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December 2011

Onondaga Lake Amended Consent Judgment Compliance Program Monthly Report

Joanne M. Mahoney, County Executive


ONONDAGA COUNTY DEPARTMENT OF WATER ENVIRONMENT PROTECTION VISION To be a respected leader in wastewater treatment, storm water management, and the protection of our environment using stateof-the-art, innovative technologies and sound scientific principles as our guide.

MISSION To protect and improve the water environment of Onondaga County in a cost-effective manner ensuring the health and sustainability of our community and economy.

CORE VALUES

Excellence Teamwork Honesty Innovation Cost-Effectiveness Safety


Table of Contents Report from Commissioner Gray Projects Update  

Progress of Projects Under Construction Fact Sheets

Green Projects Update   

Projects Summary Save the Rain– Project 50 Fact Sheets

Green Improvement Fund   

Green Improvement Fund Program Summary Completed GIF Projects Fact Sheets

Metro WWTP Phosphorus Projects/TMDL/Ambient Monitoring Program Update    

Metro Phosphorus Optimization Project Metro Phosphorus Work Plan Project Onondaga Lake Water Quality Model/TMDL Ambient Monitoring Program Water Quality Sampling Tributary Sampling Tributary Bacteria Compliance Assessment CSO 044 Conveyances Project Biological Monitoring program Sampling Summary (December 2011)

Legislative/Regulatory/Media Update   

Action Items for County Legislature in the Month of December Action Items for the Environmental Protection Committee in the Month of January Media Articles

Financial Update 

Contracts New Contracts Amendments to Existing Contracts Change Orders Funding State Bond Act Funds Federal EPA Funds


Federal Army Corps of Engineers Funds EFC Loans 

Onondaga County Lake Improvement Project Fourth Stipulation of the ACJ Clinton/Lower MIS CSO Improvement Harbor Brook Drainage Basin CSO Abatement Midland CSO Abatement Sewer Separation of CSO Areas: 022/038/040/045/046A/046B/047/048/050/051/053/054 Save the Rain Education and Outreach Grant Appendix     

Financial Tracking Summary  Federal and Stage Grants/Loans Applied for –Approval Pending Lake Improvement Project Status Report for the Period Ending 12/31/2011 Project Payments Chronology of Project Construction Starts Contractors for Construction Projects  Metro Treatment Plant  CSOs Acronyms and Abbreviations


GRAY PROJECTS UPDATE


Gray Projects Update: Progress of Projects Under Construction Harbor Brook Interceptor Sewer (HBIS) Replacement and CSO Abatement Project (Construction Phase) In November 2011, the contractor completed connections to the HBIS for CSO 014 at Seymour Street. Surface restoration work continued at Fowler High School athletic fields and in Skunk City. Comments were received from CH2M-Hill on the design for the Delaware/Grand rain garden and discussions were held with NYSEFC regarding regulatory review. It is anticipated the majority of the rain garden work will occur in the spring of 2012. To date the project has installed 7,503 linear feet (LF) of new 18” to 36” interceptor sewer between Velasko Road and West Fayette Street on the west side of Syracuse. In addition, 5,222 LF of new local sewers was installed, ranging in size from 8” to 42” in diameter. The sewer installation is 99 percent completed and the project, overall, is approximately 91 percent complete. Midland CSO 044 Abatement Project (Construction Phase) Construction continued on the 96” CSO conveyance pipeline that will connect CSO 044 in South Avenue to the Midland RTF. In November the contractor completed pipe connections to Flushing Chamber B in West Castle Street and the South Avenue Regulator structure. A majority of the work in South Avenue was completed including the bridge approach slab, allowing South Avenue to reopen ahead of schedule on December 22. The contractor installed the base slab and began construction of concrete walls for Flushing Chamber A. Clinton CSO Storage Facility Project (Construction Phase) The contractor continued site work and preparation for the major construction activities associated with the storage facility that will collect 6 million gallons of combined sewage from 8 downtown Syracuse CSOs during wet weather events. The contractor continued work on the temporary bridge at Fabius Street to be used for construction traffic into the site, with completion of the fabrication of the bridge superstructure and installation of the bridge footings and beginning installation of the superstructure. In November the contractor began work on installation of the west chamber slurry wall and testing of various techniques for installation of the grout plug under the storage tunnels. Work continued on the temporary site power with preparation for National Grid to install high voltage electrical conductors from West Fayette Street to the Trolly lot. Lower Harbor Brook CSO Conveyance Project (Construction Phase) The contractor began work on the project in November with the site clearing and grubbing. Fence installation and field office setup will be underway in December. The project will transmit combined sewage from CSOs 003 (Hiawatha Boulevard) and 004 (State Fair Boulevard) to the new storage facility to be constructed on State Fair Boulevard and from CSO 063 in the future. The USEPA completed the draft NEPA document in November and will release the document for the 30-day public comment period in December. The USEPA gave the County approval for award of the contract to J.J. Lane Construction, Inc. Lower Harbor Brook CSO Storage Facility Project (Bid Phase) A post-bid meeting was held with C.O. Falter Construction Corp.; bids were evaluated and the Notice of Intent to Award letter was being sent to the contractor. The storage facility will store combined sewage from CSOs 003, 004, and 063 during storm events and transmit the sewage after the storm to Metro via the HBIS. The USEPA completed the draft NEPA document in November for a 30-day public comment period to begin in early December. The USEPA gave the County approval for award of the contract to C.O. Falter Construction Corp.


CSO 022/045 Sewer Separation Project (Bid Phase) Bids were opened on November 29, 2011, for two contracts--General Construction and Plumbing Construction--in accordance with Wicks Law. The bids are being reviewed for accuracy and conformance with the contract documents. The project will provide for the separation of sanitary and storm flow in CSO areas 022 (located in downtown Syracuse near West Genesee and Franklin streets) and 045 (located just west of South Avenue near Onondaga Creek). Once complete, the discharge of combined sewage from these two basins will be eliminated and all sanitary sewage will be transmitted to Metro via the main interceptor sewer (MIS).


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FACT SHEET Clinton CSO Storage Facility

Project: Project Owner: Project Location: Sewershed: Technology: Capacity: CSO Capture: # CSOs Abated: Completion Date: Contract amount: Bid Date: Prime Contractor:

Clinton CSO Storage Onondaga County Trolley Lot, Syracuse Clinton/Lower MIS Storage Facility 6,000,000 gallons 114,000,000 gal/yr 8 12/ 31/13 $70,640,000 7/14/11 Jett Industries

Project Description: The Clinton CSO Storage Facility Project is a 6 million gallon combined sewer overflow storage facility that will be constructed in the parking area between the elevated rail tracks and Onondaga Creek just south of the Armory Square area of downtown Syracuse (formerly known as the Trolley Lot). During wet weather events, the facility’s three, parallel 18-foot diameter, underground storage tunnels will capture flow from 8 combined sewer overflows (CSOs) in the vicinity of the former Trolley Lot. The wastewater will be stored in the tunnels until it can be conveyed via the main interceptor sewer to the Syracuse Metropolitan Sewage Treatment Plant (Metro) for treatment. The off-site conveyance piping, which will transmit the flow to the facility, was installed under the Clinton CSO Phase 1 and 2A conveyances projects completed in 2009. There will be additional on-site conveyance piping installed under this project to connect the existing sewers to the new facility. In addition to the tunnels, there will be two above-ground structures located at either end (east and west) of the parking lot which provide access to the tunnels and house the pumping, grit collection, and odor control facilities Green Components: To further enhance the sustainability of the facility, the project includes green infrastructure components. The stormwater runoff from the entire site that measures approximately 275,000 square feet or 6.3 acres will be managed by green infrastructure. The stormwater from the area surrounding the main structure on the western half of the site will be collected by a series of catch basins and stormwater piping that will outfall into two bioretention basins. The bioretention basins will allow the stormwater to infiltrate into the ground rather than immediately runoff to the creek. In addition, stormwater runoff from the eastern half of the project site--to be restored as a parking area-will be directed to a subsurface collection facility and used to flush the storage tunnels to clear them of grit and debris that may have settled or been left behind after the stored combined sewage was transmitted to Metro. In addition, a green roof will be installed on the west building. Construction Update: In December, the contractor continued construction activities associated with the storage facility. The installation of the temporary Fabius Street Bridge has been completed and is operational. The Contractor excavated and poured the West Chamber slurry walls and assembled the rebar cages and began work on the East Chamber slurry walls with the site preparation, field piping installation and mobilization. The contractor also began site preparation and prep work for the installation of the excavation support for the tunnel walls between the east and west chambers.


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Clinton CSO Storage Facility Project – Construction Progress October 11, 2011

Project Location Map

Version 12/30/2011


Project:

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FACT SHEET CSO Area 022 and 045 Sewer Separation Project

Project Owner: Project Location: Sewershed: Technology: CSO Capture: # CSOs Abated: Completion Date: Project Cost: Bid Date: Prime Contractor:

CSO 022/045 Sewer Separation Onondaga County Syracuse Clinton/Lower MIS & Midland Sewer Separation 1,000,000 gal/yr 2 12/31/12 $6,500,000 (est.) November 29, 2011 TBD

Project Description: In 2000, the separations of 13 separate CSO basins were designed to the 95 percent stage. The CSO areas represented basins whose full separation would be cost-effective compared to other CSO abatement technologies. The remaining basins where the full separation has not been constructed were CSO areas 022 and 045. CSO area 022 is located in downtown Syracuse, and the tributary sewers are located in North Franklin, West Genesee, and Willow streets. The proposed work to be performed includes 2,000 linear feet (LF) of new sanitary sewer; 800 LF of sewer lining; and twenty (20) internal building separations. CSO area 045 is located south of downtown Syracuse with the outfall at the intersection of West Castle Street, Hudson Street, and Onondaga Creek. The combined sewage tributary to this outfall is conveyed by combined sewers located in Crescent and Hudson streets. The proposed work to be performed includes: 700 LF of new storm sewer in Hudson and Crescent streets, 1200 LF of sewer lining to convert the existing combined sewers in Crescent and Hudson streets to sanitary sewers, rehabilitation of the existing sanitary sewer in Rich Street between Hudson and Onondaga Creek, and one (1) private property separation. Green Components: The County has successfully applied its “Greening the Gray� mission to the project through the implementation of green infrastructure as it related to the reconstruction of Pocket Park on the corner of West Genesee and North Clinton streets. The park had fallen into disrepair due to settlement issues and will be rehabilitated with green components under the CSO 022 project. Project Update: In early December the bids for general construction and plumbing construction contracts were reviewed for accuracy and conformance with the contract documents and post bid meetings were held with the apparent low bidder for both contracts on December 9. No impediments to awarding the contracts were found, and the Onondaga County Division of Purchase issued the Letter of Intent to Award for both contracts on December 19, 2011. .


CSO 022 Project Area

CSO 045 Project Area Version 12/30/2011


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FACT SHEET CSO 044 Conveyances Project

Project: Project Owner: Project Location: Sewershed: Technology: CSO Capture: # CSOs Abated: Completion Date: Contract amount: Bid Date: Prime Contractor:

CSO 044 Conveyances Onondaga County Syracuse Midland Storage & RTF 6,000,000 gal/yr 1 Partial - 12/31/11 $7,978,282 9/21/10 J.J. Lane Construction

Project Description The CSO 044 Conveyances Project provides for the transmission of wet weather flow from CSO 044, which discharges to Onondaga Creek at South Avenue and West Castle Street, to the Midland Regional Treatment Facility (RTF) on the south side of Syracuse. Conveyance of the combined sewer flow to the Midland RTF will be via approximately 500 linear feet of 96-inch diameter pipeline between the terminus of the 144-inch pipeline installed under the Midland Phase Two RTF and Conveyances Project to CSO 044. Green Components: In addition to the pipeline, the project will include the construction of a new regulator structure in South Avenue and two conveyance flushing chambers. The “Greening the Gray” components incorporated include the utilization of captured stormwater for the flushing chambers, the installation of rain gardens for stormwater infiltration, and an educational, interpretive walkway. Project Update: In December the contractor completed the installation of Flushing Chamber A and removed the sewer plug within the existing 144” gravity sewer to allow for flow to be conveyed from CSO 044 to the Midland RTF. A partial certificate of substantial completion was issued for the completed work. The partial substantial completion that shows work completed to allow conveyance of CSO to the Midland Facility meets the requirements of the 4th Stipulation of ACJ’s major milestone for the CSO 044 Conveyances Project. In addition, the contractor completed restoration work in South Avenue, including installation of the bridge approach slab which allowed South Avenue to be opened ahead of schedule on December 22, 2011. .

CSO 044 Construction Progress – October 10, 2011 Version 12/30/2011


Project:

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FACT SHEET Harbor Brook Interceptor Sewer (HBIS) Replacement and CSO Abatement Project

Project Owner: Project Location: Sewershed: Technology: CSO Capture: CSOs Addressed: Completion date: Contract amount: Bid Date: Prime Contractor:

HBIS Replacement & CSO Abatement Onondaga County Harbor Brook Corridor Fayette St. to Velasko Rd. Harbor Brook Interceptor Replacement 36,000,000 gal/yr 9 6/30/2012 $21,536,849 11/2/09 J.J. Lane Construction

Project Description: The HBIS Replacement Project provides for a much needed upgrade to the existing Harbor Brook Interceptor between West Fayette Street and Velasko Road on the west side of Syracuse. This length of the interceptor sewer conveys dry weather flow and a portion of the combined flow from CSOs 009, 010, 011, 013, 014, 015, 016, 017, and 018 for conveyance to Metro for treatment. The existing interceptor is a U-shaped cast-in-place concrete pipe constructed in the 1920s that has fallen into disrepair. Due to the shape and age of the HBIS, flow restrictions have developed which have decreased capacity and increased infiltration in some areas. The project includes the installation of 7,600 linear feet (LF) of new HBIS ranging in size from 18- to 36-inches in diameter, 1,500 LF of new local sewers, rehabilitation of 860 LF of 30-inch brick sewer, installation of 4 new regulator manholes, and rehabilitation or replacement of 2500 LF of Harbor Brook Culvert. In addition, during construction the available funding allowed CSO Areas 013 and 016 to be completely separated which will increase CSO capture and eliminate two CSO discharge points. As a result, the capture projection for this project is anticipated to be 0.9 percent or 36 million gallons. Green Components: The County has successfully applied its “Greening the Gray” mission to the HBIS Replacement Project. The GI components incorporated into this gray construction project include the installation of approximately 40 enhanced tree basins with infiltration zones and the construction of a bioretention area that will manage stormwater runoff from an area of approximately 3.2 acres. The enhanced tree basins will be located on Hartson, Herriman, and Hoeffler streets in the Skunk City area of Syracuse. The bioretention area will be located at the corner of Grand Avenue and Delaware Street and will contain a series of rain gardens and bioretention swales which will collect off-site runoff from impervious areas and manage the on-site stormwater as well. The site will have a “park-like” setting with an educational theme. Construction Update: In December 2011, the contractor completed surface restoration work at Fowler High School athletic fields, in Skunk City, and on Seymour and Amy streets. The design documents for the Delaware/Grand Rain Garden were submitted to NYSDEC for regulatory review with anticipation that the rain garden work will occur in the spring of 2012. To date, the project has installed 7,503 LF of new 18” to 36” interceptor sewer between Velasko Road and West Fayette Street on the west side of Syracuse. In addition, 5,222 LF of new local sewers were installed, ranging in size from 8” to 42” in diameter. The sewer installation is 99 percent complete, and the project overall is approximately 92


percent complete. The remaining tree basins and the bioretention area at Delaware and Grand avenues will be completed in early 2012.

New HBIS Alignment through Skunk City (In Yellow)

Version 12/30/2011


Project:

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FACT SHEET Lower Harbor Brook CSO Storage and Conveyances Project

Project Owner: Project Location: Sewershed: Technology: Capacity: CSO Capture: # CSOs Abated: Completion Date: Contract Amount: Bid Date: Prime Contractor:

Lower Harbor Brook CSO Conveyances & Storage Onondaga County State Fair Blvd., Syracuse Harbor Brook Underground Tank 4,900,000 gallons 55,000,000 gal/yr 3 12/31/13 Conveyances – $4,147,888 Storage – $25,039,101 Conveyances – 8/30/11 Storage – 10/18/11 Conveyances – J.J. Lane Storage – C.O. Falter

Project Description: The Lower Harbor Brook CSO Conveyances and Storage Facility Project is a 4.9 million gallon combined sewer overflow storage facility that will be located on County-owned property on State Fair Boulevard between Hiawatha Blvd. and West Genesee Street in the City of Syracuse. The facility will capture and store the overflows from CSOs 003, 004 and 063 up to the 1-year, 2-hour design storm event. After the storm event subsides, the contents of the storage tank will be pumped to the existing Harbor Brook Interceptor Sewer for conveyance to the Metropolitan Treatment Plant (Metro) for full treatment. The project also includes construction of CSO conveyance pipelines on State Fair Blvd., Hiawatha Blvd., and Erie Blvd. to convey combined sewage from the overflow regulators to the storage tanks during rainfall and snowmelt events. Floatables and grit removal will be included in this facility. Odor control provisions will be incorporated into the facility design and the tank will be completely enclosed. Green Components: To further enhance the sustainability of the facility, the project includes green infrastructure components. The stormwater runoff from the rooftops of the storage tank and controls building will be stored within the CSO storage tank and used for a second and third cleaning flush of the tank. This water will ultimately be treated at Metro eliminating the need for this stormwater to be treated on-site. The stormwater storage is designed to capture the 100-year storm (5.2 inches) from the tank and the control building rooftop. Project Update: The conveyances contractor continued the site clearing and grubbing work in December and began installation of the temporary construction fencing. The Notice to Proceed was issued to C.O. Falter Construction Corp. on December 6, 2011, and the contractor has begun to mobilize equipment on site. The Storage Project Pre-Construction Meeting was held on December 20, 2011. In addition, the 30-day public comment period for the USEPA-issued FNSI (Finding of No Significant Impact) for both the conveyances and storage tank projects ended on December 23, 2011.


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Lower Harbor Brook CSO Storage Facility – View from State Fair Boulevard

Lower Harbor Brook CSO Storage Facility – View from the Northeast

Lower Harbor Brook CSO Storage and Conveyances Project Area Version 12/30/2011


GREEN PROJECTS UPDATE


Green Projects Update:

2011 was a remarkable year for the Save the Rain Program. The first full year of project implementation featured the ‘Project 50’ campaign to build 50 separate and distinct green infrastructure projects. The 2011 construction season also provided several high-profile signature projects including one of the largest green roofs in the country at the OnCenter complex; an innovative water re-use system at the War Memorial Arena that converts captured stormwater into ice for the Syracuse Crunch AHL hockey team; the conversion of the Skiddy Park basketball courts to green courts via a partnership with the Boeheim Foundation “Courts 4 Kids” program; and the development of several “green street” projects throughout neighborhoods in Syracuse. The aggressive goal of Project 50 established Onondaga County as a national leader in the development of green infrastructure. In April, the US EPA designated Onondaga County and Syracuse as one of ten model green infrastructure communities. The designation identified the Save the Rain Program as one of the most comprehensive and sustainable approaches to stormwater management in the country. Many great partnerships with organizations throughout the community were formed this year. Save the Rain collaborated with entities such as the City of Syracuse, Syracuse University, the Near Westside Initiative, and dozens of local community-based organizations. The relationships provided numerous opportunities to develop green projects and work with residents on projects that will benefit the entire community. The ‘Project 50’ campaign yielded 60 green infrastructure projects in 2011. The experience of the 2011 campaign provides a strong foundation for years to come. For the full listing of green projects, please visit www.savetherain.us/green-projects.

