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LOCAL NEWS

AND CULTURE JANUARY 4-10, 2017

SFREPORTER.COM FREE EVERY WEEK

THE FILM INDUSTRY

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JANUARY 4-10, 2017 | Volume 44, Issue 1

NEWS OPINION 5 BLUE CORN 7

I AM

FAKE NEWSSTAND What didn’t really happen NEWS

.

Shannon Maxwell, AVP, Santa Fe Branch Manager

7 DAYS, METROGLYPHS AND THIS MODERN WORLD 8 JAVI-YEAR 10 A look at the day planner of Santa Fe’s part-time figurehead OVER THE HILL 13 The county’s unused La Bajada Ranch could be used for agriculture for the next five years under the terms of a new lease COVER STORY 14 ACTION! Film industry spending is finally surpassing 2011 levels following a slump while state officials waffled on incentives. But is the program going to flatline again?

CULTURE

Century Bank has a deep history in New Mexico. Just like you and me. I AM your bank.

10 WHO, WHERE AND WHEN Mayor Javier Gonzales has not only travelled to international destinations and appeared on national news programs, but he’s also spent lots of time head-tohead with the city’s elites right at home. We break down some details of the last year in his public life.

MyCenturyBank.com 505.995.1222

Cover design by Anson Stevens-Bollen artdirector@sfreporter.com

EDITOR AND PUBLISHER JULIE ANN GRIMM

SFR PICKS 19 Refugees speak, America deindustrializes, lectures are given and sculptures are unveiled

ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER AND AD DIRECTOR ANNA MAGGIORE ART DIRECTOR ANSON STEVENS-BOLLEN

THE CALENDAR 21

CULTURE EDITOR ALEX DE VORE

MUSIC 23

STAFF WRITER STEVEN HSIEH

MY NAME IS JONAS Chris Jonas Trio aims to blow your mind

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December 23, 2016 Anna Maggiore anna@sfreporter.com

CULTURE STAFFER MARIA EGOLF-ROMERO CONTRIBUTORS AMY DAVIS GYWNETH DOLAND

unSTYLE 25 WEAVER FEVER That’s a wrap

COPY EDITOR CHARLOTTE JUSINSKI

SAVAGE LOVE 26 The 30-year-old virgin, cam girls and quick sex FOOD 29 TUNA, TUNA EVERYWHERE Santa Fe restaurants seem a little fishy of late MOVIES 31 FENCES REVIEW: THE MEASURE OF A MAN Plus culture shock and the realization we’re awfully privileged from Ghostland

EDITORIAL INTERN KIM JONES DIGITAL SERVICES MANAGER BRIANNA KIRKLAND PRINT PRODUCTION MANAGER AND GRAPHIC DESIGNER SUZANNE S KLAPMEIER MAJOR ACCOUNTS ADVERTISING EXECUTIVE JAYDE SWARTS ADVERTISING EXECUTIVES MICHELLE RIBEIRO NOAH G SIMPSON CIRCULATION MANAGER ANDY BRAMBLE OFFICE MANAGER JOEL LeCUYER PRINTER THE NEW MEXICAN

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ANSON STEVEBNS-BOLLEN

LETTERS

NEWS, DECEMBER 21: Mail letters to PO Box 2306, Santa Fe, NM 87504, deliver to 132 E Marcy St., or email them to editor@sfreporter.com. Letters (no more than 200 words) should refer to specific articles in the Reporter. Letters will be edited for space and clarity.

“THE END OF EVERYTHING”

NOT SO FAST While I didn’t vote for “the Don,” I have to say your article is off simply because you have this idea that the past administration has done wonders. Healthcare in New Mexico has gone downhill. Doctors are closing their doors or not taking insurance. Clinics are booking patients two and three months out because there are too many people needing care and not enough caregivers. Emergency rooms have longer lines again because of too many people and not enough doctors. ... The economy is growing according to the media, but two in 10 families in this state earn less than $10,000 a year. ... We have one of the highest violent crime rates in the US. We are at the bottom of the barrel here, so it’s not like he can make things much worse. Oh, and don’t blame a Republican governor when it’s the Legislature that seems very proud to have blocked almost anything she has tried to do. The only point you made that I paid attention to was the attorney general appointment. Legalization [of marijuana] in New Mexico has been stalled in the roundhouse for years by the D’s. ... If they would get their head around that little question, or at least put it up for public vote, we might be able to dig out of the massive shortfalls we have here.

PAPER CHANGES, JANUARY 4: GOT A BRAND NEW BAG The best part about the new year is that everything can be fresh. The paper you are holding is one example. SFR has been delivering local news and culture since 1974, and our print edition is our pride and joy. This year, we’re rolling out improvements to the layout that enliven your reading experience. Check out our redesigned Movies page, for example. Gone are the “Barf” to “Yay” ratings, replaced with a numeric system that allows our critics more freedom of explanation. We’re also conserving the physical resources that go into making the paper, printed locally by The New Mexican on recycled paper with soybased ink. The new format means less paper waste and no staples. What hasn’t changed is our commitment to speaking truth to power and to having fun while we share our community. We’re ever grateful to our readers and advertisers.

GLEN FINN SFREPORTER.COM

JULIE ANN GRIMM EDITOR@SFREPORTER.COM

The Fences Review:Man Measure of a

BEST MOVIE EVER

9 8

or++ Stellar+perf mances;+brilliant+ source+material

between mother trapped d, an the e as an aging the everyon game in Fences, overbearing husban and mere two sets: d love for her the name of the sons 7 adheres to a Simplicity is ight August WilTroy a straine desire to do right by their ion of playwr the most part, It’s here that tive intment. new film adaptat Prize-winning tale of famand backyard. tan- instinc r of loss and disappo Kushner prorgh. Maxson home legendary family dogs and her own sense Tony son’s 1983 Pulitze of 1950s Pittsbu gly believes he spins tall tales 6 in America scribe screenplay, which betrayal set in seemin and double He Angels . does death ily, gton to the death himself from his close Denzel Washin uncredited tweaks g role of gles with e should live, before his death Acclaimed actor (Stephen vides was unable to complete r and in the starrin stood knows how everyon n Bono directo hingto man as garbage duty both mistak e—Was and Wilson 5 whose age once friend and fellow but make no (Jovan Adepo) , a flawed man disappearing Troy Maxson the Negro Basety in 2005, to his sons Cory by practically of his air of authori a transition from he carries with Henderson) Fences his own ance and one in the way of l Hornsby), but ned makes hurt defining perform the majors—a sen- Lyons (Russel that he once envisio 4 into a careerball Leagues to his hardened any year. haunting truth resents his butfilms of this or seems to inform caretaker and a belies the himself, and now him and that for the finest d, a great things for quietly longing father, a husban a as s while e sibilitie lifestyl 3 FENCES r toned-down provider. , plenty familia have been. to transit ion Washington is, of course per- what might Washin gton is rivetin g, able Directed by Denzel a ed in over 100 Washin gton nonsen se to ton, Davis, Adepo, having appear ay 2 With Washing 2010 Broadw with the role, ng, lighthe arted missing Henderson from charmi the Tony-winning ism without Hornsby and who also plays formances of ly detached narciss impressive PG-13, 138 min. de Viola Davis, . Stage-to- painful performance all the more DeVargas, Regal, reprisal alongsi pace of a Violet Crown, in the film version 1 the theatrical deftly a beat, Troy’s wife Rose into account Washington when we take acts circles around easy feat, but r, minino is tic howeve screen of cinema dialogue. Davis, potential perils Fences, for the navigates the embracing them— WORST malism by flat-out MOONLIGHT EWS MOVIE AND QUICKY+REVI EVER FANTASTIC BEASTS THEM THE EAGLE WHERE TO FIND THING BEST WORST HUNTRESS HAVE THAT EVER COULD A STAR ROGUE ONE: HAPPENED STORY STORY A STAR WARS WARS LAND GHOST ROGUE ONE: tired and

9

GHOSTLAND

9

;+not+whitewashed ++ Uncensored k+ the+tribe’s+culture+shoc -+ Slow+build;+ in+Germany

shocks and Simon Stadler Rookie director d: The View with Ghostlan following humbles viewers i, a documentary . When a of the Ju’Hoans bushmen of Namibia d the the Ju’Hoansi in 1990 that prevente for food, they law was passed hunting animals Ju’Hoansi from of “gatherers.” with their titles ng were left only resorted to performi then i by dancing, The Ju’Hoans ers for money for visiting Westernshooting arrows. Ghostland and music playing privilege and on a journey of takes viewers

tribesmen walk they watch the expressions as native garb. juxtaposition around in their an interesting Ghostland poses i and the Westerners— between the Ju’Hoansso little and yet living having ers the bushmen and the Western i, Ju’Hoans happily and carefree; unknown to the having luxuries

the Ju’Hoansi civilization. his subjects from as well Stadler takes ing African tribes, Germany tribe to visit neighbor of Namibia and as “civilized” areas the lives of those with and— where they witness stores, clean water, nervous access to grocery see them all—meat. We fascinated most sacred of and restroom to use an airplane the more civilized world. s of on the by the amenitie trained almost always The camera is ally focuses on , but occasion wearing four bushmen white people) Westerners (aka confused yet intrigued and uncomfortable

Namibian bushmen

experience culture

d as unhappy, gas yet who are perceive like soap in a simplest things ar light unfulfilled. The or packaged underwe station restroom tribe members, which forces the nd up the faces of e and understa us to recogniz Westerners like really are. (Kim Jones) d we 85 min. how privilege orary Arts, NR, Center for Contemp

shock in the new

d.

doc, Ghostlan

8

arth+Vader ++ It’s+Star Wars,+bro;+D -+ Creepy+CGI

to get our Star apparently going Now that we’re form, it’s only in annualized Rogue One, Wars movies the validity of natural to question of non-core films in the the first in a series to tell a story outside the one franchise, and know and love. we’ve come to of Everything’s main plotlines Theory (The Erso We follow Jyn of an Imperial the daughter Felicity Jones), Mikkelsen Mads by played her father science officer is orphaned when want to fight (Hannibal). Jyn ce and doesn’t grows a conscien young and brash anymore. She’s , but for the Empire care about anything down much and doesn’t to track Alliance needs in exchange when the Rebel to her, she enlists is available someone close ce of freedom for whatever semblan And so, along with a galaxy. r particula in this Andor (Diego named Cassian his place Rebel captain beginning to question is who Luna), reprogrammed a wise-crackin’ by Firefly’s Alan in the fight, and (voiced brilliantly to Douglas Imperial droid he’s awfully similar Guide to r’s Tudyk, even if from The Hitchhike planets to Adams’ Marv the must traverse the Galaxy), Jyn CONTIN UED

SFREPO RTER.C

OM

ON PAGE 33

2017 JANUAR Y 4-10,

Happy Holidays!

DON’T GUT OUR HELP

9

6

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or stop by any of our convenient locations.

KATHRYN BRADY SFREPORTER.COM

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E+ VORE BY+ ALEX+ D p o r t e r. c o m alex@sfre

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If inequality and the well-being of hardworking Americans are truly important to the new Congress, they are now in a position to prove it. More than 43 million people in this country still live below the poverty line. That number would be more than twice as high were it not for federal anti-poverty policies, according to the Census Bureau. Why then would the new Congress be gearing up to attack these programs?

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JANUARY 12/8/16 4-10, 2:57 2017 PM

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LETTERS I hope we can count on our members of Congress—Representative Ben Ray Luján and Senators Martin Heinrich and Tom Udall—to reject any proposals that would take us backwards—whether gutting SNAP by turning it into a “block grant” or reducing access to Medicaid. Instead they should focus on doing some good, like expanding the Earned Income Tax Credit to workers not raising children, who are currently taxed deeper into poverty. Now more than ever, we need to focus on making things better for hardworking Americans. Dismantling our safety net is not the way to do that.

on politically, socially, and culturally and I’m grateful!

MARY ANN J KACZMARSKI LOS ANGELES, CALIFORNIA

READER POEM, DECEMBER 24: WINTER GLOVES Canyon Road loves, Just so they know, even with out snow.

ESTELLE BERGER SANTA FE

Those leather mittens were my kittens. Twenty-one was I,

LETTERS, DECEMBER 14:

headed for the sky. Sheepskin lined,

“ADIOS, COMPADRES”

Brown suede outside. Resewed for my hand

TO THE SOUTH WITH YOU

Computer Help that Doesn’t Suck!

finest mittens in the land.

I am proud to be a resident of a sanctuary city. I believe that [Mr. Bender] misunderstands the definition of a “sanctuary“ city. It means that our police force won’t engage in unconstitutional practices of profiling or stop-andfrisk based solely on a perceived appearance. Criminal activity will be prosecuted. It is the responsibility of all citizens to continue to fight against hate crimes and ensure protection for those disenfranchised by president-elect’s administration. So Mr. Bender, you and your friends won’t be missed here, nor in New York City or Los Angeles and so many other cities in the US designating themselves as a “sanctuary.” Perhaps a vacation to North Carolina or another state that embodies extreme practices against its citizens might be more apt. Congrats to Mayor Gonzales. He makes me proud of our community.

Many a snowball fight had they, through the night. A warm hand and two they made it through. SnoSeal on the outside dark brown, they never lied. Forty-two years of delight They were my winter might. Now you have them both, please take no oath. Ecstatic the two were left for you. Enjoy my lifelong friends Truly my time with them ends. If you read this There is no amiss.

MARY ANN CRISTELLO SANTA FE

Keep them, keep them, Your delight is my gem. Ever grateful for what is fateful.

THE FORK, NOVEMBER 24:

BY GF ZAXUS

“TURKEY HANGOVER”

CCandNS.com 505.216.1108

518 Old Santa Fe Trail #6, Santa Fe, NM

SOME WARM FUZZIES You do such a great job!! I’m in LA, but we visit Santa Fe every year and you really help me to broaden my understanding of what is going

SFR will correct factual errors online and in print. Please let us know if we make a mistake, editor@sfreporter.com or 988-7530.

SANTA FE EAVESDROPPER “I’m not buying produce today since I’m driving.” —Overheard at Whole Foods

“I love the Kardashians. I mean, I appreciate their cultural value.” —Overheard at Plaza Café Southside Send your Overheard in Santa Fe tidbits to: eavesdropper@sfreporter.com 6

JANUARY 4-10, 2017

SFREPORTER.COM


BLUECORN We pay the most for your gold coins, heirloom jewelry and diamonds!

It’s News to Me… BY ROBERT BASLER

LO S R D .

3909 ACADEMY RD.

CERRIL

RD.

D.

Hey! Bob! Sorry to interrupt you, but I see that Santa Fe’s Cathedral Basilica is being turned into a Muslim mosque! Boy, does that ever refry my beans! It says here they’re going to put a burqa

O RT

SR

And fake news? That comes from some pimply-faced little cretin working at a snot-encrusted laptop in his parents’ dank basement crawling with water bugs. Maybe in Moscow, maybe in Macedonia or maybe in Tesuque. This crap-lizard has an agenda, and his idiotic stories carry weight only in that if he can get enough half-wits to believe them, they can do enormous damage…

AIRP

OW

I’m not seeing the difference. The news I riff on in Blue Corn comes from real stories gathered by real local journalists who get their real asses out on the street, talk to legitimate sources and carefully craft balanced reports. It is a noble profession, and if you do it right, a lot of important people are pissed off at you a lot of the time.

On Facebook. Some guy I never heard of just posted a link to an Acme News story. Okay, where do I begin? That burqa detail is designed to have you frothing at the mouth, and apparently it’s working.

SPECIALIZING IN:

EAD

What’s the difference between your stuff and fake news? About 96 additional IQ points per reader. I want to amuse people, not deliver a false tale designed to make them act impetuously in anger. Unlike fake news, my columns aren’t meant to fool anybody.

on Our Lady of Guadalupe. Not on my watch, buster! Sigh. Where did you read that?

S. M

H

appy New Year, Bob! I’m seeing a lot of stuff about the role fake news played in the presidential election. You must be very proud, since that’s your line of work. No. I deal in sarcasm, smartass observations, infantile silliness, outright absurdity and occasional satire, but not fake news.

On the Plaza 60 East San Francisco Street, Suite 218 Santa Fe, NM 87501 • 505.983.4562 • SantaFeGoldworks.com

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Is that right? Well, for your information, my favorite alt-right radio commentator is reporting the same thing now, too! Who is he quoting? The Acme News story. So that’s two sources. No, it’s still one source, and a bad one. That’s how fake news works. Look at this! Acme News says some guy went to Christus St. Vincent to get his tonsils out, and liberal surgeons forced him to have a sex change operation! Give me strength. Bob! Bob! Acme News says the Santa Fe Kiwanis Club is coming for our guns, in spite of the 18th Amendment! This is bad! Sweet little baby Jesus. I guess if they can roll over our precious 18th Amendment rights, resistance is futile!

Denture Repair Clinic Lawrence Larragoite, D.D.S. Prosthodontics and General Dentistry

That sounded like sarcasm. Yes, mixed with feigned ignorance. My trademark. This Acme story here says eating a single Frito pie can sterilize a man overnight! Interesting. May I treat you to an extralarge one? Robert Basler’s humor column runs twice monthly in SFR. Email the author: bluecorn@sfreporter.com

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JANUARY 4-10, 2017

7


7 DAYS CHILD POOPS IN MEOW WOLF’S HOUSE OF ETERNAL RETURN Art critics loved it.

MIA AND ELIJAH ARE TOP BABY NAMES IN NM FOR 2016 They beat out other top contenders like Bandelier and Walter White Jr. Jr.

RUSSIANS ADMIT TO ATHLETE DOPING... ...And also hacked the US election. At least now you can stop blaming your family in the Midwest.

BREAKING BAD ACTOR SWORN IN AS BERNALILLO COUNTY COMMISSIONER Way to go, Gomey!

