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Annual Report 2015-2016


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SARC Annual Report 2015-2016


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SARC Annual Report 2015-2016

Table of Contents The Year In Review Message from the Executive Director and Board President 2015-2016 SARC Board of Directors

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Programs and Services Leading by LEAPing EmployLink Launched Consultation Services CBO Sustainability Project Progress Safety Leadership and Partnership Training: Year in Review Pension, Benefits and Insurance

06 08 10 12 13 14 15

SARCAN Recycling Year in Review Social Responsibility Environmental Sustainability Community Building

16 17 18 22

Financial Reports Financial Higlights Financial Statements

LEFT: AMY MCNEIL PRESENTS CINDY HODGSON WITH HER LEAP GRADUATION CERTIFICATE

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SARC Annual Report 2015-2016

Message from the Executive Director and Board President This was another year of growth for SARC and its divisions. We planned, developed and designed new programs and services and worked at maintaining the ones we’ve developed over the last few years as we wrap up our 20122016 strategic plan. The year was spent winding down, but also looking to the future with bright eyes and enthusiasm, as we put pen to paper to plan our next four-year vision. Officially, the new strategic plan will not launch until the 2016-2017 fiscal year; however, we spent time in the 2015-2016 year planning and preparing for what is to come. As we wind down the 2012-2016 strategic plan, we can’t help but be impressed by the work that has been accomplished. When we started working on the plan in 2011, we considered it to be ambitious and daunting, but we plugged away, year by year. Now that we can reflect on it, we can see not only the volume of the work accomplished, but the value of it as well.

Through developing leadership programs, we learned about leading ourselves. Through working with government on the CBO Sustainability Project, it has been front and centre how important communitybased organizations are in their communities. Through working on gaining efficiencies, creating new programs and implemented new technology at our recycling depots, we understood the deep roots of SARCAN in Saskatchewan. Like the Roughriders and Telemiracle, we are unique to Saskatchewan, and we embrace it. Whether you’re in a Member Agency, a depot or attending a professional development event, we are part of a strong and connected network. As the 2012-2016 strategic plan progressed, SARC and SARCAN Recycling became more visible with new branding, more sophisticated with new services and programs, and more efficient by reviewing what we do and how we do it. We did all this, and will continue to do so, to respect what we have built

together and keep it strong. In some ways, the SARC network feels like a family in the sense that we have the feeling of comfort and security developed from years of history mixed with the anticipation and excitement of what’s on the horizon, and how we will continue to work together to build our legacy into the future. That’s what our next cycle of strategic planning will be focused on: maturing and growing, while still taking the time to enjoy the incredible network we are all part of across Saskatchewan. Whether you’re in a Member Agency, attending a conference or working at depot - or even bringing your recycling to one you are part of something you will only find in Saskatchewan. Our Membership consists of 36 Regular Members, 39 Associate Members and 12 Affiliate Members - a grand total of 87 Members across the province! -Amy McNeil and Brian Haswell


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2015-2016 SARC Board of Directors

Brian Haswell South East Representative Cosmopolitan Learning Centre

Joe MacLeod North West Representative Columbian Industries

Cheryl Zander South East Representative Redvers Activity Centre

Esther Redden South West Representative West Central Abilities

Lionel Prefontaine SARC Board Tr e a s u r e r External Appointment

Jim Jensen North Manager Porcupine Opportunities Program, Inc.

Al Love Past President Canadian Deafblind Assoc. Sask. Chapter

Gwen Loewen North West Representative Menno Homes of Saskatchewan

Dawn Desautels South West Representative Cypress Hills Ability Centres

Lynne Demeule South Associate Representative Cheshire Homes of Regina

Murray Baird North East Representative Pine Industries/ PA C S C

Yvonne Nyholt North Associate Battlefords Residential Services, Inc.

