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OF SUPPORT ANNUAL REPORT 2020-2021


COMING HOME

On June 1, 2021, my wife Ann and I began an exciting new chapter at our alma mater,

Southern Adventist University. This campus holds a special place in our hearts. It is where we dated, where we graduated, and where we made lifelong friends. In many ways, coming back to Southern feels like coming home.

Although it has been a few years since I was a student here, many things remain the same.

The dedication of the university’s faculty and staff, its pursuit of academic excellence, the outreach to our community and the world, and a focus on biblical principles are still at the core of what makes it special.

In the following pages, I invite you to take a look at highlights from this past year at Southern.

You will find stories of innovation, achievement, service, and missions, all made possible by God’s providence and your faithful support.

Your partnership has strengthened Southern amid the challenges of a pandemic year. You

have helped students overcome insurmountable financial hurdles on the path to reaching their dreams. You have made a significance difference. As I look at the iconic pillars that distinguish our campus, I can’t help but think of how you have held us up. You are our pillars of support. God bless you,

Ken Shaw, ’80, EdD President

2

ANNUAL REPORT • PILLARS OF SUPPORT


CONTENTS

4

10

ACADEMICS

13

MISSIONS

16

SPIRITUAL LIFE

15

LEGACY SOCIETY

18

GIFTS AT WORK

22

MEET THE PRESIDENT

President......................................................................................Ken Shaw, ′80 Interim Vice President for Advancement.............................Jon Larrabee, ′84 Administrative Assistant............................................................Lori Thompson Director of Advancement......................................................Kenny Turpen, ′09 Associate Director of Advancement.................................... Robert Bovell, ′89 Associate Director of Strategic Partnerships........................Lucas Patterson Director of Planned Giving...........................................Kimberly Bobenhausen Director of Alumni Relations............................................... Evonne Crook, ′79 Assistant Director of Alumni Relations................................... Ashley Fox, ′15 Annual Giving Coordinator.......................................... Sandra Araújo-Delgado Database Manager..................................................................... Eric Baerg, ′07 Donor Recognition and Records Coordinator........................ Candy Reichert

SERVICE

24

THANK YOU

SEND ADDRESS CHANGES TO: Advancement Southern Adventist University Post Office Box 370 Collegedale, TN 37315-0370 Phone 423.236.2829 Fax 423.236.1829 Email advancement@southern.edu Website southern.edu

27

ALUMNI


JOSLEN LACHE VELOZ, SENIOR THEOLOGY MAJOR 4 4

ANNUAL REPORT • PILLARS OF SUPPORT


FINDING MY CALLING AT SOUTHERN

Born into a family with three generations of ministers in Cuba, Joslen Lache Veloz, senior theology major,

told himself he wouldn’t be the next one. He wanted to study business or law so that he could have the things he only dreamed about.

In 2014 his prospects greatly improved with his family’s move to the United States. Finally, he could

pursue his dreams without limitations. Determined to make his way, Lache Veloz seized every business opportunity he encountered, but before finishing high school, he sensed God pulling him in a different direction—toward becoming a minister.

Not sure of which path to take, Lache Veloz registered at Southern as a business major, but he also

signed up for Soul-winning And Leadership Training (SALT). This program, a partnership between Southern and It Is Written, provides students with college credit and hands-on evangelism training.

“The experience was transformational,” Lache Veloz recalls. “God used it to reaffirm my calling, and I

became passionate about the gospel. Professors Alan and Nicole Parker and Raul Rivero were amazing gifts to me. They took the time to mentor and guide me to answer God’s call.”

Southern also supported his new dream in other ways. “Scholarships were such a blessing to me,” he

recalls. “I received the WISE scholarship three years in a row. It matched my work earnings and allowed me

13:1

STUDENT-FACULTY RATIO

11

GRADUATE DEGREE PROGRAMS

71

BACCALAUREATE DEGREES

20

ASSOCIATE DEGREES

to take more time to study. This year, I was honored to receive the Charles Weineger Fellowship Scholarship, which Southern matched.”

After graduation, Lache Veloz will work as a pastor for the Carolina Conference, and says “I can’t wait to

fulfill God’s calling and bless others the way He has blessed me.”

