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2020 - 2021

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T H

A N N I V E R S A R Y

S E A S O N


THE ARTS

IMAGE: TIM JAEGER

GULFCOASTCF.ORG/25


30 T H A N N I V E R S A R Y S E A S O N 2020 – 2021

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THE SARASOTA BALLET’S

2020 - 2021 SEASON

DIGITAL PROGRAM 1 23 - 27 OCTOBER 2020 Featuring extracts from the choreographic works of Sir Frederick Ashton

DIGITAL PROGRAM 2 20 - 24 NOVEMBER 2020 Featuring extracts from the choreographic works of George Balanchine

REFRACTIONS | PROGRAM 4 26 FEBRUARY - 1 MARCH 2021

DIGITAL PROGRAM 3 18 - 22 DECEMBER 2020 Featuring extracts from the ballets of various choreographers

SERENDIPITOUS MOVEMENT | PROGRAM 5 26 - 27 MARCH 2021

Peter Darrell's OTHELLO

George Balanchine's SERENADE

Will Tuckett's CHANGING LIGHT

Mark Morris' THE LETTER V

George Balanchine's DONIZETTI VARIATIONS

Sir Kenneth MacMillan's ELITE SYNCOPATIONS

MARK MORRIS | PROGRAM 6 9 - 10 APRIL 2021

HEROINES | PROGRAM 7 30 APRIL - 1 MAY 2021

"Morris, revered by dance fans as today's most musical

Dame Ninette de Valois' CHECKMATE

choreographer, creates precise yet languid movement

Agnes de Mille's FALL RIVER LEGEND

and pleasing patterns that flow..."

Bronislava Nijinska's LES BICHES

- The San Francisco Examiner Front Cover Photography By Matthew Holler | Katelyn May and Ricardo Rhodes 1


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PHOTO © FRANk ATURA

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IAIN WEBB DIREC TOR

On behalf of everyone at The Sarasota Ballet, I would like to welcome you to our 30th Anniversary Season. While this certainly is not how we had envisioned celebrating this important milestone, we are excited to bring you this innovative Season filled with beautiful ballets. Anniversary Seasons are a perfect opportunity to take stock of where we came from, where we are today, and where we will be in the future. While the world outside may seem more than a little chaotic, we must remind ourselves of all that has come before, all the trials that we have overcome, and indeed, grown from. This pandemic is no different, and through the extraordinary support and generosity we have received, alongside the hard work and determination of our staff and dancers, we will come out the other side stronger than ever before. Across the world, the performing arts are in danger, which makes what we have all achieved together these past months all the more remarkable. The outpouring of support, from the thousands of ticket donations through to the amazing financial support of our Emergency Fund, allowed us to continue through the first months of this pandemic in a way we did not think possible. Through your generosity we were able to financially support all our dancers through to the end of their contracts last Season, and with the additional help of an incredible annoymous donor, we were able to continue this support from the start of this Season as well. Additionally we’ve been able to provide free virtual classes for hundreds of our students, and in July provide a safe environment for over 50 students from across the United States to learn from our talented faculty at our International Intensive. For this, and for so much more, I want to personally thank each and every person who has supported us through these extraordinary times. Looking back over the past 3 decades, there is so much to celebrate and so many important individuals to recognize and thank. However, there are three particular people who we all owe a great deal to, for without them, The Sarasota Ballet would not be here today. They are of course, Jean Weidner Goldstein – our Founder, Eddy Toussaint – the Company’s first Director, and Robert de Warren – who stewarded The Sarasota Ballet for 13 Seasons. While this Company has changed a great deal throughout the years, the one thing that has always remained consistent is our passion for dance and our astonishing community. I greatly look forward to sharing this season with you all, it has been an honor working alongside the entire Company to bring our 30th Anniversary Season to life during this unprecedented time. Together with all the dancers and staff, we want to take this moment to thank the extraordinary Joseph Volpe and Margaret Barbieri for their incredible support and work in guiding us back onto the stage. Together we are strong, 30 years strong in fact. And united, we will ensure that The Sarasota Ballet continues to dance, now and forever.

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YO U R D R E A M S A R E O U R I N S P I R AT I O N

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JOSEPH VOLPE EXECUTIVE DIREC TOR

Due to Covid-19, The Sarasota Ballet’s 30th Season looks very different than what was planned. However, there are many things to be thankful for. At the end of last Season, there was a true coming together of our Trustees, staff, donors, patrons, students, and company dancers. We launched the Emergency Fund which created a way for us to support our dancers through the end of the 20192020 Season. It is because of the tremendous support of all our donors that the Ballet can continue dancing into this season. With the ever-changing guidelines from local, state, and national health officials, we have put our primary focus on the safety of our dancers, staff, and patrons. We have moved to a virtual format for our first three productions. Making this decision was not easy or simple. Director Iain Webb had to completely re-structure the first three Programs. Therefore, all the contractual and artistic planning had to be revised to make digital and streaming content possible. Our Staff has pursued new technologies and new ways to problem solve. Seeing everyone working together as a team has been truly inspiring. Last Season our Trustees, staff, and executive leadership worked together on a new 3-year strategic plan that will allow the entire organization to achieve new heights. From exciting artistic endeavors, through the expansion of our education programming, to increased community involvement, being a part of The Sarasota Ballet family is more rewarding than ever. The Sarasota Ballet strives to be a cornerstone of the Sarasota community. There are so many people to thank: Chair Dick Johnson, Vice Chair Patricia Golemme, and President Frank Martucci. They have been incredible leaders on our board and in this community. Our many committee chairs have provided advice and stewardship throughout these last many months. I expect great things from our new advisory council, and their involvement will help the organization to succeed in the future. Lastly, in times such as these, it is important to tell each and every one of you how much your support means to The Sarasota Ballet. While this Season is not what any of us envisioned, we have forged ahead and laid the groundwork for an incredible year. We look forward to sharing our Season – and our vision for the future – with all of you.

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Season THE OBSERVER’S GUIDE TO THE ARTS AND SOCIETY

We all know things will look a little differently this season, but don’t worry, we’re here to help make the best of it. See which events are virtual or in person, and get tips on how to enjoy them to their fullest — even if it is in the comfort of your home. Plus, get cocktail recipes, takeout options and the 411 on the philanthropy scene. It’s everything you need to support your favorite local organizations at a distance.

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Read Now


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MARGARET BARBIERI A S S I S TA N T D I R E C T O R

How wonderful it has been to be back in the studio, with our dancers rehearsing and performing in the Digital Programs. They are all amazingly dedicated, and we have been very careful to work them back slowly upon their return to the studio, practicing social distancing in classes and in rehearsals. Never could we have expected such an enormous change to our 30th Anniversary Season, and the necessary adjustments to our rehearsal and performance procedures have been a significant undertaking; nevertheless, we all maintain a passionate determination to create another beautiful year of ballet. The career of a ballet dancer can often be a preciously fleeting thing. In the best of circumstances, a couple decades on stage might transition naturally to a career of coaching the next generation of dancers, crafting new choreographic endeavors, or preserving ballet history through administration and academia. I address this because, given the tumultuous nature of these recent months, the loss of a year to a dancer can be catastrophic. With that in mind, the sheer resilience our dancers are demonstrating during this interlude never ceases to impress me. Their tenacity through these arduous times makes their commitment ever apparent, and their eagerness to return to the stage is evidenced in their summer activities – whether adhering to stringent self-administered training regimens, or exploring more personal physical and creative outlets. Our Company dancers have shown that they are collectively determined to endure this crisis. On a related note, Iain and I are so proud of how readily our dancers have engaged with the challenges of performing for our Digital Fall Season. Ballet performed to an audience of cameras can take on a vastly different feel as a dancer, compared to doing so in front of hundreds, even thousands, of live audience members, dynamically reacting to every subtle gesture in real time. The recording process also requires certain technical adjustments and modified lighting, all of which can be jarring to a dancer unconditioned to performing in such an environment. I also wish to recognize and thank our production and technical staff, who have worked tirelessly and diligently to ensure our Digital Fall Season truly represents the beauty of the art form. Now that our 30th Anniversary Season is underway, we are all adjusting to safer rehearsal practices while preserving the artistry of the medium. It may still feel vaguely unorthodox rehearsing with social distancing protocol in mind, but the Company has adhered to the necessities of the present day without hesitation, and with their fellow dancers’ utmost well-being in mind. After all, they are simply too aware of the importance of adaptation and agility to seize every moment, as time is all too finite.

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RICHARD JOHNSON BOARD CHAIR

As Board Chair, I wish you a warm welcome to The Sarasota Ballet’s 30th Anniversary Season. In this challenging time, the Board and I are so appreciative of the exceptional support our community has provided to the Ballet. I am enormously proud with how the Ballet and its leadership have responded to the crisis. The Company has done a terrific job of taking care of its dancers throughout this time, and I believe has set an industry example across the world. Iain, Joseph, and Margaret have shown great integrity and courage during this time and have guided the company with grace and vigor. The innovation and ingenuity of our leaders are a testament to their years of experience, and the reason I have such confidence in the Company’s ability to not only endure, but to prosper. Speaking of prosperity, I am consistently reassured in the future of this Company. Not only do we have three remarkable directors, but we also have a very gifted and engaged Board of Trustees. Last year we created a new officer position, The President of the Board of Trustees. The purpose of this role was to strengthen communication between the Ballet and the Board. I am most pleased that fellow Trustee, Frank Martucci accepted this additional responsibility. With our Vice Chair Patricia Golemme, we look forward to working with Frank in his new capacity. I believe, together, we the Trustees will foster an ever-greater future for The Sarasota Ballet. Another important addition to the company is our newly founded Advisory Council, a group of individuals who are both a part of the Sarasota community and also passionate about The Sarasota Ballet. We believe that the talents, skills, and networks of these council members will enhance our leadership structure and help us reach further into the community. I would like to thank Ginger Cannon Bailey for chairing this committee, and at the same time, express my appreciation to all of our committee chairs for their leadership and commitment. As we look to the future, we are excited about the direction laid out by our 2020 Strategic Plan which was approved by the Board of Trustees last March. This new Strategic Plan focuses on four key areas over the next three years: artistic expansion, education and community programs, and audience development. I would like to thank and recognize Sara Robinson, our Chief Advancement Officer, for all her detailed work with the 2020 Strategic Plan. This is an exciting moment to be a part of The Sarasota Ballet. Even in these uncertain times, know that The Sarasota Ballet is better, stronger, and more committed to this community than ever before. Finally, I want to personally thank Iain, Joseph, Margaret, and my fellow Trustees for their support of me as Chair of the Board.

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JEAN WEIDNER GOLDSTEIN FOUNDER & CHAIR EMERITUS

For a performing arts organization to mark its 30th anniversary is a marvelous achievement; for one to reach the artistic heights that The Sarasota Ballet has in the last 13 years alone, is a true rarity. Although my dream was to build a European-style Company with an eclectic repertoire that would challenge both artists and audiences, I never imagined that the Company I founded and managed from my kitchen with a few close friends, could turn into one of America’s internationally recognized ballet companies under the inspired leadership of the Artistic Director, Iain Webb and his life partner and Assistant Director, Margaret Barbieri. From national tours to some of the most renowned dance venues in the United States and to glowing reviews in prestigious publications across the world, The Sarasota Ballet has accomplished feats and attained a reputation deserving of immense pride. With that in mind, I want to take this moment to recognize and thank the many hundreds of people who brought us to this moment. From my home, to our modest offices and studio at the Sarasota Mall, and onward to our arrival at the FSU Center for the Performing Arts, The Sarasota Ballet grew through the efforts and contributions of our myriad of donors, dancers, staff members, and volunteers. To individually thank every person would take an entire book of its own, but I wish to recognize early Artistic Directors Eddy Toussaint and Robert de Warren for their passionate stewardship of The Sarasota Ballet during its formative years. The artistic contributions of both generated the foundation on which The Sarasota Ballet could mount the Company’s meteoric trajectory under Director Iain Webb, and his brilliant artistic and management team. In addition, I want to celebrate two very special members of The Sarasota Ballet family who have been with the Company since its inception: Pavel Fomin, revered Russian Pedagogue and Ballet Master, and Barbara Epperson, Administrative Assistant and Board Liaison. They continue to play a vital role within The Sarasota Ballet and are treasured and dear friends. A shout out to our dynamic Company Executive Director, Joseph Volpe, formerly of the Metropolitan Opera House, who lends amazing support to Iain and Margaret’s artistic vision. With the addition of Sara Robinson, Chief Advancement Officer, the Ballet now has an extraordinary leadership team taking their management, production, marketing, and artistic personnel to new heights. To see this thirty-year amalgamation of knowledge, passion, and raw energy manifest as today’s incarnation of The Sarasota Ballet brings me boundless joy. Season after Season, Director Iain Webb has arranged diverse programming that challenges dancers as much as it dazzles audiences; to see the Company tackle this repertoire with such aplomb and artistic interpretation speaks volumes to the quality and dedication of everyone involved. I eagerly look forward to what the Company is destined to achieve, this 30th Anniversary Season and beyond.

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THE SARASOTA BALLET THANKS THOSE WHO HAVE GIVEN SO MAGNANIMOUSLY OVER THE LAST 30 YEARS

Our Special Angel Amicus Foundation Charles & Margery Barancik Foundation Community Foundation of Sarasota County Kay Delaney and Murray Bring Norbert and Ann Winslow Donelly Friends of The Sarasota Ballet Alfred and Ann Goldstein Foundation Jerome* and Sydney Goldstein Jean Weidner Goldstein Patricia Golemme and Timothy Fullum Gulf Coast Community Foundation Jim and Harley Hanrahan

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Julie A. Harris Huisking Family Fund of the Community Foundation of Sarasota County Elaine Keating and Dr. Sidney Katz Pat and Ann Kenny Ernie and Alisa* Kretzmer Harry Leopold and Audrey Robbins Harold* Libby and Wanda Rayle-Libby Frank and Katherine Martucci Muriel O'Neil Fund at the Community Foundation of Sarasota County Mercedita OConnor Roy Palmer*

Rubin Charitable Foundation Tourist Development Council of Sarasota County William G. and Marie Selby Foundation Bud and Betty Shapiro Shubert Foundation, Inc. Renee Silverstein* Hillary Steele Paul and Sharon Steinwachs Marcia Jean Taub and Peter Swain Ethel and Ron Taub* Jean Weiller Anonymous

* Deceased


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JEAN WEIDNER GOLDSTEIN Founder & Director 1993-1994

Former Principal with Stuttgart Ballet and former Artistic Director of Evansville Dance Theatre, Jean Weidner Goldstein founded The Sarasota Ballet in 1987 with the goal of becoming a full resident ballet company, which was achieved in 1990 with the appointment of the Company’s first Director, Eddy Toussaint. During the period of 1993-1994 she guided the Company as Interim Director until the appointment of Robert de Warren in 1994. Jean continues to offer her support and love to Director Iain Webb, who was appointed as third Director in 2007.

EDDY TOUSSAINT Director 1990-1993

In 1990 Jean Weidner Goldstein and the Board of Directors appointed the first Director of The Sarasota Ballet, Eddy Toussaint. Toussaint relocated with dancers from his company, Ballet De Montreal Eddy Toussaint, to form the nucleus of The Sarasota Ballet. Additionally, he oversaw the first class of Dance – The Next Generation, The Sarasota Ballet's fully scholarshipped drop-out prevention program. As The Sarasota Ballet celebrates our 30th Anniversary Season, we thank and recognize Eddy Toussaint for the passion and artistry he instilled during his tenure.

ROBERT DE WARREN Director 1994-2007

Robert de Warren, former director of Northern Ballet and Ballet at Teatro alla Scala Milan, took on the mantle of Artistic Director in 1994. During his 13 years with the Company, de Warren created 24 ballets on the The Sarasota Ballet, including works such as Madam Butterfly and Last Call: The Dance. Additionally, de Warren brought in ballets by other choreographers, as well as commissioning new works from artists such as Jim Buckley and Pavel Fomin. As The Sarasota Ballet celebrates our 30th Anniversary Season, we thank and recognize Robert de Warren for his leadership and creativity throughout his tenure.

BOARD CHAIRS 1990-Present

Bette Seigerman Patrick Donovan Edward Cheek Jeffery Giordano Richard Angelotti Christine Jennings Richard Trumpler

Joel Freedman David Berger William Jacobs Tana Sandefur Marianne Siegel Charles Knowles Jerry Chip

Sydney Goldstein Ronald Ciaravella Chris Pfahler Hillary Steele Richard Johnson

As The Sarasota Ballet celebrates our 30th Anniversary Season, we want to thank and recognize every board member and board chair that has served over the past 30 years. 15


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T H E S A R A S O TA B A L L E T ’ S

REPERTOIRE Sir Frederick Ashton Apparitions, Birthday Offering, La Chatte métamorphosée en femme, The Dream, Enigma Variations, Façade, La Fille mal gardée, Illuminations, Jazz Calendar, Marguerite and Armand, Meditation from Thaïs, Monotones I, Monotones II, Les Patineurs, Les Rendezvous, Rhapsody, Romeo & Juliet Balcony Pas de Deux, Scènes de ballet, Sinfonietta, The Sleeping Beauty Awakening Pas de Deux and Vision Solo, Symphonic Variations, Tweedledum and Tweedledee, The Two Pigeons, Valses nobles et sentimentales, Varii Capricci, Voices of Spring Pas de Deux, The Walk to the Paradise Garden, A Wedding Bouquet

August Bournonville Flower Festival in Genzano Pas de Deux, The Jockey Dance, The Kermesse in Bruges Act I Pas de Deux, William Tell Pas de Deux

George Balanchine Allegro Brillante, Apollo, Bugaku, Divertimento No. 15, Donizetti Variations, The Four Temperaments, Jewels (Emeralds, Rubies, & Diamonds), Prodigal Son, Serenade, Stars and Stripes, Tarantella, Theme and Variations, Valse-Fantaisie, Western Symphony, Who Cares?

Dame Ninette de Valois Checkmate, The Rake’s Progress

David Bintley Four Scottish Dances, ‘Still Life’ at the Penguin Café Sir Matthew Bourne Boutique, The Infernal Galop

Christopher Bruce Sergeant Early’s Dream James Buckley Anne Frank John Cranko Pineapple Poll Peter Darrell Othello Agnes de Mille Rodeo

Robert de Warren The Nutcracker [production] Flemming Flindt The Lesson Michel Fokine Les Sylphides, Petrushka Marcelo Gomes Dear Life... Martha Graham Appalachian Spring


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2007-2020 Matthew Hart Cry Baby Kreisler, John Ringling’s Circus Nutcracker, Tchaikovsky’s Ballet Fantasy Johan Kobborg Napoli Act III (after Bournonville), Salute Joe Layton The Grand Tour Sir Kenneth MacMillan Concerto, Elite Syncopations, Las Hermanas, Summer Pas de Deux Vaslav Nijinsky L’Après-midi d’un Faune (The Afternoon of a Faun) Robert North Troy Game Rudolf Nureyev Raymonda Act III Renato Paroni Rococo Variations Anna Pavlova The Dragonfly Solo Marius Petipa La Bayadère Pas de Trois - Pas de Deux - Coda - Finale, The Black Swan Pas de Deux, Bronze Idol from La Bayadère, Le Corsaire Pas de Trois, Diana and Actaeon Pas de Deux, Don Quixote Pas de Deux, Harlequinade Solo Yuri Possokhov Firebird

André Prokovsky Anna Karenina, Vespri Jerome Robbins The Concert, Fancy Free Galina Samsova Paquita [production] Peter Schaufuss La Sylphide pas de deux [production] Paul Taylor Airs, Brandenburgs, Company B Twyla Tharp In The Upper Room, Nine Sinatra Songs Will Tuckett Changing Light, Lux Aeterna, The Secret Garden, Spielende Kinder Antony Tudor Continuo, Gala Performance, The Leaves are Fading, Lilac Garden Vasily Vainonen Flames of Paris Pas de Deux Hans van Manen Grosse Fuge Dominic Walsh Bello, Camille Claudel La Valse Pas de Deux, Clair de Lune, Dying Swan, I Napoletani, Time Out of Line, The Trilogy: Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, Wolfgang for Webb Christopher Wheeldon The American, Prokofiev Pas de Deux, There Where She Loved Sir Peter Wright Giselle [production], The Mirror Walkers, Summertide

RESIDENT CHOREOGRAPHER Ricardo Graziano Amorosa, Before Night Falls, En Las Calles de Murcia, In a State of Weightlessness, The Jolly Overture, Pomp and Circumstance, Shostakovich Suite, Somewhere Pas de Deux, Sonata in Four Movements, Symphony of Sorrows, Valsinhas COMPANY CHOREOGRAPHY Ricki Bertoni Hip 2 Be Square, Ragtop George Birkadze Farandole Jamie Carter À Deux Mains, Addio ad un Sogno, Concordium, Five Duets (Between Longing and Yearning), Holiday Overture, The Tarot Meg Egington Cézanne’s Doubt Pavel Fomin Hommage à Chopin, Paquita [production] Alex Harrison The Blue Hour Kate Honea Baroque and Blues, Gitana Galop, Headlines, Percolator Logan Learned Nebulous, Scene de Ballet Octavio Martin On The Outside, Orpheus and Eurydice David Tlaiye Xibalba Kelly Yankle Ne Me Quitte Pas


THE SARASOTA BALLET’S

BOARD OF TRUSTEES

RICHARD JOHNSON

PATRICIA GOLEMME

FRANK MARTUCCI

BOARD CHAIR

BOARD VICE CHAIR

PRESIDENT

PAT KENNY

JONATHAN STRICKLAND COLEMAN

MAUREEN STEINER

TREASURER

JEAN WEIDNER GOLDSTEIN FOUNDER & CHAIR EMERITUS

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SECRETARY

GOVERNANCE

SYDNEY GOLDSTEIN

HILLARY STEELE

BOARD CHAIR EMERITA

CHAIR EMERITA


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ISABEL ANCHIN BECKER

PEGGY ABT

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GINGER CANNON BAILEY

PAUL CANTOR

LYNDA DOERY

JULIE A. HARRIS

PHIL LOMBARDO

TERESA MASTERSON

PETER B MILLER

ROSEMARY OBERNDORF

AUDREY ROBBINS

MICKI SELLMAN

HILLARY STEELE

JEAN WEILLER

MARK FAMIGLIO

DR. BART PRICE

HONORARY TRUSTEE

HONORARY TRUSTEE 21


THE SARASOTA BALLET’S

ADVISORY COUNCIL

MARYANN ARMOUR

JUDY CAHN

SANDRA DEFEO

FRANCES FERGUSSON

CHARLES HUISKING

ROBIN KLEINSTRAUSS

PETER KRETZMER

KAREN LICHTIG

CHRISTINE LIEBERMAN

RICHARD MARCH

JOAN MATHEWS

DONNA MAYTHAM

GINGER CANNON BAILEY ADVISORY COMMITTEE CHAIR

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DR. JOEL MORGANROTH MERCEDITA OCONNOR

MARILYNN PETRILLO

ROSE MARIE PROIETTI

RICHARD SEGALL

JAN SIROTA

LOIS STULBERG

MARCIA JEAN TAUB

DAVID WELLE

LISA WICKS


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THE FACTS THE SARASOTA BALLET $7.6 M

Annual Operating Budget ARTISTRY

154

Ballets and Divertissements

52

Different Choreographers

39

World Premieres

13 American Company & American Premieres AUDIENCE

9 National Tours

72

National And International Reviews

30,000 Audience Members A Year EDUCATION & ENGAGEMENT

4 Education Programs serving over 3,000 students

160 Dance - The Next Generation Students

96 Community Partners

80 Engagement Activities serving over 8,500 people 23


THE SARASOTA BALLET

APRIL 18, 2021

Photo Credit Matthew Holler

ALA

CELEBRATING

THE 30th ANNIVERSARY SEASON

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30 TH ANNIVERSARY SEASON GALA Join us on Sunday, April 18, 2021 at the University of South Florida’s Clyde G. Nixon Courtyard for our Annual Gala celebrating The Sarasota Ballet’s 30th Anniversary Season. This very special event will include a curated performance by The Sarasota Ballet and an elegant dinner catered by Michael’s on East. Following all guidelines for health and safety, the event will be held outdoors under the stars to allow for distanced seating with smaller tables carefully designed to accommodate patrons who are comfortable sitting together at a safe distance from other guests. The entire event will take place from the safety of your table, allowing for you to enjoy the evening while social distancing from other guests. Planning a safe event for our dancers and Gala attendees is our number one priority in designing the event, which promises to be an unforgettable evening. Show your support for The Sarasota Ballet and join us as a sponsor of this very special celebration! All sponsors of $1,000 and above will be recognized in the winter update of the 30th Anniversary Season Program book, on the 30th Anniversary Gala invitation, in performance programs, and in a special ad in the Observer. Please reply by December 11, 2020 to be included on all Gala materials.

30TH ANNIVERSARY GALA SPONSORSHIP OPPORTUNITIES Diamond Sponsor $50,000 (10 Guests) • Choice of Dinner Table Placement • First Choice Dancer Request • Choice of Performance Seats • Recognition on all Gala Marketing Materials (E-blast and print) • Invitation to a unique 30th Anniversary Dinner with the Principal Dancers available to Emerald and Diamond Sponsors • Special gift from Iain Webb’s Collection Emerald Sponsor $25,000 (10 Guests) • Premier Dinner Table Placement • Preferred Dancer Request • Premier Performance Seating • Recognition on all Gala Marketing Materials (E-blast and print) • Invitation to a unique 30th Anniversary Dinner with the Principal Dancers available to Emerald and Diamond Sponsors Sapphire Sponsor $10,000 (10 Guests) • Premium Dinner Table Placement • Premium Performance Seating • Recognition on Gala E-blast Marketing Ruby Sponsor $6,000 (6 Guests) • Preferred Dinner Table Placement • Preferred Performance Seating Pearl Sponsor $1,000 (One Guest) • Preferred Gala Seating • Preferred Performance Seating All Sponsors at the Pearl level and above will receive: • Recognition in the 30th Anniversary Gala Ad in The Observer • Recognition in the Season Program Book • Recognition in Performance Programs • Recognition on Gala Invitation • Recognition in the Gala Video There will be regular tickets available for $500. For more information, please contact Sara Robinson at 941.225.6504 or by email at srobinson@sarasotaballet.org.

