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SONJA RICHTER – EXPLORING THE NORDIC NOIR LARGE SCANDINAVIAN ARCHITECTURE SPECIAL VISIT MAGICAL LAPLAND SWEDISH DESIGN AT LONDON FASHION WEEK

PROMOTING BRAND SCANDINAVIA

ISSUE 57

OCTOBER 2013

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Enabling real

achievement Mannaz is an international frontrunner in customised executive and project leadership development. Adopting innovative and efficient learning methods, we empower people development and business success. With offices in Copenhagen, London and Hong Kong and an international network of over 375 associated facilitators we have global reach.

You can subscribe to our monthly newsletter M Knowledge and learn more at www.mannaz.com/intl


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Scan Magazine | Contents

Contents COVER FEATURE 10

Sonja Richter Dedicated and intense, celebrated Danish actress Sonja Richter tells Scan Magazine about her dream of moving to New York, and reveals how something about the power of survival attracted her to the role of Merete Lynggaard in The Keeper of Lost Causes, the tense thriller that opened in Danish cinemas early this month.

10 25

TRAVEL FEATURES 24

Like herrings and handbags? Then you will most likely love Helsinki, the city that is big yet small, traditional but innovative. Read all about the Design District, the markets, and the food fairs not to miss.

25

Frieze Art Fair To gear up for one of the world’s biggest contemporary art fairs, Frieze London, join Scan Magazine’s reporter for a chat with a couple of the most ground-breaking, awe-inspiring Scandinavian artists who will be exhibiting there.

18

SPECIAL THEMES 26

Award-winning Danish Wallpaper

Swedish Design at London Fashion Week

61

Boasting well-known names such as BACK and upand-coming stars along the lines of Maria Nilsdotter, Re.Present came to London’s Institute of Contemporary Art to show London Fashion Week that the Swedish cool is very hot. Scan Magazine has all the best bits.

20

CULINARY PROFILE 22

Couloir Replacing steep slopes with breaking waves, Couloir is an après-ski bar on Amager Beach Park, 5 kilometres from Copenhagen’s town square. Scan Magazine went to see what all the fuss is about and discovered amazing burgers and a relaxed, surf-friendly atmosphere.

86

Danish Architecture World-renowned for its simplicity, functionality, aesthetics and humanistic understanding, Danish architecture is driven by a need for innovation not only in regards to environmental sustainability, but also in terms of economic and social welfare; solar cells, urban mountains and Scandinavian values.

111 Magical Lapland If snow-clad fells are your cup of tea, this is the theme for you. But, as Scan Magazine discovered, there is more to Lapland than exceptionally beautiful nature and extreme weather conditions. Read more about airdried reindeer, the Sámi way of life, husky rides, the Northern Lights, and much, much more.

REGULARS & COLUMNS

82 128

Swedish Architecture A steady constant in a world of rapid change, architecture brings stability and defines our time. Swedish architecture, then, mirrors our needs, desires and longing for harmony. From cathartic processes refusing squares to planning consultation in the name of Nobel, this is trailblazing world-class architecture.

Joha Having set out to tell the world about wool’s cooling, as well as warming, qualities, Danish underwear producer Joha brings warmth and comfort to snug toddlers and soft eco-friendliness for all the family, day and night. Autumn is here – what’s not to love?

Norwegian Architecture Take rapid population growth and combine it with climate change, and architecture has got itself a very challenging task indeed. With wooden high-rise buildings symbolising its pioneering position, Norwegian architecture promotes forward-thinking solutions to everything from the single-family home to cultural complexes and office buildings.

When CAMAC’s Annual Student Wallpaper Design Competition returned last month, two out of three winners were Danish. The work of competing students was exhibited at the Imago Gallery in Mayfair.

19

Ecospheres Staycation is the new vacation, right? Wrong. The ecoconscious Swedish travel agency Ecospheres offers nothing but sustainable destinations, with a hiking adventure in Morocco being one of its most popular packages.

DESIGN FEATURES 17

Visit Helsinki

14

We Love This | 16 Fashion Diary | 118 Hotels of the Month | 122 Attractions of the Month

126 Restaurants of the Month | 135 Humour | 138 Music & Culture | 144 Scandinavian Culture Calendar

Scan Business REGULARS & COLUMNS 131 Business Columns & News Key note, columns and news stories on Scandinavian businesses and business events.

134 Scandinavian Business Calendar Highlights of Scandinavian business events.

Issue 57 | October 2013 | 3


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We look forward to welcoming you to Stockholm! elite hotel arcadia, elite eden park hotel, elite hotel marina tower, elite palace hotel, elite hotel stockholm plaza


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Staying with Elite Hotels means staying in style! Choose between five beautiful hotels in Stockholm.

www.elite.se


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Scan Magazine | Editor’s Note

Dear Reader, The loss of an exceptionally talented editor is a double-edged sword, at least if you are asked to take over from her. Waving goodbye to Nia Kajastie not only means loosing a very well-liked colleage; it also means that I have some big shoes to fill. That said, I am very excited to be taking over as editor of Scan Magazine, a publication that has grown in both size and popularity under Nia’s editorship, and I look forward to unearthing many a hidden Scandinavian holiday gem, up-and-coming design talent, and new Nordic eatery here in the UK in the months to come. September has been a busy month for London-based Scandinavians, with both London Fashion Week and London Design Festival gracing the city with its presence. Scan Magazine ventured out to all the hot-spots and spoke to the most interesting up-and-coming talents from the Nordics, and you can read all about Frieze Art Fair, Swedish fashion designers at ICA’s RePresent, and award-winning Danish designers in the design section. Alongside this annual celebration of design and creativity, we thought it appropriate to delve into another field where the design, innovation and quality that define Scandinavia merge into one: architecture. It may be getting chilly outside, but the architects featured this month tell you everything you need to know

about environmentally-friendly insulation, aesthetics that outlive trends, office environments that boost success, and homes that promote happiness. Not quite at the house-buying stage just yet? Do not fret: we have lined up some of the very best ideas for escapism this winter. Film fans, find out about the highlights at London’s upcoming Nordic Film Festival; lovers of avant-garde music, snap up the next available flight to Reykjavik for the amazing Iceland Airwaves line-up; and those of you looking for stunning nature treks and rare Sámi delicacies, simply fast-forward to our Magical Lapland theme. If leaving the house seems like too big an ask as the evenings get darker and the rain more persistent, take comfort in the idea that good things come to those who wait. Like Sonja Richter, our cover lady, for instance, who will appear on a screen near you very soon.

Linnea Dunne Editor

Scan Magazine

Contributors

Tim Gay

Issue 57 | October 2013

Signe Hansen

Anette Berve

Inna Allen

Anna Taipale

Julie Lindén

Sophia Stovall

Cecilia Varricchio

Mette Lisby

Published by

Thomas Bech Hansen

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Scan Magazine Ltd

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Maria Smedstad

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Published 07.10.2013 ISSN 1757-9589

Design & Print Liquid Graphic Ltd

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Next issue 4 November 2013 © All rights reserved. Material contained in this publication may not be reproduced, in whole or in part, without prior permission of Scan Magazine Ltd.

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Scan Magazine | Contributors

Regular Contributors Linnea Dunne (editor) has been working as a freelance writer for almost fifteen years, contributing to Scan Magazine since 2010. A fan of coffee, politics and folk music, she is Swedish born and bred but now lives in north London. Mette Lisby is Denmark’s leading female comedian. She invites you to laugh along with her monthly humour columns. Since her stand-up debut in 1992, Mette has hosted the Danish versions of “Have I Got News For You” and “Room 101”. Swedish Sara Schedin is a freelance writer with a degree in journalism from City University London. She moved here in 2006 and is currently covering Scandinavian culture in the UK.

Kjersti Westeng moved from Norway to London to study journalism. She now finds it impossible to leave, despite having finished university two years ago. From 9 to 5 she works in PR, but in the evenings she writes her blog and plans her next holiday. Julie Lindén is half Swedish and half Norwegian, and came to London two years ago to pursue a degree in journalism and creative writing at Kingston University. When she’s not busy studying, she is travelling the globe, learning new languages and planning novels to be written. Hannah Gillow Kloster is a Norwegian freelance writer who came to London to study English literature on its home turf. With a BA from Royal Holloway under her belt, she is currently pursuing an MA in Digital Humanities in Chicago, combining her two favourite things: literature and the internet.

8 | Issue 57 | October 2013

Maria Smedstad moved to the UK from Sweden in 1994. She received a degree in Illustration in 2001, before settling in the capital as a freelance cartoonist, creating the autobiographical cartoon Em. She writes a column on the trials and tribulations of life as a Swede in the UK. Karl Batterbee is devoted to Scandinavian music and knows exactly what is coming up in the UK. Apart from writing a monthly music update for Scan Magazine Karl has also started the Scandipop Club Night and its corresponding website: www.scandipop.co.uk. Inna Allen is a freelance writer, translator and photographer whose passions lie in all things art and design. She moved to the UK from her native Finland in 2001 and has since developed a chronic yearning for sauna. Having travelled much of the world, Signe Hansen, MA graduate in Journalism and previous editor at Scan Magazine, is now back freelancing in London, where she writes on everything Scandinavian and her main passions: culture, travel and health. Julie Bauer Larsen is a 29-yearold journalist specializing in corporate communication. In her current day job she combines her professional skills with years of experience as a volunteer on numerous projects for the Red Cross and other organisations. She’s passionate about incredible India, fantastic food and new novels.

Magnus Nygren Syversen is a Norwegian freelance journalist, who graduated from Middlesex University with a BA in Journalism & Communication in 2010. Having left London and relocated to the other side of the world, he is currently doing his MA at Deakin University in Melbourne, Australia. Rikke Oberlin Flarup is a Danish freelance writer and publisher with a passion for thick novels and DIY zines. Still a newcomer to London, she spends her free time exploring the city's hidden gems. Maria Malmros is a freelance writer from Sweden, with a journalism degree from Ithaca College in New York (USA). She enjoys painting, learning foreign languages, and rummaging through London, looking for any areas of the city yet to be uncovered. Nicolai Lisberg has a bachelor’s degree in journalism from the Danish School of Journalism. He has lived in both Denmark and Germany, before moving to London last year. When he is not busy learning a new language, he spends most of his time playing, watching or writing about football. Cecilia Varricchio is a Swedish freelance writer and translator who moved to London in 2009. Before moving to London, she spent more than nine years in different countries outside Sweden, including five ears in Italy. She has a strong passion for writing since her childhood years.


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Business on the go Now also on iPad

Tablet Business app

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Photo: Signe Vilstrup

Scan Magazine | Cover Feature | Sonja Richter

10 | Issue 57 | October 2013


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Scan Magazine | Cover Feature | Sonja Richter

Sonja Richter has, with her raw dedicated performances, become one of Nordic Noir’s dark darlings.

Sonja Richter - exploring the Nordic Noir From the distraught fiancée of a paralysed man, to a self-pitying alcoholic; whether it is on the screen or stage, actress Sonja Richter is not known to do light-hearted character portrayals. The 39-year-old Dane, who is starring in the adaption of Jussi Adler-Olsen's bestselling novel The Keeper of Lost Causes, talks to Scan Magazine about her attraction to the dark and incomprehensible sides of human nature. By Signe Hansen | Cover Photo: Signe Vilstrup / Photos: Christian Geisnæs

As a destroyed alcoholic, fighting with her demons and her self-pity, Sonja Richter held the hearts of the entire theatre captivated – and it was no gentle treat she gave them. The painfully truthful performance, which was my first live encounter with Richter’s captivating persona, took place at the Betty Nansen Theatre in Copenhagen in 2005. Since that surely unique occasion, I have learnt that in fact this kind of raw, 100 per cent dedicated performance is not unusual for Richter, who has been a regular cast member at Betty Nansen as well as The Royal Danish Theatre for more than a decade. In 2003, four years after graduating from Denmark’s National Theatre School, Richter was nominated for the country’s two most prestigious film awards for her heart-wrenching performance in Susanne Bier’s dark love story Open Hearts. Ten years and numerous films later, she is

still very much at the top of Nordic directors’ lists when it comes to capturing the complex, dark characteristic of the Nordic Noir. But what exactly is it that drives the mesmerising blonde to explore the darkest of the dark? When I ask Richter, she answers with a suitably mellow laugh: “It is not something that I consciously seek out, but maybe somehow I do because I find it fascinating. I am offered them [the roles], but I also accept them, and I do so because I find it tremendously interesting; I’m not afraid to go into those emotions, pictures and moods, I find it exciting more than I find it unpleasant.” After a short pause she adds: “I guess I am just strangely curious to explore everything that I don’t understand.”

tropa Group’s upcoming franchise based on Jussi Adler-Olsen's award-winning thriller series about Department Q. When Richter was offered the role, it was, however, not a reverence for the novels, which she had not then yet read, or thrillers in general that convinced her to say yes. It was, she says, the story within the story. “What I think this story, more than anything, is about, is the power of survival, both for my character Merete and for Carl Mørck, whom Nikolaj Lie Kaas plays. The two main characters are each in their own darkness; he is in a darkness that is within him, and she is in one that surrounds her. The strength that they need to get through and out on the other side is what I find very fascinating and worth telling about the story.”

In the darkness In her newest venture, The Keeper of Lost Causes, Richter plays Merete Lynggaard, a woman who has been encaged for five years. The film is the first of Danish Zen-

When The Keeper of Lost Causes had its world premiere at the Locarno Film Festival in August, Richter’s intense portrayal, according to reviewers, had the audience

Issue 57 | October 2013 | 11


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many years, harboured a dream of moving to New York, a dream that only grew stronger with her recent spell in the States. However, she admits, the plan always ends up getting postponed when a new intriguing chance to explore some mysterious, dark or just puzzling aspect of human nature turns up as a job opportunity. “Right now I’m filming in Thyborøn in Northern Jutland, and that is not especially New York funky or anything, but that doesn’t matter if the role is right [Richter is currently recording for the film When Animals Dream/Når dyret vågner -2014]. New York is more something I dream about for private reasons. I find it a fascinating city... I like the idea that I can just disappear there.” Judging from Richter’s continuously captivating performances, however, it seems her chances of sneaking off without anyone noticing are as slim as the petite actress herself. Richter’s intense performance in the adaption of Jussi Adler-Olsen’s bestselling novel The Keeper Of Lost Causes had the audience squirming in their seats at the film’s premier.

squirming in the seats. The making of the scenes took weeks, during which Richter spent most of her time in a small, purpose-built enclosure. Captioning the unbearably tense and frightful atmosphere was, she admits, difficult, but the film’s director Mikkel Nørgaard caught it at its core. “When I saw the film, I did think – is that it? Because it felt like I’d been in that cage for three weeks sweating my soul out. But that’s the way it is, it’s not the first time I watched one of my films and thought that,” she explains and adds: “It’s like boiling a really good soup or sauce; it takes a long time and when it’s done there are only a few really tasty drops left. The bright lights of Hollywood Having starred in numerous Scandinavian films, plays and TV-series, Richter was recently offered her first role in a film on the other side of the Atlantic. In the Tommy Lee Jones directed film, The Homesman, Richter yet again, though in considerably warmer and brighter settings, plays a captive woman. But while many Danish actors would give their left arm to, one day, get that call from Hollywood, Richter was, perhaps not surpris-

12 | Issue 57 | October 2013

ingly, not particularly eager to leave the dark Nordic universe. “I’ve often been asked if I dreamt about going to Hollywood, and I always said – no, not really. The way I work means that I sometimes feel shameful about my profession because people think I do it for the wrong reasons, and that [the dream of Hollywood] is the wrong reason for me: I do it for the story, not because I want to be in the spotlight,” stresses Richter.

The Keeper of Lost Causes (Kvinden i Buret) premiers in Danish cinemas October 3. The film is set to premier in countries all over the world during the following months.

The Homesman stars some of Hollywood’s biggest names, including Tommy Lee Jones, Hillary Swank and Meryl Streep, and the cast was, says Richter, part of the reason she went for the role. “I said yes because it was a challenge, a difficult role, and because it was a chance to work with people who are at the top of my profession. I thought it would be straightout stupid to say anything but yes to the chance to tell a story with them. In that way it was a dream, but it was not one that I had articulated to myself.” Richter, who grew up in the countryside in Jutland, today lives by herself in Copenhagen. But she reveals that she has, for

For more information, please visit: www.arnedahl.net


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WELCOME TO HAGEDORNHAGEN hagedornhagen is founded by the two photographers Mads Hagedorn-Olsen and Anders Morell. At hagedornhagen we have a passion for creeps and tiny winged creatures. For this reason, we have collected, prepared and photographed selected types of beetles, butterflies and plants, and created a series of artprints of very high quality, as regards to both craftsmanship and artistry. Each artprint has been produced in a limited edition.

DANISH DESIGN www.hagedornhagen.com


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Scan Magazine | Design | We Love This

We love this... October has arrived and Scandinavia is an abundance of colour. As the fresh air and rain sweep up the dust and clean our gardens, we celebrate with homemade apple pies and new additions to the home from our favourite Scandinavian designers! By Christina B. Poulsen

We just love this Mini Moderns children’s wallpaper with beautiful colour and horse print, £23 www.bodieandfou.com

Our favourite Danish knitwear brand AIAYU has once again launched a fantastic range of throws and pillows in lovely colours and amazing Cashlama wool. Prices start from £80 wild-swans.com

Another great addition to the nursery – a Friends of Violet poster of a pear that needs a hug! If that doesn’t make you cuddly, what Great brass lantern, £45

Lovely cobber vase, adds warmth to any

will? £28

en.housedoctor.dk

table, £30, en.housedoctor.dk

www.bodieandfou.com

14 | Issue 57 | October 2013


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Scan Magazine | Design | Fashion Diary

Fashion Diary... October is officially the month when we bring out the boots and knits; colours are generally darker, but the most beautiful shades of grey and taupe mixed with soft suede and leather make a great alternative, and one which the Nordic fashionistas master to perfection! By Christina B. Poulsen

Gorgeous grey suede bag from House Doctor. We love the practical yet fashionable shape, £180, www.bodieandfou.com

Beautiful dress in grey and gold with elasticated waistband, drop sleeves and gold button detail. Add a pair of heels or neat sandals and you are ready for a night of fun! Why not also check out the Stine Maria Black does brilliant jewellery for the

Goya dress in a darker Pyrite Grey or the

eclectic woman: spinning mono necklace

stylish Trip Shirt in the same style? Stine

from Maria Black, £175

Goya dress, £389.

www.net-a-porter.com

wild-swans.com

If autumn is the time for bold colours and prints and a fresh take on elegant femininity, it certainly is the time to take a sneak peek at the gorgeous new arrivals over at Danish Hofmann, whose online shop is overflowing with soft wools, luxurious silks and playful silhouettes and volumes. We absolutely love this look from the sophisticated, youthful online retailer that draws its inspiration from the effortless style of Perfect Sofie Schnoor boots that will work even

Parisian women: Lotta trousers £225,

in the office as the sequins add style, £245

Marisa jumper £195.

wild-swans.com

hofmanncopenhagen.com

16 | Issue 57 | October 2013


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Scan Magazine | Design | Frieze Art Fair

will be kept secret, and will only be revealed at Frieze. She will not interfere with the children’s work, but will be responsible for finding a way to present her project and the children’s final decision.

Frieze Art Fair. Photo: Lyndon Douglas

Scandinavian talent at London Frieze Art Fair This month, one of the world’s biggest contemporary art fairs, Frieze London, opens its doors to the public in Regent’s Park. Scan Magazine has scouted two must-see Scandinavian artists exhibiting there.

Another interesting Scandinavian presenting at Frieze is Swedish artist Ilja Karilampi, who will be represented by the Sandy Brown gallery in the Frame section of the fair. Karilampi has produced a diverse set of work, from installations to a glowing piece for a nightclub in Stockholm. He is best-known for his documentary-style video work, which mixes hand-held camera footage with digitally-manipulated imagery. At Frieze, he will present a new video installation called Hendrix Incident. It is based on Karilampi’s own experiences and knowledge of the Gothenburg suburb Mölndal at a unique time in history: when touring rock star Jimi Hendrix was detained there for two weeks after being arrested for trashing his hotel room. Frieze London will be open to the public 17–20 October 2013.

By Sanna Halmekoski

While many artists will present works via the more than 170 art galleries featured, the winner of the prestigious Emdash Award is invited to create new work for the fair, and this year’s winner is Finnish artist Pilvi Takala. Scan met the artist at Gasworks, a studio in Vauxhall, where she has a residency from August until October. She is known for her video work documenting experimental performances in which she often breaks a community’s unspoken rules. For example,

Takala filmed her unsuccessful attempt to enter Disneyland Paris dressed in a Snow White costume. “For Frieze, I wanted to create a power shift, so I left the decision over how best to spend the Emdash budget to a committee of ten children aged 8 to twelve. This is a group that is not normally entrusted with large budgets or important decisions. The children will collectively decide how the Emdash award money of around 8,000 pounds will be used. I have no say in their decision,” says Takala. The outcome of her workshops with these children Above: Ilja Karilampi. © Christian Bertell/Sveriges Radio Below: Comissioned wall works for Berns Salonger nightclub in Stockholm by Ilja Karilampi

For more information, please visit: www.friezelondon.com www.pilvitakala.com www.karilampi.se www.sandy-brown.com www.gasworks.org.uk Gasworks studio. Photo: Sanna Halmekoski

Pilvi Takala. Photo: Sanna Halmekoski

Issue 57 | October 2013 | 17


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rector Dr. Riccardo Bigi, who confided to Scan Magazine that he was rather surprised to learn that as many as two of the three students behind the wallpapers he had selected were from Denmark. When awarding the prize to winner Sara Zollinger, whose wallpaper can be ripped to create multiple patterns, he said: “This looks at wallpaper in a different and innovative way, embodying artistic vision and technical ability. The peeling back of layers simultaneously creates a sense of modernity and primitive memory.”

CAMAC Danish design student Sara Zollinger's winning wallpaper.

CAMAC Danish design student Stina Eldsten's winning wallpaper.

Danish design students win praise at the London Design Festival

Along with her fellow student at the Danish Academy, Stina Eldsten, Zollinger also won the Mr. Perswall Prize, awarded by the competition’s sponsor, to a total of four lucky students who will have their designs manufactured and sold on the Mr. Perswall website. Zollinger, who was encouraged to participate in the competition by Design School tutor Malene Kristiansen, said: “I only had three days to do the first digital design, so it had to happen really fast. But in a way I think that was a good thing; it meant I didn’t have time to think too much, just do it. It is a great experience to do something like this and see that it really works – I learned a lot from this competition.” Several other students from the Danish Academy were shortlisted for the competition’s many other prizes, which included work placements at English design companies.

Students from the Design School at the Royal Danish Academy of Fine Arts have won praise and prizes in CAMAC’s Annual Student Wallpaper Design Competition. The prizes were handed out at a special reception hosted by CAMAC, a charitable incorporated organisation, and Imago Art Gallery, to celebrate the Academy’s first year of participation in the competition. By Signe Hansen | Photos: Ben Taylor

For the first time, eight design students from Denmark joined students from eight universities and colleges across the UK and Ireland in CAMAC’s Annual Student Wallpaper Design Competition. The competition, currently in its fifth year, is for the second time running as part of the London Design Festival, and students had

18 | Issue 57 | October 2013

their work exhibited at Imago Gallery in Mayfair and Morley Gallery at Morley College during the festival. Sara Zollinger and Stine Marie Krebs were among three students commended by the Imao Gallery. The gallery’s prize, the Imao Gallery Award, was awarded by gallery di-

CAMAC Danish design student Sara Zollinger and gallery director Dr. Riccardo Bigi.

For more information, please visit: www.mrperswall.co.uk


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Dagmar dress from the SS14 collection. Photo: House of Dagmar

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One of the celebrated Altewai Saome looks. Photo: AltewaiSaome

BACK SS14. Photo: BACK

The Swedish fashion wonder Re.Presented at London Fashion Week The old news? The Swedish cool is hot. Very hot. The new news? Swedish brands are joining forces to make a collective fashion statement far beyond the country’s borders. First stop: London Fashion Week. By Julie Lindén

The Re.Present Showroom, a collective initiative by individuals from Business Sweden, Make Lemonade Agency and Varg PR, aims to create a platform for key Scandinavian designers to form and grow lasting relationships with the British fashion industry, pin-pointing London as an increasingly focal metropolitan for Scandinavian fashion. Launched at the beautiful London Institute of Contemporary Art on 15 September, the showroom’s first stop featured 11 Swedish designers – from the hyped stylistic design duo AltewaiSaome to veteran ready-to-wear brands such as BACK and House of Dagmar. “The UK is one of our most important markets, where the awareness of our brand has increased even more during the last couple of seasons. Participating in Re.Present feels like a natural step for us, and the fact that some of the best brands in Sweden are represented under

one roof is amazing,” the House of Dagmar designers said. The showroom will continue to travel the globe as it showcases Swedish fashion on a seasonal basis. The hope is to help participating fashion houses connect to the city in question, while maintaining the creative individuality of all. Maria Nilsdotter, showing her collection of characteristically fable-inspired jewellery, emphasised her personal relationship to London as a key reason for her presence at Re.Present: “I got my degree at London-based Central Saint Martins College of Arts and Design, so it feels very special for me to be back showcasing my design. Our goal is to meet with buyers who have a knowledge of and understanding for our kind of jewellery design, and can help the brand grow internationally,” she said.

Eco-friendly brand Maska, named 2011’s Rookie of the Year by the Swedish Fashion Council, was one of the newer faces hoping to create lasting bonds with London. “We will be dressing a different woman in London than we will in Stockholm, and it’s vital to be present at the location where you want to take the brand,” said Maria Svensson, co-founder of Maska. “The fashion industry is in constant flux, so being part of this collective helps us get out there.” Rest assured: the Swedish cool is far from being put on ice.

Gargoyle ring by Maria Nilsdotter. Photo: Maria Nilsdotter

For more information, please visit: www.representshowroom.com

Issue 57 | October 2013 | 19


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Joha is one of Scandinavia’s largest producers of wool wear, underwear and nightwear for babies, children and youngsters.

Warm and snug as a bug in sheep’s favourite wear Like it or not: winter, the season of mounting temperature differences between the in- and outdoors, is approaching. But family-owned Danish underwear producer Joha offers an easy solution: wrap yourself and your loved ones up in a 100 per cent natural, moist-absorbing, heat and cold protecting set of soft Merino wool underwear. By Signe Hansen | Photos: Joha

Wool underwear might not sound like an area of great innovation. Still, Joha, Scandinavia’s largest producer of underwear for babies, children and youngsters, has many firsts under its belt. It was the first company in the world to manufacture machine washable wool clothes for babies and the first baby underwear producer to be approved for the EU-Ecolabel label. Joha was founded by current CEO and administrative director Michael Frølund Jo-

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hansen’s grandparents in 1963. Today the brand, which is head-quartered in Sunds near Herning in Jutland, is sold in approximately 900 shops in the Nordic countries as well as Germany, Belgium, Holland, Russia and recently Japan. The success can, says CEO Johansen, be attributed to the continued adherence to his grandfather’s meticulous and quality-orientated approach. “My granddad was a qualified tailor, and we have maintained

his approach to tailored clothing up until today. We devote great effort to ensuring that the things that leave our production unit are of a very high quality. When my granddad started the company, nothing left without having gone through his personal quality control. Today it’s on a different scale; it’s not possible for one man to quality-control everything, but we still ensure that nothing leaves without having been through a rigorous quality check.” All Joha’s products, which include wool, cotton and silk underwear and nightwear, are produced at the brand’s own factory in Ukraine, which employs more than 350 people. The warming, and cooling, qualities of wool Thirty-five years ago, Joha began producing wool underwear for babies. Though home-knitted wool has been a favoured fabric for centuries, especially in the cold north, the company was the first to manu-


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Scan Magazine | Design | Joha

of the product, including silk and cotton combinations. Joha's 100 per cent wool products are available in several variations and designs – from the very thin fabric ideal for use in summer, to the thick, warm and cosy fabric perfect for winter. Johansen explains: “A lot of people know that wool is great for keeping the body warm and maintaining a stable temperature when it’s cold, but actually it is just as good at keeping the heat away from the body.” Another unique quality of wool is its ability to absorb moisture. Because of the many small air pockets contained in the fabric’s fibres, it can absorb up to 40 per cent of its own weight. In comparison, cotton only absorbs approximately eight per cent of its own weigh. “Wool is a fantastic product for babies to sleep in because it keeps their bodies at a constant temperature and absorbs any moisture preventing them from getting damp and cold,” explains Johansen. Soft on the skin and the environment

facture a product which was machinewashable and durable. Since then, the company has developed several variations

Not everybody associates wool with a soft and luxurious material. Some might have less than fond memories of grandma’s rigid home-knitted sweaters and prickly winter socks. But, made from soft Merino wool sourced from New Zealand and Aus-

tralia, Joha's wool products are a different story. All products carry the Woolmark quality mark, and in 2000 Joha was, as the first baby underwear brand, approved for the EU-Ecolabel. “All our products, the cotton and wool, have the EU-Ecolabel. It‘s a symbol that testifies that there are no harmful substances in our products but also that the product has been through an environmentally-harmless production. It means that we have to be extra careful when we source our yarn, and it makes things a little bit more complicated, but we like to run a principled business,” stresses Johansen. Joha’s collections of timeless Scandinavian underwear and nightwear designs are continuously renewed by the company’s five designers and also include an organic series. Furthermore, Joha recently launched a series of female wool underwear, which will be followed by the Johansen series for men this autumn.

For more information, please visit: www.joha.dk

Joha recently launched a series of women’s wool underwear and is launching the Johansen series for men this autumn.

Issue 57 | October 2013 | 21


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The après-ski bar that needs no snow Restaurant and café Couloir takes the spirit of the Alps to Copenhagen and the Øresund coast, replacing steep slopes and snowboarders with breaking waves and surfers.

rooms and one restaurant. On a good night, we accommodate around 500 people,” says Kasper Nielsen.

By Thomas Bech Hansen | Photos: Couloir

Natural alternative Live DJ sets, an open patio, delicious moules-frites, burgers, beers and a relaxed and sun-tanned, sportily-clad clientele: it sounds like a French ski bar, it feels like it, and it sort of is. As sister bar to its namesake in French ski town Tignes, Couloir’s Danish branch vows to create an authentic après-ski atmosphere in Amager Beach Park. “Couloir started out as a place that aimed to reflect the culture of various après-ski bars in France and Austria with a cosy atmosphere and affordable food and drinks. Of course, the blueprint was already in place with Couloir in Tignes,” explains coowner Kasper Nielsen.

yet one that keeps a firm focus on fresh produce and a high service level. From the outset, the people behind the concept have maintained their original passion, which is to make a place for people to reminisce and tell skiing stories and simply enjoy a great meal. Today, Couloir is that and much more. “We have gone from being a small, unknown Amager hangout to a well-visited and varied place with two large dining

Amager Beach Park is located about 5 kilometres from Copenhagen’s town square, and boasts a true seaside atmosphere with water sport options aplenty. This setting was the natural choice for fusing the best of the Alps with a place much less snowy. “When you do not have any mountains or much snow, which is the case in Denmark, the natural alternative to skiing is surfing and kite surfing. One of the best places for that is definitely Amager Beach Park,” says Kasper Nielsen and provides added reasons why this is a happening place: “New buildings are built all the time, which contribute to a growing customer base. Yet the place maintains its really relaxed atmosphere, which makes it a joy to work here.”

Storytelling and great meals Since its inception, Couloir has gradually refined its concept to make it an all-round café/restaurant with an affordable menu,

22 | Issue 57 | October 2013

For more information, please visit: www.couloir.dk


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HALF P RIC TICKET E S

£6

BY APP LYING CODE sc

aneven t

s50

AT CHE C

KOUT*

COM P ETITION Win a Stressless® Orion Batick Latte Chair and Stool worth £1349

All the best of brand Scandinavia for you to taste, test and buy! Tobacco Dock, Wapping, London

The Scandinavia Show will be returning to London on 12-13 October 2013. This time at the historic TOBACCO DOCK in Wapping, London.

TRAVEL Denmark, Sweden, Norway, Finland and Iceland are some of the greatest travel destinations in the world. And The Scandinavia Show will be the UK’s single most important showcase for Nordic tourism this year.

The Scandinavia Show is the only UK show dedicated exclusively to showcase the best of Denmark, Sweden, Norway, Finland and Iceland. The show incorporates Scandinavian design, travel, lifestyle, fashion, culture, music and food and all our exhibitors have well-stocked stalls – everything can be purchased at The Scandinavia Show.

FOOD All the most mouth-watering specialities from the Nordic culinary table will be handed out or sold at The Scandinavia Show.

DESIGN & LIFESTYLE If you love the bright and airy Scandinavian design, then The Scandinavia Show will be a can’t-miss event. The show will exhibit everything from top-end furniture, lighting, fabrics, carpets, interior design items, designer clothes and footwear, to timeless classics that will always embody the simple, yet stylish Scandinavian disposition.

Gold Sponsor

Official Silver Partner

NEW FOR 2013! - Get up close with the beautiful Reindeer - NORDICANA film experience by Arrow Films - Visit us at the historic TOBACCO DOCK in WAPPING - Meet Swedish actor and strong man Magnus Samuelsson - See the live Viking battle by VisitDenmark

*T&C’s apply

12-13 October 2013

For further information, competition and tickets: Magnus Samuelsson

www.scandinaviashow.co.uk

Official Bronze Partner

Official Partners

Bronze Sponsors

Entertainment Partner

Organised by

SCAN M A G A Z I N E


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Herrings and handbags – autumn comes to Helsinki Restaurant in Helsinki. Photo: Timo Santala

Helsinki: a big little city, steeped in equal parts tradition and innovation. Whether in the comfort zone of great design or its buzzing culinary scene, the city retains the capacity to surprise. Autumn infuses Helsinki with food festivals, design happenings and tons of energy. By Joanna Nylund

Market Square. Photo: Lauri Rotko

If there is anything typical about Helsinki cuisine, it would be the emphasis on fresh, locally-produced food. Autumn arrives with a bountiful harvest from fields, forests and the sea, with chefs all over town creating inspired menus based on the very best seasonal ingredients. Helsinki’s open-air food markets and market halls, where you can buy locallygrown food directly from the producers, are perfect examples of traditional ways of selling food that now meet the demands of gourmet palates and environmentallysound food production.

Street pop-up restaurant. Photo: Maija Astikainen

Design district Iittala. Photo: Ewan Bell

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The annual Helsinki Baltic Herring Fair takes place 6-12 October this year. Dating back all the way to 1743, the popular fair is the oldest traditional event in Helsinki. Local fishermen gather in the seaside Market Square to sell their Baltic herring products and other types of fish. Restaurant Day is a real food lovers’ event, too. This local initiative promotes street food culture by allowing anyone to launch their own pop-up restaurant for the day, wherever they like. The event, arranged four times a year, has gained huge popularity and also serves as an innovator, especially for immigrants to contribute to the diversity of Helsinki restaurant culture. Helsinki is also very much a design lover’s Mecca. The Helsinki Design Week, arranged annually in September and looking forward to its ten-year anniversary in

2014, is the biggest design event in Northern Europe. The annual event features an intriguing blend of contemporary design, fashion and music. In the very heart of the city lies the Design District, a cluster of creative businesses that spans 25 streets and 200 dots on the map. There is something here for every discerning taste: jewellery, design and antiques shops, fashion boutiques, museums, art galleries, restaurants and showrooms. There are guided design walks as well as tailored tour maps with special themes. The Design District is also home to the Museum of Finnish Architecture, the Design Museum and Design Forum Finland. Tram number 6, running from Hietalahti to Arabianranta, serves as the perfect means of transport for those seeking their fill of design, art and tasty food.

