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Giving Your guide to community giving in the Lowcountry | 2012-13

Navigating the future

Foundation gives kids opportunity to sail, lead and dream Special thanks to:


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to the Trident United Way The Association of Fundraising Professionals’ Outstanding Community Organization Foundation Award Winner


Your guide to community giving in the Lowcountry

contents

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Reaching kids

Staff Writers

Sailing program, TBonz team up in social entrepreneurship

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Three years to make a difference

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Execs put expertise, cash, commitment to work for nonprofit organizations

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Mapping a future workforce

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About the cover: Jasmine Mood, a sixth-grader at Mitchell Elementary School, pilots a 44-foot sailboat with the help of Ian Jones, an assistant principal at R.B. Stall High School. The pair participated in Reach Sailing, which teaches kids teamwork and social skills. Cover photo/Leslie Burden

4 Quick Facts 6 AWARD Winners 20 NONPROFIT SPOTLIGHT 30 Helping out

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Quick Facts

Quick Facts

The Lowcountry region demonstrates a commitment to positive social, educational and economic change through local, regional and statewide giving and the endowed organizations providing services.

How the South Gives

How South Carolina Gives

The Chronicle of Philanthropy analyzed IRS data from across the U.S. to create profiles of states and communities. Here is how Southern states compare, with South Carolina ranking 25:

The data compares metro areas from around the Palmetto State.

State Rank

Region Total % of income

Contributions

% of income

Florida........................................... 4...............................$7.4 billion................................... 4.6%

Columbia............... $375 million...................6.5%

Georgia.......................................... 6...............................$4.8 billion................................... 6.2%

Charleston.... $324.5 million................. 5.5%

North Carolina................................ 9...............................$4.3 billion................................... 5.9%

Augusta, Ga........... $255 million...................7.2%

Virginia......................................... 10..............................$4.2 billion................................... 4.8%

Greenville........... $122.2 million...................6.7%

Tennessee.................................... 16..............................$2.7 billion................................... 6.6%

Florence............... $59.9 million...................7.4%

Alabama....................................... 23..............................$2.3 billion................................... 7.1%

Sumter................. $30.2 million...................7.6%

South Carolina.........................25..........................$2.0 billion............................... 6.4% Louisiana...................................... 28..............................$1.5 billion................................... 5.3% Mississippi.................................... 32..............................$1.1 billion................................... 7.2%

How the Lowcountry Gives

Factoids

The data compares the tri-county care in charitable giving.

$52.2 million Berkeley County

16%

The Lowcountry’s percentage of charitable giving out of the $2 billion given annually by South Carolinians

$54.5 million Dorchester County

$214.9 million Charleston County

1.5%

South Carolina’s percentage of charitable giving from the $135.8 billion donated annually across the U.S.

Annual Giving by Residents in Area Municipalities

-$21,000

Charleston

$74.3 million

Mount Pleasant

$60.6 million

Summerville

$40.1 million

2009 to 2010 annual budget of the

Goose Creek

$16.7 million

Association of Fundraising Professionals

North Charleston

$13.8 million

Change in giving to foundations from the

Source: The Chronicle of Philanthropy

4 Giving: Your guide to community giving in the Lowcountry

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Largest Endowment Holdings in the Charleston Area 1. Roper St. Francis.....................................................................$726,492,683 2. Medical University of South Carolina.......................................$207,027,475 3. Coastal Community Foundation...............................................$163,986,267 4. The Citadel..............................................................................$144,995,570 5. College of Charleston................................................................$64,281,545 6. Bishop Gadsden........................................................................$38,700,609 7. Ceres Foundation......................................................................$27,633,177 8. Middleton Place Foundation......................................................$11,855,692 9. Charleston Parks Conservancy....................................................$9,554,619 10. Companion Foundation.............................................................$8,294,096 11. Spaulding Paolozzi Foundation..................................................$8,014,036 12. Trident United Way....................................................................$7,263,318 13. Elizabeth C. Bonner Charitable Trust..........................................$6,910,833 14. S.C. Coastal Conservation League.............................................$6,693,484 15. Historic Charleston Foundation..................................................$6,354,361 16. Association for the Blind............................................................$6,078,814 17. Charleston Museum..................................................................$5,869,174 18. Sumner Pingree Jr. Family Foundation......................................$5,608,155 19. Charleston Library Society........................................................$5,155,338 20. S.C. Historical Society...............................................................$4,197,780 21. Spoleto Festival USA.................................................................$3,446,658 22. Jerry and Anita Zucker Family Foundation.................................$3,143,765 23. Next Child Fund Inc. .................................................................$3,128,420 24. International Primate Protection League....................................$3,088,973 25. Charleston Animal Society.........................................................$2,999,604 26. Lowcountry Open Land Trust.....................................................$2,521,809 27. Charleston Day School..............................................................$2,311,355 28. Patrick Family Foundation.........................................................$1,926,717 29. Preservation Society of Charleston............................................$1,839,841 30. Carolina Children’s Charity........................................................$1,463,729 31. Gibbes Museum of Art...............................................................$1,434,216 32. Charles & Brenda Larsen Foundation........................................$1,177,083 33. Gary Davis Family Foundation...................................................$1,000,000 Source: Guidestar data compiled and provided by the Coastal Community Foundation

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Award Winners

AFP recognizes 2012 outstanding philanthropists Each year at its National Philanthropy Day luncheon, the Association of Fundraising Professionals Lowcountry Chapter honors outstanding individuals and corporations that serve as models of philanthropy and whose philanthropic leadership enriches the community. The Outstanding Corporate Philanthropist Award recognizes a business or corporation that has demonstrated outstanding commitment through financial support and

motivation of others in philanthropic community involvement. Likewise, the Outstanding Individual Philanthropist Award recognizes an individual or family with a proven record of generosity and exemplary leadership in demonstrating civic and charitable responsibility. The Outstanding Community Organization Foundation Award recognizes a community organization or foundation that has demonstrated outstanding commitment

through financial support and encouragement and motivation of others in philanthropic involvement and leadership roles. This year, Charles Cole has been given special recognition for championing spinal cord research by facilitating collaboration between hospitals and health organizations. This year’s other winners are General Dynamics (Corporate), Wayland and Marion Cato (Individual) and the Trident United Way (Organization).

Charles Cole, Special Recognition After Charles “Charlie” Cole fell down a flight of stairs in 2008 and injured his spinal cord, his wife Joanne spent a year compiling information about doctors, therapies, vans, wheelchairs and more. “We sat back and tried to think what I could do to help with this effort,” Cole said. Cole spearheaded a collaboration of leading facilities, including Roper St. Francis Healthcare, the Medical University of South Carolina, the Coastal Carolinas Health Alliance and South Carolina Spinal Cord Injury Research Fund. The result is the Center for Spinal Cord Injury, a clinic that operates out of Roper’s downtown Charleston hospital. The clinic is open one day a month. People with spinal cord injuries go through a series of meetings with doctors, nurses, therapists, pharmacists and social workers, Cole said. “When you leave there, you’ve got everything that took Joanne a year to create,” Cole said. The clinic opened in July 2012 and averages about 10 patients a month from around the state. Cole said he hopes the number of referrals will grow as this is the only such clinic in the state. “We hope that the knowledge of spinal cord injuries spreads throughout South Carolina so more people know about the injury the impact on patients,” he said. Cole is vice chairman of the Roper St. Francis Foundation where he’s focused on raising money for the clinic. The goal is to create a $1.5 million endowment to operate the clinic. Cole saw first-hand the impact of his

work recently. While waiting for his wife to pick him up after a therapy session, a young woman approached him and offered her thanks. “I’m thanking you for the spinal cord injury clinic,” she told Cole. “Had I not gone there, I would not be receiving the therapy I’m receiving today.” “That’s about the best as it can get,” Cole said. In addition to his work with the clinic, Cole has a lengthy history of community service in each city where he’s lived.

