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Is there room in the food magazine market for a new publication?

Sarah Stothard


Sarah Stothard N0369884 Fashion Communication and Promotion Negotiated Project Stage One FASH30001


CONTENTS APERITIVO

An introduction into the food landscape p6

ANTIPASTO

Exploring appropriate methods p10

PRIMO

Artisan p14 Slow Food p19 SECONDO Magazine shelves p22 Oh Comely p24 Cereal p27 Kinfolk p29

CONTORNO

Fashion and Food p34 Anthropologie p36 Toast p38

DOLCE

The Reader p41

CAFFĂˆ

A conclusion to findings p49


STRATEGIC OUTCOMES Introducing Reccomendations p53 Toast and Print Media p54 The Reader p57 Content p63 Distribution Methods p66 Conclusion p69

DIGESTIVO Appendix p71


APERITIVO An introduction into the food landscape


Eating is all about refuelling, not pleasure (Blythman, 2006: xvii) Taken from Bad Food Britain

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The food landscape of the world is changing. Tastes are developing and in some

communities there is an increased desire to discover more about food and its origins. Contrary to Blythman’s scathing quote that food no longer occupies a place of pleasure within our lives, there are small pockets in communities around the globe who have set out to change this. The term artisan, meaning food or produce created out of a slow, natural process using skills and techniques passed down for generations (School of Artisan Food, 2013), is developing strongly within the food community. A small armada of small suppliers, farm shops and independent stores are aiming to change people’s opinions of food. On discussing the view that British gastronomy has a poor reputation worldwide, Blythman poses the question; “What about all the farmers’ markets, regional food festivals, and new artisan food products that are popping up left, right and centre, the length and breadth of the land?” (Blythman, 2006: xi). This statement is very true; there are incredible areas of the United Kingdom with an outstanding reputation for local food, with local producers winning countless awards. As a lifestyle choice, artisan living has been expanded and explored in great depths since it emerged in the United States from its Scandinavian roots. The success of this lifestyle in the United States is partly due to a few artisan food magazines, which reveal the pleasures of eating good food in good company, as well as exploring the people behind the food and the areas it originates from (Williams, 2013). They aim to disprove Blythman’s statement that food is simply for fuel. American chef David Tanis revealed in Kinfolk magazine in 2013 that “The whole idea is that it’s not just about fuel...I also want the experience of getting [to the table] to be enjoyable. Maybe it starts with going to the market and getting excited about the fact that the tomatoes are ripe” (Tanis, 2013). It is this passion that is fuelling people to learn more, and to get involved in the age old traditions which are only beginning to gain notable publicity now. Following the success of a publication, ideas such as “[the] most basic ingredients in our gardens and cupboards have the power to preserve and anoint and steep and relieve and hope” (Peters, 2013) have encouraged those with an interest in the artisan lifestyle to invest a little time in creating good food for friends and family, and for some, creating a new publication to entice others into exploring an idea previously overlooked in some publications. These publications have seen untold successes in the United States due to their keen target market of foodies aged between twenty and thirty. After breaking into the UK market, a few recent British publications, such as Cereal and Oh Comely emerged and discussed the artisan lifestyle and its influences, again to a similar age group. To truly reach the market of artisan foodies these publications need to discover gaps in the markets, explore who the new consumer is, and how best to distribute their ideas to them. It is this market gap that, theoretically, will help give the artisan community a firm and ever developing place in British society today.

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Figure Two: Carrots in Borough Market (Sarah Stothard, 2013)


ANTIPASTO Exploring appropriate methods

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Primary Research

To develop a greater understanding of where research could best be discovered and

developed, a variety of primary research was conducted and explored. Using a range of methods, including interviews with business professionals, consumer profiles, visits to artisan producers and food festivals; a wider understanding of the chosen field of artisan food was developed. All primary research can be found in the appendix of this document. Interviewing owner and artisan butcher of Dropswell Farm, Paul Craddock, proved very useful and a great deal a great deal of knowledge and insight was passed on and a variety of exploratory research pathways were identified to investigate as secondary research. All primary research conducted was carried out in an ethical manner, and consent forms for each section of research can be found in the appendix. Secondary Research Using key words discovered during primary research, a well selected range of books, journals, publications and articles were used to gain further insights into artisan food, and to develop further understanding of magazine production. An understanding of the position of artisan food within the UK market was broadened by reading a variety of sources. All references to secondary research used can be found in the appendix. The most insightful and useful piece of text came from Joanna Blythman’s Bad Food Britain. This piece of text not only helped round ideas generated from primary research, but informed further reading and ideas based on theories surrounding why the British have a poor global reputation for food; a subject which the argument posed in the question of this research document aims to rectify. A full methodology can be found in the appendix of this document.

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Figure Three: Cured Meats (Unknown, 2013)


Primo Introducing the artisan Exploring Slow Food

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Artisan “’Artisan’ is a term used to describe food produced by non-industrialised methods, often handed down for generations but now in danger of being lost. Tastes and processes, such as fermentation, are allowed to develop slowly and naturally, rather than curtailed for mass-production.” (http://www.schoolofartisanfood.org, 2013)

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The term artisan is often applied to increase

the cost of a product (Craddock, 2013). Such uses often cover up a lack of honesty between the producer and consumer, going against the definition. The terms artisan, organic, and hand-crafted can often be used to simply increase profit. Paul Craddock, an artisan butcher stated that, “I think it is sometimes a licence to print money. People use it as an excuse to charge more. And I think sometimes the ethics behind it aren’t quite right. I think they sometimes use that sort of thing as excuse to just charge a little bit extra rather than the actual quality of the product you produce and buy, that is where it is worth its money. It shouldn’t be about the name that’s written on it” (Craddock, 2013). In its true form, artisan food is an ancient practice where the creation of produce is done so with honesty and above all, a passion for good quality ingredients. Those trading in artisan food have an unwritten appreciation for the craft and skill involved within their trade. Paul Craddock has always, and will always be a butcher. “[Dropswell] are very traditional and the meat that we sell; customers buy the meat, take it home and do something with it... they like to know where it has come from, and I can tell them pretty much where everything has come from, and they like to be able to take it home and use the stuff that they buy from us.” (Craddock, 2013) It is people such as Paul who, no matter the income, will always be committed to the practice of creating their produce to the highest possible standard, in order to spread the passion they feel as a craftsperson. This in turn keeps the consumer loyal, and entices others to discover

more. It is true to say that, based on the continuous argument posed by Blythman in Bad Food Britain that as a nation, the British are struggling with good food; be it due to a lack of understanding or simply a love of ease (Blythman, 2006). However, “there is a growing demand for what is authentic, local and trustworthy” (Boyle, 2006, p.76). This demand is at the very root of the success of businesses such as Dropswell, and the reason that cluster groups of people the length and breadth of the United Kingdom are working together to produce, sell and educate others about local and artisan food, and preserve the very heart of the heritage they descend from. Whilst interviewing a Danish artist, Blythman asked about the difference between British and Danish shopping trolleys; “[the artist] noticed what people had in their shopping baskets...big amounts of pies, readymade food, and lots of crisps. A Danish trolley, irrespective of social class would look much… greener. We eat a lot more green food and our dishes look nicer” (Blythman, 2006, p.24). This cultural difference, not only in colour but in interest portrays an extremely negative attitude towards the British diet and our interest and passions surrounding food. Artisan producers consistently challenge the microwave diet of some UK shoppers by developing innovative products, advice and have the privilege of a loyal and expanding consumer base; something which Blythman does not consider in her argument. This Scandinavian and Danish approach to food is breaking into the international market, and there is a huge desire from consumers to eat healthier and use fresh, local ingredients. A Mintel report

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from 2012 on the most visited restaurants in the UK outlined that “the Scandinavian restaurant scene could court more mainstream popularity by tapping into consumer demands for fresh ingredients and light dishes. Diners at Scandinavian venues tend to be ethically motivated and will be drawn to venues which echo their lifestyle choices.” (Mintel, 2012) Whilst this report focuses mainly on the restaurant involvement of Scandinavian food, the lifestyle and ethics it represents have been translated into many new artisan and craft food outlets the world over, and with great successes shown predominantly in the United States. In Boyle’s Authenticity, he poses the opinion that “the hunger for authentic food has led to a foodie explosion, now well into its second decade in the UK.” (Boyle, 2006, p.87) Artisan food sits perfectly within this argument, as in Britain today we have seen a surge of new artisan food outlets, inner city food markets and a new age of foodie chefs to sample products and create wonderful dishes. Practised all over the world in thousands of different ways, artisan food is constantly growing and developing as we travel, taste and trade with different cultures. It is this element of curiosity which inspires the producer to create something new and exciting to share with their consumer, or simply as a method of adding a new element to a much loved flavour. As described by chef David Tanis, these seemingly simple elements or ingredients can create something wonderful, and changing the perspective of those who narrow their tastes to the fast and microwavable; “the whole idea is that it’s not just about fuel. I want the experience at the table to be as enjoyable, but I also want the experience of getting there to be enjoyable.” (Tanis, 2013, p.17) Artisan producers will always create on a small scale, and take pride in having one key delicacy within their collection that takes pride of place. In a recent interview with Kinfolk magazine, artisan baker, Tom Herbert of Hobbs House Bakery and Butchery, discussed his love of bread, and its significance within his work and home life. “British baking is much more inclusive (than French bread) and has an honesty to it that strikes a chord with people, just the way that sitting around a campfire does…It can be something simple that’s made with time, passion, and love.” (Herbert, 2013, p.67) This passion is as integral as the individual ingredients put into each loaf of bread he bakes, and is passed to the consumer in the form of taste, knowledge and experience. We recognise the loaf of bread as something that goes seemingly unnoticed on our dinner tables, without realising that “conversation should flow around the bread, as people tear big hunks off the loaf ”( Parks, 2013, p.67). This centralisation of something so simple is another key ingredient into the age old recipe that makes artisan produce such an important part of our dining experience. Gatherings around artisan food have soul, they feel like home wherever or whoever they are being enjoyed with (Herbert, 2013, p.67). It is this component that gives Blythman’s argument a counter; we can embrace this kind of crafted lifestyle, and it starts at our tables.