ALI MCGRAW SCORNED IN THE SANTA FE NEW MEXICAN FOR USING A CELL PHONE WHILE DRIVING But she should still totally run for governor.

CONVENIENCE STORE IN MAYHILL, NM UNDER FIRE FOR “KILL OBAMA” SIGN Truly a proud day for our state which, until now, was generally perceived as a meth Mecca or a heroin hideaway.

CARRIE FISHER DIES Drowned in moonlight, strangled by her own bra.

READ IT ON SFREPORTER.COM

8

SFR’S 2017 PHOTO CONTEST

Y’ALL LIKE SOCIAL MEDIA, RIGHT?

Bust out your cameras and submit to our annual photo contest for a shot at prizes and inclusion in our Santa Fe Manual! The deadline is Feb. 1, so start snappin’!

We do Instagram and Twitter and Facebook just like you do, so find those things online and give us a like or a follow or whatever it’s called now.

JANUARY 4-10, 2017

SFREPORTER.COM


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JANUARY 4-10, 2017

9


NEW YORK, NEW YORK On the mayor’s first trip to the Big Apple in 2016, he met with “close friend” Bill de Blasio. He also spoke with several Hillary Clinton operatives, none more important than campaign chair John Podesta.

Javi-year Inside the day planner of Santa Fe’s ‘part-time’ figurehead BY STEVEN HSIEH s t e v e n @ s f r e p o r t e r. c o m

M

ayor Javier Gonzales loves La Plazuela. He dined at the restaurant housed at La Fonda Hotel 19 times in 2016. And he almost always ordered a table for two: Coffee with Alan Webber, the former gubernatorial candidate and founder of the magazine Fast Company. Breakfast with former district attorney Jennifer Padgett in the midst of her election bid. Lunch with Lee David Zlotoff, the producer behind MacGyver. “They have this great spinach salad with grilled chicken,” Gonzales tells SFR of La Plazuela, adding that the city doesn’t foot the bill for his lunch meetings. “It’s usually a guest check whenever I go.” The City Council last year established an independent salary commission to decide how much the mayor will make when the position officially becomes full-time with the arrival of “strong mayor” power changes in 2018. An ordinance approved by voters three years ago bumped the mayor’s salary from $29,600 to $74,000 until the commission completes its work. With the upcoming salary discussions, we felt it appropriate to inspect how our current mayor spends his time. SFR reviewed about 1,200 scheduled blocks from Gonzales’ 2016 calen-

dar, obtained through a public records request. Notably, it only took one day for his office turn over an hour-byhour breakdown of his working hours. (We’re still waiting for Gov. Susana Martinez’ daily calendar, which we asked for five years ago.) Also to Gonzales’ credit, the results of our request mostly bored us. He already treats the mayorship like a full-time job, often working 40-hour weeks, including weekends.

There are people who participate in civic organizations that also participate in politics. -Javier Gonzales

About 25 percent of his appointments were meetings with city employees. He sat down for bi-weekly meetings with heads of his tourism, arts and youth services departments. He also checked in regularly with the police and fire chiefs, parking director and asset

WHERE IN THE WORLD IS THE MAYOR? RY UA

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19-22, WASHINGTON, DC

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22-24, KANSAS CITY

10-11, DES MOINES

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JANUARY 4-10, 2017

SFREPORTER.COM

development manager. The mayor spent roughly another quarter of his working hours making appearances at ribbon-cutting ceremonies, art shows, trade fairs, benefit dinners, weddings and funerals. When he wasn’t taking care of city business or showing his face for the public, Gonzales chatted with business owners, journalists, political operatives, foreign consuls, consultants, union leaders, nonprofit directors, artists, and officials from the state and federal government. Some of his most frequent visitors reflect his policy priorities. Of noncity employees, Gonzales met the most (14 times) with Beth Beloff, chair of the Sustainable Santa Fe Commission, which worked with the city to establish the Verde Fund to take aim at climate change and poverty. He met five times with Jeannie Oakes, a senior fellow at the Learning Policy Institute who helped devise a soda tax plan to fund early childhood education. (Gonzales later also consulted with Bloomberg Philanthropies, the nonprofit project of former New York City mayor Michael Bloomberg, who championed a beverage tax during his tenure.) Mayor Gonzales, a former state Democratic Party head, also met with prominent locals who happen to contribute large sums to political campaigns. Charmay Allred, a prominent art collector and big-time donor, met with Gonzales at least five times this year. “She is a big patron of the arts and regularly introduces me to artists or

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AP

27-30, NEW YORK CITY

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5-9, BEIJING, CHINA (OVERBOOKED FLIGHT)

24-27, INDIANAPOLIS

22-24, WASHINGTON, DC

BLOOMBERG PHILANTHROPIES Nov. 15

LOCAL BIG-WIGS Gonzales, former chair of the state’s Democratic Party, occasionally dines with big donors. He says these meetings have nothing to do with a potential run for governor in 2018. Here’s the value of recent state and federal political donations:

$19,533

SANDE DEITCH 2 Meetings

$114,789

CHARMAY ALLRED 5 meetings

$314,383

EARL AND DEBORAH POTTER 5 meetings

MEET THE PRESS Here’s a look at the mayor’s media appointments in 2016. Gonzales’ national profile rocketed after Nov. 15, when he went on Fox News to defend sanctuary cities.

SINCE NOVEMBER 15

Gonzales took 15 trips in 2016, including two international trips.

12-17, DOHA, QATAR

JOHN PODESTA BILL DE BLASIO Chairman of the 2016 Mayor of Clinton Campaign New York City Sept. 13 March 29

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10-1, HARVARD


NEWS

people who have contributed to the city,” he says. He met with either Earl or Deborah Potter, the proprietors of Five & Dime General Stores, five times. (Deborah Potter sits on the city’s film commission.) Combined, the couple has given more than $300,000 to state and federal political campaigns since 1997. Given that Santa Fe has a public campaign finance system, he’s not likely fundraising for the next mayor’s race. Asked whether meetings with Democratic donors could have any relation to a potential run for governor, Gonzales says, “Absolutely not. These are individuals that significantly invest in the city of Santa Fe and nonprofits. Santa Fe is a big Democratic town. There are people who participate in civic organizations that also participate in politics.” Gonzales took 15 trips during the year, spending 73 days out-of-state or racking up airline miles. The city paid for travel on six of the mayor’s out-of-state forays. Grants, fellowships and federal funds covered the rest. His longest trip was to Harvard University, where he spent 23 days (including travel) participating in a fellowship for LGBT leaders, which he called “an incredible opportunity.” He also journeyed to the Middle Eastern country of Qatar on a junket with the US Conference of Mayors and to Paris for a meeting about “inclusive growth.” “There’s a list of questions we go over before I’ll agree to a trip. Is it going to help me build upon some of the initiatives I’ve said are priorities? Is it a place I can advocate on the needs of Santa Fe at a federal level?” Applications for the independent salary commission must be submitted to the city by Monday, Jan. 9. The mayor will nominate seven members for approval by City Council.

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STEVEN HSIEH

NEWS

Over the Hill

Private lease for agriculture to take over part of county’s unused ranch BY STEVEN HSIEH s t e v e n @ s f r e p o r t e r. c o m

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ANSON STEVNS-BOLLEN

early eight years ago, Santa Fe County shelled out $7 million of taxpayer dollars to purchase 470 acres of land near La Cienega. Since then, county officials have struggled to find a purpose for the sprawling woodland formerly known as Santa Fe Canyon Ranch. At one point, the county formed a steering committee to evaluate ideas for the property, now called La Bajada Ranch. The open space has remained untouched. Once considered a blank canvas with possibilities limited only by the imaginations of land planners, La Bajada Ranch today is more commonly associated with bureaucratic slog. But a county plan presented this fall and a separate lease agreement signed last week look poised to finally put the land to use. Hang some ornaments on those piñon trees, Santa Fe County. We have ourselves a holiday miracle!

Lessee Frank Mancuso Jr. isn’t ready to celebrate yet.

Frank Mancuso Jr., a film producer known for horror flicks, last week entered into a five-year lease with the county for roughly half the land, agreeing to pay about $108,000 over the term. The contract limits the property to agricultural, livestock and educational purposes. Mancuso already owns about 850 acres of adjacent property, which he purchased from Santa Fe Canyon Ranch, LLC, in 2014, ending a plan to develop multiple homes in the area. He rezoned the property for a single-family homestead. When the now-disbanded La Bajada Steering Committee accepted ideas for the neighboring acres more than a year ago, Mancuso was the only one to submit a proposal. He plans to transform sections of the area into a community farm to encourage local agriculture. The film producer declined to speak with SFR this week, pending an approval of the lease by the state Department of Finance and Administration. “This process has been difficult and frustrating, and I am embarrassed that it has taken this long to get into an agreement and a project we can share with the community,” Mancuso told SFR in July. Carl Dickens, president of La Cienega Valley Association, welcomed the news. “Anything we can do to bring agriculture back is something we support,” he tells SFR, noting that the property once served as a working cattle ranch. “We hope the community college will be involved.” As for the unleased section of the ranch, the county this fall made steps toward a vision. A development plan presented to commissioners in October would allow for residential development alongside public services. Mark Hogan, director of the county’s Projects, Facilities and Open Space Division, suggested the land could be used for a fire station, trail network or visitor center. The proposal also calls for opening the property for a county program that allows landowners to sell development rights to more densely populated areas, part of an initiative to reduce sprawl.

A five-year lease of La Bajada Ranch will earn the county about $108,000.

The county invested hard cash in that and the county needs to demonstrate that there is some fiscally responsible return for that investment. -Eric Blinman, former chairman of the La Bajada Steering Committee

“I think we were all pleasantly surprised,” said Eric Blinman, former chairman of the La Bajada Steering Committee. “The county invested hard cash in that and the county needs to demonstrate that there is some fiscally responsible return for that investment.” Blinman adds that Mancuso’s “narrowly limited” ideas for the property posed

a challenge for the county to meet the committee’s recommendations. The request for proposals called for plans that would maximize the county’s investment while still preserving the property’s “unique cultural, agricultural, historical and biological resources.” “I think that if the Mancuso proposal had been more holistic, that the county would have done something different,” he says. The short timeframe of the agreement, on the flipside, presents opportunity. “It’s like there’s nothing lost in granting the lease to Mancuso, and it leaves open the idea of a broader approach in the future.” But not everyone is happy with the results. Paul White, who also served on the steering committee, tells SFR, “This just flies in the face of what the community wanted.” He pointed to a 2010 poll that showed the majority of surrounding residents preferred to leave the area as open space. A report from the poll showed that “residents are clearly very resistant to any types of projects that might take away from the rural nature of the area.” Dickens says he needs to hear more about the county’s plan before he offers any sort of endorsement. “The idea of finding someone who will lease the property and build sustainable homes, we find kind of interesting,” he tells SFR. “We at one point were faced with the possibility of 635 homes there, so it’s a helluva lot better than it was then. This is something our community has been dealing with, and we’re hopeful that things will be settled. We’ll be watching as time moves along.”

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ACTION! A

THE FILM INDUSTRY BRINGS BIG MONEY TO NEW MEXICO, BUT DOES THE INCENTIVE CAP MORTGAGE ITS POTENTIAL FUTURE SUCCESS?

BY ALEX DE VORE a l e x @ s f r e p o r t e r. c o m

fter enjoying a surge of activity in the state, mid-2011 came as a dark time for the film industry in New Mexico. The arrival of Susana Martinez in the governor’s office and the subsequent session of the state Legislature presented threats to the future of film here. Citing what they said were alternative priorities like education, lawmakers aimed to limit incentives and rebates meant to draw film productions. Direct film spending in New Mexico plummeted as much as 42 percent between 2011 and 2014, according to a recent economic report. Insiders say the threats and the actual changes to incentive programs dealt a major blow, and years later, the industry is just beginning to return to a place of stability. To illustrate, think about Marvel Studios productions like Thor or The Avengers—the first installments, re14

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leased in 2011 and 2012, respectively, were shot in New Mexico; their sequels, debuting in 2013 and 2015, were not. To Eric Witt, the exective director (and sole employee) of the new city/ county Santa Fe Film Office, the notion of scaling back New Mexico’s courtship of the film industry was absurd. Film not only puts hundreds of millions of dollars into New Mexico’s economy (the state Film Office estimates the 2016 fiscal year brought $387 million in direct spending into the state), but it creates hundreds of jobs. The second phase of a four-phase report by Canadian accounting firm MNP on the effects of film and TV incentives released in October 2015 suggests that the industry employed between 2,500 and 4,000 New Mexico residents annually between 2010 and 2015. During this time, 74 percent of the industry’s full-time positions filled went to New Mexicans. Additionlly, in the last two fiscal years, spending surpassed the previous highs. Those hefty numbers were part of the reason that Witt counted on widespread support in 2002, when he helped


draft a film incentive program under outgoing governor Gary Johnson which essentially issued rebates to producers for part of the money they spent here. In the years that followed, Witt would become deputy chief of staff and director of media industries developments for the incoming governor, Bill Richardson. With his prior knowledge of film and finance, Witt assisted in turning New Mexico into one of the go-to territories for production. “I knew what I needed—I knew what we needed,” Witt says. “Major film and television production does not take place anywhere in the world anymore without an incentive, and that has changed the entire nature of the business. … It has this whole new language.” Witt grew up in New Mexico, but made for California where he pursued a degree in entertainment finance at the University of California, Los Angeles. In 1990, he went to work for famed producer Dino De Laurentiis. “Dino built studios [and] we made films all over the world, and I got a lot of experience, and it’s how I learned to speak the language,” Witt says. Witt formed a production company called Asylum Entertainment in 1996, which, he says, “imploded after a couple years.” He retreated home to New Mexico in the early 2000s to lick his wounds, but the plan was always to return to a studio job. “And then I got roped into politics,” he says. “Bill Richardson was becoming governor, and he really wanted to strengthen the film industry and we had a lot of success with that.” Richardson built on the original Johnson-era version of the incentives program and successfully lured big-dollar productions shopping for the best deal. Beginning in 2003, film projects were eligible for a 15 percent rebate on money spent for certain qualifying expenditures such as wages, vendors and other costs that can be attributed directly to the production.

By 2006, lawmakers had upped rebates to 20 percent of the total qualifying spend, a number that later jumped to today’s 25 percent. This made New Mexico very popular, according to Witt. So much so, he says, that other states attempted to emulate New Mexico’s film-luring programs. “By 2011 there were 42 or 43 other states with similar incentives,” Witt points out.

Major film and television production does not take place anywhere in the world anymore without an incentive. -Eric Witt

And then came Martinez, elected in 2010 after Richardson termed out. Martinez and her allies proposed slashing the rebates back to the original 15 percent, even the threat of which many in the industry blamed for potential New Mexico productions choosing other states, such as Georgia or Louisiana, for superior

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FILMED IN SANTA FE You’d probably be surprised to know how many movies and television programs have been made in and around Santa Fe, so we dug through the wide world of productions to highlight a few standouts. Vampires (1998) James Woods wears a leather jacket, fights vampires and makes a call from a phone booth (that never actually existed … movie magic!) on Guadalupe Street near Cerrillos Road. Awful? Maybe, but the biz was/is still good for NM. The Bachelor (2002-present) Oh sure, there was that hotly contested $50K-ish in tax cash that the city spent to lure a show here in 2015 for the purposes of tourism, and we’re not sure it really worked out the way everyone thought, but one thing’s for sure—that one female contestant who thought we were near the ocean is a moron. Also, they spelled the name of our city “Sante Fe,” so... The Longest Yard (2005) This Adam Sandler remake of a Burt Reynolds film about prison inmates who play football against their guards took over the old State Penitentiary and also famously ruined karaoke night for your old pal Alex when Tracy Morgan stole his microphone during a stirring rendition of Gloria Gaynor’s “I Will Survive.” Did You Hear About the Morgans? (2009) Hugh Grant and Sarah Jessica Parker star in this movie about people who must relocate to some small town after witnessing a murder, and you may just see the famous Plaza Café in there somewhere. Crazy Heart (2009) You may recognize downtown bar Evangelo’s throughout this Jeff Bridges-led film about an aging singer-songwriter who feels feelings and sings and songwrites about them. The Book of Eli (2010) We were pretty OK with this movie, which was shot in part

at the State Pen, until it turned out Denzel Washington was somehow a completely blind sharpshooter who was protecting the Bible by blasting fools. Gary Oldman took some of the sting out of the absurdity, though. Cowboys & Aliens (2011) This comic book adaptation starred Daniel Craig and Harrison Ford as a couple of cowpokes that run afoul of an alien invasion. It also ruled. Cowboys & Aliens is another in a long line of films and TV shows shot in part at the Bonanza Creek Ranch such as 3:10 to Yuma, Manhattan and, sadly, Wild Hogs, which is that movie about middle-aged dudes like Tim Allen and John Travolta who take a motorcycle trip and are jerks (it also featured scenes shot in Madrid). Longmire (2012-present) The stuff of your mom’s fantasies, this TV show-turnedNetflix-exclusive follows a rugged lawman who, like, arrests people or something. Longmire shoots in and around Santa Fe and generally spends a good six months out of the year at the Greer Garson Studios at Santa Fe University of Art and Design. Manhattan (2014-2015) The story of the race to atomic weaponry in 1940s Los Alamos, Manhattan was all about that drama and was mostly filmed at the now-defunct barracks of the Bruns Army Hospital on the Santa Fe University of Art and Design campus due to its totally 1940s-esque aesthetic, though set designers did make alterations. Whiskey Tango Foxtrot (2016) The white house on Grant Avenue that does not blend in with the neighborhood at all stood in for a press compound in Afghanistan in this terrible movie starring Tina Fey. It’s terrible.

2012’s The Avengers filmed in New Mexico; its 2015 sequel, Avengers: Age of Ultron, did not.

