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LOCAL NEWS

AND CULTURE JANUARY 11-17, 2017

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JANUARY 11-17, 2017 | Volume 44, Issue 2

NEWS OPINION 5 NEWS 6 7 DAYS, METROGLYPHS AND THIS MODERN WORLD 6 WOMEN’S MARCH ON WASHINGTON 7 The Women’s March on Washington is happening locally, too SECRET DATA 9 Does having a political agenda mean you can’t view public documents? COVER STORY 10 LOST, FOUND, FORGOTTEN Even with DNA, dental records or fingerprints, locating a missing person or identifying remains can be difficult. So what of those for whom no one is searching? THE ENTHUSIAST 14 STILL IMAGES Ian Shive photographs National Parks sites out of love and activism

29 BED HEAD A new sartorial column debuts this week, featuring a few style tips from the city often considered to sit at the pinnacle of fashion: Paris. What are Parisians wearing and smearing on their faces? Read on to find out. Cover design by Anson Stevens-Bollen artdirector@sfreporter.com

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EDITOR AND PUBLISHER JULIE ANN GRIMM

CULTURE

ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER AND AD DIRECTOR ANNA MAGGIORE ART DIRECTOR ANSON STEVENS-BOLLEN

SFR PICKS 17 Ponies, health, words and metal mayhem

CULTURE EDITOR ALEX DE VORE

THE CALENDAR 19

STAFF WRITER STEVEN HSIEH

MUSIC 23

COPY EDITOR CHARLOTTE JUSINSKI

AND THE WINNER IS... More music awards than ever before

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January 4, 2016 Anna Maggiore anna@sfreporter.com

CULTURE STAFFER MARIA EGOLF-ROMERO CONTRIBUTING EDITOR JEFF PROCTOR

A&C 25 CROSSROADS Southside arts and culture

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS GYWNETH DOLAND ELIZABETH MILLER

SAVAGE LOVE 26 Cock cage, pillow talk and some dumb ‘phobe A&C 29 BED HEAD Zut alors! Ooh-la-la! Other French exclamations! FOOD 31 THE GOOD BOOK The Betty Crocker Cookbook rides again

EDITORIAL INTERN KIM JONES DIGITAL SERVICES MANAGER BRIANNA KIRKLAND PRINT PRODUCTION MANAGER AND GRAPHIC DESIGNER SUZANNE S KLAPMEIER MAJOR ACCOUNTS ADVERTISING EXECUTIVE JAYDE SWARTS ADVERTISING EXECUTIVES MICHELLE RIBEIRO NOAH G SIMPSON CIRCULATION MANAGER ANDY BRAMBLE

MOVIES 32 HIDDEN FIGURES REVIEW: SPACE RELATIONS Plus the mostly not-so-good Chatty Catties

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READINGS & CONVERSATIONS

is a lecture series on political, economic, environmental, and human rights issues featuring social justice activists, writers, journalists, and scholars discussing critical topics of our day.

brings to Santa Fe a wide range of writers from the literary world of fiction, nonfiction, and poetry to read from and discuss their work.

© Jimmy Chalk

© Inez & Vinoodh

In Pursuit of Cultural Freedom

GLENN GREENWALD with

TOM ENGELHARDT

DAN CHIASSON

WEDNESDAY 15 FEBRUARY AT 7PM LENSIC PERFORMING ARTS CENTER

The Trump presidency presents massive, new threats to the protection of civil rights and liberties, long under assault—but also entirely new political opportunities.

Eileen Myles is the author of more than a dozen volumes of poetry, fiction, and nonfiction, including Snowflake/different streets, Sorry, Tree, Chelsea Girls, Not Me, Skies, Cool for You, The Importance of Being Iceland: Travel Essays in Art, and Inferno: A Poet’s Novel, winner of the Lambda Literary Award for Lesbian Fiction. Her autobiographical novel Chelsea Girls, originally published in 1994 and reissued in 2015, brings together snapshot-like memories from her 1960s Catholic upbringing with an alcoholic father, her difficult teen years, her committed embrace of lesbianism, and her life as a poet in 1970s New York, which she describes as “a glowing cord of drunkenness and sex.”

Glenn Greenwald is an investigative journalist and author. A former constitutional lawyer, he founded the online global media outlet The Intercept with Laura Poitras and Jeremy Scahill in 2014. He is the author of several best sellers—most recently No Place to Hide: Edward Snowden, the NSA, and the US Surveillance State. He is the recipient of numerous awards for his investigative journalism and was named one of the top 100 Global Thinkers for 2013 by Foreign Policy magazine. He is a recipient of the 2011 Lannan Cultural Freedom Award. Greenwald will speak about “Political Trends and Civil Liberties in the Trump Era.”

TICKETS ON SALE NOW

ticketssantafe.org or call 505.988.1234 $6 general/$3 students and seniors with ID Video and audio recordings of Lannan events are available at:

www.lannan.org MONTH #-#, 2017

with

WEDNESDAY 1 FEBRUARY AT 7PM LENSIC PERFORMING ARTS CENTER

− Glenn Greenwald, on the 2016 presidential election

XX

EILEEN MYLES

SFREPORTER.COM

Myles’s book I Must Be Living Twice: New and Selected Poems 1975–2014 was described by John Ashbery as being “like a gasp of fresh air in the turbulent urban environment she writes from.”


ANSON STEVENS-BOLLEN

LETTERS

Have you had a negative dental experience? Michael Davis,

DDS

New Patients Welcome

Would you like to experience caring, smiling, fun, gentle people who truly enjoy working with you?

Mail letters to PO Box 2306, Santa Fe, NM 87504, deliver to 132 E Marcy St., or email them to editor@sfreporter.com. Letters (no more than 200 words) should refer to specific articles in the Reporter. Letters will be edited for space and clarity.

NEWS, DECEMBER 14: “NEXT IN LINE”

GLORIFIED BABYSITTERS? I am a foster parent. If there have been any improvements at CYFD, they have been so minor they have barely touched on fixing the mess. As a foster parent, I do not have a voice with CYFD—no one is hearing or even attempting to listen. The affect that the system has on the children removed from their homes is horrible, but there is no system for the foster parents to speak. There is no forum, there is no chain of command made available, there is nothing in place to give or accept suggestions; we are out there doing the dirty work with next to no support from CYFD and no one is asking us for feedback. We are silent, the state’s babysitters. ... Believe me, Monique Jacobson is not talking to any foster parent that has complained about the system; she will be put in touch with those who buy into the system, those who know from experience that they will get nothing positive from saying anything negative. Thank you for writing the article.

CHERI LEREW SOCORRO

COVER, DECEMBER 7:

SMILES OF SANTA FE Michael W. Davis, DDS 1751 Old Pecos Trail, Suite B (505) 988-4448 www.SmilesofSantaFe.com

P R OV I D E R F O R D E LTA A N D U N I T E D C O N C O R D I A D E N TA L P L A N S • M O S T I N S U R A N C E S A C C E P T E D

“SO LONG, FAREWELL”

PASSING THE BATON Yes, the Western Hemisphere has dramatically changed in the last 200 years. The men of the cloth, the clergy of all demoninations, knelt and prayed as the Indigenous people were being murdered, butchered and exterminated in the name of their gods (notice a small g). ... I am an old Indian now, at the age of 70. ... As a Native American, I am not exempt from changes, for I drive a car. And at the end of the day I want to look in the mirror and feel happy that I did something for someone in need. ... America is still the greatest empire on earth. We shall see with this new administration the passing of the baton. We all have a rendezvous with destiny. I go forth with great anticipation.

Upaya offers these Opportunities to Develop Greater Mindfulness

Daily Meditation

See schedule: Upaya.org/about/meditation-schedule/

Dharma Talk and Meditation Wednesdays, 5:30 - 6:30 p.m.

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Sunday, January 29, 9:30 a.m. - 12:30 p.m. A Half-day Introduction to Zen Meditation By Donation Only - Registration Required SANTA FE, NM

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OCTAVIO DE ZALDIVAR SANTA FE

CORRECTION Due to a math error, “Over the Hill” (Jan. 4) misstated the rent value of Frank Mancuso Jr.’s lease with the county. It is $21,600 over five years, not $108,000. SFR regrets the error. SFR will correct factual errors online and in print. Please let us know if we make a mistake, editor@sfreporter.com or 988-7530.

We pay the most for your gold coins, heirloom jewelry and diamonds! On the Plaza 60 East San Francisco Street, Suite 218 Santa Fe, NM 87501 • 505.983.4562 • SantaFeGoldworks.com

SANTA FE EAVESDROPPER “It all has some milk, sugar and butter.” —Overheard Christmas Eve morning at Clafoutis, when a woman was concerned about her large order’s ingredients “I thought of my band name. It’s Uptown Squirrels. We do remakes of songs that have the word ‘girl’ and substitute ‘squirrel.’” —Overheard at Ohori’s Coffee

FRESHAIR

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BEAUTY Oscar Daniel Hair Design 227 E. Palace Ave. Suite L 989-3264 | Open Tues - Sat

Send your Overheard in Santa Fe tidbits to: eavesdropper@sfreporter.com SFREPORTER.COM

JANUARY 11-17, 2017

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7 DAYS REALITY SHOW PERSONALITY OMAROSA MANIGAULT TO JOIN TRUMP TEAM So basically, if you don’t have political experience there’s no limit to how high you can go!

CASE IN POINT: TRUMP APPOINTS SON-INLAW TO SENIOR ADVISOR ROLE Oh, he isn’t even trying to hide his bullshit anymore.

F

EDUCATION WEEK MAGAZINE GIVES NM POOR EDUCATION RANKING We not know why! We use good word all time!

THIRD GRADE STUDENTS WHO CAN’T Wh at i s th READ MOVE UP ANYWAY is!? See!?

IT SNOWED ON A FRIDAY And some of the residential streets are still un-navigable even though it’s practically spring again already.

F

WIPP REOPENED It’s designed to collapse. So, don’t worry. It’s cool.

CITY COUNCILOR IS MAD ABOUT SEEMINGLY UNNECESSARY SIDEWALK CONSTRUCTION PROJECT AFTER WORK BEGINS A day late and about $450,000 short.

+ $2 to SFR for a lo go

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JANUARY 11-17, 2017

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KIM JONES

NEWS Natural & Healthy Skin Care Solutions SUNSPOTS? WRINKLES? AGING & DAMAGED SKIN?

REMEDIES™ now offers Skin Repair and Restoration Using COLD LASER Therapy and Corrective Peels for Total Skin Transformation! Can’t make DC? Join Lindsay Conover and others for the Santa Fe event on Jan. 21.

Women’s March on Washington In DC and at home, the women of New Mexico are ready to stand up

BY KIM JONES i n t e r n @ s f r e p o r t e r. c o m

W

omen’s rights are human rights. Everybody’s rights are human rights. Everybody matters, everybody has equal importance in this world,” says local activist Amanda Flory. “And that’s what we’re going to Washington to say.” Flory tells SFR she’s been involved in politics since she was 3 years old, when she sat on her parents’ shoulders in Lamy during a protest against the Waste Isolation Pilot Plant. Flory, the Lamy native turned Albuquerque Underground ’Zine music writer, plans to be among tens of thousands who gather in the nation’s capital the day after the presidential inauguration to demonstrate. When Flory heard about the nationally organized Women’s March on Washington on Jan. 21, she decided to organize a larger New Mexican group to attend. “You know… Power in numbers,” she tells SFR. Next, Flory got in touch with Samia Assed, the president of the board of the Albuquerque Center for Peace and Justice, who then helped her coordinate hotel rooms, bus tickets, protest permits, police protection and fundraising for those who wanted to attend but couldn’t afford the cost. They raised money

through bake sales, raffles, house parties and knitting to ensure as many New Mexicans could march as possible. Now, about 200 people plan to embark on the 27-hour bus trip, and over 200 more are traveling by plane. Flory tells SFR she feels like the march is a way to let Trump know who he works for. “He is not representing us well,” she says. “He is destroying all of our alliances around the world that are vital, that we have been building up for years. He has disrespected women more than I can say and it’s just not a world I want to see for my nieces, nephews and godson.” Can’t make it to DC to fight for basic human rights? No problem—Lindsay Conover has it covered. With a little help from her friends, the Santa Fe organizer made sure New Mexico’s capital city is in on the action. When Conover watched the election, her shock sent her into a brief depression. But when she heard about the DC event, the astrological counselor sprang into action to arrange a local version. “Our event will ... raise awareness around other organizations that are also fighting for women and human rights,” Conover says. “I am marching because I want a better world for us to live in that honors equality, humanity and justice. For me, this is the first step in that direction.” Marchers should meet on the north side of the Bataan Building on West De Vargas Street between Galisteo Street and Don Gaspar Avenue at 10:30 am on Saturday, Jan. 21. A rally at the Roundhouse starts at noon. For more details, visit wmwsf.net.

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Sample soups from Santa Fe’s finest chefs during a benefit event for The Food Depot! LANB

presents

Creating a better way.

THE FOOD DEPOT

David Risser & Charles Goodman with

Councilor Signe Lindell, District 1

John Adams for

Northern New Mexico’s Food Bank

Saturday, January 21, 2017 (Noon to 2:30 PM) Santa Fe Community Convention Center 201 W. Marcy Street in Santa Fe Purchase tickets at the Lensic Box Office in Santa Fe 211 W. San Francisco • 505-988-1234 ticketssantafe.org

Santa Fe Reporter Quarter Page Ad 2017 4.75x5.625.indd 1

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1/9/2017 7:19:05 PM

JANUARY 11-17, 2017

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January 11, 2016 | American Civil Liberties Union of New Mexico

Dear President-elect Trump, For nearly 100 years, the ACLU has stood as this nation’s

Many of our country’s most cherished rights are the result of

premier defender of freedom and justice for all.

ACLU litigation and advocacy. They include the Scopes trial

As you assume the nation’s highest office, we must ask you

and the following Supreme Court cases: Korematsu

(the right to teach evolution in public science classrooms)

now as president-elect to reconsider and change course on

(challenging Japanese American internment); Miranda (the

certain campaign promises you have made.

right to remain silent); Griswold (the right to contraception);

Specifically, you promised to:

right to a court-appointed attorney if you can’t afford one);

Loving (the right of interracial couples to marry); Gideon (the Windsor (striking down the federal Defense of Marriage Act);

- amass a deportation force to remove 11 million

and Obergefell (the right of same-sex couples to marry)

undocumented immigrants - ban the entry of Muslims and institute aggressive surveillance programs targeting them

presidents of both parties to ensure that our country makes good on its founding premise as the land of the free.

- restrict a woman’s right to abortion services - reauthorize waterboarding and other forms of torture - change our nation’s libel laws and restrict freedom of expression

If you do not reverse course and endeavor to make these campaign promises a reality, you will have to contend with the full firepower of the ACLU at your

These proposals are not simply un-American and wrongheaded. They are unlawful and unconstitutional, and would violate the First, Fourth, Fifth, Eighth, and Fourteenth Amendments of the Constitution, as well as other statutes and international treaties.

and others. We have worked with and battled American

every step. The staff of the ACLU of New Mexico, as well as the hundreds of ACLU litigators and activists and the millions of card-carrying members and supporters across the country, stand ready to fight against any encroachment on our hard-won freedoms and rights.

One thing is certain: We will be vigilant every day of your tenure as president. And when you ultimately vacate the Oval Office, we will do likewise with your successor.

Anthony D. Romero Executive Director American Civil Liberties Union XX

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www.aclu-nm.org

Peter G. Simonson Executive Director American Civil Liberties Union of New Mexico


Secret Data

LAURA PASKUS

NEWS

The ‘politics’ of wrangling data on the Gila lead state to withhold public information B Y L A U R A PA S K U S , NEW MEXICO POLITICAL REPORT

A

one-sentence provision in state law is emboldening at least one agency to keep public information from seeing the light of day. All officials have to do is accuse someone of having a political agenda. For more than a year, retired Interstate Stream Commission director Norman Gaume has wanted to know how much water farmers and others currently draw from the Gila River. That’s where the state plans to build a controversial new project that would divert even more water from the river. Specifically, he wondered if water users are using the maximum amount of water they’re already allotted from the river. In December, Gaume filed a public records request to look at ISC reports that show how much water is diverted from and used along the Gila and its tributaries each year. He wanted to see if the on-theground data supports assertions by his former agency that farmers were already using all the water they could—and still needed more. While looking through the bound 2015 report at the ISC’s office in Santa Fe late last year, Gaume read through its printed Excel spreadsheet tables. According to him, those tables contained the information he had been seeking for the past year but had been unable to find—in part because he was having a hard time “making sense of voluminous ISC public records produced as hard copies.” Gaume asked for an unlocked copy of the Excel spreadsheet. With an unlocked copy—instead of a locked copy or a PDF— users can examine the formulas and original data that is used to reach conclusions or achieve results. In its response to his request, the ISC categorized the spreadsheet as a “database.” In order to inspect that database, Gaume was told to sign the agency’s database agreement. That agreement prohibits the requester from making copies or providing the database to anyone without the ISC’s written approval. It also says the database can’t be used for any “political or commercial purpose” without the agency’s approval. The state statute under which Gaume

requested the documents, known as the Inspection of Public Records Act (IPRA), says that the “use of state agency databases for commercial, political or solicitation purposes is restricted.” Breaching the signed agreement carries criminal penalties. Gaume proposed making changes  to the three-page agreement the ISC wanted him to sign. Rather than not providing copies of the ISC’s spreadsheet to anyone, he wrote that he would list the names of those with whom he was sharing it. He also added a note that “advocacy use” of the database was not “political.” According to Gaume, the agency refused his suggestions. The ISC did not respond to a request for comment or information for this story.

