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It’s Going Down

AS YOUTH CRIME AND INCARCERATION RATES PLUMMET IN NEW MEXICO, WHAT’S THE ROLE OF SANTA FE’S JUVIE LOCKUP? BY AARON CANTÚ,

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SEPTEMBER 12-18, 2018 | Volume 45, Issue 37

NEWS

I AM curious .

OPINION 5

Gary Lutz, EVP | Commercial Banking, Northern New Mexico | Trust & Wealth Management

NEWS 7 DAYS, CLAYTOONZ AND THIS MODERN WORLD 6

Being curious is my job. It’s how I help you discover solutions to your personal and business financial needs.* I AM Century Bank.

IN THE MIX 9 City officials aren’t sure what to do about Andrea Romero’s contract to promote a local business group HOMEGROWN GUYS 11 Recent floods have driven home the importance of what the District 3 county commissioner will do. Meet the candidates COVER STORY 12 IT’S GOING DOWN People under age 18 have been locked up less and less as years have gone by—so what purpose does juvie serve in Santa Fe County? THE ENTHUSIAST 19

IN THE HERE AND NOW With the Brett Kavanaugh hearings reminding us how hard the government seems to want to limit women’s access to health, a Santa Fe-born series of musical events aim to fight the power.

Cover design by Anson Stevens-Bollen artdirector@sfreporter.com

INTO THE WOODS Santa Fe National Forest seeks public input about its new management plan

* Investment products purchased through Century Trust and Asset Management are not FDIC insured, are not deposits, have no bank guarantee and are subject to investment risk, including the possible loss of principal.

MyCenturyBank.com 505.995.1203

EDITOR AND PUBLISHER JULIE ANN GRIMM

CULTURE

ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER AND AD DIRECTOR ANNA MAGGIORE

SFR PICKS 21 Poetic dispatches from the Luhan house, dogs on film, hoop dreams and Tuesdays go punk MUSIC 25 IN THE HERE AND NOW Noise for NOW’s sophomore streak kicks off this week A&C 28 DICHOTOMY Sienna Luna over here and Matthew Rowe over there FOOD 35 SMALL BITES 33 Tesuque bites, Italian fare and farmhouse ales CHILE AND COMFORT ON CANYON ROAD 35 Caffe Greco might sound Italian, but really it’s a New Mexican joint MOVIES 39

CULTURE EDITOR ALEX DE VORE

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Filename & version:

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THE NUN REVIEW Plus the weapons of the future and James Franco’s creepin’ in KIN

Phone: (505) 988-5541 Fax: (505) 988-5348 Classifieds: (505) 988-5541 Office: 132 E MARCY ST.

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JUNE 6-12, 2018

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SFR FILE PHOTO

LETTERS

Have you had a negative dental experience? Michael Davis,

DDS

New Patients Welcome

Would you like to experience caring, smiling, fun, gentle people who truly enjoy working with you?

COVER, SEPTEMBER 5: Mail letters to PO Box 2306, Santa Fe, NM 87504, deliver to 132 E Marcy St., or email them to editor@sfreporter.com. Letters (no more than 200 words) should refer to specific articles in the Reporter. Letters will be edited for space and clarity.

NEWS, AUGUST 29: “LEAVE THE DRIVING”

LET HIM KNOW Folks seem to not remember that after Greyhound closed its station on St. Michael’s Drive, it stopped at the Giant Station on St. Francis and Sawmill. That is a much more convenient location for Santa Feans than Eldorado, and is actually closer to I-25. The Route 6 bus line goes there every day except Sunday. Someone needs to inform Greyhound Corporate Regional Manager Ed van Heel of this.

PELICAN LEE SANTA FE

It’s interesting Santa Fe is called “a world class city” but doesn’t have an inter-state bus station or cab service. Many people refer to Uber or Lyft as hitchhiking. I’ve used cross-country buses in Brazil and Turkey. Everything from the bus stations to the buses were far superior than here. Try getting out of Santa Fe on a Sunday afternoon when you don’t have a car.

RAY AUDAIN SANTA FE

DRINKS GUIDE, AUG. 29: “LUCKY 7”

AW YISS Thanks for sharing your favorites. I love that Mojito Alegria from Tumbleroot! They don’t skimp on the fresh mint, and the rum is made by hand with 100 percent organic ingredients. Yum.

ANGELA SMIRKMAN SFREPORTER.COM

Michael W. Davis, DDS 1751 Old Pecos Trail, Suite B (505) 988-4448 www.SmilesofSantaFe.com

P R OV I D E R F O R D E LTA A N D U N I T E D C O N C O R D I A D E N TA L P L A N S • M O S T I N S U R A N C E S A C C E P T E D

“WAS DEBBIE RIGHT?”

TIME HAS TOLD Debbie has [been] proven even more right today than she was 24 years ago. I worked for Mayor Jaramillo at City Hall ... writing documents for public understanding of her initiatives. I found her forthright, an informed and energetic visionary, [and] honestly and passionately devoted to her causes. Many of us continue to appreciate what she accomplished in a short time for real down-home people. Especially now, it is clear that Debbie’s ideas, actions and passionate voice were right on the spot. She was true to the hearts of Santa Fe’s people. While not a native, I’ve been a Santa Fean for some 50 years. Count me in as one of those true hearts. Obvious empty spaces in our Mayor Portraits Wall on the ground floor at City Hall have annoyed me for years. If the current powers in city government don’t have the moxie to restore Mayor Jaramillo’s photograph where it belongs, I hereby volunteer my hands. The time is now.

RICHARD POLESE SANTA FE

NOT SO MUCH

SMILES OF SANTA FE

THEM’S FIGHTIN’ WORDS I’ve been a fan of Debbie’s since I was a teenager. I’d watch every council meeting because of her. I’m 45 years old now and I still talk about her. She is by far the best mayor we have ever had. The mayors after her and the current mayor don’t and will never hold a candle to her. I always wonder “what would Debbie say” [or] “I wonder what Debbie thinks” about decisions and how our city has fallen apart after she worked her butt off to save it. God bless you, Debbie. They don’t deserve to have your picture hung up in City Hall. You were OUR mayor, not some bought-out, pussyfoot, ass-kissing mayor. Your legacy will forever live on. You are deeply missed. God bless you and your family.

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PAULINE LOVATO VIA FACEBOOK

GOOD RIDDANCE Nothing like the memory and words of an old-fashioned unrepentant racist to make my weekend. So glad she’s a relic of the past. Let’s just make sure that she goes the way of confederate memorials going forward. Nice to see that others share these fond memories.

DAVID CARTWRIGHT SFREPORTER.COM CONTINUED ON PAGE 7

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DAYS

S FR E P O RTE R .CO M / FUN

SECOND ROOFTOP POOL PROPOSED FOR ELDORADO HOTEL On the second floor, though, so beer bottles won’t smash quite so satisfyingly, governor.

PRANZO IS CLOSING How you respond to this news defines your character.

MARTIN HEINRICH ENDORSES LEGAL POT, CATCHES UP TO GARY JOHNSON Johnson will always be the funniest stoner politician, though.

STATE RELEASES TEACHER RATINGS Public Education Department’s devotion to bureaucracy rates as exemplary.

WE FORGOT TO MENTION THE VILLAGE VOICE DIED LAST MONTH. But SFR is still going strong. Eat that, haters.

AMALIA RESIDENTS SICK OF PUBLICITY Which is odd, because you’d think people who choose to live in Amalia just crave attention. ly is on ning Win f of it. hal un is ! ng f Havi er half oth the

DEMONS FOOTBALL BREAKS ITS 35-GAME LOSING STREAK Atta boys!

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LETTERS KNOCK IT OFF We need to stop being so divisive. Period. It’s a shame that her photo is not at City Hall. Despite people’s feelings towards her, she was the first female mayor in Santa Fe.

HORTENCIA T BENAVIDEZ VIA FACEBOOK

NEWS, SEPTEMBER 5: “FIESTA DIALOGUES”

GRACIAS Thank you to the Reporter for printing the “Fiesta Dialogue” summaries this past week. It’s important to notice how the Hispanic, Native and white communities in Santa Fe gathered to consult and eliminate one of the most blatant expressions of colonialism and racism within the city. They did it peacefully through painful discussions, all with a deep love and care for what keeps Santa Fe special: our many fiestas and tourism. I have been saying for years the dark underbelly of Santa Fe is the incredible suffering resulting from colonialism inflicted on this region. It penetrates all of New Mexico’s Indigenous peoples.

L GRIFFITH SANTA FE

NEWS, SEPTEMBER 5: “BEFORE THERE’S SMOKE”

YIKES It is shocking to me that a project like this would go forward without a full Environmental Impact Study and public comment. Literally it seems to me that the US Forest Service is trying to bulldoze this project through. Cutting 90 percent of the trees is not “thinning”—it is deforestation and has not been proven to be a deterrent to wildfires. These are roadless public lands, and the public has a right to comment and an EIS is necessary.

KAREN WEBER SFREPORTER.COM

Trump-era Forest Service and the Republicans in Congress deny the reality of climate change. In reality, the forests they are destroying are not coming back. Logging and burning are for profit, not forests, and not public safety. The Forest Service keeps repeating the same old lie, stated as fact in this article: “Prescribed burns have become a routine part of the Forest Service’s effort to reverse conditions established by a century of wildfire suppression.” Which century would that be? Fire suppression was practiced from 1935-1972, a period of low wildfire incidence. Since 1972, the FS has been burning and logging forests as fast as it can hand out the lucrative private contracts—and fires have increased dramatically in that period. The FS targets large-diameter trees while repeating the nonsense that they do the opposite. A walk through any forest they have destroyed is evidence enough of that. Sam Hitt is right. “We have to treat these forests with the kind of respect that takes into account that the whole thing is alive and it knows what it’s doing.” And science supports him.

CATE MOSES SFREPORTER.COM

NEWS, SEPTEMBER 5: “GUAD’S WORK”

COULDN’T DO IT Pretty much sums up why we moved our business in May after 14 years on Montezuma. It was one frustration after another, starting way back when construction began on Guadalupe Street in preparation for the Railyard development; Borders closing was another.

CANDELORA VERSACE VIA FACEBOOK

TOO MUCH PARTY TIME I live in the Railyard neighborhood. One reason I see for the lack of pedestrian traffic are all the drunks and panhandlers coming out of the park.

ANNA LUCERO JONES VIA FACEBOOK

AT LAST Finally, some balanced reporting on this topic. Recent science has shown that prescribed burns and “thinning,” aka logging, have a near 0 percent impact on preventing wildfires. They don’t work. They are not based on science. The

SFR will correct factual errors online and in print. Please let us know if we make a mistake: editor@sfreporter.com or 988-7530.

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S FR E P O RTE R .CO M / N E WS

KATRINA MENDOZA/MIX SANTA FE

In the MIX

The City Council wonders why Andrea Romero wants to reassign her city contract

ANSON STEVENS-BOLLEN

LEFT: Andrea Romero is a candidate for the Legislature and the director of MIX Santa Fe. RIGHT: A MIX event at El Rey Court.

B Y M AT T G R U B S m a t t g r u b s @ s f r e p o r t e r. c o m

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he letter Andrea Romero sent to city economic development head Matt Brown contained just two sentences. “I would like to see that the MIX Santa Fe services contract be assigned to the Santa Fe Chamber Opportunities Fund for the fiscal year 2018-19. The Santa Fe Chamber of Commerce has agreed to act as the assigned designee of this contract, and [Andrea Romero Consulting] will be working with it to carry out ongoing duties and responsibilities with the Chamber.” Since 2015, Romero has made about $20,000 a year on a contract to promote the business networking group MIX Santa Fe. It’s focused on fostering connections between Santa Fe entrepreneurs, and Romero’s role has been to plan events, handle social media and  create buzz. Now, she apparently wants to continue the work, but with the Chamber of Commerce acting as a buffer between her and the city. Santa Fe’s governing body isn’t sure why. The city manager has already signed off on the transfer, but it’s not clear he had the power to do so. The new city attorney

says the governing body needs to give the herself available to answer questions. okay, a proposition at which the council It’s that kind of vague exchange balked during its last meeting, and even- about the reasoning for the contract tually delayed until the end of this month. reassignment that has given City The confusion seems to stem from Councilor JoAnne Vigil Coppler fits. a series of job changes at City Hall and “The thing that raised my suspicion miscommunications was that with, what, six between city staff and or seven months left in the council—all set the contract, for it to be against the backdrop assigned to a different of Romero’s run for entity? No one was able state House and her to explain the significontroversial contract cance of that,” Vigil Copwith another entity, pler tells SFR. the Regional Coalition Romero’s contract exof Los Alamos Nationpires on April 5, 2019. Acal Lab Communities. cording to procurement SFR called Romero rules, a new contract for last week to talk about the same services must why she requested the go out to bid. switch. She replied During  the Aug. 29 -City Councilor immediately by text City Council meeting, JoAnne Vigil Coppler message, asking for an Vigil Coppler  comemailed list of quesplained to her colleagues tions. Because such that  no one from the a back-and-forth is city seemed to be able fraught with possibilito adequately expound ties for misunderstanding and delay, SFR on what seemed to her like an unusual asked for a brief phone interview. Rome- request, or why the city was willing to go ro refused. along with it. Instead, she claimed in a text message Vigil Coppler told councilors she had this week that the move had been planned no  issue with the city’s investment in for quite some time. She refused to make MIX.

I hate to say it, but I think this is a political move and I don’t like it.

NEWS

“[However,] I do have a quarrel with us subrogating our responsibilities to another entity that hasn’t gone through the procurement process. [The Chamber of Commerce] hasn’t competed or anything like that,” she said. “I hate to say it, but I think this is a political move and I don’t like it.” Having beaten incumbent state Rep. Carl Trujillo in the June primary, Romero was the presumptive next state representative from House District 46. She faces a write-in challenger, however, in Democrat Heather Nordquist. Romero’s letter to the city asking to reassign the contract was written the week after she beat Trujillo. Though the contract with Romero predates her run for office by years, the city would have a contract with a sitting state representative were she to win. Mayor Alan Webber campaigned for Romero in the primary. He wouldn’t comment for this story. Romero previously held a similar contract that’s made headlines. While acting as executive director for the LANL coalition, she had to reimburse the group for inappropriate spending on baseball tickets in Washington DC, as well as for food and drink purchases both in the capital and back home in Santa Fe. Her contract with the group wasn’t renewed. MIX’s story, and Romero’s, is that the group has been seeking for some time to make itself a nonprofit entity. Co-founder Kate Noble tells SFR that MIX’s board told Romero to ask the city to reassign the contract. The business group has had ties to the Chamber of Commerce since its beginning, and the board has been using the chamber’s 501c3 arm to ensure it can get grants from donors who won’t give to either a public entity like the city or to a for-profit group. “These things are disconnected,” Noble says. “We asked her to because we’ve been thinking about what [MIX’s] future should be.” Noble says she wasn’t aware that Romero’s letter to the city came so soon after her primary victory, but tells SFR that the move away from direct funding by the city isn’t nefarious. Noble has emails between MIX, city staff, and the Chamber of Commerce discussing the switch in May. Brown, the city’s economic development director, confirms that MIX talked with him about making the switch last spring, before Romero won her race. He says that while the city wouldn’t have a say about who the Chamber of Commerce hires to complete the contract, the city will have the same oversight of how its money is spent.

SFREPORTER.COM

SEPTEMBER 12-18, 2018

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SFRE PORT E R .CO M / E LECTI O N S

Homegrown Guys Mike Anaya and Rudy Garcia face off to represent the largest geographic district in the county

BY AARON CANTÚ a a r o n @ s f r e p o r t e r. c o m

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system and was president of the community’s water association for over 20 years.  Campaign finance records indicate that Anaya has  spent a little over $650  on signage for his candidacy, and that he paid for them himself. During Anaya’s time as a commissioner, he served on the board that oversaw the  Buckman Direct Diversion Project, which treats water from the Rio Grande for homes and businesses in the region. The water that fell in the form of a damaging thunderstorm in July is also on his

COURTESY RUDY GARCIA

he two men running for county commissioner in District 3 have deep roots in Santa Fe. They’ll not only represent the 50,000 people who live in Edgewood, Stanley, Galisteo, Cerrillos, Madrid and La Cienega, but will have a hand in broader county issues, including the $22 million corrections operating budget that includes the adult jail and juvenile detention facility. Had it not been for Mike Anaya choosing to run as an independent in the general election, this race could have already been over after the June primary, when Rudy Garcia beat out three other men to secure the Democratic nomination. Anaya sat on the five-member commission from 2003 to 2010 as a Democrat, and his brother Robert currently holds the seat as a Democrat. Anaya, 54, frames his choice to run as an independent not as a shrewd political calculation, but a noble act of public service in our polarized times. “I know there’s a lot of finger-pointing and bickering among Democrats and Republicans, and in a way I get tired of hearing it and seeing it,” Anaya says.  Enough people were receptive to his independent candidacy that he successfully gathered 220 nominating signatures in order to get on the ballot. Born, raised, and still living in Galisteo, Anaya says his parents taught him and his brother the significance of community involvement. His father, Joe Anaya, installed the village’s first water

Garcia, left, and Anaya, right, have both been close to county operationsfor years.

mind: The debris and abandoned cars still strewn around La Cienega are a reminder, he says, that the county needs to consider the reality of climate change going forward. “A lot of those houses were built in the flood plain,” Anaya says. “I don’t how they got approved, but they’re in a 100-

Garcia had raised $2,700, including a grand each from the Realtors Association of New Mexico and Sommer Karnes & Associates LLP, a law firm specializing in real estate law. He has taken in $800 since the primary from other private contributors. Garcia sees splits in land jurisdiction among the county and city as a place where the public bodies could coordinate more effectively. “One of the things I would like to see happen is a lot more dialogue between the city, county, and governments, and see how we can all work together for planning and zoning in certain areas,” he says. “The county commission district, [Santa Fe Public Schools], the city … let’s come together, all three, and figure out how we could actually collaborate a lot more.” As a board member at SFPS, Garcia has special insight into some of the rapid growth happening north of La Cienega, particularly in the Las Soleras neighborhood where growing youth populations have helped swell enrollment at Southside schools. The winner of November’s race will also have a say in broader issues on the county budget. Garcia says the county’s juvenile jail on Airport Road needs a “serious look” in light of its consistently high cost and low population of incarcerated youth, and he thinks it’s time for the adult jail to have a “time out” due in part to a lack of adequate medical staff and overdose deaths in recent years. For his part, Anaya admits he “hasn’t given much thought” to the juvenile detention facility on Airport Road, and back in 2003 he was a booster of the adult jail retaining state inmates even after the US Department of Justice discovered serious neglect in how jail staff handled inmates’ health. But now, Anaya says he’s open to looking at both facilities with fresh eyes. “Every time you incarcerate someone, it’s dramatically expensive, it’s a lot of money,” Anaya says. “That would be something I can ask, if I’m elected, to review all of the options we have.” COURTESY MIKE ANAYA

year flood plain and that’s not good.” He goes on to say that “the county is going do everything they can to try to help those people.” Rudy Garcia, who is 47 and lives in La Cienega, is palpably more pissed off that parts of his village remain a mess long after the storm’s passage. He blames inefficiencies at the county, which he says he became familiar with during his 25 years working there (most recently as the leg-

ELECTIONS

islative liaison project manager; he says he’ll retire after the election no matter the outcome). In general, he thinks things get done too slowly at the county. Garcia’s pitch boils down to “making government friendlier.” He adds, “Why should it take four weeks to get a simple shed permit or garage permit? I want to make it more efficient to help the general public.” One idea Garcia has is to more aggressively use oblique imagery, or aerial imagery captured at an angle of 40 to 45 degrees, across the huge expanse of District 3 to identify dilapidated roads radiating out from Highways 41 and 14. Garcia says the county already has this technology. Like Anaya, Garcia traces his lineage deep in the region’s history—his grandparents still live in the same home off Airport Road they’ve occupied his entire life. Before his triumph in the primary,

SFREPORTER.COM

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It’s Going Down AS YOUTH CRIME AND INCARCERATION RATES PLUMMET IN NEW MEXICO, WHAT’S THE ROLE OF SANTA FE’S JUVIE LOCKUP?

BY AARON CANTÚ a a r o n @ s f r e p o r t e r. c o m

I

probation and parole office decides they’re a not risk to the community. Other times, they may be held for days or weeks until going before Judge Mary Marlowe Sommer in the District Court, who could place them on supervised release. It’s more rare to be held longer than that, but it happens. In other words, the Santa Fe County juvenile detention facility is a holding center. If a child’s crimes are severe enough to merit incarceration after they’re adjudicated (basically the youth equivalent of “convicted”), they’ll likely be sent to the Youth Diagnostic & Development Center jail in Albuquerque for about nine months, followed by a short stint at a residential treatment facility meant to re-integrate them into society.

