Page 1

Summer 2009

CALLING ON

THE PORT S.C.’s economy moored to a vibrant maritime industry

SCBIZ exclusive An interview with Lynn Harton, president and CEO of The South Financial Group

Outside the box Creativity helps businesses adapt to the economy

After 50 years on the waterfront, Tim Twomey hopes for a resurgence in support for the port.

389 Johnnie Dodds Blvd Suite 200 Mt. Pleasant, SC 29464 CHANGE SERVICE REQUESTED PRSRT STD US POSTAGE PAID BOILINGBROOK, IL PERMIT # 645


A Hillwood Development Project

Building Alliances One Client at a Time

H

illwood Investment Properties retained the services of Alliance Consulting Engineers, Inc., for the master planning and infrastructure design of the 750-acre

Charleston Trade Center. When completed, this project will include up to 10 million square feet of manufacturing, distribution and commercial space that will bring quality jobs to South Carolinians in the Low Country. Alliance Consulting Engineers, Inc., is proud to provide innovative project delivery methods, a focus on quality and unparalleled responsiveness. We help bring vision into reality.

• Industrial Park Master Planning & Design

• Roadway Design

• Water & Wastewater Planning & Design

• Site Certification

• Solid Waste Management

• Grant Application

• Stormwater Management

• Construction Management

• Land Planning & Site Design

Alliance Consulting Engineers, Inc. P.O. Box 8147 Columbia, SC 29202-8147 P: 803 779-2078 F: 803 779-2079 www.allianceCE.com


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®

Contents VOL.3, ISSUE 2

CEO and Publisher - Grady Johnson gjohnson@scbiznews.com • 843.849.3103 Vice President of Sales - Steve Fields sfields@scbiznews.com • 843.849.3110 Business Assistant - Erin Henry ehenry@scbiznews.com • 843.849.3102

SUMMER 2009

COVER STORY PORTS, LOGISTICS & DISTRIBUTION

Special Projects Editor - Allison Cooke Oliverius aoliverius@scbiznews.com • 843.849.3149

Calling on the port As the home of what historically has been one of the nation’s busiest ports, literally tons of cargo moves through the state each year on its way to store shelves and manufacturing plants across the nation. We’ll take you inside some of the most important — and heated — issues that the port, and the industries that support it, face today. A maritime industry in transition ............Page 16 The growing role of rail ..........................Page 19

16

Managing Editor - Andy Owens aowens@scbiznews.com • 843.849.3141

Senior Copy Editor - Beverly Morgan bmorgan@scbiznews.com • 843.849.3115 Staff Writer - Molly Parker mparker@scbiznews.com • 843.849.3144 Staff Writer - James T. Hammond jhammond@scbiznews.com • 864.235.5677 Staff Writer - Chelsea Hadaway chadaway@scbiznews.com • 843.849.3142 Senior Research Coordinator - Gini Rice grice@scbiznews.com • 843.849.3114 Research Assistant - Leslie Halpern lhalpern@scbiznews.com • 843.849.3123

Cover Photo/Leslie Halpern

EXCLUSIVE

Art Director - Ryan Wilcox production1@scbiznews.com • 843.849.3117 Senior Graphic Designer - Jane Mattingly production2@scbiznews.com • 843.849.3118

Ready, willing & able

Director of Business Development - Mark Wright mwright@scbiznews.com • 843.849.3143 Advertising Coordinator - Bennett Parks bparks@scbiznews.com • 843.849.3126

In this SCBIZ magazine exclusive, Lynn Circulation and Event Manager - Kathy Allen kallen@scbiznews.com • 843.849.3113

Harton, The South Financial Group’s new president and CEO, discusses his plans to

Circulation and Event Assistant - Kim McManus

revive the troubled bank holding company

12

and maintain its independence. Photo/James T. Hammond

DEPARTMENTS

S P E C I A L S EC T I O N PA G E 2 8

4 | Viewpoint

MARKETFACTS

5 | Upfront 8 | Inclusion 9 | Technovation 10 | Profile: Darla Moore

REAL ESTATE EMPLOYMENT EDUCATION GOVERNMENT

STATEWIDE EDITION

Find out who appears in

South Carolina’s people,

the 2009 edition of The

businesses and economy.

Best Lawyers in America.

48 | 1,000 words SC BIZ | w w w. s c b i z m a g . c o m

The entire contents of this publication are copyrighted by SC Biz News LLC with all rights reserved. Any reproduction or use of the content within this publication without permission is prohibited. SCBIZ and South Carolina’s Media Engine for Economic Growth are registered in the U.S. Patent and Trademark Office.

EST LAWYERS®

Essential information about

47 | People in the news

2

S P ECIAL S ECT ION PAGE 4 0

kmcmanus@scbiznews.com • 843.849.3116

Mailing address: 389 Johnnie Dodds Blvd., Suite 200 Mount Pleasant, SC 29464 Phone: 843.849.3100 • Fax: 843.849.3122 www.scbiznews.com


Viewpoint

AccessHealth SC shows great promise for state ave you heard the news? Instead of just in The Wall Street Journal noted that health talking about fixing what’s broken with care spending has now risen to 17.6% of total health care, a new collaborative organi- U.S. output, up three percentage points from zation called AccessHealth SC is doing some- 1994. That’s unsustainable growth, and now thing about it. virtually everyone recognizes this as a critical I’ve been involved for many years in ad- financial issue for the nation, for businesses vocacy for community-based approaches and for individual citizens. to bridging the gaps in care for low-income, The Obama administration will push hard uninsured citizens in the Charleston region; for action at the federal level this year, but it’s so for me it’s truly exciting to see the emer- very clear that improving the quality of health gence of a statewide effort with serious goals care while reducing costs and improving acand timelines and the opportunity for fund- cess to care will require efforts at all levels. It’s ing to support pilot programs like World War II, in a way, around the state. where everyone pitched in and The program, initiated by It’s no secret that everyone made some sacrifices the Duke Endowment, is adto ensure victory. health care costs ministered by the S.C. HosAt the individual level, we pital Association. The goal is continue to spiral must take personal responsito change the current fragbility for trying to maintain out of control. mented system of care for the our own good health. Stop uninsured into a coordinated smoking. Eat a healthier diet. approach that meets patients’ Exercise more. Make sure you needs for ongoing preventive, chronic and have a “medical home” at a clinic or famacute health care and medication needs. ily physician’s practice to help monitor your You can find out much more about the health and provide timely care when needed. program at www.accesshealthsc.net. I urge you Perhaps we should be calling this a “medical to visit the Web site and become familiar with home base” to avoid confusion. the program. Aside from the importance of In the provider sector, including hospitals, the initiative in terms of improving the overall physicians and medical support staff, there’s health of South Carolinians, we as business- a need to recognize that we must remake people need to recognize that this effort has our health care system to deliver better care the potential to give us a competitive advan- and get more return for dollars we spend on tage from the standpoint of regional econom- care. It can be done — and is being done — ic development and the financial health of our at places such as the Mayo Clinic, the Clevebusinesses. land Clinic and the Geisinger Health System It’s no secret that health care costs contin- in rural Pennsylvania. An article in the April ue to spiral out of control. A recent column issue of the AARP Bulletin (yes, I’m showing

H

SUBSCRIPTION INFORMATION SCBIZ reaches thousands of South Carolina’s top decision-makers. Add your name to the list by ordering a print subscription to SCBIZ. Your subscription also includes SCBIZ Daily. Delivered to your e-mail inbox each weekday morning, SCBIZ Daily is your link to statewide business news. One year for $43.50 4 SC BIZ | w w w. s c b i z m a g . c o m

my age) e) combines coordinated primary care care, surgery “with a warranty,” electronic health records and increased patient involvement to produce dramatic improvements in care, along with more efficient spending of health care dollars. Help from AccessHealth SC to pilot projects in regions around the state will come in two forms: technical support to help create community-based care networks and monetary grants to sustain the networks. Communities must apply for the grants, which will be awarded twice a year based on a variety of criteria. Although the AccessHealth SC initiative is targeted mainly at helping the uninsured in our communities, it should be obvious to anyone who’s been paying attention to health care issues that the building of community systems to provide better care for the uninsured can and should be used as a platform to provide better care for everyone, whether insured or not. So make sure you learn more about AccessHealth SC and what it can do for your community’s health and economic development. When it comes to fixing our health care system, this is our time. This is our moment. Together, we can do this.

Bill Settlemyer bsettlemyer@scbiznews.com

NEW SUBSCRIBERS: Subscribe online at www.scbizmag.com or call 843.849.3116. CURRENT SUBSCRIBERS: Change your address online at www.scbizmag.com or call 843.849.3116.


Upstate

Midlands

Lowcountr y

Pee Dee

Grand Strand

Upfront REGIONAL NEWS

|

D ATA

S.C. exports top $19.8B in 2008 South Carolina’s exports in 2008 totaled more than $19.8 billion in goods sold to 193 countries, according to recent reports from the S.C. Department of Commerce and the S.C. State Ports Authority. The state’s exports increased 19.65% from 2007, ranking the state No. 18 out of 54 U.S. states and territories and third in the Southeast. Some of the top export industries included vehicles, machinery, rubber, plastics, organic chemicals, and optics and medical equipment. Aircraft and spacecraft experienced the greatest export growth, at 153%. The iron sector increased 132% and inorganic chemical exports were up 69%. Germany remained South Carolina’s No. 1 export market in 2008, purchasing more than $4.78 billion in products, and the Saudi Arabia market grew the most, up 405%. Other markets in the state’s top 10 included Canada, Mexico, the United Kingdom, China, France, Australia, Belgium, Japan and Brazil.

Are we there yet? ?

260,800

The economy and rising fuel uel igit decline costs have caused a double-digit uth Caroliin traffic congestion across South na’s major highways, accordingg to a national any that survey from Inrix Inc., a company he country tracks traffic patterns across the le data. using GPS technology to compile litan Nearly every major metropolitan e-digit area in the country saw a double-digit om 2007 decrease in traffic congestion from erage decline to 2008, Inrix reported, for an average ed Americans of 30% nationwide. It also reported urs stuck in spent an average of 13 fewer hours traffic in 2008 than in 2007.

Metro area

Population

That’s ho how many jobs trade through the ports on South Carolina coast generates. Carolina’s Trade also generates $11.8 billion in ann annual income and $1.5 billion in gove government taxes, and has a $44.8 bbillion impact on the state’s econom economy. Source: S.C S.C. State Ports Authority

Congestion 2008 vs. U.S. 2007 ranking

Columbia

716,030

-51.8%

83

CharlestonNorth Charleston

630,100

-45.2%

71

Augusta-Aiken

528,519

-38.2%

92

CharlotteGastonia, N.C.

1,651,568

-25.3%

27

613,828

-24.8%

87

GreenvilleMauldin-Easley

“It’s so much more fun to mow the lawn when the grass is high. You look behind yourself and you can tell where you’ve been.” Lynn Harton, president and CEO of The South Financial Group, in an exclusive interview with SCBIZ to discuss his new position and how he plans to revive the troubled bank holding company and maintain its independence. See the full story on Page 12.

S.C. business bankruptcies up 86% Bankruptcy filings by businesses increased 86% last year in South Carolina, according to the Administrative Office of the U.S. Courts. Statewide, business bankruptcies increased from 144 to 268. Total bankruptcy filings in South Carolina increased 14% last year to 8,502. Nationally, bankruptcy filings increased at an even steeper rate last year — 31% — to 1.1 million. w w w. s c b i z m a g . c o m | S u m m e r 2 0 0 9

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Upfront

Local impact of the Capital Purchase Program As of March 2009, the U.S. Department of the Treasury has made investments in banks in 48 states, the District of Columbia and Puerto Rico through the Capital Purchase Program. The investments have ranged from $301,000 to $25 billion. So far, the Treasury has invested $615,846,000 in financial institutions in South Carolina. Date

Cluster aims to connect distribution industry In an effort to provide a formal structure through which transportation, distribution and logistics companies in South Carolina can collaborate, New Carolina: South Carolina’s Council on Competitiveness launched the Transportation, Distribution and Logistics Cluster in February of 2008. Since then, nearly 40 business professionals from industry, government, education and trade groups have come together to increase efficiency and innovation within the industry and to work on improving competitiveness on regional, national and international fronts. The group’s first major initiative has been development of a statewide strategic communications plan to create a better understanding of the critical nature of the cluster and its impact on South Carolina’s overall economy. It hired Chernoff Newman to conduct the study and create the plan, which should be released in the fall. “The plan provides the communications strategies necessary to secure the future competitiveness of the industry, which will result in increased prosperity for South Carolinians at all economic levels,” said Deepal Eliatamby, president of Alliance Consulting Engineers and co-chairman of the cluster. “The cluster is putting the finishing touches on the report and will launch it statewide starting in the fall with a series of presentations and hosted events in the Upstate, Midlands and Lowcountry.” Guided by Eliatamby and co-chairman Bill Smith, CEO of Red Rock Developments, New Carolina is preparing to mobilize the cluster by creating stewards, engaging stakeholders and providing a mechanism to support cluster actions. “With a strong system of interstate highways, one of the world’s most efficient ports, two rail companies operating track throughout the state, airports with an international scope and a growing network of distribution centers, our state is positioned to become a hub for the global marketplace,” Eliatamby said. Members of the cluster include leaders from S.C. State Ports Authority, S.C. Trucking Association, S.C. Department of Commerce, World Trade City Orangeburg, Hillwood Investment Properties, S.C. Power Team, ATS Logistics, Milliken & Co., Greater Columbia Chamber of Commerce, Orangeburg County Development Commission, Engineered Products and WSI of the Southeast. For more information or to get involved, contact Katherine Robinson, project coordinator at New Carolina, at krobinson@newcarolina.org. 6

SC BIZ | w w w. s c b i z m a g . c o m

Name of Institution

Price Paid

11/21/08 First Community Corp.

$11,350,000

12/05/08 South Financial Group Inc.

$347,000,000

12/05/08 First Financial Holdings Inc.

$65,000,000

12/19/08 Security Federal Corp.

$18,000,000

12/19/08 Tidelands Bancshares Inc.

$14,448,000

1/09/09 GrandSouth Bancorp.

$9,000,000

1/09/09 Congaree Bancshares

$3,285,000

1/16/09 SCBT Financial Corp.*

$64,779,000

1/30/09 Greer Bancshares Inc.

$9,993,000

2/13/09 BankGreenville

$1,000,000

2/13/09 Regional Bankshares Inc.

$1,500,000

2/27/09 Southern First Bancshares Inc.

$17,299,000

3/08/09 HCSB Financial Corp.

$12,895,000

3/08/09 First Reliance Bancshares Inc.

$15,349,000

3/13/09 Provident Community Bancshares Inc.

$9,268,000

3/27/09 Clover Community Bankshares Inc.

$3,000,000

4/24/09 Peoples Bancorp. Inc.

$12,680,000

Source: U.S. Department of the Treasury *SCBT returned the funds in May.

E-commerce tool to help market S.C. seafood S.C. Market Maker is a new online marketing tool designed to streamline the supply chain from S.C. seafood and other agricultural producers to consumers. It is part of a national online network that connects the entire supply chain, including growers, fishing industry members, distributors, retailers and consumers. The effort to bring Market Maker to South Carolina has been facilitated by Clemson University Public Service Activities, the S.C. Department of Agriculture, the S.C. Sea Grant Consortium and the U.S. Department of Agriculture Natural Resources http://sc.mar ketmaker.uiu c.edu Conservation Service.


| a new state of mind RANKED AMERICA’S #1 “SOCIAL MOBILITY” UNIVERSITY SC State University is a national leader in producing well-rounded graduates who make tremendous contributions to society. In fact, Washington Monthly magazine ranks SC State #1 in the nation in “Social Mobility.” We take your talents, unlock your potential and assist you in becoming a leader who will change the world. In more than 60 years, our ROTC Bulldog Battalion has provided nearly 2,000 commissioned officers to lead the U.S. Armed Forces, including 13 General Officers. SC State served as host to the first U.S. Presidential Primary Debate of the 2008 election cycle, and our Women’s Tennis Team recently won its fourth consecutive Mid-Eastern Athletic Conference Championship title. Our “state of mind” is excellence, and we’re ready to share it with you.

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www.scsu.edu


Check your blind spot By Allison Cooke Oliverius, Special Projects Editor

W

hen you first began to drive, you learned the importance of checking your blind spots. Your driving instructor made you take that extra second to turn around and look to make sure your path was clear before you turned or merged into another lane. Now that you are a business owner or manager, it is time to apply this basic principle to your workplace to make sure the environment is diverse. It’s important to take the time to assess the work force, look for diversity blind spots and take steps to make sure you are driving your business — and your employees — down the road of success.

lind Thee council, created in 1999, not only Th periences or knowledge base. Diversity blind spots are not intentionally discriminatory, but serves as a hub for businesses across the state they might result in unintentional discrimina- looking for information and contacts regardtion or the perception of discrimination, said ing diversity education, training and support, Cheryl Behymer, a partner at the Fisher and it also offers programs for members. “The HR audit (her organization performs Phillips law firm in Columbia. In the legal context, we often find diver- for companies) is going to give us a clear sity blind spots in the categories protected picture of their work force makeup and the by our various civil rights laws: race, sex, age, culture of the organization and leadership,” religion, etc. But we might also see a diversity Moss said. “A lot of things can be gleaned blind spot arise based upon the way some- from the start. We can establish policies and one is dressed or speaks, whether they have procedures and people management systems tattoos, piercings or other characteristics, that will help the company grow in the direction they want, but they Behymer said. are not sure how to do that.” “You need differences for “If you have more strength. If you have more perspective, more points of perspective, more How do you establish What is a diversity blind spot? workplace diversity? view, that will help your workpoints of view, Diversity blind spots arise when we make place to be healthier, more No matter which path to judgments based on our prior individual ex- productive and more sucthat will help your clarity you choose, Moss said your initiative to achieve dicessful. It also helps you to be workplace to be versity should be strategic and Six key reasons to tie workplace more creative and innovative have buy-in from the top. You and that’s important in this healthier, more diversity to organizational should also follow through on economy. When challenges strategic goals and objectives: productive and plans and recommendations. are so intense, you need that 1. Having greater adaptability and flexibility in a edge to bring to the table,” more successful.” A committee — which is dirapidly changing marketplace. verse, of course — can help said Behymer, who is also the Cheryl Behymer 2. Attracting and retaining the best talent. make sure the company stays chairwoman-elect for the S.C. partner, Fisher and 3. Reducing costs associated with turnover, on course with initiatives. Diversity Council and has Phillips law firm absenteeism and low productivity. “You don’t want to take a conducted numerous on-site 4. Increasing return on investment from various diversity training programs. survey and then never give initiatives, policies and practices. any feedback or never do any How do you recognize it? 5. Gaining and keeping greater or new market follow-up, because that conveys an ‘I don’t care’ You can start by simply taking a quick look attitude,” Behymer said. “It can also be dangershare — locally and globally — with an around your office. Do your employees look, ous because if you acquire knowledge of disexpanded, diverse customer base. think and believe the way you do? 6. Increasing sales and profits. crimination and don’t do anything about it, Source: S.C. Diversity Council We often surround ourselves with people there is a liability.” who support our own beliefs and ideas, but Another important way to achieve a diverse “companies are missing the boat when they don’t work force is to consider your hiring practices. look at diversity and don’t value different ideas,” If you mostly hire people who were recomsaid JoAnne Moss, a partner with the Columbia mended by current employees, you might be consulting firm Human Resource Dynamics. building a work force of like-minded people. Ways to gain clarity include conducting do“You need to be casting a wider net to it-yourself employee surveys, hiring a consult- reduce bias in the interview process and iming firm to perform an audit or participating in prove your selection process,” Moss said. “If a program offered by the Diversity Council, an you limit your recruiting strategies, you limit affiliate of the S.C. Department of Commerce. what you get.” SC

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Te c h n

offer menu g restaurants tin pa ci rti pa a, immy Higgs) At Viva La Vist price. (Photo/J le ab rd fo af samplers at an

vation

Businesses look outside box to adapt to the economy By Chelsea Hadaway, Staff Writer

