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GUIDE

BEER luke oldham, 2nd shift brewing assistant brewer, plus four more brewers you should know p. 18

ST. ST. LOUIS’ LOUIS’ INDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT CULINARY CULINARYAUTHORITY AUTHORITY

Guide to Beer 2016

SAUCEMAGAZINE.COM

FREE, GUIDE TO BEER 2016

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Guide to Beer 2016

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publisher’s perspective

I S T I L L R E M E M B E R M Y F I R S T B E E R : A N O LY M P I A . ( W E W O N ’ T TA L K A B O U T W H E N . )

PHOTO BY JONATHAN GAYMAN

I had never tasted anything like it – the distinct flavor of what I now know as hops tasted like straw or hay to my undeveloped palate. Admittedly, Olympia isn’t exactly high-brow stuff, but it introduced me to my love for years to come: the golden gift of my formative college years. As time passed, I advanced from a light beer drinker to a microbrewery explorer and now a craft beer lover. Beer is at the heart of this city, and the love and support of the community (including our loyal readers) has allowed the vibrant St. Louis beer scene to evolve at a break-neck pace. Led by established favorites, it continues to grow, incorporating obsessive homebrewers-turnedprofessionals and a constant influx of new names and faces garnering national attention. Guide to Beer 2016

Examples abound. The prestigious James Beard Foundation has named The Side Project Cellar, co-owned by Sauce contributors Cory and Karen King, a semifinalist in the Outstanding Bar Program category. (See p. 15 for a guide to Side Project’s bottle releases and p. 16 to learn more about hops from Side Project tasting room manager Katie Herrera.) Beer website Rate Beer recently named Cherokee Street’s Earthbound Beer as best new brewery in Missouri. (Flip the magazine over to find out what to sip at Earthbound now on p. 21.) It’s no secret that I have a special place in my heart for brewers: perfectionists, purists and literal tastemakers, and we’re keeping

our eyes on the next generation of bold new brewers in St. Louis. (Meet them on p. 18.) St. Louis is one of the best beer cities in the country, tantamount to our evergrowing food scene, featuring imaginative beers from world-class talent. So with this year’s Guide to Beer, let’s raise a pint to the most passionate, hardestworking people in town. Cheers to you and thank you for making St. Louis a fabulous beer city!

Allyson Mace Founder and publisher

This month on Sound Bites, the Sauce team discusses Hit List Tuesday, March 1 at noon on St. Louis on the Air. Then tune in to St. Louis Public Radio 90.7 KWMU later in the month when editor Catherine Klene talks about the growth of the local brewing scene with 4 Hands Brewing Co.’s Andy Burgio and Perennial Artisan Ales’ Jonathan Moxey.

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Steady as she gose

Anyone can wax poetic about the complex, bright acidity and joyful effervescence of a lactic acid-laced brew.

BY KRISTIN SCHULTZ

Sour skeptics don’t need to slink out of the room when beer buddies rave about a pour that smells like a ripe gym sock. Instead, they can grab a gose (pronounced GOHZ’-uh) and join the conversation.

“It’s a gateway sour,” explained Andy Hille, certified cicerone and Perennial Artisan Ales brewer. “Rather than being abrupt, goses have other elements like salt and citrus that bridge the gap. If you don’t like sour beers, maybe you haven’t had the right one.”

The salt in gose beers is nothing like your grandfather shaking table salt into his Schlitz to offset the beer’s, um, distinctive flavor. Dating back to gose’s 18th-century German origins, salt is combined with ground coriander to provide a unique platform on which to build and balance other flavors. While gose can have flavors that range from tart and juicy to direct and twangy, the brew should come together and finish with a mild but detectable salinity. This profile, combined with the beer’s bright sunny color, abundance of bubbles and relatively low alcohol content make it a perfect warm weather slammer. “It’s like a brewer’s Gatorade,” Hille said. “It’s got a low ABV and a salty, refreshing aspect with tartness.” Perennial’s gose, Suburban Beverage, starts with a wheat beer base and the traditional salt, but takes a decidedly logical exit to Margaritaville with the use of orange and lemon peel and Key lime juice. But it’s more approachable (and safer) than the tequila-based cocktail at 4.2-percent ABV. 2nd Shift’s Green Bird is poured at Bridge.

