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133rd

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University of Michigan / Ann Arbor


For many of us, attending live performing arts events is like oxygen — as critical to our well-being as the air we breathe. Just like that great workout that pushes your body to new limits, the performing arts can stretch you, increasing your mental capacity to explore — and absorb — new ideas. And just like a great workout, the UMS season gives renewed energy and vitality to our community. During the 2011/2012 season, we offer dozens of events that will entertain, comfort, inspire, and provoke — sometimes all at once. In a ten-week “season-within-the-season,” we will explore artists who were and are considered “renegades” — those who diverged from or re-imagined what came before: Carlo Gesualdo, the Renaissance composer; Ludwig van Beethoven, who completely re-imagined Western composition and ushered in a new aesthetic; Robert Wilson and Philip Glass, who broke all of the rules defining conventional opera; and a roster of 20th-century composers whose music will be lifted up by none other than Michael Tilson Thomas and the San Francisco Symphony, which presents its American Mavericks Festival only in Ann Arbor and at Carnegie Hall. And this is just the beginning. Oxygen is a highly reactive element that readily combines with almost all other elements; this UMS season combines different artists, different ideas, different cultures, and different communities. Take a deep breath. It promises to be an exhilarating journey.

www.ums.org

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133rd

ums

11/12 Season Media Partner

September Sat 17 Sun 18 Fri-Sat 23-24

An Evening with Ahmad Jamal Emerson String Quartet Mark Morris Dance Group

October Sat 1 Sun 9 Thu 13 Sat 15 Fri-Sat 21-22 Thu 27 Thu-Sat 27-29

John Malkovich and Musica Angelica Baroque Orchestra The Infernal Comedy: Confessions of a Serial Killer Yuja Wang piano State Symphony Capella of Russia Goran Bregovic and His Wedding and Funeral Orchestra Cloud Gate Dance Theatre Schola Cantorum de Venezuela Gate Theatre of Dublin: Beckett’s Endgame and Watt

November Thu 3 Fri 4 Sat 5 Wed 9 Fri 11 Sat 12 Sun 20 Sun 27

Apollo’s Fire and Philippe Jaroussky countertenor Jeannette Sorrell conductor Audra McDonald Diego El Cigala AnDa Union A Night in Treme: The Musical Majesty of New Orleans St. Lawrence String Quartet Beijing Guitar Duo with Manuel Barrueco Canadian Brass

December Sat-Sun 3-4 Tue 6 Wed 7

Handel’s Messiah London Philharmonic Orchestra Vladimir Jurowski conductor Janine Jansen violin Stile Antico

Jazz, Monogram Chamber Arts Dance, Monogram

Choral Union, Monogram Choral Union, Asia, Monogram Divine Voices, Monogram World, Monogram Dance, Asia, Monogram Divine Voices, Monogram Theater, Monogram

Choral Union, Monogram Monogram World, Monogram Asia, World, Monogram Jazz, Monogram Chamber Arts, Monogram Asia, Monogram Monogram

Monogram Choral Union Divine Voices


January Fri-Sun 20-22 Sat 28 Sun 29

Series Index

Pages

Choral Union International Theater Chamber Arts Dance Jazz Divine Voices Renegade Asia World Monogram

6-9 10-11 12-13 14-15 16-17 18-19 20-21 22-23 24-25 26-50

Theater, Renegade, Monogram Chamber Arts, Monogram Choral Union, Renegade, Monogram

Einstein on the Beach Les Violons du Roy with Maurice Steger recorder Hamburg Symphony Orchestra Messiaen’s From the Canyons to the Stars Jeffrey Tate conductor Francesco Tristano piano Daniel Landau filmmaker

February Sat 4 Fri 10 Thu 16 Fri 17 Sat 18 Wed 22 Thu 23

Sabine Meyer and the Trio di Clarone Chamber Ensemble of the Shanghai Chinese Orchestra The Tallis Scholars Sweet Honey In The Rock Random Dance Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra with Wynton Marsalis Hagen Quartet

Chamber Arts, Monogram Chamber Arts, Asia, World, Monogram Divine Voices, Renegade, Monogram Monogram Dance, Renegade, Monogram Jazz, Monogram Chamber Arts, Renegade, Monogram

March Fri 9 Sat 10 Thu 15 Thu-Sat 15-17 Thu-Sun 22-25

Chicago Symphony Orchestra Riccardo Muti conductor Pinchas Zukerman violin Max Raabe & Palast Orchester Denis Matsuev piano The Andersen Project Ex Machina Written and directed by Robert Lepage San Francisco Symphony: American Mavericks Michael Tilson Thomas conductor

Choral Union World, Monogram Choral Union, Monogram Theater, Monogram

April Thu 12 Fri 13 Sat 14 Wed 18 Thu-Sat 19-21 Sun 22

Zakir Hussain and Master Musicians of India Cheikh Lô Charles Lloyd Quartet Pavel Haas Quartet Ballet Preljocaj: Snow White Joshua Bell violin Academy of St. Martin in the Fields

Asia, World, Monogram World, Monogram Jazz, Monogram Chamber Arts, Monogram Dance, Monogram Choral Union

www.ums.org

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Choral Union, Renegade, Monogram

734-764-2538


Choral Union Series Media Partner

133rd annual series

A 10-concert series of international orchestras and solo recitalists in the splendor of Hill Auditorium


The Infernal Comedy: Confessions of a Serial Killer

John Malkovich and Musica Angelica Baroque Orchestra

Apollo’s Fire and Philippe Jaroussky

countertenor

Jeannette Sorrell music director

Thursday \ November Hill Auditorium

3\

7:30 pm

John Malkovich makes his UMS debut portraying a dead serial killer who returns to the stage to present his autobiography in a public reading. Malkovich appears as part of a theatrical opera of sorts that features a 40-piece chamber orchestra and two sopranos telling the real-life story of Jack Unterweger, a convicted murderer and acclaimed prison poet. Pardoned by the Austrian president Kurt Waldheim in 1990 at the behest of the Viennese literati, Unterweger’s public “rehabilitation” was anything but — within two years, he had been arrested and convicted for the brutal murder of 11 prostitutes in three countries. This gripping performance uses arias and music by Gluck, Vivaldi, Mozart, Beethoven, Boccherini, and Haydn as the counterpoint to Malkovich’s chilling monologue, which shifts between reality and delusion.

“When I heard Philippe Jaroussky for the first time, I was struck by his musicality and sensibility,” Cecilia Bartoli told The New York Times Magazine for a profile last November. “There is a beauty in his phrasing and a delicacy, if not fragility, in his soul that touches the listener profoundly.” UMS is delighted to welcome French countertenor Philippe Jaroussky in his UMS debut for this performance with Apollo’s Fire, “one of the nation’s leading baroque orchestras.” (The Boston Globe) Named for the classical god of music and the sun, Apollo’s Fire was founded in 1992 by the harpsichordist and conductor Jeannette Sorrell, who envisioned an ensemble dedicated to the Baroque ideal that music should evoke various passions in its listeners. Together they explore the full dramatic range of Handel and Vivaldi arias written for the virtuosi castrati singers of the 18th century. “Apollo’s Fire has forged a vibrant, life-affirming approach to the re-making of early music…Their seductive vision of musical authenticity is guided by a shared commitment to honest emotional expression, rooted in period style yet never its slave.” (BBC Music Magazine)

Sponsored by Jane and Edward Schulak

Program

Louise Fribo and Valerie Vinzant sopranos Martin Haselböck conductor

Saturday \ October Hill Auditorium

1\

8 pm

Additional promotional support provided by Between the Lines, Metro Times, and Ann Arbor’s 107one.

Yuja Wang

Sunday \ October Hill Auditorium

piano

Handel “Disperato il mar turbato” from Oreste (1734) Handel “Con l’ali di costanza” from Ariodante (1735) Vivaldi Concerto for Four Violins in b minor (1711) Vivaldi “Se in ogni guardo” from Orlando Finto Pazzo (1714) Vivaldi “Se mai senti spirati sul volto” from Catone in Utica (1737) Vivaldi/Sorrell La Folio (“Madness”) (1705) Vivaldi “Vedro con mio diletto” from Giustino (1724) Vivaldi “Nel profondo” from Orlando Furioso (1727) Additional promotional support provided by Between the Lines.

9 \ 4 pm

Twenty-four-year-old Chinese pianist Yuja Wang is widely recognized for playing that combines the spontaneity and fearless imagination of youth with the discipline and precision of a mature artist. Regularly lauded for her controlled and prodigious technique, her command of the piano has been described as “astounding” and “superhuman.” Yuja has been praised for her authority over the most complex technical demands of the repertoire, the depth of her musical insight, her fresh interpretations, and her graceful, charismatic stage presence. Following her San Francisco recital debut, the San Francisco Chronicle wrote, “The arrival of Chinese-born pianist Yuja Wang on the musical scene is an exhilarating and unnerving development. To listen to her in action is to re-examine whatever assumptions you may have had about how well the piano can actually be played.” She made her UMS debut in January 2008, just months after graduating from the Curtis Institute of Music, and since then has spent each year criss-crossing the globe with a cavalcade of impressive debuts and awards, including the prestigious Avery Fisher Career Grant, given to select musicians destined for bright solo careers.

London Philharmonic Orchestra Vladimir Jurowski conductor Janine Jansen violin Tuesday \ December Hill Auditorium

The London Philharmonic returns for its first appearance since November 2006, this time under the direction of the exciting young conductor Vladimir Jurowski, who became the orchestra’s principal conductor in 2007, succeeding Kurt Masur. Jurowski conducts Tchaikovsky’s Manfred Symphony, the only one of Tchaikovsky’s symphonies that is not numbered. Based on a poem by Lord Byron, the Manfred Symphony is rarely performed in the concert hall. Janine Jansen, a 23-year-old violinist who has been a huge star in her native Holland ever since her Concertgebouw debut at the age of 10, makes her UMS debut. Program

Pintscher Mozart Tchaikovsky

Program

Ravel Copland Rachmaninoff Brahms

6 \ 7:30 pm

Miroirs (1904-05) Piano Variations (1930) Selected Preludes (1903-10) Sonata TBA

Towards Osiris (2005) Violin Concerto No. 5 in A Major, K. 219 (1775) Manfred Symphony, Op. 58 (1885)

Additional promotional support provided by WRCJ 90.9 FM and Detroit Jewish News.

www.ums.org

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American Mavericks

San Francisco Symphony Michael Tilson Thomas conductor

Three Different Programs in Hill Auditorium Featuring:

Paul Jacobs organ Jeremy Denk piano Mason Bates laptop Thursday

\ March 22 \

7:30 pm

Jessye Norman soprano Meredith Monk and Joan La Barbara vocalists St. Lawrence String Quartet Friday

\ March 23 \

8 pm

Emanuel Ax piano Saturday

\ March 24 \ 8 pm

As part of its centennial season, Michael Tilson Thomas and the San Francisco Symphony will present its second American Mavericks Festival, which will tour to only two US venues: Hill Auditorium and Carnegie Hall. The 2012 festival celebrates the creative pioneering spirit and the composers who created a new American musical voice for the 20th century and beyond. These concerts will examine the music of iconoclastic, revolutionary composers championed by MTT and the SFS, such as John Cage, Morton Feldman, Carl Ruggles, Edgard Varèse, and Charles Ives, and expand the maverick roster through two commissions by Bay Area composers John Adams and Mason Bates. Concerts will feature performances by longtime SFS collaborators Jessye Norman, Emanuel Ax, Meredith Monk, Jeremy Denk, and the St. Lawrence String Quartet, among others. Subscribers may select two of the three San Francisco Symphony programs as part of their Choral Union Series. Program 1 (Thurs 3/22 at 7:30 pm)

Aaron Copland Henry Cowell Mason Bates Lou Harrison

Orchestral Variations (1930, orchestrated in 1957) Piano Concerto (1928) Mass Transmission (2010) Concerto for Organ with Percussion Orchestra (1973)

Program 2 (Fri 3/23 at 8 pm)

Henry Cowell John Adams John Cage Edgard Varèse

Synchrony (1929-30) Absolute Jest (2011) John Cage Songbooks (1970) Amériques (1918-21, revised 1927)

Program 3 (Sat 3/24 at 8 pm)

Carl Ruggles Morton Feldman Charles Ives

Sun-Treader (1931) Piano and Orchestra (1975) A Concord Symphony (1916-19 for piano;

orchestration by Henry Brant premiered1995)

The San Francisco Symphony residency is made possible with support from the Maxine and Stuart Frankel Foundation and the UMS Creative Ventures Leadership Fund. Please see page 56 for more information. Related education programs are funded by the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation. Additional promotional support provided by Ann Arbor’s 107one, WDET 101.9 FM, and Detroit Jewish News.


Subscribe Today! 10 concerts in Hill Auditorium

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From the Canyons to the Stars

Hamburg Symphony Orchestra

Jeffrey Tate conductor Francesco Tristano piano Daniel Landau filmmaker Sunday \ January 29 \ 4 pm Hill Auditorium

In 1971, French composer Olivier Messiaen was commissioned by Alice Tully, the New York philanthropist most widely known for her contribution to Lincoln Center, to write a piece commemorating America’s Bicentennial. Messiaen was inspired and fascinated by the natural wonder he found in the landscapes of the American West. Des canyons aux étoiles (From the Canyons to the Stars) represents his sonic impressions of America’s last untouched frontier. Conductor Jeffrey Tate and the Hamburg Symphony Orchestra, in collaboration with Israeli filmmaker Daniel Landau, bring the piece alive in a new cinematic installation, where images of man’s impact on the environment create a counterpoint to sounds of untouched nature. Through film images projected on multiple screens, Hill Auditorium will be turned into a multi-sensory experience celebrating the beauty of the earth and our unaltered landscapes. Program

Messiaen

Des canyons aux étoiles (From the Canyons to the Stars)

(1971-74) Additional promotional support provided by WDET 101.9 FM.

Chicago Symphony Orchestra Riccardo Muti conductor Pinchas Zukerman violin Friday \ March 9 \ 8 pm Hill Auditorium

Riccardo Muti, the Chicago Symphony’s new music director, makes his first UMS appearance since 2006 conducting an all-Brahms program. Violinist Pinchas Zukerman, recognized as a phenomenon for nearly four decades, returns to UMS for a performance of the Brahms Violin Concerto. “Youth sticks with some people…Zukerman seems the forever-young virtuoso: expressively resourceful, infectiously musical, technically impeccable, effortless. As usual, it was a joy to be in his musical company.” (Los Angeles Times) Program

Brahms Brahms

Violin Concerto in D Major, Op. 77 (1878) Symphony No. 2 in D Major, Op. 73 (1877)

Sponsored by Co-sponsored by Robert and Marina Whitman and Clayton and Ann Wilhite.

Denis Matsuev

Thursday \ March Hill Auditorium

Anyone who attended last season’s concert by the Mariinsky Orchestra came away talking about one thing: the astonishing piano soloist Denis Matsuev, whose extraordinary performance of Rachmaninoff’s Third Piano Concerto had the audience buzzing in the lobby at intermission, immediately after the performance, and for weeks beyond the concert hall. UMS immediately pursued a date for a solo recital and is pleased to deliver what is sure to be one of the most talked-about events of the season. “[The] Russian pianist Denis Matsuev brought …legendary Herculean strength and terrifying technique that Rachmaninoff and his famous octave-and-a-half hand span was said to have embodied. Matsuev was up to the task. Not only did he throw down thunderous octaves and navigate flurries of notes and trills, he had the endurance to consider the greater picture of the work at all times…It was a performance of formidable dexterity and structural clarity.” (Pittsburgh) Program

Tchaikovsky Rachmaninoff Scriabin Tchaikovsky Stravinsky

Seasons (1875-76) Prelude in g minor, Op.23, No. 5 (1903) Prelude in g-sharp minor, Op. 32, No. 12 (1910) Etude-Tableaux in a minor, Op. 39, No. 6 (1916) Etude in c-sharp minor, Op. 2 (1887) Etude in d-sharp minor, Op. 8, No. 12 (1894) “Dumka” (1886) Three Movements from Petrouchka (1921)

Sponsored by the Catherine S. Arcure and Herbert E. Sloan Endowment Fund.

Joshua Bell leader and violin Academy of St. Martin in the Fields

Sunday \ April Hill Auditorium

22 \ 4 pm

Sir Neville Marriner says that the small ensemble he founded in 1958 “had no intention of giving any concerts or continuing forever.” Happily, whatever the initial intention, the Academy is firmly established more than 50 years later as one of the world’s leading chamber orchestras. Formed from a group of leading London musicians and working without a conductor, the Academy gave its first performance in its namesake church in November 1959. For their first UMS appearance in 11 years, the Academy brings their highly lauded sound to an exquisite all-Beethoven program. Superstar violinist Joshua Bell attacks the stunning Beethoven Concerto with his breathtaking virtuosity and sumptuous tone and leads the rest of the program from the concertmaster’s chair. Program

Beethoven Beethoven Beethoven

Coriolan Overture, Op. 62 (1807) Violin Concerto in D Major, Op. 61 (1806) Symphony No. 7 in A Major, Op. 92 (1811-12)

Made possible by the University of Michigan Health System and Bank of Ann Arbor. Additional promotional support provided by WRCJ 90.9 FM and Detroit Jewish News.

Additional promotional support provided by WRCJ 90.9 FM and Detroit Jewish News.

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piano

15 \ 7:30 pm

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Theater Series Media Partners

international

Beckett’s Endgame and Watt

Gate Theatre of Dublin

Michael Cogan director Featuring Barry McGovern and Rosaleen Linehan Thursday \ October 27 \ 7:30 pm Friday \ October 28 \ 8 pm Saturday \ October 29 \ 8 pm Power Center

Straight from Ireland’s acclaimed Gate Theatre is a doublebill of two one-act plays by the great Irish modernist writer, playwright, and humorist Samuel Beckett. The Gate is largely considered the leading interpreter of Beckett in the world; it’s like seeing the Maly Drama Theatre perform Chekhov or The Globe perform Shakespeare. Endgame, like Waiting for Godot, is considered one of Beckett’s most important works, written in a style associated with the Theatre of the Absurd. Watt, a novel written while Beckett was in hiding during World War II, is the extraordinary story of an itinerant character who one day walks from a train station to the home of a Mr. Knott, whom he will serve. The bizarre adventures of Watt and his struggles to make sense of the world around him are told with elegant simplicity, immense pathos, and explosive humor. Barry McGovern, who performs the role of Watt, selected the texts from the novel for this one-man performance. “Quite simply outstanding...I got an almost delirious joy from hearing, and seeing, an hour-long distillation of Beckett’s novel, Watt.” (Guardian) Funded in part by the Wallace Endowment Fund. Additional promotional support provided by Ann Arbor’s 107one.


Einstein on the Beach

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An Opera in Four Acts by Robert Wilson – Philip Glass with choreography by Lucinda Childs

www.ums.org  734-764-2538 Main Floor $135 / $120 / $85 Balcony $120 / $110 / $85

Preview Performances: Friday \ January 20 \ 7 pm Saturday \ January 21 \ 7 pm Sunday \ January 22 \ 2 pm Power Center

Reserve your tickets for opening night and help UMS continue to bring great theater to Ann Arbor! New this season, donors of $1,000 or more will be invited to UMS’s First Night Green Room events. UMS will host a reception in the Power Center Green Room before the opening night performance and at intermission. Join other theater lovers for beverages, a light snack, and lively discussion about theater.