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s with most dollars made in New Mexico, the bulk of the concern lies (or should lie) with the little guy— the people who aren’t making millions of dollars, but who work the tough and vital jobs in the industry to make productions possible. We found some folks who do just that to get their take on the current climate on local film.

Pierre Barrera

Originally from South Dakota, set dresser Barrera moved to New Mexico 1992 in pursuit of film opportunities, specifically in the form of Wyatt Earp, a Western released in 1994. “I’ve kept pretty steady work the whole time, but things got very tough around 2011,” he recalls. “Because of the talented crew I work with, I managed to maintain work, but we could all see that the jobs started to become scarce and I know a lot of productions pulled out.” Barrera says his love of film work came out of being obsessed with a good story, and that he hopes the incentive cap can be increased or done away with altogether. “I’ve made this my home, I’ve raised my family here,” Barrera says. “I want to make sure I can continue working in this state.”

Maximiliano Martinez

A veteran of the state’s film industry and lifelong New Mexican, Martinez has done everything from appearing as an extra, stand-in work, catering, craft services, production assistance and more on shows like Better Call Saul, Longmire and The Night Shift. “We’ve had the drought before, and for a few years there weren’t that many films coming in, but I was one of the lucky ones,” Martinez tells SFR. “But honestly, the boost in the economy is ridiculous—there are just so many things that open up. It’s a great stimulus for New Mexico.” Martinez says he would almost certainly move out of the state to continue working in film if opportunities dry up here. “I could never imagine going back to a desk job or a cash register,” he says. “It can get tough working long hours, and most of us work almost every day, but you can make a great wage” working in film and television.

Alec Brown

A senior majoring in film editing at Santa Fe University of Art and Design, Brown currently works with his fellow students for the most part, but he’s also interned with at least one major film that shot in Santa Fe (he was unable to provide specifics as of press time). “We’ve had so many intriguing films set up shop at Garson Studios, and it’s done so much for the state industry, let alone my campus,” Brown says. “They’ve created jobs and notoriety for my school and have given students countless opportunities to learn about their crafts professionally and also about how the film business works and evolves.” Brown hails from Austin but says he’s fallen in love with Santa Fe. “I think [incentives] are important for filmmakers who want to continue to live in this state,” he continues. “After studying here, I have to say New Mexico has a charm that can’t be replicated—one that constantly feeds inspiration [and] with film being an effective voice for social change. It would be a shame not to use it.”

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ALEX DE VORE

THE EVERYDAY PEOPLE

incentives. But after a hard battle, state way through 2018,” says Octavio Marin, lawmakers instead agreed to keep the re- director of operations at Santa Fe Studios. bate at its current level but do something “It’s absolutely becoming busier and busthat conservatives in the Roundhouse had ier.” been pushing for for years: impose a cap on This obviously means more money for how much the state would pay. the state and more money for Santa Fe. The $50 million annual limit remains “You just don’t have enterprises in the in place, yet the governor appears to be state that drop this kind of money in eight coming around. weeks—a typical vendor list for a movie “To [the Martinez administration’s] covers, like, 300 things, from babysitting credit, they eventually started to realize and pet walking to food and drinks, office that more films meant more money for the supplies … Just look around your house, state, and last year we started to see that and every single thing you see is something uptick in productions again,” Witt says. needed for a film, because they’re recreatNew Mexico lawmakers even sweet- ing an entire world for every production,” ened the deal with the passage of 2013’s Witt says. Breaking Bad Bill, which allows a recurThat’s not even to mention the benering television series to take advantage of fits to service and hospitality industries as a 30 percent rebate on a production’s total well as tourism. Tourism is already a cash qualified expenditures. Productions start- cow in New Mexico, but it’s even more lued to trickle in once more, and the capital crative when tourists come in search of locity region stood to make a ton of money. cations featured in films like Independence Thus, the Santa Fe Film Office was born in Day: Resurgence or Crazy Heart and televiJuly of 2016 to aid in bringing productions sion programs like House of Cards or Manto the region. “We’re looking at a sizeable hattan. According to the third phase of the economic impact,” city Councilor Signe MNP study, released in July 2016 with a Lindell, who voted to approve the joint focus on tourism, 16 percent of people surventure, tells SFR. “I think it’s a matter veyed from out of state noted that the film of we want to keep ourselves out in front, industry would have a “great influence” on we want to attract film projects to Santa their decision to visit. Fe and we want to find any way we can be “The reality is that, for the year of 2016, helpful.” Santa Fe had a lot of filming, a lot of interIn a mere six months, numerous pro- est in future filming, and the net result is ductions have funneled through Witt’s that all the hotels saw a definite uptick,” office. Four major films and two television says Rich Verruni, president of the Santa programs are in progress and additional Fe Lodgers Association. He says 2016 was projects are scheduled to begin early this “absolutely a banner year.” year, he says. Witt aims to smooth the way But not all the news is good. And it for productions with permit navigation, might not last. According to Witt, there’s hospitality information, tax and revenue cause for concern that we may begin to exqueries and scheduling changes. Whether ceed the incentive cap as soon as the 2018 it’s helping secure permission to close a fiscal year. Whereas payments prior to the street for a shoot or reserving hotel rooms cap adhered to what was essentially a payfor out-of-town crew, he’s on the case. Witt as-you-go timeline, current productions performs all these duties for now but plans to hire another worker to help this year. The office is a $330,000 investment from the city and county governments—that price tag also accounts for marketing, web design, inclusion in location scouting expos, membership dues for national and global entities such as the Association of Film Commissioners International and day-to-day operations. It’s all spending that Witt says is “being adjusted as we find we need more of this or less of that.” Added up, the county and city’s cinematic resources are operating at nearly full capacSanta Fe Film Office head Eric Witt. ity. “We’re pretty busy all the


eligible for rebates will receive deferred payments in the event they are owed $2 million or more. “They instituted a turning system wherein, depending on the credit you earned, they’d pay in installments.” Since the state divides the big balances into several years’ worth of payments, it goes into the next year owing millions to productions, he says. “And what is going to happen is that we will owe more credits—even with a spread-out system— than the $50 million we have allocated.” The most recently available information from the New Mexico Taxation and

Revenue Department states that nearly $7.5 million has been paid out as of Oct. 31 for the 2017 fiscal year, but this doesn’t include deferred payments. As of press time, repeated requests for a comment from the New Mexico Film Office went unanswered. Witt says delays won’t affect the major studios as much. But for smaller, independent productions with private investors looking to recoup their money as quickly as possible, it could mean they look elsewhere. “If a production is looking at us or Toronto, and they’re going to have to wait another year for their credit

VALUE OF NEW MEXICO FILM AND TELEVISION INDUSTRY The amount of money spent by film productions shot in New Mexico started to fizzle after 2011 amid concerns that the incentive percentage would be reduced. After the passage of 2013’s Breaking Bad Bill, film dollars coming into the state began to rise once more.

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[from New Mexico], that could be the tipping point.” He continues, “I never liked this cap to begin with. I personally think we should just get rid of it altogether, but I know that’s not going to happen with the current political environment; I really don’t think anyone anticipated the economic shape we’d be in.” Witt calls the cap an “arbitrary number,” and says increasing payouts is a smart move. “When productions are looking for a place to film, they look at three major things: What’s the cap, do they have any stages and do they have a decent crew.” Witt says. “Two out of three isn’t going to cut it, and it would be hard to keep going as we are without an increase.” Witt is not alone in advocating for a return to greater incentives. Jon Hendry, president of the International Alliance of Theatrical Stage Employees Local 480, Santa Fe’s “below-the-line” film union, says the state will need to “catch up with inflation” and revisit the incentive cap to ensure productions will continue to choose the state and make sure full-time New Mexico residents continue to get hired. “If this were up to me, I’d say increase the cap; we’re not asking to blow it off completely. With any program you do, there’s going to be a percentage of people who are against it,” Hendry says. “[Opponents will] say it’s because films aren’t being shot in every single county, but it isn’t like people in California say they hate the film business because they live in Fresno instead of Hollywood. And really, we’re putting our resources and our dollars back here—this isn’t money for Hollywood, it’s money for main street.” Hendry and his members have put their support behind incoming state Rep. Daymon Ely, D-Corrales, who plans to introduce a bill during the upcoming legislative session that links the incentive numbers to market data.

COURTESY DAYMON ELY

ACTION!

Incoming Democratic state Rep. Daymon Ely plans to introduce a bill to strengthen film.

“We’re still working on what we’ll tie the bill to, but the idea is to create stability within the industry,” Ely tells SFR. “What we’ve learned is that if you don’t have predictability, you lose business. But we aren’t looking for an arbitrary increase of the cap; you’d index it with some standard, which we’re working on right now.” Ely says that as a freshman legislator, he won’t be able to prefile the bill, but that he’ll introduce it on Jan. 17. “At least right now, the film industry is working, and I do think that creating an unpredictable environment is something we can’t afford to do,” he says. “Look at how difficult it is for us to attract jobs here. … My hope would be that it won’t be controversial. I’m not so naive to think there’s not going to be opposition from somewhere, but the last thing we want is a repeat of 2011.”

SOURCE: MNP TAX INCENTIVE STUDY

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Photographer Martin J Desht once worked for Bethlehem Steel in Philadelphia. His father before him had been a coal miner and worked for Mack Trucks. “It was the most diversely and heavily industrialized city in North America, and when they started to lose that economic base beginning in the ’70s,” Dresht tells SFR, “I knew there was a story that needed telling.” Faces from an American Dream was born. The show, which focuses on American deindustrialization, has exhibited annually across the country since 1992 and comes to Santa Fe this week. “The American dream is a perennial topic,” Desht says. “The show is always topical, election or not.” (Alex De Vore)

COURTESY JUDITH FEIN

DREAM DREAM DREAM

MARTIN J DESHT

ART OPENING

Faces from an American Dream: On display Wednesday Jan 4. Reception 5 pm Friday Jan. 20. Through Jan. 28. Free. Vista Grande Public Library, 14 Avenida Torreon, 466-7323.

COURTESY AXLE CONTEMPORARY

ART OPENING

ASSEMBLED AND BOUND Frederick Spaulding uses unique materials in his assemblage sculpture works. One of his earliest shows, for example, featured a series of bricks silkscreened with photographic images of Chicago, and his work in the upcoming opening at Axle Contemporary follows the original-parts suit. “I use a batch of materials—a collection, I call it—that I collect over many years,” Spaulding tells SFR. “And I rebuild in different ways, so it’s like I am constantly recycling the material.” Spaulding is still perfecting his newest piece for the upcoming show at Axle’s mobile space, and we can’t wait to see the finished product. (Maria Egolf-Romero) Frederick Spaulding Opening Reception: 5 pm Friday Jan. 6. Free. Axle Contemporary, in front of the New Mexico Museum of Art, 107 W Palace Ave., 670-5854.

PREHISTORIC PRESERVATION The Tiwa people, a group of Tanoan Pueblo tribes located in the Southwest, have a history and culture that so fascinated archaeologist/professor Severin Fowles that he literally wrote the book on their hierocratic history. Fowles teaches anthropology at Barnard College and Columbia University, and his installment of Southwest Seminars’ Ancient Sites, Ancient Stories lecture series focuses on making sense of the petroglyphs found all over Northern New Mexico. Impress your friends on your next trip to Bandelier when you know what the cliffs are saying. Fowles discusses the knowledge he accumulated during years of research and does the whole Q&A thing with the audience. (Kim Jones) Interpretations of Archaic Northern Rio Grande Rock Art: 6 pm Monday Jan. 9. $12. Hotel Santa Fe, 1501 Paseo De Peralta, 982-1200.

COURTESY THE AUTHOR

BOOKS/LECTURES

EVENT

Never Fear

Refugees Speak puts human faces on the refugee crisis

Human beings seem to have an overactive fear of the unknown, and we’re hard-pressed to think of a more immediate example of the ugliness that can be born of fear than the current international refugee crisis. People are scared about the ramifications that might occur when American cities grant sanctuary status but, in most cases, it’s the result of a simple case of not enough information. Travel journalist Judith Fein is aware of this and, as such, has helped to organize an upcoming event that will hopefully dispel at least some of the fear surrounding this volatile issue. At Refugees Speak, interested parties will have the chance to ask nearly a dozen refugees from varying creeds and countries like Syria, Africa, Iraq and beyond almost anything they wish by writing queries on index cards. The event will also provide information about how people might help through donations of goods, time and money. “In a lot of cases, these people are overwhelmed,” Fein says. “They’ve seen horrible atrocities, and now they get $240 a month and are given very little time to get jobs, pay rent, make it on their own. … We asked, ‘What is need-

ed now?’” In most cases, the simple answer is that these people need support and care, but there is always much to be done, especially during today’s political climate of fear-mongering and potential oppression. The subtext of the event is, of course, don’t be a jerk, and try to remember that refugees are human beings. “We figured that instead of hearing about the situation from experts, we wanted to hear from the [refugees] themselves,” Fein adds. “We know that Santa Fe has to be one of the most incredible places in the world, and we know that people want to help; this will help them to do that.” So take your questions and concerns to the source, but remember to maintain your compassion and a healthy level of empathy. You’ve no idea what these people have been through, and we are truly never better as a species than when we flex our understanding. (ADV) REFUGEES SPEAK 1-3 pm Sunday Jan. 8. Free. First Presbyterian Church, 208 Grant Ave., 982-8544.

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Email all the relevant information to calendar@sfreporter.com.

COURTESY EVOKE CONTEMPORARY

Want to see your event here?

THE CALENDAR

You can also enter your events yourself online at calendar.sfreporter.com (­submission doesn’t guarantee inclusion). Need help?

Contact Maria: 395-2910

WED/4 ART OPENINGS MARTIN DESHT: FACES FROM AN AMERICAN DREAM Vista Grande Public Library 14 Avenida Torreon, 466-7323 Desht debuts his nationally toured photo documentary concerning American deindustrialization in a solo exhibit that is on view at the library through Jan. 28, with an reception and meet-the-artist event on Jan. 20 at 5 pm (see SFR Picks, page 19). Noon-6 pm, free

BOOKS/LECTURES DHARMA TALK Upaya Zen Center 1404 Cerro Gordo Road, 986-8518 This short meditation is followed by a dharma talk presented by Upaya Zen Priests Joshin Brian Byrnes and Genzan Quennell. 5:25 pm, free

EVENTS ECHO CHAMBER: PANEL DISCUSSION Center for Contemporary Arts 1050 Old Pecos Trail, 982-1338 Six leaders of the local emerging arts community meet to discuss the future of Santa Fe's contemporary art scene in the midst of Stranger Collective’s most recent exhibit. Panel members include Eliza Lutz, founder of Matron Records, Alicia Guzman, a faculty member at Santa Fe University of Art and Design and Niomi Fawn, a queer curator. 6:30 pm, free SUPPORT GROUP FOR STROKE SURVIVORS Christus St. Vincent 455 St. Michael's Drive, 820-5202 If you or a loved one has suffered a stroke, this group offers support. 11 am, free

Julie Speed’s “Bear” is on view through Jan. 31 at Evoke Contemporary as part of a solo exhibit, which opened Dec. 30.

MUSIC BILL FORREST Vanessie 427 W Water St., 982-9966 Forrest performs an evening set of pop tunes, classics and standards on a swanky piano. And swank adds to the quality of sound, right? 6:30 pm, free CALVIN HAZEN El Mesón 213 Washington Ave., 983-6756 A resident of Madrid, Spain, Hazen really knows his way around flamenco guitar, which he proves in this solo performance. 7 pm, free DJ SATO Boxcar 530 S Guadalupe St., 988-7222 Sato brings a set of house and electronica tunes in the Railyard area venue. 10 pm, free

E CLAYTON WEST El Farol 808 Canyon Road, 983-9912 Usually frontman of the local band The Soul Deacons, West takes a stab at a solo-acoustic act. 8:30 pm, free SIERRA La Fiesta Lounge 100 E San Francisco St., 982-5511 Classic country, rock, oldies, Latin and funk. 7:30 pm, free SKY SMEED Cowgirl 319 S Guadalupe St., 982-2565 A folky solo guitar performance with indie rock influences. 8 pm, free TUCKER BINKLEY Osteria D'Assisi 58 S Federal Place, 986-5858 Binkley is a piano-playing master and he puts on a show at the local Italian eatery. 6 pm, free

THU/5 MUSIC ALTO ESTILO El Farol 808 Canyon Road, 983-9912 Acoustic soul tunes performed in a classic Canyon Road haunt. 8:30 pm, free BILL FORREST Vanessie 427 W Water St., 982-9966 Forrest plays a selection of pop songs and classics on piano. 6:30 pm, free DJ SHATTER’S BIRTHDAY BASH The Underground 200 W San Francisco St., 819-1597 Celebrate the last year of Shatter’s 20s with live hip-hop performances by OG Willikers, Kron Jeremy, Benzo and more. 9 pm, $5

GYPSY PLAYBOYS Cowgirl 319 S Guadalupe St., 982-2565 Western swing, country, gypsy jazz and rock from a band of playboys. 8 pm, free RANDY RANE Omira Bar & Grill 1005 St. Francis Drive, 780-5483 Brazilian and Spanish guitar. 6 pm, free SIERRA La Fiesta Lounge 100 E San Francisco St., 982-5511 Classic country, rock, oldies, Latin and funk. 7:30 pm, free TIERRA SONIKETE El Mesón 213 Washington Ave., 983-6756 A jazz quartet including trumpeter JQ Whitcomb and flamenco guitarist Joaquin Gallegos. 7 pm, free

TUCKER BINKLEY Osteria D'Assisi 58 S Federal Place, 986-5858 Binkley is a piano-playing master and dazzles with his key-rocking skills. 6 pm, free

FRI/6 ART OPENINGS FREDERICK SPAULDING Axle Contemporary 670-5854 Spaulding creates sculptures using constructed and premade industrial ceramic pieces bound with steel straps, which mirror components of the world in which we live. Find the mobile gallery in front of the New Mexico Museum of Art (107 W Palace Ave.) for this opening event. Through Jan. 29 (see SFR Picks, page 19). 5 pm, free CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE

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Republican Party of Santa Fe County

THE CALENDAR

Announces the

County Central Committee Meeting; Precinct Caucuses; Biennial Organizing County Convention to Elect new County Central Committee Members; New County Officers; and Delegates to the Republican State Central Committee.

