Page 1


Turning 65? Welcome to Medicare! What is Medicare Advantage? What about drug coverage? You’ve got a lot to learn.

Ask Me. Call today 505.303.3517 or stop by

2213 Brothers Rd, Suite 500 Santa Fe 87505 You may be speaking with a licensed sales agent. 2

OCTOBER 30-NOVEMBER 5, 2019

SFREPORTER.COM


DECEMBER 4-10, 2019 | Volume 46, Issue 47

NEWS OPINION 5 NEWS

I AM

7 DAYS, CLAYTOONZ AND THIS MODERN WORLD 6 SCHOOL’S LOCKED DOWN 8 Public school students undergo numerous safety drills a year; we go inside a lockdown and examine the psychological effects SEEKING COMMENT 11 A mining proposal along the Pecos River moves into the public comment period for exploratory drilling COVER STORY 12 THE DARKEST TIMELINE The winning stories from our 2019 fiction writing contest are chilling and timely

27

.

More me time. I don’t worry about my banking because it’s easy. Mobile, online or face-to-face, Century is there when and where I need them. Century is MY BANK.

GHOST STORIES The Japanese mix horror with amusement in the form of ghostly yokai, sort of like poltergeists, and a massive new exhibit at the Museum of International Folk Art tells the tale.

Cover design by Anson Stevens-Bollen artdirector@sfreporter.com

CULTURE EDITOR AND PUBLISHER JULIE ANN GRIMM

MyCenturyBank.com 505.995.1200

ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER AND AD DIRECTOR ANNA MAGGIORE

SFR PICKS 19 Small art, library, psych-rock and indie films

ART DIRECTOR ANSON STEVENS-BOLLEN

THE CALENDAR 20

CULTURE EDITOR ALEX DE VORE

MUSIC 23

CONTRIBUTING EDITOR JEFF PROCTOR

THE SHAPE OF CLASS TO COME A local punk-rock icon offers a class on the phenomenon

SENIOR CORRESPONDENT JULIA GOLDBERG STAFF WRITERS LEAH CANTOR KATHERINE LEWIN

3QS 25 WITH STUDENT-ACTOR ADRIENNE RUGG

Filename & version:

19-CENT-41204-Ad-Hiker-SFReporter(resize)-FIN

Cisneros Design:

505.471.6699

Client:

Century Bank

Publication:

Santa Fe Reporter

Run Dates:

December 4, 2019

Contact: jossie@cisnerosdesign.com Ad Size: 4.75”w x 5.625”h Due Date: November 27, 2019 Send To: Anna Maggiore: anna@sfreporter.com

COPY EDITOR AND CALENDAR EDITOR COLE REHBEIN EDITORIAL INTERN ALLISON SLOAN

A&C 27 GHOST STORIES A new exhibit at the Museum of Int’l Folk Art of Japanese boogies keeps the scary season going FOOD 29 THE MUCK AND THE HOLLAR One of Madrid’s beloved eateries is threatened by an unappetizing problem MOVIES 33

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS AEDRA BURKE CADE GUERRERO DIGITAL SERVICES MANAGER BRIANNA KIRKLAND PRINT PRODUCTION MANAGER AND GRAPHIC DESIGNER SUZANNE S KLAPMEIER SENIOR ACCOUNTS ADVERTISING EXECUTIVE JAYDE SWARTS ADVERTISING ACCOUNT EXECUTIVES ROBYN DESJARDINS MAGDALENA NERO

FRANKIE REVIEW Plus, Marriage Story warmed our cold, cold hearts

CIRCULATION MANAGER ANDY BRAMBLE PRINTER THE NEW MEXICAN

www.SFReporter.com

Phone: (505) 988-5541 Office: 132 E MARCY ST.

EDITORIAL DEPT.: editor@sfreporter.com

CULTURE EVENTS: calendar@sfreporter.com DISPLAY ADVERTISING: advertising@sfreporter.com CLASSIFIEDS: classy@sfreporter.com

THOUGH THE SANTA FE REPORTER IS FREE, PLEASE TAKE JUST ONE COPY. ANYONE REMOVING PAPERS IN BULK FROM OUR DISTRIBUTION POINTS WILL BE PROSECUTED TO THE FULL EXTENT OF THE LAW. SANTA FE REPORTER, ISSN #0744-477X, IS PUBLISHED EVERY WEDNESDAY, 52 WEEKS EACH YEAR. DIGITAL EDITIONS ARE FREE AT SFREPORTER.COM. CONTENTS © 2019 SANTA FE REPORTER ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. MATERIAL MAY NOT BE REPRODUCED WITHOUT WRITTEN PERMISSION.

association of alternative newsmedia

SFREPORTER.COM

DECEMBER 4-10, 2019

3


making

spirits BRIGHT 505 988-7393

912 Baca Street, Santa Fe, NM

ReflectiveJewelry.com

k ou pic ! y p l e h ft Let us t special gi a out th llery is open a Our g ri 9 -5 F Mon - - 4 Sat 10

3811 Cerillos Road, Suite 104, Santa Fe 87507

USE YOUR FLEXIBLE SPENDING ACCOUNT DOLLARS BEFORE THE END OF THE YEAR! Monday-Friday 7:30am - 7:30pm Saturday 7:30am - 1:30pm

SERVICES INCLUDE:

· GENERAL DENTISTRY · IMPLANTS · DENTURES · ZIRCONIA CROWNS · WISDOM TOOTH EXTRACTION/ORAL SURGERY

CALL FOR AN APPOINTMENT!

505-933-6872

• INSURANCE ACCEPTED • MEDICAID PAYMENTS ACCEPTED: Visa, Mastercard, Discover, American Express, Cash/Check 4

DECEMBER 4-10, 2019

SFREPORTER.COM


JULIE ANN GRIMM

LETTERS

Have you had a negative dental experience? Michael Davis,

DDS

New Patients Welcome

Would you like to experience caring, smiling, fun, gentle people who truly enjoy working with you?

SMILES OF SANTA FE Michael W. Davis, DDS 1751 Old Pecos Trail, Suite B (505) 988-4448 www.SmilesofSantaFe.com

P R OV I D E R F O R D E LTA A N D U N I T E D C O N C O R D I A D E N TA L P L A N S • M O S T I N S U R A N C E S A C C E P T E D

Mail or deliver letters to 132 E Marcy St., Santa Fe, New Mexico 87501; or email them to editor@sfreporter.com. Letters (no more than 200 words) should refer to specific articles in the Reporter. Letters will be edited for space and clarity.

MUSIC, NOV. 19: “SERIOUSLY? THIS AGAIN?”

and then kill victims and cause great bodily harm to others. The latest sentencing of Dominic Friedlein is a perfect example of these unspeakable atrocities. He received a mere two years plus one year house arrest. ... ... Why does New Mexico, its judges and its prosecutors take these matters so lightly? Someone must answer for these outlandish sentencing guidelines.

BEVERERLY A FORDHAM SANTA FE

TO BUSK OR NOT TO BUSK Busking is a crucial part of the music scene, just like recording and composing and improvising. A lot of famous musicians got their start on the streets by busking. If you’re gonna be salty about someone playing music outside, close your shop doors and invest in some sound tiles. Otherwise, get smart and strike up an understanding with the busker.

KACY CREWS VIA FACEBOOK

Hypnotherapy Certification Course Begins January 27

Hypnotherapy Academy of America 505-767-8030

www.HypnotherapyAcademy.com

BUILD MOMENTUM That was a good article. Flyover country needs a flywheel. It would seem that momentum has to build at some point, but development along a four-lane highway is always about the automobile, and it will take concerted effort to make it otherwise. Anyway, good work. Thanks.

SPECIALIZING IN:

JEFF DONLAN SANTA FE

NOW OFFERING

ORT

RD.

.

3909 ACADEMY RD.

LOS RD

APR PERFORMANCE PRODUCTS

RD.

SFR will correct factual errors online and in print. Please let us know if we make a mistake: editor@sfreporter.com or 988-7530.

AIRP

OWS EAD S. M

I am appalled at the lack of strength in properly addressing the atrocious sentencing guidelines for individuals who drink, drive,

Tuesday, December 10, 7 pm

“FLYOVER COUNTRY”

“DRUG AND ALCOHOL AUBSE WORSENING IN NM”

DO SOMETHING!

SPECIAL FREE CLASS

CERRIL

MORNING WORD, NOV. 21:

COVER, NOV. 19:

Integrate Your Interest in Practical Spirituality, Self-improvement and Holistic Healing, into a Career Helping People

3909 Academy Rd., Santa Fe, NM 87507 | 473-3001

SANTA FE EAVESDROPPER

“I named my dog Spirit ... now every time I go home, I get to say, ‘Thank you, Spirit.’” —Overheard at Verde Juice

Send your Overheard in Santa Fe tidbits to: eavesdropper@sfreporter.com

We pay the most for your gold coins, heirloom jewelry and diamonds! On the Plaza 60 East San Francisco Street, Suite 218 Santa Fe, NM 87501 • 505.983.4562 • SantaFeGoldworks.com SFREPORTER.COM

DECEMBER 4-10, 2019

5


S FREP ORTER.COM / FUN

COME ALONG JOE.

KAMALA HARRIS DROPS OUT OF PRESIDENTIAL RACE Follow her lead, Biden … don’t question it.

SUPER-FAMOUS AND SUPERADORABLE CAT L’IL BUB DIES Easily the worst thing to come out of what was already a truly terrible year.

FORMER RIO ARRIBA COUNTY SHERIFF’S DEPUTY WHO TASED TEEN TO REMAIN OUT OF CUSTODY UNTIL TRIAL Did they at least take away his taser?!?

FUNDS FOR SMALL NEW MEXICO CHARTER SCHOOLS TO DIMINISH OVER THE NEXT FEW YEARS It just makes you wanna tase someone.

EVERYBODY LOVES BABY YODA Strong with the force and cute, he is. When 50 years old you reach, look that good you will not.

STATE TO CONDUCT RAPID-FIRE HIRING FAIR Everywhere but in Santa Fe. We like it slow.

SHOPPING CENTER WITH KAUNE’S FOR SALE AS ARE THE BEESTRO AND CAFÉ ATALAYA What about a bunch of mini Meow Wolf locations?

READ IT ON SFREPORTER.COM LAND USED City Hall’s latest power couple has resigned. Land Use Director Carol Johnson and her husband Asset Manager Kevin Kellogg say it’s about family and not about their house getting red-tagged last month.

6

DECEMBER 4-10, 2019

SFREPORTER.COM

W E A R E WAY M O R E TH A N W E D N E S DAY H E R E A R E A CO UP LE O F O N LI N E E XC LUS I V E S :

PODCAST IS BACK Season two of SFR’s Reported podcast opens on Saturday with some of the Writing Contest winners. Listen at www.sfreporter.com/podcast or subcribe with iTunes or Spotify.


THE

“WORRY-FREE, GOTCHA COVERED” HEALTH PLAN

Life is as wonderful as it is full of surprises. But a health plan from New Mexico Health Connections means you’re covered for doctor visits, hospital stays, medications and whatever life has in store. To find the perfect plan for you and your family,

myNMHC.org

call 866-668-9002 or visit myNMHC.org.

NMHC0483-1016 SFREPORTER.COM

NOVEMBER 27-DECEMBER 3, 2019

7


LEAH CANTOR

NEWS

S F R EPO RTER.COM / NEWS

A lockdown just before Thanksgiving affected three public schools.

Locked Down SFPS shooter protocols trail national best practices as new law takes effect B Y K AT H E R I N E L E W I N k a t h e r i n e @ s f r e p o r t e r. c o m

S

tudents fill the hallways, heading to their next class. The short blast of a bell pierces Capital High School. Teachers rush to their assigned rooms and students hurry into the classroom nearest them, highlighting the sudden emptiness in the Southside school’s corridors. A short space of time passes, followed by a soft click as a computer system locks every classroom door. The doors will not open until the perceived danger has passed. In the classroom where I’m sitting, I watch a teacher drop a bolt into place that secures the door into the floor so a potential attacker can’t get inside.  Later, I learn that students who linger too long in the hallways are taught to hide in other areas of the school. Back in the classroom, the teacher switches off the lights and closes the blinds. Everyone in the school huddles in a closet or against a wall, out of sight of doors and windows.   That’s the operative mission here, we’re told: Don’t get seen by a school shooter. On this occasion, I found myself in the middle of a training exercise for about 45 minutes. But I didn’t know it at the time. 

8

DECEMB ER 4-10, 2019

Lockdown drills to practice for an active shooter have become a regular part of students’ lives, experts say, after the seemingly constant stream of mass shootings across the country in churches, schools and even a Wal-Mart. So have lockdowns for actual threats. In Santa Fe alone, my recent experience at Capital—coupled with a pair of real lockdowns last Tuesday at Milagro Middle School and Santa Fe High School—show that the phenomenon and the fear it inspires have not spared the City Different. Despite the efforts of Santa Fe Public Schools, some of the district’s lockdown and active shooter protocols are not considered best practices by national experts who specialize in the psychology of students and faculty, SFR has found. The ambiguity surrounding whether the exercises are real or simulated, along with other protocols, could actually be traumatizing students, especially at Capital, where the population of immigrants and others have already lived through horrors. While faculty and staff are encouraged to let students know that a lockdown is just a drill, such notification is not required.  Students in New Mexico public schools can expect to hide in a dark classroom or elsewhere on campus at least twice each school year from now on. That’s because lawmakers this year passed legislation mandating that all schools conduct at least two active shooter drills annually. It’s the first time in

SFREPORTER.COM

state history that active shooter drills have been specifically required.   The law, adopted in the spring without a single opposing vote, reduced the total number of required fire and other emergency drills from 12 to eight. But it allows school districts more flexibility for incorporating active shooter drills.  SFPS will conduct 11 safety drills this year, including four fire drills, one evacuation, a lockdown drill inside the classroom and two when the students are switching classes or at lunch or recess, according to SFPS security chief Mario Salbidrez, the former deputy chief of the Santa Fe Police Department.  Salbidrez recently rolled out the use of an app called the Rave Panic Button at Santa Fe, Capital and Early College Opportunities high schools. He plans to initiate its use at Milagro and Ortiz middle schools and Mandela International Magnet School as well. The app can be used to alert law enforcement of a danger to put schools into lockdown and let teachers know when a lockdown is just a drill.   The district’s general safety plan is based on best-practice recommendations from national security experts, according

to SFPS Superintendent Veronica Garcia. However, she says, the district relies on local police to dictate safety protocols at incidents to which they respond. Relying only on law enforcement to decide what type of drill is the most effective is not always the wisest, says Melissa Reeves, a school psychologist and researcher for the last two decades, who has developed best practices for teaching active shooter lockdowns. “Law enforcement is used to training with highly sensorial activities because that’s part of what they do, same with the

We don’t light a fire in the hallway to practice fire drills [and] we don’t put a child on a street corner and have someone grab them and kidnap them to teach stranger danger. -Melissa Reeves, school psychologist

military,” Reeves says. “That is not what we need to be doing in schools.” Regardless of whether there is a threat, the Santa Fe school district wants it to feel legitimate. For many students, and for myself when the drill trapped me on campus at Capital that day after a mentoring session for the school newspaper, it felt all too real.


How best to train students and teachers on what to do when there is a threat on campus remains the subject of some debate. Based on SFR’s first-person account, Reeves says some of Santa Fe district’s protocols follow agreed-upon standards and some don’t.  For example, Reeves does not endorse withholding from students that a lockdown is just a drill because it “incites more fear” and if a real shooter is on campus, students don’t know whether to take the situation seriously.  Lockdowns have the potential to inflict trauma, especially on vulnerable populations common throughout  SFPS—immigrant children and those with autism, she says.  “We don’t light a fire in the hallway to practice fire drills [and] we don’t put a child on a street corner and have someone grab them and kidnap them to teach stranger danger,” Reeves tells SFR via phone. In addition to the lockdown drill, district schools have upped their security measures over the last several years. Some school officials use the Violence Threat Assessment training, which Reeves teaches around the country, as well as more controlled access to the school, security officers on campus, and alarms and surveillance video systems.  Lockdowns in response to a real threat are becoming more common, too, even if the cause is not a shooter on campus. In just the first week of school this year, four lockdowns occurred due to threats in neighborhoods near campuses, Garcia said in August. Garcia estimates that the district locked schools down 15 to 20 times “at a minimum” last year in response to real threats, most from violence in surrounding areas off campus. The week after the active shooter drill at Capital, three public schools across town locked down for what turned out to be a real response to a fake campus shooter threat called in by students.  As armed law enforcement officers paced outside the locked doors of Milagro Middle school, a parent tells SFR her daughter inside suffers from a diagnosed anxiety disorder and both real school shootings around the country and emergency drills have exacerbated her condition. The woman did not want her name published due to concerns that publicity would negatively impact her daughter.

SFR asked the district through newly appointed spokesman David Carl how many drills and actual lockdowns have occurred so far this school year, but district officials did not respond before press time. At the beginning of the school year, SFPS released a 12-minute video called “Run, Hide, Fight” as a tool for informing children about active shooter drills. Garcia calls their film a response to parents’ concerns that a widely circulated film of the same name was too graphic.  Reeves tells SFR she considers the national Run, Hide, Fight video “absolutely unnecessary and quite frankly traumatizing” for students.  The SFPS low-budget, sanitized production is a mix of local school officials, staged classroom discussions and reenactments of what should be done during a lockdown. Parents received a notice that their children would see SFPS’s toned down version of the video. The district allowed parents and principals to make the final call about which students would see the video. The video is just one of the ways the district has ramped up preparedness and security measures in recent years. In 2018, the school district invested in a security system that checks the ID of people who want to enter the campus to make sure they are not registered sex offenders or anyone else who has been flagged as dangerous.  The schools also have check-in kiosks to track school visitors and make sure they can’t enter the school unseen, as well as programmable locks on doors.  Garcia says behavioral and mental services remain the most important tools the district has for protecting schools from a threat that might come from a student.  “That’s where threat assessments, that’s where anti-bullying, and counselling services become very important,” she says in August, “because many of these shootings took place by kids who have been bullied.” For Reeves and her colleagues, making sure that faculty and staff are staying connected to students is the most important step in preventing crises. “Relationships and connectedness is our number one prevention and mitigation tool,” Reeves says. “What we know is good crisis intervention helps to mitigate traumatic impacts. Our goal is that [students and teachers] don’t have lifelong trauma implications. We’re really trying to get in there and train school districts on that.” Leah Cantor contributed reporting.

SFREPORTER.COM

DECEMBER 4-10, 2019

9


ARTISAN CRAF TED JEWELRY SINCE 1974

Annual HOLIDAY SALE You’re Invited To The

Handmade Jewelry At Wholesale Pricing

T WO W E E K E N D S I N A R O W !

DECEMBER 6 - 7 | 10 - 5 DECEMBER 13 - 14 | 10 - 5 AM

AM

PM PM

675 Harkle Road, Santa Fe, NM Downstairs in our Jewelry Warehouse

Learn More at WWW.PEYOTEBIRD.COM

Descubra por qué cada vez más residentes de Nuevo México eligen los planes Dual de UnitedHealthcare. Más residentes de Nuevo México con Medicare y Medicaid están inscritos en un plan UnitedHealthcare Dual Complete® en comparación con todos los demás planes de la competencia combinados.* Si usted tiene estas dos tarjetas, llámenos para averiguar si reúne los requisitos para nuestro plan. La mayoría de los planes incluyen: Primas de costo $0.

Créditos para comprar los productos para la salud que necesita.

Atención dental integral.

Hasta 36 traslados de ida todos los años.

Estamos listos para ayudarle.

1-844-279-9286, TTY 711

UHCCommunityPlan.com/NM *Datos de membresía correspondientes a planes Dual en Nuevo México, según los Centros de Servicios de Medicare y Medicaid (Centers for Medicare and Medicaid Services, CMS), al 10/1/2019 Los planes están asegurados por UnitedHealthcare Insurance Company o una de sus empresas afiliadas, una organización de Medicare Advantage que tiene un contrato con Medicare y un contrato con el programa estatal de Medicaid. La inscripción en el plan depende de la renovación del contrato del plan con Medicare. Y0066_170131_104754 Aceptado CST27555B

10

DECEMBER 4-10, 2019

SFREPORTER.COM


S FR E P O RTE R .CO M / N E WS

Open for Comment US Forest Service invites feedback on a proposal to begin mine prospecting activities in the Pecos

A

n Australian mining company that’s been making noise about searching for precious metals near the Pecos Wilderness has taken the formal steps to seek approval of a new prospecting project. The US Forest Service announced Monday that public comments will be accepted on the proposal through Jan. 17. This week, the Forest Service initiated the “scoping period” for the proposal, which is the first part of the environmental review process mandated by the National Environmental Policy Act. In its new letter to the “Friends and Neighbors of the Santa Fe National Forest,” the agency says public comments will help determine which issues and concerns to focus on during the NEPA process. A public meeting to discuss the proposal and gather public comments is planned for Thursday, Dec. 12, from 6-8 pm at Pecos High School. Comexico LLC, an American subsidiary of Australian mining company New World Cobalt, is seeking a permit that would cover one year of exploratory drilling on existing mineral deposits in and around Jones Hill. Those operations would help the corporation determine the feasibility of expanding to full-scale mining operations in the future. According to the Forest Service letter, the company proposes to drill up to 30 core holes (at sites that were already

Professional Counselors and Peer Supports are here to HEAR YOU 24 /7/365

previously disturbed by past prospecting activity), will only use existing roads, and will use less than 3 acre-feet of water from an existing well. Although the proposed project area is near endangered species habitats, wetlands and floodplains, roadless areas and Native American religious sites, the agency’s letter says it expects the proposed drilling activities to “have no adverse effects on these values.” Forest Service staff have already set some conditions on the application to enhance environmental protections. For example, it prohibits drilling until after the spotted owl breeding season, meaning drilling won’t start until at least October 2020. The agency will also require the company to prevent the spread of invasive weeds by washing vehicles and equipment, and has mandated continued consultations with local tribes about the cultural resources in the area. Yet, a coalition of local Pecos residents and environmental groups have been steadily organizing resistance to the project for fear that prospecting could lead to full-fledged mining in an area still suffering from the negative environmental impacts of past mines. Mining laws that have not been changed since 1872 give companies the rights to explore and develop any mining claims on federal land, and strips the Forest Service of the power to stop projects all together. But based on the NEPA assessment, the agency can decide what kinds of hoops the company will have to jump through to move forward.

er

Peer to P e

BY L E A H CA N TO R l e a h @ s f r e p o r t e r. c o m

Warmline

WARM LINE

Q: Will this process allow Comexico to build a new mine in the Pecos? A: No. As USFS stated several times in a letter to the public, “the project under consideration is not a mining proposal.” The current proposal is for a year-long permit to drill holes into deposits on Jones Hill to determine how much zinc, gold, and copper is below the surface. Any future mining activities will require another permit, which means that Comexico or any company they sell the rights to in the future would have to go through the process all over again. But according to Comexico’s own analysis, both the proximity of the historical Tererro mine and more recent prospecting activities on Jones Hill make is seem likely that the area’s mineral deposits would support future mining activities. The company has already secured the rights to other prospects surrounding Jones Hill. If exploration at Jones Hill turns up positive results, the company plans to expand its operations to surrounding sites. On its website, New World Cobalt states, “the company’s ultimate objective is to develop a centrally located processing facility that is fed by ore from multiple deposits, laying the foundations for the development of a significant new VMS [volcanogenic massive sulfide] camp.” Q: What kind of comments will the Forest Service take into consideration? A: “Comments should be within the scope of the proposed action, have a direct relationship to the proposed action outlined in the letter, and include supporting reasons for the Forest Service to consider,” the agency says in its letter to the public. Comments will be accepted via an online form, email, postal mail, hand delivery to the Pecos Ranger Station, or in public at the Dec. 12 meeting at Pecos High School. Q: What happens next? A: The New Mexico Mining and Minerals Division has a process to review the application, and then Santa Fe County will also have to review and vote on whether to approve the application in accordance with new mining laws passed by the Santa Fe County Commissioners in August. The Forest Service has prohibited any drilling activity to begin until after Oct. 1, 2020.

