LEED V.4 Presentation

Page 1

LEED V4


Introduction to LEED The LEED Ratings LEED For New Constructionâ„¢ Scorecard LEED points in detail


Introdcution to LEED 1/17/2019

LEED: Better Buildings Are Our Legacy

1/17/2019

LEED: Better Buildings Are Our Legacy

Homes:

What is LEED?

1/17/2019

LEED, or Leadership in Energy and  Environmental Design, is the most widely used green building rating system in the http://leed.usgbc.org/ world. Available for virtually all building, community and home project types. LEED: Better Buildings Are Our Legacy LEED: Better Buildings Are Our Legacy

Applies to single family homes, low-rise multi-family (one to three stories), or mid-rise multi-family (four to six stories); includes Homes and Multifamily Lowrise and Multifamily Midrise.



Interior Design and Construction Applies a complete interior    that  are  fit-out; includes Commercial Interiors, Retail and Hospitality. 2/3 http://leed.usgbc.org/

© 2019 U.S. Green Building Council to projects

© 2019 U.S. Green Building Council

http://leed.usgbc.org/

2/3

BD+C:

Building Design and Construction Applies to buildings that are being newly constructed or going through a major renovation;

ID+C:

O+M:

Building Operations and Maintenance existing buildings that are undergoing improvement work or little to no construction;

Applies to   http://leed.usgbc.org/

ND:

Neighborhood Development Applies 2019 U.S. Green Building Councilor to new land ©development projects redevelopment projects containing residential uses, nonresidential uses, or a mix.

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The LEED Ratings:

Certified: 40-49 points

Silver: 50-59 points

Gold: 60-79 points

Platinum: 80+ points


SCORECARD

Sample LEED For New Constructionâ„¢ Scorecard LEED for New Construction and Major Renovations (v4)

Credit

Integrative process

POSSIBLE: 1 1

LOCATION & TRANSPORTATION Credit LEED for Neighborhood Development location Credit Sensitive land protection Credit High priority site Credit Surrounding density and diverse uses Credit Acccess to quality transit Credit Bicycle facilities Credit Reduced parking footprint Credit Green vehicles

POSSIBLE: 16 16 1 2 5 5 1 1 1

SUSTAINABLE SITES

POSSIBLE: 10 REQUIRED 1 2 1 3 2 1

Prereq Credit Credit Credit Credit Credit Credit

Construction activity pollution prevention Site assessment Site development - protect or restore habitat Open space Rainwater management Heat island reduction Light pollution reduction

WATER EFFICIENCY Prereq Outdoor water use reduction Prereq Indoor water use reduction Prereq Building-level water metering Credit Outdoor water use reduction Credit Indoor water use reduction Credit Cooling lower water use Credit Water metering

POSSIBLE: 11 REQUIRED REQUIRED REQUIRED 2 6 2 1

ENERGY & ATMOSPHERE Prereq Fundamental commissioning and verification Prereq Minimum energy performance Prereq Building-level energy metering Prereq Fundamental refrigerant management Credit Enhanced commissioning Credit Optimize energy performance Credit Advanced energy metering Credit Demand response Credit Renewable energy production Credit Enhanced refrigerant management Credit Green power and carbon offsets

POSSIBLE: 33 REQUIRED REQUIRED REQUIRED REQUIRED 6 18 1 2 3 1 2

MATERIAL & RESOURCES POSSIBLE: 13 Prereq Storage and collection of recyclables REQUIRED REQUIRED Prereq Construction and demolition waste management planning 5 Credit Building life-cycle impact reduction Building product disclosure and optimization - environmental product Credit declarations 2 Building product disclosure and optimization - sourcing of raw Credit materials 2 2 Credit Building product disclosure and optimization - material ingredients 2 Credit Construction and demolition waste management INDOOR ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY Prereq Minimum IAQ performance Prereq Environmental tobacco smoke control Credit Enhanced IAQ strategies Credit Low-emilling materials Credit Construction IAQ management plan Credit IAQ assessment Credit Thermal comfort Credit Interior lighting Credit Daylight Credit Quality views Credit Acoustic performance

POSSIBLE: 16 REQUIRED REQUIRED 2 3 1 2 1 2 3 1 1

INNOVATION Credit Innovation Credit LEED Accredited Professional

POSSIBLE: 6 5 1

REGIONAL PRIORITY Credit Regional priority

POSSIBLE: 4 4 110

TOTAL

40-49 Points CERTIFIED

50-59 Points SILVER

60-79 Points GOLD

80+ Points PLATINUM


INTEGRATIVE PROCESS BD&C 1 point This credit applies to: • • • • • • • •

New Construction Core & Shell Schools Retail Data Centers Warehouses & Distribution Centers Hospitality Healthcare (Prerequisite)

Intent To support high-performance, cost-effective project outcomes through an early analysis of the Interrelationships among systems. Perform a preliminary “simple box” energy modeling analysis before the completion of Schematic design that explores how to reduce energy loads: • • • • • • • • •

Site conditions. Massing and orientation. Basic envelope attributes. Thermal comfort ranges. Programmatic and operational parameters. Indoor water demand. Outdoor water demand. Process water demand. Supply sources.

