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SANTA FE’S RENTAL HOUSING SHORTAGE IS A PROBLEM OF QUANTITY AND QUALITY, WITH THE CITY’S FUTURE HANGING IN THE BALANCE BY MATT GRUBS, P.12


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JULY 11-17, 2018 | Volume 45, Issue 28

WE ARE

NEWS OPINION 5

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NEWS 7 DAYS, CLAYTOONZ AND THIS MODERN WORLD 6 PHONE-PAS 9 ICE detainees were denied phone translation services for about two weeks and corrections administrators aren’t saying why NUCLEAR FAMILY 11 From Doctor Atomic to the halls of Congress, victims of New Mexico’s nuclear fallout may finally get their day in the public eye COVER STORY 12 BUILDING UP OR TEARING DOWN? It’s no secret that Santa Fe has a severe housing shortage, and everyone seems to want to fix that. But who can, and how can they? THE INTERFACE 17 DEVICE AND CONQUER Robot overlords are taking over the world. Leave it to Lee Zlotoff and Danny Rubin to make it funny

11 NUCLEAR FAMILY The residents of the Tularosa Basin want the federal government to extend its downwinders compensation to include New Mexicans and hope exposure in this summer’s opera production of Doctor Atomic spreads the word. Cover design by Anson Stevens-Bollen artdirector@sfreporter.com

EDITOR AND PUBLISHER JULIE ANN GRIMM

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OUTSTANDING CITIZENS Local music and arts collective releases its latest

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LETTERS

renew skin : renew life

____________________________________________________ Mail letters to PO Box 2306, Santa Fe, NM 87504, deliver to 132 E Marcy St., or email them to editor@sfreporter.com. Letters (no more than 200 words) should refer to specific articles in the Reporter. Letters will be edited for space and clarity.

COVER, JULY 4: “POLITICAL CARTOON CONTEST”

THE BEST ONE It was an honor to be selected among the political cartoon winners. But the cartoon I chose to clip and save was the brilliant and sophisticated “Fake Mirror,” by 12-year-old Emma St. Peter. She gives me great hope that young adults like her will lead us out of the Trumpian despotism that is engulfing our great nation. Good job, Emma!

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NEWS, JULY 4: “WEED WASTE”

DISCOUNT? Ever since my first visit to a dispensary I wondered when the plastic packaging would become a problem. I think the best route, and what I am already doing, is after my plastic containers are empty I keep them and bring back to dispensary for them to reuse. I asked for the store to give me a discount for any

containers brought back, but unfortunately they don’t. So if they did have some type of in-house customer return program it’s a win-win.

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WEB EXTRA, JULY 6: “JOURNALIST’S CHARGES DROPPED”

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SANTA FE EAVESDROPPER Little boy to family: “Is this Starbucks?” —Overheard at Clafoutis Man: “When is Folk Art Market?” Woman, disdainfully: “It’s this weekend. I leave.” —Overheard at Milad Persian Bistro

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7 DAYS AMTRAK STILL THREATENING TO NIX NEW MEXICO SERVICE A story that’s as old as the Lamy spur.

NATIONAL FOREST REOPENS The collective celebration registered on the Richter scale just below that one soccer game.

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NEW LOS ALAMOS NAT’L LAB CONTRACTOR ANNOUNCES TAKEOVER TO HAPPEN NOV. 1 Now’s time to remove all the “u” keys from office keyboards to make accident reporting harder for the next staff.

STARBUCKS SAY IT’S DITCHING PLASTIC STRAWS. That totally offsets millions of single-use cups, locations within blocks of one another and general corporate overlordery.

FEDS DROP INAUGURATION DAY CHARGES AGAINST SFR REPORTER AARON CANTÚ Free the press.

CLINT EASTWOOD TO SHOOT NEW MOVIE NEAR LAS CRUCES That leathery old snapping turtle oughta feel perfectly at home in the dry desert air.

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S FR E P O RTE R .CO M / N E WS

OLLE

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in these situations where these women have been through an incredibly horrific experience that I can’t imagine going through.” Like all Cibola detainees represented by the Santa Fe Dreamers Project, the New Mexico Immigrant Law Center and its network of pro-bono lawyers, Canning’s client is a transgender woman. She is kept in an isolated pod at the prison with between 50 and 60 other trans women. Brockway and Canning say trans people often face severe brutality with little consequence in Central America, an observation supported by Amnesty International. This is why Carlota*, a 23-year-old trans woman who spent the last six months locked up at Cibola, left her hometown of Yoro, Honduras, and tried crossing into California in January. Speaking from the Albuquerque home of a woman who took her in after her release, Carlota says being incarcerated alongside other trans women provided

NS-B

A

special phone line that provides translation services for immigrants detained at the Cibola County Correctional Facility was inexplicably disconnected for two weeks in June and July, limiting access to legal counsel who help people file asylum claims and mental health professionals who assess their well-being. The lapse led to a loss of valuable time to work on detainees’ cases, attorneys and others tell SFR. As of July 5, the phone line had been restored, according to Kevin Martin, public information officer for CoreCivic, the private prison company that operates the  detention center on contract with US Immigration and Customs Enforcement. CoreCivic subcontracts the translation service to Language Line Services, and prison officials as well as outsiders who visit the prison, such as legal counsel, use the  line to facilitate communication with detainees. Martin blames the lapse in service on a “billing issue,” but would not elaborate. Lawyers and mental health workers say they were surprised after showing up to the prison in the last couple weeks to meet with detainees, only to be turned away by staff who informed them that communication wasn’t possible. By June 29, more than a week after the service went down, not even Dean King, the top ICE official overseeing the  prison from Albuquerque, had heard about the problem, according to an email obtained by SFR. Two lawyers who frequent the prison told SFR on July 9 that they had not been informed that the translation line was back in service. Wes Brockway, a staff attorney at the Santa Fe Dreamers Project who has represented immigrants detained at Cibola, says a CoreCivic employee in charge of scheduling legal visits informed him on July 5 that the line was still down—apparently in error. “I’m happy for our clients that have access to that, but it shouldn’t have been down in the first place,” Brockway says. “There were important things we needed to schedule that we were unable to for the last two weeks, and [detainees] were

just very flat-out denied access to counsel and services necessary for their asylum cases.” Martin, the spokesperson for CoreCivic, writes in an email to SFR that the private prison company was “not required” to give attorneys and others access to the Language Line phone service. When SFR relayed this information to Brockway, he cited executive orders issued by past US presidents mandating each federal agency provide limited English speakers “meaningful access” to services such as legal counsel. Lynne Canning, a Santa Fe-based attorney, was planning to speak with her client over the phone with a translator. Her client is scheduled to appear in front of a judge early next week to argue her asylum claim. After SFR informed Canning the translation line was up  again, she said she would visit her client at  Cibola this week. “There are obvious advantages to speaking in person instead of the phone,” Canning explains to SFR, “particularly

N ST EVE

BY AARON CANTÚ a a r o n @ s f r e p o r t e r. c o m

ANSO

Phone-Pas

Private prison company won’t say why a critical over-the-phone translation service was down for two weeks at Cibola County prison

NEWS

her with some sense of security, but that she also experienced mistreatment from guards and nurses. (*Name has been changed.) “There were times they treated us as if we were men,” says Carlota, including misgendering and not using their preferred names. Then, “they started to just refer to us by our last names, but I feel this is a form of discrimination.” At one point, after getting into a fight with another prisoner, Carlota says she was held in solitary confinement—in a cell by herself for 23 hours a day—for a month. She says she knows other women who were held in similar conditions even longer. The United Nations considers more than 15 days in solitary to be torture; CoreCivic has repeatedly claimed it doesn’t use solitary confinement. Despite the conditions, Carlota is among the more fortunate trans detainees to go through Cibola. That’s because she had legal representation, unlike the 15 others who currently do not, attorneys tell SFR. Carlota credits legal counsel for a judge tentatively approving her asylum claim in June. With her lawyers from the Santa Fe Dreamers Project, Carlota says, “I didn’t feel alone anymore. I felt more confident. They were working on my case and they won the case, thanks to God.” Brockway, who represented Carlota, says immigration lawyers often work in tandem with mental health workers who visit detainees to conduct interviews that gauge trauma and other psychological conditions. The results can bolster a person’s “credible fear” claim—a key hurdle in asylum cases. On June 8, Albuquerquebased child psychiatrist Shawn Sidhu held a training at the University of New Mexico for mental health workers interested in  administering to detainees at Cibola. To his surprise, 70 people showed up, and in a few weeks a dozen  volunteers were ready to begin visits under his direction. “But that’s when the phone stuff started happening,” blunting the team’s momentum, Sidhu tells SFR. Both CoreCivic and ICE maintain that legal and mental health volunteers can obtain their own translation help, but Sidhu says they need the precision of a professional service. “The amount of detail we need, asking who persecuted them, and also discussing feelings and emotions, those are higher language [concepts],” Sidhu says. “You basically can’t do the work without a specialized interpreter.”   SFREPORTER.COM

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Nuclear Families COURTESY COMPREHENSIVE NUCLEAR-TEST-BAN TREATY ORGANIZATION

For downwinders, congressional hearings and opera performance are two tactics in a long fight for compensation

The Trinity Test was the world’s first atomic bomb detonated by the US.

B Y E VA R O S E N F E L D i n t e r n @ s f r e p o r t e r. c o m

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hen Tularosa Basin Downwinders Consortium Co-Founder Tina Cordova got her chance to testify before Congress, 73 years had passed since the world’s first atomic bomb detonated in Southern New Mexico. Cordova had been requesting the hearing for eight years, and twice the Senate Judiciary Committee had granted and then cancelled her appearance. Accompanying her to the late June hearing were 12 other New Mexico women affected by the 1945 atomic bomb detonation at the Trinity test site. Some had cancer themselves and some had lost loved ones to radiation-related illness— or both, like Cordova, whose father died battling three simultaneous cancers. When Cordova started the consortium 13 years ago with another Tularosa native,

Fred Tyler, they had never heard of the Radiation Exposure Compensation Act of 1990. The act compensated only Nevada Test Site downwinders in Utah, Nevada and Arizona, though New Mexicans living near Trinity experienced a blast more powerful than the bomb detonated over Nagasaki later that year. Cordova’s testimony asked lawmakers to  extend compensation to New Mexico, Idaho and Pacific Islander downwinders, as well as people who worked in the uranium industry after 1917. Historically, the national government has characterized the test site as sparsely inhabited, and remained closedmouthed about  medical repercussions from the fallout. The US Department of Energy’s official website still calls it “a remote corner on the Alamogordo Bombing Range.” Census data, however, shows tens of thousands of people, mostly Hispanic and Native, living within a 50-mile radius of the bomb.

Bernice Gutierrez, a member of the consortium’s steering committee, was 8 days old and living in Carrizozo when the test occurred 35 miles away. When she was 2, her family moved to Albuquerque, where she lives today. “But imagine all the damage that was done in that short time,” she says. “It followed us, believe me. “My mom had three types of cancer. She had skin, thyroid, and breast cancer,” Gutierrez says. “One endocrinologist asked me if we had ever been exposed to radiation. I didn’t have a clue. I really never connected the dots. After my brother got thyroid cancer, my sister got it and is currently going through it again for the third time. My daughter had it three times. My brother’s daughter got it. My other brother had pancreatic cancer. I had to have my thyroid removed.” She fills the space of six minutes listing the cancer diagnoses and deaths of cousins, aunts, uncles, nephews and nieces. “To say that we weren’t affected is insane,” she says. “That is not a normal family history.” Gutierrez learned about the link between her family’s medical history and their radioactive exposure only when she saw Cordova speaking on television five years ago. “It was like a lightbulb went on,” Gutierrez says. The group argues that all of New Mexico is affected economically by the lack of federal compensation for downwinders. Medical costs, often reaching millions of dollars for a single patient, are shouldered by the state’s share of Medicaid rather than a federal program like that of Utah, Nevada or Arizona. Federal compensation, advocates say, would not only account for costs now absorbed by the state, but might bolster small-town economies as clinics and other small businesses open locally to provide care. The downwinders consider last month’s Congressional hearing a catalyst rather than a victory in the fight for compensation. They’re engaged in  on-

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going lobbying and exposure campaigns, including one unorthodox  vehicle for exposure: Doctor Atomic, which opens at the Santa Fe Opera on July 14 under the direction of Peter Sellars. It’s set to feature Cordova, Gutierrez and other downwinders performing, the result of a lunch meeting between Cordova, Sellars and choreographer Emily Johnson in March. “They said, ‘We want to embrace you,’” Cordova says. The three discussed bringing the downwinders’ story into the production, as well as that of the Pueblo people of Northern New Mexico affected by the construction of Los Alamos. “In a group setting recently, with a number of downwinders present,” Cordova says, “I told Peter and Emily: Imagine, we’re a group of people that don’t have access to the opera, much less access to being part of the opera. We will access an audience that we would have never had access to before. And through this art form I believe that people will open their minds, their hearts to the understanding that we have been harmed in this process, and that we have been left all these years to deal with this on our own.” In addition to the exposure offered by the production, Gutierrez emphasizes the emotional weight of hearing the story told.  Watching the scene in which General Groves ignores the advice of his medical advisor not to detonate without evacuating the area, she says, is an “intense moment of supreme anger. … We were in the dark for many many years, because history doesn’t tell the whole truth. And to hear it being told factually, it’s amazing. It’s something we were never ever told.” The downwinders’ ultimate goal is to receive acknowledgement, apology, and compensation from the federal government—“just like other downwinders,” Cordova says. “There’s a moral and ethical imperative to right this wrong after 73 years. In those 73 years, people have suffered immensely.”

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BUILDING UP OR TEARING DOWN? Santa Fe’s rental housing shortage is a problem of quantity and quality, with the city’s future hanging in the balance B Y M AT T G R U B S m a t t g r u b s @ s f r e p o r t e r. c o m

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his is a frustrating time for most people to find a place to live in Santa Fe. It’s been a seller’s market for home ownership for at least a couple years, and a landlord’s market for rentals for a decade. For those with no place to call home, it’s a daily battle with little in the way of transitional housing to get them on their feet. Depending on who’s doing the math, estimates of the shortage in housing stock can run to 8,000 or more. About 1,500 multifamily homes—from duplexes to apartment developments— are in the city’s pipeline for new construction with another 1,200 in early planning stages. It’s grim. Today, just about any new home options will help. Getting new development wrong, though, threatens to yank at the cultural fabric of Santa Fe for future generations by exacerbating inequity. Community groups, developers and elected officials all seem to want to avoid that, but without a plan, Santa Fe could further splinter into a less recognizable city. The tip of the iceberg is multifamily housing. Generally speaking, that’s anything that is not a single-family home. Those properties are the most likely to be rented, and there are almost none available.

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The shortage of both affordable and market-rate apartments crystallized this spring, when a local man offered a storage shed in his backyard for rent on Craigslist. The $575-a-month structure lacked running water or a toilet and the listing included requirements for prospective renters such as needing to regularly engage in “contemplative daily practice.” After SFR published a story about it, the city told the owner it was likely illegal. He took down the ad. According to CBRE Group, the commercial real estate giant that monitors Santa Fe’s multifamily housing market, the city’s occupancy rate has been at 95 percent or above since May 2014. “I think it all begins with quality of life. People want to live there,” David Eagle tells SFR. He writes the CBRE reports on Santa Fe. That only sounds like a nice problem to have if you already have a place to live. It’s not useful to think of occupancies above 95 percent as a 5 percent vacancy rate, he says, because it doesn’t really indicate a vacancy. People move out, they move in and there’s always a little lag time that does not translate to availability. The CBRE survey measures large apartment complexes, so there’s an ungauged segment of the market for casitas and compounds. But those homes don’t make for a hidden glut of places for rent that would push the actual occupancy rate down to something sane. The fact is, very few people or companies are building multifamily housing. Even in a city with a demonstrated need and a desire to issue a permit in a matter of months, getting a multifamily project built takes years. Today, added time means added cost. “We’ve been averaging a 4-5 percent increase on construction costs annually,” says Josh Rogers, who oversees multifamily projects for Titan Development. Aside from the cost of raw construction material, subcontractors are hard to find, and many are based in Albuquerque. “There’s about a 10 percent premium for construction in Santa Fe. You’re asking those subcontractors to commute. And when they’re commuting, they’re not working,” he explains. Still, Titan is building the Broadstone Rodeo development off St. Francis Drive on the southeast end of town. It’s the


MATT GRUBS

biggest new project in Santa Fe, and is a “class A” development that promises 188 apartment homes with one or two bedrooms. They’ll have a resort-style pool, an entertainment room, patios and covered parking. Rogers expects rent to begin at $1,050 for a one-bedroom apartment. “It’s gotten nutty up there,” he says. “There are places with popcorn ceilings that rent for $1,250 a month. I don’t even know how to justify that. Are there really people who walk in and see a popcorn ceiling from the ’70s and say, ‘I want this?’” The industry groups apartments into class A, B or C based on age, condition, rent and amenities. Class A is in good repair, has professional management and goes for market-rate rent or above. Class B is maybe 15 years old and due for an update; rent reflects that. Class C apartments are the oldest and in need of repair. With hardly any class A apartments in Santa Fe, rent is out of whack. That dynamic costs the city both residents and money. People who live here spend money here. Around 80 percent of the city’s budget comes from gross receipts tax. Most estimates are that at least half the city’s workforce doesn’t live in Santa Fe. Many people commute from Albuquerque—where they pay most of their taxes. “You’d be blown away at the difference in quality between Albuquerque and Santa Fe,” Rogers says. “The consumer looks at that and says, ‘I get so much less for my money. I’ll just make the commute.’” He says Titan spoke to Presbyterian Medical Group, which has structured shifts at its soon-to-open hospital so nurses can work longer hours and commute fewer days; an indication that the company anticipates many new employees will live outside the city. If Titan can stick to the $1,050 price point for its one-bedroom apartments, it has the potential to put pressure on notoriously rigid rental rates, which sat at $952 for January, according to CBRE. That rate might be conservative, because it measures large complexes, which tend to be on the city’s lower-priced Southside. If new apartments aren’t much more expensive than older ones, those landlords will be forced to drop rates. They could also spend money on repairs or new appliances to make their property more competitive. In an ultra-tight market like Santa Fe,

By the time the doors of the Railyard Flats apartments opened in May, the complex with 58 units had just four for rent.

though, it’s often just the lucky few who snag a new place and settle in. That’s the case at the Railyard Flats development off Cerrillos and Paseo de Peralta, which is in its first leasing cycle. “I don’t think we expected our apartments to go as fast as they did,” offers Rupert Ortiz, the property manager for the Greystar-owned development. “We probably could have asked more.” The 58-unit property, which focuses on scaled-down, convenient urban living, began renting in February. By the time the doors opened in May, the complex had four units left. “It’s a pretty competitive rate,” he tells SFR of the units, which start at $890 for a studio and top out at $2,200 for two-bedroom rental. “I’ve seen some of the older developments around town and we’re pretty close on pricing.” Though Railyard Flats is competitive with smaller downtown apartments, it commands a rather high price per square foot. “We call around [to apartments] all the time,” Titan’s Rogers says. “When people pick up the phone and you tell them you’re looking for an apartment, they don’t say, ‘Let us tell you about our community,’ they say, ‘Yeah, when are you looking?’ It’s that full.”

ture of housing in the city. They’re interested not just in houses, but in homes—safe places to play and pray, to cry, laugh and grow. As far as Santa Fe meetings go, it’s a diverse crowd. There seem to be as many 20-somethings as there are people in their 60s. A few heads of green and pink hair are scattered among the gray. In many ways, the room around them is a simulacrum of Santa Fe’s housing

It’s gotten nutty up there. There are places with popcorn ceilings that rent for $1,250 a month. I don’t even know how to justify that.

It’s a hot Thursday evening in late June. In a gallery space at the Santa Fe Art Institute, 100 or so people plop down on metal folding chairs to consider the fu-

-Josh Rogers, Titan Development

market: It’s a beautiful space, but inefficient. By the time organizers move the gathering outside after the sun sets, more than a few people will call it quits. The building can house the people, but it can’t really accommodate them. They can’t thrive.

The evening’s exercise is to look at housing through the lens of science fiction; to imagine Santa Fe in the year 2068 as a city where housing is plentiful and affordable. Free of some of the normal constraints of problem-solving, organizers hope to bring new voices to the conversation, and to connect the individual efforts around the community. “A lot of the books, a lot of the movies that thought about solutions, came about years and decades before [those solutions] came to fruition,” Creative Santa Fe’s Cyndi Conn says as things get underway. It’s the first dialogue in Creative Santa Fe’s Disruptive Futures series. The arts-centric group has brought in urbanist and designer Liz Ogbu to talk about how housing equity can lead to sustainable communities. There’s a temptation in addressing affordable housing, Ogbu says, to think of the fix in terms of “units” rather than “homes.” Successful projects don’t just stop at a roof and four walls; they build those thriving spaces that can sustain a historically diverse city like Santa Fe. Success also means seeking voices from the communities that will be impacted. Ogbu recalls meetings she’s held for affordable home projects where residents stand with arms folded, exuding doubt and distrust, waiting for what’s next. For people who typically aren’t represented at the table, there’s a fear of being run out of a neighborhood or a home that has been in a famCONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE

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MATT GRUBS

COURTESY KATRINA MENDOZA

ily for generations. In housing, Ogbu says, community that is already divided. SanSometimes, that’s slow. the people closest to a problem are often ta Fe has grown for wealthier, older sec“Trust has to be built,” says Tomás Riclosest to the solution. ond-home buyers, but it’s failed to pro- vera, who heads the Chainbreaker Collec“The lack of affordable housing, the vide enough housing options for the next tive, an economic and environmental jusincrease in community gentrification, generation of locals and new workers. tice group. He says, as Ogbu does, that it’s the concerns about community difficult to convince people you’re displacement, the loss of cultural listening. He points to the city’s efmemory, places constraints on a lot fort to find the next use for the forof people to imagine possibilities,” mer Santa Fe University of Art and says Creative Santa Fe’s Pascal EmDesign, which could include a housmer. ing component. “It’s really hard The consensus at Disruptive Futo have a trust-building session in tures is that those things need to be three months. We’ve been doing acknowledged to move forward, not this for 14 years. That’s why people ignored in favor of something that open their doors when we knock.” only looks like progress. He’s doesn’t think the city is “I was really nervous to talk acting in bad faith, rather that soluabout it, because it’s an emotional tions take serious commitment. topic,” City Councilor Renee Vil“How we build our city reflects larreal tells the crowd that evening. our values,” Rivera says. Slowing “Especially in Santa Fe.” the process, eating a bigger chunk For Santa Fe’s Native populaof the $2.3 million annual morttion, says Beata Tsosie-Peña of gage payment the city makes on the Tewa Women United, a lot of deproperty, would be a value statevelopment carries the ugly whiff of ment that might convince skeptics Urbanist Liz Ogbu says that in housing, the people closcolonialism; a stink that’s hard to that the city is serious. est to a problem are often closest to the solution. get rid of. “There’s absolutely a risk of do“Only rich settlers can afford our ing it wrong. That’s kind of what’s traditional homes. Passive solar adobe “How do you honor the traditions gotten us into this mess in the first place,” homes. Who doesn’t want that?” she asks that have always made Santa Fe special he says of the housing crisis. a chuckling group. It’s funny, but there’s and unique … while still keeping the door It’s a point not lost on Villarreal, who genuine hurt in those words. open to change and to innovation and to represents District 1, a hodgepodge of A slapdash approach to any housing increased diversity?” Conn muses to SFR wealthy new-to-town residents and old development threatens to worsen those a week earlier. “Collaboration moves at Santa Fe families on the north and northinjuries and drive a wedge deeper into a the speed of trust.” west side of Santa Fe.