PHOTO BY JONATHAN GAYMAN

SPRING FORECAST / Perennial Artisan Ales 17 Peppermint patties in liquid form: Bittersweet chocolate and mint are the highlight of this big, bold, aggressive Imperial mint chocolate stout.

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Piney River Brewing Co. Crankbait Cream Ale Smooth, crisp and clean with little bite, this canned American-style cream ale arrives just in time for yard work and float trip planning.

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march Guide to Beer 2016

“It’s a gateway sour.” – Andy Hille, certified cicerone and Perennial Artisan Ales brewer

The beer also incorporated lemon basil and bright, herbaceous lemon verbena from Prairie Birthday Farm in Kearney, Missouri. Both 4 Hands and Perennial plan to rerelease their goses in mid- to late-summer 2016. If curiosity or good old-fashioned peer pressure from sour-fanatics necessitates you pop a bottle sooner, stop by any of Dave Bailey’s restaurants (Rooster, Small Batch, Baileys’ Chocolate Bar, Baileys’ Range or Bridge) and ask for Green Bird, a gose brewed by 2nd Shift Brewing especially for the restaurant group. “We wanted to do something for them that went well with their food,” said 2nd Shift’s Libby Crider. Green Bird’s light and lemony brew is a tart sip with citrus flavors complemented by the traditional coriander and salt. Given the increasing popularity of session beers and sours, it’s no surprise that interest in gose is rising as fast as bubbles after a pour.

Spring offers something for every palate to kick those winter blues out the door. Here, six local, seasonal offerings we can’t wait to swill. – Katie Hererra

The Civil Life Brewing Co. Big Belgian-Style Blond Ale Boozy and Belgian, this beer is completely out of the Civil Life wheelhouse. Fortunately for STL, Civil Life has perfected perfection. This beauty is sure to please.

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4 Hands Brewing Co. also got in on gose in 2015 when it collaborated with two Kansas City restaurants

for its Preserved Lemon Gose. It’s a natural combination: “Preserved lemons and gose both involve salt,” said 4 Hands owner Kevin Lemp.

Mark Twain Brewing Co. A Wee Bit Foggy A little nutty with caramel sweetness, this lightly floral, earthy ale is more than a wee bit Scotch.

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4 Hands Brewing Co. Contact High Loads of zesty citrus and refreshing dankness round out this keep-inyour-cooler-for-the-nextsix-months, hoppy wheat beer.

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2nd Shift Brewing Technical Ecstasy Put simply, this Czechstyle Pilsner has the ideal balance of biscuity, clean malt and floral, peppery hops.

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750s that are worth it The fear of paying a premium for a beer you won’t like is legitimate. But some of the best beer available is found in those intimidating, 750-milliliter bottles. Bottling beer like wine is cheaper and more efficient for breweries, but that’s not the only reason they do it. The reason you should venture into a larger format is the texture it produces. Bigger bottles are the medium of choice for bottle conditioning, which is when a small, secondary fermentation takes place in the bottle. Like the méthode champenoise of Champagne, bottle conditioning creates softer, more velvety bubbles rather than the sharper bite of carbon dioxide in forced carbonated beers. Is it wrong to associate good beer with the heft of a six-pack? No more so than it is to enjoy a 32-ounce Miller High Life – not wrong at all. But with a little research, you can eliminate the risk in buying big bottles and taste the reward. – David Schroeder

BRASSERIE DUPONT FORÊT SAISON

MYSTIC SAISON RENAUD

BONNY DOON ¿QUERRY? CIDER

Forêt is an oftenoverlooked organic saison. The aptly named beer is dry but fruity with complex scents and flavors typifying the perfume classification chypre: citrus with woody, mossy notes. Parker’s Table, 7118 Oakland Ave., Richmond Heights, 314.645.2050, parkerstable.com