“The most beautiful thing we can experience is the mysterious.” — Albert Einstein Widely credited as one of the greatest artistic achievements of the 20th century, this rarely-performed and revolutionary work launched director Robert Wilson and composer Philip Glass to international success when it was first produced in Avignon, France in 1976 with subsequent performances in Europe and at the Metropolitan Opera. It is still recognized as one of their greatest masterpieces. Now, nearly four decades after it was first performed and 20 years since its last production, Einstein on the Beach will be reconstructed for a major international tour including the first North American presentations ever held outside of New York City. Einstein on the Beach breaks all of the rules of conventional opera. Instead of a traditional orchestral arrangement, Glass composed for the synthesizers, woodwinds, and voices of the Philip Glass Ensemble. Non-narrative in form, the work uses a series of powerful recurrent images as its main dramatic device, shown in juxtaposition with abstract dance sequences created by American choreographer Lucinda Childs. There are no traditional intermissions; audiences are free to wander in and out at liberty during the five-hour performance. The New York Times critic John Rockwell said, “Einstein was like nothing I had ever encountered…Its very elusiveness radiated richly, like some dark star whose effects we can only feel…Einstein on the Beach, perhaps like Einstein himself, transcended time. It’s not (just) an artifact of its era, it’s timeless…an experience to cherish for a lifetime.” Prior to the production’s final technical rehearsals and world première in Montpelier, France, UMS will host the production’s creators, musicians, performers, and crew for three weeks as they reconstruct and rehearse the work for what is likely to be the final world tour designed and led by its original creators. A rare chance to see a work of this scale in progress, these preview performances will be the only opportunity to see Einstein on the Beach in the Midwest.  Sponsored by

Hosted by Carl and Charlene Herstein, David and Phyllis Herzig, and Prue and Ami Rosenthal. Additional promotional support provided by WDET 101.9 FM, Ann Arbor’s 107one, and Detroit Jewish News. The 2012 production of Einstein on the Beach was commissioned by: University Musical Society of the University of Michigan; BAM; the Barbican, London; Cal Performances University of California, Berkeley; Luminato, Toronto Festival of Arts and Creativity; De Nederlandse Opera/The Amsterdam Music Theatre; Opéra et Orchestre National de Montpellier Languedoc-Rousillon. Produced by Pomegranate Arts, Inc.

www.ums.org

The Andersen Project

Ex Machina

Written and directed by Robert Starring Yves Jacques

Lepage

Thursday \ March 15 \ 7:30 pm Friday \ March 16 \ 8 pm Saturday \ March 17 \ 8 pm Power Center

Filled to the brim with his trademark humor and visual and technological brilliance, this off-the-wall masterpiece by Canadian theater visionary Robert Lepage stars Yves Jacques (Far Side of the Moon) in a one-man tour-de-force about a Canadian writer from the rock-and-roll milieu who is unexpectedly commissioned by the Opera Garnier in Paris to write a libretto for a children’s opera. Arriving in Paris, he finds that his living quarters for the next three months, which he acquired through an apartment swap with a friend, are in a building that is also home to a peep show in the city’s red light district. Freely inspired by the timeless fables written by Hans Christian Andersen who, as it turns out, didn’t really like children, as well as anecdotes from his personal diaries, The Andersen Project keenly explores unraveling relationships, personal demons, the thirst for recognition, and compromise that comes too late. The piece was commissioned by the Danish government in 2005 to mark the bicentennial of the birth of that country’s most beloved writer. “A theatrical conjurer, whose dazzling shows have captivated audiences around the world with their mixture of storytelling and stunning imagery.” (Guardian, London, on Robert Lepage) Content appropriate for mature audiences only. Performed in English and French (with projected titles). A strobe light is used in this performance. Additional promotional support provided by WDET 101.9 FM and Ann Arbor’s 107one.

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Chamber Arts Series Media Partner

49th annual series

Mozart’s Late Quartets: “King of Prussia”

Emerson String Quartet

Sunday \ September Rackham Auditorium

18 \

4 pm

Formed in the bicentennial year of the United States, the Emerson String Quartet took its name from the great American poet and philosopher Ralph Waldo Emerson. The group made its Ann Arbor debut in 1989, and in 14 appearances since has performed with the integrity, energy, and commitment that it has demonstrated throughout more than 30 years of extensive touring and recording. The Emerson’s unparalleled achievements over the past three decades includes nine Grammy awards (two for “Best Classical Album,” an unprecedented honor for a chamber music group), three Gramophone Awards, the coveted Avery Fisher Prize, membership in the American Classical Music Hall of Fame, and cycles of the complete string quartets of Beethoven, Bartók, Mendelssohn, and Shostakovich in the world’s music capitals. This return appearance features the Quartet in an all-Mozart program, performing three quartets commissioned by the King of Prussia, Friedrich Wilhelm II. “With musicians like this, there must be some hope for humanity.” (The Times, London) Program

Mozart Mozart Mozart Mozart Sponsored by

Quartet No. 21 in D Major, K. 575 (1789) Quartet No. 22 in B-flat Major, K. 589 (1790) Adagio and Fugue in c minor, K. 546 (1788) Quartet No. 23 in F Major, K. 590 (1790)

St. Lawrence String Quartet Saturday \ November Rackham Auditorium

12 \

8 pm

One of the great finds of the 09/10 season was the St. Lawrence String Quartet, which made its UMS debut in a stellar program of Haydn, Ravel, and John Adams. Haydn returns to the program for this appearance, which is bookended with the composer’s quartets. In between, the ensemble performs a new work by Osvaldo Golijov, the Argentinean composer who has worked with the SLSQ since the early 1990s. The SLSQ appears twice with UMS in the 11/12 season; they also perform a new work by John Adams with the San Francisco Symphony as part of the Choral Union Series in March. Program

Haydn Quartet No. 57 in C Major, Op. 74, No. 1 (1793) R.M. Schafer Quartet No. 3 (1981) Golijov New Work (composed for SLSQ) (2011) Haydn Quartet No. 61 in d minor, Op. 76, No. 2 (“Quinten”) (1796-97)


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Chamber Ensemble of the Shanghai Chinese Orchestra

7 concerts in Rackham Auditorium

www.ums.org  734-764-2538

Wang Fujian artistic director

$287 / $245 / $189 / $140

Friday \ February 10 Rackham Auditorium

Les Violons du Roy 28 \

8 pm

The chamber orchestra Les Violons du Roy borrows its name from the renowned string orchestra of the court of the French kings. Based in Québec City, the 15-member group was brought together in 1984 by music director Bernard Labadie. They specialize in the vast repertoire of music for chamber orchestra, performed on modern instruments in the style most appropriate to each era. The orchestra has been widely acclaimed for the exceptional energy, brilliance, and vitality of its performances. The ensemble appeared with countertenor David Daniels for a Chamber Arts concert in St. Francis church in 2001; now it returns with Swiss recorder virtuoso Maurice Steger, a “wonderfully deft player, with absolute clarity of note and line, even in the most virtuosic variations.” (Fanfare)

Sponsored by the Confucius Institute of the University of Michigan.

Hagen Quartet

Thursday \ February Rackham Auditorium

Program

Additional promotional support provided by WRCJ 90.9 FM.

Sabine Meyer and the Trio di Clarone

Program

Beethoven Beethoven Beethoven

4 \ 8 pm

String Quartet in F Major, Op. 18, No. 1 (1801) String Quartet in f minor, Op. 95 (1810) String Quartet in E-flat Major, Op. 74 (1809)

Additional promotional support provided by WDET 101.9 FM.

Sabine Meyer was solo clarinetist with the Berlin Philharmonic, a position she left as she became increasingly in demand as a solo artist. Today, in addition to her recital and concerto appearances, she performs in two chamber ensembles, including the Trio di Clarone, whose other members are her husband and her brother. Trio di Clarone began in part because of their shared interest in the basset horn, a rare instrument in the clarinet family that was used in Mozart’s Requiem and in his five divertimenti written for a trio of basset horns. “And so the evening was one of those absolute godsends in musical experience that cannot be fathomed — simply a gift.” (Rems Zeitung) Program

Mozart Poulenc Stravinsky J.S. Bach Mozart C.P.E. Bach Mozart

23 \ 7:30 pm

“Their performance was filled with subtlety and wonder… the playing was breathtaking in its precision, dynamism, and agility…a thrilling encounter.” (The Independent) Regarded internationally as one of the foremost string quartets of the day, the Hagen Quartet consists of the two brothers Lukas (violin) and Clemens (cello) and their sister Veronika Hagen (viola), along with violinist Rainer Schmidt, who has been with the group for more than 20 years. For this return performance — they last appeared in Ann Arbor in 1998 — the Hagen Quartet presents a program of Beethoven quartets as part of UMS’s focus on musical renegades.

W.F. Bach Overture in g minor (originally attributed to J.S. Bach, BWV 1070) (est. 1717) Telemann Concerto for Recorder in C Major, TWV 51:C1 (b.1681) Scarlatti Concerto Grosso in Seven Parts, No. 3 in F Major (est. 1715) Vivaldi Concerto for Recorder in c minor, RV 441 (b.1742) Geminiani Concerto Grosso No. 12 in d minor, “La Folia” (after Corelli) (1726-29) Geminiani Concerto for Recorder in F Major (after Corelli) (b.1687)

Saturday \ February Rackham Auditorium

8 pm

The 20 members of the Chamber Ensemble of the Shanghai Chinese Orchestra are drawn from the first large-scale modern orchestra of traditional instruments in China. The Chamber Ensemble features music that represents the gallant warriors of the past, the happy days of childhood, a foggy spring morning after a night of rain, and other poetic images brought to life by these iconic musicians. They perform on the zheng, dizi, erhu, pipa, and other Chinese instruments seldom featured in the West. While Chinese stars such as Lang Lang have brought new attention to Western classical music in China, this ensemble provides a window into the traditional Chinese classical music that dates back centuries.

Bernard Labadie conductor Maurice Steger recorder

Saturday \ January Rackham Auditorium

\

Three Arias from The Marriage of Figaro (1886) Sonata for Two Clarinets (1918) Three Pieces for Clarinet Solo (1918) French Suite No. 5 for Two Clarinets and Basset Horn (1723) Divertimento No. 1 for Three Basset Horns, K. 439b (1783) Duo for Two Clarinets in C Major, Wq. 142 (b.1714) Four Arias from Cosi fan tutte for Three Basset Horns (1789)

www.ums.org

Pavel Haas Quartet Wednesday \ April 18 Rackham Auditorium

\ 7:30 pm

“The world’s most exciting string quartet? Well, they suit the tagline better than most. Their tone is large, quasi-orchestral. They take risks. Above all, they play with passion.” (The Times, London) Based in Prague, the Pavel Haas Quartet is named for the Czech composer who was imprisoned at Theresienstadt and died at Auschwitz in 1944. While the Quartet is passionately committed to the Czech repertoire, and particularly the three wonderful string quartets that Haas composed, all their performances receive extraordinary acclaim. Program

Tchaikovsky Pavel Haas Smetana

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Quartet No. 1 in D Major, Op. 11 (1871) Quartet No. 2, Op. 7 (“From the Monkey Mountains”) (1925) Quartet No. 1 in e minor (“From My Life”) (1876)

734-764-2538


Dance Series Media Partners

20th annual series


Mark Morris Dance Group

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Friday \ September 23 \ 8 pm Saturday \ September 24 \ 8 pm Power Center

Main Floor $164 / $148 / $100 Balcony $148 / $132 / $100

www.ums.org  734-764-2538

Mark Morris artistic director

The Washington Post called Mark Morris “our Mozart of modern dance. There is that same sense of easy fecundity, his air of an aging, congenial enfant terrible, the sheer brilliance and wealth of his choreographic invention.” Morris has changed the way that audiences see modern dance, with unique artistry that reflects a profound and sophisticated love of music. His company of exuberant dancers lives up to its reputation of wit, grace, and a refined musicality that is further reinforced by Morris’s use of live musicians in every performance. Of Socrates, the San Francisco Chronicle enthused, “What Morris captures…is a mood that evolves from jubilant to resigned. This may be his most elegiac work, and it will always seem like a special event.” The New York Times added, “Socrates, though not simple, is simply beautiful.”

FAR

Random Dance

Wayne McGregor artistic director Saturday \ February Power Center

Program

Excursions (2008) Barber’s Excursions for Piano, Op. 20 Festival Dance (2011) Hummel’s Piano Quartet in G Major, Op. posth. 4 Socrates (2010) Satie’s Socrates for tenor and piano Sponsored by

Additional promotional support provided by Ann Arbor’s 107one.

18 \

8 pm

“If any artist has defined the decade, it’s Wayne McGregor.” (The Times, London) Random Dance was founded in 1992 and became the instrument upon which McGregor evolved his drastically fast and articulate choreographic style. The company became a byword for its radical approach to new technology, incorporating animation, digital film, 3-D architecture, electronic sound, and virtual dancers into the live choreography. McGregor, an award-winning British dancemaker who serves as resident choreographer of The Royal Ballet, Covent Garden, is renowned for his physically taxing movement style and ground-breaking collaborations across dance, film, music, visual art, and science. Specifically, he researches the relationship between dance and the mind as artist-in-residence at the Department of Experimental Psychology at the University of Cambridge. Wayne McGregor is “doing some of the most exciting work in ballet on the planet.” (The New York Times) Additional promotional support provided by WDET 101.9 FM.

Water Stains on the Wall

Cloud Gate Dance Theatre Lin Hwai-min artistic director

Snow White

Friday \ October 21 \ 8 pm Saturday \ October 22 \ 8 pm Power Center

Ballet Preljocaj

The virtuosity of the dancers from the Taiwanese company Cloud Gate has caused critics to rave that they “possess a control and articulation that verge on the superhuman.” (Chicago Sun-Times) Trained in tai chi, meditation, Chinese opera movement, modern dance, and ballet, the company performs a rich repertoire with roots in Asian myths, folklore, and aesthetics, all infused with a contemporary perspective. For this long-awaited UMS debut, Cloud Gate presents Lin Hwai-min’s newest work, Water Stains on the Wall. The white set looks like a blank piece of rice paper traditionally used by Chinese calligraphers and painters, onto which images of drifting clouds in different degrees of blackness are projected, with dancers grounded on a tilted floor yet appearing to float. They look like flowing ink, creating exquisite spaces that are constantly shifting, reminding one of Chinese classical landscape painting. Luxuriating in the sheer joy of movement, these remarkably fluid performers make stillness every bit as breathtaking as action. “Water stains on the wall” is a popular metaphor that represents the highest state in the aesthetics of Chinese calligraphy. Hwai-min and dancers take off from this metaphor and create an abstract work of beauty and magic that stands sublimely on its own.

Angelin Preljocaj artistic director Jean Paul Gaultier costume designer

Thursday \ April 19 \ 7:30 pm Friday \ April 20 \ 8 pm Saturday \ April 21 \ 8 pm Power Center

It’s been more than a decade since Ballet Preljocaj (pronounced prezh-oh-kahzh) made its UMS debut, but this production of Snow White, created in 2008, will be well worth the wait. Angelin Preljocaj has created a work for all 26 dancers of his company, setting the Grimm brothers’ version of the fairytale to the most beautiful scores of Gustav Mahler’s symphonies for this contemporary ballet. With costumes designed by Jean Paul Gaultier, this production of Snow White is sure to shake up those who have grown up with only the Disney version at their disposal. “I was very keen to tell a story, offer something magical and enchanted,” says Preljocaj. At the same time, he approaches Snow White’s stepmother, the Queen, as the centerpiece of the story, representing the conflict of her own longing to be desirable and seductive while watching her daughter grow up. Sponsored by Gil Omenn and Martha Darling.

Co-sponsored by Rani Kotha and Dr. Howard Hu.

www.ums.org

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An Evening with Ahmad Jamal

Ahmad Jamal piano James Cammack bass Herlin Riley drums Manolo Badrena percussion Saturday \ September Hill Auditorium

Main Floor $168 / $148 / $132 Mezz/Balc $132 / $100 / $48

17 \ 8 pm

“Ahmad Jamal is not just a living legend of jazz; he is one of the most inspired and inspiring artists in music today.” (AllAboutJazz.com) A pivotal influence on Miles Davis and countless others, NEA Jazz Master Ahmad Jamal incorporates a unique sense of space in his music — his musical concepts are exciting while confidently understated. Like Louis Armstrong, Jamal is an exemplary ensemble player, someone who listens and responds with total command of the keyboard. His charismatic swing and daringly inventive solos always tell a story. Born in Pittsburgh 81 years ago, Jamal is playing better than ever, with lifetime achievement awards feeling premature given his ongoing desire to push the genre forward. He returns after his UMS debut in 2008 with the ensemble from his 2010 release, A Quiet Time, which features drummer Herlin Riley, who was for many years the drummer in the Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra. Funded in part by NEA Jazz Masters Live, a program of the National Endowment for the Arts in partnership with Arts Midwest that celebrates the living legends who have made exceptional contributions to the advancement of jazz.

A Night in Treme: The Musical Majesty of New Orleans

Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra with Wynton Marsalis Wednesday \ February Hill Auditorium

22 \ 7:30 pm

The February 2010 snowstorm was about the only thing that could keep Wynton Marsalis and the Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra away from Ann Arbor! Wynton Marsalis stands in a league all his own. A creative genius, compassionate humanitarian, legendary trumpeter, masterful composer, arts advocate, tireless educator, and cultural leader, he inspires and uplifts people through superb music-making. His first trumpet came from Al Hirt at age 6, though it took a few years for interest in the instrument to stick. Now, more than 40 years later, he is best known as the leader of the 15-member Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra. Despite one of the most aggressive touring schedules in the business, JLCO makes each concert fresh, drawing in audiences who are continually energized and amazed by the group’s depth of outrageous talent. “The audience was weak from applauding and shouting and jumping up and down with the joy of the great music it had heard.” (El Universal/The Herald) Additional promotional support provided by Ann Arbor’s 107one and Detroit Jewish News.

Rebirth Brass Band Donald Harrison, Jr. saxophone Christian Scott trumpet Glen David Andrews trombone Dr. Michael White clarinet Friday \ November Hill Auditorium

www.ums.org  734-764-2538

Charles Lloyd Quartet

11 \ 8 pm

The Treme (pronounced truh-MAY) neighborhood of New Orleans has been a source of African-American music and culture for as long as cooks in the Crescent City have been serving red beans and rice on Monday nights. Birthplace of the great New Orleans brass band tradition and one of the first black neighborhoods in America, Treme is the heartbeat of New Orleans and home to Congo Square. This concert features the Rebirth Brass Band, known for combining traditional brass band sound with funk, jazz, soul, and hip hop and for embracing the quintessential New Orleans art form “second line,” whereby the band is followed by jubilant dancing. In addition to being a pillar of the New Orleans music scene, the Rebirth Brass Band was featured in the opening scene and on the Grammy-nominated soundtrack of David Simon’s hit HBO show “Treme,” which follows a group of New Orleaneans who are rebuilding their lives after Hurricane Katrina. The concert takes place in conjunction with the HBO show’s second season. Donald Harrison, Jr., Christian Scott, Glen David Andrews, and Dr. Michael White join the Rebirth Brass Band in this personal celebration of New Orleans music and heritage.

Charles Lloyd saxophones and flute Jason Moran piano Reuben Rogers bass Eric Harland drums

Saturday \ April 14 Michigan Theater

Forty years ago, saxophonist Charles Lloyd was a pop star; his 1966 album, Forest Flower, sold a million copies. Four years ago, at 69, when most individuals are thinking of ways to slow down and kick back, Lloyd shifted to a higher gear and formed a new quartet. Lloyd has always led exceptional bands, and this is perhaps the best. With MacArthur fellow Jason Moran on piano, Reuben Rogers on bass, and Eric Harland on drums, the Quartet’s concerts are events of pristine beauty and elegance, full of intensely-felt emotion and passion that touches deep inside the heart. This is not entertainment, but the powerful uncorrupted expression of beauty through music. Lloyd’s latest release, Mirrors, “sees him attaining jazz nirvana, calling numbers that channel his love of Monk, eastern spiritualism, California, and traditional gospel music. Listening is like a meditation, and the sparse, taut accompaniment of the quartet keeps everything in focus.” (Jazz Choice) Additional promotional support provided by Ann Arbor’s 107one.