Arabia Memories collection. Photo: Timo Junttila

For more information, please visit: www.visithelsinki.fi


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Scan Magazine | Travel Feature | Ecospheres

town on the Atlantic coast. Marrakech is a fascinating city with a lot of culture and activities to offer, such as cooking courses and convenient shopping in its fantastic souks. This is an opportunity not to be missed, so when you travel, why not do it sustainably and in luxury?

Explore eco luxury – hiking in Morocco Eco luxury has grown exponentially in recent years, especially as people have realised the impact that travelling has on the environment. Ecospheres is a Swedish-based travel agency that offers only sustainable destinations. One of their most popular options is hiking in Morocco, an adventure suitable for everyone, and all year round. By Cecilia Varricchio | Photos: Ecospheres

The hiking trip in the Atlas Mountains is a beautiful and unforgettable experience. Ecospheres has been offering this destination since its inception and it has always been an incredible success. The lodges are located in the higher Atlas, which is a two-hour drive from Marrakesh. Customers stay in a mountain hotel called Kasbah Du Toubkal, dubbed one of the best in the world by the famous CondĂŠ Nast Traveller Magazine. And they are right. Martin Scorsese decided to film Dalai Lama in this area because of the spectacular views and beautiful nature. The hotel is operated by Berbers, one of the indigenous Moroccan peoples. The hotel is eco-rated by Ecospheres: it is, for instance, equipped with solar cells, and five per cent of the total revenue goes to Imlil Village Association, helping the local inhabitants with numerous projects (in the past, for example, they acquired an ambulance for the village).

Tailor-made hiking No matter the level of training and fitness, anyone can participate in the hiking organised by Ecospheres, as each customer will have their own guide to walk at their appropriate pace. The tracks to choose from are almost infinite and clients can decide how many kilometres they want to walk before sitting down for a delicious picnic or just to admire the breath-taking landscape. Morocco is an exotic place and the temperature in the mountains is comfortable all year round. It is also possible to make longer hikes down to the Azzeden Valley where there is another amazing lodge to spend the night in. Combine trekking with city life and beaches We recommend allowing four to five days for the hiking and after, if you have time, you can combine this trip with a few nights in Marrakech or Essaouira, a beautiful

For more information, please visit: www.ecolyx.com

Issue 57 | October 2013 | 25


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E: TURE M E C TH ITE L H C IA EC N AR P S IA G WE R NO

Illustration: Treet in Bergen. By autumn next year, the world’s tallest wooden building will be completed in Bergen. The project is developed by Bergen og Omegn Boligbyggelag (BOB) and designed by Artec Architects and Engineers and is one of the pilots in Nal’s new project, Tre og by.

Norwegian Architecture Wooden high-rise buildings are the future of the city Population growth asks for a compact redevelopment of urban areas, and so far there have been few reasons to challenge steel and concrete as the first choice construction materials of the city. Still, climate change and the need for reducing CO2 emissions call for a new approach. By Line Kaasine, National Association of Norwegian Architects

Wood has the unique capability of both reducing and storing CO2. The fast development of new high-rise technologies furthermore enhances the potential of wood as playing an important role in the future building industry.

dian Michael Green Architects are now competing with internationally renowned companies such as Arup and Skidmore Owings & Merrill. The last three have recently developed designs for 30-storey wooden buildings.

In fact, the race of building the world’s tallest wooden building is already taking place: pioneers such as Helen & Hard, winner of the Norwegian Wood Prize, the UK-based Waugh Thistleton and Cana-

At the moment, Forte Apartments in Melbourne is the tallest already built timber house with its 32 metres and 12 storeys. Through the use of massive wood elements, the project has managed to cut

26 | Issue 57 | October 2013

CO2 emissions equivalent to 345 cars removed from the roads permanently. This first position, however, is already challenged by a Norwegian project: with its advanced technologies of glulam beams and modules, Treet in Bergen will become the world’s tallest wooden building by autumn next year. Norway is of course contented with being in the lead – but at the same time hoping to be challenged by a taller project and more forward-thinking technologies in the not too distant future.

For more information, please visit: www.arkitektur.no


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Special Theme | Norwegian Architecture

stage. We have evolved from designing specific buildings to creating plans of large urban areas as a whole,” Klev says. In the past year, A-lab won nine out of nine competitions within this field. One of their most recent projects is a strategy for the new urban development of Vollebekk in Groruddalen, north of Oslo. The firm won the contract thanks to a design “rooted in principles for sustainable urban development, focusing on economical, ecological and social sustainability.” The industrial area of Vollebekk will soon be completely transformed, with new daycare centres, a new school, 1,500 residences, restaurants and other recreational areas. A-lab’s strategy is to ensure optimal qualities for a culturally-diverse group of future residents and visitors of this new urban area.

Located in a former airport area at Fornebu, the offices have stunning views over the Oslo fjord. Photo: Luis Fonseca

Klev finishes: “The Vollebekk project is a good example of the kind of work we do. We try our best to create exciting areas and buildings and always add a new layer of meaning to every design project or masterplan.”

Nine wins in a row Odd Klev and Geir Haaversen founded A-lab in 2000 with one main purpose: they wanted to create a fun place to work. Thirteen years later, A-lab has grown into an award-winning architecture company of around 40 architects, renowned for designing innovative architecture and sustainable urban developments. By Kjersti Westeng

Klev and Haaversen initially wanted to design offices for IT-companies but quickly realised they had to expand their field. In 2001, the design of Oslo City shopping mall led to their first award. It was the beginning of a very successful decade for A-lab, something that became obvious when they had to quadruple their staff in 2006. “We had to expand very quickly because we took on two gigantic projects at the same time: the headquarters for DNB and the new regional and international offices for Statoil,” Klev says. A-lab quickly received international recognition for the Statoil project and won the WAF Award

A circulation tower connects the office lamellas with the central atrium and social areas. Photo: Trond Joelson Byggeindustrien

for Future Project of the Year in 2009. After the completion of the building in 2012, they received the prestigious World Architecture News Award for Best Commercial Building. Although designing commercial buildings is something Klev and Haaversen both enjoy and have been very successful with, the two architects have decided to approach a new market: urban planning and largescale housing and business developments. “We are still very interested in designing large commercial buildings, but we want to contribute with our ideas at the planning

One of A-lab’s most recent projects is a strategy for the new urban development of Vollebekk. Image: A-lab

For more information, please visit: www.a-lab.no

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Above left, right and below: Single-family home at Telthusveien

Intelligent architecture When Norwegian architecture firm Plank Arkitekter started in 2008, it was with an existing client base and an existing standing in the area of Stavanger. Nonetheless, few could have foreseen its speedy growth in the next five years into what is today one of the Sandnes region’s most significant architecture firms. By Hannah Gillow Kloster | Photos: Plank Arkitekter

Central to Plank’s success, explains cofounder Thor Grashei, has been its combination of experienced architects with long-standing ties to local networks, as well as its team of young, enthusiastic architects with varied educational backgrounds. Going from six to 20 in the last five years, their diverse backgrounds furthermore create a diversity of approaches, making the Plank office into a melting pot of ideas. “With such diversity of education and experience amongst our staff,” says Grashei, “we can work with any type of project or client.” And if they should happen to lack the specific knowledge required, they have several partnerships with other firms, local as well as interna-

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image” – a perfect combination of baseline philosophy and the urge to accommodate each project’s particular needs and specific requirements. The majority of Plank’s projects are office buildings, largely based in the wellestablished oil industries of Sandnes. Plank’s approach is one of functionality, first and foremost. Second only to that is the key idea of adaptability. Businesses change, practices change, and office buildings should reflect this and have the ability to change with its users. One recent feature project is Sandnes Bank’s main offices, which are moving to the inner harbour area of Sandnes city centre. According to Grashei this is “particularly exciting,” partly because of the sheer size of the project, but also because

of the location. The inner harbour area was previously, as the name suggests, a functioning harbour area, which has now become part of the city proper. Situated between a booming business disctrict and the sea, the bank’s new building will become a significant part of the new public space. Despite such large scale corporate projects, Plank operates at every level of the architecture spectrum. Another recently completed project includes a single family home at Telthusbakken. The striking, modern structure exudes a fresh and modern approach while at the same time fully incorporating the land on which it stands. Plank has planned over 600 housing units since its inception, all currently in differ-

tional, as evident by countless fruitful collaboration projects. These networks provide valuable interchanges of inspiration and knowledge, which directly benefit Plank’s clients – a factor apparent in the firm’s impressive resume. In 2012, Plank was named a Gazelle firm by Norwegian financial newspaper Dagens Næringsliv – a significant achievement only awarded to remarkably stable and fast-growing businesses, no mean feat for a company only four years old. This achievement succinctly reflects Plank’s ability to create stable business relationships, not to mention just how pleased their clients have been with their work.

Single-family home in Stavanger

High staff and client involvement Grashei explains that Plank approaches work with an “extraordinarily high involvement from the staff members in every new project, and a close collaboration with every client.” He further shares another reason for the firm’s high client satisfaction, namely relying on “functional architecture that looks towards the future, with a focus on the client’s needs and

Holiday home in Harsted

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Grashei puts it, “small in an international perspective,” the firm is “locally significant,” making sure to approach all projects as contributions to the region. Despite its relatively small stature on an international scale, the company’s founder highlights existing collaborations with large-scale Scandinavian firms, as well as a willingness to embark on future collaborative ventures. Always open to new impulses, all of Plank’s staff are trained architects. This ensures not only quality control at every stage of project planning, but also different perspectives on each and every project, making sure that a Plank project is always the best possible version of what it can be.

Møldalhagen

ent phases from planning to completion. This remarkably high number again draws attention to Plank’s almost meteoric rise to becoming such a significant player in their area, as do huge feature projects such as Stavanger Business Park, the contract of which Plank won a pitching competition for. The first section of this building, which will cover close to 600,000 square feet, will be ready for move-in this autumn. Despite Stavanger Business Park’s huge size, it will be a remarkably eco-friendly

Stavanger Business Park

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building, on a human scale. With a focus on sustainability at every turn, plans are made for low-impact waste removal and reduced energy and water use. As such, Stavanger Business Park is a prime example of Plank’s basic ideas put into large-scale use.

“Each of our projects is unique,” states Grashei, “and each of our buildings will have its own identity.” Nonetheless, there is a certain something that ties together all of Plank’s projects, and it is possible to distinguish a Plank building from the surrounding structures. It is hard to say exactly what creates that unity, but there is a hint to be found in Plank’s vision statement: functional and beautiful buildings that create value for the client, the region, and for us.

Locally significant value creator When talking about the future, Grashei alludes to certain feature projects of high exposure that will help shape the urban areas of Sandnes, continuing the work Plank has been doing. Though Plank is, as

For more information, please visit: www.plank-arkitekter.no


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Top left: Cabin at Ula. Top right: Tåsen centre. Below left: Vindernborgen, shops and offices. Below right: Amfi Pyramiden, shopping mall in Tromsø.

40 years of beautiful architecture This year, Meinich Arkitekter celebrates 40 years of quality work, innovative design and sustainable architecture. Specialising in commercial buildings, housing projects and planning processes, the firm of twenty architects is known for designing beautiful buildings while closely cooperating with its clients in order to ensure the best possible results. By Kjersti Westeng | Photos: Meinich Arkitekter

The architects at Meinich Arkitekter work on the premise that all projects have three phases: knowledge, design and implementation. This correlates with the office mantra, the three Vs: “Viten, vett og vilje,” which means “knowledge, skill and determination.” “When we take on a project, we start with the initial sketches and ideas, work through the regulations, design the building, and see the project all the way through until we are happy with the finished product,” says CEO and partner Kristian Fodstad, who has worked at Meinich Arkitekter since 1996. Meinich Arkitekter quickly found its area of expertise within shopping centres and housing projects. During its 40 years in the industry, the firm has had extensive contact with public authorities and can therefore offer expert advice on govern-

ment regulations for property development. During the last few years, Meinich Arkitekter has designed a number of popular shopping centres, such as Fagernes, Tangen, Morenen, and Rygge shopping centre, to name a few. Fodstad says: “When it comes to shopping centres we are particularly good at the logistics: deliveries, parking, transport and human interaction. We also design houses and cabins in the high-end housing market, making private individuals a fairly large percentage of our client group.” In 2008, Meinich Arkitekter founded its subsidiary company: Meinich Inne (Meinich Inside), led by Kaja Rishovd. The company consists of three interior architects who take on various jobs within interior design. Meinich Inne specialises in shopping centres, offices, apartment lay-

out, private housing and furniture design. Both Meinich Inne and Meinich Arkitekter take great pride in working closely with their clients during a project. “It’s always nice when we can surprise our clients with a wonderful idea we’ve had, but our focus is to work together. We cooperate closely with our clients throughout the whole project in order to ensure the best possible results,” Fodstad concludes.

Salma Office. Photo: Finn Ståle Felberg

For more information, please visit: www.meinich.no

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Tune oprhanage

Enduring design by unmatched experience Considered one of the most experienced and well-known architecture firms in Norway, NAV AS Architects has made it its pursuit to emphasise lasting values and innovation in design. Representing some of Norway’s finest examples of building restoration and progressive architectural thinking, it is no wonder that the NAV AS portfolio is both prized and admired. By Julie Lindén | Photos: NAV AS

Established in Oslo in 1997, the company has more than 16 years’ experience of fulfilling an ambitious vision: exploring natural conditions in interplay with the characteristics of the individual task. Remaining true to this notion, the company continuously and intently strives towards an inventive and progressive approach to what good architecture really is. Lasting values and contemporary inventiveness CEO and architect MNAL Per Arne Bjørnstad stresses the idea of lasting values as a core belief in NAV. Still, works by the company will always bear the seal of contemporary thinking, utilising natural materials with a meticulous twist. “We are not concerned with trends. The work we do should last for decades, and therefore we need to use materials that age with

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dignity. Our projects reflect solidness, but there is also an air of progressiveness and detailing.” The company has a vast and varied portfolio, including public and private as well as commercial and cultural projects. Where possible, NAV aims to take on tasks incorporating both exterior construction, interior and landscape design. This is to make sure of not losing the sense of comprehension and unity in the projects, Bjørnstad explains, while stressing the vitality of maintaining a good dialogue with the client. Restorations of historical importance NAV AS Architects are perhaps most famous for their restoration projects. With unrivalled expertise in the field of restoring protection-worthy buildings, the com-

pany has taken on several prestigious projects commissioned by the state antiquarian. One of these commissions was the antiquarian rehabilitation of the Domus Bibliotheca, Domus Academica and the Observatory, all at the University of Oslo, completed with grand acclaim in 1994, 2004 and 2011 respectively. The restoration of the Domus Academica has since its completion won several awards for excellent accentuation of the epoch’s distinctive features, a result of careful research and respect for the original on NAV’s part. “When working on these buildings, we set aside our own architectonic expressions and ideas, and focus on researching the original idea with materials and outlook,” says Bjørnstad, adding: “It’s more about managing knowledge than setting our own mark, and we always maintain great


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Special Theme | Norwegian Architecture

Margarinfabrikken Nursery

respect for the original architect and previous work.” Bjørnstad notes that working on some of the nation’s most precious historical buildings is a very special undertaking. “It’s interesting working on them as they are some of the most important buildings in the country, and some even a manifestation of our recent history. The University in particular is exceptional as it represents Norway as a new nation.” The margarine factory turned nursery Beyond the praise received for a list of restoration projects, NAV AS Architects are noted for their many school and nursery projects. The most famous work includes Bakkeløkka high school, which was given the Educational Building Prize in 2002, awarded by the Ministry of Research and Education. The project, with an environmentally-friendly profile, was also featured at numerous international exhibitions, including the School Buildings – The state of affairs: Centre for Architecture exhibition in New York in 2007. As far as educational establishments go, few could match NAV’s ambition when in

Bakkeløkka secondary school

2010 they set out to renovate a large margarine factory to create Norway’s largest nursery school – appropriately named the Margarine Factory Nursing School. The project was met with a fair share of scepticism, as many feared for the well-being of the 500 children who would all be cared for under the same roof. Since the opening of the nursery, critics have found good reasons to change their minds: the nursery school came in second place at the Designers’ Saturday Award for Best Interior as recently as this year. “The size of the building raised great concern, but we worked on down-sizing the volume to create smaller rooms and areas,” says Bjørnstad. “It was important to design the building

according to its needs and the users’ – and it has emerged as a pedagogical paradise.” A pedagogical paradise, and a symbol of great architectural thought.

For more information, please visit: www.nav.as

Oslo harbour KF, new office and workshop building. Photo: Rolf Estensen

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Offices outside the city of Sarpsborg, awarded Arnebergprisen in 2012 for interior solutions.

Lambertseter senter: a rehabilitation and shopping centre with a library, a cinema and parking. Norway’s first shopping centre with energy classification B, which was awarded Builidng of the Year 2010.

VIP-terminal at Oslo Ariport.

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Special Theme | Norwegian Architecture

Left: Old industrial buildings transformed into 16,000-square-metre offices. Right: The building in Rue Archimède, Brussels, which houses the Norwegian embassy, the delegation to EU and Norwegian businesses.

Sustainable yet innovative architecture Architecture is undoubtedly a both competitive and ever-changing industry, where only the best survive. Hille Melbye Architects has designed beautiful buildings for almost 50 years, simply by combining the two most important aspects of architecture: innovation and sustainability. By Kjersti Westeng | Photos: Hille Melbye Architects

Hille Melbye Architects was founded in 1955 by Harald Hille. The son of a bishop, Hille originally started out wanting to build parish churches. He designed a number of well-known churches in Norway but soon realised that he had to expand his area of expertise. In 1985, Harald Melbye became a partner and the firm changed its name. “We are a solid architecture firm with over 50 years of valuable experience. Our focus has always been to ensure that we’ve got broad in-house competence, which has led to a steady growth of the firm,” says CEO Øivind Breen. Hille Melbye Architects has extensive experience ranging from city planning and large property development projects to private properties, interior and design. With thorough experience of shopping centre development, Hille Melbye Archi-

tects has designed a number of large shopping centres in Norway. Its redesign of Lambertseter centre in Oslo in 2010 proves that the firm is well-equipped to take on large, complex projects within this field. Hille Melbye Architects completely revitalised the building and added new shops, a cinema, a library and a car park, and the firm won Byggeindustrien’s award for Building of the Year for its efforts. Optimising the value appreciation Hille Melbye Architects’ aim is always to optimise the value appreciation of the properties it designs, including the interests of the three main stakeholders: the public/society, the users, and the owner. The obvious thing to concentrate on is the financial aspects of a property: cost effective and commercial solutions. Hille Melbye Architects works to ensure a max-

37 apartments in Oslo city centre.

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Redesign and conversion of old Oslo city centre hospital buildings into apartments, which recieved two awards: Oslo Bys Arkitekturpris 2005 and Statens Byggeskikkpris 2007.

imisation of value appreciation for the owner – both the short-term and longterm costs for operations and the maintenance and flexibility or generality to secure future revenue. The environmental issue is multifaceted. Is the building sustainable in terms of energy efficiency and other environmental concerns? Are the aesthetics of the building of lasting quality? Does it function well within the existing environment? Although Hille Melbye Architects delivers contemporary designs, the firm focuses on designing buildings that will be just as aesthetically pleasing ten years from now as they are today. Finally, the studio considers the value proposition to the users of any building. “As Churchill said: we shape our buildings; thereafter they shape us. It is incredibly important to us that the ones actually using the building are satisfied,” says Breen. In 2011, Hille Melbye Architects designed the new office for Infotjenester AS, a Norwegian company providing other busi-

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nesses with training courses and relevant corporate information. The four-storey office building is situated in Sarpsborg and is one of the first office buildings in Norway to be awarded energy label A, based on the EU’s energy consumption labelling scheme. Since July 2010, all new buildings in Norway are measured on their level of energy efficiency and given an energy consumption label ranging from A to G. Achieving label A was a goal from the beginning, which is why Hille Melby Architects implemented a number of advanced systems for ventilation, heating and cooling, while taking the utmost advantage of daylight and limiting the amount of glass used in the building. Aside from the environmental aspect, the focus was very much on designing a building that the staff would be satisfied with. The office spaces on the three bottom floors all lead to a centrally-located atrium, making it easy to find your way around the building. The aim is that everyone should be able to find their favourite spot in the building as each area is decorated differently.

Where innovation meets experience Hille Melby Architects has extensive experience with government regulation of property development and has a good relationship with public authorities. With longstanding experience come confidence and stability, both of which are positive attributes for an architect. However, it is just as important for an architecture firm to be innovative and creative. Although the 30 architects currently working for Hille Melbye Architects have a similar educational background, they are very different in terms of skillsets and areas of expertise. By nurturing these differences, Hille Melbye Architects creates a thriving working environment and generates great results. “When I first joined Hille Melbye Architects I was very impressed by the team of architects we have working here. The mix of experienced competence and youthful innovation creates a perfect team,” Breen finishes. For more information, please visit: www.hille-melbye.no


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The Sami Science Building in Kautokeino. Photo: Statsbygg

Kunnskapsparken in Alta. Photo: Verte

Fri Sikt ice sculpture, a work by Verte intended to highlight the problems of light pollution. Photo: Verte

Nature and architecture – a perfect collaboration Northern Norwegian firm Verte has taken environmentally-conscious design one step further. For them, it is not just about what the building does to the environment, but also what the environment does to the building. The result is a concept of mutual respect and knowledge interchange – precisely the basic ideas of the Sami expression the company is named after. By Hannah Gillow Kloster Taking pride in understanding its northern surroundings, Verte got its name as two merging architecture and landscaping firms were trying to pinpoint exactly who they are. As co-founder Linda Nielsen explains: “Our focus is the north.” Verte’s credentials are clearly reflected at Breilia School, where the firm created outdoor spaces with integrated artificial daylight. Understanding the impact of the long, dark winter on humans, Verte brings daylight to outdoor spaces even when there is none. Nielsen explains that the light design also “creates a positive climate adaptation, which the teachers report has positive effects on the childrens’

concentration levels.” So the lighting is not just poetic. Poeticism combined with positive impact is highly descriptive of Verte’s portfolio. Working across a huge range of projects, from bar interiors to buildings and hiking trail rest stops, Verte’s staff mirrors the diversity of its work. Of the 10 staff members, only two are originally Norwegian. This gives them, as Nielsen says enthusiastically, “a lot of inspiration for free, with professional and cultural diversity.” Though open to impulses from all over the world, Verte in particular focuses on the impulses it gets from its northern Scandinavian networks. “In many ways

we have more in common with northern Sweden and Finland than southern Norway,” says Nielsen, succinctly highlighting Verte’s deep understanding of the climate and culture it works in. Nielsen explains that there are a lot of challenges when it comes to climate and sustainability. However, with the strong mutual respect that permeates its work, Verte’s projects reflect the studio’s stated values: passion, playfulness, diversity and presence.

Panorama apartments by the Alta Fjord. Photo: Andrew Budd

For more information, please visit: www.verte.no www.verteblog.blogspot.no www.coldclimateterritory.blogspot.no

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Interiors designed with this in mind are environmentally-sustainable in the truest way. Who knows where Scenario will go next? One thing is certain: wherever it is, it will be timeless, well-crafted, and excitingly unique.

Atrium in the new headquarters for Aker Solutions ASA in Stavanger, covering 40,000 square metres.

Interior individuality Office interiors for insurance company Skuld.

From office spaces and private homes to train interiors and high fashion clothing stores, the one thing one can be sure about when it comes to Norwegian interior architects Scenario is that no two projects will be the same. By Hannah Gillow Kloster | Photos: Scenario

Founded in 1984, Scenario is a wellestablished interior architecture firm based in Oslo. With an impressive portfolio of everything from family apartments to office buildings, Scenario has made its mark, but the main thing that the sheer diversity of its resume highlights is its individualistic approach to each and every project. Far from an overarching concept permeating all of its work, Scenario insists that every project must be specifically tailored to each client and each space. Founder Linda Steen explains that “working within frameworks of existing buildings, at the same time understanding and accommodating the needs of the people who will use the spaces, the designers take into account every unique factor of every project.” This results in the exciting freshness found in each of the firm’s projects, large or small. According to Steen, “nothing is too big or too small” for Scenario. Hence, recent

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projects include both single pieces of furniture and the large-scale office spaces for Aker Solutions, not to mention their next big gig: the notable Deichmanske Library, Norway’s largest public library, situated behind the new Opera House in Oslo. “It is exciting to create a library for everyone – all cultures, all ages,” says Steen, explaining that the library should be “part of the city, integrated inside and out, conveying the written word through more than its books.” But this is a particularly challenging brief, Steen insists, because there are so many factors involved in a public building. Not only must it be accessible to all, but the materials must reflect the durability needed to sustain the impact of heavy use. Durability is central to Scenario’s work, in terms of both design and choice of materials. Steen points out that “we still use furniture built and designed more than half a century ago, because they were well-built and timeless,” a philosophy Scenario brings to its own work as well.

Riccovero concept store in Byporten, Oslo.

Office interiors for digital printing company Megaprint AS.

For more information, please visit: www.scenario.no


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What A Mess art exhibit with artist Arne Revheim

The art of architecture When Espen Handegård founded his own architectural firm in 2010, his goal was clear: to combine architecture and art in order to create something completely unique for each of his clients. By Magnus Nygren Syversen | Photos: Espen Handegård

After working for a selection of Norwegian and Australian architectural firms for seven years, Espen Handegård decided in 2010 that it was time to break out on his own, and follow his two passions in life: art and modern architecture. He founded his own studio, Handegård Arkitektur, and now thrives in his offices at Hydrogenfabrikken, a creative community of designers, artists and architects, which Handegård himself was involved in drawing.

His winning design, called e-Motion, is a six-storey tall sculpture built of 2,500 aluminium pipes, arranged to form a wavelike structure. Another example of Handegård combining elements from both art and architecture is What a mess, a project in which he worked with artist Arne Revheim to create an installation made of cardboard pipes, and filling an area of 520 square metres, functioning as a mobile art exhibition.

One of Handegård’s recent achievements is winning a competition for the contract to create a roadside landmark for Askim municipality in the south east of Norway.

Whether it is drawing a new building, remodelling an old, worn-down house, or taking on a large scale public project, Handegård tackles them all with the same

Villa Aarum remodelling of existing house

approach: “It is important to me that my architectural expression is based on innovation, so that things evolve in the right direction. For every project, whether it’s an installation, a home or a large building, we make a thorough analysis of the plot and the surrounding area in context with our clients’ requests and needs,” he says. “We make as little impact on the environment as possible, and use materials with a low carbon footprint. That way we can design a sustainable building that adapts to nature and its surroundings. In the design phase we always try to find an element the client may not even know they want, and one which contributes to making the building unique,” says the creative. “This could be the surprising crossroad where architecture meets art.” For more information, please visit: www.handegaard.no

e-MOTION landmark

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View from Mountainhouse

Rock solid architecture With a unique location, an unconventional look and the highest energy rating achievable in Norway, Mountainhouse in Lofoten is one of architect Martin Glomnes’s favorite achievements.

shape of the building, also has another story behind it: “When I was in the navy in my early twenties I was stationed not far from Lofoten, and we were served a brand of American freeze-dried food. That brand was called Mountain House,” says Glomnes.

By Magnus Nygren Syversen | Photos: Vindveggen Arkitekter

Sitting on top of a small cliff overlooking the Vestfjord, surrounded by several mountains, Mountainhouse with its astounding views truly is a sight to be seen. “The view from the house is spectacular. It takes your breath away,” says architect Martin Glomnes. His firm, Vindveggen Arkitekter, designed and built Mountainhouse, a one-of-a-kind detached house in beautiful Svolvær in Lofoten, on the northwest coast of Norway. This is where steep mountains crash into

the fjord, where a small town blends in with Norwegian nature at its finest – it is a unique location to build a home. Building on Vindveggen’s mission to design environmentally-friendly buildings, Mountainhouse has solar panels on the roof, used for both underfloor heating and hot water. This, among other things, has earned it the highest grade in Norway’s energy rating system. The origin of its name, naturally inspired by its mountainous surroundings and the

Located in Lillestrøm, a 20-minute drive from the Norwegian capital, Vindveggen has most of its projects close to its base in the south-east of Norway. These vary from houses and apartment complexes to large public projects such as nurseries and schools. “And due to a previous partner we also have strong ties to Lofoten, and so I go there every few weeks on business,” explains Glomnes. Founded in 1995 under the name Skjeseth & Solvang Arkitekter, Glomnes’ architectural firm changed its name to Vindveggen last year. The name, which directly translates to 'The Wind Wall', has a strong symbolic meaning in and around Lillestrøm, as it refers to a 650-metre-long wind wall, built in the early 20th century to protect the area’s timber stocks from heavy winds. For more information, please visit: www.vindveggen.non

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Special Theme | Norwegian Architecture

Sundbyvegen bridge

Kolomoen bridge

Statsrådskjæringen bridge

Complex construction and innovative design Building on nearly 30 years of architectural expertise, Løvseth+Partner has recently developed a fondness for designing timber bridges. By Magnus Nygren Syversen | Photos: Løvseth+Partner

Founded 10 years ago, in 2003, Løvseth+Partner builds on the tradition and experience of founder and namesake Morten Løvseth’s previous architectural firm, Lunde & Løvseth. “Lunde & Løvseth was a large company. Among other things we designed the Government Park in Oslo, an area of 10,000 square metres built in stone,” Løvseth explains. After 17 successful years, Løvseth decided to leave the company and start afresh, bringing with him his partner Anne Marie Lööf.

Since 2003 Løvseth+Partner has seen steady growth, taking on projects large and small, and specialising in large housing projects, bridge design and transportrelated projects. Today, the company has seven full-time employees and about ten projects on the go at any given time. “It is important for us to take on a variety of projects, ranging in both size and complexity” says Lööf. This is exemplified by Løvseth+Partner currently being involved in

two large-scale building projects in and around the Norwegian capital, building 127 and 250 homes respectively, as well as the smaller but more complex Jomfruhagen project, fitting as many as 17 so-called row houses into an area of only 4,000 square metres in an Oslo suburb. “The Jomfruhagen project is located on an incredibly complex site and represents a new trend in the market, challenging building regulations using innovative solutions,” says Løvseth. Still, the most interesting projects for Løvseth and Lööf are transport-related, and in the last few years the firm has taken on several contracts designing bridges, the majority built in timber. “Norway is the world's leading nation in regards to timber constructions, and there is an incredible amount of engineering science that goes into designing these timber bridges in order for them to withstand the weight of 50 tonnes of trucks, and an equal amount of braking force,” says Løvseth. “Timber is an environmentally-friendly, local material, and these bridges probably have a longer life span than concrete ones,” he adds. For more information, please visit: www.lovsethpartners.no

Jomfruhagen. ©Linda Blom

Kværnerbyen

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Shared meeting area with a view of Oslo at DNB headquarters.

Award-winning office interior design from Zinc Zinc is the name of a Norwegian interior architecture firm for businesses and companies, based in Norway’s capital Oslo. It has 22 skilled, enthusiastic and experienced employees and was formed in 2000. The majority of the company’s employees are interior architects; in addition, there are furniture designers and industrial designers. By Stian Sangvig | Photos: Zinc

Zinc's board of directors

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The firm’s corporate clients are in sectors such as banking and finance, the public sector, education and media and include companies such as DNB (Norway’s largest bank), Nordea (also a bank), the Norwegian Foreign Office, Statnett, TV2 (private Norwegian television broadcaster based in Bergen), Adressa Mediehus (newspaper based in Trondheim) and the Royal Norwegian Embassy in Rome, Italy. The latter is part of a framework agreement between Zinc and the Norwegian Foreign Office.

Corporate management lounge with a view of the Oslo fjord at DNB headquarters in Oslo.

Zinc believes its main competitive advantage lies in the ability and desire to offer the broadest possible range of solutions and services to clients. “Our primary objective is to offer our clients strategic design for the future, encouraging joy, productivity and creativity by putting emphasis on functionality and expressive design,” explains general manager Stine Lanes Jensen, who joined the company in 2001 and has been in the role of general manager since 2011. “In order to achieve our objective it is essential that we take our clients’ ambitions, culture and individual needs very seriously, which also makes each project unique,” continues Jensen. “We often collaborate with companies offering complementary solutions and services, for example service design, in order to offer our clients the broadest possible package,” says Jensen. “The evidence that our strategy appears to be working lies in our track record of delivering large and complex projects. We also experience that we are drawn into the building process at earlier and earlier stages such as programming and area ef-


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ficiency analysis,” she continues. “Examples of clients include Nordea Bank, a contract we recently secured involving the design of their new main office in Oslo, due for completion in 2015. Another similar and equally recent example is Flesland Naeringspark next to the airport of Norway’s second largest city, Bergen, a competition-winning entry with our sister company A-lab.” The importance of a space to meet in In terms of solutions and services offered, recent projects include the design of meeting space, meeting rooms, canteens, coffee bars, receptions, open office landscapes, auditoriums and detailed interior design. “Today’s access to and the rapid growth of advanced mobile technology offers a great degree of flexibility in how we work and where we work,” says Jensen. “Sometimes we work from home, other times the airport, the hotel room, the train or our car, but we always need appropriate and adequate places to meet colleagues and clients,” she insists. “A canteen, for example, may serve as a canteen during the daily lunch break around midday, but before or afterwards it may be used as a meeting area for a group of colleagues. In order to stay at the top of our game at all times we need to design user-friendly solutions allowing our clients’ employees to take full advantage of the advances in technology,” continues Jensen.

Office interiors for Advokatene Schjoedt law firm in Oslo.

“Another key to our success is our organisational structure and the way we treat our staff,” says Jensen. “Each member of staff can take full ownership of their projects from start to finish. This allows us to offer the client a single point of contact. Zinc’s employees are thereby also encouraged and incentivised to work to the best of their creative ability by working closely with the client from start to finish of every project according to time and budget,” she explains. “At the same time, we also seek to work as closely together in teams as possible, thus supporting each other and making each other better. While most of our business comes from the south east of Norway, we are slowly expanding both nationally and internationally. Recent examples include Adressa Mediehus in Trondheim, the Royal Nor-

Custom-designed reception desk at Aspelin Ramm Real Estate developers in Oslo, nominated for Best Interiors at Designers Saturday Awards 2013.

wegian Embassy in Italy and Den Norske Bank’s offices in London,” says the general manager. About Zinc’s future, she says: “We would like to grow in the sense that we want to continue to expand our range of services and solutions. Continued international expansion could be interesting too. Having said that, we do not want to take on new designers simply for the sake of growing, unless they bring something brand new and unique to the table.”