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LU M I NA RY C I R C L E $1 00 , 00 0 +

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JEAN WEIDNER GOLDSTEIN

SYDNEY GOLDSTEIN

In Loving Memory of Alfred Goldstein Program 7

Digital Program 1

PATRICIA GOLEMME AND TIMOTHY FULLUM

ERNIE KRETZMER In Loving Memory of Alisa Kretzmer

Program 4

The Margaret Barbieri Conservatory


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LU M I NA RY C I R C L E $ 100, 000 +

FRANK AND KATHERINE MARTUCCI

PAUL AND SHARON STEINWACHS

The Margaret Barbieri Conservatory

Digital Program 3; Live Music

JEAN WEILLER

OUR SPECIAL ANGEL

Digital Program 2

Program 5

Gifts and photos are current as of 19 October 2020

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B E N E FA C T O R C I R C L E $7 5, 00 0 - $ 9 9 ,9 9 9

MARK FAMIGLIO

PAT AND ANN KENNY Program 6

In Loving Memory of ROBERT AND JEANNE ZABELLE Digital Program 1

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GU A R D I A N C I R C L E $ 5 0 , 0 0 0 - $74, 999

JULIE A. HARRIS

RICHARD JOHNSON In Loving Memory of Marsha Johnson

Digital Program 2

Digital Program 1

HARRY LEOPOLD AND AUDREY ROBBINS

PHIL AND KIM LOMBARDO

BUD AND BET TY SHAPIRO

Program 7

Program 7

Program 5

HILLARY STEELE

ANONYMOUS

Digital Program 3 Gifts and photos are current as of 19 October 2020

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CONNOISSEUR CIRCLE $2 5, 00 0 - $ 4 9 ,9 9 9

JAMES AND MARYANN ARMOUR FAMILY FOUNDATION

ISABEL ANCHIN BECKER

ROBERT AND GAIL DAVIES

Digital Program 3

Dance - The Next Generation

MICHAEL AND SHERRY GUTHRIE

CHARLES HUISKING

Program 4

ANDREW AND JUDITH ECONOMOS

Digital Program 1

ROBIN KLEIN-STRAUSS AND MICHAEL STRAUSS Program 7 30

RICHARD MARCH In Loving Memory of Helen March Program 5; Live Music

CLAUDIA MCCORKLE AND BEAU Digital Program 2


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CONNOISSEUR CIRCLE $ 2 5 , 0 0 0 - $49, 999

PETER B. MILLER AND DR. MARTHA HARRISON

MERCEDITA OCONNOR

DR. BART PRICE

Program 4

Digital Program 3

MARILYN AND STEVE ROTHSCHILD

MICKI SELLMAN In Loving Memory of Jerry Sellman

NOEL AND TOBY SIEGEL

Program 5

Program 4

MARCIA JEAN TAUB AND PETER SWAIN In Loving Memory of Ethel and Ron Taub

JEAN VOLPE

MAT T AND LISA WALSH

Digital Program 2

Digital Program 1

Program 5 Gifts and photos are current as of 19 October 2020

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AFICIONADO CIRCLE $1 5, 00 0 - $ 2 4 ,9 9 9

PEGGY AND KEN ABT

PAUL CANTOR AND MICHELLE ROY

In Loving Memory of JOHN CARRIER

Program 7

ELIZA P. CULVERHOUSE

FRED AND LYNDA DOERY

The Margaret Barbieri Conservatory

Program 7

WILLIAM AND JANICE FARBER

BARBARA JACOB

JUDY RUDGES AND STAN KATZ

JANICE BINI AND DEAN SCARBOROUGH

Program 4; Dance - The Next Generation

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Program 4


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AFICIONADO CIRCLE $ 1 5 , 0 0 0 - $24, 999

RICH AND CLARE SEGALL Digital Program 1

ALISON GARDNER AND JAN SIROTA Program 5

TOM AND MAUREEN STEINER Digital Program 2

CURT AND MELLISS SWENSON

THOMAS AND GWENDOLYN WATSON

Digital Program 1; Dance - The Next Generation

Dance - The Next Generation

WILLIAM AND KAREN WAT T

Gifts and photos are current as of 19 October 2020

JARED WINTERS

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PAT R O N C I R C L E $1 0, 00 0 - $ 1 4 ,9 9 9

SHARI AND STEVE ASHMAN Program 4

BOB AND GINGER CANNON BAILEY

MARGARET BARBIERI Program 7

Program 5

MURRAY BRING AND KAY DELANEY BRING

JACKLYN BRUNCKHORST

Program 6

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JUDY CAHN In Loving Memory of Charles Cahn Digital Program 3

NEIL AND SANDRA DEFEO

KAROL FOSS

RENEE HYMSON

Program 5

Program 3

Program 7


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PAT R O N C I R C L E $ 1 0 , 0 0 0 - $14, 999

WALDRON KRAEMER AND JOAN LOVELL

TINA AND RICK LIEBERMAN

BILL AND ANNET TE LLOYD

Program 4

Program 6; Dance – The Next Generation

KAREN GLORIO LUTHER

JOAN MATHEWS

Program 7

Digital Program 1

DONNA MAY THAM In Loving Memory of Walter Maytham Digital Program 3

BILL AND LINDA MITCHELL Digital Program 2

DRS. JOEL AND GAIL MORGANROTH

JOHN AND CINDY MORRIS

Digital Program 1

Gifts and photos are current as of 19 October 2020

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PAT R O N C I R C L E $1 0, 00 0 - $ 1 4 ,9 9 9

In Loving Memory of MASAYASU TAMATANI

DOROTHY O’BRIEN AND RICHARD ANTOINE

Program 5; Live Music

Program 4

MARY JO RESTON

FLORI ROBERTS

ROSE MARIE PROIET TI Program 7

ROSEMARY AND LOU OBERNDORF Dance - The Next Generation

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GAIL AND SKIP SACK

LOIS STULBERG

Digital Program 2

Live Music

ANONYMOUS

Gifts and photos are current as of 19 October 2020


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PAT R O N S C I R C L E $ 1 0 , 0 0 0 - $14, 999

Private Wealth . Asset Management . Institutional Investment Management

C A CUMBERLAND ADVISOR S

Investment Management Our private wealth practice offers institutional-level money management for individual investors, like you. Since 1973, we have been providing investment management service to institutional clients—independent nonprofits, foundations, qualified retirement plans and government entities. As a private investor, you can leverage that same independent and insightful expertise in the management of your portfolio. Call today to learn how our investment strategies can help you. A Registered Investment Advisory Firm Since 1973

800. 257. 7013 One Sarasota Tower, 2 N. Tamiami Trl; Ste. 303, Sarasota, FL 34236 | www.cumber.com

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DEVOTEE CIRCLE $5 , 0 0 0 - $ 9 ,9 9 9

GEORGE ALLISON, ASID AND ALAN WATKINS, ASID

ROBERT AND SARA ARTHUR

BETTY-JEAN AND DAVID BAVAR

RUTH AND DAVID BELILES

DONALD H. AND BARBARA K. BERNSTEIN FAMILY FOUNDATION

WILLIAM AND BONNIE CHAPMAN

JONATHAN STRICKLAND COLEMAN AND RICK KERBY

GEORGIA COURT

BRUCE ENSINGER AND CLARK DENHAM

ELEANOR FABER

FRANCES FERGUSSON AND JOHN BRADBURY

LAURIE FITCH

THE FLETCHER FAMILY CHARITABLE FOUNDATION

HERMAN AND SHARON FRANKEL

RONALD AND MICKI H. GAMER

VALERIE GILL

38


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DEVOTEE CIRCLE $ 5 , 0 0 0 - $9, 999

MATT AND KRISTIN GLAVIN

JEREMY HAMMONDCHAMBERS AND JULES PRICE

ELLEN GOLDMAN

ROBERT AND INEZA HART

RENEE HAMAD

GERALD AND DEBORAH HAMBURG FAMILY FOUNDATION

JOANN HEISEN In Loving Memory of David Lenihan

DR. SIDNEY KATZ AND ELAINE KEATING

MICHAEL AND MARCY KLEIN

ANNE KLISURICH

LYDIA LANDA

PETER AND TERESA MASTERSON

RICHARD AND CORNELIA MATSON

BETTY MENELL

CARLA AND MICHAEL MILLER

GLORIA MOSS

Gifts and photos are current as of 19 October 2020

39


DEVOTEE CIRCLE $5 , 0 0 0 - $ 9 ,9 9 9

EUGENE NOBLE

40

STU AND GINI PELTZ

MARILYNN PETRILLO In Loving Memory of Marsha Johnson

EDWIN AND MAUREEN SCHLOSS

GABRIEL AND VALERIE SCHMERGEL

JOHN AND RITA STEELE

BETH UFFNER AND ROBERT GOLDFARB

TOM AND TERESA WALSH

DAVID WELLE AND ROSEMARY REINHARDT

ELEANOR WILSON WILLIAMS

RICHARD WIRES

FREMAJANE WOLFSON In Loving Memory of Blair Wolfson

CHARLES O. WOOD, III AND MIRIAM M. WOOD FOUNDATION

SHEILA AND MERRILL WYNNE

SORA YELIN In Loving Memory of Cary F. Yelin

ANONYMOUS

Gifts and photos are current as of 19 October 2020


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Studio South Fitness

For those who want more...

You’ve always chosen the very best...

For your family. For your lifestyle. Now you can choose the best for your body. Ask us about a special offer for Sarasota Ballet patrons.

Fitness Partner of The Sarasota Ballet 55 S. Palm Ave. |Sarasota, FL 34236 | 941.365.4584 | studiosouthfitness.com

41


GOLDEN & SILVER CIRCLES $3,000 - $4,999 | $1,000 - $2,999

GOLDEN CIRCLE

SILVER CIRCLE

Christopher and Natalie Armstrong John and Patricia Dupps Robert and Iris Fanger Shirley Fein Linda A. Fiorelli Edmund and Patsy Garno Thomas I. and Linda Z. Klein Philanthropic Fund Peter Kretzmer Dorothy Lawrence Edward Levesque Barbara Fischer Long and James Long Arthur Siciliano and B. Aline Blanchard Diran and Virginia Tashian Sallie Carter Tyler Karen Vereb and Bud Blanton Vivian T. Dauber Revocable Trust Susan and Charles Wilson

Maria Abraham Stephen and Kay Aidlin Peggy C. Allen Caroline Amory and Marjorie Floyd Robert and Elaine Appel Carol Arscott Gregg and Cynthia Baran Ruth Barker Mercedes T. Bass In Loving Memory of Everett and Shirley Behrendt Jonathan and Kristina Berg Jerry and Helga Bilik Donna and Jon Boscia Jerry and Gay Bowles Diana Cable Peter and Judy Carlin Patricia Corson and Martin Goldstein Katie Couchot Mary and Peter Davis Toby Deutsch Syble Dolan-Di Girolamo

42

Murray Duffin Anthony Dyson Annette and Edward Eliasberg Douglas Engebretson Larry and Carol English Barbara and Bill Epperson Ronald and Sharon Erickson Laura Feder Graham Fell Sara W. Fishman Paul Francis and Lolli Zarlin Irene and Robert Fritsch Wanda Garofalo Jennifer Gemmeke Roz Goldberg Helen and John Habbert Dr. Barbara Hajjar William and Jo Haraf Beverly Harms Peter and Bonnie Hurley Janet Hyman Janet G. Jacobs Elizabeth Johnston Ann E. Jones Joseph Kadow

Merrill Ann Kaegi Katherine Knowles Donna Koffman Deirdre Lanesskog Joan Switt Langbord Bart and Joan Levenson Sandra Levy Melvy Erman Lewis Marlene and Hal Liberman Cynthia Lichtenstein Sandra Long Rise Snyder Loshaek Margaret Maguire Louis and Carolou Marquet Judith Marquis Jean M. Martin Bert and Joy Mayerhofer Eva Maze Mary Jane McRae Michael and Michelle Morris Chad and Ruth Morrison Eric and Malfada Neikrug Tom and Jane Oliver Virginia Haskins Page Joe and Janis Peixoto Kimberley Pelyk Charles and Charlotte Perret Megan Powers Jana and Eric Putnal Pamela Revels Sara and Benjamin Robinson Ann Hill Roth and Gilbert Roth Jack and Lenore Rubin Stanley and Jo Rutstein Murray and Abby Sherry Carole Sisson David and Karen Smith Nancy Smith Malcolm Stevenson Elizabeth Stewart Ed Town and Steve Rubin Anna Maria Troiano Philip and Helene Tucker Ernest Werlin Florence Wildner Robert J. Wilk Mary Lou and Edward Winnick

Gifts are current as of 19 October 2020


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Your partners in the arts

1st Source Bank Wealth Advisory Services is pleased to sponsor the Sarasota Ballet. We are proud to continue our tradition of investing in the arts and the human spirit. Our Sarasota, Florida office allows us to serve all your banking and wealth advisory needs including trust and estate administration.

Cyndi Miller Vice President Investment accounts are not insured by the FDIC or any federal government agency, are not a deposit, have no bank guarantee and may lose value.

Kurt Thompson Senior Vice President Managing Director, The Family Office

1800 2nd Street, Suite 712 941 554-2605 ● 1stsource.com

SARASOTA MAGAZINE PROUDLY SUPPORTS

THE SARASOTA BALLET

32

STATE AWARDS 2020

WINNER OF 32 STATE AWARDS FOR WRITING, DESIGN AND PHOTOGRAPHY IN 2020. LOVED BY OUR READERS AND RECOGNIZED BY OUR PEERS. SARASOTA MAGAZINE CELEBRATED 40 YEARS OF EXCELLENCE IN 2019.

43


ENTHUSIASTS $500 - $999

Betty Anthone In Loving Memory of Roland Anthone Amy Barkin Margaret and Isaac Barpal Wesley and Lucia Begg Richard Belle Charlotte Bimba Linda Bodzy Judith Bowie Marty and Barbara Bowling Kyuran Choe-Albano, MD Naomi and Saul Cohen Nadine Cohodas In Loving Memory of Sylvia Cohodas Michael and Marcia Corrigan Donna Cubit-Swoyer Kumu Dreier Douglas Endicott Wendy Fisk Tim and Ellen Foster Michael and Jean Freed Suzanne Freund Alfred and Anne Garrett Barbara and Paul Gessler Bonnie and David Goldmann Sue Marquis Gordon Barbara K. Grauer Andrew and Felicia Hall Alene Hazeltine Don and Sue Helgeson James W. and Mary R. Heslin Dale Horwitz Brett Jenkins

Gifts are current as of 19 October 2020

44

Susan Johnson Thomas and Alison Jones Laura and Russell Karlins Ronald and Rita Karns Karp Family Foundation Jane Kritzer and Carol Carmenaro Carol Lackey Arthur and Marcella Levin Evie Lichter Gerda Maceikonis Jasey Magno Albert and Marita Marsh Benjamin L. Meluskey Lee and Jan Peakes Richard Prescott and DJ Arnold Susan Rawson Margot and Jack Robinson Susan L. Robinson Karen Roosen Wylie Royce Shoko and Jun Sadoshima

Lawrence Sage William and Marge Sandy Carl and Cornelia Sare Joan Sarney Gail Schaeffer and Edward Ellis Molly Schechter Anne and Alexander Scott Vielka Sheppard Jane Sheridan Jennifer Smith Thomas Smith J. S. Soble Judi Stern Peggy Sweeney Joan Tatum Veronica Tcherevkoff Carolyn K. Warren Maureen and Daren Wells

Kim Wheeler Ann Williams J. Bryan and Yvonne Williams Carol B Williams Jane Woods Betty M. York Scott and Martha Young Anonymous


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Proud supporter of

endless pirouettes, flights of fancy and following your heart

Ask any artist: Pursuing your passion means giving the best of yourself. We understand. That’s why we’re proud to support The Sarasota Ballet, because great performance is worth the investment.

Fifth Third Bank, National Association. Member FDIC. CS4504

45


ADMIRERS $250 - $499

Cecile Adams Nicholas and Jocelyn Baskey Edward and Sheila Braun Barbara J. Chin James Clark Louis and Marianne Cohen Aubert Coran Judy Cottone Robert and Linda Crootof Cynthia Cuminale Harold and Jacqueline D'Alessio Leila and James Day Kathleen Doepfner William Draeger Jr David Eichlin and Bob Griffiths Sandra Fink Nancy and Peter Finn Rhoda and Stuart Friedman Dana Gaddis Dimitar and Maria Georgiev Marie and William Goetz

Gifts are current as of 19 October 2020

46

Nancy Gold Sharon Grisez Jerry and Joelle Hamovit John and Nancy Harris Kathryn Harvey Robert Hemingway Donald Hoercher Marion B. Hoercher Oya Horiguchi Terry Hynes Deborah Kalb Bruce Kalt Arno Kastner John and Barbara Kerwin Richard Kiegler and Ruthann Sturtevant-Kiegler Marlene Kitchell Robert Kloss

Patricia M. Knott Philippe Koenig Carol Lewis Stephanie R. Louis Dr. Lisa Mann and Dr. Rocco Marotta Donald and Judith Markstein James and Lynn Medlin Sandra Miranda Paul and Karen Morton Jon Newman Jon and Susan Newsome Marilyn Nordby Wiley and Fran Osborn Lenee and Conrad Owens Jeannette Paladino Julie Planck

Lenore and Isadore Sborofsky Philanthropic Fund Ann Schluederberg James Scholler Barbara Schott John and Carole Segal Elizabeth Shalett Barbara Shivers Ira and Carole Singer Skylar Smith Arthur Soudijn Wesley Spencer and Pauline Wood Nasrin and Mark Thierer Carol Tillotson Marianne and Niels Trulson Ann Waller Terry Wohl


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Our local news fits your schedule. Quite a concept. We’re here for you with local news & weather just about any time you need us.

OVER AIR

THE

MORNING EDITION

CHANNEL 39

6 & 400HD

9 & 509HD

20 & 1020HD

CHANNEL 39

WEEKDAYS 6A-9A 47


ADVOCATES $100 - $249

Marjorie and Jerry Abrams Priscilla Adams Gerald Addicott James Akers Janette Albrecht Sherrie Albrecht Edward Allen and Lorraine Gawronski Lucia and Steven Almquist Paul Altman Christina Amato Andrea Anderson Angela Anderson Maureen Ballinger Elaine Bankoff Linda and Mark Baron Gaele Barthold and Larry Weiss Maxine and Irv Bass Joan Bauerlein James and Lynnette Bennett Emily Berger Elizabeth Weil Bergmann David Bloom Glen Bodzy Harry Born Gay Boylston Scott and Lisa Bradley Suzanne and Joseph Brent Mary Buckley Kristine B. Bundrant Tom and Edy Bulthuis Kristine B. Bundrant Dierdre Miles Burger Joan and Anthony Campo

Gifts are current as of 19 October 2020

48

Kennedy Cassada Elizabeth Catanzano Lynn Chancer Glenn and Evelyn Cooper Agnes Coppin Christina Cowell Mayers Kristie-Lynne Cox Fiona Crawford Wylie Crawford Glenn Cudiamat Margaret Palacio DAiuto Linda E. Daniel Lucille D'Armi-Riggio Patrice DeMoss D. M. DiBenedetto Marianne and Paul Diczok Shelly Dorfman George Dorris and Jack Anderson Judith Drachman Brian and Victoria Eckl Carol and Martin Edelman Hazel Edlinger Norris and Denise Elswick Betty Ferguson Bradley and Nancy Fields

Anne Findeisen Alan Fishbein Kathleen A. Fisher Joann and Clifford Flanigan Priscilla Fort Elaine and Robert Foster Martha Friedman Gilbert Friend-Jones David and Carol Furer Michael and Karen Gardiner Elvira Garibovic Paul and Suellyn Gates Everett and Mary Gendler Jeff George Laurel Gerritsen Susan Giroux Rita and Paul Glosser Burton Gold Marilyn Golden Marjorie R. Goldstein Jane F. Gordon John and Catherine Graham

Ricardo Graziano Dr. James and Barbara Griffith Gary Gulden Suzanne Guyette Steven Ha Ben Hall Robert Halpern Sandra Hammer Martin and Sherrie Handelman Bonnie L. Harrison William Hatz Daniel and Emma Headington Christine Heckel Susan Hecker Stan and Adrienne Heishman Belle Heneberger Joe and Mary Kay Henson Elaine Herda Ronald Hernden Florence S. Hesler Micheal Hetsler Anita Pihl Robert Hildebrand Elliott Himelfarb and Janet Minker


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ADVOCATES $100 - $249

Moira Hintsa Christopher Hird Michael Hird John and Nina Hockenberry Joseph Hogan William Holland Dex and Kate Honea Barbara Hopton Deborah Hutton Vlatka Ivanisevic Allen and Mary Ivey Linda Jacob Sue Jacobson Barbara Jacoby Millicent Jaekle Oliver and Suzanne Janney Judith Liersch and Allen Jennings Dale and Barbara Jensen Bette Johnson Jim Johnson Jane Jones Edward and Lyn Kahn Judith Kahn Roger and Kristy Kaufman Adele Kellman Mr. and Mrs. Alfred C. Kellogg Roderick Kelly

Maura Kenny Julie Keverian Alyson L. King Kim Kirchhofer Ellen Klein Mary Klimasiewfski Patricia Klugherz Lily Koester Janet Korte Ellen and Arthur Kramer Anita Lambert Kevin Lambert Gail Landry Harriet Lane Robert Lange Michaela Larson Deanne Lay Ellen Layman Nancy Lee Ron Lee Barry Levin Judith Levine Phyllis and Phil Lieberman Terrance and Elvira Lindemann

Sheryl D Lindholm Louis Loeb Jacqueline Lorusso Francine Luque Carol MacLennan Flora Major Kimberley Mancini Maria Mandler Michael Mao Peter Marion Noralyn Marshall Oscar Martinez Gregg and Jill May Lynn McBrier Ann Mcconnachie Jane McCormack Josephine and Joelle McCoy Henry McFarland Robert and Vicki McGriff Julie McGue Leanne McKaig Marianne McKenna Dianne McLoughlin Robert and Sharon McMillan Robert and Margo Menson

Margaret Merlino Joan and Robert Meyer Jean Miller Mary Mitchell Zachary Morowitz and Julie Brown Bert and Betty Morris Phyllis Myers Martha Naismith Joan Nasser Linda Neal John and Katherine Nelson Nicolla Newall Atsushi Nishizawa Richard and Lois Noyes Jennifer Nzeza Maegan Ochoa Mary Olha Lauren Ostrander Vance Ostrander Thomas Paine Robin and Emilio Palermo Anand Pallegar Laura and Fred Pardee Michele Pasquini Lorelei Paster Richard Paulsen Katharine Pepper In Loving Memory of Michael Pepper Bertha P. Person Sue and Jerry Peterson Richard Peterson Lynne Pettigrew

Gifts are current as of 19 October 2020

49


ADVOCATES $100 - $249

Katelyn Pforzheimer Andrea Pilch Andrea Plautz Dr. Marc and Carol Pohl Katie Powers Richard Prager Kimberly Proctor Carlos de Quesada Jerry and Carole Reid Tere Reis Della Relling Ronald and Marci Rhodes Cheryl Richards Sandra Ripberger Laurie Rizzolo Martin Robbins Anne F. Roberts Mary Berhang Ursula Robinson Beverly Root Sheila Rosenthal Stanford and Rona Ross Dr. Jack and Nancy Rozance Saul and Joyce Rubenstein Herbert Ruderman Sidney and Marcia Rutberg Catherine Ryan

Gifts are current as of 19 October 2020

50

Georgena and Paul Ryan Sara Sardelli-Rachon and Kenny Rachon Phyllis Schaen Norma Schatz Gary Schieneman Tobi Schneider Eda Scott Herb and Ann Sears Philip and Karen Selwyn Susan Serling and David Kessler Dr. Rosabella Shek Jean Shorr and David Langhaug Joseph Shortall Steve Sills Jean Simon Barbara Smith Carolynne and Barbara Smith Kathie Smith Barbara Smith-Bacon Barbara Somma Michael Sonberg Ann Spaulding

Doris and Louis Stanek Gordon Stanley Barbara Staton Victoria Sterling Louise P. Stevens Joan and Jim Stewart George Straschnov, MD Fredricka Taubitz Judith G. Taylor Bogdana Tchakarova Sigmund and Lora Tobias Carol A. Tomlinson Dr. Martin Tucker Marlo Turner Carl Tursi Walt and Carole Ulin Stanley Vickers Susan Viqueira Sarah Walcutt-Febish Paul Walser

Jason and Anna Webb Elaine and Jeff Weinberg Gail J. Weiser Charles and Sheila Weiss Iris Wenglin Donald West Sid and Maryann Whitman Richard and Dorothy Williams Gretchen M. Wilson Karen Wiltsie Mark Wood Marsha Zapson Dodie Zehnwirth Stanley Zielinski Wayne Morgan and Charlotte Zurn Anonymous


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IN MEMORIAM T H E F O L LO W I N G M E M B E R S O F O U R S A R A S OTA B A L L E T C O M M U N I T Y H AV E PA S S E D AWAY I N T H E L A S T Y E A R . W E C E L E B R AT E T H E I R L I V E S A N D H O N O R T H E M F O R T H E I R G E N E R O S I T Y, W H I C H W I L L H AV E A L A S T I N G I M PA C T O N T H E B A L L E T F O R Y E A R S TO C O M E .

CHARLES & MARGERY BARANCIK The Sarasota Ballet cherishes the memory of Chuck and Margie Barancik. Their generosity, spirit, and passion for the arts continues to impact our organization now, and will for years to come.

STEPHEN AIDLIN

THOMAS KLEIN

STANLEY KANE

MARY DONIKIAN

CAROL PHILLIPS

RUSSEL LEE

ROLAND ANTHONE MARY ELLE HUNTER

EVERETT BEHRENDT

MARCIA KATZ

TERRENCE MCNALLY

JANET HUNTER

INA RAE LEVY

MICHAEL PEPPER

HELEN MARCH

MORTON MANDLE

MORTON SKIRBOLL

The memorial page above is presented here to the best of our knowledge. We truly apologize if we have not recognized members of our Ballet community that have passed away recently. Please contact the Development Department so that we may update our archives.

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F O U N D AT I O N AND PUBLIC SUPPORT $100,000+

THE MURIEL O’NEIL FUND FOR THE PERFORMING ARTS

AT THE COMMUNITY FOUNDATION OF SARASOTA COUNTY

$50,000+ ALFRED & ANN GOLDSTEIN FOUNDATION

JEAN ALLENBY GOLDSTEIN TOURING FUND

FLORIDA DEPARTMENT OF STATE

52


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F O U N D AT I O N AND PUBLIC SUPPORT $30,000+

$10,000+

BANK OF AMERICA CLIENT FOUNDATION

CHARLES HENRY LEACH II FUND

CORNELIA T. BAILEY FOUNDATION

AT DUQUESNE UNIVERSITY

THE KORS LE PERE FOUNDATION ROCKEFELLER TRUST COMPANY

Gifts are current as of 19 October 2020

53


F O U N D AT I O N AND PUBLIC SUPPORT $5,000+ CORDELIA LEE BEATTIE FOUNDATION

JEROME ROBBINS FOUNDATION

$2,500+

ANNETTE J. HAGENS MEMORIAL FOUNDATION

GILBERT WATERS CHARITABLE FUND II

WOMEN’S OUTREACH MINISTRY CHURCH OF THE REDEEMER

54


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F O U N D AT I O N AND PUBLIC SUPPORT ADDITIONAL SUPPORT PROVIDED BY Andy Frank Fund at the Community Foundation of Sarasota County Bernard Lewis Charitable Foundation Betty & Marie Healy Family Foundation Canandaigua National Bank & Trust Costco Wholesale Deline Charitable Foundation Fay A. Schweim Memorial Children's Dance Fund

Gifts are current as of 19 October 2020

Florida State University Jelks Family Foundation Johnston Family Fund Manatee Community Foundation Midvale Foundation SRQ Media Gives Back Foundation The Leda Freedman Fund Tucker Family Charitable Fund

55


C O R P O R AT E S P O N S O R S $20,000

$10,000+

$5,000+

56


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C O R P O R AT E S P O N S O R S $2,500+

MATCHING GIFTS

ADDITIONAL SUPPORT PROVIDED BY AbbVie Amazon Smile FlorinRoebig Trial Attorneys Flowers by Fudgie Gulf Coast Italian Culture Society Hedge Team at Premier Sotheby's International Realty IBM Corporation Goldman, Babboni, Fernandez, & Walsh (Justice Pays)

Gifts are current as of 19 October 2020

Longboat Key Education Center Michael's on East Network for Good Puget Sound Development, LLC Sapphire Shores LLC Serbin Print Marketing & Publishing Studio South White Oaks Investment Management

57


MEDIA SPONSORS SEASON SPONSORS

SPONSORS

DANCE MEDIA

Gifts are current as of 19 October 2020

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T H E D E V E LO P M E N T T E A M

SARA RO B I N S O N C H I E F A D VA N C E M E N T O F F I C E R Welcome to the 30th Anniversary Season! As we embark on this milestone year, we celebrate the people, programs, and the incredible artistry that makes The Sarasota Ballet possible. COVID-19 has given us all a chance to reflect on what is important and then to re-envision the ways in which we connect with our dancers, staff, leadership, students, patrons, and our audience. During the 2019-2020 season, staff, leadership, and the Trustees worked together to create a strategic plan for organizational growth over the next three years. The 2020 Strategic Plan provides a framework for artistic expansion, education and community programs, and audience development in the years ahead. Although our approach has been altered by COVID-19, the goals are still there and very much alive in the work that we are doing. In the spring of 2020, we were pleased to welcome a new Advisory Council to our leadership structure to help us navigate the challenges and growth that lies ahead. Also, in the spring and summer of 2020, we created a new framework to engage our leadership, dancers, students, patrons and audience this coming season. The Development Team joins me in welcoming you to this unique season. We are here for you. To help you connect in uncertain times and to help you continue to enjoy the remarkable talent of The Sarasota Ballet now and in the future. Thank you for your generous support. We look forward to sharing an exciting 30th Anniversary season with you.

srobinson@sarasotaballet.org | 941.225.6504

CHAD MORRISON

LAUREN STROMAN

RACHAEL FISK

KATHERINE KNOWLES

SENIOR DEVELOPMENT OFFICER

DEVELOPMENT OFFICER

DEVELOPMENT ASSISTANT

GRANTS MANAGER

941.359.0099 x 110 lstroman@sarasotaballet.org

941.359.0099 x 119 rfisk@sarasotaballet.org

941.359.0099 kknowles@sarasotaballet.org

941.359.0099 x 113 cmorrison@sarasotaballet.org

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THE MARTUCCI L E G AC Y S O C I E T Y The Sarasota Ballet believes in the importance of legacy. Having been entrusted to safeguard the legacies of the most influential figures in ballet – Dame Margot Fonteyn, Rudolf Nureyev, and Sir Frederick Ashton - we understand how to care for your legacy when you include The Sarasota Ballet in your planned giving. The members of our Legacy Society have created a lasting impact on future generations. Their gifts support our professional Company, Dance – The Next Generation, Live Music, Touring, our Education Programs, and much more. Whether we’re reviving nearly lost works or transporting students to our Education Programs, we’re proud to protect your legacy within The Sarasota Ballet.