Additional promotional support provided by Ann Arbor’s 107one.

www.ums.org

\ 8 pm

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Divine Voices Media Partner


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Veni Emmanuel

Stile Antico

$136 reserved $100 general admission

Wednesday \ December 7 St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church

\ 7:30 pm [note venue]

One of the most talked-about events two years ago was the young British ensemble Stile Antico, which is now firmly established as one of the most original and exciting new groups in the choral music world. The group’s most recent release, Song of Songs, won the 2009 Gramophone Award for Early Music. Working without a conductor, the 12 members of Stile Antico rehearse and perform as chamber musicians, each contributing artistically to the end result. Their performances have been repeatedly praised for their vitality and commitment, expressive lucidity, and imaginative response to text. For this return engagement, Stile Antico moves across town to the beautiful sanctuary of St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church, where they will perform a program of Tudor music for Christmas and Advent. The program is centered on Thomas Tallis’s magnificent seven-part “Christmas” mass, written for the combined choirs of the Spanish and English Chapels Royal and first performed in December 1554. The mass is interspersed with contemporaneous liturgical settings for Advent and Christmas, from the perfect miniatures of William Byrd’s exquisite Propers for the Fourth Sunday of Advent to Robert White’s exuberant setting of the Magnificat and John Sheppard’s extraordinary Verbum Caro. Complete program details at www.ums.org.

State Symphony Capella of Russia Valery Polyansky conductor

Thursday \ October 13 \ 7:30 pm St. Francis of Assisi Catholic Church

Featuring 50 glorious voices, the State Symphony Capella of Russia was founded in 1991 as a result of a merger of the USSR State Chamber Choir and the State Symphony Orchestra of the USSR Ministry of Culture. Specialists admire the strict performing discipline that reigns in the collective, which results in beautiful flexibility of phrasing, a rich and warm sound, noble expression, and skillful balance. Their flawless vocal and choral technique, crystal-clear and precise intonation, and unfailing attention to poetic words has led to captivating reviews, including this one from Le Monde de la Musique in France: “What a choir! Beautiful, noble, ideally balanced, diversity of timbres, flawless, clear intonation…We can only dream about such a choir.” The Capella’s program will include Russian choral works of Bortnianski, Tchaikovsky, Rachmaninoff, Taneyev, Sidelnikov, and Schnittke, as well as works of Anton Bruckner and Russian folk songs.

The Tallis Scholars Peter Phillips director

Schola Cantorum de Venezuela

Thursday \ February 16 \ 7:30 pm St. Francis of Assisi Catholic Church

María Guinand conductor

Thursday \ October 27 \ 7:30 pm St. Francis of Assisi Catholic Church

What does joy sound like? Schola Cantorum de Venezuela is one of the most important choral societies from the growing choral movement in Venezuela. With a repertoire of more than 50 major symphonic-choral works, the 45-voice SCV is beloved by highly-acclaimed conductors and composers alike. The group has performed several premières by Osvaldo Golijov and John Adams and has appeared on over 35 recordings. The premier touring chorus of Latin America, the Schola Cantorum has a breathtaking range of repertoire, from sacred hymns and motets to propulsive rhythms and tuneful popular idioms of their rich Latin American culture. Every SCV concert is a vivid cultural and joyous experience. They bring infectious passion to each work they sing. Their Ann Arbor debut program, Water and Fiesta, features songs by composers from Venezuela, Brazil, Argentina, Peru, Colombia, Uruguay, Cuba, Mexico, and the US. Complete program details available at www.ums.org. www.ums.org

The Tallis Scholars add a new dimension to UMS’s 11/12 focus on artistic renegades, presenting music of the wealthy Italian prince Carlo Gesualdo. Gesualdo’s infamy relates to his obsessive double murder of his wife and her lover, but he was also a maverick Renaissance composer whose eccentric approach to creating music — and whose colorful life story — inspired both Nadia Boulanger and Igor Stravinsky several hundred years later. His music contains wild gesticulations and abrupt surprises, and contemporary Renaissance scholars now regard him as perhaps the most forward-thinking, expressive, and sensual composer of his time. Consumed by guilt after murdering his wife, Gesualdo devoted himself to composing church music. At the centerpiece of this program is the Tenebrae Responses for Holy Saturday, part of the liturgy for the final three days of Holy Week. Works by other “maverick” Renaissance composers round out the program; complete details at www.ums.org. Additional promotional support provided by WDET 101.9 FM.

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Renegade Seriess Media Partner


Our popular media culture and politics have been awash for the last few years in a tidal wave of rhetoric privileging ideas and personalities that yearn to break with the past — to change, sometimes radically, the way we function, to reimagine and reshape the way we do things. In a word: to innovate. People seem to be looking in all sectors of life for a new creativity that maps a pathway to a new frontier.

Opera > Music Theater > Visual Arts & Design > Choreography > Time-Based Arts

Einstein on the Beach

An Opera in Four Acts by Robert Wilson – Philip Glass with choreography by Lucinda Childs

Looking at reality differently…Breaking with or reinterpreting “the canon”…(Maybe even ignoring it!?) Creating something new that we could never imagine…and, once realized, never live without?

Orchestral Music > Piano > Experimental Film

The most basic artistic impulse can encompass all of these ideas. And so…

Jeffrey Tate conductor Francesco Tristano piano Daniel Landau filmmaker

UMS has designed a 10-week, 10-performance journey to showcase some of these ideas as expressed through the performing arts — both historically and in the present. These performances from January through March 2012 operate as a window into artistic innovation and experimentation with real staying power. We begin our journey with Einstein on the Beach, the work by which theater artist Robert Wilson and composer Philip Glass changed, in one stroke, the way we think about the possibilities of grand opera. Carlo Gesualdo adopted an unprecedented chromaticism in the Renaissance that still startles and thrills today. Beethoven pushed 18th-century classical form beyond its limits and ushered in a whole new aesthetic era. Olivier Messiaen celebrated nature through a complex and unique new musical language, which conductor Jeffrey Tate takes a step further by adding film. Dancemaker Wayne McGregor collaborates with an unlikely cohort of neuroscientists, software engineers, and psychologists to author a new movement vocabulary. Theater magician Robert Lepage continues to reinvent storytelling for the stage. Our exploration culminates in a four-day orchestral music festival and residency “American Mavericks” led by Michael Tilson Thomas with the San Francisco Symphony and a roster of musical stars. As MTT himself says, “The [American] mavericks are iconoclasts, mold-breakers, voyagers, pioneers of the American sound. They imagined themselves as musical revolutionaries. And they were.” The Mavericks roll call includes John Cage, Morton Feldman, Aaron Copland, Meredith Monk, Edgard Varèse, Henry Cowell, Mason Bates, Lou Harrison, John Adams, Carl Ruggles, Charles Ives, Lukas Foss, Morton Subotnick and David Del Tredici….to name a few. We struggled with finding a word that helped frame this experience. Our conversations crystallized around the word Renegade: a rebel, someone who breaks with customs. This task of naming has generated much discussion and debate and even made some feel uncomfortable. Maybe that’s the point. Renegades have a way of bringing out the extremes of our humanity. You may, at times find yourself experiencing a complex set of reactions — confusion/delight, wonder/rage, thrill/boredom... But, in the end, we hope that your own way of seeing and experiencing these works changes, and, maybe, you’ll find a little bit of the renegade spirit within yourself.

www.ums.org

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From the Canyons to the Stars

Hamburg Symphony Orchestra Choral Music

Renaissance Mavericks: Composition’s Historic Turn I

The Tallis Scholars Peter Phillips director

Choreography > Design and Technology > Neuroscience

FAR

Random Dance

Wayne McGregor artistic director Chamber Music

Beethoven: Composition’s Historic Turn II

Hagen Quartet

Theater > Storytelling > Design

The Andersen Project

Ex Machina

Written and directed by Robert Starring Yves Jacques

Lepage

Orchestra Music > Chamber Music

American Mavericks

San Francisco Symphony Michael Tilson Thomas conductor Four Different Programs Featuring:

Paul Jacobs organ Jeremy Denk piano Mason Bates laptop Jessye Norman soprano Meredith Monk vocalist Joan La Barbara vocalist St. Lawrence String Quartet Emanuel Ax piano The San Francisco Symphony residency is made possible with support from the Maxine and Stuart Frankel Foundation and the UMS Creative Ventures Leadership Fund.

Details on these performances can be found on pages 38-47.These events can be purchased as part of the Monogram Series.

734-764-2538


Each year, UMS presents a concentrated focus on artists from one region of the world, rotating among Africa, the Arab World, the Americas, and Asia. Returning to a focus on Asia (the first took place during the 07/08 season), UMS concentrates its efforts on China, including the musical traditions of Shanghai and Inner Mongolia; Taiwan; and India. In addition to presenting culturallyspecific music and dance from these regions, UMS also presents artists who were born and raised in China and are best known for their performances of Western classical music.


Yuja Wang

Sunday \ October Hill Auditorium

Subscribe Today! piano

www.ums.org  734-764-2538

9\

Main Floor $240 / $222 / $200 Mezzanine $210 / $168 / $96

4 pm

Chinese pianist Yuja Wang combines the spontaneity and fearless imagination of youth with the discipline and precision of a mature artist. Regularly lauded for her controlled and prodigious technique, her command of the piano has been described as “astounding” and “superhuman.” Born in Beijing in 1987, Yuja began studying piano at age six, with her earliest public performances taking place in China, Australia, and Germany. She went on to study at the Central Conservatory of Music in Beijing under Ling Yuan and Zhou Guangren. She has been praised for her authority over the most complex technical demands of the repertoire, the depth of her musical insight, her fresh interpretations, and her graceful, charismatic stage presence. Co-sponsored by Donald Morelock. Media Partner WGTE 91.3 FM.

Beijing Guitar Duo with Manuel Barrueco Sunday \ November Rackham Auditorium

20 \ 4 pm

Meng Su and Yameng Wang are on the cusp of a very exciting career. They first met as children at the Central Conservatory in Beijing, where they studied with the acclaimed professor Chen Zhi. In 2008, they went to study with Manuel Barrueco at the Peabody Conservatory of Music in Baltimore and officially established themselves as the Beijing Guitar Duo. Their impressive talents come together to create one of the most interesting young guitar duos on the scene today.

Water Stains on the Wall

Chamber Ensemble of the Shanghai Chinese Orchestra

Lin Hwai-min artistic director

Wang Fujian artistic director

Cloud Gate Dance Theatre

Friday \ February 10 Rackham Auditorium

Friday \ October 21 \ 8 pm Saturday \ October 22 \ 8 pm Power Center

Trained in tai chi, meditation, Chinese opera movement, modern dance, and ballet, this Taiwanese company performs a rich repertoire with roots in Asian myths, folklore, and aesthetics, all infused with a contemporary perspective. For this longawaited UMS debut, Cloud Gate presents Hwai-min’s newest work, Water Stains on the Wall. The white set looks like a blank piece of rice paper traditionally used by Chinese calligraphers and painters, onto which images of drifting clouds in different degrees of blackness are projected, with dancers grounded on a tilted floor yet appearing to float. They look like flowing ink, creating exquisite spaces that are constantly shifting, reminding one of Chinese classical landscape painting. Co-sponsored by Rani Kotha and Dr. Howard Hu. Media Partners Between the Lines and Metro Times.

AnDa Union

Wednesday \ November Michigan Theater

8 pm

The 20 members of the Chamber Ensemble of the Shanghai Chinese Orchestra are drawn from the first large-scale modern orchestra of traditional instruments in China. The Chamber Ensemble features music that represents the gallant warriors of the past, the happy days of childhood, a foggy spring morning after a night of rain, and other poetic images brought to life by these iconic musicians. They perform on the zheng, dizi, erhu, pipa, and other Chinese instruments seldom featured in the West. Sponsored by the Confucius Institute of the University of Michigan. Media Partner WGTE 91.3 FM.

Zakir Hussain and Master Musicians of India

Zakir Hussain tabla \ Fazal Qureshi tabla and kanjira Rakesh Chaurasia bansuri \ Dilshad Khan sarangi Navin Sharma dholak \ Abbos Kosimov doyra Meitei Pung Cholom Performing Troupe (dancing drummers of Manipur)

9 \ 7:30 pm

Formed in 2003, AnDa Union is part of a musical movement that is finding inspiration in old and forgotten folk music from the nomadic herdsman cultures of Inner and Outer Mongolia, drawing on a repertoire of music that all but disappeared during China’s recent tumultuous past. The group’s 14 members all hail from the Xilingol Grassland area of Inner Mongolia, a semiautonomous region of China. They are accomplished singers and instrumentalists, performing on the traditional horse-head fiddle (tsuur), a three-holed flute (maodun chaoer), as well as Mongolian versions of the dulcimer, zither, lute, and mouth harp. The main singing style is khoomii, commonly referred to as throat singing, a traditional type of Mongolian overtone singing that replicates the sound of nature.

Thursday \ April Hill Auditorium

12 \

7:30 pm

Zakir Hussain is today appreciated both in the field of percussion and in the music world at large as an international phenomenon. A classical tabla virtuoso of the highest order, he consistently performs brilliant and exciting concerts that have not only established him as a national treasure in his own country, but have earned him worldwide fame. For this return appearance, Hussain has assembled a line-up of Indian classical music greats, topped off by the dancing drummers of Manipur. Hosted by Rani Kotha and Dr. Howard Hu. Media Partners WEMU 89.1 FM, Ann Arbor’s 107one, and Metro Times.

Sponsored by the Confucius Institute of the University of Michigan.

www.ums.org

\

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In addition to the Asia Series, UMS presents this world music tour of artists performing musical styles originating from their homelands.

Goran Bregovic and His Wedding and Funeral Orchestra Saturday \ October Hill Auditorium

15 \ 8 pm

“It was party time…a Balkan free-for-all, and the jam-packed auditorium went wild…” (The Jerusalem Post) Balkan music icon and acclaimed film composer Goran Bregovic celebrates the music of Europe’s Gypsy tradition. With a 20-piece ensemble consisting of a Serbian Gypsy band, a classical string ensemble, an all-male choir, two Bulgarian female singers, and Bregovic’s own electric guitar, the music blends raucous Gypsy dance tunes with traditional Eastern European choral music, spinning it all through a rock-and-roll cycle. Media Partner Michigan Radio 91.7 FM.

Cigala & Tango

Diego El Cigala

Saturday \ November Michigan Theater

5\

8 pm

Diego El Cigala is an internationally celebrated Gitano flamenco singer and contemporary flamenco’s most compelling voice. His mother and father were both accomplished practitioners of flamenco, as were his grandparents. He started off singing for well-known flamenco dancers but has since “moved to the front,” which in flamenco slang means to sing on one’s own instead of accompanying a dancer. He is noted for being a pioneer in fusing flamenco with other Latin American music forms such as the bolero, Afro-Caribbean jazz, and tango. His latest project, Cigala & Tango, is the musical testimony to his concert at the legendary Teatro Gran Rex in Buenos Aires last April. The legendary Paco de Lucía says, “Diego has one of the most beautiful flamenco voices of our time, a voice of sweetness that flows over everything. When I listen to him, it warms my heart.” Media Partner WEMU 89.1 FM.


AnDa Union

Wednesday \ November Michigan Theater

Subscribe Today!

9 \ 7:30 pm

www.ums.org  734-764-2538

Formed in 2003, AnDa Union is part of a musical movement that is finding inspiration in old and forgotten folk music from the nomadic herdsman cultures of Inner and Outer Mongolia, drawing on a repertoire of music that all but disappeared during China’s recent tumultuous past. The group’s 14 members all hail from the Xilingol Grassland area of Inner Mongolia, a semiautonomous region of China. They are accomplished singers and instrumentalists, performing on the traditional horse-head fiddle (tsuur), a three-holed flute (maodun chaoer), as well as Mongolian versions of the dulcimer, zither, lute, and mouth harp. The main singing style is khoomii, commonly referred to as throat singing, a traditional type of Mongolian overtone singing that replicates the sound of nature. Sponsored by the Confucius Institute of the University of Michigan.

Wang Fujian artistic director

\

Zakir Hussain and Master Musicians of India Zakir Hussain tabla Fazal Qureshi tabla and kanjira Rakesh Chaurasia bansuri Dilshad Khan sarangi Navin Sharma dholak Abbos Kosimov doyra Meitei Pung Cholom Performing Troupe (dancing drummers of Manipur) Thursday \ April Hill Auditorium

Chamber Ensemble of the Shanghai Chinese Orchestra Friday \ February 10 Rackham Auditorium

Main Floor $266 / $238 / $217 Mezzanine $238 / $172 / $98

8 pm

The 20 members of the Chamber Ensemble of the Shanghai Chinese Orchestra are drawn from the first large-scale modern orchestra of traditional instruments in China. The Chamber Ensemble features music that represents the gallant warriors of the past, the happy days of childhood, a foggy spring morning after a night of rain, and other poetic images brought to life by these iconic musicians. They perform on the zheng, dizi, erhu, pipa, and other Chinese instruments seldom featured in the West.

12 \

7:30 pm

Zakir Hussain is today appreciated both in the field of percussion and in the music world at large as an international phenomenon. A classical tabla virtuoso of the highest order, he consistently performs brilliant and exciting concerts that have not only established him as a national treasure in his own country, but have earned him worldwide fame. For this return appearance, Hussain has assembled a line-up of Indian classical music greats, topped off by the dancing drummers of Manipur. Hosted by Rani Kotha and Dr. Howard Hu. Media Partners WEMU 89.1 FM, Ann Arbor’s 107one, and Metro Times.

Sponsored by the Confucius Institute of the University of Michigan. Media Partner WGTE 91.3 FM.

Cheikh Lô

Friday \ April 13 Michigan Theater

Berlin Nocturne

Max Raabe & Palast Orchester

Saturday \ March Hill Auditorium

10 \ 8 pm

“Max Raabe and his 12-piece Palast Orchester are re-creating the music of the Weimar era with verve and class.” (Time Out New York) A nostalgic homage to the legendary nocturnal flair of the Weimar Era, the debonair Max Raabe embodies the high style and musical glory of the 1920s and 1930s, all backed by his stellar 12-member band. His art lies in revealing the enigmatic intelligence, ambiguity, musical power, and complexity of the “German chansons” from the turbulent Weimar Republic — and then shaking it up with a completely unexpected cover from the contemporary pop realm.

Cheikh Lô is one of the great mavericks of African music. A superb singer and songwriter, as well as a distinctive guitarist and drummer, he has personalized and distilled a variety of influences from West and Central Africa to create a style that is uniquely his own. After emigrating to Paris and then returning to Senegal in the late 1980s, Lô attracted both the attention of and comparisons to Youssou N’Dour, who produced two of his early albums. His signature blend of semiacoustic flavors — West and Central African, funk, Cuban, flamenco — has been distilled into his most mature, focused, yet diverse statement today, with his husky, sensual voice sounding better than ever. Media Partners WEMU 89.1 FM and The Michigan Chronicle.

Sponsored by Media Partner Michigan Radio 91.7 FM.

www.ums.org

\ 8 pm

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Choose at least five events from pages 26-50 and save 10%.

An Evening with Ahmad Jamal

Ahmad Jamal piano James Cammack bass Herlin Riley drums Manolo Badrena percussion Saturday \ September Hill Auditorium

17 \ 8 pm

“Ahmad Jamal is not just a living legend of jazz; he is one of the most inspired and inspiring artists in music today.” (AllAboutJazz.com) A pivotal influence on Miles Davis and countless others, NEA Jazz Master Ahmad Jamal incorporates a unique sense of space in his music — his musical concepts are exciting while confidently understated. Like Louis Armstrong, Jamal is an exemplary ensemble player, someone who listens and responds with total command of the keyboard. His charismatic swing and daringly inventive solos always tell a story. Born in Pittsburgh 81 years ago, Jamal is playing better than ever, with lifetime achievement awards feeling premature given his ongoing desire to push the genre forward. He returns after his UMS debut in 2008 with the ensemble from his 2010 release, A Quiet Time, which features drummer Herlin Riley, who was for many years the drummer in the Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra. Funded in part by NEA Jazz Masters Live, a program of the National Endowment for the Arts in partnership with Arts Midwest. Media Partners WEMU 89.1 FM, Metro Times, and The Michigan Chronicle.