For more information on how Zinc may provide interior design for your company please go to www.zinc.no

A ‘village’ of quiet rooms and meeting spaces at Aspelin Ramm Real Estate developers in Oslo.

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Revitalisation of Telenor communal spaces. Pilot.

Tailored solutions from exterior to interior By combining different fields of architecture, Romlaboratoriet Architecture has found a unique status in the business: offering clients the completeness of a tailored package focusing on human needs. By Julie Lindén | Photos: Romlaboratoriet

“The main idea we work with is providing the facilitation of good experiences,” says Bente Opdal, manager and interior architect at Romlaboratoriet. “We work with

architecture in an interdisciplinary manner, without caring for boundaries between these disciplines. This means that the office can provide optimal, compre-

hensive solutions for the benefit of our users.” Romlaboratoriet aims to create a positive atmosphere from the get-go, making sure that the client feels well taken care of and receives tailor-made design. “Our goal is to solve projects on a basis of individual preconditions. By tailoring the project to fit the needs of the individual client we are able to offer a highquality end product,” says Charlotte Elstad, partner and architect at the firm. Through a successful marriage between structural architecture and interior design, the company strives to offer a wholeness of experience for all clients. The analysis of

Extension to villa

Gym at Sonans private sixth form college rebuilt into an auditorium

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Office space renovation

Private home


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individual needs occurs through a continuous dialogue with the commissioner. Human needs, Opdal explains, must always act as a foundation for the architectonic solutions – if not, the construction will not succeed. Key to the task is wholeness; the notion that a good project is the result of human needs, aesthetics and innovative, individual solutions.

space. One of the projects was a revitalisation of an open space atrium, where the aim was to achieve higher usage. This was solved through improving acoustics, providing a pleasant atmosphere through use of colours, lighting and comfortable furnishing amongst other things. “It’s always rewarding when you feel you’ve reached the client’s goal as well as your own,” says Opdal.

A variety of assignments

Another weighty commissioner in office projects is Statkraft, with whom Romlaboratoriet has just completed a design project encompassing 15,000 square metres and workspaces for 400 employees. Statkraft also commissioned a rehabilitation project of two existing office buildings – a field of architecture that Romlaboratoriet believes will become increasingly important in the years that lie ahead. “An ever-growing part of our work will consist of re-designing existing architecture, and re-using materials,” Opdal says.

The merging of architectural elements provides Romlaboratoriet with the opportunity to undertake a variety of assignments and thereby form a wide portfolio of experience. From large office projects, hotels and restaurants in the commercial part of the market – to smaller projects assigned by private clients. “The variation we experience at Romlaboratoriet gives us a drive to do more and do better,” Opdal says. “Through our interlaced fields of design, we find and improve solutions each day,” Elstad adds. “Our dream projects are the ones that have this kind of depth – the projects that benefit society as a whole.” Office projects Romlaboratoriet strives towards creating good workplace environments by challenging the status quo and applying solutions that provide a wide range of working zones suited to the different companies. At Telenor headquarters at Fornebu west of Oslo, Romlaboratoriet has done serveral projects to improve different zones in the office

Decorating project Sundvolden Hotel

Responsibility and durability Opdal and Elstad believe that the business is leaning towards a more conscious profile on the whole, requiring practicing architects and designers to continuously educate themselves within sustainability and new expressions of design. Romlaboratoriet is currently working on an office project for Finn.no, Norway’s leading online marketplace, which chiefly involves reuse of inventory. “In order to create something unique for every client we have to be at the forefront

of innovation. A responsible use of resources and environmentally-conscious measures will also affect aesthetics – and that challenges us to constantly think in a new way and not get caught up in fads. “Responsibility is of the essence, and we are definitely moving towards an industry where existing building mass is becoming more and more imperative – to both the human and the biological environment. Expressions might get simpler and more modern, while the durability and technology behind new solutions is intricate,” says Opdal. Inspiring by feeling inspired Relationships are, in the view of Romlaboratioriet’s 12 employees and partners, as crucially important on an internal as an external basis. Motivation and inspiration are key terms contributing to the growth and development of the office, showing in each and every project. “We have an optimistic approach to our environment and a strong professional commitment!” says Opdal. “Our aim is to provide our staff with a work environment that makes everyone look forward to going to work. Fridays we serve up traditional waffles to keep up the good spirit.” “We firmly believe that in order to inspire others you must feel inspired yourself, and that’s what we try to achieve.” For more information, please visit: www.romlab.no

Døgnvill Bar & Burger, Vulkan, Oslo

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The extension of the farmhouse at Uppigaard Lid

Architecture blending in with its surroundings by Adaptiv Arkitektur Adaptiv Arkitektur is a young architecture firm, founded in 2010 by architect Pål Sylwester Witczak, who is the only permanent employee of the company. Adaptiv Arkitektur is based near the mythical Seljord Lake in the village of Seljord in Telemark county, 160 kilometres from Oslo. By Stian Sangvig | Photos: Adaptiv Arkitektur

“At Adaptiv Arkitektur we offer a thematic range of architectural services, from conceptual studies to complete design and follow-up of a finished building,” explains Witczak, who worked as an architect in Oslo for ten years before setting up Adaptiv Arkitektur. “Our competitive advantage lies in our ability to adapt our design to the surroundings, in terms of both natural scenery and urban environment,” he continues. One of Adaptiv Arkitektur’s feature projects is the quick sketch of Ringsevju housing and holiday homes. The objective was to sketch a potential area in Seljord next to

Ringsevju housing and holiday homes

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the Seljord Lake, showing how it may be utilised for housing and recreation purposes. In addition to the 40 housing units, the area might also include a recreation area as well as a visitor centre thematically connected to the myths of the Seljord Lake monster. “The sketch is currently being considered by the planning authorities,” says Witczak. Another feature project is the extension of the farmhouse at Uppigaard Lid. The farm is situated in peaceful surroundings with spectacular views in the mountain village Øyfjell in Telemark, and the purpose of

the extension was to adapt the building to the needs of a growing family. “As the original farmhouse was built in the 19th century, the challenge was to design an extension offering all the qualities of modern living while at the same time communicating with the architectural language of the original farmhouse,” explains Witczak. The company recently won a competition to add new buildings to an area consisting of historical wooden houses without compromising the area’s historical features. “The future looks bright. My hope is to be able to grow a small and manageable team of people, and I am keen to offer the company’s unique architecture to an expanded clientele,” Witczak concludes.

For more information, please visit: www.adaptivark.no


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Fornebu Shopping Centre in Oslo is to become the first shopping centre in Norway to achieve an ‘outstanding’ energy efficiency rating from BREEAM.

Creating the perfect shopping centre A down-to-earth approach to architecture and years of experience have secured AMB arkitekter the position as one of Scandinavia’s leading architectural practices within the design, development and refurbishment of retail centres.

shopping centre, but we can still use much of our experience, and I get a kick out of working with and learning from people with new perspectives and cultures.” AMB arkitekter also designs residential, office, sports and hotel buildings.

By Signe Hansen | Photos: AMB arkitekter

In 1983, when Einar Aakerøy founded AMB arkitekter, he was all the manpower the business had; today, 30 years later, his two partners, Michael Bowe and Mario Obmascher, and 42 employees from 20 different nations help him out at the company’s head office in Oslo. Environmentally-sound buildings AMB arkitekter landed their first major contract to do a string of shopping centres for Norwegian developers in 1984; since then the company has designed, developed and planned hundreds of retail projects. “The main reason our clients choose us is that we have sound knowledge of what counts for the customers, not my clients – the shoppers: how they behave and what they look for in a shopping centre,” explains Aakerøy. Another distinguishing factor is AMB’s work with BREEAM (the world's foremost environmental assessment method and rating system for buildings) to assess and attain the best practices in sustainable building design, construction and opera-

tion. At present the company is developing the Fornebu Shopping Centre on the former site of Oslo Airport, which is to become the first shopping centre in Norway to achieve an “Outstanding” rating from BREEAM. “It’s an incredibly challenging process, but it’s the way we need to go for the future, and though it’s very demanding, I think it’s fantastic that our clients have decided to set that as their goal,” stresses Aakerøy. Moving across borders In recent years, AMB’s reputation has started to work its way across the borders not only to Sweden but also eastern Europe, where the company is currently involved in major projects in Abinsk, Russia, and Riga, Latvia. Situated in the old part of Riga, a UNESCO-listed site, the city’s new shopping centre obviously provided numerous challenges to the architects. But the result has been, says Aakerøy, a very elegant, upscale centre that everyone was very happy about. “Of course, in different cultural contexts customers have slightly different expectations of what to meet in a

Gallerija Centrs, Riga, Latvia

Abinsk Shopping Centre in Russia

For For more more information, information, please please visit: visit: www.astadgard.se www.ark-amb.no

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New ambassador residence in Sofia, Bulgaria (commissioner Statsbygg). Built with the ambition to promote Norwegian and Nordic architecture, design and landscape design on an international level, it is the result of a first place in an international architecture competition (in collaboration with N1 Architects).

Modern solutions in dialogue with the environment How to strike the perfect balance between the needs of the client and those of the environment? PML Architects nurtures ideas that promise logical solutions and ethical awareness. By Julie Lindén | Photos: PML Architects

The Oslo-based office, established by architect Per Martin Landfald in 2004, undertakes projects within the private and public sector alike, boasting many years of experience. New constructions and remodelling projects are both part of the company’s portfolio, in addition to museums and exhibition projects. Landfald explains that there is a particular reason why the relatively smallscaled office is able to partake in such a wide variety of projects: “We are a small company, but we put together specialised teams with partners and freelancers when needed. In other words we staff to suit each individual project, something that allows us to work with dedication and focus. We don’t experience the same pressure as large companies, who might feel obliged to take on large amounts of work just to keep the business running.”

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that is, everything you can call external factors,” Landfald explains. He points out that by creating enduring architectural structures, the buildings will automatically be given qualities beneficial to the environment. This way, the company strives to bring a consciousness of time, place and nature to each project. “By creating architecture that’s qualitatively good more than it is trend-conscious, you create architecture that lasts. If it lasts, it means it has an environmental stability to it, representing a structure that can stay current for a lifetime and more.”

An ethical nod to nature The theory has paid off. During PML Architects’ nine years in business a remarkable number of projects have been realised, and that with a seal of unmistakable quality. Several of the company’s competition entries have been crowned winners, mostly because of progressive thinking and solutions in tune with increasing environmental challenges. “Our architecture is environmentallyoriented, strong and timeless. However, the term ‘environment’ means much more than CO2 and energy to us. It represents nature, seasons, changing weather, function, culture and experiences – Adapted contrasts between new and old: remodelling of an existing cabin with new extension.


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Compact villa for a young family. Focus is on rationality and detailing.

Formed by the basic elements Although PML Architecture makes a point of not designing with architectonic form as a principal goal, its designs are characterised by their way of representing basic, elementary and logical expressions. Each task is viewed as a question in need of an answer, the design being the means for a response. The features are known and classic, and likened to the four basic elements. “Earth, air, fire and water are great symbols of the results we want to achieve with our architectural thinking,” says Landfald. “They all say something about how architecture and nature are interlinked, and that good form should be the product of something natural, something that is a matter of course. Design should never exist for its own sake; it’s there to solve a task.” Synergy – reaching the full potential By carrying out analyses in close dialogue with all clients, PML is able to out-

The interior is organised into open sequences of spaces, consciously relating to the exterior environment.

line the needs and current situation of each. Then an interdisciplinary analysis and design process follows, upon which a suitable and logical solution is reached. In a world and an industry that set increasingly high standards when it comes to the economy, ecology and bureaucracy behind building construction, PML goes a long way towards ensuring that every project reaches its full potential. “Our approach is designing with synergy in mind; how can we make a project the best possible solution to the client’s needs, while still making sure that we only affect the surroundings in a positive way? How to achieve as many gains as possible with few measures? We want to give more of ‘both’ and much less of ‘either/or’,” says Landfald, stressing that good experiences are the best pay-offs of a job well done. “If a project looks good, offers a practical solution to the client’s problems or needs and has the potential

to give the client many good experiences, then we have done our job.”

Full redefinition of a 1970s villa equipped with a new extension that creates a dynamic entirety with the garden.

The projects focus on details and the use of material.

Cabin in a tree.

The office partakes in a minimum of two architectural competitions a year. Above are the entries for competitions launched to rebuild the Oslo Post Office building (left) (in collaboration with A-tract) and design a new Våler church (right).

For more information, please visit: www.pmlark.no

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Tradition anchored in modern expressions Good architecture that stands the test of time while complimenting location, material and modern expressions of design? It can be done, and RAM Architecture boasts the experience to prove it. Cabin at Kvitfjell

Addition to villa in Lillehammer. Photo: Jørn Hagen

Villa in Lillehammer

Extension to villa in Lillehammer

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By Julie Lindén | Photos: RAM Architects

Based nearby one of Norway’s most beautiful valleys, Gudbrandsdalen, RAM Architecture is a company with strong ties to Norwegian nature and traditional methods of construction. Using wood as a primary material, architects at RAM strive towards creating precise and modern design features in every project. The successful combination of tradition and clean, inventive outlines has resulted in a collection of esteemed projects. “Our designs may be inspired by tradition, but we make a point of always interpreting that tradition into a clean, tight and interesting expression,” says manager and architect Hilde Grøneng. “Our location makes it completely natural for us to make use of all the fantastic wood we have in this part of the country, and incorporate that into our vision.” A principal example of the RAM architectonic vision is Lillehammer coach station. Inspired by the nature of Gudbrandsdalen, the building comprises walls alternately formed by horizontal wood logs and glass. The appearance is solid but airy, sleek in form but eye-catching. “It is a fantastic example of how our inspirations are anchored in manifested techniques, while still offering a new and unique tone to the building,” says Grøneng. She stresses that awareness of location is an important pillar of RAM Architecture, informing every project from the very getgo. This notion in pairing with a consciousness of architectonical expression is vital to the reputation of RAM as a deliverer of lasting quality. “We solve every task by analysing the location first. Only then can we see which of our ideas work and which we have to continue developing. We always work in teams and therefore

our clients can rest assured that every idea has been considered by several minds. That secures quality.” As does absorbing inspiration from abroad, Grøneng explains. Architects at RAM are highly influenced by Swiss and Austrian architecture in addition to Nordic styles, and have travelled widely to develop architectural ideas for the Norwegian climate. A project currently under way is an extension to the beautifully located Juvasshytta lodge, facing Norway’s highest mountain, Galdhøpiggen. “We aim to create good architecture that lasts. Trends don’t matter much to us, but a clear and qualitative interpretation of ideas does.”

Annex to villa in Lillehammer. Photo: Erik Lindholm Hansen and Kirsti Hovde

Lillehammer coach station

For more information, please visit: www.ram-arkitektur.no


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Top: Nærøy upper secondary school Below: Vidhaugen nursery school

Environmentally-friendly constructions powered by dedication How to make limitations count for something positive? With years of commended experience to support them, ROJO Architects have found their answer in a successful combination of diverse design, a humble approach and a good grasp of the client’s individual needs. By Julie Lindén | Photos: ROJO Architects

“I find that the real possibilities lie in the challenges and limitations we face every day, be it a set financial framework, conditions on the site or the particular demands set by the commissioner,” says Sondre Andvik, Manager at ROJO Architects. “Everyone has expectations as to what we can help them accomplish, so an interested and humble ear is definitely of the essence.” Specialising in energy efficient constructions since 2001, Trondheim-based ROJO Architects aim to contribute green solutions to the lives of private clients and the public alike. The environmentally friendlyprofile is exemplified by projects such as

Vidhaugen nursery school and Kulsås apartment complex, both built in accordance with the highest of energy standards – the former as a passive house design. By delivering quality design that owns up to its environmental responsibility, such as buildings with increased and improved insulation to minimise heat loss, the company aligns seamlessly with an innovative and ethically-conscious profile. “We care for permanence. Our projects are meant to last for decades, and are therefore not marked by trends or fads,” says Andvik. “Timelessness and durability are key terms, but that doesn’t mean the attractiveness of our projects is in any way sacrificed.”

Andvik explains that the company draws much of its inspiration from meeting with their clients. A continuous dialogue is key when it comes to maintaining a good relationship with the commissioner during project development, not to mention that it keeps employees of the company motivated throughout the process. “This is an office of outstanding architects who meet assignments with enthusiasm and dedication to the task. My belief is that willpower plays just as important a part in the completion of a project as talents and skillsets, and I am proud that we greet our clientele with all of the above,” says Andvik. “It’s when we are able to marry that attitude with the uniqueness of each project that we really meet, and exceed, the client’s expectations.” For more information, please visit: www.rojoarkitekter.no

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“We feel extremely privileged to be able to work with so many of Norway’s most significant businesses and organisations,” says André Fosse, architect and partner at Momentum. “All clients have their own culture and organisation, and the way in which they organise their projects will obviously reflect this. “We have developed the ability to capture what the client wants and provide them with proposals that enlighten what they actually need in order to achieve the desired results. This way, we also establish clearly what we need to do to ensure that we meet the clients’ needs,” Fosse explains. It is precisely this method, in addition to Momentum’s expertise in modern office spaces, that has landed the Oslo-based company several sought-after clients, including a gratifying collaboration with Statoil. “We were hired by Statoil when they started planning their move to new offices at Fornebu, built specifically for Statoil by property developer IT Fornebu,” says Fosse. “First, we acted as architectural advisor during the process of selecting the new premises and securing their functional requirements as tenant in the new building. Eventually, we were also commissioned as interior architects for the entire office space.

Building momentum with functionality at heart From an architectural idea to a completed building; from understanding what the client wants and facilitating it by exposing what they actually need, to providing a solid foundation for the remainder of the project. This is the Momentum Method – a method that helped Momentum Architects make a name for itself. By Didrik Ottesen | Photos: Bjørgli&Bergersen

Established in 2008, the architect and interior design company Momentum Architects has experienced solid growth based on the idea that design should display the

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clients’ identity, a formula that is transferable regardless of the client, be it Statoil, Hydro, or the Norwegian Ministry of Defence.

“Accordingly, our job was to develop the internal layout for all the operational parts of the building, where we assessed Statoil’s working processes and how we could


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apply their methods to the interior design and consequently increase the office’s flexibility and efficiency,” the partner explains. “By involving the client at an early stage of the process, we achieved pliable solutions and produced a modern office sufficiently adapted for the future.” The systematic approach, the process experience, and the development of functional solutions are some of the factors that have contributed to Momentum’s growth, helping to improve the client’s identity, value and productive energy. “The firm has three areas of focus: office and work space development, hospitals and healthcare buildings, and architectural consultancy, particularly on longterm leases of new office buildings. The latter is an increasingly popular service for businesses these days. It basically means that larger businesses rent office space through a realtor agency, which then plans and adapts the office to the clients’ needs. “During this process, it’s obviously vital to have architects with the right expertise to maximise the benefits of the solution. This is where Momentum has the experience and strength to ensure that the clients’

demands are met and the solutions are as advantageous as possible,” says Fosse. As most projects involve organisational development to a certain extent, Momentum’s exploration of the clients’ basic needs makes the foundation of the philosophy: “This philosophy, that buildings should develop from a desire for optimal functionality regardless of current trends, is where our strength lies. As far as we’re concerned, there is no specific division between the architect’s role and the interior designer’s role – we believe that the best result is achieved when these two parties work closely together, maintaining the overall objective, the client’s needs, throughout the process,” Fosse maintains. Gaining experience with every job, Fosse has realised that one conclusion is evident: “Our belief is that the planning of someone’s work space, regardless of the industry, should not be any less of a priority than the planning of the building itself. Too often, the functionality of an office is almost forced upon a building, and this is far from an ideal situation – particularly as it can be avoided by reversing the process and focusing in equal parts on functionality and the building itself.”

For more information, please visit: www.momentumark.no

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how to execute a project, whether it is rural or urban area development, hospitals and health facilities, infrastructure, or shopping centres. "The 14-step method is designed to highlight the best features for both our clients and ourselves,” says Bjerknes. "There are some elements there that are more specific to each of the phases, but also some general guidelines which constitute the method's frame. For instance, the development of strong and apparent concepts is of great importance throughout every phase,” he explains. "Every project represents a tremendous opportunity and has its own uniqueness through possibilities, creative solutions and analysis, which is how the project is eventually created."

Top: New terminal at Oslo Airport. Below: New terminal at Flesland Airport.

A 14-step method to surprising new possibilities

In wanting to develop a long-lasting quality culture aiming to surpass any given partners’ life-span, the approach and methods used within the company are important cornerstones to ensure longevity and quality. "We have previously said that qualities such as longevity and simplicity are qualities we appreciate in our solutions. By exploring the fundamental challenges of any task, and by analysing and understanding them, we can reach beyond conventional expectations and change for change’s sake,” says Bjerknes and finishes: "Following this thinking, we sometimes uncover surprising new possibilities, while other times the obvious solution is confirmed as the best."

With a vision to maintain and develop long-lasting, sustainable and high-quality solutions, Nordic – Office of Architecture, has become one of the largest architectural practices working in the national and the international arena. By Didrik Ottesen | Photos: Nordic – Office of Architecture

Having continuously developed and adapted to the numerous changes in the industry for over thirty years, Nordic – Office of Architecture has specialised in complex and function-specific facilities, from the largest and vastest areas in Norway to private housing. "Through the encouragement of individual development for our members of staff, we

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aim to achieve a collective culture with the ability to offer our clients and society more sustainable, elegant, functional and surprising architectural solutions," says John Arne Bjerknes, partner at Nordic – Office of Architecture. By developing a scrutinised and thorough approach, the Oslo-based office with its 130 employees, has created a method for

Ski rental and café at Breidablikk

For more information, please visit: nordicarch.com


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network of colleagues when needed. ”It is a strength that we are some 350 colleagues, not just us 30 here in Oslo. We regularly collaborate with the other offices on projects and share knowledge, resources and experience. It is both a security and an inspiration.” One of the firm’s latest projects was to develop a new opera house in Kristiansund. The company won the bid to deliver a new culture centre with the key purpose of housing the main opera stage in addition to a museum, library and culture school. “Kristiansund is a small city, so it was also a case of not creating a white elephant, but to incorporate this large culture centre into the existing scenery. The centre will be located between two restored, historical buildings, and it was a challenge to successfully merge the three elements.” Facilitate use

The Bislett Stadium, the cultural significance and large scale of which gave the architects quite the challenge. The stadium has now grown in volume to accommodate the need for full-size sports tracks, yet maintained its characteristic expression.

Architecture is more than just creating a functional space

For Dahle, architecture is about initiating activity and provoking a reaction. He feels that the ultimate goal of architects is to enable usage and create a desire to interact. “We always strive to evoke an emotional reaction; if we do that, we have succeeded as architects. However, we don’t set out to create something that is beautiful, provoking, ugly or different. It is more important for us how people interact with what we create.”

In Norway, C. F. Møller might be associated with developing hospitals because of its highprofile project Akershus University Hospital. But manager Christian Dahle explains that the company has a lot more to offer – such as a passion for developing urban spaces. By Anette Berve | Photos: C. F.Møller

”Our vision is that when we finish a project we have created more than just a functional space. We want there to be a sense of an additional purpose and giving back more than we took.” When C. F. Møller won the bid for three major restoration and construction projects in Oslo, its place amongst Norwegian architectural heavy-weights was secured. Established in 1923, with offices in Aarhus, London, Stockholm and Oslo, C. F. Møller

is Scandinavia’s oldest and biggest architectural concern. ”In Denmark, C. F. Møller is known for projects in housing, urbanising and landscape. We try to include such projects in our Norwegian office as well. Our work on the Bislett stadium and Domus Media are important projects that showcase this,” Dahle explains. Sharing knowledge and experience The different branches of C. F. Møller work independently while still sharing a larger

Opera and culture centre Kristiansund

For more information, please visit: www.cfmoller.com

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Office building for Ericsson, Asker

A drive to go further: architectural diversity with JRA Jostein Rønsen Architects AS describe themselves as generalists, keen to explore various kinds of projects without limiting design to set categories. Private constructions to public developments – this small-scale office knows how to turn great ideas into unique structures. By Julie Lindén | Photos: Jostein Rønsen Architects

The office, centrally located in Oslo’s Grubbegata, is made up of nine architects offering everything from customary architectural services to assistance within nontraditional fields. Though specialised in large-scale projects, the company strives to welcome assignments on several levels of complexity. “Our aim is to take on a miscellany of projects,” says architect Jostein Rønsen, founder of the company. “We do a lot of different things, and we try to focus on the individuality and uniqueness of the projects rather than what category they belong to.” The varied portfolio of JRA was brought about and furthered by many unique,

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prestigious and exciting projects. After its establishment in 1995, the office collaborated closely with Aviaplan AS during the building of Oslo Airport Gardermoen’s traffic control tower. The project was prized for its outstanding concrete design, and JRA grew to offer services to locations around the country. Ericsson AS headquarters – a mark of supreme quality Much praise has been dealt out to JRA’s 2001 completion of the Ericsson AS headquarters. Situated adjacent to a farm in Asker, west of Oslo, the office building was inspired by the openness of courtyards and conveys a seamless transition

from old to new. The office volumes are deconstructed into elements to suit the surrounding terrain, and are designed to let in the maximum amount of light and air. Rooftops have been given an open finish to embrace the distinctive feel of the JRA design. “I wouldn’t say we have any kind of special image or inspiration in mind when we start a project,” says Rønsen, adding: “We solve every assignment for what it essentially is: a challenge for us to meet and acknowledge for its particular needs and prerequisites. The methodology differs greatly from project to project, and so floor plans and designs must follow naturally.” Rewarding competition Architectural competitions make up a significant part of production, as roughly 90 to 95 per cent of the company’s assignments have been initiated through such entries. Rønsen notes the importance of employing this work structure, as it gives a good return on invested time. “Both open and invited competitions are of interest to us, not simply because they provide us with appealing projects but also because they are a good way to keep in


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Top: Vadsø elementary school, Vadsø. Below: QB - office building for PEAB Real Estate Development, Tromsø. Photos: CADMAN.

tune with the industry and the market. We’re allowed to test our expertise on everything from complete solution proposals to the development of realistic quotes for each client,” says Rønsen. The results of the competitive spirit have, to say the very least, been abundant. The company won first place in a turnkey project competition in Norway earlier this year, designing a new 7,300-squaremetre elementary school for Vadsø municipality. Over the past few years a number of corporate and industry buildings have also been commissioned, representing a trusting clientele at companies such as SKANSKA and PEAB. Entirety and drive – no matter the size Rønsen stresses that the feeling of entirety is key to JRA, no matter the size of a project. Bringing together ideas of form, function and user experience, all employees motivate each other to reach the full potential of every task. Being a smallscale office providing a wide scope of services helps, Rønsen notes. “We get to take on a lot of different projects and thereby work with methodologies

Top: Twin schools Oppsal Vetland, Oslo Below: University College of Dentistry, Tromsø

of various kinds. That allows you to keep learning and expanding on your current skillset, something that pays off in the end,” says Rønsen. “Designing a care home is vastly different from designing a villa or an office building – they have completely different areas of use and demand, but because we have great and varied experience we are able to take these projects on with an open and driven mind.” JRA aims to grow further in the coming years, in order to take on even more projects on a long-term basis. The company has made it a goal to enter additional collaborations with other companies to expand on the current portfolio. “For a company of nine employees, we have completed a good number of large-scale projects – some as large as 30,000 square metres. Our hope is to continue to grow, while staying as involved in every phase of construction as we are at the moment. Ideas matter, as do details, expression and final delivery of a seamless experience. Every client deserves an architectural firm that stays connected all the way,” says Rønsen.

Office building for Aibel, Asker. Top: Atrium of the office building for Aibel.

For more information, please visit: www.jrarkitekter.no

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Scan Magazine | Special Theme | Norwegian Architecture

Krydderhagen, housing project at Hasle in Oslo. Illustration by MIR

How to stand the test of time Halvor Bergan and Geir Dyrvik of Dyrvik Arkitekter encourage young architects to challenge the established companies to ensure the constant modernising of Norwegian architectural traditions. By Anette Berve | Photos: Dyrvik Arkitekter

The majority of Dyrvik Arkitekter’s projects are obtained by winning architectural competitions. Bergan and Dyrvik emphasise the importance of encouraging their team to contribute with ideas and suggestions in order to make sure the good ideas come out. “It is not important whose idea a project was, we simply want the idea on the table. At the same time it doesn’t matter if you have zero or 20 years of experience – everyone gets to contribute to the project to hand. That is the key to getting our team motivated and excited,” Bergan explains. When Geir Dyrvik and Knut Fabritius opened the doors to their office in 1998, their strategy was to cater to a wide range of clients. Within two years their team had grown to over 20, the projects varying from

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industrial buildings to apartment complexes and urban planning. At the same time, the company began to demonstrate a knack for cultural centres, and today, the company has invited Halvor Bergan and Fridtjov Bergsgard as partners and has a team of over 40 architects.

Geir explains their main focus as identifying the primary task of the building and space while unfolding its potential: “I believe our vision and ambition is that our projects have a cultural durability. We build everything with the intention of it being just as relevant in 50 years time. The way we do that is that we start a project by looking at the bigger picture, understanding the history and the surroundings. They become the pillars when we further develop the project. We try to identify the core and the strength in every project and remove anything unnecessary and disturbing.” Building for the future

The test of time Geir agrees that the success lies in the fact that the whole team is involved in every project. “Our strength is in the way we work and the layout of our office. Having open-plan offices, we encourage our team to communicate directly. Though we have smaller teams with the ultimate responsibility for any project, I believe the process of inviting everyone to contribute is what makes our project outlines great.”

Bergan insists that architecture is more that just an idea. To achieve a good result, the firm continuously discusses and revises its drafts to improve the original idea. “We put a lot of thought and effort into details and the choice of materials for the building to stand the test of time. We also have a strong focus of choosing sustainable solutions, and have extensive knowledge of building eco-friendly buildings.”


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Culture and education centre in Mo i Rana. Illustration by MIR

Alfaset crematorium. Photo: Helge Garke

Porsgrunn Culture Centre. Photo: Ivan Brodey

“The complete opposite to the culture centre is the crematorium that we developed for Alfaset in Oslo. Its simple form that rises from the ground is a subdued monumentality where landscape and situation are linked together. It creates a dignity through its simplicity. Where culture houses are meant to be open and inviting and full of sound, this is a place for ceremonies. They are two opposites that show the broad span of projects that we have,” Geir Dyrvik explains.

The power of a scale model “The process around developing the entry for Porsgrunn Culture Centre is a perfect example of how we work as a team,” explains Dyrvik. ”The project has only recently been finalised, but we entered the contest in 2007. Early on, this project became a heated debate in the office, with several strong opinions on the form and function. It confirmed the importance of physically working on a scale model to understand the bigger picture, but also challenge the way we thought of culture centres. By using the scale model we understood the connection and relation the culture house had to the rest of the city. By working from a scale model of the city and the centre we could easily see the cultural and physical parameters of the area. This process of narrowing down the project is our forte and why we succeeded in creating an anti-monumental building at a time when every culture centre was built to imitate the Opera House in Oslo.”

Competing with Europe The architectural competitions that Dyrvik Arkitekter enters are open to the whole of Europe. Competing alongside renowned foreign companies has put pressure on Norwegian companies to stay on top, and Dyrvik Arkitekter has won several contests in competition with many of the leading companies in Europe. One element Bergan and Dyrvik especially approve of is the inclusion of a young company in the list of nominees. The smaller companies are what ensure originality. “By including smaller and younger architectural companies in competitions for projects, you enrich the competition as well as the profession. The same goes for the international environment emerging throughout Norwegian companies. Dyrvik Arkitekter and other offices have architects from all over the world on their teams and this is a positive change for the industry,” says Dyrvik.

Little Bislett, apartment building in Oslo. Photo: Halvor Bergan

For more information, please visit: www.dyrvik.no

Details “It is always exciting when an artist is invited to decorate our buildings and can do more than just hang pictures on the wall. At the same time you are a bit nervous as to whether it will blend in or stand out from the building and its original meaning,” Bergan explains. “In this case it ended up strengthening our initial meaning of the building, and the tower especially. The centre is bursting with culture and the artist managed to interpret that in a way that people understand. A good idea can withstand being improved and changed, it usually only makes it better.”

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Scan Magazine | Special Theme | Norwegian Architecture

for growing the family’s vegetables. Floorto-ceiling windows open out onto the garden. “None of the house’s original elements has been removed, but rather worked around. All the kitchen components, such as the table, worktop, even the roof, are built to serve as furnishing elements, and as a part of the garden.”

Senstad construction. The practice is currently building a new farmhouse in Senstad, about an hour outside Oslo. The vision is to integrate the new house into the farmland without disturbing existing historic farm buildings or the scenery. The new house is being built into the ground, with a grass roof designed as a slight hilltop in the garden. This building has been tailored to the family’s as well as the farm’s basic needs.

“This room had to be practical and functional. It is the family’s activity that will personalise and define the room. By using concrete as the primary material, contact with the garden is promoted, instead of a constant worry over dirt ruining the floors,” Tandberg explains, concluding: “A building’s elements should have purpose on several levels, not just the aesthetic.”

The art of merging an old building with a modern lifestyle Bjørn Tandberg runs Tandberg Arkitekter, an architectural practice specialising in restoration and new construction. He aims to find new uses for historic buildings in modern society while challenging the buildings’ original purpose. By Anette Berve | Photos: Tandberg Arkitekter

“Architecture is about conveying history and connections. Architecture can question how you use a building and how a family lives. I want to challenge the traditional conventions of layout and structure,” says the architect. Inviting the outdoors in Bjørn Tandberg founded Tandberg Arkitekter in 2002 in order to investigate modern construction together with conservation. His passion is evident in the company’s portfolio, where restoration and the use of primary construction dominate. When the team works on projects, be it cabins, housing or churches, the focus is on bringing nature closer to our everyday life. “Modern technology can facilitate the interaction between nature and humans, to let the cold outdoors become a part of the building. Historically, Norwegian buildings

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consisted of a flexible structure of rooms, more integrated with nature and the elements. I enjoy challenging these room layouts and allowing clients to decide what suits them. Today’s home owners want freedom, space for their personal lifestyles, their belongings, and their family,” Tandberg insists, adding: “Integrating old elements with modern materials and modern lifestyles can be a tricky act. It is about identifying the different elements and materials with historic significance and determining what new qualities can be introduced. History cannot be copied, but new elements can ensure the preservation of an existing element.” Practical and individual In Vålerenga in downtown Oslo, the practice has succeeded in balancing the old and the modern. A wooden townhouse from 1822 was given a modern extension with a kitchen and integrated greenhouse

Totengata in Oslo

For more information, please visit: www.tandberg-arkitekter.no


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SW SP ED ECI ISH AL AR THE CH ME ITE : CT UR E

Above: Winner of the Kasper Salin prize 2012, Domkyrkoforum in Lund by architect Carmen Izquierdo. Below: Catherina Fored of the Swedish Association of Architects (Photo: Urban Orzolek).