6 Giving: Your guide to community giving in the Lowcountry

Locally, Cole has served as president of the Charleston Metro Chamber of Commerce, president of the Juvenile Restitution Program, treasurer of the Gibbes Museum of Art and chairman of the board of deacons and an elder at First Scots Presbyterian Church. He was secretary/treasurer of The Citadel Foundation, served on the board of directors for The American College of the Building Arts and the Friend’s of Sullivan’s Island School Foundation. – By Holly Fisher www.charlestonbusiness.com


AWARD WINNERS General Dynamics, Corporate Philanthropist One thing that didn’t change with General Dynamics’ acquisition of Force Protection last year was the company’s commitment to the local community. At its Ladson facility, General Dynamics Land Systems Force Protection designs, manufactures and tests military support vehicles, specifically armored vehicles able to withstand land mines, hostile fire and improvised explosive devices. Among its charitable sponsorships are the Cooper River Bridge Run, Lowcountry Food Bank, the Medal of Honor Society, the Patriots Point Foundation and Joint Base Charleston, explained Tommy Pruitt, communications and marketing manager. The company also supports Trident United Way and this year worked with Teachers’ Supply Closet on Day of Caring. The company also sponsors Red Shirt Fridays at the Charleston RiverDogs in which attendees wearing a red shirt receive $1 off admission and can choose to donate that dollar to military families in need. The company also sponsors Military Appreciation Night.

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in 15 and 20 years,” Pruitt said. “It’s an Involvement with the RiverDogs as well as the South Carolina Stingrays hockey team investment in the future. We’re growing our own engineering and technology talent. And and Charleston Battery soccer team are that’s not just important to us as a company not only good for the community, but also but it’s important to us as a region.” for General Dynamics’ 600 local The company’s efforts – employees who can participate in although started as Force those events, Pruitt said. Protection – continue under the Education programs are also General Dynamics name, and important to General Dynamics. Pruitt said it’s important for people The company funds scholarships to see that the new company at Charleston Southern University engaged in the community – both and Trident Technical College as locally and in communities around well as supporting The Citadel the world. Foundation. Chris Brown The employees appreciate that With K-12 students, General Vice-President, Dynamics focuses on robotics General Dynamics commitment as well, he said. “I’m happy to see that the company’s and STEM (science, technology, taking an active role in the engineering, math) initiatives. It provides mentors for students at Burke High community and it’s not just a place to work. It makes people proud to be associated with School and supports area robotics teams. the company and work here.” “It’s important to us because that’s where we’re going to get our future scientists, – By Holly Fisher engineers and designers that are going to develop the products and protect people

Giving: Your guide to community giving in the Lowcountry

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Award Winners Previous Philanthropy Day honorees and winners Winners

Year Name 1996 Piggly Wiggly 1997 Bank of America 1998 Anita and Jerry Zucker & Bell South 1999 Peatsy and Fritz Hollings & the Post and Courier Foundation 2000 Laura and Bill Hewitt & Wachovia Bank, N.A. 2001 Linda and Tony Bakker & Dolphin Architects and Builders 2002 Judith and Melvin Solomon & Sticky Fingers Restaurant Group 2003 The Hugh C. Lane Family & Publix Supermarkets 2004 Edwin S. Pearlstine & Croghan’s Jewel Box 2005 Nella Barkley & Carolina First Bank 2006 Charles and Celeste Patrick & The Duke Endowment 2007 Dr. Theodore Stern & Blackbaud, Inc. 2008 Charles and Andrea Volpe & Baker Motor Company 2009 Bill and Ruth Baker & Charleston Place Hotel 2010 Ted Legasey, the Charleston Riverdogs, & Women Making a Difference 2011 George and Sandra Fennell, GlassPro, & Coastal Community Foundation

Honorees Year Category Name 2005........ Donor............................. Paul and Paula Heinauer 2005........ Volunteer....................... Andrew HaLevi 2005........ Creativity....................... Normal LoRusso 2005........ Community.................... Lucey Mortgage 2006........ Benevolent Spirit............ Frances Fike 2006........ Creative Spirit................ Jeff Tayler 2006........ Philanthropic Spirit......... The Muhler Company 2006........ Community Spirit........... WINGS for Kids 2007........ Benevolent Spirit............ Priscilla McLeod Robinson 2007........ Creative Spirit................ Gil Shuler 2007........ Philanthropic Spirit......... Dixon Hughes, PLLC 2007........ Community Spirit........... Junior League of Charleston 2007........ Readers’ Choice............. Chef Brett McKee 2008........ Benevolent Spirit............ Louis Yuhasz 2008........ Creative Spirit................ Denise Barto 2008........ Philanthropic Spirit......... Blackbaud, Inc. 2008........ Community Spirit........... Hope Haven of the Lowcountry 2008........ Readers’ Choice............. Thomasena Stokes-Marshall 2009........ Benevolent Spirit............ Jacki Baer-Fields to Families 2009........ Creative Spirit................ Rawle Murdy Associates 2009........ Philanthropic Spirit......... Hulsey Law Group 2009........ Community Spirit........... East Cooper Community Outreach 2009........ Lifetime Achievement..... Jerry Zucker 2009........ Readers’ Choice............. Debby Stephenson-Courageous Kidz

8 Giving: Your guide to community giving in the Lowcountry

Trident United Way, Community Organization Trident United Way’s role in the Charleston area community is that of facilitator, organizer and strategic partner. But in all its efforts the goal is the same: creating real, long-lasting change in the community. “United Way is not the organization that does the direct service work that changes conditions in the community. We’re the organization that brings organizations and people together to create formulas, strategies and collaboration to create that change,” said Barry Waldman, vice president of communications. An example is Links to Success, a proven model that addresses a child’s poverty, health and family issues, thereby helping the child academically, Waldman said. Links to Success is in 11 tri-county schools. Those schools have high levels of poverty and low performance records. After implementing Links to Success, nine schools have improved their state ratings, Waldman explained. The program also addresses lack of education among parents. “We know Chris Kerrigan that if the mother has graduated from President CEO, high school, the child’s chances are Trident United Way four times as great,” Waldman said. “As part of the program, we’re working with parents to get them into GED programs and get them financially stable. Mom can’t read with her kid if she can’t read.” Trident United Way also has seen significant success with its 2-yearold CharityTracker program, an online system that creates a more efficient way to connect the many local churches and agencies with the people who need their services. Waldman recounts the story of a woman who went to a local agency in need of food for her family. The case worker found out this woman made a living with her sewing machine, which had broken. The case worker used CharityTracker to put out a call for a sewing machine and within an hour had three sewing machines. “That’s the system working perfectly,” Waldman said. “It’s all about streamlining the system and making it work better.” Another such program is The Benefit Bank-SC, a web-based software program that completes multiple applications for benefits, such as food stamps, student loans and Medicaid, in one in-take process. “We know that the majority of people who qualify for foods stamps don’t get them because the application process is so onerous,” Waldman said. So, again, it’s all about long-lasting change. “The idea is to get people financially stable so they can start moving up the ladder to self-sufficiency,” he said. – By Holly Fisher