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Broadstone Rodeo off St. Francis Drive is the city’s biggest pending rental project.

“People need to understand the complexities of our housing situation. When people get to share their story about what they’ve experienced, it helps us understand what we need to do better,” she says. The history of displacement—pushing out traditional uses of place in the name of progress—breeds resentment. Villarreal says it’s not a problem City Hall is likely to solve on its own. “I don’t think government is equipped to [handle conversations about cultural loss],” she tells SFR. “Groups that are community-based and address social and racial inequities in the city, not just healing, but difficult policy decisions and choices” can better inform the government. Rivera, Conn and others are anxious to have those conversations. “If you want to talk about cultural harmony in our city, you don’t necessarily need to have a panel discussion on cultural harmony,” Conn tells SFR in the organization’s office in an old house on Read Street. “We have events, we have activities, we bring people together in play, in joy. And that’s where the arts also come in.” It’s an off-the-beaten path approach, but it’s not as though conventional


BUILDING UP OR TEARING DOWN?

SOURCE: CBRE GROUP, HUD

methods are working. Creative Santa Fe would know. It’s working with New Mexico Inter-Faith Housing to develop the Siler Yard Arts + Creativity Center on city land off Siler Road. The Siler Yard project aims to provide 65 live-work homes for artists with lower incomes who are part of Santa Fe’s creative economy. It would help those both inside and outside the project. It’s slated to include performance, exhibition and “micro-retail” space, a shared workshop and a classroom with programs such as entrepreneurship training to help residents transition to sustainable living and find connections to social services. It’s not cheap. The $14-$15 million price tag for those 65 units is roughly $35,000$50,000 more per home than Titan’s Broadstone Rodeo project. That’s with some costs covered by a grant from the National Endowment for the Arts, land donated by the city, $400,000 promised for things like water and sewer lines, and funding from the partnership with Creative Santa Fe. The majority of the homes would rent to artists who earn less than 50 percent of the area median income—no more than $34,650 a year for a family of four. Some homes will rent for as little as $300 a month. For all its ambition, the project has yet to win a federal Low Income Housing Tax Credit that would cover 60 percent of its construction cost. Developers found out this month that Siler Yard came painfully close to getting the credit for a second straight year. The group is considering a third try. Its $9 million ask would double the total award for all six projects in the state that got money this year. Backers are adamant that Siler Yard is the right way to provide affordable housing: Tie it in to the local economy. Provide a common space for the community, not just residents. Include robust social and economic programming. It’s not just the kind of development lower-income Santa Feans need, they say, it’s the kind of development that neighbors will want—if they can build it and if the city will continue to support it. Santa Fe Mayor Alan Webber has spent a lot of time lately thinking about Robert F Kennedy. Last month was the 50th anniversary of the death of a man many thought had the vision, power and will to change America even more than his brother who became president. Webber says Kennedy’s vision of an inclusive America provided hope for progress and gave a voice to the voiceless: “He got away from the theory of

change, that it was a zero-sum game; that for me to succeed, you have to fail.” The mayor thinks that’s prescriptive. “We have to find solutions that don’t require somebody else to lose. … We have to not just build housing for the sake of housing but livable, attractive neighborhoods where people want to put down roots,” he says. He will need to try to do it without tearing up the roots that are already there. His housing advisory group says there needs to be a plan: Find a sustainable funding source and use city land for affordable housing. The group will keep meeting. “It’s not easy,” Webber offers. “This is the hard stuff. This has been the hard stuff of America for as long as I’ve been alive.” There are success stories. Both the Soleras Station multifamily project near the new Presbyterian Hospital and the Villa Consuelo rehabilitation project for senior housing off Cerrillos Road won federal low-income housing credits the past two years. The Civic Housing Authority plans to rehab roughly 10 apartments at a time for the Villa Consuelo project. The result will be 100 up-to-date, affordable apartment homes for older Santa Feans. The Soleras Stations project is being developed by The Housing Trust. Zach Thomas, who directs land use for the group, says the 87-home project will feature one-, two-, and three-bedroom apartments. Of those, 73 will be what are called income-verified, where a resident has to prove they earn less than 60 percent of the area median income, or $43,200 for a family of four. The homes will be available to applicants who earn “all the way from 120 percent of AMI down to 30 percent,” Thomas tells SFR. Planning 14 apartments to be affordable even for people who earn above the median income for Santa Fe indicates how expensive it can be to live in the city. Like the Broadstone Rodeo project, Soleras Station plans to come online in late summer or early fall 2019. From developer to home hunter, it’s hard to find someone who is seriously looking at the problem who isn’t passionate about it. Builders want reliable funding streams for affordable projects, and market-rate developers crave predictability from the city. Residents who fear being shoved out of their traditional neighborhood in favor of redevelopment are crying to be heard. Santa Fe is becoming more financially and racially segregated with each passing year. There’s certainly the will to solve Santa Fe’s housing crisis. What the city needs next is the way.

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TECH

Santa Fe Network’s first original content considers the secret lives of smart devices BY JULIA GOLDBERG @votergirl

L

ast spring, Alexa made headlines when she secretly recorded a conversation between a husband and wife and then sent the communiqué to the husband’s employee. The story was one of several high-profile news events highlighting the smart device’s unexpected behavior. Other customers had experienced Alexa’s creepy unbidden laughter. Reports of researchers’ discovery that they could secretly program smart devices to hear commands undetectable to humans added to rising dismay from privacy advocates, as well as those of us who saw The Terminator too many times at a young age. Lee Zlotoff—of MacGyver fame—rattles off these incidents while discussing his new web series, Our Own Devices, as examples of why the show is situated not just in the here—Santa Fe—but the now. “We are living in weird times,” he says

with a laugh. Zlotoff produced the web series, the first original content from Santa Fe Network (SantaFeNetwork.TV). It premieres online July 11. Don’t let my Terminator reference scare you off. Unlike most meditations on human/cyborg dynamics, Our Own Devices foregoes the dystopian twist—it’s a comedy. Written by Danny Rubin (writer of Groundhog Day) and directed by Vicky Jenson (director of Shrek), the 12-episode micro-series (each episode is just a few minutes long) takes a look at a particular Santa Fe household where the smart devices—Alexa and Siri, primarily—have a secret relationship. (See a trailer at SFReporter.com.) The show grew from a conversation between Zlotoff and Rubin, both Santa Fe residents and friends with serious Hollywood experience. Zlotoff shared the idea, Rubin immediately responded and—with relative ease— the show came to fruition. While Rubin immediately saw the comedic potential in a Siri/Alexa relationship (he started out in comedy, so writing short and funny comes naturally), the series also incorporates other themes Santa Fe Network’s original web series “Our Own Devices” he’s explored throughout comedically explores what happens when Alexa meets Siri. his career. “A fascination COURTESY SANTA FE NETWORK

Device & Conquer

from when I was very young that carries through in all of my writing has to do with the pursuit of understanding of what the limits of humanity are: What are we bound to, what can we not escape and what are we assuming that isn’t necessarily true? This juncture with technology raises a lot of those questions in an interesting way,” he tells SFR. Both Rubin and Zlotoff are also excited to be part of the movement to bolster New Mexico’s film industry, and the booming landscape of online distribution presents unique opportunities for creatives living here—established and newcomers alike. “It’s a really exciting time for content creators,” Zlotoff says. “It’s a brave new world. It used to be unless you got a movie studio or network to fund or distribute whatever you made, there was no way to get it to the audience. With the internet … if you can build a better mousetrap and entice people to nibble on the cheese, then they’re yours.” Such was the thinking behind SFN’s creation, which allows New Mexico film-

makers to share their work online for free viewing. The project grew out of work from the Santa Fe Film and Digital Media Commission, and also is part of the Emerging Media Alliance, a network of groups here working across mediums and genres. SFN Vice President Adam Shaening-Pokrasso, who has been on the digital commission since it began almost two years ago and also runs the creative agency 12FPS, says SFN “is really designed around cultivating a local and statewide network and platform for showcasing creative work.” The film industry is strong here, Shaening-Pokrasso says, particularly when it comes to production and post-production, but SFN seeks to bridge gaps the initial stages of project development and the final stages of distribution. “We need the ideas to not be coming from California … but to cultivate the writers we have here, and instead of leaving to be distributed … stays here to be distributed nationally and internationally.” SFN’s model already has attracted attention. “I think it’s the first place-based network, because we haven’t found another one,” Anna Darrah, SFN president, says. “Other places are interested, though, and asking a lot of questions because they think it’s a smart idea.” SFN celebrates its one-year anniversary and the launch of Our Own Devices with an open party on July 11. Zlotoff, one of SFN’s founders, sees the effort as one that will help build New Mexico’s standing in the industry. “I think Santa Fe and New Mexico, with just a little more effort,” he says, “could explode as the next ‘It’ state.” Stay tuned. SANTA FE NETWORK ANNIVERSARY PARTY 7:30 pm Wednesday, July 11. Free. Hotel Santa Fe, 1501 Paseo de Peralta, santafenetwork.tv

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STRAIGHT TRIPPIN’ The artsy weirdo community of Madrid, New Mexico, lies a brief drive outside town, but isn’t always on tourists’ or locals’ must-do list. Santa Fe Variety Tours aims to fix this with a five-hour tour of the one-time mining, one-time ghost town. Pop by the restaurants, check out the Madrid Old Coal Town Museum or pick up contemporary art works at any of the numerous galleries. There’s a pretty sweet bar with live music, too and, for those of you still balking, a pretty glorious 1950s-esque soda shop. Chocolate malt, anyone? Meet on the Plaza and make it happen. (Alex De Vore)

STEPHANIE MENDEZ

COURTESY VISITMADRIDNM.COM

EVENT WED/11

Trip Out in Madrid Day Tour: 11 am-4 pm Wednesday July 11. $45. Santa Fe Plaza, 100 Old Santa Fe Trail; funsantafe.com.

PUBLIC DOMAIN

FILM FRI/13-SUN/15 ALL YOU NEED IS LOVE Nostalgic for the 1960s? Get a heavy dose at a screening of the classic Beatles animated feature Yellow Submarine, the first of many films scheduled to be shown at The Screen, the previously dormant theater now run by the Center for Contemporary Arts. The 1968 classic, illustrated by hand and animated frame by frame, takes place in Pepperland, where the peaceful denizens are under siege by the music-hating Blue Meanies. The Beatles come to the rescue on a yellow submarine, get holes in their pockets, sing their way past the dreaded Suckophant and finally conquer with their groovy tunes. Psychedelic effects abound. (Roan Lee-Plunket) Yellow Submarine: 3:45 pm Friday-Sunday July 13-15. $8-$11. The Screen, 1600 St. Michael’s Drive, 473-6494.

LOIS GREENFIELD

MUSIC MON/16 ENTER THE CHAMBER We’ve said it before and we’ll say it again: There are benefits in exposing young folks to the powers of classical music. And nobody knows this better than the Santa Fe Chamber Music Festival, the yearly event that brings the chamber music ruckus to Santa Fe like clockwork, even hosting a little something for the kids. Not only does the Youth Concert give the musical context needed to painlessly dip a toe into the world of chamber music, they’ll probably provide a bit of history to flesh out the ol’ cultural CV. Will this performance from the Orion String Quartet turn your kids into brain surgeons? Who knows—but it probably won’t hurt their chances. (Alex De Vore) Santa Fe Chamber Music Festival Youth Concert: 11 am Monday July 16. Free. New Mexico Museum of Art, 107 W Palace Ave., 476-5072.

EVENT THU/12-SUN/15

That’s All Folky Celebrate the 15th anniversary of the world’s largest folk art market “Beautiful objects,” says Khristaan Villela, the director of the Museum of International Folk Art, are something we can all come together around even if we do not share language, religion or creed—these things that are “not only beautiful, but also lead to significant improvement in people’s lives.” Such as Aissata Namoko, a Malian artist who makes indigo-dyed clothing and home accessories. In 2004, she started Djiguiyasa Cooperative in Bamako to cultivate a skilled workforce of woman artists. The profits Namoko and her cooperative made selling work at the International Folk Art Market last year allowed them to buy a solar array for a local school so that children have lights to read by. “The question is, what does it actually mean to have impact in your home community?” Villela asks. “In some cases, the artists have been able to buy vehicles, whereas they used to have to walk hours to get to the field where they harvest things like indigo.” Namoko is one of 162 artists from 53 countries who will sell work at this year’s International Folk Art Market, bringing the number of countries represented since the market’s founding in 2004 to 98, about half the world’s total count. Other artists Villela is looking forward to at market this year include Pedro Or-

tega Lozano, a self-taught Mexican artist who makes visually striking retablos out of cut paper, and Carla Fernández, a Mexico City-based fashion designer who has traveled her country cataloging Indigenous garments, and “has pioneered a model of how designers can work with Native communities,” Villela says. Leading the Thursday artist procession and serving as the honorary chair of this year’s market is Bangladesh-born Nobel Peace Prize-winning economist Muhammad Yunus. Yunus is known for creating the concept of microcredit—lending small amounts of money to impoverished people, usually women, to pursue entrepreneurship as a means of escaping poverty. Also on Thursday on the Plaza, the Chilean musicians Pascuala Ilabaca y Fauna perform traditional South American music with global influences, including rock and jazz. Ilabaca occasionally brings an accordion onstage. In addition to the main market on Museum Hill, events across town go on all weekend. (Eva Rosenfeld) INTERNATIONAL FOLK ART MARKET Various times Thursday-Sunday July 12-15. Various costs (and some free). The Plaza, 100 Old Santa Fe Trail, and Museum Hill, 710 Camino Lejo; folkartmarket.org.

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Want to see your event here? Email all the relevant information to calendar@sfreporter.com. You can also enter your events yourself online at calendar.sfreporter.com (submission doesn’t guarantee inclusion). Need help?

Contact Charlotte: 395-2906

WED/11 BOOKS/LECTURES ARTIST DEMO: ILYA KAZAKOV form & concept 435 S Guadalupe St., 982-8111 form & concept collaborates with the International Folk Art Market to present a special demonstration by Kazakh artist Kazakov. Drawing inspiration from his surroundings in rural Kazakhstan, the master silversmith is reinventing a jewelry tradition that spans millennia. 11 am-1 pm, free BILINGUAL BOOKS AND BABIES Santa Fe Public Library Main Branch 145 Washington Ave., 955-6780 Join a play and language group to enjoy books, songs and finger games. 10:30 am, free BILINGUAL BOOKS AND BABIES Santa Fe Public Library Southside 6599 Jaguar Drive, 955-2820 Miss the earlier one (see above)? Here’s another. 4 pm, free CRITICAL CONVERSATIONS: LYDIA CACHO Center for Contemporary Arts 1050 Old Pecos Trail, 982-1338 Author, journalist and Mexican peace activist Cacho’s recent documentary project, Somos Valientes (We Are Brave), seeks a positive and hopeful narrative for Mexican society. She keynotes a presentation, then is joined by her documentary collaborator, journalist Marcela Zendejas de la Vega. 6 pm, $5 DHARMA TALK BY SENSEI KAZ TANAHASHI Upaya Zen Center 1404 Cerro Gordo Road, 986-8518 This week's talk is presented by Sensei Kaz Tanahashi and is entitled "Painting Peace." The evening begins with a 15-minute meditation. 5:30 pm, free

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JOANNA V HILL: SPIRITUAL LAW The Coffee Wheel 7 Caleinte Road, La Tienda, Eldorado 87508, 982-2165 Local author Hill reads from her book Spiritual Law, the retelling of theologian Emanuel Swedenborg's classic, Divine Providence, aiming to serve as a handbook for spiritual growth. 2:30 pm, free MIDDLE LENGTH LAM RIM Thubten Norbu Ling Tibetan Buddhist Center 1807 Second St., Ste. 35, 660-7056 In weekly classes taught by Geshe Thubten Sherab, learn about Lam Rim—it means "Stages of the Path" in Tibetan, and refers to the entire Buddhist path to enlightenment. 6:30 pm, free PRESCHOOL STORY TIME Santa Fe Public Library Southside 6599 Jaguar Drive, 955-2820 Get yer kids learnt. 10:45 am, free SOCIAL ENTREPRENEURSHIP: INSPIRING INNOVATION IN BUSINESS, GOVERNMENT AND NONPROFITS International Folk Art Market 620 Cerrillos Road, 474-6783 An armchair interview with Mayor Alan Webber, led by Kim Meredith, executive director of the Stanford Center on Philanthropy and Civil Society. 11 am-12:30 pm, free THE NICOMACHEAN ETHICS IN MEDIEVAL JEWISH AND ISLAMIC THOUGHT St. John's College 1160 Camino Cruz Blanca, 984-6000 Ilona Gerbakher, Columbia University PhD student in Islamic studies, lectures in the Junior Common Room, Peterson Student Center. 4:30 pm, free

COURTESY OBSCURA GALLERY

THE CALENDAR

DANCE DANCE FOR ALL ABILITIES AND LEVELS Cornell Rose Garden Galisteo St & W Cordova Rd Every other Wednesday, dance for flexibility, balance, grace, creativity, socializing and joy. RSVP to Claire at 577-8187 or crodill99@gmail.com. 4 pm, $10 FLAMENCO DINNER SHOW El Farol 808 Canyon Road, 983-9912 Make a dinner reservation for a show by the National Institute of Flamenco. 6:30 pm, $25 FLAMENCO DE SANTA FE SUMMER SEASON El Flamenco de Santa Fe 135 W Palace Ave, 209-1302 Get authentic Spanish tapas, wine and beer, and a dramatic performance by local dancer Antonio Granjero and his renowned international company, Entreflamenco. Doors open an hour before the performances so you can get situated with dinner (purchased separately). 7:30 pm, $25-$40

SFREPORTER.COM

Parisian artist Coco Fronsac makes her debut in the United States as part of the group show Limelight, opening Friday at Obscura Gallery. Obscura, the brainchild of Jennifer Schlesinger (formerly of Verve Gallery, RIP), could be a new favorite photo spot.

EVENTS GEEKS WHO DRINK Second Street Brewery (Railyard) 1607 Paseo de Peralta, 989-3278 Pub quiz! 8 pm, free PUEBLO POTTERY DEMONSTRATION: JERRY DUNBAR AND MARITA HINDS Museum of Indian Arts & Culture 710 Camino Lejo, 476-1250 Learn from Dunbar (Ysleta del Sur Pueblo) and Hinds (Tesuque Pueblo). Free with museum admission. 1-4 pm, $6-$12

RESPIRATORY CARE DEPARTMENT MEET 'N' GREET Santa Fe Community College 6401 Richards Ave., 428-1000 Respiratory therapists who earn a degree at SFCC find good jobs, so if you're down for good job prospects, attend a meet-and-greet with SFCC Respiratory Care Program Director Rebecca Jeffs, to find out what opportunities are available with a degree. It's in the Health and Sciences Center, room 442. 3-6 pm, free

TRIP OUT IN MADRID DAY TOUR Santa Fe Plaza 100 Old Santa Fe Trail If you're a'scared to venture 26 miles south on your own, join Santa Fe Variety Tours' five-hour tour to the galleries, shops and sites of Madrid (see SFR Picks, page TK). 11 am-4 pm, $45 WEDNESDAY AFTERNOON MARKET Santa Fe Farmers Market 1607 Paseo de Peralta, 983-4098 A produce-centric happy hour. 3-6 pm, free

¡VÁMONOS! SANTA FE: WALK WITH THE FAITH COMMUNITY Bicentennial Alto Park 1121 Alto St. What better motivation to walk than when you can talk to someone interesting while you do it? These pleasant early-morning strolls are with spiritual folks. Rise 'n' shine and head to the park to go for a stroll with Rachel Ryer of Thubten Norbu Ling Tibetan Buddhist Center. For more info, check out sfct.org/vamonos. 7 am, free


ENTER EVENTS AT SFREPORTER.COM/CAL

FOOD HEATHER SWEETSER AND LLYD WELLS: MIDDLE EASTERN COFFEE, ARABIC AND ANCIENT COLLECTIONS SITE Santa Fe 1606 Paseo de Peralta, 989-1199 As part of the Digest This! event series, Sweetser, instructor of Arabic at the University of New Mexico, and Wells, faculty member at St. John’s College, present about the Arabiv language, the history of the region, and discuss coffee in great detail. Enjoy date cookies and Middle Eastern coffee to round out the experience. 6 pm, $5-$10

MUSIC CHINO XL AND OG WILLIKERS Shadeh Nightclub Buffalo Thunder Resort and Casino, 30 Buffalo Thunder Trail, 819-2338 The Outstanding Citizens Collective presents Chino X and OG Willikers (see Music, page 22). 8 pm, $10-$15 DAVE MENSCH Cowgirl 319 S Guadalupe St., 982-2565 Acoustic rock and country. 8 pm, free DAVID GEIST Osteria D'Assisi 58 S Federal Place, 986-5858 Piano standards and Broadway faves. 6 pm, free ESTER HANA Vanessie 427 W Water St., 982-9966 Masterful classical, jazz and cabaret tunes. 6:30 pm, free GERRY & CHRIS La Fiesta Lounge 100 E San Francisco St., 982-5511 Traditional Irish sounds from Gerry Carthy meld with Latin tunes by Chris Abeyta when these two longtime friends play together. 7:30 pm, free JOAQUIN GALLEGOS El Mesón 213 Washington Ave., 983-6756 Soulful flamenco guitar. 7 pm, free MUSIC ON THE HILL: JIMMY STADLER St. John's College 1160 Camino Cruz Blanca, 984-6000 Head to the college's athletic field for the best Wednesday night summer tradition we know of. Bring a blanket and a picnic for the Taos musician who, for more than 25 years, has been a musical fixture in Northern New Mexico with his feel-good rocky-folkybluesy songs on keyboard, guitar and mandolin. Take a shuttle from the PERA Building (413 Old Santa Fe Trail) parking lot to the field. 6 pm, free