Swedish Architecture: Establishing quality and defining our time “At its very best, Swedish architecture concretely mirrors people’s needs, desires and longing for balance, completeness and harmony,” says Catherina Fored, architect and federal director of the Swedish Association of Architects. By Swedish Association of Architects | Photos: Åke E:son Lindman

The architects Gert Wingårdh and Rasmus Waern say in the recently published book, What is architecture and 100 other very important questions [Vad är arkitektur och 100 andra jätteviktiga frågor], that architecture differs from other art forms in that it cannot be avoided. “In a world of virtual values, architecture lies firm. The picture you, your work, your city or your country create through buildings will most likely outlive you. Houses are the most important traces of human beings. The old ones were here long before us, and we will leave behind new ones. Architecture is a status which cannot be updated.” As such, role models who show some sense of direction, establish quality and define our time become more and more important. Every year, outstanding architecture is celebrated at the Swedish As-

sociation of Architects’ architecture awards. The most prestigious award within constructional architecture in Sweden, the Kasper Salin prize, is awarded here, instituted in 1962 in the memory of the famous Stockholm-based architect by the same name (1856-1919). In 2012, architect Carmen Izquierdo and developer Domkyrkorådet in Lund won

the award for the extension of the quarters around the city’s medieval cathedral. The jury’s motivation: “the building has its own distinct architectonic identity all the while subordinating itself to the cathedral. A bold operation, which thanks to poetic precision resulted in a convincing entirety. The entrance to Stora Södergatan is strong and independently shaped in a way never seen before in Sweden.” Carmen Izquierdo is the first woman to ever win the prestigious award. Who will win the prize this year? The jury has studied more than 50 objects across the country, and who the shortlisted candidates are will be made public later this month: that is when the classic “And the nominees are…” phrase will be completed. The winner will be announced on 8 November at the architecture awards at Stockholm Waterfront Congress. The awards ceremony programme is available at www.arkitekt.se/arkitekturgalan2013

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Refusing to put life in a box Ross Architecture & Design is the award-winning studio that rejects squares in favour of organic shapes and materials, aiming to promote a freer, healthier everyday life. “We don’t walk in straight lines on the beach or in the woods,” says cofounder and head architect Pål Ross. “So why on earth do we insist on living in square houses?” By Linnea Dunne | Photos: Ross Architecture & Design / Design©Pål Ross

“People from Småland are known for their persistent approach to business,” says Pål Ross. “I sometimes think that this is my key strength – and perhaps my greatest weakness. I'm incredibly bad at giving up, but thanks to this perseverance and skill I have done what people thought impossible.” Judging by the awards and accolades, people are impressed. Most recently, the Ross studio was announced as one of the winners in the European leg of the 2013 International Property Awards, stating that the

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Pål Ross, Head Architect and founder of Ross Architecture & Design.

winners “increase the beauty” of their cities. And beauty, it seems, is a recurring

theme in the Ross history, as the firm’s Villa Victor in Östersund was voted the most beautiful villa in the country back in 2009. Art and engineering The son of a gifted artist and grandson of a factory owner, Ross developed an appreciation for both aesthetics and technology early on. But the family’s plans for him disintegrated when an international company bought its weaving factories, leaving Ross with the epiphany that he could instead combine his love of art and engineering to make the world a more beautiful place. Ross graduated in 1992, facing a harsh economic climate and high unemployment amongst architects. Working as a teacher at a Waldorf school, he met his now-wife, Deirdre. “I married an architect, not a teacher,” she said upon dis-


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Scan Magazine | Special Theme | Swedish Architecture

the process – one described by the man himself as “mad,” mainly because it guarantees a happy customer every single time. It sounds near cathartic, starting off with a number of interviews to pinpoint who the customers are, what makes them tick, and how they live their lives; everything is taken into consideration, from winds and views to the way nature casts shadows at different points throughout the day.

Opposite and above: Villa Victor, the most beautiful house in Sweden. Photos: Mikael Damkier

covering his graduation project, determined to share her husband’s rare talent with the world. And so, in 1996, Ross Architecture & Design was born. Putting a silver lining on everyday life In a move typical of Ross’s innovative ways, the firm entered a market that had traditionally been a no-go area for architects in Sweden: the private home market. Saturated with prefab homes, this holy grail welcomed Ross with doors wide open, and close to 250 unique homes later, the industry has surrendered to the fact that it was wrong. Three recessions have passed since the studio’s inception, yet it has never seen a quiet day. Creating houses that combine the classic with the modern, always in tune with nature, Ross carefully takes the lives of his clients into his hands with a promise to brighten up their everyday life, or, as he

refers to it, “direct an endless choreography.” A far cry from the sharp corners of prefab homes, he wants to create a flow in which people can move naturally. “Nothing is square by nature. People aren’t square, we don’t move in squares – building homes that are square is illogical,” he insists. These days, a Ross imitation can be recognised a mile off, and there are plenty out there – an endorsement, the architect assumes. Naturally, the knowledge and experience of actually building a property gives him a distinct advantage: “It certainly makes it easier when you’re trying to push the boundaries. You know just how far you can go before it becomes practically impossible.” Satisfaction guaranteed: live in a work of art But more than just a skillset, the power behind Ross architecture lies as much in

“Then I hibernate. No phone, no internet, no family – I get into a flow where I forget about time and place, and I just work.” In addition to that priceless flow, you get top quality: from the tiles in the bathroom to the lighting throughout, the assumption is that only the best will do. A safe investment, which, as Ross puts it, allows you to live in a work of art. A calling to change lives Having conquered the private home market and proved his point, Ross is now broadening his views in the hope of improving the lives of many more thousands of people than he ever could with villas alone. Aqua Serena, a holiday resort development with eight flats in southern Turkey, marks the studio’s first venture abroad. At the same time, Ross is itching to transform the concept of the nursing home: “This is my calling. Nursing homes are all about care, of course – but prison-like environments make for a certain type of behaviour. What if we created work places where you just can’t be sad and angry?” It is a question worth considering, and one that goes a long way toward explaining the market-leading, award-winning position of Ross Architecture. Left: Drawing of the holiday resort development Aqua Serena in Turkey. Right: Work in progress at Aqua Serena in Turkey, the first ever Ross development abroad.

For more information, please visit: www.ross.se

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Scan Magazine | Special Theme | Swedish Architecture

Hornsbergs strandpark, an organic living room for Kungsholmen residents.

Where magic comes tailor-made With plenty of informal seats and benches alongside Kungsholmen’s north-western shoreline, as well as a sun-heated outdoor shower for runners, Hornsbergs strandpark was created as a big livingroom as opposed to a pretty park. Awarded the Swedish Association of Architecture’s own prize in 2012, Sienapriset, the wellplanned but organic project says a lot about the core principle of Sweden’s fifth largest architecture firm – one where solution-focused attention to detail comes first. That, and a touch of magic. By Linnea Dunne | Photos: Åke E:son Lindman

Carl Nyrén founded his architecture firm in 1948. When he sold it to his employees 35 years later, around 20 architects, interior designers and construction engineers worked under his leadership. Today, Nyréns is one of Sweden’s five biggest studios, and of its 110 employees, now also including landscape architects, building conservationists, model makers and illustrators, more than 70 have been made partners – something that is quite extraordinary.

for the responsibility,” landscape architect Bengt Isling speculates. “There were plenty of equally talented employees, and Carl didn’t want to choose. I guess the whole employee ownership thing was the spirit of the times, too.” It appears to have worked: few firms continue to grow but stay intact, satisfied staff and all.

“Carl was about to retire in 1983, but his son Johan was possibly a bit young

Specialising in the design and delivery of full-scale, complex projects, Nyréns is in-

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Nominated twice in World Architecture Festival 2013

dustry leading within urban architecture and landscape design as well as research and education environments. And with plenty of awards already under its belt, the studio was recently nominated for two awards at this year’s World Architecture Festival in Singapore: in the landscape category for Hornsbergs strandpark and in the display category for art gallery Artipelag. A more than 700-metre-long park with four different parts, including the Moa Martinsson Square, Hornsbergs strandpark is as urban as parks get, allowing residents of Stockholm’s Kungshomen to make the most of its waterside location. There is a jetty for sunbathing, three long, floating piers, and dense groups of trees divided by species. As such, it creates an interesting juxtaposition in Nyrén’s portfolio next to Artipelag, which is all about getting away from the city to explore art and nature in the archipelago.


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“It’s quite exotic to the non-Scandinavian eye: very location-customised and distinctively Scandinavian,” says Isling, who worked on the project, about Artipelag. The brain child of Björn Jakobson behind baby carrier brand BabyBjörn, Artipelag is a haven for art and nature exploration in Baggensfjärden, dubbed ‘the Louisiana of Sweden’. It was born out of Jakobson’s urge to give something back, and his love for the Stockholm archipelago was a driving force behind the project. Installation in tune with nature

Above left and middle: The 700-metre long shoreline at Hornsbergs strandpark. Right: The Nyréns office, where 110 staff, including 70 partners, create tailor-made, flexible architecture.

Rumour has it that Jakobson rejected countless architects before he met Johan Nyrén, but things moved quickly after that. “I won’t give you Bilbao, but an installation in tune with nature – that I can do,” Nyrén said to Jakobson, and the result was a very Nordic-looking creation surrounded by pine trees, with reflections of the Baltic Sea in big glass panels greeting visitors who arrive by boat.

Artipelag stands for activities in the archipelago. That was what the building brief said, and that is what the final product promotes. “Johan sadly passed away before Artipelag opened its doors, but it’s his ideas you experience out there. He didn’t design every single detail in the end, but it was his project, his work of art,” says Isling.

As the founder’s dream was to show off the beautiful archipelago to visitors, its natural state got to dictate the choice of materials. The building has an organic shape with facades of tarred wood, and the roof is covered in moss and sedum plants. The boardwalk that runs from the parking lot and 900 metres through the woods and along the shore is made exclusively of larch wood.

Nyréns-esque means flexible, enabling, magical Nyréns has always had multiple head architects, and they change over time. As such, there is no such thing as a typical Nyréns building; the firm has created countless public spaces over the years, and though some of them have a lot in common, each project is unique.

But there is a lot to be said for creating something customised, something tailormade and purpose-built. It has been said on more than one occasion that Nyréns offers attention to detail that is otherwise hard to come by, a strategic approach to planning far beyond the basic necessity. Perhaps this flexibility is what makes something Nyréns-esque: a creation’s ability to allow its users to get on with life, uninterrupted. As Isling puts it, it is a solution-focused approach to architecture: “We solve all the problems: technical, financial, and architectural – but more than that, we add a touch of magic. And that’s what makes a project interesting.” For more information, please visit: www.nyrens.se

Above left: The 900-metre long larch wood boardwalk, which takes you through the woods and along the shore at Artipelag, Baggensfjärden (Photo: Charlie Bennet). Middle: The Artipelag art gallery with a constant temperature of 21 degrees Celsius and 50 per cent humidity at all times. Right: The Artipelag art gallery –‘The Louisiana of Sweden,’ surrounded by pine trees (Photo: Charlie Bennet).

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Scan Magazine | Special Theme | Swedish Architecture

Scandic Hotel Alvik in Stockholm. Photo: Åke E:son Lindman

Architecture with empathy ETTELVA Arkitekter is a firm with a profound ability to understand people’s living habits, use of buildings, and the necessities of communities. With solid experience from 30 years of activity, the firm realises projects that are enjoyable and comfortable for the users. By Cecilia Varricchio | Photos: ETTELVA Arkitekter

ETTELVA Arkitekter started as a small office but has grown a lot recently, especially over the last five to seven years. To date, the company has realised a great variety of different projects that have provided them with an abundance of experience. One of the key elements in its working approach is that it goes through a lot of brainstorming before starting any project, in order to properly understand how the end users could benefit the most from the project’s realisation. Functionality and comfort are the first pillars on which the project must be based, and the firm aims to create beautiful and func-

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tional environments where the users play a central role. Vice MD and partner Linda Saarnak tells us that they refer to this concept as “considerate architecture”. ETTELVA Arkitekter prides itself on having realised many respected buildings, and below you can read about a few of them. Hotel Scandic Alvik The partnership with Scandic started back in 2002 when ETTELVA Arkitekter was commissioned to design and plan Scandic Hotel Alvik in Stockholm. The project was very successful and, thanks to this success, in 2012, the firm was asked to also

design a conference centre attached to the same building. The result was a spectacular extension of the existing hotel roof, a conference centre designed for 300 guests with a private entrance and foyer. The hotel was the expression of the spirit of the city and soon became a public landmark. With a strong and distinctive shape, ETTELVA Arkitekter succeeded in modernising the image of the hotel. District Kyrkoherdens fiskevatten ETTELVA Arkitekter was recently contracted to convert a piece of undeveloped land into a new residential district just north of Enköping station. When finished, district Kyrkoherdens fiskevatten will consist of 600 housing units plus facilities for community activities, such as a pre-school and a nursing home. A lot of emphasis is being put on connecting the area to surrounding existing districts. “We are very


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Photo: ETTELVA Arkitekter/Land Arkitektur

Photo: ETTELVA Arkitekter/Kontur

Photo: Åke E:son Lindman

pleased to be involved in the development of such a large new neighbourhood in Enköping. An interesting challenge of the project is how to combine the historic context with innovative and new concepts, to create a new city blend,” Saarnak says.

pected to bring a sense of activity and city buzz to the neighbourhood.

buildings the office designs for BMW must have a strong brand identity, but at the same time, ETTELVA Arkitekter adapts BWM’s requirements to local demands. To succeed with this challenge, the architects work closely with the company’s internal architects and advisors in Germany. The largest project that ETTELVA Arkitekter has implemented for BMW and MINI so far is the redevelopment of Bavaria Stockholm in Solna. Inaugurated in 2013, the building covers 16,000 square metres and is one of the largest BMW and MINI dealerships in Sweden.

Student housing on Årstafältet Årstafältet is one of the larger urban development areas in Stockholm. Many architects and builders are involved, and in the first phase of the project, ETTELVA Arkitekter, together with Svenska Bostäder, is developing 130 student apartments. The basic concept of the 12-storey building is to create efficient and affordable housing units of the highest quality. The building will help solve the city’s problems with scarcity of housing, especially for younger students. It will also become a landmark in the area, and student residents together with the café and bar on the ground floor are ex-

Djurgården’s visitor centre Djurgården’s visitor centre is currently under construction, but soon to be completed. Located just next to the bridge that connects the city to Djurgården, this will be the first building that a visitor sees when entering Djurgården and as such will serve as a meeting place for both Stockholmians and tourists. Djurgården is an island in central Stockholm, often cited as one of the locals’ favourite recreation areas, and it is visited by around 10 million people every year. The visitor centre will have its own restaurant and café, and, of course, tourist information. BMW ETTELVA Arkitekter is BMW’s architect partner in Sweden. It is key that all the

For more information, please visit: ettelva.se

Linda Saarnak, left

Photo: Pix Provider

Photo: Pix Provider

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Värtaterminalen, illustration of the new ferry terminal north of Djurgården, Stockholm.

Creating liveable architecture for the local neighbourhood Berg | C.F. Møller Architects is a relatively small, local architecture business in Stockholm. But despite its small size, the firm is very well-equipped, with a track record of winning important, large-scale projects on which it always co-operates with its clients to translate complex specifications into a result that appears simple and natural. By Cecilia Varricchio | Photos: Berg | C.F. Møller

The international architect business C. F. Møller, founded in the 1920s, and Berg Arkitektkontor, well established since the 1950s, merged in 2007. The joint venture has made it one of Scandinavia’s most versatile and reputable architectural offices today. The studio’s concept is based on the idea that the overall aspect of any project is as important as the slightest detail, and it always tries to realise projects that convey the ideals of clarity, simplicity and unpretentiousness. Always in-

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volved in exciting projects, the firm is currently working on two very important builds in Stockholm: Karolinska Institutet’s Biomedicum, the laboratory of the future hoping to raise Nobel Prize winners, and a new terminal building in Värtaterminalen in Djurgården. Good example of social sustainability Berg | C.F. Møller Architects won the contract for the project at Värtaterminalen through a competitive process. The scope

of the project is to build the new ferry terminal with the objective of making it an architectural and environmental landmark for the new urban development in the north of Djurgården, with the purpose of connecting the city and the port to make it a public place so that travellers and Stockholm residents can walk out there and enjoy the view of the ferries, the waterfront and the new city skyline. Inspiration for the building has been taken primarily from the archipelago, with water activity, rolling waves and movements, but also from the traditional harbour architecture with its large structures and warehouses. The terminal will be a large building matching the scale of the ships and design of the port area. The project started in 2009 and is expected to be completed in 2016, the construction of the new


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pier currently in the works. The goal is that the terminal will become energy independent through the use of integrated systems that utilise solar, wind and hydro energy. Creating social venues The Biomedicum contract was won in 2010 when Karolinska Institutet decided to find a new location for all its research activities. This will be a place attracting researchers and scientists from all over the world. One of the most important enablers of research activity is giving the opportunity to scientists to network easily, enabling co-operation and even more outstanding work and outcomes. Therefore, Berg | C.F. Møller Architects intentionally tried to create meeting places between the different labs. Moreover, the design has a high level of flexibility as laboratories are constantly developing. To keep up with these changes, the firm decided to create a rigid basic structure that can be changed quickly and adapted over time. The aim is to turn on its head what Karolinska Institutet is today, which is a typical campus area with a building placed bang in the middle of a park. Instead, Berg | C.F. Møller Architects is hoping to design a park within the building contrasting the typical layout of labs and to create a softer environment with a lot of green spaces. The building is compact and equipped with all the top-end environmental solutions. It has a twin shell facade with small

Värtaterminalen illustrations

variations inspired by the test tube, a common object in a lab, to bring life and movement to the facade. To provide light in the workplace, floor-to-ceiling glass walls and a courtyard with lots of green were designed, explains Mårten Leringe, CEO at Berg | C.F. Møller Architects. Close collaboration with clients For Berg | C.F. Møller Architects it is extremely important to always keep a close dialogue with clients and to continuously discuss problems and their solutions. The

C.F. Møller group has offices in Stockholm, Copenhagen, Aarhus, Aalborg, Oslo and London, and staff possess expertise in multiple areas across the organisation, in order to share the same vision. This is how the small and personal local architect firm Berg | C.F. Møller Architects manages to offer just the same capabilities as a large one. For more information, please visit: www.cfmoller.com

Biomedicum illustrations

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Illustration of Ulls hus, the brand new main building at the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences outside Uppsala.

Unexpected solutions with Nobel’s stamp of approval Ahrbom & Partner has set its mark all over Stockholm, with the Court of Justice, theatres and university buildings on their list. Over the years, the firm has gained momentum with its combinations of old and new and, not least, its unexpected solutions. By Anne Line Kaxrud/Linnea Dunne | Photos: Ahrbom & Partner

The architect firm has extensive experience in restoring, improving and developing buildings within Stockholm city centre. By combining old traditions and new impulses it has been involved in some of the most culturally important projects in Stockholm. “We enjoy creating unexpected solutions by uniting old and new and are constantly challenging ourselves by taking on new kinds of projects,” founding partner Per Ahrbom says. The firm may not be among the biggest in Sweden, but that has had little effect on its influence in Stockholm. City landmarks such as rebuilds and extensions of the

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Royal Opera, the Stockholm City Theatre and the Court of Justice are all represented in its portfolio, in addition to educational institutions such as the Royal Institute of Technology and the Stockholm School of Economics. “It’s been important to us not to get too specialised but show to the clients as well as to ourselves that we approach every project with fresh eyes,” Ahrbom says. “We want to avoid getting stuck in one way of thinking, and it is far more fun with varied tasks.” Ahrbom himself can refer to a long and successful career, including work with the temporary placement of the Swedish par-

liament in Kulturhuset in Stockholm and the design of the Stockholm City Theatre, before he started up Ahrbom & Partner in its current form 15 years ago. “Throughout the years we have worked with a variety of important state and institutional buildings around Stockholm, from restoration and development to interior design. I believe that it is one of our main strengths that we work with a variety of tasks,” Ahrbom notes. Brand new campus full of light While Stockholm is the centre point of their work, the Ahrbom & Partner touch is also visible elsewhere, such as in Uppsala where the Swedish University of Agricultural Sciences is about to get a new main building. Ulls hus, as the building will be called, will house not only the central management and administration of the campus but also lecture halls and semi-


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nar rooms for students, aptly including those aiming for a career in landscape architecture. More importantly, Ulls gränd, a new interconnecting alleyway, will be created to break up the space, making the Student Union and main canteen more accessible. At the heart of the campus, a green square that doubles up as recreational space will open up, enclosed by the main, u-shaped building with entrances to all the key parts of the campus. Light is a key factor here, with a building that gets thinner the higher up you get, allowing natural light to reach all of the green and leaving plenty of roof terraces for relaxation, as well as space for sedum plants. The 24,000 square metre campus building is to open its doors in the summer of 2014. Creating unexpected solutions A different Ahrbom & Partner speciality is a seldom seen ability to combine old and new, as evidenced by the library at the Royal Institute of Technology, the Court of Justice and the Stockholm School of Economics. In the case of the latter project, Ahrbom & Partner decided to build an extra, brand new building, and cover the outdoor space between the two buildings with a glazed roof. “Living in Scandinavia, we unfortunately do not have that many days of sun and heat, meaning that these spaces went to waste during large parts of

Stockholm School of Economics. Façade and entrance towards the park (left). View from the new courtyard space, the new building by Ahrbom & Partner to the left (right). Photos: Åke E:son Lindman.

the year,” Ahrbom says and adds that the new rooms have been welcome contributions to the projects. “We usually say that they got an extra room they did not ask for,” he muses. Thanks to the glass, the rooms are largely lit by natural daylight and are areas people come to socialise in as well as to work. “At the Stockholm School of Economics, the space is used for reading, chatting, parties and seminars, and has truly become the heart of the school,” says Ahrbom. Having acted as a key player in the development of the competition brief for the architecture competition to create the new Nobelcenter, researching the conditions

for the new-build at Blasieholmen and participating in the planning of the operations at the new centre, Ahrbom & Partner now excitedly awaits contributions from architecture firms eager to put their stamp on what is sure to be a world-famous, well-photographed building. Nobelcenter will house the Nobel museum and the Nobel Foundation and has been planned for years now, so the stakes are high: “It’s an exciting time,” says architect Pär Ahlbom. “This will without doubt attract attention from all over the world.” For more information, please visit: www.aop.se

Left: The Stockholm Court of Justice: from the new inside courtyard with waiting room, cafe and a new building housing courtrooms. Photo: Åke E:son Lindman. Right: Aerial view of the site for the new Nobelcenter.

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The refurbished HSB Stockholm offices

Welcome home – where the office is more than a working place 2011 was the time for one of Sweden’s largest housing organisations, HSB, to start a complete renovation of their offices in Stockholm. They knew exactly what they expected of the new offices: a welcoming and easily-accessible space, for both employees and clients. They asked pS Arkitektur to realise a project which satisfied these requirements, and pS Arkitektur made these ideas come true.

terms of square metres, but used in a more efficient way, thus having a positive impact on several aspects, such as creativity, environmental impact and reduction of costs.

By Cecilia Varricchio | Photos: Jason Strong Photography

Sustainability and creativity are the two cornerstones on which all pS Arkitektur’s work is based. Keeping this in mind, together with the HSB requests for a welcoming and accessible space, the design was carried out to create an office space ideal for people to meet and collaborate. The result was a success. HSB’s new office in Stockholm was welcoming, modern and with technical solutions at the forefront of architecture. Enjoyable environment provides great boost to creativity The design of these new offices involved some extremely innovative thinking. The goal behind the project was to build an office with great features to allow people to maximise their creativity and energy. An appropriate working environment can dramatically improve employees’ perform-

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ances, as when employees feel that the company is paying a lot of attention to their working conditions, they automatically feel satisfied and part of a team, increasing their energy levels and engagement. What pS Arkitektur did was to abolish all old-style office clichés and design an activity-based office with openspace blocks, each block composed of desks, meeting places, and quiet rooms.

FACTS Interior architect: pS Arkitektur

Attracting clients

Principal architect: Peter Sahlin

The employment of new technologies, for example in the field of acoustics and lighting, made the transition from the old single-person offices to the new open spaces extremely easy and good not only for employees, but also for visitors and clients. The reception hall is now wide and open, as is the shop. The new HSB office in Stockholm is smaller than it used to be in

Hand submission architect: Beata Denton Lighting design: Beata Denton Participating architects: Martina Eliasson, Emilie Westergaard Folkersen,Thérèse Svalling

For more information, please visit: www.psarkitektur.se


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Top left, bottom left and middle: Hurst House, Bourne End, UK, was shortlisted for Best Residential Property in Europe as part of the International Design and Architecture Awards. Right: Woodpeckers, New Forest, a replacement house on a rural site on the edge of the New Forest National Park.

Swedish architecture at its best – in the UK Founded in 2010 by Magnus Ström, Ström Architects has brought the best of Swedish design to Southern England. The firm specialises in creating one-off houses with astonishing contemporary design; every single project is unique and tailor-made to the client so that everyone will be able to enjoy a perfect house satisfying every need.

what activities and habits his clients practise and have when at home: whether or not they work from home, if they often have parties or guests, or if they have busy lives and spend less time at home.

By Cecilia Varricchio | Photos: Ström Architects

It has been 18 years since Magnus Ström moved to the UK, where he graduated with an honours degree in architecture at Portsmouth University. In the last 15 years he has been working on house projects – he finds them more interesting and rewarding than designing office space. At the moment, Ström is working on four new houses across the country and two town house conversions in London. A firm believer that designing a house allows more room to express the personal idea of

architecture, Ström insists that he does not design houses, but homes with soul. His focus and goal is to create homes where the owner will spend time feeling good in a calm atmosphere. Moreover, he always tries to use not just his own style and personal taste, but also to involve the client in the design process in order to pursue a creative course that will allow the creation of a house that will perfectly fit the needs of those who will live in it. For example, he always takes into account

Private House, Suffolk. The clients' brief was for a country house - 'a dream in the woods', a peaceful place to relax, regenerate, and think of new ideas.

Combining simplicity with beautiful design Ström grew up in Sweden and has been influenced by typical Swedish ideals and modernism. His design is stylish and pure, and also very functional. In his work, nature is an important element as he feels it has a calming effect. During all these years, Ström’s work has regularly won awards, and his firm was elected as one of the best emerging architect firms in the world in 2012 by Wallpaper Magazine. With extensive experience in the market from across a long period of time, Ström Architects is the ideal choice for any Swede or Scandinavian looking to build a house in the UK with a distinctive Nordic quality and style – and, of course, with a personal touch. For more information, please visit: stromarchitects.com

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Apartment building in the neighborhood Böljan in Hammarby Sjöstad

Diversity as concept: the strength of experience combined with new ideas Erséus Architects has a different perception of business compared to many other architect firms. Instead of focusing on only one particular type of design, the firm has gained broad and varied knowledge through a perfect mix of architects with different backgrounds who complement each other. The studio is suitable for any kind of project, ranging from houses to cultural or historical buildings and infrastructure. By Cecilia Varricchio | Photos: Erséus Architects

Divided into two evenly-sized offices in Gothenburg and Stockholm, Erséus Architects is composed of a highly professional and skilled team of about 45 employees who work all across Sweden and, occasionally, abroad. One of the most important values the company brings to any project is the sheer variety of different projects it has worked on: the marrying of different areas of architecture, construction techniques and design creates a valuable environment for creativity and innovative ideas. It has realised, and is still

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currently working on, plenty of urban development projects, but is also involved in the designing of private homes, hotels, public buildings, and swimming arenas, to name a few. Moreover, the size of the projects the firm can take on varies greatly, which makes it a perfect match for all kinds of jobs, both large and small. Views and methods in the creative process Erséus has an experienced team that has been working together for many years,

capable of adding to any project innovative and beautiful ideas that are also easy attainable and extremely functional. The architects have different competences and are of different ages so that they complement each other in every single aspect, from professional to cultural. Having young architects, in fact, brings the firm a lot of energy and new, invaluable ideas. The older staff instead provide experience, knowledge and the ability to solve even the most difficult tasks. The collaboration of older and younger creatives brings both an innovative mind-set and technical expertise, making it to possible for the firm to produce incredibly innovative designs with perfect execution. The organisation has an almost flat hierarchy and owners Peter Erséus and Fredric Scherman consider it crucial that everyone’s voice is heard. Their vision is


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that anyone can add value with his or her ideas and proposals. High ambitions lead to great projects It is not easy to win a big public project, and often just to get to pitch a firm has to be officially invited to the final round or win a prior pitching process. But Erséus is extremely popular and has won many competitions and awards over the years. Peter Erséus even, earlier in his career, won the Kasper Salin prize (a highly prestigious Swedish award) for his design of The School of Business, Economics and Law at Gothenburg University. Erséus Architects is therefore often chosen on its merits and always aims to be in the absolute top tier of architect firms in Sweden. The Royal Dramatic Theatre in Stockholm is one of the interesting culturalhistorical projects that it has been working on, assigned by The National Property Board of Sweden, with the task of recuperating and managing the building. Hotel Skeppsholmen in Stockholm is another one: the property was built in the 18th century and is now converted to a hotel. Erséus and Scherman tell us that this is a qualified restoration task, particularly exciting because it requires the ability and courage to combine modern style with the old and classic. Empathising design for people To be a great architect you must be capable of empathising with people. This aspect becomes even more important when designing private homes, and a lot of improvements could be made in regards to countless apartments across Sweden today. Erséus Architects is very much aware how important it is to understand the needs of the people who are going to live in an apartment, and is able to work together with them to obtain the best result. Though this might seem obvious, there are many apartments that could have been refurbished or built in much better ways: it is all about finding the design that best suits and satisfies the client’s requirements and that, thanks to architectural creativity, creates value. Whatever the project, bringing in this wellequipped firm seems like a wise choice.

Experience, sympathy and inspiration, coupled with highly skilled and creative talents, is a very tough combination to beat.

Top and centre left: Hotel Skeppsholmen in Stockholm with the famous ‘Long Row’, two 100-metre-long houses running on the same axis, originally drawn by Nicodemus Tessin Jr as naval barracks for Karl XII’s bodyguards. Middle right and bottom left: Angered Arena, Gothenburg, a sports facility that

For more information, please visit: www.erseus.se

opened in spring 2013 (Photos: Bert Leandersson). Bottom right: Student House at Stockholm University, inaugurated in August 2013

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The Rya Plant. Photo: Kasper Dudzik

The pure water drop before it bursts It is easy to forget the important function that some buildings have for society. KUB Architects is an expert in designing essential buildings and has vast experience of realising projects such as power plants, waterworks, water towers, and wastewater treatment plants. One of its most successful projects is the Rya Plant, which obtained a lot of international recognition and also won the prestigious Swedish Kasper Salin prize in 2010. By Cecilia Varricchio | Photos: Bert Leandersson

The Rya Plant is the largest water treatment plant in the northern countries, operated by the public company Gryaab in Gothenburg. This wastewater treatment plant has been nominated for and won several prestigious awards, both national and international. As mentioned above, this project won KUB Architects Sweden’s most highly valued award for architects, the Kasper Salin prize. In addition, the Rya Plant won the 2011 European Steel Design Award, the Swedish Steel Design

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Award, and several local awards including Per och Alma Olssons fund (Gothenburg City Architecture Prize) and Helge Zimdal award (for the Götaland region). The Rya Plant has been awarded no less than five architecture awards in addition to several water prizes thanks to the special technology used in the building. When designing the Rya Plant, the concept was very clear: “to show the pure water drop before it bursts,” a task in which KUB Ar-

chitects excelled. The plant is built as a big glass palace and intended to express the importance of what is inside. It contains a set of filters, all of which meet the standards agreed by the European Union in 1999, regulating nitrogen and phosphor emissions. Impressively, the Rya Plant is the largest disc filter building in the world. Proximity to the forest When KUB Architects kicked off the project in 2006, they also considered the national park, Rya Skog, which is located just behind the plant, to be extremely important. “The idea was to make a transparent body which would be suspended in the background of the vast open basins against the backdrop created by the forest,” says architect PerEric Persson. He tells us that in order to allow space for everything, they had to work upwards and


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also dig down. The floor plan is simple and consists of two halls, one on each side of the main building. These halls have a combined capacity for 40 filters. Using disc filters for wastewater treatment is both effective and efficient as it allows reducing the space needed for the plant. The result of the design is beautiful and stylish. It creates an optical illusion that the building is floating in front of the natural reserve and you can see the forest through the large glass facades. The treated water, before being returned to our rivers and sea, goes through a water sculpture the shape of a big sea shell, created by artist Pül Svensson. When stepping out in this area, you can feel the forest, and it gives you another level of awareness of how innovative and important the work in the Rya Plant is and has been in terms of its impact on nature. Seeking simple principle solutions KUB Architects is famous for its simplicity in approach and ability to design beautiful and functional buildings. This architect firm, based in Gothenburg, has 20 employees, all combining their technical expertise with a humanistic approach in terms of design and style. They all put a lot of care and attention into both the overall impact and smaller details of their work. Additionally, the environment is an important focus, and the firm always strives to work in a sustainable way in both the short and long term. For example, it provides its customers with services that help the transition towards a more sustainable society, adapting to environmental conditions in all the steps of the design process and fulfilling its customers’ as well as the community’s expectations, all the while meeting the demands of eco-cycling and environmental compatibility. KUB Architects considers it very important to contribute to a resourceefficient society and to realise classic buildings that will express our time and, at the same time, maintain a classic appeal in the future. For more information, please visit: www.kub-arkitekter.se

Photo: Kasper Dudzik

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Radisson Blu Riverside Hotel in Gothenburg. New construction completed in 2013. Photo: Ulf Celander

Versatile architecture with interior design expertise Reflex Architects has vast competence in many different fields of architecture and usually works on very large projects. What distinguishes the studio from most other architecture firms is its solid expertise in interior architecture, with ten specialists working exclusively in this area. This makes it stand out from competitors, adding more value to new projects. By Cecilia Varricchio | Photos: Reflex Architects

Reflex Architects is located in Stockholm but works all over Sweden. The firm has about 60 employees: architects, interior designers, physical planners and building engineers. Reflex Architects also works through qualified collaborations in areas such as landscape, graphics, lighting design and artistic decoration, and is principally active in designing offices, hotels, laboratories and pharmacies in addition to residential complexes. At the moment, the team is focusing on large housing projects in the Stockholm region, a sector that is growing extremely rapidly. Assignments

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range from product development to urban planning, with an emphasis on complex construction projects. Customers are often larger property developers, owners or tenants in both the public and the private sector. The firm has consciously focused on a mix of governmental, municipal and private clients, as the latter are less sensitive to economic crises and budget cuts. Unique projects to make an impact Reflex Architects has realised many unique projects since its inception 15 years ago, such as commercial builds, vil-

las, a church built in glass, and laboratories for large medical companies such as Astra Zeneca and Biovitrum. Interior architecture played a central role in the realisation of the new offices for law firm Baker McKenzie. When the company decided to move into new premises in a restructured property, redeveloped by Reflex Architects, on Vasagatan 7, it also chose Reflex Architects to conceptualise and design the office’s interior. Other important projects that Reflex Architects has realised are, inter alia, H&M’s headquarters in Stockholm, Courtyard by Marriott Hotel, Nya Lilla Erstagården and residential block Sädessärlan. Right now, the office is working on two central high-rise offices in Stockholm City, an office complex in the new Arena City in Solna, and a brand new centre in a municipality outside Stockholm with both residential and commercial buildings.