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Figure Four: Radish Chips (Migle Seikyte, 2013)


Figure Five: Freshly Baked Ciabatta (Brown Dress with White Dots, 2013: Online)

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Figure Six: Camembert with honey and walnuts (Zakaria Snow, 2013)


Slow Food Helping to increase the currently clustered popularity of the artisan food movement is Slow

Food. An idea that originated in the 1980s, “the early Slow Food movement sought to protect local farmers, restaurants and economies through an appreciation of the value of local produce and the promotion of a local osterie.” (Parkins, W and Craig, G, 2006, p.19) This deep appreciation of produce and its origins has allowed the Slow Food movement to grow vastly, leaving its Italian roots and setting up Slow Food groups across the world. Set within pockets of local communities across the globe, Slow Food groups have been set up with the directive of connecting members who seek the “pleasure of food with a commitment to community and the environment” (Slow Food, 2013). With regular meetings to discuss local produce, forgotten foods and local practices, as well as being actively involved within community events, the Slow Food organisation simply sets out to promote, rather than change. If the link between Slow Food and artisan eating is considered, it becomes clear that by using varying methods and differentiating terminologies, both “seek to continue local traditions not only in how food is produced but in what is eaten and how it is prepared.” (Ritzer, 2004, p.194) The considered ideas behind Slow Food; favouring local ingredients, preparing food in a traditional manner and sharing the dining experience in a casual environment which strays away from “brushing up on dining etiquette” (Williams, 2013, p.x), allows Slow Food to take a place within the family home. This take on dining and sourcing ingredients is partially behind the surge in popularity of artisan food. Those who have vested interests within creating a lifestyle based around their dining experiences and food purchasing habits have in a certain manner, adopted the ideology of Slow Food, be it favouring “food preparation that is traditional and as close to hand made as possible” (Ritzer, 2004, p.194) or choosing a local farm shop where the weekly meat and vegetable shop will be carried out, as a matter of principle towards supporting local farmers and “voting with your fork” (Tanis, 2013, p.18). Slow Food has, in recent years become a lifestyle choice that not only applies to “cooking as well as music, language, clothing” (Gho in Boyle, 2006, p.101). Slow Food’s place in today’s society is still as relevant as it was when it began. There will always be a need for a group to reconnect people with their food culture and history, and to help local producers find their feet in a hectic, fast paced world of microwaves and quick ready meals.

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Secondo Sitting on the food magazine shelves Oh Comely Cereal Kinfolk

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ARTISAN 021 Figure Seven: Meat platter with bread and olives (Lyla and Blu, 2013)


The Magazine Market Research into the market stems from an initial interest in the way artisan food and the lifestyle it includes is portrayed within printed publications. After exploring the United Kingdom and United States markets, a number of interesting publications were discovered, with two British publications and one American being discussed in detail in the report.

By exploring print media, its importance within certain markets has become clearer. Those who have good access to the internet will use print as a way of getting alternative information to their sister sites, whereas an older or more sentimental market tends to keep the publications, as collectors or archivists (Cereal Media Kit, 2014), in order to have a record of favourite recipes, photographs and design quality. Within the artisan food magazine genre, it is vital that print and digital publications sit hand in hand. Whilst offering a variety of content on both mediums, the magazines readership is supplied with a range of articles, recipes and imagery that so many competitor publications fail to provide.

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Figures 8-11: Magazine Covers (Details in appendix)

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Oh Comely “Oh Comely is a lifestyle magazine with life” (Oh Comely, 2013) From ohcomely.co.uk

“It is a magazine that makes people smile, full of quiet moments and stories. Read it with a cup of tea or a toddy” (About Oh Comely, 2013). Within the British magazine sector, magazines such as Oh Comely, which were derived from humble beginnings, have developed into international success stories within their targeted audience.

Founded in June 2010, and named after a mutual love of a song by American band Neutral Milk Hotel,

Oh Comely’s aim was to create a magazine for women, that their “boyfriends, brothers and husbands would want to borrow” (Oh Comely FAQ’s, 2013). The content of the magazine aims to provide a solution to the then gap in the women’s magazine market. Due to the creation of a non-traditional women’s magazine, Oh Comely are able to portray the founder’s sense of honesty using text, images and stories, bringing with it a sense of “wisdom, calm beauty and a mischievous sense of humour”(Oh Comely FAQ’s, 2013) . Described as a magazine “about people and their stories” (Oh Comely FAQ’s, 2013), one of the their initial aims was to inform their readership of the curiosities happening in the world, and to share the experiences of the people behind them. This sense of worldly curiosity is portrayed through the magazines design; putting strong emphasis on photography and illustration, and displaying the supporting imagery in its best form. Oh Comely was initially created without a set readership in mind, instead preferring to create a magazine that could be accessed by all who have an innate sense of curiosity and a passion for beautiful and peaceful imagery. Their latest information however shows that their current core audience is built of creative, professional women aged 20-35 (Oh Comely FAQ’s, 2013). Despite Oh Comely’s FAQ’s showing that the actual readership is much broader, the content in the publication is not reaching as far as initially intended, and is excluding a large readership group. Whether due to layout, content or simply distribution, the growth of the magazine has been stunted, leaving open several pockets in the market for potential new ventures. _ Oh Comely’s approach to bridging the gap between an online presence as well as a print copy of the magazine has had great successes. With an attitude which focuses on the opportunities that digital media presents the world, Oh Comely believes that “the best media outlets are using digital content to make their whole business more successful” (Oh Comely FAQ’s, 2013). By having embraced their digital presence, Oh Comely have increased their readership online. With a social media presence spanning Facebook, Twitter and many more, Oh Comely is actively encouraging people to engage their curiosity and discover new content in new formats. ARTISAN 024


Figure Twelve: Oh Comely Contents Page Issue 18 (Oh Comely, 2014)

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Figure Thirteen: Ube Ice Cream (Jolito de Leon, 2013)


Cereal “Though this quarterly is both British and internationally focused, the clean, white aesthetic and serene photography are clearly inspired by Scandinavia” (Cereal Media Kit, 2013).

A quarterly food, travel and lifestyle magazine based in the heart of Bristol, Cereal is an exquisitely

published magazine filled with striking, conceptual photography. Founders Rosa Parks and Rich Stapleton both have deeply rooted interests in food and travel, and appreciate the quiet simplicity of a well laid out piece of work. The idea behind the title, Cereal, stems from the comfort and excitement of waking up as a small child to a big bowl of cereal. It is this excitement that they intend inspiring within their readership (Parks, 2013). The design behind Cereal has been carefully considered down to the smallest detail. Coming from a literary background, Rosa’s love of reading and writing has “made its mark on how the magazine is produced and structured” (Parks, 2013). It is this love of books that inspired the title graphics itself, using the lines between the letters like the divisions on a bookshelf. Rich’s influence comes across strongly in terms of layout and structural integrity; “I wanted to give the visual content of the magazine sufficient room to breathe, which meant that we decided upon a very minimal aesthetic with lots of white space” (Stapleton, 2013). Cereal’s use of white space is unlike anything else on the market. Its closest competitor, US food and lifestyle magazine Kinfolk, uses white spacing to clearly focus attention to the words, imagery and overall composition, but is done so with an air of difference. With Cereal, its intentions to experiment with space are so clear that they become overlooked; instead, the striking photography and tales take pride of place. Just as a good frame does to a painting, it is a background element to support something truly spectacular. Cereal has gained an international reputation from its printed distribution, but also through its comprehensive use of digital media. With 25,000 unique visits per month and 100,000 page views per month, readcereal.com is fast becoming an integral part of the magazine, and sees regular, exclusive content uploaded each day (Cereal Media Kit, 2014). Social media has also played an integral part in Cereal’s online growth. By using the image sharing platform Pinterest, Cereal has allowed their readership to fully absorb the passion the magazine has for beautiful photography. Cereal’s Pinterest page includes inspirational images that have influenced the visuals of the magazine, published editorial images, and examples of product, type and other imagery. As their popularity has grown, Cereal has created a strong social media presence across Instagram, Twitter and Facebook where the reader is actively encouraged to contact them and to share thoughts on the latest publication. With the majority of tweets replied to by the magazine, Cereal have developed a commendable relationship with their reader, building trust with the brand as a whole. In terms of readership, Cereal, like Oh Comely, has a key readership between 25-40 years old, holding 50% of their total reader group. Described as “patrons of art galleries” who “travel frequently” and who “spend their money on travel, fashion, food and home and interiors” (Cereal Media Kit, 2014), Cereal’s readers open up plenty of areas for the magazine to explore and print as content. Their statistics do however show a market that may not fully relate to the magazine; 9% of their readership is aged 40-50. Such a market could expand by using a varied use of content, or a mixture of age appropriate articles and imagery to fully engage all core readership groups. ARTISAN 027


Figure Fourteen: The Kinfolk Table (Williams, 2013)


Kinfolk American food, travel and lifestyle magazine Kinfolk was founded in 2011. The success of this stunningly

photographed quarterly is due to a collection of ideas from “a growing international community of artists, writers, designers, photographers, cooks and others who are interested in creating small gatherings and finding new things to make and do” (Kinfolk Online, 2013). As a result of this varied group of contributors, Kinfolk’s content is exquisitely crafted to give the reader a new insight into a new idea, lifestyle or area of the world within each issue. It instils curiosity in all. Collecting ideas from a community of creative people rather than a set list of contributors enables Kinfolk to develop a unique issue each time. Their creative community is the inspiration behind the stories told within the pages of the magazine, and allows the reader to relate to the articles on a human level, rather than having the author elevated above them. This use of real people telling real stories has given Kinfolk a unique standing within the artisan food magazine genre, allowing the reader to explore the publication further with access to back issues, the website and social media channels. Using a range of creative from different backgrounds also allows Kinfolk to reaffirm its values of creating a magazine which “celebrates small gatherings” (Williams, 2013) by using the simple passions of those who write, photograph or design for the magazine. Filling its pages with lush photography, desire for Kinfolk to distribute worldwide has risen in the two short years it has been running. At present, Kinfolk has been translated into Japanese, Russian and Korean, to further show its desire to be a magazine that can affect people worldwide. Kinfolk was designed to “fill a void on the newsstand” (Kinfolk Online, 2013). The readership who responded to this new magazine is young, and passionate about photography, art and food. Each issue aims to touch upon each of these areas, and should be kept as a “blueprint for a balanced, international lifestyle” (Kinfolk Online, 2013) rather than simply a quick read. The relationship Kinfolk has between online and print media offers the readership a wide variety of content. Kinfolk.com offers unseen content from its printed sister publication, which includes city guides,

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galleries and film. Setting its web presence apart from other similar sites on the market, Kinfolk also offers access to back-issues to those who subscribe to the magazine. Another branch of their online presence includes a weekly series of videos entitled Kinfolk Saturdays. A series of short films to inspire days off and weekends away, Kinfolk Saturdays is a perfect representation of the visual quality of the magazine in a digital format. Kinfolk magazine has recently begun to expand the brand, in the form of events and new publications. Starting in 2012, Kinfolk began to curate several international events, including workshops, dinners, and skill based evenings to get people involved directly in the lifestyle the magazine portrays. For food lovers who want more than a handful of recipes per issue, The Kinfolk Table was launched in late 2013, and provides 85 recipes, stories and city guides. Kinfolk is a wonderful example of artisanal printed media, as it not only discusses the lifestyle and portrays the food in an aesthetically pleasing manner, but also offers something back to the community, bringing in the true sense of artisan food. Use of social media is vital to the success of a publication, as it allows readers to engage with the publication at any time they wish. Kinfolk’s

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social media presences include Twitter, Facebook and Instagram. All photos on their Instagram feed are by editor and founder Nathan Williams, giving it a sense of honesty and reflecting the developing artisan food magazine idea that the editor should not be hidden in the background. Sharing his experiences with food, travel and lifestyle in such a manner, Williams is able to reflect on the magazines Facebook description as “the leading entertaining magazine for young food enthusiasts, interested in casual gatherings” (Kinfolk’s Facebook, 2013). As a young food enthusiast himself, Williams is allowing the readership to become immersed within his food centred lifestyle at a level they are at ease with. Such uses of social media are becoming increasingly popular within the food magazine genre, and have had great successes in terms of engaging the reader, and increasing the magazines targeted consumer. Kinfolk’s main readership of young food enthusiasts with interests in travel, photography and casual dining, are aged between 20 and 35. Similar to Oh Comely and Cereal, both of whom have almost identical readerships, Kinfolk is still read by an older age group, but on a very small level. By varying the use of social media and including creative communities of an older generation, readers over 35 may be more inclined to purchase the magazine or engage with them online.