JIM GAUTIER: CORNERSTONES Historic Santa Fe Foundation 545 Canyon Road, Ste. 2, 983-2567 Featuring photographs Gautier sees as representing cornerstones in time. 5 pm, free

When: Sat.; January 14, 2017 Time: 9:00 am Place: SF Woman’s Club 1616 Old Pecos Trail Registration $20 per person

MUSIC BILL FORREST Vanessie 427 W Water St., 982-9966 Forrest plays classics and covers on piano, following a performance by Doug Montgomery at 6. Two pianists in one evening! 8 pm, free CHRIS JONAS TRIO GiG Performance Space 1808 Second St., 989-8442 This one-of-a-kind trio performs a set containing elements of classic jazz, with colors and sounds outside of the usual domains of traditional jazz (see Music, page 23). 7:30 pm, $20

We’d love to hear from you Send notices via email to calendar@sfreporter.com. Make sure you include all the pertinent details such as location, time, price and so forth. It helps us out greatly. Submissions don’t guarantee inclusion.

For help, call Maria at 395-2910.

DAVID GEIST Pranzo Italian Grill 540 Montezuma Ave., 984-2645 Show tunes on piano. 6 pm, $2

COURTESY ARGOS GALLERY

Paid By: Republican Party of Santa Fe County; www.santafe.gopnm.org

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DOUG MONTGOMERY Vanessie 427 W Water St., 982-9966 Montgomery is a piano talent. 6 pm, free EQUINOX Starlight Lounge at Montecito 500 Rodeo Road, 428-7777 Jazz by Louis Levin on piano, Gayle Kenny on upright bass and Bren Funches’ on vocals. 8 pm, free GERRY & CHRIS La Fiesta Lounge 100 E San Francisco St., 982-5511 Friends and collaborators Gerry Carthy (Irish music) and Chris Abeyta (Latin music) blend their talents. 8 pm, free GREG SCHNEIDER, DAVID KENT AND DAVID BEATTY First Presbyterian Church 208 Grant Ave., 982-8544 Compositions performed by Chancel Bell Choir and the Santa Fe Eternal Summer String Orchestra in celebration of 150 years of the First Presbyterian Church. 5:30 pm, free

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This image is one of three on view at Argos Gallery from Odilon Redon’s “The Temptation of St. Anthony,” part of the exhibit Art Of The Print Cycle, through Jan. 6.

CONTINUED ON PAGE 24

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COURTESY THE BAND

MUSIC

FIRST

TRACKS

Hear, Here We’ve got our ear to the ground in search of interesting tidbits of music-related information, Santa Fe. Are you recording an album? Hitting the road to tour? Thinking of going major-label? We want to know about it.

1

Balkan folk ensemble Rumelia is reconfiguring their personnel to become a three-piece outfit. They’ll also lose the name and, hopefully, rise like some kind of phriggin’ phoenix in the new year. No word on the fate of their alreadyrecorded live album created at the San Miguel Chapel in 2016, but we’ve heard it’s bonkersgood.

Chris Jonas Trio—it’s probably not what you think.

My Name is Jonas See? Weird genius. But it was the catalyst to everything he’s become, seemingly innocuous though it may be. “I was the kid ’m not somebody who is into who’d lie on my back and stare at clouds jazz because of the scene or the during recess and I didn’t know what to do style. It just nailed me as a kid,” with myself,” Jonas says. “Music then just local musician Chris Jonas says. slowly took over my world.” He’s staring directly at me, and it’s intense; He would eventually attend Oberthere’s a lot going on behind his eyes, but it lin College as a composer at first—but, mostly makes me think he’s some kind of he says, “I got my feelings hurt because weird genius. they regarded the saxophone as a ‘nov“When I was in 6th grade, my dad wantelty instrument.’ Their ed to go to Sears to buy a words, not mine. I tried ratchet set,” he continbeing a poet, but in the ues, “which was weird, end I wound up on the because he was about outskirts of the conservathe least handy guy you tory. As an artist, I think can think of, but in the we’re controlled by somebasement of Sears they thing that comes from sold records; two for two the inside. … It’s fucking bucks, I think. And so he agony.” said, ‘Son, you choose two So how does a musiand I’ll choose two,’ and I cian who feels no particwas like, ‘Hell yeah!’” ular affinity for jazz wind Dad chose albums up writing for and leadfrom Glenn Miller and ing what we might call a Les Brown. Jonas wound jazz trio? Well, a lot of it up with some old Count depends on your notion Basie recording and a of genre definitions. late-1970s Duke Elling-Chris Jonas Who’s to say one man’s ton release. “Of course, I chaotic and personally had no idea who that was, mnemonic translation of but when I came home music has to be labeled and put it on, it freaked me out,” he says. anything in particular? And since when “It was late, weird Ellington, and I had did jazz own the rights to chaos or improthis spiritual experience; I sensed that the visational and sometimes beautifully fracmusic was these dark wires coming out of tured musical explosions? It certainly the record player. Beyond that was music, doesn’t occur much to Jonas, though given and it was this infinite void. … What do his time on the periphery of experimental you do with that? It stayed with me, and it arts collective High Mayhem some years wasn’t because I liked jazz. It just resonat- ago (we use the term “experimental” very ed something inside me.” loosely, since we know HM kind of hates

BY ALEX DE VORE a l e x @ s f r e p o r t e r. c o m

“I

I was the kid who’d lie on my back and stare at clouds during recess.

What the hell is jazz, anyway?

In local metal news, heavy-hitters Dysphotic are currently in the studio working on their sophomore album to be released early this year, and Santa Fe/Denver solo metal project Salt for Knives is doing the same damn thing. Both albums will be put out by local imprint Entelodon Records (entelodonrecords.com). Meanwhile, a new cassettebased label, King Volume (kingvolume.com), was founded by local artist Todd Ryan White and has already released a box set featuring non-locals Dead Things, Lord Mountain and Lord Loud. Cassette releases are metal as hell, but don’t worry if you don’t have the hardware— each set comes with the digital downloads, a sticker and a couple buttons. We hear you can expect a second set come springtime.

2

it), it makes sense that he’d shirk the concept of neatly packaged and labeled arts. Still, there’s an undeniably musical quality to his cacophonous experiments. Think about what it might have been like if David Byrne had locked himself away to pursue classical training, or if the weirdos of jazz— as we are wont to describe it, anyway—like Mingus or Monk had existed in a world where the technology of creation was practically limitless. The sounds I’ve heard created by Jonas defy conventional explanations like, “Oh, it sounds just like this or that”—and yet, they sound almost terrifyingly familiar, like the soundtrack to an unsettling recurring dream you’ve had since you were very young. The man is a maniac, which I say with no small amount of admiration and with the understanding that all truly great artists are at least a little unhinged. See Jonas perform alongside drumme Will Dyar, bassist Ron Lundberg and Dan Pearlman on the cornet. Yeah, that’s four, but we’re still callin’ them a trio. There will be much for the jazz aficionados to appreciate, certainly, but also for those in search of something at least a little different. “In my experience, you create material that’s as evocative as possible,” Jonas says. “Sometimes they resonate in ways that you think you don’t know what it means, but then, if you just try to connect the dots…” He trails off as if another, more important thought suddenly shot into his brain. That’s OK, though, because I totally know what he means. CHRIS JONAS TRIO

Pop-punker-turned-hiphop MC/producer Zach Maloof, aka OG Willikers, has kicked off a new podcast with local DJ/promoter SaggaLiffik called Ra Ra Room Radio over at soundcloud.com/ rararoomradio. They’ll be talkin’ all things DIY New Mexico arts and music with the movers and shakers from the scene and are already up to four installments. There’s been a definite hip-hop bent thus far, but Maloof tells us he’ll be broadening their horizons soon.

7:30 pm Friday Jan. 6. $20. GiG Performance Space, 1808 Second St.

Send your hot tips and information to alex@sfreporter.com.

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ENTER EVENTS AT CALENDAR.SFREPORTER.COM/CAL

HALF BROKE HORSES Second Street Brewery (Original) 1814 Second St., 982-3030 Two-step to some of this band’s honky-tonk and Americana. 6 pm, free JESSIE DELUXE Zephyr 1520 Center Drive Heavy rock with melodic choruses. 8:30 pm, $5 JIM ALMAND Mine Shaft Tavern 2846 Hwy. 14, Madrid, 473-0743 Almand performs a repertoire of roots and blues.  5 pm, free JOHN KURZWEG BAND Cowgirl 319 S Guadalupe St., 982-2565 Kurzweg and his band of brothers play rock ’n’ roll covers and originals. 8:30 pm, free LITTLE LEROY & HIS PACK OF LIES El Farol 808 Canyon Road, 983-9912 Leroy presents an evening of rock 'n' roll mixed with a bit of comedy. Laugh and rock out at the same time.  8:30 pm, $5 LONE PIÑON Second Street Brewery (Railyard) 1607 Paseo de Peralta, 989-3278 This local acoustic trio honors their roots with Latin influenced contemporary tunes, which have an authentic and original Northern New Mexican sound. They perform their originals on instruments like the fiddle and guitarrón.  6 pm, free RANDY RANE Omira Bar & Grill 1005 St. Francis Drive, 780-5483 Brazilian and Spanish guitar match the enviornment of this Brazilian-style grill. Meat lovers, rejoice!  6 pm, free REGGAE DANCEHALL FRIDAYS: BROTHERHOOD SOUND Palace Saloon 142 W Palace Ave., 428-0690 This downtown watering hole invites you to dance to some vibey reggae tunes performed by Brotherhood Sound, the premier reggae group in the Southwest.   10 pm, $5 SANTA FE HOUSE COLLECTIVE Boxcar 530 S Guadalupe St., 988-7222 A local group mixes it up with a set of house music. 10 pm, free THE GYPSY PLAYBOYS Mine Shaft Tavern 2846 Hwy. 14, Madrid, 473-0743 Young guys make up this band that plays vintage instruments. They write their own swinging, rocking originals. 7 pm, free

THE CALENDAR

THE THREE FACES OF JAZZ El Mesón 213 Washington Ave., 983-6756 Stop in and see who joins the jazz trio as their special guest. It’s always a surprise. 7 pm, free TUCKER BINKLEY Osteria D'Assisi 58 S Federal Place, 986-5858 Binkley is a piano-playing master who dazzles with his classic skills. We already mentioned the lasagna at this place. Just sayin’. 6 pm, free

WORKSHOP FIRST FRIDAY ART ACTIVITY Georgia O'Keeffe Museum 217 Johnson St., 946-1000 Artists of all ages create drawings and explore the use of color in modern artwork. 5 pm, $8-$12

SAT/7 BOOKS/LECTURES IAIA WINTER READINGS GATHERING: MELISSA FEBOS AND JAMES THOMAS STEVENS Institute of American Indian Arts 83 Avan Nu Po Road, 424-2300 Best-selling authors gather to read from their works during this week-long series. The first evening features Febos, author of the memoir Whip Smart and Stevens, who is a professor in the institute's creative writing program. The readings take place in the auditorium in the Library and Technology Center. 6 pm, free THE OPERA BREAKFAST SERIES: TOM FRANKS Collected Works Bookstore and Coffeehouse 202 Galisteo St., 988-4226 Franks discusses Verdi’s Nabucco before a viewing of of the opera as performed at the Metropolitan Opera screens at the Lensic Performing Arts Center at 11 am. 9:30 am, $5

DANCE FLAMENCO DINNER SHOW El Farol 808 Canyon Road, 983-9912 Enjoy dinner while flamenco dancers entertain. 6:30 pm, $25 NOCHE DE TABLAO FLAMENCO El Mesón 213 Washington Ave., 983-6756 An evening of flamenco dancing and Spanish-inspired cuisine. They also make a killer margarita. 7 pm, $10

Want to see your event listed here? We’d love to hear from you Send notices via email to calendar@sfreporter.com. Make sure you include all the pertinent details such as location, time, price and so forth. It helps us out greatly. Submissions don’t guarantee inclusion.

For help, call Maria at 395-2910.

EVENTS ZAZENKAI: A DAYLONG SILENT MEDITATION RETREAT Upaya Zen Center 1404 Cerro Gordo Road, 986-8518 Sensei Irène Kaigetsu Kyojo Bakker, Joshin Brian Byrnes, and Genzan Quennell lead this full day of meditation practice. Registration is required, so visit upaya.org or call before heading to the mind-opening event. 6 am, $50

MUSIC BILL FORREST Vanessie 427 W Water St., 982-9966 Forrest plays classics and covers on piano, following a performance by Doug Montgomery at 6 pm. 8 pm, free CHANGO Boxcar 530 S Guadalupe St., 988-7222 Pop and rock covers done right by the local group. 10 pm, free DAVID GEIST Pranzo Italian Grill 540 Montezuma Ave., 984-2645 Geist had an illustrious 20-year career on Broadway as a conductor, pianist and vocal coach. He brings his big-time talent to a small venue and performs a set of showtunes and standards with ease. 6 pm, $2 DOUG MONTGOMERY Vanessie 427 W Water St., 982-9966 Montgomery starts the evening (which ends with a performance by pianist Bill Forrest begining at 8 pm) with lounge piano and vocal classics, standards, pop tunes and originals. Two pianists in one place make for an entire evening of lovely tunes. 6 pm, free CONTINUED ON PAGE 26

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Weaver Fever I L L U S T R AT I O N S A N D S T O R Y B Y A M Y D AV I S

T

here are many Southwestern Native American legends about Grandmother Spider swirling through time. This is my favorite one: She tossed her freshly woven web laced with sparkling dewdrops into the darkness and it became the glittering stars, sun and planets. Bang! The universe was born. She sang her song and danced across the heavens spreading her web of light, fanning the vital flame. The fireworks of life burst up, exploding. Anchoring us all with her magical braided cords to The Great Mystery, she made sure that we were all connected to one another. All of us with our unique purpose for our Earthwalk. Interwoven. Never alone. When I saw the aubergine, tangerine and greeny-gray muslin wraps by Natasha Naragis many years ago I would gaze at them for, well ... a loooong time. My husband would say, “Hey, I’ll meet you back here in an hour.” And there I would stand, absorbing her work, lapping up the subtle moon glow of colors, an infinite tapestry of delicate textures. It felt like gossamer, indeed, a spider’s web. Unimaginably light. “Etheric” barely does it justice. So imagine my surprise when a talented designer and teacher of two production sewing courses at the Santa Fe Community College named Estelle Norris-Smallwood

invited me to a freshly-baked style-forward pop-up in the Railyard, and there was Naragis. As I entered this very SoHo-circa1985-NYC-drizzled-in-Left-BankParis space, the snooty smoke of doubt cleared. Norris-Smallwood’s passion for bias-cutting is apparent on an elegantly draped, deep midnight gown topped with a shimmering satin pistachio jacket. The dark grey ombre fringe on the back of the semi-bolero, though, is the juiciest cherry on top. It is true couture and only available at a new boutique dubbed natasha santa fe (403 Guadalupe St., 913-9236), which is open 10 am-4 pm Wednesday-Sunday or by appointment. That’s right, style fiends—the Railyard has it going off! Better than Barneys, nicer than Neiman’s and you can buy direct … no middle man. Snap up Naragis’ scrumptious and sumptuous woven wraps, scarves, outerwear and tunics, done in a muted palette with contrasting selvages. Hot roses bleed into luminous kumquat and plums meet indigos. These bright edges make the granites and lighter softer tones vibrate with sunshine made from linen, cashmere, silk, muslin

and alpaca. She also loves the Indonesian technique of ikat, wherein threads are wrapped and colored before weaving, as well as shibori, an eighth-century Japanese art that reminds one of grown-up tiedye. They are butter-soft and gorgeous. YUM! At the moment she is showcasing Amanda Speer and Dain Daller, both of whom live off the grid in Abiquiu and create fabulous woven wraps. Bright-toasty roasted yellow corn with matcha tea greens dripping into electric blues; reds next to sun kissed caramels. Their work recalls smoldering embers, salty oceans and pinky-chocolate earth. Bobbie Sumberg has knitted pieces that are like the lovechild of a poncho and a wee capelet. Lush and sublime colors; vivid azures to icy slates to lilac frost and persimmon sunrise. Karim Jaekel is another one of the

Woven silk scarf by Natasha Naragis; ceramic wrap pins by Pam Knob; earrings by Bessie Berman. All available at natasha santa fe.

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showstoppers in this boutique of chic. Being Naragis’ only son and proof that the apple does indeed fall not far from the tree, his works are done in cotton and raw silk. Hand-woven scarves and wraps, but with a bit of a more heavy and rustic bent … juicy sherbet hues welcoming you. Jaekel adores grassy greens, lemon drop and happy cerulean. These are primaries with a twist. He informed me that both mom and son will soon make large bolts of fabric which interior designers can snatch up and use to create masterpieces. Pam Knob showcases ceramic wrap pins. Open hearts, squares and circles all shimmering in pearly pastels, plus super-fun felted and handwoven scarves. The bright amethyst and oyster one caught my eye. Bessie Berman has created earrings of warm metals, thin as potato chips, fashioned out of bottle caps with zias, hammered copper hoops and discs and wooden loops. Frida Khalo, the Blessed Virgin and ravens all make cameos in Berman’s work and they promise not to give you drooping Buddha ears. They dangle feather-light like flashing icicles. On the walls of natasha santa fe you’ll spy another nod to underground cool: Cissie Ludlow’s photographs from a 1980’s NYC performance piece/fashion show of which Naragis was a part. Dubbed Trashique—a sly play on tres chic—her photos wink at you from the walls. A sexy sculpture from Trashique also makes an appearance with Michael Motley’s fireengine-red, life-sized paper skeleton complete with no flesh other than his nether regions (with a curly cue glittery carpet). Peckerman, Naragis’ pet name for him, greets you in a very “Toto, we are not on Canyon Road anymore!” way. This is the real deal, fashion folk of the high desert. Naragis shines and has given Santa Fe a place not only to shop but to also experience. Let’s relish the splendor of being human and thank Grandmother Spider for all of our lavish and magnificent gifts. Happy New Year, Santa Fe.