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Above left: Nya Lilla Erstagården Children's Hospice in Erstavik. New construction with estimated move-in date in 2014 (Visualisation: Reflex Architects). Above middle: Nykvarn Centrum: residential, commercial and office spaces in Nykvarn. New construction estimated to kick off in 2014 (Visualisation: Reflex Architects). Above right: Scandinavian office building in Stockholm. New construction with estimated move-in date in 2015 (Visualisation: Tenjinvisual).

Architecture for better healthcare As already mentioned, Reflex Architects has been working on Nya Lilla Erstagården, a children’s hospice in Nacka, outside Stockholm, but this is not the only project the company has had success with in the healthcare sector. It is now finalising the new building at Sophiahemmet, with a maternity and a delivery ward, which will be inaugurated in 2013/2014. This tailor-made, new development will have a capacity of 4,000 deliveries every year, built the same size as Sophiahemmet’s older buildings. Reflex Architects is also involved in the huge NKS-project, which envisages the realisation of the New Karolinska Solna and Södersjukhuset, both major hospitals in the Stockholm area. Architect firm with rapid growth Reflex Architects has grown rapidly since its inception back in 1999, when Johan Lin-

nros, Kjell Mejhert, Anders Nordlund and Maria Rudberg founded it. They started as a small office with just a few employees and today the firm employs almost 60 professionals. Their first assignment was CityCronan in Stockholm, which they completely refurbished and created as a new, modern, and stylish building. This project was awarded the ROT prize and Skanska’s Environmental Prize and nominated as Redevelopment of the Year in 2003. Thanks to vast expertise and the capacity to meet clients’ expectations, coupled with superb past achievements, the firm has become highly regarded in several areas of architecture. “Even if the interior architecture division is quite large, most of our employees are house architects and this is why we are capable of realising such big and important projects,” says Linnros. Constantly at the forefront in product development, the firm is also designing fur-

niture to use in its projects. Interior design is often integrated within a project, even though the company also does work on projects involving house planning alone or those exclusively revolving around interior architecture. This architect firm always has environmental issues in mind when starting a new project, and it is its aim to develop long-term sustainable human habitats. Its policy is to at least meet, but mostly exceed, official environmental regulations. This is feasible thanks to the use of new technologies such as renewable energies, recyclable materials and environmentally-friendly operations. Reflex Architects is constantly expanding its portfolio by adding masterpieces of contemporary Nordic architecture, which it perfectly embodies and represents. For more information, please visit: www.reflexark.se

Left: Courtyard by Marriott Hotel in Stockholm. New construction and furnishing, completed in 2010. Middle: Office at Vasagatan 7 in Stockholm. Redevelopment completed in 2009. Right: H&M headquarters, offices and shops in Stockholm. New construction and furnishing completed in 2008. Photos: Åke E: son Lindman

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A small, big architect firm Contekton Architects is a small architect firm located in Vänersborg, far away from the big cities. But even if it is not one of the large city firms, it is constantly engaging with several clients and working on numerous important, international projects. This is the story of local architects achieving success around the world. By Cecilia Varricchio | Photos: Contekton Architects

Contekton Architects has managed to secure several different significant contracts over the years and to work with a wide range of different clients. The firm boasts extensive experience in many sectors, from healthcare to film studios, education, industry, shopping centres and housing. One of the firm’s unique selling points is that, as it is used to working in different sectors, thus gaining a deep knowledge of and understanding for each and every one of them, its team is capable of very quickly adapting to any challenge. The financial capacity of people outside the big cities is perceptibly different, and an important gift for an architect working with such customers is being able to provide high quality at affordable prices. Contekton Architects has always paid a lot of attention to

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this aspect, and its proficiency in combining high quality with good prices has allowed the office to work with several projects abroad, including in Africa, America and Norway. Great attention to customer requirements As Contekton Architects is experienced in working with all kinds of clients, the organisation has developed a great sensibility for clients’ needs and wants, as well as an admirable capacity to adjust to these requests. The team’s portfolio includes exciting projects such as the world-famous film studios in Trollhättan and approximately 50 on-going projects in Sweden and abroad. Architects Peter Bergmann and Anders Patriksson tell us

Top left: N3 centre for youth culture. Top right: Film i Väst, Trollhättan. Bottom left: Sportshopen in Tanum. Middle: Loft conversion apartment in a former industrial environment. Bottom right: West East shopping centre.

that they are a local office with extensive competences and that it all started in the 70s, when the firm was founded. Since then, they have been able to offer specialised services through all types of architectural assignments. At the moment, Contekton Architects is working on approximately 15 commercial and residential developments in Norway, where clients have recognised its skills in building beautiful buildings with the highest standards and at the right price. It seems like there is reason to believe that this small, local architect firm will just keep on getting more and more successful.

Contekton Architects Kungsgatan 3, 462 33 Vänersborg Tel: +46 (0) 521262680 E-mail: info@contekton.com

For more information, please visit: www.contekton.com


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Scan Magazine | Special Theme | Swedish Architecture Left: A Ponte Vecchio in Stockholm, urban design project for developing and revitalizing public life in the inner city. Right: Urban infill where the architectural form conveys the dialogue between site and programme, between public and private.

lieves that urban quality is the answer to many environmental and health-related issues. Co-founder Ola Kjellander explains why: “The challenge of our culture is to keep cities attractive and functional on all levels. That is why the development depends on urban quality.” Common ground, solid urban fabrics and sustained city milieus are a few examples of the ways in which the company contributes towards this. Inspired by Nordic culture

Shaping the cities of our future “Our countries are built on the humanistic idea that architecture and cities should be for everyone,” says Stefan Sjöberg, co-founder of Kjellander + Sjöberg, who are renowned for urban sustainability and continue to apply the fundamentals of Nordic culture to their architectural work. By Sara Mangsbo | Photos: Kjellander + Sjöberg, Adam Mørk, Johan Fowelin

They are one of the leading Scandinavian agencies of a new architectural generation – one they describe as an era where extensive variation and creative living combinations are preferred in lieu of white drywalls and defined borders. Since its inception in 1998, Kjellander + Sjöberg has kept to a clear vision: to engage and involve people, companies and communities at large through sustainable living and working solutions. “We want to see what happens when you let the public sphere into the private room,” says Sjöberg. The office is dedicated to an architecture that allows interaction, modification and improvisation, where attention to context is of equal importance as the design itself.

edge on liveability, resource efficiency and climate adaption. The organiser, the Danish Ministry of Environment, requested suggestions for innovative actions and alliances. Discussing the future of our cities is an important ingredient in the company’s work process. Kjellander + Sjöberg be-

It is easy to see how the practice allows the company’s Swedish roots to play a big role in the architectural work. “I hold the Nordic countries to be some of the most promising environments for city planning at present. We can see many examples of new developments around the world that are segregated and undiversified, but our focus is on social space, on inclusive and attractive, rich environments,” says Kjellander. Addressing many stakeholders at the same time and keeping a democratic dialogue throughout the whole work process will encourage urban sustainability to grow, according to Sjöberg: “Our architecture should be a synthesis of the city, the environment and the building – never a disconnected object.“ For more information, please visit: www.ksark.se

Urban quality is the answer In early October, Kjellander + Sjöberg is invited to participate in the Copenhagen Urban Futures Forum to share its knowl-

Left: A ‘Mini-Manhattan’ on Kungsholmen, the residential infill is a distinctive addition with a strong urban identity. Middle: Villas by the Woodland Cemetery in Stockholm, a combination of materials and textures with great attention to detail. Right: Residential area in Annedal, designed as a link between nature and city.

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Triangeln Station, Malmö. Photo: Felix Gerlach

A unique blend of know-how Sweco Architects has broad competence across the architectural spectrum, with building architects, interior designers, landscape architects and urban planners employed by the company. One of Sweco’s most distinctive features is that it is a great group of professionals with expertise in several different fields in addition to architecture, thus being able to solve any potential issue in-house. Sweco offers clients broad experience and know-how for all kinds of challenging projects, while offering aspiring architects and current employees a wide range of exciting career opportunities. By Cecilia Varricchio | Photos: Sweco Architects

There are other architect firms of the same size as Sweco Architects, but no other studio offers the same unique combinations as this group. With architects, environmental experts and engineers under the one roof, it becomes easy to solve any problem. A pertinent example of the success of this unique combination is the newly renovated and remodelled Sweco house in Stockholm. Sweco’s team internally designed and planned the redevel-

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opment of the Sweco house where 1,500 people work since the beginning of the year. The architects worked on the interior design and décor to create a large, inviting ‘living room’ space for social and creative meetings with glass-enclosed meeting rooms. This redevelopment focused a lot on environmental issues and on creating social spaces for employees. The restoration was a huge success and it was awarded the Sweden Green Building

award, which goes to the best redevelopments from an environmental perspective. Exciting projects, nationally and internationally A successful project realised by Sweco Architects is the Triangeln Station in Malmö. This is part of a bigger project, The City Tunnel, which connects Malmö Central Station to the Öresund Bridge and Denmark. The Triangeln station won the classical architecture award, the Kasper Salin prize, in 2011. Sweco already works internationally on a lot of projects, and the firm’s ambition is to expand overseas even more. This should be easily achieved thanks to the size of the company, able to provide to its customers all the benefits of a large organisation with countless skilled employees. Sweco is a prominent firm within the design of new cities and an ex-


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pert in soil, water supply, energy and infrastructure to name a few. It has realised numerous projects of this nature, one of which is Caofeidian, a Chinese city with more than 1 million inhabitants. Sweco brings a lot to these parts of the world, especially in terms of the processes behind urban planning and sustainability issues. Moreover, these projects are very valuable to the firm’s employees as they provide the opportunity to work abroad while being responsible for large-scale projects such as the design of a brand new city. Additionally, employees will experience and overcome stimulating challenges and learn from and be influenced by other cultures, thus able to enrich the firm’s internal culture once back home. “Given Sweco’s size, opportunities for employees are endless as they do not have to move to a different company to further their careers or move from one country to another,” says Jan Mattsson, CEO of Sweco Architects. Experts in passive housing Sweco Architecs is a leading company in the field of passive housing, currently working on the world’s most northern passive house, a pre-school that will be ready to move into next year. This project has been a bit tricky given the climate

conditions and the decreasing opportunities to take advantage of renewable energies the further north you go. Joining forces, Sweco’s architects and engineers enabled the implementation of some highly advanced construction techniques. The work started over a year and a half ago and is still ongoing. In order to qualify as a passive house, a building must be energy efficient and use renewable energy, but the selection of organic and nontoxic building materials is also very important in reducing the environmental impact of the building’s life cycle. A distinguished combination Sweco Architects’ mission is to create value by delivering advanced consulting services, and its vision is to become Europe's most respected company in architecture, engineering and environmental construction and to actively contribute to the sustainable development of society. It seems unquestionable that the studio is on the right track towards accomplishing this vision. Sweco Architects is not only present nationwide in Sweden but, as a big umbrella group of different companies, covers the whole of Scandinavia with offices in Finland and Denmark as well. The whole group consists of 9,000 employees with approximately 550 working in

the architectural industry. Sweco has a long and inspiring history that started back in 1889, but the company as we know it today was formed in 1997 when FFNS Architects, founded in 1958, bought the engineering consultancy firm VBB.

A few examples of Sweco Architects assignments: Swedish Pavilion for the World Expo 2010 in Shanghai Police stations in Kalmar and Helsingborg Market Hall in Gothenburg - renovation and conversion Interior design of Shanghai Tang’s fashion stores in China Ystad Arena, Behrn Arena in Örebro, Helsingborg Arena, Strömvallen in Gävle Central Post Office in Malmö Health care buildings at Borås Hospital, Falun Hospital and The University Hospital of Turku. Travel centres in Landvetter, Örnsköldsvik and Jönköping Roskilde Cathedral School and Frederiksborg Gymnasium in Denmark Swedish Embassy and the Trade Council of India – redevelopments and new buildings

For more information, please visit: www.sweco-arch.se

Top left: Incubator Jinan in China - a centre of 200,000 square metres for start-ups (Visualisation: Sweco). Bottom left: Clarion Hotel at Arlanda Airport (Photo: Tim Meier). Centre: MD Jan Mattsson. Right: Sweco’s headquarters in Stockholm, prized with several environmental awards. 1,500 employees work here (Photo : Tim Meier).

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An office building and operations centre for Preemraff refinery based in Lysekil, Sweden, with a control room of two different shapes, round and rectangular respectively.

Beautiful and convenient architecture “The perfect house should be like a bird’s nest: practical, useful, beautiful, ecofriendly and specifically built for those who live there.” This is the motto that Mats & Arne Arkitektkontor lives and breathes every day on its projects, with every detail realised according to the client’s unique needs. By Cecilia Varricchio | Photos: Nordicaa.com

Every project designed by Mats & Arne Arkitektkontor starts with a thorough analysis of what the client really wants, to make sure that the building will reflect the customer’s expectations exactly. This method is clearly visible in one of the firm’s most important projects, the Preemraff, a refinery in Lysekil in Sweden, where the studio planned and built an office building and an operations centre with a control room of two different shapes, round and rectangular respectively. The difference in shape was instigated by the need to make visually clear that the most important part of the plant, the control room, is well protected from potential explosion, hence a round, dark part with small openings as windows. It was important to emphasise that the control room is the core and the safest place of the whole plant, transmitting the impres-

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sion of a secure and reliable workplace. The rectangular red shape is primarily intended as an administrative building. Implementing projects: from initial draft to building The entire analysis involved meetings with representatives from all departments in the company, ranging from the executive committee to the cleaning staff, in order to ensure that this complex building would be tailored to the needs of all the employees working there. Once all the principal requirements had been identified, technical calculations were implemented and the work started to advance quickly.

tect Arne Algeröd tells us that discussions with the client about the choice of materials and the working environment are crucial for the office. For example, energy consumption always has a big impact when working on large buildings, and in Preemraff they chose to heat the building with steam. If the requirements on your wish list add up to an architect firm that can efficiently realise a project that on the one hand mirrors the needs of the client, and on the other is functional, all, of course, at an affordable price, Mats & Arne Arkitektkontor might just be the perfect match.

The importance of sustainability Sustainability and environmental issues are some of the most important aspects of the work of Mats & Arne Arkitektkontor. Archi-

For more information, please visit: www.matsoarne.se


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Clockwise from top left: Göteborg Landvetter Airport; Kvillebäcken; Herresta; Jönköping Energi, Torsvik; Stadsskogens skola.

The challenge of combining sustainability with high architectural ambition Liljewall Architects is one of Sweden’s largest architect firms and works all across Sweden and internationally, with offices in Gothenburg, Stockholm, Malmö and Buenos Aires. The firm has the expertise to create buildings at the top of their game in terms of both architectural design and environmental issues. By Cecilia Varricchio | Photos: Liljewall Architects

Liljewall Architects’ accomplishments include planning and design in many different areas, ranging from urban planning to interior design. The firm was in charge of the huge transformation and alteration of Göteborg Landvetter Airport, a project covering more than 6,500 square metres, including a more efficient use of the retail space and a redesign of food halls and waiting areas. The inauguration took place in February this year and the redevelopment has given the airport a new, fresh flavour. Complete architecture office with specialist skills Liljewall Architects is also very skilled in fields such as biofuel, biogas and waste incineration plants. For example, the company is creating a new construction of

a biofuel-fired cogeneration plant for Jönköping Energi, Torsvik. This project is a supplement to the award-winning plant that Liljewall Architects previously designed for the company. Liljewall Architects also has vast experience of designing education facilities for students of all ages, and the attention to the environment is exemplified by one of the firm’s latest projects. Using advanced techniques, the company built a zero-emissions school, Stadsskogens skola, with solar panels on the entire roof and solidwood technology. The firm’s portfolio also boasts many Reggio Emilia inspired schools and pre-schools which are based on the special pedagogy that puts children’s needs first and promotes learning environments that stimulate meetings between people. Moreover, Liljewall Archi-

tects works with 3D and BIM in all phases of its projects. Over ten years of extensive experience of this gives the firm a competitive edge and the ability to make important design-, cost- and sustainabilityrelated decisions early on. Satisfied, returning customers are the foundation of the business Liljewall Architects works persistently to meet customers’ expectations and requirements. This is achieved through commitment and by taking into account resources, recycling issues and human well-being. For example, the firm is an active member of Sweden Green Building Council, SGBC, which is responsible for the environmental certification of buildings in Sweden. The success of Liljewall Architects is very much down to its employees’ knowledge and attitude, which make the foundation of the company’s values and future potential. For more information, please visit: www.liljewall-arkitekter.se

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: ME URE E T H L T ITEC A I EC CH SP H AR S NI A D

Clockwise from left: Urban Mountain is a proposal for the refurbishment and extension of a 50,000-square-metre high-rise office building in central Oslo, Norway (Visualisation: schmidt hammer lassen architects); The Royal Playhouse in Copenhagen, realised 2004-2007 by Lundgaard & Tranberg Architects (Photo: Jens M. Lindhe); DTU Compute by Christensen & Co architects (Photo: Adam Mørk); KPMG in Frederiksberg, Denmark by 3XN in 2012 (Photo: Adam Mørk).

Sustainable Danish architecture Danish architects are leaders in the fields of construction, town planning and landscaping, providing social, economic and environmental value for people and society at large. The Danish architectural profession consists of more than 800 companies employing a total of around 5,000 workers, and the companies span sole traders to large firms with several hundred employees.

clude topics such as life-cycle cost, resource efficiency and a holistic approach to sustainability. Danish architecture is ready to make a significant contribution to the advancement of sustainability in a broad sense on a global scale.

By The Danish Association of Architectural Firms

Danish architectural firms are working in an increasing number of countries all around the globe, including countries that, in every sense, are far away from Denmark. Not only do they deliver architectural solutions at a high level: they also bring with them a set of values stemming from their Scandinavian origin.

Denmark introduced legally binding rules for energy efficient buildings as early as 1976. Since then, the requirements have been tightened every two to five years and expanded to cover ventilation and lighting as well as heating. By 2020, the energy consumption of buildings must be reduced to nearly zero or by 50 per cent compared to 2010. This prompts Danish architects to constantly develop new solutions combining high architectural quality with low energy consumption. The most advanced new buildings are energy positive: they have active and passive energy systems that produce more energy than the buildings consume. In addition, Denmark has been a laboratory for sustainable town development for many years. The Danish sustainability agenda is constantly broadening to in-

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The Danish Association of Architectural Firms actively promotes further internationalisation of member companies. We are confident this will not only enhance the further development of their businesses but also strengthen the drive towards a more sustainable future.

Christian Lerche, director of The Danish Association of Architectural Firms. Photo: Carsten Ingemann

For more information, please visit: www.danskeark.dk


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Above: Ørestad is developed as an urban area featuring innovative architecture that sets new standards for Danish architecture. This development works as a laboratory for new ideas and typologies, within the fields of both temporary functions and architecture. Below: Guide to New Architecture in Copenhagen contains 137 examples of new constructions, public spaces, and overall plans for the capital’s development. The guide book can be bought at bookshops and travel agencies in Copenhagen as well as in our own bookshop, DAC& BOOKS/SHOP, or online at www.dac-bookshop.dk.

New Danish Architecture Since the golden age of the 1950s and 60s, Danish architecture has been characterised by and world-renowned for its simplicity, functionality, aesthetics, and humanistic understanding. Today, new Danish architecture is also driven by a need for innovation and sustainable development that deals not only with environmental issues, but also with the perspectives of economic and social welfare. By Danish Architecture Centre | Photos: Kontraframe and Stamers Kontor

Copenhagen, like other cities in Denmark and around the world, has in the last 15 years experienced an accelerated transformation. Large sites in the city, previously occupied by industrial buildings and harbour installations, have been redeveloped into vibrant neighbourhoods, such as Nordhavnen, Scandinavia’s largest metropolitan development project. In other places, entirely new urban districts such as Ørestad have been planned and built comprising humanistic, sustainable, and innovative architecture, landscape design and urban spaces that promote new ways of living, working, and playing. Consequently, architecture and urban planning play an important role in most people’s lives, and more and more people are taking an interest in the city’s develop-

ment. The Danish Architecture Centre (DAC) is Denmark’s national centre for the development and dissemination of knowledge about new architecture, urban development and innovation in the built environment. Inviting you to explore new Danish architecture, the Danish Architecture Centre offers a wide range of activities, including exhibitions, lectures, guided tours in the city, ‘Podwalks’, family workshops, etc. Online, you’ll find the Copenhagen X gallery with more than 200 examples of new architecture in Copenhagen. In print, you can buy the guide book, Guide to New Architecture in Copenhagen, which gives you a comprehensive overview of Copenhagen’s new architecture and urban development.

For more information, please visit: www.dac.dk

Enjoy exploring the city!

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Scan Magazine | Special Theme | Danish Architecture

Airy architecture grounded on solid experience RUBOW arkitekter has been designing schools, day care centres and nursing homes for decades. But that does not mean that the firm is stuck on repeat; on the contrary, it never creates two similar solutions. Each project is based on the specific characteristics of the site, the building’s function and, most importantly, the needs of the people who are going to use it. By Signe Hansen | Photos: RUBOW arkitekter

When RUBOW arkitekter wins almost every second competition it enters, it is not only because of the firm’s vast experience within environmental and social sustainability. It is also because RUBOW’s architects meticulously tailor every proposal to meet the specific demands and needs of the project. The result is that the numerous schools, day care centres and nursing homes designed by RUBOW arkitekter differ a lot, as all parameters, the architectonical, technical, economic, social and environmental, are interwoven.

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“What is interesting about this is that we never know where it will take us. It is the potential of the project and the site that is our inspiration, and this means that the outcome is always specific, never general. That’s probably one of the reasons that so many of our proposals are successful: people never know what to expect from us, and that can be an advantage because it gives us the freedom to do something new and unexpected,” explains partner at RUBOW, Susanne Hansen, stressing: “Every time we create a pro-

posal, we build it on our fundamental values in relation to people and welfare, and we don’t want to compromise on those.” Interpreting the site RUBOW arkitekter has won a string of architectural competitions in recent years. A striking example of how the firm innovatively interprets and utilises the site-specific characteristics of a project is the Vilhelmsro School in the municipality of Fredensborg. The school consists of ten structures, clad in slate tiles, on poles to match the structure of the forest that surrounds it. Natural sunlight is led through light prisms deep into the core of the buildings. The forest as a theme inspired the design of the spaces inside and outside of the buildings, giving children, teachers, parents and neighbours alike new possibilities and experiences.


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In striking contrast, another of the firm’s major projects is that of a large, urban school. Located in and integrated into the heart of Helsingør, the new school’s architectural theme is inspired by the diversity of city life. Specialist knowledge Every time RUBOW works on a proposal, a team is put together to provide not only architectural expertise but also specialist knowledge within the area in which the construction is to serve. This means that when RUBOW sets forward to create a school, for instance, it draws on the knowledge and know-how of experienced teachers. Hansen explains: “What we have is not just a very qualified team but also the will to think in new directions. Based on our knowledge of the functional requirements of a specific project, we feel we can interpret more freely the specific project’s potential, meaning that we never come up with a standardised solution. The solution grows from the project, and that means that every proposal becomes independent and programme-specific at the same time.” More than solar cells In recent years, environmentally- and socially-sustainable buildings have become a buzz term within the public as well as the private sector. But for RUBOW arkitekter sustainability is more than that: it is a way of enhancing both the building’s aesthetics and the well-being of its users. A remarkable example of this is the firm’s new design for Trekløveret day care centre in Frederiksberg. Due to strict space

limitations, the institution is built as a ‘Babylon tower’ across four floors, all surrounded by outdoor play areas. The tower’s structure is used as a social tool dividing the children into age defined groups with the oldest children highest up in the tower. The top floor houses a secret workshop area with views of the sky and the city. “Being in the city gave us the opportunity of creating a completely different building than you would usually see for a day care centre. By building upwards we actually managed to create a lot more light, air and plenty of opportunity for the kids to get their hands dirty,” says Hansen, adding: “Sustainability is so

much more than solar cells: it is the way you adapt to a city landscape, and it is a possibility to add something architectonical and functional to the building.” RUBOW arkitekter employs approximately 60 people. The company’s core focuses are: social housing, health and culture, educational institutions, nursing centres and nursing homes; environment and energy, and city plans. RUBOW arkitekter, Skt. Annæ Passage, Bredgade 25 F, 1260 København K. Tlf: +45 33 69 11 22

For more information, please visit: www.rubowarkitekter.dk

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The seven-storey extension to the Royal Library, known as the Black Diamond, has become an architectural icon in Denmark. Photo: Adam Mørk

Urban mountains and black diamonds schmidt hammer lassen architects, commonly known as the firm behind some of Scandinavia’s most recognised cultural buildings, also leads the way when it comes to innovative sustainability. Scan Magazine had the opportunity to talk to creative director and founding partner Bjarne Hammer about the democratic approach to architecture that is the key to the office’s award-winning designs. By Signe Hansen | Photos: schmidt hammer lassen architects

Founded in 1986, schmidt hammer lassen architects’ ambition was to push the then still rigid boarders of architecture. Hammer explains: “Our project then was to shift the field of architecture into its most powerful position, to use it to effect change and better conditions for its users and society. That’s the agenda that we found, and still find, relevant.”

as the extension to the Royal Library, The Black Diamond, ARoS, Aarhus Museum of Art, and the Cultural Centre of Greenland in Nuuk. All projects emphasise the firm’s focus on functionality and sustainability as well as the use of natural light and exploration of the relationship between art, design and architecture. Informal libraries

Based on the perception of architecture as a social tool, schmidt hammer lassen architects has created some of Denmark’s most prestigious cultural projects, such

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With its clean-cut lines and glittering black granite surfaces, schmidt hammer lassen architects’ most iconic building, The Black Diamond, has become an ar-

chitectural landmark on the Copenhagen waterfront. Situated in the historic heart of Copenhagen, the extension marks a radical shift from the traditional library structure. Open and essentially democratic, the building, which has become an informal meeting place for students, tourists and locals, is seen by many as a textbook example of how to work with modern academic libraries. The Black Diamond is far from the only successful library designed by schmidt hammer lassen architects. This year, the firm received the RIAS and RIBA Awards for the University of Aberdeen New Library in Scotland, which opened in 2012. Based on democratic principles the library has already succeeded in creating change at the UK’s fifth-oldest university. “The library that we created for the University of Aberdeen very clearly expresses


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the set of values that we try to incorporate in most of the cultural buildings we create. As a starting point, it was important for us to create an architectural structure that would invite people on campus to come inside, and, at the same time, we wanted the building to be a landmark for the university and Aberdeen – something they could be proud of,” says Hammer and adds: “The architecture, the space, and the connections provide an informal accessibility that encourages knowledge sharing and social interaction; it is in architecture’s power to subconsciously articulate this to its users.” The results have been clearly measurable with a usage increase of more than 102 per cent compared to the previous library. The Urban Mountain In central Oslo a 50,000-square-metre high-rise office building stands awaiting a new life. Through The Urban Mountain, a winning proposal by schmidt hammer lassen architects, the building is to be refurbished and extended, and its energy consumption and CO2 footprint remarkably reduced. The reconstruction, which is inspired by the idea of a Norwegian fell inside the city, will have greenery visible from both the in- and outside. “We have integrated many of the sustainable and green elements into visible parts of the building’s design; for us that is a natural thing to do and something which we do in several of our projects,” stresses Hammer. “When it comes to climate challenges and the scarcity of resources, creating visibility and awareness is something that architecture should support.” The reconstruction of the building is based on the cradle-to-cradle principle, which means that as much as 90 per cent of the demolished existing materials are being recycled into new and upgraded building materials, 80 per cent being directly used in the new, refurbished building. There is, explains Hammer, a huge potential in this approach, which could, in two or three generations’ time, erase the current waste of resources when old buildings are demolished.

Urban Mountain is schmidt hammer lassen’s winning proposal for a refurbishment and extension of a 50,000square-metre high-rise office building in central Oslo. The Urban Mountain building will be the tallest in Norway and the first high-rise building in Norway to enjoy natural ventilation.

At a glance: schmidt hammer lassen architects was founded in 1986 and today has offices in Aarhus, Copenhagen, London and Shanghai. schmidt hammer lassen architects has 140 employees spread across the four offices. The office has a distinguished track record as designers of high-profile cultural buildings, such as art galleries, educational complexes and libraries.

schmidt hammer lassen architects’ new library at the University of Aberdeen serves a community of 14,000 students. Photos: Adam Mørk

The decoration created by Greenlandic artist Buuti Pederse in Culture Centre of Greenland is – as is the building – a reference to the surrounding nature and Greenlandic culture. Photos: Adam Mørk

For more information, please visit: www.shl.dk

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Left and bottom right: With the design of a stunning wooden skyscraper C.F. Møller Arkitekter aims to push the limits for the use of classic building materials. Top right: C.F. Møller’s design for a new urban hospital in Køge includes vast green areas and lakes. Middle: The Energy- Climate- and Environmental Park in Hillerød is not just a beautiful landscape but also comprises the functions of energy production, sewage filtration, recycling and climate adaption.

Combining the past and present to find solutions for the future A tower block constructed in wood, a sewage plant doubling up as an attractive recreational park, and a top-modern urban university hospital engulfed in lakes and parks – the work of Danish architecture firm C.F. Møller Architects is characterised by the original combination of long-established elements and materials with innovative technology and knowledge. By Signe Hansen | Photos: C.F. Møller Architects

Founded in 1924, C.F. Møller Architects is one of Denmark’s oldest architecture firms, yet it continues to seek out new ways even when the reaction is astonishment and disbelief. The firm’s proposal to build a 34-storey apartment block exclusively in wood in Stockholm provoked both. What about fires, termites and rot? The concerns were plentiful, but wood, a building material used extensively in the past, in fact has great potential when combined with today’s knowledge and technology, says Julian Weyer, one of nine partners at C.F. Møller Architects. “We had thousands of comments on our proposal, but one of the reasons is that people haven’t realised the full potential of the building material. Today we are very adept at analysing life-cycles and energy

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relationships, and we can, in a precise and innovative way, calculate risks and create strategies to avoid them. These advances open up the possibility of combining classic building materials with hightech construction methods. At this moment in time, that is a strong driving force for us – trying to find innovative combinations, for example with wood constructions; we want to push the limits.” In addition to the aesthetic qualities of building in wood, wood constructions have the advantage of being CO2 neutral for many years, as the wood carries a negative CO2 footprint. While the Stockholm tower block is still at the proposal stage, many other of C.F.

Møller’s equally innovative, though perhaps less controversial, projects are on their way to becoming reality all over Denmark. Among them are an Energy-, Climate- and Environmental Park which merges the functions of energy production, sewage filtration, recycling and climate adaptation in a way not seen anywhere else in the world. All functions are incorporated into a beautiful recreational and educational landscape for families and school classes to visit.

C.F. Møller Architects was founded by the late Professor Christian Frederik Møller in 1924. C.F. Møller Architects has expertise within all types of architecture, from landscape and infrastructure to residential, cultural and commercial as well as science and healthcare, and has experience with projects of all sizes and locations.

For more information, please visit: www.cfmoller.com


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Left: The new neighbourhood Sluseholmen has with its canals, shared green areas and lively atmosphere become known as one of the most successful urban renewal projects in Copenhagen. Top right: Arkitema’s new housing project, Prästgården, in Sweden, teeters on the cliffs in beautiful harmony with nature. Bottom right: House of Vestas, the new headquarter of Vestas Wind Systems A/S, is the first building in Northern Europe to obtain the exclusive LEED certification category platinum.

Building on Scandinavian values Inspired by the Scandinavian welfare society and the idea of the good life, Arkitema Architects has built some of Scandinavia’s best-functioning living quarters, ambitious schools and sustainable offices.

feel a responsibility to promote what we in Scandinavia perceive as the good life, balancing work, family and a sustainable lifestyle,” Bach stresses.

By Signe Hansen | Photos: Kontrafame

Founded in Aarhus by five architecture students in 1969, Arkitema Architects’ core values grew from social as well as architectonical ideals. Partner Jørgen Bach explains: “Our office is firmly rooted in the Scandinavian traditions and everything they entail: the welfare society, taking care of the weak and respecting nature and its resources.” The firm’s values thoroughly permeate the overall landscape plan for Sluseholmen, previously a desolate industrial port zone, which is, today, widely considered one of the most successful urban renewal projects in Copenhagen. Those who have visited might be surprised to learn that this entire part of the city is just three years old. Small jetties, canals and large courtyard areas all add to the feel of a well-established local community. Built on the principle of architectonic variation the housing blocks are split into individ-

ual houses in different designs and materials. The structure, which also works as a social tool, is proven, through field studies, to have made people feel safe and more inclined to use the common areas. The new neighbourhood has been used as a case study on successful city planning by architects all over the world. “At the moment there is a lot of interest from the rest of the Western world in everything Scandinavian and we, of course, find that fantastic. But we also

With offices in Copenhagen, Aarhus, Stockholm and Oslo, the Scandinavian themes of daylight, open spaces and clear lines play a significant role in Arkitema’s work, as does the focus on sustainability and nature. In Sweden the firm is behind Prästgården, a housing project that teeters on the edge of a precipice. “In the Danish landscape you don’t really have to permanently alter anything when you build, and I quite like that idea. That’s why instead of blasting the cliffs away, in the Prästgården project we spared the natural landscape. That way, you have housing and cliffs in beautiful harmony and nature can restore itself when, maybe one day, the buildings are no longer there,” says Bach.