Save the Rain Project 50 Status Summary Projects Completed

30

Projects Under Construction

28

Projects in Contract Phase

2

Total Projects (as of 12/22/11)

60


Project

1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21

Save the Rain - PROJECT 50

Completed Projects: Townsend Median Phase 1 Townsend Median Phase 2 Connective Corridor Phase 1 Contract 1 OnCenter Green Roof OnCenter Surface Lot War Memorial Cistern System (Phase 1) Downtown Streetscapes - 200 block E. Water St. Tree Plantings in Court Woodlawn Tree Plantings in Schiller Park Tree Plantings in Union/Demong Parks Concord Place Sunnycrest Arena Parking Lot County Board of Elections Bldg Geddes St Road Recon R.G. Zoo - Elephant Exhibit Bellevue Academy Barnabas Ctr - Onondaga Earth Corps Demo Bishop Foery - Onondaga Earth Corps Demo Street Tree Contract A Street Tree Contract B Rain Barrel Program 2011

GI Technology

Bioretention Bioretention Green Street Green Roof Porous Pavement, Tree Trench Stormwater Reuse Cistern Enhanced Street Trees Community Tree Planting Community Tree Planting Community Tree Planting Green Street Porous Pavement Bioretention Bioretention Green Roof Tree Plantings Rain Gardens, Green Wall Rain Gardens, Rain Barrels Enhanced Street Trees Enhanced Street Trees Rain Barrels

Completed GIF Projects: 22 Putnam Properties 23 Spa at 500 W. Onondaga 24 The Galleries Office Towers Parking Lot 25 Monroe Building 26 Hotel Skyler 27 Skiddy Park - Courts4Kids 28 CNY Philanthropy Center 29 Vibrant Spaces 30 CNY Jazz Arts Foundation 31 Matawon Development Group

Green Roof Bioretention Underground Infiltration Green Roof Porous Pavement, Cistern Porous Pavement Green Roof, Bioretention, Porous Porous Pavement, Bioretention Green Roof Infiltration Trench

Construction Phase: 32 OnCenter Garage 33 Harrison Street 34 Connective Corridor Forman Park 35 Erie Canal Museum Green Roof 36 Downtown Streetscapes - 200-300 blocks 37 SCSD Institute of Tech 38 Water Street Gateway 39 Otisco St Green Corridor Phase 1 40 SUNY Upstate Green Roof 41 SUNY Upstate Rain Garden/Trees 42 SUNY Upstate - IHP 43 Greening the Gray - Clinton Storage 44 Skiddy Park Enhancements 45 Sunnycrest Golf Parking Lot 46 Hazard Library Green Roof 47 Avery Ave at Pass Arboretum 48 Wilbur Ave Zoo Entrance 49 Delaware Rain Garden (Grand & Delaware St.) 50 Greening the Gray at Harbor Brook 51 Harbor Brook (CSO18) Treatment Wetland 52 Greening the Gray - Basin 044 53 SCSD Hughes Magnet School Parking Lot 54 SCSD Dr. Weeks Elementary 55 Vacant Lot Project: 701 Oswego Street 56 SCSD Central Offices Parking Lot 57 Pocket Park at W. Genesee & N. Clinton 58 Greening the Gray at Basin 045

Bioretention Green Street Landscape Enhancement Green Roof Enhanced Street Trees Separation Infiltration Trench & Porous Pavers Green Street Green Roof Rain Garden/Trees Tree Trench Bioretention & Green Separation Porous Pavement Bioretention Green Roof Rain Garden Rain Garden Rain Garden Bioretention & Porous Pavement Treatment Wetland Downspout Disconnection Porous Pavement Bioretention Infiltration Trenches, Urban Garden Infiltration Beds Porous Pavement & Bioretention Downspout Disconnection

Contracting Phase: 59 Connective Corridor Phase 1 Contract 2 60 Water Street Pavement Removal

Green Street Pavement Removal

Total:

Cost

Capture (gal/yr)

$86,000 $43,000 $948,717 $1,038,000 $529,040 $1,229,251 $102,030 $0 $0 $0 $78,900 $407,000 $0 $203,000 $183,900 $0 TBD TBD

13 317,000 53,000 5,742,000 1,033,000 2,360,000 400,000 131,000 118,000 160,000 48,000 955,000 1,876,000 114,000 523,000 114,000 20,000 TBD TBD

TBD

TBD

$1,222,352

814,000

$75,757 $60,000 $100,000 $99,311 $100,000 $164,674 $62,700 $153,618 $52,188 $24,214

81,000 150,000 352,000 91,581 173,000 344,400 2,145,581 440,000 53,000 73,600

$246,985 $109,920 $50,000 $73,480 $109,970 $0 $920,088 $1,413,732 $0 $0 $0 $0 $244,000 $362,599 $67,275 $316,420 $299,990 $0 $0 $260,000 $0 $288,000 $89,000 $85,214 $403,500 $105,000 $0

30 1,277,000 180,000 121,000 39,000 169,000 2,251,000 924,000 2,240,845 211,000 65,000 18,000 5,152,000 898,000 843,000 88,000 746,000 680,000 TBD 305,000 13,600,000 69,000 1,504,000 2,177,000 259,000 2,036,619 125,000 69,000

TBD $124,000

2 2,494,366 768,000

$12,532,825

57,992,024


Project: Project Owner: Project Location:

FACT SHEET Avery Ave Park Greening – Pass Arboretum

Sewershed: GI Technology: Capture Area: Run-off Reduction: Year Constructed Construction Cost: Prime Contractor:

Avery Ave (Pass Arboretum) Syracuse Parks Dept. Avery Ave. between Tompkins St. & Bryant St. Harbor Brook Rain Gardens 39,000 sq. ft. 746,000 gal/yr 2011 $316,420 Economy Paving

Project Description: The Avery Ave Pass Arboretum Project is one of many collaborations of Onondaga County Save the Rain and the City of Syracuse Parks Department. The project involves the installation of 11,000 square feet of rain gardens along the east side (Avery Ave.) of the park. The location is ideal for educational opportunities with walkways for pedestrian traffic woven into the footprint. This project was designed with consideration for historic preservation and was approved by the City of Syracuse Landmark Preservation Board. The new plantings in Pass Arboretum were chosen according to the vegetation historically found in this park.

Site of Rain Garden Before Construction

Avery Ave Rain Gardens Under Construction

Rendering of the Rain Garden After Completion

Renderings Prepared by Viridian Landscape Studio Version 12/23/2011


Project: Project Owner: Project Location:

FACT SHEET Concord Place - Green Street

GI Technology: Sewershed: Capture Area: Run-off Reduction: Year Completed: Construction Cost: Prime Contractor:

Project Description: Concord Place is the first “green street” in Syracuse. This project demonstrates a subtle approach to managing stormwater with the installation of infiltration trenches along the street corridor. Stormwater enters the system through the existing storm drain connections in the street. Instead of the collected water flowing to the sewer system, as was previously the case, the water is directed to an underground trench filled with a stone base. As the water enters the trench, it slowly filters through the compacted stone and soil, eventually releasing into the ground water. In addition to the underground infiltration system, Concord Place also received a new mill and pave application to the street surface.

Concord Place Onondaga County Concord Place from Westcott St. to Allen St. Infiltration Bed Erie Blvd. Storage System 39,000 sq. ft. 955,000 gal/yr 2011 $78,900 Cornerstone Paving

Concord Place

This type of project is unique among green infrastructure projects – although above the surface it appeared to be a traditional street paving process, below the street green infrastructure was installed to more effectively manage stormwater and protect our water resources. The completion of the Concord Place renovation is the first of several planned “green street” projects within the Save the Rain program.

Construction of the Underground Infiltration Trench

Conceptual Design Showing Standard Asphalt with the Subsurface Infiltration Bed Version 12/28/2011


FACT SHEET Connective Corridor Phase 1, Contract 1

Project: Project Owner: Project Location: Sewershed: GI Technology: Capture Area: Run-off Reduction: Year Completed: Construction Cost: Prime Contractor:

Connective Corridor Phase 1 City of Syracuse University Ave. Clinton/Lower MIS Green Street 326,000 sq. ft. 5,742,000 gal/yr 2011 $948,717 (bid) Barrett Paving Materials, Inc.

Project Description: The Connective Corridor project is a major infrastructure plan that will create a strong visual and physical link along the major streetscape connections between Syracuse University and the downtown business districts. The project builds upon needed public works improvements, incorporating green infrastructure such as tree trenches and porous pavement into traffic-calming streetscape designs that feature bicycle lanes, landscape buffers between vehicular and pedestrian zones, and enhanced pedestrian facilities. The project required close collaboration and cooperation among the City, Syracuse University, and the County. This first phase of the Connective Corridor project involved the design and construction of a “green street� on the section of University Avenue between East Genesee and Waverly streets, in the heart of the Syracuse University area. The project is one of the most significant collaborations between the City, County, and Syracuse University and addresses a considerable amount of stormwater runoff. In addition to large-scale capture, the project provides a showcase for the implementation of green infrastructure in urban settings in a highly traveled corridor of the City.

Above: Aerial Photos after Construction Complete

Conditions Prior to Construction Version 12/22/2011


FACT SHEET Connective Corridor: Forman Park

Project: Project Owner: Project Location: Sewershed: GI Technology: Capture Area: Run-off Reduction: Year Constructed: Construction Cost: Prime Contractor:

C.C. Forman Park City of Syracuse Parks Dept. E Genesee St. & Almond St. Clinton/Lower MIS Landscape Enhancement 6,800 sq. ft. 121,000 gal/yr 2011 $50,ooo Ballard Sports

Project Description: The Connective Corridor Forman Park Project is the second of three 2011 Save the Rain projects done in partnership with the City of Syracuse and Syracuse University. The City and University are constructing a corridor between University Hill and Downtown Syracuse, and the Save the Rain program has partnered with both to include green infrastructure throughout the corridor The Forman Park project consists of enhancing the landscaping in and around the park, while capturing stormwater from within the park. In total, 4,045 shrubs and perennials will be planted as part of this project, servicing 6,800 square feet of drainage area and capturing 121,000 gallons of stormwater annually.

Forman Park After Construction (above) & Before Construction (below)

Version 12/22/2011


Project: Project Owner: Project Location:

FACT SHEET Connective Corridor: Phase 1, Contract 2

Sewershed: GI Technology: Capture Area: Run-off Reduction: Year Contracted: Construction Cost: Prime Contractor:

C.C. Phase 1, Contract 2 City of Syracuse E Genesee St. Between University and Forman Ave. Clinton Green Street 142,000 sq. ft. 1,771,000 gal/yr 2011 TBD Barrett Paving Materials

Project Description: The Connective Corridor: Phase 1, Contract 2 project is the third and final Save the Rain project of 2011, done in partnership with the City of Syracuse and Syracuse University. The City and University are constructing a corridor between University Hill and Downtown Syracuse and the Save the Rain program has partnered with both to include green infrastructure throughout the corridor. The East Genesee portion of the Connective Corridor work (Phase 1, Contract 2) consists of creating a green street on both sides of East Genesee. This includes various types of green infrastructure including subsurface infiltration trenches, porous pavement, tree plantings, and bioretention. The result of this work is that 1,771,000 gallons of stormwater is captured annually and kept out of the combined sewer system.

Aerial Photograph of Project Area Before Construction

Conceptual Rendering of Connective Corridor – Phase 1, Contract 2 Project

E Genesee St. Before Construction Version 12/22/2011


Project:

FACT SHEET County Board of Elections Building

Project Owner: Project Location: Sewershed: GI Technology: Capture Area: Run-off Reduction: Year Completed: Construction Cost: Prime Contractor:

County Board of Elections Building Onondaga County 1000 Erie Blvd. West N/A Stormwater Planters 6,000 sq. ft. 114,000 gallons 2011 $0 County Facilities

Project Description: The County Board of Elections Building Project is a green project that is outside of the combined sewershed districts of the Amended Consent Judgment. This project is being done voluntarily by Onondaga County as part of the expansion of the Save the Rain campaign countywide. This project consists of re-routing roof leaders to direct stormwater from the roof into planting beds and planter boxes between the building and the parking lot of the property. These planter boxes and planting beds are located on the south and east sides of the building where the roof leaders drain. Additionally, a rain barrel was installed to capture supplemental stormwater from the roof of the building to water the plants in the planting beds and planter boxes during dry periods of the year. In total, this project captures 114,000 gallons of stormwater annually. Also, as part of the ongoing sustainability efforts of Onondaga County, stone removed from the OnCenter during the green roof construction was reused to construct the infiltration bed of these stormwater planters.

Stormwater Planter Box to be Installed at Onondaga County Board of Elections

Conceptual Rendering of Onondaga County Board of Elections Green Project Version 12/22/2011

Stormwater Planter Box Detail


Project: Project Owner: Project Location:

FACT SHEET Downtown Streetscapes

Sewershed: GI Technology: Capture Area: Run-off Reduction: Year Completed: Construction Cost: Prime Contractor:

Downtown Streetscapes City of Syracuse 300 Block of Montgomery St. & 200 Block of E Water St. Clinton/Lower MIS Enhanced Street Trees 17,000 sq. ft. 300,000 gal/yr 2011 $212,000 Davis Wallbridge

Project Description: Onondaga County is working with the City of Syracuse to develop streetscape improvements on E. Water and Montgomery streets. The designs include the planting of enhanced street trees in the right-ofway and curb extensions at the intersections of S. Salina & Montgomery streets. The enhanced tree pit design provides a wide storage and soil trench area for trees to maximize stormwater intake. This enhanced tree system will have a dramatic effect on the growth, vitality, and lifespan of the tree. The project is part of the Save the Rain Urban Forestry Program that will plant over 8,500 trees by 2018 and is part of the long-term strategic vision for a green corridor along E. Water Street from S. Warren Street to Erie Boulevard.

Enhanced Street Trees - 200 Block E. Water St. Above – Facing Montgomery St.; Below – Facing Warren St.

Example of Enhanced Tree Pit Detail

Version 12/22/2011


FACT SHEET Elephant Exhibit - Green Roof at the Rosamond Gifford Zoo

Project: GI Technology: Project Location: Project Owner: Sewershed: Capture Area: Run-off Reduction: Year Completed: Construction Cost: Primary Contractor:

Elephant Barn Green Roof Green Roof Rosamond Gifford Zoo Onondaga County Harbor Brook 6,500 sq. ft. 114,000 gal/yr 2011 $183,900 Bette & Cring

Project Description: A green roof was installed in May 2011 at the new, larger elephant barn at Rosamond Gifford Zoo. This vegetative roof will prevent 114,000 gallons of stormwater runoff from entering the sewer each year. This green roof was part of a larger renovation of the elephant exhibit which included not only the bigger elephant barn, but also a new spectator pavilion near the barn and refurbishing the existing four-acre elephant yard with rain gardens and open green space.

Elephant Barn’s Green Roof Under Construction

Version 12/28/2011

Elephant Exhibit Project Concept


FACT SHEET Erie Canal Museum Green Roof

Project: GI Technology: Project Location: Project Owner: Sewershed: Capture Area: Run-off Reduction: Year Constructed: Construction Cost: Prime Contractor:

Erie Canal Museum Green Roof 318 Erie Blvd. East Onondaga County Clinton/Lower MIS 2,000 sq. ft. 39,000 gal/yr 2011 $73,480 J&B Installations

Project Description: The project will take place on the site of the Erie Canal Museum, located on East Water and Market Street. The museum is known for having a comprehensive collection of Erie Canal related documents, photographs, prints, and rare books. Founded in 1962, the museum is housed in the National Register 1850 Weighlock Building. The Erie Canal Museum stormwater retrofit project features the installation of a green roof on one of the main buildings at the Erie Canal Museum and Visitor Center. The green roof will feature plantings in a lightweight growing medium on top of a waterproof membrane designed to capture stormwater, irrigate plantings, and allow excess stormwater to evapotranspirate which will ultimately prevent stormwater from leaving the rooftop and entering the combined sewer system.

Example of Green Roof Implementation

Erie Canal Museum Before Green Roof

Diagram of Green Roof Implementation

Version 12/22/2011


Project: Project Owner: Project Location:

FACT SHEET Geddes Street Road Reconstruction Project Description: The Geddes Street Road Reconstruction Project was coordinated with needed public roadway improvements along South Geddes Street, which borders the George Fowler High School parking lot and sports fields, in addition to other parcels. This project features the design and installation of vegetated curb extensions adjacent to the sidewalk on the western side of the 300-500 blocks of South Geddes Street. Vegetated curb extensions with subsurface infiltration trenches will capture and infiltrate stormwater runoff from the right-of-way, preventing approximately 523,000 gallons per year from entering the combined sewer system.

S. Geddes St. Before Green Project

Sewershed: GI Technology: Capture Area: Run-off Reduction: Year Completed: Construction Cost: Prime Contractor: Construction

Geddes Street City of Syracuse 300-500 Blocks of S. Geddes St. Harbor Brook Bioretention 29,700 sq. ft. 523,000 gal/yr 2011 $203,000 (bid) John R. Dudley

S. Geddes St. - Curb Extensions Installed

S. Geddes St. - Curb Extensions Installed Version 12/22/2011


Project: Project Owner:

FACT SHEET Greening the Gray in Basin 045

Project Location: Sewershed: GI Technology: Capture Area: Run-off Reduction: Year Contracted: Construction Cost: Prime Contractor:

Greening the Gray - Basin 045 Onondaga County & City of Syracuse Hudson St. & Crescent Ave. Midland Rooftop Disconnection 4,000 sq. ft. 69,000 gal/yr 2011 TBD J.J. Lane Construction

Project Description: The Greening the Gray in Basin 045 project consists of a rooftop downspout disconnection of an existing building along Crescent Ave. and connecting it to an adjacent separated storm sewer. This prevents stormwater runoff from the roof of this building from entering into the combined sewer system. This project is one of several greening the gray projects that Onondaga County is completing under the Save the Rain program. The rooftop of the building that is being disconnected has an area of approximately 4,000 sq. ft., which equates to an annual stormwater capture and runoff reduction of 69,000 gallons per year. CSO 045 Aerial View Prior to Construction

Site of Greening the Grey in Basin 045 Save the Rain Project Version 12/22/2011


Project: Project Owner: Project Location: Sewershed: GI Technology:

FACT SHEET Greening the Gray at Clinton Storage

Capture Area: Run-off Reduction: Year Contracted: Construction Cost: Contractor:

Greening the Gray at Clinton Storage Onondaga County/City of Syracuse Trolley Lot Clinton Green Separation, Bioretention 292,000 sq. ft. 5,152,000 gal/yr 2011 TBD Kiewit/Jett Industries

Project Description: The Greening the Gray at Clinton Storage Project consists of green separation and stormwater management practices to handle runoff--not only from the site of Clinton Storage (Trolley Parking L0t), but also from The Museum of Science and Technology (MOST) and southern half of Jefferson Circle. This project is one of several greening the gray projects that Onondaga County is completing as part of the Save the Rain Program. This particular project consists of both green separation and bioretention elements. On-site stormwater will be captured in bioretention areas. Bioretention areas allow for the capture and slow infiltration of stormwater. Furthermore, off-site stormwater from the roof of the MOST and the southern half of Jefferson Circle will be managed via green separation in a separate 2012 green infrastructure project. The roof leaders from the MOST will be re-plumbed and connected to new stormwater piping that routes stormwater to the storage facility that will be constructed as part of Save the Rain’s Clinton Storage Facility, a gray project at this location. In total, the green infrastructure elements for this project capture 5,152,000 gallons of stormwater annually.

Rendering of Greening the Gray at Clinton Storage

Version 12/23/2011

Clinton Facility Construction Before GI Installation


Project: Project Owner: Project Location: Sewershed: GI Technology:

FACT SHEET Greening the Gray at Lower Harbor Brook Storage Facility

Capture Area: Run-off Reduction: Year Contracted: Construction Cost: Contractor:

Greening the Gray at Lower Harbor Brook Storage Onondaga County/City of Syracuse State Fair Blvd. and Rusin Ave. Harbor Brook Green Separation, Bioretention, Porous Pavement 18,000 sq. ft. 305,000 gal/yr 2011 TBD C.O. Falter Construction

Project Description: The Greening the Gray at Harbor Brook Storage project consists of green separation and stormwater management practices to handle runoff not only from the site of the Lower Harbor Brook Storage Facility, but also from surrounding streets. This project is one of several greening the gray projects that Onondaga County is completing under the Save the Rain program. This project consists of green separation, bioretention, and porous pavement. As a new utilities building constructed for the Harbor Brook Storage facility, the roof leaders from this facility will be plumbed so that stormwater enters into a bioretention area instead of Harbor Brook. Additionally, a bioretention area will be constructed at the intersection of Rusin Ave. and State Fair Blvd. to capture runoff from both streets. Flexible porous pavement will also be installed around the new storage tank to handle adjacent runoff. In total, the stormwater capture for this project is 305,000 gallons per year.

Aerial View of Lower Harbor Brook Storage Site Prior to Construction of Storage Facility and Associated Green Work Conceptual Rendering of Greening the Gray at Lower Harbor Brook Storage Project Version 12/23/2011


FACT SHEET Harbor Brook Wetland Project

Project: Project Owner: Project Location: Sewershed: GI Technology: Capture Area: Run-off Reduction: Year Contracted: Construction Cost: Prime Contractor:

Harbor Brook Wetlands Onondaga County Velasko Rd. & Grand Ave. Harbor Brook Constructed Wetland 145 acres 13,600,000 gal/yr 2011 TBD AJ Montclair

Project Description: The Harbor Brook CSO 018 Constructed Wetlands Pilot Treatment System will serve the dual purposes of treating overflows from CSO018, currently discharged into Harbor Brook, while also acting as a demonstration project to test the effectiveness of three types of constructed wetland treatment systems. In 2011, the compensatory storage portion of the work was completed. Based on the knowledge gained from this pilot project, these wetland systems may be integrated as part of a larger constructed wetland treatment system along Harbor Brook with additional water quality, natural habitat, recreational, educational, and other community benefits. The project will be located within the approximately 34 contiguous acres of Onondaga County-owned land known as the Velasko Road Detention Basin. This constructed wetland pilot project will capture and treat approximately 13.6 million gallons of combined sewage each year and substantially improve the quality of the stormwater discharge into Harbor Brook.