A

year ago, Jamey Nelson would never food festival — in October. have thought to bring his business to The rule was that the 26 participating resthe Charleston Food + Wine Festival, taurants had to offer menu samplers at an afan event that caters to epicureans. fordable price, between $1 and $4 each. And Nelson is the director of business devel- the music and entertainment would be free. opment for Palmetto Surfacing, a Charleston “People could try a Ruth’s Chris steak sandcompany that provides kitchen and bathroom wich for $4,” said Jacque Riley, owner of Riley countertops to restaurants and homes. Communications, which helped organize the After recognizing the only segment of his event. The Blue Marlin, Ristorante Divino, business that was staying flat or growing was Liberty Tap Room and Gervais & Vine offered remodeling, Nelson decided to actively pur- bites of sea scallops, grilled lamb, and shrimp sue this segment — and the festival was an and grits. ideal place to reach those people. “We wanted people to be able to try every“It was a completely nontraditional venue,” thing for a low cost,” said Deirdre Mardon, Nelson said. “Our angle was that we had a executive director of the Vista Guild. “Then, countertop that was certified we hoped people would come safe for food preparation.” back to the restaurants.” “It’s paid for itself Palmetto Surfacing ended They didn’t know what to up becoming an event sponsor. expect, and 7,000 people came already. We’ve It provided countertops for the out and bought $20,000 in gotten three direct food tokens in the first hour. food demonstrations and had a booth at one of the tents. The guild had bought jobs from just Palmetto Surfacing didn’t 25,000 tokens and planned to being there.” exactly fit the typical sponsor use them the whole day. But mold for a food and beverage they went so quickly, the rest Jamey Nelson industry event, but looking at of the day was spent countdirector of business different ways to reach out to ing tokens to be reused, Mardevelopment, a client base and having a little don said. At this year’s event, Palmetto Surfacing open-mindedness paid off. planned for Sept. 12, the guild “It went really well; a lot of is bringing 60,000 tokens. our client base was there socializing and we were able to catch them at a social setting and let Words of wisdom Although there are no rules for trying new everybody know we’re still here,” Nelson said. “Everyone in this market is hearing doom things and looking outside the box for innoand gloom. It’s good to let everybody know vative business ideas, Satish Jayachandran, a marketing professor at the University of South we’re strong, we’ll be here next year.” The company was able to gain exposure to Carolina’s Moore School of Business, says a about 5,000 people and “made a lot of impres- few things should be kept in mind. “Whatever you do now should not hurt sions that over time will pay off.” “It’s paid for itself already,” Nelson said. your survival in the future,” he said. “At some “We’ve gotten three direct jobs from just be- point, we will come out of the recession.” He advises increasing the affordability of ing there. Those three will turn into nine if we your products. Offer smaller sizes for lower make those three happy.” In Columbia, the Congaree Vista Guild prices, change the thresholds for discounts — decided to try a new idea to stimulate the bur- instead of buy three, get one free, offer buy two, geoning restaurant area there. It organized the get one free — and lower fees, he said. But Jayachandran warned that people get first Viva La Vista event — a budget-friendly

Palmetto Surfacing countertops gave Bobby Flay room to slice and dice at the Charleston Food + Wine Festival. (Photo provided/www.letstalkcharleston.com)

accustomed to lower prices, and that makes it harder to increase those prices again. Emphasizing value and decreasing consumer risk sends a message to consumers, especially with higher-value products, he said. He cited Hyundai’s offer to take your car back if you lose your job. Similarly, JetBlue Airways offers a full refund with no cancellation fees if you book a ticket and then lose your job. “If you reduce the risk of buying, people will be more willing to get off the sidelines and buy,” he said. Nelson advised looking for strategic partnerships, like the one Palmetto Surfacing forged with the Food + Wine Festival. And for Nelson, being open-minded is what brought him to the festival — one of his suppliers approached him with the idea. “Your suppliers have customers just like you, but in more markets,” Nelson said. “Ask them if there are any other things they’re doing in other markets that are working.” SC

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Profile: Darla Moore

Destined for greatness Darla Moore takes on the business world and wins By Holly Fisher • Photography by Paula Illingworth

Darla Moore attributes her success to having a stable, loving family and growing up in a small town where everyone had a hand in raising her.

arla Moore recites, without hesitation, the moment she knew she was destined for greatness: She was 9 years old and swinging on her grandmother’s porch on Pine Bay Road in Lake City. She might not have known specifically that she would rise to the top of the business world. She might not have known specifically that a business school would bear her name. She might not have known specifically that she would be the keeper of a massive fortune. But she knew she was destined for something. “When you are born with energy, ambition, curiosity and you’re born in a rural environment, you feel the confines of that,” said Moore during an interview at her downtown

D

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Charleston home. As a teenager, Moore said she couldn’t stand the rules and restrictions of her small hometown. Her main thought was: “I’ve got to bust out of here.” Moore headed to the University of South Carolina, on the fast track for a promising future. “All I wanted was to get that degree and get out,” she said. Moore earned a degree in political science from USC. Then she was off to Washington, D.C., working for the Republican National Committee and later earning an MBA from George Washington University. In the early 1980s, Moore was managing director of Chemical Bank in New York, which today is JPMorgan Chase & Co.. But at that time, a Southern woman didn’t have many opportunities. In a January 2000 article on Inc.com, Moore is quoted as saying, “There wasn’t a snowball’s chance in hell that a female from the rural Deep South would be invited or embraced by that LBO (leverage buyout) environment. Historically, no major players in the LBO business were women.” Not easily deterred, Moore turned to another avenue of finance: bankruptcies. While at Chemical Bank, Moore turned the banking world on its ear — suddenly she was making money on companies that were facing financial troubles. Chemical Bank was offering bankrupt companies high-interest loans and raking in the profits. According to an article in Fortune magazine, Moore generated at least $100 million for Chemical during her last three years there. The future Moore dreamed of as a child had arrived.

The top of her game In early 1993, Moore left Chemical Bank to become CEO of her husband’s company, Rainwater Inc. Moore and Richard Rainwater had married Dec. 13, 1991. Moore had no trouble taking on sticky investment situations and fully embracing

her role as a stockholder in major corporations. Fortune dubbed her the “toughest babe in business.” She had no problem booting Richard Scott, CEO of Columbia/HCA, and T. Boone Pickens, founder of oil and gas company Mesa, from their top roles. “I’ve harassed guys all my life,” Moore said in a Fortune cover story in September 1997. Moore also garnered spots on Fortune’s list of the 50 Most Powerful Women. She has a stunning home just off the Battery in downtown Charleston, and she maintains her family home in Lake City. Moore, 54, has come full circle. She looks differently at the Lake City life from which she had run as though her life depended on it. In the two decades after she left her hometown, Moore said a remarkable thing happened: She grew up. “I got there — wherever ‘there’ is,” she said. “How many more articles can you have? How many more magazine covers? How much more money? How much more recognition? It’s the law of diminishing return.” Moore realized she wanted substance in her life. “The gratification of life is in being productive, not in things,” she said. “The value system that had been embedded in me I utterly embraced after I had gotten there.” Today, Moore said life is about friends, family and substance. She attributes her successes to a stable, loving family and a small Southern town where everyone had a hand in raising her. Moore has been generous with her time, her expertise and her wealth. In 1998, she gave USC’s College of Business Administration $25 million. The school was named in her honor, making it the first major business school to be named for a woman. In 2004, Moore donated an additional $45 million to her alma mater. Moore founded the Palmetto Institute, an independent nonprofit research and edu-


cational organization, in 2002. Its mission is Out of the weeds In fact, it’s often when Moore is out pullto create a climate that raises the per-capita ing weeds with her dog that her best business income of South Carolina and its citizens. ideas take shape. A passion for parks As vice president of Rainwater Inc., Moore In addition to her service on several boards, is involved in the often complex task of selectMoore’s latest efforts involve improvements ing companies worthy of investment dollars. to Charleston’s public parks. Moore, an avid The initial concept is simple: “We started gardener and plant lover, recognized that, with a pot of money and we made it a bigger although Charleston’s historic buildings are pot of money,” she said. Rainwater Inc. mancarefully preserved, the same attention wasn’t ages $2.5 billion. being given to the city’s 120 public parks. The devil, as they say, is in the details. So While she lived in New York City, Moore how that pot of cash grows isn’t so simple. watched Central Park be transformed from Rainwater Inc. has spent the past three a “rat-infested, fearful” place to a wonderful years preparing for the current recession. park, she said. She was certain the same atten“The good news is, I’ve lived through tion could be given to Charleston’s parks. these markets before,” Moore said. “It’s cycli“There’s the preservation of history, but cal. We will come out of this, but it’s not the the parks are not up to the same standard,” end of cycles.” she said. “It’s time for Charleston to have a America is in a transitional period in similar organization as the one that rehabbed which the luxury of cheap oil is disappearCentral Park.” ing, Moore said. Americans In New York City, the have been spoiled and now City Parks Foundation is “Being a successful comes the painful adjusta nonprofit organization ment of a shrinking econinvestor is the ability omy. that supports hundreds of parks throughout the city. Rainwater Inc. has been to make decisions Moore met with representagetting out of some investwith imperfect tives from the foundation, ments and employed a stratwho visited Charleston and egy to make the business information.” offered recommendations. liquid, Moore explained. Darla Moore The result is the CharlesWithout a crystal ball, ton Parks Conservancy and Moore and Rainwater have an initiative called Park looked to the world news Angels. around them to make the best business deciSix lead Park Angels — those with a pas- sions they can. sion for the city’s public parks — have been “Being a successful investor is the ability selected to publicly represent the conservan- to make decisions with imperfect informacy. They are working with the organization tion,” Moore said. and the city to mobilize Charleston residents She added, “Most of our strategies were who have a passion for parks. derived from the front page of the newspaper, The key, Moore explained, is involving not the business section.” not only the city but the local residents. It’s a Over the past 10 to 15 years, the rest of the long-term project that has undertaken several world has bought into the idea of capitalism. projects since its inception, including recent With capitalism, everyone is going after the work at Brittlebank Park and Chapel Street same resources, Moore said. All that takes Fountain Park. energy, and though the United States once “The city can’t do it,” she said. “You can had access to the world’s oil supply, now sit and complain that somebody needs to do many more countries are sucking off the something, but that somebody is you. You same straw, she said. can say somebody needs to do something — “That’s what we saw — the globalization well, bend over and pull the weeds. of capitalism led to a commodity crisis of “I don’t get paid for it, but I want to be energy, oil and food. part of something bigger,” Moore said, add“A lot of people derived the same big picing she would be pulling weeds along with ture, but we probably moved before most,” the angels. Moore said.

Part of the package Many years have passed since Moore was a little girl swinging on her grandmother’s front porch. She’s put plenty of cracks in the glass ceiling and forged a path for businesswomen today. Moore pauses at the idea of herself as a role model. She realizes she probably is one, but she doesn’t spend a lot of time thinking about it. In fact, gender really isn’t important, Moore said; working hard is. “I don’t think about it in the context of gender. I think about being the best in the world at what you do,” she said. Being a Southern female with blond hair and blue eyes started as the kiss of death, Moore said, but now it’s part of the package. “I became the best in the world at what I did,” she said. “It’s not about boys, girls, men or women. I worked as hard as I could possibly work.” SC

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SC BIZ EXCLUSIVE

Ready, willing & able Story and photos by James T. Hammond, Staff Writer

he sparkle in Lynn Harton’s eyes as he discusses his plan to turn around The South Financial Group — the financially troubled parent of Carolina First Bank — suggests the company might have chosen just the right person for the job. Did he know how big a task he faced when he took over late last year as president and CEO? “I had a pretty good idea,” the 47-year-old North Carolina native said. He reflected for a second, then added: “It’s so much more fun to mow the lawn when the grass is high. You look behind yourself and you can tell where you’ve been.” Harton, who has been with The South Financial Group since February 2007, came on board as chief risk and credit officer, a position that gave him a front-row seat as the bank holding company began to grapple with a toxic portfolio of real estate loans gone bad, mostly around Tampa, Fla.

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A brief history

During Lynn Harton’s first presentation to shareholders as president and CEO, he assured investors he’s attacking the company’s problems head-on.

The South Financial Group also has 70 offices operating as Mercantile Bank in Florida, most of them in Jacksonville, Orlando, Tampa Bay, southeast Florida and Gainesville. The Mercantile Bank unit grew from a small St. Petersburg bank with 240 employees. The Greenville bank bought GulfWest Banks Inc., Mercantile’s parent, in 2002. After making other acquisitions and experiencing growth, South Financial rebranded all its Florida banks with the Mercantile banner.

The 20-year-old bank was started in Greenville by Mack Whittle — its first and only president before Harton. It grew rapidly, buying banks to become a major player in Florida and the Carolinas. South Financial is now listed as the nation’s 35th-largest bank. Carolina First was created in 1986 and is the Real estate repercussions Banks such as Carolina First expanded into largest S.C.-based commercial bank in the state. It operates in both Carolinas, as well as on the Florida during the past two decades because Internet under the brand name Bank Caro- the Sunshine State was seen as the growth mecca of banking, largely built on real estate Line. 12

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development. But that balloon burst for banks as fast as it did for the housing market when the recession gathered steam last year. Today, the Tampa market constitutes 10.3% of the company’s commercial real estate loans, the third-largest segment after Upstate South Carolina (14.1%) and Western North Carolina (18%). But when it comes to commercial real estate loans that are past due for 90 days, 26% of such loans are in the Tampa area and 11% are in central Florida. By comparison, 5% of those loans are concentrated in the coastal zone of South Carolina, and 6% are in the rest of the state. Florida is seemingly the black hole of South Financial’s troubles, a major contributor to its five consecutive quarters of losses, totaling more than a half billion dollars. The South Financial Group reported a loss for 2008 of $568.6 million, or $7.77 per diluted share, compared with net income of $73.3 million, or 99 cents per diluted share, for 2007. The company attributed the loss primarily to a $426 million goodwill impairment charge resulting from a decrease in the Mercantile banking segment’s value and a $344.6 million provision for credit losses resulting from continued credit deterioration — particularly in the Florida market. The bank holding company’s woes have been reflected in the peaks and valleys of its stock price: It traded as low as 69 cents on March 5 after reaching a 52-week high of $13.50. The stock traded at more than $30 a


EXCLUSIVE SCBIZ SC BIZ share in 2004. On May 5, Harton appeared at the annual shareholders’ meeting in Greenville, his first as CEO. He didn’t sugarcoat the task ahead to put the company back on a solid footing. During his presentation, he pointed out that The South Financial Group’s stock declined in value in 2008 by 72%, compared with a 45% drop for the top 20 U.S. banks and 39% for the company’s peer banks in the Southeast. He also noted that The South Financial Group accepted $347 million from the U.S. government’s Troubled Asset Relief Program in November. To survive and thrive, he said, The South Financial Group must “solidify strong brand and community support in S.C. and then recreate in Florida and N.C.”

Culture shock Harton said the current economic recession that has pummeled banks particularly hard will have some winners and losers. He predicted that 500 banks will fail across America during this economic downturn. And he cautioned shareholders and employees that the bank’s culture must be changed if it is to survive and remain independent. But he also said it is his aim to make the company a “consolidator,” not a bank that is forced into a shotgun marriage with a larger, healthier bank. Harton has some experience whipping troubled banks back into profitable enterprises. He led the 2004 merger and integration of Union Planters Bank of Memphis, Tenn., with Regions Financial Corp., a large, multistate bank based in Birmingham, Ala. Today, Harton has a laser focus on building a common banking culture across the company that understands credit risk and that has deep support from within to recognize and deal with potentially troublesome loans. Harton was frank with shareholders on May 5, saying growth had been given such a high priority that it blinded local managers to the fundamentals for ensuring that the bank amassed good assets as it grew. When he took over, Harton began to prune the corporate tree of managers responsible for the Florida bank’s troubled portfolio. As he had at Union Planters, which experienced about 50% turnover under his management, Harton set about replacing local and regional leaders within his new bank. “Some people could come along; others could not,” he said. When he got the call to join The South Financial Group as senior executive vice presiw w w. s c b i z m a g . c o m | S u m m e r 2 0 0 9

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reputation of the company is less than stellar.” One important area of change he noted is his new leadership team. The organizational chart he offered showed that, of 11 people on the current senior executive management team, eight have joined the company since 2005. And seven of them assumed their current leadership roles in the past 12 months. Both of the bank’s subsidiaries have new presidents: Scott Frierson at Carolina First and Ernie Diaz at Mercantile. In addition, Harton has reorganized the company to eliminate what he calls business “silos” to fully integrate all the bank’s operations and create broad and deep support for the company’s frontline bankers. Harton insists that the company is working from a position of strength, despite its recent losses. Its tangible equity as a percentage of tangible assets was 10.03% as of March 31, the third-highest among its Southeast peer banks. The South Financial Group also has reined in spending. The total number of employees has been reduced by 3%; no executive management bonuses were paid for 2008; no employee merit increases will be authorized in 2009; the 401(k) match has been cut by 50%; and new travel and other expense policies have been implemented. The corporate jet is parked and is for sale. Harton has set in motion a thorough review of the bank’s strategy and practices, to ensure it has the best possible business model as it works its way out of the financial swamp. One such review he cites is the effectiveness and profitability of its branch offices. He found that the best-performing branch offices were in major business hubs and suburban submarket hubs. The worst-performing branches were in predominantly residential areas. Yet South Financial has continued to expand into those residential suburbs. “We’ve been chasing rooftops,” he said, when research has shown that is not the right strategy. Another goal Harton has set for the company is to fully utilize the digital revolution. There’s still too much paper in the loan approval process, he said. He aims to establish a product development group and a sales management group. “Commercial lending is our biggest line of business, but we didn’t have a commercial A man with a plan business support group,” Harton said. The first slide in Harton’s presentation to Harton emphasizes education and training shareholders attacked the problem head-on: within the company to ensure his employees “Change is needed … Financial performance have all that is required to succeed. dent in February 2007, he said he already had a good sense of the company, having competed with Carolina First and Mercantile banks while at Regions Financial. “I knew the company,” he said. “What I didn’t know was what I’d be allowed to do.” He started at the bank working for Whittle, who had long held the three top positions of chairman of the board, president and CEO. It was a corporate governing structure not uncommon in the heady days before the recession. But The South Financial Group, like so many other companies staggered by the collapse of the housing market and its associated lending practices, began unwinding that powerful position at the top of corporation. The board’s makeup changed. Previously, the lineup featured overlapping directorships with the chairman. For example, Whittle was on the University of South Carolina board, and former USC President Andrew Sorensen sat on Whittle’s bank board. With Whittle’s departure from the executive post in October and from the board this spring, new rules were adopted to separate the board chairman’s post from the chief executive role. John C.B. Smith Jr., an attorney with Nelson Mullins Riley and Scarborough in Columbia, became the non-executive chairman. Harton sits on the board, but under the new rules he cannot be chairman. When Harton introduced himself to more than 100 shareholders at the annual meeting, he was greeted warmly. The only shareholder to speak at the meeting, Jimmy Grantham, opened his remarks by saying, “Thank God you are here.” But Grantham, who owned stock in a bank that was purchased by The South Financial Group, is a frequent critic of the board. He assailed the board for a lack of vision and failure to have a strategic plan. He says the company grew too fast by acquiring other banks without adequately supervising them. “I’m not sure one man can fix this,” he said. Smith, The South Financial Group’s board chairman, responded that the board has worked long and hard since the crisis began and even decided the day of the annual meeting to reduce its own compensation to half of 2008 levels because of the crisis.


Hollings Cancer Center attains National Cancer Institute designation Prestigious honor offers new hope for South Carolinians with cancer.

Ernie Diaz (from left), president of Mercantile Bank; Lynn Harton, president and CEO of South Financial; and Scott Frierson, president of Carolina First Bank.

“This is a business we are going to own,” Harton said. “We can’t spend money on everything, so this is what we’re going to spend money on. “Our people are excited about the clarity of the plan,” Harton said. He has been traveling around his company’s markets in the Carolinas and Florida, holding employee meetings and briefing his workers on his goals and strategy.

Be careful what you wish for For Harton, becoming leader of a major regional bank realizes a long-held dream, but he’s come by a path he might not have foreseen. He said he did not know he might quickly become president of The South Financial Group when he came to Greenville in 2007. “That was a hope of mine,” he said, “but it happened much more quickly than I anticipated. I never asked for it. You have to earn that.” He exudes confidence that he can lead the bank out of the wilderness. “Oh, I can fix it,” he said in an interview, smiling broadly. But he is ever mindful of the challenges. “The only question is the environment we all are in,” he said. “It’s like a golf tournament: We have a team that can win; we just don’t know if the game is going to be called before it’s finished.” SC

National Cancer Institute (NCI) designation means cancer patients in South Carolina will have expanded in-state access to novel clinical trials and the most promising new therapies being developed by the physicians and scientists at the Medical University of South Carolina’s Hollings Cancer Center. The elite status will also help attract to MUSC the best and brightest researchers and cancer specialists from around the world. The state’s economy is another big winner, as NCI-designated cancer centers receive substantial research grants. At MUSC Hollings Cancer Center, we are committed to making hope a reality for all our patients. With NCI designation now a reality, there is more reason for hope than ever before. For more information, visit HollingsNCI.info This public announcement was made possible through private donations.

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PORTS, LOGISTICS & DISTRIBUTION

A MARITIME INDUSTRY IN TRANSITION By Molly Parker, Staff Writer his summer, Tim Twomey will begin his 50th year working on the Charleston waterfront. In the past half century, he’s watched the evolution of containerization change the face of the maritime industry. He’s witnessed the explosive growth of shipping companies and the changing role of steamship agencies — such as his employer, Carolina Shipping Co., where he works in the operations department. He’s adapted to the advent of technology and lived through the dispersal of the Lowcountry’s maritime cluster — once centrally located downtown near the U.S. Custom House, now spread out across the greater Charleston region. Begrudgingly, he has given in to post-Sept. 11 port security measures. Twomey, 74, has taken these changes in stride. But what bothers him the most is the public’s seemingly lukewarm attitude toward the state’s maritime activities. “When I first came here and got in the business, everybody was involved in it and people were interested in the waterfront,” Twomey said. “I think we are at fault somewhat for not educating people more about the

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Waterfront veterans Joe Buckheister (left) and Tim Twomey have a combined 85 years of experience. (Photo/Leslie Halpern)

waterfront and its contribution. I think we have been negligent.”