The Infernal Comedy: Confessions of a Serial Killer

Mark Morris Dance Group

John Malkovich and Musica Angelica Baroque Orchestra

Mark Morris artistic director

Friday \ September 23 \ 8 pm Saturday \ September 24 \ 8 pm Power Center

The Washington Post called Mark Morris “our Mozart of modern dance. There is that same sense of easy fecundity, his air of an aging, congenial enfant terrible, the sheer brilliance and wealth of his choreographic invention.” Morris has changed the way that audiences see modern dance, with unique artistry that reflects a profound and sophisticated love of music. His company of exuberant dancers lives up to its reputation of wit, grace, and a refined musicality that is further reinforced by Morris’s use of live musicians in every performance. Of Socrates, the San Francisco Chronicle enthused, “What Morris captures…is a mood that evolves from jubilant to resigned. This may be his most elegiac work, and it will always seem like a special event.” The New York Times added, “Socrates, though not simple, is simply beautiful.” Program

Excursions (2008) Barber’s Excursions for Piano, Op. 20 Festival Dance (2011) Hummel’s Piano Quartet in G Major, Op. posth. 4 Socrates (2010) Satie’s Socrates for tenor and piano Sponsored by

Media Partners Between the Lines, Metro Times, and Ann Arbor’s 107one.

www.ums.org

Louise Fribo and Valerie Vinzant sopranos Martin Haselböck conductor

Saturday \ October Hill Auditorium

1\

8 pm

John Malkovich makes his UMS debut portraying a dead serial killer who returns to the stage to present his autobiography in a public reading. Malkovich appears as part of a theatrical opera of sorts that features a 40-piece chamber orchestra and two sopranos telling the real-life story of Jack Unterweger, a convicted murderer and acclaimed prison poet. Pardoned by the Austrian president Kurt Waldheim in 1990 at the behest of the Viennese literati, Unterweger’s public “rehabilitation” was anything but — within two years, he had been arrested and convicted for the brutal murder of 11 prostitutes in three countries. This gripping performance uses arias and music by Gluck, Vivaldi, Mozart, Beethoven, Boccherini, and Haydn as the counterpoint to Malkovich’s chilling monologue, which shifts between reality and delusion. Sponsored by Jane and Edward Schulak

Media Partners WGTE 91.3 FM, Ann Arbor’s 107one, Between the Lines, and Metro Times.

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Yuja Wang

Sunday \ October Hill Auditorium

piano

9 \ 4 pm

Twenty-four-year-old Chinese pianist Yuja Wang is widely recognized for playing that combines the spontaneity and fearless imagination of youth with the discipline and precision of a mature artist. Regularly lauded for her controlled and prodigious technique, her command of the piano has been described as “astounding” and “superhuman.” Yuja has been praised for her authority over the most complex technical demands of the repertoire, the depth of her musical insight, her fresh interpretations, and her graceful, charismatic stage presence. Following her San Francisco recital debut, the San Francisco Chronicle wrote, “The arrival of Chinese-born pianist Yuja Wang on the musical scene is an exhilarating and unnerving development. To listen to her in action is to re-examine whatever assumptions you may have had about how well the piano can actually be played.” She made her UMS debut in January 2008, just months after graduating from the Curtis Institute of Music, and since then has spent each year criss-crossing the globe with a cavalcade of impressive debuts and awards, including the prestigious Avery Fisher Career Grant, given to select musicians destined for bright solo careers. Program

Ravel Copland Rachmaninoff Brahms

Miroirs (1904-05) Piano Variations (1930) Selected Preludes (1903-10) Sonata TBA

Co-sponsored by Donald Morelock. Media Partner WGTE 91.3 FM.


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State Symphony Capella of Russia Valery Polyansky conductor

Thursday \ October 13 \ 7:30 pm St. Francis of Assisi Catholic Church

Featuring 50 glorious voices, the State Symphony Capella of Russia was founded in 1991 as a result of a merger of the USSR State Chamber Choir and the State Symphony Orchestra of the USSR Ministry of Culture. Specialists admire the strict performing discipline that reigns in the collective, which results in beautiful flexibility of phrasing, a rich and warm sound, noble expression, and skillful balance. Their flawless vocal and choral technique, crystal-clear and precise intonation, and unfailing attention to poetic words has led to captivating reviews, including this one from Le Monde de la Musique in France: “What a choir! Beautiful, noble, ideally balanced, diversity of timbres, flawless, clear intonation…We can only dream about such a choir.” The Capella’s program will include Russian choral works of Bortnianski, Tchaikovsky, Rachmaninoff, Taneyev, Sidelnikov, and Schnittke, as well as works of Anton Bruckner and Russian folk songs. Media Partner WRCJ 90.9 FM.

Goran Bregovic and His Wedding and Funeral Orchestra Saturday \ October Hill Auditorium

15 \ 8 pm

“Bregovic is both the catalyst and ringmaster for a musical spectacle unlike anything else on North American stages.” (San Francisco Chronicle) “It was party time…a Balkan free-for-all, and the jam-packed auditorium went wild.” (The Jerusalem Post) Balkan music icon and acclaimed film composer Goran Bregovic celebrates the music of Europe’s Gypsy tradition. With a 20-piece ensemble consisting of a Serbian Gypsy band, a classical string ensemble, an all-male choir, two Bulgarian female singers, and Bregovic’s own electric guitar, the music blends raucous Gypsy dance tunes with traditional Eastern European choral music, spinning it all through a rock-and-roll cycle. The result is nothing short of a dizzying, symphonic worldmusic whirlwind, cathartic and delirious. Ann Arbor is one of only a handful of cities in the United States that will present Goran Bregovic this year. “Bregovic makes a music that runs the spectrum from ecstatic, robustly earthy dance music, to naughty pop tunes, to vocal and string arrangements ripe with sentimentality.” (Daily Star, Lebanon) Media Partner Michigan Radio 91.7 FM.

www.ums.org

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Water Stains on the Wall

Cloud Gate Dance Theatre Lin Hwai-min artistic director

Friday \ October 21 \ 8 pm Saturday \ October 22 \ 8 pm Power Center

The virtuosity of the dancers from the Taiwanese company Cloud Gate has caused critics to rave that they “possess a control and articulation that verge on the superhuman.” (Chicago Sun-Times) Trained in tai chi, meditation, Chinese opera movement, modern dance, and ballet, the company performs a rich repertoire with roots in Asian myths, folklore, and aesthetics, all infused with a contemporary perspective. For this long-awaited UMS debut, Cloud Gate presents Lin Hwai-min’s newest work, Water Stains on the Wall. The white set looks like a blank piece of rice paper traditionally used by Chinese calligraphers and painters, onto which images of drifting clouds in different degrees of blackness are projected, with dancers grounded on a tilted floor yet appearing to float. They look like flowing ink, creating exquisite spaces that are constantly shifting, reminding one of Chinese classical landscape painting. Luxuriating in the sheer joy of movement, these remarkably fluid performers make stillness every bit as breathtaking as action. “Water stains on the wall” is a popular metaphor that represents the highest state in the aesthetics of Chinese calligraphy. Hwai-min and dancers take off from this metaphor and create an abstract work of beauty and magic that stands sublimely on its own. Co-sponsored by Rani Kotha and Dr. Howard Hu. Media Partners Between the Lines and Metro Times.


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Beckett’s Endgame and Watt

Gate Theatre of Dublin

Michael Cogan director Featuring Barry McGovern and Rosaleen Linehan

Schola Cantorum de Venezuela María Guinand conductor

Thursday \ October 27 \ 7:30 pm St. Francis of Assisi Catholic Church

What does joy sound like? Schola Cantorum de Venezuela is one of the most important choral societies from the growing choral movement in Venezuela. With a repertoire of more than 50 major symphonic-choral works, the 45-voice SCV is beloved by highly-acclaimed conductors and composers alike. The group has performed several premières by Osvaldo Golijov and John Adams and has appeared on over 35 recordings. The premier touring chorus of Latin America, the Schola Cantorum has a breathtaking range of repertoire, from sacred hymns and motets to propulsive rhythms and tuneful popular idioms of their rich Latin American culture. Every SCV concert is a vivid cultural and joyous experience. They bring infectious passion to each work they sing. Their Ann Arbor debut program, Water and Fiesta, features songs by composers from Venezuela, Brazil, Argentina, Peru, Colombia, Uruguay, Cuba, Mexico, and the US. Complete program details available at www.ums.org. Media Partner WRCJ 90.9 FM.

www.ums.org

Thursday \ October 27 \ 7:30 pm Friday \ October 28 \ 8 pm Saturday \ October 29 \ 8 pm Power Center

Straight from Ireland’s acclaimed Gate Theatre is a doublebill of two one-act plays by the great Irish modernist writer, playwright, and humorist Samuel Beckett. The Gate is largely considered the leading interpreter of Beckett in the world; it’s like seeing the Maly Drama Theatre perform Chekhov or The Globe perform Shakespeare. Endgame, like Waiting for Godot, is considered one of Beckett’s most important works, written in a style associated with the Theatre of the Absurd. Watt, a novel written while Beckett was in hiding during World War II, is the extraordinary story of an itinerant character who one day walks from a train station to the home of a Mr. Knott, whom he will serve. The bizarre adventures of Watt and his struggles to make sense of the world around him are told with elegant simplicity, immense pathos, and explosive humor. Barry McGovern, who performs the role of Watt, selected the texts from the novel for this one-man performance. “Quite simply outstanding...I got an almost delirious joy from hearing, and seeing, an hour-long distillation of Beckett’s novel, Watt.” (Guardian) Funded in part by the Wallace Endowment Fund. Media Partners Between the Lines, Michigan Radio 91.7 FM, and Ann Arbor’s 107one.

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Apollo’s Fire and Philippe Jaroussky Jeannette Sorrell music director

Thursday \ November Hill Auditorium

3\

countertenor

7:30 pm

“When I heard Philippe Jaroussky for the first time, I was struck by his musicality and sensibility,” Cecilia Bartoli told The New York Times Magazine for a profile last November. “There is a beauty in his phrasing and a delicacy, if not fragility, in his soul that touches the listener profoundly.” UMS is delighted to welcome French countertenor Philippe Jaroussky in his UMS debut for this performance with Apollo’s Fire, “one of the nation’s leading baroque orchestras.” (The Boston Globe). Together they explore the full dramatic range of Handel and Vivaldi arias written for the virtuosi castrati singers of the 18th century. “Apollo’s Fire has forged a vibrant, life-affirming approach to the re-making of early music…Their seductive vision of musical authenticity is guided by a shared commitment to honest emotional expression, rooted in period style yet never its slave.” (BBC Music Magazine) Program

Handel Handel Vivaldi Vivaldi Vivaldi Vivaldi/Sorrell Vivaldi Vivaldi

“Disperato il mar turbato” from Oreste (1734) “Con l’ali di costanza” from Ariodante (1735) Concerto for Four Violins in b minor (1711) “Se in ogni guardo” from Orlando Finto Pazzo (1714) “Se mai senti spirati sul volto” from Catone in Utica (1737) La Folio (“Madness”) (1705) “Vedro con mio diletto” from Giustino (1724) “Nel profondo” from Orlando Furioso (1727)

Media Partners WGTE 91.3 FM and Between the Lines.

Audra McDonald

Friday \ November Hill Auditorium

4\

8 pm

A Juilliard-trained, four-time Tony Award-winning singer and actress who has released four solo albums and performed with every major orchestra in the US, Audra McDonald is not one to rest on her laurels — which also include two Grammy Awards and two prime-time Emmy Award nominations. The vivacious actress is a restlessly creative spirit who is reluctant to be typecast as strictly a musical theater artist, despite her enormous success in that genre. Since her last UMS appearance in 2005, McDonald has made her Houston Grand Opera debut, won her fourth Tony (for A Raisin in the Sun), played Olivia in Shakespeare’s Twelfth Night at The Public Theater’s Shakespeare in the Park, performed at the White House for President Obama, and spent four years on the ABC series “Private Practice.” She now returns to her musical theater roots, including the role of Bess in Porgy and Bess for American Repertory Theater and this Hill Auditorium concert. Sponsored by Co-sponsored by Robert and Pearson Macek. Media Partners Metro Times, The Michigan Chronicle, Ann Arbor’s 107one, and WEMU 89.1 FM.


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Cigala & Tango

Diego El Cigala

Saturday \ November Michigan Theater

5\

8 pm

“Flamenco has to be suffered,” Diego El Cigala asserted in a New York Times interview. “How do you convey emotions from within your heart if you don’t know what suffering is? If there is no evidence of pain in your heart, there is no song.” Nicknamed “El Cigala” (Norway Lobster) for his thin frame and strong voice, Diego is an internationally celebrated Gitano flamenco singer and contemporary flamenco’s most compelling voice. His mother and father were both accomplished practitioners of flamenco, as were his grandparents. He started off singing for well-known flamenco dancers but has since “moved to the front,” which in flamenco slang means to sing on one’s own instead of accompanying a dancer. He is noted for being a pioneer in fusing flamenco with other Latin American music forms such as the bolero, Afro-Caribbean jazz, and tango. His latest project, Cigala & Tango, is the musical testimony to his concert at the legendary Teatro Gran Rex in Buenos Aires last April. The legendary Paco de Lucía says, “Diego has one of the most beautiful flamenco voices of our time, a voice of sweetness that flows over everything. When I listen to him, it warms my heart.” The New York Times adds, “He radiates a magnetic mix of winking charm and unpredictable vitriol reminiscent of a singer from an entirely different milieu, Frank Sinatra.” Media Partner WEMU 89.1 FM.

www.ums.org

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AnDa Union

Wednesday \ November Michigan Theater

9\

7:30 pm

Formed in 2003, AnDa Union is part of a musical movement that is finding inspiration in old and forgotten folk music from the nomadic herdsman cultures of Inner and Outer Mongolia, drawing on a repertoire of music that all but disappeared during China’s recent tumultuous past. The group’s 14 members all hail from the Xilingol Grassland area of Inner Mongolia, a semi-autonomous region of China. They describe themselves as “music gatherers” who dig deep into Mongol traditions to unearth forgotten music — music as it might have been played late into the evening in the camps of Genghis Khan. Its members are accomplished singers and instrumentalists, performing on the traditional horse-head fiddle (tsuur), a three-holed flute (maodun chaoer) as well as Mongolian versions of the dulcimer, zither, lute, and mouth harp. The main singing style is khoomii, commonly referred to as throat singing, a traditional type of Mongolian overtone singing that replicates the sound of nature. The performance is accompanied by a captivating documentary film that follows the group on a journey through the vibrant capital of Hohhot and the wild and varied landscapes of the Inner Mongolian grasslands and mountains, where they discover the secrets of their haunting and beautiful music. While wholeheartedly embracing modern society in all its facets, the Mongolian people are a culture fighting for survival in an increasingly industrialized world. Sponsored by the Confucius Institute of the University of Michigan.


A Night in Treme: The Musical Majesty of New Orleans Rebirth Brass Band Donald Harrison, Jr. saxophone Christian Scott trumpet Glen David Andrews trombone Dr. Michael White clarinet Friday \ November Hill Auditorium

11 \ 8 pm

The Treme (pronounced truh-MAY) neighborhood of New Orleans has been a source of African-American music and culture for as long as cooks in the Crescent City have been serving red beans and rice on Monday nights. Birthplace of the great New Orleans brass band tradition and one of the first black neighborhoods in America, Treme is the heartbeat of New Orleans and home to Congo Square. This concert features the Rebirth Brass Band, known for combining traditional brass band sound with funk, jazz, soul, and hip hop and for embracing the quintessential New Orleans art form “second line,” whereby the band is followed by jubilant dancing. In addition to being a pillar of the New Orleans music scene, the Rebirth Brass Band was featured in the opening scene and on the Grammy-nominated soundtrack of David Simon’s hit HBO show “Treme,” which follows a group of New Orleaneans who are rebuilding their lives after Hurricane Katrina. The concert takes place in conjunction with the HBO show’s second season. Donald Harrison, Jr., Christian Scott, Glen David Andrews, and Dr. Michael White join the Rebirth Brass Band in this personal celebration of New Orleans music and heritage.

St. Lawrence String Quartet

Media Partners WEMU 89.1 FM, Metro Times, The Michigan Chronicle, and Ann Arbor’s 107one.

Media Partner WGTE 91.3 FM.

www.ums.org

Saturday \ November Rackham Auditorium

12 \

8 pm

One of the great finds of the 09/10 season was the St. Lawrence String Quartet, which made its UMS debut in a stellar program of Haydn, Ravel, and John Adams. Haydn returns to the program for this appearance, which is bookended with the composer’s quartets. In between, the ensemble performs a new work by Osvaldo Golijov, the Argentinean composer who has worked with the SLSQ since the early 1990s. The SLSQ appears twice with UMS in the 11/12 season; they also perform a new work by John Adams with the San Francisco Symphony as part of the Choral Union Series in March. Program

Haydn Quartet No. 57 in C Major, Op. 74, No. 1 (1793) R.M. Schafer Quartet No. 3 (1981) Golijov New Work (composed for SLSQ) (2011) Haydn Quartet No. 61 in d minor, Op. 76, No. 2 (“Quinten”) (1796-97)

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Beijing Guitar Duo with Manuel Barrueco Sunday \ November Rackham Auditorium

20 \ 4 pm

Meng Su and Yameng Wang are widely noted for their outstanding technique and artistic musicality. They first met as children at the Central Conservatory in Beijing, where they began studied with the acclaimed professor Chen Zhi. Both women have won the Tokyo International Guitar Competition (Yameng Wang won it at age 12), and have received heaps of acclaim and recognition at international guitar events and from other seasoned guitarists, including Sergio Assad who has written and dedicated works to them. In 2008, they went to study with Manuel Barrueco at the Peabody Conservatory of Music in Baltimore and officially established themselves as the Beijing Guitar Duo. Their impressive talents come together to create one of the most exciting guitar duos on the scene today. Manuel Barrueco joins them for this debut performance, which will feature both individual and ensemble work for classical guitar. “It was clear from the evening that both women are incredibly gifted, and together, with their ability to fuse technical skill effortlessly with their depth of musicality, they have the star potential to serve as inspiration for new generations of guitarists to come.� (Classical Guitar)


Canadian Brass

Sunday \ November Hill Auditorium

27 \

4 pm

Five tremendous brass musicians — each a virtuoso in his own right — form the legendary Canadian Brass. With an international reputation as one of the most popular brass ensembles today, Canadian Brass performs brass standards as well as a wide-ranging library of original arrangements created especially for them, including the works of Renaissance and Baroque masters, classical works, marches, holiday favorites, ragtime, Dixieland, big band, Broadway, and popular songs and standards. This Thanksgiving-weekend concert is sure to start your holidays off with a bang. Canadian Brass came about when friends Chuck Daellenbach (tuba, the only original member still playing with the group) and Gene Watts (trombone) got together to form a brass quintet in 1970. At the time, brass quintets were not entirely new, but they had never garnered the huge success that Canadian Brass has since made possible. Masters of concert presentation — from formal classical concerts to music served up with lively dialogue and theatrical effects — Canadian Brass has developed a uniquely engaging stage presence and rapport with audiences. The hallmark of any Canadian Brass performance is entertainment, spontaneity, virtuosity, and, most of all, fun. Media Partner WRCJ 90.9 FM.

www.ums.org

Handel’s Messiah

Ann Arbor Symphony Orchestra UMS Choral Union Jerry Blackstone conductor

Saturday \ December 3 \ 8 pm Sunday \ December 4 \ 2 pm Hill Auditorium

The Grammy Award-winning UMS Choral Union (2006 “Best Choral Performance” for William Bolcom’s Songs of Innocence and of Experience) launches the holiday season with its signature work, Handel’s Messiah. An Ann Arbor tradition in the beautiful surroundings of Hill Auditorium, these performances are ultimately the heart and soul of UMS, connecting audiences not only with the talented people on stage, but also with the friends and family who attend each year. Start off your holiday season with a spirited “Hallelujah!” Sponsored by the Carl and Isabelle Brauer Fund. Media Partners Michigan Radio 91.7 FM and Ann Arbor’s 107one.