Rendering of the 3 Types of Wetlands

Version 12/23/2011

The Future Location of the Constructed Wetlands


FACT SHEET Harrison Street – Commercial Green Street

Project: Project Owner: Project Location: Sewershed: GI Technology: Capture Area: Run-off Reduction: Year Contracted: Construction Cost: Prime Contractor:

Harrison St. - Green Street City of Syracuse 300 Block of Harrison St. Clinton/Lower MIS Bioretention 10,000 sq. ft. 180,000 gal/yr 2011 $109,920 Economy Paving

Project Description: The project is located on the southern side of Harrison Street, between Montgomery and State streets, on the northern side of the OnCenter Convention Center (across from the historic War Memorial Arena). The OnCenter is home to countless entertainment attractions for local, regional, and national audiences. Since 1992, the OnCenter has been the premiere convention location for the region. The stormwater retrofit project along the 300 block of Harrison Street, next to the OnCenter, features the installation of a new sidewalk planter that uses bioretention practices to capture and treat surface runoff from the adjacent roadway. Runoff enters the planter via four new curb stormwater inlets, irrigating the new native shade trees, ornamental shrubs, and colorful perennials and then infiltrates through an aggregate trench down into the sub-grade below.

Harrison Street Before Green Street Technology

Version 12/23/2011

Harrison Street After Green Street Technology Installed


FACT SHEET Hazard Library Green Roof

Project: Project Owner: Project Location: Sewershed: GI Technology: Capture Area: Run-off Reduction: Year Contracted: Construction Cost: Prime Contractor:

Hazard Library Green Roof Onondaga County 1620 West Genesee St. Harbor Brook Green Roof 5,000 sq. ft. 88,000 gal/yr 2011 $67,275 J&B Installations

Project Description: This project involves a green roof installation at the Hazard Branch Library. Located at the intersection of W. Genesee Street and St. Mary’s Avenue, the Hazard Branch Library has over 100 years of library service to Syracuse’s West Side. The proposed stormwater retrofit project will install a vegetated roof system on a large portion of the existing library rooftop. The green roof will feature plantings in a lightweight growing medium on top of a waterproof membrane, designed to capture stormwater, irrigate the plantings, and allow excess stormwater to evapotranspirate. The membrane for the roof is currently in place with plantings of the sedum turf planned for spring.

Aerial View of Hazard Library Prior to Green Roof Installation

Diagram of Green Roof Implementation

Green Infrastructure Site Plan for Hazard Library


FACT SHEET OnCenter Convention Center Green Roof

Project: Project Location: Project Owner: Sewershed: GI Technology: Capture Area: Run-off Reduction: Year Completed: Construction Cost: Prime Contractor:

OnCenter Green Roof 800 South State St. Onondaga County Clinton/Lower MIS Green Roof 66,000 sq. ft. 1,033,000 gal/yr 2011 $1,038,000 J&B Installations

Project Description: The stormwater retrofit at the Convention Center was one of several GI projects constructed on site at the OnCenter Complex in 2011. The OnCenter is home to countless entertainment attractions for local, regional and national audiences. Since 1992, the OnCenter has been the premiere convention location for the region. The Green Roof at the OnCenter involved the installation of a green roof system on the 66,000 square foot rooftop of the Convention Center. The roof consists of a waterproof membrane liner that is covered with a layer of lightweight growing medium and planted with a mix of sedums (low-growing succulent vegetation). The new rooftop landscape is a self-sustaining system requiring little maintenance once established and relies upon natural processes to retain and evapotranspirate stormwater runoff. This green roof is one of the largest in the Northeast.

Aerial View of Convention Center Before Green Roof Installation

Application of Roof Membrane Photos of Green Roof Under Construction Version 12/30/2011


FACT SHEET OnCenter Municipal Parking Garage

Project: Project Owner: Project Location: Sewershed: GI Technology: Capture Area: Run-off Reduction: Year Contracted: Construction Cost: Prime Contractor:

OnCenter Parking Garage Onondaga County 817-835 S. State Street Clinton/Lower MIS Bioretention 72,500 sq. ft. 1,277,000 gal/yr 2011 $246,985 Economy Paving

Project Description: The OnCenter Municipal Parking Garage Project is taking place at the municipal parking garage to the east of the historic OnCenter/War Memorial Arena. The OnCenter is home to countless entertainment attractions for local, regional, and national audiences. Since 1992, the OnCenter has been the premiere convention location for the region. The project involves the design and construction of rain gardens on the existing landscape surrounding the garage. This new bioretention feature will capture and infiltrate the stormwater runoff coming from the existing roof leaders and pipe/downspout infrastructure of the parking garage facility. Disconnecting this existing infrastructure from the conventional sewer system will result in the capture of approximately 1.3 million gallons of stormwater annually.

OnCenter Garage Prior to Construction

Aerial View of the OnCenter Garage Under Construction (Facing North)

Construction of a Rain Garden at the OnCenter Garage with Downspout Draining Into It Version 12/28/2011


Project: Project Owner: Project Location: Sewershed: GI Technology:

FACT SHEET OnCenter Surface Parking Lot

Capture Area: Run-off Reduction: Year Completed: Construction Cost: Prime Contractor:

OnCenter Surface Lot Onondaga County 801-813 S. State St. Clinton/Lower MIS Porous Pavement, Tree Trench 134,000 sq. ft. 2,360,000 gal/yr 2011 $529,040 Economy Paving

Project Description: This project took place at the existing surface parking lot across the street from the site of the historic War Memorial Arena. The OnCenter is home to countless entertainment attractions for local, regional, and national audiences. Since 1992, the OnCenter has been the premiere convention location for the region. The OnCenter Surface Lot is the site of a stormwater retrofit project that repaved the existing parking lot with porous asphalt. In addition to the pavement resurfacing, the project features the design and construction of an infiltration trench along three sides of the parking lot to manage runoff from the entire lot as well as from adjacent streets. The project also features a new tree infiltration trench and a new section of sidewalk.

Porous Asphalt

OnCenter Parking Lot Before Construction

OnCenter Parking Lot After Construction Complete Version 12/22/2011


Project: Project Owner: Project Location:

FACT SHEET Otisco Street Green Corridor

Sewershed: GI Technology: Capture Area: Run-off Reduction: Year Contracted: Construction Cost: Prime Contractor:

Otisco Street Green Corridor City of Syracuse Otisco St. from S. Geddes to Seneca St. Clinton/Harbor Brook Curb Extensions, Rain Gardens 76,981 sq. ft. 2,240,845 gal/yr 2011 $1,413,732 Derek Tarolli, Inc.

Project Description: Phase 1 of the Otisco Street Green Corridor is a green street project to be constructed as part of the Save the Rain program. The project has many facets; however, the main aspect is the existing curb lines along Otisco Street at the intersections of S. Geddes, Ontario, and Seneca streets that will be extended approximately 6 feet into the road. The new curb line will include curb stormwater inlets to allow stormwater to runoff into new bioretention areas between the new curb and the existing curb. This green practice allows for substantial stormwater capture. Phase 1 of the Otisco Street Green Corridor Project allows for a runoff reduction of almost 2.25 million gallons per year. Not only do curb extensions provide substantial stormwater capture, but they also act as “traffic calming devices� in that they promote safe travel. The new rain gardens that will be constructed within the curb extensions will not only capture stormwater, but they will also provide a small amount of treatment to stormwater runoff. In other residential green street projects throughout the country, these rain gardens have become community gardens as residents tend to rain gardens in front of their homes and provide maintenance as needed. Version 12/23/2011

Curb Extension Diagram


Project: Project Owner: Project Location: Sewershed: GI Technology:

FACT SHEET Pocket Park at West Genesee and North Clinton Streets

Capture Area: Run-off Reduction: Year Contracted: Construction Cost: Prime Contractor:

Pocket Park City of Syracuse W. Genesee & N. Clinton Streets Clinton/Lower MIS Bioretention Planters, Permeable Pavers 7,120 sq. ft. 125,000 gal/yr 2011 $105,000 (est.) JJ Lane Construction

Project Description: This stormwater retrofit project takes place on the site of an existing 2,500 square foot City of Syracuse park at the northwest corner of West Genesee and North Clinton streets. The park is currently closed to the public and will be redeveloped to address stormwater runoff on site and from adjacent streets. After thorough excavation and backfill, the new Pocket Park design will feature two stormwater planters offset from the sidewalk. These planters help to physically define the extent of Pocket Park, with one side of the planter serving as a seatwall to provide additional seating opportunities for the public. Also, the planters collect stormwater runoff from West Genesee and North Clinton streets via two new curb inlets and decorative cast iron trench drains set into the existing sidewalk. A mixture of native shrubs and perennials will be planted to provide visual interest to this urban park space.

Stormwater Planters with Seatwall Detail

The interior of the park is redesigned to feature permeable pavers, benches, reconstructed planters with native shrubs and perennials, and new canopy trees planted in structural soil to ensure adequate soil volume. This Pocket Park project is being incorporated into the CSO 022 Sewer Separation Project, which is a gray project of the Save the Rain Program. It is expected to capture 125,000 gallons each year.

Conceptual Rendering of Proposed Park Design Version 12/28/2011


Project: Project Owner: Project Location: Sewershed: GI Technology:

FACT SHEET SCSD Central Offices Parking Lot

Capture Area: Run-off Reduction: Year Contracted: Construction Cost: Prime Contractor:

SCSD Central Offices Parking Lot SCSD 725 Harrison St Clinton/Lower MIS Porous Pavement, Infiltration Beds 125,000 sq. ft. 2,036,000 gal/yr 2011 $403,500 Orchard Earth & Pipe

Project Description: This project involves the construction of two infiltration trenches under standard asphalt and two infiltration beds beneath porous asphalt in the parking lot of the Syracuse City School District (SCSD) Central Offices on Harrison Street. These installations of green infrastructure are expected to capture over two million gallons of stormwater each year. A unique facet of this particular project is the design of an infiltration bed along Harrison Street that will be 12 feet deep to allow the interception of a 24� storm sewer line. This storm sewer line originates from the adjacent Hutchings Psychiatric Center, allowing for the capture of runoff from not only the Central Offices Parking Lot, but also from the roof of all of the Hutchings buildings and parking lot, making this particular project one of the most cost-efficient projects thus far in the Save the Rain program.

Aerial View of SCSD Central Offices Parking Lot Prior to Construction

Aerial View of Green Infrastructure Plans at SCSD Central Offices Version 12/28/2011


Project: Project Owner: Project Location: Sewershed: GI Technology:

FACT SHEET SCSD Hughes Magnet School Parking Lot

Capture Area: Run-off Reduction: Year Constructed: Construction Cost: Prime Contractor:

Hughes Magnet School Syracuse City School Dist. 370 Jamesville Ave Midland Porous Pavement, Infiltration Bed 80,000 sq. ft. 1,504,000 gal/yr 2011 $288,000 ACTS II Construction

Project Description: The project at Hughes Magnet School involves the construction of a new parking lot that is able to capture stormwater runoff not only from the new construction, but also from the existing parking lot, school roof, and Jamesville Ave. This unique project is able to prevent approximately 1.5 million gallons of stormwater from entering the combined sewer system annually. The new parking lot will consist of porous asphalt parking stalls and standard asphalt driving lanes. Beneath the entire parking lot is a subsurface infiltration bed that is sized to handle runoff from this large drainage area.

Tributary Drainage Area

The existing parking lot and roof leader connections to the combined sewer system will be intercepted and re-plumbed into the subsurface infiltration bed in the new parking lot. Also included in this project is a small planting area between the new parking lot and Jamesville Ave. that will handle additional stormwater from surrounding areas. Porous Parking Lot Location Before Construction

Conceptual Rendering of Green Project Plans

Porous Lot - Construction Nearing Completion Version 12/28/2011


Project: Project Owner: Project Location: Sewershed: GI Technology:

FACT SHEET SCSD Institute of Technology

Capture Area: Run-off Reduction: Year Contracted: Construction Cost: Prime Contractor:

SCSD Institute of Technology Syracuse City School District 258 E. Adams St. Clinton/Lower MIS Sewer Separation with Water Quality Treatment 128,000 sq. ft. 2,251,000 gal/yr 2011 $0 (No County Funding) Christa Construction

Project Description: The stormwater retrofit project at the Syracuse City School District (SCSD) Institute of Technology, located at 258 E. Adams Street, is part of the on-going collaboration with Onondaga County, the SCSD, and the City of Syracuse. The school was originally built in 1900 and was added to the National Register of Historic Places in 1981. The project features sewer separation with water quality treatment as part of an overall renovation and expansion at this site which includes parking lot resurfacing and a new building addition to the main facility. Sewer separation involves the installation of new pipelines to specifically collect and transmit stormwater to the nearest water body, while the existing sewer pipeline remains in place to solely convey sewage to a treatment plant. The two separated pipe networks greatly alleviate the amount of stormwater that enters the sewer system and allows greater management of wet-weather flow.

Aerial View of SCSD Institute of Technology

Proposed Building Addition and Stormwater Plan Schematic of Separated Sewer (EPA) Version 12/30/2011


FACT SHEET SCSD Dr. Weeks Elementary

Project: Project Owner: Project Location: Sewershed: GI Technology: Capture Area: Run-off Reduction: Year Contracted: Construction Cost: Prime Contractor:

Dr. Weeks Elementary School Syracuse City School District 710 Hawley Ave Clinton/Lower MIS Bioretention 124,000 sq. ft. 2,177,000 gal/yr 2011 $89,000 Fahs Construction

Project Description: The Dr. Weeks Elementary School Project will include green infrastructure enhancements in conjunction with an existing project at the school managed by the Joint School Construction Board (JSCB). The JSCB will be implementing a wide-range of retrofit enhancements to the school building and property with the Save the Rain Program providing green infrastructure improvements. The project consists of two bioretention areas that are designed to capture runoff from nearly all of the impervious area surrounding the site. This includes all of the paved areas in and around the playground and the parking lot adjacent to the school. In total, this project will prevent 2,177,000 gallons of stormwater from entering into the combined sewer system annually. Construction began in December 2011 and is expected to be completed in 2012.

Dr. Weeks Elementary School Aerial Photo Before GI Installed

Version 12/22/2011

Conceptual Rendering of Dr. Weeks Elementary GI Project


Project: Project Owner: Project Location: Sewershed: GI Technology:

FACT SHEET Skiddy Park Enhancements

Capture Area: Run-off Reduction: Year Constructed: Construction Cost: Prime Contractor:

Skiddy Park Enhancements Syracuse Parks Dept 300 Tioga St. Clinton/Lower MIS Flexible Porous Pavement, Spray Fountain Retrofit 23,000 sq. ft. 898,000 gal/yr 2011 $244,000 ACTS II Construction

Project Description: The Skiddy Park Enhancement is a collaborative project with the Onondaga County Save the Rain Program, the City of Syracuse Parks Department, and the Near West Side Initiative’s new playground equipment project. This is the second Save the Rain project at Skiddy Park this year. This project consists of removing all existing asphalt pavement in the park and installing new 10 foot wide flexible porous pavement walkways. Around the existing field house will be an infiltration trench that captures runoff from both Tully and Tioga streets. In addition, a pilot for the Save the Rain City Parks Water Spray Fountain Volume Reduction Initiative will be implemented as part of this project. This will consist of removing the existing water spray feature and installing a new feature that will have a push button timer and control panel that will only allow the fountain to run at certain times during the day. Currently, the fountain runs continuously from midMay to mid-October. This measure alone prevents 493,000 gallons of water from entering the combined New Water Spray sewer annually. Overall, Fountain Feature the project reduces (Courtesy: Water Odyssey) 898,000 gallons of runoff annually.

Aerial Photo of Skiddy Park GI Enhancements Under Construction

Rendering of Skiddy Park GI Enhancements Version 12/22/2011


FACT SHEET Street Tree Plantings

Project: Project Owner: Project Location: Sewershed: GI Technology: Capture Area: Run-off Reduction: Year Completed: Construction Cost: Prime Contractor:

Street Tree Contract Various Owners Various Locations N/A Tree Plantings N/A 814,000 gal/yr 2011 $122,352 Tumbers Town & Country Landscaping

Project Description: Tree canopy coverage is vital for urban stormwater management as trees capture and store rainwater in their canopies and root zones, eventually releasing this water into the atmosphere through evapotranspiration. Trees also help to slow down and temporarily store stormwater runoff due to their physical presence and the ability of tree roots to improve soil conditions to promote infiltration. Urban trees also provide a host of other community benefits including those related to aesthetics, air quality, shading, property values, and energy. This comprehensive Street Tree Planting Contract addresses stormwater management by specifying and securing plant materials and services for the planting of trees throughout the City of Syracuse as part of the Onondaga County Save the Rain program during the 2011 spring and fall planting seasons. A total of 407 trees were planted by the CityCounty Arborist and community groups in 2011.

Street Tree Planting on Herriman St.

Version 12/28/2011


Project: Project Owner: Project Location: Sewershed: GI Technology:

FACT SHEET Sunnycrest Park Arena Parking Lot

Capture Area: Run-off Reduction: Year Completed: Construction Cost: Prime Contractor:

Sunnycrest Arena Lot Syracuse Parks Dept. Robinson St. Clinton /Lower MIS Porous Pavement, Bioretention 107,000 sq. ft. 1,876,000 gal/yr 2011 $407,000 Ruston Paving

Project Description: The project is the surface parking lot located at the Sunnycrest Park Arena, adjacent to Henninger High School. The asphalt surface was replaced with porous asphalt parking spaces in the center section of the main parking area and along the outer parking stalls of the baseball field. In addition, the project included enhanced street plantings (28 trees) and two bioretention areas designed to capture flow from the standard pavement portion of the parking lot. The Sunnycrest Arena Parking Lot Project is one of the most cost-effective green parking lot projects in the Save the Rain program. Estimated capture is close to 2 million gallons annually.

Conditions Prior to Green Project

Aerial Photos of Sunnycrest Arena Parking Lot – Before Construction (Left) and After Construction (Right) Version 12/29/2011


Project: Project Owner: Project Location: Sewershed: GI Technology:

FACT SHEET Sunnycrest Park Golf Course Parking Lot

Capture Area: Run-off Reduction: Year Contracted: Construction Cost: Prime Contractor:

Sunnycrest Golf Course Syracuse Parks Dept. Caleb Avenue Erie Blvd. Storage System Stream Inflow Removal, Bioretention 48,000 sq. ft. 843,000 gal/yr 2011 $362,599 ACTS II Construction

Project Description: The project will take place at the existing surface parking lot located at the Sunnycrest Golf Course on Caleb Avenue. The existing asphalt surface will be reduced in size while maintaining the same number of parking spaces. The project will consist of pavement removal and stormwater capture into two separate bioretention areas--one intercepting stormwater flows from Caleb Avenue and the other from the existing parking lot. In addition, an existing catch basin capturing runoff from the golf course will be raised to prevent stormwater from entering the combined sewer system. Elements of this project will mirror traditional infrastructure with the majority of the parking surface receiving a new standard asphalt top coat. The parking lot will be graded to send flow to one of the bioretention areas via curb inlets. This is one of two projects at Sunnycrest Park (including the arena parking lot). Onondaga County is partnering with the City of Syracuse Parks Department on this and several other projects throughout the City.

Version 12/29/2011

Sunnycrest Golf Course Parking Lot After Pavement Removal & Construction of Bioretention Areas

Left: Aerial View of Sunnycrest Golf Parking Lot Below: Conditions Prior to Construction


FACT SHEET SUNY Upstate Cancer Center Green Roof

Project: Project Owner: Project Location: Sewershed: GI Technology: Capture Area: Run-off Reduction: Year Contracted: Prime Contractor:

SUNY Upstate Green Roof SUNY Upstate 750 E. Adams St. Clinton/Lower MIS Green Roof 12,000 sq. ft. 211,000 gal/yr 2011 LeChase Construction

Project Description: As part of SUNY Upstate Cancer Center’s expansion, a green roof is being installed on a newly built campus building. The new green roof will cover approximately 12,000 square feet and prevent 211,000 gallons of stormwater from entering into the combined sewer system annually. Construction of the campus building where the green roof will be located began in Spring 2011. The green roof is part of a larger “green initiative” SUNY Upstate is undertaking. Several other green infrastructure elements are being incorporated into other SUNY Upstate projects within Onondaga County. These projects range from green roofs to rain gardens to tree plantings.

