...........................Good 2013 ................... ...........................Good 2012 ...................

Card State Report Absolute Rating ....................Excellent 2013 ................... ....................Excellent 2012 ...................

30,000

MARKET FACTS

County Charleston School District

School

40,000

2014

FINANCIAL SERVICES

Card State Report Absolute Rating ...........................Good 2013 ................... ...........................Good 2012 ...................

Blvd. 102 Green Wave SC 29483 Summerville, 2.sc.us www.dorchester2.k1 Grades PK-12 Joseph R. Pye Superintendent an, C. Gail Hughes 21 Board Chairwom ................................. 0 No. of Schools Schools .................. No. of Charter

MEDICAL & HEALTH CARE

5.3%

Dorchester District 2

BUSINESS RESOURCES

11.1%

EMPLOYMENT & ECONOMIC

Carolina.

$50,000-$74,999

$100,000-$199,999

13.4 %

RTATION AND

Source: S.C. Department

benefits in South

EMPLOYMENT & ECONOMIC

EDUCATION

EDUCATION

SERVICES

St. 229 E. Main SC 29461 Moncks Corner, .us www.berkeley.k12.sc n Grades PK-12 Rodney Thompso Superintendent, , Kent Murray Board Chairman ................................43 0 No. of Schools Schools .................. No. of Charter

Card State Report Absolute Rating ..................... Average 2013 ................... ..................... Average 2012 ...................

IMPORT/EXPORT & DISTRIBUTION

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DEMOGRAPHICS

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Berkeley County School District

ict map

School distr

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School

500 Ridge St. SC 29477 St. George, 2.sc.us www.dorchester4.k1 Grades PK-12 Morris Ravenell Superintendent, , Kenneth Jenkins 6 Board Chairman .................................. 0 No. of Schools Schools .................. No. of Charter

GOVERNMENT

GOVERNMENT

38

(+3.95%)

100,000

BUSINESS RESOURCES

MEDICAL & HEALTH CARE

HOSPITALITY & TOURISM

IMPORT/EXPORT & DISTRIBUTION

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Charleston-ar Dorchester District 4

FINANCIAL SERVICES

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