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UP S N E D OP N N A N S E F XE T A S O E H R , FOR ISTORY EASURE T H DEN TR U O B A D , P.10 I M H M I R S HI ANN G JULIE BY


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JUNE 13-19, 2018 | Volume 45, Issue 24

WE ARE

NEWS OPINION 5

comfortable .

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NEWS 7 DAYS, CLAYTOONZ AND THIS MODERN WORLD 6 THE NEW BOSS 9 We had a fireside chat with the new CEO of Christus St. Vincent

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COVER STORY 10 THE LEGEND OF FENN’S GOLD Local bajillionaire Forrest Fenn has been saying for years that he hid a treasure chest somewhere in the mountains north of Santa Fe, and he wrote a cryptic poem that he claims is a treasure map. SFR talked to him—and asked hard-hitting questions about Scrooge McDuck

FANTASY, FREE ME If you’re champing at the bit for the Santa Fe Playhouse’s upcoming production of The Rocky Horror Show, you’re not alone. If you don’t know it, who even are you?

THE INTERFACE 15 BUSY NEW WORLD Tech and art and art and tech ... and the Emerging Media Alliance has it all under control

CULTURE

EDITOR AND PUBLISHER JULIE ANN GRIMM

SFR PICKS 17 Be the cowboy, see the ghost, do the DJ do and get all the crabs THE CALENDAR 18 THREAD THE NEEDLE Calexico’s Joey Burns on a variety of topics and Son of Town Hall’s old-timey rafting adventure A&C 25

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MAD WORLD City of Mud wants you to feel outraged

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FOOD 31 ALCHEMICAL INVENTIONS Your friendly neighborhood dispensary enters the restaurant game HEREDITARY REVIEW Plus the fallout of infidelity in The Day After

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Mail letters to PO Box 2306, Santa Fe, NM 87504, deliver to 132 E Marcy St., or email them to editor@sfreporter.com. Letters (no more than 200 words) should refer to specific articles in the Reporter. Letters will be edited for space and clarity.

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LETTERS

7 DAYS, JUNE 6

renew skin : renew life

[SIGH] WE SAID BE COOL “It’s Pride Month: We’re begging you, straight people. Be cool.” How fucking offensive! You may not have noticed but many, if not most, straight people, around here and probably everywhere else, either support and accept the gays and celebrate their right to be who they choose to be or don’t waste their time worrying about how other people live. I can only assume that you supercilious twits don’t care as long as you get an opportunity to be hip, superior, and snarky. This is right down there with your little condescending ironic digs about the “inferior” people who live in Española or the people who are “stupid enough” to be Catholics. It must be hard to be a terminal hipster in a backwater tourist trap.

ED FIELDS SANTA FE Editor’s Note: We printed this letter as we received it, but the terms “inferior” and “stupid enough,” purportedly quotes from SFR, have never been used by SFR in these contexts.

COVER, JUNE 6: “DEMOCRATIC PRIMARY ELECTION RESULTS”

PAPER AIN’T FREE THO I believe that all media, print, digital, and TV have an obligation to our democracy to educate and give free and equal quantity, a generous amount of media to each candidate in every election. ... Free media for candidates will help reduce the corrupting influence of campaign finance contributions better than any other law or oversight. Without the League of Women Voters’ website and candidate information, I would have little if not no information of candi-

____________________________________________________

CORRECTIVE SKINCARE BY APPOINTMENT dates. ... Defense of our democratic government relies on an informed voter. Fair, informed elections need media support for all candidates disregarding paid political ads. Media, will all of you come to the aid of your country? Hopefully before November 2018.

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Call to schedule a complimentary consultation CORRECTIONS In last week’s coverage of election returns, SFR incorrectly described the boundaries of legislative District 46. It does not include Rio Arriba County.

505 . 983 . 2228

807 Baca Street, Santa Fe | remedies@cybermesa.com

Aubrey Dunn is running for Senate. In last week’s reporting on the winner of the primary for land commissioner, SFR incorrectly stated that he is running for that office. Cibola National Forest was, in fact, not closed at the time that we published The Enthusiast (June 6: “Crews Cut”)—however, portions of that forest will indeed be closed starting this Friday. Sorry, folks. Lastly: The cover image on our June 6 edition is also the cover of our Summer Guide insert, and was taken by LeRoy Sanchez.

SFR will correct factual errors online and in print. Please let us know if we make a mistake, editor@sfreporter.com or 988-7530.

SANTA FE EAVESDROPPER “Dude, those bathrooms are clutch.” —Overheard at a campground in Ojo Caliente

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7 DAYS TRUMP DOES SOME CRAZY SHIT, PISSES OFF CANADA AT G7 SUMMIT And Trudeau is just like, “Naw, brah.”

ALBUQUERQUE JAIL ACCIDENTALLY RELEASES WRONG INMATE Everyone still more pissed off about ART bus line.

SANTA FE GIVES SPECIAL ALCOHOL PERMIT TO NATIONAL GOVERNORS ASSOCIATION The City Council’s got your back, mistreated SFPD officers who responded to the last governor-related alcohol event.

MISSING NEW MEXICO AIR FORCE OFFICER FOUND 35 YEARS LATER Time really flies, don’t you think?

DENNIS RODMAN HEADS TO SINGAPORE Which cabinet official is he again?

SANTA FE PUBLIC SCHOOLS ADOPT NEW, MORE PROGRESSIVE DRESS CODE POLICY For once we’re not 20 years behind the times.

SFR MAKES ELECTION NIGHT FRONT PAGE SPELLING ERROR But we still get reults, dammit!

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S FR E P O RTE R .CO M / N E WS

The New Boss O

n Friday June 15, Lillian Montoya will be the first woman named as president and chief executive officer of Christus St. Vincent Regional Medical Center. Santa Fe’s only major hospital has had its share of challenges—lawsuits, complaints from the community about quality of care and a longstanding, negatively tinged nickname that comes up more often than not in conversations about the place. After briefly serving as chair of the hospital’s board of directors, in 2013 Montoya joined the executive staff; as a result, she’s familiar with the problems. In 2013, SFR wrote about tense negotiations between hospital management and District 1199NM, the union that represents its employees. Nurses reported being unable to give proper care for patients because of understaffing, contrary to hospital-made algorithms that showed understaffing wasn’t a problem. Management and staff negotiated a contract last summer that included raises and bonuses for some employees and cost-of-living salary adjustments. The watchdog group Leapfrog gave St. Vincent low marks in 2017 on a number of indicators, including rates of infections and other accidents, burnishing the hospital’s poor street reputation. The hospital says it’s improved detection processes and purchased a UV light machine to eradicate pathogenic molecules in patients’ rooms. On the eve of taking the reins at Christus, Montoya sat down with SFR to talk about changes and challenges for the hospital as well as her own background, which includes executive- and director-level stints at the Regional Development Corporation, Los Alamos National Laboratory and the New Mexico Commission on Higher Education over the course of 25 years. Montoya says real and perceived gaps in the hospital’s services are closing due to a better work experience for its 2,100

employees, and that a better work environment will lead to a better patient experience. Here are some of the highlights of SFR’s conversation with Montoya:

COURTESY LILLIAN MONTOYA

BY AARON CANTÚ a a r o n @ s f r e p o r t e r. c o m

Lillian Montoya takes the helm of Christus St. Vincent after five years as chair of the board and decades of public work

employees and teams. They need to have a sit-down and visit at least once a month or every other month, and it’s called a round. Some questions they ask are, do you have the tools and resources to do your job? Are there any questions or concerns you want to raise? Someone you’d like to recognize or compliment? Please talk a little more about the hospital’s procedures for hiring staff, how long they stick around and who you’re looking for right now. We’re at 100 percent peer interviewing [by workers with equivalent titles], with orientations for new employees happening every two weeks. I went to orientation this morning. [There were] 24 new staff members in there. I asked them to raise their hands if they were interviewed by their peers and every hand went up. Our highest performers in the organization hire their peers. They fill the vacancies. They can pick people they want to work with. … Our turnover rate is the second-lowest in the entire Christus family. We’re at 10 percent turnover, while the national average is at 17 percent turnover. The aver-

What is the hospital doing to improve its record of care? I think it’s three things. First, focus on your people—if you focus on people, they do their best work and take care of others better. Second is focus on clinical quality of care. … We have physicians and nurses engaged in clinical-driven performance [who] identify areas where we can do better, track surgical site infections by nurses who work with a team to look at our data … it’s a continuous feedback loop. And third is patient experience, how management engages their people and engages their patients, observing our providers in how they talk to patients and their families. A focus on quality, experience, and workplace environment: It’s all three.

Montoya will be the hospital’s first female CEO when she takes the helm this month.

- Lillian Montoya, incoming president and CEO of Christus St. Vincent ciates and employees and find out what mattered. People want to be seen; they want to know their contribution matters. They want you to help them contribute [at] a higher level. We hold our leaders accountable for key behaviors they need to engage in with

age tenure for our workforce is seven and a half years, which is good for health care. People have choice in health care [employment]. We’re hiring everyone from nurses to technicians to physicians to advanced practice clinicians. We’re able to recruit [but] the challenge that we face is the same challenge faced by other businesses and companies in Santa Fe: housing, transportation, quality childcare, education, and, also very important: Several of our folks who move here ask, “Where’s my partner going to work?” And that one we can’t do much about. Is there anything else the state’s Legislature could do to give health care facilities what they need? It’s a long list. What has risen to the top is the need for more loan repayment programs for healthcare providers—loan re-service programs. The programs the state has now [which Montoya helped design while deputy director at the New Mexico Commission for Higher Education] focus on shortage areas only—not shortage area professions. We don’t get the benefit of bringing people onto our staff because there is a higher need in rural places like Gallup, but if there was an expanded loan repayment program, the whole state could recruit more easily than we can now. Smaller organizations don’t have the resources to fill gaps when it comes to [hospital staff ] housing. We partner with [Albuquerque Homeownership Center] to provide down payment assistance, [and] not every employer in New Mexico can do that. Transportation is a good example: 21 percent of our [full- and parttime employees] commute from outside Santa Fe. So many come from the Zia Rail Runner that we have people to pick up at Zia and drop them off here.

SFR: Patient experience and perception were some of the hospital’s largest problems when you were elected chair of the board of directors in 2013, and you say it had to do with how the hospital cares for its employees. Can you elaborate? Montoya: In the first three months of joining the team from the board, I spent 75 percent of my time rounding and visiting hospital staff and clinics. I wanted to talk to our asso-

People want to be seen, they want to know their contribution matters. They want you to help them contribute [at] a higher level.

NEWS

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ANSON STEVENS-BOLLEN

Forrest Fenn opens up about history, hoaxes and his hidden treasure

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BY JULIE ANN GRIMM e d i t o r @ s f r e p o r t e r. c o m

I

was ready to make fun of Forrest Fenn. There had been just enough national media this spring about his purported hidden treasure to make me freshly annoyed. I suspected the whole deal was a stunt and he was starving for attention. It’s been eight years since the famed Santa Fe art dealer published his autobiography, The Thrill of the Chase, and invited people to look for what he says is a chest full of gold and jewels hidden for the taking. At least three treasure hunters have died trying. It’s getting on summer now, and more are likely to try. I waited weeks for my backordered copy of the book to arrive, and then shamefully didn’t read more than half of it before our meeting. But not long after I set foot into his office just a few steps from his front door on Santa Fe’s east side, my defenses melted. Turns out, Fenn is rather charming and interesting—cantakerous too. Three local authors confirm they laid eyes on what Fenn planned to hide before he did it, and all three also declined to help him write a book about it. That didn’t stop him. One of them, Michael McGarrity, the Santa Fe author of about a dozen crime novels, consents Fenn is indeed charming and has called him a friend of sorts for 45 years. He says he does not have a doubt that Fenn hid the chest, but he’s skeptical about the underlying purpose of the ordeal. It’s not likely what Fenn claims, that he hid it to get American families “off the couch,” McGarrity says. “I don’t buy it and I never have bought it, and I have told Forrest that,” McGarrity tells SFR in an interview. “This has to do with a legacy. This is also about getting attention, but he would deny it and would  be miffed. … He loves having people believe he is mysterious, and in some ways, he is.”

Yet McGarrity is quick to mention that he admires Fenn for his storied military career and his role in putting Santa Fe on the map as an arts destination in the 1980s. Dorothy Massey, owner of the downtown Collected Works Bookstore, agrees with that estimation. “The Fenn Gallery was a must-stop, even if you didn’t like art. You hadn’t seen Santa Fe until you had been to the gallery,” she says. Massey says the book stands on its own as an American biography, not just a treasure hunt. Fenn is hard of hearing, so he asks me to sit very close while we talk. He may have even broken some news during our chat. Much of the coverage about his chest refers to it as “buried treasure,” but the man threatened me bodily harm both times I said the word “buried.” He’s not saying it is, he says. And he’s not saying it’s not. Near the end of our interview, when I’m pestering him about the contents of the chest, he changes the topic abruptly. “Do you like books? Can I show you a few?” He’s downright giddy to lead us—past tables layered with beaded moccasins, under a dozen hanging headdresses, in sight of 10 buffalo heads high on the walls and below two rows of pots, each big enough to hold a bushel of chile—to a shelf of volumes with leather binding and gilded pages. They’re fore-edged books, he explains, shifting the angle so that SFR Art Director Anson Stevens-Bollen and his camera can view the edge of the pages as the book is closed, reflecting an inch of gold. Then he slightly fans the pages with his thumbs, shifting them just so to reveal a painting of a horse. He reaches for a second book; this one shows Cambridge in one direction and, when he turns it over to repeat the process, Oxford in the other. Fenn seems to be this way. He might be hiding behind a chest of gold and a lifetime accumulation of wealth, but he’s still


SFR: How many copies of The Thrill of the Chase are up you to now? FF: The Collected Works Bookstore, as of last week, has sold about 40,200. And that is a lot of books for one bookstore. Of course, they are the only one that handles it. Amazon buys it from them and marks it up 10 bucks and sells it. Amazon sells so many books that the bookstore stores ’em in Amazon’s warehouse. That feels like a lot of books. For a little ol’ kid from Texas what lived by the cemetery, that’s a lot. Well, we might as well talk about the treasure. Where did it come from? When I had cancer they told me I was gonna die. And I have never subscribed to a lot of things I have heard. Who says I can’t take it with me when I go? So I got this beautiful little chest. I gave $25,000 for it and I said I am going to take a bunch of stuff with me when I go, and I started filling it up. There are 265 American gold coins, most of them eagles and double eagles, and Alaskan placer nuggets, and two of them are as large as a hen’s egg, and lots of rubies and emeralds and diamonds and sapphires, and jewelry … wonderful stuff that came out of my own collection. I wanted the treasure chest to be impressive if somebody found it or when somebody found it. I think it is going to be impressive when somebody finds it and opens that lid. Are you sure no one has found it? Don’t ask me how, but I am sure.

ANSON STEVENS-BOLLEN

I get paid to ask questions, though. I am smart enough not to answer some. I

have a way of knowing whether it has been found or not. But the summer is coming on, you know.

LET’S TALK ABOUT TREASURE

You think a lot of people will come this summer looking for it? I get over 100 emails a day and a lot of them tell me ‘I am on my way to Santa Fe to look for the treasure.’ Of course, it is in one of four states and a lot of people are going to Yellowstone too, they think it’s in Yellowstone or Montana or Colorado.

Media reports have long pegged the value of the treasure at around $1 million, but that’s not a number Fenn uses. Shane Hoffman, who owns Premium Precious Metals in Santa Fe with his brother Andrew, says the reported 20 troy pounds of gold could be worth about $312,000 today. Plus, the historic value, called the “numismatic collectability,” of some items might give them more worth to certain buyers. But he says because it is a commodity, as the price of the gold goes up, the collectable value doesn’t add as much to the price.

People have come to your house and threatened your family, and then of course people have gotten hurt off on their own looking for the treasure. Are you putting anyone in danger with all of this? An average of nine people die each year at the Grand Canyon, did you know that? That is a fact. They don’t have enough water, sunstroke, they fall off a mountain or something. But an average of nine a year is a lot, I think. Everybody is responsible for their own actions. Last summer, the chief of the State Police asked you to call off the hunt and you said no. Did you ever meet with him? No. I talked to him on the phone. His reason was mostly financial. He didn’t want to spend money searching for people and he said that. But every time you get in your car and head to town you are putting yourself at risk. The treasure that you decided to put in there, you’ve talked about it being worth $1 million … [Interrupts] No, that is not true, you are reading the press. I have never said what it was worth, because I don’t know. The value changes every minute around the world. It is worthwhile. If you can find it, it is worthwhile. It is worth your trip. CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE

COURTESY FORREST FENN’S THE THRILL OF THE CHASE

something like a good old boy. Set to celebrate his 88th birthday in August, he’s not finished yet with childlike wonder. He’s a little ornery. Maybe he’s even evidence that the most valuable thing isn’t what is obvious— it’s what you have to go looking for.

Fenn says this is a picture of the bronze chest and some of its contents.

Placer gold is the kind that had miners wading into streambeds with shovels, pans and dreams. Fenn says there are many pieces of it in the chest, including two “as large as a hen’s egg.” Hoffman says the value of this gold depends on its purity and it must be melted down and assayed to determine. The US government issues the gold eagle as a one-ounce pure bullion coin. An ounce of gold was $1,302 as of presstime. Double Eagle coins contained just under an ounce of gold and were worth $20 as face value before the US went off the gold standard in 1933. Fenn says there are 265 of a combination of these coins in the chest.

The value of diamonds, rubies and other gemstones depends on their clarity, cut and size. There’s no way to estimate sight unseen what these and other objects might be worth.

Does he think it’s out there? “I don’t know. I wouldn’t put money on it being out there,” Hoffman says. “I think the notoriety [Fenn] has gained from this is worth far more than what is in that box.”

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You are right, I have been reading the press. I also read that you told people you will die before you tell someone; in other words, when you die, you will take the secret with you. Well, I am not gonna tell, whether I die or not. But nobody knows where the treasure chest is but me. My wife does not know within 18 months of when I hid it. But does your wife pester you for the location like everyone else does? My family doesn’t discuss it. So what do you and your family like to do for fun? Well, I am 87 years old. Give me some options. Your house is full of all these beautiful artifacts. And therein lies the fun I’ve had in the past. And is that over? Do you go looking for artifacts? No. You’re done? I was a terrible student in high school. I barely graduated. My father was a principal and that was one reason I think I was able to graduate. I never did go to college. But I have said before because I did not go to college I never did learn a lot of the rules that make businesses fail. I had a really good military career. I was a fighter pilot for 17 of my 20 years. I was shot down twice. I flew 328 combat missions. I lost roommates. I got 26 medals. I had a wonderful military career. I had a very successful business (pronounced “bidness”) career in Santa Fe at Fenn Galleries Limited for 17 years, and since then I have written 11 books and I’ve excavated a prehistoric and historic Indian pueblos and written a book about that and published a second book. What do you do for encores? That is a valid statement, isn’t it?

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Fenn’s Poem Where the Treasure Lies As I have gone alone in there And with my treasures bold, I can keep my secret where, And hint of riches new and old. Begin it where warm waters halt And take it in the canyon down, Not far, but too far to walk, Put in below the home of Brown. From there it’s no place for the meek, The end is ever drawing nigh; There’ll be no paddle up your creek, Just heavy loads and water high. If you’ve been wise and found the blaze, Look quickly down, your quest to cease, But tarry scant with marvel gaze, Just take the chest and go in peace. So why is it that I must go And leave my trove for all to seek? The answers I already know, I’ve done it tired, and now I’m weak. So hear me all and listen good, Your effort will be worth the cold. If you are brave and in the wood I give you title to the gold.