THE CALENDAR

OPEN MIC NIGHT Tumbleroot Brewery & Distillery 2791 Agua Fría St., 303-3808 Singer-songwriter Jason Reed rekindles his long-beloved open mic affair on Santa Fe's newest stage. 6:30 pm, free POLYPHONY MARIMBA CONFLUENCE The Bridge @ SF Brewing Co. 37 Fire Place, 557-6182 Get in the mood for this weekend's International Folk Art Market with classically influenced African music on marimba. 7 pm, free RAMON BERMUDEZ JR. TerraCotta Wine Bistro 304 Johnson St., 989-1166 Latin and smooth jazz guitar. 6 pm, free SANTA FE BANDSTAND: DALE WATSON Santa Fe Plaza 100 Old Santa Fe Trail Texas' Watson, a member of the Austin Music Hall of Fame, is a country music maverick. He describes his sound as "Ameripolitan," aiming to distinguish it from the star-driven pop machine of Music Row in Nashville. Supported by Kitty Jo Creek. 6 pm, free SANTA FE CROONERS Palace Saloon 142 W Palace Ave., 428-0690 Golden Age standards. 6:30-9:30 pm, free TONE RANGER AND POST MOVES Santa Fe Oxygen & Healing Bar 137 W San Francisco St., 986-5037 Artists and amateur visitors alike can get in on some live painting as ambient pedal steel players (yes, there is more than one on the planet) lay down morphing soundscapes. 8 pm, $5-$10

OPERA MADAME BUTTERFLY Santa Fe Opera House 301 Opera Drive, 986-5900 Giacomo Puccini's beloved, simple, devastating opera is one of Santa Fe Opera's most popular shows of all time, so get your tickets early. If you’ve never seen an opera, Puccini is your best intro. 8:30 pm, $35-$310

WORKSHOP FALL PRE-PROPOSAL INFORMATION SESSION Santa Fe Community Foundation 501 Halona St., 988-9715 Learn more about applying for SFCF grants. 2-5 pm, free INTRODUCTION TO ZEN Mountain Cloud Zen Center 7241 Old Santa Fe Trail, 988-4396 Explore the basics and finer points of good posture and finding a comfortable meditation position. 5 pm, free

THU/12

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BOOKS/LECTURES IMMIGRATION 101: LEARN THE BASICS OF OUR AMERICAN IMMIGRATION SYSTEM Meow Wolf 1352 Rufina Circle, 395-6369 Join an active learning experience about the fundamentals of the American immigration system to learn about immigration law and policy to better understand what’s happening in the news and make a positive impact in your community. Taught by Allegra Love, immigration attorney and executive director of Santa Fe Dreamers Project. 6:30 pm, free MUHAMMAD YUNUS: A WORLD OF THREE ZEROS Collected Works Bookstore and Coffeehouse 202 Galisteo St., 988-4226 Yunus, winner of the 2006 Nobel Peace Prize, is the honorary chair of this year's International Folk Art Market. Today he'll sign copies of his books—but there’s no presentation, so read it yourself. 2 pm, free NANCY OWEN LEWIS: THE HOUNDS OF EL DELIRIO AND DOGS FOR DEFENSE: NEW MEXICO’S CANINE WARRIORS El Zaguán 545 Canyon Road, 982-0016 In the 1940s at El Delirio, the Santa Fe estate of Amelia Elizabeth White, her personal dog handler trained pets for the war effort. From show dogs to war dogs, the changing role of a world-class kennel and the woman who owned it are examined in this illustrated presentation. RSVP is required: 983-2567. 3 pm, $5 PRESCHOOL STORY TIME Santa Fe Public Library Main Branch 145 Washington Ave., 955-6780 Rëëd some büüks. 11 am, free SCOTT CANNING: LA RAMBLA La Sala de Galisteo 5637 Hwy. 41, Galisteo, 466-3541 Canning, horticulture director of the Santa Fe Botanical Garden, discusses the design, construction and function of La Rambla, a water event drainage solution that’s an essential functional aspect of the SFBG. 7 pm, free SOCIAL STARTUP SUCCESS: HOW TO MAXIMIZE IMPACT FOR SOCIAL CAUSES International Folk Art Market 620 Cerrillos Road, 474-6783 Kathleen Kelly Janus is a social entrepreneur, author and lecturer; her new book, Social Startup Success, features best practices for early stage nonprofit organizations. 10 am-noon, free

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OG Willikers’ Lights On For Safety is the newest feat of local hip-hop collective B Y E VA R O S E N F E L D i n t e r n @ s f r e p o r t e r. c o m

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ights On For Safety is an album title that has been floating around rapper Zach Maloof’s consciousness for a decade, originally as an acoustic folk album title, now excavated from old notes and re-appropriated to christen Maloof’s (aka OG Willikers) new hip-hop effort, out July 11. The phrase’s original meaning has long dissipated, and now whatever significance it carries is the cumulative weight of having stuck around long enough to absorb transformation. The same could be said for most of the objects that have lasted in Maloof’s orbit throughout his dramatic musical evolution. The RaRa Room, where I met Maloof, started out as a teenage band practice room during his pop-punk days, lasted through the singer-songwriter folk rock era of his early 20s, and now serves as the de facto hub of Outstanding Citizens Collective, the Santa Fe hip-hop collective in which OG now raps. It’s also where he hosts RaRa Room Radio, a local music podcast. The room is “a shrine to local independent music and comic book nerdness,” Maloof says. Sure enough, past show flyers paper the walls, and when he pulls open a file cabinet full of titles, he cautions: “You would think these are records, but they’re comic books.” He’s scavenged studio parts from his many gigs in Santa Fe’s music world. Lights On produces the same sensation that time has been compiled into one composite object. It sounds like a saga of personal growth, but its would-be streamlined narrative progression is

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made disjointed—and more interesting— by Maloof’s many collaborators. The album boasts over 20, and genre and sound oscillate from track to track based on who’s featured. Four tracks in the middle of the album are heavily influenced by Amazonian musicians, friends and family  Maloof met while traveling through Peru. He is reluctant to call the album spiritual for fear of coming off as moralizing, but on certain songs it becomes impossible to deny. Some of the album’s most clever and compelling moments come out of artists bringing their particular spiritual roots in conversation with hip-hop traditions. ABOVE: Zach Maloof, In “Toma,” an ode to aka OG Willikers, drops his newest, Lights On For Mother Earth, Santa Fe-based Safety and performs at artist Asliani raps: “She opens Buffalo Thunder’s Shadeh the road / For us to put down this week. BELOW: Street artsit Wonky designed the that heavy load / Con esta albums’s art (opposite). madre, I have yet to commune / But I sense she may be calling to me soon … Madre, ven a mi and show me how to make it rain.” Legun, a producer on the album, is a water protector from Kewa Pueblo. If the collaborators feel like a part of Maloof’s personal narrative, it’s because they are; the album is as much a product of Outstanding Citizens Collective as it is a solo project. “I’ve never done anything by myself,”  Maloof tells me, despite recording, mixing and mastering the record alone. Outstanding Citizens (minus the “Collective”) began in 2008 with four local rappers: Wolfman Jack, Benzo, Fluid and Symmetry. OG Willikers was in a rap group called State of the Mingo that often played alongside Outstanding Citizens. In 2015,

COURTESY OG WILIKERS

Outstanding Citizens


MUSIC Maloof met the graffiti artist Wonky, who had recently moved back to Santa Fe from Texas. Maloof was working his day job at the Draft Station when he overheard Wonky talking about hip-hop. The two became  fast friends. Around the same time, members of Outstanding Citizens were discussing the possibility of forming a collective, and Maloof brought Wonky into the seam. In January 2017, over 20 potential collaborators gathered in the RaRa Room to launch plans and an Instagram account. “We decided to call it the Outstanding Citizens Collective, which made it much bigger, wider, vaster—a concept instead of it just being a rap group,”  Maloof  explains. This broader definition allowed for the inclusion of DJs and visual artists. It also meant less squabbling over “small-town stuff” and more collaboration across projects. “We’re all solo artists,” Maloof continues.  “It goes, ‘What can you do for the collective, and what can the collective do for you?’ We’re not here to make anyone’s career; we’re here to support people’s careers—sometimes it’s a record label. For [Wonky], we threw an art opening and we were his art management. Now it’s my turn; the support is circling around me now.” Wonky designed the album cover for Lights On, a street sign surrounded by his alternatingly swoopy and geometric lettering and abstract graphics. He usually uses markers or spray paint for his work,  a style that’s rarely found in Santa Fe’s galleries. “[Street art] is not big here at all,” Wonky says. “You might find some stuff at a pop art gallery, or here and there you’ll see something and think, ‘Oh, that’s kinda flavor.’ KEEP  Contemporary is the only spot that’s showing some dope stuff.” The unsanctioned scene, though, is thriving, according to Wonky. “Santa Fe is a graffiti hub. A lot of people don’t know that,” he says. “If you pay attention to little stickers, you’ll see shit from all over the place. So-and-so’s in town … and abandoned shit out in the middle of New Mexico. There’s a massive graffiti culture, but none of it’s professional.” Wonky and OG cite similar dilemmas for hip-hop and graffiti in the local scene. “If you want to be a gigging musician,” OG says, “You have to play alt.country, Americana, cover band stuff—that’s the only way to make money. It’s the same with art.” Wonky puts it more bluntly: “Everyone’s looking for a painting of a mesa or some shit.” What venues did support Outstanding Citizens Collective have mostly closed; they were regulars at the Underground,

where Wonky used to do live art and sell decorated lighters and stickers while musicians performed. OG looks back on this time affectionately. “Basement dive bar, a little grungy,” he remembers. “Run by this dude Johnny Pink. Slicked-back hair, leather jacket, crass, didn’t drink. Loved him. Hated hip-hop but loved us. It was more communal. If anything we’d just be rapping to each other.” This era comes through in OG’s music. On the song “What I Do It For,” he raps, “It’s easy to frown when you play a show with no crowd / You say nobody must like hiphop in this town.”

“But for me, the most exciting time for the [collective] was when we started growing out of there. When we played Meow Wolf and the entire place was packed. We knew who went where and where to stand,” he says. “People are getting older here. We don’t have time to just be fucking around anymore. [Wonky and I] are two of the only members who don’t have kids.” Maloof’s July 11 album release, featuring Outstanding Citizens Collective members Fluid, Benzo, Anthonius Monk and Fred Been Stoned, also launches the  collective’s first tour. The members hope to  spearhead community engagement programs in the next year, like youth workshops and mentorship programming. “I don’t see big money in my future,”  Maloof says, “Just satisfaction that even if I quit tomorrow—or let’s say after the tour—I won’t feel like I never tried.” LIGHTS ON FOR SAFETY ALBUM RELEASE PARTY 8 pm Wednesday July 11. $10-15. Shadeh Nightclub, Buffalo Thunder Resort and Casino, 20 Buffalo Thunder Trail, 819-2338

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THE CALENDAR DANCE FLAMENCO DE SANTA FE SUMMER SEASON El Flamenco de Santa Fe 135 W Palace Ave, 209-1302 Get dinner and a dramatic performance by Entreflamenco. Doors open an hour before the performances so you can get food (purchased separately). 7:30 pm, $25-$40

EVENTS DISRUPTECH Los Alamos Golf Course 4250 Diamond Drive, Los Alamos, Carefully selected entrepreneurial-minded scientists present their ideas to entrepreneurs, investors, regional leaders, policy makers and industrial partners. 11:30 am-4:30 pm, $35 GEEKS WHO DRINK Santa Fe Brewing Company 35 Fire Place, 424-3333 Quiz results can win you drink tickets for next time. 7 pm, free NEW MOON WATER WHEEL CEREMONY Frenchy's Field Osage Avenue and Agua Fría Street Pray for moisture, bless the waters and offer up items for blessings. 6 pm, free O2 OPEN MIC Santa Fe Oxygen & Healing Bar 137 W San Francisco St., 986-5037 Calling all creatives: What do you get when you combine a nice space, good people, creative expressions, a mic 'n' an amp, then throw in some oxygen elixirs? 8 pm, $5 THE PLEASURE SHOW STORY COLLECTION Axle Contemporary 670-5854 Curator Mi'Jan Celie ThoBiaz uses the Axle space as a pleasure story collection site. Sign up for an appointment to share yours at axleart.com. Today the gallery is parked in the Railyard (Market and Alcaldesa streets). 10:30 am-2:30 pm, free

FOOD BROTHER COYOTE Derailed at the Sage Inn 725 Cerrillos Road, 982-5952 Folk ballads. 6-9 pm, free

MUSIC BIRD THOMPSON The New Baking Company 504 W Cordova Road, 557-6435 Adult contemporary singer-songwriter with a Buddhist twist. 10 am, free DJ 3D MANNY KARAOKE Palace Saloon 142 W Palace Ave., 428-0690 Get the mic. 10 pm, free

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ENTER EVENTS AT SFREPORTER.COM/CAL

DJ INKY The Matador 116 W San Francisco St., 984-5050 Punk, funk, soul, rock 'n' roll, old-school country and modern alternative. 9 pm, free DAVID GEIST Pranzo Italian Grill 540 Montezuma Ave., 984-2645 Broadway faves and standards. 6 pm, $2 ESTER HANA Vanessie 427 W Water St., 982-9966 Masterful classical, jazz and cabaret tunes. 6:30 pm, free GARRY BLACKCHILD Second Street Brewery (Original) 1814 Second St., 982-3030 Americana. 6 pm, free GERRY & CHRIS La Fiesta Lounge 100 E San Francisco St., 982-5511 Traditional Irish sounds from Gerry Carthy meld with Latin tunes by Chris Abeyta when these two longtime friends play together. 7:30 pm, free GOT SOUL El Farol 808 Canyon Road, 983-9912 Catch soulful jazz from the house band. 10 pm, free JAKA Cowgirl 319 S Guadalupe St., 982-2565 Afro-pop. 8 pm, free JOHN RANGEL El Mesón 213 Washington Ave., 983-6756 Jazz piano maestro Rangel is joined by a special guest. 7 pm, free KING REMO SOUND SYSTEM Boxcar 530 S Guadalupe St., 988-7222 Reggae 'n' dancehall with Sgt. Remo, Dre Z Melodi and Mister Kali. 10 pm, free PAT MALONE TerraCotta Wine Bistro 304 Johnson St., 989-1166 Solo jazz guitar. 6 pm, free RON ROUGEAU The Dragon Room 406 Old Santa Fe Trail, 983-7712 Acoustic songs from the ‘60s, ‘70s and beyond. 5:30 pm, free SANTA FE BANDSTAND: IFAM ARTIST PROCESSION AND PASCULA ILABACA Y FAUNA Santa Fe Plaza 100 Old Santa Fe Trail Come celebrate the opening of this year’s International Folk Art Market with Pascuala Ilabaca’s jazz, pop and rock, and influences gathered throughout her life in such distant places as India and Mexico. 5:30 pm, free

VINCENT COPIA Osteria D'Assisi 58 S Federal Place, 986-5858 Original and traditional Americana. 6 pm, free

THEATER AGES OF THE MOON Teatro Paraguas 3205 Calle Marie, 424-1601 New Mexico Actors Lab presents a gruff and funny play in which two old friends, reunited by mutual desperation, reflect and bicker over bourbon on ice until 50 years of love, friendship and rivalry are put to the test (see Acting Out, page 33). 7:30 pm, $5-$25

WORKSHOP DRAWING MODERN: GEOMETRIC LANDSCAPES Georgia O'Keeffe Museum 217 Johnson St., 946-1000 Take a close look at artists Georgia O’Keeffe and Michael Namingha’s works reflecting the New Mexico landscape, and create your own desert-inspired drawing. 5:30-7:30 pm, $18-$35

FRI/13 ART OPENINGS ALCHEMY IN THE MOMENT ViVO Contemporary 725 Canyon Road, 982-1320 This show defines "alchemy" as the uniting of the external with the internal, resulting in a transformation of physical reality as a consequence of our attention to it. Through Sept. 4. 5 pm, free THE BLISSETT/O’BRIEN SHOW Cheri O’Brien Fine Art 618 Canyon Road, 425-308-2061 Do you ever wonder where colorful characters come from; how these crazy people and animals are brought to life by an artist? Now’s your chance to find out. Through Aug. 16. 5 pm, free ELI LEVIN: NUDES Argos Studio & Santa Fe Etching Club 1211 Luisa St., 988-1814 Levin’s new book surveys his struggle with the nude as an art form. In conjunction with the book's release, this exhibit displays some 40 paintings. Through Aug. 3. 5:30 pm, free NATHAN BENNETT Blue Rain Gallery 544 S Guadalupe St., 954-9902 Bennett, of Salt Lake City, Utah, has been working on his patina-on-bronze painting technique for nearly 30 years, to stunning effect with scenes of the historic and working-class American West. Through July 28. 5 pm, free


DANCE EMIARTE FLAMENCO The Lodge at Santa Fe 750 N St. Francis Drive, 992-5800 Another summer of flamenco performances at the Benitez Cabaret welcomes a special collaboration with the National Institute of Flamenco (see 3 Questions, page 27). 8 pm, $20-$50 FLAMENCO DINNER SHOW El Farol 808 Canyon Road, 983-9912 Make a dinner reservation for a show by the National Institute of Flamenco. 6:30 pm, $25

CRY-BABY Railyard Park Cerrillos Road and Guadalupe Street, 982-3373 Johnny Depp heads up a supercool John Watersdirected cast. See it under the stars! 8 pm, free RETURN: RECLAIMING NATIVE AMERICAN FOODWAYS FOR HEALTH AND SPIRIT The Lodge at Santa Fe 750 N St. Francis Drive, 992-5800 Short documentary film about pre-Columbian foods. Info: returndocumentary.com. 5:30-9:30 pm, $25-$85 YELLOW SUBMARINE The Screen 1600 St. Michael’s Drive, 473-6494 Liverpudlian adventures (see SFR Picks, page 19). 3:45 pm, $8-$11

MUSIC BOOMROOTS COLLECTIVE El Farol 808 Canyon Road, 983-9912 Reggae meets hip-hop. 9 pm, $5 BROTHER COYOTE Inn and Spa at Loretto 211 Old Santa Fe Trail, 984-7997 Folk ballads. 7 pm, free

Opening: Saturday, July 14th Noon - 5pm

national juried exhibit of encaustic/wax art

Meet the artists and Juror Augustine Romero Angel Wynn (NM) “Ain’t No Joke “

The Museum of Encaustic Art Presents these events: Sunday July 15th 4-6pm: Santa Fe Chapter of Citizens’ Climate Lobby “Presentations” and Roaming Writers Group “Open Mic” The Museum’s admission prices will be waived on Sunday July 15, 4 pm-6 pm. Enjoy refreshments, the exhibition, and a deeper look into Global Warming.

Gallery Exhibition July 14th thru September 2nd Enjoy the diverse interpretation by 48 encaustic/wax artists on the topic of Global Warming. The theme for this 2nd annual exhibit, helps us to examine how we assimilate and personalize the scientific informaion coming to light about Global warming. We have collaborated with ART SMART, teaching encaustic, with the theme of endangered species in mind. Their artwork will be exhibited. Join us for a stimulating and entertaining weekend! DISCOVER THE ART OF WAX Thanks to our sponsors for their support

www.moeart.org

moeart is a 501c3 non profit arts organization.

632 Agua Fria Street Santa Fe NM 87501 • 505 989 3283

JULY

FREE LIVE MUSIC

AT THE ORIGINAL

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GARRY

BLACKCHILD

13 CLUB 14 THE SHINERS

Vaudeville & Ragtime, 6 PM

Americana, 6 PM

SWING SOLEIL

15

Sunday

FILM

Global Warming is REAL

Saturday

EVENTS ART SANTA FE Santa Fe Community Convention Center 201 W Marcy St., 955-6590 The multi-day curated contemporary art show employs the theme Allure, referring to the undeniable power of contemporary and modern art to captivate, seduce and charm. Info at artsantafe.com. Noon-7 pm, $10-$25 THE LALAS BURLESQUE SHOW Buffalo Thunder Resort and Casino 20 Buffalo Thunder Trail, 455-5555 The Los Angeles-based burlesque troupe performs a classic rock-themed, comedic, audience-interactive show. 9:30 pm, $25-$40 TECH AND THE WEST SYMPOSIUM New Mexico History Museum 113 Lincoln Ave., 476-5100 Embark on an intellectual exploration of technology through exhibits, concerts and symposia. A full schedule of events is at santafeopera.org. 9:30 am-4 pm, $60-$100

CHANGO Palace Saloon 142 W Palace Ave., 428-0690 Danceable cover tunes. 10 pm, $5 CHAT NOIR CABARET Los Magueyes Mexican Restaurant 31 Burro Alley, 992-0304 A musical respite from the outside world. 6 pm, free DAVID GEIST AND DADOU Pranzo Italian Grill 540 Montezuma Ave., 984-2645 Santa Fe's consummate Broadway performer is joined by accordionist and singer Dadou for the latter's Geist Cabaret debut. 6 pm, $2 DOUG MONTGOMERY AND ESTER HANA Vanessie 427 W Water St., 982-9966 Standards, classical and Broadway cabaret tunes on piano and vocals: Doug starts, Ester takes over at 8 pm. 6 pm, free IAN MOORE AND THE QUAKER CITY NIGHT HAWKS Tumbleroot Brewery & Distillery 2791 Agua Fría St., 303-3808 This blues-oriented guitar-driven sound ranges from graceful pop songs to the psychedelic to British pub rock to deep Americana. 7 pm, $12 JESUS BAS La Boca (Taberna Location) 125 Lincoln Ave., 988-7102 Spanish and flamenco guitar. 7 pm, free JOE BOOTH BAND Mine Shaft Tavern 2846 Hwy. 14, Madrid, 473-0743 Honky-tonk from Prescott, Arizona. (Fun fact: You say that word like "presskit.") 7 pm, free JOHN KURZWEG BAND Cowgirl 319 S Guadalupe St., 982-2565 Rock 'n' roll from a bunch of experts. Also, it's Cowgirl's 25th anniversary party all dang day, so enjoy special fun and food! 8:30 pm, free KATY P & THE BUSINESS Boxcar 530 S Guadalupe St., 988-7222 Rock 'n' roll imported all the way from Taos. 10 pm, $5 MARC SANDERS Osteria D'Assisi 58 S Federal Place, 986-5858 Piano standards. 6 pm, free THE PLEASURE PILOTS La Fiesta Lounge 100 E San Francisco St., 982-5511 Original and classic R&B. 8 pm, free RONALD ROYBAL Hotel Santa Fe 1501 Paseo de Peralta, 982-1200 Native American flute and Spanish classical guitar. 7 pm, free

Friday

BOOKS/LECTURES LIVING THE TRUTH OF AWAKENING Railyard Performance Center 1611 Paseo de Peralta, 982-8309 Amoda Maa offers an intimate conversation that includes the totality of the human experience within the unbounded space of unconditioned awareness. 7 pm, $20 MAKING THE FOREIGN LESS FOREIGN: PROFILES IN SOCIAL INNOVATION International Folk Art Market 620 Cerrillos Road, 474-6783 Speaker Fred de Sam Lazaro is a journalist, PBS News correspondent, scholar of ethics and religion, and director of the Under-Told Stories project, a program that combines teaching and international journalism. 10 am-noon, free MERIDEL RUBENSTEIN: EDEN TURNED ON ITS SIDE photo-eye Bookstore + Project Space 1300 Rufina Circle, Ste. A3, 988-5152 Internationally renowned artist and University of New Mexico alumna Rubenstein creates photographic artworks that engage the natural world and investigate humanity’s place within nature. 5 pm, free RICHARD BALTHAZAR: CONTINUITY OF CULTURE AND ART IN MESOAMERICA El Museo Cultural de Santa Fe 555 Camino de la Familia, 992-0591 Balthazar speaks on the cultural and iconographic continuity across the millennia from the Olmec, Maya and other precursors into the Aztec world, including a possible source of the ceremonial calendar. 6 pm, free

FLAMENCO DE SANTA FE SUMMER SEASON El Flamenco de Santa Fe 135 W Palace Ave., 209-1302 Get authentic Spanish tapas, wine and beer, and a dramatic performance by Entreflamenco. Doors open an hour earlyso you can get dinner (sold separately). 7:30 pm, $25-$40

Gypsy Jazz, 6 PM

RAILYARD REUNION

Bluegrass, 11:30 AM

AT THE RAILYARD

AMP RAILYARD 14 PLAZA CONCERT

Saturday

UNUM MAGAZINE FIRST ANNIVERSARY Design Warehouse 101 W. Marcy St., 988-1555 Unum Magazine celebrates one year with a photo exhibition showcasing the 84 women featured in its digital pages. 5 pm, free

THE CALENDAR

Thursday

ENTER EVENTS AT SFREPORTER.COM/CAL

No music in pub

We pay the most for your gold coins, heirloom jewelry and diamonds! On the Plaza 60 East San Francisco Street, Suite 218 Santa Fe, NM 87501 • 505.983.4562 • SantaFeGoldworks.com

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Get savager at: SFReporter.com/savage

ried a gay friend might hire a hit man to off the girlfriend so he can have a shot at your heart, come out to him as hetero-romantic at the same time you come out to him as bi.