This saison is made with one type of Pilsner malt and a single addition of Saaz hops fermented with a clean, expressive yeast. The result emits both fruitiness and a dryness reminiscent of Pilsners. Craft Beer Cellar, 8113 Maryland Ave., Clayton, 314.222.2444, craftbeercellar.com/clayton

In a market overrun with saccharine, single-note options, this cider offers gratifying complexity. The winery ferments pears and quince fruit along with apples from its vineyard to produce this multifaceted cider. Grapevine Wines, 309 S. Kirkwood Road, Kirkwood, 314.909.7044, grapevinewinesandspirits.com

PANIL BARRIQUEE

ANYTHING FROM SIDE PROJECT

2ND SHIFT KATY

Plum and red currant notes acquired from aging in cognac barrels anchor the balsamic vinegar-like acidity in this complex sour beer. The Wine & Cheese Place, 7435 Forsyth Blvd., Clayton, 314.727.8788, wineandcheeseplace.com

This brewery’s legendary status (and international reputation) makes it hard to bring a bottle home – beer nerds will travel for this stuff, and release events sell out quickly. Follow @SideProjectBrew on Twitter for information on bottle releases of these amazing beers.

Barrel-aging and wild yeast Brettanomyces in Katy produce a textured complexity that offsets the subtle tartness of the beer. Saint Louis Hop Shop, 2606 Cherokee St., St. Louis, 314.261.4011, saintlouishopshop.com

PHOTO BY JONATHAN GAYMAN

For more on how to survive Side Project bottle releases, see p. 15.

Guide to Beer 2016

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B A CK T O B A SIC S COMPILED BY TIFFANY LEONG Craft brewers only drink esoteric beers you’ve never heard of, right? Wrong. At the end of a long day, grilling with friends or hitting a dive bar, these beerwater American lagers still hit the spot. Here, St. Louis craft brewers proudly declare their guilty pleasure beers. My not-so-guilty pleasure is definitely Stag. After you drink a lot of craft beer, you seek out the opposite. It’s light, easy-drinking and doesn’t end on a sweet note. – Rebecca Schranz, Earthbound Beer co-owner and brewer

TA P L I N E U P AT E L I JA H P ’ S B U R G E R S & B R E W S

BEST BEER LISTS You can hit up just about any restaurant in St. Louis and have a beer with your food, but there are certain restaurants that bring craft beer to life. Here are seven places that take pints to the next level. - Kristen Chalfant

BRIDGE TAP HOUSE & WINE BAR Pair Bridge’s a la carte cheese and charcuterie boards with 57 taps and more than 200 bottles, and you’ve got a match made in beer heaven. The list ranges from local favorites to well-balanced beers from around the world with familiar names alongside harder-to-find gems like Crooked Stave’s Colorado Wild Sage Mountain saison. 1004 Locust St., St. Louis, 314.241.8141, thebridgestl.com

PHOTOS BY DAVID KOVALUK

RETREAT GASTROPUB New to the scene, Retreat offers an elevated pub menu along with 10 taps, eight showcasing some of St. Louis’ best breweries. But what sets it apart is the thoughtful selection of specialty bottles and cans, like the collaboration beer Geyser Guide to Beer 2016

Gose from Evil Twin and Two Roads, along with those two other taps which offer weird, frequently rotating sours like Prairie’s Funky Gold Simcoe. 6 N. Sarah St., St. Louis, 314.261.4497, retreatgastropub.com

MIKE’S GRILL & TAP After visiting Mike’s Grill & Tap, you’ll start making up excuses to drive to O’Fallon, Missouri. Mike’s offers 24 delightfully diverse drafts, ranging in varieties from 2nd Shift Art of Neurosis IPA to 4 Hands Absence of Light peanut butter chocolate milk stout. 2447 State Highway K, O’Fallon, 636.240.0633, mikesgrillandtap.com

