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THE BUSINESS JOURNAL FOR GREENVILLE, SPARTANBURG & ANDERSON

2010

EPv ent lanning Guide

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TO DO LIST: VENDORS. NEGOTIATIONS. BUDGETING. CONTRACTS. SITE SELECTION. WEATHER PLAN. MENUS. TRANSPORTATION. REGISTRATION. ACCOMMODATIONS. INSURANCE. SCHEDULING. SETUP. LAST MINUTE CHANGES. TEAR DOWN. WOULDN’T YOU RATHER ENJOY YOUR EVENT?

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epg Publisher - Lisa Jones ljones@scbiznews.com Editor - James T. Hammond jhammond@scbiznews.com Managing Editor Francis B. Allgood fallgood@scbiznews.com Staff Writer - Scott Miller smiller@scbiznews.com Production Manager/Art Director S. Kevin Greene kgreene@scbiznews.com Sales Manager - Salley Tyler styler@scbiznews.com Account Executive Pam Edmonds pedmonds@scbiznews.com Marketing Coordinator Elizabeth Feather efeather@gsabusiness.com Office Manager - Vickie Deadmon vdeadmon@scbiznews.com Circulation Manager - Kathy Allen kallen@scbiznews.com 843.849.3113 Circulation Assistant Kim McManus kmcmanus@scbiznews.com 843.849.3116 Contributing Writer - Lydia Dishman

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Presented b y: GSA Busin ess Details: The Event Plannin g Guide is des the go-to pub igned to be lication for ev ent planners in the Upstat e area. Don’t miss: The guide in cludes great planning tool including chec s, klists and dir The guide also ec tories. includes arti cles that look at the latest trends. In this issue : Tips on plan ning an even t in any econ ensuring a su omic climate, ccessful corp orate develop ment progra m and much m ore.

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he skills required of a good driver operating in a challenging environment are remarkably similar to the skills required in operating any successful enterprise. So too are the potentials for heart-racing accomplishments. In the end, highperformance driving boils down to managing momentum. Those who manage momentum most successfully end up in the lead. Businesses that manage people, resources and costs most successfully end up profitable. BMW Performance Driving School Corporate Events help bring new focus to your business by putting your team through the paces on the track. Experience how overly aggressive driving leads to a slower lap time in the same way that rising costs cut into the bottom line. Effectively processing all of the sensory feedback a car gives the driver in order to balance steering with braking and acceleration is the driving equivalent of working smarter, not harder. In the end, the stopwatch—like a P & L statement—never lies.

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vent design, planning and production is our business, so we at Christa Hovis Special Events are pleased to be a sponsor of the 2010 Event Planning Guide. We began this year being recognized as one of the best in the event business by receiving six regional awards. We are wrapping up this year with being part of some exciting programs including the launch of the new BMW X3 and Fashion Greenville, a spin-off of the infamous Charleston Fashion Week. We are looking ahead to another successful year working with corporate and social clients. We hope you find this guide useful and we encourage you to work with Christa Hovis Special Events as you look to find ways to enhance your event programs.

Corporate Meetings & Conventions

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Corporate Meetings & Conventions

6 7 8 11 12

Corporate Meetings & Conventions

onvention planning checklists C Trends in meeting technology Corporate event planning checklists Return on investment Face value

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Corporate Meetings & Conventions

Convention planning checklists Accommodations Committee checklist o Find out date of arrival and departure for the majority of the group. o Make a tentative booking of rooms. o Obtain information on the hotel and rates to send with promotional material. o Have emergency housing available for latecomers. o Record expected time and date of each attendee’s arrival. o Maintain regular liaison with the hotel regarding reservations. o Get information on exhibit locations and storage for exhibit materials.

Public Relations/ Advertising Committee checklist o Prepare direct-mail materials to promote attendance. o Prepare write-ups for newsletters and association publications. o Send advance information to the media and invite the media to the event. o Set up a press table or a separate pressroom, if appropriate. o Obtain copies of all speeches in advance to give to the media and arrange for the speakers to be available for interviews. o Arrange for a photographer. o Provide news releases and photos of the speakers for their hometown papers.

Finance Committee checklist o Find out when payment is due for various functions. o Decide on ticket prices. o Determine policy on accepting checks and giving refunds. o Find out when payment is due to speakers and extra help. o Determine the cost and number of meals as well as guarantee on number of meals. o Determine whether VIP accommodations will be paid for by your organization.

Plan for success

The formula for a successful convention includes a wellestablished plan; clearly defined goals and objectives; organized volunteers; solid financial administration; and functional committees for finance, accommodations and public relations/advertising. For a list of hotels with meeting facilities, see page 40.

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Sample budget Expenses Mailing and postage

$________________

Printing

________________

Signs and decorations

________________

Speakers

________________

Registration staff/materials

________________

Extra help

________________

Transportation

________________

Entertainment

________________

Meeting room or rooms

________________

Snacks

________________

Meals

________________

Gratuities

________________

Audio-visual equipment rental

________________

Gifts

________________

Miscellaneous

________________

Total

________________

Income Registration fees

$________________

Contributions

________________

Sponsorships

________________

Exhibit space rentals

________________

Total

________________ Source: thegreatevent.com


Corporate Meetings & Conventions

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Trends in meeting technology Staff Report

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echnology allows your business to express its creative, sophisticated and innovative side. It can also enhance the effectiveness of your message at your next meeting, conference or presentation. That’s why a strategically designed, planned and expertly executed event program will impress every audience member and produce measurable ROI, according to Joe Clark executive director of Jackson Marketing Group’s video production and business theater division. Clark says JMG commands the use of multiple technologies regardless of where a function takes place. In order to grab the attention of a workforce who is increasingly relying on iPhones and WiFi to share information, Fred Giles says, “Technology is absolutely essential.” Giles is a sales executive with Plan-It Nerds, a company that produces events with an emphasis on audiovisual, lighting and other technical elements. “More businesses are adding media to their presentations,” says Giles, “They aren’t changing the message, just the method of delivery.” Giles believes as much as 80 percent of conferences now are technology-based, giving the audience a more innovative and interactive experience. But planning such a multi-media event doesn’t have to break the budget. In the wake of a slowly-recovering economy, many businesses have sought budget-friendly alternatives to traditional meetings and conferences. And what they’ve discovered is that budget-friendly doesn’t mean low-quality. Clarke has observed a rise in virtual meetings as travel continues to be stressful, time-consuming and expensive. Web technology enables out-of-towners to attend the meeting through a teleconference, without travel expenses. High-definition imagery has enabled quality projections of everything happening in conferences from power point presentations to speakers. “For the past two years, all the images we capture, edit, and project are in high definition,” notes Clarke. Everything from meeting announcements to visuals and live-streaming events are managed via the Web says Clarke, who has also noticed a shift away from using a few large screens to individual laptops or computer monitors in meeting rooms.

Planning Ahead for Success Once a company establishes a budget for their meeting, organizers will want to consider the size of the audience and the venue. Clarke says Jackson Marketing Groups uses dozens of computers to direct all aspects of the me-

Photos Provided: Inset: PDA, Bottom: JMC, Charleston

dia at an event. “We have an integrated system that creates imagery, as well as manages the actual lights, sound, video,” he explains. Next, planners will want to consider the visual and lighting elements of the meeting. “Today, we’re using more LED (light-emitting diode) lighting because it uses less power and creates significantly less heat,” says Clarke. As LED output is still on the low side, Clarke says Jackson Marketing Group uses it primarily for décor and relies on traditional tungsten to light speakers and the stage. However, some companies have LED wired to a computer to cast a com-

pany logo on backdrops and in meeting rooms. These trends have rewritten the rules of meeting planning. Fabian Unterzaucher, general manager of the Westin Poinsett Hotel, said business guests have come to expect Internet access everywhere in a facility. “Not only do they demand high-speed access, but they expect it to be reliable at all times,” says Unterzaucher. He does, however, urge conference organizers to plan ahead if a group needs a lot of bandwidth for meetings. “We have three T1 lines that we can route to the meeting rooms if they need, but it helps to know in advance.” epg

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Corporate event planning checklists Before the event

book of lists 2011

Things are looking up. Be sure you’re in view. As the recovery steadily accelerates, this is the cover you’ll see on every decision-maker’s desk in the Upstate. Starting with the movers and shakers at the 1500 companies featured inside. Your ad in GSA Business’s 2011 Book of Lists puts you in the right place at the right time, all year long. This indispensable resource is scoured thoroughly by over 30,000 readers in the Upstate business community. For more information or to reserve space, contact our sales department at 864-235-5677 or visit us online at www.gsabusiness.com.

GSA Business 2011 Book of Lists Delivers February | Ad close December 31

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o Determine event goals and objectives. This is especially important with client events and sales meetings, as it will help you keep on track. o Identify possible dates for the meeting. No matter what date you pick, someone will complain it doesn’t work. Thinking ahead and checking with others on possible conflicts can limit the inconvenience for all parties. o Prepare a preliminary agenda and guest list to help set the criteria for the venue. o Prepare a preliminary budget. Unless you manage your corporate event closely, the budget can grow unexpectedly. o Send meeting requirements to selected sites with requests for written proposals. If you are signing a contract, get a written proposal so there won’t be surprises. o Review site proposals from responding suppliers, select potential sites and begin site negotiations with potential venues. Whenever possible, speak to companies that have hosted similar events at the venue. o Conduct site visits as required. This is important when you’re using the facility for the first time. Determine security needs at the location. o Negotiate hotel rates and blocks. If you use hotel meeting rooms for the event, you could get a significant discount on sleeping rooms. o Determine preliminary food and beverage requirements and negotiate menus and prices. It’s all negotiable, but keep in mind that the more you customize the deal, the more you’ll have to manage. o Establish a theme and preliminary graphics for the logo, program, etc. Take advantage of this opportunity to enhance your corporate brand. o Consider hiring a printer for invitations, programs and agendas. o Add any deadlines and other requirements to the timetable.

As the event gets closer o Form committees as required. The larger the event, the more work to be done. Make life easier by getting others involved. Organizations that have regular events should consider forming standing committees that meet regularly. o Develop a promotional strategy.  o Do some PR for the event. Calendar notices, press releases and interviews may all be appropriate, depending on the size of your event. 


Corporate Meetings & Conventions o For nonprofit or charity events, line up sponsors. Prepare and mail letters to potential event sponsors requesting consider ation in their budgets. o Identify needs for outside consultants, specifying requirements. o If you are charging admission to the event, establish registration fee structures and policies, and be sure to include clear cancellation policies. o Invite and confirm key speakers. This includes people within your organization. Don’t assume anyone is automatically available. o Obtain audiovisual needs from speakers and presenters, and order all necessary equipment. o Review, update and confirm final event budget. o Identify and communicate on-site responsibility areas for committees and volunteers. Set up training for volunteers and educate them about your expectations. o Select and order speaker gifts and awards. o Order special decorations for the event. o Prepare and order the signs. This is another opportunity to build your brand. o Arrange for travel and housing of all staff and VIPs.

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The day of the event o Have a staff/volunteer meeting to review responsibilities, procedures and overlap areas such as registration. Taking 10 minutes for an informational and motivational meeting will save headaches later in the day. o Confirm and monitor pickup of all rental equipment and supplies.

Immediately afterward o Pack and inventory all material. Many of your collateral materials are reusable — and they’re a big investment. o Do financial reconciliation. Gather the invoices and make sure you have been billed correctly and that you pay in a timely fashion. Watch expense reports, an area where a lot of costs can be hidden. o Perform post-budget performance review. Were you on budget? Could you have saved money? o Write and mail thank-you letters. o Collect and organize data for final meeting reports. Get evaluations from staff, volunteers and consultants to determine what went right and what could be improved on so next time goes more smoothly.

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Corporate Meetings & Conventions

Corporate event planning checklists (continued) The Room o Location o Caterer o Liquor o Bartenders o Linens (tablecloths, napkins) o Menu o Cake o Votives and votive candles o Napkin rings o Table candy o Table games o Glitter or confetti o Bathroom florals

Giveaways/Prizes o T-shirts o Caps o Tote bags/baskets o Pens, notepads o Theme-oriented items

o Premiums, with company logo for corporate event

Other o Photographer or videographer o Registration table o Gift table  o Information table

Out-of-Town Guests o Hotel reservations o Weekend-at-a-glance or itinerary o Maps to and from airport and other locations o Welcome gifts o Transportation o Other________________

Decorations o Sign-in board

o Message book o Centerpieces o Welcome sign o Band backdrop o Balloon bouquets o Buffets – decor and signage o Ceiling treatments o Outside lobby area o Seating cards o Table cards o Directional signage o Easels o Theme-oriented signs o Company display

Entertainment o DJ o Band o Music during cocktails o Other entertainment (caricaturist, magician, etc.)

o Photo favors o Special presentation: Who to emcee? Who to present? o Roasts/toasts o Audiovisual needs o Other (theme-oriented)

Printed materials o Invitations to ceremony, party, benefit or main event o Invitations to reception (if applicable) o Response cards o Response envelopes o Seating cards o Table cards o Cocktail napkins  o Matches o Programs  o Agenda o Newsletter Source: thegreatevent.com

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Corporate Meetings & Conventions

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Return on investment Ensuring a successful corporate development program Staff Report

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ext week, employees at the Phoenix Center in Greenville are breaking out of their cubicles to spend part of their day climbing, swinging, and balancing between trees. And while it will no doubt be fun, how they navigate the ropes course will be an object lesson in team building they’ll be taking back to work. “Everyone is really looking forward to it,” says Adam Brickner, executive director. “Not only will it be a nice break in everyone’s routine, but we’ll all be learning more about ourselves, our group as a whole, and our unique ways of working together effectively.” Their development program will involve physical as well as critical thinking activities including a half day spent in conference, designed to open lines of communication, build relationships and trust, and motivate employees. Brickner believes the exercise is an essen-

tial investment. “It’s important for us to nurture and enlighten our leadership team. This organization provides addiction treatment services to about 4,800 people every year, and having a solid team in place is critical.”

Great expectations

The key to obtaining results from any development program is to gather enough information on the front end to establish goals and then explain them to the participants, says Bobbi Wheless, principal of the Wheless Group, a Greenville-based firm that coordinates leadership and staff development retreats. A third party can assist by first surveying the company to determine areas that need work and what type of program would work best. Typical needs include improving communication, working together efficiently and improving leadership skills. Typical programs include recreation, education, development and redirection. “With solid objectives and expectations

at the outset,” says Wheless, “I am able to feed questions and situations to stimulate the group’s collective thinking.”

Follow through, follow up

In addition to outlining expectations, employees should also have action plans to help them incorporate their new knowledge into their daily duties. “One of the things that can happen when you call in a development consultant is that after the session is over and the report is written, it gets put on a shelf,” Wheless says. So it’s important to follow up with employees to make sure the impact of their “A-ha” moment doesn’t fade. Wheless advises continuing to work together toward those goals. “Joint meetings are an effective way to talk through issues and delve deeper,” she says, “When possible, do it face-toface so people can see each other and read body language.” Electronic communications are convenient but also easily misunderstood. epg

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Corporate Meetings & Conventions

Face value

Staff Report

T

echnology and the economy have changed the meeting and event planning industry. Businesses have spent the past year cutting back on “nonessential” expenses, including national sales meetings, trade shows, staff retreats and the like. If a company did actually host a major function, chances are it was scaled way back and involved budget-friendly videoconferencing. In addition, someone who would not generally be given such a task probably planned the event in-house. The decision to cancel an event or hold a barebones meeting planned by inexperienced staff centers around saving money. But the end result might not be exactly what executives had in mind. “Video conferencing has become very interactive, but what you lose with that is a level of impact,” said Emily Kosa of DNA Creative Communications LLC. “Face-to-face time allows you a level of control. With ‘skyping,’ you lose some of that control and are not as immersed in the experience.”

The importance of holding a well-planned corporate meeting in any economic climate

In fact, Forbes Insights recently conducted a study of 760 business executives, asking them if they preferred face-to-face or virtual meetings. Eight out of 10 respondents said the benefits of a face-to-face meeting outweigh the cost savings of a virtual meeting.

A worthwhile investment

A recent perception has been that if a company spends money on a corporate event – and hires someone to plan it – it is acting frivolously. But Kosa said corporate events are worthwhile investments because they excite customers, increase your company’s visibility and motivate employees. Technology can even be a distraction, according to Steve Jones, general manager of the Spartanburg Memorial Auditorium. He has asked his employees to put away all devices during company meetings. “Everyone is at the table with their Blackberry, pushing buttons,” he said. “I’m going nuts. ‘What are we even here for?” In the entertainment business, Jones encourages his staff to interact with each other and the consumer to gauge how the experience can be improved.

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“People want that social contact,” he said. “They don’t want the ‘drive-thru’ window.” Given the current economic climate, more associations are turning to local chapter meetings and regional shows as oppose to national conferences. It saves on travel costs, but it also provides a more intimate setting, Jones said. “A lot of corporations are looking at one thing – is it well organized,” Jones explained.

Client advocate

The use of an industry professional to plan your event helps to ensure your company doesn’t leave any money on the table. Professionals know what questions to ask to obtain reduced rates on certain items, or even get fees waived. For example, if you reserve a block of rooms at a hotel, the hotel will require that a certain percentage of those rooms be occupied or you will be charged a penalty. Requesting that the hotel lower the occupancy requirement from 95% to 70%, for example, can save a considerable amount of money. In addition, if you have a block of rooms, a hotel will often provide meeting space at a re-


Corporate Meetings & Conventions duced rate, and in some cases for free — if you just ask. Many other hidden costs exist that industry professionals can weed through during contract negotiations to save your company money on the event. And, in many cases, meeting planners do not charge for their services. It’s an accepted business arrangement in the hotel industry that the hotel pays the third party a commission based on the number of room nights. The third party is compensated because the hotel wouldn’t have obtained the business without the help of the planner, and the hotel wants the planner’s future business.