Figure Fifteen: Gluten Free Breakfast (Marcus Nilsson, 2013) Figure Sixteen: A Kinfolk Breakfast (Jen Causey, 2013)


Figure Seventeen: Lemon Salt and Rosemary Fries (Alexandra Cooks, 2012)


COntorno Fashion and Food Anthropologie Toast

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Fashion And Food In recent years, brand extension within fashion companies has been

growing. Be it new developments in interiors, new magazine style look books or blogs and events, brands are trying to connect with their consumer on a closer level. Exploring brand values and the core consumer desires has enabled many brands to have great successes in such projects. One brand in particular explored within this report is American fashion and interiors company Anthropologie, who over summer 2013 entered into a short term series of events surrounding farmers within their local community. Events such as this bring communities together, and increase brand loyalty whilst encouraging the consumer to do something different and new. This can be a very effective way of getting core consumers to act on their passions and interests in a community based way.

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Figure Eighteen: Pink Passion Fruit Lemonade (Mowie Kay, 2013)


Anthropologie A key player in the American fashion market, with stores now emerging in international capitals, Anthropologie perfectly blends fashion with interiors and food culture.

Famed for it’s in store and online aesthetic, Anthropologie unapologetically embrace all styles with its décor, products and the lifestyle it represents. “Anthropologie remains a destination for those wanting a curated mix of clothing, accessories, gifts and home décor that reflects their personal style and fuels their lives’ passions, from fashion to art to entertaining” (Anthropologie, 2013). From their eclectic mix of products, and their desire to be a crucial part of their local community, an initiative was formed in the United States over the summer of 2013. Advertised as the Pop-up Farmers Markets and in a different city every weekend during the summer across the country, the Anthropologie farmers market saw great success. Each farmers market included in store demonstrations from local artisan producers, products on sale and mini classes to involve the public with a lifestyle they may not be so familiar with. The overall aim was simple; to help out local business. From the success of the farmers markets, there was an immediate reaction within the producers who exhibited there in terms of sale and voice. Kathy Tillman of Inglewood Farm in Nelson County said; “there are a lot of people who have never heard of our farm that are here, so it’s really helping us out because we just opened last year so we’re trying to get our name out there”(Cunnington, 2013). For brands such as Anthropologie, whose home collections include place settings, kitchenware and food magazines such as Kinfolk; taking part in a food venture was a clear and unbridled next step in terms of business and brand ethics. From such a venture, the opportunities for Anthropologie in terms of artisan food are vast, and the future could reveal more brand extensions surrounding their desire to be part of their local community.

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Figure Nineteen: Anthropologie Farmers Market Poster (Anthropoligie, 2013)

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Toast “In the UK, a piece of toast represents comfort. Eating a piece of toast is a simple, easy going, almost symbolic thing – a slice of home snatched and buttered on the way out of the door…The Toast company seems to have been crafted from moments of these – it’s a seductive combination of honesty, poetry and practicality sprung from the kind of relaxed dialogue, possibility and easy flow of a weekend morning” (Thomsen Brits, 2013).

Toast’s pride sits within its extensive ethical policy. Toast began in in the late 1990s

as a catalogue company specialising in luxury lounge pyjamas made from organic and unbleached cotton (Toast, 2013). Such ethical practices have allowed Toast to develop into a unique sustainable fashion brand, trading predominately through catalogues. By only using leathers that are a by-product of the meat industry, and recycled papers for their catalogues and leaflets, Toast have a firm standing within the ethical community, as well as a reputation for luxury products due to the quality and care put into each item (Toast, 2013). Toasts use of high quality design, original and inspiring imagery has enabled the founders to build a reputable brand with the ability to extend their brand successfully into new arenas. With 186,000 customers, and 125,000 unique web visitors per month, Toast aims to create a “rich lifestyle mix” (Toast, 2013) for its customers, from both its 11 UK stores and their successful mail order catalogue. The most recent addition to the Toast family was the introduction of a new look catalogue, titled Nourishment. This catalogue featured twelve men and women whom “in various ways work with food and all of whom are passionate about what they do” (Nourishment, 2013). With small paragraphs of information about each person, and stunning imagery to run alongside, Toast have begun on the path of linking a digital element, their Toast Travels food and lifestyle blog, to their direct output to consumers through print. Whilst being interviewed in Kinfolk magazine on the heritage of Toast, co-founder Jessica Seaton said that, “life has become increasingly fast-paced. The connectivity means the boundaries between work and non-work and relaxation are more smudgy” (Seaton, 2013). It is blurred boundaries such as the one described here that gives Toast its power within the fashion world. It aims to ease the transition from work life to home life through the comfort of its clothing, and to also instil calmness in the relaxed environment of the home due to a unique approach to interiors. ARTISAN 038


Figures Twenty - Twenty Three: Nourishment (Toast, 2013)


Figure Twenty Four: Cinnamon Roll Waffles with Cinnamon Drizzle (Jen Tilley, 2013)


Dolce The New Reader

After researching the current magazine market of publications which

feature artisan food, a gap in the market for a new publication was discovered around the 35 plus age group. From information sourced from Cereal, only 9% of readers were over 35 (Cereal Media Kit, 2014). From these figures, a survey of 40 men and women aged between 30 and 60 were asked a series of questions surrounding artisan food, magazines and their interest in food. The final question thanked respondents for their time, and gave them the option to continue taking part in the research by leaving an email address. Three consumers were then chosen, and formed the basis of consumer profiles. Full survey results can be found in the appendix of this document.

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David 51 Married 2 Children Occupation, and time in occupation: Teacher, 24 years Favourite food: Steak and Chips Favourite drink: British Beer Favourite food memory: Fried potato and egg as a child. Cooked in a pan, served with bread and butter and brown sauce. Best holiday/trip: Italy on several occasions Food magazine/publication of choice: Good food/ Practical classics for non food Favourite film/film genres: Ealing comedies Favourite band/music: Pink Floyd Describe your home in three words: newish with character Describe your diet in three words: fairly well balanced Why are you interested in food? I enjoy eating and trying new food, cooking is fun and brings the family together. It is nice to sit with the family and enjoy good food. When did you first learn to cook? Were there any key influences?: My mam showed me how to bake simple cakes as a child. Most used recipe book: Several- Jamie gets used often, also the be-ro book for home baking How much do you spend on luxury, artisan or local food per month?: About ÂŁ200, mostly at the local butcher who likes to experiment. Most used piece of kitchenware: The spoons and tongs stuff Ideal Sunday: A lazy morning, up about 8, something light for breakfast, then a home made coffee at about 10. A morning walk, followed by roast beef and Yorkshire pudding with lots of veg. A relaxing afternoon, with a beer. A light nap in the afternoon and tea later. Then a beer or two and some TV. What would make a perfect small gathering/meal?: Having everyone together at home in a good restaurant , with good food and conversation.


Figure Twenty Five: Davids’ Images (David, 2013)

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Figure Twenty Six: Kellys’ Images (Kelly, 2013)

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Kelly 38 Married 2 Children Occupation, and time in occupation: Head of Health Education and Food and Nutrition Teacher (3 years) Favourite food: Houmous (Favourite dish Butternut squash risotto) Favourite drink: Peppermint tea Favourite food memory: Greek holidays (Feta salads and tzatziki – sunshine, colour and yum!) Best holiday/trip: (Food wise) All Greek holidays in particular Lindos, Rhodes (Diving in Great Barrier Reef – not relevant to food) Favourite food magazine/publication of choice: Ideal home (usually have good recipes in as well as home ideas) Favourite film/film genres: Romantic Comedy (Anything with Mathew Mcconaghy) Favourite band/music: I love Motown and Northern Soul, but also have many favourites e.g. Jack Johnson, Paolo Nutini, Elli Goulding and Passenger) Describe your home in three words: Old, Vintage, wonderful Describe your diet in three words: Balanced (apart from Xmas!!), colourful, nutty Why are you interested in food?: I am interested in the nutrients that food provides us with. Also how we have choices over the fuel we provide our body with and how it can affect how we feel, energy levels, antiageing, prevention of disease etc. When did you first learn to cook? Were there any key influences?: My parents did not cook, I started cooking when I left home in my twenties. How much do you spend on luxury, artisan or local food per month?: I would say around £50, generally we try to have a luxury meal in or out once or twice a month, and although we are a busy family try to source some locally produced foods when we can. Most used piece of kitchenware: Blender (Soups and smoothies) but actually it is probably the sharp knife and the chopping board! Ideal Sunday: Family walk and out to a local cosy pub restaurant for Sunday lunch, no ironing and coming back to cuddle up and watch a film. What would make a perfect small gathering/meal?: Tapas all small tasters and everyone gathered around talking, eating and having fun.


Sharon Age: 51 Married 2 Children Occupation, and time in occupation: Curriculum Leader, 10 years Favourite food: Grilled chicken marinated with lemon Favourite drink: Good red wine Favourite food memory: First indian curry in London Best holiday/trip: Italy on several occasions Food magazine/publication of choice: Good Food Favourite film/film genres: Arsenic and Old Lace/black and white ealing comedies Favourite band/music: Kasabian/most types of music Describe your home in three words: cottagey but modern Describe your diet in three words: Good home cooking Why are you interested in food? I enjoy preparing food for my family and take pleasure in sharing this with them. When did you first learn to cook? I learned to make basic things from an early age, cakes etc but really began to cook when I had my first kitchen. Most used recipe book: I use many, Jamie Olivers for Italian and some family recipes, books, Paul Hollywood for bread, Linda McCartney for Veggie and pastry How much do you spend on luxury, artisan or local food per month?: About ÂŁ200, mostly at the local butcher but also at every possible food festival or farm shop we come across. Most used piece of kitchenware: Kitchenaid blender, for pastry/cakes/slicing and chopping veg and herbs. Ideal Sunday: Frothy coffee about 10, lunch with the family followed by some time in the fresh air/walking or in the garden, followed by a nap in front of the tele. What would make a perfect small gathering/meal?: All of the family around the table, good food and wine with lots of conversation.


Figure Twenty Seven: Sharons’ Images (Sharon, 2013)

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CAFFĂˆ A conclusion to findings

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“The whole idea is that it’s not just about fuel” (Tanis, 2013) From Kinfolk Volume Nine

The trend for artisan food is not one which will be forgotten or diminish

quickly. Artisan practices are in the blood of the people who craft them, from butcher to baker; they have been passed down for centuries (Craddock, 2013). It is therefore impractical to think that this is simply a craze within the food world; it may never make the front page of national news, but the artisan lifestyle is slowly growing in popularity. The purpose of artisan food is quite simple; good food, enjoyed with good friends in a relaxed environment (Williams, 2013). A perfect artisan meal needn’t be complicated; “just a roast with roast veg. I mean, it’s an easy meal but its good meat, good veg; banged in the oven and left” (Craddock, 2013), as its purpose is to have something of high quality that brings back memories. Based on research into the current magazine market which explores artisan food, there is a gap in the market for a magazine that appeals to the over 35s. As the majority of readers of Cereal and Oh Comely are under this age group, with some fragmented readers over this age, a number of readers aren’t getting the content or information that matches their interests or preferred lifestyle. From this and the results of the survey, a new magazine can be developed which will directly target its audience’s needs through content, visuals and links with the artisan industry. A good way to introduce such a magazine could be in the form of a brand extension, such as the extension to Anthropologie with its farmers markets. Research into a range of brands has suggested that a suitable brand to extend would be Toast, as they have already shown interest in artisan food and food related media. Currently displayed in a digital format, there is potential that a food based print magazine which could reach a larger number of Toasts core consumer group through a variety of distribution methods.