For Gaume, it was a familiar scenario. Since 2014, he has been an outspoken critic of his former agency and has opposed the state’s plans to build a diversion on the Gila River. “Twice before the ISC has refused to give me a spreadsheet,” Gaume said last week. Both times, he was trying to see how staff had achieved the results presented to the commission and the public. In both those earlier instances, once he finally had unlocked versions of the spreadsheets, he revealed problems with the state’s plans on the Gila. According to the New Mexico Foundation for Open Government executive di-

ABOVE: The Gila River in southeastern New Mexico. BELOW: Norman Gaume, former director of the Interstate Stream Commission, has good reason not to trust the state’s math.

rector Peter St. Cyr, requiring someone to sign a release saying a database won’t be used for “political purposes” is a violation of the First Amendment. “The fact is that a citizen can redress their government anytime they want,” he said. “Those are fundamental rights we have as citizens in a democracy.” He added that the agreement to not use information for political reasons seems to show public officials don’t want to be scrutinized. Susan Boe, a retired attorney who preceded St. Cyr as executive director of NMFOG, spent much of her tenure at the government transparency group trying to get the ISC to release documents. Last week, she recalled the agency’s resistance to releasing spreadsheets to Gaume in the past. In late 2014, for instance, Gaume had requested an unlocked spreadsheet related to the flows of the Gila River. When the agency wouldn’t release it, NMFOG filed a “mirror request” for the same spreadsheet. Boe said she was invited to the ISC office in Santa Fe, where staff projected information onto a screen but wouldn’t unlock the data. To receive the unlocked spreadsheet, Boe would have to sign the agreement barring her from sharing it. She refused. Eventually, the ISC posted the unlocked spreadsheet on its website. When Gaume and other analysts identified

and corrected errors in it, they learned that the Gila River doesn’t yield as much water as the ISC previously said. They found that New Mexico’s “new” legal water rights granted by Congress in 2004— 14,000 acre feet per year—exceed what the river can actually yield. Boe finds two things about the disclosure agreement particularly troublesome. “In the case of the ISC, we’ve got them in recording and on paper, two years ago, saying, ‘We know you’re going to use this for political purposes,’” she said. “Well, I couldn’t tell you if [Gaume is] a Democrat or a Republican, but if ‘political’ means ‘against the Gila River diversion,’ that’s very problematic.” She also doesn’t think the prohibition on using the data for “political purposes” is constitutional—especially if an agency does not refer to political parties, but is instead identifying someone as having an opinion contrary to the agency’s official line. “The second thing is we don’t believe that an Excel spreadsheet is a ‘database,’” Boe said. Boe noted that the agency didn’t release the unlocked spreadsheet until after ISC staff had presented faulty data to the commission and the public. “By releasing it at a pretty late date, it precluded people who are experts in these flowcharts from looking at them and raising the necessary red flags,” she said.

SFREPORTER.COM

JANUARY 11-17, 2017

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HUNDREDS OF PEOPLE DIE ANONYMOUSLY EACH YEAR, BUT A PUBLIC DATABASE OFFERS A CHANCE TO NAME SOME OF THE DEAD

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SFREPORTER.COM

BY ELIZABETH MILLER o u t d o o r s @ s f r e p o r t e r. c o m

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ifelong rancher Warren Read and his wife, Diane Amatore, were driving their ranch east of Las Vegas to check on their cattle when they spotted about 20 crows circling in the December sky above the property’s western fence line. Read knew the spiraling black wings often signal death below, so they headed toward the site to see if the previous week’s cold weather had cost them a calf. Instead, they found the prone and naked form of a dead man. “There wasn’t anything to it. I go out and check my cattle every day and when we see crows and stuff like that pawing around, we go out and see what it is, and that’s when we found him,” Read says. “That’s all I know to tell you.” Wherever he’d been before, the man’s death—alone and in the cold—highlights the vagaries of naming some of the nation’s dead and matching them up to unsolved missing persons cases that have left families without answers and resolution. In New Mexico, there are an estimated 265 open missing persons cases, according to the National Missing and Unidentified Persons System, known as NamUs. Nationally, that number reaches to more than 12,700.

The National Institute of Justice, run by the US Department of Justice, and the Unidentified Decedents Database launched NamUs in May 2006 to address what was then seen as an epidemic: these many unsolved missing persons cases. The goal was to expand access to information previously restricted to law enforcement agencies, and provide a tool for those most motivated to find a missing person, namely that person’s family, who can then search for clues and reports on unidentifiable remains. “NamUs can be used by essentially anyone, which is kind of the beauty of it,” says Melissa Gregory, regional administrator for NamUs. So far, NamUs has aided in closing 1,500 of the 11,900 closed cases nationwide. The database has three components, two for public use and one just for medical examiners and coroners dealing with individuals who are deceased and identified but no next of kin has been located. The two for public use provide case details for people who are missing and remains that have been found but not identified. Anyone can enter a missing person into the database, though that listing doesn’t go live until someone with NamUs reviews and verifies it. Only medical examiners and coroners can enter listings for people who are unidentified, but that information becomes publicly viewable on the website.


NamUs can be used by essentially anyone, which is kind of the beauty of it. -Melissa Gregory, regional administrator for NamUs

never hit on one another. Most labs only have the capability to handle STRs, and only a handful of labs do mitochondrial profiles. The University of North Texas, where remains from New Mexico are sent for processing, is one of the mitochondrial labs, meaning both samples, if available, will be collected from bodies sent there. Mitochondrial DNA can only come from a maternal relative of a missing person, but at times, depending on how degraded remains have become, may be the only option for collection from the body found. But that means if a son is searching for his father, the two samples won’t hit on one another in the DNA database. “Because of those types of nuances, the biometrics isn’t a be-all end-all,” Gregory says. “On top of that, we don’t have all of these biometrics. … Some [law enforcement] agencies are more receptive than others. There’s agencies that are way busier than others, so they might not get back to us as quickly as possible. … How NamUs can really assist is it might prompt the gathering of biometrics a little more, or it might encourage investigators on either the unidentified or missing side to participate a little more because they have a potential match or a suggestCONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE

NAMUS.GOV

“We’ve got a lot of people who deem themselves to be web sleuths, and so somebody like them or even a family member of a missing person can always go on the unidentified side and run searches based on specific demographics or circumstances or a time frame, location, et cetera, and see if any of those unidentified remains might match up to the missing person,” Gregory says. “We’ll get an email from the individual saying, ‘Hey, I think this is a possible match.’” Following an investigation into the thousands of unidentified deceased people in the country by Reveal, an investigative news website and podcast from the Center for Investigative Reporting, the 47-year-old mystery of “Mountain Jane Doe,” a 21-year-old woman found stabbed to death on a trail in Kentucky, was finally resolved and the woman identified. Reveal also created an app that allows for simultaneously searching records for those found and those missing in hopes of increasing matches. Investigators review suggestions from the public and look for a way to use biometric data—something like DNA or dental records—to make exclusions or identifications. While the main goal would be to bring a missing person home, Gregory says, identification can at least bring families answers and some closure. But there are a lot of hitches to this system. Take the well-known local case

of Robbie Romero. A 7-year-old boy who was last seen walking between his friend’s house and his own home in June 2000 could turn up as a 7-year-old body found 16 years ago, or as a 23-year-old found this year. He’s in the NamUs database. As is Wayland Johle, a 43-year-old Native American man last seen in July in a park in Farmington and thought to perhaps be on his way to the Salt Lake City area. And Edward Hoag, a 55-year-old white male, long homeless by choice but consistent in his calls to his family, who traveled to Oregon looking for work and last called home on June 10 with word he was headed “back south,” which was interpreted as back to Truth or Consequences, and has not been heard from since. And Holly Alcott White, a 49-year-old woman last seen in Taos on May 5, who did not turn up for plans to walk with a friend two days later, and whose car was found near the Rio Grande Gorge Bridge. Those records are generous in their detail around the circumstances of the person’s disappearance. Some are so spare they include little more than the date and town last seen, and only hints at the family’s lingering questions. “It is unknown if her disappearance is a result of foul play or if she is missing voluntarily,” reads the record for Eva Serna-Barela, a 52-year-old Hispanic woman last known to reside in Las Cruces. Scars, tattoos, and skeletal details like a previously broken collarbone can all be listed as part of the identifying information, but basic descriptors can also derail a search of the system. A person’s family may not know about a tattoo, or eye color may not be distinguishable by the time a body is recovered. “Those are just some of the challenges that the general public might face because they might not even realize something like that when they’re running searches for a possible match,” Gregory says. So, forensic efforts often focus on what doesn’t change, like DNA, dental records and fingerprints. DNA from family members of a missing person and from unidentified remains will be entered into a database that constantly checks each of those sides against one another, searching for possible matches. Dental records can also produce identifications without needing DNA—and that’s good, because DNA runs into its own limitations. It can be collected in two forms, short tandem repeats (STRs) and mitochondrial, and if investigators collected one type from the body found and a different type from relatives reporting a missing person, they’ll

A man whose body was found naked on a Northern New Mexico cattle ranch during the winter of 2015 had this tattoo on his right shoulder blade. The NamUs database includes pictures like this that might help identify remains.

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KELLI JOHANSEN

Reade key fob. When they went to move the tarp, they found a human skull. In May, a couple stopped near an arroyo in Lordsburg to let their dog urinate, and it found a body. Local police officers said they had contact with the decedent six months previous, and that he was “waiting for a bike tube he had ordered from Western Auto,” the NamUs report reads. “Once he received the tube, he would be on his way. Officers also stated that decedent was positioned in the same position as when they spoke to him in December.” Photos of his belongings include a couple coins and some folded

NAMUS.GOV

ed match, and we get information to compare between the two.” The NamUs listings for New Mexico include a bevy of cases that offer few, if any, hints to their identities and little hope of being solved. “It’s tough—there’s really no percentage we can really give of the odds,” Gregory says. Landscapers cutting weeds at an abandoned property in Las Cruces in October ran over a shirt, then saw another shirt, some trash and a tarp. Among the belongings found were some thoroughly rusted keys with a still legible Walgreens/Duane

The man wearing this sweatshirt was found dead at the same location near Lordsburg where police had spoken to him months earlier. His identity remains a mystery.

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No one knows how a man found in December of 2015 near this spot outside Las Vegas, New Mexico, got there or where he came from.

dollar bills, a screwdriver, a watch and a shirt embroidered with the name Jason and “The Rockville Valley Fertilizer Company.” As if just to prove the point of how many cases like this exist, SFR’s initial inquiry to the Office of the Medical Examiner about the body on the ranch returned reports for a different set of remains, also located in December 2015. In that case, three arm bones were found by a bridge near Gallup, a few hundred yards from where a partial skeleton that was missing its arms had been found a year before. That skeleton had been identified; whether the arm bones belonged to it had not been confirmed when the report was completed. The NamUs database also includes listings for a skull given to the Salvation Army after a storage locker was cleaned out. Bones a hunter spotted scattered across a ranch near Wagon Mound. Skeletal remains a camper located under a large rock near Aztec. After a trailer fire in Edgewood, a white male in his 70s was discovered charred on his bed with a .38 caliber revolver with one spent casing in the cylinder. That report promises “more investigation when snow clears.” Skeletal remains were found in a shallow grave near Rio Puerco with fibers and pieces of ceramic. The report notes no obvious signs of modern origin. That’s the other snag—sometimes the bones that surface

are from burials that have been dug up or flooded out, and no one is searching for that person. The chance of identification, in those cases, is slim. “If nobody has submitted the DNA or reported a person missing or anything along those lines, yet we have unidentified remains—if nobody in the scientific aspect of missing persons is aware of that missing person—it’s never going to be identified,” Gregory says. “There’s nothing to compare it to.” What people most often seem to misunderstand, other than the intricacies of how DNA collection and comparison works, is the speed at which these things move forward. “People think that things move a lot quicker than is actually possible,” Gregory says. “Resources are, of course, a big issue, just like they are for anybody in the criminal justice arena.” The other presumption, she says, is that if people searching through NamUs don’t see a photo or don’t see that DNA or prints have been collected, they’ll assume law enforcement isn’t working the case. Sometimes, photos just aren’t available, or there’s no known family, so DNA isn’t an option. If the person had no criminal record and never applied for a concealed carry permit, their fingerprints may not be on file. Maybe no one knows who someone’s dentist was, making it impossible to get dental information.


“Those are the types of challenges from the biometrics side of things or for finishing out a case that investigators face,” Gregory says. “I think the public might make assumptions when those things are missing from a case that somebody’s just not working on it or not doing their jobs, when there’s usually a lot more behind why that information might not be there.” Thirteen months after Read found a body on his ranch, that man is still listed on the NamUs database. The law enforcement investigation and subsequent autopsy failed to provide any answers as to who this man had been, where he came from or how he died. Read’s initial call to police at 10:48 am on Dec. 6, 2015, went to Patrolman Gene Pretlow Jr., who was sent by dispatch in Las Vegas to respond to what was then characterized as an unattended death off State Road 104. Half an hour later, he met Read and Amatore at the entrance to their property. They led him to the body, just over a mile north from the gate off the state road, past a red barn. Read told responding officers he’d been nearby three weeks prior and the body wasn’t there. Both he and Amatore said they didn’t have any idea who the man was, nor did they know of anyone missing in the area. The remains had, by then, been severely preyed upon by animals. Pretlow reported he thought the body appeared to be that of a middle-aged male, though decomposition and scavenging by “the numerous birds on scene” and “unknown carnivore(s)” impeded definitive statements. He radioed back to dispatch by 11:30 am that this was an active crime scene, and that he was “unable to determine if foul play was involved.” At 12:41 pm, the investigations bureau asked Agent Ryan Boone to join Pretlow and NMSP Investigations Bureau Agent

In New Mexico, there are an estimated

265

open missing persons cases, according to the National Missing and Unidentified Persons System. Nationally, that number reaches to more than

12,700. Search the database yourself at namus.gov.

JANUARY 28TH • 6PM 877-THUNDER (877.848.6337)

William Mora, who was the case agent for the investigation and by that time was already on scene. (Repeated requests for an interview with the New Mexico State Police officers involved were met only with word from Sgt. Chad Pierce, the State Police spokesman, that the request had been forwarded along. As of press time, months later, approval was still pending.) Boone’s report describes the man’s body lying on a diagonal line, his head toward the southwest, his chest covered with what appeared to be bird feces. Pieces of bone were exposed where organs and skin had been scavenged, and his eyes and other distinguishing features were missing. Among the items collected from the scene were three pieces of white cloth, possibly a t-shirt or underpants, stained with what was suspected to be blood and bird feces. All evidence was sent to a temporary locker in Las Vegas. The Office of the Medical Investigator sent Lloyd Ellis, who pronounced time of death at 6:50 pm, and rolled the man’s body over to reveal a tattoo on his right shoulder blade: a by-then mottled rendition of an iconic Led Zeppelin image, the angel wings and upstretched arms still distinguishable. By 7:45 pm, nine hours after the call went in to state police, the body was removed from the scene by a local mortuary. The man’s remains then traveled to Albuquerque, to the Office of the Medical Investigator at the University of New Mexico. The OMI did not respond to requests for an interview. The medical examiner’s report describes a well-developed male, roughly 5 feet 9 inches tall. After extensive animal depredation removed much of the organ and body tissue, the corpse weighed just 85 pounds. What damage was left to be observed could have been attributed to a number of causes: a heart attack, environmental exposure, drug overdose or lethal injury among them. A toxicology screening for a bevy of drugs detected none.

“Because the examination is limited by postmortem changes, the cause and manner of death are best certified as undetermined,” Dr. Veena Singh, a medical investigator and certified forensic pathologist, wrote in the autopsy report. The 24-page death investigation report describes a thin man with short, blond hair, a blond beard and mustache, eyes a color that could not be determined, and missing teeth. In addition to the Led Zeppelin image, his tattoos included an “Oriental character” on his left upper back, and the letters B and C and a dolphin on his right shoulder. Mora, who attended the autopsy, reported Singh told him that while there wasn’t anything overtly suspicious on the body, by then, that evidence could have been obscured. He made a note of checking for missing persons in the area, and that none matched the individual found. He also called the New Mexico Behavioral Health Institute to ask about recent releases, and was denied that information on the basis of the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act (HIPAA). Adult Protective Services similarly did not have any information on clients missing in the area, nor did they know of anyone who matched the man’s description. The reality is that without someone actively searching for him from the other end, without someone to notice that he’s gone, it’s unlikely those who found and retrieved him will ever know who he was. Perhaps more disconcerting is how unsurprised Read—one rancher, running his cows through his own small corner of the state—was to find a body amid the circling birds and frozen ground at the edge of his property. “That’s not the first time that’s happened,” he says. “Down through the years we’ve had several of them.” He couldn’t say for sure exactly where they’d come from or whether anyone had ever figured out who they were.