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Einstein on the Beach An Opera in Four Acts by Robert Wilson – Philip Glass with choreography by Lucinda Childs Preview Performances: Friday \ January 20 \ 7 pm Saturday \ January 21 \ 7 pm Sunday \ January 22 \ 2 pm Power Center

“The most beautiful thing we can experience is the mysterious.” — Albert Einstein Widely credited as one of the greatest artistic achievements of the 20th century, this rarely-performed and revolutionary work launched director Robert Wilson and composer Philip Glass to international success when it was first produced in Avignon, France in 1976 with subsequent performances in Europe and at the Metropolitan Opera. It is still recognized as one of their greatest masterpieces. Now, nearly four decades after it was first performed and 20 years since its last production, Einstein on the Beach will be reconstructed for a major international tour including the first North American presentations ever held outside of New York City. Einstein on the Beach breaks all of the rules of conventional opera. Instead of a traditional orchestral arrangement, Glass composed for the synthesizers, woodwinds, and voices of the Philip Glass Ensemble. Non-narrative in form, the work uses a series of powerful recurrent images as its main dramatic device, shown in juxtaposition with abstract dance sequences created by American choreographer Lucinda Childs. There are no traditional intermissions; audiences are free to wander in and out at liberty during the five-hour performance. The New York Times critic John Rockwell said, “Einstein was like nothing I had ever encountered…Its very elusiveness radiated richly, like some dark star whose effects we can only feel…Einstein on the Beach, perhaps like Einstein himself, transcended time. It’s not (just) an artifact of its era, it’s timeless…an experience to cherish for a lifetime.” Prior to the production’s final technical rehearsals and world première in Montpelier, France, UMS will host the production’s creators, musicians, performers, and crew for three weeks as they reconstruct and rehearse the work for what is likely to be the final world tour designed and led by its original creators. A rare chance to see a work of this scale in progress, these preview performances will be the only opportunity to see Einstein on the Beach in the Midwest.  Sponsored by

Hosted by Carl and Charlene Herstein, David and Phyllis Herzig, and Prue and Ami Rosenthal. Media Partners Michigan Radio 91.7 FM, Between the Lines, WDET 101.9 FM, Ann Arbor’s 107one, and Detroit Jewish News.


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Les Violons du Roy Bernard Labadie conductor Maurice Steger recorder Saturday \ January Rackham Auditorium

28 \ 8 pm

The chamber orchestra Les Violons du Roy borrows its name from the renowned string orchestra of the court of the French kings. Based in Québec City, the 15-member group was brought together in 1984 by music director Bernard Labadie. They specialize in the vast repertoire of music for chamber orchestra, performed on modern instruments in the stylistic manner most appropriate to each era. The ensemble appeared with countertenor David Daniels for a Chamber Arts concert in St. Francis church in 2001; now it returns with Swiss recorder virtuoso Maurice Steger, a “wonderfully deft player, with absolute clarity of note and line, even in the most virtuosic variations.” (Fanfare) Program

W.F. Bach Overture in g minor (originally attributed to J.S. Bach, BWV 1070) (est. 1717) Telemann Concerto for Recorder in C Major, TWV 51:C1 (b.1681) Concerto Grosso in Seven Parts, No. 3 in F Major (est. 1715) Scarlatti Vivaldi Concerto for Recorder in c minor, RV 441 (b.1742) Geminiani Concerto Grosso No. 12 in d minor, “La Folia” (after Corelli) (1726-29) Geminiani Concerto for Recorder in F Major (after Corelli) (b.1687) Media Partners WGTE 91.3 FM and WRCJ 90.9 FM.

From the Canyons to the Stars

Hamburg Symphony Orchestra Jeffrey Tate conductor Francesco Tristano piano Daniel Landau filmmaker Sunday \ January Hill Auditorium

29 \

4 pm

In 1971, French composer Olivier Messiaen was commissioned by Alice Tully, the New York philanthropist most widely known for her contribution to Lincoln Center, to write a piece commemorating America’s Bicentennial. Messiaen was inspired and fascinated by the natural wonder he found in the landscapes of the American West. Des canyons aux étoiles (From the Canyons to the Stars) represents his sonic impressions of America’s last untouched frontier. Conductor Jeffrey Tate and the Hamburg Symphony, in collaboration with Israeli filmmaker Daniel Landau, bring the piece alive in a new cinematic installation, where images of man’s impact on the environment create a counterpoint to sounds of untouched nature. Through film images projected on multiple screens, Hill Auditorium will be turned into a multi-sensory experience celebrating the beauty of the earth and our unaltered landscapes. Program

Messiaen

Des canyons aux étoiles (From the Canyons to the Stars) (1971-74)

Media Partners WGTE 91.3 FM and WDET 101.9 FM.

www.ums.org

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Sabine Meyer and the Trio di Clarone

Saturday \ February Rackham Auditorium

4 \ 8 pm

Sabine Meyer was solo clarinetist with the Berlin Philharmonic, a position she left as she became increasingly in demand as a solo artist. Today, in addition to her recital and concerto appearances, she performs in two chamber ensembles, including the Trio di Clarone, whose other members are her husband and her brother. Trio di Clarone began in part because of their shared interest in the basset horn, a rare instrument in the clarinet family that was used in Mozart’s Requiem and in his five divertimenti written for a trio of basset horns. “And so the evening was one of those absolute godsends in musical experience that cannot be fathomed – simply a gift.” (Rems Zeitung) Program

Mozart Poulenc Stravinsky J.S. Bach Mozart C.P.E. Bach Mozart

Three Arias from The Marriage of Figaro (1886) Sonata for Two Clarinets (1918) Three Pieces for Clarinet Solo (1918) French Suite No. 5 for Two Clarinets and Basset Horn (1723) Divertimento No. 1 for Three Basset Horns, K. 439b (1783) Duo for Two Clarinets in C Major, Wq. 142 (b.1714) Four Arias from Cosi fan tutte for Three Basset Horns (1789)

Media Partner WGTE 91.3 FM.

Chamber Ensemble of the Shanghai Chinese Orchestra Wang Fujian artistic director Friday \ February 10 Rackham Auditorium

\

8 pm

The 20 members of the Chamber Ensemble of the Shanghai Chinese Orchestra are drawn from the first large-scale modern orchestra of traditional instruments in China. The Chamber Ensemble features music that represents the gallant warriors of the past, the happy days of childhood, a foggy spring morning after a night of rain, and other poetic images brought to life by these iconic musicians. They perform on the zheng, dizi, erhu, pipa, and other Chinese instruments seldom featured in the West. While Chinese stars such as Lang Lang have brought new attention to Western classical music in China, this ensemble provides a window into the traditional Chinese classical music that dates back many centuries. Sponsored by the Confucius Institute of the University of Michigan. Media Partner WGTE 91.3 FM.


Sweet Honey In The Rock

Friday \ February Hill Auditorium

The Tallis Scholars Peter Phillips director

Thursday \ February 16 \ 7:30 pm St. Francis of Assisi Catholic Church

The Tallis Scholars add a new dimension to UMS’s 11/12 focus on artistic renegades, presenting music of the wealthy Italian prince Carlo Gesualdo. Gesualdo’s infamy relates to his obsessive double murder of his wife and her lover, but he was also a maverick Renaissance composer whose eccentric approach to creating music — and whose colorful life story — inspired both Nadia Boulanger and Igor Stravinsky several hundred years later. His music contains wild gesticulations and abrupt surprises, and contemporary Renaissance scholars now regard him as perhaps the most forward-thinking, expressive, and sensual composer of his time. Consumed by guilt after murdering his wife, Gesualdo devoted himself to composing church music. At the centerpiece of this program is the Tenebrae Responses for Holy Saturday, part of the liturgy for the final three days of Holy Week. Works by other “maverick” Renaissance composers round out the program; complete details at www.ums.org.

17 \ 8 pm

Sweet Honey In The Rock focuses on music that challenges, inspires, teaches, encourages, and empowers audiences from all walks of life to become interested and involved in issues that are central to their lives. For over three decades, Sweet Honey In The Rock has celebrated our collective humanity, singing about the challenging issues of racism; social, economic, and environmental injustice; equal rights; and the greed that seems to be pulling our nation apart. The group has built a distinguished legacy as one of the most celebrated ambassadors of a cappella music, fusing five scintillating and soulful voices with the texture, harmonic blend, and raw quality that is indigenous and true to authentic a cappella music. They take audiences on journeys that span centuries of African-American history and culture — sound journeys that nurture and heal. In the tradition of artists in action — this is the group that sang at the rally when the University of Michigan defended its affirmative action position before the Supreme Court — Sweet Honey taps the spirit, encourages audiences to think, asks them to reflect, and inspires them to make a difference in their communities. Sign language interpreted. Sponsored by

Media Partners Metro Times, Between the Lines, and WEMU 89.1 FM.

Media Partners WRCJ 90.9 FM and WDET 101.9 FM.

www.ums.org

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FAR

Random Dance

Wayne McGregor artistic director Saturday \ February Power Center

18 \

8 pm

“If any artist has defined the decade, it’s Wayne McGregor.” (The Times, London) Random Dance was founded in 1992 and became the instrument upon which McGregor evolved his drastically fast and articulate choreographic style. The company became a byword for its radical approach to new technology, incorporating animation, digital film, 3-D architecture, electronic sound, and virtual dancers into the live choreography. McGregor, an award-winning British dancemaker who serves as resident choreographer of The Royal Ballet, Covent Garden, is renowned for his physically taxing movement style and ground-breaking collaborations across dance, film, music, visual art, and science. Specifically, he researches the relationship between dance and the mind as artist-in-residence at the Department of Experimental Psychology at the University of Cambridge. Wayne McGregor is “doing some of the most exciting work in ballet on the planet.” (The New York Times) Media Partners Metro Times, Between the Lines, and WDET 101.9 FM.


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Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra with Wynton Marsalis Wednesday \ February Hill Auditorium

22 \

7:30 pm

The February 2010 snowstorm was about the only thing that could keep Wynton Marsalis and the Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra away from Ann Arbor! Wynton Marsalis stands in a league all his own. A creative genius, compassionate humanitarian, legendary trumpeter, masterful composer, arts advocate, tireless educator, and cultural leader, he inspires and uplifts people through superb music-making. His first trumpet came from Al Hirt at age 6, though it took a few years for interest in the instrument to stick. Now, more than 40 years later, he is best known as the leader of the 15-member Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra. Despite one of the most aggressive touring schedules in the business, JLCO makes each concert fresh, drawing in audiences who are continually energized and amazed by the group’s depth of outrageous talent. “The audience was weak from applauding and shouting and jumping up and down with the joy of the great music it had heard.” (El Universal/The Herald) Media Partners WEMU 89.1 FM, Metro Times, The Michigan Chronicle, Detroit Jewish News, and Ann Arbor’s 107one.

www.ums.org

Hagen Quartet

Thursday \ February Rackham Auditorium

23 \ 7:30 pm

“Their performance was filled with subtlety and wonder… the playing was breathtaking in its precision, dynamism, and agility…a thrilling encounter.” (The Independent) Regarded internationally as one of the foremost string quartets of the day, the Hagen Quartet consists of the two brothers Lukas (violin) and Clemens (cello) and their sister Veronika Hagen (viola), along with violinist Rainer Schmidt, who has been with the group for more than 20 years. For this return performance — they last appeared in Ann Arbor in 1998 — the Hagen Quartet presents a program of Beethoven quartets as part of UMS’s focus on musical renegades. Program

Beethoven Beethoven Beethoven

String Quartet in F Major, Op. 18, No. 1 (1801) String Quartet in f minor, Op. 95 (1810) String Quartet in E-flat Major, Op. 74 (1809)

Media Partners WGTE 91.3 FM and WDET 101.9 FM.

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Berlin Nocturne

Max Raabe & Palast Orchester

Saturday \ March Hill Auditorium

10 \ 8 pm

“Max Raabe and his 12-piece Palast Orchester are re-creating the music of the Weimar era with verve and class.” (Time Out New York) A nostalgic homage to the legendary nocturnal flair of the Weimar Era, Max Raabe and Palast Orchester embodies the high style and music glory of the 1920s and 1930s. The debonair Raabe has a singular ability to capture the cunning rasp of the cabaret singer, the confident bel canto hero, the oily melodiousness of the revue beau, the carefree timbre of early jazz, and the falsetto of ragtime, all backed by his stellar 12-member band. His art lies in revealing the enigmatic intelligence, ambiguity, musical power and complexity of the “German chansons” from the turbulent Weimar Republic — and then shaking it up with a completely unexpected cover from the contemporary pop realm. In his amazing and simply fun performances, he keenly reminds us that between melancholy and irony, rebellion and resignation, elegy and slapstick, there is often only half a measure, sometimes just a single note, or a mere word. Max Raabe and Palast Orchester will surely “disarm and charm with impeccable glamour.” (The Boston Globe) “Fascinating. A born crooner.” (The Washington Post) Sponsored by

Media Partner Michigan Radio 91.7 FM.

Denis Matsuev

Thursday \ March Hill Auditorium

piano

15 \ 7:30 pm

Anyone who attended last season’s concert by the Mariinsky Orchestra came away talking about one thing: the astonishing piano soloist Denis Matsuev, whose extraordinary performance of Rachmaninoff’s Third Piano Concerto had the audience buzzing in the lobby at intermission, immediately after the performance, and for weeks beyond the concert hall. UMS immediately pursued a date for a solo recital and is pleased to deliver what is sure to be one of the most talked-about events of the season. “[The] Russian pianist Denis Matsuev brought …legendary Herculean strength and terrifying technique that Rachmaninoff and his famous octaveand-a-half hand span was said to have embodied. Matsuev was up to the task. Not only did he throw down thunderous octaves and navigate flurries of notes and trills, he had the endurance to consider the greater picture of the work at all times…It was a performance of formidable dexterity and structural clarity.” (Pittsburgh) Program

Tchaikovsky Rachmaninoff Scriabin Tchaikovsky Stravinsky

Seasons (1875-76) Prelude in g minor, Op.23, No. 5 (1903) Prelude in g-sharp minor, Op. 32, No. 12 (1910) Etude-Tableaux in a minor, Op. 39, No. 6 (1916) Etude in c-sharp minor, Op. 2 (1887) Etude in d-sharp minor, Op. 8, No. 12 (1894) “Dumka” (1886) Three Movements from Petrouchka (1921)

Sponsored by the Catherine S. Arcure and Herbert E. Sloan Endowment Fund. Media Partner WGTE 91.3 FM.


Choose at least five events from pages 26-50 and save 10%.

The Andersen Project

Ex Machina

Written and directed by Robert Starring Yves Jacques

Lepage

Thursday \ March 15 \ 7:30 pm Friday \ March 16 \ 8 pm Saturday \ March 17 \ 8 pm Power Center

Filled to the brim with his trademark humor and visual and technological brilliance, this off-the-wall masterpiece by Canadian theater visionary Robert Lepage stars Yves Jacques (Far Side of the Moon) in a one-man tour-de-force about a Canadian writer from the rock-and-roll milieu who is unexpectedly commissioned by the Opera Garnier in Paris to write a libretto for a children’s opera. Arriving in Paris, he finds that his living quarters for the next three months, which he acquired through an apartment swap with a friend, are in a building that is also home to a peep show in the city’s red light district. Freely inspired by the timeless fables written by Hans Christian Andersen who, as it turns out, didn’t really like children, as well as anecdotes from his personal diaries, The Andersen Project keenly explores unraveling relationships, personal demons, the thirst for recognition, and compromise that comes too late. The piece was commissioned by the Danish government in 2005 to mark the bicentennial of the birth of that country’s most beloved writer. “A theatrical conjurer, whose dazzling shows have captivated audiences around the world with their mixture of storytelling and stunning imagery.” (Guardian, London, on Robert Lepage) Content appropriate for mature audiences only. Performed in English and French (with projected titles). A strobe light is used in this performance. Media Partners Michigan Radio 91.7 FM, Between the Lines, WDET 101.9 FM and Ann Arbor’s 107one.

www.ums.org

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American Mavericks

San Francisco Symphony Michael Tilson Thomas conductor

Four Different Programs in Hill Auditorium and Rackham Auditorium Featuring:

Paul Jacobs organ Jeremy Denk piano Mason Bates laptop Thursday

\ March 22 \

7:30 pm

Jessye Norman soprano Meredith Monk and Joan La Barbara vocalists St. Lawrence String Quartet Friday

\ March 23 \

8 pm

Emanuel Ax piano Saturday

\ March 24 \ 8 pm

As part of its centennial season, Michael Tilson Thomas and the San Francisco Symphony will present its second American Mavericks Festival, which will tour to only two US venues: Hill Auditorium and Carnegie Hall. The 2012 festival celebrates the creative pioneering spirit and the composers who created a new American musical voice for the 20th century and beyond. These concerts will examine the music of iconoclastic, revolutionary composers championed by MTT and the SFS, such as John Cage, Morton Feldman, Carl Ruggles, Edgard Varèse, and Charles Ives, and expand the maverick roster through two commissions by Bay Area composers John Adams and Mason Bates. Concerts will feature performances by longtime SFS collaborators Jessye Norman, Emanuel Ax, Meredith Monk, Jeremy Denk, and the St. Lawrence String Quartet, among others.

Program 1 (Thurs 3/22 at 7:30 pm)

Aaron Copland Henry Cowell Mason Bates Lou Harrison

Orchestral Variations (1930, orchestrated in 1957) Piano Concerto (1928) Mass Transmission (2010) Concerto for Organ with Percussion Orchestra (1973)

Program 2 (Fri 3/23 at 8 pm)

Henry Cowell John Adams John Cage Edgard Varèse

Synchrony (1929-30) Absolute Jest (2011) John Cage Songbooks (1970) Amériques (1918-21, revised 1927)

Program 3 (Sat 3/24 at 8 pm)

Carl Ruggles Morton Feldman Charles Ives

Sun-Treader (1931) Piano and Orchestra (1975) A Concord Symphony (1916-19 for piano;

orchestration by Henry Brant premiered1995)

The San Francisco Symphony residency is made possible with support from the Maxine and Stuart Frankel Foundation and the UMS Creative Ventures Leadership Fund. Please see page 56 for more information. Related education programs are funded by the John S. and James L. Knight Foundation. Media Partners WGTE 91.3 FM, Ann Arbor’s 107one, WDET 101.9 FM, and Detroit Jewish News.


Choose at least five events from pages 26-50 and save 10%.