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Figure Twenty Eight: Rustic Peach and Plum Tart (Melissa Hartfiel, 2011)


Strategic Outcome Introducing reccomendations Toast and print media The reader Content Distribution methods Conclusion

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Figure Twenty Nine: Portabello Burger (Karoline, 2013)

Figure Thirty: Goats Cheese and Caramelised Onion Pizza (Minimalist Baker, 2013)


Introducing outcomes The magazine market surrounding artisan food is currently somewhat restricted in terms of the readership it is able to reach. As the research in the main body of this report showed, UK publications Cereal and Oh Comely, and US publication Kinfolk, all target 20-35 year olds with their content. Choosing to fill the gap in the publications market using a brand is a commendable way to introduce a new magazine without the risk of launching something into the paid for market. As a brand extension, the publication will match directly with the identified set of brand values, and immediately target the desired audience. It is vital however, that such a publication should have a digital presence. Today, “despite the growth of the World Wide Web, new media and technologies have not diminished the popularity of magazines� (Whittaker, 2008, p. 2). Within our fast paced society, it is increasingly important for any piece of printed media to have an online presence in order to present new content, reach a larger consumer group, and to demonstrate its viability as a publication. Using a brand from which to launch a publication, there is a smaller necessity to fill the magazine with costly advertisements, as any imagery or product used tends to be from the brand in question. This in turn will increase brand loyalty by seeing the products in a new light. This section will outline recommendations for the brand extension, identify key readership groups, and suggest appropriate channels of distribution for the publication.

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Toast and Print media British fashion house Toast is the chosen brand to extend and with which to launch a new artisan food publication. As a brand, Toast portrays a wholesome, organic and curious lifestyle. These brand aesthetics can not only be found in the clothing and interior items they sell, but in the look and feel of the catalogues they send out to consumers, their website, and the Toast Travels blog. The name of the brand, Toast, also has comfortable, warm connotations linking to quick weekday breakfasts, or relaxed, lazy Sunday brunches (Parks, 2013).

As an extension, a food publication is a logical next step for Toast to branch into based on their current range of food related projects. In December 2013 Toast included a fashion catalogue entitled Nourishment, featuring 12 artisan food producers and farmers. Each person shown in the catalogue had a miniature biography to explain their role within the food world, and some stunning images of them in their workplaces, dressed head to toe in Toast clothing. This magazine was more than a marketing stunt; it was a way of Toast expressing their foodie desires in a new medium. Toast Travels, the brands online blog, features several guest posts from friend of the brand Orlando Gough, whose recipe book is also for sale on their website. When writing on their blog, Gough’s honest style engages the reader, and encourages trust for the brand.. Having incorporated two elements, Gough’s blog posts and the launch of Nourishment, of their love of food already into the brand, producing a magazine could be a great success for the founders. As earlier consumer research suggests, the new artisan readership is looking for a food magazine that reflects the artisan lifestyle. It should have good quality recipes inside, pay attention to food trends, but also reflect the artisan lifestyle by including regular interviews with the industry. It should also aesthetically portray this lifestyle; keeping layouts simple, imagery interesting, and most importantly should give the reader a feel of honesty. Full consumer responses to the survey can be found in the appendix of this document.

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Figure Thirty One: Toast September 2013 Catalogue (Nicholas James Seaton, 2013)


Figure Thirty Two: Age of readers surveyed (Sarah Stothard, 2013)

Figure Thirty Three: Magazine covers shown in survey (Sarah Stothard, 2013)


The reader B ased on consumer research, 36 out of 40 people questioned fit into the 30-55 age groups,

as shown in figure thirty two. From information and figures received from Cereal and Oh Comely, the majority readership is between the ages of 20 and 35, which raises questions around whether the older reader, 9% in Cereals figures, are getting the content they need to fulfil their artisan interests. It could therefore be theorised that this age range is often overlooked by the current range of artisan food magazines. From analysing a range of artisan food magazines, the content across all tends to be very similar in terms of use of language, themes and articles, which may restrict certain age groups from reading particular areas of magazines. The publication will, like others, set out with the aim to reach other age groups, but with particular attention being paid to the over 35 market. It is vital that the consumer has an input into what content is delivered through any form of brand extension. From the survey it was suggested that a new food magazine should have a strong link with the artisan community, including information on local farm shops, interviews with producers, where

to buy supplies, as well as filling its pages with interesting, easy to make recipes and stunning photography. When shown images from Cereal, Oh Comely and Kinfolk (figure thirty three), Cereal was the most likely to be read by the target audience. The aesthetics of the imagery may have influenced this. This again links back to the consumer’s feedback of Toasts’ Nourishment catalogue, as the majority of readers preferred the minimal look of the cover, and were intrigued about the content of the magazine. Forming four key consumer groups, aptly named after toppings for Toast, allows a clearer look at what each reader desires from food publications, and what their interests are. This in turn will allow the brand extension of Toast to reach a wide number of interests and ensure that the publication is fully appropriate for each consumer group.

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Figure Thirty Four: Rhubarb and Ginger preserve (Fortnum and Mason, 2013)

RHUBARB AND GINGER PRESERVE “This warming jam brings together two perfect partners: Timerley rhubarb from here and ginger from further afield.� (Fortnum and Mason, 2013) 30-35 Creatives Passionate about art, photography and literature Live in cities Favour food markets and festivals over chain supermarkets Read vintage classics Well travelled Educated, often to university level High levels of disposable income Hold casual dinners with minimal effort Read Kinfolk and Cereal magazine

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Figure Thirty Five: Honeycomb Amphora (Fortnum and Mason, 2013)

hONEYCOMB aMPHORA “This is honey as it should be eaten: pure, clear and complete with the honeycomb that it came from. Very good on sourdough bread with unsalted butter.� (Fortnum and Mason, 2013) 36-40 Have young children Cook experimental and tasty food, but it needs to be quick and easy Cost of ingredients is kept low - luxuries are kept for quiet dinners alone whilst the children are asleep Watch cookery programmes and are particularly fond of Jamie Oliver and Hugh Fearnley Wittingstall Educate their children on the importance of good quality food Hold relaxed dinners for family on special occasions

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Figure Thirty Six: Wild Blueberry Preserve (Fortnum and Mason, 2013)

wILD bLUEBERRY pRESERVE “The result is a not-too-sweet, aromatic preserve that is devine on fresh buttered bread, ice cream and all kinds of teatime foods� (Fortnum and Mason, 2013) 41-50 Nostalgic Tend to have older children Enjoy country walks with stops in local pubs and tea rooms Shop at local farm shops and butchers Live away from the city (but may travel there to work) Shop at Toast, Hobbs and Joules Food favourites include fresh homemade soup, warm crusty bread and handpicked fruit turned into preserves

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Figure Thirty Seven: Vintage Orange Marmalade (Fortnum and Mason, 2013)

Vintage Orange Marmalade “A classic vintage. The result is a rich, citrussy, not-too-sweet flavour. A cheery sight on ones breakfast table.� (Fortnum and Mason, 2013) 50-55 Enjoy growing their own fruit and vegetables Higher levels of disposable income Teachers, doctors, lecturers, business owners Well travelled Collect recipe books, but will always return to a favourite Holds casual dinners for friends Food treats include fine cheeses and charcuterie

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Figure Thirty Eight: Pomegranate Scones (MakingTodayBeautiful, 2013)


Content Outlining appropriate content for the new

publication is vastly important. It must resonate with the target readership, as well as portraying Toast in accordance to brand values. To arrive at a suggested list of content, Toast and Toast Travels was carefully analysed to ensure the true essence of the brand is shown in print and digital formats. Toast has strong ethical views at the core of its brand values. From the materials their clothing is made of to the quality of the recycled paper their catalogues are printed on, this strong sense of ethical reasoning can simply be added to the launch of a new publication whilst maintaining its content and style. Arrangement of the magazine will be clean, to portray the sense of honesty that both the brand and the readership desires. Keeping the cover minimal, save for a beautifully photographed image and title, will again ensure that the readership is at ease with the launch of a new venture into publication. As shown in the moodboard (figure thirty nine), white space has been considered to ensure that the content and the imagery is the focus. In some popular food magazines such as Good Food and Delicious, pages are often cluttered with text, symbols,

advertisements and imagery, and the meaning of each page can become lost. With Toast’s brand extension it will be kept pure to reflect the heritage it stems from. Textures will remain matt, in keeping with the current style of the Toast catalogues, and to ensure the wholesome feel the readership desires remains prominent. In keeping with its competitors, there will be a digital presence to the magazine. Available on both the Toast website and Toast Travels, the digital segment of the magazine will offer exclusive content not available in the printed edition. Web content will include: •Behind the scenes videos showing the making of the recipes •Exclusive video interviews with producers, chefs and access to exclusive behind the scenes footage from these interviews •Access to recipes from older issues •Digital version of the publication, with click through links to purchase products where Toast clothing or home items have been used

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Figure Thirty Nine: Moodboard One (Full details in appendix)


To ensure that the target readership is able to fully connect with the brand online, there will also be a Twitter feed, Instagram and Pinterest pages to interact with the consumer on a visual and written level. It will also enable the reader to contact the magazine directly, share their thoughts and become more involved with the brand as a whole. Photography used in the magazine will be rustic, authentic, and will inspire the curiosity of the reader. It is also vital that images used portray the simplicity of the artisan lifestyle and the values it contains. As shown in the consumer survey, the cover image of Cereal proved most popular, so matching a similar aesthetic may help develop the publication. It is important however to remember that Cereal, despite being available to purchase, should be kept as a competitor, and therefore should only be used as inspiration, not as a template for the magazine. Reader feedback on Nourishment showed that readers enjoyed the “suggestion that the food is wholesome and organic” and that it “reflect[s] a simple and content lifestyle” (Survey, 2013). Such views will be transferred into the aesthetic of the publication, from the imagery of food and producers, to the lands in which the dishes originate. Jessica and Jamie Seaton intended the name Toast to sound wholesome; to show the customer the luxuries of lazy Sundays, slow breakfasts and the importance of family and friends. It is therefore appropriate to consider the effect the name of a new publication will have in terms of linking back to these original thoughts surrounding Toast, and the connotations the reader will have with it. Originally, several words surrounding the food industry were thought of, however the connotations of such words did not match the brand or its style fully. Following this development, a series of words directly preceding toast in everyday language could be deemed appropriate. As seen in earlier consumer groupings, the use of a foodstuff or preserve will tie directly to the brand and its values. Considered titles included: •Jam •Marmalade •Butter •Cheese •Pâté •Eggs Of those most fitting with the brand values, generating a sense of comfort and home, the title Jam was chosen. Written in the same font as the Toast logo, but on a smaller scale, Jam is the epitome of simple yet luxurious toast toppings, and brings back food memories of making homemade jams to spread on hot toast on cold mornings; the snatched slice of home on the way to work (Parks, 2013), a small piece of comfort. The print version of Jam will be printed on 130gsm recycled matt paper, in keeping with the brands values. The images show the simplistic layout of Jam, and examples of content that will be included. It is vital that the aesthetics of Jam reflect that of Toast, ensuring that the publication is kept a part of the brand, despite being approached as an extention.

