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The Craft LOCAL BREWERIES EXPAND AND RESHAPE FOR A DISCERNING AUDIENCE BY ALEX DE VORE, P.14


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CELEBRATING NATIONAL VOLUNTEER WEEK APRIL 23–29

Their hands do the work of the heart Each day the volunteers and auxilians of CHRISTUS St. Vincent devote their time, energy and spirit of giving to our patients and their families. As they put their hands and hearts to work and reach out in service to others, they embody our mission to improve the health and well-being of the communities we serve. Each volunteer brings his or her unique touch, but they are united in their hands-on, heartfelt gift of self. This Volunteer Week, we recognize and appreciate our volunteers.

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MONTH #-#, 2017

SFREPORTER.COM


APRIL 26-MAY 2, 2017 | Volume 44, Issue 17

NEWS OPINION 5

I AM

NEWS 7 DAYS, METROGLYPHS AND THIS MODERN WORLD 8

.

Marcel Legendre, VP, Santa Fe Branch Manager

SWIMMING UPSTREAM 11 Servers need to be able to tell when folks are drunk, and when it goes bad, cops step in WEIGHING THE SUGAR TAX 13 Santa Feans weigh in on both sides of the sugar tax question before voters on Tuesday COVER STORY 14 THE CRAFT A craft beer revolution is brewing all over the country, and Santa Fe is no exception THE ENTHUSIAST 21 ON THE TRAIL AGAIN Four days after being mauled by a bear in the Valles Caldera last June, veritable badass Karen Williams was already running again. Where is she now?

My clients expect superior customer service. That’s how I work. I AM your bank.

33 BED HEAD Happy Loco, the fashionforward brainchild of streetwear designer Jeremy Salazar, embodies being both happy and loco. See the dude in action at Meow Wolf this weekend. Cover design by Anson Stevens-Bollen artdirector@sfreporter.com

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EDITOR AND PUBLISHER JULIE ANN GRIMM ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER AND AD DIRECTOR ANNA MAGGIORE

CULTURE

ART DIRECTOR ANSON STEVENS-BOLLEN

SFR PICKS 23 Fighting the patriarchy, dreamin’, what’s in a name and high-flying circus action

CULTURE EDITOR ALEX DE VORE

THE CALENDAR 25

STAFF WRITERS AARON CANTÚ MATT GRUBS

MUSIC 27

COPY EDITOR CHARLOTTE JUSINSKI

BY ANY OTHER NAME Like Degrassi, Rosedale is a valuable Canadian commodity. Also: Bye, Skylight AC 29 DANCE DANCE REVOLUTION Feminists rise through performance and dance SAVAGE LOVE 30 Sleep sex and European sex dungeons

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MOVIES 39 MY ENTIRE HIGH SCHOOL SINKING INTO THE SEA REVIEW Plus a-sploding heads in Free Fire

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MARCH 1-7, 2017

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LETTERS

ANSON STEVENS-BOLLEN

Introducing Mattress Mary and Sharon. Your local experts at getting a great night’s sleep.

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Mail letters to PO Box 2306, Santa Fe, NM 87504, deliver to 132 E Marcy St., or email them to editor@sfreporter.com. Letters (no more than 200 words) should refer to specific articles in the Reporter. Letters will be edited for space and clarity.

ENDORSEMENT, APRIL 12: “VOTE NO IN THE SODA WAR”

CAN’T AFFORD IT Can you read this? If so, you are ahead of a quarter of our state’s kindergartners who cannot read one single letter on the first day of school. When our children reach third grade, three-quarters are not proficient in reading or math. Our children’s prospects, from birth to career need help. Pre-K is quality standards-based education for 3- and 4-year olds (not “a sort of hybrid between childcare and nursery school”). The benefits of high-quality early childhood education have been shown by non-partisan peer-reviewed research to last through kindergarten, third grade, and well into adulthood. In a state in which funding for public education, higher education, and social services continues to shrink, local communities must come up with solutions. One way or another, these children will touch your life. We can either invest in them now and give them the opportunity to succeed, or we can pay for them when they are youth in need of much more costly services. Pre-K gives children the opportunity to enter kindergarten ready to learn, and that is the first step to breaking the cycle of poverty and improving our community. How can we afford to say no to that?

KATHERINE ORTEGA COURTNEY SANTA FE COMMUNITY FOUNDATION

OOH, THEY MAD Your “no” endorsement of the pre-K initiative was appalling. You show little understanding of the urgent need for early childhood education and its well-documented public value. And your reasons for opposing the measure are bizarre. Support from the “progressive cabal” is a turn-off? Would we be better off if Santa Fe were run by the corporate cabal that rules most of the country? Policies

that support working families face brutal, well-funded opposition and require smart supporters who can raise money to fight back. You worry this will create a bureaucracy? All vital public programs require humans to implement them. Nobody argues that we should eliminate social security because a fraction of its cost goes to administration (also known as decent jobs). You think this is “political posturing?” This is how politics is supposed to work: We should elect leaders who run on their track record of delivering bold achievements for their constituents, rather than lining the pockets of their corporate sponsors. If Mayor Gonzales is thinking of running for governor based on delivering for kids over Coke, then sign me up for his progressive cabal.

MITCH ACKERMAN SANTA FE

WHAT IS IT, JAVIER? After listening to Mayor Javier Gonzales on KSFR and reading the Reporter, my resistance to the sugar tax has increased. Gonzales said that 100 percent of the tax would go to pre-K education. The ordinance allows 5 percent of the tax to go for administrative costs, an undetermined percentage for building construction and annual quality and fiscal audits. The audit process alone will require more bureaucracy and probably at a cost of 10 percent or more. The mayor said it will pay for 1,000 children to go to pre-K but only if most can pay at least half of the cost of a high quality pre-K education. He said that the program will be ready next year. [Gonzales] fails to mention that the ordinance requires one year of data collection before the program begins. In my opinion, the mayor is not honest when he says the city will not be hiring extra staff— surely the city manager as per ordinance is not going to collect the money. He cannot even do his own job without the help of an assistant city manager. The city has other options including CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE

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LETTERS using texting fines and creating economically diverse neighborhoods to help children be successful.

STEFANIE BENINATO SANTA FE

SFR notes that you “join others who are suspicious of the mayor’s intentions”—those intentions being higher office, of course. You suspect that Mayor Gonzales might even go so far as to use the success of his leadership on an important issue as a barometer for his next career move. I’ve got white knuckles from clutching my pearls so hard. STOP THE DAMN PRESSES. A politician is aspirational for higher office, hoping his leadership on a particular issue could further his career. ... Sorry, SFR, I was unaware we were running a monastic order and not a local government here. SFR opposes the initiative because it ”requires the city to take on a whole new bureaucracy, not just hiring a third-party contractor to collect the tax from distributors, but also overseeing who gets the money and monitoring outcomes.” Good point, except—this isn’t new. The city already collects taxes, already distributes and monitors grants. ... So what’s that “whole new bureaucracy” is SFR referencing here? ... I get that we’d all like for the state, an entity that can levy truly progressive taxes, to foot the bill here. But it won’t. And the low- and lower-middle income children of this town—the kids whose parents can’t afford a year at a private preschool—need this program yesterday. ... There is no better tool at our disposal than early childhood ed for stopping the prison industrial complex, dismantling white supremacy, and smashing the patriarchy.

SASCHA ANDERSON SANTA FE

LAME. DUH! How lame is it to come up with a lot of namby-pamby arguments to stop lots of low-income kids from pre-K and keep their parents from wasting health & funds from too much soda? Sorry, SFR—that’s LAME! ... Why couldn’t Pre-K for Santa Fe wait another year for a regular city election? Because tons of kids would be a year or more older, duh! Every formative year [before age 5] is crucial for child development! If not now, when? Do you see the state or others stepping up in the Martinez/ Trump climate of NO? Not gonna happen. Tnx. Also, feel free to be convinced to do a pre-K retraction ... that you came around to YES! Because the counter-arguments I see in SFR and The New Mexican seem to be simply not wanting the mayor to be a successful progressive. That’s why we elected

APRIL 26-MAY 2, 2017

WILLIAM FERGUSON SANTA FE

ASK FOR HELP

CLUTCHIN’ PEARLS

6

him, duh!

For years I have supported the idea of a similar tax—but with a major distinction. I envisioned imposing a tax on companies that choose to create products with high fructose corn syrup, etc. This would incentivize these manufacturers from producing more detrimental forms of their products. If they bore the burden for the quality and health effects of their products, they would produce them more conscientiously. Taxing the people at the bottom of the totem pole does NOT achieve these ends, and the companies will continue on as before. Furthermore, lumping kombucha into the category with sugary beverages is entirely misguided and you are making it harder for people like me to gain the health benefits of this vital drink by taxing it along with the others. I wish you had solicited broader-reaching input before presenting this tax plan to the people. I would have loved to assist.

ANTHE A KELLEY SANTA FE

NOT A POTATO As a community, I think we should be paying attention to the core issue surrounding the so-called ”sugar tax” vote on May 2. The issue at stake is improving the educational future of our city’s children! That is essentially what it is about, not who is paying for what ads or whether you will be forced to lessen your sugar intake or whether the money will be spent on intended targets. ... The point is to create equal access for all children in Santa Fe and to expand existing enrollment in these programs. ... Demand continues to exceed supply! Have you been paying attention to the budget crises in the schools in our state? ... Why not look at this vote as an opportunity to change your level of sugar intake and to support the improvement of the education future of Santa Fe students? ... This is not a political issue. It is an educational vision! Do we need to be constantly reminded that we are 49th in the country? Que lastima! Please vote YES for this very needed initiative!

ESLEE KESSLER SANTA FE

FROM A TAX PRO I don’t question the intentions of our Mayor pushing this tax and I also support the goal of funding pre-K for those in need. ... Something needs to be done now more than later, but I think its overall tax structure is bad tax policy. ...

SFREPORTER.COM

During this time of year I see firsthand and feel the anguish when people come in with their tax bills and tell me they feel blindsided with all the increases. Santa Feans have been hit with more and more new taxes. ... This would be the highest tax ever imposed here. ... This tax ... is going to push those families deeper into poverty and make it harder for them to pay their bills. This tax is not equal. The burden of the tax will be paid by the low- and middle-class because that is what they buy. By its very intention this tax will end up being a sinkable fund, which means in three years the city will have to increase taxes somewhere else to fund the pre-K program because people will go elsewhere to buy or not buy at all. ... There are [other] sources of revenues that would have less of a negative impact and be more fair to everyone. Some cities are taxing plastic containers at a rate of 1/8 of a cent which is used for public good, like senior care. Everyone contributes and the burden is distributed across the board and is not overwhelming against those who can least afford it, like this tax would be.

PATRICK VARELA SANTA FE COUNTY TREASURER

NEWS, APRIL 19: “WHEN SFUAD CLOSES A DOOR, IT OPENS A WINDOW”

REMOTE AND SMALL Except for tourism-related arts and shops/ hotels/cafes and the luxury real estate “industry” (and I use this word charitably), Santa Fe remains an economic basket case especially hard on the condition of the lower and middle classes. Chasing movie makers and producers is fine, but the local pols need to try to sell the city as a place for software developers. Its outdoor attractions and character would be a natural for techie millennials and their companies if certain infrastructure was provided by the town. This would bring the kind of good-job enterprises that

can be conducted from anywhere, so Santa Fe’s remoteness and smallness would not be a great drawback for such investment.

JAY REEDY SFREPORTER.COM

THEY’RE ENDLESS Look how well the film industry is doing in New Mexico. Why is that? One reason is lots of tax and rebate incentives. Why not offer incentives (such as no corporate state income taxes to any business) to all New Mexico businesses? Just think of the possibilities.

DAVID DENNISON SANTA FE

PICKS, APRIL 19: “SCIENCE MATTERS, Y’ALL”

LOVE YER MAMA Having the sciences is extremely important, but being conscientious in creating a better world for each other is even more important. This starts with realizing that all of our actions/interactions have an effect on other species, the planet and each other. We ALL need to be accountable and acknowledge that we can make a difference. One person individually can start a motion and make a difference. The little details in life can add up to make a tremendous impact. Take a stand and say something if you see someone litter, hurt people, or cause destruction. These times and the planet are in a scary place. We must now earn to keep what we have. Respect other people, other species, and the Earth!

CD FRIEDMAN SANTA FE

SFR will correct factual errors online and in print. Please let us know if we make a mistake, editor@sfreporter.com or 988-7530.

SANTA FE EAVESDROPPER “... and that’s how prom was ruined.” —Overheard on Nusbaum Street “Hey, do you want my didgeridoo?” —Overheard at the Adobe Rose Theatre

Send your Overheard in Santa Fe tidbits to: eavesdropper@sfreporter.com


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APRIL 26-MAY 2, 2017

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7 DAYS STARBUCKS RELEASES UNICORN FRAPPUCCINO A sure sign of the end times … if the word “frappuccino” didn’t already do the trick.

SANTA FE SCHOOLS BUDGET OUTLOOK IMPROVES Soon we’ll go from closing two schools to free unicorn frappuccinos for every boy and girl!

SANTA FE MANUAL HITS NEWSSTANDS Now you know what to do for the next year.

THOUSANDS MARCH FOR SCIENCE You can’t ignore us! Unless, you know, you ignore us.

ARCHDIOCESE BACKS SUGARY DRINK TAX Communion wine not affected. What would Jesus drink?

SUPREME COURT TO HEAR LEGISLATIVE LAWSUIT AGAINST GOVERNOR Distinct possibility that the state will implode from all three branches of government being in the same place at the same time.

GOV, LAWMAKERS BICKER OVER FURLOUGHS If anyone should be taking forced days off …

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APRIL 26-MAY 2, 2017

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The cost increase will

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$2.56 $4.06

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Santa Fe’s beverage tax would dramatically raise prices If the new beverage tax passes in Santa Fe, get ready for some serious sticker shock. It would be the largest tax of its kind in the country and would dramatically increase the cost of drinks you buy every day—like sodas, teas, sports and juice drinks. In many cases, you would pay more in taxes than for the drink:

2x A gallon of juice drink would more than double –from $1.50 to $4.06 +$3 A 12-pack of soda would go up nearly $3 – from $4.49 to $7.37 300% A canister of lemonade mix spikes more than 300% – from $6.98 to $28.74 Too many families in Santa Fe are struggling to make ends meet. The city already has a multimillion dollar budget surplus and doesn’t need a new tax. Let’s find a better way to fund Pre-K – instead of a massive tax increase on working families and small businesses.

Vote against the beverage tax—we just can’t afford it.

Paid for by Better Way For Santa Fe & Pre-K, info@betterwayforsantafe.com, David Huynh, 505-819-3276 10

APRIL 5-11, 2017

SFREPORTER.COM

ABA_SantaFe_StickerShock_9_75x11.indd 1

4/18/17 10:00 PM


COURTESY SANTA FE POLICE DEPARTMENT

NEWS

Swimming Upstream How police decide to try to find where a drunken driver last had a drink B Y M AT T G R U B S m a t t g r u b s @ s f r e p o r t e r. c o m

P

olice think Dominic Friedlein was drunk. One officer said the 24-year-old admitted as much at the hospital. “Someone else should’ve drove. I ruined my life today,” Friedlein said hours after the crash, according to Santa Fe police officer Ubaldo Garcia. “How do you not blame yourself for something like this? I killed someone today.” On the evening of April 9, Friedlein misjudged a left-hand turn from St. Francis Drive to San Mateo Road, causing the crash that killed Stefan Seigmann, a passenger in his SUV. Santa Fe police charged Friedlein with vehicular homicide and two counts of causing great bodily harm in a DWI crash. The mother and son who smashed into Friedlein’s Toyota 4Runner were both seriously injured. Friedlein told police he’d had three beers from a local brewery, all on an empty stomach. Given the right circumstances—the time in which he drank the beers, their size and alcohol content—he could have been drunk when he ordered the last one. There are more variables to consider, many of them subjective, but there’s a chance someone should not have sold Friedlein that last beer. Figuring that out—tracing the final drink through what’s called a source investigation—can be one of the more effective tools in the fight against drunken driving. But as with Friedlein’s case and a few dozen like it each year around New Mexico, deciding whether someone else played a part in a DWI-related death or injury is difficult. For example, a police officer reported Friedlein had been drinking at Second Street Brewery. Investigators later learned it was the Santa Fe Brewing Company. Santa Fe Brewing Co. owner Brian Lock tells SFR he’s since turned over receipts and video from the tasting room to Santa Fe police. “Our thoughts and prayers are with the people involved in the accident,” Lock says. “That’s the first thing.”

Lock says his servers are trained as required by law and that the tasting room has a three-beer limit. He didn’t see anything on the video that would indicate one of his servers missed a sign that Friedlein was drunk. “We all need to take personal accountability for our choices, right? That’s not in question,” says New Mexico State Police Captain Suzanne Skasik. “But the servers and the licensees carry a big weight on their shoulders, too, when making decisions about how to determine when a person has had too much.” Capt. Skasik oversees the Special Investigations Unit (SIU), which investigates overserving, serving to minors and other violations of the Liquor Control Act. Her team of 15 agents and five sergeants is spread out around New Mexico. They average a handful of source investigations a month; much of their time is spent not tracing last drinks but trying to be proactive. “It’s uncomfortable. It’s difficult. And we really encourage the servers or the clerks that if they’re not comfortable refusing the sale, to go to their leadership or their management and get that person involved,” Skasik tells SFR. “And to err on the side of caution and deny the sale.” For those who don’t, a first offense for serving someone who’s drunk is a misdemeanor that often results not in jail time, but in a fine and the uneasy knowledge that their permit to sling booze is in

ADMINISTRATIVE SMACKDOWN PENALTIES FOR SELLING TO A MINOR OR INTOXICATED PERSON

FIRST CITATION

$1,000 and one-day suspension (no alcohol sales)

SECOND CITATION

(within 1 year) $2,000 plus seven-day suspension

THIRD CITATION (within 1 year) $10,000 plus revocation

While city cops levy charges against the driver in an alcohol-related car crash, the State Police’s Special Investigations Unit can go after the person who served the driver his last drink.

jeopardy. That kind of threat to the pocketbook is usually pretty effective, state officials say. There’s also the promise of a harsh penalty for a second violation: a fourth-degree felony. But it’s the administrative side of things that really makes the law against overserving someone stand up. Penalties for licensees—the bars, gas stations and liquor stores—start at $1,000 and a day of no alcohol sales. Two violations in a year bring $2,000 and a week of not selling booze. Three violations in 12 months brings a revocation, according to New Mexico Administrative Code. But the state often chooses instead to force the license holder to sell the license. In New Mexico, liquor licenses are limited and have become a valuable commodity. One retail license recently sold for $1 million. Licenses for bars routinely cost hundreds of thousands of dollars. In the past 20 years, Deputy Superintendent of Regulation and Licensing Alex Sanchez says, department staff can recall the state having revoked just a single license. “People’s livelihoods are tied up in these licenses. There are loans and mortgages that depend on the value of the license, so we work really hard to get people to sell them instead of a straight revocation,” says Sanchez. “Also, if the banks know that we’re taking away licenses, it becomes less likely that they’ll loan money to buy them.” The SIU is the only law enforcement

entity in the state that can issue an administrative citation for selling or serving alcohol to a drunk person. Other police agencies can refer source investigations to SIU, but Skasik says she often sees a crash reported on the evening news and tells her crew to get after it. “We actively seek out information from within our own agency … when there is a fatality involving alcohol or when the investigating officer believes alcohol may have been a factor,” Skasik tells SFR. “We try to get in as early as we can on those investigations to backtrack and trace the source.” Serious crashes aren’t the only trigger for a state investigation, though. Complaints also come to SIU through the state’s Alcohol and Gaming Division or from a local agency. Santa Fe County DWI Prevention Specialist Peter Olson says while a tip may not carry legal weight, it can be useful. “It’s just their word, but it gives us an idea of where people have been drinking,” he says. In the city and county of Santa Fe, officers and deputies are told to ask suspected drunken drivers where they’ve been drinking as a matter of course. “We can do our own last-drink investigations,” SFPD deputy chief Mario Salbidrez says. But he knows that unless a witness speaks up or an officer is lucky enough to find a receipt for booze, the trail to the last drink ends at the scene of an arrest or a crash. “Most of the time, they won’t tell us where they had it.”

SFREPORTER.COM

APRIL 26-MAY 2, 2017

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SFREPORTER.COM


NEWS

Weighing the Sugar Tax Yes DANIEL BORRERO Pediatric Dentist You might expect a guy who makes a living taking care of kids’ teeth to go straight to a fewer-cavities argument—and he has one if you want to hear it. But Borrero sees pre-K programs as his top argument for supporting the sugary drink tax. “The main reason is obviously the kids. I love kids. I work with kids, so I would say the welfare of the kids. Looking at the research, all the benefits that a child gets from having that early experience in education; it’s so important that I have to say that’s the main cause.” He says “you can see the difference” in the kids who have been to a pre-K program. “Before I go in the room, I can tell you, ‘That kid is probably going to Head Start.’ Because they’re relaxed; it’s no big deal going to the dentist.”

On May 2, Santa Fe will tally the votes in the citywide election that asks whether to impose a 2-cents-per-ounce tax on the distribution of sugary drinks. If voters approve, the money will be collected by a thirdparty contractor, then earmarked to provide pre-kindergarten spots within the Santa Fe Public School District boundaries and distributed to early-childhood education programs with the assistance of a new city commission. We checked in with people on both sides about the reasons for their choice.

53,057

voters eligible to cast a ballot

2 cents

per fluid ounce: amount of the proposed tax

POQUEEN RIVERA American Heart Association “Heart disease is the number-one killer in New Mexico. Low- and middle-income families are more affected by chronic diseases, and it’s time we had a community conversation about that.” “In New Mexico, we don’t talk about our health and our diet as much as we should,” Rivera tells SFR. “We need to think more about the things we eat and drink. We don’t question the normality of it. It’s not just changing the consumption to alter behavior, but changing the industry so that it will offer healthier beverages.”

$7.7 million

estimated annual tax revenue

966

pre-kindergarten seats the tax is estimated to fund

SIMON BRACKLEY President and CEO, Santa Fe Chamber of Commerce “I think it’s ill-considered either as a health program or as a tax. … It’s so regressive. It will completely fall on lower-income Santa Feans. And … it doesn’t seem right that one-half of the community is voting to put a tax on the other half of the community that can least afford it.” If pre-K is something the city thinks it must have, the longtime Chamber leader tells SFR, then the city needs to have a thorough debate. “Raising taxes is never easy, but I feel as though the city hasn’t explored all of the potential options, whether it be a real estate transfer tax, property tax, gasoline tax … There are lots of options out there.”

RON TRUJILLO City Councilor “This is not something that’s in the purview of city government to be managing. Education has always been a state issue. It should continue to be a state issue. We as a city should stick to the business of the city; infrastructure, roads, sidewalks, public safety, parks, etc.” There’s enough to do around Santa Fe, the District 4 representative says, without taking on a new program. “We have a lot of projects we haven’t been able to fund. These are things that have been piling up on top of each other year after year. We need to take care of those projects before we start taking care of other people’s projects.”

YOUNG JO-ALMEIDA

KARLA PARRA

Parent

Parent “Kids. Because all kids have the right to learn,” Karla Parra says through an interpreter. Her oldest two children went to pre-K, but her youngest child wasn’t accepted into a program. Did she notice a difference? “Yes. The oldest learned English very quickly,” she says, pointing out that Spanish is the primary language spoken at home. Parra, who lives on the Southside, isn’t worried about the impact of the tax on her finances. “In my home, we don’t really drink soda very often.”