AARON CANTÚ

f you attended a public school anywhere in the United States, and if you’ve also seen the inside of a jail, you may have noticed similarities: The cinder block walls, the harsh fluorescent lighting overhead, an air conditioner with the temperature set uncomfortably low and the vaguely bread-like smells of taxpayer-purchased cafeteria food. At the Santa Fe County Youth Development Program on Airport Road—euphemistically rebranded by the private prison company that briefly operated it from 1998 to 2003 after it transitioned from a joint adult jail to a juvenile-only detention center—the connection

between school and jail is more on the nose. During the week, the children incarcerated here attend classes for a few hours a day led by teachers employed by Santa Fe Public Schools. Their stays in lockup are usually less than 30 days, and often far shorter; too little time for courses to count for credit. It can happen, though, if they stay a while. But they’re not supposed to be here that long, because the Santa Fe facility typically holds teens only during pre-adjudication—before they see a judge. They might end up here for just a few hours after catching charges such as shoplifting, drug possession or damaging property, if an evaluator from the Children, Youth and Families Department-administered

The county’s juvenile detention center on Airport Road got a new name in the late 1990s.

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SEPTEMBER 12-18, 2018

SFREPORTER.COM

That’s happening far less than it used to, and the county’s facility, once crammed with young prisoners, has seen a steady decline in its average population year after year. Even though it has a capacity to hold 63 juveniles, staff at the youth jail say they have not seen more than 27 at a time in a decade. Sometimes, there are fewer than 10. Kids are brought in from 16 other jurisdictions in the state, but even then, it’s never even halfway full. The closing of juvenile jails in New Mexico and the dwindling numbers of kids at the Santa Fe County center reveal a larger trend: Youth incarceration in the state is falling, consistently and quickly, a result of reforms that reflect broader national trends. Those reforms, people who work in youth services say, have directly led to falling crime rates among people under 18. This shift presents a question for overseers of a facility built amid the prison boom of the late 20th century: Will the Santa Fe County youth detention center grow more important as other counties shutter theirs, or less, as the US appears to progress past the era of mass incarceration for young people? The answer depends on the funding available for alternatives, which can change with the political winds, and whether incarcerating kids is something society wants to keep doing. Tommy Rodriguez has witnessed a massive sea change in his 25 years working at CYFD. The state agency is best known for child welfare social services, but it’s also the body that oversees whether youth are initially incarcerated after being apprehended by police. For a long time, when it came to helping young people stay out of the system, “we weren’t being successful,” says Rodriguez, now the regional administrator for Juvenile Justice Services, overseeing probation and parole officers in Northern New Mexico. Set to retire in a few months, Rodriguez started as a juvenile probation officer in 1994. That was the same year President Bill Clinton signed the Violent Crime Control and Law Enforcement Act into law. It freed up billions of dollars for the construction of new federal prisons and for local departments to hire new police officers, and gave momentum to the broader tough-on-crime movement. Among young people, the “use of institutional confinement for even minor offenses was growing” in states across the country, according to the Center on Juvenile and Criminal Justice. In the media, some youth, especially black


teenagers, were characterized as “superpredators,” a term invented by a Princeton professor to describe a mythical “new breed” of criminal with “absolutely no respect for human life and no sense of the future.” Hillary Clinton infamously deployed the term while campaigning for her husband in 1996.

with local social service programs. With its population of locked-up youth bursting at the seams, officials in Bernalillo County began working with the foundation 16 years ago. Soon after, the county saw a decline in both juvenile prisoner population and youth crime, according to Grace Philips, general

Juvenile Detention Centers in New Mexico

• Bernalillo County • Santa Fe County • Chavez County • Curry County • Lea County • Luna County • Doña Ana County • San Juan County

CLOSED IN THE LAST YEAR • McKinley County, August 2017 • Taos County, June 2018

JURISDICTIONS THAT SEND YOUTH TO SANTA FE COUNTY • Colfax County • Eddy County • Guadalupe County • Laguna Pueblo • Los Alamos County • Mora County • Otero County • Quay County • Pueblo of Pojoaque • Rio Arriba County • San Miguel County • Santa Ana Pueblo • Taos County • Torrance County • Union County • US Marshals

Back then, probation offices in New Mexico, like other states, dealt with kids harshly on a wide scale. “When I started, [probation officers] had caseloads of 40 to 45 kids,” he says. “Facilities were jam-packed, and detention centers were overflowing.” The kids they monitored were saddled with up to 45 conditions of probation, and violating even one could lead back to juvie. In the late 1990s, the private prison company that operated the Santa Fe youth detention center on contract, Cornell Companies (later acquired by GEO Group), pushed the county to expand the number of beds from 40 to 115. That never happened, and the county started managing operations on its own in 2004. It was around that time that the state’s Juvenile Justice Advisory Committee, whose members are appointed by the governor, started working with the Annie E Casey Foundation’s Juvenile Detention Alternatives Initiative (JDA). The foundation collects best practices and data, and offers training to local jurisdictions for how to divert young people away from jail by connecting them

counsel for the New Mexico Association of Counties. “After applying the JDA initiative, the population at their detention facility went way down, and criminal conduct by youth declined at the same rate,” Philips tells SFR. “You saw improvement in pub-

The number of annual referrals made by New Mexico law enforcement to juvenile probationary officers— which police are supposed to transmit every time they arrest someone under 18— fell steadily from 15,452 to 11,419 between fiscal years 2011 and 2017. The statewide trend cuts across gender, age, type of crime and race and ethnicity, according to numbers from CYFD. And it reflects locally in Santa Fe County. Between fiscal years 2014 and 2017, the number of alleged crimes committed by people primarily between the ages of

12 and 17 dropped, from 1,141 to 810. Use or possession of drug paraphernalia is the offense for which teens got pinched most frequently, followed by possession of marijuana and household battery. The county’s report from CYFD only includes the top 13 offenses committed by youth. More serious crimes such as murder, rape or violent shootings happen infrequently enough that they are not listed on the report. The contrast between these positive trends and mainstream news coverage of teenage delinquency is a constant frustration for Richard DeMella, the Santa Fe city planner for youth and family services. A former NYPD cop with a thick Brooklyn accent, DeMella now oversees three city programs that give youth in the system extra support in school and subject them to intensive monitoring. In recent years, the city has partnered with Communities in Schools and YouthWorks. “Juvenile crime has been declining as a whole in this state over the past eight years, but you would never hear that,” DeMella contends, because the media focuses on sensational and rare stories of youth violence. “All it takes is one incident to blow everything up.” The Santa Fe New Mexican reported in July that Santa Fe police suspected several disparate instances of violence this year to be gang-involved, including a shootout between two cars in the Santa Fe Place mall parking lot this summer. SFPD Detective Casey Salazar tells SFR the police believe at least some of the youth involved in that shootout were associated with an Española-based group called OTR, or On The Real. Salazar says this suspicion is based in part on a conversation with one youth CONTINUED ON PAGE 15

AARON CANTÚ

JUVENILE DETENTION CENTERS

lic safety at the same time less youth are locked up.” It was more than a correlational relationship, says Rodriguez. It turns out that when you approach teenagers from a place of caring, he says, they’re more likely to engage, and less likely to get in serious trouble. And, case loads for juvenile parole officers are down to an average of 10 to 15. After 2002, he says, “We hired community behavioral health clinicians [and] masters-level social workers,” he says. “We now go over the backgrounds of kids, conduct triage where we talk about their lives from birth to present day, discuss what the kid had been through and experienced, why they aren’t doing well in school, why there may be dysfunction in the family.” From there, probation officers are supposed to slot them into services that fit their needs.

Youth correctional officer Melodie Montoya says the center offers 17 programs for teens including church services, painting workshops and group therapy.

SFREPORTER.COM

• SEPTEMBER 12-18, 2018

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JANUARY 3-9, 2018

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SFREPORTER.COM


AARON CANTÚ

AARON CANTÚ

ANSON STEVENS-BOLLEN

The youth lockup has a few touches of childhood such as board games and classrooms, but it’s got a distinctive jail feeling.

and police review of social media postings. He could not recall whether the interviewed youth was involved in the shooting. Judge Mary Marlowe Sommer later dismissed charges for several teens arrested in the mall shooting because prosecutors hadn’t built their cases in a timely manner, and at least one teen was held at the juvenile center for 52 days. “When a youth is detained, the juvenile probation office will tell me if they have gang affiliation,” Sommer explains to SFR over the phone. “But that’s an allegation. It is not demonstrated.” Criminal Intelligence Officer Christopher Abbo tells SFR that SFPD has observed “a lot of traveling between Albuquerque and Santa Fe” of loosely affiliated peer groups allegedly involved in crime. The observation is disputed by Albino Garcia, the executive director of La Plazita Institute, a reporting center for adjudicated youth in the South Valley. “I don’t want to punk out Santa Fe, but

I really don’t know of any connections with Santa Fe and Albuquerque gang youth stuff,” Garcia says. DeMella, the city family and youth planner, thinks attention to high-profile but rare instances of organized youth crime affect public support for alternatives to detention, which can in turn affect funding for his programming. DeMella says state funding for programs he oversees took a sharp dive two years ago, to $130,000 annually from about $205,000 in 2015. But just as important for DeMella as funding is the availability of social services where kids can plug in. “My thing is, before we ask for money, let’s make sure we have services in place for people,” he says. Inside the Santa Fe County youth lockup, colorful murals painted by teens who have passed through here adorn an otherwise bleak cinder block hallway leading toward the six housing pods.

The pods, split between two main units, each hold about a dozen single-person cells on two floors, and have tables with seats attached to the floor in their common areas. In one pod, worn-looking board games sit on a table. Youth who are here for longer periods of time can earn privileges like watching television for good behavior. All of them are strip-searched each time they return to the facility from court or receiving visitors. Pablo Sedillo, the county’s public safety department director, maintains that staff and volunteers at the jail nurture creativity out of the youth, citing one teen who recently won a Zozobra-drawing contest held by the city and the Chamber of Commerce. Hidden talents, he says, “can unfortunately surface when they’re in a detention setting, because there are a lot of staff, mentors,” and volunteers. Melodie Montoya, the senior shift supervisor at the detention center, says

it offers 17 different programs for teens, including church services, poetry workshops, painting classes and substance abuse group therapy. This past summer, string musicians came and gave a performance, and a father-son pair from Cochiti Pueblo held workshops on drum-making. Adam, an 18-year-old who spoke to SFR under a pseudonym, says that he cycled in and out of the Santa Fe juvenile facility about a dozen times since he was 14. Being incarcerated as a teen “changes your mind,” Adam tells SFR. “Your mindset. You stop caring. You’re like, ‘Fuck it, I’m already in the system,’ and you stop caring.” Immediately before his 18th birthday, Adam went on the run, skipping his probation appointments after failing a urine drug test once again. He had failed enough of them to have spent months at a time at the Santa Fe youth jail, and was facing a year at Albuquerque’s Youth Diagnostic & Development Center for CONTINUED ON PAGE 17

SFREPORTER.COM

SEPTEMBER 12-18, 2018

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SEPTEMBER 12-18, 2018

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SFREPORTER.COM


Delinquent Referral in New Mexico

his latest transgression. Eventually, he served about two weeks in the adult jail after turning 18. Adam is the type of kid whom CYFD would point to as most in need of intensive monitoring: His first offense was auto burglary, followed by threatening a security guard, and then larceny. The fact that his probation violations were mostly for failed drug tests is a reminder that Santa Fe has no inpatient substance abuse treatment program for juveniles, DeMella says. “Maybe he belongs in a residential treatment center, but there aren’t any here, so they stick him in the jail,” DeMella says. All incarcerated youth at the facility receive an hour of recreation daily, which may include time at a half-court with a single basketball hoop. The court is connected to a small library where a volunteer librarian visits twice a week. The books are donated and include novels, but also selections such as a Mickey Mouse picture book not meant for most teens. Three boys file into the library wearing brown jumpsuits, the standard uniform here. Had they chosen not to go to the library, their only other choice was to remain in the housing pod.

20,000

15,000 15,452 14,102 12,609 11,419

10,000

5,000

0

2014

2015

2016

2017

Delinquent Referral in Santa Fe County 1,250 1,141

1,185

1,000 846

750

810

500

250

0

2014

2015

2016

2017

Top Youth Offenses SF County Shoplifting ($250 or less) Use/Possession of Drug Paraphernalia Possession of Alcohol by a Minor Criminal Damage of Property Poss of Cannabis (1 oz or less)(1st Off) Battery Battery (Household Member) Resisting/Evading Arrest

Larceny ($250 or Less)

150 0

2014

2015

50 2016

100 2017

SOURCE: CYFD

Concealing Identity

In 2015 county commissioners considered closing the facility because of its consistently low usage and high cost. The juvenile jail then made up a tenth of the county’s total corrections budget, and still does. On July 1, the county approved an operating budget that earmarked $2.2 million for the facility, with $1.4 million going to staff salary and benefits. A task force formed in 2015 recommended that the county tear down the old building and build a newer, more modern one that could serve as a regional youth detention center. County Commissioner Anna Hansen says the cost of the plan was too high to consider, but that the closure of the Taos youth jail has already made Santa Fe a “de facto regional juvenile center.” Commissioners haven’t seriously discussed closing it since. The county receives $185 a day for each child it detains from other jurisdictions, contract payments that amounted to more than $428,000 last year. “If we closed, we would have to transport all these kids to another location, which affects a lot of different things,” Sedillo argues, such as taking beat cops off the street to book youth at other lockups.

ANSON STEVENS-BOLLEN

By The Numbers

Richard DeMella says state funding for youth programs has taken a dive, and he’d like to see it rebound.

They should get therapy and education, they should be taken care of in jail, not just thrown in there like an old box. We need comprehensive programming for those kids. -Richard DeMella, Santa Fe city planner for youth and family services

Tommy Rodriguez, the regional administrator for Juvenile Justice Services, strikes a similar tone. Closing the jail, he says, “would be like removing kids from the community again. Kids who commit serious offenses need to be housed someplace, so we’d have to move them to places like Bernalillo or Las Cruces.” Even DeMella thinks jailing youth has its place. “If a kid murders someone or rapes, and there are people like that, they belong in jail, but not in the cell by themselves,” he says. “They should get therapy and education, they should be taken care of in jail, not just thrown in there like an old box. We need

comprehensive programming for those kids.” Large-scale alternatives to jailing continue to catch on elsewhere. Earlier this year, for example, Connecticut closed its only juvenile correction facility. Journalist Nell Bernstein has argued that the practice of incarcerating any youth should be abolished, because of the effects of institutionalization and because it is intractably racist in practice. (As elsewhere, children of color in New Mexico are disproportionately incarcerated.) “If you think of the major developmental tasks of adolescence, they’re things like: Forming trusting relationships, which is taboo inside any locked facility,” Bernstein said in an interview with now-defunct The Awl. “They live this very regimented life where they’re not allowed to make any decisions or ask any questions or form any relationships.” There have been no reported accusations of abuse by staff at the Santa Fe facility in recent years, nor have there been reports of sexual assault, both of which have plagued other facilities across the country. One youth to whom SFR sent a list of questions and who declined to give his name said his monthlong stint at the facility helped him. For others like Adam, the routines of jail life were damaging, especially after repeated visits. He says he doesn’t want other youth to experience what he did as a teenager. “Personally, I don’t like to be institutionalized,” he tells SFR. “It doesn’t teach you nothing, until something real happens, like you’re facing a year [in jail].” He is now working to finish his GED, making up for time he lost while incarcerated at various times over the last couple of years.

SFREPORTER.COM

SEPTEMBER 12-18, 2018

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celebr ate the tenth anniversary of the r ailya rd!

THE RAILYARD

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SUNDAY/ SEPTEMBER 16 • 10 AM – 6 PM

ENTIRE RAILYARD • BACA & NORTH RAILYARD

RAILYARD SCAVENGER HUNT COCO EN ESPAÑOL

FRIDAY/ SEPTEMBER 14 • 7– 9:30 PM

RAILYARD PARK • DANCE & MOVIE IN THE PARK Folkloric dance of Los Niños de Santa Fe followed by Coco en Español with English subtitles.

SATURDAY/ SEPTEMBER 15 • 10 AM – 4 PM

RAILYARD PARK • LIVING HISTORY FESTIVAL Live demonstrations of traditional Weaving, Spinning, Tin Working and more. Kids build their own Pop Up Playground & play in the sand. railyardpark.org

RAILROAD ART, PHOTOGRAPHY & MODEL RAILROAD EXHIBITION

EL MUSEO CULTURAL / ON THE TRACKS Videos, Refreshments, collectibles, train toys and more.

RAILRUNNER AND SANTA FE SOUTHERN TRAIN CAR OPEN HOUSE

Get on Board! nmrailroadhistory.com

Explore the Railyard via new St. Francis underpass and enter to win great prizes donated by Railyard businesses. Multiple bike rental locations available or ride your own

COMMUNITY PARADE

BACA RAILYARD • 11AM Led by the Partizani Brass Band! Come join us with bikes, scooters and pets to the NORTH RAILYARD via the underpass. FREE PARKING in the Baca Railyard via Railfan Rd. or at the DOT lot at 1120 Cerrillos Road, across from Baca Railyard entrance.

POP-UP PLAYGROUND & SAND PLAY SUNDAY

RAILYARD PARK • 11AM – 3 PM Fun continues with Games, Games, Games for all!

COMMUNITY PICNIC AND RAILYARD REUNION BAND

RAILYARD PARK • NOON – 2 PM Bring your own or enjoy box lunches from Boxcar Restaurant, and variety of treats from Santa Fe food trucks. EL MUSEO CULTURAL / ON THE TRACKS RAILROAD ART, PHOTOGRAPHY & MODEL RAILROAD EXHIBITION & TRAIN CAR OPEN HOUSE continue with MOOSE CABOOSE mini-train for the kids!

VIOLET CROWN TRAIN FILM FEST

3:10 to Yuma @ 2 pm Original Murder on the Orient Express @ 6 pm Special Model Railroad Display!

VIOLET CROWN TRAIN FILM FEST

Original Murder on the Orient Express @ 2 pm 3:10 to Yuma @ 6 pm Special Model Railroad Display!

ARRIVAL OF THE MAYORS!

HISTORIC SANTA FE DEPOT/RAILYARD PLAZA • 3PM SF Mayor Alan Webber, ABQ Mayor Tim Keller and other dignitaries arrive on the Rail Runner to help us celebrate and cut the birthday cake!

RAILYARD 10TH ANNIVERSARY CONCERT

RAILYARD PLAZA WATER TOWER • 2 – 6 PM Santa Fe Salutes the 10th Anniversary of the Railyard with the Santa Fe Concert Band, Lone Piñon and a Santa Fe All-Star Tribute to Tom Petty! Mariachi too!

PARTIZANI BRASS BAND

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18

AUGUST 29-SEPTEMBER 4, 2018 SFREPORTER.COM


BRANDON JOHNSON

Into the Woods Open houses on forest plan revision to allows a peek at Santa Fe National Forest’s future BY ELIZABETH MILLER e l i z a b e t h @ s f r e p o r t e r. c o m

T

hirty years ago, before downhill mountain biking was a popular sport or ultrarunning had broken into the world stage, before high-speed chairlifts had reached more than a one-off demo in the US, and before side-by-side models of ATVs had branched out from farm work, the Santa Fe National Forest issued a management plan. That plan has been amended 13 times, but it has become apparent that the needs of the 1.5 million-acre forest, which stretches from alpine lakes and peaks to the desert of Caja del Rio, have outgrown those modifications and a full rewrite is due. Even public perceptions, uses and values of the forest have changed in the three decades since this plan was drafted, as the Forest Service notes in documents about its effort to rewrite the plan. To draw  people into the process and draft a plan that both reflects their current needs and future wishes, Forest Service staff have hosted more than 230 public meetings with more than 3,000 attendees. The latest is a series of informal open houses, including one in Santa Fe on Sept. 27, for people to consider new materials, including pieces of the draft plan that have not yet been published for public review, and to offer feedback and guidance. “Folks may catch something that would be helpful to us,” says Charles Clark, collaboration specialist with the Santa Fe

National Forest who joined the agency in 2015 specifically to work on this plan revision. “It’s really an opportunity to let people know what’s coming, explain a lot of the terms and documents that are coming out, and then get informal feedback.” For dedicated commenters, it’s a chance to study up before formal comment periods open up on the draft plan and environmental impact statement. The documents take shape under broad ideological groupings, labeled alternatives, around whether to emphasize utilization of the forest or natural processes. Those groupings will guide broad strokes, like whether the service prioritizes maintaining roads people use to remove forest products or decommissioning them to improve ecological conditions or restore riparian areas. Clark says he expects the final plan will land, as many multiple stakeholder initiatives do, with a mixed agenda that most resembles the alternative that calls for a balance. “What we want is for the final plan to really capture our best research as well as much of the public,” he says. Among the bigger concerns reviewed in this process are whether to suggest Congress expand any of the national for-

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Backpackers are just one group of users whose comments will be considered in a wholesale update of the forest management plan.

est’s wilderness areas. Suggesting such a land designation automatically confers the rules applied to designated wilderness areas, banning mechanized tools and toys, according to federal officials. The consideration has had mountain bikers worried that trails will be off-limits and cattle ranchers concerned they won’t be able to use mechanized equipment to clear trails and ATVs to manage their cattle. The  service considers on-the-ground details, like whether major roads, utility lines or other noticeable structures cross an area that, by definition, would need to appear “untrammeled by man.” Then it gets into the weeds on the physical experience of the place, and whether it represents wilderness qualities like solitude. The impossibility of balancing it all appears in just two public comments collected by the Forest Service on this revision. One says “evidence of old roads should preclude wilderness consideration,” while another states “old roads that are being reclaimed through natural processes should not preclude wilderness consideration.”

