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Issue 23 | February 2015

PLUS

FROONCK WE DDI NG P L A N N E R DELUXE

FINEST MUSEUMS AND GALLERIES BEST OF BRANDENBURG VALENTINE'S DAY DESIGN, FASHION, CULTURE & LIFESTYLE


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Discover Germany | Contents

Contents FEBRUARY 2015

73

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PANDION VISTA building, Cologne. Photo: Atelier Jahr

Estrel Berlin. Photo: Estrel Berlin

COVER FEATURE 6

perception, proves that we do have some romance in our blood, although it comes in odd disguises sometimes.

Froonck Meet the man who organised over 400 weddings. Froonck is the wedding planner who has seen it all. Passionate about his job he talks about romance and the German DIY mentality.

Finest Galleries and Museums Germany Prof. Dr. Eckart Köhne President, Deutscher Museumsbund e.V. (German Museums Association) explains the fascinating German museum landscape, followed by a fine selection of amazing art galleries and most intriguing museums.

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Best of Brandenburg

Design ‘Love is all around me’ is our Valentine’s Day issue’s design motto. Beware, you may fall in love with one or two items. Read about rings made of Japanese samurai smithery and gentlemen’s fashion inspired by ladies’ man Porfirio Rubirosa.

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Fashion The ski season is in full swing. Hit the slopes in style and slip into some warm and cosy, yet very cool, designer items.

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Dr. Dietmar Woidke, Minister President of Brandenburg introduces us to his federal state. Brandenburg has it all: historic treasures, beautiful nature with plenty of waterways and much more.

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Did you know they’re German? Jessica Holzhausen digs beyond the usual suspects and examines the history of iconic German brands, which have grown global.

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“Valentine’s Day – the German way” Our staff writer Nane Steinhoff takes a closer look at German behaviour onValentine’s Day and, contrary to international

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Schlossparkhotel Mariakirchen is a contemporary four star hotel that perfectly blends stunning heritage with modern design in the heart of Bavaria, it even has its own brewery. Enjoy Austrian hospitality at the lakeside Hotel Karnerhof in Carinthia, a top holiday retreat for families as well as those searching for wellness and rest in a beautiful Alpine landscape.

Attraction of the Month Munich’s Bayerische Staatsoper is a true gem in Germany’s cultural landscape: Sublime, dignified and embracing the digital age.

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Business Our legal expert Gregor Kleinknecht takes us to the old Greeks. We also feature a fine selection of Austrian law firms, communication, real estate and architecture companies, aesthetic surgeons and an outstanding school for hotel management.

Hotels of the Month

FEATURES

Culture Read about picture book holidays in Eastern Bavaria, Valentine’s Day in Germany and dive into our special themes about art, exhibitions and the beautiful state surrounding Berlin.

Wine & Dine Wine expert Iris Ellmann presents a few drops almost too good to share. Discover some of the most amazing hotels and find out about Bremen’s culinary treasures.

Restaurant of the Month At Zermatt’s Restaurant Les Marmottes guests are treated to the ultimate and very original slow food in a truly stunning, authentic and contemporary Swiss chalet atmosphere.

REGULARS & COLUMNS 9

SPECIAL THEMES 36

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Culture Calendar Save the date! Discover Germany’s Culture Calendar is your perfect guide to February’s social highlights.

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Barbara Geier Our columnist Barbara Geier introduces us to one of Germany’s most famous trees.

Issue 23 | February 2015 | 3


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Dear Reader,

Discover Germany

Sales & Key Account Managers

Issue 23, February 2015

Emma Fabritius Nørregaard

Published 02.02.2014 ISSN 2051-7718

Welcome to our February 2015 issue.Valentine’s Day, celebrated by many and dreaded by many others, is slowly getting more poular in the German speaking regions and we have taken the opportunity to show you that, contrary to international perception, we have a bit of romance in our genetic code too.

Laura Hummer Antonietta Cutarelli Noura Draoui Stefan Cameron

Published by Scan Magazine Ltd.

Advertising info@discovergermany.com

Design & Print Liquid Graphic Ltd. Executive Editor Thomas Winther

Discover Germany is published by: SCAN GROUP Scan Magazine Ltd. 15B Bell Yard Mews Bermondsey Street London SE1 3TY United Kingdom

Creative Director Mads E. Petersen Editor Tina Awtani Art Director

Phone +44 (0)870 933 0423 info@discovergermany.com

Svetlana Slizova Feature Writer

For further information, please visit www.discovergermany.com

Nane Steinhoff Copy-Editor Mark Rogers Contributors Emmie Collinge Iris Ellmann Barbara Geier Meryem Hauer Jessica Holzhausen Gregor Kleinknecht Marilena Stracke

Who else would be more suitable for this month’s cover star interview than Froonck, the famous wedding planner we all know from TV. Beside an interview with the master of romance, you will find out that we may not be able to compete with the French or the Italians, but Germans have their own special – sometimes a little different – way of being romantic. A great way to spend the day is visiting one of the many intriguing museums in galleries scattered around the country. Prof. Dr. Eckart Köhne President, Deutscher Museumsbund e.V. (German Museums Association) explains what makes the German museum landscape so very exciting. From ancient sculptures to modern video installations the types of art on display and ready to be explored are unlimited. In our Special theme you find some prime exhibition examples which are well worth a visit. If you consider spending more than an afternoon, please take a look at our special theme about Brandenburg, introduced by no other than Dr. DietmarWoidke, Minister President of Brandenburg.The federal state that surrounds Berlin is full of surprises including monumental UNESCO World Heritage sites, more waterways than Venice and most welcoming locals ready to turn your trip, business or leisure, into a pleasant experience. Whatever your plans are this February, and regardless of your relationship status, take your time to flip through the following pages and discover the treasures we have gathered from Germany, Austria and Switzerland. There will certainly be something to make your heart beat a little faster. Enjoy the magazine!

Tina Awtani © All rights reserved. Material contained in this publication may not be reproduced, in whole or in part, without prior permission of Scan Magazine Ltd. This magazine contains advertorials/promotional articles

4 | Issue 23 | February 2015


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SEB voted best Private Bank in German-speaking Europe Over 100 private banks were tested by Fuchsbriefe publishing house with IQF and risk analysis specialists Quanvest. Their conclusion in 2014 noted, “SEB Private Banking Luxembourg stands out in almost every category: in addition to brilliant advice, the competition cannot keep up in terms of either investment proposals or transparency.” Our international network of private banking offices will look after all aspects of your family finances, from daily transactions to long term investments. Its services cover everything from tailored financial management, through to helping you to optimise the legal and tax structures within which your assets are held. As one of the world’s strongest banks* and with more than 150 years of experience in private banking, we have just what it takes to ensure your future prosperity. To find out what SEB can do for your personal wealth, contact us in London or Luxembourg: Christian A. Hvamstad +44 (0) 20 7246 4307 privatebanking@seb.co.uk

Ulrich Graner +352 (0) 2623 2310 kontakt@sebgroup.lu

Gregor Neumann +352 (0) 2623 2881 kontakt@sebgroup.lu

*SEB is ranked 9th in the world according to Bloomberg report June 2014

Sweden • Norway • Denmark • Finland • Luxembourg • Switzerland • United Kingdom • Singapore • Estonia • Latvia • Lithuania


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Discover Germany | Cover Feature | FROONCK

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Discover Germany | Cover Feature | FROONCK

FROONCK Wedding planner deluxe Froonck is Germany’s most glamorous wedding planner. With a portfolio comprising over 400 weddings, he knows exactly how to turn a dream wedding vision into reality. He is the man to be trusted when handling the most important moment in life, not only for many celebrities. TEXT: TINA AWTANI | PHOTOS: © VOX (VIER HOCHZEITEN UND EINE TRAUMREISE, MO-FR 4PM) / NADY EL-TOUNSY

He has seen it all: A diving groom disguised as the Frog King emerging from a river near Berlin, a gothic themed wedding featuring coffins and barb wire or a couple tying the knot in a cage full of lions. It is hard to surprise Froonck, but his job certainly never gets boring. “I remember my very first wedding, I was so nervous. The water ballet from the Friedrichstadt palace performed in an art deco indoor pool – that was amazing,” the charming event organiser remembers the beginning of his career. That was twelve years ago. “Looking back, I know it was always my vocation,”he says. After returning from a journey to the United States, where he gained first hand experience with the wedding planning industry, he was instantly hooked and decided to quit his career in advertising in order to organise weddings. Since then he has become renowned for organising the most extraordinary weddings. “We had a crew pizza and a big band in a luxury hotel at the Côte d'Azur, we danced with Xavier Naidoo at Oliver Pocher’s wedding. I fell into the pool when Sarah [Connor] and Marc [Terenzi] tied the knot,” he recalls. Over the years, highlights were plenty. “We’ve arranged an incredible Indian ceremony in the Cologne trade fair centre, we had the most spectacular bonfire at a Balkan themed wedding in a beach club

on the Rhine river and in Scotland we organised Highland games for the guests,” Froonck remembers fondly. Despite regularly starring on TV in shows like VOX’s "4 Hochzeiten und eine Traumreise" [four weddings and a dream journey], the romantic perfectionist spends most of his time organising the most unusual and glamourous events with his agency “WH!TE by Froonck”. And although he's employing the best industry experts, it is always the Maestro himself who takes great care of the clients personally.“It is very important to always focus on the positive, the good and the beautiful in everything. I love to make things beautiful around me, live in style and highly value aesthetics and good taste,” the wedding planner says. He loves his profession and he gets a lot out of his job.“When you treat people nicely, you live in a beautiful environment, it creates a warming bliss and harmony. This is great.” Weddings – not such a big deal in Germany (yet) While other nations take the use of a wedding planner for granted, Germany is still a bit behind. “People are still sceptical, they think ‘we don’t need that’ or ‘ it’s a family affair, we’d rather do it ourselves’. Spending

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Discover Germany | Cover Feature | FROONCK

money on a professional event organiser is not really common yet,”Froonck explains. “During the many first interviews I did with ‘my’ couples, I quickly realised that Germans are mostly DIY-characters and service-resistant as I like to put it.” In other countries such as the USA, Great Britain, South Africa or Australia it is a completely different story. People realise the dimensions and have higher expectations in terms of individualism, perfectionism and creativity. Froonck believes that a wedding still hasn’t reached the social status it has in other countries and cultures.“Take a look at the Balkan region, Turkey, Lebanon, the Arab States, India, Africa or Thailand – the wedding couple is lavishly celebrated like a King and Queen for several days. They are the centre of attention admired by not seldom more than 400 guests or more.” According to the wedding expert Germans tend to celebrate rather moderately with an average of 80 guests, the whole procedure doesn’t take more than one day and the couple really doesn’t like to be the centre of attention.

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“Romance is an attitude” Just in time forValentine’s Day and ahead of the wedding season, Froonck published a new book. "Hochzeitsfieber – Liebe, Tränen, Traualtar, meine besten Storys" [Wedding fever – love, tears, altar, my best stories] discloses a most emotional journey through the delights (and ordeals) of weddings. A wedding CD by Froonck is to be released shortly: details are yet to be revealed, but we know for sure that the Maestro himself will be performing some vocals. Romance plays an important role in the life of the wedding planner, who’s currently in a happy relationship.“For me romance is rather an attitude and a way of life instead of a short-lived feeling or moment. In my eyes it is like a pair of glasses I use to take a closer look at people and situations. It helps me deal with those.” The master of ceremonies is expanding the product range for his online store www.monsieur-Froonck.com. But one of his dreams has not come true yet in his wedding empire.“I would love to create my own wedding dress collection.The first de-

sign is already sketched, but this project has still a long way to go,“ Froonck reveals. When he’s not busy running his wedding empire, Froonck likes to take it slow.“Sleep long, relax in SPAs, massages and doing,” the romantic entrepreneur muses. He’s got a passsion for opera, good books, great food and loves to go out dancing. During winter he recharges his batteries during a nice beach holiday. “I love sunbathing, swimming, shopping and just hanging out with good friends,”he says. He also actively promotes gender equality and participates in Berlin’s Rainbow-Run or marches the streets on Christopher Street Day to spread the message in his spare time. Unlike the UK, where Elton John just officially got married to David Furnish, gay marriages are still not fully accepted in German law, only a registered life partnership is.


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Discover Germany | Design | Dedicated to Design

Dedicated to Design... February’s Valentine’s Day marks the season of love and happiness, and while plenty of passion-filled greeting cards find their way to their lucky recipients, we take a closer look at how to add a loving touch to your home. Despite the fact that romance may not be the first thing to spring to mind when thinking German, we did find a few matching items that make your design loving heart beat a little faster.

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EDITOR'S PICKS

Bretz art and design furniture makers are the German masters of cult sofas. An absolute classic since 1995, the Gaudi Récamière combines great craftsmanship with true romance. £1,200. www.bretzshop.de Spice up your walls with a sticker panel. This model shows the word love in many different languages, thus called LOVE INTERNATIONAL. £46. www.annawand.de

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Cuddle up! This cushion says it all. £39. www.taj-woodscherer.com Hand-made metal heart featuring a height of 27 cm and a width of 32 cm. With a weight of 2 kilos it is really solid and great for storing little treasures. £64. www.fmb-leuchten.de

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Artist Rudi Hurzlmeier designed these 50s inspired love birds. Measuring 16.1 x 10.6 x 5.3 cm, the couple is ideal for hanging above the kitchen table. £6. www.inkognito.de

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Discover Germany | Design | Fashion Finds

Fashion Finds February is the best month to hit the beautiful slopes of Germany, Austria and Switzerland. We have gathered a few very stylish items from local designers that make you look great from ski lift to après ski. And it is not just the great looks, these pieces keep you nice and warm too. BY TINA AWTANI | PHOTOS: PRESS IMAGES

The label Bogner stands for unique, innovative and trendy designer wear, the latest in high-function and high fashion ski wear, sportswear and golf wear. We love these items from the women’s collection. Knitted dress KIMBERLY £387, Lamb skin coat MARSHAL-L £2,349 Euro, Sweater KIMBA £774. www.bogner.com

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Discover Germany | Design | Fashion Finds

Can it get any cuter? Earmuffs by Brigitte von Boch. £16. www.bevonboch.com

Accessories are vital to add some finishing touches and make a look perfect. German label Brigitte von Boch is renowned for its exquisite fashion and furniture product range. We like the knitted hand-warmers. Mittens £31, www.bevonboch.com

Skip the ski boots and slip into something a little more comfy. This pair is a new interpretation of the classic hiking boot. Robust and sturdy, while still looking fabulous, they are the perfect companions for your way home from the après ski party. £78. www.tamaris.com

Casual, catchy and cosy – another beautiful Bogner combination that keeps you nice and warm. Knitted jacket LUCINA £464, trousers MEG £232. www.bogner.com

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Discover Germany | Design

Japanese samurai smithery made in Germany Exceptional jewellery and wedding rings forged by master hands since 1991. The award-winning Mokume Gane Damast Markus Eckardt goldsmith’s shop guarantees genuine handicraft and individual jewellery by using the special Mokume Gane technique. TEXT NANE STEINHOFF | PHOTOS: SYBILLE GLEIM-ECKARDT

“Our pieces of jewellery are highly individual – not only because of extraordinary design, but also because of very distinctive precious metal alloys and unique patterns,” Markus Eckardt says. The family business is located in Ensdorf, where Markus Eckardt and his wife Sybille Gleim-Eckardt specialise in creating exclusive products with the use of Mokume Gane smithery. Mokume Gane is Japanese for ‘wood grain in metal’and describes a 300-year-old unusual Japanese forging technology which is used to incorporate precious metals in several contrasting colours into extraordinary patterns. The jewellery is manufactured from a welded block, which consists of many different layers of thin precious

metal plates. “What is special is that we weld our own raw material blocks. This guarantees compositions and patterns, which aren’t available anywhere else,” Markus Eckardt says. Customers can pick their favourite pattern as well as determine colour, material, form, width, thickness and potential combinations with gemstones. The couple use

Dress like a legend Named after the iconic Porfirio Rubirosa, the Swiss label Rubirosa designs extraordinary quality gentleman’s shoes, accessories and skis. Every item is handmade to perfection in Italy, Portugal and Switzerland. TEXT TINA AWTANI | PHOTOS: RUBIROSA

The last grand gentleman, irresistable Latin lover, bon vivant – Porfirio Rubirosa was called many names, but it was his lavish lifestyle and impeccable sense of style that made him so very special. Hollywood goddesses like Ava Gardner or Marylin Monroe fell for his charms just like Tina Onassis or Eva Peron to name just a few. Once married

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to the richest women in the world, he graced the jet-set parties from the American West Coast to the slopes of the Swiss Alps. “I have always cared about clothes, and I will go to any length to look good, but the way Rubirosa dressed made me feel as if I’d fallen off the garbage truck,” Sammy Davis Jr. once famously said.

their own unique precious metal alloys, and in 2009 they were awarded the national prize for outstanding, innovative performance in craftsmanship for their ‘Mujodogane’ alloy. Offering comprehensive all-round services as gold and silver master smiths, gemstone specialists or hand engravers just to name a few, the manufacturer also offers special products such as chopsticks, bowls, paperclips or belt buckles. “Everything is possible,”Markus Eckardt concludes. www.mokume-saar.de

The brand Rubirosa pays tribute to the man, who is believed to have sparked the inspiration for Ian’s Fleming’s James Bond. ”The high quality products are appealing to the cosmopolitan gentlemen of all age groups, who are passionate about aesthetics and hold high expectations for themselves, their life and their peers. It is these core values, which our discerning customers rate very highly,”Flavio Agosti, co-founder and managing director says. Given the amazing product range available, it is hard to pick a favourite, but Agosti shares a little insider information:“An absolute must-have for 2015 is a pair of Ariza sneakers!” www.rubirosa.ch


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Did you know they are German? Famous brands and their history When thinking of famous products made in Germany the first thing to spring to mind is usually the automotive sector: Mercedes Benz, BMW or Volkswagen are renowned and loved all over the world. But there are other well recognized brands people normally do not associate with Germany including sweets and famous football shoes. TEXT: JESSICA HOLZHAUSEN | PHOTOS: PRESS IMAGES

While“Made in Germany”today is recognized as a sign of quality it was, in its origin, meant in a completely different way: In the 19th century during the industrial revolution the English labelled German products with this sign to signal their bad quality and to protect the regional market from cheaper products imported from the continent.“Made in Germany”was then something comparable to what many might

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think of cheap plastic toys “Made in China” today. High quality products such as German cars, sport equipment and electronic devices slowly changed that image. A little bear conquers the world Everyone likes sweets and so did the German candy maker Hans Riegel in Bonn. After finishing school and apprenticeship he worked for sweet manufacturers all over

Germany before, in 1920, he founded his own sweet factory in Bonn: Haribo – a shortened version of his name and the town his factory was situated in. Haribo up until today stands for Hans Riegel Bonn. According to the records Hans Riegel declared starting his business with nothing else except a bag of sugar. In 1922 Hans Riegel invented a candy figure that today is known all over the world. He called it the “Tanzbär” (the dancing bear), a figure made from sugar, gum arabic that was later substituted by gelatine, acidifier and different flavours. Today the “Tanzbär” is better known as Haribo Goldbär and where once Hans Riegel had worked on his own, today Haribo has more


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Discover Germany | Feature | Did You Know They Are German?

to fabricate tailor-made sport shoes – Adolf a shoemaker and Rudolf a clever business man. Out of this cooperation a successful business emerged: During the Olympic Games in 1928, for the first time, athletes wore shoes made by the two brothers. Since the mid-1930s the Dassler brothers had fabricated sport shoes for many different disciplines.

Top: Messi in Adidas Football shoes

From the early beginning Rudolf and Adolf Dassler did not work well together due to their very different characters and ways of handling work. After the war they split following another dispute: While Adolf“Adi” Dassler continued his business under the label Adidas, originating from a short version of his name, his brother Rudolf founded another successful sports brand in 1948: Puma. Adidas and Puma both are located in Herzogenaurath, Germany, but Puma became part of the French Kering group in 2007. Today Puma’s most popular advertising character is the Jamaican sprinter Usain Bolt.

tioned in 1774 as a subject and shoemaker. About 120 years later Konrad Birkenstock opened two shoe shops in Frankfurt and started to manufacture footbed insoles that today are still an important part of Birkenstock sandals and slippers. The shoe production, even in 2015, for the most part remains in Germany but the sales business has grown: Today Birkenstock shoes are sold in about 80 countries worldwide. Due to their flexibility and wearing comfort Birkenstock shoes can often be found on the feet of doctors and nurses in hospitals. For a long time, though, the shoes seemed to be not very fashionable until stars like Madonna started wearing them as an accessory.

Below: Haribo Goldbären Bottom: The first Haribo delivery truck

Healthy feet Not sport shoes but shoes none the less are made and exported by the German manufacturer Birkenstock. The company’s story goes back even further in history: In the archives of the city of Langenbergheim a Johann Adam Birkenstock was first men-

then 6,000 employees at 15 different European locations – five of them still in Germany, among them one in the city where everything had started: Bonn. From a small-scale shoe business to a multinational manufacturer of sports equipment: Adidas Adidas – the German national football team wears it, as does World Football Player Lionel Messi. What had started as a smallscale business in the small town of Herzogenaurach in Middle Franconia, in less than 100 years became the world’s second biggest manufacturer of sports equipment. Adidas’s history goes back into the 1920s: In their mother’s laundry room the two brothers Rudolf and Adolf Dassler started

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Discover Germany | Feature | Did You Know They Are German?

Beauty from head to toe From toe to nose, from feet to neck: The German brand Nivea can be found today in many drugstores all over the world. The traditional Nivea Creme in its typical blue and round box has been sold that way since 1924, but the business started far earlier when, in 1890, Oscar Troplowitz, a pharmacist, bought the Beiersdorf corporation that specialised in manufacturing medical plasters. In 1911 Beiersdorf sold its first Nivea Creme in drugstores and pharmacies. Today many other products can be found under the brand name Nivea: from body lotion to face cleanser, from shampoo to bath oil, from deodorant to special product lines for men. To take one step back from beauty to the more practical things in daily life one must mention the success of electronic devices Made in Germany. Take for example Bosch or Miele. Bosch was founded in 1886, and besides being an automotive parts supplier, invents and manufactures power tools,

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household appliances and building technology. Miele on the other hand specialises in household appliances from washing machines to stoves. Founded a few years after Bosch in 1899, Miele for the first few years manufactured hand-driven cream separators, followed in 1900 by the first buttermaking machine and the invention of the washing machine. In 2013/2014 Miele made a turnover of 3.22 billion Euros. Among the more recent brands that became internationally successful are the supermarket chains Aldi and Lidl. And of course there are German beers like Becks, Warsteiner and Löwenbräu and liquors like Jägermeister that became famous and true German export hits.