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Get savager at: SFReporter.com/savage

party small talk is the worst!). What are your thoughts on this subject and other things in a relationship like this? -Man Behind The Cam Girl

My brother is a virgin and turning 30 in a few weeks. He said he wants to hire an escort just for drinks and conversation for his birthday, but he doesn’t really know how to tell what’s a reliable service or what criteria he should be looking for to tell whether an agency is legit, reliable, etc. I’m very happy he came to me with this because I can tell it’s not something he wants to share with many people—but I don’t have any advice or knowledge to pass on regarding this and I want to respect his privacy by not discussing it with everyone in our social circles. Do you have any advice in regards to what he should be looking for? -My Younger Brother’s Romantic Order “Look to social media,” said Mistress Matisse, a writer, sex worker, and sex-workers-rights activist. “Now that so many review boards have been taken down, social media is the best way to find a good independent escort.” About those review boards: Law enforcement agencies, always on the lookout for ways to “save” sex workers by making their jobs more dangerous, have gone after online sites, aka review boards, where clients rated and ranked escorts and—more importantly— escorts communicated with each other about safety, clients to avoid (flaky, rude, unhygienic), and clients they absolutely shouldn’t see (erratic, threatening, violent). Elizabeth Nolan Brown wrote a great piece for Reason about the issue last fall (“The Truth About the Biggest US Sex Trafficking Story of the Year,” September 9, 2016), and everyone should go read it at Reason.com. Anyway, MYBRO, back to your brother and Matisse’s advice. “I’m not saying ‘no social media’ equals ‘bad escort,’” said Matisse. “There are lots of good escorts who don’t have much of a social-media presence. But if you want to get to know a little about who someone is before you meet them, that’s just how you do it now.” Another rarely discussed, perfectly legal alternative to figuring out if an escort is for real: pay them to meet up for drinks and conversation, which just so happens to be all your brother wants (or all he’s willing to tell you he wants). “Obviously, this is not a good option for the budget-conscious,” said Matisse. “But if you want to test your chemistry and create some trust on both sides before booking a private date, it’s a solid way to go. Note the keyword, though: PAY her for her time. (Most ladies have a public social meeting fee that’s lower than private-time rates.) And remember the basic rules when you do decide to set a private-time date: Don’t ask about sex and don’t talk about money other than to briefly acknowledge that you have seen her rates and agree to pay for her time. Expect to use condoms and to abide by the rules of whoever you’re seeing.” You can follow Mistress Matisse on Twitter @mistressmatisse. I’ve been reading your column for years, and it has definitely helped me develop a sex-positive view of dating, relationships, sex, and otherwise. I’ve been seeing a girl recently who revealed to me she’s a cam girl. I’m totally okay with it. She makes a great living, it’s important to her, and it turns her on—all great things! But it’s something she likes to keep to herself, and for good reason, obviously. People, however, are obsessed with what other people do for a living. So what’s the best answer for when I’m asked what she does? She’s as unsure of what to say as I am. I’m bringing her to a company event (I work in finance), and both of us are sure everyone is going to ask what she does (cocktail

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Say this: “She’s an independent contractor with a video production company—she makes her own hours and works from home. It’s a great gig. Oh hey, how about them Bears/Colts/Cubs/Broncos/Braves/WhateverTheFucks.” I’m a tall, slender, attractive, fit, artistic, female 65-year old, taking testosterone, and now without a partner. I’m not sure how to go about engaging in noncommittal quick sex dates. I don’t know of any escort services for the ladies, but I would be interested. I’m also interested in exploring the bisexual side of life. Where would you advise I go? -Curious And Wondering I’m going to echo Mistress Matisse and suggest diving into Sex Work Twitter. Most male sex workers target their ads/online presence to other males, since men are likelier to buy sex, but many male escorts are bisexual or straight but gay-for-pay. They’ll happily see female clients, as will many female sex workers, you just gotta ask—politely and, again, without talking about sex explicitly. Remember: You’re paying for the escort’s time, CAW, anything else that happens is just consenting adults doing consenting adult things. I have a suggestion for GAYMAN, the guy who just got out of an abusive relationship and wanted to know how to reconnect with his sexuality and other gay men. I came out three years ago, and I must say that joining the organization
Frontrunners changed my life. It’s an LGBTQ-friendly running group, and I found so much support there as a man coming out late in life. I’ve met so many LGBTQ people, from all backgrounds, with extremely varied interests, and it really opened me up socially. I’m happy to say I’ve made some great friends in the year that I have participated. -Running While Queer Love your column. Often you get questions on how to meet people/find partners, and you respond, “Get out of the house, go to the gym, volunteer.” Here’s one activity you haven’t mentioned: sign up for dance lessons, e.g., salsa, swing, tango, ballroom, etc. It’s not hard to find a dance studio that offers group lessons, and partners aren’t required. Anyone can join a class. A group dance class will expose you to many people and put them right in your arms as an introduction. I can’t think of a better way to meet people. I’m a straight guy who met his last six girlfriends— the latest at nine years and counting—in dance classes. I honestly wouldn’t know what to do at a bar. Obviously, partner dance isn’t for everyone, but skeptics might be surprised. It’s a pretty great environment, and people seem at ease because everyone is focused on having fun. -Strictly Come Dancing Thanks for sharing, RWQ and SCD. READERS: Psychotherapist, author, and friend Esther Perel (Mating in Captivity) is seeking couples to be featured on her upcoming original audio series. Couples can be married or in a long-term committed relationship, and from all sexual orientations and cultural, racial, and religious backgrounds. Gay male couples are particularly encouraged to apply. For more info, go to tinyurl.com/perelaudio.

SFREPORTER.COM

On the Lovecast, Dan talks with Adam Conover from Adam Ruins Everything savagelovecast.com. mail@savagelove.net @fakedansavage on Twitter

DUO RASMINKO Second Street Brewery (Railyard) 1607 Paseo de Peralta, 989-3278 Folk tunes and Bohemian pop performed by a duo of ladies. 6 pm, free GERRY & CHRIS La Fiesta Lounge 100 E San Francisco St., 982-5511 Longtime friends and collaborators Gerry Carthy (Irish music) and Chris Abeyta (Latin music) blend their talents. 8 pm, free RANDY RANE Omira Bar & Grill 1005 St. Francis Drive, 780-5483 Brazilian and Spanish guitar.  6 pm, free ROSIE FLORES The Kitchen Sink Recording Studio 528 Jose St., 699-4323 Flores performs a rockabilly and honky-tonk concert with Susan Holmes. 7 pm, $20 SHANE WALLIN Mine Shaft Tavern 2846 Hwy. 14, Madrid, 473-0743 Wallin does his originals on the heated deck, so you can stay warm and toasty on this winter’s eve.  3 pm, free THE BARBWIRES Second Street Brewery (Original) 1814 Second St., 982-3030 Bluesy goodness by this local ensemble.  6 pm, free THE BOOMROOTS COLLECTIVE El Farol 808 Canyon Road, 983-9912 Reggae warms up even the coldest of winter nights. 8:30 pm, $5 TUCKER BINKLEY Osteria D'Assisi 58 S Federal Place, 986-5858 Binkley is a piano-playing master who dazzles with an impressive set of lounge music skills.  6 pm, free

THEATER NABUCCO (VERDI): THE MET LIVE IN HD Lensic Performing Arts Center 211 W San Francisco St., 988-1234 See a recorded performance of the Metropolitan Opera’s Music Director James Levine conducting Verdi’s early drama of Ancient Babylon, Nabucco. In this performance, Plácido Domingo adds a new role to his repertoire as the title character. If you can’t make the early showing, catch an encore perfomance at 6 pm.  11 am and 6 pm, $22-$28

Want to see your event listed here? We’d love to hear from you Send notices via email to calendar@sfreporter.com. Make sure you include all the pertinent details such as location, time, price and so forth. It helps us out greatly. Submissions don’t guarantee inclusion.

For help, call Maria at 395-2910.

SUN/8 ART OPENINGS PAT D'ANDREA: EYES ON FIRE Santa Fe Public Library Main Branch 145 Washington Ave., 955-6780 This solo exhibit features photographs taken by D'Andrea of the aftermath of fires in the Jemez Mountains between 2011 and 2016. Through Jan. 29. 2 pm, free

BOOKS/LECTURES IAIA WINTER READINGS GATHERING: SYREETA McFADDEN, SANTEE FRAZIER AND MANUEL GONZALES Institute of American Indian Arts 83 Avan Nu Po Road, 424-2300 Best-selling authors gather to read from their works during this week-long series. This evening’s readings feature McFadden who is a writer and photographer, Frazier, an IAIA graduate, and Gonzales, author of the collection The Miniature Wife and Other Stories. The readings take place in the auditorium in the Library and Technology center. 6 pm, free

EVENTS DANCE SPACE GRAND OPENING Dance Space 2308 Richards Ave., Ste. A, 510-1454 This new dance studio specializes in Nia, a combination of dance and martial arts intended for people of all ages and body types. The grand opening event features a community jam class taught by instructors Lisa McGee, Christine Curran, Sarah Nickerson and Betsy Love. 2-4 pm, free

KIDS IN CRISIS Collected Works Bookstore and Coffeehouse 202 Galisteo St., 988-4226 JourneySantaFe presents a discussion on the crisis impacting foster children in Northern New Mexico. Learn how to get involved to help the state’s most vulnerable residents. 11 am, free REFUGEES SPEAK First Presbyterian Church 208 Grant Ave., 982-8544 Refugees from around the world take questions from the public in an open discussion at the downtown chruch. Write your questions for the speakers on a notecard and discuss what locals can do to help them feel welcome (see SFR Picks, page 19). 1 pm, free

MUSIC BROOMDUST CARAVAN Cowgirl 319 S Guadalupe St., 982-2565 Lunchtime gospel, rock and folk songs which you can enjoy with a drink (like a lava lamp, which puts a frozen margarita IN your beer). Noon, free CHRIS ABEYTA El Farol 808 Canyon Road, 983-9912 The veteran singer-songwriter performs his originals in this classic Canyon Road bar venue. 7 pm, free DOUG MONTGOMERY Vanessie 427 W Water St., 982-9966 Piano lounge tunes by one of Santa Fe’s favorite pianists. He is a favorite for good reason, which he can prove in just a few songs. 6:30 pm, free GARY REYNOLDS Cowgirl 319 S Guadalupe St., 982-2565 Reynolds performs acoustic Americana by his lonesome on his guitar.  8 pm, free GERRY & CHRIS La Fiesta Lounge 100 E San Francisco St., 982-5511 Longtime friends and collaborators Gerry Carthy (Irish music) and Chris Abeyta (Latin music) blend their talents and respective musical specialities, creating a sound that belongs to them alone. 6 pm, free THE BARNYARD STOMPERS Mine Shaft Tavern 2846 Hwy. 14, Madrid, 473-0743 This band, based in South Texas, performs a set of rowdy outlaw country and dirty blues tunes. They love a good time and play with a pace that aims to make everyone enjoys themselves.  3 pm, free


ENTER EVENTS AT CALENDAR.SFREPORTER.COM/CAL

MON/9 BOOKS/LECTURES IAIA WINTER READINGS GATHERING: CHIP LIVINGSTON, MARIEHELENE BERTINO AND ISLET PRCIC Institute of American Indian Arts 83 Avan Nu Po Road, 424-2300 Best-selling authors gather at the arts school to read from their works during this week-long series. This evening features readings by Livingston, who has authored four books, Bertino, who has published both novels and poetry collections and Prcic, who is a published author, as well. The readings take place on the college campus in the auditorium in the Library and Technology Center. 6 pm, free INTERPRETATIONS OF ARCHAIC NORTHERN RIO GRANDE ROCK ART: SEVERIN FOWLES Hotel Santa Fe 1501 Paseo de Peralta, 982-1200 Fowles is a professor of anthropology at Barnard College and has spent extensive time researching New Mexican history to write his book titled The Making of Made People: The Prehistoric Evolution of Hierocracy Among the Northern Tiwa of New Mexico. The professor discusses his findings about Northern New Mexico rock art in this lecture, which is a part of the weekly series Ancient Sites and Ancient Stories by Southwest Seminars (see SFR Picks, page 19).   6 pm, $12 VIVACE OPERA BOOK GROUP Collected Works Bookstore and Coffeehouse 202 Galisteo St., 988-4226 The Santa Fe Opera Guild and the bookstore present Vivace, a new book group devoted to readings about opera. This is the group’s first meeting, and they discuss Molto Agitato: The Mayhem Behind the Music at the Metropolitan Opera by Johanna Fiedler. Based on her 15-year-long association with the legendary organization, the book provides a fascinating history of the institution, beginning with its start as an alternative to the elite Academy of Music.   6 pm, free

MUSIC BILL HEARNE TRIO La Fiesta Lounge 100 E San Francisco St., 982-5511 A honky-tonk and country extravaganza by the Best of Santa Fe 2016 winner and his two pals in the swanky hotel’s lounge. 7 pm, free

THE CALENDAR

CANYON ROAD BLUES JAM El Farol 808 Canyon Road, 983-9912 This jam session celebrates 10 years of existence. Stop by with your instrument and sing the blues with other musicians from the community. Make music and friends! 8:30 pm, free CHUSCALES La Boca 72 W Marcy St., 982-3433 This internationally renowned flamenco guitarist performs a set you won’t soon forget. ¡Ole! 7 pm, free

DOUG MONTGOMERY Vanessie 427 W Water St., 982-9966 Montgomery makes piano playing look like a simple affair. He has a ton of talent, and about that we do not joke. He is a Santa Fe favorite and he performs a set of classics, covers and standards that includes something for every member of the family. This is the kind of evening that grandma, your younger cousin and your knows-everything uncle can all enjoy. Maybe you’re in for a bicker-free evening out, or just some good lounge vibes. 6:30 pm, free

Jazz Funk at MOVE with Gino Garcia! JAZZ FUNK—often referred to as Street Jazz—mixes foundations of Jazz with Hip Hop, Funk, and House and is the style you might see performed in music videos by Beyonce, Janet Jackson, Lady Gaga, etc. The class begins with a high energy warm up to get the heart pumping and follows with a step by step combination. Shoes recommended.

Sun. Jan. 8 Tue. Jan. 10 Thu. Jan. 12

3:30-5 5-6:30 5-6:30

Sun. Jan. 15 Tue. Jan. 17 Thu. Jan. 19

3:30-5 5-6:30 5-6:30

Drop-in classes: $15; Class card (6 classes): $72 Working in the fashion industry for over a decade does not come without its stresses. Fortunately, GINO GARCIA has continually found an outlet in dance, which has remained a dynamic part of his life. His love of the Art hasn't been overshadowed by a demanding career, in fact teaching dance in Santa Fe alongside Kate Eberle, as well at NMSA and Moving Arts Espanola, opened a door of possibilities in dance education which had previously been hidden. Over the past three years, Gino has been studying dance intensively with some of the industries best in LA, NYC, and most recently Berlin, while over time developing a unique style which combines the fun and freedom of Hip Hop with the intensity and sass of Jazz Funk.

M VE

Dance Conditioning Plus!™ ercely fun  tness

901 W. San Mateo, Santa Fe 505-660-8503 www.movedcp.com

Start the New Year Developing Greater Mindfulness january 6 - 22

Winter Practice Period

with Honey Harris

A Traditional Buddhist Training Period Led by Joshin Brian Byrnes and Genzan Quennell with Sensei Irène Kaigetsu Kyojo Bakker come for the entire period or these select retreats: jan. 7 jan. 11-15 jan. 17-22

= = =

Zazenkai: A Daylong Meditation Retreat Ox Herding: Stages of Zen Practice Sesshin: An Intensive Meditation Retreat

SANTA FE, NM

505-986-8518

WWW.UPAYA.ORG

SFR FILE PHOTO

If there’s a name more synonymous with local radio than 98.1 KBAC Radio Free Santa Fe’s Honey Harris, we’ve never heard it. Hell, Honey’s been a downright institution around here since the ’90s. She also took home top honors in SFR’s Best of Santa Fe 2016 in the Best DJ category, a prestigious award only bestowed upon the most special of locals. Harris is even good enough to allow our editor and culture editor to appear on her program, The Big Show with Honey Harris, every Friday morning at 9:30 am to yap about what we’re up to with the paper. Additionally, Harris serves up some of the best and most frequent interviews with local artists, chefs, musicians and more. For this and a million other reasons, we seriously love Honey Harris, and if you tune to 98.1 Monday-Friday from 7-11 am, you’ll find out why you should too! (Alex De Vore) How long have you been at this radio game? This current incarnation of KBAC went on the air in 1995, and [current operations manager] Ira Gordon and I were the first two DJs. I did some radio in college, too, while I was getting my degree in sociology because someone told me it would be an easy A. I never really wanted to get into radio. I guess it was just the thing it turned out I was best at. Do you think radio is sustainable as a medium? Y’know, I don’t really worry about it. I think a lot of people in Santa Fe tune in to hear about what’s going on in their community. That was actually the biggest priority back when I signed on in ’95—people didn’t really know who Ira and I were, and we made a point to get connected with the local community. Do you have any big plans for the upcoming year? Oh, none that I can really say. I don’t honestly know. I think I’ll just be playing good music and hopefully doing good interviews. As long as I can play music that I think is cool, I’m usually pretty happy.

