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LOCAL NEWS

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AUGUST 30-SEPTEMBER 5, 2017 | Volume 44, Issue 35

I AM

NEWS OPINION 5

.

Tara Archuleta, AVP | Business Development Officer

NEWS

My family’s success means everything to me. I bring that same commitment to success when finding solutions for my clients. I AM Century Bank.

7 DAYS, METROGLYPHS AND THIS MODERN WORLD 6 DASHED DREAMS 9 What does Trump’s unsure stance on Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals mean for young undocumented workers in Santa Fe? REALTY CHECK 10 A shocking (not really) new real estate industry survey shows that the whiter and richer you are, the more optimistic you tend to be THINKIN’ OF A MASTER PLAN 11 The airport needs scrilla COVER STORY 12 SAM IN SANTA FE Writer Sam Shepard spent influential years writing and living in Santa Fe, and while he never wrote a memoir, a collection of letters between him and a friend shed light on his complex life

23 BURN WHOM? Early examples of the ever-popular Zozobra (particularly conquistador versions) seem to have parodied the controversial Entrada situation since way back when. Cover photo by Mike Piscitelli

EDITOR AND PUBLISHER JULIE ANN GRIMM

CULTURE

ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER AND AD DIRECTOR ANNA MAGGIORE

SFR PICKS 17 Shit-talkers, new murals, horsing around and activities that can only be found on a mountain THE CALENDAR 19 MUSIC 21 THE RETURN OF POP-PUNK Scotland’s Murderburgers head underground A&C 23 BURN WHOM? Shuster didn’t seem to like the Entrada, either SAVAGE LOVE 24 Down in the dumps

ART DIRECTOR ANSON STEVENS-BOLLEN CULTURE EDITOR ALEX DE VORE STAFF WRITERS AARON CANTÚ MATT GRUBS COPY EDITOR AND CALENDAR EDITOR CHARLOTTE JUSINSKI CONTRIBUTING EDITOR JEFF PROCTOR

Filename & version:

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Cisneros Design:

505.471.6699

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Century Bank

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Santa Fe Reporter

Run Dates:

August 30, 2017

Contact: nicole@cisnerosdesign.com Ad Size: 4.75" w x 5.625” h Due Date: August 21, 2017 Send To: Anna Maggiore, anna@sfreporter.com

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS MARY FRANCIS CHEESEMAN ALICIA INEZ GUZMÁN ERIC KILLELEA R MITCHELL MILLER MARIA EGOLF-ROMERO LAUREN THOMPSON DIGITAL SERVICES MANAGER BRIANNA KIRKLAND PRINT PRODUCTION MANAGER AND GRAPHIC DESIGNER SUZANNE S KLAPMEIER

BED HEAD 27 FALL FORWARD Yo, you know it’s sweater time!

SENIOR ACCOUNTS ADVERTISING EXECUTIVE JAYDE SWARTS

¡POUR VIDA! 29

ADVERTISING EXECUTIVE MICHELLE RIBEIRO

OLD-SCHOOL VS. BRAND-NEW A triumverate of winey goodness

CIRCULATION MANAGER ANDY BRAMBLE

MOVIES 33 MENASHE REVIEW Plus: living that hip-hop dream in Patti Cake$

www.SFReporter.com

MyCenturyBank.com 505.424.2866

Phone: (505) 988-5541 Fax: (505) 988-5348 Classifieds: (505) 983-1212 Office: 132 E MARCY ST.

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CULTURE EVENTS: calendar@sfreporter.com DISPLAY ADVERTISING: advertising@sfreporter.com CLASSIFIEDS: classy@sfreporter.com

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LETTERS Mail letters to PO Box 2306, Santa Fe, NM 87504, deliver to 132 E Marcy St., or email them to editor@sfreporter.com. Letters (no more than 200 words) should refer to specific articles in the Reporter. Letters will be edited for space and clarity.

renew skin : renew life

NEWS, AUG. 23: “CAR TROUBLE”

____________________________________________________

HORSE’S MOUTH This is the most thorough and intelligent account I have read on the subject [of the MVD]. It will save days of research and wrong turns due to misleading information available from various sources. Aaron’s reporting is excellent and I appreciate the effort! I am looking forward to his stories.

URSULA FREER SANTA FE

VOTER SUPPRESSION It will be one more layer of difficulty for rural people, local elderly and especially people of color in New Mexico. Not coincidentally, you will need this very same license to vote in future elections.

DAN YARBROUGH VIA FACEBOOK

GET IT TOGETHER, MVD I lost count of how many MVD trips I had to make to finally get a license renewed. I had a certified copy of my birth certificate, I had my original Social Security card (with the caveat on it that it wasn’t to be used for identification). What they didn’t accept: expired passport (even though the State Department says it is still valid for identification purposes); the rules say a document issued by a government agency, but they didn’t accept a voter identification card. They did accept a lease, although anyone can go to Office Depot and get a lease form and fill in anything they want. I had to switch my telco bill from my PO box (secure) to my street address (and back again). I understand the security issues, but there is a lot of nonsense and very little apparent leeway. Thanks for bringing the issue out in the open.

DAVE DILLMAN SANTA FE

CORRECTIVE SKINCARE BY APPOINTMENT ANSON STEVENS-BOLLEN

NEWS, AUG. 23: “BREAKING UP IS HARD TO DO”

TOTAL SHOCKER Amazing [the city] would choose Wells Fargo—such a criminal recent history! One would think any person or business would choose integrity over those crooks. I’m shocked.

SUSAN KOHL VIA FACEBOOK

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COVER, AUG. 23: “ATF INFORMANT NO. 9097”

DESPICABLE THEM I did not see any evidence that this sting has reduced or hampered the overall influx of illegal drugs into this state or country for that matter. Arresting 103 individuals on drug possession seems to only impact the overburdened court system, penal institutions, and other enforcement related agencies in this state. I am genuinely pessimistic this course of action by the ATF was beneficial to anything but the numbers. Despicable at best.

WILLIAM RUSSELL VIA SFREPORTER.COM

SFR will correct factual errors online and in print. Please let us know if we make a mistake, editor@sfreporter.com or 988-7530.

SANTA FE EAVESDROPPER “Let’s stop. We just need to find a driver.” —Overheard on the Plaza at Indian Market Send your Overheard in Santa Fe tidbits to: eavesdropper@sfreporter.com SFREPORTER.COM

AUGUST 30-SEPTEMBER 5, 2017

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7 DAYS ?!

rah t? B Wha

BEARS ARE SNACKING IN ELDORADO BACKYARDS Just imagine what would happen if there were still chickens.

CANDIDATE PACKETS AVAILABLE FOR MUNI ELECTION Stash them in the kitchen drawer next to the ketchup packets.

SANTA FE PLACE H&M STORE SET TO OPEN SOON Just in time for Zozobra’s outfit this year to feature a denim jacket with ruffled sleeves peeking from the cuffs.

CITY SKEPTICAL ABOUT MERGING WITH BLUE BUSES Us too. Can we get home on the bus past 7 pm before we worry about getting to Taos?

DION’S GREEN CHILE RANCH COMING TO ALL LOCATIONS The best news since sliced pizza.

THIRD SECOND STREET BREWERY OPENS ON RUFINA STREET It’s kinda like “jumbo shrimp.” Just go with it.

SANTA FE SEARCHES FOR NEW CITY HISTORIAN Perfect for the millennial with multiple graduate degrees and a good degree of righteous indignation.

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AUGUST 30-SEPTEMBER 5, 2017

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IT IS ILLEGAL IN SANTA FE TO LEAVE AN ANIMAL IN A HOT CAR

Yes, it is illegal!

Street Homeless Animal Project has posted a billboard on I25 between Santa Fe & Albuquerque as part of a campaign with the City of Santa Fe, Santa Fe Police & Animal Control to alert everyone that it is illegal to leave animals in hot cars even with the windows open – Not for a Minute, Not for a Second! Parked cars are deathtraps for animals: The temperature in a vehicle can rise almost 20 degrees in 10 minutes, 30 degrees in 20 minutes, soaring to 100 degrees in just minutes - even on days that don’t seem hot to you! Cracking the windows makes no difference. Animals can suffocate, sustain brain damage, and die from heatstroke in just minutes — THAT’S

ALL IT TAKES!

Leaving a dog in a hot car is a misdemeanor and can cost you up to $500 or up to 90 days in jail and you can be charged with neglect & animal cruelty by the Santa Fe Police Department and Animal Control.

If you see an animal in a hot car, call 911 or 505-428-3710 SFPD Non-Emergency number IMMEDIATELY - A LIFE DEPENDS ON IT!

If you suspect an animal is suffering from heatstroke — take them to the nearest veterinary clinic. SMITH VETERINARY HOSPITAL 600 Alta Vista Street Mon - Fri - 7:30 am - 6 pm Sat & Sun 8 am - 4 pm

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Weekdays 6-10 pm 505-982-4418 www.svh-nm.com

TO REPORT A DOG IN A HOT CAR IN SANTA FE COUNTY CALL:

911 or 505-428-3720 santafecountynm.gov/sheriff/animal_control

TO REPORT A DOG IN A HOT CAR IN ALBUQUERQUE: Call 911 or 311

Brought to you by Northern New Mexico Street Homeless Animal Project, assisting the street homeless community in obtaining veterinary care and supplies for their companion animals since 1998.

www.nmshap.org www.facebook.com/nmshap

If you love them – leave them at home! 8

AUGUST 9-15, 2017

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NEWS

Dashed Dreams Undocumented Santa Feans who came to the country as children fear their days in the US are numbered BY AARON CANTÚ a a r o n @ s f r e p o r t e r. c o m

T

hey take your blood pressure, manage your debts and serve food at your banquets. There are more than 750,000 undocumented people who have legal permission to work in the United States through the federal Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, a band-aid solution applied by President Obama in 2012 for working-age young immigrants who were illegally brought to the country as children. Now, hundreds of people who qualify for the DACA program in Santa Fe are among those at the mercy of President Trump’s decision whether to rescind the program at the behest of 11 state attorneys general, who have threatened to sue  the federal government if it didn’t begin to phase out the program by Sept. 5. Ending DACA would make good on Trump’s campaign promise to “immediately terminate” the program. One Santa Fean who would be affected is Roxana Guillen, who works as a medical assistant at La Familia Medical Center. A significant portion of the clinic’s clientele is undocumented, and Guillen feels like her personal experience helps her connect with patients. Despite the risks that come with speaking out, she says she’s in a unique position to advocate for undocumented people. “I don’t know what exactly is going to happen, and I don’t know what position I will be put in in the near future, but I want to be the best person I can be for the community I’m serving,” Guillen tells SFR. “I feel like coming out with this; I can say I am undocumented, but I am helping my community as well. I have done nothing wrong and this is what I’m doing.” Guillen received her work permit six years ago, and has renewed it every two years since. It costs $500 just to apply. That’s a steep price for people who are often working to support not just them-

selves, but their family members as well. Still, the jump in income that comes with legal permission to work can have a major impact on a person’s quality of life. Hugo Medina, who works as the accounts receivable coordinator for Santa Fe University of Art and Design, juggled a full-time job at a fast food restaurant and other part-time jobs at local eateries in the evenings for over a decade, including weekends, to support himself and his family. “You get used to it,” he now says, adding that before DACA he was afraid to apply for better jobs because of his legal status. “It becomes your daily routine, you have to work and you have to pay rent and the bills.”   Medina fears for his family’s future if DACA is terminated. Each person permitted to work under the program

has to submit tax forms and other application materials to the Department of Homeland Security, meaning that an agency now detaining people at a record pace could reference the addresses listed on a person’s DACA materials for easy prey. Medina takes comfort in the fact that there are 39 states whose attorneys general have not submitted letters urging the president against DACA, and New

Tell them about our parents’ situation, of other people who are dealing with legal status in this country. -Hugo Medina, DACA recipient

Mexico is one of them. He believes political leadership in these states should speak up. So too, he says, should the large institutions, like universities and corporations, that reap the benefits of undocumented people in labor, taxes, tuition and other material assets. “Tell congressmen and representatives, have them understand our situation,” he urges. “Tell them about our parents’ situation, of other people who are dealing with legal status in this country. We come to work and are successful and have a life.” For Hali Calzidillas, a DACA worker who is set to begin a paralegal fellowship at the New Mexico Immigrant Law Center in two weeks, it’s critical not just to advocate for immigrants who qualify for the program, but for all undocumented people in the country. “It’s not just about me having food on the table and a job,” she argues. “It’s about quality of life, access to legal help, access to affordable housing—all those things that make life equitable.” Recently, members of the Santa Fe Dreamers Project—a legal aid nonprofit named for the DREAM Act that would provide a path for permanent residency for the DACA-eligible population, should it ever pass in Congress—created 1,000 emergency “tool kits” primarily for teachers to distribute to students. They include a summary of DACA and the threats to it, ideas for how to raise awareness about the program, and materials for mailing letters to elected officials, including postcards featuring images of DACA recipients in Santa Fe. Allegra Love, an attorney and the director of the project, says the educational format of the tool kit is meant to spread awareness of the program fast. “We need more people engaged than have been engaged,” Love says. “And they need to be engaged quickly. There’s not a ton of time for educating. We need a massive public outcry.” Others are less optimistic. Ana Juarez, a server at the Four Seasons Resort Rancho Encantado and a DACA recipient, is already preparing for the worst. “You can learn more things about Mexico, and what you can do if you ever get deported,” she says. “If there’s nothing we can do to change the president’s mind, we’ll have to prepare to have different lives.”

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AUGUST 30-SEPTEMBER 5, 2017

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I

t’s been four years since the Santa Fe Association of Realtors polled city voters ahead of an election. And somewhere among the budget shortfalls, parks bond controversies and sugary-drink tax elections, since last time, voters seem to have lost their faith in city government. In 2013, 51 percent of likely city-election voters said Santa Fe was headed in the right direction, a 15-point gap over those who thought the city was on the wrong track. This year, that gap has narrowed to a single point: 45-44. “I would call it a conflicted community,” says Joe Goode, a pollster with American Strategies, the Washington, DC-based firm that conducted the survey for SFAR, which released the results on Tuesday. Santa Feans are far more optimistic about their city than they are about the state, the poll shows, but their optimism doesn’t necessarily run deep. While seven in 10 likely voters say they have either an “excellent” or “good” quality of life, twice as many chose “good.” And while a quarter of people think their life is excellent, just as many people think their quality of life is just fair. What’s more, their outlook varies depending on where they live, how much school they’ve had and their race. The survey results show different Santa Fes. Voters who live in City Council Districts 1 and 2 are far more likely to think the city is headed in the right direction. Those who live in Districts 3 and 4 are just as adamant that the city is on the

wrong track. Hispanics tend to be more pessimistic about the city’s direction, Anglos tend to be optimistic. Those who have completed college are more optimistic than those who haven’t. “It probably has more to do with economic status and how people are feeling economically pressured,” says Goode. The city isn’t entirely divided. There’s broad recognition that affordable housing is a major challenge. The development overlay district along St. Michael’s Drive remains a popular potential solution to that problem. Voters favor environmental protection over reduced regulation. And they have become more skeptical about the ability of the city to deliver basic services. As far as who gets the blame for that, the mayor fares better than the City Council. “The City Council gets just kind of lukewarm scores on everything,” Goode explains. Regardless of the issue—reducing crime, handling the budget, maintaining infrastructure—at least 68 percent of voters felt the council did a poor or just fair job of handling it. Voters echoed that sentiment when it came time to rate the job of elected officials. The City Council’s job rating was 38 percent positive, 59 percent negative. Mayor Javier Gonzales, who has yet to declare a decision about a run for a second term in the March 2018 election, sported a 51 percent job rating compared to the 48 percent of voters who had a negative impression of the job he’s done. Pollsters surveyed 400 likely voters. Cell and internet-based phones made up more than half the respondents.

IS SANTA FE HEADED IN THE RIGHT DIRECTION OR ON THE WRONG TRACK? +15

+1

51%

45%

36% 2013 10

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2017

44%


RIMA KRISST FOR FLY SANTA FE

NEWS

Thinkin’ of a Master Plan Santa Fe maps the future of its upstart airport and tries to ensure a new terminal is paid in full

B Y M AT T G R U B S @mattgrubs

S

tand on the tarmac outside the Santa Fe Municipal Airport’s terminal and you could be forgiven for scoffing at the notion that there’s a space problem here. Mountains rise in the distance. The wind blows unfettered. There’s nary a tree in sight and you can see for miles. Stand outside the front of the terminal—or even just inside the doors—and you start to understand why the city is anxious for expansion. There’s not much room to maneuver if one of the handful of commercial flights is leaving in next couple hours. It’s quaint, but cramped. “We need a new terminal,” airport director Cameron Humphres tells SFR bluntly. “That’s fairly obvious in terms of the size of the terminal, its location and that sort of thing.” While the current terminal is too small inside, though, the airport also has a space problem on the outside, and as a host of city committees consider approving the airport’s master plan in the coming weeks, the two challenges go hand in hand. The airport master plan doesn’t tackle the cost of building a new terminal, only the concept of and timing for it. Instead, the plan charts a course for maintenance, operations and future development. In large part, that’s because a new terminal could cost almost $40 million, and it’s not certain there’s the political will to commit that kind of cash.

“That would be the equivalent of two years of the city’s current capital-project spending,” says Renee Martinez, deputy city manager. The potential airport investment needs a frank discussion about what it would mean for spending on things like roads, parks, police, fire and broadband. “It’s a hard decision about priorities,” she says. “A city has to have good, robust air service if it’s going to create jobs and if it’s going to grow,” says Stuart Kirk, executive director of the Northern New Mexico Air Alliance, a public-private partnership designed to bring more direct flights to Santa Fe. Kirk says the airport’s big sell is its convenience. While another direct flight to someplace like Los Angeles, Chicago or Salt Lake City might be a win, it would also put pressure on the terminal. Fly into

or out of Santa Fe now, and the process is generally smooth from the time a traveler jumps into her car to the time she steps on a plane. “It’s not the time to the airport,” Kirk explains, “it’s really the time to the gate.” While the alliance considers how to attract more travelers and more flights, the city has estimates in hand that will check off two of the most pressing needs at the airport—reconstructing the primary taxiway from the southwest end of the main runway back to the terminal, and repairing the top couple inches of landing surface on the entire main runway. Those two projects will cost roughly $4.2 million if the FAA approves the apparent low bids. The federal government covers the vast majority of that work, leaving the city on the hook for less than $132,000—about the cost of a condo in midtown.

TERMINAL ILLNESS: A PROPOSED CURE NEW ENTRANCE & PARKING LOT

NEW TERMINAL

TARMAC EXTENSION

EXISTING TERMINAL

The Federal Aviation Administration will pay for some airport improvements. The city hopes that includes a new terminal building.

According to the master plan draft that’s in front of the Airport Advisory Board on Wednesday, there is nearly $30 million in other needed improvements and maintenance costs over the next 20 years. They include a quick-turnaround facility for rental cars, a new entrance from the as-yet-unused interchange with Highway 599 and an extension of the primary runway to potentially enable it to handle larger commercial jets. There’s also the planned improvement of the airport’s third runway, known by the abbreviation for the 180-degree difference in its compass headings: 10-28. It’s key to the space problem outside the terminal, and it may play a much larger role in paying for a new terminal than expected—especially considering it’s temporarily closed because of bad pavement. The Federal Aviation Administration’s funding structure normally won’t pay for a third runway—let alone a new terminal. But because the layout of the airport runs afoul of safety guidelines, there’s a chance that the feds would kick in money to make sure an airport that is almost certain to get more busy will also be more safe. “It makes funding for the terminal more competitive,” Humphres says. For now, job one is getting the airport master plan approved. It hasn’t been updated since 2002, and when it’s completed, both the city and the FAA will have a better idea of what lies ahead. By next year, the city could be hiring an architect to design a new terminal and, perhaps, have a better idea of how much of the bill for it would be paid by the federal government.

