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THE UNIVERSITY OF HONG KONG DEPARTMENT OF ARCHITECTURE

YEAR 2 ARCHITECTURE DESIGN STUDIO ECOLOGIES: THE FUNCTION OF ENVIRONMENT IN ARCHITECTURE STUDIO SU CHANG

STUDIO FOLIO SPRING 2019


“A stimulating environment is an environment that appeals to you, that provokes you and incites you to act. For this you must be able to place the signals and stimuli it gives off - that is, make them part of a familiar domain. Learning is the process of making things part of your domain: making something that was once beyond you your own‌â€? - Deschooling, Herman Hertzberger The environment works as an agent of change of different natural and social ecologies. In the seminal essays of Herman Hertzberger, The School Building as a Micro-City and The City as a Macro-School, the Dutch architect proposed an analogical approach to rethink contemporary education experience by learning from the city. Cross-referencing basic typologies in school architecture and urban environment, a design technique emerges by hybridizing them into a new ecology for learning and living. This studio explores the relationship between school architecture and the mountain fringes in Hong Kong. Our goal is dual-fold: to reinvent school architecture typology on the one hand, and to reintroduce spatial and ecological generosity back to the city on the other. Studio Instructors: Ulrich Kirchhoff, Geraldine Borio, Su Chang, Wallace Chang, Sunnie Lau, Rosalia Leung Assistant: Vivian Xu Wei


MOUNTAIN LEARNING


Our studio concerns the finding of a suitable definition of ‘environment’. This is a term that is frequently used in contemporary architecture, but it is our contention that it is often inadequately addressed and somewhat misused. We are not expecting you to design a school that looks ‘green’, displaying the merely tokenistic provision of a ‘green’ veneer, but rather, we would like to approach this issue in a much broader sense, starting by asking: 1. How can the sense of place and atmosphere of the environment contribute to the spatial identity of a school? (the subjective) 2. How can a school be organized as a background environment for diverse range of functions yet flexible for future change? (the objective) The studio interrogates two key concepts about school and environment: atmosphere and organization. Atmosphere: Place/Identity A school is a building we all have some experience of, as we spent a large part of the first years of our lives in one. The particular character of the school you attended would have created a lasting impression and even, at least in part, made you the person you are now. These memories should remind you of the responsibility that lies at the heart of this project and the architectural possibilities we are inviting you to explore. When you are designing a new school, we would encourage you to imagine the sound of walking along a corridor, or even the sound of twenty children doing this. How will the school smell? What will spaces be like in the winter and summer? We need to be accurate in judging the size and special character of a room, the position and detailing of its doors, the size of a window and its height in relation to the inside and outside: what should a room feel like?


Organization: Function/Flexibility When looking at the photographs of any school, one is struck by the sense of personalization that is abundantly displayed. This leads to an understanding that, as architects, our responsibility in designing a school lies primarily in making a very carefully organized background environment comprised of many rooms with different functions. What should their relationship to one another be like? What is the school’s relationship to its neighborhood, considering that in Hong Kong there is an attitude to school security that is more extreme than other part of the world? How will the school function as a school, and at other times as a community resource? We should also remember that teaching methods are constantly changing and that the technology that supports teaching evolves, too. Care needs to be taken in ensuring that the infrastructure of the school is capable of accommodating change. The success of many school buildings lies in the way that they are spatially generous and flexible: they are simply well organized rooms. We invite you to work in two scales at the same time: 1. Elements Mapping of the Local Environment - Treescape and Building Shade - Roofscape - Drainage, Runoff, and Water System - Trail, Streetscape and Open Space - Foundation and Retaining Wall - Urban Vista and Wind Corridors 2. Spatial Programming of a School - Classroom configuration - Transitional space and corridor - Assembly hall and gathering space - Open playground


STUDIO SITE: HAPPY VALLEY, HONG KONG


STUDENT WORK


CHERYL TRISNADI / KIM DAEGEUN

THE BRIDGE


8

16

32

BLUE HAPP HON

0 4 8

50 m

55m

60m

80m

70m 0 4 8

Site Analysis

public and private circulation

16

32


Precedent Tectonic 1/5

Paul Rudolph, Yale School of Architecture


P R O C E S S : PA R T I I

15

We played with how the infrastructure would weave into the school blocks and create smaller courtyards while bridging the two roads. Our objective is to elongate the school along the infrastructure so more interaction can occur. Identical blocks are used as massing objects for both public infrastructure and school.

Design Iterations


Model 1/100


0

4

8

16

32

Height above Sea Level (m)

50 m

Height above Sea Level (m)

90

90 85

85

80

80

75

75

70

70

65

65

60

60

55

55

50

50

45

60m

55m

40

70m

45 40 35

35

45m

50 m

55m

60m

70m

80m

py Valley meets the beginning (or foot) of the mountain. We analyzed how pedestrians would move late trictly private. We also mapped out the service core of every building within our site and found that mos pen inwardly unlike Yale A&A. Most importantly, we found that there is another neighborhood on the o commute between the two areas through a road that detours around the mountain.