M art u

cci

For more information, please contact Chad Morrison at 941.225.6513.

e rin e h t Frank and Ka

"A P L A N N E D G I F T I S A WAY T O P E R P E T UAT E A N D L E AV E A PA R T O F Y O U R S E L F T H A T WILL CONTINUE ON WITHIN T H E O R G A N I Z A T I O N ." - FRANK MARTUCCI

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30 T H A N N I V E R S A R Y S E A S O N 2020 – 2021

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MEMBERS OF THE M A RT U C C I L E G AC Y S O C I E T Y

George Allison and Alan Watkins

Donald H. and Barbara K. Bernstein

Jerry and Gay Bowles

Murray Bring and Kay Delaney Bring

Donald Britt

Ann Burroughss

Judy Cahn

Lynn Chancer

Jonathan Strickland Coleman and Rick Kerby

Edward Cooke

Douglas Endicott

Ellen Goldman

Jean Weidner Goldstein

Patricia Golemme

Gudrun Graugaard

Julie A. Harris

Richard Kemmler

Pat and Ann Kenny

Ernie Kretzmer

Lydia Landa

Julia Laning

Harry Leopold and Audrey Robbins

Richard March

Frank and Katherine Martucci

Joan Mathews

Mary Jane McRae

Peter Miller and Dr. Martha Harrison

Sandra Miranda

Rose Marie Proietti

Mary Jo Reston

Terry and Susan Romine

Will A. Ryall

Bert and Eleanor Schweigaard-Olsen

Micki Sellman

Bud and Betty Shapiro

B. Aline Blanchard and Arthur Siciliano

Hillary Steele

Marcia Jean Taub

David Welle and Rosemary Reinhardt

Kim Wheeler

Anonymous

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PAT R O N B E N E F I T S Patron Benefits represent the highest level of recognition for the commitment and support of The Sarasota Ballet. In appreciation for patrons’ generous support, The Sarasota Ballet provides ticketing benefits, special events, and activities. As The Sarasota Ballet celebrates our 30th Anniversary Season, we are thrilled to announce our new VIRTUAL DONOR BENEFITS for the Fall of 2020! If you are considering a gift to The Sarasota Ballet, please know that your gift means more now than ever. Your gift will support the Artistic, Education, and Engagement Programs of the organization. In addition to helping the Company, you will receive recognition in our 30th Anniversary Season Program Book and Insider Access to this very special season through the following: • Virtual and in-person events with the dancers • Virtual After-Parties for Programs 1-3 • Invitation to a virtual Company Meet & Greet with the Dancers, October 2020 • Invitation to our annual Silver Circle event, Spring of 2020 • A special 30th Anniversary Season gift

Join Today!

For questions regarding membership and patron benefits, please contact Lauren Stroman, Development Officer at lstroman@sarasotaballet.org or 941.225.6510.

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30 T H A N N I V E R S A R Y S E A S O N 2020 – 2021

LU M I N A R Y C I R C L E - $100,000 O R M O R E Production Sponsor recognition for a Ballet, Education, or Community Program • Recognition includes virtual curtain announcement (fall) and curtain announcement (spring), photo in the Season Program Book, listing in Performance Programs, and photo on signage (virtual and print) • Invitation to all Studio Dress Rehearsals (virtual and in-person) B E N E FAC TO R C I R C L E - $75,000 TO $99,999 All benefits listed below, plus: • Invitation to dinner at the home of Directors Iain Webb and Margaret Barbieri – Spring 2021 G UA R D I A N C I R C L E - $50,000 TO $74,999 All benefits listed below, plus: • Invitation to Exclusive Coaching Experience with Director Iain Webb – Spring 2021 CO N N O I S S E U R C I R C L E - $25,000 TO $4 9, 999 All benefits listed below, plus: Sponsorship recognition for a Ballet, Education, or Community Program • Recognition includes photo in the Season Program Book, listing in Performance Programs, and photo on signage (virtual and print) • Invitation to Virtual Reception with the Chair of the Board of Trustees – October 2020 • Invitation to a Studio Dress Rehearsal (virtual or inperson) A F I C I O N A D O C I R C L E - $15,000 TO $24,999 All benefits listed below, plus: • Invitation to the Back-to-Season Brunch with Company Meet & Greet – January 2021 PAT R O N C I R C L E - $10,000 TO $14,999 All benefits listed below, plus: Co-Sponsorship recognition for a Ballet, Education, or Community Program • Recognition includes photo in the Season Program

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Book, listing in Performance Programs, and photo on signage (virtual and print) • Invitation to Annual Dinner of Excellence – May 2021 • Invitation to a Studio Dress Rehearsal (virtual or inperson) D E V OT E E C I R C L E - $5,000 TO $9,999 All benefits listed below, plus: • Photo in the Season Program Book (virtual and print) • Invitation to Virtual and In-Person After-Performance Parties with Company • Signed Season Program Book G O L D E N C I R C L E - $3,000 TO $4,999 All benefits listed below, plus: • Invitation to Virtual Cocktail Reception with Company Meet and Greet – October 2020 S I LV E R C I R C L E - $1,000 TO $2,999 All benefits listed below, plus: • Concierge Ticketing Service • Invitation to the Annual Silver Circle Reception – Spring 2021 E N T H U S I A S T S - $50 0 TO $999 All benefits listed below, plus: • Listing in all Performance Programs (virtual and print) • 30th Anniversary Gift A D M I R E R S - $250 TO $499 All benefits listed below, plus: • Listing in the 2020 - 2021 Annual Magazine – Summer 2021 A D V O C AT E S - $100 TO $249 All benefits listed below, plus: • Listing in the Season Program Book (virtual and print) S U P P O R T E R S - $50 TO $99 • In-Step E-Newsletter

*The Season Program Book acknowledges all 2020-2021 contributions received or pledged in writing by 10/19/2020

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30 YEARS STRONG KEEP US DANCING, NOW & FOREVER

VISION

TO INFUSE OUR COMMUNIT Y WITH THE HIGHEST QUALIT Y AND DIVERSIT Y OF DANCE IN AMERICA

MISSION

WE ENRICH LIVES, CAPTIVATE EMOTIONS AND STRENGTHEN COMMUNIT Y THR OUGH THE AR T OF DANCE

BY PHONE

To make a donation using your credit card, please contact the Development Department at 941.225.6510

ONLINE

To make a donation online, visit: https://www.sarasotaballet.org/sarasota-ballet-giving

BY MAIL

Send a check made payable to The Sarasota Ballet: The Sarasota Ballet Attention: Development Department 5555 North Tamiami Trail Sarasota, FL 34243

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WAYS TO G I V E TO T H E S A R A S OTA B A L L E T

GIFTS OF STOCK OR EQUITIES

Your contribution of stock is tax deductible at its fair market value at the time it is donated, whether the value has decreased or increased. The following are the instructions needed to transfer stock to our account: Account Name: Account Number: DTC: Tax ID: Custodial Bank: Attn: Questions:

Sarasota Ballet of Florida General Account 57-4735-00 #2803 #65-0135900 US Bank Christopher “Lee” Stewart 513.632.4194 | christopher.stewart3@usbank.com

PLEASE NOTE: Because electronic transfers are made without identifying the donor, please contact us in advance about the number of shares that will be given. You can phone the Development Department at 941.225.6510.

PLANNED GIVING

Naming The Sarasota Ballet in your will or living trust allows you to provide for the future of The Sarasota Ballet while maintaining control of your current assets. You can choose a dollar amount or percentage of your estate, or include The Sarasota Ballet as a contingent beneficiary. To discuss Planned Giving, contact Chad Morrison, Senior Development Officer, at cmorrison@sarasotaballet.org or 941.225.6513.

CHARITABLE IRA ROLLOVER

The Charitable IRA Rollover provision allows individuals who have reached age 70½ to donate up to $100,000 to charitable organizations directly from their Individual Retirement Account (IRA), without treating the distribution as taxable income.

MATCHING GIFTS

Double or triple your impact! If your firm or company offers a matching gift program, you are credited with the entire contribution. Many companies even match gifts made by board members or retirees. Questions? Contact the Development Department at 941.225.6510 or email lstroman@sarasotaballet.org

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BIOGRAPHIES

IAIN WEBB DIREC TOR

Born in Yorkshire, England, Iain Webb started ballet at 14 before moving to London at 16, where he trained for two years with The Rambert School of Ballet and a year at The Royal Ballet School. He further spent a year as an apprentice with The Sadler’s Wells Royal Ballet where he was offered a full-time position. His main principal repertoire included Ashton’s The Dream (Oberon), The Two Pigeons (Young Man), La Fille mal gardée (Colas and Alain); Bintley’s The Snow Queen (Kay); Fokine’s Les Sylphides (Poet), Petrushka (Petrushka); Balanchine’s Prodigal Son (The Son); Cranko’s Card Game, Lady and the Fool, Taming of The Shrew; Nureyev’s Raymonda; Massine’s La Boutique Fantasque; van Manen’s Five Tangos; and Wright’s productions of Coppélia (Franz), The Sleeping Beauty (Blue Bird), Swan Lake (Prince and Benno). In 1989 Webb transferred to The Royal Ballet, Covent Garden, to perform character roles that included Ashton’s The Dream (Bottom), Cinderella (The Small Sister, Dancing Master, and Napoleon), Tales of Beatrix Potter (Mrs. Tiggy-Winkle and Pigling Bland); Baryshnikov’s production of Don Quixote (Sancho Panza); and MacMillan’s Different Drummer (The Doctor) and Manon (The Client). During this time he was a board member of Sir Matthew Bourne’s “Adventures in Motion Pictures.” In 1996 Webb retired from The Royal Ballet, but was invited back as a guest artist to give three farewell performances at Covent Garden as The Small Sister in Ashton’s Cinderella. After retiring as a dancer, he was invited by Sir Matthew Bourne to be Rehearsal Director for The West End, L.A. and Broadway seasons of Swan Lake and continued to work with Bourne on his production of Cinderella. In 1999 Webb was asked by Tetsuya Kumakawa to join his newly formed K-Ballet Company in Japan as Ballet Master and two years later was appointed Assistant Director. During this time, he worked with Kumakawa on building the company into one of Japan’s leading ballet companies—and the only company to tour extensively throughout Japan as well as New York and Shanghai. Webb also worked with many international stars including Adam Cooper, with whom he co-directed The Adam Cooper Company and organized its tour to The Kennedy Center. Likewise, he co-produced with Johan Kobborg the London performances of Out of Denmark and staged Roland Petit’s Carmen Pas de Deux for Alessandra Ferri and Julio Bocca for American Ballet Theatre’s 65th Anniversary Gala. Throughout Webb’s career he has produced and directed many international performances, presenting dancers from The Royal Danish Ballet, Paris Opera Ballet, New York City Ballet, and Stuttgart Ballet, to name a few. He has been a guest teacher for White Oak Dance Project, Birmingham Royal Ballet, and Rambert Dance Company, as well as teaching master classes and workshops for all the major ballet schools in England. In 2013 he became an Ashton Associate for the Sir Frederick Ashton Foundation. In July 2007 Webb took over the directorship of The Sarasota Ballet. Under his leadership the Company had performed 154 ballets and divertissements by the end of the 2019 - 2020 Season, including 39 world premieres and 13 American Company and American premieres. These include ballets by Ashton, Balanchine, Bourne, Cranko, de Valois, MacMillan, Tharp, Tuckett, Tudor, van Manen, and Wheeldon. In 2011 The Sarasota Ballet performed George Balanchine’s Diamonds at The Kennedy Center in Washington, D.C. with The Suzanne Farrell Ballet. In 2013 The Company was invited back, this time to perform Sir Frederick Ashton’s Les Patineurs for Ballet Across America III. In 2014, Webb and Assistant Director Margaret Barbieri organized The Sir Frederick Ashton Festival, commemorating the 25th anniversary of Ashton’s passing. The Festival garnered national and international acclaim for its dedication in preserving and presenting the choreographic legacy of Sir Frederick Ashton. As a result, the Company was invited to perform at the 2014 Fall for Dance Festival at the New York City Center, marking The Sarasota Ballet’s first appearance in New York City. In August 2015 The Sarasota Ballet performed to critical acclaim at the Jacob’s Pillow Dance Festival in Becket, Massachusetts. The 2016 - 2017 Season marked Webb’s 10th Season as Director of The Sarasota Ballet and began with a week-long residency at New York’s Joyce Theater, followed by two performances at the 1932 Criterion Theatre in Bar Harbor, Maine. In recognition of his outstanding achievements in building the artistic reputation and stability of The Sarasota Ballet, the Board of Directors engaged Iain Webb for an additional ten years as Director. In August of 2018, The Sarasota Ballet returned to the Joyce Theater for the Company’s second week-long residency. 67


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BIOGRAPHIES

JOSEPH VOLPE EXECUTIVE DIREC TOR

Joseph Volpe, retired General Manager of The Metropolitan Opera and theater and management consultant, was appointed Executive Director of The Sarasota Ballet in February 2016. Volpe first joined the Board of The Sarasota Ballet in 2014 after a long history in the world of the performing arts. He spent 42 years working at The Metropolitan Opera, rising from apprentice carpenter to General Manager from 1990 to 2006. In that role Volpe expanded the length of The Met repertory season as well as the number of new productions. There were four world premieres, 22 Met premieres, four commissions and expanded international touring activities. His term was characterized by sound fiscal management, fresh customer service initiatives, and no contract disputes for over three decades of his leadership in contract negotiations. He conceived and developed “Met Titles,” an innovative titling system providing multilingual translations of the operas on the backs of each seat, visible only to the individual audience member who wished to utilize them, and initiated the development of Tessitura, a management software program for targeted marketing and fundraising appeals, which is now licensed to more than 400 companies worldwide. In 1998, Volpe instituted an education outreach project for young children in cooperation with the City of New York Department of Education emphasizing direct experience with music and opera for students. He also established a partnership with the University of Connecticut that provides students from music and drama departments with behind-the-scenes access to the creative and technical processes that bring the opera to life on The Met stage. Volpe retired from The Met in July of 2006, leaving the company with a strong administration, an endowment fund that had increased from $100 million to $345 million and exceptional artistic plans for the future. Since that time, Volpe consulted for two years with Giuliani Partners. Currently, he consults with Theatre Projects Consultants providing comprehensive advice from project conception and design to daily operations and fiscal management. Volpe helps major arts organizations and universities as they plan a move into new facilities or address the reorganization and renovation of existing ones. He serves as a Senior Consultant for Hudson Scenic Studios advising on all aspects of management, labor negotiation, and strategic planning. He also heads The Volpe Group, Ltd, his own theater and management consulting firm. Volpe taught a course entitled “Managing in the Performing Arts” for five years at New York University’s Stern School of Business. He has been a guest lecturer at Columbia University, the University of Pennsylvania’s Wharton School of Business, Georgetown, SUNY Purchase, Harvard and Oxford University. He has received honorary degrees from numerous universities, including Georgetown University, Fordham University and Hamilton College. Volpe is the author of The Toughest Show on Earth, My Rise and Reign at The Metropolitan Opera, published by Random House in 2006.

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BIOGRAPHIES

MARGARET BARBIERI A S S I S TA N T D I R E C T O R

Born in South Africa of Italian parents, Margaret Barbieri moved to England to study at The Royal Ballet School. In 1965 she joined The Royal Ballet Touring Company (now Birmingham Royal Ballet), and became a Principal Dancer in 1970. During a highly successful 25-year dancing career, she danced most of the leading roles in the classical repertoire (including The Sleeping Beauty, Swan Lake, Coppélia, Romeo and Juliet, La Fille mal gardée, Taming of the Shrew, The Two Pigeons, and The Dream). However it was her major impact in the title role of Giselle at the age of 21 that first established her special reputation as a Romantic Ballerina. In 1973 she was invited to dance Giselle at the Deutsche Oper in Berlin and received high praise from the press and audience alike, a triumph which she repeated in 1974 when she returned to her native South Africa to dance the role in Durban. She replaced an indisposed Natalia Makarova at short notice in the same role for Norwegian National Ballet and made many guest appearances with companies internationally in Giselle, Swan Lake, Coppélia, and Cinderella. In addition to guesting, Barbieri also performed worldwide with The Royal Ballet. Barbieri worked closely with most of the great masters of the 20th Century, including Sir Frederick Ashton, Sir Kenneth MacMillan, Dame Ninette de Valois, John Cranko, Antony Tudor, Rudolf Nureyev, and Hans van Manen. Roles were created on her by Ashton, Sir Peter Wright, Tudor, David Bintley, Michael Corder, Ronald Hynd, and Joe Layton. Many of her best-known roles were televised, including Swanhilda (Coppélia), Black Queen (Checkmate), The Mother (Bintley’s Metamorphosis), Young Girl (Le Spectre de la Rose), and van Manen’s Grosse Fuge. With David Ashmole, she was featured in BBC TV’s Ballet Masterclass series, given by Dame Alicia Markova, who later coached her in Fokine’s The Dying Swan and Pavlova’s The Dragonfly. Barbieri retired from The Royal Ballet in 1990 to become Director of the new Classical Graduate Programme at London Studio Centre and Artistic Director of the annual touring company, Images of Dance. During her tenure, she was instrumental in devising the Classical Ballet Course for the BA Honours degree. Here she gave Christopher Wheeldon his first professional commission and Sir Matthew Bourne his first classical ballet commission. She also found time to teach at Birmingham Royal Ballet Company and the English National and Royal Ballet Schools, serving on The Royal Ballet’s Board of Governors from 1994-2000 and participating as an External Assessor for the Arts Council of England from 1995-2001. Her staging credits include Swan Lake Act II, The Fantasy Garden from Le Corsaire, and Kingdom of the Shades from La Bayadère for Images of Dance; Nureyev’s production of Raymonda Act III for K-Ballet in Japan; Ashton’s Façade for Scottish Ballet, K-Ballet, and Oregon Ballet Theatre; and The Two Pigeons for K-Ballet and State Ballet Theatre of Georgia. During the last 10 years at The Sarasota Ballet she has staged Wright’s production of Giselle; Ashton’s The Two Pigeons, Façade, Birthday Offering, Les Patineurs, Les Rendezvous, La Fille mal gardée, Valses nobles et sentimentales, and Jazz Calendar; de Valois’ The Rake’s Progress and Checkmate; Cranko’s Pineapple Poll; Wheeldon’s There Where She Loved and The American; Darrell’s Othello; Bourne’s Boutique; Bintley’s Four Scottish Dances; Layton’s The Grand Tour; Fokine’s Les Sylphides and Petrushka; Nureyev’s Raymonda Act III; and Samsova’s production of Paquita. Barbieri has been invited to judge at numerous ballet competitions across the globe, including Brazil, Japan, South Africa, the United States, and Europe. In April 2010, she was awarded Distinction by the University of the Arts, London, for her Post Graduate Certificate in Teaching and Learning. In 2013 she was invited to speak at the Ashton Symposium in London and became an Ashton Associate for the Sir Frederick Ashton Foundation. Having previously staged several ballets for The Sarasota Ballet, Barbieri was appointed Assistant Director in August 2012.

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Photography by: Markus Drew


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BIOGRAPHIES

RICARDO GRAZIANO |

RESIDENT CHOREOGRAPHER

In 2011, Ricardo Graziano was given the opportunity by Iain Webb to choreograph his first ballet, Shostakovich Suite, which premiered in October 2011. Following this ballet, Graziano choreographed four new ballets before being appointed Resident Choreographer by Iain Webb on stage in 2014 after a performance of Symphony of Sorrows. Since then he has choreographed four more complete works for the Company, including In a State of Weightlessness, which premiered 12 August 2015, as a part of The Sarasota Ballet’s first week-long residency at the Jacob’s Pillow Dance Festival. His other works for The Sarasota Ballet include Pomp and Circumstance, Valsinhas, Before Night Falls, En Las Calles de Murcia, Sonata in Four Movements, The Jolly Overture, Somewhere, and Amorosa. In total, Graziano has choreographed eight, one-act ballets and three divertissements. Graziano is also a Principal Dancer with The Sarasota Ballet.

PAVEL FOMIN |

BALLET MASTER

Pavel Fomin was born in Ukraine and received his ballet training at the Odessa Ballet School and the Kirov Ballet. From 1964 - 1990 he was a Principal Dancer with the State Academic Opera and Ballet House in Odessa City and danced most of the Russian classical repertoire, including Basilio in Don Quixote, Albrecht in Giselle, and Prince Désiré in The Sleeping Beauty. While still performing, Fomin rose quickly to the position of Principal Ballet Master and Artistic Director at the Odessa State Academy of Opera and Ballet. Since joining The Sarasota Ballet in 1991 as Ballet Master, Fomin has staged many ballets and pas de deux for the Company.

KATE HONEA |

ASSISTANT BALLET MISTRESS

While continuing to dance as a Principal with the Company, at the start of the 2018 - 2019 Season Kate Honea took on the role of Assistant Ballet Mistress under the guidance of Margaret Barbieri. As a student, Honea started her training at The Sarasota Ballet School 24 years ago. She has danced with the Company for 18 years, taught in The Sarasota Ballet School for 14 years, and choreographed 4 works for the company and several Endof-Year performances for the School. As Honea expands her experience from the stage to assisting in the studio, her goal is to help pass on the special coaching and knowledge that Iain and Margaret have passed on personally to her, and to preserve and maintain the high level of performances for which The Sarasota Ballet is known.

OCTAVIO MARTIN |

ASSISTANT BALLET MASTER

A native of Havana, Cuba, Martin received his training at the Cuban National Ballet School, joining the National Ballet of Cuba in 1994, and in 2001 was promoted to Primer Bailarin. In 2004 Martin was awarded the Alejo Carpentier medal, one of the highest honors an artist can receive in Cuba. For two years he was a Principal Guest Artist with the Royal Winnipeg Ballet of Canada and in 2006 he joined The Sarasota Ballet, rising to Principal Dancer in 2008, where he danced leading roles in ballets by Ashton, Balanchine, de Valois, and Wheeldon. As Assistant Ballet Master with the Company, Martin works closely with Director Iain Webb and Assistant Director Margaret Barbieri in working and rehearsing with the Company, and in addition teaches at The Sarasota Ballet School and The Margaret Barbieri Conservatory. 73


DAN I

P R I N C I PA L S E BROWN L EL

Joined The Sarasota Ballet in 2007 Promoted to Soloist in 2009 and Principal in 2010 Lead and Featured Roles include:

D

OG

RAZIAN O

RICA

R

Ashton’s Apparitions, Birthday Offering, Enigma Variations, La Fille mal gardée, Jazz Calendar, Marguerite and Armand, Méditation from Thaïs, Scènes de ballet, Symphonic Variations, Valses nobles et sentimentales, Varii Capricci, The Walk to the Paradise Garden; Balanchine’s Diamonds, Emeralds, The Four Temperaments, Prodigal Son, Serenade, Stars and Stripes, Western Symphony; de Valois’ Checkmate, The Rake’s Progress; Fokine’s Les Sylphides; Graziano’s Amorosa, In a State of Weightlessness; MacMillan’s Concerto, Las Hermanas; Nureyev’s Raymonda Act III; Robbins’ Fancy Free; Taylor’s Brandenburgs; Tharp’s In the Upper Room, Nine Sinatra Songs; Tuckett’s Lux Aeterna; Wheeldon’s The American, There Where She Loved; Wright’s Giselle, Summertide.

Joined The Sarasota Ballet in 2010 Promoted to Principal in 2011 Lead and Featured Roles include:

Ashton’s Birthday Offering, Enigma Variations, La Fille mal gardée, Illuminations, Jazz Calendar, Marguerite and Armand, Monotones II, Symphonic Variations, The Walk to the Paradise Garden; Balanchine’s Diamonds, Emeralds, Prodigal Son, Stars and Stripes, Western Symphony, Who Cares?; Bintley’s ‘Still Life’ at the Penguin Café; de Mille’s Rodeo; de Valois’ The Rake’s Progress; Fokine’s Les Sylphides; Graham’s Appalachian Spring; MacMillan’s Las Hermanas; Nijinsky’s L’Après-midi d’un Faune; Nureyev’s Raymonda Act III; Robbins’ The Concert; Samsova’s Paquita; Tharp’s In the Upper Room, Nine Sinatra Songs; Taylor’s Airs, Brandenburgs; Tuckett’s Changing Light, Lux Aeterna; Tudor’s Lilac Garden; Wheeldon’s The American, There Where She Loved; Wright’s Giselle, Summertide.

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T H E S A R A S OTA B A L L E T CO M PA N Y M E M B E R S


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KA T

P R I N C I PA L S E

H ON E A

Joined The Sarasota Ballet in 2002 Promoted to Soloist in 2006 and Principal in 2009 Lead and Featured Roles include:

AH I R

UL L A

N D

TO

Ashton’s La chatte métamorphosée en femme, La Fille mal gardée, Jazz Calendar, Marguerite and Armand, Les Patineurs, Les Rendezvous, Rhapsody, The Two Pigeons; Balanchine’s Apollo, The Four Temperaments, Rubies, Serenade, Stars and Stripes, Theme and Variations, Western Symphony, Who Cares?; Bintley’s ‘Still Life’ at the Penguin Café; Bruce’s Sergeant Early’s Dream; Flindt’s The Lesson; Fokine’s Petrushka, Les Sylphides; Graham’s Appalachian Spring; MacMillan’s Elite Syncopations; Prokovsky’s Anna Karenina; Robbins’ The Concert, Fancy Free; Samsova’s Paquita; Taylor’s Airs, Company B; Tuckett’s Changing Light; Tudor’s Gala Performance; Wheeldon’s The American, There Where She Loved; Wright’s Summertide.

V IC

T H E S A R A S OTA B A L L E T CO M PA N Y M E M B E R S

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Joined The Sarasota Ballet in 2007 Promoted to Coryphée in 2008 and Principal in 2009 Lead and Featured Roles include:

Ashton’s Apparitions, Birthday Offering, The Dream, Enigma Variations, Marguerite and Armand, Monotones II, Les Patineurs, Symphonic Variations, The Two Pigeons, Varii Capricci, A Wedding Bouquet; Balanchine’s Apollo, Emeralds, The Four Temperaments, Rubies, Serenade, Stars and Stripes; Bourne’s Boutique; de Valois’ The Rake’s Progress; Gomes’ Dear Life...; Fokine’s Petrushka, Les Sylphides; Graham’s Appalachian Spring; Graziano’s Amorosa, Symphony of Sorrows; Layton’s The Grand Tour; MacMillan’s Concerto; Pavlova’s The Dragonfly solo; Nureyev’s Raymonda Act III; Robbins’ The Concert; Taylor’s Airs; Tharp’s In the Upper Room; Tuckett’s Changing Light; Tudor’s Lilac Garden, Gala Performance; Wright’s Giselle. 75


KA T

P R I N C I PA L S YN L E

MAY

Joined The Sarasota Ballet in 2017 Promoted to Principal in 2018 Lead and Featured Roles include:

STRE

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EL L

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EN

Ashton’s The Dream, Enigma Variations, Meditation from Thaïs, Monotones I, Les Patineurs, Les Rendezvous, Rhapsody; Balanchine’s Diamonds, Stars and Stripes, Theme and Variations, Western Symphony; Bintley’s Four Scottish Dances, ‘Still Life’ at the Penguin Café; Bournonville’s The Kermesse in Bruges Act I Pas de Deux; Gomes’ Dear Life...; Graham’s Appalachian Spring; Graziano’s Amorosa, Shostakovich Suite, Symphony of Sorrows, Valsinhas; Hart’s John Ringling’s Circus Nutcracker; MacMillan’s Las Hermanas; Robbins’ The Concert; Samsova’s Paquita; Taylor’s Airs, Brandenburgs; Tuckett’s The Secret Garden; Tudor’s The Leaves are Fading; Walsh’s I Napoletani; Wheeldon’s There Where She Loved; Wright’s Giselle.

Joined The Sarasota Ballet in 2012 Promoted to Junior Principal in 2015 and Principal in 2016 Lead and Featured Roles include:

Ashton’s Apparitions, Birthday Offering, Enigma Variations, Illuminations, Jazz Calendar, Scènes de ballet, Sinfonietta, Symphonic Variations, A Wedding Bouquet; Balanchine’s Apollo, Diamonds, Emeralds, The Four Temperaments, Serenade, Western Symphony; Bintley’s Four Scottish Dances; de Mille’s Rodeo; Fokine’s Les Sylphides; Graham’s Appalachian Spring; Graziano’s In a State of Weightlessness, Symphony of Sorrows; MacMillan’s Concerto, Las Hermanas; Nijinsky’s L’Après-midi d’un Faune; Robbins’ The Concert, Fancy Free; Taylor’s Brandenburgs; Tuckett’s Changing Light, Lux Aeterna; Tudor’s Continuo, Lilac Garden; Walsh’s Wolfgang for Webb; Wheeldon’s The American, There Where She Loved. 76

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RIC A

P R I N C I PA L S R

RHO D E O S D

Joined The Sarasota Ballet in 2007 Promoted to Soloist in 2010 and Principal in 2012 Lead and Featured Roles include:

Ashton’s Birthday Offering, The Dream, La Fille mal gardée, Méditation from Thaïs, Monotones II, Les Rendezvous, Rhapsody, Scènes de ballet, Sinfonietta, Symphonic Variations; Balanchine’s Apollo, Diamonds, Emeralds, The Four Temperaments, Rubies, Serenade, Stars and Stripes, Theme and Variations, Western Symphony, Who Cares?; Bintley’s ‘Still Life’ at the Penguin Café; Bruce’s Sergeant Early’s Dream; Darrell’s Othello; de Valois’ Checkmate; Fokine’s Les Sylphides; Kobborg’s Salute; Graziano’s Symphony of Sorrows; Nijinsky’s L’Après-midi d’un Faune; Robbins’ The Concert, Fancy Free; Taylor’s Brandenburgs; Tuckett’s Changing Light; Wheeldon’s The American, There Where She Loved; Wright’s Giselle, Summertide.