Kim Edmunds South Manager Representative West Central Abilities

SARC Board Committees Executive Committee: • Al Love • Brian Haswell • Lionel Prefontaine • Murray Baird • Dawn Desautels

SARCAN Committee: • Murray Baird • Joe MacLeod • Kim Edmunds • Jim Jensen

Member Services: • Yvonne Nyholt • Dawn Desautels • Gwen Loewen • Esther Redden

Finance/Pension & Benefits: • Lionel Prefontaine • Lynne Demeule • Cheryl Zander


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SARC Annual Report 2015-2016

Leading by LEAPing SARC’s second year of the Leadership Excellence Advancement Program (LEAP) started in September 2015 with nearly 40 people from 20 organizations across Saskatchewan representing the disability services, child and family programs, and education sectors. With one group in Saskatoon and one in Regina, each met almost monthly throughout the year to participate in eight engaging and interactive sessions These sessions were filled with practical information, principles, best practices, and tips to give up and coming and current non-profit leaders the opportunity to increase leadership and management skills in an environment that fosters small group discussion, networking with peers, and continuous learning. New for this year was a partnership between SARC and the Ministry of the Economy to create an application form for the Canada-Saskatchewan Job Grant that would be specific to LEAP. Many organizations were approved for the grant, which covered two-thirds of the total training cost (more if considered a “small” employer). This funding support was very much appreciated. This arrangement will be continuing for the 2016-2017 LEAP year as well.

RIGHT: THE SASKATOON-BASED LEAP GROUP ATTENDS A SESSION ON RECRUITMENT AND RETENTION WITH SARC’S HR CONSULTANT


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SARC Annual Report 2015-2016

Feedback from LEAPers

LEAP Sessions: • How Managers Communicate and Lead • Recruitment and Retention • Fostering an Effective Team • Employee/Labour Relations Basics • Employee Accountability • Legislation Impacting the Employment Relationship • Governance • Public and Government Relations

Peer to Peer Learning LEAP is a great opportunity to learn not only from the session content but from each other as well

Networking The opportunity to network really added value and enriched the learning process; it was nice to hear that others were going through the same things and it didn’t matter where they were located or how big/small their organization was

Best Practices Each area gave awareness and opportunity to improve skills and develop better practices within the organization

Resources The Learner Handbooks are well put together – good content, well written, and a good reference


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SARC Annual Report 2015-2016

EmployLink Launched SARC created a network and website to link job seekers of all abilities to employment. In October 2015, SARC launched the EmployLink CBO network and website resources for job seekers and educators in conjunction with Disability Employment Awareness Month. The employer resources will be launched later in 2016, and we look forward to connecting employers to the growing EmployLink membership. CBOs can participate by becoming members of EmployLink. As members, they can: • Be connected to each other to share information across

the province • Have access to various learning and development opportunities (ex. Annette Borrows spoke to EmployLink members in March 2016 about “Reaching the CORE of Supported Employment”) • Receive a 10% discount for all registrations for SARC’s three supported employment one-day training events • Be listed on the EmployLink website so that job seekers, educators, and employers can easily access them for support.

RIGHT: JENNIFER LALONDE WORKS AT MARTODAM’S CLOTHING STORE IN MEADOW LAKE


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SARC Annual Report 2015-2016

EmployLink At a Glance For Job Seekers EmployLink has resources and information for job seekers of all abilities who wish to better prepare themselves for employment opportunities.

For Educators The website has custom-designed resources for educators who want to support students with disabilities to prepare for the transitioning from high school.

For Community Based Organizations EmployLink members are CBOs that support people of all abilities to become employed. Through the network, they can connect with other members across the province.

For Employers EmployLink helps employers that are looking for help so they can realize the benefits of creating more inclusive workforces in our communities.


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SARC Annual Report 2015-2016

Consultation Services Timely advice and support when our Members need it most.

Our human resources, labour relations, and facility planning consultation services saw an increase in the number of SARC Members accessing support from the previous year in addition to being involved in projects that were provincial in scope for the benefit of all Member Agencies. Our Members continue to express their appreciation for these services, which provide them with convenient access to expertise and advice to assist them in making informed decisions. While there will always be a need for additional resources at particular times (i.e., legal advice, involvement of engineer or architect), the time and cost savings for the sector through SARC’s consultation services are significant. This past year was another busy one for SARC’s staff providing one-on-one support to Members.