No

May 2

Election Day

4,728

early votes cast as of the morning of Tuesday April 25

(SOURCES: SANTA FE COUNTY CLERK, O’DONNELL ECONOMICS & STRATEGY PRE-K STUDY)

“I’m the parent of a toddler and I also have older kids. I have more than one reason, but I don’t want to ask my other friends to pay for [my child’s pre-K]. It’s going to cost them. They have to buy higher-cost drinks. So it’s going to cost them to help my kid and my neighbor’s kid.” To Jo-Almeida, the program’s funding stream and its message don’t agree with each other. “They’re saying, ‘Okay, soda is a bad drink.’ So do they want us to stop drinking it or do they want us to drink more? It’s kind of a confusing tax.” SFREPORTER.COM

APRIL 26-MAY 2, 2017

13


Local breweries expand and reshape for a discerning audience

BY ALEX DE VORE a l e x @ s f r e p o r t e r. c o m

THE BIG GUY

A seemingly endless line of students enrolled in brewing and beverage management courses at Central New Mexico Community College pours into the main brewery warehouse at the Santa Fe Brewing Company on the outskirts of town. Dressed in matching coveralls, they’re here to learn about large-scale brewing. Rows of massive stainless steel fermenters tower overhead as workers flit around mixing ingredients, manning machinery and crafting various types of beloved local beer, which are headed for countless local bars and restaurants and 10 states. A centrifuge whirrs loudly in the background, separating sediment from the brews for the cleanest possible beer; two and a half years ago, the brewery became the first in the state to boast such a device. Outside, construction chugs forward on upcoming additions such as a brand-new family-friendly beer garden and a subterranean tasting room built within buried shipping containers specifically to serve barrel-aged creations. The cacophony of cleaning, brewing and working rings out everywhere.

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APRIL 26-MAY 2, 2017

SFREPORTER.COM

Founded in 1988, Santa Fe Brewing Company remains one of the most productive, oldest and best-known craft breweries in the region. What began as a micro-scale operation pushing out small batch brews from Dinosaur Trail has grown into one of New Mexico’s largest brewing operations. Of course, owner Brian Lock has a much loftier vision than founder Mike Levis probably ever dreamed of back when he created the legendary Santa Fe Pale Ale in the ’80s. Lock bought the business in 1997 along with three other partners. By 2003, he had bought them out and began ramping up production. Today, the company’s reach continues to stretch. With a tasting room and one of the highest-quality music venues in the area, the operation has grown to include well over a dozen flagship, seasonal and, soon, barrel-aged beers. Ex-

perimental and one-off formulas are not uncommon. Think of it more like a family united by beer, but you’re reaping all the benefits. Santa Fe Brewing Co.’s head of research and development, David Ahern-Seronde, appears on the brewery floor as if from nowhere. “So,” he says. “You wanna take the tour?” In addition to his R&D work, Ahern-Seronde acts as a tour guide for visitors on Saturdays. He’s also worked most of the other jobs here. “I’m one of only four people who is cross-trained in everything,” he says. A local musician and co-founder of DIY metal venue The Cave, Ahern-Seronde came to Santa Fe Brewing nearly five years ago and started on the canning line. Before long he proved an aptitude for the work and moved up to cellarman (which he describes as a glorified janitor). Eventually, he became a brewer.


ANSON STEVENS-BOLLEN

Head of Research and Development, David Ahern-Seronde. Opposite: Santa Fe Brewing Co. is all over the barrel game.

ANSON STEVENS-BOLLEN

“I knew pretty much nothing about brewing when I started,” he says, “and my first batch was about 290 kegs.” On the day of SFR’s visit, AhernSeronde is experimenting with South African hops for what he hopes will become a pretty solid pale ale. “Smell these,” he says, holding out a handful of the aromatic flowers. “Not a lot of people are specifically using these hops without cutting them with other kinds.” We say that they smell exactly like a particularly skunky kind of weed. “Yup,” Ahern-Seronde confirms. “Hops are genetically very close to marijuana.” When we reconnect a couple weeks later, he has an update about the batch: “It came out pretty ok,” he says. “But there’s still work to do.” This is an apt statement when it comes to the brewery—fast and steady growth doesn’t seem to be slowing. Adjacent to Santa Fe Brewing Co.’s fermenter warehouse sits another, even larger space that houses the canning line, a vast Rube Goldbergian contraption that

Thousands of Santa Fe Brewing Co. cans ready to ship. Right: Over 100 cans are filled per minute on the canning line.

Ahern-Seronde estimates can fill over over 120 12-ounce beers per minute. Lock says the operation currently takes up roughly 61,000 square feet, but that by the time they’re done with improvements, they’ll have another 10,000. Ahern-Seronde grabs a pair of Pilsners

as they whiz by, one for me, one for the photographer. It’s one of the most deliciously fresh beers either of us has ever tasted. Stacked nearby are thousands of empty cans emblazoned with custom artwork, waiting to be filled. Attached is the main distribution center, and the two other adjoining rooms contain sales offices, pallets of thousands of ready-to-ship cans and a gargantuan walk-in refrigerator full of kegs. This is also where the brewery’s new water filtration system resides. A complex array of pipes and pumps feed outside to two standing tanks, one of which will contain gray or waste water, the other soon-to-be potable water. “The idea is that we’ll be able to take whatever waste water we can and recycle it,” says Ahern-Seronde. “And then we’ll use that to water the plants and trees in the beer garden once it’s built.” This isn’t the only way the brewery recycles. Several times a week, a nearby cattle rancher picks up hundreds of pounds of spent grains to feed his herd. “We’ve had guys come in looking for just a couple buckets of grain to feed their pigs or whatever, too,” Ahern-Seronde adds. “The idea is that more people are environmentally conscious these days and concerned about the products they’re buying,” says Lock of green steps the operation is taking. “The driving force behind a lot of it is our engineer, Alfonz Viszolay —without him it wouldn’t be possible.” Recently, they moved the taproom from the smaller space people know and love to temporary digs in The Bridge, the music venue across the parking lot that previously (and perhaps disastrously) housed Sol Santa Fe. And though the titular bridge itself has yet to be built, it will ultimately allow drinkers to legally transport alcohol from the forthcoming 10,000-square-foot permanent taproom to the music venue. Lock believes the majority of these improvements will be busi-

ness-ready by January of next year, and even says they hope to kick off a shuttle service to and from downtown Santa Fe. “I already have the passenger van,” he says. “Maybe we’ll do Wednesday through Saturday pickups, and that would be nice not only for tourists, but for locals who don’t want to worry about driving.” As we wrap our tour at Santa Fe Brewing Company, Ahern-Seronde tells us that the future seems bright. With something like 60 locals working full- and part-time jobs at the brewery, they’re impacting the Santa Fe economy in a major way. Much of this can be attributed to the rise of beer nerd culture and more drinkers eschewing large-scale brews for creative craft and micro-scale beers, but Lock obviously has ideas and the means to execute them. SANTA FE BREWING CO. 35 Fire Place, 424-3333 santafebrewing.com 11 am-10 pm Monday-Friday; 11 am-9 pm Saturday; 2-8 pm Sunday Good for: Live music fans and craft beer fans searching for a reliable brew

THE NEW GUY

When chemist John Rowley opened his restaurant/taproom/brewery in an unassuming warehouse space on Maclovia Street seven-ish months ago, not even he could envision the explosive local response. Rowley had been a home brewer since the ’80s, and still serves as president of the Sangre de Cristo Craft Brewers, a loosely structured club of home brew fans who get together to craft CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE

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• APRIL 26-MAY 2, 2017

15


beer and talk shop. Rowley’s operation itself, however, leans more toward sour and farmhouse beers. For beer nerds, these are soughtafter brews; for casual drinkers or those new to the wide world of beer, however, the old-world style most commonly associated with Belgian brewing practices is a fairly new concept. Regardless, Rowley’s unusual offerings (and a stellar gastropub menu courtesy of restauranteur/ chef Jeffrey Kaplan) have meant rapid growth, from the craftscale and custom-built brewing equipment in the back to a relatively new cellar built to cultivate barrel-brewed concoctions— no small feat for a guy still working

cate any of them to anybody specifically, including ourselves.” Kaplan says this is meant to not only showcase beers that he and Rowley find exciting, but also a means to share dynamic beers from all over the world. “Our design is to be a destination taproom,” he says, “so we want to have the best versions of different kinds of beer as we can find.” Every Wednesday at 4 pm, this means tapping rare or hard-to-get kegs. “It’s something that maybe there’s only one keg in Santa Fe or maybe one or two in the entire state,” Kaplan says. “We’re just trying to do fun stuff and keep the beer world fun and interesting.” Plans to enclose Rowley’s patio are on the horizon, but Kaplan says

Ale

Beer brewed at higher temperatures. The yeast will generally rise to the top of the brew during the process and, by the end, sink to the bottom. Sometimes ales wind up with a higher alcohol content. Think fruitier or more bitter beers.

Bitterness

You know that bitter IPA you say you love? That pale ale that kinda stinks? This is caused by hops used in brewing. What type of hops are used and when they’re added during the boiling stage are factors in how bitter that beer will be.

Blends

ANSON STEVENS-BOLLEN

Sometimes brewers will blend beers together to make another beer more complex in taste.

Filtration

The process of removing non-liquid stuff from beer. Y’know, like straining? Or getting that yeast outta there? (Like in coffee, sediment adds flavor, so you don’t want beer that’s too filtered.)

Hops

John Rowley of Rowley Farmhouse Ales is kind of a real-life mad scientist.

his day job at Los Alamos National Laboratory. “I think a lot of it is that we filled a niche that was necessary to fill,” Rowley explains. “There are places that have a lot of taps, but they tend to have a pretty static list whereas, if we find something cool, we put it out.” Rowley says his ultimate goal was to foster a neighborhood feel while slowly yet surely introducing his beers far and wide. He estimates nine locations between Santa Fe and Albuquerque now serve Rowley, but insists that “if there are people who want to try our beer, we’d rather they come in here and drink it.” With 22 taps for beer and two more for cold-brewed Ohori’s coffee and filtered water used for brewing, Rowley may just have some of the most exciting offerings in town. According to Kaplan, “We don’t dedi-

16

APRIL 26-MAY 2, 2017

that expansion will most likely be reserved just for the brewing operation. “We like where we are,” he says. “We want to make sure to keep it local and intimate.” ROWLEY FARMHOUSE ALES 1405 Maclovia St., 428-0719 rowleyfarmhouse.com Open daily, 11:30 am-10 pm Good for: Beer nerds and sophisticated palettes

THE OLD STANDBY

Second Street Brewery president and brewmaster Rod Tweet say they decided to open a Railyard location in 2010 because they were producing more of their popular beer than they knew what to do with. The local champs have slowly but surely built a mini-empire throughout Santa Fe since its inception 20 years ago. This is why Tweet and head brewer John

SFREPORTER.COM

These little cone-like flowers come from the female plants of climbing vines and make your beer taste like beer. Hops work sort of like a bitter spice and provide balance to the sweeter malt flavors. You’ve probably used this word before all like, “Oh yeah, this beer is pretty hoppy, you guys,” and prayed no one asked any follow-up questions. This sucker is in the cannabis family.

India Pale Ale (IPA)

Legend has it that the only way the British could ship beer to India in the days of the East India Trading Company without it spoiling was to make it way hoppy and bitter. Hence, India Pale Ale. Boom. Science.

International Bitterness Units (IBU)

The rating assigned to beers in terms of bitterness. Light beers are usually rated 5-10, whereas stuff like that Stone IPA you drink to prove to your friends you’re a knowledgeable beer person can get up between 50-70 IBUs. It goes to 100, but at that point we’d be scared to death.

Keg

That metal barrel you got for your lame birthday party no one attended that

you’ve now been slowly working to finish in a completely not-sad way. A keg holds about 7.75 gallons (29.33 liters). That’s a lot.

Lager

Fermenting at colder temperatures, the yeast from lagers settles more toward the bottom during the brewing process. Type of yeast and colder maturation are both factors and, generally speaking, lagers are more crisp and light than ales.

Malt

It used to be barley, now it’s been processed in water to germinate and then heated to stop the germination process. The level of heat dictates the color of beer, so lightly roasted = lighter beer.

Noble Hops

Super-duper-fancy-ass hops traditionally grown in select areas in Europe and sometimes used to brew traditional beers, like Pilsners. Think of them almost like fancy wine grapes known for being grown in particular regions. Probably only the nerdiest of beer nerds needs to be on the lookout for noble hops and most of us probably can’t tell the difference, taste-wise.

Saison

You’ll feel like an idiot when we tell you that it means “season,” but you’ll be glad to know that these often-simple, light-bodied and delightfully fizzy beers are making serious inroads in Santa Fe and beyond. Pop by Rowley or Duel and ask for one and they’ll probably say something like, “Wow, you sure do know the names of things.”

Tannins

Compounds in cereal grains and other plants (like hops), these bad boys also bring a kind of bitterness to beer and also make a chilled brew kinda hazy.

Yeast

Single-celled microorganisms that convert sugars into alcohol. A long time ago some scientist looked at yeast through a microscope and was like, “These microorganisms know how to party.”

Zymurgy

The actual chemistry branch that focuses on fermentation. Also the name of the American Homebrewers Association’s magazine. Not kidding.


For now, they’re just trying to get everything completed. Scee works on a mural on one wall in the dining area, and power tools drone someplace within. As of now, Tweet and Walker aim to open in late May or early June, and despite seeming tired from the overwhelming level of work required, they also seem at peace. This is a game-changer for Second Street Brewery, and another feather in the cap for the midtown district. SECOND STREET BREWERY (RUFINA) 2920 Rufina St. secondstreetbrewery.com Good for: Locally-minded drinkers interested in a wide array of rotating styles

THE PIONEERS “In 2016, we expanded exponentially,” Duel Brewing’s Todd Yocham says. He stands among the brewing equipment at Duel’s Santa Fe location. Along with his fellow brewer Michael Karr, Yocham is one of only two people responsible for crafting the midtown brewhouse’s beers. “We opened the space in Albuquerque

and almost simultaneously we were offered a chance to have our beer over at Meow Wolf,” he continues. “We added more tanks, too, so we could try to keep up with the demand of selling beer in three locations. It doesn’t seem like it’s going fast, but if you look at our timeline, it went pretty quickly.” Yocham has been on board since day one. Karr came on four months later. And when the doors opened in a warehouse space off Siler Road in 2013, Yocham says, most of the other locations in the neighborhood were vacant. “Oh, there was nothing here,” he recalls. A niche was quickly carved, however. With a focus on Belgian brewing methods coupled with the Duel mission to create beers that can’t be found just anywhere, they’ve thrived. “It starts with the yeast,” Karr explains. “Yeast out of Belgium creates different flavors that American yeasts don’t typically have, and it’ll create these esters that lend a lot to the product.” Esters are the fruity flavor created during the fermentation process of sour beers and vary based on what fruits are used in the process.

“It’s a byproduct of the yeast activity,” Karr notes. “We have a mentality of brewing—allowing the yeast to do their thing at a temperature that’s uncomfortable for the typical American brewer; being patient. It’s not filtering, it’s making a beer that we think is going to be delicious.” To date, Yocham and Karr have surpassed 30 different recipes, though at any given time the restaurant at Duel serves up six. Still, they’re always trying new things. “A lot of Michael’s passions are going into taking care of these casks,” Yocham says, motioning to numerous barrels scattered around the space. “For example,” Karr interjects, “the same beer is going into six different casks and we’ll taste them periodically, and each cask is going to be doing something different with the beer, so we’ll figure out what the right blend is at the end.” Blending is the process of mixing different beers to create another, third product with serious flavor complexity. This is a testament to Duel’s experimental nature: Yes, they’ve got standout brews such as the Turncoat sour Scottish ale and the CONTINUED ON PAGE 19

ANSON STEVENS-BOLLEN

Walker have been searching for an even larger space to house their third retail location over the last three years and they say it’s nearly ready to open. Down on Rufina Street in the now-bustling Siler Road area, Tweet and Walker are hard at work alongside construction crews and new restaurant general manager Mariah Scee to complete renovations on Second Street’s new 20,000-squarefoot warehouse space. “We think there was a guy doing engineering work in here at some point, but we think maybe he didn’t have a business license—he just did it,” Tweet says of the warehouse’s history. “We did find out he built concrete bunkers for L Ron Hubbard.” Second Street has owned the warehouse for a few years now. Back before Meow Wolf first opened, the collective assembled elements for the House of Eternal Return in this space. But now, only weeks from opening a branch of the brewery, things are finally coming together. Tweet and Walker show off newer equipment, and more of it, including numerous fermenting tanks and a soon-to-be-operational canning line. Walker says they’ll be able to fill 30 cans a minute once it’s running, and with something like 70 original recipes to pull from, he’s excited to get started. Tweet says that Second Street will also soon enter the realm of barrel-aged sours thanks to recent trends and more discerning drinkers. Through a row of windows the restaurant/venue space is visible. “We’ll have 24 taps and a long standing bar,” Tweet says, motioning in the temporarily empty area. “We’ll have a stage over there in that corner, and we’ll be doing things that aren’t really happening in Santa Fe musically.” Walker agrees, adding, “There’s just not anything else like this in town right now.” The pair envisions different zones throughout the warehouse, such as a more lounge-like area with comfy chairs or the aforementioned standing bar. For entertainment, they tapped Matron Records’ Eliza Lutz to keep things fresh. “We’re going to start having events that are a lot different from what you’ll see in our other locations,” Tweet notes. They’ll even kick off a new food menu created by current Second Street Railyard chef Milton Villarrubia III and, according to Tweet, certain food and beer selections will be specifically tethered to the new location. This very well may mean brand-new recipes in celebration of the expansion, but Walker won’t spill anything just yet.

Rod Tweet (left) and John Walker inside the massive new Second Street Brewery warehouse.

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2 0 1 7

Japanese

Cultural Festival A Day of Family Fun

With so many local breweries to choose from, we asked the experts what they’d recommend from their own operations.

Special guests from Japan Story tellers for children

Kamishibai

Japanese Intercultural Network

David Ahern-Seronde Santa Fe Brewing Co. Java stout. It’s tasty and big. Also, coffee comes through and has a placebo caffeine buzz. People argue that. I don’t.

Invitation to Tea Taiko Drum Performances Martial Arts Demonstration Japanese Dance

M

Cosplay

A

Kids Activities • Japanese Cuisine

T

and

Art Items for sale

Saturday

april 29

S U R I

Santa Fe Community Convention Center

Doors open at 9:30 a.m. — 5:00 p.m Admission: $5.00 12 and under FREE

www.santafejin.org

Brian Lock Santa Fe Brewing Co. I personally love our Freestyle Pilsner. My tastebuds have evolved. It’s a beer that light and easy to drink and you can have more than a couple and not feel like you’re hammered. Jeffrey Kaplan Rowley Farmhouse Ales I’d say the Saison du Sarlacc. It’s a mixed-fermentation, dry-hopped spelt saison, a great farmhouse-style beer. John Rowley Rowley Farmhouse Ales I would say the upcoming bourbon barrel-aged Oud Bruin is going to be delightful. Still a ways to go on that beer, but it is coming along nicely. Michael Karr Duel Brewing At this moment, I’d choose Bad Amber because I had one last night and it was delicious! Plus, I think it’s a good entry into the Belgian style; lightly hopped, the malt and yeast come through with a bit of coriander spice. Todd Yocham Duel Brewing Cezanne Vérité. [It’s a] barrel-aged saison [with] 10.4 percent ABV. Paul Mallory Blue Corn Brewery I think our [Road Runner] IPA is one of the best. It’s aggressively hoppy, but it’s still very drinkable. Rod Tweet Second Street Brewery Tough question. Boneshaker Special Bitter. Nothing too fancy by current standards and a pretty loose interpretation of a bitter, I gotta admit, but the style is a great platform and has everything: full-flavored, nice yeast character and highly drinkable because of it’s unusual dry-hop combination of oily floral East Kent Goldings and sharp, spicy/fruity Citra.

Don’t be sorry. Play it UBER safe. Get a LYFT home. Think SaFe

Drinking and driving is never good. Ever.

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John Walker Second Street Brewery Fulcrum.. It’s big, juicy, wildly aromatic and extremely drinkable for such a big IPA.


Duel Brewing’s Todd Yocham (left) and Michael Karr run a two-man operation.

ALEX DE VORE

Whistler blonde, but Yocham and Karr are dedicated to crafting new styles all the time. “We have a long way to go before we’re maxed out with [the equipment] we have, but that’s going to happen this year and that’s exciting,” Karr says. “Our reputation will continue to grow as far as the sour beers go.” Yocham agrees, saying, “If people can come into any one of the breweries in the state and try something they haven’t had, they’re going to take that information home. … There are very few breweries in the state that aren’t killing it at what they do, and you drive around the country and that’s not the case everywhere.” DUEL BREWING 1228 Parkway Drive, 474-5301 duelbrewing.com Noon-10 pm Monday-Thursday; Noon-midnight Friday and Saturday; 1-8 pm Sunday Good for: Adventurous beer fans looking for a challenge

THE YOUNG ONE

ALEX DE VORE

In its Southside location, Blue Corn Brewery’s head brewer Paul Mallory emerges from the back room. He’s much younger than you’d imagine, but he’s a man on a mission. “I’m coming up on 11 months, a year now,” he says of his position. “I think I was

just in the right place at the right time.” Mallory, a New Mexico native who grew up in Albuquerque, says he was only a few home brew batches in when he discovered his passion for beer. He’d taken prerequisite classes at Central New Mexico Community College before transferring to the University of California, Davis, to complete master brewer’s courses after which he’d take on positions with various small breweries in California. “It took a while before I could get my foot

Blue Corn Brewery’s Paul Mallory envisions future collaborations with local businesses.

in the door,” he says. “I would have done anything—keg cleaning, deliveries, anything—but it was probably only two or three years between when I knew I wanted to become a brewer and when I actually called myself a brewer.” These days, Mallory is charged with filling 10 taps at Blue Corn, six of which are the brews for which they’re known, like the Road Runner or the Gold Medal Oatmeal Stout. Mallory says the oatmeal stout “either wins an award or comes close to winning an award with the Great American Beer Festival or other places every year.” Blue Corn is owned by Santa Fe Dining, which also runs Albuquerque’s Chama River Brewing Co. and Kellys Brew Pub, among others. Mallory says there’s a certain level of shared resources and beers between them, but also that “it’s kind of a point of pride to be able to feature your own beers.” The extra four taps allow for more experimentation. Mallory says Blue Corn is also embracing the trend of barrel-aged sours, but his passions ultimately lie in collaboration with other local businesses. “I can show you some of the chocolate nibs we’re working with,” he says as he disappears into a walk-in refrigerator. When he returns, an overstuffed Ziploc full of what appear to be chocolate shavings in hand, he seems almost giddy at the idea of working with unexpected ingredients. “These came from Cacao Santa Fe,” he says of the new chocolatier on Richards Lane, “and they can’t really use this stuff in chocolate, but they’ll sell it for use in candles or soaps, and I think it’s going to make a really nice stout.” Mallory describes his collaborative efforts as “the art of the follow-up,” and

points to locally roasted chocolate or coffee or locally grown fruit for future projects. “If you call back enough times, you can get your hands on some pretty good local ingredients,” he explains. “I’m really close to getting my hands on a Colkegan whiskey barrel from Santa Fe Spirits, so it’s kind of like a three-business collaboration when it’s all said and done.” Mallory does say it’s a mite harder for Blue Corn to focus on barrel-aged beers, as a certain amount of time is needed for them to come to fruition. Furthermore, Blue Corn is known for certain brews. “That’s kind of the challenge,” he says. “Making sure you have the beers people are coming to drink while also trying out new things. But I’m going to be trying some things this year.” What those are exactly remain a secret, but if Mallory’s commitment to collaboration and experimentation can provide a clue, they’ll probably be worth the wait. BLUE CORN CAFÉ & BREWERY 4056 Cerrillos Road, 438-1800 bluecorncafe.com 11 am-10 pm daily Good for: Everyday beer fans not quite ready to get weird

If your lust for beer has been piqued, check out the Beerland Tour at The Lodge at Santa Fe this Thursday and Friday, April 27 and 28 (5 pm. Free. 750 N St. Francis Drive, 992-5800). Events include a homebrew seminar, a Detox/Retox yoga event, lawn games and, of course, so much beer. Admission is free, but unless you meet a kind stranger, you’ll have to pay for the beer.