LUK E

T H E S A R A S OTA B A L L E T CO M PA N Y M E M B E R S

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AUFUSS H SC

Joined The Sarasota Ballet in 2019 Previous Companies Royal Danish Ballet, Birmingham Royal Ballet, & Scottish Ballet Lead and Featured Roles with Other Companies include:

Ashton’s Dante Sonata, Romeo & Juliet; Bintley’s King Dances, Prince of the Pagodas; Bourne’s Highland Fling; Bournonville’s Kermesse in Bruges, Napoli, La Sylphide; Cranko’s Card Game; Lopez’s A Streetcar Named Desire; MacMillan’s Elite Syncopations; Neumeier’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream, Lady of the Camellias;

Lead and Featured Roles include:

Ashton’s Les Rendezvous; Balanchine’s Theme and Variations, Western Symphony; Graziano’s In a State of Weightlessness, Shostakovich Suite; Hart’s John Ringling’s Circus Nutcracker; Schaufuss’ La Sylphide pas de deux; Walsh’s I Napoletani 77


RIC

P R I N C I PA L S K

E IB

T H E S A R A S OTA B A L L E T CO M PA N Y M E M B E R S

RTONI

C H A R A C T E R P R I N C I PA L Joined The Sarasota Ballet in 2007 Promoted to Character Principal in 2014 Lead and Featured Roles include:

Ashton’s The Dream, Enigma Variations, Façade, La Fille mal gardée, Jazz Calendar, A Wedding Bouquet; Balanchine’s Bugaku, Diamonds, Rubies, Prodigal Son, Stars and Stripes, Western Symphony, Who Cares?; Bintley’s ‘Still Life’ at the Penguin Café; Bruce’s Sergeant Early’s Dream; de Mille’s Rodeo; de Valois’ Checkmate, The Rake’s Progress; Flindt’s The Lesson; Fokine’s Petrushka; Graham’s Appalachian Spring; Graziano’s Before Night Falls, Symphony of Sorrows; Layton’s The Grand Tour; North’s Troy Game; Robbins’ The Concert; Taylor’s Brandenburgs, Company B; Tharp’s In The Upper Room, Nine Sinatra Songs; Tuckett’s Changing Light, The Secret Garden; Walsh’s I Napoletani; Wheeldon’s The American; Wright’s Giselle.

EL IZ

FIRST SOLOIST

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TH SYKE E S AB

T H E S A R A S OTA B A L L E T CO M PA N Y M E M B E R S

Joined The Sarasota Ballet in 2009 Promoted to Soloist in 2014 and First Soloist in 2016 Featured Roles include: Ashton’s Birthday Offering, Enigma Variations, Façade, Jazz Calendar; Balanchine’s Diamonds, Emeralds, Serenade, Stars and Stripes, Theme and Variations; Bruce’s Sergeant Early’s Dream; de Mille’s Rodeo; Graziano’s Before Night Falls, In a State of Weightlessness; Kobborg’s Salute; Nureyev’s Raymonda Act III; MacMillan’s Concerto; Possokhov’s Firebird; Taylor’s Brandenburgs, Company B; Tudor’s Continuo; Wheeldon’s The American; Wright’s Giselle.


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SA M A

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Joined The Sarasota Ballet in 2019 Promoted to Soloist in 2020

Featured Roles include: Ashton’s The Dream, Façade, Jazz Calendar, Les Rendezvous, Monotones I, Tweedledum and Tweedledee, Varii Capricci, A Wedding Bouquet; Balanchine’s The Four Temperaments, Stars and Stripes, Who Cares?; Bintley’s Four Scottish Dances, ‘Still Life’ at the Penguin Café; Gomes’ Dear Life...; Graziano’s In a State of Weightlessness; Hart’s John Ringling’s Circus Nutcracker; Samsova’s Paquita; Taylor’s Company B; Wheeldon’s The American; Wright’s Summertide.

Featured Roles with The Sarasota Ballet include: Ashton’s Les Rendezvous; Balanchine’s Theme and Variations, Western Symphony; Graziano’s En Las Calles de Murcia, Shostakovich Suite; Hart’s John Ringling’s Circus Nutcracker; MacMillan’s Las Hermanas; Taylor’s Brandenburgs; Walsh’s I Napoletani. Featured Roles with The Finnish National Ballet included: Bintley’s Cinderella; Caniparoli’s Lady of the Camellias; Elo’s A Midsummer Night’s Dream; Goecke’s Lonesome George; Lifar’s Suite en blanc.

H D AR

OUSE

RYO K

RIC H

Joined The Sarasota Ballet in 2012 Promoted to Soloist in 2016

O

DOSHIM A S A

Joined The Sarasota Ballet in 2018 Previous Company | The Australian Ballet

Joined The Sarasota Ballet in 2011 Promoted to Soloist in 2016

Featured Roles with The Sarasota Ballet include: Ashton’s Apparitions, Les Patineurs; Balanchine’s Diamonds, Stars and Stripes, Western Symphony; Bintley’s Four Scottish Dances; Graziano’s Amorosa, En Las Calles de Murcia, In a State of Weightlessness; Hart’s John Ringling’s Circus Nutcracker; MacMillan’s Concerto pas de deux; Walsh’s I Napoletani; Wright’s Giselle. Featured Roles with The Australian Ballet included: Ashton’s Monotones II; Balanchine’s The Four Temperaments; Bintley’s Faster; Kylián’s Petite Mort; Tharp’s In the Upper Room.

Featured Roles include: Ashton’s Façade, Monotones I, The Two Pigeons, A Wedding Bouquet; Balanchine’s Bugaku, Emeralds, Serenade, Western Symphony, Who Cares?; Bintley’s Four Scottish Dances; Graham’s Appalachian Spring; Graziano’s Before Night Falls, In a State of Weightlessness; MacMillan’s Concerto; Samsova’s Paquita; Tuckett’s The Secret Garden; Tudor’s Continuo, The Leaves are Fading; Wheeldon’s The American, There Where She Loved; Wright’s The Mirror Walkers, Summertide. 79


UI B IA

A M I

RQUES

Joined The Sarasota Ballet in 2018 Promoted to Coryphée in 2020

Featured Roles include: Ashton’s Les Patineurs, Rhapsody, Varii Capricci Balanchine’s Theme and Variations, Stars and Stripes Bintley’s Four Scottish Dances Graham’s Appalachian Spring Hart’s John Ringling’s Circus Nutcracker Taylor’s Brandenburgs Tudor’s The Leaves are Fading

Featured Roles include: Ashton’s Les Patineurs, Les Rendezvous Balanchine’s Theme and Variations, Western Symphony Graziano’s En Las Calles de Murcia, Shostakovich Suite Robbins’ The Concert Taylor’s Brandenburgs Samsova’s Paquita Wright’s Giselle

PRATT L IE

IVA

Joined The Sarasota Ballet in 2015 Promoted to Coryphée in 2019

DA N 80

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YU R

AS

C O RY P H É E

N

SP

ITALE

Joined The Sarasota Ballet in 2012 Promoted to Coryphée in 2019

Joined The Sarasota Ballet in 2018 Promoted to Coryphée in 2020

Featured Roles include: Ashton’s Enigma Variations, Monotones II Balanchine’s Emeralds, The Four Temperaments Graham’s Appalachian Spring Graziano’s In a State of Weightlessness, Symphony of Sorrows North’s Troy Game Tuckett’s Lux Aeterna, The Secret Garden Wright’s Giselle

Featured Roles include: Ashton’s Enigma Variations, Rhapsody Balanchine’s Theme and Variations, Western Symphony Graham’s Appalachian Spring Graziano’s En Las Calles de Murcia, In a State of Weightlessness Taylor’s Brandenburgs Walsh’s I Napoletani Wright’s Giselle


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LMORBI A D V A

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T H E S A R A S OTA B A L L E T CO M PA N Y M E M B E R S

941.359.0099

Joined The Sarasota Ballet in 2016 Promoted to Coryphée in 2018

Joined The Sarasota Ballet in 2012 Promoted to Coryphée in 2019

Featured Roles include: Ashton’s The Dream, Les Patineurs, Les Rendezvous Balanchine’s Stars and Stripes Bintley’s ‘Still Life’ at the Penguin Café Graziano’s Shostakovich Suite, Valsinhas Hart’s John Ringling’s Circus Nutcracker Taylor’s Brandenburgs Tuckett’s Changing Light, The Secret Garden

Featured Roles include: Ashton’s Enigma Variations, Monotones II Balanchine’s Emeralds, The Four Temperaments Graham’s Appalachian Spring Graziano’s Symphony of Sorrows North’s Troy Game Tuckett’s Lux Aeterna, The Secret Garden Wright’s Giselle

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DOM I

Joined The Sarasota Ballet in 2019 Trained at | The Sarasota Ballet Studio Company (18/19) & Richmond Ballet

KORTE

Joined The Sarasota Ballet in 2018 Previous Company | Ballet West II

OM

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U E J E NK IQ I

L AS

EPROH

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ET 82

N

Joined The Sarasota Ballet in 2018 Previous Company | Atlanta Ballet 2

KIMBRELL

Joined The Sarasota Ballet in 2019 Previous Company | Cincinnati Ballet Second Company

HUTTO

Joined The Sarasota Ballet in 2020 Previous Company | Texas Ballet Theater

N

AN

LA Y A

GUEREDO FI

S

Joined The Sarasota Ballet in 2018 Previous Company | Oklahoma City Ballet

C

Joined The Sarasota Ballet in 2018 Trained at | Elmhurst Ballet School

LAVIN

CL

EG R I

EVANS

N

A

Joined The Sarasota Ballet in 2019 Previous Company | Los Angeles Ballet

Y VE

T H E S A R A S OTA B A L L E T CO M PA N Y M E M B E R S

ER I

HA R

OSTACH E

MI K

C AI

JA N

MI H

CO RPS DE BA LL E T

Joined The Sarasota Ballet in 2020 Previous Company | National Ballet of Canada


30 T H A N N I V E R S A R Y S E A S O N 2020 – 2021

ERKIN S

KE LL

Joined The Sarasota Ballet in 2019 Trained at | The Sarasota Ballet Studio Company (18/19) & Kansas City Ballet

Y

L VA

LADARE S

| W W W. S A R A S OTA B A L L E T.O R G

LLIAMS WI

Joined The Sarasota Ballet in 2016 Trained at | The Washington School of Ballet

E

A NN A

L PE

LEGRINO

Joined The Sarasota Ballet in 2018 Trained at | Eastern Connecticut Ballet

Joined The Sarasota Ballet in 2018 Previous Company | Atlanta Ballet 2

PAI G

AP I L

Joined The Sarasota Ballet in 2018 Previous Company | National Ballet of Canada

LE N IN

EM E

Joined The Sarasota Ballet in 2018 Trained at | The Sarasota Ballet Studio Company (18/19) & English National Ballet School

R OST ANDE N E

J UL IA

YU

LAU R

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NAKA NO

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C ORP S D E B A L L ET R

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EB E R

Joined The Sarasota Ballet in 2019 Previous Company | Intuição Companhia de Ballet

UN G YO

Joined The Sarasota Ballet in 2018 Trained at | School of Pennsylvania Ballet

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Trained at | The Sarasota Ballet Studio Company (19/20) Washington Ballet Trainee Program

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MA C

JO E

LVA SE

MC

ALPINE

OLI

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VOGT N Y

Previous Company | Charlotte Ballet II

Trained at | The Sarasota Ballet Studio Company (18-20) Canada’s National Ballet School

ME L

KENNE

ANDRE A

Second Season Apprentice Trained at | English National Ballet School

Trained at | The Sarasota Ballet Studio Company (19/20) The JKO School at American Ballet Theatre

L

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CEL L E T AR T

I

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LYN CASS FA A DA

D

APPRENTICES

E WELLS I AN

Trained at | The Sarasota Ballet Studio Company (19/20) Ellison Ballet Professional Training Program


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A state of the art outpatient physical therapy clinic, offering top of the line rehabilitation services. Specialties Include: Specialties Include: Orthopedic Injuries Orthopedic Injuries Sports Injuries

Sports Injuries Balance

Balance

Post-Operative Rehabilitation

Post-Operative Rehabilitation

Bodywise Physical Therapy 436 South Tamiami Trail 5831 Bee Ridge Rd Osprey,Suite Florida 34229 300 Sarasota, FL 34233

941.375.8624

941.378.5100 BodyWiseSarasota.com

BodyWiseSarasota.com info@bodywisesarasota.com info@bodywisesarasota.com

Hands-On Health

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Trained at | School of American Ballet

E M OS R

N

N

Trained at | Charlotte Ballet

N AMA

IELDS

M

OR I

O KA

Second Season Studio Company Trained at | The Royal Ballet School

IA RYAN H T

CY

CO LI

Second Season Studio Company Trained at | Boston Ballet School Trainee Program

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N MARTIN O S

AF D

Second Season Studio Company Trained at | The JKO School at American Ballet Theatre

N

NESSKO G

Trained at | Margaret Barbieri Conservatory

RI

LA

UDIAM

HAR

BL A K E

Trained at | Boston Ballet School Trainee Program

C N Y

RE

Y

KAT EL

N

A LL E N

AT

KE N

STUD IO C O M PA N Y

Trained at | The Margaret Barbieri Conservatory


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Trained at | The Margaret Barbieri Conservatory

N

CA LE

T SU

HERL

A

Trained at | Orlando Molina Ballet Training Center

KENTI E AR W

N

N T HO M A S JE

BRIAN

Trained at | The School of Pennsylvania Ballet

ON

TE R R I

SMITH R A

D

Second Season Studio Company Trained at | School of American Ballet

L

N SKY

ENDE

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HW C S

ER

LILIAN

S T U D I O C OMPANY

Previous Company | Atlanta Ballet 2

The Sarasota Ballet Studio Company provides a stepping stone from pre -professional trainee to Company member. This t wo -year audition- only program provides talented young dancers with a comprehensive curriculum to refine their ar tistic and technical sk ills plus prepare them for The Sarasota Ballet and other national and international companies. Studio Company dancers also have a week ly rotation into Company class, understudy Company roles, and the oppor tunit y to per form with the corps de ballet. Studio Company dancers are ambassadors of The Sarasota Ballet and represent the organization, bringing dance education programs to local schools along with presenting thier own reper toire in regular per formances within the local communit y. I n 2019-2020, they created roles in K ate Honea’s Stella Natalis as par t of The Sarasota Ballet ’s collaboration with K ey Chorale. I n addition, they per formed at Marie Selby Gardens as par t of Dali N ights and at Valencia Lak es retirement communit y. Members of The Sarasota Ballet Studio Company have gone on to join The Sarasota Ballet and other professional companies including Ballet H ispánico, Ballet Austin, Croatian National Ballet, Orlando Ballet, The Florida Ballet, and The Washington Ballet.

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T H E S A R A S OTA B A L L E T

2 0 2 0 D I G I TA L S E A S O N

LES PATINEURS

MONOTONES II

VISION SOLO

MÉDITATION FROM THAÏS

ROMEO & JULIET

DONIZETTI VARIATIONS

FAÇADE

TARANTELLA

LA CHATTE

THE FOUR TEMPERAMENTS

WESTERN SYMPHONY

THE INFERNAL GALOP

MIRROR WALKERS

CLAIR DE LUNE

SUMMER

NUTCRACKER

AMOROSA

WHO CARES?


MEDIA SPONSOR

DIGITAL PROGRAM 1

23 - 27 OCTOBER 2020

SIR FREDERICK ASHTON CHOREOGRAPHER

Few choreographers have left an imprint quite so deep on the world of British ballet than Sir Frederick Ashton. Born in Ecuador 17 September 1904, he was determined to become a dancer after witnessing Anna Pavlova perform in 1917. Studying ballet with Léonide Massine and Dame Marie Rambert in London, he first delved into choreography under Rambert’s guidance, creating for her Ballet Club. He would later work with Dame Ninette de Valois, founder of the Vic-Wells Ballet, with whom he would continue to collaborate for decades — first as resident choreographer of the company, then as principal choreographer when de Valois’ company received its royal charter in 1957 and was retitled, “The Royal Ballet.” Ashton succeeded de Valois as Director of the Royal Ballet upon her retirement in 1963, a position he would hold until his own retirement in July 1970. After his retirement, Ashton created several short ballets as pièces d’occasion; he died 19 August 1988, leaving behind a vast body of work including more than eighty ballets, and inspiring generations of dancers and choreographers to keep the spirit of British ballet thriving.

INTRODUCTION TO THE FIRST DIGITAL PROGRAM Our first Digital Program of the Season serves as a celebration of the works of Sir Frederick Ashton. With a balletic catalogue spanning over six decades, Ashton’s choreographic career carried the Royal Ballet to success during its formative years, and he left an enormous impression on the world of ballet in the 20th century. A major component of The Sarasota Ballet’s driving force is to preserve and restore historic ballets, especially those of Ashton; as a consequence of the company’s success with these restoration efforts, The Sarasota Ballet has garnered notable national and international attention. Thus, opening our Digital Fall Season with a tribute to his career felt like a perfect match. This program features seven ballets and excerpts spanning Ashton’s career, each selected for its presentability and compatibility with the digital medium.

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30 T H A N N I V E R S A R Y S E A S O N 2020 – 2021

LES PATINEURS

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EXTRACTS

First performed by the Vic-Wells Ballet (now the Royal Ballet) 16 February 1937, Les Patineurs depicts a whimsical skating party comprised of a series of divertissements; couples glide across a simulated lake, while a lone Blue Boy, the virtuoso soloist of the ballet, strives to attract his own skating partner. Set to music composed by Giacomo Meyerbeer and arranged by Constant Lambert, Les Patineurs would prove a major success for Ashton and would be performed by the Royal Ballet almost every season through 1968. With a charming effervescence complementing structural complexity, Les Patineurs has become one of Ashton’s signature ballets.

MONOTONES II Created as a gala performance piece in 1965 in benefit of the Royal Ballet Benevolent Fund, Monotones II was inspired by Erik Satie’s 1888 trio of piano compositions, Trois Gymnopédies. A pas de trois of two men and one woman, the 24 March premiere was danced by Vyvyan Lorrayne, Sir Anthony Dowell, and Robert Mead. White-clad, above-lit dancers move with an ethereal air, coupling Ashton’s clean lines of form with a touch of weightlessness. The initial success of the work was sufficiently significant to inspire Ashton to expand the piece the following year, employing Satie’s Gnossiennes, with what would become known as Monotones I.

MÉDITATION FROM THAÏS This ballet traces its origins to an 1890 novel by Anatole France, based on the life of its namesake 4th-century Saint Thaïs of Egypt. It was first adapted into an opera, Thaïs, in 1894 by Jules Massenet to a libretto by Louis Gallet; the opera has since become known for, among other elements, an emotionally potent second-act instrumental intermezzo, Méditation. In 1971 Ashton created a pas de deux on Dame Antoinette Sibley and Sir Anthony Dowell around this Méditation for a gala performance at the Adelphi Theatre. A “vision scene” unrelated to the plot of the opera, Méditation from Thaïs was glowingly received, with Dame Marie Rambert considering it one of Ashton’s three masterpieces.

LA CHATTE MÉTAMORPHOSÉE EN FEMME A ballet solo created on Merle Park for a performance in Vienna on 31 March 1985, La chatte métamorphosée en femme (titled Die verwandelte Katze for its original production) draws themes from an 1858 opéra comique of the same title, as well as the opera’s music by Jacques Offenbach.

THE SLEEPING BEAUTY

VISION SOLO

A production of the original 1890 ballet choreographed by Marius Petipa with a score by Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky, The Sleeping Beauty premiered with Sadler’s Wells Ballet at the Royal Opera House 20 February 1946 with significant choreographic additions by Ashton as well as Dame Ninette de Valois. Ashton would continue to revise the ballet’s choreography over the years; for a 1952 performance, he created a new variation for Aurora, including this Vision Scene, on Dame Beryl Grey.

ROMEO & JULIET

BALCONY PAS DE DEUX

A rich, intimate treatment of Shakespeare’s iconic romantic tragedy, Ashton’s version of Romeo & Juliet was created for the Royal Danish Ballet and first performed 19 May 1955. Ashton choreographed Romeo & Juliet with a smaller stage in mind, encouraging the audience to direct their attention to the dramatic subtleties and deep characterization. The balcony scene in particular has since been reproduced for gala performances and other events, putting on full display the chemistry and interplay between its titular leads.

FAÇADE

FOXTROT, VALSE, TANGO-PASODOBLE

An early Ashton piece first performed by the Camargo Society 26 April 1931, the ballet Façade is a loose adaptation of a series of poems of the same name by Dame Edith Sitwell, set to music originally composed by William Walton for Sitwell’s debut recitation of her poetry. A plotless oneact ballet initially comprised of seven divertissements, with three more added by Ashton over the decade following its premiere, Façade serves as a prototypical display of Ashton’s signature wit and charm, Ashton himself dancing in the original cast for several divertissements including the Tango-Pasodoble.

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MEDIA SPONSOR

DIGITAL PROGRAM 2

20 - 24 NOVEMBER 2020

GEORGE BALANCHINE CHOREOGRAPHER

Born Georgiy Melitonovich Balanchivadze on 22 January 1902 in Saint Petersburg, Russia, George Balanchine would become a significant choreographic force in the United States, primarily stemming from his thirty-five-year tenure as co-founder and Artistic Director of New York City Ballet. His early years were spent studying and performing ballet across Europe, for several years also serving as choreographer and ballet master of Sergei Diaghilev’s Ballets Russes. Though a knee injury would end his performing career, and bankruptcy after Diaghilev’s death ended the Ballets Russes, Balanchine continued choreographing and staging ballets with the Ballets Russes de Monte-Carlo. Upon his arrival to the United States in 1933, he quickly went about founding the School of American Ballet, with Lincoln Kirstein’s assistance. After this, he would begin choreographing Broadway musicals and, later, Hollywood films, coinciding with a company relocation to Hollywood in 1938. With Kirstein, he would found the Ballet Society in 1946, a dance company which would later spin off and evolve into New York City Ballet, where Balanchine would remain until his death 30 April 1983. Renowned for his musicality, he would frequently work with major composers and musicians of his era and sculpt his choreography meticulously around the score. His contributions to the world of dance in the 20th century would result in him often being styled as, “the father of American ballet.”

INTRODUCTION TO THE SECOND DIGITAL PROGRAM Balanchine’s prolific creative output comprises a significant segment of neoclassical ballet choreographed in the United States during the 20th century. Many of these works are shaped around deeply American themes and motifs, as Balanchine was keen on celebrating the cultural tropes of his adopted home country. Our second Digital Program reflects Balanchine’s uncanny ability to capture musical themes and tones via the visual medium of ballet. From the dusty town roads of the Old West to the bustling streets of New York, with a brief tour of Italy in between, this Balanchine-focused Digital Program brings us through some of the legendary choreographer’s favorite destinations.

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THE FOUR TEMPERAMENTS Created for the fledgling Ballet Society, the forerunner of New York City Ballet, and part of the company’s inaugural performance on 20 November 1946, The Four Temperaments draws inspiration, as well as its title, from the four personality types—melancholic, sanguinic, phlegmatic, and choleric—associated with the archaic “humoural” theory of medicine. Balanchine had commissioned the score from German composer Paul Hindemith in 1940, with the intention of performing it himself for friends and guests at evening social occasions. The success of this modernist work, as well as several others over the following couple years, would lead to securing company residency at the New York City Center and officially changing the organization’s name to New York City Ballet.

DONIZETTI VARIATIONS

PAS DE DEUX

Created for a New York City Ballet program, “Salute to Italy,” in celebration of Italy’s unification centennial anniversary, Donizetti Variations premiered 16 November 1960 alongside La Sonnambula and Monumentum Pro Gesualdo. While the latter two ballets of the program were somber in tone, Donizetti Variations was infused with cheer and sunshine to balance them out. The music—as well as the ballet’s namesake—is sourced from Gaetano Donizetti’s Don Sebastien, an 1843 opera.

TARANTELLA This intense pas de deux, intended as a showcase for New York City Ballet dancers Patricia McBride and Edward Villella, was first performed 7 January 1964 at the New York City Center. An arrangement of Louis Moreau Gottschalk’s Grande Tarantelle, based on the fast-paced tarantella folk dance form popular in Southern Italy and Argentina, was prepared by Kay for the ballet. Due to its classical technical flair, Tarantella has been frequently revived as a gala and festival performance piece.

WESTERN SYMPHONY

2ND MOVEMENT (ADAGIO)

Balanchine’s rollicking tribute to the Old West, Western Symphony was created for New York City Ballet and premiered 7 September 1954. The accompanying score, arranged by frequent NYCB collaborator Hershy Kay, includes an assortment of classic American folk songs reminiscent of the era. Balanchine was inspired to craft a “love letter” ballet to the Western films he had grown to adore after his 1933 arrival to the United States; cowboys and dance hall girls combine classical ballet forms with square dance gestures in this ballet as charming in character as it is outstanding in technique.

WHO CARES? In 1937, Balanchine was in discussion with composer and pianist George Gershwin to collaborate on a ballet project, after their joint efforts on the Hollywood musical film, The Goldwyn Follies; these plans, however, would never come to fruition due to Gershwin’s untimely passing that year. Thirty-three years later, Balanchine created Who Cares? incorporating sixteen of Gershwin’s popular works, as a tribute to both Gershwin himself as well as New York City. Upon its opening night 7 February 1970, Balanchine received the Handel Medallion, New York’s highest cultural award, in recognition of his contributions to the performing arts.

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DIGITAL PROGRAM 3 INTRODUCTION TO THE THIRD DIGITAL PROGRAM In a departure from our first two Digital Programs, our December Program represents the choreographic breadth achieved through The Sarasota Ballet’s expansive repertoire, as well as the myriad artistic voices that have shaped our Company over these past thirty years. These artists include many of the choreographic masters of the 20th century, such as Sir Kenneth MacMillan and Sir Peter Wright, as well as forces sculpting the landscape of ballet today – Sir Matthew Bourne, Dominic Walsh, and the Company’s own Resident Choreographer Ricardo Graziano, among so many others. Along with excerpts from beautiful ballets by these artists, a traditional Nutcracker pas de deux rounds out the Digital Program with a dash of holiday spirit.

THE INFERNAL GALOP

MERMAN SOLO

An earlier work in Sir Matthew Bourne’s choreographic catalogue, The Infernal Galop premiered in 1989 with Bourne’s company, Adventures in Motion Pictures, to mark the bicentennial of the French Revolution. A comic ballet of French tropes and iconography viewed through a distinctly English lens, Bourne’s The Infernal Galop comprises a series of vignettes—two lovers engaged in an overblown romantic spectacle, a fashion show replete with pretense, an all too curious trio of men by a pissoir—all set to popular French cabaret songs. This Program features the “Merman Solo,” set to Charles Trenet’s La Mer (The Sea), in which a dressing gown-attired gentleman of the ocean tantalizes three sailors.

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18 - 22 DECEMBER 2020 THE MIRROR WALKERS

This enrapturing pas de deux was created by Sir Peter Wright for Stuttgart Ballet and first performed 27 April 1963. Choreographed to Tchaikovsky’s Suite No. 1 for Orchestra in D major, Op. 43, The Mirror Walkers seamlessly combines rich musicality with understated elegance, dancers clad in stark-white physically manifesting the score in a passionate display of fluid grace.

CLAIR DE LUNE

This dazzling solo, set to Claude Debussy’s eponymous piano suite movement, was created by Dominic Walsh for his Dominic Walsh Dance Company; it premiered 29 April 2011 as part of the Company’s presentation by The Sarasota Ballet.

AMOROSA

PAS DE DEUX

Premiered 25 January 2019 by The Sarasota Ballet, this Ricardo Graziano creation sets five couples in striking ruby and black attire to the powerful momentum of Antonio Vivaldi’s Cello Concertos.

ADDITIONAL WORKS TO BE ANNOUNCED


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OTHELLO

CHANGING LIGHT THE LETTER V

MARK MORRIS DANCE GROUP

DONIZETTI VARIATIONS

SERENADE

ELITE SYNCOPATIONS CHECKMATE

FALL RIVER LEGEND

LES BICHES


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OT H E L LO PROGRAM 4

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REFRAC TIONS

OTHELLO In creating a thirty-minute ballet inspired by Shakespeare’s Moor of Venice, set to Liszt’s dramatically-charged score, Peter Darrell caught the essence of the central conflict between its five principal characters and, like the American contemporary choreographer José Limón in his 1949 Othello-based The Moor’s Pavane, made some bold choices that work in purely dance terms. The ballet opens formally, with Iago presented almost as a sinister Master of Ceremonies, introducing the tragic quartet of characters, handling the stage properties (goblets, handkerchief, etc.), controlling the action throughout. The first scene establishes the characters and develops Iago’s plot to achieve the hero’s downfall. Darrell’s articulate choreography and mime bring to life the familiar actors in the drama, leading to Cassio’s drunken fall from grace and Othello’s jealous confrontation with his innocent wife Desdemona.