Rendering of New SUNY Upstate Cancer Center Building Expansion (Courtesy: www.upstate.edu)

Layers of a Green Roof

Version 12/28/2011

Engineering Design Plan for Green Roof at SUNY Upstate Cancer Center (Courtesy of Ewing Cole)


Project:

FACT SHEET SUNY Upstate Cancer Center Rain Garden and Tree Plantings

Project Owner: GI Technology: Project Location: Sewershed: Capture Area: Run-off Reduction: Year Contracted: Prime Contractor:

SUNY Upstate Rain Garden and Tree Plantings SUNY Upstate Rain Garden, Tree Plantings 750 E. Adams St. Clinton 4,000 sq. ft. 65,000 gal/yr 2011 LeChase Construction

Project Description: As part of SUNY Upstate Cancer Center’s expansion, a new pedestrian and automobile plaza will be constructed surrounding the new Cancer Center building. The intent of the new plaza is to promote safe travel not only by pedestrians, but also by vehicles. Green infrastructure is being incorporated into this plaza in the form of a rain garden and tree plantings. Combined, the rain garden and tree plantings capture 4,000 square feet Rendering of SUNY Upstate Cancer Center of impervious area, preventing 65,000 gallons of Building Expansion (Courtesy: www.upstate.edu) stormwater from entering the combined sewer system annually. Construction of the campus building and the pedestrian/automobile plaza began in the spring of 2011. These green projects are part of a larger “green initiative” SUNY Upstate is undertaking. Several other green infrastructure elements are being incorporated into other SUNY Upstate projects within Onondaga County. These projects range from green roofs to rain gardens to tree plantings.

SUNY Upstate Cancer Ctr Expansion Conceptual Rendering Incorporating Green Infrastructure (Courtesy of Klepper, Hahn and Hyatt)


FACT SHEET SUNY Upstate: Institute of Human Performance Expansion

Project: Project Location: Project Owner: Sewershed: GI Technology: Capture Area: Run-off Reduction: Year Contracted: Construction Cost: Prime Contractor:

SUNY Upstate IHP 505 Irving Ave. SUNY Upstate Clinton/Lower MIS Tree Trench N/A 18,000 gal/yr 2011 $0 (No County Funding) SUNY Upstate’s Contractor

Project Description: In collaboration with SUNY Upstate, this project will involve the realignment of the sidewalk along South Crouse Avenue in addition to installing a tree trench along the road in order to maximize the tree canopy in this parking area that otherwise has few existing trees. The project will take place on the site of SUNY Upstate’s Institute for Human Performance (IHP) and will be part of a planned 160,000 square foot expansion of IHP, which will showcase SUNY Upstate’s strength in its interdisciplinary and interdepartmental approach to the study of disorders of the nervous system.

Site Conditions Prior to Construction

The expanded facility is expected to open in the spring of 2013.

Tree Trench Illustration

Street Tree Palette Version 12/28/2011


Project: GI Technology: Project Location: Project Owner: Sewershed: Capture Area: Run-off Reduction: Year Completed: Construction Cost:

FACT SHEET Townsend Median Retrofit Phase 1

Townsend Median Phase 1 Enhanced Street Trees & Pavement Removal S. Townsend St. Median (E. Adams St. to McCarthy Ave.) Onondaga County Clinton 18,000 sq. ft. 317,000 gal/yr 2011 $86,000

Project Description: The Townsend Median project, completed in 2011, is a stormwater retrofit project that features the redesign of the existing Townsend Street median and the planting of ten new trees along both sides of S. Townsend Street between E. Adams St. and McCarthy Ave. The new median is designed to be below surface grade allowing stormwater from both sides of S. Townsend Street to drain directly into the median, irrigate new vegetation, and eventually infiltrate. The median’s new design features combination plantings of native grasses in place of the existing pavement and concrete cobbles. Existing street trees within the median are preserved while new street trees enhance the existing streetscape, fill vacant tree pits, and ultimately increase tree canopy coverage. In addition, four new street trees are designed to be “stormwater trees,” with new curb stormwater inlets built into the existing curb to allow stormwater runoff to infiltrate the planting soils around the trees. The entire Townsend Median project is anticipated to capture approximately 370,000 gallons of stormwater runoff each year. Version 12/28/2011

Townsend Median (Phase 1) After Retrofit

Townsend Median (Phase 1) Before Retrofit


Project: Project Owner: Project Location:

FACT SHEET Townsend Median Retrofit Phase 2

Sewershed: GI Technology: Capture Area: Run-off Reduction: Year Completed: Construction Cost: Prime Contractor:

Townsend Median (Phase 2) City of Syracuse S. Townsend St. Median from E. Adams to E. Taylor Street Clinton/Lower MIS Pavement Removal/ Plantings 3,000 sq. ft. 53,000 gal/yr 2011 $43,000 Davis Wallbridge

Project Description: The Townsend Median Project, completed in 2011, is a stormwater retrofit project that features the landscape restoration of the existing Townsend Street median. Phase 2 involved the planting of various plant plugs and shrubs along S. Townsend Street between E. Taylor Street and E. Adams Street. The new median is designed to be below surface grade, allowing stormwater from both sides of S. Townsend Street to drain directly into the median, irrigate new vegetation, and slowly infiltrate. This project is the second Save the Rain project along Townsend Median, with the first spanning the length of the median between E. Genesee and E. Adams Street. The entire Townsend Median project is anticipated to capture approximately 370,000 gallons of stormwater runoff each year.

Aerial View of Townsend Median After Retrofit (Facing North)

Townsend St. Median Before Retrofit

Phase 2 Townsend St. Median Plantings Version 12/28/2011


FACT SHEET Tree Plantings in Court Woodlawn

Project: Project Owner: Project Location: Sewershed: GI Technology: Capture Area: Run-off Reduction: Year Completed: Construction Cost: Prime Contractor:

Tree Planting – Schiller Park City of Syracuse Court Woodlawn Clinton\Lower MIS Tree Planting N/A 118,000 gal/yr 2011 $0 City/County Arborist

Project Description: This community tree planting included the addition of 59 trees in the Court Woodlawn neighborhood of Syracuse, NY. Species planted include honey locust, red oak, redbud, river birch, and serviceberry trees. Tree plantings are an important aspect of the Save the Rain program because they absorb rain water and reduce the potential of runoff to the sewer system. Trees naturally soak up stormwater and use the precipitation to feed their root systems. Each tree absorbs approximately 20,000 gallons of stormwater each year. Example of a River Birch Tree

This planting is part of the ongoing efforts of the Save the Rain Urban Forestry Program. The program is developing a robust tree planting strategy for neighborhoods throughout the City of Syracuse. Over the life of the program, it will support the planting of 8,500 trees.

(Tree photos from www.arborday.org)

Example of a Red Oak Tree

Example of a Honeylocust

Example of a Serviceberry Version 12/28/2011

Example of a Redbud


FACT SHEET Tree Plantings in and around Schiller Park

Project: Project Owner: Project Location: Sewershed: GI Technology: Capture Area: Run-off Reduction: Year Completed: Construction Cost: Prime Contractor:

Tree Planting – Schiller Park City of Syracuse Schiller Park Clinton\Lower MIS Tree Planting N/A 160,000 gal/yr 2011 $0 City/County Arborist

Project Description: This community tree planting included the addition of 80 trees in and around Schiller Park in Syracuse, NY. Tree plantings are an important aspect of the Save the Rain program because they absorb rain water and reduce the potential of runoff to the sewer system. Trees naturally soak up stormwater and use the precipitation to feed their root systems. Each tree absorbs approximately 20,000 gallons of stormwater each year. This planting is part of the ongoing efforts of the Save the Rain Urban Forestry Program. The program is developing a robust tree planting strategy for neighborhoods throughout the City of Syracuse. Over the life of the program, it will support the planting of 8,500 trees.

Community Members Planting Trees in Schiller Park with the City-County Arborist & Cornell Cooperative Extention

Version 12/28/2011


Project:

FACT SHEET Tree Plantings in Union & Demong Parks

Project Owner: Project Location: Sewershed: GI Technology: Capture Area: Run-off Reduction: Year Completed: Construction Cost: Prime Contractor:

Tree Planting – Union & Demong Parks City of Syracuse Union & Demong Parks Clinton\Lower MIS Tree Planting N/A 48,000 gal/yr 2011 $0 City/County Arborist

Project Description: This community tree planting included the addition of 24 trees in Union Park and Demong Park in Syracuse, NY. Tree plantings are an important aspect of the Save the Rain program because they absorb rain water and reduce the potential of runoff to the sewer system. Trees naturally soak up stormwater and use the precipitation to feed their root systems. Each tree absorbs approximately 20,000 gallons of stormwater each year. This planting is part of the ongoing efforts of the Save the Rain Urban Forestry Program. The program is developing a robust tree planting strategy for neighborhoods throughout the City of Syracuse. Over the life of the program, it will support the planting of 8,500 trees.

Community Members Planting Trees in Union & Demong Parks with City-County Arborist & Cornell Cooperative Extention

Version 12/28/2011


Project: Project Owner: Project Location: Sewershed: GI Technology:

FACT SHEET Vacant Lot Project: 701 Oswego St.

Capture Area: Run-off Reduction: Year Contracted: Construction Cost: Prime Contractor:

Vacant Lot – Oswego St. City of Syracuse 701 Oswego St. Clinton/Lower MIS Infiltration Trenches, Urban Garden 15,000 sq. ft. 259,000 gal/yr 2011 $85,214 Cornerstone Paving

Project Description: The Vacant Lot Project at 701 Oswego Street is the first vacant lot project of the Save the Rain program. The vision of the Vacant Lot program is to convert City-owned empty lots into useable spaces for public benefit. This vision also provides the opportunity for stormwater capture and management on these sites. The Oswego Street project involves the installation of two infiltration trenches designed to capture stormwater from Oswego and Shonnard streets via existing stormwater infrastructure. The existing catch basins along both streets will convey stormwater into the infiltration trenches. The construction of an urban garden is also incorporated into this project. It will include apple and peach trees as well as berry bushes. This green infrastructure is designed to capture up to 1� of rainfall at a given time, reducing annual stormwater runoff by approximately 259,000 gallons.

Conceptual Rendering of Vacant Lot After GI Installed (Rendering Credit: Atlantic States ()C Legal Foundation)

Aerial View of Vacant Lot Before GI

Conceptual Rendering of the Vacant Lot Green Infrastructure Project Version 12/22/2011


FACT SHEET War Memorial Arena Rainwater Re-Use Cistern System

Project: Project Location: Project Owner: Sewershed: GI Technology: Capture Area: Run-off Reduction: Year Completed: Construction Cost: Prime Contractor:

War Memorial Cistern 200 Madison St. Onondaga County Clinton/Lower MIS Rain Re-use Cistern 44,000 sq. ft. 400,000 gal/yr 2011 $1,229,251 C.O. Falter Construction

Project Description: The OnCenter War Memorial Arena Rainwater Re-use System Project is located on the site of the Onondaga County War Memorial Arena, bounded by Madison, South State, Harrison, and Montgomery streets. Since 1951, the War Memorial has been home to countless concerts, conventions, and various community events. The arena is currently the home of the Syracuse Crunch Hockey team of the AHL. The innovative water re-use system is located within the basement of the Arena and involves the design and construction of approximately 15,000 gallons of belowground rainwater storage, in addition to the installation of filtration, disinfection, and water re-use technology. The project is intended to recapture rain water and snow melt runoff from the War Memorial Arena roof, reusing the captured runoff primarily for ice production and ice maintenance for events at the arena, including sporting events and family entertainment.

Rainwater Reuse System Used to Make Ice for the War Memorial Arena, Home of the Syracuse Crunch Version 12/23/2011


Project: Project Owner: Project Location: Sewershed: GI Technology:

FACT SHEET Water Street Gateway

Capture Area: Run-off Reduction: Year Contracted: Construction Cost: Prime Contractor:

Water Street Gateway City of Syracuse 300 Block Water St. Clinton/Lower MIS Infiltration Trench, Porous Pavers 53,000 sq. ft. 924,000 gal/yr 2011 $920,088 Davis Walbridge

Project Description: The Water Street Gateway Project will be a comprehensive ‘green’ street application located on the 300 block of Water Street and is the first of the “Save the Rain” gateway projects intended to demonstrate green infrastructure applications at key entry points into the City. The design will include the installation of several green infrastructure elements that will capture stormwater and enhance the urban landscape. The project scope will incorporate streetscape tree detail with enhanced tree plantings in the right-of-way; installation of porous pavers in parking lanes; use of infiltration trenches and planters; and additional landscaping features throughout the footprint of the block.

300 Block of Water St. Before Construction

The project is being developed in conjunction with the private renovation of 323, 325, and 327 E. Water Street and is part of the long-term strategic vision for a green corridor along E. Water Street from S. Warren Street to Erie Boulevard.

Water St. Gateway – Rendering of Completed Project

Porous Pavers – 300 Block Water St. (North Side of the Street) Version 12/28/2011


FACT SHEET Wilbur Avenue Zoo Entrance Enhancements

Project: Project Owner: Project Location: Sewershed: GI Technology: Capture Area: Run-off Reduction: Year Contracted: Construction Cost: Prime Contractor:

Wilbur Avenue Zoo Entrance Onondaga County Wilbur Ave. & Conservation Pl. Harbor Brook Rain Gardens, Porous Pavement 39,000 sq. ft. 680,000 gal/yr 2011 $299,990 Economy Paving

Project Description: The Wilbur Avenue Zoo Entrance Enhancement Project involves capturing stormwater runoff from numerous adjacent streets and piping that stormwater into rain garden applications in the park space located at the zoo entrance on Wilbur Avenue. Stormwater will be captured from Conservation Place, S. Wilbur Avenue, and Coleridge Avenue as part of this project. The three rain gardens that will be constructed are connected hydraulically, allowing overflows from each rain garden to be connected to the other rain gardens and eventually the combined sewer system. The rain gardens will be planted with numerous types of plant species that will beautify the zoo entrance, promoting further pedestrian traffic in this area. At the same time, these plants will allow captured rainwater to be infiltrated and evaporated, preventing it from entering the combined sewer system. A unique aspect of this project is that existing infrastructure (i.e. catch basins) will be tied in to the site and utilized for capturing rainwater. This will reduce construction disruptions and allows the project to be more cost efficient.

During Construction (above) Before Construction (below)

Conceptual Rendering of Wilbur Ave. Zoo Entrance Green Infrastructure (Courtesy: CH2M Hill) Version 12/28/2011


GREEN IMPROVEMENT FUND


Green Improvement Fund Update

Green Improvement Fund Program – 2011 Summary The Save the Rain Green Improvement Fund Program was extremely successful in 2011. The incentive program provides grant funding to private property owners for the installation of green infrastructure. With over 40 applications submitted--20 applications under contract and 10 projects completed--the GIF Program made great strides in 2011. 2011 also saw the GIF program undergo several improvements including new program parameters that place a greater emphasis on gallons captured; a revamped technical review process for proposed GIF projects; and refinement of the application & program description information. In 2012, the GIF Program will continue to develop key relationships with private property owners and build upon experiences gained in 2011.

Green Improvement Fund Summary Applications Received Applications Approved Applications Denied Applications Pending Projects Under Contract Projects Completed (2011) Projects Completed (2010)

62 48 5 9 20 10 7

More information on green improvement projects, please visit www.savetherain.us/gif-projects.


Project:

FACT SHEET Central New York Jazz Arts Foundation

Project Owner: Project Location: Sewershed: GI Technology: Capture Area: Run-off Reduction: Year Completed: GIF Award:

Central New York Jazz Arts Foundation Private 441 E. Washington St. Clinton Green Roof 3,000 sq. ft. 53,000 gal/yr 2011 $52,188

Project Description: The Central New York Jazz Arts Foundation project consists of the construction of a 3,000 square foot green roof at the property located on 441 E. Washington Street. The green roof was constructed utilizing sedum and a 5-inch thick constructed soil medium. Sedum is a type of low-growing succulent vegetation that requires little maintenance once installed. The estimated annual capture of the roof is approximately 53,000 gallons. The CNY Jazz Arts Foundation is a not-for-profit organization that is dedicated to providing, presenting, and teaching jazz to the Central New York Community. In addition to the green roof construction, the current home of the Foundation has undergone several improvements to the facility to accommodate a wide variety of entertainment performance and services.

Green Roof Installation at Jazz Central

Diagram of Green Roof Implementation

Version 12/30/2011


Project: Project Owner: Project Location: Sewershed: GI Technology:

FACT SHEET The Galleries Office Towers

Capture Area: Run-off Reduction: Year Completed: GIF Award:

Galleries Office Towers Private 441 S. Salina Street Clinton Underground Infiltration System 20,000 sq. ft. 352,000 gal/yr 2011 $100,000

Project Description: The Galleries Office Towers project, located at 441 South Salina Street, consists of the redevelopment of an existing parking lot for the Galleries of Syracuse. The project included the installation of three underground infiltration systems on site and regrading of the lot to allow stormwater to enter the underground storage. The lot size is approximately 20,000 square feet that will result in an estimated annual capture of 352,000 gallons. Due to mild temperatures this winter season, the project was constructed and completed in December.

Parking Lot (Street View) - Before

Parking Lot (Street View) - After

View of Infiltration Catch Basin

Version 12/28/2011


Project: Project Owner: GI Technology: Project Location: Sewershed: Capture Area: Run-off Reduction: Year Completed: GIF Funding:

FACT SHEET Hotel Skyler

Hotel Skyler Private Porous Pavement, Cistern 609 South Crouse Ave Clinton 9,800 sq. ft. 173,000 gal/yr 2011 $100,000

Project Description: The green infrastructure project at Hotel Skyler, located near the intersection of South Crouse Avenue and Harrison Street, comprised of the renovations of two separate areas on site to reduce and reuse storm water runoff. The first renovation involved the conversion of an existing 9,800 square feet asphalt parking lot to a porous lot utilizing brick pavers with structural soils and subsurface infiltration. The other project included the installation of two dry wells (also called cisterns) to capture storm water that may be used in place of potable water for flushing of toilets in the facility. The project was designed to store or infiltrate at least one inch of rainfall, which will allow the site to capture an estimated total annual storm water runoff of 173,000 gallons.

Parking Lot – Main Entrance

View from S. Crouse Ave.

View from Building ity Hall

Rear

it y Hall


Project: Project Owner: Project Location: Sewershed: GI Technology: Capture Area: Run-off Reduction: Year Completed: GIF Award:

FACT SHEET Monroe Building Green Roof

Monroe Building Private 333 E. Onondaga St. Clinton Green Roof 5,200 sq. ft. 91,581 gal/yr 2011 $92,832

Project Description: The green roof project at the Monroe Building converted approximately 5,200 square feet of rooftop surface to a vegetative roof system comprised of a sedum and chive mixture. This roof is expected to capture at least one inch of precipitation in a given storm or sequence of storms, preventing it from entering the sewer. The project, located at 333 E. Onondaga Street, is be one of the first green roof projects constructed downtown and included a green jobs component. SUNY-ESF partnered with the project to incorporate participants in the Green Infrastructure Training Program for education and maintenance of the roof.

Workers from Helping Hands Green Collar Job Training Program who Installed the Green Roof

Monroe Building Before the Green Roof Was Installed

Monroe Building After the Green Roof was Installed

Version 12/29/2011


FACT SHEET Putnam Properties

Project: Project Owner: Project Location: Sewershed: GI Technology: Capture Area: Run-off Reduction: Year Completed: GIF Award:

Putnam Properties Private 212 E. Fayette Street Clinton Green Roof 4,600 sq. ft. 81,000 gal/yr 2011 $75,757

Project Description: The Putnam Properties building is located at 212 East Fayette Street next to the HSBC Building and Lincoln Center. The project included the construction of a 3200 square foot green roof implemented to capture up to 2 inches of rain fall per wet-weather event. The project also included a second level of capture on a rooftop area adjacent to the Putnam Properties building. The Putnam green roof is estimated to capture approximately 81,000 gallons annually and will act as a demonstration project in the downtown corridor with sections of the roof visible to occupants of the HSBC Building, the Hills Building, One Park Place, and Lincoln Center.

Green Roof Planting

Adjacent Section Green Roof

Version 12/01/2011


FACT SHEET Skiddy Park - Courts4Kids

Project: Project Owner: Project Location: GI Technology: Sewershed: Capture Area: Run-off Reduction: Year Completed: GIF Funding:

Skiddy Park Courts 4 Kids 300 Tioga St. Porous Pavement Clinton/Lower MIS 19,000 sq. ft. 344,400 gal/yr 2011 $164,674

Project Description: Completed in July 2011, this project renovated the basketball court at Skiddy Park and involved the installation of porous pavement and an associated subsurface infiltration bed to convert the impervious surface to a permeable area. The area of the court is approximately 19,000 square feet. Stormwater runoff will be reduced by about 344,400 gallons each year. This green infrastructure project was part of a larger Skiddy Park renovation--a collaborative effort with The Jim and Juli Boeheim Foundation, NY Knicks star and Syracuse University alumnus Carmelo Anthony, and the City of Syracuse Department of Parks, Recreation, and Youth Programs.