January Events ALL EVENTS AT 6PM UNLESS OTHERWISE NOTED

JANUARY 7 — 9:30 AM

JANUARY 21 – 9:30 AM

THE OPERA BREAKFAST SERIES:

THE OPERA BREAKFAST SERIES:

Tom Franks on Nabucco

Robert Glick on Romeo and Juliette

JOURNEY SANTA FE PRESENTS:

SOCIAL JUSTICE SERIES:

JANUARY 8 — 11 AM

JANUARY 21

The Crisis in Foster Care JANUARY 9

The Opera Guild Book Club discussion group of Joanna Fiedler’s Molto Agitato JANUARY 12

JANUARY 14

Barbara Murphy Miguel Lost and Found at the Museum & Donald Willerton Ghosts of San Juan JANUARY 15 – 11 AM

Margaret Randall Only The Road / Solo El Camino & Sabra Moore Openings: A Memoir from the Women’s Art Movement, New York City, 1970-1992 JANUARY 26

Senator Peter Wirth: Changes after the Election and What Lies Ahead for 2017 Legislative Session JANUARY 19 Julia Cameron celebrating the 25th AnniversaryThe Artists Way

Brian Egolf: A Legislative preview and update for 2017 Session, focusing on the new leadership, jobs and the economy JANUARY 22 – 3PM

YOUNG ADULT SERIES:

INSPIRATION SERIES:

JANUARY 22 – 11 AM

JOURNEY SANTA FE PRESENTS:

Nasario Remembers The Rio Puerco, Nasario Garcia and filmmaker Shebana Coehlo

JOURNEY SANTA FE PRESENTS

Resistance and Resilience Activist and Author Demetria Martinez will lead a conversation in honor of the Women’s March in Washington D.C.

Douglas Preston Lost City of the Monkey God JANUARY 29 – 11 AM

JOURNEY SANTA FE PRESENTS:

Ken Mayers, co-founder Veterans For Peace, on their work in NM and the recent pivot to Asia saying no to US missile defense in N. Korea

202 Galisteo Street • 505-988-4226 www.cwbookstore.com

WINTER HOURS 8AM – 6PM CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE

ON NIGHTS WITH NO SCHEDULED EVENT

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ENTER EVENTS AT CALENDAR.SFREPORTER.COM/CAL

TUE/10 6401 Richards Ave., Santa Fe, NM 87508

BOOKS/LECTURES

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

Events are free unless otherwise noted. Empower Students, Strengthen Community. Empoderar a los Estudiantes, Fortalecer a la Comunidad.

6

FRI

High School Equivalency/GED Spanish and evening class orientation 5 to 9 p.m., Room 502 505-428-1356 Pick up an orientation packet before Jan. 5. $25 fee

17 TUES

Classes Begin for Spring Semester www.sfcc.edu

20 FRI 25 WED

AARP Back to Work 50+ Info Session 10 a.m. to Noon, Jemez Rooms 855-850-2525

27 FRI

AARP Tax Aide Begins 8 a.m. to 5 p.m., Fitness Education Center 505-428-1780 Free income tax preparation through April 15.

505-428-1000

SFCC Governing Board Meeting 5:30 p.m., Board Room, Room 223 505-428-1148 Board Finance Committee meets Tuesday, Jan. 24. Public welcome.

Degrees and Certificates from SFCC Open Doors to Success! SPRING REGISTRATION IS UNDERWAY NOW TALK TO AN ADVISER TODAY

505-428-1270 • www.sfcc.edu Accessible … Affordable … Exceptional … EDUCATION

PLUS ...

Accessible … Affordable … Exceptional … EDUCATION

SFCC will be closed for Winter Break Dec. 17 through Jan. 2. Monday, Jan. 16—SFCC closed for Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr. Day. Through Wednesday, Feb. 1—Holiday Art Show, Red Dot Gallery, 826 Canyon Rd., 505-820-7338 Job Club, Résumé Review Days, Free Walk-In Clinics and More www.sfcc.edu/events-resources 505-428-1406 Register for credit and noncredit classes at www.sfcc.edu. FIND MORE EVENTS & DETAILS AT WWW.SFCC.EDU

Individuals who need special accommodations should call the phone number listed for each event.

LEARN MORE. 505-428-1000 | www.sfcc.edu 28

JANUARY 4-10, 2017

SFREPORTER.COM

EVENTS

MUSIC

WOLF STAGED READING Jean Cocteau Cinema 418 Montezuma Ave., 466-5528 This staged reading presents the first act of WOLF, a new feature film screenplay by Jocelyn Jansons, winner of the George RR Martin screenwriter grant featuring an all-star cast including Forrest Goodluck of The Revenant and Ryan Begay of Blaze You Out. The story follows a girl as she moves to the Gila Mountains and discovers she is magic. 6 pm, $10

BILL HEARNE TRIO La Fiesta Lounge 100 E San Francisco St., 982-5511 Prepare to two-step. 7 pm, free DOUG MONTGOMERY Vanessie 427 W Water St., 982-9966 Piano lounge tunes. 6:30 pm, free TUCKER BINKLEY Osteria D'Assisi 58 S Federal Place, 986-5858 Binkley is a piano-playing master. 6 pm, free

MUSEUMS COURTESY NEW MEXICO MUSEUM OF ART

JANUARY

IAIA WINTER READINGS GATHERING: ELISSA WASHUTA, CLAIRE VAYE WATKINS AND KEN WHITE Institute of American Indian Arts 83 Avan Nu Po Road, 424-2300 Readings by Washuta, author of My Body Is A Book Of Rules, White, writer of the film Winter in the Blood, and Watkins, a published author. 6 pm, free

THE CALENDAR

Agnes Pelton’s “Awakening (Memory of Father)” is on display at the New Mexico Museum of Art as part of Conversations in Painting: Early 20th Century to Post War American Art. EL RANCHO DE LAS GOLONDRINAS 334 Los Pinos Road, 471-2261 Living history. GEORGIA O’KEEFFE MUSEUM 217 Johnson St.,946-1000 O’Keeffe at the University of Virginia. Through summer 2017. HARWOOD MUSEUM OF ART 238 Ledoux St., Taos, 575-758-9826 Ken Price, Death Shrine I. Agnes Martin Gallery. Continuum, Through May 2017. MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY NATIVE ART 108 Cathedral Place, 983-8900 Rick Bartow: Things You Cannot Explain. Through Dec. 31. Lloyd Kiva New: Art. MUSEUM OF INDIAN ARTS & CULTURE 710 Camino Lejo, 476-1250 Into the Future: Culture

Power in Native American Art. MUSEUM OF INTERNATIONAL FOLK ART 706 Camino Lejo, 476-1200 Flamenco: From Spain to New Mexico. Through Sept. 2017. Sacred Realm. The Morris Miniature Circus. Under Pressure. Through Dec. 2017. MUSEUM OF SPANISH COLONIAL ART 750 Camino Lejo, 982-2226 Chimayó: A Pilgrimage Through Two Centuries. The Beltran Kropp Collection. The Delgado Room. NM HISTORY MUSEUM 113 Lincoln Ave., 476-5019 Agnes Martin and Me. Through Aug. 2017. Lowriders, Hoppers and Hot Rods: Car Culture of Northern New Mexico. Through March 2017. Out of the Box: The Art of the Cigar. Through Oct. 2017. NM MUSEUM OF ART 107 W Palace Ave., 476-5072 Alcoves 16/17. Small

Wonders. Through March 2017. Conversations in Painting. Through April 2017. PALACE OF THE GOVERNORS 105 W Palace Ave.,476-5100 Fractured Faiths: Spanish Judaism, The Inquisition and New World Identities. POEH CULTURAL CENTER AND MUSEUM 78 Cities of Gold Road, Pojoaque, 455-3334 Ashley Browning, Perspective of Perception. The Past of the Govenors. SANTA FE BOTANICAL GARDENS 715 Camino Lejo, 471-9103 Bill Barrett: Visual Poetry. Through March 2017. Ojos y Manos. WHEELWRIGHT MUSEUM OF THE AMERICAN INDIAN 704 Camino Lejo, 986-4636 Eveli: Energy and Significance.


FOOD

Tuna, Tuna Everywhere Trendy raw fish appetizers are a hit in Santa Fe

BY GWYNETH DOLAND t h e f o r k @ s f r e p o r t e r. c o m

I

n September, I mentioned the Niçoise-style tuna carpaccio that was on the menu at Bouche (451 W. Alameda St., 982-6297). The menu has since changed, but it stuck a little in the back of my mind: Man, there is some kind of mostly-raw tuna on every high-tone menu in town! And seriously: There is. Take a little tour with me. For example, Santacafé (231 Washington Ave., 984-1788) offers a simple yellowfin app with miso, wasabi and soy ($14). Many restaurants sail around the Pacific Rim for inspiration. Coyote Café (132 W. Water St., 983-1615) has a sexedup Hawaiian tuna sashimi starter with sweet chile teriyaki sauce, lemon oil and a sugar snap pea and avocado salad ($22). At Restaurant Martín (526 Galisteo St., 820-0919) there’s a yellowfin tuna tartare with green apple dashi, toasted seaweed oil, Hass avocado mousse, kabocha squash and frozen wasabi ($16). Martín also does a pan-seared yellowfin with miso spinach, butternut squash, smoked aioli and yuzupon reduction as an entree ($33). Caviar is big, too. I was out at Blue Heron Restaurant at Sunrise Springs Resort & Spa (242 Los Pinos Road, 7808145) for New Year’s Eve and chef Rocky Durham served buckwheat blini topped with caviar as a passed hors d’oeuvre. Simple, classic, it was one of the best things we ate all weekend. And it was notably better than the white blini and caviar I served at my house on Christmas Eve. The Compound’s (653 Canyon Road, 982-4353) tuna tar-

tare ($17) is served with walnut toast, preserved lemon and black caviar. At Geronimo (724 Canyon Road, 982-1500) you get the whole shopping cart: Hawaiian ahi tuna sashimi and tartare combination with buttermilk scallion pancakes, wasabi creme fraiche, avocado, soy lime syrup, shiso leaves and caviar ($19). The avocado-tuna combo is popular and it can go in different directions. Even at Eloisa (in the Drury Plaza Hotel, 228 E. Palace Ave., 982-0883), which focuses on a pretty landlocked flavor profile, the popularity of rare fish cannot be avoided: It’s a Hamachi starter with avocado, Seville orange, black limes and a cucumber vinaigreta ($16). Sazón’s atun Azteca comes with avocado, cucumber and spicy tacuba sauce ($17). Tuna and cucumber do have an affinity; The Old House (in the Eldorado Hotel & Spa, 309 W. San Francisco St., 988-4455) offers a spicy Ahi tartare with avocado mousse, cucumber carpaccio, pickled radishes and crispy rice paper ($16). Luminaria (in the Inn & Spa at Loretto, 211 Old Santa Fe Trail, 984-7915) mixes it up with avocado, macadamia nuts and a sesame-chipotle drizzle ($14). You can understand the popularity of raw tuna from the restaurant’s perspective: It’s an attractive appetizer that satisfies people who don’t eat red meat; it can easily be paleo and gluten-free; it’s often lowfat and low-calorie and its enduring popularity makes it simultaneously exotic and familiar. The New York Times named Hawaiian poke as one of the most trendy

You can understand the popularity of raw tuna from the restaurant’s perspective.

Yellowfin

A big (300-pound-plus) fish with pale pink flesh and a mild flavor.

Ahi

The Hawaiian name for yellowfin.

Yellowtail

Not tuna, but probably amberjack or some other member of the jack family that is similar to tuna.

Hamachi/Buri

The Japanese names for yellowtail.

Poke

Rhymes with “okay.” At its simplest, this is an everyday dish in Hawaii, where cubes of tuna are tossed with soy sauce, sesame oil and onion.

foods of 2016. Also fantastically trendy, according to Pinterest: things in bowls. Huh. Well, if you want to feel trendy at home, it’s actually pretty easy to whip up a newfangled tuna salad. Get some high-quality raw tuna. Cube it. Think about what kind of textures and flavors you want in there and add cucumber for crunch, avocado for creaminess, mango for a little sweetness. Whip up a marinade that includes flavors you like. Make it Mexican with lime juice, chipotle and cilantro. Go Asian with something like the recipe below. Just make sure you put it in a bowl if you want to look cool when you post it on Pinterest. SIMPLE TUNA POKE Serves 2 as an appetizer Take this as a starting point and feel free to experiment wildly with your marinade. Rice vinegar is a great addition but make sure you don’t leave it sitting too long before serving, as it will change the texture.

• 1 tablespoon soy sauce • 2 teaspoons sesame oil • 1 garlic clove, minced • 2 green onions, thinly sliced • Red pepper flakes, sriracha or chipotle, to taste • 1/2 pound high-quality yellowfin tuna, cubed • 1/2 avocado, cubed • 1/2 mango, cubed (optional) • 1/2 cup cubed seedless cucumber (optional) • Toasted white and black sesame seeds In a medium bowl, whisk together the soy sauce, sesame oil, garlic, green onions and spicy thing of your choice. Add the tuna and let it sit 5-15 minutes. Just before serving, add the avocado, mango and/or cucumber. Adjust the seasonings if necessary. Sprinkle sesame seeds over the top and serve.

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• JANUARY 4-10, 2017

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Eavesdropper

C I N E M AT H E Q U E 1050 OLD PECOS TRAIL • 505.982.1338 • CCASANTAFE.ORG

SHOWTIMES JAN 4 – 10, 2017

Wed. & Thurs., January 4 & 5 11:00a EOS: Rembrandt 11:45a Best Worst Thing* 1:00p Harry Benson: Shoot First 1:45p Best Worst Thing* 3:00p Moonlight 3:45p Harry Benson: Shoot First 5:15p Moonlight 5:45p Best Worst Thing* 7:30p Moonlight 7:45p Delicatessen*

Hear something around town? Get it in the paper... Send your Overheard in Santa Fe tidbits to: eavesdropper@sfreporter.com

DEKALOG 7&8

11:30a Fri.-Sun. Jan. 6-8

Fri. - Sun. January 6 - 8 11:30a Dekalog Episode 7 & 8 12:00p Moonlight* 1:30p Moonlight 2:15p Ghostland* 3:45p Moonlight 4:15p Best Worst Thing* 6:15p Best Worst Thing 6:30p Ghostland* 8:15p Moonlight 9:00p Best Worst Thing*

Mon. & Tues., January 9 & 10 2:15p Moonlight* 3:45p Moonlight 4:30p Best Worst Thing* 6:00p Moonlight “The best 10 hours you will ever spend at the movies...” – Indiewire 6:30p Ghostland* 8:15p Moonlight DEKALOG MARATHON coming JANUARY 14th! 8:30p Best Worst Thing* *in The Studio

“A DAZZLING

RY. ENenTA DO’t CblinUkM ce – not ev on . Don elid Every flutter of antey wonder a ou ng risks blocki world.” of the photographic

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MOVIES

RATINGS

Fences Review: The Measure of a Man

BEST MOVIE EVER

10

August Wilson’s classic play comes to the screen

9 8

9

BY ALEX DE VORE a l e x @ s f r e p o r t e r. c o m

7

++ Stellar performances; brilliant source material

Simplicity is the name of the game in Fences, the new film adaptation of playwright August Wilson’s 1983 Pulitzer Prize-winning tale of family, death and betrayal set in 1950s Pittsburgh. Acclaimed actor Denzel Washington does double duty both as director and in the starring role of Troy Maxson, a flawed man whose age once stood in the way of a transition from the Negro Baseball Leagues to the majors—a hurt he carries with him and that seems to inform his hardened sensibilities as a father, a husband, a caretaker and a provider. Washington is, of course, plenty familiar with the role, having appeared in over 100 performances of the Tony-winning 2010 Broadway reprisal alongside Viola Davis, who also plays Troy’s wife Rose in the film version. Stage-toscreen is no easy feat, but Washington deftly navigates the potential perils of cinematic minimalism by flat-out embracing them—Fences, for

6 5 4 3 2 1 WORST MOVIE EVER

-- Slightly too long; play-to-film not for everyone

the most part, adheres to a mere two sets: the Maxson home and backyard. It’s here that Troy spins tall tales of legendary family dogs and tangles with death himself. He seemingly believes he knows how everyone should live, from his close friend and fellow garbage man Bono (Stephen Henderson) to his sons Cory (Jovan Adepo) and Lyons (Russell Hornsby), but his air of authority belies the haunting truth that he once envisioned great things for himself, and now resents his buttoned-down lifestyle while quietly longing for what might have been. Washington is riveting, able to transition from charming, lighthearted nonsense to a painfully detached narcissism without missing a beat, a performance all the more impressive when we take into account the theatrical pace of the dialogue. Davis, however, acts circles around

everyone as an aging mother trapped between a strained love for her overbearing husband, an instinctive desire to do right by their sons and her own sense of loss and disappointment. Angels in America scribe Tony Kushner provides uncredited tweaks to the screenplay, which Wilson was unable to complete before his death in 2005, but make no mistake—Washington makes Fences his own by practically disappearing into a career-defining performance and one of the finest films of this or any year. FENCES Directed by Denzel Washington With Washington, Davis, Adepo, Hornsby and Henderson Violet Crown, DeVargas, Regal, PG-13, 138 min.