Longtime Savage Love fanboy with a bit of a conundrum—and it’s your fault! I’m a bi man in my 30s. To use Charles M. Blow’s word, my bisexuality is “lopsided.” This means that I fall in love with women exclusively, but I love to have sex with men occasionally. My current girlfriend not only approves, she likes to join in. We have a great kinky sex life, and at times we invite a hot bi dude to join us. You keep saying that to counter bisexual erasure, it is the duty of every bisexual to come out of the closet. If I were a “proper” bisexual, i.e., romantically interested in men also, that would be no problem—my family and work and social circles are extremely liberal. However, your advice to us kinksters and people in open relationships is that we probably shouldn’t come out to our parents or colleagues, since when it comes to sex, it’s advisable to operate on a need-to-know basis. While I agree with this completely—my mother doesn’t need to know my girlfriend pegs me—the rule keeps me in the closet as well. Since I’m only sexually interested in men, wouldn’t I be revealing facts about my sex life if I came out as bi? I also wouldn’t want to mislead gay men into thinking that I’m available for romantic relationships with them. So which rule is more important: the duty to come out as a bisexual or the advice to operate on a need-to-know basis when it comes to your sex life? -Bisexual Leaning Out Warily There’s nothing improper about your bisexuality, BLOW—or Charles M. Blow’s bisexuality, or the bisexuality of other “lopsided” bisexuals. While the idea that bisexuals are equally attracted to men and women sexually and romantically used to be pushed by a lot of bi activists (“I fall in love with people, not genitals!”), it didn’t reflect the lived/ fucked/sucked experience of most bisexuals. Like you and Blow (hetero-romantic bisexuals), many bisexuals have a strong preference for either women or men as romantic partners. My recently “gay married” bisexual friend Eric, however, is one of those bi-romantic bisexuals. This popular misconception—that bisexuals are indifferent to gender (and more highly evolved than all those genital-obsessed monosexuals)— left many people who were having sex with men and women feeling as if they didn’t have an identity. Not straight, not gay, and disqualified from bi. But thanks to bisexuals like Blow coming out and owning their bisexuality and their lopsidedness, a more nuanced and inclusive understanding of bisexuality has taken root. That nuance is reflected in bisexual activist Robyn Ochs’s definition of bisexuality: “I call myself bisexual,” Ochs says, “because I acknowledge that I have in myself the potential to be attracted—romantically and/or sexually—to people of more than one sex and/or gender, not necessarily at the same time, not necessarily in the same way, and not necessarily to the same degree.” Lopsided or not, BLOW, you’re a proper bisexual, and if you’re in a position to come out to your family and friends, you should. And rest assured, telling people you’re bi doesn’t mean you’re divulging details about your sex life. You’re disclosing your sexual orientation, not detailing your sexual practices. You can tell someone you’re attracted to men and women—at the same time, in your case, if not in the same way—without telling them about the hot bi dudes you and the girlfriend bed together. And if you and the girlfriend are perceived to be monogamous, and you want to keep it that way, you can allow people to continue to make that assumption. Finally, BLOW, most gay men are aware that bi guys usually aren’t romantically interested in other men. And that’s fine—so long as hetero-romantic bi guys don’t mislead us, most gay men are down to fuck. (And gay men who won’t date homo-romantic or bi-romantic men? You guys are missing out. My friend Eric was a hot, hung, adventurous catch. Congrats, Christian!) And since you’re partnered and presumed to be monogamous, you’re also presumed to be unavailable. But if you’re wor-

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Bi married man here. I was always out to my wife, but two months ago, I came out to our tight circle of friends. Everyone has been supportive, and I’m glad I took this step. But on three different occasions, my wife’s best friend has loudly asked me whose cock I would most like to suck out of all the other guys at the party. My birthday is coming up, and I don’t want her there. My wife doesn’t want to offend her oldest friend, and she makes excuses like “She was drunk” or “She was only joking.” I told my wife that I wouldn’t be coming to my own birthday party if her friend was invited, but she invited her anyway “by accident.” (She sent the invite via group text.) She doesn’t want to confront or disinvite her friend because that would be awkward. What do we do? -Her Unthinking Buddy Bad Yucks Here’s what you’re going to do, HUBBY: You’re going to ask your wife how she would feel if a friend of yours was sexually harassing her and you made excuses for that friend (“He was drunk!”) and then “accidentally” invited that asshole to her birthday party. Then if she won’t call her friend and retract the invitation, you do it. It will be awkward, that’s for sure, but your wife’s friend shouldn’t be spared that awkwardness. Lord knows she made things awkward for you—don’t hesitate to return the favor. I am a 23-year-old bisexual woman and I have two questions for you: (1) Is it possible to fall in love differently with women than with men? I think I am bisexual because I have been in love with some women, despite never getting past a kiss. What I find strange is that whereas with men I feel immediate attraction, with women the attraction rises after a deep friendship is formed. (2) Is it possible that I was in love with two different people at the same time? I always thought that I could be in love with only one person at a time, but during that short span, I was in love with both a guy who made me suffer and my best friend, a woman, who helped me with that guy. After I found a new boyfriend, I stopped thinking about anyone else because our relationship is closed. But I don’t know if that’s just because I avoid thinking about others or because I wasn’t really in love with the two people (despite my surprisingly real heartbreak). -Bisexual In Need And Inquiring Finally 1. See my response to BLOW, above. 2. A person can love more than one parent, more than one child, more than one sibling, more than one set of tit clamps, and more than one romantic partner. Telling people they can feel romantic love for only one person at a time isn’t just stupid, it’s harmful. Let’s say Bill is partnered with Ted, and Bill believes romantic attraction/love is a one-ata-time phenomenon because that’s what he was told. Now let’s say Bill develops a crush on Sandra. If Bill doesn’t question the one-at-a-time bullshit he was taught to believe about romantic love, Bill is highly likely to think, “Well, I must not be in love with Ted anymore, otherwise I couldn’t feel this way about Sandra,” and then he may dump triedand-true Ted for shiny-and-new Sandra. I’m not arguing that everyone should be poly— most people want only one partner at a time, and that’s fine. But telling people they can’t experience romantic attraction or romantic love for more than one person at a time sets long-term relationships up for failure. Because while stable, lasting love feels amazing, it’s less intoxicating than shiny, new, cum-drunk love. And while almost all stable, lasting loves were shiny, new, cum-drunk loves early on, very few new loves become lasting loves. If we don’t want people tossing lasting love overboard every time they develop feelings for someone new, people need to know that, yes, you can be in love with two different people at the same time. On the Lovecast, the author of Many Love, Sophie Lucido Johnson: savagelovecast.com mail@savagelove.net @fakedansavage on Twitter ITMFA.org

ROSE'S PAWN SHOP Mine Shaft Tavern 2846 Hwy. 14, Madrid, 473-0743 Americana, folk-rock, alt. country 'n' bluegrass on the deck. 8 pm, free RY WARNER Mine Shaft Tavern 2846 Hwy. 14, Madrid, 473-0743 Warner plies his own style that he calls “high country,” mashing up rockabilly and honky-tonks on the deck. 5 pm, free SANTA FE BANDSTAND: LUMBRE DEL SOL Santa Fe Plaza 100 Old Santa Fe Trail Chicano rock sure to please. Supported by Sol Fire. 6 pm, free THE SHINERS CLUB JAZZ BAND Second Street Brewery (Original) 1814 Second St., 982-3030 Jazz and ragtime. 6 pm, free TGIF RECITAL: ROBERT MARCUS AND EDWIN LIGHT First Presbyterian Church 208 Grant Ave., 982-8544 Marcus on clarinet and Light on piano perform selections by Finzi and Brahms. 5:30 pm, free THE THREE FACES OF JAZZ El Mesón 213 Washington Ave., 983-6756 A swinging jazz trio. 7:30 pm, free TONIC JAZZ SHOWCASE Tonic 103 E Water St., 982-1189 Jazz with host Loren Bienvenu (drums), featuring Chris Ishee (keys) and Casey Andersen (bass). 9:30 pm, free VANILLA POP Palace Saloon 142 W Palace Ave., 428-0690 The only cover band we'd pay double digits to see. 10 pm, $10 VICTOR MASON Blue Corn Café and Brewery 133 E Water St., 438-1800 Give a listen to Santa Fe’s own Mason, an Americana musician playing classic and pop tunes. 6 pm, free

OPERA CANDIDE Santa Fe Opera House 301 Opera Drive, 986-5900 Head up the hill for Leonard Bernstein's operetta. 8:30 pm, $35-$310

THEATER AGES OF THE MOON Teatro Paraguas 3205 Calle Marie, 424-1601 New Mexico Actors Lab presents one of the late playwright Sam Shepard’s personal favorites (see Acting Out, page 33). 7:30 pm, $5-$25

A MIDSUMMER NIGHT’S DREAM Monte del Sol Charter School 4157 Walking Rain Road, 982-5225 Bring blankets or lawn chairs, family, friends—and umbrellas, just in case. Admission is by donation, so be generous. 6 pm, free GREASE! James A Little Theatre 1060 Cerrillos Road, 476-6429 Rock out with the greasers and the pink ladies in the classic musical, performed by the kids of Pandemonium Productions. 7 pm, $8-$12

SAT/14 ART OPENINGS GLOBAL WARMING IS REAL Museum of Encaustic Art 632 Agua Fría St., 989-3283 Wax artists tackle a hot topic. Through Sept. 2 (see AC, page 29). Noon-5 pm, $5-$9 LIMELIGHT Obscura Gallery 1405 Paseo de Peralta, 670-2447 The new photography gallery presents its first group exhibition of pioneering female artists who take contemporary approaches to early photographic process. Through Aug. 3. 4 pm, free

BOOKS/LECTURES DEBBY PEARSON: ONE WOMAN'S SOLO MOTORCYCLE ADVENTURE TO THE ARCTIC CIRCLE Travel Bug Coffee Shop 839 Paseo de Peralta, 992-0418 Pearson shares her travelog and pictures from Colorado to the Arctic Circle—done in 30 days on her motorcycle. 5 pm, free MIRIAM SEIDEL: THE SPEED OF CLOUDS op.cit Books DeVargas Center, 157 Paseo de Peralta, 428-0321 In a wheelchair, in her Earthbound days, the heroine of this sci-fi novel travels space and time, encounters a cyborg boyfriend and gains fame in the fanzine world. 2 pm, free TECH AND THE WEST: THE MYSTERY AND MYSTIQUE OF ROBERT OPPENHEIMER Lensic Performing Arts Center 211 W San Francisco St., 988-1234 Oppenheimer has become an almost mythical embodiment of the Manhattan Project. Who was this man? Did he, his work, his character, support such a burden of history? Richard Rhodes, the Pulitzer Prize-winning author of The Making of the Atomic Bomb, lectures. 10 am, $5

DANCE ASPEN SANTA FE BALLET Lensic Performing Arts Center 211 W San Francisco St., 988-1234 Start your summer of dance off on the right foot with an evening of contemporary ballet featuring rising star choreographer Bryan Arias, Swedish phenom Alexander Ekman’s Tuplet and dancemaker Jirí Kylián. 8 pm, $36-$94 EMIARTE FLAMENCO The Lodge at Santa Fe 750 N St. Francis Drive, 992-5800 A special collaboration with the National Institute of Flamenco (see 3 Questions, page 27). 8 pm, $20-$50 FLAMENCO DINNER SHOW El Farol 808 Canyon Road, 983-9912 Make a dinner reservation for a show by the National Institute of Flamenco. 6:30 pm, $25 FLAMENCO DE SANTA FE SUMMER SEASON El Flamenco de Santa Fe 135 W Palace Ave, 209-1302 Get authentic Spanish tapas, wine and beer, and a dramatic performance by Entreflamenco. Doors open an hour early so you can get situated with dinner (sold separately). 7:30 pm, $25-$40

EVENTS ART SANTA FE Santa Fe Community Convention Center 201 W Marcy St., 955-6590 Fifty-four local and international galleries exhibit cutting-edge work, and visitors can also catch unique programing, special events and entertainment. Noon-7 pm, $10-$25 ARTIST DEMONSTRATION: NANCY AND CHRIS YOUNGBLOOD Lyn A Fox Fine Pueblo Pottery 839 Paseo de Peralta, 5770835 The work of this motherand-son duo is inspired by a great family of potters who taught them the technique and style that they practice to this day. 1-4 pm, free BIRD WALK Randall Davey Audubon Center 1800 Upper Canyon Road, 983-4609 Head to the hills for a guided birding hike. 8:30-10 am, free CITIZENS' CLIMATE LOBBY MEETING Santa Fe Public Library Main Branch 145 Washington Ave., 955-6780 Learn how CCL is working for climate change solutions that bridge the partisan divide and how you may help. More info: santafe@ citizensclimatelobby.org or call 690-2247. 10 am, free


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INTERNATIONAL FOLK ART MARKET Museum Hill 710 Camino Lejo, 984-8900 Internationally respected and chock-full of art and crafts from around the globe: handmade jewelry, textiles, baskets, ceramics and more. That $85 early bird ticket (it gets you in at 7:30 am) is actually totally worth it to beat the mosh pit-level crowds that turn out for this puppy. Shuttle buses get you there; folkartmarket.org has all the details. 10 am-5 pm, $15-$85 LAVENDER IN THE VALLEY FESTIVAL Purple Adobe Lavender Farm Road 1622 Between Mile Markers 210 and 211, Abiquiu, 685-0082 Enjoy all the best the purple herb has to offer with crafts, tours, artists, good food, music and, naturally, lots of lavender, all up in the picturesque village of Abiquiú. 10 am-5 pm, $5 NEW MOON CEREMONY: THROWING OF THE BONES Santa Fe Oxygen & Healing Bar 133 W San Francisco St., 9865037 Set intentions for new beginnings. Facilitator JoAnne Dodgson is a healer, teacher and ceremonial guide in the ways of Ka Ta See, an ancient Peruvian lineage. 5-7 pm, $20 donation SANTA FE ARTISTS MARKET Santa Fe Railyard Market Street at Alcaldesa Street, 310-8766 Treasures from a juried group of local artists. 8 am-2 pm, free THE SUN AWAITS OUR SHADOWS: TIME CAPSULE BURIAL SITE Santa Fe 1606 Paseo de Peralta, 989-1199 SITE’s Education Department worked with artist Dario Robleto and a group of New Mexico School for the Arts students on the construction of a time capsule; put it in the ground today. 6 pm, free TECH AND THE WEST SYMPOSIUM New Mexico History Museum 113 Lincoln Ave., 476-5100 Take part in the two-year initiative presented as part of 2017’s The (R)evolution of Steve Jobs at the Santa Fe Opera, and this year's Doctor Atomic. A full schedule of events is at santafeopera.org. 10 am-5 pm, $60-$100 ¡VÁMONOS! SANTA FE: FAMILY WALK Santa Fe River Trail W Alameda Street and Placita de Oro Grab the kids and head to the park to go for a stroll with Tish Wilson of the Community Development Institute. For more info, check out sfct.org/vamonos. 9-10 am, free

THE CALENDAR

RAILYARD URGENT CARE We put patients first and deliver excellent care in the heart of Santa Fe.

with La Emi

Open 7 days a week, 8am – 7pm

COURTESY LA EMI

If there were such a thing as a city having a Flamenco Master General, it would certainly be Emily Grimm, aka La Emi. For decades now, Grimm has honed her flamenco skills at home and abroad, and now, with her EmiArte Flamenco studio dedicated to teaching and with a number of summer performances lined up (8 pm Friday-Sunday July 13-15. $20-$50. The Lodge at Santa Fe, 750 N St. Francis Drive, 992-5800), we thought we’d see what’s up. (Alex De Vore)

+ INJURIES & ILLNESS + X-RAYS + PHYSICALS + LAB TESTS + VACCINATIONS + DRUG TESTING + DOT EXAMS Locally owned and operated by Dr. Victor Sherman and Dr. Troy Watson WHERE TO FIND US 831 South St. Francis Drive, just north of the red caboose.

(505) 501.7791

How’d you get that nickname? When I was born—my name is Emily Ruth Grimm, that’s my birth certificate name—my mom and dad would always call me Emi. Since I was a few months old. Where I’m from in Northern New Mexico—my parents own a house in Chamisol—we’d say ‘La Emi’ or ‘El David,’ that’s just kind of how we talked, and it just stuck. And I thought, what better stage name?

www.railyardurgentcare.com

How did you know you wanted to or were ready to teach? I actually started teaching when I was 12 years old in the Northern New Mexico public schools, and I guess I enjoyed it. It was definitely intimidating at first. At 15, I started teaching at the Maria Benitez Institute for Spanish Arts and at Moving Arts Española. I taught for several years, I would say close to 10, and I feel like God’s plan kicked into play and everything pointed me in the direction of opening my own studio. I started traveling more and more more with dancing and, of course, they would have to have a teacher available at Maria’s institute all year round, so I’d get back from my travels and they’d have teachers there [in my place]. So I wouldn’t say I felt ready, but life shoved me out of the nest, and I really wanted to bring the community together.

David Griego invites you to join us on FRIDAY, JULY 13, when we sponsor Santa Fe Bandstand’s Music on the Plaza with LUMBRE del SOL!

For people who maybe don’t know exactly what flamenco is, how do you get them out to the show? Flamenco has the three big parts—more can come into play, but it’s always a singer, a dancer and a guitarist. This summer, we’ll have two singers: Vicente Griego, an incredible singer from Dixon, and the other singer is José Fernández, a gypsy from Granada. He’s grown up doing flamenco since he was 9. Sometimes we have two guitarists, like Chuscales—what a high honor to have him there—and Eloy Gonzales, he’s a young guy. This summer is a partnership with the National Institute of Flamenco, with [Joaquin] Encinas providing the artistic direction. In the show, we’re going to have several different numbers from different artists and six core dancers who are female. Flamenco is an art of the people, and we really want people to experience the journey with us.