ACADEMICS


SOUTHERN’S AUTOMOTIVE PROGRAM RANKS FOURTH IN THE NATION

Southern Adventist University has the fourth-best automotive technology

baccalaureate program in the nation, according to a recent ranking by CollegeChoice. Consideration was given to its nationwide reputation, graduation and retention rates, affordability, and first salaries for graduates.

The program also has been recognized by The Best Schools, ranking it

number five. Valden Gardiner, who participated in the program, recalls what drew him here. “I chose Southern because it is one of the top 10 schools

Alijah Banks, sophomore technology major (left), works on an engine with program director Dale Walters.

in automotive in the country,” he said. “Most tech-vocational community colleges [are] very large. At a smaller private university, students have better access to the teachers.”

Southern offers several four-year, two-year, and non-degree options

for study, including a BS/AT combined major that allows students to study

SOUTHERN RANKS IN THE TOP

IN THE

business administration in combination with auto service. For students who are interested in managing, operating, and perhaps even owning an automotive service business, this is an attractive option, providing for a business–focused approach to the study of automotive service.

At Southern, students receive hands-on instruction and practical

experience while working in a full-service garage. Through a practicum, they also gain worksite experience and make connections with potential employers. A version of this story was originally published in the Southern Accent.

6

ANNUAL REPORT • PILLARS OF SUPPORT

SCHOOLS IN TENNESSEE FOR RETURN ON INVESTMENTS

BY U.S. NEWS AND WORLD REPORT’S “BEST COLLEGES” GUIDE FOR THE 19TH CONSECUTIVE YEAR


THE CENTER FOR INNOVATION AND RESEARCH IN COMPUTING LAUNCHES FIRST COMMERCIAL SOFTWARE

The Center for Innovation and Research in Computing (CIRC) launched

its first-ever commercial software program, DotPurple. CIRC aims to enhance student learning in the School of Computing by engaging students in real-world development projects. With the release of its own software for public use, CIRC is now able to generate increased income to fund additional projects and employ more students.

Jesse Hines, senior computer science major, works for CIRC.

DotPurple is a cross-platform GUI (graphical user interface) that runs

on the Microsoft .NET Framework, commonly used for web development. It simplifies the intricate details of developing with text boxes, drop-down menus, file pickers, and other organizational components. DotPurple was designed to streamline much of the repetitive bulk work in developing to make it a more simplified process.

The outlook for the software’s growth has been good, according to Michael

Babienco ’15, the head programmer for DotPurple. On Twitter, there has been notable recognition, including from Scott Hanselman, a prominent technology programmer for Microsoft.

Currently, there are multiple versions available for download. DotPurple is a

free software program, but if someone wants to use it for more hefty projects, a more advanced edition is available for purchase on the

488

UNIVERSITY ENROLLMENT

IN FALL

2020

FRESHMEN AND TRANSFER STUDENTS

2,738

3.61

AVG. HIGH SCHOOL GPA

1,104

TOTAL ENROLLMENT

AVG. SAT SCORE

STATES COUNTRIES

AVG. ACT SCORE

48

39

23

DotPurple website. A version of this story was originally published in the Southern Accent. ACADEMICS


ENACTUS TEAM REACHES TOP TIER IN NATIONAL COMPETITION

Southern’s Enactus team placed third in the nation at the Enactus United

States National Exposition. Having ranked second in their league several times, this was the first time they reached the top tier in this competition.

Housed in the School of Business, Enactus develops projects that use

innovation and business principles to improve people’s lives and livelihood. “We consider this part of our Christian commission as well,” says Michelle Doucoumes, ’05 and ’10, assistant professor in the School of Business and Southern’s Enactus sponsor.

This year’s projects included offering marketing services to small local

businesses affected by the pandemic, running a two-semester curriculum for girls in grades 6-12 to spark their interest in STEM* fields, promoting a soap production and marketing operation in Zambia that empowers women and

Enactus student leaders and their sponsor display the team’s award.

youth to support themselves, providing resources and funding to help restore sight to blind cataract patients in India, and developing an initiative to support entrepreneurship among students at Southern.