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The majority of lands The Wilderness Society has advocated to see in the wilderness inventory did make that list, says Michael Casaus, New Mexico state director for The Wilderness Society. If there’s concern, it’s that not all of about 100,000 acres supported for wilderness or special conservation designation will be listed for public consideration. “The public isn’t given an opportunity to weigh in on the full scope of potential recommended wilderness in the plan because the Forest Service has not carried forward certain areas that, again, have been endorsed by a broad set of local and regional government entities,” he says. On the other end, the Santa Fe Fat Tire Society has been working to make sure some of the areas where the club has re-opened trails  affected by the Pacheco Fire stay open to mountain bikers. “We’re supportive of what they’ve proposed in their draft for recommended wilderness,” says Brent Bonwell, president of the Fat Tire Society. “Mountain bikers— we’re conservationists, too, because we enjoy being out in the forest and enjoying it in its current state.” It’s just tough, given that wilderness status means an end to access for mountain bikers. The one thing that remains consistent in every version of the forthcoming plan are the areas marked for oil and gas or geothermal leases. “It’s a separate standalone process and the results of that we just take as-is,” Clark says. A draft plan and environmental impact statement  is scheduled for release in January. OPEN HOUSE ON SANTA FE NATIONAL FOREST MANAGEMENT PLAN REVISION 2:30-5:30 pm Thursday Sept. 27. Free. Santa Fe National Forest Headquarters, 11 Forest Lane, 438-5442; additional dates scheduled through Monday Dec. 10. For info: santafeforestplan@fs.fed.us

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SEPTEMBER 12-18, 2018

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FETCH A FLICK Had a ruff week? If you love dogs, you’re barking up the right tree with the Bow Wow Film Fest. Visit the CCA’s Cinematheque to celebrate the glory, the beauty, the majesty and the absurdity of man’s best friend with a litter of short films in a 90-minute film festival. Some are animated, others are live action, but all feature good boys and girls. There’s also a silent auction and a reception if you get here early, so fetch your wallet and help support the Santa Fe Animal Shelter. Tickets sold out last year, so get on it. (Layne Radlauer)

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FILM THU/13

Bow Wow Film Festival: 7 pm Thursday Sept. 13. $25. CCA Cinematheque, 1050 Old Pecos Trail, 982-1338.

COURTESY POJOAQUE.ORG

DANCE FRI/14 JUMP THROUGH HOOPS As anyone who caught hoop dancer Nakotah LaRance’s stunning performance at this year’s Indian Market fashion show can tell you, the world of hoop dance is full of opportunities for impressive moves. The addition of hoops—which represent the circle of life as well as living beings such as the eagle or butterfly—to traditional Native dancing has a rich history, too, but the art form continues to evolve. Enter the Pueblo of Pojoaque Youth Hoop Dancers, the award-winning next generation of dancers who embrace tradition while innovating and expanding. Think of it like another great reminder that when it comes to culture around here, we’re up there with some of the best. (Alex De Vore) Pueblo of Pojoaque Youth Hoop Dancers: 6 pm Friday Sept. 14. Free. Buffalo Thunder Resort and Casino, 20 Buffalo Thunder Trail, 455-5555.

COURTESY SECOND STREET BREWERY

MUSIC TUE/18 RAWK! Does everyone remember just a few short years ago when music fans who wanted something more than classic rock covers or country/Americana/folk were pretty much out of luck? Those days have gone, it seems, and a new era of rock ‘n’ roll excellence has arrived. A lot of it goes down in DIY spaces and house shows, but Second Street Brewery’s Rufina Taproom has been knocking it out of the park lately. For example, find (on a Tuesday night, no less) Tuesday Night Draft Punx, a new series that kicks off with three kickass bands, from local indie/mathy act Future Scars to California shoegazers Ridgeway and the smooth indie of NDVRS, one of Santa Fe’s newest and most promising projects. Rawk is right. (ADV) Tuesday Night Draft Punx: 8 pm Tuesday Sept. 18. $5. Second Street Brewery (Rufina Taproom), 2920 Rufina St., 954-1068.

BOOKS/ LECTURE SUN/16

New Woman Poems explore art, history, love and Northern New Mexico

When Santa Fe-based poet Lauren Camp was invited to be poet-in-residence at Taos’ Mabel Dodge Luhan House in 2013, it turns out she was basically just given a free vacation. “The invitation came without any expectations,” Camp says. “I didn’t have to produce anything if I didn’t want to … but I wrote 54 pages of poems. It was nuts!” That stack of poems has become Turquoise Door, a collection of poetic musings on the early-20th century patron of the arts. “I had no interest in Mabel,” Camp says of the book’s genesis. But the staff of the Luhan house were eager to feed Camp’s growing curiosity about Luhan and the time she lived in New Mexico. The complicated, intelligent, pioneering, stubborn, and perhaps not always likeable Luhan at the center of the book is nothing if not a fascinating study. The book is thick, both in volume (over 100 pages of poetry) and in substance. At first glance, it’s perhaps too dense to enter into. But Camp urges the reader to consider her subject. “Mabel was not always kind, or maybe even decent,” Camp says. “But she was remarkable as

an early feminist, before there even was such a thing. I think they called her a ‘new woman.’” Camp, like Luhan, grew up in New York State and came to New Mexico as an adult, but she says the parallels that may seem obvious between her and her subject are perhaps a red herring. “I wouldn’t say that we are like souls,” Camp says. “But it’s kind of fascinating to write about someone you think you might not like, or who might not like you. I don’t think the book is for Mabel at all. It’s more a book exploring her and her time period and what she did, and respecting the positive things she did.” Indeed, the book is not an exaltation of the woman, but more an honest considering of New Mexico: its fraught and beautiful history, and its haunted and pensive present. (Charlotte Jusinski)

LAUREN CAMP: TURQUOISE DOOR 2 pm Sunday Sept. 16. Free. op.cit Books, De Vargas Center, 157 Paseo de Peralta, 428-0321

SFREPORTER.COM

SEPTEMBER 12-18, 2018

21


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You can also enter your events yourself online at calendar.sfreporter.com (submission doesn’t guarantee inclusion). Need help?

Contact Charlotte: 395-2906

WED/12 BOOKS/LECTURES BILINGUAL BOOKS AND BABIES Santa Fe Public Library Main Branch 145 Washington Ave., 955-6780 In a program for babies 6 months to 2 years old (and their caregivers), join a play and language group to enjoy books, songs and finger games. 10:30 am, free BILINGUAL BOOKS AND BABIES Santa Fe Public Library Southside 6599 Jaguar Drive, 955-2820 Miss the earlier one? Don’t want to drive downtown? Here’s another. 4 pm, free DHARMA TALK BY ZENSHIN FLORENCE CAPLOW AND REIGETSU SUSAN MOON Upaya Zen Center 1404 Cerro Gordo Road, 986-8518 This week's talk is "The Hidden Lamp." The evening begins with a 15-minute meditation, so please arrive by 5:20 pm. 5:30 pm, free FINANCIAL LITERACY FOR TEENS Santa Fe Public Library LaFarge Branch 1730 Llano St., 955-4860 Join Guadalupe Credit Union to learn about basic money management, managing your own bank account. This week's session focuses on basic money management. 4:30 pm, free

One of Santa Fe’s favorite painters (or at least one of SFR’s favorite painters) Erin Currier presents new works in Las Meninas at Blue Rain Gallery, opening Friday. This one is “American Women (dismantling the border) III (after Delacroix)”—see more info on page 27.

MEDICINAL HERB WALK Santa Fe Botanical Garden 715 Camino Lejo, 471-9103 Learn about the plants of the Santa Fe Botanical Garden on this interactive and educational walk through the gardens focusing on the identification of local plants and their medicinal uses. Guide Lynn Childson is a medical herbalist who has been a practicing herbalist for over 20 years, and is currently the manager at Herbs, Etc. 5-7 pm, $10-$15

MIDDLE LENGTH LAM RIM Thubten Norbu Ling Tibetan Buddhist Center 1807 Second St., Ste. 35, 660-7056 In weekly classes taught by Geshe Thubten Sherab, learn about Lam Rim—it means "Stages of the Path" in Tibetan, and refers to the entire Buddhist path to enlightenment. It’s considered instructions for the attainment of Buddhahood. 6:30 pm, free

READINGS & CONVERSATIONS: THE REV. WILLIAM BARBER WITH KHURY PETERSEN-SMITH Lensic Performing Arts Center 211 W San Francisco St., 988-1234 The Rev. Barber discusses his book, Third Reconstruction: Moral Mondays, Fusion Politics, and the Rise of a New Justice Movement. Petersen-Smith specializes in borders and migration and coauthored Black Solidarity with Palestine. 7 pm, $5-$8

DANCE

RICK HENDRICKS: MEXICAN HISTORY IN NEW MEXICO El Zaguán 545 Canyon Road, 982-0016 The US invasion, occupation and eventual annexation of New Mexico produced a dramatic clash of cultures. Hendricks, the New Mexico state historian, presents evidence that New Mexican politics mirrored the situation in the rest of the Mexican republic. Call 983-2567 to RSVP. 1 pm, $10

DANCE FOR ALL ABILITIES AND LEVELS Cornell Rose Garden Galisteo St & W Cordova Rd Every other Wednesday, dance for flexibility, balance, grace, creativity, socializing and joy. Dance therapist instructor Claire Rodill is trained in numerous dance forms. Call or email Rodill at 577-8187 or crodill99@gmail.com to RSVP. 4 pm, $10

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The C. G. Jung Institute of Santa Fe presents

Jung

Lecture & Workshop

for the general public & mental health clinicians

In the World

Jon Maaske, M.F.A., Ph.D., Jungian analyst, Albuquerque Lecture: Culture, Ethics, and Ecology in 2018: the Destructive Power of Unmitigated Agency

Friday, September 14th 7-9pm $10 (+$10 surcharge for 2 CEUs or 2 Ethics CEUs or 2 Cultural CEUs) We are destroying life on the planet—the “Sixth Extinction.” What is wrong in this profoundly unethical situation? The basic answer is simple: our attempts to “predict and control” everything have taken over any sense of being a part of everything. We see this tension conceptualized throughout history: the interplay of Yin and Yang; David Bakan’s concepts of agency and communion; and, more recently, in The Master and his Emissary, Iain McGilchrist has expressed profound concern that the extracting, separate-from-the-world, functioning of the left hemisphere of the brain—the “emissary”—has forgotten that it serves the “master”—the holistic, functioning-within-the-world, right hemisphere. The differences between indigenous and colonialist cultures demonstrate the tension. Settler colonialism in the U.S., expressed as Manifest Destiny, is a profound example of unmitigated agency. Events such as the protest at Standing Rock offer an image of a different approach that persists despite the temporary defeat—a fierce, loving, expression of community and connection with the earth. The speaker will show some photographs of nature including the loss of the lodgepole pine to the mountain pine beetle, secondary to global warming and unsustainable forestry practices. They are images of the “brutiful” power of nature responding to anthropogenic assaults.

Workshop: Ethical Considerations: What can I do?

Saturday, September 15th 9:30am-2:45pm $55 4 CEUs or 4 Ethics CEUs We will discuss the ethical question, “What can I do?” We will use and expand upon the lecture concepts (briefly recapped for those unable to attend the lecture) to explore the deep ethics of: “How can I Be?” How can we take effective action? How do we deal with rage and despair? How do we persist in an attitude of hope, gratitude, and power? What are the particular ethical issues in addressing these issues in therapy? The presenter will also utilize a powerful model from the psychology of wilderness survival, “deep survival,” that is ultimately an ethical stance applicable far beyond wilderness emergencies.

Both events at: Center for Spiritual Living, 505 Camino de los Marquez, Santa Fe Friday lecture and Saturday workshop tickets at the door – for information call Jon Maaske, 505-889-4570 For expanded program details go to www.santafejung.org

RAILYARD URGENT CARE

We put patients first and deliver excellent care in the heart of Santa Fe. Open 7 days a week, 8am – 7pm Railyard Urgent Care is Santa Fe’s only dedicated urgent care clinic operating on a solely walk-in basis, 7 days a week, to ensure excellent medical care with the shortest possible wait times.

Short wait times! railyardurgentcare.com + INJURIES & ILLNESS + X-RAYS + PHYSICALS + LAB TESTS + VACCINATIONS + DRUG TESTING + DOT EXAMS

THE CALENDAR EVENTS CHILDREN’S CHESS CLUB Santa Fe Public Library Main Branch 145 Washington Ave., 955-6780 Join other kids to play against for a nice mix of quiet thought and roaring laughter, and play as many games as time allows. 5:45 pm, free FORT SUMNER HISTORIC SITE/BOSQUE REDONDO MEMORIAL: PAST, PRESENT, AND FUTURE New Mexico History Museum 113 Lincoln Ave., 476-5100 Before discussing the future, it is necessary to visit the past. A panel offers an overview of the sites’ history. Noon-1 pm, free PUEBLO POTTERY DEMONSTRATION: ANGIE YAZZIE Museum of Indian Arts & Culture 710 Camino Lejo, 476-1250 The demo series continues with Yazzie of Taos Pueblo. Free with museum admission. 1-4 pm, $6-$12 SANTA FE TIME BANK INFO SESSION Unitarian Universalist Congregation 107 W Barcelona Road, 982-9674 What even is time banking? Find out at the org's monthly potluck and meeting. 5:30 pm, free ¡VÁMONOS! SANTA FE: WALK WITH THE FAITH COMMUNITY Bicentennial Alto Park 1121 Alto St. Rise 'n' shine and head to the park to go for a stroll with Rev. Gail Marriner of the Unitarian Universalist Church. More info: sfct.org/vamonos. 7 am, free

FILM DARE TO DREAM The Screen 1600 St. Michael’s Drive, 473-6494 The documentary tells the story of the largest medical school in the world, the Latin American School of Medicine in Havana, Cuba. Any and all students see it for free. 7 pm, $15 DRILLING MORA COUNTY Jean Cocteau Cinema 418 Montezuma Ave., 466-5528 After the film about fracking in New Mexico, stick around for a Q&A with progressive activist and former gubernatorial candidate Peter DeBenedittis and civil rights attorney Jeffery Haas. 7:30 pm, $15

MUSIC WHERE TO FIND US

DAVID BORREGO AND FRIENDS Cowgirl 319 S Guadalupe St., 982-2565 Rock and folk. 8 pm, free

831 South St. Francis Drive, just north of the red caboose.

(505) 501.7791

ENTER EVENTS AT SFREPORTER.COM/CAL

DAVID GEIST Osteria D'Assisi 58 S Federal Place, 986-5858 Piano standards and Broadway faves. 6:30 pm, free GREG SCHLOTTHAUER Vanessie 427 W Water St., 982-9966 Pop, rock and contemporary on piano with vocals too. 6:30 pm, free MISSI & COMPANY La Fiesta Lounge 100 E San Francisco St., 982-5511 Music! We don't know what kind but we bet it's good! 7:30 pm, free OPEN MIC NIGHT Tumbleroot Brewery & Distillery 2791 Agua Fría St. Signups start at 6:30 pm, and everyone who performs gets a recording afterward—just like the good old days. 7-10 pm, free PAT MALONE El Mesón 213 Washington Ave., 983-6756 Sweet melodic jazz guitar. 7 pm, free SANTA FE CROONERS Palace Saloon 142 W Palace Ave., 428-0690 Golden Age standards. 6:30-9:30 pm, free

WORKSHOP INTRODUCTION TO ZEN Mountain Cloud Zen Center 7241 Old Santa Fe Trail, 988-4396 Explore the basics and finer points of Zen meditation. 5 pm, free

THU/13 BOOKS/LECTURES CONVERSATIONS WITH DIEGO RIVERA: THE MONSTER IN HIS LABYRINTH Collected Works Bookstore and Coffeehouse 202 Galisteo St., 988-4226 Artist Barbara Cardona-Hine, has a conversation with former Santa Fe Poet Laureate Joan Logghe about the book. 6:30 pm, free THE HUMAN “GRID”: UNDERSTANDING THE PERIPHERAL NERVOUS SYSTEM St. John’s United Methodist Church 1200 Old Pecos Trail, 982-5397 Glenn Conroy explains all our insides. 1 pm, $15 THE REBIRTH OF LOCAL NEWS: A DISRUPTIVE FUTURES DIALOGUE International Folk Art Alliance 620 Cerrillos Road, 474-6783 Take a look at the work of journalists and news organizations as they create trust and provide news that people can use to affect change in their communities. 5:30 pm, free

THE STORY BEHIND BACA RAILYARD DISTRICT AND OPUNTIA CAFÉ Stewart Udall Center 725 Camino Lejo, 983-6155 Join the Santa Fe Botanical Garden and landscape architect Solange Serquis for the story behind the newly renovated neighborhood. 3-4:30 pm, $5-$10

DANCE O2 SWING NIGHT Santa Fe Oxygen & Healing Bar (Apothecary) 133 W San Francisco St., 986-5037 There's a lesson from 8-9 pm, then get swinging from 9 pm to midnight. 8 pm, $10

EVENTS CONTINUING EDUCATION OPEN HOUSE Santa Fe Community College 6401 Richards Ave., 428-1000 You can totally teach an old dog new tricks. And an old human, too. Find out about just-for-fun offerings in room 131 at the college. 4-6 pm, free POEH NATIVE ART SHOWCASE Buffalo Thunder Resort and Casino 20 Buffalo Thunder Trail, 455-5555 Visit with local artists and purchase one-of-a-kind art. 5-7 pm, free

FILM BOW WOW FILM FESTIVAL CCA Cinematheque 1050 Old Pecos Trail, 982-1338 A rousing and fun-loving collection of films (see SFR Picks, page 21) 7 pm, $25 LE MANS Lensic Performing Arts Center 211 W San Francisco St., 988-1234 The 1970 drama follows a Porsche driver haunted by the memory of an accident that killed a fellow racer. 7 pm, free

MUSIC 50 WATT WHALE Cowgirl 319 S Guadalupe St., 982-2565 Rock ‘n’ roll. 8 pm, free DJ 3D MANNY KARAOKE Palace Saloon 142 W Palace Ave., 428-0690 Get the mic. 9 pm, free DYLAN FOLEY GiG Performance Space 1808 Second St. Perhaps one of the finest Irish fiddlers of his generation. 7:30 pm, $20 FLAMINGOSIS Meow Wolf 1352 Rufina Circle, 395-6369 EDM gets the audience all up in the heat of the dance. 8 pm, $15-$18 CONTINUED ON PAGE 26

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MUSIC

In the Here and TOM HINES

Grizzly Bear’s Daniel Rossen and activist Amelia Bauer bring joy to the fight for women’s rights

BY LUKE HENLEY a u t h o r @ s f r e p o r t e r. c o m

M

aybe the years pass quicker or more things change within them lately. Either way, it seems like ages ago that the now-baseline insanity in discourse and politics first sprang forth with new affronts on human rights and dignity chittering out of our Facebook feeds. Speaking to immediate events, the current presidential administration is ushering in a new Supreme Court justice who attempts to keep his stances against women’s health and reproductive rights wriggly enough as to avoid full focus—but we see what they are doing. Thankfully, people like Daniel Rossen, singer  and guitarist of indie act Grizzly Bear, and his wife Amelia Bauer are doing the good work to help stem the flow of anti-woman, restrictive rightwing rhetoric via their work with the Noise for NOW (National Organization of Women) Initiative. And what’s even better? You’re invited to the party. Almost exactly a year ago, Noise for NOW staged one of Santa Fe’s most impressive bills in recent memory boasting acts such as Bon Iver, TV  On The Radio and Tune-Yards. It was an unprecedented event in a lot of ways, even in Santa Fe’s ever-growing concert market. As Rossen says, it was “a level of show that wasn’t really happening here. You had giant acts coming to the opera—really established acts like Lyle Lovett and Bon-

Grizzly Bear

nie Raitt—but there was a whole echelon of bands that just couldn’t come here because they can’t really afford to route it in.” A year down the line, Noise for NOW’s scope continues to grow. “We’ve taken Noise for NOW and made it into a national effort,” Bauer says. “We have more and more people joining the organization all the time, and we’re organizing shows like these here in Santa Fe in various parts of the country that have been identified to us as places of high need for funding for women’s health and abortion access.”