Top left: NIVEA advertisement in the UK in 1934 Top right: NIVEA box in 1925 & in 2007 Right: NIVEA Creme production


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Discover Germany | Wine & Dine | The WineBarn Column

Too good to share! SOLTER BRUT PINOT CUVEE

TEXT: IRIS ELLMANN | PHOTOS: THE WINEBARN

Love it or hate it,Valentine’s Day will soon be upon us and we want to turn the tables and celebrate with all those who are single on Valentine’s Day! Forget the flowers and the handwritten notes, forget the romantic cards and the restaurant booking – just treat yourself to a wonderful bottle of wine and some of your favourite food and chocolates instead. My idea of a perfect evening in on my own would include some of my most favourite wines and here they are: Start off your evening in style by reclining on the sofa with some fine bubbles: Sekthaus Solter: SOLTER BRUT PINOT CUVEE £22.20 a bottle. This delicious example of a Pinot Cuvée comes from the Solter estate in the Rheingau and has a wonderful golden colour thanks to being fermented in the barrel. It also has a delicious light fizzing mousseux which is achieved from being activated by the yeast over a period of three years. It is best served chilled in a coupe or flute with a delicious plate of sushi! Save your calories for later and enjoy the finest Norwegian wild salmon with a perfect organic Riesling Grand Cru Dry: Wittmann: 2013 KIRCHSPIEL Riesling Grand Cru Dry £38.30 a bottle.

The Wittmann estate is in the rolling hills of the Rheinhessen and uses organic production techniques. It is also a member of the “Naturland Association”and it is their use of old vines, diminished growth and very low yields that shape this vineyard’s exceptional character. This particular Grand Cru comes from the Kirchspiel site which is exclusively used for Grand Cru wines. Its brilliance derives from its intensive, spicy notes, with a fine almost sleek body and an exquisite mineral tone in the finish. This really is a complete love story in a glass!

a glass and best enjoyed when taken with a selection of fine chocolate. Now who thinks staying in on your own is dull? I know it will be a fabulous night! Happy Drinking! Iris (who is looking forward to her special night in!)

Return to your sofa with a divine sweetie – to be matched of course with the best Belgian chocolates: Bassermann-Jordan: DEIDESHEIMER MAEUSHOEHLE RIESLING Beerenauslese 0.375l £49.99 a bottle. A very rich, almost creamy Riesling Beerenauslese with power and a huge ageing potential. It comes from the Pfalz which is Germany’s second largest wine-growing region thanks to its almost Mediterranean climate. Expect aromas of ripe peach and apricot, even herbal notes which when combined with the mineralic spice and a gentle acidity give a lot of character to the wine. It is quite simply a taste of heaven in

Iris Ellmann (above) is managing director at The WineBarn, an award-winning merchant of German wine based in beautiful Hampshire. The WineBarn, Clump Farm Barn, Farleigh Lane, Dummer, Hampshire RG25 2AF E-mail: iris@thewinebarn.co.uk www.thewinebarn.co.uk

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Hotel

of the Month Germany

Old meets new in the heart of Bavaria Ideally suited for conferences and events, the Schlossparkhotel Mariakirchen is a contemporary four star hotel that perfectly blends stunning heritage with modern design. The magnificent water castle, a traditional brewery and a most contemporary hotel building offer the best of both worlds for private and corporate guests. TEXT: TINA AWTANI | PHOTOS: SCHLOSSPARKHOTEL MARIAKIRCHEN

“It is the contrast between the old and the new – the water castle from the 16th century blended with the modern new building in the castle grounds. Based in the beautiful village of Mariakirchen, many of our returning visitors appreciate the romantic atmosphere,”managing director Johanna Lindner says. The large standard rooms are located in the state-of-the-art new build, featuring a contemporary, light and airy interior with modern bathrooms. The building is quite extraordinary in terms of design and sus-

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tainability. Innovative, high quality construction materials and the most advanced heating technologies guarantee that CO2 emissions are reduced to the bare minimum while offering the highest feelgood factor for guests. However, those visitors who prefer a historic ambience can choose from a selection of rooms inside the castle or opt for the castle tower suite. Conference and wedding hot-spot Given the proximity to the Bavarian capital of Munich and the beautiful natural setting, leisure as well as business tourists take ad-

vantage of the beauty of this Bavarian stretch of unspoilt nature.“We host plenty of cyclists who are passing through and like to take a break. But mostly our guests are business travellers and corporate event groups, who appreciate the recreational value of a stay at Schlossparkhotel Mariakirchen despite being on a business mission,” Lindner explains. The Schlossparkhotel Mariakirchen offers very flexible use of space in terms of rooms and communal areas and in summer plenty of alfresco locations within the grounds add to the portfolio. But it is not only the room sizes that set the individual spaces apart. Following the holistic concept of the premises, design-wise the old meets the new in the architectural concept. Some historic castle rooms have been carefully refurbished to their former splendour; others


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Discover Germany | Hotel of the Month | Germany

“kidnapping the bride”, every little detail is carefully taken care of by Lindner and her team. Beer, Brotzeit and beyond Schlossbräu Mariakirchen brewery and restaurant is a major feature of the premises. The art of beer brewing reaches back until the year 1752 in Mariakirchen and is now more attractive than ever.“From 2003 we brew five different varieties in the former castle stables. Our master brewer often guides groups through the production facilities and explains to them how to turn hop and malt into our palatable and naturally cloudy Schlossbräu Mariakirchen beer. No one ever leaves without having tasted a pint or two,”Lindner says. Surrounded by large copper brewing kettles and vaulted ceilings, guests can choose from a large menu of fresh local specialities such as a typical hearty Brotzeit made of fresh bread with a choice of meat, cheese or other toppings, real Flammkuchen from the wood stove, and much more. In the summer, a traditional BBQ is best enjoyed in the beautiful beer garden. A pint of Schlossbräu Mariakirchen has to be part of the meal!

leys or the excitingVoglsam theme park for the whole family. Just recently the region has been opened up via “XperBike” GPS for keen cyclists at all levels. Not to be missed is a visit to the baroque churches Maria Himmelfahrt next to the hotel, as well as the close by churches of Osterhofen and Aldersbach, which were created by the Asam brothers, two of Germany’s most significant late baroque artists. News for 2015 includes the addition of an Orangerie to the castle garden in order to further enhance the lounge and breakfast facilities and make a stay at the Schlossparkhotel Mariakirchen even more pleasant. www.schlossparkhotel-mariakirchen.de

After having indulged in great food, shedding the extra pounds is easy, as the Schlossparkhotel Mariakirchen provides a large fitness and sauna area. But given the beautiful surroundings, a walk in the castle park or a nice hike throughout nature are a good alternative. Attractions nearby include the picturesque Kollbach, Rott and Isar val-

have been given a contemporary twist, featuring graffiti type murals.“From the small team meeting with a hearty one pot meal in a casual surrounding to the multi-day conference with high-tech facilities and a several course festive banquet, we make sure, that everyone’s needs are perfectly catered for,”Linder says. Given the romantic setting, Schlossparkhotel Mariakirchen is the perfect wedding destination. Tailor-made wedding specials ensure that everything runs smoothly on the big day. From coffee in the castle garden to the very German wedding tradition of

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Hotel

of the Month Austria

Experience the very best Austrian hospitality at the lakeside Hotel Karnerhof in Carinthia On a gentle slope overlooking the crystal clear water of Austria’s fifth largest lake, the Lake Faak, lies the Hotel Karnerhof. The family owned four-star hotel is a holiday retreat for families as well as those searching for wellness and rest in a beautiful Alpine landscape. TEXT: JESSICA HOLZHAUSEN | PHOTOS: HOTEL KARNERHOF

Surrounded by about 100,000 square metres of meadows and gardens the hotel guests not only benefit from everything the Austrian Alps have to offer but also from a mild climate. “Lake Faak is Austria’s southernmost Alpine lake, close to the Italian and Slovenian borders and offers a hint of the Mediterranean,” explains Ursula Melcher. “We want to give our guests the chance to let the burdens of everyday life slip away and to unwind in our exclusive lakeside ambience.” The owner family and their dedicated team strive to make every holiday a perfect one.

ments, Hotel Karnerhof is an oasis of pampering and relaxation,”says the owner. While taking a dip in the lake or swimming in the heated outdoor pool hotel guests will be able to enjoy the hotel’s oneof-a-kind location: A breathtakingly beautiful view over the turquoise blue lake and the impressive Karawanken mountain range.“My special highlight is the lakeside sauna in our rustic boathouse from which guests can directly jump into the lake to cool down,” says Ursula Melcher. A 250metre lakeshore beach is reserved exclusively for hotel guests.

A spa and wellness area on the lake’s shore The large spa and wellness area does its part: It includes several different saunas, a steam bath, a fitness room and more.“With a wide range of beauty and massage treat-

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Outdoor activities for sport enthusiast and families alike Staying at the hotel will never become boring given the many activities the region has

to offer. Whether along the Nordic walking path around the lake or further up into the mountains: Hiking enthusiasts will find plenty of possibilities. From guided canoe tours to a treetop canopy tour or water sports such as sailing or windsurfing – tourists will find a wide choice of activities around the lake. This is why the Hotel Karnerhof is an ideal place for family holidays. There are also options for tennis or yoga and attractive golf courses are nearby. www.karnerhof.com


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Emotion . Excitement . Expectation

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Restaurant of the Month Switzerland

Take it slow And enjoy a fresh, organic and very personal cuisine At Zermatt’s Restaurant Les Marmottes guests are treated to the ultimate and very original slow food in a truly stunning, authentic and contemporary Swiss chalet atmosphere. TEXT: TINA AWTANI | PHOTOS: LES MARMOTTES

Named after the cute little inhabitants of the mountain region and located close to the Ski Lift Zermatt-Furi, the restaurant Les Marmottes is a very special place. While most chefs source their ingredients on local markets or via specialised wholesalers, at Les Marmottes things are a little different. Passionate about nature and gastronomy, Nadine and Robi Perren embarked on a mission to wave goodbye to the modern and streamlined food supply chains and turn back to nature by focusing on sourcing regional, seasonal and organic products.“We are very proud of the fact, that almost everything that is processed in our kitchen comes from local sources. The game we serve comes directly from the Zermatt hunting lodges, while the other meat comes from our own or local farms, I know many animals from their birth,”Robi Perren explains. “Organic fruit and vegetables are grown at

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our own premises or local farms too, and we use only the best fresh local dairy products such as specialty cheese varieties,”he adds.

ride, and for larger groups, special events or great occasions the Les Marmottes is available on an exclusive basis.

The restaurant building offers the best of both worlds, it is a new build equipped with all the latest amenities, but has been cleverly interior designed to deliver the ultimate cosy Alpine charm. While Nadine is in charge of interiors, decorations and running the back office, Robi meets and greets guests and makes sure every single one is taken care of in the best possible way.“An outstanding cuisine is key, but we aim to deliver more. Getting a good feeling for what the guests really want is essential and we try to guide them through a wonderful culinary journey,”Robi says.

The Perrens also offer a beautiful holiday apartment in their chalet, which is a top tip for a stay in Zermatt – be it winter or summer.

On Tuesdays and Thursdays candlelight dinners are followed by a romatic sleigh

www.les-marmottes.ch

The Perren family


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Discover Germany | Wine&Dine | Asam Hotel

Asam hotel City stay with a personal atmosphere The family-run asam city hotel in the heart of Munich’s historic district guarantees extraordinary personal ambience and support, a quiet retreat from city life and promises to make your stay as pleasant as possible. Dorothea Sauper (left) and Sophie Brunier (right).

TEXT: NANE STEINHOFF | PHOTOS: ERNST JANK

T

Trying to stand out from Munich’s usual hotel landscape, the small boutique hotel banks on a different business model.“Often you only find the big hotel chains in Munich’s city centre. Small, individually run hotels – notably family businesses – become more and more rare,” Dorothea Sauper and Sophie Brunier, managers and owners of the hotel, agree. A small number of employees ensures a personal atmosphere, which makes the fulfilment of individual wishes possible.“Our advantage is that we can take our time for each customer,”Dorothea Sauper adds on behalf of all employees.

Situated close by the Marienplatz and the Viktualienmarket in the middle of the historical Hackenviertel, guests can chose between sixteen rooms and 8 suites with a sophisticated ambiance. Despite the outstanding location, the privately owned hotel prides itself on being based in a very quiet neighbourhood and on having rooms which face a quiet courtyard. Whether for your business trip, a weekend getaway or the famous Oktoberfest, mother and daughter Dorothea Sauper and Sophie Brunier will provide an attentive, warm and unobtrusive service, while guaranteeing that direct bookings always re-

ceive the best price. “The satisfaction of our guests is our philosophy. It’s really important for us that we are personal contact persons for our clientele,” Dorothea Sauper concludes. www.hotel-asam.de/en

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Estrel Berlin Europe’s biggest hotel and convention centre The Estrel Berlin is without doubt Europe’s biggest and most impressive convention, entertainment and hotel complex, which is able to preserve a special and very personal ambience at the same time. The motto ‘convention, living, entertainment – all under one roof’ summarises what the hotel stands for: an all-round talent, which leaves nothing to be desired. TEXT: NANE STEINHOFF

Being a worldwide leading congress and conference hotel, its secret of success is the combination of elegant and multifunctional halls with 15,000 square metres of event capacity, an extraordinary four-star plus hotel with 1,125 rooms and suites and top-class international show events. “The Estrel is an owner-operated hotel and not part of a hotel chain. Despite its size and dimensions, the Estrel manages to be a special and very personal hotel.The employees in particular with their role as hosts contribute to this feeling as they ensure that every visitor feels

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welcome when entering our house,” Ute Jacobs, General Manager, says.

Fulfilling spontaneous customer requests is an absolute necessity for the hotel’s service standards and consistently high quality can be expected in all hotel areas from breakfast, to catering, during the conference, at the exclusive dinner, the soiree or the coffee break in between. Additionally, all important decision makers are on site, which guarantees first-hand support, optimal coordination, flexibility and service.


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Discover Germany | Wine&Dine | Hotel Estrel Berlin

the opportunity to quickly go up to his room between conferences – but also a lot cheaper.Transfer costs between event locations, hotel and potential other locations alone can cost a lot of money and Estrel Berlin makes it possible to save not only time, but also cash,” Thomas Brueckner, General Manager, says. 15,000 square metres of top-class technical conditions for congresses, conferences and events of all sizes and types, such as international politics and economic summits, fairs, company exhibitions, gala events and concerts of international stars, are on hand. Convention Hall I has space for more than 6,000 guests alone and 61 further elegant and multifunctional rooms invite many events to Berlin. First-class communication and hall technology, stage machinery and innovative media technology, as well as the latest technological equipment and standards leave no wish unfulfilled. No wonder the likes of Siemens, Aral, Shell, VW or Daimler Chrysler have chosen the premises for their events. Boxing world cups with Vitali Klitschko, German TV-show‘Wetten dass…?’, the SPD political party and the Echo, as well as the Bambi Awards have chosen the Estrel Berlin before. Five restaurants, three bars and a summer garden with an own boat dock guarantee an extensive range of culinary variety. From national to international menus – the many restaurants offer everything from German to Italian and Asian cuisine. A bustling entrance, a magnificent room standard with modern style and timeless design, light and natural tones and light, lively and elegant architecture create a feelgood atmosphere for visitors, while the festival and convention centres are directly linked to the hotel and are only a few steps away. Convenient Convention Centre “Finding everything you need beneath one roof is not only convenient for conference guests and planners – which congress participant wouldn’t be very thankful, if he got

performed on a modern stage that suits the needs of international top stars. From impersonators to acrobats, dancers, magicians or soul music and 80s music specials, the Estrel Berlin offers top level entertainment throughout the year. Not only visitors to the daily evening programme benefit from the high-quality light and stage design. Why not rent the hall and use it exclusively for your business event? Arrange gala buffets or menus for up to 1,000 guests and book single elements or whole shows from ‘Stars in Concert’ for your event’s framework programme. www.estrel.com

Opposite page, main image: Exterior view of the Estrel Berlin. Photo: Estrel Berlin Opposite page, bottom: Up to 1,800 events are held in the Estrell Congress & Fair Centre annually. Photos: Sven Hobbiesiefken Left: Hotel lobby of the Estrel Berlin. Photo: Philipp Koschel (top) Junior suite of the Estrel Berlin. Photo: VisionPhotos (middle) Relaxing atmosphere, Mediterranean dishes and Mediterranean joie de vivre: a visit to the Portofino restaurant is like visiting good friends. Photo: Philipp Koschel (below) Below: Coco Fletcher fascinates as Tina Turner at the show ‘Stars in Concert’. Photo: Andreas Friese Grahame Patrick as the King of Rock‘n’Roll at ‘Stars in Concert’. Photo: Andreas Friese

1,800 annual events and 360,000 visitors are not enough for the Estrel as the completion of a second congress area, comprising 10,000 square metres of additional event space, is planned for autumn. The expansion seeks to widen the hotel’s market position and attract even more national and international events to Berlin. ‘Estreltainment’ “For 18 years, the Estrel has been bringing the best lookalikes onto its LasVegas stage at the successful ‘Stars in Concert’ show. Elvis, Madonna, Louis Armstrong and other pop icons delight the audience and tribute shows to ABBA, the Beatles, Elvis or the Blues Brothers please the crowd,” Ute Jacobs says. The Estrel Festival Centre offers a broad portfolio of shows and musicals, which are

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Main image: Outside view of the traditional and famous Zum Franziskaner tavern.

Munich’s finest When planning a trip to the city of beer, breweries and inns, be sure not to miss out on the best parts. Stay at one of the finest hotels in Munich’s city centre, enjoy Bavarian hospitality, traditional cuisine and a proper beer in the famous Franziskaner and when visiting the Oktoberfest, party in the impressive SchützenFestzelt. TEXT: NANE STEINHOFF | PHOTOS: GASTRONOMIEBETRIEBE REINBOLD GMBH & CO. KG

Reinbolds Hotel Drei Löwen is located in the heart of the city, and famous sights, the pedestrian zone, the central station or the Oktoberfest are only a few steps away. The four-star traditional hotel offers spacious and newly renovated comfortable double rooms with a feel-good ambiance. High speed internet access, a comprehensive breakfast buffet, which covers every culinary craving, as well as a relaxing restaurant and lobby will make your stay in Munich a special one. A stylish atmosphere and perfect service can be expected 24 hours a day. If you plan on going to Oktoberfest this year, why not book the ‘Wies’n-Special’, which includes one night at the hotel, breakfast, a visit to the famous SchützenFestzelt and seats for hotel guests at a table for ten – which can be hard to find in the

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crowded tents – and a food and drink voucher for 50 Euros per person. You can book a single, a double or a three bed room from now onwards. Zum Franziskaner Established in 1363, in close proximity to the Franciscan monastery, Munich’s longstanding and tradition-rich tavern Zum Franziskaner survived wars, inflation, bombs and a five-year-long business interruption from 1944 until 1950. Today, the tavern is popular among the old and the young and everyone feels comfortable due to the unique and special atmosphere. Visit Zum Franziskaner for a morning pint, lunch or dinner – traditional Munich hospitality is of great importance here from 9.30 until 24.00. Embrace Bavarian delicacies such as the Weisswurst, a

Top: The cosy atmosphere of the Zum Franziskaner tavern. Above: Outside view of Hotel Drei Löwen. Below: Oktoberfest 2014 in the Schützen-Festzelt.

Bavarian veal sausage, alongside a big mug of delicious locally brewed wheat beer. The Schützen-Festzelt This year, make sure to book your tickets early for one of the party tents at Oktoberfest. The Schützen-Festzelt is a ‘tent’with a solid wooden construction with all modern conveniences. Offering space for over 5,000 guests, 1,100 additional Oktoberfest enthusiasts can be served in the attached garden with a glazed ceiling. Everything that guests appreciate about the services of the Franziskaner, the quality of the kitchen or the beer, can also be found in the tent. www.hotel3loewen.de www.schuetzen-festzelt.de www.zum-franziskaner.de www.facebook.com/z.franziskaner


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Discover Germany | Wine&Dine | Treschers Schwarzwald Hotel am See

Treschers Schwarzwaldhotel am See Romantic getaway with a family atmosphere Treschers Schwarzwald Romantikhotel at the Lake Titisee stands out for many reasons: First-class location, romantic rooms with impressive lake views, friendly and unobtrusive service, a welcoming spa area and top-class local cuisine – all served with a cosy family atmosphere.

esque scenery and the very best in style, atmosphere and hospitality. “We want our guests to remember the time they spend with us with great pleasure,”she adds.

TEXT: NANE STEINHOFF | PHOTOS: TRESCHERS SCHWARZWALDHOTEL

An extensive wellness and spa area with a large indoor and outdoor pool landscape, fitness room, a generously dimensioned sauna world and a wide range of classic and exotic beauty treatments invite to extensive relaxation. Seasonal and regional cuisine with fresh ingredients can be enjoyed alongside exquisite wines in one of the many cosy and elegant restaurants, lounges and bars before recharging batteries in one of the 80 luxurious rooms, apartments and suites.“The greatest thing for me is to see guests with a smile on their faces in our restaurants in the evening. Then it is a successful day for me,”Michael Moninger, manager of the hotel, concludes.