Value-added partnerships

Corporations should view the partnerships as a value-added arm of their business, Kosa said. Event planners can work with staff members, rather than take their place. Event planners can also work transparently, taking care of the details without recognition – all the while making your company look great. “We accomplish our mission with our events,� Kosa said. “We want it to be cost effective, too. It’s important to get the right speaker, to get good interaction with the audience, and to get good feedback from their experiences.� epg

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Plan some fun into your next meeting agenda The next time you have a companywide meeting, try some of these tips for upping the fun level. 1. Have your group come up with its own goofy cheer. Have each person contribute a line to it and use it to start or end each meeting or cry out when things get tense. 2. Have an office mascot: Any funny-looking doll, puppet or inflatable dinosaur will work. The mascot will travel the office once a day, with employees writing down the first thing that comes to mind when it reaches their desk. Read some of these deep thoughts at the next meeting and try to guess who wrote what. 3. Liven up meetings by using silly props, such as a funny microphone shaped like a bird. You can talk only when it’s your turn to “squawk.� 4. Take a meeting break for a humorous celebration and give small awards or certificates to people for nonsense things: neatest desk, breaking the copy machine or never having a hair out of place. 5. Build in time for employees to learn something about one another. 6. This could be a talent show in the office or a group trip to the local bowling alley for some lighthearted fun. Source: Shannon McDevitt, owner of Just Humor Me! www.justhumorme.com

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Business Casual 16 17 18 19 22 23

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lert or asleep? A From beginning to end Technical worksheet for events Calendar of events Ballpark estimates for events Proper attire


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Business Casual

Alert or asleep?

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ating the right foods makes a big difference in how alert and content people are during a meeting or conference. Careful choices need to be made when feeding large groups because the wrong foods can have negative results. Keeping attendees sharp, interested and comfortable are the goals.

Caterers share what makes and breaks business meeting meals

Sample Menu Breakfast

Assorted whole fruit Miniature muffins Individual yogurt with house made granola Pre-assembled egg and sausage croissants cut in half Mini quiche or frittata

Easy does it

Many business men and women use these meetings as a networking tool, often engaging in conversation. Catering planners avoid heavy sauces, large pieces and foods that crumble. Guests prefer food that is easy to handle. People don’t want to eat food that gets all over their face, gets stuck in their teeth, or drips on their shirts. Leave the pizza and barbecue chicken wings off the menu and go for quiche, soup or fish entrees to eliminate food embarrassments. Strossner’s Bakery Inc. caters events for groups of 10 to several hundred. Marketing director Chrissy Michalski said it’s important to organize the food for easy access. For more than 100 people, more than one service line is key, or position the table so that both sides can be used by guests. It’s best to keep the food service outside the meeting area, she said.

 

Lunch

Mesclun salad with grilled chicken and a citrus vinaigrette (chicken on the side) Rosemary roasted potatoes Balsamic grilled vegetables Assorted rustic breads  

Afternoon snack Warm soft pretzels Granola bars House made trail mix Assorted cookies

Crowd pleasers

Consider the gender ratio and if there will be international attendees at the event. Vegetarian requests are frequent, so salad bars and deli boards give attendees many options, and meats can be added or avoided. Allergies are always a concern, so it is important to provide menu ingredients and serve the sauces and toppings on the side. “We can accommodate those needs on the spot,” said Sarah Essich, group dining coordinator for High Cotton restaurant on Greenville’s Main Street. A successful chef doesn’t want to exclude anyone, keeping in mind vegetarian preferences or health issues such as glutton allergies. At High Cotton, the chef will have something in his bag of tricks for the diner with special needs or requests, Essich said. Don’t forget to spruce up the setting, Strossner’s Michalski said. “Fresh flowers are cheerful, and always brighten a table,” she said.

Avoid too much sugar and too much spice

Whenever possible, use ingredients grown in local garden and from local farms and suppliers. When planning a breakfast, avoid foods like doughnuts and danishes. Too much sugar may not sit well in the stomachs of some guests.

Pre-processed foods contain massive amounts of sodium and can cause bloating. Fresh ingredients are the way to go to keep salt-sensitive diners and guests happy.

Heavy foods = heavy eyelids

The heavy ‘meat and potatoes’ lunch will always slow things down and should be avoided. Instead, choose lighter, satisfying foods for lunch like salads with side additions of nuts, dried cherries, grilled salmon or chicken.

Timing is everything

Grab-and-go is good idea when attendees are rushed. Some guests may have spent the early morning hours traveling in a car, arriving just in the nick of time. Serve something easy to pick up so people can get seated and organized. The mid-afternoon break is an opportunity to provide light, simple snacks. The break is normally the time when guests slip out and take a few phone calls or attend to

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personal matters. A time-consuming snack will eat into their personal time, so pre-wrapped snacks, house-made trail mix or granola bars are a good addition to the table. Favorites at High Cotton, Essich said, are ginger marinated chicken satay on a skewer, for example, or bacon-wrapped shrimp. A favorite with women, she said, is a caprese finger food that includes a grape tomato, mozzarella, basel and balsamic vinegar.

Have fun with your food

Foods with a local flare often give planners a chance to incorporate themes and creativity, which keep people interested, and they will consider the food an event in and of itself. Instead of canned tuna sandwiches, serve fresh seared tuna sandwiches. Making guests feel special begins with making the food special. Themed lunches could include Asian with sushi and side dishes like noodle salad and stirfry. Local fare in the South is a platform for many popular themed events. epg


Business Casual

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From the beginning to the end Give your event plenty of thought, attention to detail The Goal

Before you begin drawing up budgets or picking locations, you need to determine the goal of your event. Whether it’s a social or corporate function, you must have a clear understanding of your overall objective including who the audience will be and if a return on investment is being measured. Review your goals often throughout the planning process to make sure you stay on target.

ly if you have a tight budget, or if your event space will only allow so many guests.

Event Timing

If your event is timed for just after work, consider what your guests may be doing after the party. The prospect of a cocktail party in downtown Greenville after work becomes more attractive if it is within walking distance of good restaurants.

The Budget

The economy has pushed many people into planning who have no prior experience in coordinating events. Consequently, whether the function is for corporate or social event, or a nonprofit fundraiser, many employees have no idea what to expect with costs. Look for a planner who will take time to educate you based on how much you have to spend. A professional planner will take your budget and scale the project to meet those requirements and find the perfect match for venue, menu, and number of guests to reach your objectives. Change is inevitable so build an extra cushion into your budget for contingencies. 10-20 % of your total budget should cover any last-minute changes.

The Date

Time of year is key to the success of your event so factor in weather and temperature, especially if you have attendees traveling or you plan to hold the function outdoors. Check your local events calendar to compare your event date to other events happening in the community. See page 19 of this Event Planning Guide for a list of upcoming events in the region.

Invitations

Make sure you have an accurate head count before you order invitations. Have everyone in your office check the final list to make certain all details such as name spelling and addresses are correct. Nothing is more embarrassing than sending an invitation to someone who has been gone for an extended period of time or your invitation doesn’t arrive because the person or business moved. Invest in good quality card stock and printing. An impressive invitation sets the tone for the entire event. Designate someone to handle RSVPs and include their phone number on the invitation. Assist the designated responder by addressing the invitation specifically to the guest only – do not leave it open to interpretation — especial-

mixed crowd should be offered a variety of light and substantial options. For breakfasts think in terms of combinations of bread or whole grain options, proteins and fruits. Luncheons or dinners can start with a small cup of tomato bisque and salad, both filling and delicious. If you are having a more intimate event, ask the chef if he or she can introduce the menu and the wine selections. Encouraging your guests to ask questions during an explanation of the forthcoming meal provides an interesting, interactive touch.

Roaming Entertainment

When you ask guests to drive to a remote location, make sure you have plenty of parking and allow them enough time to arrive and get back to work if it is a breakfast or lunch event. Keep in mind that as breakfast events become more popular, you may have to replicate one multiple times as it won’t serve everyone’s schedule. Start morning events at 8:30 a.m. to get past the rush hour and don’t schedule them to go longer than one hour.

Wow Them in the Beginning

If possible, arrange parking for your guests. Valet parking is a nice touch when you squeeze an event into a workday. If you or your guests have to pay for parking mention it on the invitation. If you are at another location such as a plant or warehouse, use golf carts to transport your guests from the parking lot to the facility. Segways, trolleys, or carriages are unique alternatives.

Wow Them in the Middle

Have your staff greet each guest at the parking lot or at the front door. Your attention to this detail will reinforce the quality of your work. Make sure there is always something going on so it isn’t a static experience. Move guests through rooms or furnish entertainment so the event is always evolving.

Great Food

Great food doesn’t have to be boring. Let your guests guide appropriate choices. An allfemale group will enjoy lighter fare, while a

If you want to entertain your guests, go beyond hiring a band. Build on a theme of color, place, or time such as a “Las Vegas Night” or “Mid-afternoon in Morocco.” For the former, lounges with vintage arcade games or plasma screen TVs with video games provide interactive entertainment for all ages. The Moroccan theme could feature belly dancers, drummers and an array of Middle Eastern fare.

Prizes

Guests love to win drawings but if you plan on holding a raffle, you must make sure to be in compliance with local ordinances and the venue. Giveaways might include a trip to Biltmore, the Greenville Symphony, meals at local restaurants, a turn driving at the BMW Performance Center, or a weekend getaway to the NASCAR track in Charlotte, N.C.

Wow Them in the End

Have someone at the door to say goodbye and hand out swag bags. These goodie packs can be filled with donated gift certificates or coupons from local businesses. Whether or not gifts are in your budget, consider mailing a “thank you for coming” note to acknowledge each guest’s attendance.

Wrap It Up

After the event, have a meeting to determine the high and low points of the event. What worked and what would you do differently. Write up a summary to help with your objectives for the next event. If you know you’ll be doing another event, book the date right away to avoid conflicts later on. epg Source: Christa Hovis, owner and principal, event designer and planner Christa Hovis Special Events. eventdiva@christahovis.com

2010 Event Planning Guide | www.gsabusiness.com

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Business Casual

Technical worksheet for events

A

ccounting for all audiovisual needs for your meeting or event can POWER be a daunting task. IUse this form to help clarify your needs and better communicate with your selected production company. Are you familiar with the power available at this venue? ____________

GENERAL EVENT INFORMATION

If not, do you have a contact for this at your venue? _______________

Organization or individual name: _ ____________________________

AUDIO

What kind of event are you planning? __________________________

How many people will be speaking? _ _________________________

How many people are you expecting? _ ________________________

What kinds of microphones are needed for this event?______________

What is the event date? ____________________________________ Where do you plan to host this event? _ ________________________

Wired HH/Qty____________________________________________ Wireless HH/Qty__________________________________________ Wireless LAV/Qty_________________________________________

What is your audio-visual budget for this event? __________________

Wireless Headset/Qty______ Specific other:____________________

Event Details Load In:____________________Date:_____________Time:_______ Rehearsal:______________________________________________ _____________________________________________________ Doors Open to Guests:_______ Show Start:_______ Show End:______

The speaker(s) will address your audience from: (please circle one): • Wired mic stand • Head table mic stands • Upright podium • Tabletop podium • None

VIDEO

Does your event have a theme or specific color choices?____________

What is the purpose of having video as an element of this event? _ ____

Do you have a show flow or agenda for this event? ________________

Do you already have content you would like to present in video? ______ _____________________________________________________

Do you have a logo specific to your event that you would like to project onto the walls, floor or building facade? ________________________

If so, what media and media source are you using? _ ______________

Are you planning to have entertainment that will require lighting?______

How many media sources do you plan to use? (PC, DVD) ___________

If so, is there a rider available with their specific needs? ____________

Do you need assistance with video design or production? ___________

Will this event take place in more than one location? (tents, rooms, buildings) _ __________________________________

Would you like to use a projection screen(s) for this event? __________ If so, would you like to do front or rear projection? _ _______________

At what times would you transition the location of your event? _ ______ Ground support your video screen(s) or suspend from ceiling points? _ ____ Do you have a room diagram for this event? _____________________ Do you have any specific camera work needs for this event? _________ What elements would you like to use lighting for? (stage, dance floor, decor) __________________________________ Will this event be videotaped? _______________________________

18 2010 Event Planning Guide | www.gsabusiness.com

Information provided by Production Design Associates


Business Casual

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Upstate Calendar of EVENTS The following is a sampling of some major events in the Upstate region.

January

The Battle of Cowpens Reenactment takes place at Cowpens National Battlefield. While many historic sites in the area remember the Civil War, this one marks the site of the 1781 Battle of Cowpens, considered by many historians to be a turning point in the Southern campaign of the American Revolution. 864-461-2828. http:// www.nps.gov/cowp/

February Disco isn’t dead, at least not in Spartanburg in early February when Retrofest, the South’s Largest Disco Party, takes place at Spartanburg Memorial Auditorium. This groovin’ fundraiser brings out not only some old clothes, but a lot of support for the American Red Cross. http://piedmont.redcross.org/

March

The Return to the Green festival celebrates Irish-style for St. Patrick’s Day. Held at Falls Park in Greenville, the festival features activities for children and adults including arts and crafts, live entertainment and food. 864-467-6667. www.greatergreenville.com

April Spring brings the beauty of azaleas to the Upstate and it also brings the Azalea Festival to Pickens. Hundreds of blooming azaleas, arts and crafts, children’s games, a historical tour and an eclectic range of musicians highlight this mid-April celebration of spring’s arrival. 866-615-6603. www.pickenschamber.org/AzaleaFest Piedmont Plant and Flower Festival Springtime blooms means summers just around the corner. A large collection of plants and flowers, fruits and vegetables as well as outdoor accessories. The seasonal festival is held at the Greenville State Farmers Market. 864-244-4023

May More than 100,000 people pack downtown for Spring Fling weekend. Festivalgoers enjoy music, entertainment, arts and crafts, carnival rides, a classic car show

Photo/S. Kevin Greene

and international foods. 864-596-3105. www.cityofspartanburg.org The Greer Family Fest provides rides, storytelling, arts and crafts, food and for those who like adventure, a mud volleyball tournament. 864-877-4841. www.greerfamilyfest.com In Pickens, the Blue Ridge Fest features some of the biggest names in beach bands on Friday night and a “cruise-in” with more than 400 classic and antique cars. A motorcycle rally on Saturday also helps to support this charity fundraiser weekend. 864-240-3400. www.blueridgefest.com The month ends with the Freedom Weekend Aloft, one of the nation’s largest hot-air balloon events, in Simpsonville. The festival attracts balloonists and their crews from all over the country for twice-daily mass balloon launchings and competition. Arts and crafts, carnival rides, concerts and fireworks round out the fun. www. freedomweekend.org. 864-399-9481

June

The Upstate Shakespeare Festival at Falls Park in downtown Greenville is a

chance for theater lovers to bring a picnic basket and enjoy two plays in a beautiful outdoor setting. www.upstateshakespearefestival.org For those who enjoy sheaf tossing and bagpipes, the Greenville Scottish Games take place in early June at Furman University with plenty of activities for children and adults. www.greenvillegames.org/

July Spartanburg ushers in the patriotic season in the beginning of July with the Red, White and Boom festival in Barnet Park. The Fourth of July in Greenville is celebrated with the Red, White and Blue downtown festival. The event features a parade, fireworks, live music and barbecue. In July, Gaffney goes all out for the Peach Festival, which celebrates the fresh peach industry in Cherokee and Spartanburg counties. This 10-day festival includes parades, sporting events, truck and tractor pulls, concerts by nationally-known country music artists and plenty of food, topped off with delicious peach desserts. www.scpeachfestival.org

August

Carolina Panthers Summer Training Camp Enjoy professional football “up close and personal.” The NFL’s Carolina Panthers roar into Spartanburg for summer training camp at Wofford College. Practice sessions are free and open to the public.

September

Art in the Park, sponsored by the Greenville Recreation Department and Upstate Visual Arts, is held on the Governor’s School grounds in downtown Greenville. This annual celebration features local and regional artists. 864-232-4433. www. upstatevisualart.org/uvartnpark.htm Upper South Carolina State Fair Fall means the fair has come to town. Agricultural exhibits, food, rides and entertainment for the whole family. http://upperscstatefair.com/ South Carolina Apple Festival Beginning the week following Labor Day and running through the next weekend, the South Carolina Apple Festival celebrates the beginning of apple harvest season in Oconee County, the largest appleproducing area in the state. http://www. westminstersc.com/event97.htm

2010 Event Planning Guide | www.gsabusiness.com

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Business Casual Greenville Open Studios Greenville Open Studios is a weekend event which opens the studios of local visual artists to the public. The event showcases artists at work in their studios. Greenville Open Studios began as an idea cast about during a casual conversation between a small group of artists several years ago; they discussed doing something to raise awareness in the greater community of the tremendous creative energy in the area. The idea has evolved into a full-fledged annual event. http://www.greenvillearts.com/programs/open_studios.aspx

Euphoria Indulge in gourmet fare from Greenville’s top kitchens at this weekend festival of wining and dining. http://www.euphoriagreenville.com/

October Spartanburg dresses in its international wardrobe for the International Festival, which offers entertainment, costumes and cuisine to celebrate the wide variety of people that call the Upstate home. 864596-3105. www.cityofspartanburg.org/ international-fest/ During the second weekend of October, Fall for Greenville transforms 10 blocks of downtown Greenville into a huge open-air eatery as area restaurants offer samples of their specialties. The event also features waiters’ races, ice carving, an antiques show, bicycle races and a soccer tournament. 864-467-5791. www.mainstevents.com/ More than 30,000 people are estimated to visit Pumpkintown the second Saturday in October each year. On Highway 8 about 10 miles outside Pickens, the annual Pumpkin Festival is celebrated on the grounds of an old schoolhouse.