ELIJAH P’S BURGERS & BREWS The 60-plus beer menu at Elijah P’s is cleverly organized by tasting note, starting with the broad categories: crisp, hop, malt, roast, smoke, fruit and spice, and tart and funky. It’s a classy, yet relaxing old-school hangout perfect for sampling a wide variety of beers from everywhere, including the Old Bakery brewery around the corner and Belgian breweries like Brasserie d’Achouffe. 401 Piasa St., Alton, 618.433.8445, elijahps.com

SALT & SMOKE The extensive selection of whiskey might tempt you to ignore this barbecue haven’s beer list. Don’t. Salt & Smoke’s taps offer a range of styles and flavors from local breweries – from Perennial’s Saison de Lis to The Civil Life’s American Brown. 6525 Delmar Blvd., University City, 314.727.0200, saltandsmokestl.com

5 STAR BURGERS 5 Star Burgers is the place to be during happy hour with half-price local draft beer and mini munchies that will keep you there ’til your belly’s full and your heart’s content. Order a pint of Six Mile Bridge’s Irish Red Ale at the Kirkwood location. 312 S. Kirkwood Road, Kirkwood, 314.394.2250, 5starburgersstl.com

D R E S S E L’ S P U B L I C H O U S E With rotating food and beer menus, you might not know what to expect at Dressel’s but you know it will be good. The most recent rotation included house-made chorizo corn dogs and Points Unknown IPA from Ecliptic Brewing. I need not go on. 419 N. Euclid Ave., St. Louis, 314.361.1060, dresselspublichouse.com

A bottle of Busch. I don’t even know why; maybe it’s the nostalgia. When I go to a dive bar that doesn’t have craft beer, I’ll go for a bottle of Busch. – Lauren Pattan, The Old Bakery Beer Co. co-owner I’ll grab any light, hoppy beer; a nice Pilsner or a pale ale. I’m not picky – anything from a Stag to a Pivo pils from Firestone Walker. – Dave Johnson, Kirkwood Station Restaurant and Brewing Co. brewmaster Stag, but Budweiser classic is a close second. My grandfather was a distributor for Stag in the ’50s. It’s nostalgic; it takes me back to those days at my grandpa’s parties. (Budweiser) is what my dad would drink when he was grilling. – John Witte, Square One Brewery & Distillery director of beverage operations I have no shame putting quite a few Natty’s (Natural Light) back if I’m in for a long drinking session with some old friends. Sometimes you have to go back to your college roots. – Ryan Landolt, Ferguson Brewing Co. head brewer If I’m drinking all day or if I’m barbecuing, PBR is a good way to go. – Darren McLean, Excel Brewing Co. head brewer

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WHERE SHOULD I GET A BEER? START HERE

8 N E W TA S T I N G R O O M S TO E X P LO R E N O W IT’S DAYDRINKING TIME

WHAT TIME IS IT?

DO YOU BUY ORGANIC?

PM SURE

I THOUGHT WE WERE TALKING ABOUT BEER?

SWEET POTATO BEER CREATIVE?

BIT OF A BEER NERD?

LOOKING FOR SOMETHING ADVENTUROUS?

NO, NOT REALLY

O’FALLON O’BAR

WHY NOT?

LET’S GET CREATIVE

ALWAYS

IS THAT MADE WITH CITRA HOPS?

NO, KEEP IT CLASSIC

IT’S NOT MY FANTASY WHO ARE YOU WITH?

I GOT MY WHOLE SQUAD WITH ME

MODERN BREWERY

SAUSAGE AND BEER YOUR THING? SIX MILE BRIDGE

DUH

OLD BAKERY BEER

GOT A THING FOR ACCENTS?

WHO DOESN’T?

HUH?

MY BOO DID YOU BRING THE KIDS WITH YOU?

STANDARD BREWING

YES

PEEL PIZZA & BREWERY

NO WHAT KIND OF A DATE ARE YOU HAVING? BEER DATE WITH DINNER

COZY BY THE FIRE HUNGRY?

NO, WE CAME TO DRINK

RECESS BREWING

MORE LIKE HOT DOGS AND WINGS CASUAL FOOD OR ARTISANAL?