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MAY 18-21, 2017 BIKES, BEER & BEYOND Four days of cycling events for avid and casual riders, bike builders, craft beer drinkers and music lovers. Featured Events:

Live Music:

• Caja del Rio Gravel Grinder • Women’s Bike Clinics • Santa Fe Century & Gran Fondo • Tour de Brewer & Tour de Brunch

Orgone, May 18

• La Tierra Poker Ride • Hand Crafted Bike Show • Friday & Saturday Beer Gardens

Full Event Schedule: www.OutsideSantaFe.com/events

OUTSIDE BIKE & BREW FESTIVAL RETURNS

Hello Dollface, May 20

RAILYARD URGENT CARE We put patients first and deliver excellent care in the heart of Santa Fe.

+ INJURIES & ILLNESS + X-RAYS + PHYSICALS + LAB TESTS + VACCINATIONS + DRUG TESTING + DOT EXAMS Locally owned and operated by Dr. Victor Sherman and Dr. Troy Watson WHERE TO FIND US 831 South St. Francis Drive, just north of the red caboose.

(505) 501.7791

www.railyardurgentcare.com 20

APRIL 26-MAY 2, 2017

SFREPORTER.COM

$20 Locals Pass for Fri. & Sat. concerts/beer gardens available at Whole Foods Market


On the Trail Again

COURTESY SPARTAN RACE

THE ENTHUSIAST

Nearly a year ago, trail runner Karen Williams survived a bear attack. It has hardly slowed her down BY ELIZABETH MILLER e l i z a b e t h @ s f r e p o r t e r. c o m

S

he’s decided it was her CamelBak that saved her life. The backpack Karen Williams wore for an ultramarathon through the Valles Caldera in June 2016 intervened when a mother bear attacked her. Teeth sunk into the front of her neck, but the bear couldn’t get around the straps and bag in the back. That also prevented the bear from getting a firm enough grip to shake Williams, which spared her some injury—not that her injuries were minor. A broken orbital lobe from where the bear swiped her meant it was seven weeks before she could blow her nose. When she jumped back into an Ironman in October, her arm still wasn’t working well, and she struggled to get it out of the water while swimming. Cosmetic surgery to replace a partially lost eyebrow is ongoing. So, too, are the races—a triathlon in April, and the Iron Horse Bicycle Classic from Durango to Silverton, Colorado, in May. SFR caught up with her after CrossFit and before the pool lanes were set for her laps. The afternoon ahead of her included a run and constructing an 8-foot wall in her backyard to help her train for obstacle course races. Did getting mauled by a bear slow her down? “Not really, no,” she says. “I’m lucky.” Williams was out running the trails again four days after her attack. It was kind of hard, she concedes: Two black

eyes, one of them still swollen shut, made it tough to see. “There was lots of walking so I wouldn’t trip and fall and break something else,” she says. And there was more to it, of course. A hole that could have provided a bear den freaked her out a little, she says, and so too did the moment last fall she realized she was running through an area littered with acorns: “not ideal,” she calls it. She carries bear spray now. “You’re allowed to be afraid, but you shouldn’t let being afraid change what you do,” she says. “Just change the way you do things so you don’t have that issue again.” Williams started running and biking competitively shortly after watching Julie Moss famously drag herself across the finish line of the Hawaii Ironman in 1982. She said to her then-boyfriend, “I’d like to try that,” she recalls, to which he said, “You could never do that.” She laughs, retelling it. “So he didn’t last.” She bought her first bicycle—financed to fit her Army private’s salary—and started on duathlons. That led to joining a friend for the Mount Taylor 50K, her first ultramarathon. Most of her runs, particularly during the six years she lived offgrid, half a mile from her closest neighbor, were on elk trails. Encounters with wildlife—the mountain lion that fell out of a juniper tree while stalking her or the bear her two dogs alerted her to—come with the territory. A portion of her time now goes to educating other people on avoiding conflicts with wildlife, and working on legislation

Neither bear nor fire nor lions dropping from trees will keep Karen Williams off the course.

to change the policy that led the New Mexico Game and Fish Department to track down and kill the bear that attacked her to test it for rabies. The test was negative, and Williams insists that bear was just defending her cubs. The bill failed in committee this year, but she’ll try to bring it back again. The bear’s cubs were captured and raised at the Cottonwood Rehabilitation Center in Española, some of six cubs veterinarian Kathleen Ramsay spent her summer rounding up acorns and bushes laden with rosehips to feed. Given the fact that bears can get rabies and that even with the vaccine, a human is not guaranteed to survive contracting rabies, and the litigious environment we live in, she says it’s human behavior that needs fixing. “What we need to take from this lesson is not trying to change a law over one bear,

but to educate a whole population base in the entire United States about how to live with bears,” she says. That means running in pairs and without headphones, curbing dogs, and not feeding wildlife or allowing them to access food in dumpsters. Video of the cubs’ release back into the wild in November showed them on a brave race of their own—bounding away among the junipers.

LIONS AND HIKERS AND BEARS, OH MY! A lecture from Daryl Ratajczak, wildlife biologist for the US Forest Service in the Santa Fe National Forest 7 pm Tuesday May 2. Free. Los Alamos Nature Center, 2600 Canyon Road, Los Alamos, 662-0460

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6401 Richards Ave., Santa Fe, NM 87508

MAY 2017 EVENTS

~ free unless otherwise noted.

Empower Students, Strengthen Community. Empoderar a los Estudiantes, Fortalecer a la Comunidad.

13

SAT

17 4

WED

SFCC Commencement Ceremony

2 p.m. | SF Indian School Pueblo Pavilion — 1501 Cerrillos Rd. | 505-428-1665 | stream live and more ceremony info at www.sfcc.edu

THURS

HSE (GED) Graduation

5:30 p.m., Fitness Education Center

505-428-1433

Explore Your Options Info Session 6 p.m., Jemez Rooms

505-428-1779

final voting May 1-31

Readings in the Library — Patagonian Road — Read by author Kate McCahill and staff 5 p.m., Library 505-428-1903

5

FRI

10 WED &31

12 13 24

FRI

SAT WED

Student Fashion Show — Admission: $8 5:30 p.m., Hilton Hotel, 100 Sandoval St. 505-702-6778 Islamic Book Club Reading 6 p.m., Jemez Rooms

505-428-1516

Fulbright Lecture with Dr. Adam Kowalik 9 a.m., HEC, 1950 Siringo Rd. RSVP: 505-428-1235 Spring Chamber Choir and Chorus Concert 2 to 3 p.m., Jemez Rooms 970-545-5455 SFCC Governing Board Meeting 5:30 p.m., Board Room, Room 223 505-428-1148 Board Finance Committee meets Tuesday, May 23. Public welcome.

~ Info session for high school students and their parents ~

Saturday, May 6 9-9:30 a.m. & 4:15-4:45 p.m. Room 223, Board Room1 Two 5-day sessions run June 12-16 and 26-30. Application deadline is May 22. For more info, contact: 505-428-1637 or david.markwardt@sfcc.edu

PLUS ... May 29 — SFCC will be closed for Memorial Day. Job Club, Résumé Review Days, Free Walk-In Clinics and More www.sfcc.edu/events-resources 505-428-1406 REGISTER FOR COURSES, FIND MORE EVENTS & DETAILS AT WWW.SFCC.EDU Individuals who need special accommodations should call the phone number listed for each event.

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THE NEW KING It would obviously take one hell of an animated film to topple records set by Hayao Miyazaki’s 2001 masterpiece Spirited Away, but, as luck would have it, such a film has presented itself. Your Name from director Makoto Shinkai (2007’s 5 Centimeters Per Second) tells the story of a young boy and girl who set out to meet each other after they switch bodies. We hear this thing is downright magical and, as of earlier this year, it became the highest-grossing anime movie of all time. Now that’s spirit. (ADV)

COURTESY WOMEN’S MARCH ON WASHINGTON SANTA FE

AMUSE

FILM WED/26

Your Name: 7 pm Wednedsday April 26 (subtitled); 2:20 pm and 9 pm Thursday April 27 (dubbed). $8-$10.50. Jean Cocteau Cinema, 418 Montezuma Ave., 466-5528.

KATE RUSSELL

PERFORMANCE FRI-SUN/28-30 CIRC-IN’ Who doesn’t love Wise Fool? Santa Fe’s dedicated (and long-running) circus troupe not only provides educational programming for kids of all ages, they preside over shows of such death-defying wonder and whimsical beauty that you’re practically guaranteed to be charmed. For the third annual CircAspire event, Wise Fool welcomes all levels of students to perform what they refer to as “pre-professional” acts. This oughta be a good one. (ADV) CircAspire: 7 pm Friday, April 28; 2 pm and 7 pm Saturday April 29; 4 pm Sunday April 30. $5-$20. Wise Fool, 1131 Siler Road, 992-2588.

COURTESY CONCERT FOR SANTA FE DREAMERS

EVENT FRI/28 DREAM ON OK, we’ll admit it—we’re pretty infatuated with the Santa Fe Dreamers Project and its founder, attorney Allegra Love. ICYMI, Love helps immigrants navigate the often tricky and tumultuous world of naturalization, visa and asylum paperwork in an effort to help them live in the US safely. Musicians have noticed her efforts, too, and a cavalcade of who’s-who champions descends upon Skylight. Performances from acts like Nosotros, Jono Manson and Joe West & the Santa Fe Revue oughta get you there, and the Dreamers Project scores another win. (ADV) Concert for Santa Fe Dreamers: 6 pm Friday April 28. $10. Skylight, 139 W San Francisco St., 982-0775.

EVENT THU/27

Stick it to the Man Indigenous artists come together to fight patriarchy and care for our planet Slaying the patriarchy and simultaneously caring for the Earth is hard work, but artists and activists usually don’t shrink from a challenge. Thus, we welcome Dear Patriarchy, a mind-blowing coming-together of Indigenous artists and musicians as means of resistance, raised awareness and fundraiser for Indigenous environmental justice nonprofit Honor the Earth. We’re talking Minnesota-based activist Winona LaDuke, a champion for renewable energy and food systems, Oregon folk musician Nahko Bear and friends (think Conor Oberst, Bob Dylan kinda jams), local visual artist Rose B Simpson, Arizona activist and water protector Kim Smith, artist/DJ Ginger Dunnill and so many more. “It revolves around anti-patriarchy and really bringing women to the forefront,” Smith says. “When we’re talking about a lot of the buzz, it’s been around what happened in Standing Rock, but the reality is that the way we treat our land is also the way we

treat our women, and there has to be a paradigm shift.” Smith, who hails from the Diné Nation, sits on the board of Honor the Earth and works as an activist all over the country. “A lot of the destruction or abuse gets normalized,” she says. “The protection of Mother Earth isn’t a hippie thing, it’s about survival.” Smith says Honor the Earth hosts many fundraisers and provides grants to other environmental groups, but that Dear Patriarchy is the first event of its kind they’ve mounted. “This is really our first ‘show,’ which makes it exciting because it could become an annual thing and become bigger and better,” she says. “It’s really a stage for feminists to talk about where they stand and how a lot of their work revolves around caring for Mother Earth.” (Alex De Vore) DEAR PATRIACHY 8 pm Thursday April 27. $20-$100. Meow Wolf, 1352 Rufina Circle, 395-6369

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ON S FRI ALE DAY !

GALLERY SHOWING: For the month of May we are excited to display Edwina H. Milner’s collection of work, Various Mediums

May Events

A L L E V E N T S AT 6 P M U N L E S S O T H E R W I S E N O T E D

W E D N E S D AY, M AY 3

A launch party for SFUAD’s Glyph, an arts and letters magazine T H U R S D AY, M AY 4

Institute of American Indian Arts Student Anthology Launch Party

S AT U R D AY, M AY 1 3 @ 4 P M

Reception for Gallery Artist Edwina H. Milner S U N D AY, M AY 1 4 @ 5 P M (OFFSITE AT THE LENSIC) THE NM HISTORY MUSEUM AND THE LENSIC PRESENT:

An Evening with Gary Snyder, hosted by Jack Loeffler

F R I D AY, M AY 5 SANTA FE OPERA SPOTLIGHT SERIES:

Oliver Prezant Birds of a Feather: Rimsky-Korsakov and Stravinsky on Rimsky-Korsakov’s opera The Golden Cockerel S AT U R D AY M AY 6

#1 NYT best-selling local author, Jen Sincero, You Are A Badass At Making Money M O N D AY M AY 8 SANTA FE OPERA GUILD BOOK CLUB: The Pearl

T U E S D AY M AY 9

Mercy Strongheart, A Boy Named Trout F R I D AY, M AY 1 2 SANTA FE OPERA SPOTLIGHT SERIES:

M O N D AY, M AY 1 5

Elaine Pinkerton, All the Wrong Places and Peggy Van Hulsteyn, Art of Murder T U E S D AY, M AY 1 6

Craig Johnson (Longmire series), paperback launch of The Highway Man T H U R S D AY, M AY 1 8

Sue Boggio and Mare Pearl, Long Night Moon F R I D AY, M AY 1 9 SANTA FE OPERA SPOTLIGHT SERIES:

Oliver Prezant Who Wears the Pants? Women in Disguise on Handel’s opera Alcina T U E S D AY, M AY 2 3

Oliver Prezant Music Tech: 600 A.D. to the Present on Bates’s opera The (R) evolution of Steve Jobs

Alan Kishbaugh Deep Waters: Frank Waters Remembered in Letters and Commentary

S AT U R D AY, M AY 1 3 @ 9 A M

ICONIK DOWNTOWN PRESENTS JAZZ

OPERA BREAKFAST SERIES PRESENT:

Lecturer Mark Tiarks on Strauss’s “Der Rosenkavalier”

Every Saturday 11:30am to 1:30pm

JOURNEY SANTA FE CONVERSATIONS

Every Sunday at 11am

202 Galisteo Street | 505-988-4226 | www.cwbookstore.com S U M M E R H O U R S 8 A M – 8 P M | S U N D AY 8 A M – 6 P M

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COURTESY PHOTO-EYE GALLERY

Want to see your event here?

THE CALENDAR

Email all the relevant information to calendar@sfreporter.com. You can also enter your events yourself online at calendar.sfreporter.com (submission doesn’t guarantee inclusion). Need help?

Contact Maria: 395-2910

WED/26 BOOKS/LECTURES DHARMA TALK: KEIDO TROY FERNANDEZ Upaya Zen Center 1404 Cerro Gordo Road, 986-8518 This week's talk is given by Fernandez, a novice Zen priest at Upaya. The talk is entitled "Attuning to the Wisdom of the Heart" and we’ve attuned our hearts to seriousness when it comes to listing these events. 5:30 pm, free FIRESHED AWARENESS SPRING SEMINAR SERIES REI Community Room 500 Market St., 982-3557 This community seminar is an interactive learning experience that addresses the issues affecting our watershed. Speakers talk about the impacts of wildfires on things like the economy, culture and recreation. 5:30 pm, free IAIA ARTIST-IN-RESIDENCE TALK IAIA Musem of Contemporary Native Arts 108 Cathedral Place, 983-8900 Bring a sandwich to hear visual artist Ka’ila Farrell-Smith and jeweler Anthony Lovato as they discuss their artistic practices in this lunchtime lecture. Both artists conclude their month of participation in the Institute of American Indian Arts’ Artist-in-Residence program with this event. 12:30 pm, free JOHN KESSELL: WHITHER THE WATERS Collected Works Bookstore and Coffeehouse 202 Galisteo St., 988-4226 Kessell, a professor emeritus of history at the University of New Mexico, presents his latest book Whither the Waters: Mapping the Great Basin from Bernardo de Miera to John C Fremont, which tells the story of an influential cartographer. 6 pm, free

“Poland 2005 (horse plowing birds waiting)” by Pentti Sammallahti is on display at photo-eye Gallery in the solo exhibit Warm Regards.

POETRY SLAM St. John's College 1160 Camino Cruz Blanca, 984-6000 Bring your friends to hear (or sign up to recite) spoken-word and slam poetry, which is rhythmic, hypnotizing, energetic and performative. See the slam in the Junior Common Room at the Peterson Student Center. 8 pm, free POLLY SCHAAFSMA: ROCK ART AND PUEBLO SHIELDS, SYMBOLISM AND CHANGE School for Advanced Research 660 Garcia St., 954-7213 The author presents a lecture about artistic themes in Pueblo art. 3:30 pm, $5

ROBERT NOLD: THE INVERSE TEXTURE EFFECT IN THE DRY GARDEN Santa Fe Botanical Garden 715 Camino Lejo, 471-9103 Nold leads a discussion about the inverse texture effect in soil, its application in a mostly un-irrigated garden, and why “drainage” is a term best reserved for plumbing. 11 am, free DOUG THAL: TOXIC PLANTS AND YOUR HORSE Pecos Trail Cafe 2239 Old Pecos Trail, 982-9444 Thal has been riding and training horses his entire life, and today he’s a prominent equine vet. He talks about the plants you and your equine buddies should avoid. 6:30 pm, free

EVENTS

MUSIC

GEEKS WHO DRINK Second Street Brewery (Railyard) 1607 Paseo de Peralta, 989-3278 Know stuff and feel good about it at this game that rewards the biggest know-itall. Trivia, y’all, it’s not trivial this evening. 8 pm, free TAPS AND TABLETOPS Jean Cocteau Cinema 418 Montezuma Ave., 466-5528 Scrabble or Backgammon the night away while you enjoy beer and wine on happy-hour discount. Beer and wine and games, oh my! 6 pm, $10

DJ SATO Boxcar 530 S Guadalupe St., 988-7222 Get turnt to house and oldschool hip-hop. Or enjoy it sober. Music is the only drug we need. 10 pm, free DANIEL ISLE SKY The Dragon Room 406 Old Santa Fe Trail, 983-7712 Folk rock originals. 5 pm, free GREG SCHLOTTHAUER Vanessie 427 W Water St., 982-9966 Piano standards, great vocals. 6:30 pm, free

JOAQUIN GALLEGOS El Mesón 213 Washington Ave., 983-6756 Gallegos performs a set of passionate flamenco tunes. 7 pm, free RAMON BERMUDEZ JR. TerraCotta Wine Bistro 304 Johnson St., 989-1166 Let’s be honest, guys: Wednesdays can be rough. It’s mid-week and you’re tired. Maybe you should break up the routine and grab a glass of wine while listening to a live performance of Latin and smooth jazz guitar by Bermudez. 6 pm, free

CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE

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THE CALENDAR

THU/27 ART OPENINGS MANUEL LOPEZ: ORDINARY GRACE Northern New Mexico College 921 Paseo de Oñate, Española, 747-2193 Lopez presents sculptural works and paintings in this solo exhibit. He carves wonders from wood, creating traditional but modern works. Through April 29. 6 pm, free

BOOKS/LECTURES

SPECIALIZING IN:

RT R

D.

LO S R D .

S. M

3909 ACADEMY RD.

CERRIL

PO AIR

EVENTS BEERLAND TOUR The Lodge at Santa Fe 750 N St. Francis Drive, 992-5800 The week is almost over, and that’s a good reason to get your lawn party on in celebration of the VICELAND TV series with lawn games (of course), yoga, music and happy-hour specials, a home brew seminar and a special screening of the series at 7:30 pm. 5 pm, free

DEAR PATRIARCHY: A BENEFIT FOR THE RESISTANCE Meow Wolf 1352 Rufina Circle, 395-6369 Nahko and Friends, Winona LaDuke, Rose B Simpson and more perform in celebration of creative women and all of their accomplishments, with a special closing DJ set by Miss Ginger. The future is female (see SFR Picks, page 23). 8 pm, $20-$100

FOOD ANGELS NIGHT OUT Multiple Locations Thirty-five local restaurants participate in this day benefitting Kitchen Angels by donating 35 percent of their proceeds to the nonprofit organization. This year’s participating restaurants include Izanami, The Teahouse, Arroyo Vino and more (see Food, page 37). 7 am-10 pm, free

MUSIC GREG SCHLOTTHAUER Vanessie 427 W Water St., 982-9966 Schlotthauer performs a set of pop, standards and classic covers on piano in the downtown swanky venue. 6:30 pm, free CONTINUED ON PAGE 28

COURTESY EVOKE CONTEMPORARY

BOOK CLUB FOR GROWN UPS Bee Hive Kid’s Books 328 Montezuma Ave., 780-8051 Pretty much what it sounds like, folks: reading for adults. This week they discuss In Other Words by Jhumpa Lahiri. Leave the kiddos at home and do something for yourself. 7:30 pm, free JOHN NIETO-PHILLIPS: HOMELAND OR FANTASY HERITAGE? School for Advanced Research 660 Garcia St., 954-7200 Nieto-Phillips, a professor at Indiana University, speaks about Spanish-American identity and ideology in New Mexico from the 1890s through the 1940s. 6:30 pm, free

HOWARD FRENCH Santa Fe Center for Spiritual Living 505 Camino de los Marquez, 983-5022 An associate professor of journalism at Columbia University, French presents a lecture titled "Everything Under the Heavens: How the Past Helps Shape China’s Push for Global Power." 6 pm, $15-$20 SANTA FE COMMUNITY COLLEGE WRITING AWARDS Collected Works Bookstore and Coffeehouse 202 Galisteo St., 988-4226 Attend this awards ceremony, which honors Santa Fe Community College student with exceptional writing skills. Yay, writers! 6 pm, free

EAD OW SR D.

3909 Academy Rd. 473-3001 Factory Trained Technicians

Jeremy Mann’s “SF 10” is on view at Evoke Contemporary as part of the solo exhibit Experimentations, Process and Emotions, opening Friday.

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COURTESY ROSEDALE

MUSIC Damn—look at Rosedale go up there with that keyboard!

By Any Other Name I say Rosedale plays pop-punk, Rosedale says otherwise BY ALEX DE VORE a l e x @ s f r e p o r t e r. c o m

C

anadian one-man power-pop act Rosedale returns to the Cowgirl this Thursday April 27 at 8 pm to make us all think things like, “Dude, blink-182’s Dude Ranch was actually pretty sick!” Just kidding—nobody but my dumb friend Jasper thinks that anymore, and Rosedale’s Mike Liorti has a far more nuanced sound than that particular band’s early stuff anyway. “Throwback” would be too harsh a term, but for fans of acts like Honorary Title or later Green Day or, yes, blink-182, Liorti hits all the right notes (ha—music jokes) in a pop-punk way, yeah, but also as a songwriter who pulls from the heavy-hitters of the genre’s greatest hits and histories for inspiration, while simultaneously embracing his own damn thoughts and feelings and ideologies and celebrity crushes. Anyway, legend has it Rosedale basically followed the infamous Warped Tour everywhere he could for years, playing the parking lots and winning the hearts of the people and honing his act. Even today he’s on the road basically nonstop playing solo, getting tighter and putting on one hell of a show. I spoke with Liorti to try out a little something where he was given a lead-in to a sentence to be completed on the spot with very little time to formulate an answer. Here are the results: Pop punk is … not what I play. I’m more along the lines of alternative power-pop, I guess. There’s some punk influence, but it’s more of the early-2000s/late-’90s realm. I guess there

are some emo influences in there as well, but not so much lyrically. (Author’s note: Damn, genre lines get blurry.)

up at rosedalebooking@gmail.com—everyone gets a chance.

When I was setting out as a musician, I couldn’t stop listening to …

overthink: Sell it! Performance over passion! Eye contact! Open your eyes! Smile! Be grateful! Move! Body Language! Be Present! Get her eyes off her phone! Don’t do what you did last night at this part! Dammit! I guess it’s not all so secret, but it’s probably the reason I sweat so much.