Multibillion-dollar impact That contribution is the creation of thousands of jobs across South Carolina and the luring of deep-pocketed developers such as

Jafza International and big-name manufacturers such as BMW and General Electric. According to a recent report sanctioned by the S.C. State Ports Authority, trade through the ports on South Carolina’s coast generates 260,800 jobs, $11.8 billion in annual income and $1.5 billion in government taxes, and it makes a $44.8 billion impact on the state economy. “As the port goes, so goes our economy here,” former SPA President and CEO Bernard Groseclose said late last year at a gala celebrating the 75th anniversary of the Propeller Club. Shortly after that speech, Groseclose offered his resignation to the SPA’s board. His sentiments proved true, only in reverse — as the economy went, so went our port. In December, Maersk Line announced it would be pulling out of Charleston when its contract expired at the end of 2010. That announcement shook the maritime industry and economic developers across the state — Maersk is the world’s largest shipping line and the Port of Charleston’s largest customer, accounting for about 20% of its business. Negotiations are ongoing to keep the Danish company in town. That announcement also led to a politi-


PORTS, LOGISTICS & DISTRIBUTION

cal awakening — for better or worse — and pushed the port toward a new way of thinking. Today, the ports authority, and by extension the state’s maritime industry, is an entity in transition. It’s also an entity that just can’t seem to catch a break. “The way I see it, it looks like the port takes one step forward and two steps back,” said Joe Buckheister, a vice president with McAllister Towing & Transportation Co. Inc. Buckheister has spent 36 years working the waterfront, and two of his three children took up maritime careers as well: his daughter with Maersk and his son with the State Ports Authority.

A sea of changes At the ports authority, the search for a new chief executive is under way. Meanwhile, state lawmakers penned legislation this session that could have far-reaching governance and financial implications — dictating changes to the board’s makeup and requiring the sale of thousands of acres of valuable Daniel Island land, among other things. The agency is in the midst of crafting a new strategic plan. The SPA created a (Photo/Leslie Halpern) new position, chief commercial officer, and hired Paul McClintock of Atlanta to fill it. His mission is to streamline the port’s marketing efforts. Crews are busily constructing a $550 million terminal on the former Navy base in North Charleston. And a fight is brewing about how, or whether, to provide near-dock dual rail access to that terminal. The economy, meanwhile, continues to hammer container traffic. Between July 2008 and March 2009, the port handled 1.1 million 20-foot equivalent units, a drop of 13.6% compared with the year-ago period. There is not a port in the nation unaffected by the economy’s global downturn. But Charleston is losing market share at the same time. Of the nation’s top 10 ports, the only ones to register steeper volume drops were the

Port of Seattle, at 21.2%, and the Port of Long Beach, in California, at 18.3%. The Port of Savannah’s year-over-year drop during that period was 9.8%, from about 2 million TEUs to 1.8 million TEUs.

Revving the economic engine But the ports authority is making positive gains, too. When Groseclose resigned, the SPA board’s vice chairman, John Hassell, stepped in to temporarily fill the role. Hassell, on leave from his job as president of the Maritime Association of South Carolina, said he has no interest in taking over permanently, but he has not sat idly by, either. Getting the agency’s house in order during this economic downturn is too important to simply keep the next chief executive’s seat warm, he said. Hassell has put all of the port’s employees through a customer training program. As the agency’s leader, he’s worked to fulfill the board’s mission of facilitating economic development in the state. It’s a balancing act between ensuring the ports authority keeps a strong balance sheet and still revving its economic development engine, he said. Groseclose was criticized for putting too much weight on the creation of wealth for the authority. “We became a margin-driven organization,” Hassell said. That was fine when the economy was booming — and Hassell said it was necessary to create capital for the major projects under way, including the new terminal construction. But when the economy began to slide, the authority should have taken a closer look at its customer arrangements, Hassell said. “We should have probably reacted faster to that than we did,” he said. “Looking forward, we are laser-focused on our economic development mission.” It might be years before the results become evident — but Hassell is confident the agency

The rankings Top 10 export commodities Rank Commodity % of Total 1 ....... Paper and paperboard, incl. waste ..14% 2 ....... Wood pulp .........................................7% 3 ....... Fabrics, including raw cotton.............4% 4 ....... General cargo, miscellaneous............4% 5 ....... Auto parts ..........................................4% 6 ....... Automobiles ......................................3% 7 ....... Synthetic resins, NSPF.......................3% 8 ....... Logs and lumber ...............................3% 9 ....... Unclassifiable chemicals ...................3% 10 ..... Poultry, chiefly fresh and frozen.........2%

Top 10 import commodities Rank Commodity % of Total 1 ....... Furniture ............................................8% 2 ....... Auto parts ..........................................7% 3 ....... Sheets, towels, blankets ....................4% 4 ....... General cargo, miscellaneous............3% 5 ....... Fabrics, including raw cotton.............3% 6 ....... Auto and truck tires and tubes ..........3% 7 ....... Menswear .........................................3% 8 ....... Apparels, miscellaneous....................2% 9 ....... Women’s and infantwear ...................2% 10 ..... Paper and paperboard, incl. waste ....2%

Top 10 export destinations Rank Destination % of Total 1 ....... Germany..........................................10% 2 ....... Belgium/Luxembourg ........................8% 3 ....... Netherlands .......................................7% 4 ....... United Kingdom .................................6% 5 ....... China .................................................6% 6 ....... Brazil .................................................5% 7 ....... India ..................................................4% 8 ....... Japan ................................................4% 9 ....... Italy....................................................3% 10 ..... France ...............................................3%

Top 10 import destinations Rank Destination % of Total 1 ....... China ...............................................21% 2 ....... Germany..........................................14% 3 ....... India ..................................................8% 4 ....... Netherlands .......................................6% 5 ....... Pakistan.............................................4% 6 ....... Brazil .................................................4% 7 ....... Belgium/Luxembourg ........................3% 8 ....... Japan ................................................3% 9 ....... Italy....................................................3% 10 ..... United Kingdom .................................3% Ranked by 2008 loaded TEU Source: S.C. State Ports Authority

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PORTS, LOGISTICS & DISTRIBUTION

Are you a member?

Economic impact Among the key findings of an SPAsanctioned study, maritime activity in the state contributes the following:

Your voice in the stafÀng industry for: • • • • •

Education CertiÀcation Legislation Ethics Networking

www.scaps.org Visit our website to Ànd out information on how to become a member.

• More than $44.8 billion in total economic output each year across the state. • 260,800 jobs, representing 10.9% of all jobs in South Carolina. • $11.8 billion in labor income, which is 13.6% of the state’s total income. • $1.5 billion in state and local taxes. • $18.5 billion in value-added impact, representing 12.1% of the total gross state product.

is making headway. “I wish we could see immediate results, but that’s not the way it is in this industry, particularly in these times,” he said.

Teamwork pays off “Chapters are the backbone of our association and provide the muscle we need to combat adverse legislation.” – William H. Stoller, CPC, CSP – ASA Chairman

The SPA has received some immediate gratification, though. Another of Hassell’s goals is for the authority to think outside its own boundaries and to form partnerships with private companies for a team marketing approach. Through this effort, the ports authority and a host of private companies were able to persuade The National Shipping Co. of Saudi Arabia to add Charleston to its East Coast rotation. Hassell said the company’s decision was driven largely by the port’s proximity to companies that produce energy-related products, such as General Electric’s gas turbine manufacturing plant in Greenville. The team that lured the new carrier here included SSA Cooper, a stevedoring agency that handles union labor; Superior Transportation, a North Charleston-based trucking company; Dockside Logistics, an export handling company that counts General Electric among its customers; and J.E. Oswalt, which transports the heavy turbines off railcars. Superior Transportation President and CEO Pat Barber called it an example of the type of collaborative marketing effort that needs to become the norm. “I think it gives the customer a certain degree of confidence when they see all the members of the supply chain in the same room reading from the same sheet of music,” Barber said. “We’ve already proven it works.” SC

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PORTS, LOGISTICS & DISTRIBUTION

By Molly Parker, Staff Writer very day, large blue cranes at the Port of Charleston move hundreds of cargofilled containers onto waiting 18-wheelers, which hit the highways with everything from home furnishings to high-end manufacturing equipment. Trucks reign in South Carolina. But state officials now say it’s time for trains to play a larger role in the economic supply chain, to give business and industry lower-cost freight options, reduce the glut of traffic along the state’s highways and mitigate diesel emissions. “The increased cost of fuel and freight has made rail king,” Commerce Secretary Joe Taylor said. In late March, the Commerce Department released a study that thrust the state’s rail system into the spotlight. Some 2,260 miles of rail lines crisscross the state, connecting businesses to one another and to the Port of Charleston. About 20% of the goods coming into the Port of Charleston leave on a train, but that is less than at competing ports. The Georgia Ports Authority moves about 35% of its cargo via rail, and the Virginia Ports Authority moves about 30%, according to a senior railroad executive. Yet the debate is far more complicated than whether one of the nation’s oldest modes of transportation should play a bigger role in South Carolina’s future. Implementing the contents of the thick study — conducted by Wilbur Smith Associates of Columbia — would mean running

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intermodal trains that can be a mile long through neighborhoods in North Charleston that are the focus of a renaissance of revitalization efforts. In a recent public speech, Keith Summey, the shoot-from-the hip mayor of the state’s third-largest city, recently compared the state of South Carolina to Nazi Germany because of its attempts to run roughshod over his redevelopment efforts. He also promised a legal fight against the “worthless legislators” attempting to dictate rail access in his city.

A port issue Those pushing for a compromise argue that the port’s long-term competitiveness is at stake — and South Carolina’s economy with it. Without equal access for Norfolk Southern and CSX, the railroads serving the port will have no incentive to offer competitive rates, the theory goes; and without competitive rail rates, shippers might choose to call on other ports. “The issue is really a port issue,” said Rob Martinez, Norfolk Southern’s vice president of business development. “Is Charleston going to be competitive in the long term or will it become a port of second order on the Atlantic?” The study says that “one of the largest, if not the largest” rail issue in South Carolina concerns Class 1 service to the Port of Charleston. It reads: “Rail service at the port received poor ratings in availability, capacity, quality and service levels (the only ‘needs improve-

ment’ overall) from shippers’ perspectives.” The port’s largest container terminal, the Wando Welch facility in Mount Pleasant, is 11 miles from the nearest rail line. Two of the port’s container terminals are served by rail, and some 5,000 empty containers have been handled at the Columbus Street Terminal in the past couple of years. But no loaded containers have been handled at Columbus Street or the existing North Charleston facility, the study says. Instead, containers are trucked to rail yards several miles away. Most of the goods moving to or from the Port of Charleston via rail are break bulk cargo such as generators, or BMW vehicles manufactured in the Upstate and shipped out of Union Pier Terminal. The source of contention is a section of the study that calls for the placement of a neardock intermodal facility on the former Navy base. The SPA is building a container terminal on the southern end of the property, and the developer Noisette Co. has planned a sustainable business and residential development atop 340 acres on the property’s north end. Placing an intermodal facility on the base would require the use of an existing rail line that runs through the base’s northern end — and through the heart of the Noisette Co.’s property. CSX has near-dock access to the terminal property from the southern end, but the state’s No. 1 carrier has no plans to share that line with chief rival Norfolk Southern — nor can it be forced to. Carriers do sometimes share

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PORTS, LOGISTICS & DISTRIBUTION

Commerce Secretary Joe Taylor has said the increased cost of fuel and freight has made rail king. (Photo/Molly Parker)

lines, but only when it is mutually beneficial. The only viable option, the study says, is to build an intermodal facility on the former Navy base that could service Norfolk Southern and CSX — or only Norfolk Southern, should CSX wish to carry out its plans for an intermodal facility to the south of the terminal. John Koch, CSX’s director of international sales and marketing, says the company has done its part, working “diligently over the past several years with the Ports Authority and other entities to “meet rail needs of the port in the future.

Seven-year-old promises Summey isn’t just angry; he’s also the keeper of a memorandum of understanding that the city of North Charleston and the SPA penned in 2002, in which the state agency promised that any rail access serving the terminal would remain exclusively to the south end. When the SPA signed that agreement, it had not put together a plan for the exact terminal location or made any decisions on rail service. By that point, the SPA had become the ball in a legislative pingpong game — directed back and forth between Daniel Island and

North Charleston several times. In May 2002, the General Assembly passed a law dictating that the new terminal go to the “west bank of the Cooper River” — which effectively meant the defunct North Charleston Navy base. Later that same month, state leaders brokered a compromise with the city, giving North Charleston the entire northern section of the base free of charge. The city then sold that land to Noisette for $9.6 million. Meanwhile, the SPA sought from the Army Corps of Engineers a permit for the new terminal, which called for moving all cargo by truck, either for the long haul or on short trips to Norfolk Southern and CSX’s intermodal facilities in North Charleston, located off Meeting Street and Goer Drive, respectively. The corps issued approval of the project in April 2007 after an arduous, five-year process — and the permit did not include on-dock rail service. At the time, the SPA said that plan suited its shipping customers just fine. It suited the State Ports Authority, too. The agency had spent years and millions of dollars planning a massive container terminal on Daniel Island meant to secure Charleston’s place in the global shipping world — only to have those plans shattered in a political up-

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SC BIZ | w w w. s c b i z m a g . c o m


heaval, attributable in part to Daniel Island residents’ concerns about trains running through their upscale community. And it seemed to suit the state’s political leaders, as well. Little noise was made at the time about the fact that on-dock or near-dock rail access was not a part of the blueprint. But the game changed recently — the ante upped by Commerce’s rail study. Jeff McWhorter, president of S.C. Public Railways, the Commerce arm that funded the study, said it was conducted last year “because it was simply time for it.” The state’s rail plan had not been updated since 1999, largely because no state or federal funding had been available for railroad improvements, he said. The concern was that South Carolina would miss out on federal funding for rail improvements without a current plan as the nation — facing overcrowded roads and emissions concerns — looked to Congress to fund rail upgrades that could create a viable alternative to trucks and cars in the movement of goods and people. “The whole point of ensuring dual access to both Class 1 carriers that serve the Charleston area is to ensure, to the extent possible, the sustainable economic viability of our state,” McWhorter said. SPA executives have remained publicly quiet on the debate, fearful their involvement could hinder the agency’s hard-fought terminal project and delay its 2014 scheduled opening. Boasting of its deep waters capable of handling larger ships, economic developers and port officials say forging ahead with construction signals to the world that South Carolina has outstretched arms ready to grab the excess capacity expected to flow to the East Coast via the expanded Panama Canal — set to debut in five years. The new terminal will increase the Port of Charleston’s capacity by about 1.4 million 20-foot-long containers, to a total of about 4 million TEUs, according to permit documents. In April, the agency awarded its first construction contract for the terminal. Work on the $60 million containment wall is expected to begin this summer, following several years of site preparation and excavation work. “Our message to the marketplace has to be that we are building a new terminal and that it’s going to be online by 2014,” said John Hassell, interim executive director of the SPA. Rep. Jim Merrill, R-Daniel Island, said he

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SC BIZ | w w w. s c b i z m a g . c o m

finds the SPA’s decision to stay out of the debate “baffling.” “Truly, I don’t know what words to use,” Merrill said. “I’m incredulous, shocked, baffled, bewildered that they would plan and ask the community to support expansion and say they are committed to reducing their environmental impact and load on our infrastructure and not work to improve a vital component of it.” Merrill was among the lawmakers who directed the SPA off of Daniel Island. Today, he joins other state and local officials in rallying for dual rail access, and he led the charge in the state House to transfer the controversial rail line in question to S.C. Public Railways. At the close of session, lawmakers abandoned that plan, instead punting the issue to the courts. Noisette argues it already owns the deeds to the line and the property underneath it — and is already involved in a lawsuit with the Charleston Naval Complex Redevelopment Authority attempting to prove the point.

A hard-fought dream When the Navy base closed in 1996, it rocked North Charleston. Since then, the city has worked aggressively to revitalize its oldest neighborhoods. The fruits of those efforts include the creation of a quaint downtown strip of eateries and the demolition of the state’s largest public housing project, which was a hotbed of crime. A pastel-colored development for lowincome families went up in its place, and area home values have been climbing ever since. Noisette helped create the vision for a 3,000-acre footprint that includes many of the city’s most underserved communities, in addition to the 340 acres owned by Noisette on the former Navy base. That company is headed by John Knott, known locally for developing the private Dewees Island, an upscale community accessible only by boat. Noisette leases and manages a little more than 800,000 square feet of office and warehouse space on the northern end of the Navy base and has sold 11 acres — numbers the company says warrant bragging rights considering it was deeded the final parcels of the property just a few years ago. It received its first and largest chunk, about 170 acres, in July 2003. Knott said a tentative agreement is in place with a developer to start the first of several planned urban housing developments, but he said talk of running intermodal trains through his property has put those discus-


PORTS, LOGISTICS & DISTRIBUTION

sions on shaky ground. Knott also has threatened to sue the state, and he claims that “the massive condemnation” necessary to carry out that plan would easily exceed $300 million. “This would destroy the entire Noisette area and the redevelopment the city of North Charleston has put so much effort into,” he said. Still, leading Senate Republicans say the state’s economic health outweighs the wishes of a developer with an aggressive dream. South Carolina’s unemployment rate is the second-highest in the nation, behind Michigan. Even before the recession, the Port of Charleston was losing market share to its competitors, falling behind Georgia and Virginia. “I understand that Noisette’s development would be harmed if you have a rail line running through the middle of it,” said Sen. Larry Grooms, chairman of the Senate Transportation Committee. “But I told them, I cannot put your economic self-interest ahead of the economic interest of the entire state.” Recently, Grooms, R-Charleston, along with Senate colleagues Glenn McConnell, R-Charleston, and Hugh Leatherman, RFlorence, directed Norfolk Southern to reconsider the possibility of building an intermodal

facility in Charleston on a parcel of land near the foot of the Arthur Ravenel Jr. Bridge called the Promenade. Both Norfolk and S.C. Public Railways argue the plan is unworkable. Grooms, who is exploring a run for governor, said his ultimate goal is to find a compromise. But he said he will fight, if necessary, as did Summey — pitting state lawmakers against a mayor who once rode an armored personnel carrier into town to make a point. It was Summey’s protest of plans to place a frozen chicken storage locker on the former Navy base that eventually led to the compromise parceling off half the base to the Ports Authority and half to the city. The end result of that was that memorandum of understanding between the SPA and North Charleston. State lawmakers directed the city and port to the negotiation table, so it’s unfair for them to be attempting to change the rules today, Summey said. “The state of South Carolina has become not unlike Nazi Germany in that they think they can dictate to us as a community how we live,” Summey said during a City Council meeting. “That’s wrong, and I don’t care which ones of those worthless legislators vote for it. They do not represent our community fairly, and we will fight it to the nth degree.” SC

BIZ

About 20% of the goods coming into the Port of Charleston leave on a train. By comparison, the Georgia Ports Authority moves about 35% of its cargo via rail, and the Virginia Ports Authority moves about 30%. (Photo/Paula Illingworth)

MOVING THE ECONOMY Within your industry, what are your company’s unique areas of expertise? We haul and transport heavy and awkward cargo, as well as precast and prestress concrete products, including bridge girders, pipes and wall panels.

Superior Transportation Inc. Patrick Barber, President 1940 Hanahan Road, North Charleston, SC 29406 843-740-1840 www.superiortransportation.us Product or service: Trucking Year founded locally: 1998

What major factors and issues do you believe will affect the local economy in 2009? A change in leadership at the South Carolina State Ports Authority and stimulus money.

How has the current economy changed the way you do business?

What major factors and issues do you believe will affect the ports, logistics and distribution industry in 2009?

We have trimmed spending and we’ve taken steps to make our fleet more fuel efficient, including reducing speed and engine idling.

Dual rail access to the new port terminal, or an agreement allowing Norfolk Southern to operate on CSX tracks.

What do you think is the most important “key to success” that a startup business should consider?

What’s the most important lesson you’ve learned that you would pass on to a younger person entering the work force?

Start with plenty of cash and hold onto it.

Always wake competition!

up

earlier

than

your

What does your firm provide that differentiates you from your competition? We offer hands-on management, experience and an excellent safety record.

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION

TRANSPORTATION

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MOVING THE ECONOMY Within your industry, what are your company’s unique areas of expertise? Parker Rigging Co., Inc. specializes in crane rental and rigging. With cranes up to 175-ton capacity, PRC can provide their customers with affordable and efficient lifting services. PRC also specializes in securing large cargo to railcars for rail transport. What do you think is the most important “key to success” that has made your business thrive?

Parker Rigging Co. Inc. Timothy L. Parker, President 5541 Woodbine Ave., North Charleston, SC 29406-6143 843-747-7977 • Fax: 843-747-5560 www.parkerrigging.com Services: Crane Rental, Rigging, Steel Fabrication and Erection, Railcar Tie-downs and Burn-offs Year founded locally: 1982

Even though it may sound cliché, Parker Rigging Co., Inc. prides itself on customer service. Our customers know that they will always receive the personalized treatment they have come to expect. PRC is a small, hands-on, company with the owners and management available for our customers. What do you see as the key issue – in your industry – that must be addressed? Proper training of crane operators and riggers is the most important issue in the

crane business today. Crane accidents cause many injuries and deaths in the United States each year. Many of these accidents are caused by crane operators that are not properly trained. Parker Rigging Co., Inc. strives to keep its staff of crane operators and riggers trained to all current OSHA and ANSI standards. What major factors and issues do you believe will affect the local economy in 2009? The biggest factor to affect the local economy is consumer attitude. If consumers are afraid to spend money, the economy will become stagnant. The next factor to affect the local economy is corporate attitude. Corporations must realize that they can stimulate the economy by spending money on capital expenditures, product development, and hiring new employees. As the prevailing attitudes toward the economy brighten, the economy should grow.