BUT WHERE IS IT? Forrest Fenn penned a poem that he included near the end of The Thrill of the Chase that he says contains nine clues to lead seekers to the reward. He writes a few sentences before, it’s “in the mountains somewhere north of Santa Fe,” and has issued a few statements over time that others believe might get people closer to the spot. Fenn says he made two trips to hide it, one with the chest and one with its contents. NPR reported in 2016 that it’s at “an elevation above 5,000 feet. It’s not in a mine, a graveyard or near a structure.” He reportedly told another treasure seeker that he used a sedan to drive to where he walked to the spot. Keep in mind, he’s not saying it’s buried. But he’s not saying it’s not. The seeker will also know more about Fenn than anyone else, because Fenn also claims to have tucked into the chest an unpublished biography that’s about 20,000 words long.

Did you ever think instead of burying the treasure ... [Interrupts] Now I never did say I buried it, I said it is hidden. That doesn’t mean it isn’t buried, it’s just I did not want to give that as a clue. Did you ever think about giving all that to some community cause like kids or art or something? That’s been done so many times. I wanted to do something different. Do you know if anybody has ever gotten close to finding it? I know that there have been people within 200 feet. They told me exactly where they were. But they did not know that they were that close. In a million years, I wouldn’t tell them. So you won’t even play a little bit of hot/cold? I would never say that. I am asked that all the time. ‘Am I getting close?’ I usually say ‘No comment,’ or usually I just don’t respond to the e-mail. I get 100 emails a day, the long ones I don’t even read. When you had the treasure here, did you ever roll around in it like Scrooge McDuck? Like what? Scrooge McDuck. Do you know who that is? No, but I know what you mean and the answer is yes, I did. Years ago, in my gallery downtown, a guy came in and bought something from me for about 8 or 10 thousand dollars in cash, he paid for it in $100 bills and the whole staff was in the front room, about eight or 10 of us, and I walked right out the middle of the room and I threw it up in the air and it just went everywhere. Then we started picking it up, and I was $100 short and I thought somebody stole a $100 bill from me and I couldn’t figure out who it was and I fretted over it. And about a month later, I


WHERE TO LOOK

What do you plan to do when someone finds the treasure? Are you going to go out and meet them? I am ambivalent about that. I have argued that with myself for a number of years. The fact is, it depends on the individual. I have got a feeling that the person that finds it is not going to tell anybody. There are a lot of problems if somebody knows that you’ve found a treasure chest. Not only is it the cardinal element, but for instance you may not want the IRS to know that you found it. If you make it known that you found the treasure chest, you are going to find out that you’ve got a lot more friends than you thought you had. So it is really real? (Turns to Anson) Did she just ask me that? Anson: You gotta ask. Well, finish reading my book and then if you wanna call me on the phone and ask me that question, I’ll answer it for you. Is that a real saber-toothed tiger skull on the bookshelf ? Yes. What is your favorite piece in your collection? My favorite piece is in my vault. It’s the first little arrowhead that I ever found when I was 9 years old. How many pieces do you still have your collection? Count them. I have 3,500 arrowheads if you wanna count those. I don’t know, a few hundred … Are you a collector? I have two little pots and I love them. But I don’t really have the money. I didn’t really have the money either. But I still collected. I first collected bottle tops and then I collected string, anything that was free I collected. What got you interested in the type of art that you started collecting? Well, I grew up in Central Texas and I remember when my grandmother used to tell me about when she was a kid in Fort Worth, the Comanches and the Kiowa running through their barnyard trying to catch chickens and that sort of thing has influenced me. And so I collected Kiowa and Comanche and southern Cheyenne artifacts, and they ranged mostly in Oklahoma but all the way down into the little town that I lived in. I am interested in history.

Do you have any advice for people who come looking this summer? Be prepared, you know. Don’t go in the mountains unless you know what you’re doing. Take plenty of water and tell somebody where you’re going and when you’re gonna come back. And be sure you take somebody with you and a GPS and a cell phone. Particularly flatlanders, Easterners, that have never been in the Rocky Mountains, they need to be prepared. They need to study before they go. Of course everybody tells you that—the government, the Park Service, they are always emphasizing this and several blogs dedicated to the treasure story always talk about safety. How did you first tell the story that you would bury the treasure? I didn’t bury the treasure. If you say that, I’ma shoot you with a dull bullet. Sorry. I got it. How did you first tell the world, ‘Come look for it?’ There was people around Santa Fe who know. See, they told me I was gonna die. I had cancer. And so I couldn’t write the book because I did not know the ending, and so I talked to Doug Preston. I tried to talk him into writing it, and Sally Denton and Michael McGarrity, I showed them all the treasure chest full of stuff and asked them to write the book, because the ending would have to be written after I was dead. But then nobody wanted to do it, and then I read Salinger’s book. What’s the name of that book? The famous one? Catcher in the Rye? Yeah, I read that one and I thought ‘That is such a simple book,’ I said, ‘I can do that.’ Because I was not impressed with Catcher in the Rye, there were no big words in it or anything. And so I said, ‘If the world thinks that is a good book. I can do that,’ and so I started writing. Why do you think that Sally and Doug and Michael didn’t wanna do it? Well, first of all, they all had books they were writing. And secondly, they did not like the philosophy of me dying and them writing the story. But I did not ask them why. They were busy people. Preston has three books on the New York Times list, the last thing he needs is a memoir about Forrest Fenn. Is the picture in the book the real chest and the objects in it? Yes, and also the one on the dust jacket. There are three actual pictures of the chest. The picture does not have the gems and jewels in it. There’s a pre-Columbian

Fenn says the treasure is in the mountains north of Santa Fe, somewhere in the highlighted areas of the four states on this map. While a number of seekers look near Santa Fe, others have flocked to Yellowstone National Park with the same idea.

gold frog. There are five or six gold bracelets. There is a Tiarona and Sinu fetish necklace that is 2,000 years old and it is just so wonderful. But I will tell you another thing, my treasure chest was full of things and I was ready now to go hide it, but I felt a little bit empty inside. It is too abstract. I decided the reason I am not happy is that I am not in this treasure chest with it, with this other stuff. So I had a wonderful little rolled turquoise and silver bracelet in my vault and the 22 beads are picked up by [Richard] Wetherell. … When he first discovered Mesa Verde and climbed down from the bluffs and into the ruin, he [found them.] A few years later, when he was excavating, an Indian was working for him and took those 22 little beads and made a bracelet out of them. I won it in a pool game with Byron Harvey, heir to Fred Harvey. And it fit me perfect. And when I put that thing into the treasure chest, part of me didn’t want to. But I said, ‘Yeah, I’m going to suffer a little bit if I put that thing in there, and I close the lid—I can believe that I am in that treasure chest like everything else.’ Do you like books? Can I show you a few? (We spend the next 15 minutes popping around the rare books in the corner of the library and looking at cast bronze bells that Fenn created and has been burying with copies of a unpublished 20,000-word biography inside. The phone rings, and it’s Garrett VeneKlasen, who two weeks later would narrowly lose the Democratic nomination for state land commissioner.

COURTESY FORREST FENN’S TOO FAR TO WALK

turned the fan on and it floated down. It was on one of the fan blades, so I apologized to my staff.

“What’s going on? … Well, I’ma vote for you … Can you send me some information by mail? Ok. I am in meeting right now.” He hangs up.) He’s an old friend of mine. He is running for office. You voted for Hillary, didn’t you? I did. Did you? My vote was against Hillary. I wrote in Harry Truman’s name. I wasn’t going to vote for Trump. I liked Harry Truman. (We’re almost back to the front door now, moving out to the shady porch and toward the flower garden where someone’s been at work the whole time we’ve been inside.) If you say I buried it, I am going to come looking for you. … Good luck to you guys. This interview was edited for length.

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or a variety of reasons—all traceable to the film Bladerunner—most of my notions about the future carry post-humanist anxieties and involve flying cars. I saw no flying cars ( just lots of the regular kind, desperately searching for parking in the Railyard) over the June 8 weekend of events kicking off Emerging Media Month. I did, however, see, hear and possibly initiate plenty of discourse about the relationship between people, nature and technology in this wacky, fractured and increasingly digitized-possibly-tothe-brink-of-ruin culture in which we live. As mentioned in a previous column, a confluence of events, anchored by the Interplanetary and CURRENTS New Media festivals, are part of a larger movement to emphasize Santa Fe’s growing role in both emerging arts and technology. On the ground, this translated into a very busy weekend, during which I attempted to hit as many events as possible while not spontaneously combusting in the heat. I didn’t make everything and, if you also missed out, not to worry: It’s a busy month with more to come. CURRENTS opened June 9 at El Museo Cultural (and continues through June

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BY JULIA GOLDBERG @votergirl

24) with a panoply of interactive displays, virtual reality experiences, audio installations and more, and will require return visits to truly grok. I was particularly taken with “Hollow Noise,” a sound installation by Taiwanese artist Fujui Wang, an audio and kinetic piece that provided a surprisingly meditative sense of calm (surprising given the mass of sensory experiences going down in El Museo—be sure to look for it). In the most relative sense, the exhibition hall for the inaugural Nation of Makers Conference (hosted at the Convention Center over the weekend) felt lo-fi, in a good way. There, a variety of maker types gathered to discuss the state of making, and to display handson projects melding technology with DIY. There, I found Todd Blatt, founder of We the Builders, who was working on a project in which a 7-inch sculpture of Rosie the Riveter by sculptor Jen Schachter had been digitized, turned into a 6-foot 3-D model, and cut into 2,600 three-inch chunks so that hundreds of other makers could download them. Those pieces were shipped to MAKE Santa Fe and were being reassembled into a multi-hued sculpture representing the theme of inclusivity that was the conference’s guiding principal. Artist Katherine Lee showed me the “great wheel” that was also made with a 3-D printer, on which she was spinning yarn (from cotton she grows herself ). All this activity made me feel extra lazy (generally, the only things I make are messes),

U

Ready, set, go: It’s Emerging Media Month

and NASA. Gallery Marketing Manager Jordan Eddy noted during the artists’ talk that the works were interested in space not as “a void,” but, rather, a “complicated cultural space we project onto.” The notion of complicated cultural spaces stayed with me as I ended the evening at SITE Santa Fe for the multi-media concert Displaced Horizons, part of SITE’s  Sound and Spectacle series, a collaborative musical/visual piece examining water infrastructure. As was the case throughout the weekend, the work toggled between concern about the ways in which technological tools have taken over culture, and using those tools to make stuff (art, performance, objects) responding to those concerns. Chris Jonas, one of the composers and performers for Displaced Horizons, is also shepherding the Emerging Media Alliance, a project by the city’s Film and Digital Media Commission. He sees June as the opening salvo of what will be more events and discussions in this realm. “A weekend like this is an opportunity for all of us as artists to scratch our heads and ask what we are doing with our tools,” he says, “and to create opportunities with our relationship to the public to explore these complicated views.” EMA’s launch party is Thursday evening, and membership is open to both individuals and groups to join and collaborate in this brave new world. CO

Busy New World

although Lee herself said that despite her hands-on approach across a variety of disciplines, she found herself wondering about the role of making. “It can be meaningful to make things, … to shape the world we live in physically. But if I stopped making stuff, I could just sit around.” (As an expert, I told her just sitting around is an overrated experience). From NomCom, I scooted over to form & concept Gallery for an artists’ talk on the group show Inner Orbit (up through July 21). Gallery Director Frank Rose said the show,

Matthew Mullins’ “The Sun In Our Bones” is part of form & concept Gallery’s show Inner Orbit, an exhibition in conjunction with Futurition. It hangs through July 21.

mounted in conjunction with Interplanetary, focuses on the personal experiences artists have with the cosmos, writ large and small. This included Matthew Mullins’ paintings of fractals and other shapes in nature, as well as Drew Cassidy Lenihan’s investigation of his family’s history in World World II as it intersected with Shell Oil Company, the US Navy

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MUSIC FRI/15

Local DJs are really bringing it at Molly’s lately with a weekly residency from DJs Confuse and In and, if longtime local deck master Audiobuddha has anything to say about it, they’ll have a monthly event on the roster, too. In his mild-mannered civilian identity of Steve Brisk, Audiobuddha tells SFR that Molly’s has installed a new sound system and that if all goes well at his upcoming event, a rebranding of his Skylight residency Replenish, now dubbed Velvet, it’ll go down more often. “We’re going to be emphasizing a cooler, smoother, darker vibe,” Brisk says. “I’ll be doing cool remixes, African house, more tribal-flavored stuff, deep house—I’m such a house-head.” DJs Confuse and In kick things off and The Rev closes out the 18-and-over night. (ADV) Velvet: 10 pm Friday June 15. $5 (ladies free before 11 pm). Molly’s Kitchen and Lounge, 1611 Calle Lorca, 983-7577.

COURTESY FORM & CONCEPT

PERFORMANCE SAT/16 GHOST DANCE Ever heard of an EMF meter? They’re those gadgets that detect electromagnetic fields or, in some cases, psychic energy and possibly ghosts. Spooky, right? But don’t be scared; New York-based multi-disciplinary artist and dancer Nathan Wheeler plans to use them for a nonspooky event. This Saturday, Wheeler sets up multiple EMF meters within form & concept in order to pick up on the energies of the audience (and of himself), which will then play their own part in his improvisational movement piece through on-the-spot visuals and audio. Newagey? Maybe so, but also très intéressant and creative. Who knows what’ll happen? Not even Wheeler himself. (ADV) Nathan Wheeler Performance: 7 pm Saturday June 16. $5-$25. form & concept, 435 S Guadalupe St., 982-8111.

EVENT SAT/16-SUN/17

ANSON STEVENS-BOLLEN

GET CRABS Do you ever get to that Father’s Day time of year and think, “Holy shit, I don’t know what my dad likes outside of telling long-winded stories about friends of his I’ve never met?” Well, don’t sweat—and don’t get him another tie. Instead, grab your dad (or whoever) and head to Second Street Brewery’s Rufina Taproom this weekend. There, you’ll find a veritable smorgasbord of crabs and beers. Like, it’s literally eating crab and drinking beers. Seventeen breweries including Second Street and Santa Fe Brewing Co. take part in the fun, and on Saturday evening, musician Chris Combs provides the soundtrack. And no, you don’t need a dad (or a good relationship with one) to be there, just a thirst for great beer and a desire to get crabs. (ADV) Crab and Pilsner Festival: 11 am-10 pm Saturday and Sunday June 16 and 17. Free (pay for food, though, duh). Second Street Brewery Rufina Taproom, 2920 Rufina St., 954-1068

MUSIC THU/14

Punk Rock Rodeo Mitski delivers experimental narrative via cathartic tunes Whether by deliberate care for the cowboy mythos or cosmic coincidence, Brooklynite indie rocker Mitski Miyawaki kicks off the tour for her new album, Be the Cowboy, in Wild West territory, with stops in Montana, Colorado and then Santa Fe. The still-unreleased work (Aug. 17, y’all) follows her deft feat of sucker-punch songwriting from 2016’s Puberty 2. This time, she says in a statement, she experiments with “narrative and fiction” through the album’s voice; “because women have so little power and showing emotion is seen as weakness, this ‘character’ clings to any amount of control she can get. Still, there is something very primordial in her that is trying to find a way to get out.” Through sweet, intimate melodies and exuberant, punky bridges, Mitski has always dealt in making the primordial coherent. Her lyrics distill as much emotional meaning as possible into simple moments of prose and crystal clear imagery for the listener to hang their hat onto. Be the Cowboy’s opening track, “Geyser,” out now as a single, reaffirms Mitski’s capacity to simultaneously hold

wisdom and angst in the sonic balance (“FYI sounds better when u blast it,” she added as a note on the track on Spotify). However, unlike her earlier multi-layered ballad tracks, the new material goes for something more stripped-down; what she calls a “’person singing alone onstage’ atmosphere.” Mitski has summoned something of a cult following, and can be named in a cohort of young, razor-sharp female musicians who have carved out a niche in indie rock, sorted with the likes of Japanese Breakfast, Lucy Dacus and Frankie Cosmos. She recently thanked her fans in a tweet, for their support “in a business that can’t imagine someone like me being a worthy investment.” Her live show is pure catharsis. The album title comes from a private joke/ Ghandi bastardization/oddball personal mantra: Be the cowboy you wish to see in the world. So wrangle some tickets and be it. Indie-pop singer-songwriter Katie Von Schleicher opens. (Eva Rosenfeld) MITSKI 7 pm Thursday June 14. $15-$18. Meow Wolf, 1352 Rufina Circle, 395-6369.

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JUNE 13-19, 2018

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MIDDLE LENGTH LAM-RIM Thubten Norbu Ling Tibetan Buddhist Center 1807 Second St., Ste. 35, 660-7056 In weekly classes taught by Geshe Thubten Sherab, learn about a comprehensive and straightforward synthesis of the essential instructions that support the progressive stages of meditation and practice leading to the attainment of Buddhahood. 6:30 pm, free PRESCHOOL STORY TIME Santa Fe Public Library Southside 6599 Jaguar Drive, 955-2820 Get yourself and your kid out of the house and see other real live humans. 10:45 am, free

Want to see your event here? Email all the relevant information to calendar@sfreporter.com. You can also enter your events yourself online at calendar.sfreporter.com (submission doesn’t guarantee inclusion). Need help?

Contact Charlotte: 395-2906

COURTESY NO LAND

THE CALENDAR

DANCE

WED/13 BOOKS/LECTURES BILINGUAL BOOKS AND BABIES Santa Fe Public Library Main Branch 145 Washington Ave., 955-6780 In a program for babies 6 months to 2 years old (and their caregivers), join a play and language group to enjoy books, songs and finger games. 10:30 am, free BILINGUAL BOOKS AND BABIES Santa Fe Public Library Southside 6599 Jaguar Drive, 955-2820 Miss the earlier one downtown (see above)? Here’s another. 4 pm, free DHARMA TALK BY MATTHEW KOZAN PALEVSKY Upaya Zen Center 1404 Cerro Gordo Road, 986-8518 This week's talk is presented by Matthew Kozan Palevsky, the president of Upaya and a social and political activist. The evening begins with a 15-minute meditation, so please arrive by 5:20 pm. 5:30 pm, free MARJORIE DEVIN: GALLERY TALK New Mexico Museum of Art 107 W Palace Ave., 476-5072 Join Devin, former director of the Tamarind Institute of Lithography, for a conversation about Frederick Hammersley's prints and lithographs. Free with museum admission. 12:30 pm, $6-$12 MEET THE ARTIST: WESLEY WRIGHT Santa Fe Clay 545 Camino de la Familia, 984-1122 Visiting ceramic artist Wright takes a break from his weeklong workshop to talk about his work and answer questions about the creative process. Feel free to drop in, join the informal discussion and learn about his unique vision. 6 pm, free

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JUNE 13-19, 2018

DANCE FOR ALL ABILITIES AND LEVELS Dance Station 947-B W Alameda St. Each Wednesday, dance for flexibility, balance, grace, creativity, socializing and joy with dance therapist instructor Claire Rodill. RSVP: 577-8187 or crodill99@gmail.com. 2 pm, $10

EVENTS CURRENTS NEW MEDIA FESTIVAL Various locations Santa Fe's premier festival for interactive and immersive installations. Events of varying costs (including free!) happen all around town, with a concentration in the Railyard; check currentsnewmedia.org. Various times, free GEEKS WHO DRINK Second Street Brewery (Railyard) 1607 Paseo de Peralta, 989-3278 Do you basically know everything about everything? Put it to good use. Quiz results can win you drink tickets for next time. 8 pm, free NEW MOON WATER WHEEL CEREMONY Frenchy's Field Osage Avenue and Agua Fría Street Pray for moisture, bless the waters and offer up items for blessings and in hopes of heavy rains. 6 pm, free ¡VÁMONOS! SANTA FE: WALK WITH THE FAITH COMMUNITY Bicentennial Alto Park 1121 Alto St. Rise 'n' shine and head to the park to go for a stroll with Rev. Harry Eberts. For more info, check out sfct.org/vamonos. 7 am, free

MUSIC CALEXICO The Bridge @ SF Brewing Co. 37 Fire Place, 557-6182 Indie rock from the Arizona indie duo (see Music, page 20). 7:30 pm, $28

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Flying Wall Studios hosts a puppet exhibition at NO LAND through June 30, and this Sunday artists Damon and Sabrina Griffith demonstrate the puppets’ machinations at a performance. We’re kinda spookily intrigued—which is why we’re letting Flying Wall take over our Instagram on Thursday, June 14. Give a follow at @sfreporter.