It’s a dual focus that benefits communities by creating new markets for excellent shows that feature high-profile acts while also benefiting women’s rights in an increasingly hostile legal environment. In a political landscape that causes what people  often refer  to as resistance fatigue, such concerts offer a vital beacon to keep activists invigorated and ready to fight. A large part of this vitality is because the events are rooted in revelry and the unifying force of music. Even as things continue to get worse, according to Bauer, she says there is a serious thrust

forward in the attitude of organizers, musicians and concert attendees. “Having a public event that you can tangibly ascertain the level of support for this cause keeps it fresh and alive,” she says. “It’s a dynamic way to stay involved. It’s celebratory, you know?” Helping to stoke this celebratory spark is Rossen’s band Grizzly Bear, whose Noise for NOW appearance coincides with the tail end of their tour in support of the excellent 2017 album Painted Ruins. Rossen, now a Santa Fe resident after years of adoration for the city, wrote the album remotely, via the internet, with his band mates who now occupy various regions of the United States. Nevertheless, the album has a cohesion and unity of vision that harks back to the band’s tight-knit early days in the Brooklyn jam space in which they began. “We’ve worked to make the music more collectivized,” Rossen explains. “This was probably the most collaborative version of songwriting that we’ve done. Even though we were working from afar, to begin with everything went through a filter whereby everybody in the band could contribute.” Live, of course, Grizzly Bear shines with the comfortable strength of four members who have played together for a little over a decade and a half. In addition to Grizzly Bear’s performance, Noise for NOW also stages upcoming solo performances by indie pop wonder St. Vincent and avant-folk statesman Andrew Bird at the Santa Fe Opera on Tuesday Sept. 18. Scheduled to appear alongside Grizzly Bear is Albuquerque-originated freak-folk  band A Hawk and a Hacksaw, a recent addition to the bill featuring pop genius Heather Trost and all-around musical weirdo Jeremy Barnes. NOISE FOR NOW: GRIZZLY BEAR WITH A HAWK AND A HACKSAW 6:30 pm Friday Sept. 14. $31. The Bridge at Santa Fe Brewing Co., 37 Fire Place, 557-6182

Keep Contemporary

E nd of Summer PRESENTS

Group Show

SEPTEMBER 14TH | 5-8 PM 112 West San Francisco St., Ste. 102 | Downstairs

Refreshments — Music — Good Vibez DJ Dynamite Sol on the One’s and Two’s

Keep Contemporary RESIDENT ARTISTS & INTRODUCING: Jeffrey Pitt | Victor Whitmill | Ally Burke | Dano Sanchez | Mikel Roman | Allison M. Low | Bailey Hunter Robinson | Mario Romero | Nate Seubert | Patrick Haemmerliein | Chris Roberts-Antieau

FEATURING

SFREPORTER.COM

SEPTEMBER 12-18, 2018

25


C

C

SY

THE CALENDAR

RS

GREG SCHLOTTHAUER Vanessie 427 W Water St., 982-9966 Piano standards. 6:30 pm, free JIM ALMAND El Mesón 213 Washington Ave., 983-6756 Rock, blues and folk. 7 pm, free JONO MANSON Tumbleroot Brewery & Distillery 2791 Agua Fría St. Rootsy rock 'n' roll. 5-7 pm, free MARC SANDERS Osteria D'Assisi 58 S Federal Place, 986-5858 Piano standards. 6:30 pm, free MISSI & COMPANY La Fiesta Lounge 100 E San Francisco St., 982-5511 Music! We don't know what kind but we bet it's good! 7:30 pm, free OPEN MIC & JAM About the Music 2305 Fox Road, 603-4570 Get together with your old friends or make some new ones at this weekly mic. 5-9 pm, $5 PAT MALONE TerraCotta Wine Bistro 304 Johnson St., 989-1166 Solo jazz guitar. 6 pm, free

ehavioral ealth

 Research

 Diabetes

anagement

aare oordination AD epatitis

Come e perience family-friendly healthcare across the life span

elcoming Dr. esse abriel to our lameda amily edicine Clinic

ROBERT PLANT AND THE SENSATIONAL SPACE SHIFTERS Santa Fe Opera House 301 Opera Drive, 986-5900 If you don't know who Robert Plant is, you need a serious lesson in musicology. 7:30 pm, $112-$200 RON ROUGEAU The Dragon Room 406 Old Santa Fe Trail, 983-7712 Acoustic classic rock. 5:30 pm, free SIMON LEE-PLUNKET La Boca (Taberna Location) 125 Lincoln Ave., 988-7102 Folky originals and covers. 7 pm, free TAYLOR GUITARS ROAD SHOW The Candyman Strings & Things 851 St. Michael's Drive, 983-5906 The folks from Taylor lead an in-store clinic to show off new products. Play ‘em too! 7-9 pm, free

THEATER ATACAMA Teatro Paraguas 3205 Calle Marie, 424-1601 A man and a woman meet in the northern Chilean desert while searching for bone fragments of loved ones. 7:30 pm, $10-$20

WORKSHOP PAINTING CLASS WITH ROBBI FIRESTONE Red Sage Buffalo Thunder Resort and Casino, 20 Buffalo Thunder Trail, 819-2056 The renowned painter conducts a two-hour painting class. Materials provided. 6 pm, $45

FRI/14 ART OPENINGS DAVID SYRE: SOUL MAPS: THE JOURNEY EVOLVES Ellsworth Gallery 215 E Palace Ave., 989-7900 Multimedia artist Syre exhibits in France, the United States and Argentina, with all of his shows united by a common theme: the road traveled by the artist. Through Sept. 29. 5:30 pm, free EARTH AND SKY: PAINTINGS OF THE SOUTHWEST BacArt House 933 Baca St., 577-0113 In works by Anita Louise West and Lee Blakeney, lyrical landscapes highlight the nature that surrounds us. Through Oct. 13. 5 pm, free

COURTESY CITY OF MUD

Appointments available immediately All insurance welcome liding fee scale available

ENTER EVENTS AT SFREPORTER.COM/CAL

ZONE opens at City of Mud with innovative new works by various artists on Friday. Page 27 has the details; these are Laird Hovland’s Fibonacci 3-D resin prints, and we’re enchanted.

26

SEPTEMBER 12-18, 2018

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ENTER EVENTS AT SFREPORTER.COM/CAL

ERIN CURRIER: LAS MENINAS Blue Rain Gallery 544 S Guadalupe St., 954-9902 Old white European men are replaced with Latin American women. Through Sept. 29. 5 pm, free JACK KOTZ: HOME & AWAY Peters Projects 1011 Paseo de Peralta, 954-5700 Kotz brings various locations to life and explores the hidden dramas of daily life, and the relationship between people and place. Through Oct. 27. 5 pm, free JOE BOVA: CERAMICS Stevens & Howell Fine Art Agora Center, 7 Avenida Vista Grande, Ste. B-8, Eldorado, 466-7277 Figurative yet surreal ceramic pieces, imbued with social and political commentary, eroticism and humor. 5-8 pm, free KEIKO SADAKANE: CMY Gebert Contemporary 558 Canyon Road, 992-1100 Japanese artist Sadakane only uses blue, red and yellow. Through Oct. 13. 5 pm, free MATTHEW ROWE: CONTEXTUAL KERNING Beals & Co. Showroom 830 Canyon Road Eastern sensibilities, American minimalism and contemporary impulses (see AC, page 28). 5 pm, free MERIDEL RUBENSTEIN: EDEN TURNED ON ITS SIDE Peters Projects 1011 Paseo de Peralta, 954-5700 Examine the ecological and human processes across time that either reinforce or destroy the notion of Eden. Through Oct. 27. 5 pm, free MICHAEL FURMAN: PORSCHE PORTRAITS Patina Gallery 131 W Palace Ave., 986-3432 View images of some of the finest cars in existence. Through Oct. 5. 5:30 pm, free WENDY FOSTER: LARGER THAN LIFE Studio WFC 1704 Lena St., Ste. B1 New works of collage. Through Oct. 7. 5 pm, free YUMIKO IZU AND KENRO IZU: IN HARMONY Scheinbaum and Russek 812 Camino Acoma, 988-5116 Observe how the couple influenced each others’ work through their photographs. Through Oct. 19 by appointment. 5 pm, free ZONE City of Mud 1114A Hickox St., 954-1705 Digital photo collage, video-enhanced motion sculpture and other media explore geometric, serene and futuristic flavors. Through Nov. 30. 5 pm, free

THE CALENDAR

BOOKS/LECTURES HANDWRITING LIVES! New Mexico History Museum 113 Lincoln Ave., 476-5100 There are only 11 individuals who bear the title of master penman, and one of them is from Albuquerque. Bill Kemp describes the progression of perfecting his letterforms. 6 pm, free

DANCE PUEBLO OF POJOAQUE YOUTH HOOP DANCERS Buffalo Thunder Resort and Casino 20 Buffalo Thunder Trail, 455-5555 Dancers perform in the lobby (see SFR Picks, page 21). 6 pm, free

EVENTS GARDEN SPROUTS PRE-K ACTIVITIES Santa Fe Botanical Garden 715 Camino Lejo, 471-9103 Head to the garden's outdoor classroom for a hands-on program for 3-5 year olds and their caregivers. 10-11 am, $5 GOVERNOR’S AWARDS FOR EXCELLENCE IN THE ARTS St. Francis Auditorium 107 W Palace Ave., 476-5072 The best of the best are honored at an evening’s awards ceremony. Info at nmarts.org. 5:15-7 pm, free POEH NATIVE ART SHOWCASE Buffalo Thunder Resort and Casino 20 Buffalo Thunder Trail, 455-5555 Purchase one-of-a-kind art pieces from Pueblo artisans. 5-7 pm, free SECOND STREET ARTS COLLECTIVE OPEN STUDIOS Second Street Studios 1807 Second St. Working artists open their studios to art enthusiasts. Info is at 2acsf.com. 5-8 pm, free STARRY STARRY NIGHT Santa Fe Children's Museum 1050 Old Pecos Trail, 989-8359 At a benefit for the New Mexico Children's Foundation, get dinner, dance under the stars and auctions. 5:30 pm, $150

FILM COCO Railyard Park Cerrillos Road and Guadalupe Street, 982-3373 Along with folk dancing from Los Niños de Santa Fe, catch the film in Spanish, with English subtitles. 7 pm, free

MUSIC 4SWING The Montecito 500 Rodeo Road, 428-7777 Swinging jazz. 6 pm, $2

ALTO STREET Second Street Brewery (Original) 1814 Second St., 982-3030 Folk-pop 'n' bluegrass. 11:30 am-1:30 pm, free ANTERO WINDS QUINTET St. John's College 1160 Camino Cruz Blanca, 984-6000 Known for their artistic sensitivity and exuberant stage presence, the quintet presents works by Jean Françaix, György Ligeti and Malcolm Arnold, as well as more contemporary works. Peterson Student Center’s Great Hall. 7:30 pm, $20 BIRD THOMPSON The New Baking Company 504 W Cordova Road, 557-6435 Adult contemporary with a dab of dharma. 10 am, free BURGER BEATS: DJS DAVE SMOOTH, MARTI MCFLY AND XAVIER Boxcar 530 S Guadalupe St., 988-7222 House and bass tunes with a variety of local DJ folks. 10 pm, free THE BUS TAPES La Fiesta Lounge 100 E San Francisco St., 982-5511 Alternative folk-rock with funk ‘n’ blues. 8 pm, free CHAT NOIR CABARET Los Magueyes Mexican Restaurant 31 Burro Alley, 992-0304 Modeled after 19th-century Parisian cabarets, musical respite from the outside world. 6 pm, free DJ ELVIS KARAOKE Palace Saloon 142 W Palace Ave., 428-0690 Get the mic. 10 pm, $5 DIANE CLUCK AND ELLE SHADE Zephyr Community Art Studio 1520 Center Drive, Ste. 2 Cluck tours through from Virginia with mythic avant-garde folk and all kinds of unusual instruments. Supported by Shade's ukelele pop-folk. 7:30 pm, $15 DOUG MONTGOMERY AND GREG SCHLOTTHAUER Vanessie 427 W Water St., 982-9966 Standards, classical, pop and Broadway tunes on piano: Doug starts, Greg takes over at 8 pm. 6 pm, free DUO RASMINKO Mine Shaft Tavern 2846 Hwy. 14, Madrid, 473-0743 Bohemian pop on the deck. 5 pm, free GRAVITAS SHOWCASE Meow Wolf 1352 Rufina Circle, 395-6369 A boatload of EDM artists under the Gravitas label. Y so srs? 8 pm, $20-$25 CONTINUED ON PAGE 30

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“The intertwining of red and blue is energy, and it’s pulsating through these snakes and playing with the figure,” she says. “With all of the pieces there’s an interplay of hot and cold and how they play with each other. It’s visually striking, but blue and pink are the representation of the two sides of the self.” “Link in a Chain” more overtly displays the aforementioned idea of symmetry: A bull with nearly identical horns is surrounded by a chain that doesn’t quite meet. It’s arboreal, with the creature either transforming to a tree or having mor-

Dichotomy Sienna Luna explores her duality while Matthew Rowe embraces imperfection BY ALEX DE VORE a l e x @ s f r e p o r t e r. c o m

phed from one; the beast’s third eye oozes energy and follows you wherever you go. This animal-meets-plant motif is a sly hint at her burgeoning body of work, early ideas from which we’ll see at Two Sides / Same Coin, and a project that finds Luna randomly generating plant and animal subjects and abstracting on the results with homeopathic flora imagery and the accoutrements of the natural world. “I always do people,” she notes, “but I’ve wanted to do still lifes with plants and animals; I want to make double helixes out of plants and bugs—I want to be versatile, I don’t want to just continue creating the same thing over and over again because it’s my comfort zone.” This speaks, of course, to growth—personal, artistic or otherwise—and becomes an excellent counterpoint to the Two Sides / Same Coin idea of balance. How does one balance their own duality while  tackling and managing growth as a human or as an artist? “To make art that has some kind of emotion people resound with, that takes putting yourself into it,” Luna muses. “Not to say, ‘I bleed for thee!’ but [this body] is definitely personal. It’s somehow kind of scary.”

COURTESY SIENNA LUNA

TWO SIDES

During a late afternoon studio visit with painter, illustrator and graphic designer Sienna Luna, she is bustling through last-minute preparations for her upcoming show at the ART.i.factory, the gallery space within the Art.i.fact consignment shop. Paints and tools litter the table of her small space, but it is still impossibly clean. She offers me figs—literal figs. A Santa Fe native who returned to town after a stint in Arizona, Luna’s had a little more than a month to prepare new works, brush up in-progress pieces and create prints for Two Sides / Same Coin, an event that not only showcases the artist’s gorgeous, colorful work, but that serves to help her explore the concept of duality in art, nature, mankind and herself. “It’s about the balance of opposing identities,” Luna says, “and the same patterns playing out in the natural world.” Luna says the concept started out through mere observation of her surroundings. This eventually grew into a regular practice of seeking, both within herself and inside other people who gravitate into her sphere. “I started noticing it in other people— how we seek to find that balance within ourselves. … We’re trying to find our identities; are we masculine, feminine, something in between? It was about trying to illustrate people who maybe aren’t one or the other, an interplay of elements in most people. I wanted to understand what I was noticing.” Take titular piece “Two Sides  Same Coin,” a work that embraces yet toys with the notion of symmetry. We observe a woman from behind, her shoulders and back bare but emblazoned with sacred geometry and a single red bird; her headdress has become a makeshift nest. Around her, jutting upward, are two writhing snakes, one red and the other blue, nearly meeting in the middle. Perhaps a nod to Uroboros, the snake that ate itself, but more of a play on the idea of two.

SIENNA LUNA: TWO SIDES / SAME COIN “Two Sides / Same Coin” by Sienna Luna—all about that snakes.

4-7 pm Saturday Sept. 15. Free. ART.i.factory, 930 Baca St., 982-5000

2ND ANNUAL THEATRE WALKta Fe

SEE YOU ON TS THE STREEH E T AND IN ! S T A SE

Saturday • September 22 • 1:30 to 5:30

For schedule and a map:

www.TheatreSantaFe.org /walk 28

SEPTEMBER 12-18, 2018

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San

Stroll between performances by 20 theatre companies at 10 venues in the Rufina Arts District

$5 wrist band — covers all performances! (12 and under FREE)


S FREP ORT ER.COM/ARTS

A&C COURTESY BEALS & CO. SHOWROOM

THE BREAKS

“I was born into an art family,” artist and gallerist Matthew Rowe says. “Both my parents are art dealers, and ever since I was a kid, when we took vacations, it was museums and galleries—and I’ve always been making stuff.” Rowe’s name might sound familiar due to Addison Rowe Gallery, a space that specializes in deceased artists such as Emil Bisttram and Beatrice Mandelman—but he’s a devout ceramicist in his own right and has trained in both Eastern and Western methods  at the University of New Mexico, the Oxbow School in California and under Santa Fe ceramics master Heidi Loewen. “I kind of stumbled upon it in college, the idea that clay is like a record,” Rowe says. “Like how some of the earliest Babylonian records we have are receipts carved into clay.” In  his upcoming show,  Contextual K e r n i n g, Rowe builds on his love of clay as he simultaneously embodies an exercise in letting go. As much as any artist does, Rowe labors over each piece in its initial stages—but whereas the clay and ceramics most people are familiar with tend to be utilitarian pieces such as bowls or vessels, Rowe’s works are made to be broken. Each piece is carefully crafted, deliberately broken, then rebuilt into wall hangings meant for beautification rather than use. “Part of it was working in a gallery and realizing people value something that hangs on a wall more than sits on a table,” Rowe says, “and part of it was this kind of celebration within our cultural norms; celebrating a broken piece and raising its value by putting it on the wall—you’re taking away the function of the piece, but you’re shifting it, celebrating the work.” For each piece, Rowe uses the slab method of throwing clay, a style that shirks the more readily recognizable vesssel-turning wheel to create two-dimensional creations.  Next, he creates patterns and shapes within the clay before he breaks it down into pieces—a step that is necessary due to the small size of his kiln. While the pieces are fired for upward of 16 hours, Rowe builds the wooden backs and frames in which they’ll hang. “I’ve learned in this process that I spend almost as much time making the backs as the pieces themselves,” he says, “but it’s not just a board the ceramic is attached to. I’ve tried to make it so there’s a conversation between the background and the piece.” This means a sort of 3-D effect for many works. Rowe also creates in smaller

mediums, such as tile, but with a similar break-the-clay methodology. “That way you’re not creating the illusion of space,” he says. “It’s actually there.” Rowe delves into minimalism as well, but with a decidedly Japanese bent. A self-described obsessive when it comes to Japanese architecture, many of his pieces resemble the types of paper screens, doors and windows we associate with traditional homes on the island nation. He achieves this simply, with wooden dowels mounted on the backing, but he toils over their positioning until he considers them just right—an interesting step, considering how completely he seems to enjoy the sometimes random shapes that occur during the breaking of the clay. Still,  the  commitment to minimalism illustrates another point for Rowe: namely, the way we speak about and consume art. “I feel like the over-conceptualization in contemporary art is one of the things that’s ruining it,” he says. “I don’t want to write a manifesto! If I have to write that way about it, the works aren’t doing their job. I’m just trying to make things I like.” Find Rowe’s show at both his residency at the Beals & Co. Showroom, which opens this Friday, and at Four Seasons Resort Rancho Encantado (198 Hwy. 592, 946-5700) through Sept. 16. MATTHEW ROWE: CONTEXTUAL K E R N I N G 5-8 pm Friday Sept. 14. Free. Beals & Co. Showroom, 830 Canyon Road, 357-0441.

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¡GLOBALQUERQUE!

THE CALENDAR

ENTER EVENTS AT SFREPORTER.COM/CAL

New Mexico’s 14th Annual Celebration of World Music & Culture

September 21 & 22, 2018

National Hispanic Cultural Center | Albuquerque, NM

Music. Dance. Culture. TICKETS ON SALE NOW

20 Performances 17 Acts 5 Continents 3 Stages 2 Nights 1 Unique Event Even

TIX | HOTEL PACKAGES | INFO

globalquerque.org

AYNUR (TURKEY) CANZONIERE GRECANICO SALENTINO (ITALY) COREYAH (KOREA) DELGRES (GUADELOUPE) IRIS DEMENT (ARKANSAS, USA) YOUSSRA EL HAWARY (EGYPT) JARLATH HENDERSON (IRELAND) JUPITER + OKWESS (DR CONGO) LOS DE ABAJO (MÉXICO) LADAMA (BRAZIL/COLOMBIA/VENEZUELA/USA) LA DAME BLANCHE (CUBA) LEMON BUCKET ORCHESTRA (CANADA) LLUVIA NEGRA (TAOS, NEW MEXICO, USA) MARTHA REDBONE (CHEROKEE/CHOCTAW/APPALACHIA) RIO MIRA (ECUADOR/COLOMBIA) TRIBUTE TO ANTONIA APODACA (LAS VEGAS, NEW MEXICO, USA)

The Global Village of Craft, Culture & Cuisine!

Open throughout the entire festival! Featuring a unique selection of arts, crafts, clothing, jewelry, homeopathics, more! Craft Beer! Artisan Wine! International Foods! Saturday, Sept. 22

FREE Global Fiesta! 10:30 AM - 4:00 PM

Free community day of interaction & exploration! Enjoy international dance classes, workshops, panels & discussions with visiting artists, film, hands-on inter-activities, and so much more!

SPECIAL RAILRUNNER / ROOM / TICKET PACKAGE Includes transportation to/from Railrunner in ABQ and Venue! Full hot breakfast, too!