PARKER RIGGING

MOVING THE ECONOMY Within your industry, what are your company’s unique areas of expertise?

testing and send the finished assembled parts to the end user.

We specialize in product packing, order processing and inspection services. We even have a team that does assembly and quality control for the automotive industry.

What’s the most important lesson you’ve learned that you would pass on to a young person entering the work force?

What do you think is the most important “key to success” that a start-up business should consider?

C&C Warehouse & Distribution Co. Inc. Top local executive: Jimmy Connelly, President 1009 Trident St., Hanahan, SC 29410 843-818-2332 www.candcwarehouse.com Product or service: Service-oriented warehouse and distribution Year founded locally: 1972

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Learn the industry. Know your competition and focus on customer service. We, as warehousing professionals, are a serviceoriented business. If we cannot provide the customer with the service they require, someone else will. What does your firm provide that differentiates you from your competition?

Your business colleagues can be your best customers. Developing a relationship with your peers can be very helpful and educational. What major factors and issues do you believe will affect the ports, logistics and distribution in the industry in 2009? The S.C. State Ports Authority, politicians and city officials must come together and focus on one goal. That goal is to allow the SCSPA to build and grow, as it is the biggest economic developer in the state.

We perform automotive parts inspection and product assembly. For example, we import two different parts from two different customers, assemble them, perform quality

SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION


MOVING THE ECONOMY How has the current economy changed the way you do business? Some commodities that used to flow through our facilities fairly quickly are now stored for longer periods because their sales have slowed dramatically during this economic downturn. Tires and paper are two examples. That’s meant growth for our overflow facilities. More goods are being stored for longer than 30 days. What key to success has made Sunland thrive?

Sunland Distribution Arch Thomason, President and CEO 255 Black Hawk Road, Greenville, SC 29611 www.SunlandDistribution.com Product or service: Third party logistics Year founded locally: 1982

Within your industry, what are your company’s unique areas of expertise? Sunland Distribution has seen a lot of changes in the logistics industry since our founding in 1982. The globalization of trade has led to a huge expansion in the type of goods being shipped and stored, and to business relationships that stretch across the globe. As one of the largest third-party logistics companies in the Southeast, we provide warehouse services, transportation management services, contract labor, packaging and full supply chain consulting services. Sunland specializes in HAZMAT chemical storage, food storage in state-of-the-art facilities that meet USDA and FDA requirements, automotive Tier 1 support and retail goods warehousing.

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Our people are our greatest strength. We have a dedicated work force. Many employees have been with Sunland for years. Our executive management team has more than 100 years of combined experience in the logistics business. That’s how Sunland has grown and succeeded during the last 27 years. What does Sunland provide that differentiates you from the competition? Sunland is a South Carolina company and that local ownership fosters a great sense of pride and responsibility. We’re always looking to improve how we do business. We strive to be innovative and responsive in customtailoring logistics solutions to meet the unique needs of each customer. We take industry best practices to the next level. That’s the Sunland advantage. What major issues do you think will affect ports, logistics and distribution in 2009?

avoidance issues on the horizon. Both of these issues will impact our industry in 2009. What major factors and issues do you believe will affect the local economy in 2009? The value of the U.S. dollar — import versus export — will have a significant impact on our local economy. A depreciated U.S. dollar means higher prices for imported goods. It will affect our ability to compete on a global scale. What’s the most important lesson you’ve learned that you would pass on to a young person entering the work force? I’d tell any young person entering today’s job market to work hard and work continually to learn your business. Real problem solvers are the most successful people in our business, or in any business. And don’t be afraid to challenge the status quo. Stars create their own environment. What philanthropic organizations does your company support and why? We recently adopted a U.S. Marine company stationed in Afghanistan. We sent our first shipment of care packages to them in March. Sunland employs many veterans of the U.S. military and we wanted to show our support for our troops. Sometimes we forget we are at war.

Energy costs will most likely increase once the economy gets back on track. I think there are also some union

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MOVING THE ECONOMY to be more productive in other areas when needed. We took some drivers and trained them in diesel mechanics to assist with roadside breakdowns. Keeping repair costs down is vital to your budget when trucking long distances. We have a good team at Liquid Box, all the way from the office staff who keeps the drivers on time, to the warehouse team that keeps inventory upto-date, to the mechanics who build truck engines with quality priced parts to keep the trucks running great!

Liquid Box Inc.

What do you think is the most important “key to success” that a start-up business should consider?

Scott Adams, President and CEO Michele Adams, Vice President and Boss Lady. 5175 Virginia Ave., Charleston, S.C. 843-708-0246 www.liquidbox.us Total number of local employees: 25

POSITIVE PEOPLE! If you have a good business plan, you’re headed in the right direction. The wrong people can kill everything. Keep positive people around you and talk to God every day; between both of them, you’re already headed towards success!

Product or service: Trucking and flexitank service Year founded locally: 2002

What advice would you give fellow business leaders to help them thrive during current economic conditions?

Within your industry, what are your company’s unique areas of expertise? Liquid Box has company-owned trucks and chassis that haul legal and overweight containers local and long distance. Having 20-foot and 40-foot tri-axles, we can meet the needs of our most demanding customers. Our fleet also includes 53-foot dry vans and flatbed services with cross docking available. Liquid Box is the only certified flexitank service on the East Coast. We take can take a 20-foot dry box container and convert it so it can hold non-hazardous liquids, providing an extremely cost-effective way to ship liquid overseas. We take liquid cargo that comes from as far as the Midwest and pump it into flexitanks so it can be shipped overseas. Who would have thought it would be profitable for businesses to take liquid from the Midwest and ship it out of Charleston, S.C.? We did and we are doing it as you read this article! How has the current economy changed the way you do business? The economy has been rough on everybody so, change has played a big part in our business. We have learned to cross-train

My advice is to buckle up; it’s going to be a bumpy ride! Cut cost in all areas and use the savings to keep a good employee. They will see that and return the favor by helping you find ways to save money in and out of the office. What does your firm provide that differentiates you from your competition? We care! That’s not a statement made just to fill a space! You call us and you will get a real person on the phone 24 hours a day, seven days a week. We didn’t spend years building a reputation just to let it get torn back down by bad business. There are too many other companies fighting for the same job and we don’t want to lose the chance to get it! What unique skill sets does your staff bring to the marketplace? I truly believe I have the best people for the job in place NOW! All my drivers have the value of hard work instilled in them. The mechanics are the kind of people that if they don’t know what might be wrong with the engine, they call somebody and get their ideas on the subject while watching the cost

of the repairs. I have the best dispatcher in Charleston, S.C.! How do I know? My wife reminds me every day when she shows up to work to dispatch for Liquid Box! We are like a big family around here, because when somebody is having a bad day, there are about 20 people trying to cheer them up. You don’t find that very much, especially in this day and age. What major factors and issues do you believe will affect the ports, logistics and distribution industry in 2009? The South Carolina ports, and all the groups that make up the working body, need to work as one to bring in customers instead of letting them go elsewhere. I have lost 30% of my business to the Port of Savannah, which has led to me open up a location in Georgia. It really wasn’t what I wanted to do, but my customers wanted me to stay with them. I still believe that we have a better port system, better trucking companies and an access-friendly road system in and out of the ports! What’s the most important lesson you’ve learned that you would pass on to a young person entering the work force? When life throws you a lemon ... throw it back! Work hard, keep your head up and don’t get distracted from your goals. Your name is the only thing you have to start out with so, don’t tarnish it. What philanthropic organizations does your company support and why? I’m a member of the Shriners and the Masonic Organization. Kids are also a big issue with us. We support about everything that deals with kids. Liquid Box is building a hot rod Zamboni the Charleston Stingrays Hockey Team will use to give children rides on the ice next season. We also support Special Olympics and we sponsor four Little League teams. We have a blast watching them play when we can.

TRUCKING AND FLEXI TANK SERVICES

TRUCKING AND FLEXI TANK SERVICES

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SPECIAL ADVERTISING SECTION


MOVING THE ECONOMY sales and new business to try and capture market share. In addition to our Charleston location, we have opened a Columbia office and warehouse terminal to reallocate resources and assets to a new market. The ability to change and adapt in this economic environment helps to minimize risk for our company; and we are certain in this climate, we do not want to be in a riskier position.

Anyware Express Adam Lawrence, President and CEO (left)* Alan Levesque, Vice President & COO (right) P.O. Box 40877, North Charleston, SC 29423 843-225-6430 Product or service: Freight/transportation/ warehouse services * Answers provided by Adam Lawrence

Within your industry, what is your company’s unique area of expertise?

What do you think is the most important “key to success” a startup business should consider? I think the key to success for a startup in this business is cash flow and the ability to attain capital through private funding or, of course, your local bank. Especially in these credit-crunch times, it is the most important factor to running, managing and growing a company.

The most unique area of our team’s expertise is our ability to get any task at hand completed successfully, no matter what the logistics challenge may be. Whether it is a simple freight move across town, across the state or across the country; or a complicated warehousing or port-related project, we can handle it. We can also handle anything and everything in between.

It’s simple: Run a tight ship, line your pockets and prepare for the unexpected. And, cross your fingers for a smooth economic recovery!

How has the current economy changed the way you do business?

What unique skill sets does your staff bring to the marketplace?

Over the past 6-8 months the economy has been a real challenge. We have had to adapt in many creative ways. One way was to cut costs by managing and evaluating each expense. With our ability to lower our expenses, it has given us the opportunity to be more creative with customers -- which is critical in this environment to remain competitive.

Our team understands we’re a reflection of the companies that entrust us with their goods. From the moment goods are picked up to the time they are delivered, we uphold each customer’s core values and company image. Along with that understanding, we bring flexibility and reliability to each and every customer we work with. Whether we’re on an expedited job to help a manufacturing assembly line resume operations,

We have also had a primary focus on

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What advice would you give fellow business leaders to help them thrive during current economic conditions?

or delivering time-sensitive piece of medical equipment to a local hospital, our customers can rest assured that their goods will be delivered anywhere, anytime and on-time. What major factors and issues do you believe will affect the local economy in 2009? The major factors I feel will affect the local economy are the trending global economic conditions, the banks’ ability to loan money, how well the stimulus package (that has been allocated and approved by Gov. Mark Sanford) will permeate our local economic system and the ultimate success of the Port of Charleston. All of these factors will play a major role in our local recovery throughout 2009. What do you see as the key issue – in your industry – that must be addressed? Every sector of each industry we work with has been affected one way or another. We can only hope that through the many avenues the government and private sector are taking to improve the system, those avenues will start to work. What’s the most important lesson you’ve learned that you would pass on to a young person entering the work force? When times are really good, don’t get too excited and when times are really bad, don’t get too discouraged. Just try and keep a steady, well-composed, optimistic attitude and things will work out for the best.

www.anywareexpress.com

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MARKETFACTS REAL ESTATE EMPLOYMENT EDUCATION GOVERNMENT

REAL ESTATE EMPLOYMENT EDUCATION GOVERNMENT

Construction Cost Comparison 2009

Number of Residential Homes, Condos & Villas Sold â&#x20AC;&#x201C; March 2009 Market Aiken

March 2008

March 2009 % Change

2008 Total 2009 Total

% Change

112

99

-11.6%

324

237

-26.9%

67

65

-3.0%

174

150

-13.8%

Charleston Trident

752

568

-24.5%

1,967

1,303

-33.8%

Cherokee County

34

24

-29.4%

79

45

-43.0%

Coastal Carolinas*

502

451

-10.2%

1,298

1,042

-19.7%

Greater Columbia

758

616

-18.7%

2,050

1,478

-27.9%

Greater Greenville

708

490

-30.8%

1,798

1,216

-32.4%

Beaufort

Greenwood

65

41

-36.9%

174

106

-39.1%

Hilton Head Island Area**

183

146

-20.2%

454

320

-29.5%

Piedmont Regional Association**

234

162

-30.8%

701

427

-39.1%

Realtor Association of Greater Pee Dee****

185

119

-35.7%

494

290

-41.3%

Southern Midlands Association

33

25

-24.2%

81

70

-13.6%

Spartanburg

249

200

-19.7%

674

505

-25.1%

Sumter/Clarendon County

123

86

-30.1%

298

233

-21.8%

Western Upstate MLS*****

261

183

-29.9%

674

450

-33.2%

4,266

3,275

-23.2%

11,240

7,872

-30.0%

State Totals

Wilmington, N.C. ........................................ 77.2 COLUMBIA ............................................. 79.6 Raleigh, N.C. ................................................80.0 Charlotte ......................................................80.0 Austin, Texas................................................80.8 CHARLESTON ......................................... 83.2 Savannah.....................................................83.3 Jacksonville, Fla...........................................83.8 Mobile, Ala. ..................................................84.5 Huntsville, Ala. .............................................86.1 Nashville, Tenn. ............................................88.0 Richmond, Va. ..............................................88.4 Birmingham, Ala...........................................88.5 Norfolk, Va. ..................................................88.7 New Orleans ................................................88.9 Phoenix........................................................89.0 Atlanta .........................................................90.2 Miami ..........................................................90.3 Tampa, Fla. ..................................................91.1 Pittsburgh ....................................................97.6 Washington, D.C. .........................................99.7 INDEX AVERAGE................................... 100.0 Wilmington, Del..........................................102.8 Providence, R.I. ..........................................103.2 Hartford, Conn............................................107.9 Bridgeport, Conn. .......................................108.0 New Haven Conn. ......................................108.2 Los Angeles ...............................................108.3 Newark, N.J. ..............................................109.5 Philadelphia ...............................................113.2 Chicago .....................................................114.9 Boston .......................................................115.4 New York ...................................................130.7 Source: Means Building Construction Cost Data 2009 Compiled by Center for Business Research, Charleston Metro Chamber of Commerce, Oct. 7, 2008

*Myrtle Beach, North Myrtle Beach, Conway and Georgetown **Beaufort, Jasper, Allendale, Barnwell, Colleton, Hampton, Orangeburg and Bamberg counties ***Rock Hill, York, Lancaster and Chester ****Florence and Pee Dee area *****Anderson, Tri-County, Pickens County Note: Approximate figures are accurate as of March 15, 2009. Source: S.C. Association of Realtors

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REAL ESTATE EMPLOYMENT EDUCATION GOVERNMENT


MARKET FACTS S.C. Foreclosure Trends April YTD New foreclosure filings .......................... 2,309 ............9,611 Foreclosure sales ...................................... 492 ............2,029 Average sale price ........................... $187,217 ......$196,579 Total savings............................................ 33% ............. 42%

In Good Faith

Source: RealtyTrac

Number of Residential Homes, Condos & Villas Sold Market

Year-to-date ’07 Year-to-date ’08

Aiken Beaufort Charleston Trident

% chg.

112

85

-24.10%

61

55

-9.80%

713

476

-33.20%

Cherokee County

20

20

0.00%

Coastal Carolinas*

426

378

11.30%

Greater Columbia

708

507

-28.40%

Greater Greenville

630

491

-22.10%

56

44

-21.40%

Greenwood Hilton Head Island Area**

179

168

-6.10%

Piedmont Regional Association***

197

173

-12.20%

Realtor Association of Greater Pee Dee****

148

109

-26.40%

30

40

33.30%

178

207

16.30%

Southern Midlands Association Spartanburg Sumter/Clarendon County

99

74

-25.30%

Western Upstate MLS*****

233

183

-21.50%

3,790

3,010

-20.60%

State Totals

PROJECT Westminster Presbyterian Church

Median Price of Residential Homes, Condos & Villas Sold Market

Year-to-date ’07 Year-to-date ’08

Aiken

% chg.

$153,000

$143,000

-6.50%

Beaufort

190,000

204,000

7.40%

Charleston Trident

210,000

192,000

-8.60%

Cherokee County

76,000

79,000

3.90%

Coastal Carolinas*

183,000

160,000

-12.60%

Greater Columbia

145,000

139,000

-4.10%

Greater Greenville

145,000

139,000

-4.10%

Greenwood

100,000

108,000

8.00%

Hilton Head Island Area**

375,000

274,000

-26.90%

Piedmont Regional Association***

150,000

148,000

-1.30%

Realtor Association of Greater Pee Dee****

95,000

99,000

4.20%

Southern Midlands Association

91,000

59,000

-35.20%

Spartanburg

115,000

113,000

-1.70%

Sumter/Clarendon County

125,000

115,000

-8.00%

Westen Upstate MLS*****

118,000

120,000

1.70%

151,400,000

139,500,000

-7.90%

State Totals

*Myrtle Beach, North Myrtle Beach, Conway and Georgetown **Beaufort, Jasper, Allendale, Barnwell, Colleton, Hampton, Orangeburg and Bamberg counties ***Rock Hill, York, Lancaster and Chester ****Florence and Pee Dee Area *****Anderson, Tri-County, Pickens County Note: Approximate figures are accurate as of Dec. 15, 2008. Source: S.C. Association of Realtors

GOVERNMENT EDUCATION EMPLOYMENT REAL ESTATE

BUILDER Yeargin Potter Shackelford Construction ARCHITECT Freeman & Major Architects LOCATION Greenville, SC RESULTS On Time. On Budget.

Trust

Commitment

Quality Value

121 Edinburgh Court Greenville, SC 29607 phone [864] 232.1491 fax [864] 242.9054 website ypsconst.com

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MARKET FACTS REAL ESTATE EMPLOYMENT EDUCATION GOVERNMENT

2008 Year-end Retail Market Office Report – Charleston

Peninsula Suburban Totals

Market Size

Occupied

483,510

455,274

Occupancy Vacant Rate

Small Shop Rent

Average Avg. PassRent throughs

28,236

94.16% $34.74 $28.15

$8.33

13,292,864 11,537,220 1,755,644

86.79% $18.49 $14.48

$2.74

Berkeley

1,111,206

905,594

205,612

81.50% $10.19

$8.53

$1.47

North Charleston

3,833,220

3,055,030

778,190

79.70% $15.45 $12.22

$2.48

East Cooper

3,293,721

3,131,483

162,238

95.07% $24.10 $20.91

$3.86

Summerville

1,988,275

1,771,608

216,667

89.10% $17.53 $14.06

$2.77

West Ashley

3,066,442

2,673,505

392,937

87.19% $15.40 $12.62

$2.23

2008 Year-end Retail Market Office Report – Columbia Market Size Market

Occupancy Annual Vacant Rate Absorption

12,362,970 1,180,222

Downtown

Small Average Shop PassRent throughs

Avg. Rent

90.94%

-207,507 $16.13

$19.52

$3.80

269,075

6,000

97.77%

5,000 $15.36

$16.65

$3.98

Cayce/West Columbia

1,035,779

129,935

87.46%

-43,613 $11.19

$14.84

$1.30

Forest Acres

775,469

1,400

99.82%

4,900 $20.67

$21.86

$4.10

Harbison/St. Andrews

3,429,488

299,295

92.98%

-109,577 $16.64

$19.70

$3.01

Lexington

1,437,170

27,593

98.08%

21,013 $17.07

$20.31

$3.69

North Columbia

466,249

75,400

83.83%

-9,500

$9.25

$11.20

$1.74

Northeast Columbia

3,920,599

550,265

86.00%

-62,080 $17.02

$21.58

$5.06

Southeast Columbia

1,114,541

136,634

87.74%

-13,650 $14.19

$16.99

$2.93

2008 Year-end Retail Market Office Report – Greenville Occupancy Vacant Rate

Small Shop Rent

907,484

82,502

91.67%

$16.90

$13.17

$3.08

East Side

1,588,955 1,367,883

221,072

86.09%

$15.05

$11.85

$2.65

Laurens Road

1,367,666 1,255,509

112,157

91.80%

$14.19

$10.31

$2.55

Market Size Occupied Cherrydale

989,986

Average Avg. PassRent throughs

South

313,991

250,253

63,738

79.70%

$9.56

$7.47

$1.29

West

416,767

412,767

4,000

99.04%

$10.96

$8.88

$2.24

Woodruff Road

2,557,424 2,421,097

136,327

94.67%

$19.91

$14.35

$2.96

Market

7,234,789 6,614,993

619,796

91.43%

$16.39

$12.26

$2.72

Note: All information was compiled using data sources deemed reliable. Statistical data was collected as of December 2008. Source: Colliers Keenan Inc.

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REAL ESTATE EMPLOYMENT EDUCATION GOVERNMENT


2008 Year-end Office Market Report – Charleston Total Market Total

Available

Sublease

Avg. Rate

Vacancy

Occupied Space

West Ashley

982,434

172,919

2,700

$17.98

17.88%

806,815

Lower North Charleston

2,526,938

663,857

73,336

$19.06

29.17%

1,789,745

Upper North Charleston

2,013,505

432,206

0

$16.77

21.47%

1,581,299

East Cooper

2,379,990

311,177

20,717

$20.94

13.95%

2,048,096

Downtown Charleston

2,063,704

118,559

17,629

$23.87

6.49%

1,927,516

Total

9,966,571

1,698,718

114,382

$19.72

18.19%

8,153,471

Market

Trust, Value, Client Satisfaction, Teamwork THS Constructors, Inc., is building projects in South Carolina and throughout the Southeast for global advanced technology and manufacturing corporations. Let us help you with your next project.