ENTER EVENTS AT SFREPORTER.COM/CAL

DJ SAGGALIFFIK Boxcar 530 S Guadalupe St., 988-7222 House, acid lounge, half-time and dance tunes. 10 pm, free DAVID GEIST Osteria D'Assisi 58 S Federal Place, 986-5858 Piano standard. 6 pm, free GERRY & CHRIS La Fiesta Lounge 100 E San Francisco St., 982-5511 Irish sounds and Latin tunes. 7:30 pm, free GOT SOUL El Farol 808 Canyon Road, 983-9912 Soulful jazz. 10 pm, free HOGAN & MOSS Cowgirl 319 S Guadalupe St., 982-2565 Original songs with old souls, Appalachian trad, Delta soul, gypsy swing and gospel blues. 8 pm, free MIKE NICHOLSON Vanessie 427 W Water St., 982-9966 Standards ‘n’ pop on piano. 6:30 pm, free MUSIC ON THE HILL: DOUG LAWRENCE St. John's College 1160 Camino Cruz Blanca, 984-6000 Head to the college's athletic field for the best Wednesday night summer tradition we know of. Bring a blanket and a picnic for the jazz music of saxophonist Lawrence. Take a shuttle from the PERA Building (413 Old Santa Fe Trail) parking lot to the field. 6 pm, free OPEN MIC NIGHT Tumbleroot Brewery & Distillery 2791 Agua Fría St., 303-3808 Signups start at 6:30 pm, and everyone who performs gets a recording afterwards. 6:30 pm, free SANTA FE CROONERS Palace Saloon 142 W Palace Ave., 428-0690 Golden Age standards. 6:30-9:30 pm, free SYDNEY WESTAN Tiny's Restaurant & Lounge 1005 S St. Francis Drive, 983-9817 Folk ‘n’ Western. 5:30-7:30 pm, free

THU/14 ART OPENINGS DON USNER: CHIMAYÓ AND THE PLAZA DEL CERRO El Zaguán 545 Canyon Road, 982-0016 In an artist talk, the photographer discusses his exhibit currently hanging at El Zaguan, which includes black-and-white portraits of many of the residents of the historic village of Chimayó. RSVP to 983-2567 or info@ historicsantafe.org. 3 pm, $5

THE CALENDAR

BOOKS/LECTURES ELIZABETH BARLOW ROGERS: SAVING CENTRAL PARK Collected Works Bookstore and Coffeehouse 202 Galisteo St., 988-4226 Author Rogers tells how her love affair with New York City led her to the protection and enhancement of the city's green spaces. 6:30 am, free NICK MERRICK: BEAUTY AND STRUCTURE, INTERPRETIVE ARCHITECTURAL PHOTOGRAPHY La Sala de Galisteo 5637 Hwy. 41, Galisteo, 466-3541 Merrick's lecture covers everything from “What is a photograph?” to the difference between human and camera perception. 7 pm, free THE SUMMER OF 1945: THE ROAD TO TRINITY La Fonda on the Plaza 100 E San Francisco St., 982-5511 Head to the Lumpkins Ballroom for a seminar about why and how the first nuclear bomb was developed with speakers who have experienced its history. 7:30 pm, $10

EVENTS CURRENTS NEW MEDIA FESTIVAL Various locations Santa Fe’s premier festival for interactive and immersive installations. Events of varying costs (including free!) happen all around town; get all info at currentsnewmedia.org. Various times, free EMERGING MEDIA ALLIANCE LAUNCH PARTY El Museo Cultural de Santa Fe 555 Camino de la Familia, 992-0591 Join the EMA as it pools resources and launch efforts to unify and amplify world-changing work (see The Interface, page 15). 7 pm, free GEEKS WHO DRINK Santa Fe Brewing Company 35 Fire Place, 424-3333 Stellar quiz results can win you drink tickets. 7 pm, free NEW MEXICO WOMEN IN THE ARTS COCKTAIL PARTY FOR PAULA CASTILLO galleryFRITZ 540 S Guadalupe St., 820-1888 Sculptor Paula Castillo has been selected as the sole representative of New Mexico in the National Museum of Women in the Arts' Women to Watch exhibition series. 5:30 pm, $25 O2 OPEN MIC Santa Fe Oxygen & Healing Bar 137 W San Francisco St., 986-5037 Calling all creatives! Perform to your heart’s content. 8 pm, $5

RESPIRATORY CARE DEPARTMENT MEET 'N' GREET Santa Fe Community College 6401 Richards Ave., 428-1000 If you're down for good job prospects, meet with SFCC Respiratory Care Program Director Rebecca Jeffs in the Health and Sciences Center, room 442. 3-6 pm, free STEPHEN AUGER: IRIS Axle Contemporary 670-5854 Climb inside a small space and experience sound and light frequencies that induce visualizations. Today it's at Meow Wolf (1352 Rufina Circle). Book your appointment ahead of time, though, because this will likely fill up—that's at axleart.com/iris. 4-10 pm, free

MUSIC BILL HEARNE TRIO Second Street Brewery (Original) 1814 Second St., 982-3030 Country and honky-tonk. 6 pm, free BROTHER COYOTE Derailed at the Sage Inn 725 Cerrillos Road, 982-5952 Indie pop, folk 'n' soul. 6 pm, free CONNIE LONG AND FAST PATSY Palace Saloon 142 W Palace Ave., 428-0690 Rockabilly, country and Western. 10 pm, free DJ INKY The Matador 116 W San Francisco St., 984-5050 Punk, funk, soul, rock 'n' roll. 9 pm, free GERRY & CHRIS La Fiesta Lounge 100 E San Francisco St., 982-5511 Traditional Irish sounds meld with Latin tunes. 7:30 pm, free THE GUNSELS Tiny’s Restaurant & Lounge 1005 S St. Francis Drive, 983-9817 Americana and honky-tonk. 7 pm, free JONO MANSON Tumbleroot Brewery & Distillery 2791 Agua Fría St., 303-3808 Rock 'n' roll. 5 pm, free JOSEPH GENERAL BAND Boxcar 530 S Guadalupe St., 988-7222 Reggae imported from Albuquerque. 10 pm, free MIKE NICHOLSON Vanessie 427 W Water St., 982-9966 Piano standards. 6:30 pm, free THE MITGUARDS Cowgirl 319 S Guadalupe St., 982-2565 Americana roots music with hints of folk, country and swing from husband-and-wife duo Chris and Deb Mitguard. 8 pm, free

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JAIRO ZAVALA RUIZ

MUSIC

Thread the Needle Calexico’s Joey Burns sings the songs, tells the stories BY ALEX DE VORE a l e x @ s f r e p o r t e r. c o m

G

enerally speaking, it can be hard for both musicians and music journalists to make a piece feel innovative. Often, the first thing I’ll tell someone when I phone or sit down with them is that I’m sorry if they’ve heard similar questions already from other writers; they’ll usually say it’s OK, and we’ll usually have a good talk—but it can be easy to fall back on rote questions and answers for both sides. Calexico’s Joey Burns, however, felt different. Maybe it’s because the band’s been at it practically forever, making Burns a seasoned vet at handling yahoo interviewers like me. Calexico released its ninth studio album, The Thread that Keeps Us, just last year to overwhelmingly positive reviews. The Thread is unmistakably Calexico and rides that middle ground between indie rock and an almost Latin-meets-country sound fostered from years living near the US/Mexico border in Tucson, Arizona. And that doesn’t even begin to cover the countless tours, collaborations, singles, et cetera they’ve presided over. Still, on the phone, Burns had a refreshing ease about him and a magnetic ability to free associate while staying focused. Here are some highlights:

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Joey Burns (right) has a lot of thoughts and songs rattling around in that head of his.

On what exactly it is that Calexico does, Burns says, “I’ve been more open-minded when it comes to trying to define ourselves as a band. We’ll play everything, from jazz, indie rock, folk festivals; anything, really, and I think there’s a little something for everyone, even if that does sound cliché. We’re still playing instruments, we’re not going completely electronic, but that would be fun to do. We’ve collaborated with Goldfrapp, Nortec Collective, Mexican Institute of Sound, and being able to do that well is something we take a lot of pride in.” On those collaborations for which Calexico is known, Burns muses, “I think for musicians, it comes naturally and we’ve allowed [collaborations] to be more open-ended. In doing that, it’s a reflection of who we are as people coming from the Southwest. It opens a lot to talk about. Even just here in Tucson, there’s an openness and blending of ideas. Culturally and socially, people tend to be a little more open here.”

On Calexico’s varied sound and the concept of so-called “world music,” Burns points out that, “French music isn’t considered ‘French’ in France. It’s just music. It’s interesting—when you travel around the world, your concept of what’s ‘world music’ changes. It’s helped open the door for me musically, and a long time ago I stopped wondering what was cool. I love finding new stuff, and if it comes from a Putumayo CD, so be it. I’m constantly listening or finding new stuff that’s off the beaten path, and it’s easier now because you just find a podcast. One of the joys of touring, though, is that you get to go to new places and hear new music played live or playing somewhere.” On whether or not the newest album is is political, Burns thinks a moment, then answers: “I think we’re all in the same boat, and some of the best stories can be interpreted in different ways. For me, the goal was to write really good songs with really good stories. Am I influenced by what’s around me? Of course I am. Ev-

eryone is. That’s just a product of where we are. There’s stuff [on the album] that’s politically charged, but as a friend of mine in Spain says, the most political thing is our heart. Really, all of what we’re dealing with has to do with our hearts and how we interpret things in life; any kind of story that can highlight that and turn someone’s head or open someone’s eyes. … I’m banking on that. I want to be a good example for my kids. I try to reflect [the band] and who we are; what is it that’s happening to me? What can I do to make it better? Certainly, our government pulling out of the Paris Climate Accord is a big wake-up call. I want to understand it more. What can we do to help each other? Music can help.” On songwriting with his kids, Burns sounds excited and says, “Sometimes I talk about my twin daughters [onstage]. They’re 7 and they’re really concerned with what’s happening with the environment. We wrote this song called ‘Girl in the Forest,’ and I started bringing up


On what he hypothesizes it might be like to see the band live, Burns says: “Because of the name of our band, because of the regional character of our music … people who come to a Calexico show walk away like they learned something new. It’s affected them. And I’m happy to be doing this. I’m happy to keep fighting as long as I can.” CALEXICO 7:30 pm Wednesday June 13. $28. The Bridge @Santa Fe Brewing Co., 665-6182.

COURTESY SON OF TOWN HALL

themes of protest, people protecting water, people who want to develop and run pipelines and bring harmful fuels through them, and they just kind of looked at me and were like, ‘Why can’t the girl in the forest simply be about a girl who communicates with animals?’ The end result is a combination of those things and feelings, and I think about them when I’m singing that song. I recorded a demo on a cassette four-track, and it had a certain 1970s slap-back feel because of the lo-fi.

MUSICAL WORMHOLE Meanwhile, hot off a main stage appearance at the Kerville Folk Festival in Texas, semi-local duo Son of Town Hall comes to the oldest church in America with their three parts music/one part theater thing they do so well. If the hats and shirts and such didn’t tip you off, the project of Santa Fe singer-songwriter-author David Berkeley and London-based producer/songwriter Ben Parker has a sort of quirky ’80s throwback feel—by which, of course, we mean 1880s. Think soft and beautiful finger-picking on acoustic guitars melding with vocal harmonies so sublimely tuned and timed it can be hard to tell who’s singing which parts. As the story goes, Berkeley and Parker met during a bar brawl over a woman in London. “I thought she was looking at me and David thought she was looking at him,” Parker says of the chance meeting. “But she was looking at neither of us—she had a wonky eye, as we say in London.” OK, this is going to take some suspension of disbelief, but Berkeley tells SFR that most audiences are quick to embrace that. “We have this backstory where we’re traveling from show to show by raft and people find themselves wanting to to believe that and travel with us,” Berkeley says. “I love going as deep as we’re able to go [with the story], and I’m well aware of the absurdity of it—but if you go see theater, you know the actors are going to take you on some sort of journey, and we’re playing with that in a weird way—but it’s still a concert and still very much about the music.” The show is participatory as well, and Berkeley stresses it’s not particularly formal. “And this is coming from a songwriter who has dreaded sing-a-longs his entire career,” Berkeley jokes. “It starts to break down the wall a little bit; we’re all doing this together; that takes out a lot of the ego.” SON OF TOWN HALL

7:30 pm Thursday June 14. $15-$18. San Miguel Mission, 401 Old Santa Fe Trail, 983-3974.

PRESENTS

THE SEASON — F I NA L E —

OPERA CONCERT MUSIC and

DONIZETTI, GOUNOD R I C H A R D S T R AU S S of

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SUNDAY JUNE 17, 5:30 PM

www.nmpas.org

TICKETS AND MORE INFORMATION AT:

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SANTA FE

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THE CALENDAR

SON OF TOWN HALL San Miguel Chapel 401 Old Santa Fe Trail, 983-3974 Folky Americana (see Music, page 20). 7:30 pm, $15-$18

THEATER RAPTURE, BLISTER, BURN Teatro Paraguas 3205 Calle Marie, 424-1601 Take a look at gender politics and feminist ideals in a 2013 play by Gina Gionfriddo. 7:30 pm, $5-$15 THE ROCKY HORROR SHOW Santa Fe Playhouse 142 E De Vargas St., 988-4262 When Brad and Janet's car breaks down, they end up with Dr. Frank-N-Furter (see Acting Out, page 29). 7:30 pm, $15

FRI/15 ART OPENINGS AMIE LEGETTE: ACCUMBENT ARRAYS Ellsworth Gallery 215 E Palace Ave., 989-7900 Works on paper by Santa-Febased artist LeGette viscerally yet abstractly recall natural landscape, both internal and external. Through July 1. 5 pm, free BEYOND THE VEIL Keep Contemporary 112 W San Francisco St., Ste. 102, 307-9824 The gallery's second annual abstract invitational features numerous local artists exploring anything that ain't figurative. 5 pm, free

COURTESY GERALD PETERS GALLERY

MITSKI Meow Wolf 1352 Rufina Circle, 395-6369 Indie tunes that say everything you wish you could (see SFR Picks, page 17). 7 pm, $15-$18 MR. P CHILL Mine Shaft Tavern 2846 Hwy. 14, Madrid, 473-0743 Hip-hop. 8 pm, free PAT MALONE TerraCotta Wine Bistro 304 Johnson St., 989-1166 Solo jazz guitar. 6 pm, free RON ROUGEAU The Dragon Room 406 Old Santa Fe Trail, 983-7712 Classic acoustic tunes.. 5:30 pm, free

ENTER EVENTS AT SFREPORTER.COM/CAL

Painter Penelope Gottlieb turns the Audubon canon on its ear with her interpretations of birds and botanicals, created by painting over digital prints. She’s part of Cross Currents at Gerald Peters Gallery, opening Friday, and this is “Rose Rugose (Hering Gull).”

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ENTER EVENTS AT SFREPORTER.COM/CAL

BLACK OUT Sierra Projects 818 Camino Sierra Vista An exhibition that reflects the current climate of darkness—personal, political and spiritual, with Tess McArdle’s sumi ink paintings and the video installations of RJ Ward. Through June 30. 5 pm, free COLLECTED WORKS: SELECTIONS FROM THE ESTATE OF PHYLLIS SLOANE Gerald Peters Gallery 1011 Paseo de Peralta, 954-5700 Check out 24 works from the estate of artist Phyllis Sloane (1921-2009). Through July 14. 5 pm, free CROSSCURRENTS Gerald Peters Gallery 1011 Paseo de Peralta, 954-5700 A group show features artists Peregrine O’Gormley, Penelope Gottlieb and James Prosek. Through July 14. 5 pm, free DAVID ROTHERMEL: COUNTERPOINT David Rothermel Contemporary 142 Lincoln Ave., 575-642-4981 Rothermel combines his musical knowledge with his skills as a painter. Through June 30. 5 pm, free DEBRA BAXTER: TOOTH & NAIL CLOSING RECEPTION form & concept 435 S Guadalupe St., 982-8111 It's your last chance to catch this unnerving yet beautiful show, in which Baxter aims to fearlessly to create elegant and sometimes dangerous objects.. 5 pm, free DOUG WEST: SACRED PLACES Blue Rain Gallery 544 S Guadalupe St., 954-9902 See new landscape paintings by the iconic painter of the Southwest. Through June 30. 5 pm, free EARTHSCAPES: CONTEMPORARY VIEWS OF AND FROM THE LAND David Richard Gallery 1570 Pacheco St., 983-9555 A group show inspired by the land we live on, whether alpine, suburban, natural or manmade. Through July 14. 5 pm, free OUTRAGE City of Mud 1114A Hickox St., 954-1705 Expressions of political and environmental angst and alienation. Through Aug. 28 (see AC, page 25). 5 pm, free RICARDO MAZAL: A 15-YEAR SURVEY Center for Contemporary Arts 1050 Old Pecos Trail, 982-1338 Work from Mexican-born artist Mazal, whose unique paintings and use of photography demonstrate his research and thinking, which trace the grand themes of life, death and spiritual transformation. 5 pm, free

THE CALENDAR

SARAH BIENVENU: POINT OF VIEW Winterowd Fine Art 701 Canyon Road, 992-8878 New watercolors by Bienvenu celebrate 40 years of plein aire painting in New Mexico. Through June 28. 5 pm, free TRANSFER DOWNLOAD: SIMULATIONS IN HYPERSPACE Art House 231 Delgado St., 995-0231 A unique digital exhibition features a survey of new digital art by an international roster of contemporary artists showcased in an immersive projection area controlled by visitors, who can select from a menu of artworks to view. Through May 1, 2019. 5 pm, free

BOOKS/LECTURES ART CHATS New Mexico Museum of Art 107 W Palace Ave., 476-5072 The museum is free for New Mexico residents on Friday evenings, so no better time to pop in for a series of 15-minute talks about the museum's history and exhibitions. 5:30-6:30 pm, $6-$12 RICHARD BALTHAZAR: AZTEC GODDESSES El Museo Cultural de Santa Fe 555 Camino de la Familia, 992-0591 Artist Balthazar speaks on the iconography and mythology of the five main goddesses, remarks on the several appearing in the calendar, and notes on many others from the pantheon. 6 pm, free SUZANNE STAMATOV: COLONIAL NEW MEXICAN FAMILIES Allá 102 W San Francisco St., Ste. 20, 988-5416 Stamatov discusses and signs her new book, in which she relies on both ecclesiastical and civil records to discover how families formed and endured during a period of contention in New Mexico in the 18th century. 4 pm, free

DANCE SANTA FE BLUES DANCE Move Studio 901 W San Mateo Road, 660-8503 Dance the blues! If you need a lesson, come at 8:30 pm. The dance starts at 9:30 pm. No street shoes (smooth soles, please). 8:30 pm, $8-$10

EVENTS CURRENTS NEW MEDIA FESTIVAL Various locations Santa Fe’s premier festival for interactive and immersive installations. Events of varying costs (including free!) happen all around town. For all the info: currentsnewmedia.org. Various times, free

STEPHEN AUGER: IRIS Axle Contemporary 670-5854 IRIS, by merging rhythmic sound, pulsating light and vibrational resonance, induces bodily experience beyond the boundaries of the intellectual mind. Today it's in the Farmers Market shade structure (Market and Alcaldesa Streets). Book your appointment ahead of time at axleart.com/iris. 5-8 pm, free ¡VÁMONOS! SANTA FE: ADA & SENIORS' WALK Bicentennial Alto Park 1121 Alto St. Head to the Mary Esther Gonzales Senior Center at the park to go for an accessible stroll with Anthony Alarid, deputy director of the Governor's Commission on Disability. For more info, check out sfct.org/vamonos. 10-11 am, free

FILM THE JERK Railyard Park Cerrillos Road and Guadalupe Street, 982-3373 Bring a blanket and catch a showing of Steve Martin's very first starring role. 8 pm, free

THE LENSIC AND RON BLOOMBERG PRESENT

VAUDEVILLE JUNE 15, 7:30 pm FRIDAY HOSTED BY ALI MACGRAW

12+

ACTS

Tickets: $25 Reserved | Students under 18: $15

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505-988-1234 SERVICE CHARGES APPLY AT ALL POINTS OF PURCHASE Lensic Presents Season Sponsors:

MUSIC BOOMROOTS COLLECTIVE Tumbleroot Brewery & Distillery 2791 Agua Fría St., 303-3808 Reggae meets hip-hop. 8 pm, free BROTHER COYOTE Inn and Spa at Loretto 211 Old Santa Fe Trail, 984-7997 Folk ballads. 7 pm, free CHANGO Palace Saloon 142 W Palace Ave., 428-0690 Danceable cover tunes. 10 pm, $5 CHAT NOIR CABARET Los Magueyes Mexican Restaurant 31 Burro Alley, 992-0304 Local musician Charles Tichenor and pals get together for a musical respite from the outside world. Vive la révolution! 6 pm, free DAN TRUDELL Museum Hill Café 710 Camino Lejo, 984-8900 Perhaps one of the greatest piano players in jazz today is joined by Colin Deuble on bass and John Trentacosta on drums. Rezzies: 946-7934. 7 pm, $20-$25 DOUG MONTGOMERY AND MIKE NICHOLSON Vanessie 427 W Water St., 982-9966 Piano standards: Doug starts, Mike takes over at 8 pm. 6 pm, free DUANE MARK Mine Shaft Tavern 2846 Hwy. 14, Madrid, 473-0743 Rootsy Americana on the deck. 5 pm, free

GRAND OPENING EVENT IN SANTA FE! WEDNESDAY, JUNE 13TH FROM 10-6PM

Take a trip to Santa Fe for your health! Sacred Wellness offers a full line of CBD products to the public, handmade in New Mexico. We also carry locally-sourced Essential Oils, Flower Essences, and Gemstones. Stop in to enjoy our Grand Opening event with CBD samples, prize giveaways, snacks and drinks!