The Caesar Family Legacy

Opening and sale

Thurs. Dec 12, 4-8 pm

Crisis

Artist Kenneth Johnson (Muscogee/Seminole) curates a one-of-a-kind exhibition—the Caesar Family and their German Silver jewelry legacy exhibition is through March 2020.

and

Access Line

Crisis Line

CRISIS LINE

Proposed Pecos Exploration FAQ

New Mexico

1 (855) 662-7474 1 (855) 466-7100

www.nmcrisisline.com Warmline

1 (855) 662-7474 For TTY access call 1 (855) 466-7100 1 (855) 227-5485

NEWS

Coe Center

1590 B Pacheco Street, Santa Fe, NM 87505 coeartscenter.org • 505.983.6372

Bruce Caesar and family will be at the Coe to share their work along with Keri Ataumbi, Cody Sanderson, Adrian Standing Elk Pinnecoose, Pat Pruitt, Kenneth Johnson and daughter Skye, Samuel LaFountain, Jodi Webster, Maria Samora, Emmett Navakuku, J.J. Otero, and Brian Fleetwood.

SFREPORTER.COM

DECEMBER 4-10, 2019

11


1

s t

2019

PLACE

G oob er

G FICTION WINNERS

THEME: The Darkest Timeline

T

his was harder than I expected. A LOT of incredible writers and stories. I truly enjoyed every one of them,” writes fiction contest judge Trent Zelazny. Choosing them was hard, he says, but in a good way. Zelazny spent more than a week with the entries to SFR’s annual Writing Contest before selecting the winners. They’re just what you might never expect from twisted timelines: three tales with wrinkles and dark spots. Third-place winner Kristin Goodman’s bio features success with comedy, but her version of a future with implanted tracers that monitor hormone fluctuation goes in the other direction in “The Sheol”; a story with a familiar pulse comes from Jill Cooper in the second-place choice of “The River Time”; and winner David Howard delights and mystifies with the favorite “Goober.” Zelazny spends most of his full-time work in Santa Fe with editing and writing projects, including one that is so top secret right now he can’t explain who it’s with or what is—but it’s big. He’s published crime, horror and fantasy fiction, and also works part-time at the George RR Martin’s new Beastly Books next to the Jean Cocteau Theater. (He’s also the child of the influential and local late sci-fi author Roger Zelazny, whose list of published novels is super long.) SFR’s staff asked writers to riff on the theme “the darkest timeline” this year. The days are approaching their darkest part of the year. But that’s the not the only reason. We’re also keenly aware that the trajectory we’re on—as a society, a nation, a species, even—must be influenced by forces and angles that remain hidden. Miss last week’s paper? Read the winners of the nonfiction contest at www.sfreporter.com. (Julie Ann Grimm)

12

DECEMBER 4-10, 2019

SFREPORTER.COM

TRENT ZELAZNY

B Y D AV I D H O WA R D

oober has always been pretty stealthy. Not just cat-stealthy, but weird, disappear and reappear stealthy. We’d see him in the den and then he’d walk out of the living room, at the opposite end of the house. The only path between them is the kitchen where we’re sitting. We’d laugh it off, thinking he’d sneaked past and we just didn’t notice. “I guess he jumped into another dimension and came out in the living room.” Sometimes he’d stare at the wall or the floor. Living in the country, we have a lot of bugs so we thought he’d found something interesting. Occasionally, I’d get up close and try to see what he saw. With the other cats it’s obvious; a moth to munch or one of the boxelder bugs that invade the house in waves. Goober is different. If he saw a daddy long-legs, he’d swat and play with it but the stare is just a stare. Not even the chittering sound he makes when he watches the birds outside—just staring. We joked about this too. “Ha ha, he’s looking at the little girl that takes care of him on the other side.” It became a thing, to make jokes about our teleporting cat, whenever he did something uncanny. “Where’d you go Goob? Do they have good treats? Did you get ... tuna [or cheese or egg or whatever treat I was about to dole out]?” He’d do his strange little quack-meow, “wah” and orbit my legs in tighter and tighter circles until I gave him his treat. We spoil the cats. We had to reel it in a bit because the other two started to get fat. Not Goober. He eats and eats and eats and stays skinny. He doesn’t seem unhealthy but lithe and slinky, like one of the feral cats that haunt the neighborhood. We worried a little about his weight and took him to the vet. And back to the vet. For urine tests. For stool tests. For blood tests. For more blood tests. Several hundred dollars and every bit of diagnostic machinery available to modern veterinary science later, the vet thinks he’s older than his records show. Other than that, nothing. Except a lecture about letting Goober roam outside. I could tell the vet didn’t believe me but we don’t. Ever. Goober gets leaner and more muscular and never leaves the house. At least not in any conventional way. We’d just finished dinner and the cats were still milling around the kitchen hoping for snacks. Goober sat down, stared, and touched the floor. Not pawing at it but tentative, just touching, like when he plays with a loose strand of hair. He pulled his paw back and the next time he touched it his paw went into the floor. “Goober!” He turned and went to his food like nothing had happened. I walked over and touched the floor. Solid. “Did you see that?” I asked my wife. “See what?” “Nothing. I think I had too much wine.”


2

ANSON STEVENS-BOLLEN

Not long after that episode I retired from my day job and started working from home. Goober’s “travels” got stranger. Maybe it was always that way but now I’m around to see it. I was sitting on the living room couch with a laptop and Goober went behind a chair. He appeared at a full gallop coming into the living room. When Goober runs fast, he sounds just like a horse. He has to accelerate up to it though and he didn’t. He was just there, barrump-barrump, at full speed. He came to a sliding halt at the edge of the rug and did a quick look around. “Did anyone see me being undignified?” Immediately, he stuck his leg in the air and started grooming. His coat was full of dirt. I grabbed a brush from the bookshelf and started cleaning him up. “Where were you buddy? That’s some gnarly stuff in your hair. You are getting a little gray around the muzzle. Maybe the vet’s right about your age.” Our cats are indoor cats. Except for a loose screen Goober exploited a couple of times soon after we moved in, they’ve never been beyond the sun porch. The dirt worried me so I checked the house from end to end to find out how he was getting out. Nothing. Nothing catsized any way. I got the house sealed up better but I never discovered an escape route. The next time, I definitely saw it. I think. Goober was doing his thousand-yard stare by the cat tree in the den. I watched from the doorway because well, cats are weird and I’m easily amused. He stood up, walked forward, and disappeared. Maybe I watch too much science fiction, but I remember being surprised that there wasn’t a warp-speed flash or a ripple or something. He just went from there to not there like he’d walked behind a mirror. I staggered to the kitchen and poured some vodka from the bottle in the freezer. I took a sip and then knocked it back. I sat there, staring at my phone wondering how to, or if I should, tell the wife. He’s her baby. They’ve been together a long time—since before we moved in together. Way longer than we’ve been married. Would she even believe me? Am I nuts? Did I really just see that? “Goober? Where are ya Goob-man?” He strolled into the kitchen from the living room making his “I’m starving” quack and went face down in the kibble bowl. This time he had dirt and some kind of burrs stuck to his fur. I’d just seen him in the den, literally a minute before, and he was spotless. Even if it was just a matter of him knowing a way out, he didn’t have time to escape, run around and get dirty, and come back in. Thinking back, he’d have to have at least two ways in and out since he kept appearing at opposite ends of the house. He finished his snack and jumped into my lap. I started petting him and picking burrs out of his fur. It’s almost irrelevant at this point, but the burrs look like nothing I’d ever seen before. Not just in our yard, but ever. He had a nasty scratch on his head. Not fresh— more like a mostly-healed relic from a cat fight a week ago. He was on my lap this morning while I read the paper and the scratch wasn’t there. I am, was, a scientist. I’m not religious or superstitious. I pride myself on being able to figure things out or at least suspend judgement until I know enough to figure things out. Maybe Goober knows ways out of the house I haven’t found. But I was thorough checking the

n d

PLACE

The R i v er

I

BY JILL COOPER

t was the River Time, if you believed the Legend or, if you didn’t, the River Thyme, for the herbs that grew along its banks. What was remarkable about the River, if one noticed, was that it always flowed at the same rate, unaffected by seasons, snow melt, fires or drought. It makes its way through the Town in its deep narrow canyon exactly as the moon makes its way around the earth in its elliptical orbit. The Legend of River Time held that when someone inadvertently fell in, the River would not take him if it were not his time to die. But if it were his time, it would. Thus, the Legend embraces stories of dead old men lying peacefully at the bottom of the River and stories of healthy young boys clamoring out of the River. ***

house. Maybe he has a condition that ages him more rapidly than normal. But the vet didn’t find anything unusual other than unexplained wear and tear. Maybe I am insane, had a stroke, or have some other reason for hallucinating. But I function as well as I ever did in every other aspect of life and my wife has seen it too, to a lesser extent. The rational explanations don’t fit the observed facts. Maybe-but, maybe-but, maybe-but, it’s enough to drive me insane if I’m not already. The questions go on and on: Is it just him or is the portal (for want of a better word) “open” and only he can see it? Do others (the other cats?) see it but don’t go for whatever reason? Could I hold his tail and follow him? If I let go part way, would it cut off my arm? What if he came back without me? Does he even go to the same place every time or is it portal lottery? Given enough time, I think I can structure experiments to answer some of them safely. If I take it as a given that I’m not insane or hallucinating, there are a few things I know for sure although some of them raise new questions: Goober can go some place. I don’t know if “some place” is some where, some when, another dimension, or something else entirely. The mechanism to move (move is even open to debate) from here and now to some place is unknown. Time, relative to our time frame, is accelerated in this other place. He ages and may have gotten in a fight but the actual “traveling” doesn’t seem to hurt him. Dirt and burrs come back with him. That’s the part that really scares me. Things come back with him. David Howard grew up in Santa Fe and now lives in La Mesilla. He retired from LANL in 2019 and discovered a love of film photography late in life.

On both sides of the river, the brush grew wild except for a small clearing on the south bank to make room for the tiny River Park bordering on Main Street where tourists came to visit the shops and restaurants. At the River Café on Main Street, a version of the Legend of River Time was printed on the back of the menu and the servers were encouraged to embellish the Legend for the diners. And so it happened, one moonlit night, that Mr. and Mrs. Moxie from New York City were seated at Julio’s table at the River Café. Mr. Moxie was a loud, angry, arrogant man of sixty-six, very rich and used to having his own way. Mrs. Moxie was half his age and something of a blonde bombshell. It was a loveless marriage and her role was apparently to make Mr. Moxie look good. Julio could tell that the Moxies had been fighting and the poor missus had been crying. Mr. Moxie ordered for both of them and after his first bottle of wine, demanded to know about this nonsense story on the back of the menu. Julio was prepared to oblige. After the second bottle, Mr. Moxie was eagerly taking in Julio’s bogus tale of the temperamental redheaded chef who imagined his fallen cheese soufflé meant the end was near. He ran from the Café across Main Street through the Park to the edge of the canyon where he looked down at the River and saw an old gray man. He returned happily to his kitchen. “They say,” Julio continued, “that if you see a much older version of yourself in the River, you will live a long time.” “That so,” scoffed the increasingly inebriated Mr. Moxie, who like many powerful men, was terrified of dying and eager for any sign of immortality. “Go see for yourself,” said Julio. “Go to the River Time.” “No, you don’t,” said Mrs. Moxie, who had been silent throughout the meal. It was the sad state of their marriage that he was more likely to do someCONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE

SFREPORTER.COM

• DECEMBER 4-10, 2019

13


Ríos had confirmed what she thought was the truth. Now she had to figure out what to do with it.

ANSON STEVENS-BOLLEN

thing if she objected to it. “It is dangerous and wet out there and you will slip in your new ostrich boots. Plus, you have had much too much to drink.” “I think I can handle it,” snarled Mr. Moxie, who had spared no expense keeping himself fit. “You’re going to be stuck with me for a long time. You’ll see.” He threw several hundred dollars on the table, grabbed his wife’s arm and pulled her out the door to take a look in the River.

***

At her office Monday morning, Marisol realized there was nothing she could do with it. She couldn’t prove a murder charge against Mrs. Moxie based only on the evidence in the coroner’s report and an explanation of that evidence by Señor Ríos. The Moxies’ New York lawyers would make a mockery of her case, and more importantly, of Señor Ríos. They would grind him up in the machinery of the law and she couldn’t let that happen. What was she to do? The next Sunday after church she asked Señor Ríos if she might walk with him again. They went along quietly for a while, keeping the constant pace, until she cried out “It isn’t fair!” Señor Ríos was not startled. He understood her frustration even before she tried to explain. “What can I do?” she wailed. “Nada,” Señor Ríos said. “But it isn’t right!” “Lo siento. El Rio se encargara.” Marisol didn’t understand what he said. “Don’t worry. The River will take care of it,” he repeated in English and turned toward his cottage.

***

It was said that when the police recovered Mr. Moxie from the River, he looked much older than sixty-six. Even the coroner in the City—the body had to be sent away for a proper autopsy—found the dead man to have infirmities of old age which should have precluded his going to the River which was inconsistent with all the evidence of Mr. Moxie’s excellent health the night he dined at the River Café. As for what happened, Mrs. Moxie told the wholly credible story—there were no other witnesses—of how Mr. Moxie leaned over to see his image in the River and apparently slipped. Claiming to be afraid of heights, Mrs. Moxie had stayed back. When she heard her husband fall, she screamed for help. When he saw what happened, Julio blamed himself for making up the story that sent Mr. Moxie into to the River and quit on the spot. It was also said that Mrs. Moxie was inconsolable, fainted and had to be carried back to the Hotel. When she emerged the next morning, she was no longer the blonde bombshell, but a sweet, simple, pale and unbearably tragic young widow. She had touched the Townspeople with her sorrow and they took her in. There was a great outpouring sympathy and communal grief. The Hotel forgave its bill and men and women she’d never met sent flowers and gifts with their condolences. The Hotel restaurant was crowded with diners hoping for a glimpse of the River Widow who was required to remain among them until the investigation was complete. The untimely demise of Mr. Moxie in his new ostrich boots was good for business. Little attention was paid to the coroner’s report. ***

Señor Ríos lived alone in a small adobe cottage at the bend in the River where it turned down the mountain into the canyon. He was old but no one could say how old or indeed what his real name was or where he came from or how he knew everything or how he managed to get by—nothing about him was known except that he was the Keeper of the Legend of River Time and would remain so until the River claimed him. It was not surprising that Señor Ríos found nothing odd about the coroner’s observations. It was clear to him that Mr. Moxie died before his time and that he must, therefore, have been killed, by his or another’s hand. The River, never capricious, was not responsible. Just days earlier, a small boy chasing his dog had fallen down the steepest part of the embankment and escaped unharmed. A “miracle” the local paper called it. At Sunday mass, the Father thanked the Lord for the “miracle” of delivering the boy—and his dog—back to the arms of his family. Señor Ríos rose from his pew to explain that it was the River, not a miracle. The River would not take the boy or the dog before their time. “No es un milagro, he said. “Confía en el Río. No es la hora del nino o del perro.”

14

DECEMBER 4-10, 2019

SFREPORTER.COM

***

***

Marisol Smith, the town’s prosecutor, was also in Church that morning. She was a serious, responsible young attorney who, on the one hand, respected the legal system, and on the other, believed the Legend of River Time. She had not been among those moved by the tragic widow. Nor had she ignored the findings in the coroner’s report. After church, she waited for Señor Ríos. “Excuse me, Señor,” she said, “may I walk with you?” “Sí,” he said easily, as if he were often asked for his company, which he wasn’t. “You know of course about Mr. Moxie, the dead man taken out of the River.” Señor Ríos nodded. His pace was constant and Marisol fell into his rhythm as they walked down the River Road. “And you know that Mr. Moxie appeared much older when he came out of the River than when he went in.” “Sí,” Señor Ríos nodded. “So,” Marisol wanted to be very clear, “does the Legend of the River hold that Mr. Moxie died before his time? That the River didn’t take his life. That someone else did.” Señor Ríos smiled. “Sí.” They had reached the turnoff for the Cottage and Marisol didn’t think it appropriate to go further. Señor

For her fiftieth birthday, Mrs. Moxie, now a rich, restless, dark-haired widow, returned to the Town, she told herself, to commemorate where her fortunes changed. She was not so perverse as to stay at the Hotel or eat at the River Café or indeed go anywhere near River. All she knew is that she had to come back and start again because, when she allowed herself to admit it, for all her good fortune, she was not happy. Mrs. Moxie was accompanied by Oscar, a young, very pretty boy who made her feel good. At a bar far from Main Street, Mrs. Moxie and Oscar were drinking margaritas. Julio, the chatty bartender, suggested that, there being a full moon, they drive over to the Hot Springs on the other side of the Mountain. “They say,” Julio promised, “that if you make a wish at the Hot Springs under a full moon, it will come true.” “Nonsense,” said Mrs. Moxie. She didn’t want to go. “Let’s go,” said Oscar, “it will be fun. And who knows what will come of it.” He nudged her playfully. “You don’t want to be a bore.” That was all Oscar had to say. Mrs. Moxie, like many rich widows with young lovers, was terrified of becoming a bore. The road to the Hot Springs followed the River up and around the Mountain. Oscar was driving a spiffy convertible, lost in his fantasies of promises filled, when they crossed the narrow bridge over the River and didn’t see the car crossing the other way. No one was hurt in the crash except Mrs. Moxie who was thrown from the car into the River where she drowned, strangely enough, in a few inches of water. Stranger still, when they pulled her out, she looked like she did when she was Mr. Moxie’s blonde bombshell. Cooper has enjoyed rewarding careers in education, mathematics, arts and the law. The Santa Fe resident who says she is “moved by the magic of the city” is turning her attention now to writing. She feels she is making some progress.