Box Car Racer [by Box Car Racer]. That album, front-to-back, changed my life, and once I saw it live, it was over. Grades went down, couldn’t score anymore on the ice (Author’s note: This is probably about hockey because Canada) and music, production gear and skateboarding were the only things that mattered. I’d been playing music before that, but I really started leaning towards the idea of making it my life after seeing those kind of punk/club shows. I play solo because … it just has never worked out with band members or fill-in guys. Nobody else cares. Not only do I play solo, but I manage Rosedale. I’m the booking agent, the merch person, the producer, video director, designer, editor … everything. These days, music is considered a hobby. A side gig. I get it—nobody is gonna love my baby as much as me, and that’s totally fine, but it seems like all these hobbyist part-timers [like] managers, producers, booking agents, drummers, etc. are so preoccupied with modern-day ‘growing up’ distractions that as soon as a speck of hard times hit, they’re out! It explains why people don’t bother going to shows anymore. There’s so much doubt, because 99 percent of musicians don’t care to entertain their audience these days. They’re bored! So they leave right after their friends’ bands because they doubt it’s gonna get any better. The only real-lifers left are already in bands. If not, hit me

When I perform, I secretly …

People will like Rosedale if …

they give it a chance. I can’t count how many people have said, ‘Not gonna lie, this is really not my style of music, but you made me like it,’ then they buy a CD. I’m often considered a hater by my friends; there are so many bands I don’t like from all genres, but then there are about five bands from every genre that I can sing every word and feel something. I call those ‘Cleaners,’ referencing Tim Grover’s book Relentless. Call it conceited, but I believe I’m on my way to being a Cleaner. I just need more people to ignore doubt and give it a chance—a huge challenge these days.

My ultimate goal is to…

inspire mass audiences to pursue their passion and go all in. To be an example that getting through bad luck and loneliness builds a character that is unstoppable. The only way to fail is to quit, and there’s always a way to keep going if you reinvent and take the leap everyone else thinks you’re crazy for taking. ROSEDALE 8 pm Thursday April 27. Free. Cowgirl, 319 S Guadalupe St., 982-2565

SKYLIGHT SET TO CLOSE Owners of the downtown nightclub Skylight (139 W San Francisco St., 982-0775) tell SFR they plan to stop regular operations following this weekend’s activities, which include a benefit for the Santa Fe Dreamers Project on Friday and a farewell party on Saturday. The club’s hours had already been drastically cut. Opened in 2014 after former tenant Milagro 139 shut its doors, the cavernous 7,000-square-foot space containing three separate bars became a haven for local and touring DJs, comedians and dance events such as EmiArte Flamenco. Skylight also hosted bigger-name touring bands such as The Dandy Warhols, X and Surfer Blood. With roughly 25 employees, the closure also comes as a blow to local service industry workers. “The largest impact of this is not on me, it’s not on the partners,” managing partner Kate Kennedy says. “It’s the staff and the role we play in the community.” Kennedy points to debt that they couldn’t climb out of, caused by slow winter business, the buying out of several partners who left the business last year and two citations from the Department of Alcohol and Gaming in 2015. “That, coupled with the impact of immigration policies, have affected some of our customer base, specifically on our international nights,” Kennedy tells SFR. She also estimates that nearly 100 renters, promoters and entertainers will be affected by the closure. For now, Skylight plans to honor all of the events currently booked through October and will possibly restructure. Kennedy says the liquor license allows the club to host one-off or picnic events. “We are working diligently to uphold those agreements,” Kennedy explains. “We refuse to be the bar that was going to just lock up and not say anything, and we do want everyone to come out this weekend—we want to own our mistakes and we want to thank our supporters.” The farewell party will run from 2 pm-2 am Saturday April 29, and Kennedy says she’s helped employees find positions at other local businesses.

SFREPORTER.COM

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NEW MEXICO PERFORMING ARTS SOCIETY

“ THE

THE CALENDAR

ENTER EVENTS AT SFREPORTER.COM/CAL

PRESENTS

CREATIVE FIRE” HONORING SANTA FE ARTIST

RICHARD G. KURMAN

Saturday, May 6, 2017 AT 7:00 PM Immaculate Heart of Mary Chapel 50 Mount Carmel Road, Santa Fe

www.nmperformingartssociety.org or call Hold My Ticket: 877-466-3404

Tickets $34 at:

Members of the New Mexico Bach Society Franz Vote, Music Director and Conductor Linda Marianiello, flute • Jacquelyn Helin, piano

John Andrews, The Shakespeare Guild

S & p e i rit s t s a T OF

Old Santa

Fe

A CULINARY EXPERIENCE Featuring delectable bites & signature cocktails from: ~ La Casa Sena ~ Osteria d'Assisi ~ Coyote Cafe

MAY 13

CALL 505.986.8388 for details historicwalksofsantafe.com

JOHN RANGEL DUETS El Mesón 213 Washington Ave., 983-6756 Jazz piano tunes with accompaniment by a surprise guest. 7 pm, free LATIN NIGHT WITH VDJ DANY Skylight 139 W San Francisco St., 982-0775 Remember that salsa class you took in college? Now is the time to show it off. 9 pm, $7 PAT MALONE TerraCotta Wine Bistro 304 Johnson St., 989-1166 Jazzy solos on guitar. 6 pm, free REGGAE NIGHT: EL DUB Boxcar 530 S Guadalupe St., 988-7222 Dub used to be a genre close to reggae, and that’s the kind of dub this performer’s name refers to. Witness the talents of his one-man reggae band. 10 pm, free ROSEDALE Cowgirl 319 S Guadalupe St., 982-2565 Aggressive pop (see Music, page 27). 8 pm, free

THEATER PIE Adobe Rose Theatre 1213 Parkway Drive, 629-8688 Apollo Garcia Orellana, John Flax, Tara Khozein and Danielle Reddick wrote this play, which presents an extremely abridged version of human history. Directed by Kent Kirkpatrick. 7 pm, $12-$25 THE MOTHERFUCKER WITH THE HAT Teatro Paraguas 3205 Calle Marie, 424-1601 This high-octane verbal cage match of fidelity and misplaced haberdashery tells a story about life struggles with addiction, friendship and love. 7:30 pm, $10

FRI/28 ART OPENINGS ALLYSON PACKER: PLAZAS Radical Abacus 1226 Calle de Comercio Packer presents a participatory sculptural installation as part of the multi-part series, Premises. Through May 14, by appointment only on weekdays. 6 pm, free ANNE APPLEBY: WINTER INTO SPRING Charlotte Jackson Fine Art 554 S Guadalupe St., 989-8688 See a presentation of color and abstraction through the eyes of this artist who has studied with an Ojibwe elder. The works challenge the viewer to “see” rather than “look” with her paintings. Through May 27. 5 pm, free

APRIL HOWLAND: MY WILD KINGDOM ViVO Contemporary 725 Canyon Road, 982-1320 Meet the artist and see bighorn sheep, grizzly bears and more in the realistic wildlife oil paintings at the opening of her first solo show. Howland finds inspiration on her treks in the wilderness and turns it into the fuzzy faces you’ll see in her works. 5 pm, free BRIAN GUTENBERG: CLEAR SEEING PLACE LewAllen Downtown 1613 Paseo de Peralta, 988-8997 See bold, chromatically intense oil paintings inspired by the artist's deep love of nature. Through June 4. 5 pm, free DELIBERATE ACTS: SITE SCHOLAR EXPEDITION 2016-17 form & concept 435 Guadalupe St., 982-8111 This sixth annual exhibit by SITE Santa Fe presents works by student artists from around the state in the borrowed space as SITE renovates. See works by David Beams and Justus Benally from Institute of American Indian Arts, Sarah Canelas and Kemely Gomez from Santa Fe University of Art and Design, Eric-Paul Riege from the University of New Mexico and more. 5 pm, free JEREMY MANN: EXPERIMENTATIONS, PROCESS AND EMOTIONS Evoke Contemporary 550 Guadalupe St., 995-9902 Moody cityscapes and sensual portraits make up this presentation of new works by the San Francisco-based artist. His style presents a blurred representation of scenes in a way that makes familiar things, like a cityscape at night, feel new. Through May 20. 5 pm, free PENTTI SAMMALLAHTI: WARM REGARDS photo-eye Gallery 541 S Guadalupe St., 988-5152 Sammallahti is a Finnish photographer and this exhibit presents a selection of her silver-gelatin prints taken around the world on her travels funded by a 15-year grant from the Finnish government. Isn’t it cool when governments think art is worth funding? Through June 24. 5 pm, free

BOOKS/LECTURES CORA DIAMOND St. John's College 1160 Camino Cruz Blanca, 984-6000 Diamond presents a lecture titled "Wittgenstien Changes His Mind" in the Great Hall. She explores the philosopher’s alienation from civilization. 7:30 pm, free

GIVING VOICE TO IMAGE 5 ViVO Contemporary 725 Canyon Road, 982-1320 Gallery artists work with local poets to create works inspired by each other's concepts, creating collaborative pieces for this annual show. Former Santa Fe poet laureate Valerie Martinez leads this final night of readings inspired by the works, which are on view though May 16. 5:30 pm, free LEN KRAVITZ Santa Fe Community College 6401 Richards Ave., 428-1000 SFCC’S School of Fitness Education presents two free lectures: “Women, Hormones and Metabolism and Solutions to a Complex Conundrum” and “The Physiology of High Intensity Interval Exercise” by Kravitz, who has a doctorate in the field of health fitness. So, you can probably believe what he says. 3 pm, free LOIS RUDNICK: DARKNESS AND LIGHT IN THE LAND OF ENCHANTMENT New Mexico Museum of Art 107 W Palace Ave., 476-5072 Rudnick speaks about two of the most influential artists to ever call New Mexico home, Cady Wells and Georgia O’Keeffe, and their friendship. These two artists, whose lives intersected in dramatic and complex ways during the 1930s and 1940s, lived and painted within similar landscape parameters. 1 pm, $5 SONGS FROM THE EXTRACTION ZONES: A SYMPOSIUM & EXHIBITION ON FRACKING IN NEW MEXICO Santa Fe Art Institute 1600 St. Michael’s Drive, 424-5050 This exhibition and dialogue presents talks by anti-fracking advocates and works by artists who address the escalating threats and impacts of fossil fuel extraction. 6 pm, free

EVENTS BEERLAND TOUR The Lodge at Santa Fe 750 N St. Francis Drive, 992-5800 Get your lawn party on in celebration of the VICELAND TV series with lawn games (of course) yoga, music and happy hour specials, plus a home brew seminar and more. 5 pm, free OUTDOOR VISION FEST Santa Fe University of Art and Design 1600 St. Michael’s Drive, 473-6011 Interactive installations, projection mapping and motion graphics are just some of the mediums you can expect at this outdoor festival with musical soundscapes by Space Mob. 8:45 pm, free CONTINUED ON PAGE 30

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SFREPORTER.COM


ESMÉ OLIVIA

Dance Dance Revolution

A&C up with a message. “In some ways, I think the activism I was participating in was a more masculine way,” says Re. “‘Let’s fight. Let’s resist.’ That’s not what’s true in me. I want to get a bigger vision of the world, or be a mirror of the culture to hold up.” Early on, they considered naming the performance “Fierce Feminine Resistance,” but decided the title was too reactionary. They wanted to reflect a new path for the world rather than playing into a partisan feedback loop. With the performance swiftly approaching, the artists convened to come up with an introduction that would set the tone for the interconnected pieces. “We just needed something that would help the audience get grounded and present,” says Re. “We had to communicate that this is not a light, chit-chatty thing.” The performances include stories of sexual violence and healing, parenting in the face of an uncertain global future, and the objectification of women. With a sliding scale ticket price of $10 to $20 (and no one will be turned away for lack of funds), the show also supports nonprofit organizations Girls Inc. and Honor the Earth. At first, the group’s ideas for the introduction were elaborate and opinions were strong and scattered. Re was concerned that the group would break apart before the performance. “Within the hour, we all had a chance to speak and come up with a new plan,” she says. “I thought, ‘Wow—this is what strong, conscious women who have been around a while and know how to communicate can do together.’ What if we had more of that in our political system?”

Political turmoil won’t knock these performers off balance BY J O R DA N E D DY @jordaneddyart

I

was making phone calls and signing petitions and going on marches and spending too much time on Facebook,” says Amina Re. She’s recounting her activist efforts in the time since January’s presidential inauguration, a flurry of activity that left her oddly frustrated. “I thought, ‘I’m an artist, I want to do my art.’ That’s the artist’s role: to bring change.” Re has been painting for 25 years, and commenced a foray into performance art about three years ago. She was involved in Santa Fe’s strain of the Occupy movement in 2011 and has organized a series of open mic nights to encourage community members to speak out. Perhaps, Re thought, her art and activism could fall into rhythm. She emailed 10 local artists—all women— and asked if they’d like to put on a show. “I said, ‘I want to do a performance where everyone has their own piece in response to the current sociopolitical climate,’” Re says. That was a little over two months ago, and the impromptu collective has shifted in membership as word passed through the creative community. The performance, Fierce Feminine Risings, debuts this Saturday and features eight artists: seven women and one man. Each performer presents a vignette exploring the transformative power of feminine energy and its persistence in the face of violence and oppression.

Re initially met with local dancer Emmaly Wiederholt, and they worked to set a date and line up a venue. They connected with Elise Gent, owner of the Railyard Performance Center, who offered up her space. Gent also expressed interest in performing, and soon other artists organically entered the project’s orbit. Lianne Joy, who participated in Re’s open mic nights and implements dance and theater into her work as a counselor, came on board. Fe Fox, who has a background in circus performance and collaborates with Re on contact improvisation workshops, threw his hat in the ring. Re engaged Robin Duda, an actress she has admired in a number of community theater productions. They were intent on reaching outside of their immediate circles to reflect the diversity of Santa Fe’s larger community. “The majority of us were white women, and most of us were doing some kind of dance thing,” Re says. “I remember thinking, ‘I need to bring diversity into my sphere.’ Then I realized that what I need to do is actually leave my sphere. I need to step out of my zone and be ready to listen.” They reached out to Esmé Olivia, a Dutch and Mestiza poet, dancer and singer who was born and raised in New Mexico. Just a few weeks ago, multidisciplinary artist Sina Soul—who has Pacific Islander, North African and Latina roots—joined the effort. As the show took shape, the fledgling group examined their motives and came

FIERCE FEMININE RISINGS Esmé Olivia and others dance to the tune of resistance this weekend.

7:30 pm Saturday April 29. $10-$20 (no one turned away). Railyard Performance Center, 1611 Paseo de Peralta, 982-8309

may 18 - 21, 2017

Zen Brain: Mind, Brain, Social Perspectives of Views, Values, Ethics: Explore Questions on How the Brain and Mind Operate in Relation to Ethical Conflicts. Richard Davidson, Al Kaszniak, Evan Thompson, John Dunne, Rhonda Magee, Roshi Joan Halifax, John Paul Lederach, and Cynda Hylton Rushton 15 CEUs for Counselors, Therapists, Social Workers SANTA FE, NM

505-986-8518

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We pay the most for your gold coins, heirloom jewelry and diamonds! On the Plaza 60 East San Francisco Street, Suite 218 Santa Fe, NM 87501 • 505.983.4562 • SantaFeGoldworks.com SFREPORTER.COM

APRIL 26-MAY 2, 2017

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Get savager at: SFReporter.com/savage

I’m a 31-year-old gay male. I’ve been with my fiancé for three years, and we are getting married in the fall. I’ve got a question about initiating sex in my sleep—I read somewhere that “sexsomnia” is the “medical” term, but maybe the internet invented that? According to my fiancé, I have initiated or performed some kind of sex act in the middle of the night and then gone right back to sleep. The next day, I don’t remember anything. This freaks me out for a couple of reasons: My body doing things without my mind being in control is concerning enough, but it feels kinda rapey, since I doubt I’m capable of hearing “no” in this state. My fiancé doesn’t feel that way; he finds it sexy. The other thing—and maybe I shouldn’t have read so much Freud and Jung in college—is that I’m worried my body is acting out desires that my conscious mind doesn’t want to acknowledge. According to my fiancé, the last time I did stuff in my sleep, I rimmed him and told him how much I wanted to fuck him. Rimming isn’t a typical part of our sex life (although I’d like it to be), and my fiancé has never bottomed for anyone (I’ve topped guys in prior relationships, but in our relationship I’ve only bottomed). Is my body doing things that my mind won’t admit it wants to do? Is there a way to prevent it from happening? -Sexsomniac Hoping Eventually Eager Trysts Stop Sexsomnia is a real and sometimes troubling phenomenon, SHEETS, and not something the internet made up like Pizzagate or Sean Spicer. The American Academy of Sleep Medicine says sexsomnia is real—a real clinical condition—but they prefer the fancier, more “medical” sounding name: sleep related abnormal sexual behaviors. Dr. Michel Cramer Bornemann, a lead researcher at Sleep Forensics Associates (sleepforensicmedicine. org), describes sexsomnia as “sleepwalking-like behaviors that have sexualized attributes.” And sleep-rimming your delighted fiancé definitely counts. “Sexsomnia may be expressed as loud, obscene vocalizations from sleep (that are typically uncharacteristic of the individual while awake), prolonged or violent masturbation, inappropriate touch upon the genitals, buttocks, and breast of a bed partner, and initiation of sexual intercourse,” said Dr. Bornemann. “The vast majority of sleep disorders are not reflective of a significant underlying psychiatric condition.” So your unconscious, late-night gropings/ initiatings/rimmings don’t mean you secretly desire to be an ass-eating top. And there’s no need to drag poor Sigmund or Carl into this, SHEETS, since you’re not doing anything in your sleep that you don’t desire to do wide awake. You wanna rim your fiancé, you’ve topped other guys and would probably like to top this one too—so neither of the examples you cite qualify as desires your “conscious mind doesn’t want to acknowledge.” (Unless you wrote me in your sleep.) Like all sleep disorders, sexsomnia is just something that happens to a very small number of people, SHEETS, there’s no need to endow it with deeper meaning. Take it away, Dr. Bornemann… “The brain is made of approximately 100 billion neurons, or electrical connections that allow effective communication between brain subunits. As with all electrical systems, errors in transmission may occur—these are called ‘switching errors.’ In sleep, switching errors may activate previously quiescent areas of the brain while other areas remain off-line. In sleep-related behaviors, it is thought that deep-seated subunits near the sleep-wake generating center become triggered, which activate primal automatic behaviors. Simply stated, electrical switching errors in sleep may unleash the animal that actually lies within us all—sometimes to an extent that may have unintended criminal or forensics implications.” In most cases, sexsomniacs will hump a pillow or jerk themselves off. The sexsomniacs who tend to make the news—the ones we hear about—are the “unintended criminals” Dr. Bornemann alluded

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to, i.e., people who’ve sexually assaulted someone while asleep. Luckily for you, SHEETS, your fiancé is okay with your “primal automatic behaviors.” But you might wanna watch Sleepwalk with Me, an autobiographical film by Mike Birbiglia, a comedian with a sleep disorder. Birbiglia wasn’t initiating sex in his sleep—he was jumping out of windows. A danger to himself and others, he sought treatment and is no longer jumping out of windows in his sleep. You’re not a danger to yourself or others currently, SHEETS, but if you got a new partner or your current partner’s feelings about surprise, middle-of-the-night rimjobs were to change, you could be a danger. So you should chat with a doctor now about drugs and/or other interventions. “My catch-all advice is to read this book called The Promise of Sleep by Dr. William C. Dement,” said Birbiglia in an email after I shared your letter with him. “He’s sort of the father of sleep medicine. He talks about sleep hygiene extensively, i.e., how to have the best night’s sleep possible by avoiding TV, eating heavily, drinking, etc., a few hours before bed. I know this isn’t exactly an answer to SHEET’s specific question, but getting a better night’s sleep could probably help him across the board in ways that he doesn’t even realize.” My boyfriend wants to visit a private gay sex dungeon in Europe this summer but we only want to play only with each other. Any tips on getting to play in an actual dungeon without having to put out for the guy whose dungeon it is? -Requests A Curious Kinkster Put Berlin on your itinerary, RACK, google “SM Apartments” or “Hoist Basements,” break out your credit card, splurge, and send pics. I’m a straight married male. My wife has a very close male who happens to be in a poly marriage. Recently, my wife said she would like us to be able to date others, have sex, romance, etc., but still remain a married couple. She specifically wants to date her friend. I am struggling. I am not closed off to having a conversation about nonmonogamy, but I struggle with the thought of her having a boyfriend. I want to be able to give this to her, but I feel like my mind and body are not letting me. Any advice is so much appreciated. -Help Understanding Spouse’s Blunt And New Demand “Introducing nonmonogamy into an existing monogamous relationship can be tough, especially when it wasn’t your idea,” said Cunning Minx, host of the Polyamory Weekly podcast, who has been providing poly news, advice, and insights to the masses since 2005 at polyweekly.com. “It’s even more stressful when there is a potential partner waiting in the wings! Yikes!” While Minx is a poly activist and advocate, HUSBAND, she thinks both parties need to be on the same page before going poly. And before you take that step—if you take that step—Minx thinks you need to ask yourself some questions. “HUSBAND should do a fear inventory,” said Minx. “What is he afraid of? What would it mean to him if his wife had a boyfriend? What if she wanted to love a woman—does the penis make a difference? If so, why? Then he should sit with his wife and take stock of the health of their current relationship.” You can say no to opening up your marriage, HUSBAND, but your wife may decide she wants out of the marriage if no is the answer—basically, this is a circumstance where one of you is going to have to pay a pretty steep price of admission. You’ll either have to accept polyamory, or your wife will have to drop it. There isn’t really a middle ground here—or is there? “It’s perfectly acceptable for HUSBAND to selfidentify as monogamous while his wife practices polyamory,” said Minx. “It’s a difficult path, and will require a high level of internal security and self-awareness on his part, but ultimately your selfidentity is your own decision.”