RESEARCH / ANALYSIS - Individual expert team members initially develop a rough understanding of the issues associated with the project before meeting –


LOCATION AND TRANSPORTATION (LT) LT CREDIT: LEED FOR NEIGHBORHOOD DEVELOPMENT LOCATION BD&C 3–16 points • This credit applies to • New Construction (8–16 points) • Core & Shell (8–20 points) Intent To avoid development on inappropriate sites. To reduce vehicle distance traveled. To enhance livability and improve human health by encouraging daily physical activity. Projects attempting this credit are not eligible to earn points under other Location and Transportation credits. Requirements: Locate the project within the boundary of a development certified under LEED for Neighborhood Development (Stage 2 or Stage 3 under the Pilot or 2009 rating systems, Certified Plan or Certified Project under the LEED v4 rating system).


LOCATION AND TRANSPORTATION (LT) LT CREDIT: SENSITIVE LAND PROTECTION BD&C 1-2 points This credit applies to • New Construction (1 point) • Core & Shell (2 points) Intent To avoid the development of environmentally sensitive lands and reduce the environmental impact from the location of a building on a site. Option 1. Locate the development footprint on land that has been previously developed. OR Option 2. Locate the development footprint on that does not meet the criteria for sensitive land.

Walnut Creek Wetland Center / Frank Harmon Architect

To conserve and protect the natural wetland, the Center rests lightly upon the sensitive land. Poised above the flood plain to create a minimal footprint, the Center embraces the indigenous materials surrounding it and responds to the climate and culture


LOCATION AND TRANSPORTATION (LT) LT CREDIT: HIGH-PRIORITY SITE Villa Montgomery Apartments, a remediation project in Redwood City, California, by Fisher Friedman Associates, earned LEED Gold certifi cation under the LEED NC rating system, for compliance with multiple Sustainable Sites strategies, including brownfi eld site selection and remediation.

BD&C 2-3 points This credit applies to • New Construction (1-2 points) • Core & Shell (2-3 points) Intent To encourage project location in areas with development constraints and promote the health of the surrounding area. Requirements: Option 1. Historic District (1 point BD&C except Core and Shell, 2 points Core and Shell) Locate the project on an infill location in a historic district. Option 2. Priority Designation (1 point BD&C, 2 points Core and Shell) Option 3. Brownfield Remediation (2 points BD&C, 3 points Core and Shell) Perform remediation to the satisfaction of that authority. (Refer to page 14 of LEED_v4_Building Design and Construction. pdf for more information)

This redevelopment project in Miami takes advantage of existing infrastructure.


NC, CS, SCHOOLS, RETAIL, DATA CENTERS, HOSPITALITY Option 1. Surrounding Density (2–3 points BD&C except Core and Shell, 2-4 points Core and Shell)

LOCATION AND TRANSPORTATION (LT) LT CREDIT: SURROUNDING DENSITY AND DIVERSE USES • • • • •

BD&C 1–6 points This credit applies to New Construction (1–5 points) Core & Shell (1–6 points)

Intent To conserve land and protect farmland and wildlife habitat by encouraging development in areas with existing infrastructure. To promote walkability, and transportation efficiency and reduce vehicle distance traveled. To improve public health by encouraging daily physical activity.

Requirements: Option 1. Surrounding Density: Locate on a site whose surrounding existing density within a ¼-mile (400-meter) radius of the project boundary meets the values in Table 1. Use either the “separate residential and nonresidential densities” or the “combined density” values. Option 2. Diverse Uses: Construct or renovate a building or a space within a building such that the building’s main entrance is within a ½-mile (800-meter) walking distance of the main entrance of four to seven (1 point) or eight or more (2 points) existing and publicly available diverse uses (listed in Appendix 1). (Refer to page 14-16 of LEED_v4_Building Design and Construction. pdf for more information)

Locate on a site whose surrounding existing density within a ¼-mile (400-meter) radius of the project boundary meets the values in Table 1. Use either the “separate residential and nonresidential densities” or the “combined density” values. Table 1a. Points for average density within 1/4 mile of project (IP units) Combined density

