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NOVEMBER 21-27, 2018

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SFREPORTER.COM


MARCH 20-26, 2019 | Volume 46, Issue 12

NEWS OPINION 5 NEWS Catherine Sandoval | Universal Banker I feel that in our small communities, it’s

7 DAYS, CLAYTOONZ AND THIS MODERN WORLD 6

important to know and support each other. I’m happy to help!

SESSION ROUNDUP: CANNABIS EDITION 7 Legal weed is dead, but it ain’t all bad news for the green dream BANKING ON THE PUBLIC 9 What would a public bank look like in New Mexico?

29 WORKING FOR PEANUTS

WILD HORSES OF PLACITAS 11 Magestic mascots or troublesome tramps? COVER STORY 12 SPRING POETRY SEARCH April is National Poetry Month, so gear up with our town’s finest poets (this year, at least)

OK, so there isn’t a real chimpanzee onstage, but the Santa Fe Playhouse’s production of Trevor is still worth it thanks to standout performances and a killer script.

THE INTERFACE 17 BACK TO THE FUTURE Artist holds hope, certainty and trepidation simultaneously, with regards to climate change

Cover Illustration by Anson Stevens-Bollen artdirector@sfreporter.com

MyCenturyBank.com 505.995.1200

CULTURE SFR PICKS 19 Murals and soul, fashion and thrones

EDITOR AND PUBLISHER JULIE ANN GRIMM

THE CALENDAR 20

ASSOCIATE PUBLISHER AND AD DIRECTOR ANNA MAGGIORE

MUSIC 23

ART DIRECTOR ANSON STEVENS-BOLLEN

SILENT NO MORE New Mexico Gay Men’s Chorus on Harvey Milk 3 QUESTIONS 25 WITH KBAC’S CHRIS DIESTLER

STAFF WRITERS LEAH CANTOR WILL COSTELLO COPY EDITOR AND CALENDAR EDITOR CHARLOTTE JUSINSKI

A&C 27 CURATORIAL KEEP Contemporary owner on the present and his own work ACTING OUT 29 WORKING FOR PEANUTS Monkeying around at the Santa Fe Playhouse FOOD 31

CONTRIBUTING EDITOR JEFF PROCTOR CONTRIBUTING WRITERS MATTHEW K GUTIERREZ LUKE HENLEY JULIA GOLDBERG ZIBBY WILDER DIGITAL SERVICES MANAGER BRIANNA KIRKLAND PRINT PRODUCTION MANAGER AND GRAPHIC DESIGNER SUZANNE S KLAPMEIER SENIOR ACCOUNTS ADVERTISING EXECUTIVE JAYDE SWARTS

USE IT OR LOSE IT Communicate, restaurants!

ADVERTISING EXECUTIVE MARCUS DIFILIPPO

MOVIES 33 TO DUST REVIEW Plus the rise and fall of Theranos in HBO’s new doc The Inventor: Out for Blood in Silicon Valley

www.SFReporter.com

CULTURE EDITOR ALEX DE VORE

Phone: (505) 988-5541 Office: 132 E MARCY ST.

CIRCULATION MANAGER ANDY BRAMBLE PRINTER THE NEW MEXICAN

EDITORIAL DEPT.: editor@sfreporter.com

CULTURE EVENTS: calendar@sfreporter.com DISPLAY ADVERTISING: advertising@sfreporter.com CLASSIFIEDS: classy@sfreporter.com

THOUGH THE SANTA FE REPORTER IS FREE, PLEASE TAKE JUST ONE COPY. ANYONE REMOVING PAPERS IN BULK FROM OUR DISTRIBUTION POINTS WILL BE PROSECUTED TO THE FULL EXTENT OF THE LAW. SANTA FE REPORTER, ISSN #0744-477X, IS PUBLISHED EVERY WEDNESDAY, 52 WEEKS EACH YEAR. DIGITAL EDITIONS ARE FREE AT SFREPORTER.COM. CONTENTS © 2019 SANTA FE REPORTER ALL RIGHTS RESERVED. MATERIAL MAY NOT BE REPRODUCED WITHOUT WRITTEN PERMISSION.

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S A N TA F E I N S T I T U T E COM MUN IT Y L EC T U R E S  4

MARCH 13-19, 2019

Srividya Iyer-Biswas

LAWS OF LIFE, TIME, & CHANCE Tuesday, March  | : p.m. The Lensic Performing Arts Center  W. San Francisco Street Using rapid, iterative feedback between theory and experiments, Srividya Iyer-Biswas works to discover the basic physical laws that govern the behavior of single cells. A physicist at Purdue University and External Professor at the Santa Fe Institute, Iyer-Biswas and her team have reported scaling laws governing the growth and division of cells, and have developed a theory that reveals the emergence of a scalable, cellular unit of time. Her current work involves extending these results to thermodynamics of organismal computation, time-dependent phenomena involving cellular decision-making, and laws that dictate complex biological and social phenomena.

Lectures are free and open to the public. Seating is limited. Reserve your tickets at www.santafe.edu/community

SFI’s  Community Lecture Series is supported by The Lensic Performing Arts Center and The Santa Fe Reporter. Photo: © Balint Alovits, “Time Machine no., , Budapest.” www.balintalovits.com •

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ANSON STEVENS-BOLLEN

LETTERS

Shake off the Winter Blues Mail letters to PO Box 2306, Santa Fe, NM 87504, deliver to 132 E Marcy St., or email them to editor@sfreporter.com. Letters (no more than 200 words) should refer to specific articles in the Reporter. Letters will be edited for space and clarity.