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SARC Annual Report 2015-2016

Human Resources

Labour Relations

SARC’s Human Resources Consultant assists SARC Members to establish HR best practices and recruitment and retention strategies by promoting the disability services sector as a career of choice. This includes attending many events and career fairs throughout the year.

SARC’s Labour Relations Consultant provides advice and support on personnel and labour relations issues to Member Agencies throughout the province.

In 2015-2016, most inquiries directed to our Human Resources Consultant were about:

• Interpretation of the new Saskatchewan Employment Act provisions • Providing consultation regarding workplace conflict/issues • Assisting through collective bargaining process

• • • • •

Compensation Interview questions Job descriptions Performance management Policies

In 2015-2016, the trends for support for SARC’s Labour Relations Consultant included:

Facility Planning

SARC’s Facility Planner assists our Members through the planning and implementation stages of renovations and new builds. This position also assists with longterm planning to ensure sustainability from a capital perspective. In 2015-2016, this position was busy with: • Assisting Members to create a 3-5 year capital plan • Single purpose inspections (such as assessing whether a furnace should be replaced or if a proposed addition is viable) • Assessing houses for purchase


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SARC Annual Report 2015-2016

CBO Sustainability Project Progress The CBO Sustainability Project was initiated in 2014-2015 as a multi-year plan aimed to create long-term sustainability, healthy growth, and effective service delivery for CBOs that deliver residential and day program services for individuals with intellectual disabilities and critical in-home support, residential, and counselling services for children in need of protection and their families. Deliverables were assigned to five task teams from the Ministry of Social Services, SARC, SARC Member Agencies, and CBOs funded by Child & Family Programs. In 2015-2016, the CBO Sustainability Project task teams were able to move through the “familiarization” stage of understanding the similarities and differences between the Community Living Service Delivery (CLSD) CBO sector and Child & Family Programs (CFP) CBO sector to drafting work in support of their assigned deliverables. Governance: • Examined best practices and information about key competencies of high-performing Boards; governance models; Board recruitment, assessment, and monitoring; and professional development • Forwarded information to other task teams to support them in their work (i.e., Quality Assurance) • Work of this group is nearing completion and awaiting approval Outcomes Based Service Delivery: • Identified the logic model

of how outcomes are achieved in order to better understand how to create a true outcome statement • Created initial drafts of outcome statements specific to CLSD Quality Assurance: • Compared current standards in place for CFP and CLSD CBOs, noting that there will be a need to have unique standards for each sector in particular areas • Identified how standards relate to outcomes to ensure work would not be contradictory to that of the Outcomes Based Service Delivery task team • Created initial drafts of standards statements Shared Services: • Created list of possible opportunities for CBOs to utilize “group buying power” and access services more efficiently • Created a decisionmaking matrix in order

to determine which opportunities may be viable and worth further exploration Started the process of applying the decisionmaking matrix to identified opportunities

Attraction, Retention, and Compensation: • Became operational in Fall 2015; was able to work until all task team work was put on hold from February-April 2016 due to the provincial election • Identified short-term and long-term deliverables related to CBO staffing complements, core standardized training, salary funding standards, and human resource management support strategies 2016-2017 should bring the opportunity for CBO engagement, and SARC looks forward to seeing the draft work vetted by our Members.


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SARC Annual Report 2015-2016