Skiddy Park Basketball Court Before the Renovation

Skiddy Park’s New Porous Pavement Basketball Court After the Renovation

Skiddy Park’s New Porous Pavement Basketball Court After the Renovation Version 12/29/2011


FACT SHEET The Spa at 500

Project: Project Owner: GI Technology: Project Location: Sewershed: Capture Area: Run-off Reduction: Year Completed: GIF Award:

The Spa at 500 Private Bioretention 500 W. Onondaga Clinton 8,500 sq. ft. 150,000 gallons/yr 2011 $60,000

Project Description: The Spa at 500 project was one of the first applications for funding awarded under the Green Improvement Fund. The project, located on the Near West Side, involved replacing an asphalt parking lot with an extensive bioretention and landscaping system to mitigate stormwater runoff from the property. The new parking lot features several bioretention areas along the perimeter and center sections of the lot. Enhanced landscaping, including shrub and tree plantings, was also used as design features on the lot. The project will capture 150,000 gallons annually.

Spa Parking Lot Before Renovation

Bioretention Plantings in Spa Parking Lot

Spa Parking Lot After Renovation Version 12/29/2011


Project: Project Owner: Project Location: Sewershed: GI Technology:

FACT SHEET Vibrant Syracuse Spaces

Capture Area: Run-off Reduction: Year Completed: GIF Award:

Vibrant Syracuse Spaces Private 196 S. Geddes Street Harbor Brook Porous Pavement, Bioretention 14,510 sq. ft. 440,600 gal/yr 2011 $153,618

Project Description: The Vibrant Syracuse Spaces project, located at 196 South Geddes Street, is a total conversion of an existing impervious unused lot to a parking lot for Gear Factory Inc. The project included the creation of a 10,000 square foot parking lot utilizing porous pavement to capture stormwater run-off. Additionally, the project includes capture in the city right-of-way section of the property. Approximately 4,500 square feet of new sidewalk and right-of-way sections were added to include bioretention areas and tree plantings. In total, the Vibrant Spaces project will capture an estimated 440,000 gallons annually.

Porous Concrete Parking Lot (Street View)

Another unique aspect of the project is the manner in which it has come to realization. The applicant has worked closely with both the County and the City of Syracuse to maximize the capture potential of the project. Plans for the private property section were fully vetted for maximum capture while the right-ofway work was fully developed after an extensive collaboration with the City of Syracuse Department of Public Works. Sidewalk Bioretention Section Version 12/01/2011


METRO WWTP PHOSPHORUS PROJECTS /TMDL/AMBIENT MONITORING PROGRAM UPDATE


Metro WWTP Phosphorus Projects/TMDL/Ambient Monitoring Program Update: Metro Phosphorus Optimization Project  Final report approved by NYSDEC on December 13, 2011.

Metro Phosphorus Work Plan Project  Report due to NYSDEC on December 31, 2011.

Onondaga Lake Water Quality Model/TMDL 

Received peer review draft comments of “Phase 3 Model Validation - Onondaga Lake Water Quality Modeling Project” report, dated August 2011, on December 11, 2011. Awaiting final version of comments. The general view of the peer review panel is that the modelers have been responsive to each of the technical reviews that have preceded preparation of the final document, including the three most recent discussions of plunging inflows, phosphorus bioavailability, and sediment fluxes. The peer review panel noted that Anchor-QEA has done a generally good job both in carrying out the model development and application and in documenting what was done (with one possible exception related to variability of P loading from Metro).

Provided electronic model outputs for select scenarios to NYSDEC to support ongoing TMDL development.

Received official notice regarding NYSDEC six-month extension (from 12/31/11 to 6/30/12) to County’s deadline to demonstrate ability to meet phosphorus effluent limit and NYSDEC’s TMDL determination.

Ambient Monitoring Program WATER QUALITY SAMPLING SUMMARY: Tributary Sampling (December 2011)  Tributary bacteria sampling events conducted on December 8, 15, and 22.  Tributary biweekly sampling events conducted on December 6 and 20. Tributary Bacteria Compliance Assessment (November 2011)  Bacteria in Compliance with the NYS Ambient Water Quality Standards (AWQS) for: Bloody Brook at Onondaga Lake Parkway, Ninemile Creek at Lakeland Rt 48, Harbor Brook at Bellevue Avenue, Onondaga Creek at Dorwin Avenue, Harbor Brook at Velasko Road, and Ley Creek at Park Street. 

Bacteria in Non-Compliance for: Onondaga Creek at Kirkpatrick Street and Harbor Brook at Hiawatha Boulevard.

CSO 044 Conveyances Project (Groundwater Dewatering Sampling) 

Continued in-stream monitoring program for chloride at two (2) bridge sampling locations related to the dewatering project, as required by NYSDEC.

Lake winter sampling event conducted on December 13.


Biological Monitoring Program Sampling Summary (December 2011)  

No biological-related sampling events conducted in December 2011. Completed pelagic trawl larval sample sorting and identifications in December.


LEGISLATIVE /REGULATORY / MEDIA UPDATE


Legislative/Regulatory Update: Action Items for the County Legislature in the Month of December  A resolution amending the 2011 Onondaga County budget to increase appropriations within the Department of Water Environment protection and to accept additional revenue. ($735,000) 

A resolution amending the 2012 County budget to provide for ongoing County participation in Honeywell and Onondaga Lake remediation issues. ($160,000)

Action Items for the Environmental Protection Committee in the Month of January:  Lake Improvement: ACJ update.


Branching Out Published: Thursday, December 01, 2011, 6:00 AM

By Nariman Jiries / The Post-Standard Stephen Harris becomes a part of the greening of Syracuse Editorial assistant Nariman Jiries interviewed Stephen Harris, who is the city-county arborist. Name: Stephen Harris Age: 44 Where do you live? The Westcott neighborhood in Syracuse. Tell us about your family: My wife, Kristine, and I grew up in Ohio and met while attending Ohio State. We moved here in 1998 so I could attend State University College of Environmental Science and Forestry. After graduating, I found a job in town. We’ve lived here 13 years and have two boys, Bela (Bayla), 13 and Max, 8. They both attend Ed Smith School in Syracuse. Educational background: Bachelor’s in geography, and Associate’s and master’s degrees in forestry. Occupation: City-county arborist How long have you been the city-county arborist? 18 months. What are your main responsibilities? For the city, I oversee the management of city trees. For the county, I am one of many people involved in implementing Onondaga County’s Save The Rain Program. As part of this effort, 8,500 street trees will be planted in city neighborhoods by 2018. The last time the city planted that much was in the 1970s when more than 9,000 trees were planted to replace elms lost to Dutch elm disease. What can you tell us about the Save the Rain program? The STR program is a comprehensive way to manage stormwater in order to reduce pollution to Onondaga Lake and its tributaries using green infrastructure. More than 50 green infrastructure projects are complete or in construction to redesign roofs, parking lots and streets so that storm water infiltrates on site rather than go down a storm drain.

http://blog.syracuse.com/neighbors/2011/12/branching_out.html


What transformation can the city of Syracuse expect in the future? Neighborhoods inside the county’s sewershed, about 50 percent of the city, will be reforested. In addition, many streets will be transformed into green streets as pavement is reduced and trees are planted. Syracuse will get a “green infrastructure makeover.” What job did you have prior to this? I worked in sales and production at a nursery that supplied native trees and shrubs for restoring wetlands and forests. Before that, I was an urban forest educator for Cornell Cooperative Extension of Onondaga County. Why are urban forests important? Trees do many things all at once and return $2 to $3 worth of benefits for every $1 invested. And scientists have measured many benefits. Trees improve air quality by reducing the artificially high temperatures of places like downtown where the “heat island” effect makes air pollution even worse. The shade of trees reduces energy costs and extends the life of paved surfaces. Trees slow stormwater down thereby decreasing storage and treatment needs. There are many more benefits. Trees improve in performance as they get larger, unlike gray infrastructure, which declines in performance and value the season after they are built. What are some issues facing the city’s urban forest? We have a lot of mature trees in poor condition. As storms become more unpredictable, the community can expect more trees and branches to come down and management costs to increase. The Emerald ash borer will arrive with certainty and force the city to treat and remove more than 2,300 ash trees. Every neighborhood will lose canopy. What is the most challenging part of your work? Finding a Christmas tree for Clinton Square. What is the best part about your work? Being outside and seeing every corner of the city. Working in the parks department is great. I don’t think the public fully understands the scale of work that gets accomplished in the park system and the talent of the people that do it. Working with both city and county departments is great, too. When did your passion for forestry spark? While serving as a Peace Corps volunteer in the Gambia, West Africa. I worked with farmers to establish tree nurseries and plantations for food, firewood and live fencing. Native trees would grow 100-feet tall and wide. You could plant papaya and banana plants and have fruit in 10 months. What is your key philosophy in life? Stay focused on the solution, not the problem. What do you enjoy best about your neighborhood? Walking to the library. Almost everything we want or need is in walking or biking distance (restaurants, school, parks and groceries). What is your favorite time of year? Summer. My kids love winter best as long as there is snow.

http://blog.syracuse.com/neighbors/2011/12/branching_out.html


http://photos.syracuse.com/post-standard/2011/12/photos_of_the_day_december_1_2_41.html


http://photos.syracuse.com/post-standard/2011/12/photos_of_the_day_december_1_2_41.html


Neighbors West Today: Onondaga Lake cleanup progressing, closer to 'swimmable,' 'fishable' lake Published: Thursday, December 01, 2011, 4:15 PM

Updated: Thursday, December 01, 2011, 4:18 PM

By Catie O'Toole / The Post-Standard

Syracuse, NY -- Joel Potash remembers bringing his family to Onondaga Lake in the 1960s to swim, fish and have a picnic on the shoreline. Today, the 74-year-old Syracuse resident volunteers with the Neighbors of the Onondaga Nation in hopes of seeing the lake — which for decades served as a dumping ground for raw municipal sewage and industrial wastes — cleaned up so others can once again enjoy those same activities. “I think it would be a wonderful resource,” he said. “It’s worth the effort.” Potash was among some 150 people who came out to a community forum on a rainy Tuesday night at the Rosamond Gifford Zoo to learn more about lake cleanup. Organizers said they were not expecting so many people to attend, but they were glad to see the community come together to listen, discuss and share ideas. Residents at the community forum emphasized the need to keep the public informed about the progress of the lake cleanup, to reassure them the process is being done safely and to continue moving toward the overall goal to once again have a "fishable" and "swimmable" lake. “It’s not going to happen this summer,” said Judith Enck, regional administrator for the Environmental Protection Agency, “but it will happen in the near future.”

http://www.syracuse.com/news/index.ssf/2011/12/neighbors_west_today_occs_new.html


A new beginning Onondaga Lake Partnership sets sights high for the future of Onondaga Lake

A dog and its owner enjoy one of the groomed pathways at Onondaga Lake Park. Photo by Amanda Wada. By Amanda Wada As of Monday, December 5, 2011   

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#Syracuse — The Onondaga Lake Partnership Nov. 29 held a community forum to discuss the progress and future of Onondaga Lake. More than 100 Syracuse area residents came to the Rosamond Gifford Zoo to hear about the current clean-up efforts and the partnership’s vision for Onondaga Lake’s future. #The meeting was an extensive look at the history of Onondaga Lake, and the organizations and companies that have been involved in the effort to improve the lake and its watersheds. #In October of 2006, the company that purchased Solvay Processor and Allied Chemical, Honeywell, entered an agreement with the New York State Department of Environmental Conservation for a remediation plan to clean the lake. The plan was approved by a federal court in January of that year. #Since the plan was put into place, the project to improve Onondaga Lake has extended well beyond Honeywell’s remediation plan. The clean-up effort has brought the city, county, state and federal government together in a partnered effort to promote the clean-up of the lake and its tributaries, and make the waterway and surrounding attractions a central attraction for Syracuse. #At Tuesday’s public meeting hosted by the Onondaga Lake Partnership, County Executive Joanie Mahoney spoke of the cooperation between the local, state and federal organizations. Without their partnership, she said, it would have been impossible to secure federal resources for the planned green infrastructure. Mahoney joined Syracuse Mayor Stephanie Miner, meteorologist and environmental scientist Dave Eichorn, regional director of the Department of Environmental Conservation Ken Lynch, Judith Enck from Region 2 of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, and Meridith Perrault from the Onondaga Environmental Agency. Representatives from the Onondaga Nation also shared their historical connections to Onondaga Lake. #This partnership, and the passion surrounding Onondaga Lake and the clean-up effort, will play an important role in Syracuse’s future. Over the coming weeks, The Eagle will research this topic in a series of features that explore the history of the lake, the improvements that have taken place over the past decade, the legal and political influence, the current partnership effort around continuing those improvements, the vision of that partnership, and the education efforts that will inform the public about what’s happening at Onondaga Lake, and why Syracuse should be proud. #Please share your questions and expectations along the way. What questions do you have about the lake’s future? What do you expect from the clean-up effort? E-mail Amanda Wada, awada@eaglenewsonline.com.

http://www.eaglenewsonline.com/news/2011/dec/04/new-beginning/


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2011-12-01

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For the Love of Clean Water

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Green Infrastructure Protects Rivers Around the United States

A new report from the Natural Resources Defense Council documents progress around the United States in protecting some of the nation’s most polluted rivers and lakes by installing green infrastructure in urban environments. Instead of directing rainwater off streets and rooftops into sewers and storm drains, and ultimately area waterways, green infrastructure captures rainwater where it falls for irrigation and other uses.

Green Infrastructure Prevents Water Pollution This is good news, especially in cities with what’s known as combined sewerage overflow systems. In cities such as Syracuse, NY, and Washington, DC, storm drains direct rainwater into the same pipes that carry household sewage to treatment plants. During major rainfalls, the system overflows, raw sewage and all, directly into local rivers.

Green Infrastructure Relieves Overburdened Sewer Systems Green infrastructure prevents overflows with landscaping enhancements such as replacing concrete and blacktop with semi-pervious surfaces to allow rainwater to reach the ground below sidewalks and driveways. It means rooftop gardens and green roofs which capture rainwater and grow plants, which also help clean the urban air and capture climate-changing carbon dioxide emissions. And, it means repurposing rainwater for other uses like landscaping irrigation, rainwater collection systems, and in Syracuse, hockey rink ice.

Green Infrastructure Example: Syracuse NY NRDC’s report Rooftops to Rivers II documents green infrastructure practices in a dozen U.S. cities. The video below describes just one city’s experience.

Anyone Can Install Green Infrastructure While major projects such as those described by Syracuse NY and Onondaga County Executive Joanie Mahoney in the video above are quite large in scale, just about anyone can implement green infrastructure enhancements on their property. • A Rainwater collection system is readily available for purchase at home and garden stores or on online. Rain barrels enable homeowners to disconnect one or more of their roof downspouts from the storm water system and use that water for plants and landscaping during dry periods. It can also been used for drinking water as long as you purify the water with a system like a berkey water filter. • Even without the barrel, homeowners can plant rain gardens and use rooftop runoff to enhance their yards. The Wisconsin Department of Natural Resources has published a downloadable manual on rain gardens for homeowners. • Though requiring professional installation, green roofs are becoming more popular on individual houses. • And when renovating driveways and sidewalks there are more and more alternatives to traditional impermeable concrete and asphalt. Innovations such as interlocking concrete tiles provide the ease of traditional driveways while allowing the rainwater through. For more information on green infrastructure and how individuals might install it, check out NRDC’s report or the Environmental Protection Agency’s website. Tags: green infrastructure, green infrastructure stormwater, rainwater collection system

http://www.bigberkeywaterfilters.com/wordpress/green-infrastructure/green-infrastructure-protects-rivers-aro...


Onondaga Lake ready for swimming? Published: 12/06 2:38 pm; Updated: 12/06 6:06 pm

Liverpool (WSYR-TV) - Would you be willing to jump into Onondaga Lake? The lake has a bad reputation as one of the filthiest bodies of water in the world, but, after years of clean-up, at least one expert and the county’s top official say it has become swimmable. Steve Effler and the Upstate Freshwater Institute have been testing the water quality in Onondaga Lake for 35 years. “You'd come out here on a hot summer day and this thing would be bubbling up…smelly gas coming up all over the place. It was quite an experience back then, but it has gotten really substantially better,” Effler said. He says to meet swimming visibility standards he has to see an object called a Secchi disc at four feet underwater and, now, Effler can see it at more than eight feet. In addition, mercury and certain bacteria were once a major issue in Onondaga Lake. Onondaga County Executive Joanie Mahoney is also encouraged by the lake’s improvement. She noted that the number of fish in the lake has doubled since clean-up efforts began. Onondaga County reached its goal of starting 50 new projects this year to divert rainwater runoff from overflowing the sewer system. The most pressing issues are on the southern part where creeks empty into the http://www.9wsyr.com/mostpopular/story/Onondaga-Lake-ready-forswimming/T99VlLTnk06KK9KIqr6FeQ.cspx


lake. After storms, rainwater runoff combines with sewage to overflow the system and empties directly into the lake. “The most worrisome part…I'd still like to see the amount of fecal coliform bacteria that comes in the southern part get even lower,” Effler said. “And that's this green technology initiative that the county's got.” The county’s Save the Rain project includes the Oncenter’s green roof and the Syracuse Crunch using rainwater for ice. The county wanted to complete 50 projects related to Save the Rain and Mahoney says it has easily surpassed its goal. “That's where Save the Rain comes in. If we can prevent those overflows then we prevent the bacteria from getting into the creek and being able to get into the lake without making its way through the sewage treatment plant,” said Onondaga County Executive Joanie Mahoney. In addition to improving lake quality, Mahoney noted that the project will help save the county money by averting the need to treat rainwater. Although the Department of Environmental Conservation has not yet signed off on swimming in the lake, Effler thinks one of the main issues is popular perception. He jokes that perhaps the only way to change that perception is for people to actually dive into the once-notoriously polluted lake.

http://www.9wsyr.com/mostpopular/story/Onondaga-Lake-ready-forswimming/T99VlLTnk06KK9KIqr6FeQ.cspx


Onondaga County and the city of Syracuse offer free weekend parking and extended hours at Washington Street garage Posted on December 9, 2011 by Christopher Hein

If successful over holiday, free parking and extended hours offered for first time at Washington Street garage could be kept for longer period of time by Chris Hein – (Syracuse) With the holiday season here, shoppers are sure to flock to downtown Syracuse including Armory Square. The extra shoppers to downtown means more traffic. Normally downtown has plenty of parking, but this season could be slightly different.

The Trolley Lot parking area in Armory Square was closed this past September thanks to the construction of a 6-million-gallon stormwater storage system as part of the county’s Save the Rain program. When it was in use, the Trolley Lot could fit up to 700 cars and according to Ben Walsh, the Deputy Commissioner of the Department of Neighborhood and Business Development, the Trolley Lot was used a lot during the holiday season.

https://nccnews.expressions.syr.edu/?p=38736


Because of the closing of the Trolley Lot, Onondaga County and the city of Syracuse decided to offer free weekend parking and extended hours on Thursdays and Fridays at the Washington Street garage. Starting at 4pm on Thursdays and Fridays, visitors to Armory Square can park there for free. And before this past Black Friday, Washington Street garage was normally closed on the weekends, but now it is open both days.

Walsh said the free parking and extended hours started this past Black Friday. As far as ending date to the free weekend parking, that still has not been decided. Walsh said free parking could last much longer after the New Year depending how heavily the garage gets used.

Although many local Syracuse residents said they did not know about the free parking on the weekends at the Washington Street Garage, Walsh and city officials are planning to fix that. They are planning to run a series of ads for the free weekend parking on Washington Street garage.