Register at 3:00pm the day of the event to win a Gold Zia Pendant with a 1.1 carat diamond!

on e P laza

60 East San Francisco Street | Suite 218 | Santa Fe, NM 87501 505.983.4562 | SantaFeGoldworks.com

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ASPEN SANTA FE BALLET 2018 SUMMER SEASON ASPEN SANTA FE BALLET

July 14

PILOBOLUS July 24

ASPEN SANTA FE BALLET:

September 1

NRITYAGRAM DANCE ENSEMBLE

September 27

w w w.aspensantafeballet.com ASFB MEDIA SPONSORS 

ASFB GOVERNMENT / FOUNDATION SPONSORS  Melville Hankins

FILM ALICE IN WONDERLAND Santa Fe Public Library Southside 6599 Jaguar Drive, 955-2820 Have a very merry unbirthday at the library's free matinee of the classic cartoon. 2:30 pm, free YELLOW SUBMARINE The Screen 1600 St. Michael’s Drive, 473-6494 I’ve got a hole in me pocket! (see SFR Picks, page 19). 3:45 pm, $8-$11

MUSIC

AN EVENING WITH PIANIST JOYCE YANG

ASFB BUSINESS PARTNER 

THE CALENDAR

Family Foundation

Partially funded by the City of Santa Fe Arts Commission and the 1% Lodgers Tax, and made possible in part by New Mexico Arts, a Division of the Department of Cultural Affairs, and the National Endowment for the Arts. PHOTO: ROSALIE O’CONNOR

ADAM LOPEZ AND HIS RHYTHM REVIEW Mine Shaft Tavern 2846 Hwy. 14, Madrid, 473-0743 R&B, country and rockabilly on the deck. 8 pm, free AFREEKA SANTA FE'S JULY JAM Railyard Performance Center 1611 Paseo de Peralta, 982-8309 A fundraising concert by Terra Watts of Uganda, Nigeria's Agalu and local DJ Clemente. 7 pm, $10 BROTHER COYOTE The Dragon Room 406 Old Santa Fe Trail, 983-7712 Folky rock. 6:30 pm, free THE BUS TAPES Cowgirl 319 S Guadalupe St., 982-2565 Alternative folk-rock. 8:30 pm, free CALI SHAW Mine Shaft Tavern 2846 Hwy. 14, Madrid, 473-0743 Folk nuevo on the deck. 3 pm, free CHAT NOIR CABARET Los Magueyes Mexican Restaurant 31 Burro Alley, 992-0304 Vive la révolution! 6 pm, free CHATTER SITE Santa Fe 1606 Paseo de Peralta, 989-1199 The Albuquerque institution brings its slightly weird, really interesting and comfortably informal contemporary chamber music north for a spell. 10:30 am, $5-$15 CHRIS ISHEE TRIO El Mesón 213 Washington Ave., 983-6756 Eclectic classic jazz. 7:30 pm, free DAVID GEIST AND JULIE TRUJILLO Pranzo Italian Grill 540 Montezuma Ave., 984-2645 Santa Fe's consummate Broadway performer is joined by singer Trujillo. 6 pm, $2 DOUG MONTGOMERY AND ESTER HANA Vanessie 427 W Water St., 982-9966 Standards, classical and Broadway cabaret tunes on piano and vocals: Doug starts, Ester takes over at 8 pm. 6 pm, free

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HALF BROKE HORSES Cowgirl 319 S Guadalupe St., 982-2565 Country and Americana. 1-4 pm, free JUSTIN MARTIN Meow Wolf 1352 Rufina Circle, 395-6369 Melodic and tough hip-hop influenced electronica remixes, all with a sense of humor. 9 pm, $20-$22 LITTLE LEROY AND HIS PACK OF LIES Derailed at the Sage Inn 725 Cerrillos Road, 982-5952 Rock 'n' roll 'n' stuff. 6 pm, free LOS PRIMOS MELØDICOS Cava Lounge Eldorado Hotel, 309 W San Francisco St., 988-4455 Afro-Cuban, romantic and traditional Latin music. 8 pm, free METALACHI Boxcar 530 S Guadalupe St., 988-7222 Heavy metal mariachis. 10 pm, $15-$20 NEXT 2 THE TRACKS Cowgirl 319 S Guadalupe St., 982-2565 Outlaw country. 8 pm, free NICOLAS CARTER GiG Performance Space 1808 Second St. No, not the brother of the Backstreet Boy—this guy's much cooler. The talented and versatile harpist was raised playing the Paraguayan harp, and now blends his harpist skills with those of a theater artist and storyteller. 7:30 pm, $20 PALM IN THE CYPRESS El Farol 808 Canyon Road, 983-9912 Alternative country and folk. 9 pm, $5 THE PLEASURE PILOTS La Fiesta Lounge 100 E San Francisco St., 982-5511 Original and classic R&B. 8 pm, free REVIVAL OF THE FITTEST Tonic 103 E Water St., 982-1189 Jazz, swing and roots. 9:30 pm, free RONALD ROYBAL Hotel Santa Fe 1501 Paseo de Peralta, 982-1200 Native American flute and Spanish classical guitar. 7 pm, free SANTA FE BANDSTAND: TYLOR BRANDON BAND SWAN Park Jaguar Drive and Hwy. 599 These folks strive to get back to the root of old-style country tunes, to showcase the best in country music from all generations, and to put on a show to keep us two-steppin’ the night away. 6 pm, free SWING SOLEIL Second Street Brewery (Original) 1814 Second St., 982-3030 Swingin' jazz. 6 pm, free

TARA KHOZEIN & JESSE TATUM form & concept 435 S Guadalupe St., 982-8111 Flutist Tatum and vocalist Khozein join forces for a performance of new compositions in woodwinds and vocals, music and theater. 7 pm, $5-$25 VINCENT COPIA Osteria D'Assisi 58 S Federal Place, 986-5858 Original and traditional Americana. 6 pm, free

OPERA DOCTOR ATOMIC Santa Fe Opera House 301 Opera Drive, 986-5900 It's chilling that this one still feels topical 73 years after the events of its story, but nuclear apocalypse remains America's favorite fever dream. This will be the first time the 2005 opera is performed in New Mexico—with the lights of Los Alamos visible from the open-air venue, to boot. It’s probably sold out, but go find a scalper STAT. 8:30 pm, $47-$310

THEATER A MIDSUMMER NIGHT'S DREAM Monte del Sol Charter School 4157 Walking Rain Road, 982-5225 The Santa Fe Shakespeare Society returns for its eighth year, this time with one of Shakespeare's most-beloved comedies. Bring blankets or lawn chairs, family, friends— and umbrellas, just in case. Admission is by donation, so be generous. 6 pm, free AGES OF THE MOON Teatro Paraguas 3205 Calle Marie, 424-1601 One of the late playwright Sam Shepard’s personal favorites (see Acting Out, page 33). 7:30 pm, $5-$25 GREASE! James A Little Theatre 1060 Cerrillos Road, 476-6429 Rock out with the greasers and the pink ladies in the classic musical, performed by Santa Fe’s favorite and wildest youth theatre company, Pandemonium Productions. 7-9 pm, $8-$12 THE SWEETEST SWING IN BASEBALL Studio Center of Santa Fe 1614 Paseo de Peralta, 989-4423 When Dana’s latest gallery showing tanks and her boyfriend of many years leaves her, she becomes lost and desperate. A failed suicide attempt brings her to a psychiatric hospital, and she devises a plan to stay longer: She will become Darryl Strawberry. She starts painting again, and once her gallerist sees the new work, she has to have them. But who is the artist—Dana or Darryl? 7:30 pm, $20-$25 CONTINUED ON PAGE 30

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S FR E P O RTE R .CO M /A RTS

Hot Wax in the Summer Time The Museum of Encaustic Art focuses on the near and present danger of global warming Jones—an age when a sizable percentage of our country believes lizard people roam the earth. “Facts matter” is the weirdly not-currently-straightforward thesis of Global Warming is REAL, which opens this Saturday afternoon at the Museum of Encaustic Art. During a recent visit to the surprisingly large space, near Joseph’s on Agua Fría Street, I learned the organization is the largest of its kind in the world. Who knew?

BY IRIS MCLISTER a u t h o r @ s f r e p o r t e r. c o m

COURTESY MUSEUM OF ENCAUSTIC ART

D

uring a recent Sunbathing Sunday™, a friend fished out a book about occult practices. The subject is not really my bag, but got me thinking about how we like to learn about things; specifically, how we either like to be surprised by information or not, bookwise. There’s no right or wrong way to pick up a book. Every reader has their own style, born from the primordial goop of our first inklings of what we do and don’t want to know about. Growing up in rural Florida, emerging from the aforementioned goop can be tricky—yet Mom found ways to inspire Sis and me in the almost-alwaysempty, air-conditioned bliss of our county’s public libraries. It was here where I first discovered Mom did something confounding: She would pick up a book and head straight for its very last page, reading the conclusion usually with a barely perceptible, satisfied little nod, then almost always put the book back on the shelf. Because she usually turns up her nose at fiction (to which I still silently wail, “But Cheever! But Murdoch! But Updike!”) this is her pattern, her means of appraising the ultimate readability of a book. Art shows don’t have much in common with novels, I don’t think; but those with names like Global Warming is REAL appeal to Mom, who doesn’t like curve balls, and me, who wants surprises. In any case, a show about global warming seems important in an age of fake news and Alex

Encaustic work is relatively rare in the larger scheme of art things, even though people have been making artwork with beeswax since 450 BC, and you almost certainly have worked with wax yourself— Crayola crayons, anyone? Now in its second iteration, the show’s focus, says Museum Director and Founder Douglas Mehrens, will always be on global warming. “Always,” he repeats with a wry chuckle, “until global warming doesn’t exist anymore.” Of course, this isn’t likely to be the case anytime soon, and though Mehrens isn’t thrilled with the current political situation, he says carefully, “I didn’t want the show to be images of Trump, or be overly politicized.” That leaves a large group—50 artists in all, selected from a pool of over 80 applicants—whose work relates to, but doesn’t necessarily directly address, the show’s theme.

Noon-5 pm Saturday, July 14. $5-$9. Museum of Encaustic Art, 632 Agua Fría St., 989-3283

Washington-based encuastic artist Fiona Huthcinson’s “Declining Colony” was created with encaustic wax and oil paints—plus, look at that bee. We like it.

Ages of the Moon • by Sam Shepard

The Sweetest Swing in Baseball

July – • Thur. Fri. Sat. : p.m., Sun. at  p.m.

For Giving Productions & Red Thread Santa Fe at Warehouse :  Paseo de Peralta

★ We few, we happy few • Shakespeare Upstart Crows of Santa Fe at El Museo Cultural

www.TheatreSantaFe.org ★ youth performers

Mehrens cites Al Gore’s An Inconvenient Truth as inspiration. “I thought this would be a really great topic for artists to reflect on,” he says, “to examine how we assimilate and personalize scientific information about global warming.” Most of the artists, only around a fifth of whom are local, work in the technique of hot wax painting, using heated beeswax to which pigment is added, then applying it in liquid or paste form to the surface of any number of materials. One particularly striking piece, “Entropy II” by Belen Millan, came all the way from Spain: a large wood panel, soaked with warm, fire-toned washes of color, with a bottom ridge splattered in dripping wax. Many others in the show, which will be up through early September, look deceptively like paintings, with relatively flat appearances whose true nature only emerges upon closer inspection, belying a depth that’s somehow both opaque and luminous. Local artist Angel Wynn’s “Ain’t No Joke” seems to address the theme of global warming, albeit cautiously, with a lone and weirdly lonely looking dead tree surrounded by blue sky above and parched earth below. Some of the works are for sale, based on the artist’s decision—an unorthodox choice for museum exhibitions, and one I’d like to see repeated more often. The institution also has lectures scheduled, as well as an open mic and programs for children as part of the exhibition. I suppose if you did think about the show’s title as a book, it would be somewhat of a “gotcha” title, since entering the museum provides an opportunity to see  works that aren’t always obviously linked to our ever-hotter planet. Still, sometimes it’s good to know what you’re getting into from the very start—right, Mom? GLOBAL WARMING IS REAL OPENING RECEPTION

New Mexico Actors Lab at Teatro Paraguas:  Calle Marie

For full details and to buy tickets, please see

A&C

July –, : p.m.

★ Grease • The musical • Pandemonium Productions James A. Little Theatre:  Cerrillos Road

by Rebecca Gilman

July – • Fri. Sat. : p.m. • Sundays at  p.m.

Theatre Lovers Club: Janet Davidson speaking on The Sweetest Swing in Baseball at Warehouse :  Paseo De Peralta Tuesday July  •  to  p.m. •   : www.TheatreSantaFe.org/tlc

Fri. Sat. at  p.m. • Sunday at  p.m. SFREPORTER.COM

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THE CALENDAR WORKSHOP HOMEBUYER EDUCATION Homewise 1301 Siler Road, Bldg. D, 983-9473 Homewise presents a free workshop to help you understand the home buying process. 9 am-4 pm, free

SUN/15 BOOKS/LECTURES CLAY BONNEYMAN EVANS: BONES OF MY GRANDFATHER op.cit Books DeVargas Center, 157 Paseo de Peralta, 428-0321 Part memoir, part WWII history, Evans reads from an adventure tale of self-discovery and resistance. 2 pm, free DAVID KEPLINGER: ANOTHER CITY Garcia Street Books 376 Garcia St, 986-0151 These poems travel inward and outward at once: into moments of self-reproach and grace, and to those of disassociation and belonging. 4:30 pm, free ENLIGHTENED COURAGE Thubten Norbu Ling Tibetan Buddhist Center 1807 Second St., Ste. 35, 660-7056 Commit to the peaceful and courageous path of full awakening with the ideas in The Way of the Bodhisattva. 10 am-noon, free

Best of Santa Fe Party at the Railyard:

Friday, July 27 FREE

Tribute concert SPONSORED BY

JOURNEYSANTAFE: MIGUEL CHAVEZ AND MEGAN RODRIGUEZ Collected Works Bookstore and Coffeehouse 202 Galisteo St., 988-4226 Discuss the state of mental health care in Santa Fe. 11 am, free RICHARD BALTHAZAR: CODEX NUTTALL El Museo Cultural de Santa Fe 555 Camino de la Familia, 992-0591 Artist Balthazar speaks on the historical context of this codex and examples of its vivid record of the genealogies, alliances, and conquests of 11th- and 12th-century rulers of the Mixtec city-state of Tilantongo. 2 pm, free SANTA FE FREE THINKERS’ FORUM Unitarian Universalist Congregation 107 W Barcelona Road, 982-9674 This week, the humanist discussion group considers: What does it mean to be “spiritual” but not “religious”? Rise ‘n’ shine ‘n’ think. 8:30 am, free

FLAMENCO YOUTH DE SANTA FE The Lodge at Santa Fe 750 N St. Francis Drive, 992-5800 A youth show of flamenco artists ranging from ages 5-18. 2 pm, $15-$20 FLAMENCO DE SANTA FE SUMMER SEASON El Flamenco de Santa Fe 135 W Palace Ave., 209-1302 Get authentic Spanish tapas, wine and beer, and a dramatic performance by local dancer Antonio Granjero and Entreflamenco. Doors open an hour before the performances so you can get situated with food (sold separately). 1:30 pm and 7:30 pm, $25-$40 MONO MUNDO WORLD DANCE FESTIVAL Santa Fe Plaza 100 Old Santa Fe Trail A diverse free fest showcases just about any kind of dance you could possibly like (flamenco, ballroom, swing, Middle Eastern, modern, burlesque and breakdancing) from New Mexico artists. 12:30-3:30 pm, free

DANCE

ART SANTA FE Santa Fe Community Convention Center 201 W Marcy St., 955-6590 The multi-day curated contemporary art show employs the theme Allure, referring to the undeniable power of contemporary and modern art to captivate, seduce and charm. Info’s at artsantafe.com. 11 am-5 pm, $10-$25

EMIARTE FLAMENCO The Lodge at Santa Fe 750 N St. Francis Drive, 992-5800 Another summer of flamenco performances welcomes a special collaboration with the National Institute of Flamenco (see 3 Questions, page 27). 8 pm, $20-$50

EVENTS

CHRIS YOUNGBLOOD; COURTESY LYN A FOX FINE PUEBLO POTTERY

5-9 pm •

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July 25

World-renowned Santa Clara potters Nancy and Chris Youngblood give demonstrations at Lyn A Fox Fine Pueblo Pottery this Saturday; mother Nancy tends toward the traditional, son Chris toward the contemporary, but both are rooted in strong family and tribal traditions.


FILM ROMEO AND JULIET Violet Crown Cinema 1606 Alcaldesa St., 216-5678 The Stratford Festival presents Shakespeare's tragedy about kids in love. 11 am, $15 YELLOW SUBMARINE The Screen 1600 St. Michael’s Drive, 473-6494 From G-L-O-V-E to L-O-V-E (see SFR Picks, page 19). 3:45 pm, $8-$11

MUSIC BYRD AND STREET Mine Shaft Tavern 2846 Hwy. 14, Madrid, 473-0743 Americana. 1 pm, free CHRISTIAN VINCENT La Fiesta Lounge 100 E San Francisco St., 982-5511 Classical and flamenco guitar. 6 pm, free THE DELTAZ Boxcar 530 S Guadalupe St., 988-7222 Heavy blues and psychedelic rock, classic country and folk. 10 pm, free

DOUG MONTGOMERY Vanessie 427 W Water St., 982-9966 Piano standards. 6:30 pm, free ERIC BIBB First Presbyterian Church 208 Grant Ave., 982-8544 A fiery singer with soul, gospel and folk roots, Bibb’s latest album, Migration Blues, evokes images of a sharecroppers, hitchhikers, orphans and refugees. 7:30 pm, $20-$35 LONE PIÑON Mine Shaft Tavern 2846 Hwy. 14, Madrid, 473-0743 Norteño tunes on the deck. 3 pm, free MICHAEL UMPHREY Osteria D'Assisi 58 S Federal Place, 986-5858 Piano standards. 11:30 am-2:30 pm, free NACHA MENDEZ La Boca (Taberna Location) 125 Lincoln Ave., 988-7102 International Latin music. 7 pm, free PAT MALONE AND JON GAGAN El Farol 808 Canyon Road, 983-9912 Jazzy jazz. 7 pm, free SANTA FE CHAMBER MUSIC FESTIVAL: BEETHOVEN New Mexico Museum of Art 107 W Palace Ave., 476-5072 Harpist June Han, the Zebra Trio and the Orion String Quartet. 6 pm, $66-$90 THE SANTA FE REVUE Cowgirl 319 S Guadalupe St., 982-2565 Americana ‘n’ rock ‘n’ roll. Noon, free SINNERS AND SAINTS Mine Shaft Tavern 2846 Hwy. 14, Madrid, 473-0743 Country ‘n’ Americana. 8 pm, free SKY SMEED Cowgirl 319 S Guadalupe St., 982-2565 Poignant folk songs. 8 pm, free TIM NOLEN AND RAILYARD REUNION Second Street Brewery (Original) 1814 Second St., 982-3030 Bluegrass and Americana. 11:30 am-1:30 pm, free TWOSOME Osteria D'Assisi 58 S Federal Place, 986-5858 Piano standards. 6 pm, free

THEATER A MIDSUMMER NIGHT'S DREAM Monte del Sol Charter School 4157 Walking Rain Road, 982-5225 The Santa Fe Shakespeare Society presents the Bard's most-beloved comedy. Bring blankets or lawn chairs— and umbrellas, just in case. Admission is by donation. 6 pm, free

AGES OF THE MOON Teatro Paraguas 3205 Calle Marie, 424-1601 New Mexico Actors Lab presents one of the late playwright Sam Shepard’s personal favorites. A gruff and funny play in which two old friends, reunited by mutual desperation, reflect and bicker over bourbon on ice (see Acting Out, page 33). 2 pm, $5-$25 GREASE! James A Little Theatre 1060 Cerrillos Road, 476-6429 Rock out with the greasers and the pink ladies in the classic musical, performed by Santa Fe’s favorite and wildest youth theatre company, Pandemonium Productions. 2 pm, $8-$12 THE SWEETEST SWING IN BASEBALL Studio Center of Santa Fe 1614 Paseo de Peralta, 989-4423 For Giving Productions and director Janet Davidson present a dark comedy that examines the success-to-failure rollercoaster for an artist. With a bunch of our favorite local actors: Debrianna Mansini, Talia Pura, Hamilton Turner, Danielle Louise Reddick, Sharon Henderson and JD Garfield. 4 pm, $20-$25

Presents

The 11th Annual

Viva Mexico! Fiesta AND

El Pedregal Equestrian Charro Team Trick Roping On Foot, Trick Roping On Horseback, Horse Reining

July 21 & 22, 2018 - 10am-4pm Celebrate our festive neighbor to the south at El Rancho de las Golondrnas! Experience the action packed and historic tradition of Mexican Charreadas. Browse the Las Golondrinas Mercado and shop with over 20 artisans from Mexico. Feast on traditional Mexican food in La Fonda Mexicana. Dance to traditional Mexican music and enjoy traditional Folklorico dance perfmances.

More info at golondrinas.org IN PARTNERSHIP WITH:

PARTIALLY FUNDED BY: THE COUNTY OF SANTA FE LODGERS TAX, THE CITY OF SANTA FE ARTS COMMISSION, AND NEW MEXICO ARTS

WORKSHOP DARIO ROBLETO: CUT PAPER FLOWERS SITE Santa Fe 1606 Paseo de Peralta, 989-1199 Learn how to make intricate cut paper flowers with artist Robleto. Stemming from his interest in emotions in visual communication and the arts of mourning traditions, Robleto has revived the Victorian parlor art in a contemporary way. 2 pm, $5-$10

MON/16 BOOKS/LECTURES INVENTING LOS ALAMOS: SCIENTISTS AND WORKERS IN AMERICA’S FIRST ATOMIC CITY Collected Works Bookstore and Coffeehouse 202 Galisteo St., 988-4226 A conversation considers the following: While Los Alamos' history as the center of the creation of the atom bomb has filled many pages, these three authors will discuss a different side of the story— the lives of the people who worked at Los Alamos Labs. 6:30 pm, free

EVENTS GEEKS WHO DRINK Draft Station Santa Fe Arcade, 60 E San Francisco St., 983-6443 Stellar quiz results can win you drink tickets for next time. Isabel is your host. 7 pm, free

CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE

Through November 25, 2018

Rooted in Tradition, Reaching for the Stars: 20 artists who stretch the boundaries of New Mexican art as we know it with new materials and twists on classic imagery.

Detail, The Blessed Gamer by Patrick McGrath Muñiz.

THE GATE OF SWEET NECTAR LITURGY Upaya Zen Center 1404 Cerro Gordo Road, 986-8518 A chant offering love, wisdom and transformation. 5:30 pm, free INTERNATIONAL FOLK ART MARKET Museum Hill 710 Camino Lejo, 984-8900 Art and crafts from around the globe (see SFR Picks, page 19). 9 am-5 pm, $15 LAVENDER IN THE VALLEY FESTIVAL Purple Adobe Lavender Farm Road 1622 between Mile Markers 210 and 211, Abiquiu, 685-0082 Crafts, tours, artists, good food, music and, naturally, lots of lavender. 10 am-5 pm, $5 MEDITATION & MODERN BUDDHISM: SOLUTIONS FOR DIFFICULT DAYS Zoetic 230 St. Francis Drive, 292-5293 Learn meditations for lasting happiness and contentment. 10:30 am-noon, $10 THE PLEASURE SHOW STORY COLLECTION Axle Contemporary, 670-5854 Curator Mi’Jan Celie Tho-Biaz collects the public’s pleasure stories. Sign up for an appointment to share yours at axleart.com. Today the gallery is parked on Canyon Road. 12:30-4:30 pm, free STEAM SUNDAYS New Mexico Museum of Art 107 W Palace Ave., 476-5072 A scavenger hunt about art and science. Free with museum admission. 10 am-5 pm, $6-$12

THE CALENDAR

!