QUICKY REVIEWS

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GHOSTLAND

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ROGUE ONE: A STAR WARS STORY

GHOSTLAND

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++ Uncensored; not whitewashed -- Slow build; the tribe’s culture shock in Germany

Rookie director Simon Stadler shocks and humbles viewers with Ghostland: The View of the Ju’Hoansi, a documentary following the Ju’Hoansi bushmen of Namibia. When a law was passed in 1990 that prevented the Ju’Hoansi from hunting animals for food, they were left only with their titles of “gatherers.” The Ju’Hoansi then resorted to performing for visiting Westerners for money by dancing, playing music and shooting arrows. Ghostland takes viewers on a journey of privilege and civilization. Stadler takes his subjects from the Ju’Hoansi tribe to visit neighboring African tribes, as well as “civilized” areas of Namibia and Germany where they witness the lives of those with access to grocery stores, clean water, and— most sacred of all—meat. We see them nervous to use an airplane restroom and fascinated by the amenities of the more civilized world. The camera is almost always trained on the four bushmen, but occasionally focuses on Westerners (aka white people) wearing uncomfortable and confused yet intrigued

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BEST WORST THING THAT EVER COULD HAVE HAPPENED

expressions as they watch the tribesmen walk around in their native garb. Ghostland poses an interesting juxtaposition between the Ju’Hoansi and the Westerners­— the bushmen having so little and yet living happily and carefree; and the Westerners having luxuries unknown to the Ju’Hoansi,

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THE EAGLE HUNTRESS

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FANTASTIC BEASTS AND WHERE TO FIND THEM

yet who are perceived as unhappy, tired and unfulfilled. The simplest things like soap in a gas station restroom or packaged underwear light up the faces of the tribe members, which forces Westerners like us to recognize and understand how privileged we really are. (Kim Jones) Center for Contemporary Arts, NR, 85 min.

Namibian bushmen experience culture shock in the new doc, Ghostland.

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MOONLIGHT

ROGUE ONE: A STAR WARS STORY

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++ It’s Star Wars, bro; Darth Vader -- Creepy CGI

Now that we’re apparently going to get our Star Wars movies in annualized form, it’s only natural to question the validity of Rogue One, the first in a series of non-core films in the franchise, and one to tell a story outside the main plotlines we’ve come to know and love. We follow Jyn Erso (The Theory of Everything’s Felicity Jones), the daughter of an Imperial science officer played by Mads Mikkelsen (Hannibal). Jyn is orphaned when her father grows a conscience and doesn’t want to fight for the Empire anymore. She’s young and brash and doesn’t much care about anything, but when the Rebel Alliance needs to track down someone close to her, she enlists in exchange for whatever semblance of freedom is available in this particular galaxy. And so, along with a Rebel captain named Cassian Andor (Diego Luna), who is beginning to question his place in the fight, and a wise-crackin’ reprogrammed Imperial droid (voiced brilliantly by Firefly’s Alan Tudyk, even if he’s awfully similar to Douglas Adams’ Marv from The Hitchhiker’s Guide to the Galaxy), Jyn must traverse the planets to CONTINUED ON PAGE 33

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uncover the plans for an Imperial mega-weapon you may have heard about called the Death Star. Rogue One separates itself from previous Star Wars films with a tale that’s more about the individual human cost of war than the admittedly fun fantasy of space magic. This isn’t to say that known elements from the Star Wars realm don’t find their way into the film, but rather than focus on one young man’s journey to selfdiscovery and missing hands in a black-andwhite, good-versus-evil universe, Rogue One isn’t afraid to point out that the Rebel Alliance must sometimes do ugly things in the name of peace. This paradoxical concept not only helps to flesh out a chapter in the saga that we’ve always kind of wondered about, it is a solid foundation for the humanization of the rebels who, in previous outings, had proven disappointingly dimensionless. The CGI is as brilliant as one would expect from the franchise, save a few creepy choices such as a computer-generated version of Peter Cushing (RIP) as Governor Tarkin that is understandable given he’s not alive, but that still falls victim to the uncanny valley. It’s also possible that the heavy emphasis on fan service for the second Star Wars film in quick succession could arguably be perceived as a crutch. Regardless, the action sequences are just right and every conceivable detail seems to have been considered. We actually grow to care about characters that represent a fairly huge shift in a monumental piece of shared culture, and Rogue One does a fine job in establishing a number of new characters. If this is a fair example of the kinds of side stories we can expect from the Star Wars universe, we say bring us more. With such a massively rich vein for storytelling, there’s ample opportunity to win new fans while pleasing entire generations of others. One must be careful not to allow this film to be overhyped, and there will always be minimal things to pick apart if you’re one of those sci-fi fans. But, if you’ve ever been into Star Wars to any degree whatsoever, you’ll want to see this film immediately; the last three minutes alone are worth it. (ADV) Regal, Violet Crown, PG-13, 134 min.

BEST WORST THING THAT EVER COULD HAVE HAPPENED

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++ Fun to see the young actors -- Director seems to be living + vicariously through the doc

Director Lonny Price (Company and 2001’s Sweeney Todd in concert) explores the complexities of the 1981 Broadway musical

Oh, y’know, just a stormtrooper in a tank—no big.

Merrily We Roll Along. The show, from legendary composer/director team Harold Prince and Stephen Sondheim, is dissected in the new documentary, Best Worst Thing That Ever Could Have Happened. Price tackles not only the young actors involved, but the musical’s unprecedented approach of telling protagonist Frank Shepard’s journey from zero to hero by using a backwards time frame. Prince and Sondheim’s risky vision for their production was to cast all young people. They hosted an open cattle call, advertising for individuals between the ages of 14 and 20 and, after a rigorous audition process, the chosen few felt like the most fortunate actors of their time. Unexpectedly, however, the play flopped. Hard. Attendees fled the theater within minutes of the curtain, and after the first disastrous run, the script was scrapped and one of the main actors was replaced. The Best Worst Thing That Ever Could Have Happened guides viewers on an inspiring journey through excitement, disappointment and creative fulfillment. Each actor from the original cast of Merrily We Roll Along (such as Jason Alexander of Seinfield) share their stories about life after the musical’s demise. Stimulating interviews dive into topics important to consider for all creative minds, such as being flexible in one’s career path or following one’s heart despite obstacles. Price himself flashes back to his glory days

as Merrily’s Charley Kringas, which makes the film seem like he is living vicariously, but it is his capturing of the family-like unity found within the theater that becomes the leading message of the film. (KJ) Center for Contemporary Arts, NR, 96 min.

THE EAGLE HUNTRESS

8

++ It’s a girl hunting with an effing eagle -- We may not get the whole story

Forget Frozen. Just let it go. And ditch your heartbreak-turned-fury over the role sexism likely played in the recent presidential election. Instead, let your thrill for a 13-year-old Mongolian girl named Aisholpan Nurgaiv soar above the ice-covered steppes of Mongolia in The Eagle Huntress, which has to be the girlpower movie of the year. The new Sony Pictures Classics documentary, narrated by Star Wars newcomer Daisy Ridley, tells the story of the traditional hunting bond between golden eagles and men from the Kazakh, a nomadic tribe that’s been around since before the days of Genghis Khan. But more than that, it’s how this young girl breaks the glass ceiling between verdant expanses and craggy mountains. You see, like being president of the United States, eagle hunting in Mongolia is just for men. And, boy howdy, even if you stopped reading the

subtitles for a few minutes, you’d know how the men interviewed for the film really feel about Aisholpan’s interloping on their sausage fest. Women are weak; they don’t have the courage to hold the bird; they should stay home and make tea for the hunters. Her father, to be congratulated on his forward thinking and bold dedication to his daughter, sees past the gender barrier. “It’s not choice,” he explains, “it’s a calling that has to be in your blood.” And it’s in hers. Aisholpan thus shows no fear, strapping on her fur-lined hat and trotting into town on her sturdy horse, arm extended as it becomes a perch for the avian predator. The bird’s wingspan is wider than she is tall, dwarfing the ruddy-cheeked girl with each restless flap. She pets its head as if it were a house cat, talking all the while with praise and comfort. Oh, and by the way—she had to rappel down a cliff side and snatch the eaglet from its nest. Then months of training. No bigs. What majestic footage: the grace of the powerful wings alighting from the edge of the mountain, the expressions on the old dudes’ faces as she earns perfect scores at the region’s annual eagle festival as the youngest competitor and the first-ever female. It is a trip for the imagination to look inside yurts and back to stone goat enclosures, across barren snowscapes and through villages with stumpy homes and smoky corridors. See too the textures of the textiles, the steam from the mouths of beasts, and the expressive faces not just of the starring eagles, but the scruffy horses and bleating lambs. We dare you to watch impassively as father and daughter ride off together after Aisholpan passes the ultimate test of recognition for a hunter: catching a fox in the snowy mountains. The Eagle Huntress is a great winter movie that stands to touch the coldest chambers of heart with fierce inspiration. Grab it with your talons. (Julie Ann Grimm) DeVargas, G, subtitles, 87 min.

FANTASTIC BEASTS AND WHERE TO FIND THEM

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++ The Potter-verse is fun -- One must like the Potter-verse

We follow the hijinks of a young wizard named Newt Scamander (Eddie Redmayne of Les Misérables), a sort of conservationist/magic ecologist who travels the globe both searching for and educating folks about rare magical beasts and having just such a delightfully absurd CONTINUED ON PAGE 35

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MOVIES

This young girl captured and raised a damn eagle that she now hunts with. Dang. yet appropriate name. For those familiar with the Harry Potter fiction, we can think of Newt like a sort of precursor to the beast-loving Hagrid from the original run of books and films, especially in his inability to accept that some beasts are just plain dangerous. It’s 1926 in New York City and oh, man, wouldn’t you know it—a bunch of Newt’s beasts get loose! If that wasn’t hard enough for the guy, the American magic community sure is different than the British one to which we’ve grown accustomed via JK Rowling’s other works. Muggles (nonmagic folk) are here called “no-maj,” and it’s hard to decide if it’s insulting or just right that the American version of such a concept is the least creative descriptor of all time. Just as Newt comes to New York, a malevolent invisible force starts killing people, and our adorable little hero must join up with a disgraced magic cop named Tina (Katherine Waterston of Inherent Vice), her mind-reading sister Queenie (Alison Sudol) and a no-maj named Kowalski (Dan Fogler) who just wants to open a damn bakery but is swept up in the madness. Everyone obviously blames Newt and his magic creatures, but it seems like the mysterious Graves (who is like, the vice president of magic or something and played by Colin Farrell) knows more than he’s letting on and anyway—Newt dresses in bright colors, so he can’t possibly be bad. Potter-heads will no doubt feel excitement at the prospect of revisiting the world of Rowling’s creation, but make no mistake about the feel of Fantastic Beasts: It’s just not quite the same. It sure is fun, though, and with a reported four more films in the series on the way, all directed by Potter veteran David Yates, there’s still time to do better. If nothing else, the huge reveal at the end is pretty exciting (no spoilers), just don’t expect to love it unless you’re already into this stuff. (ADV) Violet Crown, Regal, PG-13, 133 min.

CCA CINEMATHEQUE 1050 Old Pecos Trail, 982-1338

JEAN COCTEAU CINEMA

++ Incredibly well-crafted -- Fails to give main character a strong voice

In a new work based on the previously unproduced screenplay In Moonlight Black Boys Look Blue by Tarell Alvin McCraney, director Barry Jenkins (Medicine for Melancholy) brings us a romantic drama fueled by self-discovery. A young boy grows up in Miami during the ’70s and ’80s while struggling to accept his identity. We tour through three significant chapters of Chiron’s life, from timid boy to deluded man, as played at various ages by newcomer Alex Hibbert, Ashton Sanders from Straight Outta Compton and Westworld’s Trevante

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Rhodes. Chiron must navigate a veritable minefield of adolescent strife, from a drugaddicted mother, an antihero crack dealer named Juan (Mahershala Ali) and his budding sexuality with lifelong friend Kevin (Jharrell Jerome and André Holland). Moonlight focuses on the paradoxical question of who you are and who you are expected to be, as Chiron learns he can be open with Kevin sans judgment and utilizes that presence as a safe space. Chiron uncomfortably flits through adulthood, defying the stereotypes of gay and black men, but eventually becoming a crack dealer running the inner city of Atlanta. When Chiron and Kevin reconnect in adulthood, however, Chiron must evaluate who he has become and who he has portrayed himself to be. The gritty plot is beautifully accompanied by ambient lighting and carefully composed scenes, further supporting the poignancy each character brings to the screen, and though Chiron’s voice is rarely heard, he expresses himself with his actions, whether violent or passionate. Moonlight thus becomes a cinematic masterpiece, a journey of love, loss and self-discovery that will leave viewers captivated by Chiron’s character long after the film is over. (KJ) Center for Contemporary Arts, Violet Crown, R, 111 min.

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SAMU

SAMIR

SAMU and his brother SAMIR were rescued at Sam’s Club in Santa Fe by an employee of our Felines & Friends veterinarian. We took the brothers in to find them a forever home. TEMPERAMENT: Both brothers are very sweet, playful and social, get along well with kids, and love human attention and having their bellies rubbed. They must go to a home together or one with another kitten or active cat to play with. SAMU is a handsome boy with a short orange & white coat and orange tabby markings. SAMIR is a handsome boy with a short coat and brown tabby markings. City of Santa Fe Permit #16-006

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COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENTS SANTO NIÑO REGIONAL CATHOLIC SCHOOL Competing on a national stage. Our mission is to provide excellent elementary, academic education with a Catholic tradition for 3 years to 6th grade. Our committment is to educate the whole child in a safe, service oriented environment. No transfer fee! Visit us at santoninoregional.org for more information or call 505-424-1766. WOMEN’S EMPOWERMENT GROUP This is a psychoeducational therapeutic support group for women 18+ who want to work on building self-esteem, self-confidence, setting boundaries, and being assertive. Come prepared to learn concrete techniques and make positive changes in your life with the support of other women. Group meets Mondays from 6:308:30, January 16 -March 6 at Tierra Nueva Counseling Center. Facilitated by Michelle Lynn, LMHC and Nicole Ortiz Student Therapist. $10/ session, sliding scale. Call 471-8575 to register. STITCH AWAY THE WINTER BLUES! A creative outlet and group support for seasonal stress and depression by crocheting, knitting, and/or any other yarn crafting of interest in a group setting. Facilitators will also offer instruction to those who are new to yarn crafting. Thursday Evenings, 6-8pm, January 19 - March 9 at Tierra Nueva Counseling Center. Group facilitated by student therapists LaTausha Cotner and Katie Roemerman. $10/session sliding scale. Call 471-8575 to register. TEACH YOUR WAY AROUND THE WORLD. Get TESOL Certified & Teach English Anywhere. Earn an accredited TESOL Certificate and start teaching English in the USA and abroad. Over 20,000 new jobs every month. Take this highly engaging & empowering course. Celebrating our 15th year. Next Course: March 11 - May 27. Contact John Kongsvik. 505-204-4361. info@tesoltrainers.com www.tesoltrainers.com

MINDFUL RELATING AND EMBODIED EMOTION: Group therapy for emotional processing and skill building, with a focus on mindfulness and somatic practices. How do emotions help and hinder us? What emotions have had the biggest impact on your life? How can we participate with emotion to grow through challenging times? For men and women ages 18+. $10/ session sliding scale. Tierra Nueva Counseling Center. Call 471-8575 to register. Saturdays 12-2pm, from January 14-February 11. MODERN BUDDHISM IN SANTA FE: Buddhist wisdom offers practical tools and spiritual realizations that change our mind: the way to increase our good qualities, improve relationships and change our world. Transformative meditations diminish stress and frustration, allowing expansive and peaceful states of mind to naturally arise. Without inner peace, outer peace is impossible. Kelsang Lhadron, Resident Teacher @ KMC - NM in Albq. will give teachings and guided meditations: an American Buddhist nun whose inspiring teachings offer profound insight, transmitted with humor and practical advice. Saturdays 10:30am - Noon at BODY of Santa Fe, 333 W Cordova Rd $10/ Drop-in class Classes: Jan. 7, 14, 21, 28, Feb. 4 More info: (505) 292 5293, www.meditationinnewmexico.org Contact: Kelsang Lhadron: rt@nkt-kmc-newmexico.org EYES ON FIRE: Photographs by Pat D’Andrea. Photographs of the aftermath of the fires in the Jemez Mountains taken from 2011 - 2016. Show taking place at the Santa Fe Public Library Main Branch downtown on Washington Ave. Opening reception on Sunday January 8 from 2 - 4pm. Photographs will be up through January 29

HEALING THROUGHT THE ART OF TRADITIONAL NATIVE AMERICAN POTTERY. Open group for men and women 21 and up where we will incorporate the traditional pottery teachings and history into a collaborational therapeutic model. $10/session, sliding scale. Group meets on Mondays 5:30-7:30 pm, ongoing through March 13. Group led by student therapist and traditional Native American potter Sanda Sandoval and student therapist Traci McMinn-Joubert. Call Tierra Nueva Counseling Center at 505-471-8575 to register. RECOVERING FROM RELIGIOUS AND SPIRITUAL ABUSE. A support group is forming to help people who have experienced abuse and adverse effects from belonging to high demand religious and spiritual groups. This support group has no religious or spiritual agenda, and everyone is welcome. Group held Wednesdays from 6:30-8:30, January 18-March 8. $15/session sliding scale. Group led by Sylvan Schneider, LMHC and Randall Browning, student therapist. To register call Tierra Nueva Counseling Center 505-471-8575.

MARKETPLACE FURNITURE

RESTAURANT GUIDE 2016-201 7 2016 -201 7

RESTAURANT GUIDE

RESTAURANT GUIDE

E ANT GUID R E S TAU R SFR 2017

1

Hungry ?

SFRCLASSIFIEDS.COM

1

Pick up a copy at one of the locations below and find out: * Buffalo Thunder Resort & Casino

* Old Santa Fe Inn

* City Shoe Repair

* Las Palomas Hotel

* Collected Works Bookstore

* La Posada de Santa Fe

* Eldorado Hotel & Spa

* Residence Inn

* Eye Associates

* Rosewood Inn of the Anasazi

* Fitness Plus

* Santa Fe Chamber of Commerce

* Fort Marcy Recreation Complex

* Santa Fe Convention Center

* Garrett’s Desert Inn

* Santa Fe Plaza (east side and south side)

* Harold Runnels Building

* Santa Fe Public School Administration Building

* Hilton Santa Fe

* Santa Fe Sage Inn

* Hotel St. Francis

* Santa Fe Southside Library

* Hotel Santa Fe

* Santa Fe Spa

* Hyatt Place

* Santa Fe University of Art and Design

* Inn and Spa at Loretto

ADVERTISE AN EVENT, WORKSHOP OR LECTURE HERE IN THE COMMUNITY ANNOUCMENTS

SFR 2017 R E S TAU R ANT GUID E

SFR’s Restaurant Guide is back and bigger than ever! Did your favorite local eatery make our Top 10 or 25 Faves lists?