PETER DARRELL

CHOREOGRAPHER

Peter Darrell (1929-1987) was one of a group of young choreographers, along with John Cranko and Sir Kenneth MacMillan, who emerged from the Sadler’s Wells (later Royal Ballet) School shortly after the war, and joined the more experimental Sadler’s Wells Theatre Ballet. But Darrell soon left to dance in musicals and in Sweden before taking part in the Mercury Theatre’s Ballet Workshop, where he made a series of well-received ballets, and making his professional debut with a new work for Festival Ballet.

Then in 1957 he joined with the choreographer Elizabeth West to form a new touring company, Western Theatre Ballet, based in Bristol, with a repertory of dance-dramas on contemporary themes, creating works like The Prisoners (1957), on a jail break, and Mods and Rockers, in 1963 the first ballet to After a brief duet for Emilia and Desdemona, the second scene the music of The Beatles. A Wedding Present dealt with presents the final, fatal encounter when Othello homosexuality, while Sun into Darkness (1966), strangles Desdemona (in the ballet, with the the first British evening-length ballet with a very handkerchief Iago has duped him into contemporary setting, with ritual murders in accepting as evidence of her guilty amour a Cornish village. Choreography by with the disgraced Cassio), before his Peter Darrell Following West’s death in 1962, Darrell realization and suicide. The ballet oversaw the company’s eventual ends where it began, with Cassio and Music by move in 1969, for financial reasons, Emilia seated in formal attitudes Franz Liszt to Glasgow, becoming Scottish Ballet, and Iago, clutching his “motiveless which required a more mainstream malignancy”...or is it grief? Designed by repertory. But in addition to bringing in The ballet does not seek to present Peter Farmer ballets by a variety of choreographers, all the characters and complete action he created a number of new ballets of Shakespeare’s famous tragedy, Lighting Design by including several evening-length opting instead for a powerful, formal Aaron Muhl works in addition to his new versions of and intimate summary of the interaction standard works like Swan Lake and Giselle, between Othello, Desdemona, Emilia, and his 1972 Tales of Hoffman was restaged Cassio, and Iago. Nor did Peter Darrell give us by American Ballet Theatre in 1973. Darrell also a “moor” in the traditional pattern: his Othello is made several ballets specifically for television and the danseur noble of the great tragic ballet tradition occasionally choreographed for other companies, as with (think Swan Lake’s Siegfried or Giselle’s Albrecht), rather than Othello. Shakespeare’s exotically black-visaged outsider. Replacing Because he worked primarily with companies outside London, words with dance, Darrell presents Othello’s flawed nobility, Darrell never achieved the reputation of such contemporaries as gorgeously poetic language and over-powerful imagination in Cranko and MacMillan. But he had, nevertheless, a major impact terms of the romantic ballet dancer, rather than the orthodox on the growth of audiences for ballet in England and Scotland actor of dramatic tradition. as well as pioneering the treatment of themes long considered Darrell made the ballet, first danced in Trieste in 1971, for a outside the realm of ballet. touring company led by André Prokovsky and Galina Samsova that later became their New London Ballet and has since been danced by a number of other companies.

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FRANZ LISZT COMPOSER

Franz Liszt was the precociously talented son of a musically inclined overseer in the service of the Hungarian Prince Esterhazy. Born in 1811, he became the most celebrated piano virtuoso of his day, as well as a much-admired teacher, conductor, and composer. He also encouraged the careers of such other composers as Wagner, Berlioz, Grieg, Saint-Säens, and Borodin. In Vienna, the young Liszt studied piano with Czerny and composition with Salieri. By the age of nine he was giving concerts and composing. In 1827, after his father’s death, Liszt lived with his mother in Paris, teaching and belatedly educating himself by reading and meeting leading First Performed by authors and artists. Inspired by hearing New London Ballet Paganini play, Liszt launched himself as a 17 November 1971 virtuoso concert pianist, and for 20 years toured Europe to triumphant acclaim, First Performed by giving much of his fees to charities.

The Sarasota Ballet

From 1833-1839, he lived with the 29 January 2010 married Countess Marie d’Agoult. Two of their children died, in 1859 and 1862, and the third, Cosima, later married Richard Wagner. In 1847, at the age of 35, he met the married Princess Carolyne zu Sayn-Wittgenstein, who persuaded him to retire from concert work, settle in Weimar, and concentrate on composing. In later life, unable to marry Princess Carolyne, Liszt took minor orders of PETER FARMER the priesthood and, known as the Abbé Liszt, divided his time DESIGNER between Rome, Weimar, and Budapest. Born 1941 in Luton (England), Peter Farmer enjoyed a hugely successful and prolific theatre design career, embracing over 300 theatre and dance productions, with a special sympathy for set and costume design in dance, including productions for many of the w o r l d ’s major companies including The Royal Ballet, Stuttgart Ballet, London Festival Ballet, Australian Ballet, Royal Winnipeg Ballet, and Vienna State Opera. Farmer’s first ballet design was for Ballet Rambert’s Agrionia (1964), the first of many key collaborations with choreographer Jack Carter. Since then, he collaborated with most of the world’s leading choreographers and dance companies, including designs for Sir Peter Wright’s Giselle and Coppélia, Dame Alicia Markova’s Les Sylphides, Robert North’s Troy Game, Sir Frederick Ashton’s The Dream, Andre Prokovsky’s The Three Musketeers, Sir Kenneth MacMillan’s Winter Dreams, Erik Bruhn’s Chopiniana, Stanton Welch’s Madame Butterfly, and Houston Ballet’s Manon, among many others. Farmer enjoyed a possibly unparalleled reputation among British theatre and dance designers, and his designs of both costumes and sets for dance have had a major impact on 20th century theatre design. Peter Farmer passed away on the 1st of January 2017. 99


CHANGING LIGHT PROGRAM 4

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REFRAC TIONS

CHANGING LIGHT

WILL TUCKETT

Having previously worked with The Sarasota Ballet in 2010 and 2012 restaging Spielende Kinder, Changing Light marked Will Tuckett’s first ballet commissioned for the Company by Director Iain Webb. While the choreography and look of the ballet didn’t materialize until Tuckett’s arrival in Sarasota, the inspirational spark came months before from Composer and close friend, Jeremy Holland-Smith, whose new and unnamed composition would form the foundation for Changing Light. “I remember clearly my arrival at the airport on my trip to make Changing Light. Whilst I had a loose plan and structure for the whole piece, there was something niggling, a piece of the creative jigsaw somehow missing that I couldn’t put my finger on. “As we drove over the Skyway Bridge I played Jeremy’s music again on my headphones and turning to the window looked out over one of the most spectacular sights I have ever seen, the Sarasota sunset. The light and sea appeared to merge, the colours turning from sky blue to orange, then pink, then purple. It was both utterly beautiful and totally invigorating and made me feel really good just to be alive. “I realized that the missing piece of the jigsaw was the very place itself - Sarasota. “Choreographing this piece was pure pleasure. The company approached every rehearsal with such vigour, appetite and desire to dance that I could hardly bear for each day of rehearsals to end. It is this energy and love of dance that is woven into the steps I put together. “Then onstage I worked for the first time with Aaron Muhl who provided with lights what I had seen in the sky that very first evening over the sea.

“Sadly I don’t think things have changed that much in the world. There are some truly terrible things happening around the globe but we all need to keep faith and have hope in our ability to change the future and, even more, we need to keep our faith and hope in one another. “If there’s one thing that for me that can embody that sense of hope, it is dance. That feeling that the moment is ours, right now to move forward in, has remained and I believe we should all hold onto that. “I am thrilled that Iain has chosen to remount Changing Light and it gives me huge pleasure to be able to work with this wonderful company again.”

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Will Tuckett is an award-winning choreographer, dancer, and director of theater, opera, and film. Trained at The Royal Ballet School, he was a member of The Royal Ballet from 1990–2005 working as a choreographer and dancer. He is now a Principal Guest Artist. He has choreographed for all the major UK dance companies and also in Europe, the USA, Canada, Japan, and China. In 2006 he was made the first ROH2 Creative Associate for The Royal Opera House, responsible for devising and delivering an innovative series of works for new and family audiences. These have now been seen within the Opera House and on tour, both in the UK and abroad. Films of his productions include Pinocchio (BBC), Stravinsky’s The Soldier’s Tale (WowWow TV Japan), and Elizabeth (Sky Arts).

Awards include the Cosmopolitan Dance Award, The Ursula Moreton Award for Choreography (twice), Jerwood Foundation Award for Choreography, and Varna International Competition Award for Best Choreography. His production of Choreography by The Wind in the Willows transferred into the West End in 2013 and won the 2014 Will Tuckett Olivier Award for Best Entertainment. Music by He was Artistic Associate of The Royal Opera House 2007-2011 and was the Jeremy Holland-Smith Clore Dance Fellow 2008-2010. He Lighting Design by also directs for theater, opera, musical theater, and film, including work for Aaron Muhl The Royal Shakespeare Company, Shakespeare’s Globe, Almeida Theatre, Sage Gateshead, the Whitechapel Gallery, Tate Modern, Tate Tanks, The National Gallery, the BBC, and Channel 4.

“I said at the time of making the piece, ‘There’s a feeling that things have not been brilliant lately and we’re all feeling slightly embattled. The only way around it is just to say, shall we do it?’

- Will Tuckett

CHOREOGRAPHER

Additionally, Tuckett directed and choreographed the full-length dance/drama Elizabeth for The Royal Ballet, which toured internationally through the summer of 2017, directed Rossini’s L’Italiana in Algeri for Garsington Opera, and choreographed Cole Porter’s Kiss Me Kate for Opera North and Welsh National Opera, currently touring throughout the UK. His most recent work in North America was a new fulllength Pinocchio for the National Ballet of Canada and Texas Ballet Theater.


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JEREMY HOLLANDSMITH

COMPOSER

Jeremy is a composer, orchestral arranger and conductor who has amassed an extensive range of work in film, television, ballet and theater over recent years. Jeremy studied at the Junior Guildhall School of Music and the Royal Northern College of Music, winning numerous prizes. Jeremy’s most recent projects include composing the score for the feature film The Passing, orchestrating and conducting the score for A Royal Night Out, The Secret Garden for The Sarasota Ballet, his work with Murray Gold on Life Story and Doctor Who and continues to work on the hugely successful BBC series, The Musketeers. Jeremy has also worked closely with Joby Talbot on numerous projects Commissioned by including Psychoville (BBC), Hunky Dory, The Sarasota Ballet Alice’s Adventures in Wonderland (ROH), and Tide Harmonic (Signum Records). In First Performed by 2016, he orchestrated and conducted The Sarasota Ballet Joby’s scores for Sing!, the forthcoming 1 February 2013 animation movie from Illumination and Universal studios and Out of Shadowland, a new live Musical show for Disney Sea, Tokyo. As a conductor, Jeremy has worked with many orchestras including the BBC National Orchestra of Wales, BBC Philharmonic, BBC Concert Orchestra and the Brussels Philharmonic. He made his debut at the BBC Proms in 2015 conducting the BBC Concert Orchestra in the Life Story Prom presented by Sir David Attenborough. He has also been Musical Director and Composer on numerous productions for the Royal Shakespeare Company and a Musical Director for several West End productions, including The Lord of the Rings, Billy Elliot and The Thief of Bagdad.

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D O N I Z E T T I VA R I AT I O N S PROGRAM 4

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REFRAC TIONS

DONIZETTI VARIATIONS

GEORGE BALANCHINE

Although Balanchine could craft an elaborate pas de deux as well as anyone, as with Tchaikovsky Pas de Deux, he generally preferred to surround a central couple with a small corps, making a show-off piece into a small ballet useful for filling out programs. So with Donizetti Variations, first seen November 1960, using ballet music Gaetano Donizetti wrote for his final opera, Dom Sébastien, written in 1843 for the Paris Opera. It comes from the second act, set in an African court and has been called Donizetti’s “finest achievement in the field of music for ballet.” But it wasn’t until the ballet was revised in 1971 with new costumes that most ballet goers recognized how Balanchine was using the nimble footwork typical of August Bournonville, the great nineteenth century Danish choreographer, as preserved in Copenhagen, where Balanchine had spent time on several occasions, first as a guest balletmaster in 1930 and again when his wife, Tanaquil LeClercq, was hospitalized there in 1956 with polio.

CHOREOGRAPHER

Probably the most important and influential ballet figure in America, he was born Georgi Balanchivadze in St. Petersburg in 1904. More than three decades after his death in New York in 1983 we can appreciate more fully the huge impact of a choreographer whose creative life spanned 60 years, carrying the grand Russian classical style triumphantly into the modernist era, establishing one of the world’s leading companies—New York City Ballet—and giving America its own classical ballet tradition.

Graduating from the Petrograd Imperial School of Ballet in 1921 at age 17, Balanchine also studied piano and composition, and joined what is now the Mariinsky Ballet, where his first choreographies shocked the company’s traditionally-minded establishment. In 1924 he toured Germany with his own group of Soviet State Dancers until an audition for Diaghilev led to the Ballets Russes acquiring the talents of Balanchine, Tamara Geva (the first of his four ballerina wives), and Alexandra Danilova. Within a year, he was appointed Chief Choreographer, creating Choreography by 10 ballets for the company, notably Apollo (1928), which Balanchine later described George Balanchine as the great turning point in his life, and Music by Prodigal Son (1929)—both constantly Gaetano Donizetti revived to this day.

With a corps of nine—six women and three men—Balanchine uses various combinations of three to accompany and offset the central pair, a challenge he always seemed to enjoy. But it’s also a ballet full of small details and hidden technical difficulties for the dancers in the small beats and leaps known as batterie, although such difficulties must look effortless Original Costume Design by in their buoyancy. And there’s also an Karinska unexpected joke for the corps.

After Diaghilev’s death in 1929 and the fragmentation of the Ballets Russes, Balanchine worked in Copenhagen, Lighting Design by This “ballet pure and simple,” as Paris, and Rene Blum’s Ballet Russe de Aaron Muhl Balanchine called it, was created for a Monte Carlo. It was in London during his program celebrating the one-hundredth directorship of Les Ballets 1933 that Lincoln anniversary of Italian independence. It also Kirstein persuaded him to come to America, balanced a more complex ballet having its where they founded the American School of Ballet premiere on the same program, Monumentum pro in New York (1934), out of which emerged The American Gesualdo, set to Stravinsky’s “recomposition” of three Ballet (1935), Ballet Society (1946), and eventually the New York madrigals by the Calabrian composer Don Carlo Gesualdo, a City Ballet (1948). Initially based at City Center, it moved in 1964 masterpiece of a very different kind. to its present home at Lincoln Center’s David H. Koch Theater, built to Balanchine’s specifications. During the 1930s and 1940s Balanchine also choreographed extensively for Broadway and the movies, including Rodgers and Hart’s On Your Toes and The Boys from Syracuse. He later married Maria Tallchief (1946-1952) and Tanaquil LeClercq (1952-1969), for whom he also created leading roles. Balanchine’s ballets are notable in that his musical training enabled him to work closely with the music of Stravinsky, Prokofiev, Hindemith, Schoenberg, Webern—some of the greatest names of 20th century music—as well as reinterpret the music of the past: Bach, Mozart, Mendelssohn, Brahms, and Tchaikovsky. One of the world’s greatest choreographers, he created a neoclassical aesthetic that connected the vigor of American modernism with the Russian ballet tradition. Balanchine now stands as a ballet colossus between America and Europe, his rich repertoire of ballet constantly performed and appreciated around the world. 102


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GAETANO DONIZETTI COMPOSER

Before his death in 1848, aged 51, Gaetano Donizetti was an operatic workhorse, writing more than fifty operas. Born in Bergamo in 1797 to a poor family he started his musical education there as a choirboy before studying in Bologna. His career as a working composer began in Naples before his growing reputation took him to other leading Italian opera centers and eventually to Paris and Vienna. His early work reflects the influence of Rossini, especially in its florid treatment of the voice. But while always writing to satisfy the demands of virtuoso singers, with maturity he developed a stronger balance between the florid vocal line and dramatic values, and also First Performed by the handling of larger musical units. His New York City Ballet only ballet music comes from the three 16 November 1960 grand operas written for the Paris Opera, which required a ballet. First Performed by

The Sarasota Ballet After a period of neglect, in which Donizetti’s style was considered old23 April 2010 fashioned and only a few of his operas remained in the standard repertory— notably Lucia di Lammermoor, L’Elisir d’Amore, Don Pasquale, and La Favorite—more recently audiences have rediscovered many of his other works through performances and recordings as part of a revival of interest in Italian Romantic opera that also includes the operas of Rossini and Bellini.

KARINSKA

COSTUME DESIGNER Originally named Varvara Jmoudsky, Karinska was born 1886 in Kharkov, Ukraine. Karinska remained in Russia after the Revolution, remarrying and managing a fashion house and embroidery school, but when these were nationalized, she moved to Brussels and then Paris. She began making costumes for cinema and ballet, notably the Ballet Russe de Monte Carlo and Les Ballets 1933, and this started her long collaboration with Balanchine. Her career continued to flourish in London, where she moved in 1936, before settling in New York in 1939. Karinska was a top costume-maker and designer, winning an Oscar for Joan of Arc (1948), a nomination for Hans Christian Andersen (1952), and the first Capezio Dance Award for Costume. In 1964 she accepted a permanent appointment making costumes for Balanchine’s New York City Ballet, from which she retired in 1977. Karinska died in 1993 at the age of 97.

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S E R E NA D E PROGRAM 5

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SERENDIPITOUS MOVEMENT

SERENADE

GEORGE BALANCHINE

Serenade, now one of the world’s most beloved ballets, was the first work George Balanchine choreographed after arriving in the United States in 1934. Using the first three movements of Tchaikovsky’s gracious Serenade for Strings, it was made on a group of young professional and advanced student dancers. After several out-of-town tryout performances, on March 1, 1935, it opened the first program of The American Ballet, the forerunner of the New York City Ballet. Over the years Balanchine continued to make changes in it, most notably in 1941 adding Tchaikovsky’s Danse Russe, the work’s original conclusion, as the third of the ballet’s four movements, the form in which it has since been danced around the world.

CHOREOGRAPHER

Probably the most important and influential ballet figure in America, he was born Georgi Balanchivadze in St. Petersburg in 1904. More than three decades after his death in New York in 1983 we can appreciate more fully the huge impact of a choreographer whose creative life spanned 60 years, carrying the grand Russian classical style triumphantly into the modernist era, establishing one of the world’s leading companies—New York City Ballet—and giving America its own classical ballet tradition.

Graduating from the Petrograd Imperial School of Ballet in Serenade is not a completely “abstract” ballet, for there are 1921 at age 17, Balanchine also studied piano and composition, suggestions of love returned and love lost, but the emphasis and joined what is now the Mariinsky Ballet, where his first remains on the movement itself rather than any narrative. choreographies shocked the company’s traditionally-minded That movement is often surprisingly simple, as Balanchine establishment. In 1924 he toured Germany with his own group of first worked out much of it on students at the newly-founded Soviet State Dancers until an audition for Diaghilev led to School of American Ballet. When seventeen women the Ballets Russes acquiring the talents of Balanchine, turned up for one class, an awkward number for Tamara Geva (the first of his four ballerina wives), a choreographer, he arranged the unusual and Alexandra Danilova. Within a year, he was spacing that opens the ballet, still a appointed Chief Choreographer, creating breathtaking moment. When only six Choreography by 10 ballets for the company, notably Apollo turned up, or someone was late or fell, George Balanchine (1928), which Balanchine later described he wove these into the ballet. The as the great turning point in his life, and later movements developed in similar Music by Prodigal Son (1929)—both constantly fashion, building to the surprising Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky revived to this day. finale. As the great modern dancer Martha Graham noted, “It is simplicity Costume Design by After Diaghilev’s death in 1929 and the itself – but the simplicity of a great Karinska fragmentation of the Ballets Russes, artist.” Balanchine worked in Copenhagen, After opening the first performances of The American Ballet, in 1948 Serenade also began the New York City Ballet’s inaugural program and is considered the company’s signature ballet.

Lighting Design by Aaron Muhl

The score itself has remained one of Tchaikovsky’s most popular, but it has its own surprises. The solemn opening, for example, is derived from a Russian folksong that in its original form provides the main theme for the joyous Danse Russe. And while Tchaikovsky was writing the Serenade in the summer of 1881, he was also writing a work that is its polar opposite, the 1812 Overture.

Paris, and Rene Blum’s Ballet Russe de Monte Carlo. It was in London during his directorship of Les Ballets 1933 that Lincoln Kirstein persuaded him to come to America, where they founded the American School of Ballet in New York (1934), out of which emerged The American Ballet (1935), Ballet Society (1946), and eventually the New York City Ballet (1948). Initially based at City Center, it moved in 1964 to its present home at Lincoln Center’s David H. Koch Theater, built to Balanchine’s specifications. During the 1930s and 1940s Balanchine also choreographed extensively for Broadway and the movies, including Rodgers and Hart’s On Your Toes and The Boys from Syracuse. He later married Maria Tallchief (1946-1952) and Tanaquil LeClercq (1952-1969), for whom he also created leading roles. Balanchine’s ballets are notable in that his musical training enabled him to work closely with the music of Stravinsky, Prokofiev, Hindemith, Schoenberg, Webern—some of the greatest names of 20th century music—as well as reinterpret the music of the past: Bach, Mozart, Mendelssohn, Brahms, and Tchaikovsky. One of the world’s greatest choreographers, he created a neoclassical aesthetic that connected the vigor of American modernism with the Russian ballet tradition. Balanchine now stands as a ballet colossus between America and Europe, his rich repertoire of ballet constantly performed and appreciated around the world.

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PYOTR ILYICH TCHAIKOVSKY COMPOSER

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KARINSKA

COSTUME DESIGNER Originally named Varvara Jmoudsky, Karinska was born 1886 in Kharkov, Ukraine. Karinska remained in Russia after the Revolution, remarrying and managing a fashion house and embroidery school, but when these were nationalized, she moved to Brussels and then Paris. She began making costumes for cinema and ballet, notably the Ballet Russe de Monte Carlo and Les Ballets 1933, and this started her long collaboration with Balanchine. Her career continued to flourish in London, where she moved in 1936, before settling in New York in 1939.

Pyotr Ilyich Tchaikovsky was born in Russia in 1840. He began taking piano lessons at age five and, although he displayed an early passion for music, his parents hoped that he would grow up to work in civil service. Tchaikovsky honored his parents’ wishes in 1859 by taking a bureau clerk post for four years with the Ministry of Justice, but became increasingly fascinated with music. When he was 21, he began music lessons at the Russian Musical Society and enrolled at the newly founded St. Petersburg Conservatory, becoming one of the school’s first composition students. In 1863 he moved to Moscow, where he became a professor of harmony at the Moscow First Performed by Conservatory. American Ballet

(now New York City Ballet) Tchaikovsky’s work was first performed in 1 March 1935 1865, with Johann Strauss the Younger conducting Characteristic Dance in First Performed by Pavlovsk. In 1868 Tchaikovsky’s First The Sarasota Ballet Symphony was well received in Moscow and the following year, his first opera, 13 April 2012 The Voyevoda, was received with little fanfare. He repurposed some of its material to compose his next opera, Oprichnik, which achieved some acclaim in 1874 and he also earned praise for his Second Symphony. Also in 1874, his opera Vakula the Smith received harsh critical reviews, yet Tchaikovsky still managed to establish himself as a talented instrumental composer with Piano Concerto No.1 in B-flat minor.

Karinska was a top costume-maker and designer, winning an Oscar for Joan of Arc (1948), a nomination for Hans Christian Andersen (1952), and the first Capezio Dance Award for Costume. In 1964 she accepted a permanent appointment making costumes for Balanchine’s New York City Ballet, from which she retired in 1977. Karinska died in 1993 at the age of 97.

Acclaim came readily for Tchaikovsky in 1875 with Symphony No. 3 in D major. He embarked on a tour of Europe and in 1876 completed the ballet Swan Lake. He resigned from the Moscow Conservatory in 1878 to focus his efforts on composing. His collective body of work constitutes 169 pieces; among his most famed late works are the ballets The Sleeping Beauty (1890) and The Nutcracker (1892). Tchaikovsky died in St. Petersburg in 1893.

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THE LETTER V PROGRAM 5

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SERENDIPITOUS MOVEMENT

THE LETTER V Commissioned in 2015 by Stanton Welch for Houston Ballet, The Letter V marked the first time that legendary American modern dance choreographer Mark Morris had choreographed on the Company. However this was far from the first time that Morris had choreographed on a ballet company, having previously choreographed works over the past several decades for several other ballet companies including American Ballet Theatre, San Francisco Ballet and the Paris Opera Ballet.

MARK MORRIS

CHOREOGRAPHER

Mark Morris, hailed as “the most successful and influential choreographer alive, and indisputably the most musical” (The New York Times), was born on August 29, 1956, in Seattle, Washington. In addition to creating over 150 works for the Mark Morris Dance Group, he conducts orchestras, Choreographed to Joseph Haydn’s Symphony No. 88 in G Major directs opera, and choreographs for ballet companies with lighting designs by Nicole Pearce and costume designs worldwide. Morris’ work is acclaimed for its ingenuity, musicality, by Maile Okamura, The Letter V is an extraordinary example of wit, and humanity. Named a Fellow of the MacArthur Foundation Morris’ dynamic approach to dance and distinctive musicality. in 1991, he has received eleven honorary doctorates to date, Interestingly the ballet name originates from the fact that and a multitude of awards, including the Samuel H. Scripps/ some of Haydn’s symphonies were once known by letters of the American Dance Festival Award for Lifetime Achievement, alphabet, with V being assigned to this piece, hence the ballet’s the Leonard Bernstein Lifetime Achievement Award for the title. Reviewing the ballet’s New York premiere in 2019, The New Elevation of Music in Society, the Benjamin Franklin Laureate York Times critic Gia Kourlas wrote that she “realized that the Prize for Creativity, the Cal Performances Award of Distinction only thing I want to watch after a ballet by Mr. Morris was in the Performing Arts, the Orchestra of St. Luke’s Gift another ballet by Mr. Morris.” of Music Award, and the 2016 Doris Duke Artist Talking before The Letter V’s world premiere Award. In 2015, Morris was inducted into the in 2015, Morris talked about the artistic National Museum of Dance in Saratoga Choreography by process behind the ballet. “I plan almost Springs, New York. Morris opened the Mark Morris nothing in advance except I study the Mark Morris Dance Center in Brooklyn, music, because I don’t know what I’m New York, in 2001 to provide a home Music by going to see. So when I come into for his company, subsidized rental Joseph Haydn the room, although I’ve seen these space for local artists, community dancers and worked a little bit with education programs for children Costume Design by them before, to actually start working and seniors, and a school offering Maile Okamura from zero to make up a dance in a dance classes to students of all ages short period of time is a lot of very and levels of experience with and Lighting Design by interesting and intuitive work. So I without disabilities. Morris’ memoir, Out Nicole Pearce recognize them right away and I make up Loud, co-written with Wesley Stace, was a dance on those exact people, and that’s published by Penguin Press in 2019. what you’ll see when you see my dance The Letter V.”

Artists of Houston Ballet in Mark Morris’ The Letter V | Photo by Amitava Sarkar (2015), Courtesy of Houston Ballet 108


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JOSEPH HAYDN

COMPOSER

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NICOLE PEARCE

LIGHTING DESIGNER

Nicole Pearce has created thirteen works An instrumental figure in the with Mark Morris, including All Fours, development of chamber music and Cargo, and Candleflowerdance, as well widely regarded as the “Father of the as Carnaval for the Voloshky Ukranian Symphony,” Franz Joseph Haydn was Dance Ensemble and Up and Down for born 31 March 1732 in Rohrau, Austria. The Boston Ballet. Pearce has designed Haydn was discovered to be musically for the choreographers Robert Battle, Jessica gifted by his parents, who sent him at age six to Lang, Aszure Barton, John Heginbotham, Andrea Miller, live with a schoolmaster relative in Hainburg to begin training Alexander Ekman, and Brian Brooks, and for companies such as a musician; not long after, he would move to Vienna to serve as Alvin Ailey, The Joffrey, Atlanta Ballet, Ballet Memphis, and as a chorister at St. Stephen’s Cathedral. By 1749, Haydn had The Joyce Theater. Other selected New York credits include matured out of the vocal range of his youth, leaving The American Dream and The Sandbox directed by the choir and exploring the career possibilities Edward Albee; Beebo Brinker Chronicles directed of freelance musicianship. After some time of by Leigh Silverman; Edgewise directed by Trip honing his skills through various jobs, Haydn Cullman; Trouble in Mind directed by Jade would finally see full-time employment King Carroll; and Savage in Love directed by in 1757 as Kapellmeister (music director) First Performed by Pam MacKinnon. under Count Morzin. Prince Paul Anton, Houston Ballet head of the enormously wealthy 28 May 2015 Esterházy family, hired Haydn in 1761 for similar work. First Performed by

The Sarasota Ballet The next few decades would prove massively fruitful for Haydn, remaining 26 March 2021 in the Esterházy family’s comfortable employ under the patronage of Anton and, after 1762, Prince Nikolaus I. A contract renegotiation in 1779 resulted in Haydn receiving permission to write for patrons other than the Esterházy family, and Haydn’s subsequent surge in international popularity as his compositions were enthusiastically received. In 1790, Prince Nikolaus was succeeded by his son Anton, who dissolved the court orchestra and drastically reduced Haydn’s salary due to a decrease in the need of his services, though allowing him to travel. Haydn journeyed twice to England, where he composed some of his most famous work, such as the Surprise, Military, Drumroll, and London symphonies. He returned to Vienna in 1795, where he would create works for public performance. By 1803 Haydn’s health began to decline; musical ideas would still come to him, but he could no longer focus effectively enough to manifest them into fully structured compositions. He died peacefully on 31 May 1809, having left behind a vast and diverse body of composition, along with an enormous impact on the world of classical music.