SFREPORTER.COM

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MIKE PISCITELLI

D

BY ERIC KILLELEA a u t h o r @ s f r e p o r t e r. c o m

ressed in a longsleeved button-down and dark jeans, Sam Shepard, seated in the north room of the Santa Fe Institute library, dropped his hands from a handsome, clean-shaven jawline onto a portable Olympia typewriter. He rejected an office and preferred to work among the books, alone at his adopted desk, set below a window offering views of the Jemez Mountains. He worked here for the solitude, transforming Oedipus into what would become his final play, A Particle of Dread. Shepard’s plays about troubled families—fathers and sons, alcoholics and drifters in the American West—influenced a generation of writers. And Santa Fe influenced him. The Pulitzer Prize-winner first moved here in 1983 after leaving his 12

AUGUST 30-SEPTEMBER 5, 2017

first wife, O-Lan Jones, and their son in California to eventually live with actress Jessica Lange and her daughter. In Santa Fe, Shepard hoped to escape the “star bullshit,” find a place to rent, and reinstate the “Garcia y Vega Club,” composed of himself, his son and his former father-in-law Johnny Dark. In one of the 1,000 letters between the men who considered themselves brothers, excerpts of which SFR is sharing with permission, Dark described Shepard’s move to Santa Fe as “the further adventures of Huck Finn as written to his friend Tom, in which Huck goes to the American Southwest and begins to get along with himself.” Dark was right—and he wasn’t. Shepard built a family here, hit the bars, rode horses, fired guns, read avidly, studied the spiritual teachings of philosopher George Gurdjieff, wrote plays, bounced around movie sets and landed a Miller Distinguished Scholarship at the institute in 2010. He lived with his family in Santa Fe between 1983 and 1986, then alone from 2010 to 2015, before moving to his home in Kentucky, where he died

SFREPORTER.COM

on July 27 of this year. He was 73. The cause was amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or Lou Gehrig’s disease. In a recent New Yorker piece, friend and onetime lover Patti Smith wrote that Shepard—who was raised on an avocado farm in California by an Air Force bomber pilot and a teacher, only to write plays in the booming offoff Broadway scene during the 1960s in Manhattan—“liked to be on the move.” Shepard wrote about a corrupted Midwestern heritage in Buried Child, which won him the Pulitzer in 1979. He received an Academy Award nomination in 1984 for his portrayal of an Air Force pilot in The Right Stuff. He traveled with a fishing rod, an acoustic guitar and a dog. He wrote more than 55 plays, acted in 60 movies, and always brought a notebook, pen and books for the road. The greatest American playwright of his generation listened to coyotes howling in the desert and dreamed of riding horses without a saddle. In New Mexico, friends of Shepard now describe him as a family man, an affectionate father of three who had a 30-year relationship with Lange. They say he was a playful, generous friend who encouraged them in their own writing. He was reserved yet available for conversation and could be charming when meeting scientists for lunch at the institute, or when he sat beside the late Rosalea Murphy for Silver

Coin margaritas at the Pink Adobe Dragon Room, which she founded. There was shadow, too, friends say. He was the son of an alcoholic, a cagey loner who could think himself a phony, a rootless man who abandoned his first wife and son for Smith, then lived with Lange to start anew in the New Mexican desert. In Deming, Dark, now a deli clerk at Peppers Supermarket, reminisces on living with his then-wife, along with his daughter (Jones), Shepard and his grandson in the 1970s near San Francisco. Dark and Shepard exchanged letters over 45 years. In 2009, after Shepard separated from Lange, he decided to sell the letters to the University of Texas Press. The friends edited the collection together, sometimes at the Santa Fe Institute, where Dark met with physicist David Pines, who recalls “the two of them being as close as brothers and Sam being proud of that correspondence.” But the competitive relationship suffered through the editing process, and Chad Hammett was brought on to help mediate through publication in 2013. “These guys went as deep as you can go,” Hammett says. “There was a part of Sam that wanted to connect with people. I think he was able to connect with people through his writing, whether his plays or his letters.” For Shepard, who never wanted to write a memoir, the letters got damn close to revealing who he was. “You could tell how deeply some of them cut him,” Hammett says. “The letters about his leaving his wife and son. It still pained him.” Early examples show how Shepard viewed his work and reveal his efforts to define what it means


MAIL CALL

to be a man. “And as he got older, the conversations that he had with Johnny became, ‘What does it mean to be a good man?’” Hammett says. Those who knew Shepard say he carried himself like a laconic cowboy: He knew how to breed and ride horses, cut cattle out of a herd. His strong but almost shy mannerisms mirrored the roles played by Gary Cooper and Clint Eastwood. He was a man plucked out of yesterday. He never used computers or email. He certainly did not tweet. Acting appeared part hobby and part thrill. He enjoyed playing characters that took him to strange depths, even if that meant isolation. “Lonely fodder for future work,” Smith wrote. But writing motivated him. Early on, he fed off emotion and drug-fueled bursts of energy, scrapping attempts at novels 200 pages in, only to resurrect them in later works. He became a more measured, complicated writer as he aged. In Santa Fe, Jeremy Sabloff, president of SFI from 2009 to 2015, says Shepard was a perfect fit as a Miller Scholar, a position created to welcome creative types onto Cowan Campus for “both their complementary and orthogonal perspectives.” Shepard shared the independent thinker role with longtime institute-based writer Cormac McCarthy between 2010 and 2011, and stayed on after his fellowship ended. At the institute, Shepard talked to his colleagues about writing and acting. “He was so low-key,” Sabloff says. “Given the common perception of famous actors and writers, Sam was not full of himself.” Shepard attended institute events, but he was more interested in how both scientists and artists occupy a creative space. Further considering Shepard’s personality, Sabloff recalls watching Blackthorn in 2011, in which Shepard played a renamed version of American train robber Butch Cassidy. “He’s on this horse and he doesn’t say a lot, but you get this great force of determination,” Sabloff says. “It captured the essence of Sam.” Shepard appeared in several New Mexico-made films, including 2000’s

All The Pretty Horses, an adaption of the National Book Award-winning novel by McCarthy. Felon, released in 2008, was another. He wrote and directed the Western Silent Tongue, a reimagining of the old West down in Roswell, released in 1993. And his play Fool for Love was recreated for the screen and directed by Robert Altman in El Dorado and Las Vegas, New Mexico, in 1985. The local press, along with local bartenders and waiters, shared past sightings of Shepard walking with his children near the Plaza, reading at Garcia Street Books, eating at Harry’s Roadhouse and drinking with Lange at Coyote Café. Shepard was known in many quarters of Santa Fe. But, aside from the fond memories of a man about town, he was admittedly both enamored with and haunted by the City Different. Here, he was awash in desires for isolation and community. “He was terrible at his relationships, but he had his writing,” Dark tells SFR. “He lived in Santa Fe, but he also lived in hotels and on the road. He was almost like a man without a home. … He might have been running away or he might have been running toward something.” Shepard’s father worked as a custodian at the La Fonda Hotel and died after a vehicle hit him outside a bar here in the mid-1980s. The drink preyed on Shepard as well. After separating with Lange, he drank hard and was arrested and charged with speeding and drunken driving in Illinois in 2009; he was arrested again on suspicion of aggravated DWI in Santa Fe in 2015. Shepard began feeling the dire effects of ALS, which wreaks havoc on the nervous system, several years ago. He remained private, telling few of his disease. Many friends say they did not know he was sick until he left Santa Fe for Kentucky. “He couldn’t breathe in the high altitude,” Dark says. “He really loved the institute up there, but he thought, ‘Maybe it’s just the air. I’m having trouble breathing.’” It is impossible for friends to fully explain Shepard. “When you talk about Sam, are you talking about the 23-year-old or the 30-year-old or the 60-year old?” Dark says. “The theater Sam or the movie Sam? The guy at home or the guy at the bar? The funny, generous Sam? Sometimes they were different people.”

Shepard To Dark April 2, 1983

I talked with Mathew tonite since we’re only about 4 hours nor th of Santa Fe & he’s ar ranged us hotel reservations & is working on getting us a place to rent. He switched right into high businessman gear & talking with him is like talking to a travel agent or something. He’s g reat though & working his ass of f to f ind us a place without letting anyone know “who” it’s for. We’ve only r un into the “star” bullshit once—in Denver—but it was a real drag with all the waitresses and customers coming over to get her autog raph. I hope it’s not going to be a big deal that way in Santa Fe but who knows. We ar rive tomor row at Mathew’s and he’s going to f ill us in on the possible houses we can rent. As soon as I know where we’ll be I’ll let you know so you & Jesse can make plans to come down. I’m really looking for ward to seeing you both. We’ll have a g reat time down there re-instating the “Garcia y Vega” Club. I gotta get some sleep now. More later. CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE

Shepard wrote more than 55 plays, but never a memoir. A collection of letters he penned to friend and former father-in-law Johnny Dark is a stand-in.

SFREPORTER.COM

• AUGUST 30-SEPTEMBER 5, 2017

13


Shepard To Dark

Dark To Shepard

Shepard To Dark

October 11, 1989

Januar y 12, 2001

It’s ver y quiet here right now. Shura

I too—always hoped, (af ter

Back home and still reeling from the amazing

& Jessie are taking naps. The birds

you lef t) that each time we

are chirping & a light snow is falling

met (here, Santa Fe, Virginia)

past the windows. … I’m str ugg ling

we’d fall back into those g reat

along with my play, which is ver y

states—ie: that incredible horse

dif f icult to write because, f inally, I’m

ride we took—stoned—on the

beginning to see the absolute hope-

deser t in N.M. or—stoned—sit-

lessness of all for ms of negativity—

ting in the bedroom in Santa

but hopefully, this will be some kind

Fe contemplating shooting up

of f inal def initive piece on my ageold

the new wall with shotgun or—

themes of father & son, sister, broth-

stoned—at the gun show and

er, mother, family, etc. Who knows?

later in the upstairs room of

If nothing else, I feel as though,

the house in Iowa that time I

af ter twenty one years of writing I’m

came with Sharon. So at f irst

March 30, 1985

f inally able to get down to the real

avalanche of experiences over the past year. I think you and Scarlett may have the absolute right approach: never leave your cozy little

feeling ver y lonely and driving out into that long stretch of highway with nothing around ... Right af ter ward I called you and then I headed on to Santa Fe where I thought I might spend a leisurely day and do some writing but, instead, I went out that night to an old restaurant me and Jessie used to go to called the Pink Adobe and asked if the owner was around—a g reat old Louisiana woman named R osalie but it tur ns

us to get loaded and

mask s. Also doing some painting &

out she had died last summer, which kind of

(therefore crazy)

re-kindled that old interest which

shocked me … and then I went staggering out of

when I f irst came

has now manifested as yet an-

to Santa Fe—

other obsession for Wester n Ar t

which must have

from the late 1800’s to the tur n

been unsettling

of the centur y. Luckily, now—

for Jessica and

and I don’t know whether this

the place and the moon was full and ever ything was so reminiscent and nostalgic of the time me and Jess had lived there and the air was full of that wonderful smell of bur ning pine—so I decided I would get good and dr unk. I hadn’t had

maybe the rea-

has to do with age or not, but

son she didn’t

these whirlwinds of obsession

want me to

are much more shor tlived, even

dog because life will just bash you over the head out there. I remember leaving Deming and

of course I kept pushing for

essence of what’s behind it. So many

home and your war m baths and your big fuzzy

that thought in over three and a half years— totally dr y—not one sing le drip of liquor and now, suddenly, I know without a doubt that I am

visit.

going off with the full intention of getting abso-

though they have all the same

lutely smashed. … The bar is completely on the

characteristic intensity & blind

other side of town, way up on Canyon R oad and

lust behind them. Me, Jessie

it’s a Sunday night and no one is on the streets

& Shura have come into some

at all and I’m walking and there’s that g reat

brand new ter ritor y of togeth-

New Mexican mountain chill in the air. It’s only

er ness now. There’s a real sense

about for ty deg rees and having gotten used to

of family & belonging to each

Minnesota winters it feels like nothing and with

other. It’s a whole dif ferent ball

my new reamed out hear t ar ter y I feel almost

park raising a little girl but

invincible anyway so I walk the whole distance,

it’s quite incredible to see how

f ind the bar where some fat guy is singing old

it demands a dif ferent side

Dylan songs and I order my big g lass of red

of me & how positively she

wine. Sitting there at the bar and looking down

responds to it when I allow it Sam Shepard as Eddie the cowboy in Fool For Love in 1985.

in myself.

the row of slightly pathetic middle-aged ex-hip-

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ing despair of bar life comes f looding back and I can’t believe I’m actually back in this situation— this old familiar situation of drinking alone with

Dark to Shepard

KELLI JOHANSEN

pie types who are obvious regulars the whole ach-

August 20, 2010

There we were in New

strangers. I f inish my wine and leave and star t

York sitting on a stoop

walking back down the hill into town again—back

in our twenties and then

toward the plaza. I walk for miles and miles,

you went off to Eng land

wondering if maybe I’ve gotten disoriented and

and I went off to Yucatan

forgotten the way but then I keep checking for

and we both had wives

landmark s and realize I’m on the same road me

and then there we were in

and Jessica used to bicycle down ever y mor ning

Califor nia and now here

with Shura strapped to the back of her moth-

we are without wives with

er’s bike like some little papoose—she was about

you in Kentucky and me

three years old then and we would go to this little

in New Mexico. how did

coffee shop connected to the La Fonda Hotel and have breakfast. Then I go diving fur ther into the past and remember when you and I had met each other in the lobby of the La Fonda af ter a night of debaucher y with two women and no sleep and I keep right on associating into the inevitable memories of my Dad being a custodian at the La Fonda and then, before I know exactly what’s going on with myself I’m there inside the La Fonda at the bar ordering another g lass of red wine! There’s a whole g roup of Eng lish tourists sitting in one cor ner of the place ordering Ger man beer. They’re ver y organized and even go about getting dr unk in an orderly fashion. I f inish this second large g lass of red wine and go out into the lobby and star t wandering around staring at all the g reat photog raphs of early Santa Fe days, some dating back to the ver y early 1800’s—views of the plaza with muddy streets and bur ros and Indians and Mexicans and soldiers and all the g reat mix of races and the marketplace and traders from all over—none of them with even the slightest clue that the whole place would one day be invaded by

The La Fonda Hotel unearthed memories for Shepard, too. His father had worked there. He took breakfast at the hotel after a night of “debauchery” in the 1980s.

Hollywood and millionaires and that the biggest commodity would be ar t and Indian jewelr y. I head out into the street and f ind yet another bar, another hotel, another big g lass of red wine and f inally manage to get myself good and sloshed. Now, I got to the plaza or rather, tr y to walk through the plaza on my way back to the hotel where I’m staying. There’s still not a soul on the street. One lowrider car—a silver Chevy which I’m actually surprised to see—I thought all the low-riders had moved up to Española. The plaza is completely decked out in Christmas lights—ever ything is wrapped and draped in lights: the trees, the band shell, the bank, the Gover nor’s Palace, the iron fences sur rounding the snow covered lawn—red, g reen, blue, white; blinking on and off. I get to the ver y center of the plaza and star t tur ning in circles for some reason and staring up through the bar ren trees, ver y dr unk, seeing the big moon overhead—something like one of those early bad

KELLI JOHANSEN

foreign f ilms with sub-titles and I star t feeling ver y sor r y for myself and conjure up all this stuff about my father and the play I just f inished in San F rancisco which deals with his death and all that stuff and the whole thing just becomes a god-awful dr unken mess of emotional indulgence in the past!! At one point I’m cr ying out to the moon and the heavens in a dr unken wail, thinking there’s no one around and all of a sudden I see someone walking straight towards me across the plaza—not a cop, just a person but It’s so shocking to see another human being—and this is par t of what I

all that happen? [. . .] I’m looking for ward to both yr visits, yours and Jesse and Maura, which is what you’ll be experiencing too. You and Jesse and Maura in New Mexico and you and me in New Mexico. Isn’t it odd we should be coming together to work on a project which by its nature took 40 years to materialize and just at that moment, Jesse should appear as he did when he was a kid wondering what we were doing in the basement, and we both get to see him but in separate places but both in New Mexico where Mathew and yr Dad died? Well, that’s what I’ll be experiencing too. And then it’ll be over. Never to come again for any of us at this time, at this age, in this place. I f ind that exhilarating, like brassily tr ying to g rab the mer r y-go-ring. There’s so much material to dig. We in fact have become The T wo Prospectors.

was tr ying to tell you down there in Deming in the coffee shop—how it sometimes feels as though I am absolutely unaware of anyone else existing in this life that I wonder to what extent I am cut off from other people—how far have I removed myself into The Pink Adobe inspired—or deranged—Shepard one night in 2001 to go on a bender, “drinking alone with strangers.”

this totally ridiculous state of isolation??? Having

Reprinted with permission from Two Prospectors: The Letters of Sam Shepard and Johnny Dark. University of Texas Press, 2013.

survived those bad Santa Fe blues I make it back up into the cold countr y. SFREPORTER.COM

AUGUST 30-SEPTEMBER 5, 2017

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THIS IS IMPORTANT… If there’s a harder-working artist and coordinator than Israel Francisco Haros Lopez, we don’t know ‘em. From his Chicano Codex Coloring Book and recent solo shows at Iconik Coffee Roasters to his work tutoring youths and locking down tech and help for the school-aged set, he’s basically the best. This time out, however, Lopez brought together seven local artists like Niomi Fawn, Jared Antonio-Justo Trujillo and others to create portable murals for the Siler Yard Arts + Creativity Center, the upcoming live/work/create space in the revitalized Siler Road area. Lopez and crew reveal and dedicate the murals this Thursday along with Mayor Javier Gonzales. (Alex De Vore)

COURTESY WHEELCHAIR SPORTSCAMP

COURTESY ISRAEL FRANCISCO HAROS LOPEZ

ART OPENING THU/31

Now More Than Ever Mural Dedication: 5:30 pm Thursday Aug. 31. Free. Siler Yard, Siler Road and Trades West Road.

TANNER JENSEN, “WILD AT HEART”

FILM THU/31-SUN 3 CALLING ALL NEIGH-SAYERS Unless a horse talked smack about you sometime, it would be really hard to dislike them. They’re beautiful, graceful, intelligent and intuitive—and they’re also often abandoned and neglected. The Horse Shelter takes care of equines in need, and this week it presents the nationally touring Equus Film Festival fundraiser. There are plenty of feel-good films and even a block especially for kids—but those interested in history, social justice or the science of genetics will also find something worthwhile. The Horse Shelter’s own story screens on Friday evening in Horse Shelter Diaries. Get descriptions and times of film blocks in our calendar (starting page 19), or check equusfilmfestival.net for more info. (Charlotte Jusinski) Equus Film Festival: Various times ThursdaySunday, Aug. 31-Sept. 3. $10 per block; $75 for whole weekend. Jean Cocteau Cinema, 418 Montezuma Ave., 466-5528.

COURTESY NEW MEXICO TRUE

MUSIC MON/4 BASIN STREET BLUES You’ve felt the change in the weather and you’ve thought about tuning up your skis for the upcoming winter season—so long, summer; fall is here. But you can ease in smoothly and slowly, before the snow makes it more challenging for everyday people to scale the mountain, and you can embrace fall activities and a performance from Red River-area duo Alchemie while you’re at it. OK, they’re goofy, but they’re also fun. And with other things to do like chairlift rides, disc golf and, of course, beer, you were mostly going for the view anyway, right? (ADV) Fall Activities: 10 am-3 pm Monday Sept. 4. Free. Ski Santa Fe, 740 Hyde Park Road, 982-4429.

MUSIC SAT/2

It’s Hard Out There for a Gimp So says Kalyn Heffernan, aka Wheelchair Sports Camp, the wheelchair-bound Denver-based MC, on her song of the same name—the song that made us fall in love. Heffernan is fire, a studied lyricist who spits rhymes one day, goes to jail for her activism the next, shoots some of the coolest and most impressive music videos roaming the internet today and crafts clever, socially relevant lyrics to the tune of “shut the fuck up, she’s music-ing.” “I found rap music when I was 5, so it’s really been my first identity,” Heffernan tells SFR. “Before I identified with my disability or my femininity or my queerness, it’s always been my first love. … I started writing my own raps when I was 12 for a talent show.” And they’re smart, a seamless mix of live hip-hop, jazz, experimentalism and Heffernan’s undeniably smooth flow. Through music, she explores all aspects of herself and the rap game: The MC, the educator, the activist, the self-described shit-talker, Heffernan picks apart preconceived societal notions of her disability, her musical ability and beyond. She’s grown with the music as well, putting together her own beats, sampling from anything that sounds good, working with live drums and trumpet SFREPORTER.COM

(not to mention a pedal steel guitarist for her current tour) and collaborating with underground beatsmiths in the pursuit of original sound. “I used to make all the beats and produce it all—I started making beats in high school when I couldn’t afford to pay men to do it for me or pay for studio time to teach myself,” she says. “I’ve been trying to produce more for other people in the studio, which has been awesome; we had the late, great Ikey Owens produce [the song] ‘No Big Deal’ before he passed away, and he made it what it is.” See, it’s more than a simple love of hip-hop that drives Heffernan—it’s in her bones. “I’ve always been drawn to it,” she explains, “since the first time I heard it scrolling through the radio stations. It’s pretty inexplicable. It’s always been my everything.” Find out more this week as Wheelchair Sports Camp takes the stage alongside local MC Benzo III at Second Street Brewery’s brand-spanking-new Rufina Street location. (Alex De Vore) WHEELCHAIR SPORTSCAMP WITH BENZO III 8 pm Saturday Sept. 2. $10. Second Street Brewery (Rufina Taproom), 2920 Rufina St., 954-1068

AUGUST 30-SEPTEMBER 5, 2017

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CHRISTOPHER DORANTES

Want to see your event here?

THE CALENDAR

Email all the relevant information to calendar@sfreporter.com. You can also enter your events yourself online at calendar.sfreporter.com (submission doesn’t guarantee inclusion). Need help?