Separate residential and nonresidential densities

Points BD&C (except Core and Shell)

Points BD&C (Core and Shell)

Square feet per acre of buildable land

Residential density (DU/acre)

Nonresidential density (FAR)

22,000

7

0.5

2

2

35,000

12

0.8

3

4

DU = dwelling unit; = floor-area Table 1b. Points forFAR average density ratio within 400 meters of project (SI units)

Combined density

Separate residential and nonresidential densities

Points BD&C (except Core

Points BD&C

Updated to reflect the July 2, 2018 LEED v4 Building Design and Construction Addenda

15


LOCATION AND TRANSPORTATION (LT) LT CREDIT: ACCESS TO QUALITY TRANSIT BD&C 1–6 points This credit applies to • New Construction (1–5 points) • Core & Shell (1–6 points) Intent To encourage development in locations shown to have multimodal transportation choices or otherwise reduced motor vehicle use, thereby reducing greenhouse gas emissions, air pollution, and other environmental and public health harms associated with motor vehicle use.

Requirements: Locate any functional entry of the project within a ¼-mile (400-meter) walking distance of existing or planned bus, streetcar, or rideshare stops, or within a ½-mile (800-meter) walking distance of existing or planned bus rapid transit stops, light or heavy rail stations, commuter rail stations, or commuter ferry terminals.

(Refer to page 18 of LEED_v4_Building Design and Construction. pdf for more information) Mass transit in New Jersey.


LOCATION AND TRANSPORTATION (LT) LT CREDIT: BICYCLE FACILITIES BD&C 1 point Intent To promote bicycling and transportation efficiency and reduce vehicle distance traveled. To improve public health by encouraging utilitarian and recreational physical activity.

Requirements: Design or locate the project such that a functional entry or bicycle storage is within a 200-yard (180-meter) walking distance or bicycling distance from a bicycle network

(Refer to page 21 of LEED_v4_Building Design and Construction. pdf for more information)

The Florida town of Lauderdale‐by‐the‐Sea encourages residents to bike to the beach by installing racks to secure their bicycles to.


LOCATION AND TRANSPORTATION (LT) LT CREDIT: REDUCED PARKING FOOTPRINT BD&C 1 point Intent To minimize the environmental harms associated with parking facilities, including automobile dependence, land consumption, and rainwater runoff.

Requirements: Do not exceed the minimum local code requirements for parking capacity. Projects that have not earned points under LT Credit Surrounding Density and Diverse Uses or LT Credit Access to Quality Transit must achieve a 20% reduction from the base ratios. Provide preferred parking for carpools for 5% of the total parking spaces after reductions are made from the base ratios. Preferred parking is not required if no off-street parking is provided.

(Refer to page 25 of LEED_v4_Building Design and Construction. pdf for more information)

Preferred parking for car/vanpool vehicles to reduce vehicle use.


LOCATION AND TRANSPORTATION (LT) LT CREDIT: GREEN VEHICLES BD&C 1 point Intent To reduce pollution by promoting alternatives to conventionally fueled automobiles.

Requirements: Designate 5% of all parking spaces used by the project as preferred parking for green vehicles. Clearly identify and enforce for sole use by green vehicles. Distribute preferred parking spaces proportionally among various parking sections (e.g. between short-term and long-term spaces). Green vehicles must achieve a minimum green score of 45 on the American Council for an Energy Efficient Economy (ACEEE) annual vehicle rating guide (or local equivalent for projects outside the U.S.).

(Refer to page 27 of LEED_v4_Building Design and Construction. pdf for more information)

Refueling station within a parking garage in Miami.


SUSTAINABLE SITES (SS) SS PREREQUISITE: CONSTRUCTION ACTIVITY POLLUTION PREVENTION Required Intent To reduce pollution from construction activities by controlling soil erosion, waterway sedimentation, and airborne dust.

Requirements: Create and implement an erosion and sedimentation control plan for all construction activities associated with the project. The plan must conform to the erosion and sedimentation requirements of the 2012 U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Construction General Permit (CGP) or local equivalent. (Refer to page 30 of LEED_v4_Building Design and Construction. pdf for more information)

Storm-water pollution prevention plan on construction site.