Watch the story here:

https://nccnews.expressions.syr.edu/?p=38736


Onondaga Lake cleanup hits milestone this week with completion of barrier wall Published: Wednesday, December 07, 2011, 2:00 AM By Catie O'Toole / The Post-Standard

Geddes, NY -- The Onondaga Lake cleanup — prompted by a lawsuit filed in 1988 — hits a milestone this week with the completion of a barrier wall to stop contaminated groundwater from flowing into the lake. Workers are expected by Thursday to complete the approximately mile-and-a-half underground steel barrier wall between the former Allied Chemical property and the lake. “It’s a major milestone for the cleanup of Onondaga Lake,” said John McAuliffe, Honeywell International’s Syracuse program director. The barrier — made up of 1,620 panels — cuts off the primary source of contaminated groundwater from going into the lake, company officials said. Honeywell, the successor to Allied Chemical and Solvay Process Co., which released mercury and other chemicals into the lake from 1884 to 1986, agreed to spend $550 million to clean up the lake bottom and its tributaries. Onondaga County is spending an additional $600 million to help clean up the lake. Most of the lake cleanup is scheduled to be completed by 2016; the county is scheduled to finish its work by 2018. The next step includes dredging and capping the lake bottom starting next year.

http://www.syracuse.com/news/index.ssf/2011/12/onondaga_lake_cleanup_hits_mil.html


The barrier wall along the lakeshore begins near Exit 7 on Interstate 690 West by the fairgrounds in Geddes. The final section, where work is being completed this week, is just east of Harbor Brook, parallel to the CSX railroad tracks. This week, a Honeywell subcontractor, Sevenson Environmental Services, worked to install the last of the steel sheets. A hydraulic hammer drove the steel through the ground, just offshore. Some of the panels, which range from 35 to 77 feet long and are just under 5 feet wide, are in the lake, while others are near the shore. Construction on a collection trench is expected to be completed by early next year. Parts of a groundwater collection system are already up and running. The groundwater collected is pumped to a treatment plant on Willis Avenue. The water is tested to ensure it meets state Department of Environmental Conservation standards before it is returned to the lake. “The barrier wall is a significant achievement as we prepare for the lake operations — the dredging and capping — in 2012,” McAullife said. Work on the barrier wall began in October 2006, shortly after the treatment plant was built. Since the cleanup work started, hundreds of engineers, scientists and construction workers have worked to clean the lake, McAuliffe said. This year, about 500 employees, or about 90 percent of the workforce, live locally, he said. Honeywell plans to hire more people as the project continues, McAuliffe said. The water quality has improved, experts say. Steven Effler, director of research for the Upstate Freshwater Institute in Syracuse who has been studying the lake for more than 30 years, said phosphorus, chlorides and ammonia levels, as well as algea concentrations, have decreased substantially, while oxygen concentrations in the lower waters have improved. The county has greatly reduced the ammonia and phosphorus discharged into the lake by using more modern sewage treatment, he said. That also has helped reduce algea in the lake, which has led to an improvement in the lake water clarity. “Just looking at the water, it’s less green and you can see into it deeper,” Effler said.

http://www.syracuse.com/news/index.ssf/2011/12/onondaga_lake_cleanup_hits_mil.html


The barrier wall is reducing the amount of contaminated groundwater that reaches the lake, but it will take time to collect data to see if there are benefits to the water quality and fish, Effler said.

Scientists, mostly from the State University College of Environmental Science and Forestry, have documented 65 species of fish in the lake, compared to nine to 12 species counted in the 1970s, Effler said. Sightings of bald eagles, ospreys, kingfishers and great egrets have increased, the DEC reported. Other cleanup-related construction projects are underway, setting the stage for the $451 million project to dredge the contaminated lake bottom, and cap parts of it, to keep mercury and other chemicals from contaminating fish. Construction of a double-walled pipeline is nearly completed. During the lake dredging, the pipeline will transport sediment from the bottom of the lake to a consolidation area at Wastebed 13 off Airport Road in the town of Camillus. Work is continuing on the sediment consolidation area and a wastewater treatment plant that Honeywell is required to build on Wastebed 13. The DEC also is reviewing the final design for remediating Nine Mile Creek behind the fairgrounds and work is expected to begin next year. Plans include removing contaminated soil and restoring wetlands. Remediation of the Geddes Brook wetlands began in August. The project includes removing 84,000 cubic yards — the same as a 14-foot-deep soccer field — of contaminated soil and invasive plants, and replacing that soil with 57,000 cubic yards of clean soil. Honeywell will plant 50,000 native shrubs, flowers and trees to protect and enhance habitat for wildlife such as fish, birds, frogs and turtles, according to Honeywell newsletter.

http://www.syracuse.com/news/index.ssf/2011/12/onondaga_lake_cleanup_hits_mil.html


By restoring Geddes Brook to a more natural, sinuous, meandering channel, water will flow over the channel banks into the wetlands during wet seasons, something that rarely occurs now, Anchor QEA principal scientist Ryan Davis, who has been working on Onondaga Lake and the watershed since 2003, wrote in the newsletter. Onondaga County also is working on lake cleanup projects, including upgrading the Metropolitan Syracuse Wastewater Treatment Plant and addressing the combined sewer overflow, which happens when it rains and stormwater with sewage flows into the creeks and eventually into the lake. The county has built storage and treatment facilities, and also completed about 60 “green” infrastructure projects this year. Honeywell officials said they expect the dredging and capping to begin sometime next year, and continue for four years. The dredging will take place in a small portion of the lake, about 450 acres of the 3,000-acre lake, along the southwest shore off I690 West, DEC officials have said. The county expects to complete construction of stormwater storage facilities at the Trolley Lot near the Museum of Science and Technology (MOST) in Armory Square and another on State Fair Boulevard along Harbor Brook by the end of 2013, said Matthew Millea, deputy county executive for physical services. The county will continue its “green” infrastructure projects, including green streets, green roofs, rain gardens and wetlands, through 2018. “What it means is the lake is getting healthier faster,” Millea said, “and we’re now talking about the future of a clean lake, rather than the future of a polluted lake.” Catie O’Toole can be reached at cotoole@syracuse.com or 470-2134.

http://www.syracuse.com/news/index.ssf/2011/12/onondaga_lake_cleanup_hits_mil.html


'Pocket park' off Clinton Square should be fixed, reopened by next summer Published: Thursday, December 22, 2011, 5:46 AM

By Dick Case / Post-Standard columnist

Not to worry; it’s on the way. That’s the cheery word I had this week from Andrew Maxwell, the city’s director of planning and sustainability, who is my contact for information about Robert R. Haggart Park. The “pocket park,” so-called, is across the street from my workplace in The Post-Standard building. The park’s at North Clinton and West Genesee Street, in the “heart of downtown Syracuse,” as we used to say. The park’s named for Bob Haggart, who used to be a columnist for the paper. Bob left us in untimely fashion in 1997; cancer took him. We miss him a lot. When the park came along, it pleased Bob’s ex-colleagues. Not only was it a neat memorial but it was handy by Bob’s old office. We could watch over it. I called Andy Maxwell the other day to comment on the gray, tall, board fence the city has put up around the pocket. Haggart Park has seen better days, I have to admit. It turns out it was put up on top of a building that was torn down. Some of the debris was shoveled into the hole; the landscape’s sinking. Sinking. I talked to Andy Maxwell about the situation back in September and he told me the park’s in for a fix. It’s to be included in the county’s “save the rain” sewer project, which is going on all over town. Andy figures work on the park could start in the summer of 2012.

http://blog.syracuse.com/opinion/2011/12/pocket_park_off_clinton_square.html


It’s to include porous pavement, planters and other environmentally friendly measures. Just the sort of thing to knock the socks off the Common Council, which Bob Haggart used to call “Syracuse’s greatest deliberative body,” tongue firmly planted in cheek. According to Andy, the city raised the fence to protect us from falling into one of the park’s holes and hurting ourselves. “It’s a safety issue,” he explained. Just now, the fence looks a bit intimidating, honestly. The sort of place we’re tempted to get a boost up and peek inside. The fence doesn’t even have any happy paintings by school kids on it. One more thing: Bob Haggart isn’t buried in the park. That’s a totally false rumor made up by Syracuse’s greatest deliberative body.

http://blog.syracuse.com/opinion/2011/12/pocket_park_off_clinton_square.html


A clean canvas; The future of Onondaga Lake's shoreline will be determined by the Syracuse community

Potential enhancements for the Geddes lakeshore, rendered by Honeywell, Oct. 2010 PHOTO COURTESY HONEYWELL INTERNATIONAL, INC By Amanda Wada Wednesday, December 28, 2011 “There is an alignment, I guess, of the stars right now to try to keep the monitoring programs working together and to reduce redundancy,” said Ed Michalenko, president of the Onondaga Environmental Institute. It seems that the alignment extends beyond monitoring programs. As Honeywell’s clean-up process continues to address the toxic chemicals that were left in the lake, the Metropolitan sewage treatment plant in Syracuse also continues to maintain healthy phosphorus and oxygen levels which has lead to a noticeable difference in the color and odor around the lake. Meanwhile, Onondaga County and the city of Syracuse continue to work together to implement creative, green infrastructure programs. More than 50 projects around the city prevent sewage and stormwater overflow from entering the lake and polluting it further. Instead of collecting overflow water and sending it http://www.eaglenewsonline.com/news/2011/dec/28/clean-canvas-future-onondaga-lakes-shoreline-will-/


to the METRO plant to be treated and returned to the lake, the city and county have found useful ways to use the water. “[Projects] range from parking lots that are done with porous pavement and plantings to the new green roof on the Oncenter, which is one of the biggest green roofs now in the northeast,” said County Executive Joanie Mahoney. “It has already been installed, and it will capture a million gallons of rainwater, annually. Right next door, we have a water re-use system that we’ve put into the War Memorial, and we’re saving the rain and making the ice for Syracuse Crunch hockey team out of rainwater. The owner of the Crunch, Howard Dolgon, will tell you they’re the only hockey team in the country that’s skating now on recycled rainwater.” Onondaga County and Syracuse were named as one of the nation’s top-10 leaders in green infrastructure by the EPA in 2011. A decade ago, Onondaga Lake was an embarrassment. It smelled, it was dark and foreboding, and it was a health hazard. With the recent clean-up progress, and creative leadership, Syracuse has begun to wake up to Onondaga Lake’s possibilities. In 2000, the Onondaga Lake Partnership was formed to “[provide] a framework for government agencies to cooperate as they restore and conserve water quality, natural resources, and recreational uses of the Lake to the benefit of the public. OLP also fosters the participation of special interest groups, businesses, and educational institutions from the community,” according to onlakepartners.org. “The city of Syracuse is one of the six agencies involved with the Onondaga Lake Partnership,” said Andrew Maxwell, Director of Planning and Sustainability for the city of Syracuse. He joins the EPA, the DEC, the County Executive, the Onondaga County Office of the Environment and the New York State Attorney General’s office. The group has worked to educate the public about the lake, and coordinate efforts to improve it. The Onondaga Lake Partnership has worked with organizations such as SUNY ESF, the Onondaga Environmental Institute, the Onondaga Nation and many others who have contributed to the education of the community and improvement of the lake. While these entities continue to work together, the County Executive has taken a step forward in developing a formal visioning process for the future of Onondaga Lake. Last year, Mahoney appropriated $20,000 to support F.O.C.U.S. Greater Syracuse to lead community-wide visioning around Onondaga Lake. “The proposal that I made to the legislature in my budget was that FOCUS is an organization that already exists that already engages the community in the topics that they are working on,” Mahoney said. “They have agreed to take the topic of the vision for the future of Onondaga Lake on for us.” The visioning process would be two-fold, Mahoney said. “There’s two parts to it,” she said. “A lot of documents have been created in the past talking about the lake I’d like someone to bring those together, and I’d like to have somebody do outreach right now to talk about what the community wants, and then put the ideas that people have into an organized ... list of projects that we can do, or a planning document for what we want to see, and also what we don’t want to see on the lake.” http://www.eaglenewsonline.com/news/2011/dec/28/clean-canvas-future-onondaga-lakes-shoreline-will-/


“One of the only benefits that I see to having endured being the home of one of the most polluted lakes in the country is that as a result, the county owns 90 percent of the shoreline, which I think presents a tremendous opportunity for this community and I want to be careful going forward that we have a vision for where we want to be and we have careful planning,” Mahoney continued. “I’m here for this one moment in time. Many people who came before me have worked on cleaning the lake, and I’m sure people will come after me, and I don’t think that this decision about what we want the shoreline to be should be left to the individual that just happens to hold this office at this time. I want it to be a much broader conversation and a lot more input from the community at large.” The county legislature passed the budget with a contingency, which means they will have to go back and revisit the topic before the funds will be released. “I’m hopeful that the legislature will see what I do, and this is bigger than county government, this should be something that the community participates in at large,” Mahoney said. As we discussed last week, the DEC has also committed to community visioning around the Camillus wastebeds, where Honeywell will be storing covered sediment from the lake bottom. Honeywell has also involved the community for input on the future of the shoreline that they own. Passive recreation, with a focus on environmental conservation, seems to be a popular idea. Many people are vocal about their desire for an extension of Syracuse’s Creekwalk, a popular trail that connects Armory Square to Onondaga Lake. The ‘lake-loop’ could extend around the entire Onondaga Lake shoreline, but there are no firm plans. The future of the lake and its shoreline will be determined by public input. “I think other communities around the country wouldn't believe their good fortune if they had a lake as beautiful as Onondaga Lake,” Mahoney said. “With all of the shoreline, for the most part, in a natural state it’s a clean canvas for our community to decide what we want to do.”

http://www.eaglenewsonline.com/news/2011/dec/28/clean-canvas-future-onondaga-lakes-shoreline-will-/


FINANCIAL UPDATE


Financial Update: Contracts

New Contracts Green Improvement Fund (GIF)  Contract with Salina Shoe Salon, Inc. for reimbursement of green improvements in the Midland Ave. sewer shed, including a green roof. Contract Amount: $85,000

Executed: 12/13/11

Green Improvement Fund (GIF)  Contract with 147 E. Onondaga Street Corp. (The Galleries) for reimbursement of green improvements in the Clinton sewer shed. Contract Amount: $100,000

Executed: 12/13/11

Green Improvement Fund (GIF)  Memorandum of Understanding with the Syracuse Housing Authority for reimbursement of green improvements for the Leonard Apartments. Contract Amount: $120,290

Executed: 12/13/11

Amendments to Existing Contracts Save the Rain  Contract with Retz Advertising & Design, LLC amended to include ongoing advertising and outreach for Save the Rain campaign. Contract Amendment Amount: $295,000 Executed: 12/13/11 CSO Program Management  Contract with CH@M Hill amended to include ongoing program management, including expansion of the wetland demonstration project and additional GIF program support. Contract Amendment Amount: $8,700,000 Executed: 12/16/11 Change Orders

Green Infrastructure Program – Harrison Street, OnCenter Parking Lot & Garage  Contract with Economy Paving Co., Inc. amended to include costs associated with new grading plan. Change Order Amount: $159,024.49

Executed: 12/13/11


Funding Grants State Bond Act Funds  Reimbursements requested in December: Clinton Storage for $3,152,598.86 on 12/30/11  Reimbursements received in December: Clinton Storage for $1,348,880.70 on 11/30/11 Total payments received to date in State Bond Act funds: $130,128,881 Federal EPA Funds  Reimbursements requested in December: Midland (CSO 044) for $600,889.00 on 12/22/11.  Reimbursements received in December: Midland for $606,147.00 on 12/27/11 Midland for $559,042.00 on 12/27/11 Federal Army Corps of Engineers Funds  Reimbursements received in December: WQM for $178,415.48 on 11/30/11  Reimbursements requested: WQM for $56,287.48 on 12/30/11 EFC Loans  Reimbursement requests to EFC in December: HBIS request for $338,113.46 on 12/5/11 HB (storage) request for $3,630,717.11 on 12/22/11 

Reimbursements received in December: Midland LT for $2,374,565.30 on 12/22/11 HBIS ST for $318,113.46 on 12/22/11

Long Term EFC Loan: Clinton request for $1,198,695.97 on 12/16/11

Total reimbursement monies received to date through EFC loans for the funded ACJ projects: $188,411,760 (short term) and $46,323,901 (long term).


Onondaga County Lake Improvement Project 4th Stipulation of the ACJ Clinton/Lower MIS CSO Improvements Summary of Current and County Authorizations

Total Project Costs Total Proposed Budget

Project /Task/Line Item Clinton Street CSO Facility Planning (Original) Engineering Services (EEA) $ Original Facility Plan Subtotal $ Clinton Street CSO Conveyances Project Contract No. 1 - Phase 1 Conveyances (Delaney) Contract No. 2 - Phase 2A Conveyances (Delaney) Construction Testing (CME) Engineering/Construction Services (CDM/C&S) Conveyances Subtotal

Expended To Date

751,266 $ 751,266 $ $ $ $ $ $

Authorization Remaining

751,266 $ 751,266 $ 14,478,053 4,074,455 14,595 2,737,369 21,304,472

$ $ $ $ $

(0) (0)

$ $ $ $ $

14,478,053 4,074,455 5,095 2,738,000 21,295,603

(0) (0) (9,500) 631 (8,869)

Clinton Storage Project Construction Estimate (with contingency) Engineering Services (EEA and others) Construction Management and Administration Project Escalation to Midpoint of Construction CSO Storage Subtotal

$ $ $ $ $

58,000,000 $ 8,500,000 $ 3,600,000 3,500,000 73,600,000 $

5,944,270 $ 6,853,881 $ $ $ 12,798,151 $

Facility Plan for CSOs 027 & 029 Construction Estimate Engineering Services (Ch2MHill) Engineering Services (TBD) County Administration and Other Costs Facility Plan Subtotal

$ $ $ $ $

3,100,000 88,944 $ 770,000 3,958,944 $

$ 91,186 $ $ $ 91,186 $

Clinton/Lower MIS Green Implementation Program Construction Contracts incl. GIF Public/Private $ Ch2MHill Program Management & Engineering $ Green Subtotal $

38,508,611 $ 15,900,000 $ 54,408,611 $

5,886,331 $ 5,012,911 $ 10,899,242 $

32,622,280 10,887,089 43,509,369

Program Management Project Management (CDM/C&S) $ (2) Project Management for Facility Plan (CDM/C&S) $ Program Management Subtotal $

1,811,903 $ 1,811,903 $

1,409,891 $ $ 1,409,891 $

402,012 402,012

$ $ $ $ $ $ Miscellaneous Subtotal $

4,132,400 4,861,000 64,564 226,334 175,832 117,644 9,577,774

$ $ $ $ $ $ $

2,077,200 3,832,296 50,608 226,334 170,885 78,134 6,435,457

$ $ $ $ $ $ $

2,055,200 1,028,704 13,957 0 4,947 39,510 3,142,317

Total $

165,404,101

$

53,689,666

$

111,714,435

(1)

Miscellaneous County Costs Land Acquisition IMA Legal Consulting (John Clare & Mezey) Debt Other

Authorized Master Budget 165,500,000

Notes: (1) Includes engineering costs from original Clinton RTF Project (2) CDM/C&S Project Management costs are included in the total facility plan costs

52,055,730 1,646,119 3,600,000 3,500,000 60,801,849 3,100,000 (2,242) 770,000 3,867,758


Onondaga County Lake Improvement Project 4th Stipulation of the ACJ Harbor Brook Drainage Basin CSO Abatement

Summary of Current and Proposed Costs, and County Authorizations Total Project Costs Total Proposed Budget

Project /Task/Line Item

Expended to Date

Authorization Remaining

Harbor Brook CSO Abatement Project Original Engineering Expenses

$

5,500,000

$

5,500,000

$

HBIS Replacement and CSO Abatement Project Construction Contract No. 1 (1) (JJ Lane) Other Miscellaneous Work Engineering/Construction Sevices (CDM/C&S) County Administration and Other Costs

$ $ $ $

18,289,918 2,482,920 2,012,615 114,547

$ $ $ $

18,344,748 1,768,762 115,417

$ $ $ $

(54,830) 2,482,920 243,853 (870)

HBIS Replacement and CSO Abatement Project Total $

22,900,000

$

20,228,927

$

2,671,073

$ $ $ $ $

34,502,000 4,200,000 3,390,000 2,280,000 44,372,000

$ $ $

1,616,134 245,212

$

1,861,346

$ $ $ $ $

34,502,000 2,583,866 3,144,788 2,280,000 42,510,654

$ $ $ $ FCF Program Total $

12,000,000 1,878,731 800,000 400,000 15,078,731

$

74,300

$

74,300

$ $ $ $ $

12,000,000 1,804,432 800,000 400,000 15,004,432

Other Harbor Brook Green Construction Contracts incl. GIF Public/Private & Rain Barrels $ Ch2MHill Engineering & Program Management $ Harbor Brook Green Project Total $

9,300,000 3,650,000 12,950,000

$ $ $

1,292,089 1,444,255 2,736,344

$ $ $

8,007,911 2,205,745 10,213,656

Program Management Project Management (CDM/C&S) $ Project Management for FCF Plan Implem (CDM/C&S) $ Program Management Total $

499,269 499,269

$

319,271

$

179,998

$

319,271

$

179,998

Harbor Brook Mitigation

$

3,500,000

$

3,265,000

$

235,000

Total Costs for Harbor Brook CSO Area under 4th Stip

$

104,800,000

$

33,985,187

$

70,814,813

Lower Harbor Brook Storage & Conveyance Construction Estimate (with contingency) Engineering Services (EEA) Engineering Services (CDM/C&S) Project Escalation to Midpoint of Construction Lower Harbor Brook Storage & Conv Total Harbor Brook CSOs FCF Program Construction Estimate Engineering Services (Arcadis) County Administration and Other Costs Project Escalation to Midpoint of Construction

-


Onondaga County Lake Improvement Project 4th Stipulation of the ACJ Midland CSO Abatement