* Genoveva Chavez Community Center

SPACE SAVING furniture. Murphy panel beds, home offices & closet combinations. wallbedsbybergman.com or 505-286-0856.

INSID E THE BEST DININ G IN THE CITY DIFF EREN T / 2016 -201 7

* Santa Fe Visitor's Center

* Inn at Santa Fe

* SFCC (main entrance)

* Inn of the Governors

* Sports Medicine Center

* Inn on the Alameda * Kokoman Liquors, Pojoaque * Manhattan Street and Guadalupe Street corner

* State Capitol Building * State Education Building * State Employees Credit Union

* Mesa Public Library, Los Alamos

* State History Library

* La Montañita Co-op

* Rancho Viejo Village Market

* Montoya Building

* Vitamin Cottage

* NM State Library

* Water Street (by parking lot)

The Reporter’s annual Restaurant Guide:

Your foodie compass to what’s cooking in Santa Fe.

SFREPORTER.COM

JANUARY 4-10, 2017

37


SFR CLASSIFIEDS 3 Ways to Book Your Ad!

CALL: 505.983.1212

EMAIL: classy@SFReporter.com

WEB: SFRClassifieds.com

MIND BODY SPIRIT ASTROLOGY Rob Brezsny

Week of January 4th

ARIES (March 21-April 19) Light, electricity, and magnetism are different expressions of a single phenomenon. Scottish scientist and mathematician James Clerk Maxwell (1831-1879) was the first to formulate a theory to explain that startling fact. One of the cornerstones of his work was a set of 20 equations with 20 unknowns. But a younger scientist named Oliver Heaviside decided this was much too complicated. He recast Maxwell’s cumbersome theory in the form of four equations with four unknowns. That became the new standard. In 2017, I believe you Aries will have a knack akin to Heaviside’s. You’ll see the concise essentials obscured by needless complexity. You’ll extract the shining truths trapped inside messy confusions.

- my friend Luther. 2. Creative power arises when you conquer your tendency to stay detached. - paraphrased from poet Marianne Moore. 3. If you want to be original, have the courage to be an amateur. - paraphrased from poet Wallace Stevens. 4. “In the beginner’s mind there are many possibilities, in the expert’s mind there are few.” Zen teacher Shunryu Suzuki.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21) “There is a desperation for unknown things,” wrote poet Charles Wright, “a thirst for endlessness that snakes through our bones.” Every one of us has that desperation and thirst from time to time, but no one feels the pull toward perplexing enchantments and eternal riddles more often and more intensely than you Scorpios. And according to my astrological TAURUS (April 20-May 20) “The thornbush is the old meditations on your life in 2017, you will experience this obstacle in the road,” wrote Franz Kafka. “It must catch pull even more often and with greater intensity than ever fire if you want to go further.” Let’s analyze this thought, before. Is that a problem? I don’t see why it should be. In Taurus. If it’s to be of maximum use for you in 2017, we fact, it could make you sexier and smarter than ever— will have to develop it further. So here are my questions. especially if you regard it as a golden opportunity to Did Kafka mean that you’re supposed to wait around pas- become sexier and smarter than ever. sively, hoping the thornbush will somehow catch fire, either through a lucky lightning strike or an act of random SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21) I hope you will seek vandalism? Or should you, instead, take matters into your out a wide range of intoxicating experiences in 2017. The omens predict it. Fate sanctifies it. I hope you will own hands—douse the thornbush with gasoline and throw a match into it? Here’s another pertinent query: Is gracefully barrel your way through the daily whirl with a the thornbush really so broad and hardy that it blocks the constant expectation of sly epiphanies, amusing ecstasies, and practical miracles. There has rarely been whole road? If not, maybe you could just go around it. a time in your life when you’ve had so much potential to GEMINI (May 21-June 20) The fictional character Scott heal old wounds through immersions in uncanny bliss. Pilgrim is the hero of Bryan Lee O’Malley’s series of But please note: The best of these highs will NOT be graphic novels. He becomes infatuated with a “ninja delivinduced by drugs or alcohol, but rather by natural means ery girl” named Ramona Flowers, but there’s a complicalike sex, art, dancing, meditation, dreamwork, singing, tion. Before he can win her heart, he must defeat all seven yoga, lucid perceptions, and vivid conversations. of her evil ex-lovers. I’m sure your romantic history has compelled you to deal with equally challenging dilemmas, CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19) I thought of you when I read a tweet by a person who calls himself Vexing Gemini. But I suspect you’ll get a reprieve from that kind Voidsquid. “I feel imbued with a mysterious positive enerof dark melodrama in 2017. The coming months should gy,” he wrote, “as if thousands of supplicants are worshipbe a bright and expansive chapter in your Book of Love. ping golden statues of me somewhere.” Given the astroCANCER (June 21-July 22) The creature known as the logical omens, I think it’s quite possible you will have simshort-eared elephant shrew is typically four inches long ilar feelings on regular occasions in 2017. I’m not necesand weighs a little more than one ounce. And yet it’s sarily saying there will literally be golden statues of you in more genetically similar to elephants than to true shrews. town squares and religious shrines, nor am I guaranteeing In its home habitat of southern Africa, it’s known as the sengi. I propose we regard it as one of your spirit animals that thousands of supplicants will telepathically bathe in 2017. Its playful place in your life will symbolize the fact you in adoration. But who cares how you’re imbued with mysterious positive energy as long as you are? that you, too, will have secret connections to big, strong influences; you, too, will have natural links with powerhouses that outwardly don’t resemble you. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22) “When I look back, I see my former selves, numerous as the trees,” writes Leo poet Chase Twichell. I’m sure that’s an experience you’ve had yourself. Do you find it comforting? Does it feel like being surrounded by old friends who cushion you with nurturing familiarity? Or is it oppressive and claustrophobic? Does it muffle your spontaneity and keep you tethered to the past? I think these are important questions for you to meditate on in 2017. It’s time to be very conscious and creative about shaping your relationships with all the people you used to be. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22) “’Life experience’ does not amount to very much and could be learned from novels alone… without any help from life.” So said Nobel Prizewinning author Elias Canetti, who was born in Bulgaria, had British citizenship, and wrote in German. Although his idea contradicts conventional wisdom, I am presenting it for your consideration in 2017. You’re ready for a massive upgrade in your understanding about the nature of reality—and firsthand “life experience” alone won’t be enough to ensure that. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22) I am rooting for you to be flagrantly unique in 2017. I vehemently want you to be uninhibited about expressing your deepest, rawest, hottest inclinations. In this spirit, I offer the following four rallying cries: 1. “Don’t be addicted to looking cool, baby!”

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18) When it’s summer in the Northern Hemisphere, the birds known as arctic terns hang out in Greenland and Iceland. Before the chill sets in, they embark on an epic migration to Antarctica, arriving in time for another summer. But when the weather begins to turn too cold there, they head to the far north again. This is their yearly routine. In the course of a lifetime, a single bird may travel as far as 1.25 million miles—the equivalent of three roundtrips to the moon. I propose that you make this creature your spirit animal in 2017, Aquarius. May the arctic tern inspire you to journey as far as necessary to fulfill your personal equivalent of a quest for endless summer. PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20) In June 1962, three prisoners sneaked out of the Alcatraz Federal Penitentiary, located on an island in San Francisco Bay. Did they succeed in escaping? Did they swim to safety through the frigid water and start new lives abroad? No one knows. Law enforcement officials never found them. Even today, though, the U.S. Marshals Service keeps the case open, and still investigates new evidence when it comes in. Are there comparable enigmas in your own life, Pisces? Events in your past that raised questions you’ve never been able to solve? In 2017, I bet you will finally get to the bottom of them. Homework: Send me a list of your top five New Year’s resolutions. Go to RealAstrology.com and click on “Email Rob.”

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s Expanded Weekly Audio Horoscopes and Daily Text Message Horoscopes. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700. © CO P Y R I G H T 2 0 1 7 R O B B R E Z S N Y 38

JANUARY 4-10, 2017

SFREPORTER.COM

EVOLUTIONARY ASTROLOGER TERRI ZEE has recently moved to Santa Fe and is now welcoming new clients. She is certified by both schools of Evolutionary Astrology, Steven Forrest’s Apprenticeship Program, and Jeffrey Wolf Green’s School of Evolutionary Astrology. Terri has over seventeen years of experience in soul-based astrology and offers consultation either in person or via Skype. Please visit her website http://terrizee.com/ or email zee2@airmail.net or call 214-912-3126.

NUTRITION

REFLEXOLOGY

FOOD & NUTRIENT SENSITIVITY TEST Do you feel mood swings or tiredness after eating certain foods? What vitamin or nutritional deficiencies do you need to know about? Find your best & worst foods, your personal optimum diet. Non-invasive dietary test uses electronically imprinted vials. Jane Barthelemy, Kinesiologist fiveseasonsmedicine.com 505-216-1750

FOOT REFLEXOLOGY FOR HOSTESS & HOLIDAY NEEDS. For anyone you know who is on their feet a lot, suffers chronic pain or leads a stressful life... the relaxation and rejuvenation found at Santa Fe Reflexology may be the perfect gift! To order your gift certificates: (505) 414-8140 julie@sfreflexology.com

PSYCHICS

MASSAGE THERAPY

TANTRA MASSAGE & TEACHING Call Julianne Parkinson, 505-920-3083 • Certified Tantra Educator, Professional Massage Therapist, & Life Coach LIC #2788

LOVE. CAREER. HEALTH. Psychic readings and Spiritual counseling. For more information call 505-982-8327 or go to www.alexofavalon.com. Also serving the LGBT community.

ARE YOU A THERAPIST OR A HEALER? YOU BELONG HERE IN MIND BODY SPIRIT!

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SFR CLASSIFIEDS 3 Ways to Book Your Ad!

LEGALS LEGAL NOTICE TO LEGAL NOTICES CREDITORS/NAME ALL OTHERS CHANGE NOTICE OF SALE ON

FORECLOSURE/ D-101- CV-2016- 00162 Lawrence T. Davis STATE OF NEW MEXICO COUNT OF SANTA FE FIRST JUDICIAL DISTRICT No. D-101- CV-2016- 00162 Villas De Santa Fe Condominium Association, Inc. Plaintiff, v. Lawrence T. Davis; Unknown Spouse of Lawrence T. Davis; JOHN DOES I V, inclusive; JANE DOES I-V, inclusive; BLACK CORPORATIONS I-V, inclusive; WHITE PARTNERSHIPS I-V, inclusive; Unknown Heirs and Devisees of each of the abovenamed Defendants, if deceased, Defendant(s). NOTICE OF SALE ON FORECLOSURE PLEASE TAKE NOTICE that the above-entitled Court, having appointed me or my designee as Special Master in this matter with the power to sell, has ordered me to sell the real property (the “Property”) situated in Santa Fe County, New Mexico, commonly known as 400 Griffin Street, Santa Fe New Mexico 87501, and more particularly described STATE OF NEW MEXICO IN as follows: An undivided THE PROBATE COURT 30000/263000 interest in fee SANTA FE COUNTY simple as tenant in common in No.: 2016-0197 and to Unit Number(s) 2205, IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF MAIDA E. BARELA, together with a corresponding undivided interest in the DECEASED. Common Furnishings which are NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN appurtenant to such Unit(s), that the undersigned has as well as the recurring (I) been appointed personal representative of this estate. All exclusive right to reserve, use, and occupy an Assigned Unit persons having claims against within Villas de Santa Fe, A this estate are required to present their claims within two Condominium (the “Project”); (II) exclusive right to use and months after the date of the first publication of notice, or the enjoy the Limited Common Elements and Common claims will be forever barred. Claims must be presented either Furnishings located within or otherwise appurtenant to to the personal representative such Assigned Unit; and (III) at the address Listed below, or non-exclusive right to use and filed with the Probate Court of Santa Fe, County, NM located at enjoy the Common Elements of the Project, for their intended the following Address: purposes, during (A) in the 102 Grant Ave., Santa Fe, NM case of “floating” Timeshare 87501-2061 Interests, such Use Periods Dated: November 22, 2016 as shall properly have been Maria Barela reserved in accordance with 220 Ephriam St. the provisions of the then Santa Fe, NM 87501 current Rules and Regulations 505-913-9054 promulgated by Villas de Santa Fe Condominium Association, Inc.; and (B) in the case of “fixed” Timeshare Interests, NEED TO PLACE A such Fixed Vacation Week LEGAL NOTICE? as is specifically set forth below, all pursuant to the SFR CAN PROCESS Declaration of Condominium ALL OF YOUR LEGAL for Villas de Santa Fe, A Condominium, duly recorded NOTICES FOR THE in the Office of the Clerk of MOST AFFORDABLE Santa Fe County, New Mexico, PRICES IN THE SANTA in Book 1462, at Page 195, as amended from time to time FE AREA. (the “Declaration”). Initial Use Year: 2005 Timeshare Interest: Fixed Use Period: N/ A Number CLASSY@ of Rights (if applicable): SFREPORTER.COM 30000 Fixed assigned Unit: Vacation Week No.: N/A Unit Type (if applicable): The sale STATE OF NEW MEXICO IN THE PROBATE COURT SANTA FE COUNTY IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF Robert Hernandez, DECEASED. No.: 2016-0115 NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed personal representative of this estate. All persons having claims against this estate are required to present their claims within two (2) months after the date of the first publication of this notice, or the claims will be forever barred. Claims must be presented either to the undersigned personal representative at the address listed below, or filed with the Probate Court of Santa Fe County, New Mexico, located at the following address: 102 Grant Ave., Santa Fe, NM 87501. Dated: December 13, 2016 Gary L. Thompson 6078 Hoochaneetsa Plz. S Cochiti Lake, NM 87083 505-350-0240

CALL: 505.983.1212

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SERVICE DIRECTORY is to begin at 9:00 a.m. on Wednesday, January 11, 2017, on the front steps of the First Judicial District Courthouse, 225 Montezuma Avenue, City of Santa Fe, County of Santa Fe, State of New Mexico, at which time I will sell to the highest and best bidder for cash in lawful currency of the United States of America, the Property to pay expenses of sale, and to satisfy the Judgment granted to Villas De Santa Fe Condominium Association, Inc. (“Villas De Santa Fe”). Villas De Santa Fe was awarded a Default Judgment Decree of Foreclosure on October 24, 2016, in the principal sum of $27,157.49, plus attorney fees in the sum of $623.16 and attorney costs in the sum of $659.70 for a total amount of $28,449.40, plus interest thereafter at the rate of 8.75% per annum from October 24. 2016, until the property is sold at a Special Master’s Sale, plus costs of the Special Master’s Sale, including the Special Master’s fee in the amount of $212.50, plus any additional attorney fees and costs actually expended from the date of this Default Judgment until the date of the Special Master’s sale, plus those additional amounts, if any, which Plaintiff will be required to pay before termination of this action for property taxes, and insurance premiums, or any other cost of upkeep of the property of any sort. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the real property and improvements concerned with herein will be sold subject to any and all patent reservations, easements, all recorded and unrecorded liens not foreclosed herein, and all recorded and unrecorded special assessments and taxes that may be due. Villas De Santa Fe, its attorneys, and the Special Master disclaim all responsibility for, and the purchaser at the sale takes the property, subject to the valuation of the property by the County Assessor as real or personal property, affixture of any mobile or manufactured home to the land, deactivation of title to a mobile or manufactured home on the property, if any, environmental contamination on the property, if any, and zoning violations concerning the property, if any. NOTICE IS FURTHER GIVEN that the purchaser at such sale shall take title to the above described real property subject to a one (1) month right of redemption. PROSPECTIVE PURCHASERS AT SALE ARE ADVISED TO MAKE THEIR OWN EXAMINATION OF THE TITLE AND THE CONDITION OF THE PROPERTY AND TO CONSULT THEIR OWN ATTORNEY BEFORE BIDDING. By: /s/ Robert Doyle, Special Master, P.O. Box 51526, Albuquerque, NM 87181 505-417-4113

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Kids of all ages & adults welcome! Call Coach Jim 505.795.0543

INNER FOR TWO

Captured with Humor & Warmth HOLIDAY PORTRAITS BY: JANE PHILLIPS PHOTOGRAPHY 505.984.1944 jane@janephillipsphotography.com

3 ways to Book your ad: Call classy at: 505.983.1212 Email: classy@ sfreporter.com Book online at sfrclassifieds.com now with color! XCELLENT MACINTOSH SUPPORT 20+yrs professional, Apple certified. xcellentmacsupport.com • Randy • 670-0585

“YOU ARE WHAT YOU INK”

106 N. Guadalupe • (505) 820-2075

HAPPY HOUR @ THE BAR 4-6:30 PM Wed. thru Sun. $4 $5 $6 Appetizers • Chicken Fried Asian Ribs • Brie & Apricot Jalapeno Poppers •

• Mushroom Ragout w/ Boursin in Phyllo • Blue Crab Cakes & Remoulade

XX

NOW OPEN

227 DON GASPAR | SUITE 11A

Inside the Santa Fe Village

505-920-2903

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SFR’s Photo Contest is here! Submit your photos by Feb. 1 SFReporter.com/PhotoContest

MONTH #-#, 2017

SFREPORTER.COM

January 4, 2017 Santa Fe Reporter  

Santa Fe Reporter's ACTION! The Film Industry brings big money to New Mexico, but does the incentive cap mortgage its potential future succe...

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