For more information, please visit: www.arkitema.dk

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Reshaping Copenhagen Copenhagen is undergoing rapid change. As the population continues to grow, the need for new residential quarters intensifies and the historic city centre faces new expectations. Årstiderne Arkitekter is one of the architecture firms that has taken on the challenge of adapting Denmark’s capital to suit the demands of today – and tomorrow. By Signe Hansen | Photos: Årstiderne Arkitekter

Founded in Silkeborg in 1985, Årstiderne Arkitekter is today Denmark’s third largest architect firm, with offices in Denmark, Norway and Sweden. But the firm’s work principles still embody the earthbound approach typical of its home region. “I think that what makes us different from other Copenhagen-located firms stems from our provincial roots, which have meant that our sense of responsibility is very strong,” says Mikkel Westfall, partner at Årstiderne Arkitekter’s Copenhagen office, adding: “When you work in the provinces, you have to do a good job

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every time because everyone’s eyes are on you and everyone will know about the result, and that has developed a decency and accountability that also characterise our Copenhagen office.” Developing and expanding Copenhagen Recent years have seen the redevelopment of many of Copenhagen’s past industrial sites and harbours into new, slick living quarters. The neighbourhoods are often located close to nature and water, yet within, or in close proximity to, the city. “A lot of people today have become very

urbane and attached to the city, and they do not, like past generations, wish to swap vibrant city life for provincial bliss when they start a family. As a consequence, the demand for healthy, light family homes in Copenhagen is very big, but so is the continued demand for student housing, and that is the problem we work to solve,” says Westfall. Among Årstiderne Arkitekter’s most prominent recent projects is the striking 14-storey Strandtårnet, which comprises 27 exclusive freehold flats with stunning ocean views in the previously industrial area of East Amager. Nearby another tower, Øresundstårnet, will, when finished in 2014, provide 101 rental homes. Both buildings are inspired by the rawness of New York’s Meatpacking District, and to contribute to a varied and vibrant part of the city they include a mix of versatile and


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Opposite page and above: The old buildings of Fiolstræde, in Copenhagen’s historic centre, are being remodelled into modern apartments.

flexible homes for families as well as young singles and professionals. “The key thing for architects, when working in cities, is to have a clear understanding of the fact that we are creating a small piece of a city that first and foremost, as a whole, needs to be a pleasant place for its inhabitants to live. That way there is a lot more responsibility imbedded in our industry than one might think,” stresses Westfall. Injecting new life into Copenhagen’s old streets The development of new city quarters such as East Amager is not the only way in which Årstiderne Arkitekter has helped mould Copenhagen into the city that its inhabitants want. The firm is also transforming the historic centre of the city to adapt to the new demands of residents, companies and retailers. “The challenge in the old part of the city is that you have the needs and requirements of the people, companies and institutions to consider, but the old buildings also have their own structural needs,” Westfall says. New standards for workspaces within both the private and the public sectors have meant that the old buildings, which for many years housed offices, are often found unfit for that purpose today. This was the case in, among other places, the historic streets Fiolstræde and Krystalgade. Årstiderne Arkitekter is now working to enable a new use of the buildings. “It’s a very interesting development because it actually means that we are recreating the properties to fill their original purpose; we are designing contemporary apartments in old buildings,” explains Westfall and adds: “The development is

transforming Copenhagen into an exciting living quarter with a completely different vibe than earlier; offices do not create the life and vibrancy that homes do.” Building into the future Copenhagen’s famous shopping streets are also among the areas gearing up for the future. One of the greatest challenges in this context is, explains Westfall, the increasing use of online shopping, which in Denmark is the second highest in the world. “The change is very tangible, and it means that what retailers want, and what we aim to create, is a beautiful and exciting area where labels can brand themselves with, for instance, large signature stores. It might be that in coming years people won’t actually be shopping in the stores but ordering online afterwards. That’s the challenge in our business: in reality you don’t know what the future will demand, and that’s why what we aim to

create are flexible and adaptable structures.” Having for the last few years focused on utilising their vast experience within the areas of living, working and shopping, it certainly looks as though leading Copenhagen into the future by interchanging and fusing these three is a task for Årstiderne Arkitekter. FACTS: Årstiderne Arkitekter was founded by Per Laustsen in 1985 Årstiderne Arkitekter employs approximately 170 people, 25 of who work in the Copenhagen office. The company undertakes more than 600 projects every year.

For more information, please visit: www.aarstiderne.dk

Strandtårnet is one of Årstiderne Arkitekter‘s striking new buildings, which characterises Copenhagen’s new slick living quarter in the old industrial area of East Amager

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In cooperation with Realdania Byg Tegnestuen Vandkunsten has created the modern seaweed house on Læsø

Building materials that last beyond a lifetime When it comes to thinking in terms of sustainability, Tegnestuen Vandkunsten is not just going by the rules. By expanding the life span of their buildings and using and creating recyclable components, the Copenhagen-based architecture firm is aiming to move well beyond commonplace sustainability parameters. By Signe Hansen | Photos: Helene Høyer Mikkelsen/Realdania Byg

Tegnestuen Vandkunsten was founded by architects Svend Algren, Jens Thomas Arnfred, Michael Sten Johnsen and Steffen Kragh in 1970. Back then, the ambition to create housing entities that would not just house individuals but also create social communities was a major driving force. But the question of energy sustainability and the use of environmentallyconscious materials have also been at the heart of the firm’s work for decades and define much of its aesthetic and func-

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tional expression. “We have always been focusing on sustainability, but we started talking and thinking more and more about it since the middle of the 90s. Since then, we have built numerous demonstration projects featuring different kinds of new sustainability measures,” says Søren Nielsen, partner since 2008, adding: “What we find really interesting is the possibility of using the methods of sustainability to enrich the architectonical and functional identity of the building.”

In 2009, Tegnestuen Vandkunsten was awarded the Alvar Aalto Medal. Since its establishment in 1967, the medal has been awarded approximately every five years to persons or companies with significant achievements in creative architecture. Expanding the life of buildings When talking sustainability within the architectural world, many firms focus mainly on energy usage, insulation and natural energy resources. But the use of flexible, recyclable and adaptable building materials is another area where huge resources, both economic and environmental, can be saved. “We have adopted a critical approach to sustainability; it is not just about saving energy in the operation


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of buildings, but also about choosing the right materials and preserving the material resources of the building,” stresses Nielsen. In collaboration with Loughborough University, and through other research projects, Tegnestuen Vandkunsten has become one of the most focused architecture firms when it comes to flexible buildings and recyclable materials. In practice, this means that most buildings created by Tegnestuen Vandkunsten are designed to facilitate a change of purpose in the future. By adding more depth and higher ceilings, office buildings, for instance, may easily be converted into flats. “Previously, there has been a tendency to design buildings for specific purposes, but we know that in 100 years that purpose is likely to change. You need different things at different times and if we manage to accommodate that need there is a greater chance of the building surviving,” explains Nielsen. Tegnestuen Vandkunsten employs the potential inherent in this approach not only to accommodate future users but also to benefit present day inhabitants: “We like to build in a way that enables small changes along the way. We create homes where inhabitants can move the walls and create their own interior design to fit their individual lives and needs,” says Nielsen. “Before, you had to live in a specific way which was defined by architects, but more flexibility also means more longevity because the rooms can be adapted to the new demands that are bound to arise.” A new aesthetic language Another essential advantage of using flexible and clear-cut materials is that if at some point in the future the building should not be needed anymore, its materials can be disassembled and utilised in other projects. Many of Tegnestuen Vandkunsten’s buildings are put together in components that enable their reshaping or destruction without the destruction of the building materials. This means that the lifetime of the components is extended past that of the building. “So far there are very few architects that work with that

The seaweed house explores the potential of using seaweed, which used to be a common building material on Læsø, to create sustainable buildings.

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As seaweed accumulates CO2, the seaweed house can be heated for approximately 20 years before it starts leaving a CO2 footprint.

acoustic qualities, it affects the people who live with them.” He finishes: “I believe that dressing down our buildings, using raw and truthful materials, makes people dress down and become less formal. But of course that’s one of the things about architecture that I can’t actually prove.”

perspective, but I believe it will be part of the building practice of the future,” explains Nielsen. “An exciting aspect of this is that you can also use the methods to enrich the architectonical expression of the building. With visible connections you can create a pattern and a rhythm through the way the components are organised instead of trying to hide it; it is a different aesthetic approach from what you see in a lot of modern architecture.”

in a modern way,” explains Nielsen. The material, which is plentiful in the surrounding ocean, is one of the most CO2 efficient building materials available. “If you do a lifecycle analysis of the building, it has one of the lowest CO2 footprints I’ve seen, because seaweed and trees accumulate CO2, which means that the building can be heated for approximately 20 years before it starts leaving a CO2 footprint,” Nielsen says.

Trying out new things

Preserving the family silver – the social space

Tegnestuen Vandkunsten’s office is located in Krudtløbsvej 14, 1439 København K.

Even when it comes to creating sustainable buildings, this is never done by compromising on Tegnestuen Vandkunsten’s family silver, the social space. The two are both at the heart of the company, stresses Nielsen. In fact, he says, they complement each other in factual as well as inexplicable ways. “It is hard to say, or prove, exactly what sociological effect our choice of materials has, but I firmly believe that if you use a lot of natural materials, like wood and seaweed, which are warm and soft materials with good

The office was founded in 1970 by Architects Svend Algren, Jens Thomas Arnfred, Michael Sten Johnsen and Steffen Kragh.

When it comes to research within alternative, sustainable material choices, Tegnestuen Vandkunsten does not hesitate to go all the way. One of the results of the firm’s explorations is the modern seaweed house. The remarkable building, which consists of netted bags of seaweed attached across the timber-framed walls and roof, is constructed on Læsø in cooperation with Realdania Byg. The seaweed forms part of a former local building practice no longer in use. “Realdania’s idea was to demonstrate that you can use a traditional building material like seaweed

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AT A GLANCE:

Employing approximately 50 architects, Tegnestuen Vandkunsten specialises in city planning, residential buildings, office buildings, cultural institutions, renovation and landscaping all over Scandinavia and northern Europe.

For more information, please visit: www.vandkunsten.com


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Vilhelm Lauritzen’s new project in Copenhagen’s old industrial harbour Nordhavnen will cover 14,000 square metres and include 128 unique waterside homes in six separate blocks surrounded by water

Going new ways with Nordic functionalism Vilhelm Lauritzen Arkitekter is behind some of Copenhagen’s most iconic examples of Nordic functionalism, such as the city’s original airport from 1939. Today the company treads a fine balance between honouring its legacy and exploring new ways. By Signe Hansen | Photos: Vilhelm Lauritzen Arkitekter

New living quarters are shooting up all over Copenhagen; where Vilhelm Lauritzen Arkitekter is involved, there is sure to be a firm focus on the needs of future inhabitants and users. The principles of functionalism have been at the core of the firm ever since its foundation by Vilhelm Lauritzen in 1922. “The principles that defined the functionalism of Lauritzen’s time are always our starting point. It might sound a bit too practical, but it is not the same thing as saying that we do not aim to create beautiful buildings; however, we always design buildings from the inside out,” partner Torsten Stephensen explains. “Another thing we have inherited from our founder is his refined use of materials to influence the architecture; we work with a highly detailed approach, everything is carefully thought through.”

Though Vilhelm Lauritzen Arkitekter is behind some of Copenhagen’s most iconic and beloved buildings, the firm’s 70 employees do not aim to recreate these, but strive for their work to reflect their time. “In reality we are very explorative; we do not wish to just do as we used to do. I believe that you should always try to bring architecture forward – not because you are afraid of falling behind, but because you are curious to try new ways,” stresses Stephensen. Among Vilhelm Lauritzen’s newest projects is the first new residential quarter to be built in Copenhagen’s old industrial harbour, Nordhavnen (the northern harbour). The project will cover 14,000 square metres and include 128 unique waterside homes in six separate blocks surrounded by water. Though lit through floor-to-

ceiling windows, the individual flats will, thanks to the angling of the individual blocks and protrusions in the facade, provide room for privacy. Enclosed recreational areas will facilitate a shared community life. “It has been very important for us to create properties that appeal to a broad audience; the apartments vary widely in size and price and will fit families, professionals and young newcomers to the city. We want to create colour, life, and a buzz of people,” says Stephensen.

For more information, please visit: www.vla.dk

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The design of the above office building in Halfdansgade, Copenhagen, has earned Danielsen Architecture much praise and recognition.

Creating value through aesthetic and functional architecture When Danielsen Architecture designs, the result is not just beautiful architecture but also highly functional structures. The firm, which is behind Copenhagen Airport’s wing-shaped domestic terminal hall, designs buildings from the inside out and outside in. By Signe Hansen | Photos: Danielsen Architecture

A walk through the connection hall of the domestic terminal at Copenhagen Airport is alone almost worth a flight. Showered in natural light from hundreds of windows of different sizes and shapes, you walk, or glide, through a long, pristinely white hallway. The walls are arched and the ceiling vaulted. Leaning towards it, a seemingly endless row of white, curved columns disappears into the light of a sail-shaped window at the distant end. It all, rather fittingly, creates the feeling of walking straight into heaven – though the final goal might be Aalborg.

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The domestic terminal hall, which was created by Danielsen Architecture in 2007, in many ways defines the essence of the successful firm’s architectural vision. It is not only stunningly beautiful from both the inside and the outside but also serves several purposes, explains Kasper Danielsen, founder and owner of the firm. “The terminal is a very good example of how we work both from the inside out and from the outside in. On the inside, the building works as a connection between the international and the domestic terminals. It forms a 300-metre-long passageway, and somehow we wanted to create a

feeling of moving through that space but also of being in a Scandinavian room; we wanted to create a great Nordic story in the space of an open Nordic room. That’s its primary function in all its simplicity. But what a lot of people do not know is that the building also works as a noise barrier between the airside and the landside, and this is part of the reason behind its wing shape.” The wing shape, which diverts plane noise, has aroused many associations with its users: some refer to it as cathedral-like while others perceive the shape of a boat. Functional homes Danielsen Architecture was founded in 1987 and has through the years created a significant number of housing and office buildings as well as public and recreational facilities. Recently the firm has been busy implementing its characteris-


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tic functional aesthetics in a share of the many new sustainable homes being built in Copenhagen. “There’s nothing more functionally-dependent than housing; who wants to live in it if it doesn’t work?” Danielsen asks rhetorically before continuing: “That’s why it is very much on our conscience to create functional homes. It might be that they are not going to become exceptionally spectacular in their expression, but when you are creating a lot of homes you also have to expect that a lot of people are going to live in them and, realistically, most people don’t live an extraordinary life and don’t want to pay for extraordinary features like double ceiling height.” This, however, does not mean that the firm has not created housing buildings with noticeable aesthetic qualities. Among the more striking ones is the 12-storey Metropolis housing block by the waterside in Sluseholmen, which has become a landmark of the new neighbourhood.

FACTS: Danielsen Architecture delivers architectural and interior design projects such as commercial, residential, production, logistic buildings, hotels and restaurants, both new constructions and renovations. Through its sister company, Danielsen Space Planning, Danielsen Architecture also offers strong expertise in space planning and programming. Both companies are run and owned by Kasper Danielsen and Malin Meyer.

When it comes to building offices, Danielsen Architecture has naturally accommodated the demand for more discrete design that has grown in recent years. “A building is no better than its ability to fulfil its functional purpose. In other regions you might find a greater focus on defining office buildings from the

Examples of Danielsen Architecture’s much praised merger of functionalism and aesthetics are the small but exceptionally set office buildings in Halfdansgade. The buildings stand out with their cobber clad walls and a distinct multiple faceted roof shape while floor-to-ceiling

For more information, please visit: www.danielsenarch.com

windows allow for natural light, and spacious rooms facilitate a flexible and inspiring environment. “We believe that there is a Nordic architecture: it’s a way of working which is closely connected with the Nordic mindset. It is our ambition to base our work on these Nordic ideas and which will also be visible in the end result. It is closely interrelated to the ideal of working from the inside out and outside in – you cannot have a house which is just nice to look at,” stresses Danielsen.

Photo: Adam Mørk

Offices that work for work

outside with specific exterior characteristics, but they are not necessarily good places to work and on the inside many look exactly the same,” says Danielsen.

Kasper Danielsen, founder and co-owner of Danielsen Architecture

Danielsen Architecture’s stunning interior design of the domestic terminal hall in Copenhagen has become a favoured background for fashion shoots and commercials.

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World Maritime University, Malmo

Busy times for award-winning Danish architects The studio at Kim Utzon Architects is a hive of activity right now. Here is a look at their latest innovations, spanning hotels, houses and a university. By Thomas Bech Hansen | Photos: Kim Utzon Architects

A UN-commissioned university project, an exclusive residential area in a desirable Copenhagen suburb, and a hotel project to liven up urban life: these are some of the diverse projects currently on the table at Kim Utzon Architects. Multicultural challenge Right now, one of Kim Utzon Architects’ projects is Malmö’s new World Maritime University, a project commissioned by the UN to house students from all over the world. Meticulous preparation is key when undertaking such a task.

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“We want everybody to feel at home and co-exist with each other, even if they come from vastly different backgrounds,” Utzon explains. “We have to collect all the cultural data, for instance when making prayer rooms to be used by students regardless of specific religious beliefs, to create the best frame for people’s activities.” The project involves a 2,800-square-metre expansion of former port office Tornhuset, built in 1910. “Our approach is to show respect for the existing building’s national ro-

manticism by applying an extension, which forms a separate angle to highlight the whole complex as a landmark for the port of Malmö,” explains Kim Utzon. Exclusive housing Across Öresund, some 30 kilometres north of central Copenhagen, another ground-breaking project is underway. On the Danish Defence Command’s old Henriksholm grounds in the town of Vedbæk, 26 courtyard houses and 66 townhouses are being built. “Brand new housing is a rarity in this highly desirable area so relatively close to the capital and right on the coast. We expect the houses to be ready for the first people to move in during the summer of 2014,” says Kim Utzon.


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Revitalising hotel Only a few blocks from Amalienborg Castle, the main residence of the Danish royal family, is the street of Borgergade. Here, Kim Utzon Architects is in the process of creating a hotel to liven up the urban landscape, as part of the Wakeup Hotels franchise. “Today, Borgergade is characterised by parked cars and an almost non-existent urban life. Our project aims to revitalise the life of the street with a facade that provides a café atmosphere and a dining area to access straight from the outside,” says Kim Utzon. Same philosophy As diverse as the challenges facing his team may be, Kim Utzon maintains his core philosophy throughout all of them. “It doesn’t matter if we are working on a kitchen or living room for a one-family house, the lobby for a hotel, a cultural building or a town square. The trick is finding out how we can make spaces for people to get together,” says Kim Utzon. Architecture as a way of creating “worthy frames for the lives of human beings,” goes the first line on Utzon Architects’ website, and it is an important mantra for Kim Utzon´s architecture. “A house should be built to be able to stand outside at night. Materials matter. If we can pick materials that age well over the years, that make buildings look increasingly beautiful with use, then we succeed.”

Above: Henriksholm, Vedbæk. Below: Wakeup Hotel Borgergade, Copenhagen

For more information, please visit: www.kimutzon.dk

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Above: aarhus arkitekterne won the award for Best Future Project in the healthcare category for the new north wing at Rigshopitalet, Copenhagen. Opposite top: The hospital in Helsingborg, Sweden, seen from above. Opposite, middle: In collaboration with schmidt hammer lassen architects, aarhus arkitekterne will be building Nyt Hvidovre Hospital. Opposite, bottom left: The hospital in Aalborg, north Denmark. Opposite, bottom right: The hospital in Aabenrå, south Denmark.

Where functionality and aesthetics go hand in hand aarhus arkitekterne is an experienced and informal architectural and consulting firm creating architecture with empathy. By combining aesthetics and functionality, they design buildings that facilitate an optimal flow for the users. By Rikke Oberlin Flarup | Photos: aarhus arkitekterne

“We specialise in delivering high-quality architecture where form, function and logistics are all taken into consideration. This is the number one reason why so many of our solutions are chosen when it comes to healthcare facilities,” says partner Mette Dan-Weibel. In 2012, at the World Architecture Festival, aarhus arkitekterne won the award for Best Future Project in the health category for their project Rigshospitalet – The North Wing, which they created in collaboration

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with consultants and architects 3XN, Nickl & Partner Architecten, Grontmij og Kristine Jensens Tegnestue. When aarhus arkitekterne plans a new hospital or, as in this case, a new wing to an existing hospital, its approach is rooted in many years of experience of planning and building healthcare facilities. Its healthcare team is skilled in several aspects and levels of healthcare constructions and offers consultancy in optimisation of maintenance costs and implementation of user involvement of staff, patients and relatives.

“Key to creating a well-functioning hospital with a pleasant atmosphere is making sure that the needs of both patients and staff are met,” says Mette Dan-Weibel. This is done by providing positive elements of distractions and making sure that walking distances are as short as possible – all in an aesthetic environment. aarhus arkitekterne participates both nationally and internationally in creating somatic and psychiatric hospitals and has worked in countries such as Norway, Sweden, Ireland, and the Faeroe Islands in addition to Denmark. A green and efficient hospital Rigshospitalet – The North Wing is characterised by its unique shape of folded Vstructures supported by two main thor-


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oughfares, ensuring that way-finding is easy and distances short, thus minimising the walking distances and improving the working conditions for the hospital staff. At the same time, the V-structures give room to five atriums that work as pleasant recreational spaces for patients and visitors. The central thoroughfares combined with a vertical distribution grid ensure optimal logistics and a good connection to the existing hospital via a footbridge crossing. Because of the shape of the building, the North Wing will open up to plenty of natural daylight and provide a good view to the adjacent public park to the west. The aim of the project is to create a much greener hospital, to make Rigshospitalet the preferred choice for patients who need highly specialised hospital care, and to be a workplace that employees are proud to be part of. Putting people first aarhus arkitekterne deals with architecture at all stages of a project, from concept development to design and planning as well as site observation and construction supervision. The firm has strong technical skills and works in a good social environment. For aarhus arkitekterne, dialogue and knowledge exchange are the main process tools and the fundamental elements in all of their work.

unfold within the buildings. aarhus arkitekterne works with an array of projects of great architectural diversity and high quality. Every project is unique and the company’s design team focuses on creating multi-functional spaces that are prepared to face future demands and requirements, for instance by integrating the latest research results and technological improvements. The final products are most often a result of a process-oriented approach, where both the client and other parties involved

have worked together towards a commonly defined goal. By co-operating with its clients, aarhus arkitekterne develops clear and visionary concepts that create a basis for beautiful, functional and eventful architecture. aarhus arkitekterne has affiliations in Aarhus and Copenhagen and employs approximately 80 professionals. For more information, please visit: www.aa-a.dk

When designing a new hospital, the main focus is to create optimal care and treatment, patient-targeted architecture. This means that when choosing aarhus arkitekterne you get a company that is highly skilled in both design and sustainability and can develop new hospital equipment as well as including energyoptimised solutions. Regardless of the project type, aarhus arkitekterne always puts people first when developing a new building. Every project is unique It is all about exploring the specific potential of each individual project by defining possibilities and limitations in order to provide the best possible solution for the client, all in relation to the financial framework of the project: its location, the landscape, the users and the life that will

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Fordgrunden, a housing project in South Harbour Copenhagen. The old industrial harbour area Fordgrunden will be transformed into a housing area consisting of several clusters of buildings that are displaced in proportion to each other, creating different spaces between them. The development sits in a green undulating landscape along with small courtyards and squares that make up the community.

Reaching full potential for diverse housing in the city Urban housing should be adapted to the uniqueness of the surrounding area and provide its inhabitants with the possibility of truly having their own space in the centre of the city. This is the philosophy behind housing projects designed by Holscher Architects in the centre of the Danish capital. By Julie Bauer Larsen | Photos: Holscher Architects

“We strive to create housing that co-exists with the surroundings and makes the most of the unique qualities of any urban building site. Our aim is to provide optimal living spaces for urbanites who love the city life and embrace the possibilities of having unique homes that can be tailored to their lives as they live them,” says managing director Mikkel Nordberg from Holscher Architects. The award-winning company has a proven record of accomplishment of building inner-city housing, which correlates perfectly with the given

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surroundings, making the most of the urban nature. Housing with a stance “At Holscher, we have a vision for future urban housing. We want it to be as sustainable as possible and to make room for nature in the city to come into play when we design new housing areas. We work on the city’s terms to make room for as much wild and organic nature as possible,” explains Mikkel Nordberg and continues: “In co-operation with the Schools

of Visual Art, we employ a PhD student working on a thesis about the importance of landscaping in urban areas. This provides us with scientific support for our approach to planning and building in the city – we know that useable, meaningful outdoor areas are important for everyone, whether living in a single-family home in a smaller town or right in the centre of Copenhagen.” By incorporating nature into urban housing, Holscher Architects hopes to increase well-being and make it possible for families to stay the city without the children missing out on outdoor spaces. The future of the city Research shows an increase in the number of people wishing to live in the city, and this provides opportunities and chal-


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Above left and bottom middle: Stokhusgade, seven-storey housing on a narrow lot. In central Copenhagen, Holscher Architects has designed and built award-winning housing on a seven-metre narrow lot. The design of the unique building has provided the residents with grand views of their neighbourhood. Top and bottom right: Cirkuspladsen: star-shaped housing in green gardens. The intention of the project is to create a unifying urban space that creates spatial quality in a complex area of the city. The buildings encircle a lush garden that opens up towards the harbour. The angled typologies of the buildings establish a number of small squares. Harbour and channel space become a particularly intense space where activity from the houseboats situated at the quay will influence everyday life and mix with residents and other users of the harbour space.

lenges for future urban planning, says Mikkel Nordberg, who manages the studio alongside the other partner, Nils Holscher: “Our overall aim as architects is to offer our interpretation of the future of cities as being diverse and sustainable. When we create new inner-city housing, we emphasise light, views and nature.” The priorities of Holscher Architects and its customers are evident in the housing projects – both in current apartment areas and in future developments, such as two large former industrial sites near the Copenhagen harbour, which will be transformed into modern housing areas within the next few years. Thorough planning for a green vision Holscher Architects works with the correlation that exists between the city and a building, making use of the 15 employees’ core competencies within city planning, project design, and detailing. The studio

has experience and expertise in architecture, urban strategies and design across the spectrum, from concept development to site supervision and construction management. “We work very closely with the property owners and investors to ensure a thorough foundation and thought-out vision for the project ahead. After the initial workshops we make sure that the local authorities and other contributors get a sense of ownership in order to create the best possible conditions for co-operation towards the joint goal of a living urban area,” says Mikkel Nordberg on the closeknit partnerships that have made unique buildings come to life all over Copenhagen.

For more information, please visit: holscherarkitekter.com

Strandlodsvej, urban development. The vision of the project is to create a recreational, sustainable urban environment – an area with tall as well as lower buildings along with plants that will create a multiplicity of different cityscape and landscape spaces. The new structures are inspired by the area’s industrial past.

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The playgrounds created by Preben Skaarup Landskab utilise the landscape and engaging playground equipment rather than the usual swings and slides.

Creating landscapes to explore For almost 30 years, Preben Skaarup Landskab has been shaping the cities, coastlines and open spaces of Denmark. Pushing the limits of its field and creating landscapes that invite people in and encourage activity are at the heart of the firm’s agenda. By Signe Hansen | Photos: Preben Skaarup Landskab

Founded by Preben Skaarup in Aarhus, 1984, Preben Skaarup Landskab has won more than 45 first prizes in landscape competitions all over the country. Especially prominent is the fingerprint the firm has left on its home region, Jutland, where it has shaped city centres, coastlines, recreational areas and everything in between. At the core of Preben Skaarup’s successful approach to landscape architecture lies an inherent ambition to challenge and move the limits of the profession. Anne Vium Skaarup, daughter of Preben Skaarup and day-to-

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landscape architecture. It is what we do and where our heart is; we are quite broad and work in all areas of landscape architecture, and our ambition continues to be to develop and extend the possibilities of our field.” Preben Skaarup Landskab’s employees find a great part of their inspiration in the Nordic traditions but also gain ideas from other parts of the world – most recently on a study trip to Japan. Making Jutland’s rugged coastline accessible to everyone

day manager of the office, explains: “Since the very beginning, the ambition has been to make a difference – to always challenge, examine and develop the field of

Recent first-prize-winning proposals from Preben Skaarup Landskab include a master plan for the coastline of Thisted municipality. The plan aims to open up the area to everyone from surfers, anglers and birdwatchers to families and disabled visitors, ensuring there is enough space for all activities to take place without con-


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flict. Furthermore, measures were implemented to safeguard the preservation of the area’s cultural heritage buildings, a particularly hard job in a region where strong winds, sand and massive waves dominate the landscape. “We always work with the landscape to get the biggest possible effect from the smallest changes, if possible, in a way that is surprising and unexpected,” explains Vium and adds: “We always aim to give the developer more than he expects to get. That is the most important thing and it is integral to our ambition of creating something that makes a difference; it has to deliver something unexpected and new.”

most illustrative examples of the office’s approach is found in a playground on Stige Ø, Odense Municipality. The playground, which is part of the firm’s extensive plan for the island’s recreational and natural areas, is located on an old refuse site, which has been redeveloped into a recreational area. “We created a playground without the traditional swings and slides. Instead, there are large areas with sand, water, poles and rounded hills which the kids can run up and down and use for sledging in the winter,” explains Vium, adding: “We always aim to create landscapes that inspire people to explore them in many different ways.”

In Thistsed, Preben Skaarup Landskab not only made the beach accessible to everyone through ramps and tracks but also created a protected lido, which for the first time allows children and disabled people to safely enjoy the sea.

The huge potential and continuous development of landscape design were among the reasons Vium was attracted to her father’s field. As an architecture student she was determined to go her own way, but she soon realised that the freedom, natural change and longevity of landscaping were what really had her interest. “Landscaping is a lot freer and in many ways more interesting than construction, because it keeps changing. To create something and then see how it develops, the trees and plants grow and change the landscape – that’s just wonderful.”

Landscapes that encourage activity In an age when getting people to exercise more is at the top of the agenda for most health care institutions, open spaces encouraging activity are more valuable than ever. Preben Skaarup Landskab has explored innovative ways of creating such landscapes for decades, and one of the

AT A GLACE: Preben Skaarup Landskab was founded by Preben Skaarup in 1984. Today the company employs ten landscape architects with experience within planning, concept development, urban development, city centre development, renovation of recreational areas, highways, cemeteries, city parks and design of city equipment. Preben Skaarup Landskab works with projects all over Denmark as well as in Sweden, Finland, Germany and the UK. Social and environmental sustainability are inherent in all of Preben Skaarup Landskab’s projects. Preben Skaarup Landskab has recently won several competitions for projects including: Kongensgade pedestrian street in Esbjerg The renovation of the housing area in Blåkildevej 2020 in eastern Aalborg Furthermore, the firm has ensured a framework agreement on road architecture with the National Road Directorate. Address: Preben Skaarup Landskab, Graven 3, 8000 Århus C

For more information, please visit: www.prebenskaarup.dk

Above right: In Klitmøller, Thisted Muncipality, Preben Skaarup Landskab has created an accessible and multifaceted coastline.

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Clockwise from the top: 24 bungalow family homes in Odder; Reden, community centre for YWCA social work, Aarhus; Ringkøbing, one of Denmark’s largest schools; Public housing complex with 60 homes at Teglbakken.

When every project is unique Many things have happened since Arkitektfirmaet Frost Larsen A/S was founded in 1975. The company has grown from a regional to a national one, but the key values remain the same: it is all about listening to the wishes of the client and treating every project differently. By Nicolai Lisberg | Photos: Arkitektfirmaet Frost Larsen A/S

For most architectural offices it is important to brand oneself as having a specific style, but Arkitektfirmaet Frost Larsen A/S is not like most companies. Instead, it focuses on embracing the versatility each project has to offer: “We are a traditional company in terms of how we do our work. The most important thing for us is that the property owner is satisfied with our job, and therefore the connection to the owner is very important throughout the entire project, right from when the first sketch is drawn,” says Svend Åge Christensen, architect and partner at Arkitektfirmaet Frost Larsen A/S. Because of this, there is no such thing as a routine project for this firm specialising in schools, homes and nursing homes. “When we’re given a task, we don’t al-

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ready have the answer lying in a drawer – how could we? Every assignment is different from the previous one. There are different budgets and demands, so as a company we also need to think differently from project to project,” says Svend Åge Christensen.

everyone to be around and inside our buildings,” says Svend Åge Christensen. This specific way of working seems to have given the company both success and recognition. Not only is the firm rated with an A, the highest mark possible, from BEC; it was also recently appointed official SKI provider, prequalifying the office as architectural consultant for state authorities, municipalities, regions, private and semi-public organisations.

The seal of quality In addition to the close connection to the client, Arkitektfirmaet Frost Larsen A/S also makes a habit of taking the location of each new building into consideration. “It all needs to fit together. Each location offers different possibilities and challenges, and as an architectural practice it’s our job to make sure that the location and building match in the end. We are aware of every detail, we choose the materials and we give our design a scale, so it’s nice for

For more information, please visit: www.frostlarsen.dk


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S MA PECI GIC AL AL THE LA ME PL AN : D

Welcome to Magical Lapland Known primarily for the Northern Lights and Santa Claus, Finnish Lapland offers that and so much more. While nature lovers and Christmas fans will feel right at home and get all the thrills they could dream of, gastronomes, extreme sports enthusiasts and cultural heritage devotees alike are sure to find that Lapland and its far-reaching fells and snow-covered slopes are short of end-of-the-rainbow magical. By Linnea Dunne | Photo: Tiina Törmänen / VisitFinland

Photos: Mikko Ryhänen

It is not only about the Aurora Borealis with its other-worldly blues and sweeping shapes across the sky, though they certainly do help: there is something about Lapland that gives it an almost surreal quality. Perhaps it is also its people: locals who live for their family-run businesses, which welcome tourists and tell them all about the Lappish culture and traditions,

and the Sámi people, with Europe’s only surviving indigenous culture. Maybe it is the symbiosis of people with nature, their cloudberry picking and salmon fishing and reindeer herding – all of which you can participate in and experience for real. Perhaps it is about the kicks: the peaks and slopes that make for some of the best

skiing and snowboarding in the world, or the reindeer safaris, husky rides and snowmobiles racing across the vast snowcovered fields. Unless, of course, you are a lover of all things edible; Finnish Lapland offers the most exquisite, unusual delicacies, such as Lappish game, red king crab from the Arctic Sea and, naturally, sautéed or air-dried reindeer. Whatever you come for, and whatever the time of year, you will know by the incredible hospitality and warmth of the locals that you have arrived at your destination. Choose from luxurious hotels, cosy holiday cottages and adventurous wilderness cabins, and do not miss all the historical secrets and entertaining activities offered by local, family-owned businesses. Scan Magazine picked out some of the all-time favourites to help you choose – and to, little by little, try to share some of that magic with you. For more information, please visit: www.lapland.fi

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Northern exposure You can explore Lapland in countless different ways. From snowmobile safaris and reindeer rides to snowboarding and ice-fishing, the Inari-Saariselkä area in Finnish Lapland offers unforgettable experiences and high-quality,modern services in the rugged wilderness. By Inna Allen | Photos: Inari-Saariselkä Tourism

With plenty of unique tourism specialities and activities, in Inari-Saariselkä you can experience what the north is really like. “A true highlight of any Lappish holiday is experiencing the exoticism of reindeer or husky safaris,” says Maaret Mattus from Inari-Saariselkä Tourism. “You can explore the Lappish culture at local reindeer farms and enjoy memorable moments in a cosy sleigh pulled by a reindeer, or experience the thrill of speed and fall in love with the cute huskies.” Ranging from shorter rides to lengthier safaris lasting a few hours, reindeer and husky safaris allow you to experience the

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wilderness of Lapland and the magical tranquility of the fells. Winter fun for the whole family The skiing season of northern Lapland is kind to ski lovers as it usually lasts from October to May. Approximately 250 kilometres north of the Arctic Circle is Europe's northernmost holiday resort, Saariselkä. The resort’s ski centre with its two fells provides skiing fans with a total of 15 slopes of varying difficulty, five ski lifts, and a freestyle park for snowboarders. Cross-country skiers can immerse themselves in the untouched, un-

paralleled fell landscapes of the surrounding nature. A particular favourite with children and adults alike, Saariselkä boasts Lapland’s longest toboggan run. The thrilling downhill ride stretches a whopping 1.2 kilometres, and toboggans or smaller handheld sledges can be borrowed from many of the hotels and businesses at the resort. The thrill of speed and the glistening snowscapes beckon visitors to try out snowmobiling. With thousands of kilometres of snowmobile tracks and routes, the adventurous activity is vastly popular. “There are several local companies hiring out snowmobiles and arranging guided safaris, allowing you to learn snowmobiling the safest way possible,” Mattus advises. “Another speedy alternative is ice and snow karting. With the help of a professional guide, you can try tackling quick


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braking and tight bends on a safe karting track.” Other types of family pursuits include horse excursions, boating and canoeing, ice-fishing, bird watching and hiking. For indoor fun, there is the Angry Birds Activity Park. Combining the famous birds with some northern magic, the Saariselkäbased park highlights physical activity; the rides don’t move people, but people move the rides. And of course, a trip to Lapland would not be complete without seeing Santa Claus or the magical Aurora Borealis. “Our area is special, as the Northern Lights are visible approximately 200 nights of the year.”

can find suitable accommodation for your trip whether you want to enjoy the silence of nature or stay right at the heart of all the activity. The cuisine of Northern Lapland covers some breadth, offering a combination of purity and uniqueness of ingredients. From sautéed or air-dried reindeer and Arctic Ocean king crab to whitefish, cloudberries and wild mushrooms, the authentic flavours from the Lappish nature delight the palates of Finns and international visitors alike. Numerous restaurants serving a wide range of meals will make sure that the mouth-watering delicacies of the north are available throughout your stay.