3rd

PLACE

The Sheol

I

BY KRISTIN GOODMAN

ANSON STEVENS-BOLLEN

release my breath and kick—hard. There is a slight uptick in my breath. Stay calm, Anica. Level off. You can’t afford to make a mistake now. The hum of the massive air purifier helps me stay focused in my Nous (my mind’s eye). In my peripheral I see my father. Hands clasped at his waist. His feet spread past his hips. His presence is massive in the dark expanse. If I complete this sequence perfectly, I will be one step closer to earning my Iron Belt. A rush of air alerts me that my competitor’s leg is swinging toward me. It’s a quick snap, as her foot barely skims my nose. Breathing in, I drop backward, swing my left leg up and plant it directly into my opponent’s femur. A loud pop echoes through the expanse, as she drops into the darkness and disappears. I float in the inky black space, holding steady, keeping my heart rate even and calm. The battle is complete, but I must stay mindful of my adrenaline levels. Always. Even here. I open my eyes. Mac, my father, sits across from me on the floor. We are mirrors of one another, cross legged, hands cupped in our laps, breathing in sync. He’s a large man with thick eyebrows. His piercing green eyes are reminiscent of the forests I ran through in my child-

hood. It wasn’t that long ago, but it feels like we were living on a different planet. The only forest left is the manmade tropical grove we planted here. That’s what we’re told, anyway. Atta girl, Mac says in a whisper. You are one meditation away. I see a tiny tear well up in his eye. He is proud. I did good. The tear evaporates in the warm air, which is lucky. There are no highs or lows here. We must all keep our emotions steady, even in moments of fatherly pride. Getting Mac’s approval is cool, but it’s more about survival than it is about pride. Becoming an Iron Belt in the mindful martial arts isn’t easy. But it may be the only way to stay a citizen in The Hive. Any rise in body temperature, any hormone fluctuation, could signal the tracers implanted in my thyroid and brain stem. The mindful martial arts help correct our emotions quickly if practiced. All the citizens of The Hive have tracers. If you refused the implantation you were repurposed, which is the same punishment you receive if one of your tracers were to ever go off. So, you’re damned if you do, but you’re really damned, if you don’t. There are two options for repurposing: be thrown to the Cannibals or be thrown into The Sheol. In case you’re wondering, I’d prefer the Cannibals. At least with flesh eating zombie like humans, there’s a one percent chance of escape. The Sheol, however, is an impenetrable and inescapable underground maze. Basically, it’s prison with no guards. They don’t need them. And if you are to somehow find your way out of the maze, which is a huge if, The Sheol would lead you directly out onto The Playa, aka Cannibal territory. I say, cut out the middleman and just get it over with. Being repurposed can be slow or fast. I prefer fast. When I was seven, I watched Mac and Sol, my mother, martial art train with their bodies. That was

before the revolt and before we had to relocate to The Hive. Watching them practice was like watching a ballet, from what I remember of ballet. Dancers moving through space, defying gravity and simultaneously using breath as a weapon and as a shield. No more of that. Remember the tracers? When the Triumvirate (our three bodies of government) took control and moved us into The Hive, every citizen was ordered to the medical center to be “traced”. The state media spin was that it was for our own good. What with the growing population in the fragile new ecosystem, the government began to create a fear campaign that we would run out of resources quickly, which would only start another citizens war. They were right, of course. Resources had become scarce and when I say scarce, I mean it: no oil, no clean water, no animals, no trees, nada. Whether the government created the shortage and chaos with their propaganda causing a run on our natural resources, or it was inevitable because of overpopulation and no regulation, it happened all the same. It was devasting and nobody wants to be left out or behind again. Those who were left behind, are out there now in The Playa. And while they may technically still be human, how they are living is not. It’s the stuff of horror movies. Back when humans paid to be scared. Once every citizen of The Hive was traced—our hormones, our DNA, and our brains—they became government property. This property is monitored in The Cell. Only the Doge and the three leaders of the Triumvirate can enter and exit The Cell and the Workers in The Cell never leave. They live there. It’s very mysterious. All we’ve been told, is that it’s a complex monitoring system that tracks each citizen living in The Hive. It follows the created Hive parameters that we must all follow to remain citizens. These parameters are nearly impossible to follow: no violence, no rigor, no sex. Essentially, it doesn’t allow any citizen to experience a spike in their system that could lead to a revolt, overpopulation, or a crime of any kind. The first few years in The Hive were challenging. Citizens weren’t used to behaving like robots and The Sheol nearly filled up the first three months. That kind of growth left the Triumvirate no choice but to rethink the purpose of The Sheol population. They needed to expand, so they chained many of the less intelligent repurposed and forced them into slave labor. They dug over five thousand more acres of tunnels for the growing population. By then, most of The Hive citizens acclimated to their new lifestyles, and they were happy to be where they were. Following the new rules, working a steady job, and spending your one day off lying on a green lawn of purslane and bittercress watching the fish orbit The Hive, seemed like a far better choice than living out one’s natural life in a dark, musty maze, and being just another link in a never-ending chain gang. The state media stopped reporting on The Sheol expansion two years ago. I’m not sure if they stopped because the expansion stopped, or they realized it was stressful to hear about it. Every time they reported on it, the number of extractions increased considerably. Anxiety is not allowed in The Hive. I know that sounds unbelievable. How does a human CONTINUED ON PAGE 17

SFREPORTER.COM

DECEMBER 4-10, 2019

15


jobfair-SFR.qxp_Layout 1 11/26/19 3:38 PM Page 1

y a Stro d i l o H friday, december 13, 2019, 4-7 pm

glow at santa fe botanical garden and free admission to museums!

Museum of Indian Arts and Culture indianartsandculture.org • 505-476-1269

• 5 & 6pm: Tewa Women’s Choir in MIAC theater • 5:30 & 6:30pm: Native American dances • Renata Yazzie (Diné), pianist, playing classical and holiday music and enjoy holiday refreshments • Outdoor tree lighting and ornament workshop • Traditional western holiday music played in Navajo

Museum of International Folk Art internationalfolkart.org• 505-476-1200

• Gourd ornament workshop, and refreshments in the atrium • 5:15pm: Pasión Flamenca –Luís Campos, Fabian Sisneros, and Nicolasa Chavez present flamenco holiday songs in Vernick Auditorium

Wheelwright Museum of the American Indian wheelwright.org • 505-982-4636

• Cider and biscochitos • Fun childrens’ craft activities • 15% off at the Case Trading Post, the oldest Native American art shop in Santa Fe!

GLOW at Santa Fe Botanical Garden santafebotanicalgarden.org • 505-471-9103

• 5–8pm (last entry 7:30pm) • $10 Advanced/$12 day of event • Children 12 and under are FREE • Winter lights, fun activities, and live music!

ON MUSEUM HILL (OFF OLD SANTA FE TRAIL) 16

DECEMBER 4-10, 2019

SFREPORTER.COM

Looking for a Job? CHRISTUS St. Vincent is hosting a

JOB FAIR December 19, 2019 9:00 am – 2:00 pm

Vernick Conference Center (Lowest Level Entrance) 455 St. Michael’s Drive, Santa Fe, NM 87505 Looking to take your career to the next level? Don’t miss the opportunity to connect face-to-face with managers and explore clinical and non-clinical positions available at CHRISTUS St. Vincent! • • • • • • • •

Employment Benefits include: Retirement Plan Tuition Reimbursement Competitive Pay Paid Time Off Employer Assisted Housing Program Paid Personal Holidays Shift Differentials Paid National Holidays

Initial on-site interviews will take place so remember to bring a resumé and dress to impress! For more information, visit stvin.org/jobfair or call (505) 913-5730.


avoid anxiety in a post-apocalyptic world? The answer is—we don’t. Which is why we practice mindful breathing and meditation. I finished showering. Today we had hot water. That and the idea that I could finally earn my Iron Belt almost made me forget what today was. My mother disappeared two years ago, today. The report stated that she was murdered by a Worker who had gone rogue. But there was no video evidence of Extraction Machinery used on that day. Odd that the fine-tuned extraction team suddenly seemed messy and confused. There were rumors of a “glitch” or uncharged camera batteries. Nothing added up. The Worker’s name was never released, and no cause of death was determined. She was just reported to be dead, recylced. I stepped into the skin dryer and pressed power. I’m accustomed to the up and down breeze of the vent now, whisking the water from my skin and pulling it back into the water plant system. When I was little it scared me to death. Every drop of water goes back to feed the fish and plants. Yes, every resource is micro-managed down to drops of water. If my ancestors had only started this practice in the nineteen seventies, perhaps we’d still have fish in the ocean and trees on the mountain tops. Hindsight. The smell of grilled cheese wafts through our tiny cabin. We haven’t had real cheese in years. Then one afternoon my mom freaked out. She needed a grilled cheese and damn it she was going to figure out how to

have one! She perfected vegan cheese. Or maybe I just can’t remember what dairy tastes like. But it’s good. I watch Mac press the bread into the grill with his spatula. The cheese oozes out the sides. Sitting in the plastic chair, cold under my buttocks, I decide to ask. It’s today, isn’t it? He doesn’t look up. He keeps pressing. Willing it to be the perfect sandwich my mother used to love to make. Mac only makes grilled cheese on this day. For her. Last year, he stopped marking the day. He just made grilled cheese. I didn’t question his decision. Instead, it made me suspicious. Maybe he didn’t believe she was recycled, either. Maybe he knew something, and he wasn’t sharing it with me. Dad, do you think maybe she was repurposed and not recycled? She was recycled, Anica. That’s what the report said. So, that’s what happened. Being recycled means you died. Being repurposed means you committed a crime or chose to be a victim of a crime. In The Hive, if you are involved in a crime – either perpetrator or victim – you are at fault and you are sent to The Sheol to be repurposed. Mac places the grilled cheese in front of me and begins to eat. He had never lied to me before. Is this how it was going to be from now on? On the anniversary of my mother’s disappearance? I push the food away.

I’m not hungry. Mac looks up at me. His eyes widen. Now, I’ve done it. He leaps from his chair and jumps over my head. I duck and turn, just in time to see him land on a masked intruder wearing all black. He has the intruder on the ground in a choke hold. No! Dad! Stop! It was all so fast and efficient. I hadn’t seen an extraction up close before. The red lights appearing from above our cabin and the Extraction Machinery dropping into the kitchen. The large arms grabbing Mac first; the intruder second. I feel my blood pressure go up, as my father disappears into the dark sky above me. Breathe, Anica. Breathe. The tracer in my neck sends a shock through my entire body. I fall to the ground. Darkness. Kristin Goodman is an award-winning screenwriter and playwright recognized and honored at festivals including: The Austin Film Festival, Screencraft Film Fund, Screencraft Drama Screenplay, The Disney Fellowship, The Nashville Film Festival, and The New York Screenwriting Contest. She is the director of the national and regional touring live comedy show The Pump and Dump Show and directed Robert Shenkkan’s newest play Building The Wall at The Adobe Rose Theatre. She lives in Santa Fe with her husband and daughter.

Live Music Activities for Kids Festive Beverages

Open Weekends and Select Weekdays November 29-December 31, 5-8pm public gardens • classes • events 715 Camino Lejo • Museum Hill santafebotanicalgarden.org

SFREPORTER.COM

DECEMBER 4-10, 2019

17


T NEX AY D NES WED

BRITTANY HOWARD • 3/22 PINK MARTINI • 3/22

GARZA• 2/10 FLOR DE TOLOACHE • 2/21 ROBERT EARL KEEN • 2/23 TINSLEY ELLIS • 2/24 JOSEPH • 2/28 ALLMAN BETTS BAND • 3/5 LILA DOWNS • 3/1 ALTAN • 3/11 DAVID WILCOX • 3/14 DRIVE BY TRUCKERS • 3/31

Pawliday Glamorous Gift Sale!! GIFTS FOR YOURSELF AND OTHERS! (while supporting New Mexico’s neediest animals)

Fashion Jewelry Handbags Shoes/Boots and other great gift items donated by our top supporters! Tiffany David Yurman Nambe Manolo Blahnik C. Louboutin St. John Issey Miyake Emanuel Ungaro Neiman Marcus Henri Bendel Bergdorf Goodman Coach And many more!

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 7 10AM–6PM

03,49

SUNDAY, DECEMBER 8 NOON–6PM BARKIN BOUTIQUE 510 N. Guadalupe (next to Jinja)

18

DECEMBER 4-10, 2019

SFREPORTER.COM


SFR E P O RTE R .CO M /A RTS / S FR P I C KS

DID SOMEONE ART? Some libraries smell overly of woody pine, some are too dusty, others—old, well-maintained, mysterious ones—have a certain smoky smell, like pages burned up by the genius minds in their midst. I bet that’s what the library at the New Mexico Museum of Art smells like, and now I can find out—there’s an open house today, and besides tons of art books from around the world, there’s also the opportunity to see rare holiday cards exchanged between New Mexican artists while they lived here, like Gustave Baumann, Agnes Sims and Olive Rush, among others. This is a rare chance to browse the collections freely, gather inspo for your own art and chat with librarians about your finds. (Cole Rehbein)

COURTESY 7ARTS GALLERY

COURTESY NEW MEXICO MUSEUM OF ART

EVENT WED/4

New Mexico Museum of Art Library Open House: 1-4 pm Wednesday, Dec. 4. Free. New Mexico Museum of Art, 107 W Palace Ave. 476-5072

COURTESY GENERAL MOJO’S

MUSIC THU/5 PSYCH! As much as Seattle-based General Mojo’s indulges in the throwback flower power of 1960s-era psych-rock bands, they also delve into early-aught indie-pop elements such as Mates of State levels of vocal harmonies. Much of it lives in vocalist Heather Thomas and bassist/ vocalist Dune Butler’s sing-songy rapport, but keyboardist Eric Vanderbilt-Matthews takes up the psychedelia a notch with synthy sounds so sweet and timeless they’re hard to ignore. Think of the band like Foxygen had they leaned more into bluesy sounds over R&B, or like a history lesson on the all-you-need-is-love era bands who defined hippie-dom with sick riffs and booty-bumping basslines. (Alex De Vore) General Mojo’s: 8 pm Thursday, Dec. 5. Free. Tumbleroot Brewery & Distillery, 2791 Agua Fría St., 303-3808.

SFR FILE PHOTO

FILM TUE/10 ACTION! Didja know that when he’s not producing hit HBO shows and upcoming video games and toying with impatient Game of Thrones fans, author George RR Martin is out there supporting the next generation of creatives through grants and such? Well, he is, and come Tuesday, Martin’s GRRM Grant, one which goes to fledgling filmmakers working within the fantasy and/or sci-fi milieus, will be awarded to a newly flush film dork at Martin’s Jean Cocteau Cinema. Since handing out checks and such isn’t very exciting in and of itself, the cinema also has a full slate of short and indie films ready to screen. Did we mention they also have a full bar? (ADV) New Mexico Film Foundation Indie Screening: 7 pm Tuesday, Dec. 10. $5. Jean Cocteau Cinema, 418 Montezuma Ave., 466-5528.

ART OPENING FRI/6 - SAT/7

Size Matters 7 Arts Gallery goes small-scale Angel Wynn, one of five artists represented at 7 Arts Gallery, was surprised by how many of her pieces sold last holiday season. “People say art doesn’t sell around the holidays,” she tells SFR, but her smaller pieces (6-by-6-inch, mostly) flew off the walls. This was the inspiration for 7 Arts Gallery’s upcoming show Great Things Come in Small Packages. The show features six artists’ work—Wynn, plus Cecilia Robertson, Tom McGee, Dayna Fisk Williams, Nancy Silvia and Rosa Silbert—in a variety of mediums including acrylic, fiber, encaustic, gouache, pastel and glass. In keeping with 7 Arts’ ethos, all the artists are local to Santa Fe and they make 100% of their own profits. This, Wynn says, is rare in Santa Fe, especially in the downtown galleries. 7 Arts is an artist-run nonprofit that doubles as a gallery and a studio so visitors can watch the artists at work and engage with their processes. While quite a few artist cooperatives in the Santa Fe area employ a similar model, so far 7 Arts is the only work-space/gallery near the Plaza, which

is where most out-of-towners tend to stay. Wynn, who again shows smaller pieces, combines photography with an ancient painting technique called encaustic wax, in which layers of translucent hot wax are brushed over photographs, textiles, and other mixed media. Silbert, meanwhile, works in molded glass and metal sculpture, and Robertson, who usually creates large-scale oil paintings, traded in her oils for gouache and pushed herself to go smaller as a way of making her work more affordable for holiday shoppers. Whether you’re in the market for small art or you just want to take a look at some interesting pieces, 7 Arts Gallery also hosts a meet-and-greet with the artists so you can get an insider’s look while you enjoy a cup of hot chocolate, apple cider and other holiday treats. (Allison Sloan)

GREAT THINGS COME IN SMALL PACKAGES 4-7pm Friday, Dec. 6 and 1-4 pm Saturday, Dec 7. Free. 7 Arts Gallery, 125 Lincoln Ave., 437-1107

SFREPORTER.COM

DECEMBER 4-10, 2019

19


THE CALENDAR COURTESY ARGOS STUDIOS

EVENTS

Want to see your event here? Email all the relevant information to calendar@sfreporter.com.

GEEKS WHO DRINK Second Street Brewery (Railyard) 1607 Paseo de Peralta, 989-3278 Brews and Qs with prizes. 8 pm, free NEW MEXICO PINBALL MEETUP The Alley 153 Paseo De Peralta Meet people who enjoy pinball and learning more about the hobby. Bring cash or quarters for the machines. 6-11 pm, free WAYWARD WEDNESDAYS Chili Line Brewing Company 204 N Guadalupe St., 982-8474 The freshest, locally roasted, organic local comedy, including the occasional friend from the road ... and an open mic! Signup starts at 7:30 pm, jokes start at 8:30 pm. 8:30 pm, free

You can also enter your events yourself online at calendar.sfreporter.com (submission doesn’t guarantee inclusion). Need help?

Contact Cole 395-2906

WED/4

MUSIC

BOOKS/LECTURES BREAKFAST WITH O’KEEFFE: HER LOVE AFFAIR WITH LIGHT, COLOR AND PERCEPTION Georgia O'Keeffe Education Annex 123 Grant Ave., 946-1039 An exploration of O’Keeffe’s uses of light, color and visual perception in her works of art by Dale Kronkright, head of conservation, Georgia O’Keeffe Museum. 9-10 am, $15 LIBRARY OPEN HOUSE New Mexico Museum of Art 107 W Palace Ave., 476-5072 Explore the museum's collection of holiday cards handmade and exchanged by artists in New Mexico, such as Gustave Baumann, Will Shuster, Dorothy Dunn, Agnes Sims and others. This is an informal opportunity to browse books and artist files, ask questions, exchange recommendations with the librarian and see what’s new (see SFR Picks, page 19). 1-4 pm, free NOURA ERAKAT WITH JANINE JACKSON Lensic Performing Arts Center 211 W San Francisco St., 988-1234 The Lannan Foundation presents Erakat, a human rights attorney and legal advocate for Palestinian refugee rights at the United Nations and Jackson, program director at the media watch group FAIR and producer/host of its weekly radio show CounterSpin. 7 pm, $5-$8

The historical-political prints being shown at Argos Studios this Friday (page 21) speak even more clearly with the distance of time.

WE’VE MOVED!

LOCATED INSIDE OF THE DESIGN CENTER

418 CERRILLOS RD.

BAKERY

100% GLUTEN-FREE 20

• SFREPORTER.COM BAKERY & KITCHEN

DECEMBER 4-10, 2019

Hour of Opreation

SANTA FE, NM 87505 505-346-2669 REVOLUTIONBAKERY.COM

ARMED FOR APOCALYPSE Zephyr Community Art Studio 1520 Center Drive, Ste. 2 Rock 'n' roll music tuned way down and pissed way off. 7-11:30 pm, $10 BOB FINNIE Fenix at Vanessie 427 W Water St., 982-9966 Piano and vocals. 6:30 pm, free BOXCAR KARAOKE Boxcar 530 S Guadalupe St., 988-7222 Work up the nerve to sing a song and then bask in that post-performance glow. 10 pm, free JOAQUIN GALLEGOS El Mesón 213 Washington Ave., 983-6756 Flamenco guitar. 7-9 pm, free LENI STERN AFRICAN TRIO GiG Performance Space 1808 Second St. Award-winning West African jazz-rock. 7:30 pm, $22 MATTHEW ANDRAE Tesuque Casino 7 Tesuque Road, 984-8414 Rhythmic covers and originals of a folky bent on guitalele. 6-9 pm, free NO SHOW CADILLAC Cowgirl 319 S Guadalupe St., 982-2565 Dirty folk. 8 pm, free PAT MALONE El Farol 808 Canyon Road, 983-9912 A jazz guitar set, special for the holiday season. 6-8 pm, free

100%

GLUTEN FREE • pastries • bread • salads


ENTER EVENTS AT SFREPORTER.COM/CAL

SANTA FE MEGABAND REHEARSAL Odd Fellows Hall 1125 Cerrillos Road, 470-7077 An open community band which provides an opportunity for musicians to get together and play acoustic string band music. 7-9 pm, free TINY'S ELECTRIC JAM Tiny's Restaurant & Lounge 1005 S St. Francis Drive, 983-9817 Plug it in and rock out. Hosted by Nick Wimett and Albert Diaz. 8:30 pm, free

WORKSHOP PWD OPEN STUDIO Meow Wolf 1352 Rufina Circle, 395-6369 An all-ages choice-based art studio for people with developmental disabilities. Skip the line, come directly to the David Loughridge Learning Center and choose to make art at different stations, make new friends in the community and take some time to chill out in this low-stimulation environment. 1-3 pm, free

THU/5 ART OPENINGS ART STUDENT STUDIO TOUR Santa Fe Community College 6401 Richards Ave., 428-1000 During the opening reception of the SFCC Art and Design Faculty and Staff Exhibition, 20 student studios will be open. This is an opportunity for the public to see the art offerings at the college and speak to the student artists. 4-6 pm, free SCHOOL OF ARTS, DESIGN & MEDIA ARTS FACULTY AND STAFF EXHIBITION Santa Fe Community College 6401 Richards Ave., 428-1000 Over 50 staff and faculty members show their work across a variety of media. 4-6 pm, free

BOOKS/LECTURES HAMPTON SIDES: ON DESPERATE GROUND: THE MARINES AT THE RESERVOIR Collected Works Bookstore and Coffeehouse 202 Galisteo St., 988-4226 Historian Sides' book discusses Marines' efforts in the Battle of Chosin Reservoir in North Korea. 6 pm, free

EVENTS GEEKS WHO DRINK Santa Fe Brewing Company 35 Fire Place, 424-3333 Stellar quiz results can win you drink tickets for next time. 7 pm, free

THE CALENDAR

HOLIDAY CHOCOLATE TASTING AND ART SHOW Kakawa Chocolate House 1300 Rufina Circle #A4, 930-5460 Enjoy Kakawa's fine drinking chocolate blends with a pop-up art exhibit featuring the paintings of Sandy Vaillancourt. 5:30-7:30 pm, free

MUSIC BOB FINNIE Fenix at Vanessie 427 W Water St., 982-9966 Piano and vocals. 6:30 pm, free DANIEL MURPHY Cowgirl 319 S Guadalupe St., 982-2565 Rock n' Roll. 8 pm, free DAVID GEIST W/ JAMIE RUSSELL Osteria D'Assisi 58 S Federal Place, 986-5858 Solo instrumental piano. Second set features Mr. Russell on drums. 6-9 pm, free ERIC OWENS AND JEREMY DENK Duane Smith Auditorium 1300 Diamond Drive, Los Alamos The Los Alamos Concert Association presents baritone Owens and pianist Denk for an interpretation of Schubert's "Die Winterreise." 7 pm, $35 GENERAL MOJO'S Tumbleroot Brewery & Distillery 2791 Agua Fría St., 303-3808 Kaleidoscopic psychedelic rock (see SFR Picks, page 19). 8-10 pm, free JESUS BAS Tesuque Casino 7 Tesuque Road, 984-8414 Spanish and flamenco guitar. 6-9 pm, free JOYWAVE; UPSAHL Meow Wolf 1352 Rufina Circle, 395-6369 Synth pop. 7-10:30 pm, $18-$22 MARIO FEBRES El Farol 808 Canyon Road, 983-9912 Flamenco guitar. 6-8 pm, free OPEN MIC WITH STEPHEN Mine Shaft Tavern 2846 Hwy. 14, Madrid, 473-0743 Show off what your mama gave ya. If she gave you your guitar and/or other talents of some sort, that is. 7 pm, free PAT MALONE TerraCotta Wine Bistro 304 Johnson St., 989-1166 Solo jazz guitar. 6 pm, free ROBERT WILSON The Dragon Room 406 Old Santa Fe Trail, 983-7712 Crafted vocals. 6-8 pm, free TIERRA SONIKETE El Mesón 213 Washington Ave., 983-6756 Jazzy fusion with JQ Whitcomb on trumpet and Joaquin Gallegos on guitar. 7 pm, free

THEATER VARIATIONS Warehouse 21 1614 Paseo de Peralta, 989-4423 The New Mexico School for the Arts presents a play by Kate Hims about the 13-yearold Alice, who wishes her life was completely different. Then one morning she wakes up— and it is. Alice is taken through a series of parallel universes, reliving the same ten minutes over and over again (see 3Qs, page 25). 7-9 pm, $5-$10

FRI/6 ART OPENINGS ART OF DEVOTION: HISTORIC ART OF THE AMERICAS Peyton Wright Gallery 237 E Palace Ave., 989-9888 This exhibition showcases the largest and most significant collection of 17th to 19th century Spanish Colonial Viceregal artwork commercially available in the world, plus a very rare collection of bultos, cristos and retablos by significant New Mexican santeros. 5-6 pm, free YIIYAH MAN: TAKEN BEYOND CULTURE Museum of Contemporary Native Arts 108 Cathedral Pl., 983-8900 A new exhibit of prints from Diné artist Duhon Lee James, with First Friday free admission. 5-7 pm, free GREAT THINGS COME IN SMALL PACKAGES 7 Arts Gallery 125 Lincoln Ave., 437-1107 Six Santa Fe artists show their smaller works (see SFR Picks, page 19). 4-7 pm, free HILLARY VERMONT Madame Matisse 1291 San Felipe Ave., 204-7869 Colorful, whimsical show of canines and felines with 10% of sales benefitting Santa Fe Animal Shelter. Woof y'all. 4:30-6:30 pm, free POLITICS AS USUAL: PRINTMAKING AND SOCIAL COMMENTARY Argos Studio 1211 Luisa St., 988-1814 An exhibit of historical prints that speak to social or political issues still relatable today. 5:30-7:30 pm, free

Clearing your path to a brighter future. PAST CRIMINAL CONVICTIONS OR ARRESTS HOLDING YOU BACK?