Class “A” Office Market West Ashley

422,848

35,984

2,700

$22.78

9.15%

384,164

Lower North Charleston

1,058,288

246,082

67,511

$24.00

29.63%

744,695

Upper North Charleston

851,000

206,703

0

$19.93

24.29%

644,297

East Cooper

1,546,020

214,691

19,000

$25.51

15.12%

1,312,329

Downtown Charleston

1,031,219

48,737

17,629

$28.44

5.51%

964,853

Total

4,909,375

752,197

106,840

$24.13

17.50%

4,050,338

Note: All information was compiled using data from sources deemed reliable. Statistical data was collected as of December 2008 and encompasses office buildings 10,000 square feet and larger.

Alternative Energy Facilities

Aeronautics/Aerospace Facilities

2008 Year-end Office Market Report – Columbia Market

Total feet

Vacant

Occupancy Absorption Rate (six-month)

Avg. Class “A” rate occupancy

Class “A” rate

CBD

4,460,021

559,021

87.47%

-1,641 $16.28

91.85%

$20.43

Suburbs

4,816,215

858,773

82.17%

5,231 $14.20

86.51%

$17.69

Cayce/West Columbia

491,817

150,254

69.45%

-10,095 $13.86

37.50%

$17.00

East Columbia

104,438

2,100

97.99%

0 $12.29

-

-

Forest Acres

723,057

88,420

87.77%

638 $15.42

92.41%

$17.00

Northeast

1,171,800

137,832

88.24%

23,623 $16.11

91.46%

$19.38

St. Andrews

2,325,103

480,167

79.35%

-8,935 $13.55

84.67%

$17.11

Total

9,276,236 1,417,794

84.72%

3,590 $15.02

90.06%

$19.18

Note: These numbers do not include transitional properties such as operations and call centers. All information was compiled using data sources deemed reliable. CBD - Central Business District Statistical data was compiled as of December 2008 and encompasses all multitenant office buildings 10,000 square feet and larger.

2008 Year-end Industrial Market Report – Greenville Market Anderson

Total

Vacant

10,561,082

839,732

Vacancy Under Rate Absorption Construction 7.95%

-32,678

0

Rental Rate $3.63

Greenville

74,108,223

8,550,003

11.54%

1,036,914

300,000

$3.25

Spartanburg

65,468,791

6,647,894

10.15%

-1,204,957

1,815,000

$3.28

150,138,096

16,037,629

10.68%

-200,721

0

$3.28

Upstate Market

Note: All information was compiled using data from sources deemed reliable. Statistical data was collected as of December 2008 and encompasses industrial buildings 10,000 square feet and larger. Source: Colliers Keenan Inc.

GOVERNMENT EDUCATION EMPLOYMENT REAL ESTATE

Research/Biotechnology Facilities

South Carolina Office 150 Executive Center Drive, Suite B108 Greenville, South Carolina 29615 864.254.6066 • Fax: 864.254.6086 THS Constructors, Inc. was recently named the sixth fastest growing company in South Carolina by the South Carolina Chamber of Commerce.

Georgia Office 3330 Cumberland Blvd., Suite 500 Atlanta, Georgia 30339 770.933.6203 • Fax: 770.933.6223 North Carolina Office 503 Carthage St., Suite 204 Sanford, North Carolina 27330 919.718.0006 • Fax: 919.718.0008

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MARKET FACTS REAL ESTATE EMPLOYMENT EDUCATION GOVERNMENT

Unemployment Rates by County

EMPLOYMENT Upstate $1,661,000,000 5,985 jobs

Piedmont $638,000,000 1,155 jobs

Catawba $201,000,000 1,588 jobs

Pee Dee $465,000,000 3,684 jobs

Midlands $882,000,000 4,435 jobs

Charleston $206,000,000 1,354 jobs

Lowcountry $117,000,000 392 jobs

2008 Significant Capital Investments Company

2008 Significant Job Creations

Total Capital Investments Company

Total Jobs

Rank

County

Mar-09

Feb-09

Change

1

Allendale

22.3

23.3

-1.0

2

Marion

21.1

21.8

-0.7

3

Chester

20.6

20.7

-0.1

4

Union

20

19.5

0.5

5

Marlboro

18.6

19.6

-1

6

Bamberg

18

16.8

1.2

7

Lancaster

17.5

14.5

3.0

8

McCormick

16.9

19.1

-2.2

9

Chesterfield

16.8

17.5

-0.7

10

Barnwell

16.7

15.4

1.3

11

Hampton

16.5

16.1

0.4

12

Cherokee

16.4

16.9

-0.5

13

Dillon

16.2

16.7

-0.5

14

Clarendon

15.9

16

-0.1

15

Orangeburg

15.9

15.5

0.4

16

Williamsburg

15.4

16.0

-0.6

17

Lee

14.8

14.9

-0.1

18

Horry

14.4

11.9

2.5

19

Oconee

14.3

13.7

0.6

20

Abbeville

14

15.1

-1.1

21

Colleton

13.7

14.2

-0.5

22

Darlington

13.6

13.1

0.5

23

Fairfield

13.3

14.3

-1.0

24

Sumter

13.3

13.6

-0.3

25

Greenwood

13

13.5

-0.5

26

Georgetown

12.8

13

-0.2

27

York

12.7

14.2

-1.5

28

Newberry

12.7

14.2

-1.5

BMW Manufacturing Co. ............................. 500 Spartanburg County

29

Anderson

11.9

12.6

-0.7

American Titanium Works LLC..... $422,000,000 URS Corp. ................................................... 400 Laurens County Lancaster County

30

Spartanburg

11.6

11.4

0.2

31

Florence

11.2

11

0.2

32

Calhoun

11.1

11.3

-0.2

33

Laurens

10.9

11.1

-0.2

Osage Bio Energy LLC ................ $161,500,000 H.J. Heinz Co. ............................................. 350 Union County Florence County

34

Kershaw

10.7

10.8

-0.1

35

Berkeley

10.2

10.2

0

FITESA ........................................ $120,000,000 Laurens County

Monster Worldwide Inc................................ 350 Florence County

36

Jasper

10.1

10.5

-0.4

37

Pickens

9.9

9.7

0.2

H.J. Heinz Co. ............................. $105,000,000 Shaw Industries Group Inc. ......................... 350 Florence County Lexington County

38

Edgefield

9.9

10.9

-1

39

Dorchester

9.7

9.8

-0.1

Michelin North America Inc. .......... $90,000,000 Lexington County

American Titanium Works LLC..................... 320 Laurens County

40

Greenville

9.6

9.4

0.2

41

Saluda

9.3

9.4

-0.1

Horsehead Corp. ........................... $87,000,000 Computer Sciences Corp............................. 300 Barnwell County Richland County

42

Richland

8.8

8.5

0.3

43

Aiken

8.6

9.4

-0.8

Target Corp. ................................ $73,000,000 Home Depot................................................ 300 Kershaw County Lexington County

44

Beaufort

8.6

8.6

0

45

Charleston

8.4

8.2

0.2

46

Lexington

7.9

7.8

0.1

BMW Manufacturing Co. ............. $750,000,000 Spartanburg County

Rollcast Energy Inc. .................... $170,000,000 Newberry County

Cross Country Home Services ..................... 350 Anderson County

Shaw Industries Group Inc. ........... $60,000,000 Titanium Solutions Inc................................. 300 Lexington County Lancaster County

Source: Newsline Workforce Trends, April 2009, S.C. Employment Security Commission

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MARKET FACTS Wage and Salary Employment – March 2009

Unemployment Rates – State Comparison March ’09

2008

2007

2006

Alabama

9.0

5.0

3.5

3.5

Florida

9.7

6.2

4.0

3.4

Georgia

9.2

6.2

4.4

4.6

N. Carolina

10.8

6.3

4.7

4.7

S. Carolina

11.4

6.9

5.9

6.4

Tennessee

9.6

6.4

4.7

5.1

Net Change Industry

March ’09

Natural Resources and Mining

Feb. ’09 March ’08 Month Ago

Year Ago

4,200

4,200

4,500

0

-300

Construction

103,500

105,100

116,000

-1,600

-12,500

Manufacturing

219,200

222,100

246,500

-2,900

-27,300

Trade, Transportation and Utilities

358,100

355,000

376,100

3,100

-18,000

29,500

29,500

28,200

0

1,300

Information Financial Activities

102,900

103,700

106,300

-800

-3,400

Professional and Business Services

207,500

206,000

223,600

1,500

-16,100

Educational and Health Services

209,000

207,600

207,200

1,400

1,800

Leisure and Hospitality

198,700

193,100

214,700

5,600

-16,000

Government

346,700

345,800

350,100

900

-3,400

1,850,200

1,843,300

1,944,500

6,900

-94,300

Total Nonagricultural Employment

Virginia United States

6.8

4.0

3.0

3.0

8.9*

5.8

4.6

4.6

*Represents the unemployment rate as of February 2009. Source: U.S. Department of Labor Statistics, S.C. Employment Security Commission

S.C. unemployment hits 11.5% South Carolina’s jobless rate increased one-tenth of a point in April to 11.5%, the highest since January 1983. The national unemployment rate also increased

Source: Workforce Trends Newsline, April 2009, S.C. Employment Security Commission

in April, to 8.9%, compared with 8.5% in March. Despite the higher jobless rate, nearly 9,700 nonfarm jobs were gained in South Carolina in April. Source: Workforce Trends Newsline, May 2009, S.C. Employment Security Commission

GOVERNMENT EDUCATION EMPLOYMENT REAL ESTATE

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MARKET FACTS REAL ESTATE EMPLOYMENT EDUCATION GOVERNMENT

Labor Force and Unemployment by County and Metropolitan Statistical Area (MSA) 2009 Labor Force

Unemployment

Labor Force

County/ MSA

March 2009

Feb. 2009

March 2008

March 2009

Feb. 2009

Abbeville

11,501

11,639

11,400

1,615

1,763

826

Aiken

75,995

76,445

73,746

6,571

7,164

3,320

3,362

3,373

3,240

750

787

463

Allendale

March 2008

Anderson MSA

87,543

87,171

85,092

10,411

10,952

4,911

Bamberg

6,287

6,190

6,233

1,129

1,041

553

Barnwell

9,058

9,059

8,688

1,557

1,556

769

Beaufort

62,939

63,237

62,453

5,425

5,465

2,606

Berkeley

79,976

80,303

78,037

8,150

8,194

3,946

Calhoun

7,171

7,147

6,839

794

805

370

Charleston

176,000

176,339

173,538

14,737

14,442

7,190

Cherokee

25,884

26,188

25,534

4,241

4,418

1,786

Chester

15,750

15,819

15,164

3,243

3,270

1,597

Chesterfield

19,121

19,259

18,331

3,210

3,361

1,311

Clarendon

12,513

12,481

12,357

1,988

2,000

981

Colleton

16,752

16,812

16,321

2,301

2,379

1,014

Darlington

32,851

32,573

31,026

4,456

4,282

2,085

Dillon

13,028

13,044

12,749

2,110

2,174

Feb. 2009

March 2008

March 2009

Feb. 2009

March 2008

Lancaster

29,626

29,867

29,433

5,342

2,999

3,388

Laurens

34,045

34,257

33,423

3,696

3,808

2,113

Lee

8,264

8,197

8,011

1,224

1,223

633

135,106

134,260

131,362

10,675

10,509

5,144

3,531

3,488

3,561

500

410

408

Marion

13,302

13,300

12,649

2,806

2,893

1,430

Marlboro

11,804

11,919

11,517

2,198

2,333

1,185

Newberry

18,550

18,603

18,392

2,259

2,388

973

Lexington

Oconee

31,057

30,862

30,131

4,451

4,222

1,759

Orangeburg

40,279

40,082

40,943

6,399

6,206

3,101

Pickens

59,993

60,065

58,452

5,912

5,805

2,657

Richland

184,066

182,450

179,125

16,273

15,573

8,922

9,393

9,346

9,069

878

877

431

139,629

140,166

136,005

16,190

15,969

7,130

Sumter MSA

42,339

42,604

43,333

5,624

5,791

3,128

1,104

Union

12,326

12,299

11,532

2,461

2,401

1,028

Williamsburg

15,554

15,547

15,193

2,403

2,492

1,381

107,263

109,959

105,609

13,583

15,598

5,779

63,958

64,251

62,346

6,224

6,290

2,792

Edgefield

11,220

11,327

10,824

1,106

1,234

564

Fairfield

11,497

11,478

11,147

1,460

1,496

966

Florence

65,380

64,946

62,798

7,346

7,124

3,647

Georgetown

30,403

30,251

30,034

3,903

3,939

1,850

Greenville

228,271

228,305

222,546

22,002

21,353

9,742

Greenwood

29,948

30,253

30,424

3,906

4,077

1,927

7,823

7,768

7,577

1,287

1,254

530

129,673

127,080

128,490

16,571

18,033

7,408

Jasper

10,052

10,141

9,878

1,016

1,064

475

Kershaw

30,996

30,835

29,704

3,329

3,319

1,640

Horry/ Myrtle Beach MSA

March 2009

McCormick

Dorchester

Hampton

County/ MSA

Unemployment

Saluda Spartanburg MSA

York

Multicounty Metropolitan Statistical Areas Charleston

319,934

320,893

313,921

29,111

28,926

13,928

Columbia

378,228

375,515

367,245

33,408

32,579

17,473

Florence

98,231

97,519

93,824

11,802

11,406

5,732

Greenville

322,309

322,627

314,420

31,610

30,966

14,511

2,185,500

2,189,300

2,131,300

248,600

238,400

125,700

State totals South Carolina*

Note: *Seasonally adjusted; in thousands Source: Workforce Trends Newsline, April 2009, S.C. Employment Security Commission

40,000 Thatâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s the number of jobs in South Carolina associated with the automobile industry. Many of the jobs are in support of industries that supply primary manufacturers of cars and trucks in the United States and other countries. Sales for cars and light trucks have rapidly declined â&#x20AC;&#x201D; down 38% since February 2008. A continued decline in sales will affect employment at manufacturers, dealers, suppliers and many support industries in the auto sector. Source: CNN, Center for Automotive Research, Reference USA and the Bureau of Labor Statistics

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REAL ESTATE EMPLOYMENT EDUCATION GOVERNMENT


MARKET FACTS GOVERNMENT EDUCATION EMPLOYMENT REAL ESTATE

Total Student Fees for Full-time Undergraduate Students, Academic Year 2007-08 Summary of required fees according to use (expenditures) Total Research Institutions Clemson University

$9,870

USC Columbia*

8,346

Medical University of S.C.**

10,790

Comprehensive Teaching Institutions The Citadel

$7,710

Coastal Carolina University

7,600

College of Charleston

7,778

Francis Marion University

7,038

Lander University

7,728

S.C. State University

7,318

USC Aiken

7,006

USC Beaufort

6,250

USC Upstate

EDUCATION South Carolina higher education facts Number of colleges and universities: 55 Independent four-year institutions: 21

Public technical colleges: 16

7,760

Winthrop University

10,190

Two-Year Regional Campuses USC Lancaster

$4,628

USC Salkehatchie

4,698

USC Sumter

4,748

USC Union

4,768

Research institutions: 3 Teaching institutions: 10 Public two-year regional: 4

Higher education fall 2008 enrollment: 226,489

Technical Colleges Aiken

Independent two-year institutions: 1

$3,298

Central Carolina

2,824

Denmark

1,878

Florence-Darlington

3,190

Greenville

3,090

Public technical colleges: 84,270 Independent four-year institutions: 38,486

Horry-Georgetown

3,050

Midlands

3,160

Northeastern

2,590

Orangeburg-Calhoun

2,592

Piedmont

2,876

Spartanburg Community College

3,194

Tech. College of the Lowcountry

3,026

Tri-County

2,744

Trident

2,768

Research institutions* $9,608

Williamsburg

2,278

Teaching institutions $8,338

York

3,084

Public technical colleges $3,162

* Excludes medicine, law and health professions ** Includes pharmacy, nursing and allied health Source: S.C. Higher Education Statistical Abstract, 2007 and 2008

Independent two-year institutions: 750

Research institutions: 48,333

Teaching institutions: 50,417

Public two-year regional: 4,233

Average undergraduate in-state tuition and required fees 2008-09

$5,000

$10,000

$15,000

*Excludes Medical University of South Carolina; and medicine and law at the University of South Carolina.

GOVERNMENT EDUCATION EMPLOYMENT REAL ESTATE

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MARKET FACTS REAL ESTATE EMPLOYMENT EDUCATION GOVERNMENT

Tuition and Fees by State Average undergraduate tuition and fees for full-time students in degree-granting institutions

Public Four-year 2006-07

State or jurisdiction United States

Tuition and required fees Total (in-state)

Private Four-year

2007-08* Tuition and required fees Total (in-state)

Public two-year, tuition and required fees (in-state)

2006-07

Room

Board

Total

Tuition and required fees

2007-08*

Total

Tuition and required fees

Room

Board

20062007

20072008*

$12,797

$5,666

$13,424

$5,950

$4,072

$3,402

$28,919

$20,517

$30,393

$21,588

$4,812

$3,993

$2,018

$2,063

Alabama

10,686

4,716

11,035

4,907

3,107

3,022

19,380

13,061

21,014

14,116

3,319

3,578

2,802

2,814

Arkansas

9,799

4,954

10,598

5,427

2,926

2,244

19,213

13,371

20,096

14,178

2,884

3,033

1,901

1,928

Florida

10,418

3,009

10,709

2,980

4,385

3,345

26,524

18,299

27,534

19,167

4,554

3,813

1,968

1,862

Georgia

10,320

3,773

10,984

4,006

4,139

2,839

27,188

18,889

29,046

20,175

5,119

3,752

1,730

1,876

9,021

3,761

9,479

3,835

3,113

2,530

28,896

21,100

30,363

22,162

22,162

3,564

1,526

1,641

Louisiana Mississippi

10,049

4,456

10,776

4,762

3,200

2,815

17,640

12,193

18,395

12,693

2,941

2,941

1,710

1,726

North Carolina

10,471

4,040

10,889

4,301

3,648

2,939

27,545

20,220

29,141

29,141

3,921

3,723

1,303

1,377

South Carolina

14,194

7,905

15,089

8,389

4,159

2,542

23,560

17,195

24,914

24,914

3,261

3,364

3,108

3,223

Tennessee

10,534

5,006

11,340

5,366

3,312

2,662

24,377

17,453

25,802

18,509

3,871

3,422

2,474

2,631

Virginia

13,143

6,450

13,928

6,887

3,862

3,178

24,632

17,821

26,170

18,892

3,740

3,537

2,361

2,484

*Preliminary data based on fall 2006 enrollment weights. Note: Data are for the entire academic year and are average charges. Tuition and fees were weighted by the number of full-time-equivalent undergraduates but were not adjusted to reflect student residency. Room and board are based on full-time students. Degree-granting institutions grant associate or higher degrees and participate in Title IV federal financial aid programs. Some data have been revised from previously published figures. Detail might not sum to totals because of rounding. Sources: U.S. Department of Education, National Center for Education Statistics, 2006-07 and 2007-08 Integrated Postsecondary Education Data System, Fall 2006, Fall 2007 and Spring 2007.

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Certified Workforce. Certified Sites. Certified Assistance.

Certified Business Ready NEW MEGASITE: NOW AVAILABLE AT I-95 AND HWY 68! BAMBERG, BARNWELL, ALLENDALE AND HAMPTON COUNTIES, SC 803.541.0023 WWW.SOUTHERNCAROLINA.ORG 36

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REAL ESTATE EMPLOYMENT EDUCATION GOVERNMENT


Orangeburg County, South Carolina, USA

Ten-year Analysis of Average Salaries of Full-time Teaching Faculty Nine-month contract basis % 1998-99 2007-08 Change Research Institutions Clemson University

Port of Charleston

$57,746 $84,064

45.6%

USC Columbia

60,018

81,506

35.8%

Medical University of South Carolina

52,713

95,619

81.4%

SOUTH CAROLINA’S Global Logistics Triangle II-26 US-301 I-95 I-

Comprehensive Teaching Institutions The Citadel

$48,360 $67,332

39.2%

Coastal Carolina University

43,417

61,905

42.6%

College of Charleston

44,542

62,380

40.0%

Francis Marion University

45,708

59,325

29.8%

Lander University

44,524

51,303

15.2%

S.C. State University

42,614

59,425

39.4%

USC Aiken

46,049

55,741

21.0%

USC Beaufort

40,472

54,630

35.0%

USC Upstate

43,988

54,164

23.1%

Winthrop University

44,282

60,987

37.7%

$44,884 $48,474

8.0%

www.OCDC.com

Where... Global Diversity is NOW!