Celebrating its 128th anniversary in May, the hotel in the heart of the Black Forest offers everything for an unforgettable trip. Take a long hike through the legendary wooded mountain scenery and enjoy Baden-Wuerttemberg’s beautiful natural side, which is just a few steps away. The lakeside location makes the hotel the perfect holiday destination – not only for a romantic getaway on Valentine’s Day. Everything is within reach, from water sports to rambling, boat tours and winter sports. “Our hotel’s unique characteristic is certainly the direct waterside location in combination with the altitude of the Black Forest. You won’t find another hotel in

Germany which enjoys a prominent location like us,” says Marion Moninger, marketing director. “Additionally, family-run hotels become less common – especially in the dimension of ours. The fact that manager Mr. Moninger is present on the operational side of the business twenty-fourseven, definitely contributes to the very personal atmosphere of the house,” she adds. The family business around the Moninger and Trescher families guarantees an open ear for their customers’ extraordinary wishes, pure relaxation and first-class facilities for guests, which look for a pictur-

www.schwarzwaldhotel-trescher.de/en

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Discover Germany | Wine&Dine | Bremen

Bremen City of culinary pleasures Kohl and Pinkel, Labskaus or Knipp – (you’ll find out later what these are!): Admittedly, while these specialities of Bremen sound as though they might take a bit of getting used to, it does not make them any less tasty. A combination of the city’s close proximity to the sea and strong connections with the agricultural hinterland form the basis for Bremen’s traditional dishes. TEXT & PHOTOS: BTZ BREMER TOURISTIK-ZENTRALE | TRANSLATION: EMMIE COLLINGE

And it’s these two characteristics that have shaped Bremen’s “national dishes”, such as the typical seaman’s dish – Labskaus, with its surprisingly harmonious mix of corned beef and pickled herring, or Kohl and Pinkel. Which is what exactly? Well, it’s Kale and groats sausage (in the same family as Knipp, Kassler, Speck and Mettwurst), perfectly highlighting the Bremen dwellers’ penchant for rustic treats. A particularly old tradition can be indulged in at the venerable Ratskeller, where the Kellermeister poured out the first noble

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drops in 1409. Today, as a guest of the house, you can choose from the 70 page wine menu, treasured by connoisseurs as a wine encyclopaedia with 650 illustrious varieties. As a special treat you can have a guided tour of the cellars and their fine wines, where certain wines are accompanied by specially selected chocolates. The menu of the Ratskeller consists of Bremen’s specialities and other typical local dishes. A few steps towards the river Weser and not far from the city centre lies the Schlachte embankment, where international restaurants, gastro-boats, cafes and bars await.

In summer there is seating for 2,000 just in its beer gardens and terraces. Gastronomic offerings abound: Genuine Hanseatic cuisine, good home-cooking, Dutch, Italian, Mexican, Bavarian or even Australian – all wishes can be fulfilled here. In the centre of the town you’ll find the Schnoorviertel, where locals and tourists flock to the district’s many idyllic restaurants and bars.The little 15th and 16th century houses in Bremen’s oldest quarter are tightly packed together like pearls on a string.The workplaces of artists, goldsmiths and gallery owners can be discovered amongst the winding alleyways and tiny squares. Small cafes and restaurants indulge the most discerning palates. The Katzen café is furnished in the style of the belle époque or art nouveau. Its framed pictures of showbiz celebs, political leaders and famous artists accompany the guest from the basement bar up to the first floor restaurant. The rustic and welcoming restaurant Haake-Beck Ausspann in a former warehouse from 1550 offers local and seasonal dishes with an emphasis on fish. In the historic 13th century Bierkeller Comturei diners enjoy a medieval feast, tucking


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into a Raubritterspiess –“robber baron kebab”, something rather like a mixed grill on a skewer. Not far from the Rathaus and housed within the renowned Die Glocke concert hall, you’ll find Intermezzo serving up further treats for the palate. The Bremer Tapas Teller has a variety of local delicacies such as Knipp, Labskaus, and Bremer Hochzeitssuppe (wedding soup). For larger groups the restaurant offers an original Bremen Beer menu, where appropriate beers are served with each of the five regional speciality dishes. Every second cup of coffee drunk between Flensburg in the north and Füssen in the south, originates from firms in the Hanseatic city of Bremen. The first coffee house in the German-speaking lands was opened here in 1673 and traditional coffee roasting can still be experienced today in the Münchausen Coffee Roasting House. Bremen is also ideal for lovers of a more “hoppy”taste – beer has been brewed here for 700 years. World renowned and enjoyed in 140 countries, a brewery visit to Beck’s takes you through the works, the brewhouse and a small museum before the tasty

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finish with a small product testing session. The culinary exploration doesn’t end here though: head to Bremen’s Überseestadt to visit the“Piekfeine Brände”open distillery, where the process of making brandy from the raw fruit to finished distillate captivates visitors before culminating in an aroma and taste session. The finished products range from many fruit brandies to nut liqueurs and even Panna-Cotta liqueur. In the Überseestadt there are also many opportunities to enjoy a good cup of coffee. In the listed marble hall of the Lloyd Coffee Roasting House you can be inducted into the secrets of the art of coffee, and then test your heart and kidneys on the different kinds in the adjoining café – enjoyment guaranteed. The Handicraft workshop on Böttcherstrasse, the small alleyway between the Marktplatz and the Weser, is home to a host of arts and crafts and also houses the Bremer Bonbon Manufaktur (Bremen Sweet Manufacturers). A large copper vessel, in which the colourful sweet mixture is boiled, dominates the pretty shop floor and a huge selection of sweets is available for purchase – the choice is yours: self-consumption or as a gift. Sampling the sweets here is more than encouraged!

So whether it’s coffee, chocolate, beer or sweets, Bremen knows the meaning of good taste. Aesthetically too, it’s a city that understands our visual appetite: Between April and June the Rhododendron Park is transformed into an extraordinary sea of colour with more than 2,000 different kinds of Rhododendrons and Azalea, a unique occasion in mainland European and one not to be missed. www.bremen-tourismus.de Top left: Bremen's Böttcherstraße. Photo: Jan Rathke Top middle: Ratskeller. Photo: Dietmar Banck Top, cluster of images: Schlachte beer garden. Photo: Dietmar Banck (left) Schnoor quarter. Photo: Ingrid Krause (below left) Lloyd coffee. Photo: Jan Rathke (right) Beck’s beer brewery (below right) Below: Sweet surprises in the Schnoor quarter. Photo: Hans-Joachim Harbeck

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Valentine’s Day - the German way Compared to the rest of Europe, Germany doesn’t seem to quite grasp the romantic significance of Valentine’s Day. While Italy, France and England celebrate the occasion with their partners and unleash their most romantic side, Germans prefer to keep distant, practical and efficient, while sticking to their usual structured day-today routine. TEXT: NANE STEINHOFF | PHOTO: PRESS IMAGE

If your post box isn’t overflowing with Valentine’s Day cards from several secret admirers this year, you’re either very grumpy and unlovable or you simply surround yourself with Germans too much as it seems to be usual to ignore the 14th of February in the federal republic. And because Germans love their statistics and surveys, the internet is inundated with inter-

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esting facts about Valentine’s Day, which may shed some light on the reasons why Germany doesn't appear to be too enthusiastic about this annual event. Statistically, German men spend around 33 Euros and women approximately 26 Euros on mostly uninspired gifts such as flowers, perfume or chocolate. An average of only 36

per cent of all Germans plan on giving a present to their loved one, while the percentage is 45 per cent in England. In comparison, Englishmen spend an equivalent of 51 Euros, while British women spend 29 Euros on their partners. In total, England estimates that 978 million Pounds will be spent on Valentine’s Day, while Germany’s economy will only profit from 572 million Euros. America’s lovebirds stay true to the motto ‘Bigger is Better’ as the average American spends 134 US Dollars on candy, cards or romantic dinners. In fact, Americans almost spend more money (367 million US Dol-


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Discover Germany | Culture | Valentine’s Day

origin of this custom is not totally clear but one of the existing theories is that the idea stems from the day of the beheading of Valentin von Terni, a bishop who married couples against imperial orders and who gave them flowers from his garden as a present. In Germany, the Valentine’s Day disappeared up until after the Second World War and it is still not clear why. It is thought to have something to do with the economic miracle and the involved wealth that the date gained importance again after 1950. Despite all the statistics mentioned above, Germany is still a good destination for a romantic getaway. Visit Cologne’s Hohenzollernbruecke and embrace one of the city’s most charming traditions. Fix a love lock to the railings on the bridge as proof of your love with your significant other before throwing the key into the Rhein river. Or why not visit Hamburg and go on a boat trip on the Alster river? Germany’s wine regions with their historic towns and cosy, traditional guest-houses also invite visitors for relaxed and romantic days.

This park in Husum is perfect for a romantic stroll. Photo: Oliver Franke/Tourismus und Stadtmarketing Husum GmbH

lars) on their pets than Germans on their partners. Of course the amount of money spent shouldn’t be compared with love, but the fact that 31 per cent of Germans confessed to having completely forgotten Valentine’s Day in 2013 speaks for itself. Presents commonly bought in Germany are flowers or sweets, while the French prepare a romantic dinner at home or invite their lovers to the restaurant. Validating the notion thatValentine’s Day is still a rather strange and unfamiliar concept for Germans, a big supermarket chain awk-

wardly promoted 1 kilogram of ‘Mett’, minced pork meat, as one of their‘suitable gift ideas’ for Valentine’s Day a few years back. So while Germans prepare their annual excuses for the dreaded date in February, such as“the 14th is everything that is wrong with this materialistic society”, “the chocolate makes me fat anyway”, “the poor flowers and the related environmental pollution arising from kerosene”or“the day is only a stupid invention from America”, let’s look at the actual origins of Valentine’s Day. Despite widespread beliefs,Valentine’s Day doesn’t come from America or florists. The

Being single isn’t a reason not to book a flight to Germany as approximately 16 million singles wait to find a partner. However, flirting with a German is somehow different to flirting with other Europeans. According to the Spiegel, women should“forget all the playfulness, the banter, the teasing, shy smiles and eye contact. It's just not what German men do.” To seduce a man, start a warm but serious discussion – maybe about Angela Merkel’s foreign policies. Women shouldn’t be approached with a drunken ‘Yo baby’ as they are known for preferring to flirt discreetly. Prepare yourself for things to take a little longer but maybe you’re lucky and you discover the often passionate woman under the cold exterior after years of trying and befriending her. If you want to prepare yourself like a true German leaving nothing to chance and being on the safe side to get it right, why not book a weekend ‘flirt workshop’ offered at various institutions nationwide?

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Attraction of the Month Germany

The Bayerische Staatsoper Sublime, dignified and embracing the digital age Munich’s Bayerische Staatsoper is a true gem in Germany’s cultural landscape, attracting over 600,000 visitors per year with its impressive and diverse portfolio of 450 performances, reaching from classical opera and concerts to breathtaking ballet and song recital nights. TEXT: TINA AWTANI

Set in a stunning classical National Theatre building in the heart of town, the Bayerische Staatsoper dates back to the year 1653. The young Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart celebrated a major career breakthrough here and, under the reign of King Ludwig II, composer Richard Wagner developed a close relationship with the iconic opera house, which today is considered not only one of the most beautiful opera houses in Europe, but also the largest in Germany with a seating capacity of 2,101. The programme reads impressively and attracts opera lovers from all over the world. Kirill Petrenko took over as General Music Director at the Bayerische Staatsoper in 2013.“Within one single season almost 40 operas spanned 400 years of

musical history: That makes the Bayerische Staatsoper one of the most diverse international opera houses of all,” says Christoph Koch, Head of Press. But it is not only the black-tie-wearing distinguished gentlemen, and ladies in shimmering gowns who enjoy the magic of opera. The Bayerische Staatsoper is strongly committed to its educational mandate and offers a wide range of services in order to spark an interest in opera in the younger generation. “Our intense Campus programme is quite remarkable. With an array of tailor-made children’s operas, workshops, school programmes and much more, we introduce music to children as young as pre-school age,”Koch explains. And while sitting on a boostercushion and watching the stage in

Main image: Bayerische Staatsoper, Nationaltheater, Munich. Photo: Felix Löchner Above, from top: Kirill Petrenko. Der Ring des Nibelungen, Siegfried. Bayerische Staatsoper, Nationaltheater, Munich. All above photos: Wilfried Hösl

astonishment, tiny tots are given the chance to develop a passion for classic opera right from the start. The Bayerische Staatsoper embraces modern times, and state-of-the-art live streaming technology allows internet users worldwide to watch some the most stunning performances live and for free from their homes. 2015 holds a few very special treat for music lovers. Kirill Petrenko himself will conduct the complete Ring des Nibelungen and the famous Opera Festival (24 June–31 August 2015), where Richard Strauss‘ Arabella and Claude Debussy’s Pelléas et Mélisande will premiere, is said to be one of the finest in the world. www.staatsoper.de

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Upper Bavarian Forest Nature Park Picture book holidays in Eastern Bavaria The Upper Bavarian Forest Nature Park is part of the biggest continuity of wooded mountain ranges in Central Europe. Broad valleys, deep forests, roaring torrents, bizarre rock formations, crystal clear lakes, romantic villages and towns, as well as castles, palaces and monasteries make this unadulterated landscape between Munich and Prague a true holiday paradise. TEXT: NANE STEINHOFF

Nature and culture are blended with warm hospitality on quality hiking paths, such as the ‘Goldsteig’. No other place offers the opportunity to cross ten 1,000-metre-high mountain peaks in one day, while enjoying dreamlike views as far as the Alps on a clear day. Cycling enthusiasts will find happiness on 1,200 kilometres of biking paths across the attractive landscape and just thinking about the sporty mountain bike trails across the Bavarian and Bohemian forests will make their hearts beat faster. The Upper Bavarian Forest Nature Park offers a wide range of activities – leisurely family tours along romantic river valleys or trying out eBikes, which will make it possible for everyone to effortlessly climb mountains, are just a fraction of the possibilities.

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Visitors seeking relaxation can profit from a diverse wellness and health programme. Visit Bavaria’s youngest Kneipp Spa in Bad Kötzting or stay in top-class wellness hotels or feel-good farms with several health treatments. Become the manager of your own health and enjoy the treats a holiday in breathtaking nature with a clean environment and intact flora has to offer. Take the well-deserved break from everyday life and let yourself be ensnared by the silence of this astonishing scenery. Whether you embrace a shopping spree in romantic Bavarian Forest towns, such as Cham, Waldmünchen, Roding or Furth im Wald, taste culinary highlights of the region, visit cultural places such as churches, palaces or castles or romp around with your children,

Main image: Cham - truly charming. Photo: Stefan Gruber Above: The Hohe Bogen mountain range in the Bavarian Forest. Photo: Stefan Gruber (top) The Kaitersberg on the Goldsteig hiking path. Photo: Ludwig Jilek (below) Below: Further Drachenstich, a theatre in Furth am Wald. Photo: Fred Wutz

the Upper Bavarian Forest Nature Park will guarantee an unforgettable holiday. Amusement parks, various leisure pools and swimming lakes, high rope courses or the Bayerwald wildlife park will not only please children and numerous festival, theatre and open-air productions portray a special highlight in the Nature Park. Those searching for nature, culture, art, relaxation and a big portion of recreational fun, will find their perfect holiday destination in the Upper Bavarian Forest Nature Park. www.bayerischer-wald.org


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Main imagea: Aerial view of Passau, the ending point of the Crystal Road. Photo: Passau Tourismus e.V Below: ‘Glaeserne Gaerten’ (glass gardens) in Frauenau. Photo: Stephan Moder, TVO (left) One of the leading glass production companies at the Crystal Road in Bodenmais: ‘Joska Kristall’. Photo: Stephan Moder, TVO (middle) Waldnaab, the headstream of the River Naab in the Upper Palatinate. Photo: Stefan Gruber (right)

The Crystal Road 250 kilometres of diversity Located on the Bavarian-Czech border, the Crystal Road in Eastern Bavaria is one of the most beautiful and diverse holiday routes in Germany. 250 kilometres lead across the impressive landscapes of the Bavarian and Upper Palatine Forests, where the 700-year-old tradition of glass-making and glass art is still alive today. TEXT: NANE STEINHOFF

Visitors are always fascinated by the sheer diversity, the delicate material has to offer. As they visit the many manufacturers and cabins along the glass route and watch the artesians at work, they can follow glass from its creation until its refinement and finishing touch. The larger factories offer exciting guided tours through their facilities, shopping is sure to turn into a special experience and every glass production facility along the route has its own character. Often referred to as “the city of lead crystal”, Neustadt an der Waldnaab is the start-

ing point of the Crystal Road. From there, the trail leads across wooded mountain ranges, through towns and municipalities rich in tradition with numerous glass huts and glass refinement factories on the way. Join a glassblower while artistically and skilfully creating the most beautiful and incredible shapes out of glowing gooey molten glass and try to produce your own crystal ball under professional guidance with a blowpipe. Or visit the Bayerischer Wald museum village, which sheds a light on the life of the past with its 150 regional

buildings from 1580 to 1850 alongside a glass exhibition. Find a bargain at a local industrial outlet or opt for impressive glass productions based on antique role models. The glass enthusiast will find everything from fine drinking glasses, traditional Art Nouveau style glass creations, sparkling chandeliers, highly imaginative glass lampshades to unique works of art from internationally significant glass artists as well as experimental unconventional glass masterpieces from young artists. At the geographical centre of the Crystal Route, which distinguishes itself by combining art, culture and impressive landscapes, lies the Upper Bavarian Forest Nature Park with its appealing landscapes. The ending point lies Passau, the famous “city of three rivers”at the border of Austria. Don’t forget to visit the local glass museum, which is home to the worldwide biggest collection of “Boehmisches”Glass. www.dieglasstrasse.de www.ostbayern-tourismus.de

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Main image: Museum Island, Berlin. © DOM publishers

Special

These all compete for visitors with their collections, exhibitions and special events. And very successfully at that, as the 2013 survey figures on visitor numbers show: The museums recorded over 110 million visitors, and another 5.3 million were recorded at exhibition centres that do not have their own collections. This overwhelming success is testament to how successfully the establishments have moulded their profile to fit the requirements of a modern science and experience-driven society. Simultaneously, these locations are establishing themselves as places of education and communication. Cooperation with schools and other educational establishments as well as with different demographic groups is naturally part of the work of museums. As education and leisure establishments, they contribute to society’s development; an unseen part of a living and viTheme brant multicultural nation.

Finest Galleries & Museums

Germany’s vastly diverse museum landscape has a rich heritage and historic roots. We have ambitious Germany Dukes and Kings and their passion for artwork to thank for the grand collections that exist today in the big museum complexes of Berlin, Dresden, Munich and Kassel.The state museums of Berlin and the state art collections of Dresden are preserving the inheritance of the

Germany’s Museum Scene Tradition and innovation, education and encounter Museums, once described by author Martin Mosebach as “treasure houses of our towns and cities”, exist in abundance across Germany. Indeed, when compared to the rest of Europe, Germany boasts an unusually high number of museums; over 6,500 museums are listed by the Institute for Museum Research, including 674 art museums, but there are also traditional, folkloric, popular art and local history museums, natural history museums, technology museums, large museum complexes and specialist museums. TEXT: PROF. DR. ECKART KÖHNE PRESIDENT, DEUTSCHER MUSEUMSBUND E.V. (GERMAN MUSEUMS ASSOCIATION) TRANSLATION: EMMIE COLLINGE | PHOTOS: DEUTSCHER MUSEUMSBUND E.V. (GERMAN MUSEUMS ASSOCIATION)

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Board members of the German Museums Association. From left to right: Robert Kirchmaier, Jan Warnecke, Ulrike Stottrop, Prof. Dr. Eckart Köhne, Prof. Dr. Wiebke Ahrndt, Gregor Isenbort. Front row from left to right: Dr. Gabriele Uelsberg, Dr. Ulrike Lorenz, Dr. Susanne Köstering. Not present: Dr. Christina Haak. © Th. Goldschmidt


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ruling houses for the future, exhibiting these artefacts to an international public.Yet even the smallest principalities once had comprehensive collections, which today showcase each region’s cultural richness, such as the collections at Schloss Friedenstein in Gotha. In 1754, Europe’s first publicly accessible museum was opened in Braunschweig. Duke Carl I of BraunschweigLüneburg famously founded the “Art and Natural History Cabinet”, displaying bronze statues, curiosities, ivory carvings, antiques, East Asian objects and much more. Significantly, this was not just open for a select group, but for the citizens. The general population’s growing confidence in the 19th century also found expression in the museum sector, as noteworthy art collections were developed with the involvement of the citizens. Consider the Städel Museum in Frankfurt am Main, founded in 1815 by the merchant and banker Johann Friedrich Städel, and the Kunsthalle in Bremen that was founded by the citizen-led Kunstverein [Art Society] in 1823. With over 2,800 museums in total, popular art and local history museums comprise Germany’s largest museum sector. Often intimate in size and led by volunteers, these contain local and regional history collections, hereby offering a worthwhile contribution by binding the local population to its cultural inheritance and ensuring an attractive cultural offering in the region.

LWL-museum for Art and Cultural History, Daniel Libeskind’s new Military History museum in Dresden as well as David Chipperfield’s rebuilt “Neuen Museums” on Berlin’s Museum Island that was destroyed in the war. The latter, since reopening in 2009, has attracted thousands of visitors to its Nefertiti exhibition. One of the most visited German museums is the German Museum of the Sea (Meeresmuseum) in Stralsund, where the Oceaneum was designed by the architectural firm of Behnisch, who rose to prominence when they built Munich’s Olympic stadium. The Deutsche Museumsbund [German Museums Association] is the voice of the German museum scene. Founded in 1917 as an interest group for museums and their workers, we look after the procurement and maintenance of contents, staff and financial prerequisites for museums. Our primary concerns involve the qualifications for museum work and overall quality assurance, along with networking, encouraging young museum experts and maintaining contact with political decision makers. At our yearly conference, hundreds of museum experts gather to exchange information and ideas relating to Germany and beyond. Led by a voluntary board made up of representatives from various

museum types, the Deutsche Museumsbund guarantees a strong voice for museums in Germany. Not just places of reassurance, reflection and focus, Germany’s museums are places of interaction, education, experiences, community and activities – a unique diversity, unmatched across the globe. www.museumsbund.de Below left: Landesmuseum Karlsruhe. © Th. Goldschmidt Ruhr Museum. © Ruhr Museum Below right: The iconic bust of Nefertiti in the Neues Museum, Berlin © Staatliche Museen zu Berlin. Photo: Bernd Weingart © Städel Museum, Frankfurt am Main © OZEANEUM Stralsund. Photo: Schlorke

Germany’s industrial prowess led to a broad spectrum of technological history museums and places of industrial heritage. Today, as powerful witnesses of Germany’s industrial past, these redundant industrial premises, for example in the Ruhr, but also in Saarland and Saxony, inspire visitors. Many of these have gained UNESCO world heritage site status, such as the Volklinger ironworks in Saarbrücken and the Zeche coal mine complex in the Ruhr Museum in Essen. Outstanding architecture at an international level has become a trademark of Germany’s museum landscape. Impressive examples include Volker Staab’s recently-opened

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One of the seven most beautiful views in the world Located south of Bonn in Remagen-Rolandseck, the Arp Museum Bahnhof Rolandseck offers spectacular views across the Rhine valley alongside artworks showcasing over 500 years of art history. Rated amongst the most beautiful and leading art museums in the Rhineland, its architecture impresses with a successful combination of a 19th century train station and an avant-garde building by Richard Meier. TEXT: NANE STEINHOFF | PHOTOS: ARP MUSEUM BAHNHOF ROLANDSECK

Housing stunning collections of modern and contemporary art, as well as excellent old master paintings from the collection Rau for UNICEF, the museum is dedicated to the works of the artist couple Hans Arp and Sophie Taeuber-Arp. As a pioneer of abstract art in the 20th Century the French-

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German poet, painter and sculptor Hans Arp was a co-founder of Dadaism and Surrealism and the inventor of biomorph sculpture. His wife Sophie Taeuber, a dancer, painter and sculptor, is considered one of the most important artists of geometric abstraction.