SFREPORTER.COM

On the Lovecast, a deep dive into the world of cuckolding: savagelovecast.com mail@savagelove.net @fakedansavage on Twitter ITMFA.org

MUSIC THE BILL HEARNE TRIO Second Street Brewery (Original) 1814 Second St., 982-3030 Americana by the SFR Best of Santa Fe 2016 winner and his buds. If you’re bummed and you’re into this kind of music, Hearne is bound to cheer you up, because he loves what he does. 6 pm, free THE BLUE SUNS Duel Brewing 1228 Parkway Drive, 474-5301 Blues, rock and country songs from the trio that has welcomed Mark Davis on bass. 7 pm, free CONCERT FOR SANTA FE DREAMERS Skylight 139 W San Francisco St., 982-0775 Joe West and the Santa Fe Revue, the Jono Manson Band, John Kurzweg, Baracutanga and Nosotros all perform at this benefit concert that donates proceeds to the Santa Fe Dreamers Project, which provides legal counseling and assistances for immigrant families (see SFR Picks, page 23). 6 pm, $10 DAVID GEIST Pranzo Italian Grill 540 Montezuma Ave., 984-2645 Broadway standards by this pianist who worked in New York with composers like Stephen Sondheim for years. 6 pm, $2 DONNA COLEMAN First Presbyterian Church 208 Grant Ave., 982-8544 Coleman performs compositions by Beethoven and Charles Ives on piano. 5:30 pm, free DOUG MONTGOMERY Vanessie 427 W Water St., 982-9966 A varied set of classical, standards, pop and original music on piano. 6:30 pm, free GREG SCHLOTTHAUER Vanessie 427 W Water St., 982-9966 Pop tunes on piano may be they key to a good weekend. 8 pm, free JJ AND THE HOOLIGANS Cowgirl 319 S Guadalupe St., 982-2565 Party and dance rock covers with powerful lady-vocals. 8:30 pm, free MUSIC ON BARCELONA Unitarian Universalist Congregation 107 W Barcelona Road, 982-9674 Hear classical compositions performed by the Mendelssohn string quartet. 5:30 pm, free

PINT & A HALF Mine Shaft Tavern 2846 Hwy. 14, Madrid, 473-0743 Americana and alt.country on the deck. 5 pm, free SANTA FE PRO MUSICA: BEETHOVEN PIANO CONCERTOS Lensic Performing Arts Center 211 W San Francisco St., 988-1234 Santa Fe Pro Musica’s 35th-anniversary concert finale featuring dynamic pianist Anne-Marie McDermott, who performs three of five of Beethoven’s celebrated piano concertos. 7 pm, $20-$75 SILVER STRING BAND Mine Shaft Tavern 2846 Hwy. 14, Madrid, 473-0743 Rowdygrass and blues by this Albuquerque-based band. 7 pm, free THREE FACES OF JAZZ El Mesón 213 Washington Ave., 983-6756 Three faces are better than none. Swinging jazz by this trio that welcomes a different special guest each time. 7:30 pm, free ZOLTAN & THE FORTUNE TELLERS Second Street Brewery (Railyard) 1607 Paseo de Peralta, 989-3278 Folk gypsy tunes, not fortune telling. 6 pm, free

THE MOTHERFUCKER WITH THE HAT Teatro Paraguas 3205 Calle Marie, 424-1601 This high-octane verbal cage match of fidelity and misplaced haberdashery tells a story about life-struggles with addiction, friendship and love. 7:30 pm, $12-$20

THEATER

FIERCE FEMININE RISINGS Railyard Performance Center 1611 Paseo de Peralta, 982-8309 Eight feminist artists, dancers and poets come together to present a performance that "does something" about the current socio-political climate. See Emmaly Wiederholt, Fe Fox, Esmé Olivia, Elise Gent and more (see A&C, page 23). 7:30 pm, $10-$20

CIRCASPIRE 2017: THE UPS AND DOWNS, A RECIPE FOR STARDUST SOUP Wise Fool New Mexico 1131 Siler Road, Ste. B, 992-2588 Wise Fool brings its third annual production featuring youth and adult program participants to the stage in this pre-professional extravaganza. The performance promises to thrill and delight, entice the eyes, ears and heart with flips, dances and aerial performances (see SFR Picks, page 23). 7 pm, $5-$20 PIE Adobe Rose Theatre 1213 Parkway Drive, 629-8688 Apollo Garcia Orellana, John Flax, Tara Khozein and Danielle Reddick wrote this play that presents an extremely abridged version of human history. Directed by Kent Kirkpatrick. 7 pm, $12-$25 THE MERRY WIVES OF WINDSOR Warehouse 21 1614 Paseo de Peralta, 989-4423 The Santa Fe Shakespeare Society performs the immortal comedy of love and trickery. 7:30 pm, $20

WORKSHOP MENTAL HEALTH FIRST AID TRAINING Santa Fe Community College 6401 Richards Ave., 428-1000 Call to register for this early-bird course that can give you the tools to help an individual in crisis and recognize the warning signs for mental health problem. We could all stand to be better allies. 8 am, free

SAT/29 BOOKS/LECTURES JOANNE LEFRAK: GALLERY TALK form & concept 435 Guadalupe St., 982-8111 Lefrak, the director of education at SITE Santa Fe, engages several of the SITE scholars who have work showing in the sixth annual student art exhibit. 2 pm, free

DANCE

EVENTS AMP CELEBRATES 10 YEARS Whole Foods 753 Cerrillos Road, 992-1700 Today is a good day to get your groceries because AMP concerts is celebrating its 10th anniversary. Whole Foods donates 5 percent of its profits to the nonprofit music promoters. Noon, free CONTEMPORARY CLAY FAIR Santa Fe Woman’s Club 1616 Old Pecos Trail, 983-9455 This juried event features over 30 of New Mexico’s top ceramic artists exhibiting functional dinnerware, sculptural vessels and artistic wall pieces. 10 am-5 pm, free


ENTER EVENTS AT SFREPORTER.COM/CAL

SANTA FE ARTISTS MARKET Railyard Park Cerrillos Road and Guadalupe Street, 310-8766 This market features works by local artists representing a ton of different mediums, from sculpture to ceramics to photography and more. 8 am-1 pm, free SANTA FE JAPAN FESTIVAL Santa Fe Community Convention Center 201 W Marcy St., 955-6590 Eiichi Obana, a guest from Japan, shares the traditional art of Kamishibai, which is a form of storytelling that uses original art prints. Also see traditional celebratory dance and performances on handmade drums, cosplay and more. 9:30 am-5 pm, $5 SATURDAY SCIENCE Santa Fe Children's Museum 1050 Old Pecos Trail, 989-8359 Michael Sheppard of Big Sky Learning takes kiddos on an adventure with sparks and shocks as an exploration of static electricity. Free with museum admission. 1 pm, $5-$7 SOUNDS LIKE PRIMAL FEAT. PERKULAT0R, SOOHAN AND GALAXY Meow Wolf 1352 Rufina Circle, 395-6369 Galaxy's album release party comes with live performances by fellow space electronica jammers, tons of dance performances and even live-creation by fashion designer Happy Loco, who will paint a piece on the spot. Round-trip tickets on the party bus from Albuquerque are available (see Bed Head, page 33). 8 pm, $20-$50 WORLD TAI CHI & QIGONG DAY DEMONSTRATION Farmers Market Pavilion 1607 Paseo de Peralta, 983-7726 See live demonstrations of both ancient healing arts on their day of world celebration. 11 am, free

MUSIC THE BURTON JACKSON EXPERIENCE Mine Shaft Tavern 2846 Hwy. 14, Madrid, 473-0743 Bluegrass on the deck. 3 pm, free CALI SHAW BAND Cowgirl 319 S Guadalupe St., 982-2565 Eclectic funk. 8:30 pm, free CHANGO Boxcar 530 S Guadalupe St., 988-7222 Santa Fe's party cover band. 10 pm, free DAVID GEIST Pranzo Italian Grill 540 Montezuma Ave., 984-2645 Broadway standards. 6 pm, $2

THE CALENDAR

with Dash Shaw

COURTESY OF DASH SHAW

We spent a good chunk of the weekend watching and loving and rewatching My Entire High School Sinking Into the Sea, the new animated film from celebrated comics artist Dash Shaw (see full review, page 39). The tale of a high school that quite literally sinks into the sea, the film is the culmination of nearly seven years of work from Shaw and his wife Jane Samborski and is one of the most delightfully bizarre and brilliant things we’ve ever seen. Obviously, we called the guy. (Alex De Vore) Would you say the movie is based on your own life or experiences? The joke was that it’s kind of combining the two opposing schools of comics from when I was a teenager. The majority of comics in the ’90s were the autobio comics, like Crumb, and I loved those comics. At the opposite end of the spectrum were the boy’s adventure or superhero comics. The joke was that it would be an autobio comic, but clearly warped into a boy’s adventure world where it has an extremely unreliable narrator. It was a joke, but also I was on the school newspaper and I had friends like those friends. So parts of it are real—I think I was kind of mean in the way that teenagers are mean, but I made [the main character] meaner because it seems like that was a part of it ... (I was) the person who would decide to make a movie where they’re the hero. The film is in your style, but also other people obviously worked on it. How much did you draw or animate? A whole lot. It was primarily made by Jane Samborski and myself in our apartment. We’re married, and we drew most of it in our kitchen. It was a very small operation. The script was written in 2010, but I feel like if I say ‘six years,’ I’m exaggerating to make it sound more, ... I don’t want to make it sound like it took longer than it did. Everything about the movie was based upon what I thought was possible with limited means. I thought about it like Evil Dead where the director has a cabin and a couple actors and it kind of gets by on its energy. The story is simple, it has a video game-like progression. The characters don’t change clothes, so you don’t have to worry about keeping track of outfit changes in different scenes. I thought the main joke or the dissonance in the movie is that it’s a disaster movie, but they’re still talking about high school stuff. Do you think that creative types or outcasts will find solace or inspiration in a film like this? Well, that sounds nice. I guess that would be nice. I When I look at it, it feels like one of those movies that was very meaningful to me at a young age, like when I saw Ralph Bakshi’s Wizards. Maybe ‘anti-establishment’ is too strong a word, but it has, at least, a contrarian sensibility. I didn’t try to think of an audience, I didn’t play-test it for people and try to think of an audience. When it was finishing I thought, ‘This feels like a movie I would have really liked at a young age if I had come across it.’ I hope 16-year-old nerdy kids who are into art will find it. CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE

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THE CALENDAR DOUG MONTGOMERY Vanessie 427 W Water St., 982-9966 For over 30 years, Montgomery has been wowing audiences with his piano talents, and he’s about to do it again tonight. 6:30 pm, free GREG SCHLOTTHAUER Vanessie 427 W Water St., 982-9966 Piano-jammin’ pop. 8 pm, free HELLA BELLA Mine Shaft Tavern 2846 Hwy. 14, Madrid, 473-0743 Witness covers like you’ve never heard them before from this rock band starring Bella Gigante. 8 pm, free HOGAN & MOSS Cowgirl 319 S Guadalupe St., 982-2565 Folk, roots and old-timey tunes by this duo. 1 pm, free PAT MALONE Inn and Spa at Loretto 211 Old Santa Fe Trail, 984-7997 Jazzy guitar goodness by this solo performer. 7 pm, free PINT & A HALF Second Street Brewery (Original) 1814 Second St., 982-3030 Roots and alt.country. 6 pm, free ROBERTO CAPOCCHI AND TRACY DOYLE San Miguel Chapel 401 Old Santa Fe Trail, 983-3974 A program of classical music on guitar and flute. 8 pm, $20 SANTA FE PRO MUSICA: BEETHOVEN PIANO CONCERTOS Lensic Performing Arts Center 211 W San Francisco St., 988-1234 Santa Fe Pro Musica’s 35th-anniversary concert finale featuring dynamic pianist Anne-Marie McDermott, who performs three of Beethoven’s five piano concertos. 4 pm, $20-$75 SHERITA PEREZ DUET Duel Brewing 1228 Parkway Drive, 474-5301 Enjoy a Belgian beer and indie folk influenced by musical greats like Joni Mitchell, Amy Winehouse, Stevie Nicks and Etta James. 7 pm, free SO SOPHISTICATED WITH DJ 12 TRIBE Skylight 139 W San Francisco St., 982-0775 Top 40 hits in hip-hop and R&B as remixed and spun by DJ 12 Tribe. 9 pm, $7 STILL CLOSED FOR REPAIRS Second Street Brewery (Railyard) 1607 Paseo de Peralta, 989-3278 Indie folk. 6 pm, free

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VAIVÉN El Mesón 213 Washington Ave., 983-6756 Calvin Hazen plays guitar and Jon Gagan plays bass, but the two don’t play around when it comes to making jazz music. 7:30 pm, free

OPERA SANTA FE OPERA COSTUME AND PROPS SALE Santa Fe Opera House 301 Opera Drive, 986-5900 Live in your childhood dressup fantasy, but better. Shop the opera's crazy-amazing collection of costumes, fabric, furniture and stage props at this rare sale. They say everything is "reasonably priced," and to bring your own bags and hangers. 9 am-3 pm, free

THEATER CIRCASPIRE 2017: THE UPS AND DOWNS, A RECIPE FOR STARDUST SOUP Wise Fool New Mexico 1131 Siler Road, Ste. B, 992-2588 Wise Fool brings its third annual production featuring youth and adult program participants to the stage in this pre-professional extravaganza. The performance promises to thrill with flips, dances and aerial performances (see SFR Picks, page 23). 2 pm and 7 pm, $5-$20 PIE Adobe Rose Theatre 1213 Parkway Drive, 629-8688 Apollo Garcia Orellana, John Flax, Tara Khozein and Danielle Reddick wrote this play that explores human history. Directed by Kent Kirkpatrick. 7 pm, $12-$25 THE MERRY WIVES OF WINDSOR Warehouse 21 1614 Paseo de Peralta, 989-4423 The Santa Fe Shakespeare Society presents the immortal comedy of love and trickery. 7:30 pm, $20 THE MOTHERFUCKER WITH THE HAT Teatro Paraguas 3205 Calle Marie, 424-1601 A high-octane verbal cage match tells a story about struggles with addiction, friendship, love, and the challenges of adulthood. 7:30 pm, $12-$20 THE THREEPENNY OPERA Greer Garson Theatre at Santa Fe University of Art and Design 1600 St. Michael's Drive, 473-6439 Set in Victorian England, this classic musical satire written by Bertolt Brecht tells the story of woe in a capitalist society. Kenn McLaughlin makes his debut, directing his first production at this theater. 7 pm, $5-$15

THE WIZARD OF OZ Santa Fe Performing Arts 1050 Old Pecos Trail, 982-7992 Santa Fe Performing Arts’ City Different Players and Teen Ensemble presents the non-musical version of L Frank Baum's beloved story. Go to Oz, don’t sing about it. 2 pm, $8

WORKSHOP MARY DEZEMBER AND GALAXY DANCER St. John's College 1160 Camino Cruz Blanca, 984-6000 Take a walk in nature led by a poet and a wilderness guide. After, participate in a writing exercise and a sharing of work. Find them in the Junior Common Room at Peterson Student Center to kick off the hike. 2 pm, free NOT JUST FOR THE BIRDS Santa Fe Clay 545 Camino de la Familia, 984-1122 Help efforts to assist homeless individuals by making a ceramic bird house or birdbath for the auction at the Not Just for the Birds event, which happens in June and donates proceeds to nonprofit groups. 1 pm, $25 TRACY NEAL: TREES FOR SANTA FE Santa Fe Botanical Garden 715 Camino Lejo, 471-9103 Do you want more shade in your yard next summer? Do you wonder what the names are of the trees you see around Santa Fe? Join Neal for a class on choosing, planting, caring for and identifying trees in your landscape. 9 am, $25-$30

SUN/30 BOOKS/LECTURES BARBARA ARLEN: EARLY PEEK AT AUTUMN/WINTER FASHION Wheelwright Museum of the American Indian 704 Camino Lejo, 982-4636 Arlen, a textile expert who regularly reviews runway shows and fashion seasons, presents her review of the AW 2017 season. 3 pm, free HENRIETTA CHRISTMAS AND PAUL RHETTS: THE BASIC GENEALOGY CHECKLIST Santa Fe Public Library Main Branch 145 Washington Ave., 955-6780 Christmas and Rhetts present their co-authored book, The Basic Genealogy Checklist, which details the best ways to discover facts about your family and ancestry. 2 pm, free CONTINUED ON PAGE 34

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FASHION

A Happy Movement

Don’t You Know That I’m Loco STO RY BY M A R I A EG O L F - RO M E RO I L L U S T R AT I O N S B Y T H E A M I L I N A I R É

A

s a famous chocolatier once posited, if you want to view paradise, simply look around and view it. This is also the mindset of designer Jeremy Salazar, aka the mind behind Happy Loco. The young creator embraces everything that’s made him the positive thinker he is today, even his upbringing in a rougher part of Albuquerque. Expression wasn’t big in the South Valley. “Where I came from, it wasn’t a thing to be an artist or creative or to express yourself. It was more of this straight way of living. It wasn’t real,” he says. “It always took other people to show me something was possible.” By painting messages of hope, peace and self-love on his designs, Salazar hopes to make others feel a sense of self-acceptance. “Maybe I could inspire a kid here who’s in whatever situation to want to do something too,” Salazar says. “I feel like it’s a little bit harder to do things here because it doesn’t seem like it’s possible—it’s easier when you know someone is from the same part of town as you or the same city, and you see them do something cool.” Even Salazar’s look has a celebratory, exuberant feel. He ornaments his long dreadlocks with hints of gold in the form of beads or tiny spoons. He often incorporates leopard print into his ensembles and wears small peach-rimmed glasses. He has a naturally stylish, soft-spoken vibe, so you’re always leaning in because you want to hear what he’s saying. There’s something inherently peaceful about him, and maybe a little hint of Cheech and Chong. Salazar says his look and design skills come from his skateboarding lifestyle. “I started noticing skateboarders had their own sense of self-expression,” he says. “They had their own individuality.” As any skater knows, the sport isn’t easy on clothing. “My clothes started ripping really fast, and I couldn’t afford

clothes, so I just decided I would learn how to sew my pants back together,” Salazar tells SFR. “I didn’t think they were really fashionable or anything. I was just trying to fix my clothes.” Salazar’s friends and fellow skaters noticed the mending, and a pair of white pants with leopard print patches spawned

his first commission for a friend in 2016. “I was super excited that somebody liked something that I did,” he says. “I had made some other pants. … My friend who’s into fashion saw me skateboarding in them in a video, and she wanted me to make shorts like the same design,” he says. And thus, Happy Loco was born.

Few designers have so successfully created hand-painted designs or reconstructed new garments from outdated ones. Many end up looking like 1980s disasters. But Happy Loco pieces embrace a future-punk aesthetic that feels as natural as Salazar does. Most feature simple symbols like eyes and flowers, or empowering messages like “be weird” and “happy loco por vida.” Some items make political statements, like the infamous red “Make America Great Again” hats—Salazar drew a bold line through the last two words and replaced them with (you guessed it) “happy loco”; or the fuzzy leopard jacket featuring an anti-pipeline patch he brought back from his trip to Standing Rock. Before he was a designer, Salazar dabbled in public art, making social statements. Like the time he took a ton of chalk to the Central New Mexico Community College campus and drew a cross, heart, peace sign and skateboard figure (symbols he now frequently incorporates into his designs) next to the words “What makes you happy?” According to Salazar, “Once I was writing it on the floor, people started telling me [what made them happy] and interacting with [the work], and I was really surprised.” Such interest pushed Salazar to further pursue happiness as a topic in his work. “Eventually I started photographing people and asking them what makes them happy,” he says, adding that he wants wearers to “feel happy, confident, beautiful, to stand out; I really just want people to feel confident in expressing themselves and expressing their deepest darkest demons or their greatest feelings.” The brand wouldn’t exist without what Salazar calls his “yin and yang,” which is the balance between the positive being he’s become and “where I came from, that whole loco kind of gang-culture stuff.” You can experience Salazar and his happy-vibe in person this Saturday at Galaxy’s CD release party, as he live-paints an outfit and displays his post-punk-creative process. To see more of Salazar’s work, check his website www.happyxloco.com or, if you want a Happy Loco piece of your own, his Etsy shop (etsy.com/shop/HappyLoco). There are options for all genders, awesome unisex overalls and the majority of his designs are one-of-a-kind. He says the Happy Loco aesthetic is “something from the future, maybe.” We say, most definitely. SOUNDS LIKE PRIMAL FEAT. PERKULAT0R, SOOHAN AND GALAXY 8 pm Saturday April 29. $20-$50. Meow Wolf, 1352 Rufina Circle, 395-6369

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THE CALENDAR JOURNEYSANTAFE: VERONICA GARCIA Collected Works Bookstore and Coffeehouse 202 Galisteo St., 988-4226 Garcia, superintendent of Santa Fe Public schools, has pushed for education reforms like increased funding and school-based health clinics. She speaks about the changes she's made and those she has planned for the future. 11 am, free

EVENTS RAILYARD ARTISAN MARKET Santa Fe Farmers Market 1607 Paseo de Peralta, 983-4098 Hit the market and peruse a variety of handmade artworks representing mediums like sculpture, painting and ceramics, all made by artists living in Santa Fe. 10 am-4 pm, free

MUSIC New Mexico’s #1 Tamale Makers Since 1955. Tamales Are Still Made The Original Way... By Han d.

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CACTUS SLIM & THE GOATHEADS Mine Shaft Tavern 2846 Hwy. 14, Madrid, 473-0743 Rock and blues on the deck. Pos3a’spm, free DOUG MONTGOMERY Vanessie 427 W Water St., 982-9966 Piano tunes including classical, standards, pop and originals. 6:30 pm, free DULCIMETRIX Santa Fe Public Library (Southside) 6599 Jaguar Drive, 955-2820 Banjo, upright bass and guitar are some of the instruments on which this band plays a set of Irish, Celtic and Americana gospel tunes. 1 pm, free SANTA FE PRO MUSICA: BEETHOVEN PIANO CONCERTOS Lensic Performing Arts Center 211 W San Francisco St., 988-1234 Santa Fe Pro Musica’s 35th-anniversary concert New Mexico’s #1 Tamale finale featuring dynamic piaMakers Since 1955. Anne-Marie McDermott, Posa’s Tamales Are Stillnist Made who performs three of five of The Original Way... By Hand . Beethoven’s celebrated Piano Concertos. 3 pm, $20-$75

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PIE Adobe Rose Theatre 1213 Parkway Drive, 629-8688 Apollo Garcia Orellana, John Flax, Tara Khozein and Danielle Reddick wrote this play that presents an extremely abridged version of human history. Directed by Kent Kirkpatrick. 2 pm, $12-$25 THE MERRY WIVES OF WINDSOR Warehouse 21 1614 Paseo de Peralta, 989-4423 The Santa Fe Shakespeare Society presents this immortal comedy of love and trickery. 4 pm, $20 THE MOTHERFUCKER WITH THE HAT Teatro Paraguas 3205 Calle Marie, 424-1601 This high-octane verbal cage match tells a story of struggles with addiction, friendship, love, and the challenges of adulthood. 2 pm, $12-$20 THE THREEPENNY OPERA Greer Garson Theatre at Santa Fe University of Art and Design 1600 St. Michael's Drive, 473-6439 Set in Victorian England, this classic musical satire written by Bertolt Brecht tells the story of woe in a capitalist society. Kenn McLaughlin makes his debut as director at the theater. 7 pm, $5-$15 THE WIZARD OF OZ Santa Fe Performing Arts 1050 Old Pecos Trail, 982-7992 Go to Oz with Dorothy, Toto and more in this nonmusical version performed by the local kids. Oz is probably a much less creepy place when people aren’t randomly busting into song for no reason. 2 pm, $8

WORKSHOP

BOB ALBERS: BUDDHISM IN A NUTSHELL Thubten Norbu Ling Tibetan Buddhist Center 1807 Second St., Ste. 35, 660-7056 If you've been stressed lately or really want to learn something new, Albers' introductory course on basic Buddhist philosophy and principles THEATER within the Tibetan Mahayana context should do the trick. CIRCASPIRE 2017: THE CATERING 6:30 pm,COUPON free UPS AND DOWNS, A CATERING COUPON PAULA PANICH: WRITING RECIPE FOR STARDUST DinnerSOUP for 4 WHAT YOU LOVE Dinner forFool 4 New Mexico Santa Fe Botanical Garden TAKEWise OUT 715 Camino Lejo, 471-9103 1131 Siler Road, Ste. B, NASCAR GIVEAWAY TAKE OUT SPECIALS Gardeners learn that interestNew Mexico’s #1 Tamale 992-2588 SPECIALS Mak See cashier for details. ers 1 Enchilada Casserole ing and complex gardens are Wise Since(Cheese, 1955. Chicken or Beef)Fool brings its third 1 Enchilada Casserole Posa’s Tama• 1lesQt.Are based on underlying strucof Beans •Mad 1Qt. eof Riceproduction featuring Stillannual (Cheese, Chicken or Beef) The • 4 Tamales • 6 Tortillas Origi nal and Way. Byyouth Hand tures made ofOf soft and hard • 1 Qt. of .. Beans • 1Qt. .of Rice and adult Any Catering Order On Totalprogram Order Of $6 Or More. • 1 Two Liter Pepsi or Diet Pepsi • 4 TamalesOR• 6 Tortillas elements. Writers retail participants to theOrderstage in Any Catering Order Of learn that OnExcludes Total Of $6tamales Or More. $45 Or More. Two Liter Pepsi or Diet Pepsi 1• 1Tamale Pie Casserole & cateringretail purchases. OR effective writing is based on Excludes tamales pre-professional extrav(Pork, Chickenthis or Cheese) $45 Or More. 3538 ZAFARANO DR •18 Tamale PieBeef Casserole Flautas (Roast or Chicken) & catering purchases. good bones. Join writer and (Pork, Qt. ofChicken Beansaganza. •or1 Cheese) Qt. of Rice The performance 3538 473-3454 ZAFARANO DR • ••811Flautas (Roast Beef Two Liter Pepsi or or DietChicken) Pepsi to thrill and delight, teacher Panich for a workshop • 1 Qt. of Beanspromises • 1 Qt. of Rice Mon-Sat 6am473-3454 to 9pm / Sunday 7am to 8pm • 1 Two Liter Pepsi or Diet flips, Pepsi regarding writing on subjects with dances and aerial Restaurant Restaurant Mon-Sat 6am to 9pm / Sunday 7am to 8pm ONLY $29.99 REG. $49.99 related to gardens, houses 1514 RODEO ROAD ONLY $29.99 Mondays Only performances SFR With this(see coupon. Cannot bePicks, used with With this coupon. Cannot be used with REG. $49.99 Restaurant Restaurant 3pm til Close other offers or discounts. Must present otherand offers orhorticulture. discounts. Must present 1514 820-7672 RODEO ROAD Mondays23). Only page With thiswhen coupon. CannotOne be used with With thiswhen coupon. CannotOne be used with Expires 1/31/14 coupon ordering. coupon coupon ordering. coupon til Close other offers Expires or discounts. Must present other or discounts. Must present Restaurant 3pm per person. 1/31/14. PSG14. per person. 1/31/14. PSG14. 1offers pm,Expires $25-$30 PSG14 Mon-Sat 6am820-7672 to 8pm / Sunday 7am to 6pm Expires 1/31/14 coupon when ordering. One coupon coupon when ordering. One coupon 4 pm, $5-$20 Restaurant