San Francisco Symphony Mavericks Chamber Concert Michael Tilson Thomas conductor Meredith Monk and Joan La Barbara vocalists Sunday \ March 25 Rackham Auditorium

\

4 pm

This final concert of the four-concert American Mavericks residency features 17 musicians from the San Francisco Symphony performing chamber music. American mavericks explored every sound that a full orchestra could make, but they also composed fascinating, and invigorating, chamber music. This concert features intriguing chamber works from composers whose music will shape the decades to come. Program

Meredith Monk Lukas Foss Morton Subotnick Del Tredici

New Work (commissioned for this program) Echoi (1963) From Jacob’s Room (1985) Syzygy (1966)

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Zakir Hussain and Master Musicians of India Zakir Hussain tabla Fazal Qureshi tabla and kanjira Rakesh Chaurasia bansuri Dilshad Khan sarangi Navin Sharma dholak Abbos Kosimov doyra Meitei Pung Cholom Performing Troupe (dancing drummers of Manipur) Thursday \ April Hill Auditorium

12 \

7:30 pm

Zakir Hussain is today appreciated both in the field of percussion and in the music world at large as an international phenomenon. His playing is marked by uncanny intuition and masterful improvisational dexterity, founded in formidable knowledge and study. The favorite accompanist of many of India’s greatest classical musicians and dancers, he has not let his genius rest there. Hussain is widely considered a chief architect of the contemporary world music movement, with many historic collaborations including Shakti, which he founded with John McLaughlin and L. Shankar in the early 1970s, Sangam with Charles Lloyd and Eric Harland, and recordings and performances with artists as diverse as George Harrison, Van Morrison, Rennie Harris, and the Kodo Drummers of Japan. For this return appearance, he performs with a host of Indian classical music greats, topped off by the dancing drummers of Manipur. Hosted by Rani Kotha and Dr. Howard Hu. Media Partners WEMU 89.1 FM, Ann Arbor’s 107one, and Metro Times.


Choose at least five events from pages 26-50 and save 10%.

Cheikh Lô

Friday \ April 13 Michigan Theater

\ 8 pm

Cheikh Lô is one of the great mavericks of African music. A superb singer and songwriter, as well as a distinctive guitarist and drummer, he has personalized and distilled a variety of influences from West and Central Africa to create a style that is uniquely his own. Lô dedicates both his life and music to Bave Fall, a specifically Senegalese form of Islam and part of the larger Islamic brotherhood of Mouridism, which emerged at the end of the 19th century from opposition to French colonialism. Bave Fall is distinguished visually by patchwork clothes and long dreadlocks that lead some to confuse it with Rastafarianism. Born to Senegalese parents in Burkina Faso near the Malian border, Lô was interested in music from an early age, running away from school to teach himself guitar and percussion on borrowed instruments. As a teenager, he was influenced by Cuban music, which was all the rage in West Africa at the time. After emigrating to Paris and then returning to Senegal in the late 1980s, Lô attracted both the attention of and comparisons to Youssou N’Dour, who produced two of his early albums. His signature sound, based on the popular national mbalax style, was an instant success in Senegal and prompted rave reviews on his European tour: “a compelling performer with energy and personality to match that of the early Bob Marley.” (The Guardian, London) More recently, Lô has immersed himself in the Dakar scene, and his return home is reflected in his new album, Jamm. His signature blend of semi-acoustic flavors — West and Central African, funk, Cuban, flamenco — has been distilled into his most mature, focused, yet diverse statement today, with his husky, sensual voice sounding better than ever. Media Partners WEMU 89.1 FM and The Michigan Chronicle.

www.ums.org

Charles Lloyd Quartet Charles Lloyd saxophones and flute Jason Moran piano Reuben Rogers bass Eric Harland drums Saturday \ April 14 Michigan Theater

\

8 pm

Forty years ago, saxophonist Charles Lloyd was a pop star; his 1966 album, Forest Flower, sold a million copies. Four years ago, at 69, when most individuals are thinking of ways to slow down and kick back, Lloyd shifted to a higher gear and formed a new quartet. Lloyd has always led exceptional bands, and this is perhaps the best. With MacArthur fellow Jason Moran on piano, Reuben Rogers on bass, and Eric Harland on drums, the Quartet’s concerts are events of pristine beauty and elegance, full of intensely-felt emotion and passion that touch deep inside the heart. This is not entertainment, but the powerful uncorrupted expression of beauty through music. Lloyd’s latest release, Mirrors, “sees him attaining jazz nirvana, calling numbers that channel his love of Monk, eastern spiritualism, California, and traditional gospel music. Listening is like a meditation, and the sparse, taut accompaniment of the quartet keeps everything in focus.” (Jazz Choice) Media Partners WEMU 89.1 FM, Metro Times, The Michigan Chronicle, and Ann Arbor’s 107one.

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Choose at least five events from pages 26-50 and save 10%.

Snow White

Ballet Preljocaj

Angelin Preljocaj artistic director John Paul Gaultier costume designer

Pavel Haas Quartet Wednesday \ April 18 \ 7:30 pm Rackham Auditorium

Thursday \ April 19 \ 7:30 pm Friday \ April 20 \ 8 pm Saturday \ April 21 \ 8 pm Power Center

Tchaikovsky Quartet No. 1 in D Major, Op. 11 (1871) Pavel Haas Quartet No. 2, Op. 7 (“From the Monkey Mountains”) (1925) Smetana Quartet No. 1 in e minor (“From My Life”) (1876)

It’s been more than a decade since Ballet Preljocaj (pronounced prezh-oh-kahzh) made its UMS debut, but this production of Snow White, created in 2008, will be well worth the wait. Angelin Preljocaj has created a work for all 26 dancers of his company, setting the Grimm brothers’ version of the fairytale to the most beautiful scores of Gustav Mahler’s symphonies for this contemporary ballet. With costumes designed by Jean Paul Gaultier, this production of Snow White is sure to shake up those who have grown up with only the Disney version at their disposal. “I was very keen to tell a story, offer something magical and enchanted,” says Preljocaj. At the same time, he approaches Snow White’s stepmother, the Queen, as the centerpiece of the story, representing the conflict of her own longing to be desirable and seductive while watching her daughter grow up.

Media Partner WGTE 91.3 FM.

Sponsored by Gil Omenn and Martha Darling.

“The world’s most exciting string quartet? Well, they suit the tagline better than most. Their tone is large, quasi-orchestral. They take risks. Above all, they play with passion.” (The Times, London) Based in Prague, the Pavel Haas Quartet is named for Czech composer Pavel Haas, who was imprisoned at Theresienstadt and died at Auschwitz in 1944. While the Quartet is passionately committed to the Czech repertoire, and particularly the three wonderful string quartets that Haas composed, all their performances receive extraordinary acclaim. “In a class of their own…” (The Strad) Program

Media Partners Metro Times and Between the Lines.


Subscribing to a UMS series can simplify and enhance your quality of life:  Personal Fulfillment. UMS takes you to a place where the imagination is thriving, where you can schedule your personal escape to maintain balance in your life. A UMS series allows you to invest in yourself while supporting the quality of life in our community.  Value. Free ticket exchanges up to 48 hours before a performance, discounts of up to 19%, and the first crack at the best seats in the house! What’s not to love about that?  Building Relationships. Create memories with people who are important to you, whether attending together or meeting up at the performance.  Discovery. Take a chance and discover new artists, new art forms, and new ideas.

Plus…Subscribers Receive Great Benefits!  Installment Billing. Your order of $300 or more placed by Friday, June 25 qualifies for installment billing (credit card only, charged in three equal increments when the order is received, the first week in July, and the first week in August).  Free Parking. Subscribers who order at least 8 events receive free parking in the Power Center structure (Fletcher Street), a close walk to all performance venues. Make sure to check the box on the order form if you wish to take advantage of this opportunity.  Free Ticket Exchanges. Up to 48 hours prior to the performance. See page 61 for more details.

There are two types of UMS subscribers: Fixed Package Subscribers subscribe to the packages that we’ve created on pages 6-25 of this brochure. They are generally programmed by genre. Plus, if you want to add on performances from the Monogram Series, you’ll get a 10% discount on each Monogram Series ticket, regardless of the number of events purchased! Monogram Subscribers create their own package of at least five events from those listed on pages 26-50. You become the programmer and curate your own season, customized to your interests! A Note About Single Tickets. As a subscriber, you may order tickets now to ANY event in our season. Non-subscribers must wait until Monday, August 22. UMS Donors ($250+ annually) may purchase tickets to individual events beginning Monday, August 15.

www.ums.org

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another


Blockbusters

At UMS, we try to make sure that the events on our season offer a chance to experience something new, to look at the world through a different lens, or even to change our very lives. To that end, we offer another way to think about the events on our season — transcending the genre-based groupings of the fixed series offered throughout this brochure. While these groupings are not offered as specific series options, they are intended to provide you with another way of looking at the events in this brochure and may be helpful to you as you build your personal 11/12 season.

John Malkovich and Musica Angelica Baroque Orchestra Sat, Oct 1 The Infernal Comedy: Confessions of a Serial Killer Sat, Oct 15 Goran Bregovic and His Wedding and Funeral Orchestra Audra McDonald Fri, Nov 4 A Night in Treme: The Musical Majesty of New Orleans Fri, Nov 11 Canadian Brass Sun, Nov 27 Fri, Feb 17 Sweet Honey In The Rock Wed, Feb 22 Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra with Wynton Marsalis Chicago Symphony Orchestra Fri, Mar 9 Riccardo Muti conductor Max Raabe & Palast Orchester Sat, Mar 10 Joshua Bell violin with Academy of St. Martin in the Fields Sun, Apr 22

Expect the Unexpected

John Malkovich and Musica Angelica Baroque Orchestra Sat, Oct 1 The Infernal Comedy: Confessions of a Serial Killer Fri-Sat, Oct 21-22 Cloud Gate Dance Theatre Thu-Sat, Oct 27-29 Gate Theatre of Dublin: Beckett’s Endgame and Watt Apollo’s Fire with Philippe Jaroussky countertenor Thu, Nov 3 AnDa Union Wed, Nov 9 Einstein on the Beach Fri-Sun, Jan 20-22 Sun, Jan 29 Hamburg State Symphony Messiaen’s From the Canyons to the Stars Random Dance Sat, Feb 18 Sat, Mar 10 Max Raabe & Palast Orchester Robert Lepage’s The Andersen Project Thu-Sat, Mar 15-17 Ballet Preljocaj: Snow White Thu-Sat, Apr 19-21

Comfort Music

Emerson String Quartet Mark Morris Dance Group Yuja Wang piano Les Violons du Roy with Maurice Steger recorder Sabine Meyer and the Trio di Clarone Hagen Quartet Chicago Symphony Orchestra Riccardo Muti conductor Denis Matsuev piano Pavel Haas Quartet Joshua Bell with Academy of St. Martin in the Fields

Remixed

John Malkovich and Musica Angelica Baroque Orchestra The Infernal Comedy: Confessions of a Serial Killer Einstein on the Beach Hamburg State Symphony Messiaen’s From the Canyons to the Stars Max Raabe & Palast Orchester Robert Lepage’s The Andersen Project Ballet Preljocaj: Snow White

Debut/Discovery

Goran Bregovic and His Wedding and Funeral Orchestra Cloud Gate Dance Theatre Apollo’s Fire with Philippe Jaroussky countertenor Diego El Cigala Beijing Guitar Duo Janine Jansen violin (with London Philharmonic) Maurice Steger recorder (with Les Violons du Roy) Max Raabe & Palast Orchester Cheikh Lô Pavel Haas Quartet

www.ums.org

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Sun, Sep 18 Fri-Sat, Sep 23-24 Sun, Oct 9 Sat, Jan 28 Sat, Feb 4 Thu, Feb 23 Fri, Mar 9 Thu, Mar 15 Wed, Apr 18 Sun, Apr 22 Sat, Oct 1 Fri-Sun, Jan 20-22 Sun, Jan 29 Sat, Mar 10 Thu-Sat, Mar 15-17 Thu-Sat, Apr 19-21 Sat, Oct 15 Fri-Sat, Oct 21-22 Thu, Nov 3 Sat, Nov 5 Sun, Nov 20 Tue, Dec 6 Sat, Jan 28 Sat, Mar 10 Fri, Apr 13 Wed, Apr 18


UMS Family Programs are made possible by

Family-Friendly UMS Performances While parents are the best judge of their own children’s age appropriateness for UMS events, we offer these recommendations to guide you through our season. If in doubt, feel free to contact the UMS Ticket Office, who will be happy to put you in touch with a staff member with children to discuss whether an event might be appropriate for your family.

UMS Kids Club Open to students in grades 3-12 and encompassing the entire UMS season, the UMS Kids Club allows families to purchase up to two kids’ tickets for $10 each with the purchase of at least one adult ticket for $20 beginning two weeks before the performance (opening night for multipleperformance runs). Seating is subject to availability and ticket office discretion. UMS will reserve a limited number of seats (no fewer than 30) for each performance (opening night for multipleperformance runs) — even those that sell out! Check out our recommendations to create some great memories for your family.

Ages 8 and up (3rd grade) Goran Bregovic and His Wedding and Funeral Orchestra AnDa Union A Night in Treme: The Musical Majesty of New Orleans Canadian Brass Chamber Ensemble of the Shanghai Chinese Orchestra Sweet Honey In The Rock Zakir Hussain and Master Musicians of India Ages 12 and up (middle school) Mark Morris Dance Group Yuja Wang piano Les Violons du Roy with Maurice Steger recorder Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra with Wynton Marsalis

Sat, Oct 15 Wed, Nov 9 Fri, Nov 11 Sun, Nov 27 Fri, Feb 10 Fri, Feb 17 Thu, Apr 12

Fri-Sat, Sep 23-24 Sun, Oct 9 Sat, Jan 28 Wed, Feb 22

Ages 14 and up (high school) Cloud Gate Dance Theatre Fri-Sat, Oct 21-22 Audra McDonald Fri, Nov 4 Hamburg State Symphony Sun, Jan 29 Messiaen’s From the Canyons to the Stars Chicago Symphony Orchestra Fri, Mar 9 Cheikh Lô Fri, Apr 13 Ballet Preljocaj: Snow White Thu-Sat, Apr 19-21


UMS education programs provide engaging experiences with arts, culture, and creativity for the entire southeastern Michigan community. As part of UMS’s mission and core values, we are committed to sustaining these efforts for generations to come.

www.ums.org/education Adult & Community Engagement 734-615-4077  umsed@umich.edu

Youth, Teen, and Family Program 734-615-0122  umsyouth@umich.edu

Each year, the UMS Youth Education Program serves up to 25,000 schoolchildren, parents, and educators in southeastern Michigan, giving many students their first opportunities to experience the live performing arts. UMS is proud to have one of the largest series of diverse, artisticallydriven youth performances in the state. The performances, extensive teacher training and curriculum development, and a yearly teen-led performance (Breakin’ Curfew), comprise the award-winning program, designated as a “Best Practice” in 2004 by ArtServe Michigan and the Dana Foundation. The UMS Youth Education and Community Engagement Program is enhanced by official partnerships with the Ann Arbor Public Schools, Washtenaw Intermediate School District, the Kennedy Center Partners in Education Program, Neutral Zone, and many other area youth and family organizations. The Youth Education series is sponsored by The Esperance Family Foundation.

The UMS Adult Education and Community Engagement Program reaches diverse audiences through a wide variety of educational programs. UMS works with many regional, local, and university-based partners each season to launch initiatives to engage audiences in the arts, with programs for students, young professionals, and Arab American, African/African American, Mexican/Latino, Asian, and Detroit-based communities, among others. UMS is proud of its educational and residency programs, all designed to help increase access and deepen participation in the arts in our community. Through artist interviews, panel discussions, symposia, social receptions, workshops, and informal dialogues, UMS creates a rich assortment of value-added programs. Over 100 events each season inspire creativity, enhance knowledge, promote connections with friends and family, and inform each audience member’s individual experience with the arts.

Peter Riegelbauer, bass player with the Berlin Philharmonic and the Scharoun Ensemble Berlin, leads a master class at the U-M School of Music, Theater & Dance. Photo by Mark Gjukich.

www.ums.org

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you make it

Ticket sales cover just half the cost of presenting the very best in world-class music, dance and theater, as well as a wide array of education programs for audiences of all ages. Your gift, of any amount, will help to make the UMS season possible. Please consider making a contribution to support the fabulous programming you enjoy each season. In recognition of their contributions, annual donors of all levels are eligible for a variety of benefits, from advance ticket purchases to complimentary valet parking and First Night Green Room events at higher levels.

The UMS Creative Ventures Leadership Fund The creation of a permanent fund for artistic, innovative, and cutting edge programming is a major goal of the UMS Strategic Plan. By embracing innovation in our programming, we will provide unique, creative, and transformative educational opportunities for U-M students, and place Ann Arbor on the map as a cultural destination. UMS patrons and donors Maxine and Stuart Frankel have established the UMS Creative Ventures Leadership Fund to help make this goal a reality. In addition, the University of Michigan is joining with UMS and the Frankels to bring, from around the world, the very best in the performing arts. This season, the Fund will support the American Mavericks Festival by Michael Tilson Thomas and the San Francisco Symphony, a four-day residency highlighting groundbreaking American composers from the 20th century. The residency includes three performances by the San Francisco Symphony, a chamber concert, and a host of educational opportunities that will only take place in San Francisco, Ann Arbor, and New York. You can join the Frankels in support of innovative and transformative programming. Please call UMS Development Director Susan McClanahan at 734-647-1177 for more information. Maxine and Stuart Frankel.


images from

Conductor Masaaki Suzuki greets concert sponsors backstage after the Bach Collegium Japan performance of Bach’s Mass in b minor on March 25, 2011, two weeks after the 9.0 earthquake that devastated Japan. UMS donated half of the proceeds of all ticket sales for the eight days preceding the concert to the American Red Cross Japan Earthquake and Pacific Tsunami Relief Fund, raising $9,486. The Bach Collegium Japan’s manager made a personal contribution to the efforts, allowing UMS to send $10,000 to the American Red Cross.

Members of the Cleveland Orchestra took advantage of a “snow day” in Ann Arbor to perform chamber music at an informal jam session hosted by Classical Revolution Ann Arbor at Silvio’s on North University Avenue. Orchestra members borrowed music, stands, and in some cases, instruments, performing a variety of chamber music with students and amateur musicians. One of the highlights of the evening was piano soloist Pierre-Laurent Aimard, who played the Schumann Piano Concerto at the Hill Auditorium concert the night before, sitting down at an old upright piano with three others to play Brahms’s g-minor piano quartet.

As part of its 10/11 focus on Play and Creativity, UMS audience members had the opportunity to play some new instruments in the mezzanine lobby at Hill Auditorium before Vladimir Feltsman’s recital.s

Each summer, the UMS Choral Union hosts three “Summer Sings” events, where anyone in the community is invited to spend a Monday night singing great choral music and socializing with other amateur musicians. These events have grown in popularity over the past 17 years, drawing hundreds of people looking for an opportunity to sing large choral works with prominent choral conductors. The 2011 Summer Sings dates and repertoire will be announced in late May.

Michael Tilson Thomas, music director of the San Francisco Symphony, looks on during a conducting master class at the U-M School of Music, Theater & Dance in March 2010. www.ums.org

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Detailed seat maps are available on our website at www.ums.org/tickets/seat_maps.asp

Hill Auditorium 825 North University Avenue Map 1 Orchestras

Map 2 Classical Recitals & Jazz/World BALCONY

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Hill Auditorium (H3) Ahmad Jamal Sat Sept 17 Goran Bregovic/Wedding & Funeral Sat Oct 15 A Night in Treme Fri Nov 11 Max Raabe Sat Mar 10

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Hill Auditorium (H1) John Malkovich/Musica Angelica Apollo’s Fire Handel’s Messiah London Philharmonic Hamburg State Symphony/Messiaen Chicago Symphony/Muti San Francisco Symphony Mavericks Joshua Bell/Academy of St. Martin

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Sat Oct 1 Thu Nov 3 Sat-Sun Dec 3-4 Tue Dec 6 Sun Jan 29 Fri Mar 9 Thu-Sat Mar 22-24 Sun Apr 22

Hill Auditorium (H2) Yuja Wang Audra McDonald Canadian Brass Sweet Honey In The Rock Jazz at Lincoln Center/Marsalis Denis Matsuev Zakir Hussain and Master Musicians

Sun Oct 9 Fri Nov 4 Sun Nov 27 Fri Feb 17 Wed Feb 22 Thu Mar 15 Thu Apr 12

Rackham Auditorium 915 East Washington Street

Pricing Pricing scheme applies to all venues.