CHARCUTERIE’S OUR THING

YES

NO ARE VEGETARIANS INVOLVED?

YES

MAIN & MILL BREWING

Main & Mill Brewing Co., 240 E. Main St., Festus, 636.543.3031, mainandmillbrewingco.com; Modern Brewery, 5231 Manchester Ave., Unit E, St. Louis, modernbrewery.com; O’Fallon Brewery, 45 Progress Parkway, Maryland Heights, 636.474.2337, ofallonbrewery.com; The Old Bakery Beer Co., 400 Landmarks Blvd., Alton, 618.463.1470, oldbakerybeer.com; Peel Wood-Fired Pizza and Brewery, 104 S Cherry St., O’Fallon, Illinois, 618.726.2244, brewery.peelpizza.com; Recess Brewing, 307 N. Main St., Edwardsville, 618.692.5101, recessbrewing.com; Six Mile Bridge Beer, 11841 Dorsett Road, Maryland Heights, 314.942.2211, sixmilebridgebeer.com; Standard Brewing Co., 12322 Dorsett Road, Maryland Heights, 314.548.2270, standardbrewingstl.com Guide to Beer 2016

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THE ROOKIE’S GUIDE TO A SIDE PROJECT BOTTLE RELEASE

ILLUSTRATION BY VIDHYA NAGARAJAN

The forums are abuzz; Twitter is atwitter. The latest Side Project Brewing creation will be released tomorrow at Perennial Artisan Ales, and this time, you’re getting your hands on some of the world-class beer. But before you bumrush the bar, take note: A certain standard of behavior applies. We chatted with brewer and co-owner Cory King – and stood in some long lines – to make sure you don’t look a fool at your first bottle release. – Catherine Klene

DO get there early. A recent Side Project Cellar release started at 4 p.m., but the line started at 8 a.m. Make a fake dentist appointment and leave work ASAP. However …

Project teams are fine with bottle shares. Just don’t run your mouth about your latest and greatest without offering neighbors a pour.

DON’T panic. “If the release is at 4 p.m., as long as you get there by 4 p.m., you’re going to get some beer,” King said. “I never announce beforehand how many bottles there will be.”

DON’T get shitfaced. Some of those fancy beers pack a punch. Have fun, but stay classy.

DO bring a bottle. Hell, bring a cooler. The Perennial and Side

Guide to Beer 2016

DO trade. Swapping one of your prized bottles for an equally rare treat is called good fun. Auctioning a bottle to the highest bidder is called profiteering. Rude.

DON’T hire a beer mule. And yes, this actually happens. If you want more than your allocation, do what everyone else does and lie to your friend about how long you’ll wait in line. DO clean up. Glass bottles go in the recycling; trash goes in the dumpster. The sidewalk should not look like Soulard Mardi Gras. DON’T cut. Look, ninja, we all saw you. If you really want to stand

with your BFF Steve, you can both go to the back of the line. DO inform your neighbor. If you need to leave the line for a bathroom break or to hit the bar, that’s cool. Just give a heads up so the people around you know you didn’t abandon ship. DON’T be a loner. “Be prepared to meet some locals, be prepared for beer to be shared and be prepared for a calm release,” King said.

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Beginner’s Guide to Hops BY K ATI E H E R R E R A

PHOTO BY CARMEN TROESSER

Hops are getting a lot of attention these days. Brewers are experimenting with new varietals and different levels and combinations of hops, while consumers debate the attraction of aggressively bitter beers. Even if you’re not a fan of the (perhaps waning) trend of abrasive, hop-heavy brews, it is important to understand the role hops play beyond bittering your beer.

Interested in learning more? Check out STL native Stan Hieronymus’ For the Love of Hops: A Practical Guide to Aroma, Bitterness and the Culture of Hops. amazon.com

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“I don’t like bitter beer, so who cares?”

brewing, they add a lot of bitterness. When added toward the end or after the boiling stage (dry-hopping), they contribute powerfully to the flavor and aroma of a beer. Hops are unique and draw a lot from their terroir. Adding them late in the brewing process lets hops show off what they got.