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AWARD WINNERS Wayland and Marion Cato, Individual Philanthropist For more than 20 years, Wayland and Marion Cato have directed $1.2 million through the Coastal Community Foundation, establishing more than 10 individual and endowment funds that benefit nonprofits such as Spoleto Festival USA, American College of the Building Arts, Charleston Southern University and Ashley Hall. In addition to these established endowments, the Catos also have made significant gifts directly to individual institutions. “Through their endowments, the Catos will continue to shape and benefit our community even beyond their lifetimes,” said Leigh Handal, director of philanthropy at Pet Helpers and chairwoman of the Association of Fundraising Professionals Awards Committee. “The educational scholarships

they have established will not only help students make their own mark on the world, they will also inspire charity among the young people they help. An emphasis on improving the future is clearly central to the Catos’ philanthropic giving.” The Catos also made the largest single gift ever to the College of Charleston’s School of

the Arts to establish the Marion and Wayland H. Cato Jr. Center for the Arts. They have established two endowed scholarships at Charleston Southern University, one honoring Marion Cato’s father, L. Mendel Rivers, that benefits students who are or have served in the armed forces, and another in their name that benefits students in need who demonstrate a strong work ethic. The Gibbes Museum of Art also has benefited from both the Catos’ financial support, as well as their leadership on the board. Spoleto Festival Director Nigel Redden particularly credited Wayland Cato’s “vigilance and experienced oversight [with leading] the festival from the brink of financial disaster to a position of fiscal responsibility and health.” – By Holly Fisher

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Jasmine Mood, a sixth-grader at Mitchell Elementery School , helps hoist the sail on the Sophie, a 44-foot sailboat used by the Reach Sailing program.

10 Giving: Your guide to community giving in the Lowcountry

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Re ching Kids Sailing program, TBonz team up in social entrepreneurship By Matt Tomsic | Photography by Leslie Burden

During an independent study course, John Miller, a former bartender at TBonz, came up with the idea for a charity that would use sailing as a platform to teach kids teamwork and social skills. He shared the idea with his manager at TBonz, and he approached the restaurant’s co-owner, who told Miller to run with it.

Sixth-grader Khalil Pearson grabs the wheel, answering his captain’s call to pilot a 44-foot sailboat from the Charleston City Marina into the Ashley River. The Sophie glides into the river while Capt. John Miller hops around the cockpit, readying the sails. “I need a tug-of-war candidate,” Miller shouts as he grabs the line to the mizzen sail at the boat’s stern. Jasmine Mood and Bryane Russell help Miller pull the line, and the sail rises to the top of the mast, catching a light breeze on a 79-degree day in October. “That’s one down, next one, one more,”

Miller shouts. The trio hops to the cockpit, maneuvers around Khalil and grabs the line to the mainsail. “Tug of war,” Miller shouts. “Who’s helping? Pull, c’mon. ... Alright, done deal.” The mainsail catches the light breeze, and the wind pushes the boat forward. “Who wants to cut the engine off?” Miller says. “Alright, we’re sailing now.” Reach Sailing, founded by Miller, organized the afternoon sail, one of dozens it does throughout the year for students across the Lowcountry. The program is funded by the TBonz Foundation, a charitable organization

created by TBonz Restaurant Group to invest in social entrepreneurship and to strengthen and improve the Lowcountry. Reach Sailing teaches kids teamwork and social skills while giving them a learning experience outside of the classroom. “We don’t look at numbers,” Miller said of the program’s scope. “If 50 kids go out a month, that’s fine. If five kids go out a month, that’s fine. It’s about the quality of service.”

Investing in social entrepreneurs Jerry Scheer, a co-owner of TBonz Restaurant Group, said the restaurants and founda-

Giving: Your guide to community giving in the Lowcountry 11


Cover Story

Khalil Pearson, a sixth-grader at Mitchell Elementary School, helps pack up the mainsail as the Sophie returns to the Charleston City Marina.

Reach Sailing’s 27-foot sailboat the Whisper glides through the Ashley River with elementary school students as its crew.

Pearson steers the Sophie from Charleston City Marina into the Ashley River. Pearson said he enjoys racing the program’s other sailboat, the Whisper, during their trips.

tion like to do more than just present checks to charities. “We like to get involved with the social entrepreneurs who turn a dime into a dollar,” Scheer said. The restaurant group and its owners, Scheer and Mark Cumins, created the foundation more than a decade ago, and they knew their company’s growth would be tied to the community. “We didn’t really tell that story because we didn’t want to give the impression of self-serving,” said Emmy Scott, director of marketing for TBonz. “But we’ve realized in the last few years and by being recognized by other people in the community that we have a great story, and we want to tell that story. “By us telling the story, it gets recognition for programs like Reach Sailing, Delicious

Delights and Yoga Kidz.” Scott said the foundation does accept donations. “But the majority of our funding is through our own restaurants contributing a percentage of net sales,” Scott said. In 2010, the foundation spent $206,000 on a variety of charitable projects, according to the most recent IRS filing available on Guidestar. The expenses included funding for TBonz-backed programs like Reach Sailing ($20,600) and Yoga Kidz ($38,500). The foundation also gave $10,000 to the Komen Charleston Race for the Cure; $14,600 to the Lowcountry Food Bank; $20,000 to the College of Charleston; $15,400 to Charleston Volunteers for Literacy and $19,300 to the Boys and Girls Club. The foundation limits its expenses by us-

ing a volunteer workforce; everyone from Scheer, the foundation’s president, to Miller donates time and isn’t paid. “We avoid the trickle-down effect because there is none,” Miller said, adding that the money that goes from the restaurants to the foundation eventually reaches kids through its programs.

12 Giving: Your guide to community giving in the Lowcountry

‘Run with it’ The idea for Reach Sailing began during an independent study class at the College of Charleston for which Miller and his professor agreed he would write a thesis. Miller, a former boat captain who served in the Coast Guard, was bartending at TBonz while he wrote the thesis, and he told the restaurant’s manager about the idea while they were sailing. The manager took it to Scheer.