ENTER EVENTS AT SFREPORTER.COM/CAL

MUSEUM OF SPANISH COLONIAL ART

On Museum Hill, Santa Fe 750 Camino Lejo | 505.982.2226 Open 10 am – 5 pm | spanishcolonial.org SFREPORTER.COM

JULY 11-17, 2018

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La Emi AT THE BENITEZ CABARET AT THE LODGE AT SANTA FE WITH SPECIAL GUESTS

NEVAREZ Y JOSÉ ENCINIAS

July 13 to

Aug 26 FEATURING CHUSCALES AND JOSÉ FERNÁNDEZ WITH GUEST APPEARANCES BY VICENTE GRIEGO

8PM WED-SUN

DOORS 7:15PM | TICKETS FROM $20-$50 TICKETS AVAILABLE AT

HHANDR.COM/FLAMENCO AT THE LENSIC BOX OFFICE 505-988-1234 | 505-660-9122

Pandemonium Productions presents

JULY 13, 14, 15, 20, 21, 22

FRIDAYS & SATURDAYS at 7:00PM SUNDAYS at 2:00PM Performances at the James A. Little Theatre 1600 Cerrillos Road

Call 505-982-3327 for Tickets and Information or visit www.pandemoniumprod.org

This project is supported in part by New Mexico Arts, a Division of the Department of Cultural Affairs, by the National Endowment for the Arts and New Mexico Childrens Foundation

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JULY 11-17, 2018

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THE CALENDAR THE PLEASURE SHOW STORY COLLECTION Axle Contemporary 670-5854 During the mobile gallery’s run of The Pleasure Show, curator Mi’Jan Celie Tho-Biaz uses the Axle space as a pleasure story collection site. Sign up for an appointment to share yours at axleart. com. Today it’s at the Chavez Center (3221 Rodeo Road). 4-8 pm, free SANTA FE INDIVISIBLE MEETING Center for Progress and Justice 1420 Cerrillos Road, 467-8514 Join the politically progressive group for group activism. 7 pm, free

MUSIC BILL HEARNE TRIO La Fiesta Lounge 100 E San Francisco St., 982-5511 Honky-tonk and Americana from a Santa Fe legend. 7:30 pm, free COWGIRL KARAOKE Cowgirl 319 S Guadalupe St., 982-2565 Michèle Leidig hosts Santa Fe's most famous night of karaoke. 9 pm, free DOUG MONTGOMERY AND ELIZABETH YOUNG Vanessie 427 W Water St., 982-9966 Piano standards with Young on violin. 6:30 pm, free FUTUREBIRDS Meow Wolf 1352 Rufina Circle, 395-6369 Psychedelic country 'n' soaring harmonies out of Athens, Georgia. With support from fellow Athens native Parker Gispert, whose solo shows blend performance with relevant storytelling. 7 pm, $12-$15 SANTA FE CHAMBER MUSIC FESTIVAL YOUTH CONCERT New Mexico Museum of Art 107 W Palace Ave., 476-5072 Festival artists engage children (and their adults!) through music, musical instruments and composers— even a bit of history. 11 am, free SANTA FE CHAMBER MUSIC FESTIVAL: BEETHOVEN New Mexico Museum of Art 107 W Palace Ave., 476-5072 An etherial program features harpist June Han, the Zebra Trio and the Orion String Quartet. 6 pm, $66-$90 SUN RIAH, GLITTER VOMIT, MARIE CLAIRE BRYANT AND KATIE JOHNSON Zephyr Community Art Studio 1520 Center Drive, Ste. 2 Sun Riah (harp melodies, tender lyrics, incredible vocal work) is joined by Glitter Vomit (contemplative songs with soundscapes), plus poetry readings by Bryant and Johnson. 8 pm, $5-$10

ENTER EVENTS AT SFREPORTER.COM/CAL

VAIVÉN El Flamenco de Santa Fe 135 W Palace Ave., 209-1302 Flamenco-jazz fusion. Doors open an hour before the performance so you can get dinner (sold separately). 7:30 pm, $25

TUE/17 BOOKS/LECTURES AFTER TRUMP AND BREXIT: A NEW ECONOMICS Lensic Performing Arts Center 211 W San Francisco St., 988-1234 The rise of xenophobic nationalism and intolerance has many roots; economists Wendy Carlin (professor of economics at University College London) and Samuel Bowles of the Santa Fe Institute discuss two of ‘em. 7:30 pm, free BILINGUAL BOOKS AND BABIES Santa Fe Public Library LaFarge Branch 1730 Llano St., 955-4860 In a program for tiny tots, join a play and language group to enjoy books, songs and finger games. 1 pm, free PRESCHOOL STORY TIME Santa Fe Public Library LaFarge Branch 1730 Llano St., 955-4860 Büüüüüüüüüüks. 10:30 am, free

DANCE ARGENTINE TANGO MILONGA El Mesón 213 Washington Ave., 983-6756 Put on your best tango shoes and join in (or just watch). 7:30 pm, $5

EVENTS BEHIND ADOBE WALLS HOME AND GARDEN TOURS Hotel Santa Fe 1501 Paseo de Peralta, 982-1200 Experience our town's unique beauty on the 79th annual bus tour at four seldom-seen private residences with outstanding art collections and which showcase a variety of architectural styles and high desert gardens. Event proceeds benefit the Santa Fe Garden Club. Noon-4:45 pm, $85 EL MERCADO DEL SUR Plaza Contenta 6009 Jaguar Drive, 550-3728 Get all your favorite produce, local goods, live music, health screenings, family activities and friendship without the struggle for Railyard parking. 3-6 pm, free GEEKS WHO DRINK Boxcar 530 S Guadalupe St., 988-7222 A pub quiz can win you drink tickets for next time. 8 pm, free

METTA REFUGE COUNCIL Upaya Zen Center 1404 Cerro Gordo Road, 986-8518 A gathering for people who are struggling with illness and loss in a variety of its forms. 10:30 am, free SANTA FE INDIVISIBLE MEETING Center for Progress and Justice 1420 Cerrillos Road, 467-8514 Join the politically progressive group to put into action the planning you did last night. 8:30 am, free TUESDAY FAMILY MORNINGS Santa Fe Botanical Garden 715 Camino Lejo, 471-9103 Go play in the garden, weed, plant and make art. 10-11:30 am, $10 ¡VÁMONOS! SANTA FE: WALK WITH A COMMUNITY HEALTH WORKER Plaza Contenta 6009 Jaguar Drive, 550-3728 Head to the Plaza Contenta to go for a stroll with Alondra Hernandez, and hit the Southside Farmers Market while you're at it. 5:30-6:30 pm, free

MUSIC BILL HEARNE TRIO La Fiesta Lounge 100 E San Francisco St., 982-5511 Honky-tonk and Americana from a Santa Fe legend. 7:30 pm, free BILL PALMER Tumbleroot Brewery & Distillery 2791 Agua Fría St., 303-3808 Rock 'n' roll ‘n’ dirty country. 5-7 pm, free BLUEGRASS JAM Derailed at the Sage Inn 725 Cerrillos Road, 982-5952 You guessed it: It's a bluegrass jam. 6 pm, free CANYON ROAD BLUES JAM El Farol 808 Canyon Road, 983-9912 Sign up if you want to join in, but be forewarned—this ain't amateur hour. 8 pm, $5 CHUSCALES La Boca (Original Location) 72 W Marcy St., 982-3433 Exotic flamenco guitar. 7 pm, free DOUG MONTGOMERY AND ESTER HANA Vanessie 427 W Water St., 982-9966 Standards, classical and Broadway cabaret tunes on piano and vocals: Doug starts, Ester takes over at 8 pm. 6 pm, free JIM ALMAND Cowgirl 319 S Guadalupe St., 982-2565 Jazzy R&B on guitar and harmonica. 8 pm, free MICHAEL UMPHREY Osteria D'Assisi 58 S Federal Place, 986-5858 Piano standards. 6 pm, free CONTINUED ON PAGE 36


THEATER

ACTING OUT For Lack of Flash-Bangs ew Mexico Actors Lab shows are not flashy. They’re not exhilarating, they’re not heart-pounding. There are no pyrotechnics involved and, in Sam Shepard’s Ages of the Moon, up now at Teatro Paraguas, when Ames shoots a ceiling fan with a shotgun, the resulting white smoke that spews from the fixture is the most technically advanced thing I’ve seen from a NMAL production in a year. They’re all about talk and intricate character relationships; you must pay attention, because there are no flash-bangs to snap you out of a daydream, should you slip into one. That being said, these shows are almost always nicely done. Every time I see a NMAL production, usually directed by the company’s founder Robert Benedetti, I can’t help but think they’re like having consistently good sex with a long-term spouse: It’s not wild infatuation, it’s not adolescent lust, you don’t fidget all the next day desperate to do it again—but you also won’t ever turn down another go-around, it’s just what you need, and everyone goes to sleep satisfied. The one-act Ages of the Moon is no exception. Opening weekend sold well, with Saturday’s performance even requiring extra chairs tucked into corners—not unexpected for the first Shepard piece presented in town since the sometimes-Santa Fean writer died in 2017. It’s an expectedly gruff and surly two-actor piece from the pensive man’s-man of playwrights; in short order

we learn that Ames’ wife has found a name and phone number written in a girlish hand on one of his fishing maps, and kicked him out of the house. He retreats to his man-cave, a cabin in some Kentucky woods, where he calls up his old friend Byron in tears, speaking of ending his life. The show opens on the two sexagenarian men on the porch, drinking copious whiskey and waxing poetic about the past—polka-dot dresses and matching high-heels, drunken-stoned nights, all the wonderful ways things used to be and LYNN ROYLANCE

N

BY C H A R LOT T E J U S I N S K I c o p y e d i t o r @ s f r e p o r t e r. c o m

will never be again. This show is another casting success from Benedetti. He’s spent a storied career learning how to recognize talent, assembling an experienced and deft company of sorts, and the dependably good folks he gets onstage together almost always succeed. “My book on directing starts with the statement that ‘directing is the art of correcting the mistakes you made in casting,’” Benedetti tells me via email. “I first of all try to internalize the life of the play at a deeply preverbal level … [and] to create an environment in which that energy can manifest itself anew, without premeditating how the play will live in these particular actors and in this particular space; rather I strive to be fully present and open to the actors’ impulses and interactions.” Here, expectedly, Nicholas Ballas (Ames) and Paul Blott (Byron) have most of that necessary chemistry. Once they get rolling, the script carries them effortlessly for the show’s hour-long duration. Shepard’s work harks to the manlyman-literature cornerstones Brokeback Mountain and A River Runs Through It, both favorites greatly due to their contrasts: Dudes in the woods doing dude-in-the-woods things (herding sheep, fishing, being generally stoic), but also quietly struggling with intense emotions and fighting to maintain societal expectations at every turn. Ages does this too; within a few minutes of opening, Ames is discussing a “minor blow job” (Byron is flabbergasted that such a thing could ever be anything but major) and Byron is lamenting his waning

ability to get it up. Fishing rods hang on the wall, guns are drawn, violence makes its way in; so many misandrist tropes that you expect (though perhaps don’t desire) from a play about men. The surliness wanes, however, and they become deeply human. Blott’s Byron, at first the more irreverent of the two, delivers a haunting monologue, one of the best I’ve heard in a while, about love and loss and possible total insanity; and Ballas exhibits great range as Ames swings from despondent Good Ol’ Boy to one who suffers from—again—possible total insanity. Whenever you think the show’s jumped the shark, it pulls itself right back in an almost palpable collective sigh. If there aren’t literal pyrotechnics, Shepard’s writing provides plenty of dynamism in character and story. All that being said of men and manliness, this show is, all told, centered on the concept of the woman. The title, at first easily forgettable, must be remembered: The men have met on a night that there will be a total eclipse of the moon. Byron, when drunkenly opining about women and how they function differently from rooted, earthbound men, gestures to the moon and suggests: “They’re plugged into it, somehow.” Later, wrapped in a blanket on the porch, he mumbles more: “I want to see this moon—this miracle, here,” repeating a running joke that the eclipse, a frequent phenomenon, could be a oncein-a-lifetime experience. The play opens with Ames saying that he likes things to be what they are; a tree a tree, a man a man, a moon a moon. And while all is mostly as it seems here (two men, a porch, whiskey), there are endless layers down into subterranean fractal caves of implication. These guys must be crazier and much bigger assholes than they are letting us see; or are they far more sensitive and soft than their sullied, surly appearances suggest? Mankind, rooted in the earth, eclipses womankind in the moon, throwing deep shadow. A finnicky ceiling fan becomes a foil for Catholic hocus-pocus. Even the set and the blocking, results of edited impulse, are constructed with meaning: “The space must be an expression of the event,” Benedetti writes of the building and the movements therein. But pay close attention, because there are no flashing lights to show the way. AGES OF THE MOON

Sure, Byron (Paul Blott) and Ames (Nicholas Ballas) curse and tell lewd stories and drink copious whiskey and pull guns on each other, but dammit if they ain’t secret softies after all.

7:30 pm Thursday-Saturday July 12-14; 2 pm Sunday July 15. Through July 22. $5-$25. Teatro Paraguas, 3205 Calle Marie, 424-1601.

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FEBRUARY 7-13, 2018

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L’Olivier When in France, order the escargots. Do this when you’re at L’Olivier downtown as well. Snails for starters ($13.50) mark a path to a memorable meal at this bistro that’s the first one chef Xavier Grenet has owned. The chef is a native of Paris who’s been in more than a few successful kitchens, and this tiny restaurant with a spacious patio has a smooth ambiance. The escargots is served as it should be—with slivered almonds, sauteed spinach and cherry tomatoes, combining for a pleasing salty, acidic and savory flavor. Beautiful fish and steak cuts are of course on the classic menu, but for a night that’s plant-based, you won’t even miss the meat in the wild rice, its chewy grains topped with juicy mushrooms and colored with cranberries and roasted beets ($20). Splurge on meaty wines like Bordeaux from Château Grivier ($18 per glass) and crystal-clear Picpoul de Pinet ($13 per glass) from the edge of the Mediterranean Sea. There’s even French-born Badoit sparkling water ($6.50) to complete the temporary trip. (JAG)

PC’s Restaurant & Lounge We are not exaggerating: The chicharron burrito arrived at the table measuring a full 8 inches long, 4 inches wide and 2 inches thick. That’s 64 cubic inches of cheese and Christmas chilesmothered home cooking for under $9. PC’s is a giant at one of the busiest corners in Santa Fe, but somehow remains hidden. The spacious dining room is accommodating to a large party for a birthday dinner, two people snuggled in a corner or a family at a booth. And we saw all of them on our visit. Plus the separate bar area has plenty of tables with sightlines to televisions that play NFL in the fall, MLB in the spring and all those other sports alphabets you know and love. The sign says authentic New Mexican, and they ain’t lyin’. Experience crunchy fried chunks of pork skins next to creamy pintos with some respectable chile (hearty, hot green and smoky, smooth red), or a generous burger on a good bun ($8.15). Sit long enough to let that settle so there’s room to order a smooth and sweet bowl of natillas for dessert ($4). A couple years ago, the mayor proposed that residents levy a tax on sugary beverages and Santa Femous Southsiders decried the plan. “What’s next, a tax on chicharrones?” You’d pay extra for these, but you don’t have to. (Julie Ann Grimm)

229 Galisteo St., 989-1919 Lunch and dinner Tuesday-Saturday loliviersantafe.com

315 Restaurant and Wine Bar Louis Moskow’s 315 has quietly become a Santa Fe fine-dining staple over the past two decades. The atmosphere inside the home-turned-restaurant is both intimate and convivial. Service is attentive and efficient but not overbearing. You would expect a French-inspired restaurant to get its sauces right, and Moskow’s kitchen doesn’t disappoint. The squash blossom beignets ($14) are delicately battered and quickly fried to find a happy home atop a goat cheese fondue and drizzled with a lively tomato basil sauce. The pan-roasted sea bass ($30) is served with sticky jasmine rice and a black olive saffron fennel butter, accented with lemon juice and shimeji mushrooms. It’s exciting and varied without overwhelming the flavor of the fish. You’d be remiss passing on dessert. Even when we were full, a single scoop ($3) of house-made pineapple brown sugar sorbet was divine. The restaurant’s seemingly endless wine list (from which bottles are half-off on Tuesdays) has a pairing for every dish and a wide selection of half bottles and wines by the glass. Moskow recently added a select few spirits, including pastis for a hot summer afternoon or an early fall evening on the patio. (Matt Grubs)

315 Old Santa Fe Trail, 986-9190 Dinner daily 315santafe.com

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THE CALENDAR PAT MALONE TerraCotta Wine Bistro 304 Johnson St., 989-1166 Solo jazz guitar. 6 pm, free ROLLER'OKE Rockin' Rollers 2915 Agua Fría St., 473-7755 Roller-skating singing aliens! 7 pm, $5 RONALD ROYBAL El Flamenco de Santa Fe 135 W Palace Ave., 209-1302 Native flute and Spanish classical guitar. Arrive an hour early to get dinner (purchased separately). 7:30 pm, $25

ENTER EVENTS AT SFREPORTER.COM/CAL

SANTA FE BANDSTAND: ALEX MARYOL Santa Fe Plaza 100 Old Santa Fe Trail Bluesy bluesy blues. Supported by Kyle Martin. 6 pm, free SANTA FE CHAMBER MUSIC FESTIVAL: RAN DANK New Mexico Museum of Art 107 W Palace Ave., 476-5072 Frederic Rzewski’s tour-deforce 36 Variations shows you things you never knew a piano could do. Acclaimed pianist Ran Dank performs. Noon, $27-$31

TONY BROWN Palace Saloon 142 W Palace Ave., 428-0690 R&B, soul, reggae, rock, blues, jazz, funk and Afro-Cuban tunes. 6:30 pm, free VINTAGE VINYL NIGHT The Matador 116 W San Francisco St., 984-5050 DJ Prairiedog and DJ Mamagoose spin the best in garage, surf, country and rockabilly. 8:30 pm, free

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GEORGIA O’KEEFFE MUSEUM 217 Johnson St.,946-1000 The Black Place: Georgia O’Keeffe and Michael Namingha. Through Oct. 28. Journey to Center: New Mexico Watercolors by Sam Scott. Through Nov. 1. HARWOOD MUSEUM OF ART 238 Ledoux St., Taos, 575-758-9826 Peter Sarkisian: Mind Under Matter. Through July 22. Larry Bell: Hocus, Focus and 12; Rafa Tarín: For Now. Both through Oct. 7. IAIA MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY NATIVE ARTS 108 Cathedral Place, 983-8900 Action/Abstraction Redefined. Through July 27. Art & Activism: Selections from The Harjo Family Collection. Through July 31. Without Boundaries: Visual Conversations. Through July 29. Holly Wilson: On Turtle’s Back. Rolande Souliere: Form and Content. Both through Jan. 27, 2019. MUSEUM OF ENCAUSTIC ART 632 Agua Fría St., 989-3283 From Ancient Beeswax to the Modern Crayon. MUSEUM OF INDIAN ARTS & CULTURE 710 Camino Lejo, 476-1250 Stepping Out: 10,000 Years of Walking the West. Through Sept. 3. Points Through Time. Through Oct. 1. Maria Samora: Master of Elegance. Through Feb. 28, 2019. What’s New in New: Selections from the Carol Warren Collection. Through April 7, 2019. Lifeways of the Southern Athabaskans. Through July 7, 2019. MUSEUM OF INT’L FOLK ART 706 Camino Lejo, 476-1200 Negotiate, Navigate, Innovate: Strategies Folk Artists Use in Today’s Global Marketplace. Through July 16. Artistic Heritage: Syrian Folk Art. Through July 29. No Idle Hands: The Myths & Meanings of Tramp

COURTESY NEW MEXICO HISTORY MUSEUM

MUSEUMS

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In addition to exhibiting “Oppenheimer’s Chair” at the New Mexico History Museum, artist Meridel Rubenstein releases her newest book at the photo-eye Bookstore and Project Space on Friday. Art. Through Sept. 16. Beadwork Adorns the World. Through Feb. 3, 2019. Crafting Memory: The Art of Community in Peru. Through March 10, 2019. MUSEUM OF SPANISH COLONIAL ART 750 Camino Lejo, 982-2226 GenNext: Future So Bright. Through Nov. 25. NM HISTORY MUSEUM 113 Lincoln Ave., 476-5019 The Land That Enchants Me So: Picturing Popular Songs of New Mexico. Through Feb. 24, 2019. Atomic Histories. Through May 31, 2019. NM MUSEUM OF ART 107 W Palace Ave.,476-5072 Patrick Nagatani: Invented Realities. Through Sept. 9. Frederick Hammersley: To Paint Without Thinking. Through Sept. 29. Shifting Light: Photographic Perspectives. Through Oct. 8. Horizons: People & Place in New Mexican Art. Through Nov. 25.

PALACE OF THE GOVERNORS 105 W Palace Ave., 476-5100 Tesoros de Devoción. POEH CULTURAL CENTER AND MUSEUM 78 Cities of Gold Road, Pojoaque, 455-3334 In T’owa Vi Sae’we. EL RANCHO DE LAS GOLONDRINAS 334 Los Pinos Road, 471-2261 Living history. SANTA FE BOTANICAL GARDENS 715 Camino Lejo, 471-9103 Dan Ostermiller: Gardens Gone Wild! Through May 11, 2019. SITE SANTA FE 1606 Paseo de Peralta, 989-1199 SITElab 10: Michael Rakowitz. Through Aug. 18. WHEELWRIGHT MUSEUM OF THE AMERICAN INDIAN 704 Camino Lejo, 986-4636 Peshlakai Vision. Memory Weaving: Works by Melanie Yazzie. Both through Oct. 7.


Wild Culture Patrick’s Probiotics brings the health benefits of the microbiome to the Railyard BY MARY FRANCIS CHEESEMAN a u t h o r @ s f r e p o r t e r. c o m

E

ating fermented foods is an incredibly nutritious and essential practice, and the Western diet has thankfully been expanding beyond old standbys like wine, beer, cheese and bread to include other, wilder options, such as kefir. This milk-based drink originated in the central Asian Caucasus mountains, and is fermented to eliminate lactose and prevent spoilage. But kefir is actually created by “grains,” which are colonies of yeast and bacteria that almost look like rock candy in their solid form. With numerous applications even beyond the culinary—kefir makes for fine compost tea for soil, or an addition to face and body scrubs—it can be used in water as well, which is how Patrick’s Probiotic Fine Foods makes its lineup of slightly effervescent, light-bodied sodas. Founded in 2016 by Shawn and Lyn Patrick, Patrick’s Probiotics moved in 2017 into the space formerly occupied by the Aztec Café. Beyond the storefront, however, their sodas are available at 25 different locations, including Meow Wolf, Sweetwater Harvest Kitchen and Body of Santa Fe. The Patricks  are Silicone Valley tech industry expatriates, he a former CMO and she a former business manager to an ergonomic software company. Together they now focus their considerable knowledge and business acumen on a shared passion for making things that taste good on the palate and feel good in the gut. Four years of experimentation led to the genesis of a kefir culture the couple named Áine, after the Celtic goddess of the summertime. And though the practice

of naming a culture and treating it like a living being may seem strange, it is not historically uncommon. With kefir as their starter, the Patricks are focused on contributing to wellness by encouraging customers to embrace the broader world of fermentation. Fermenting acts as a preservative, eliminates toxins, breaks food down into more easily digestible forms and creates new nutrients—in the case of kefir, those would be vitamins, amino acids and minerals such as calcium, magnesium and phosphorus. For the purposes of the café, more foods will be added to the lineup, such as hummus made from sprouted chickpeas and breads from Wild Leaven Bakery in Taos. The Patricks, meanwhile, are firm in their commitment to “living foods,” and their ultimate goal for the café is to diversify. “We also will be using our platform to extend into other food areas, such as hot sauces, dressings and ketchups,”  Shawn tells SFR. “The idea is to displace sugary, processed food with a better-tasting probiotic alternative.” Three such hot sauces are available at $1 apiece for the café’s breakfast burrito: a Hatch green chile, habanero and taco sauce, each made with a different chile base and accented with herbs and spices. I dubbed taco my favorite, a blend of ancho, arbol and Hatch red mixed with tomato, smoked paprika and turmeric. The burritos themselves are on the smaller side, clocking in at $2.99 each for a combination of artificial hormone-free cheese, cagefree eggs and nitrate-free bacon. Fermented foods tend to have strong flavors—think of cheese, sauerkraut, miso or kefir’s most easy comparison, kombucha, which tastes not unpleasantly like

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FOOD

Three probiotic hot sauces available in the café, from left to right: Hatch green chile, red chile and habanero.

vinegar. But kefir is relatively flavorless, and the sodas are light and delicate, tasting of fruit accented by floral and herbal notes. “We are really approaching these drinks more like a wine vintner, where every characteristic matters,” Shawn says. “We also are focused on simplicity, which is why pineapple, raspberry and peach [are the only flavors]. We want people to understand what we are shooting for.” I sampled all three varieties ($4.25 for 12 ounces), but the  peach won out in the end. Its lush stone fruit overtures tasted fantastic with the fizzy bite of the kefir soda water. A slight tang of lemon and hints of orange peel, rose hips and hibiscus provided plenty of interesting secondary flavors, and though the drink also contained hawthorn berries, chamomile and blackberry leaves, these ingredients didn’t really impact the taste. I added ice cubes made of kefir and coconut cream for $3 more, which turned the texture into more of a creamy Italian soda. The Patricks also serve mocktails ($7.25), such as  a  sangria that consists of a blend of all three sodas poured on top of raw coconut, pineapple and berries  then finished with elderberry hibiscus-infused ice cubes. It made for a refreshing treat on a hot July afternoon. Coffee options are

available from local organic roaster Agapao as well, and the menu is nascent but expanding. Small (and in some cases, gluten-free and Paleo-friendly) bites are available, with a few options such as a sourdough cultured croissant and a cinnamon swirl ($4.95). Bags of organic popcorn with a probiotic seasoning are featured for $3, topped with either powdered cheddar cheese or Hatch chile and lime. The spirit of the Aztec Café is ever present, with the Patricks paying homage to the once-loved local coffee shop that  occupied their space by preserving an arty, vaguely Western steampunk vibe. Antebellum chairs from the 1900s sit beside wooden tables made by Albuquerque artist Stitch Jackson, and books and Harpers magazines from over 100 years ago are available to read. A player piano from 1900 sits against a wall decorated with pictures of cows and horses, and the Patricks are hoping to display art from local artists and host musicians and community events in the future, further contributing to Santa Fe’s culture in more ways than one. PATRICK’S PROBIOTIC FINE FOODS 317 Aztec St., 365-2725 8 am-6 pm Tuesday through Saturday

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10 9

Westwood : Punk, Icon, Activist Review Punk-rock styles and maintaining independence in the fashion world

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BY ROAN LEE-PLUNKET S F R i n t e r n @ s f r e p o r t e r. c o m

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If you’ve never heard of her, Vivienne Westwood is the 77-year-old British fashion designer and creator of the label that shares her name. More importantly, Westwood is known for being the original creator of punk fashion around the time the Sex Pistols crashed onto the British culture scene in the 1970s. The new documentary Westwood: Punk, Icon, Activist, like Westwood’s clothing, feels tangibly pieced together, jumping forward and backward in time with photographs, interviews, and footage from past and present. We learn that Westwood wasn’t always interested in becoming a designer, though she claims that she could have made a pair of shoes at the age of 3. Along the road to fame, she sold rock ’n’ roll records, rebelled against social norms, and became a mother and environmental activist before making the unusual decision to start a completely independent fashion label and falling in love with another designer 10 years her senior.