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Distribution methods As previously mentioned, Jam will be available both on and offline. Through a link on the Toast

homepage and on Toast Travels, Jam will be fully accessible on both web browsers and portable devices. A mobile ready version of the site would also be created. The aim of the Jam segment of the website is to remain in keeping with the accessibility and simplicity of the Toast website. Inspiration for the Jam homepage and social media can be seen in moodboard two (figure fourty). In keeping with the digital age, Twitter, Instagram and Pinterest presences will be linked to from the Jam website, as well as being detailed in the magazine. The aesthetics of these will be in keeping with the simplicity of the publication. As shown in the moodboard (figure fourty), the visuals of all three suggested platforms of social media will be connected to show unity between them. Any updates on Instagram and Pinterest will be shared on the Twitter page to encourage readers to access all social media sites Jam is on. The printed version of Jam will be distributed with the catalogues posted out to customers. The magazine will be a quarterly, published four times a year, reflecting on the food seasons. On the Toast website, the consumer is able to select which catalogues they receive, and an option to receive Jam will be available here. At present, Toast look books are not sent out on a regular basis, meaning the consumer has to reregister their address and catalogue selection each time they wish to receive a new look book. The launch of Jam aims to address this issue by offering a subscription button, to allow the consumer to receive Jam on a quarterly basis without missing an issue. There will also be the option to unsubscribe, giving the consumer the same freedoms as those who pay regularly for their subscriptions. The magazine will first be released on a trial basis as a free publication running alongside the brand. Dependant on success of the publication, samples may be sent out with catalogues, and the option to subscribe for a small fee to receive Jam regularly could be launched. This fee would include receiving Jam on a quarterly basis, exclusive content online and discount on Toast products. Online content will be accessible via a username and password combination set upon subscription. The print magazine will also be available within the 11 Toast stores in the UK. Complimentary copies will be given to consumers on a trial basis. The intention through using stores as a platform to launch the magazine is to reach a wider audience who may not be familiar with the brand online, and who may stumble upon the stores and enter out of curiosity. When the magazine is a success and is developed into a more in-depth and paid for publication, it will be sold in the home section of the stores alongside their cookery books, and will also be available for purchase at the till points.

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Figure Fourty: Moodboard Two (Full details in appendix)


Figure Fourty One: Fresh Strawberries (Kankana Saxena, 2013)


Conclusion If the recommended outcomes were to be applied to Toast, the brand will

theoretically see an increase in both sales revenue and online interest. The aim of Jam is to create a larger community of people surrounding the publication, and the brand though product insertion. If successful and sold within stores, Jam will become a more tailored artisan food magazine, with its key competitors being Cereal in the United Kingdom and Kinfolk in the United States. With these two magazines being heavily influenced by creative communities and global contributors, there is the possibility for writers across both magazines to collaborate on articles, designs and features in certain special editions of Jam magazine. The launch of Jam will also address a market gap discovered through consumer age groups of both Cereal and Oh Comely. The market addressed, 35 plus, has shown to have a keen interest in the world of artisan food and are looking for a new and more content appropriate publication (Survey, 2013). For the purpose of this report, the brand extention of a food magazine has been applied to Toast; however with some tailoring of brand values and aesthetics, the idea could easily be applied to another appropriate brand or store.

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Figure Fourty Two - Fresh Flowers in Jars (Erin and Tara, 2013)


Digestivo Appendix List of References p72 List of Illustrations p74 Bibliography p78 Methodology p81 Survey p82 Consumer Consent Forms p87 Interview with Paul Craddock p91 Emails p96 Tutorial Record Sheets p101

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List of References Books Blythman, J, 2006. Bad Food Britain: How a Nation Ruined its Appetite. Great Britain: Fourth Estate Boyle, D, 2004. Authenticity: Brands Fakes, Spin and the Lust for Real Life. London: Harper Perennial Parkins, W and Craig, G, 2006. Slow Living. New York: Berg Ritzer, G, 2008. The McDonaldization of Society 5. United States of America: Pine Forge Press Williams, N, 2013. The Kinfolk Table. United States of America: Workman

Interviews Craddock, P, 2013. Artisan Butcher and Businessman: Interview with Paul Craddock by Sarah Stothard, Dropswell Farm, 16th November 2013 Herbert, T, 2013. Baker and Businessman: The Baker Brothers: Interview with Tom Herbert by Rosa Parks, Kinfolk Magazine Volume Six, pages 67-68 Seaton, J and J, 2013. Founders of Toast: Toast of the Town: Interview with Jessica and James Seaton by Louisa Thomsen Brits, Kinfolk Magazine Volume Nine, pages 55-57 Tanis, D, 2013. Chef and New York Times Food Columnist: One Good Chef: David Tanis interviewed by Nils Bernstein, Kinfolk Magazine Volume Nine, pages 17-19

Magazines

Cereal, 2013. Cereal Media Kit 2014. Bristol, December 2013 Nourishment, 2013. Nourishment Catalogue by Toast. Swansea, November 2013 Oh Comely, 2013, Media FAQ’s 2013/14. London, December 2013 Parks, 2013. The Baker Brothers. Kinfolk Volume Six, page 67 Peters, N.M, 2013. Eating Reveremtly. Kinfolk Volume Six, page 98 Thomsen Brits, L, 2013. Toast of the Town. Kinfolk Volume Nine, page 55

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Websites Angthropologie, 2013. Our Story [online] Available at: http://www.anthropologie.eu/anthro/category/ our+story/help-our-story.jsp [Accessed: November 29th 2013] Cunnington, J, 2013. Anthropologie Invites Local Vendors to Farmers Market Event [online] Available at: http://www.newsplex.com/home/headlines/216373611.html [Accessed: December 12th 2013] Kinfolk, 2013. About Us [online] Available at: http://www.kinfolk.com/about-us/ [Accessed: 11th November 2013] Kinfolk, 2013. Description on Facebook [online] Available at: https://www.facebook.com/kinfolkmag [Accessed: 1st December 2013] Parks, R, 2013. Cereal [online] Available at: http://vsco.co/features/vsco-film-cereal-magazine [Accessed: 12th December 2013] School of Artisan Food, 2013. What is artisan food? [online] Available at: http://www.schoolofartisanfood.org/about-us/artisan-food [Accessed: 1st December 2013] Slow Food, 2013. What is slow food? [online] Available at: http://www.slowfood.org.uk/about/whatwe-do/ [Accessed: 1st December 2013] Spicer, H. 2013. Menu Flavours [online] Available at: http://academic.mintel.com/display/627150/ [Accessed: 15th December 2013] Stapleton, R, 2013. Cereal [online] Available at: http://vsco.co/features/vsco-film-cereal-magazine [Accessed: 12th December 2013] Toast, 2013. Background of Toast [online] Available at: http://www.toast.co.uk/content/careers/background.htm [Accessed 27th December 2013]

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List of Images Figure One - Samantha Goh, 2013. Milk ice-cream from Momufuku Milk bar, NYC. Cereal Tumblr [online] Available at: http://readcereal.tumblr.com/post/46967520761 [Accessed: January 3rd 2014] Figure Two – Sarah Stothard, 2013. Carrots in Borough Market. [photograph] Figure Three – Unknown, 2013. Cured Meats. [online] Available at: http://media-cache-cd0.pinimg. com/originals/30/7b/f7/307bf70dc8dd4be8091512512c3c65ea.jpg [Accessed: 3rd January 2014] Figure Four - Migle Seikyte, 2013. Radish Chips. [online] Available at: http://mykitchenaffair.blogspot. co.uk/2013/04/when-spring-gives-you-radishes.html [Ac-cessed: 3rd January 2014] Figure Five – Brown Dress with White Dots, 2013. Freshly Baked Ciabatta. [online] Available at: http:// browndresswithwhitedots.tumblr.com/page/4 [Accessed: 12th November 2013] Figure Six - Zakaria Snow, 2013. Camembert with honey and walnuts. [online] Available at: http:// www.flickr.com/photos/75760684@N03/7944652566/ [Accessed: 12th January 2014] Figure Seven – Lyla and Blu, 2013. Meat Platter with Bread and Olives. [online] Available at: http:// www.lylaandblu.com/post/42793897575 [Accessed: 4th January 2013] Figure Eight – Cereal, 2013. Cereal Volume Two. [online] Available at: http://cereal.bigcartel.com/ product/volume-two [Accessed: 11th January 2014] Figure Nine – Oh Comely, 2013. Oh Comely Space Issue. [online] Available at: http:// ohcomelymagazine.tumblr.com/ [Accessed: 11th January 2014] Figure Ten – Kinfolk, 2013. Kinfolk Volume Nine. [online] Available at: http://www.amazon.co.uk/ Kinfolk-Volume-9-Nathan-Williams/dp/1941815081/?ref=pd_sim_b_1 [Accessed: 11th January 2014] Figure Eleven – Nourishment, 2013. Nourishment Catalogue by Toast. [online] Available at: http:// www.toast.co.uk/content/lookbook/men/aw13/lookbook-autumnwinter.htm#1 [Accessed: 12th December 2013] Figure Twelve – Oh Comely, 2014. Contents Page for Issue Eighteen. [online] Available at: http://www. ohcomely.co.uk/issue/792 [Accessed: 11th January 2014] Figure Thirteen: Jelito De Leon, 2013. Purple Ube Ice Cream. [online] Available at: http://readcereal. com/features/ube/ [Accessed: 15th January 2014] Figure Fourteen – Kinfolk, 2013. The Kinfolk Table. [online] Available at: http://www.kinfolk.com/ shop/book/the-kinfolk-table-cookbook/ [Accessed: 18th December 2013] Figure fifteen – Marcus Nilsson, 2013. Gluten Free Breakfast. [online] Available at: http://www.marcusnilsson.com/Pictures/?c=78&c2=146&p=1088 [Accessed 11th January 2014] ARTISAN 074