Not many people do like bitter beer – or bitter anything, for that matter. Bitterness in beer is designed to balance sugar, a byproduct of malt, which is what produces all that alcohol we’re so fond of. Bitter flavors add a refreshing zip to prevent cloying, sweet tastes from saturating your palate. So you can drink more beer.

all you have to do is head to Schlafly. The brewery has started its own SMASH (Single Malt and Single Hop) program called The Hop Trial Experience. SMASH programs aim to isolate and highlight the intricacies of specific beer ingredients. Schlafly pairs the same single-malt base with different single hops in a series of IPA trials, then polls public opinion to gauge effectiveness and likability of the specific hop.

“But what if I don’t like the taste of hops?”

Now that I have your attention, let’s talk about what makes this climbing nettle plant so special – aside from it being a close cousin to marijuana. The answer lies in the lupulin found inside those hop cones. Lupulin contains resins and aromatic oils that, depending when hops are added during the brewing process, help to bitter and impart a multitude of scents and flavors to your beer.

Don’t give up! Hop traits vary by growing region and are dissimilar. American hops, mostly grown in the Pacific Northwest, tend to be piney, citrusy and resinous, while English hops are more herbal and woody. German and Czech varieties, called noble hops, are floral and peppery. Australian and New Zealand hops emit juicy tropical and stone fruit notes.

When hops are added at the beginning or middle of the boiling stage of

And if you want to learn more about what particular varieties taste like,

Schlafly co-founder Dan Kopman has traveled the world meeting hop farmers and looking for exciting varietals to bring back to St. Louis. Some that have already been tested include Galaxy (Australian with ripe passion fruit notes), Barbe Rouge (French with berry brightness), Azacca (American with juicy tropical fruit and woodsy notes), Jarrylo (American with spicy pear and citrus notes) and Hüll Melon (German with honeydew melon notes).

The Schlafly Tap Room and Schlafly Bottleworks will see nine Hop Trials this year, with experimental American hop Hopsteiner 07270 on deck. Look for dank and fruity aromatics and a savory palate.

“So, you’re saying I might like hoppy beers after all?” Yes! A little research with trial and error goes a long way. Looking for single dry-hopped beers is a great way to assess individual hop characteristics and grow your palate beyond discerning bitterness. Start with Schlafly and any other single-hopped beers you see at local breweries, then look into the many accessible, hop-forward styles available year-round in St. Louis. Not all these beers are single-hopped, but they highlight the distinctive characteristics of the key hop featured.

IT’S ALL ABOUT THE IBUs

2ND SHIFT TECHNICAL ECSTASY CZECH PILSNER*

SIERRA NEVADA PALE ALE*

DESCHUTES MIRROR POND PALE ALE*

THE CIVIL LIFE PREMIUM BITTER

URBAN CHESTNUT HOPFEN BAVARIAN IPA

4 HANDS DIVIDED SKY RYE IPA

BELL’S TWO HEARTED*

4 HANDS INCARNATION IPA

SIERRA NEVADA TORPEDO EXTRA IPA

FOUNDERS RED’S RYE IPA

2ND SHIFT ART OF NEUROSIS

36

38

38

40

45

45

46

55

59

65

70

72

Hallertau Mittelfrueh, Hallertau Tradition and Hallertau Merkur

Falconer’s Flight

Centennial

Mosaic

Citra

Amarillo

Simcoe

Saaz

Cascade

Cascade

East Kent Golding

Lemon zest and honey

Soft floral notes and fruit

Juicy citrus and grass

Juicy citrus and grass

Soft tea and stone fruit

Grapefruit pith and herbal tea

Bright citrus with black pepper undertones

Bright, zesty citrus

Herbal and juicy tropical fruit

Juicy pineapple and light dankness

Crisp citrus

Citrus and pine

Lemon zest and honey

Light grass and pepper

Grapefruit and floral

Citrus and floral

Delicate floral, honey and lemon

Mild dankness with citrus and herbs

Citrus and mild earthiness

Grapefruit

Pine and stone fruit

Pine and tropical fruit

Grapefruit

Dankness and cat-piss (in a good way!)