Photo/GHS, Randy Hadaway

The event includes traditional music, clogging, barbecue, antique cars and a parade. It’s also one of the largest outdoor arts and crafts shows in the state with more than 140 booths. 864-898-0261

November

The Turkey Day 8K race in Spartanburg started as a bet between two friends who decided all great cities have a Thanksgiving Day road race. The registration fee is canned food for the local soup kitchen. The event is sponsored by the Spartanburg Running Club.

Engagement Parties Bridal Showers Rehearsal Dinners Weddings & Receptions Meetings Company Retreats Training Events Conferences Company Parties Family Reunions

Hagood Mill near Pickens celebrates Native American heritage each November. Hagood Mill was built in 1845 and operated until the mid-1960s. After several attempts to revise the historic gristmill, it was back in business in 1997 and is operated now during the third weekend of every month by the Pickens County Cultural Commission. The Native American Celebration in November is one of the biggest draws of the year. In 2003, petroglyphs were discovered on a large rock often used as a picnic spot or play area for children. www.co.pickens. sc.us/culturalcommission/

December

Beginning after Thanksgiving, Roper Mountain Holiday Lights illuminate downtown Greenville and I-85 in elaborate colorful light displays to celebrate the Christmas season. www.ropermountain.org Spartanburg, Fountain Inn, Greenville, Anderson and Pendleton all host special holiday events for families. A favorite is the annual Greenville Poinsettia Christmas Parade down Main Street the first Saturday of the month. 864-467-4485

Spartanburg’s most romantic venue for wedding events offers the simplicity and convenience of hosting all your affairs in one stunning location. Whether planning for business or a special occasion – make Summit Pointe your first choice for memorable meetings and unforgettable events. We invite you to tour our facility and discuss your needs with us, so that together we may create the right event experience for you.

805 Spartan Blvd • Spartanburg, SC 2930 1

1-877-477-0477 • www.Summit-Pointe.com 20 2010 Event Planning Guide | www.gsabusiness.com


Business Casual

BMW Performance Center

bmwusa.com/ performancecenter 1-888-345-4BMW

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The Ultimate Driving Machine

ÂŽ

NEED A FAST GIFT IDEA? If you want to show that special employee or client that they truly are special, forget that bottle of wine or coffee table book this year and consider a day at the BMW Performance Center. This is no middle-of-the-road gift, this an own-the-road gift that will stay with them long after they’ve parked the BMW and their heart has slowed down. Visit bmwusa.com/performancecenter.

2010 Event Planning Guide | www.gsabusiness.com

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Ballpark estimates for event budgets

O

ne of the most difficult and often most limiting factors for an event is the budget. Knowing how to make the most of a budget of any size can be tricky. With all the variables to consider (food, date, audiences, etc.), it can help to have a general formula to use for plugging in details.

Catering/rentals — 60%-65%

The budgets for catering and rentals can be combined because most caterers are able to include organization of the rentals as part of their service because of the overlap. When considering caterers, ask for photos of previous events and compare budgets. This will give you a clear picture of what you will receive at your budget level. Presentation and customer service are key elements to evaluate, especially if the caterers are also servicing the event. Though it is the most important, catering is also probably one of the most flexible. Your initial quote from a vendor is open to revision. You might be surprised by how much you can lower your cost per person by cutting one ingredient. Catering might include: food, beverages, alcohol serving permits/bartender if needed, tables, chairs, linens, serving ware, decorations, serving staff, staging, heating/fans, labor, etc.

Location — 10%-15%

The location of your event can significantly influence your attendance. Hosting the event at your company headquarters might be good for branding, but might not be conducive to serving food. Holding the event at a new or unique facility might draw more interest, but it might be a pricier option. Conducting thorough research will help you determine your best solution. Compare the costs associated with a facility that offers a single site fee versus an hourly rate. Be aware that some sites might have very specific contracts, such as requiring pre-selected vendors or enforcing strict time requirements. Location might include: facility, access to power and water, technology, cleanup, trash disposal, etc.

Marketing — 5%-10%

Publicizing an event might be one of the more neglected categories, but informing people and enticing them to your event is crucial to its success. Using door prizes or giveaways can be a good incentive for attendance, as well as a good branding piece for your company. Consider your audience. Tech-savvy individuals might catch you Twittering about your event, while others might peruse local event

22 2010 Event Planning Guide | www.gsabusiness.com

calendars. Printed invitations are traditionally the most popular, but if that’s not in your budget, consider an electronic version instead. Marketing might include: printing invitations, postage, e-vites, advertising, media relations, grass-roots marketing, phone calls, prizes, promotional items, etc.

Miscellaneous — 15%-20%

Though an elusive category, budgeting for all your “miscellaneous” items can definitely add up. Even though they are miscellaneous, make sure you are aware of, and don’t underestimate, the different elements. Including a photographer to capture the event or providing valet parking can go a long way toward impressing your guests. Your event should always “over deliver.” If you have event sponsors to help share the cost, you need to have enough resources to thank and recognize those sponsors. Miscellaneous items might include: additional decor, entertainment/speaker fees, transportation, event parking, printing of program or materials, staff time, photographer or videographer, technology and audiovisual if not provided by the site facility, etc. epg Source: Emily Kosa, special event planner, DNA Creative Communications. www.dnacc.com


Business Casual

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Proper Attire

Follow these guidelines to ensure you are appropriately dressed, whether you’re attending a formal wedding, a business dinner or a barbeque.

White Tie

WOMEN

MEN

or dressy pants outfit

Short cocktail dress; long, dressy skirt and top;

Black tailcoat; matching trousers with a single stripe of satin or braid; white pique wing-collared shirt with stiff front; white vest; white bow tie; white or gray gloves; black patent leather shoes; and black dress socks

DRESSY CASUAL MEN

WOMEN

Seasonal sport coat or blazer; slacks; opencollar shirt

Formal (floor-length) evening gown

WOMEN

BLACK TIE

Street-length dress; skirt and dressy top; or dressy pants outfit

MEN

BUSINESS CASUAL

Black tuxedo jacket and matching trousers; formal (pique or pleated-front) white shirt; black bow tie (silk, shiny satin or twill); vest or black cummerbund to match tie; dressy suspenders to ensure a good fit (optional); black patent leather shoes; black dress socks; and no gloves. In the summer or on a cruise: white dinner jacket; black tuxedo trousers; and other black-tie wardrobe.

or patterned bow tie and cummerbund; black shiny patent leather or dressy black leather shoes; and black socks

WOMEN

WOMEN

Formal (floor-length) evening gown; or short, dressy cocktail dress

Formal (floor-length) evening gown; short, dressy cocktail dress; or dressy separates, any of the above accessorized with items such as a feather boa, colorful shawl or colorful jewelry

BLACK TIE OPTIONAL

MEN Seasonal sport coat or blazer; slacks or khakis; open-collar shirt

WOMEN Skirt, khakis or slacks; open-collar shirt, knit shirt or sweater (no spaghetti straps or low-neck tops)

SPORT CASUAL MEN

SEMIFORMAL

Khakis or clean, pressed jeans; plain T-shirt (no slogans), polo shirt or casual button-down shirt

MEN

MEN

WOMEN

Either a tuxedo (see “Black Tie”) or a dark suit; white shirt; and conservative tie

Dark, dressy business suit (usually worsted wool) with matching vest (optional); white shirt; conservative tie; dressy leather shoes; and dark dress socks

Khakis or clean, pressed jeans; plain T-shirt (no slogans), polo shirt or casual button-down shirt

WOMEN Formal (floor-length) evening gown; short, dressy cocktail dress; or dressy separates

CREATIVE BLACK TIE MEN Tuxedo combined with trendy or whimsical items such as a black shirt or a matching colored

WOMEN Short afternoon or cocktail dress; or long dressy skirt and top

FESTIVE ATTIRE

HOLIDAY CASUAL MEN Same as “Business Casual” with some holiday colors or designs.

WOMEN

MEN Seasonal sport coat or blazer in color of choice; slacks; open-collar shirt or shirt with festive or holiday-themed tie

Same as “Business Casual” with some holiday colors or designs. Source: Revised 17th edition of Emily Post’s “Etiquette”

2010 Event Planning Guide | www.gsabusiness.com

23


e al l y t s Life not as usu

ness i ent s v u e B r you 26 g ckr n i i l F n e re k to o e o b 2 7 G mag ce i a t F c erfe rom p F e h 28 ing t r u t ap 30 C

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Lifestyle

Business not as usual

With the help of eco-friendly planners, a green event is simple and rewarding

C

onsidering the environment has become an important part of planning meetings, weddings and social events as more individuals and businesses recognize that eco-friendly event planning is cost-effective, practical and good public relations. Roper-Starch, a leading U.S. consumer marketing research and trends consulting company, recently reported that 80% of people consider themselves environmentalists. “We’re all thinking about the future for our children and our grandchildren. We’re not just thinking about now,” said Carolyn Schoepf, president of Corporate Raves Inc. Schoepf has been planning a variety of events – including corporate, wedding and fundraisers – since 1988 and has noticed a recent uptick in requests for eco-friendly elements. She said one of the easiest ways her clients can be kind to the environment is to cut back on waste. Doing so makes an impact when hosting groups of any size, and it just takes a little time and thought. “Place recycling containers alongside trash bins to make it easy for event goers to recycle,” said Schoepf, who plans BMW Manufacturing Co.’s annual Earth Day event. Event planners can also make more conscious choices when it comes to décor. Floral arrangements, for example, usually end up in the trash once an event is over. Consider selecting live plants that can be raffled off to participants, given to guests, or donated to local schools or charities. Schoepf said many brides request their flowers be taken to assisted living homes. Food is another important area for reducing waste and the key is to obtain an accurate headcount. Other eco-friendly elements include hiring a caterer that serves locally grown food and asking the caterer to compost scraps. A local organic farmer could be hired to pick up the scraps and take them to his or her farm for composting. Unused food items can be taken to the local soup kitchen.

When serving food, Shoepf suggest using china and glassware instead of paper or polystyrene.

Green exhibit

The tradeshow industry traditionally leaves a pretty large carbon footprint behind, but Katie Leckenbusch of JC Rose and Associates said that is changing. The company she works for builds tradeshow exhibits and offers a range of products from simple tabletop displays and retractable banner stands, to modular components that can stand two-stories tall. And, because the company manufactures custom exhibits on-site, it has the ability to offer clients eco-friendly options. For example, modular booths can be built with recycled materials and low-weight aluminum, which saves money if the exhibit must be shipped to an event. In addition, graphics can be printed with eco-solvent ink on fabric made from recycled soda bottles. “There is a price-point difference, but for some people, it’s such a big part of their corporate structure, that is OK with them,” Leckenbusch said. “Personally, I think you end up with an exhibit or display that gives you another talking point. Not only is it beautiful and interesting for your target market to see, but there is the added aspect that it has been cre-

26 2010 Event Planning Guide | www.gsabusiness.com

ated without producing harmful effects.” Convention centers are also making an effort to become more eco-friendly, Leckenbusch said. Exhibitors often leave a lot behind that could be recycled or given away, and some convention center operators have taken it upon themselves to sort out items rather than just toss them.

Green lodging

Planning a tradeshow, conference or wedding often includes making travel and lodging arrangements and some planners offer to track all of the guests’ travel and arrange for carbon offsets. Carbon offsets can be purchased through companies like NativeEnergy. com or CarbonFund.org. These companies provide tools to calculate carbon emissions and opportunities to offset them through supporting various carbon reducing. Planners can also arrange for attendees to stay at a green hotel, (a complete list is provided by the Green Hotels Association, greenhotels.com). They can also choose a venue that is centrally located and ask attendees to consider carpooling. When planners incorporate local products and sustainable practices into events, the occasion can be meaningful and memorable. epg


Lifestyle

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Greening your event Events can generate a lot of trash. With so many people interested in reducing their carbon footprint, use your next event as a way to promote environmentally friendly practices. Use this checklist to see how green you can make your event.

• If you must use paper, use post-consumer paper whenever possible. • Tie-in promotions. • Use reusable cups or mugs as promotion products that participants can take home and use after the event.

Waste Reduction

Recycling and Cleanup

Marketing/Advertising • Print all advertising on used paper or post-consumer recycled paper. • Advertise electronically. Use e-mail as your main source of communication; when possible, direct people to a Web site where all information about your event can be found. • Print signs and posters on the blank side of previously used paper. • Inform participants that the event will have a green focus, and encourage them to be supportive and active. • Offer online event registration.

• Have appropriate recycling bins at your event. Request additional recycling and garbage containers from the venue you’re using. • Place the garbage and recycling bins next to each other so attendees can make one “stop and drop.â€? • Make announcements and use signs to show guests the “Recycling Rules.â€? They’ll need to know what can be recycled and where to take the items. Make it as easy as possible. • Have (polite and fun) volunteers monitor the recycling bins to ensure trash is being deposited into the right bin. • Evaluate the types of waste your event will produce and see if you can substitute the waste that might go to the garbage with waste that can be recycled or reused. • Try to use the most environmentally friendly products and services that are available, including eco-friendly cleaning materials and products, even if they cost a bit more. epg

At the Event Avoid using paper • Use dry-erase boards and chalkboards instead of flip chart paper. • Encourage PowerPoint presentations or online presentations instead of handouts. • If handouts are required, print material on the back of previously used paper or on post-consumer or recycled paper. • Always print handouts double-sided.

Source: Jennifer Cherock, Trio Solutions Inc.,www.trio-solutions.com

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2010 Event Planning Guide | www.gsabusiness.com

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Lifestyle

From Facebook to Flickr

Going online to plan your next event By Lyn Mettler

I

f you’re planning an event, using the latest and greatest Web and social media technologies is a great way to communicate, save time and attract more people to your shindig, whether it’s a wedding, a corporate luncheon or the opening of a new restaurant.  Here are seven free online resources you can tap into to get your next event off the ground:  

1. Facebook

It’s tough these days to host an event and not include Facebook as part of the planning. Using their event feature, you can invite anyone to come, whether they’re on Facebook or not, and it will keep track of RSVPs for you. You or attendees can upload photos, videos or links related to the event and start a discussion on “The Wall,” a place where people can publicly post comments.  One word of warning: Typically about a third of the people on Facebook who say they’ll attend actually attend. www.facebook.com

2. Twitter

Set up an account just for your event, try to find the folks you’d like to invite to your event and “follow” them. Most people will “follow” you back, so you can then begin to “tweet” updates about the event and engage in dialogue with them about it, as well. Additionally, set up a “hashtag,” which is a pound sign followed by a word that anyone can use in their tweets when talking about your event. While it’s taking place, people can “tweet” and follow “tweets” from everyone else at the event by using that hashtag. www.twitter.com

3. Evite

This is an oldie but goodie. Almost everyone has received an Evite invitation at some point if they’re on e-mail. A digital version of the classic invitation you get in the mail, Evite lets you choose from a variety of designs or create your own, and then send to your invitation list via e-mail where they can RSVP and see who else is attending. But it does a lot more. In fact, Evite describes itself as “Your own personal party planner.” It provides an event checklist, budget estimator, drink calculator and other cool party planning tools. www. evite.com Alternatives include Eventbrite.com and Socializr.com.

4. The Knot

Brides and grooms only for this one. What a fabulous tool that I wish had been around when I got married. Set up an account, and you can track your budget and due dates, manage your guest list, create a customized Web page about your big day to share with friends and family,

28 2010 Event Planning Guide | www.gsabusiness.com


Lifestyle

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search for vendors and send a Save the Date by e-mail. It’s become a must-have for couples headed down the aisle. www.theknot.com

5. Evernote

Evernote is a versatile service that bills itself as a way to “remember everything.” Who can argue with that? It lets you use your phone or computer to snap a photo of a cute tablecloth you saw, clip a Web page with party planning ideas, type in text notes from a meeting, etc., which are then searchable and tagable for easy retrieval. www.Evernote.com

6. Remember the milk 

Need an easy-to-use way to keep track of tasks for your event? This is the answer. Create lists for different types of tasks (promotion, execution, vendors), which you can tag by subject. It will also send you reminders via e-mail, cell phone or instant messaging services and will hook up with your iPhone, your calendar and even Gmail. You can share your tasks and lists with anyone you want, and even note your tasks’ geographic locations, so you can more efficiently plan outings.  www. RemembertheMilk.com

7. Photo sharing sites

OK, so you’ve had the event, it went beautifully, and now everyone is rehashing the good

times. Consider creating a group on Flickr, a photo social networking site or Picassa (a Google product), where everyone can upload photos of their grand time and download full versions of others’ photos to save or print. Or stick them up on Facebook where all your friends can tag themselves! www.flickr.com

So grab your smart phone, your laptop or your iPad and get to planning! epg   Lyn Mettler is the founder and co-owner of Step Ahead Inc., a Charleston-based company that creates and manages social media campaigns for organizations.

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2010 Event Planning Guide | www.gsabusiness.com

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Lifestyle

Capturing the perfect image

Photo/Travis Bell Photography

Staff Report

S

o, the importance of hiring a photographer and videographer to capture precious moments should be high on your list. In fact, it could make up anywhere from 9-12% of your overall wedding budget. With such an investment in images that will be passed down through generations, you need to be sure how you want them to look and that you choose a photographer and videographer that can deliver.