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“They looked at it and were like, ‘Run with it,’ ” Miller said. Now, the program provides transportation, food and sailing for kids at Mitchell Math and Science Elementary School and Buist Academy, among other Lowcountry schools. “When I mix the two demographics, there’s no delineation between their performance, their behavior,” Miller said. “You’ve got the same thing because it’s a foreign environment, and it puts them on an equal platform.” The program provides knowledge and experience that students can’t get in the classroom, Miller said. It teaches them teamwork, social skills and history; it also teaches them about the environment and literacy, as students respond to prompts and write reflective essays about their sailing trips. Khalil, Jasmine and Bryane said they have fun during the sailing trips, which are sometimes awards for good behavior. Khalil said he likes racing the other program’s sailboat, and Jasmine said she enjoys going over the wake and visiting undeveloped islands. Eric Center, a fourth-grader at Mitchell, said that his first sail was a little scary but that he was excited about sailing again. It’s fun riding on the sailboat, he said, and it’s relaxing. During one of Reach’s sails in October, Miller’s crew prepared to jibe and reverse course to head back to the marina. Miller explained the move to the kids, saying the maneuver turns the stern of the boat through the wind. He told the kids to watch the boom. “Careful, Jasmine,” Bryane called to the boat’s bow. The Sophie turned, and the crew began pulling down its sails. The boat neared the dock, and Miller steered. “How many tides do we have a day in Charleston?” Miller asked. “Four,” Khalil said. “That’s right, buddy, that’s right. Two coming in, two going out. So we’re always sailing in moving water.”

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Yoga program teaches kids control Yoga Kidz has grown from Leigh Biearman’s 4-year-olds to sixth-graders participate in the work in California and the TBonz Foundation’s program, and 13 volunteer yoga instructors teach financial backing into a program that reaches about 20 classes each week. The program has several benefits for the stuhundreds of elementary school students a year. Biearman was living in San Diego, running a dents, Biearman said, and teachers have begun yoga program for kids, when she met with Jerry participating, too, during the yoga sessions. “Kids know when they get frusScheer, a co-owner of TBonz Restautrated and angry, they can stop, take rant Group and a friend of her father’s. a break and breathe,” Biearman said. Biearman talked to Scheer about her “That’s one of the biggest benefits.” yoga work on the West Coast and said She said Scheer has been continushe was considering a move to the ally supportive of the program. Lowcountry. Scheer said he’d help her “He was all about it from the getstart a yoga program here. go,” Biearman said. “He really under“I think he probably heard that passtood it’s not about just test scores sion in my voice,” Biearman said. Biearman and academics. We treat the whole Biearman started the program in 2008, and it now serves Mitchell Math and Sci- child and start giving them some tools to release ence Elementary School, Charleston Progressive stress and anger. The kids now who are in sixth grade, they’ve had yoga since they were in first Academy and other schools. Now, Yoga Kidz is in its fifth year and has ex- grade once a week. It makes me feel kind of old panded to Myrtle Beach. About 400 students from to see these kids who are now taller than me.”

Students at Mitchell Elementary participate in weekly Yoga Kidz classes. (Photo/Andy Owens) With the Sophie’s sails down, Miller used the engine to turn the boat and back it into the boat slip. Spread every few feet along the ship’s starboard side, the students held lines, awaiting Miller’s instructions. They passed a 24-foot sailboat used in trans-Atlantic races, and Khalil and Bryane debated the best way to cross the Atlantic: Drive all day or drive all night?

“It doesn’t make sense for you to go to sleep during the day and wake up at night and drive,” Bryane said. “You are not nocturnal.” “I wouldn’t drive 24 hours a day,” Khalil said. “Sorry.” The Sophie pulled closer to its slip, and as it parked, Khalil, Bryane and Jasmine tossed their lines to volunteers waiting on the dock. “Inside voices,” Miller shouted. “Stay seated until we say ‘clear.’ Good job, dream team.”

Giving: Your guide to community giving in the Lowcountry 13


Glenn Tollevsen works with Tre’Von Taylor, 6, at Mary Ford Elementary


Philanthropy

Three years to make a difference Execs put expertise, cash, commitment to work for nonprofit organizations

By Andy Owens | Photography by Leslie Burden

E

ach member of the Charleston Philanthropic Partnership pays $5,000 a year for the opportunity to do more than just give money. The group, which includes investment bankers, CEOs, economists, business consultants and managing directors of some of the largest companies and financial firms in the world, chooses organizations to support with commitments of money, leadership and time. Their common link is that they live in Charleston and have expertise and experience, along with capital, to provide support for community organizations — without taking charge of the organizations — by working alongside board members, staff, volunteers and clients of nonprofits. “We’re bringing together like-minded individuals that would like to leverage their time and their money to help nonprofits expand and improve their overall sustainability,” said Paul Kohlheim, a management consultant and chairman of Charleston Philanthropic Partnership since it began three years ago. For many philanthropists, giving money

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Literacy consultant Linda Kasarjian works with teachers at Mary Ford Elementary. isn’t always enough. Nonprofit consultants specializing in giving issues frequently discuss ways to keep active donors engaged to keep them giving year after year. Charleston Philanthropic Partnership goes beyond that, by putting the donors in control of how the money is spent and providing three years of

direct input and side-by-side planning. “The three years is important because we’re really focused on sustainability. That’s a challenge for nonprofits,” Kohlheim said. “The three years gives us enough time that we chart out the objectives that we want to accomplish with this organization. We’re their partner, and we measure how we’re doing against those objectives each year.” The organization started with seven or eight members. That number has increased, and Kohlheim said that after its first three years, the Partnership is ready to grow even more in the future. A larger membership would give the organization more resources and expertise; it would account for the ebb and flow of members with varying interests; and it would give the organization time to allow for substantial change. “We’re kind of looking at that 20-to25 range as being sort of an initial critical mass for the organization, giving us enough breadth of people around the table,” he said, adding that cities similar to Charleston support much larger organizations.

Giving: Your guide to community giving in the Lowcountry 15


Philanthropy

Ford niques at Mary tes teaching tech ra st . on rd m de Fo y n at Mar Kasarjia Zion Jackson, 6, nsultant Linda co ith w cy ra ks te or Li w n p: so To a Mix ol. Bottom: Dan Elementary Scho

First partnerships Sherry Snipes-Williams, CEO of Charleston Promise Neighborhoods, said several members of the Philanthropic Partnership were sitting at the table when the idea of building an organization to transform the Charleston Neck area was being discussed several years ago. “Our work is around community and

neighborhood transformation and school transformation,” she said. “So we were fortunate to partner with Charleston Philanthropic Partnership in our early years to help us design and test programming models.” Snipes-Williams said having a small leadership team provided significant depth for the fledgling nonprofit and helped challenge assumptions and prevent it from making mis-

16 Giving: Your guide to community giving in the Lowcountry

takes that could have slowed down or derailed the organization. “We certainly benefited from the vast experience that the members have from their business experience but also from their other philanthropic experiences,” she said. “For us, it was like having our own consulting and coaching team from all over the country and now in Charleston.” Charleston Promise Neighborhoods and Charleston Volunteers for Literacy were the first two organizations supported by Charleston Philanthropic Partnership during its first three years. Kohlheim was on the team that first met with Charleston Volunteers for Literacy. It was an off-site meeting that nearly every partner and the entire board attended. The meeting allowed both sides to collectively understand where the organization was going and what the Charleston Philanthropic Partnership could provide them. Kohlheim said the moment stands out because of the realization of what they were going to be able to accomplish together. “We walked out of that room really feeling like partners with that organization. That was a great start to that relationship,” he said. www.charlestonbusiness.com


Philanthropy Growing relationships The Charleston Philanthropic Partnership models itself after Social Venture Partners International groups and other philanthropic organizations. The Coastal Community Foundation of South Carolina serves as the facilitating organization for the Partnership. Edie Blakeslee, regional vice president for the Coastal Community Foundation, said that as the Partnership has grown, leadership roles have emerged and now the organization is ready to grow and add members. “We try to make it very clear upfront — yes, it’s a financial contribution, and it’s also a time commitment,� she said. “If someone is interested it’s usually a conversation. We’re pretty transparent. Come to a meeting, luncheon. See if you think we’re a personality fit, and then if there’s interest, we give you more information.� Kohlheim said cities such as Pittsburgh, Cincinnati and Seattle have Social Venture organizations that serve a variety of nonprofit organizations with a larger membership. “I’ve seen how powerful it can be in other places,� Blakeslee said.