Main image: The old station and the new building in the background. Above: New building of the ARP Museum. (top) Contemporary architeture inside the museum. Photos: Ulrich Pfeuffer / GDKE (middle) Bistro at the train station. Photo: Claudia Görres (bottom)

“The Arp Museum Bahnhof Rolandseck is a unique place that combines exciting architectural experience and magnificent landscape views with a first rate cultural programme of fine arts exhibitions, classical music concerts, literature events and more,” explains Dr. Oliver Kornhoff, the museum’s director. Exceptional old and new art and architecture Ancient ceiling frescoes, stucco and an ornamentally designed cast-iron terrace: the interior of the train station is an obvious memorial to glamorous times. Having a


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long tradition as a meeting place for artists, musicians and society since the 19th century, legendary happenings, exhibitions and station festivals were held of international artists since the inauguration in 1858. After extensive renovation the neo-classical jewel now comprises a new entrance hall, exhibition rooms and an impressive ballroom with chandeliers, in which the museum’s restaurant serves regional culinary delights. Being one of the most important cultural relics of Rhenish architectural history, simple forms and balanced proportions outside integrate the building harmonically into the surrounding noble landscape. Oliver Kornhoff adds:“Our visitors love to relax on the train station’s wonderful terrace with a view over the Rhine and the hills of the Siebengebirge enjoying a drink or a meal after they have visited the museum.” After Hans Arp’s death in 1966, a part of his and Sophie Taeuber-Arp’s artistic legacy made its way to Rolandseck thanks to his second wife Marguerite Arp-Hagenbach. To create enough space for a worthy presentation of the extensive and multifaceted collections – comprising paintings, sculptures, collages, textile works, jewels etc. – an extension was needed. Pritzker Prize winning American Richard Meier created a modern 2,900 square metre addition to the museum on the heights above the panoramic Rhine valley in 2007.

up through the hill.“It is a special desire for us to continue the tradition of the historic place and to carry it on into the future,” Oliver Kornhoff says.“We want to implement a top-class, wide-ranging cultural programme beyond the culturally develpoed urban space the culturally developed urban space which is attractive for people who live in the region, as well as for international tourists.” A special advantage is that the Arp museum can be reached comfortably by train – it still stops here every hour – or by boat – the landing stage is only a few steps away. Announcing the programme for 2015, Oliver Kornhoff invites all art enthusiasts to explore seven special exhibitions which are connected through this year’s topic “Freiräume”(free spaces): “Visitors can look forward to an unusual tribute to Hans and Sophie Arp’s individual artistic expressions as well as to their romantic relationship. Until May we are showing the multisensory installations of Brazilian sculptor Ernesto

Neto. Further highlights are a show on the revolution in French painting between Poussin and Monet and a homage to the prominent German abstract artist Bernard Schultze for his 100th birthday.” The overall experience of the Arp Museum Bahnhof Rolandseck is sure to be a special one. Well-travelled Alexander von Humboldt once called the view of the mountain peak silhouettes on the opposite river bank “one of the seven most beautiful views in the world”. So, make sure to retrace his steps and to put a trip to the romantic Rhine valley on your 2015 to-do list. www.arpmuseum.org

Below: Ernesto Neto installation view, 2014. Courtesy: Ernesto Neto 2014. Photo: Mick Vincenz Bottom: Installation view ‘Rapunzel. Von Türmen und Menschen in der Kunst’. Photo: David Ertl (left) Installation view of ‘Leibhaftig’ 2014. Photo: Collection Rau for UNICEF, Helmut Reinelt (right)

The characteristic white landmark with glazed walls, overwhelms the visitor with a light flooded interior and impressive vistas onto the surrounding landscape.“My open and transparent architecture creates smooth transitions from the inside to the outside and reflects the same connection to nature as is expressed in the works of Hans Arp,”Richard Meier explains. The new building comprises three levels of exhibition space and rooms for events such as concerts or artistic workshops. Every first time visitor is stunned by the walk through variously designed tunnels and the ride in the glazed elevator, which goes 40 metres

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Bernhard Knaus Fine Art, Frankfurt Young, aspiring and internationally successful artists in one gallery Bernhard Knaus in Frankfurt follows a dual track approach: On the one hand he works together with artists with an international reputation whose works are exhibited at famous art museums all over the world. On the other hand he offers young graduates from art schools a chance to make their work known to the public. TEXT: JESSICA HOLZHAUSEN | PHOTOS: BERNHARD KNAUS FINE ART

The gallery of Bernhard Knaus is situated near Frankfurt’s central station. Founded in 1996, Knaus first concentrated on publishing limited photo, video and graphic edi-

Bernhard Knaus. Photo: Knaus Foto

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tions working with contemporary international artists before expanding the focus towards abstract and representational paintings in recent years. In 2001 he opened his first gallery in Mannheim, six years later he moved to his current space on Niddastraße 84 in Frankfurt, and in 2010 Luigi Kurmann joined Knaus as artistic director. Now six exhibitions per year take place over 310 square metres. Currently Bernhard Knaus Fine Art represents 14 artists and cooperates with 20 more, many of them already well known on the international art market.“From the very beginning we have put emphasis on a continuous and long-term support and promotion,” says Bernhard Knaus. This not

only means organising exhibitions but also publishing books and cooperating with museums all over the world. Bernhard Knaus Fine Art also deals with works of Becher School artists like Candida Höfer,Thomas Struth, Andreas Gursky and Thomas Ruff, as much as with those of Alighiero Boetti, SALVO, Remy Zaugg, Helmut Newton and others. Daniele Buetti’s FLAGS – alienating a well known design The most recent exhibition shows eight works from Daniele Buetti’s FLAGS series that emphasizes how important colour and composition are in the context of flag design: Flags normally use geometrical forms and primary colours – as does Buetti in his series. But for him the flag is only the starting point; in working with a soft focus he alienates the motif so that its origin as a flag is barely recognizable. Bright, nearly blind-


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Ralf Peters: Visual puzzles and photographic art Another artist working with and exhibiting at Bernhard Knaus Fine Art is the wellknown photographer Ralf Peters. Peters started his career with politically orientated paintings in the 1980s; since 1987 he has also created sculptures and room installations, before he began to dedicate his work to photography in the mid 1990s. From the very beginning he worked with digital manipulation and image editing on the computer. His first photo series had the title Tankstellen or Petrol Stations, here he removed brand names and logos that make certain companies recognizable. With a completely different concept in mind, he created the series Different Persons that shows 12 female faces – all so much looking alike that they could be related, sisters or cousins. Indeed they are not: Peters searched for them for years and used no digital manipulation at all to heighten similarities in their facial features. Main image: Exhibition of Daniele Buetti’s FLAGS at gallery Bernhard Knaus in 2014. Right: Daniele Buetti: there is hope, 2010. Ralf Peters: Japanische Kirschen, 2013.

Ralf Peters’works can be found in museums worldwide as much as in offices or with private collectors. He has an exclusive contract with Bernhard Knaus Fine Art in Frankfurt. Staggering between documen-

tary and manipulative photography, Ralf Peters’ work is always a visual challenge and a puzzle. Bernhard Knaus Fine Art works with aspiring artists like Myriam Holme An example of a younger artist at Bernhard Knaus Fine Art is Myriam Holme, born 1971, who studied at the art academies in Karlsruhe and Munich. Myriam Holme creates works on paper as well as abstract paintings on aluminium plates using watercolour, acrylic or lacquer. She also combines paintings with room filling installations. In February and March 2015 Bernhard Knaus will hold Myriam Holme’s first solo exhibition in his gallery, where large-scale works on paper will be shown for the very first time. Besides the above mentioned Bernhard Knaus Fine Art exhibits artists creating abstract paintings and drawings, like Albrecht Schnider, Jerry Zeniuk, Harald Kröner and Robert Zandvliet. Bernhard Knaus Fine Art also represents artists working in the field of photography like Kyungwoo Chun, Flo Maak and Bernhard Prinz. www.bernhardknaus-art.de

ing colours create a kind of transcendental impression. Daniele Buetti is a contemporary Swiss artist with an international reputation who often works with digital media. Since 2004 Daniele Buetti has been professor at the Academy of Fine Arts in Münster and currently works in Zurich and Münster. The FLAGS series evolved from Buetti’s previous work: In 2014 he had created a 25 minutes sound installation in the famous Schirn Kunsthalle in Frankfurt initiated by Bernhard Knaus Fine Art. Called IT’S ALL IN THE MIND the installation involved visitors through hypnosis and suggestion. Here, Buetti used a so-called colour purification technique to evoke certain feelings associated with colours and their psychological effects. This not only allows the visualization of feelings but also purifying the soul from negative effects.

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Discover Germany | Special Theme | Finest Galleries & Museums Germany

A treasure chest of International architecture Located beautifully along Frankfurt’s Main riverbank, the Deutsches Architekturmuseum (DAM) is Germany’s most significant architecture museum. TEXT: TINA AWTANI | PHOTOS: DAM

The striking building itself is an architectural masterpiece over four floors with a magnificent courtyard. Famous architect Oswald Mathias Ungers, who significantly influenced contemporary German architecture with his rational design based on cubic forms, created a“house-in-a-house” behind the the facade of the neo-classicist villa. “Since its opening in 1984, DAM is not only one of Frankfurt’s finest museums, it is furthermore the German architecture museum with a national claim, making it one of a kind in the country,” director Peter Cachola Schmal points out. The museum’s library comprises more than 30,000 publications on architectural history dating back to 1800 and the museum’s permanent collection includes over 200,000 files of architectural significance including

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works by Gottfried Semper, Ludwig Mies van der Rohe, Frank O. Gehry, Norman Foster, Christo and many more, plus a stunning 1,320 scale models. Until 19 April the “SKYWARD – Highrise City Frankfurt”exhibition examines the history and architecture of the high-rises which are forming the city‘s skyline. In May more landmark building projects such as the European Central Bank in Frankfurt, the recently opened Musée des Confluences in Lyon, France and China’s Dalian International Conference Centre in China will be showcased in order to celebrate the 47th anniversary of Austrian architect firm COOP HIMMELB(L)AU. An absolute highlight this spring is not to be missed, Schmal recommends: “Until mid-July DAM presents the impressive and amazing works of the currently most sought after architecture photographer Iwan Baan. ‘52 weeks, 52

cities’ is a kind of visual travel diary and demonstrates global citizen Baan’s view of globalised architecture, focusing on the slum as well as boomtown.” For young explorers the museum offers exciting events scheduled throughout the year, and for the architecture aficionados a variety of lectures are part of the DAM event calendar. After having admired the architectural treasures, the DAM café is the perfect place to sit down to let the newly gained impressions sink in while enjoying great river views. www.dam-online.de Main image: Deutsches Architektur Museum. Photo: Uwe Dettmar Top: SKYWARD - Highrise City Frankfurt. Photo: Uwe Dettmar Above: Permanent exhibition. Photo: Norbert Miguletz Right: Director Peter Cachola Schmal. Photo: Lisa Farkas


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L E I KO I K E M U R A 25.09.2015 – 31.01.2016


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The Gutenberg Museum The Gutenberg Museum, one of the oldest printing museums in the world, invites you to journey through 4,000 years of writing and printing history. From the cuneiform tablet through to modern typography, from handwriting to the printing press, from Gutenberg’s workshop to newspaper rotary presses, The Gutenberg Museum’s permanent and temporary exhibitions give an exciting glimpse into the realm of the “black art”. TEXT: GUTENBERG MUSEUM | TRANSLATION: EMMIE COLLINGE | PHOTOS: PRESS IMAGES

Johannes Gutenberg of Mainz, the “Man of the Millenium”, wrote himself into the history books when he invented the printing press more than 550 years ago. By introducing moveable metal letters, he began a “media revolution”. With the museum’s regular demonstrations in his reconstructed workshops, visitors can see first-hand how this process really worked. The life, work and inventions of Johannes Gutenberg are vividly presented – and eagerly devoured by the museum’s 100,000 visitors each year.

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The centrepiece of the exhibition involves two examples of the renowned 42-line Gutenberg Bible, which can be seen in the strong room. Founded in 1900, The Gutenberg Museum focuses on the man himself as well as all aspects of printing. Printing-related machinery, typesetting machines, and printing presses from across the centuries bring the history of printing to life. In the permanent exhibition important examples of European printing

from the 15th century to the present day are on display. A “world museum of printing”, the Gutenberg museum has created fascinating displays that outline the earliest history of printing in east Asia, as well as writing and printing from the Islamic lands.The museum expounds the development of script, the craft of book-binding, techniques of graphic printing, the production of paper and inks, and much more. Spread across four floors and covering 3,000 square metres, The Gutenberg Museum’s appeal lies in its accessible, thought-provoking and educational approach to the subject of printing. There are up to five special exhibitions each year focusing on specific aspects and special collections. One core theme of the temporary exhibitions is their role as a platform and forum for the latest developments in Typography.


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books, printing and the history of text, as well as a reading room open for those interested. Besides the administration, the restoration department, the Gutenberg library, and the International Gutenberg Society of Mainz (Internationale GutenbergGesellschaft in Mainz e.V.) are all also housed in the imposing renaissance building known as ”Zum Römischen Kaiser” (”To the Roman Emperor”).

Items from the special collections are“put into perspective” by their inclusion in the museum’s one-off exhibitions. The Gutenberg Museum possesses a unique incunabulum (pre-1501 printed books) collection, considered one of the most important worldwide bookplate collections with more than 100,000 pages and around 7,000 miniature books. Other artefacts, for example, are: Misprints, posters, art books and newspapers. The Gutenberg is also home to the “Mainz mini press archive” (MMPM) with numerous literary and book artefacts from small printers and publishers (Minipressen – Small scale printers), that are hard to find in public libraries.

The printing workshop of the Gutenberg museum is fully functional and the highlight of the museum’s educational department. Everyone who is interested in printing can find something suitable on offer. There are group programmes for all ages, from school pupils to older people, covering topics such as manual setting of type through to letterpress printing. Gutenberg's methods of printing with moveable types can be fully understood once visitors have a go for themselves; a reproduction printing block of the Gutenberg bible and other printing blocks with many other motifs have this very purpose. In the typesetting workshop our volunteers print one-offs of specially commissioned works with hand-setting. There are also numerous workshops from children’s holiday programmes to intensive weekend workshops, where artists and crafts people help develop practical skills relating to books and printing, including Origami, experimental writing techniques and other forms of text design, classical lead type and press printing, as well as alternative book-binding methods and collage. The museum often arranges extra events to accompany the special exhibitions.

In addition to all this, the unique printing workshop can be hired for children’s birthday parties and corporate or private events. Visited by over 100,000 people each year, The Gutenberg Museum is a beacon within today’s world, illuminating its visitors about one of the world’s most powerful tools. www.gutenberg-museum.de www.gutenberg-druckladen.de www.gutenberg-bibliothek.de www.minipresse.de www.gutenberg-shop.de Main image, left: To the Roman Emperor Left, from top: Call for Type Exhibition. © Gutenberg Museum. Photo: Dr. Juliane Schwoch Media lounge. © Gutenberg Museum. Photo: Pilar Serrano Celma Vault full of treasures. © Citymarketing GmbH Below: Replica of the historic Gutenberg press. © Gutenberg Museum. Photo: D. Bachert 42-line Gutenberg bible, Shuckburgh edition. © Gutenberg Museum Print show. © Citymarketing GmbH

For additional information visitors can learn more in the Gutenberg library. The specialised library has over 85,000 volumes, scientific articles and magazines about

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Discover Germany | Special Theme | Finest Galleries & Museums Germany

Travel the world In the heart of Munich For over 150 years, the Museum Fünf Kontinente [Five Continents Museum] has celebrated the richness and beauty of global cultural and ethnic diversity in a most spellbinding and open-minded way. TEXT: TINA AWTANI | PHOTOS: MUSEUM FÜNF KONTINENTE

Located in the prestigious Maximilianstraße, visitors of all age groups are welcome to step inside and travel the world to discover the cultural magic of Africa, America, Asia, Australia, the Near and Middle East and the South Seas. Permanently showcasing more than 160,000 items of ethnographic interest and amazing works by international artists, 135,000 photographic documents, as well as a library stocked with over 100,000 books, the Museum Fünf Kontinente is a treasure chest for those longing to explore the exciting mysteries of other nations. Special exhibitions include Unter demVulkan. Kunst der

Ömie aus Papua-Neuguinea [Under theVulcano. Oemie art from Papua New Guinea] and the spectacular Myanmar.Von Pagoden, Longyis und Nat-Geistern [Myanmar. Pagodas, Logyi and Nat Spirits]. Based on the expedition of Lucian Scherman, former director of the museum, and his wife Christine to the country of Burma in 1911, the exhibition offers unparalleled insight into the culture of the “Golden Country”. “We see the museum’s collections as a creative expression of the richness of human cultures from the past and present. With ever growing global interrelations in

MAKK A unique hotspot for art and design The Museum of Applied Arts Cologne, MAKK for short, is the only museum in Europe with a strong focus on art in combination with design and also displays the entire spectrum of European handicrafts from the Middle Ages to the 19th century. TEXT MARILENA STRACKE | PHOTOS: MAKK

The MAKK is based in the heart of Cologne and not only impresses with its permanent exhibition but also receives international attention for their future-oriented special exhibitions. Museum Director Dr. Petra Hesse reveals what art and especially design lovers can look forward to in 2015: “Two remarkable exhibitions are happening this year. One of them is called SYSTEM DESIGN. Over 100 Years of Chaos in Everyday Life [until 7 June 2015]. It deals with the system concept in design and is, with its focus on that specific design history, the first of its kind.”

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More than 150 exhibits by over 90 international designers, both historical and contemporary, deal with, partly, quite sur-

mind, we also focus on current as well as future-oriented issues,”director Dr. Christine Kron explains. www.museum-fuenf-kontinente.de Top: Museum Fünf Kontinente. Photo: Marianne Franke Above: View of the Pagodas (10th-13th century), Bagan, Myanmar. Photos: Heinz Schoeneich (left) Monastery novice in festive gear during hair cutting ceremony. Photo: Wolfgang Ott (right)

prising issues in regard to the system concept in design. As with most other exhibitions at MAKK there are special programmes for kids, says Dr. Hesse, who ensures that visitors of all ages are cared for. She continues: “The special exhibition LOOK! Fashion Designers from A-Z [19 September 2015 to 31 January 2016], will take our visitors to the exciting world of Fashion. We will show a selection of our most important acquisitions of Haute Couture and Prêt-à-porter, starting from sketches by Alexander McQueen to Zadig &Voltaire.” www.makk.de

Design section with the Winkler Collection, MAKK. © Rheinisches Bildarchiv Cologne (left); Shelves and desk “Eames Storage Unit”, Ray and Charles Eames, 1949, Herman Miller Furniture Company. © MAKK / Photo: Sascha Fuis Fotografie Cologne (middle); Opening Ceremony, Prêt-à-porter, Spring/Summer collection 2014, MAKK. © Rheinisches Bildarchiv Cologne / Photo: Marion Mennicken (right)


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Discover Germany | Special Theme | Finest Galleries & Museums Germany

The Glyptothek in Munich shows history carved in marble The Glyptothek in Munich is a compilation of masterpieces from ancient times, a special collection dedicated to sculptures carved from marble in ancient Greece and Rome. Some even say it is the world’s most beautiful museum of its kind. TEXT: JESSICA HOLZHAUSEN PHOTOS: STAATLICHE ANTIKENSAMMLUNGEN UND GLYPTOTHEK MÜNCHEN / RENATE KÜHLUNG

The word Glyptothek in itself is a modern word created from the Greek words “glyphein”, which means sculpture, and “theke”, a repository.Therefore a Glypthothek is a place to store sculptures.What makes the Munich Glyptothek so special is not only its collection, but also that statues are presented in an outstandingly beautiful architecture reminiscent of Roman thermal baths. The antiquities are presented in front of brick walls and in bright daylight provided by large floor-toceiling windows and glass domes. “The changing light allows visitors to experience the sculptures in a new way every day,”says director Florian Knauß. “On a beautiful, sunny day the marble masterpieces glow in sunlight

– like they did in ancient times” when the statues were displayed on market squares or in temples. One of the most impressive treasures of the Munich Glyptothek is the so called Aeginetans that once adorned the tympana of Aegina’s most important temple displaying the heroes of Greek legends during the battle for Troy. “Their importance results from the fact, that the sculptures are Greek originals while most masterpieces from that time are lost today or are only known as later Roman copies,” explains Knauß. Beyond that they show a change in Greek culture from the Archaic period to-

wards the classical style. “The west pediment originates from the Archaic period. The sculptures on the east pediment were created only a few years later. But here the Classic Greek art not only changed how the human body was displayed, but it also shows a completely new understanding of what it means to be human.”Two German and two British researchers discovered the sculptures in Aegina in 1811 when the excavation site was on the territory of the Ottoman Empire. One year later, Martin von Wagner was able to purchase them by auction for the Bavarian Crown Prince Ludwig. Apart from these famous sculptures the Glyptothek displays Greek and Roman art from the 6th century B.C. to the 5th century A.D. Special exhibitions are dedicated to certain topics or show modern art related somehow to antiquity. www.antike-am-koenigsplatz.mwn.de/en Main image: Glyptothek Munich Above from left: Like no other figure this dying soldier shows the new conception of the human being in classical times. West pediment of the temple of Aegina. Diomedes, the Greek hero at the battle for Troy. Emporer Augustus.

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Discover Germany | Special Theme | Finest Galleries & Museums Germany

Munich Residenz Not your usual museum A trip to the Munich Residenz is a truly unique museum experience: visitors can stroll through the European history of art and style, while admiring a wide variety of art collections and roaming through stately rooms with architectural features from the Renaissance to Baroque, the Rococo period and Classicism.

tangible context as the visitor wants to connect the things he learns about the former residents with their history and stories,” Sabine Heym concludes.