Contact Charlotte: 395-2906

WED/30 BOOKS/LECTURES DHARMA TALK BY SENSEI GENZAN QUENNELL Upaya Zen Center 1404 Cerro Gordo Road, 986-8518 This week's talk is presented by Sensei Genzan Quennell. It's entitled, "Right Speech— Noble Silence." The evening begins with a 15-minute meditation. 5:30 pm, free LOO'K CLOSER: ART TALK AT LUNCHTIME Georgia O'Keeffe Education Annex 123 Grant Ave., 946-1039 Take a closer look at an O'Keeffe piece with a brief talk from a curator. 12:30 pm, free

DANCE ENTREFLAMENCO: 2017 SUMMER SEASON El Flamenco de Santa Fe 135 W Palace Ave., 209-1302 Antonio Granjero, Estefania Ramirez and Antonio Hidalgo Paz co-direct this summer series featuring Granjero and Ramirez performing original choreography. 7:30 pm, $25 FLAMENCO AT THE LODGE The Lodge at Santa Fe 750 N St. Francis Drive, 992-5800 Spanish tapas, spirits and flamenco in the storied Maria Benitez Cabaret Theatre featuring a world class line-up of artists—that’s five solid awesome things right there. 8 pm, $25-$45

EVENTS GEEKS WHO DRINK Second Street Brewery (Railyard) 1607 Paseo de Peralta, 989-3278 Pub trivia can win you drink tickets for next time—and the categories are many. 8 pm, free

The requisite skills to make moccasins like these (Shoshone-Bannock; on view in Stepping Out: 10,000 Years of Walking the West at the Museum of Indian Arts and Culture) would take a hot minute to acquire, but you can get a start at a loom beading workshop with Marvin Gabaldón at the Wheelwright Museum on Sunday. TAPS AND TABLETOPS Jean Cocteau Cinema 418 Montezuma Ave., 466-5528 Happy hour and board games! What's not to like? Bring your own or play one of the cinema's. We were really into Apples to Apples back when we were innocent, but now it’s all about Cards Against Humanity. 6 pm, free

MUSIC BILL FORREST Vanessie 427 W Water St., 982-9966 Standards, jazz and pop on piano plus so much wine that you’ll be like, “Wow. That’s a lot of wine.” 7 pm, free BOK CHOY Tiny's Restaurant & Lounge 1005 S St. Francis Drive, 983-9817 Classic rock and bokin’ fun. 8 pm, free

DJ SAGGALIFFIK Boxcar 530 S Guadalupe St., 988-7222 Electronica and dance tunes from the local hero. Yeah, we said hero. I mean, this guy’s been at it, slaying the whole time, for ages. And that’s heroic. We’ll fight you. 10 pm, free DANIELE SPADAVECCHIA El Mesón 213 Washington Ave., 983-6756 Gypsy jazz. 7 pm, free FLAMENCO EN VIVO Museum of Int’l Folk Art 706 Camino Lejo, 476-1200 Listen to flamenco guitar as you peruse the museum's exhibit Flamenco: From Spain to Mexico for an immersive experience. Free with museum admission. 1 pm, $7-$12 MICHAEL UMPHREY Osteria D'Assisi 58 S Federal Place, 986-5858 Standards on piano. 6:30 pm, free

NIGHT TRAIN La Fiesta Lounge 100 E San Francisco St., 982-5511 Rock ‘n’ roll and bluesy soul and something something rhymes with “bowl.” 7:30 pm, free PINK MARTINI AND THE SANTA FE SYMPHONY STRINGS Santa Fe Opera 301 Opera Drive, 986-5900 We’re really into in when bands team up with big masses of stringed instruments. It happens here, to benefit local food delivery nonprofit Kitchen Angels, and we’re really into Kitchen Angels too. Listen to the symphony cover hits and classics with such variety, there's something for grandma and you, too. 7:30 pm, $39-$109 RAMON BERMUDEZ JR. TerraCotta Wine Bistro 304 Johnson St., 989-1166 Latin and jazz guitar. 6 pm, free

SANTA FE CROONERS Palace Saloon 142 W Palace Ave., 428-0690 Swing music, which miraculously is still a thing. And don’t lie, Beckie, we know you were all into it in the ’90s. Also, we once got tattooed by a guy who actually loved that weird late-’90s swing/rockabilly revival because apparently he liked tattooing dice and cards and stuff on people who had probably never played dice or cards. 7 pm, free TIFFANY CHRISTOPHER Cowgirl 319 S Guadalupe St., 982-2565 Hear pop originals and covers from greats like Prince in this powerhouse songstress' sets. Also of note is Christopher’s one-woman looping setup, which finds her crafting intricate layers all on her lonesome through the power of musical technology! Y’know—pedals and such. 8 pm, free

THEATER THE TEMPEST Santa Fe Botanical Garden 715 Camino Lejo, 471-9103 Local theater companies, the Botanical Garden and more volunteers and professionals than you can imagine have teamed up for the first-ever Shakespeare in the Garden and The Tempest. 7:30 pm, $25-$35

THU/31 ART OPENINGS NOW MORE THAN EVER Siler Yard Siler Road and Trades West Road Join in for a mural dedication, for which local artists were asked to “speak to current culture and the future of culture,” addressing the definition and meaning of contemporary art (see SFR Picks, page 17). 5:30 pm, free CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE

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YOGA / PERMACULTURE / WORKSHOPS / ECSTATIC DANCE / LAWN SPORTS WILD & SCENIC FILM FESTIVAL (2 DAYS)

ACTION DAY: NATURAL BUILDING w/ EARTH BAGS

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FILM EQUUS FILM FESTIVAL: MEET THE FILMMAKERS OF OUT OF THE WILD Jean Cocteau Cinema 418 Montezuma Ave.,466-5528 To kick off three days of equine-centric films to benefit The Horse Shelter, screen Out of the Wild, the story of Henry, a down-and-out former cowboy who takes a job at a ranch and meets an unsound mustang. As Henry trains the horse, he finds his own path to healing and redemption (see SFR Picks, page 17). 8:30 pm, $10

MUSIC BILL FORREST Vanessie 427 W Water St., 982-9966 Standards, jazz and pop on piano. 7 pm, free BROTHER E CLAYTON El Mesón 213 Washington Ave., 983-6756 Soul and blues from the frontman of local band The Soul Deacons. 7 pm, free

DANIELE SPADVECCHIA L’Olivier Restaurant 229 Galisteo St., 989-1919 Mediterranean gypsy jazz. 6 pm, free DAVID GEIST Pranzo Italian Grill 540 Montezuma Ave., 984-2645 Hear piano standards performed by Geist, who had a 20-year career composing Broadway tunes, at this intimate venue. Look deep into your date’s eyes among the candlelight and remind yourself how rare it is to find someone ... who will actually sleep with you. 6 pm, $2 DJ DYNAMITE SOL Boxcar 530 S Guadalupe St., 988-7222 House, funk, reggaeton and hip-hop. 10 pm, free FREAKS OF THE INDUSTRY WITH DJ POETICS Skylight 139 W San Francisco St., 982-0775 Hip-hop, old-school, funk and disco. 9 pm, $5-$7 GRACE ASKEW Mine Shaft Tavern 2846 Hwy. 14, Madrid, 473-0743 Electronic Southwestern Americana. 5 pm, free GREG BUTERA & THE GUNSELS Second Street Brewery (Original) 1814 Second St., 982-3030 Cajun honky-tonk from the longtime local and his band. 6 pm, free

EAD OW SR D.

COURTESY TANSEY CONTEMPORARY

SPECIALIZING IN:

POR

EVENTS NEW HOMEBUYER NIGHT Homewise 1301 Siler Road, Bldg. D, 983-9473 Homewise helps everyone understand what needs to happen to buy a home. No, really—everyone. You can do it! So just chill out, Jessi, because there are resources. 5 pm, free

ENTREFLAMENCO: 2017 SUMMER SEASON El Flamenco de Santa Fe 135 W Palace Ave., 209-1302 Antonio Granjero, Estefania Ramirez and Antonio Hidalgo Paz co-direct original choreography. 7:30 pm, $25 RUMBATERAPIA Skylight 139 W San Francisco St., 982-0775 If you like to move your limbs and torso and perhaps head, this is the place for you; doubly so if you like bands with names that are interesting and require brain power to decipher. Get a dance lesson then see a performance in every style ever (merengue, guaracha, reggaeton, merengueton, cumbia, rumba, flamenca, sevillas, omg we don't even know these words). 8 pm, $20

AT TAOS MESA BREWING AMPHITHEATER // TAOS, NM // SEP. 29-OCT 01

AIR

BOOKS/LECTURES THE DHARMA OF DOGS Ark Bookstore 133 Romero St., 988-3709 Contributors to this book of essays about dogs reflect on what canines can teach us. 6:30 pm, free TIBETAN YOGA OF BREATH BOOK DISCUSSION Santa Fe Public Library Main Branch 145 Washington Ave., 955-6780 In the Pick Room, discuss Tibetan Yoga of Breath by Anyen Rinpoche. We hear it's a great way to relieve stress and see things clearly. 6 pm, free

3909 Academy Rd. 473-3001 Factory Trained Technicians

Artist Ran Adler uses found natural items to make meditative sculptural works, on view in Unfolding Presence, opening Friday at Tansey Contemporary. This one is “Whirlpool.” CONTINUED ON PAGE 22

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MARTIN BLONDEAU

MUSIC Five Reasons to be at The Murderburgers’ Santa Fe Show BY ALEX DE VORE a l e x @ s f r e p o r t e r. c o m

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evoted readers (and c’mon, there are scads of you, I just know it) will no doubt be aware that I’m super into emo and pop punk and all of those genres’ many offshoots and subgenres. This is tough for a Santa Fean, however, since the chances to see such things live have been minimal (with a hat-tip to the folks at Meow Wolf for that great Waxahatchee show a couple weeks ago that also introduced me to the Maryland band Snail Mail, whom I now love all hard), but the upcoming appearance from Scotland’s The Murderburgers at The Underground might just fix all that … for a minute, anyway. Here’s five great reasons you should be excited, too:

They’re Nostalgic! I sent the video for the song “The Waves” to a friend of mine who said, “Love it. Reminded me of my youth.” Indeed, it’s the fast-paced and upbeat sound of pop-punk you knew and loved 15-plus years ago, but Murderburgers front man and main songwriter Fraser ( just Fraser, like Cher) sidesteps blink-182 schmaltz for more of a smart and raw Fat Wreck sound. Google that if you don’t know it, and be amazed. “I think it’s been getting better,” Fraser tells me of the reception to the band. “When we first started out, it was difficult to get 10 people out to a show, but we just played Glasgow and there were a couple hundred people there.”

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Murderburgers front man Fraser let us call him on the phone.

They’ve Got Good Guests! The 12 Habits of Highly Defective People, the band’s 2016 album, features members of another fantastic contemporary pop-punk act: Wisconsin’s Masked Intruder. And though the mysterious masked members of that particular band lean pretty hard into adorable songs of love and loneliness, it’s mostly the musical aesthetic that wound up in the Murderburgers stuff. “We had Red on drums and Yellow on bass … it was half of Masked Intruder on the album,” Fraser says. “It all just fell into place accidentally; the drumming on the demo was pretty different from the way Red plays the drums, and it changed things a bit, but I preferred the way he did it.”

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They’re on Asian Man Records! The San Jose-area label is run out of founder Mike Park’s mom’s garage, as it has been since its inception in the ’90s. If having your mom pick up your mail and employing exactly one person while forever changing the course of punk rock, pop punk, ska and beyond isn’t the

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most punk thing you hear today, you’re leading cooler lives than we are, that’s for damn sure. “I’ve always been a fan of the label—since I started getting into punk music,” Fraser explains. “We played with Joyce Manor, who used to be on Asian Man, and Barry [Johnson] said he was gonna pitch us to Asian Man. … I thought there was no way [Mike Park] was going to go for it, I felt like he took this restless Scottish band that people hadn’t heard of, and it’s been going pretty well because of it.” They Really Got it Together! Fraser has stated in interviews that albums prior to 2016’s 12 Habits were just kind of thrown together, whereas their most recent offering was produced by Chicago-based Matt Allison, a guy who’s worked with the likes of Alkaline Trio, The Broadways, Smoking Popes and many, many more. “We never really had that experience of recording in a professional studio with someone who’d worked with similar bands and on records that I’m a big fan of,” Fraser recalls. “It’s definitely worth it, it’s one of the best recording ex-

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periences I’ve ever had and I’m really happy with how it turned out.” They’ve Got Great Stuff Coming Up! Fraser tells me that after this tour, he’ll head back to Scotland and spend some time working on non-band things, demoing new stuff and working with non-Murderburgers musicians. And even though 12 Habits only came out last October, he’s raring to go on the next album and currently working on demos and is in the planning stages of a split with Israeli punk act Not on Tour plus some other splits which haven’t been nailed down just yet. “Once we’re not touring, I feel like I’ll have more time to focus on recording stuff,” he says. “I’d like to get a new record out next year.”

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THE MURDERBURGERS WITH CITY MOUSE AND ALIEN SPACE KITCHEN 9 pm Friday, Sept. 1. $5. The Underground, 200 W San Francisco St.

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AUGUST 30-SEPTEMBER 5, 2017

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THE CALENDAR

A 100, 50, and 25 mile cycling event covering distinct areas on the Acoma and Laguna Pueblo reservations and local communities. This spectacular event offers both the experienced and recreational cyclist an exciting and rare opportunity to ride through competitive and scenic race courses. Tour de Acoma is a fundraising event, all proceeds go to Haaku Museum Foundation.

acomaskycity.org • 800-747-0181 15 minutes south of I-40, exit 102 Acoma, NM 87034

September EVENTS A L L E V E N T S AT 6 P M U N L E S S O T H E R W I S E N O T E D

FOR THE MONTH OF SEPTEMBER GALLERY SHOWING: Artist Allen Blagden, one of the nation’s leading Visual Artists

W E D N E S D AY, S E P T E M B E R 6 , 2 0 1 7 SANTA FE WRITERS LAB PRESENTS:

Deborah Madison In My Kitchen & Doug Merriam Farm Fresh Journey, The Santa Fe Farmers Market Cookbook S AT U R D AY, S E P T E M B E R 9 , 2 0 1 7

Ariel Gore We Were Witches in conversation with local poet and author, Miriam Sagan M O N D AY, S E P T E M B E R 1 1 , 2 0 1 7 SANTA FE OPERA GUILD BOOKCLUB:

Discusses The Castrato and His Wife. Free to members of Santa Fe Opera Guild, $5 for non-members. T U E S D AY, S E P T E M B E R 1 2 , 2 0 1 7

Dr. Luis Lopez More Musings of a Barrio Sack Boy and Jorge Aigla A Bird For Buddha: Words from Afar

S AT U R D AY, S E P T E M B E R 1 6 , 2 0 1 7 @3PM KIDS (8-12YRS) MUSIC AND BOOK SIGNING:

Jim Kristofic & Nolan James Black Sheep White Crow and Other Windmill Tales: Stories from Navajo Country T U E S D AY, S E P T E M B E R 1 9 , 2 0 1 7

William DuBuys & David J. Weber (d. 2010) First Impressions: A Reader’s Journey to Iconic Places of the American Southwest in conversation with Dan Flores F R I D AY, S E P T E M B E R 2 2 , 2 0 1 7 @4PM ARTIST RECEPTION AND BOOK SIGNING:

Allen Blagden Marking the Moment

S AT U R D AY, S E P T E M B E R 2 3 , 2 0 1 7

T H U R S D AY, S E P T E M B E R 1 4 , 2 0 1 7

Gabriel Tallent My Absolute Darling (most talked about debut novel of 2017)

Brian Jabas Smith Spent Saints Since many of our events are often standing room only, if you’d like to reserve a seat, pre-purchase a book by calling us and we’ll reserve a seat for you.Thank you for your patience at larger events, we appreciate it!

202 Galisteo Street • 505-988-4226 www.cwbookstore.com

WINNER: BEST BOOKSTORE

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AUGUST 30-SEPTEMBER 5, 2017

FA L L H O U R S : M O N - S U N 8 A M - 6 P M (UNLESS THERE IS AN EVENT)

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HALF BROKE HORSES Tiny's Restaurant & Lounge 1005 S St. Francis Drive, 983-9817 Country and Americana. 7 pm, free JADE MASQUE Cowgirl 319 S Guadalupe St., 982-2565 Say goodbye to August and hello to world music by Masque. 8 pm, free KARAOKE Camel Rock Casino 17486 Hwy. 84/285, 984-8414 You know the drill, dudes. This one is a contest, though, so bring your A-game. So, like, Seal or something. 7:30 pm, free LIMELIGHT KARAOKE Palace Saloon 142 W Palace Ave., 428-0690 Hostess Michèle Leidig corrals us as we sing our fave songs. We’re still thinking about that sexagenarian who rocked Montell Jordan’s “This Is How We Do It” a few months ago. Also Seal. 9 pm, free MARC SANDERS Osteria D'Assisi 58 S Federal Place, 986-5858 Piano standards in the lounge. Probably no Seal. 6:30 pm, free MIAMI NIGHT WITH VDJ DANY Skylight 139 W San Francisco St., 982-0775 We might start calling VDJ Dany “Florida Man” in our heads. OK, that’s a lie, we already have. He spins bachata, merengue and reggaeton. 9 pm, $5-$7 NIGHT TRAIN La Fiesta Lounge 100 E San Francisco St., 982-5511 Rock ‘n’ roll ‘n’ soul ‘n’ stuff. 7:30 pm, free PAT MALONE TerraCotta Wine Bistro 304 Johnson St., 989-1166 Solo acoustic jazz guitar. 6 pm, free

THEATER THE FIESTA MELODRAMA Santa Fe Playhouse 142 E De Vargas St., 988-4262 Lampooning local news and politics, the melo has been delighting crowds and embarrassing politicians since New Mexico was only seven years old. Book your tickets early, because this tradition sells out fast (see 3 Questions, page 25). 7:30 pm, $15-$25 THE TEMPEST Santa Fe Botanical Garden 715 Camino Lejo, 471-9103 Magicians, spirits, an enchanted isle, shipwrecks, foiled murder plots, love at first sight, a royal wedding, and much more. Shakespeare in the Garden presents a fun (and super-pro!) production of the Bard’s weirdest play. 7:30 pm, $25-$35

ENTER EVENTS AT SFREPORTER.COM/CAL

FRI/1 ART OPENINGS ANN HOSFIELD: A RETROSPECTIVE New Concept Gallery 610 Canyon Road, 795-7570 Artist Ann Hosfield explores her love for nature and the wild with paintings, drawings and sculpture. 5 pm, free CECILIA ROBERTSON: PAINTING FROM LIFE 7 Arts Gallery 125 Lincoln Ave., 437-1107 Painter Robertson works to understand the vital/healing relationship between nature and earth’s inhabitants. This show of new work includes the artist’s plein air and studio landscape paintings of New Mexico and the American Southwest. 5 pm, free JOHNNIE WINONA ROSS: SEEP LINE Charlotte Jackson Fine Art 554 S Guadalupe St., 989-8688 Johnnie Winona Ross’ paintings are landscapes—though not in a way that is immediately recognizable. Each of Ross’ paintings is inspired by a particular place, often close to his mesa home near Taos. With a spare visual language, Ross invokes the presence of water in the desert. Through Oct. 1. 5 pm, free NEW KOWLOON CITIES Iconik Coffee Roasters 1600 Lena St., 428-0996 Artist Hans Harland-Hue presents an ode to humanity as this solo series depicts a quiet Earth, far in the future, saved by unification. 6 pm, free RAN ADLER: UNFOLDING PRESENCE Tansey Contemporary 652 Canyon Road, 995-8513 Adler uses a variety of organic materials (seed pods, horsetail reeds, mahogany pods, sea grapes and other found, natural components) to create his works. His art has given him a way to think of meditation and intentional prayer. Through Sept. 30. 5 pm, free TIM REED Good Folk Gallery 141 Lincoln Ave., 983-1660 Small-scale paintings and drawings with plenty of color and personality. 5 pm, free WOOD, DRY BONES, DESICCATED SINEW Jean Cocteau Cinema 418 Montezuma Ave., 466-5528 Wood and bones: so similar in their function, yet so different in form. Santa Fe artist Michael Gullberg brings these elements together in beautiful, unexpected ways, breathing life into objects that have long since expired, like animal bones and tree branches. 5 pm, free

BOOKS/LECTURES DEAN'S LECTURE SERIES: GOD AND PHILOSOPHY IN DESCARTES’ MEDITATIONS St. John's College 1160 Camino Cruz Blanca, 984-6000 If you talk about reason, you talk about Descartes. The philosopher takes these challenges very seriously. No one better to discuss the concept with than St. John’s tutor Henry Higuera. Catch the lecture in the Great Hall, Peterson Student Center. 7:30 pm, free

DANCE ENTREFLAMENCO: 2017 SUMMER SEASON El Flamenco de Santa Fe 135 W Palace Ave., 209-1302 Antonio Granjero, Estefania Ramirez and Antonio Hidalgo Paz co-direct this summer series featuring Granjero and Ramirez performing original choreography. 7:30 pm, $25

EVENTS WASSA WASSA AFRICAN DANCE & DRUM FESTIVAL Railyard Performance Center 1611 Paseo de Peralta, 982-8309 The fourth annual celebration of African dance, drum and song classes. Opening night features Fara Tolno, a dancer from Guinea, and Mali dance from Djeneba Sako. The whole weekend is packed, so head over to facebook.com/ wassaensemble for all the deets. 6:30 pm, $20 ZOZOBRA Fort Marcy Park 490 Washington Ave., 955-2501 If you don't know Zozo, who even are you and what even are you doing? The 93rd annual all-day party features music, hangings-out, food and fun, and culminates at 9:30 pm or so with the burning of a 40-foot-tall puppet nicknamed Old Man Gloom. Get your glooms into the Gloom Box ahead of time (Hutton Broadcasting has one at 2502 Camino Entrada, Ste. C) or drop them off at the Gloom Tent at the park (see A&C, page 23). Then whip out glow sticks and yell “Burn him!” 3 pm, $10-$60

FILM EQUUS FILM FESTIVAL: A SUNDAY HORSE Jean Cocteau Cinema 418 Montezuma Ave., 466-5528 A Sunday Horse is the story of Debi, a champion rider who has an accident and is gravely injured. With the love of her family and her horse, plus her own tough determination, she fights her way back into the saddle (see SFR Picks, page 17). 9 pm, $10 CONTINUED ON PAGE 24


A&C

BurnWhom? What exactly is Zozobra’s deal? BY ALICIA INEZ GUZMÁN a u t h o r @ s f r e p o r t e r. c o m

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ver the years, Zozobra has had many looks: a pencil mustache, a black comb-over, pointy, elf-like ears, a grandmotherly coif (think short and permed), bulbous lips that bring to mind the likes of Steven Tyler, a revolving door of eyebrow configurations (all of them more or less angry). But the long and short of it is, we know what to expect when it comes to Zozo’s appearance: a belted white frock with buttons running down the center, a bow tie, glowing eyes and some very strange hand gestures. Zozobra is and isn’t formulaic, a caricature not of anyone in particular, it would seem, except for that ambiguous non-being, “Old Man Gloom.” In that way, Zozobra shares the same vague category of Burning Man’s “The Man.” Still, I’ve always circled back to the same question: What exactly is Zozobra? I haven’t been since college. Then, the event felt like a smoke-filled haze, chants of “burn him” shaking Fort Marcy Park. Effigies have that effect. They are infused with the collective energy of “the people,” united by their dislike for a particular (and typically) political and politically divisive figure. Effigies of Donald Trump in Mexico City’s Easter Celebration have burned two years running, not to mention the countless piñatas that bear comb-overs and spray tans even more ghastly than the originals. Enrique Peña-Nieto hasn’t escaped symbolic immolation either. And when Margaret Thatcher died of a stroke, anti-Thatcher activists lit her likeness on fire in South Yorkshire.