Photography

What’s your style? When your parents married, there was one type of photography: traditional. Most every shot was posed, which meant wedding albums of yesteryear contained picture-perfect images of the bride and groom with various family members, as well as the must-have shots of the new couple sharing a kiss, cutting the cake, and heading off for the honeymoon. But today’s brides want more. They prefer a series of photos that tell a complete story of the day. That’s why more brides are choosing photographers who use a photojournalistic approach, a style that has its roots in the documentary style found in newspapers and magazines. “Our wedding photographer took a lot of standard, traditional portraits,” says Jeff Hall of Upstate-based Jeff Hall Photography. “But I have

always been a fan of documenting what was going on, and not doing a whole lot of coaching.” Hall is referring to a trend that has taken hold of the wedding industry in the last few years. Former newspaper photojournalists and fine art photographers like Hall, approach wedding photography differently. Events are not staged, but rather photographed as they happen to capture real, raw reactions and emotion. In college, Hall learned a number of photographic disciplines including the fine art of shooting in black and white as well as with real film as opposed to digital. “I’ve recently switched back to using film,” explains Hall, “I’ve just seen so many overdone photoshopped images that were candid, but manipulated so much afterwards that it takes away from what truly happened.” Four years ago Hall set out to treat clients to this personal philosophy and vision and is now shooting weddings and lifestyle photographs throughout the Southeast in a documentary style. Hall understands that traditional family photos will always be an important part of any wedding album, as are photos of the cake, dress, rings and more. That’s why he sets aside time after the ceremony to meticulously pose the bride and groom. “Then I move everyone else in and let the group shots form themselves,” he explains. By allowing friends and family to stand close to the person of their choice instead of in size order, for example, it keeps everyone looking natural and more relaxed no matter what the setting.

30 2010 Event Planning Guide | www.gsabusiness.com

But it’s that documentary style that’s allowed Hall to capture tender — and hilarious — moments as they happen to be preserved as family history. “It is a big challenge to get candid shots without people stopping and styling,” says Hall, but he gets around even the most posed shots by shooting before guests realize their picture is being taken. “It helps not to do too much preparation,” says Hall.

Trends

Recently, there’s more focus on photographing the details of the wedding: the bride’s dress, hair, favors, flowers, etc. For this, Hall works in concert with Aaron Greene, a photographer and videographer also based in Greenville. “We aren’t side by side, we split up and capture the couple getting ready for the ceremony and we each have our own way of shooting details.” Working this way allows the couple to get the most comprehensive coverage of all the special moments. Photo albums that are more like coffee table books continue to be the rage, and Hall said couples have expressed more of an interest in helping to design them. “The albums we use are not matted photos on heavy pages, they are printed on photo paper. That gives you a blank canvas to lay out whatever size image you want,” says Hall. He usually selects his favorite photographs and designs simple and clean backgrounds. From there, couples


Lifestyle

What’s your style? Here’s a quick reference guide to the types of photography out there. Traditional: Formal color shots that are generally set up and direction by the photographer. They include typical group family photos and posed “magazine style” images. Photojournalism: Photos taken as they happen without any orchestration by the photographer or any other party. This style is based in newspaper photography, which hinges on capturing moments as they happen, rather than staging them. Illustrative: This involves allowing the photographer to create “artsy” settings and situations in which to snap photos.

Indispensable yet disposable

For even more images, especially candid photos, buy disposable cameras for your guests to use. Select either 35mm disposable cameras or digital disposable cameras and place them on tables at the reception and ask guests to snap away. The cameras are available in sleek white or silver, as well as fun colors and designs to match your wedding décor.

Black & White versus color

There are advantages to both black and white and color images. If you must choose between one or the other, experts suggest shooting everything in color. You can always manipulate the color image later, converting it to black and white or sepia tones, for example. If you have a little room in your photography budget, you may want two photographers at your event, capturing moments in black and white and color.

can make whatever changes they want to try to tell the story of their wedding from their perspective. “I try to have as much personal contact with couples as I can because it’s easy to get lost with so many proofs to choose from.”

Choosing a photographer

With the surge of wedding photographers in the last few years, it won’t be hard to find a Web site or a blog on which to view sample photos. These, combined with viewing proofs of actual weddings, are great tools to gauge the photographer’s style and capabilities. But don’t base your decision on that alone. “You want to be able to talk to the photographer and get a feel for how their personal-

ity works with yours,” said Hall, who travels across the Southeast for weddings. “The last thing I want to do is photograph a wedding and not meet the couple’s expectations.” As it becomes more affordable for new photographers to get into the business room, Hall cautions, “Make sure the person is prepared to shoot in the location you’ve chosen and that they’ll shoot what you want.” This is especially important for destination weddings, Hall explains, if a photographer’s portfolio is only based on indoor shots. “They need to show they can create their style consistently in every setting and scenario.” Other tips in choosing a photographer include: • Get references. Check out the photographer’s Web site, as well as Facebook or MySpace pages. Brides will make comments on those pages regarding their experience and the photographer’s capabilities. • Review their professional background. The other types of work the photographer has performed may come through. For example, a photographer with a sports background knows the importance of timing. • Get a signed contract that outlines exactly what you want and what services the photographer will provide.

Videography

And we’re rolling. “I think video is very much part of our culture and the way we share things,” says Aaron Greene of Paper Star Pictures. www.paperstarpictures.com “A video shows the emotions of the wedding in a different format.” As such Greene offers couples options that include photos and videos, however, he produces short, cinematic art films of the wedding. The two complement each other, Greene says, because they share a unified aesthetic to document the day. The advantage of video is being able to hear and see what happened at the same time. “We always capture the audio in high quality on a secondary recording device,” says Greene, “Then we will overlay those important moments and music.” For the last few years, Greene has been shooting weddings as a still photographer and has gradually moved into doing more documentary work with high definition video. Using as many as three cameras, Greene captures and distills the day into a cinematic, music video style DVD as opposed to a straightforward video of the day’s events. “It’s been my experience that no one wants to watch a full-length re-creation of the wedding and reception. We create a cinematic collage of the highlights that can be viewed again and again.”

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Don’t rely on Uncle Joe

Greene suggests using a family member if you want to document every little moment separately, but choose a professional videographer for a polished film that you’ll want to show off. Greene says be wary of those quasi-professionals who own a video camera and want to make a few extra dollars on the weekends. He offers these tips for selecting a professional videographer: Ask to see a demo. Better yet, ask to see a couple. A real professional will be able to show you a portfolio and a range of work. Ask for testimonials from former customers. Ask your videographer for three to four really testimonials and to provide contact information for those couples. No videograPhoto/Travi pher should shy s Bell Photo graphy away from putting you directly in contact with a client. Anyone can fabricate a letter of recommendation. Ask the videographer exactly what kind of cameras they use. Most camcorders are not good enough to professionally capture the day for you. If you want the finished video to look sharp on your television, then shooting in 1080 P High Definition is the best you can get. Ask about their capabilities and if they are producing to modern industry standards. Ask them if they have a day job. Because of the low barrier to entry, many “videographers” are not dedicated to the craft – they’re just trying to make an extra buck on the weekends. It takes time to edit, author and render DVDs from footage. Any shortcuts will show in the final quality of your wedding video. Ask them who exactly will be filming and editing the footage. The bigger the production, the more crew it will take. Find out whom the principal photographer is and if they will be on hand to direct the crew. If someone else is editing, it shouldn’t deter you from hiring them, just be sure that they have the skill set to produce the video you want. Ask if they shoot more than one event per day. It helps to know how dedicated the videographer and their team are to making your event special. epg More information is available at www.paperstarpictures.com

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Lists & Direc tories 34 - Event Planners 36 - Alternative/O

utdoor Venues

40 - Hotels with M

eeting Facilities

41 - Golf Courses 42 - Exhibition Ce

nters

44 - Rental Compa

nies

45 - Florists/Event

Decor

46 - Caterers

This section is sponsored by

47 - Index of Adve

rtisers

47 - Index of Comp

anies

32 2010 Event Planning Guide | www.gsabusiness.com


The PlaCe TO MeeT

The Crowne Plaza has become Greenville’s Place to Meet with 16 flexible meeting rooms, totaling 7,500 square feet of meeting space, and an additional 1,700 square feet of exhibit space in our pre-function areas; the hotel has the versatility to accommodate most set-up requirements and can accommodate a wide variety of events including seminars, board meetings, tradeshows, conferences, and gala events. Whether your event includes 10 people or 600, the Crowne Plaza has just the right combination of elegantly appointed and technologically equipped rooms to meet your needs. The Crowne Plaza offers exceptional expertise and signature services. Our experience in hosting high-level corporate meetings and leading social and civic events, as well as our professional attention to every detail, assure that your function will be a success. We offer unparalleled cuisine provided by Ruth’s Chris Steakhouse, sumptuous surroundings and gracious service to create a one-of-a-kind event!

851 Congaree Rd, Greenville, SC 29607 | (864) 297-6300 Ruth’s Chris Steak House | (864) 248-1700


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Lists & Directories

EVENT PLANNERS Listed Alphabetically

10-X Group 104 W. Broad St. Greenville, SC 29601 864-420-1172/864-752-1521 Holly Rollins, president, Julia Hoyle, event manager Services: Event planning, large-scale conferences, trade shows www.10-xgroup.com

All Occasion Celebrations 108 N. Main St. Mauldin, SC 29662 864-284-6686 Krystal Donald, co-owner, Eric Kruse, co-owner Services: Wedding and event planning, wedding direction, reception coordination www.alloccasioncelebrations.com

Brett Inc. PO Box 2304 Greenville, SC 29602 864-239-0616/864-242-9811 Tim Brett, president, Elaine Barnhill, senior director Services: Board meetings, tournaments, concerts, press conferences, groundbreakings and ribbon-cuttings www.brett-inc.com

Christa Hovis Special Events LLC 3620 Pelham Rd., Suite 189 Greenville, SC 29615 864-304-9085/864-297-3192 Christa Hovis, owner, principal event designer and planner Services: Award-winning design, planning and production services www.christahovis.com

Christine Faust Events 14 Manly St. Greenville, SC 29601 864-590-2440 Christine Faust, owner, principal planner Services: Design, planning and coordination for weddings and corporate events www.faustevents.com

Communication Works LLC PO Box 27142 Greenville, SC 29616 864-908-4744 Betty Parker Ellis, president/owner Services: Event management, publicity, customer relations www.communicationworksllc.com

Corporate Meeting and Event Management LLC 131 Stewart Rd. Simpsonville, SC 29681 864-967-9722/864-228-1956 Bobbie MacIntosh, president Services: Meeting and special event planning

Corporate Raves Inc. 1430 Maryland Ave. Spartanburg, SC 29307 864-585-8012/864-585-8018 Carolyn Schoepf, owner Services: Corporate event design, destination management and wedding coordination www.corporateraves.com

Custom Production Services 730 Sterling Dr. Spartanburg, SC 29316 864-814-1221/864-814-1219 Wm. A. (Sandy) Morgan, president Services: Total event production and management. Sound, lighting and staging for concerts and corporate events.

DNA Creative Communications 103 E. Park Ave. Greenville, SC 29601 864-235-0959/864-235-1304 Debbie Nelson, owner/manager Services: Event strategy, branding, planning, management, promotion, staffing www.dnacc.com

Duvall Catering & Event Design PO Box 16766 Greenville, SC 29607 864-270-3271/843-763-6142 Caroline Heuring, event coordinator Charlie Moore, operating manager Services: Catering, event design, bar service for private parties, weddings and corporate events. www.eventsbyduvall.com

Erwin-Penland 125 E. Broad St. Greenville, SC 29601 864-271-0500/864-235-5941 Joe Erwin, president Services: Event marketing, trade shows, sponsorships, meeting planning, business and consumer launch events www.erwinpenland.com

Event Rentals 225 W. Main St. Spartanburg, SC 29306 864-591-1846/864-591-1944 Wendell Christopher, owner

34 2010 Event Planning Guide | www.gsabusiness.com

Services: Event planning, trade shows, party supply rental www.event-rentals.com

Full Circle Public Relations 148 River St., Suite 205 Greenville, SC 29601 864-672-9614/864-672-9619 Liza Jones, president, Kim Banks, APR, director of client services Services: Press conferences, corporate events, trade shows, publicity events www.fullcirclepr.com

Grace Hall 108 Trade Street,Greer, SC 29651 864-848-0099 Mary Jackson, event manager Services: Creative concept to project management and production www.gracehallgreersc.com

JBM & Associates 14 Manly St. Greenville , SC 29601 864-250-9713/864-250-0434 Jacqui Bomar, president Services: Full service event and marketing company with a focus on consumer shows in the southeast www.jbmshows.com

Multi Media Services 1029 Thousand Oaks Blvd. Greenville, SC 29607 800-297-8533/864-676-1946 John Toohey, sales manager Jerry Maxey, rental manager Services: Audio/video staging www.mmsav.com

On the Go LLC PO Box 5204 Greenville, SC 29606 864-325-2589 Oâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;Zandra L. Floyd, president Services: Concierge service, task and time management, event planning www.onthegoconcierge.com

Plan Ahead Events of Greenville 2434 Hudson Rd., Unit 147 Greer, SC 29650 864-630-0766/864-236-8237 Jay Howle Services: Full-service events focusing mainly on corporate, nonprofit and charities www.planaheadevents-greenvillesc.com

Professional Party Rentals Inc. 647 Congaree Rd., Greenville, SC 29607 864-627-8808/864-627-8807

Jeff Fann, co-owner, Dorie Fann, co-owner Services: Event planning, trade shows, audio/visual, party supply rental, event decor/props www.professionalpartyrentals.com

Shafer & Huguley 509 Pettigru St. Greenville, SC 29601 864-232-7655/864-233-8913 Jeff Shafer, co-owner, Gaines Huguley, co-owner Services: Event planning, audio/visual, advertising specialties/awards/corp. gifts, event decor/props, signs/banners, trade shows www.shmkt.com

Southern Panache Events LLC 2456 Hudson Rd. Greer, SC 29650 864-292-2804/864-292-2349 Brigitte Gillespie Adley, Kim Costello Carmichael Services: Full service event design and planning www.southernpanacheevents.com

U Designs 5B E. Coffee St. Greenville, SC 29601 864-232-7374 Brie D. LeBret, CEO Services: Design, decor, planning, photography, floral, catering www.udesignsevents.com

Up to Eleven Events 111 Smith Hines Rd., Suite I Greenville, SC 29607 864-676-1023/864-751-4112 Casey Gallagher Reid, president Services: Entertainment consultation, event management, talent booking, production and operations, greening consultation and experiential marketing ideas www.up2elevenevents.com

Upstate Wedding and Event Services 1225 Pendleton St., Suite 6 Greenville, SC 29611 864-220-1220/864-220-1224 Patty Revels Services: Event facilitation, rental of tables, chairs, linens, china, decor items, printing of invitations and programs, event planning and execution www.upstateweddingservices.com


Lists & Directories

epg

This year, Christa Hovis Special Events won 6 regional ISES awards. Although we worked hard for this recognition from our industry, we also understand that it takes more than creativity and a great team to achieve such accolades. It also takes clients who are willing to break with the norm, think outside the box and trust in our ideas. To them, we wanted to say...

International Special Events Society

International Special Events Society

International Special Events Society

International Special Events Society

International Special Events Society

International Special Events Society

BEST EVENT PLANNING CORPORATE

SOCIAL

NON-PROFIT

CORPORATE

SOCIAL

EVENT COLLATERAL

WINNER BEST WINNER WINNER WINNER EVENT PLANNING BEST EVENT PLANNING BEST EVENT DESIGN

GREENVILLE SC

864.304.9085

CHRISTAHOVIS.COM

WINNER WINNER BEST EVENT DESIGN BEST EVENT DESIGN

christa hovis SPECIAL EVENTS ;4

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Lists & Directories

UPSTATE ALTERNATIVE/ OUTDOOR VENUES Listed Alphabetically

295 Complex-Southport Road Southport Road Spartanburg, SC 29301 864-595-5356/864-595-5363 Maximum Capacity: 1,500 baseball/softball fields, soccer fields, concession/restroom building, playground www.spartanburgparks.org

Anchor Park Pavilion at Lake Bowen 8515 Highway 9, Inman, SC 29349 864-583-7361/864-596-4937 Maximum Capacity: 50 Covered pavilion with eight picnic tables, two permanent charcoal grills and a public playground. http://www.sws-sssd.org/customers/ pavilion-rentals.html

Anderson Arts Center 110 Federal St. Anderson, SC 29625 864-222-2787/864-716-3840 Stephanie Newton, executive administrator Maximum Capacity: 400 Accommodations for large weddings and receptions, a conference room for business meetings, classrooms for children’s birthday parties or other events www.andersonarts.org

Ashtabula Historic House 2725 Old Greenville Highway Pendleton, SC 29670 864-650-0003 Jackie Reynolds Christa Skeen, executive director Maximum Capacity: 100 Ashtabula is an elegant 2-story c.1825 plantation house set back in a lovely 10acre park. The site offers several outdoor settings for a small intimate wedding on the front steps of the plantation house or on the patio in front of a two-story colonial period tavern www.pendletonhistoricfoundation.org

Augusta Manor 1004 Augusta St. Greenville, SC 29605 864-271-1003 Sharon Wells Macy Covington, wedding planner, coordinator Maximum Capacity: 475 A beautiful, historic mansion, the

facility has a beautiful outdoor arbor, 2,100-square-foot ballroom, two dinning rooms, bridal suite, photographers studio and a state of the art sound system. Perfect for any event, 15,000 square feet are available for weddings, corporate events, reunions or fundraisers. www.augustamanor.org

Berry Field-Asheville Highway Asheville Highway Spartanburg, SC 29301 864-595-5356/864-595-5363 Maximum Capacity: 1,000 Baseball fields www.spartanburgparks.org

Heather Statham, event specialist Maximum Capacity: 200 Non-smoking music venue with bar in middle of space, private smoking room, stage with lights and sound, an ideal setup for receptions, reunions, parties www.burgundyblues.com

Canaan Road Soccer Complex Canaan Road Spartanburg, SC 29301 864-596-9000/864-595-5356 Maximum Capacity: 2,000 www.spartanburgparks.org

The Carolina Country Club 2355 Carolina Country Club Road

BMW Performance Driving School Spartanburg, SC 29306 1155 Highway 101 S. Greer, SC 29651 888-345-4269 Dan Gubitosa, facility manager Mike Renner, corporate events coordinator Doug McGrath, corporate events coordinator Natalie Popkin, facility coordinator Maximum Capacity: 500 Bring new focus to your business by putting your team through the paces on the driving track. Flexibility to accommodate large and small events, evening functions, seminars and private events. www.bmwusa.com/performancecenter