TEXT: NANE STEINHOFF

The palace is also a centre of the arts with concert halls, ball rooms, event locations and other cultural facilities, such as the Academy of Science.

Being one of the largest castle complexes in Europe, the Munich Residenz was built in the middle of the city centre in 1385 and has been constantly extended since. It served as place of residence and seat of government for Bavarian Dukes and Kings until the buildings were made public in 1920.“Visitors can reconstruct the history of the building and its previous residents and also learn a lot about the former use and function of the rooms,” says Dr. Sabine Heym, director and head of the museum board of the Bavarian Palace Department. Putting special emphasis on presenting the historic rooms as authentically as possible, audio guides, personal guided tours, as well as special events guarantee that art and history come alive. “The Munich Residenz is a true treasure trove in the heart of Munich. The building with its imposing fa-

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cades from distinct architectural epochs was built to impress with grandeur. Today, a stunning collection of world-class artworks and wealth unfolds inside,” Ines Holzmueller, press officer, adds.

www.residenz-muenchen.de Main image: The ballroom building of the Munich Residenz.

Highlights of the over 100 rooms include the impressive, domed Antiquarium, which is the oldest preserved room of the palace. The most prominent collection is the Schatzkammer with more than 1,250 artworks, which have been accumulated over centuries. Take a look at unique mountain crystal pots, jewellery from the 16th century or the Cuvilliés Theatre – a jewel of Rococo architecture. “The Munich Residenz is not experienced as a classical museum with individual artworks as we focus on walkable art in terms of architecture and interior design. The primary goal is to experience a

Above from top: Estrade of Antiquarium. Auditorium of the Cuvilliés Theatre. Apartment of the Queen in the Munich Residenz. (left) ‘Green Gallery’ – View from hall of mirrors to the South. (right) All images: © Bavarian Palace Department / Andrea Gruber, Rainer Herrmann, Maria Scherf, Philipp Mansmann

The Bavarian Palace Department manages 45 palaces, castles and residences. The unique ensembles of European architecture with their sumptuous artistic interiors attract over five million visitors annually from all over the world. www.schloesser.bayern.de


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The Museum for Communication Berlin

Communication to touch Discover the past, present and future of the world of communication through exciting interactive exhibitions in a unique ambience. Permanent displays offer vivid insights into the history of the information society, while temporary ones showcase many different aspects of communication. TEXT: NANE STEINHOFF | PHOTOS: MUSEUMSSTIFTUNG POST UND TELEKOMMUNIKATION

“Our museum is for everybody and we encourage visitors to interact with our exhibitions. What makes us stand out is that we combine the benefits of a modern museum with the historical architecture of a building from the imperial period, while also offering a great variety according to our visitors,” Oliver Goetze, deputy director of the Museum for Communication Berlin, says. Being a diverse‘museum to touch’, visitors can send telegrams with an old tube mail or communicate with three autarchic robots. “It’s a real children’s magnet and some keep coming back, especially for the robots,” Mr Goetze adds.

Permanent exhibitions take visitors on time travel through the history of communication from the first petroglyphs and the ‘Blue Mauritius’, which is the world’s most famous postage stamp, to the first telephone from Philipp Reis and the Enigma – the German cipher machine of the Second World – to Facebook and Twitter. From April, the interactive ‘Dialogue with Time’ will demonstrate how it feels to age.“Onsite senior guides will encourage dialogue, while visitors will be able to open a door with shaky hands or see through eyes with cataracts. We are trying to show the challenges of growing old and to answer questions about the future,”Mr Goetze says.

Main image: The Museum for Communication. Photo: Michael Ehrhart Above: The ‘Lichthof’ is a popular venue available for hire for company events. Photo: Herbert Schlemmer (left) Permanent exhibition about communication history (shows the combination of historical architecture and modern communication history). Photo: Michael Ehrhart (middle) Temporary exhibition ‘Dialogue with Time’. Photo: Bert Bostelmann (right)

Until the end of February, ‘Around The World in 80 Things – The JulesVerne Code’, a visual and interactive world trip across time, will let visitors experience unconventional objects related to JulesVerne, such as a walking stick with an integrated compass, and will illustrate how we can explore the world today in real time with just one click of the mouse through an interactive‘Urban Observatory’. Since the museum’s opening in 1898, it has developed into more than just a place for exhibitions. Today, it is one of the most prominent addresses in Berlin when it comes to event venue hiring and high-profile companies value the combination of modernity and classical ambience in the world’s oldest postal museum for their receptions. www.mfk-berlin.de

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Discover Germany | Special Theme | Finest Galleries & Museums Germany

The art headquarters of Düsseldorf The Museum Kunstpalast Düsseldorf invites guests of all ages to enjoy a collection with more than 100,000 kinds of art objects. The beautifully designed building with its historical facade is home to art treasures that are certainly worth a visit, or two.

Main image: Museum Kunstpalast. Photo: Geerd Jacobs Top: Rubens gallery in the Museum Kunstpalast. Photo: Andreas Schiblon Above: The museum's KristallBar is great for events. Photo: Jürgen Vogel

TEXT: MARILENA STRACKE | PHOTOS: MUSEUM KUNSTPALAST DÜSSELDORF

The Museum Kunstpalast resulted from the successful merger of the Kunstmuseum (art museum) and the Kunstpalast (art palace) in 2001. The founding of the collection, however, goes back to around 1710 when the elector Johann Wilhelm von der Pfalz began collecting paintings together with his wife Anna Maria Luisa de’ Medici. Today the Museum Kunstpalast is the official art museum of the state capital, Düsseldorf. Press officer Marina Schuster adds: “It plays an important role in the cultural landscape of North Rhine-Westphalia but also receives prestigious international attention when there are exhibitions such as Caravaggio, Bonjour Russia, El Greco and Andreas Gursky.” True highlights are the Rubens gallery and the glass museum Hentrich, containing

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over 10,000 objects. The Museum Kunstpalast was one of the first in Germany to become a partner of google art projects, making a virtual visit possible from anywhere. The museum also offers a great programme for younger guests, whilst ensuring it stays up to date on all social media platforms. Its multi-purpose auditorium, Robert-Schumann-Saal has also proved to be a fantastic location for cultural events. This year the museum is proud to host an exhibition of 60-80 large-size photographs by famous filmmaker Wim Wenders, who has gained an international reputation for films such as Wings of Desire and Pina. Schuster explains: “Different from his films, Wenders stays away from modern techniques when taking photographs. His pictures are created in analogue, without arti-

ficial lights or tripods.” The exhibition runs from 18 April to 16 August 2015, and marks the Düsseldorf-born artist’s 70th birthday. From 10 October 2015, visitors can look forward to the first German solo show of the Spanish baroque painter Francisco de Zurbarán, which will showcase around 70 pieces.“Zurbarán is, next to Velázquez, not only regarded as one of the most significant representative of the Golden Age of Spain, he also counts as one of the greatest of European painters,”Schuster says. When it comes to art, words can only describe so much, and there is more to discover at the Museum Kunstpalast Düsseldorf. Certainly a must-see during your next visit. www.smkp.de


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Discover Germany | Special Theme | Finest Galleries & Museums Germany

Main image: Installation view: "Philip Guston", Aurel Scheibler, Berlin, 2014. Right from top: Installation view: "FORM FARBE RAUM – Uhlmann Baumeister Kricke Nay", Aurel Scheibler Berlin, 2012 until 2013. Installation view: Jack Pierson, "Truth", Aurel Scheibler Cologne, 2002. Aurel Scheibler in front of "Tom Freudenheim“ by Alice Neel, 1979, oil on canvas, 102 x 76 cm. Photo: Courtesy Aurel Scheibler, Berlin, 2015

Berlin’s art gallery Everything but mainstream Art dealer Aurel Scheibler stands for new approaches in an art historical context and for connecting contemporary art with classical but always topical artists’ works since 1991. Placing emphasis on selling and showcasing international artworks, which don’t normally find their way into German exhibition space, the Aurel Scheibler Gallery attracts many visitors, which seek art beyond the mainstream. TEXT: NANE STEINHOFF | PHOTOS: AUREL SCHEIBLER, BERLIN / SIMON VOGEL, ISABELL ERTL, ROMAN MÄRZ

“We put a focus on artists with special activity and on works with strong topicality. Connecting the contemporary and the classical, while never being stale is our goal. Our visitors, especially young people, seem to appreciate this concept,”Aurel Scheibler, art dealer and gallery owner, explains. First established in Cologne in 1991, Germany’s liveliest art scene at that time, the gallery tried to primarily exhibit works from America and the UK – art which wasn’t available to a German audience until then. In 2006, this extraordinary philosophy was taken to the new centre of art activity. Today, the gallery sits in an ancient hall from

1911 in Berlin, which in itself is worth a visit.“The room has a great aura.There is no other exhibition space like ours in Germany, which makes it an unique experience,” Aurel Scheibler remarks. Having spent three years in New York at Christie’s print department and as a personal assistant at The MoMA’s Department of Painting & Sculpture, Aurel Scheibler also worked in several galleries and museums after attending school in Cologne. He also edited the catalogue raisonné for the German abstract painter Ernst Wilhelm Nay, which made him the worldwide expert on that work. “This

practical experience was my dissertation,” Aurel Scheibler smiles. Since then, the art enthusiast managed to get internationally renowned artists such as Öyvind Fahlström, Alice Neel, Norbert Kricke or Jack Pierson onto his exhibition walls. “Real super highlights were the Philip Guston and Ad Reinhardt exhibitions. Until we exhibited their work, their art did not have gallery shows in Germany and is almost non-existent in German institutions,” Aurel Scheibler states. Don’t miss Tom Chamberlain’s upcoming exhibition, who impresses audiences with extraordinary minimalist works, made of several paint layers.“You have to come and see his paintings in the original as the effects are only revealed when you stand in front of them,”Aurel Scheibler says.“I strive for acceptance, good ranking and good art sales,”he laughs.“After all, the latter is what keeps us going.” www.aurelscheibler.com

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KAI 10 Arthena Foundation promotes young artists and searches a dialogue KAI 10 in Düsseldorf is a private and non-commercial institution with the intention of promoting contemporary art that opened its doors in autumn 2008 with the exhibition “No illusions”. Supporting the artistic process on site, organising international group exhibitions as well as instigating discussions about all forms of art, KAI 10 foremost supports young artists in gaining a reputation. TEXT: JESSICA HOLZHAUSEN | PHOTOS: KAI 10 | ARTHENA FOUNDATION

KAI 10, financed and run by the non-profit Arthena Foundation is a platform for experimental practices in the field of contemporary art, architecture, design and new media. The entrepreneur Monika Schnetkamp initiated the foundation to bring together art and science, to create a dialogue between those working in art and those discussing it on the basis of scientific knowledge and cultural theory. The chairwoman established the institution in the media harbour Düsseldorf to have enough space for these events and the up to three exhibitions the Arthena Foundation holds at KAI 10 every year. Up until today artistic director Zdenek Felix and curators Julia Höner and Ludwig Seyfarth have curated nineteen exhibitions staging more than 100 emerging artists. KAI 10 | Arthena Foundation mainly focuses on young artists and helps them find

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their own creative way.The foundation promotes their work by organising exhibitions, publishing catalogues and online film documentations. Furthermore, established artists find their space at KAI 10 as well: In 2013 for example KAI 10 held an exhibition with the title Collagierte Skulpturen showing the work of Isa Genzken, Rachel Harrison and Manfred Pernice. Curated by Zdenek Felix, Collagierte Skulpturen tried to overcome the dissent between sculpture and collage in showing how both forms can be mixed. In the same year, for its fifth anniversary the Arthena Foundation for the first time expanded its scope and participated at the 55th Biennale di Venezia 2013. Thomas Zipp’s installation entitled Comparative Investigation about the Disposition of the Width of a Circle at Palazzo Rossini was one of the highlights of the Biennale.

Until 21 February 2014 KAI 10 is showning Lost Paradise featuring Mark Dion, Stefan Panhans, Andreas Schulze, Marta Volkova & Slava Shevelenko and David Zink Yi. Lost Paradise searches for the relations of modern civilisations and the state of nature in art. Have we lost paradise to a state of earthly sorrow? Or have we kept the connection? www.kaistrasse10.de

Main image: Ludger Gerdes Angst, 1989, Installation view KAI 10, 2014 Courtesy Skulpturenmuseum Glaskasten Marl. Photo: Alexandra Höner © VG Bildkunst, Bonn 2014 Above from top: Mark Dion, Andreas Schulze, Installation view Lost Paradise. Photo: Henning Krause Andreas Schulze, Installation view Lost Paradise. Photo: Achim Kukulies David Zink Yi, Untitled, 2013. Installation view Lost Paradise. Photo: Achim Kukulies (left) Monika Schnetkamp, chairwoman Arthena Foundation (right)


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Discover Germany | Special Theme | Finest Galleries & Museums Germany

Gedenkstätte Bergen-Belsen Remembering the victims of Nazi-Germany The concentration camp in Bergen-Belsen once was a place of suffering; today it has become a place of remembrance and a museum telling about its history. TEXT: JESSICA HOLZHAUSEN | PHOTOS: LOWER SAXONY MEMORIALS FOUNDATION

When British troops liberated the concentration camp Bergen-Belsen near Hannover in April 1945 they not only found ten thousand sick and starving people, many of them children, but also thousands of dead: Photographs from 1945 show naked bodies of women, men and children piled upon each other. Unburied. After the Germans had started the Second World War by invading Poland, the concentration camp was founded as a camp for prisoners of war, since 1941 mainly from the Soviet Union. From 1943 onwards Jews were also detained here under the supervision of the SS. About 52,000 people died in Bergen-Belsen, among them Anne Frank – whose diary was later published – who died shortly before the camp’s liberation in March 1945.

On 26 April 2015, 70 years after end of WWII, 150 survivors and their family members will come back to Bergen-Belsen to commemorate those who died, to remember friends and family. Many survivors were children when they were finally set free in 1945 and today still remember very well what they experienced in Nazi Germany, says spokesperson Stephanie Billib. “Many of them have health problems and certain pictures or symbols still terrify them, like smoking chimneys, dogs or men in uniform. Even today their life cannot be ‘normal’.” That makes it so important for them to come back to Bergen-Belsen, to make the horrors they had to experience more visible for those who live today.“They want to tell their story, to get in contact with a younger

generation to guarantee that young people today continue engaging for democracy and human rights,”says Billib.Young people should gain consciousness of and knowledge about history. But Bergen-Belsen is not only open to those remembering. Next to the memorial place that can be visited daily, there is also a museum telling the story of this place.“Visitors are often very impressed because of the amount of information and the atmosphere they experience in our exhibition,” says Stephanie Billib. In particular, interviews made with contemporary witnesses are an important element, because here visitors learn about first hand experiences. For the outdoor area there also exists a tablet application that is especially helpful for groups and schools visiting the site. bergen-belsen.stiftung-ng.de

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PEAK PERFORMANCE www.phh.at


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Besides a robust economic development, Brandenburg offers a high quality of life. This view is shared by both citizens and visitors. Brandenburg has become a top destination for tourists from around the world.

Special

Many visitors are attracted by our rich Prussian heritage, including the famous Sanssouci Palace, and historic sites such as castles, monasteries and old town centres. Theme Others come to Brandenburg because of its picturesque landscape and stunning nature with its abundant treasures.

Best of Brandenburg

Dear Ladies and Gentlemen Are you looking for a place which is good for business and investment? A place that is good for education and family life? A place that offers you ample opportunities for culture, sports and recreation? A place that is at the heart of Europe, connecting East and West? In short, a place that combines everything you need? TEXT: DR DIETMAR WOIDKE, MINISTER PRESIDENT OF BRANDENBURG | PHOTOS: DIE HOFFOTOGRAFEN

Then you should come to visit Brandenburg. Encompassing Berlin, Brandenburg is part of the vibrant“capital region”, one of Germany’s most dynamic regions in terms of innovation and economic growth. Companies benefit from the region’s excellent infrastructure, top-notch universities and a highly skilled workforce. Moreover, they benefit from an economic policy that supports businesses in the best way possible. In 2015, the citizens of Brandenburg celebrate the 25th anniversary of their state, which was re-established in the course of German reunification. The first years of Brandenburg were a rocky path. People enjoyed real democracy and freedom for the first time. But they also felt the pain of economic restructuring and massive layoffs. Back then, it was hard to imagine that sustainable recovery and redevelopment would be possible.

It was possible! It was possible thanks to the solidarity from our new partners – including Western federal states and the European Union. It was possible thanks to the commitment and the courage of our citizens. And, last but not least, it was possible thanks to a state government, which spared no efforts to prevent large-scale deindustrialization. Today, we can say: We are now on the right track. Brandenburg has become an attractive location for companies, among them large global players, such as Rolls Royce, Mercedes or BASF. Moreover, the BerlinBrandenburg region benefits from a high concentration of academic and research institutions, with positive effects on startup activity and entrepreneurship. In 2013, for example, new businesses provided jobs for around 17,000 people while generating revenues of 1.7 billion Euros.

If you like water, Brandenburg is definitively the place to be. We have more than 3,000 lakes and 30,000 km of watercourses, surrounded by forests and nature conservation areas. The beautiful Spree Forest, the Oderbruch area in Eastern Brandenburg or the unspoilt nature of the Uckermark region are perfect for those seeking recreation. Others prefer the UNESCO heritage in Potsdam or our stunning industrial monuments in the Lusatia region. Whatever you are most interested in: Brandenburg has a lot to offer. In 2015 you can attend a special highlight: The federal horticultural exhibition “BUGA” [Bundesgartenschau] in the Havel region, an area whose settlement dates back to the Middle Ages. Starting in April, the BUGA will guide you through impressive landscapes of flowers, parks and historic buildings. If you are planning a family trip, think about buying a BUGA ticket. You see, there are plenty of reasons to come to Brandenburg. We are looking forward to your visit! SincerelyYours,

Dr. Dietmar Woidke, Minister President of Brandenburg

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Brandenburg Full of variety Located in the East of the country and surrounding Berlin, one of the 16 federal states in Germany has it all. Incredible nature, one of Europe’s most extensive landscapes of rivers and lakes and a close proximity to one of the most exciting and vibrant cities in the world. TEXT: NANE STEINHOFF

Longing for culture, natural beauty and scenic lake districts? This is the place to breathe in the fresh air, let your eyes wander over lush green meadows, glistening waters or impressive UNESCO World Heritage Sites. Brandenburg is a holiday paradise, offering a wide range of activities and sights. Often dubbed Europe’s largest water sports region, the unspoilt countryside is perfect for visitors on the quest to discover the great outdoors, while benefiting from the

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closeness to one of Europe’s most exciting capitals. Where baroque meets contemporary Potsdam, Brandenburg’s capital, is renowned for its rich culture and heritage. It’s a magnificent city boasting UNESCO World Heritage Sites, gardens, lakes, parks and palaces, which date as far back as Potsdam’s time as the former royal seat of Prussia. Peacock Island, Belvedere Palace, Saviour’s Church, New Palace in Sanssouci Park or the observatory at Babelsberg Cas-

Main image: Babelsberg Castle. Photo: TMB-Fotoarchiv/Yorck Maecke Right top: Park of Sanssouci Palace in Potsdam. Photo: TMB-Fotoarchiv/Geertje Wieck/SPSG Right below: Marina on a lake in Brandenburg. Photo: TMB-Fotoarchiv/Steffen Lehmann Below: A street festival in the Dutch Quarter in Potsdam. Photo: TMB-Fotoarchiv/Uwe Seibt

tle are just a few of the plentiful tourist attractions. The historical centre of Potsdam comprises a number of charming old buildings, inviting long shopping strolls with its lively street cafes, elegant boutiques, antique shops and local restaurants. Make sure to visit the New Market Square – it is one of the best preserved baroque squares in Eu-


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Discover Germany | Special Theme | Best of Brandenburg

toric towns and villages or explore the smallest low mountain range of Germany in Brandenburg’s administrative district of Potsdam-Mittelmark. Cycle through colourful poppy, blue cornflower and yellow rapeseed fields or take a look at the picturesque alleys in the pine forests, so typical of the Brandenburg area. Whether you explore the region by foot, bike, car or canoe, countless nature parks and 240 conservation areas are waiting to be explored. While around one third of Brandenburg’s landscape consists of nature reserves, the Lower Oder Valley National Park covers 60 km of meadowland along the river. It is home to flowering dry grassland, picturesque scenery, many species of wildlife, Petzow Castle, historical tobacco barns and much more.Take a river cruise or ride your bike through 7,000 km of newly renovated cycling paths across Brandenburg to experience the beautiful natural scenery.

milk, beer or mud baths and try wellness wonders such as linseed oil, apricot kernels or aromatic soaks in wooden tubs. Brandenburg has a lot to offer and is well worth a visit. www.brandenburg-tourism.com Below from top down: Explore the big network of biking paths around the Spreewald. Photo: TMB-Fotoarchiv/Paul Hahn Enjoy one of the many canals around Brandenburg. Photo: TMB-Fotoarchiv/Wolfgang Ehn The ‘green jungle’ of Germany, the Spreewald forest. Photo: mosta, Tourismusverband Spreewald Blossoming trees in spring. Photo: TMB-Fotoarchiv/Yorck Maecke

Discover Germany’s Venice

rope. Or take it easy and enjoy the laid back atmosphere in the Dutch Quarter where offbeat bars, art galleries and nicely decorated courtyards sparkle with bohemian flair. Film fans should visit Babelsberg, Europe’s oldest and biggest film studios and birthplace of over 3,000 movies and TV productions. Water, wildlife and beyond Over 3,000 lakes and 30,000 km of waterways invite a variety of leisure activities in the German state with an astonishingly idyllic countryside. Three UNESCO biosphere reserves, eleven nature parks and the Havel, Oder and Spree rivers offer several possibilities for action on land, as well as water. Hike through an ocean of blossoming white and pink fruit trees in the waterscape of the River Havel in spring, visit his-

To discover ‘Germany’s Green Venice’ hop into a canoe or wooden boat in the magical Spreewald Forest. An experience not to be missed, Germany’sVenice is much more peaceful than the original Italian version and consists of 250 km of canals, which lead through forests, wide meadows and small villages with wooden houses surrounded by water. Visitors can be shipped through hours of undisturbed tranquillity in the nature preserve where dragonflies buzz across the water, green bushes glide past and rare bird species fly across the 48,000 hectare stream labyrinth. After a tiring activity-packed day, treat yourself to some culinary highlights, such as local asparagus or‘Knieperkohl’, a pickled cabbage dish made of a mixture of kale, white, brown and red cabbage, which is traditionally combined with savoury dishes, such as salted pork leg. If you seek to relax, visit one of the idyllic thermal spa resorts in Bad Belzig, Templin and Bad Saarow. Indulge your senses in

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Potsdam-Mittelmark Enjoy with all the senses From big city life to rural postcard idyll in just 30 minutes: people who leave Berlin’s city boundaries behind in a southerly direction, can look forward to a diverse landscape, a big variety of local delicacies, an interesting agricultural and economic heritage and much more. TEXT: NANE STEINHOFF | PHOTOS: METZLER/PRESSESTELLE LK PM

Germany’s geologically blessed administrative district of Potsdam-Mittelmark offers a wide range of positive contrasts. While the South impresses with the mountain ranges of the High Flaeming Nature Park, the North captivates visitors with big cities, economic progress and phenomenal lake scenery.

the small, the quiet, the diverse and the loving and passionate atmosphere on the other. You only need open your eyes and curiosity to embrace the small adventure of Potsdam-Mittelmark,” says Steffie Marquardt, employee in the administration of the economic promotion of Potsdam-Mittelmark.