For better or worse, effigies make the particular abstract, and in the process do what politics can’t: enact a collective and symbolic catharsis. But who is the “him” for Zozobra? Gloom and the past, yes. Perhaps former lovers, too? POTUS? Bad employers? Bad employees? A blank slate for everyone’s respective projections? A reason to party? All of the above? I mean, there aren’t anti-Zozobra activists like there are anti-Trump activists. The giant marionette is supposed to be gloom itself (who can forget the moans?) made manifest with old divorce papers and police files, as well as the grievances that attendees can write on-site. Once there was even a wedding dress that went up in flames. He is a reason to say goodbye to the past with friends, family and strangers by your side. At least commercially, the burning of Zozobra is the kick-off event for Fiestas; when he succumbs to the fire dancer and burns into a pile of ash, “the crowd dances joyfully as they sing the Fiesta Song, and the centuries-old Fiestas de Santa Fe return to bring happiness and hope to the people of Santa Fe,” as the event’s website (burnzozobra.com) tells it. It’s certainly a rosy way of describing a marionette, part monster part ghost, that gets burned to the ground. But so it goes.

Or does it? There’s a strange plot twist, here; Zozobra kicks off the reenactment of Santa Fe’s self-styled (and deeply questionable) origin story, DeVargas’ “peaceful” re-entry into Santa Fe after the Pueblo Revolt. And while Fiestas have been celebrated since DeVargas’ death in the opening years of the 18th century, it was Edgar Lee Hewett, a non-Spanish identifying white archeologist, midwesterner and Museum of New Mexico founder, along with a hand-

ful of tourism boosters, who first initiated the Entrada in 1919. Hewett is one thing. And so is the Entrada, a blatant whitewashing of history. But Zozobra’s strange place in Fiestas is one of those paradoxes that’s hard to ignore once recognition hits. Zozobra’s burning rids us of the gloom of the recent past only to take us further back in time. The result is that we land in an era of invented Spanish colonialism, the 20th century. In that, the giant muslin-rigged marionette shares his birth with the birth of Santa Fe’s collective “Spanish” identity. Constructed in 1924 by transplant artist Will Shuster, the earliest Zozobra took the form of a conquistador replete with a goatee, his first appearance a parody of Fiestas and the Entrada. Since that time, Zozobra has gained a reputation as Santa Fe’s most beloved (and goofy) antihero, save for his role in 1943, the height of WWII. Then, Zozobra was fashioned by Shuster into a caricature that appeared to recall Hideki Tojo, general of the Japanese Imperial Army and Prime Minister of Japan from 1941 to 1944. With exaggerated facial features and a pair of round spectacles, this particular Zozobra was nothing short of racism fueled by xenophobia and hyper-nationalism. It was also more broadly reflective of wartime propaganda. As we march toward Zozo’s 100th birthday, with celebrations of individual decades along the way(it’s the 1950s this year), it’s clear that he’s worn a few different hats. Now, mostly it seems Zozobra is just himself, a mix of pageantry and pyrotechnics. ZOZOBRA 3 pm Friday Sept. 1; burning at approx. 9:30 pm. $10-$60. Fort Marcy Park, 490 Bishop’s Lodge Road, burnzozobra.com.

ANSON STEVENS-BOLLEN

Astrology Santa Fe PRESENTS:

An Astrology Marathon

15 minute Power Readings to interpret the impact of the Eclipse on you. $20

Thursday, August 31 • 9 am until 4 pm 103 Saint Francis Dr., Santa Fe Please call 505 819 7220 for appointment

We pay the most for your gold coins, heirloom jewelry and diamonds! On the Plaza 60 East San Francisco Street, Suite 218 Santa Fe, NM 87501 • 505.983.4562 • SantaFeGoldworks.com SFREPORTER.COM

AUGUST 30-SEPTEMBER 5, 2017

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Get savager at: SFReporter.com/savage

My brother just broke up with his girlfriend for the second time in eight months. They had been together for two and a half years, and she became pretty discontent when she finished college and my brother entered law school because all his time and attention weren’t revolving around her. In January, she staged this bizarre, soap-opera-esque situation to make my brother jealous, and then broke up with him when he reacted predictably. (This is not speculation—she admitted to it.) After the breakup, my brother became a mess of a person—sobbing all the time and talking about her to anyone and everyone. At the risk of sounding insensitive, he was unbearable. Then, against the advice of my family, he started talking to her again and they got back together. The second breakup came after he snooped and found out she had been texting her ex-boyfriend. She was telling that guy that she was trying to line up her next boyfriend while still dating my brother. They broke up again, and he’s now back in the same situation. He started back at school yesterday. He almost fucked that up last time because of her bullshit, and I don’t want to see that happen again. Additionally, I feel bad this happened—I really do—but I don’t have the time or patience to have the same conversation with him a million times. It’s exhausting and annoying. -Now Over Brother’s Relationship Obsession Your brother is an adult. (I mean, presumably he’s an adult—they’re not letting minors into law school these days, are they?) And since he’s an adult, NOBRO, you can’t stop him from making terrible choices or the same terrible choice over and over again. But here’s the good news, NOBRO: You’re an adult, too! And just as you can’t force your brother to stay away from this toxic POS, your brother can’t force you to converse with him all day long about politics or his POS ex or Game of Thrones turning into Star Trek. (Suddenly, only characters we don’t care about die on GoT. I half expect to see red shirts on the extras in season 7.) And if your brother makes the mistake of getting back together with this woman a second time, your adult ears don’t have to listen to his adult ass complain endlessly about the by-now-predictable consequences of his terrible choices. If you’re feeling anxious about conversations you fear being dragged into, NOBRO, let your brother know you’re done listening to him sob about his ex. “It was idiotic to take her back the first time,” you could say. “But, hey, we all do idiotic things from time to time, particularly where our love lives are concerned. You would have to be an idiot, however, to take her back a second time. Personally, bro, I don’t think you should waste another second of your life pining for that manipulative piece of shit. I’m definitely not wasting another minute of my life discussing her with you. So how about Jon Snow getting out that frozen lake full of zombies, huh? Apparently hypothermia isn’t a thing in the Seven Kingdoms.” My ex-boyfriend and I were together for a year and a half. He is a silver fox who is significantly older than me. I was 23 when we met and he was 58. It was supposed to be a fling, but it evolved into a beautiful romance. But after much consideration (he has a vasectomy and already has four kids and will be retiring soon), we ended it three months ago. It was heartbreaking, but we made a conscious decision to be close friends and talk every day. Out of the blue last week, he asked me if I had a boyfriend. I don’t, but I was coincidentally about to go on my first date

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AUGUST 30-SEPTEMBER 5, 2017

since the breakup. He proceeded to tell me he “kinda” has a new girlfriend, a woman closer to his age. This was not something I wanted to hear, which he could tell from the silence that met this disclosure. This conversation ruined my weekend. I have been unable to eat or sleep. The guy I went on a date with was sexy—not a love connection, but a bangtown prospect—but I was too emotionally fucked to do anything with him. Do I explain these thoughts to my ex? Let time do the healing? Why did my ex feel the need to tell me about his new girlfriend? -Heartbroken Over New Ex’s Yummy Your ex told you about his new girlfriend because you two are close friends, right? And close friends typically confide in each other about their love lives, don’t they? And that’s what you wanted, isn’t it? Backing up: It’s always inspiring when two people manage to salvage a friendship after their romantic relationship ends. But it’s not possible—it’s certainly not on anyone’s list of breakup best practices—to go in an instant from lovers to besties who talk on the phone every day. You got your heart broken, HONEY, and only time can cauterize that particular wound. Your reaction to the news that your ex has a new girlfriend proves your post-breakup friendship wasn’t a “conscious decision” but an ill-advised rush. And while the physical aspect of your relationship with Mr. Silver Fox ended three months ago, you never got out of each other’s pants emotionally. (A bruised ego might also be contributing to your inability to eat or sleep—he got over you faster than you got over him.) I don’t think you should explain anything to your ex right now, HONEY, because I don’t think you should talk to your ex for the next six months or so. You need to get on with your life—and getting on that new guy is a good place to start. I’m a 26-year-old heterosexual female, and I was recently dumped by my boyfriend. He was my first love and the person I lost my virginity to. We’d been seeing each other for a little over a year. I had sex with someone else while I was seeing my ex (it was a more casual relationship in the beginning). I wanted more, and I’m not 100 percent sure but think that’s what scared him off. I went into a depression and started seeing a therapist. This all happened a little more than a month ago. Friends tell me that the “best way to get over someone is to get under someone else,” but I’m not sure what to do. I’m pretty sure I’m doing the thing I shouldn’t be doing: holding out hope my ex will decide he made a horrible decision and want to be with me again. I know it is idiotic to have this hope. Can you give me some direction? -Don’t Underestimate My Pain This may not be helpful in the short term, DUMP, but it’s not idiotic to hold out hope your ex will take you back. It could happen— indeed, it has happened for lots of folks. I have two friends who are married to men who dumped them, regretted it, and begged to be taken back. The trick, however, is to assume it won’t happen and make a conscious effort to get on with your life. (And, if necessary, a conscious effort to get under someone else.) Your boyfriend/first love/first fuck dumped you a little more than a month ago—you’re allowed, one month and change later, to live in hope of a reconciliation. Odds are good, though, that it’s a false hope, DUMP, so don’t pass on any solid offers and keep seeing that therapist. On the Lovecast, parents, talk smart to your kids about sex: savagelovecast.com

SFREPORTER.COM

mail@savagelove.net @fakedansavage on Twitter ITMFA.org

EQUUS FILM FESTIVAL: HORSE SHELTER DIARIES Jean Cocteau Cinema 418 Montezuma Ave., 466-5528 As part of three days of equine-centric films to benefit The Horse Shelter, the shelter's own story screens, along with two short films. In Horse Shelter Diaries, nine horse trainers took nine horses that had never been ridden and trained them for 100 days, then competed at the Gimme Shelter rally (see SFR Picks, page 17). 6:45 pm, $10 EQUUS FILM FESTIVAL: INTO THE SPOTLIGHT Jean Cocteau Cinema 418 Montezuma Ave., 466-5528 A sampling of short films accompany the feature Into The Spotlight: KYB Dressage. Yes, dressage is dancing horses and yes, it's incredibly difficult. In following the stories of rescued horses, the documentary also shines the spotlight on horse rescue and in the United States (see SFR Picks, page 17). 2 pm, $10 EQUUS FILM FESTIVAL: TRUE APPALOOSA AND CHEVAL MARWARI Jean Cocteau Cinema 418 Montezuma Ave., 466-5528 True Appaloosa features a horse breeder set on uncovering the Asiatic origins of the Appaloosa (there are only about 100 "true Appaloosas" left in the world—who knew?), followed by Cheval Marwari, about the Marwari, another breed whose population is dwindling, this one of Indian origin (see SFR Picks, page 17). 4:15 pm, $10

MUSIC BOOMROOTS COLLECTIVE Boxcar 530 S Guadalupe St., 988-7222 Get down to some reggae after you burn the shit out of Zozo. 10 pm, free BROOMDUST QUARTET Cowgirl 319 S Guadalupe St.,982-2565 Americana. 8 pm, free DANIELE SPADAVECCHIA Inn and Spa at Loretto 211 Old Santa Fe Trail, 984-7997 Acoustic jazz, swing, Latin and Italian classics. 7 pm, free DAVID GEIST Pranzo Italian Grill 540 Montezuma Ave., 984-2645 Hear piano standards performed by Geist, who had a 20-year career composing Broadway tunes, at this intimate venue. 6 pm, $2

DOUG MONTGOMERY Vanessie 427 W Water St., 982-9966 Gotta get that smooth, smooth piano. 6 pm, free FRED GRAHAM: MENDELSSOHN, SWEELINCK AND WALKER First Presbyterian Church SF 208 Grant Ave., 982-8544 Graham performs classical compositions on the organ. 5:30 pm, free GERRY & CHRIS La Fiesta Lounge 100 E San Francisco St., 982-5511 Gerry Carthy and Chris Abeyta are two friends with very different backgrounds, and together they fuse Celtic and Latin music. 8 pm, free GREG SCHLOTTHAUER Vanessie 427 W Water St., 982-9966 Piano and vocals. 8 pm, free HALF BROKE HORSES Duel Brewing 1228 Parkway Drive, 474-5301 Honky-tonk songs and heart-infused Americana. 7 pm, free JAKA Second Street Brewery (Original) 1814 Second St., 982-3030 Zimbabwean-influenced original dance music with heavy polyrhythms and thick vocal harmonies. 6 pm, free JAKE PHILLIPS Mine Shaft Tavern 2846 Hwy. 14, Madrid, 473-0743 Acoustic rock on the deck to get your long weekend started. 5 pm, free THE JAKES Mine Shaft Tavern 2846 Hwy. 14, Madrid, 473-0743 Not to be confused with Jaka or Jake Phillips, The Jakes are a rock ‘n’ roll band with quite the following. 8 pm, free MURDERBURGERS, CITY MOUSE AND ALIEN SPACE KITCHEN The Underground 200 W San Francisco St. Pop punk from Scotlandbased rockers the Murderburgers; jazzy pop by City Mouse and locals Alien Space Kitchen perform a varied repertoire of rock originals. If you want more punk shows in Santa Fe, you gotta get to the existing punk shows in Santa Fe! (See Music, page 21.) 9 pm, $5 RAY MATHEW Upper Crust Pizza (Eldorado) 5 Colina Drive, 471-1111 As much as we enjoy seeing Eldo folks in town on occasion, it’s also nice to catch live music without having to drive 20 minutes. Here’s some eclectic country jazz. 6 pm, free

RONALD ROYBAL Hotel Santa Fe 1501 Paseo de Peralta, 982-1200 Native American flute and Spanish-style classical guitar. 7 pm, free RYAN HUTCHENS Second Street Brewery (Railyard) 1607 Paseo de Peralta, 989-3278 Folk music from South Carolina influenced by southern Appalachian traditional music, bluegrass, folk and gospel. 6 pm, free SUMMER FLING WITH DJ POETICS Skylight 139 W San Francisco St., 982-0775 Top 40, hip-hop, reggae, Latin and house music. Summer’s winding down, gotta get it now while the gettin’s good. 9 pm, $5-$7 THE THREE FACES OF JAZZ El Mesón 213 Washington Ave., 983-6756 Jazz by this swinging trio, which welcomes a different special guest each Friday night. 7:30 pm, free

SAT/2 ART OPENINGS CECILIA ROBERTSON: PAINTING FROM LIFE 7 Arts Gallery 125 Lincoln Ave., 437-1107 Painter Robertson works to understand the vital/ healing relationship between nature and earth’s inhabitants. This show features landscape paintings of New Mexico and the American Southwest. If you missed the opening celebration yesterday, don’t worry, there’s another today. 3-5 pm, free JIM GRIFFITH: FRESH FISH Art Exchange Gallery 60 E San Francisco St., 603-4485 It’s just what it sounds like: Griffith presents new realistic paintings of fish in this solo exhibit. Fish are some of the planet’s prettiest creatures; our favorites include trout (of course), shad and alligator gar. JK on that last one. They’re dang terrifying. Through Sept. 30. 4 pm, free TIM BAVINGTON: SUNSHINE MAKER David Richard Gallery 1570 Pacheco St., 983-9555 Celebrate the colorful run of Tim Bavington’s first exhibition at David Richard Gallery with a closing reception. The show features paintings from the artist from 2002-2017. There’s also an artist talk (turn the page for more). 4 pm, free


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BOOKS/LECTURES ARTIST TALK: TIM BAVINGTON AND DAVE HICKEY David Richard Gallery 1570 Pacheco St., 983-9555 Artist Tim Bavington and historian and art critic Dave Hickey have an art-filled and critical exchange about Bavington’s current exhibition, as well as art and contemporary culture in general. 4 pm, free GALLERY TALK AND BOOK SIGNING: JOHNNIE WINONA ROSS Charlotte Jackson Fine Art 554 S Guadalupe St., 989-8688 Meet the artist and the publisher and get your copy of Johnnie Winona Ross (published by Radius) signed. 3-4 pm, free

DANCE ASPEN SANTA FE BALLET SUMMER BALLET Lensic Performing Arts Center 211 W San Francisco St., 988-1234 Brazilian choreographer Fernando Melo returns this summer with a second world premiere ballet that blends video projection with stirring movement. Sharing the program is Alejandro Cerrudo's “Little Mortal Jump” and Los Angeles-based choreographer Cherice Barton’s “Eudaemonia,” exploring the search for happiness. 8 pm, $36-$94 ENTREFLAMENCO: 2017 SUMMER SEASON El Flamenco de Santa Fe 135 W Palace Ave., 209-1302 Antonio Granjero, Estefania Ramirez and Antonio Hidalgo Paz co-direct this summer series featuring Granjero and Ramirez performing original choreography. 7:30 pm, $25

EVENTS BIG FOOT BBQ & BLUES FEST Fitzgerald Park Hwy. 4, Jemez Springs, 575-829-3540 You might not believe in Bigfoot, but you probably believe in blues music, beer and barbecue, beautiful drives and bustin’ out dance moves, so head on up to the mountains to get your fill. If you're so inclined, Christopher Dyer, "Doctor Bigfoot" himself, will talk about evidence of the woodsy ape-man in New Mexico. 11 am-4 pm, free FALL ACTIVITIES AT SKI SANTA FE Ski Santa Fe 740 Hyde Park Road, 982-4429 Ride the chairlift, hear some tunes from CS Rockshow and get your ski passes and gear early at a discount. Or just drive up there for fun—we do that a lot. 10 am-3 pm, free

with Vaughn Irving

SPORTS PHYSICALS only $35 through September 29th

Services offered through the Pediatric Clinic at COURTESY VAUGHN IRVING

Since 1919, the Santa Fe Playhouse has presented the Fiesta Melodrama, a lampooning of local and national politics written by a team of secret writers who take stabs at everything from local restaurants to elected officials to this very publication (7:30 pm Thursday and Saturday, Aug. 31 and Sept. 2; 10 pm Saturday Sept. 2; 2 pm Sunday Sept. 3. Through Sept. 10. $15-$25. Santa Fe Playhouse, 142 E De Vargas St., 988-4262). This year, Boris Kofveve, a Russian interloper, seeks to take over the Santa Fe mayoral race with the help of a particularly hilarious Governor Boozeanna Martinis. Vaughn Irving, artistic director of the theater, co-directed the play with Andrew Primm. (Charlotte Jusinski)

Monday–Friday from 8:15 AM to 10 AM or by appointment Walk-in Hours: M, T, F: 8-5. W: 8-3. Th: 8-6.