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MON/1 ART OPENINGS EDWINA H MILNER: VARIOUS MEDIUMS Collected Works Bookstore and Coffeehouse 202 Galisteo St., 988-4226 See Milner's latest paintings in this solo exhibit. Through May 30. 5 pm, free

BOOKS/LECTURES THERESA PASQUAL: ANCIENT SITES AND ANCIENT STORIES III Hotel Santa Fe 1501 Paseo de Peralta, 982-1200 Pasqual, the former historic preservation officer at Acoma Pueblo, speaks about the importance of preserving sacred sites in her lecture titled "Resistance to Resilience: Protecting Sacred Places in Turbulent Times." 6 pm, $15

EVENTS GEEKS WHO DRINK Draft Station 60 E San Francisco St., 983-6443 Compete against other teams for trivia knowledge victory. Not much feels better than knowing you know more than everyone else, except using that knowledge for evil. Ahhh, the dark side. 7 pm, free

MUSIC COWGIRL KARAOKE Cowgirl 319 S Guadalupe St., 982-2565 If you were truly an amazing singer, you would probably be a musician. But that doesn't mean amateurs don't deserve time to rock the mic. 9 pm, free LE CHAT LUNATIQUE: MONDAY NIGHT SWING Odd Fellows Hall 1125 Cerrillos Road, 470-7077 Bust your best swing dance moves while the Albuquerque-based Gypsy swing/rock band performs. 8 pm, $10 MELLOW MONDAYS WITH DJ OBI ZEN Boxcar 530 S Guadalupe St., 988-7222 This DJ mixes live percussion into his electronica sets. 10 pm, free

TUE/2 BOOKS/LECTURES PHOTOGRAPHIC SOCIETY OF SANTA FE MEETING St. John’s United Methodist Church 1200 Old Pecos Trail, 982-9274 Bring up to five images for peer review at this gathering of photo-lovers. 6:30 pm, free


ENTER EVENTS AT SFREPORTER.COM/CAL

DARYL RATAJCZAK: LIONS AND HIKERS AND BEARS, OH MY! Los Alamos Nature Center 2600 Canyon Road, Los Alamos, 662-0460 Would you know what to do if you came face-to-face with a large animal, like a bear or a mountain lion? Ratajczak, a wildlife biologist, lays down the law on hiking safely amongst big mammals, and what to do if you have a run in with one (see Enthusiast, page 21). 7 pm, free

THE CALENDAR

EVENTS GEEKS WHO DRINK Boxcar 530 S Guadalupe St., 988-7222 Battle others for the seat as king of knowing everything about trivia. 8 pm, free

MUSIC CANYON ROAD BLUES JAM Boxcar 530 S Guadalupe St., 988-7222 El Farol's famous Tuesday night blues jam has moved to Boxcar during renovations. 8:30 pm, free

JERKAGRAM, RUSA AND MASSIVELY PARALLEL Zephyr Community Art Studio 1502 Center Drive, Ste. #2 Jerkagram is a psychedelic rock duo from Los Angeles, and they're joined by two local progressively experimental rock groups. 8 pm, $5-$10 PAT MALONE TerraCotta Wine Bistro 304 Johnson St., 989-1166 Jazzy guitar goodness by this solo performer. 6 pm, free

Get your physical so you can get physical!

EL RANCHO DE LAS GOLONDRINAS 334 Los Pinos Road, 471-2261 Living history. GEORGIA O’KEEFFE MUSEUM 217 Johnson St.,946-1000 O’Keeffe at the University of Virginia. Through Aug. HARWOOD MUSEUM OF ART 238 Ledoux St., Taos, 575-758-9826 Ken Price, Death Shrine I. Agnes Martin Gallery. Continuum, Through May. MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY NATIVE ART 108 Cathedral Place, 983-8900 Athena LaTocha: Inside the Forces of Nature. Through May. New Impressions: Experiments in Contemporary Native American Printmaking. Through June. Daniel McCoy: The Ceaseless Quest for Utopia. Through Jan. 2018. MUSEUM OF INDIAN ARTS & CULTURE 710 Camino Lejo, 476-1250 Frank Buffalo Hyde: I-Witness Culture. Through Jan. 2018. Into the Future: Culture Power in Native American Art. Jody Naranjo: Revealing Joy. Through Sept. MUSEUM OF INTERNATIONAL FOLK ART 706 Camino Lejo, 476-1200 No Idle Hands: The Myths and Meanings of Tramp Art. Through Sept. 16. Flamenco: From Spain to New Mexico. Through Sept. Sacred Realm. The Morris Miniature Circus. Under Pressure. Through Dec. MUSEUM OF SPANISH COLONIAL ART 750 Camino Lejo, 982-2226 Chimayó: A Pilgrimage Through Two Centuries. The Beltran Kropp Collection. The Delgado Room. NM HISTORY MUSEUM 113 Lincoln Ave., 476-5019 Agnes Martin and Me.

COURTESY NEW MEXICO HISTORY MUSEUM

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See “Halberd Head” at the New Mexico History Museum as part of the exhibit, Telling New Mexico: Stories from then and Now.

Through Aug. Out of the Box: The Art of the Cigar. Through Oct. NM MUSEUM OF ART 107 W Palace Ave., 476-5072 Meggan Gould and Andy Mattern: Light Tight. Through Sept. 17. Cady Wells: Ruminations. Through Sept. 17. Conversations in Painting. Through April. Be With Me: A Small Exhibition of Large Paintings. Through April. PALACE OF THE GOVERNORS 105 W Palace Ave., 476-5100 Treasures of Devotion/ Tesoros de Devoción.

POEH CULTURAL CENTER AND MUSEUM 78 Cities of Gold Road, Pojoaque, 455-3334 Water Is Life Pushpin Show. Through June. SANTA FE BOTANICAL GARDENS 715 Camino Lejo, 471-9103 Bill Barrett: Visual Poetry. Through March. Ojos y Manos. WHEELWRIGHT MUSEUM OF THE AMERICAN INDIAN 704 Camino Lejo, 986-4636 Eveli: Energy and Significance.

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RESTAURANTS

Dine out at any of these locations on Thursday, April 27th, 2017 and 25% of your bill goes to support Kitchen Angels Breakfast, Lunch & Second Street Brewery at the Dinner! The Teahouse 992-0972

Breakfast & Lunch Tecolote Café 988-1362

Lunch & Dinner Andiamo! 995-9595

Dr. Field Goods

(no reservations)

Izanami

982-9304

La Boca

982-3433

Piccolino Italian Restaurant

(no reservations)

Café Pasqual’s

La Fogata Grill

Railyard

Counter Culture

Loyal Hound

TerraCotta Wine Bistro

Cowgirl BBQ

Mariscos Costa Azul

989-3278 989-1166

983-9340

(no reservations) 982-2565

982-7302

(no reservations)

El Mesón

(Cerrillos Road) 473-4594

Dinner

Estevan Restaurante

Midtown Bistro

315 Restaurant & Wine Bar

Fire & Hops

The Ranch House 424-8900

986-9190

Arroyo Vino 983-2100

Bouche Bistro 982-6297

983-6756 930-5363 954-1635

Galisteo Bistro 982-3700

India House 471-2651

Bourbon Grill

Jambo Café

Café Castro

L’Olivier

984-8000

(no reservations)

Café Fina

473-1269 989-1919

820-3121

Paper Dosa

930-5521 (for large parties)

Plaza Café Southside 424-0755

Santa Fe Bite 982-0544

State Capital Kitchen 467-8237

Tune Up Café 983-7060

(no reservations)

Call 505.471.7780 to volunteer www.KitchenAngels.org

R O O F T O P

P A T I O

Located on the rooftop of the Drury Plaza Hotel, Bar Alto is an island in the sky with the highest and largest outdoor patio in Santa Fe. THE STAFF AND MANAGEMENT CORDIALLY INVITE YOU TO ENJOY LIVE ISLAND MUSIC EVERY FRIDAY AT 4:00 PM.

HAPPY HOUR: MONDAY - FRIDAY, 4:00PM - 6:30PM

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MODERN SOUTHWEST CUISINE LUNCH - DINNER - COCKTAILS - BANQUETS - WEDDINGS ELOISASANTAFE.COM | 228 E PALACE AVE, SANTA FE, NM | 505.982.0883

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COURTESY OF KITCHEN ANGELS

FOOD

Angels at the Table Get your halos out BY MICHAEL J WILSON t h e f o r k @ s f r e p o r t e r. c o m

W

hen I was in college I spent a few weekends at local nonprofit Kitchen Angels as part of the College of Santa Fe’s volunteering outreach. Volunteering is not something that 19-year-olds usually want to do, and I was not an exception to this rule. I distinctly remember standing over a very large pot of borscht. The purple liquid was intimidating. I had never had it. I hated beets. The color was untrustworthy. (I’ve since come around on both volunteering and purple foods.) One of the best things about writing this column has been reconnecting to why I fell in love with Santa Fe in the first place. I’m not an outdoorsy type, so the natural beauty is a visual bonus to what I really care about: community.

There is a sense that Santa Fe will take care of you. That no matter what, it’s here for those who embrace it and all of its endless weird and wonderful. And while I was not necessarily “into” volunteering back in 1999, I took away a sense of awe in the culture of making do and filling the gaps our money-poor but DIY-rich state has. It’s not edgy to talk about Kitchen Angels. The 25-year-old organization spends its resources preparing and delivering meals for homebound Santa Feans who don’t qualify for other meal services in the area. They serve people of all ages and types who are going through momentary trouble or long-term issues. And every day, they save lives with four paid staff members and more than 600 volunteers. On Thursday April 27, Kitchen Angels’ largest fundraising event of the year takes place at restaurants across town. Angels Night Out is a day-long chance for Santa Fe to do two things it loves to do: eat and help others. This year marks the 19th iteration, and there are a record 35 restaurants participating (including

Staff from The Teahouse with Kitchen Angels ambassador Batsheva. BELOW LEFT: Ambassadors Jacqueline and Virginia at Café Fina for last year’s Angels Night Out. BELOW RIGHT: Ambassadors Linda and Carmen at Bourbon Grill.

eight newcomers). At those participating restaurants, 25 percent of your bill goes to Kitchen Angels. Restaurants participating include but are hardly limited to Jambo Café, Dr. Field Goods Kitchen, Counter Culture Café, The Teahouse and Fire & Hops. I spoke with Kitchen Angels Community Liaison Lauren LaVail to get the details of the yearly tradition. Tony McCarty, director of the organization, started Angels Night Out in 1998. Originally based on the “Food Fight” fundraising model, where restaurants compete to raise the most for charity, McCarty’s version dropped the competition aspect in favor of simplicity. The restaurants don’t have to do much beyond open their doors to participate. The food industry is well-known for being very giving to the communities they cook for, and Santa Fe probably gives more than most. Rich Freedman, owner

at The Teahouse, echoed this sentiment by saying that that Kitchen Angels’ “work in the community is important” and it is a “pleasure to support them.” LaVail says 10 percent of the entire budget for Kitchen Angels comes from this one day of fundraising. I was surprised that so much of their revenue comes from people literally just paying a restaurant bill, which makes this one event deeply important to the 170 people served daily. “No one should go hungry, especially in this country, where everything is done in excess and there is so much waste,” Fire & Hops chef/owner Joel Coleman says, adding that he appreciates what Kitchen Angels stands for as one of the reasons that Fire & Hops will participate this year for the first time. Kitchen Angels adds a lot to Santa Fe; it embodies what I love about this place. On April 27, you can and should eat all three of your meals at one of the participating restaurants. A full list of participants is available on the Kitchen Angels website (kitchenangels.org). You may want to call ahead, though, as it can be one of the busiest evenings of the year, and seats fill quickly.

W

hile embracing its colorful history, El Nido opens its doors as a fresh, innovative new restaurant. Handcrafted Pastas, Brick Oven Pizza, Wood-Fired Grill

Open Nightly

[Brunch/Lunch Coming Soon]

www.elnidosantafe.com | 505-954-1272 SFREPORTER.COM

APRIL 26-MAY 2, 2017

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We’re doing it again! C I N E M AT H E Q U E 1050 OLD PECOS TRAIL • 505.982.1338 • CCASANTAFE.ORG

SHOWTIMES APRIL 26 – MAY 2, 2017

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DASH SHAW GIVEAWAYS ON WEEKEND SCREENINGS! SKYPE W/ DIRECTOR: SAT. 5P & 7:15

SETTLERS CampA THIS WEEKEND ONLY! 2.37x2.37 “SHIMON DOTAN’S DOCUMENTARY ON ISRAELI SETTLEMENTS IN THE WEST BANK HAS THE POWER TO PROVOKE STRONG REACTIONS WHEREVER IT PLAYS. “ — VARIETY

Wedneday, April 26 1:15p Maurizio Cattelan: Be Right Back 2:00p Frantz* 3:15p Frantz 4:15p Kedi* 5:45p Maurizio Cattelan: Be Right Back 6:30p SFJFF: Fanny’s Journey* 7:45p Personal Shopper 8:15p Donald Cried* Thursday, April 27 1:15p Maurizio Cattelan: Be Right Back 2:00p Frantz* 3:15p Frantz 4:15p Kedi* 5:45p Maurizio Cattelan: Be Right Back 6:00p Frantz* 7:45p Personal Shopper 8:15p Donald Cried* Friday, April 28 12:15p My Entire High School Sinking Into the Sea* 12:45p Frantz 2:00p Kedi* 3:15p Kedi 3:45p The Settlers* 5:00p My Entire High School Sinking Into the Sea 6:00p Frantz* 7:00p Frantz 8:15p The Real Santos* Saturday, April 29 12:15p My Entire High School Sinking Into the Sea* 12:45p Frantz 2:00p Kedi* 3:15p Kedi 3:45p The Settlers* 5:00p My Entire High School... (Skype w/ dir. Dash Shaw) 6:00p Frantz* 7:15p My Entire High School... (Skype w/ dir. Dash Shaw) 8:15p Frantz*

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Sunday, April 30 12:15p My Entire High School Sinking Into the Sea* 12:45p Frantz 2:00p Kedi* 3:15p Kedi 3:45p The Settlers* 5:00p My Entire High School Sinking Into the Sea 6:00p Frantz* 7:00p Frantz 8:15p My Entire High School Sinking Into the Sea* Mon.-Tues., May 1-2 2:30p Kedi* 2:45p Frantz 4:15p Kedi* 5:15p Frantz 6:00p My Entire High School Sinking Into the Sea 7:30p Frantz 7:45p My Entire High School Sinking Into the Sea* *in The Studio

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MOVIES

RATINGS

My Entire High School Sinking Into the Sea Review:

BEST MOVIE EVER

10 9 8

9

BY ALEX DE VORE a l e x @ s f r e p o r t e r. c o m

7

+ INCREDIBLY

With no shortage of memoir-esque graphic novels on the circuit, comic artist/animator Dash Shaw brings the gestalt to the big screen, albeit in a wildly exaggerated fashion. The film My Entire High School Sinking into the Sea is a bizarre and skewed recalling of high school wannabe life melded with Superhero adventure comedy (very) loosely based on Shaw’s own life—or at least his obsession with comics and independent film. We follow sophomore Dash (voiced by Jason Schwartzman) and his friends Assaf (Reggie Watts) and Verti (the inimitable Maya Rudolph) as the age-old perils of seaside high school coolness coupled with the pressures of a school newspaper drive a wedge between them. When Dash jealously lashes out against his pals in print and subsequently sets out to doctor a black mark on his permanent record, he discovers building inspection documents forged by the mysterious Principal Grimm (Thomas Jay Ryan), an eye-

6 5 4 3 2 1 WORST MOVIE EVER

CREATIVE AND WEIRD - MAYBE TOO WEIRD FOR SOME

patch-wearing almost-villain (who, for the record, does ultimately seek redemption). Indeed, Dash’s entire high school sinks into the sea, and it’s up to the student body to survive. Thrust into uncomfortable high school politics alongside his hurt friends, a popular-girl-type named Mary (Girls’ Lena Dunham) and a badass lunch lady with a heartbreaking past named Lorraine (Susan Sarandon), Dash still finds a way to access his own bias but, of course, that’s part of what makes it so funny. Teenagers can be self-absorbed—even as classmates are eaten by sharks—and though Dash is flawed and probably still carrying the scars from last year’s acne, he manages to become a lovable, understandably human hero.

High School is the coming-together of so many wonderful things, from comics and abstract animation to the excellent original score from Rani Sharone. John Cameron Mitchell of Hedwig and the Angry Inch fame even makes an appearance in the cast and, hopefully, some weirdo kid out there who feels lost will look up at the screen and realize there’s a whole world out there waiting for them. MY ENTIRE HIGH SCHOOL SINKING INTO THE SEA Directed by Shaw With Schwartzman, Rudolph and Watts Center for Contemporary Arts, NR, 75 min.

QUICKY REVIEWS

7

8

FREE FIRE

MAURIZIO CATTELAN: BE RIGHT BACK

FREE FIRE

7

+ CREATIVE PLOT; GOOD PACE AND LAUGHTER

- GUNS AND GORE

Sans setup or messy character development, Free Fire drops the audience right into the story of an improbable meetup between dudes looking to buy guns and the dudes who have the guns. The players in the one-scene drama are the right mix, and each in the list of mostly emerging actors is already wholly convinced of who they are: One you love, one you hate, one who is old, one who is young, one who is mysterious, one who is pompous—you get the drift. A creative plot from screenwriters Amy Jump and Ben Wheatley dishes out surprises that really are surprising. Wardrobe also did a spot-on job, with the crew in 1978 Boston outfitted in a smart set of attire from Armie Hammer’s snug blazer as Ord the bodyguard-type, to the clown suit with shoulder pads sported by Vernon (Sharlto Copley, District 9) and the mustard number for the unforgettable Babou Ceesay (Eye in the Sky) along with a remarkable afro. Knee high-boots and a great handbag complement the fixer’s quick thinking, and as Justine, Brie Larson (Kong: Skull Island) makes a sizeable contribution as the only woman in the cast. She

2

GHOST IN THE SHELL

has all the room in the world to make an impression, and she does, notably crawling on the dirt floor of the warehouse with the same gusto as the rest of the gang. We also dug on the sound, a sparse audio track with clear space for the witty dialog. Rather than a foreboding undertone of music, the singu-

Oh, the fire is free, baby. So totally free.

5

BEAUTY AND THE BEAST

6

KONG: SKULL ISLAND

lar instruments with spurts of jazz add a quality to the slow pace. The snappy editing means you trace every shot fired. Good old-fashioned rock-throwing, impromptu joint-smoking and poor marksmanship play their parts. Plus, bonus points for the juxtaposition between heavy weapons and John Denver. Be ready for a gore-

9

9

GET OUT

KEDI

fest that you might still be laughing at tomorrow. (Julie Ann Grimm) Regal, Violet Crown, R, 90 min.

MAURIZIO CATTELAN: BE RIGHT BACK

8

+ FAST-PACED, EASY TO FOLLOW

- MODERN ART—MEH

Amid the admiration and admonishment of Maurizio Cattelan’s career hides the resolute reality of the artist’s unlikely and unconventional achievements in a manufactured and manipulated world. In filmmaker Maura Axelrod’s debut documentary Maurizio Cattelan: Be Right Back, audiences see the story of an imaginative and misunderstood protagonist whose eccentric desire for success is realized through socially constructed controversy. Through feats of escapism and anxiety, Cattelan creates an alternative life for himself in the art world. His works, like taxidermy of a suicidal squirrel, a large marble sculpture of a middle finger and the bust of a half-naked woman as a “trophy wife,” give Cattelan a Banksy-esque badboy vibe that art aficionados ache for. Truth be told, though, most modern art is lost on the masses. For this reason, Cattelan’s well-regarded style breaks traditionally refined CONTINUED ON PAGE 41

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• APRIL 26-MAY 2, 2017

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MOVIES

FOR SHOWTIMES AND MORE REVIEWS, VISIT SFREPORTER.COM

and reserved boundaries in the fine arts. Conjuring motifs of failure through humor and cheeky visualization, his artistic choices catapult the inner workings of his mind directly into the lives of the public. Axelrod captures Cattelan’s mysterious indifference towards his subjects and his fans while throwing in a few twists and turns of her own directorial vision. Through interviews with curators, collectors and con artists, Axelrod uncovers the compelling story of a conceptual artist and, ultimately, the untold stories of what makes him tick. While most artists seek to dedicate themselves solely to the creation of their art, Cattelan’s dedication is rather to the success of his art. Through large-scale schemes of escape and disillusionment, Cattelan’s works create a sense of urgency within uncertainty. Axelrod’s film style creates havoc and cathartic chaos, mimicking Cattelan’s artistic confusion and contemplation . While the documentary does justice to Cattelan’s artistic vision, it might leave audiences uncertain about whether his art is brilliant or bullshit. And maybe that’s the point. (Kendall Mac) Center for Contemporary Arts, NR, 95 min.

GHOST IN THE SHELL

2

+ THERE’S A DOG - WHITEWASHING

Strap in for yet another blockbuster blunder. Scarlett Johansson’s (Avengers) latest motion picture dumpster fire, Ghost in the Shell, explores a not-so-distant-future where technology runs the lives of everyone in a racially ambiguous world. Major Mira Killian, portrayed by Johansson, is created and outfitted with a completely synthetic robotic body but controlled by a human brain. Her soul (the eponymous “ghost”) is trapped inside a cybernetic cage (the eponymous “shell”), rendering her an obedient, emotionless drone subject to her commander’s orders. Throughout the entirety of the film it is apparent that Major truly cannot trust anyone and that you probably should have just gone to see Boss Baby. Serving as an invisible assassin, fighting machine-gun misogyny with straight bangs and a rebel-without-a-cause attitude, Johansson’s performance does little to create a genuine connection with an audience. This film is actually an awful attempt to subliminally solidify whiteness as an indication of power through flashy graphics and obvious objectification of women. All the lead characters were portrayed by actors perceived to be white, living in a fictitious Asian-inspired foggy inferno fighting amongst themselves. Equipped with shiny robotic ladyparts and

KONG: SKULL ISLAND + GIANT MONSTERS AND A SWEET

6

Modern art and stuff in Maurizio Cattelan: Be Right Back.

a bad haircut, ScarJo fights robotic geishas with spider legs, oily-faced club owners and of course, like all great mysterious leading ladies, her inner demons. Johansson, who was clearly conjuring her character’s brooding and monotone demeanor from The L Word’s Shane, gives audiences little to work with in an already-confusing storyline. Director Rupert Sanders (Snow White and the Huntsman) has created a new and improved manic pixie robot dream girl who does little to distract from the racist and overly sexualized adaptation of Masamune Shirow’s 1989 manga of the same name. Just start there instead. (KM) Regal, Violet Crown, PG-13, 107 min.