SUSTAINABLE SITES (SS) SS CREDIT: SITE ASSESSMENT

BD&C 1 point Intent To assess site conditions before design to evaluate sustainable options and inform related decisions about site design. Requirements: Complete and document a site survey or assessment1 that includes the following information: • Topography • Hydrology • Climate • Vegetation • Soils • Human use • Human health effects (Refer to page 32 of LEED_v4_Building Design and Construction. pdf for more information)


SUSTAINABLE SITES (SS) SS CREDIT: SITE DEVELOPMENT—PROTECT OR RESTORE HABITAT • BD&C • 1–2 points • This credit applies to • New Construction (1–2 points) • Core & Shell (1–2 points) Intent To conserve existing natural areas and restore damaged areas to provide habitat and promote biodiversity. Requirements: Preserve and protect from all development and construction activity 40% of the greenfield area on the site (if such areas exist). Option 1. On-Site Restoration (2 points except Healthcare, 1 point Healthcare) Using native or adapted vegetation, restore 30% (including the building footprint) of all portions of the site identified as previously disturbed. Option 2. Financial Support (1 point) Provide financial support equivalent to at least $0.40 per square foot (US$4 per square meter) for the total site area (including the building footprint). (Refer to page 34 of LEED_v4_Building Design and Construction. pdf for more information)

1000016899, Hopewell, NJ

Stony Brook Millstone Watershed Associat LEED BD+C: New Construction (v2009) SUSTAINABLE SITES

PLATINUM, AWARDED APR 2

AWARDED: 11 / 26

The Brook Millstone Watershed Arboretum SSp1Stony Construction activity pollution prevention

MATERIAL & RESOURCES

REQUIRED

MRc5

Regional materials

SSc1

Site selection

0/1

MRc6

Rapidly renewable materials

SSc2

Development density and community connectivity

0/5

MRc7

Certified wood

SSc3

Brownfield redevelopment

0/1

SSc4.1

Alternative transportation - public transportation access

0/6

SSc4.2

Alternative transportation - bicycle storage and changing rooms

1/1

SSc4.3

Alternative transportation - low-emitting and fuel-efficient vehicles

3/3

SSc4.4

Alternative transportation - parking capacity

2/2

SSc5.1

Site development - protect or restore habitat

1/1

SSc5.2

Site development - maximize open space

1/1

SSc6.1

Stormwater design - quantity control

1/1

SSc6.2

Stormwater design - quality control

1/1

SSc7.1

Heat island effect - nonroof

0/1

SSc7.2

Heat island effect - roof

0/1

SSc8

Light pollution reduction

1/1

INDOOR ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY

AWARDED: 10 / 10 REQUIRED

AWARDED: 13

EQp1

Minimum IAQ performance

REQUIR

EQp2

Environmental Tobacco Smoke (ETS) control

REQUIR

EQc1

Outdoor air delivery monitoring

EQc2

Increased ventilation

EQc3.1 Construction IAQ Mgmt plan - during construction EQc3.2 Construction IAQ Mgmt plan - before occupancy EQc4.1 Low-emitting materials - adhesives and sealants EQc4.2 Low-emitting materials - paints and coatings EQc4.3 Low-emitting materials - flooring systems EQc4.4 Low-emitting materials - composite wood and agrifiber products EQc5

WATER EFFICIENCY

CONTINU

Indoor chemical and pollutant source control

EQc6.1 Controllability of systems - lighting

WEp1

Water use reduction

WEc1

Water efficient landscaping

4/4

EQc7.1 Thermal comfort - design

WEc2

Innovative wastewater technologies

2/2

EQc7.2 Thermal comfort - verification

WEc3

Water use reduction

4/4

EQc8.1 Daylight and views - daylight

EQc6.2 Controllability of systems - thermal comfort

EQc8.2 Daylight and views - views ENERGY & ATMOSPHERE EAp1

Fundamental commissioning of building energy systems

AWARDED: 31 / 35 REQUIRED

EQpc123 Designing with Nature, Biophilic Design for the Indoor Environment

REQUIR

EQpc124 Performance-based IAQ design and assessment

REQUIR


SUSTAINABLE SITES (SS) SS CREDIT: OPEN SPACE BD&C 1 point Intent To create exterior open space that encourages interaction with the environment, social interaction, passive recreation, and physical activities. Requirements: Provide outdoor space greater than or equal to 30% of the total site area (including building footprint). A minimum of 25% of that outdoor space must be vegetated (turf grass does not count as vegetation) or have overhead vegetated canopy. The outdoor space must be physically accessible and be one or more of the following: • A pedestrian-oriented paving or turf area with physical site elements that accommodate outdoor social activities; • A recreation-oriented paving or turf area with physical site elements that encourage physical activity; • A garden space with a diversity of vegetation types and species that provide opportunities for year-round visual interest; • A garden space dedicated to community gardens or urban food production; • Preserved or created habitat that meets the criteria of SS Credit Site Development—Protect or Restore Habitat and also includes elements of human interaction. (Refer to page 35 of LEED_v4_Building Design and Construction. pdf for more information)

The high efficiency Duke Law Star Commons project in Durham, North Carolina, by Shepley Bulfinch, obtained its LEED Certification by providing access to public transportation and reducing site disturbance and the heat island effect.