BMW Zentrum 1400 Highway 101 S. Greer, SC 29651 888-868-7269/864-989-5298 Maximum Capacity: 500 Museum and visitors center at BMW Manufacturing Corp. Facility has two meeting rooms. Cocktail receptions are available. www.bmwzentrum.com

Bridges Arena 1000 Powell Mill Road Spartanburg, SC 29301 864-587-4237/864-587-4265 Mark Perdue, athletic director Maximum Capacity: 400 Athletic arena with a total capacity of approximately 400 in bleacher seating or 150 at dining tables set up on the arena floor www.smcsc.edu

Burgundy Blues Jazz Club 134-A N. Main St. Anderson, SC 29621 864-222-5299 Cindy Whitfield, managing partner

36 2010 Event Planning Guide | www.gsabusiness.com

rental plans in a vibrant setting for any occasion. www.tcmgreenvillesc.org

City of Greenville - Falls Park 206 S. Main St. Greenville, SC 29602 864-467-4355 Dana Souza, director of parks and recreation Maximum Capacity: 100 An expansive park and gardens located in Greenville’s downtown Historic District. Falls Park contains outdoor amphitheaters and several other locations ideal for events, company picnics and weddings. www.fallspark.com

864-573-7540/864-580-2299 Tim Mervosh Maximum Capacity: N/A Full service, large capacity banquet facility, full dining services, exceptional 18hole golf course, driving range, putting and chipping greens, short game green, gated community www.thecarolinacountryclub.com

Centre Stage - South Carolina 501 River St. Greenville, SC 29604-8451 864-233-6733 Glenda ManWaring, executive and artistic director Maximum Capacity: 285 A 285-seat theater accompanied by three lobby areas and a patio www.centrestage.org

Charter Amphitheatre 861 S.E. Main St. Simpsonville, SC 29681 864-688-2436/864-250-4939 Roger Newton, president, GADPFMC Nikki Malpass, general manager Beth Paul, director of finance Maximum Capacity: 10,000 Amphitheatre is an outdoor venue with a 10,000 patron capacity. We also feature a private VIP area, which was just added to the venue at the 2010 season kickoff. www.charteramphtheatrecom

The Children’s Museum of the Upstate 300 College St. Greenville, SC 29601 864-233-7755/864-233-7790 Mary B. Sellers, president, CEO Maximum Capacity: 2,400 In the heart of downtown Greenville, The Children’s Museum offers flexible

Cleveland Park Spartanburg 141 N. Cleveland Park Drive Spartanburg, SC 29304 864-562-4150/864-562-4158 Jon Woodsby, park manager Maximum Capacity: 400 Public park with event center, 100-seat amphitheater, gazebo, outdoor event space, picnic shelters available for rent. Grounds feature a miniature train, volleyball area and two meeting rooms totaling 5,400 square feet. Parties must pay alcohol permit fee and events must end by midnight. www.spartanburgparks.org

The Commerce Club 55 Beattie Place, 17th Floor, One Liberty Square Greenville, SC 29602 864-232-5600/864-233-6140 Crystal Anderson Moorhouse, private event director Maximum Capacity: 500 Located atop One Liberty Square overlooking downtown Greenville and the


Lists & Directories Blue Ridge Mountains, 15,000 square feet of meeting space with seven private rooms, complete event planning services, professional culinary and service staffs. Available to non-members for social and corporate events. www.commerce-club.com

Converse College Alumnae House 580 E. Main St. Spartanburg, SC 29302 864-596-9069 Kathy Worley, director of event services Maximum Capacity: 500 Located in Converse Heights, one of the oldest neighborhoods in Spartanburg, the Converse College Alumnae House is used for many community functions. The scenic design of the house makes it a popular setting for wedding receptions, showers, and community events. Multiple rooms throughout downstairs, including kitchen. Front porch and grounds also available.

Cowpens Park-Linda St. Linda St. Spartanburg, SC 29301 864-595-5356/864-595-5363 Maximum Capacity: 200

baseball/softball fields, tennis courts, basketball court, concession/restroom building, playground www.spartanburgparks.org

Croft State Park 450 Croft State Park Road Spartanburg, SC 29302 864-585-1283 John Moon, park manager Maximum Capacity: 500 Croft State Park offers camping, three picnic shelters with water and grills (two with power). Park features a horse show ring, trails, 150-acre lake with boat rentals and playground. Hours of operation: 7 a.m. - 9 p.m. daylight savings time, 7 a.m. - 6 p.m. winter hours. New central reservation system for South Carolina State Parks, 1-866-345-7275 or online, can make reservations up to 11 months in advance www.southcarolinaparks.com

Daniel Recital Hall at Converse College 580 E. Main St. Spartanburg, SC 29302 864-596-9069 Kathy S. Worley, director of special events Maximum Capacity: 350 Auditorium

The Duncan Estate 840 Union St. Spartanburg, SC 29302 864-529-7287/864-752-1335 Danielle Sanders, owner Barbara Barnes, event coordinator Corey Sanders, owner Maximum Capacity: 200 Restored historic estate defines southern elegance. Four acres offer enchanting sites for weddings, receptions and events. Open vendor policy www.duncanestate.com

ECPI College of Technology 1001 Keys Drive, Suite 100 Greenville, SC 29615 864-288-2828/864-288-2930 Amy S. Hickman, campus president Maximum Capacity: 25 Computer lab and classrooms available for meetings. www.ecpi.edu

Eden Farms 4700 Dacusville Highway Marietta, SC 29661 864-898-0043 Amy Goudelock, owner, operator Maximum Capacity: 200 Multipurpose equestrian ministry with

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3,000 square feet of meeting space offering a large 40-stall barn, two meeting and party rooms. A non-smoking facility, Eden Farms offers ministries, parties, boarding, lessons, trail rides, walking, holiday events, camps and more. Outdoors offers 170 acres, two large riding arenas and a picnic/playground area. www.edenfarms.net

Fairmont Larkin Park-Nazareth Road Nazareth Road Spartanburg, SC 29301 864-595-5356/864-595-5363 Maximum Capacity: 50 Picnic Shelter, no power, bathroom facility www.spartanburgparks.org

Fluor Corp. 100 Fluor Daniel Drive Greenville, SC 29607-2770 864-281-4400/864-281-6121 Annette Allen, general manager Maximum Capacity: 650 A 15,000-square-foot multipurpose facility offering meeting, entertainment and banquet facilities complete with a cafeteria. Event equipment options such as stage, podium, lighting and sound system are also available upon request.

One Meeting Here Can Ch ange Your Future One Night Here Can Ch ange Your Life Discover Sanctuary, Serenity & Solitude

L a n d r u m

www.theredhorseinn.com

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Lists & Directories

Frog Pond Weddings

Greenville Women’s Club

Wyche Pavilion

107 Fleet Lane Easley, SC 29640 864-419-2665 Toni Marie Maximum Capacity: 20 Private gardens for small intimate weddings from May to October

8 Bennett St. Greenville, SC 29601 864-233-9977 Shirley Rudisill, executive director Maximum Capacity: 278 The 2nd oldest residence in Greenville County on the National Register of Historic Places, the home features Italianate architecture and is set among trees, azaleas and gardens, available for weddings, receptions, recitals, luncheons, meetings and other events. www.greenvillewomansclub.org

318 S. Main St. Greenville, SC 29601 864-467-9777/864-467-3028 Bob Munnich, director of operations Kimberly Adams, event specialist Billy Watson, event specialist Maximum Capacity: 1,500 The Wyche Pavilion is an open air facility on the bank of the Reedy River. The Thomas Roe Founders Room is the ideal setting for seminars, business lunches or private business or social dinners. The Shirley Roe Cabaret Room is a great party spot with a built in full service bar, dance floor lighting and full view of the river. Larkin’s Courtyard is located between the restaurant and The Gunter Auditorium and is ideal for a private dinner, wedding ceremony or intimate reception www.larkinsontheriver.com

Furman University Amphitheatre 3300 Poinsett Highway Greenville, SC 29613 864-294-3267/864-294-3269 Todd Duke Maximum Capacity: 3,000 A walk around Furman’s lake walking trail will bring you to the Furman amphitheatre. This canopy-roofed venue is a popular location for concerts, performances and weddings. The amphitheatre is equipped with a full sound system and newly completed rest room facilities. The venue, renovated from its original seating capacity of 450, is now able to comfortably hold 3,000 people. Speakers located in the nearby bell tower ensure that music can be heard across the entire lake. www.furman.edu

Greater Pacolet Park-Sunny Acres Road Sunny Acres Road Spartanburg, SC 29301 864-595-5356/864-595-5363 Maximum Capacity: 100 2 baseball/softball fields www.spartanburgparks.org

Greenville Little Theatre 444 College St. Greenville, SC 29601 864-233-6238/864-233-6237 Allen McCalla, artistic director Maximum Capacity: 1,085 A 585-seat auditorium with grand lobby and small meeting space, GLT offers 7,000-square feet of meeting space within two meeting rooms. GLT provides school outreach programs and other special events. www.greenvillelittletheatre.com

Greenville Technical College 506 S. Pleasantburg Drive Greenville, SC 29606 864-250-8052 Evelyn Westfield, schedule coordinator Maximum Capacity: 250 2 auditoriums with video projection and wireless microphones are available for event use www.gvltec.edu

Greer City Park 301 E. Poinsett St. Greer, SC 29651 864-984-7005/864-801-2020 Karl Rogozenski, event coordinator Laurie A. Campbell, event coordinator Maximum Capacity: 12,000 Adjacent to the City of Greer Events Center is the 12-acre Greer City Park featuring a seated outdoor amphitheater, walking trails, playground and picnic shelter for social and family events, as well as the pond with gazebo, great for outdoor weddings and small musical performances. www.cityofgreer.org

The Handlebar 304 E. Stone Ave. Greenville, SC 29609 864-233-6173 Kathy Laughlin, president Maximum Capacity: 500 Concert and event hall with full stage, PA system, 12’ screen, projection system, full service restaurant and bar. The Handlebar offers 5,000 square feet of open meeting space with smaller dining, networking and patio areas. Plenty of free parking. Band and DJ referrals, along with planning and consultation. www.handlebar-online.com

Hollywild Animal Park

Occasions at Wedgefield 1551 Eighteen Mile Road Central, SC 29630 864-639-0000 Cynthia Phillips, wedding coordinator Maximum Capacity: 200 A turn of the century estate in the Gothic Revival style, the venue offers a charming bridal suite; an intimate outdoor setting for weddings with towering evergreens, a stately white arbor and beautifully manicured grounds; and Caldwell Pavilion for receptions www.occasionsatwedgefield.com

Pavilions at Lake Blalock Park 1925 Sandy Ford Road, Chesnee, SC 29323 Spartanburg, SC 29304 864-583-7361/864-596-4937 Maximum Capacity: N/A Three covered pavilions available for rental at the Lake Blalock landing, each with two picnic tables http://www.sws-sssd.org/customers/ pavilion-rentals.html

2325 Hampton Rd., Welford, SC 29385 Inman, SC 29349 864-472-2038/864-472-6336 Mary Lee Rollins, assistant director Maximum Capacity: 1,500 A 100-acre animal park and zoo with open air covered pavilion, meeting rooms, covered amphitheater and multiple picnic tables. Outside caterers only. www.hollywild.com

Poinsett Club

Larkin’s at the Peace Center

Rainbow Lake Pavilion

38 2010 Event Planning Guide | www.gsabusiness.com

807 E. Washington St. Greenville, SC 29601 864-242-3062/864-232-5436 Brent E. Reeder, GM/COO Maximum Capacity: 900 Two ballrooms and several smaller private rooms, two full bars www.poinsettclub.org

Chigger Creek Road, Chesnee, SC Spartanburg, SC 29304 864-583-7361/864-596-4937 Maximum Capacity: 125 Enclosed, lodge-type facility with a kitchen, restrooms and a large meeting room with a fireplace. 15 round tables and 125 chairs are available. http://www.sws-sssd.org/customers/ pavilion-rentals.html

Roper Mountain Science Center 402 Roper Mountain Road Greenville, SC 29615 864-355-8900 Greg Cornwell, interim director Maximum Capacity: 300 Small conference area seating 100 available for rental. A 60-acre site with accommodations for corporate picnics for up to 200 people, the center offers 6,000 square feet of meeting space with four meeting rooms. www.ropermountain.org

Smithfields Country Club 100 Pine Ridge Drive Easley, SC 29642 864-855-3543/864-850-5961 Adam Relan, general manager, director of golf Maximum Capacity: 487 Olympic-sized swimming pool, 6 tennis courts, dining facilities, driving range www.smithfieldscc.org

Solitude Pointe 102 Table Rock Road Cleveland, SC 29635 864-836-4128/864-836-4061 Rodney Ross, co-owner Amy Ross, co-owner Maximum Capacity: 100 Beautiful log-sided event hall perfect for weddings, receptions, family reunions, corporate retreats; six luxury cabins, three with hot tubs www.solitudepointe.com

Spartanburg County Public Libraries 151 S. Church St. Spartanburg, SC 29306 864-596-3507/864-596-3518 Todd Stephens, county librarian Maximum Capacity: 180 State-of-the-art library facility with three meeting rooms available for public use. No alcohol or smoking permitted. Use only during library operating hours. All library locations have meeting facilities and most have conference rooms and


Lists & Directories A/V equipment. Contact individually or through the main branch www.infodepot.org

The Bird House at Mountainview 1275 Turpin Road Inman, SC 29349 864-706-5773 Susan Bird, owner/manager Maximum Capacity: 250 Main hall with wet bar, full kitchen, separate serving room for brides or breakout sessions, waterfalls, pool and gazebo with seating for 48, sitting on a 9-hole par three golf course www.birdhouseevents.com

The Davenport 230 Trade St. Greer, SC 29651 864-848-7212 Jay Wright, event manager Maximum Capacity: 230 Hardwood floors, antique chandeliers and the exposed brick wall provide an elegant setting for weddings, rehearsal dinners and receptions. The facility is conveniently located in the heart of downtown Greer, and can hold up to 230 people. Parking is free and abundant, and tables, chairs and linens are all included in the rental fee www.davenportgreer.com

The Venue & The Renfrew 15 Renfrew Ave. Travelers Rest, SC 29690 864-834-5355/864-834-5357 Joan Buchanan, co-owner Joseph Buchanan, co-owner Maximum Capacity: 160 The Renfrew is a stylishly restored historic mill house ideal for smaller events. The Venue, at 4,600 square feet, offers a larger space with a 40’ x 40’ dance floor www.thevenue1.com

Thornblade Club 1275 Thornblade Blvd. Greer, SC 29650 864-234-5100/864-234-5104 Patricia Calder, general manager Maximum Capacity: 500 Private meeting and event space available in all sizes, from board room to ballroom, professional event planning www.thornbladeclub.com

TimbeRock at Hopkins Farm 3717 Fork Shoals Road Simpsonville, SC 29680

864-907-0529 Carol C. Hopkins, coordinator Agnew Hopkins, food and beverage manager Maximum Capacity: 500 A historic family farm on the National Historic Register featuring gardens, grounds, gazebo, pavilion, bandstand and covered buffet for outdoor events, weddings, corporate events and social gatherings, both indoor and outdoor www.timberockathopkinsfarm.com

Twigs 1100 Woods Crossing Road Greenville, SC 29607 864-297-5112/864-297-4036 Kate Tierney, owner Maximum Capacity: 400 Indoor/outdoor tented, enclosed facility for corporate luncheons, dinners and meetings, heated for winter months www.twigs.net

Upcountry History Museum

1,400-square-foot covered pavilion. www.wilhitehouse.com

William A. Floyd Amphitheater 3027 Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd. Anderson, SC 29622 864-260-4800/864-260-4847 Charles Wyatt, director Maximum Capacity: 15,000 Outdoor amphitheater, seating provided on elevated grass terraces, bring your own lawn chair or blanket, permanent rest rooms and concession stand, decorative pond and fountain www.andersonevents.com

Willow Creek Conservatory 141 Old Ballenger Mill Road Landrum, SC 29356 864-498-2136 Morgan Graham Maximum Capacity: 300 Located just minutes from Greenville, Willow Creek Conservatory offers a wedding venue set in a natural environment that is unparalleled. The land itself is majestic, and the many structures here are truly a work of art. If you roam the grounds, you can see horses, buffalo and other wildlife. www.willowcreekconservatory.com

540 Buncombe St. Greenville, SC 29601 864-467-3100 x128/864-467-3105 Kathy Barefoot, visitor services and rentals manager Maximum Capacity: 500 Museum lobby and open floor space, Wofford College large meeting room, small meeting room, 429 N. Church St. theater with PowerPoint Spartanburg, SC 29303 www.upcountryhistory.org 864-597-4404 John I. Blair, director of conference services USC Upstate Maximum Capacity: 300 800 University Way Features the Carolina Panther’s training Spartanburg, SC 2930 facility and offers a computer friendly 864-503-5000/864-503-5007 and wireless facility. Judy Srock, director of special events and www.wofford.edu facilities scheduling Maximum Capacity: 400 USC Upstate offers a variety of facility Wofford College Leonard spaces for rent. A professional catering Auditorium, Main Building staff offers complete services for banquets, 429 N. Church Street breakfasts, luncheons, receptions, dinners, Spartanburg, SC 29303 meetings and conferences 864-597-4000/864-597-4179 www.uscupstate.edu/campus_serRobinson R. Ron, Perkins-Prothro chapvices/se/ lain, professor of religion Abbey L. Bedenbaugh, office manager Maximum Capacity: 800 The Wilhite House The auditorium has state-of-the-art sound, 604 S. McDuffie St. A/V movie screen, lights and controls. Anderson, SC 29624 Handicap accessible. Recent renovations 864-716-9910/864-716-2119 were completed during summer 2006. Lori Monroe, proprietor www.wofford.edu Maximum Capacity: 200 A historic home with 3,000 square feet of indoor space for weddings, Wofford College, receptions or parties, meetings and McMillan Theater corporate events. Formal indoor setting 429 N. Church St. and a large, well-shaded garden with a Spartanburg, SC 29303