Sacred Wellness CBD Shop [ Cannabidiol ] Products

1300 LUISA ST. SUITE 4, SANTA FE, NM 87505

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THE CALENDAR

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E CLAYTON WEST Tiny's Restaurant & Lounge 1005 S St. Francis Drive, 983-9817 Solo soul from a sole soul. 5:30-8 pm, free EQUINOX The Montecito 500 Rodeo Road, 428-7777 Jazz and blues with Lou Levin on piano, Gayle Kenny on bass, and singer Kiesha Cotton. 6 pm, $2 HALF BROKE HORSES Second Street Brewery (Original) 1814 Second St., 982-3030 Americana, honky-tonk 'n' swing. 6 pm, free HOGAN AND MOSS Mine Shaft Tavern 2846 Hwy. 14, Madrid, 473-0743 Traditional Appalachian tunes, Delta soul, gypsy swing and gospel blues. 7 pm, free JESUS BAS La Boca (Taberna Location) 125 Lincoln Ave., 988-7102 Spanish and flamenco guitar. 7 pm, free JOE WEST'S HONKY-TONK EXPERIENCE Tiny's Restaurant & Lounge 1005 S St. Francis Drive, 983-9817 Are you experienced? 8:30 pm, free LITTLE LEROY AND HIS PACK OF LIES Cowgirl 319 S Guadalupe St., 982-2565 Rock 'n' roll for dancin' to. 8:30 pm, free MARTY REGAN: FOREST WHISPERS San Miguel Chapel 401 Old Santa Fe Trail, 983-3974 Texas composer Regan, performing on shakuhachi (a Japanese bamboo flute), is joined by the Cielo String Quartet (Carla Kountoupes, Margaret Carpenter, Lee Harvey and Deborah Barbe), and clarinetist Jerry Weimer. 7 pm, $15 NOAH MURO Osteria D'Assisi 58 S Federal Place, 986-5858 Piano standards. 6 pm, free RONALD ROYBAL Hotel Santa Fe 1501 Paseo de Peralta, 982-1200 Native American flute and Spanish classical guitar. 7 pm, free SAVOR La Fiesta Lounge 100 E San Francisco St., 982-5511 Authentic Cuban street music. 8 pm, free TGIF RECITAL: JARED ARAGÓN First Presbyterian Church 208 Grant Ave., 982-8544 The well-traveled organist, born and raised in central New Mexico, plays a home state show. 5:30 pm, free

ENTER EVENTS AT SFREPORTER.COM/CAL

TONIC JAZZ SHOWCASE Tonic 103 E Water St., 982-1189 Jazzy jazz. 9:30 pm, free VELVET Molly’s Kitchen and Lounge 1611 Calle Lorca, 983-7577 Housey dance tunes. Ladies get in free before 11 pm (see SFR Picks, page 17). 10 pm, $5 ZAY SANTOS El Farol 808 Canyon Road, 983-9912 Rock 'n' roll. 9 pm, $5

THEATER RAPTURE, BLISTER, BURN Teatro Paraguas 3205 Calle Marie, 424-1601 Two best friends—one a housewife, one a career-driven bachelorette—both unfulfilled and both coveting the other's life, get together. It doesn’t end well. Or does it? 7:30 pm, $5-$15 THE ROCKY HORROR SHOW Santa Fe Playhouse 142 E De Vargas St., 988-4262 If you don't know about this cult musical by now, what the hell?! (But virgins are, as ever, welcome.) See Acting Out, page 29. 7:30 pm, $15-$25 VAUDEVILLE AT THE LENSIC Lensic Performing Arts Center 211 W San Francisco St., 988-1234 It's flashback Friday, and Santa Fe’s most talented actors, singers, dancers, comedians and jugglers take you back to the Lensic's early days when it hosted Vaudeville variety shows. 7:30 pm, $25

SAT/16 BOOKS/LECTURES AGELESS LIVING CONFERENCE Lensic Performing Arts Center 211 W San Francisco St., 988-1234 Presented by Empower New Mexico and AgeNation, leading authors and wisdom keepers guide participants on a journey of discovery, inspiration and empowerment. For more info: agenation.com. 7 pm, $49-$139 BLOOMSDAY IN SANTA FE CCA Santa Fe 1050 Old Santa Fe Trail June 16, 1904, is the day that Leopold Bloom famously wandered the streets of Dublin in James Joyce's revolutionary novel Ulysses. As a result, June 16 is internationally dubbed Bloomsday. Santa Fe’s version features live readings, music, film and conversation with actors, artists, performers and intellectuals. 7:30-9:30 pm, $16

DAVID FAMILIAN: ELECTRONIC ART St. Francis Auditorium 107 W Palace Ave., 476-5072 David Familian, artistic director and curator at the Beall Center for Art + Technology in California, lectures about Frederick Hammersley's early engagement with electronic art and the current state for artists working with technology. 1 pm, free I NEED A HEARING AID— WHERE DO I START? Natural Grocers 3328 Cerrillos Road, 474-0111 Audiologist Audrey Chumley offers tips on buying new or replacement aids at the June meeting sponsored by the Santa Fe Chapter of the Hearing Loss Association of America. 10 am, free KEN COLLINS: VIETNAM: FROM HA NOI TO HO CHI MINH CITY Travel Bug Coffee Shop 839 Paseo de Peralta, 992-0418 Join Collins for a look at Vietnam today, almost 50 years after the end of what the Vietnamese call the American War. 5 pm, free

DANCE FLAMENCO DINNER SHOW El Farol 808 Canyon Road, 983-9912 Make a dinner reservation for a show by the National Institute of Flamenco. 6:30 pm, $25 NATHAN WHEELER form & concept 435 S Guadalupe St., 982-8111 Composer and multidisciplinary artist Wheeler creates a web of “ghost detection circuits”—aka EMF meters—for an improvisational music and dance performance (see SFR Picks, page 17). 7 pm, $5-$25

EVENTS AMMA Buffalo Thunder Resort and Casino 20 Buffalo Thunder Trail, 455-5555 Mata Amritanandamayi, renowned humanitarian and spiritual leader, is worldrenowned for hugging, and you have the chance to receive an individual hug. We aren't really very woowoo over here, but we'll say on-record that these hugs are the real deal. Arrive at least 90 minutes before the program to receive a hug token. Noon, free BIRD WALK Randall Davey Audubon Center 1800 Upper Canyon Road, 983-4609 Head to the hills for a guided birding hike with experienced bird nerds. 8:30-10 am, free CONTINUED ON PAGE 26

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I

Mad World The artists in City of Mud’s latest group show want you to know how they really feel BY IRIS MCLISTER a u t h o r @ s f r e p o r t e r. c o m COURTESY CITY OF MUD

s anyone feeling less-than-jazzed about the state of the world right now? Despite some promising regional wins from last week’s midterm elections, on a national scale, the current political climate leaves a lot to be desired. With that said, do I have to tell you what inspired the upcoming art show Outrage at City of Mud gallery? “I’m leaving an open-ended interpretation,” says City of Mud’s Sasha Pyle. Still, I pressed during a conversation with the energetic, extremely likable show curator— how many of these angry artworks are related to politics? “I would say political angst is a unifying theme,” she says, “but what that looks like takes different forms.” The show, which opens Friday, is a group effort, with roughly two dozen artists contributing works related to their own interpretations of outrage—a feeling as universal as it is ineffably personal. “Artists have the right and the responsibility to express all sides of the human condition,” Pyle says. “I wanted to provide a platform for moments when artists don’t censor themselves.” Open since 2015, City of Mud is in my neck of the woods—a neighborhood which one friend winningly describes as “behind the palm reader on St. Francis.” More specifically, the gallery sits across from Tune-Up Café, on the same side of Hickox Street as Aranda’s Plumbing. It’s a fairly inconspicuous address—neither in the Baca Street or Railyard Art districts, but I think this limbo serves the space well; its literal neither-here-nor-there location aligns with an oddball ethos that’s immediately endearing. After chatting about some of the city’s more historic gallery-hopping areas, Pyle, an artist herself, says, “Galleries often put pressure on artists to produce a certain kind of work, to show things that aren’t too controversial, which I think of as a kind of implied censorship—we feel like we can’t express a full range of emotions and reactions to the world around us.” Pyle remarks that in light of the ongoing turmoil at home and abroad, “it feels inappropriate and slightly dishonest to do business as usual. I want to shake things up a little bit and give a voice to artists who aren’t trying to be easily digestible or ‘pretty.’” Clearly, Michelle Goodman got the memo. Her clay and wire sculpture “Vagina Dentata, Snapping Pussy” looks sort of like a spread-open, ummmm, beaver trap. Oval-shaped and just under a foot high, it’s reminiscent of those bizarre, menacing pieces of furniture from  Beetlejuice; poised to slip off the wall and nip at your ankles. But “Vagina Dentata” is peculiarly appealing

Michelle Goodman’s “Vagina Dentata, Snapping Pussy.” Clearly, City of Mud is the place to be this Friday night.

OUTRAGE OPENING RECEPTION 5 pm Friday June 15. Free. Through Aug. 28. City of Mud, 1114-A Hickox St., 954-1705

The Rocky Horror Show

New Mexico Actors Lab at Teatro Paraguas:  Calle Marie

June –July  • Thur. Fri. Sat. : p.m. Sun. at  p.m.

June – • Thur. Fri. Sat. at : p.m. Sundays  p.m.

Vaudeville at the Lensic

www.TheatreSantaFe.org

rather than creepy. In fact, for a show whose artists examine border conflicts, war and violence, Outrage, overall, is oddly beguiling. “My goal isn’t to depress or discourage people,” Pyle says. “There are plenty of other entities that are doing a bang-up job of that right now.” Cameroonian artist and activist Issa Nyaphaga faced torture and prison time for protesting his home country’s oppressive, dictatorial regime. In Nyaphaga’s photographic self-portrait, the artist’s face and chest are partially obscured by his outspread hands, which are covered in pale, chalk-like dots, zigzags and stripes. The wall behind him is a mashup of words, doodles and collaged images; altogether, it’s as commanding as it is enigmatic. Brad Bealmear’s “Reckoning 2” at first looks completely abstract, its lime green surface overlaid with smudgy black lines. As our eyes adjust, we start to notice that those black-on-green strokes are in fact limbs, which belong to an upside-down, falling human body, arms spread out diagonally across the canvas. Bealmear’s painting might seem visually ambiguous, but the sentiment behind it is not. “We are in deep shit,” Bealmear tells SFR via email. “Humans,” he maintains, “encrust, poison, scrape, kill and act as a terminating parasite. We don’t even give the topsoil our dead bodies and waste.” The patina on Deb Martin’s bronze vessel “Feast or Famine” has a spooky greenish tinge, spread out across its surface and settling into its ridged sides. The uneasiness is enhanced by the vessel’s base, made of little bones; its rim is adorned with clusters of tiny, Barbiehead-sized skulls. “I want people to know they’re not alone in feeling sad, or angry,” says Pyle. “Maybe the show will encourage us to think, ‘Hey, I can do something creative, something transformative with my anger, too.’” Outrage is not, by definition, pleasant, and although the show veers into dark, sometimes macabre territory in its exploration of anger, it’s overwhelmingly validating—even empowering. “I think there are going to be a lot of things that people will find a sense of relief or humor or community in,” Pyle adds, “even in themes that are painful.” Next up for City of Mud? Another group show this fall, called Bliss.

Rapture Blister, Burn by Gina Gionfriddo

For full details and to buy tickets, please see

A&C

The Lensic & Ron Bloomberg Productions

Lensic Performing Arts Center:  W. San Francisco

by Richard O’Brien

Santa Fe Playhouse:  East De Vargas Street

Julesworks Follies #54 Life Changing Edition

Jean Cocteau Cinema:  Montezuma Avenue Tuesday, June ,  p.m.

Friday, June , : p.m.

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Without snooping, I came across texts between my wife “Mary” and a guy “Jeremy” of a very sexual nature. While I would be okay if she were doing this and I knew about it, this has been going on since before we met. (We’ve been together 10 years.) She says she has never met him in person (despite communicating with him for more than a decade!) and this was the only thing she was doing that she thought would have been out of bounds. Again, if I had known, it would have been fine. I’m not okay with her being with other guys, but I know harmless flirting can be a release. Still, I have issues with anxiety and depression, and this is definitely triggering me. I do not want to snoop and I want to trust her, but I am having a hard time with both. Prior to this, it never occurred to me that Mary would do anything that had a whiff of dishonesty about it. But her having kept this from me for as long as I have known her has made me question that. I don’t want to keep bringing this up to her, but I am struggling with it. What do you think I should do? -Upset In The Midwest I think you should get over it, UITM. Easier said than done, I realize, particularly with the twin burdens of anxiety and depression. But if you would have been fine with this had you known—if there was no reason for Mary to hide this LTR-of-sorts from you—the best way to prove that to her is by giving it your retroactive blessing. You’re right, UITM: Mary shouldn’t have hidden this from you. But she assumed— incorrectly, as it turned out—you would have a problem with those texts. It was a reasonable assumption on her part, since swapping flirty texts with a stranger is regarded as “out of bounds” by most. While this makes Mary’s failure to disclose look a little worse, we live in a culture that defines absolutely everything as cheating—don’t get me started on the idiocy that is “micro-infidelities” and the idiots pushing that toxic concept—and as a consequence, people not only lack perspective (oh, to live in a world where everyone regarded harmless flirtation as no big deal!) but also the language to honesty discuss our need for a little harmless erotic affirmation from someone who isn’t obligated to find us attractive, i.e., not a spouse or partner. Put yourself in Mary’s shoes for a moment. When should she have told you about Jeremy? What would you have done if on the third or fourth date, she looked up from her menu and said, “I’ve been swapping flirty texts with this guy for, oh, the last several years. I have no interest in him in real life, we’ve actually never even met in person, but I enjoy his texts and would like to keep swapping texts with him. I hope that’s not a problem.” You would have dumped her on the spot, right? She didn’t want to stop, she didn’t know how to talk about it, she hesitated, and… a decade went by. If there’s nothing else—if no other shoes drop—give this your retroactive blessing. I have an unusual situation. I met a girl I am crazy about. She didn’t really have any interest in me except for the occasional drink; she just wanted to be friends. A few months later, I saw her at a bar. We drank a bit more than we could handle and slept together, and I thought we would start dating. A few weeks went by, and she always had an excuse as to why we couldn’t hang out. Then one night, she texted to say she wanted to see me, but I could tell she was tipsy. We went out for a few more drinks and then slept together again. A week later, the same thing happened. When I contact her during the day, she never seems interested. But I run over like a starved dog

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when she calls at night. (Sadly, due to stress and overwork, I usually can’t get hard when I go over. That’s become a big issue.) She’s very attractive, and I’m surprised she has any interest in me at all, but it’s only when she’s drunk. Besides her looks, I’m attracted by her personality and intelligence. I don’t know what attracts her to me except maybe I’m her booty call, but recently I have been terrible at it. The last time we hooked up, she told me she’s quitting drinking. Maybe she won’t contact me anymore. My question: Is it worth pursuing this if I get my ED situation fixed? Or should I just move on and if she does contact me one night, I just say, “Sorry, not interested”? It’s obvious she’s using me. But we actually have good conversations despite us both being drunk and it kinda seems like a date of some sort. What do you think? -Summoned With A Text She’s interested in you for only one thing (sex) and at only one time (when she’s drunk, horny, and out of other options)… and she can summon you with a single drunken late-night text. It’s actually not an unusual situation, SWAT— millions of people have received similar summonses. So long as the summoned person doesn’t want anything more than sex from the person issuing the summons, Yahtzee: Everybody gets laid, nobody gets hurt. But if the person being summoned wants more—if the summonee has unrequited feelings for the summoner—the summoned person is going to get hurt. Because what the summoner is essentially saying is this: “I want sex; I don’t want you.” Even if the sex is good, the rejection that comes bundled in that summons stings and the hurt grows over time. So, yeah, stop answering that drunk girl’s summonses. Let her know you want more than sex, and if she’s not interested in something more, you’re not interested in her. As for those erectile issues, SWAT, try having sex sober, earlier in the evening, and with someone who doesn’t regard your dick as a consolation prize. I bet they clear right up. I am a transgender man, and my girlfriend is a transgender woman, and we have hit a plateau. Intimate time is rare, communication is minimal, and although I care for her deeply, I do not like her as a person and no longer want to get married. I have considered asking if we could open up the relationship, but I doubt that is the solution. How does one end a longterm relationship? -Help Relationship Transition Whatever you do, HRT, please—please—don’t ask to open up your relationship when what you really want is out. A lot of people who want out do this, and it’s why so many people believe all requests to open a relationship are a sign the relationship is doomed. People who want out but ask for open inevitably get out in the end. People who want open and ask for open and get it tend to stay. But since most couples in open relationships aren’t public about it (most are more comfortable being perceived as monogamous), people hear about the insincere requests that preceded a breakup and conclude all requests are insincere. Anyway, HRT, how does one end a longterm relationship? One uses one’s words. If “I love you” are the three magic words, then “I’m leaving you” are the three tragic words. Seeing as intimacy is rare and communication is minimal, it shouldn’t come as a shock to your soonto-be-ex fiancée.