SUSTAINABLE SITES (SS) SS CREDIT: RAINWATER MANAGEMENT • • • • •

BD&C 1–3 points This credit applies to New Construction (2–3 points) Core & Shell (2–3 points)

Intent To reduce runoff volume and improve water quality by replicating the natural hydrology and water balance of the site, based on historical conditions and undeveloped ecosystems in the region. Requirements: Option 1. Percentile of Rainfall Events Use daily rainfall data and the methodology in the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) Technical Guidance on Implementing the Stormwater Runoff Requirements for Federal Projects under Section 438 of the Energy Independence and Security Act to determine the 95th percentile amount.

Dick’s Sporting Goods Corporate Headquarters in Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania, designed by Strada Architecture, LLC, incorporates roof water capture to reduce the stormwater runoff and reduce the need for potable water for irrigation.

Option 2. Natural Land Cover Conditions Manage on site the annual increase in runoff volume from the natural land cover condition to the postdeveloped condition. (Refer to page 36 of LEED_v4_Building Design and Construction. pdf for more information)

Turfstone TM Open‐Grid Pavers allow stormwater to pass through, in order to recharge groundwater and reduce runoff.


SUSTAINABLE SITES (SS) SS CREDIT: HEAT ISLAND REDUCTION BD&C 1–3 points This credit applies to • New Construction (1-2 points) • Core & Shell (1-2 points) Intent To minimize effects on microclimates and human and wildlife habitats by reducing heat islands. Requirements: Nonroof Measures (Paved area covered by trees or shaded) High-Reflectance Roof Vegetated Roof Install a vegetated roof. Option 2. Parking under Cover (1 point) (Refer to page 38 of LEED_v4_Building Design and Construction. pdf for more information)

Diagram illustrating solar reflectance and thermal emittance.

The roof at Villa Montgomery Apartments in Redwood City, California, reduces the urban heat island effect by the installation of a combination of a high–solar refl ectance index (SRI) roof material with photovoltaic systems (generating a portion of the electricity needed for operations), along with a green roof, including a playground that offers residents the opportunity to enjoy the outdoor environment.


SUSTAINABLE SITES (SS) SS CREDIT: LIGHT POLLUTION REDUCTION BD&C 1 points Intent To increase night sky access, improve nighttime visibility, and reduce the consequences of development for wildlife and people Requirements: Meet uplight and light trespass requirements, using either the backlight-uplight-glare (BUG) method (Option 1) or the calculation method (Option 2). Projects may use different options for uplight and light trespass. Check page 40-41 for ratings for luminaries (Refer to page 40-43 of LEED_v4_Building Design and Construction. pdf for more information) The Utah Botanical Center’s Wetland Discovery Point building at Utah State University in Kaysville was mindful of the nocturnal environment in which the center resides by providing very minimal exterior lighting and shielding any fixtures that would pollute the night sky.


WATER EFFICIENCY (WE) WE PREREQUISITE: OUTDOOR WATER USE REDUCTION Required

Native and noninvasive plantings do not require irrigation or fertilizers.

Intent To reduce outdoor water consumption. Requirements: Option 1. No Irrigation Required Show that the landscape does not require a permanent irrigation system beyond a maximum two-year establishment period. Option 2. Reduced Irrigation Reduce the project’s landscape water requirement by at least 30% from the calculated baseline for the site’s peak watering month.

(Refer to page 50 of LEED_v4_Building Design and Construction. pdf for more information)

Rainwater is collected for reuse to reduce the need for potable water at the Natural Resources Defense Council’s Robert Redford Building in Santa Monica, California. Photo courtesy of Grey Crawford


WATER EFFICIENCY (WE) WE PREREQUISITE: INDOOR WATER USE REDUCTION Required Intent To reduce indoor water consumption. Requirements: Building Water Use For the fixtures and fittings listed in Table 1, as applicable to the project scope, reduce aggregate water consumption by 20% from the baseline. Base calculations on the volumes and flow rates shown in Table 1. All newly installed toilets, urinals, private lavatory faucets, and showerheads that are eligible for labeling must be WaterSense labeled (or a local equivalent for projects outside the U.S.).