BEAUTY AND THE BEAST

5

+ PISSING OFF ONE MILLION MOMS - MEN AND UNREALISTIC DISHWARE

Is your masculinity feeling fragile? Fear not, delicate dudes, for the fraternity of frivolous bros in Disney’s newest live-action movie-musical has enough beefcakes and bestiality for audiences of all ages. Director Bill Condon’s (Dreamgirls, Kinsey) adaptation of the 1991 animated film of the same name illustrates the story of a cursed narcissistic prince (Dan Stevens of Downton Abbey) and a thoughtful, young woman (Emma Watson) who inevitably falls in love despite the meager machismo and brutish advances of resident asshole

Gaston (Luke Evans from Fast & Furious 6). With the help of his house staff, Lumière (Trainspotting’s Ewan McGregor), Cogsworth (Lord of the Rings’ Ian McKellen) and Mrs. Potts (Love Actually’s Emma Thompson), the Beast is able to prove he’s worthy of Belle’s love through manipulation and coercion. Spoiler alert: The two lead characters inevitably fall in love and Gaston is the winner of the No Belle Prize. The Beast, who never once gives his real name and doesn’t correct anyone when they call him such, tears Belle from her ailing father, falsely imprisons her, uses threats of violence and withholds food to convince her he’s “not like most guys,” only to triumphantly win her over with his extensive collection of leather-bound books. Modern romance. While the introduction of new songs, bright colors and subtle hints of Lafou’s queerness (portrayed by Book of Mormon’s Josh Gad) were distracting from the ragtag bunch of feeble fellas this film has to offer, Belle’s line rang true that “there must be more than this provincial life.” Perhaps maybe a plot point that doesn’t center around the alienation or objectification of women who make their own choices? Just a suggestion. Running a nearly unbearable two hours-plus, this film has all the fun-loving problematic characters we know and love from the original animated version. However, the best review for this film is probably a vague “ehhhh” noise and a noncommittal wiggly hand gesture. (KM) Regal, Violet Crown, PG, 129 min.

’70S SOUNDTRACK

- SHALLOW, PREDICTABLE AND SILLY

The most recent Hollywood take on the giant ape himself, King Kong, should have left us with a monstrous hunger for more. Instead, it feels like a souped-up version of Honey I Shrunk the Kids meets the third or fourth Jurassic Park all set to the soundtrack of Good Morning, Vietnam. Knowing this movie was heavier on the action than the plot, and wanting the throat-shaking sounds and sights to feel even closer, we went to a 3D showing and don’t regret it. Seeing Kong bat choppers out of the air and smash them together in a fiery explosion was pretty badass, and we were entertained by not just Kong but the surprising other monsters that emerge from the forbidden jungle, splendid in its CGI majesty. Yet, part of what made the flick promising was the thought of seeing Samuel L Jackson take on the biggest gorilla this side of the galaxy and John Goodman as a government monster-chaser. Whether it’s the silly script or their shallow characters, neither leaves a remarkable impression. The story is not supposed to be complicated, but did it have to be so predictable? Did the filmmakers have to write in one more female journalist (Brie Larson, Rampart) who seems to have brought too few clothes for a jungle mission? Why on earth didn’t she put her hair in ponytail while she tried to take pictures from the open door of the ‘Nam helicopter? And, oh no, why does she go from detesting to flirting with the ex-military expedition leaders in a matter of minutes? Wait for it: Why is she looking so lovingly into Kong’s terrifying red eyes? These and more questions are sure to get non-answers as it seems all but certain there will be a sequel. Maybe even more than one. Plus, do yourself a favor and get your $11 out of the deal by staying through to final scene at the end of the credits. (JAG) Regal, Violet Crown, PG-13, 120 min.

GET OUT

9

+ SMART AND SCARY; DEFIES EXPECTATION

- WRAPS UP A LITTLE QUICKLY

Much of the draw of Get Out is in seeing its writer/director Jordan Peele (of legendary comedy duo Key and Peele) strike out of the genre for which he’s known. But the film proves to be far more than a simple foray into uncharted territory from a talented comic mind, and instead becomes one of the most original and well-executed horror films in generations.

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MOVIES

Ghost in the Shell is, like, this whole thing, y’know? It’s ... y’know?

A young photographer named Chris (Daniel Kaluuya) is set to visit his girlfriend’s parents for the weekend. “Do ... they know I’m black?” he asks her nervously beforehand, and we honestly believe Rose (Girls’ Allison Williams) when she answers, “They are not racist.” And at first this seems to be all well and good, though Allison’s doctor-father Dean (a brilliantly disarming Bradley Whitford) and therapist-mother Missy (a wildly discomforting Catherine Keener) seem a bit off, they still appear to at least be trying in that I-swear-I’m-totally-not-racist kind of way. But something is just not right at the Armitage house. It could be Rose’s obviously sociopathic brother Jeremy (Caleb Landry Jones), a far-too-chipper maid (Betty Gabriel) who stands silently smiling at all times or the ominous and terrifying groundskeeper (Marcus Henderson) who speaks like he just so totally has something to hide. Regardless, it’s creepy as hell up in there, but Chris seems to be the only one who can feel it. Get Out shines in its metered examination of tokenism, conditioned racism and even our societal expectations. Peele neatly pulls this off without ever resorting to overt explanations, however, instead allowing the actions of its characters to slowly unfold the goings-on at Rose’s spooky family home. He trusts his audience will be patient, which is a sadly lacking quality of modern filmmaking. By the time all is revealed, we share in Chris’ realization that it may be too late, but we savor the slow burn right up to the shocking truth. (Alex De Vore) Regal, R, 103 min.

KEDI

9

so rude as to go inside), a beat-up old tabby who rules her perceived turf with an iron paw, a portside puffer who keeps the mouse population under control and beyond, the brief windows into the lives of cats come together to prove one thing: Cats are beloved in Istanbul. Through this, Kedi sneakily becomes perhaps more about the humans in the cats’ lives rather than the opposite. A sailor, for instance, who once lost everything but was saved by a cat who led him to a hidden cache of money, spends his days roaming the port feeding feral kittens with a bottle. Elsewhere, a baker forms an unlikely alliance with a cat who unwittingly gives his life meaning beyond his work. In a nearby home packed to the rafters with countless strays, two women cook for and feed dozens of street cats daily. Even those who aren’t in love with these fascinating creatures will find a captivating human story here. And rather than linger on the more cutesy aspects of felines, Kedi instead proves an inspiring treatise on the enriching aspects of animals and a satisfying glimpse into the beauty of the city itself. (ADV) Center for Contemporary Arts, Violet Crown, NR, 80 min.

The camera moves along the ancient streets of Istanbul, following a particularly adorable orange cat. Diners at streetside cafés hand over treats. Passersby respectfully step around her. Nearby, a clever striped fellow scales a three-story building to visit a human friend in her apartment. At an outdoor flea market across town, young and old cats alike sleep amongst the wares. The camera pans along the port and cranes up over the gorgeous Golden Horn, revealing the massive labyrinth of a city. This is Kedi, a new documentary on the street cats of Istanbul from director Ceyda Torun, and it is awe-inspiring. We follow the seemingly ordinary lives of various cats who live throughout the sprawling Turkish metropolis on the sea. From a rather polite comrade who haunts a deli patio (but is never

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COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENTS JOHREI CENTER OF SANTA FE. JOHREI IS BASED ON THE FOCUS AND FLOW OF THE UNIVERSAL LIFE ENERGY. When clouds in the spiritual body and in consciousness are dissolved, there is a return to true health. This is according to the Divine Law of Order; after spiritual clearing, physical and mentalemotional healing follow. You are invited to experience the Divine Healing Energy of Johrei. All are Welcome! The Johrei Center of Santa Fe is located at Calle Cinco Plaza, 1500 Fifth St., Suite 10, 87505. Please call 8200451 with any questions. Drop-ins welcome! There is no fee for receiving Johrei. Donations are gratefully accepted. Please check us out at our new website santafejohreifellowship.com

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MARKETPLACE EMPLOYMENT MODERN BUDDHISM IN SANTA FE: Overcoming Anger. Buddhist wisdom offers practical tools and spiritual realizations that change our mind and protect ourselves from the painful mind of anger. Anger is our worst enemy. It steals our ability to see solutions, it destroys our peace and happiness. Without anger our good qualities and abilities grow and function - in all our activities and relationships. Transformative meditations diminish stress and frustration, disappointment, allowing expansive and peaceful states of mind to arise. Without inner peace, outer peace is impossible. Kelsang Lhadron, an American Buddhist nun and Resident Teacher @ KMC-NM in Albq. gives teachings and guided meditations that are practical, inspiring and offer profound insight - transmitted with humor and warmth. Sundays 10:30am - Noon at the ZOETIC center in Santa Fe, 230 S. St. Francis Drive, Santa Fe, NM 87501 (between Alameda & Agua Fria) $10/ Drop-in class. Classes: April 30, May 7, 14, 21, 28, June 4. More info: (505) 292-5293, www.meditationinnewmexico.org Contact: Kelsang Lhadron: rt@nkt-kmc-newmexico.org

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Queen headboard and matching footboard made from solid wood antique castle door. $1900 505-660-2058 Self-starters with ambition and people skills are the perfect candidates for this career opportunity. The Santa Fe Reporter has an immediate opening for an advertising account executive to help build our digital and print publications. We offer attractive compensation and bonuses including 100% medical benefits. Your earning potential is only limited by your own motivation. Like local businesses? We love them. Sales savvy a plus.. To apply, please email a letter of interest and resumé to Anna Maggiore, Advertising Director advertising@sfreporter.com Santa Fe Reporter 132 E. Marcy Street Santa Fe, NM 87501 No phone calls please.

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MIND BODY SPIRIT

Rob Brezsny

Week of April 26th

ARIES (March 21-April 19) I have misgivings when I witness bears riding bicycles or tigers dancing on their hind legs or Aries people wielding diplomatic phrases and making careful compromises at committee meetings. While I am impressed by the disciplined expression of primal power, I worry for the soul of the creature that is behaving with such civilized restraint. So here’s my advice for you in the coming weeks: Take advantage of opportunities to make deals and forge win-win situations. But also keep a part of your fiery heart untamed. Don’t let people think they’ve got you all figured out.

equivalent of his feats, Virgo. What daring actions have you never tried before even though you’ve been sufficiently trained or educated to perform them well?

TAURUS (April 20-May 20) “One of the advantages of being disorderly,” said author A. A. Milne, “is that one is constantly making exciting discoveries.” I wouldn’t normally offer this idea as advice to a methodical dynamo like you. But my interpretation of the astrological omens compels me to override my personal theories about what you need. I must suggest that you consider experimenting with jaunty, rambunctious behavior in the coming days, even if it generates some disorder. The potential reward? Exciting discoveries, of course. GEMINI (May 21-June 20) According to my reading of the astrological omens, it’s time for you to take a break from the magic you have been weaving since your birthday in 2016. That’s why I’m suggesting that you go on a brief sabbatical. Allow your deep mind to fully integrate the lessons you’ve been learning and the transformations you have undergone over the past eleven months. In a few weeks, you’ll be ready to resume where you left off. For now, though, you require breathing room. Your spiritual batteries need time to recharge. The hard work you’ve done should be balanced by an extended regimen of relaxed playtime. CANCER (June 21-July 22) Apparently, a lot of kids in the UK don’t like to eat vegetables. In response, food researchers in that country marketed a variety of exotic variations designed to appeal to their palate. The new dishes included chocolate-flavored carrots, pizza-flavored corn, and cheese-and-onion-flavored cauliflower. I don’t recommend that you get quite so extreme in trying to broaden your own appeal, Cancerian. But see if you can at least reach out to your potential constituency with a new wrinkle or fresh twist. Be imaginative as you expand the range of what your colleagues and clientele have to choose from. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) In speaking about the arduous quest to become one’s authentic self, writer Thomas Merton used the example of poets who aspire to be original but end up being imitative. “Many poets never succeed in being themselves,” he said. “They never get around to being the particular poet they are intended to be by God. They never become the person or artist who is called for by all of the circumstances of their individual lives. They waste their years in vain efforts to be some other poet. They wear out their minds and bodies in a hopeless endeavor to have somebody else’s experiences or write somebody else’s poems.” I happen to believe that this is a problem for non-poets, as well. Many of us never succeed in becoming ourselves. Luckily for you, Leo, in the coming weeks and months you will have an unprecedented chance to become more of who you really are. To expedite the process, work on dissolving any attraction you might have to acting like someone other than yourself.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Ready for some subterranean journeys? They may not involve literal explorations of deep caverns and ancient tunnels and underground streams. You may not stumble upon lost treasure and forgotten artifacts and valuable ruins. But then again, you might. At the very least, you will encounter metaphorical versions of some of the above. What mysteries would you love to solve? What secrets would be fun to uncover? What shadows would you be excited to illuminate? SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) Why would you guzzle mind-clouding moonshine when you will eventually get a chance to sip a heart-reviving tonic? Why spoil your appetite by loading up on non-nutritious hors d’oeuvres when a healthy feast will be available sooner than you imagine? I advise you to suppress your compulsion for immediate gratification. It may seem impossible for you to summon such heroic patience, but I know you can. And in the long run, you’ll be happy if you do. SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) “You’ll always be my favorite what-if.” Many years ago, I heard that phrase whispered in my ear. It came from the mouth of a wonderful-but-impossible woman. We had just decided that it was not a good plan, as we had previously fantasized, to run away and get married at Angkor Wat in Cambodia and then spend the next decade being tour guides who led travelers on exotic getaways to the world’s sacred sites. “You’ll always be my favorite whatif” was a poignant but liberating moment. It allowed us to move on with our lives and pursue other dreams that were more realistic and productive. I invite you to consider triggering a liberation like that sometime soon. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) I’d love to see you increase the number of people, places, and experiences you love, as well as the wise intensity with which you love them. From an astrological perspective, now is an excellent time to upgrade your appreciation and adoration for the whole world and everything in it. To get you in the mood, I’ll call your attention to some unfamiliar forms of ardor you may want to pursue: eraunophilia, an attraction to thunder and lightning; cymophilia, a fascination with waves and waviness; chorophilia, a passion for dancing; asymmetrophilia, a zeal for asymmetrical things; sapiophilia, an erotic enchantment with intelligence. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) You could go online and buy an antique Gothic throne or a psychedelic hippie couch to spruce up your living room. For your bathroom, you could get a Japanese “wonder toilet,” complete with a heated seat, automated bidet, and white noise generator. Here’s another good idea: You could build a sacred crazy altar in your bedroom where you will conduct rituals of playful liberation. Or how about this? Acquire a kit that enables you to create spontaneous poetry on your refrigerator door using tiny magnets with evocative words written on them. Can you think of other ideas to revitalize your home environment? It’s high time you did so. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) Among America’s 50 states, Texas has the third-highest rate of teenage pregnancies. Uncoincidentally, sex education in Texas is steeped in ignorance. Most of its high schools offer no teaching about contraception other than to advise students to avoid sex. In the coming weeks, Pisces, you can’t afford to be as deprived of the truth as those kids. Even more than usual, you need accurate information that’s tailored to your precise needs, not fake news or ideological delusions or self-serving propaganda. Make sure you gather insight and wisdom from the very best sources. That’s how you’ll avoid behavior that’s irrelevant to your life goals. That’s how you’ll attract experiences that serve your highest good.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) On numerous occasions, French acrobat Charles Blondin walked across a tightrope that spanned the gorge near Niagara Falls. His cable was three and a quarter inches in diameter, 1,100 feet long, and 160 feet above the Niagara River. Once he made the entire crossing by doing back flips and somersaults. Another time he carried a small stove Homework: What’s the most beautiful thing you’ve on his back, stopped midway to cook an omelet, and ever done? Testify! Go to Realastrology.com and click ate the meal before finishing. Now would be an on “Email Rob.” excellent time for you to carry out your personal

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s Expanded Weekly Audio Horoscopes and Daily Text Message Horoscopes. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone © CO P Y R I G H T 2 0 1 7 R O B B R E Z S N Y at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700. 44

APRIL 26-MAY 2, 2017

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CHIROPRACTIC

HEART HEALING

$40.00 CHIROPRACTIC ADJUSTMENTS Effective May 1, 2017, Gilbert Chiropractic & Wellness located at 1504 S St Francis Drive, Santa Fe, NM, will offer a walkin clinic on Wednesdays from 1:00 p.m. to 3:30 p.m. Offer is open to everyone. Call if you have questions (505)984-1222

Energy, sound and touch take you on a magical journey of self discovery. Release emotions and deep seeded beliefs that keep you from knowing your truth and experiencing peace, love and joy in your life. Private and group sessions, contact Angela Miele at 570.447.0295, amsoulactivation.com.

ARE YOU A

PSYCHICS

LOVE. CAREER. HEALTH. Psychic readings and Spiritual counseling. For more information call 505-982-8327 or go to www.alexofavalon.com. Also serving the LGBT community.

REFLEXOLOGY

MASSAGE THERAPY

THERAPIST OR A HEALER? YOU BELONG HERE IN MIND BODY SPIRIT!

UNIQUE TO YOU Our health is reflected through the feet as an array of patterned and flexible aspects also conveyed in the body and overall being. Discomfort is a call for reorganization. TANTRA MASSAGE & Reflexology can stimulate TEACHING your nervous system to relax Call Julianne Parkinson, and make the needed changes 505-920-3083 • Certified so you can feel better. Tantra Educator, Professional SFReflexology.com, Massage Therapist, & Life (505) 414-8140 Coach LIC #2788 Julie Glassmoyer, CR

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SERVICE DIRECTORY CHIMNEY SWEEPING

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SANTA FE COYOTE FENCING Specializing in Coyote Fencing. License # 16-001199-74. No job too small or large. We do it all. Richard, 505-690-6272

CASEY’S TOP HAT CHIMNEY SWEEPS SAVE $10 WITH THIS COUPON! Spring is the best time for cleaning your fireplace or woodstove! Should additional maintenance be needed, you’ll save a bundle over winter prices. CASEY’S TOP HAT CHIMNEY HANDYPERSON SWEEPS has served the Santa Fe area for 39 years! CARPENTRY to LANDSCAPING Be prepared. Call 989-5775 Home maintenance, remodels, additions, interior & exterior, irrigation, stucco repair, jobs small & large. Reasonable rates, Reliable. Discounts avail. to seniors, veterans, handicap. Jonathan, 670-8827 www.handymannm.com

PLASTERING & STUCCO

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PERSONAL & PROFESSIONAL SERVICES

THE HANDYMAN YOU’VE ALWAYS WANTED. Dependable and creative problem solver. With Handyman Van, one call fixes it all. Special discounts for seniors and referrals. Excellent references. 505-231-8849 Safety, Value, Professionalism. www.handymanvan.biz We are Santa Fe’s certified chimney and dryer vent PHILIP CRUMP, experts. New Mexico’s best value in chimney service; Mediator LANDSCAPING get a free video Chim-Scan Resolve issues quickly, affordwith each fireplace cleaning. ably, privately, respectfully: LANDSCAPES BY DENNIS Baileyschimney.com. Call • Divorce, Custody, Parenting plan Landscape Design, Xeriscapes, • Parent-Teen, Family, Neighbor Bailey’s today 505-988-2771 Drip Systems, Natural Ponds, • Business, Partnership, Construction Mediate-Don’t Litigate! Low Voltage Lighting & FREE CONSULTATION Maintenance. I create a custom philip@pcmediate.com lush garden w/ minimal use of precious H20. 505-699-2900 505-989-8558

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LEGALS LEGAL NOTICE TO CREDITORS/NAME CHANGE

the First Judicial District at the Santa Fe Judicial Complex, 225 Montezuma Ave., in Santa Fe, New Mexico, at 1:15 p.m. on the 12th day of May, 2017 for an ORDER FOR CHANGE STATE OF NEW MEXICO OF NAME from Maria Josefita COUNTY OF SANTA FE Romero to Josie Romero. FIRST JUDICIAL DISTRICT STEPHEN T. PACHECO, COURT IN THE MATTER OF A PETITION District Court Clerk By: Gloria Landin FOR CHANGE OF NAME OF Deputy Court Clerk Murray Ramon Herrera Case No.: D-101-CV-2017-00996 Submitted by: NOTICE OF CHANGE OF NAME Maria Josefita Romero Petitioner, Pro Se TAKE NOTICE that in accordance with the provisions STATE OF NEW MEXICO of Sec. 40-8-1 through Sec. 40-8-3 NMSA 1978, et seq. the COUNTY OF SANTA FE Petitioner Murray Ramon Herrera FIRST JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT will apply to the Honorable IN THE MATTER OF A PETITION FRANCIS J. MATHEW, District Judge of the First Judicial District FOR CHANGE OF NAME OF at the Santa Fe Judicial Complex, Benito Ernest Brown Case No.: D-101-CV-2017-01050 225 Montezuma Ave., in Santa Fe, New Mexico, at 1:00 p.m. on NOTICE OF CHANGE OF NAME the 12th day of May, 2017 for an TAKE NOTICE that in ORDER FOR CHANGE OF NAME accordance with the provisions of Sec. 40-8-1 from Murray Ramon Herrera to through Sec. 40-8-3 NMSA Raymond Murray Herrera. 1978, et seq. the Petitioner STEPHEN T. PACHECO, Benito Ernest Brown will apply District Court Clerk to the Honorable FRANCIS J. By: Jessica Garcia MATHEW, District Judge of Deputy Court Clerk the First Judicial District at Submitted by: the Santa Fe Judicial Complex, Murray Ramon Herrera 225 Montezuma Ave., in Santa Petitioner, Pro Se Fe, New Mexico, at 1:00 p.m on the 12th day of May, 2017 STATE OF NEW MEXICO for an ORDER FOR CHANGE COUNTY OF SANTA FE OF NAME from Benito Ernest FIRST JUDICIAL DISTRICT Brown to Ernest Benito Brown. COURT STEPHEN T. PACHECO, IN THE MATTER OF A District Court Clerk PETITION FOR CHANGE OF By: Angelica Gonzalez NAME OF Maria Fernandita Deputy Court Clerk Magdalena Montoya Case No.: D-101-CV-2017-00896 Submitted by: NOTICE OF CHANGE OF NAME Benito Ernest Brown Petitioner, Pro Se TAKE NOTICE that in accordance with the STATE OF NEW MEXICO provisions of Sec. 40-8-1 IN THE PROBATE COURT through Sec. 40-8-3 NMSA SANTA FE COUNTY 1978, et seq. the Petitioner No.: 2017-0083 Maria Fernandita Magdalena IN THE MATTER OF THE Montoya will apply to ESTATE OF the Honorable DAVID K. Wendy Jo McGuire, DECEASED. THOMSON, District Judge of NOTICE TO CREDITORS the First Judicial District at the NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Santa Fe Judicial Complex, 225 that the undersigned has Montezuma Ave., in Santa Fe, been appointed personal New Mexico, at 10:30 a.m. on representative of this estate. All the 10th day of May, 2017 for persons having claims against an ORDER FOR CHANGE OF this estate are required to NAME from Maria Fernandita present their claims within four Magdalena Montoya to Fernie (4) months after the date of the Montoya. first publication of this notice, or STEPHEN T. PACHECO, the claims will be forever barred. District Court Clerk Claims must be presented either By: Corrine Onate to the undersigned personal Deputy Court Clerk representative at the address Submitted by: listed below, or filed with the Maria Montoya Probate Court of Santa Fe, Petitioner, Pro Se County, New Mexico, located at

APRIL 26-MAY 2, 2017

LEGAL NOTICES ALL OTHERS PUBLIC NOTICE In accordance with Sec. 106 of the Programmatic Agreement, T-Mobile West, LLC proposes to install a new antenna structure at 26972 I-25 East Frontage Road Santa Fe County, New Mexico 87507. Please direct comments to Gavin L. at 818-898-4866 regarding site NM01050A. 4/19, 4/26/17 CNS-2999890# SANTA FE REPORTER