Back-to-School checkups and vaccinations also available. Welcoming new patients. Accepting all insurance plans, including Medicaid.

901 West Alameda | 505.988.8869 | southwestcare.org

Is it weird to laugh when the world is ending? Yes and no. I’m a big fan of comedy that does not shy away from the issues. … There’s no point in going through life afraid, and if you can take a step back and laugh about things, then I think that you’re going to be a healthier, happier human being. Some folks think that laughing at current events is irresponsible. The uproar about ‘sheetcaking’ comes to mind. What would you say to that? I understand the sentiment, frankly. I get how, when we’re in dire straits, that comedy seems frivolous. But I don’t think it ever really is. I think it’s part of the human experience, and I think that it very rarely takes away the direness of the situation. It doesn’t make you feel like it doesn’t matter any more because we’re laughing about it. But it can take your mind to a new place, and help re-frame the situation. How did the writing and the rehearsing go when crazy shit just kept happening? Like, ‘Oh my god, that guy Big Rog just brought a gun to City Council, how do we get that in?’ That’s always a tricky thing with the Melodrama. ... If we can put in something without derailing the plot, we’ll continue to put things in even during the run. That’s part of what political comedy is, it has to be current and it has to matter. ... On the note of what’s-his-bucket with the gun, we actually did get that into the script. One of the things we did this year, because national politics are so crazy right now, is we included national politics, but we kept it with a local lens. … There’s a balance that the writers always try to strike; there were eight people on the team this year, and they’re all bringing various ideas, and you can’t include everything—because there’s kind of an unlimited well of crazy, stupid shit that happens in Santa Fe and in the United States, so we had to pick and choose what served the story.

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When I first signed up to be a Big Sister I wondered if the young person would want to spend time with me. I quickly learned that age has nothing to do with the bond between two people. My Little Sister keeps me young, and my life experiences help guide her through challenges in her life. Diane, Big Sister

Hang out It’s that simple www.BBBSMountainRegion.org • 505-983-8360

FILM

PERSONAL ENRICHMENT

VOYAGE TO ISTRIA: Italy, Slovenia a n d Croatia Experience the history-steeped gems of the Venetian Republic from Italy to Slovenia and Croatia. Follow the cobbled squares and winding canals of the floating city of Venice, before setting sail on the sparkling Adriatic Sea in the ideal season-when the weather’s mild and the summer crowds are thinning out. You’ll enjoy exclusive Discovery Series events, including an olive-oil tasting, and feel the warmth of a Slovenian welcome during a Home-Hosted Visit. Walk in ancient footsteps at Roman Aquileia, and find inspiration where James Joyce once did in Trieste. November 19-30, 2017

Starts at $3195

This is a small ship so space is limited. Price does not include airfare. Optional airfare from Albuquerque $1160. C E .U N M . E DU/ T R AV E L

|

FIESTA DE LOS NIÑOS El Rancho de las Golondrinas 334 Los Pinos Road, 471-2261 Roam around the ponds, creeks and acequias that give life to our historic site as you have fun with, and learn about, this precious resource. 10 am-4 pm, $6-$8 SANTA FE ARTISTS MARKET Railyard Park Cerrillos Road and Guadalupe St., 310-8766 See works by local artists representing a ton of different mediums, and enjoy the sunshine. 8 am, free THE VANELLA BORDELLA TOUR WITH ZIRCUS EROTIQUE Palace Saloon 142 W Palace Ave.,, 428-0690 Welcome to the Van Ella Bordella, an infamous house of ill repute, for an evening of debauchery, comedy, decadent delights and scintillating Victorian-era brothel history. Burlesque is badass and these ladies are some of our own local experts. 10 pm, $15-$25 WASSA WASSA AFRICAN DANCE & DRUM FESTIVAL Railyard Performance Center 1611 Paseo de Peralta, 982-8309 The fourth annual celebration of African dance, drum and song classes. A day full of fun features drumming, music and dance, and culminates in a dance party. facebook.com/ wassaensemble has the full schedule. 10 am-10 pm, $20

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EQUUS FILM FESTIVAL: HERD IN ICELAND, OF GODS AND KINGS AND WILD HORSES IN WINDS OF CHANGE Jean Cocteau Cinema 418 Montezuma Ave., 466-5528 As part of three days of equine-centric films to benefit The Horse Shelter, three short films (about 30 minutes each) tell the stories of wild horses in Iceland, Greece and the American West, and the people who love and protect them (see SFR Picks, page 17). 9:15 pm, $10 EQUUS FILM FESTIVAL: HORSE TRIBE Jean Cocteau Cinema 418 Montezuma Ave., 466-5528 Three shorter films accompany Horse Tribe, which tells the story of when the Nez Perce tribe of Idaho initiated a renaissance by bringing horses back to their land and lives. It is an intimate tale of vision and grit, a community in conflict, a man in crisis and a beloved herd at risk. The evening also features three short films (see SFR Picks, page 17). 4:30 pm, $10

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EQUUS FILM FESTIVAL: KID'S BLOCK Jean Cocteau Cinema 418 Montezuma Ave., 466-5528 Bring the young'uns to a block of horsey films special for kids. Three short films accompany the 45-minute feature, Finding Fortune, based on a true story about a prize horse that is accidentally sent to slaughter and how saving her brings a father and daughter closer together (see SFR Picks, page 17). Noon, $10 EQUUS FILM FESTIVAL: RIDERS OF THE MIST AND DAVIDE PENITENTE Jean Cocteau Cinema 418 Montezuma Ave., 466-5528 To benefit The Horse Shelter, two films from India and Germany, respectively, tell widely varying stories: epic bareback pony races across the grasslands of Assam's Brahmaputra Valley, contrasted with the fine dancing dressage horses of the Académie Équestre de Versailles. But they certainly have these things in common: really skilled riders and truly amazing horses (see SFR Picks, page 17). 2 pm, $10 EQUUS FILM FESTIVAL: UNBRIDLED Jean Cocteau Cinema 418 Montezuma Ave., 466-5528 As part of three days of equine-centric films to benefit The Horse Shelter, check out Unbridled. A child survivor of sexual abuse finds solace in a horse; inspired by a true story. The feature is preceded by One Eighty Out, a short film about veterans with PTSD and how horses help their healing (see SFR Picks, page 17). 6:45 pm, $10

MUSIC THE ALPHA CATS Second Street Brewery (Original) 1814 Second St., 982-3030 Swingin’ jazz. 6 pm, free AMERICAN JEM Rio Chama Steakhouse 414 Old Santa Fe Trail, 955-0765 Fine-tuned Americana, dinner and dancing. 6:30 pm, $20 DAVID GEIST AND JULIE TRUJILLO Pranzo Italian Grill 540 Montezuma Ave., 984-2645 Trujillo sings standards and Broadway favorites, accompanied by David Geist, in the cabaret named after the latter. 6 pm, $2 DELPHIA Osteria D'Assisi 58 S Federal Place, 986-5858 Authentic soul revival. 6:30 pm, free

DOUG MONTGOMERY Vanessie 427 W Water St., 982-9966 Gotta get that smooth, smooth piano. 6 pm, free D’SANTI NAVA Santa Fe Plaza 100 Old Santa Fe Trail Flamenco guitar. 11 am, free FOX WHITE Mine Shaft Tavern 2846 Hwy. 14, Madrid, 473-0743 Rock 'n' roll, punk, gothic opera and general craziness. 8 pm, free GERRY & CHRIS La Fiesta Lounge 100 E San Francisco St., 982-5511 Gerry Carthy plays Irish tunes, Chris Abeyta’s got the Latin jams, and together the two friends form a musical melting pot. 8 pm, free GREG SCHLOTTHAUER Vanessie 427 W Water St., 982-9966 Piano and vocals and fine fine food. 8 pm, free JOHN KURZWEG BAND Cowgirl 319 S Guadalupe St., 982-2565 Rock ‘n' roll. 8:30 pm, free MARIACHI EXTRAVAGANZA Santa Fe Opera House 301 Opera Drive, 986-5900 Enjoy a passionate musical experience featuring internationally acclaimed Mariachi Garibaldi. 7:30 pm, $26-$56 RONALD ROYBAL Hotel Santa Fe 1501 Paseo de Peralta, 982-1200 Native American flute and Spanish classical guitar. 7 pm, free SANTA FE CHILES Cowgirl 319 S Guadalupe St., 982-2565 Dixie jazz and a little hair ‘o’ the dog. 1 pm, free STILETTO SATURDAYS WITH DJ 12 TRIBE Skylight 139 W San Francisco St., 982-0775 Hip-hop and high heels. 9 pm, $5-$7 TIM NOLEN AND THE RAILYARD REUNION Derailed at the Sage Inn 725 Cerrillos Road, 982-5952 Original bluegrass tunes. 6 pm, free WHEELCHAIR SPORTS CAMP WITH BENZO III Second Street Brewery (Rufina Taproom) 2920 Rufina St., 954-1068 Local hip-hopper Benzo III supports Denver-based MC Wheelchair Sports Camp, aka Kalyn. She is wheelchair-bound, talks a lot of shit and raps like hell (see SFR Picks, page 17). 8 pm, $10 CONTINUED ON PAGE 28

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FASHION

Fall Forward

UPDATE YOUR WARDROBE WITH AUTUMNAL TRENDS

makes everything from lip balm to face spray using plants and flowers foraged from high-desert terrain in Northern New Mexico. In this retail collective, you’ll also find the newest location for Wanderer (Bed Head, “You’re Welcome at Wanderer,” June 7). Ashley Arabian’s Taos shop is one of my favorite boutiques for anything from a date night dress to an everyday jacket, and a real good bet when it comes to finding on-trend fall fashions. Besides having great taste, these people are local and lovely, so hunting for a wardrobe update at this dance party is a no-brainer.

Trade your ratty beanie for a beret. STO RY BY M A R I A EG O L F - RO M E RO I L L U S T R AT I O N S B Y T H E A M I L I N A I R É

The days get shorter and the mornings are crisp—fall is almost here, and it’s time to buy a sweater. This year, fall fashion features the reincarnation of 1970s flounce and flow. The overall aesthetic sticks with summer ’17 trends, which have also been all about the decade of disco. Autumn shapes are big and comfortable; from wide-legged pants to big sleeves—lazy chic is in. Fall is also back-to-school time, and a good opportunity to find new inspirations. Brewing a new project, dedicating your time to hitting the books or digging back into your job are made easier when you’re feeling fresh, and the following fall trends may help people take you more seriously— or at least make them think, “Damn, who’s that fine dresser?”

Support locals while filling your closet. I am a huge advocate of shopping locally, particularly when the opportunity to do so presents itself in a new location with products made and curated by New Mexicans. So, it’s my two cents that you should look for these and other spiffy fall wardrobe additions at Spur Line Supply Co. (800 20th St. NW, Albuquerque). The 8,600-square-foot space opens Friday, Sept. 1, with a bash at 5 pm, including an exclusive cocktail from Level 5 (the bar at the chic new Hotel Chaco), food from The Grove Café and Market and live DJ sets. The structure in the Sawmill District houses small retail spots for locals. Among vendors, you’ll find Aaron Boyd’s Tres Cuervos Leatherworks. Boyd designs and produces men’s wallets and bracelets, as well as field journals, bandanas and more in Santa Fe. Dry Land Wilds also occupies a spot in Spur Line Supply Co. A skincare and cosmetics brand, this group

Chic pieces like berets a kitten heel booties will make your fall wardrobe feel fresh.

We all know heat escapes through the top of the head. So, wearing a hat in the next few months as temperatures dip is sensible and fashionable. Beanies are an easy go-to, but berets are just as effortless and ooze sophistication in the place of careless college kiddo. This accessory also provides an opportunity to throw a little color into your fall wardrobe. Red is particularly hot right now—terrible pun not intended. Matching your ruby beret with your lipstick takes less than 2 minutes, and adds serious polish to any ensemble.

Get a pair of kitten-heel booties. Slipping into a pair of boots is a sure sign of cooler weather, and the current trend is white kitten-heel ankle boots. Yeah, that’s a bit of a risk when it comes to footwear in the desert. They do, however, look amazing paired with a band tee and some leggings (an outfit that feels like pajamas) so, I vote yes. If white is just not doing it for you, there are a litany of other colors to choose from, and kitten heels are just as cute on a pair of sling-backs; another classic nod to the era of the original Charlie’s Angels. That professional aura you’re aiming for is partially dependent on your appearance, and nothing says you mean business like a pair of ladylike heels.

Actually, flowy pants are the best pants. Cooler weather and less daylight mean more Netflix binging, reading and general indoor-ness. So, pants that are as comfortable as sweatpants but much more fashionable are just about all a gal could ask for. Luckily, baggy, wide-legged pants are everywhere this season. So run to grab coffee in the same stretchy pair you spent all last night in, and get compliments instead of weird looks. At least something is going right in 2017.

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6401 Richards Ave., Santa Fe, NM 87508

SEPTEMBER

CALENDAR OF EVENTS

Events are free unless otherwise noted. Empower Students, Strengthen Community. Empoderar a los Estudiantes, Fortalecer a la Comunidad.

SAFE AND PROUD

In honor of Suicide Prevention Week and Santa Fe Pride Community Resource Fair 10 a.m. to noon, Tuesday, Sept. 12, Campus Center 505-428-1467 live music | booths | films | readings Suicide Prevention Training 10 a.m. to noon, 1 to 3 p.m., Friday, Sept. 15, Room 220 preregister: counselingservices@sfcc.edu Pride — March with SFCC 5:30 p.m., Friday, Sept. 15, The Roundhouse 505-428-1467 Followed by a dance party on the Plaza

4 MON Labor Day — Campus Closed THURS Help someone learn to read and write 14 TakeFRIyourBecome education to the next Santa Fe’s a volunteer tutor withlevel LVSF at 505-428-1353 Orientation: 4 to 6 p.m., Sept. 14, Room 503 15 HUB FOR LEARNING Training: HIGHER 9 a.m. to 5 p.m., Sept. 15, Room 489 Me: Understanding the Intersections 20 WED IofAm Gender, Sexuality and Identity. PERSONAL ENRICHMENT. PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT.

3 to 5 p.m., Lecture Hall, Room 216 505-428-1467 Discussion with I Am Me filmmaker, Jenn Jevertson

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TUES

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WED

Continuing Education

Hablando de Nosotros | Talking About Ourselves 6 to 7:30 p.m., SFHEC, 1950 Siringo Rd. 505-428-1467 Código-Switch | Code-Switching

SFCC Governing Board Meeting JOINING US THIS FALL 5:30 p.m., Board Room, Room 223 505-428-1148 Seattle Film Institute • Northern New Mexico College • Bellevue Committee meets Tuesday, Sept.Univeristy 26. ContinueBoard yourFinance journey today.

sfcc.edu/ce

SAVE THE DATE — 6 toPLUS 8 p.m., Wednesday, Oct. 4

Expanded offerings from New Mexico Highlands University College Night: Meet representatives from more than

40 colleges and universities from across the state and country.

...from Santa Fe High) 1950 Siringo Rd. PLUS (across Intercambio hec.sfcc.edu • hec@sfcc.edu • 505-428-1725 11:30 a.m. to 12:45 p.m., Tuesdays, Room 537 Practice a new language and help someone learn your language. Visit www.facebook.com/sfccesl or call 505-428-1444. Job Club, Résumé Review Days and Free Career Walk-In Clinics For an up-to-date list of employer recruiters and career clinics visit www.sfcc.edu/events-resources or call 505-428-1406. REGISTER FOR COURSES, FIND MORE EVENTS & DETAILS AT WWW.SFCC.EDU Individuals who need special accommodations should call the phone number listed for each event.

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ZIGTEBRA AND THE ZIG ZAGS Boxcar 530 S Guadalupe St., 988-7222 Chicago's Zigtebra plays bedroom pop with a beat for lovers, loners and everyone in between. Supported by local rock ’n’ rollers The Zig Zags. 10 pm, free ZOLTAN AND THE FORTUNE TELLERS Second Street Brewery (Railyard) 1607 Paseo de Peralta, 989-3278 Frontman Zoltan was born in Transylvania—yes, Zoltan is a real name and yes, Transylvania is a real place. The music's not spooky, though. This jaunty Eastern European-influenced music may feature fur hats and pots and pans. 6 pm, free

THEATER THE FIESTA MELODRAMA Santa Fe Playhouse 142 E De Vargas St., 988-4262 A tradition is Santa Fe since 1919, the Fiesta Melodrama is written in the style of those from the wild west, but with a twist. Lampooning local news and politics, the melo has been delighting crowds and embarrassing politicians since New Mexico was only seven years old. Book your tickets early, because this tradition sells out fast (see 3 Questions, page 25). 7:30 pm and 10 pm, $15-$25

SUN/3 DANCE ENTREFLAMENCO SUMMER SEASON 2017 El Flamenco 135 W Palace Ave., 209-1302 World-renowned Spanish flamenco dancer Antonio Granjero presents the 2017 summer flamenco season with co-directors Estefania Ramirez, Antonio Hidalgo Paz and his company, Entreflamenco. 7:30 pm, $25 ENTREFLAMENCO: 2017 SUMMER SEASON El Flamenco de Santa Fe 135 W Palace Ave., 209-1302 Antonio Granjero, Estefania Ramirez and Antonio Hidalgo Paz co-direct this summer series featuring Granjero and Ramirez performing original choreography. 7:30 pm, $25 RUMBATERAPIA The Underground 200 W San Francisco St. Camino Gitano promotes the Hispanic-American culture through dance, theater and music; bringing to the stage musical concerts, dance groups and assisting artists with this beautiful art. Get dance lessons and see a performance to boot. 9 pm, $20

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EVENTS BODHICITTA MINDFULNESS NATURE WALKS Thubten Norbu Ling Tibetan Buddhist Center 1807 Second St., Ste. 35, 660-7056 Set and intention and head out on this mindfulness walk led by Cinny Green. 2 pm, free FALL ACTIVITIES AT SKI SANTA FE Ski Santa Fe 740 Hyde Park Road, 982-4429 Get your ski passes and gear early and at a discount, listen to live music from David Thom, play disc golf, ride the chairlift—there is no lack of mountainous fun up on the ski hill today. 10 am-3 pm, free FIESTA DE LOS NIÑOS El Rancho de las Golondrinas 334 Los Pinos Road, 471-2261 Roam around the ponds, creeks and acequias that give life to the historic site as you have fun with and learn about this precious resource. 10 am-4 pm, $6-$8 MODERN BUDDHISM: OVERCOMING ANXIETY Zoetic 230 St. Francis Drive, 292-5293 We can create an inner sense of calm, confidence and contentment by meditating on Buddha’s timeless wisdom, and we can bring this into our daily life now. Learn how with teachings by American Buddhist nun Gen Kelsang Inchug. 10:30 am, $10 SANTA FE COMMUNITY FARM STAND Santa Fe Community Farm 1829 San Ysidro Crossing, 983-3033 These local producers produce local produce. If the Farmers Market is a litle too hectic, this vibe is mellow. Noon-2 pm, free WASSA WASSA AFRICAN DANCE & DRUM FESTIVAL Railyard Performance Center 1611 Paseo de Peralta, 982-8309 The fourth annual celebration of African dance, drum and song classes. A day full of fun features drumming, music and dance. facebook.com/ wassaensemble has the full schedule. 10 am-10 pm, $20

FILM EQUUS FILM FESTIVAL: FREE SPIRITS Jean Cocteau Cinema 418 Montezuma Ave., 466-5528 The short film Wild Horse Resolution precedes Free Spirits. Both films look at the difficulty of preserving and managing the wild American mustang. Any kid who grew up with Marguerite Henry books is surely aware of this conflict already (see SFR Picks, page 17). Noon, $10

EQUUS FILM FESTIVAL: SCOUT'S HONOR Jean Cocteau Cinema 418 Montezuma Ave., 466-5528 Four films about the power of the equine-human bond are sure to make you want to go for a ride. Explore horseassisted therapy, the American cowgirl and horse rescue in California (see SFR Picks, page 17). 2 pm, $10 EQUUS FILM FESTIVAL: THE CARAVAN Jean Cocteau Cinema 418 Montezuma Ave., 466-5528 The Caravan follows carriage drivers and horse riders who willingly alter their lives for a five-month cross-country pilgrimage. Children, octogenarians and everyone in between travel from California to Florida (see SFR Picks, page 17). 4:15 pm, $10

MUSIC BORIS McCUTCHEON Cowgirl 319 S Guadalupe St., 982-2565 Modern gothic Americana from one of our fave local acts. Noon, free CARSON McHONE Mine Shaft Tavern 2846 Hwy. 14, Madrid, 473-0743 Alt.country from Austin, Texas, on the deck. This time, with feeling! 1 pm, free DANA SMITH Upper Crust Pizza 329 Old Santa Fe Trail, 982-0000 Original country-tinged folk songs. 6 pm, free DOUG MONTGOMERY Vanessie 427 W Water St., 982-9966 Gotta get that smooth, smooth piano. 6:30 pm, free HONEYWISE Cowgirl 319 S Guadalupe St., 982-2565 Folk music all the way from Iowa with hints of outlaw country and fierce mandolin. 8 pm, free THE IYAH BAND Mine Shaft Tavern 2846 Hwy. 14, Madrid, 473-0743 Reggae on the deck. 5 pm, free LONE PIÑON Second Street Brewery (Railyard) 1607 Paseo de Peralta, 989-3278 Traditional Norteño music. 6 pm, free RAMON BERMUDEZ JR. La Fiesta Lounge 100 E San Francisco St., 982-5511 Latin and jazz guitar. 6 pm, free CONTINUED ON PAGE 30


WINE

¡Pour Vida!