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864-597-4000/864-597-4179 John I. Blair, director of conference services Maximum Capacity: 90 A theater featuring a projection system for feature-length films, digital productions, cable television sports and entertainment programming, surround sound and tiered seating with comfortable, over-sized chairs. www.wofford.edu

Wofford College, Tony White Theater 429 N. Church St. Spartanburg, SC 29303 864-597-4180/864-597-4179 Mark A. Ferguson, associate professor of theatre Maximum Capacity: 100 Black box (versatile) theater www.wofford.edu/theatre

Woodburn Historic House US 76 at Woodburn Lane Pendleton, SC 29670 864-650-0003 Jackie Reynolds Maximum Capacity: 400 Woodburn, c.1830, is a graceful fourstory clapboard plantation house museum conveniently located on six rural acres just 35 minutes from Greenville. This unique site is ideal for the outdoor romantic wedding and/or reception of your dreams. Available from April - July and September -October for weddings and special www.pendletonhistoricfoundation.org

Zen -An elegant space for hire 924 S. Main St. Greenville, SC 29601 864-235-5770/864-235-5770 Jeff H. Renow, owner Maximum Capacity: 600 Our 12,000-square-foot space is broken down into two large rooms, a private suite, a full commercial kitchen that is open to your caterer of choice and an outdoor Japanese garden. Of the two rooms, the Lotus Lounge has the creative elegance of an art gallery and The Studio has a warehouse feel and overlooks the Japanese garden. All rooms are presentation capable and have state-of-the-art lighting www.zengreenville.com

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Lists & Directories

Hotels with Meeting Facilities Ranked by Square Footage of Event Space Company Address Phone/Fax/Website

Event SF/ Meeting Rooms

Capacity

Sales Director

Year Established Locally

Spartanburg Marriott at Renaissance Park 299 N. Church St., Spartanburg, SC 29306 864-596-1211/864-591-4182/www.spartanburgmarriott.com

30,000 32

2,000 (reception); 1,300 (banquet); 2,200 (theater); 900 (classroom)

Brian Wander

2004

Hyatt Regency Greenville 220 N. Main St., Greenville, SC 29601 864-235-1234/864-370-9204/www.greenville.hyatt.com

24,000 21

1,400 (reception); 1,200 (banquet); 1,580 (theater); 950 (classroom)

Domenick Buffone

1982

Embassy Suites Golf Resort & Conference Center 670 Verdae Blvd., Greenville, SC 29607 864-676-9090/864-676-0669/www.embassysuitesgreenville.com

23,000 20

2,000 (reception); 980 (banquet); 1,300 (theater); 750 (classroom)

Stacey Dawkins

1993

Holiday Inn Express Hotel & Suites Westgate Mall 895 Spartan Blvd., Spartanburg, SC 29301 864-699-7777/864-699-8888/www.hiexpress.com

17,000 2

10 (boardroom), 40 (ballroom), additional space through Summit Pointe

Teresa Jones

2002

The Westin Poinsett 120 S. Main St., Greenville, SC 29601 864-421-9700/864-421-9719/www.westinpoinsettgreenville.com

14,000 6

1,400 (total reception); 300 (banquet per ballroom); 350 (theater per ballroom); 150 (classroom per ballroom)

Tim Paulus

1925

Clarion Hotel, A Roberts Hotel 9027 Fairforest Road, Spartanburg, SC 29301 864-574-2111/864-576-7602/www.robertshotels.com

13,000 11

400 (reception), 200 (banquet), 300 (theater), 200 (classroom)

Sunshyne Ramson

2003

Hilton Greenville & Towers 45 W. Orchard Park Drive, Greenville, SC 29615 864-232-4747/864-235-6248/www.greenvillesc.hilton.com

12,000 13

450 (reception), 440 (banquet), 500 (theater), 280 (classroom)

Ryan Herron

1987

Marriott Greenville One Parkway East, Greenville, SC 29615 864-297-0300/864-679-1150/www.marriott.com/gspap

11,000 13

450 (reception), 400 (banquet), 450 (theater), 300 (classroom)

Ann Clark

1989

The Bleckley Inn 151 E. Church St., Anderson, SC 29624 864-225-7203/www.bleckleyinn.com

11,000 5

500 (reception), 250 (banquet), 350 (theater)

Shelby Clardy

2011

Hilton Garden Inn & Destination Pointe Event Center 115 Destination Blvd., Anderson, SC 29621 864-964-0100/864-964-0300/www.anderson.stayhgi.com

10,000 8

400 (reception), 360 (banquet), 500 (theater), 400 (classroom)

Cindy Morris

2005

Crowne Plaza Hotel Greenville 851 Congaree Road, Greenville, SC 29607 864-297-6300/864-297-5793/www.crowneplaza.com/gsp-ropermt

7,600 9

600 (reception), 315 (banquet), 500 (theater), 247 (classroom)

Allison Whitmire

1983

Candleberry Inn B&B & Day Spa 105 Marshland Lane, Greer, SC 29650 864-201-1411/www.candleberryinn.us

7,200 3

100 (inside), 200 (inside and outside)

Elaine Hufstetler

2002

Ramada Inn Clemson 1310 Tiger Blvd., Clemson, SC 29631 864-654-7501/864-654-7301/www.ramada.com

6,200 1

600 (banquet), 720 (theater), 400 (classroom)

Brittany Langley

1982

Drury Inn & Suites Greenville 10 Carolina Point Parkway, Greenville, SC 29607 864-288-4401/864-288-4401/www.druryhotels.com

5,676 6

Large room: 80 (classroom), 154 (theater), 70 (ushape), 60 (conference), 120 (banquet); small room: 12 (conference)

Missy Holloway

2007

The Inn on Main 319 E. Main St., Spartanburg, SC 29302 864-585-5001/www.innonmainofspartanburg.com

5,000 1

125 (indoor and outdoor combined)

Susan Sease

2004

Quality Inn 3025 N. Main St., Anderson, SC 29621 864-226-6051/864-964-9145/www.choicehotels.com

4,694 3

200 (reception), 200 (banquet), 250 (theater), 250 (classroom)

Donald Meksuanti

2007

Holiday Inn Greenville 4295 Augusta Road, Greenville, SC 29605 864-277-8921/864-299-6066/www.holiday-inn.com/gsp-southwest

3,750 4

400 (reception), 360 (banquet), 400 (theater), 180 (classroom)

Bobbie Mercer

1976

Sleep Inn Carolina First Center 231 N. Pleasantburg Drive, Greenville, SC 29607 864-240-2006/864-672-2015/www.sleepinn.com

3,200 2

20 (classroom)

Jeanne McGill

1997

Country Hearth Inn 200 International Drive, Spartanburg, SC 29303 864-576-5220/864-574-1243/www.countryhearth.com

3,180 5

350 (reception), 225 (banquet), 300 (theater), 150 (classroom)

Dawn Fowler

1968

The Phoenix, Greenville's Inn 246 N. Pleasantburg Drive, Greenville, SC 29607 864-233-4651/864-672-4704/www.phoenixgreenvillesinn.com

3,020 4

275 (reception), 180 (banquet), 300 (theater), 125 (classroom)

Donna Moore

1971

Comfort Inn Millennium 2756 Laurens Road, Greenville, SC 29607 864-288-6900/864-288-5935/www.choicehotels.com

3,000 2

250 (ballroom), 75 (meeting room)

Lisa Gribbins

1980

INP = Information not provided. NR = Not ranked. N/A = Not applicable. Although every attempt is made to ensure the accuracy and thoroughness of GSA Business lists, omissions sometimes occur. Please send additions to: List Research, 1204B E. Washington St., Greenville, SC 29601 or via fax to 235-4868 or at http://www.gsabusiness.com/directory/update_lists.

40 2010 Event Planning Guide | www.gsabusiness.com

Researched by Elizabeth Feather


Lists & Directories

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Upstate Golf Courses Ranked by USGA Slope Rating from Back/Pro Tees Company Address Phone/Fax/Website

Slope Rating/ Course Rating/ Yardage

Manager

Designer/Architect

No. of Holes/ Par

Public or Year Private Established

The Cliffs at Glassy 200 Fire Pink Way, Landrum, SC 29356 864-895-8104/864-895-0230/www.cliffscommunities.com

148 73.1 6,805

INP

Tom Jackson

18 72

Private

1993

Musgrove Mill Golf Club 772 Musgrove Mill Road, Clinton, SC 29325 864-833-6921/864-833-3511/www.musgrovemill.com

147 74.4 6,933

James R. Patterson III

Arnold Palmer

18 72

Private

1988

Greenville Country Club - Chanticleer 239 Byrd Blvd., Greenville, SC 29605 864-233-6227/864-271-3730/www.thegreenvillecountryclub.com

146 75.1 6,864

Greg Hobbs

Robert Trent Jones, Rees Jones

18 72

Private

1905

The Cliffs at Keowee Vineyards 824 Clubhouse Drive, Sunset, SC 29685 864-868-7000/864-868-4777/www.cliffscommunities.com

145 74.6 7,006

Brett Kist

Tom Fazio

18 71

Private

1999

Cross Creek Plantation 130 Club Drive, Seneca, SC 29678 864-882-8337/864-885-1582/www.crosscreekplantation.com

144 73.2 6,902

Mark Ernst

P. B. Dye

18 71

Private

1990

Thornblade Club 1275 Thornblade Blvd., Greer, SC 29650 864-234-5100/864-234-5104/www.thornbladeclub.com

143 73.4 6,707

Patricia Calder

Tom Fazio

18 71

Private

1989

The Cliffs at Keowee Falls 700 S. Cherry Laurel Way, Salem, SC 29676 864-944-8721/864-371-1845/www.cliffscommunities.com

142 75.2 7,171

Brian Peeples

Jack Nicklaus

18 72

Private

2007

Pebble Creek Golf Club - Linkside 101 Pebble Creek Drive, Taylors, SC 29687 864-244-8937/864-244-1022/www.pebblecreek-club.com

142 74.0 7,012

INP

Tom Jackson

18 72

Private

1976

The Cliffs at Keowee Springs 141 Spring Cove Way, Six Mile, SC 29682 864-868-0422/864-371-1864/www.cliffscommunities.com

141 73.9 7,100

INP

Tom Fazio

18 72

Private

2008

Green Valley Country Club 225 Green Valley Road, Greenville, SC 29617 864-246-3941/864-246-7268/www.greenvalley.cc

141 74.4 7,012

INP

George Cobb

18 72

Semi-private

1958

The Carolina Country Club 2355 Carolina Country Club Road, Spartanburg, SC 29306 864-573-7540/864-580-2299/www.thecarolinacountryclub.com

139 73.6 6,937

Tim Mervosh

Tom Jackson

18 72

Private

1984

Links O'Tryon 11250 New Cut Road, Campobello, SC 29322 864-468-5099/864-468-5339/www.linksotryon.com

139 73.2 6,877

Eric Young, Eric Edwards

Tom Jackson

18 72

Semi-private

1987

Smithfields Country Club 100 Pine Ridge Drive, Easley, SC 29642 864-855-3543/864-850-5961/www.smithfieldscc.org

138 73.3 6,800

Adam Relan

Willie B. Lewis

18 72

Private

1983

The Patriot Golf Club at Grand Harbor 200 Grand Harbor Blvd., Ninety Six, SC 29666 864-543-2000/864-543-3156/www.grandharbor.net

137 74.3 7,133

Tommy Thomas

Davis Love III

18 72

Private

2004

Southern Oaks Golf Club 105 Southern Oaks Drive, Easley, SC 29642 864-859-6698/864-306-0506

136 71.6 6,500

Wayne Myers

Willie B. Lewis

18 72

Semi-private

1989

Falcon's Lair Golf Club 1308 Falcon's Drive, Walhalla, SC 29691 864-638-0000/864-638-9993/www.aaggolfgroup.com

135 74.4 6,866

INP

Harry Bowers

18 72

Semi-private

1992

Greenville Country Club - Riverside 239 Byrd Blvd., Greenville, SC 29605 864-233-6227/864-271-3730/www.thegreenvillecountryclub.com

134 72.1 6,660

Greg Hobbs

Donald Ross, George Cobb

18 71

Private

1905

Cherokee Valley Golf Club 450 Cherokee Valley Way, Travelers Rest, SC 29690 864-895-6758/www.cherokeevalleygolfclub.com

133 71.3 6,612

Dave Maga

P. B. Dye

18 72

Semi-private

1993

Verdae Greens Golf Club at Embassy Suites Golf Resort & Conference Center 650 Verdae Blvd., Greenville, SC 29607 864-676-1500/864-676-0669/www.verdaegreens.com

133 72.4 6,685

David A. Nelson

Willard Byrd

18 72

Public

1993

The Walker Course at Clemson University 210 Madren Center Drive, Clemson, SC 29634 864-656-0236/www.walkergolfcourse.com

133 72.3 6,911

Brent Jessup

D. J. DeVictor

18 72

Semi-private

1995

Pebble Creek Golf Club - Creekside 101 Pebble Creek Drive, Taylors, SC 29687 864-244-8937/864-244-1022/www.pebblecreek-club.com

132 71.7 6,490

INP

Tom Jackson

18 71

Semi-private

1976

The Rock at Jocassee Golf Resort 171 Sliding Rock Road, Pickens, SC 29671 864-878-2030/864-878-2679/www.golfattherock.com

132 71.2 6,710

Marsha Van Daele, Judy Williams

Russell Breeden

18 72

Semi-private

1982

INP = Information not provided. NR = Not ranked. N/A = Not applicable. Although every attempt is made to ensure the accuracy and thoroughness of GSA Business lists, omissions sometimes occur. Please send additions to: List Research, 1204B E. Washington St., Greenville, SC 29601 or via fax to 235-4868 or at http://www.gsabusiness.com/directory/update_lists.

Researched by Elizabeth Feather

2010 Event Planning Guide | www.gsabusiness.com

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Lists & Directories

Furman University Timmons Arena

Photo/Bi-Lo Center

EXHIBITION & CONFERENCE CENTERS Ranked by total square feet of meeting/event space

Carolina First Center 1 Exposition Drive, Greenville, SC 29607 864-233-2562/864-255-8600 John Wilusz, general manger Elizabeth Lyons, director of Sales SF Event Space: 340,000 Meeting Rooms: 16 Capacity: 1,700 (banquet); 3,000 (theater); 800 (classroom) Recently renovated, features 280,000 square feet of exhibit space, a 30,000-square-foot ballroom and 30,000 square feet of meeting space www.carolinafirstcenter.com

Spartanburg Expo Center 6655 Pottery Road, Spartanburg, SC 29316 864-706-0162 /864-578-5450 Debby B. Mason SF Event Space: 190,000 Meeting Rooms: 18 Capacity: 1,350 booth spaces on expo floor. Over 200,000 square feet all on one level; 98,000 contiguous square feet of exhibit space; 4 auditoriums, chapel and reception areas, classrooms, conferences, corporate training, concerts, seminars; warehouse with 4 loading docks and vendor drive through to exhibit floor; 1,500 parking spaces; Clay Pot Cafe offers 5,000 square feet for dining and catering www.spartanburgexpo.com

Littlejohn Coliseum 1 Avenue of Champions, Clemson, SC 29634

864-656-0619/864-656-1414 Dusty Saine, assistant general manager SF Event Space: 180,000 Meeting Rooms: 5 Capacity: 1,000 (banquet); 400 (classroom); various layouts for 10 to 1,000 Multi-use 10,000 seat coliseum, a one stop shop for event planning, catering, meetings, expos, galas, large company meeting, parties and more www.clemsonmajorevents.com

Clemson University T. Ed Garrison Arena 1101 W. Queen St., Pendleton, SC 29670, Clemson, SC 29634-0122 864-646-2717/864-646-3362 Charles W. Williams, director SF Event Space: 100,000 Meeting Rooms: 0 Capacity: 3,000 Specifically built to promote the livestock industry, the arenaâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s design allows for concerts, trade shows and educational programs, a multipurpose facility www.clemson.edu/garrison

Chapman Cultural Center 200 E. St. John St., Spartanburg, SC 29306-5124 864-542-2787/864-948-5353 H. Perry Mixter, president/COO, The Arts partnership SF Event Space: 86,000 Meeting Rooms: 3 Capacity: 500 (theater) 86,000 gross square feet providing for visual and performing arts, science and history; 500-seat community theater, outdoor plaza for outdoor events, located adjacent to Barnet Park and the Zimmerli Amphitheater www.chapmanculturalcenter.org

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car parking lot www.piedmontinterstatefair.com

3300 Poinsett Highway, Greenville, SC 29613 864-294-3267/864-294-3267 Todd Duke SF Event Space: 43,180 Meeting Rooms: 16 Capacity: 1,000 (reception); 5,000 (concerts); 5,000 (sports events) Multipurpose arena offers meeting space, accommodates spectators and trade shows, dinners and special events; houses two basketball courts and a permanent, elevated stage and collapsible arena seating www.timmonsarena.com

Twichell Auditorium at Converse College

Civic Center of Anderson

Hyatt Regency Greenville

3027 Martin Luther King Jr. Blvd., Anderson, SC 29622 864-260-4800/864-260-4847 Charles Wyatt, director SF Event Space: 36,500 Meeting Rooms: 81 Capacity: 3,800 (arena); 440-1,500 (banquet) Conference center with ballrooms, meeting rooms and arena, elegant lobby/reception areas, large trade show/concert space and outdoor exhibition space www.andersonevents.com