Worldwide, Enactus enlists more than 72,000 students through chapters

at colleges and universities in 36 countries. More than 300 of these schools are in the United States, 98 of which participated in this year’s exposition. *Science, Technology, Engineering, and Math

8

ANNUAL REPORT • PILLARS OF SUPPORT

5

PROJECTS

50

MEMBERS

8,843

WORKING HOURS

47,299

LIVES IMPACTED


RESEARCH DAY REWARDS INNOVATION

Brayan Lopez, senior religious studies major, and Noah Manestar, ’21, who

graduated with a degree in chemistry, were the winners of Southern’s 2021 Research Day sciences competition with their 12-minute oral presentation on “Synthesis of a Substituted Benzophosphole for Use in OLED Devices.”

Coached for more than a year by Matthew Duffy, PhD, associate professor

in the Chemistry Department, Lopez and Manestar are the first in the world to synthesize some of these organic emitter compounds that fluoresce when excited by a stimulus. The result of their research is the creation of a highly emissive cyclized benzophosphole that is fairly inexpensive to produce, offering an alternative molecule for use in OLEDs (organic light-emitting diodes).

For Manestar, this was a unique opportunity. “I refined my laboratory skills far

beyond what is required in the normal coursework lab sections, and I enhanced my problem-solving methodology to discover novel, functioning syntheses,” he recalls.

Research Day stimulates intellectual curiosity and scholarship among Southern’s

Lopez left, and Manestar shine their molecules with UV flashlights, producing different colored lights.

students and faculty. This year, the virtual event showcasing the best projects from humanities, sciences, and social sciences included 102 poster presentations and 75 oral presentations.

Other oral presentation winners include Bailey Bryant, senior psychology major,

with “The Relationship Among Social Support, Stress, and Inflammatory Markers Among College Students: A Correlational Study,” and Christina Coston, junior history major, on “‘What’s Your College?’ How a University’s Name Impacts Students’

177 STUDENTS

PARTICIPATED IN RESEARCH DAY

Communication.”

ACADEMICS


BAILEY KRALL, SENIOR MUSIC MAJOR 1010

ANNUAL REPORT • PILLARS OF SUPPORT


LITTLE MOMENTS BAILEY KRALL, SENIOR MUSIC MAJOR

One evening during chapel, as we sat under fans trying to stay cool, someone whispered to me, “Bailey, the wind

came!” I quickly learned that in Bangladesh, wind means cooler weather.

It also means rain. Worship finished, and the children charged out the door. I headed to the balcony to watch the

scene. Children running and screaming with joy, others flying kites made out of newspaper. I spotted boys on the roof tucking away their pet pigeons, while others waited for mangos to fall from the trees.

As I stood with the wind on my face, I began to think of all the little moments that had made my year as a student

missionary in Bangladesh worthwhile. I thought of the first day I walked through the school gate and was immediately surrounded by children greeting me and giving me hugs. Or the time I was so discouraged and homesick and was ambushed on my way to breakfast by four little preschoolers calling out, “Bailey, you will be mom, and we will be babies!” I remembered each time the children knocked on my door to share a bite of their cookies—or whatever special treat they had—knowing there wouldn’t be any more for a while. I’ll never forget the day I faced my most rowdy class with dread,

LONG-TERM STUDENT MISSIONARIES

42

only to discover the students had brought me a bouquet of flowers, along with a banana from each of them.

As I recounted all of the ways God had been good to me during my stay in Bangladesh, I resolved to take time to

slow down and appreciate everything. The sky darkened, and the rain began to fall. I went inside with a contented heart, filled with little moments.

MISSIONS


WINNING SOULS FOR CHRIST THROUGH DIGITAL EVANGELISM

With most of the overseas trips canceled or postponed due to the

pandemic, the Evangelistic Resource Center (ERC) had to find new ways to fulfill its mission. The solution? ERC launched its first digital evangelistic campaign in collaboration with the Southeast Dominican Conference.

“We contacted conferences where we were previously scheduled to

visit,” said Raul Rivero, ERC Coordinator. The response was overwhelming with 45 churches registering for the series. As a result of this effort, 43 people

Pablo Betancourt, senior theology major, preaches from home during a digital evangelistic series.

gave their lives to Jesus. Since then, the ERC has organized three additional digital meetings in other parts of the world.

Through this experience, students have grown in different ways. Rhett

Seitz, junior pastoral care major and Bible worker, preached remotely to the Karen Community Seventh-day Adventist Church in Nairobi, Kenya, although he was not entirely comfortable using technology.