The tangible results depend on the organization’s needs, but many include reduced costs, access to working capital, strategic planning with business experts and increased numbers of people served. Blakeslee said all of the goals are geared toward going beyond the three-year partnership. “Make no mistake, nonprofits have to run, operate. They’re running a business,� Kohlheim said. “Most of the same principles, if not all, apply. You need to bring in revenue, you know, you need to deploy that revenue in an optimal way to achieve the mission.� Snipes-Williams said for Charleston Promise Neighborhoods, the Partnership helped develop a youth leadership program at area schools, implement a resident leadership program and launch a teacher incentive pay program at four elementary schools. She said the capital directly funded community service projects and resident-led planning retreats to get residents involved in community support. “They saw a lot of faith and had a lot of trust in what we were doing,� Snipes-Williams said.

•

How Charleston Philanthropic Partnership works for charities Executives, top-level managers or others with a desire to offer financial and hands-on assistance to nonprofit and charitable organizations in the Charleston area pay $5,000 a year and commit time and expertise. Members gather information about issues and charities in the region, lobby for their particular choices and vote on which nonprofits to assist for three years. The Partnership hopes to increase membership to 20 or 25, which today includes 14 voting groups: • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Betty Anderson, Brady Anderson Elizabeth Bradham Betsy Cahill, John Cahill Jim Greenho, Kecia Greenho John Farrish George Flynn, Everett Wilcox David Johnston Roger Jones Marc Chardon, Marnie Ross Chardon Julie Klaper, Marty Klaper Paul Kohlheim, Louise Kohlheim Ted Legasey Tom Martin, Wanda Martin Alex Opoulos, Chad Walldorf

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Workforce

Mapping a Future Workforce Community leaders mold cradle-to-career initiative to focus on education, workforce, health and job skills By Andy Owens

B

ryan Derreberry quickly identifies the No. 1 obstacle facing business in the Charleston area: finding skilled workers to fill a lot of open jobs. The president and CEO of the Charleston Metro Chamber of Commerce said identifying the gap between job skills and job sector demands has never been the problem. “Not only is an educated and a skilled workforce an issue for companies considering locating to this region, it’s the No. 1 issue for every businessperson in this room today,” Derreberry said during a recent Business Journal event. “That’s the first thing that each of you require for your business growth.” For the past year, a group of business and community leaders have been meeting to organize an alignment of common goals and efforts, labeled “Cradle to Career,” to accurately trace and resolve the underlying issues, something that remains elusive for Charleston and much of South Carolina. The idea is to get everyone speaking a common language, using models and metrics that have worked in other communities, to find solutions that challenge preconceptions by focusing on educating children from early childhood and into the working world. The focus isn’t just on education and job training, but also on uncovering wide swaths of overlapping social and economic issues that seem to be a constant drag on sustainable growth across South Carolina. “It is far bigger than any one organization or institution, this concept of collective com-

munity impact,” said Chris Kerrigan, president of Trident United Way. The buy-in by stakeholders includes, among others, all of the regional colleges and universities, all of the area school district, the Charleston Regional Development Alliance, the Charleston Metro Chamber of Commerce, the Coastal Community Foundation, Trident United Way, the Medical University of South Carolina, all local cities and counties, and businesses and industries such as The InterTech Group based in North Charleston. “We need to have the best and the brightest,” said Anita Zucker, CEO of The InterTech Group. “We need to have opportunity for young people. If we don’t do something that’s happening at every level of education, we can’t change their lives.”

Challenging perceptions Trident United Way serves as a convening agency for Charleston’s Cradle to Career efforts until the program develops enough to be independent, Kerrigan said. Details about the initiative are still being worked out with stakeholders, who are continuing to plan and gather information from other states. He estimated the first year of operating costs to be about $500,000, with Cradle to Career to be housed inside one of the member institutions and incubated for three to five years. He said supporting money could come from angel investors and those who understand the importance of the underlying goals.

18 Giving: Your guide to community giving in the Lowcountry

“This organization is not going to do the work; it’s not going to fund the work. It’s going to help those who are accountable for the work to do the work better,” Kerrigan said. “It takes probably a more sophisticated donor and a more sophisticated investor. It’s not going to pay off in year one or three, but in year five or seven, it will pay off.” David Ginn, president of the Charleston Regional Development Alliance, was among a group who visited cities that have used this model effectively, including Cincinnati, Austin, Texas, and Nashville, Tenn., to find out what might work in Charleston. Five years ago, Nashville’s metro area had high school graduation rates of 69%. After the region’s cradle-to-career initiative, called Alignment Nashville, was implemented, graduation rates jumped to 83%. Ginn said the relatively short time frame allows the partners in the region to see a quicker return on their investment. “That is exciting to me,” Ginn said. “It means it’s not someone else’s problem. It’s not another generation’s challenge.” Under Cincinnati’s STRIVE initiative, kindergarten readiness improve by 72% in one urban school district and math scores improve by 44% in another. Not every school system saw such dramatic improvements, but most saw the needle move in a positive way. Dr. Ray Greenberg, president of MUSC, said the success of the effort depends on bringing other community resources to bear to create a climate of support that uses models www.charlestonbusiness.com


Workforce and metrics to challenge perceptions. “I think you don’t want to be naive — the challenges are huge,” Greenberg said. “And to be fair, I think the school system gets blamed for issues that are more community and social issues. When kids are living in poverty and there may be a single-parent household or even more stressed situations than that, the school can’t make up for all the social challenges in the community.” Derreberry said there’s been a lack of investment in schools at every level, from pre-K to postgraduate, and the success of this effort requires going beyond providing the minimum funding and support levels to educators. “We must not only invest in education, we need to transform the education outcomes in our community and expand the capacity of our schools,” he said. “Education funding must be looked at in the light of it being an investment in our current and future prosperity, and not a cost.”

different groups and elected officials shows the time could be right for moving the community to take ownership of education and workforce development in this way. “I think it’s very important that the business community, the elected officials, the schools — all the area higher education institutions have expressed interest in being involved,” Greenberg said. “To me, the exciting part is everyone is going in the same direction thus far.” Greenberg said as a large employer with nearly 13,000 employees, MUSC has families with children and spouses who need opportunities so they won’t be lured away, but there’s a health component that interests him as well. For example, data show that children with poor dental health tend to miss more school. “The reciprocal part that you talk about is obviously children can’t be effective learners if they’re not healthy and if they’re distracted by not getting enough to eat,” Greenberg said. “It’s not just a narrow focus on health. It’s a broad perspective making sure people have Aligning efforts Greenberg said the buy-in from so many access to good health.”