YOU MAY QUALIFY TO HAVE YOUR RECORD CLEARED New Mexico’s new Criminal Record Expungement Act Call us today!

Santa Fe office (505) 988-8004

Albuquerque office (505) 243-1443

WWW.ROTHSTEINLAW.COM

BOOKS/LECTURES SHERRI BURR: COMPLICATED LIVES: FREE BLACKS IN VIRGINIA Collected Works Bookstore and Coffeehouse 202 Galisteo St., 988-4226 Burr's book examines the thousands of African Americans who led lives outside of slavery in the early days of the United States. 6 pm, free

CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE

SFREPORTER.COM

DECEMBER 4-10, 2019

21


THE CALENDAR EVENTS

WEEK'S EVENTS AGUA FRIA BISBEE COURT EVERY MONDAY

FRIDAY 12/6

KOREAN POP UP WITH BRENT JUNG

FRANCESCA JOZETTE 6 PM

EVERY TUESDAY

SATURDAY 12/7

GEEKS WHO DRINK 7 PM

MICHAEL R J ROTH 6 PM

EVERY WEDNESDAY

www.tumblerootbrewing.com 32 Bisbee Court Unit 3-4 Santa Fe, New Mexico 87508 Mon-Sat 5 pm to 9 pm

VINYL DATE NIGHT WINTER SEASONAL BEER RELEASE

THURSDAY 12/5 THIRSTY THURSDAY SPECIALS GENERAL MOJO'S 8 PM

FRIDAY 12/6 ALEX MARYOL BAND 8 PM

SATURDAY 12/7 CANDYMAN KIDS' SHOWCASE 1 PM

LOOKING TO BOOK A HOLIDAY PARTY? CONTACT US @

CASSIDY@TUMBLEROOTBREWING.COM

ERYN BENT BAND 8 PM

SUNDAY 12/8 BLOODY MARY AND MIMOSA SPECIALS www.tumblerootbrewing.com 2791 Agua Fria Street Santa Fe, New Mexico 87507 Mon-Fri 4 pm Sat-Sun 12 pm

ZOOMIES

Dog Daycare

and

Resort

CaGe-fReE dAyCaRe bOaRdInG 24-hOuR sUpErViSiOn NOW OFFERING FULL gRoOmInG AND

WITH

WWW.ZOOMIESINC.COM

(505)-954-1473 CONTACT@ZOOMIESINC.COM

BACA STREET ART TOUR Baca Street Pottery 730 Baca St., 204-6346 Over 20 artists and merchants with jewelry, clothing, photography, ceramics, folk art, modern furniture, beads, gems and glass. 5-9 pm, free GARDEN SPROUTS: PRE-K ACTIVITIES Santa Fe Botanical Garden 715 Camino Lejo, 471-9103 Listen to a book and participate in interactive nature and garden related activities. When you arrive, please make your way to the Ojos y Manos: Eyes and Hands Garden across the red bridge. 10-11 am, free GLOW Santa Fe Botanical Garden 715 Camino Lejo, 471-9103 Thousands of twinkling lights and large-scale light installations are aglow throughout the garden. Tonight, live music from Martin Gilmore. 5-8 pm, $8-$12 HOLIDAY GIFT FAIR Santa Fe Women's Club 1616 Old Pecos Trail Local artisans share their ceramics, textiles, jewelry, recycled objects, paintings, jewelry, basketry, ornaments and more. 10 am-5 pm, free TREE LIGHTING EVENT Four Seasons Resort Rancho Encantado 198 State Road 592, 956-5700 Live music, a tree lighting ceremony, an array of delicious food, spirited beverages and more. 6-8 pm, free

MUSIC ALEX MARYOL Tumbleroot Brewery & Distillery 2791 Agua Fría St., 303-3808 Blues and indie rock. 8-10 pm, free CS ROCKSHOW El Farol 808 Canyon Road, 983-9912 Classic rock 'n' roll with Don Curry, Pete Springer and Ron Crowder. 9-11 pm, $5 CAROLS AND BLESSINGS FROM AROUND THE WORLD Loretto Chapel 207 Old Santa Fe Trail, 982-0092 The Santa Fe Women's Ensemble presents a collection of music arranged for chorus, piano and violin. 6:30 pm, $10-$35 DJ DYNAMITE SOL Boxcar 530 S Guadalupe St., 988-7222 Top 40 hits. 10 pm, free DOUG MONTGOMERY AND BOB FINNIE Fenix at Vanessie 427 W Water St., 982-9966 Piano standards, originals and pop with vocals. Doug opens, with Bob at 8pm. 6-10 pm, free

ENTER EVENTS AT SFREPORTER.COM/CAL

EDUCATE YOUR EAR: RACHMANINOFF'S SYMPHONY NO. 1 James A Little Theatre 1060 Cerrillos Road, 476-6429 Panned at the premiere due to poor conducting, lost for almost 50 years, then resurrected in 1945, Rachmaninoff’s First Symphony is considered by many to be his best. Join Oliver Prezant and the Santa Fe Community Orchestra to get inside the music and explore the life of the composer, followed by a full performance of the first movement. 7-8:15 pm, free GROOVY PANDA Santa Fe Oxygen and Healing Bar (Apothecary) 133 W San Francisco St., 986-5037 Therapeutic sound mixed with elements of soul, blues, beatboxing and transcendental journeying. 7 pm, free J Q WHITCOMB Museum Hill Café 710 Camino Lejo, 984-8900 Local jazz trumpet. 6 pm, $20-$25 JJ AND THE MYSTIC ROOTS Cowgirl 319 S Guadalupe St., 982-2565 Rock n' roll. 8:30 pm, free LORI OTTINO AND ERIK SAWYER Mine Shaft Tavern 2846 Hwy. 14, Madrid, 473-0743 Local Americana on the deck. 5 pm, free MARIACHI CHRISTMAS Lensic Performing Arts Center 211 W San Francisco St., 988-1234 The National Latino Behavioral Health Association presents mariachis and special guest artists, folkloric dancers and a children’s choir singing favorite Christmas tunes. 7 pm, $15-$30 MARIO FEBRES El Farol 808 Canyon Road, 983-9912 Flamenco guitar. 6-8 pm, free RONALD ROYBAL Hotel Santa Fe 1501 Paseo de Peralta, 982-1200 Native American flute and Spanish classical guitar. 7 pm, free SAVOR TRIO Tesuque Casino 7 Tesuque Road, 984-8414 Cuban street music. 5-8 pm, free STELLA TROIS Second Street Brewery (Original) 1814 Second St., 982-3030 Improvisational jazz. 6 pm, free HIGH DESERT HARPS First Presbyterian Church 208 Grant Ave., 982-8544 Traditional Christmas favorites arranged for the harp. 5:30-6 pm, free

TASTE OF SPACE Second Street Brewery (Rufina Taproom) 2920 Rufina St., 954-1068 Original electronic music from Santa Fe Community College students. 7:30-10 pm, free THE FLOOZIES; MYSTIC GRIZZLY Meow Wolf 1352 Rufina Circle, 395-6369 Live electronic, 21+. 8-11 pm, $21-$25 THE THREE FACES OF JAZZ El Mesón 213 Washington Ave., 983-6756 Swinging jazz. 7:30 pm, free

THEATER A MUSICAL PIÑATA FOR CHRISTMAS Teatro Paraguas 3205 Calle Marie, 424-1601 A community celebration with classic and contemporary carols performed by The Teatro Paraguas Orchestra, dancing, seasonal poetry, skits and an original short play, Regalito by Alix Hudson. 7 pm, $5-$10 VARIATIONS Warehouse 21 1614 Paseo de Peralta, 989-4423 The New Mexico School for the Arts presents a play by Kate Hims about the 13-year-old Alice, who wishes her life was completely different. Then one morning she wakes up—and it is. Alice is taken through a series of parallel universes, reliving the same ten minutes over and over again (see 3Qs, page 25). 7-9 pm, $5-$10

SAT/7 ART OPENINGS JACQUELINE RUDOLPH STUDIO ART OPENING Borracho's Craft Booze and Brews 139 Bridge St, Las Vegas, 615-3561 Enjoy a hand-crafted cocktail, listen to regional musical talents and enjoy The Soul Series by artist Rudolph. 5-7 pm, free GREAT THINGS COME IN SMALL PACKAGES 7 Arts Gallery 125 Lincoln Ave., 437-1107 Six Santa Fe artists feature small works across an assortment of mediums. 1-4 pm, free SHELTER ART SHOW Pete’s Place 2801 Cerrillos Road., 795-7494 Shelter clients show their work to benefit the shelter’s art program. 2-4 pm, free

BOOKS/LECTURES MICHAEL MIKULA Globe Fine Art 727 Canyon Road, 989-3888 Mikula speaks about his work with architectural blown glass. Sponsored by the Glass Alliance of New Mexico. 9:30 am, free CONTINUED ON PAGE 24

22

DECEMBER 4-10, 2019

SFREPORTER.COM


MUSIC

The Shape of Class to Come A history of punk rock from storied vet Gregg Turner

RONN SPENCER

BY AEDRA BURKE a u t h o r @ s f r e p o r t e r. c o m

I

n 1998, Swedish band Refused released The Shape Of Punk To Come, and in the album’s 21 years of existence, it has become a central locus in the geography of the punk and hardcore scene. It is decidedly political, not simply anti-capitalist, but rather wholly antagonistic toward capitalism. Most importantly,  it’s a work that  never panders. It’s a difficult listen, but it isn’t simply born from a bunch of art school kids  who read Bakunin and wanted to make weird noise. The Shape of Punk to Come grew from a frustration toward the increasing popularity of the era’s mediocre pop-punk; it was a call to action, a neon middle finger on the roadside of the political landscape that was clearly favoring the haves and leaving the havenots in the dust. The Shape of Punk to Come’s  continued vitality is in no small part due to the sociopolitical landscape that shaped it. But of course, that’s nothing new, even if  The Shape of Punk to Come  is one for the ages. And maybe we veered off-course when it comes to punk rock and its content, but there’s still hope for bringing it back ’round again—just look at the shape of politics to come.

Visit Us at 1330 Rufina Circle Mon.-Sat. 10-6 P: 505.231.7775

“The Sex Pistols and The Clash came about because of what was going on in England,” says local musician and educator Gregg Turner. “If things were different in England, would those bands have existed?” Turner  teaches math at  New Mexico Highlands University in Las Vegas (the little one), but earlier, as in, like, the 1980s earlier, his career looked quite different as a co-founding member of seminal Los Angeles punk act Angry Samoans. Turner has  had a front row seat to the evolution of American punk from its early roots right up till now, and while  he’s  the first to admit he isn’t an encyclopedia, there is authority in his viewpoint and collected history. It’s that knowledge of lived experience that fueled Turner to create an upcoming class about the punk genre itself at NMHU’s satellite campus in Santa Fe. “A History of Punk Rock” begins in mid-January  and runs through the end of the spring semester. How’s that for a sweet way to earn some credits? Turner’s  experience obviously helps. Nary a true punk fan around doesn’t know Angry Samoans, and his newer material, a sort of novelty mix of doo-wop by way of Zappa’s Cruising With Ruben and the Jets, is a rollicking good time. Still, he says, the catalyst for the new class came

in the form of a push from an unexpected source. “I went into [the university] president’s office, and I threw some ideas at him of classes that I could teach,” he explains. “He sits down in front of his desk, in front of all of these academic papers, and he pulls out a copy of our second record, an original pressing from 1983.” While Turner says he was initially shocked, he quickly got on board with the idea. The class took shape. Yes, there will be tests and papers and homework and the like but, if he can get a travel budget approved, tentative guest lecturers like Dead Kennedys singer Jello Biafra and bonafide punk legend Mike Watt, among others, oughta sweeten the deal. Plus, you should see the syllabus— Turner’s class is not just about a music movement, it’s about local and national history and sociological and political trends that took place during the era that formed punk. “My take on punk starts in the ’50s with Jerry Lee Lewis, who was pretty punk rock, relative to what was going on,” Turner tells SFR. “Then all the Fuzz-Tone bands of the ’60s like The Standells, which is the time period that the term ‘punk’ originated from.” A partially evil grin crosses Turner’s face as he explains how  “I’ll have

Introducing Our Amazing Organic CBD Products Derived from Hemp Free Consultations No One Knows Our Products Better No Medical Card Needed Open to All!

Locally Woman Owned & Operated Free Easy Parking

Hempapotheke.com

Aromaland.com

Infused Skin Care

to torture the class with two hours of unJourney and Genesis so they can un derstand why the Ramones had to happen.” That’s sarcasm, but just like the popular music movements that influenced Refused to release their hardcore classic in 1998, this sentiment of rebellion has been present since the inception of punk. Turner thinks that “the common denominator of punk reseems to be some sort of freshness, re invention and renaissance.” con“There’s a universality to it,” he con tinues. “Why did those things happen, will they happen again, and does it matter?” It does, because for the first time in a long time, punk is coming back in a real way. Maybe the instruments used and the production possibilities have changed since Angry Samoans belted out the tale of how they saved Hitler’s cock in 1982 (Google it and be amazed), but as we begin to see obsession with wealth and opulence bite a new generation in its collective tail—as human rights are threatened by faceless corporations and political leaders—the movement has ignited a sense of community and a collective way to process rage and anger. There is a real desire to dig back to a time when punk was a nascent music movement filled with the angst and aggression of people  who weren’t willing to be bystanders. Taking a course about  such things  might not catalyze those specific sentiments, but Turner’s class aims to provide the historical background of understanding that helped shape the movement. At $771 for non-students, it doesn’t exactly carry a punk rock price tag (though those 65 and older can enroll for just $15; visit nmhu.org for more info), but according to Turner, there’s so much more at play than a simple music appreciation class. “This course is more than a music or history course” he says. “It’s a sociology course.”

Largest selection of CBD Brands and Terpene-Rich Esssential Oils • • • • • •

CBD Tinctures CBD Vapes CBD Pet CBD Topicals CBD Edibles Jewelry And more!

• Now Open to the Public • Shop your favorite bath & beauty products at the Source! • Created more than 30 yrs ago here in Santa Fe • All Body Care available in gallon sizes Sold at Wholesale Prices!

SFREPORTER.COM

DECEMBER 4-10, 2019

23


The pu ic is in ited to a Candlelight Commemoration honoring the 1st Annua or d A DS Da Saturday, December 7, 2019 4:30 pm - 6 pm

21 est San rancisco Street e t door to the E dorado Hote ~ Enter the court ard etween L Vicino & Casa Espana

THE CALENDAR VANESSA VASSAR: EVAN AND THE SKYGOATS op.cit Books DeVargas Center, 157 Paseo de Peralta, 428-0321 Vassar reads from her children's book of loss, magic, healing and discovery. 2 pm, free

DANCE HEROES & VILLAINS ON ICE Genoveva Chavez Community Center 3221 W Rodeo Road, 955-4000 The Santa Fe Skating Club’s 2019 show feature over 70 local skaters of all ages and skating abilities. 4 pm, $5-$10

EVENTS

W O RL D A I D S D A Y C O M M E M O RA T I O N B Y

CANDLELIGHT

Special Guests: New Mexico Governor, Michelle Lujan Grisham Dr. Esther C. Schumann, Southwest Care Music the M a Men s Chorus, Tones Refresh ents and cand es pro ided Sponsored the Southwest Care C ient Ad isor Board

Art by Jade Leyva

NewMexicoWomen.Org works to advance opportunities for self-identifying women and girls so they can lead self-sufficient, healthy, and empowered lives.

To learn more and contribute to our work, visit us at NewMexicoWomen.Org.

24

DECEMBER 4-10, 2019

SFREPORTER.COM

100 WOMEN WHO CARE Scottish Rite Center 463 Paseo de Peralta, 982-4414 At these monthly meetings, three nonprofits are selected at random to present on their work, after which the assembled women (it's actually about 350 these days) vote for their favorite, and then write checks for the nonprofit! No joke, the first place winner takes home over $10,000! Anyone is welcome as a guest. 6-7 pm, free BACA STREET ART TOUR Baca Street Pottery 730 Baca St., 204-6346 Over 20 artists and merchants with jewelry, clothing, photography, ceramics, folk art, modern furniture, beads, gems and glass. 10 am-5 pm, free CHRISTMAS AROUND THE FIRE WITH THE ARTISTS Calliope 2876 Hwy 14, Madrid, 474-7564 A fire in the courtyard, holiday beverages and cookies and a meet and greet with the gallery’s artists. 3-7 pm, free CODING CAMP Santa Fe Public Library (Main) 145 Washington Ave., 955-6780 A two-day, 10-hour free course focused on children 6th grade and older to learn serious Python programming on a Linux system. Register online at https://sites.google. com/view/ serious-programming/; attendees must commit to the full course. 10 am, free COMMEMORATION BY CANDLELIGHT: A TRIBUTE TO WORLD AIDS DAY Casa España 321 W San Francisco St., 995-4527 Special guest Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham speaks with Southwest Care HIV specialist Dr. Esther C. Schumann. Music by the NM Gay Men’s Chorus, Q-tones. Candles and refreshments provided. 4:30-6 pm, free

ENTER EVENTS AT SFREPORTER.COM/CAL

EL MERCADO DE MUSEO El Museo Cultural de Santa Fe 555 Camino de la Familia, 992-0591 Over 60 vendors with art, jewelry, books, furniture, antiques, rugs and much more from around the corner and around the world. 8 am-4 pm, free FAB LAB INTERNS POP-UP SHOP Guadalupe Center 333 Montezuma Ave., 310-8440 Fab Lab Hub interns and students from the Continuing Education Department at Santa Fe Community College offer unique gifts in a one-day pop-up shop. Proceeds benefit internship programs. 12-5 pm, free GEEKS WHO DRINK Desert Dogs Brewery and Cidery 112 W San Francisco St., Ste. 307, 983-0134 Pub trivia with prizes. 7 pm, free GLOW Santa Fe Botanical Garden 715 Camino Lejo, 471-9103 Thousands of twinkling lights and large-scale light installations are aglow throughout the garden. Tonight, live music from Half Broke Horses. 5-8 pm, $8-$12 HOLIDAY BAZAAR Zia United Methodist Church 3368 Governor Miles Road, 471-0997 Browse the offerings of 10 local artisans, take part in a silent auction or bid on white elephant items, plus baked goods and frito pies. 9 am-2 pm, free HOLIDAY FAIRE Santa Fe Waldorf School 26 Puesta del Sol, 983-9727 Enjoy performances from the Pojoaque Youth Hoop Dancers, Clan Tynker, a marimba group and take part in making crafts with family and friends. Browse goods from local artists at the artisans market or take a break to enjoy local food and sweet treats. Some holiday activities and performances require tickets, $1 each and purchasable at different points throughout the faire. 10 am-3 pm, free HOLIDAY GIFT FAIR Santa Fe Women's Club 1616 Old Pecos Trail Local artisans share their ceramics, textiles, jewelry, recycled objects, paintings, jewelry, basketry, ornaments and more. 10 am-5 pm, free MILAGRO HOLIDAY BAZAAR Milagro Middle School 1720 Llano St., 988-3532 Festivities featuring a silent auction of hand-crafted gifts and curiosities and vendor booths by local artists and artisans. Sales benefit the Milagro PTO and Art Thunder, the school's art club. 9 am-2 pm, free