“Going into the series, I had zero technology experience, and I struggled

a little bit. Slowly throughout the week, I became more adept,” he recalls. God blessed, with nine baptisms at Seitz’s church.

Digital evangelism has also broadened the team’s reach. Fernando

Portillo, senior theology major, preached remotely to a viewership from 12 churches in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic. More than 12 people asked for baptism in his series.

As restrictions are lifted and Southern’s evangelistic trips overseas

resume, the team moves forward with a new tool; we will continue to share the gospel through digital evangelism.

12

ANNUAL REPORT • PILLARS OF SUPPORT

4

DIGITAL SERIES

46

SPEAKERS

1

FIELD SCHOOL

303

BAPTISMS


“THE BIGGEST HELP EVER”

As first-generation college students, siblings Dain Ochoa, junior nursing

major, and Jadyn, sophomore social work major, treasure their Southern experience.

In March 2020, when Southern’s campus closed because of the

pandemic, Dain was struggling to pay his school bill. The outlook was bleak, with jobs closing and diminishing resources. To make matters worse, everyone in his family except his sister, Jadyn, got sick with COVID-19. His parents lost their jobs, making the path back to Southern even steeper.

Jadyn was planning to attend Southern as a freshman that August, but it

would take a miracle for both siblings to find the funding. The first sign of help came from the COVID-19 Student Relief Fund. It provided enough for them to register. The second answered prayer came through the Legacy Society

Siblings Dain, sophomore nursing major, and Jadyn Ochoa, freshman social work major are greatful for gifts that made their Southern dream possible.

Scholarship. Dain reflects on what it meant to receive these gifts from alumni

496

and friends of Southern: “I think it’s amazing that someone who doesn’t know me would make this generous gift,” he says. “I hope someday to do the same for someone else.”

Dain credits his mother, in conjunction with Southern’s missional spirit,

with opening his eyes to the needs of others. During the 2021-2022 school

LEGACY SOCIETY MEMBERS TO LEARN MORE, VISIT SOUTHERN.EDU/PLANNEDGIVING.

year, he will go as a student missionary to Bolivia, and he hopes to use his nursing degree to help others throughout his life. Similarly, Jadyn has been inspired to follow God’s calling and aims to make a difference through a career in social work. They will never forget how these scholarships made the “impossible” possible.

73,195

$

HAS BEEN AWARDED IN LEGACY SOCIETY SCHOLARSHIPS TO 29 STUDENTS SINCE 2016.

MISSONS / LEGACY SOCIETY


STUDENTS SERVE AT-RISK POPULATION IN ATLANTA

This May, the Office of Ministry and Missions sent out its first mission

group since 2019 when the pandemic changed the world. Six Southern students, along with the assistant chaplain, Michael Baranda, ’20, and the global engagement coordinator, Sonya Reaves, ’07, to Atlanta, Georgia, for a five-day Vision Trip (formerly known as uQuest).

Southern partnered with Frontline Response to support their ongoing

programs fighting human trafficking, and homelessness and mentoring youth. While in Atlanta, the students learned the history of Frontline Response’s programs and supported the staff in their weekly outreach. The five-day Vision Trip served as a powerful catalyst for conversations about how to actively be

Southern Students pose during a vision trip to Atlanta.

the hands and feet of Christ. Favorite moments included tutoring students, learning the names of those being served, and simply enjoying the ability to serve alongside fellow Southern students again.

The days were full but they ended with a Sabbath reflection on

HUMANITARIAN ENGAGEMENT

37,784 LBS

Isaiah 58:10 “If you extend your soul to the hungry and satisfy the afflicted soul, then your light shall dawn in the darkness, and your darkness shall be as the noonday.”

OF FOOD GIVEN

250

CARDS FOR VULNERABLE WOMEN

14

ANNUAL REPORT • PILLARS OF SUPPORT

572

BLESSING BAGS FOR HOMELESS

384

LUNCHES FOR CHILDREN


RAISING FUNDS FOR CHILDREN IN LEBANON

This year Benya Wilson, senior history major, decided she had to do

something to help Syrian refugees in Lebanon. Having spent a year abroad at a Syrian refugee school in Bourk Hammoud, Beirut, she knew firsthand the challenges that many families there face.