“The exceptional feature of Potsdam-Mittelmark is the number of big contrasts, which positively shape and enrich the region: the great, the loud, the diverse and sometimes the stately on the one hand and

See, feel and hear

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Steep dry valleys, fascinating streams and big glacial erratics make the High Flaeming Nature Park a famous destination for nature-lovers and relaxation seekers. Here,

one can take a deep breath of the clear air and listen to the sounds of nature. Slowly discover this landscape on 1,000 kilometres of fully developed hiking, cycling and bridle paths. Drive past unspoilt nature and villages, which have preserved their historic townscape for hundreds of years and take in the sight of ancient water mills and old fieldstone churches. Pack your hiking boots and scale the highest elevation in Brandenburg, the 200 metre high Hagelberg or visit the well-preserved castles of Eisenhardt in Bad Belzig or Rabenstein in Raben in the middle of a charming beech and mixed forest. Known as a fascinating water sports region, water enthusiasts can swim, paddle or sail in the Havelland with its Havel River and the numerous lakes, which are bor-


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perience a special flair for intimacy and exclusivity in the more rural regions where small and traditional locations, such as village churches and parks, guarantee that an almost homely atmosphere between visitors and artists emerges – ‘art to touch’ would be the right phrase,” Steffie Marquardt adds. As diverse and interesting as its cultural offering is the economic development of Potsdam-Mittelmark. Important business and science locations in the fields of biotechnology or medical engineering are located close to Berlin and follow the heartbeat of the city, while the agricultural sector follows its centuries-old rhythm just a few steps away. Smell and taste

dered by the lush grass of extensive meadows and forests. Germany’s biggest fruitand vegetable-growing region invites to extensive strolls through plantations of blossoming fruit trees in spring.

More than half of Potsdam-Mittelmark’s total area is used for agriculture and forestry.“Primary production is really important for us. Our main objective is to produce in the region for the region with the highest transparency for consumers so that we can produce ‘the stuff, from which gourmet dreams are made of’,” Steffie Marquardt says. Regional farmers and family businesses are known for their production of healthy and tasty products – from juicy steak and local pears to delicious milk and top-class fruit brandies.

Taste a sip of local hand-made whisky from the award-winning Schultzens homestead in Glindow, a glass of wine from one of the three regional vineyards, try the famous “Beelitzer Asparagus” or “Teltower Ruebchen”, a special white turnip, which is only grown in Potsdam-Mittelmark. Don’t miss out on fresh fish straight out of the Havel River, such as steamed crayfish, pikeperch or eel served in one of the cosy country inns and charming guesthouses, where “visitors can be sure to experience unique hospitality, tradition and individuality,” as Steffie Marquardt puts it. “Potsdam-Mittelmark is a region for gourmets. Everything that foodies appreciate, is grown, processed and crafted here with a lot of love, creativity and expertise. To create something special, traditional produce and modern gastronomic know-how are blended with local cuisine,” Steffie Marquardt concludes. www.potsdam-mittelmark.de Main image: Bad Belzig: View from tower of Eisenhardt Castle onto historic town. Left: Post mill in Ketzür. Ziesar Castle: Former bishop’s residence and museum of Brandenburg’s Christianisation. Old townhall and Werder Church (Havel). Below: Opening of asparagus harvesting season in Beelitz. & Traditional street music: the ‘Rabenbrüder’ from the Rabenstein Castle. (left) Fläming Spring Festival 2014 – new Queen of Fläming. (right)

A deliberate preservation of tradition can be witnessed in village communities throughout the South. Experience old traditional handicrafts and stop at the workshops of local craftsmen, who are happy to show and teach tourists their skills. Music festivals, rock and blues concerts, small village theatres, open air concerts, museums and art exhibitions, regional park festivals and village art tours round off the range of offers.“Potsdam-Mittelmark’s unique cultural programme impresses with international top acts thanks to the close proximity to Berlin and Potsdam,” says Steffie Marquardt.“At the same time, visitors can ex-

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Discover Germany | Special Theme | Best of Brandenburg

Oberspreewald-Lausitz A popular holiday destination The district of Oberspreewald-Lausitz is situated in the southernmost tip of the state of Brandenburg, between the conurbations of Berlin and Dresden. The change in the region has been remarkable; once a former mining area, it has been transformed into an attractive region for living, tourism and energy. TEXT: LANDKREIS OBERSPREEWALD-LAUSITZ | TRANSLATION: EMMIE COLLINGE | PHOTOS: STEFFEN RASCHE

P

The area has long since developed into a popular holiday destination. Each year thousands of visitors discover the fascinating mining relics, which have significantly shaped Lausitz over the course of many years. By flooding the former opencast mines in the south and creating over 20 artificial lakes, a spectacular water world on a unique scale is taking shape. As the largest man-made water landscape in Europe, the Lausitz lake district presents a host of holiday and leisure opportunities, however this is not the only attraction; in the north of the district the re-

markable lagoon landscape of the Spreewald is well worth a visit. The cycle touring network has developed over the past few years, and is now a signature feature of the region. From the Spreewald to the lakes of Lausitz, visitors – on foot or by bicycle – have a remarkable landscape to explore. Largely flat, these smooth routes are ideal for a relaxing cycle tour for young and old. So whether you want an active holiday in and around water, submerging yourself in history, or refreshing yourself in the middle of nature, there is something to suit everyone.

www.osl-online.de

The best you, you can be. It’s all about who you are, what you have to offer, and what makes you unique. Let’s find it out.

www.markuspuettmann.de 20 min. apart Frankfurt Main Airport


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Experience the European Double City of Frankfurt (Oder) /Słubice Discover the attractive riverside cities of Frankfurt/Słubice and their diverse offerings of art and culture! Think museums, concerts, theatre performances, cabaret and shopping. Delve into their bilingualism, their attitudes and unearth the historic background of the two cities. TEXT & PHOTOS: TOURISMUSVEREIN FRANKFURT ODER E.V. | TRANSLATION: EMMIE COLLINGE

Depicting the Birth of Antichrist, the spectacular and unique windows of the St. Marienkirche are certainly worth a visit. Similarly, the ‘Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach’ Concert Hall, once a Franciscan monastery church, is deeply ingrained in the heart of this Hanseatic city. The poster child-cumorchestra of the city, the Brandenburg State Orchestra Frankfurt, calls this Concert Hall their home and it has become a veritable institution within the city, making a visit more than worthwhile. Hosting conferences without frontiers in this city on the Oder? Easily done – and guaranteed to be something novel for your

clients. The Kleist Forum has space for 1,360 people in its seven conference and seminar rooms. With three stages too, Kleist Forum presents a diverse programme of theatre productions, concerts, opera and much more. Frankfurt(Oder) /Słubice gives visitors an opportunity to experience culture without frontiers. Home to multiple well-known, cross-regional festivals, the city welcomes this variety. Each autumn sees the life and works of the Frankfurt-born poet Heinrich von Kleist celebrated over the course of several days. Known as the Kleistfesttage, the city stages contemporary theatre, readings,

art exhibitions and many other events. At the beginning of March, the Musikfesttage draws classical music aficionados, lovers of symphonies and those keen to hear new compositions to the city on the Oder with several days dedicated to this well-loved genre. Folk and world music fans are captivated by autumn’s transVOCALE festival, yet another event not to be missed. And – whilst you’re there – don’t miss out on the abundance of museums. The Kleist Museum is a particular highlight, tracing this poet’s rich life and works as well as that of his contemporaries. Just one hour from Berlin, Frankfurt (Oder) is easily reached with the well-constructed motorway or by the half-hourly regional train. Reaching the city on the Oder in just one hour, these trains depart from several Berlin stations including Ostbahnhof, Alexanderplatz, Friedrichstrasse, and Zoologischer Garten. The German-Polish Tourist Information looks forward to your visit and is happy to help with any inquiries. www.tourismus-ffo.de

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Above left: Hussites Festival in Bernau’s town park. Photo: Micha Winkler. Above middle: Bernau’s historic city gate made of stone in the town wall. Photo: BeSt Bernauer Stadtmarketing GmbH

Bernau bei Berlin – where history meets modernity The city of Bernau bei Berlin combines historical with modern architectural elements and impresses with cultural diversity, historic building structures in and around the city centre, a close proximity to the metropolis of Berlin and a natural landscape, which attracts many tourists seeking extensive activity holidays.

St. Marienkirche, an impressive Gothic brick church from 1519. Get inspired by the interesting mixture of modern architecture, industrialised architecture from the GDR times and preserved historic constructions.

TEXT: NANE STEINHOFF | PHOTOS: PRESS IMAGES

Nestled in the Barnim Nature Park on the northern border of Berlin, you can escape the turmoil of the big city and embrace the relaxing atmosphere of the modern small town of Bernau bei Berlin in less than thirty minutes. Existing top-class infrastructure mixed with a green environment, close proximity to Berlin with its urban merits and top-class short-distance travel opportunities make the city a popular residential area.“The small city is the gate to the holiday region Barnimer Land, which is a popular excursion destination for many citizens of Berlin. Under the slogan ‘history

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meets modernity’ visitors can time travel from the Middle Ages up to the modern age,“ André Stahl, mayor of Bernau bei Berlin, says. Comprising 37,657 residents in the city centre and the five surrounding districts, the town centre is surrounded by a historic town wall with well-preserved towers and an original city gate made of stone. Discover medieval streets, ramparts, affectionately renovated Wilheminian-style buildings, centuries-old half-timbered houses, modern newly constructed buildings or the

Buildings from different architectural eras stand harmonically side by side and tell the story of more than 775 years of history. The Kantorhaus from the 16th century and the classical guildhall from 1805 are witnesses of their time. Don’t miss out on the exclusive Baudenkmal Bundesschule, which is a memorial of the famous Bauhaus architectural style and one of the most important buildings of modernism in Germany. Cultural diversity “Visitors appreciate the historico-cultural sights of the city and the cultural diversity. Various festivals in the city’s public space


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Above left: Old architecture in the Hohe Steinstraße. Photo: BeSt Bernauer Stadtmarketing. Above middle: Relax in front of the Muehlentor Gate. Photo: Micha Winkler (top). Bernau’s weekly market. Photo: BeSt Bernauer Stadtmarketing GmbH (below). Above right: Schoenower Heide Natural Reserve. Photo: BeSt Bernauer Stadtmarketing GmbH (top). Bernau’s town park. Photo: Micha Winkler (below).

offer special moments for tourists and residents alike,”André Stahl says. Numerous museums and art galleries for history fans, as well as fans of modernism, music festivals, concerts, exhibitions, readings and visual art vernissages – Bernau bei Berlin offers everything.“Cultural highlights are the art and traditional craft markets, as well as diverse concerts in the St. Marienkirche or the Hussites Festival,”André Stahl says. The Hussites Festival, whose origin dates back to the 15th century, traditionally takes place every second weekend of June – this year from to 14 June – and describes a celebration of the 775-year-long history of Bernau bei Berlin. Attracting around 25,000 visitors annually, the city invites for a threeday-long time travel through the Middle Ages, where more than 1,000 actors will recall the town’s history in a magnificent parade and the city park will transform into a medieval fair.

makes the city an important medical location in Germany,”André Stahl explains. High-performance medicine, rehabilitation centres in nature and top-quality after treatment characterise the medical amenities available. 16 day care centres, the Hoffnungstaler Stiftung Lobetal facilities for people with disabilities, a diverse and topclass education landscape, more than 100 societies for leisure activities and a beautiful retirement home, which impresses with topmodernity and accessibility, offers everything residents need close to their homes. The Immanuel Klinikum Bernau Cardiac Centre Brandenburg combines the medical specialist departments of a hospital with the disciplines of a heart centre under one roof. With 1,500 open-heart surgeries and over 6,400 treatments in the cardiac catheter laboratory, the Cardiac Centre Brandenburg is one of the leading institutions in Germany.

Health resort “Barrier-free Bernau bei Berlin’s economic strength lies in a comprehensive infrastructure in the area of health care, which

all kinds. The Barnim Nature Park, the Schoenewer Heide Natural Reserve, the Barnimer Feldmark Regional Park or the Wandlitz and Liepnitz Lake are easily accessible by bike and offer a relaxing nature getaway. Explore the rural idyll, the crystal clear lakes and widespread forests on the welldeveloped network of biking and hiking trails. Try horse-riding, start your own small journey of discovery on a Segway, embrace the Berlin-Usedom biking trail, which leads all the way up to the Baltic Sea or go on a pilgrimage on the famous Jacobsweg from Frankfurt (Oder) to Bernau. After an eventful day, settle down in one of the cosy restaurants and embrace the city’s top-class regional cuisine. “A local delicacy is the Bernauer Torwaechter – the black beer, which recalls the former brewing tradition of the city,”André Stahl concludes.

Active in nature Bernau bei Berlin offers beautiful sceneries and is ideal for recreational activities of

www.bernau-bei-berlin.de

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Cottbus – in the State of Brandenburg Diversity – in the middle of a “longed-for destination” Cottbus is not just another city, but many cities in one: main city of the region of Lausitz, business centre, university city, sport city, energy centre, gateway to the Spreewald and green city. TEXT & PHOTOS: STADTMARKETING- UND TOURISMUSVERBAND COTTBUS | TRANSLATION: EMMIE COLLINGE

“The Spreewald and Brandenburg have something magical and mystical for me. The flatness, the vastness, and the view to the horizon trigger a certain longing in me. It frees the eye, my thoughts run free, and through this becomes a coveted destination. I immediately liked the Brandenburg people. Like the Swiss, they have their feet on the ground; they’re honest people, who perhaps aren’t immediately approachable, a little reserved. But once you have won their trust it can be a very deep, reliable connection and an honest, natural warmth,” says Dr Stefan Kannewischer, Kannewis-

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cher Holding, Zug, Switzerland.Tourist ambassador for the Federal State of Brandenburg 2013/2014. Kannewischer Holding runs a thermal bath and spa hotel in the Spreewald near Cottbus. The visible ties between the past and the present in its quaint historic centre are a striking feature of Cottbus. Today, a former oil-fired power station shines as a new art museum, and in the imposing Art Nouveau state theatre you’ll find outstanding performances of modern acting and musical theatre. In front of superb baroque

gabled facades, romantic street cafes nestle under the dominating tower of the Oberkirche. It’s the biggest town in the region of Lausitz, as the south Brandenburg area between the conurbations of Berlin and Dresden has been known for centuries. Having retained its charm as the “City of short streets”, you can explore Cottbus and the surrounding districts easily with a bicycle. Five well-marked long distance cycle routes meet in the town, making it an ideal starting place for short or long trips out. Cottbus is particularly attractive for its rural situation “in the middle of nature”.Take, for example, the Spreewald, the only landscape within Europe to boast such waterrich nature, and known as the “green Venice”. On the Spree’s seemingly endless channels, boats glide silently on the water


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Discover Germany | Special Theme | Best of Brandenburg

of timelessness, and incomparable thanks to the imposing pyramids in the lake. Sport has a special place in Cottbus too. A multiplicity of clubs and modern sports facilities give the phrase“sports for all”a special significance. The encouragement of top-level sport up to Olympic standard has had great success, seeing successful Olympians receive coaching and training in athletics, gymnastics and cycling. International events such as the Gymnastics of Champions, the German Meeting or the Springer–Meeting (both athletics) take place in Cottbus. And, last but not least, the name of FC Energie Cottbus in the Bundesliga is testament to just what sport means to this city.

Dr Stefan Kannewischer

Cottbus - Die Vorteilsregion

Main image: Technology- and Industrial Park North. Photo: Richard Kliche Left: The Altmarkt in Cottbus. Photo: Fotolia (top) Cottbus State Theatre. Photo: Fotolia (middle) Home of the FC Energie Cottbus. Photo: Worbser Sportfotografie (down) Below: Pyramid in the Branitzer Park. Photo: Fotolia (top) A typical Spreewald barge. Photo: Fotolia (middle) The famous Spreewald. Photo: Fotolia (down)

A great business climate Companies are confronted with an outstanding milieu: qualified and motivated skilled workers, modern scientific establishments, manageable cost structures, direct access to the east European markets as well as support measures and business premises. The Development Agency Cottbus [Entwicklungsgesellschaft Cottbus – EGC] provides investors with a professional business promotion service in the matter of inward investment with advice and help – and it’s all for free! www.vorteil-fachkraefte.ch through ancient woodlands, lush flora and fauna, and past thatch-roofed farmhouses in this unique landscape. As well as this UNESCO-protected, diversity-rich river and wetlands area, new nature and leisure areas are evolving with the restoration of natural habitats in former open cast mines, giving provision for both fast and slow water sports. The Lausitz lakeland will therefore grow into Europe’s biggest artificial water landscape with one of the biggest lake areas. Just outside the city boundary of Cottbus, Germany’s largest artificial lake, the Cottbus Ostsee is coming into being. The city has much to thank for to the world traveller and writer, Prince Hermann von Pückler-Muskau. In the 19th century he created the Branitzer park, a priceless jewel

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Discover Germany | Business | Solicitor Column

A Classical Repatriation Saga Explained (Part 1)

TEXT & PHOTO: GREGOR KLEINKNECHT

Discuss museums and galleries with anybody, and it will usually not be long before talk turns to the Elgin Marbles, all the more since the call for their return to Greece has recently been revived with prominent Hollywood support. So what is the debate actually all about? The Elgin Marbles, or Parthenon Marbles, as they are also known, (let's simply call them “the Marbles”), are marble sculptures which originally adorned the Parthenon on the Acropolis in Athens and represent scenes from Athenian cult and mythology. They were brought to Britain by Lord Elgin in the early 1800s and are now housed in the British Museum in London. The dispute about the Marbles has a wider significance insofar as they are representative of many works of art in the world’s museums and private collections that have become the subject of a growing movement for the repatriation of cultural property and typify the debate about the role and place of cultural heritage and the universal museum in the international community. Many of the events which led to the removal of the Marbles from Greece are now disputed and can no longer clearly be ascertained. While Athens was under the rule of the Ottoman Empire, the Parthenon became a military citadel. In September 1687, an explosion destroyed significant parts of the building although the Marbles themselves remained relatively unscathed. For the next 113 years, the Parthenon site lay unprotected and the Ottoman occupiers as

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well as locals removed numerous fragments from the site for use as building materials elsewhere, or to fuel a growing international trade in antiquities. In 1800, Lord Elgin arrived to study and document the artworks of the Parthenon, having been given two letters of instruction by the Ottoman authorities. The documents have not withstood the passage of time and it is now disputed what work they precisely authorised Lord Elgin to carry out. In the event, Elgin removed a collection of about half of the then surviving marble sculptures from the Parthenon and shipped them to Britain, much to the dismay of the French, who were at the same time aggressively acquiring artworks to fill the Musée Napoleon (now the Louvre). It has never been established with any degree of certainty whether he hoped to rescue the sculptures for posterity and to avoid their further destruction, or whether he calculated to take advantage of his position as ambassador, and of the corrupt local authorities, to remove the Marbles from Greece for personal gain. The House of Commons then purchased the collection and vested it in the Trustees of the British Museum in perpetuity. The other half of the sculptures remained on the Acropolis and endured more destruction and plunder until the remaining sculptures were finally removed from the Parthenon in 1975 and were more recently moved into the new Acropolis Museum in Athens… [To be continued in Issue 24]

Gregor Kleinknecht LLM MCIArb is a German Rechtsanwalt and English solicitor, and a partner at Hunters Solicitors, a leading law firm in Lincoln’s Inn. Hunters Solicitors, 9 New Square, Lincoln’s Inn, London WC2A 3QN, E-mail: gjk@hunters-solicitors.co.uk www.hunters-solicitors.co.uk


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Business | Hess Rechtsanwälte & Notare AG

Main image: Dr. Hans Hess and daughter Simone Hess Nielsen. Above: Company’s office and former family home of Dr. Hans Hess.

Hess Rechtsanwälte und Notare AG A family business that helps you take the right route Hess Rechtsanwälte und Notare AG stands for personal and professional legal advice from one source with strong roots in the region. The family business run by father and daughter puts special emphasis on comprehensive, highly personal advice, while focussing on notarial services, such as real estate, company, marital and inheritance law.

workflow and the comprehensive range of services, which also includes a lot of tax aspects due to the Consilio Treuhand Revisions AG, which is managed by Hansruedi Hess, my brother,” Simone Hess Nielsen says.