SANTA FE FILM FESTIVAL CHANNEL LAUNCH PARTY Santa Fe Brewing Company 35 Fire Place, 424-3333 The SFFF launches a new channel on media distribution-disrupting Santa Fe-based startup Xerb with 135 notable films from its 20 year history. 5 pm, free

FOOD CHEF NATH THAI VEGAN POP-UP BODY of Santa Fe 333 W Cordova Road, 986-0362 An a la carte menu of plantbased favorites, with a second seating at 8 pm. 5:30 pm, free SANTA FE FARMERS MARKET Farmers Market Pavilion 1607 Paseo de Peralta, 983-7726 Fresh produce from the source. 8 am-1 pm, free

MUSIC BILL HEARNE TRIO Second Street Brewery (Original) 1814 Second St., 982-3030 Americana and honky-tonk. 6-9 pm, free BOB FINNIE Fenix at Vanessie 427 W Water St., 982-9966 Piano and vocals. 7-10 pm, free CALVIN HAZEN El Farol 808 Canyon Road, 983-9912 Flamenco guitar. 6-8 pm, free CHANGO Cowgirl 319 S Guadalupe St., 982-2565 Rock n' roll. 8:30 pm, free CHAT NOIR CABARET Los Magueyes Mexican Restaurant 31 Burro Alley, 992-0304 First-rate piano and vocals. 6 pm, free CONTROLLED BURN El Farol 808 Canyon Road, 983-9912 Rock 'n' blues. 9-11 pm, $5 CURRY SPRINGER DUO Tesuque Casino 7 Tesuque Road, 984-8414 Acoustic rock n' roll. 5-8 pm, free DESERT DWELLERS: A GEM & JAM PRE-PARTY Meow Wolf 1352 Rufina Circle, 395-6369 Liquid, natural, bass-heavy electronic, 21+. 9 pm-2 am, $19-$23 ERYN BENT BAND Tumbleroot Brewery & Distillery 2791 Agua Fría St., 303-3808 Folk. 8-11 pm, free MOUNTEBANK; JAKE TRUJILLO; ZILOETA Zephyr Community Art Studio 1520 Center Drive, Ste. 2 Indie singer-songwriting from Texas and around town. 8-11 pm, $10


THE CALENDAR

ENTER EVENTS AT SFREPORTER.COM/CAL

NOSOTROS Tesuque Casino 7 Tesuque Road, 984-8414 Latin jammers. 9 pm-12 am, free PAT MALONE TRIO El Mesón 213 Washington Ave., 983-6756 Sweet melodic jazz guitar from Malone, plus Jon Gagan on bass and Kanoa Kaluhiwa on tenor saxophone. 7:30 pm, free RON ROUGEAU The Dragon Room 406 Old Santa Fe Trail, 983-7712 Acoustic songs from the '60s, '70s and beyond. 5:30 pm, free RONALD ROYBAL Hotel Santa Fe 1501 Paseo de Peralta, 982-1200 Native American flute and Spanish classical guitar. 7 pm, free STANLIE KEE AND STEP IN Cowgirl 319 S Guadalupe St., 982-2565 Blues 'n' rock. 1 pm, free SUSAN GABRIEL Osteria D'Assisi 58 S Federal Place, 986-5858 Singer/songwriter on multiple instruments including lute, ukulele and percussion. 7-9 pm, free THE 15TH ELEMENTAL CONCERT: OXYGEN San Miguel Chapel 401 Old Santa Fe Trail, 983-3974 On the first Saturday of the month, for more than a year, Lauria & Kott have presented an evening of exploration into one element per night as if the element were a person. With guest Betsy Scarinzi. 6:30-8:30 pm, free THE JAKES Mine Shaft Tavern 2846 Hwy. 14, Madrid, 473-0743 Southern rock 'n' roll. 8 pm, free THREE BAD JACKS Boxcar 530 S Guadalupe St., 988-7222 Rock. 10 pm-1:30 am, free TIHO DIMITROV Paradiso 903 Early St. Boundary-banishing blues. 7-9 pm, $15-$20 WALKER KASS Santa Fe Oxygen and Healing Bar (Apothecary) 133 W San Francisco St., 986-5037 Original folk. 7-9 pm, free

THEATER A MUSICAL PIÑATA FOR CHRISTMAS Teatro Paraguas 3205 Calle Marie, 424-1601 A community celebration with classic and contemporary carols performed by The Teatro Paraguas Orchestra, dancing, seasonal poetry, skits and an original short play, Regalito by Alix Hudson. 2 pm, $5-$10

with Adrienne Rugg

COURTESY ADRIENNE RUGG

Santa Fe’s Adrienne Rugg is a senior at New Mexico School for the Arts, and this Friday, Dec. 6 at 7 pm, she’s playing the lead in the school’s performance of Variations at Warehouse 21, with additional performances on Saturday, Dec. 7 and Sunday, Dec. 8, both at 7 pm. Written by playwright Katie Hims, Variations follows 13-year-old Alice as she navigates family, friends and growing up in seven parallel universes. We reached out to see what that’s like. (Allison Sloan) You spent three years at NMSA’s first home in the St. Francis Cathedral School on Alameda. What has your transition to the new campus been like? The old campus was really cozy because it was a lot smaller and all of the departments were mushed together. There weren’t special rehearsal spaces for music, theater and art so we would all be doing everything together in the hallways and it made us feel really connected to each other. At the new campus, there is so much more room so our sense of community went away for a little while but we’ve been working to get that sense of family back and connecting like we used to. What do you like about Variations and how has the rehearsal process been for you? The play is really interesting because it’s set in seven different universes and since I’m playing Alice I get to experience all of them. They’re all centered around one family but in each universe the family members are different. They all have this kind of connectedness, energy and sameness that links them together so it’s been great getting to explore the similarities and differences of the universes and the family dynamics within them. Initially we didn’t know if we would get the rights to perform Variations because it’s such a new play and has only been performed once before, but when we did we were absolutely ecstatic. And we get to do British accents! Your character in the play is a 13-year-old girl living at home. Do you relate to her at all? In the play Alice has had this big fight with her mom, she’s upset with her family life and she wishes that everything would be different. When I was younger, I could relate to that more but now that I’m older I’m not as wild as Alice. She does have a lot of universal feelings though. There will always be points in time when we are frustrated and especially as a young teenager, that can be very emotional.

CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE

SFREPORTER.COM

DECEMBER 4-10, 2019

25


ASPEN SANTA FE BALLET

Ao A

THE CALENDAR CLASS CLOWNS 13.0 Meow Wolf 1352 Rufina Circle, 395-6369 Students from the Quinn Fontaine Studio perform live, improvised comedy. Fontaine teaches improvisation techniques in between skits. 7:30-8:30 pm, $12 NEW MOON CABARET Honeymoon Brewery Solana Center, 907 W Alameda St., Ste. B, 303-3139 A monthly curated 21+ variety show which celebrates diversity with performance artists in belly dance, drag, comedy, burlesque, spoken word, flow arts and more. A dance party follows the performance. 8 pm, $5 VARIATIONS Warehouse 21 1614 Paseo de Peralta, 989-4423 The New Mexico School for the Arts presents a play by Kate Hims about the 13-year-old Alice, who wishes her life was completely different. Then one morning she wakes up—and it is. Alice is taken through a series of parallel universes, reliving the same ten minutes over and over again (see 3Qs, page 25). 7-9 pm, $5-$10 ZIRCUS EROTIQUE 11 YEAR ANNIVERSARY SHOW The Lodge at Santa Fe 750 N St. Francis Drive, 992-5800 Zircus Erotique celebrates their 11 year anniversary as the longest running burlesque company in New Mexico, with special guests Holden Doves of New Orleans and Zoe Ziegfeld of New York. 21+. 8:30-11:30 pm, $15-$30

WORKSHOP

DECEMBER 14-15 The Lensic performing arts center

aspensantafeballet.com BUSINESS PARTNER 

MEDIA SPONSORS 

GOVERNMENT / FOUNDATIONS 

Melville Hankins

Family Foundation

Partially funded by the City of Santa Fe Arts Commission and the 1% Lodgers Tax, and made possible in part by New Mexico Arts, a Division of the Department of Cultural Affairs, and the National Endowment for the Arts. PHOTO: SHAREN BRADFORD

AFTERNOON OF BEING Paradiso 903 Early St. Guided meditation and music to explore Being. Bring a comfy chair if you don't like to sit with a back jack and bring a blanket for staying cozy. 1:30-4:30 pm, $20 THE ART OF THE DOODLE WITH MIKEY RAE Meow Wolf 1352 Rufina Circle, 395-6369 A weekly series of exercises designed to activate your creativity and give you plenty of time to experiment with different artistic media. Materials are included. 3-5 pm, free

SUN/8 ART OPENINGS CHISPA! La Fonda on the Plaza 100 E San Francisco St., 982-5511 Fifteen award-winning New Mexican artists show their work across a variety of mediums including jewelry, sculpture, straw applique, pottery and more, plus live music. 10 am-4 pm, free

ENTER EVENTS AT SFREPORTER.COM/CAL

FOUR MASTERS Hat Ranch Gallery 27 San Marcos Road W, 424-3391 Works in oil, acrylic, drawing, bronze sculptures and prints from Rudy Gonzales, John Hogan, Harry Leippe and Jerry West. 2-5 pm, free YOKAI: GHOSTS AND DEMONS OF JAPAN Museum of International Folk Art 706 Camino Lejo, 476-1200 In addition to crafts, the exhibition includes an immersive obake yashiki (a Japanese “ghost house”), a popular form of entertainment in Japanese amusement parks. Joe Hayes, American author and storyteller of the folklore from the American Southwest, tells New Mexican ghost stories from 1 to 2 pm along with Satori Murata who shares Japanese ghost stories. From 2 to 4 pm artist Joel Nakamura will be leading a Yokai drawing workshop in the atrium (see A&C, page 27). 1 pm, free

BOOKS/LECTURES ALLAN AFFELDT Collected Works Bookstore 202 Galisteo St., 988-4226 JourneySantaFe presents Allan Affeldt, who has worked to restore the Plaza and Castaneda Hotels in Las Vegas, NM and the Legal Tender in Lamy—projects that were long considered impossible. Now they are looking to new ventures in Santa Fe. 11 am, free ELIZABETH JACOBSON, SAWNIE MORRIS AND MICHELLE OTERO op.cit Books, DeVargas Center, 157 Paseo de Peralta, 428-0321 Santa Fe Poet Laureate Jacobson hosts Albuquerue Poet Laureate Otero and Taos Poet Laureate Morris for an incredible afternoon of poetry. 2 pm, free

DANCE HEROES & VILLAINS ON ICE Genoveva Chavez Community Center 3221 W Rodeo Road, 955-4000 The Santa Fe Skating Club’s 2019 show feature over 70 local skaters of all ages and skating abilities. 1 pm, $5-$10

EVENTS BIG BROTHERS BIG SISTERS 40TH ANNIVERSARY REUNION CELEBRATION Meow Wolf 1352 Rufina Circle, 395-6369 Get reacquainted with your matches and meet and mingle with other Bigs and Littles. Free admission for all past and present Bigs and Littles! Not involved with Big Brothers Big Sisters yet? Come learn more about the amazing organization and show your support by giving a donation of your choice at the door 5:30 pm, free

BACA STREET ART TOUR Baca Street Pottery 730 Baca St., 204-6346 Over 20 artists and merchants with jewelry, clothing, photography, ceramics, folk art, modern furniture, beads, gems and glass. 11 am-4 pm, free FELINES AND FRIENDS BENEFIT New Concept Gallery 610 Canyon Road, 795-7570 Come adopt a new kitty, browse holiday art and cat books and enjoy refreshments. 1-4 pm, $10 GLOW Santa Fe Botanical Garden 715 Camino Lejo, 471-9103 Thousands of twinkling lights and large-scale light installations are aglow throughout the garden. Tonight, live music from The Bus Tapes. 5-8 pm, $8-$12 HOLIDAY GIFT FAIR Santa Fe Women's Club 1616 Old Pecos Trail Local artisans share their ceramics, textiles, recycled objects, paintings, basketry, ornaments and more. 10 am-5 pm, free LAS POSADAS New Mexico History Museum 113 Lincoln Ave., 476-5100 This event recreates Mary and Joseph’s search for a place of shelter in the days leading up to the birth of Jesus. The public is invited to stay for carols, cookies and hot cider after the pageant. 5:30-7 pm, free MEDITATION CIRCLE El Rey Court 1862 Cerrillos Road, 982-1931 All abilities welcome! Bring a blanket or cushion and start your Sunday with some breathing. On the event lawn across from the pool. 9-10 am, free

MUSIC CHRISTINA LAROCCA Cowgirl 319 S Guadalupe St., 982-2565 Soulful singer-songwriter. 8 pm, free CHRISTMAS TREASURES Lensic Performing Arts Center 211 W San Francisco St., 988-1234 The Santa Fe Symphony's annual concert features favorites like Tchaikovsky’s Suite from The Nutcracker, Faith’s Brazilian Sleigh Bells and Berlin’s White Christmas. 4 pm, $22-$80 CRAWFISH BOYZ Tesuque Casino 7 Tesuque Road, 984-8414 New Orleans-flavored jazz. 11:30 am-3 pm, free DEAR DOCTOR Mine Shaft Tavern 2846 Hwy. 14, Madrid, 473-0743 Folk 'n' Americana on the deck. 3 pm, free JANET FEDER Littleglobe 2350 Fox Road, Ste. 200, 670-4364 Pioneering guitar composer and improviser. 7 pm, $10-$20 CONTINUED ON PAGE 28

26

DECEMBER 4-10, 2019

SFREPORTER.COM


COURTESY MUSEUM OF INTERNATIONAL FOLK ART

S FR E P O RTE R .CO M /A RTS

Ghost Stories ‘Yokai: Ghosts and Demons of Japan’ at the Museum of International Folk Art BY ALEX DE VORE a l e x @ s f r e p o r t e r. c o m

L

Artist Ishikawa Taiko made this yokai, Namahage, out of wood, paint, horsehair and other materials. Namahage has his own annual festival which finds him running through the streets in search of misbehaved children.

et’s begin with  Japan’s Night Parade of 100 Demons—an ever-evolving concept most often   depicted as a horizontal scroll painting with any number of additions and alterations  made over the years. There is no one specific version or artist; rather, it ebbs and flows as time and storytelling take hold. With roots in ancient China and Japan’s Heian Period (794-1185), the scroll’s origins are mysterious, but the concept of parading demons became a living embodiment of Japanese  ghost lore, of oni (demons) and yokai—like poltergeists, for lack of a better term, ghosts who can range from scary and spiteful to silly and mischievous. These are center stage at the Museum of International Folk Art’s  Yokai: Ghosts and Demons of Japan exhibit which opens Friday Dec. 6. The  Night Parade of 100 Demons  plays a  major  role in our understanding of yokai. By the 14th century, its imagery and lore had grown immensely to include more storytelling possibilities. And though the legend states anyone foolish enough to be outside during the parade, or even try to look at it from their homes, would be killed or kidnapped by the yokai, its ultimate message became one of entertainment and humor. By the Edo Period (1603-1868), wood block printing techniques had been developed and the scroll became easily copied. Wealthy

LIVE

THEATRE

No Number Home

by Tencha Avila • World Premiere Directed by Vaughn Irving

December 12 – 22 Thursdays–Saturdays 7:30 p.m. Sundays 2 p.m.

families began commissioning their own versions, taking the scroll out of the shrines and temples and furthering the divide between yokai and its early religious underpinnings. “What is yokai? It’s this catch-all word for things like monsters, demons, ghosts, shape-shifters, weird creatures, but also mysterious phenomena and things you can’t explain,” says Felicia Katz-Harris, senior curator of Asian folk art for the Museum of International Folk Art. “One famous example is that you’re in a forest, and you hear the sound of bean-washing in the river—but there’s no one around. Or you hear a tree fall, and you go to where you heard the sound, but there’s no tree. It’s a shared experience, and we don’t know what it is, but we start naming that experience and then artists start visually depicting it.” Katz-Harris is  the primary curator behind the  Yokai  show, and she says it’s the  first large-scale exhibit  dedicated to the topic on American soil ever. In the exhibit, the museum pays homage to hundreds of years of lore, beginning with the 100 Demon Night Parade and wending its way through popular culture like comic books and Pokémon, theater elements like noh and kabuki, craftsmanship items like netsuke and even a dash of haunted house magic from a consulting haunted house engineer.  The museum worked closely with experts in the field, including artist Kono Junya of Kyoto artist collective  Hyakuyōbako (Box of 100 Yokai), whose papier-mache sculpture of Ao Bozu, a one-eyed monk yokai, greets visitors as they enter the exhibit, and UCLA’s Kirk Kanesaka, a PhD and expert in premodern Japanese literature.

A Musical Piñata for Christmas VII

Annual community celebration!

December 6–15 Fridays • 7 p.m. Saturdays & Sundays • 2 p.m.

at Teatro Paraguas  Calle Marie at the Santa Fe Playhouse 142 E. De Vargas Street

For details and to buy tickets:

A&C

Kanesaka’s main contribution comes in the form of an installation based on the story of Oiwa, a woman who, scorned by her conniving husband, becomes deformed, dies, and then seeks out revenge from the afterlife. Her imagery is rather famous—think Ringu  or  The Grudge—and Kanesaka tells SFR that its enduring legend has a lot to do with how women were regarded in Japan’s Tokugawa or Edo Period. “I think we have to remember that the status of these women during this time period was a little bit different, and a lot of women’s voices were muted, so we see how being transformed into a ghost, their voices can be heard,” Kanesaka says. “Throughout Japanese literature, we have these tales of demonic women. Beforehand, we have tales of spirit possessions caused by angry women.” The story is common in kabuki, and Kanesaka’s section of the show features a kimono used in productions in Japan, as well as a lantern prop from the University of Waseda’s theater department that has never before left Japan. Kanesaka believes the one on display is one of two in existence. Deeper in the show, examples of yokai-influenced manga like GeGeGe no Kitarō are on display alongside other more modern examples like Pokémon. Elsewhere, famous demons like the mountain-based Tengu, Kitsune (fox) and Tanuki (raccoon) yokai mingle with video, statuary, wood block prints and other surprises. The show is staggeringly huge and an absolute don’t-miss. “This is the first time I’ve actually seen something of this scale,” Kanesaka adds. YOKAI: GHOSTS AND DEMONS OF JAPAN All day Friday Dec. 6. Through January 10 2021. By admission. Museum of International Folk Art. 706 Camino Lejo, 476-1200

Teatro Paraguas, Compania Chuscales, and Mina Fajardo present:

Holiday Flamenco: Gypsy Moon and Stars December 19–22 Thur. & Fri. • 7 p.m. Sat. & Sun. • 2 p.m. & 7 p.m.

at Teatro Paraguas  Calle Marie

www.TheatreSantaFe.org

See yoseuats! in the

SFREPORTER.COM

DECEMBER 4-10, 2019

27


THE CALENDAR

VILLA THERESE CATHOLIC CLINIC INVITES YOU!

Winter Wonderland Gala Thursday, DECEMBER 12, 2019 | 6:00 PM La Fonda on the Plaza, Lumpkin Ballroom 100 E. San Francisco St., Santa Fe, NM 87501 Keynote Speaker Archbishop John C. Wester Block of Rooms available for $99

$150 per ticket admits 2 for dinner & event If unable to attend, your donation is appreciated! TO PURCHASE TICKE TS:

Email:

ExecDirector@vtccsf.org or call 505.983.8561 Tickets can also be purchased on Eventbrite

ALL PROCEEDS HELP TO PROVIDE FREE HEALTHCARE FOR CHILDREN & FAMILIES IN NORTHERN NEW MEXICO

FUN & ENTERTAINMENT Sunday, December 8, 2019 ||| 5:30 – 8 PM |||

1352 RUFINA CIRCLE ||| SANTA FE, NEW MEXICO

CALLING ALL BIGS AND LITTLES!

You are invited to a 40th Anniversary Reunion Celebration to support Big Brothers Big Sisters — Mountain Region. FREE ADMISSION for all past and present Bigs and Littles. Not involved with Big Brothers Big Sisters yet? Come learn more about the amazing organization and show your support by giving a donation of your choice at the door.