The year in Lebanon had been intense. Wilson worked at the Adventist

Learning Center teaching music, nutrition, and hygiene classes to refugee moms, plus managing the center’s website. The children and women she worked with became more than students; she considered them friends.

She remembered children such as Abdoul Kareem, who was the sole

bread winner for his family. At the time, 13-year-old Abdoul was working six

Benya Wilson, senior history major, poses with Syrian refugees.

days a week for a meager $5. Many other children roamed the streets, hungry, not able to go to school.

Even after she arrived at Southern, Wilson’s heart was heavy with the

desperate situation of her Syrian friends. She started a fundraiser and reached out to Southern students and young alumni. The response was overwhelming. Her GoFundMe page was shared widely across social media platforms, raising over $2,000—more than double her original goal. Through this collective effort, 40 families will have food for two months.

Grateful, Wilson plans to continue raising awareness and funds to make a

HUMANITARIAN ENGAGEMENT

4,247

SERVICE HOURS WERE CONTRIBUTED DURING THE YEAR

937

VOLUNTEERS

26

PARTNER ORGANIZATIONS

difference in the lives of Syrian refugees.

SERVICE


KATIE GUILD, SOPHOMORE HEALTH, PHYSICAL EDUCATION, AND RECREATION MAJOR 1616

ANNUAL REPORT • PILLARS OF SUPPORT


TURNING ME AROUND FOR GOOD

KATIE GUILD, SOPHOMORE HEALTH, PHYSICAL EDUCATION, AND RECREATION MAJOR

I arrived at Southern in fall 2019, and even though I loved the spiritual atmosphere, my relationship with God was on

the back burner. I was going through a dark time, withdrawn from my friends and feeling sick all the time. Convinced that something was wrong, I finally went to the doctor. He found a 10 cm tumor wrapped around my heart, lungs, trachea, and vocal cords. It was aggressive and most likely cancerous. I fought back tears while questions surged in my head. Would I be able to go back to school? Would I lose my hair? Would I die?

As I struggled to understand the diagnosis of Non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma, my Southern family rallied around me. Close

friends, students, and professors sent cards and flowers and wore wristbands as a reminder to pray for me. When people

1,059

ATTENDED STUDENT WEEK OF PRAYER

7

STUDENT BAPTISMS

came to visit, I felt the need to say things like, “God is going to turn this around for good.” But my heart was screaming “God, why would you let this happen to me?”

COVID-19 regulations were already in place at the time of my fourth treatment, and I was in the hospital alone. After

weeks of excruciating pain, my resentment had grown, and I blamed God for my situation.

Laying on the hospital bed, I remembered a line I had memorized as Mary Magdalene for Southern’s SonRise

Resurrection Pageant: “This isn’t how things were supposed to happen! Jesus never did anything to deserve this!”

50

STUDENT-LED LIFE GROUPS

As I thought about His sacrifice, I couldn’t help but love Him. On May 20, 2020, I received a call from the doctor,

“There is no evidence of disease in your body,” he said. My heart leapt with joy. I was cancer-free! Through this incredibly hard experience, many things in my life came into focus. Best of all, I found what I had been searching for: Jesus. He did turn me around for good.

SPIRITUAL LIFE


AN UPDATED LOOK: SJC UPGRADES TV STUDIO AFTER GIVING DAY VICTORY

The School of Journalism and Communication (SJC) needed an updated

television news set for training its students. But how would faculty, students, and staff raise the $15,000 necessary for the TV studio renovation project? Faced with that dilemma, the SJC team turned their attention to Southern’s fifth annual Giving Day fundraising blitz, which offered various incentives for departments seeking a financial boost.

As SJC geared up for the university-wide fundraising event, held February

16-17, faculty, students, and staff reached out to alumni, family, and friends to

This rendering illustrates the new TV studio developed by TVsetdesigns being built in the School of Journalism and Communication.

solicit support for the project. The team also developed a promotional video to share with supporters on social media. During the two-day fundraiser, the SJC team intensified their efforts, maximizing a series of incentives and challenges to increase the total amount raised.

In the end, all of the hard work paid off, with the SJC netting the most

donors on campus, exceeding its goal by nearly $2,000, and winning first place in the Giving Day competition. In total, the SJC team raised $16,976.