6 5 4 3 2 1 WORST MOVIE EVER

MOVIES

6 + PUNK FASHION IS COOL AND INTERESTING - NOT ENOUGH DEPTH TO BE MEMORABLE

The rough documenting style can be confusing and frustrating at times, especially because the film doesn’t dive very deeply into its subjects. The world of punk and its origins are intriguing, but Westwood doesn’t  provide much more than brief glimpses of the Sex Pistols; seeing as this is Westwood’s area of authority, you’d think the filmmakers would  have spent more time there.  We do get a clear picture of the person behind the label, along with some  scandalous runway footage, yet this doc feels more like a summary than anything else. Compared to Frederich Tcheng’s fascinating 2014 film Dior et Moi, which thoroughly immerses the audience into the alien world of high fashion, there is

nothing particularly compelling about the story Westwood has to tell. Sure, there’s tension between Westwood and the people  who work for her, and she struggles with maintaining the integrity of her brand while fighting for environmental rights, but these issues feel slapped on—nothing compared to the agony of restitching a whole dress overnight by hand. WESTWOOD: PUNK, ICON, ACTIVIST Directed by Lorna Tucker With Westwood, Andreas Kronthaler and Kate Moss Center for Contemporary Arts, NR, 83 min.

QUICKY REVIEWS

7

SHOCK AND AWE

7

ANT MAN AND THE WASP

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SICARIO: DAY OF THE SOLDADO

JURASSIC WORLD: FALLEN KINGDOM

SHOCK AND AWE

7

Woody Harrelson and James Marsden track fictitious WMDs in the torn-from-real-life Rob Reiner movie Shock and Awe. Spoiler: There weren’t any WMDs.

+ FEELS SO GOOD TO BE RIGHT - PRETTY HEAVY-HANDED AT TIMES

A baby-faced American soldier, wheelchairbound, glides silently across a courtroom floor and explains to a judge that he was boots-onthe-ground in Iraq for precisely three hours when a roadside IED tore through his squad, severing his spinal cord and killing the rest. “How the hell does this happen?” he angrily asks. This question is at the center of Rob Reiner’s Shock and Awe, a drama about the post-9/11 era of Bush-Cheney, the occupation of Iraq and the dangerous implications of a government lying to its people. But it’s also a tale of heroic journalism against seeming insurmountable odds and a sort of early-aughts parallel to that most famous newspaper movie of all time, All the President’s Men. It’s here we meet Warren Strobel (James Marsden) and Jonathan Landay (Woody Harrelson), two very real Knight-Ridder journos who unearthed the absurd motivations behind war in the Middle East post-9/11 despite a shocking lack of evidence, alongside their valiant chief editor John Walcott (Reiner). As the rest of the country’s mainstream

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media pushes out the government’s false narrative (remember when the New York Times apologized to its readers?), Strobel and Landay follow the actual facts, reporting the truth as their friends and family and even the American public doubt their credibility and work. Today, of course, we know these men to have been right—Hussein may have been evil, but he certainly didn’t possess WMDs, nor was he in cahoots with Bin Laden; Rumsfeld and Wolfowitz and Bush and Cheney were … well, fuck ’em, we should’ve been in Afghanistan— the point is, these journalists were right and eventually acknowledged for their fine work and bravery. God bless the Fourth Estate, right? Still, for every satisfying moment or silly little in-joke about copy editing, there are truly perplexing choices. Like if the journalist Joe Galloway (Tommy Lee Jones) was so vital to Strobel and Landay’s ongoing good work, why is the role relegated to a few tired lines about how he’s old or how glory is for the young folk? And that war veteran from before? We catch snippets of his journey from small town boy to disabled former soldier, but as far as Shock and Awe’s “they’re sending your kids to a needless death!” agenda goes, it seems painfully underdeveloped and all too brief. Borderline emotionally manipulative, even. Perhaps Reiner CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE

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was really just looking to illustrate his point— y’know, to really drive it home—but they feel like scenes from a different film. And besides, we were pissed off enough already. Shock and Awe paints a fine history lesson, though, and a provides a good reminder that the good old US of A would be a hell of a lot more terrifying if there weren’t brave newspaper folk who’ve made it their lives’ work to shine a light on powerful assholes being assholes. Wow. Who would’ve thought a movie about kickass journalism would resonate with us? (Alex De Vore) Jean Cocteau Cinema, R, 90 min.

ANT MAN AND THE WASP

7

+ RUDD RULES; TINY STUFF IS SO FUN - WHY ARE THEY DOING THIS STUFF AGAIN? A RIDICULOUS REASON? OK, COOL.

With the recent spate of Marvel Studios films erring toward the awfully serious (obviously not counting Guardians of the Galaxy 2 or Thor: Ragnarok, itself basically a Guardians movie), it’s always enjoyable when things get a little less heavy-handed and more outlandishly fun. And that’s what the Ant Man series has already become known for, thanks to celebrated character actor and all-around charmer Paul Rudd as the onetime thief Scott Lang. Previously, Lang and his buds Hank Pym (Michael Douglas) and Pym’s daughter Hope Van Dyne (Evangeline Lilly) foiled the evil Yellowjacket, a villain who tried to turn Pym’s shrink-a-majig technology into weaponized paraphernalia for shadowy governments and the like. This time, however, it’s a rescue mission when we learn that Pym’s wife Janet (Michelle Pfieffer) was thrust into the quantum void (now that’s small, baby!) 30-ish years ago,

Paul Rudd and Evangeline Lilly fight baddies and do science in Ant Man and the Wasp. but maybe she’s still alive even though she’d obviously have no access to food or water, but whatever—this is Marvel, motherfucker. The bad news, though, is that Lang is stuck serving out a two-year house arrest sentence because of his escapades in 2016’s Captain America: Civil War (the government has laws that work against superheroes doing superhero stuff). But when a mysterious baddie called Ghost (Hannah John-Kamen) shows up to try and steal the aforementioned Pym tech, Lang and the gang have to hit the streets to do stuff. Caught up? Good. Rudd, who also co-wrote the script, is as wonderful as ever, a great combination of magnetic jokester and former criminal with a heart of gold. His posse (played here by Michael Peña, Tip “TI” Harris and some guy who isn’t a celebrity yet so who cares?) enters the fray as well, and the race against the clock begins because for some reason they only have two hours to get the wife out of the void. If this feels like a lot of exposition, it is. Ant Man and The Wasp is, in fact, mostly characters explaining things between fight scenes that, while fun, most often don’t really need to happen. If these people can shrink and enlarge at will, why do they ever bother fighting to retrieve things instead of sneaking in and out? It’s certainly thrilling to watch Ghost phase in and out of existence, but her backstory feels more like a tacked-on bit of trivia than a true motivator. Alas, as well, for the ultra-talented Laurence Fishburne’s appearance is minimal and tangental at best; Douglas is onscreen way too much and Lilly is dimensionless and bland. Thank goodness for Rudd, then, as he can carry just about anything and look great while

doing it. We know that looks shouldn’t matter, but let’s face it—they do. And in the end, we get another little slice of the overall Marvel universe, a respite from the melodrama and another summertime jam in a nice, cool theater. (ADV) Violet Crown, Regal, PG-13, 118 min.

SICARIO: DAY OF THE SOLDADO

6

+ KILLER BEGINNING; LANDSCAPES - THE SLOW BUT SURE DESCENT INTO BORING

But nothing ever goes as planned in movies (that’s pretty much the whole thing about movies), and as the sneaky cartel war kickoff party goes awry, we learn all kinds of nasty things about the cartels and America and even snotnosed teenagers whose cousins think it’s a good idea to turn them into illegal border crossing guides. Woof. What hurts the most is the first hour’s riveting setup and execution. We kind of love-hate Brolin’s character, Matt-something, but we also hate terrorists so, like, who’s the real bad guy here? We even start to develop a connection with the kidnapped cartel princess, which is right around the time the pacing slows to a slog and the players start to develop a collective conscience of some kind. Or do they? No, seriously—I’m asking. As always, Del Toro is pretty great and Brolin really has perfected his disaffected tough guy shtick, but when a fantastic character actor like Catherine Keener is underused to the tune of pointlessness and the rest of the characters don’t even get names outside of, probably, Shadowy Soldier 3, it stings. Director Stefano Sollima (you don’t know him, promise) does his best, and there are some downright gorgeous shots of the desert, but Sicario: Day of the Soldado loses us right at the moment we’d been hooked. Oh, it’s not that it isn’t mostly entertaining enough for the most part, it’s just that it seriously becomes boring. Drag. (ADV) Regal, Violet Crown, R, 122 min.

JURRASIC WORLD: FALLEN KINGDOM

I didn’t see the first Sicario movie. It was just one of those things where every time I had the chance I was like, “Eh, not in the mood.” The real downside of this, though, was that all of my “movie expert” buddies gave me long-winded speeches about how it was a glorious new take on the mafia movie (or something), and that Benicio del Toro was, like, so totally good. I still haven’t seen it. In the sequel, we join the clandestine world of shadowy government operatives who totally shift international power balances for the US government by doing subterfuge and torturing modern-day pirates and stuff. A returning Josh Brolin is one such guy—the kind of fixer who gets called in when the chips are down and gross stuff needs doing. This is why the Secretary of Defense (played here by Matthew Modine, who is presumably enjoying some Stranger Things heat) sends him to Mexico to kidnap a cartel king’s daughter so said cartel will start a war with some other cartel. My dumb friends could probably tell you the girl’s dad did something in the first movie, but I’ll just tell you that Alejandro (Del Toro) wants revenge on this sucker, so he gets involved, too.

3

+ DINOS ARE OBJECTIVELY AWESOME - JUST A STRAIGHT-UP BAD MOVIE

When Laura Dern and Sam Neil craned their necks to behold a wandering pack of brontosauruses in the original Jurassic Park 25 years ago, the music swelled, the emotions bubbled and audiences were filled with a deep sense of awe. When Chris Pratt and Bryce Dallas Howard run afoul of whatever dinosaurs happen their way in the franchise’s newest entry, it is painfully obvious that this series needs to go extinct. Welcome to Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom, a tired and way-too-long slog from JA Bayona, director of the excellent 2007 horror film The Orphanage. This bad boy doesn’t even register on the dumb summer popcorn flick scale thanks to its retreading of old material disguised as homage, parallel utter lack of acting and story quality, and heavy-handed performances from everyone throughout. When last we left our heroes, they’d escaped yet another dino theme park gone awry and now, just like in the third Jurassic Park (that’s the one where Sam Neil goes back to the island for some CONTINUED ON PAGE 43

How do you talk back to the voice in your head that says ‘‘you’re no good?’’

THE

Book Signing With Lucy Bellwood and Her Inner Demon Wednesday, July 18, 5:00–8:00 PM

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When Adventure Cartoonist Lucy Bellwood was faced with the demon of self-doubt, workaholism, and impostor syndrome, she took on her inner critic in a series of comics in 100 Demon Dialogues.

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WEDNESDAY, JULY 11 12:30p Summer 1993* 12:45p A Bag of Marbles 2:45p Damsel* 3:15p Hearts Beat Loud 5:15p Damsel 5:30p Hearts Beat Loud* 7:30p Damsel* 7:45p Summer 1993

MON - TUES, JULY 16 - 17 1:00p Three Identical Strangers 1:15p Westwood* 3:00p A Bag of Marbles 3:15p Westwood* 5:15p Three Identical Strangers* 5:30p American Animals 7:15p A Bag of Marbles* 7:45p American Animals

FRIDAY, JULY 13 10:00a Pixar Shorts 1 11:45a The Identical Strangers 1:45p Strangers on the Earth 3:45p Yellow Submarine 5:45p Strangers on the Earth 7:45p Three Identical Strangers

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SATURDAY, JULY 14 10:00a Pixar Shorts 1 11:45a Three Identical Strangers 1:45p Strangers on the Earth 3:45p Yellow Submarine

THURSDAY, JULY 12 12:15p A Bag of Marble* 12:30p Summer 1993 2:30p Hearts Beat Loud 2:45p Damsel* 5:00p Wonders Are Many 5:00p Wonders Are Many* 7:30p Damsel* 7:45p Summer 1993

FRI - SUN, JULY 13 - 15 11:30a Wonders Are Many 12:15p Strangers on the Earth* 1:30p A Bag of Marbles 2:15p Three Identical Strangers* 4:00p Three Identical Strangers 4:15p Westwood* 6:00p Westwood 6:15p Three Identical Strangers* 8:00p American Animals 8:15p Three Identical Strangers*

[CONT.] 5:45p Strangers on the Earth 6:00p Willy Wonka & the Chocolate Factory 7:45p Three Identical Strangers SUNDAY, JULY 15 10:00a Pixar Shorts 1 11:45a The Identical Strangers 1:45p Strangers on the Earth 3:45p Yellow Submarine 5:45p Strangers on the Earth 7:45p Three Identical Strangers

MON - THUR, JULY 16 - 19 1:30p Strangers on the Earth 3:30p Three Identical Strangers 5:30p Strangers on the Earth 7:30p Three Identical Strangers

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YOUR HOMETOWN MOVIE THEATRE WEDNESDAY, JULY 11TH 3:00 ALWAYS AT THE CARLYLE

2:00 SHOCK AND AWE

5:00 THE QUEST OF ALAIN DUCASSE

6:30 SHOCK AND AWE

7:00 JEANNETTE: THE CHILDHOOD OF JOAN OF ARC THURSDAY, JULY 12TH Ugh. Just ... ugh. reason), they must return on some misguided animal rights mission because—get this—turns out there was a volcano there the whole time and it’s active suddenly and nobody wants the dinos to die. Again. Oof. But it turns out the guys behind the mercy mission are animal traffickers hired by yet another generation of ne’er-do-wells (plus BD Wong, again, for who-knows-why) who plan on getting rich through dino-cloning and genetic manipulation; people start getting eaten and our heroes must intervene or, like, more people gonna get eaten. Pratt seems bored here as an animal behaviorist (yeah, right) and is not even allowed to do that rogue-ish smarm-charm for which he’s become known in better movies like Guardians of the Galaxy. Howard, meanwhile, brings no heat whatsoever to the role of a former exec now laboring under a nonprofit change of heart and trying to save animals because life is sacred or something. Other cast members exist, it’s just they matter so little that one almost wonders why they appear in the first place. Comic relief? Depth? If so, you’d never know it, and the script certainly isn’t doing them any favors, nor are the endless chase scenes, perilous moments of dino terror or beyond-silly narrative. With news of any Star Wars spinoffs biting the dust this week due to low box office numbers, we can only hope moviegoers enact a similar takedown of the Jurassic movies. Steven Spielberg captured something special with his first adaptation of the Michel Crichton universe all those years ago. Today’s attempts feel stale and business-like, the sort of product churned out to take advantage of nostalgia and a slap in the face of everyone who ever felt a sense of wonder for the idea of prehistoric beasts. Boo. Muck. Filth. Slime. Rubbish. Boo. (ADV) Regal, Violet Crown, PG-13, 128 min.

4:00 MARY SHELLEY

8:30 ON THE SEVENTH DAY SUNDAY, JULY 15TH 1:05 SHOCK AND AWE

5:00 ALWAYS AT THE CARLYLE

3:05 JEANNETTE: THE CHILDHOOD OF JOAN OF ARC

7:00 JEANNETTE: THE CHILDHOOD OF JOAN OF ARC

5:30 THE QUEST OF ALAIN DUCASSE

FRIDAY, JULY 13TH

7:30 SHOCK AND AWE MONDAY, JULY 16TH

2:30 ALWAYS AT THE CARLYLE

7:00 SHOCK AND AWE

4:30 THE QUEST OF ALAIN DUCASSE

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8:30 ON THE SEVENTH DAY 7:00 SHOCK AND AWE

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2:30 MARY SHELLEY thriving arts practice and gallery representation. But when an unspeakable accident occurs, the dynamic between the family is inextricably changed, and her entire existence begins to unravel while those closest to her begin to suspect she’s struggling with mental illness and misplaced grief. At her best, Collette achieves a measured balance between protective mother, loving wife and grieving woman; at her worst, she errs too far toward hammy. Still, her character is believably flawed and human even as we question whether her new circumstances are real or imagined (think Essie Davis’ wonderful sleep-deprived flirtation with insanity in the brilliant Australian horror film The Babadook). Elsewhere, Byrne is underused and middle sections drag under the weight of early shocking scenes. Alex Wolff (from that new Jumanji) stands out, however, as a son dealing with his own guilt and confusion, while newcomer Milly Shapiro helps supply spookylittle-kid vibes in a quiet, capable way. It is delightfully surprising, then, that the true revelations behind the family’s troubles are nothing like what early looks and trailers led us to believe. Instead, Hereditary becomes a twisted vision of sheer evil and artistry that takes its time and builds slowly, sometimes excruciatingly, right up to its bizarre, horrifying conclusion. (ADV) Regal, Violet Crown, R, 127 min.

SATURDAY, JULY 14TH

+ ORIGINAL AND TRULY SCARY - SOME SCENES LAG AND FEEL SHOEHORNED IN

Director Ari Aster firmly asserts his place within the pantheon of new wave horror cinema auteurs with Hereditary, his first full-length film and a decidedly terrifying yet subtle experience that keeps up with—or even surpasses— other 21st-century highlights such as 2014’s It Follows. Aster’s world is one that feels all at once dreamlike and haunting, yet all too real, like a nightmare one can’t shake or a long-residing and throbbing pain from outside the physical realm. Here we meet Annie (Toni Collette), an artist and mother grappling with the recent death of her estranged mother. Annie has seemingly cobbled together quite the life, from her husband (Gabriel Byrne) and children to her

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49 Sudden onrush 50 Scratch some statuary? 1 Faucet 54 Music organizer on a wall, 4 Self-referential, like this clue maybe 8 American realist art school 57 Modern cheesecake ingre14 Sorta, in suffix form dient 15 Planetary path 58 ___ Interwebz (intentional 16 Mr. or Ms. Right online misspelling) 17 General linked to chicken 59 Onetime Sidekick maker 18 Company named for a god- 60 Helicopter designer dess Sikorsky 19 1955 pact city 61 Country set to share the 20 Sky viewer used at an air- 2026 World Cup line’s main airport? 62 Lounging chair 23 Atlanta university 63 Multiple-day music gath24 Catan resource ering, e.g. 25 Org. with a tour 64 Dir. at 202.5° 28 Lucille’s co-star 29 Cargo carrier DOWN 32 Diamond call 33 Rita of Netflix’s “One Day 1 Paid to the church 2 Jump to conclusions at a Time” 3 Innermost of Mars’s two 35 LPs and 45s moons 36 The origins of singing 4 Coinage wordlessly? 39 George of “Star Trek” and 5 Heinous 6 Seize Twitter 7 Microbrewery brews 40 Excited 8 On the job 41 Finished 9 Geometric figure 42 “Fiddler on the Roof” 10 In this location matchmaker 11 Prefix with play, at some 43 Follow commands cons 47 “Indubitably!” 12 Tennis’s Ivanovic 48 Scribble (down)

13 Just out 21 Weed whacker, e.g. 22 Shell in a “Monty Python and the Holy Grail” running gag 25 Early Atari game 26 Start of a Frank Loesser title 27 Just over 99%? 29 Low number in Naples 30 Word misspelled in a tattoo meme 31 Part of ACLU 32 Discover 34 Kimono sash 35 “C’est la ___!” 36 Hold’s partner 37 HI-strung instruments? 38 “The Puzzle Palace” org. 39 Kids’ meal prize 42 Terrier type, informally 44 “Julius Caesar” conspirator 45 Way out 46 Cowboy’s yell 48 Game with a bouncing ball 49 Cricket, say 50 Wailuku’s island 51 Updo, e.g. 52 Entreat 53 They share the same season as Geminis 54 Sine’s reciprocal, in trig (abbr.) 55 “Well, that’s obvious!” 56 Head producer for the Wu-Tang Clan

MILIS and her siblings, MINI, MUNCH, MOXIE and MOKA were found abandoned at 2 weeks old and had to be bottle fed by a volunteer. She loves to knead her paws and dry nurse on any cat in her foster home that will give her attention. TEMPERAMENT: MILIS is fierce during playtime and will run over anyone to catch whatever is dangling at the end of a wand toy. MILIS means ‘sweet’ in Irish and it’s the perfect description for this loving little girl. AGE: born approx. 4/1/18.

www.FandFnm.org ADOPTION HOURS:

PETCO: 1-4 pm Thursday, Friday, Saturday & Sunday TECA TU at DeVargas Center: 12 noon-3 pm, First Saturday of each month Please visit our cats at PETCO and TECA TU during regular store hours. FOSTER HOMES URGENTLY NEEDED FOR ADULT CATS OF VARIOUS AGES SANTA FE CATS not only supports the mission of FELINES & FRIENDS from revenue generated by providing premium boarding for cats, pocket pets and birds, but also serves as a mini-shelter for cats awaiting adoption. For more information, please visit www.santafecats.com

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This darling cat was found by a good Samaritan who started feeding her and discovered she had an upper respiratory infection. TOAST was treated with antibiotics and is now ready for a new home. TEMPERAMENT: TOAST may be a little shy at first, but quickly warms up to love and attention. She gets along with other gentle cats, but may be just as happy being the only cat in her new home. AGE: born approx. 7/2/17.