TEXT: NANE STEINHOFF | PHOTOS: PHILIPP MÄCHLER

Based in the Canton of Obwalden and established in the 70s, lawyer and notary Dr. Hans Hess, has steadily extended the law office ever since. In 2005, his daughter Simone Hess Nielsen, also a lawyer and notary, boarded the company, which is based in the former family home of Dr. Hans Hess – a traditional Swiss chalet. Now the office manager, Simone Hess Nielsen guarantees to react flexibly and efficiently in accordance with clients’ needs, while accompanying them through all stages of proceedings. Furthermore, the law firm directs its attention to a strong regional focus. Being strongly rooted in the

local economy, as father and daughter are both active as administrative board members in companies, the duo puts their expertise into practice in a regional dimension. Their clients, mostly comprising of private individuals as well as smaller and mediumsize companies value the extensive personal advice offered. Having a big international network through long stays abroad, the duo also supports a number of clients with international backgrounds. “Our clients appreciate the personal advice of our family business, the efficient

Providing highly qualified lawyers, the law firm draws on decades of experience and can offer expertise in various fields of law. The two solicitors and one legal employee see their main task in supporting clients with personal legal advice and as notaries in real estate – and company law. “Our clients are at the heart of our activities and we focus on protecting their interests to the greatest extent possible and on arriving at efficient solutions, because the success and satisfaction of our clients is our primary motivation,” the family business agrees. www.kanzlei-hess.ch

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Left: Stefan Warbek

dustry, universities, public institutions, artists and charities. Founder Stefan Warbek explains:“Creative ideas and solutions for life’s challenges are not only the engine of our society’s development but also the driving force of any economic success. We not only see creativity and innovative ideas as the contributing factors to the on-going progress of society and culture, but also as the essence of the human spirit. This fascination with immaterial value in our society is exactly what our law firm deals with on a legal level.” “Our legal practice was founded to protect creative and innovative ideas and hence help to promote their break-through,”Warbek adds. Be it the Austria Ski group, Apassionata or SOS Children’sVillages International, Warbek is proud to have gained their trust. He adds:“It is a special honour for us to be able to support His Holiness the Dalai Lama.”

Warbek Rechtsanwaelte Protecting innovative and creative solutions Austrian law firm Warbek Rechtsanwaelte, has successfully specialised in giving legal advice and finding solutions for creative and innovative businesses and individuals. Their marvellous track record, including working with His Holiness the Dalai Lama, is not only proof of their skills but also something to be proud of. TEXT: MARILENA STRACKE | PHOTOS: WARBEK RECHTSANWAELTE

Anyone who has ever worked within a creative or innovative environment knows that they come with specific needs and always bear a unique set of problems. The attorneys at Warbek have specialised in finding solutions for exactly that. They are experts, who understand that their advice has to be tailored to unique needs and know that confidentiality is of the upmost importance in the world of intellectual

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property. Working as a very small, dedicated team ensures that their clients’ ideas and innovative developments are well guarded. Warbek’s client base ranges from companies operating in engineering, research, art and culture to show business and sports. They support national and international designers and fashion labels as well as representatives of the international patent in-

Services include intellectual property rights such as patents, trademarks, designs or copyrights as well as data protection and other important personal rights. From helping develop entrepreneurial ideas to legal questions regarding daily business, Warbek supports his clients on their creative journey and is not afraid to think outside the box. With a fantastic network of national and international patent attorneys, tax and management consultants, investors and PR agencies, Warbek attorneys can provide top-quality guidance, locally and abroad. www.warbek.at

Stefan Warbek with His Holiness the Dalai Lama.


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Discover Germany | Business | KARGO Kommunication GMBH

Creativity made in Switzerland With 499 realised projects within the last two years, KARGO operates in the fields of social media, graphic design, classical advertising, online marketing, corporate design and illustration. The small but charming advertising agency was established by Christoph Balsiger and is directly located in Bern, Switzerland. TEXT: MERYEM HAUER | PHOTOS: KARGO KOMMUNIKATION GMBH

It is a place for new ideas and creativity without limits – where some young, talented and creative minds accompany their clients and the corresponding messages through every communicative territory to reach their targets. Thereby all available platforms are used. The two experienced consultants Evelyn Schneider and Nicole Gerber provide advice or assistance wherever it is needed. Both of them are lecturing at universities to pass their knowledge on to the next generation of creative social media managers.The agency’s client base is mainly concentrated on branches such as energy, finance, associations, public authorities, gastronomy and culture. In this context, the main focus lies on the holistic communication, besides smart and networked multichannel solutions, which are

placed on- and offline. Christoph Balsiger knows that those who want to stand out have to choose the right message to meet the goals appropriately. UEFA Euro 2008 Bern The EURO 08 Bern project indicated a milestone for KARGO, who were commissioned with the conception of all arrangements of the city, canton and Euro 08 Bern association for the prestigious tournament. Due to the graphic conception for the venue, the young agency made a name for itself in Switzerland. Benefiting from the attention, KARGO soon acquired larger scale clients and projects. Between May and June, the famous beach bar Hermann, which is directly located at the Danube Canal, was transformed into the SWISS BEACH.

Swiss vegetables KARGO realised the 2014 campaign for the Association of Swiss vegetable producers by embracing the whole process from creating an initial idea to the print and development of three TV spots. The campaign is based on an all-season (spring, summer, autumn) and cross-media strategy combined with various on- and offline methods. Adrianos On the occasion of the 15th anniversary year, the trademark Adriano was represented in a completely fresh and simplified way. After developing the new corporate design, the appearance is calmer and more organised than before. But still, the wellknown Adriano’s bean remains in a simple black/white-drawing whereby the product design is accompanied with fresh colour accents. Now the responsive website and the online shop are represented in a purist, friendly, diversified and more extensive manner www.kargokomm.ch

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A global education for a career without boundaries Ranked among the best hospitality management schools in the world, Les Roches International School of Hotel Management stands for Swiss excellence in education and has prepared students for success since 1954. TEXT: NANE STEINHOFF | PHOTOS: LES ROCHES - INTERNATIONAL SCHOOL OF HOTEL MANAGEMENT

The private institution, located in the Swiss Alps and in close proximity to the golf and ski resort of Crans-Montana, seeks to train the future leaders in hospitality. Through English-taught undergraduate, graduate, and postgraduate programmes in the fields of hospitality, tourism and event management, students acquire the skill set needed for rapid advancement and career development in a fast-growing global industry with limitless opportunities. The special handson approach of the curriculum equips students with the knowledge of practical hotel and restaurant operations and builds their confidence, self-discipline and analytical skills. “A combination of academic and experiential learning on campus, coupled with real-life experiences during pro-

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fessional internships and a strong personal development gives our students a head start when joining the industry upon graduation,” says Sonia Tatar, CEO Les Roches Worldwide. Special focus on internationality According to Tatar, Les Roches currently enrols 1,680 students from 99 different countries.This international environment is the best possible preparation for a later career in a globalised industry, exposing students at a young age to many different cultures, customs and languages, teaching them cross-cultural sensitivity and a global fluency which are crucial qualities in the luxury hospitality and services industry.

With branch campuses in Marbella, Spain and Shanghai, China and affiliate institutions in Chicago, USA and Amman, Jordan, students have the opportunity to choose from a range of different study abroad options, gathering further international exposure and language skills in some of the world’s leading tourism markets.


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Discover Germany | Business | Les Roches International School of Hotel Management

Situated in the remote Swiss Alpine village of Bluche, the school provides the perfect learning environment with state-of-the-art facilities and little distraction. “The close golf and ski resort of Crans-Montana still offers many options for an animated social life and the international cities of Geneva, Milano or Paris make great weekend trip destinations,”Sonia Tatar says. A number of social and cultural events on and off campus, an array of sports activities and a fully-equipped, modern gym cater for students’needs. The campus comprises over 20 different buildings including class rooms, student-run restaurants, mock-up rooms and living quarters. “This physical closeness creates a very special environment and feeling of togetherness among the students, who believe that Les Roches is not just a school, but a way of life,”Sonia Tatar adds.

for Les Roches graduates are manifold and include jobs at hotel chains, resorts, restaurants, wellness and spas or in the wider travel and tourism industry. A dedicated career department assists students in their placement process. Sonia Tatar says: “Les Roches has a track record of high employability of graduates, with currently 89% of students either employed or with several offers on graduation day. Thanks to strong industry relations, leading companies in and outside of hospitality visit our schools to give presentations, interview students and recruit interns and graduates directly on campus. The skill sets students acquire at Les Roches have become increasingly interesting for employers outside of hospitality.” www.lesroches.edu

Proven track record of student employability The transformative education model puts a special emphasis on developing critical thinking skills, understanding contemporary management theory and integrating theory and practice. Main image: Students forming a human world map. Opposite page, below: Sonia Tatar, CEO Les Roches Worldwide. Above: Les Roches student on internship. Graduation ceremony at Les Roches. The school offers a variety of sports and social activities. Right: Les Roches main building with terrace and pool. A Les Roches instructor and students during a mixology class.

“Les Roches is European in its outlook, Swiss in its work ethos, American in its educational approach and multinational in its student body,”Sonia Tatar says.This special focus on internationality pays off: the school not only set a Guinness World Record for the ‘most nationalities in a swimming pool’in 2012, it is also ranked by industry hiring managers of luxury hotels among the top three hospitality management schools in the world for an international career, according to the TNS Global Survey 2013.

Programmes offered include a Bachelor of Business Administration (BBA) in International Hotel Management, where students choose to specialise in areas such as marketing, finance or event management. In 2014 Les Roches launched its latest specialization in spa and health management, developed in cooperation with ESPA and Genolier Swiss Medical Network, two leading companies in their respective field and preparing students for employment in this fast growing hospitality-related industry. Additionally, Les Roches offers a new global bachelor programme, rotating classes through Les Roches’ campuses in Switzerland, Spain and China, a MBA in Hospitality Management and a Master of Science in Hospitality Leadership. Postgraduate diploma courses, aimed at career changers or professionals who wish to advance within the hospitality industry are also a popular choice. Career opportunities

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PANDION Passionate about urban living Founded in 2002 by Reinhold Knodel, the PANDION AG is a group of companies specialising in realising high quality residential and commercial urban property projects. Individual companies include the PANDION Real Estate, PANDION Project Management, PANDION Distribution, PANDION Service and PANDION Design – covering every single step of the realisation process. The latest jewel in the PANDION crown is a branch in Germany’s capital Berlin. TEXT: TINA AWTANI | PHOTOS: PANDION AG

Knodel and his team of about 70 real estate experts are renowned for maximising synergy effects and the efficiency of a construction project from start to finish. Small teams and minimal bureaucracy ensure speedy management decisions in a complex industry. Striking design and captivating interiors are the PANDION signature look, while the ever rising demands of contemporary living and working environments are effortlessly matched. PANDION is currently operating in the cities of

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Cologne, Munich, Düsseldorf and recently the German capital Berlin. Projects reach from rejuvenation of existing structures to completely new builds, while always creating a most comfortable, contemporary, and sustainable surrounding for future inhabitants. Having become a major player in the area of high end urban restructuring, PANDION was recently ranked amongst the top 10 project developers in Germany’s Alisted cities, ranked by volume. The independent study was concluded by consulting

and analysing company bulwiengesa AG. To assure that high volume is matched with highest quality standards, PANDION is working hand in hand with only the best suppliers and most skilled service providers such as the famous Hamburg’s Hadi Teherani Architects, Düsseldorf’s HPP Architects or Cologne based Römer Partner Architects to name just a few.

Mathias Groß, managing director PANDION Real Estate GmbH, Berlin. Photo: Klaus Heymach


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Discover Germany | Business | Pandion AG

prime location. LE GRAND will be featuring 113 apartments spread over 18 floors, plus an additional 53 apartments in a 7 storey building and 165 underground parking spaces. In Munich the current PANDION portfolio includes three major projects featuring a total of over 580 residential units in top city locations.

straße. We’ll create 250 apartments, a small selection of commercial units plus 140 underground parking spaces, split into two separate projects spread over ten individual buildings. Given the proximity to Berlin’s city attractions, the 6,000 square metre large plot is truly a prime location. You’ll be at home, where life really happens,“ Groß concludes. www.pandion.de

Feeling the pulse of Berlin

Main image & top: PANDION FIRST, Berlin-Mitte Above: PANDION FIRST, Berlin (Penthouse) Right: PANDION D´Or, Düsseldorf, interior design of a PANDION show flat. PANDION Cosmopolitan, Berlin-Mitte (middle) PANDION VISTA, „crane house“, Rheinauhafen, Cologne. Photo: Atelier Jahr (bottom)

The crane house was just the beginning A milestone project of the company is the iconic PANDIONVISTA tower, often dubbed “the crane house” along the shore of the Rhine River, where residential and office units were created in an unprecedented way. Another 400 apartments plus more than 6,000 square metres of office space are currently created on the former RTL television headquarters, named PANDION Klostergärten. PANDION BELVEDERE in CologneMüngersdorf, PANDION PIUSHOF and PANDION BALANCE in the city centre are further projects resulting in about 200 high end residential units. In Düsseldorf 8 different projects are currently on the way, comprising almost 750 apartments and over 22,500 square metres of office space. One of them just started in December in the “Le Quartier Central”

The latest addition to the PANDION AG family is the new branch in Berlin. Without doubt, the capital is currently one of the most vibrant and exciting places to be in Germany. “We are really proud to be given the opportunity to develop new living space here, a place in the heart of the city, which lay idle for such a long time. Also, our new branch has found a very special address: Unter den Linden, directly above the legendary Café Einstein, which enjoys great popularity as a typicalViennese Coffee house amongst politicians, journalists, celebrities and tourists alike,” Knodel says. And he is pleased to have found a real Berliner, who knows the capital’s real estate landscape inside out, to take on the challenge. In July 2014 Mathias Groß took over as managing director of PANDION’s Berlin offices. The real estate expert gathered a team of project developers, project managers and sales executives and embarked on exciting new projects due for completion in spring 2017: PANDION FIRST and the PANDION Cosmopolitan in the central area of BerlinMitte. Local architects Léon Wohlhage Wernik and Stephan Höhne Architects are striving to make the most out of a 96 million euro budget and realise 250 apartments with outstanding quality. Capturing the spirit of Berlin, the idea behind the new PANDION projects was to create a cosmopolitan living quarter in a world metropolis. “Now construction and sales preparations have started for the two parallel residential projects near the Spittelmarkt and Berlin’s historic harbour. The plot is one of the last empty ones in the area in the triangle between Beuthstraße and Kommandanten-

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Moser Architects Ensuring uninterrupted quality in demanding architecture Moser Architects, one of the biggest architectural offices in Austria, stands for intelligent, functional, modern and timeless design with 50 years of experience in all specialist areas of architecture and at all planning scales, ranging from city planning to interior design. The special strength of the practice is its unparalleled experience in planning buildings for the healthcare sector. TEXT: NANE STEINHOFF | PHOTOS: MOSER ARCHITECTS

Based inVienna, 100 specialists ensure that the international firm of architects, led by father-son team Arch. Mag. Josef Moser and Arch. Dipl.-Ing. Marius Moser, always offers “comprehensive planning services providing clear lines of responsibility and uninterrupted quality control” to their clients, according to Marius Moser, Managing Partner. “Our services range from project development and design solutions for demanding tasks, which require intensive cooperation between client and consultant, to general planning and the wellorganised management of projects, as well

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as efficient cost management that assures the commercial success of the project,”Josef Moser, Managing Partner, adds. The company was established in 2000 as the successor to Marchart, Moebius & Partner, which was founded in 1960 and where Josef Moser spent his first successful years as an associated partner. Since 1960, Moser Architects can look back on a design portfolio, comprising well over 1,000 urban planning and development projects, industrial and office buildings, cultural and housing projects, as well as school and hospital

buildings.“The modular, tightly structured functioning of our highly qualified and experienced specialists, as well as the structure of the company with its own individual competence centres helps to reliably fulfil our philosophy of a ‘fast high-quality input’,”Marius Moser says. Moser Architects’guiding principle of “getting the whole picture”describes the holistic approach when it comes to their buildings. The human stands at the centre of their architecture and ‘hospitality’ is another core element, which can be felt in every single project: Moser Architects want to create architecture, which makes one feel comfortable. Demanding and complex architecture requires intensive cooperation with and trust between clients, architects and consultants. That’s why clear structures, common goals


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Discover Germany | Business | Moser Architects

and problem-solving skills are substantial factors in the company’s success.“We focus on finding custom-made solutions for clients, as well as quality assurance during all project phases,”Josef Moser says. Getting inspired by travelling, market monitoring and the will to foster constant further development, the architects put special emphasis on hospital and healthcare, as well as hotel and residential construction. A look to the East Milestones in the international work portfolio of Moser Architects include the Minsk Tower. At 165 metres, the highest tower in Belarus is characterised by its unconventional bent glass façade and shows architectural expertise and skills. A combined office and administrative skyscraper, the building also contains a luxurious hotel with 265 rooms. Other outstanding designs and thoughtthrough architectural approaches can be found all over the world. In Russia, the headquarters of the JSCB Moscow Indus-

trial Bank impresses with an unusual façade. Seemingly millions of colourful Post-it notes dominate the outside of the building and make it a real eyecatcher. A multifunctional sport-recreational and hotel complex in Russia’s Krasnogorsk is a prime example of innovation. The planned new resort, with its main focus on diagnostic and outpatient medical treatment for all kinds of sport-related health problems, will be the first of its kind in Russia. The resort will consist of a four-star resort hotel, conference areas, a wellness and medical spa, serviced apartments, a sport medical diagnostic centre and a sport and entertainment centre. Another modern architectural example is the Barakat hospital, which will be finished in 2017. The hospital is composed of four areas of specialisation – cardiology, orthopaedics, general medicine and anaesthesia – and Moser Architects have put a special emphasis on meeting every need as the spatial design takes particular account of the variety of patients and their different needs.

Being the architect in charge of the HypoAlpe Adria Bank headquarters in Zagreb, Moser Architects connected the old and the new. The design of the volumes and outdoor spaces, which create fascinating group dynamics, and the modest use of colours distinguishes the building from the surrounding architecture. The interesting form with a diversity of functions describes a project which represents one of the biggest recent investments in building construction in Croatia. A focus on healthcare Moser Architects managed to successfully connect various user requirements in EBG Med Austron, a centre for ion therapy for the treatment of tumour patients, a highquality research centre in the clinical and non-clinical areas and the fourth beam centre for proton and carbon ion therapy worldwide.

Main image: Marius Moser (left) and Josef Moser (right), Managing Partners. Photo: Agnieszka Doroszewicz Below: Barakat hospital (left) Minsk Tower. Photo: Zoomvp (right)

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Discover Germany | Business | Moser Architects Left: Regional Hospital Thermenregion Baden. Photo: Zoomvp Left below: Emergency Hospital Linz. Photo: Paul Ott Bottom: Entrance of EBG Med Austron. Ion accelerator at EBG Med Austron. Photos: Franz Baldauf

developed in the middle. The gardens and numerous communication areas are devoted to relaxation and recovery. Projects such as the General Hospital in Vienna, the Regional Hospital Steinfeldklinikum Neunkirchen, the Landesklinikum Thermenregion Mödling, the Rehabilitation Centre Bad Häring, the University and Research Centre in Austria’s Tulln, the expansion of the Regional Hospital Rohrbach and the Regional & District Hospital in Romania shouldn’t go unmentioned.

The new building of the Regional Hospital Thermenregion Baden impresses with its rounded and relaxed form, numerous inner courtyards and green spaces, which create a bright and natural atmosphere. The project reveals the unconventional and human way, which Moser Architects pursue in the conception of healthcare facilities. With over 35,000 square metres of the most modern medical facilities, the District Hos-

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pital of Vöcklabruck, represents one of the biggest structural engineering projects in Upper Austria, and Emergency Hospital Linz is a true masterpiece of healthcare architecture, which creates an atmosphere for recovery. The close proximity between three building complexes creates a significant synergy for medical supply. Individual functional groups receive their own areas and the buildings are grouped in a way such that a big, green court yard has been

Clear and modern architecture with functional, intelligent, bright and friendly interiors, which help the patients on their way to recovery, dominate Moser Architects’ healthcare facilities. “We create feel-good design, while being versatile, flexible, professional, experienced, elegant and fair. Our projects are planned and implemented for humans, who live, work or get treated in those buildings,”Marius Moser says. Moser Architects’fundamental design principles always have a ‘user’ in mind and try constantly try to improve the conventional hospital experience.


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Discover Germany | Business | Moser Architects

Hospitality and hotel projects Vienna’s Hotel Park Royal Palace impresses with enchanting minimalist, novel, highquality and stylish hotel architecture. Having created a four-star superior hotel with serviced apartments, underground parking, 212 guestrooms, 21 suites, a ballroom and a convention centre, the building defines itself as a homogeneous volume with deliberately discreet architecture. Strips of perforated, brass-coloured metal panels encircle the entire structure. The panels – partly designed as folding and sliding elements – also serve as outside sunshades for windows and balconies. The colour design features a vibrant, warm shade of gold as an identifying trait of the entire building.

general areas such as lobbies are correspondingly furnished with warm materials and light-coloured surfaces that enhance the welcoming atmosphere. Moser Architects have created clearcut, intelligent architecture combined with striking design and a strong lifestyle touch. www.moserarchitects.at

Above: Rehabilitation Centre Bad Häring. Photos: Paul Ott Below: Hotel Park Royal Palace. Photos: Walter Luttenberger Bottom: Multifunctional sport, recreational and hotel complex in Krasnogorsk, top perspective.

Vienna’s MOOONS Hotel embodies affordable, “smart” luxury made possible by an intelligent hotel concept that offers maximum efficiency of space and staff deployment. The design aims to communicate an impression of generosity and openness and

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“Architecture to serve society” That's the motto of the Vienna-based architectural practice Albert Wimmer ZT GmbH. And nowadays there are plenty of practical examples of this approach – from urban design projects to infrastructure planning, modern residential or health centre developments.

Leuven/ Belgium, the new construction of the EURO stadiums in Innsbruck, in Salzburg Wals-Siezenheim and in Klagenfurt as well as the new construction of the EURO 2012 stadiums Lviv (Ukraine).