Safety Leadership and Partnerships The growth and development of safety leadership at SARC and its Members continued to be a top priority in 2015-2016 SARC held its Safety Symposium in November 2015 at the Regina Travelodge Hotel and hosted 75 people from across the province. Attendees were able to choose four sessions to attend from 13 concurrent sessions as well as opening and closing keynote addresses. Sessions appealed to all levels of workers and managers in community-based organizations and included information on mental health and addictions in the workplace, safe lifting, violence in the workplace, an update on the new Saskatchewan Legislation, working alone, and distracted driving. There were also several exhibitor booths that featured products, services, and resources for safety at work and at home. Throughout the year, SARC’s certified PART and TLR Instructor held train-the-trainer and recertification sessions resulting in six new PART trainers, five recertified PART trainers, 25 new TLR trainers, and 12 recertified TLR trainers. In addition, SARC’s Instructor directly trained 32 employees at Member Agencies

across the province. In growing our own safety leadership, SARC has appreciated the support and partnerships with various safety organizations and associations. We were very pleased to be asked by the Service and Hospitality Safety Association of Saskatchewan (SHSA) to have a SARC representative serve on their Board of Directors; our Facilitator of Training & Education, who is also the Employee Co-Chair of SARC’s Occupational Health & Safety Committee, joined the SHSA Board in March 2016. We are very proud to be part of an organization that helps build leaders with safety as a core value who are equipped, empowered, and motivated to make change. SARC believes that a culture of safety-consciousness not only contributes to an organization’s risk management program but more importantly values everyone involved in the organization – employees, volunteers, and people receiving services.

ABOVE LEFT: COLLEEN COURTNEY POSES WITH HER SAFETY PLEDGE - CONFERENCE ATTENDEES WERE ASKED WHY A COMMITMENT TO SAFETY WAS IMPORTANT TO THEM


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SARC Annual Report 2015-2016

Year in Review: Training People and Places Throughout the province, 28 events took place last year including workshops, conferences, sessions and our second safety symposium.

Record Amount of Spots Filled 1,012 people registered for professional development events, including 39 people taking the year-long Leadership Excellence Advancement Program (LEAP).

More Organizations Than Ever Before 109 different community based organizations signed up for training in the last year, ten more than the previous year.

Increased Conference Attendance Over 400 people registered to attend SARC’s 2015 Spring Conference, Fall Conference and Safety Symposium.

In 2014-2015, SARC saw an increase in participation by communitybased organizations outside of the disability services sector. CBOs from sectors such as Child & Family Programs and Education took part in training events, including the Leadership Excellence Advancement Program (LEAP), and applied for SARC Affiliate Membership to join our network and access training at SARC Member rates.


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SARC Annual Report 2015-2016

Pension, Benefits and Insurance SARC operates group plans for Community-based Organizations and SARCAN Recycling SARC administers two Group Benefit plans on behalf of 68 community based organizations with 43 SARC Members and 25 other community-based organizations as well as a third Benefit Plan for SARCAN Recycling employees. SARC also administers a multi-employer defined contribution Pension Plan, for both SARC Member agencies and other Social Services funded agencies. For the year ending March 31, 2016 the Balanced Fund, which holds the majority of the participant funds, held its value with a 1.1% return after a 12.5% return the year before. SARC maintains an insurance program, for the benefit of SARC

Members, that was developed to meet the unique and diversified needs of communitybased organizations in Saskatchewan and includes a variety of coverages that could otherwise be difficult to obtain independently. Coverages include (but are not limited to): • Abuse Liability Coverage • Dispensing of Medication Coverage • Residential Health Care Facility Coverage (which covers food, beverages, medication, medical supplies and medical appliances) • Directors and Officers Liability • Property and General Liability.

SARC’S PENSION, BENEFITS AND INSURANCE PROGRAMS APPEAL TO A WIDE RANGE OF GROUPS IN SASKATCHEWAN

68

CBOs use SARC’s benefit programs covering over 2,000 people in Saskatchewan

4,100

Pension plan members spanning 111 divisions and 35 CBOs that are not SARC Members

$71 Million

The total assets of pension plan members. The Balanced Fund holds the majority of funds

42

Organizations participate in SARC’s unique insurance coverage


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SARC Annual Report 2015-2016

SARCAN Recycling Year in Review SARCAN Recycling is a socially responsible and environmentally progressive recycling system which helps foster the sustainable development of communities across Saskatchewan. Since 1988, our team of dedicated recyclers succeeds in providing a progressive and sustainable recycling system for beverage containers, paint and electronics for the people of Saskatchewan. SARCAN Recycling is a values-based organization, and it shows in everything that we do. In the 2015-2016 year, SARCAN undertook a revitalization of our “Three E’s” mandate to make the language more relevant to our work. Our refreshed mandate is Social Responsibility, Environmental Sustainability and Community Building, with a core set of values that helps define each of our pillars.