On the Lovecast, come hang out with the lesbians of the Lez Hang Out podcast: savagelovecast.com mail@savagelove.net @fakedansavage on Twitter Read the Savage Love Letter of the Day at thestranger.com/slog

CURRENTS NEW MEDIA FESTIVAL Various locations Santa Fe’s premier festival for interactive and immersive installations. Events of varying costs (including free!) happen all around town, with a concentration in the Railyard; check currentsnewmedia.org. Various times, free CITIZENS' CLIMATE LOBBY MEETING Santa Fe Public Library Main Branch 145 Washington Ave., 955-6780 Learn how CCL is working for climate change solutions that bridge the partisan divide and how you may help. 10 am, free DULCE BASE CONSPIRACY SYMPOSIUM Studio Center of Santa Fe 1614 Paseo de Peralta, 989-4423 Learn more about Dulce, New Mexico where, in the 1970s, a series of mysterious cattle mutilations opened doors wide to strange theories that ran the gamut from Cold War espionage to alien abduction stories. What's the truth, what's fiction, and who's crazy (if anyone)? From 11 am-5 pm, join other thinkers and speakers on the topic, then, at 7:30 pm, catch a reading of a screenplay based on the mystery. 11 am-9 pm, free ESPAÑOLA HUMANE: COME GET TO KNOW US Violet Crown Cinema 1606 Alcaldesa St., 216-5678 Representatives from Española Humane hand out Incredibles bandit masks and doggie bandanas on the patio, so get over there for some swag and friendship. 10 am-1 pm, free HERB & LAVENDER FESTIVAL El Rancho de las Golondrinas 334 Los Pinos Road, 471-2261 Visit vendors and catch lectures and hands-on activities on all things lavender. 10 am-4 pm, $6-$8 INTERNATIONAL PEACE PRAYER DAY Guru Ram Das Puri 1A Ram Das Guru Place, Española, 753-6341 A day of music, dance, prayer, and the promotion of peace and community building with guest speaker Christian Picciolini, a reformed white supremacist who now helps others overcome prejudice as the founder of the nonprofit Life After Hate. 10:30 am-9 pm, free SANTA FE ARTISTS MARKET Santa Fe Railyard Market Street at Alcaldesa Street, 310-8766 Find pottery, paintings, photography, jewelry, sculpture, furniture, textiles and more from a juried group of artists. 8 am-2 pm, free

SANTA FE RIVER SUMMER CLEAN & GREEN Bicentennial Alto Park 1121 Alto St. Join the Santa Fe Watershed Association's summer cleanup between St. Francis and the Defouri bridge. 10 am-noon, free SANTA FE STUDIO TOUR Various locations A map is available at santafestudiotour.com or at the Community Gallery. 10 am-5 pm, free STEPHEN AUGER: IRIS Axle Contemporary 670-5854 The IRIS sensorium hovers at an electric intersection of neuroscience, art, and entertainment. Today it's next to the Farmers Market (Market and Alcaldesa Streets). 5-8 pm, free

FILM JEFF BERG: MOVIES OF NEW MEXICO Santa Fe Public Library Main Branch 145 Washington Ave., 955-6780 Film clips and discussion. 1:30 pm, free

FOOD CRAB AND PILSNER FESTIVAL Second Street Brewery (Rufina Taproom) 2920 Rufina St., 954-1068 Join the Santa Fe Brewing Co. and 16 other breweries on Father's Day weekend, accompanied by the lush, groovy music of Combsy (see SFR Picks, page 17). 11 am-10 pm, free DEPRESSED CAKE SHOP Meow Wolf 1352 Rufina Circle, 395-6369 All proceeds from the baked goods sold will be donated to local mental health resources. Noon-6 pm, free PINTS FOR PARKINSON’S Fire & Hops 222 N Guadalupe St., 954-1635 Ten percent of the entire day’s beer proceeds go to Pints for Parkinson's New Mexico. Drink up! 2-11 pm, free

MUSIC AMERICAN JEM Rio Chama Steakhouse 414 Old Santa Fe Trail, 955-0765 Jaunty Americana. 6:30 pm, $20 BERKLEE NIGHT Tonic 103 E Water St., 982-1189 Jazz with students Kelt Leray (guitar) and Cyrus Campbell (bass). 9:30 pm, free BIRDS OF CHICAGO Railyard Plaza Market and Alcadesa Streets, 414-8544 With feelings of secular scripture and echoes of folk, the Birds draw heavily on the gospel tradition. 7 pm, free

BROTHER E CLAYTON Osteria D'Assisi 58 S Federal Place, 986-5858 Rock and soul. 6 pm, free BRUCE DUNLAP AND BRAHIM FRIBGANE GiG Performance Space 1808 Second St. Acoustic jazz guitarist (and stalwart GiG proprietor) Dunlap is joined by Moroccan percussionist Fribgane. 7:30 pm, $20 CS ROCKSHOW El Farol 808 Canyon Road, 983-9912 Classic rock 'n' roll with Don Curry, Pete Springer and Ron Crowder. 9 pm, $5 CHAT NOIR CABARET Los Magueyes Mexican Restaurant 31 Burro Alley, 992-0304 Modeled after 19th-century Parisian cabarets, local musician Charles Tichenor and pals get together for a musical respite from the outside world. 6 pm, free CONNIE LONG AND FAST PATSY Mine Shaft Tavern 2846 Hwy. 14, Madrid, 473-0743 Rockabilly, country and Western. 3 pm, free DJ ELVIS KARAOKE Palace Saloon 142 W Palace Ave., 428-0690 Get the mic. 10 pm, $5 DANNY HARP TRIO Mine Shaft Tavern 2846 Hwy. 14, Madrid, 473-0743 Soul, country, blues and more. 8 pm, free DAVID GEIST AND JULIE TRUJILLO Pranzo Italian Grill 540 Montezuma Ave., 984-2645 Geist's piano standards can be made better only by vocals from Trujillo. 6 pm, $2 DOUG MONTGOMERY AND MIKE NICHOLSON Vanessie 427 W Water St., 982-9966 Piano standards: Doug starts, Mike takes over at 8 pm. 6 pm, free DWAYNE ORTEGA BAND Camel Rock Casino 17486 Hwy. 84/285, Pojoaque, 984-8414 Northern New Mexico rock 'n' roll. 8:30 pm, free HALF BROKE HORSES Cowgirl 319 S Guadalupe St., 982-2565 Country and Americana for a lunch on the patio. Don’t worry, folks, they have shade tarps set up. Don’t drink in the sun. It’s not good for you in the long run. Or in the short run, for that matter. 1-4 pm, free


THEATER RAPTURE, BLISTER, BURN Teatro Paraguas 3205 Calle Marie, 424-1601 A housewife and a bachelorette are both unfulfilled and both coveting the other's life. Shit goes down, you guys. 7:30 pm, $5-$15

FREE LIVE MUSIC

AT THE ORIGINAL

ALTO 15 HORSES 16STELLA TROIS 17STREET

Country, 6 PM

Americana, 6 PM

AT THE RAILYARD

16

AMP RAILYARD PLAZA CONCERT No music in pub

Sunday

HEARNE

HALF BROKE

Saturday

14

BILL

Friday

with Steven Paxton

Saturday

Funk, 6 PM

Bluegrass, 11 AM - 1 PM

AT RUFINA

16

COMBSY

At the Crab & Pilsner Festival, 7 PM Find our Rufina Taproom Ad in this week’s issue for more details!

EVA ROSENFELD

Composer and conductor Steven Paxton, former faculty of the contemporary music program at the recently closed Santa Fe University of Art and Design, now coordinates the concert series at the historic San Miguel Mission (401 Old Santa Fe Trail, 983-3974). Paxton brings a more eclectic sound to the series, expanding from almost exclusively classical music to bring in more singer-songwriters, world music and jazz. This week sees Son of Town Hall on Thursday (7:30 pm. $15-$18) and Marty Regan on Friday (7 pm. $15). (Eva Rosenfeld) This space is allegedly the oldest church in the continental United States. How does the space and its history affect the concerts that go on there? I don’t know that they affect them a lot except that musicians and audiences, when they come to a concert or come to give a concert, they’ve got more to do than just music. There’s just more sensory input and more of an aura to it, rather than just coming to play music. It just makes it a more unique experience for the musicians. I don’t know if that changes the way they play; I doubt if it does. It just makes the experience a little more interesting. You worked at the Santa Fe University of Art and Design, which recently closed. Do you think that the closing has affected the Santa Fe arts scene more broadly, or will affect it as it sinks in a little more? I couldn’t say. There are so many of our former students who are working as artists, as musicians, working in arts organizations all over town, and they already were, and they still are. A lot of the younger ones have had to move away, so I just think there’s not the crop of new young musicians—some of whom will stay in Santa Fe—because that whole group had to leave. But as far as affecting the environment currently, I don’t know that it has very much. What’s your ideal vision for the series and how it serves the community around here? Ideally that it’s an affordable, convenient place for local musicians to perform. There aren’t that many places that they can afford to either rent or put on concerts. And it needs to be an interesting enough place that they can attract an audience and people can come and they can actually generate some income for the musicians. So I really see the goal as to be a home base for a lot of Santa Fe musicians, and to be able to also bring in some musicians that are on tour. But it’s really important to know that the primary goal of the building; it’s a historical site, and it’s also a place of worship. So the primary goals are to support the preservation of the building itself, and also to support the students at St. Michael’s High School, because the high school is actually the caretaker of the building. My personal goals are secondary to that.

THE ROCKY HORROR SHOW Santa Fe Playhouse 142 E De Vargas St., 988-4262 Brad and Janet end up at a mysterious castle where Dr. Frank-N-Furter shows them a world that they never knew existed (see Acting Out, page 29). 7:30 pm, $30

Even though I have a very demanding job with unpredictable hours, I would never give up being a Big Brother. Hanging out with my Little Brother each month helps me relax and let go of work stress and the flexibility works with my crazy work schedule. I’m not too busy to make a difference to my Little. Lucas, Big Brother

Mountain Region

Hang out

It’s that simple

www.BBBSMountainRegion.org • 505-983-8360

Through November 25, 2018

Rooted in Tradition, Reaching for the Stars: 20 artists who stretch the boundaries of New Mexican art as we know it with new materials and twists on classic imagery.

Detail, The Blessed Gamer by Patrick McGrath Muñiz.

IGOR AND THE RED ELVISES Boxcar 530 S Guadalupe St., 988-7222 Igor Yuzov grew up in the former Soviet Union, where rock 'n' roll was illegal. He sure has made up for it with his rocking and groovy musics. 10 pm, $10 JONO MANSON La Boca (Taberna Location) 125 Lincoln Ave., 988-7102 Funky rock 'n' roll originals. 7 pm, free LITTLE LEROY AND HIS PACK OF LIES Derailed at the Sage Inn 725 Cerrillos Road, 982-5952 Rock 'n' roll. 6 pm, free LOS PRIMOS MELØDICOS Cava Lounge Eldorado Hotel, 309 W San Francisco St., 988-4455 An Afro-Cuban, romantic and traditional Latin music trios. 8 pm, free MIJA Meow Wolf 1352 Rufina Circle, 395-6369 EDM from the Phoenix-based DJ with roots in drum and bass and happy hardcore. 9 pm, $20-$25 PAT MALONE Inn and Spa at Loretto 211 Old Santa Fe Trail, 984-7997 Solo jazz guitar. 7 pm, free RONALD ROYBAL Hotel Santa Fe 1501 Paseo de Peralta, 982-1200 Native American flute and Spanish classical guitar. 7 pm, free SAVOR La Fiesta Lounge 100 E San Francisco St., 982-5511 Cuban street music. 8 pm, free SHOWCASE KARAOKE Tiny's Restaurant & Lounge 1005 S St. Francis Drive, 983-9817 Sing it, friends. 8:30 pm, free SLOAN ARMITAGE Tumbleroot Brewery & Distillery 2791 Agua Fría St., 303-3808 Folk, Americana and R&B. 8 pm, free STELLA TROIS Second Street Brewery (Original) 1814 Second St., 982-3030 Weirdo improvisational jazz. 6 pm, free UNDERGROUND CADENCE Cowgirl 319 S Guadalupe St., 982-2565 Rocking, bluesy, eclectic, funky tunes. 8:30 pm, free

JUNE

THE CALENDAR

Thursday

ENTER EVENTS AT SFREPORTER.COM/CAL

MUSEUM OF SPANISH COLONIAL ART

On Museum Hill, Santa Fe 750 Camino Lejo | 505.982.2226 Open 10 am – 5 pm | spanishcolonial.org

WORKSHOP FAMILY PROGRAM: SCULPTURE Georgia O'Keeffe Museum 217 Johnson St., 946-1000 Learn about how the sculptural process evolves, from drawing to model to finished work. For children ages 4 to 12 and their grownups. 9:30-11:30 am, free CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE

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JUNE 13-19, 2018

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THE CALENDAR LANDSCAPE DESIGN TO SUPPORT POLLINATORS Railyard Park Community Room 701 Callejon St., .316.3596 Interested in learning how to design a pollinator-friendly garden? Ashley Bennett shares her entomology knowledge for how to design a garden to attract bees, wasps and other native pollinators. A one-hour lecture is followed by an hour of working on individual designs and a stroll through the Railyard Park’s native bee house. Bring a notebook and pencil. 10 am-noon, free LANTERN DECORATING FOR INTERNATIONAL FOLK ART MARKET PARADE Meow Wolf 1352 Rufina Circle, 395-6369 Getting psyched for the most colorful party of the year— aka the International Folk Art Market in July? So is Meow Wolf, and they want help to prepare their big display for the market's parade. 11 am-4 pm, free LET'S GROW: COMPOST CLINIC Santa Fe County Fairgrounds 3229 Rodeo Road Learn how to compost your yard and food waste, proper techniques for building a thermal pile, turning, finishing and screening compost. Bring hats, gloves, study shoes, water and a pitchfork if you have one. 1-3 pm, free

AMMA

MEET MATA AMRITANANDAMAYI, RENOWNED HUMANITARIAN AND SPIRITUAL LEADER

AMMA.ORG

JUNE 16 - 19, 2018 SANTA FE, NEW MEXICO LOCATION Hilton Buffalo Thunder | 20 Buffalo Thunder Trail Santa Fe, NM 87506

FREE PUBLIC PROGRAM June 16 | All Day Program | 12:00 Noon

DEVI BHAVA - FREE PROGRAM A celebration devoted to world peace

June 19 | Program begins at 7:00pm

RETREAT* June 17-19 | Pre-registration required PLEASE PLAN TO ARRIVE AT LEAST 90 MINUTES BEFORE THE PROGRAM TO RECEIVE A FREE TOKEN IF YOU WOULD LIKE TO HAVE AMMA’S EMBRACE.

*VISIT AMMA.ORG FOR MORE INFORMATION

TOKENS MAY BE LIMITED BY TIME CONSTRAINTS.

FOLLOW US ON:

OR CALL (505) 982-9801 MA Center

@MAcenterSR

SUN/17 BOOKS/LECTURES AGELESS LIVING CONFERENCE Lensic Performing Arts Center 211 W San Francisco St., 988-1234 Presented by Empower New Mexico and AgeNation, leading authors and wisdom keepers guide participants on a journey of discovery, inspiration and empowerment. Check agenation.com for info. If you miss this one, there’s another one in September—or do both, if you’re so inclined. 9 am-6 pm, $49-$139 ENLIGHTENED COURAGE Thubten Norbu Ling Tibetan Buddhist Center 1807 Second St., Ste. 35, 660-7056 With Geshe Thubten Sherab’s wisdom on how to be committed to the peaceful and courageous path of full awakening, explore the ideas in The Way of the Bodhisattva, a classic of Indian Buddhist literature. 10 am-noon, free JOEPH BADAL: OBSESSED: CYCLE OF VIOLENCE #2 Garcia Street Books 376 Garcia St., 986-0151 The second installment in Badal’s Cycle of Violence series takes the reader on a crazed man's single-minded quest for revenge. 4 pm, free

ENTER EVENTS AT SFREPORTER.COM/CAL

JOURNEYSANTAFE: JOE MONAHAN Collected Works Bookstore and Coffeehouse 202 Galisteo St., 988-4226 The New Mexico political analyst and blogger speaks about key moments in the June primaries—what happened and, perhaps more importantly, what didn’t happen. 11 am, free RICHARD BALTHAZAR: CODEX BORGIA El Museo Cultural de Santa Fe 555 Camino de la Familia, 992-0591 Presented in conjunction with his exhibit Ye Gods!: Icons of Aztec Deities, artist Balthazar speaks on the historical context of the Codex Borgia and other codices, and discusses of sample pages of this stylistically startling divinatory document. 2 pm, free SANTA FE FREE THINKERS’ FORUM Unitarian Universalist Congregation 107 W Barcelona Road, 982-9674 If you were at the last meeting of the humanist discussion group—or even if you weren't—continue considering: "Where do morals come from? How do we know right from wrong? What is the difference between innate and learned values?" Rise ‘n’ shine ‘n’ talk about heavy topics. 8:30 am, free

EVENTS CURRENTS NEW MEDIA FESTIVAL Various locations Santa Fe’s premier festival for interactive and immersive installations. Events of varying costs (including free!) happen all around town. For all the info: currentsnewmedia.org. Various times, free HERB & LAVENDER FESTIVAL El Rancho de las Golondrinas 334 Los Pinos Road, 471-2261 Wanna smell good? There is no better way than lavender and herb products. Also catch lectures and hands-on activities on all things lavender. Kids 12 and under are free. 10 am-4 pm, $6-$8 THE MECHANICS OF PLAY PERFORMANCE NO LAND 54 E San Francisco St., Ste. 7, 216-973-3367 Flying Wall Studios offers a performance to unite local performers and musicians with puppet artists Damon and Sabrina Griffith. 2 pm, free MEDITATION & MODERN BUDDHISM: AWAKENING THE HEART Zoetic 230 St. Francis Drive, 292-5293 Transform your relationships through meditations that awaken and grow the love in your heart. 10 am-noon, $10

SANTA FE STUDIO TOUR Various locations Studio tours are everyone's favorite New Mexico weekends. Visit 59 studios this year; a map is available at santafestudiotour.com or at the Community Gallery at the Santa Fe Community Convention Center. 10 am-5 pm, free

FOOD CRAB AND PILSNER FESTIVAL Second Street Brewery (Rufina Taproom) 2920 Rufina St., 954-1068 Join the Santa Fe Brewing Co. and 16 other breweries for a crab-and-beer fest. Take your dad! Take your whole family! Take yourself! It's crab! (See SFR Picks, page 17.) 11 am-10 pm, free

MUSIC ACES HIGH Palace Saloon 142 W Palace Ave., 428-0690 Americana and folk. 10 am-3 pm, free ALTO STREET Second Street Brewery (Original) 1814 Second St., 982-3030 Folk-pop 'n' bluegrass. 11 am-1 pm, free DAN LAVOIE Cowgirl 319 S Guadalupe St., 982-2565 Acoustic rock 'n' roll. 8 pm, free DOUG MONTGOMERY Vanessie 427 W Water St., 982-9966 Piano standards. 6:30 pm, free GREG ABATE AND PETE AMAHL Mine Shaft Tavern 2846 Hwy. 14, Madrid, 473-0743 Smooth jazzy tunes. 6 pm, free INANIMATE EXISTENCE, LAST OF LUCY, FIELDS OF ELYSIUM AND MARROW MONGER Ghost 2899 Trades West Road The Decibel Foundry presents technical death metal at its finest from NorCal outfit Inanimate Existence, on tour with Last of Lucy (Huntington Beach, CA) and Fields of Elysium (Santa Fe), and with some local support from Marrow Monger. 7 pm, $10 JOE WEST AND FRIENDS Cowgirl 319 S Guadalupe St., 982-2565 An alt.country brunch. Noon, free MARIO REYNOLDS La Fiesta Lounge 100 E San Francisco St., 982-5511 Latin American tunes on guitar, charango and flute. 6 pm, free MICHAEL UMPHREY Osteria D'Assisi 58 S Federal Place, 986-5858 Piano standards. 6 pm, free CONTINUED ON PAGE 30

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THEATER

ACTING OUT

Fantasy, Free Me CHARLOTTE JUSINSKI

BY C H A R LOT T E J U S I N S K I c o p y e d i t o r @ s f r e p o r t e r. c o m

The Rocky Horror Show is at its best when both the audience and the cast deeply and intensely give a shit. This cast has it in spades; the rest is up to you.