Call Jennifer @ Best Western InnSuites for info & reservations 505.242.7022

30

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JJ AND THE HOOLIGANS El Farol 808 Canyon Road, 983-9912 Rock 'n' roll shenanigans. 9-11 pm, $5 JERRY LOPEZ AND FRIENDS Lensic Performing Arts Center 211 W San Francisco St., 988-1234 The Santa Fe native son brings his buddies for some Latin tunes. Benefits the National Latino Behavioral Health Association. 7 pm, $30-$60 JESUS BAS La Boca (Taberna Location) 125 Lincoln Ave., 988-7102 Spanish and flamenco guitar. 7 pm, free JOAQUIN GALLEGOS Santa Fe Oxygen & Healing Bar (Apothecary) 133 W San Francisco St., 986-5037 Flamenco. 7-9 pm, $20 THE LONG GONE Tumbleroot Brewery & Distillery 2791 Agua Fría St. Americana. 8 pm, free MARK'S MIDNIGHT CARNIVAL SHOW Cowgirl 319 S Guadalupe St., 982-2565 Colorado rock. 8:30 pm, free NOISE FOR NOW: GRIZZLY BEAR The Bridge @ SF Brewing Co. 37 Fire Place, 557-6182 Indie rock (see Music, page 25). 6:30 pm, $31 OMAR VILLANUEVA Sunrise Springs 242 Los Pinos Road, 471-3600 A Baroque, Romantic and Latin American repertoire. 6-8 pm, free PERFECT STRANGR Turquoise Trail Bar at Buffalo Thunder 30 Buffalo Thunder Trail, 877-848-6337 Country 'n' Western. 9:30 pm, free REGIONAL/LIQUID Shadeh Nightclub 30 Buffalo Thunder Trail, 819-2338 VDJ Dany has your cumbia, huapangos, Norteñas and more; DJ Poetics has hip-hop, top 40, dancehall, EDM, reggae, old-school ‘n’ funk. 10 pm, free ROBIN HOLLOWAY Osteria D'Assisi 58 S Federal Place, 986-5858 Piano standards. 6:30 pm, $2 RONALD ROYBAL Hotel Santa Fe 1501 Paseo de Peralta, 982-1200 Native American flute and Spanish classical guitar. 7 pm, free SONGS OF RESISTANCE SING-ALONG & WORKSHOP Zephyr Community Art Studio 1520 Center Drive, Ste. 2 Zephyr founder Alysha Shaw curates protest songs, and teaches some of them and invites you to bring your favorites too. 4-6 pm, free

TGIF RECITAL: DAVID SOLEM First Presbyterian Church 208 Grant Ave., 982-8544 The organist presents works by John Adams, Johannes Brahms and Thomas Ades. 5:30 pm, free THE THREE FACES OF JAZZ El Mesón 213 Washington Ave., 983-6756 Jazz, perhaps? 7:30 pm, free TONIC JAZZ SHOWCASE Tonic 103 E Water St., 982-1189 We think this is jazz too. 9:30 pm, free VICTOR MASON Blue Corn Café and Brewery 4056 Cerrillos Road, 438-1800 Americana. 6-8 pm, free

THEATER ATACAMA Teatro Paraguas 3205 Calle Marie, 424-1601 A man and a woman meet in the northern Chilean desert while searching for bone fragments of loved ones disappeared by the Pinochet regime, and find a deep and unsettling connection. 7:30 pm, $10-$20 KING LEAR Adobe Rose Theatre 1213 Parkway Drive, 629-8688 Shakespeare’s profound and complex play explores the nature of power: in family, politics, and nature. 7 pm, $25

SAT/15 ART OPENINGS KAREN FITZSIMMONS AND SANDRA PLACE Collected Works Bookstore and Coffeehouse 202 Galisteo St., 988-4226 Abstract assemblage and illustrations, plus pastels and acrylics of birds and landscapes. Through Oct. 31. 4 pm, free SIENNA LUNA: TWO SIDES/SAME COIN The ART.i.factory 930 Baca St., Ste. C, 982-5000 The artist explores the self through the mind, body and being (see AC, page 28). 4-7 pm, free

BOOKS/LECTURES ANDREA BAKER AND RACHEL SPRING op.cit Books DeVargas Center, 157 Paseo de Peralta, 428-0321 Readings by local authors. 2 pm, free THE NATIONAL POPULAR VOTE AND YOU Southside Branch Library 6599 Jaguar Drive, 955-2820 New Mexicans for Money Out of Politics presents a lecture by Ute Haker about the push for the nonpartisan National Popular Vote. 10:30 am-noon, free

DANCE FLAMENCO REVOZO Lensic Performing Arts Center 211 W San Francisco St., 988-1234 Featuring Vicente Griego and Jerry Lopez. 7 pm, $30-$40 NOCHE DE FLAMENCO El Mesón 213 Washington Ave., 983-6756 EmiArte Flamenco really is as good as you hear they are. Reservations are needed, so call in. Seating's at 5 pm. 7 pm, $20

EVENTS ALBUQUERQUE BONSAI CLUB SHOW Santa Fe Botanical Garden 715 Camino Lejo, 471-9103 Members of the Albuquerque Bonsai club show their best bonsai, answer questions and give demonstrations. 9 am-5 pm, free AMERICAN INDIAN COMMUNITY DAY Ragle Park 2530 W Zia Road Share a meal and relax at the eighth annual event, complete with music, dances, raffles, face-painting, art projects, nonprofit booths and more. Noon-4 pm, free BIRD WALK Randall Davey Audubon Center 1800 Upper Canyon Road, 983-4609 A guided birding hike with experienced bird nerds. 8:30-10 am, free BUENOFEST Ski Santa Fe 740 Hyde Park Road, 982-4429 Pace yourself for a beer festival at 10,000 feet, featuring eight local breweries, live music, games, chairlift rides, disc golf, a gear shop sale, rock 'n' roll by JJ & The Hooligans, food and more. Info’s at skisantafe.com. Noon-5 pm, $18 FALL PLANT SALE Santa Fe Botanical Garden 715 Camino Lejo, 471-9103 Arrive early for the best selection of plants, including perennials, ornamental grasses and shrubs. 9 am-5 pm, free LIVING HISTORY FESTIVAL Railyard Park Cerrillos Road and Guadalupe Street, 982-3373 Celebrate 10 years of the Railyard Park with historical demonstrations (weaving, wool-spinning, tinwork and such), get your tintype taken, make adobe bricks and more. 10 am-4 pm, free MONARCH BUTTERFLY WATCHING AND COUNTING Leonora Curtin Wetland Preserve 27283 I-25 W Frontage Road, La Cienega, 471-9103 Monarch butterflies migrate through the Santa Fe area every year, so learn about their migration, their difficulties and how you can help the survival of their species. 1-4 pm, $5-$10


ENTER EVENTS AT SFREPORTER.COM/CAL

THE CALENDAR Thursday 9/20

NEW MEXICO RAILROAD HISTORY CELEBRATION El Museo Cultural de Santa Fe 555 Camino de la Familia, 992-0591 Have fun and learn about New Mexico’s railroad history. There is so much coolness going on that we couldn’t possibly list it all, so visit nmrailroadhistory.com. 10 am-4 pm, free POP-UP PLAYGROUND Railyard Park Cerrillos Road and Guadalupe Street, 982-3373 Imagine, construct, get covered in mud and have fun. 11 am-3 pm, free SANTA FE ARTISTS MARKET Santa Fe Railyard Market Street at Alcaldesa Street, 310-8766 Arts and crafts from a juried group of local artists. 8 am-2 pm, free SANTA FE RENAISSANCE FAIRE El Rancho de las Golondrinas 334 Los Pinos Road, 471-2261 Don thy fairest Renaissance attire and prepare thyselves. See 3 Questions over there > 10 am-5 pm, $10-$12 SHINE BRIGHT KID’S YOGA Madrid Railyard 846 Hwy. 14, Madrid, 473-0743 Get that kiddo out of bed and make ‘em stretch. 9:45-10:30 am, $10 YOGA IN THE GARDEN Santa Fe Botanical Garden 715 Camino Lejo, 471-9103 Stretching, wellness and relaxation. Mats provided. 10-11 am, $7

FILM TRAIN FILM FEST: 3:10 TO YUMA Violet Crown Cinema 1606 Alcaldesa St., 216-5678 As part of the New Mexico Railroad History Celebration, get a historical intro before the 2007 film. 6 pm, $9-$12 TRAIN FILM FEST: MURDER ON THE ORIENT EXPRESS Violet Crown Cinema 1606 Alcaldesa St., 216-5678 After a historical intro, see the 1974 film in which Detective Hercule Poirot takes up a murder case on a train. 2 pm, $9-$12

MUSIC BARACUTANGA Boxcar 530 S Guadalupe St., 988-7222 World music, Latin tunes and sultry South American beats. 10 am, $5 BRUJO TRIO Duel Brewing 1228 Parkway Drive, 474-5301 Nuevo flamenco tunes. 6 pm, free THE BUS TAPES La Fiesta Lounge 100 E San Francisco St., 982-5511 Alternative folk-rock. 8 pm, free

with Victor Macias

ANTHONIUS MONK RELEASE PARTY OUTSTANDING CITIZENS COLLECTIVE SYMATREE UNDER THE CROWN BEAT BE KEEPERS DJ SHATTER

Sunday 9/23

YOUNG HUNTER JESSIE DELUXE THE TALKING HOURS

RICHARD GONZALES PHOTOGRAPHY

Behold, the 11th annual Santa Fe Renaissance Faire cometh this weekend (10 am-5 pm Saturday and Sunday Sept. 15 and 16. $10-$12. 334 Los Pinos Road, 471-2261), and therein shall thee find fat turkey legs, chivalrous jousts, old-timey costumes the mysterious fairy village and a living freaking unicorn. We spoke with Victor Macias, event coordinator for El Rancho de las Golondrinas, the venue and “living museum” in which this fantastical event takes place. (Layne Radlauer)

Kitchen open til 10 PM daily All Ages ∙ Dog Friendly Patio

Renaissance fairs are typically for nerds. What does this one offer people who aren’t into renaissance festivals? Our festival is very family-friendly. There’s a lot of activities for families to do, many of which are educational. You also don’t have to dress up—there are a lot of people who don’t dress up. You don’t have to dress up in a costume to see the joust or the fairy forest. Plenty of educational opportunities for everyone, you can really learn a lot about history here. There is also a lot a food, too, which is definitely a draw for some. Did I tell you about the train? Rio Metro has train service from Albuquerque to the 599 drop off. The blue bus will be picking people up from there and bringing them here. Other buses will pick people up from various parts of town, like the mall. The Rio Metro and blue buses have partnered up with us to pick people up who don’t want to drive. Food, turkey legs in particular, is a huge draw for the festival. Is there anything you’re particularly excited about? There’s not just fair food. There are plenty of options and vendors at the festival. We have tacos, for example, which people don’t usually expect. They’re very popular too, there’s always a long line, and tend to be the first to go. We do, of course, have turkey legs, but there’s a lot of other vendors, too, and there’s a lot of lighter food for those who don’t want to eat turkey legs. We’ve also got vegetarian options, so everyone can feast. There is a unicorn at the fairy forest. Is it real, and if so, how did you capture it? The unicorn is very real. Her name is Zima, and she’s beautiful. We did not capture her, she came in on her own. Everyone is allowed to come and pet her.

CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE

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SEPTEMBER 12-18, 2018

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THE CALENDAR

SeaSon opening

ESTEEMED REPUTATIONS Lensic Performing Arts Center SEPTEMBER 22 at 4 PM SEPTEMBER 23 at 3 PM

PRO MUSICA ORCHESTRA THOMAS O’CONNOR, conductor ANNE-MARIE MCDERMOTT, piano HAYDN Symphony No. 92 in G Major, Hob. I:92, “Oxford” CHRIS CERRONE High Windows MOZART Piano Concerto No. 20 in D Minor, K. 466 Tickets $20-$90

Concert Sponsor: Peter and Honey Chapin

505.988.4640 | SFPROMUSICA.ORG 32

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CHAT NOIR CABARET Los Magueyes Mexican Restaurant 31 Burro Alley, 992-0304 First-rate piano and vocals from Charles Tichenor and friends. 6 pm, free DOUG MONTGOMERY AND GREG SCHLOTTHAUER Vanessie 427 W Water St., 982-9966 Piano standards: Doug starts, Greg takes over at 8 pm. 6 pm, free DRASTIC ANDREW AND THE SUGAR MOUNTAIN BAND Tumbleroot Brewery & Distillery 2791 Agua Fría St. Progressive rock 'n' Americana. 8 pm, free ED GORMAN & TWO LEFT SHOES Social Kitchen & Bar 725 Cerrillos Road, 982-5952 Irish-inspired folky fun tunes. 6 pm, free FIRE SATURDAYS Shadeh Nightclub 30 Buffalo Thunder Trail, 819-2338 VDJ Dany spins cumbia, reggaeton, bachata, salsa y más, while in the other room DJ 12 Tribe has your hip-hop, top 40, EDM, R&B and more. 10 pm, free FUN ADIXX Turquoise Trail Bar at Buffalo Thunder 30 Buffalo Thunder Trail, 877-848-6337 Popular dance, rock 'n' soul. 9:30 pm, free HALF BROKE HORSES Cowgirl 319 S Guadalupe St., 982-2565 Country and Americana. 1-4 pm, free JUSTIN MARTIN Meow Wolf 1352 Rufina Circle, 395-6369 EDM beats and savory tunes. 9 pm, $20-$22 KARAOKE Golden Cantina Lounge 10-B Cities of Gold Road, Pojoaque, 455-3313 Ask the bartenders for the "Karaoke Kourage" special. What could go wrong? 9 pm, free LITTLE LEROY AND HIS PACK OF LIES Cowgirl 319 S Guadalupe St., 982-2565 Rock 'n' roll for dancin' to. 8:30 pm, free MANJIRI ASNARE KELKAR GiG Performance Space 1808 Second St. The classical Indian vocalist is joined by Sanjay Deshpande on tabla and Shri Suyog Kundalkar on harmonium. 7:30 pm, $20 MARC SANDERS Osteria D'Assisi 58 S Federal Place, 986-5858 Piano standards. 6:30 pm, free MARIO REYNOLDS Sunrise Springs 242 Los Pinos Road, 471-3600 Traditional Norteño tunes and on guitar, charango and flute. 6-8 pm, free

ENTER EVENTS AT SFREPORTER.COM/CAL

REVIVAL OF THE FITTEST Tonic 103 E Water St., 982-1189 Jazz, swing and roots. 9:30 pm, free RONALD ROYBAL Hotel Santa Fe 1501 Paseo de Peralta, 982-1200 Native American flute and Spanish classical guitar. 7 pm, free STEPHEN STILLS AND JUDY COLLINS Camel Rock Casino 17486 Hwy. 84/285, Pojoaque, 984-8414 The two music legends have just released a collaborative album of standards—hear some of ‘em tonight. 8 pm, $55-$67 SWING SOLEIL Second Street Brewery (Original) 1814 Second St., 982-3030 Swingin' jazz. 6 pm, free THOLLEM'S ELECTRIC CONFLUENCE San Miguel Chapel 401 Old Santa Fe Trail, 983-3974 Disparate musical styles performed on a variety of electronic keyboards. 7:30-9:30 pm, $10 TONE RANGER Santa Fe Oxygen & Healing Bar (Apothecary) 133 W San Francisco St., 986-5037 Ambient neo-Western tunes. 8 pm, $20 YACHT ROCK HUSTLE Palace Saloon 142 W Palace Ave., 428-0690 Solid rock 'n' roll. 10 pm, $5

THEATER ATACAMA Teatro Paraguas 3205 Calle Marie, 424-1601 A man and a woman meet in the northern Chilean desert while searching for bone fragments of loved ones disappeared by the Pinochet regime. 7:30 pm, $10-$20 KING LEAR Adobe Rose Theatre 1213 Parkway Drive, 629-8688 Shakespeare’s profound and complex play explores the nature of power. 7 pm, $25

WORKSHOP FAMILY PROGRAM: HARVEST SEASON Georgia O'Keeffe Museum 217 Johnson St., 946-1000 Kids learn about O’Keeffe’s passion for produce as they create veggie-inspired art. 9:30-11:30 am, free FINANCIAL FITNESS FOR LIFE Homewise 1301 Siler Road, Bldg. D, 983-9473 Learn tips to create financial goals, reduce or eliminate debt, make a budget, and all kinds of other adulty things. 9 am-4 pm, free

HAIKU IN THE GARDEN Santa Fe Botanical Garden 715 Camino Lejo, 471-9103 Create three-line observations about a fleeting moment involving nature with teacher Miriam Sagan. 1-3 pm, $20 LET'S GROW: COMPOST CLINIC Santa Fe County Fairgrounds 3229 Rodeo Road Learn how to compost your yard and food waste in a hands-on clinic. Bring hats, gloves, water and a pitchfork if you have one. 9-11 am, free PAGE FOR STAGE Teatro Paraguas 3205 Calle Marie, 424-1601 With playwright Mark Dunn, explore the mechanics of telling stories through theater. Lunch included! 10 am-1:30 pm, $15

SUN/16 ART OPENINGS BEST SEATS IN THE HOUSE: CLOSING RECEPTION La Sala de Galisteo 5637 Hwy. 41, Galisteo, 466-3541 Thirty artists present their interpretation of the chair. 4-7 pm, free

BOOKS/LECTURES AMANDA BRAMBLE: SACRED PLANTS, SACRED PLANETS Madrid Railyard 2846 Hwy. 14, Madrid, 473-0743 Learn about the correlation between plants and planets. 3-3:45 pm, $10 ENLIGHTENED COURAGE Thubten Norbu Ling Tibetan Buddhist Center 1807 Second St., Ste. 35, 660-7056 Explore the ideas in The Way of the Bodhisattva. 10 am-noon, free JOURNEYSANTAFE: ROB DEAN Collected Works Bookstore and Coffeehouse 202 Galisteo St., 988-4226 The former editor of The New Mexican gives a talk about Searchlight New Mexico. 11 am, free KAT MEADS AND JEANETTA CALHOUN MISH Teatro Paraguas 3205 Calle Marie, 424-1601 North Carolina author Meads and Oklahoma Poet Laureate Mish read their work. 5:30 pm, free LAUREN CAMP: TURQUOISE DOOR op.cit Books DeVargas Center, 157 Paseo de Peralta, 428-0321 Camp's fourth collection of poetry was inspired by Mabel Dodge Luhan, the artist, feminist, author and visionary of early 20th-century Taos (see SFR Picks, page 21) 2 pm, free CONTINUED ON PAGE 34


Osteria D’Assisi Look no further for authentic Italian cuisine than Osteria, and it’s served in a decidedly unstuffy and farmhouse-esque environment amid cheery rooms, stellar service and, often, live piano music. Owner Lino Pertusini hails from Italy—as do almost all ingredients used in crafting the menu. He has sought to create food and atmosphere to rival his homeland and a more upscale experience than his other, admittedly excellent, Santa Fe establishment, Pizzeria and Trattoria da Lino on Guadalupe Street. Osteria’s hearty appetizers such as the soup of the day ($7) and fried calamari ($14) prepare the way for lunch or dinner choices such as the lightly breaded and sinfully cheesy pollo parmigiana ($17-$25), unfathomably tender piccata di vitello veal chop ($32) or osso buco e risotto ($37). Osteria’s is not an expansive menu, but it’s a refreshing lack of clutter and specials change often. Housemade tiramisu ($8.50) sweetens the deal, and with lunch combos featuring salads and sandwiches, you won’t break the bank. (Alex De Vore)

Tesuque Village Market Tesuque is home to families that have owned land here since the 16th century right next to movie stars who designed their brand-new adobe mansions. It is only fitting that the area’s mainstay eatery comfortably accommodates everyone. TVM, having recently expanded to Venice, California, keeps its anchor firmly in New Mexico with a restaurant-cum-market (est. 1989) with spicy chile and creaky wood floors. Among offerings are a brick-oven pizza ($18 for a 16-inch margherita), red chile posole with pork ($13 a bowl), a bigas-your-head chicken quesadilla ($11) and Frito pie ($11 for veggie—beef will run you $14), not to mention household staples at a premium (grab a 14-ounce bottle of ketchup here for $4 rather than run into town to spend half that). Maybe there’s something to be said here about gentrification—but sitting back at a table that bucks when you lean on it (the floor’s crooked, not the furniture), the trees full of noisy late-summer bugs, neighbors and international travelers chatting table to table—what matters most to us elsewhere just doesn’t carry the same weight here. Note: The margaritas ($12.50 for a house) mess you up, so have a DD handy. Or take a long walk. (Charlotte Jusinski)

Rowley Farmhouse Ales Even as someone who doesn’t drink beer, I still frequent breweries. Rowley Farmhouse Ales exemplifies why: The food is amazing, the atmosphere is comfortable, and beer people are generally the best people. Rowley does always have a cider on tap for folks like me, so I got a Scrumpy organic hard cider ($7.50). As for food: Korean-style wings ($9), shrimp and grits (which I would suggest they call “meaty mighty sea-bugs resting on perfect butter clouds,” $15), tender and flaky seared black cod over toasted coconut rice ($19) and a creamy farmer’s market risotto ($14) flew out to the table. It’s gastropub food without the haughty vibe; alternately, the best brewery fare sans grease or regret. To finish, a few scoops of blackberry ice cream ($3) made with the fruit left over from the summer’s brewing had just enough yeasty funk (we say that lovingly). It finished off a meal with great company that, I must admit, could probably only be improved by a beer crafted by a Los Alamos National Lab scientist (aka John Rowley). Maybe next time. (CJ) 1405 Maclovia St., 428-0719 Lunch and dinner daily rowleyfarmhouse.com