OLD-SCHOOL VS. BRAND-NEW

Who Can Sell Wine in America? BY MARY FRANCIS CHEESEMAN a u t h o r @ s f r e p o r t e r. c o m

W

e live in an age where American faith in branding has yielded true corporate giants; where Walmart and Amazon wage war on an influencer battlefield; a world where you slip on your Nikes to go eat a Big Mac and play on an iPhone while drinking a Starbucks without even thinking about it. But when it comes to wine, people become more willing to take a chance and search for hidden treasures, to explore what tastes standard, and then explore more deeply what tastes good, in the best and most subjective possible way. In fact, the conception of a wine producer as a “brand” has French roots. As an primer, let’s look at a wine called Blason d’Issan, a second label created by a famous wine estate called Château d’Issan, a classified Third Growth winery from the Margaux appellation in the Bordeaux region of France. That’s a lot of information to parse about this wine in one sentence, and we haven’t even talked about what grapes are in it. For the record, it is a red blend, reliably mostly cabernet sauvignon and merlot, produced in a more ready-todrink style than the vins de garde put out by the mother estate. It is made from young vines being cultivated for loftier bottlings, and the grapes in the bottle must only come from Margaux, where the Château owns 40 hectares. It costs $50 and tastes powerful and elegant, but

vintage variation makes a difference and this wine is never truly the same year after year. Even though the winery makes over a hundred thousand bottles, it will never be a “ubiquitous” wine ... and that’s what makes drinking it so much fun. Since Folgers and Coca-Cola debuted in the 19th century, thirsty Americans typically have looked to trusted brands to supply them with quality and value. Less

Belle Pente pinot noir comes with tart hints of cherry, pomegranate and cranberry.

than a century later, the American wine industry was forced to rebuild itself after the damaging erasure of Prohibition. When the 21st Amendment was ratified, handing over control of importation and distribution to state and local government, 48 different wine markets were created. To be effective, an American wine producer in the early days needed to produce wine on a large enough scale to make national distribution worthwhile. The national taste for wine prioritized a wine that tasted exactly the same from bottle to bottle. The “house style” rather than the “regionality” or “terroir” of a wine became all-important. A perfect example is a wine called Meiomi. Meiomi is a pinot noir for cabernet

Blason d’Issan is a red blend consisting mostly of cab-sav.

Meiomi is a pinot noir aimed at cab drinkers—live a little!

drinkers. It has a body unlike any other pinot noir I’ve met—full rich ripeness, it appeals to people who like the sweet tannin of American cabernet sauvignons. Created by Joe Wagner of the famous Caymus Vineyards, it was bought in 2015 by Constellation Brands, one of the most powerful forces of wine distribution in America. Annual production of the wine exceeds 500,000 cases and is on the rise. It retails for $28, and you can buy Meiomi practically anywhere. According to the label, the grapes can be sourced from three different California counties: Sonoma, Monterey and Santa Barbara. Between the three of them, the grapes can be sourced from over 70,000 hectares. That’s 1,750 times more than what Château d’Issan owns in Margaux, without even getting into yields or aging requirements or any of the other factors that make quick, high-volume production possible. And yet, Meiomi does what it does well—it is remarkable in its homogeneity, but it does not drink like a cheap bulk wine. It also is not a treasure to hunt down in a secret corner of a wine shop. Not all American wines are like Meiomi. Some are small-production and limited in distribution—which brings us to the 2014 Belle Pente pinot noir, from the Murto Vineyard in the Dundee Hills of Oregon. Produced from a single vineyard of grapes, it emphasizes regionality. Annual production of this wine is 573 cases. It tastes like ripe fruits with natural tartness—pie cherry and cranberry and pomegranate—with a beguiling earthy note of dried leaves and forest floor. It retails for $35, is a little harder to find than Meiomi and may taste different from bottle to bottle because of a multitude of factors, including vintage variation and a less homogenous house winemaking style. Regardless, it’s typically perfect for drinking in the fall.

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SFREPORTER.COM

AUGUST 30-SEPTEMBER 5, 2017

29


sing!

dance!

chant!

meditate!

Jiva Ananda Yoga invites you to the

2017 Santa Fe Kirtan Festival Meditation upon transcendental sound is the heart and soul of yoga wisdom and enables you to gain deep insight and realization on your spiritual journey. It cleanses away all misconceptions about your identity and uncovers your true self.

September 8-10, 2017 (Friday-Sunday)

completely

free of charge!

Kirtan is a deep reservoir of all-satisfying waters that allows you to experience inner peace and spiritual happiness. The more you drink from this reservoir, the more your heart will be filled with spiritual love and comfort.

SUNDAY, SEPT 10

SATURDAY, SEPT 9

JIVA ANANDA YOGA GLORIETA MESA YOGA PAVILION

@ PARADISO FRIDAY, SEPT 8 @ PARADISO behind Fruit of the Earth Organics 903 Early St., Santa Fe, NM

6-9 PM:

Manjari Mantra Band • The Bhakti Boogie Band

more info:

behind Fruit of the Earth Organics 903 Early St., Santa Fe, NM

20 Silent Ridge, 87508 (dirs on website)

11AM-3PM:

4-6 PM:

Heart of the Lotus Band Jai Om Forrest Evans

Various Musicians

from previous days, plus:

Gong Yoga Crystal Bowl Meditation 4PM-SUNSET:

7-9 PM:

Ganga Jala Band DJ Murari

Shiva Temple Festival

(across the valley from Yoga Pavilion) Indian potluck-style dinner • Sunset hike to Shiva Mandir • Chanting & Meditation • House concert with Sita

kirtansantafe.org • jivaanandayoga.org

505-919-9986 505-919-9982

Traveler’s Market presents

Santa Fe Flea market 2904 Rufina Street, Santa Fe. NM (around the corner from Meow Wolf)

www.santafefleamarket.com

Open Every Weekend until Sept 23 & 24, Saturday 8 am - 3 pm Sunday 8 am - 3 pm (Open on Fridays in August)

Sponsored by Traveler’s Market DeVargas Center, (Behind Office Depot) 40 Dealers of Fine Tribal and Folk Art, Jewelry, Books, Antiques, Furniture, Textiles and Beads www.travelersmarket.net

30

AUGUST 30-SEPTEMBER 5, 2017

SFREPORTER.COM

THE CALENDAR THEATER THE FIESTA MELODRAMA Santa Fe Playhouse 142 E De Vargas St., 988-4262 A tradition is Santa Fe since 1919, the Fiesta Melodrama lampoons local news and politics. We saw it last weekend and definitely laughed our asses off (and we also had a marg ahead of time to be sure we’d do that). Book your tickets early because this is tradition sells out fast (see 3 Questions, page 25). 2 pm, $20-$25

WORKSHOP LOOM BEADING WORKSHOP WITH MARVIN GABALDÓN Wheelwright Museum of the American Indian 704 Camino Lejo, 982-4636 Make a small loom project led by Gabaldón. A beadwork artist (Acoma/Taos/ Ohkay Owingeh), Gabaldón has been beading for over 35 years. Seating is first-come, first-served, so get over there fast. 1-4:30 pm, free

MON/4 BOOKS/LECTURES MARC THOMPSON: MIMBRES ROCK ART SITES Hotel Santa Fe 1501 Paseo de Peralta, 982-1200 Thompson, director of the Tijeras Pueblo Museum, presents "Mimbres Rock Art Sites: Wind in the Willows," as part of the Native Culture Matters series from Southwest Seminars. 6 pm, $15

EVENTS FALL ACTIVITIES AT SKI SANTA FE Ski Santa Fe 740 Hyde Park Road, 982-4429 If you’re not working today, there’s no better time to had up the mountain. Get your ski passes and gear early and at a discount, listen to live music from Alchemie, play disc golf, ride the chairlift—there is no lack of fun up on the ski hill today (see SFR Picks, page 17). 10 am-3 pm, free GEEKS WHO DRINK Draft Station Santa Fe Arcade, 60 E San Francisco St., 983-6443 Pub trivia can win you drink tickets for next time. 7 pm, free INDIVISIBLE SANTA FE MONDAY NIGHT MEETINGS Center for Progress and Justice 1420 Cerrillos Road, 467-8514 Join a grassroots progressive political movement to coordinate local efforts across the country with a national strategy. Fight against Trump and for a progressive agenda. 7 pm, free

ENTER EVENTS AT SFREPORTER.COM/CAL

TAI CHI Santa Fe Botanical Garden 715 Camino Lejo, 471-9103 Unwind in the garden with tai chi. 5:30 pm, $5-$7 WASSA WASSA AFRICAN DANCE & DRUM FESTIVAL Railyard Performance Center 1611 Paseo de Peralta, 982-8309 The fourth annual celebration of African dance, drum and song classes. A day full of fun features drumming, music and dance. Facebook.com/ wassaensemble has the full schedule. 10 am-10 pm, $20

MUSIC BILL HEARNE TRIO La Fiesta Lounge 100 E San Francisco St., 982-5511 Honky-tonk and two-step with the best of them. 7:30 pm, free COWGIRL KARAOKE Cowgirl 319 S Guadalupe St., 982-2565 Michèle Leidig hosts Santa Fe's most famous night of karaoke. 9 pm, free DOUG MONTGOMERY Vanessie 427 W Water St., 982-9966 Gotta get that smooth, smooth piano. Montgomery is joined by Elizabeth Young on violin at 8:30 pm. 6:30 pm, free GREG BUTERA AND THE GUNSELS Mine Shaft Tavern 2846 Hwy. 14, Madrid, 473-0743 Get to the deck for Labor Day and have some fun with local Americana-ists and honkytonkers. 2 pm, free ITASCA, DYLAN GOLDEN AYCOCK, BT/BG AND LAKE MARY Zephyr Community Art Studio 1520 Center Drive, Ste. 2 Itasca, a singer-songwriter based in Los Angeles, has some of the fastest pickin' fingers we've ever seen, and uses them to make etherial and complex guitar tunes. She is accompanied by Aycock, whose album Church of Level Track was one of NPR's top 10 solo guitar records of 2016. BT/BG is locals Ben Tempchin and Ben Gerhards (Cloacas, The Hammeritz, etc.), and Lake Mary picks the guitar warmly and intimately like Itasca. 8 pm, $5-$10 MELLOW MONDAYS WITH DJ SATO Boxcar 530 S Guadalupe St., 988-7222 Mondays are lame, but with any luck you had today off. Build up the calm for tomorrow, when it’s back into the fray. Chill out this evening with DJ Sato. And get the chicken fingers with sweet potato waffle fries. 10 pm, free

TUE/5 DANCE ARGENTINE TANGO MILONGA El Mesón 213 Washington Ave., 983-6756 Head to the downtown Spanish tapas-style restaurant and show off your best tango moves. 7:30 pm, $5

EVENTS GEEKS WHO DRINK Boxcar 530 S Guadalupe St., 988-7222 Pub trivia can win you drink tickets for next time. As ever, it’s hosted by the kindly Kevin A. Also, Boxcar has the absolute best chicken fingers we have ever had, ever. No lie. Get ‘em with honey mustard. 8 pm, free INDIVISIBLE SANTA FE ACTION TUESDAY Center for Progress and Justice 1420 Cerrillos Road, 467-8514 So you went to the Monday planning meeting. Now what? Action! Indivisible Santa Fe leads the fight for a progressive agenda. Wake up at the crack of dawn to hone your abilities in activism, social media, research, public speaking and other skills. 8:30 am, free SANTA FE FARMERS MARKET: EL MERCADO DEL SUR Plaza Contenta 6009 Jaguar Drive, 550-3728 A mega farmers’ market offering health screenings, food demonstrations and healthy, low-cost meals. The Southside is the place to be nowadays. 3 pm, free YOGA Santa Fe Botanical Garden 715 Camino Lejo, 471-9103 Breathe, bend and stretch to start your day off right. Or, as we say at SFR, “You’ll be yogoing all hard.” 8 am, $5-$7

MUSIC BILL HEARNE TRIO La Fiesta Lounge 100 E San Francisco St., 982-5511 This guy basically invented honky-tonk, so get it from the horse’s mouth. 7:30 pm, free DOUG MONTGOMERY AND DAVID WOOD Vanessie 427 W Water St., 982-9966 Gotta get that smooth, smooth piano. Montgomery starts out the evening, and Wood follows up with more at 8 pm. 6 pm, free PAT MALONE TerraCotta Wine Bistro 304 Johnson St., 989-1166 Solo acoustic jazz guitar. 6 pm, free


ENTER EVENTS AT SFREPORTER.COM/CAL

PAUL CATALDO Cowgirl 319 S Guadalupe St., 982-2565 To be a self-proclaimed “reclusive nature enthusiast” as well as a performing musician seems like a paradox, but Cataldo has it covered. Lush vocals in his singer-songwritery folk music might make you want to hole up in the woods—but in a good way. You can catch him tonight in town, or Friday in Madrid (that’s in next week’s calendar), or both if you’re feeling really excited about it. 8 pm, free

THE CALENDAR

TUESDAY BLUES JAM Boxcar 530 S Guadalupe St., 988-7222 El Farol is open again, but since they’ve been closed for renovations, the Canyon Road Blues Jam has been living here. As far as we know, tonight’s still going down, so say farewell. 8:30 pm, free VINTAGE VINYL NITE The Matador 116 W San Francisco St. Garage, surf, rockabilly and old-school country. And really damn strong drinks. PTL. 9 pm, free

ASPEN SANTA FE BALLET

Want to see your event listed here?

2017 SUMMER SEASON

We’d love to hear from you. Send notices via email to calendar@sfreporter.com

Last Summer Show! ASPEN SANTA FE BALLET

Include all that good stuff about where it is and how much and what time. You guys are smart and know what to do.

September 2 | 8pm

COURTESY NEW MEIXCO HISTORY MUSEUM

MUSEUMS

The Palace of the Governors currently displays historic images of Syria (think 18991909) in Syria: Cultural Patrimony Under Threat. EL RANCHO DE LAS GOLONDRINAS 334 Los Pinos Road, 471-2261 Living history. GEORGIA O’KEEFFE MUSEUM 217 Johnson St., 946-1000 O’Keeffe at the University of Virginia. Through Oct. 28. HARWOOD MUSEUM OF ART 238 Ledoux St., Taos, 575-758-9826 Seventy Years of Painting: Cliff Harmon and Barbara Harmon. Through Aug. 27. The Errant Eye: Portraits in a Landscape. Through Sept. 17. MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY NATIVE ARTS 108 Cathedral Place, 983-8900 American Traditional War Songs: The Ethnopoetic Videos of Sky Hopinka. Through Oct. 27. Daniel McCoy: The Ceaseless Quest for Utopia; New Acquisitions; Desert ArtLAB: Ecologies of Resistance; Connective Tissue: New Approaches to Fiber in Contemporary Native Art. All through Jan. 2018. Action Abstraction Redefined. Through July 27, 2018.

MUSEUM OF ENCAUSTIC ART 623 Agua Fría St., 989-3283 International wax art. MUSEUM OF INDIAN ARTS & CULTURE 710 Camino Lejo, 476-1250 Into the Future: Culture Power in Native American Art. Through Oct. 22. Jody Naranjo: Revealing Joy. Through Dec. 31. Frank Buffalo Hyde: I-Witness Culture. Through Jan. 7, 2018. Stepping Out: 10,000 Years of Walking the West. Through Sept. 3, 2018. MUSEUM OF INT’L FOLK ART 706 Camino Lejo, 476-1200 Flamenco: From Spain to New Mexico. Through Sept. 2017. Sacred Realm; The Morris Miniature Circus; Under Pressure. Through Dec. 2017. Negotiate, Navigate, Innovate: Strategies Folk Artists Use in Today’s Global Marketplace. Through July 16, 2018. MUSEUM OF SPANISH COLONIAL ART 750 Camino Lejo, 982-2226 Mirror, Mirror: Photographs of Frida Kahlo. Through Oct. 29. NM HISTORY MUSEUM 113 Lincoln Ave., 476-5019 Out of the Box: The Art of

the Cigar. Through Oct. 14. Voices of Counterculture in the Southwest. Through Feb. 11, 2018. NM MUSEUM OF ART 107 W Palace Ave., 476-5072 Meggan Gould and Andy Mattern: Light Tight; Cady Wells: Ruminations; Imagining New Mexico; Lines of Thought: Drawing from Michelangelo to Now. All through Sept. 17. PALACE OF THE GOVERNORS 105 W Palace Ave.,476-5100 Syria: Cultural Patrimony Under Threat. Through Dec. 31. Tesoros de Devoción. POEH CULTURAL CENTER AND MUSEUM 78 Cities of Gold Road, Pojoaque, 455-3334 In T’owa Vi Sae’we: Coming Home Project. SANTA FE BOTANICAL GARDENS 715 Camino Lejo, 471-9103 Dan Namingha: Conception, Abstraction, Reduction. Through May 18, 2018. WHEELWRIGHT MUSEUM OF THE AMERICAN INDIAN 704 Camino Lejo, 986-4636 Bridles and Bits: Treasures from the Southwest. Through Sept. 24. Beads: A Universe of Meaning. Through April 15, 2018.

This ! end k e e W

SEEEXTRAORDINARY EXTRAORDINARYDANCE DANCEAT AT SEE BUSINESS PARTNER 

Tickets: www.aspensantafeballet.com Tickets: 505-988-1234 or online at www.aspensantafeballet.com MEDIA SPONSORS 

PREFERRED HOTEL PARTNER 

GOVERNMENT / FOUNDATIONS 

Melville Hankins

Family Foundation

Partially funded by the City of Santa Fe Arts Commission and the 1% Lodgers Tax, and made possible in part by New Mexico Arts, a Division of the Department of Cultural Affairs, and the National Endowment for the Arts. PHOTO: JORDAN CURET

SFREPORTER.COM

AUGUST 30-SEPTEMBER 5, 2017

31


Burning of Zozobra

C I N E M AT H E Q U E

Goodbye gloom.

1050 OLD PECOS TRAIL • 505.982.1338 • CCASANTAFE.ORG

SHOWTIMES AUGUST 30 – SEPTEMBER 5, 2017

Wed.-Thurs., August 30-31 12:15p Step* 12:45p Maudie 2:00p Step* 3:15p The Midwife 3:45p The B-Side* 5:30p Maudie* 5:45p Step 7:30p Endless Poetry 7:45p The B-Side* Friday 11:00a 11:15a 12:45p 1:30p 2:30p 3:30p 4:30p 5:30p 6:15p 7:45p 8:15p

Friday, September 1, come for a true Santa Fe tradition, the 93rd Annual Burning of Zozobra. Park at the South Capitol Parking Lot and ride the free shuttle to Fort Marcy Park. Get all the information at BurnZozobra.com! @burn_zozobra

TheOfficialBurningOfZozobra

@burnzozobra “

★★★★★ OUTSTANDING AND INCENDIARY.” – Jordan Hoffman, THE GUARDIAN

IT DARES YOU NOT TO BE MOVED.

When people ask about the Black Lives Matter movement, whether it’s a year or 50 from now, I will tell them to see ‘Whose Streets?’” – Nick Allen, ROGEREBERT.COM

IT COULDN’T HAVE COME SOON ENOUGH.

A vital tribute to the activists who continue to fight every day.” – Jude Dry, INDIEWIRE

Monday, Sept. 1-4 Menashe* Maudie Step* Whose Streets? Menashe* Whose Streets? Step* Maudie Menashe* Menashe Whose Streets?*

Tuesday, Sept. 5 12:30p Menashe* 1:15p Whose Streets? 2:15p Menahse* 3:15p Whose Streets? 4:15p Step* 5:15p Maudie 6:00p Menashe* 7:30p Menashe 8:00p Whose Streets?* *in The Studio

When the news cameras are gone the truth will be told.

W E W I L L N O T G O Q U I E T LY

A REAL LIFE STORY

CampA 2col(3.75)x5.25 www.stepmovie.com

#STEP IS LIFE

“EXTRAORDINARY” - ROLLING STONE

FINAL SHOWS!