(Refer to page 51 of LEED_v4_Building Design and Construction. pdf for more information)

* WaterSense label available for this product type gpf = gallons per flush gpm = gallons per minute psi = pounds per square inch lpf = liters per flush lpm = liters per minute kPa = kilopascals


WATER EFFICIENCY (WE) WE PREREQUISITE: BUILDING-LEVEL WATER METERING Required Intent To support water management and identify opportunities for additional water savings by tracking water consumption. Requirements: Install permanent water meters that measure the total potable water use for the building and associated grounds. Meter data must be compiled into monthly and annual summaries; meter readings can be manual or automated. Commit to sharing with USGBC the resulting whole-project water usage data for a five-year period beginning on the date the project accepts LEED certification or typical occupancy, whichever comes first. This commitment must carry forward for five years or until the building changes ownership or lessee.

(Refer to page 54 of LEED_v4_Building Design and Construction. pdf for more information)


ENERGY AND ATMOSPHERE EA PREREQUISITE: FUNDAMENTAL COMMISSIONING AND VERIFICATION Required Intent To support the design, construction, and eventual operation of a project that meets the owner’s project requirements for energy, water, indoor environmental quality, and durability. Requirements: Commissioning Process Scope: Complete the following commissioning (Cx) process activities for mechanical, electrical, plumbing, and renewable energy systems and assemblies, in accordance with ASHRAE Guideline 0-2005 and ASHRAE Guideline 1.1–2007 for HVAC&R Systems, as they relate to energy, water, indoor environmental quality, and durability.

(Refer to page 63 of LEED_v4_Building Design and Construction. pdf for more information)


ENERGY AND ATMOSPHERE EA PREREQUISITE: MINIMUM ENERGY PERFORMANCE Required Intent To reduce the environmental and economic harms of excessive energy use by achieving a minimum level of energy efficiency for the building and its systems. Requirements: Whole-Building Energy Simulation Demonstrate an improvement of 5% for new construction performance rating compared with the baseline building performance rating.

(Refer to page 65 of LEED_v4_Building Design and Construction. pdf for more information)

Figure 10.18 Energy modeling tools, such as eQUEST, assist project teams to determine energy consumptions. Image courtesy of M&E Engineers, Inc.


ENERGY AND ATMOSPHERE EA CREDIT: RENEWABLE ENERGY PRODUCTION BD&C 1–3 points Intent To reduce the environmental and economic harms associated with fossil fuel energy by increasing self-supply of renewable energy. Requirements: Use renewable energy systems to offset building energy costs. Calculate the percentage of renewable energy with the following equation:

% renewable energy =

Sherman Hospital in Elgin, Illinois, utilizes geothermal energy to minimize energy demands from the grid.

Equivalent cost of usable energy produced by the renewable energy system Total building annual energy cost

(Refer to page 65 of LEED_v4_Building Design and Construction. pdf for more information)

Stoller Vineyards in Dayton, Oregon, generates electricity onsite by the means of photovoltaic panels mounted on the roof.

Cedar Creek Wind Farm in Colorado helps to produce clean, renewable energy. Photo courtesy of Brian Stanback


MATERIALS AND RESOURCES (MR) CONSERVATION OF MATERIALS

Intent: Implementing sustainable building materials impacts a project’s triple bottom line, just as with site selection and energy and water demands. Th e idea is to eliminate the need for new materials, with a focus on material reuse, the highest form of material conservation. Beside conservation natural resources, material reuse can “also retains the cultural value and the contextual relevancy. Requirements: ■ Reuse existing buildings and salvaged materials, consider adaptive reuse strategies to fi nd signifi cantly diff erent uses for existing structures to not only avoids extracting materials for a new building, disposing waste in landfi lls, and converting greenfi eld sites into development.

Using efficient framing strategies helps to reduce waste and save

■ Plan for smaller, more compact communities —to prevent urban sprawl and reduce the new for new infrastructure, such as roads and utilities. ■ Design smaller, more flexible homes and buildings— implement more dual purpose spaces and eliminate unused spaces. ■ Use efficient framing techniquess—Space studs at 24 inches (instead of 16 inches) and use structural insulated panels (SIPs) strategies that increases performance while using less material. ■ Promote source reduction in operations —encourage employees to reuse office supplies and implement a minimal print and double sided print policy. (Refer to page 132 of (Wiley Series in Sustainable Design) Michelle Cottrell - Guide to the LEED Green Associate V4 Exam-Wiley (2014)

The second fl oor and roof of the BASF donated Near-Zero Energy Home in Paterson, New Jersey, The SIPs form a solid thermal envelope around the structure using less dimensional lumber for wood studs, sills, and headers than typical stick frame construction.