Two-year Regional Campuses USC Lancaster USC Salkehatchie

38,241

44,105

15.3%

USC Sumter

43,863

52,438

19.5%

USC Union

42,892

43,528

1.5%

Source: S.C. Higher Education Statistical Abstract, 2007 and 2008

www.Malphrus.com Hilton Head 843.379.5700 | Charleston 843.725.5700

Aid-to-Tuition Ratio Between 1983 and 2004, the aid-to-tuition ratio for South Carolina increased from 0.0 in 1983 to 2.4 in 2004, with an average of 0.9 for the 21year period. During the 25-year period starting with 1979, the national average aid-to-tuition ratio also declined; the 25-year national average was 9.0. South Carolina’s 25-year average ratio was second-lowest among all states; the change was not available because of missing data for 1979 to 1982. However, South Carolina has experienced a 36% decrease in this indicator since the state began using need-based financial aid. This indicates the state has not balanced need-based aid with changes in tuition. Source: Recession, Retrenchment and Recovery: State Higher Education Funding & Student Financial Aid Volume II, State Profiles, October 2006, Center for the Study of Education Policy, Illinois State University

COMPLETE SITE PREPARATION Commercial | Residential | Municipal | Highway

Target Import Warehouse (left) and IKEA Distribution Center (right) Savannah, Georgia Some of the world’s largest retailers use Malphrus Construction to build infrastructure for their new stores, expansion facilities, and distribution centers. For the Target Import Warehouse, considered to be the largest tilt-up building in the country, and the IKEA Distribution Center, Malphrus performed site clearing, mass grading, wet utilities and all fine grading, as well as site and road paving.

GOVERNMENT EDUCATION EMPLOYMENT REAL ESTATE

w w w. s c b i z m a g . c o m | S u m m e r 2 0 0 9

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MARKET FACTS REAL ESTATE EMPLOYMENT EDUCATION GOVERNMENT

GOVERNMENT LEGISLATIVE REPRESENTATIVES U.S. SENATE LINDSEY GRAHAM (R) 290 Russell Senate Office Building Washington, DC 20510 202-224-5972 lgraham.senate.gov Local office: 530 Johnnie Dodds Blvd., Suite 202 Mount Pleasant, SC 29464 843-849-3887 JIM DEMINT (R) 340 Russell Senate Office Building Washington, DC 20510 202-224-6121 demint.senate.gov Local office: 112 Custom House 200 East Bay St. Charleston, SC 29401 843-727-4525 U.S. HOUSE OF REPRESENTATIVES HENRY E. BROWN JR. (R) 1st District (Horry, Berkeley, Charleston, Dorchester and Georgetown counties) 103 Cannon House Office Building Washington, DC 20515 202-225-3176 brown.house.gov Local office: 5900 Core Ave., Suite 401 North Charleston, SC 29406 843-747-4175 JAMES E. CLYBURN (D) 6th District (Portions or all of 15 regional counties; boundaries extend from the center of the state in Columbia: east to Marion County, south to Colleton County and northwest to Columbia.) 2135 Rayburn House Office Building Washington, DC 20515 202-225-3315 clyburn.house.gov Local office: 1225 Lady St., Suite 200 Columbia, SC 29201 803-799-1100

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JOE WILSON (R) 2nd District (Allendale, Barnwell, Beaufort, Hampton, Jasper and Lexington counties and portions of Aiken, Calhoun, Orangeburg and Richland counties) 212 Cannon House Office Building Washington, DC 20515 202-225-2452 joewilson.house.gov Midlands office: 1700 Sunset Blvd., Suite 1 West Columbia, SC 29169 803-939-0041 888-381-1442 Lowcountry office: 903 Port Republic St. Beaufort, SC 29902 Mail to: P.O. Box 1538 Beaufort, SC 29901 843-521-2530 J. GRESHAM BARRETT (R) 3rd District (Anderson, Greenwood, Aiken areas) 439 Cannon House Office Building Washington, DC 20515 202-225-5301 barrett.house.gov Anderson office: 303 W. Beltline Blvd. Anderson, SC 29625 864-224-7401 Greenwood office: 115 Enterprise Court, Suite B Greenwood, SC 29649 864-223-8251 Aiken office: 233 Pendleton St. N.W. Aiken, SC 29801 803-649-5571 BOB INGLIS (R) 4th District (Greenville, Spartanburg and Union counties and the northern tip of Laurens County) 100 Cannon House Office Building Washington, DC 20515 202-225-6030 inglis.house.gov Greenville office: 105 N. Spring St., Suite 111 Greenville, SC 29601 864-232-1141 Spartanburg office: 464 E. Main St., Suite 8 Spartanburg, SC 29302 864-582-6422

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JOHN SPRATT (D) 5th District (all or portions of 14 regional districts) 1401 Longworth Building Washington, DC 20515 202-225-5501 spratt.house.gov Upstate office: 201 E. Main St., Suite 305 Rock Hill, SC 29730 803-327-1114 Midlands office: 707 Bultman Drive Sumter, SC 29150 803-773-3362 Pee Dee office: 88 Public Square Darlington, SC 29532 843-393-3998

CONSTITUTIONAL OFFICES OFFICE OF THE ADJUTANT GENERAL Maj. Gen. Stanhope S. Spears 1 National Guard Road Columbia, SC 29201-4766 803-806-4200 www.scguard.com S.C. DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE Hugh E. Weathers, commissioner Wade Hampton Building, Fifth Floor 1200 Senate St. Columbia, SC 29201 803-734-2210 agriculture.sc.gov ATTORNEY GENERAL’S OFFICE Henry D. McMaster, attorney general Rembert Dennis Building 1000 Assembly St., Room 519 Columbia, SC 29201 803-734-3970 www.scattorneygeneral.org S.C. DEPARTMENT OF COMMERCE Joe E. Taylor, secretary 1201 Main St., Suite 1600 Columbia, SC 29201-3200 803-737-0400 www.sccommerce.com COMMERCE DEPARTMENT OMBUDSMAN’S OFFICE Chuck Bundy, department manager

1201 Main St., Suite 1600 Columbia, SC 29201 803-737-0440 www.sccommerce.com S.C. COMPTROLLER GENERAL Richard Eckstrom, comptroller general 305 Wade Hampton Building 1200 Senate St. Columbia, SC 29201 803-734-2121 www.cg.state.sc.us EMPLOYMENT SECURITY COMMISSION Ted Halley, executive director 1550 Gadsden St. Columbia, SC 29201 803-737-2400 www.sces.org OFFICE OF THE GOVERNOR Mark Sanford, governor P.O. Box 12267 Columbia, SC 29211 803-734-2100 www.scgovernor.com OFFICE OF THE LIEUTENANT GOVERNOR Andre Bauer, lieutenant governor P.O. Box 142 Columbia, SC 29202 803-734-2080 ltgov.sc.gov SECRETARY OF STATE Mark Hammond, secretary of state Edgar Brown Building 1205 Pendleton St., Suite 525 Columbia, SC 29201 803-734-2170 www.scsos.com STATE TREASURER Converse A. Chellis III, state treasurer Wade Hampton Building 1200 Senate St. Columbia, SC 29201 803-734-2101 treasurer.sc.gov STATE SUPERINTENDENT OF EDUCATION Jim Rex, superintendent 1429 Senate St., Suite 1006 Columbia, SC 29201 803-734-8500 ed.sc.gov/agency/superintendent

REAL ESTATE EMPLOYMENT EDUCATION GOVERNMENT


EST LAWYERS®

®

EST LAWYERS STATEWIDE EDITION

METHODOLOGY his list is excerpted from the 2009 edition of The Best Lawyers in America, the preeminent referral guide to the legal profession in the United States. Published since 1983, Best Lawyers lists attorneys in 80 specialties, representing all 50 states, who have been chosen through an exhaustive survey in which thousands of the nation’s top lawyers confidentially evaluate their professional peers. The 2009 edition of Best Lawyers is based on more than 2.2 million evaluations of lawyers by other lawyers. The method used to compile Best Lawyers remains unchanged since the first edition was compiled more than 25 years ago. Lawyers are chosen for inclusion based solely on the vote of their peers. Listings cannot be bought, and no purchase is required to be included. In this regard, Best Lawyers remains the gold standard of reliability and integrity in lawyer ratings. The nomination pool for the 2009 edition consisted of all lawyers whose names appeared in the previous edition of Best Lawyers, lawyers who were nominated since

the previous survey, and new nominees solicited from listed attorneys. In general, lawyers were asked to vote only on nominees in their own specialty in their own jurisdiction. Lawyers in closely related specialties were asked to vote across specialties, as were lawyers in smaller jurisdictions. Where specialties are national or international in nature, lawyers were asked to vote nationally as well as locally. Voting lawyers were also given an opportunity to offer more detailed comments on nominees. Each year, half of the voting pool receives fax or email ballots; the other half is polled by phone. Voting lawyers were provided this general guideline for determining if a nominee should be listed among “the best”: “If you had a close friend or relative who needed a real estate lawyer (for example), and you could not handle the case yourself, to whom would you refer them?” All votes and comments were solicited with a guarantee of confidentiality – a critical factor in the viability and validity of Best Lawyers® surveys. To ensure the rigor of the selection process, lawyers were urged to use only their highest standards when voting,

and to evaluate each nominee based only on his or her individual merits. The additional comments were used to make more accurate comparisons between voting patterns and weight votes accordingly. Best Lawyers uses various methodological tools to identify and correct for anomalies in both the nomination and voting process. Ultimately, of course, a lawyer’s inclusion is based on the subjective judgments of his or her fellow attorneys. While it is true that the lists may at times disproportionately reward visibility or popularity, the breadth of the survey, the candor of the respondents, and the sophistication of the polling methodology largely correct for any biases. For all these reasons, Best Lawyers lists continue to represent the most reliable, accurate and useful guide to the best lawyers in the United States available anywhere. Best Lawyers lists are available at www. bestlawyers.com. “Best Lawyers,” and “The Best Lawyers in America” are registered trademarks of Woodward/White, Inc.

CONTACT INFO

DISCLAIMER:

COPYRIGHT:

These lists are excerpted from The Best Lawyers in America® 2009, which includes listings for over 36,000 lawyers in 80 specialties, in all 50 states and the District of Columbia. The Best Lawyers in America® is published by Woodward/White, Inc., Aiken, South Carolina and can be ordered directly from the publisher. For information call 803-648-0300; write 129 First Avenue, SW, Aiken, SC 29801; email info@bestlawyers.com; or visit www.bestlawyers.com. Online subscriptions to Best Lawyers® databases are available at www.bestlawyers.com.

Woodward/White Inc., has used its best efforts in assembling material for this list but does not warrant that the information contained herein is complete or accurate, and does not assume, and hereby disclaims, any liability to any person for any loss or damage caused by errors or omissions herein whether such errors or omissions result from negligence, accident, or any other cause. All listed attorneys have been verified as being members in good standing with their respective state bar associations as of August 1, 2008, where that information is publicly available. Consumers should contact their state bar for verification and additional information prior to securing legal services of any attorney.

Copyright 2008 by Woodward/White, Inc., Aiken, SC. All rights reserved. This list, or parts thereof, must not be reproduced in any form without permission. No commercial use of this list may be made without permission of Woodward/White, Inc. No fees may be charged, directly or indirectly, for the use of this list without permission. “The Best Lawyers in America” and “Best Lawyers” are registered trademarks of Woodward/White, Inc.

T

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EST LAWYERS® Listed alphabetically by specialty

ADMINISTRATIVE LAW Ronald E. Cardwell McNair Law Firm P.A. James C. Gray Jr. Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP Michael A. Molony Young Clement Rivers David B. Summer Jr. Parker Poe Adams & Bernstein LLP

Manton M. Grier Haynsworth Sinkler Boyd P.A.

D. Allen Grumbine Womble Carlyle Sandridge & Rice

Charles E. Carpenter Jr. Carpenter Appeals & Trial Support

John F. Kuppens Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP

Henry L. Parr Jr. Wyche, Burgess, Freeman & Parham

F. Marion Hughes Smith Moore Leatherwood

James H. Cassidy Roe Cassidy Coates & Price

LeRoy F. Laney Riley Pope & Laney

APPELLATE LAW

J. Ronald Jones Jr. Clawson & Staubes

William C. Cleveland III Buist Moore Smythe McGee

John T. Lay Jr. Ellis, Lawhorne & Sims

Robert A. Kerr Jr. Hagood & Kerr

M. Dawes Cooke Jr. Barnwell Whaley Patterson & Helms

James K. Lehman Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP

R. Geoffrey Levy R. Geoffrey Levy Law Firm

Gray T. Culbreath Collins & Lacy

Wallace K. Lightsey Wyche, Burgess, Freeman & Parham

Cynthia J. Lowery Moore & Van Allen

Robert W. Dibble Jr. McNair Law Firm P.A.

John P. Linton Duffy & Young

G. William McCarthy Jr. McCarthy Law Firm

Paul A. Dominick Nexsen Pruet LLC

H. Sam Mabry III Haynsworth Sinkler Boyd P.A.

Stanley H. McGuffin Haynsworth Sinkler Boyd P.A.

Elizabeth Van Doren Gray Sowell Gray Stepp & Laffitte LLC

Francis M. Mack Richardson, Plowden & Robinson P.A.

Julio E. Mendoza Jr. Nexsen Pruet LLC

David E. Dukes Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP

William Francis Marion Jr. Haynsworth Sinkler Boyd P.A.

Ivan N. Nossokoff Ivan N. Nossokoff, Attorney at Law

Kevin A. Dunlap Parker Poe Adams & Bernstein LLP

William H. Short Jr. Haynsworth Sinkler Boyd P.A.

Morris A. Ellison Buist Moore Smythe McGee

Thomas E. McCutchen Jr. McCutchen Blanton Johnson & Barnette LLP

Randy A. Skinner Skinner & Associates

L. Franklin Elmore Elmore & Wall

Charles P. Summerall IV Buist Moore Smythe McGee

Gregory J. English Wyche, Burgess, Freeman & Parham

David B. Wheeler Moore & Van Allen

Steven E. Farrar Smith Moore Leatherwood

Rory D. Whelehan Womble Carlyle Sandridge & Rice

Richard A. Farrier Jr. Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP

BET-THE-COMPANY LITIGATION

Gerald M. Finkel Finkel Law Firm LLC

Charles E. Baker Baker, Ravenel & Bender C. Mitchell Brown Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP Charles E. Carpenter Jr.

ALTERNATIVE DISPUTE RESOLUTION

CARPENTER APPEALS & TRIAL SUPPORT

Mark W. Bakker Wyche, Burgess, Freeman & Parham

J. Rene Josey Turner, Padget, Graham & Laney P.A.

Capers G. Barr III Barr, Unger and McIntosh

C. Dixon Lee III McLaren & Lee

M. Malissa Burnette Burnette & Rothstein P.A.

David L. Moore Jr. Love, Thornton, Arnold & Thomason

William C. Cleveland III Buist Moore Smythe McGee

James B. Richardson Jr. James B. Richardson Jr., Attorney at Law

Theron G. Cochran Love, Thornton, Arnold & Thomason

Jack B. Swerling Law Offices of Jack B. Swerling

M. Dawes Cooke Jr. Barnwell Whaley Patterson & Helms

William T. Toal Johnson Toal & Battiste

Danny C. Crowe Turner, Padget, Graham & Laney P.A.

John C. von Lehe Jr. Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP

Eric K. Englebardt Turner, Padget, Graham & Laney P.A.

BANKING LAW

Robert M. Erwin Jr. Robert M. Erwin Jr. Law Firm Karl A. Folkens Folkens Law Firm Michael D. Glenn Glenn, Haigler, McClain & Stathakis Jack D. Griffeth Collins & Lacy William M. Hagood III Love, Thornton, Arnold & Thomason Connie C. Harnass III Connie C. Harnass III Law Firm Robert W. Hassold Jr. Robert W. Hassold Jr., Mediator and Counselor at Law Richard L. Hinson Turner, Padget, Graham & Laney P.A. Wade H. Logan III Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP Charles S. Mauney Gallivan, White & Boyd D. Cravens Ravenel Baker, Ravenel & Bender James C. Sarratt The Legal Clinic of Sarratt & Clarke Franklin G. Shuler Turner, Padget, Graham & Laney P.A. Bachman S. Smith III Haynsworth Sinkler Boyd P.A. Thomas L. Stephenson Nexsen Pruet LLC Walter B. Todd Jr. Todd & Ward P.C. Thomas W. Traxler Carter, Smith, Merriam, Rogers & Traxler G. Trenholm Walker Pratt-Thomas, Epting & Walker Thomas J. Wills Wills & Massalon

ANTITRUST LAW William C. Boyd Haynsworth Sinkler Boyd P.A.

John W. Currie McNair Law Firm P.A. M. Craig Garner Jr. McNair Law Firm P.A. George S. King Jr. Haynsworth Sinkler Boyd P.A. Lanneau W. Lambert Jr. Turner, Padget, Graham & Laney P.A. Alan M. Lipsitz Nexsen Pruet LLC Thomas E. Lydon McAngus, Goudelock & Courie John T. Moore Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP Mark S. Sharpe Warren & Sinkler John H. Warren III Warren & Sinkler

BANKRUPTCY AND CREDITORDEBTOR RIGHTS LAW Linda K. Barr Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP Barbara G. Barton Barton Law Firm Michael M. Beal McNair Law Firm P.A. John B. Butler III John B. Butler III P.A. Kevin Campbell Campbell Law Firm Weyman C. Carter McNair Law Firm P.A.

Paul A. Dominick Nexsen Pruet LLC Elizabeth Van Doren Gray Sowell Gray Stepp & Laffitte LLC David E. Dukes Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP L. Gray Geddie Jr. Ogletree Deakins Frank S. Holleman III Wyche, Burgess, Freeman & Parham Marvin D. Infinger Haynsworth Sinkler Boyd P.A. Wallace K. Lightsey Wyche, Burgess, Freeman & Parham John P. Linton Duffy & Young Edward W. Mullins Jr. Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP Morris D. Rosen Rosen, Rosen & Hagood Joel H. Smith Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP Thornwell F. Sowell Sowell Gray Stepp & Laffitte LLC Thomas W. Traxler Carter, Smith, Merriam, Rogers & Traxler J. Rutledge Young Jr. Young Clement Rivers

COMMERCIAL LITIGATION

James H. Cassidy Roe Cassidy Coates & Price

Charles J. Baker III Buist Moore Smythe McGee

George B. Cauthen Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP

W. Howard Boyd Jr. Gallivan, White & Boyd

R. Michael Drose Drose Law Firm

C. Mitchell Brown Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP

Gerald M. Finkel Finkel Law Firm LLC

Russell T. Burke Nexsen Pruet LLC

Richard R. Gleissner Finkel Law Firm LLC

R. Wayne Byrd Turner, Padget, Graham & Laney P.A.

L. Gray Geddie Jr. Ogletree Deakins Frank H. Gibbes III Gibbes Burton Michael J. Giese Smith Moore Leatherwood Mason A. Goldsmith Love, Thornton, Arnold & Thomason Manton M. Grier Haynsworth Sinkler Boyd P.A. Henry E. Grimball Buist Moore Smythe McGee Ben A. Hagood Jr. Hagood & Kerr Kevin A. Hall Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP Frank S. Holleman III Wyche, Burgess, Freeman & Parham Robert H. Hood Hood Law Firm William C. Hubbard Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP S. Keith Hutto Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP Marvin D. Infinger Haynsworth Sinkler Boyd P.A. Harold W. Jacobs Nexsen Pruet LLC Benjamin A. Johnson Robinson, Bradshaw & Hinson Ellis M. Johnston II Haynsworth Sinkler Boyd P.A. John E. Johnston Smith Moore Leatherwood Celeste T. Jones McNair Law Firm P.A. D. Larry Kristinik III Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP

Stephen G. Morrison Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP John C. Moylan III Wyche, Burgess, Freeman & Parham Edward W. Mullins Jr. Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP Curtis L. Ott Turner, Padget, Graham & Laney P.A. Samuel W. Outten Womble Carlyle Sandridge & Rice G. Dewey Oxner Jr. Haynsworth Sinkler Boyd P.A. James C. Parham Jr. Wyche, Burgess, Freeman & Parham Henry L. Parr Jr. Wyche, Burgess, Freeman & Parham A. Marvin Quattlebaum Jr. Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP D. Cravens Ravenel Baker, Ravenel & Bender Richard S. Rosen Rosen, Rosen & Hagood Morris D. Rosen Rosen, Rosen & Hagood G. Dana Sinkler Warren & Sinkler Joel H. Smith Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP B. Rush Smith III Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP Thornwell F. Sowell Sowell Gray Stepp & Laffitte LLC W. Duvall Spruill Turner, Padget, Graham & Laney P.A. Robert E. Stepp Sowell Gray Stepp & Laffitte LLC T.S. Stern Jr. Covington, Patrick, Hagins, Stern & Lewis Troy A. Tessier Wyche, Burgess, Freeman & Parham Thomas S. Tisdale Jr. Nexsen Pruet LLC Thomas W. Traxler Carter, Smith, Merriam, Rogers & Traxler Ronald J. Tryon Parker Poe Adams & Bernstein LLP Bradish J. Waring Nexsen Pruet LLC J. Calhoun Watson Sowell Gray Stepp & Laffitte LLC

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EST LAWYERS® James L. Werner Parker Poe Adams & Bernstein LLP Daniel B. White Gallivan, White & Boyd W. Reynolds Williams Willcox, Buyck & Williams Marshall Winn Wyche, Burgess, Freeman & Parham Ronald K. Wray II Gallivan, White & Boyd J. Rutledge Young Jr. Young Clement Rivers

CORPORATE LAW Eric B. Amstutz Wyche, Burgess, Freeman & Parham W.E. Applegate III Moore & Van Allen Scott Y. Barnes Warren & Sinkler J. Sidney Boone Jr. McNair Law Firm P.A. William C. Boyd Haynsworth Sinkler Boyd P.A.