RUSS SHEPPARD (PICTURED ABOVE) HAS BEEN WORKING AT THE ROSTHERN SARCAN DEPOT FOR OVER 25 YEARS, HE WAS AMONGST THE FIRST EMPLOYEES TO START AT SARCAN IN 1988


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SARC Annual Report 2015-2016

We Value Social Responsibility We are a team made up of people of all abilities in communities across Saskatchewan SARCAN Recycling is made up of more than 600 employees, at 72 depots, two processing plants, and one central office. Our teams represents the diversity of Saskatchewan, including people of all abilities and many different backgrounds. This past year, we were very proud to add a brand new depot, with a six-member team of recyclers, in the community of Buffalo Narrows. This new depot is the 64th Saskatchewan community

the development of safe work spaces and prevent injuries from occurring. As a result of our efforts, including a systemwide training session on safe work practices, we experienced a 77% reduction last year in work days lost due to injury. We are continuously improving our facilities to create more safe, open, and efficient work spaces, which this year included expanding our Regina Processing Plant, and relocating our Indian Head, Regina- Victoria East, Strasbourg, and Watson depots. This year SARCAN also began a comprehensive review of all of our policies and procedures, with intent of further promoting safety at all levels. We strive to create a customer experience that treats all customers across Saskatchewan fairly and equally

with a SARCAN depot, and its presence will ensure better recycling services in the north. We are committed to the creation and preservation of safe work spaces SARCAN Recycling is focused on continuously monitoring our work practices to foster

Customer service is the most important facet of our business, and we continually make strides to improve our customer service and standardize the customer experience across the province. In addition to our annual secret shopper program which tests the levels of service

provided by depots, the entire depot system participated in customer service training this past year. The phased-in installation of our new Point of Sale (POS) terminals is streamlining the cash payment process, helping to reduce errors in payouts and increase the transparency. Our successes are measured not just by our current customers, but also by enhancing our services to attract the recyclables not making it to our depots. Our new Drop n Go system is being rolled out across Saskatchewan over the next two years, and is designed to provide an option to the non-SARCAN customer who is unwilling to wait in line for their deposit refund. By the end of last year, Drop n Go systems were in place at 18 depots, with another 24 scheduled for installation in 2016-2017.


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SARC Annual Report 2015-2016

We Value Environmental Sustainability We help Saskatchewan residents reduce waste, conserve resources, and reduce pollution through recycling.

1

2

3

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Landfill Diversion This past year, SARCAN helped divert 47,920,154 pounds of materials from our landfills, preserving valuable resources for remanufacturing and new products.

Reuse and Recycle Along with our recycling efforts, we actively encourage the reuse of materials destined for recycling, including SARCAN’s popular glass bottle initiative and paint reuse program.

Energy Conservation SARCAN’s recycling and reuse efforts conserve 749,126 BTUs of energy each year, enough energy savings to power 6,809 homes for a year - the equivalent size of Moose Jaw!

Greenhouse Gases Our work over the past year helped prevent the emission of 49,079 metric tonnes of greenhouse gases, the equivalent of taking 10,332 cars off the road per year.

ABOVE: MS. BEGG’S GRADE 3-4 CLASS AT WESTMOUNT SCHOOL SPORT THEIR NEW SARCAN SHADES - A PRIZE FROM THE 25 ACTS OF CONSERVATION CONTEST


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SARC Annual Report 2015-2016

We strive for continuous improvement in our environmental performance. As a leader in environmental protection in Saskatchewan, we recognize the need to continuously lower our impact on the environment. We are actively reducing our energy usage, including switching to more energy efficient buildings and phasing in electric forklifts in place of propane models. These efforts helped us to achieve a 13% reduction in natural gas and 2% reduction in electricity consumption over the previously year. SARCAN is also lowering its emissions and fuel consumption through better beverage container compaction equipment and improved trailer loading techniques. As a result, SARCAN’s greenhouse gas emissions reduced 2.3% from last year, and have lowered 12.6% over the past 4 years. As a leader in waste diversion, SARCAN is also addressing the volume of waste we send to landfill. This year saw our depots and processing plants begin recycling streams for beverage container caps and our internal clear plastic bags and film.