DANCE

MELANIE MONSOUR Museum Hill Café 710 Camino Lejo, 984-8900 A blend of classical and jazz on piano and bass. 12-2 pm, free STRAY DAWGS Mine Shaft Tavern 2846 Hwy. 14, Madrid, 473-0743 Americana roots. 6 pm, free

MONDAY NIGHT SWING Odd Fellows Hall 1125 Cerrillos Road, 470-7077 Arrive at 7 pm for a lesson if you desire, then get dancin' to DJ'ed music. Singles are just as welcome as partners, all ages are invited—and if you'd just like to sit, watch and listen, there are also chairs for spectators. 7 pm, $3-$8

THEATER

EVENTS

140 LBS: HOW BEAUTY KILLED MY MOTHER Jean Cocteau Cinema 418 Montezuma Ave., 466-5528 Award-winning playwright and activist Susan Lieu brings to light the tragic story of her mother’s unexpected death due to plastic surgery malpractice in San Francisco. 7-8:30 pm, $20 A MUSICAL PIÑATA FOR CHRISTMAS Teatro Paraguas 3205 Calle Marie, 424-1601 A community celebration with classic and contemporary carols performed by The Teatro Paraguas Orchestra, dancing, seasonal poetry, skits and an original short play, Regalito by Alix Hudson. 2 pm, $5-$10

GEEKS WHO DRINK Draft Station Santa Fe Arcade, 60 E San Francisco St., 983-6443 Pub trivia with prizes. 7 pm, free NARFE HOLIDAY SOCIAL Pecos Trail Cafe 2239 Old Pecos Trail, 982-9444 The National Association of Current and Retired Federal Employees hosts a holiday get-down for their monthly meeting. 5 pm, free THE SANTA FE HARMONIZERS REHEARSAL Zia United Methodist Church 3368 Governor Miles Road, 471-0997 The barbershop chorus is looking for men and women who can carry a tune; join in on any of the four-part harmony parts (tenor, lead, baritone or bass). Directed by Maurice Sheppard. For more information, call Marv (6996922) or Bill (424-9042). 6:30 pm, free

WORKSHOP

JOIN US for an evening of

ENTER EVENTS AT SFREPORTER.COM/CAL

ANIMAL TOTEM ART WORKSHOP Santa Fe Oxygen & Healing Bar (Kaverns) 137 W San Francisco St., 986-5037 Explore personal animal totems and guides by learning about their symbols and making art with Southwest artist Stephanie LenchardWarren. Dry mixed media materials and paper will be provided. 6-8 pm, $15-$20

MON/9 BOOKS/LECTURES MONDAY STORY TIME Bee Hive Kid's Books 328 Montezuma Ave, 780-8051 Story time for all ages. 10:30 am, free PUEBLO PERSISTENCE OF RESISTANCE Hotel Santa Fe 1501 Paseo de Peralta, 982-1200 Matt Schmader, archaeologist and superintendent of open space at the Department of Parks and Recreation in Albuquerque, lectures as part of Southwest Seminars' Mother Earth, Father Sky speaker series. 6 pm, $15

FOOD DUMPLING POP-UP Tumbleroot Brewery & Distillery 2791 Agua Fría St., 303-3808 Brent Jung serves up Korean dumplings and more. 4 pm, $10

MUSIC AL ROGERS Fenix at Vanessie 427 W Water St., 982-9966 Standards 'n' jazz on piano. 6:30 pm, free CAROLS AND BLESSINGS FROM AROUND THE WORLD Loretto Chapel 207 Old Santa Fe Trail, 982-0092 The Santa Fe Women's Ensemble presents a collection of music arranged for chorus, piano and violin. 6:30 pm, $10-$35 CASEY ANDERSEN AND MOHIT DUBEY Dinner for Two 106 N Guadalupe St., 820-2075 Classical and jazz guitar. 6 pm, free COWGIRL KARAOKE Cowgirl 319 S Guadalupe St., 982-2565 Michèle Leidig hosts Santa Fe's most famous night of karaoke. 9 pm, free

DAVID NUNEZ & DIMI DISANTI Tesuque Casino 7 Tesuque Road, 984-8414 Rock 'n' soul 'n' such. 6 pm, free DYLAN EARL & THE REASON WHY; BLANCHARD; WAKE Second Street Brewery (Rufina Taproom) 2920 Rufina St., 954-1068 Post-honky-techno-indierock-boot-scoot. 8 am-12 pm, free HOLIDAY CONCERT Lensic Performing Arts Center 211 W San Francisco St., 988-1234 The Santa Fe Concert Band performs an hour of holiday music. 7 pm, free

WORKSHOP LA TIERRA TOASTMASTERS Center for Progress and Justice 1420 Cerrillos Road, 467-8514 Discover where one can advance their public speaking skills in a lively and rewarding group. Guests are always welcome. Meetings every Monday. https://latierra. toastmastersclubs.org 12-1 pm, free

TUE/10 BOOKS/LECTURES PLAYWRIGHTS FORUM Teatro Paraguas 3205 Calle Marie, 424-1601 A panel of 5 Santa Fe playwrights, Leslie Dillen, Dale Dunn, Robert Benjamin, Aaron Leventman and Talia Pura, discuss the magic of playwriting. 6-7 pm, free

DANCE ARGENTINE TANGO MILONGA El Mesón 213 Washington Ave., 983-6756 Put on your best tango shoes and join in (or just watch). 7:30 pm, $5

EVENTS ANNUAL HOLIDAY OPEN HOUSE New Mexico Governor's Mansion One Mansion Dr, 476-2800 Come see the Governor's residence all gussied up for the holidays. Children are welcome. 1-3 pm, free MESSAGES FROM THE ANGELS Healing the Scars 439 C W San Francisco St., 575-770-1228 The Angels answer your questions and offer their guidance. Raphael Weisman provides a clear channel for their wisdom, guidance and healing. 7-9 pm, $20

CONTINUED ON PAGE 31

28

DECEMBER 4-10, 2019

SFREPORTER.COM


S FR E P O RTE R .CO M / FO O D

COURTESY THE HOLLAR

The Muck and The Hollar As a Madrid restaurant literally drowns, the community rallies around BY COLE REHBEIN c o l e @ s f r e p o r t e r. c o m

B

ig shocker: A one-time mining town that was practically abandoned in 1954 and re-populated by anarchist hippie artists has some infrastructure problems. “Sometimes you walk through town and you see people’s septic systems overflowing, like actively, and that’s horrific,” Joshua Novak, owner of Madrid restaurant The Hollar (2849 NM-14, Madrid, 471-4821), tells SFR. Faulty septic tanks catacomb their way under Madrid and leech their contents everywhere it isn’t wanted, and the specter of muck has threatened Novak’s popular New American institution since the very beginning. “When I purchased the business in 2008, we were immediately having issues,” he says, starting a long story that for Madrid residents is now familiar fare. Novak  replaced The Hollar’s original septic system almost immediately, at a cost of more than $42,000 (and for which he is still in debt). That system only lasted four years until it had to be replaced again. Novak  is super up-front about not just his struggles, but also his passion for food and community, so it’s not like I’m exposing his dirty, er, sewage to the world—this is a huge problem not just for Novak and

FOOD

Above: Clean interior design welcomes diners to The Hollar. Below: Fried okra served on emergency paper settings.

The Hollar, but for practically everyone in Madrid. I bet you were expecting a nice holiday food story, maybe some secret hot toddy recipe or where to buy the best locally-made fruitcake. But reality bites, baby! More specifically, it reeks, and unless we wanna lose one of the most inspired and down-to-earth takes on American cuisine in the county, we’re gonna have to talk shit. Really, it’s about greywater storage in general, which is a little less gross to think about.  The Hollar’s most recent problems started with the opposite of a problem— booming business. Successful restaurants use a lot of water. Novak’s always kept a close eye on his usage, but a busy summer tourism season had him using over 650 gallons a day—more than his tanks could handle. “On the 15th [of November] I got a phone call from my manager saying that they were smelling something … I came down and looked at the tanks and there was water in everything.” Cue septic trucks and the $1000 bills, weekly. Estimates for a new system once again land in the $30,000-$40,000 range, and he’s trying to raise

Adopt Me!

money—with some success. Novak launched a GoFundMe on Nov. 18, to which more than 180 people have already contributed, raising over $11,000. The 2010 census counts 204 people in Madrid, so you can see how special The Hollar is to the townspeople who love it—who knew restaurants could be subscriber-supported? When I went to check out the place for myself, I was not accosted by any odor. I found the whole location charming, and even truly special, being nestled directly in the middle of town. Novak tells me the interior design was done by his sister Heather French, and it reflects Madrid’s hodgepodge aesthetic in the decor on the walls while being imminently clean and inviting. My mind was far from the septic issues when I ordered the fried okra ($7) to start. They came out quick and kept their crunch throughout the meal despite being such a soft veggie. I was, however, surprised by the biodegradable paper plate and plastic water cup. I later learned from Novak that those were emergency choices to cut down on water needed to clean dishes. “We have taken our water usage from about 450/day during wintertime to less than 200 gallons a day,” he told me, “which is huge.”

DECEMBER FREE LIVE MUSIC

Arroyo de Los Pinos is a delightful little arroyo that loves being a part of the Santa Fe Community. A bit temperamental when it rains, Arroyo de Los Pinos just needs some TLC from humans that love her.

www.santafewatershed.org

Friday

See what other arroyos are up for adoption by visiting:

6

Saturday

You can adopt Arroyo de Los Pinos by calling:

(505) 820-1696

Novak is also completely conscious of the waste. “It’s gut-wrenching that I’m putting so much plastic into the earth right now. I really hate it,” he said, saying that he hates it several times. He also mentioned that biodegradable cups are on the way. For mains, I enjoyed the fried chicken and grits with green chile ($16) while my companion had a buffalo biscuit burger ($18). Between the chicken and the okra, they’ve definitely mastered the foundational technique of American cooking, the deep fry. The chicken was served with a surprisingly versatile lavender bechamel sauce that brought out the chile’s heat in one bite and the savory depths of the chicken in the next. The burger was cooked exactly medium and the flavor tasted so earthy and fresh, as though it were from the mountain behind the town, which I later learned is the actual location of Lamonts Buffalo, their buffalo supplier. The Hollar may be special, but the challenges of operating there seem insurmountable unless Novak can raise the funds to install a new septic system. Why does he keep going? “I like giving people an experience that they can come out and sit down and have a nice time with family, with friends or even by themselves. The other part of it is, I really love cooking good food. It makes me feel good when people sit there and say, ‘that was one of our best meals.’”

7

AT THE ORIGINAL SECOND STREET

STELLA TROIS Funky Jazz, 6 - 9 PM / FREE

BILL HEARNE & FRIENDS Country, 6 - 9 PM / FREE

1814 Second Street ∙ Santa Fe, New Mexico 87505 SFREPORTER.COM

DECEMBER 4-10, 2019

29


ELDORADO HOTEL & SPA

SATURDAY, DECEMBER 7, 2019

Visit southwestcare.org for ticket prices and purchase

DINNER SHOW LIVE AUCTION DANCE PARTY Santa Fe Real

Vasquez & Lamprich

30

DECEMBER 4-10, 2019

•

SFREPORTER.COM

Roxanne & Chuck Apple and Gregg Hartnett

ONGINA

FEATURING STARS FROM

TATIANNA

KALORIE KARBDASHIAN

dine+unwind Santa Fe | the official restaurant guide Kitchen Angels Friends of Southwest Care Shaening & Associates Dr. David King, Southwest Care, and Mr. Juan Allende Richard Harveston and Oswaldo Garcia James Colombo


MUSIC SCHOLA CHRISTMAS CONCERT Loretto Chapel 207 Old Santa Fe Trail, 982-0092 Schola Cantorum of Santa Fe performs an a-capella repertoire of Christmas favorites. 6:30 pm, $19-$24

THEATER

WORKSHOP

NEW MEXICO FILM FOUNDATION INDIE SCREENINGS Jean Cocteau Cinema 418 Montezuma Ave., 466-5528 The theater presents the winner of the George R R Martin screenwriting grant, with indie screenings of local filmmakers' short films and trailers (see SFR Picks, page 19). 7-9 pm, $5

BOTANICAL BOOK CLUB: STALKING THE WILD ASPARAGUS Santa Fe Botanical Garden 715 Camino Lejo, 471-9103 Join other botanical book enthusiasts over tea, cookies and great conversation about the book of the month, Stalking the Wild Asparagus by Euell Gibbons. 1-2:30 pm, free

DECEMBER FEATURED ARTIST

418 MONTEZUMA AVE . | 505.466 .5528

SANTA FE INDIVISIBLE MEETING Center for Progress and Justice 1420 Cerrillos Road, 467-8514 Join the politically progressive group to brainstorm solutions. 9 am, free

THE CALENDAR

JEANCOCTEAUCINEMA .COM

ENTER EVENTS AT SFREPORTER.COM/CAL

COURTESY NEW MEXICO MUSEUM OF ART

MUSEUMS

READINGS: A CELEBRATION OF RAY BRADBURY’S WORK THROUGH THE LENS OF TAROT BY

ELIZABETH LEGGETT OPENING RECEPTION: THURSDAY, DECEMBER 5TH | 5:30 - 7:00 PM THURS

Gene Kloss, “Penitente Good Friday,” 1936, drypoint etching. Part of the New Mexico Museum of Art’s exhibit Picturing Passion: Artists Interpret the Penitente Brotherhood.

CENTER FOR CONTEMPORARY ARTS 1050 Old Pecos Trail, 982-1338 Scott Johnson: Fissure Through Feb. 2, 2020. GEORGIA O’KEEFFE MUSEUM 217 Johnson St., 946-1000 Contemporary Voices: Jo Whaley. Through Feb. 24. HARWOOD MUSEUM OF ART 238 Ledoux St., Taos, 575-758-9826 Dolichovespula Maculata: Works of Paper by Dianne Frost. Through Jan. 2020. IAIA MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY NATIVE ARTS 108 Cathedral Place, 983-8900 Wayne Nez Gaussoin: Adobobot. Through Nov. 30. Reconciliation. Through Jan. 19. Heidi K Brandow: Unit of Measure. Through Jan. 31. Sámi Intervention/ Dáidda Gázada. Through Feb. 16. MUSEUM OF ENCAUSTIC ART 632 Agua Fría St., 989-3283 Artworks in wax. MUSEUM OF INDIAN ARTS & CULTURE 710 Camino Lejo, 476-1250

Beyond Standing Rock: The Past, Present, and Future of the Water Protectors. Through Dec. 31. Diego Romero vs The End of Art. Through April 2020. MUSEUM OF INT’L FOLK ART 706 Camino Lejo, 476-1200 Girard’s Modern Folk. Through Jan. 26. Gallery of Conscience: Community Through Making from Peru to New Mexico. Through Jan. 5. Música Buena: Hispano Folk Music of New Mexico. Through March 7, 20201. MUSEUM OF SPANISH COLONIAL ART 750 Camino Lejo, 982-2226 NM HISTORY MUSEUM 113 Lincoln Ave., 476-5019 Working on the Railroad. Through 2021. The Massacre of Don Pedro Villasur. Through Feb. 21. Atomic Histories. Through Feb. 28. We the Rosies: Women at Work. Through March 1. NM MUSEUM OF ART 107 W Palace Ave., 476-5072 Alcoves 2020 #1 #2. Through August 2020. Social and Sublime. Through Nov. 17. Agnes Pelton: Desert Transcendentalist.

Through Jan. 5, 2020. Picturing Passion: Artists Reinterpret the Penitente Brotherhood. PALACE OF THE GOVERNORS 105 W Palace Ave., 476-5100 Closed for renovations. POEH CULTURAL CENTER 78 Cities of Gold Road, Pojoaque, 455-3334 Di Wae Powa. EL RANCHO DE LAS GOLONDRINAS 334 Los Pinos Road, 471-2261 Living history. SANTA FE BOTANICAL GARDEN 715 Camino Lejo, 471-9103 Human Nature: Explorations in Bronze. Through May 10, 2020. SITE SANTA FE 1606 Paseo de Peralta, 989-1199 Bel Canto: Contemporary Artists Explore Opera. Through Jan. 5, 2020. WHEELWRIGHT MUSEUM OF THE AMERICAN INDIAN 704 Camino Lejo, 982-4636 Laughter and Resilience: Humor in Native American Art. Through Oct. 4, 2020.

MONDAY, DECEMBER 9 | 5:30PM - 6:30PM

JULIE CAMPOLI

MF O , RDEE@C CECMA BS C E RRE E9N A | T5 M : 3I D 0 TPOM - C6 A: 3 R EN ED L EACY TU WN M0 PP U SM

JULIE CAMPOLI FREE LECTURE @ CCA SCREEN AT MIDTOWN CAMPUS

MONDAY, DECEMBER 9 | 5:30PM - 6:30PM

JULIE CAMPOLI FREE LECTURE @ CCA SCREEN AT MIDTOWN CAMPUS

SFREPORTER.COM

DECEMBER 4-10, 2019

31


HELP US

Some of Katherine’s work...

LIGHT A

MATCH!

DRAINING THE FOOD SWAMP Unbalanced landscape of food access in Santa Fe puts Southside in fight for healthy eating options

A NEED FOR TWO

Photojournalism is one of Katherine Lewin’s passions. Her work for the last six months in Santa Fe includes

Development of a design for a Southside teen center plods on without an estimated completion date or enough funds yet to finish

a multimedia approach to local storytelling at the Santa Fe Reporter. Report for America recently confirmed Lewin can continue for a second year, focusing in particular on the city’s Southside and other under-reported stories. Please consider a donation to help SFR match a grant for her salary and fund more local journalism.

Donate at

www.sfreporter.com/RFA

Please address checks to RFA and deliver to

132 E Marcy St., Santa Fe, NM 87501

32

OCTOB ER 2-8, 2019

SFREPORTER.COM

YOUTH AT THE EDGE OF THE PLAZA

Despite incremental city policy change, Santa Fe’s housing crisis hits youth the hardest

WHOEVER CONTROLS THE WALL, CONTROLS THE VOICE

Three art collectives and the International Folk Art Museum take over one Southside wall as the beginning of a movement to unite, inspire and beautify


MOVIES

RATINGS

Frankie Review

BEST MOVIE EVER

Impressive cast, so-so film

10 9

BY ALEX DE VORE a l e x @ s f r e p o r t e r. c o m

7

C

8

inephiles are sure  to hear a lot about Frankie, the newest from director Ira Sachs (Little Men) and a darling at Cannes this year. And while the film boasts a rather impressive cast of internationally respected names like Isabelle Huppert, Brendan Gleeson, Marisa Tomei, Greg Kinnear and any number of others who are probably huge in Europe, its minimalist approach ultimately droops under the weight of too much nothingness. Huppert is Frankie, a big-time actress facing a terminal disease who gathers friends and family in Sintra, Portugal, for what must be the most maudlin vacation of all time. Knowing full well her fate, her adult children struggle with their own realities despite the gorgeous Portuguese backdrop. Frankie’s daughter (Vinette Robinson) yearns to leave her husband, her son (Jérémie Renier) searches for meaning in his life through the past and finds none; a former on-set stylist of Frankie’s (Tomei) grapples with a lovesick boyfriend (Kinnear) pushing for too much, too soon and her ex-husband (Pascal Greggory),

7 6 5 4 3 2 1 WORST MOVIE EVER

+ SO BEAUTIFUL; THE PERFORMANCES - SO SLOW; PRETTY MUCH NOTHING HAPPENS

finally free to be openly gay, trades marriage war stories with her current beau (Gleeson). They’re all very selfish and charming and human if a little bit boring. Thus, the world of Frankie is pretty and hypnotic at first, but as the single day in which the film plays out unfolds, the conversational vignettes grow stale. Kudos all around for natural and nuanced performances from some of film’s most seasoned vets, but by the fifth or sixth awkward exchange between Frankie and her people, it becomes challenging to stay engaged.  In the end, we just feel bad for those who’ve been drawn into her powerful orbit—she’s manipulative and cunning and, despite staring down the barrel of so much love, seems uncomfortable in her own

skin, particularly at the idea that her kids might go on with their lives after she’s gone. There is so much in the setup, in fact, to be drawn to, it’s a pity Sachs’ vision feels so very selfindulgent and downright trite now and again, but as travelogue movies go, one could do plenty worse. In other words, come for the character studies and stay for the Portugal of it all, but don’t expect filmmaking bliss so much as a simple and uneven glimpse into the life of the flawed. Stars … they’re just like us. FRANKIE Directed by Sachs With Huppert, Gleeson, Tomei and Kinnear Center for Contemporary Arts, PG-13, 98 min.

QUICKY REVIEWS

9

MARRIAGE STORY

7

WHITE SNAKE

5

LAST CHRISTMAS

8

DOCTOR SLEEP

MARRIAGE STORY

9

+ METICULOUS CHARACTER DEVELOPMENT

- SCARLETT JOHANSSON SINGS

Marriage Story begins with Charlie (Adam Driver) and Nicole (Scarlett Johansson) reading lists of what they love most about one another. They are sweet and nuanced: both loving parents, he’s a successful Broadway director and she’s a star actor—in fact, his “favorite actor.” It seems a match made in heaven and we are quickly swept up in their idyllic partnership, making it all the more stinging when we learn the lists are part of an assignment given by a mediator to aid in the process of Nicole and Charlie’s impending uncoupling. This is writer/ director Noah Baumbach’s (Francis Ha, Mistress America) intention. He wants it to hurt, and it does. On the surface, the divorce is one of logistics, a tale of two cities: Nicole moves to Los Angeles to pursue a big role in a TV pilot and to enjoy all that “space” everyone keeps talking about, while Charlie stays in New York to bring his production of Electra to Broadway. Charlie sees her move as only temporary and insists they are a “New York family,” while Nicole maintains this move is something she’s always wanted—something Charlie failed to take seriously amidst all his self-importance.

Marriage Story: You try being happy when you’re married to Darth Vader’s grandson.

8

PAIN AND GLORY

7

PARASITE

His play, it turns out, is an apt allusion (a woman scorned), and although they’d discussed parting amicably and without lawyers, Nicole finds cutthroat, stiletto-wearing divorce attorney Nora Fanshaw (portrayed fabulously by Laura Dern) to represent her. During their first meeting Fanshaw asks Nicole for her side of the story. Nicole says, “It’s difficult to articulate.” And it is, because with no true villain to blame we are left navigating the little things that lead to the demise of their relationship. Of course, there are problems aplenty, and while it may take Charlie (and us) a moment to play emotional catch-up with Nicole, we eventually come to understand just how insidious these “little things” can be in a relationship. It’s difficult to watch as Nora paints Charlie as a sort-of deadbeat dad too consumed with his work to truly care. For Nora, the inadequacy of the father is not just about Charlie, but about all men; “God is the father and God didn’t show up,” she tells Nicole. “It’s fucked up, but that’s the way it is”—this could be a tagline for the film. Meanwhile, Charlie seeks his own council, meeting with two lawyers: a pussycat (Alan Alda) and a shark (Ray Liotta). We may want to pick a side, but Baumbach won’t let us off so easily. Nicole and Charlie are CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE

SFREPORTER.COM

• DECEMBER 4-10, 2019

33


MOVIES

FOR MORE REVIEWS, VISIT SFREPORTER.COM

so perfectly messy and endearing that we are left feeling like their 8-year-old son Henry (Azhy Robertson), grasping at his parent’s hands while they literally pull him in different directions. This is Driver and Johansson at their best and Baumbach’s finest work yet. Marriage Story is at once Greek tragedy, absurdist comedy and a surrealist dystopian reality. A must-see. (Allison Sloan)

Violet Crown, Netflix, R, 136 min.