SOLUTION

A N N E A W

15

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G A U L Y L S

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N S A

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C O C O N U T

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S H C H E O A R S P E E P F O V I N I N G E D O B S U R P T U O T R U T S

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POWERED BY 1

AT

M E T A O V A L N I K E E L E S Y T R U O R E N B E G I I R O Y E N O T R S C O K I I F E

“A Noble Effort”—dropping those last few.

J A C K S

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GRIEF SUPPORT GROUP for those experiencing grief in their lives age 18 and over. Tierra Nueva Counseling Center, 3952 San Felipe Road (next door to Southwestern College), 471-8575, Saturdays 10:00-11:30, ongoing, facilitated by student therapists from Southwestern College. It is offered by TNCC and Golden Willow with sponsorship by Rivera Family Funeral Home. Drop-ins welcome.

CHIMNEY SWEEPING

CONSCIOUS CONSUMPTION: Mindfulness-based group designed to help people cultivate a healthier relationship with food. Together, we will explore what it looks like to increase the capacity for self-regulation, engage in breathing exercises, cultivate moment-to-moment awareness, do nutritional planning, and guided meditations. Tuesdays, July 17th to August 28th from 6:00-8:00 pm. at Tierra Nueva JOHREI CENTER OF SANTA FE. Counseling Center. Facilitated JOHREI IS BASED ON THE by student therapists Woody FOCUS AND FLOW OF THE Chandler and Rene Tricou. Call UNIVERSAL LIFE ENERGY. 505-471-8575 to register. $10/ When clouds in the spirisession, sliding scale available. tual body and in consciousness are dissolved, there is UPAYA ZEN CENTER: a return to true health. This MEDITATION, TALKS, ZEN is according to the Divine INSTRUCTION, PROGRAMS Law of Order; after spiritual Upaya invites all who aspire to clearing, physical and menexpand their awareness and tal- emotional healing follow. compassionately engage in our You are invited to experience world. Come for MEDITATION the Divine Healing Energy of PRACTICE (7:00am, 12:20pm, Johrei. All are Welcome! The 5:30pm) and DHARMA TALKS Johrei Center of Santa Fe is Wednesdays 5:30-6:30pm. located at Calle Cinco Plaza, Get acquainted with Upaya 1500 Fifth St., Suite 10, 87505. and learn the basics of Zen at Please call 820-0451 with any MEDITATION INSTRUCTION questions. Drop-ins welcome! on Sunday, August 5, 3:00Open Tuesday, Wednesday, 4:00pm - RSVP: meditate@ Thursday, 2-5pm. Friday upaya.org. Learn about 2-4pm. Saturday, 10am-1pm. podcasts, retreats, Chaplaincy, Closed Sunday and Monday. and Resident programs at www. There is no fee for receiving upaya.org. 505-986-8518, Johrei. Donations are grateupaya@upaya.org. 1404 Cerro fully accepted. Please check Gordo Road, Santa Fe. us out at our new website

IS FOOD A PROBLEM FOR YOU? Do you eat when you’re not hungry? Do you go on eating binges or fasts without medical approval? Is your weight affecting your life? Contact Overeaters Anonymous! We offer support, no strings attached! No dues, no fees, no weigh-ins, no diets. We meet every day from 8-9 am at The Friendship Club, 1316 Apache Avenue, Santa Fe. www.nnmoa.com BODY IMAGE WORKSHOP: Art therapy group for anyone ages 18 and over. Through art making and discussion we will expand awareness of relationship to our bodies, and increase positive self-image and self-talk. Wednesdays 6:00-8:00 pm, July 11th August 15th at Tierra Nueva Counseling Center. Facilitated by student art-therapists/ counselors Jody Green & Rebecca Meyers. $10/session sliding scale available. Call 505-471-8575 to register.

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$50 off chimney cleanings! Offer ends soon! Prevent chimney fires! Call Santa Fe’s premier chimney service company for Safety, Value, and Professionalism. Baileyschimney.com. Call Bailey’s today 505-988-2771

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SANTA FE COYOTE FENCING Specializing in Coyote Fencing. License # 18-001199-74. We do it all. Richard, 505-690-6272 Visit our work gallery santafecoyotefencing.com

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THE ARCHANGEL GABRIEL EXPLAINS THE PURPOSE OF THERAPEUTIC WRITING LIFE. GROUP: Having trouble navigating a major life change? The Archangel Gabriel also known as Benu, has tranced This group uses writing through Karen Cook, a transprompts to explore your past, dimensional channel from understand your present, and Albuquerque for the past 45 create a new narrative for your years. Gabriel will give a workfuture. Group meets Thursday shop this Saturday, March 14 nights, July 12-August 30, at Unity Santa Fe from 1 pm to 6:30-8:30pm. Co-facilitated 4 pm. The workshop topic is by Leslie Krasne and Marybeth ìThe Purpose of Lifeî, a topic Hallman, student therapists with significant meaning for at Tierra Nueva Counseling these times. The last hour is Center. Fee: $10/session, sliding set aside for questions and scale. Please call 471-8575 to answers of a non-personal register. Bring your journal and basis. The only way we learn favorite writing pen! anything new is when we step outside our belief systems. Fee is $40 payable at the door. For questions, call Tom ADVERTISE at 505 438-2098.

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CARPENTRY to LANDSCAPING Home maintenance, remodels, additions, interior & exterior, irrigation, stucco repair, jobs small & large. Reasonable rates, Reliable. Discounts avail. to seniors, veterans, handicap. Jonathan, 670-8827 www.handymannm.com

GREENE FINE ARTS SANTA FE | SEATTLE Now representing DAVID HOPTMAN, New Mexico Acclaimed Artist 2016 Title: Sculpted Vessel BRONZE_$3500 18LX10WX6H View More at davidhoptman. com and greenefinearts.com Visitors welcome to artists studio in Tesuque NM. Call 505-328-5061 for a visit/more info

REWARD— Lost- 12 year old medium sized female brown lab mix in the airport Rd and west meadows/country club gardens area. Purple collar , teal tag that says TASHY with my address (210 calle Lema) and telephone #’s on the back. Got out of our yard sometime between 7/4 and 7/5. One of two ears sticks up just like in the photo... but her face has a lot more white now than in the photo as she is now 12. Please call Melissa at any of these numbers: 505-660-9438, 505-570-1153, 505-920-6475. **Update 7/8 Tashy was possibly sighted on Paseo del Sol West today at 5 pm**

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MIND BODY SPIRIT ACUPUNCTURE Rob Brezsny

Week of July 11th

ARIES (March 21-April 19): Your key theme right now is growth. Let’s dig in and analyze its nuances. 1. Not all growth is good for you. It may stretch you too far too fast — beyond your capacity to integrate and use it. 2. Some growth that is good for you doesn’t feel good to you. It might force you to transcend comforts that are making you stagnant, and that can be painful. 3. Some growth that’s good for you may meet resistance from people close to you; they might prefer you to remain just as you are, and may even experience your growth as a problem. 4. Some growth that isn’t particularly good for you may feel pretty good. For instance, you could enjoy working to improve a capacity or skill that is irrelevant to your longterm goals. 5. Some growth is good for you in some ways, and not so good in other ways. You have to decide if the trade-off is worth it. 6. Some growth is utterly healthy for you, feels pleasurable, and inspires other people.

confident that life will conspire to help you carry out this task. More than at any time since your birthday in 2015, this is the season for unleashing your smiles.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): You can’t sing with someone else’s mouth, Taurus. You can’t sit down and settle into a commanding new power spot with someone else’s butt. Capiche? I also want to tell you that it’s best if you don’t try to dream with someone else’s heart, nor should you imagine you can fine-tune your relationship with yourself by pushing someone else to change. But here’s an odd fact: You can enhance your possibility for success by harnessing or borrowing or basking in other people’s luck. Especially in the coming weeks. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): You wouldn’t attempt to cure a case of hiccups by repeatedly smacking your head against a wall, right? You wouldn’t use an anti-tank rocket launcher to eliminate the mosquito buzzing around your room, and you wouldn’t set your friend’s hair on fire as a punishment for arriving late to your rendezvous at the café. So don’t overreact to minor tweaks of fate, my dear Gemini. Don’t over-medicate tiny disturbances. Instead, regard the glitches as learning opportunities. Use them to cultivate more patience, expand your tolerance, and strengthen your character. CANCER (June 21-July 22): I pay tribute to your dizzying courage, you wise fool. I stage-whisper “Congratulations!” as you slip away from your hypnotic routine and wander out to the edge of mysterious joy. With a crazy grin of encouragement and my fist pressed against my chest, I salute your efforts to transcend your past. I praise and exalt you for demonstrating that freedom is never permanent but must be reclaimed and reinvented on a regular basis. I cheer you on as you avoid every temptation to repeat yourself, demean yourself, and chain yourself. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): I’m feeling a bit helpless as I watch you messing with that bad but good stuff that is so wrong but right for you. I am rendered equally inert as I observe you playing with the strong but weak stuff that’s interesting but probably irrelevant. I fidget and sigh as I monitor the classy but trashy influence that’s angling for your attention; and the supposedly fast-moving process that’s creeping along so slowly; and the seemingly obvious truth that would offer you a much better lesson if only you would see it for the chewy riddle that it is. What should I do about my predicament? Is there any way I can give you a boost? Maybe the best assistance I can offer is to describe to you what I see. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Psychologist Paul Ekman has compiled an extensive atlas of how emotions are revealed in our faces. “Smiles are probably the most underrated facial expressions,” he has written, “much more complicated than most people realize. There are dozens of smiles, each differing in appearance and in the message expressed.” I bring this to your attention, Virgo, because your assignment in the coming weeks — should you choose to accept it — is to explore and experiment with your entire repertoire of smiles. I’m

DR. JOANNA CORTI, DOM, Powerful Medicine, Powerful Results. Homeopathy, Acupuncture. Micro-current (Acupuncture without needles.) Parasite, Liver/cleanses. Nitric Oxide. Pain Relief. Transmedium Energy Healing. Worker’s Compensation and SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Emily Dickinson wrote 1,775 Auto Accidents Insurance TANTRA MASSAGE & poems — an average of one every week for 34 years. I’d accepted 505-501-0439 TEACHING love to see you launch an enduring, deep-rooted project that will require similar amounts of stamina, persistence, Call Julianne Parkinson, and dedication. Are you ready to expand your vision of 505-920-3083 • what’s possible for you to accomplish? The current astroCertified Tantra Educator, logical omens suggest that the next two months will be Professional Massage an excellent time to commit yourself to a Great Work that you will give your best to for the rest of your long life! Therapist, & Life Coach ASTROLOGY SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): What’s the biggest lie in my life? There are several candidates. Here’s one: I pretend I’m nonchalant about one of my greatest failures; I act as if I’m not distressed by the fact that the music I’ve created has never received the listenership it should it have. How about you, Sagittarius? What’s the biggest lie in your life? What’s most false or dishonest or evasive about you? Whatever it is, the immediate future will be a favorable time to transform your relationship with it. You now have extraordinary power to tell yourself liberating truths. Three weeks from now, you could be a more authentic version of yourself than you’ve ever been. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Now and then you go through phases when you don’t know what you need until you stumble upon it. At times like those, you’re wise not to harbor fixed ideas about what you need or where to hunt for what you need. Metaphorically speaking, a holy grail might show up in a thrift store. An eccentric stranger may provide you with an accidental epiphany at a bus stop or a convenience store. Who knows? A crucial clue may even jump out at you from a spam email or a reality TV show. I suspect that the next two weeks might be one of those odd grace periods for you. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): “Reverse psychology” is when you convince people to do what you wish they would do by shrewdly suggesting that they do the opposite of what you wish they would do. “Reverse censorship” is when you write or speak the very words or ideas that you have been forbidden to express. “Reverse cynicism” is acting like it’s chic to express glee, positivity, and enthusiasm. “Reverse egotism” is bragging about what you don’t have and can’t do. The coming weeks will be an excellent time to carry out all these reversals, as well as any other constructive or amusing reversals you can dream up. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Poet Emily Dickinson once revealed to a friend that there was only one Commandment she ever obeyed: “Consider the Lilies.” Japanese novelist Natsume Soseki told his Englishspeaking students that the proper Japanese translation for “I love you” is Tsuki ga tottemo aoi naa, which literally means “The moon is so blue tonight.” In accordance with current astrological omens, Pisces, I’m advising you to be inspired by Dickinson and Soseki. More than any other time in 2018, your duty in the coming weeks is to be lyrical, sensual, aesthetic, imaginative, and festively non-literal. Homework: Want to enjoy my books, music, and videos without spending any money? http://bit.ly/LiberatedGifts.

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LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Lucky vibes are coalescing in your vicinity. Scouts and recruiters are hovering. Helpers, fairy godmothers, and future playmates are growing restless waiting for you to ask them for favors. Therefore, I hereby authorize you to be imperious, regal, and overflowing with self-respect. I encourage you to seize exactly what you want, not what you’re “supposed” to want. Or else be considerate, appropriate, modest, and full of harmonious caution. CUT! CUT! Delete that “be considerate” sentence. The Libra part of me tricked me into saying it. And this is one time when people of the Libra persuasion are allowed to be free from the compulsion to balance and moderate. You have a mandate to be the show, not watch the show.

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s Expanded Weekly Audio Horoscopes and Daily Text Message Horoscopes. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone © CO P Y R I G H T 2 0 1 8 R O B B R E Z S N Y at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700. 46

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LEGALS LEGAL NOTICE TO CREDITORS/NAME CHANGE STATE OF NEW MEXICO IN THE PROBATE COURT SANTA FE COUNTY No. 2018-0101 IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF George R. Ortiz, DECEASED. NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed personal representative of this estate. All persons having claims against this estate are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice, or the claims will be forever barred. Claims must be presented either to the undersigned personal representative at the address listed below, or filed with the Probate Court of Santa Fe, County, New Mexico, located at the following address: 102 Grant Ave., Santa Fe, NM 87501. Dated: June 26, 2018 Anita Ortiz 306 Palomino St. Santa Fe, NM 87505 (505) 982-3206 STATE OF NEW MEXICO COUNTY OF SANTA FE FIRST JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT IN THE MATTER OF A PETITION FOR CHANGE OF NAME OF Andrea Marietta Gallegos Case No.: D-101-CV-2018-1812 NOTICE OF CHANGE OF NAME TAKE NOTICE that in accordance with the provisions of Sec. 40-81 through Sec. 40-8-3 NMSA 1978, et seq. the Petitioner Andrea Marietta Gallegos will apply to the Honorable DAVID K. THOMSON, District Judge of the First Judicial District at the Santa Fe County Courthouse, 225 Montezuma Ave., in Santa Fe, New Mexico, at 9:00 a.m. on the 5th day of September, 2018 for an ORDER FOR CHANGE OF NAME from Andrea Marietta Gallegos to Andrea Marietta Clemente. STEPHEN T. PACHECO, District Court Clerk By: Marina Sisneros Deputy Court Clerk Submitted by: Andrea Gallegos Petitioner, Pro Se

STATE OF NEW MEXICO COUNTY OF SANTA FE FIRST JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT IN THE MATTER OF A PETITION FOR CHANGE OF NAME OF Caliana Rose Jonas Case No.: D-101-CV-2018-1797 AMENDED NOTICE OF CHANGE OF NAME TAKE NOTICE that in accordance with the provisions of Sec. 40-8-1 through Sec. 40-8-3 NMSA 1978, et seq. the Petitioner Andrea Gallegos will apply to the Honorable DAVID K. THOMSON, District Judge of the First Judicial District at the Santa Fe County Courthouse, 225 Montezuma Ave., in Santa Fe, New Mexico, at 9:00 a.m. on the 5th day of September, 2018 for an ORDER FOR CHANGE OF NAME from Caliana Rose Jonas to Caliana Rose Clemente. STEPHEN T. PACHECO, District Court Clerk By: Marina Sisneros Deputy Court Clerk Submitted by: Andrea Gallegos Petitioner, Pro Se

BIEDSCHEID, P.C. Attorneys for the Estate of Colleen Thomasine Barnard 708 Paseo de Peralta, Santa Fe, New Mexico 87501 (505) 988-1668 By: Peter Wirth

2. LINDA ARAGON filed for Mexico, 87501, and are available STATE OF NEW MEXICO IN THE PROBATE COURT a Petition for Adjudication for your inspection there. SANTA FE COUNTY of Intestacy, Determination 4. You can petition the Court in of Heirship, and Formal any matter relating to the estate, No. 2018-0089 IN THE MATTER OF THE Appointment of Personal including without limitation, ESTATE OF Victor Vigil, Representative in the abovedistribution of assets and the DECEASED. NOTICE TO styled and numbered matter on expenses of administration. CREDITORS NOTICE IS May 1, 2018, and an Amended 5. Pursuant to Section 45-1-401 (A) STATE OF NEW MEXICO HEREBY GIVEN that the Petition for Adjudication of (3), N.M.S.A., 1978, notice of the COUNTY OF SANTA FE FIRST undersigned has been appointed Intestacy, Determination time and place of hearing on the JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT IN of Heirship, and Formal above-referenced Petition is hereby personal representative of this THE MATTER OF A PETITION Appointment of Personal given to you by publication, once a estate. All persons having claims FOR CHANGE OF NAME OF Representative on June 6, 2018, week, for three consecutive weeks. against this estate are required to Marilyn Ting and a hearing on the aboveDATED this 5th day of July, 2018. present their claims within two Case No.: D-101-CV-2018-1813 (2) months after the date of the NOTICE OF CHANGE OF NAME referenced Petition has been set Kristi A. Wareham, first publication of this notice, or for July 30, 2018, at 1:30pm, at Attorney for Petitioner TAKE NOTICE that in accorthe claims will be forever barred. the Santa Fe County First Judicial Submitted by: dance with the provisions Claims must be presented either District Courthouse located at KRISTI A. WAREHAM, P.C. of Sec. 40-8-1 through Sec. to the undersigned personal rep225 Montezuma Ave., Santa Attorney for Petitioner 40-8-3 NMSA 1978, et seq. resentative at the address listed Fe, New Mexico, before the 2205 Miguel Chavez Rd., Suite B the Petitioner Marilyn Ting below, or filed with the Probate Honorable Gregory S. Shaffer. Santa Fe, NM 87505 will apply to the Honorable Court of Santa Fe, County, New FRANCIS J. MATHEW, District 3. You are entitled to information Telephone: (505) 820-0698 Mexico, located at the following regarding the administration of Fax: (505) 629-1298 Judge of the First Judicial address: 102 Grant Ave., Santa District at the Santa Fe Judicial the estate from the personal rep- Email: kristiwareham@icloud.com Fe, NM 87501. resentative and the papers relatComplex, 225 Montezuma Dated: July 9, 2018 NEED TO PLACE A Ave., in Santa Fe, New Mexico, ing to this estate are on file with Agnes A. Vigil the Santa Fe County First Judicial LEGAL NOTICE? at 1:15 p.m. on the 20th day 991 Calle Feliz District Court, located at 225 CLASSY@ of July, 2018 for an ORDER Santa Fe, NM 87507 SFREPORTER.COM FOR CHANGE OF NAME from Montezuma Ave., Santa Fe, New 505-660-2698 Marilyn Ting to Mai Ting. FIRST JUDICIAL DISTRICT STEPHEN T. PACHECO, COUNTY OF SANTA FE District Court Clerk STATE OF NEW MEXICO Case No. D-101-PB-2018-00072 By: Jennifer Romero IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE Deputy Court Clerk OF COLLEEN THOMASINE Submitted by: Marilyn Ting, BARNARD, (s/k/a Colleen T. Petitioner Pro Se 100 Caja Del Rio Road, Santa Fe, NM 87507 Barnard or s/k/a Colleen Terrill Barnard), Deceased. NOTICE TO STATE OF NEW MEXICO CREDITORS NOTICE IS HEREBY COUNTY OF SANTA FE sfhumanesociety.org GIVEN that Dana Barnard, whose IN THE FIRST JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT address is c/o Sawtell, Wirth & Case No. D-101-PB-2018-00078 Biedscheid, P.C., 708 Paseo de IN THE MATTER OF THE Peralta, Santa Fe, New Mexico ESTATE OF ROSINA O’DELL, 87501, has been appointed as DECEASED. personal representative of the NOTICE HEARING BY Estate of Colleen Thomasine PUBLICATION Barnard, deceased. Creditors of TO: ANGELA VELEZ and the estate must present their SARA WATS (a.k.a. SARA claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publica- SHANNON TAFOYA) AND TO tion of this notice or within sixty ALL UNKNOWN HEIRS OF (60) days after mailing or other ROSINA O’DELL, DECEASED, AND ALL UNKNOWN delivery, whichever is later, or the claims will be forever barred. PERSONS WHO HAVE OR Claims must be presented to the CLAIM ANY INTEREST IN THE ESTATE OF ROSINA Personal Representative, Dana Meet Willy! He is a mixed breed who could possibly Hello Ladies, howl ya doin’? My name is Kronos and be part Cattle Dog. Willy is 5 years old on paper, but Barnard, in care of Sawtell, Wirth O’DELL, DECEASED, OR I am two years old. I currently weigh 51 pounds. Two much younger at heart. He currently weighs around & Biedscheid, P.C., 708 Paseo de IN THE MATTER BEING may sound young, but I am quite mature for my age. 55 pounds, but is working on a fitness plan to slowly LITIGATED IN THE Sometimes, I’m just looking to have a nice, quiet, shed a few pounds. Will you be his walking buddy? Peralta, Santa Fe, New Mexico relaxing day with my girl. Maybe our first date could HEREINAFTER MENTIONED Willy walks great on leash at the shelter and loooooves 87501, or filed with the First be a walk in a grassy park, where we could have a to cuddle! His favorite cuddle session involved leaning HEARING. Judicial District Court of Santa nice lunch and then go for a hike. I’ve been looking in for a head massage. Willy took a field trip offsite NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN everywhere for the right lady, so maybe you can come and enjoyed meeting new people, kids and other dogs Fe, County, New Mexico. and find me. I can’t wait to meet my new best friend! (small ones too)! Come meet this lovable boy today! of the following: Dated: June 27, 2018 1. ROSINA O’DELL, deceased, Respectfully submitted, SPONSORED BY died on January 10, 2003; SAWTELL, WIRTH &

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July 11, 2018 Santa Fe Reporter  

Building Up or Tearing Down

July 11, 2018 Santa Fe Reporter  

Building Up or Tearing Down

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