We seek to educate Saskatchewan on the importance of recycling. As a leading authority on the field of recycling in 64 communities, SARCAN annually hosts over 60 tours of depots and plants for schools and community groups. Our resources for teachers include our depot tours, a video walkthrough of the recycling process, and lesson plans on recycling. We have forged partnerships in the education sector with the Saskatchewan Environmental Society and Student Action for Sustainable Future to encourage teachers throughout Saskatchewan to include recycling as an important part of their teachings. SARCAN also continues to educate the public through our membership in Recycle Saskatchewan and through our support for the Saskatchewan Waste Reduction Council.


SARC Annual Report 2015-2016

7

million lbs

8

million lbs

aluminum

plastic

254

thousand lbs

23

million lbs

1

million lbs

1

million lbs

6

million lbs

616

thousand lbs

sustainablil

at SARCAN

tin

glass

CONSUMER

cartons

paint

electronics

cardboard

LANDFILL


lty

N

SARC Annual Report 2015-2016

2.3% decrease in GHG emissions in the last year

98.1% of all material that comes through the door is recycled

458,080 (1.9%)

50,082,654 (98.1%)

6% increase in hauling weight over the last six years

749,126 BTUs of energy conserved each year

49,079 metric tonnes of CO2 emissions avoided

49% of SARCAN’s waste is diverted from landfills


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SARC Annual Report 2015-2016

We Value Community Building We are proud to help build our communities by investing in Saskatchewan SARCAN is a Saskatchewan success story because our organization shares in our province’s spirit of collaboration and loyalty. Our focus on sourcing Saskatchewan partners, contractors, and suppliers means that the majority of SARCAN’s annual operating budget is invested in Saskatchewan. By favouring Saskatchewan business and local solutions, 49% of the materials SARCAN collects are broken down and recycled right within Saskatchewan. For example, Potters Industries in Moose Jaw uses SARCAN’s clear glass to create glass beads that are used in highway paint Saskatchewan. Working to build Saskatchewan’s economy and

keep our province a great place to live goes hand in hand with the long-term success of SARCAN. We foster the development of Saskatchewan communities through philanthropy SARCAN gives back to Saskatchewan in some very impressive ways. Once again, we were proud to support Telemiracle and their efforts to provide special needs equipment and improve access to medical treatment across the province. This year, SARCAN staff from across the province raised $52,669.83 for Telemiracle, the most we have raised in a single year to date. Beyond Telemiracle, our depots are connected to local charities and fundraising effort, improving the lives of people in all SARCAN communities.

RIGHT: THE BROADWAY AVENUE DEPOT IN SASKATOON RAISED A RECORDBREAKING $6,700 FOR TELEMIRACLE 2016


SARC Annual Report 2015-2016

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SARC Annual Report 2015-2016

SARC Financial Highlights One of SARC’s strategic goals is to ensure a sustainable future and that requires responsible financial planning and spending across all divisions. For SARC, the focus for achieving sustainability is on the diversification of our revenue sources. This is being achieved through the expansion of training programs and resource materials that are offered and was reflected during the year with a 50% increase in training and resource revenues – 2016 saw the second year of LEAP which had increased enrolment.

SARC’s operational grant funding remained relatively similar to prior year, while project grants increased as a result of PTC. SETI grants and project funding were a consistent level with prior year. SARC Bark was wound down in September 2016, and the reported results reflect those final costs. Our overall expenses were managed to stay in line with our incoming revenues.