Kerrigan agrees that Charleston is ready for this kind of effort. “I do think in the Charleston community and the Charleston region, the sun and the moon and the stars are starting to align,” Kerrigan said. “Individuals can’t do it or one corporation or one institution. It’s just too big. Pooling together, working together, I think we see the impact it has. We all have a role to play, just how do we do it?” Zucker said she sees this as an opportunity for many community organizations and businesses that might have done good work on their own in the past to come and work together by joining forces. She said everyone has a part to play in this effort to transform the community by charting a path together. “The key is we have to find people who are philosophically going to see the purpose behind this,” she said. “Everyone kind of has to be an investor in this. You’re investing in something with tremendous value. As a business owner, I want to know that I’m going to have the best and the brightest people to choose from.”

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Giving: Your guide to community giving in the Lowcountry 19


Our ACTIONs speak louder than words.

At Alcoa Mt. Holly, giving back to the community is part of our core values. Through the Alcoa ACTION (Alcoans Coming Together in our Neighborhoods) initiative, teams of Alcoa employee volunteers earn Alcoa Foundation grants of up to $3,000 for the community organizations where they volunteer. And each October Mt. Holly employees join thousands of coworkers from around the globe to celebrate the Worldwide Month of Service, rallying the volunteer spirit to complete community projects and earn ACTION grants for area organizations. Last year Alcoa employees completed 20 community projects during the 2012 Month of Service alone. Our 600+ employees live our values each day individually — as volunteer firefighters, PTA presidents, and little league coaches — as well as collectively through the group volunteer projects they complete.

Thanks to their passion, and ACTIONS, Alcoa is making our community a better place.

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NONPROFIT SPOTLIGHT

Mission statement Seeking to put God’s love into action, Habitat for Humanity brings people together to build homes, communities and hope.

Name of organization: Trident Habitat for Humanity Year established locally: 2010 Top local executive: Chris Tweedy, Development Officer Contact information: P.O. Box 1990, Mount Pleasant, S.C. 29465 843-972-0312 Fax: 843-881-2823 Website: www.tridenthabitat.org Corporate giving contacts: Same as above Average number of volunteers in 2012: Volunteers are an essential component of all Habitat activities across all Trident Habitat affiliates. Anywhere from 15 to more than 50 volunteers contribute daily to Habitat’s construction programs as well as our ReStores, year-round. This includes dedicated individuals, local companies and corporations, out of town visitors, as well as churches and other nonprofit organizations. Total operating budget (2012-2013): $137,000 Percent of revenue dedicated to program services: 100% Geographic area or specific population served: Tri-county region, including Berkeley, Charleston and Dorchester counties. Greatest need:  Raising funds to support Trident Habitat’s partner affiliate efforts to alleviate poverty housing throughout the tri-county region. 2012 Top achievements: 2012 has been a formative year in the development of Trident Habitat. Over the last year, we worked to define and operationalize an innovative regional partnership of Habitat affiliates (approximately five others exist across the country). Through this process, we have identified several ways to collaborate to make Habitat more efficient and effective in striving to reduce poverty housing in the tri-county. We have done this by: • Coordinating back-office services (shared database) • Collaborated on construction efforts and shared services (marketing)

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• Instituted a regional energy efficiency program to build Habitat homes to Energy Star Version 3 standards; • Hosted a design blitz charrette with the support of 30 local architects to share house designs and planning steps as a regional entity (also to reduce materials costs) — Alcoa has been instrumental in making this happen. 2013 Goals: • Launch a sponsorship campaign to build Energy Star Version 3 Habitat houses across the tri-county • Develop and launch a regional repair program to expand Habitat’s reach in addressing poverty housing concerns Fundraising events: Each of the partner affiliates of Trident Habitat for Humanity — Charleston, Dorchester, East Cooper, Habitat Berkeley County and Sea Island — conduct special events within their community/service area that support Habitat efforts across the region. Trident Habitat does not conduct special events or major fundraisers. Corporate giving opportunities: Partnering with local communities to advance Trident Habitat’s 2013 goals of rolling out an energy efficient home building program (sponsorship and volunteers) and develop/test/launch a regional repair effort in support of all communities Trident Habitat and its affiliates touch. Sponsored by

Giving: Your guide to community giving in the Lowcountry 21


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Mission statement To keep children safe from abuse and, when abuse occurs, to work with our community to bring healing to these children and their families. Fundraising events: • Chart a Course for Children: Known for its intimate size and generous heart, this event has raised more than $1.15 million since DNLCC provides assessment and treatment services for abused children 2001 to help abused children and their families at The Dee Norton and their families in a safe, supportive, child-friendly environment. Lowcountry Children’s Center. Guests enjoy cocktails and appetizers DNLCC coordinates with 39 partner agencies in the community as a 44% Human at Charleston’s only waterfront restaurant, Fleet Landing, while multi-disciplinary team to take Hardware appropriate action and put a32% plan in place Malfunction Error bidding on silent auction items. Held from 6-10 p.m., Feb. 7, 2013 for the child and family. Since 1991, DNLCC has helped more than 20,000 Fleet Landing Restaurant. abused children and their families begin to heal from the trauma of abuse. • Shem Creek Shindig: Guests huddle around a steaming table of Year established locally: 1991 Top local executive: Lib Henson, Interim Executive Director 10% Viruses hot oysters on a chilly fall night for this oyster roast and whole-hog 14% Software and Natural barbecue held in the fall and enjoy live music, prizes, games and a Corruption silent auction. Proceeds support the delivery of services for abused Contact information: Disasters children and their families at DNLCC. Held from 7-10 p.m., Oct. 18, 1061 King St., Charleston, S.C. 29403 2012, at The Lighthouse on Shem Creek. 843-723-3600 Fax: 843-720-7106 • Wild Women Party 2013: Child abuse significantly impacts Website: www.dnlcc.org women, with more than 75% of DNLCC clients coming from a female head of household family, so the goal of this event is to raise Corporate giving contacts: awareness among women about the issue of abuse and the healing Ann Read, Director of Development and Marketing resources available at DNLCC. For a donation of $50, guests enjoy Email: aread@dnlcc.org signature cocktails and delicious hors d’oeuvres during the two hour ladies-only party. This by-invitation event is held at Harborside East Beverly Hutchison, Development Coordinator in Mount Pleasant. Email: bhutchison@dnlcc.org Name: The Dee Norton Lowcountry Children’s Center (DNLCC)

Average number of volunteers in 2012: An average of 50 volunteers have donated 1,276 hours since January 2012. Total operating budget (2012-2013): $2.56 million Percent of revenue dedicated to program services: According to our 2010-2011 audit, 81% of our revenue is dedicated to program budget. Geographic area or specific population served: DNLCC provides comprehensive services to child victims and their families primarily in Charleston and Berkeley counties. Greatest need:  DNLCC’s greatest need is resources to increase capacity.

Corporate giving opportunities: • Chart a Course for Children — Sponsorships ranging from $500 to $7,500 • Oyster Roast — Sponsorships from $500 to $5,000 • Movie in the Park — Sponosrships from $1,000 to $5,000 • Wild Women Party — Sponsorship $3,000 Contact Beverly Contact Hutchison atus: bhutchison@dnlcc.org for specific 843.278.1827 sponsorship information.