General Admission Venues

Price Level Gold

St. Francis of Assisi (SF) 2250 East Stadium Boulevard State Symphony Capella of Russia Thu Oct 13 Schola Cantorum de Venezuela Thu Oct 27 The Tallis Scholars Thu Feb 16

Price Level (A)

St. Andrew’s Episcopal Church (SA) 306 North Division Avenue Stile Antico Wed Dec 7

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Rackham Auditorium (R) Emerson String Quartet St. Lawrence String Quartet Beijing Guitar Duo/Barrueco Les Violons du Roy/Steger Sabine Meyer/Trio di Clarone Shanghai Chinese Chamber Ensemble Hagen Quartet San Francisco Symphony Chamber Pavel Haas Quartet

Sun Sept 18 Sat Nov 12 Sun Nov 20 Sat Jan 28 Sat Feb 4 Fri Feb 10 Thu Feb 23 Sun Mar 25 Wed Apr 18


Helpful Tips for a Hassle-Free Performance Start Time and Latecomers UMS makes every effort to begin concerts at the published start time. Latecomers will be asked to wait in the lobby and will be seated by ushers at a predetermined time in the program. The late seating break is determined by the artists and will generally occur during a suitable break in the program, designed to cause as little disruption to other patrons and the artists on stage as possible. Please allow extra time to park and find your seats.

Michigan Theater 603 East Liberty Street

NOTE: Beginning with the 11/12 season, all MondayThursday performances will begin at 7:30 pm. Also please be advised that dance and theater performances often have a “no late seating” policy. UMS often doesn’t learn a specific company’s late seating policy until a couple of weeks before the performance and makes every effort to contact ticketbuyers via e-mail if there will be no late seating.

BALCONY

MAIN FLOOR

Access for People with Disabilities Accessible parking is provided in University of Michigan parking structures for those with a state-issued disability permit or a U-M handicap verification permit. There is a drop-off area near Hill Auditorium and Rackham Auditorium, and inside the Power Center structure. For more information, please contact the UMS Ticket Office at 734-764-2538.

A

All UMS venues have barrier-free entrances for persons with disabilities. Patrons with disabilities or special seating needs should notify the UMS Ticket Office of those needs at the time of ticket purchase. UMS will make every effort to accommodate special needs brought to our attention at the performance, but requests that these arrangements be made in advance, if at all possible.

STAGE

Michigan Theater (MT) Diego El Cigala AnDa Union Cheikh Lô Charles Lloyd Quartet

Sat Nov 5 Wed Nov 9 Fri Apr 13 Sat Apr 14

Seating spaces for wheelchair users and their companions are located throughout each venue, and ushers are available to assist patrons, if needed. Please explain to the usher how best to assist you. Assistive listening devices are available in Hill Auditorium, Rackham Auditorium, and the Power Center. Earphones may be obtained upon arrival. Please ask an usher for assistance. Parking/Parking Tips Detailed directions and parking information will be mailed with your tickets and are also available at www.ums.org/parking.

Power Center 121 Fletcher Street BALCONY Sec 7

Smoke-Free University As of July 1, 2011, the smoking of tobacco will no longer be permitted on the grounds of the University of Michigan, including the exteriors of U-M theaters and concert halls. Smoking will be allowed on sidewalks adjacent to public roads.

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Sec 8

Sec 3 Sec 2

Sec 4 Sec 5

Sec 1 STAGE

Power Center (P) Mark Morris Dance Group Cloud Gate Dance Theatre Gate Theatre of Dublin/Endgame and Watt Einstein on the Beach Random Dance Robert Lepage/The Andersen Project Ballet Preljocaj/Snow White

Fri-Sat Sept 23-24 Fri-Sat Oct 21-22 Thu-Sat Oct 27-29 Fri-Sun Jan 20-22 Sat Feb 18 Thu-Sat Mar 15-17 Thu-Sat Apr 19-21

www.ums.org

Children and Families Children under the age of three will not be admitted to regular UMS performances. All children attending UMS performances must be able to sit quietly in their own seats without disturbing other patrons, or they may be asked to leave the auditorium. Please use discretion when choosing to bring a child, and remember that everyone must have a ticket, regardless of age. See page 54 for information about UMS’s Family-Friendly performances and the UMS Kids Club program for students in third grade and older.

58 | 59

734-764-2538


How to Order Phone

In Person

Mail

With Visa, MasterCard, Discover, or American Express

Please visit the Ticket Office on the north end of the Michigan League building (911 North University Avenue). The Ticket Office also sells tickets for all U-M School of Music, Theatre & Dance productions and the Ann Arbor Summer Festival.

UMS Ticket Office Burton Memorial Tower 881 North University Avenue Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1011

734-764-2538

Outside the 734 area code and within Michigan, call toll-free 800-221-1229.

Internet

www.ums.org

Fax 734-647-1171

Subscription Tickets/Seating Priority Subscription tickets will be mailed in mid-August.

There is an $8 service charge for all subscription orders.

Donors Donors of at least $2,500 annually receive the highest priority seating based on level of giving for fixed series and Monogram packages. Donations may be included with your ticket order. Ticket orders must be received by Friday, June 3, 2011 to be eligible for seating priority. Within each subscription category below, annual donations of $1,000or more receive special consideration for seating. Fixed Series Fixed series subscribers (for packages listed on pages 6-25 of this brochure) receive priority before Monogram Series subscribers and individual event purchasers. Subscriptions will be filled by series, in the order received. Monogram Series Monogram subscribers (those who choose at least five events from pages 26-50 of this brochure) will receive priority before individual event purchasers. Subscriptions will be filled in the order received and must be received by Friday, August 19, 2011.

Groups of 10 or More Groups of 10 or more people attending a single event will receive priority over individual event purchasers and save 15-25% off the regular ticket prices to most performances. For more information, contact the UMS Group Sales Office at 734-763-3100 or umsgroupsales@umich.edu. UMS accepts group reservations beginning Monday, July 18, a full month before tickets to individual events go on sale to the general public. Plan early to guarantee access to great seats!

Summer Hours: 10 am to 5 pm Mon-Fri Closed Sat and Sun. Extended hours resume after Labor Day.

Don’t Miss These Important Dates! Wed May 4

Priority Period Begins for Renewing Subscribers and UMS Donors

Mon May 9

Subscription Packages Available to General Public

Fri June 3

Deadline for U-M Payroll Deduction

Seating Priority Deadline for Donors and Renewing Subscribers Fri June 24

Deadline for Installment Billing and Free Parking Options

Mon July 18

Group Sales Reservations Open

Mon Aug 15

Donor Single Ticket Day (for donors of $250+)

Fri Aug 19

Last Day to Order Monogram Series

Mon Aug 22

Internet Sales Begin

Wed Aug 24

Single Ticket Day – all tickets to individual events on sale by phone and in person

Fri Sep 17

Last Day to Order UMS Fixed Package Series

PHOTO CREDITS \\ Cover/Back Cover: Cloud Gate Dance Theatre by Liu Chen-hsiang. Inside Front Cover: Messiaen’s From the Canyon to the Stars with film by Daniel Landau. Page 4: Ballet Preljocaj’s Snow White by JC Carbonne. Page 5: Goran Bregovic by Nebojsa Babic. Page 6: Joshua Bell by Marc Horn. Page 8: Messiaen’s From the Canyon to the Stars with film by Daniel Landau. Page 10: Gate Theatre of Dublin/ Endgame. Page 12: Emerson String Quartet by Lisa-Marie Mazzucco. Page 14: Ballet Preljocaj’s Snow White by JC Carbonne. Page 16: Christian Scott from A Night in Treme. Page 18: Stile Antico. Page 20: Random Dance. Page 22: AnDa Union. Page 24: Cheikh Lô. Pages 26-27: Ahmad Jamal by Frank Capri and John Malkovich/The Infernal Comedy by Olga Martschitsch. Pages 28-29: Yuja Wang, courtesy of Opus 3 Artists and Goran Bregovic by Nebojsa Babic. Pages 30-31: Cloud Gate Dance Theatre by Liu Chen-hsiang and Schola Cantorum de Venezuela. Pages 32-33: Audra McDonald by Michael Wilson and Diego El Cigala. Pages 34-35: AnDa Union and St. Lawrence String Quartet by Marco Borggreve. Pages 36-37: Beijing Guitar Duo by and Handel’s Messiah by Ken Fischer. Pages 38-39: Einstein on the Beach by T. Charles Erickson and Maurice Steger by Kasskara. Pages 40-41: Chamber Ensemble of the Shanghai Chinese Orchestra and Sweet Honey In The Rock. Pages 42-43: Random Dance by Ravi Deepres and Hagen Quartet by Harald Hoffmann. Pages 44-45: Max Raabe by Olaf Heine and Robert Lepage’s The Andersen Project by Emmanuelle Valette. Pages 46-47: San Francisco Symphony and Michael Tilson Thomas. Pages 48-49: Zakir Hussain by Susana Millman and Charles Lloyd Quartet. Page 50: Pavel Haas Quartet by Marco Borggreve. Page 52: Image from the HBO Series “A Night in Treme,” Property of Home Box Office, Inc. Page 54: Canadian Brass. Inside Back Cover: Mark Morris Dance Group.


Important Notes from the Ticket Office Join us in the Lobby! While UMS doesn’t present concerts during the summer, you can still join us in the lobby — the Virtual Lobby, that is! Visit www.umslobby.org throughout the summer to read our multimedia blog, visit the archives (which later this year will include access to the entire 132-year performance history of UMS, in addition to video and photographic reminiscences of concerts past), and conversation areas where you can both offer up your own observations or opinions and read those of others. Our regular website, www.ums.org, will remain an information hub; the Lobby is a place where you can engage more fully with all that UMS does, gaining access to the behind-the-scenes activities that keep us humming yearround. UMS is grateful to the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation for supporting the UMS Lobby initiative during the 10/11 and 11/12 seasons through its Continuing Innovation grant program.

UMS is Migrating to a New Ticketing System! On our wish list for the past five years (at least!) was a new ticketing system that allows us to better serve you, our loyal patrons. The moment has finally arrived! In early May, we will be converting to a new ticketing system, Tessitura, which was developed by the Metropolitan Opera and is now used by more than 340 performing arts organizations around the world. Many of the new features will be apparent as we move into the 11/12 season, including:  Select your own seat when ordering online for most performances, with more detailed venue maps  Manage your address, phone, and e-mail contact information online — at any time  Manage the communications you receive from UMS so that you get only those communications you desire  One-stop shopping — so you can take care of performances, special events, and donations in one transaction  And more to come... Please rest assured that we have been working hard over the past year to ensure that there will be no disruption to you — or your seats! — as we move forward. Over the summer, you will receive information about how to access your online account. Please make sure to include complete contact information on the order form when you place your subscription. www.ums.org

Please Make Sure We Have Your E-Mail Address on File! UMS regularly sends updated concert-related parking and late seating information via e-mail a few days before the event. Please be sure that the Ticket Office has your correct e-mail address on file. Ticket Exchanges Subscribers may exchange tickets free-of-charge up to 48 hours before the performance. Non-subscribers may exchange tickets for a $6 per ticket exchange fee. Exchanged tickets must be received by the Ticket Office (by mail or in person) at least 48 hours prior to the performance. You may fax a photocopy of your torn tickets to 734-647-1171, or e-mail a photo to umstix@umich.edu. The value of the ticket(s) may be applied to another performance or will be held as UMS Credit until the end of the 11/12 season. Credit must be redeemed by April 22, 2012. For information about exchanging tickets within 48 hours of the performance, please call the Ticket Office at 734-764-2538. Ticket Donations/Unused Tickets Unused tickets may be donated to UMS for a tax-deductible contribution until the published start time of the concert. Unused tickets that are returned after the performance are not eligible for UMS Credit or for a tax-deductible contribution. Refunds Due to the nature of the performing arts, programs and artists are subject to change. If an artist cancels an appearance, UMS will make every effort to substitute that performance with a comparable artist. Refunds will only be offered if a substitute cannot be found, or in the event of a date change. Handling fees are not refundable. UMS will not cancel performances or refund tickets because of inclement weather unless the University of Michigan’s Ann Arbor campus closes. An artist may choose to cancel a performance if weather prevents the artist’s arrival in Ann Arbor, but that decision rests with the artist and not with UMS. Ticket Mailing vs. Ticket Pick-Up Your subscription tickets will be mailed in mid-August, before tickets to individual performances go on sale to the general public. Any ticket orders received fewer than 10 days prior to the performance will be held at will-call, which opens in the performance venue 90 minutes prior to the published start time. Lost or Misplaced Tickets Call the Ticket Office at 734-764-2538 to have duplicate tickets waiting for you at the venue will-call. Duplicate tickets cannot be mailed.

60 | 61

734-764-2538


Special thanks to the following supporters: Arts at Michigan. Arts at Michigan provides programs and services that enable students to integrate arts and culture into their undergraduate experience at the University of Michigan. Association of Performing Arts Presenters. UMS is working with the U-M Health System over the 11/12 season on the Medical Arts Program, an initiative to help medical students and house officers become more effective and humane physicians through arts experiences. This program is supported in part by the Association of Performing Arts Presenters Creative Campus Innovations Grant program, funded by the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation. Doris Duke Charitable Foundation Endowment Fund. Special project support for several components of the 11/12 UMS season is provided by the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation Endowment Fund, established with a challenge grant from the Leading College and University Presenters Program at the Doris Duke Charitable Foundation. The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. Special project support for classical music offerings, as well as commissioning and associated residency activities, is provided by The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation as part of a multi-year grant to UMS. NEA Jazz Masters Live. The Ahmad Jamal performance is funded in part by NEA Jazz Masters live, a program of the National Endowment of the Arts in partnership with Arts Midwest. University of Michigan. The University of Michigan provides special project support for many activities in the 11/12 season through the U-M/ UMS Partnership Program. Additional support is provided by the University of Michigan Health System, the U-M Office of the Vice President for Research, the U-M Office of the Senior Vice Provost for Academic Affairs, the Confucius Institute, and many other individual academic units. Wallace Endowment Fund. Gate Theatre of Dublin is funded in part by the Wallace Endowment Fund, established with a challenge grant from the Wallace Foundation to build participation in arts programs.

Education Program Supporters Reflects gifts made during fiscal year 2011 as of March 15, 2011.

The Andrew W. Mellon Foundation University of Michigan Anonymous Arts at Michigan Arts Midwest’s Performing Arts Fund Association of Performing Arts Presenters Rachel Bendit and Mark Bernstein The Dan Cameron Family Foundation/Alan and Swanna Saltiel CFI Group Community Foundation for Southeast Michigan Doris Duke Charitable Foundation Doris Duke Charitable Foundation Endowment Fund DTE Energy Foundation The Esperance Family Foundation Jo-Anna and David Featherman Maxine and Stuart Frankel David and Phyllis Herzig Endowment Fund The Japan Foundation JazzNet Endowment W.K. Kellogg Foundation John S. and James L. Knight Foundation Rani Kotha and Howard Hu Mardi Gras Fund Masco Corporation Foundation Michigan Council for Arts and Cultural Affairs THE MOSAIC FOUNDATION [of R. & P. Heydon] National Dance Project of the New England Foundation for the Arts National Endowment for the Arts Sarah and Dan Nicoli Quincy and Rob Northrup Prudence and Amnon Rosenthal K-12 Education Endowment Fund Target Toyota UMS Advisory Committee University of Michigan Credit Union

11/12 Season Media Partner Media Partners

UMS is a member of the University of Michigan Public Goods Council, the Arts Alliance, and the Cultural Alliance of Southeastern Michigan.

The University of Michigan is an Equal Opportunity Employer and provides programs and services without regard to race, sex, color, religion, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, or disability.


133rd ums season Mailing Address UMS Ticket Office Burton Memorial Tower 881 North University Avenue Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1011

Order Form Tips to Help UMS Subscribers We’ve worked hard to make ordering tickets to the many events in the 11/12 season as easy as possible, but with literally thousands of possible combinations, we realize that it can be difficult. With that in mind, please consider these tips that will help you make your decisions for the 11/12 season, whether you are new to UMS or have been subscribing for years:

Have Questions? We’re Happy to Help!

Call the UMS Ticket Office at 734-764-2538 Outside the 734 area code and within Michigan, call toll-free 800-221-1229

Checklist

Please double check that you have completed the following before you mail in your order. Have you: Included daytime and evening phone numbers and e-mail addresses (to be used in case of concert cancellation or ticketing problem)? Signed and enclosed your check, or signed the credit card line in “Payment Information”? If you have ordered the Choral Union, Dance, Theater, or Asia Series, have you circled your preferred performance(s) on the order form for events with more than one performance? Filled out and included the entire order form (all six sides)? Please do not cut the order form before sending.

Mailing Information UMS Account Number (if known, can be found on the mail panel of this brochure above your name)

1. Look through the entire brochure and make a list of the events you are interested in seeing. 2. If you generally like events that are thematically linked (e.g., jazz, chamber music), you will likely be most interested in the fixed packages listed in Section 1 of the order form. Anyone who purchases a fixed package may purchase any number of Monogram Series events now and still receive priority seating over single ticket buyers. The 10% Monogram event discount is available to all fixed package subscribers. 3. If you prefer a variety of events, you will probably be most interested in the Monogram Series in Section 2. When you purchase at least 5 events, you may take 10% off the total price and still receive priority seating over single ticket buyers. You may purchase a different number of tickets to each event, so feel free to invite friends to join you for any or all of the performances in your series — but you must purchase at least 5 events to qualify for a Monogram Series! 4. When you purchase a fixed package OR a Monogram Series, you may also purchase tickets to any individual Choral Union, and Chamber Arts events now (see Section 3 of the order form). These tickets may be purchased for yourself or for your friends and family. Some of these performances are not included on the Monogram Series, so you can guarantee your seats for these concerts and plan your entire season of UMS events at once! Please note that there are no discounts for these events, unless they are purchased as part of another series. 5. PLEASE BE SURE TO FILL OUT ALL SIX PAGES OF THE ORDER FORM BEFORE YOU SEND IT IN. You may also call the Ticket Office for assistance if you have questions about which package makes the most sense for you. Don’t forget to include your prepaid parking passes to avoid hassles on the night of the performance, and to make your tax-deductible contribution to UMS.

Last Name

First Name

Address City

State

Zip

Day Phone Evening Phone E-Mail Address (for up-to-date info on parking, start times, intermissions, program changes, etc.) Tickets will be mailed to the address provided above in early to mid-August. If you would like your tickets sent to a different address or held for pick-up at the League Ticket Office, please see the "important seating info" section on the next page. FOR OFFICE USE ONLY

Ticket Total:

Donation:

Payment Information  My payment is by U-M Payroll Deduction (order must be received by Friday, June 3). I understand I will be billed in four installments, once monthly in June, July, August, and September. Donations will be deducted in monthly installments beginning in July 2010. NOTE: Payroll Deduction requests must be mailed, faxed, or dropped off at the Michigan League Ticket Office. Payroll Deduction requests will not be accepted by phone.

U-M Employee ID Number

Signature Authorizing Payroll Deduction

_______________________ My Payment is by

 Check, payable to UMS  Visa  MasterCard  American Express  Discover  I want to take advantage of installment billing (credit card orders totaling $300 or more only). Please bill my credit card in three equal installments: the week the order is received in the UMS Ticket Office, the first week of July, and the first week of August. Installment billing requests must be received by Friday, June 24.