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Still Images

IAN SHIVE

THE ENTHUSIAST

Ian Shive’s photographs are meant to make you pause and consider BY ELIZABETH MILLER o u t d o o r s @ s f r e p o r t e r. c o m

F

or two weeks’ worth of days spread over more than decade, landscape photographer Ian Shive braved sandstorms, a flash flood sweeping through his camp and blistering desert heat to pursue an image of White Sands that captured the light and palette of New Mexico loved by many and immortalized in Georgia O’Keeffe’s paintings. “It’s not really a technical achievement—it’s a mental achievement,” he says of a career spent waiting out storms and chasing their perfect conditions for a photograph. The resulting homage of the white dunes catches them in near black-andwhite relief, a skim of sand blowing off

the surface mottling a bluebird horizon. It now hangs in Edition One Gallery, one of 20 images selected for the artist’s first solo exhibition, Wilderness and the National Parks, a chance to show the landscapes he makes just for the love of it. “You always want people to think and care, but I don’t have to go and overtly signal that connection,” he says. “Artistically, you can have a moment and let that be a little more subtle, and that’s what the show is.” Shive’s work often aligns itself with conservation-minded projects or work documenting our nation’s iconic wild places, as done in his latest book, The National Parks: An American Legacy. He hopes these landscapes, devoid of people and almost surreally serene, will slow down the double-tap-and-scroll-on approach. “There’s sort of a permanence, or at least a longer connection, with these places and I think that’s kind of neat in the digital age,” he says. “It’s not really my thing to say, ‘What’s going to get us the most followers?’ but, ‘What’s the thing people are going to connect with the most?’” His career has taken him to all 50 states, capturing images of national parks, wilderness areas and national monuments. Those images illustrate what’s at stake in nonprofit-run calls to action. “It’s to try to educate and inspire people to feel a connection to the place so that when they see these organizations they might support, they better understand what they have to lose,” he says. “I don’t think people care about losing something they might not relate to.” He worked in the last year on the

ABOVE: The right moment at White Sands National Monument. BELOW: Organ Pipe Cactus National Monument, Arizona: a 75-minute time lapse of a giant saguaro and the northern sky.

campaign to expand the protected area around the Grand Canyon, which has been threatened with development (including potential uranium mines, proposed mega-malls and a restaurant at the bottom of the canyon accessed by aerial tram). That hasn’t seen action from the president yet, but Obama did move to expand the Papahanaumokuakea Marine National Monument, a geographic area Shive continues to work on and document. He works from the perspective of increasing understanding of these Pacific islands—which are farther away from Hawaii than Missoula, Montana, is from Los Angeles. Much of that work has centered around Midway Atoll, located within the monument, which was the site of the World War II turning point naval Battle of Midway, which marks is 75th anniversary this coming June. “It’s a remarkably beautiful despite wars and bombs and battles and everything else we throw at it,” Shive says. “It’s an incredible place, which I think is sort of a symbol for the resiliency of our planet in many ways.” That island is also plagued by a problem that started in so many of our homes: plastic trash that works its way to the ocean, where it fills the stomachs of sea-

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birds and washes ashore. While Obama has used his last weeks in office to preserve more land, recently designating the Bears Ears and Gold Butte national monuments to protect lands in Utah and Nevada that hold Native American archaeological and ancestral sites, the incoming administration is, at best, described as a wild card in the conservation category. But despite that transition, Shive’s position remains steady. “The work we do continues to be important, regardless of who’s in office,” he says. “It’s important to educate, inform, analyze, understand the science—I think that doesn’t change. … We all have to wait and see, but based on all indications and all signs of what we do know, it’s just going to further galvanize our mission and the importance of continuing to educate people as much as we possibly can about places and issues.” WILDERNESS AND THE NATIONAL PARKS Through Feb. 3. Edition One Gallery, 1036 Canyon Road, 570-5385 The Enthusiast is a twice-monthly column dedicated to the people in and stories from our outdoor sports community. Send feedback and story ideas to outdoors@sfreporter.com.

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JOIN US AS WE CELEBRATE

SLEEP AWARENESS WEEK CHRISTUS St. Vincent Regional Sleep Center is hosting a series of informational lectures designed to help you get a better night’s sleep. Attend as many as you’d like. Refreshments will be provided. Lectures will be held on the second floor in the St. Vincent Foundation Board Room. SLEEP HYGIENE Presented by David Marler, Clinical Specialist for Philips Respironics Tuesday, January 17 • 12:00 – 1:00 PM CPAP COMPLIANCE AND EQUIPMENT CARE Presented by Jena Richter, Res Med Territory Manager Wednesday, January 18 • 12:00 – 1:00 PM LIVING WITH SLEEP APNEA Presented by Dr. Michael Baten, Medical Director of CHRISTUS St. Vincent Regional Sleep Center Thursday, January 19 • 12:00 – 1:00 PM

SEATING IS LIMITED AND RSVP IS REQUIRED. CALL THE SLEEP CENTER AT (505) 913-5137 TO RESERVE YOUR SPOT.

CHRISTUS ST. VINCENT REGIONAL SLEEP CENTER 440 ST. MICHAEL’S DRIVE, SUITE 150 SANTA FE, NM 87505 XX

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PSYCHIC-THERAPY Begin 2017 by mending the wounds of 2016. Allow yourself to heal and find clarity in spiritual connection at the Center for Inner Truth. The nonprofit spiritual sanctuary and meditation space offers weekly healing clinics to help purge one’s soul of the woes of everyday life. “Our philosophy is, everything is energy,” minister and instructor Michou Landon says. The healing clinic focuses on helping people find their clarity on a psychic level. “We help people remember the fluidity of their energy so they can make changes [to themselves] if they want to,” Landon tells SFR. (Kim Jones)

COURTESY THE ARTIST

KIM JONES

EVENT

Healing Clinic: 5:30 pm Wednesday Jan. 11. Free. Center for Inner Truth, 1807 Second St., Suite 84, 920-4418.

WORD On Jan. 15, writers across the country from all genres and backgrounds will gather at Writers Resist events to read and call for a return to decency, and Santa Fe is set to take part. “After the recent election being so difficult and toxic, it’s important for writers to embrace the ideals of a true and just society,” poet Arthur Sze says. Event co-organizer/writer Dana Levin agrees. “When we enter a period like this, we need to hear from our artists,” she says. The event is free, but attendees can donate to Esperanza Shelter for Battered Families and/or New Energy Economy, an organization focused on future clean and sustainable energy. (Alex De Vore)

CHRISTOPHER FELVER

EVENT

Writers Resist: 3:30 pm Sunday Jan. 15. Free. Counter Culture Café, 930 Baca St., 995-1105.

COURTESY MOBILEDEATHCAMP.NET

MUSIC HAPPY CAMPERS The metal onslaught continues as local promotions champs Kronos Creative present yet another impressive lineup of brutal songsmiths to dispel some of your Monday blues. And while we’ve gotta hand it to local masters of heavy like Final Drive, Cripple and Friend2Foe, the true highlight comes in the form of Toledo, Ohio’s Mobile Deathcamp. Featuring Todd Evans (formerly of GWAR!), the three-piece brings new urgency and insanity to the fast-paced world of speed metal, perfect for fans of pretty much any metal subgenre and the stuff that headbangers’ dreams are made of. Do you like fun? You like this. (ADV) Mobile Deathcamp with Final Drive, Cripple and Friend2Foe: 9 pm Monday Jan. 16. $5. The Underground, 200 W San Francisco St., 819-1957.

ART OPENING

Hard Content Half of local art collective SCUBA branches out Crockett Bodelson has carried a case of drawing paper and a marker with him since he was a child. The case—the red plastic kind his Legos came in—is the artist’s way of being ready in an instant. Inspiration comes to Bodelson in that right-now kind of way, at a bar or over dinner, and he creates drawings on the spot. These creations are featured in his upcoming solo exhibit, My One Trick Pony Never Became Famous. Bodelson is perhaps best known as one half of local art collective SCUBA, which he runs with his life partner Sandra Wang. Thus far, his creative ventures within the collective have leaned toward collaborative installation pieces, which makes his upcoming solo show of drawings a departure and new chapter in several ways. “[Sandra and I] are trying to explore our individualities,” he says. “SCUBA has always taken the limelight from both of us as individuals.” This new exhibit features Bodelson’s drawings on 8-by-11-inch sheets of printer paper. Each displays a graphic image created with Sharpie and matched with a saying that slaps you with its simultaneous familiarity and originality, achieving the difficult task of forcing the view-

er to see something old in a new light. Bodelson says he is sometimes inspired to draw in moments of anger or sadness. “If I can record a document of my emotion, and then later go back and figure out what I was thinking, I feel like that’s all you can do,” he says. “We self-analyze, but we don’t have any hard content; that’s what this is. It’s a hard copy of that moment.” One particular Bodelson drawing conveys his thesis perfectly with two simple figures standing at the edge of a cliff, with the words “what if I pushed him” emblazoned beneath. “We’ve all had this thought, you know?” Bodelson says. “It’s not wrong. It’s the truth. If we don’t write that down, if I can’t go back and look at it, I think I am going to keep having that thought, but now I can go back and be at peace with it—it’s a joke.” (Maria Egolf-Romero) MY ONE TRICK PONY NEVER BECAME FAMOUS OPENING RECEPTION 5-7 pm Friday Jan. 13. Free. Iconik Coffee Roasters, 1600 Lena St., 428-0996

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CASH’D OUT 2/21 • AFRICAN GUITAR SUMMIT 2/28 • ALEJANDRO ESCOVEDO 3/4 MASTERS OF HAWAIIAN MUSIC 3/4 & 5 DONAVON FRANKENREITER 3/7 TURKUAZ 3/11 • DAKHABRAKHA 3/12 BRIAN WILSON “PET SOUNDS” 5/18


COURTESY THE ARTIST

THE CALENDAR

Jill O’Bryan’s “nm.21.15, 2015” is on view at Center for Contemporary Arts as part of Mapping Resonance, a solo exhibit opening Friday, Jan. 13.

Want to see your event here? Email all the relevant information to calendar@sfreporter.com. You can also enter your events yourself online at calendar.sfreporter.com (­submission doesn’t guarantee inclusion). Need help?

Contact Maria: 395-2910

WED/11 BOOKS/LECTURES DHARMA TALK: JOSHIN BRIAN BYRNES AND GENZAN QUENNELL Upaya Zen Center 1404 Cerro Gordo Road, 986-8518 This talk is presented by Zen priests Byrnes and Quennell. 5:25 pm, free

IAIA WINTER READINGS GATHERING: MIGIZI PENSONEAU, JOAN NAVIYUK KANE AND ANDRE DUBUS III Institute of American Indian Arts 83 Avan Nu Po Road, 424-2300 Best-selling authors gather to read from their works during this week-long series at the art college. This evening features readings by Pensoneau, who has worked as a writer for several Hollywood studios, Kane, a Harvard graduate who won the 2009 Whiting Writer's Award, and Dubus III, who has authored six books. Head to the auditorium in the Library and Technology center to catch the lectures by successful literary individuals. 6 pm, free

EVENTS CASINO NIGHT Skylight 139 W San Francisco St., 982-0775 Swing dance and poker come together for this night of games and fun. Eat $2 pizza slices, drink $6 Stoli vodka cocktails, and try not to lose all your money. 8 pm, free

COMMUNITY-STYLE ACUPUNCTURE Southwest Acupuncture College 1622 Galisteo St., 438-8884 Receive community-style acupuncture in a group rather than private setting at the educational center. Call ahead to reserve a time slot. 5:30-8:30 pm, $17 ECHO CHAMBER: PANEL DISCUSSION Center for Contemporary Arts 1050 Old Pecos Trail, 982-1338 The second part of the discussion (which started with a panel featuring six women who participate in the local emerging arts community) happens roundtable-style and invites the community to participate in asking questions about the changing art scene in Santa Fe. 6:30 pm, free HEALING CLINIC Center for Inner Truth 1807 Second St., Ste. 84, 920-4418 This event presents the opportunity for staff and students to help you with healing a specific problem or just bringing your energy into greater harmony (see SFR Picks, page 17). 5:30-8:30 pm, $17

TAPS AND TABLETOPS: GAME NIGHT AT JEAN COCTEAU Jean Cocteau Cinema 418 Montezuma Ave., 466-5528 If you love board games, this event is perfect for you. Enjoy happy hour drink specials, bring your favorite game from home or play one of the ones provided at George RR Martin’s theater. 6 pm, free

MUSIC BILL FORREST Vanessie 427 W Water St., 982-9966 Forrest does pop hits, classics and standards on the piano. 6:30 pm, free CS ROCKSHOW La Fiesta Lounge 100 E San Francisco St., 982-5511 Classic rock tunes from Pete Springer, Don Curry and Ron Crowder. 7:30 pm, free DAVID GEIST Osteria D’Assisi 58 S Federal Place, 986-5858 Geist is a former Broadway composer and he dazzles with his key-rocking skills. 6 pm, free

DJ SATO Boxcar 530 S Guadalupe St., 988-7222 Sato plays a set dominated by house and electronica tunes. 10 pm, free E CLAYTON WEST El Farol 808 Canyon Road, 983-9912 Usually the frontman of The Soul Deacons—a local funk band—West takes a stab at a solo-acoustic soul act. 8:30 pm, free FAMILY OPERA PREVIEW Scottish Rite Center 463 Paseo de Peralta, 982-4414 Take a peek into the plans for the upcoming 2017 opera season. 6 pm, free FORMER FRIENDS OF YOUNG AMERICANS Mine Shaft Tavern 2846 Hwy. 14, Madrid, 473-0743 Gothic Americana is like, the unofficial music of Madrid. 5 pm, free JOAQUIN GALLEGOS El Mesón 213 Washington Ave., 983-6756 Gallegos puts on a passionate flamenco performance solo on guitar. 7 pm, free

THU/12 BOOKS/LECTURES CHILDREN’S STORY HOUR Collected Works Bookstore and Coffeehouse 202 Galisteo St., 988-4226 The weekly event offers an hour of stories and picture book adventures about crayons, princesses, dragons and more aimed to entertain infants, toddlers and younger kiddos up to age 5. The stories change each week are are read by the book store’s staff. 10:45 am, free IAIA WINTER READINGS GATHERING: LIDIA YUKNAVITCH AND KIMBERLY BLAESER Institute of American Indian Arts 83 Avan Nu Po Road, 424-2300 This week-long reading series presents lectures from a slew of best-selling authors. During this evening of readings, hear from Yuknavitch, a renowned published author, and Blaeser, author of three collections of poetry, in the auditorium in the Library and Technology center. 6 pm, free CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE

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Mind Body Spirit 4th ANNUAL

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Exhibitors

Agni Ayurveda All One Peace Vibrational/ Alchemy Healing Arbonne IC Body Cleanse Lymph Release Broshi Jin Shin Jyutsu Center of One Integrative Therapies Christus St. Vincent Holistic Health and Wellness Center DoTerra IC Ecstatic Dance for Santa Fe Endurance Nutrition, LLC For the Love of Lavender Global Relief Resources The Gym at Eldorado Healing Works Heaven and Earth Bodyworks Hypnosis for a Change Kathy Kaitis/Michelle Sutton Life Enhancement Chiropractic/ Inner Energy Transformation Lightning Horse Healing/ Sound Healing Light Vessel Spa/ Love Yourself Cafe Limitless Living Services/ Myriad in Health Luminous Beauty Mesa Vista Wellness New MexiCann Natural Medicine Paths of Light Santa Fe Essential Oils Santa Fe Massage and Sound Healing Scher Center for Well Being Seek Spark Shine SEVA Health and Wellness Clinic Walking Truth Life Coaching Whole Foods Market yellCast

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SFREPORTER.COM

DEMO LINE UP

Mind Body Spirit 10:15–10:45 am YELLCAST

yellCast, a Santa Fe based technology company, makes it easy for anyone to find the best mind, body, and/or spirit professional for them — plus other products and services. yellCast combines the ease of searching online with the concept of buying local and gives consumers the power to efficiently send requests to many listings at once. Businesses and service providers control their own listings on yellCast — and can sign up for FREE during the pilot period in 2017.

11:00–11:45 am

ECSTATIC DANCE CLASS A free-form moving meditation to music that goes through a cycle of rhythms. Music starts soft for grounding, builds with beats and breath, peaks in a let-it-loose release, opens and expands the heart, and finally comes back to center. Healing and fun!

12:00–12:30 pm

LIMITLESS LIVING SERVICES Preview your energy centers. Learn about chakra balancing and chakra clearing. Watch a live demo of Qigong!

12:45–1:45 pm

BROSHI JIN SHIN JYUTSU A hands-on art of harmonizing energy flows in the body. Uzi and Cynthia Broshi will guide you through a relaxing and energizing Jin Shin Jyutsu meditation that balances body, mind, heart and spirit. You’ll learn simple self-care techniques to use at home, or work for optimal health and to brighten your day.


THE CALENDAR S TICKET AT START

NASARIO GARCIA AND SHEBANA COEHLO: NASARIO REMEMBERS THE RIO PUERCO Collected Works Bookstore and Coffeehouse 202 Galisteo St., 988-4226 Garcia, a local author who was born and raised in Northern New Mexico, and Coehlo, a filmmaker, discuss their collabrative film, Nasario Remembers The Rio Puerco, an autobiographical work about Garcia’s childhood growing up in the remote region of the high desert. 6 pm, free

$22!

FREE–BRING THE KIDS! SUN | JAN 15

Want to see your event listed here? We’d love to hear from you Send notices via email to calendar@sfreporter.com. Make sure you include all the pertinent details such as location, time, price and so forth. It helps us out greatly.

EVENTS

LENSIC FAMILY FUN DAY!

FUSATSU Upaya Zen Center 1404 Cerro Gordo Road, 986-8518 Join in the temple for a traditional Buddhist ceremony of atonement, purification, and renewing of the precepts. Rejuvenation—spiritual or otherwise—feels extra good around the start of a new year. 5:25 pm, free

2 pm Kids Activities & Prizes in The Lensic Lobby 3 pm Free Concert by Folk-Rock Favorites

Trout Fishing in America

FILM THE MILAGRO BEANFIELD WAR La Tienda Performance Space 7 Caliente Road, Eldorado, 465-9214 Reel New Mexico ends its two-and-a-half-year run of monthly screenings with one of the most iconic films ever made in New Mexico. 7 pm, $5

COURTESY FORM & CONCEPT

Free event but tickets are required

GEEKS WHO DRINK Second Street Brewery (Railyard) 1607 Paseo de Peralta, 989-3278 Bring your brightest friends with you and build the strongest team to play against others for trivia-knowledge victory. The subject changes each time, so you may have better luck some weeks. 8 pm, free

SANTA FE WOMEN OF GREEN NETWORK MEETING Vanessie 427 W Water St., 982-9966 The first official meeting of this women’s group sets the stage to realize a vision of ecological sustainability and social justice. The meeting is led by Merle Lefkoff, who holds a PhD in political science and is a frequent speaker and mediator. She also has experience in leadership training in conflict zones around the world and served in the Carter administration. 6 pm, free

SAT | JAN 21 • 11 AM LIVE & 6 PM ENCORE

ROMÉO ET JULIETTE

With Diana Damrau and Vittorio Grigolo, broadcast from New York.