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NONPROFIT SPOTLIGHT

Mission statement Helping people achieve their full potential through the dignity and power of work! Name: Goodwill Industries of Lower South Carolina Year established locally: 1979 Top local executive: Robert Smith, President and CEO Contact information: 2150 Eagle Drive, Building 100 North Charleston, S.C. 29406 843-566-0072 Fax: 877-515-5070 Website: www.palmettogoodwill.org Corporate giving contacts: Tina Marshall, Vice President of Corporate Relations Phone: 843-377-2811 E-mail: tmarshall@palmettogoodwill.org Average number of volunteers in 2012: 599 Total operating budget (2012-2013): $49.7 million Percent of revenue dedicated to program services: 91.6% Geographic area or specific population served: People with disabilities, veterans, homeless, displaced workers and others seeking employment in Beaufort, Berkeley, Calhoun, Charleston, Clarendon, Colleton, Darlington, Dillon, Dorchester, Florence, Georgetown, Horry, Jasper, Lee, Marion, Orangeburg, Sumter and Williamsburg counties. Greatest need: Donations made to Goodwill remain local and provide mission services for our community. Donations of gently used clothing, household goods, books, electronics, computers and vehicles are vital to Goodwill’s ability to provide sustainable services to individuals with disabilities in our state. Goodwill relies on mission revenues generated through the sale of donated goods to fund job training and employment services for people with disabilities and other disadvantages to work. 2012 Top achievements: • Goodwill is projected to have provided services for more than 35,000 people through local job training and employment services. • Goodwill created about 100 new jobs with the opening of three new stores, including its first rural store in the Orangeburg community. • Goodwill expanded Job Link operations by 40%, adding centers in Knightsville, Johns Island, Carolina Forest and North Myrtle Beach. www.charlestonbusiness.com

2013 Goals: • Job Creation: Year-over-year increases in the number of people Goodwill is able to serve and the number placed in new jobs. • Mission expansion: Continue focusing on the expansion of mission services into rural communities while building new partnerships. Fundraising events: • Second Time Around Fashion Show, April 11, 2013 • Shining Stars Awards Banquet, May 5, 2013 • Undy 500 Motorcycle Charity Ride, Sept. 15, 2013 • Goodwill’s Night at the Theater, fall 2013. Corporate giving opportunities: $15,000 Title sponsors are needed for two annual events • The Annual Shining Stars Award Banquet recognizes businesses that have excelled in support of people with disabilities. • Goodwill Night at the Theater supports Operation Independence. • Other sponsorships: Second Time Around Fashion Show for $250 and $500, and Undy 500 Motorcycle Charity Ride begins at $100. Donation Drives: Corporate and school donation drives can be scheduled on any date. Goodwill provides donation bins and materials to help promote the drive within your business or school. UNITS Storage and Goodwill has partnered to provide no-cost storage units for families who are downsizing or moving and wish to donate to Goodwill and for businesses or schools for large or extended donation drives. E-Waste Recycling: E-waste roundups are scheduled throughout the year to help keep electronic waste out of area landfills. Electronics also can be dropped off at Goodwill’s Computer Works Store located on Rivers Avenue or at any Goodwill store and donation center. Sponsored by

Giving: Your guide to community giving in the Lowcountry 25


NOW SERVING

That’s the number of meals the Lowcountry Food Bank serves each day. Hunger is a reality in our community — and it’s often invisible. Our 300 partner agencies across the 10 coastal counties of South Carolina feed 211,360 children, seniors and families annually. For nearly 30 years, the Lowcountry Food Bank has fought to end hunger through programs such as BackPack Buddies, Senior Food Box Distribution, Kids Cafe and School Pantry. Culinary apprentices in our Zucker Family Production Kitchen serve more than 3,000 hot meals a week to children and seniors in our community. Your donations and volunteer support will make it possible for us to provide 19 million pounds of food this year. Thank you for joining our food fight and being a hunger advocate. We encourage you to visit our Paul Hulsey Community Food and Nutrition Center and see firsthand the impact your support makes each and every day. We are confident that together we can solve the hunger crisis in the Lowcountry and shorten the line.

SERVING THE 10 COASTAL COUNTIES OF SOUTH CAROLINA C H A R I T Y N A V I G AT O R Four Star Charity

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NONPROFIT SPOTLIGHT

Mission statement Our mission is to feed the poor and hungry of the 10 coastal counties of South Carolina by soliciting and distributing healthy food and grocery products to nonprofit agencies serving the poor, and to educate the public about the problems of and solutions to domestic hunger. Name of organization: Lowcountry Food Bank Year established locally: 1983 Top local executive: Pat Walker, President and CEO Contact information: 2864 Azalea Drive 843-747-8146 Fax:  843-747-8147 Website: www.lowcountryfoodbank.org Corporate giving contacts: Miriam Coombes, Vice President of Development and Communications 843-747-8146, ext. 104 E-mail:mcoombes@lcfbank.org Average number of volunteers in 2012: 5,000 Total operating budget (2012-2013): $4.8 million Percent of revenue dedicated to program services: 95.6% Geographic area or specific population served:  Berkeley, Beaufort, Charleston, Colleton, Dorchester, Georgetown, Hampton, Horry, Jasper and Williamsburg counties Greatest need: The impact of the recent recession is still reverberating across our service area and food insecurity is at an all-time high. Families across the community increasingly struggle with the choice of paying for food or paying utility bills, medical costs or other life necessities. Now more than ever, we need the grassroots support of our community to ensure that every child, family and senior citizen has the nutrition needed to lead healthy, productive lives. Financial and food donations, and advocacy on behalf of our clients as well as issues of hunger and poverty, empower the LCFB each day in fulfilling our mission. Volunteers are also vital to feeding the hungry in our community. 2012 Top achievements: • Through the Zucker Family Production Kitchen, we increased Kids Cafe meal service by 50%. Culinary apprentices in our Food Works Program prepare 600 meals a day for children in Kids Cafe. • Launching in 2011, the School Pantry Program doubled distribution of monthly boxes of nutritious food to children and families. • The LCFB was one of 13 organizations across the U.S. to be named a 2012 Share Our Strength No Kid Hungry Ally. • The LCFB launched the Cooking Matters Program in 2012 in partnership with Share Our Strength. The curriculum consists of a www.charlestonbusiness.com