Figure-ground Contour


16

Design Sketches


0 21

4

8

16

32


0

Model 1/100

4

8

16

32


32


Model 1/100

0

4

8

16

32

22


N +3.30

N +3.30

N +3.30

N +3.30

cad-block.com


cad-block.com

30


BRIAN CHAN KA HEI / KONGPIYACHARN NAPAT

THE TRAIL


57-59 BLUE POOL ROAD, HAPPY VALLEY, ENTRANCE

57-59 BLUE POOL ROAD, HAPPY VALLEY, SCOTT CENTRE

Site Analysis

trails and water runoffs


I MPRESSION

OF THE NETWORK

Site Analysis

network of infrastructure


IGN ROOFPLAN

DESIGN PLAN 1:100

SPORT HALL

AUDITORIUM

LEARNING FACILITIES

CLASSROOM

79.3 m

72.8 m

69.4 m

61.2 m

1:400

0

1

5

10

20

DESIGN PLAN 1:100

DESIGN SECTION 1:100

SPORT HALL

AUDITORIUM

LEARNING FACILITIES

CLASSROOM

DESIGN ROOFPLAN

TEACHER’S

OFFICE

/

STORAGE

45.3 m

Design Plan and Section

1:400

79.3 m

72.8 m

69.4 m

61.2 m


DESIGN CO

OUR SCHOO PLATFORMS BLOCKS ALO COMPLEX I CONSTRUCT TO THE HIK SPAN OF CAN SYSTEM OF HOLD THE B THE SUPPO BY STEEL BA RECEIVING B

DESIGN ITERATION VERSION 5 1:200

PLUS, WE TR POSSIBLE AS IN OUR SITE FLOOR AREA PLATFORM, CAPACITY A THE INTERI DURING TH AND TIMBER THE FAÇAD WE HOPE TO MILD WEATH FULLY ENCL ESSENCE OF RICH LAND TIMBER WOU NATURAL A STRUCTURA EXPOSED BU


POROSITY

THE UNIVERSITY OF HONG KO


VALERIE WONG MEI TING / CHOI PRISCILLA CHUNYING

THE CLOUD


Parti Studies


Collage Provocation


GROUPING SMALL VOLUMES

SMALL WRAPPING AROUND LARGE

LARGE VOLUMES


S ON TOP

LARGE SHELTERING SMALL

GRADUAL GROWING POROSITY


FORCE AND CIRCULATION DIAGRAM

Circulation


MID-TERM DESIGN

Massing


FINAL DESIGN PLAN 0

10

0


SECTIONAL ILLUSTRATION SHOWING STRUCTURE CELEBRATING POROSITY


MILANA MI LAN / IVY CHU KIT YING

THE ARCH


Site Analysis

Walls and Boundaries


Precedent Analysis

Uto Municipal Amitsu Elementary School


Design Section


Design Prototypes 1/50


Massing Iterations


Fragment Model 1/20


JESSY YAU KIT SZE / RAIN LI ZUYE

THE POOL


Many inte spotted in through ro in a pond.

16


Many interesting phenomenons and water details can be spotted in site due to the rock bed, water are happily flowing through rocks, both artificial or natural stairs, pipes, or resting in a pond.

Site Analysis

Water Runoff


26


Assembly Hall

Toilet Classroom

Library Sports Hall

R Teacher Office

Reception

24


Section of classrooms, teacher office, sports hall and multi-purpose room 44


45


NG TSZ LOK JOYCE / YIN YUE DELANCY

THE WRAP


st of hical sursure

hus an

6

Site Analysis Greenry


k door that ensure the students are constantly surrounded by the nature. Students can go outside our woods.

1:10 CLASSROOM CORNER

Precedent Study

Straberry Vale Elementary School


Un-wrapped Section and Plan


2 ITERATIONS & EXPERIMENT 2 ITERATIONS & EXPERIMENT OF AIR BETWEEN PLASTERPLASTER CAST OFCAST AIR BETWEEN BALLON BALLON

22 ITERATIONS ITERATIONS & & EXPERIMENT EXPERIMENT PLASTER PLASTER CAST CAST OF OF AIR AIR BETWEEN BETWEEN BALLON BALLON

RESIN TWO SELECTED RESIN CAST OFCAST TWOOF SELECTED SPOT OFSPOT SITE OF SITE 1 1 2 RESIN RESIN CAST CAST OF OF TWO TWO SELECTED SELECTED SPOT SPOT OF OF SITE SITE 11