THU | FEB 2 • 7 PM

Series generously sponsored by

AMADEUS

Adam Gillen is Mozart and Lucian Msamati is Antonio Salieri in Peter Shaffer’s tale of music and power, broadcast from London. SERVICE CHARGES APPLY AT ALL POINTS OF PURCHASE

Lensic.org | 505-988-1234 THE LENSIC IS A NONPROFIT ORGANIZATION

Brett Kern’s “Lg. Blue TRex” is on view at form & concept along with other pieces from his series of balloon-like sculptures. CONTINUED ON PAGE 24

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SFREPORTER.COM


MUSIC

And the Winner Is…

WHERE TO GO FOR NOMINATIONS: »» Visit newmexicomusic.org »» Click “Showcase” at the top right »» Scroll down to “Platinum Music Awards”

New Mexico Platinum Music Awards nominations are now open

P

eople always seem to talk about the plethora of tremendous musicians operating in the state, and the New Mexico Music Commission is ready and raring to celebrate some of these fine creators with the upcoming Platinum Music Awards at the Lensic Performing Arts Center in July. “We’re basically going to recognize lifetime achievement; the elder statesmen of New Mexico music,” president of the New Mexico Music Commission Foundation and chairman of the awards, David Schwartz, tells SFR. The New Mexico Music Commission was technically founded in 2005 but wasn’t a part of state statute until 2009. It operates as part of the Department of Cultural Affairs, and its overall mission is to promote and preserve music created in the state and to develop opportunities for appreciation and education throughout New Mexico. The Platinum Music Awards is the evolution of the commission’s Platinum Achievement Awards, established in 2013, which also recognized musicians, though its current iteration is a bit more involved and fleshed out. “It’s a lot like the Kennedy Center Honors,” Schwartz says, referencing the awards ceremony that recognizes the lasting legacy a musician has formed in the industry. If it sounds a lot like the similarly named and arguably more well-known New Mexico Music Awards, that’s

because it is—though the process is different and it doesn’t cost anything for submissions or nominees. The period for nominations is open through Feb. 15, and any individuals, businesses or organizations may nominate deserving musicians or industry pros. “They don’t have to have been born here, but they’d need a substantial part of their career to have taken place in New Mexico,” Schwartz says. “What we’re trying to do is identify musical art in the state at the highest level, and we want to see deserving people rise to the top.” This also means that nominations are not limited to just players and/or writers themselves. “Some of the nominees may not be musicians per se,” Schwartz points out. “They could be someone who is influential to the music of New Mexico, like an opera director or a professor at UNM. … It’s really open to anyone who has had an influence, and it’s genre-neutral.” Of course, there’s more to the nominations process than simply typing in a name, and the online form includes provisions for the number of years nominees have lived in the state, the number of years they’ve operated as musicians here and more. Once nominations are closed in February, an anonymous jury of industry experts appointed by the commission will sift through the offerings and name five recipients. Then, come July 25, the Music Commission Foundation (an offshoot of the commission itself ) plans to produce the celebratory event at the Lensic, with plans to benefit the Solace Crisis Treatment Center, a local nonprof-

The award will probably look better than this.

ANSON STEVENS-BOLLEN

BY ALEX DE VORE a l e x @ s f r e p o r t e r. c o m

it that aids and advocates for trauma survivors, and the New Mexico Music Commission. Schwartz says the commission’s cut will go toward music-based educational programs spearheaded by the commission such as Art to Art, a series that invites musicians and visual artists to schools to discuss their artistic processes. “In our strategic plan, there are a number of desirable programs that range from scholarships to bringing music into schools,” Schwartz says. “This could fund many great educational opportunities across the state … We’ve got a long list of plans.” The New Mexico Music Commission is also on the lookout for volunteers to help them continue the good fight. “We’re looking for people who want to get involved at all different levels,” Schwartz adds. “We want people who like the idea of what we’re doing and want to find a place in it. … We’re building.” In the meantime, we’d like to see some unexpected musicians get nominated. Maybe a hip-hop MC or a metal shredder? Either way, this means young people will probably need to get involved and, according to Schwartz, all genres will be considered. “If we end up with something that’s very esoteric, if that’s what the people want to see, then it’s worthy,” he says. “We’re attempting to be a broad-based as we can be.”

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JANUARY 11-17, 2017

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THE CALENDAR

ROOMFUL OF TEETH

STERLIN HARJO FILM SCREENING Institute of American Indian Arts 83 Avan Nu Po Road, 424-2300 See a screening of a film by Harjo, a Seminole director, as part of the Winter Reading Series, which features presentations by a few authors earlier in the evening. 7:15 pm, free

MUSIC

Saturday, January 21, 2017 | 7:30 pm St. Francis Auditorium Hear the future of music at this performance by the Grammy-winning “vocal band!” Tickets start at $30 PerformanceSantaFe.org | 505 984 8759 TicketsSantaFe.org | 505 988 1234

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BILL FORREST Vanessie 427 W Water St., 982-9966 Forrest does pop, classical and standards on a swanky lounge piano. 6:30 pm, free BRANDEN & JAMES Vanessie 427 W Water St., 982-9966 This duo performs everything from Bach to Bieber with powerful vocals and a cello, so there is a little something for everyone in their diverse set. 7 pm, free CS ROCKSHOW La Fiesta Lounge 100 E San Francisco St., 982-5511 Classic rock dancin' music from Pete Springer, Don Curry and Ron Crowder. 7:30 pm, free HALF BROKE HORSES Tiny's Restaurant & Lounge 1005 S St. Francis Drive, 983-9817 A danceable blend of honkytonk and Americana music at the ultimate old-timey Santa Fe venue. 7 pm, free LATIN NIGHT WITH DJ DANY Skylight 139 W San Francisco St., 982-0775 Latin-influenced dance tunes, including bachata, cumbia and salsa songs, may get you up and moving to the electronica beats. 9 pm, $7 LILLY PAD LOUNGE WITH DJ REBEL FROG Skylight 139 W San Francisco St., 982-0775 Keep dancing as Rebel Frog mixes a set of old school funk and hip-hop hits. 10 pm, $7 PAT MALONE TerraCotta Wine Bistro 304 Johnson St., 989-1166 Malone does his skilled solo guitar set. 7 pm, free RANDY RANE Omira Bar & Grill 1005 St. Francis Drive, 780-5483 Brazilian and Spanish guitar stylings performed in the Brazillian-style grill. 6 pm, free REGGAE NIGHT Boxcar 530 S Guadalupe St., 988-7222 Jam to dancehall beats.  10 pm, free

ENTER EVENTS AT CALENDAR.SFREPORTER.COM/CAL

THE YALE WHIFFENPOOFS Immaculate Heart of Mary Retreat Center 50 Mt. Carmel Road, 988-1975 One of America's oldest male a cappella groups, this collegiate ensemble performs their impressive set live. 7:30 pm, $20-$30

FRI/13 ART OPENINGS CROCKETT BODLESON: MY ONE TRICK PONY NEVER BECAME FAMOUS Iconik Coffee Roasters 1600 Lena St., 428-0996 Curate Santa Fe presents this solo exhibit of Bodelson’s drawings. The artist, who is the founder of local art collective SCUBA, creates intriguing, yet simple imagery, which he presents in a few ways including on posters and patches. Through March 13 (see SFR Picks, page 17). 5 pm, free FEATHER REDFOX: SHAMANIC JOURNEYS Capitol Coffee 507 Old Santa Fe Trail, 983-0646 Redfox presents paintings in an iridescent color palette with imagery she channels to depict alternate realitites and tell stories that incorporate teachings. 4 pm, free JILL O'BRYAN: MAPPING RESONANCE Muñoz Waxman Gallery 1050 Old Pecos Trail, 982-1338 O’Bryan turns breath into creative material with graphite and ink. She records not only her own breathing, but also captures the exhalation or essence of rocks in a series of large-scale rubbings, sculptural plater vessels and residue paintings telling a story of place and connection. Through March 12.  6 pm, free MADELIN COIT: INTERFACE Muñoz Waxman Gallery 1050 Old Pecos Trail, 982-1338 Coit debuts her recycled materials sculpture in the Spector Ripps Project Space in this solo exhibition that opens with a joint reception for Coit and Jill O’Bryan. Coit presents her large-scale sculpture, which is made entirely of past issues of THE Magazine.  5 pm, free

BOOKS/LECTURES BILINGUAL STORYTIME Santa Fe Children's Museum 1050 Old Pecos Trail, 989-8359 Delray Gonzalez leads an engaging morning of stories and activities in both Spanish and English. 10:30 am, $5-$7

IAIA WINTER READINGS GATHERING: ROSS GAY AND TONI JENSEN Institute of American Indian Arts 83 Avan Nu Po Road, 424-2300 This evening features readings by Gay, who has written three books, and Jensen, who wrote From the Hilltop. The readings take place in the auditorium in the Library and Technology center. 6 pm, free

DANCE EMIARTE FLAMENCO Skylight 139 W San Francisco St., 982-0775 Vincent Griego and La Emi present a flamenco performance with guest artists Ricardo Anglada, Mario Febres, Kayla Lyall, Nevarez Encinas and EmiArte Flamenco academy students. 8 pm, $15-$30

MUSIC BIG K AND BLUE TRAIN Palace Saloon 142 W Palace Ave., 428-0690 Big K and Blue Train, an Albuquerque-based group, performs R&B with a touch of blues. 10 pm, free BILL FORREST Vanessie 427 W Water St., 982-9966 Forrest opens the evening and makes wonderful music on the piano. 6:30 pm, free BRANDEN & JAMES Vanessie 427 W Water St., 982-9966 This duo performs everything from Bach to Bieber with powerful vocals and a cello. 8 pm, free THE BUS TAPES Second Street Brewery (Original) 1814 Second St., 982-3030 Folk rock and blues led by powerful female vocals. Girl power.  6 pm, free DAVID GEIST Pranzo Italian Grill 540 Montezuma Ave., 984-2645 Geist had an illustrious 20-year career on Broadway and he brings his big-time talent to his set.  6 pm, $2 FRIDAY THE 13TH METAL MASSACRE The Underground 200 W San Francisco St., 819-1597 Live metal performances by Savage Wisdom, Illumina AD, Fields of Elysium and Carrion Kind.  9 pm, $5 THE GRUVE La Fiesta Lounge 100 E San Francisco St., 982-5511 Longtime friends perform classic soul tunes and R&B bests. 8 pm, free CONTINUED ON PAGE 26

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A&C

CROSSROADS On the eve of the 18th Offroad Productions show, Michael Freed looks back BY J O R DA N E D DY @jordaneddyart

M

ichael Freed vividly remembers the first time the room hit capacity at Offroad Productions. It was the opening reception of I Want to Believe (Maybe), a group exhibition curated by local artist Erika Wanenmacher in January 2015. “I looked around at one point, and was just like, ‘Oh my god, this is packed,’” Freed says. He ended up recruiting the security guard who was checking IDs at the door to be the de facto bouncer. “It was crazy. When do you see a line to get into a gallery?” he says. At Offroad, it’s happened twice: There was a queue all the way to the street at Tim Jag’s Printed Matter show last January. Once a season for the past five years, Freed has transformed his studio space off Siler Road into one of Santa Fe’s most popular—and fleeting—gallery spaces. He curates a show each July, and engages local creatives to spearhead exhibitions in the winter, spring and fall. Each display is up for a week, hence the notoriously jam-packed openings. On the eve of Offroad’s 18th show, Desperately Seeking Other, Freed took some time to reflect on the formation and ongoing mission of the artistic experiment. Freed is originally from Oklahoma, where he spent summers working the family farm. “I always knew that I wasn’t the same type of man as my dad or my grandfather, or most of the men that I saw,” he says. Freed came out while attending the University of Oklahoma. After getting his BFA, he took a job as the

director of an arts nonprofit for five years before following a boyfriend to San Francisco. “It was not a smart idea,” he says. “I’d known him for three or four months or something.” The romance quickly flared out, but Freed stayed in the Bay Area to take care of a friend who was dying from AIDS. He’d lost many friends back in Oklahoma City, at the height of the epidemic. “I was going to a funeral every week or two, sometimes,” Freed says. “Having survived the AIDS epidemic and watched so many people die, it’s like having gone to a war.” Freed’s hospice watch in California ended on a joyful note when his friend started taking human growth hormone and recovered. Several of his pals had moved to Santa Fe, so he headed to the Southwest. “Howling coyotes everywhere, and all the trim was painted bright turquoise,” Freed says. That’s how he remembers Santa Fe in 1995, the year he arrived. He dove straight into the art scene, working part-time at two galleries before taking a full-time position at Turner Carroll Gallery on Canyon Road. At the time, Santa Fe seemed on track to becoming a contemporary art mecca. “There were galleries that wanted to try something new, edgy and different,” he says. “That worked really well for a lot of people through the ’90s and into the beginning of the aughts.” In the economic turmoil of the George W Bush era, however, Freed saw Santa Fe’s sense of daring dry up. “A lot of galleries don’t take those chances anymore,” he says. “When they hang a show, they know how much they need to sell to keep the doors open, and they select work accordingly.” Freed left Turner Carroll in 2005 to focus on his own artistic practice, and his career soared. In 2008, he debuted an exhibition of monumental drawings at the Center for Contemporary Arts entitled A Penis Show: Razing the Metaphor. The works were depictions of his genitals, paired with phallic objects such as a pistol, a banana and a cigar. Freed says his pointed meditation on modern masculinity got somewhat

A mere smattering of upcoming work at Offroad Productions: “Fame,” hand-cut analog collage by Yon Hudson. BELOW: Video still from Mo Donahue’s “Almost Me.”

mixed reviews from his friends, but it launched a long-term artistic journey. In 2011, he bought a building on Trades West Road and worked for three months to transform it into three separate spaces. A year later, on a whim, he mounted a group exhibition called Man Made that challenged cultural conceptions of male identity. The show was a hit. “The kind of work these guys did wasn’t necessarily showing on Canyon Road anymore. There was a type of venue that was missing,” he says. “I realized that I could afford to do this four times a year.” He called the space Offroad Productions, a takeoff on the term “off the beaten path.” Since then, over a dozen curators and hundreds of artists have contributed to the project. Local art legends such as Kathryn Davis, Cyndi Conn and Linda Durham have put together shows at Offroad. Well-known names appear alongside emerging artists, and local creatives share the bill with others from across the country. Freed was particularly proud of Interstated: Santa Fe/Phoenix, an exhibition of artists from both cities that he co-curated with Arizona gallerist John Reyes. “It was really rewarding to

see how, even with the big garage doors, it looked like a solid gallery,” Freed says. Next up is Desperately Seeking Other, a group show curated by local creator/DJ Yon Hudson inspired by his most recent body of work that explores the concept of the “other” in modern society. The show features 13 artists including Hudson, Harmony Hammond and Freed himself. Freed often shies away from participating in Offroad exhibitions, and only expects to break even on most shows. He offers a 60 percent cut of sales to featured artists, with the rest split between the curator and the gallery itself. That’s usually just enough to cover the costs of a bar and required security, but Freed isn’t in it for the money. “It’s about showing work that doesn’t appear elsewhere,” he says. “It’s about the quality of the art, and giving the space to make it happen.” He’s not stopping anytime soon, either: Offroad’s current schedule stretches through 2018. DESPERATELY SEEKING OTHER OPENING RECEPTION: 6 pm Saturday Jan. 14. Free. Offroad Productions, 2891-B Trades West Road, 670-9276

SFREPORTER.COM

JANUARY 11-17, 2017

25


Get savager at: SFReporter.com/savage

am really out of it and thought I’d ask you. -Confused Over Under-Garment-Area Region

My partner and I have been playing with male chastity devices. We’ve been considering going to a strip club while his cock is caged up and getting him lap dances. Is there some etiquette for this with the dancers? Do we let the dancer know before she is on his lap? Or do we not mention it? Is it rude to get a dancer involved at all? I’ve not yet found an etiquette guide for this situation. -Letting Our Cage Kink Show “I think I speak for most dancers when I say I don’t care what’s going on underneath a customer’s pants,” said Bobbi Hill, a lap dancer based in Portland, Oregon, strip club capital of the United States. “Grazing over a stiff object in the crotch region is not an uncommon experience when giving a lap dance, and depending on the texture of the device, I might not even give it a second thought.” While your concern for lap dancers is commendable, LOCKS, the person most at risk of injury is your partner. Nothing is more fun than inducing an erection in someone who’s locked in a male chastity device—a necessarily painful and punishing erection—but the devices are unyielding (ideally) and the cock flesh is weak (even when hard). A dancer who grinds down on your partner’s crotch is likelier to hurt him. That said, lap dancers don’t like surprises. If a dancer grinds down on your partner’s crotch and feels something hard, clunky, and un-cock-like in his pants, “she might go into air-dance mode,” said Hill, “which is essentially a lap dance where you make as little contact with the customer’s crotch as possible. Of course, you can never go wrong investing in a stripper’s patience and well-being—try handing her a Benjamin as you explain your situation.” Just in case you’re not interested in dancers who are hers, LOCKS, I ran your question by a male stripper. “I don’t think most dancers would mind if a customer was wearing a male chastity device as long as it caused no physical harm or discomfort,” said Aaron, a dancer at Stag PDX, Portland’s new male strip club. “If all parts of the device are safely tucked away between your legs while you receive the lap dance, there should be little to worry about. But if the device has parts that protrude—and could possibly harm an overzealous dancer while they grind up on you—you may want to be more cautious. It also never hurts to ask the dancers what they’re comfortable with.” Strippers! They’re just like us! You can ask them questions! They will answer them! They respond positively when you take their comfort into account! They also appreciate large tips! And good personal hygiene! And clients who aren’t completely shitfaced! I recently left my husband and moved from the suburbs to my own apartment in Philadelphia. It’s very liberating, and I have been starting to venture out for some great sex, something missing in my 25-year marriage. Two weeks ago, I decided to be adventurous and went to a clubby bar around the block and brought a guy back to my place. The guy was in his 40s, lean, and muscular. The sex was great! He was very oral, unlike my vanilla husband. When we got this stud’s clothes off, I saw that his pubic area was completely shaved, basically from his navel down. I don’t know if I looked as shocked as I felt. While he was humping away—I have never had anyone with such stamina and power—he told me to feel his anus, and that area, too, was shaved. I didn’t want to ask him why he shaves, but I am wondering if this is common these days? Is there some “meaning” to it? And is anal touching now customary? I