MATERIALS AND RESOURCES (MR)

Purchasing materials that are extracted, processed, and manufactured within 100 miles helps to reduce the transportation impacts associated with building materials.

CONSERVATION OF MATERIALS

Intent: Implementing sustainable building materials impacts a project’s triple bottom line, just as with site selection and energy and water demands. Th e idea is to eliminate the need for new materials, with a focus on material Wreuse, the highest form of material conservation. Beside conservation natural resources, material reuse can “also retains the cultural value and the contextual relevancy. Requirements: ■ Support local economy ■ Sustainable grown and harvested ■ Have intended endoflife scenarios that avoid landfill ■ Contain recycled content from industrial or consumer resources ■ Made of biobased material ■ Free of toxins ■ Long lasting, durable and reusable ■ Made in factories that support human health and workers’ rights With the awareness, interest, and demand of green products, unfortunately

Purchasing wood from sustainable and responsible forests helps to ensure resources for future generations.

(Refer to page 132 of (Wiley Series in Sustainable Design) Michelle Cottrell - Guide to the LEED Green Associate V4 Exam-Wiley (2014)

Sustainable procurement choices, such as cradle to cradle (C2C) certified task chairs composed of recycled content, helps to avoid landfills and the need for virgin materials.


INDOOR ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY (EQ) Strategies for Designing for Good IAQ

Figure 12.2 Owners need to prohibit smoking in the building and within 25 feet of building entrances, operable windows, and air intakes during construction and occupancy.

When designing a project teams are encouraged to address the following as a means to create a great indoor environment 6: 1. Prohibit smoking inside the building and around building entrances, windows,and air intakes (Figure 12.2 ). 2. Properly size the ventilation system (natural or mechanical) to deliver enough fresh air by calculating the number of occupants in each space and considering the activity performed by the occupants. 3. Protect the air coming into the building by locating air intakes away from exhaust sources and design a ventilation system that will remove contaminants with air filtration. 4. Test for radon. 5. Design for entryway systems, such as grilles, grates, or mats to reduce contaminants (Figure 12.3 )

Figure 12.3 This entryway system getting installed at the Waterfront Tech Center in Camden, New Jersey, will help to reduce dust, dirt, and other contaminants typically carried into a facility by foot.

6. Specify low emitting materials with low or no VOCs (Figure 12.4).

(Refer to page 151 of (Wiley Series in Sustainable Design) Michelle Cottrell - Guide to the LEED Green Associate V4 Exam-Wiley (2014)

Figure 12.4 Specifying materials with low to no VOCs helps to maintain good indoor air quality.


INDOOR ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY (EQ) Strategies for Improving IAQ during Construction

Figure 12.5 Using a sweeping compound helps to control dust.

During construction, project teams are encouraged to implement the following strategies to protect the indoor air quality: 1. Keep the building clean (Figure 12.5 ). 2. Protect absorptive materials from moisture exposure (Figure 12.6 ) and protect ductwork from dust and contaminants (Figure 12.7 ). 3. Conduct a flushout, before occupancy, to eliminate any off gassed contaminants from construction. Opening the windows is not enough to remove construction pollutants! Ductwork should be fl ushed out with a large amount of outside air. Figure 12.6 Elevate products for storage to protect against damage. (Refer to page 154 of (Wiley Series in Sustainable Design) Michelle Cottrell - Guide to the LEED Green Associate V4 Exam-Wiley (2014)

Figure 12.7 Construction teams must protect ductwork prior to installation and


INDOOR ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY (EQ) THERMAL COMFORT Figure 12.11 Wausau’s LEED Silver facility in Wausau, Wisconsin, employs operable windows to give their employees access to fresh air.

Although temperature settings should vary with the seasons, buildings should allow for occupants to control their thermal conditions to optimize satisfaction and comfort. The Green Building and LEED Core Concepts Guide describes three strategies to offer thermal comfort to occupants: 1. Install operable windows for fresh air access (Figure 12.11 ). 2. Give occupants temperature and ventilation control. If operable windows are not feasible, give occupants control over mechanically supplied and delivered warm or cool air by employing strategies such as raised access fl oors (Figure 12.12 ). 3. Conduct occupant surveys. Discover the overall satisfaction of the thermal comfort levels of the majority of the occupants to determine areas for improvement.