MAILE OKAMURA

COSTUME DESIGNER

Maile Okamura has designed and constructed dance and opera costumes for Mark Morris Dance Group, Dance Heginbotham, Atlanta Ballet, Tanglewood Music Festival, American Classical Orchestra, Bard College, and Middlebury College. She danced with Mark Morris Dance Group from 1998 to 2015. Houston Ballet Principal Connor Walsh in Mark Morris’ The Letter V Photo by Amitava Sarkar (2015), Courtesy of Houston Ballet 109


E L I T E S Y N C O PAT I O N S PROGRAM 5

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SERENDIPITOUS MOVEMENT

ELITE SYNCOPATIONS In 1974, starting his fifth year as director of The Royal Ballet, Sir Kenneth MacMillan surely needed a change of pace. He had just overseen a new production of The Sleeping Beauty and choreographed both Kurt Weill’s The Seven Deadly Sins and the erotic yet sympathetic three-act Manon, followed by an exhausting American tour and foot surgery. Why not something light and fun, danced to the irresistible rhythms of ragtime? The answer became Elite Syncopations, a lighthearted revue with the dancers in absurd costumes dancing to rags by Scott Joplin and others. So it was on October 7, 1974, with thirteen of the company’s leading dancers evoking the joys and absurdities of an earlier era, yet with a surprisingly contemporary flavor, that audiences had a chance to discover a very different side of MacMillan.

SIR KENNETH MACMILLAN

CHOREOGRAPHER

Sir Kenneth MacMillan was born in Dunfermline, Scotland in 1929. He won a scholarship to the Sadler’s Wells Ballet School and in 1946 became a founding member of Sadler’s Wells Theatre Ballet, a new company formed by Dame Ninette de Valois. He gained his first dance experience at the Wells and then moved to Covent Garden. In 1952 he returned to the Wells and there found his true vocation as a choreographer. Gifted young dancers formed a Choreographic Group to present new works, and the hit of their first performance in 1953 was MacMillan’s first ballet, Somnambulism, to music by Stan Kenton.

With the twelve-piece orchestra onstage in what may or may not In 1954 he staged a story ballet, Laiderette, and de Valois be a dance hall, the dancers, dressed in Ian Spurling’s painted commissioned Danses Concertantes, which immediately tights and funny hats, take their turns in dances drawn from the established MacMillan as a choreographer of note. In the ragtime era—roughly 1895-1918—that mixed European 1960s MacMillan would continue to prove his mastery and African-American styles, the Cakewalk, Black through choreographing works such as the Bottom, and the later Charleston. Adding controversial The Invitation (1960), as well as a to the fun, there are also suggestions of series of full-length ballets such as Romeo MacMillan’s own ballets tucked away in Choreography by and Juliet (1965), The Sleeping Beauty the details, while the dancers are given (1967), and Swan Lake (1969). He became Sir Kenneth MacMillan chances to show off their technical Director of Ballet at Deutsche Oper skills in unexpected ways. Music by Various Composers Berlin (1966-1969), and then Director The music offers its own delights: 1. Sunflower Slow Drag (Scott Joplin with Scott Hayden) – orchestra 2. Elite Syncopations (Scott Joplin) – orchestra 3. The Cascades (Scott Joplin) – orchestra 4. Hothouse Rag (Paul Pratt) – piano 5. Calliope Rag (James Scott) – piano 6. The Golden Hours (Max Morah) – piano 7. Stop-Time Rag (Scott Joplin) – orchestra 8. The Alaskan Rag (Joseph F. Lamb) – piano

Including Scott Joplin

of The Royal Ballet (1970-1977) and Resident Choreographer (1977-1982). Designed by In 1974 he created Manon and Elite Syncopations, and for the Stuttgart Ian Spurling Ballet he created Requiem (1976) and Lighting Design by My Brother, My Sisters (1978). Mayerling was first produced at Covent Garden Aaron Muhl in 1978 and had a triumphal American premiere in Los Angeles that same year. Other recent works were La Fin du Jour, which draws inspiration from the fashionable way of life shattered by World War II, and Gloria, a lament and thanksgiving for the generation that perished in World War I. MacMillan created his fifth full-length ballet, Isadora, which received its world premiere at Covent Garden in 1981.

9. Bethena – a Concert Waltz (Scott Joplin) – orchestra 10. Friday Night (Donald Ashwander) – orchestra 11. Cataract Rag (Robert Hampton) – orchestra

Although MacMillan initially intended “something short and light and funny which I can toss off and walk away from,” Elite Syncopations immediately became, and has remained, a favorite with audiences, with more substance than initially meets the eye.

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He received his knighthood in 1983 and was Artistic Associate of American Ballet Theatre from 1984-1989. MacMillan died in London in October 1992 at the age of 62. At the time of his death he was choreographing a revival of the musical Carousel.


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SCOTT JOPLIN COMPOSER

Details are scanty about much of the life of Scott Joplin (c1868-1917), the Black composer hailed as The King of Ragtime. Born in Texas, after some music lessons he moved around the Midwest with various groups and interludes of study. Already composing, in 1899 he published The Maple Leaf Rag, soon to become worldfamous, followed by other beloved rags like Elite Syncopations and The Entertainer, publishing some fifty in all. But ambitious to be recognized for more than rags, even before moving to New York in 1907 he wrote a ballet and the first of his two operas, only one of which, Treemonisha, survives, but not given a full performance until 1972.

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IAN SPURLING

DESIGNER

Born in South Australia and educated in Adelaide and then at the Slade School of Art, where he studied stage design, Ian Spurling (1937-1996) worked in both ballet and opera. His designs included Peter Darrell’s The Seven Deadly Sins for Western Theatre Ballet (and later Scottish Opera) and Kenneth MacMillan’s Elite Syncopations, Le Fin du Jour, and new set and costumes for Danses Concertantes. He also designed productions for David Bintley and the Birmingham Royal Ballet, the National Ballet of Canada, Bavarian National Ballet and Houston Ballet. In addition he was known for his costumes for Freddie Mercury, lead singer of the rock band Queen.

First Performed by The energy of ragtime develops through The Royal Ballet the constant collision of an internally 7 October 1974 syncopated melodic line against a rhythmically straightforward bass. First Performed by Most of its early practitioners were The Sarasota Ballet African-American except Joseph Lamb 21 March 2008 (1877-1960), who early sought out Joplin for advice and is considered the most important of the original rag composers along with Joplin and James Scott (18681938), followed by Paul Pratt (1890-1948) and Robert Hampton (1890-1945). The composer and actor Max Morath (b.1926) helped start the ragtime revival in 1960 with his television series The Ragtime Era and his own playing, while Donald Ashwander (1929-1994) remains best known for his music for New York’s Paper Bag Players.

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PROGRAM 6 9 – 10 APRIL 2021 | OPERA HOUSE

Mark Morris’ Pacific | Photography Nan Melville 112


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M A R K M O R R I S DA N C E G R O U P PROGRAM 6

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9 - 1 0 A P R I L 2 0 2 1 - S A R A S O TA O P E R A H O U S E

MARK MORRIS DANCE GROUP

MARK MORRIS

CHOREOGRAPHER

Formed in 1980, Mark Morris’ internationally-renowned Mark Mark Morris has been hailed as “the Morris Dance Group (MMDG) has received “highest praise for most successful and influential their technical aplomb, their musicality, and their sheer human choreographer alive, and indisputably authenticity.” (Bloomberg News). Live music and community the most musical.” (The New York Times). engagement are vital components of the Dance Group. It has In addition to creating over 150 works toured with its own musicians, the MMDG Music Ensemble, for the Mark Morris Dance Group, he since 1996, and regularly collaborates with orchestras and conducts orchestras, directs opera, and opera companies around the world. MMDG’s film and television choreographs for ballet companies worldwide. Morris’ projects include Dido and Aeneas, The Hard Nut, Falling work is acclaimed for its ingenuity, musicality, wit, Down Stairs, the UK’s South Bank Show, and Live and humanity. Named a Fellow of the MacArthur from Lincoln Center. In 2015, Morris’ signature Foundation in 1991, he has received eleven work L’Allegro, il Penseroso ed il Moderato honorary doctorates to date, and a premiered on PBS’ Great Performances. The multitude of awards, including the Samuel Mark Morris Dance Center was opened in “Mark Morris is a genius. H. Scripps/American Dance Festival Award 2001 to provide a home for the Dance His best dances...tug at us for Lifetime Achievement, the Leonard Group, subsidized rental space for local powerfully. He can align Bernstein Lifetime Achievement Award artists, programs for local children and steps and music in a way for the Elevation of Music in Society, seniors, and dance classes for students the Benjamin Franklin Laureate Prize for that transports.“ of all ages and abilities. Creativity, the Cal Performances Award – HuffPost of Distinction in the Performing Arts, the Orchestra of St. Luke’s Gift of Music Award, and the 2016 Doris Duke Artist Award. In 2015, Patrons should be aware that The Sarasota Morris was inducted into the National Museum of Ballet and the Mark Morris Dance Group have Dance in Saratoga Springs, New York. Morris’ memoir, agreed that if a live, full-scale public performance is not Out Loud, co-written with Wesley Stace, was published by possible this season due to COVID-19 restrictions, CDC guidelines, Penguin Press in 2019. or other health department recommendations pertaining to public gatherings and performances, this engagement will be rescheduled for the 2021-2022 Season.

Mark Morris’ Words | Photography Quinn Wharton

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HEROINES PROGRAM 7 30 APRIL – 1 MAY 2021 | OPERA HOUSE

MEDIA SPONSOR


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HEROINES OF DANCE “I was incredibly fortunate to have spent my career working with inspiring and extraordinary women. From the guidance I recieved from Dame Ninette de Valois, founder of The Royal Ballet, through learning some of the greatest roles of my life from the legendary Dame Alicia Markova, to sharing a dressingroom with the astounding Dame Margot Fonteyn, powerful women have sculpted my career from an early age. This program, celebrating choreographic heroines of the ballet world is a perfect start to The Sarasota Ballet’s focus on Women in Ballet, highlighting the remarkable women of the past, present, and future of dance.” - Margaret Barbieri, Assistant Director of The Sarasota Ballet

1. Dame Margot Fonteyn 1

4. Dame Alicia Markova 5. Tamara Karsavina

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3

4

2. Anna Pavlova 3. Alexandra Danilova

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6. Maria Tallchief

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7. Marie Taglioni 8

8. Dame Marie Rambert 9. Isadora Duncan

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C H E C K M AT E PROGRAM 7

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HEROINES

CHECKMATE Dame Ninette de Valois’ reputation as the guiding genius and founder of The Royal Ballet should not lead us to overlook her choreographic achievements with a series of distinctive and dramatic ballets in the 1930s, drawing on English sources and collaborators: Job (1931), The Haunted Ballroom (1934), The Rake’s Progress (1935), and Checkmate (1937). Checkmate is both a classic and unmistakably a period piece, with its Expressionist influences and distinctive art deco designs by the leading commercial artist of the day. The composer also devised the libretto, while the ballet draws, like other de Valois works (Job or The Rake’s Progress), on English elements—in this case, England’s folkloric Morris and Sword Dance traditions. The ballet is unusual in de Valois’ work in that its leading role goes not to a man but to a woman, The Black Queen, originally and memorably danced by June Brae.

DAME NINETTE DE VALOIS

CHOREOGRAPHER

Despite her insistence that “it takes more than one to make a ballet company,” the indomitable and visionary Dame Ninette de Valois must take the principal credit for creating, in The Royal Ballet, a truly native British ballet tradition, parallel with the equally legendary Dame Marie Rambert. Born Edris Stannus in 1898 in County Wicklow, Ireland, she began dancing at the age of 10, studied with Cecchetti and danced in pantomime, revue, and opera before joining the MassineLopokhova company (1922) and Diaghilev’s Ballets Russes (19231925), having changed her name legally to Ninette de Valois (1921) when ballet dancers required French or Russian stage names. In 1926 de Valois opened her London Academy of Choreographic Art and was invited in 1928 by the equally formidable Lilian Baylis to provide dancers and coach actors in drama and opera productions at her Old Vic Theatre.

The prologue establishes a contest, a chess game between Love and Death, before the stylized chess board sees a mustering of the Red pieces (Love), with the Pawns (light-hearted pages) followed by the Red Knights (powerful and chivalric fighters), challenged by the equally potent Black Choreography by Knights and the menacing Black Queen Dame Ninette De Valois herself, who uses her allure to captivate and disempower the Red Knight.

Music by

De Valois persuaded Baylis to present ballet evenings, with such success that she closed her private academy in 1931 and became resident at Baylis’ newly reopened Sadler’s Wells Theatre, where she founded the school and company that became the Vic-Wells, then Sadler’s Wells and finally (1956) The Royal Ballet after taking up residence in 1946 at the Royal Opera House Covent Garden. She continued to dance (especially character roles) until 1937, ran the company and school, and nurtured the talents of exceptional dancers and choreographers (Margot Fonteyn, Robert Helpmann, Sir Frederick Ashton, Beryl Grey, Moira Shearer, and Michael Somes).

The dignified Red Bishops and Sir Arthur Bliss threateningly robotic Red Castles enter, then the elderly, tottering Red Designed by King, with his lovingly ineffectual E. McKnight Kauffer Red Queen, before the chess game starts in earnest with the Black pieces’ Lighting Design by withering assault leading the “check” of Aaron Muhl the Red King, whose Knights and Queen defend him in vain. The Red Knight jumps to his King’s defense and fights the Black Queen to her knees, but, torn between loyalty and love, fatally Throughout the 1930s, before her growing administrative hesitates and is ruthlessly dispatched by the triumphant duties took priority over her choreographic output, de Valois Black Queen, who proceeds to the kill. created a series of masterworks including Job (1931), The Death has conquered Love, as the Black Queen stabs the Red Rake’s Progress (1935), and Checkmate (1937). In her ballets she King in “checkmate.” strove to produce a distinctively English style of choreography, drawing on English themes or sources, often preferring British composers (Bliss, Vaughan Williams, Gordon) and always working to realize her vision of an internationally excellent native ballet with homegrown stars, which bore spectacular fruit with her company’s triumphant 1949 American debut tour headed by Fonteyn, Shearer, and Helpmann.

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Her dedication and often formidable presence continued to influence and guide The Royal Ballet long after her 1963 retirement as its Director, earning her the affectionately respectful nickname “Madam,” nine honorary doctorates, countless awards and prizes, the Order of Merit, Companion of Honour, and a Damehood (DBE). Widowed in 1986 from Arthur Connell, the Irish surgeon she married in 1935, de Valois continued to guide the fortunes of The Royal Ballet, making occasional public appearances until her death at the age of 102 in 2001.


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E. MCKNIGHT KAUFFER

DESIGNER

One of the most successful and prolific poster artists of the 1920s and 1930s, Kauffer raised commercial advertising to the status of high art; and yet he was a prophet without honor in his own country. Born 1890 in Montana, he studied in San Francisco and Chicago before continuing his studies in Munich and Paris (1913), and basing himself in London for 25 years. “I felt at home there for the first time,” he wrote, a brief 1921 USA return and a successful 1937 one-man show at New York’s Museum of Modern Art notwithstanding.

First Performed by The Vic-Wells Ballet 15 June 1937 First Performed by The Sarasota Ballet 28 November 2008

ARTHUR BLISS COMPOSER

With an American father and English mother, Bliss was born in 1891, was schooled at Rugby and Cambridge University, and studied music at the Royal College of Music under Stanford, before serving in the Grenadier Guards in World War I. He was a leading English musical voice between the wars.

In London he had become a member of the London Group of painters and developed strong links to the Bloomsbury Movement (working for Roger Fry’s famous Omega Workshop) before turning to advertising and winning fame with posters showing Cubist influences and making a major impact on Modernism with his work for London Underground. Prohibited as an alien from making any contribution to the British war effort, Kauffer sailed home in 1940 with his companion, the designer Marion Dorn, on the last passenger ship to New York.

There Kauffer, who had worked so successfully in England, had little success despite a 1947 commission to design a major poster campaign for American Airlines. Depression, drink, and despair followed, and he died in 1954.

His composing career blossomed in the 1920s and 1930s with innovative, cutting-edge works for voice and orchestra, influenced by Stravinsky and Debussy, including his notable Colour Symphony (1922). Thereafter, Bliss moved towards the English music tradition, with choral works (Pastoral and Morning Heroes) and three major 1930s compositions: the ballet Checkmate, the film score for Korda’s Things to Come, and his Piano Concerto, premiered at the 1939 New York World’s Fair. In 1944 he wrote the scores for Robert Helpmann’s popular ballet Miracle in the Gorbals and in 1946 for his more experimental Adam Zero. During World War II, Bliss was Director of Music at the BBC. He was knighted in 1950 and succeeded Arnold Bax as Master of the Queen’s Musick in 1953, where he composed memorable music for Her Majesty’s coronation. Bliss’ post-war reputation suffered from the relative failure of a series of important works, including his Covent Garden opera The Olympians, his oratorio The Beatitudes, and the Cello Concerto. His final major orchestral work, Metamorphic Variations, premiered three years before his death in 1975. Bliss’ reputation awaits reassessment, despite the individual character of his opus and his significant 1930s achievement.

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FA L L R I V E R L E G E N D PROGRAM 7

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HEROINES

FALL RIVER LEGEND The brutal ax murder in Fall River, Massachusetts, of Andrew Borden and Abby Gray Borden, his second wife, in 1892 has remained vivid in public memory, aided by a large number of books, films, and even an opera, a ballet and a jumping rope rhyme, “Lizzie Borden took an ax.” Who did it has never been definitively established, although Andrew’s daughter, Lizzie, was tried and famously acquitted despite much circumstantial evidence, living in Fall River until her death. Of all the retellings, perhaps the most vivid remains Agnes de Mille’s 1948 ballet Fall River Legend. Here de Mille delves into the hidden reasons behind the murder, with a sensitive child traumatized by the death of her beloved mother. Repressed by a now-cold father and an unfeeling stepmother, Lizzie reaches out for human sympathy, but when a young pastor attracted to her is misled by the stepmother, she takes her revenge. Yet one never loses sympathy for Lizzie as she comes to terms with her deed.

AGNES DE MILLE

CHOREOGRAPHER

Agnes de Mille, dancer, choreographer, director, and author, came naturally to the theatre. Her father, William de Mille, was a successful New York playwright who moved to Hollywood to join his brother Cecil in films as writer and director. Inspired by Pavlova, Agnes studied ballet there, persevering against her family’s wishes although lacking an ideal ballet body. For a dozen years she moved between New York and London, in each presenting recitals of short works that were critical successes without making any money. She also studied with the Ballet Rambert and danced with the choreographer Antony Tudor. Back in New York in 1939, she joined the opening season of Ballet Theatre, for which she created Black Ritual, for sixteen Black women. Success came the next year with the comic Three Virgins and a Devil, followed in 1942 by Rodeo for the Ballet Russe de Monte Carlo, which in turn led in to the groundbreaking Oklahoma!, with its dream ballet.

The ballet was a long time maturing in de Mille’s mind, as she recounts in Lizzie Borden: A Dance of Death, her account of her research into the story and the making of the ballet for what is Choreography by now American Ballet Theatre. The highly Agnes de Mille dramatic score was commissioned from Morton Gould, who also helped her Music by resolve a major problem: how to deal Morton Gould with Lizzie’s acquittal. “Hang her,” said Gould. “I can write hanging music, but Designed by I couldn’t write acquittal music.” Oliver Oliver Smith Smith, a leading Broadway designer and co-director of Ballet Theatre, Lighting Design by created the evocative set, the skeleton Aaron Muhl of a house that becomes a part of the action. The actual creation was fraught, as rehearsal time was scarce and essential dancers often unavailable. The title role was designed for Nora Kaye, the great dramatic ballerina, who developed pneumonia shortly before the opening night. Frantically, de Mille rehearsed Alicia Alonso, the company’s great classical star, in a role unlike any she had ever danced. The premiere was touch-and-go, but ultimately a triumph, the ballet becoming a staple of the ABT repertory, and has since been danced by companies as varied as Dance Theatre of Harlem and the Paris Opera Ballet.

Then came a decade of successful musicals, including One Touch of Venus, Carousel, Brigadoon, Allegro (which she also directed), and Gentlemen Prefer Blondes. Now well established, she divided her time between the theater, ballets, writing, and lecturing, returning to Ballet Theatre in 1948 for Fall River Legend, among other works, and in 1965 The Four Marys, featuring four young Black women including Carmen de Lavallade and Judith Jamison. She also formed several small ballet troupes featuring American themes in the dances, some based on her work for musicals, as well as choreographing the dances for the film version of Oklahoma! and creating several programs on dance for television. A vivid writer, she published a series of autobiographical books starting in 1953 with the very popular Dance to the Piper, soon followed by And Promenade Home, and Lizzie Borden: A Dance of Death on the creation of Fall River Legend, as well as To a Young Dancer, a now-beloved handbook for young aspirants in the art, and finally Martha, a biography of her friend Martha Graham. A popular lecturer, she was unstinting in her appeals for government support of the arts, and in 1965 was appointed to the newly-formed National Council for the Arts and Humanities. Above all, she continued to write and to choreograph, mainly for American Ballet Theatre, despite a stroke in 1975 that paralyzed her right side, her last ballet appearing only a year before her death in 1993 at 81.

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MORTON GOULD COMPOSER

Morton Gould (1913-1996) has been called an “extraordinarily gifted American composer and conductor.” Although he had limited academic training in music beyond piano lessons, he began composing early and after a stint in vaudeville, at 23 had his own network radio program for over a decade. At the same time serious compositions like American Salute and Spirituals were played by leading orchestras. In 1945 Jerome Robbins borrowed his American Concertette for a ballet in a Broadway revue, renaming it Interplay before giving it to Ballet Theatre and later New York City Ballet, while in 1948 Agnes De Mille commissioned Fall River Legend for Ballet Theatre. In 1972 First Performed by Robbins again turned to Gould for I’m American Ballet Theatre Old Fashioned: Variations on a Theme 22 April 1948 by Jerome Kern. For many years he also worked with Balanchine on a neverFirst Performed by completed ballet on Audubon. Among The Sarasota Ballet his concertos is one for Tap Dancer and 30 April 2021 Orchestra. He also wrote music for films and two Broadway musicals. A brilliant orchestrator known for his arrangements and lighter pieces showcased on his many recordings, Gould preferred to be recognized for his concert work, eventually achieving the recognition he long desired as a senior figure in American music, including a Pulitzer Prize and the Kennedy Center Honors.

OLIVER SMITH

SET DESIGNER

Praised for his versatility, Oliver Smith (1918-1994) designed sets for over 400 productions—ballets, plays, musicals, films, and operas—from Léonide Massine’s Saratoga in 1941 to the Joffrey Ballet’s Nutcracker in 1987. Coming to New York after graduating from Penn State in art, he soon became established with his sets for de Mille’s Rodeo (1942) and Robbins’ Fancy Free (1944), which soon morphed into the Broadway musical On the Town, which he also co-produced. He served as co-director of American Ballet Theatre from 1945-1980 and 1990-1992, where his designs included de Mille’s Fall River Legend, Robbins’ Les Noces, and the four-act Swan Lake. While continuing to work prolifically on Broadway, including Brigadoon, My Fair Lady, West Side Story, The Sound of Music, Camelot, and Hello Dolly!, for which he received seven Tony Awards, he also worked on films (Oklahoma!, Guys and Dolls, and The Bandwagon), and taught stage design at New York University for many years. There was no easily identifiable “Smith style,” each production taking on its own atmosphere. As Agnes de Mille said of his work for Fall River Legend, “a lovely set, it has a life of its own.” 119


LES BICHES PROGRAM 7

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LES BICHES Bronislava Nijinska’s ballet Les Biches (“the does” or colloquially “the darlings”) has been called “a half-playful, half-malicious comment on the form of contemporary entertainment known as the house party. The elements comprising the party are as light-hearted and care-free as in a group of butterflies sporting in the sunlight.” However, the ballet’s composer, Francis Poulenc, agreed only in part, saying it “has no real plot for the reason that if it had it might have caused a scandal. In this ballet...there is an atmosphere of wantonness that you can see if corrupted but which an innocent-minded person would not be conscious of.” No wonder that its premiere in Monte Carlo in January 1924 by Diaghilev’s Ballets Russes caused a sensation.

BRONISLAVA NIJINSKA

CHOREOGRAPHER

Now recognized as one of the great twentieth-century choreographers, Bronislava Nijinska (1891-1972) was long overshadowed by the tragedy of her brother, Vaslav Nijinsky. Born in 1891 and growing up in a family of dancers touring Russia, she followed him to the Imperial Ballet School before joining the Imperial Ballet and then the Diaghilev Ballets Russes, creating roles in Fokine ballets and Nijinsky’s Afternoon of a Faun. Leaving the Ballets Russes when her brother was dismissed and formed a shortlived company, she returned to Russia, eventually establishing a school and company in Kiev. In 1921 she returned to Diaghilev, then in need of a choreographer, assisting with his famous production of The Sleeping Beauty before choreographing a remarkable series of her own works, including the austere Les Noces and the lighter Les Biches and Le Train Bleu.

Marie Laurencin’s set shows a large room with a big window and couch, perhaps on the Riviera, filled with a throng of modishlydressed young women. They’re eventually joined by three selfregarding athletic young men, a long-legged girl in a blue tunic, two younger women, and their sophisticated hostess, weaving a long cigarette holder and a long set of Chanel pearls, each characterized by a stylized movement motif. Poulenc’s tuneful score sets the tone in a set of separate numbers with hints of popular music mixed with suggestions of the past, Choreography by as in the Rag Mazurka and Adagietto, yet Bronislava Nijinska also a touch of melancholy.

Leaving the Ballets Russes, she launched several short-lived companies of her own, but for the rest of her life primarily worked for others. For the dancer Ida Rubinstein she choreographed the premieres of Stravinsky’s Le Baiser de la Fée and Ravel’s La Valse and Bolero. She also worked with the Paris Opera, de Basil’s Ballets Russes, the Polish Ballet, and in 1940 joined Ballet Theatre in New York before opening a studio in Hollywood, where her students included Maria and Marjorie Tallchief.

Music by Les Biches was Nijinska’s fourth Francis Poulenc ballet for the Ballets Russes after returning from the Soviet Union and Designed by assisting in Diaghilev’s recreation Marie Laurencin of the Tchaikovsky-Petipa Sleeping Beauty. Her distinctive style was first Lighting Design by shown in the acrobatic Renard and the Aaron Muhl Finally, in 1944 she choreographed monumental Les Noces, a reworking of several ballets for the Marquis de Cuevas’ the classic style with more flexible uses of International Ballet in New York and in Europe the arms and upper body. This neoclassical after the war for his Grand Ballet, eventually approach leading to a new approach to the retiring to California in obscurity until Sir Frederick traditional vocabulary, along with an increasing Ashton, who had danced in the Rubinstein company, invited tendency to abstraction in the choreography, proved wellher to restage Les Noces and Les Biches for the Royal Ballet, suited to works where the plot becomes an excuse for the starting a reassessment of her work and a lasting recognition dances while creating an atmosphere in which little is said but of its importance. much suggested. A success at the time and occasionally revived by later companies, it wasn’t until The Royal Ballet danced it in 1964 that Les Biches, with all its fascinating ambiguities, became accepted as a classic. As Poulenc noted, “This is a ballet in which you can see nothing at all or into which you may read the worst.”

Beginning in Kiev, where she worked closely with the designer Alexandra Exter, Nijinska drew on both her classic training with the Imperial Ballet and with Enrico Cecchetti and on new experimental approaches to choreography to develop a style that combined classic footwork with a freer use of the torso and arms. Rejecting a folkloric approach to Stravinsky’s monumental Les Noces, the dancers movements become abstracted from representation for highly expressive use of groups and patterns, which also proved effective in lighter contexts, as with Les Biches and Le Train Bleu. It was these reforms that she continued to develop in her later works, most of which have unfortunately been lost. Nijinska also provided a fascinating account of her life up to 1914 in Early Memoirs (1981), now considered among the key works on this period.