26

JANUARY 11-17, 2017

While I love your signoff, COUGAR, sleeping with a lean, muscular guy in his 40s who likes to have his anus touched doesn’t earn a woman her cougar wings or whiskers or whatever. You’re going to have to fuck a few boys in their 20s if you want to be a cougar. In regards to your recent hookup, COUGAR, the removal of pubic hair has definitely become more common over the last 25 years. Studies have found that upwards of 60 percent of women regularly remove most or all of their pubic hair; there aren’t studies about men removing their pubic hair, but many men do. Shaving or waxing doesn’t necessarily mean anything in particular, other than a preference for hairless junk. And the younger people are— chronologically or in spirit—the likelier they are to remove their pubes. And while I wouldn’t describe anal touching as customary, there are definitely more straight men around today who aren’t afraid of their own assholes. I met my boyfriend at a gay night in a club. I thought he was gay because he was dancing shirtless. But he loves going down on me, the PIV sex is the best I’ve ever had, and I believe him when he says he’s straight. He’s got an above-average cock, but he likes me to tell him it’s small and compare him unfavorably to men I’ve been with who had bigger cocks. I’ve had bigger and I don’t mind degrading him like this. (It’s a nice change of pace to be with a guy who doesn’t want me to pretend like I’ve never seen another cock before!) So that’s not the reason I’m writing. This is: He likes to be called a “faggot” when he’s fucking me. It makes him incredibly horny, but I feel guilty for using an antigay hate term while we’re having straight sex. Is this okay? Is it fucked up? Should we stop? -Female Anxiously Grants Slurs It’s not okay, it’s completely fucked up, and you don’t have to stop. And if you feel the least bit guilty about calling your boyfriend a fag when he’s fucking you, FAGS, an hour on gay Tumblr will make you feel better about that. The number of gay men out there who think it’s hot to call their own assholes or other men’s assholes “cunts” will both surprise you and make you feel less conflicted about calling your straight boyfriend a fag. I recently stopped reading your advice column due to its current focus on homosexuality. Just letting you know the heterosexuals are still alive and doing well. -Bored Reading Endlessly Experimental Deviants Exploring Rectums Over the last year, BREEDER, I published 140 questions from readers who identified themselves as gay, lesbian, bi, trans, or straight. Twenty-six of those questions were from gay men (18 percent), 16 were from bisexuals (12 percent), 6 were from trans people (4 percent), 2 were from lesbians (1 percent), and 90 were from straight people (65 percent). Almost all of the bisexuals whose letters I responded to were in opposite-sex, aka “straight,” relationships, and the same goes for half the letters from trans people. (Lots of trans people are straight identified and in opposite-sex, aka “straight,” relationships.) So nearly 80 percent of the questions I answered last year focused on straight people and/or straight sex. If a sex-advice column that’s about straight people and/or straight sex 65 to 80 percent of the time is too gay for you, BREEDER, then my “current focus” isn’t the problem—your homophobia is. I would say that I’m sorry to lose you as a reader, BREEDER, but I’m not.

SFREPORTER.COM

Listen to the Savage Lovecast every week at savagelovecast.com mail@savagelove.net @fakedansavage on Twitter

KINETIC FRIDAYS WITH DJ POETICS Skylight 139 W San Francisco St., 982-0775 With intentions to get you up and moving, DJ Poetics plays an electronica set. 9 pm, $7 THE MAJOR DUDES El Farol 808 Canyon Road, 983-9912 Rock ’n’ roll covers, blues and R&B tunes. 8:30 pm, free NEW WORKS BY NEW COMPOSERS James A Little Theatre 1060 Cerrillos Road, 476-6429 The Santa Fe Community Orchestra presents a completely new repertoire of compositions created by musicians in New Mexico. 7 pm, free ORNETC. Second Street Brewery (Railyard) 1607 Paseo de Peralta, 989-3278 This quartet does jazz.  7 pm, free RANDY RANE Omira Bar & Grill 1005 St. Francis Drive, 780-5483 Brazilian and Spanish guitar in the Brazilian-style grill. 6 pm, free SEAN HEALEN BAND Cowgirl 319 S Guadalupe St., 982-2565 Rock 'n' roll and country.  8:30 pm, free WILLIAM STEWART Mine Shaft Tavern 2846 Hwy. 14, Madrid, 473-0743 Stewart puts on an acoustic country performance. 5 pm, free

THEATER THE MIKADO Scottish Rite Center 463 Paseo de Peralta, 982-4414 Performance Santa Fe presents their annual free family opera. The Gilbert and Sullivan classic happens in a fictitious Japanese town, and is full of topsy-turvy twists that provide laughs and entertainment for the whole family. Call ahead to reserve your seats. 7 pm, free

BOOKS/LECTURES COLLECTED WORKS YOUNG ADULT SERIES: BARBARA MURPHY AND DONALD WILLERTON Collected Works Bookstore and Coffeehouse 202 Galisteo St., 988-4226 This new series at the downtown bookstore aims to engage young adult readers with its first installment presenting two authors who read from their respective works. Murphy reads from Miguel Lost and Found at the Museum and Willerton reads from Ghosts of San Juan. 6 pm, free IAIA WINTER READINGS GATHERING: SHERWIN BITSUI AND PAM HOUSTON Institute of American Indian Arts 83 Avan Nu Po Road, 424-2300 In this final evening of readings that complete the weeklong series of presentations by best-selling authors, hear from Bitsui, a Diné author, and Houston, who has written two short story collections and a novel. The readings take place in the auditorium in the Library and Technology center on the art school’s campus.  6 pm, free

DANCE FLAMENCO DINNER SHOW El Farol 808 Canyon Road, 983-9912 A classic: dinner and dancing. But you aren’t the one who has to dance this evening. The flamenco professionals have you covered. 6:30 pm, $25

EVENTS

ART OPENINGS

MIND BODY SPIRIT EXPO 2017 Genoveva Chavez Community Center 3221 W Rodeo Road, 955-4000 Join SFR and bring the whole family to enjoy the finest holistic offerings in Santa Fe. Live demos, vendor booths, performers and more come together for this expo of mental and physical health. Sponsored in part by Whole Foods Market and Light Vessel Santa Fe. The start of a new year is always a great time to pick up some healthy habits. 10 am-2 pm, free

DESPERATELY SEEKING OTHER Offroad Productions 2891-B Trades West Road, 670-9276 This group exhibit, featuring works by Seiya Bowen, Mo Donahue, Michael Frees and more, is a visual exploration of identity and self, curated by Yon Hudson (see A&C, page 25). 6 pm, free

'MERICAN SLANG Boxcar 530 S Guadalupe St., 988-7222 This funk band has that unctuous groove-thing going on and performs at a pace that is great for a dancing-date at the venue that never charges cover. 10 pm, free

SAT/14

MUSIC

AN EVENING WITH THE SONGWRITERS: JAMES McMURTRY, DAVE ALVIN AND JIMMIE DALE GILMORE Lensic Performing Arts Center 211 W San Francisco St., 988-1234 Three musicians kick off the new year with live performances. Alvin is a Grammywinning singer and songwriter. McMurtry is a writer and guitarist, and Gilmore is part of the legendary group Flatlanders. 7:30 pm, $34-$52 BILL FORREST Vanessie 427 W Water St., 982-9966 Forrest displays his talent for playing classics on the piano. 6:30 pm, free BRANDEN & JAMES Vanessie 427 W Water St., 982-9966 This duo performs everything from Bach to Bieber with powerful vocals and a cello.  8 pm, free THE BUS TAPES Cowgirl 319 S Guadalupe St., 982-2565 Folk rock and blues led by powerful female vocals. Girl power.  8:30 pm, free THE GRUVE La Fiesta Lounge 100 E San Francisco St., 982-5511 Longtime friends Ron Crowder and Steve O’Neill perform classic soul tunes and R&B hits in the swanky hotel’s lounge. 8 pm, free DANCE MONSTER: TENSNAKE, DJ DIRT GIRL, DJ ELDON Meow Wolf 1352 Rufina Circle, 395-6369 It's a monster-themed dance party! Tensnake comes from Germany to help the freak fest get its groove on with DJ Dirt Girl and DJ Eldon. Wear your scariest, ghouliest costumes and bust your most thrilling moves. 9 pm, $19 DAVID GEIST Pranzo Italian Grill 540 Montezuma Ave., 984-2645 Geist brings his big-time talent to a small venue and performs a set of Broadway standards with total ease.  6 pm, $2 THE GRUVE La Fiesta Lounge 100 E San Francisco St., 982-5511 Longtime friends Ron Crowder and Steve O’Neill perform classic soul tunes. 8 pm, free HALF BROKE HORSES Cowgirl 319 S Guadalupe St., 982-2565 Honky-tonk and Americana done right by this local group.  1 pm, free


ENTER EVENTS AT CALENDAR.SFREPORTER.COM/CAL

THE MELODY IN THE METER: POETRY IN SONG Immaculate Heart of Mary Chapel 50 Mt. Carmel Road, 988-1975 The Zia Singers perform contemporary choral music written to classical and contemporary poetry from the likes of Walt Whitman, Emily Dickinson, Jane Austen and more. 3 pm, $20 PAT MALONE Inn and Spa at the Loretto 211 Old Santa Fe Trail, 984-7997 Malone does his solo jazz guitar thing. 7 pm, free RANDY RANE Omira Bar & Grill 1005 St. Francis Drive, 780-5483 Brazilian and Spanish guitar. 6 pm, free SO SOPHISTICATED WITH DJ 12 TRIBE Skylight 139 W San Francisco St., 982-0775 So-phisticated, they play the latest hip hop and R&B hits. 9 pm, $7 STELLA Second Street Brewery (Railyard) 1607 Paseo de Peralta, 989-3278 Feel the funk with Stella as they perform live. Enjoy a local brew while you’re at it. 6 pm, free THE STICKY Skylight 139 W San Francisco St., 982-0775 Oh man, it’s so funky. 9 pm, $7 SWING SOLEIL Second Street Brewery (Original) 1814 Second St., 982-3030 Gypsy folk and swing jazz.  6 pm, free TRASH DISCO WITH DJ OONA Skylight 139 W San Francisco St., 982-0775 Head to the Skylab to enjoy an electronica/house music set by DJ Oona. 9 pm, $7 VAIVÉN El Mesón 213 Washington Ave., 983-6756 A mix of jazz and flamenco. 7 pm, free

THEATER THE MIKADO Scottish Rite Center 463 Paseo de Peralta, 982-4414 Performance Santa Fe presents their annual free family opera in the pink venue. This year, the story happens in a fictitious Japanese town, and is full of topsy-turvy twists that will keep the whole family laughing and feeling entertained. Call ahead to reserve your seats for this classic operetta by Gilbert and Sullivan. 7 pm, free

THE CALENDAR

SUN/15 BOOKS/LECTURES JOURNEYSANTAFE: PETER WIRTH Collected Works Bookstore and Coffeehouse 202 Galisteo St., 988-4226 Wirth is a United States senator and he speaks as part of the weekly lecture series. He talks about the future and what changes to expect in his lecture titled "Changes After The Election and What Lies Ahead for the 2017 Legislative Session." 11 am, free

MELINDA CONNOR: ENERGY HEALING Southwestern College 3960 San Felipe Road, 471-5756 Connor speaks about different forms of energy healing and the imact water has on the body. 1 pm, free

EVENTS FAMILY FUN DAY Lensic Performing Arts Center 211 W San Francisco St., 988-1234 Featuring games, prizes and a special concert by bluegrass favorites Trout Fishing in America. 2-4:30 pm, free

READINGS & CONVERSATIONS

brings to Santa Fe a wide range of writers from the literary world of fiction, nonfiction, and poetry to read from and discuss their work.

with Dana Levin

CHINA MIÉVILLE with

JORD/ANA ROSENBERG

WEDNESDAY 18 JANUARY AT 7PM LENSIC PERFORMING ARTS CENTER

JERRY NAUNHEIM

We think the Writers Resist event included in our weekly culture picks (see SFR Picks, page 17) sounds pretty excellent, so we tracked down co-organizer/poet Dana Levin to get a liite more information. Levin most recently released Banana Palace, a collection of poems that’s receiving rave reviews from such esteemed publications as the Boston Review and The Washington Post. Catch Levin’s brief reading this Sunday at Writers Resist, alongside writers like Arthur Sze, Valerie Martinez, Joan Logghe and more. (Alex De Vore) How did you get involved with Writers Resist? I was doing a reading at Florida State University, and Erin Belieu, who is a professor there and also a press mate of mine at Copper Canyon Press, asked if I wanted to get invovled. It was really her brainchild. The whole idea is to create these events all over the country to raise money in support of nonprofits that serve things we thought would be imperiled with the current administration, like women’s health, immigration or civil liberties in general. How did you select the participating authors? We wanted to have as many voices as possible. And instead of having four, five, six ‘stars,’ we wanted as many writers from diverse styles as we could. We really wanted to cast a wide net, because as much as we wish it were an endless event, it couldn’t be. What’s going on with you outsdie of the event? I’m in a time of change. After living in Santa Fe 19 years, I’ll be moving to St. Louis permanently. I’m running around reading for my book. I guess the most high-profile thing is that I’ll take part in this Library of Congress thing called Life of a Poet, where I’ll be interviewed by The Washington Post’s Book World editor Ron Charles and talk about my process. I’m sort of trying to intuit what my next writing project might be.

China Miéville is a British American writer whose fiction has been compared to the work of Franz Kafka, Ursula Le Guin, and Philip K. Dick. He is a three-time winner of the prestigious Arthur C. Clarke Award for The City & The City, Perdido Street Station, and Iron Council. He has won the World Fantasy Award and twice won the British Fantasy Award. National Public Radio describes him thus: “China Miéville is a magician. He’s the Keyser Soze of the New Weird because you never know who he’s going to be. He can do noir, do steampunk, do aliens and magic caterpillars. He’s a shape-shifter.” Miéville earned a master’s degree and a PhD in international relations from the London School of Economics and held a Frank Knox Fellowship at Harvard University. His academic writings have appeared widely, and he has published numerous works of nonfiction, including Between Equal Rights: A Marxist Theory of International Law (2006), a book version of his PhD thesis. In 2015 he released the short story collection Three Moments of an Explosion, and the following year he published the novellas The Last Days of New Paris and This Census-Taker. He lives and works in London and is a founding editor of the journal Salvage. TICKETS ON SALE NOW

ticketssantafe.org or call 505.988.1234 $6 general/$3 students and seniors with ID Video and audio recordings of Lannan events are available at:

www.lannan.org

CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE

SFREPORTER.COM

JANUARY 11-17, 2017

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THE CALENDAR

Public Forum

Building on Santa Fe’s commitment to reduce future water supply gaps.

Date: Tuesday, January 17th Time: 4:30 PM - 6:30 PM

Public Forum to discuss the Santa Fe Water Reuse Feasibility Study, an engineering evaluation of water reuse alternatives conducted by City of Santa Fe, Santa Fe County, and Bureau of Reclamation

Location: Genoveva Chavez Community Center (3221 Rodeo Road) Refreshments will be served

The open house will provide an update on Santa Fe’s water reuse strategies. Experts will be on hand to answer questions. To review the provisional report subject to acceptance by the Bureau of Reclamation visit http://www.santafenm.gov/reclaimed_ wastewater_reuse Questions and comments can be made at the forum or emailed to utilitycustomerservice@santafenm.gov

RAILYARD ARTISAN MARKET Santa Fe Farmers Market 1607 Paseo de Peralta, 983-4098 Peruse a selection of quality handcrafted gifts, goods and artworks, ranging in medium from sculpture to painting to weaving. 10 am-4 pm, free SANTA FE MODEL RAILROAD CLUB Santa Fe Children’s Museum 1050 Old Pecos Trail, 989-8359 The Santa Fe Model Railroad Club is on hand to help with train setup and offer quick repairs, so if your kid broke an important part of their model train, this is your lucky day. Plus, the child-centric museum offers an awesome play structure, crafting stations, bubble blowing and creepy crawly bugs and reptiles that will entertain and tire out your kiddos in no time. What parent doesn’t love a nice, long nap time? 1-3 pm, $5-$7 WRITERS RESIST Counter Culture Café 930 Baca St., 995-1105 This community event includes readings by former Santa Fe Poet Laureates Arthur Sze, Valerie Martinez and Jon Davis, as well as Santa Fe Living Treasure James McGrath. The gathering, which happens simultaneously in other cities across the US, aims to be a unifying force for the protection of democracy and womens’ rights, freedom of expression and the importance of enviornmentally concious movements (see SFR Picks, page 17). 3:30 pm, free

MUSIC

JILL O’BRYAN

MAPPING RESONANCE

MADELIN COIT INTERFACE

OPENING JANUARY 13, 6-8P

1050 OLD PECOS TRAIL • SANTA FE, NEW MEXICO • 505.982.1338 CCASANTAFE.ORG • FIND US ON:

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JANUARY 11-17, 2017

THE BARBWIRES Mine Shaft Tavern 2846 Hwy. 14, Madrid, 473-0743 An afternoon of live bluesy musical goodness on the heated deck. 2 pm, free BRENTANO STRING QUARTET St. Francis Auditorium 107 W Palace Ave., 982-1890 Santa Fe Pro Musica continues their 35th anniversary season with a concert featuring the Brentano String Quartet. 3 pm, $20-$75 BROOMDUST CARAVAN Cowgirl 319 S Guadalupe St., 982-2565 The local ensemble plays gospel, rock and folk tunes to entertain you through your Sunday mimosas and lazy weekend lunch. Noon, free CHRIS ABEYTA El Farol 808 Canyon Road, 983-9912 The longtime singer-songwriter does his thing. 7 pm, free