220 N. Main St., Greenville, SC 29601 864-235-1234/864-370-9204 Domenick Buffone, general manager SF Event Space: 24,000 Meeting Rooms: 21 Capacity: 1,400 (reception); 1,200 (banquet); 1,580 (theater); 950 (classroom) Atrium hotel within walking distance to restaurants, nightlife and shopping, houses the Upstateâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s largest hotel ballroom at 14,000-square feet. www.greenville.hyatt.com

Spartanburg Marriott at Renaissance Park 299 N. Church St., Spartanburg, SC 29306 864-596-1211/864-591-4182 Dan Freeland, general manager SF Event Space: 30,000 Meeting Rooms: 32 Capacity: 2,000 (reception); 1,300 (banquet); 2,200 (theater); 900 (classroom) Full-service hotel can meet the needs of groups, big or small with more space both indoors and outdoors than any hotel in Upstate S.C. www.spartanburgmarriott.com

Piedmont Interstate Fair 575 Fairground Road, Spartanburg, SC 29305 864-582-7042/864-583-2366 Wayne Harmon, CFE/ex-director SF Event Space: 25,000 Meeting Rooms: 1 Capacity: 500 (reception), 350 (banquet), 200 (theater), 200 (classroom) Fairgrounds offers 25,000 square feet of meeting space, single building offers 11,000 square feet with adjacent 2,000

580 E. Main St., Spartanburg, SC 29302 864-596-9069 Kathy S. Worley, manager of Twichell Auditorium SF Event Space: 25,000 Meeting Rooms: 10 Capacity: 1,500 1,500 seat Twichell Auditorium performing arts theatre with nearby dining hall and Alumnae House also available for event space. www.converse.edu

Embassy Suites Golf Resort & Conference Center 670 Verdae Blvd., Greenville, SC 29607 864-676-9090/864-676-0669 David A. Nelson, general manager SF Event Space: 23,000 Meeting Rooms: 20 Capacity: 2,000 (reception); 980 (banquet); 1,300 (theater); 750 (classroom) An all-suite hotel featuring more than 20,000 square feet of indoor event space, and extensive outdoor venues, including 2 covered pavilions. 18-hole championship golf course on site, Verdae Greens Golf Club; full food and beverage service, including special holiday brunch events www.embassysuitesgreenville.com

Bi-Lo Center 650 N. Academy St., Greenville, SC 29601 864-241-3800/864-250-4939 Roger Newton, executive director SF Event Space: 17,000 Meeting Rooms: N/A Capacity: 15,000 (arena); 6,000 (theater) One of the largest sports and entertainment arenas in South Carolina www.bilocenter.com


Lists & Directories

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The Conference Center and Inn at Clemson University 230 Madren Center Drive, Clemson, SC 29634-5673 864-656-7155/864-656-7154 Jeff Martin, director SF Event Space: 17,000 Meeting Rooms: 12 Capacity: 800 (reception), 425 (banquet), 500 (theater), 250 (classroom) Retreat setting on Lake Hartwell with an 18-hole golf course www.cuconferencecenter.com

Summit Pointe Conference & Events Center 805 Spartan Blvd., Spartanburg, SC 29301 877-477-0477/864-699-7867 Patti Wetherford, general manager Suresh Mathur SF Event Space: 17,000 Meeting Rooms: 10 Capacity: 10 to 750, concurrently 17,000 square feet of versatile meeting and event space for business and social occasions. www.summit-pointe.com

Carolina’s largest theater and Spartanburg’s largest banquet facility, featuring a 3,217-seat theater and a 15,000-square foot exhibition hall; reception, banquet, theater and classroom style set-ups available www.crowdpleaser.com

Spartanburg Memorial Auditorium

Upper S. C. State Fairgrounds/ Greenville-Pickens Speedway

385 N. Church St., Spartanburg, SC 29304 864-582-8107/864-278-2003 Steve Jones, general manager SF Event Space: 15,000 Meeting Rooms: 4 Capacity: 1,300 (reception); 1,200 (banquet); 3,200 (capacity for on-site theater)

Photo/Littlejohn Coliseum/Clemson University

3800 Calhoun Memorial Highway, Greenville, SC 29608 864-269-0852/864-269-7683 Kevin Whitaker, president SF Event Space: 12,000 Meeting Rooms: 4 Capacity: 8,000 (speedway area), 12,000 (fairgrounds)

Outdoor venue with football field size (8,000 square feet) exhibit hall suitable for many functions, 155 acres of fairgrounds www.upperscstatefair.com

Furman University Younts Conference Center 3300 Poinsett Highway, Greenville, SC 29613 864-294-2390/864-294-3109 Kay Wilson, director SF Event Space: 6,000 Meeting Rooms: 5 Capacity: 450 (reception), 320 (banquet), 500 (theater), 224 (classroom) 6,000 square feet of meeting space, featuring a large room for group meeting, lecture or wedding reception, room can be divided to form five more intimate break-out rooms for smaller sessions, event coordinator available www.furman.edu/younts

City of Greer Events Center

Photo/Spartanburg Memorial Auditorium

301 E. Poinsett St., Greer, SC 29651 864-984-7005/864-801-2020 Karl Rogozenski Laurie A. Campbell, events coordinator SF Event Space: 4,500 Meeting Rooms: 13 Capacity: 70-300 (banquet), 90-400 (reception) This three-story complex has the entire second floor dedicated as an events center. The floor features three multipurpose rooms, each 1,500 square feet, great for banquets, business meetings and wedding receptions. Each room is separated by retractable walls allowing for 4,500 square feet for larger events.

Rooms are supported by state of the art audio-visual technology and a caterer’s kitchen for food to be prepared off site. www.cityofgreer.org

Hub-Bub.com 149 S. Daniel Morgan Ave., Suite 2, Spartanburg, SC 29306 864-582-0056/864-577-0188 Stephen Long SF Event Space: 4,000 Meeting Rooms: 1 Capacity: 150 (indoor seating), 300 (reception) Art gallery, theater and performance hall www.hub-bub.com

Bob Jones University Museum & Gallery Inc. 1700 Wade Hampton Blvd., Greenville, SC 29614 864-770-1331/864-770-1306 Erin Jones, director Frank Richards, advancement officer John Elliott, grant specialist Amy Basinger, events coordinator Rebekah Cobb, Guest Services Coordinator Mary Chapman, director of marketing and business operations SF Event Space: 760 Meeting Rooms: 1 Capacity: Executive meeting space, flexible to meet customer’s needs. Executive conference room at the Museum & Gallery at Heritage Green offers an ideal venue for holding executive board meetings, guest lectures/conferences and staff leadership training. www.bjumg.org

2010 Event Planning Guide | www.gsabusiness.com

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Lists & Directories

Rentals/Supplies Listed Alphabetically

AARO Party Rental 1205 S. Pleasantburg Drive Greenville, SC 29605 864-277-7787/ 864-277-7795 Barbara McGee Specialization: Specializing in Corporate parties and weddings, also offer party tents, inflatables and carnival concessions Year Established Locally: 1954 www.greenvillepartyrental.com

ABC Party Rentals and Amusements

Specialization: Furnished corp.apartments, furniture rental Year Established Locally: 2001 www.corporateconnection.net

Event Decor & More 213 W. Trade St. Simpsonville, SC 29681 864-967-7490 Joy Cox Specialization: Customized fabric draping, linens, props, event decor and rentals, venue design and layouts Year Established Locally: 2007 www.eventdecorandmore.net

Event Rentals

286 Rocky Creek Road Greenville, SC 29615 864-675-6688/864-322-0253 Scott Wiener, president Specialization: Weddings, corporate and church parties, birthday parties and fundraisers. Year Established Locally: 2000 www.abcgreenville.com

225 W. Main St. Spartanburg, SC 29306 864-591-1846/864-591-1944 Wendell Christopher, owner Specialization: Wedding and corporate event needs. Year Established Locally: 1995 www.event-rentals.com

Anderson Special Events

921 Poinsett Highway Greenville, SC 29609 864-271-9972/864-233-6891 Billy Bush, vice president Staci Bryant, Wedding and Floral Consultant Specialization: Full service florist, balloon decorations, limousine service, helium tank rentals, event decor, personal and professional ceremony and wedding flower artists. Year Established Locally: 1982 www.expressions24-7.com

101 Hill View Circle Anderson, SC 29621 864-224-9844/864-224-9842 Bobby Johnson, owner Specialization: Party supply rental Year Established Locally: 2000 www.aserental.net

Asheville Hwy. Rental 1101 Asheville Highway Spartanburg, SC 29303 864-583-6393/864-582-8188 Wayne Hurt, owner Specialization: Event equipment supplier, event planner Year Established Locally: 2002 www.ashevillehwyrental.com

Co-Op Gas Inc. - Master Helium & Balloon Distributors PO Box 27 Pauline, SC 29374 864-583-6546/864-948-0623 David Akins, president Specialization: Distribution of helium gas and balloons for business Year Established Locally: 1997 www.ballooncountry.com

Corporate Connection LLC 1200 Woodruff Road, F-19 Greenville, SC 29607 864-627-4002/864-627-4006 Charlene R. Knight, owner

Expressions Unlimited Inc.

Gordon Light & Sound PO Box 3724 Greenville, SC 29608 864-242-5140/864-242-0838 James G. Floyd, owner Specialization: Professional audio and stage lighting, services and equipment rentals Year Established Locally: 1979

Greenville Rental 3 N. Kings Road Greenville, SC 29605 864-299-0512/864-299-5973 Dan McGee, president Specialization: Home, business, contractor, party, tents Year Established Locally: 1977 www.greenvillepartyrental.com

Simpsonville, SC 29681 864-363-6180 Mark Hurst, president/CEO Specialization: Promotions and events (corporate, private and public) Year Established Locally: 1999 www.hurstgroupllc.com

JC Rose & Associates Inc. 12 Park Place Court Greenville, SC 29607 864-299-4660/864-299-4669 John C. Rose, president Specialization: Turn-key coordination of trade shows, sales meetings and corporate events. Design and fabrication of custom displays (event decor, point of sale, kiosks, specialty store fixtures). Specialty furniture rentals, event floor coverings (rental and purchase). Year Established Locally: 1984 www.jcrose.net

Skyline Exhibits & Design Inc.

Leave the Details to Us

21 Roper Mountain Road Greenville, SC 29607 864-233-3996/864-232-2819 Dick Strossner, owner Mary Strossner, COO Specialization: For more than 60 years, Strossner’s has been a Greenville tradition. Our talented florists create beautiful fresh flower arrangements, bouquets and centerpieces. Our chefs and catering staff offer a menu with variety, superior quality and presentation complemented by delicious desserts from the bakery. We specialize in creating memorable weddings, impressive corporate functions and will work with you on special themed party ideas. Year Established Locally: 1947 www.strossners.com

614 N. Murray Ave. Anderson, SC 29625 864-844-1357 Hope Emory Specialization: Event supplies including invitations, stationery, rentals, favors and gifts, decor and other supplies. Year Established Locally: 2008 www.leavethedetailstous.biz

Multi Media Services 1029 Thousand Oaks Blvd. Greenville, SC 29607 800-297-8533/864-676-1946 John Toohey, sales manager Karen Dillingham, office manager Jerry Maxey, rental manager Specialization: Very large screen video and computer images, video/data projectors, flat screen monitors, sound systems; audio and video staging, projection and media display, special effects and lighting, video recording Year Established Locally: 1994 www.mmsav.com

Palmetto Sound Works PO Box 1347 Spartanburg, SC 29303 864-585-0085/864-585-8641 Alan Hulsey, owner Specialization: Audio, video, lighting for concerts and corporate events; sound, video and lights installation, staging and set design Year Established Locally: 1994 www.palmettosoundworks.com

The Hurst Group LLC

Professional Party Rentals Inc.

926 N.E. Main St., Suite F-144

647 Congaree Road

44 2010 Event Planning Guide | www.gsabusiness.com

Greenville, SC 29607 864-627-8808/864-627-8807 Jeff Fann, co-owner, Dorie Fann, co-owner Specialization: Corporate events, weddings, community events, private parties Year Established Locally: 1996 www.professionalpartyrentals.com

346 Feaster Road Greenville, SC 29615 864-234-7995 Steve Hoffman, president Specialization: Exhibits and displays, graphic design and graphic production, installation and dismantle, staging, photo backdrops, product intros, road shows Year Established Locally: 1975 www.skylinexd.com

Strossner’s Bakery, Florist, Catering, Café

Tri-County Rentals 500 Williams Ave. Easley, SC 29642 864-306-7751/864-859-7292 Becki Sanders, owner Specialization: Tents, dance floors, tables, linens, china and glassware, and more Year Established Locally: 1987 www.tri-countyrentals.com

Upstate Wedding and Event Services 1225 Pendleton St., Suite 6 Greenville, SC 29611 864-220-1220/864-220-1224 Patty Revels Specialization: Weddings Year Established Locally: 2004 www.upstateweddingservices.com


Lists & Directories

Florists/Event Decor

Spartanburg, SC 29301 864-699-9953 Oksana Kovariz Specialization: Decoration for weddings, including floral design and centerpieces, table set-up, backdrops, etc. Year Established Locally: 2008 www.everythingforweddingsonline.com

21 Roper Mountain Road Greenville, SC 29607 864-233-3996/864-232-2819 Dick Strossner, owner A Arrangement Florist Mary Strossner, COO 130 S. Church St. Specialization: For more than 60 years, Spartanburg, SC 29306 Strossner’s has been a Greenville 864-583-1314/ 864-542-0109 tradition. Our talented florists create Tom DeShazor beautiful fresh flower arrangements, Specialization: Master designer; bouquets and centerpieces. Our chefs Expressions Unlimited Inc. weddings, funerals, home and and catering staff offer a menu with 921 Poinsett Highway business floral arrangements variety, superior quality and presentaGreenville, SC 29609 Year Established Locally: 1983 tion complemented by delicious des864-271-9972/864-233-6891 www.aarrangementflorist.com serts from the bakery. We specialize Billy Bush, vice president in creating memorable weddings, Staci Bryant, wedding and floral consultant And Why Not Balloons impressive corporate functions and Specialization: Full-service florist, balloon By apointment will work with you on special themed decorations, limousine service, helium Greenville/Spartanburg, SC 29334 party ideas. tank rentals, event decor, personal and 864-230-0321 or 864-595-3636/ Year Established Locally: 1947 professional ceremony and wedding 864-486-1923 www.strossners.com flower artists Joy Stern, owner Year Established Locally: 1982 Specialization: Certified balloon artist; www.expressions24-7.com Touch of Class Ltd. arches, columns, dance floor decor, 306 Mills Ave. centerpieces, bows and more Greenville, SC 29605 Floral Designs Ltd. Year Established Locally: 1997 864-233-8542 103 Halton Road andwhynotballoons.com Merriann Hart Greenville, SC 29607 Specialization: Pretty wedding 864-234-7194/864-234-7195 Barretts Flowers and beautiful funeral designs Larry Allen, owner 3241 Wade Hampton Blvd., Suite 17 Year Established Locally: 1982 Specialization: Floral arrangements for Taylors, SC 29687 www.touchofclassltd.com weddings, parties and special events. 864-268-7563/864-268-5208 Year Established Locally: 1978 Robert E. Barrett, AIFD, owner www.floraldesignsltd.com Twigs Karen Weir, AIFD, manager 1100 Woods Crossing Road Specialization: Fresh, unusual flower Greenville, SC 29607 JC Rose & Associates Inc. arrangement, design for weddings 864-297-5112/864-297-4036 12 Park Place Court and parties Kate Tierney, owner Greenville, SC 29607 Year Established Locally: 1990 Specialization: Indoor/outdoor facility 864-299-4660/864-299-4669 www.barrettsflowers.com for corporate luncheons, dinners and John C. Rose, president meetings, event planning, florist, event Specialization: Turn-key coordination of Coggins Flowers & Gifts décor/props trade shows, sales meetings and cor800 N. Church St. Year Established Locally: 1990 porate events. Design and fabrication Spartanburg, SC 29303 www.twigs.net of custom displays (event decor, point 864-585-6266/864-585-6223 of sale, kiosks, specialty store fixtures). James Coggins U Designs Specialization: Full-service floral and gift Specialty furniture rentals, event floor coverings (rental and purchase). 5B E. Coffee St. shop, offering design services for wedYear Established Locally: 1984 Greenville, SC 29601 dings and events www.jcrose.net 864-232-7374 Year Established Locally: 1956 Brie D. LeBret, CEO www.expressflowershop.com Skyline Exhibits & Design Inc. Specialization: Large scale corporate and social/weddings346 Feaster Road Dahlia A Florist planning,design,production,site Greenville, SC 29615 303 E. Stone Ave. selection,floral, pastry, catering, photog864-234-7995 Greenville, SC 29609 raphy, cosmetology, print collateral Steve Hoffman, president 864-232-0112/864-232-1123 Year Established Locally: 2006 Specialization: Exhibits and displays, Kristi Podsiadlo www.udesignsevents.com graphic design and graphic production, Specialization: A retail florist that specialinstallation and dismantle, staging, photo izes in weddings and events of all sizes and styles; daily floral deliveries, custom design backdrops, product intros, road shows Year Established Locally: 1975 Year Established Locally: 2000 www.skylinexd.com www.dahliaonline.com Listed Alphabetically

Everything for Weddings 8027 Warren H. Abernathy Highway

Strossner’s Bakery, Florist, Catering, Café

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Audio/Visual Services Listed Alphabetically

Custom Production Services 730 Sterling Drive Spartanburg, SC 29316 864-814-1221/864-814-1219 Wm. A. (Sandy) Morgan, president Specialization: Total event production and management. Talent buying, staging, sound, lighting and video. Year Established Locally: 1987