Now, they are ready to install a new, state-of-the-art news set, which will

replace one donated by local TV station WRCB 20 years ago. SJC associate professor Stephen Ruf said the new set will be a great addition to the studio, which also includes a smaller set built last semester for the weekly talk show Ignite.

18

ANNUAL REPORT • PILLARS OF SUPPORT

SJC GIVING DAY NUMBERS

142

TOTAL DONORS

48

ALUMNI CONTRIBUTED

21

STUDENTS MADE A GIFT

WON FIRST OR SECOND PLACE IN 7 CHALLENGES


GIVING DAY 2021 BY THE NUMBERS

926

TOTAL DONORS

134

AMBASSADORS

168

CURRENT AND FORMER EMPLOYEES MADE A GIFT

100

264

DONORS INVITED BY AMBASSADORS

1,118,711

$

RAISED

ACADEMIC AREA WITH MOST DONORS SCHOOL OF JOURNALISM AND COMMUNICATION

STUDENTS MADE A GIFT

11

ACADEMIC AREAS HAD AN INCREASE IN DONORS OVER LAST YEAR

ACADEMIC AREA WITH MOST DOLLARS APPLIED TECHNOLOGY

GIFTS AT WORK


YOUR IMPACT 2020 600

93% OF STUDENTS

STUDENTS RECEIVED

1.7

$

MILLION RECEIVED A PORTION OF MORE THAN $18 MILLION IN SOUTHERN AID

IN FINANCIAL SUPPORT FROM FUNDS GENERATED THROUGH NAMED ENDOWMENTS

193,177

$

CONTRIBUTED THROUGH GIFTS OF $100 OR LESS

1,571

LOYALTY CIRCLE MEMBERS*

70%

OF EMPLOYEES GAVE TO SOUTHERN CAUSES

*MADE AN ANNUAL GIFT FOR THREE CONSECUTIVE YEARS OR MORE

20

ANNUAL REPORT • PILLARS OF SUPPORT


2021 TOTAL GIVING

2,841

ALUMNI AND FRIENDS CONTRIBUTED

1,162,420

$

NON-ENDOWED SCHOLARSHIPS AND AWARDS

$

150,246

$

$

WSMC

5,747 OTHER

$

382,903

CAPITAL PROJECTS

$

67,682

SPECIAL PROJECTS

$

577,098

ACADEMIC AREAS

$

30,109

247,941

THE SOUTHERN FUND

CAMPUS SUPPORT

$

302,514

ASSIST AND PARTNERING FOR ETERNITY

$

GRAND TOTAL

6,121,019

94,854

$

GIFTS IN KIND

2,150,938

$

948,567

$

NAMED ENDOWMENTS

MISSIONS

GIFTS AT WORK


22 22

ANNUAL REPORT • PILLARS OF SUPPORT


TEN THINGS ON PRESIDENT KEN SHAW’S MIND

1 2 3 4 5 6

My first priority is to get to know everyone at Southern who provides a Christian environment for students to learn. I can’t wait to engage with our wonderful students as they come back to campus.  outhern has a great reputation. I would like S to showcase what we do at the university nationally and globally. One of Southern’s greatest assets is its emphasis on helping students find God’s calling in their lives. I want every Adventist student in the Southern Union to know that they are welcomed here. I want to stay relevant with our students by listening to their stories, worshiping with them, and laughing and crying with them. It makes me a better leader.

7 8 9

10

Daily devotions help me stay spiritually grounded. God’s Word provides a foundation, which reminds me daily who is in control. I want to make Southern more affordable to students. I praise God for wonderful alumni and friends who have contributed to our $60 million endowment. My goal is to raise it to $100 million. I want to invite alumni of all ages to get involved by making a gift during Giving Day, coming back to campus to reconnect with friends, and looking for mentorship opportunities.  lumni and friends can be proud of A Southern’s long-lasting legacy of having a strong biblical foundation, academic excellence, and a service emphasis.