ENTER EVENTS AT CALENDAR.SFREPORTER.COM/CAL

DELPHIA Vanessie 427 W Water St., 982-9966 Pop vocals with a soul twist. 6:30 pm, free HARMONIC DIVERSIONS First Presbyterian Church 208 Grant Ave., 982-8544 Serenata Santa Fe presents a performance of a unique sampling of compositions including Carl Nielsen's "Serenata in Vano" and Richard Strauss's "Till Eulenspiegel." 3 pm, $15-$35 LAUREN ALEXANDER Cowgirl 319 S Guadalupe St., 982-2565 Alexander does a roots-meets-psychedelic thing. 8 pm, free THE MELODY IN THE METER: POETRY IN SONG Immaculate Heart of Mary Chapel 50 Mt. Carmel Road, 988-1975 The Zia Singers, a local women’ choir directed by Aaron Howe, showcases a program of contemporary choral music written to classical and contemporary poetry, including works by Dickinson, Austen, Whitman and more.  3 pm, $20 NACHA MENDEZ La Boca 72 W Marcy St., 982-3433 Latin guitar and originals.   6 pm, free

THEATER THE MIKADO Scottish Rite Center 463 Paseo de Peralta, 982-4414 Performance Santa Fe presents their annual free family opera. The classic story happens in a fictitious Japanese town, and is full of topsy-turvy twists. Call ahead to reserve your seats. 7 pm, free

WORKSHOP TRANSFORMATIONAL BREATHWORK Center for Inner Truth 1807 Second St., Ste. 84, 920-4418 In a guided small-group session, experience the healing that comes with conscious deep breathing. Bring two blankets. Pre-register by calling. 1 pm, $20

MON/16 BOOKS/LECTURES ANCIENT SITES AND ANCIENT STORIES: SEAN GREGORY DOLAN Hotel Santa Fe 1501 Paseo de Peralta, 982-1200 Dolan, an author of multiple archaeological titles presents a lecture titled "Tewa Pueblo Fieldhouses: Archaeological Discoveries in Los Alamos." 6 pm, $12

MUSIC BILL HEARNE TRIO La Fiesta Lounge 100 E San Francisco St., 982-5511 Wear your two-steppin' shoes to this honky-tonk and country extravaganza by the 2016 Best of Santa Fe winner. Dancing is therapy and exercise, both of which we could use more of. 7 pm, free CHUSCALES La Boca 72 W Marcy St., 982-3433 The renowned flamenco guitarist puts on a live show you won’t soon forget in the tapas-inspired eatery. 7 pm, free DELPHIA Vanessie 427 W Water St., 982-9966 Pop vocals with a soul twist. 6:30 pm, free DJ OBI ZEN Boxcar 530 S Guadalupe St., 988-7222 Obi Zen plays house and ‘90s hip-hop with live percussion mixed into his spinning, which gives his sound an instrument-meets-technology feel.   10 pm, free MOBILE DEATH TRAP, FINAL DRIVE, FRIEND2FOE The Underground 200 W San Francisco St., 819-1597 An evening of hardcore rock and metal (see SFR Picks, page 17). 9 pm, $5 SANTA FE GREAT BIG JAZZ BAND Tiny's Restaurant & Lounge 1005 S St. Francis Drive, 983-9817 This 16-piece band performs with vocalist Joan Kessler.   7 pm, free

TUE/17 EVENTS GEEKS WHO DRINK Boxcar 530 S Guadalupe St., 988-7222 Bring your smarty-pants friends and play against other teams for trivia-knowledge victory. 8 pm, free

MUSIC BILL FORREST Vanessie 427 W Water St., 982-9966 Forrest shows off his talents, playing a set of classics and standards on the piano. 6:30 pm, free BILL HEARNE TRIO La Fiesta Lounge 100 E San Francisco St., 982-5511 Wear your two-steppin' shoes to this honky-tonk and country extravaganza. 7 pm, free CONTINUED ON PAGE 30

SFREPORTER.COM


FASHION

Three Parisian Style Tips STO RY BY M A R I A EG O L F - RO M E RO I L L U S T R AT I O N S B Y T H E A M I L I N A I R É

I

n the third grade my class made a time capsule. My contribution was a video fashion show in which my best friends modeled what I considered popular fashions of the time. My point? I’ve always had a thing for fashion. Beyond natural affinity, style has been my armor and my form of expression. Good outfits can cheer me up and I save them for special occasions (or particularly bad ones). Before writing for SFR, I was a buyer at Buffalo Exchange in Albuquerque, where I spent eight hours a day digging for treasure in other peoples’ used clothing and learning about vintage items, trends and construction. My aesthetic tendencies are only rivaled by my love of writing, so I am—in no uncertain terms—living the dream right now. I am not a person who thinks they have the prescription for perfection, or who knows every detail of every runway show this year. I am someone with a real-life relationship with and daily admiration for fashion and styling of all kinds. In this column I plan to write about lo-

French je ne c’est quoi style the world eternally seeks to replicate, I can name three products Parisians rely on yearround. Take a step into some international tennis shoes: Adidas’ Stan Smith sneakers In the US, there are skate shoes and Converse aplenty. In Paris, a large portion of the population lives in Adidas’ Stan Smiths. Created in 1963, the first leather tennis shoe was named after the French tennis player Robert Halliet until 1971, when its name was changed to the Stan Smith for the famous American player. Maybe Parisian loyalty lies with the shoes’ original title, but I am betting it’s their classic and simple style that makes them a dependable staple in French wardrobes. The $75 pair can be worn with everything from jeans to dresses, as I saw everyone from toddlers to their babely dads rocking them daily in France. Wear the ankle-bearing sneakers with chunky socks and enjoy them even on colder days.

1

cal shops, easy and effective products and environmentally conscious labels, about locals with rad style and local designers. I’ll make best-of lists and detail where you can find the items on them whether in town or on the interwebs. In the future, I may contradict myself and change my mind because I am human and messy, and so is my style. Recently, I spent two beautifully wondrous weeks in Paris. It was holiday time, and the City of Lights was romantically overcast with its streets sparkling in colored bulbs, the architecture casting heavy silhouettes tipped by hundreds of tiny chimneys in the winter fog. But what stood out to a fashion-phile like me? Parisian style: effortless and perfectly put-together. French citizens of all ages walk the streets in drool-worthy ensembles, completed by rich wool jackets or down-filled parkas and the finest display of billowing and blanketing scarves one will ever see. While I can’t anymore capture the inexplicably

Worship your skin, ditch your contour stick: Facial Oil Skin is sexy is Paris. Most wear minimal, if any, makeup. You would be hard-

2

pressed to find a Parisian walking around with a full Kardashian contour. Highlighting your cheeks and brows is a sure way to make the best of your bone structure and, unlike contour sticks—which cake make up into your pores—facial oils keep your skin moisturized and highlighted at the same time. There is an exhaustingly huge selection to choose from when it comes to facial oil, and locally, your options are no different. Head to La Montañita Co-op (913 W Alameda St., 984-2852), which has shelves upon shelves of oils ranging in price from around $9 to around $60. Try the Jemez Pueblo-made Eye Nutrient by maxandjane ($30). It’s clearer than the same brand’s oil, making a perfect highlighting gloss. Just a dab on your brow and cheek bones and you’re ready to go. Let your brows do their thing: Boy Brow Part of what is classically beautiful about French women is that they accept their natural beauty, and simply enhance it. Caterpillar-brow glory is a true thing in Paris. Ditching your tweezing habit may be harder than you expect at first, but accepting your natural brow shape will pay off in the end. Think about it. It’s not hard to think of a super-babe with bushy brows—Brooke Shields, Solange Knowles and Cara Delevigne, to name a few. (If you need some inspiration to get you through the awkward grow-out phase, check out @kactye—17-year-old model Natalia Castellar—on Instagram.) The hands-down best product this bushy-browed lady has found is Glossier’s Boy Brow. The $16 tube comes in three colors and somehow controls and accentuates your expression-makers perfectly.

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Santa Fe Optical

Snuggle a baby, Support a Mom Ready to Volunteer?

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MOVING SALE!

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MANY MOTHERS

Santa Fe Optical Our 25th year in business!

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SFREPORTER.COM

JANUARY 11-17, 2017

29


ENTER EVENTS AT CALENDAR.SFREPORTER.COM/CAL

BRANDEN & JAMES Vanessie 427 W Water St., 982-9966 This duo performs everything from Bach to Bieber with powerful vocals and a cello. 8 pm, free HONEYWISE Cowgirl 319 S Guadalupe St., 982-2565 This threesome of lifelong friends performs a roots mix of guitar and upright bass blended with piano, mandolin, Native American flutes and rich vocals. 8 pm, free PAT MALONE TerraCotta Wine Bistro 304 Johnson St., 989-1166 Solo jazz guitar. 7 pm, free

THE CALENDAR

WORKSHOP LIFESONGS ENSEMBLE New Mexico Dance Institute Dance Barns 1140 Alto St., 983-7646 This ensemble meets every Tuesday afternoon ultitlizing poetry and movement to share life experiences. 5:30 pm, $15 HOW TO DO YOUR TAXES IN A GIG ECONOMY Santa Fe Chamber of Commerce Office 1644 St. Michael’s Drive, 988-3279 Arm yourself with knowledge and do your taxes right. 5:30 pm, $15

Want to see your event listed here? We’d love to hear from you Send notices via email to calendar@sfreporter.com. Make sure you include all the pertinent details such as location, time, price and so forth. It helps us out greatly. Submissions don’t guarantee inclusion.

COURTESY KYLEBELL.SQUARESPACE.COM

MUSEUMS

Filmmaker Kyle Bell’s award-winning documentary, Dig It If You Can, about artist Steven Paul Judd, is screening now at the Museum of Contemporary Native Arts. EL RANCHO DE LAS GOLONDRINAS 334 Los Pinos Road, 471-2261 Living history. GEORGIA O’KEEFFE MUSEUM 217 Johnson St.,946-1000 O’Keeffe at the University of Virginia. Through summer 2017. HARWOOD MUSEUM OF ART 238 Ledoux St., Taos, 575-758-9826 Ken Price, Death Shrine I. Agnes Martin Gallery. Continuum, Through May 2017. MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY NATIVE ART 108 Cathedral Place, 983-8900 Visions and Visionaries. Through July 31, 2017. MUSEUM OF INDIAN ARTS & CULTURE 710 Camino Lejo, 476-1250 Into the Future: Culture Power in Native American Art.

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MUSEUM OF INTERNATIONAL FOLK ART 706 Camino Lejo, 476-1200 Flamenco: From Spain to New Mexico. Through Sept. 2017. Sacred Realm. The Morris Miniature Circus. Under Pressure. Through Dec. 2017. MUSEUM OF SPANISH COLONIAL ART 750 Camino Lejo, 982-2226 Chimayó: A Pilgrimage Through Two Centuries. The Beltran Kropp Collection. The Delgado Room. NM HISTORY MUSEUM 113 Lincoln Ave., 476-5019 Agnes Martin and Me. Through Aug. 2017. Lowriders, Hoppers and Hot Rods: Car Culture of Northern New Mexico. Through March 2017. Out of the Box: The Art of the Cigar. Through Oct. 2017. NM MUSEUM OF ART 107 W Palace Ave.,476-5072 Alcoves 16/17. Small Wonders. Through March. Conversations in Painting. Through April.

PALACE OF THE GOVERNORS 105 W Palace Ave., 476-5100 Fractured Faiths: Spanish Judaism, The Inquisition and New World Identities. POEH CULTURAL CENTER AND MUSEUM 78 Cities of Gold Road, Pojoaque, 455-3334 Ashley Browning, Perspective of Perception. The Past of the Govenors. SANTA FE BOTANICAL GARDENS 715 Camino Lejo, 471-9103 Bill Barrett: Visual Poetry. Through March 2017. Ojos y Manos. WHEELWRIGHT MUSEUM OF THE AMERICAN INDIAN 704 Camino Lejo, 986-4636 Eveli: Energy and Significance.


FOOD • 1 cup reduced-sodium chicken broth • 1/3 cup raisins • 3 cups shredded deli rotisserie chicken (from 2-lb chicken) • 1/4 cup chopped fresh cilantro • 1/4 teaspoon salt • 1/4 teaspoon pepper • 16 sheets frozen phyllo pastry (14by-9 inches), thawed • Cooking spray • 1/2 cup slivered almonds, finely ground

The Good Book

Like a surrogate grandma in a red binder

Unfortunately, however, that means they missed a lot of tutoring at the apron strings. Betty Crocker defines and explains all the tools, techniques and terms a new cook needs to know. There’s an entire two-page spread on beating, whipping and folding. The vegetable chapter has 10 beautiful pages of photos and descriptions of vegetables, followed by four pages of charts on how to cook everything from artichokes to zucchini. The recipes are not mind-blowing. But when you want something mind-blowing you go to Pinterest, right? What this book does have is recipes for the way young people live now. Like roasted chicken sausage with potatoes and cheese, which is really similar to a lunch I throw together in the toaster oven on a busy Tuesday (there are two kinds of chicken sausage in

MOROCCAN CHICKEN PIE From the Betty Crocker Cookbook • • • • •

2 tablespoons butter 1 large onion, chopped (1 cup) 1/2 teaspoon ground cinnamon 1/2 teaspoon ground turmeric 2 tablespoons all-purpose flour

BETTY CROCKER COOKBOOK

R

emember that old Betty Crocker Cookbook? The red one with loose-leaf pages in a three-ring binder that was probably splattered with pancake batter? We always had one on the shelf when I was growing up, but I hadn’t actually looked at one in years until the new edition landed on my desk. First reaction: “Who wants this old thing?” Slow realization: “This is a perfect how-to for a young person leaving home and setting up a kitchen for the first time.” I thought the book was boring because it starts with this chapter of “This is a knife” and “Here are the pots and pans you should have,” and I’m at the part of my life when I’m more like, “Good gravy, why do we have 17 Bundt pans?” But I was that kid once! I took a stained copy of The Joy of Cooking with me when I went to college (still have it) and referred to it like a religious text. But the Betty Crocker Cookbook is even more user-friendly. And it has pictures … lots of great pictures. Twenty-somethings love to cook! And unlike many of their parents or grandparents, they think of it as a fun leisure activity, not a grueling daily chore. That’s partially because so many grew up in an era when a huge percentage of their meals were eaten out at a restaurant or out of a package.

my fridge right now). Moroccan chicken pie makes use of rotisserie chicken meat and packaged phyllo. I get paid to eat at some really fancy restaurants and write about it, but at home I cook like my own grandmother (see: pot roast, peach pie). If you know some young people who need a surrogate grandma, you might introduce them to Betty Crocker.

Heat oven to 350 degrees. Lightly spray 9-inch glass pie plate with cooking spray.

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In 10-inch nonstick skillet, melt butter over medium heat. Cook onion in butter 5 to 6 minutes, stirring occasionally, until softened and lightly browned. Stir in cinnamon and turmeric. Stir in flour; cook 1 minute, stirring constantly. Slowly stir in broth. Add raisins. Heat to boiling; boil gently 1 minute, stirring occasionally. In large bowl, stir together onion mixture, chicken, cilantro, salt and pepper.

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Place phyllo sheets on work surface; cover with clean, damp towel. Place one phyllo sheet in bottom and up side of pie plate, allowing excess phyllo to extend over edge. Lightly spray with cooking spray; sprinkle with 1 1/2 teaspoons of the ground almonds. Repeat layers, using seven more phyllo sheets and alternating position of sheets to cover bottom and side of pie plate.

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Spoon chicken mixture into pastry-lined plate. Using kitchen scissors, cut excess phyllo from edges. Layer with remaining eight phyllo sheets, spraying each with cooking spray and sprinkling with almonds. Fold excess phyllo under to form rustic crust edge.

4

Bake 30 to 40 minutes or until crust is golden brown. Let stand 10 minutes before serving.

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It’s a pie. With chicken. A chicken pie, if you will.

Computer Help that Doesn’t Suck!

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JANUARY 11-17, 2017

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MOVIES

RATINGS BEST MOVIE EVER

10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 WORST MOVIE EVER

Hidden Figures Review: Space Relations An inside look at the nonwhite women who made the space race possible

8 ++ IMPORTANT HISTORY

-- SOMETIMES

BY ALEX DE VORE a l e x @ s f r e p o r t e r. c o m

HEAVYHANDED

Here’s the thing—it’s kind of hard to not like Hidden Figures, at least insofar as it’s the simultaneous story of uncredited black women who were so awesome at their jobs that they literally made safe space flight possible, yet they were treated so poorly amidst the racist atmosphere of 1960s Virginia that we’re all kind of like, “What the hell, man?!” That said, the overall tone seems a tad breezy for the subject matter. It could be that director/screenwriter Theodore Melfi wanted to tell the story, which was based on the book of the same name by Margot Lee Shetterly, in a palatable fashion, but you just know that the actual story was far more intense. We mostly follow Katherine Goble/Johnson (Taraji P Henson), a lifelong math ultra-genius who works as a human computer for the space program at NASA with dozens of other black women. Along with her close friends/fellow NASA employees Dorothy Vaughan (Octavia

Spencer) and Mary Jackson (Janelle Monáe), Katherine attempts to deduce the incredibly complex science needed to launch John Glenn into space. Of course, it’s the ’60s, and white people are basically the absolute worst, so even though Katherine can do any math that comes her way and Dorothy teaches her damn self how to program NASA’s newly-minted (and roomsized) IBM supercomputer and Mary is some kind of goddamn engineering phenom, they have to fight some pretty nasty racism on the part of people like lead engineer Paul Stafford (The Big Bang Theory’s Jim Parsons) and supervisor Vivian Mitchell (a perfectly condescending and bitchy Kirsten Dunst). Henson’s performance exists in the sweet spot between vulnerable mother and widow and complete badass, unafraid to excel at math or to fight for her race and gender. And though Spencer and Monáe prove indispensable to the pacing

and overall feel of Hidden Figures, some of the impact of the real-world achievements made by the women they portray winds up dissipated as they’re relegated to periodic bits of comic relief. Still, it is Katherine’s story, and there’s much to enjoy here. The sting of racism cuts deep even now, and we must never forget that these people literally had to be complete geniuses and fight their asses off to receive even a modicum of respect. Don’t be surprised if Hidden Figures becomes required viewing for students down the road at some point and, we hope, we start to get other films about the incredible people of color throughout history who perhaps didn’t get the recognition they so obviously deserved.  HIDDEN FIGURES Directed by Theodore Melfi With Henson, Spencer, Monáe and Costner Violet Crown, Regal, PG-13, 127 min.