WHITE SNAKE

7

+ KILLER ANIMATION; DARKER THEMES - COMEDY THAT DOESN’T LAND; THE MIDDLE LAGS

Though the Chinese legend of Lady White Snake dates back to around the Tang Dynasty (that’s the 600s, y’all), its enduring legacy has stretched into any number of television, comic book, opera and film formats. Its newest foray is that of the computer animated film from newcomer directors Amp Wong, previously an animator himself, and Ji Zhao, previously an editor, and it’s a rather enjoyable though imperfect retelling. In the tale, a beautiful woman/snake spirit named Blanca is sent to assassinate an evil general who is using dark magic to consolidate his power. Failing, she loses her memories and awakens sometime later in a Snakecatcher Village high in the mountains. There, the denizens catch snakes for a living for some reason; there, she falls in love with Xuan, the black sheep of the villagers who fears snakes but thirsts for knowledge alongside his dog Dudou. Blanca believes herself to be human, but as her snake spirit kin search for her alongside the evil general she didn’t have a chance to kill, she slowly begins remembering her past as Xuan winds up willing to do whatever it takes to be with her—even giving up his humanity altogether. Cue martial arts and awesome demons both good and bad; cue legendary Chinese storytelling tradition of challenging adventure and painful circumstance which both make way for moral and inter-personal growth. White Snake is a gorgeously animated affair, from the worlds of windswept mountains and frozen battlefields to the bizarre and exaggerated takes on what we assume are well-known Chinese demons. While certain characters, mostly Xuan, fall victim to the uncanny valley, others, like this one fox demon and some of the snake spirits, bear artful and compelling designs. It’s a pity other characters like Dudou the dog wind up feeling Disney-fied, but for every moment it feels like White Snake might be pandering for laughs, it unleashes a massive fight scene cho-

34

DECEMBER 4-10, 2019

reographed and animated in a way we don’t honestly see in the States, or a story beat far more tragic and real than we’re used to from such films. But then, it’s hard to tell exactly who White Snake is for. Some scenes contain noncartoonish violence while others are far too sexy for kids—so why does the dog seemingly play to youths? Chalk it up to some kind of cultural difference; maybe kids in China are trusted to understand darker themes? Either way, White Snake never treats its audience like it won’t or can’t understand, and that is shockingly rare in animated features. So really, don’t take your kids unless they’re a little older, and don’t expect hand holding. Instead, prepare for an artfully told journey film with enough surprising elements to feel fresh and enough familiar ones as to avoid culture shock. You’ll laugh and cry and also probably gasp—you’ll forgive them for a middle section that feels sooooo long and boring. (ADV)

Jean Cocteau Cinema, NR, 99 min.

LAST CHRISTMAS

5

+ GREAT TWIST ENDING - TOO MUCH WHAM!

Just in time for the holidays, Last Christmas from director Paul Feig (that 2016 Ghostbusters reboot) provides a heartwarming story about a young woman named Kate (Emilia Clarke, the mother of dragons herself) and her attempts to get her life together. Kate spends her days working as an elf for “Santa” (Michelle Yeoh) in a yearround Christmas store and her nights either couch-surfing or auditioning for any acting or

SFREPORTER.COM

White Snake boasts stellar animation and a darker tone than most American animated features.

singing gigs she can find. Kate struggles to maintain an already strained relationship with her Yugoslavian immigrant family and any number of friendships, but after a life-saving heart transplant, she transforms from a bumbling but caring dork into a cold shell of a woman—and we haven’t even gotten to the the shoehorned romantic interest Tom (Crazy Rich Asians star Henry Golding) and the big twist ending! The twist does manage to be surprising, but the remainder of the film, particularly Clarke and Golding’s chemistry, falls flat. Feig’s vision becomes a good-enough movie for families to watch together, and there’s some kind of pseudo-valuable message about how we need to love ourselves before we can love others, but most of the cast’s heavy hitters—like Patty Lupone and Emma Thompson (who also wrote the script)—aren’t used effectively. Still, holiday movies are going to come out every year, and Last Christmas is at least a little better than typical Hallmark schlock. You’ll get the feels, you’ll get the unpredictable conclusion—but Jesus, pump the breaks on the George Michael music! (Cade Guerrero)

Regal (both locations), Violet Crown, PG-13, 103 min.

DOCTOR SLEEP

8

+ STANDS UP TO THE KUBRICK VERSION AS A SEQUEL

- DUVALL LOOK-ALIKE FEELS CHEAP

Remakes, reprises and late-breaking sequels seldom captivate in contemporary cinema— especially when they’re trying to follow movie-

making greats. So, imagine our chagrin when, nearly 40 years later, the second chapter of The Shining turned out to be such a delightful little house for horror. Doctor Sleep kept us awake and not even a little annoyed, which is no small accomplishment given the letdown that came with this year’s other Stephen King title. This one was a crafty, well-paced and well-acted bit. Although the recreated scenes from weeks after the sour end of Jack Torrance at The Overlook Hotel include Danny’s childhood complete with a Shelley Duvall look-alike mom (Alex Essoe) and has us at first wondering if this would be a cheesy recap, we quickly join Dan (Ewan McGreggor) as he’s all grown up and still shining, sort of. What seems to be a disconnected set of stories soon weaves together into a frightening garment. Director Mike Flanagan makes a righteous effort to stand up to Stanley Kubrick with his own screenplay based on King’s book, reminding us that the scary parts get even more scary when they happen just out of sight. Fan service sinks right in with the continuity of the ghosts, the hallways and even the waterfalls of blood near the elevator from 1980. While the first chapter was so strong with gaslighting that we can still smell the fumes, however, now women rule the day. Rebecca Ferguson’s (Mission Impossible: Rogue Nation) villainess Rose the Hat runs a gang of soul-sucking child killers with a witchy finesse that’s creepy AF in nearly every scene, and newcomer Kyleigh Curran is believable and composed as Abra Stone, the new child wonder with psychic powers that make her a target. Abra


FOR MORE REVIEWS, VISIT SFREPORTER.COM

and Danny take on a sort of crimefighting duo motif, and there’s a surprising depth of emotion in how the whole thing wraps up. Or does it? (Julie Ann Grimm)

Regal (both locations), Violet Crown, R, 152 min.

PAIN AND GLORY

8

+ THE SMALL BUT CLEVER TWIST; BANDERAS

- HEAVY HANDED NOW AND THEN

When it comes to a filmmaker like Pedro Almodóvar—a director who inserts bits and pieces of himself into practically everything he does—it can be hard to tell what’s real, what’s not and what might just be fantasy. In Pain & Glory, Almodóvar blurs the lines further, telling the story of a once-lauded writer/director named Salvador (Antonio Banderas) who, on the cusp of senior citizenship, starts to feel wistful and hopes to come to terms with the events of his life thus far. Between chronic pain, depression and haunting memories of his past, Salvador has chosen to leave writing and filmmaking behind. This comes with a sense of meaninglessness, but when a small theater asks him to present his most famous work as part of a film festival, Salvador sets out to make peace with its lead Alberto (Asier Etxeandia), a man he hasn’t spoken with since the film premiered three decades earlier. Alberto introduces Salvador to heroin which, for a time, calms his pain and anxieties. But when the pair collaborates once more on a one-man show based on Salvador’s cinematic awakening as a youth, old friends come calling and he is faced with a dilemma he can no longer ignore. Banderas is a revelation, a calming and dimensional if scattered presence and a man who’s lived enough to know he wants to set right the missteps of his past. The performance is a masterclass in vulnerability and buried fears dredged up again, and it’s easily one of his best. But the real magic of Pain & Glory is in its disparate timelines. Are Salvador’s flashbacks really flashbacks, or are they a grand vision for something new? Call it a midlife crisis, call it a bout of crippling nostalgia—call it what you like, but Salvador’s own salvation comes in the form of acceptance that a new chapter always comes if we let it. One often wonders if one’s best days are behind them, and while what we learn in Pain & Glory can’t possibly quell those fears, it does provide resounding hope. Almodóvar proves his skills for the umpteenth time while coaxing one of the year’s best performances out of Banderas. The lesson is fuzzy, but there for those who look. In a simple phrase? You ain’t seen nothing yet. (ADV)

Center for Contemporary Arts, R, 113 min.

PARASITE

7

+ THRILLING BUILDUP; EXCITING

PERFORMANCES THROUGHOUT

- DISAPPOINTING PAYOFF

Is poverty inescapable? Are its symptoms self-wrought? Must the poor stoop to extreme measures just to get by, and do the wealthy have an ethical obligation to take notice and maybe do something about it? Filmmaker Bong Joon-ho (The Host) raises these and scads of other questions in his newest, Parasite, a semi-comedy, semi-dark parable examining the lengths to which one family will go to survive. We follow Kim Ki-woo, (Choi Woo-shik), a college-aged youth who unwittingly scores a job tutoring English to the daughter of the

MOVIES wealthy Park family. Kim’s own family has slipped into a sort of default conman mode, and he must fake credentials in order to keep his position. Soon after, his sister (Park So-dam), mother (Jang Hye-jin) and father (Song Kang-ho, a regular Bong collaborator in films like The Host and Snowpiercer) have all weaseled their way into various jobs for the Parks, and life seems doable for possibly the first time ever. But when a former employee returns in search of something she left behind, the comfy jobs transform into a hellscape, wrenching security from the Kim family and spiraling everything out of control. Bong’s eye is, as always, masterful, from the more overt symbolism based in modern-day classism to the subtler moments and examinations of insanity, even if it’s temporary. Each character proves a powerhouse on their own, but the ensemble dynamic of the Kim family feels so natural and comfortable that we find reasons to empathize even when they’re at their worst. Song in particular carries the film in the background with a commanding performance as a desperate father pushed to his very limits. Elsewhere, the Park family’s innocent yet irritating cluelessness starts to make us wonder if vilifying the rich always makes sense—they’re not bad people, they’re just blissfully ignorant of the goingson in their own home. Parasite morphs so suddenly and jarringly that it becomes a breathless dash to the finish line. Bong brings us to the brink of unforgivable, but keeps us grounded the entire time. Pity, then, that it begins to lag once the major conflict kicks in. The final 30 minutes, which could have reveled in sheer chaos and nearly do, feel more like a sudden drop in pacing than they do a satisfying conclusion. It isn’t even that satisfaction is mandatory, rather that Parasite‘s ending feels more like a tacked on series of events. The journey to get there is riveting, but it surely seems like Bong felt he needed to hedge his bets in an otherwise fantastic tale. (ADV)

WEDNESDAY DECEMBER 4 12:00p Marriage Story* 12:15p Where’s My Roy Cohn? 2:15p Marriage Story 2:45p Pain And Glory* 5:00p Pain And Glory 5:15p Marriage Story* 7:30p Marriage Story 8:00p Pain And Glory* THURSDAY, DECEMBER 5 12:00p Marriage Story* 12:15p Where’s My Roy Cohn? 2:15p Marriage Story 2:45p Pain And Glory* 5:15p Marriage Story* 6:45p Another Day of Life presented by the SF Council of International Affairs 8:00p Pain And Glory* FRIDAY - TUESDAY, DE6 6 - 10 11:30a Marriage Story* 12:00p Aeronauts 2:15p Aeronauts* 2:30p Marriage Story 4:30p Marriage Story* 5:15p Aeronauts 7:15p Marriage Story* 7:30p Aeronauts

Center for Contemporary Arts, Violet Crown, R, 132 min.

CCA CINEMATHEQUE 1050 Old Pecos Trail, 982-1338

JEAN COCTEAU CINEMA 418 Montezuma Ave., 466-5528

REGAL SANTA FE PLACE 6 4250 Cerrillos Road, Ste. 1314, 424-6109

REGAL STADIUM 14 3474 Zafarano Drive, 844-462-7342 CODE 1765#

THE SCREEN 1600 St. Michael’s Drive, 428-0209

VIOLET CROWN 1606 Alcaldesa St., 216-5678

For showtimes and more reviews, visit SFReporter.com

WED - THURS, DEC 4 - 5 11:00a The Irishman 3:00p The Irishman 7:00p The Irishman FRI - SAT, DEC 6 - 7 11:15a Frankie 1:15p The Irishman 5:15p Frankie 7:15p Frankie SUNDAY, DECEMBER 8 11:15a The Irishman 3:00p Frankie 5:15p Reason w/ filmmaker Anand Patwardhan MONDAY, DECEMBER 9 11:15a Frankie 1:15p The Irishman 5:15p Putting People First: How Urban Design and Density Build a Better Future (lecture presented by Homewise) 7:15p Frankie TUESDAY, DECEMBER 10 11:15a Frankie 1:15p The Irishman 5:15p Frankie 7:15p Frankie

SFREPORTER.COM

DECEMBER 4-10, 2019

35


SFR CLASSIFIEDS 2 Ways to Book Your Ad!

CALL: 505.988.5541

EMAIL: classy@SFReporter.com

JONESIN’ CROSSWORD

PHOTOS WITH SANTA CLAWS AT PETCO

“Save IT Till the End”—those last two.

(Cerrillos at St. Michaels) Children of all ages • All types of pets on leashes or in carriers

by Matt Jones

December 7th & 8th and December 14th & 15th • 10 AM – 4 pm ALL PROCEEDS BENEFIT FELINES & FRIENDS

POWERED BY on

Pres t

CALL FELINES & FRIENDS AT

27

30

38

39

42

43

34

40

35

L36 I LY B37

41 44

45

46

51

47

52

53

57

56

58

60

61

63

64

65

66

67

68

ACROSS

54

55

59 62

56 Not just some 57 Aquatic barrier 1 “Anaconda” singer Nicki 59 Nutritional amt. 6 Bot. or ecol. 60 Anniversary gift before wood 9 Earth-shaking event 61 Dwyane Wade’s team for 14 Singer with three albums most of his career named after ages 63 Singer Cleo or Frankie 15 PC key beside the space bar 64 1099-___ (bank-issued tax 16 Detach form) 17 Salad ingredient that’s 65 Decline slowly fuzzy on the outside 66 Beginning 19 ___ di pepe (tiny pasta variety) 67 “Evil Dead” hero 20 Shoo-___ (favorites) 68 Puff pieces? 21 Raise crops 22 Barn-roof adornments DOWN 23 Drug buster, for short 1 “___ Whoopee” 25 Much of Mongolia 2 Menzel of “Frozen 2” 28 Titular host of NBC’s “Game of Games” 3 Bygone documentaries 30 It can cause a row 4 “Thrilla in Manila” victor 31 Geometry calculations 5 “Bring the Funny” judge Foxworthy 33 Belt loop puncher 6 “Lord of the Rings” villain 34 False pretense 38 Busy spot for Finnish travel 7 Get on up 8 “Addams Family” cousin 42 “Bonanza” role 9 Eighth note, in the U.K. 43 Linseed product 44 “I have ___ / the plums ...” 10 “The Last of the (poem line spoofed in memes) Mohicans” character 11 “___ kettle of fish” 45 Big ___, California 12 Baseball Hall of Famer Ralph 46 De-lumps, as flour 13 Are real 48 Obi-Wan or Luke, e.g. 18 Boil over 53 It’s got 14 points on Malaysia’s flag 24 Reunion group

26 “Field of Dreams” state 27 “The Burning Giraffe” painter 29 Acronymic 1992 single by The Shamen (from “Boss Drum”) 31 “That feels good!” 32 “Can’t Fight This Feeling” band ___ Speedwagon 33 Feel unwell 34 Petty arguments 35 Great series of wins 36 “___ you kidding me?” 37 ___ Dew (PepsiCo product) 39 Grammatical subject 40 Welsh stand-up comedian Pritchard-McLean 41 Court judge 45 Evil computer system in “The Terminator” 46 Dagger holder 47 “Big-ticket” thing 48 Jiggly dessert 49 Aquafina competitor 50 Leary of the “Ice Age” series 51 “Fame” actress Cara 52 Goofy smiles 54 “It’s ___!” (“I’ll see you then”) 55 Hotel postings 58 Alfa Romeo rival 61 “Paper Planes” rapper 62 “Last Week Tonight” airer

HONEY BOY was found homeless and living outside. Once in our care, we quickly realized he was a social, loving boy that needed help finding a forever home. HONEY BOY loves human attention and would do well with a family that has time to spend with him. He plays a little rough with other cats and would do fine as an only cat. He may like the companionship of a cat friendly dog or enjoy a family with older children that will keep him company. HONEY BOY is approximately 1 1/2 years old. HONEY BOY can be seen by appointment.

DECEMBER 4-10, 2019

SFREPORTER.COM

MOONCAKE and MIDORIYA are 6 month old siblings. They were born into foster care and both are very well socialized. MOONCAKE is a sweet girl that loves to play with toys and to chase her brother. MIDORIYA loves to snuggle and has a hearty purr. Both kittens are active and like to be in high places where they can keep an eye on things below. Both very friendly and gentle, and would do fine in a home with young children. These siblings need to be adopted as a pair and can be seen at our Adoption Center inside Petco.

HOMES FOR THE HOLIDAYS Art exhibit, book signing & holiday gift sale

DECEMBER 8, 1-4 PM ADMISSION $10 — PROCEEDS WILL BENEFIT FELINES & FRIENDS A few cats/kittens available for adoption will be at the event. www.newconceptgallery.com

www.FandFnm.org ADOPTION HOURS:

PETCO: 1-4 pm Thursday, Friday, Saturday & Sunday TECA TU at DeVargas Center: 12 noon-3 pm, First Saturday of each month Please visit our cats at PETCO and TECA TU during regular store hours. FOSTER HOMES URGENTLY NEEDED FOR ADULT CATS OF VARIOUS AGES SANTA FE CATS not only supports the mission of FELINES & FRIENDS from revenue generated by providing premium boarding for cats, pocket pets and birds, but also serves as a mini-shelter for cats awaiting adoption. For more information, please visit www.santafecats.com

Get SFR by mail! 6 months for $65 or one year for $120

SFReporter.com/shop CROSSWORD PUZZLE SPONSORED BY:

NEW ARRIVALS! TRUST EXERCISE by Susan Choi Hardcover, Fiction $27.00 THE FIFTH RISK by Michael Lewis Softcover, Non-Fiction $16.95

202 GALISTEO STREET 505.988 . 4226 CWBOOK STORE .COM

© COPYRIGHT 2019 JONESIN’ CROSSWORDS (EDITOR@JONESINCROSSWORDS.COM)

36

316-2281

City of Santa Fe Permit #19-002

SOLUTION

C I L T I T M B I O A W I A L

29

BE MY FUR-EVER FRIEND!

M I N A A D E L K I W I I N S N A R C E L A R E A H E L S H O S S

26

33

50

13

Q U A K E U N F I X A C I N I V A N E S D E S E R T A R L S H A M I R P O R T E A T E N I F T S T S T A R E F R D A M I H E A T A B A T E T O K E S

25

32

49

12

22

24 28

11

19

21

23

10

16

18

20

48

9

15

17

31

8

S H E A T H

14

7

G R I N S

6

J S A E F R U F A R G O L E N S I N K O I S U R K N I Y M N I E A T

5

I R E N E

4

D E N I S

3

E V I A N

2

J E L L O

1


SFR CLASSIFIEDS 2 Ways to Book Your Ad!

CALL: 505.988.5541

COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENTS

SERVICE DIRECTORY

ADOPTEE SUPPORT GROUP For those of us who are adoptees, we live our lives filled with questions of loss, grief and trust every day. The Zory’s Place Adoptee Support Group provides a safe space where we can explore our feelings with others who understand and share similar experiences. 2nd Wednesday of every month, 7 - 8:30 pm 1600 C Lena St, Conference Room, Santa Fe Facilitator: Amy Winn, MA LMHC-CMH0184591, Adoptee 505-967-9286

ARTS

UPAYA ZEN CENTER: SUNDAY MORNING MEDITATION PRACTICE Are you interested in learning about Zen meditation? Then come get acquainted with Upaya and learn the basics of Zen meditation and temple etiquette. On Sunday, December 15, 9:30 a.m. 12:30 p.m., Matthew Kozan Palevsky leads THE EASE AND JOY OF MORNINGS, a gentle morning of silent meditation. Offered by donation, but please register to reserve your place: Registrar@upaya.org, Upaya.org/programs, or 505-986-8518. 1404 Cerro Gordo, Santa Fe.

GreeneFineArts.com Willard Clark Cottage on the Pond Oil on Canvas 20” x 24” $9,500 206.605.2191

— In Fond Memory of Those We Served —

HOMEOPATHY: What is it, Where it has come from and What is it good for? Learn about the principals and history of this unique, controversial medical art used by millions of people around the world and how it is relevant to modern day health challenges. Join Julian Jonas, a Certified Classical Homeopath with over 35 years A BUDDHIST WORKSHOP: of experience as a healthcare Developing Love & practitioner, for a talk and Compassion for Ourselves Q&A at the Vista Grande & Others at Kagyu Shenpen Public Library in Eldorado, Kunchab Buddhist Stupa, 3777 Santa Fe on December 10th KSK Lane (off Airport Road). at 6:30 pm. Admission is SATURDAY, DECEMBER 7th, 10 free. Contact 505-557-6470/ am - noon and 1 - 3 pm. With homeopathnm@gmail.com for Dr. Fred Cooper. In Buddhism, more information. three different approaches begin with first allowing ourselves to be happy & experience joy, and then extending that loving kindness to others. Everyone is welcome. LOST PETS Call 505-982-4763 or email cooper@santafe.edu to register or for more information.