A

decade ago, SFR’s then-movie writer Emiliano Garcia-Sarnoff wrote a review of High School Musical 3  that still makes me laugh. Titled “Troy and Chad” (Oct. 27, 2008), the review characterized the film not as a prepubescent romp, but rather as “Disney’s first movie about gay teenagers struggling with their super-obvious gayness while trying to live double lives as Disney-perfect straight kids.” He went on to discuss the film as a serious piece of LGBTQ+ cinema, tongue firmly in cheek—or was it? I think of this review, and this concept, often: taking a ridiculous and perhaps infantile piece of culture and elevating it to the realm of high art. The act of taking seriously something so un-serious has always appealed to me. There is no better production to which I could apply this tactic than  The Rocky Horror Show,  up  at the Santa Fe Playhouse through July 1. For those who  somehow  don’t know what  Rocky  is, it’s a marvelously self-

aware 1973 musical by queer folk hero Richard O’Brien  that revels in its own campy horribleness as it lampoons the horror films of the first half-ish of the 20th century. The impossibly vanilla Brad (Santiago Baca) and Janet (Grace Lill) get a flat tire in a rainstorm and end up in the castle of Dr. Frank-NFurter, a mad genderqueer scientist from another planet who has created Rocky (RJ Henkel), a perfect human specimen. Frank opens Brad and Janet’s eyes to the concept of doing whatever the fuck you want (particularly sexually). Retro doowoppy and rock ’n’ rolley music plays throughout. After the release of the movie version in 1975 (featuring the iconic performance of Tim Curry as Frank-N-Furter), it turned into the very definition of “cult classic.” Across the country, art house movie theaters still run weekly midnight showings  for which regulars dress up and act out the show as it plays on the big screen. For both the movie and the stage

versions, the crazier and more brazen the audience, the better the experience is. Under the co-direction of Michael Blake Oldham and Vaughn Irving, the main players in this cast could not be more enthusiastic, which is a necessity for a successful Rocky.  Ghoulish siblings Magenta (Rikki Carroll) and Riff Raff (Mark Westberg), Frank-N-Furter’s right-hand twins, are so deeply in their cartooney characters, it was weird to see them act like humans during breaks. Matthew K Gutierrez, who plays both rock ’n’ roller Eddie and the benevolent wheelchair-bound Dr. Scott, may be one of the most hilarious people on Santa Fe’s stages right now. (When I acted with Gutierrez in 2017’s  Unnecessary Farce, director Irving actually had to say on multiple occasions: “You’re stealing the scene, Matty. Stop being so funny.” His impeccable sense of timing and weirdness is present here, too, to delightful effect.) Which brings us, of course, to FrankN-Furter himself, a luminous Xavier Visage. About a thousand feet tall and with the quadriceps of a Greek god, Visage was perhaps birthed with the express purpose of  playing this role. (I wasn’t there, of course, but I can speculate.) Frank makes or breaks the show, and it’s positively made here with Visage’s effervescent performance and strong vocals. Further, technically, the show is an exciting experiment for the Playhouse: There is essentially no set, just glittery curtains, and narrative  work from lighting designer Annie Haynes and master electrician and co-designer Kyra Murzyn turns an empty stage into a forest, a castle and a laboratory. A live band is led by music director Andrew Primm. So, all those points are about this particular production. It sounds amazing, it looks fantastic, it’s fun and stupid and, once an obnoxious audience is in the seats, it will be a vital piece of summer entertainment. But what of the thing I said at the beginning—the virtue of regarding something so silly as high art? At the risk of sounding like a tool: Rocky Horror is perhaps one of the most culturally important  pieces of entertainment of the 20th century. In “Over at the Frankenstein Place,” Lill’s Janet sings in a sweet trill: “In the velvet darkness of the blackest night / Burning bright, there’s a guiding star / No matter what or who you are … I can see the flag fly, I can see the rain / Just the same, there has got to be / Something better here for you and me.” Yes, she’s talking about a literal castle full of aliens, but what this show has been for anyone on the spectrum of

“different”—particularly LGBTQ+ kids— is a beacon showing the way to  who you are. There is freedom in absurdity. There is a release in campiness. Somehow, the tighter that corset is laced, the easier it is to breathe; the higher your heels, boy, the closer you are to some kind of divinity. Your masculinity is part of your power, all you queer girls. Your fluidity is what’s going to let you  slide  through adversity and sing and thrive. You need to be weird as hell, and once you embrace that, anything is allowed. Anything is possible. And at the Santa Fe Playhouse for the next three weeks, you can (and should) do whatever you want. You can (and should) yell obscenities. You can (and should) sing along. Buy a $5 prop bag to be sure you have the right stuff at hand. This is the only way we can transcend the bullshit. You should be too intense. And honestly, if you  don’t  go overboard, that is when you fuck up. By not living wildly, that is where you fail. Be insane and brave. Have at it. You do you, and gloriously so. We see you, and we’re with you. Go.

THE ROCKY HORROR SHOW 7:30 pm Thursdays-Saturdays June 14-30; 2 pm Sundays June 17-July 1. Also 10:30 pm Friday June 29. $15-$30. Santa Fe Playhouse, 142 E De Vargas St., 988-4262. Recommended for ages 18+.

GUEST NARRATORS June 14: Michael Blake Oldham June 15: Quinn Fontaine (LGBTQ+ Night!) June 16: Cristina Vigil June 17: John Hayes June 21: Stephen Jules Rubin June 22: SFP Board Member June 23: Charlotte Jusinski (I get no $$ for this, folks) June 24: Stephen Rommel June 28: Bella Gigante June 29: Barbara Hatch June 29 Late Show: Vaughn Irving June 30: Danette Sills July 1: Michael Blake Oldham

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THE CALENDAR NACHA MENDEZ La Boca (Taberna Location) 125 Lincoln Ave., 988-7102 Buttery Latin tunes. 7 pm, free PAT MALONE AND JON GAGAN El Farol 808 Canyon Road, 983-9912 Jazzy McJazzesALot. 7 pm, free

THEATER RAPTURE, BLISTER, BURN Teatro Paraguas 3205 Calle Marie, 424-1601 Two best friends, both unfulfilled and both coveting the other's life, get together. It amounts to an unflinching look at gender politics and feminist ideals. 2 pm, $5-$15 THE ROCKY HORROR SHOW Santa Fe Playhouse 142 E De Vargas St., 988-4262 It’s just a jump to the left (see Acting Out, page 29). 2 pm, $15-$25

MON/18 EVENTS GEEKS WHO DRINK Draft Station Santa Fe Arcade, 60 E San Francisco St., 983-6443 Stellar quiz results can win you drink tickets for next time. 7 pm, free THE SANTA FE HARMONIZERS REHEARSAL Zia United Methodist Church 3368 Governor Miles Road, 699-6922 Have you been itching to start singing again? The local choral group invites anyone who can carry a tune to its weekly rehearsals. 6:30-8 pm, free SANTA FE INDIVISIBLE MEETING Center for Progress and Justice 1420 Cerrillos Road, 467-8514 Progressive group activism. 7 pm, free

MUSIC

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BILL HEARNE TRIO La Fiesta Lounge 100 E San Francisco St., 982-5511 Honky-tonk and Americana. 7:30 pm, free COWGIRL KARAOKE Cowgirl 319 S Guadalupe St., 982-2565 Santa Fe's most famous night of karaoke. Tonight’s suggestion: some old-school Matchbox Twenty. No one will hate you and it won’t be stuck in your head for three days. 9 pm, free DOUG MONTGOMERY AND ELIZABETH YOUNG Vanessie 427 W Water St., 982-9966 Montgomery provides the standards on piano, and Young joins in on violin. 6:30 pm, free

ENTER EVENTS AT SFREPORTER.COM/CAL

MELLOW MONDAYS Boxcar 530 S Guadalupe St., 988-7222 DJ Sato spins some jams to calm you down. 10 pm, free SANTA FE GREAT BIG JAZZ BAND Tiny's Restaurant & Lounge 1005 S St. Francis Drive, 983-9817 A 16-piece great big band! 7 pm, free

THEATER PLUS ONE TO ... Santa Fe Brewing Company 35 Fire Place, 424-3333 Local actor Kevin Atkinson and his crew (four or five people total) play a live-action role-playing game onstage, but the catch is that they're also all pretty comical humans, so it's entertaining to watch. It’s comedy, it’s adventure, it’s a live-action chooseyour-own-adventure book. 7 pm, free

TUE/19 BOOKS/LECTURES BILINGUAL BOOKS AND BABIES Santa Fe Public Library LaFarge Branch 1730 Llano St., 955-4860 In a program for babies 6 months to 2 years old (and their caregivers), join a play and language group to enjoy books, songs and finger games. 1 pm, free FUNDEMENTALS OF TIME IN PHYSICAL & ADAPTIVE SYSTEMS PANEL DISCUSSION Lensic Performing Arts Center 211 W San Francisco St., 988-1234 The Santa Fe Institute asks the question: What could be more mysterious, more precious and more fleeting than time? This panel of real smart people discusses the challenges of time in physics, biology, and culture. 7:30 pm, free

DANCE ARGENTINE TANGO MILONGA El Mesón 213 Washington Ave., 983-6756 Put on your best tango shoes. 7:30 pm, $5

EVENTS AMMA: DEVI BHAVA Buffalo Thunder Resort and Casino 20 Buffalo Thunder Trail, 455-5555 Meet Mata Amritanandamayi, renowned humanitarian and spiritual leader revered for her message of selfless love and compassion toward all beings. She’s renowned for her hugs, so arrive 90 minutes early for a free token to get one. 7 pm, free

GEEKS WHO DRINK Boxcar 530 S Guadalupe St., 988-7222 This quiz can win you drink tickets for next time. As ever, it's hosted by the kindly Kevin A. 8 pm, free JULESWORKS FOLLIES #54: LIFE-CHANGING EDITION Jean Cocteau Cinema 418 Montezuma Ave., 466-5528 Santa Fe's longest-running (and only) variety show rides again, presenting theater, music, comedy, stand-up, spoken-word and much more. 8 pm, $7-$10 NATIVE BEE WALK Railyard Park Community Room 701 Callejon St., 316-3596 Join Olivia Carrill to learn about declining native bee populations. 10 am-noon, free SANTA FE INDIVISIBLE MEETING Center for Progress and Justice 1420 Cerrillos Road, 467-8514 Join the politically progressive group to put into action the planning you did last night. 8:30 am, free ¡VÁMONOS! SANTA FE: WALK WITH A COMMUNITY HEALTH WORKER Plaza Contenta 6009 Jaguar Drive, 550-3728 Head to the Plaza Contenta (across from Cesar Chavez Elementary School) to go for a stroll with Evelyn Rios. Walkers in this series se habla español, too! For more info, check out sfct.org/vamonos. 5:30-6:30 pm, free

MUSIC BILL HEARNE TRIO La Fiesta Lounge 100 E San Francisco St., 982-5511 Honky-tonk and Americana. 7:30 pm, free BILL PALMER Tumbleroot Brewery & Distillery 2791 Agua Fría St., 303-3808 Rock 'n' roll, dirty country and acoustic ballads. 5-7 pm, free BLUEGRASS JAM Derailed at the Sage Inn 725 Cerrillos Road, 982-5952 You guessed it: It's a bluegrass jam. 6 pm, free BLUEPRINT AND DJ DETOX Buffalo Thunder Resort and Casino 20 Buffalo Thunder Trail, 4555555 Dusty drum breaks, surgically chopped samples and hard-hitting rhymes from the Columbus, Ohio-based rapper. 7 pm, $10 CANYON ROAD BLUES JAM El Farol 808 Canyon Road, 983-9912 Music and camaraderie. 8 pm, $5 CHUSCALES La Boca (Original Location) 72 W Marcy St., 982-3433 Exotic flamenco guitar. 7 pm, free CONTINUED ON PAGE 32

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MARY FRANCIS CHEESEMAN

@THEFORKSFR

Alchemical Inventions New health food bar opens near its sister operation, an organic dispensary BY MARY FRANCIS CHEESEMAN a u t h o r @ s f r e p o r t e r. c o m

E

dible Alchemy opened its doors in late May of this year in the space formerly occupied by Rasa Kitchen and Juice Bar. But the concept behind the newly revitalized restaurant remains the same; namely, providing healthful raw vegan and gluten-free options, particularly to the burgeoning clientele of the next-door sister operation, cannabis dispensary Fruit of the Earth Organics. The dispensary grows its own greenery both organically and outdoors, the latter of which reportedly produces a much tastier and flavorful final product. All of this contributes to a ready-and-waiting card-carrying clientele with health and wellness concerns, ready to shop at nearby Whole Foods for their groceries and Fruit of the Earth for their edibles and tinctures. It is to these folks that Edible Alchemy explicitly caters. “My mother died of cancer,” says owner Lyra Barron, longtime Santa Fean and co-founder not only of Edible Alchemy, but also Fruit of the Earth and the nearby events space Paradiso. “Building community and fostering education about health is always at the forefront for me. I wanted a place where people suffering from major problems

could find something that would nurture them back to whole.” And there’s no reason why those who aren’t exclusively raw foodies can’t also partake in her offerings. A little bit of cucumber juice and raw chocolate never hurt, right? In fact, Barron, who opened Fruit of the Earth’s doors in 2011 and currently runs the business with her son Jaum, swooped in the very day Rasa announced its closure three months ago, taking over the lease and salvaging the remaining staff. This included husband-and-wife chef team Margaux and Josh Spain, who helped craft a menu that replicated the kind of healthy, plantbased options available at Rasa. The Iowa-born natives moved to Santa Fe by way of Hawaii in search of greater opportunites in the field of vegan cooking. “There aren’t a lot of options in rural Iowa,” Margeaux tells SFR. “Things are a little easier in Santa Fe.” Together, the Spains and Barron emphasize a holistic approach to raw foods crafted from ingredients sourced from Green Tractor Farm. The Spains wanted as small a carbon footprint as possible, and thus reached out to the La Cienega family operation to supply the bulk of their produce. Raw versions of dips, salads, vegetable burgers, pizza and spring rolls are served alongside a spectrum of smoothies, cold-pressed juices, various elixirs and pastries. The pastries

Raw blueberry pie that has mango and dates all up in it. Say what?!

are sugar-free, although various alternative sweeteners, such as maple, agave and fruits are sometimes employed. The Spains also make the edibles for Fruit of the Earth, which are also entirely organic and use locally sourced ingredients whenever possible. Edible Alchemy’s décor is a mixture of earthy neutrals and cheery colors, with oilcloth table linings brightly festooned with orange and yellow flowers covering four tables sitting adjacent to a bar and cold case. I first tried the vanilla bean cold brew latte ($7), made with Agapao beans processed overnight in cold water—the only way to make coffee in a raw bar naturally—and flavored with maple, vanilla

FOOD

bean and almond milk. It tasted smooth and flavorful, with a lighter body and consistency than most lattes. For a second course, the turquoise majik smoothie ($9) features pineapple, banana, probiotic coconut yogurt and Blue Majik, a supplement of the probiotic arthrospira platensis, a blue algae derivative of spirulina known for its high antioxidant content, nutrient density and pretty blue hue that it imparts to drinks. Though it sounds equal parts healthy and disgusting, Blue Majik thankfully doesn’t have much of a taste, and the slight herbal earthiness is not unpleasantly framed by the creamy banana and hints of ginger and mint. I also tried the falafel salad ($12), a giant bowl of greens and sprouts mixed with cucumbers and sliced tomatoes spritzed with lime. The salad is layered with raw almond croutons and balls of lightly roasted chickpeas tossed in an orange tahini dressing and dotted with edible flowers. The dressing is crisp, and though the falafel crumbles quickly, it incorporates into the meal quite well. For dessert, the raw blueberry pie ($7) is made with wild blueberries and mangoes contained by a crust of pulverized almonds and medjool dates. For good measure, try it a la mode, topping it with a $3 scoop of house-made coconut ice cream. The ice cream has a satisfying creaminess to it, and I  left surprised  by how several courses of straight fruits and vegetables could make me feel so full. Edible Alchemy is easy to like and sincere in its mission of sustainability without being pedantic about it—a tough balancing act when your offerings embody the raw, vegan and gluten-free diet. And the menu never makes direct claims about its health benefits; it simply states that it believes in “the healing power of foods.” The content speaks for itself. EDIBLE ALCHEMY 815 Early St., 983-8152 11 am-3 pm daily

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KUNM 89.9 FM kunm.org

THE CALENDAR DOUG MONTGOMERY AND MIKE NICHOLSON Vanessie 427 W Water St., 982-9966 Piano standards: Doug starts, Mike takes over at 8 pm. 6 pm, free EGGBONE Paradiso 903 Early St. Innovative, fun jazz. 7 pm, $10 MICHAEL UMPHREY Osteria D'Assisi 58 S Federal Place, 986-5858 Piano standards. 6 pm, free

ENTER EVENTS AT SFREPORTER.COM/CAL

PAT MALONE TerraCotta Wine Bistro 304 Johnson St., 989-1166 Solo jazz guitar. 6 pm, free ROLLER'OKE Rockin' Rollers 2915 Agua Fría St., 473-7755 Roller skating, aliens and karaoke are back! That $5 entry fee includes skates. 7 pm, $5 TONY BROWN Palace Saloon 142 W Palace Ave., 428-0690 R&B, soul, reggae, rock, blues, jazz, funk y más. 6:30 pm, free

TROY BROWNE Cowgirl 319 S Guadalupe St., 982-2565 Dextrous Americana. 8 pm, free VINTAGE VINYL NIGHT The Matador 116 W San Francisco St., 984-5050 DJ Prairiedog and DJ Mamagoose spin the best in garage, surf, country and rockabilly. Bring your cash, folks—this bar doesn’t take plastic. 8:30 pm, free

Much more than RADIO educational

LOS ALAMOS HISTORICAL SOCIETY ARCHIVE

MUSEUMS

Do you have any Grey Poupon? Ask all the right questions at the New Mexico History Museum’s Atomic Histories exhibit, which talks about Los Alamos—and other things. GEORGIA O’KEEFFE MUSEUM 217 Johnson St.,946-1000 The Black Place: Georgia O’Keeffe and Michael Namingha. Through Oct. 28. Journey to Center: New Mexico Watercolors by Sam Scott. Through Nov. 1. HARWOOD MUSEUM OF ART 238 Ledoux St., Taos, 575-758-9826 Peter Sarkisian: Mind Under Matter. Through July 22. Larry Bell: Hocus, Focus and 12; Rafa Tarín: For Now. Both through Oct. 7. IAIA MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY NATIVE ARTS 108 Cathedral Place, 983-8900 Action/Abstraction Redefined. Through July 27. Art & Activism: Selections from The Harjo Family Collection. Through July 31. Without Boundaries: Visual Conversations. Through July 29. Holly Wilson: On Turtle’s Back. Rolande Souliere: Form and Content. Both through Jan. 27, 2019. MUSEUM OF ENCAUSTIC ART 632 Agua Fría St., 989-3283 From Ancient Beeswax to the Modern Crayon. MUSEUM OF INDIAN ARTS & CULTURE 710 Camino Lejo, 476-1250 Stepping Out: 10,000 Years of

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Walking the West. Through Sept. 3. Points Through Time. Through Oct. 1. Maria Samora: Master of Elegance. Through Feb. 28, 2019. What’s New in New: Selections from the Carol Warren Collection. Through April 7, 2019. Lifeways of the Southern Athabaskans. Through July 7, 2019. MUSEUM OF INT’L FOLK ART 706 Camino Lejo, 476-1200 Negotiate, Navigate, Innovate: Strategies Folk Artists Use in Today’s Global Marketplace. Through July 16. Artistic Heritage: Syrian Folk Art. Through July 29. No Idle Hands: The Myths & Meanings of Tramp Art. Through Sept. 16. Beadwork Adorns the World. Through Feb. 3, 2019. Crafting Memory: The Art of Community in Peru. Through March 10, 2019. MUSEUM OF SPANISH COLONIAL ART 750 Camino Lejo, 982-2226 GenNext: Future So Bright. Through Nov. 25. NM HISTORY MUSEUM 113 Lincoln Ave., 476-5019 The Land That Enchants Me So: Picturing Popular Songs of New Mexico. Through Feb. 24, 2019. Atomic Histories. Through May 31, 2019. NM MUSEUM OF ART

107 W Palace Ave.,476-5072 Patrick Nagatani: Invented Realities. Through Sept. 9. Frederick Hammersley: To Paint Without Thinking. Through Sept. 29. Shifting Light: Photographic Perspectives. Through Oct. 8. Horizons: People & Place in New Mexican Art. Through Nov. 25. PALACE OF THE GOVERNORS 105 W Palace Ave., 476-5100 Tesoros de Devoción. POEH CULTURAL CENTER AND MUSEUM 78 Cities of Gold Road, Pojoaque, 455-3334 In T’owa Vi Sae’we. EL RANCHO DE LAS GOLONDRINAS 334 Los Pinos Road, 471-2261 Living history. SANTA FE BOTANICAL GARDENS 715 Camino Lejo, 471-9103 Dan Ostermiller: Gardens Gone Wild! Through May 11, 2019. SITE SANTA FE 1606 Paseo de Peralta, 989-1199 SITElab 10: Michael Rakowitz. Through Aug. 18. WHEELWRIGHT MUSEUM OF THE AMERICAN INDIAN 704 Camino Lejo, 986-4636 Peshlakai Vision. Memory Weaving: Works by Melanie Yazzie. Both through Oct. 7.