six-week cooking and nutrition course that teaches skills to cook healthy, affordable meals and make nutritious food choices. • In 2012, 15% (3 million pounds) of the LCFB’s total food distribution will be fresh produce through partnerships with local farmers, Limehouse Produce and GrowFood Carolina. 2013 Goals: • The LCFB will continue to enhance training, professional development and capacity-building opportunities for its network of 300 partner food pantries, soup kitchens, shelters and schools. Our goal is to provide the food resources, knowledge and tools necessary for partners to create sustainable hunger solutions. • Our organization will continue to examine how to use limited resources to make the largest impact on hunger and expand existing programs and initiatives that meet targeted hunger needs. • The LCFB will continue to increase healthy food distribution, including the distribution of fresh produce. Fundraising events: • Chefs’ Feast (March 10, 2013): Join Chef Robert Carter and the Lowcountry’s most acclaimed chefs at the 14th annual Chefs’ Feast, presented by Embassy Suites Charleston Area Convention Center. Indulge in delectable fare from more than two dozen top Lowcountry restaurants while enjoying live jazz music and cocktails. Proceeds benefit the Lowcountry Food Bank’s Kids Cafe and BackPack Buddies programs. Visit www.lowcountryfoodbank.org/ chefs-feast for updates on participating chefs and entertainment. • The Farmer’s Table (Fall 2013): The Lowcountry Food Bank invites you to connect with talented farmers, food artisans, and chefs that contribute to the growing culinary reputation and local food community of Beaufort. The all-local feast, prepared by Beaufort’s most talented chefs, kicks off at the Farm at Habersham with tours, hors d’oeuvres and cocktails. Visit www.lowcountryfoodbank.org/ farmerstable for updates on participating chefs and entertainment. Corporate giving opportunities: • Sponsor a local BackPack Buddies Program at a Title 1 school • Sponsor a local School Pantry Program at a Title 1 school • Sponsor a local mobile pantry holiday distribution • Sponsor a truckload of fresh, regional produce • Sponsor a truckload of holiday turkeys • Sponsor an apprentice in the Food Works Program • Sponsor fuel for a LCFB truck for an entire year Giving: Your guide to community giving in the Lowcountry 27


NONPROFIT SPOTLIGHT

Mission statement The American Red Cross prevents and alleviates human suffering in the face of emergencies by mobilizing the power of volunteers and the generosity of donors. Name of organization: American Red Cross, Charleston, S.C., Region Year established locally: The Carolina Lowcountry Chapter received its Charter in 1917. Today, the organization serves seven counties. Top local executive: Louise Welch Williams, Regional CEO Contact information: American Red Cross 8085 Rivers Ave., Suite F, North Charleston, S.C. 29406 Phone: 843-764-2323, Fax: 843-764-2318 Website: www.lowcountryredcross.org Corporate giving contacts: Gordon Robertson, philanthropy director Phone: 843-764-2323 x368, email: gordon.robertson@redcross.org Katherine M. Bibee, major gifts manager Phone: 843-764-2323 x355, email: katherine.maybank@redcross.org Roberta Freer, philanthropy manager Phone: 843-764-2323 x386, email: roberta.freer@redcross.org Lexie Leyman, Workplace Giving Manager Phone: 843-764-2323 X359, email: Lexie.Leyman@redcross.org Average number of volunteers in 2012: 3,200 Total operating budget (2012-2013): $2.5 million Percent of revenue dedicated to program services: 91% Geographic area or specific population served: Beaufort, Berkeley, Charleston, Colleton, Dorchester, Hampton and Jasper counties. Greatest need: Your time, talent and treasure. 2012 Top achievements: • The Red Cross is the only social service agency that responds to the emergency needs of victims of disasters 24 hours a day, every day. Red Cross disaster volunteers responded to the needs of 1,171 victims of disasters including residential fires during FY12. Red Cross volunteers reached 17,923 individuals in our community with Community Disaster Education for themselves and their families. • The American Red Cross Service to the Armed Forces provided outreach to 15,616 individuals, military families and military medical facilities. The Red Cross provides an around-the-clock, around-the-world network to let service members to stay in touch with families during births, deaths and serious illness. We provided 2,688 military case services to personnel and their families in FY12. • With the support of more than 500 blood drive sponsors in Charleston, the Red Cross conducted 1,006 blood drives last year and distributed 37,368 units of red blood cells to area hospitals. www.charlestonbusiness.com

• The Retired and Senior Volunteer Program for volunteers 55 years and older provided 315,169 service hours to 150 area agencies. • American Red Cross International Services help reconnect families separated by war, conflict, disaster and humanitarian emergencies. • During FY12, Red Cross volunteers from the Lowcountry deployed to North Dakota, Texas and Vermont to assist victims of disasters, bringing home experience and knowledge to help here. • In FY12, 9,276 Charleston-region residents were taught lifesaving coursework through Red Cross training courses in Standard First Aid, CPR, AED, Water Safety, Babysitting and Pet First Aid. • During FY12, we trained 66 Ready When the Time Comes volunteers from 16 partners in Shelter Operations and Disaster Assessment. 2013 Goals: Enhanced client advocacy: To continue meeting the immediate, disaster-caused needs of our neighbors while further developing and leveraging community partnerships for the benefit of those we serve. Sharing the urgency for local support: The Red Cross raises money through corporate, foundation and individual giving. The American Red Cross in Charleston lost its largest funder after Trident United Way changed funding priorities. We are asking our corporate partners to give their employees a choice to include the Red Cross Workplace Giving Campaign. Fundraising events: Old Village Home, Garden & Art Tour, 1-5 p.m., April 21, 2013, Mount Pleasant. The self-guided tour offers visitors the opportunity to look inside some of the Old Village’s most beautiful homes. Corporate giving opportunities: The Heroes for Fire Victims Campaign supports Red Cross relief services for neighbors whose homes are damaged or destroyed by fires. The average cost for this aid is $1,250. The Clara Barton Society members are active partners in carrying out the work of the Red Cross, learning how their gifts are used to help people in need. Giving opportunities range from $1,000 to $1 million, and a donor packet can be designed to meet individual needs. Tiffany Circle Society of Women Leaders is a national network of female leaders and philanthropists who invest $10,000 annually in their local chapters, following in the footsteps of a long line of female leaders who have helped the Red Cross fulfill its mission for more than 130 years. Ready When the Time Comes trains teams of volunteers from businesses, civic clubs, neighborhood associations and other groups. Sponsorship opportunities can be designed to meet individual needs. Sponsored by

Giving: Your guide to community giving in the Lowcountry 29


Helping out

Niyi Anderson of Cummins Turbo Technologies reads to a child at North Charleston Elementary during the Day of Caring on Sept. 7.

Charleston Day of Caring Photography by Leslie Burden More than 8,500 people participated in the Trident United Way Day of Caring on Sept 7, a daylong effort of community service projects that allowed individuals and groups to share their knowledge, time and sweat. Trident United Way raised $11 million from 30,000 donors locally last year, including 1,800 individuals and couples contributing $1,000 or more. During its 68 years, Trident United Way has raised $175 million, and the Charleston community has delivered half of the 10 largest Day of Caring events in the nation. Trident United Way connects volunteers with nearly 300 nonprofits in the tri-county region.

30 Giving: Your guide to community giving in the Lowcountry

www.charlestonbusiness.com


Helping out

Carlton Pugh of Kapstone helps to landscape a park in Park Circle.

Debbie Los of Cummins reads to a child at North Charleston Elementary.

Jackie Parson of Cummins reads to children at North Charleston Elementary.

Amy Argus of Johnson & Johnson plants flowers in Park Circle.

Left: Maria Marinkova of Cummins reads to children at North Charleston Elementary. Right: Kapstone employee Mike Fleury prepares a flowerbed in Park Circle.

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Giving: Your guide to community giving in the Lowcountry 31


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Visit our website

www.charlestonrideforhope.com for more information about the Jerry Zucker Ride for Hope

2012

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2012 Giving Guide  

Your guide to community giving in the Lowcountry. Brought to you by the Charleston Regional Business Journal.

2012 Giving Guide  

Your guide to community giving in the Lowcountry. Brought to you by the Charleston Regional Business Journal.

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