HOPS USED

Hallertauer Hüll Melon, Hallertauer Mandarina Bavaria and Hallertauer Cascades

TASTES LIKE

URBAN CHESTNUT HALLERTAUER PALE ALE

SMELLS LIKE

IBUs

Bitterness in beer is measured through International Bitterness Units. High IBUs are a good indicator of bitterness, but they don’t tell you everything about how drinkable a beer is. Think of it like lemonade: High acid (IBUs) can make for a bitter sip, but adding extra sugar (or sweet malts) will balance your beverage.

Guide to Beer 2016

* Single-hopped beer

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bold new brewers ST. LOUIS BREWERIES DON’T EXACTLY ADHERE TO REINHEITSGEBOT PURITY LAWS OR THE STRICT HIERARCHY OF TRADITIONAL GERMAN BREWING. INSTEAD, LAISSEZ FAIRE EXPERIMENTATION AND COLLABORATION HAVE PRODUCED AS MANY EXCITING NEW BREWERS AS BEERS. LOCAL FAVORITES LIKE 4 HANDS INCARNATION IPA AND PERENNIAL SUBURBAN BEVERAGE WEREN’T CONCOCTED BY OWNERS OR BREWMASTERS, BUT RATHER THESE RISING TALENTS. by MATT BERKLEY \\ photos by GREG RANNELLS

Luke Oldham

ASSISTANT BREWER, 2ND SHIFT BREWING, NEW HAVEN

AREAS OF INTEREST

The entire process. Though Oldham hasn’t debuted a beer of his own (yet), he has taken on 2nd Shift Brewing’s day-to-day responsibilities (brewing most of its beers) while co-owner and brewmaster Steve Crider focuses on growing the brand. PRAISE FROM THE BOSS

“Luke is truly a go-getter. He’s a person who does exactly what you need him to do with zero problems,” Crider said. “And he’s also a goofball.”

Guide to Beer 2016

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Andy Hille

BREWER, PERENNIAL ARTISAN ALES, ST. LOUIS

BEERS | Regalia, Stefon and

Suburban Beverage

AREAS OF INTEREST

“Everything: recipe formulation, experimental styles,” Hille said. When developing recipes, he’s in pursuit of balance. “More like a culinary approach to beer – beers that don’t sway too far one way or another with flavor.” PRAISE FROM THE BOSS

Perennial co-owner Phil Wymore is impressed by Hille’s creativity as much as his skill. “Andy is very freeform and creative,” Wymore said. “And he helps us incorporate a lot of pop culture in our brand.”

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Andy Burgio

LEAD BREWER, 4 HANDS BREWING CO., ST. LOUIS

BEERS | Incarnation IPA,

Prelude

AREAS OF INTEREST | Recipe

development – especially for sour and barrel-aged beers. He is focused on achieving efficient brewing without compromising on quality.

PRAISE FROM THE BOSS | “Andy’s passion is

unparalleled,” said Kevin Lemp, 4 Hands owner and founder. “He isn’t satisfied easily, and from an owner’s perspective that is really what you’re looking for – because you don’t want to just put out a product. Andy helps us make sure that we’re putting out the very best beer we can.”

Guide to Beer 2016

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Brandon Stern

BREWER, THE CIVIL LIFE BREWING CO., ST. LOUIS

BEERS | Burton-On-Holt

pale ale, Wee Bit Heavy Scotch Ale, Oatmeal Stout, Belgian-Style Table Beer, Belgian-Style Dubbel Ale, Big Belgian-Style Blond Ale

AREAS OF INTEREST

Recipe development. “Playing around and experimenting with new ingredients – continuing education and research,” Stern said. He is leading Civil Life’s Belgian series, as well as the brewery’s new cask beer program. PRAISE FROM THE BOSS

“He has a lot of skill,” said head brewer Dylan Mosley. “But also, I like (that) he doesn’t always agree with me. He’s not afraid to speak his mind. Brandon is definitely not for hire.”