THE MIDWIFE ENDLESS POETRY THE B-SIDE SPONSORED BY

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AUGUST 30- SEPTEMBER 5, 2017

SFREPORTER.COM


MOVIES

RATINGS BEST MOVIE EVER

10 9 8

Menashe Review Heart and heartbreak in Hasidic New York

7

BY ALEX DE VORE a l e x @ s f r e p o r t e r. c o m

6

Director Joshua Weinstein presents an intimately heartbreaking and painstakingly accurate depiction of the Hasidim living in Brooklyn in Menashe, a tale loosely based on the life of its star, Menashe Lustig. Menashe lost his wife a year prior to the events of the film, and Hasidic law dictates his son Rieven must be raised with a complete family (we even learn that should Menashe remarry, the stepmother wouldn’t be allowed to touch his son). Thus, Rieven is sent to live with Menashe’s brother, a decidedly humorless stickler for rules who affords Menashe little respect and imposes the strictest of upbringings on his nephew. Thematically, the film could have played out in any sort of community—love, loss and the underdog are universal—but by delving deep into the laws, customs and everyday lives of Hasid-

5 4 3 2 1 WORST MOVIE EVER

9 + PAINSTAKINGLY AUTHENTIC

- A LITTLE SHORT

ic Jews in New York, we are given a rarely-seen glimpse into a sect that operates in plain view but whose inner-workings remain unknown to most. Lustig is phenomenal as the downtrodden father figure caught between his religion and love for his son. He’s far from perfect, and his penchant for cracking jokes damages his credibility in the eyes of his brethren. But observing constant humiliation driven by his boss, his brother, his rabbi or at arranged dates makes us root for him, even as he struggles to pay rent, feed his son and get to work on time. Menashe is presented primarily in Yiddish, and Weinsten goes so far as to cast ultra-ortho-

dox New Yorkers, most of whom perform without a film credit. Not only does this add unprecedented authenticity to the film, it surprises with each natural performance; this is as real as it gets. Add fantastic examples of traditional Jewish music and just enough humor and heart, and we’ve got one of the most fascinating and engrossing films of the year. MENASHE Directed by Weinstein With Lustig Center for Contemporary Arts, PG, 82 min.

QUICKY REVIEWS

8

PATTICAKE$

6

EL SALVADOR: ANOTHER VIETNAM AND ATOMIC ARTIST

7

3

STEP

THE DARK TOWER

PATTI CAKE$

8

Patricia Dombrowski (Danielle Macdonald) dreams of hip-hop superstardom in Patti Cake$.

+ DANIELLE MACDONALD IS A MUCH BETTER ACTOR THAN EMINEM

- HAVE I SEEN THIS BEFORE?

Patricia Dombrowski, aka Killa P, aka Patti Cake$, is an aspiring rapper. She’s undeniably talented, but she doesn’t fit the template of what the music industry expected a rapper to look like—she’s a fat white girl. The “chasing your dreams” picture is not a new idea. It usually goes something like this: The main character has a talent and a dream. They usually live in a shitty place and have a shitty job, which is only extra motivation for their ultimate goal. Obstacles and rivals rise and fall in front of them, and then there’s a final test which shows off their skills, heart, dedication. It probably doesn’t matter if they win or lose. Within that framework, director Geramy Jasper’s first feature film is pretty entertaining. Patti is charming and relatable. She’s filled simultaneously with self-confidence and selfdoubt. Australian actress Danielle Macdonald gives one of those performances where it would be difficult to imagine anyone else playing the role: like Tony Soprano or Napoleon Dynamite. The story takes place in a fully developed world of suburban New Jersey’s hell of highways, parking lots and gas stations.

7

ATOMIC BLONDE

10

DUNKIRK

Jasper, who also wrote the script, imbues the world with subtle attention to detail and tough love for his characters that reminds me a bit of Mike Leigh. But ultimately, Patti Cake$ is a simple story done well, with lively performances and positive energy. (R Mitchell Miller) Violet Crown, R, 108 min.

EL SALVADOR: ANOTHER VIETNAM AND ATOMIC ARTIST

6

+ RELEVANT THEN, RELEVANT NOW - GRAINY IMAGES AND POOR SOUND QUALITY

Pop culture and school curriculum have long collided to make sure modern Americans know the visual landscape of the jungles of Vietnam and the olive drab of the US fighting men during its protracted and life-taking involvement there. But not everyone is mindful that a few years later, our nation’s ceaseless thirst for control led to extensive US support for military leaders in El Salvador amid a vast rebellion from the peasant class. This documentary double feature from the way-back machine leads off with El Salvador: Another Vietnam which, during its 1981 debut, was an edgy firsthand look at the Central America civil war over the economic stronghold of the coffee oligarchy. Catalyst Media’s crew CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE

SFREPORTER.COM

• AUGUST 30-SEPTEMBER 5, 2017

33


MOVIES

FOR SHOWTIMES AND MORE REVIEWS, VISIT SFREPORTER.COM

shot much of the 53 minutes of footage as the story was breaking, from refugee camps and urban warfare campaigns to the streets of Washington, DC, and the halls of Congress. Listen carefully as US Rep. Clarence Long makes his point: “I’m worried about whether this is being done not because it’s needed but because we have an administration that’s made a bunch of macho statements and now feels that it ought to follow through on them.” Don’t crunch your popcorn too loudly, as the words might become inaudible; old film makes for poor sound quality. But don’t make for the door—settle in for part two, much closer to home. Meet Tony Price, known for his sculptures from the detritus of discarded parts at Los Alamos National Laboratory, who narrates his own story as he picks through a public salvage yard and explains what compels him to create from a legacy of destruction. These 27 minutes from 1982 are interlaced with footage from atomic test sites and artfully presented with the movement and sounds that convey Price’s vision from three sensory paths. (Julie Ann Grimm) NR, Jean Cocteau Cinema, 53 min. and 27 min.

STEP

7

+ FEELS GREAT - REALLY ONLY SCRATCHES THE SURFACE

Director Amanda Lipitz has come a long way from her days as producer for the Legally Blonde musical. Now she presents Step, a documentary examining the lives of young women juggling their step dance team and the pursuit of college acceptance during their final year at a Baltimore school for girls. Lipitz zeroes in on three disparate and distinct voices: Cori, the over-achiever hoping for a full ride to Johns Hopkins University; Tayla, a relatively average student with an intense mother; and Blessin, the founder of the step team with a fiery personality that hides great sadness. Lipitz sets the stage against the backdrop of the 2015 police murder of Freddie Grey, but other than some peripheral mentions of the tragedy and an emotionally flat field trip to Grey’s memorial with the step coach leading the way, the underlying theme is lost in the shuffle. We do, however, understand that as young black women living at or below the poverty line, the doc’s main subjects are at a disadvantage—but we’re left to simply know that, as Lipitz never digs much deeper into the matter than “They’ve got it hard; step dance is the escape, college the light at the end of the tunnel.”

34

AUGUST 30-SEPTEMBER 5, 2017

You’re running out of chances to see El Salvador: Another Vietnam.

It’s a bleak picture and an often-heavy experience as we come to know the young girls and root for both their step team during competitions and their potential successes as students. When 100 percent of their senior class graduated from the Baltimore Leadership School for Young Women, the reaction feels exaggerated, but the college counselor and principal of the school care so much and try so hard that we can’t help but get swept up in their ethics and efforts. It would have been nice to find out where the girls are today or even to have gotten a clearer idea of their home lives or trials and tribulations, and Step does come perilously close to emotionally manipulative. Still, there is an ultimate message of positivity and hard work that’s impossible to deny, and ample sentimental satisfaction that comes from knowing even those who struggle with intense adversity and systematic oppression can make their way and make their mark. (Alex De Vore) Center for Contemporary Arts, PG, 83 min.

SFREPORTER.COM

THE DARK TOWER

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+ SUPER-COOL IDEA - SUPER-UNCOOL EXECUTION

A moment comes towards the end of The Dark Tower—Stephen King’s eight-novel series come to life on the big screen—when a thought occurs: “Are they really ending this already? What the hell?” Indeed, the long-percolating project from director Nikolaj Arcel (better known as writer for the original Swedish production of The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo) crams so very much into so very little time that practically everything suffers, not least of which is the pacing. We follow a young boy named Jake (Tom Taylor) who, in the wake of his father’s death, has started having dream visions of a man in another world who’s hell-bent on destroying this mysterious dark tower that, like, stops demons from breaking into the multiverse somehow … or something. Of course, everyone from his mom to his therapist to his shit-heel stepdad (or mom’s boyfriend or whatever) doesn’t believe that the vi-

sions are real. Jake sure is persistent, though, and when he busts into that other world through some sci-fi portal machine, it turns out he was right the whole time and he’s got psychic superpowers that amount to some sort of telepathic communication ability. An ancient battle was fought and lost here between the Man in Black (a seemingly bored Matthew McConaughey) and the Gunslingers, an ancient order of knights. It is eluded to that they might be related to Arthurian legend somehow … or something. Roland (aka the Gunslinger; Idris Elba, who makes a sincere go of it) is the last of the order, and having also lost his father (plus his buddies), he identifies with and joins Jake to stop the destruction of the tower and kill the Man in Black. If it sounds cool, that’s because it could have been. But with so much source material and a relatively short running time, we don’t have a chance to care for anyone before the Man in Black’s cartoonish super-villainy gets out of hand. McConaughey plays this in a too-calm-and-collected sort of way, which could say something about how he’s so evil he doesn’t even bother with emotions, but mostly it feels lacking in drama. Oh, there are neat little visual tricks that show how the Gunslinger is super-good at reloading his guns in various ways, but the threats never seem particularly perilous and the Man in Black’s motives boil down to “he’s just evil” … or something. The Dark Tower could have easily been twoplus hours and far more awesome; hell, it could have been two or three movies. In fact, it should have been. But if we had to guess, it’ll probably do pretty poorly and wind up on the cinematic ash heap forgotten to time ... or something. (ADV) Regal, Violet Crown, PG-13, 95 min.

ATOMIC BLONDE

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+ THERE’S NO LOVE STORY - YOU CAN SEE THE PLOT TWISTS COMING FROM A MILE AWAY

It’s 1989 at the height of Cold War. The Iron Curtain still hangs and things are kind of freaky in East Berlin. In short, it ain’t good. But as the opening credits shout in graffiti, “This isn’t that story.” Based on the 1989 Antony Johnston/ Sam Hart graphic novel The Coldest City, the film Atomic Blonde follows MI6 agent Lorraine Broughton (Charlize Theron) who is sent to Berlin to recover “the list,” highly coveted intel naming double-agents. Among that list is “Satchel,” a double agent for the Queen and for the Soviets, wanted by the Allies for treason. Broughton’s mission: recover the list and expose


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Dance is basically everything in the documentary Step.

Satchel’s identity. Along the way, she meets the shady David Percival (James McAvoy), a fellow agent who indulges in the hedonistic underground culture of East Berlin. The two work together to evacuate Spyglass (Eddie Marsan), the good-guy Stasi officer who has committed the list to memory, and is the Allies’ last shot at obtaining the information. With a steel-gray and neon palette accompanied by classic ’80s music from the likes of Depeche Mode, David Bowie and The Cure, Atomic Blonde is aesthetically a lot of fun. But while the production gets a lot right about the ’80s (as a millennial I can only assume), the hair, makeup and costumes felt more contemporary. But maybe that’s not a bad thing; there’s only so much pleather you can wear before it gets tacky. Theron plays an excellent heartless and calculating spy while McAvoy is her scruffy, ambivalent, wayward counterpart. And while Atomic Blonde is certainly entertaining, it’s a bit predictable. However, the fight choreography and and gorgeous cinematography make up for some of the substance the plot lacks. Atomic Blonde is a treat on the big screen, but it’s not a necessity. Maybe save a few bucks and enjoy Theron’s ass-kicking at home in a few months. (Lauren Thompson) Regal, Violet Crown, R, 115 min.

truths before the credits roll. It is, in fact, somewhat rare to see a mainstream film that deviates from the cinematic formula, but Nolan doesn’t let up for an instant. From the terrifying desperation of those stranded on the beach to a shell-shocked soldier (Cillian Murphy of Netflix series Peaky Blinders as well as Nolan’s Batman films) too broken to return to battle and a selfless dogfighter (Tom Hardy) barely hobbling along in the sky, dialogue becomes sparse compared to the frantic reality of sinking ships, dropped shells and the cruelty of the human survival instinct. Of course, there are only so many times you can see a bunch of soldiers abandon a ship, and the jarring nature of the heaving seas becomes nearly as difficult to watch as the violence. Still, moving performances from Mark Rylance and Kenneth Branagh—not to mention a surprisingly natural turn from Harry Styles (yeah, from One Direction)—remain a joy to watch, and the utter unfairness and brutality of war hang heavy over every last scene. This isn’t just one of the best war movies in recent memory, it’s one that will no doubt be shown in schools and referred to forever as an artful depiction of one of the ugliest chapters in human history. (ADV) Regal, Violet Crown, R, 106 min.

DUNKIRK

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+ RELENTLESS YET BEAUTIFUL - LOTS OF PEOPLE JUMPING OFF SHIPS

In 1940, near the start of World War II, the Allied forces suffered a tremendous defeat against German troops in the town of Dunkirk in France. Subsequently, 300,000 soldiers would be evacuated by military and civilian watercraft, but not before immeasurable losses. It’s a harrowing tale not known to many who aren’t WWII buffs before now, but in Christopher Nolan’s sprawling yet concisely told Dunkirk, we see the tragic events play out with a relentless pace and attention to detail. We follow three main narratives; that of soldiers stranded on a beach waiting for rescue over the period of a week, an hour in the lives of British fighter pilots, and a single day for a civilian pleasure yacht captain who helps retrieve said soldiers alongside his son and his son’s friend. Nolan presents an off-kilter look at each timeline, weaving in and out of the stories, though Dunkirk never feels disjointed. Rather, as bits and pieces from each angle are revealed, we begin to understand the incredible scope of the evacuation and just how lucky the survivors really were, though we’re faced with some hard

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12 Courtroom fig. 13 “Go team!” cheer 18 “___the Worst” (show on FXX) 22 “The Simpsons” disco guy et al. 25 Ceramics oven 26 Health clinic pamphlet subjects 28 “The Big Board,” for short 29 Back-to-school mo. 30 Innate quality 32 Hybrid J-Pop group that debuted “Gimme Chocolate!!” in the U.S. in 2016 33 Yardstick fraction DOWN 34 “One ___ Over the Line” 35 Major constellation? 1 Zone named for Dr. 36 Bread that gets filled Grafenberg 40 Cure-alls 2 “I Love It” duo ___ Pop 41 Home to some one-star reviews 3 Like stock without face value 42 Pillages 4 Be in need of AC 43 Galapagos owner 5 Actor Kinnear of “Brigsby 47 Having a handle? Bear” 48 First month of el año nuevo 6 Kind of bar lic. 50 Crown with jewels 7 Egg, in biology class 51 Atlas closeup map 8 Group that sometimes 52 Cultural value system includes Y 9 Old postal mascot who pro- 54 Actress Cannon of “Heaven Can Wait” moted new five-digit codes 55 States of wrath 10 Co. that owns Life, Look, 56 It often follows “further” and Money 57 Not preowned 11 The most famous one is 59 Fig. that’s in the neighborhood based in Vienna 55 “___ Necessarily So” 56 Dissenter’s position 58 Quick sprint for “Late Night” host Seth? 60 “___ White People” (2017 Netflix original series) 61 Destroy, as a recording 62 Cookie that somehow did a Swedish Fish version 63 “Legend of the Guardians” birds 64 The gauche half of an etiquette list 65 “Crud!”

BE MY FUR-EVER FRIEND! MEADE and siblings MERCER, MEYER & MELIKA, and their feral mom were found fending for ERCER E & M themselves in a Santa Fe yard. AD E M TEMPERAMENT: The kittens have developed lovely personalities and are all very playful and must go with a sibling or to a home with a very playful cat or kitten. MELIKA has been adopted, but her handsome orange tabby brothers are still waiting for homes. AGE: born approx. 6/6/17. City of Santa Fe Permit #17-004.

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COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENTS MINDFULNESS-BASED STRESS REDUCTION (MBSR) returns in September for it’s 20th year. This is the original 8-week model created by Jon KabatZinn at the UMASS Medical Center and facilitated by Daniel Bruce. Learn techniques to help manage pain, anxiety, insomnia and depression. This science and researched based model has been shown to increase brain neurogenesis and function in specific areas related to learning and memory, selfawareness, empathy and compassion. Dates: Tuesday Mornings, Sept. 19 - Nov 7, 2017 (10 -12:30pm) For workshop information and or registration go to www. danieljbruce.com or email: danielbruce1219@gmail.com or call 470-8893

HELP SOMEONE LEARN TO READ AND WRITE. Literacy Volunteers of Santa Fe provides free tutoring to adults who need to improve their ability to read and write. The 2010 U.S. Census indicated that 34% of adults in the Santa Fe area are functionally illiterate. You can help by becoming a volunteer tutor. A workshop will be held September 14 and 15. For more information visit our website, www.lvsf.org, or call 428-1353.

CLEVELAND MILLFEST Takes Place Sept 2 and 3 2017, 10 AM TO 5 PM daily. * 60+ artists, a variety of native foods and baked goods, dance exhibitions and continuous musical entertainment. * The Cleveland Roller Mill, a 3-story, adobe, water-powered historic flourmill will be in JOHREI CENTER OF SANTA FE. operation. 3 mill tours daily. Nominal admission into Museum. JOHREI IS BASED ON THE Parking $3 per vehicle FOCUS AND FLOW OF THE The Event takes place in UNIVERSAL LIFE ENERGY. Cleveland, NM hwy 518-mile When clouds in the spiritual marker 31 see sign on road body and in consciousness (100 miles northeast of Santa Fe.) are dissolved, there is a 575-387-2645. return to true health. This is according to the Divine www.clevelandrollermillmuseum.org Law of Order; after spiritual clearing, physical and mental- CAMINO GITANO INVITES YOU to two upcoming events emotional healing follow. come have fun! Dance lessons You are invited to experience and live performance! the Divine Healing Energy Camino Gitano promotes the of Johrei. All are Welcome! Hispanic-American culture The Johrei Center of Santa through dance, theater and Fe is located at Calle Cinco music; bringing to the stage Plaza, 1500 Fifth St., Suite musical concerts, dance 10, 87505. Please call 820groups and assisting art0451 with any questions. ists with this beautiful art to Drop-ins welcome! There is boost their careers and artistic no fee for receiving Johrei. life. The main objective is to Donations are gratefully organize cultural events and accepted. Please check workshops that improve and us out at our new website enhance the arts. All our persantafejohreifellowship.com formances are a combination VALLECITOS MOUNTAIN of Spanish classical dances, RETREAT CENTER - Applied from the School of Bolera, Spanish gypsy dance and Mindfulness: Learning how “Flamenco” combined with the to bring the benefits of mindfulness into everyday life Jazz and Latin music style. Upcoming Events: and the work place. October *Skylight presents Rumbaterapia 5-8. Always wanted to go on Aug 31, 8 - 10 PM, $20 cover retreat or learn more about meditation? Find your way Live performance and dance lesson to the stunning wilderness *The Underground at Evangelos landscape of Vallecitos deep in presents Rumbaterapia the majestic Tusas Mountains Sept 3 & 17, 9 pm, $20 cover outside of Taos NM. Register Live performance and dance lesson Today at www.vallecitos.org renemena67.wixsite.com/camino-gitano

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IS FOOD A PROBLEM FOR YOU? Do you eat when you’re not hungry? Do you go on eating binges or fasts without medical approval? Is your weight affecting your life? Contact Overeaters Anonymous! We offer support, no strings attached! No dues, no fees, no weigh-ins, no diets. We meet every day from 8-9 am at The Friendship Club, 1316 Apache Avenue, Santa Fe. 505-982-9040. SANTA FE KIRTAN FESTIVAL— FREE! Friday thru Sunday, September 8, 9 and 10. Friday, 6:00 pm to 9:00 pm at Paradiso, 903 Early St., behind Fruit of the Earth Organics. Saturday 4:00 pm to 9:00 pm at Paradiso. Sunday, Mesa Yoga Pavilion, 11:00 am to 8:00 pm. Manjari, Bhakti Boogie Band, Forrest Evans, Heart of the Lotus, Jai Om, Ganga Jala and more. Sunday, Gong Yoga, Qi-Gong, Kirtan Jam. Shiva Mandir Temple Fest. Info: kirtansantafe.org. LAST MINUTE 2017 CEU’S THE ETHICS OF WELLNESS AND SELF CARE EXPLORED THROUGH SOMATIC AWARENESS workshop is SATURDAY SEPTEMBER 16 at 930am-430pm $120 non-ceu $160 - 6 Ethics CEU’S. We will explore the ethics of self care as professionals, especially psychotherapists. For more info see: www.sacredtransitionsguide.com To register email: katedowphd@gmail.com