James W. Bannister Bannister & Wyatt

Leon C. Harmon Nexsen Pruet LLC

Paul E. Tinkler Law Offices of Paul E. Tinkler

C. Bradley Hutto Williams & Williams

Cotton C. Harness III Cotton C. Harness III, Attorney at Law

Thomas W. Traxler Carter, Smith, Merriam, Rogers & Traxler

C. Bradley Hutto Williams & Williams P.A.

Bernard F. Hawkins Jr. Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP

John B. White Jr. Harrison, White, Smith & Coggins

Timothy C. Kulp Timothy C. Kulp Law Firm

Sean D. Houseal Buist Moore Smythe McGee

FAMILY LAW MEDIATION

Leigh J. Leventis Leigh J. Leventis Law Office

W. Thomas Lavender Jr. Nexsen Pruet LLC

Joseph M. McCulloch Law Office of Joseph McCulloch Jr.

Elizabeth B. Partlow Ogletree Deakins Gordon C. Rhea Richardson, Patrick, Westbrook & Brickman

CONSTRUCTION LAW

Robert L. Clement Jr. Young Clement Rivers

ELDER LAW

Charles J. Baker III Buist Moore Smythe McGee

William E. Craver III Craver & Webb

Michael B. Bridges Dobson, Jones, Ball, Phillips & Bridges

Daniel T. Brailsford Robinson, McFadden & Moore

John W. Currie McNair Law Firm P.A.

EMINENT DOMAIN AND CONDEMNATION LAW

Henry W. Brown Nexsen Pruet LLC

Gus M. Dixon Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP

James L. Bruner Bruner, Powell, Robbins, Wall & Mullins LLC

Randolph B. Epting Haynsworth Sinkler Boyd P.A.

Walter H. Bundy Jr. Smith, Bundy, Bybee & Barnett Thomas J. Coker Jr. Haynsworth Sinkler Boyd P.A. John E. Cuttino Turner, Padget, Graham & Laney P.A. John R. Devlin Devlin & Parkinson L. Franklin Elmore Elmore & Wall C. Allen Gibson Jr. Buist Moore Smythe McGee H. Brewton Hagood Rosen, Rosen & Hagood Herbert W. Hamilton Hamilton Martens Ballou & Sipe Leo H. Hill Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP Marvin D. Infinger Haynsworth Sinkler Boyd P.A. Thomas B. Jackson III Tyler, Cassell, Jackson, Peace & Silver N. Ward Lambert Harper Lambert & Brown W. Jefferson Leath Jr. Leath Bouch & Crawford Francis M. Mack Richardson Plowden Lawrence B. Orr Orr, Elmore & Ervin Claron A. Robertson III Robertson & Hollingsworth Franklin J. Smith Jr. Richardson, Plowden & Robinson P.A. T.S. Stern Jr. Covington, Patrick, Hagins, Stern & Lewis Henry P. Wall Bruner, Powell, Robbins, Wall & Mullins LLC James L. Werner Parker Poe Adams & Bernstein LLP

David L. Freeman Wyche, Burgess, Freeman & Parham Daniel J. Fritze Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP

Eric C. Schweitzer Ogletree Deakins

Stephen S. Bartlett Stephen S. Bartlett, Attorney at Law Bobby H. Mann Jr. Temple Mann Briggs & Hill Robert N. Rosen Rosen Law Firm James C. Sarratt The Legal Clinic of Sarratt & Clarke

FIRST AMENDMENT LAW

Mary A. Shahid McNair Law Firm P.A.

Jay Bender Baker, Ravenel & Bender

Ellison D. Smith IV Smith, Bundy, Bybee & Barnett

D.A. Brockinton Jr. Brockinton & Brockinton

Richard D. Bybee Smith, Bundy, Bybee & Barnett

Newman Jackson Smith Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP

David L. Freeman Wyche, Burgess, Freeman & Parham

EMPLOYEE BENEFITS LAW

Howell V. Bellamy Jr. Bellamy, Rutenberg, Copeland, Epps, Gravely & Bowers

Michael T. Brittingham Nexsen Pruet LLC

William L. Want Charleston School of Law

John J. Kerr Buist Moore Smythe McGee

FAMILY LAW

Thomas M. Christina Ogletree Deakins

Mark O. Andrews Andrews & Shull

Wallace K. Lightsey Wyche, Burgess, Freeman & Parham

Joel A. Daniel Ogletree Deakins

Pamela A.E. Deal Deal & Deal

William L. Dennis Smith Moore Leatherwood

Victoria L. Eslinger Nexsen Pruet LLC

Kenneth Allan Janik Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP

George M. Hearn Jr. Hearn, Brittain & Martin

S. Keith Hutto Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP

Amy Y. Jenkins McAngus, Goudelock & Courie

Robert M. Holland Holland Law Firm

Steven A. McKelvey Jr. Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP

David A. Merline Jr. Merline & Meacham

Kermit S. King Law Office of Kermit S. King

Natalma M. McKnew Smith Moore Leatherwood

R. Kent Porth Nexsen Pruet LLC

Grace Knie Grace Knie, Attorney at Law

GOVERNMENT RELATIONS LAW

Andreas N. Satterfield Jr. Jackson Lewis

Jack W. Lawrence Lawrence & Rudasill

John R. Thomas Thomas & Fisher

C. Dixon Lee III McLaren & Lee

Joseph D. Walker McNair Law Firm P.A.

Martin C. McWilliams Jr. Haynsworth Sinkler Boyd P.A.

Ken H. Lester Ken H. Lester, Attorney at Law

ENERGY LAW

Julie O. Medich Haynsworth Sinkler Boyd P.A.

Robert T. Bockman McNair Law Firm P.A.

Timothy E. Madden Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP

Edward G. Menzie Nexsen Pruet LLC

M. John Bowen Jr. McNair Law Firm P.A.

David A. Merline Jr. Merline & Meacham

Leo H. Hill Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP

William M. Musser McNair Law Firm P.A.

Lucas C. Padgett Jr. McNair Law Firm P.A.

Mark S. Sharpe Warren & Sinkler

ENVIRONMENTAL LAW

D. Allen Grumbine Womble Carlyle Sandridge & Rice Jo Watson Hackl Wyche, Burgess, Freeman & Parham John B. Hagerty Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP Cary H. Hall Jr. Wyche, Burgess, Freeman & Parham J. David Hawkins Nexsen Pruet LLC Julian Hennig III Nexsen Pruet LLC P. Mason Hogue Jr. Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP Michael D. Jones Haynsworth Sinkler Boyd P.A. William W. Kehl Wyche, Burgess, Freeman & Parham George S. King Jr. Haynsworth Sinkler Boyd P.A. G. Marcus Knight Nexsen Pruet LLC

Susan M. Smythe Buist Moore Smythe McGee John R. Thomas Thomas & Fisher

CORPORATE GOVERNANCE AND COMPLIANCE LAW

John H. Warren III Warren & Sinkler

Suzanne H. Clawson Haynsworth Sinkler Boyd P.A.

C. Thomas Wyche Wyche, Burgess, Freeman & Parham

Jo Watson Hackl Wyche, Burgess, Freeman & Parham \

DUI/DWI DEFENSE

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Keith M. Babcock Lewis, Babcock & Hawkins

Sara S. Rogers McNair Law Firm P.A.

Mark O. Andrews Andrews & Shull

O.W. Bannister Jr. Bannister & Wyatt

SC BIZ | w w w. s c b i z m a g . c o m

Timothy W. Bouch Leath Bouch & Crawford Ronald E. Cardwell McNair Law Firm P.A. Phillip L. Conner McNair Law Firm P.A. Karen A. Crawford Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP R. Howard Grubbs Womble Carlyle Sandridge & Rice Ben A. Hagood Jr. Hagood & Kerr

John O. McDougall McDougall & Self James T. McLaren McLaren & Lee Kenneth C. Porter Porter & Rosenfeld Robert N. Rosen Rosen Law Firm Morris D. Rosen Rosen, Rosen & Hagood Carol H. Sanders Carol Sanders P.A. Lon H. Shull III Andrews & Shull Vicki Johnson Snelgrove Johnson, Johnson, Whittle & Snelgrove Ann M. Stirling Stirling & O’Connell J. Mark Taylor Moore, Taylor & Thomas

Carl F. Muller Wyche, Burgess, Freeman & Parham Thomas S. Tisdale Jr. Nexsen Pruet LLC

FRANCHISE LAW

Stephen K. Benjamin McAngus, Goudelock & Courie Dwight F. Drake Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP James P. Fields Jr. McNair Law Firm P.A. James H. Hodges Hodges Consulting Group John C. Moylan III Wyche, Burgess, Freeman & Parham James H. Quackenbush Jr. Berry, Quackenbush & Stuart P.A. Theodore D. Riley Riley Pope & Laney Newman Jackson Smith Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP George B. Wolfe Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP

HEALTH CARE LAW J. Marshall Allen Buist Moore Smythe McGee Stuart M. Andrews Jr. Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP Charles E. Carpenter Jr. Carpenter Appeals & Trial Support Molly Craig Hood Law Firm Frederick A. Crawford


EST LAWYERS® Richardson, Plowden & Robinson P.A. M. Elizabeth Crum McNair Law Firm P.A. M. Craig Garner Jr. McNair Law Firm P.A. William Douglas Gray McNair Law Firm P.A. Timothy L. Hewson Nexsen Pruet LLC

Cort R. Flint McNair Law Firm P.A.

Sue Erwin Harper Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP

Fred W. Suggs Ogletree Deakins

Sarah McMillan Purnell Haynsworth Sinkler Boyd P.A.

William Y. Klett III Nexsen Pruet LLC

George A. Harper Constangy, Brooks & Smith

Catherine Templeton Ogletree Deakins

Susan C. Rosen Rosen Law Firm

Wellington M. Manning Jr. Dority & Manning

Knox L. Haynsworth Jr. Ogletree Deakins

J. Hagood Tighe Fisher & Phillips LLP

Richard S. Rosen Rosen, Rosen & Hagood

J. Bennett Mullinax J. Bennett Mullinax LLC

Katherine Dudley Helms Ogletree Deakins

M. Baker Wyche III Ogletree Deakins

Kenneth M. Suggs Janet, Jenner & Suggs LLC

Robert H. Hood Hood Law Firm

Timothy D. St. Clair Turner, Padget, Graham & Laney P.A.

Stephen J. Henry Stephen Henry Law Firm

David S. Yandle Buist Moore Smythe McGee

Matthew P. Utecht Haynsworth Sinkler Boyd P.A.

LABOR AND EMPLOYMENT LAW

Allan R. Holmes Gibbs & Holmes

LEGAL MALPRACTICE LAW

MERGERS & ACQUISITIONS LAW

Cynthia B. Hutto Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP

Mark W. Bakker Wyche, Burgess, Freeman & Parham

Donald C. Coggins Jr. Harrison, White, Smith & Coggins

William C. Boyd Haynsworth Sinkler Boyd P.A.

Celeste T. Jones McNair Law Firm P.A.

Wade E. Ballard Ford & Harrison

Steven E. Farrar Smith Moore Leatherwood

Gus M. Dixon Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP

William W. Kehl Wyche, Burgess, Freeman & Parham

Vance J. Bettis Gignilliat, Savitz & Bettis

A. Camden Lewis Lewis, Babcock & Hawkins

Randolph B. Epting Haynsworth Sinkler Boyd P.A.

G. Dewey Oxner Jr. Haynsworth Sinkler Boyd P.A.

Michael W. Bishop Ford & Harrison Cherie W. Blackburn Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP

Warren C. Powell Jr. Bruner, Powell, Robbins, Wall & Mullins LLC

Daniel J. Fritze Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP

Matthew B. Roberts Nexsen Pruet LLC

Robert O. King Ogletree Deakins

David B. Summer Jr. Parker Poe Adams & Bernstein LLP

Henry S. Knight Jr. Constangy, Brooks & Smith

M. Malissa Burnette Burnette & Rothstein P.A.

Susan Taylor Wall Parker Poe Adams & Bernstein LLP

MARITIME LAW

G. Marcus Knight Nexsen Pruet LLC

Donna Kivett Tribble Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP

Herbert W. Louthian Louthian Law Firm P.A.

E. Grantland Burns Nexsen Pruet LLC

R. Randall Bridwell Charleston School of Law

Edward G. Menzie Nexsen Pruet LLC

Matthew P. Utecht Haynsworth Sinkler Boyd P.A.

Mark W. Buyck III Willcox, Buyck & Williams

David M. Collins Buist Moore Smythe McGee

William M. Musser McNair Law Firm P.A.

Sandra Louise Weikel Miller Womble Carlyle Sandridge & Rice

Michael D. Carrouth Fisher & Phillips LLP

Marvin D. Infinger Haynsworth Sinkler Boyd P.A.

MUNICIPAL LAW

Daniel J. Westbrook Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP

Carl B. Carruth McNair Law Firm P.A.

Stephen P. Williams Haynsworth Sinkler Boyd P.A.

Molly Hughes Cherry Nexsen Pruet LLC

IMMIGRATION LAW

Donald A. Cockrill Ogletree Deakins

Patrick L. Cont Sturm & Cont

INSURANCE LAW Charles E. Baker Baker, Ravenel & Bender Samuel R. Clawson Clawson & Staubes Gerald M. Finkel Finkel Law Firm LLC James C. Gray Jr. Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP Henry E. Grimball Buist Moore Smythe McGee Elizabeth Scott Moise Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP E. Warren Moise Grimball & Cabaniss Michael A. Molony Young Clement Rivers G.D. Morgan Jr. McAngus, Goudelock & Courie Robert D. Moseley Jr. Smith Moore Leatherwood James D. Myrick Buist Moore Smythe McGee A. Marvin Quattlebaum Jr. Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP Thomas C. Salane Turner, Padget, Graham & Laney P.A.

Donald C. Coggins Jr. Harrison, White, Smith & Coggins J. Walker Coleman IV Parker Poe Adams & Bernstein LLP Patrick L. Cont Sturm & Cont John G. Creech Ogletree Deakins J. Lewis Cromer Cromer & Mabry J. Howard Daniel Ogletree Deakins David E. Dubberly Nexsen Pruet LLC G. Daniel Ellzey Fisher & Phillips LLP Carol B. Ervin Young Clement Rivers Ingrid B. Erwin Jackson Lewis Victoria L. Eslinger Nexsen Pruet LLC William H. Floyd III Nexsen Pruet LLC William H. Foster Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP L. Gray Geddie Jr. Ogletree Deakins

INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY LAW

J. Theodore Gentry Wyche, Burgess, Freeman & Parham

Julian W. Dority Dority & Manning

Henrietta U. Golding McNair Law Firm P.A.

Mark C. Dukes Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP

Thomas G. Greaves III Ogletree Deakins

Amy Y. Jenkins McAngus, Goudelock & Courie S. Clay Keim Ford & Harrison Phillip A. Kilgore Ogletree Deakins

David B. McCormack Buist Moore Smythe McGee William Ross McKibbon Jr. Ogletree Deakins Rita M. McKinney McNair Law Firm P.A. Susan P. McWilliams Nexsen Pruet LLC D. Randle Moody II Roe Cassidy Coates & Price Richard J. Morgan McNair Law Firm P.A. Brian P. Murphy Brian Murphy Law Firm Leigh Mullikin Nason Ogletree Deakins Jonathan P. Pearson Fisher & Phillips LLP

Benjamin Allston Moore Jr. Buist Moore Smythe McGee Gordon D. Schreck Buist Moore Smythe McGee

MASS TORT LITIGATION Ronald L. Motley Motley Rice Steven W. Ouzts Turner, Padget, Graham & Laney P.A. Joseph F. Rice Motley Rice

R. Allison Phinney Ogletree Deakins

A. Hoyt Rowell III Richardson, Patrick, Westbrook & Brickman

Michael S. Pitts Nexsen Pruet LLC

R. Bruce Shaw Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP

A. Christopher Potts Hitchcock & Potts

Kenneth M. Suggs Janet, Jenner & Suggs LLC

Terry Ann Rickson Terry Rickson

David G. Traylor Jr. Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP

David E. Rothstein Burnette & Rothstein P.A.

MEDICAL MALPRACTICE LAW

Andreas N. Satterfield Jr. Jackson Lewis Eric C. Schweitzer Ogletree Deakins Franklin G. Shuler Jr. Turner, Padget, Graham & Laney P.A. Lewis T. Smoak Ogletree Deakins Charles T. Speth II Ogletree Deakins Thomas L. Stephenson Nexsen Pruet LLC J. Hamilton Stewart III Ogletree Deakins Kristofer K. Strasser Ogletree Deakins Jim O. Stuckey II Littler Mendelson

J. Benjamin Alexander Haynsworth Sinkler Boyd P.A. John K. Blincow Turner, Padget, Graham & Laney P.A. Wm. Douglas Gray McNair Law Firm P.A. William U. Gunn Holcombe Bomar Charles E. Hill Turner, Padget, Graham & Laney P.A. H. Spencer King The Ward Law Firm Wallace K. Lightsey Wyche, Burgess, Freeman & Parham G. Dewey Oxner Jr. Haynsworth Sinkler Boyd P.A. James C. Parham Jr. Wyche, Burgess, Freeman & Parham

P. Mason Hogue Jr. Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP

Danny C. Crowe Turner, Padget, Graham & Laney P.A.

NON-PROFIT/CHARITIES LAW Keith G. Meacham Merline & Meacham

NON-WHITE-COLLAR CRIMINAL DEFENSE James W. Bannister Bannister & Wyatt O.W. Bannister Jr. Bannister & Wyatt Dale T. Cobb Jr. Belk, Cobb, Infinger & Goldstein Francis J. Cornely Francis J. Cornely, Attorney at Law John D. Delgado Law Firm of John Delgado Jonathan S. Gasser Harris & Gasser Coming B. Gibbs Jr. Gibbs & Holmes Gregory P. Harris Harris & Gasser Gedney M. Howe III Gedney M. Howe III P.A. J. Rene Josey Turner, Padget, Graham & Laney P.A. I.S. Leevy Johnson Johnson Toal & Battiste Leigh J. Leventis Leigh J. Leventis Law Office Lionel S. Lofton Lofton & Lofton Michael P. O’Connell Stirling & O’Connell Andrew J. Savage III Savage & Savage Jack B. Swerling Law Offices of Jack B. Swerling John B. White Jr. Harrison, White, Smith & Coggins

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EST LAWYERS® PERSONAL INJURY LITIGATION Kenneth C. Anthony Jr. Anthony Law Firm Luther J. Battiste III Johnson Toal & Battiste Larry C. Brandt Larry C. Brandt P.A. Robert L. Buchanan Jr. Buchanan Law Office Mark W. Buyck Jr. Willcox, Buyck & Williams M. Dawes Cooke Jr. Barnwell Whaley Patterson & Helms Eugene C. Covington Jr. Covington, Patrick, Hagins, Stern & Lewis Christopher J. Daniels Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP David E. Dukes Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP William N. Epps Jr. Epps & Nelson Carl B. Epps III Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP Robert M. Erwin Jr. Law Office of Robert M. Erwin Jr. Edward Vernon Ferrell Glenn Law Offices of E. Vernon F. Glenn J. Kendall Few J. Kendall Few P.A. Robert W. Foster Jr. Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP Robert P. Foster Foster Law Firm Richard M. Gergel Gergel, Nickles & Solomon Michael J. Giese Smith Moore Leatherwood Michael D. Glenn Glenn, Haigler, McClain & Stathakis Joseph P. Griffith Jr. Joe Griffith Law Firm Henry E. Grimball Buist Moore Smythe McGee William U. Gunn Holcombe Bomar

Rebecca Laffitte Sowell Gray Stepp & Laffitte LLC

Carl L. Solomon Gergel, Nickles & Solomon

D. Cravens Ravenel Baker, Ravenel & Bender

William C. Boyd Haynsworth Sinkler Boyd P.A.

I.S. Leevy Johnson Johnson Toal & Battiste

Michael E. Spears Michael E. Spears P.A.

Phillip E. Reeves Gallivan, White & Boyd

David H. Crawford Buist Moore Smythe McGee

Stephen R.H. Lewis Covington, Patrick, Hagins, Stern & Lewis

Kenneth M. Suggs Janet, Jenner & Suggs LLC

Kurt M. Rozelsky Smith Moore Leatherwood

Anne S. Ellefson Haynsworth Sinkler Boyd P.A.

Lionel S. Lofton Lofton & Lofton

Mark C. Tanenbaum Mark C. Tanenbaum P.A.

R. Bruce Shaw Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP

Morris A. Ellison Buist Moore Smythe McGee

Wade H. Logan III Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP

Monteith P. Todd Sowell Gray Stepp & Laffitte LLC

Joel H. Smith Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP

Larry D. Estridge Womble Carlyle Sandridge & Rice

H. Sam Mabry III Haynsworth Sinkler Boyd P.A.

Alan D. Toporek Uricchio, Howe, Krell, Jacobson, Toporek, Theos & Keith

Kenneth M. Suggs Janet, Jenner & Suggs LLC

F. Douglas P. Evans Brown, Massey, Evans, McLeod & Haynsworth

William Francis Marion Jr. Haynsworth Sinkler Boyd P.A. Ronald A. Maxwell Maxwell Law Firm Francis X. McCann Law Offices of Frank McCann Thomas E. McCutchen Jr. McCutchen Blanton Johnson & Barnette LLP

David G. Traylor Jr. Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP Matthew P. Utecht Haynsworth Sinkler Boyd P.A. Richard W. Vieth Henderson Brandt & Vieth Geoffrey H. Waggoner Waggoner Law Firm

Sarah McMillan Purnell Haynsworth Sinkler Boyd P.A.