2 22

Upper: Upper: large tree large tree Upper: Upper: large large tree tree

Lower: smallLower: tree small tree Lower: Lower: small small tree tree 1

2

1

Resintois used to cast the air between trees. Paper Resin is used 11 cast the air between trees. Paper balls resemble the distribution of tree crowns clay balls clay resemble the distribution of the treeaircrowns Resin isis used to between Paper Resin used to cast cast the airtransparent between trees. trees. Paper 2 at the two selected spot. With the maat the two selectedclay spot. With the transparent maballs resemble the distribution of tree crowns clay balls resemble the distribution of tree crowns we can determine the developable space ma2 terial, weterial, can determine the developable space at selected spot. the 2 atthe thetwo two selected spot.With With thetransparent transparentmathat istoclosest towe the tree, which we believe would that is closest theterial, tree, which we believe would can determine the developable space terial, we can determine the developable space be our ideal learning environment. that is closest to the tree, which we believe would be our ideal learning thatenvironment. is closest to the tree, which we believe would be be our our ideal ideal learning learning environment. environment.

Material Studies


1:200 PARTI MODEL ON SITE

Site Model


STRETCHING

PUBLIC SPACES

SPORTS DAY

STRETCHING

CARNIVAL

WAITING FOR DAD

Model + Sketch Public Space


LEARNING ENVIRONMENT

LEARNING

RECESS

LEARNING

PLAYING

AFTER SCHOOL

Model + Sketch

Learning Environment

C


VISUAL REFERENCES


Ricardo Legorreta, Casa en Valle de Bravo, Mexico, 1973

Alvar Aalto, Maison Luise Carre, Bazoches-sur-Guyonnes, France, 1956-59

Alvar Aalto, Terrace Housing at Kauttua, Finland, 1938

Eduardo Souto de Moura,2 Houses, Ponte de Lima, Portugal , 2003-12

Renzo Piano Building Worshop, Punta Nave (Genoa), Italy, 1989-1991

Sergio Fernandez, House in Caminha, Rua da Fraga, Caminha, Portugal, 1973


Hans Scherer, Strickler & Weber, Mühlehalde Terrace Housing, Umiken, Switzerland, 1963-71

Geoffrey Bawa, A.S.H. De Silva House, Galle, Sri Lanka, 1959

Kikutake & Kiyonori, Pasadena Heights, Mishima, Japan, 1974

Tadao Ando, Rokko Housing I, II and III, Kobe, Japan, 1981-1998

Alvaro Leite Siza, Tolo House, Lugar das Carvalhinhas, Alvite, Paroquia de Cerva, Comunidad Ribeira da Pena, Distrito de Vila Real, Portugal, 2005

José Antonio Coderch, Torre Valentina, Costa Brava, España, 1959


The Peak, Zaha Hadid

Playground, Aldo Van Eyck

Manhattan Transcript, Bernard Tschumi


Hannes Meyer, MĂźmliswil School

Tom Emerson, Karsern Drawing


REFERENCES - TEXT On Mountain Fringe Banham, Reyner,“Ecology II: Foothills“, Los Angeles: The Architecture of Four Ecologies, Harmondsworth : Penguin Books, 1971 On Learning Hertzberger, Herman,“Space and Learning“, Lessons in Architecture 3, Rotterdam: 010 Publishers, 2008 On Model Maltzan, Michael. “Architecture as craft: After Narrative, Before Memisis”. Architecture As Craft, Michiel Riedijk (Ed.), SUN architecture, 2011 https://www.mmaltzan.com/essays/essay-notes-on-architecture-as-craft-after-narrative-beyondmimesis/ On Section Shu, Wang. “剖面的視野 (The Perspectives of Section)”. Times+Architecture, February 2010. http://wen.org.cn/modules/article/view.article.php/2519 On Representing Environment Abalos, Iñaki. “Why we don’t draw arrows (hardly ever)” AV Monographs 169 (2014) pp 26-31 On Nature Mateo, Josep L. Earth, Water, Air and Fire. The Four Elements and Architecture today. ACTAR. Zürich, 2014. http://www.mateo-arquitectura.com/the-four-elements-and-architecture-today/


On the Use of Nature Herzog, Jaques. The Hidden Geometry of Nature, Lecture at Harvard University Symposium Emerging European Architects, 18 October 1988. https://www.herzogdemeuron.com/index/projects/writings/essays/the-hidden-geometry.html On Bullshit Frankfurt, Harry G. On Bullshit. Princeton, NJ.: Princeton University Press, 2005. https://www5.csudh.edu/ccauthen/576f12/frankfurt__harry_-_ on_bullshit.pdf

STUDIO GUESTS Nasrine Seraji / HKU Eunice Seng / HKU Weijen Wang / HKU Iñaki Ábalos / Ábalos+Sentkiewicz / ESTAM Madrid Alberto Veiga / Barozzi+Veiga

Profile for Su Chang

Studio Folio 2019 Spring  

Studio Folio 2019 Spring  

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