QUICKY REVIEWS

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CHATTY CATTIES

GHOSTLAND

CHATTY CATTIES

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++ REPRESENTS DEAF COMMUNITY;

CATS ARE CUTE -- INCONSISTENT PLOT; BAD ACTING

If you’re a die-hard cat person, Chatty Catties might pique your interest, but if your movie needs aren’t met with cute pets alone then it may be a flop. The seemingly low-budget comedy by relatively new director Pablo Valencia follows the life of alcoholic dental assistant Shelby (Megan Hensley from The Haunting of Alice D) and her tabby cat Leonard (voiced by John Autry II) in an alternate world where cats can talk to humans. Chatty Catties is mostly shot through Leonard’s perspective as his human goes through everyday life. Together the two navigate as an unlikely pair; Leonard gives Shelby unfiltered advice about her relationship and career, while Shelby whines, binge-drinks and neglects him. Chatty Catties is one of those films that is so bad it’s almost good, though the overall plot is lost within quirky vignettes and corny dialogue—which greatly detracts from the frequent and appreciated candid cat scenes—but the dry humor is enough to make you chuckle and cringe.

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ROGUE ONE: A STAR WARS STORY

As Shelby lacks the motivation and responsibility to care for Leonard, other cat moms are featured in conversational bits with their felines in forced (and failed) attempts to be funny. None of the human actors seem confident in their roles, which makes the film quality equivalent to that of a YouTube video. Now, this cheeseball isn’t all negative num-

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BEST WORST THING THAT EVER COULD HAVE HAPPENED

bers, as all of the cats are voiced by deaf or hard-of-hearing actors, which allows them to work in roles that don’t relate to their disability. And hey—cats are cute. So, set aside Shelby’s over-the-top one-liners and the many poorly executed scenes and you’ve got yourself a pretty OK cat flick. (Kim Jones) Jean Cocteau Cinema, NR, 84 min.

You’d think a movie about talking cats would rule, and yet...

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THE EAGLE HUNTRESS

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MOONLIGHT

GHOSTLAND

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++ UNCENSORED; NOT WHITEWASHED -- SLOW BUILD; THE TRIBE’S CULTURE SHOCK IN GERMANY

Rookie director Simon Stadler shocks and humbles viewers with Ghostland: The View of the Ju’Hoansi, a documentary following the Ju’Hoansi bushmen of Namibia. When a law was passed in 1990 that prevented the Ju’Hoansi from hunting animals for food, they were left only with their titles of “gatherers.” The Ju’Hoansi then resorted to performing for visiting Westerners for money by dancing, playing music and shooting arrows. Ghostland takes viewers on a journey of privilege and civilization. Stadler takes his subjects from the Ju’Hoansi tribe to visit neighboring African tribes, as well as “civilized” areas of Namibia and Germany where they witness the lives of those with access to grocery stores, clean water, and—most sacred of all—meat. We see them nervous to use an airplane restroom and fascinated by the amenities of the more civilized world. The camera is almost always trained on the four bushmen, but occasionally focuses on Westerners (aka white people)


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wearing uncomfortable and confused yet intrigued expressions as they watch the tribesmen walk around in their native garb. Ghostland poses an interesting juxtaposition between the Ju’Hoansi and the Westerners­— the bushmen having so little and yet living happily and carefree; and the Westerners having luxuries unknown to the Ju’Hoansi, yet who are perceived as unhappy, tired and unfulfilled. The simplest things like soap in a gas station restroom or packaged underwear light up the faces of the tribe members, which forces Westerners like us to recognize and understand how privileged we really are. (KJ) Center for Contemporary Arts, NR, 85 min.

number of new characters. If this is a fair example of the kinds of side stories we can expect from the Star Wars universe, we say bring us more. With such a massively rich vein for storytelling, there’s ample opportunity to win new fans while pleasing entire generations of others. One must be careful not to allow this film to be overhyped, and there will always be minimal things to pick apart if you’re one of those sci-fi fans. But, if you’ve ever been into Star Wars to any degree whatsoever, you’ll want to see this film immediately; the last three minutes alone are worth it. (Alex De Vore) Regal, Violet Crown, PG-13, 134 min.

ROGUE ONE: A STAR WARS STORY

BEST WORST THING THAT EVER COULD HAVE HAPPENED

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++ IT’S STAR WARS, BRO; DARTH VADER -- CREEPY CGI

Now that we’re apparently going to get our Star Wars movies in annualized form, it’s only natural to question the validity of Rogue One, the first in a series of non-core films in the franchise, and one to tell a story outside the main plotlines we’ve come to know and love. We follow Jyn Erso (The Theory of Everything’s Felicity Jones), the daughter of an Imperial science officer played by Mads Mikkelsen (Hannibal). Jyn is orphaned when her father grows a conscience and doesn’t want to fight for the Empire anymore. She’s young and brash and doesn’t much care about anything, but when the Rebel Alliance needs to track down someone close to her, she enlists in exchange for whatever semblance of freedom is available in this particular galaxy. And so, along with a Rebel captain named Cassian Andor (Diego Luna), who is beginning to question his place in the fight, and a wise-crackin’ reprogrammed Imperial droid (voiced brilliantly by Firefly’s Alan Tudyk, even if he’s awfully similar to Douglas Adams’ Marv from The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy), Jyn must traverse the planets to uncover the plans for an Imperial mega-weapon you may have heard about called the Death Star. Rogue One separates itself from previous Star Wars films with a tale that’s more about the individual human cost of war than the admittedly fun fantasy of space magic. This isn’t to say that known elements from the Star Wars realm don’t find their way into the film, but rather than focus on one young man’s journey to self-discovery and missing hands in a blackand-white, good-versus-evil universe, Rogue One isn’t afraid to point out that the Rebel Alliance must sometimes do ugly things in the name of peace. This paradoxical concept not only helps to flesh out a chapter in the saga that we’ve always kind of wondered about, it is a solid foundation for the humanization of the rebels who, in previous outings, had proven disappointingly dimensionless. The CGI is as brilliant as one would expect from the franchise, save a few creepy choices such as a computer-generated version of Peter Cushing (RIP) as Governor Tarkin that is understandable given he’s not alive, but that still falls victim to the uncanny valley. It’s also possible that the heavy emphasis on fan service for the second Star Wars film in quick succession could arguably be perceived as a crutch. Regardless, the action sequences are just right and every conceivable detail seems to have been considered. We actually grow to care about characters that represent a fairly huge shift in a monumental piece of shared culture, and Rogue One does a fine job in establishing a

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C I N E M AT H E Q U E 1050 OLD PECOS TRAIL • 505.982.1338 • CCASANTAFE.ORG

SHOWTIMES JAN 11 – 17, 2017

Wednesday January 11 2:15p Moonlight* 3:45p Moonlight 4:30p Best Worst Thing* 6:00p Moonlight 6:30p Ghostland* 8:15p Moonlight 8:30p Burn Country* Thursday, January 12 2:15p Moonlight* 3:45p Moonlight 4:30p Best Worst Thing* 6:00p Moonlight 7:30p Defenders of Wildlife present Yochi* - free w/ director in person! 8:15p Moonlight

++ FUN TO SEE THE YOUNG ACTORS -- DIRECTOR SEEMS TO BE LIVING

VICARIOUSLY THROUGH THE DOC

Director Lonny Price (Company and 2001’s Sweeney Todd in concert) explores the complexities of the 1981 Broadway musical Merrily We Roll Along. The show, from legendary composer/director team Harold Prince and Stephen Sondheim, is dissected in the new documentary, Best Worst Thing That Ever Could Have Happened. Price tackles not only the young actors involved, but the musical’s unprecedented approach of telling protagonist Frank Shepard’s journey from zero to hero by using a backwards time frame. Prince and Sondheim’s risky vision for their production was to cast all young people. They hosted an open cattle call, advertising for individuals between the ages of 14 and 20 and, after a rigorous audition process, the chosen few felt like the most fortunate actors of their time. Unexpectedly, however, the play flopped. Hard. Attendees fled the theater within minutes of the curtain, and after the first disastrous run, the script was scrapped and one of the main actors was replaced. The Best Worst Thing That Ever Could Have Happened guides viewers on an inspiring journey through excitement, disappointment and creative fulfillment. Each actor from the original cast of Merrily We Roll Along (such as Jason Alexander of Seinfield) share their stories about life after the musical’s demise. Stimulating interviews dive into topics important to consider for all creative minds, such as being flexible in one’s career path or following one’s heart despite obstacles. Price himself flashes back to his glory days as Merrily’s Charley Kringas, which makes the film seem like he is living vicariously, but it is his capturing of the family-like unity found within the theater that becomes the leading message of the film. (KJ) Center for Contemporary Arts, NR, 96 min.

GOLDEN GLOBE WINNER BEST DRAMA MOTION PICTURE

Saturday, January 14 11a Dekalog Marathon: 1 & 2 11:30a Dekalog 9 & 10* 1:15p Dekalog Marathon: 3 & 4 2:00p Elle* 3:30p Dekalog Marathon: 5 & 6 4:45p Hunter Gatherer* 5:30p [Dekalog pizza break] 6:00p Dekalog Marathon: 7 & 8 Elle* MARATHON 6:45p 8:15p Dekalog Marathon: 9 & 10 non-stop run of all ten films / Jan. 14, 11a - 8:15p 9:15p Moonlight*

DEKALOG

“The best 10 hours you will ever spend at the movies...” – Indiewire

Includes a PIZZA BREAK at 5:30p!

“...an undeniably singular & imaginative work.”

THE EAGLE HUNTRESS

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++ IT’S A GIRL HUNTING WITH AN EFFING EAGLE

-- WE MAY NOT GET THE WHOLE STORY

Forget Frozen. Just let it go. And ditch your heartbreak-turned-fury over the role sexism likely played in the recent presidential election. Instead, let your thrill for a 13-year-old Mongolian girl named Aisholpan Nurgaiv soar above the ice-covered steppes of Mongolia in The Eagle Huntress, which has to be the girlpower movie of the year. The new Sony Pictures Classics documentary, narrated by Star Wars newcomer Daisy Ridley, tells the story of the traditional hunting bond between golden eagles CONTINUED ON PAGE 35

Friday, January 13 11a Moonlight 11:30a Dekalog 9 & 10* 1:15p Elle 2:00p Moonlight* 4:00p Moonlight 4:15p Elle* 6:15p Hunter Gatherer 7:00p Elle* 8:00p Elle

- Justin Chang, VARIETY

Sunday, January 15 11a Moonlight 11:30a Dekalog 9 & 10* 1:15p Elle 2:00p Moonlight* 4:00p Moonlight 4:15p Elle* 6:15p Hunter Gatherer 7:00p Elle* 8:00p Elle Mon. - Tues., January 16-17 12:30p Elle* 3:00p Elle* 3:45p Moonlight 5:30p Elle* 6:00p Hunter Gatherer 8:00p Elle* 8:15p Moonlight *in The Studio

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Ghostland reminds us just how much we really have.

and men from the Kazakh, a nomadic tribe that’s been around since before the days of Genghis Khan. But more than that, it’s how this young girl breaks the glass ceiling between verdant expanses and craggy mountains. You see, like being president of the United States, eagle hunting in Mongolia is just for men. And, boy howdy, even if you stopped reading the subtitles for a few minutes, you’d know how the men interviewed for the film really feel about Aisholpan’s interloping on their sausage fest. Women are weak; they don’t have the courage to hold the bird; they should stay home and make tea for the hunters. Her father, to be congratulated on his forward thinking and bold dedication to his daughter, sees past the gender barrier. “It’s not choice,” he explains, “it’s a calling that has to be in your blood.” And it’s in hers. Aisholpan thus shows no fear, strapping on her fur-lined hat and trotting into town on her sturdy horse, arm extended as it becomes a perch for the avian predator. The bird’s wingspan is wider than she is tall, dwarfing the ruddy-cheeked girl with each restless flap. She pets its head as if it were a house cat, talking all the while with praise and comfort. Oh, and by the way—she had to rappel down a cliff side and snatch the eaglet from its nest. Then months of training. No bigs. What majestic footage: the grace of the powerful wings alighting from the edge of the mountain, the expressions on the old dudes’ faces as she earns perfect scores at the region’s annual eagle festival as the youngest competitor and the first-ever female. It is a trip for the imagination to look inside yurts and back to stone goat enclosures, across barren snowscapes and through villages with stumpy homes and smoky corridors. See too the textures of the textiles, the steam from the mouths of beasts, and the expressive faces not just of the starring eagles, but the scruffy horses and bleating lambs. We dare you to watch impassively as father and daughter ride off together after Aisholpan passes the ultimate test of recognition for a hunter: catching a fox in the snowy mountains. The Eagle Huntress is a great winter movie that stands to touch the coldest chambers of heart with fierce inspiration. Grab it with your talons. (Julie Ann Grimm) DeVargas, G, subtitles, 87 min

CCA CINEMATHEQUE 1050 Old Pecos Trail, 982-1338

++ INCREDIBLY WELL-CRAFTED -- FAILS TO GIVE MAIN CHARACTER A STRONG VOICE

In a new work based on the previously unproduced screenplay In Moonlight Black Boys Look Blue by Tarell Alvin McCraney, director Barry Jenkins (Medicine for Melancholy) brings us

Adopt Me please! Santa Fe Animal Shelter 100 Caja Del Rio Road, Santa Fe, NM 87507

505-983-4309

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LIL’ SIMBA

Chihuahua Smooth Coated mix – 13 lb – 7 year old Male

ONTARIO

American Pit Bull Terrier mix – 65 lb – 1.5 yr old Male

JEAN COCTEAU CINEMA 418 Montezuma Ave., 466-5528

UA DeVARGAS 6 DeVargas Center, N Guadalupe St. and Paseo de Peralta, 988-2775

REGAL STADIUM 14 3474 Zafarano Drive, 844-462-7342 CODE 1765#

THE SCREEN SFUAD, 1600 St. Michael’s Drive, 473-6494

MOONLIGHT

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a romantic drama fueled by self-discovery. A young boy grows up in Miami during the ’70s and ’80s while struggling to accept his identity. We tour through three significant chapters of Chiron’s life, from timid boy to deluded man, as played at various ages by newcomer Alex Hibbert, Ashton Sanders from Straight Outta Compton and Westworld’s Trevante Rhodes. Chiron must navigate a veritable minefield of adolescent strife, from a drug-addicted mother, an antihero crack dealer named Juan (Mahershala Ali) and his budding sexuality with lifelong friend Kevin (Jharrell Jerome and André Holland). Moonlight focuses on the paradoxical question of who you are and who you are expected to be, as Chiron learns he can be open with Kevin sans judgment and utilizes that presence as a safe space. Chiron uncomfortably flits through adulthood, defying the stereotypes of gay and black men, but eventually becoming a crack dealer running the inner city of Atlanta. When Chiron and Kevin reconnect in adulthood, however, Chiron must evaluate who he has become and who he has portrayed himself to be. The gritty plot is beautifully accompanied by ambient lighting and carefully composed scenes, further supporting the poignancy each character brings to the screen, and though Chiron’s voice is rarely heard, he expresses himself with his actions, whether violent or passionate. Moonlight thus becomes a cinematic masterpiece, a journey of love, loss and selfdiscovery that will leave viewers captivated by Chiron’s character long after the film is over. (KJ) CCA, Violet Crown, R, 111 min

VIOLET CROWN 1606 Alcaldesa St., 216-5678

For showtimes and more reviews, visit SFReporter.com

LIL’ SIMBA is an adorable 7-year-old short

hair Chihuahua mixed breed doggy who came to Santa Fe from another animal shelter in New Mexico. He weighs about 13 lbs. which seems like a good weight for him. Lil’ Simba is a very sweet boy who LOVES people. At the shelter, Lil’s Simba has also done well with children. He is very wiggly and loves attention, especially belly rubs! This little guy is friendly with everyone and would be a great addition to your family! If you’re ready to fall in love then come meet Lil’ Simba! SPONSORED BY

ONTARIO is a handsome year-and-a-half-old

dog who came to the animal shelter as a stray. He weighs about 65 lbs. which seems like a healthy weight for him. Ontario is an active boy who will make a great companion, especially with someone who enjoys outdoor adventures. He also enjoys play chase, for example with a tennis ball. Ontario’ other favorite pastimes are long walks, giving kisses, getting his back scratched and snuggling. This awesome guy (with the SOFTEST coat) named Ontario would love to meet you!