BULLETINS

YOUR INTUITION & THE TAROT - An Experiential Workshop in Spiritual Energy & Clairvoyant Symbolism. Through breath, grounding, and energy awareness techniques, explore your experience of the tarot and your relationship to your own clairvoyanceóHow you can “see” more clearly & deeply. BYO or cards provided. Limited to 15. All levels. Wednesday, December 11, 5:45pm • CO-FE Collaborative Work Space, 314 S. Guadalupe St. $30 • RSVP 505.927.5407

ADVERTISE AN EVENT, WORKSHOP OR LECTURE HERE IN THE COMMUNITY ANNOUCMENTS

CALL 988.5541

FENCES & GATES

REAL ESTATE LAND FOR SALE

12.5 acres with water, natural gas, electric with transformer, and phone at lot, ready to build. Surrounded on two sides by a conservation area and Galisteo Basin preserve land. 360 degree mountain views. A wonderful cul-de-sac lot. Priced very well for this attractive piece of the Southwest. Feel free to roam this lot and see for yourself that this would lend itself to a piece of paradise. A two story home would have exquisite views. There are other lots to choose from but this one is a stand out. Mark 505-249-3570 or mklap480@gmail.com. See the MLS listing for more details. 18 Alyssa Court, lot #15, Lamy, NM

EMAIL: classy@SFReporter.com

CHIMNEY SWEEPING

HANDYPERSON

JONATHAN THE HANDYMAN OF SANTA FE Carpentry • Home Maintenance Windows & Doors • Portales Painting: Interior & Exterior Landscaping & Fencing Tile Work • Stucco Repair Reasonable rates, Reliable. Discounts available to seniors, veterans, handicap. Call or Text - 670-8827 www.handymannm.com

Chimney Cleanings come with free Dryer vent check and fire extinguisher evaluation. Safety, Value, Professionalism. CSIA Certified. GB-98 Lic. 392671. Baileyschimney.com. Call Bailey’s today 505-988-2771

LANDSCAPING

SANTA FE COYOTE FENCING. Specializing in Coyote Fencing. License # 19-001199-74. Thinking about upgrading or building a new fence? Give Richard a call: 505-690-6272

LANDSCAPES BY DENNIS Landscape Design, Xeriscapes, Drip Systems, Natural Ponds, Low Voltage Lighting & Maintenance. I create a custom lush garden w/ minimal use of precious H20. 505-699-2900

PERSONAL & PROFESSIONAL SERVICES Be careful, there are “Professionals” loose in Santa Fe putting a camera down your chimney and charging more to repair a crack than it originally cost to build your chimney. For 41 years Casey’s Top Hat Chimney Sweeps has given an honest assessment and a fair price.

Mediate—Don’t Litigate! PHILIP CRUMP Mediator I can help you work together toward positive goals that create the best future for all • Divorce, Parenting plan, Family • Business, Partnership, Construction

Thank You Santa Fe!

505-989-5775

FREE CONSULTATION

philip@pcmediate.com

505-989-8558

DO YOU HAVE A GREAT SERVICE? ADVERTISE IT HERE IN THE SERVICE DIRECTORY CLASSY@ SFREPORTER.COM

MISSING ORANGE FEMALE TABBY Please return Sweet Pea, beloved family pet. GENEROUS REWARD OFFERED. Last seen in North Santa Fe close to the Lodge Hotel. SJ Miller 720-440-1053 SFREPORTER.COM

DECEMBER 4-10, 2019

37


SFR CLASSIFIEDS 3 Ways to Book Your Ad!

CALL: 505.988.5541

EMAIL: classy@SFReporter.com

WEB: SFRClassifieds.com

ACUPUNCTURE Rob Brezsny

Week of December 4th

ARIES (March 21-April 19): In composing this oracle, I have called on the unruly wisdom of Vivienne Westwood. She’s the fashion designer who incorporated the punk esthetic into mainstream styles. Here are four quotes by her that will be especially suitable for your use in the coming weeks. 1. “I disagree with everything I used to say.” 2. “The only possible effect one can have on the world is through unpopular ideas.” 3. “Intelligence is composed mostly of imagination, insight, and things that have nothing to do with reason.” 4. “I’m attracted to people who are really true to themselves and who are always trying to do something that makes their life more interesting.”

fantasies. You feel no inhibition about envisioning scenes that you may or may not ever carry out in real life. You understand that this free-form play of images is a healing joy, a gift you give yourself. It’s a crafty strategy to make sure you’re not hiding any secrets from yourself. Now is a favorable time to practice this art, Virgo.

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): “I’m drowning in the things I never told you.” Famous make-up artist Alexandra Joseph wrote that message to a companion with whom she had a complicated relationship. Are you experiencing a similar sensation, Taurus? If so, I invite you to do something about it! The coming weeks will be a good time to stop drowning. One option is to blurt out to your ally all the feelings and thoughts you’ve been withholding and hiding. A second option is to divulge just some of the feelings and thoughts you’ve been withholding and hiding—and then monitor the results of your partial revelation. A third option is to analyze why you’ve been withholding and hiding. Is it because your ally hasn’t been receptive, or because you’re afraid of being honest? Here’s what I suggest: Start with the third option, then move on to the second.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): In accordance with current astrological omens, here’s your meditation, as articulated by the blogger named Riverselkie: “Let your life be guided by the things that produce the purest secret happiness, with no thought to what that may look like from the outside. Feed the absurd whims of your soul and create with no audience in mind but yourself. What is poignant to you is what others will be moved by, too. Embrace what you love about yourself and the right people will come.”

DR. JOANNA CORTI, DOM, Powerful Medicine, Powerful Results. Homeopathy, Acupuncture. Micro-current (Acupuncture without needles.) Parasite, Liver/cleanses. Nitric Oxide. Pain Relief. Transmedium Energy Healing. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): “I swear I became a saint Worker’s Compensation and from waiting,” wrote Scorpio poet Odysseus Elytis in his Auto Accidents Insurance poem “Three Times the Truth.” According to my reading accepted 505-501-0439 of the astrological omens, you may be in a similar situation. And you’ll be wise to welcome the break in the action and abide calmly in the motionless lull. You’ll experiment with the hypothesis that temporary postponement is best not just for you, but for all concerned.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): “My greatest asset is that I am constantly changing,” says Sagittarian actress and activist Jane Fonda. This description may not always be applicable to you, but I think it should be during the coming weeks. You’re primed to thrive on a robust commitment to self-transformation. As GEMINI (May 21-June 20): I’ve got some borderline you proceed in your holy task, keep in mind this other sentimental poetry to offer you in this horoscope. It may advice from Fonda. 1. “One part of wisdom is knowing be too mushy for a mentally crisp person like you. You what you don’t need anymore and letting it go.” 2. “It may worry that I’ve fallen under the sway of sappy is never too late to master your weaknesses.” 3. “If versions of love rather than the snappy versions I usually you allow yourself, you can become stronger in the favor. But there is a method in my madness: I suspect you very places that you’ve been broken.” 4. “The challenge is not to be perfect. It’s to be whole.” P.S. And need an emotionally suggestive nudge to fully activate what does it mean to be whole? Be respectful toward your urge to merge; you require a jolt of sweetness to all your multiple facets, and welcome them into the inspire you to go in quest of the love mojo that’s potentially available to you in abundance. So please allow conversation you have about how to live. your heart to be moved by the following passage from CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): You can’t escape your poet Rabindranath Tagore: “My soul is alight with your past completely. You can’t loosen its hold on you so infinitude of stars. Your world has broken upon me like a thoroughly that it will forever allow you to move with flood. The flowers of your garden blossom in my body.” limitless freedom into the future. But you definitely have CANCER (June 21-July 22): Try saying this, and notice how it feels: “For the next 17 days, I will make ingenious efforts to interpret my problems as interesting opportunities that offer me the chance to liberate myself from my suffering and transform myself into the person I aspire to become.” Now speak the following words and see what thoughts and sensations get triggered: “For the next 17 days, I will have fun imagining that my so-called flaws are signs of potential strengths and talents that I have not yet developed.”

the power to release yourself from at least a part of your past’s grip. And the coming weeks will be an excellent time to do just that: to pay off a portion of your karmic debt and shed worn-out emotional baggage.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Aquarian playwright August Strindberg didn’t have much interest in people who “regurgitate what they have learned from books.” He was bored by stories that have been told over and over again; was impatient with propaganda disguised as information and by sentimental platitudes masquerading as sage insights. He craved to hear about LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): An interviewer asked singersongwriter Leonard Cohen if he needed to feel bothered the unprecedented secrets of each person’s life: the things they know and feel that no one else knows and and agitated in order to stimulate his creativity. Cohen said no. “When I get up in the morning,” he testified, “my feels. He was a student of “the natural history of the human heart.” I bring Strindberg’s perspective to your real concern is to discover whether I’m in a state of attention, my dear one-of-a-kind Aquarius, because grace.” Surprised, the interviewer asked, “What do you mean by a state of grace?” Cohen described it as a knack now is a perfect time for you to fully embody it. for balance that he called on to ride the chaos around PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): “It’s no fun being in love him. He knew he couldn’t fix or banish the chaos—and it with a shadow,” wrote Piscean poet Edna St. Vincent would be arrogant to try. His state of grace was more like Millay. And yet she indulged profusely in that no-fun skiing skillfully down a hill, gliding along the contours of activity, and even capitalized on it to create a numunpredictable terrain. I’m telling you about Cohen’s defi- ber of decent, if morose, poems. But in alignment nition, Leo, because I think that’s the state of grace you with your astrological omens, Pisces, I’m going to should cultivate right now. I bet it will stimulate your cre- encourage you to fall out of love with shadows. The ativity in ways that surprise and delight you. coming weeks will be an excellent time to channel your passions into solid realities: to focus your ardor VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Poet Juan Felipe Herrera and adoration on earthly pleasures and practical praises the value of making regular efforts to detox our concerns and imperfect but interesting people. cluttered minds. He says that one of the best methods for accomplishing this cleansing is to daydream. You give Homework: Evil is boring. Rousing fear is a hackneyed yourself permission to indulge in uncensored, unabashed shtick. More: https://bit.ly/EvilisBoring

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s Expanded Weekly Audio Horoscopes and Daily Text Message Horoscopes. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone © CO P Y R I G H T 2 0 1 9 R O B B R E Z S N Y at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700. 38

DECEMBER 4-10, 2019

SFREPORTER.COM

MIND BODY SPIRIT

GROUPS RE AGING PSYCHICS

Aging with joy: beyond grief and regret Time-limited focus groups, sliding scale Therapy group available Sue Barnum, LPCC, CGP, TEP bsue6827@gmail.com

LOVE. CAREER. HEALTH. Psychic readings and Spiritual counseling. For more information call 505-982-8327 or go to www.alexofavalon.com. Also serving the LGBT community.

HYPNOTHERAPY & NLP

REFLEXOLOGY

AGING COACHING

Get On Track to Live your Best Life Ever! Over 20 yrs. experience with all kinds of *AGING* issues and goals. Call Patrick - M i s e r y a n d J oy Singleton at 505-577-1436 Bring Purpose and Creativity to santafehypnotherapyandnlp.com the late phase of your life! Shanti E. Bannwart - Licensed Psychotherapist L.P.C.C and CRADLE THERAPY Life-Coach (505) 466-2705

AYURVEDIC ASTROLOGY

Ayurveda looks into bringing balance to the body so that no disease can take over. Astrology gives us your DNA and can easily Diagnose the disease or imbalance. Together the 2 ancient arts can help treat all ailments including CANCER, DIABETES Etc. Power readings 20 min for $15. Please call 505 819 7220 for your appointments. 103 Saint Francis Dr, SF, NM

CLASSY@ SFREPORTER.COM

~Being Held~ Are you grieving, anxious or lonely? Are you in process of awakening and young parts are coming up? I can help you with Cradle Therapy and Embodiment Sessions First session half price www.duijaros.com

PERSONALIZED REFLEXOLOGY SESSIONS Promoting flexibility to recover and sustain optimal well being! www.SFReflexology.com Julie Glassmoyer, CR 505/414-8140

MASSAGE THERAPY

TANTRA MASSAGE & TEACHING Call Julianne Parkinson, 505-920-3083 • Certified Tantra Educator, Professional Massage Therapist, & Life Coach

ARE YOU A THERAPIST OR HEALER? YOU BELONG HERE IN MIND BODY SPIRIT! CALL 988.5541 TODAY!


SFR CLASSIFIEDS 2 Ways to Book Your Ad!

CALL: 505.988.5541

EMAIL: classy@SFReporter.com

LEGALS LEGAL NOTICE TO CREDITORS/NAME CHANGE

STATE OF NEW MEXICO IN THE PROBATE COURT SANTA FE COUNTY IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF CARLENE KELSEA STATE OF NEW MEXICO CAREY, DECEASED. IN THE PROBATE COURT No. 2019-0227 COUNTY OF SANTA FE NOTICE TO CREDITORS No. PB-2019-0224 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN IN THE MATTER OF THE that the undersigned has been ESTATE OF DANIEL L. appointed personal repreO’KEEFE., Deceased. sentative of the estate of the NOTICE TO CREDITORS decedent. All persons having NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN claims against the estate of that the undersigned has the decedent are required to been appointed Personal present their claims within Representative of this estate. All persons having claims four (4) months after the date against this estate are required of the first publication of any to present their claims within published notice to creditors four months after the date of or sixty (60) days after the the first publication of this date of mailing or other delivNotice or the claims will be ery of this notice, whichever forever barred. Claims must be is later, or the claims will be presented either by delivery forever barred. Claims must be or mail to the undersigned in presented either to the undercare of Tracy E. Conner, P.C., signed personal representative Post Office Box 23434, Santa at the address listed below, or Fe, New Mexico 87502, or by filed with the Probate Court of filing with the Probate Court Santa Fe County, New Mexico, for the County of Santa Fe, located at the following 102 Grant Avenue, Santa Fe, address: 100 Catron Street, New Mexico 87501 with a Santa Fe, NM 87501. copy to the undersigned. Dated: November 13, 2019 Dated: November 13, 2019 Lincoln G. Harris Shannon O’Keefe c/o Walcott, Henry & Personal Representative Winston, P.C. c/o Tracy E. Conner 150 Washington Avenue, Post Office Box 23434 Suite 207 Santa Fe, New Mexico 87502 Santa Fe, NM 87501 Phone: (505) 982-8201 (505) 982-9559

STATE OF NEW MEXICO IN THE PROBATE COURT SANTA FE COUNTY IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF KATE BRAVERMAN, DECEASED. Case No.: 2019-0239 NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed personal representative of the estate of decedent. All persons having claims against the estate of the decedent are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of any published notice to creditors or sixty (60) days after the date of mailing or delivery of this notice, whichever is later, or the claims will be forever barred. Claims must be presented either to the undersigned personal representative at the address listed below, or filed with the Probate Court of Santa Fe Country, New Mexico, located at the following address: 100 Catron Street, Santa Fe, NM 87501. Dated: November 20, 2019 Michael S. Clark 142 Alvarado Road Berkeley, CA 94705 510-508-2204

r a d n e l a tc s e b e h T Fe a t n a S in

. R E T T E B T O G JUST nts. e v e E 4 MOR

trol. n o c r e us E R O M 4 ss. e c c a e l E mobi

4 MOR

calendar.sfreporter.com

NEED A NAME CHANGE? WE CAN HELP.

New Mexico’s REAL ID rules require some people to get courtapproved name changes. After you’ve made your court date, come see us. Run your legal notice for two weeks for $119.28 and we’ll give you a notarized affidavit for the court. CALL ROBYN AT 988.5541 SFREPORTER.COM

DECEMBER 4-10, 2019

39


WE BUY DIAMONDS GOLD & SILVER GRADUATE GEMOLOGIST THINGS FINER Inside La Fonda Hotel 983-5552

BODY BY NATURE

SPA | STUDIO | KIDS BOUTIQUE | VEGAN CAFE STUDIO CLASSES New Student Pass: $60/unlimited Ashtanga Vinyasa, Active Alignment, Classical Mat Pilates, Yin Yoga, Dynamic Alignment, Qi Gong Magadao, Restorative Yoga, Candlelight Yogas WINTER SOLSTICE CEREMONY Sat 12/21 HOLIDAY YOGA IMMERSIONS Surya & Tias Little THE BODY AS A TEMPLE Dec 28, Wed YOGA RESOLUTION/ RESOLUTION Jan 1, Sat SPA SERVICES massage • facials signature natural facelift ECO BOUTIQUE Sustainable Gifts Under $50 DROP-OFF CHILDCARE $12 per visit up to 2 hrs! 505-986-0362 | 333 W. Cordova bodyofsantafe.com

COLONICS BY A RN 699-9443 JEEP

MAINTENANCE & REPAIR. ALL ISSUES RESOLVED. MODERN AUTOWORKS. 1900 B CHAMISA ST. 505-989-4242.

i LOVE TO ORGANIZE Experienced References Sue 231-6878

NISSAN

SFR BACK PAGE BASE PRICE: $25 (Includes 1 LARGE line & 2 lines of NORMAL text) COLOR: $12/Line (Choose RED ORANGE GREEN BLUE orVIOLET) ADDITIONAL LINES: $10/Line | CENTERED TEXT: $5/AD BOLDED LINE:$10/Line | HIGHLIGHT $10

DEADLINE 12 NOON TUESDAY

BEGINNERS GUITAR LESSONS. $35

FATHER-DAUGHTER RELATIONSHIPS

Workshop For Women-12/8 bkempower1@gmail.com, betsykeats.com

WRITING WORKSHOP!

Medical Card Consults

JERRY COURVOISIER DRONE PHOTOGRAPHY PHOTOSHOP LIGHTROOM 1 ON 1 505-670-1495

CHECK OUT

new online newspaper

Anniversary Show, 12/7 at The Lodge 8:30PM www.zeburlesque.com

• Same Day Appts Welcome $50/hr 22 yrs experience Lic. 3384 • 670-8789

Deforestation SF

Not-evil Personal Training XCELLENT 505.312.5445 / rebxrebx.com MACINTOSH SUPPORT ROLFING 20+yrs professional, Apple certified. xcellentmacsupport.com • Randy • 670-0585

505-983-5549

Chronic pain? Poor posture/mobility? 347-927-4372. vincerolfer.com

USED BOOKS & CDS

Rare & signed, collectible, gift quality, & affordable! Open every day • 329 Garfield • 820-7827

MASSAGE BY JULIE OBSCURA GALLERY • Swedish • Deep Tissue •

WEIRDNEWS.INFO

GOOD. STRONG. FUN.

® MICROSOFT ACCESS Psych-K To change subconscious beliefs that limit the expression of DATABASES your full potential. Renate Design - Training Troubleshooting Destin / 505-450-9300 richter@kewa.com

HONOR OF GEETA IYENGAR W/ OLGA & WILLAMARIE 12/7 WINTER SOLSTICE YIN INTENSIVE W/ MELISSA SPAMER 12/21 DECEMBER SPECIAL 1-MONTH UNLIMITED PASS $75 200 HR. TEACHER TRAINING 2020/2021 982-0990 YOGASOURCE-SANTAFE.COM

of Northern NM Julian Jonas, CCH • 30 years of experience. Gentle & effective healing for Join us at Ghost Ranch in January. acute & chronic conditions. ghostranch.org or joannebrown.com Call: 505.557.6470 www.centerforhomeopathy.com

MAINTENANCE & REPAIR. ALL ISSUES RESOLVED. MODERN AUTOWORKS. 1900 B CHAMISA ST. Save $20 Buy Intro Pack For Only Newagemedicalsf.com 505-989-4242 $120. (First 4 Lessons Only!). 505-469-8581 santafeguitarlessons.com calls returned within 24hrs 505.428.0164

NEED HELP W/SCHOOL? SIMPLE OFFICE SOLUTIONS

Accepting New Patients The Center for Homeopathy

CLASSY@SFREPORTER.COM 505-988-5541

ZIRCUS EROTIQUE

Math, Language Arts, Science Level 3, Highly Effective 4th - 8th TUTORING Call Jeff Davis @ 471-2450

SILVER • COINS JEWELRY • GEMS TOP PRICES • CASH 3 GEMOLOGISTS ON STAFF Earthfire Gems 121 Galisteo • 982-8750

CUSTOMIZE YOUR TEXT WITH THE FOLLOWING UPGRADES:

TEXTILE REPAIR 505.629.7007 WE ARE TRULY THANKFUL VIDEO LIBRARY 839 P de P 983-3321

YOGASOURCE Diamonds and GOLD BEST YOGA STUDIO WE BUY AND SELL VOTED BIRTHDAY CELEBRATION IN

SAGE MESA COLLECTIVE

NM Artisan Goods Wed thru Sun - 10 am to 5 pm @sagemesacollective

Dealer of Fine Photography 1405 Paseo de Peralta, 87501 www.obscuragallery.net

LOST PADRE RECORDS

The hidden Forest Service Plan. New/Used Vinyl & Tapes See it on YouTube OnceAForest.org Buy - Sell - Trade Downtown@ 905 W Alameda St 310-6389 Open Tue-Sun Office Assistance & Organization kathy@sos-santafe.com / sos-santafe.com Positive Psychotherapy 505.988.9630 Career Counseling 826 Camino De Monte Rey, Piano Lessons All Levels, Masters/ Suite A-3 33 yrs teaching exp. 575.973.1621 982-7434 • www.shafferphd.com Santa Fe, NM 87505

LEARN JINGLE BELLS!

TAKE YOUR NEXT STEP

Amata Chiropractic

SAM SHAFFER, PHD

INNER FOR TWO 106 N. Guadalupe Street (505) 820-2075 •

LIGHT A

onday! M our

1/2 off top shelf margaritas with

HELP US

MATCH!

live jazz band!

Donate at

www.sfreporter.com/RFA

Please address checks to RFA and deliver to

132 E Marcy St., Santa Fe, NM 87501

Delivering Santa Fe’s favorite restaurants for over 16-years happy hour everyday Open 7-days: 4:30-9pm Check out Dashing’s facebook page for daily specials - LIKE us on facebook and get more promos

Dashing Delivery

Get the Dashing Delivery app:

from 4 pm to 6:30 pm M-F: 12-1:30pm Lunch

R

.com

505-983-3274

Profile for Santa Fe Reporter

December 4, 2019: Santa Fe Reporter  

December 4, 2019: Santa Fe Reporter: Fiction Writing Contest

December 4, 2019: Santa Fe Reporter  

December 4, 2019: Santa Fe Reporter: Fiction Writing Contest

Advertisement