W. Howard Boyd Jr. Gallivan, White & Boyd

Susan Taylor Wall Parker Poe Adams & Bernstein LLP

James D. Brice Gallivan, White & Boyd

J. Calhoun Watson Sowell Gray Stepp & Laffitte LLC

Michael T. Cole Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP

John S. Wilkerson III Turner, Padget, Graham & Laney P.A.

Gray T. Culbreath Collins & Lacy Attorneys at Law

PUBLIC FINANCE LAW

G.D. Morgan Jr. McAngus, Goudelock & Courie Robert D. Moseley Jr. Smith Moore Leatherwood Ronald L. Motley Motley Rice Edward W. Mullins Jr. Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP James D. Myrick Buist Moore Smythe McGee G. Dewey Oxner Jr. Haynsworth Sinkler Boyd P.A. D. Michael Parham Parham, Smith & Dodson Douglas F. Patrick Covington, Patrick, Hagins, Stern & Lewis Gary W. Poliakoff Poliakoff & Associates Sarah McMillan Purnell Haynsworth Sinkler Boyd P.A.

Christopher J. Daniels Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP William S. Davies Jr. Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP Elbert S. Dorn Turner, Padget, Graham & Laney P.A. David E. Dukes Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP Robert W. Foster Jr. Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP William U. Gunn Holcombe Bomar

T. David Rheney Gallivan, White & Boyd

Frank B.B. Knowlton Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP

Gedney M. Howe III Gedney M. Howe III P.A.

Terry E. Richardson Jr. Richardson, Patrick, Westbrook & Brickman

John T. Lay Jr. Ellis, Lawhorne & Sims P.A.

Carl H. Jacobson Uricchio, Howe, Krell, Jacobson, Toporek, Theos & Keith

Richard S. Rosen Rosen, Rosen & Hagood

Pope D. Johnson III McCutchen Blanton Johnson & Barnette LLP John E. Johnston Smith Moore Leatherwood John D. Kassel John D. Kassel, Attorney at Law, LLC George J. Kefalos George J. Kefalos P.A. Patrick E. Knie Patrick E. Knie Law Offices Steven M. Krause Krause, Moorhead & Draisen

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Robert H. Hood Hood Law Firm

PRODUCT LIABILITY LITIGATION

John D. Kassel John D. Kassel, Attorney at Law, LLC

Todd J. Johnson Johnson, Johnson, Whittle & Snelgrove

Steven E. Farrar Smith Moore Leatherwood

David L. Moore Jr. Love, Thornton, Arnold & Thomason

Phillip E. Reeves Gallivan, White & Boyd

Robert H. Hood Hood Law Firm

PROFESSIONAL MALPRACTICE LAW

Daniel B. White Gallivan, White & Boyd

Pope D. Johnson III McCutchen Blanton Johnson & Barnette LLP

William C. Helms Barnwell Whaley Patterson & Helms

Daniel B. White Gallivan, White & Boyd

Dana C. Mitchell III Mitchell Law Firm

D. Cravens Ravenel Baker, Ravenel & Bender

Richard A. Harpootlian Richard A. Harpootlian P.A.

David G. Traylor Jr. Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP

Morris D. Rosen Rosen, Rosen & Hagood Susan C. Rosen Rosen Law Firm Kurt M. Rozelsky Smith Moore Leatherwood David L. Savage III Savage & Savage R. Bruce Shaw Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP Joel H. Smith Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP Henry B. Smythe Jr. Buist Moore Smythe McGee

SC BIZ | w w w. s c b i z m a g . c o m

H. Sam Mabry III Haynsworth Sinkler Boyd P.A. William Francis Marion Jr. Haynsworth Sinkler Boyd P.A. C. William McGee Gallivan, White & Boyd David L. Moore Jr. Love, Thornton, Arnold & Thomason

O. Wayne Corley McNair Law Firm P.A. Theodore B. DuBose Haynsworth Sinkler Boyd P.A. Rion D. Foley McNair Law Firm P.A. Robert S. Galloway III Haynsworth Sinkler Boyd P.A. Charlton deSaussure Jr. Haynsworth Sinkler Boyd P.A. Alan M. Lipsitz Nexsen Pruet LLC Kathleen Crum McKinney Haynsworth Sinkler Boyd P.A. Margaret Christian Pope Pope Zeigler E. Tyler Smith Haynsworth Sinkler Boyd P.A. John Paul Trouche Haynsworth Sinkler Boyd P.A. John K. Van Duys Haynsworth Sinkler Boyd P.A. M. William Youngblood McNair Law Firm P.A.

RAILROAD LAW John E. Parker Peters, Murdaugh, Parker, Eltzroth & Detrick

Elaine H. Fowler Turner, Padget, Graham & Laney P.A. W. Foster Gaillard Buist Moore Smythe McGee Joel E. Gottlieb Gottlieb & Smith P.A. Cary S. Griffin McNair Law Firm P.A. R.E. Hanna III Hull, Towill, Norman, Barrett & Salley William O. Higgins Ellis, Lawhorne & Sims P.A. Mark R. Holmes Smith Moore Leatherwood Arthur L. Howson Jr. Gallivan, White & Boyd Otis Allen Jeffcoat III Jeffcoat, Pike & Nappier W. Leighton Lord III Nexsen Pruet LLC John B. McArthur Haynsworth Sinkler Boyd P.A. Charles E. McDonald Jr. Haynsworth Sinkler Boyd P.A. William P. McElveen Jr. Ellis, Lawhorne & Sims P.A. Edward G. Menzie Nexsen Pruet LLC James B. Moore Jr. McNair Law Firm P.A. Cecil H. Nelson Jr. Nelson Law Firm Matthew J. Norton Parker Poe Adams & Bernstein LLP A. Marvin Quattlebaum Smith Moore Leatherwood Ralph C. Robinson Jr. Callison Tighe & Robinson LLC Frank E. Robinson II Richardson, Plowden & Robinson P.A. Neil C. Robinson Jr. Nexsen Pruet LLC Elizabeth W. Settle Hagood & Kerr Mark S. Sharpe Warren & Sinkler W. Lindsay Smith Womble Carlyle Sandridge & Rice

Stephen G. Morrison Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP

Terry E. Richardson Jr. Richardson, Patrick, Westbrook & Brickman

Ronald L. Motley Motley Rice

Daniel B. White Gallivan, White & Boyd

Lynn Gatlin Stevens McNair Law Firm P.A.

Curtis L. Ott Turner, Padget, Graham & Laney P.A.

REAL ESTATE LAW

David M. Swanson Haynsworth Sinkler Boyd P.A.

Steven W. Ouzts Turner, Padget, Graham & Laney P.A.

William J. Bates Young Clement Rivers J. Sidney Boone Jr. McNair Law Firm P.A.

Susan M. Smythe Buist Moore Smythe McGee

William H. Tucker Hull, Towill, Norman, Barrett & Salley Ralston B. Vanzant II Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP


EST LAWYERS® John H. Warren III Warren & Sinkler

Theodore J. Hopkins Jr. Haynsworth Sinkler Boyd P.A.

Daniel A. Collins Collins & Collins

Charles M. Stuart Jr. Charles M. Stuart Jr., Attorney at Law

Sherod H. Eadon Jr. Lee, Eadon, Isgett, Popwell & Reardon

James I. Warren III Wyche, Burgess, Freeman & Parham

J. Tod Hyche Smith Moore Leatherwood

Rita Bragg Cullum Ellis, Lawhorne & Sims P.A.

Karen Hudson Thomas Ellis, Lawhorne & Sims P.A.

F. Earl Ellis Jr. Ellis, Lawhorne & Sims P.A.

H. Dave Whitener Jr. Whitener & Wharton P.A.

John Jay James II Paulling & James

Frank W. Cureton Haynsworth Sinkler Boyd P.A.

John R. Thomas Thomas & Fisher

Johnnie Dodenhoff Fulton Fulton & Barr

John F. Wyatt Bannister & Wyatt

Kenneth Allan Janik Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP

William L. Dennis Smith Moore Leatherwood

Kenneth B. Wingate Sweeny, Wingate & Barrow

Henry Mills Gallivan Gallivan, White & Boyd

SECURITIES LAW

Richard A. Jones Jr. Dobson, Jones, Ball, Phillips & Bridges

J. Donald Dial Jr. Haynsworth Sinkler Boyd P.A.

WATER LAW

Scott B. Garrett McAngus, Goudelock & Courie

Michael L.M. Jordan McNair Law Firm P.A.

James B. Drennan III Dennis, Shaw & Drennan

Fred L. Kingsmore Jr. Nexsen Pruet LLC

Randy E. Fisher Thomas & Fisher

WHITE-COLLAR CRIMINAL DEFENSE

William L. Harbison Ellis, Lawhorne & Sims P.A.

Burnet R. Maybank III Nexsen Pruet LLC

Carole H. Gunter Mays, Foster, & Gunter

James W. Bannister Bannister & Wyatt

Ben C. Harrison Harrison, White, Smith & Coggins

Keith G. Meacham Merline & Meacham

James Carlisle Hardin III James C. Hardin III PLLC

O.W. Bannister Jr. Bannister & Wyatt

M. Terry Haselden M. Terry Haselden, Attorney at Law

David A. Merline Merline & Meacham

J. Tod Hyche Smith Moore Leatherwood

Dale T. Cobb Jr. Belk, Cobb, Infinger & Goldstein

Wallace G. Holland Young Clement Rivers

David A. Merline Jr. Merline & Meacham

John Jay James II Paulling & James

Joel W. Collins Jr. Collins & Lacy, Attorneys at Law

Roy A. Howell III Trask & Howell

Thomas F. Moran Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP

Paige Weeks Johnson Johnson, Johnson, Whittle & Snelgrove

John D. Delgado Law Firm of John Delgado

Russell T. Infinger Nexsen Pruet LLC

Jonathan H. Nason McNair Law Firm P.A.

W. Steven Johnson Todd & Johnson LLP

Jonathan S. Gasser Harris & Gasser

Christopher G. Isgett Lee, Eadon, Isgett, Popwell & Reardon

Robert B. Pearlman Pearlman & Pearlman

Richard A. Jones Jr. Dobson, Jones, Ball, Phillips & Bridges

Coming B. Gibbs Jr. Gibbs & Holmes

Michael G. Roberts Turner, Padget, Graham & Laney P.A.

Michael L.M. Jordan McNair Law Firm P.A.

Gregory P. Harris Harris & Gasser

Carl H. Jacobson Uricchio, Howe, Krell, Jacobson, Toporek, Theos & Keith

William A. Ruth Ruth & MacNeille

Catherine H. Kennedy Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP

Gedney M. Howe III Gedney M. Howe III P.A.

John M. Scott III Turner, Padget, Graham & Laney P.A.

Fred L. Kingsmore Jr. Nexsen Pruet LLC

Celeste T. Jones McNair Law Firm P.A.

J. Munford Scott Jr. Turner, Padget, Graham & Laney P.A.

Robert M. Kunes Evans, Carter, Kunes & Bennett

J. Rene Josey Turner, Padget, Graham & Laney P.A.

W. Henry Sipe III Hamilton Martens Ballou & Sipe

R. David Massey Brown, Massey, Evans, McLeod & Haynsworth

I.S. Leevy Johnson Johnson Toal & Battiste

Joseph D. Clark Haynsworth Sinkler Boyd P.A. Suzanne H. Clawson Haynsworth Sinkler Boyd P.A. Andrew B. Coburn Wyche, Burgess, Freeman & Parham John W. Currie McNair Law Firm P.A. Gus M. Dixon Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP Daniel J. Fritze Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP Neil E. Grayson Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP Julian Hennig III Nexsen Pruet LLC P. Mason Hogue Jr. Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP John M. Jennings Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP George S. King Jr. Haynsworth Sinkler Boyd P.A. G. Marcus Knight Nexsen Pruet LLC Edward G. Menzie Nexsen Pruet LLC Elizabeth O. Temple Womble Carlyle Sandridge & Rice John H. Warren III Warren & Sinkler

TAX LAW Robert E. August Merline & Meacham George S. Bailey Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP Scott Y. Barnes Warren & Sinkler Edward G.R. Bennett Evans, Carter, Kunes & Bennett C. Vincent Brown Brown, Massey, Evans, McLeod & Haynsworth T. Heyward Carter Jr. Evans, Carter, Kunes & Bennett John R. Chase Haynsworth Sinkler Boyd P.A. Frank W. Cureton Haynsworth Sinkler Boyd P.A. J. Donald Dial Jr. Haynsworth Sinkler Boyd P.A. Erik P. Doerring McNair Law Firm P.A. Randolph B. Epting Haynsworth Sinkler Boyd P.A. Randy E. Fisher Thomas & Fisher

Irvin J. Slotchiver Slotchiver & Slotchiver John R. Thomas Thomas & Fisher Joseph D. Walker McNair Law Firm P.A. Robert Young Law Office of Robert Young John C. von Lehe Jr. Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP

TECHNOLOGY LAW Mark C. Dukes Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP

James F. McCrackin Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP Keith G. Meacham Merline & Meacham David A. Merline Merline & Meacham David A. Merline Jr. Merline & Meacham Lesley R. Moore Wyche, Burgess, Freeman & Parham William G. Newsome III Nexsen Pruet LLC

TRUSTS AND ESTATES

Julian J. Nexsen Nexsen Pruet LLC

Robert E. August Merline & Meacham

Virginia M. Phillips Dobson, Jones, Ball, Phillips & Bridges

George S. Bailey Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP

Hugh T. Rice Jr. Rice, MacDonald & Winters

Edward G.R. Bennett Evans, Carter, Kunes & Bennett

William A. Ruth Ruth & MacNeille

C. Michael Branham Young Clement Rivers

J. Kurt Schumacher Jr. Schumacher Law

William Bert Brannon Moses Koon & Brackett

James W. Shaw Dennis, Shaw & Drennan

C. Vincent Brown Brown, Massey, Evans, McLeod & Haynsworth

W. Henry Sipe III Hamilton Martens Ballou & Sipe

J. Michael Grant Grant & Kuyk

T. Heyward Carter Jr.

Cary H. Hall Jr. Wyche, Burgess, Freeman & Parham

John R. Chase Haynsworth Sinkler Boyd P.A.

Evans, Carter, Kunes & Bennett

Kenneth F. Smith Buist Moore Smythe McGee David C. Sojourner Ellis, Lawhorne & Sims P.A. B. Joel Stoudenmire Nexsen Pruet LLC

Newman Jackson Smith Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP

Lionel S. Lofton Lofton & Lofton Michael P. O’Connell Stirling & O’Connell Andrew J. Savage III Savage & Savage Jack B. Swerling Law Offices of Jack B. Swerling

WORKERS’ COMPENSATION LAW Ellen M. Adams Collins & Lacy Attorneys at Law Luther J. Battiste III Johnson Toal & Battiste Johnnie W. Baxley III Willson, Jones, Carter & Baxley Grady L. Beard Sowell Gray Stepp & Laffitte LLC Thomas P. Bellinger McWhirter, Bellinger & Associates P.A. Michael E. Chase Turner, Padget, Graham & Laney P.A. Alan R. Cochran Cochran Law Firm Malcolm M. Crosland Steinberg Law Firm Ajerenal Danley The Danley Law Firm William S. Davies Jr. Nelson Mullins Riley & Scarborough LLP Mark Davis McAngus, Goudelock & Courie Vernon F. Dunbar Turner, Padget, Graham & Laney P.A.

J. Russell Goudelock III McAngus, Goudelock & Courie

Jeffrey S. Jones Willson, Jones, Carter & Baxley Richard B. Kale Willson, Jones, Carter & Baxley D. Michael Kelly The Mike Kelly Law Group Stanford E. Lacy Collins & Lacy, Attorneys at Law Ernest G. Lawhorne Ellis, Lawhorne & Sims P.A. Mary Sowell League Ellis, Lawhorne & Sims P.A. W. Hugh McAngus McAngus, Goudelock & Courie Linda B. McKenzie Bowen McKenzie & Bowen H. Patterson McWhirter McWhirter, Bellinger & Associates P.A. James P. Newman Jr. Howser, Newman & Besley Samuel F. Painter Nexsen Pruet LLC David T. Pearlman Steinberg Law Firm Shannon T. Poteat Willson Jones Carter & Baxley Andrew N. Safran Andrew N. Safran LLC William E. Shaughnessy Turner, Padget, Graham & Laney P.A. Lana H. Sims Jr. Ellis, Lawhorne & Sims P.A. William Smith II Chappell, Smith & Arden P.A. Danny R. Smith Harrison, White, Smith & Coggins Harold E. Trask Trask & Howell Kathryn Williams Kathryn Williams P.A. Harold J. Willson Willson, Jones, Carter & Baxley

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People in the News UPSTATE

PEE DEE

Knox L. Haynsworth Jr., of Ogletree Deakins’ Greenville office, has been honored by Best Lawyers in recognition of his 25th consecutive year of being listed in the lawHaynsworth Dawgert Griffiths yer rating directory. Haynsworth has practiced labor law since 1960. He is past president of the Erica Dawgert and John C. Griffiths, who S.C. Bar and the Greenville County Bar and work in the Florence office of WebsterRogers is a permanent member of the 4th Circuit LLP, have earned the CPA designation. Judicial Conference. Tim McConnell has been selected by Gov. James D. Galyean has joined Mark Sanford to serve as a member of the Nexsen Pruet’s business Georgetown County Disabilities and Special litigation practice group in Needs Board. The board helps obtain serGreenville as special coun- vices for people meeting the eligibility criteria sel. Prior to joining the firm, for the Mental Retardation Division or the Galyean served as assistant Autism Division of the S.C. Department of Galyean U.S. attorney for the district Disabilities and Special Needs. McConnell works as a manager for the BAS/Tax Group of South Carolina. in WebsterRogers LLP’s Georgetown office. Chris Toates has joined Prudential C. Dan Joyner Co. in the Pelham Road office. Toates MIDLANDS previously served as co-owner of Carolina Landscape Concepts LLC. Christine Hobson, formerly the vice president of lending for Community One Federal Credit Union, will now handle branch servicGoodlett Wolfe es as well. Hobson has been with Community One for six years and has been in the financial Toby Goodlett has been named retail bankindustry for 16 years. ing executive at First Citizens in Columbia. Edward T. Zeigler Jr., pres- Goodlett, former division executive for Georident of Greenville-based gia, holds the Certified Mortgage Banker architecture firm Craig designation, was the mortgage banker of the Gaulden Davis, has been year in 2002 and served as a faculty memappointed to a two-year term ber of the Mortgage Bankers of America on the board of directors of School of Mortgage Banking. Mike Wolfe Zeigler Jr. the American Institute of has been named executive vice president and Architecture Students. He Orangeburg/Sumter division executive. Prior will serve as the American Institute of Archi- to joining First Citizens, Wolfe was the presitects’ liaison to the student institute’s board. dent of Community Resource Bank and the Zeigler is currently serving a three-year term president and CEO of Orangeburg National on the national board of directors of the Bank. American Institute of Architects. Christian E. Boesl, Suzanne Boulware Cole and Christopher M. Adams have been named

shareholders of Collins & Lacy P.C. Boesl practices in the firm’s Columbia office in the areas of workers’ compensation, employment law and product liability. Cole practices in the firm’s Greenville office and focuses on workers’ compensation. Adams practices in the Columbia office and his focus includes general civil litigation, with a concentration in construction law, product liability, premises liability, criminal defense and catastrophic injury.

Boyer

Brian Boyer has been hired as senior vice president of commercial real estate at Lake Carolina. He brings five years of industry experience to the position.

Central Carolina Community Foundation has appointed JoAnn M. Turnquist as president and CEO. Turnquist has 25 years of experience leading corpoTurnquist rate teams and independent associations. Most recently, she was chief of staff for the Moore School of Business at the University of South Carolina. Columbia Mayor Bob Coble has been selected as a Platinum 2009 Compleat Lawyer by the University of South Carolina Law School Alumni Association. Coble is on the board of directors for the River Alliance, EngenuitySC and the Central Carolina Economic Development Alliance. Mickey E. Layden of Colliers Keenan Inc. has been elected senior vice president. Layden joined Colliers Keenan in 1986 and has served as vice president of property management since 1988. Layden also serves as president of LCK Construction Services, an affiliate of Colliers Keenan. She has taken an active role in the community, serving as board chairwoman for the Committee of 100 and Palmetto Center for Women. She also serves on the board of directors for the Columbia YMCA and Central SC Alliance.

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Unexpected beauty

{

Cypress Gardens was once one of the Lowcountryâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;s largest rice plantations. Now a public park, the 80-acre pristine blackwater swamp offers unexpected beauty for visitors to enjoy. One of the best ways to experience the park is in a boat, from which you can enjoy views of seasonal blooms as well as bald cypress and swamp tupelo trees, seen above. For information, visit www.cypressgardens.info. (Photo/Ryan Wilcox)

}

2009 SC Biz Issue 2  

SCBIZ is the quarterly magazine serving senior level decision-makers across the entire state of South Carolina. In addition to the print pub...