Gordon Light & Sound PO Box 3724 Greenville, SC 29608 864-242-5140/ 864-242-0838 James G. Floyd, owner Specialization: Professional audio and stage lighting, services and equipment rentals Year Established Locally: 1979

GromVision Corporate Video Production 9 Seagrass Court Mauldin, SC 29662 864-284-6160 Greg Grom, president Specialization: Corporate event videography Year Established Locally: 1995 www.gromvision.com

Multi Media Services 1029 Thousand Oaks Blvd. Greenville, SC 29607 800-297-8533/864-676-1946 John Toohey, sales manager Karen Dillingham, office manager Jerry Maxey, rental manager Specialization: Very large screen video and computer images, video/data projectors, flat screen monitors, sound systems; audio and video staging, projection and media display, special effects and lighting, video recording Year Established Locally: 1994 www.mmsav.com

Palmetto Sound Works PO Box 1347 Spartanburg, SC 29303 864-585-0085/864-585-8641 Alan Hulsey, owner Specialization: Audio, video, lighting for concerts and corporate events; sound, video and lights installation, staging and set design Year Established Locally: 1994 www.palmettosoundworks.com

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Lists & Directories

Upstate Full-Service Caterers Ranked by Number of Local Employees Company Address

Phone/Fax Website

Local Employees

Largest Event in 2009

Top Local Official(s)

864-627-1403/864-676-1612 www.staxs.net

120

Charity golf tournament, 4,000 people

George Coumos, co-owner; Natalie Hardin, catering director

864-297-7200/864-289-0321 www.stickyfingers.com 864-964-0100/864-964-0300 www.anderson.stayhgi.com, www.andersondestination.com 864-233-3996/864-232-2819 www.strossners.com

100

1,500 people

Tammy Johnson, catering/sales manager

50

St. Joseph's Catholic School

Cindy Morris, assistant general manager

50

INP

Dick Strossner, owner; Mary Strossner, chief operations officer

864-882-0800 www.clubtikihut.com

50

400 people

Leslie Schweitzer

864-467-1000/864-467-0475 www.triocafe.com

45

200 people

Kip Wynne, Steve Boone

864-487-7427 www.daddyjoesbbq.com

42

1,200 people

Ree Smiley, general manager

864-676-9090 www.embassysuitesgreenville.com

40

1,200 people

Bill Groves, food and beverage director

Henry's Smokehouse 240 Wade Hampton Blvd., Greenville, SC 29609

864-232-7774/864-232-7237 www.henryssmokehouse.com

40

2,000 people

Tiger O'Rourke, general manager

Hooters 2401 Laurens Road, Greenville, SC 29607

864-987-9464/864-987-9233 www.hooters.com

40

Golf tour, 200 people

Randy Frady, general manager

Jason's Deli 824 Woods Crossing, Greenville, SC 29607

864-284-9870/864-284-9871 www.jasonsdeli.com

35

BMW Pro-Am

Brandy E. McDonald, catering/marketing director

Paesano's Italian Restaurant 1727 Blue Ridge Blvd., Seneca, SC 29672

864-882-3368/864-885-1186 www.paesanositalian.com

35

INP

Frank John Messana

Peter David's Gourmet Catering 921 Grove Road, Greenville, SC 29605

864-242-0404/864-232-5028 www.peterdavids.com

35

500 people

Angie Finazzo, president

Azia Restaurant 15 Market Point Drive, Greenville, SC 29607

864-297-0788/864-297-3622 www.aziagreenville.com

30

Taste of the Nation

Peter Lieu, owner

Blockhouse Restaurant & Oyster Bar 1619 Augusta St., Greenville, SC 29605

864-232-4280/864-233-3398 www.blockhouse.net

30

INP

Dana McMullen, operations manager

The Cazbah 308 Trade St., Greer, SC 29651

864-877-9311/864-877-9199 www.thecazbah.com

30

250 person wedding and reception

Audrey H. Stenger, owner; Chris A. Porter, owner, operator

Fuddruckers 160 Congress Blvd., Suite C, Duncan, SC 29334

864-234-7528/864-234-7841 www.myfuddruckers.com

30

1,000 - Spartanburg Regional Hospital

INP

Justin's Catering 2435 E. North St., Suite 225, Greenville , SC 29615

864-201-8221/888-882-3776 www.justinssteakhouse.com

30

900 people Gala

Justin Blake Reeves, owner

The Palms Restaurant and McKibbon's Pub at The Phoenix, Greenville's Inn 246 N. Pleasantburg Drive, Greenville, SC 29607

864-233-4651/864-672-4704 www.phoenixgreenvillesinn.com

30

Meyers Center

Donna Moore, events coordinator

Sullivan's Metropolitan Grill 208 S. Main St., Anderson, SC 29624

864-226-8945/864-226-8611 www.sullivansmetrogrill.com

30

500, sorority function

Sabra Nickas; Bill Nickas; Joe Hardee, event coordinator

The Blue Ridge Brewing Co. 217 N. Main St., Greenville, SC 29601

864-232-4677/864-232-4680 www.blueridgebrewing.com

25

INP

Bob Hiller, president; Rich Flagg, chef

Carolina Barbecue No. 1 7115 Lone Oak Road, Spartanburg, SC 29301

864-503-0542/864-503-0543 www.mycarolinabbq.com

25

Hanger B Ball

Michael R. Hicks, owner, operator

Good Life Catering Co. 1225 Pendleton St., Suite 3, Greenville, SC 29611

864-605-0130/864-605-0130 www.goodlifecateringonline.com

25

550 guests

Shane Clary, chef, owner

Schlotzsky's Deli 603 E. Greenville St., Anderson, SC 29621

864-226-1346/864-226-1289 www.schlotzskys.com/anderson

25

300+

Lou Hart, owner, general manager

864-232-7374 www.udesignsevents.com

25

500 people

Brie D. LeBret, CEO

704-942-6494 www.chilis.com

20

100 people

Lori Ann Stewart-Johnson, delivery manager

864-270-3271/843-763-6142 www.eventsbyduvall.com

20

INP

Caroline Heuring, event coordinator; Charlie Moore, operating manager

864-241-0401/864-241-0406 www.saffronssidewalkcafe.com

20

200 people, Childrens Museum grand opening

Glenn Patrick Sawicki, owner

Stax Catering 80 Orchard Park Drive, Greenville, SC 29615 Sticky Fingers Catering 3 Market Point Drive, Greenville, SC 29607 Hilton Garden Inn & Destination Pointe Event Center 115 Destination Blvd., Anderson, SC 29621 Strossner's Bakery, Florist, Catering, Café 21 Roper Mountain Road, Greenville, SC 29607 Tiki Hut 156 Keowee Marina Drive, Seneca, SC 29679 Trio, A Brick Oven Café 22 N. Main St., Greenville, SC 29601 Daddy Joe's BBQ & Beach 1400 W. Floyd Bker Blvd., Gaffney, SC 29341 Café Verdae at Embassy Suites 670 Verdae Blvd., Greenville, SC 29607

U Designs 5B E. Coffee St., Greenville, SC 29601 Chili's 3801 Clemson Blvd., Anderson, SC 29621 Duvall Catering & Event Design 206 Woods Lake Road, Greenville, SC 29607 Saffrons 1 Augusta St., Suite 101, Greenville, SC 29601 Table 301 207 S. Main St., Greenville, SC 29601

864-232-7007/864-232-5282 www.sobys.com

20

400

Michael Granata, executive chef, Soby's Catering; Stephanie Grover, director, sales and catering, Table 301

Bucky's Barbecue 1700 Roper Mountain Road, Greenville, SC 29615

864-329-0054/864-676-1689 www.buckysbbq.com

18

1500

Wayne Preston

INP = Information not provided. NR = Not ranked. N/A = Not applicable. Although every attempt is made to ensure the accuracy and thoroughness of GSA Business lists, omissions sometimes occur. Please send additions to: List Research, 1204B E. Washington St., Greenville, SC 29601 or via fax to 235-4868 or at http://www.gsabusiness.com/directory/update_lists.

46 2010 Event Planning Guide | www.gsabusiness.com

Researched by Elizabeth Feather


Lists & Directories

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Index of advertisers BMW Performance Center . ...............................Back cover, 20

Littlejohn Coliseum Clemson University . ............................. 10

Christa Hovis .......................................... Inside front cover, 35

Pinnacle Hospitality ............................................................ 20

Commerce Club . ................................................................ 13

Plan Ahead Events ....................................... Inside back cover

Countybank......................................................................... 25

Spartanburg Expo Center ...................................................... 8

Crowne Plaza Hotel . ........................................................... 33

Strossner’s Bakery and Florist................................................ 5

High Cotton of Greenville, LLC . ............................................. 9

The Red Horse Inn .............................................................. 37

Hyatt Regency Greenville .................................................... 27

Zen...................................................................................... 15

.....................................................................................................

Index of companies 10-X Group...................................................... 34

Bridges Arena.................................................. 36

Communication Works LLC.............................. 34

295 Complex-Southport Road.......................... 36

Bucky’s Barbecue............................................ 46

Converse College Alumnae House.................... 37

A Arrangement Florist...................................... 45

Burgundy Blues Jazz Club............................... 36

Co-Op Gas Inc. – Master Helium & Balloon

AARO Party Rental........................................... 44

Café Verdae at Embassy Suites........................ 46

Distributors...................................................... 44

ABC Party Rentals and Amusements................ 44

Canaan Road Soccer Complex......................... 36

Corporate Connection LLC............................... 44

All Occasion Celebrations................................. 34

Candleberry Inn B&B & Day Spa....................... 40

Corporate Meeting and Event Management LLC.... 34

Anchor Park Pavilion at Lake Bowen................ 36

Carolina Barbecue No. 1.................................. 46

Corporate Raves Inc......................................... 34

And Why Not Balloons...................................... 45

Carolina First Center........................................ 42

Country Hearth Inn........................................... 40

Anderson Arts Center....................................... 36

Centre Stage - South Carolina.......................... 36

Cowpens Park-Linda St.................................... 37

Anderson Special Events.................................. 44

Chapman Cultural Center................................. 42

Croft State Park............................................... 37

Anderson Sports and Entertainment Center...... 42

Charter Amphitheatre....................................... 36

Cross Creek Plantation..................................... 41

Asheville Hwy. Rental....................................... 44

Cherokee Valley Golf Club................................ 41

Crowne Plaza Hotel Greenville......................... 40

Ashtabula Historic House................................. 36

Chili’s.............................................................. 46

Custom Production Services............................ 34

Augusta Manor................................................ 36

Christa Hovis Special Events LLC..................... 34

Daddy Joe’s BBQ & Beach............................... 46

Azia Restaurant............................................... 46

Christine Faust Events..................................... 34

Dahlia A Florist................................................. 45

Barretts Flowers.............................................. 45

City of Greenville – Falls Park........................... 36

Daniel Recital Hall at Converse College............ 37

Berry Field-Asheville Highway.......................... 36

City of Greer Events Center.............................. 43

DNA Creative Communications........................ 34

Bi-Lo Center.................................................... 42

Civic Center of Anderson.................................. 42

Drury Inn & Suites Greenville........................... 40

Blockhouse Restaurant & Oyster Bar................ 46

Clarion Hotel, A Roberts Hotel.......................... 40

Duvall Catering & Event Design...................34, 46

BMW Performance Driving School.................... 36

Clemson University T. Ed Garrison Arena.......... 42

ECPI College of Technology.............................. 37

BMW Zentrum................................................. 36

Cleveland Park Spartanburg............................. 36

Eden Farms..................................................... 37

Bob Jones University Museum & Gallery Inc..... 43

Coggins Flowers & Gifts................................... 45

Brett Inc........................................................... 34

Comfort Inn Millennium.................................... 40

Continued on next page

2010 Event Planning Guide | www.gsabusiness.com

47


epg

Lists & Directories

Embassy Suites Golf Resort

Littlejohn Coliseum.......................................... 42

The Cliffs at Glassy.......................................... 41

& Conference Center...................................40, 42

Marriott Greenville........................................... 40

The Cliffs at Keowee Falls................................ 41

Erwin-Penland................................................. 34

Multi Media Services..................................34, 44

The Cliffs at Keowee Springs........................... 41

Event Decor & More......................................... 44

Musgrove Mill Golf Club................................... 41

The Cliffs at Keowee Vineyards........................ 41

Event Rentals..............................................34, 44

Occasions at Wedgefield.................................. 38

The Commerce Club........................................ 36

Everything for Weddings.................................. 45

On the Go LLC................................................. 34

The Conference Center and Inn

Expressions Unlimited Inc...........................44, 45

Paesano’s Italian Restaurant............................ 46

at Clemson University...................................... 43

Fairmont Larkin Park-Nazareth Road................ 37

Palmetto Sound Works..................................... 44

The Davenport................................................. 39

Falcon’s Lair Golf Club..................................... 41

Pavilions at Lake Blalock Park.......................... 38

The Duncan Estate........................................... 37

Floral Designs Ltd............................................ 45

Peace Center for the Performing Arts............... 43

The Handlebar................................................. 38

Fluor Corp........................................................ 37

Pebble Creek Golf Club - Creekside.................. 41

The Hurst Group LLC........................................ 44

Frog Pond Weddings........................................ 38

Pebble Creek Golf Club - Linkside.................... 41

The Inn on Main............................................... 40

Fuddruckers.................................................... 46

Peter David’s Gourmet Catering....................... 46

The Palms Restaurant and McKibbon’s Pub

Full Circle Public Relations............................... 34

Piedmont Interstate Fair................................... 42

at The Phoenix, Greenville’s Inn........................ 46

Furman University Amphitheatre...................... 38

Plan Ahead Events of Greenville....................... 34

The Patriot Golf Club at Grand Harbor............... 41

Furman University Timmons Arena................... 42

Poinsett Club................................................... 38

The Phoenix, Greenville’s Inn........................... 40

Furman University Younts Conference Center... 43

Professional Party Rentals Inc.....................34, 44

The Rock at Jocassee Golf Resort.................... 41

Good Life Catering Co...................................... 46

Quality Inn....................................................... 40

The Venue & The Renfrew................................ 39

Gordon Light & Sound...................................... 44

Rainbow Lake Pavilion..................................... 38

The Walker Course at Clemson University........ 41

Grace Hall . ..................................................... 34

Ramada Inn Clemson....................................... 40

The Westin Poinsett......................................... 40

Greater Pacolet Park-Sunny Acres Road........... 38

Roper Mountain Science Center....................... 38

The Wilhite House............................................ 39

Green Valley Country Club................................ 41

Saffrons........................................................... 46

Thornblade Club.........................................39, 41

Greenville Country Club - Chanticleer............... 41

Schlotzsky’s Deli.............................................. 46

Tiki Hut............................................................ 46

Greenville Country Club - Riverside.................. 41

Shafer & Huguley............................................. 34

TimbeRock at Hopkins Farm............................ 39

Greenville Little Theatre................................... 38

Skyline Exhibits & Design Inc......................44, 45

Touch of Class Ltd............................................ 45

Greenville Rental.............................................. 44

Sleep Inn Carolina First Center......................... 40

Tri-County Rentals........................................... 44

Greenville Technical College............................. 38

Smithfields Country Club............................38, 41

Trio, A Brick Oven Café..................................... 46

Greenville Women’s Club.................................. 38

Solitude Pointe................................................. 38

Twichell Auditorium at Converse College.......... 42

Greer City Park................................................ 38

Southern Oaks Golf Club.................................. 41

Twigs . .......................................................39, 45

Henry’s Smokehouse....................................... 46

Southern Panache Events LLC......................... 34

U Designs.............................................34, 45, 46

Hilton Garden Inn &

Spartanburg Convention & Visitors Bureau....... 34

Up to Eleven Events......................................... 34

Destination Pointe Event Center..................40, 46

Spartanburg County Public Libraries................ 38

Upcountry History Museum.............................. 39

Hilton Greenville & Towers............................... 40

Spartanburg Expo Center................................. 42

Upper S. C. State Fairgrounds/

Holiday Inn Express Hotel

Spartanburg Marriott at Renaissance Park..40, 42

Greenville-Pickens Speedway.......................... 43

& Suites Westgate Mall........................................40

Spartanburg Memorial Auditorium.................... 43

Upstate Wedding and Event Services..........34, 44

Holiday Inn Greenville...................................... 40

Stax Catering................................................... 46

USC Upstate.................................................... 39

Hollywild Animal Park...................................... 38

Sticky Fingers Catering.................................... 46

Verdae Greens Golf Club at Embassy Suites Golf

Hooters............................................................ 46

Strossner’s Bakery, Florist, Catering......... 44, 45, 46

Resort & Conference Center............................. 41

Hub-Bub.com.................................................. 43

Sullivan’s Metropolitan Grill.............................. 46

William A. Floyd Amphitheater.......................... 39

Hyatt Regency Greenville............................40, 42

Summit Pointe Conference & Events Center..... 43

Willow Creek Conservatory.............................. 39

Jason’s Deli..................................................... 46

Table 301........................................................ 46

Wofford College............................................... 39

JBM & Associates............................................ 34

The Bird House at Mountainview...................... 39

Wofford College Leonard Auditorium,

JC Rose & Associates Inc......................34, 44, 45

The Bleckley Inn.............................................. 40

Main Building................................................... 39

Justin’s Catering . ........................................... 46

The Blue Ridge Brewing Co.............................. 46

Wofford College, McMillan Theater................... 39

Larkin’s at the Peace Center Wyche Pavilion.... 38

The Carolina Country Club..........................36, 41

Wofford College, Tony White Theater................ 39

Leave the Details to Us.................................... 44

The Cazbah..................................................... 46

Woodburn Historic House................................. 39

Links O’Tryon................................................... 41

The Children’s Museum of the Upstate............. 36

Zen -An elegant space for hire......................... 39

48 2010 Event Planning Guide | www.gsabusiness.com


Our Services Site Selection

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SHOWS &

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2010 GSA Event Planning guide