MOVIES

RATINGS BEST MOVIE EVER

Hereditary Review

10

A new wave horror classic

9

BY ALEX DE VORE a l e x @ s f r e p o r t e r. c o m

8

Director Ari Aster firmly asserts his place within the pantheon of new wave horror cinema auteurs with Hereditary, his first full-length film and a decidedly terrifying yet subtle  experience  that  keeps up with—or even surpasses— other 21st-century highlights such as 2014’s  It Follows. Aster’s world is one that feels all at once dreamlike and haunting, yet all too real, like a nightmare one can’t shake or a long-residing and throbbing pain from outside the physical realm. Here we meet Annie (Toni Collette), an artist and mother grappling with the recent death of her estranged mother. Annie has seemingly cobbled together quite the life, from her husband (Gabriel Byrne) and children to her thriving arts practice and gallery representation. But when an unspeakable accident occurs, the dynamic between the family is inextricably changed, and her entire existence begins to unravel while those closest to her begin to suspect she’s struggling with mental illness and misplaced grief.

7 6 5 4 3 2 1 WORST MOVIE EVER

9 + ORIGINAL AND TRULY SCARY

- SOME SCENES

LAG AND FEEL SHOEHORNED IN

At her best, Collette achieves a measured balance between protective mother, loving wife and grieving woman; at her worst, she errs to far toward hammy. Still, her character is believably flawed and human even as we question whether her new circumstances are real or imagined (think Essie Davis’ wonderful sleep-deprived flirtation with insanity in the brilliant Australian horror film The Babadook). Elsewhere, Byrne is underused and middle sections drag under the weight of early shocking scenes. Alex Wolff (from that new Jumanji) stands out, however, as a son dealing with his own guilt and confusion, while newcomer Milly Shapiro helps check off the req-

uisite spooky-little-kid vibes in a quiet yet capable way. It is delightfully surprising, then, that the true revelations behind the family’s troubles are nothing like what early looks and trailers led us to believe. Instead,  Hereditary  becomes a twisted vision of sheer evil and artistry that takes its time and builds slowly, sometimes excruciatingly, right up to its bizarre, horrifying conclusion. HEREDITARY Directed by Aster With Collette, Byrne, Wolff and Shapiro Regal, Violet Crown, R, 127 min.

QUICKY REVIEWS

6

THE DAY AFTER

THE DAY AFTER

6

+ BEAUTIFUL CINEMATOGRAPHY;

HAUNTING SOUNDTRACK - NOT SUPER ORIGINAL INFIDELITY STUFF

Korean filmmaker Hong Sang-soo (On the Beach at Night Alone) explores well-worn themes of adultery in his latest, The Day After. When the head of a publishing company named Kim (Kwon Hae-hyo) has an affair with a former employee (Kim Min-hee), he winds up haunted by her memory and attempting to jumpstart a second affair with a new employee a few weeks later. And though adultery may seem like old news to American audiences, it’s a timely topic for Korean culture, where it was ruled in 2015 that cheating on a spouse was no longer a punishable crime after more than six decades in which offenders faced potential jail time. The injustice of Kim’s affair is made brutally clear when his wife (Yun-hee Cho), mistaking the new employee for the woman her husband previously cheated with, physically attacks her— even if the angry and violent wronged woman trope does seem lacking in nuance. Jealousy ensues, however, and Kim, being the insensitive coward he is, fires the new employee so his former mistress can take her job. But he still can’t figure out exactly how he feels—no matter

6

MOUNTAIN

6

SOLO: A STAR WARS STORY

how many shots of soju he consumes. The women in the film act as the voice of conscience and reason, alerting Kim to his cowardice and perhaps representing all spouses who have been hurt by infidelity; The Day After’s crisp black and white cinematography reflects Kim’s tragically simplified worldview. Although the overall message of the film

7

probably has more cultural significance in Korea, it does carry a certain universal emotional weight. Still, Hong presents a variation on very familiar themes, and it could have used more than beautiful black and white to truly stand out. (Roan Lee-Plunket) Jean Cocteau, PG-13, 1:31

Korean film The Day After looks at infidelity in beautiful black and white.

9

DEADPOOL 2

RBG

MOUNTAIN

6

+ PAINSTAKING AND OCCASIONALLY SPELLBINDING CINEMATOGRAPHY

- NARRATIVE IS VAGUE AT BEST, OBTUSE AT WORST

There’s no more accurate synopsis of Australian filmmaker Jennifer Peedom’s film Mountain than its title; it’s about mountains, broadly. Between aerial alpine shots and the droning narration of Willem Dafoe, the film opts not to focus in on any particular locale or storyline, but instead attempts to answer the sweeping questions, “What are mountains?” and “Why have humans chosen to enter them?” This is an ambitious goal, surely, but the lack of specificity makes for not only narrative fatigue but ethical pitfalls. Mountain kicks off with a brief history of the human ethos towards mountains, beginning with an era when the mountains contained only the “holy or hostile” and people dared not enter. The script favors the collective “we” voice: “We insulated ourselves away from nature—the mountains called us back.” Now, it says, we are drawn to the wild; or at least, a special class of adventurers among us is. No matter that many people live and work in the outdoors, and have done so for a long time—not just as an oasis from cushy modernity.

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MOVIES

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ADVANCE TICKETING: (505) 982-1338 or visit CCASANTAFE.ORG H HEARING & SIGHT ASSISTIVE DEVICES NOW AVAILABLE H Wednesday, June 13 11:15a Let the Sunshine In 11:30a The Rider* 1:15p RBG 1:45p The Seagull* 3:15p The Seagull 4:00p Let the Sunshine In* 5:30p RBG 6:00p The Seagull* 7:30p The Seagull 8:00p Let the Sunshine In* Thursday, June 14 10:45a The Rider 11:30a Let the Sunshine In* 1:00p The Seagull 1:45p The Seagull* 3:00 Let the Sunshine In 4:00p RBG* 5:00p The Seagull 6:00p Someone You Love: The HPV Epidemic* 7:00p Fabulous Thursdays: The Gospel According to Andre Friday, June 15 11:15a Becoming Who I Was* 11:45a Doctor from India 1:30p RBG* 1:45p The Seagull 3:30p RBG* 4:00p The Seagull 5:30p Becoming Who I Was* 6:00p Let the Sunshine In 7:45p The Rider* 8:00p RBG Saturday, June 16 11:15a Becoming Who I Was* 11:45a Doctor from India 1:30p RBG* 1:45p The Seagull 3:30p RBG* 4:00p The Seagull 5:30p Becoming Who I Was* 7:30p The 4th Annual Bloomsday in Santa Fe 7:45p Let the Sunshine In* Sunday - Tuesday, June 17 - 19 11:15a Becoming Who I Was* 11:45a Doctor from India 1:30p RBG* 1:45p The Seagull 3:30p RBG* 4:00p The Seagull 5:30p Becoming Who I Was* 6:00p Let the Sunshine In 7:45p The Rider* 8:00p RBG

*in The Studio

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You into mountains? The movie Mountain is probably for you. When the film refers to “humans,” it refers to a wealthy, predominantly white leisure class, and the history it deems universal is more accurately the arc of Western Romantic thought. Random shots of Buddhist monks don’t do much to change that. The film does briefly make reference to the “imperial aim” of mountaineers: to “grid, girdle, and name the upper world; to bring it and its peoples into the realm of the known and the owned.” Yet the writers encounter no cognitive dissonance between referencing these “peoples,” and the repeated thesis that humans exclusively avoided the mountains up until this point. Mountain is at its most compelling during its athletic sequences, when mountaineers perform dazzling calisthenics against colossal landscapes. These scenes take on a humor and geometric artistry beyond the majestic National Geographic-esque landscape shots one comes to expect. The shrewd decision to feature the music of the Australian Chamber Orchestra makes these moments even more lovely. In one particularly clever sequence, climbers repeatedly plummet off of walls to the end of their ropes to the sound of a rapid string section. The symphony concludes, and two mountaineers smoke together as if sitting on a stoop, except their legs dangle thousands of feet in the air. The film takes on land degradation as its central moral stand against the mountaineering industry, but this message is never reconciled with either the valorization of the explorers themselves or the film’s final declaration: that in the end, the mountains will always outlast us, as narrated over shots of the land’s natural processes. The viewer is primed by the sight of so many human bodies to fully grasp the mountain’s vitality, how they breathe. Here, what could instill awe is undercut by trite generalizing, and if not for the orchestra might be more effective on mute. (Eva Rosenfeld) Violet Crown, PG, 74 min.

SOLO: A STAR WARS STORY

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+ EVEN WHEN IT AIN’T GREAT, STAR WARS IS STILL PRETTY FUN

- LOW STAKES; BORING HUMOR

Every time it seems young Han Solo is about to face some overwhelming and perilous situation in the newest Star Wars offshoot film, a little voice in the back of our head says, “Yeah, but we know it’s gonna be OK.” We know he’ll live, we know he’ll fight another day, we know that no matter what else happens, he’ll one day rescue a princess, fall in love, have a smarmy goth kid who goes full Sith and on and on. And there’s the rub, even if it’s from a film that famously lost its original directors and brought on Ron “Willow” Howard to reshoot a hefty number of scenes. In Solo: A Star Wars Story, we get the lowdown on what made Han Solo Han Solo, from

his early adventures and his surname to his lost love and iconic friendships with that Kashyyykian champion himself Chewbacca and the super-sexy Lando Calrissian. But a significant chunk of the story falls flat under our preconceived notions about the character, leaving audiences to force-chuckle at that irritating movie trope wherein someone says something like, “You should fight for something more than yourself!” We know, of course, that he will one day. Hail Caesar’s Alden Ehrenreich is more than capable as young Han, a rogue-ish type with a killer smile enamored by the idea of an outlaw lifestyle, but ultimately a survivor with a heart of gold. After a difficult upbringing in the slums of some planet, Han winds up fighting for the Empire in hopes of becoming a pilot, but Q’ira, the woman he left behind (Emilia Clarke of Game of Thrones), preys on him always. Han is thus wrapped up in the intergalactic game of smuggling and thievery to try and make a buck and get back to her. Under the wing of the criminal Beckett (Woody Harrelson, Cheers), Han learns and grows and evolves and blah blah blah. Donald Glover’s turn as Lando becomes the most exciting part of the film as Glover nails that Billy Dee Williams vocal affect and plants the seeds of self-preservation we know from The Empire Strikes Back. Harrelson shines as well as the unscrupulous space burglar with shifting allegiances and priorities. Clarke, meanwhile, feels a tad goofy and underused, a romantic interest whose backstory becomes “Don’t worry about it.” But Han’s doing-it-for-the-girl thing seems a fine enough motivation as any, even if a more complete idea of his guilt over not saving Q’ira is poorly explored; Chewie remains his most important relationship. And it’s middling low-stakes fun through the galaxy, though in comparison to 2016’s Rogue One—a story with characters we hadn’t forged feelings about a million years ago—the Star Wars world has felt much more fresh and intriguing. Everything here is tempered by what we already know and lacks a certain drama because of that. Oh, and enough with the sassy robots, Star Wars. It’s starting to feel stale. (Alex De Vore) Regal, Violet Crown, PG-13, 135 min.

DEADPOOL 2

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+ FUNNY AND ENTERTAINING - IT’S NOT REALLY A “REAL” MOVIE, NOW, IS IT?

No one is going to accuse Ryan Reynolds and crew of trying to make a “good” movie with Deadpool 2, but it’s definitely one of those fun summertime romps you always hear about. Reynolds is, of course, Deadpool, the merc with a mouth who regenerates like Wolverine, fights with the power of a million ninjas and kills … well, he kills pretty much anyone he can.


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When last we left him, Deadpool’s affairs seemed in order and he’d found his own place within the Fox-owned Marvel universe (we see you, Venom, we’re just not sure what the deal with you is yet), but his affinity for doing what he considers right at all costs has put him in a bit of a bind. No spoilers, but he’s trying to die. Throw in a handful of lesser-known (or cared-about) X-Men and X-Force characters (like Domino, Shatterstar, Colossus and Zeitgeist), a number of in-jokes for comics fans, a barely-there story about helping people (maybe) and Josh “Also Thanos” Brolin as the time-traveling supersoldier Cable, and you’ve got a recipe for madness—and sequels, even if it’s beyond irreverent and over-packed with one-line groaners and over-the-top violence. Reynolds does his Reynolds thing, breaking the fourth wall, using that voice of his and becoming the victim and perpetrator of some seriously gruesome carnage. Brolin, meanwhile, finds that happy middle ground between emotionless straight man and foil as his character travels back in time to prevent a horrible future tragedy. Regardless—and say what you will—the action in Deadpool 2 is bonkers-fun. The award for best new character goes to Atlanta’s Zazie Beetz as Domino, a mutant whose power is just that she’s pretty lucky. It sounds dumb, and Deadpool himself mocks her for it, but between her kickass fight scenes and Beetz’ laid-back, funny delivery, we’re definitely into it. Round out the rest with some ridiculous and only-sometimes-funny jokes from side characters—including TJ “I Make Bomb Threats” Miller—and you get a perfectly fine movie that certainly won’t give the Marvel Studios juggernaut a run for its money, but still delights in poking fun at it nonetheless. Director David Leitch (Atomic Blonde) deserves recognition for allowing the silliness to always throttle the story forward, just don’t take your kids—and make sure to hang around for the self-referential mid-credit scenes. Shit’s rich. (ADV) Jean Cocteau Cinema, Violet Crown, Regal, R, 119 min.

RBG

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+ FASCINATING AND IMPORTANT - SOME INTERVIEWS FEEL SUPERFLUOUS

Now in her mid-80s, Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg is enjoying a bit of late-in-life rockstar status. Much of this has to do with her shuffling more toward liberalism after George W Bush appointed two conservative justices during his presidential tenure (Ginsburg was decidedly more moderate in her rulings beforehand) and the subsequent numerous dissenting opinions she’s filed, such as against a 2014 ruling that found crafts mega-corp Hobby Lobby wouldn’t need to take women’s reproductive health into account within its employee health coverage. Regardless, she’s come to be known as a bit of a badass and an icon not just for feminism, but fighting for what’s morally right. American history fans are no doubt aware of Ginsburg’s track record dating back to the 1970s when, as a lawyer, she first argued before the Supreme Court and worked to turn the tide for women in this country. About time, then, that she’d become the focus of a documentary—and a damn fine one at that. In RBG, from documentarians Julie Cohen and Betsy West, we finally get the full picture. It’s a tale of breaking boundaries and emotional resonance wherein Ginsburg is proven to be not only a staunch ally to women, but to men, people of color and indeed the American underdog. Through interviews with friends, family, former clients and current colleagues, a sense of deep admiration from all sides of the aisle emerges proving that even those who might

MOVIES

YOUR HOMETOWN MOVIE THEATRE WEDNESDAY, JUNE 13TH 4:30 IN THE LAST

2:30 MARY SHELLEY

DAYS OF THE CITY

5:00 IN THE LAST DAYS OF THE CITY

7:00 THE DAY AFTER

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2:30 MARY SHELLEY 2:00 MARY SHELLEY 5:00 IN THE LAST DAYS OF THE CITY 7:30 MARY SHELLEY FRIDAY, JUNE 15TH

Damn, now that’s some RBG dedication. disagree with Ginsburg can’t help but be drawn to her grace and enamored with her style and accomplishments. We also see a broad overview of a number of cases she presided over and how she handled them. She is funny and composed, an avid arts and opera fan who seemingly never tires and takes seriously her charge to work for the American people. For Ginsburg, we learn (or re-learn) that the job is never about partisanship or special interests; it’s about helping to shape the country in a way that is mutually beneficial for all. She’s not naive, however, and plans to continue the fight, she says, “so long as she can go at it full-steam.” There are no signs of stopping, and it’s endlessly inspiring and amusing to observe her boom within pop culture. Be warned, however, that some of the content may drive one mad—from the shamelessly one-sided ideology of old white men and pervasive lack of equality in America, to the level to which Ginsburg has constantly had to rise in order to prove herself. Tirelessly. Again and again. Still, we’re glad to know she’s still out there crusading, and we can only hope RBG is shown to everyone—particularly young people—for a long time to come. (ADV) Violet Crown, PG, 98 min.

2:00 MARY SHELLEY 4:30 IN THE LAST DAYS OF THE CITY 7:00 THE DAY AFTER 9:00 SOLLERS POINT

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SATURDAY, JUNE 16TH 5:30 THE DAY AFTER 2:00 MARY SHELLEY 8:00 JULESWORKS WWW . JEANCOCTEAUCINEMA . COM

LOCATED AT 4 1 8 MONTEZUMA AVE SANTA FE NM 8 7 5 0 1

CONTACT US : ( 5 0 5 ) 4 6 6 -5 5 2 8

CCA CINEMATHEQUE 1050 Old Pecos Trail, 982-1338

JEAN COCTEAU CINEMA 418 Montezuma Ave., 466-5528

REGAL STADIUM 14 3474 Zafarano Drive, 844-462-7342 CODE 1765#

THE SCREEN SFUAD, 1600 St. Michael’s Drive, 473-6494

VIOLET CROWN 1606 Alcaldesa St., 216-5678

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JONESIN’ CROSSWORD

BE MY FUR-EVER FRIEND!