Rest and relish

Inari – Centre for Sámi culture

After a busy day out in nature, there is nothing better than to relax and enjoy a good night’s sleep at one of the high-quality hotels and holiday cottages of the area. Choosing from around 13,500 beds, you

Inari village is an important centre for the fascinating and conspicuous Sámi and Lapp culture. Siida, the Sámi Museum and Northern Lapland Nature Centre, gives visitors a true feel of the Sámi

culture and heritage, its exhibitions showcasing how nature and people have adapted to the extreme conditions of the northern environment. Just a stone’s throw away from Siida is the newly-built Sámi Cultural Centre Sajos. The largest congress and event venue in northern Lapland, it was established to increase the possibility for the Sámi people in Finland to preserve and develop their own language, culture and business activities as well as to manage and develop their cultural self-government. The Inari-Saariselkä tourism region has good flight connections from Helsinki to Ivalo, from where there is a bus connection to Saariselkä. If you are travelling by car or bus, the number 4 highway will take you all the way. For more information, please visit: www.inarisaariselka.fi

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Sampo, the world’s only passenger icebreaker

Seasons in the snow Kemi, the northernmost seaside town in Finnish Lapland, offers fascinating possibilities for experiencing the real Arctic. One of Finland’s most popular winter destinations, Kemi is full of little miracles waiting to be discovered. By Inna Allen | Photos: Kemi Tourism Ltd

One of Kemi’s gems is the icebreaker Sampo – the only passenger icebreaker in the world. For the past 26 years, Sampo has provided exotic experiences to over 200,000 visitors from all over the world. During its four-hour cruise, passengers gain a good understanding of how the icebreaker is built and how it works, from the engine room and all the way up to the bridge. You can brave the weather and watch the crashing of the ice from the deck of the ship, or stay warm and cosy inside the comfortable interior. During the

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cruise, passengers enjoy a tasty lunch at the onboard restaurant. Arctic heartbreaker and ice-cold swim After lunch, Sampo stops in the middle of the endless field of ice, allowing passengers to come down off the ship and onto the ice. You can walk around and admire the vast, spacious scenery, and for a truly unique experience, why not try ice swimming? “It may sound a bit daring, but ice swimming, which means sliding into the ice cold pool from the edge of the ice in a

special thermal suit, makes for a truly unforgettable experience,” says Titta Vuorinen from Kemi Tourism Ltd. “We also recommend the combination of an icebreaker cruise and a snowmobile safari. This all-day trip provides visitors with the best impression of our winter town Kemi.” At the beginning of the seven-hour programme, participants are given weather-appropriate clothing and taught how to drive the snowmobiles. Then it is off to the ice, to drive around in the shoreless field of breathtaking views of the arctic winter. Participants will also visit a Laplander’s hut, enjoy a hot drink and try out a reindeer sleigh ride. The safari is then continued by boarding the icebreaker Sampo directly from the frozen-over sea, and after a thorough cruising, lunching


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and ice swimming experience, the snowmobilers return to Kemi town centre and Sampo makes its way to the harbour. Once the icebreaker is back in the harbour, each passenger receives a special certificate of attendance from the captain. Fitting 150 people onboard, icebreaker Sampo’s cruise season lasts from the middle of December to the middle of April. Ensuring a comfortable journey, the vessel’s bars offer full service throughout the cruise. Snowman’s land Right by the Gulf of Bothnia, the SnowCastle of Kemi is a source of great pride and a true showcase of the architectonic snow-work of the local constructors. Every winter, the great and impressive snow structure rises to grace the town centre, offering wonderful experiences for both children and adults alike. January 2014 will see the opening of the 19th SnowCastle, along with the SnowHotel, SnowRestaurant, SnowChapel and the Children’s World. The tremendous area, constructed using piped seawater snow, takes around 21,000 cubic metres of snow, the equivalent of 2,100 lorry truckloads. Great light-effects add to the charm of the snow and ice-sculpting, as well as to the structures around the area. Like everything in the SnowCastle, the entire SnowHotel and all of its rooms are made of snow and snow alone. There are 18 rooms with double and single beds, and two group rooms with five beds, as well as a beautifully-decorated Honeymoon Suite. “The fresh air is about minus five degrees Celsius. On a good bed, inside a well-equipped sleeping bag, you are guaranteed to have sweet dreams!” Vuorinen laughs. 2014 welcomes a new concept for snow lovers: sleep underneath the arctic sky, inside a warm Olokolo hut. Designed for nature watching, Olokolo‘s see-through structures provide memorable sleeping experiences. “And if you’re lucky enough, the sky will be lit by the Northern Lights,” Vuorinen says. The SnowCastle of Kemi attracts around 80,000 to 100,000 people each winter. En-

joy wining and dining at the atmospheric SnowRestaurant or organise the party of your life in the SnowCastle. The SnowChapel marries several happy couples every year, both local natives and those from far afield. Whatever you are after,

this little arctic wonder is sure to provide lasting memories. For more information, please visit: www.visitkemi.fi

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Highlighting Lapland Our Lapland – Our Saamiland companies provide services and programmes tailormade to bring you close to Lappish culture and its pristine nature. A group of genuine family-owned companies, it offers accommodation in cosy hotels and holiday villages, alongside versatile holiday packages in Northern Lapland.

farm. Its range of husky safaris includes everything from adventures of a couple of hours to trips a few days long, with nights spent in a wilderness cabin.

By Inna Allen | Photos: Our Lapland - Our Saamiland companies

Forming an adventure-based eco-tourism company, Wilderness Hotel Nellim and Muotkan Maja Wilderness Lodge offer explorative and fun adventure safaris into the Lappish wilderness. Both destinations provide comfortable, well-equipped accommodation that breathes the peace of nature. And a vital part of any visit, transportation company KukkolaBusses gets people around, making round-trips in northern Lapland, transfers to Norway and Russia and tours to the Arctic Ocean.

From husky, snowmobile and reindeer safaris to snowshoe tours and chasing the Northern Lights, there are plenty of exotic things to do in the beautiful region of Finnish Lapland. “Visitors can immerse themselves in the Sámi culture, take a cruise on lake Inari and enjoy activities in nature such as cross-country skiing, hiking, Nordic walking and berry and mushroom picking,” says Eila Kautto from Aurora Lapland Travel. “With over 20 years of experience in the international travel trade, in collaboration with our partners, we have put together wonderful winter and summer packages, highlighting all the wonders of Lapland.” The village of Inari is the centre of Sámi culture and heritage in Finland. Located next to the River Juutua, Tradition Hotel

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Kultahovi offers a combination of service, heritage and nature for guests – a destination that provides a deeper understanding of Europe’s only surviving indigenous culture. Activity company Lake & Snow Inari offers guided tours, cruises and safaris, taking visitors to the wilderness of the Inari area all year round. Holiday Village Valle sits on the banks of the Teno River and provides comfortable accommodation and nature-based programmes. Using the experience of generations, the Poronpurija Activity Services offer custom-made services, such as salmon fishing and hiking trips. For a special holiday far away from the everyday hustle, Guesthouse Husky offers cosy accommodation and Finnish-Lappish homemade food right beside an Alaskan husky

With these services and so much more, Our Lapland – Our Saamiland companies want to share the best of Lapland with you.

For more information, please visit: www.auroralaplandtravel.fi


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A haven in the wilderness If searching for the perfect Aurora Borealis or a first-time walk on a frozen-over lake in Lapland, you might as well have it all. Wilderness Lodge Muotkan Maja welcomes you to get cosy with its local food and authentic atmosphere. By Anna Taipale | Photos: Muotkan Maja Wilderness Lodge

Run by the Lappalainen family, Muotkan Maja is situated in the middle of the rugged woodlands of northern Finland by the UKK National Park. The hotel accommodates up to 50 people in hotel rooms, apartments and cabins and offers fullrange service including picking up its guests from the airport and taking them to a snowmobile safari in the middle of the night. “We want to create an unforgettable, wholesome experience around the finest facets of Lapland. Our packages in-

clude activities for 4-7 days, ranging from a visit to a reindeer farm to husky safaris, camp fire meals, skiing and snowshoe walks in the fells and forests nearby,” says Jouko Lappalainen. This winter, the guests may also enjoy the northern lights from the comfort of their private cabins with see-through walls and ceilings. Active relaxation In addition, the family runs another hotel with a similar concept: Wilderness Hotel

Nellim, also located in the serene landscapes by the lake Inari. The hotel accomodates up to 70 people and is the perfect place to experience Aurea Borealis, the high season starting in early September and running through March. Both Muotkan Maja and Nellim serve local food of reindeer meat, fish, berries and mushrooms. The staff consists of family and local people only, and the owners take pride in the homely atmosphere. Guests are always very well taken care of, in the conventional way as well as by providing all the gear needed in the arctic conditions. “The weather may vary from high freeze to snow storms, and part of the experience is definitely about winning oneself. Our guests laughingly muse about another holiday after the one spent with us. But many of them return for another unforgettable, inimitable experience with us.”

For more information, please visit: www.muotkanmaja.fi

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Hotel of the Month, Finland

Adventures in Lapland at your doorstep Welcome to reindeer country. Lapland Hotel Riekonlinna, located in the stunningly picturesque region of Saariselkä in Finnish Lapland, welcomes holiday-makers and conference guests alike to a relaxing stay with an adventurous twist. The popular hotel is located in a fell village just a day’s journey from the Arctic Sea, and forms part of the Lapland Hotels chain.

alongside Lappish game delicacies,” says Vaarala. Each restaurant has its own look, and it is a matter of pride that all the food should be locally produced. Snow and northern lights are what most people associate with Lapland. Winter is indeed high season at Lapland Hotels, but that is not all. ”Personally, I find the warm spring months here to be just wonderful,” smiles Eine Vaarala. ”And everyone should get to experience Lapland in autumn, when nature is positively aglow. The colours are amazing!”

By Joanna Nylund | Photos: Lapland Hotels

Whether coming for a conference or to savour the beauty of nature, Saariselkä is just the place. Hotel Riekonlinna offers visitors a versatile choice between combination rooms, suites and holiday apartments. ”Our popular apartments provide a stylish and comfortable alternative if you want to make your stay slightly more independent,” says Lapland Hotels’ marketing manager Eine Vaarala. With the peaks, slopes and cross-country tracks of Lapland just around the corner, great experiences await visitors. Enjoy a trek across the fells, or take nature by the horns – sometimes literally – on one of the many exciting winter safari options offered by the hotel’s partner, Lapland Safaris. Want to go ice fishing? See the fells

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from the back of a snowmobile? Ride a sledge pulled by huskies? Explore nature on skis or snowshoes? All this, and much more, is available as part of package day trips or tailored to your needs. You also have the unique opportunity to visit a reindeer farm, where your Sámi host will teach you how to lasso a reindeer and all about the customs of the Sámi, an indigenous people successfully combining traditional and modern ways of living. After a rewarding day out, the hotel invites you to unwind with its Feelgood services and gym. And, of course, a delicious dinner: Lapland Hotels are famous for their great cuisine. ”The local connection is important. Our restaurants make the most of our closeness to the Arctic Sea, serving exotic catches such as red king crab

For more information, please visit: LaplandHotels.com


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Hotel of the Month | Denmark

are also available for sale. Afterwards, historic tours of the manor are offered. Another popular event is the manor’s wine and cheese tasting, which takes place in the old dungeon, where guests are entertained with local ghost stories. As any decent castle, Nørre Vosborg, of course, has a ghost or two of its own, but, though he has not seen them, Holme assures us they are most certainly friendly.

Nørre Vosborg’s impressive party and conference hall can accommodate up to 300 guests.

Hotel of the Month, Denmark

Meetings, weddings and getaways in serene surroundings

Past Danish Prime Minister Lars Løkke Rasmussen is among the many conference guests to have enjoyed a visit to Nørre Vosborg.

With its enchanting atmosphere and serene location it is no wonder Nørre Vosborg is, and has been, popular with everyone from famous writers to business leaders and local ghosts. For the last five years, the 500-year-old manor house, located in west Jutland 20 kilometres from Holsterbro, has functioned as a hotel, conference centre and wedding venue.” By Signe Hansen | Photos: Nørre Vosborg

Constructed over a period of 500 years, the 16 buildings of Nørre Vosborg went into the hands of Realdania in 2004. The foundation spent a whopping 144 million DKKR on renovating and updating the old buildings to the standards expected of a modern hotel. Today, the historic buildings house 56 hotel rooms, meeting and party venues for up to 300 people, and several historic lounges and halls preserved as they were when the manor’s owners left in the 19th century. The broad set-up enables the hotel to cater for various groups, explains Hotel Director Thomas Holme: “During the week we have a lot of conference activity, board meetings and courses for local companies such as B&O. We house meetings for everything between two and 100

people. At the weekends, on the other hand, we are usually busy with celebrations; we are a very popular wedding venue because of our wonderful location, which appeals to a lot of young couples. Also, a lot of people come here for a classic weekend getaway, enjoying some good food, walks and outdoor activities such as mountain biking or fishing.” The hotel also hosts a string of historic and cultural events, including a chamber music festival. In addition, guests can follow in the footsteps of fairytale writer Hans Christian Andersen, who stayed at the manor during the summer of 1859. Every Sunday, Nørre Vosborg serves a popular locally-sourced Sunday brunch, which attracts many families and guests eager to try out the local delicacies, which

The pristine white walls of Nørre Vosborg make for an impressive sight in the midst of a peaceful landscape.

For more information, please visit: www.nrvosborg.dk

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The hotel is located in the heart of Kristiansand

Hotel of the Month, Norway

Where people matter the most People often consider Norway a beautiful country, but not many would associate it with sunshine, beautiful beaches and popular music festivals. One visit to Kristiansand and you may change your mind; and during that visit, why not stay at Kristiansand’s most popular hotel, Clarion Hotel Ernst? By Kjersti Westeng | Photos: Clarion Hotel Ernst

Kristiansand is famous for being Norway’s southern capital: the city where the sun always shines. It is typically known as a summer paradise, with white wooden houses, long sandy beaches and idyllic skerries. In the heart of this charming city, you will find Clarion Hotel Ernst. This beautiful, charismatic hotel has Kristiansand’s finest shops and restaurants on its doorstep and transport links only a few minutes’ walk away. Clarion Hotel Ernst was recently renovated and reopened its doors in the autumn of 2010. “After a three-year renovation period, Clarion Hotel Ernst is now a fabulous and

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large business and conference hotel with 200 rooms and suites and 19 meeting rooms. We can take up to 1,000 guests, which is the highest capacity of any hotel in Kristiansand,” says sales manager Anette Berntsen. Number one hotel in Kristiansand According to Tripadvisor, Clarion Hotel Ernst is the most popular hotel in Kristiansand, something the hotel staff take great pride in. Staff at Clarion Hotel Ernst have all been hired based on one key merit: their ability to go that extra mile to ensure a fantastic experience for all

guests. They are not given a specific manual of how to offer great service; instead, they are trusted to provide service in a personal and unique way, all depending on the guest. “Given that the rating on Tripadvisor solely rests on our guests’ opinion, it definitely means a lot to us to be number one. Although I think the hotel is fantastic in itself, I fully believe it all comes down to our staff. They are the ones who make us truly unique,” Berntsen says. Guests who visit Clarion Hotel Ernst are guaranteed what Berntsen calls “a wow experience,” and from the second you en-


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Scan Magazine | Hotel of the Month | Norway

ter the hotel you feel certain you won’t be disappointed: the lobby itself is incredibly beautiful, spacious and elegant; the original décor of the building was kept after the renovation, but the added mix of modern design and contemporary art makes Clarion Hotel Ernst a hotel full of character; music is played in all common rooms, including the lift, and guests often walk into the lobby to find something exciting going on, such as nice food and drink being served, a DJ playing, or massages being offered. “We try to entertain our guests in the lobby in order to get in contact with them. We want to keep an open dialogue with them in order to make sure they are enjoying their stay,” Berntsen explains. Passion for local food The chefs at Clarion Hotel Ernst are passionate about locally-produced food and only serve food made from local produce. The breakfast buffet is very popular and offers a wide range of hot and cold dishes, with plenty of organic options. In the evening, guests can either go for a three course option or choose from the seasonal à la carte menu. For those not want-

Hotel Clarion Ernst is a beautiful hotel full of character

Standard single room

ing the evening to end, Club Clarion stays open until 2 am on the weekends, offering drinks and snacks in an elegant yet lively atmosphere. Club Clarion is also a popular meeting place for non-guests, so this is a great opportunity to get to know the locals and find out what they love about their city. Despite being known as a summer paradise, Kristiansand has a lot to offer throughout the rest of year as well. Firstly, it is the home of Kristiansand Zoo and Amusement Park, Norway’s biggest zoo

and most popular tourist attraction. Secondly, Kristiansand is a city full of culture. The city centre is small, charming and idyllic: you can take a walk around the Old Town (Posebyen) to visit museums and art galleries or wander around the small niche shops in the heart of the city before dining at one of the many exciting restaurants. The southern part of Norway is known as the festival region, and a number of festivals take place in Kristiansand throughout the year, including the metal festival Southern Discomfort and the Dark Season Music Festival. Kristiansand also arranges a number of concerts and mini festivals in the city centre. Kilden Performing Arts Centre, a theatre and concert hall as well as an architectural landmark, is located just a few minutes' walk from the hotel. “Kristiansand has something for everyone. It is an intimate city full of culture and life,” Berntsen finishes.

For more information, please visit: www.clarionernst.no

Above: The hotel fitness room. Below: Clarion has 19 meeting rooms, a restaurant and a bar

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Scan Magazine | Attraction of the Month | Iceland

Fjaðrárgljúfur is a magnificent 100-metre deep canyon that formed at the end of the last Ice Age. Hikers can venture inside and walk alongside the Fjaðrá river.

Attraction of the Month, Iceland

Succumb to the forces of nature With its rumbling volcanoes and shifting glaciers, Katla Geopark is a place where ice and fire meld together in breath-taking form. This is Iceland’s most volcanically active area, where the dramatic nature is constantly altering the extraordinary landscape. By Stephanie Lovell | Photos: Visit South Iceland

Although the natural elements have been at play for thousands of years, the Katla Geopark Project is a fairly recent development. “There was a worrying tendency of people moving away from the area,” explains Steingerður Hreinsdóttir, the Chief Operating Officer at Katla Geopark, “so to counter this, we began work in 2008 towards joining the European Geoparks Network (EGN), which is part of the wider Global Geoparks Network endorsed by UNESCO.” In line with the values upheld by the EGN, Katla Geopark prioritised protection of geodiversity, support for local sustainable development, preservation of local culture and promotion of nature tourism in the area.

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Lying 2 kilometres inland from sea, Hjörleifshöfði is a tuff rock promontory surrounded by sand that was formed by an eruption under Mýrdalsjökull glacier during the last ice age. Photo: Þórir Kjartansson

At the mercy of volatile volcanoes The geopark is named after the mighty Katla, one of Iceland’s largest and most active volcanoes which lurks beneath the Mýrdalsjökull glacier. Since its neighbour, the barely pronounceable Eyjafjallajökull, erupted in 2010, spewing its ash all over the northern hemisphere and wreaking travel chaos across Europe, the volcanic activity in Katla has been closely monitored in anticipation of an imminent eruption. Katla last erupted in 1918 and, considering that on average it does so every 50 years, its next eruption is long overdue.


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hind the cascading water, making for an especially magical experience. Further along the south coast, you will be stunned by the colossal Skógafoss, which towers at a staggering 62 metres tall. Venture down the trails along the Skógá river to see the 30 smaller waterfalls leading up to this dazzling climax.

The Eyjafjallajökull eruption was not the first time that volcanic ash from Iceland caused such far-reaching problems. When the volcano Laki erupted in 1783, it produced a toxic aerosol cloud that generated a persistent haze, which at its peak covered a quarter of the earth’s surface, spreading all the way to Siberia, China and India. This resulted in the Haze Famine, which took the lives of six million people across the world. It was the worst natural disaster ever to hit Iceland, where 75 per cent of livestock perished due to the toxic ash and almost 10,000 Icelanders died of starvation. These tragic events had a profound effect on the island’s inhabitants, particularly those living in the volcano’s vicinity, where 40 per cent of the population died. “The Katla Geopark area has a very powerful history,” acknowledges Hreinsdóttir. “The lives of the people who live right next to the volcanoes have been shaped by nature.” Experience the splendours of nature Throughout history, agriculture has been the most important economic activity in the area, but tourism has been growing in importance. “This is no surprise, seeing as there is an abundance of natural wonders to be discovered in this vast geopark, which covers 9,542 square kilometres of land and encompasses three municipalities in the south of Iceland,” says Hreinsdóttir.

Although the spectacular natural sights are what make Katla Geopark such a unique place, there are also some fascinating things to do indoors: learn all about the science behind the Eyjafjallajökull eruption at the Þorvaldseyri visitor centre or delve into the tumultuous world of the Vikings at the Saga centre in Hvolsvöllur. Visitors to Katla Geopark can embark upon many different kinds of hiking trails. Þórsmörk is a natural mountain reserve where you can walk amidst curious rock formations and trek along impressive mountain gorges. As you reach the summits of the mountain peaks, prepare to be amazed by spectacular views of the surrounding glaciers. For more adventurous visitors, there are a variety of glacial tours to choose from, some of which include snowmobiling, rafting, caving, snorkelling and kayaking.

“Katla Geopark is accessible all year round, with more and more attractions remaining open in winter,” says Hreinsdóttir. “We are fortunate in that we rarely get heavy snowfall.” It takes less than two hours by car or bus from Reykjavík and there are plenty of accommodation options all over the geopark, including hotels, guesthouses and campsites. However long you do end up staying, you can be sure to leave completely blown away by this dynamic destination.

The geopark is home to some of Iceland’s most picturesque waterfalls. At Seljalandsfoss you can walk along a ledge be-

Gígjökull is one of Eyjafjallajökull’s outlet glaciers. When Eyjafjallajökull erupted in 2010, it altered Gígjökull’s appearance dramatically. Photo: South Iceland Adventure

For more information, please visit: www.katlageopark.is

Photo: Arnar Óli Kristinsson

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Kim Bernhard Tornby and the Fillod Stone, the three-metre and 15-tonne artwork by Daniel Fillod.

Attraction of the Month, Denmark

Explore the art of upcoming international artists in Northern Jutland At the idyllic Gallery Tornby in Northern Jutland, artists and visitors from all over the world benefit from owner Kim Bernhard Tornby’s genuine love of art and the people behind it. This autumn, the gallery exhibits the work of Norwegian multi artist Arjuna Geir Aasehaug and Serbian visual artist Gala Caki as well as selected works of the almost 50 artists connected to the gallery. By Signe Hansen | Photos: Gallery Tornby

As a testimony to the continued artistic significance of Denmark’s famous northern tip, also known as the land of light, Gallery Tornby, in Vester Tversted on the main road to Skagen, presents a surprisingly international art collection, primarily of paintings. Immediately upon turning towards the charming, white farmhouse, guests are faced with a giant manifestation of the sky-high level of creativity and ambition that saturates its every nook and cranny. The Fillod stone, a 15-tonne rock decorated with captivating patterns, serves as the fittingly original landmark of

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The Joest Jacobsen family enjoy their stay at Gallery Tornby

the gallery. Among the many well-established names to have exhibited and worked with the gallery is the Fillod stone’s creator, the now 78-year-old French artist Daniel Fillod. The enigmatic artist, who uses everything from walls to windows as canvasses, decorated the stone with a combination of Nordic and Indian mythology as well as “a bit of his own soul,” explains gallery owner Kim Bernhard Tornby. The three-metre tall stone was one among many artworks created during the gallery’s French/Danish art week in the summer of 2012.


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Gallery Tornby also represents a string of Danish and Scandinavian artists as well as artists from France, Spain and South America. When setting up exhibitions, artists benefit from the gallery’s adjoining holiday cottage and artist refuge. The infectious joy of art The idea of opening his own gallery came

to Bernhard Tornby in 2008, when, in his 40s, he rediscovered a passion for visual art. “As a kid I used to help out my granddad who had a paint store. He was also a keen art painter and sold art items such as canvasses, which I helped make. Actually, I made canvasses for some of Denmark’s most famous artists, and I grew up in a very artistic environment,” he says. However, Bernhard Tornby left the art world behind when he decided to travel the world as a marine engineer. But when, years later, back in Denmark he and his Faroese girlfriend, Hannelin Simona Á Hálvmørk, stumbled upon a beautifully-located old farm house by North Jutland’s western coastline, Bernhard Tornby’s innate love of art turned into a dream of creating his own gallery. Less than a year later, he had turned the dream into reality. Bernhard Tornby, who still works full-time as a production manager at a medical company, is not just dedicated to visual art but also to music. The two art forms are constantly interwoven at Gallery Tornby. The gallery’s many music events led to him being awarded the Jazz Award Of The Year at the internationally-recognized jazz festival JazzyDays in 2011. “The gallery is my free space, my passion and my social network, but don’t misinterpret that: it is also a professionally-run business, and there is a purpose to all of the initiatives which pop up again and again,” stresses the gallery owner. This autumn, Gallery Tornby will take part in the start of JazzyDays in Tversted with a live jazz concert with guitarist Ole Bech at the opening of the Arjuna Geir Aasehaug and Gala Caki

exhibitions on October 12. The following week the gallery will be open every day except Monday.

The combination of music and art earned Gallery Tornby and its owner Kim Bernhard Tornby the Jazz Award in 2011.

Gallery Tornby is located close to Tversted, 35km from Skagen and 79km from Aalborg Airport. The Gallery is open from 13:00pm17:00pm every Saturday and Sunday from March 24 to November 10 as well as specific holidays including Christmas. Address: Skagensvej 53b, Tversted, 9881 Bindslev

For more information, please visit: www.galleritornby.dk

Birgit Kirke fromThe Faroe Islands

International reach Despite its somewhat secluded and serene location, Gallery Tornby’s reputation has travelled far since its inauguration in May 2009. One of the gallery’s first exhibitions with a non-Scandinavian artist was that of the visual artist Serhiy Savchenko from Ukraine. The artist’s positive experience with the gallery has since enabled a string of collaborations with other Eastern European artists, which has set Gallery Tornby apart from many Danish galleries focused mainly on Nordic art. “What I aim to do, is to stand out from the crowd and showcase something which is not often seen in Denmark. The problem with new Eastern European artists is that they are not that known in Denmark – and not at all known in Tversted,” jokes the gallery owner with a reference to the remote location and tiny size of Tversted. “To some extent people buy art because they like it, but they also think about its prospective value, and that means that because they hear and read more about Danish art, they are more likely to buy that. That’s why I make four-year contracts with my artists – to give the quality of their work time to sink in.”

From left to right: Arturs Akopjans from Latvia; Yuriy Petrenko from Ukrain; Eduard Belsky from Ukraine; Vladimir Karnachev from Russia

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Scan Magazine | Restaurant of the Month | Sweden

Restaurant of the Month, Sweden

A small local restaurant with high ambitions For anyone travelling to Stockholm and looking for an excellent restaurant with reasonable prices, Sjögräs, located at Timmermangatan 24, is the perfect spot. Here, customers will enjoy the finest French food with a Swedish touch and a rum list that will impress even the connoisseurs.

A go-to place in Stockholm Sjögräs is not only famous for being a great restaurant, but also for the relaxing and entertaining bar where guests can enjoy pleasant drinks before or after dinner. Our recommendation is, naturally, to try one of the rum-based cocktails, carefully and skilfully mixed by the professional barman. Service, food and drinks are of the highest standard and make this restaurant a place you simply do not want to miss when you happen to be in Stockholm.

By Cecilia Varricchio | Photos: Sjögräs

For the quality of its plates, Sjögräs could compete with any of the top-class, exclusive restaurants in Stockholm. What really distinguishes this neighbourhood restaurant, located in the central Södermalm in Stockholm, is the relaxed and cosy atmosphere enjoyed by its customers. The restaurant opened 19 years ago and has become a classic destination in town. It is always nominated in both the Michelin Guide and the White guide. It is a real Stockholm gem, serving only the finest food at affordable prices. An extraordinary experience from an innovative kitchen Customers can be sure that they will leave Sjögräs fully satisfied. The pio-

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neering kitchen is never disappointing, always presenting sophisticated dishes, yet the atmosphere is far from pretentious. Reinventing French food with an innovative Swedish touch has turned out to be a huge success. On the menu, customers will find a perfect mix of topquality seafood and ingredients from farms and forests. Here, the focus is more on quality than quantity, so this is not a menu of many pages. Sjögräs does, however, have a remarkable rum list – probably one of the best and most assorted in the world, says restaurateur Hjalmar Litzén. Visitors can enjoy fantastic rum-tastings alongside different chocolates of which there are also an impressive selection.

For more information, please visit: www.sjogras.com


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You can stop by Ni&Tyve for a few casual drinks

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Bertel O. Steen and his family lived here for many years

Restaurant of the Month, Norway

From car workshop to famous restaurant Behind the royal castle in Oslo, more specifically Parkveien 29, you will find the city’s oldest wooden villa. The building was once occupied by the famous Norwegian car importer Bertel Otto Steen and his family, who had a car workshop in the back yard. Today, it is home to Oslo’s famous Ni&Tyve (Twenty Nine) restaurant. By Kjersti Westeng | Photos: Ni&Tyve The villa was originally designed by Norwegian architect Hans Linstow, who is considered by many to be Norway’s first architect. He is famous for designing the Norwegian royal castle, the surrounding park and Karl Johans gate, Oslo’s main high street. In 1913, the building was bought by car importer Bertel O. Steen. Restaurant manager Calle Åkerblom says: “Bertel O. Steen bought this building exactly 100 years ago and lived here with his family until he died. The entire first floor is decorated to recreate his time here and tell his story.” Ni&Tyve has around 120 seats inside and just as many outside. The menu is the same on both floors, but the atmosphere

is completely different. The second floor is warm and romantic, inspired by the

Top: A restaurant full of history and character Below: The first floor has been designed as a homage to Bertel O. Steen and his workers.

Baroque era and the first hundred years of the building’s history. The first floor has been designed as a homage to Bertel O. Steen and his workers. The atmosphere is slightly darker, but very elegant and charismatic with everything in brown: tables, chairs, curtains, walls and lamps. Guests also have the opportunity to rent a private room, also known as a ‘chambre séparée,’ in case they want to celebrate a special occasion in private. The seasonal à la carte menu is full of dishes the guests know and love. “We don’t serve food with ingredients our guests haven’t heard of; instead we try to serve food that they are familiar with and can’t get enough of. We also have an extensive wine list,” Åkerblom says. Though the beautiful surroundings would suggest a dining experience comparable to the Ritz, you do not need to put on your finest attire for a visit here. “You can stop by Ni&Tyve on a regular Tuesday if you fancy some good food and a beer. The atmosphere is nice and relaxing, making everyone feel welcome,” Åkerblom finishes.

For more information, please visit: www.niogtyve.no Ni&Tyve’s head chef, Jakob Thomassen

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Restaurant of the Month, Denmark

Modern elegance and fresh flavours at Copenhagen’s historic Restaurant Marchal With the young Michelin-awarded chef Ronny Emborg in charge, the historic Hotel d’Angleterre’s Restaurant Marchal has taken a new and exciting course. With a mix of fresh flavours and modern elegance, the thoroughly redecorated restaurant welcomes hotel guests and business visitors as well as dedicated foodies and local bons vivants. By Signe Hansen | Photos: Restaurant Marchal

Named after Jean Maréchal, the very first chef to rule the kitchen of Hotel d’Angleterre, the hotel’s new Restaurant Marchal attracts both local and international guests with its unpretentious atmosphere and high gastronomic ambitions. In 2011 the restaurant, and the entire hotel, closed down for extensive renovations. When it reopened in May this year, it was with one of Denmark’s most refined and renowned young chefs, Ronny Emborg, as head chef.

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Despite the massive sums spent on renovations and Emborg’s many awards and prizes, Marchal did not reopen as a venue exclusively for the rich and famous. With a selection of small and larger á la carte dishes, rather than a set tasting menu, the restaurant leaves the choice of what and how much to eat, and spend, to the guests. Frank Henriksen, director of food and beverage at Hotel d'Angleterre explains: “We want the focus to be on the food; we want it to be challenging and something we can be proud of. But that


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Scan Magazine | Restaurant of the Month | Denmark

does not necessarily imply that our ambition is to win a Michelin star – we also want to think about what our guests want, and that’s the reason we have deselected the large set menus, which are obligatory at a lot of Copenhagen’s gourmet restaurants.” Nordic cuisine with a twist of French luxury

Dishes by Emborg

At 30 years of age, Ronny Emborg is undoubtedly one of the most talented chefs within Nordic cuisine: in 2005, the young chef won the championship for Danish chefs; three years later he trained at the then world’s best restaurant El Bulli; and, in 2010, he secured Restaurant AOC in Copenhagen its first Michelin star. The sensory and elegant characteristic of his kitchen is often said to transcend the border between food and visual art.

worked at Michelin star restaurants all over the world. Casual elegance As one of the oldest luxury hotels in the world, it is not surprising to find a little opulence at Hotel d’Angleterre. Restaurant Marchal’s wine cellar, for instance, still boasts an awe-striking selection of wines at around 25,000-30,000 DKKR. But, just like the food, the elegant interiors of the restaurant are designed to make everyone feel welcome and at ease. The multiple dining rooms, seating up to 60 guests, are decorated with classic chandeliers, dark wooden tables and subdued purple colours. “A lot of people think of Hotel d’Angleterre as an extremely exclusive location, but we want to make sure that the two girlfriends, who are just looking to have a light bite and a glass of wine, also feel welcome,” stresses Frank Henriksen and rounds off: “Yes, we have an extremely

Emborg’s sensory kitchen can not only be explored at Restaurant Marchal but also in his recently published book, The Wizard’s Cookbook. For more information visit: www.ronnyemborg.dk

For more information, please visit: www.dangleterre.com

Foie Gras Crop

Dish by Emborg

Tatatar

For Restaurant Marchal, Emborg has created a menu of artistic as well as more classic dishes based on the key elements of his sensory kitchen. “My kitchen is very much based on classic techniques, but the Nordic twist adds some lighter tastes and fresh ingredients; I like to use a lot of vegetables to heighten the visual impression and the lightness of the dish,” explains Emborg. To ensure that his ingredients have the freshest and sharpest taste possible, the chef sources the majority from the north. But he does not dogmatically shy away from luxury goods such as French foie gras, which is, he says, just too wonderful to exclude. At Marchal, Emborg heads a kitchen of 20 chefs, including four deputy chefs who have

talented chef and an elegant restaurant, but you can also choose to sit on our covered terrace, enjoy the view of Kongs Nytorv and have a drink with your friends. And, though everything here, from the table mats to the chandeliers, has an exclusive quality to it, it is all put together to make you feel good. We don’t want to be known as the fancy restaurant with the formal head waiter.”