(Refer to page 158 of (Wiley Series in Sustainable Design) Michelle Cottrell - Guide to the LEED Green Associate V4 Exam-Wiley (2014)

Figure 12.12 Raised access floors provide the flexibility to grant occupants individual control of the amount of air supplied through diffusers for their thermal comfort.


INDOOR ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY (EQ) LIGHTING

Th e LEED green building certification program addresses lighting in terms of naturally available daylight and artificially supplied light. When debating whether to incorporate daylighting strategies, project teams are advised to conduct a life-cycle cost analysis to determine the up front costs and operational savings. Strategies The Green Building and LEED Core Concepts Guide suggests the following strategies to address lighting for a green building project: 1. Use daylighting. Remember passive design strategies and benefits (Figure 12.15 ). 2. Give occupants lighting control l for economic benefits from energy savings while improving occupant satisfaction. 3. Conduct occupant surveys. Discover the overall satisfaction of the lighting levels of the majority of the occupants to determine areas for improvement. (Refer to page 162 of (Wiley Series in Sustainable Design) Michelle Cottrell - Guide to the LEED Green Associate V4 Exam-Wiley (2014)

Figure 12.15 Providing interior environments with access to natural daylight not only improves the occupants’ satisfaction and productivity levels but also helps to reduce the need for artificial lighting to reduce operating costs.


INDOOR ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY (EQ) ACOUSTICS

The ability to communicate effectively, in person or via telecommunications, is impacted by the quality of acoustics. Just as with thermal comfort and lighting controls, delivering highperforming interior acoustic environments adds to the satisfaction and wellbeing of building occupants and employees Strategies. Strategies The Green Building and LEED Core Concepts Guide provides the following strategies to address acoustics and therefore increase occupant comfort12: 1. Consider acoustical impacts. Consider interior finishes, building geometry, and duct insulation that will impact the ability for employees and staff to communicate and work effectively. 2. Conduct occupant surveys. Discover the overall satisfaction of the interior acoustic quality of the majority of the occupants to determine areas for improvement. (Refer to page 158 of (Wiley Series in Sustainable Design) Michelle Cottrell - Guide to the LEED Green Associate V4 Exam-Wiley (2014) (Refer to page 136 of LEED_v4_Building Design and Construction. pdf for more information STC Ratings)

Designing for proper acoustic performance also helps to improve the satisfaction and comfort levels of occupants by improving the ability to effectively communicate.


INDOOR ENVIRONMENTAL QUALITY (EQ) EQ CREDIT: QUALITY VIEWS

BD&C 1–2 points Intent To give building occupants a connection to the natural outdoor environment by providing quality views. Requirements Achieve a direct line of sight to the outdoors via vision glazing for 75% of all regularly occupied floor area. View glazing in the contributing area must provide a clear image of the exterior, not obstructed by frits, fibers, patterned glazing, or added tints that distort color balance. (Refer to page 134 of LEED_v4_Building Design and Construction. pdf for more information)


INNOVATION (IN) IN CREDIT: INNOVATION

Frick Environmental Center / Bohlin Cywinski Jackson

BD&C 1–5 points Intent To encourage projects to achieve exceptional or innovative performance. Th e LEED green building certification program offers up to six points for projects within the Innovation category by addressing four different strategies: 1. Exemplary performance 2. Innovative strategy 3. Pilot credit 4. Including a LEED Accredited Professional on the project team projects can earn exemplary performance credits (within the Innovation category) for achieving the following: ■Reuse 95 percent of the building. ■Reduce parking capacity by 60 percent. ■Provide at least 15 percent of total energy from renewable sources on the project site. ■Implementing an educational program for the community, occupants and visitors ■Achieving LEED prerequisites from other rating systems, such as Site Management Policy and Green Cleaning Policy ■Defining and implementing a waste management program that diverts a signifi cant amount of waste generated from outside sources from landfills

(Refer to page 134 of LEED_v4_Building Design and Construction.pdf for more information)

The Conservancy now has a home base for its growing environmental education programs, which are offered to students in Pittsburgh’s public schools. Fully equipped classrooms, offices, and support spaces provide the much-needed amenities for the Conservancy’s award-winning programs, while a public ‘living room’ and gallery space welcome park visitors to stop in to learn more about the park’s history and extensive trails, and the sustainability of the building.


REGIONAL PRIORITY (RP) RP CREDIT: REGIONAL PRIORITY BD&C 4 points Intent To provide an incentive for the achievement of credits that address geographically specific environmental, social equity, and public health priorities.

Use this link to to look at Harrison charter Township, Michigan Regional priority credit: http://bit.ly/REGIONAL-PRIORITY Backup link: https://www.usgbc.org/credits/rp1


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