Summary of Current and Proposed Costs, and County Authorizations Total Project Costs Total Proposed Budget

Project /Task/Line Item Midland Ave. RTF & Conveyances Midland Phase 1 Conveyances - Construction Midland Phase 2 RTF & Conveyances - Construction Midland Demolition Contracts - Construction Other Construction Phase 1 and 2 Engineering (Parsons & EEA) CME Construction Testing RTF Modifications (Construction, Eng, CM, Admin) Facility Plan Total

Expended to Date

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

1,836,434 53,372,390 748,483 124,579 14,717,163 213,745 3,000,000 74,012,794

$ $ $ $ $ $

1,836,434 53,372,689 748,483 124,579 12,503,353 159,823

$

68,745,362

$ $ $

7,701,898 770,190 664,921

$ $ $

5,406,168 432,397

$

9,137,009

$

5,838,565

$ $ $ $ $

5,000,000 623,954 210,000 5,833,954

$ $

$ $ $ Facility Plan Total $

Midland Green Implementation Program Construction Contracts incl. GIF Public/Private $ Ch2MHill Program Management & Engineering $ Clinton Green Program Total $

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

(0) (299) 0 (0) 2,213,810 53,922 3,000,000 5,267,432 5,267,432

$ $ $ $ $ $

2,295,730 770,190 232,524 3,298,444 3,298,444

13,942

$ $ $

5,000,000 610,012 210,000

$

13,942

$ $

5,820,012 5,820,012

14,900,000 118,384 3,720,000 18,738,384

$ $ $ $

121,368 121,368

$ $ $ $ $

14,900,000 (2,984) 3,720,000 18,617,016 18,617,016

7,500,000 3,202,341 10,702,341

$ $ $

650,134 798,892 1,449,026

$ $ $ $

6,849,866 2,403,449 9,253,315 9,253,315

6,530,602

5,624,897 5,624,897

$

905,705

6,530,602

$ $ $

$ $

905,705 905,705

$

1,806,946

$

1,806,802

$

144

$ $ $ $ Miscellaneous Costs Total $

182,323 208,317 635,031 509,615 3,342,232

$ $ $ $

$181,975 194,317 495,031 513,214 3,191,339

$ $ $ $ $

348 14,000 140,000 (3,599) 150,893

128,297,316

$

$

43,312,816

CSO 044 Conveyances Project Contract No. 6. - JJ Lane Construction Contingency 5% Engineering Services (EEA) Construction Management Sevices (CDM/C&S) see below Conveyances Project Total FCF Facility Plan Construction Estimate Engineering Services (Arcadis and others) Construction Management and Administration Project Escalation to Midpoint of Construction Clinton Storage Project Total Facility Plan for Midland CSOs Construction Estimate Engineering Services (Ch2MHill) Engineering Services, County Admin, ect (TBD)

Program Management Project Management (CDM/C&S) includes CSO 044 $ (1) Project Management for Facility Plan (CDM/C&S) Program Management Total $ Miscellaneous County Costs Land Acquisition IMA Legal Consulting (John Clare & Mezey) Debt Other

Authorization Remaining

Total Cost for Midland project under 4th stipulation Authorized Master Budget $128,300,000

$

84,984,500


Onondaga County Lake Improvement Project 4th Stipulation of the ACJ Sewer Separation of CSO Areas 022/038/040/045/046A/046B/047/048/050/051/053/054 Summary of Current and Proposed Costs, and County Authorizations

Total Project Costs Total Proposed Budget

Project /Task/Line Item Sewer Separation Construction Contracts CSO 024 (Falter) CSO 053/054 (Falter) CSO 038//40/046A/046B (Falter) CSO 047/048 (Falter) CSO 050 (Lane) CSO 051 (Lane) CSO 022/045 (estimated Project Costs)

Expended to Date

Authorization Remaining

Construction Total

$698,864 $2,000,817 $3,598,931 $1,654,022 $4,362,188 $5,037,280 $6,750,000 $24,102,102

$698,864 $2,000,817 $3,524,487 $1,654,022 $4,362,188 $5,037,280 $0 $17,277,659

$0 $0 $74,444 $0 $0 $0 $6,750,000 $6,824,443

Service Contracts (Engineering /Consulting /Program Management) ACE CDM/C&S CME Department of the Army Spectra Engineering/Management Total

$484,286 $1,446,468 $109,492 $153,504 $437,996 $2,631,746

$484,286 $1,247,982 $49,704 $153,504 $437,996 $2,373,472

$0 $198,486 $59,788 $0 $0 $258,274

Miscellaneous Costs Total

$135,084 $101,425 $116,269 $14,235 $13,540 $380,553

$135,084 $101,425 $106,269 $14,235 $4,093 $361,105

$0 $0 $10,000 $0 $9,447 $19,448

Total

$27,114,401

$20,012,236

$7,102,165

Miscellaneous County Costs City of Syracuse Consulting (John Clare & Mezey) Debt Legal Other

Authorized by Legislature $27,684,286


Onondaga County Lake Improvement Project Save The Rain Education and Outreach Grant Summary of Current and Additional Costs, and County Appropriations December 2011 Funding Sources

Appropriations

Program Funding 2009 Appropriation 2010 Appropriation 2011 Appropriation 2011 Additional Appropriation 8/11 2012 Appropriation Total

$ $ $ $ $

375,000 300,000 200,000 200,000 -

$

1,075,000

Funding Uses Retzcanter Marketing

Contract Amount

Newspaper Advertising Television Placement Radio Advertising Outdoor Advertising Online Advertising Website Social Media Direct Mail Production Postage Interactive DVD Viral Marketing Press Releases Media Kit/Brochure Trade Show Booth Green CNY Rain Saver Support Program General Marketing * SubTotal

Environmental Finance Center Education and Outreach Environmental Finance Center Staff Onondaga Environmental Institute ESF Onondaga Earth Corps Baltimore Woods Nature Center Purchased Services (ASLF)

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

6,308 18,054 2,110 30,796 6,443 11,885 2,696 7,335 11,509 12,355 4,300 391,210

$

505,000

Contract Amount

Expended to Date $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

6,308 18,054 2,110 30,796 6,443 11,885 2,696 7,335 11,509 12,355 4,300 215,535 329,326

Difference + (-) $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

Expended to Date

175,675 175,675

Difference + (-)

SubTotal

$ $ $ $ $ $ $

100,155 110,212 49,937 13,040 22,601 7,937 303,882

$ $ $ $ $ $ $

84,510 70,623 27,024 2,833 22,601 20,000 227,590

$ $ $ $ $ $ $

15,645 39,589 22,913 10,208 (12,063) 76,292

SubTotal

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

21,000 4,000 1,200 5,200 3,000 1,000 4,000 60,614 100,014

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

10,131 78 1,359 35 2,022 50,328 63,953

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

10,869 3,922 (159) 5,165 978 1,000 4,000 10,286 36,061

Total EFC Contract

$

403,896

$

291,543

$

112,353

Non-Labor Expenses (EFC) Printing-Outreach Postage Travel Facilities Rental Program-related Supplies - Other Web -based Marketing Efforts Training Supplies and Materials Indirect/Overhead

Miscelaneous Ed/Outreach Expenses

Contract Amount

Exhibit & More Tri Tank Corp Integrated Marketing Century Decorations The Post Standard Lamar Snafu Promotion Greater Syr Chamber Syr Jazz Fest (2010) CNY Jazz Arts Found (2010) The Right Coast Assoc Ballantyne Gardens Maple Hill Nursery Marks Products Ent Syr Hibernian Fest Corp Printglobe Just the Right Stuff Dano Enterprises Centerstate CEO CME dba Salt City Signs Travel CNY Jazz Arts Found Credit Card Multi Media Total

STR Education and Outreach Totals Anticipated Additional Expenditures at 12/31/11

Expended to Date

Difference + (-)

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

-

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

1,955 3,680 9,721 950 22,468 16,250 10,000 675 10,000 5,000 1,000 700 515 2,941 2,000 2,775 1,568 7,680 675 590 566 1,500 1,892 28,750

$ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $ $

-

$

-

$

133,851

$

-

$

Expended 754,720

$

Balance 320,280

$

288,027

$

32,253

$

Budget 1,075,000


APPENDIX


December 2011 FINANCIAL TRACKING SUMMARY: FEDERAL & STATE GRANTS/LOANS APPLIED FOR, NOT YET APPROVED

PROJECT NAME METRO - CURRENT AERATION SYSTEM UPGRADE AMMONIA REMOVAL DEMO BIOSOLIDS - MECHANICAL THICKENERS DIGESTER MOD/CHEMICAL STORAGE DIGITAL SYSTEM IMPROVEMENTS MISCELLANEOUS IMPROVEMENTS ODOR CONTROL AMMONIA REMOVAL FULL SCALE/ STAGE II PHOSPHORUS REMOVAL PHOSPHORUS REMOVAL PILOT CSO - CURRENT CLINTON ST CONVEYANCE & RTF ERIE BLVD SEW SEP STORAGE FRANKLIN ST FCF HARBOR BROOK FCF HARBOR BROOK CSO ABATEMENT HIAWATHA INTERCEPTOR/RTF KIRKPATRICK ST PUMP STATION MALTBIE ST FCF MIDLAND AVE CONVEYANCE MIDLAND AVE PHASE II & RTF MIDLAND AVE PHASE III MIDLAND AVE MITIGATION COSTS NEWELL ST FCF ONONDAGA CREEK FCF SEWER SEPARATION SIPHON REHABILITATION TEALL BROOK FCF WEST ST SEWER SEPARATION OTHER AMBIENT WATER MONITORING OXYGENATION DEMO SEQR REGULATORY TOTAL DOLLARS

ORIGINAL BUDGET

EFC SHORT TERM

EFC LONG TERM

NYS FUNDING

E.P.A.

$8,500,000 $2,000,000 $5,600,000 $2,900,000 $1,400,000 $7,700,000 $190,000,000 $5,000,000 $31,245,000 $3,000,000 $3,200,000 $250,000 $5,444,000 $8,000,000 $5,642,000 $250,000 $3,000,000 $45,000,000 $27,000,000 $1,310,000 $3,000,000 $7,704,000 $1,230,000 $175,000 $1,000,000 $8,000,000 $2,400,000 $50,000 *$380,000,000

*Original budget figures were based on 1997 dollars

$0

$0

$0

$0


December 2011 FINANCIAL TRACKING SUMMARY: FEDERAL & STATE GRANTS/LOANS APPROVED & RECEIVED PROJECT BUDGET

PROJECT NAME METRO - CURRENT AERATION SYSTEM UPGRADE AMMONIA REMOVAL DEMO BIOSOLIDS-MECHANICAL THICKENERS DIGESTER MOD/CHEMICAL STORAGE DIGITAL SYSTEM IMPROVEMENTS MISCELLANEOUS IMPROVEMENTS ODOR CONTROL AMMONIA REMOVAL FULL SCALE/ STAGE II PHOSPHORUS REMOVAL PHOSPHORUS REMOVAL PILOT CSO - CURRENT CLINTON ST CONVEYANCE & RTF ERIE BLVD SEW SEP STORAGE FRANKLIN ST FCF HARBOR BROOK FCF HARBOR BROOK CSO ABATEMENT (a) HIAWATHA INTERCEPTOR/RTF KIRKPATRICK ST PUMP STATION MALTBIE ST FCF MIDLAND AVE CONVEYANCE MIDLAND AVE PHASE II & RTF MIDLAND AVE PHASE III MIDLAND AVE MITIGATION COSTS (b) NEWELL ST FCF ONONDAGA CREEK FCF (a) SEWER SEPARATION SIPHON REHABILITATION TEALL BROOK FCF WEST ST SEWER SEPARATION OTHER AMBIENT WATER MONITORING OXYGENATION DEMO SEQR REGULATORY TOTAL DOLLARS

(c )

NYS GRANT APPROVED

NYS GRANT RECEIVED

FED EPA GRANT APPROVED

FED EPA SHORT-TERM SHORT-TERM LONG-TERM LONG-TERM ACE GRANT EFC LOAN EFC LOAN EFC LOAN EFC LOAN GRANT RECEIVED APPROVED RECEIVED APPROVED RECEIVED APPROVED

$8,500,000 $2,000,000

$5,834,381 $1,145,109

$5,834,381 $1,145,109

$7,365,000 Full-Scale

$6,868,954 $202,078

$5,600,000 $2,900,000 $1,400,000 $7,700,000

$4,319,819 $1,563,317

$4,319,819 $1,563,317

$4,938,419 $1,849,000

$4,938,419 $1,849,000

$190,000,000 $5,000,000

$47,331,203

$47,331,203

$31,245,000 $3,000,000 $3,200,000 $250,000 $5,444,000 $8,000,000 $5,642,000 $250,000 $3,000,000 $45,000,000 $27,000,000

$51,120,000 $1,700,000 $3,828,053 $384,200 $3,880,000

$1,310,000 $3,000,000 $7,704,000 $1,230,000 $175,000 $1,000,000

$54,705,015 $54,705,015

$1,049,185

$14,613

$14,676,422 $775,509 $285,682

$14,711,148 $154,126 $3,833

$7,413,199

$7,389,197

ACE GRANT RECEIVED

$108,000,000 Full Scale

$105,860,930 $1,936,991

$17,200,000

$989,323

$21,348,881 $1,700,000 $3,828,053 $384,200 $3,880,000

$37,788,890 $2,301,876 $4,726,762

$9,334,263 $2,094,314 $4,589,759

$53,689,500

$20,008,299

$15,603,494 $923,162 $1,179,012 $343,500

$3,731,790 $216,543 $296,823 $348,596

$7,502,302 $211,097 $26,055,238

$7,502,302 $211,097 $26,055,238

$12,000,000 $212,000

$10,940,632 $188,106

$2,710,169 $4,246,376

$37,749 $828,115

$15,000,000 $10,000,000

$15,000,000

$25,155,568

$10,831,449

$367,737 $442,154

$367,737 $442,154

$870,768 $1,045,162 $2,299,460

$870,768 $1,045,162 $2,299,460

$1,435,500 $1,236,594 $3,059,716

$1,024,433 $1,094,139 $2,481,443

$7,231,454 $140,623 $188,809 $395,540

$6,756,274 $14,050,177 $11,100,177 $1,958 $5,743 $6,621

$263,603,257

$188,411,760

$99,517,704

$46,323,901 $17,456,177 $14,506,177

$48,904,185 $30,235,201

$3,406,000

$3,406,000

$8,000,000 $2,400,000 $50,000 *$380,000,000

$159,900,000 $130,128,881 $103,609,200 $84,940,216

*Original budget figures were based on 1997 dollars (a) NOTE: PROJECT IS US ARMY CORPS OF ENGINEERS PROJECT (b) NOTE: PROJECT RECEIVED $40,500 COST SHARE GRANT FROM (NYSERDA) (c )NOTE: PROJECT RECEIVED $87,500 COST SHARE GRANT FROM (NYSERDA)


Lake Improvement Project Status Report For The Period Ending 12/31/2011

ACJ START DATE

Project Title METRO - Current 1 AERATION SYSTEM UPGRADE 2 AMMON. REMOVAL DEMONSTRATION

11/1/1998

ACJ FINISH DATE

COUNTY FINISH DATE

ORIGINAL BUDGET(2)

AUTHORIZED BUDGET

7/1/2002

01/03/00 $

8,500,000 $

3/1/2000

12/31/99 $

2,000,000 $

3 BIOSOLIDS - MECHANICAL THICKENERS

$

ENGINEER

6,925,115 EEA 1,350,000 EEA 15,100,000

4 DIGESTER MOD/CHEMICAL STORAGE

7/1/2002

10/31/00 $

5,600,000 $

5,092,545 C&S

5 DIGITAL SYSTEMS IMPROVEMENTS

7/1/2002

06/31/01 $

2,900,000 $

3,520,317 Systems Integrated

6 MISCEL. IMPROVEMENTS

7/1/2002

01/31/99 $

1,400,000 $

1,400,000

7 ODOR CONTROL

7/1/2002

12/20/00 $

7,700,000 $

8,393,855 OBG

AMMONIA REMOVAL FULL SCALE/

10/1/2001

11/1/2003

11/01/03 $

125,000,000

STAGE II PHOSPHORUS REMOVAL

10/1/2003

4/1/2005

$

65,000,000

4/1/2006

4/1/2007

12/31/00 $

CLINTON ST. CONVEYANCE/

5/1/2003

5/1/2007

10/28/06 $

15,987,190

CLINTON ST. RTF

5/1/2007

1/1/2012

12/28/10 $

15,258,090

7/1/2002

04/13/02 $

3,000,000 $

2,684,523 Barton & Loguidice

5/1/2000

05/01/00 $

3,200,000 $

5,216,618 EEA

13 HARBOR BROOK FCF

7/1/2002

07/01/02 $

250,000 $

14 HARBOR BROOK CSO ABATEMENT

7/1/2002

$

5,443,980 $

15 HIAWATHA INTERCEPTOR/RTF

7/1/2002

12/31/00 $

8,000,000 $

16 KIRKPATRICK ST. PUMP STATION

7/1/2002

10/29/02 $

5,641,860 $

12,558,335 EEA

8/31/1998

7/1/2002

04/26/99 $

250,000 $

362,028 EEA

5/1/1999

5/1/2004

12/06/00 $

75,000,000 $

145,368,853 EEA

8

9 PHOSPHORUS REMOVAL - PILOT

$

129,386,187 EEA

5,000,000 $

4,300,000 EEA

CSO - Current 10

11 ERIE BLVD STORAGE SYSTEM 12 FRANKLIN ST. FCF

4/26/1999

17 MALTBIE STREET FCF 18 MIDLAND AVE RTF & CSO ABATEMENT 19 MIDLAND AVE MITIGATION COSTS

$

$

165,500,042 EEA

889,109 EEA 104,800,000 Moffa & Assoc. 6,047,183 EEA/Parsons

3,000,000

20 NEWELL STREET RTF

7/1/2002

07/01/01 $

1,310,000 $

473,132 Moffa & Assoc.