LEFT: THE 2015 AL MCGUIRE RECIPIENTS POSE AT THE SARC FALL CONFERENCE: PATRICK FLAMAN, NOAH GMEINWESER, SHERRI LUMBIS AND JENNIFER WEIBE


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SARC Annual Report 2015-2016

SARCAN Financial Highlights SARCAN Recycling had a record-breaking year with 420.8 million containers returned, the highest number ever. Return rates remain strong at 82.1% overall.

Throughout the year, there were seven months where containers collected were record-high. Sustainability has been a focus the last number of years, and this is being achieved by controlling costs system-wide. 2015-2016 saw an increase in expenses of 4.9%. While higher than increased revenues, this expense still falls in line with increased containers. The total cost per legislated container was 6.9¢ per container versus

6.8¢ per container the previous year. Salvage revenue was down $1.3M in spite of increased volumes and the US exchange rate – this was a result of the decreased prices realized in the salvage markets. Out of our net income of $3.3M, $0.8M was paid out to system stakeholders and a significant amount invested in capital improvement projects, including an expansion to our Regina processing plant and a new point of sale

system. In the nonlegislated program, the decrease in revenue and expenses was due to the disassembly ending in 2015 – as the disassembly operated at a loss in prior year, this had a positive effect on our net income. UDRS is in the process of winding down as a result of milk containers becoming part of the multimaterial stream, with full operations ceasing June 30, 2016. The net income in UDRS is restricted to that program and not for general use.

LEFT: JASON REDING FROM THE WAKAW SARCAN DEPOT POSES WITH A VERY RARE CONTAINER RECEIVED AT THE DEPOT - A MOUNTAIN DEW BOTTLE FROM 1964


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SARC Annual Report 2015-2016

SARC Financial Statements

SARC’s operations encompass a variety of services and activities, including member activity, training and resources, consultants (Human Resources, Labour Relations, and Facility Planner), Administration and Projects [Supported Employment Transition Initiative (SETI) and Provincial Training Committee (PTC)]. Year ended March 31 (in $000s):

2016

2015

% change

Revenues

$2,227

$2,005

+11.1%

Grants - Operation

779

761

+2.4%

Grants - Projects

664

565

+17.5%

Training and Resources

449

300

+49.7%

Other

335

379

-11.6%

$2,217

$2,171

+2.1%

Member Association Activity

230

225

+2.2%

Training and Resources

462

440

+5.0%

Consultants

417

439

-5.2%

Projects (SETI and PTC)

664

565

+17.7%

Administration

294

313

-6.1%

Amortization

99

100

-1.0%

SARC Bark (net of gross profit)

51

89

-42.7%

$10

($166)

+106.0%

Expenses

Net Profit (loss)

A copy of our audited financial statements are available upon request


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SARC Annual Report 2015-2016

SARCAN Financial Statements

SARCAN’s operations are divided into 3 main Programs – legislated, which is the collection and recycling of beverage containers and is legislated by the Ministry of Environment, non-legislated which includes used paint and end-of-life electronics, and Unified Dairy Recycling System (UDRS) which includes milk containers (jugs and cartons). Legislated program (beverage containers) Year ended March 31 (in $000s): Revenues Expenses Net Income # of Containers Returned

2016

2015

% change

$33,788

$33,485

+0.9%

$30,452

$29,042

+4.9%

$3,336

$4,443

-24.9%

420.8 million

405.6 million

+3.7%

Non-legislated program (used paint, end-of-life electronics) Year ended March 31 (in $000s): Revenues Expenses Net Income Lbs of Material Collected

2016

2015

% change

$1,388

$1,709

-18.8%

$986

$1,614

-38.9%

$402

$95

+323.2%

7,030,814

7,802,543

-9.9%

2016

2015

% change

$404

$571

-29.2%

$281

$308

-8.8%

$123

$263

-53.2%

620,457

634,733

-2.2%

Unified Dairy Recycling System (milk containers) Year ended March 31 (in $000s): Revenues Expenses Net Income Lbs of Material Collected


Thank you!


SARC/SARCAN Recycling Annual Report 2015-2016