JOY GODFREY

138 Tesuque Village Road, 988-8848 Breakfast, lunch and dinner daily tesuquevillagemarket.com

58 S Federal Place, 986-5858 Lunch and dinner daily; brunch Saturday and Sunday osteriadassisi.com

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TACO

THE CALENDAR SANTA FE FREE THINKERS’ FORUM Unitarian Universalist Congregation 107 W Barcelona Road, 438-6265 Join the humanist discussion group to ponder: "Why is there anything at all? Why not nothing?” 8:30 am, free

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SEPTEMBER 12-18, 2018

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EVENTS ALBUQUERQUE BONSAI CLUB SHOW Santa Fe Botanical Garden 715 Camino Lejo, 471-9103 Members of the Albuquerque Bonsai club show their best bonsai of different styles and species of trees, answer questions and give demonstrations. 9 am-5 pm, free FALL ACTIVITIES AT SKI SANTA FE Ski Santa Fe 740 Hyde Park Road, 982-4429 Head up the hill for chairlift rides, disc golf, live music, a beer garden and a sports shop sale. The Sean Healen Band plays some live rock 'n' folk. Info’s at skisantafe.com. Today’s also the third annual Ski Bueno Classic Disc Golf Tournament (elitebrothersdiscgolf.com). 10 am-3 pm, free INTUITIVE HEALING WITH ELIZABETH ANGLIN Madrid Railyard 2846 Hwy. 14, Madrid, 473-0743 Heal yo'self—but intuitively. 3-3:45 pm, $10 LOUIS MONTAÑO CITY PARK MURAL RESTORATION Louis Montaño Park 730 Alto Street Help restore the historic murals along the river located below the Boys and Girls club on Alto Street. Bring your favorite paintbrush! Drinks and snacks provided. Park near the Boys and Girls Club at 730 Alto St. Noon-6 pm, free MEDITATION & MODERN BUDDHISM: BUDDHIST PSYCHOLOGY FOR MODERN LIVING Zoetic 230 St. Francis Drive, 292-5293 A practical guide to develop a positive state of mind. 10:30 am-noon, $10 NEW MEXICO RAILROAD HISTORY CELEBRATION El Museo Cultural de Santa Fe 555 Camino de la Familia, 992-0591 Have fun and learn about New Mexico’s railroad history with historical engines and cars, operating model trains, train art and photography, a scavenger hunt (god we love scavenger hunts) and live demos and re-enactments as well as lots of activities for kids and a guided railroad history bike tour. There are WAY more events today than we have room to list, so, visit nmrailroadhistory.com. 10 am-4 pm, free

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NEW MEXICO RAILROAD HISTORY CELEBRATION: COMMUNITY PARADE Railyard Plaza Market and Alcaldesa Streets, 982-3373 Led by the boisterious party-time jams of the Partizani Brass Band, bring your bikes, scooters, kids and pets and march around, starting at the Railyard Plaza. For info: nmrailroadhistory.com. 11 am, free NEW MEXICO RAILROAD HISTORY CELEBRATION: COMMUNITY PICNIC Railyard Park Cerrillos Road and Guadalupe Street, 982-3373 Join your fellow railfans for a community picnic with the dulcet bluegrass tones of Tim Nolan's Railyard Reunion. Bring your own lunch or grab something from the many restaurants and food trucks that grace the Railyard. For info: nmrailroadhistory.com. Noon, free POP-UP PLAYGROUND Railyard Park Cerrillos Road and Guadalupe Street, 982-3373 Imagine, construct, get covered in mud and have a great time at a free public celebration of child-directed play. The Railyard Park provides materials (pallets, logs, cardboard, twine and rope). 11 am-3 pm, free SANTA FE RENAISSANCE FAIRE El Rancho de las Golondrinas 334 Los Pinos Road, 471-2261 Don thy fairest Renaissance attire and prepare thyselves for all the turkey leg-eatin', loom-weavin', mead-guzzlin’ fun you can handle. Children under 12 are free! (See 3 Questions, page 31.) 10 am-5 pm, $10-$12 YOGA WITH GRACE McWILLIAMS Madrid Railyard 2846 Hwy. 14, Madrid, 473-0743 Get limber and quash your stress with yoga. 10-10:45 am, $10 YOGA WITH RACHEL FREDELL Madrid Railyard 846 Hwy. 14, Madrid, 473-0743 Have trouble waking up by 10 am to hit yoga this morning? Or need even more? Stretch out those tight joints and do some sun salutations. 1-1:45 pm, $10

FILM TRAIN FILM FEST: 3:10 TO YUMA Violet Crown Cinema 1606 Alcaldesa St., 216-5678 As part of the New Mexico Railroad History Celebration, get a historical intro before the 2007 film, then enjoy watching outlaw Ben Wade (Russell Crowe) as he terrorizes 1800s Arizona until he is finally captured. But wait— there’s more ... 2 pm, $9-$12

TRAIN FILM FEST: MURDER ON THE ORIENT EXPRESS Violet Crown Cinema 1606 Alcaldesa St., 216-5678 As part of the New Mexico Railroad History Celebration, get a historical intro before the 1974 film. 6 pm, $9-$12

MUSIC GARY FARMER AND THE TROUBLEMAKERS Shadeh Nightclub 30 Buffalo Thunder Trail, 819-2338 To benefit the Mesa Prieta Petroglyph Project, an evening of rock 'n' blues, a silent auction and a special performance by the Lightning Boy Foundation Hoop Dancers. 4-7 pm, $35 BAILE DOMINGUERO Golden Cantina Lounge 10-B Cities of Gold Road, Pojoaque, 455-3313 Cumbia, Norteña, pasito satevo and reggaeton tunes. 9 pm, free THE BARBEDWIRES Mine Shaft Tavern 2846 Hwy. 14, Madrid, 473-0743 Soulful blues on the deck. 3 pm, free BLOOM Santa Fe Oxygen & Healing Bar (Apothecary) 133 W San Francisco St., 986-5037 A harmonic and eloquent fusion of soulful heart-songs, medicine music, ecological connection and solutionary activism from musician Robin Liepman. 7-10 pm, $5-$15 CHRISTIAN VINCENT La Fiesta Lounge 100 E San Francisco St., 982-5511 Classical and flamenco guitar. 6 pm, free DOM FLEMONS GiG Performance Space 1808 Second St. A founding member of the Carolina Chocolate Drops, Flemons' repertoire covers a solid century of American folklore, ballads and tunes. 7:30 pm, $25-$28 DOUG MONTGOMERY Vanessie 427 W Water St., 982-9966 Piano standards. 6:30 pm, free DRUM CIRCLE WITH TRAVIS STROOPE Madrid Railyard 2846 Hwy. 14, Madrid, 473-0743 Play some drums. 7-8 pm, $10 FULL OWL Cowgirl 319 S Guadalupe St., 982-2565 Americana. 8 pm, free LONE PIÑON Second Street Brewery (Railyard) 1607 Paseo de Peralta, 989-3278 Norteño, ranchera and huasteca jams. 1-4 pm, free CONTINUED ON PAGE 36


@THEFORKSFR

X-mas? More like heck, yes.

Chile and Comfort on Canyon Road Don’t let the Italian moniker fool you—Caffe Greco’s dishes are purely New Mexican BY MARY FRANCIS CHEESEMAN a u t h o r @ s f r e p o r t e r. c o m

P

ositioned at Canyon Road’s origin point sits Caffe Greco, a quirky, family-owned restaurant  that serves as an abridged introduction of what to expect for the throngs of uninitiated visitors exploring Santa Fe’s historic street of art galleries. It’s a primary-colored love letter to Northern New Mexican food and art, occupying a 200-year-old adobe building with red, blue and yellow painted walls adorned with retablos, car cartoon cowboys and José Guadalupe PosaPosa da-style calaveras. You’ll find chandeliers made of antlers hanging almost at eye-leveye-lev el from low ceilings of wooden vigas and an old cigarette machine turned Art-o-mat which, for $5,  serves up the most wallet-friendly art on Canyon Road. Add in the menu of standards as classic as a jukebox playlist, from huevos rancheros and enchiladas to Frito pie and stuffed sopaipillas, and you have a particular blend of elements perfectly suited to the

uniquely Santa Fean style of synesthesia tourists feel so acutely—spicy chile and fried tortillas offered alongside works of art that seem to come from a dream where everything tastes as strong as it looks. Owners Rita and Michael Linder opened Caffe Greco in 1992, after moving to Santa Fe in 1987 from New York City. Their shared passion was not restaurants but opera, which Rita studied at the Accademia Nazionale di Santa Cecilia, a conservatory in Rome, and which Michael performed as a cantor working at Carnegie Hall. Their favorite restaurant was Antico Caffè Greco, a historic café and the oldest bar in Rome. When it came time to name their Santa Fe venture, they decided on homage. Presently there are multi-

ple generations of the family working in the restaurant, including daughter Julie Bell and her husband Lance; the Bell family owned a department store in Santa Fe for 58 years. Though the Linders named their restaurant after a Roman institution, the wheelhouse of chef Ray Velasquez is undeniably New Mexican food, the kinds of things he learned to make in his grandma’s Las Vegas kitchen as a child. His cooking has garnered plenty of recent critical praise with Pasatiempo naming his green chile stew ($8.95) one of the finest in Santa Fe, and Edible Santa Fe, Albuquerque, Taos singling out his Frito pie ($8.95) and green chile cheeseburger ($13.95). Since nothing inspires a chile Sep craving like the cool air of September, I decided I needed to try that burger. It arrived on a homemade bun sizzling and piping hot, loaded with Monterey jack and Socor green chile from Socorro. Chunky and fresh, the green chile was a delight, and the burger itself was simple, locally sourced, grassfed beef that was straightforward and delicious. My dining companion ordered a burri mixed vegetable burri-

FOOD

to of spinach, summer squash, sweet peppers and artichoke ($12.95) smothered in red and green chile. The red was equally compelling, sourced from Chimayó, earthy and not too spicy no matter what the allcaps warning printed on the menu claimed. My palate has a mid-level sensi sensitivity to spice—I like it and crave it, but there are limits—and though the sauce made me sweat a little on that cool after afternoon, nothing made my lips swell up or my face turn red or cause any of the other less-delicate side effects for which chile can sometimes be responsible. There are also stuffed sopaipillas ($13.95) featuring pork adovada or beans and cheese, crispy chalupas ($12.95) and, in addition to the homemade green chile stew, an arroz con pollo soup and posole are available for $8.95. Caffe Greco also has items available on the menu that are not New Mexican, such as a Reuben sandwich ($14.95) and a green chile grilled cheese ($10.95) and, since the restaurant is open for breakfast, lunch and dinner, you’ll also find omelets ($12.95) and stacks of pancakes ($11.95). Breakfast is served all day, but the ribeye and grilled wild-caught salmon (both $23.95) are only available at night.  Still, the regional cuisine outshines it all. Beers are expensive at $6 for a Bud Light, projecting a sort of blue-collar version of the Canyon Road-style wine list prices further up the street at The Compound and Geronimo, but I’m not mad at it. The tourist experience is part of the pilgrim’s progress, and Caffe Greco makes for a wonderful way station for the acolyte looking to explore Santa Fe’s finer secrets. CAFFE GRECO 233 Canyon Road, 820-7996 8:30 am-5 pm Wednesday-Sunday Closed Monday and Tuesday

The burger rumors are true.

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THE CALENDAR

Volunteers Needed for Research Study

You may be eligible to participate if you: • Are 50 years of age or older • Are healthy

Study participation involves:

• Receiving an investigational vaccine for pneumonia and the FDA approved flu vaccine • 3 visits to our clinic with blood draws Compensation for time and travel is provided.

THEATER

For more information, contact: Southwest Care Center Research Department at 505-395-2003

Photos: Michael Long

Meet the artist MICHAEL LONG

FRIDAY, SEPTEMBER 14 & 28 AND SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 23 11:00 AM - 3:00 PM

CERRILLOS FIESTA –

15B First Street

Cerrillos, NM 87010 505-474-9326

STOREWIDE SALES!

CerrillosStation.com Mon-Sat 10-5:30

Sun 11-5

a new shop for women & men FREE VIBES | AFFORDABLE GOODS

1703 Lena st 505.738.1800 tues-fri, 10-6 sat-sun, 11-5 new fall hours

36

SEPTEMBER 12-18, 2018

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ATACAMA Teatro Paraguas 3205 Calle Marie, 424-1601 A man and a woman meet in the northern Chilean desert while searching for bone fragments of loved ones disappeared by the Pinochet regime. 2 pm, $10-$20 KING LEAR Adobe Rose Theatre 1213 Parkway Drive, 629-8688 Shakespeare’s profound and complex play explores the nature of power in family, politics and nature. 2 pm, $25

WORKSHOP

VISIT THE GALLERY DURING THIS SATURDAY 9/15!!

NACHA MENDEZ La Boca (Taberna Location) 125 Lincoln Ave., 988-7102 Latin music from around the world. 7 pm, free OLIVIA OROVICH Osteria D'Assisi 58 S Federal Place, 986-5858 Celtic, American folk, klezmer, Slavic folk, jazz and classical music on violin. 6:30 pm, free PAT MALONE AND JON GAGAN El Farol 808 Canyon Road, 983-9912 A jazzy duet. 7 pm, free SANTA FE SYMPHONY SEASON OPENER Lensic Performing Arts Center 211 W San Francisco St., 988-1234 A double-violin performance featuring Sirena Huang and Elmar Oliveira. 4 pm, $22-$80 SUGAR MOUNTAIN Cowgirl 319 S Guadalupe St., 982-2565 A Neil Young tribute. Noon, free

BEGINNING SHAMANIC JOURNEY WITH RUTH ABER Madrid Railyard 2846 Hwy. 14, Madrid, 473-0743 Ever wanted to be a shaman? You gotta start somewhere. Proceeds benefit the Madrid Medical/Dental Fund. 11 am-12:45 pm, $10

MON/17 BOOKS/LECTURES SOUTHWEST SEMINARS: RELIGION, WARFARE, AND THE HISTORY OF MAYA DIVINE KINGSHIP IN WESTERN BELIZE Hotel Santa Fe 1501 Paseo de Peralta, 982-1200 Jason Yeager, chair of the department of anthropology at the University of Texas (San Antonio), speaks as part of Southwest Seminars' Native Culture Matters lecture series. 6 pm, $15

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EVENTS

DANCE

SANTA FE INDIVISIBLE MEETING: ALLEGRA LOVE Center for Progress and Justice 1420 Cerrillos Road, 467-8514 Join the politically progressive group for special guest Allegra Love, an immigration attorney, director of Santa Fe Dreamers Project and general national superhero. 7 pm, free TAI CHI IN THE GARDEN Santa Fe Botanical Garden 715 Camino Lejo, 471-9103 Practice gentle exercises that improve fitness through mind and body integration, movements and breathing. 5:30-6:30 pm, $7

ARGENTINE TANGO MILONGA El Mesón 213 Washington Ave., 983-6756 Put on your best tango shoes. 7:30 pm, $5

MUSIC COWGIRL KARAOKE Cowgirl 319 S Guadalupe St., 982-2565 Michèle Leidig hosts Santa Fe's most famous night of karaoke. 9 pm, free DOUG MONTGOMERY AND ELIZABETH YOUNG Vanessie 427 W Water St., 982-9966 Standards on piano and violin. 6:30 pm, free THE PLEASURE PILOTS La Fiesta Lounge 100 E San Francisco St., 982-5511 Original and classic R&B. 7:30 pm, free RYLEY WALKER Second Street Brewery (Rufina Taproom) 2920 Rufina St., 954-1068 Sweet, soulful acoustic guitar with meditative lyrics. 8-11 pm, $14-$16

TUE/18 BOOKS/LECTURES ANDREW WULF: COLD WAR CULTURAL DIPLOMACY Fuller Lodge 2132 Centra Ave., Los Alamos, 662-8405 The director of the New Mexico History Museum revisits the American National Exhibition in Moscow. Presented by the Los Alamos Historical Society. 7 pm, free BILINGUAL BOOKS AND BABIES Santa Fe Public Library LaFarge Branch 1730 Llano St., 955-4860 In a program for babies 6 months to 2 years old (and their caregivers), join a play and language group to enjoy books, songs and finger games. 1 pm, free PRESCHOOL STORY TIME Santa Fe Public Library LaFarge Branch 1730 Llano St., 955-4860 Kids who are read to are generally smarter than kids who aren't. Get 'em learnt! 10:30 am, free

EVENTS METTA REFUGE COUNCIL Upaya Zen Center 1404 Cerro Gordo Road, 986-8518 A Buddhist support group for sharing life experiences of illness and loss in a variety of its forms. 10:30 am, free SANTA FE INDIVISIBLE MEETING Center for Progress and Justice 1420 Cerrillos Road, 467-8514 Join the politically progressive group to put into action the planning you did last night. 8:30 am, free YOGA IN THE GARDEN Santa Fe Botanical Garden 715 Camino Lejo, 471-9103 An all-levels yoga class designed to cultivate awareness, alignment, strength and flexibility. 8-9 am, $7 ¡VÁMONOS! SANTA FE: WALK WITH A COMMUNITY HEALTH WORKER Plaza Contenta 6009 Jaguar Drive, 550-3728 Head to the Plaza Contenta (across from Cesar Chavez Elementary School) to go for a stroll with Marisol Santiago. For more info: sfct.org/ vamonos. 5:30-6:30 pm, free

MUSIC BILL PALMER Tumbleroot Brewery & Distillery 2791 Agua Fría St. Rock 'n' roll, dirty country and beautiful acoustic ballads. 5-8 pm, free BLUEGRASS JAM Social Kitchen & Bar 725 Cerrillos Road, 982-5952 Yup, it's a bluegrass jam. 6 pm, free CHUSCALES La Boca (Original Location) 72 W Marcy St., 982-3433 Exotic flamenco guitar. 7 pm, free DOUG MONTGOMERY AND AL ROGERS Vanessie 427 W Water St., 982-9966 Piano standards: Doug starts, Al takes over at 8 pm. 6 pm, free FUTURE SCARS, RIDGEWAY AND NDVRS Second Street Brewery (Rufina Taproom) 2920 Rufina St., 954-1068 Local post-rockers Future Scars are joined by Ridgeway, a hard-hitting combo of shoegaze and hardcore, and NDVRS' indie-pop full of thick, catchy vocals (see SFR Picks, page 21). 8:30 pm, $5


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PAT MALONE TerraCotta Wine Bistro 304 Johnson St., 989-1166 Solo jazz guitar. 6 pm, free THE PLEASURE PILOTS La Fiesta Lounge 100 E San Francisco St., 982-5511 Original and classic R&B. 7:30 pm, free TONY BROWN Palace Saloon 142 W Palace Ave., 428-0690 R&B, soul, reggae, rock, blues, jazz, funk y más. 6:30 pm, free

WORKSHOP INNOVATE + EDUCATE LaFarge Library 1730 Llano St, 955-4860 Teens! Get the information you need to build a career you actually enjoy. 4:30-5:45 pm, free THE POWER IN STORY Academy for the Love of Learning 133 Seton Village Road, 995-1860 Explore individual and collective stories, and what can emerge when we unearth and breathe renewed life into them. 6:30-9 pm, free

MUSEUMS

New Mexico Sept 23 Peace Choir 3PM SUN

RD

at James A. Little Theatre 1060 Cerrillos Road

ABQ concert dates Sept 28TH & 29TH

Buy concert tickets online at NMPeaceChoir.org (or at the door) $20 General admission | $15 Seniors (62+) | Free for 10 and under

SEPTEMBER FREE LIVE MUSIC

COURTESY THE ARTIST

AT THE ORIGINAL Friday

14

ALTO STREET

15

SWING SOLEIL Jazz Manouche, 6 PM

Acoustic Pop, 6 PM

AT THE RAILYARD

16 LONE PIÑON

Sunday

GEORGIA O’KEEFFE MUSEUM 217 Johnson St.,946-1000 The Black Place: Georgia O’Keeffe and Michael Namingha. Through Oct. 28. HARWOOD MUSEUM OF ART 238 Ledoux St., Taos, 575-758-9826 Larry Bell: Hocus, Focus and 12; Rafa Tarín: For Now. Both through Oct. 7. IAIA MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY NATIVE ARTS 108 Cathedral Place, 983-8900 CineDOOM: Narratives of Native Film and Beyond. Through Oct. 29. Holly Wilson: On Turtle’s Back; Rolande Souliere: Form and Content. Both through Jan. 27, 2019. Darren Vigil Gray: Expanding Horizons; Meeting the Clouds Halfway. Both Through Feb. 16, 2019. Action/Abstraction Redefined. Through July 7, 2019. MUSEUM OF ENCAUSTIC ART 632 Agua Fría St., 989-3283 Climate Change is REAL. MUSEUM OF INDIAN ARTS & CULTURE 710 Camino Lejo, 476-1250 Stepping Out: 10,000 Years of Walking the West. Through Dec. 30. Points Through Time. Through Oct. 1. Maria Samora: Master of Elegance. Through Feb. 28, 2019. What’s New in New: Selections from the Carol Warren Collection. Through April 7, 2019. Lifeways of the Southern Athabaskans. Through July 7, 2019. MUSEUM OF INT’L FOLK ART 706 Camino Lejo, 476-1200 No Idle Hands: The Myths & Meanings of Tramp Art. Through Sept. 16. Beadwork Adorns the World. Through Feb. 3, 2019. Crafting Memory: The Art of Community in Peru. Through March 10, 2019. MUSEUM OF SPANISH COLONIAL ART 750 Camino Lejo, 982-2226

Echoes Peace

of

Saturday

JIM ALMAND Cowgirl 319 S Guadalupe St., 982-2565 Jazzy R&B. 8 pm, free MICHAEL UMPHREY Osteria D'Assisi 58 S Federal Place, 986-5858 Piano standards. 6:30 pm, free NOISE FOR NOW: ST. VINCENT AND ANDREW BIRD Santa Fe Opera House 301 Opera Drive, 986-5900 Powerful indie rock (see Music, page 25). 7:30 pm, $43-$81

THE CALENDAR

Son Huasteco, 1-4 PM

Edgar Heap of Birds’ “Surviving Active Shooter Custer” doesn’t mince words as part of SITE Santa Fe’s Casa Tomada (House Taken Over).