Figure Sixteen – Jen Causey, 2013. A Kinfolk Breakfast. [online] Available at: http://www.simplybreakfast. blogspot.co.uk/ [Accessed: 11th January 2014] Figure Seventeen – Alexandra Cooks, 2012. Lemon Salt and Rosemary Fries. [online] Available at: http://www. alexandracooks.com/2012/07/27/fries-with-lemon-salt-rosemary/ [Accessed: 11th January 2014] Figure Eighteen - Mowie Kay, 2013. Pink Passion Fruit Lemonade. [online] Available at: http://www. mowielicious.com/home/page/2/ [Accessed: 9th January 2014] Figure Nineteen – Anthropologie, 2013. Anthropologie Farmers Market Poster. [online] Available at: http:// popandcircumstanceblog.com/2013/09/11/anthro/ [Accessed: 10th December 2013] Figure Twenty – Toast, 2013. Ole Hansen. [online] Available at: http://www.toast.co.uk/content/lookbook/ men/aw13/lookbook-autumnwinter.htm#12 [Accessed 14th January 2014] Figure Twenty One – Toast, 2013. Rachel Khoo. [online] Available at: http://www.toast.co.uk/content/ lookbook/men/aw13/lookbook-autumnwinter.htm#34 [Accessed: 14th January 2014] Figure Twenty Two – Toast, 2013. Thomasina Miers. [online] Available at: http://www.toast.co.uk/content/ lookbook/men/aw13/lookbook-autumnwinter.htm#24 [Accessed: 14th January 2014] Figure Twenty Three – Toast, 2013. Tom Oldroyd. [online] Available at: http://www.toast.co.uk/content/ lookbook/men/aw13/lookbook-autumnwinter.htm#32 [Accessed: 14th January 2014] Figure Twenty Four – Jen Tilley, 2013. Cinnamon Roll Waffles with Cinnamon Drizzle. [online] Available at: http://www.howto-simplify.com/2013/09/cinnamon-roll-waffles-with-cinnamon.html [Accessed: 9th January 2014] Figure Twenty Five – David, 2013. Consumer Profile. [Own Images] Figure Twenty Six – Kelly, 2013. Consumer Profile. [Own Images] Figure Twenty Seven – Sharon, 2013. Consumer Profile. [Own Images] Figure Twenty Eight – Melissa Hartfiel, 2011. Peach and Plum Tart. [online] Available at: http://www.melissahartfiel.com/2011/08/31/rustic-peach-and-plum-tart/ [Accessed: 5th January 2014] Figure Twenty Nine – Karoline, 2013. Portobello Burger. [online] Available at:http://gronaskafferiet.se/ [Accessed: 5th January 2014] Figure Thirty – Minimalist Baker, 2013. Goats Cheese and Caramelized Onion Pizza. [online] Available at: http://minimalistbaker.com/goat-cheese-caramelized-onion-pizza/ [Accessed: 5th January 2014] Figure Thirty One – Nicholas James Seaton, 2013. September 2013 Catalogue. [online] Available at: http:// www.toast.co.uk/content/lookbook/women/aw13/lookbook-september.htm [Accessed: 11th December 2013] Figure Thirty Two – Sarah Stothard, 2014. Age of Readers Surveyed. [Own infographic image] Figure Thirty Three – Sarah Stothard, 2013. Magazines shown in survey. [Own edited image] Figure Thirty Four – Fortnum and Mason, 2014. Rhubarb and Ginger Preserve. [online] Available at: www.


fortnumandmason.com/p-5366-rhubarb-ginger-preserve.aspx [Accessed: 18th January 2014] Figure Thirty Five – Fortnum and Mason, 2014. Honeycomb Amphora. [online] Available at: www. fortnumandmason.com/p-5431-welsh-chunk-comb-honey-welsh-honey-honeycomb.aspx [Accessed : 18th January 2014] Figure Thirty Six – Fortnum and Mason, 2014. Wild Blueberry Preserve. [online] Available at: www. fortnumandmason.com/p-5300-wild-blueberry-[reserve-340g-jar.aspx [Accessed: 18th January 2014] Figure Thirty Seven – Fortnum and Mason, 2014. Vintage Orange Marmalade. [online] Available at: http:// www.fortnumandmason.com/p-5314-orange-marmalade-sir-nigels-vintage-orange-marmalade.aspx [Accessed: 18th January 2014] Figure Thirty Eight – Making Today Beautiful, 2013. Pomegranate Scones. [online] Available at: http:// making-today-beautiful.com/2013/04/24/pomegranate-scones/ [Accessed: 10th November 2013] Figure Thirty Nine – Moodboard One: 1.Cereal, 2013. Issue Two. [online] Available at: http://www.huhmagazine.co.uk/4956/cereal-issuen%C2%BA2. [Accessed: 20th January 2014] 2.Kelsey Cronkhite, 2013. Inspiration versus Imitation. [online] Available at: http://www.pinegateroad.com/ reflection-2-inspiration-vs-imitation/ [Accessed: 20th January 2014] 3.Unknown, 2013. Cabin in the Woods. [online] Available at: http://theyardpdx.tumblr.com/ post/12128956400 [Accessed: 20th January 2014] 4.Unknown, 2013. Under. [online] Available at: http://blackmountainblues.tumblr.com/post/21908276611 [Accessed: 20th January 2014] 5.Unknown, 2013. Elephant Magazine. [online] Available at: http://kariusbakt.us/post/36544870213 [Accessed: 20th January 2014] 6.Unknown, 2013. La Vie de Mer zine. [online] Available at: http://thesealife.com.au/post/132/la-vie-de-mer [Accessed: 20th January 2014] 7.Brandon Nickerson, 2013. Birds. [online] Available at: http://www.behance.net/gallery/Birds/8516401 [Accessed: 20th January 2014] Figure Fourty – Moodboard Two: 1.Circle 21 Candles, 2013. Homepage. [online] Available at: http://webdesignledger.com/inspiration/21inspiring-minimalist-web-designs [Accessed: 20th January 2014] 2.Grain and Gram, 2013. Homepage. [online] Available at: http://slodive.com/inspiration/showcase/ minimalist-website-layouts/ [Accessed: 20th January 2014] 3.Nudge, 2013. Homepage. [online] Available at: http://designinstruct.com/visual-inspiration/web-designinspiration/minimalist-website-designs/ [Accessed: 20th January 2014] 4.Pink and Lola, 2013. Homepage. [online] Available at: http://www.etsy.com/uk/shop/


PinkandLolaShop?ref=l2-shop-info-name [Accessed: 20th January 2014] 5.J Burns, 2011. Social Media Logo Designs. [online] Available at: http://creattica.com/css/25fiftysix/78263 [Accessed: 20th January 2014] 6.Unknown, 2014. Social Media Logos. [online] Available at: http://www.slapcompany.com/news/fallconference-board-review-features-adaptation-bury-my-heart [Accessed: 20th January 2014] 7.James Kicinski McCoy, 2014. Bleubird Homepage. [online] Available at: http://bleubirdblog.com [Accessed: 20th January 2014] Figure Fourty One - Kankana Saxena, 2013. Fresh Strawberries. [online] Available at: http://www. playfulcooking.com/dessert/roasted-strawberries-frozen-yogurt/ [Accessed: 20th January 2014] Figure Fourty Two – Erin and Tara Photography, 2013. Fresh Flowers in Jars. [online] Available at: http:// ruffledblog.com/ruffled_galleries/beachside-australian-wedding/beachside-australian-wedding-75/ [Accessed: 20th January 2014]

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Bibliography Books Bell, J. 2006. Doing Your Research Project: A Guide for First Time Researchers in Education, Health and Social Science. Fourth Edition. Berkshire: Open University Press Bestley, R and Noble, I. 2005. Visual Research: An Introduction to Research Methodologies in Graphic Design. Switzerland: AVA Publishing SA Blythman, J, 2006. Bad Food Britain: How a Nation Ruined its Appetite. Great Britain: Fourth Estate Boyle, D, 2004. Authenticity: Brands Fakes, Spin and the Lust for Real Life. London: Harper Perennial Brillat-Savarin, J.A. 2009. The Physiology of Tast, or Meditations on Transcendental Gastronomy. New York: Random House Clapp, J, 2013. Food. Cambridge: Polity Press Korsmeyer, C., ed., 2005. The Taste Culture Reader: Experiencing Food and Drink. London: Berg Leimgruber, W, 2006. Takeaway. Germany: Museum fur Gestaltung Zurich Parkins, W and Craig, G, 2006. Slow Living. New York: Berg Parkinson, KJ, 2006. Food is Love: Advertising and Gender Roles in Modern America. Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press Rayner, J, 2013. A Greedy Man in a Hungry World: Why Almost Everything You Thought You Knew About Food Is Wrong. London: William Collins Ritzer, G, 2008. The McDonaldization of Society 5. United States of America: Pine Forge Press Short, F, 2006. Kitchen Secrets: The Meaning of Cooking in Everyday Life. Oxford: Berg Whittaker, J. 2008. Magazine Production. New York: Routledge Williams, N, 2013. The Kinfolk Table. United States of America: Workman Interviews Craddock, P, 2013. Artisan Butcher and Businessman: Interview with Paul Craddock by Sarah Stothard, Dropswell Farm, 16th November 2013 Herbert, T, 2013. Baker and Businessman: The Baker Brothers: Interview with Tom Herbert by Rosa Parks, Kinfolk Magazine Volume Six, pages 67-68 ARTISAN 078


Seaton, J and J, 2013. Founders of Toast: Toast of the Town: Interview with Jessica and James Seaton by Louisa Thomsen Brits, Kinfolk Magazine Volume Nine, pages 55-57 Tanis, D, 2013. Chef and New York Times Food Columnist: One Good Chef: David Tanis interviewed by Nils Bernstein, Kinfolk Magazine Volume Nine, pages 17-19 Magazines Cereal, 2013. Cereal Media Kit 2014. Bristol, December 2013 Nourishment, 2013. Nourishment Catalogue by Toast. Swansea, November 2013 Oh Comely, 2013, Media FAQ’s 2013/14. London, December 2013 Parks, 2013. The Baker Brothers. Kinfolk Volume Six, page 67 Peters, N.M, 2013. Eating Reveremtly. Kinfolk Volume Six, page 98 Thomsen Brits, L, 2013. Toast of the Town. Kinfolk Volume Nine, page 55 Journal Articles Bommel, K van, and Spicer, A. 2011. “Hail the Snail: Hegemonic Struggles in the Slow Food Movement” Organization Studies. November. De Backer, C.J.S. 2013. “Family meal traditions. Comparing reported childhood food habits to current food habits among university students.” Appetite. May. Websites Angthropologie, 2013. Our Story [online] Available at: http://www.anthropologie.eu/anthro/category/ our+story/help-our-story.jsp [Accessed: November 29th 2013] Cunnington, J, 2013. Anthropologie Invites Local Vendors to Farmers Market Event [online] Available at: http://www.newsplex.com/home/headlines/216373611.html [Accessed: December 12th 2013] Kinfolk, 2013. About Us [online] Available at: http://www.kinfolk.com/about-us/ [Accessed: 11th November 2013] Kinfolk, 2013. Description on Facebook [online] Available at: https://www.facebook.com/kinfolkmag [Accessed: 1st December 2013] Parks, R, 2013. Cereal [online] Available at: http://vsco.co/features/vsco-film-cereal-magazine [Accessed: 12th December 2013] Poole, S. 2013. Let’s start the Foodie backlash. [online] Available at: www.theguardian.com/books/2012/ sep/28/lets-start-foodie-backlash [Accessed: 14th November 2013] School of Artisan Food, 2013. What is artisan food? [online] Available at: http://www.schoolofartisanfood. org/about-us/artisan-food [Accessed: 1st December 2013]


Slow Food, 2013. What is slow food? [online] Available at: http://www.slowfood.org.uk/about/what-we-do/ [Accessed: 1st December 2013] Spicer, H. 2013. Menu Flavours [online] Available at: http://academic.mintel.com/display/627150/ [Accessed: 15th December 2013] Stapleton, R, 2013. Cereal [online] Available at: http://vsco.co/features/vsco-film-cereal-magazine [Accessed: 12th December 2013] Toast, 2013. Background of Toast [online] Available at: http://www.toast.co.uk/content/careers/background. htm [Accessed 27th December 2013]


Methodology • November 2013 • Online • Consumers aged between 30 - 60 • Strengthened theories, confirmed outcome, encouraged new lines of secondary research

Initial Survey

• 19th November • Email • Cereal Magazine • Introduction email sent off, outlined project and what I want to discover. • Reply from the editor received24th November with media pack attached. Working to a deadline so unable to hold interview. • Intending on keeping a running dialogue open.