_

Account Number (Do not include hyphens, dashes or spaces)

Expiration Date

Signature of cardholder

_________________________________________  Please continue


Have Questions? We’re Happy to Help! Call the UMS Ticket Office at 734-764-2538 Outside the 734 area code and within Michigan, call toll-free 800-221-1229

Important Seating Info — Please Fill This Out! A. If the seat section you selected is not available for any event that you have purchased, would you prefer (please check all that apply):  Change

my seats to the next highest price section  Change my seats to the next lowest price section  If available, move me to a different performance of the same event and keep the same price section (note any exceptions below)  Call me at the daytime number listed on page 1 of this order form  E-mail

me at the address listed on page 1 of this order form

Please Note: If you do not check a box, you will automatically be moved to the next lowest price section, and the cost difference will be converted to UMS Credit, which may be utilized at any time during the 11/12 season. A UMS Credit receipt will be printed with your tickets and mailed in August. If the venue that you have selected has several levels (e.g., main floor and balcony), UMS will keep your seats on the level that you requested and move to you to the next lowest price section, unless you indicate otherwise here:

__________________________________________________________________________________________________ B. Disability-Related Seating Needs or Special Seating Requests __________________________________________________________________________________________________ C. I would like my tickets mailed to:  The

address on the front of this form

 Please  My

hold my tickets at the League Ticket Office for me to pick up prior to my first performance.

summer address (please list address and dates below)

__________________________________________________________________________________________________

How to Order Tickets Phone

With Visa, MasterCard, Discover, or American Express

734-764-2538

Outside the 734 area code and within Michigan, call toll-free 800-221-1229.

Internet

www.ums.org In Person

Please visit the Ticket Office on the north end of the Michigan League building (911 North University Avenue). The Ticket Office also sells tickets for all U-M School of Music, Theatre & Dance productions and the Ann Arbor Summer Festival.

Don’t Miss These Important Dates! Wed May 4

Priority Period Begins for Renewing Subscribers and UMS Donors

734-647-1171

Mon May 9

Subscription Packages Available to General Public

Hours

Fri June 3

Deadline for U-M Payroll Deduction Seating Priority Deadline for Donors and Renewing Subscribers

Fri June 24

Deadline for Installment Billing and Free Parking Options

Mon July 18

Group Sales Reservations Open

Mon Aug 15

Donor Single Ticket Day (for donors of $250+)

Fri Aug 19

Last Day to Order Monogram Series

Mon Aug 22

Internet Sales Begin

Wed Aug 24

Single Ticket Day — all tickets to individual events on sale by phone and in person

Fri Sep 16

Last Day to Order UMS Fixed Package Series

Fax

10 am to 5 pm Monday-Friday Closed Saturdays and Sundays. Extended hours resume after Labor Day.

Mail

UMS Ticket Office Burton Memorial Tower 881 North University Avenue Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1011

There is an $8 service charge for all subscription orders.

Subscription requests are filled in the order in which they are received. Order early to guarantee the best seats before tickets go on sale to the general public. UMS Donors are given seating priority for upgrades and new series when orders are received by Friday, June 3. Reminder: Tickets will be mailed in mid-August. Please be sure that you have noted above if you would like tickets to be sent to a different address or held at the Ticket Office for pick-up.


133rd ums season

Have Questions? We’re Happy to Help! Call the UMS Ticket Office at 734-764-2538 Outside the 734 area code and within Michigan, call toll-free 800-221-1229

PLEASE NOTE: Please consult the venue seating maps on pages 58-59 of this brochure as you make your selection.

1. Fixed Series Packages:

Orders must be received by Friday, September 16, 2011 Main Floor

Mezzanine

Balcony

Series (# of performances)

No. of Packages

Gold Circle

A

B

A

B

B

C

E

Total

Choral Union Series (10)

________

650

575

520

500

420

350

280

100

________

Please circle your preferred TWO performance dates for the San Francisco Symphony

Thu Mar 22 at 7:30 pm

Fri Mar 23 at 8 pm

Sat Mar 24 at 8 pm

Main Floor Series (# of performances)

_______

Asia Series (6)

No. of Packages

Mezzanine

Gold Circle

A

B

A

B

E

Total

240

222

200

210

168

96

________

Please circle your preferred performance: Cloud Gate Dance Theatre

Fri Oct 21 at 8 pm Sat Oct 22 at 8 pm

Jazz Series (4)

_______

168

148

132

132

100

48

_______

World Series (7)

_______

266

238

217

238

172

98

_______

Series (# of performances)

No. of Packages

Gold Main

Gold Balc

A

B

C

D

E

Total

Chamber Arts Series (7)

________

*

*

287

245

189

140

*

________

Dance Series (4)

________

164

148

148

132

100

*

*

________

Please circle your preferred performance:

Mark Morris Dance Group

Fri Sep 23 at 8 pm

Cloud Gate Dance Theatre

Fri Oct 21 at 8 pm

Sat Oct 22 at 8 pm

Ballet Preljocaj/Snow White

Thu Apr 19 at 7:30 pm

Fri Apr 20 at 8 pm

Theater Series (3)

________

135

120

Sat Sep 24 at 8 pm

120

110

Sat Apr 21 at 8 pm 85

*

*

Please circle your preferred performance:

Gate Theatre/Beckett

Thu Oct 27 at 7:30 pm

Fri Oct 28 at 8 pm

Sat Oct 29 at 8 pm

Einstein on the Beach

Fri Jan 20 at 7 pm

Sat Jan 21 at 7 pm

Sun Jan 22 at 2 pm

Lepage/Andersen Project

Thu Mar 15 at 7:30 pm

Fri Mar 16 at 8 pm

Sat Mar 17 at 8 pm

Divine Voices (4)

________

________ 136 reserved

________

________ 100 general admission

1. Fixed Series Package Sub-Total $ _________


PLEASE NOTE: Please consult the venue seating maps on pages 58-59 of this brochure as you make your selection.

2. Monogram Series:

Orders must be received by Friday, August 19, 2011

Choose 5 or more events from this listing, and take 10% off! Subscribers to any of the Fixed Series Packages listed in Section 1 of the Order Form may order any number of individual Monogram events now and receive the 10% discount.

APRIL

MARCH

FEBRUARY

JANUARY

DEC

NOVEMBER

OCTOBER

SEPTEMBER

Where an asterisk (*) is marked, seats are not available in this price section for venue listed.

No. of Tickets

Ahmad Jamal

Sat 9/17, 8pm, H3

Mark Morris Dance Group

Fri 9/23, 8pm, P

Mark Morris Dance Group

Sat 9/24, 8pm, P

Malkovich/Musica Angelica

Sat 10/1, 8pm, H1

Yuja Wang, piano

Sun 10/9, 4pm, H2

State Symphony Capella

Thu 10/13, 7:30pm, SF

Goran Bregovic

Sat 10/15, 8pm, H3

Cloud Gate Dance Theatre

Fri 10/21, 8pm, P

Cloud Gate Dance Theatre

Sat 10/22, 8pm, P

Schola Cantorum Venezuela

Thu 10/27, 7:30pm, SF

Gate Theatre/Beckett

Thu 10/27, 7:30pm, P

Gate Theatre/Beckett

Fri 10/28, 8pm P

Gate Theatre/Beckett

Sat 10/29, 8pm, P

Apollo’s Fire/Jaroussky

Thu 11/3, 7:30pm, H1

Audra McDonald

Fri 11/4, 8pm, H2

Diego El Cigala

Sat 11/5, 8pm, MT

AnDa Union

Wed 11/9, 7:30pm, MT

A Night in Treme

Fri 11/11, 8pm, H3

St. Lawrence String Quartet

Sat 11/12, 8pm, R

Beijing Guitar Duo

Sun 11/20, 4pm, R

Canadian Brass

Sun 11/27, 4pm, H2

Handel’s Messiah

Sat 12/3, 8pm, H1

Handel’s Messiah

Sun 12/4, 2 pm, H1

Einstein on the Beach

Fri 1/20, 7pm, P

Einstein on the Beach

Sat 1/21, 7pm, P

Einstein on the Beach

Sun 1/22, 2pm, P

Les Violons du Roy/Steger

Sat 1/28, 8pm, R

Hamburg Symph/Messiaen

Sun 1/29, 4pm, H1

Sabine Meyer

Sat 2/4, 8pm, R

Shanghai Chamber Ens

Fri 2/10, 8pm, R

The Tallis Scholars

Thu 2/16, 7:30pm, SF

Sweet Honey In The Rock

Fri 2/17, 8pm, H2

Random Dance

Sat 2/18, 8pm, P

Wynton Marsalis/JLCO

Wed 2/22, 7:30pm, H2

Hagen Quartet

Thu 2/23, 7:30pm, R

Max Raabe/Palast Orch

Sat 3/10, 8pm, H3

Denis Matsuev

Thu 3/15, 7:30pm, H2

Lepage/Andersen Project

Thu 3/15, 7:30pm, P

Lepage/Andersen Project

Fri 3/16, 8pm, P

Lepage/Project

Sat 3/17, 8pm, P

San Fran Symph/Denk

Thu 3/22, 7:30pm, H1

San Fran Symph/Norman

Fri 3/23, 8pm, H1

San Francisco Symph/Ax

Sat 3/24, 8pm, H1

San Fran Chamber

Sun 3/25, 4pm, R

Zakir Hussain

Thu 4/12, 7:30pm, H2

Cheikh Lô

Fri 4/13, 8pm, MT

Charles Lloyd Quartet

Sat 4/14, 8pm, MT

Pavel Haas Quartet

Wed 4/18, 7:30pm R

Ballet Preljocaj/Snow White

Thu 4/19, 7:30pm, P

Ballet Preljocaj/Snow White

Fri 4/20, 8pm, P

Ballet Preljocaj/Snow White

Sat 4/21, 8pm, P

______ ______ ______ ______ ______ ______ ______ ______ ______ ______ ______ ______ ______ ______ ______ ______ ______ ______ ______ ______ ______ ______ ______ ______ ______ ______ ______ ______ ______ ______ ______ ______ ______ ______ ______ ______ ______ ______ ______ ______ ______ ______ ______ ______ ______ ______ ______ ______ ______ ______ ______

A Mezz/

Gold Main

A Main

B Main

Gold Balc

B Mezz

B Balc

C

D

E

46

42

36

34

24

*

*

*

10

48

44

*

44

*

40

32

24

18

48

44

*

44

*

40

32

24

18

*

68

60

60

50

40

34

20

10

*

50

44

46

40

30

24

20

10

40 reserved

30 general admission

48

44

40

38

26

*

*

*

10

48

44

*

44

*

40

32

24

18

48

44

*

44

*

40

32

24

18

35 reserved

25 general admission

48

44

*

44

*

40

32

24

18

48

44

*

44

*

40

32

24

18

48

44

*

44

*

40

32

24

18

*

54

48

48

38

34

30

18

10

50

44

38

42

36

32

26

20

10

44

38

*

44

*

32

26

18

*

42

36

*

42

*

30

24

18

*

46

42

36

34

24

*

*

*

10

*

46

40

*

*

*

32

22

*

*

42

36

*

*

*

28

20

*

48

42

38

42

34

30

24

18

10

36

28

24

28

24

22

18

14

10

36

28

24

28

24

22

18

14

10

54

48

*

48

*

42

34

24

18

54

48

*

48

*

42

34

24

18

54

48

*

48

*

42

34

24

18

*

48

42

*

*

*

32

22

*

*

58

50

50

40

30

26

18

10

*

48

42

*

*

*

32

22

*

*

38

34

*

*

*

24

18

*

45 reserved

Total

______ ______ ______ ______ ______ ______ ______ ______ ______ ______ ______ ______ ______ ______ ______ ______ ______ ______ ______ ______ ______ ______ ______ ______ ______ ______ ______ ______ ______ ______ ______ ______ ______ ______ ______ ______ ______ ______ ______ ______ ______ ______ ______ ______ ______ ______ ______ ______ ______ ______ ______

35 general admission

46

42

36

40

34

28

22

18

10

42

38

*

38

*

34

28

22

18 10

54

46

40

44

38

32

24

20

*

46

40

*

*

*

32

22

*

48

44

40

38

26

*

*

*

10

*

50

44

46

40

30

24

20

10

48

44

*

44

*

40

32

24

18

48

44

*

44

*

40

32

24

18

48

44

*

44

*

40

32

24

18

75

68

60

60

50

40

34

20

10

75

68

60

60

50

40

34

20

10

75

68

60

60

50

40

34

20

10

*

42

36

*

*

*

28

20

*

48

42

38

42

34

30

24

18

10

42

36

*

42

*

30

24

18

*

44

38

*

44

*

32

26

18

*

*

42

36

*

*

*

28

20

*

48

44

*

44

*

40

32

24

18

48

44

*

44

*

40

32

24

18

48

44

*

44

*

40

32

24

18

Monogram Series Sub-Total $

Less 10% (must purchase at least 5 events from Section 2 or any series in Section 1) 2. Monogram Series Total (please do not round your total)

������


3. Choral Union/Chamber Arts Events SUBSCRIBER BENEFIT! Subscribers to any series may order tickets to all Choral Union and Chamber Arts events now. Seating priority will be given to UMS Donors. We’re sorry, we are unable to offer discounts to these concerts unless they are purchased as part of an entire Choral Union or Chamber Arts Series, or as part of a Monogram Series where applicable (concerts also listed on Monogram are referenced with an asterisk). No. of Tickets

A Mezz/

Gold Main

A Main

B Main

Gold Balc

B Mezz

B Balc

C

D

E

Total

Emerson String Quartet

Sun 9/18, 4pm, R

_____

*

52

44

*

*

*

34

24

*

_____

Malkovich/Musica Orch*

Sat 10/1, 8pm, H1

_____

75

68

60

60

50

40

34

20

10

_____

Yuja Wang, piano*

Sun 10/9, 4pm, H2

_____

56

50

44

46

40

30

24

20

10

_____

Apollo’s Fire/Jaroussky*

Thu 11/3, 7:30pm, H1

_____

60

54

48

48

38

34

30

18

10

_____

St. Lawrence SQ*

Sat 11/12, 8pm, R

_____

*

46

40

*

*

*

32

22

*

_____

London Philharmonic

Tue 12/6, 7:30pm, H1

_____

75

68

60

60

50

40

34

20

10

_____

Les Violons du Roy/Steger*

Sat 1/28, 8pm, R

_____

*

48

42

*

*

*

32

22

*

_____

Hamburg Symph/Messiaen*

Sun 1/29, 4pm, H1

_____

65

58

50

50

40

30

26

18

10

_____

Sabine Meyer*

Sat 2/4, 8pm, R

_____

*

48

42

*

*

*

32

22

*

_____

Shanghai Chamber Ens*

Fri 2/10, 8pm, R

_____

*

38

34

*

*

*

24

18

*

_____

Hagen Quartet*

Thu 2/23, 7:30pm, R

_____

*

46

40

*

*

*

32

22

*

_____

Chicago Symphony/Muti

Fri 3/9, 8pm, H1

_____

100

90

76

80

70

56

48

30

10

_____

Denis Matsuev, piano*

Thu 3/15, 7:30pm, H2

_____

56

50

44

46

40

30

24

20

10

_____

San Fran Symph/Denk*

Thu 3/22, 7:30pm, H1

_____

75

68

60

60

50

40

34

20

10

_____

San Fran Symph/Norman*

Fri 3/23, 8pm, H1

_____

75

68

60

60

50

40

34

20

10

_____

San Fran Symph/Ax*

Sat 3/24, 8pm, H1

_____

75

68

60

60

50

40

34

20

10

_____

Pavel Haas Quartet*

Wed 4/18, 7:30pm, R

_____

*

42

36

*

*

*

28

20

*

_____

Academy of St. Martin/Bell

Sun 4/22, 4pm, H1

_____

75

68

60

60

50

40

34

20

10

_____

3. Choral Union/Chamber Arts Sub-Total $ ________

4. Parking Pre-Paid Event Parking Passes may be purchased in advance for $5 each for the Thayer and Fletcher Street parking structures, just a short walk from most concert venues in Ann Arbor. Vouchers may be redeemed for parking beginning two hours before the event and expire at the end of the 11/12 season. Each parking pass is good for one use only. Parking is not guaranteed with vouchers, so please arrive early to allow enough time to park.

Pre-Paid Parking Passes

@ 5

4. Parking Sub-Total $

n SUBSCRIBER BENEFIT: I subscribed to eight or more events prior to June 24, 2011 and would like free parking in the Power Center (Fletcher Street) structure on UMS concert nights. Please send a special voucher with my tickets.

5. Support UMS

Totals

Don’t Forget! Ticket prices cover only 46% of our costs. Please help UMS maintain its standard of excellence with your tax-deductible donation. See page 56 for details.

1. Fixed Series Package Sub-Total

Giving Levels

3. Choral Union/Chamber Arts Sub-Total

Presenters Circle Director $100,000 or more Soloist $50,000-$99,999 Maestro $20,000-$49,999 Virtuoso $10,000-$19,999 Concertmaster $7,500-$9,999 Producer $5,000-$7,499 Leader $3,500-$4,999 Principal $2,500-$3,499 Patron $1,000-$2,499

Friends Benefactor Associate Advocate Friend

$500-$999 $250-$499 $100-$249 $1-$99

If you are a donor, please print your name(s) as you would like it to appear in the program book listing, or check here n to remain anonymous. Donors of $250 or more will be listed in the program book.

2. Monogram Series Total (do not round)

4. Parking Sub-Total 5. Postage/Handling

$8.00

6. Total 1-5 7. Tax-Deductible Contribution to UMS

8. Grand Total (Lines 6 + 7) Did you double-check your order? Please review the checklist on the mailing/payment page to be sure that you haven’t forgotten anything.


Subscription Tickets/Seating Priority Subscription tickets will be mailed in mid-August.

Donors Donors of at least $2,500 annually receive the highest priority seating based on level of giving for fixed series and Monogram packages. Donations may be included with your ticket order. Ticket orders must be received by Friday, June 3 to be eligible for seating priority. Within each subscription category listed below, annual donations of $1,000 or more receive special consideration for seating. Fixed Series Renewing and fixed series subscribers (for packages listed on pages 6-25 of this brochure) receive priority before Monogram Series subscribers and individual event purchasers. Subscriptions will be filled by series, in the order received. Monogram Series Monogram subscribers (those who choose at least five events from pages 26-50 of this brochure) will receive priority before individual event purchasers. Subscriptions will be filled in the order received and must be received by Friday, August 19.

Please Note Please Make Sure We Have Your E-Mail Address on File! UMS regularly sends updated concert-related parking and late seating information via e-mail a few days before the event. Please be sure that the Ticket Office has your correct e-mail address on file. Subscription Ticket Exchanges Subscribers may exchange tickets free of charge. Exchanged tickets must be received by the Ticket Office (by mail or in person) at least 48 hours prior to the performance. The value of the ticket(s) may be applied to another performance or will be held as UMS Credit until the end of the season. You may fax a photocopy of your torn tickets to 734-647-1171. UMS Credit must be redeemed by April 22, 2012. For information about exchanging tickets within 48 hours of the performance, please call theTicket Office. The UMS Ticket Office will accept subscription ticket exchanges after tickets are mailed in August.

Ticket Donations/Unused Tickets Unused tickets may be donated to UMS for a tax-deductible contribution up until the published start time of the performance. Unused tickets that are returned after the performance are not eligible for UMS Credit or for a tax-deductible contribution. Refunds Due to the nature of the performing arts, programs and artists are subject to change. If an artist cancels an appearance, UMS will make every effort to substitute that performance with a comparable artist. Refunds will only be offered if a substitute cannot be found, or in the event of a date change. Handling fees are not refundable. UMS will not cancel performances or refund tickets because of inclement weather unless the University of Michigan’s Ann Arbor campus closes. An artist may choose to cancel a performance if weather prevents the artist’s arrival in Ann Arbor, but that decision rests with the artist and not with UMS.

Access for People with Disabilities For more information about accessibility services, please see page 59 in this brochure.


Burton Memorial Tower 881 North University Avenue

Graphic Design: Margot Campos

Ann Arbor, MI 48109-1011

Non-Profit Organization US Postage PAID Ann Arbor, MI Permit No. 27

Connecting Audiences and Artists in Uncommon and Engaging Experiences

11/12 UMS Series Brochure  

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