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BE MY FUR-EVER FRIEND! Sadly, SUZIE’s owner passed away on Christmas Day 2016, leaving this sweet cat in need of a new home and a new person to bond with. TEMPERAMENT: While SUZIE is not really a lap cat, she is very social and will talk with her human from time to time. She is a petite, beautiful kitty with a short coat and brown tabby markings with large white areas. She just had a wellness exam including a senior blood panel and is in very good health. AGE: born approx. 2006. City of Santa Fe Permit #17-004

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63 Baby garment with snaps 64 Word heard by Marge a lot, I 1 Put in stitches imagine 5 Andreas opener 65 Extreme aversion 8 Cogitates, with “over” 66 ___ Martin (007’s car) 13 Antioxidant berry in fruit juices 67 Part of MS-DOS (abbr.) 14 Nervous twinge 68 Fairy tale preposition 15 Like a game’s tutorial levels 16 Considered only in terms of DOWN money 1 Trump tweet ender, often 19 Science Fiction and Fantasy 2 Prefix before friendly or terrorism Writers of America bestowals 3 Brownie ingredients, sometimes 20 Bird that runs 35 mph 4 Khartoum’s river 22 Dating site datum 5 Uphill battle 23 1986-to-2001 orbiter 6 Supermarket section 24 Hi-___ graphics 7 March Madness gp. 26 Like “The Polar Express” 8 Cheese companion 28 “Ain’t happenin’” 9 Exploitative type 30 “Friends” friend 10 Retired hockey great Eric 31 Filet mignon cut 11 “Dig in, everyone!” 35 Foul, as weather 36 Number sometimes decoded as “Z” 12 High-class group, for short? 15 Hubble after whom a space 39 Friedlander of “30 Rock” telescope was named 42 Amish, e.g. 17 “I’ve got ___ feeling about 43 “Buy It Now” site this!” 47 ___ of troubles 49 Ashley and Mary-Kate, for two 18 “Born on the Fourth of July” locale, briefly 51 Christmas tree choice 20 “To ___ is human” 52 Fall back, tidewise 21 “Little Red Book” chairman 54 Quirky comic Philips 25 James Bond, for example 55 Unagi, at sushi bars 56 It’s provided by guild members 27 “Como ___?” (“How are you?” in Spanish) 60 Advice that the four long entries with circles failed to follow 29 Horns that are really winds

32 Iron-___ (T-shirt transfer patterns) 33 London or Brooklyn ending 34 Home of Times Sq. and Columbus Cir. 37 Brings by cart, perhaps 38 Bovine quartet 39 Peanut butter brand for “choosy moms” 40 Instances of agreement 41 Hackers’ hangout that’s tough to find via search engines 44 Keg attachment 45 “I’d like to buy ___” (request to Pat Sajak) 46 Armani competitor, initially 48 “I’ll have ___ Christmas without you” (Elvis lyric) 50 “Rio ___” (John Wayne flick) 53 Ask for a doggie treat, perhaps 54 Judy Jetson’s brother 57 “Make ___!” (Captain Picard’s order) 58 Some PTA members 59 Aloha Stadium locale 60 Morgue acronym 61 Judge Lance played by Kenneth Choi on “American Crime Story” 62 First number shouted before a ball drop, often

www.FandFnm.org ADOPTION HOURS:

Petco: 1-4 pm Thurs., Fri., Sat. & Sun. Xanadu/Jackalope during business hours. Teca Tu is now at DeVargas Center. Cage Cleaners/Caretakers needed! SANTA FE CATS not only supports the mission of FELINES & FRIENDS from revenue generated by providing premium boarding for cats, pocket pets and birds, but also serves as a mini-shelter for cats awaiting adoption. For more information, please visit www.santafecats.com CROSSWORD PUZZLE SPONSORED BY:

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SARAH T was abandoned by her owner at Santa Fe Cats in April 2016 and is still waiting for a forever home. TEMPERAMENT: Sweet and affectionate once settled, SARAH T is a lovely companion. Since she has not lived previously with other cats, she is wary of them (and dogs as well) and would probably prefer to remain as a single pet in her new home. SARAH T is a beautiful girl with a short gray & white coat in the tuxedo pattern. AGE: born approx. 5/1/11. City of Santa Fe Permit #17-004

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COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENTS SANTO NIÑO REGIONAL CATHOLIC SCHOOL Competing on a national stage. Our mission is to provide excellent elementary, academic education with a Catholic tradition for 3 years to 6th grade. Our committment is to educate the whole child in a safe, service oriented environment. No transfer fee! Visit us at santoninoregional.org for more information or call 505-424-1766. WOMEN’S EMPOWERMENT GROUP This is a psychoeducational therapeutic support group for women 18+ who want to work on building self-esteem, self-confidence, setting boundaries, and being assertive. Come prepared to learn concrete techniques and make positive changes in your life with the support of other women. Group meets Mondays from 6:308:30, January 16 -March 6 at Tierra Nueva Counseling Center. Facilitated by Michelle Lynn, LMHC and Nicole Ortiz Student Therapist. $10/ session, sliding scale. Call 471-8575 to register.

STITCH AWAY THE WINTER BLUES! A creative outlet and group support for seasonal stress and depression by crocheting, knitting, and/or any other yarn crafting of interest in a group setting. Facilitators will also offer instruction to those who are new to yarn crafting. Thursday Evenings, 6-8pm, January 19 - March 9 at Tierra Nueva Counseling Center. Group facilitated by student therapists LaTausha Cotner and Katie Roemerman. $10/session sliding scale. Call 471-8575 to register. TEACH YOUR WAY AROUND THE WORLD. Get TESOL Certified & Teach English Anywhere. Earn an accredited TESOL Certificate and start teaching English in the USA and abroad. Over 20,000 new jobs every month. Take this highly engaging & empowering course. Celebrating our 15th year. Next Course: March 11 - May 27. Contact John Kongsvik. 505-204-4361. info@tesoltrainers.com www.tesoltrainers.com

LEGALS

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MINDFUL RELATING AND EMBODIED EMOTION: Group therapy for emotional processing and skill building, with a focus on mindfulness and somatic practices. How do emotions help and hinder us? What emotions have had the biggest impact on your life? How can we participate with emotion to grow through challenging times? For men and women ages 18+. $10/ session sliding scale. Tierra Nueva Counseling Center. Call 471-8575 to register. Saturdays 12-2pm, from January 14-February 11. THE ART OF SELF-COMPASSION, EXPERIENTIAL WOMEN’S GROUP. Come to explore, play and take risks in an intimate and safe environment for creative living, connection to others and the greater all. 4 Thursdays 6:30-9:00PM, Jan 12 - Feb 2. $ 110. Call Silvia 505-660-2961 or email silviastenitzer@gmail.com

MARKETPLACE

RECOVERING FROM RELIGIOUS AND SPIRITUAL ABUSE. A support group is forming to help people who have experienced abuse and adverse effects from belonging to high demand religious and spiritual groups. This support group has no religious or spiritual agenda, and everyone is welcome. Group held Wednesdays from 6:30-8:30, January 18-March 8. $15/ session sliding scale. Group led by Sylvan Schneider, LMHC and Randall Browning, student therapist. To register call Tierra Nueva Counseling Center 505-471-8575.

JOHREI CENTER OF SANTA FE. JOHREI IS BASED ON THE FOCUS AND FLOW OF THE UNIVERSAL LIFE ENERGY. When clouds in the spiritual body and in consciousness are dissolved, there is a return to true health. This is according to the Divine Law of Order; after spiritual clearing, physical and mental- emotional healing follow. You are invited to experience the Divine Healing Energy of Johrei. All are Welcome! The Johrei Center of Santa Fe is located at Calle Cinco Plaza, 1500 Fifth St., Suite 10, 87505. Please call 820-0451 with any questions. Drop-ins welcome! There is no fee for receiving Johrei. Donations are gratefully accepted. Please check us out at our new website santafejohreifellowship.com

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LEGAL NOTICE TO FURNITURE CREDITORS/NAME CHANGE STATE OF NEW MEXICO IN THE PROBATE COURT SANTA FE COUNTY No.: 2016-0197 IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF MAIDA E. BARELA, DECEASED. NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed personal representative of this estate. All persons having claims against this estate are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice, or the claims will be forever barred. Claims must be presented either to the undersigned personal representative at the address listed below, or filed with the Probate Court of Santa Fe, County, NM located at the following Address: 102 Grant Ave., Santa Fe, NM 87501-2061 Dated: November 22, 2016 Maria Barela 220 Ephriam St. Santa Fe, NM 87501 505-913-9054

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• Residential/ Commercial • Bonded & Insured • Exceptional custom tailored cleaning services • Pet Friendly Safety, Value, Professionalism. • Extremely Dependable We are Santa Fe’s certified • Reasonable Rates chimney and dryer vent • Serving Santa Fe & Surrounding areas experts. New Mexico’s best • Free estimates value in chimney service; get a free video Chim-Scan 505 660-4505 with each fireplace cleaning. Baileyschimney.com. Call Bailey’s today 505-988-2771

ROOMMATE SERVICES ALL AREAS ROOMMATES.COM. Lonely? Bored? Broke? Find the perfect roommate to complement your personality and lifestyle at Roommates.com! (AAN CAN) CASEY’S TOP HAT CHIMNEY SWEEPS is committed to protecting your home. Creosote CASH FOR CARS: Any Car/ build-up in your fireplace or Truck. Running or Not! lint build-up in your dryer vent Top Dollar Paid. We Come reduces efficiency and can pose To You! Call For Instant a fire hazard. Be prepared. Offer: 1-888-420-3808 www.cash4car.com (AAN CAN) Call 989-5775

AUTOS WANTED

HANDYPERSON CARPENTRY to LANDSCAPING Home maintenance, remodels, additions, interior & exterior, irrigation, stucco repair, jobs small & large. Reasonable rates, Reliable. Discounts avail. to seniors, veterans, handicap. Jonathan, 670-8827 www.handymannm.com THE HANDYMAN YOU’VE ALWAYS WANTED. Dependable and creative problem solver. With Handyman Van, one call fixes it all. Special discounts for seniors and referrals. Excellent references. 505-231-8849 www.handymanvan.biz

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UPAYA ZEN CENTER: DEVELOP GREATER MINDFULNESS Upaya is a community resource for developing greater mindfulness and inspiring positive social change. Come for DAILY MEDITATION: 7:00am, 12:20pm, 5:30pm (See: upaya.org/about/meditation-schedule/); WEEKLY DHARMA TALKS Wednesdays at 5:30-6:30pm (See: upaya. org/about/dharma-talkschedule/); January 17-21: SESSHIN - An Intensive Zen Meditation Retreat. January 29: THE EASE AND JOY OF MORNINGS - A Half-day Meditation Retreat (Instruction offered-donation only). Register online, registrar@upaya.org, or 505-986-8518. More info: www.upaya.org/programs. 1404 Cerro Gordo, Santa Fe, NM.

SANTA FE COYOTE FENCING Specializing in Coyote Fencing. License # 16-001199-74. No job too small or large. We do it all. Richard, 505-690-6272

Start the new year with health. Come in for a physical and 1 in 50 chance for 6 month gym membership. Call Internal Medicine Specialist to book your appointment (505) 395-3003

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MIND BODY SPIRIT ASTROLOGY Rob Brezsny

Week of January 11th

ARIES (March 21-April 19) In Norse mythology, Yggdrasil is a huge holy tree that links all of the nine worlds to each other. Perched on its uppermost branch is an eagle with a hawk sitting on its head. Far below, living near the roots, is a dragon. The hawk and eagle stay in touch with the dragon via Ratatoskr, a talkative squirrel that runs back and forth between the heights and the depths. Alas, Ratatoskr traffics solely in insults. That’s the only kind of message the birds and the dragon ever have for each other. In accordance with the astrological omens, Aries, I suggest you act like a far more benevolent version of Ratatoskr in the coming weeks. Be a feisty communicator who roams far and wide to spread uplifting gossip and energizing news.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) Now would be an excellent time to add new beauty to your home. Are there works of art or buoyant plants or curious symbols that would lift your mood? Would you consider hiring a feng shui consultant to rearrange the furniture and accessories so as to enhance the energetic flow? Can you entice visits from compelling souls whose wisdom and wit would light up the place? Tweak your imagination so it reveals tricks about how to boost your levels of domestic bliss.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) In 2017, you will have unprecedented opportunities to re-imagine, revise, and reinvent the story of your life. You’ll be able to forge new understandings about your co-stars and reinterpret the meanings of crucial plot twists that happened TAURUS (April 20-May 20) You have a divine mandate once upon a time. Now check out these insights from to love bigger and stronger and truer than ever before. author Mark Doty: “The past is not static, or ever truly It’s high time to freely give the gifts you sometimes complete; as we age we see from new positions, shifthold back from those you care for. It’s high time to take ing angles. A therapist friend of mine likes to use the full ownership of neglected treasures so you can share metaphor of the kind of spiral stair that winds up them with your worthy allies. It’s high time to madly cultivate the generosity of spirit that will enable you to inside a lighthouse. As one moves up that stair, the core at the center doesn’t change, but one continually more easily receive the blessings that can and should sees it from another vantage point; if the past is a core be yours. Be a brave, softhearted warrior of love! of who we are, then our movement in time always GEMINI (May 21-June 20) I love and respect Tinker Bell, brings us into a new relation to that core.” Kermit the Frog, Shrek, Wonder Woman, SpongeBob SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) The Tao Te Ching is a SquarePants, Snow White, Road Runner, and Calvin and poetically philosophical text written by a Chinese sage Hobbes. They have provided me with much knowledge more than two millennia ago. Numerous authors have and inspiration. Given the current astrological omens, I translated it into modern languages. I’ve borrowed suspect that you, too, can benefit from cultivating your relationships with characters like them. It’s also a favorfrom their work to craft a horoscope that is precisely able time for you to commune with the spirits of Harriet suitable for you in the coming weeks. Here’s your highTubman, Leonardo da Vinci, Marie Curie, or any other his- class fortune cookie oracle: Smooth your edges, torical figures who inspire you. I suggest you have dream- untangle your knots, sweeten your openings, balance like conversations with your most interesting ancestors, your extremes, relax your mysteries, soften your glare, as well. Are you still in touch with your imaginary friends forgive your doubts, love your breathing, harmonize from childhood? If not, renew acquaintances. your longings, and marvel at the sunny dust. CANCER (June 21-July 22) “I never wish to be easily defined,” wrote Cancerian author Franz Kafka. “I’d rather float over other people’s minds as something fluid and non-perceivable; more like a transparent, paradoxically iridescent creature rather than an actual person.” Do you ever have that experience? I do. I’m a Crab like you, and I think it’s common among members of our tribe. For me, it feels liberating. It’s a way to escape people’s expectations of me and enjoy the independence of living in my fantasies. But I plan to do it a lot less in 2017, and I advise you to do the same. We should work hard at coming all the way down to earth. We will thrive by floating less and being better grounded; by being less fuzzy and more solid; by not being so inscrutable, but rather more knowable. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) Here’s my declaration: “I hereby forgive, completely and permanently, all motorists who have ever irked me with their rude and bad driving. I also forgive, totally and forever, all tech support people who have insulted me, stonewalled me, or given me wrong information as I sought help from them on the phone. I furthermore forgive, utterly and finally, all family members and dear friends who have hurt my feelings.” Now would be a fantastic time for you to do what I just did, Leo: Drop grudges, let go of unimportant outrage, and issue a blanket amnesty. Start with the easier stuff—the complaints against strangers and acquaintances—and work your way up to the allies you cherish.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) I recently discovered Tree of Jesse, a painting by renowned 20th-century artist Marc Chagall. I wanted to get a copy to hang on my wall. But as I scoured the Internet, I couldn’t find a single business that sells prints of it. Thankfully, I did locate an artist in Vietnam who said he could paint an exact replica. I ordered it, and was pleased with my new objet d’art. It was virtually identical to Chagall’s original. I suggest you meditate on taking a metaphorically similar approach, Capricorn. Now is a time when substitutes may work as well as what they replace. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) “It is often safer to be in chains than to be free,” wrote Franz Kafka. That fact is worthy of your consideration in the coming weeks, Aquarius. You can avoid all risks by remaining trapped inside the comfort that is protecting you. Or you can take a gamble on escaping, and hope that the new opportunities you attract will compensate you for the sacrifice it entails. I’m not here to tell you what to do. I simply want you to know what the stakes are.

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) “All pleasures are in the last analysis imaginary, and whoever has the best imagination enjoys the most pleasure.” So said 19thcentury German novelist Theodor Fontane, and now I’m passing his observation on to you. Why? Because by my astrological estimates, you Pisceans will have exceptional imaginations in 2017—more fertile, fervent, VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) There are some authors who and freedom-loving than ever before. Therefore, your both annoy me and intrigue me. Even though I feel allergic capacity to drum up pleasure will also be at an all-time to the uncomfortable ideas they espouse, I’m also high. There is a catch, however. Your imagination, like fascinated by their unique provocations. As I read their everyone else’s, is sometimes prone to churning out words, I’m half-irritated at their grating declarations, and superstitious fears. To take maximum advantage of its yet greedy for more. I disagree with much of what they bliss-inducing potential, you will have to be firm about say, but feel grudgingly grateful for the novel perspectives steering it in positive directions. they prod me to discover. (Nobel Prize-winner Elias Homework: Tell a story about the time Spirit reached Canetti is one such author.) In accordance with the down and altered your course in one swoop. Go to current astrological rhythms, Virgo, I invite you to seek out similar influences—for your own good! RealAstrology.com and click on “Email Rob.”

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s Expanded Weekly Audio Horoscopes and Daily Text Message Horoscopes. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700. © CO P Y R I G H T 2 0 1 7 R O B B R E Z S N Y 38

JANUARY 11-17, 2017

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EVOLUTIONARY ASTROLOGER TERRI ZEE has recently moved to Santa Fe and is now welcoming new clients. She is certified by both schools of Evolutionary Astrology, Steven Forrest’s Apprenticeship Program, and Jeffrey Wolf Green’s School of Evolutionary Astrology. Terri has over seventeen years of experience in soul-based astrology and offers consultation either in person or via Skype. Please visit her website http://terrizee.com/ or email zee2@airmail.net or call 214-912-3126.

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LOVE. CAREER. HEALTH. Psychic readings and Spiritual counseling. For more information call 505-982-8327 or go to www.alexofavalon.com. Also serving the LGBT community.

Don’t miss our MIND BODY SPIRIT EXPO this saturday JAN 14 10AM-2PM @GCCC

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January 11, 2017 Santa Fe Reporter  

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