21 ONONDAGA CREEK FCF

7/1/2002

07/01/02 $

3,000,000 $

648,342 Parsons

22 SEWER SEPARATION

1/1/2012

01/01/12 $

7,703,880 $

27,684,286 OBG

23 SIPHON REHABILITATION

7/1/2002

06/11/99 $

1,230,000 $

1,026,391 C&S

24 TEALL BROOK FCF

7/1/2002

12/01/01 $

175,000 $

01/14/00 $

1,000,000 $

25 WEST ST SEWER SEPARATION

5/1/1999

1,235,346 EEA 2,720,572 CHA

26 ERIE BLVD CSO ABATEMENT

New Project

OTHER 27 AMBIENT WATER MONITORING 28 OXYGENATION DEMO PROJECT 29 SEQRA REGULATORY COMPLIANCE

TOTAL DOLLARS

5/1/1999

7/1/2002

$

4/1/2003

02/25/04 $

2,400,000 $

$

50,000 $

* $

380,000,000 $

(1)

(2)

*Original budget figures were based on 1997 dollars (1) SEQR costs are reflected in the individual projects under total payments to date (2) Original budget figures were based on 1997 dollars

8,000,000 10,087 50,000 Parsons

655,742,866


Lake Improvement Project Status Report For The Period Ending 12/31/2011

CONSTRUCTION CONTRACT AMOUNTS

SOFT COST CONTRACTS 1 $

352,747 $

6,473,110

TOTAL PAYMENTS TO DATE $

2 $

1,346,856

3 $

1,266,416 $

13,160,742

$

4 $

748,386 $

4,357,480

$

5 $

451,713 $

2,974,514

$

7 $

999,299 $

6,956,868

8 $

21,289,868 $

106,962,810

$

6

9 $

4,055,734

TOTAL ESTIMATED COST

FORECASTED COSTS

6,925,115

$

1,347,187

100.00%

5,092,545

$

5,092,545 $

(507,455)

100.00%

3,520,317

$

3,520,317 $

620,317

100.00%

$

1,400,000

$

1,400,000 $

$

8,393,855

$

8,393,855 $

$

128,688,040

$

128,688,040 $

(61,311,960)

100.00%

(806,460)

98.00%

$

4,109,693 $

83,848 $

4,193,540 $

53,689,666 $

111,810,376 $

165,500,042 $

$

2,684,523 $

2,018,689 $

6,967,205 $

11 $

901,556 $

1,734,929

$

2,684,523

12 $

973,543 $

3,920,238

$

4,948,516 $

436,363 $

373,370

$

889,109 $

66,397 $

$

33,985,186 $

70,814,814 $

6,047,183 $

540,945

(652,813)

1,347,187 $

$

15 $

100.00%

14,760,077 $

23,493,887

7,587,617

(1,574,885)

$

10,925,869 $

14 $

% COMPLETED EXPENDITURES

5,571 $

14,754,506 $

10 $

13 $

6,925,115 $

OVER/UNDER BUDGET

14,760,077

693,855

134,254,762 (315,477)

99.96%

100.00% 100.00%

32.44% 100.00%

3,767,205

71.03%

955,506 $

705,506

93.05%

104,800,000 $

99,356,020

32.43%

$

5,535,152

$

3,406,000 $

9,453,183 $

1,453,183

63.97%

16 $

2,520,394 $

9,882,154

$

12,558,335

$

12,558,335 $

6,916,475

100.00%

17 $

109,483 $

152,418

$

362,028

$

362,028 $

112,028

100.00%

18 $

22,441,704 $

63,704,994

$

84,984,501 $

43,315,499 $

$

3,000,000 $

19

-

128,300,000 $

53,300,000

66.24%

$

3,000,000 $

3,000,000

100.00%

20 $

472,572

$

473,132

$

473,132 $

(836,868)

100.00%

21 $

503,551

$

648,342

$

648,342 $

(2,351,658)

100.00%

20,012,236 $

22 $

1,965,109 $

16,531,049

$

7,672,050 $

27,684,286 $

$

1,021,823

$

1,026,391

$

1,026,391 $

24 $

320,039 $

903,566

$

1,235,346

$

1,235,346 $

1,060,346

100.00%

25 $

403,332 $

2,311,126

$

2,720,572

$

2,720,572 $

1,720,572

100.00%

$

-

(2,389,913)

100.00%

23

26

27 28 $

10,087

$

15,849,937 $

$

10,087

-

$

19,980,406 (203,609)

-

$

10,087 $

239,193,244 $

642,699,654 $

29

$

80,623,182 $

270,450,230

$

419,356,347 $

72.29% 100.00%

270,749,654


December 2011

Project Title METRO - Current

TOTAL PAYMENTS TO DATE 12-31-11

TOTAL PAYMENTS TO DATE 11-30-11

Change

1 AERATION SYSTEM UPGRADE

$

6,925,115

$

6,925,115

$

-

2 AMMON. REMOVAL DEMONSTRATION

$

1,347,187

$

1,347,187

$

-

3 BIOSOLIDS - MECHANICAL THICKENERS

$

14,754,506

$

14,754,506

$

-

4 DIGESTER MOD/CHEMICAL STORAGE

$

5,092,545

$

5,092,545

$

-

5 DIGITAL SYSTEMS IMPROVEMENTS

$

3,520,317

$

3,520,317

$

-

6 MISCEL. IMPROVEMENTS

$

1,400,000

$

1,400,000

$

-

7 ODOR CONTROL

$

8,393,855

$

8,393,855

$

-

8 AMMONIA REMOVAL FULL SCALE/

$

128,688,040

$

128,688,040

$

-

STAGE II PHOSPHORUS REMOVAL

$

$

2,967

$

-

9 PHOSPHORUS REMOVAL - PILOT

$

4,109,693

$ $

4,106,726

CSO - Current 10 CLINTON ST. CONVEYANCE/ CLINTON ST. RTF

$ $

53,689,666

$

50,197,014

-

$

3,492,652

$

-

11 ERIE BLVD STORAGE SYSTEM

$

2,684,523

$

2,684,523

$

-

12 FRANKLIN ST. FCF

$

4,948,516

$

4,948,516

$

-

13 HARBOR BROOK FCF

$

889,109

$

804,020

$

85,089

14 HARBOR BROOK CSO ABATEMENT

$

33,985,186

$

33,245,284

$

739,902

15 HIAWATHA INTERCEPTOR/RTF

$

6,047,183

$

6,047,183

$

-

16 KIRKPATRICK ST. PUMP STATION

$

12,558,335

$

12,558,335

$

-

17 MALTBIE STREET FCF

$

362,028

$

362,028

$

-

18 MIDLAND AVE RTF & CSO ABATEMENT

$

84,984,501

$

83,564,396

$

19 MIDLAND AVE MITIGATION COSTS

$

3,000,000

$

3,000,000

$

-

20 NEWELL STREET RTF

$

473,132

$

473,132

$

-

21 ONONDAGA CREEK FCF

$

648,342

$

648,342

$

-

22 SEWER SEPARATION

$

20,012,236

$

20,012,236

$

-

23 SIPHON REHABILITATION

$

1,026,391

$

1,026,391

$

-

24 TEALL BROOK FCF

$

1,235,346

$

1,235,346

$

-

25 WEST ST SEWER SEPARATION

$

2,720,572

$

2,720,572

$

-

26 ERIE BLVD CSO ABATEMENT

$

$

-

-

$

-

1,420,105

OTHER 27 AMBIENT WATER MONITORING

$

15,849,937

$

14,615,290

$

28 OXYGENATION DEMO PROJECT

$

10,087

$

10,087

$

-

29 SEQRA REGULATORY COMPLIANCE

$

-

$

-

$

-

$

-

TOTAL DOLLARS

$

419,356,347

$

412,380,986

$

1,234,647

6,975,361


Chronology of Project Construction Starts Pre-ACJ Signing (1/20/98)  General Improvements  Odor Control and Residuals Handling 1998

1999

2000

2001

2002

Status

Location

Complete Complete

Metro Metro

Metro Metro Metro Regional Market W.Newell/Vale St. Maltbie/Plum St. Various

      

Digital Systems Upgrade Ammonia Removal Demonstration Aeration System Upgrade Hiawatha RTF - ACOE Newell St. RTF Demo/Improvements Maltbie St. FCF Siphon Rehab

Complete Complete Complete Complete Complete Complete Complete

  

Digester Modifications/Chemical Storage Franklin St. FCF West Street Sewer Separation

Complete Complete Complete

Ammonia Trackdown

Complete

 

Midland Ave. Conveyance Phase I Phosphorus Removal – Phase I Pilot

Complete Complete

Tallman/Oxford St. Metro

 

Complete

Franklin to Teall

   

Erie Blvd. Storage System Upgrade Full Scale Ammonia Removal/ Stage II Phosphorus Removal Kirkpatrick St. Pump Station & Force Main Onondaga Creek FCF Teall Brook FCF Water Street Sewer Separation (CSO 024)

Complete Complete Complete Complete Complete

Metro Kirkpatrick St. Inner Harbor Teall Ave. Water Street

 

Harbor Brook FCF Brighton Ave Sewer Separation (CSO 053/054)

Complete Complete

W.Hiaw./I-690 Brighton/Bishop Ave

Metro I-690/Franklin W. Genesee, Plum, Tracy, N. West St. Metro


Project

Status

Location

Complete

Tallman/Onondaga

Tallman/Onondaga Sewer Separation (CSO 038, 040, 046A &046B) Midland Phase II RTF/Conveyances

Complete

Blaine/Oxford St.

 

Phosphorus Removal – Phase II Pilot Biosolids Handling Improvements

Complete Complete

Metro Metro

Sewer Separation – CSO 047 & 048

Complete

South Ave/ Bissell St.

 

Sewer Separation – CSO 050 Clinton Phase I Conveyances

Complete Complete

Parkway/Rockland

Clinton Phase IIA Conveyances

Complete

Sewer Separation – CSO 051

Complete

Colvin St.

 

Harbor Brook Interceptor Sewer Save the Rain Green Projects

Authorized/Underway Authorized/Complete

Velasko/Fayette Various

     

Midland CSO 044 Clinton Storage Facility Lower Harbor Brook (Conveyance & Storage) Save the Rain Green Projects CSO 022 Sewer Separation Project CSO 045 Sewer Separation Project

Authorized Authorized/Underway Authorized/Underway Authorized/Underway Authorized Authorized

W. Castle/South Ave Armory Square Hiawatha/State Fair Blvd. Various West Genesee/Franklin South Avenue

2004

2005

2006

2007

2008

2009

2010

2011


CONTRACTORS for CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS Metro Treatment Plant AERATION SYSTEM UPGRADE Bongiovanni Construction (General) Ridley Electric (Electrical)

$5,626,956.41 $ 846,154.00

DIGITAL SYSTEM UPGRADE Systems Integrated

$2,974,514.27

ODOR CONTROL CONTRACT # 1 Falconet, Inc. (General) Scriba Electric (Electrical) Burns Bros. (Heating/Ventilation) Burns Bros. (Plumbing)

$4,872,660.53 $ 315,580.30 $ 82,459.00 $ 50,168.00

ODOR CONTROL CONTRACT # 2 Murnane Construction

$1,636,000.00

PHASE III IMPROVEMENTS CONTRACT 1 – DIGESTER & LAGOON IMPROVEMENTS Maxim Construction $ 645,730.74 PHASE III IMPROVEMENTS CONTRACT 2 – CHEMICAL STORAGE & FEED FACILITIES C.O.Falter Construction Corp. (General) $2,527,300.08 Barry & Barry Electrical Co. (Electrical) $ 193,665.22 Burns Bros. (HVAC) $ 224,232.51 Edward Joy Company (Plumbing) $ 38,669.35 PHASE III IMPROVEMENTS CONTRACT 3 – DIGESTER & LAGOON CLEANING Waste Stream Environmental Inc. $ 727,881.80 FULL SCALE AMMONIA/PHOSPHORUS REMOVAL - FIELD OFFICE James & Son Construction $ 28,388.00 Resun Leasing, Inc. $ 112,224.00 Ridley Electric Co. $ 32,295.00 Burns Brothers $ 18,440.00 FULL SCALE AMMONIA/PHOSPHORUS REMOVAL U.S. Filter – Kruger Products, Inc. U.S. Filter – Kruger Products, Inc.

$ 8,261,182.00 $ 3,918,080.00


CONTRACTORS for CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS Metro Treatment Plant

FULL SCALE AMMONIA/PHOSPHORUS REMOVAL SITE PREPARATION - CONTRACT 2 C.O. Falter Construction Corp. (General) Ridley Electric (Electrical) C.O. Falter Construction Corp. (Pile Testing) Moretrench Environmental

$22,243,604.98 $ 255,627.00 $ 431,008.00 $ 4,602,086.57

PILE INSTALLATION – CONTRACT 3 M.A. Bongiovanni Construction

$ 9,045,731.95

GENERAL - CONTRACT 4 The Pike Company (General) Ridley Electric Co. (Electrical) Edward Joy Company (HVAC) Burns Brothers (Plumbing/Fire Protection)

$46,860,263.46 $ 6,927,238.00 $ 3,009,057.61 $ 1,217,583.74

BIOSOLIDS HANDLING IMPROVEMENTS C.O. Falter Construction Corp. (General) Ridley Electric (Electrical) Airside Technology (HVAC) Burns Bros. (Plumbing)

$10,929,016.19 $1,476,223.00 $ 532,187.00 $ 173,679.09

CSOs CLINTON CONVEYANCES PHASE I & 2A The Delaney Group, Inc. The Delaney Group, Inc.

$14,478,053.39 $ 4,074,455.32

CLINTON CSO ABATEMENT Ruston Paving (Farmers’ Market Lot) Davis Wallbridge (Pearl St/Lot 3) Davis Wallbridge (Townsend St.) J&B (Pirro Conv. Center) VIP (Onondaga Library) C.O. Falter (War Memorial) Ridley (War Memorial) Economy Paving (On Center) J & B (Erie Canal Museum) Jett Industries (Clinton Storage) Joy Process Mechanical (Cistern War Memorial) C&S Technical (Cistern War Memorial)

$ 188,046.14 $ 635,873.93 $ 476,625.39 $1,038,000.00 $ 37,141.66 $ 571,101.00 $ 427,300.00 $1,044,969.49 $ 73,480.00 $70,640,000.00 $ 79,540.00 $ 188,021.00


CONTRACTORS for

CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS CSOs (cont) Walbridge (Streetscape/Water St) Ruston Paving (Sunnycrest Parking Lot) Acts II Construction (Skiddy Park) D.E. Tarolli (Otisco Street) Orchard Earth & Pipe (Syr School Dist Park Lot) Jeffrey DeRoberts (GIF) King & King Architects (GIF) Jefferson Clinton Commons (GIF) ESF Foundation, Abby Lane Housing (GIF) Hotel Skyler (GIF) Near West Side Initiatives, Inc. (GIF) Near West Side Initiatives, Inc. (GIF) Tash Taskale (GIF) St. Lucy’s Church (GIF) Putnam Properties (GIF) Centro (GIF) 500 W. Onondaga St. Inc. (GIF) CNY Jazz Arts Foundation (GIF) Jim & Juli Boeheim Foundation (GIF) Home Headquarters, Inc. (GIF) Galleries of Syr, 147 E. Onondaga St (GIF) Syracuse Housing (GIF) ERIE BOULEVARD STORAGE SYSTEM M. Hubbard Construction Ridley Electric (Electrical) Burns Bros. (Mechanical) Scriba Electric (Electrical) Burns Bros. (Plumbing)

$1,128,797.50 $ 407,000.00 $ 547,000.00 $1,413,732.00 $ 403,500.00 $ 99,311.00 $ 100,000.00 $ 100,000.00 $ 78,000.00 $ 100,000.00 $ 22,730.69 $ 78,000.00 $ 89,211.00 $ 125,000.00 $ 75,757.00 $ 65,390.00 $ 52,740.00 $ 52,188.00 $ 163,203.51 $ 36,045.00 $ 100,000.00 $ 120,290.00

$1,556,752.00 $ 154,059.00 $ 174,350.00 $ 144,640.61 $ 33,217.97

HARBOR BROOK CSO ABATEMENT Titan Wrecking & Environmental, LLC (Demolition) $ 215,632.57 Joseph J. Lane Construction $21,536,849.00 (Interceptor Sewer Replacement) Bette Cring (Elephant Barn greening) $ 207,701.00 VIP (Onondaga Library) $ 37,141.66 John Dudley Construction (Geddes St) $ 203,274.00 J & B Installations (Hazard Library/Erie Canal Museum) $ 67,275.00


CONTRACTORS for CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS CSOs (cont)

Economy Paving (Rosamond Gifford Zoo) J.J. Lane (Lower HB) A.J. Montclair (HB CSO Storage) C.O. Falter (HB CSO Storage) Vibrant Spaces, LLC (GIF) NYSARC, Inc. (GIF)

$ 616,410.00 $4,147,888.00 $ 260,000.00 $25,039,101.00 $ 153,618.00 $ 95,053.00

HARBOR BROOK FCF C.O. Falter Construction Corp. (General)

$

KIRKPATRICK ST. PUMP STATION & FORCE MAIN C.O. Falter Construction Corp. C.O. Falter Construction Corp. Patricia Electric King & King Mechanical G.J. Adams Plumbing

$ 4,398,009.12 $ 4,425,766.31 $ 761,184.63 $ 245,569.51 $ 51,624.16

MALTBIE STREET FCF Over & Under Piping

$ 152,418.00

MIDLAND AVENUE CONVEYANCES Marcellus Construction (General)

$1,836,434.47

MIDLAND AVENUE PHASE II CONVEYANCES & RTF Empire Dismantlement Corp. (Demolition) Murnane Building Contractors, Inc. (General) Ridley Electric Company (Electrical) Edward Joy Company (HVAC) Edward Joy Company (Plumbing)

$ 457,681.50 $47,929,392.75 $ 2,904,771.00 $ 2,053,808.50 $ 484,717.17

MIDLAND AVENUE PHASE III CONVEYANCES Titan Wrecking & Environmental, LLC (Demolition) JJ Lane VIP Architectual (Onondaga Public Library) Acts II (Hugh’s Magnet School Parking Lot) Jubilee Homes of Syracuse (GIF) Dunbar Association, Inc. (GIF) 500 W. Onondaga St. Inc. (GIF) Syracuse Model Neighborhood (GIF)

$ 290,801.39 $ 7,978,282.00 $ 18,570.83 $ 288,700.00 $ 100,000.00 $ 99,840.00 $ 60,000.00 $ 250,000.00

373,370.21


CONTRACTORS for CONSTRUCTION PROJECTS CSOs (cont)

Alexander Property West (GIF) Viraj, NY, LLC (GIF) People’s AME Zion Church (GIF) People’s Community Dev. Corp (GIF) Matawon Development Group (GIF) Salina Shoe Salon (GIF)

$ $ $ $ $ $

81,000.00 95,650.00 54,700.00 80,825.00 24,214.00 85,000.00

SEWER SEPARATION – CSO 024 C.O. Falter Construction Corp.

$

701,799.00

SEWER SEPARATION – CSO 053/054 C.O. Falter Construction Corp.

$ 2,211,604.54

SEWER SEPARATION – CSO 038, 040, 046A&B C.O. Falter Construction Corp.

$ 3,524,487.29

SEWER SEPARATION – CSO 047 & 048 C.O. Falter Construction Corp.

$ 1,654,022.34

SEWER SEPARATION – CSO 050 Joseph J. Lane Construction

$ 4,360,527.06

SEWER SEPARATION – CSO 051 Joseph J. Lane Construction

$ 5,029,323.00

SIPHON REHABILITATION Insituform Metropolitan

$1,021,822.99

TEALL BROOK FCF C.O. Falter Construction Corp. (General) Scriba Electric (Electrical)

$ 877,095.43 $ 26,470.20

WEST STREET AREA SEWER SEPARATION Maxim Construction (General)

$2,311,125.85


WEP ACRONYMS ACJ

Amended Consent Judgment

AMP

Ambient Monitoring Program

AMSA

Association of Metropolitan Sewerage Agencies

AWQS

Ambient Water Quality Standards

ARRA

American Recovery and Reinvestment Act

ASLF

Atlantic States Legal Foundation

BAF

Biological Aerated Filter (Biostyr)

CALM

Consolidated Assessment and Listing Methodology

CAMP

Community Air Monitoring Plan

CSLAP

Citizens Statewide Lake Assessment Program

CSO

Combined Sewer Overflow

CWA

Clean Water Act

DMR

Discharge Monitoring Report

DO

Dissolved Oxygen

EBM

Ecosystem-Based Management

ECM

Energy Conservation Measures

EECBG

Energy Efficiency and Conservation Block Grant

ELAP

Environmental Laboratory Approval Program

EMS

Environmental Management System

ERM

Environmental Resource Mapper

FCF

Floatable Control Facility

GIF

Green Improvement Fund

HRFS

High Rate Flocculation Settling

I&I

Inflow & Infiltration

IW

Industrial Wastewater

km

Kilometers

km2

Square Kilometers

LA

Load Allocations

LF

Linear Feet

LAN

Local Area Network

m

Meters

MCP

Municipal Compliance Plan

H:\WEP\abbreviations.doc


Metro

Metropolitan Syracuse Wastewater Treatment Plant

MGD

Million Gallons Per Day

mg/L

Milligrams Per Liter

MIS

Main Interceptor Sewer

MS4s

Municipal Separate Storm Sewer Systems

mt

Metric Tons

NACWA

National Association of Clean Water Agencies

NBP

National Biosolids Partnership

NELAC

National Environmental Laboratory Accreditation Conference

NYSDEC

New York State Department of Environmental Conservation

NYSDOH

New York State Department of Health

NYSEFC

New York State Environmental Facilities Corp.

NYWEA

New York Water Environmental Association

OLP

Onondaga Lake Partnership

OLWQM

Onondaga Lake Water Quality Model

OU

Odor Unit

P2

Prevention Program

P2CO

Prevention Program County Operations

PdM

Predictive Maintenance

PIDs

Photo-ionization Detectors

PFRP

Process to Further Reduce Pathogens

PLA

Project Labor Agreement

RTF

Regional Treatment Facility

PWL

Priority Waterbodies List

SCA

Sediment Consolidation Area

SCADA

Supervisory Control and Data Acquisition

SEPS

Secondary Effluent Pump Station

SEQR

State Environmental Quality Review

SGIP

Suburban Green Infrastructure Program

SHB

Solids Handling Building

SMPs

Storm Water Management Practices

SOP

Standard Operating Procedure

SPDES

State Pollutant Discharge Elimination System

SRP

Soluble Reactive Phosphorus

H:\WEP\abbreviations.doc


SSV

Site-Specific Variance

SUNY-ESF

State University of New York College of Science and Forestry

SWMM

Storm Water Management Modeling

SWMP

Storm Water Management Plan

SWPPP

Storm Water Pollution Prevention Plan

TDP

Total Dissolved Phosphorus

TMDL

Total Maximum Daily Load

TP

Total Phosphorus

TSI

Trophic State Index

UAA

Use Attainability Analysis

UFI

Upstate Freshwater Institute

ug/l

Micrograms per liter

USEPA

United States Environmental Protection Agency

USFWS

United States Fish and Wildlife Service

USGS

United States Geological Survey

UST

Underground Storage Tank

VOC

Volatile Organic Compounds

WAN

Wide Area Network

WLA

Waste Load Allocations

WEF

Water Environment Federation

WEP

Water Environment Protection

WSE

Waste Stream Environmental

H:\WEP\abbreviations.doc


December 2011 Monthly Report