Interview with Publications

Interview with industry • 16th November 2013 • Dropswell Farm Shop and Tea Room • Paul Craddock, Head Butcher and owner • Key insights into the artisan industry, weaknesses outlined within the industry, potential leads of gaps in the market discussed, confirmed theories .

Interview with Industry • 19th November • Email • Slow Food Nottingham • Introduction email sent off, outlined project and what I want to discover. • No reply

• 19th November 2013 • Email • Kinfolk Magazine • Introduction email sent off November 5th. • Reply recieved November 10th explaining that they are currently pushed for time but would try to answer my questions. Questions emailed over November 19th. • No reply

Interview with Publications • 19th November 2013 • Email • Oh Comely magazine • Introduction email sent off, outlined project and what I want to discover. • Reply recieved 25th November with FAQ's attached. Told not to hesitate if I need anymore help.

Interview with Publications

• 25th November • Email • The School of Artisan Food • Introduction email sent off, outlined project and what I want to discover • No reply

Interview with Industry

Consumer Profiles • 2nd January • Email • Four consumers who left emails on survey • Outlined next stage of research • Included consent form and full description of what was needed • Three out of four replied. These responses proved very useful and can be found in the main body of the document

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Survey Created 15th November 2013 40 respondents took part Where a written answer was required, a number of responses have been shown as an example. Full responses will be provided on request. For security and privacy, the last question, which thanks respondents for their participation and invites them to take part in the next stage by leaving an email address, has been left out of this appendix. Disclamer: I am a third year student at Nottingham Trent University, completing a dissertation titled ‘Can the artisan lifestyle of the US foodies be successfully transferred to the UK market?’. My aim is to create a brand extention in the form of a magazine. The content will include recipes, interviews and some homewear items. This survey aims to support my theory that there is a gap in the market for this particular kind of magazine, and how best to distribute it amongst the target audience. By taking part in this survey, you are agreeing to have your results included and analysed in the main body of my work, and responses in full in the appendix. Any personal information (i.e. the email at the end of the survey) will be used by myself only. The survey results will be destroyed when I finish my third year. If you are happy to continue please proceed to Question 1. If not, please close the webpage. Thank you to those who are willing to take part, it will greatly benefit my research and my knowledge around this topic. If you have any questions about my project or any concerns relating to the survey, please feel free to contact me at sarah.stothard@hotmail.co.uk Thanks again, Sarah Stothard

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Nottingham Trent University School of Art and Design

CONSENT FORM Project Title: Can the artisan lifestyle of the US foodies be successfully transferred to the UK Market? Please read and confirm your consent to being interviewed for this project by ticking the appropriate boxes and signing and dating this form

1.

I confirm that the purpose of the project has been explained to me, that I have been y given information about it in writing, and that I have had the opportunity to ask questions about the research

2.

I understand that my participation is voluntary, and that I am free to withdraw at any time without giving any reason and without any implications for my legal rights

3.

I give permission for the interview to be recorded by research staff, on the y understanding that the tape will be destroyed at the end of the project

4.

I agree to take part in this project

David Stothard Name of respondent

7 Jan 2014 Date

y

y

D Stothard Signature

For office use only Name of researcher taking consent ………Sarah Stothard……………. Date ………7th January………… Signature S Stothard ARTISAN 087


Nottingham Trent University School of Art and Design

CONSENT FORM Project Title: Can the artisan lifestyle of the US foodies be successfully transferred to the UK Market? Please read and confirm your consent to being interviewed for this project by ticking the appropriate boxes and signing and dating this form

1.

I confirm that the purpose of the project has been explained to me, that I have been / given information about it in writing, and that I have had the opportunity to ask questions about the research

2.

I understand that my participation is voluntary, and that I am free to withdraw at any time without giving any reason and without any implications for my legal rights

3.

I give permission for the interview to be recorded by research staff, on the / understanding that the tape will be destroyed at the end of the project

4.

I agree to take part in this project

Kelly Rose ___________________ Name of respondent

9/1/14 __________ Date

/

________K rose__________ Signature

For office use only Name of researcher taking consent ……Sarah Stothard…………. Date ……9th January…… Signature S Stothard ARTISAN 088

/


Nottingham Trent University School of Art and Design

CONSENT FORM Project Title: Can the artisan lifestyle of the US foodies be successfully transferred to the UK Market? Please read and confirm your consent to being interviewed for this project by ticking the appropriate boxes and signing and dating this form

1.

I confirm that the purpose of the project has been explained to me, that I have been y given information about it in writing, and that I have had the opportunity to ask questions about the research

2.

I understand that my participation is voluntary, and that I am free to withdraw at any time without giving any reason and without any implications for my legal rights

3.

I give permission for the interview to be recorded by research staff, on the y understanding that the tape will be destroyed at the end of the project

4.

I agree to take part in this project

Sharon Stothard Name of respondent

7 Jan 2014 Date

y

y

S Stothard Signature

For office use only Name of researcher taking consent ……Sarah Stothard………. Date ………7th January…… Signature S Stothard ARTISAN 089


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Interview with Paul Craddock Saturday 16th November 2013, 11am, Dropswell Farm Shop Sarah: Hello Paul, thank you for taking the time to talk to me today. Paul: That’s no problem Sarah. Sarah: So, I wanted to ask first of all, with Dropswell, what kind of lifestyle do you think Dropswell reflects? Paul: Reflects as in our customers you mean? Sarah: Yeah, like what kind of lifestyle do you as a brand portray to your customers? Paul: We, erm, well, just quality really, and home produced items, cause we’ve got, I mean, you’re aware that we produce more and more now of our own sort of goods. Erm, but with like the veg that we buy, we buy that from the locality and all the goods, all the ingredients we get from local suppliers. We don’t use any sort of big distributors that are like all multinational. It’s a northern regional distributor we use and that type of thing. Our erm, the customers that we have, like, a lot of the customers, like the shop customers, alot of them always like to produce, to make their own, because we are very traditional and the meat that we sell; they buy the meat, take it home and do something with it, not like your value added products that are already in a little tray where they just take them home and put them in the oven. A lot of our customers don’t really go for that sort of thing. They like to, erm, they like to know where it has come from, and I can tell them pretty much where everything has come from, and they like to be able to take it home and use the stuff that they buy from us. Sarah: Put their own touch on it. Paul: Yeah. Sarah: You interact with food every day obviously at work, do you take enjoyment from preparing meals at home still, or is it very much separated? Paul: No no, I cook alot. Sarah: What is a relaxing meal to you? Paul: Erm, just a roast with roast veg. I mean, it’s an easy meal but it’s good meat, good veg; banged in the oven and left. Then thats job job. Very little else really! (laughs) Sarah: What made you decide to explore new products like having the tapas nights that you do in the tea room and the charcuterie? Paul: Well, the charcuterie is a bit of a passion that I have because its something that I like to do. But its erm, charcuterie in this country its, its been around forever but the British public consider charcuterie as salamis ARTISAN 091


and your dry cured meats and things like that. The British general public think that that is what charcuterie is but its not. It’s a massive subject and the British have been producing charcuterie as long, or longer than most of the continental countries by way of bacon, bacon as in, like middle bacon back bacon, hams, your gammons, sausages, pies, pates, all of that sort of thing, that’s all charcuterie. And we’ve produced it as long as anyone else. The subject that charcuterie is, it includes your parma ham... Sarah: Do you think there is a market for British charcuterie to break in? Paul: There is a massive market but unfortunately we’re in the North East. Everything starts in the south and travels. Sarah: I noticed that actually when I went to London, in Borough Market and stuff you could barely walk past two stands before bumping into a local butcher who was doing all the charcuterie and stuff and have been going for sort of, 10, 15 years doing these cured salamis and stuff but I’ve noticed the same thing in Nottingham. We’ve got one deli in the city centre and that’s all imported from Italy and France and Spain. Paul: It’s difficult. Sarah: What do you think would make a great small gathering? Paul: In this area it would be really really difficult to achieve. Because there is, nobody...What we found is that farmers markets in this area are just, well they are just a part time affair really. There is nobody that really puts in a great deal of effort and a lot of them would disagree with us but it’s true, they don’t. And none of them, they just don’t work together. They want to work in competition with each other. There is nothing. They don’t want to work as a whole, they don’t want to work as a group, they all want to work as an individual and it just wont work by doing it like that. So, to answer your question, I don’t know how to answer it! Bang me head against a brick wall really. In the North East its difficult. I mean, Scotland isn’t so bad because they have a bit of things going on, the South of England yes and the Midlands maybe a little bit more. Sarah: Do you think that’s the peoples attitude in general towards things like that? Paul: Yeah. They all think that they are working on their own. They won’t pull together. Sarah: What is your favourite food memory? Paul: ooo! Probably my favourite food memory would be my best batch of salami where I haven’t had to worry about it too much. I don’t know really! Sarah: That’s quite a nice one actually, I like that. Paul: Yeah, because when I started making it it was just horrendous. It was like a nightmare (laughs) Sarah: You’ve got to fail first haven’t you? Paul: You fall over before you can walk. Sarah: The food magazine industry is growing. What role do these magazines play in your line of work? Paul: They play a big part in it. There is one which we use, its a free foodie magazine. If it is a one that you have to pay for, people struggle to buy them. They won’t pay for them really, thats what I have found. But if they are free ones then they pick them up. I mean, there is one that we distribute through here, its Appetite


