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The most pleasing aspect of this work is that its primary aim is actual effective communication with Pitjantjatjara speakers. At the very beginning of Chapter 1 the reader is exhorted to ‘Listen first’ (5) to learn right from the beginning from the speakers of the language. Pitjantjatjara examples are taken from actual speech not ‘invented’ for the purpose according to the ‘rules’.

This work is an excellent reference for the serious learner with access to Pitjantjatjara speakers and an extremely useful companion to other more technical works on Western Desert languages. It should be standard issue to all working in the communities where Pitjantjatjara is spoken. It is also of great, value to those interested in Aboriginal languages generally to those who crave insight into their complexity and beauty. Extract of a review by David Price, published in Australian Aboriginal Studies 1989 /number 2

Wangka Wiru A handbook for the Pitjantjatjara language learner

Paul Eckert  •  Joyce Hudson

I feel it is impossible to discuss the workings of a language intelligently without the use of technical terminology of some kind, a suitable meta-language. Professional linguists commonly make two mistakes when writing for non-linguists. One is the use of a difficult and esoteric terminology that confuses and intimidates. The other is the over-simplification and over-explanation, of terminology and issues which seems to patronise and trivialise. In Wangka Wiṟu basic technical terms are explained and concretely illustrated in a directly useful manner.

Wangka Wiru

The gaining of real fluency in an Aboriginal language by English speakers working in remote communities is still an achievement rare enough to inspire admiration. It requires determination, patience, sensitivity, empathy and intellectual effort. Still many attempt the task with enthusiasm and find great reward and pride in small gains, discovering the rich humour, warmth and humanity of their hosts in the process. To such people a volume like Wangka Wiṟu is of immeasurable value. There are ‘Learner’s Guides’ available for a range of Aboriginal languages but none that I have seen come anywhere near the depth, thoroughness and structural logic of Wangka Wiṟu. In the introduction it is emphasized that Wangka Wiṟu is intended to be a reference work. It is not a comprehensive language course. The conclusion states that it is ‘designed to give some basic information about the language’ which should ‘help in the task of communicating with Pitjantjatjara speakers’ (p277).

For copies of this volume write:

sales@mirrabookapress.com.au

Paul Eckert  •  Joyce Hudson


Wangka Wiru A handbook for the Pitjantjatjara language learner

Paul Eckert  •  Joyce Hudson


Published by Mirrabooka Press www.mirrabookapress.com.au Email: sales@mirrabookapress.com.au Original edition published in 1988 by ASTEC Aboriginal Studies and Teacher Education Centre, University of South Australia (formerly South Australian College of Advanced Education, Underdale) Reprinted 1991, 1992, 2005, 2010, 2012 Š Paul Eckert and Joyce Hudson, 1988, 2010 This book is copyright. Apart from any fair dealings for the purpose of private study, research, criticism or review as permitted in the Copyright Act of 1968 and subsequent amendments, no part of this publication may be reproduced, stored in a retrieval system or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise without prior written permission of the publisher. Cover art: Yilpi Adamson Cover Design: Paul Eckert

Printed in South Australia by Openbook Howden Design and Print 2-12 Paul Street, St Marys, SA 5042 Telephone: 08 8124 0000 www.openbookhowden.com.au

ISBN No: 978-0-646-54852-4


The most pleasing aspect of this work is that its primary aim is actual effective communication with Pitjantjatjara speakers. At the very beginning of Chapter 1 the reader is exhorted to ‘Listen first’ (5) to learn right from the beginning from the speakers of the language. Pitjantjatjara examples are taken from actual speech not ‘invented’ for the purpose according to the ‘rules’.

This work is an excellent reference for the serious learner with access to Pitjantjatjara speakers and an extremely useful companion to other more technical works on Western Desert languages. It should be standard issue to all working in the communities where Pitjantjatjara is spoken. It is also of great, value to those interested in Aboriginal languages generally to those who crave insight into their complexity and beauty. Extract of a review by David Price, published in Australian Aboriginal Studies 1989 /number 2

Wangka Wiru A handbook for the Pitjantjatjara language learner

Paul Eckert  •  Joyce Hudson

I feel it is impossible to discuss the workings of a language intelligently without the use of technical terminology of some kind, a suitable meta-language. Professional linguists commonly make two mistakes when writing for non-linguists. One is the use of a difficult and esoteric terminology that confuses and intimidates. The other is the over-simplification and over-explanation, of terminology and issues which seems to patronise and trivialise. In Wangka Wiṟu basic technical terms are explained and concretely illustrated in a directly useful manner.

Wangka Wiru

The gaining of real fluency in an Aboriginal language by English speakers working in remote communities is still an achievement rare enough to inspire admiration. It requires determination, patience, sensitivity, empathy and intellectual effort. Still many attempt the task with enthusiasm and find great reward and pride in small gains, discovering the rich humour, warmth and humanity of their hosts in the process. To such people a volume like Wangka Wiṟu is of immeasurable value. There are ‘Learner’s Guides’ available for a range of Aboriginal languages but none that I have seen come anywhere near the depth, thoroughness and structural logic of Wangka Wiṟu. In the introduction it is emphasized that Wangka Wiṟu is intended to be a reference work. It is not a comprehensive language course. The conclusion states that it is ‘designed to give some basic information about the language’ which should ‘help in the task of communicating with Pitjantjatjara speakers’ (p277).

For copies of this volume write:

sales@mirrabookapress.com.au

Paul Eckert  •  Joyce Hudson


Wangka Wiru