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Scan Magazine | Restaurant of the Month | Finland

Restaurant of the Month, Finland

Saluting food Mange Sud is a privately-owned restaurant that brings together the food, wines and atmosphere of the Mediterranean. Located in Eira, a smart residential neighbourhood in southern Helsinki, the restaurant serves the authentic flavours of southern Europe and boasts one of the largest wine collections in Helsinki. Most wines, even the rarer ones, can be enjoyed by the glass, making Mange Sud the perfect place for tasting new, delicate tones.

flects the full spectrum of life: business lunchers, family get-togethers, wine tasters and romantic couples. Open Monday to Friday from 4 pm, Saturday from 1 pm.

By Inna Allen | Photos: Mange Sud

Mange Sud uses flavours to take you on a journey through the Mediterranean, picking inspiration from Italian, French, Spanish, north African and Lebanese kitchens. Ingredients used and dishes served are all based on authentic recipes. “Our signature dish is Bouillabaisse, the traditional fish soup from Provence,” says restaurant manager Pasi Sipilä. Diners get to enjoy a large plate of fish and seasonal sea food, served on top of a bowl of lobster and fish soup. Rouille, a saffron and garlic mayonnaise, croutons and parmesan finish off the melt-in-the-mouth dish. “The French restaurant guide Petit Futé claims our Bouillabaisse is the best that can be found north of Marseille.” Mange Sud also offers some set menus, such as the Culture Menu – Ten Steps Away from

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the Theatre. If you are planning a visit to a cultural happening, such as a concert, a play or an exhibition, Mange Sud will book and pay for your taxi after a delicious meal at the restaurant. Created in honour of one of the restaurant’s regular customers, another ingenious idea is the so-called Free Hands Menu, where you tell the staff how many courses you wish to have and they build a menu for you along with accompanying wines. Informal, attentive and easy-going, Mange Sud has paid particular attention to its service. “Our staff is present at all times, paying attention to the customers in a respectful manner. The atmosphere of our restaurant is cosy and enjoyable,” Sipilä continues. The restaurant’s clientele re-

Address: Tehtaankatu 34 D 2, 00150 Helsinki, Finland

For more information, please visit: www.mangesud.fi


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Scan Business | Key Note | Mannaz

Scan Business Key Note 131 | Business Feature: Almondy 132 | Annika Goodwille 133 | Business Calendar 134

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Coaching to reach your goal By Paul Blackhurst, Client Director, Mannaz

This month, I decided to try something a bit different. During our leadership programmes we make great use of coaching as a means of development and problem solving, but instead of telling you all about it, I thought it might be interesting for you to experience it. So, find a moment of peace, take a piece of paper and note down the answers to the following questions: • Think about a major challenge in your life at the moment – and just one! Choose the one that is the most important for you to work on right now. • For this challenge, what is your goal: what exactly do you want to achieve, and how will you know you have achieved it? • What will the benefit to you of achieving the goal be, and why is it important to you? • What are the benefits to others? • What’s happening now, specifically, and how do you know? • What have you already done to try to reach your goal, and what progress have you made? • What obstacles or constraints within yourself or outside of yourself are holding you back? What is really stopping you?

• What could you do to achieve this goal? • What else? And again: anything else? I know you don’t know the answer, but if you did, what would you say? • If you could obtain more resources – time, money, people, ideas – would this open up more options? • What are the advantages and disadvantages of each of the options you have identified? • Which of these options appeals most to you, and which has the greatest chance of improving the situation? • What is your level of commitment to achieving this goal? How would you score this on a scale of 1 to 10? • If your commitment score is less than 8 – will you actually do it? Would it not be better to drop the idea and find something you really want? If your score is 8 or higher, how can you make your commitment a 10? • What support might you ask for? • What is your next step going to be and when will you do it?

ronment, try using these questions to stimulate their thinking and to get them to generate their own ideas. When people know the answers in their hearts, but lack the confidence to think it through on their own, coaching can be the answer. (This model is adapted from the GROW model which was popularised by Sir John Whitmore in his book, Coaching for Results, Nicholas Brearley Publishing, 1992.)

Paul Blackhurst, Client Director, Mannaz

I hope you found that useful. If you did, I would love to hear from you via the e-mail address below. And, of course, the next time someone asks for your advice or complains about something in their envi-

For more information, please visit: www.mannaz.com or email pbl@mannaz.com

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Scan Magazine | Business | Almondy

serve in as little as ten minutes, with leftover slices – not that we think there will be any – still delicious after another week in the fridge. The traditional Swedish recipe that inspired the success remains a secret, but a crusty almond base topped with layers of butter cream and other delicious goodness, always made from natural ingredients free from artificial preservatives and additives, is a recurring theme. Amongst the all-time favourites and best-sellers are the Almondy cakes topped with Toblerone, and DAIM, known and loved by children and adults alike. Proudly Swedish, with a secret dating back to the 1890s, Almondy is the sweet venture that got inbetween two young men and their boat – and made the world love them.

Toblerone tart

A sweet touch of almond Initially, all Kent Ahlqvist and Lennart Dahlbom wanted to do was sail around the world. Luckily, the pair stumbled across an old, secret recipe for the most delicious, almond-based tart, and realised that time spent doing anything other than baking would be wasted. In 1982, they bought Mandelbageriet, now known as Almondy, and decided to get busy baking and taking the world by storm – without sails, that is. By Linnea Dunne | Photos: Almondy

The plan worked. Business boomed and Almondy outgrew its original premises within a year, and today, Almondy’s DAIM cake is the most sold cake in all of the Nordics. That is despite 70 per cent of its produce being exported, the brand being the fastest growing in the UK, which is no wonder: more than one in ten UK residents has a gluten intolerance or avoids gluten by choice, making Almondy’s treats particularly tempting, as they are completely gluten free and baked in a gluten free environment. But Almondy’s tarts suit cake lovers with a range of different priorities. They are

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suitable for Kosher and Halal diets and tick all the ethical boxes as well, with Rainforest Alliance certification. Moreover, they are the embodiment of convenience, sold frozen, pre-cut and ready to

Almondy will be making friends with the vikings and reindeer at the Scandinavia Show 2013. Pop by stand 53 and say hello!

For more information, please visit: www.almondy.com


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Scan Business | Column | Annika Åman-Goodwille

Will crowdfunding change today’s banking system? This spring, I was contacted by a talented young lady I had met several times before who was now raising money through Kickstarter* for her new project: a book about Howard Tangye, an influential fashion teacher at Central St Martins. I must admit I was at once smitten by the idea. By investing a modest sum, I could become a part of her journey. During my time in business, I have met many companies seeking funding and investment, and I have seen their continuous problems in raising any. It is hardly worth mentioning that over the last few years the traditional sources of borrowing and funding for small businesses, the banks, have all but dried up, despite Government pressure and the input of risk-free money from the taxpayer. It is not surprising, then, that the Government has encouraged the development of crowdfunding initiatives to give entrepreneurs alternative fundraising opportunities. Historically, entrepreneurs have often played a crucial role in pulling economies out of recessions: necessity is the mother of invention and out of need comes creativity. Cyberspace and social media are yet again

demonstrating what can be done when you have the chance to pull people together in uncomplicated ways. Funding Circle* and Crowdcube* are but two of many crowdfunding sites; just Google ‘crowdfunding’ to see how many are out there and how diverse their strategies are. Funding Circle, founded in 2010, is lending money in reaction to high bank lending rates, typically about 15 per cent, at a time when cash in the bank earns next to nothing. The company says the average return is 5.8 per cent per annum after fees of one per cent and bad debts, and although of course the risk is higher through collective funding, the risks are also spread. So far, Funding Circle has lent over £150 million to small businesses. Crowdcube, in contrast, is equity based. According to the NESTA/BBAA** Siding with Angels publication, the overall return to business angels has been 22 per cent on capital invested over 4 years after the negative exits in a diversified portfolio have been off-set by the positive exits, some of which return very high rates. According to the IMF’s Christine Lagarde, we live in times of great economic change. And don’t we just! Think how much the crowdfund-

ing movement might change things and reshape the currently aging, outmoded and paralysed banking system. * www.kickstarter.com, www.fundingcircle.com, www.crowdcube.com ** NESTA = National Endowment for Science, Technology and the Arts; BBAA = British Business Angels Association

Column by Annika Åman-Goodwille www.goodwille.co.uk

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Danske Bank International S.A., R.C.S. Luxembourg, No. B. 14.101, Aut. 24859

“I don’t spend valuable time on managing my wealth. I leave that to the experts” Stefan, 44, Sales Director, International Private Banking client

Scandinavian Business Calendar – Highlights of Scandinavian business events Anti-corruption event ‘The new world of anti-corruption: new approaches in anti-corruption enforcement and new jurisdictions enforcing anti-corruption laws’, at Statoil UK Ltd. Date: 09 October

UK Tax Update with the Finnish Chamber of Commerce The Finnish Chamber of Commerce in co-operation with SEB welcomes you to a UK tax update with Helena Whitmore of SEB Private Banking, at SEB Scandinavian House. The event will cover the new Statutory Residence Test, new rules for Overseas Workday Relief and much more. Date: 10 October

The Swedish Chamber at the Scandinavia Show The Swedish Chamber of Commerce will be exhibiting at The Scandinavia Show. The Scandinavia Show is the only UK show dedicated to showcasing the best of Sweden, Denmark, Norway, Finland and Iceland. The show incorporates Scandinavian design, travel, lifestyle, fashion, culture and food. Sign up at www.scc.org.uk Date: 12 – 13 October

LINK up drinks at Royal Park Hotel Join the Swedish Chamber for some casual networking drinks and meet with fellow SCC members at the Royal Park Hotel, a boutique hotel in central London. The hotel, which is a member of the Swedish Chamber of Commerce, is a haven of elegance amidst the hustle and bustle of central London. Sign up at www.scc.org.uk Date: 15 October

Aquavit tasting event in Aberdeen Date: 16 October

Portfolio Management. A solution beyond the ordinary Stefan has created his wealth and wishes to see it grow. As he would rather spend his time on work and family, he has decided to use our Portfolio Management solution. Based on his desired risk level and target return, we have agreed with Stefan on a tailor-made investment strategy. By closely monitoring his portfolio and taking appropriate action, we help Stefan reach his financial goals while allowing him to focus on other things. If you need help with Portfolio Management, Danske Bank International might have the solution for you. To obtain more information and to take our test, please visit our website www.danskebank.lu.

Company visit at Handelsbanken in association with the Young Professionals The Swedish Chamber welcomes you to a joint SCC and Young Professionals company visit at Handelsbanken. Sign up at www.scc.org.uk Date: 17 October

Financial Evening with Øystein Dørum The Norwegian-British Chamber of Commerce and Den Norske Klub ask: ‘Global Economic Outlook: Awash With Cash – But Is It Enough?’ Date: 24 October

Nordic Thursday Drinks Fraternise with fellow Scandinavians at this joint networking event with the Norwegian, Danish and Finnish Chambers of Commerce, held at Bo Concept in Notting Hill. Date: 31 October


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Scan Magazine | Column | Humour

IS IT JUST ME...

By Mette Lisby

Or is Christmas showing up earlier and earlier each year? My bikini was barely dry from this summer’s beach trips when snowflakes, jingle-bells and Father Christmas started to appear in ads on my TV. This year’s first ad had the familiar, cheery Christmas-y tone but the voice-over ended in a concerned “do not let Christmas sneak up on you,” thus indicating that Christmas is lurking around the corner, hiding, like some sort of stalking holiday, cunningly sneaking up on people to surprise us at random dates. I, however, find that Christmas is usually pretty punctual. Not like Easter, that definitely seems more prone to sneaking, since it does have a new date every year. (By the way: what is up with that? Historians apparently know exactly when Jesus was born, but are kind of vague on when he died?) While Easter might be the sneakier of the two, as far back as I can

remember, neither of them managed to really “sneak up on me.” I never even caught them trying to. I never found Christmas attempting to make a surprise attack. Neither by being celebrated early November, nor by hiding behind a curtain, ready to jump out screaming: “Surprise!” Still, the well-intending people in the ads feverishly advise me to start getting ready for Christmas. In fact, they kind of insist that I HAVE to buy all my gifts early September. Really? Like they have no crap to sell you when December comes? And what good would it do you to get your Christmas gift shopping done in September? That would be almost three months of walking around in your home feeling like you lived at Selfridge’s.

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Still I value the input from the kind, concerned TV ad people. I am taking the threat of Christmas sneaking up on me quite seriously. Not that I started buying gifts yet, but I have started eating more. Just as a cautious preparation in my anticipation for Christmas. I wouldn’t want to wake up on the 25th and find myself going: “What? It’s Christmas! NOW? Really? I hadn’t even noticed!” Mette Lisby is Denmark’s leading female comedian. She invites you to laugh along with her monthly humour columns. Since her stand-up debut in 1992, Mette has hosted the Danish versions of “Have I Got News For You” and “Room 101”.


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Scan Magazine | Column | Humour

Autumn

British summers may not always be as lovely as this one has been, but the autumns tend to be reliably spectacular. In Scandinavia, the colour of fir-trees stays decidedly fir-tree-hued throughout the year, but in the UK the trees explode with colour. It’s a time of crisp air, ripe apples and crackling bonfires and it’s a time to redis-

By Maria Smedstad

cover the inside of pubs. Ignored over the summer months in favour of sunny beer gardens, the insides of pubs come alive once more with the darkening of the nights. Last year, my other half organised a surprise autumn treat for the two of us. It started with a delicious dinner in one of these great pubs. We shared bangers and mash in the romantic glow of candles, overlooked by the pub’s resident Jack Russell terrier, a one-eyed, fragrant beauty named Nelson. We then moved on to autumn activity number two: a midnight ghost hunt in a National Trust property! We envisioned creeping around marble-floored corridors and being told credible tales of previous inhabitants by a knowledgeable, ancient guide. We did not envision being given dowsing rods by a young chap and told to go stand in a sodden orchard for half an hour (while he went off, presumably, for a cup of tea and to catch up with match of the day on his

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phone in the stable blocks). So there we were, up to our knees in good old British mud, clinging onto pieces of bent metal in the hope of communicating with whatever dead spirit might wish to float past. None did. Then it started to rain. Then thunder. And I was reminded of one other very important aspect of life in the UK: never venture outside between the months of October and August without your umbrella.

Maria Smedstad moved to the UK from Sweden in 1994. She received a degree in Illustration in 2001, before settling in the capital as a freelance cartoonist, creating the autobiographical cartoon Em. Maria writes a column on the trials and tribulations of life as a Swede in the UK.


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Travel Column | Tim Gay

Dreaming of Iceland Fifty-five years is a long time to cherish a dream, but I had wanted to go to Iceland ever since the tender age of six. This year, my wife, who much prefers a warm holiday, finally waved the white flag and booked us a week in Reykjavik. By Tim Gay | Photos: Visit Iceland

I knew that this far north, the summer sun never sets, yet nothing could prepare me for bright sunshine at three in the morning. Leaving a dark Heathrow Airport at midnight on an Icelandair flight, we flew into the sun, and as we approached Iceland, the sky brightened until it resembled a summer’s day back home. Having watched countless television shows about Iceland, I was convinced that the best way to describe the Icelandic landscape was as otherworldly, and the short trip from Keflavik into Reykjavik city centre confirmed that I was right. I was gripped with excitement. Checking in at 3 a.m. was also a first for me, but something the Hotel Holt staff were well used to. Though having blackout blinds as well as curtains appeared both odd and unnecessary considering how tired we were after our journey, the hotel was a very comfortable, quiet and relaxed place to stay. Being new to Iceland, we decided to try

out the most obvious things – but even these were simply amazing. We saw Minke whales off Akranes, dolphins, and thousands of puffins; we took a coach trip around the southern part of the island, saw volcanoes, stood on the gap between the Continental tectonic plates and, of course, took in the geysers. While people back home suffered downpours of rain, we enjoyed 26 degrees hanging out in Reykjavik’s cafes. A highlight of the trip was meeting a friend from my university days, some forty years ago. I met Arni Ibsen and his wife Hildur Kristjansdottir in Exeter back in 1972, where Arni was studying drama before returning to Iceland and a career as an actor and poet. I had lost contact with the pair when we left university, but managed to find Hildur with the very generous help of Hrefna Minshull at the Icelandic Embassy in London. Sadly, I learnt that Arni had passed away a few years ago,

but Hildur came to our hotel for a catchup about the four decades since the last time we met, and I was very touched when she gave me a book of Arni's poetry. Fifty-five years is a long time to cherish a dream indeed, and many a dream is destroyed on the way. With Iceland, the reality proved so much better than I could have ever imagined. Hotel Holt Mr Snorri Valsson Bergstadastraeti 37 Reykjavik 101 Tel: 354 552 5700 www.holt.is

Reykjavik Grapevine www.grapevine.is

Photo: Tim Gay

Issue 57 | October 2013 | 137


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Scan Magazine | Music & Culture | LIFEM Festival 2013

singing in the Karelian tradition. While the most easily recognisable band members are the three charismatic songstresses, the band also relies on acoustic drums, bass, and accordion for its unique sound. The career highlights are plentiful: they collaborated with famed composer A. H. Rahman on the Lord of the Rings musical and have received a WOMEX award. “When our album Oi Dai was released, it became playlisted around the world and took our music to another level,” says singer Susan Aho, insisting that the band are determined to continue to cast their spell on fans around the globe with their tangible enigmatic energy and poetic, Finnish-Karelian lyrics that seem to transcend time and place.

Värttinä. Photo: AJ Savolainen

The Finns are coming! LIFEM, the London International Festival of Exploratory Music, is getting ready to kick off its annual event at King’s Place with a bang. Finnish music is at the forefront this year, and the festival will feature folk, jazz, and electronic music. A dizzying array of ground-breaking, new talent and heavy-hitting veterans makes this a must for music afficionados. By Maria Malmros | Photos: LIFEM Jimi Tenor

LIFEM marks the return of flamboyant artist Jimi Tenor to the London stage. Tenor is known as much for his showmanship and experimental on-stage visuals as he is for his electronic music, which can best be described as eclectic; heavily influenced by jazz, he is rarely seen without his beloved saxophone. Tenor’s natural ease on stage was apparent as a young boy in music school. Tenor says: “I sometimes had to do recitals and sing a bit. People liked it – it was a special feeling the first time… I kind of got hooked on that.” The musician and composer has gone from one style to another with apparent effortlessness, describing his music as “all over the place.”

138 | Issue 57 | October 2013

Not a fan of the status quo, he insists that he “managed without compromises – I did what I felt like at the moment.” With the timely arrival of his new album, the restless entertainer proves that he keeps things just as fresh today as he did twenty years ago. Traditional meets contemporary Iconic folk music band Värttinä celebrates its 30th anniversary this year, and makes a glorious return to British soil. Hailing from Karelia, a part of Finland that was lost to the former Soviet Union during World War 2, the band’s heritage continues to impact their music, marked by close vocal intervals and powerful chest

For your free Jimi Tenor or Lasetus LIFEM 2013 festival EP: KingsPlace.co.uk/freedownloads For Festival & Tickets: www.kingsplace.co.uk/lifem2013 Scan Magazine readers receive a 20% discount on all tickets (*) with the code 'SCANMAGAZINE' online or quote 'SCANMAGAZINE' at the box office: 020 7520 1440. *doesn't apply to early bird 'online savers' tickets

For more information, please visit: lifem.org.uk


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Scan Magazine | Music & Culture | Iceland Airwaves

Nordic cross-genre eruption in Reykjavík From Björk and Sigur Rós to Monsters and Men and Múm, Iceland has offered the world an insight into its musical idiosyncrasies and craft. It has effortlessly alleviated financial doom, supported newly-independent nations when no one else would, and had Reykjavík mayor Jón Gnarr open the city’s 2010 gay pride parade in full drag. By Simon Cooper | Photos: Iceland Airwaves

In short, Iceland bucks trends, and nothing is more symbolic of this than the fact that the world’s smallest capital city can host a fully modern musical festival during the onset of winter. Yes, Iceland Airwaves 2013 is just around the corner, and here we take a look at what the fifteenth installment of this increasingly hip and popular event will hold in store. Despite the much-hyped appearance of German electro-pioneers Kraftwerk on the fifth and final night, it is once again Airwaves’ ensemble of both upcoming and established Nordic artists, from Iceland and beyond, which will delight the thou-

sands descending on Reykjavík’s bars and clubs. Native acts including the likes of high school music teacher Borko, Beirutesque collective Útidúr, and original pop outfit Retro Stefson stud the hugely diverse line-up, and a number of bands from surrounding Scandinavian countries are expected to provide some of this year’s highlights. Copenhagen female trio Baby in Vain will bring their brand of rock whilst former Mexican-turned-Norwegian model Carmen Villain’s experimental pop will find its place amongst the diversity in sound. Swedish bands El Rojo Adios and Goat, meanwhile, deliver crafted country and rock-jazz fusion respectively. Though

it’s not so easy to pigeonhole: within Reykjavík’s tightly-knit musical circles, there is no room for copycats or scenesters, and foreign musicians are selected by the organisers for their cross-genre innovation. Elsewhere, Swedish songstress Anna Von Hausswolff’s atmospheric brand of music would seem perfect for the darkened backrooms and churches that help comprise Airwaves’ range of venues. The rare chance also exists to catch some music from the Faroe Islands, with Byrta and Eivør Pálsdóttir representing the mid-Atlantic archipelago. With a special performance by the Icelandic Symphony Orchestra and darkly minimalist and electronic local multi-instrumentalist Ólafur Arnalds, this year’s festival promises to be a stand-out one. And to make sure fans get the chance to see their artists in both larger venues and more intimate settings, many acts opt for multiple gigs, ‘offvenue’ being the name given to impromptu, smaller coffee shop performances that pop up around the city. Iceland Airwaves runs from 30 October – 3 November 2013.

For more information please visit: www.icelandairwaves.is

Issue 57 | October 2013 | 139


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Music & Culture | Nordic Film Festival

directorial debut Pusher (Denmark 1996) and the classic Bleeder (Denmark 1999). Expect a distinct Swedish feel to the programme as well, with films such as The Hidden Child (Sweden 2013), a crime thriller based on Camilla Läckberg’s bestselling novel, and Finnish Blood, Swedish Heart by Mika Ronkainen (Sweden/Finland 2012), winner of the Dragon Award for Best Nordic Documentary at Gothenburg International Film Festival this year.

Above: The Hidden Child

Above: Kidd Life

A new Nordic narrative

NFF 2013 will be showing at The Institute of Contemporary Art (ICA), Riverside Studios and Ciné Lumière in London from 25 November to 4 December 2013. The festival is hosted by Day for Night, a London based independent film company. Working across film exhibition, distribution and screen translation, Day for Night works with film festivals, venues, film makers and audiences, with the central aim of enabling broader access to visual culture through innovative curatorial and distribution projects.

The Nordic Film Festival returns this year with an exceptional programme, celebrating the creative talents of contemporary and classic film making from the Nordic countries. By Sophia Stovall | Photos: Nordic Film Festival

Festival Director and founder of Nordic Film Festival, Sonali Joshi, reveals that NFF 2013’s programme “comprises an eclectic mix of Nordic films, ranging from crime thrillers and noir-esque stories that have come to characterise Nordic fiction in recent years, to a broader range of content covering drama, animation, experimental film and documentary.” This year’s programme demonstrates the strength of past Nordic storytelling and the talent thriving today. Director’s pick Andreas Johnsen’s Kidd Life (Denmark 2012), is “a daring, funny, at times outrageous, highly entertaining, but also telling comment on fame and celebrity culture.” A hard-hitting and darkly comic music documentary turned social commentary following Nicholas Kidd, who shoots to fame overnight when his mock-rap YouTube video propels him into public consciousness.

140 | Issue 57 | October 2013

NFF 2013 programme highlights The opening night of NFF, hosted by the Danish interior brand Republic of Fritz Hansen™, will comprise a screening of Marcus Fjellström’s short noir animation series Odboy & Erordog Suite (Sweden/Germany 2013) with live soundtrack performed by the Pearls Before Swine Experience quartet.

Finnish Blood Swedish Heart

This year’s programme features a number of documentaries and musical collaborations, including a Sigur Rós double bill. Inni (Iceland 2011) a music documentary and Valtari Film Experiment (Iceland 2012), an anthology of short films made in response to Sigur Rós’s album Valtari. Odboy & Erordog Suite

While this year’s experimental content introduces new talent and genres, the programme equally aims to remind audiences of the early work of established directors, such as Nicolas Winding Refn’s

For more information, please visit: www.day-for-night.org/nordic-filmfestival


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At Angels Club there is a cosy atmosphere in stylish surroundings

A night in heaven in the centre of Copenhagen Located in the historical centre of Copenhagen is the exclusive gentlemen’s club, Angels Club. At Angels Club, there is only one wish: to thrill and delight all your senses. By Rikke Oberlin Flarup | Photos: Angels Club

“Angels Club is a serious, discrete and luxurious gentlemen’s club. Our vision is to treat both bar staff and dancers as angels, and I expect our guests to do the same. It is important to us to have good company karma, in relation to our employees as well as the angels and our guests,” says Dennis Skaarup, owner of the club. For gentlemen who have had enough of loud, pulsating music, disco balls and a hectic nightlife, Angels Club is the place to be. Situated in the heart of Copenhagen, the club provides a cosy atmos-

142 | Issue 57 | October 2013

phere in stylish surroundings and dimmed lights where you can indulge in the club’s fine selection of spirits, champagnes and refreshing cold beers on tap. Lovely bartenders make sure that your glass is always full, giving you the chance to lean back and relax, while the club’s dancers take to the stage with exhilarating shows for your

entertainment. Anyone visiting can expect to be very well-pampered. 15 to 20 shows a day In the discrete and luxuriously-decorated lounge at Angels Club, visitors are thoroughly entertained by girls performing erotic and exciting shows. No matter what your preference, Angels Club promises that their shows will be just like your dreams. The club hosts between 15 and 20


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Scan Magazine | Advertorial | Angels Club

erotic shows every day, performed by socalled angels from all over Europe. Dancers as well as staff are carefully selected to grant visitors the expected perfect experience, and it has been said on more than one occasion that what the club offers is amongst the best of its kind in all of Europe. The dancers are highly talented, their shows both exciting and inspirational. A boys’ night out For anyone wanting to try something a bit different from a conventional bar or nightclub, a gentlemen’s club could be the answer. Angels Club offers everything the heart desires, including when it comes to drinks. Enjoy a glass of single malt whisky, a round of shots to get things started, or perhaps a chilled bottle of fine champagne – the Angels Club specialty. This gentlemen’s club has no less than 14 different kinds of champagne to choose from and offers everything from regular 0.75 litre bottles to whopping six litre bottles.

Whether you are going out with a bunch of old friends, looking to entertain a group of business associates, or trying to find the perfect place to end a great stag night, Angels Club welcomes you to enjoy a night in heaven. A sober and serious nightclub The largest gentlemen’s club with erotic shows in Copenhagen, Angels Club puts great effort into providing service of only the highest standard. This means that both the visitors and the girls working at the club are ensured the highest level of security. Angels Club is a sober and serious nightclub for gentlemen seeking only the finest and most beautiful things in life. Located on Nørregade 1, right next to the famous Strøget in the centre of Copenhagen, Angels Club is also the most wellattended gentlemen’s club in Copenhagen. If you are anywhere near the centre of Copenhagen and looking for the perfect night out with your mates or busi-

One of the dancers who perform at Angels Club.

ness associates, make sure not to miss this fine gentlemen’s club. For more information, please visit: www.angelsclub.dk

Choose between 14 different kinds of fine Champagne.

Issue 57 | October 2013 | 143


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Scan Magazine | Music & Culture | Scandinavian Music

Scandinavian Music

This month seems to be the month when all of the recent Scandinavian pop heavyweights launch their big comeback hits. Sweden’s national treasure, Laleh, returned with brand new single Colors. It’s her first new material since the mega successful Sjung album from last year, which launched the phenomenal hit Some Die Young, amongst others. Well the great news is that Colors is a phenomenon in itself, perhaps even up there with the aforementioned Some Die Young, although it’s too early to say for sure. It’s a song with more than one tempo and direction. You may think that THAT chorus following

THAT verse is the song’s highlight. But then comes THAT middle eight, which is then mercifully semi-repeated as THAT outro. It’s pretty brilliant all in all. You get the sense that it’s something new from Laleh, while still maintaining all the best bits from her last album. Denmark’s biggest male popstar of the last half decade or so also returned to the fore this month: Rasmus Seebach and his first new single in an age, Olivia. For Olivia, he’s toned down the massive synth rave-ups that created incredible tunes (and enduring hits) for him such as Natteravn and Sirenerne. And instead, he’s gone down the mid-tempo, piano ballad route, one with heavy r&b influences. It’s a beautiful production, complemented by the usual rose/thorn, soft/rough vocal delivery thing that he always has going on. Naturally, it went straight to Number 1 on Danish iTunes upon its release, and has remained there since. Norway impressed at this year’s Eurovision Song Contest thanks to Margaret Berger’s stunning performance of the electro stomper I Feed You My Love. On the follow-up single just released in Norway, Human Race, she’s not too happy with how we’ve all turned out. “I don’t know where I lost my faith… help me escape the human race.” It’s a song about wanting to find your innocence again, af-

By Karl Batterbee

ter growing up and realising what goes on in the world – and wanting out. This is all set to a suitably post-apocalyptic backdrop of harsh electronic sounds and gloomy sci-fi blips and bleeps, a production that follows on from the chugging electro of I Feed You My Love. With it being Ms Berger though, the negativity of the lyric is dressed up in a sparkling pop melody. And that makes for a very good pop song. Following on from the pan-Nordic conquering debut single Undressed, Sweden’s Kim Cesarion has finally premiered his second single, Brains Out. It’s another up-tempo, funked-up, souled-out pop track that requires a feel-good falsetto sing-a-long when it gets to the chorus. I could reference a dozen or so obvious influences and comparisons, from Prince to Justin Timberlake, but what with this and Undressed, it’s actually becoming quite clear that what we’re hearing is Kim Cesarion’s own take on the pop/soul/funk sound. If you loved Undressed, then you’ll love this too. And don’t worry, the ‘brains out’ bit refers to Kim loving them out – not the other thing.

www.scandipop.co.uk scandipop@googlemail.com

Scandinavian Culture Calendar – Where to go, what to see? It’s all happening here! Scenes from a Marriage (Until 9 Nov) This is a portrait of extraordinary intimacy and a searchingly honest and moving love story. We follow Johan and Marianne from their seemingly perfect happy marriage through betrayal and loss to warring contenders in divorce and beyond. See Swedish director Ingmar Bergman’s extraordinary play directed by Trevor Nunn at St James Theatre, London, SW1E. www.stjamestheatre.co.uk

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Olivia Williams (Marianne) and Mark Bazeley (Johan) in Scenes from a Marriage. Photo: Nobby Clark

By Sara Schedin


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Elina Brotherus, Annunciation 2009. Copyright Elina Brotherus, courtesy of the artist and GB Agency, Paris

Mettle and Modernity: Courageous women artists of the 20th century (5 Oct – 9 Feb) The exhibition presents female avantgarde artists who searched for new ways to express themselves, often taking greater risks than their male counterparts when questioning traditional artistic concepts. Their work was often criticised for the very fact that it was created by women. Comprising works from 1900-1945 by some 30 artists, the exhibition explores individual bodies of work as well as the

Anna Riwkin, Portrait of a Friend, 1920s. Photo: Erik Thor

Siri Derkert Salome. Photo: Erik Thor

ways in which the Swedish art scene was influenced by currents in the European art world, with a special focus on Germany and Russia. Mon–Sun 11am–5pm. Millesgården, Herserudsvägen 32, Stockholm. www.millesgarden.se BFI London Film Festival (9 – 20 Oct) This year’s festival will feature a number of Scandinavian acts, including Lukas Moodysson’s We are the Best! bfi.org.uk Home Truths: Photography, Motherhood and Identity (11 Oct – 5 Jan) The exhibition aims to challenge long-held stereotypes and sentimental views of motherhood by addressing issues such as gender roles, domesticity, the body and the identity of individuals within the family unit. The works of the eight artists tend to be autobiographical in their focus and

sit within the documentary genre. Large in both scale and scope, many of the projects span several years, some still on-going. One of the artists is Finnish photographer and video artist Elina Brotherus, who records herself through years of failed IVF treatments. Mon–Sat 10am–6pm, Thu 10am–8pm, Sun 11:30am–6pm. The Photographers’ Gallery, London, W1F. www.thephotographersgallery.org.uk Von Hertzen Brothers on UK tour (18 – 27 Oct) Finnish rock band Von Hertzen Brothers’ song Flowers and Rust won the Anthem Of The Year award in the Progressive Music Awards in London last month. See them live at various venues across the UK this month. www.vonhertzenbrothers.com LIFEM 2013 – The Finnish Line (30 Oct – 2 Nov) London International Festival of Exploratory Music (LIFEM) is a festival of in-

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Royal Opera House, London, WC2E. www.roh.org.uk Satellite Stories on Finland tour (Nov) Their music has been praised by British music magazines such as NME and Q. In November, indie rock band Satellite Stories are touring their homeland Finland. www.satellitestories.com The Eclectic Moniker on Germany tour (Nov) Danish musicians’ collective the Eclectic Moniker plays indie pop mixed with world and calypso influences. They are touring Germany this month with their 2013 album ‘Continents’. theeclecticmoniker.bandcamp.com Finnish indie rock band Satellite Stories

spiring and boundary-expanding music committed to all genres and origins. This year’s festival features the very best of Finnish folk, world and jazz music. www.lifem.org.uk 2

Wozzeck featuring Karita Mattila (31 Oct – 15 Nov) Leading Finnish operatic soprano Karita Mattila plays Marie, girlfriend of poor solider Wozzeck, in this opera by Austrian composer Alban Berg.

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Ja Ja Ja Festival (8 – 9 Nov) Some of the biggest names in Nordic music, including Danish Mew and Icelandic múm, are set to perform at this new festival. The full line-up has yet to be announced at the time of writing but should be up when this issue is out. www.roundhouse.org.uk/ja-ja-ja-festival


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Promoting Brand Scandinavia. Featuring interview with Sonja Richter. Design, Travel and Culture