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MARIE LAURENCIN

DESIGNER

Marie Laurencin (1883-1956) lived a remarkable life at a remarkable time in both art and history. Born in Paris, she studied painting in Sévres and Paris. Influenced as she once said by the artists Matisse, Derain, Picasso, and Braque, she soon became a member of the artistic avant-garde and an early member of the Section d’Or Cubists. She married twice and had many lovers, both male and female, including Guillaume Apollinaire, many of whom remained long-time friends.

First Performed by Ballets Russes 6 January 1924 First Performed by The Sarasota Ballet 30 April 2021

Using her customary light palette and often “feminine” subjects such as women, children and flowers, Laurencin was soon recognized as the most important woman among the leading French painters of her time. She also painted many portraits, designed sets for plays, operas, and ballet, starting in 1924 with Nijinska’s Les Biches for the Ballets Russes, illustrated books, especially those by friends, and wrote poetry. Accused of collaboration after World War II, she was never formally charged and had earlier been among those advocating unsuccessfully for the release of the deported poet Max Jacob.

FRANCIS POULENC COMPOSER

One of the most popular twentiethcentury composers, Francis Poulenc (1888-1963) was largely self-taught. Already performing in his teens, he was early influenced by Stravinsky and Erik Satie, becoming part of the Group of Six in their jointly-composed ballet-farce Les Mariés de la Tour Eiffel (1921) and composing Les Biches for Diaghilev’s Ballets Russes (1924). He also wrote the delightful Aubade, a small-scale piano concerto first set by Nijinska in 1929 and then Balanchine, and a later ballet, Les Animaux modeles (1942), for Serge Lifar. He also composed a number of small-scale piano, choral, and chamber works as well as many songs, for which he became especially known, in 1935 establishing an enduring partnership with the baritone Pierre Bernac. The songs, many with texts by Guillaume Apollinaire and Paul Eluard, reveal a refined sensibility joined to a lyric line, while throughout his work an apparent simplicity masks a sophisticated musical mind. Other works included the exhilarating Concert Champetre for Harpsichord and Orchestra, the Two-Piano Concerto and the Organ-Concerto, the opera Dialogues of the Carmelites (1957), for chorus the powerful Stabat Mater and brilliant Gloria, the late sonatas for clarinet and oboe, and L’Histoire de Barbar for narrator and piano.

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BALLET FOUNDATIONS AND TRUSTS The Frederick Ashton Foundation exists to enrich the legacy of Sir Frederick Ashton (1904 – 1988) and his ballets. The Ashton ballets performed this Season are some of over one hundred ballets created by Sir Frederick Ashton™. The Frederick Ashton Foundation, a registered charity working independently of, but in close association with, The Royal Ballet, exists to enrich the legacy of Frederick Ashton™ and his ballets. For further information, please go to www.frederickashton.org.uk. The performances of Donizetti Variations and Serenade, Balanchine® Ballets, are presented by arrangement with The George Balanchine Trust and have been produced in accordance with the Balanchine Style® and Balanchine Technique® Service standards established and provided by the Trust. Sir Kenneth MacMillan's Elite Syncopations is performed by kind permission of Deborah, Lady MacMillan. This production of Peter Darrell's Othello is presented with the cooperation of The Peter Darrell Trust. This production of Agnes de Mille's Fall River Legend is presented with the cooperation of The De Mille Working Group, Anderson Ferrell, Director.

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THREE REMARKABLE WOMEN JACK ANDERSON “Ballet is woman” is one of George Balanchine’s most frequently quoted remarks. Despite the success of male stars over the years, ballerinas have usually ruled the ballet stage, at least since the late 18th century. But when it comes to choreography, women have not reigned. Nor have they reigned as company directors. Those fields have, historically, been dominated by men. That state of affairs mirrored society as a whole. Men headed households and dominated business, the professions, and the arts. There were notable exceptions, yet in the arts more men than women achieved prominence as writers, painters, and composers. Until recent decades, leading American and European symphony orchestras excluded women from their ranks.

to admire the basic principles of ballet and explored the possibilities of ballet as an art, among them three choreographers The Sarasota Ballet is featuring this season: Bronislava Nijinska, Ninette de Valois, and Agnes de Mille. Their works were diverse, yet all three believed in ballet. All three also possessed organizational skills and would not have gotten anywhere without steely determination.

Nijinska (1891-1972), came from a family of PolishRussian dancers, studied at the Imperial Academy in St. Petersburg and danced with Diaghilev’s Ballets Russes from 1909 to 1913. She then organized a school and an often experimental company in Kiev, returning to Diaghilev in 1921, and remained in Western Europe, where she collaborated with several In dance, from the late 19th century companies. In 1938 she moved to Los - George Balanchine onward, talented and rebellious women Angeles where she opened a school; in began to protest against the status quo, 1940 she became one of the founding resolving to create their own dances, and choreographers of Ballet Theatre (now often their own companies. Some had no American Ballet Theatre). Although she use whatsoever for ballet, a discontent that returned to Europe several times after World helped foster the development of the great dance War II, she remained associated with Los Angeles form we call modern dance. Other women continued until her death.

“Ballet is woman”

Bronislava Nijinska and Ann Hutchinson Guest

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FEATURED ARTICLE Dame Ninette de Valois

Dame Ninette de Valois

Nijinska was known for her personal idiosyncrasies as well as her imagination. Despite her years in America, she never learned to speak fluent English, yet somehow always managed to make herself understood. Because she disliked the feeling of human perspiration, she as much as possible refrained from touching dancers and wore gloves in classes and rehearsals. And one of the props of Les Biches became a personal trademark: the long cigarette holder associated with the ballet’s Hostess. In the 1950’s, Nijinska started slipping into international semi-obscurity until, at the invitation of Sir Frederick Ashton, The Royal Ballet’s director who had once been a dancer with one of Nijinska’s companies, she staged the satirical Les Biches for Britain’s Royal Ballet in 1964 and, two years later, the monumental Les Noces. Late in her life and shortly after her death, several of her former associates, began exploring the possibilities of reviving more of her ballets, and there have been productions of Bolero, Le Train Bleu, and Brahms Variations. More such revivals would be welcome. Nijinska’s output was enormous, choreographing modern dramatic ballets, comedies, and plotless, or near-plotless, works that today might be called abstract , as well as restaging such historically important older ballets as La Fille mal gardée and The Sleeping Beauty. Les Biches, to a jaunty score by Francis Poulenc, was a success at its premiere by the Diaghilev Ballet in 1924, and has been successful in recent years in its many revivals. Depicting antics at a house party at a fashionable villa on the French Riviera in the 1920s, it is both an evocation of that era and a sly commentary on it. Just who are these frivolous empty-headed people, and what sort of house is it in which they are disporting themselves? The audience is free to make up its own mind and either just 124

lean back and have fun or indulge in serious sociological and psychological speculations — or do both while appreciating how Nijinska, like an expert cocktail maker, spikes her essentially classical choreography with unusual angled poses and movements for the upper body. In fact, Les Biches, and certain other Diaghilev ballets of the time depicting fashionable society, by Nijinska, Léonide Massine, and George Balanchine, have occasionally been called, and usually in disparagement, choreographic cocktails. They may very well be, but that is no reason for scorn. It could even be argued that, by choosing topical themes, their choreographers were showing that, far from being restricted to fairy tales or legends, ballet could deal with contemporary life, something Vaslav Nijinsky, Bronislava’s brother, had already demonstrated in 1913 when he choreographed Jeux, a ballet about a tennis game, for Diaghilev. Choreographers of such ballets look at human behavior and what their choreographic cocktails say about it may still be fizzy or potent enough to have a strong kick. Les Biches has occasionally inspired choreographers to produce original works of their own on its general theme. Thus, Peter Darrell, who in 1963 created Mods and Rockers, considered the first ballet to music by the Beatles, in 1964 choreographed Houseparty for BBC-TV, which employed the Poulenc score to satirize manners and dance fads of 1960s London; historically-minded dancegoers may have recalled that Nijinska’s Biches had sometimes been titled The House Party in England. Who knows what the result might be if some trendy 21st-century choreographer took Poulenc’s Biches score to accompany a new satire on social life in today’s Sarasota. In any case, Nijinska’s original choreography from the 1920s retains its freshness.


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A member of the ensemble in Diaghilev’s original production of Les Biches was Edris Stannus, a young Irish dancer who at the urging of her mother, a glassmaker, changed her name to Ninette de Valois (1898-2001). Her father, a British army officer, died during World War I. Displaying an interest in the theatrical arts, de Valois began studying dance and at the age of 14 became a member of an itinerant troupe of child players advertised as the Wonder Children. They performed constantly, including in theatres built as entertainment centers at the ends of piers in seaside towns—so many that de Valois later used to quip that she thought she had danced at the end of every pier in Britain. Her specialty was Pavlova’s Dying Swan, and her renditions of the famous solo were so successful that they were inevitably encored -- this swan becoming one who died several times a day. Looking back on her theatrical childhood, de Valois once mused, “Were we often tired? Certainly. Bored? Never.” De Valois was accepted into Diaghilev’s Ballets Russes in 1924, remaining with it until 1927 when health problems forced her to stop dancing as a regular member of the company. But, although she retired from the Ballets Russes, she did not retire from ballet. She opened schools in London and Dublin, where she worked with the great poet William Butler Yeats on productions of some of his verse plays, and became increasingly interested in Britain’s repertory theatre movement. Idealistically envisioning ballet companies as components of British national theatres, she began offering her services as teacher and choreographer to the directors of ambitious repertory playhouses. But few were interested in this brash young woman with starry-eyed plans, except for London’s Old Vic, which was under the management of Lilian Baylis, who took a chance on de Valois and hired her to teach movement to her actors and singers. Baylis also gave her the opportunity to stage ballets as curtain-raisers to short operas and to produce ballet evenings of one-act works. In addition to running the Old Vic, Baylis restored the Sadler’s Wells Theatre, and de Valois soon was active at both. The dance troupe she founded became known as the VicWells Ballet and after Sadler’s Wells was found to be the theatre more suitable for ballet, the Sadler’s Wells Ballet, the forerunner of today’s Royal Ballet. De Valois, indefatigable, supervised balletic activities at both theatres, teaching, choreographing, lecturing, writing, and establishing “second” companies to develop younger dancers and choreographers.

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on William Blake’s illustrations for the biblical book of that name and The Rake’s Progress and The Prospect Before Us were inspired by William Hogarth and Thomas Rowlandson. The idea for Checkmate—an allegorical chess game between love and death—was suggested to de Valois by its composer, Arthur Bliss. She liked his basic idea, but there was one snag. De Valois, or so she claimed, knew nothing about how to play chess. She soon learned, and the ballet’s creation was underway, with designs by E. McKnight Kauffer, an American artist who had settled in England, where he attracted attention for his bold posters advertising the London Underground. His geometric designs for Checkmate proved equally striking. Checkmate received its successful world premiere in 1937 at the International Exhibition in Paris, where the Vic-Wells was dancing during a tour arranged by the British Council. In 1940, another foreign tour, this one of the Netherlands, arranged by the British Council and the Foreign Office, almost resulted in disaster. Although World War II had broken out, the Dutch had not yet been attacked by the Germans. Then, while the British dancers were still in Holland, the news came that Germany had invaded. Panic ensued. But, keeping strict discipline, de Valois, who did, after all, come from a military family, managed to lead her dancers safely back to London. Otherwise, the Nazis might have captured her entire ballet company, complete with Sir Frederick Ashton, Margot Fonteyn, and de Valois herself. The touring repertory’s scenery, costumes, and musical scores were not so lucky. The décor and music of the works taken on tour were lost and the restored Checkmate was not seen again until 1947. Ag n e s d e M

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Although conflict, love, and death are perennial choreographic themes, the mass movements and impressive groupings devised by de Valois for Checkmate make it very much a ballet of its time. Even before war erupted, the threat of conflict hovered in the air, and choreographers reacted with ambitious and often allegorical ballets suggesting the threat of war, among them Léonide Massine’s Les Présages and Rouge et Noir and later Sir Frederick Ashton’s Dante Sonata. These works, which lacked explicit plots, were in the so-called “symphonic” style favored by Massine for grandlyscaled ballets, often to major symphonic compositions, expressing serious themes or moods. Checkmate matched the temper of the times without specifically referring to current events. Not merely a ballet about a game, its dramatic situations were deadly serious, and the ballet may still seem relevant in our own time of seemingly perpetual conflict. As years passed, de Valois increasingly turned from choreography to devote herself to administrative duties, Don Quixote of 1950 being her last creation for the Royal Ballet, and in 1963 she ceded the direction of the company to Ashton. But although she may have retired from British ballet, she did not retire from ballet itself, for she continued to work as adviser, and occasionally as a choreographer in Turkey, where she became a consultant to companies in Ankara and Istanbul.

Ag n

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Agnes de Mille (1905-93) was another major influence on 20th century ballet. Like Nijinska, she came from a family involved with the performing arts. Her father, William DeMille (family members adopted variant spellings of their surname), was a playwright and Broadway and Hollywood director, her uncle Cecil B. DeMille, was the noted director of Hollywood film epics, and her husband, Walter Prude, was a concert manager. Her grandfather, however, was Henry George, an American economist who formulated a once-influential theory known as the Single Tax, which proposed that a single tax be placed upon land, with no further taxes on income or for improvements, including buildings, on that land. As a child, de Mille loved theatre and dance, but her family discouraged serious study in those fields because Agnes was considered plain and lacked a dancer’s body. It was

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not until she had graduated from UCLA, as an English major, that she began serious dance studies. After some years in New York she set off to England to work with Marie Rambert who like de Valois was one of the pioneers of British ballet and who directed a company initially known as the Ballet Club and later as Ballet Rambert. One of her fellow students at Rambert was Antony Tudor, on his way to becoming one of the world’s foremost choreographers of dramatic ballets. De Mille danced in the premiere of Dark Elegies, his great ballet about grief, and gave solo programs of her own—”dance recitals” they were called— of serious and comic choreographic sketches. Although less common on stages today, such solo programs were popular in the 1930s and ‘40s, and de Mille, who possessed considerable dramatic and mimetic gifts, became known for them. Nevertheless, she longed to create full-scale ballets. Like Nijinska, she and Tudor were invited to New York in 1939 to choreograph for the first season of Ballet Theatre. But it was with another company, the Ballet Russe de Monte Carlo, that she achieved fame. The always very popular Ballet Russe had settled in New York at the outbreak of World War II and was becoming an American institution, with many American and Canadian, as well as Russian and other European dancers among its ranks. When de Mille persuaded Sergei J. Denham, its director, to let her choreograph a ballet, the result, in 1942 was a smash hit, Rodeo, her “cowboy ballet” to a lusty score by Aaron Copland. De Mille conquered Broadway the next year with her choreography for the Rodgers and Hammerstein musical Oklahoma! Other Broadway successes followed, including the dances for Carousel, Brigadoon, and Gentlemen Prefer Blondes. Many of these sequences were miniature ballets, which de Mille hoped would be not only entertainments, but also revelations of her characters’ psychological states. Although her ballets ranged across historical eras and geographical locales, de Mille was especially associated with Americana. A lover of American history and folklore, she dreamed of establishing a company that would explore American dance traditions. She made several attempts to found such a troupe, most ambitiously a Heritage Dance Theatre in the 1970s, but none proved successful.


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Fall River Legend, her ballet for Ballet Theatre in 1948, to a strong score by Morton Gould, showed de Mille at her most serious. It was inspired by the life of Lizzie Borden, a shy New England spinster who in 1892 was accused of murdering her father and stepmother with an axe. Lizzie was acquitted, although much popular opinion held that she was guilty, but had committed the murders in reaction to the repressive puritanical environment in which she was raised. De Mille adopted this theory, especially after Gould told her that he could compose effective music for a guilty verdict, but not for an acquittal. Acquittal music and the choreography to it might be bland, and Fall River Legend is anything but bland. Guilty or innocent, the real Lizzie Borden made Fall River famous, almost a tourist attraction, and in 1996 the Borden house became a bedand-breakfast inn. Generally favoring liberal causes, de Mille kept constantly active as a choreographer, writer, lecturer, and advocate for governmental and philanthropic support of the arts. She never gave up, even after a stroke in 1976 left part of her body paralyzed. Given her attitudes toward social issues, there is one balletic concern about which her opinions, and those of de Valois as well, may now seem old-fashioned: both women believed that ballet should be dominated by men. Deborah Bull, a former principal

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dancer of The Royal Ballet, has observed that “de Valois very famously said now she’d established British ballet, it was time to hand it over to the men so they could run it.” In a curious way, that may have been an assertion that at a time when women, notably Rambert and de Valois herself, were essentially dominating British ballet direction, having men in charge would affirm that ballet was a respectably masculine as well as feminine activity. A concern for respectability may also have shaped de Mille’s opinions on gender issues. As her biographer Carol Easton has noted, “She was politically liberal, morally conservative.” Although she counted many homosexuals as personal friends, her general attitudes toward gay men were ambiguous and, as Easton puts it, “she could be derisive and insulting” when she spoke of them. Often ahead of their times in some of their ideas, de Mille and de Valois were also children of their times, adopting views that today might seem outmoded. Nevertheless, they fought for the cause of dance. Along with Bronislava Nijinska, they conclusively demonstrated that women could be successful ballet choreographers; they acknowledged the worth and adaptability of dance forms other than ballet, incorporating them into their choreography and expanding the scope of ballet as an art.

Bronislava Nijinska’s Les Biches

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I had a fleeting acquaintance with two of these choreographers, although I did glimpse de Valois a few times at the Royal Opera House in London, an erect determined-looking woman. De Mille I saw more often, for when I was reviewing for the New York Times and covering American Ballet Theatre performances at the Metropolitan Opera House, as her aisle seat was a few rows ahead of my press seats and we eventually started chatting a little. One day before a performance of Fall River Legend my husband, George Dorris, complimented her by saying, “Fall River is so well constructed.” Her response was strong and shrewd: “Yes! Structure. Structure is my strength. Not steps. Structure.” But it was Nijinska who had the greatest personal impact on me. When I was a young writer living in Berkeley and writing occasional freelance articles for Dance Magazine, Lydia Joel, its editor at the time, asked me if I would be willing to go to Southern California and interview Bronislava Nijinska, who had just moved back to Los Angeles from Europe. I gulped and said yes: given such an opportunity, what else could I say?

Dame Ninnette de Valois, Margaret Barbieri, and Iain Webb

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I did considerable research, but in all my research, I did not learn that Nijinska’s English was almost non-existent. Nor was the English of her husband, Nicholas Singaevsky, much better. But, when we met in her attractive home in Pacific Palisades, after staring at each other in confusion for a few moments, this formidable woman and I began talking. Somehow. But did we talk! Through words in an assortment of fragmented languages. And through gestures, as well. She demonstrated steps. She shared stories and ideas, and showed me her remarkable scrapbooks in which she tried to document every ballet she had choreographed. She and her husband served me drinks and then dinner and eventually drove me back to the bus stop for Los Angeles. It was an exhilarating occasion. The strength of Nijinska’s personality was overwhelming. De Valois and de Mille must also have been something like that. Nijinska, de Valois, and de Mille—there was no stopping them. Their talents, determination, and persistence have left ballet richer, leaving no doubt that in choreography and administration, as well as in performance, ballet can also be woman.


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A D M I N I S T R AT I O N

SARA ROBINSON

KRISTIE COX Finance Director

Senior Development Officer

CHAD MORRISON

JASON ETTORE

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941.359.0099 x 121 kcox@sarasotaballet.org

941.359.0099 x 113 cmorrison@sarasotaballet.org

941.359.0099 x 105 jettore@sarasotaballet.org

Chief Advancement Officer

LAUREN STROMAN Development Officer

Box Office & House Manager

Finance / Office Manager

AMY MILLER

RICHARD AMATO

941.359.0099 x 110 lstroman@sarasotaballet.org

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MEYBIS CHAVARRIA

COURTNEY HANSEN

RACHAEL FISK

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941.359.0099 x 116 chansen@sarasotaballet.org

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Video & Graphic Designer

ROD KELLY

Marketing Director

Graphic Designer

Development Associate

Marketing Officer

BARBARA EPPERSON Administrative Assistant, Board Liaison

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TINA TAYLOR

KATHERINE KNOWLES

CARLOS MOREIRA

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Box Office Assistant

Grants Manager

Facilities

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Your future Our focus

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Podiatrist Dr. Robert F. Herbold Proud participant in the Doctors’ Circle

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PRODUCTION

DOUG NICHOLSON

JERRY WOLF

AARON MUHL

MARK NOBLE

Technical Advisor & Consultant from Birmingham Royal Ballet

Head of Wardrobe

Lighting Designer

Production Stage Manager

FRANCESCA MACBETH

ANASTASIYA POFF

ZARA BAROYAN

Production Stage Manager

Rehearsal Pianist

Class Pianist

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E D U C AT I O N S TA F F C H R I S TO P H E R H I R D | EDUCATION DIRECTOR Christopher Hird is from England and studied at The Royal Ballet School. He toured Europe as part of a company headlined by the internationally acclaimed Ballerina Sylvie Guillem. After retiring from the stage, Hird worked as the Assistant to the Director of the British Ballet Organization, and later as Assistant to the Development Manager at The Royal Ballet School. He earned a Bachelor of Arts in Dance from the University of Roehampton and a Diploma from Canada’s National Ballet School’s Teacher Training Program. Hird joined Boston Ballet School in 2003 and was promoted to Artistic Manager and Head of Adult Programing in 2009. He was a main teacher for students in the Pre-Professional and Classical Ballet Programs as well as part of the Senior Leadership Team. Hird has served on the international jury of the Youth America Grand Prix, the Japan Grand Prix, the Surrey Festival of Dance (Canada), the ADC International Ballet Competition, and the Seminário Internacional de Dança de Brasília. He has been a guest teacher for Alvin Ailey American Dance Theater, Canada’s National Ballet School, Academy of Nevada Ballet Theatre, Cecchetti Council of America, and Harvard University. The Sarasota Ballet appointed Christopher Hird as Director of Education and Principal of The Margaret Barbieri Conservatory in July 2016. Hird has expanded the visibility of the Education Programs, with performances at Selby Gardens, Inspire Sarasota, and Lakehouse West among others. He has enhanced the Margaret Barbieri Conservatory, launching a new Trainee Program, as well as a summer exchange program with Canada’s National Ballet School. In addition, Hird oversees The Sarasota Ballet Studio Company, and has developed the Adult Program to offer more opportunities for students.

D I E R D R E M I L E S BU RG E R | ASSISTANT EDUCATION DIRECTOR Born in Burlington, Massachusetts, Dierdre Miles Burger began her formative dance training with Margaret Prishwalko Fallon and subsequently the Boston Ballet School. In 1974 she joined Boston Ballet, where she would dance countless principal roles in the classical and contemporary ballet repertory. She was particularly known for her portrayal of Juliet in Romeo and Juliet, the Sugar Plum Fairy in The Nutcracker, and the Principal Stomper in Twyla Tharp’s Brief Fling. In June of 1993 Ms. Miles Burger retired from performing and joined Boston Ballet’s Artistic Staff. In September 2002 Ms. Miles Burger was appointed Principal of Boston Ballet School. Certified in the dance notation method Labanotation, Ms. Miles Burger was also on the faculty of The Boston Conservatory from 1991 until 2001. In the summer of 2006 she left Boston Ballet to move to Florida, where she continued to teach and coach on a freelance basis. During this time Ms. Miles Burger became an ABT® Certified Teacher, successfully completing the ABT® Teacher Training Intensive in Primary through Level 7 of the ABT® National Training Curriculum (ABT NTC) and was later appointed to the prestigious Board of Examiners for the curriculum. She has expanded that role to include adjudicating ABT NTC exams as well as teaching the ABT NTC Teacher Training Course. In addition, she has served on the jury for several ballet conventions and competitions including Youth America Grand Prix regional semi-finals and New York City finals. In July 2010 she was appointed Director of Orlando Ballet School, serving there for eight years until August 2018. Under her leadership Orlando Ballet School grew and developed programming, most notably the Orlando Ballet School Academy which develops young dancers for professional careers. In June 2019 Ms. Miles Burger was appointed Assistant Education Director at The Sarasota Ballet. She looks forward to sharing her years of experience to further the growth of The Sarasota Ballet School and The Margaret Barbieri Conservatory.

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LISA TOWNSEND

LAUREN TAYLOR

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Education Administrator 941.359.0099 x 120 ltaylor@sarasotaballet.org

MATTISON BEDINGHAUS Full-Time Faculty

ELIZABETH WEIL BERGMANN

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PATRICIA STRAUSS

Part-Time Faculty

Full-Time Faculty pstrauss@sarasotaballet.org

Part-Time Faculty

YSEULT LEGER

Part-Time Faculty

CLAUDIA LYNN RIGHTMIRE

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SARAH KRAZIT

MARIAH COHEN

SEA LEE

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JULIANA CRISTINA

Part-Time Faculty

ALEXEI DOVGOPOLYI Part-Time Faculty

SARAH METZLER

Part-Time Faculty

ADDUL MANZANO

Part-Time Faculty

Part-Time Faculty

MONESSA SALLEY

KAREN SHAPIRO

JEAN VOLPE

Part-Time Faculty

Part-Time Faculty

Part-Time Faculty

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P R E- P RO F E S S I O NA L P RO G R A M

The Margaret Barbieri Conservatory is a pre-professional program designed to prepare students for a career in The Sarasota Ballet and other national and international companies. Led by Education Director Christopher Hird and Assistant Education Director Dierdre Miles Burger, the Conservatory is named to honor the former Royal Ballet ballerina and now Assistant Director of The Sarasota Ballet, Margaret Barbieri. Our distinguished faculty inspires the students through a curriculum that not only stresses technical excellence but also development of each individual artist.

C OV I D -19 – W E K E E P DA N C I N G! As of March 2020, we moved our students to a virtual platform, offering all students daily classes free of charge through to the end of May. For the 2020-21 school year, students have the choice to dance with us in-person or virtually. Our students have embraced our health and safety guidelines and we are so pleased they are able to continue their training with us.

O F F I C I A L YOU T H A M E R I C A G R A N D P R I X PA RT N E R S C H O O L We are thrilled to be one of a select number of official schools recognized by YAGP for providing quality training for the pre-professional student. As well as entering students for YAGP, both Christopher Hird and Dierdre Miles Burger are part of the international jury for the semifinals. The Margaret Barbieri Conservatory is now a popular destination school for young talented students from around the world.

I M AG E S O F DA N C E

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The culmination of our school year is a special performance at the Sarasota Opera House that showcases the talented youth of Sarasota. We are proud to partner with Key Chorale, the Sarasota Youth Opera, the Sarasota Music Conservatory and the Circus Arts Conservatory. A highlight of the calendar year for all our students, we hope that Images of Dance 2021 will take place on May 4.


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T R A I N E E P RO G R A M

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A new Trainee Program was launched in 2018 for talented students who are preparing for their first steps as professional dancers. Now in its third year, the Program has 25 students, a growth of 150% since its inception. This year we also welcomed 6 male students for the first time. The goal of the Trainees is to join a professional company. At the end of the 2019-20 school year 3 students were selected for The Sarasota Ballet Studio Company. “This is a true testament to the quality of the training at the Conservatory,” says Margaret Barbieri. “We started the Conservatory to bring in talent that would progress into the Company. To have three promoted from a single year really demonstrates the Conservatory’s growth and the caliber of students we are attracting and training. More and more we can look first to the Trainee Program each year to find the next generation of Sarasota Ballet Studio Company members.”

R E C O G N I Z I N G OU R DONORS The Conservatory remains ever grateful to the support of our donors. We particularly recognize Eliza P. Culverhouse and the Muriel O’Neil Fund at the Community Foundation of Sarasota County. Without their support we would not be able to provide the best possible experience for our students and families.

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T H E S A R A S OTA BA L L E T S C H O O L The Sarasota Ballet School provides a comprehensive dance education while inspiring a life-long love of dance for children ages 3 and above. Our experienced professional faculty foster each student’s individual development and make learning creative and fun. Students benefit from the close connection with The Sarasota Ballet, often receiving free tickets to attend Company performances and performing in Company productions such as John Ringling’s Circus Nutcracker and ‘Still Life’ at the Penguin Café.

C OV I D -19 R E S P O N S E Since March 2020, the School offered free online classes to all students through the end of May, followed by weekly online sessions via Facebook Live. As of September 2020, with new health and safety protocols developed in concert with other professional dance schools in the USA, we are now able to hold both in-person and virtual options for students in our beautiful studios in Rosemary Square. We produced a special video for parents outlining our Health and Safety Procedures and our families have been so thankful for the great efforts we are doing to keep our students safe.

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A huge thank you to everyone who donated to our Emergency Fund or as part of the Giving Challenge. It has allowed us to continue offering education for everyone.