GenNext: Future So Bright. Through Nov. 25. NM HISTORY MUSEUM 113 Lincoln Ave., 476-5019 The Land That Enchants Me So: Picturing Popular Songs of New Mexico. Through Feb. 28, 2019. Atomic Histories. Through May 26, 2019. NM MUSEUM OF ART 107 W Palace Ave., 476-5072 Shifting Light: Photographic Perspectives. Through Nov. 4. Horizons: People & Place in New Mexican Art. Through Nov. 25. PALACE OF THE GOVERNORS 105 W Palace Ave., 476-5100 Closed for renovations. POEH CULTURAL CENTER AND MUSEUM 78 Cities of Gold Road, Pojoaque, 455-3334

In T’owa Vi Sae’we. EL RANCHO DE LAS GOLONDRINAS 334 Los Pinos Road, 471-2261 Living history. Renaissance Fair: 10 am-5 pm Saturday and Sunday Sept. 15 and 16. SANTA FE BOTANICAL GARDENS 715 Camino Lejo, 471-9103 Dan Ostermiller: Gardens Gone Wild! Through May 11, 2019. SITE SANTA FE 1606 Paseo de Peralta, 989-1199 Casa Tomada (House Taken Over). Through Jan. 6, 2019. WHEELWRIGHT MUSEUM OF THE AMERICAN INDIAN 704 Camino Lejo, 986-4636 Center for the Study of Southwestern Jewelry.

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SEPTEMBER 12-18, 2018

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O T O F D FOO Contest ENTER NOW!

Winning photos will be published in our new RESTAURANT GUIDE in October. One Grand Prize winner gets $200 worth of prizes from SFR and our local food and drink partners. #SFRfoodies ENTER HERE:

SFReporter.com/contests

ENTRIES ACCEPTED THE WHOLE MONTH OF SEPTEMBER. No limit on entries per photographer. $5 per photo. 38

AUGUST 29-SEPTEMBER 4, 2018

•

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MOVIES

RATINGS BEST MOVIE EVER

10

The Nun Review

9

Jesus!

8

BY ALEX DE VORE a l e x @ s f r e p o r t e r. c o m

7

It’s possible the people behind the Conjuring series had the prequel in mind from the start when the first movie dropped in 2013, but a more likely explanation is that horror has enjoyed a major resurgence in the last decade and there was money to be made. Enter  The Nun, a prequel to four (!) other films and a fun, sometimes-scary late-summer popcorn flick starring what’s-her-face from  American Horror Story  (Taissa Farmiga, who of course is related to The Conjuring’s Vera Farmiga), some dude as a priest (Demián Bichir) and some other dude as the French Canadian version of deus ex machina (Jonas Bloquet). Spooky goings-on abound in an ancient convent in the hills of Romania, so when a nun from the cloister offs herself (the ultimate sin in Catholicism, we’re told), the Vatican sends their best evil and/or miracles investigator to see what’s up. Turns out an evil presence has been tearing it up out there and messing with

6 5 4 3 2 1 WORST MOVIE EVER

6 + THAT DEMON IS SPOOKY; PRETTY FUN

+ WON’T

HOLD UP TO SCRUTINY; FRUSTRATING CHARACTER ACTIONS

the hundreds of years of perpetual adoration maintained by the nuns. Supernatural devil stuff ensues with minimal hints to the principal characters’ back stories, subtle nods to the property’s outlying universe and any number of “Did that actually just happen?!” jump scares. This makes The Nun  feel exhilarating at times, even if it suffers from disjointed filler scenes that only seem to exist as setup to the run-ins with the demon, who appears as a sincerely frightening nun. It’s the eyes, y’know? The eyes. Actors’ performances, meanwhile, are serviceable, though they usually have more to do with wide-eyed heavy breathing than actual acting; we get minimal information about

demonology and something about the Knights Templar. Whatevs. But we didn’t show up because we hoped for the contemporary horror equivalent of Citizen Kane—we showed up because the monster is scary, the jump scares are plenty and we need distractions from these waning warm days. Add another notch to your horror movie record for sure, and enjoy the spooks—just don’t think about anything too hard. THE NUN Directed by Corin Hardy With Farmiga, Bichir and Bloquet Regal, Violet Crown, R, 96 min.

QUICKY REVIEWS

7

KIN

8

THE MISEDUCATION OF CAMERON POST

7

CRAZY RICH ASIANS

KIN

7

+ COOL PREMISE, CONSISTENT FEEL; TRUITT AND FRANCO

- REYNOR AND THE FINALE

Before you go see KIN, know this: There’s going to be a sequel. There has to be. The feature film debut of directors and brothers Jonathan and Josh Baker walks a weird line between gritty reality and otherworldly sci-fi. The Baker brothers have only written and directed a handful of short films, and KIN is based on 2014’s Bag Man. It’s an admirable effort that hangs together well, despite some obvious shortcomings. As the film opens, we meet Eli Solinski (promising newcomer Myles Truitt), a smart but troubled kid who is the adopted son of Hal, a hardworking widower played by Dennis Quaid (Something to Talk About). When he’s not getting in trouble at school, Eli has a side hustle selling wire from abandoned Detroit buildings. That’s where he finds a futuristic gun that is the film’s strongest tie to science fiction until the very end. Eli’s older brother is Hal’s biological son, Jimmy (Jack Reynor, Grassland), who just got out of jail. He’s in deep with local dirtbag Taylor (James Franco, Freaks and Geeks) for protecting him in prison. It’s the reason Jimmy and Eli (kin, get it?) have to hit the road, with Taylor close on

Get blasted with future weapons in KIN.

10

BLACKKKLANSMAN

8

MISSION: IMPOSSIBLE - FALLOUT

their heels. Also on their heels are two soldiers from the future who seem pretty anxious to get that gun back from Eli. Everyone eventually catches up to Jimmy and Eli and the film comes together in very cool way, but with only minutes to wrap it up. Franco’s larger-than-life-gangster arc fizzles, and most of the plot questions are addressed with what feels like a line or two. That’s the beef most people seem to have with the film, anyway, and it’s legit. The Bakers hooked up with Stranger Things producers Shawn Levy and Dan Cohen, and the film has strong ties to the feel of that series, right down to Eli riding his bike everywhere in the beginning. Overall, it coalesces pretty well with respect to tempo and mood, but weak spots include Reynor’s performance, as well as a strong need for a few minutes more on the tail end to get the viewer more invested in the plot twist. KIN is getting panned big-time on metrics sites like Rotten Tomatoes and MetaCritic, but those ratings feel a bit impatient. If this movie does stand alone, you’ll have reason to be disappointed, but if it’s the start of something innovative (or even just interesting), you’ll be rewarded. It plays pretty well on the big screen, so if you’re going to roll the dice, do it soon. (Matt Grubs) Regal, Violet Crown, PG-13, 108 min. CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE

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• SEPTEMBER 12-18, 2018

39


MOVIES

FOR SHOWTIMES AND MORE REVIEWS, VISIT SFREPORTER.COM

only a few lines that mostly just reaffirm that his character is gay. But it’s fun to see sweeping aerial shots of Singapore, especially when used in conjunction with the over-the-top lifestyle of the Young family. Fireworks happen, y’all. And then eventually we’re fed a rom-com trope about Rachel and Nick’s undying love having nothing to do with money or status or making overbearing family members happy. The sorta-kinda-twist, however, lies in the stark reality of drastically differing social stations. This feels perhaps more true-to-life than plenty of the genre’s other examples, but still—wouldn’t you know it—love conquers all. Thank goodness, then, for the fantastic music found throughout Crazy Rich Asians that generally comes in the form of hit American or British songs covered in Chinese. This really sets a tone that makes non-Asian viewers feel welcome but still out of our element, a seemingly small yet clever touch in a film that is definitely aiming for fun rather than high art. Hopefully, though, it won’t be another two decades before Asian filmmakers and actors get another shot at the big screen of this scope. Frankly, it shouldn’t have to be a novelty—and if Hollywood’s concern is that (white) audiences won’t get it, let this be a lesson to them: If you make it, we will come. (Alex De Vore) Regal, Violet Crown, PG-13, 120 min.

THE MISEDUCATION OF CAMERON POST

8

+ DIVERSE CAST PLAYS DEEP CHARACTERS

- CRINGEWROTHY TOPIC

There’s nothing in this story that is easy to watch. Even during the flashbacks of hushed moments of intimacy, we’re cringing because of the rest of the context. The only thing that keeps our minds on track is the thought that adults in New Mexico are no longer allowed to subject their kids to what goes on in The Miseducation of Cameron Post. The state Legislature outlawed so-called “conversion therapy” in 2017, but it was perfectly legal in the state of Pennsylvania in 1993, the setting for this story. Cameron, played by Chloë Grace Moretz (Carrie, 2013), lands in the God’s Promise boarding school after a prom night that ends with shocking revelations to her high-school boyfriend. All the coded language and stunning agendas emerge at once, and Cameron herself seems paralyzed, numbed, unable to figure out whether she wants to or can be cured of her gayness, or whether she should plot an escape. The sparse dialog from the teen at first makes the biting words of the adults even sharper. “You,” says creepy psychologist Dr. Marsh, “are at an age when you are especially vulnerable to evil.” Jennifer Ehle (Fifty Shades of Grey) makes us believe she’s willing to go to any length to break the kids, and the basic message here is that “there is no such thing as homosexuality,” and teens with same-sex attraction are acting out some sort of deficiency in their lives that can be fixed with more Bible and fewer orgasms. But don’t get us wrong—it’s not an even slightly funny take. The teens predictably suffer damage by this philosophy and by severed relationships with their parents. Their characters are deep in the omission of details—and just what we don’t know also seems to offer a plethora of clues. We manage to cheer a little inside when it’s clear Cameron won’t take the bait, and we celebrate the way like minds can still find each other in the guarded friendships she forms. (Julie Ann Grimm) Center for Contemporary Arts, NR, 91 min.

CRAZY RICH ASIANS

7

+ VERY PRETTY; WU IS THE BEST - CHECKS OFF ALL THE STAID ROM-COM BOXES

It’s been well over 20 years since a mainstream American-produced film featured an entirely Asian cast (the last one was The Joy Luck Club in 1993, by the way, and Asians still remain the least-represented ethnicity in movies)—but with the release of the explosively popular Crazy Rich Asians from Now You See Me 2 director John M

BLACKKKLANSMAN So-called gay conversion therapy is illegal in New Mexico. Thank God. Still, The Miseducation of Cameron Post is a stirring and excellent film. Chu, this alarming issue may change. Or at least be addressed better by Hollywood? Fingers crossed. Representation matters—even if the underlying plot of the Kevin Kwan book-turned-movie follows a relatively formulaic plotline. Constance Wu (Fresh Off the Boat) is Rachel Chu, a young NYU econ professor who has fallen for the uber-charming Nick Young, heir to bazillions of family dollars, but who hasn’t told Rachel that he’s rich despite their year-long relationship—an interesting factoid she only discovers once the pair heads to Nick’s homeland of Singapore for a wedding. A seriously fancy-ass wedding. Cue mild drama (she forgives him for not mentioning the rich thing pretty quickly) and jokes about how things sure are different over there. Wu asserts her leading-lady position brilliantly, a comedic actor with a knack for sublime timing and who has proven her chops on television for years. Here she portrays a cool and up-for-anything type who bravely fields Young

family drama from Nick’s mother (the talented and graceful Michelle Yeoh of Crouching Tiger, Hidden Dragon fame), vindictive, jealous exes and petty rich types; get this woman in more projects immediately, someone. Elsewhere, B-plot elements feel shoehorned in at best, particularly the crumbling marriage of Nick’s sister Astrid (Gemma Chan) and a wildly pointless role portrayed by Silicon Valley’s Jimmy O Yang. Henry Golding (who you probably don’t know yet) is serviceable as the handsome and apparently magnetic Nick (he hangs out at the YMCA and borrows Rachel’s Netflix password so, like, he’s not one of those rich people). As is the case with most characters, we get a primer in his deal within the film’s early minutes, though nobody outside of Rachel really develops beyond their baseball card stats. Community vet Ken Jeong is, as almost always, underused, even if his daughter (played by rapper Akwafina) does provide some of the most organically funny moments of the film. Nico Santos (of NBC’s Superstore) feels misused as well, a very funny actor who gets

10

+ IMPORTANT HISTORY LESSON; BRILLIANT PERFORMANCES

- LITERALLY NOTHING BAD TO SAY

Spike Lee’s newest is a film that should make you break down sobbing—dor the past, the present, and for the potential future, given this low point in human history. BlacKkKlansman so vividly and powerfully captures our attention, taking us right up to the brink of hope before abruptly pulling us back down to reality; where racism is very much alive and well, where former KKK grand wizard David Duke can appear publicly, without fear, where protesters are run down for daring to point out that Black Lives Matter and where non-white Americans struggle daily for their very humanity. America first? Fuck you. John David Washington (Ballers) is Ron Stallworth, the real-life Colorado Springs detective who, in 1979, infiltrated the ranks of a local KKK chapter by simply making phone calls to local white supremacists and even David Duke himself (Topher Grace). Jewish officer Phillip Zimmerman (played here by Girls and Star Wars alum Adam Driver) poses as Stallworth for in-person goings on, and the small investigative team uncovers and thwarts an assassination attempt on a black student activist (Laura Harrier of Spiderman: CONTINUED ON PAGE 43

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WEDNESDAY, SEPT 12 12:30p Mystery of Picasso 12:45p Miseducation of Cameron Post* 2:15p Mystery of Picasso 3:00p The Cakemaker* 4:00p Cielo 5:15p Miseducation of Cameron Post * 5:45p Mystery of Picasso 7:15p Miseducation of Cameron Post* 7:30p Mystery of Picasso THURSDAY, SEPT 13 1:30p Mystery of Picasso 2:30p Miseducation of Cameron Post* 3:15p Mystery of Picasso 4:30p The Cakemaker* 5:00p Cielo 7:00p Bow Wow Film Fest 7:00p Bow Wow Film Fest* FRIDAY - SUNDAY, SEPT 14 - 16 11:15a American Chaos* 11:30a The Wife 1:15p Ceilo* 1:30p The Wife 3:00p Mystery of Picasso* 3:45p The Wife 4:45p Mystery of Picasso* 6:00p The Wife 6:30p Cielo* 8:00p The Wife 8:15p American Chaos* MONDAY - TUESDAY, SEPT 17 - 18 12:30p American Chaos* 12:45p The Wife 2:30p Mystery of Picasso* 3:00p The Wife 4:15p Cielo* 5:15p The Wife 6:00p Mystery of Picasso* 7:30p The Wife 7:45p American Chaos* *indicates in The Studio

WEDNESDAY, SEPT 12 2:00p The Bookshop 4:30p The Bookshop 7:00p Dare to Dream THURSDAY, SEPT 13 2:00p The Bookshop 4:30p The Bookshop 7:00p The Bookshop FRIDAY, SEPT 14 2:45p Woman Walks Ahead 5:00p The Bookshop 7:15p Woman Walks Ahead SATURDAY - SUNDAY, SEPT 15 - 16 12:00p The Bookshop 2:30p Woman Walks Ahead 4:45p The Bookshop 7:15p Woman Walks Ahead MONDAY - TUESDAY, SEPT 17 - 18 2:30p The Bookshop 5:00p Woman Walks Ahead 7:15p The Bookshop SPONSORED BY SFREPORTER.COM

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Over 35 interactive r o o d t u o d n a r o indo exhibits, including , our . m u i r a t e n a l p e l b a t r po

COME PLAY WITH US! 1050 Old Pecos Trail

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MOVIES

YOUR HOMETOWN MOVIE THEATRE WEDNESDAY, SEPT. 12TH SATURDAY, SEPT. 15TH 2:30 THE ODD COUPLE 12:30 RUNNING FOR GRACE (1968) 4:50 WINTER BROTHERS 3:00 SCARRED HEARTS 7:30 DRILLING MORA COUNTY THURSDAY, SEPT. 13TH

“Hi, asshole.” (Note: That’s not an actual line from BlacKkKlansman.) Homecoming). It’s a fascinating bit of American history and the actual Stallworth even penned a book about it (Black Klansman: A Memoir)— though Lee’s version is dramaticized. Before now, Stallworth’s story was ultimately relegated to the trivia pile for most Americans. Hopefully this film changes that. Washington is electric as Stallworth, his lifelong desire to be a cop at odds with his burgeoning radicalism. Can change occur from the inside? Maybe so. Harrier wows as well, a strong black woman with a penchant for subtle vulnerability and a streak of well-earned rage. Even the white guys (some of ’em, anyhow) start to get it as best they can, but the racism rampant on the streets of Colorado Springs and within Stallworth’s department itself is shockingly casual— conditioned, maybe, but no less ugly. That casual hate grows bolder throughout the film, starting at something about how the Klan “is non-violent” and culminating in cross-burning and explosives among intense, heartbreaking, powerfully delivered lessons in black history. Corey Hawkins as Kwame Ture alone is worth watching. But it’s not all heavy doom and gloom. There is pain, shock and awe, yes, but artfully chosen moments of levity punctuate the more challenging elements and the editing and pacing are damn near perfect. And we should never look away, even if BlacKkKlansman proves hard to watch—especially for white people, and rightly so. If the events of Charlottesville or the similar re-rise of no-longer-afraid white supremacists haven’t clued you in to how the fight must continue, perhaps pop culture will. Either way, there’s a lot to learn and a lot to consider here thanks to Lee’s masterful filmmaking and the real Stallworth’s incredible achievements. (ADV) Regal, Violet Crown, R, 135 min.

MISSION: IMPOSSIBLE - FALLOUT

7

+ THRILLINGLY OVER-THE-TOP

ACTION; (MOSTLY) MAGNETIC CAST - EVERY CLICHE IMAGINABLE

Mission: Impossible - Fallout, the franchise’s sixth installment, throws away coherency and realism, replacing these with palpable tension and absurd action pieces. Ghosts of Ethan Hunt’s (Tom Cruise) past come back to haunt him as a cache of plutonium is lost on his watch, and it’s up to the Impossible Missions Force (ugh) to combat a group of terrorists called The Apostles in retrieving it. Fans of the series will appreciate the gunplay, fistfights, mask-wearing and daredevil stunts provided by Cruise, anyone else will find a serviceable action flick that works OK for late summer. Cruise is loose—hydrated and unstoppable, remarkable for a 56-year-old actor. Henry Cavill (Man From UNCLE), meanwhile, looks as if he’s been sleeping in his car for the last few weeks. He’s so puffy, he can’t fully put his arms down. Ving Rhames is surprisingly soulful as Luther

Stickell, however, and his long-standing relationship with Cruise’s Ethan Hunt takes the forefront, further strengthening their 23-year bond. Elsewhere, Rebecca Ferguson (Life) has the most spectacular character entrance in the film, and although she is underused, she is easily the biggest scene-stealer. Simon Pegg further proves he belongs in the series with some of the best scenes coming from his familiarity with every single recurring character. Alec Baldwin shows up, too, basically playing himself, but Angela Bassett capably counters his forgiving-father archetype with a stern mother character as head of the CIA. Sean Harris, the stereotypical villain, growls and makes threats. An honorable mention does go to True Detective alum Michelle Monaghan as it was particularly nice to see her come back to the series. Christopher McQuarrie returns as well as series writer/director, following up his success with the fifth installment, Rogue Nation. McQuarrie’s directing style is competent enough as far as action scenes go, but between the too-frequent double crosses and an excess of cheesy lines (21 by this author’s rough count), his writing skills feel weak. The sets and cinematography simultaneously scream “pretty” and “fake.” Still, as we approach late summer, there are far worse choices. Fallout is as silly as it comes, but at least it isn’t a disappointment. (Matthew K Gutierrez) Regal, Violet Crown, PG-13, 147 min.