NOTICE OF SALE ON FORECLOSURE/ D-101- CV-2016- 00112 Ray M. Abeita/Christine Abeita STATE OF NEW MEXICO COUNTY OF SANTA FE FIRST JUDICIAL DISTRICT No. D-101- CV-2016-00112 Villas De Santa Fe Condominium Association, Inc. Plaintiff, v. Ray M. Abeita; Christine Abeita; JOHN DOES I-V, inclusive; JANE DOES I-V, inclusive; BLACK CORPORATIONS I-V, inclusive; WHITE PARTNERSHIPS I-V, inclusive; Unknown Heirs and Devisees of each of the abovenamed Defendants, if deceased, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE ON FORECLOSURE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that the above-entitled Court, having appointed me or my designee the following address: 102 Grant as Special Master in this matAve., SF, NM 87501. ter with the power to sell, has Dated: April 21, 2017 ordered me to sell the real Barbara Mann property (the “Property”) situ366 Calle Victoriano ated in Santa Fe County, New Stanley, NM 87056 Mexico, commonly known as 505-249-6435 400 Griffin Street, Santa Fe New Mexico 87501, and more STATE OF NEW MEXICO particularly described as folCOUNTY OF RIO ARRIBA lows: 1 Timeshare Interest(s) FIRST JUDICIAL DISTRICT consisting of 1 undivided one IN THE MATTER OF THE fifty-second (1/52) interest(s) in PETITION OF GILBERT fee simple as tenant in common EUTIMIO MAESTAS in and to the below-described TO CHANGE HIS NAME TO Condominium Unit, together TIMMY GILBERT MAESTAS. with a corresponding undiCase No. D-117-CV-2017-00120 vided interest in the Common NOTICE OF CHANGE OF NAME

STATE OF NEW MEXICO COUNTY OF SANTA FE FIRST JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT IN THE MATTER OF A PETITION FOR CHANGE OF NAME OF Maria Josefita Romero Case No.: D-101-CV-2017-00932 NOTICE OF CHANGE OF NAME TAKE NOTICE that in accordance with the provisions of Sec. 40-8-1 through Sec. 40-8-3 NMSA 1978, et seq. the Petitioner Maria Josefita Romero will apply to the HONORABLE FRANCIS J. MATHEW, District Judge of 46

TAKE NOTICE that in accordance with the provisions of Section 40-8-1 through Section 40-8-3 NMSA 1978, the Petitioner, GILBERT EUTIMIO MAESTAS, will apply to the Honorable Jennifer L. Attrep, District Judge of the First Judicial District at the Santa Fe Judicial Complex at Santa Fe, New Mexico, at 225 Montezuma, Santa Fe, NM, on the 12th day of June, 2017 at 8:20 am for an ORDER FOR CHANGE OF NAME from GILBERT EUTIMIO MAESTAS to TIMMY GILBERT MAESTAS. STEPHEN T. PACHECO, District Court Clerk Deputy Court Clerk Submitted by: Kristi A. Wareham, P.C. Kristi A. Wareham Attorney for Petitioner 2205 Miguel Chavez Rd., Suite B Santa Fe, NM 87505 Telephone: (505) 820-0698 Fax: (505) 820-1247 Email: kristiwareham@aol.com Date: April 24, 2017

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Furnishings which are appurtenant to such Condominium Unit, as well as the recurring (1) exclusive right every calendar year to reserve, use, and occupy an Assigned Unit of the same Unit Type described below within Villas de Santa Fe, a Condominium (the “Project”); (ii) exclusive right to use and enjoy the Limited Common Form Elements and Common Furnishings located within or otherwise appurtenant to such Assigned Unit; and (iii) nonexclusive right to use and enjoy the Common Elements of the Project, for their intended purposes, during a Vacation Week, as shall properly have been reserved in accordance with the provisions of the then-current Rules and Regulations promulgated by Villas de Santa Fe Condominium Association, Inc., all pursuant to the Declaration of Condominium for Villas de Santa Fe, a Condominium, duly recorded in the Office of the Clerk of Santa Fe County, New Mexico, in Book 1462, at Page 195-294, as thereafter amended (the “Declaration”). The sale is to begin at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, May 31, 2017, on the front steps of the First Judicial District Courthouse, 225 Montezuma Avenue, City of Santa Fe, County of Santa Fe, State of New Mexico, at which time I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in lawful currency of the United States of America, the Property to pay expenses of sale, and to satisfy the Judgment granted to Villas De Santa Fe Condominium Association, Inc. (“Villas De Santa Fe”). Villas De Santa Fe was awarded a Default Judgment Decree of Foreclosure on November 15, 2016, in the principal sum of $13,705.33, plus attorney fees and tax in the sum of $589.64 and attorney costs in the sum of $1,238.17 for a total amount of $15,533.10, plus interest thereafter at the rate of 8.75% per annum from November 15, 2016, until the property is sold at a Special Master’s Sale, plus costs of the Special Master’s Sale, including the Special Master’s fee in the amount of $212.50, plus any additional attorney fees and costs actually expended from the date of this Default Judgment until the date of the Special Master’s sale, plus those additional amounts, if any, which Plaintiff will be required to pay before termination of this action for property taxes, and insurance premiums, or any other cost of upkeep of the property of any sort. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the real property and improvements concerned with herein will be sold subject to any and all patent reservations, easements, all recorded and unrecorded liens not foreclosed herein, and all recorded and unrecorded special assessments and taxes that may be due. Villas De Santa Fe, its attorneys, and the Special Master disclaim all responsibility for, and the purchaser at the

sale takes the property, subject to the valuation of the property by the County Assessor as real or personal property, affixture of any mobile or manufactured home to the land, deactivation of title to a mobile or manufactured home on the property, if any, environmental contamination on the property, if any, and zoning violations concerning the property, if any. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the purchaser at such sale shall take title to the above described real property subject to a one (1) month right of redemption. PROSPECTIVE PURCHASERS AT SALE ARE ADVISED TO MAKE THEIR OWN EXAMINATION OF THE TITLE AND THE CONDITION OF THE PROPERTY AND TO CONSULT THEIR OWN ATTORNEY BEFORE BIDDING. By: /s/ Robert Doyle, Special Master P.O. Box 51526 Albuquerque, NM 87181 505-417- 4113 NOTICE OF SALE ON FORECLOSURE/ D-101- CV-2016- 00154 Charles Friend/Unknown Spouse of Maxine Huntington STATE OF NEW MEXICO COUNTY OF SANTA FE FIRST JUDICIAL DISTRICT No. D-101- CV-2016-00154 Villas De Santa Fe Condominium Association, Inc. Plaintiff, v. Charles Friend; Unknown Spouse of Maxine Huntington; JOHN DOES I V, inclusive; JANE DOES I-V, inclusive; BLACK CORPORATIONS I-V, inclusive; WHITE PARTNERSHIPS I-V, inclusive; Unknown Heirs and Devisees of each of the abovenamed Defendants, if deceased, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE ON FORECLOSURE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that the aboveentitled Court, having appointed me or my designee as Special Master in this matter with the power to sell, has ordered me to sell the real property (the “Property”) situated in Santa Fe County, New Mexico, commonly known as 400 Griffin Street, Santa Fe New Mexico 87501, and more particularly described as follows: An undivided 10000/263000 interest in fee simple as tenant in common in and to Unit Number(s) 2206, together with a corresponding undivided interest in the Common Furnishings which are appurtenant to such Unit(s), as well as the recurring (i) exclusive right to reserve, use, and occupy an Assigned Unit within Villas de Santa Fe, A Condominium (the “Project”); (ii) exclusive right to use and enjoy the Limited Common Elements and Common Furnishings located within or otherwise appurtenant to such Assigned Unit; and (iii) non-exclusive right to use and enjoy the Common Elements of the Project, for their intended purposes, during (A) in the case of “floating” Timeshare Interests, such Use Periods as shall properly have been reserved in accordance with the provisions of the then

current Rules and Regulations promulgated by Villas de Santa Fe Condominium Association, Inc.; and (8) in the case of “fixed” Timeshare Interests, such Fixed Vacation Week as is specifically set forth below, all pursuant to the Declaration of Condominium for Villas de Santa Fe, A Condominium, duly recorded in the Office of the Clerk of Santa Fe County, New Mexico, in Book 1462, at Page 195, as amended from time to time (the “Declaration”). The sale is to begin at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, May 31, 2017, on the front steps of the First Judicial District Courthouse, 225 Montezuma Avenue, City of Santa Fe, County of Santa Fe, State of New Mexico, at which time I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in lawful currency of the United States of America, the Property to pay expenses of sale, and to satisfy the Judgment granted to Villas De Santa Fe Condominium Association, Inc. (“Villas De Santa Fe”). Villas De Santa Fe was awarded a Default Judgment Decree of Foreclosure on November 30, 2016, in the principal sum of $6,641.33, plus attorney fees and tax in the sum of $607.62 and attorney costs in the sum of $1,102.13 for a total amount of $8,351.08, plus interest thereafter at the rate of 8.75% per annum from November 30, 2016, until the property is sold at a Special Master’s Sale, plus costs of the Special Master’s Sale, including the Special Master’s fee in the amount of $212.50, plus any additional attorney fees and costs actually expended from the date of this Default Judgment until the date of the Special Master’s sale, plus those additional amounts, if any, which Plaintiff will be required to pay before termination of this action for property taxes, and insurance premiums, or any other cost of upkeep of the property of any sort. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the real property and improvements concerned with herein will be sold subject to any and all patent reservations, easements, all recorded and unrecorded liens not foreclosed herein, and all recorded and unrecorded special assessments and taxes that may be due. Villas De Santa Fe, its attorneys, and the Special Master disclaim all responsibility for, and the purchaser at the sale takes the property, subject to the valuation of the property by the County Assessor as real or personal property, affixture of any mobile or manufactured home to the land, deactivation of title to a mobile or manufactured home on the property, if any, environmental contamination on the property, if any, and zoning violations concerning the property, if any. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the purchaser at such sale shall take title to the above described real property subject to a one (1) month right of redemption. PROSPECTIVE


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LEGALS PURCHASERS AT SALE ARE ADVISED TO MAKE THEIR OWN EXAMINATION OF THE TITLE AND THE CONDITION OF THE PROPERTY AND TO CONSULT THEIR OWN ATTORNEY BEFORE BIDDING. By: /s/ Robert Doyle, Special Master P.O. Box 51526 Albuquerque, NM 87181 505-417- 4113 NOTICE OF SALE ON FORECLOSURE/ D-101- CV-2016- 00070 Kathleen R. Osmon/Unknown Spouse of Josephine Vander Meer STATE OF NEW MEXICO COUNTY OF SANTA FE FIRST JUDICIAL DISTRICT No. D-101- CV-2016-00070 Villas De Santa Fe Condominium Association, Inc. Plaintiff, v. Kathleen R. Osmon; Unknown Spouse of Josephine Vander Meer; JOHN DOES I V, inclusive; JANE DOES I-V, inclusive; BLACK CORPORATIONS I-V, inclusive; WHITE PARTNERSHIPS I-V, inclusive; Unknown Heirs and Devisees of each of the abovenamed Defendants, if deceased, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE ON FORECLOSURE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that the aboveentitled Court, having appointed me or my designee as Special Master in this matter with the power to sell, has ordered me to sell the real property (the “Property”) situated in Santa Fe County, New Mexico, commonly known as 400 Griffin Street, Santa Fe New Mexico 87501, and more particularly described as follows: Timeshare Interest(s) consisting of 1 undivided one fifty-second (1/52) interest(s) in fee simple as tenant in common in and to Unit Number(s) 2208, together with a corresponding undivided interest in the Common Furnishings which are appurtenant to such Unit(s), as well as the recurring (i) exclusive right to reserve, use, and occupy an Assigned Unit within Villas de Santa Fe, A Condominium (the “Project”); (ii) exclusive right to use and enjoy the Limited Common Elements and Common Furnishings located within or otherwise appurtenant to such Assigned Unit; and (iii) non-exclusive right to use and enjoy the Common Elements of the Project, for their intended purposes, during (A) in the case of “floating” Timeshare Interests, such Use Periods as shall properly have been reserved in accordance with the provisions of the then current Rules and Regulations promulgated by Villas de Santa Fe Condominium Association, Inc.; and (B) in the case of “fixed” Timeshare Interests, such Fixed Vacation Week as is specifically set forth below, all pursuant to the Declaration of Condominium for Villas de Santa Fe, A Condominium, duly recorded in the Office of the Clerk of Santa Fe County, New Mexico, in Book 1462, at Page 195, as amended from the

time (the “Declaration”). The sale is to begin at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, May 31, 2017, on the front steps of the First Judicial District Courthouse, 225 Montezuma Avenue, City of Santa Fe, County of Santa Fe, State of New Mexico, at which time I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in lawful currency of the United States of America, the Property to pay expenses of sale, and to satisfy the Judgment granted to Villas De Santa Fe Condominium Association, Inc. (“Villas De Santa Fe”). Villas De Santa Fe was awarded a Default Judgment Decree of Foreclosure on March 6, 2017, in the principal sum of $8,192.85, plus attorney fees and tax in the sum of $1,418.26 and attorney costs in the sum of $1,270.09 for a total amount of $10,881.20, plus interest thereafter at the rate of 8.75% per annum from March 6, 2017, until the property is sold at a Special Master’s Sale, plus costs of the Special Master’s Sale, including the Special Master’s fee in the amount of $212.50, plus any additional attorney fees and costs actually expended from the date of this Default Judgment until the date of the Special Master’s sale, plus those additional amounts, if any, which Plaintiff will be required to pay before termination of this action for property taxes, and insurance premiums, or any other cost of upkeep of the property of any sort. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the real property and improvements concerned with herein will be sold subject to any and all patent reservations, easements, all recorded and unrecorded liens not foreclosed herein, and all recorded and unrecorded special assessments and taxes that may be due. Villas De Santa Fe, its attorneys, and the Special Master disclaim all responsibility for, and the purchaser at the sale takes the property, subject to the valuation of the property by the County Assessor as real or personal property, affixture of any mobile or manufactured home to the land, deactivation of title to a mobile or manufactured home on the property, if any, environmental contamination on the property, if any, and zoning violations concerning the property, if any. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the purchaser at such sale shall take title to the above described real property subject to a one (1) month right of redemption. PROSPECTIVE PURCHASERS AT SALE ARE ADVISED TO MAKE THEIR OWN EXAMINATION OF THE TITLE AND THE CONDITION OF THE PROPERTY AND TO CONSULT THEIR OWN ATTORNEY BEFORE BIDDING. By: /s/ Robert Doyle, Special Master P.O. Box 51526 Albuquerque, NM 87181 505-417- 4113 NOTICE OF SALE ON FORECLOSURE/ D-101- CV-2016- 00065 Arthur J. Bachechi/Betsy A.

Bachechi STATE OF NEW MEXICO COUNTY OF SANTA FE FIRST JUDICIAL DISTRICT No. D-101- CV-2016-00065 Villas De Santa Fe Condominium Association, Inc. Plaintiff, v. Arthur J. Bachechi,; Betsy A. Bachechi,; JOHN DOES I-V, inclusive; JANE DOES I-V, inclusive; BLACK CORPORATIONS I-V, inclusive; WHITE PARTNERSHIPS I-V, inclusive; Unknown Heirs and Devisees of each of the abovenamed Defendants, if deceased, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE ON FORECLOSURE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that the aboveentitled Court, having appointed me or my designee as Special Master in this matter with the power to sell, has ordered me to sell the real property (the “Property”) situated in Santa Fe County, New Mexico, commonly known as 400 Griffin Street, Santa Fe New Mexico 87501, and more particularly described as follows: Timeshare Interest(s) consisting of 1 undivided one fifty-second (1/52) Interest(s) in fee simple as tenant in common in and to the below-described Condominium Unit, together with a corresponding undivided interest in the Common Furnishings which are appurtenant to such Condominium Unit, as well as the recurring (i) exclusive right every calendar year to reserve, use, and occupy an Assigned Unit of the same Unit Type described below within Villas de Santa Fe, a Condominium (the “Project”); (ii) exclusive right to use, and enjoy the Limited Common Elements and Common Furnishings located within or otherwise appurtenant to such Assigned Unit; and (iii) nonexclusive right to use and enjoy the Common elements of the Project, for their intended purposes, during a Vacation Week, as shall properly have been reserved in accordance with the provisions of the then current Rules and Regulations promulgated by Villas de Santa Fe Condominium Association, Inc., all pursuant to the Declaration of Condominium for Villas de Santa Fe, a Condominium, duly recorded in the Office of the Clerk of Santa Fe County, New Mexico, in Book 1462, at Page 195-294, as thereafter amended (the “Declaration”). The sale is to begin at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, May 31, 2017, on the front steps of the First Judicial District Courthouse, 225 Montezuma Avenue, City of Santa Fe, County of Santa Fe, State of New Mexico, at which time I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in lawful currency of the United States of America, the Property to pay expenses of sale, and to satisfy the Judgment granted to Villas De Santa Fe Condominium Association, Inc. (“Villas De Santa Fe”). Villas De Santa Fe was awarded a Default Judgment Decree of Foreclosure on January 25, 2017, in the principal sum of $5,447.16, plus

Master in this matter with the power to sell, has ordered me to sell the real property (the “Property”) situated in Santa Fe County, New Mexico, commonly known as 400 Griffin Street, Santa Fe New Mexico 87501, and more particularly described as follows: 1 Timeshare Interest(s) consisting of 1 undivided one fifty-second (1/52) interest(s) in fee simple as tenant in common in and to the below-described Condominium Unit, together with a corresponding undivided interest in the Common Furnishings which are appurtenant to such Condominium Unit, as well as the recurring (i) exclusive right every calendar year to reserve, use, and occupy an Assigned Unit of the same Unit Type described below within Villas de Santa Fe Condominium (the “Project”); (ii) exclusive right to use and enjoy the Limited Common Elements Form 5011635 (7-1-14) Page 5 of 11 NM-6 ALTA Commitment (6-1706) New Mexico and Common Furnishings located within or otherwise appurtenant to such Assigned Unit; and (iii) nonexclusive right to use and enjoy the Common Elements of the Project, for their intended purposes, during a Vacation Week, as shall properly have been reserved in accordance with the provisions of then-current Rules and Regulations promulgated by Villas de Santa Fe Condominium Association, Inc., all pursuant to the Declaration of Condominium for Villas de Santa Fe, a Condominium, duly recorded in the Office of the Clerk of Santa Fe County, New Mexico, in Book 1462, at Page 195-294, as thereafter amended (the “Declaration”). Unit Number: 2221 Vacation Week Number: 42 Unit Type: 1 Bedroom Initial Occupancy Year: 1999 Timeshare Interest: Floating Annual Timeshare Interest The sale is to begin at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, May 31, 2017, on the front steps of the First Judicial District Courthouse, 225 Montezuma Avenue, City of Santa Fe, County of Santa Fe, State of New Mexico, at which time I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in lawful NOTICE OF SALE ON currency of the United States FORECLOSURE/ of America, the Property to pay D-101- CV-2016- 00146 expenses of sale, and to satisfy Beverly Cohen/Natalie Shemonsky the Judgment granted to Villas STATE OF NEW MEXICO De Santa Fe Condominium COUNTY OF SANTA FE Association, Inc. (“Villas De FIRST JUDICIAL DISTRICT Santa Fe”). Villas De Santa No. D-101- CV-2016-00146 Fe was awarded a Second Villas De Santa Fe Amended Default Judgment Condominium Association, Decree of Foreclosure on March Inc. Plaintiff, v. Beverly Cohen,; 20, 2017, in the principal sum Natalie Shemonsky,; JOHN of $7,195.54, plus attorney fees DOES I-V, inclusive; JANE and tax in the sum of $589.84 DOES I-V, inclusive; BLACK and attorney costs in the sum of CORPORATIONS I-V, inclusive; $923.04 for a total amount of WHITE PARTNERSHIPS I-V, $8,708.42, plus interest thereinclusive; Unknown Heirs and after at the rate of 8.75% per Devisees of each of the aboveannum from March 20, 2017, named Defendants, if deceased, until the property is sold at a Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE Special Master’s Sale, plus costs ON FORECLOSURE PLEASE of the Special Master’s Sale, TAKE NOTICE that the aboveincluding the Special Master’s entitled Court, having appointed fee in the amount of $212.50, me or my designee as Special plus any additional attorney fees attorney fees and tax in the sum of $1,391.80 and attorney costs in the sum of $825.69 for a total amount of $7,664.65, plus interest thereafter at the rate of 8.75% per annum from January 25, 2017, until the property is sold at a Special Master’s Sale, plus costs of the Special Master’s Sale, including the Special Master’s fee in the amount of $212.50, plus any additional attorney fees and costs actually expended from the date of this Default Judgment until the date of the Special Master’s sale, plus those additional amounts, if any, which Plaintiff will be required to pay before termination of this action for property taxes, and insurance premiums, or any other cost of upkeep of the property of any sort. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the real property and improvements concerned with herein will be sold subject to any and all patent reservations, easements, all recorded and unrecorded liens not foreclosed herein, and all recorded and unrecorded special assessments and taxes that may be due. Villas De Santa Fe, its attorneys, and the Special Master disclaim all responsibility for, and the purchaser at the sale takes the property, subject to the valuation of the property by the County Assessor as real or personal property, affixture of any mobile or manufactured home to the land, deactivation of title to a mobile or manufactured home on the property, if any, environmental contamination on the property, if any, and zoning violations concerning the property, if any. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the purchaser at such sale shall take title to the above described real property subject to a one (1) month right of redemption. PROSPECTIVE PURCHASERS AT SALE ARE ADVISED TO MAKE THEIR OWN EXAMINATION OF THE TITLE AND THE CONDITION OF THE PROPERTY AND TO CONSULT THEIR OWN ATTORNEY BEFORE BIDDING. By: /s/ Robert Doyle, Special Master P.O. Box 51526 Albuquerque, NM 87181 505-417- 4113

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and costs actually expended from the date of this Default Judgment until the date of the Special Master’s sale, plus those additional amounts, if any, which Plaintiff will be required to pay before termination of this action for property taxes, and insurance premiums, or any other cost of upkeep of the property of any sort. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the real property and improvements concerned with herein will be sold subject to any and all patent reservations, easements, all recorded and unrecorded liens not foreclosed herein, and all recorded and unrecorded special assessments and taxes that may be due. Villas De Santa Fe, its attorneys, and the Special Master disclaim all responsibility for, and the purchaser at the sale takes the property, subject to the valuation of the property by the County Assessor as real or personal property, affixture of any mobile or manufactured home to the land, deactivation of title to a mobile or manufactured home on the property, if any, environmental contamination on the property, if any, and zoning violations concerning the property, if any. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the purchaser at such sale shall take title to the above described real property subject to a one (1) month right of redemption. PROSPECTIVE PURCHASERS AT SALE ARE ADVISED TO MAKE THEIR OWN EXAMINATION OF THE TITLE AND THE CONDITION OF THE PROPERTY AND TO CONSULT THEIR OWN ATTORNEY BEFORE BIDDING. By: /s/ Robert Doyle, Special Master P.O. Box 51526 Albuquerque, NM 87181 505-417- 4113 First Judicial District Court State of New Mexico County of Santa Fe In the Matter of a Petition for a Change of Name of Jose Ramon Roberto Valdez. Case No.: D-101-CV-201700884 NOTICE OF CHANGE OF NAME TAKE NOTICE that in accordance with the provisions of Sec. 40-8-1 through Sec. 40-8-3 NMSA 1978, the Petitioner Jose Ramon Roberto Valdez will apply to the Honorable Raymond Ortiz, District Judge of the First Judicial District at the Santa Fe Judicial Complex at Santa Fe, New Mexico at 8:30 a.m. on the 19th day of May, 2017 for an ORDER FOR CHANGE OF NAME from Jose Ramon Roberto Valdez to Raymond R Valdez. STEPHEN T. PACHECO, District Court Clerk By: Victoria Neal, Deputy Court Clerk Submitted by: Jose Ramon Roberto Valdez Petitioner, Pro Se APRIL 26-MAY 2, 2017

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April 26, 2017 Santa Fe Reporter  

April 26, 2017 Santa Fe Reporter

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