TEXT & PHOTOS: ALBERT WIMMER ZT GMBH

Architecture should, and needs, to contribute to an open society. With this belief in mind, the Viennese architect DI Dipl TP Albert Wimmer tries to find the perfect solution for all of his different projects: for the planning of residential buildings as well as for the making of urban developments, sports stadiums or ventures within the health care sector. For every project, producing specific concepts and spatial interpretations are the first aspects to consider. His belief is at the same time the basis of Albert Wimmers working method and is reflected under four headings, namely“in-

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tervention” (to understand the aura of a place and reinterpret it),“articulation”(to be aware of the high amount of responsibility towards society),“art”(to let emotions influence the design of buildings and to find alternatives to conventional architecture) and“innovation”(progress). Important competitive successes enabled the Atelier Albert Wimmer, which was founded in 1977, to realize a number of large-scale projects such as the power plant Freudenau in Vienna, the reorganization and revitalization of the town centre in

DI Dipl TP Albert Wimmer. © Hubert Dimko


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Discover Germany | Business | Albert Wimmer ZT GmbH

and is there for everyone to enjoy. At the same time, it needs areas for possible acquisition – areas which need to be conquered first.”Openness, transparency and flexibility are the themes that can be found in all of Albert Wimmer's work. The most recent example of this is the hospital Nord in Vienna. According to the slogan“Smart hospital – the Viennese way”, the Health Team led by the Albert Wimmer ZT GmbH developed a hospital with around 800 beds

that combines the advantages of a central hospital with those of a pavilion-style building. This creates a health centre, where the patients come first and the atmosphere is relaxed and enjoyable. The “healing environment” is expanded by a “healing garden”, which merges the ideas of comfort, healing, growing and recovering into one overall concept. www.awimmer.at

Current activities include competition successes such as the masterplan for the district aroundVienna's main train station, the new conference centre at the Viennese UNO-City, the masterplan for Europe's biggest passive housing estate “Eurogate”and the new construction of the“Vienna North Hospital”. Architect Albert Wimmer constantly strives for the ideal city. He also believes that in order to be attractive, every city needs to have its own identity.“Master plans are a good tool to balance out different (for example public and private) interests and to enable a wide, flexible, easy and intuitive use for all. It is important to me that I don't determine every little detail, but to allow the city – or the district – enough room for development. My vision is to create a lively city that includes identity giving highlights

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Creative and functional architecture from Vienna These exceptional architects from Vienna work in accordance with the principle that every building should appeal to all the human senses in a positive way. Only a timeless and rational approach combined with a long-lasting effect leads to a unique image. Therefore, form means much more than just a simple expression to fulfil a function. TEXT: MERYEM HAUER | PHOTOS: SKYLINE ARCHITEKTEN GMBH

Established in 2003, skyline architekten operates as an internationally active company and they are able to refer to a strong network of well-proven partners from various planning and execution disciplines. The managing director, Udo-Friedrich Schuster, together with his partners Herbert Schiff, Christian Schuppa and Peter Todorov, offer professional support at all phases of the planning through to local construction management.

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Their aim is to combine a high level of creativity and aesthetics with the highest pos-

sible cost-benefit ratio. Already during the planning process, the experienced architects put special emphasis on the best possible marketing of each building through the investor as well as optimised operating results for the users at as low operating expenses as possible. That is what skyline architekten call the principle of optimised occupancy costs. Reference clients include hotels/thermal springs, therapy centres/hospitals, office buildings, housing, custom designs, urban development, shopping, and industrial construction. Tauern Spa Zell am See – a direct link to nature This exceptional project is directly located in Kaprun, Salzburg and its completion took place in November 2010. A four-star hotel with over 160


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Discover Germany | Business | Skyline Architekten

draw all eyes to them. The highest point of the hotel is the expressive roof of the sideward glazed skyline pool, which works as a design-related reference to the exclusive Hotel-Spa with a spectacular view on the Kitzsteinhorn glacier. Sonnenpark Bad Hall

Main image & top: Tauern Spa Zell am See. Photos: Photoart Reifmueller Above: Tauern Spa Zell am See. Photo: Rupert Steiner Left below: Peter Todorov, Herbert Schiff, Christian Schuppa, Udo-Friedrich Schuster (from left to right) Right: Sonnenpark Bad Hall. Photos: Dietmar Tolerian (top)

The most important project group for skyline architekten is the rehabilitation centres. Sonnenpark Bad Hall is a psychosocial health centre and also specialises in alcohol withdrawal: it was completed in 2009. Due to the hillside location an uninterrupted view over the whole landscape is given. A white bedroom wing, which provides hotel standards, defines a wind shielded open space and is oriented towards the leisure rooms.The entrance building contains an ambulance, a therapy centre and restaurant; the whole construction is entirely faced in brick. That allows continuity of the material, from the inside to the outside. Another special design from skyline architekten is the open hall that leads to the upper levels, to provide an excellent first orientation, and flood the building with plenty of daylight. The entrance hall leads to a tract on the top level and ends on a terrace with a panoramic view.

Sonnenpark Lans. Photo: Photoart Reifmueller (bottom left) Sonnenpark Rust. Photo: Rupert Steiner (bottom right)

rooms and an extended spa area provides a public thermal spring, sauna, fitness area as well as an enclosed beauty centre. When entering the foyer, visitors already start to relax and leave their everyday life behind them as they are welcomed by a sparkling waterfall cascade.The uniquely constructed roof lends the building a special character; its creative design is also recognisable from the surrounding mountains. A sheltered and traffic-free space in the middle is located four metres above the building nearby and opens up onto the valley east and west axis. The public spa can be reached over a forecourt on the lower level.

Therapy centres All of the therapy centres are very similar in their function, but they appear as unique and distinctive buildings. They react to the

qualities of the plot, neighbourhood and environment on the one hand but also to the clients’wishes and budget on the other. Two room levels of the Tyrolean psychosocial health institute in Lans are divided into three components with glazed linking sections. The ground floor contains several therapy rooms, a kitchen with dining hall and the administration offices. An impregnated larch wood facade structures the building and supports the integration into the environment. This project was completed in September 2011. Another example is the therapy centre Justuspark in Bad Hall: its grand opening is planned for April 2015. The entrance stairs within the therapy tract lead to the patient rooms, which provide 4-star hotel standards. The organisation of the building as well as the daylight-flooded development plan simplifies orientation for patients. Skyline architekten attach particular importance to the material efficiency as well as sustainability of the detailing.They work in an open-minded and future-oriented way and rely on decades of professional experience. No matter if modern or classical materials are used, they could both be the right solution. www.skyline-architekten.at

A great view is given from all of the guest areas. The walls of the public bath and sauna are extended to the outdoor area and provide additional protection from wind and weather. On bad weather days or during the evening hours the attractions within

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Discover Germany | Business | Nickl & Partner Architekten AG

Nickl & Partner Architekten AG

Main image: Helmholtz Institute, University Ulm HIU (Germany). Photo: Werner Huthmacher

On a constant quest for the brand-new

Above: Clinical Research Centre Hannover CRC (Germany). Photo: Stefan Müller-Naumann

Award-winning architect’s office Nickl & Partner Architekten AG stands for innovative healthcare buildings and research premises, which give architecture a human dimension. The company based in Munich, Berlin, Frankfurt and Zurich, puts a special emphasis on maximum planning quality and realisation of unconventional ideas right down to the last detail. TEXT: NANE STEINHOFF | PHOTOS: NICKL & PARTNER ARCHITEKTEN AG

“Our work involves the constant search for the brand-new – almost like researchers do – and the critical analysis of our completed building structures,”Prof. Christine Nickl-Weller, says. Having gained expert knowledge since 1979, the architects always remain flexible to be responsive to future developments.“Especially in the area of healthcare- and research buildings, this means sustainability. Flexibility is the central theme for all of our designs,” Prof. Nickl-Weller explains. “Our designs are created on the basis of observation. We ask ourselves: What is the situation for the patient in the hospital and how can we improve this? What requirements would we have in his position? We see the task of an architect as improving the traditional and conventional,” Prof. NicklWeller continues.

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Focusing on the human dimension and future-orientated creativity, a recently completed research building is the Helmholtz-Institute of the University of Ulm. A distinctive modern façade design refers to the topics of chemistry and physics and the architect’s office managed to intelligently connect the new research building, which specialises in electrochemical energy storage, with another campus area to foster exchange.

Far above: Centre for Stroke and Dementia Research CSD, Munich (Germany). Photo: Belu Tec Vertriebsgesellschaft mbH

The Centre for Stroke and Dementia Research in Munich brings together the partner institute of the National Centre for Neurodegenerative Diseases and the Institute for Stroke and Dementia Research under one roof. It aims for a direct exchange of fundamental- and application-oriented research through the integrative research approach. The transparent square impresses with flexibility, a clear building geometry and characteristic expressiveness, while open laboratories provide ideal conditions for research and space for communication. “We try to encourage ‘ informal communication’, which describes spontaneous meetings that lead to an exchange of ideas among the researchers,” Prof. Nickl-Weller says. www.nickl-architekten.de

Another prime example is the Clinical Research Centre Hannover, which was completed in 2014. Intelligently located close to the university, the centre for early clinical research, blends perfectly with the surrounding urban building structures, while bringing together different research laboratories and office areas as well as treatment, common and overnight rooms for study participants.

Prof. Christine Nickl-Weller (left) & Prof. Hans Nickl (right)


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Architecture reflects values

Main image & above left: Villa, Berlin Grunewald (new build)

Berlin-based architect and artist Klaudia Keilholz is passionate about beautiful buildings from a glorious past. By carefully preserving the historic features while adding the amenities of modern times, she brings old houses back to their original splendour and creates new houses with a historic flair from scratch.

with modern technologies,” Klaudia Keilholz says. According to her the reflection of the inhabitants of a building need to be pictured perfectly in order to ensure a happy life together under one roof.

Above middle: Klaudia Keilholz Above right: Watercolour painting by Klaudia Keilholz

TEXT: TINA AWTANI | PHOTOS: CHRISTOPH DOERING

A graduate from the prestigious RWTH Aachen University as well as Italy’s University of Venice, Klaudia Keilholz worked in Germany and the United States for many years, before establishing her own architectural office in Berlin. Specialising in exclusive country mansions and historic urban villas, Keilholz is an expert in the field of listed buildings. For her, architecture is a way of turning a dream into reality and she considers the first consultation with a client the most important and defining phase of a project. Once the foundation is laid, Klaudia Keilholz guides her client personally through

every single step of a building project, from the first intense interview to detailed planning to overseeing constructions – until finally the keys are handed over, the experienced architect is a partner to rely on for her clients. “The private home functions as a business card for its owner and reflects the values of the inhabitants,”Klaudia Keilholz explains. She is convinced that form needs to be balanced and reveal function. Generous floor plans and the use of sustainable materials are crucial in her work with historic buildings, which are a very complicated matter.“Classic architecture needs to be blended

Klaudia Keilholz is bursting with creativity and a keen and renowned watercolour artist. She sees her artworks as an inspiration to dream for others.“Contrary to the expert know-how and the attention to detail in architecture, I step back and create lightness through generous brush strokes and reduce things to the bare minimum”, Klaudia Keilholz says. Not seldom do her clients decide to grace the walls of the newly finished home with paintings from the architect they established such a strong bond with during the whole process. www.keilholz-architektur.de

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Discover Germany | Business | Dr Markus Handle

The new 3 D rejuvenation concept for the aging face Monaco (MC) is not only the place for the rich and glamorous, it is also the spot for newest trends and developments. Dr. Handle recently presented before a stunning audience of Plastic surgeons, including his mentor Prof. Ivo Pitanguy, the world’s most famous plastic surgeon, his new treatment concept for facial aesthetics. TEXT: DR MARKUS HANDLE | PHOTOS: PRESS IMAGES

The 3 D treatment concept for facial rejuvenation. His target is the nature of the aging process leading to an individualized treatment approach that guarantees safety, longevity and genuineness. By treating the reason for aging we can invert the aging process and provide a touch of youth for an important time frame. We are not hiding the signs of aging anymore; we are curing and therefore reconstructing the face aesthetically, Dr. Handle says. The single wrinkle on the surface of the skin is just the sign for a 3 D structural change of the underlying facial structures. The new treatment concept reconstructs the entire region. Often the wrinkle does not even need a treatment, it disappears on its own. Results are 100% natural, what every one of us wants, he mentions.

trough. He points out that this is not the only reconstructive measure: the enforcement of the mimic muscle additionally improves smiling and elevates the angle of the mouth. This new concept can be applied to all parts of the face. It is new because of its measures, just minimal invasive treatments, foremost by enhancing volume. Proper technique and knowledge lead to the highest success rates and patients’satisfaction. Down turn time is limited to less than a day. Rarely do his patients notice a slight swelling or experience pain for any longer than three days.“Patients visit me in

my clinics because they don’t want a paralyzed face anymore, they want to reconstruct their facial volume and 3 D structure, and smile naturally again.” Dr. Handle’s new concept is detecting the reason for a deformed facial structure and setting up a valid treatment plan to rejuvenate patients more naturally. www.acaps.at Dr Markus Handle

In a patient who is concerned about his/her nasolabial-fold the primary treatment is now elevating the cheek, often combined with a mid-cheek lift by pointing out the cheekbone.This action leads to an elevation and and smoothing out of the NLF as well as a smoothing and reshaping of the tear

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Plastic, aesthetic and reconstructive surgeon Dr. Heinz Wallner

“Form follows function” Dr. Heinz Wallner’s private practice for plastic surgery combines the best of two medical worlds – the safety of a modern clinic and the intimate and friendly atmosphere of a small practice – while the patient’s health is of the highest value and importance. TEXT: NANE STEINHOFF | PHOTOS: DR. HEINZ WALLNER

In our time, success and popularity are often linked to beauty. Many people exercise, but problem areas remain unaffectedand skin loses its elasticity while we age. Aesthetic surgery, however, is able to specifically target those problematic areas. Located on the Eastern shores of Lake Constance, the clinic’s principle is that beauty without health is only of questionable value. Dr. Wallner says: “There are limits as to what can be done because health should never be sacrificed for beauty. The trick is to sensibly implement the patients’ wishes with as little risk as possible, to specify the medically feasible and to point out the limitations, while not crossing those.”

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After having served as medical director in the state hospital Feldkirch and as consultant at the renowned Bodenseeklinik in Lindau, Dr. Wallner established his own private clinic for plastic surgery in 2009.“It was my wish to advise and treat patients away from time pressure and rush. Only the intensive engagement with the patient’s wishes makes it possible to create an individual and suitable treatment plan and to achieve the best possible result,”he adds. Ideally situated in a discreet area of the interdisciplinary outpatient clinic of the state hospital Bregenz, the private clinic guarantees no waiting periods, benefiting from the advantage of a wide range of specialist doctors available in-house if required. Dr.

Main image: The state hospital Bregenz. Top: Reception area of Dr. Wallner’s private practice. Above: Dr. Heinz Wallner at work.

Wallner offers a broad spectrum of aesthetic surgery, while focussing on ambulatory upper and lower eyelid surgery and lacrimal sac correction, which seeks to remove tiredness and dissoluteness.Targeted liposuction through local anaesthesia removes fat stores in places which can barely be influenced by losing weight. Furthermore, beautiful breasts are a dream of many women (and men).Various types of breast surgery – from reduction and lifting to enlargement are possible. Whether a patient wants a facelift, abdominoplasty, tumor removal or a scar correction, Dr. Wallner always aims to enhance a positive physical feeling, while turning the client’s aesthetic vision into reality as precisely as possible.Turning back the clock without changing the patient’s expression is top priority for Dr. Wallner. www.plastisch-wallner.eu


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Culture Calendar Save the date as there are plenty of great events scheduled for the weeks to come. From music festivals and exciting exhibitions to fantastic sport events and social highlights, Discover Germany’s Culture Calendar is your perfect guide to what not to miss in February. Berlinale, Berlin 65th International Film Festival (5–15 February) The ‘Berlinale’ is the city’s largest public cultural event: Get ready for 10 days full of movies, international stars, parties and the competition for the golden bear at one of the largest film festivals in Europe. www.berlinale.de/en Samba carnival, Bremen (6–7 February) If you happen to be more up North this carnival season, why not visit Bremen’s Samba Carnival instead? Every year, colourful costumes are worn and happy samba rhythms played to celebrate Europe’s biggest Samba carnival. www.bremen.de/bremer-samba-karneval31850080

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Discover Germany | Culture | Culture Calendar

White Turf horse racing, St. Moritz, Switzerland (8,15 & 22 February) White Turf horse racing is a unique, exclusive, top-class sports event with gourmet catering and lively music, all taking place on the frozen lake among the beautiful snow-capped mountains of St. Moritz. www.whiteturf.ch Carnival, Cologne and all over Germany (12–18 February) The ‘fifth season of the year’ is filled with days of colourful street parades, big parties and costume balls all over Germany. The best and most

traditional celebrations can be found in Cologne, Duesseldorf, Aachen and Mainz. Don’t miss ‘Fasching’ with its crazy ‘Weiberfastnacht’, Rose Monday, Shrove Tuesday and Ash Wednesday. www.koelnerkarneval.de/en www.cologne-tourism.com ‘Ambiente’ Trade Fair, Frankfurt (13–17 February) The world’s most important consumer goods trade fair with 4,700 exhibitors from 89 countries, boasts a globally unrivalled range of products in the Dining, Giving and Living areas. You can expect to find all the market’s new

products, inspiring ideas and the latest trends. ambiente.messefrankfurt.com Euro Dance Festival, Europapark Rust (18–22 February) Learn to dance like our cover star: spend five eventful days with the best dancers in the world, who seek to teach beginners, advanced dancers and professionals in various dance styles. A dancing fair and world-class show evenings round off the programme. www.euro-dance-festival.de

Opposite page: Street parade in Cologne. Photos: J. Rieger, Köln/Festkomitee Kölner Karneval (top) The Berlinale Palast. Photo: Dirk Michael Deckbar, Berlinale 2005 ( bottom left) White Turf 2014. Photo: swiss-image.ch / Andy Mettler (right) Ambiente trendshow. Photo: Messe Frankfurt Exhibition GmbH / Pietro Sutera (bottom right) This page: Drummers and live music at one of the many performances at Sambas Carnival. Photo: Norbert A. Müller, Bremen (above left) Street parade of Bremen’s Samba Carnival. Photo: Johann Ebend, Bremen (above right) Over 1,000 dogs and mushers compete in several disciplines against other teams. Photo: TI Bernau (bottom right)

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Discover Germany | Culture | Culture Calendar

Dog sledding world cup, Bernau and Todtmoos (20–22 February & 26 February – 1 March) ‘Go! Haw! Gee!’ Visitors to the sled dog world cup 2015 can expect mushers’ calls to roam through the winter air as approximately 2,000 dogs and 300 mushers from the whole world will try to get to their top speed in Bernau and Todtmoos. www.todtmoos.de ART Innsbruck, Austria (20–23 February) Seventy galleries and art dealers from ten nations will present international fine art, such as paintings, sculptures, photography, and antiques of the 19th, 20th and 21st century at the 19th international fair for contemporary art and antiques. www.art-innsbruck.at/index.php/en

‘Biikebrennen’, North Sea coast of Schleswig-Holstein (21 February) One of the oldest North Frisian traditions, which seeks to drive out the winter, is celebrated with torch marches, big fires along the coast and punch before embracing traditional delicacies, such as kale with smoked pork chops. www.nordseetourismus.de FIBT Bob & Skeleton World Championships, Winterberg (22 February–8 March) Bob and Skeleton competitions with contestants from all over the world are rounded off with an exciting side programme with a lot of parties and other events to visit. www.winterberg2015.de/index.php/startseite.html 19th Rheingau Gourmet & Wine Festival, Eltville-Hattenheim (26 February–11 March) International celebrity chefs will cook live in the unique atmosphere of Eltville-Hattenheim. Twenty-nine top viniculturalists will serve their wines, live bands play music and numerous

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events, such as cooking demonstations, luncheons, international tastings and dinners can be looked forward to. www.rheingau-gourmet-festival.de 28th Gourmet Festival of Schleswig-Holstein (until 1 March 2015) Nineteen international star chefs show their impressive cooking skills combined with a large amount of creativity. Fifteen host restaurants will lure visitors to Schleswig-Holstein with many gourmet events and top-class dining experiences. www.gourmetfestival.de

Top: Culinary delicacies from around the world can be enjoyed. (top & right) Star chef Michael Fell prepares his plates at the Gourmet Festival. (left) Photos: Rheingau Gourmet & Wein Festival Left: Biikebrennen at the North Sea. Photo: Günter Pump, Nordsee-Tourismus-Service GmbH


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Discover Germany | Culture | Barbara Geier

Love can be found in many places Now, here’s an important question. Are Germans romantic? Many, and in particular our more hot blooded and emotionally expressive Southern European neighbours might disagree, but my gut feeling tells me that the answer to this question is yes. Let me just tell you a little story why I think so:

from Germany that there are options apart from online dating sites. Should you try it, make sure to let us know if it works out for you!

TEXT: BARBARA GEIER

In the north of Germany and near a town called Eutin there’s a tree called Bräutigamseiche – Bridgegrooom’s Oak. It’s a registered natural monument and while the German obsession with putting official stamps on everything must be as unromantic as it gets, the fact that this tree functions as a dead drop and kind of public letter box for people seeking love partners, certainly isn’t. Here’s the romantic tale behind the very wooden and very old-school dating site: In the late 19th century, the daughter of the local head forester and the son of a Leipzig chocolate maker were in love, alas, and had to resort to secretly exchanging letters by leaving them in the hole in the tree’s trunk since the girl’s father disapproved of the relationship. The head forester chap finally relented and gave his permission for the two love birds to marry and since then people have been writing to the tree in the hope of finding a love partner. Now, don’t tell me that’s not romantic?! Ok, some might say it’s Kitsch, another German special-

ity, but hey, so are most Valentine’s cards. Back to the Bridgegroom’s Oak: In true German fashion of making everything efficient and orderly, the tree was assigned a postal address (yes!) and a ladder was set up so that the postman could climb up and deposit the letters accordingly. Four to five letters arrive per day from all over the world. And it’s a public letter box so anyone can open, read or answer the letters. One man, for example, who was on a holiday in the area found a letter from a woman who actually only lives a few miles from his hometown and they ended up marrying. Imagine you answer the question“How did you to meet”by saying“Oh, we were introduced by a tree.”There must be quite a few by now who’re giving this answer because allegedly over a hundred marriages have been triggered by the Bridgegroom’s Oak. Even the postman found his better half via the tree when his future wife saw him on a TV programme about the oak and wrote to him after. So, I’ll leave you with this encouraging report

Barbara Geier is a London-based freelance writer, translator and communications consultant. She is also the face behind ww.germanyiswunderbar.com, a German travel and tourism guide and blog that was set up together with UK travel writer Andrew Eames in 2010.

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Into the trees and a little above. Dinner in the corner seat, le Chef knows how. In the family for years and years. Lumber has settled down. Private spa and a cosy chalet. Where the slope ends, you are home. Roomservice knocks with a picnic box. Terrine with brioche and local wine. A last glance of red covers the Matterhorn. www.cervo.ch

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Discover Germany | Issue 23 | February 2015  

Discover Germany promotes German, Swiss & Austrian Design, Tourism, Food, Culture and Business.

Discover Germany | Issue 23 | February 2015  

Discover Germany promotes German, Swiss & Austrian Design, Tourism, Food, Culture and Business.