6:00 BLUE IGUANA 8:30 THEY LIVE SUNDAY, SEPT. 16TH

2:30 THE ODD COUPLE 12:00 RUNNING FOR GRACE (1968) 5:00 WINTER BROTHERS

2:30 SCARRED HEARTS

7:20 THE WILD BOYS

5:30 RUNNING FOR GRACE

FRIDAY, SEPT. 14TH

8:00 BLUE IGUANA

12:30 RUNNING FOR GRACE

TUESDAY, SEPT. 17TH 1:00PM - RUNNING FOR GRACE

3:00 SCARRED HEARTS 3:30PM - BLUE IGUANA 6:00 BLUE IGUANA 8:30 THEY LIVE

6:00PM - AUTHOR EVENT WITH JASON HELLER

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JONESIN’ CROSSWORD

BE MY FUR-EVER FRIEND!

“TL;DR”--some short versions. by Matt Jones

CALL FELINES & FRIENDS

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45 “Parks and Recreation” character Andy 1 Playground marble 48 Joan of Arc, e.g., for short 6 “Stay With Me” singer 49 Ruling official Smith 52 Word with Plaines or 9 Point-and-click tool Moines 14 Late-night TBS show 53 Niihau necklace 15 Bank offering, for short 55 Like a government wonk, 16 “Champagne Supernova” say band 58 They may be receding 17 Storage place 61 1990s cardio fad 18 Does some present prepa- 62 For some reason it’s National Soft Pretzel Month ration 20 New pilot’s achievements 63 “Ambient 1: Music for Airports” composer 22 Wed. preceder 23 “Inglourious Basterds” org. 64 Become a member 65 Regards 24 The Braves, on score66 Columnist Savage boards 67 Classic symbols of the 25 “I ___ Man of Constant theater Sorrow” 28 Country singer Travis DOWN 30 Elba who recently announced he won’t be play- 1 “With ___ of thousands” ing James Bond 2 Escaped 32 Australia’s Outback, alter- 3 Horn 4 “Break Your Heart” singer natively Cruz 37 Becomes less green 5 Provide with a wardrobe 38 Historic castle officially 6 Protestors’ placards called “Her Majesty’s Royal 7 Unfit for farming Palace and Fortress” 8 Mario Puzo subject 41 Discipline with poses 9 “The Jungle Book” boy 42 Wound on a bobbin 10 Rowboat pair 43 Limp Bizkit frontman Fred 11 “Mr. Robot” network

12 Tiny drink 13 Feature of a Mariner’s cap 19 Blasting stuff 21 Fall-blooming flowers 25 2012 Affleck thriller 26 Bearing 27 Donkey relative 29 “___ the best of times ...” 31 Word before longlegs or Yankee 33 1940s-’50s jazz style 34 Strange sighting 35 Traffic caution word 36 Poker variant 38 Hype up 39 Grimm creature 40 Piece with a headline 41 PGA measurements 44 2016 Dreamworks movie with Justin Timberlake 46 Respectable group? 47 Converse rival 50 Lilly of pharmaceuticals 51 Penalized, monetarily 52 Knighted vacuum cleaner inventor 54 They offer immunity on “Survivor” 55 Highly proper 56 Wrestler John of countless memes 57 “Peter Pan” dog 58 Took in 59 King Kong, for instance 60 Vexation

PETCO: 1-4 pm Thursday, Friday, Saturday & Sunday TECA TU at DeVargas Center: 12 noon-3 pm, First Saturday of each month Please visit our cats at PETCO and TECA TU during regular store hours. FOSTER HOMES URGENTLY NEEDED FOR ADULT CATS OF VARIOUS AGES SANTA FE CATS not only supports the mission of FELINES & FRIENDS from revenue generated by providing premium boarding for cats, pocket pets and birds, but also serves as a mini-shelter for cats awaiting adoption. For more information, please visit www.santafecats.com

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This wonderful cat found her way to safety at her rescuer’s home in the County. Unfortunately, she lives where she is not permitted to keep SOPHIE. TEMPERAMENT: SOPHIE is energetic and outgoing. She can be a little rough when playing, so would probably not be good with very small children. SOPHIE would prefer to be the only cat in her new home. AGE: born approx. 5/10/17. Come meet SOPHIE at Teca Tu @ DeVargas during regular store hours.

www.FandFnm.org

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MACKENZIE and MARGUERITE are from over a dozen cats transferred in late 2017 to Felines & Friends after being rescued from a hoarding case. We believe MACKENZIE and MARGUERITE are sisters. They were adopted together in early 2018, but their family is unable to keep them. TEMPERAMENT: Both cats are sweet, gentle and developing their individual personalities now that they have good food and a clean environment. MACKENZIE and MARGUERITE are beautiful Lynx Point Siamese mix. AGE: born approx. 12/10/15. The girls are with their current owners who are willing to arrange for approved applicants to meet them.

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SERVICE DIRECTORY

JOHREI CENTER OF SANTA FE. JOHREI IS BASED ON THE FOCUS AND FLOW OF THE UNIVERSAL LIFE ENERGY. When clouds in the spiritual body and in consciousness are dissolved, there is a return to true health. This is according to the Divine Law of Order; after spiritual clearing, physical and mentalemotional healing follow. You are invited to experience the Divine Healing Energy of Johrei. All are Welcome! The Johrei Center of Santa Fe is located at Calle Cinco Plaza, 1500 Fifth St., Suite 10, 87505. Please call 820-0451 with any questions. Dropins welcome! Open Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, 2-5pm. Friday 2-4pm. Saturday, 10am-1pm. Closed Sunday and Monday. There is no fee for receiving Johrei. Donations are gratefully accepted. Please check us out at our new website santafejohreifellowship.com Saturday, September 29 at 10:30 we will hold our monthly gratitude service. All are welcome!

CHIMNEY SWEEPING

JEWISH HIGH HOLIDAY CEMETERY GATHERING TO REMEMBER On Sunday, September 16th 1:30, the Jewish Community Council of Northern New Mexico will continue the Jewish tradition of remembering deceased family and friends on the Sunday between Rosh Hashanah and Yom Kippur. We will also bless the new Bimkom kever Remembrance Plaques. Events will be held in the Shalom Jewish Section of Rivera Family Funerals and Memorial Gardens Cemetery, 417 Rodeo Road, Santa Fe. All are welcome. A DAY OF SACRED SOUND AND SOUL REVITALIZATION: Saturday, October 13th, 9:30am to 4:30 pm, PARADISO, 903 Early St., Santa Fe / $75 / To Register call 505-220-6657. Revitalizing the Soul means rediscovering connection with your “true nature”, that loving self that transcends “ego hang-ups” and negative emotions. Using sound from quartz crystal bowls, movement, drawing, and lively interactive dialogue, Barry Cooney, Ph.D. will assist you in healing old wounds while nurturing joy and self love.

FOREST REALITY HIKE SUNDAY, SEPTEMBER 16, 9AM. Join Sam Hitt and the Santa Fe Forest Coalition to see for yourself Forest Service plans to clear and burn trees in roadless wilderness quality land near Hyde Memorial State Park. Meet at the Black Canyon Campground trailhead parking lot just off State Highway 475 (Ski Basin road). Bring water and rain gear. The two mile hike with moderate uphill climb takes approximately 2 hours. Free. Everyone welcome.

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GREENE FINE ARTS Cottage On The Pond Willard F. Clark Oil on canvas, 20” x 24” $9500 A resident in Santa Fe from 1928 to 1992, Clark addressed nearly every aspect of life in NM in his paintings, woodcuts and engravings. Friend and LANDSCAPING contemporary of such New Mexican notables as Gustave LANDSCAPES BY DENNIS Bauman, Eli Levin and Brian Landscape Design, Xeriscapes, Long, Clark was an integral part Drip Systems, Natural Ponds, of Santa Fe’s artistic tradition. Low Voltage Lighting & greenefinearts.com Maintenance. I create a custom lush garden w/ minimal use of precious H20. HOME 505-699-2900

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Meet Suzy! She is a 3 year old mixed breed and at 65 pounds she is a great sized dog for just about any adventure. Suzy has enjoyed affection from staff and volunteers here at the shelter and been super sweet and affectionate in return. She loves to run and play and she’s ready to find a new home. If you have another dog at home feel free to bring them in for a Meet n’ Greet with this lovely lady! SPONSORED BY

Meet Milo! This handsome boy is about a year old and currently weighs about 14 pounds. He found his way to the shelter as a stray and is now ready to settle down in a home of his own! Milo is ready for someone to show him the ropes and a great day for him would involve a walk around town, trips to training class, and of course lots of treats. If you have another dog at home you’re more than welcome to bring them in for a Meet n’ Greet with this gentleman.

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MIND BODY SPIRIT

Rob Brezsny

Week of September 12th

ARIES (March 21-April 19): Author Anne Carson describes part of her creative process in this way: “Sometimes I dream a sentence and write it down. It’s usually nonsense, but sometimes it seems a key to another world.” I suspect you might be able to benefit from using a comparable trick in the coming days. That’s why you should monitor any odd dreams, seemingly irrational impulses, or weird fantasies that arise in you. Although they may not be of any practical value in themselves, they could spur a train of thought that leads you to interesting breakthroughs.

one of her bulletins: “Stage 1. me: I’m the cutest thing in the world. Stage 2. me, two seconds later: no, I’m a freaking goblin. Stage 3. me, two seconds after that: I’m the cutest goblin in the world.” I’m guessing that many of you Libras have reached the end of your own personal version of Stage 2. You’ve either already slipped into Stage 3, or soon will. No later than October 1, you’ll be preparing to glide back into Stage 1 again.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): “There’s no such thing as love,” said Scorpio painter Pablo Picasso, “there are only proofs of love.” I’m tempted to believe that’s true, TAURUS (April 20-May 20): “The idea of liberation especially as I contemplate the current chapter of your through the suppression of desire is the greatest foolish- life story. The evidence seems clear: you will thrive by ness ever conceived by the human mind,” wrote philoso- engaging in practical demonstrations of how much you pher E. M. Cioran. I agree that trying to deny or stifle or care. You’ll be wise to tangibly help and support and ignore our desires can’t emancipate us. In fact, I’m encourage and inspire everyone and everything you inclined to believe that freedom is only possible if we love. To do so will make you eligible for blessings that celebrate and honor our desires, marvel at their enigare, as of this moment, still hidden or unavailable. mas, and respect their power. Only then can we hope to SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): According to a Pew refine them. Only then can we craft them into beautiful, Research Study, nearly 75 percent of Americans say useful forces that serve us rather than confuse and they talk to God, but only 30 percent get a reply. I’m undermine us. The coming weeks will be an excellent guessing the latter figure will rise dramatically for time for you to engage in this spiritual practice, Taurus. Sagittarian Americans in the next three weeks, howGEMINI (May 21-June 20): “Remember that sometimes ever. Why? Because the astrological indicators sugnot getting what you want is a wonderful stroke of luck,” gest that authorities of all kinds will be more responsays the Dalai Lama. Ain’t that the truth! When I was 22 sive than usual to Sagittarians of all nationalities. years old, there were two different women I desperately Help from higher powers is likely to be both more yearned for as if they were the Muse Queens of Heaven palpable and more forthcoming. Any communications who would transform me into a great artist and quench my you initiate with honchos, directors, and leaders have infinite passion. Fortunately, they both rejected me. They a better-than-normal chance of being well-received. decisively set me free of my bondage to them. Later, when I CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): One day in October was older and wiser, I realized that blending my fortunes 1926, author Virginia Woolf inscribed in her diary, “I with either of them would have led me away from my true am the usual battlefield of emotions.” It was a comdestiny. I got lucky! In a similar but less melodramatic way, plaint, but also a brag. In fact, she drew on this conGemini, I suspect you will also get lucky sometime soon. stant turmoil to fuel her substantial output of creative writing. But the fact is that not all of us thrive on such CANCER (June 21-July 22): Don’ts for Boys or Errors of ongoing uproar. As perversely glamorous and appealConduct Corrected was an advice book for boys published ing as it might seem to certain people, many of us in 1902. Among many other strictures and warnings, it can do fine without it. According to my analysis, that offered this advice: “Don’t giggle. For the love of decency, will be true for you in the coming weeks. If you have a diary, you might justifiably write, “Hallelujah! I am never giggle.” There was additional counsel in the same vein: “Don’t be noisy. The guffaw evinces less enjoyment NOT a battlefield of emotions right now!” than the quiet smile.” Another exhortation: “Don’t tease. AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Anthropologist Margaret Be witty, but impersonal.” In accordance with astrological Mead had definite ideas about “the ways to get insight.” omens, I hereby proclaim that all those instructions are She named them as follows: “to study infants; to study utterly wrong for you right now. To sweetly align yourself animals; to study indigenous people; to be psychoanawith cosmic rhythms, you should giggle and guffaw and lyzed; to have a religious conversion and get over it; to tease freely. If you’re witty—and I hope you will be—it’ll have a psychotic episode and get over it.” I have my own serve you well to be affectionate and personable. list of ways to spur insight and inspiration, which LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): “Simplicity is about subtracting the obvious and adding the meaningful,” writes designer John Maeda. “The ability to simplify means to eliminate the unnecessary so that the necessary may speak up,” says artist Hans Hofmann. “Simplicity strips away the superfluous to reveal the essence,” declares a blogger named Cheo. I hope these quotes provide you with helpful pointers, Leo. You now have the opportunity to cultivate a masterful version of simplicity. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Your keynote is the Japanese word shizuka. According to photographer Masao Yamamoto, it means “cleansed, pure, clear, and untainted.” One of his artistic practices is to wander around forests looking in the soil for “treasures” that emanate shizuka. So in his definition, the term isn’t about being scrubbed or sanitized. Rather, he’s interested in pristine natural phenomena that are unspoiled by civilization. He regards them as food for his soul. I mention this, Virgo, because now is an excellent time for you to get big doses of people and places and things that are cleansed, pure, clear, and untainted. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Libran blogger Ana-Sofia Cardelle writes candidly about her relationship with herself. She keeps us up to date with the ever-shifting self-images that float through her awareness. Here’s

SEPTEMBER 12-18, 2018

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AYURVEDIC ASTROLOGY

PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Stanley Kubrick made masterful films, but most of them bore me. I regard John Ashbery as a clever and innovative poet, but I’ve never been excited by his work. As for painter Mark Rothko, I recognize his talent and intelligence, but his art leaves me empty. The music of Nora Jones is pretty and technically impeccable, but it doesn’t move me. In the coming weeks, Pisces, I invite you to make the kinds of fine distinctions I’m describing here. It will be important for you to be faithful to your subjective responses to things, even as you maintain an objective perspective about them and treat them with respect. Homework: Make two fresh promises to yourself: one that’s easy to keep and one that’s at the edge of your capacity to live up to.

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PSYCHICS

includes: to do walking meditations in the woods on a regular basis, no matter what the weather; to engage in long, slow sex with a person you love; to spend a few hours reviewing in detail your entire life history; to dance to music you adore for as long as you can before you collapse from delighted exhaustion. What about you, Aquarius? What are your reliable ways to get insight? I suggest you engage in some of them, and also discover a new one. You’re in the Flood of Radical Fresh Insights Phase of your astrological cycle.

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s Expanded Weekly Audio Horoscopes and Daily Text Message Horoscopes. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone © CO P Y R I G H T 2 0 1 8 R O B B R E Z S N Y at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700. 46

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LEGALS LEGAL NOTICE TO CREDITORS/NAME CHANGE

STATE OF NEW MEXICO COUNTY OF SANTA FE FIRST JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT IN THE MATTER OF A PETITION FOR CHANGE STATE OF NEW MEXICO OF NAME OF Ruza Anacapri IN THE PROBATE COURT Schroeder SANTA FE COUNTY Case No.: D-101-CV-2018-02502 No. 2018-0134 NOTICE OF CHANGE OF IN THE MATTER OF NAME TAKE NOTICE that THE ESTATE OF JANET in accordance with the proviSHAUGHNESSY, DECEASED. sions of Sec. 40-8-1 through NOTICE TO CREDITORS Sec. 40-8-3 NMSA 1978, NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN et seq. the Petitioner Ruza that the undersigned has been Anacapri Schroeder will apply appointed personal representato the Honorable RAYMOND tive of this estate. All persons Z. ORTIZ, District Judge of the having claims against this estate First Judicial District at the are required to present their Santa Fe Judicial Complex, 225 claims within four (4) months Montezuma Ave., in Santa Fe, after the date of the first pubNew Mexico, at 10:00 a.m. on lication of this notice, or the the 14th day of September, 2018 claims will be forever barred. for an ORDER FOR CHANGE Claims must be presented either OF NAME from Ruza Anacapri to the undersigned personal repSchroeder to Ronan Anton resentative at the address listed Schroeder. below, or filed with the Probate STEPHEN T. PACHECO, Court of Santa Fe County, New District Court Clerk Mexico, located at the followBy: Monica Chavez Crespin ing address: 102 Grant Avenue, Deputy Court Clerk Santa Fe, New Mexico, 87501. Submitted by: Ruza Schrieder Dated: August 23, 2018. Petitioner, Pro Se Jean Shaughnessy STATE OF NEW MEXICO 16 Alcott Circle COUNTY OF SANTA FE Taunton, MA 02780 FIRST JUDICIAL DISTRICT 505-884-9800 COURT IN THE MATTER OF STATE OF NEW MEXICO A PETITION FOR CHANGE OF IN THE PROBATE COURT NAME OF Lynn Ann Rose Miles COUNTY OF SANTA FE No.: D-101-CV-2018-02560 No. PB-2018-0136 NOTICE OF CHANGE OF IN THE MATTER OF THE NAME TAKE NOTICE that in ESTATE OF AARON KYLE accordance with the provisions SCHOOLEY, Deceased. of Sec. 40-8-1 through Sec. NOTICE TO CREDITORS 40-8-3 NMSA 1978, et seq. the Petitioner Lynn Ann Rose Miles NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN will apply to the Honorable that the undersigned has DAVID K. THOMSON, District been appointed Personal Judge of the First Judicial Representative of this estate. District at the Santa Fe Judicial All persons having claims against this estate are required Complex, 225 Montezuma Ave., to present their claims within in Santa Fe, New Mexico, at 9:00 a.m. on the 26th day of four months after the date of November, 2018 for an ORDER the first publication of this FOR CHANGE OF NAME Notice, or the claims will be forever barred. Claims must be from Lynn Ann Rose Miles to LynnAnnRose Mary Huntington. presented either by delivery STEPHEN T. PACHECO, or mail to the undersigned in District Court Clerk care of Tracy E. Conner, P.C., Post Office Box 23434, Santa By: Bernadette Hernandez Fe, New Mexico 87502, or by Deputy Court Clerk Submitted by: filing with the Probate Court Lynn Ann Rose Miles for the County of Santa Fe, 102 Petitioner, Pro Se Grant Avenue, Santa Fe, New Mexico 87501, with a copy to NEED TO PLACE A the undersigned. LEGAL NOTICE? Dated: August 24, 2018. SFR CAN PROCESS Theodore Howie Schooley Personal Representative ALL OF YOUR LEGAL c/o Tracy E. Conner NOTICES FOR THE MOST Post Office Box 23434 AFFORDABLE PRICES IN Santa Fe, New Mexico 87502 THE SANTA FE AREA. Phone: (505) 982-8201

STATE OF NEW MEXICO COUNTY OF SANTA FE FIRST JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT IN THE MATTER OF A PETITION FOR CHANGE OF NAME OF Joanne Louise Rodriguez No.: D-101-CV-2018-02593 NOTICE OF CHANGE OF NAME TAKE NOTICE that in accordance with the provisions of Sec. 40-8-1 through Sec. 40-8-3 NMSA 1978, et seq. the Petitioner Joanne Louise Rodriguez will apply to the Honorable FRANCIS J. MATHEW, District Judge of the First Judicial District at the Santa Fe Judicial Complex, 225 Montezuma Ave., in Santa Fe, New Mexico, at 1:15 p.m. on the 12th day of October, 2018 for an ORDER FOR CHANGE OF NAME from Joanne Louise Rodriguez to Joni Rodriguez Davis. STEPHEN T. PACHECO, District Court Clerk By: Jorge Montes Deputy Court Clerk Submitted by: Joanne Louise Rodriguez Petitioner, Pro Se

LEGAL NOTICES ALL OTHERS

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STATE OF NEW MEXICO COUNTY OF SANTA FE FIRST JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT NO. D-0101-DM-2018-00501 CONNIE MORRISON, Petitioner, vs. GLORIA ORETEGA, Respondent. NOTICE OF PENDENCY OF ACTION, STATE OF NEW MEXICO TO THE Respondent, greetings; You are Hereby notified that the above named Petitioner has filed a civil Action against you in the above entitled court and cause, the General object thereof being Petition for Dissolution of a Domestic Partnership. Unless you enter your appearance before the 28th day of September 2018, a judgment by default will be entered against you. WITNESS, the Honorable Matthew J. Wilson, District Judge of the First Judicial District Court of the State of New Mexico, and the seal Of the District Court of Santa Fe County, this 30th day of August 2018. Stephen T. Pacheco, Clerk of the District Court.

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September 12, 2018 Santa Fe Reporter  

September 12, 2018 Santa Fe Reporter: It's Going Down

September 12, 2018 Santa Fe Reporter  

September 12, 2018 Santa Fe Reporter: It's Going Down

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