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Jonathan Moxey

BREWER, PERENNIAL ARTISAN ALES, ST. LOUIS

BEERS | Fête de Nöel

Winter Ale, Anniversaria, Dubbel Block, Dealers’ Choice cocktail series beers

AREAS OF INTEREST

Barrels and wild yeasts like Brettanomyces. “(But) my main interest is introducing people to the wonderful relationships beer has with food and how well it can work together when you find the correct harmonies and contrasts,” Moxey said. “My brother Brian (Moxey) is the chef here at Perennial, and I really enjoy making beer for his food and encouraging him to make food for my beer.” PRAISE FROM THE BOSS

“Like being a great chef, great brewers need to have a good palate to be able to be critical of a beer and perfect certain elements,” said Perennial coowner Phil Wymore. “That’s something that Jonathan has in spades, and it makes him a really talented brewer.”

Guide to Beer 2016

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Guide to Beer 2016


Guide to Beer 2016

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BEER ET AL. by heather hughes, catherine klene and meera nagarajan

Be a Beer Kingmaker Pioneer new local beer at area pilot breweries. Sample small batch beers at Schlafly Bottleworks’ weekly Small Brews Programs or share your thoughts on Urban Chestnut’s latest efforts at its upcoming Urban Research Brewery, opening late spring or early summer. Schlafly Bottleworks, 7260 Southwest Ave., Maplewood, 314.241.2337, schlafly.com; Urban Research Brewery, 4501 Manchester Ave., St. Louis, 314.222.0143, urbanchestnut.com

Adults-Only Coloring Local blogger Jessica Leitch brings the adult coloring book trend to Urban Chestnut in The Grove with a monthly coloring club. Check in and collect your coloring sheets, grab a pint and some pomme frites and scribble outside the lines. Register online. Urban Chestnut Brewery & Bierhall, 4465 Manchester Ave., St. Louis, jessicaleitch. com/coloring-club-stl

Hoppy Hour It’s easy as 1, 2, 3. Combining equal parts gin, club soda and this Bittermilk No. 2 Tom Collins with Elderflower & Hops makes a refreshing and floral beerinspired riff on the classic. $13. The Wine & Cheese Place, 7435 Forsyth Blvd., Clayton, 314.727.8788, wineandcheeseplace.com

Civil Reads Books are better with beer. Double-fist one of each every other month at The Civil Life Brewing Co.’s reading group. Go online or check the chalkboard upstairs for the current read, then sign up for the mailing list at the bar. The Civil Life Brewing Co., 3714 Holt Ave., St. Louis, thecivillife.com

Fermenter to Farm Almost every day, farmer Bill Hofstetter makes the rounds to Perennial Artisan Ales, The Civil Life Brewing Co., Modern Brewery and 4204 Main Street Brewing Co. and carts off 2,000-plus pounds of spent grain for the mutual benefit of the breweries and his cattle. Ferment, reuse, recycle.

Eat your beer Union Loafers Cafe and Bread Bakery’s naturally fermented oat porridge bread won’t get you tipsy, but it does offer the nutty richness of an oatmeal stout. Bonus: You can top this one with butter. $8. Union Loafers Cafe and Bread Bakery, 1629 Tower Grove Ave., St. Louis, 314.833.6111, unionloafers.com

Bachelor’s in Beer Class is in session at Cicero’s Beer School. Each semester, learn how to tell your ales from your lagers, meet brewers and take field trips to local breweries. Graduate with honors – and a more refined palate. Cicero’s, 6691 Delmar Blvd., University City, 314.862.0009, ciceros-stl.com

Wall-Mounted Bottle Openers Display your beer nerd status permanently with a stylish, wallmounted bottle opener. These locally made beauties come from the proudly bearded woodworker Daniel Kruger. $20 to $25, beardedboardsstl.com

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Guide to Beer 2016


Guide to Beer 2016

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Guide to Beer 2016


Guide to Beer 2016

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Profile for Sauce Magazine

Guide to Beer 2016  

Guide to Beer 2016  

Profile for saucemag