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A M E R I C A N BA L L E T T H E AT R E® NAT I O NA L T R A I N I N G C U R R I C U LU M

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The Sarasota Ballet School is delighted to announce the introduction of the American Ballet Theatre® National Training Curriculum. American Ballet Theatre was designated America’s National Ballet Company by an Act of Congress in 2006. The Sarasota Ballet School faculty are certified to teach level Pre-Primary through Level 3 of the curriculum following completion of a teacher training course led by Dierdre Miles Burger, Assistant Education Director who is also a member of the ABT’s Artistic Board of Examiners. The ABT® National Training Curriculum is a breakthrough program that combines high quality artistic training with the basics of dancer health and child development. The ABT® National Training Curriculum consists of a comprehensive set of age-appropriate, outcome-based guidelines to provide the highest quality ballet training to dance students of all ages and skill levels. “I am delighted that The Sarasota Ballet will be adopting the American Ballet Theatre® National Training Curriculum,” says Cynthia Harvey, Artistic Director of the ABT® National Training Curriculum, and ABT Jacqueline Kennedy Onassis School. “My links with Iain Webb and Margaret Barbieri go back to The Royal Ballet, and I have followed The Sarasota Ballet’s achievements with great interest.”

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S U M M E R B A L L E T E D U C AT I O N S U M M E R 2020 Summer at The Sarasota Ballet School always brings a wonderful variety of students from the USA, Canada, and beyond. As planning for our International Intensive and Summer Camps was in full swing, the pandemic added a new challenge.

V I RT UA L S U M M E R C A M P S Designed for our youngest students, our week-long Summer Camps in 2020 moved online through the new medium of Zoom. Sue Peterson, Children’s Program Head devised movement classes, craft-making, costume design, and dance history that could be delivered virtually. The students were incredibly patient and loved the opportunity to dance from their home dance spaces. Our parents were very thankful: “Bless all your hearts for coming up with a positive solution for a very un-nerving and distressing problem! Thank you and hoping we will all see each other soon.” “Thank you SO much for doing these online classes for the kids! Eliana enjoyed it so much. For some reason she was really scared before the class today and didn’t want to participate because she was so unsure what to expect. So, THANK YOU!!! She loved it, and the second she began dancing and following your steps her eyes were shining! I ‘m so thankful!” 138


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I N T E R NAT I O NA L I N T E N S I V E

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The Sarasota Ballet School is part of a nationwide cohort of professional dance schools and companies and during COVID-19, the dance world came together to develop new health and safety polices to protect students, faculty, and staff so that students could keep dancing. We were thrilled to offer a hybrid International Intensive. Students took class in-studio from 9:30-1:00 every day and then Zoomed in for classes every afternoon. We were one of only a very small handful of professional dance schools to offer an in-studio option, so we were very excited to welcome over 50 students from 18 US states including Florida. The students also had the amazing opportunity to perform on the beautiful Mertz Theatre stage at the FSU Center for the Performing Arts. It warmed the heart to see the students so inspired to perform, with masks and social distancing. We may have been the only program in the country to offer a program-end performance. We recorded and sent the final presentation to all the families. Who would have thought performing in masks would not only be part of their dance experience but also create memories they will never forget.

PA R E N T QUOT E S “A quick note of congratulations for hosting a successful (and safe) summer intensive! The care and consideration you took to provide high level training while ensuring the health and wellness of your dancers was impressive - and notably no easy feat. Well done.” “ Thank you so ver y much for holding this Intensive – I have heard nothing but how wonder ful and challenging this training has been for my daughter. You pulled it off beautifully.”

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A DU LT P RO G R A M The Sarasota Ballet School also offers a continuing education program for adults of all ages. Both in-person and virtual options are available with several levels of training from which to choose. Our adult students all have unique stories to tell and come together to share their passion for dance. Throughout COVID, we offered daily online Zoom classes along with Saturday Facebook Live with Education Director Christopher Hird. Our adult students have been so grateful to keep dancing: “Thank you so much for the Facebook live and Zoom classes. It means so much to be able to keep my ballet going. I love the music and Christopher’s commentary.” “I’m from Boston and being able to take adult classes online is such a gift, especially in these times. I’ll make a donation to your Emergency Fund as well.”

A DU LT P O I N T E C L A S S

“Taking your class this morning left me feeling more alive than I have since I stopped taking class 3 years ago. My heartfelt thanks.”

In 2019 we introduced a pointe class specially tailored for the adult learner. Students with at least 3 years of experience may take our Adult Pointe classes.

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SILVER SWANS®

New in the 2019 - 2020 Season, The Sarasota Ballet introduced a dance and movement program for participants over 55. Education faculty are certified by the Royal Academy of Dance to teach Silver Swans® and the classes take place at senior centers in the community.

JOYFUL MOVEMENT THROUGH PARKINSON’S In the fall of 2019, The Sarasota Ballet launched a new program in partnership with The Neuro Challenge Foundation for Parkinson’s that offers free classes for people living with Parkinson’s Disease. The classes are normally offered at The Sarasota Ballet School’s Rosemary Studios and are currently being held virtually.

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DA N C E – T H E N E XT G E N E R AT I O N In 1991, Dance – The Next Generation (DNG) was founded by Jean Weidner Goldstein and was designed as a dance program to directly impact underserved children in the local community. Each year DNG averages an enrollment of around 165 students, from third to twelfth grade, regardless of background, ability, or financial status. DNG is a free program provided by The Sarasota Ballet to the families of children in Title 1 schools who are considered at risk of dropping out. In addition to dance instruction, students are transported in DNG vans from their schools to dedicated facilities where they receive healthy snacks through a partnership with All Faiths Food Bank. They also receive dance clothes and shoes, and participate in an hour of mentor-supervised homework in classrooms and a stateof-the-art computer lab. Initially the focus was on classical ballet instruction, but the program has since expanded to include jazz, dance composition, and elements of dance. But DNG is more than a dance program. The goal was and remains to nurture the development of the entire individual with emphasis on discipline, self-esteem, and the desire for higher education.

D N G G R A DUAT E S C O L L E G E & U N I V E R S I T Y M AT R I C U L AT I O N When students complete the 10-year program, and graduate from high school, those who are academically eligible may apply for a dedicated college scholarship from State College of Florida Manatee-Sarasota, or to receive special scholarship assistance at the University of South Florida SarasotaManatee. Starting in the sixth grade, students have access to further college scholarship opportunities and mentoring through our connection with Take Stock in Children Sarasota. Ave Maria University Bard College Bethune-Cookman College Central Texas College Coker College Florida A & M University Florida Atlantic University Florida Gulf Coast University Florida State University Goucher College Jersey College of Nursing Keiser Career College Kennesaw State University Liberty University Loyola University Mercyhurst University Mountain State University

New World School of the Arts New York University Northwestern University Roosevelt University Santa Fe Community College State College of Florida Tallahassee Community College University of Central Florida University of Florida University of Maryland University of Miami University of North Florida University of South Florida, SarasotaManatee University of Tampa Valencia Community College

PA R T N E R O R G A N I Z AT I O N S

Please Join Us In Thanking The Following Organizations:

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D N G & T H E I M PAC T O F C OV I D -19

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In March of 2020, the rise of the Coronavirus (COVID-19) pandemic prompted the cancellation of the remaining ten weeks of The Sarasota Ballet’s season. That cancellation resulted in Dance – The Next Generation not being able to complete the remainder of its program. This included cancelling the end of year performance, the final assessments, and all remaining after-school programs. In response to these cancellations, DNG staff moved to an online, virtual format, offering online classes at three levels and promoting a virtual enrichment program. DNG staff worked with the Sarasota and Manatee County School systems to ensure that every student had access to the digital resources necessary to participate in the program by calling each family personally to ensure they had the opportunity to participate. This fall, DNG remains subject to the safety recommendations and guidelines from the CDC and Sarasota and Manatee County School systems. The program is being modified to engage all returning students in either virtual or in-studio classes. To ensure the families of DNG students have the resources they need, electronic tablets have been provided to all students so they can keep dancing!

“With everything going on these past couple months, there’s been so much to worry about. With The Sarasota Ballet stepping up to offer this program at this time, we have one less source of concern, as we know our child can continue to receive the support that has helped her thrive. Thank you for giving us a sense of stability and comfort at a time when it’s so deeply needed.” - DNG Parent 143


COMMUNITY

E N G AG E M E N T

PUBLIC SCHOOLS, PERFORMANCES, & PROGRAMS

We partnered with 59 public schools in Sarasota, Manatee, and for the first time, Charlotte County. During October and February, dancers from The Sarasota Ballet Studio Company and The Margaret Barbieri Conservatory presented Gwendolyn, the Graceful Pig, read by the author, David Ira Rottenberg. Over 5,000 children from pre-K and up had the opportunity to see dance for the first time and we gave out bookmarks to every student, emphasizing the importance of reading. Our annual school matinées showcased the story of The Sleeping Beauty; over 1,800 3rd grade students attended these performances at the Mertz Theatre at FSU Center for the Performing Arts. All students and teachers receive free transportation.

FREE LECTURES, TICKETS & TOURS

Free lectures, free and deeply discounted tickets to The Sarasota Ballet performances, and free backstage tours provide access for over 1,400 people of all ages to explore dance each season. 144

COMMUNITY PERFORMANCES

Curated performances by The Sarasota Ballet Studio Company and The Margaret Barbieri Conservatory celebrate the history of ballet and engage over 2,000 audience members of all ages in the beauty of dance. In 2019-2020 we performed at Marie B. Selby Gardens, Valencia Lakes, and the Museum of Fine Arts, St. Petersburg, among many others.

2020-21 SEASON

The Sarasota Ballet is committed to continuing its reach into the local community. Several existing programs are now running virtually including Joyful Movement through Parkinson’s and Silver Swans®. In addition, we are planning to ensure all public school students have access to dance through a virtual format as part of EdExploreSRQ.


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THE SARASOTA BALLET believes dance is for everyone. Through Community Engagement programs, we provide access and opportunity at little or no cost. During the 2019-20 season, we enabled over 8,500 students, families, and people of all ages to explore the wonderful world of dance. Here are some highlights of last year:

COMMUNITY PARTNERS EDUCATION:

Sarasota Public Schools (32) Manatee Public Schools (17) Charlotte Public School (10) Florida State University New College of Florida New College Children’s Center Osher Lifelong Learning College Ringling College of Art USF Sarasota - Manatee Visible Men Academy

CULTURAL INSTITUTIONS:

Arts and Culture Alliance of Sarasota County Ft. Myers Symphony (Southwest Florida Symphony) Key Chorale Marie Selby Botanical Gardens Museum of Fine Arts, St. Petersburg

Music Compound Origami Air Sailor Circus/Circus Arts Conservatory Sarasota Opera Sarasota Youth Opera Sarasota Orchestra Sarasota Music Conservatory

COMMUNITY DISTRICT ORGANIZATIONS:

PUBLIC LIBRARIES:

SERVICE ORGANIZATIONS:

Fruitville Public Library Shannon Staub Public Library Braden River Library

SENIOR CENTERS:

Aviva Senior Life Plymouth Harbor The Glenridge on Palmer Ranch Valencia Lakes Retirement Community

Downtown Sarasota Alliance Greater Sarasota Chamber of Commerce Manatee Chamber of Commerce Venice Art Walk Visit Sarasota County

All Faiths Food Bank Big Brothers Big Sisters of Sarasota County Big Brothers Big Sisters of Manatee County Child Protection Center Johns Hopkins All Children’s Hospital Junior League of Sarasota Neuro Challenge Foundation Take Stock in Children Sarasota County 145


YO U R S P E C I A L I N V I TAT I O N J O I N A V I B R A N T CO M M U N I T Y O F DA N C E E N T H U S I A S T S T H E F R I E N D S O F T H E S A R A S OTA B A L L E T As a member of the Friends of The Sarasota Ballet you will: • Contribute to the success of one of the most exciting ballet companies in America • Share in the Company’s growth and achievements • Meet the dancers and become “an insider” • Observe the dancers in class • Deepen your understanding of the art form • Make new friends who are also ballet and art enthusiasts • Receive quarterly newsletters and invitations to special events • Receive advance notice of performances by the Studio Company and The Margaret Barbieri Conservatory • Through your volunteer efforts, learn more about how the Company works

MAKE CONNEC TIONS

S H A R E T H E PA S S I O N

There are many interesting ways to volunteer your time at The Sarasota Ballet. For example, the Ballet depends on volunteers to assist in the Box Office, guide the Backstage Tours, and mentor Dance – The Next Generation students. Please consider which volunteer opportunities most interest you and let us know about your special skills or areas of expertise.

We hope you will become a member of the Friends of The Sarasota Ballet. For further information please contact the Membership Chair:

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Betty Ferguson, Friends Membership Chair Telephone 917.885.4699 Email bcamarest@yahoo.com Thank you in advance for your response and we look forward to working with you as we participate in the success of this amazing ballet Company.


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V O LU N T E E R O P P O RT U N I T I E S BOX OFFICE Friends work regular shifts to help the Box Office Manager. If you have computer skills and the telephone is your friend, this is a very rewarding opportunity. TOUR GUIDES Friends serve as tour guides for the “Backstage at the Ballet” tours. This gives you the opportunity to delve even deeper into what makes The Sarasota Ballet so successful and to transmit that knowledge to an enthusiastic audience. MENTORING Dance – the Next Generation (DNG) is a highly acclaimed drop-out prevention program for atrisk students. Friends provide support by assisting with homework, serving snacks, and mentoring students who take advantage of the discipline of dance to excel in life.

LU N C H E O N S A N D S P E C I A L E V E N T S The Friends’ popular Showcase Luncheons and special social events are held throughout the year. There are opportunities to volunteer for the Events Committee and participate in selecting menus, designing decorations, and engaging entertainment for these gatherings. Committee members also participate by taking reservations, greeting guests, and helping with auctions as well as other fundraising projects. The Friends dedicate proceeds from the Showcase Luncheons and Special Events to The Sarasota Ballet. DANCERS’ SUPPERS The Friends provide food for the dancers during performance weekends. This is an extremely satisfying way that the Friends can support the Company. I N F O R M AT I O N A N D A D V O C A C Y Volunteers are always welcome to help at the Lobby Information Desk, distribute “Will Call” tickets and disseminate marketing materials prepared by the Ballet. There are two “Special Services” committees that use volunteers to communicate with members who do not use email. For more information contact friends@sarasotaballet.org 941.228.9899

DANCE IS JOY, DANCE IS LOVE. DANCE IS WHAT DREAMS ARE MADE OF.

EXECUTIVE COMMIT TEE President Patricia Golemme 508.735.7882

EX OFFICIO Richard Johnson Board Chair, The Sarasota Ballet

Vice President Melliss Swenson

941.951.6319

Frank Martucci Board President, The Sarasota Ballet

941.242.2554

Iain Webb Director, The Sarasota Ballet

941.922.8498

Joseph Volpe Executive Director, The Sarasota Ballet

941.343.7117

Chad Morrison Liaison, The Sarasota Ballet

Secretary Peggy Sweeney Treasurer Elaine Foster Past President Richard March

S TA N D I N G C O M M I T T E E C H A I R S OUTREACH Andi Lieberman Carolou Marquet

630.862.4681 941.355.1842

COMMUNICATION Christina Cowell

732.688.7205

DANCERS’ SUPPERS Peggy Sweeney Laurie Fitch

941.242.2554 941.925.7391

EDUCATION LIAISON Bruce Ensinger

740.228.1464

SPECIAL EVENTS Donna Maytham

941.351.5361

MEMBERSHIP Betty Ferguson

r 941.497.7841

RESERVATIONS Phyllis Myers

941.360.0046

SPONSORSHIP DEVELOPMENT Laurie Feder

203.952.7617

THEATRE SUPPORT Melliss Swenson

941.951.6319

VOLUNTEER COORDINATOR Vielka Sheppard

813.695.3560

SPECIAL SERVICES Katie Couchot (Administraiton) Jane Sheridan (Newsletter) Micki Sellman (Telephoning)

941.475.6475 508.367.4949 941.954.8791

147


The Friends of The Sarasota Ballet is an amazing group of individuals who champion the Company throughout the region. Through their wonderful events and volunteer work, they are a vibrant part of The Sarasota Ballet community, forming close bonds through a mutual love of the art form and play a vital part in the continued success of The Sarasota Ballet.

148

Catha Abrahams Nancy Abrams Peggy & Ken Abt Priscilla Adams Caroline Amory Andrea (Pandy) Anderson Richard & Patricia Anderson Elaine & Robert Appel Chris & Natalie Armstrong Carol Arscott Shari & Stephen Ashman Elaine Bankoff Cynthia & Gregg Baran Ruth A Barker Marge Barpal Jocelyn E. Baskey Isabel A. Becker Rhoda & Herb Beningson Kacy Carla Bennington Charlotte Bimba Shirley Blair Barbara Blumfield Lydia Bohn Robert Boyd Arline Breskin Susette T. Bryan Beverly & Michael Budin Cynthia Burnell Chris & Jon Butcher Diana Cable Paul Cantor & Michelle Roy Peter & Judy Carlin Alexander & Irene Cass Frank Cerullo Lynn C. Chancer Carol Chawkins Marsha Chernick Barbara Chertok Victoria & Frank Chester Barbara Chin Merle & George Chorba Dennis Ciborowski & Meryl Gale Dale Horwitz Clayton Saul & Naomi Cohen Jonathan Coleman Juanita Connell Evelyn & Glenn Cooper Pat Corson Katie Couchot Sandra Cowing

Kristie Cox Donna Swoyer-Cubit Colleen Curran Donna Marie D’Agostino Jacqueline & Harold D’Alessio Mrs. Lucille R. D’Armi-Riggio Susan Loren Davidson Gail Davies James & Leila Day Robert de Warren Louis DeFrancesco & Anne Heim Kay Delaney & Murray Bring Dolly Delvecchio JoAnne DeVries Diane DiBenedetto Lynda Doery Angela Dolorico Carolyn & Thomas Drew Barbara Dubitsky Linda Elliff Douglas Endicott Bruce Ensinger & Clark Denham Barbara E. Epperson Sharon Erickson William & Janice Farber Laura Feder Shirley Fein Patricia D. Fennessey Elizabeth Ferguson Maureen & Thomas Steiner Sandy Fink Linda Fiorelli Judy Fireman Beverly Fisher Yvette Fishman Laurie Fitch Bert Fivelson Marjorie Floyd Marlene Forster Karol Foss Elaine Foster Suzanne Freund Mikal H. Frey Jennifer Gemmeke Jerry Genova & Bob Evans Randee Gevertz Kathryn Gibby Jacqueline Giddens Susan Giroux Linda A. Glover

Nancy Gold Mariyn R. Golden Ellen Goldman Faith Goldman Patricia Golemme Janis Goodman & Scott Grier Kathryn Goodwin Sue M Gordon Barcy Grauer & Bruce Wertheimer Dr. James Griffith & Barbara Sanderson Bob Griffiths & David Eichlin Debbie Grovum Sue Guarasci Helen & John Habbert Carol Ann Hallainger Renee Hamad Gerald & Deborah Hamburg Barbara & Julian Hansen Jo & William Haraf John & Nancy Harris Barbara Harrison Kathryn Harvey Gladys & Elizabeth Hazeltine Donna Hecker Charlotte Hedge Audrey Heimler Donald Helgeson & Sue Shepard Marcia Hendler Martha Hennes Florence Hesler Carl & Anne Hirsch Laurie Hofheimer Carolyn Ann Holder Jean & Peter Huber Barbara Hyde Carol Hyde Arlene H. Irons Allen & Mary Ivey Vlatka Ivanisevic Barbara Jacob & Karen Lichtig Barbara Jacoby Barbara Jarabek Mary Johnson Richard Johnson Susan Kaye Johnson Alison Jones Anne Jones Merrill Ann Kaegi Deborah R. Kalb Ken Keating


Carolyn Keidel Barbara & Bruce Keltz Ann & Pat Kenny Barbara & John Kerwin Joan Kiernan Marlene Kitchell Robin Klein-Strauss Mary S Klimasiewfski Bob Kloss Pat Klugherz Philippe Koenig Peter E. Kretzmer Jane Kritzer & Carol Cermenaro Robert Ladieu & David Hamilton Anita Lambert Lydia H. Landa Gail Landry Harriet K. Lane Jim & Peggy Lang Joan Langbord & George Hollingsworth Jean Shorr Langhaug Marianne Lauria Alan Lenowitz Iris Leonard Judith Levine Marlene & Hal Liberman Cynthia Lichtenstein Andrea Lieberman Phil & Phyllis Lieberman Tina & Rick Lieberman John F. Lindsey William & Annette Lloyd James Long & Barbara Fischer Long Jan Lovelace George B. Ludlow Francine Luque Meg Maguire Richard March Carolou & Lou Marquet Dr. Albert & Marita Marsh Mary Lee Martens & Charleen Alper Jean Martin Katherine Martucci Jacqueline Massari Peter & Teresa Masterson Joan Mathews Christina Cowell Mayers Donna Maytham Helen McBean Leanne McKaig Mary Jane McRae Jennifer Meinert Peter Miller & Martha Harrison Sandra Miranda

Jean A Mitchell Mary Mitchel Raymond & Maralyn Morrissey Chad Morrison Phyllis Myers Linda Neal Martha Naismith Eric & Malfalda Neikrug Nicolla Newall Gene Noble Beryl Nord Marilyn Nordby Mercedita OConnor Catherine Olsen Conrad & LenĂŠe Owens Jeannette Paladino Helen Panoyan Cynthia & Barry Pearlman Barry Pearlman Virginia & Stuart Peltz Colette Penn Susan Peterson Sharon Petty Christopher Phillips Bernard & Elaine Pfeifer Julie Planck Fannie Porter Peter & Joanne Powers Richard Prescott & DJ Arnold Rose Marie Proietti Jimmye Reeves Rebecca Reilly Pam Reiter Mary Jo Reston Cheryl Richards Dr. Heidi Riveron Audrey Robbins & Harry Leopold Anne Roberts Margot & Jack Robinson Sara Curtis Robinson Elinor Rogosin Terry & Susan Romine Sydell Rosen Sally Ross Nancy & Jack Rozance Dr. Jack & Lenore Rubin Marcia & Sidney Rutberg Beverly Ryan Phyllis Schaen Norma Schatz Barbara (Bobbye) Schott Liliana & Paul Scire Michael Score Eda T. Scott

Carol & Erwin Segal John & Carole Segal Richard & Clare Segall Tracy Seider Micki Sellman Karen Selwyn Elizabeth Shalett Vielka Sheppard Jane Sheridan Murray & Lee Sherry Jean B. Simon Zerbe Sodervick & Jane Reed Irene Stankevics Hillary Steele Maureen & Thomas Steiner Judith Stern Judilee Sterne Louise Stevens Mac Stevenson George J. Straschnov, MD Ruth Struth Ann Sundeen Peggy Sweeney Melliss Swenson Virginia & Dee Tashian Joan Tatum Marcia Jean Taub & Peter Swain Veronica & Michel Tcherevkoff John Teryek Carolyn Thompson Jacqueline & John Thompson Carol Tilotson Janet Tolbert Niels & Marianne Trulson Mary Kay Urell Susan Valentine Karen Vereb Joseph & Jean Volpe Carol Von Allmen Lauren Ann Walsh Tom & Gwen Watson Myrna & Jeremy Whatmough Kim Wheeler Laurie Wiesemann Florence Wildner Edie Winston Elizabeth Wolfe Fremajane Wolfson Betsy Wollman Pauline Wood & Wesley Spencer Betty York Dr. Elaine Zwelling 149


D O C T O R’ S C I R C L E These physicians have agreed to see our dancers immediately and treat them at a substantially reduced fee or no fee at all. To show your appreciation, please consider using their services when you may have the need.

ACUPUNCTURE

DIAGNOSTIC SERVICES

PHYSICAL THERAPY

Filipp A. Gadar, A.P.D.O.M 3205 Southgate Circle, Suite 18 Sarasota, FL 34239 941.735.6786

Partners Imaging Center of Sarasota 1250 S Tamiami Trail, Suite 103 Sarasota, FL 34239 941.951.2100

Fane Sigal, MPT Bodywise Physical Therapy 5831 Bee Ridge Road, Suite 300 Sarasota, FL 34233 941.378.5100

CHIROPRACTIC Dr. Jared A. Winters Florida Chiropractic & Rehabilitation Clinics 1918 Robinhood Street Sarasota, FL 34231 941.955.3272 Dr. Lars Eric Larson 3560 S Tuttle Avenue Sarasota, FL 34239 941.363.6744

DENTAL Dr. Peter Masterson Lakewood Ranch Dental 6270 Lake Osprey Drive Sarasota, FL 34240 941.907.8300

DERMATOLOGY Dr. Elizabeth Callahan SkinSmart Dermatology 5911 N Honore Avenue, #210 Sarasota, FL 34243 941.308.7546 Dr. Erin Long Intercoastal Medical Group 3333 Cattlemen Road Sarasota, FL 34232 941.379.1799

150

Sarasota MRI 2 N Tuttle Avenue Sarasota, FL 34237 941.951.1888

EYES Dr. Susan M. Sloan 500 S Orange Avenue Sarasota, FL 34236 941.365.4060

INTERNAL MEDICINE Dr. Bart Price 1250 S Tamiami Trail, Suite 301 Sarasota, FL 34239 941.365.7771

ORAL AND MAXILLOFACIAL SURGERY Todd J. Reuter, DMD, MD Sarasota Oral & Implant Surgery 2130 S Tamiami Trail Sarasota, FL 34239 941.365.3388

ORTHOPAEDICS David A. Sugar, MD Sugar Orthopaedics 1921 Waldemere St. Sarasota, FL 34239 941-556-6900

PODIATRY Dr. Robert F. Herbold 4717 Swift Road Sarasota, FL 34231 941.929.1234 Dr. Paul Yungst 1921 Waldemere Street, Suite 106 Sarasosta, FL 34239 941.917.6232


30 T H A N N I V E R S A R Y S E A S O N 2020 – 2021

12 South Palm Avenue Downtown Sarasota 941-365-7900

www.sarasotabooks.com Full-Service Bookstore

|

941.359.0099

| W W W. S A R A S OTA B A L L E T.O R G

Everything else pales in comparison. It’s not just about putting your best smile forward — it’s about keeping you smiling for a lifetime.

√ Special Orders √ Author Events √ On-Line Shopping Option Sarasota’s independent bookstore

(941) 907-8300 | 6270 Lake Osprey Drive, Sarasota 34240 www.lakewoodranchdental.com DENTAL IMPLANTS | COSMETIC | PORCELAIN VENEERS | LASER DENTISTRY | PEDIATRIC

151


A DV E RT I S E R S I N D E X

1st Source Bank Allegiant Private Advisors Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc. - David Yarletts Bart Price, M.D. - Concierge Medical Services BMO Private Bank Bodywise Physical Therapy Bookstore1Sarasota Caroline C. Amory, Realtor ® Community Foundation of Sarasota County

43 12 152 45 3 85 151 66 4

Cumberland Advisors

37

Designing Women Boutique

72

Dex Imaging - Document Technology

88

Fifth Third Bank

45

Florida Chiropractic & Rehabilitation Clinics

70

Goldman, Babboni, Fernandez and Walsh Gulf Coast Community Foundation

68 inside front

Jewish Federation of Sarasota-Manatee

130

Lakewood Ranch Dental

151

Matthew Holler Photography Michael’s on East

88 104

Morton’s Gourmet Market

70

New Balance / Fleet Feet Sports / Molly’s! Boutique

70

New York Dancewear Company, LTD. Observer Media Group

130 8

Parker Group - UBS Financial Services

130

Peter G. Laughlin / Premier Sotheby’s

6

Plymouth Harbor - Retirement Community

10

Podiatrist Dr. Robert F. Herbold

130

Robert Toale and Sons Funeral Home

151

Rugs as Art - Area Rug Superstore Sarasota Bay Club - Retirement Community

72 2

Sarasota Magazine

43

Strategic Marketing Resources, Inc.

66

Studio South Fitness

41

Suncoast News Network

47

Suncoast PearlWealth Group - RBCWealth Management

47

Willis A. Smith Construction, Inc.

68

WUSF

68

152

The Arts Your

take years of practice, focus, dedication, discipline and perseverance, coupled with skill and knowledge. Financial Advisor should possess those same attributes.

Let’s Talk I’ll Listen We’ll Work Together

AMERIPRISE FINANCIAL DAVID J. YARLETTS, CFP® Financial Advisor Certified Financial Planner™ 541 North Orange Avenue Sarasota, Florida 34236 (941) 364-9009

DAVID.J.YARLETTS@AMPF.COM

Ameriprise Financial and its representatives do not provide tax or legal advice. Consult your tax advisor or attorney regarding specific tax or legal issues. Ameriprise Financial Services, Inc. Member FINRA and SIPC ©2015 Ameriprise Financial, Inc., All rights reserved.


Profile for The Sarasota Ballet

30th Anniversary 2020-2021 Season Program Book  

The Sarasota Ballet's 30th Anniversary Season Program Book for the 2020-2021 Performance Season

30th Anniversary 2020-2021 Season Program Book  

The Sarasota Ballet's 30th Anniversary Season Program Book for the 2020-2021 Performance Season