MODERN BUDDHISM: MEDITATION CLASSES IN SANTA FE “Overcoming Anxiety” Buddhist wisdom is a path to stability, inner strength, self-confidence and inner peace. Offering practical tools and spiritual realizations that reduce and eventually eliminate the worry and stress caused by excessive attention to the past and future. We can create mental space by learning to control our mind. Developing positive ways of viewing and understanding our experience eliminates mental discomfort and leads to the fulfillment of our wishes for happiness. We have the power to transform our lives and bring real benefit to ourselves and others. Meditations will explore the nature of anxiety, the pure nature of our mind, and creating a plan for overcoming anxiety. Gen Kelsang Inchug, an American Buddhist nun has been studying, practicing and teaching for many years with the guidance of Geshe Kelsang Gyatso. Her teachings and guided meditations in Santa Fe are accessible, inspiring and offer profound insight - transmitted with warmth and humor. Sundays 10:30am - 12:00pm at ZOETIC 230 S. St. Francis Dr, Santa Fe, NM 87501 (between Alameda & Agua Fria) $10/ Drop-in class Ongoing classes: September 3, 10, 17, 24... More info: (505) 292-5293 www.meditationinnewmexico.org Contact: rt@nkt-kmc-newmexico.org

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MIND BODY SPIRIT

Rob Brezsny

Week of August 30thth

ARIES (March 21-April 19): ”We are continually faced by great opportunities brilliantly disguised as insoluble problems,” said businessman Lee Iacocca. You are currently wrestling with an example of this phenomenon, Aries. The camouflage is well-rendered. To expose the opportunity hidden beneath the apparent dilemma, you may have to be more strategic and less straightforward than you usually are—cagier and not as blunt. Can you manage that? I think so. Once you crack the riddle, taking advantage of the opportunity should be interesting.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): The sadness you feel might be the most fertile sadness you have felt in a long time. At least potentially, it has tremendous motivating power. You could respond to it by mobilizing changes that would dramatically diminish the sadness you feel in the coming years, and also make it less likely that sadness-provoking events will come your way. So I invite you to express gratitude for your current sadness. That’s the crucial first step if you want to harness it to work wonders.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): “Don’t hoot with the owls TAURUS (April 20-May 20): Close your eyes and imag- at night if you want to crow with the rooster in the ine this: You and a beloved ally get lost in an enchanted morning,” advised Miss Georgia during the Miss Teen forest, discover a mysterious treasure, and find your way USA Pageant. Although that’s usually good counsel, it back to civilization just before dark. Now visualize this: may not apply to you in the coming weeks. Why? You give a dear companion a photo of your face taken Because your capacity for revelry will be at an all-time on every one of your birthdays, and the two of you high, as will your ability to be energized rather than spend hours talking about your evolution. Picture this: drained by your revelry. It seems you have a special You and an exciting accomplice luxuriate in a sun-lit temporary superpower that enables you both to have sanctuary surrounded by gourmet snacks as you listen maximum fun and get a lot of work done. to ecstatic music and bestow compliments on each other. These are examples of the kinds of experiments I SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): During this phase of your astrological cycle, it makes sense to express more invite you to try in the coming weeks. Dream up some leadership. If you’re already a pretty good guide or role more! Here’s a keynote to inspire you: sacred fun. model, you will have the power to boost your benevolent GEMINI (May 21-June 20): On its album Jefferson’s influence to an even higher level. For inspiration, listen to Tree of Liberty, Jefferson Starship plays a song I educator Peter Drucker: “Leadership is not magnetic co-wrote, “In a Crisis.” On its album Deeper Space/ personality. That can just as well be a glib tongue. It is not Virgin Sky, the band covers another tune I co-wrote, ‘making friends and influencing people.’ That is flattery. “Dark Ages.” Have I received a share of the record Leadership is lifting a person’s vision to higher sights, sales? Not a penny. Am I upset? Not at all. I’m glad raising a person’s performance to a higher standard, the songs are being heard and enjoyed. I’m gratified building a personality beyond its normal limitations.” that a world-famous, multi-platinum band chose to record them. I’m pleased my musical creations are appreciated. Now here’s my question for you, Gemini: Has some good thing of yours been “borrowed”? Have you wielded a benevolent influence that hasn’t been fully acknowledged? I suggest you consider adopting an approach like mine. It’s prime time to adjust your thinking about how your gifts and talents have been used, applied, or translated.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): “One should always be a little improbable,” said Oscar Wilde. That’s advice I wouldn’t normally give a Capricorn. You thrive on being grounded and straightforward. But I’m making an exception now. The astrological omens compel me. So what does it mean, exactly? How might you be “improbable”? Here are suggestions to get you started. 1. Be on the lookout for inspiring ways to surprise yourself. 2. Elude any warped expectations that people CANCER (June 21-July 22): Author Roger von Oech tells us that creativity often involves “the ability to take have of you. 3. Be willing to change your mind. Open something out of one context and put it into another so yourself up to evidence that contradicts your theories that it takes on new meanings.” According to my analy- and beliefs. 4. Use telepathy to contact Oscar Wilde in your dreams, and ask him to help you stir up some sis of the astrological omens, this strategy could and should be your specialty in the coming weeks. “The first benevolent mischief or compassionate trouble. person to look at an oyster and think food had this abiliAQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): A modern Israeli woman ty,” says von Oech. “So did the first person to look at named Shoshana Hadad got into trouble because of an sheep intestines and think guitar strings. And so did the event that occurred long before she was born. In 580 B.C., first person to look at a perfume vaporizer and think one of her male ancestors married a divorced woman, gasoline carburetor.” Be on the lookout, Cancerian, for which at that time was regarded as a sin. Religious inventive substitutions and ingenious replacements. authorities decreed that as punishment, none of his LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): When famous socialite Nan descendants could ever wed a member of the Cohen Kempner was young, her mother took her shopping at tribe. But Hadad did just that, which prompted rabbis to Yves Saint Laurent’s salon. Nan got fixated on a certain declare her union with Masoud Cohen illegal. I bring this white satin suit, but her mean old mother refused to buy tale to your attention as a way to illustrate the possibility it for her. “You’ve already spent too much of your monthly that you, too, may soon have to deal with the conseallowance,” mom said. But the resourceful girl came up quences of past events. But now that I have forewarned with a successful gambit. She broke into sobs, and you, I expect you will act wisely, not rashly. You will pass continued to cry nonstop until the store’s clerks lowered a tricky test and resolve the old matter for good. the price to an amount she could afford. You know me, Leo: I don’t usually recommend resorting to such extreme PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Want to live to be 100? Then be as boring as possible. That’s the conclusion of measures to get what you want. But now is one time longevity researchers, as reported by the *Weekly World when I am giving you a go-ahead to do just that. News.* To ensure a maximum life span, you should do VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): The computer scientist Tim nothing that excites you. You should cultivate a neutral, Berners-Lee invented the miraculous communication blah personality, and never travel far from home. JUST system that we know as the World Wide Web. When KIDDING! I lied. The *Weekly World News* is in fact a asked if he had any regrets about his pioneering work, famous purveyor of fake news. The truth, according to he named just one. There was no need for him to have my analysis of the astrological omens, is that you should inserted the double slash—“//”—after the “http:” in web be less boring in the next seven weeks than you have addresses. He’s sorry that Internet users have had to ever been in your life. To do so will be superb for your type those irrelevant extra characters so many billions of health, your wealth, and your future. times. Let this serve as a teaching story for you, Virgo. Homework: Send news of your favorite mystery—an As you create innovations in the coming weeks, be mindful of how you shape the basic features. The details enigma that is both maddening and delightful. you include in the beginning may endure. Freewillastrology.com.

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s Expanded Weekly Audio Horoscopes and Daily Text Message Horoscopes. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone © CO P Y R I G H T 2 0 1 7 R O B B R E Z S N Y at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700. 38

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REFLEXOLOGY

JOYFUL AWAKENINGS— Release old programming, experience unconditional self-love and embody your joy! Akashic records clearing, deep emotional healing, love vibration activation. Aleah Ames, CCHt. 505-660-3600, Joyful-Awakenings.com.

UNIQUE TO YOU Our health is reflected through the feet as an array of patterned and flexible aspects also conveyed in the body and overall being. Discomfort is a call for reorganization. Reflexology can stimulate your nervous system to relax and make the needed changes so you can feel better. SFReflexology.com, (505) 414-8140 Julie Glassmoyer, CR

DREAMS

PSYCHICS

REIKI

ICRT (International Center for Reiki Training) Licensed Reiki Master Teacher, Teresa Jantz, from Durango, CO will be offering an Usui/Holy Fire II Reiki I & II class in Santa Fe, September 15 & 16 and an Usui/Holy Fire II ART/ Master class September 22-24. Please call 970-903-2547 or visit TouchpointTherapy.com to register today!

ARE YOU A HEALER OR THERAPIST?

UNDERSTANDING YOUR DREAMS Free Webinar, September 12th 7:00 - 8:30 PM • Register at: www.willsharon.com/freewebinars 6 Session Class Starts on September 26th Will Sharon Anam Cara MSW, CPC

LOVE. CAREER. HEALTH. Psychic readings and Spiritual counseling. For more information call 505-982-8327 or go to www.alexofavalon.com. Also serving the LGBT community.

MASSAGE THERAPY

YOU BELONG HERE IN MIND TANTRA MASSAGE & TEACHING Call Julianne Parkinson, 505-920-3083 • Certified Tantra Educator, Professional Massage Therapist, & Life Coach LIC #2788

BODY SPIRIT!

CALL 983.1212 OR EMAIL CLASSY@SFREPORTER.COM


SFR CLASSIFIEDS 2 Ways to Book Your Ad!

LEGAL NOTICE TO CREDITORS/NAME CHANGE

STATE OF NEW MEXICO COUNTY OF SANTA FE FIRST JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT IN THE MATTER OF A PETITION FOR CHANGE OF NAME OF STATE OF NEW MEXICO Juniper Kempthorne, A CHILD IN THE PROBATE COURT Case No.: D-101-CV-2017-02043 SANTA FE COUNTY No. 2017-0160 NOTICE OF CHANGE OF NAME IN THE MATTER OF TAKE NOTICE that in THE ESTATE OF Daniel accordance with the provisions Berrigan, DECEASED. of Sec. 40-8-1 through Sec. NOTICE TO CREDITORS 40-8-3 NMSA 1978, et seq. the NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN Petitioner Jennifer Belsey will that the undersigned has apply to the Honorable DAVID been appointed personal K. THOMSON, District Judge representative of this estate. of the First Judicial District at All persons having claims the Santa Fe Judicial Complex, against this estate are required 225 Montezuma Ave., in Santa to present their claims within Fe, New Mexico, at 2:30 p.m. four (4) months after the on the 25th day of September, date of the first publication 2017 for an ORDER FOR of this notice, or the claims CHANGE OF NAME of the will be forever barred. Claims child from Juniper Ocean Love must be presented either to Storm Kempthorne to Juniper the undersigned personal Ocean Love Storm Mountain. representative at the address STEPHEN T. PACHECO, listed below, or filed with the District Court Clerk Probate Court of Santa Fe, County, New Mexico, located at By: Jorge Montes the following address: Deputy Court Clerk 102 Grant Ave., Submitted by: Jennifer Belsey Santa Fe, NM 87501. Petitioner, Pro Se Dated: August 23, 2017. STATE OF NEW MEXICO James J. Berrigan IN THE PROBATE COURT 2300 Constitution Ave. SANTA FE COUNTY Fort Collins, CO 80526 (970) 689-3637 No. 2017-0150 IN THE MATTER OF THE STATE OF NEW MEXICO ESTATE OF Brigida Marquez COUNTY OF SANTA FE Rico AKA Brigida Rico FIRST JUDICIAL DISTRICT Marquez AKA Vickie Montoya, COURT IN THE MATTER OF DECEASED. A PETITION FOR CHANGE OF NAME OF Jennifer Renee Belsey NOTICE TO CREDITORS Case No.: D-101-CV-2017-02044 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has NOTICE OF CHANGE OF been appointed personal NAME TAKE NOTICE that in accordance with the provisions representative of this estate. All persons having claims of Sec. 40-8-1 through Sec. 40-8-3 NMSA 1978, et seq. the against this estate are required Petitioner Jennifer Renee Belsey to present their claims within will apply to the Honorable four (4) months after the DAVID K. THOMSON, District date of the first publication Judge of the First Judicial of this notice, or the claims District at the Santa Fe Judicial will be forever barred. Claims Complex, 225 Montezuma must be presented either to Ave., in Santa Fe, New Mexico, the undersigned personal at 2:30 p.m. on the 25th day representative at the address of September, 2017 for an listed below, or filed with the ORDER FOR CHANGE OF Probate Court of Santa Fe, NAME from Jennifer Renee County, New Mexico, located at Belsey to Jenaveev Violet the following address: Butterfly Mountain. STEPHEN 102 Grant Ave., T. PACHECO, Santa Fe, NM 87501. District Court Clerk Dated: August 11, 2017. By: Jorge Montes Manuela Marquez Deputy Court Clerk 1020 Ave. de las Companas Submitted by: Santa Fe, NM 87507 Jennifer Renee Belsey (505) 204-5423 Petitioner, Pro Se

CLASSY@SFREPORTER.COM OR 983.1212 TO PLACE YOUR AD!

STATE OF NEW MEXICO COUNTY OF SANTA FE FIRST JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT Case No.: D101CV2017-02141 IN THE MATTER OF A PETITION FOR CHANGE OF NAME OF MARIA JUANITA VALDEZ aka Marie Juanita Valdez NOTICE OF CHANGE OF NAME TAKE NOTICE that in accordance with the provisions of Sec. 40-8-1 through Sec. 40-8-3 NMSA 1978, et seq. the Petitioner Maria Juanita Valdez will apply to the Honorable David K. Thomson, District Judge of the the First Judicial District at the Santa Fe Judicial Complex, 225 Montezuma Ave., in Santa Fe, New Mexico, at 2:45 p.m. on the 25 day of September, 2017 for an ORDER FOR CHANGE OF NAME from Maria Juanita Valdez to Marie Juanita Valdez. STEPHEN T. PACHECO, District Court Clerk By: Maxine Morales, Deputy Court Clerk Submitted by: Maria Juanita Valdez Petitioner, Pro Se

Judicial District Court, located at 225 Montezuma Ave, Santa Fe, New Mexico 87501, offer for sale and sell at public auction to the highest bidder for cash the following described property located in Santa Fe County, New Mexico: The property to be sold is located in Santa Fe County, New Mexico, and is a condominium unit within the Pueblo Encantado Condominiums, generally described as Pueblo Encantado Condominium, Unit K-2, 15 Mesa Encantado #227 and more particularly described as: Unit K-2, Pueblo Encantado Condominium (“Condominium”), created by the “Declaration of Covenants, Conditions and Restrictions for Pueblo Encantado Condominiums”, recorded on December 30, 1980, in Book 412, pages 824-841 in the office of the Santa Fe County Clerk (“Declaration”). (the “Property”). The Sale of this Property includes ANY AND ALL IMPROVEMENTS, FIXTURES, AND ATTACHMENTS, AND ANY AND ALL ABANDONED PERSONAL PROPERTY AS DESCRIBED IN THIS LEGAL NOTICES - COURT’S JUDGMENT, together with all and singular ALL OTHERS tenements, hereditaments, STATE OF NEW MEXICO and appurtenances thereto COUNTY OF SANTA FE belonging or any wise FIRST JUDICIAL DISTRICT appertaining thereto. If Case No. D-101-CV-2015-00547 personal property of Ms. JP MORGAN CHASE BANK, N.A. DeHaven, her agents, or Plaintiff, v. representatives, or of any JYL DEHAVEN, other person or entity INDIVIDUALLY AND AS separately ordered to vacate ANCILLARY PERSONAL and quit possession of the REPRESENTATIVE OF Property on or before the date THE ESTATE OF JAMES of the sale, remains on the real WAYLAND ROBERTS, property after the date of the DECEASED; JYL DEHAVEN, sale, such personal property AS ANCILLARY PERSONAL is deemed abandoned and REPRESENTIVE OF THE the purchaser may dispose of ESTATE OF ARCHIE LEE the property in any manner ROBERTS, DECEASED; THE pursuant to applicable law. BOARD OF DIRECTORS The property will be sold OF PUEBLO ENCANTADO subject to a nine month right CONDOMINIUM UNIT of redemption; easements, OWNERS ASSOCIATION, reservations and restrictions INC., A New Mexico of record; taxes and nonprofit corporation. governmental assessments Defendants. including unpaid utility bills; NOTICE OF SALE any liens or encumbrances not NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN foreclosed in this proceeding; that the undersigned Special the valuation of the property Master, in accordance with by the County Assessor as real the terms of the Order or personal property; affixture Granting Summary Judgment of any mobile or manufactured (“Order”) entered on June 20, home to the land; deactivation 2017 in favor of the Board of of title to a mobile or Directors of Pueblo Encantado manufactured home on the Condominium Association property; environmental (the “Association”), will on contamination, if any; any Wednesday, October 11, 2017, homeowners’ association at the hour of 9:45 a.m. MT, or condominium dues, at the entrance of the First assessments, declarations,

CALL: 505.983.1212

rules, requirements and restrictions and the Association’s continuing assessments and recorded rights as set forth in the Declaration and other matters of record; any requirements imposed by city or county ordinance or by state law affecting the property; and zoning violations concerning the property, if any. No representation is made as to the validity of the rights of ingress and egress. Transfer of title to the highest bidder shall be without warranty or representation of any kind. ALL PROSPECTIVE PURCHASERS AT THE SALE ARE ADVISED TO REVIEW THE DISTRICT COURT FILE, TO MAKE THEIR OWN EXAMINATION OF TITLE AND TO CONSULT THEIR OWN ATTORNEY BEFORE BIDDING. This sale is subject to a motion hearing scheduled for September 27, 2017 on Plaintiff’s Motion for Reconsideration. The sale will be made to satisfy an indebtedness awarded and owed to the Association secured by the Real Property as set forth in the Order. In the Order the Association’s judgment as secured by the Real Property as of April 5, 2017 was $34,053.16 (“Association’s April 5, 2017 Judgment”). The Association’s April 5, 2017 Judgement has and will continue to accrue interest, and additional costs and expenses and reasonable attorney’s fees arising from collection of it until satisfied plus any remaining attorney fees and costs accruing prior to the date of sale. The Association and/or its assignee may apply all or any part of its judgment to the purchase price in lieu of cash. The Association and/or its assignee has the right to bid at such sale and submit its bid verbally or in writing. Proceeds of the sale shall first apply to the costs of sale, including the Special Master’s fee, for any costs incurred for the maintenance and protection of the property, including those not included in the Association’s judgment, and then to the Association for its judgment, which will include additional amounts from the Association’s April 5, 2017 Judgment. If the sale results in a winning bid that exceeds the Association’s judgement, then those amounts will be put into

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the Court’s registry and paid to all remaining parties as their respective interests may appear. The Plaintiff or other lien holders at the time of the sale may have obtained judgments against the Property which may authorize them to bid in judgment amounts in lieu of cash but to date no such judgments have been entered. The sale will or may be affected by the Court’s Order after hearing on September 27, 2017 and may be postponed and rescheduled at the discretion of the undersigned Special Master. The sale is subject to the entry of an order of the Court approving the terms and conditions of this sale. The purchaser at such sale shall take title to the above described real property subject to Defendant Jyl DeHaven’s nine month right of redemption. /s/ Jonathan Morse Jonathan Morse, Special Master P.O. Box 8387 Santa Fe, NM 87504-8387 (505) 982-3305 Address inquiries to the Attorneys for the Association: Walcott, Henry & Winston, P.C. Charles V. Henry 200 West Marcy St., Suite 203 Santa Fe, New Mexico 87501 (505) 982-9559 (505) 982-1199 fax charlie@walcottlaw.com

NEED TO PLACE A LEGAL NOTICE?

AUGUST 30-SEPTEMBER 5, 2017

39


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BODY of Santa Fe

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i LOVE TO ORGANIZE Experienced References Sue 231-6878

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how to Book your classy ad: Call classy at: 505.983.1212 Email: classy@ sfreporter.com colors and full highlights Personal service and Great Rates!

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RED HOUSE SMOKE SHOP

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Kindly donate to the Santa Fe Community College Foundation. https://www.sfcc.edu/donate/

PRAJNA YOGA

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OPEN EVERYDAY! 10 am - 9 pm

INNER FOR TWO 106 N. Guadalupe Street (505) 820-2075

“YOU ARE WHAT YOU INK”

happy hour!

WEDNesday – Sunday from 4 pm to 6:30 pm Enjoy treats like: • grilled Colorado peach burrata • mesquite smoked prime rib sliders • Kobe Beef Hot Dog • Boursin stuffed Squash Blossoms (from the Chef’s Garden!) • wine • local brews... and lively conversation. See you there!

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227 DON GASPAR | SUITE 11A

Inside the Santa Fe Village

505-920-2903

happy hour everyday from 4 pm to 6:30 pm

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