“Triple 8”—fittingly for the 888th Jonesin’ Crossword. by Matt Jones

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19 -y, pluralized 21 Bobby Flay’s milieu 24 Exclamation often misspelled with the second letter at the end 25 Be nomadic 26 ___ it up 29 Show starter 30 Water nymph, in mythology 31 Yew, for example 32 Mind 33 Philosopher’s suffix 34 Midpoint, for short 35 Group in the pit 36 Carmaker Ransom 37 Intuition 38 Alveolus, e.g. 41 Pays off 42 Undeserved reputation 43 “Hurry up!,” in Spanish 44 He brought the frankincense 46 Startled sound 48 Storyteller with morals 49 Italian lawn bowling 50 Make a present presentable? 51 “___! Cherry-O” (kids’ board game) 52 Corvette roof option 53 Took a load off 54 Shade 55 Robotic factory piece

www.FandFnm.org ADOPTION HOURS:

PETCO: 1-4 pm Thursday, Friday, Saturday & Sunday TECA TU at DeVargas Center: 12 noon-3 pm, First Saturday of each month Please visit our cats at PETCO and TECA TU during regular store hours. FOSTER HOMES URGENTLY NEEDED FOR ADULT CATS OF VARIOUS AGES SANTA FE CATS not only supports the mission of FELINES & FRIENDS from revenue generated by providing premium boarding for cats, pocket pets and birds, but also serves as a mini-shelter for cats awaiting adoption. For more information, please visit www.santafecats.com

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Cocktails for Critters ”

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MAKAYLA, MARIAH and MOUSE (2) were rescued by a kind person and transferred to Felines & Friends for placement. TEMPERAMENT: All 3 kittens are very sweet and playful. Each of these kittens should go to a home with a sibling or with another playful kitten, or to a person who is home during the day to play with a kitten. MAKAYLA and MARIAH are sweet, playful kittens who enjoy attention. MAKAYLA is a beautiful girl with a short coat and brown tabby markings with white mittens. AGE: born approx. 3/28/18.

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LUKAS and his siblings, LAUREL and LENEAL were found in a yard in Santa Fe and rescued by a kind person who transferred them to Felines & Friends. TEMPERAMENT: All the kittens are very sweet and social, and love playing with their siblings and enjoy attention from their foster family. They must go to a home with a sibling or with another playful kitten or with an adult person who is home all day to shower the kittens with attention. LUKAS is a handsome boy with a medium-length black & white coat and a stripe on his nose. AGE: born approx. 4/10/18.

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COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENTS EMPLOYMENT TEACH YOUR WAY AROUND THE WORLD. Get TESOL Certified & Teach English Anywhere. Earn an accredited TESOL Certificate and start teaching English in USA & abroad. Over 20,000 new jobs every month. Take this highly engaging & empowering course. Hundreds have graduated from our Santa Fe program. Next Course: July 9 - Aug 3. Contact John Kongsvik. 505-204-4361. info@tesoltrainers.com www.tesoltrainers.com

JOHREI CENTER OF SANTA FE. JOHREI IS BASED ON THE FOCUS AND FLOW OF THE UNIVERSAL LIFE ENERGY. When clouds in the spiritual body and in consciousness are dissolved, there is a return to true health. This is according to the Divine Law of Order; after spiritual clearing, physical and mental- emotional healing follow. You are invited to experience the Divine Healing Energy of Johrei. All are Welcome! The Johrei Center of Santa Fe is located at Calle IS FOOD A PROBLEM FOR YOU? Cinco Plaza, 1500 Fifth St., Do you eat when you’re not Suite 10, 87505. Please call hungry? Do you go on eating 820-0451 with any questions. binges or fasts without medical approval? Is your weight affecting Drop-ins welcome! Open Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, your life? Contact Overeaters 2-5pm. Friday 2-4pm. Saturday, Anonymous! We offer support, 10am-1pm. Closed Sunday and no strings attached! No dues, Monday. There is no fee for no fees, no weigh-ins, no diets. receiving Johrei. Donations We meet every day from 8-9 are gratefully accepted. Please am at The Friendship Club, check us out at our new web1316 Apache Avenue, Santa Fe. site santafejohreifellowship.com www.nnmoa.com

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HIRING NOW Rio Rancho Public Schools Work for one of the best school districts in New Mexico! We need: • Elementary, middle and high school teachers (high needs in math and science) • Special education teachers • Diagnosticians • Psychologists • Speech Language Pathologists • Occupational, physical ad recreational therapists • Behavior therapists • Educational assistants • Bus Drivers & Bus Attendants • Custodians • Maintenance workers Competitive salaries Excellent Benefits Apply online at rrps.net (look for the “Jobs” link).

Registered Behavior Technician: Are you energetic, caring & OF SFR READERS HAVE A COLLEGE compassionate? Do you enjoy working with children? Do you DEGREE? FIND THE PERFECT EMPLOYEE have experience working with individuals with special needs? HERE IN EMPLOYMENT SECTION! Behavior Change Institute is hiring in Santa Fe! Apply online CALL: 988.5541 TO PLACE YOUR AD! recruit-SFR.qxp_Layout 1 6/11/18 4:12 PM Page 1 www.behaviorchangeinstitute. com/careers/!”

Have you ever thought about teaching?” If you have a college degree, you could be teaching this August! If you would like to learn more, contact: Mike Chavez, Director, HR Operations Rio Rancho Public Schools (505)962-1222

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ADOPT ME, PLEASE! ESPAÑOLA HUMANE 108 Hamm Parkway Española, NM 87532

505-753-8662

evalleyshelter.org • petango.com/espanola Orion could be a new friend who spends some time with you. After a while you will be saying “what a cute little guy Orion is!” and “what a little white fuzzy ball of energy!” He is about 12 weeks old and was surrendered by his previous owners. Orion is great with people and other cats. We hope that description makes you want to come visit with Orio — he might be the perfect kitten to complete your household! He is eager to receive visitors! How about today?

Orion

Foxy is a one-of-a kind puppy with a medical condition called Maxillary Prognathia. Although this condition is serious, it’s not fatal and we’ve talked to a few Veterinarian dental specialists that have made some suggestions on how we can deal with any potential medical problems that come from this condition. She’ll have to have some teeth removed before she goes home and have special toys and food while she heals. She is about 12 weeks old and is an Australian Shepherd mix. For more information about Foxy give us a call or drop by and meet this special dog.

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We’re hiring! CHRISTUS St. Vincent is now hiring for the following positions: 3 Food & Nutrition Staff Per Diem: Prior restaurant or institutional experience desirable. 1 Food & Nutrition Production Tech 2 Full time: One to three years experience in a quantity (high volume) institution, hospital, restaurant, or in a military setting. 1 Food & Nutrition Production Tech 1 Per Diem: One year food experience required. Previous grill, pizza or deli experience desired. 1 Food & Nutrition Room Service Operator Full time: Computer experience desirable. Please apply at our career site at www.stvin.org/careers or contact our recruiters at (505) 913-5740.

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MIND BODY SPIRIT ACUPUNCTURE Rob Brezsny

Week of June 13th

ARIES (March 21-April 19): My Aries acquaintance Tatiana decided to eliminate sugar from her diet. She drew up a plan to avoid it completely for 30 days, hoping to permanently break its hold over her. I was surprised to learn that she began the project by making a Dessert Altar in her bedroom, where she placed a chocolate cake and five kinds of candy. She testified that it compelled her willpower to work even harder and become even stronger than if she had excluded all sweet treats from her sight. Do you think this strenuous trick might work for you as you battle your own personal equivalent of a sugar addiction? If not, devise an equally potent strategy. You’re on the verge of forever escaping a temptation that’s no good for you. Or you’re close to vanquishing an influence that has undermined you. Or both.

you finagle? (P.S. Philosopher Alfred North Whitehead attributed the primary drive for innovative ideas and gizmos to “pleasurable intellectual curiosity.”)

TAURUS (April 20-May 20): You have caressed and finessed The Problem. You have tickled and teased and tinkered with it. Now I suggest you let it alone for a while. Give it breathing room. Allow it to evolve under the influence of the tweaks you have instigated. Although you may need to return and do further work in a few weeks, my guess is that The Problem’s knots are now destined to metamorphose into seeds. The awkwardness you massaged with your love and care will eventually yield a useful magic. GEMINI (May 21-June 20): “Whether you love what you love or live in divided ceaseless revolt against it, what you love is your fate.” Gemini poet Frank Bidart wrote that in his poem “Guilty of Dust,” and now I offer it to you. Why? Because it’s an excellent time to be honest with yourself as you identify whom and what you love. It’s also a favorable phase to assess whether you are in any sense at odds with whom and what you love; and if you find you are, to figure out how to be in more harmonic alignment with whom and what you love. Finally, dear Gemini, now is a key moment to vividly register the fact that the story of your life in the coming years will pivot around your relationship with whom and what you love.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Would you have turned out wiser and wealthier if you had dropped out of school in third grade? Would it have been better to apprentice yourself to a family of wolves or coyotes rather than trusting your educational fate to institutions whose job it was to acclimate you to society’s madness? I’m happy to let you know that you’re entering a phase when you’ll find it easier than usual to unlearn any old conditioning that might be suppressing your ability to fulfill your rich potentials. I urge you to seek out opportunities to unleash your skills and enhance your intelligence.

DR. JOANNA CORTI, DOM, Powerful Medicine, Powerful Results. Homeopathy, Acupuncture. Micro-current (Acupuncture without needles.) Parasite, Liver/cleanses. Nitric Oxide. Pain Relief. SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): The temptation to overTransmedium Energy Healing. dramatize is strong. Going through with a splashy but messy conclusion may have a perverse appeal. But why Worker’s Compensation and Auto Accidents Insurance not wrap things up with an elegant whisper instead of a garish bang? Rather than impressing everyone with accepted 505-501-0439 how amazingly complicated your crazy life is, why not quietly lay the foundations for a low-key resolution that will set the stage for a productive sequel? Taking the latter route will be much easier on your karma, and in my opinion will make for just as interesting a story.

CONSCIOUSNESS

PSYCHICS

FREE YOUR AUTHENTIC JOYFUL SELF Experience the healing power of Self-Awareness and Self-Love. Aleah Ames, CCHt. 505-660-3600 Joyful-Awakenings.com

LOVE. CAREER. HEALTH. Psychic readings and Spiritual counseling. For more information call 505-982-8327 or go to www.alexofavalon.com. Also serving the LGBT community.

REFLEXOLOGY

ASTROLOGY

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Each of us harbors rough, vulnerable, controversial, or unhoned facets of our identity. And every one of us periodically reaches turning points when it becomes problematic to keep those qualities buried or immature. We need to make them more visible and develop their potential. I suspect you have arrived at such a turning point. So on behalf of the cosmos, I hereby invite you to enjoy a period of ripening and self-revelation. And I do mean “enjoy.” Find a way to have fun.

THE FUNDAMENTAL PURPOSE OF EXISTENCE Enjoy a video of Adi Da responding to His devotees’ questions. Saturday, June 16th, UNIQUE TO YOU 2:30-4:00 FREE CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): For the next two-plus Our health is reflected through Santa Fe Public Library, weeks, an unusual rule will be in effect: The more you lose, the feet as an array of pat145 Washington Ave. the more you gain. That means you will have an aptitude terned and flexible aspects for eliminating hassles, banishing stress, and shedding ASTROLOGY SANTA FE also conveyed in the body defense mechanisms. You’ll be able to purge emotional MARATHON CONTINUES and overall being. Discomfort CANCER (June 21-July 22): Congratulations on the congestion that has been preventing clarity. You’ll have is a call for reorganization. 15 minute power reading to ana- MASSAGE work you’ve done to cleanse the psychic toxins from good intuitions about how to separate yourself from influ- lyze your Doshas for betterment Reflexology can stimulate your THERAPY your soul, Cancerian. I love how brave you’ve been as ences that have made you weak or angry. I’m excited for nervous system to relax and you’ve jettisoned outworn shticks, inadequate theories, you, Capricorn! A load of old, moldy karma could dissolve of Body, Mind & Spirit. $20 make the needed changes so Every Monday 10 am until 4pm and irrelevant worries. It makes my heart sing to have and disperse in what seems like a twinkling. If all goes you can feel better. 103 Saint Francis Dr, Unit A, seen you summon the self-respect necessary to stick well, you’ll be traveling much lighter by July 1. GO INWARD.. FEEL BETTER! Santa Fe, NM 87501 up for your dreams in the face of so many confusing SFReflexology.com AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): I suggest you avoid start- Please call Bina Thompkins for signals. I do feel a tinge of sadness that your heroism (505/414-8140) hasn’t been better appreciated by those around you. Is ing a flirtatious correspondence with a convict who’ll be appointments - 505 819 7220 Julie Glassmoyer, CR there anything you can do to compensate? Like maybe in jail for another 28 years. OK? And don’t snack on fugu, the Japanese delicacy that can poison you if the cook isn’t careful about preparing it. Please? And don’t LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): I hope you’re reaching the final participate in a séance where the medium summons the stages of your year-long project to make yourself as solid spirits of psychotic ancestors or diabolical celebrities and steady as possible. I trust you have been building a with whom you imagine it might be interesting to constable foundation that will serve you well for at least the verse. Got that? I understand you might be in the mood next five years. I pray you have been creating a rich sense for high adventure and out-of-the-ordinary escapades. And that will be fine and healthy as long as you also of community and establishing vital new traditions and surrounding yourself with environments that bring out the exert a modicum of caution and discernment. best in you. If there’s any more work to be done in these PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): I suggest that you pat yoursacred tasks, intensify your efforts in the coming weeks. If self on the back with both hands as you sing your own you’re behind schedule, please make up for lost time. praises and admire your own willful beauty in three mirintensify the appreciation you give yourself?

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): “Necessity is the mother of invention,” says an old proverb. In other words, when your need for some correction or improvement becomes overwhelming, you may be driven to get creative. Engineer Allen Dale put a different spin on the issue. He said that “if necessity is the mother of invention, then laziness is the father.” Sci-fi writer Robert Heinlein agreed, asserting that “progress is made by lazy men looking for easier ways to do things.” I’m not sure if necessity or laziness will be your motivation, Virgo, but I suspect that the coming weeks could be a golden age of invention for you. What practical innovations might you launch? What useful improvements can

rors simultaneously. You have won stirring victories over not just your own personal version of the devil, but also over your own inertia and sadness. From what I can determine, you have corralled what remains of the forces of darkness into a comfy holding cell, sealing off those forces from your future. They won’t bother you for a very long time, maybe never again. Right now you would benefit from a sabbatical—a vacation from all this high-powered character-building. May I suggest you pay a restorative visit to the Land of Sweet Nonsense? Homework: Many of us try to motivate ourselves through abusive self-criticism. Do you? If so, maybe it’s time to change. Testify at Freewillastrology.com.

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s Expanded Weekly Audio Horoscopes and Daily Text Message Horoscopes. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone © CO P Y R I G H T 2 0 1 8 R O B B R E Z S N Y at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700. 38

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LEGAL NOTICE TO CREDITORS/NAME CHANGE

Danae Towne 26117 McBean Pkwy #11 Valencia, CA 91355 (661) 993-5572

STATE OF NEW MEXICO IN THE PROBATE COURT SANTA FE COUNTY No. 2018-0083 IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF Kenneth Lee Towne, DECEASED. NOTICE TO CREDITORS NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed personal representative of this estate. All persons having claims against this estate are required to present their claims within four (4) months after the date of the first publication of this notice, or the claims will be forever barred. Claims must be presented either to the undersigned personal representative at the address listed below, or filed with the Probate Court of Santa Fe, County, New Mexico, located at the following address: 102 Grant Ave., p.o. box 1985, Santa Fe, NM 87504. Dated: May 24, 2018

STATE OF NEW MEXICO COUNTY OF RIO ARRIBA FIRST JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT IN THE MATTER OF A PETITION FOR CHANGE OF NAME OF Maria Christina Isabel Marquez Case No.: D-111-CV-2018-00112 NOTICE OF CHANGE OF NAME TAKE NOTICE that in accordance with the provisions of Sec. 40-8-1 through Sec. 40-8-3 NMSA 1978, et seq. the Petitioner Maria Christina Isabel Marquez will apply to the Honorable Jason Lidyard, District Judge of the First Judicial District at the Rio Arriba Courthouse, 7 Main St., Tierra Amarilla, New Mexico, at 8:00 a.m. on the 11th day of July, 2018 for an ORDER FOR CHANGE OF NAME from Maria Christina Isabel Marquez to Christina Maria Marquez STEPHEN T. PACHECO, District Court Clerk

By: Jennifer Romero Deputy Court Clerk Submitted by: Maria Christina Isabel Marquez Petitioner, Pro Se STATE OF NEW MEXICO IN THE PROBATE COURT SANTA FE COUNTY IN THE MATTER OF THE ESTATE OF WILLIAM PETER GEORGENES, DECEASED. Case No.: 2018-0072 NOTICE TO CREDITORS BY PUBLICATION NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the undersigned has been appointed personal representative of this estate. All persons having claims agains this estate are required to present their claims within four months after the date of the first publication of this Notice or the claims will be forever barred. Claims must be presented to the undersigned care of Gini Nelson, Esq., Gini Nelson Law Office, PMB 303, 1704 Llano St., Ste B, Santa Fe, NM 87505-5444, or filed with the Probate Court of Santa Fe

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County, located at the following address: 102 Grant Ave., Santa Fe, NM 87504. DATED: June 7, 2018 HELEN VERONICA MACLEOD Personal Representative c/o Gini Nelson, Esq. Gini Nelson Law Office PMB 303, 1704 Llano St., Ste. B Santa Fe, NM 87505-5444

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FENCES & GATES Meet Loras! We think he looks a lot like a Bull Terrier mix: what is your guess? He is a handsome pooch who is a little over a year old and weighs about 38 pounds. An ideal day for Loras would include long walks and other adventures with his favorite person — and of course, lots of treats! Loras has been great with the shelter staff and is learning how to play with other dogs. As always, if you have another dog at home you’re more than welcome to bring them in for a Meet n’ Greet with this gentleman.

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Meet Arthur! He is a handsome German Shepherd mix about 2 years old and weighs 67 pounds. He found his way to the shelter as a stray and he is now ready to settle down in a home of his own! He has been really shy but Arthur has been a part of our behavior training and has come a long way. An ideal day for Arthur would include long walks with his favorite person to show him around town, and lots of treats! If you have another dog at home you’re more than welcome to bring them in for a Meet n’ Greet with this gentleman.

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CUSTOM QUEEN BED BY ERNEST THOMPSON CARVED HEAD-FOOT BOARDS & SIDERAILS SOLID ALDERWOOD IN EXCELLENT CONDITION CERTIFICATE OF AUTHENTICITY APPOINTMENT ONLY SERIOUS INQUIRIES ONLY - $4000

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RECORDS 4 SALE Fridays & Sundays Old Las Vegas Hwy & Old Pecos Trail (505) 587-9686

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I help Leaders, Business Owners, Entrepreneurs and Individuals manifest their vision and become happy, fulfilled and free! Donna Karaba, MA, Naropa University Professional Coaching and June 16, 1-3 p.m. County Consulting since 2003 Fairgrounds Compost Area, 3229 Rodeo Rd, Santa Fe, NM 87507 505-954-1011 Participate in a hands-on compost demonstration and learn how to start a new compost pile and to maintain it as it develops. Worm and straw bale compostVintage bikes, call or email: ing basics will be covered. Brant@bmgart.com 505-670-2447 Destin / 505-450-9300 richter@kewa.com

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June 13, 2018 Santa Fe Reporter  

June 13, 2018 Santa Fe Reporter: The Legend of Fenn's Gold

June 13, 2018 Santa Fe Reporter  

June 13, 2018 Santa Fe Reporter: The Legend of Fenn's Gold

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