MEET THE PRESIDENT


THANK YOU, PRESIDENT SMITH “I appreciated Dave’s servant leadership and

“Dr. David Smith will long be remembered for his

“I am grateful to president Smith for his care and

the value he placed on teamwork. Through both

visionary leadership at Southern. One of his most

concern for the well-being of the student body. By

personal office visits and public meetings, he

laudatory achievements is the way he navigated the

modeling the love and patience of Jesus, he made

intentionally encouraged and inspired us to bring

challenges of the COVID-19 pandemic. Unlike many

an impact on Southern. During one of the hardest

our best to the Lord’s service.”

higher education institutions across the country, Dr.

times to navigate an academic institution, he

Smith and his team reopened campus while creating

listened and acted on student concerns. Although

a safe and meaningful experience for all. It is with

we are sad to see him leave, we are grateful for

great appreciation, albeit tinged with reluctance, that

his time of service.”

TYSON HALL (ATTENDED), DEAN OF GRADUATE STUDIES

we bid President Smith farewell.” RUTH LIU, TRUSTEE

24

ANNUAL REPORT • PILLARS OF SUPPORT

SHERYL KAMBUNI, ’21, STUDENT ASSOCIATION PRESIDENT 2020-2021


DONOR SUPPORT PULLED ME THROUGH

In December 2020, my whole family tested positive for COVID-19 and we

I am so grateful to have been chosen for this endowed scholarship. I was

had to isolate for two weeks. Once we were cleared, my mother went back to

able to avoid taking out a loan this last year, which relieved so much stress for

work only to find she didn’t have a job. A few days later, my brother received

my family. It has also made clear how God has led me, and His desire for me

a call telling him he was laid off. Our world was turned upside down. I worked

to serve Him.

overtime and holidays and saved every penny, but unfortunately, it wasn’t

enough.

becoming a physician. I plan to take a gap year to prepare for medical school,

obtain my private pilot’s license, and receive medical missionary training.

Because of your generosity to the COVID-19 Student Relief Fund, I was

This scholarship puts me in a better position to pursue my dream of

able to return to Southern and buy school supplies and food.

as you help others through this endowment and inspire them to live a life of

Thank you for helping me continue my studies at Southern.

Thank you for this blessing, and I pray that God will continue to bless you

service. DAMARIS YOXOM-SONTAY SENIOR NURSING MAJOR

KEVIN SINGH, ’21

THANK YOU


THANK YOU Thank you for being a pillar of support and strength for Southern Students. Generations stand on your shoulders to answer God’s calling in their lives because of your philanthropic commitment. With your help, Southern provides a fertile ground where dreams can take root, grow, and become reality. You make this possible. We celebrate our

Scan this QR code to view our lists of donors.

partnership by including your names on our recognition pages.

26 26

ANNUAL REPORT • PILLARS OF SUPPORT

Scan this QR code to take a tour of our new Bietz Center for Student Life.


CHANGING THE WORLD FOR A STUDENT

I support Southern because of the intangibles. You can get a degree

anywhere, but I understand the added value of what Southern provides. At Southern, students have the opportunity to not only receive an education but also to make connections that will change their lives forever. I had a fantastic experience at Southern. I met many like-minded friends who positively influenced the person I am today. Finally, I met my wife, who will indefinitely play a role in my life and family.

Besides the people and friendly employees, the various organizations

(Asian club, BCU, SALT) provided so many opportunities to experience things I had never been exposed to before attending Southern. As a result, I developed new hobbies and interests that I would not have otherwise explored. While I can’t single-handedly change the world, I can change the world for a student who might have an even broader impact someday. That’s why I support Southern. DANIEL MORGAN, ’14

42, 452

DONATED BY ALUMNI TO SOUTHERN IN 2020-2021

9.5% ALUMNI ENGAGEMENT

ALUMNI


Non-Profit Org. U.S. Postage

PAID

P.O. Box 370 Collegedale, TN 37315

Chattanooga, TN College Press

BY TRANSFERRING AN APPRECIATED ASSET TO SOUTHERN: • You may avoid capital gain tax and possibly other taxes. • You may receive an income tax deduction. • You may save the expense of maintaining and insuring the asset. • You may receive the joy of knowing your asset is going to help a student experience Southern.

When your giving is not limited to cash, you may discover giving potential you did not know you had.

Contact Southern for more information 423.236.2832 southern.edu/plannedgiving

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Profile for Isaac James

Annual Report 2020-2021  

Annual Report 2020-2021  

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