magazine, a good little magazine. It’s a foodie magazine and thats all artisan producers and small small shops, small scale producers, nothing like the big multi’s or anything that’s advertised in them or anything like that. It’s quite small scale. There are people who go around putting in articles from the producers. We’ve been in. They came and did some pies with us and put a feature in, which is great for us because we got customers from it. Sarah: So they drive business for you as well. Paul: Yeah. It’s publicity you couldn’t pay for. Sarah: Where did your desire to open a farm shop and tea room come from? Paul: Just stumbled on it really. I’ve always been a butcher. It’s what I’ll always be. When I came here I knew the family. I knew them all my life. And I came here to sell something completely different to the farm shop, just some game, and within a couple of weeks they asked if I would join the business. Then we opened the cafe and they decided they wanted to really concentrate on the farm and basically we were left the choice to close or run. And we chose to run. We’re still here! Sarah: Still going! Paul: Just! Sarah: I noticed on the website when I was having a quick look last week that you have really wide range of butchery courses. Why did you decide to do them? Paul: Just for money really. Tough times. In touch times you have to do everything and that is why we do so much. I mean, most people cant believe the amount of work that goes on in the background and, well, anyone from the outside doesn’t understand. Sarah: They don’t understand the pressures either do they? Paul: No. I mean, your looking at, in times like this, when we are in a fairly outlying area really, it’s not like we are in a busy area or close to a big city. I mean I know Hartlepool is quite a big place but it’s not really that affluent and the areas surrounding it aren’t particularly affluent. And we aren’t that close to a big city so we have to do a lot. Sarah: Do you enjoy passing on your knowledge to people or is it purely for the money? Paul: I do now. When I was younger I didn’t particularly, well, I didn’t really have that much knowledge to pass on. You learn. The more you get the more you know. It becomes easier to pass it on. Sarah: Your website also mentioned, under the beef butchery course, that it is for serious foodies. How would you describe a serious foodie? Paul: A serious foodie is somebody who is willing to...the beef courses that we do, they are too intense to have a...after two or three hours they would just be fried. They would need to go and have a lie down in a dark room. Me as well. You can’t learn it. You have to come back. It is more geared towards to professionals. Chefs and that to further their experience with me. Sarah: So it’s more professionals that attend rather than the general public? Paul: Yeah. I mean, in the other ones there are all sorts of people. I tend to just do them with one or two


people, so they (the classes) can be pretty much tailored to whatever they want. I don’t stick to a rigid format. I just say, ‘What do you fancy doing?’ Sarah: It’s kept nice and relaxed. Paul: Yeah, that helps. Sarah: Would you consider writing or publishing a cook book or journal based on the things that you do here? Paul: I don’t know. I could do. If I ever had the time then maybe. Maybe one day I’ll put down some scribbles and let somebody else make some sense out of it. Sarah: Sounds like a plan. Paul: It would be interesting actually, could make it interesting! Sarah: I think you could. Paul: Well, yes. I’ve got plenty of experience and plenty of tales to tell that’s for sure. Sarah: Tales are good. That’s part of the reason I am doing this project. It’s all about the tradition and the heritage behind why something has been done really. And the importance of that story and how it brings people together over something as simple as a roast dinner. Paul: Yeah. It’s, yeah, like, one of the first butchery courses I ever did was with a guy, whose wife wanted something unusual for a birthday present. He is someone who I would say is a serious foodie, he likes to mess about and he comes, they come every six months or so and fill their freezer up and that is how they are historically our customers. He used to buy half a pig and I used to cut it up. Now i just cut it into three lumps and he does it himself. I have a good relationship with him, I mean, I dried his ham for him this year because when he tried last year it failed. So rather than doing that, I tell him ‘you sort it out, I’ll finish it off ’. I don’t charge for things like that. Sarah: It’s nice when you have a relationship like that with the customer as well. Paul: Yeah. Its just customer service. We have quite a close relationship with all of our customers. Sarah: Do you think that it is important to have that? Paul: It’s very important. Sarah: One of the things I am also going to do is a small section on Slow Food and the movement. It’s been going for about 15 years in the UK. Do you think that it’s whole campaign around eating good food in a slow, natural, relaxed environment when we live in such a fast paced world? Paul: It does have its place. I sometimes wonder where some things like the slow food movement and the advertisements for things like slow food and organic food and this that and the other come from. I think it is sometimes a licence to print money. People use it as an excuse to charge more. And I think sometimes the ethics behind it aren’t quite right. If you know what I mean. I think they sometimes use that sort of thing as excuse to just charge a little bit extra rather than the actual quality of the product you produce and buy, that is where it is worth its money. It shouldn’t be about the name that’s written on it. Sarah: It should be about the experience.


Paul: Yeah, I think that is it. Sarah: That’s all of my questions, but is there anything else that you think I should research, that you think might be worth it? Paul: I don’t know. I mean, going back to these little cluster groups and things like that, sometimes these people , especially, I mean i know in Australia there is a lot of things like that. There was a documentary with this guy, I can’t remember his name but he was a city banker and he decided he would go live the life in the country and this that and the other and he just was just amazed at the amount of effort that you have to put in to get, to actually get something to the table. I mean he had no knowledge whatsoever, but i think sometimes the general public don’t realise the amount of effort people put in. I think alot of these cluster groups, they sort of think it is a good idea and then realise actually, its better to just have a job because it is much easier. Sarah: It is a lot harder to actually do it. Paul: It is a really difficult thing. I mean, the amount of effort we put in. You know the hours I work, I don’t get paid for the hours that I work. I just do it because thats what I do. Sarah: Do love it? Paul: Yeah. Thats why I do it. Because if i didn’t id go pick litter up or anything to earn a living. But this is what I am and this is what I do. But I like the customers aswell. I like being able to intertact with the customers too. Sarah: THats the most important thing. Paul: It is, yeah. Is that alright? Sarah: I think that is everything! Thank you so much for helping me out with everything. Paul: Anytime. You know where we are if you need anything else.


Emails (To Kinfolk Magazine) sarah stothard 05/11/2013 To: info@kinfolk.com Hello My name is Sarah Stothard and I am a student studying communication and promotion at Nottingham Trent University. Food is my passion, and has been such an important part of my life since I can remember. From farmers markets to exciting new delis, I love it all. Due to this passion, my final year project is based around the traditions and curiosity of food, how it can help people escape from their busy working day, and how the slow food movement has helped influence this. Kinfolk is one of my key influences over this project, as I think that your magazine reflects perfectly the lifestyle I am exploring through this project. I was wondering if it would be at all possible to have an email interview with someone from your magazine, to aid in my research and to include in full in my project. I hope to hear from you soon, Sarah sarah.stothard@hotmail.co.uk @sarahstothard Hanna Haugen Pettersen 08/11/2013 To: sarah.stothard@hotmail.co.uk Picture of Hanna Haugen Pettersen Hi Sara, Thanks for you kind words and your wish to do an interview with us. Though your request is very enticing and something we normally would love to do, unfortunately, at this time we have our hands full here. You’re welcome to send me your questions and I’ll forward it to our editors, but I can’t promise a reply at any time soon. We’ll do our best though... Have a great weekend! Hanna Editorial Assistant | Kinfolk Magazine | www.kinfolk.com <http://www.kinfolk.com/> | (503) 946 8400 | 328 NE Failing, Portland OR 97212

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sarah stothard 19/11/2013 To: Hanna Haugen Pettersen Picture of sarah stothard Hi Hanna, Sorry for the delay in my reply, it has been such a busy couple of weeks here! I really appreciate you getting back in touch. I understand that things are hectic for you at the moment, but thank you for welcoming my interview request. Below are a list of interview questions I have created to help my project. I’d love it if you could pass this around for me, any responses are more than welcome! What kind of lifestyle does Kinfolk reflect? What is a relaxing meal to you? What is the best part of your job at Kinfolk? What is your favourite food memory? How does your magazine effect the food industry? The slow food movement has been around in the UK for 15 years, do you think it’s campaign still has relevence in today’s fast paced society? Once again I really appreciate your reply and feedback, and hope to hear from you soon. Sarah

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(To Cereal Magazine) sarah stothard 19/11/2013 To: hello@readcereal.com Picture of sarah stothard Hello My name is Sarah Stothard and I am a student studying communication and promotion at Nottingham Trent University. Food is my passion, and has been such an important part of my life since I can remember. From farmers markets to exciting new delis, I love it all. Due to this passion, my final year project is based around the traditions and curiosity of food, how it can help people escape from their busy working day, and how the slow food movement has helped influence this. Cereal Magazine has greatly influenced my thinking and inspired this project. From your graphics to content, every part of the lifestyle your magazine portrays fits myself and my project perfectly. Your magazine has also inspired me to develop my skills as a writer, as it is my dream to write for a magazine such as yours when I graduate in 2014. I was wondering if it would be at all possible to have an interview with someone from your magazine, to aid in my research and to include in full in my project. I hope to hear from you soon, Sarah sarah.stothard@hotmail.co.uk @sarahstothard Cereal Magazine 24/11/2013 To: sarah stothard Picture of Cereal Magazine Outlook Active View 1 attachment (2.4 MB) Download Cereal Media Kit_2014.pdf (2.4 MB) Cereal Media Kit_2014.pdfView online Download as zip Hello Sarah, I hope you are well :) We have a rather hectic schedule in the coming month as we are on deadline but I have attached a media kit to this email which I hope will be of help to your project! Have a wonderful day! Best, Rosa

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(To Oh Comely Magazine) sarah stothard 19/11/2013 To: hello@ohcomely.co.uk Picture of sarah stothard Hello My name is Sarah Stothard and I am a student studying communication and promotion at Nottingham Trent University. Food is my passion, and has been such an important part of my life since I can remember. From farmers markets to exciting new delis, I love it all. Due to this passion, my final year project is based around the traditions and curiosity of food, how it can help people escape from their busy working day, and how the slow food movement has helped influence this. Oh Comely is one of my key influences over this project, (as well as my dream magazine to work for) as I think that your magazine reflects perfectly the lifestyle I am exploring through this project. I was wondering if it would be at all possible to have an email interview with someone from your magazine, to aid in my research and to include in full in my project. I hope to hear from you soon, Sarah sarah.stothard@hotmail.co.uk @sarahstothard

hello | oh comely Attachment 25/11/2013 Documents To: sarah stothard Picture of hello | oh comely Outlook Active View 1 attachment (33.4 KB) Download Oh Comely magazine FAQs.doc (33.4 KB) Oh Comely magazine FAQs.docView online Download as zip Dear Sarah, Thanks for your email. That sounds like a fantastic final year project-how exciting! Please find attached a copy of our FAQs which I hope helps although do not hesitate to contact us should you need any further information. Very best, Olivia

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(To Toast) sarah stothard 25/11/2013 To: contact@toast.co.uk Picture of sarah stothard Hello My name is Sarah Stothard and I am a student studying communication and promotion at Nottingham Trent University. Food is my passion, and has been such an important part of my life since I can remember. From farmers markets to exciting new delis, I love it all. Due to this passion, my final year project is based around the traditions and curiosity of food and how it can help people escape from their busy working day. I am paying particular attention to the influence of artisan food and the lifestyle surrounding this produce. My project is resarched based, and concludes with a strategic outcome. For my outcome I intend on creating a food and lifestyle journal through Toast that would be sent out with catalogues and would be available online. The journal would include your house and home products, interviews with artisan producers and include recipes appropriate to my project and your brand. I feel that Toast is the ideal brand to include in my research project due to your wonderfully relaxed and homely style of marketing, your product ranges and your target audience. I have been inspired to research into your brand further due to a recent interview that James and Jessica took part in with Kinfolk magazine. I am very excited about this project and would love to keep a channel of communication open with Toast to share my research and my journalistic outcome with at the close of my project in February. I was wondering if it would be at all possible to have an interview with someone from Toast, to aid in my research and to include in full in my project. I hope to hear from you soon, Sarah sarah.stothard@hotmail.co.uk @sarahstothard contact@toâ&#x20AC;&#x2039;ast.co.uk 25/11/2013 To: sarah stothard Hello Sarah, Thank you for your email. I have passed this email onto the appropriate departments, We will be in contact to advise. If you have any further queries, please do not hesitate to contact us. Kind Regards, Emily Toast +44 (0)844 557 5200 www.toast.co.uk


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