WEB EXTRA, MARCH 11: “RECREATIONAL WEED APPEARS DOA”

THERE THERE Don’t fret, in this case failure is a good thing. HB 356 is a deeply flawed bill—and just the latest example of the clown show called the New Mexico Legislature. There is no need to reinvent the wheel. Other states have done this, some have done it very well and are prospering, and others have crafted bad laws and are not successful.

Government-run shops, weird age requirements, one ounce only. It was pretty obvious it was gonna go down. They wanted people to save receipts, who in New Mexico is gonna do that?

TAMMI FIELDS VIA FACEBOOK

WEB EXTRA, MARCH 12: “SFR SUES FOR ACCESS”

WELL DESERVED Santa Fe taxpayers deserve to know the history of public servants, especially those who carry deadly weapons! The [police department’s] refusal to disclose background on officers makes the public wonder what they are hiding and creates distrust in SFPD officers. Keep pushing SF Reporter!

JOHN CARR VIA FACEBOOK

TOMAS MAS VIA FACEBOOK

THEM’S FIGHTIN‘ WORDS

SHINE A LIGHT

The first time we legalized it in Washington, via a popular ballot measure, our fucking shit-for-brains governor vetoed the bill. Next election we legalized it again. Now we have more taxes, less crime, and the shit-for-brains governor is gone.

Lack of transparency always implies something to hide. Good job SFR and free press!

JONATHAN TAYLOR POWELL VIA FACEBOOK

SCOTT MOORE VIA FACEBOOK

WHAT DID THEY EXPECT Well they did add a bunch of things to it, to make sure it would not be successful.

SFR will correct factual errors online and in print. Please let us know if we make a mistake: editor@sfreporter.com or 988-7530.

with a

5.90%APR*

Balance Transfer for Life!

SANTA FE EAVESDROPPER Tourist Man: “This place is like the Spanish New Orleans.” Tourist Woman: “It really is just like that.” —Overheard at 10:30 pm on San Francisco Street

dncu.org *Annual Percentage Rate. For qualified borrowers, some restrictions apply. Promotion for external consolidations only. Transactions that will qualify must be requested between Jan. 14, 2019 – March 31, 2019. Any balance transferred after March 31, 2019 will be charged at the regular rate of 9.90%APR.

Send your Overheard in Santa Fe tidbits to: eavesdropper@sfreporter.com WinterShake-BalTrans-4.75x11.5.indd 1

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1/8/192019 9:45 AM5 MARCH 20-26,


DAYS

U N YO ! W S O KID W D SLO KING C U F

UNMANNED SPEED TRAP POLICE VEHICLES MIGHT RETURN TO SANTA FE Next is pre-cogs, followed by people being arrested because who knows what they might do at some point.

SANTA FE HIGH AND SANTA FE INDIAN SCHOOL BOYS LOSE AT BASKETBALL FINALS But both Pecos teams killed it, and it was the third time for the boys to win the state championship. Way to be, P-Town!

POPPIES, TOURISTS TAKING OVER CALIFORNIA But you still only have, like, 11 Instagram followers, Karen.

NEW ZEALAND BANS ASSAULT RIFLES MERE DAYS AFTER CHRISTCHURCH ATTACK Oh. So it’s not hard to do—our system just sucks.

MAYOR, MEDIA EVALUATE HIS FIRST YEAR IN OFFICE Never fear! There is still ample time for public input about potholes and prairie dogs.

THE 60-DAY LEGISLATIVE SESSION IS OVER Just in time for the city to get flooded with spring break visitors.

MEOW WOLF DOES TWITTER BATTLE WITH ARTS SITE HYPERALLERGIC OVER CRITICAL THINK PIECE And it was exactly the kind of metered, rational response we want from one of our city’s largest employers and public faces.

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S FR E P O RTE R .CO M / FUN


S FREP ORT ER.COM / NE WS

NEWS

Session Roundup: Cannabis Edition The legislative session is over, but where do New Mexico’s marijuana laws stand? BY W I L L CO ST E L LO w i l l @ s f r e p o r t e r. c o m

C

annabis had a mixed record of success in 2019’s 60-day Legislative session. Recreational marijuana failed to make it to the governor’s desk, but two smaller bills, one expanding the hemp industry and the other easing restrictions on medical marijuana patients, both passed both houses of the Legislature. A bill that softens penalties on drug busts also passed and is heading to the governor. She has until April 5 to sign or veto any of the measures. Recreational Bill Failed SFR wrote early last week that recreational marijuana was not likely to pass the Senate—and sure enough, it didn’t. After the bill passed the House of Representatives, some advocates thought it might have some legs, but Sen. John Arthur Smith (D-Deming), who chairs the Senate Finance Committee, said that it would be “a long shot” if the bill got a hearing. Still, it’s the furthest a legalization bill has gotten so far in New Mexico. Some advocates didn’t like the bill anyway, for reasons including a ban on home-grown plants and a requirement to carry a receipt of marijuana purchases, and would rather start fresh. They’ll get their chance next year, as Gov. Michelle Lujan Grisham signaled at the end of the session that it would be on her agenda during the next one in 2020. “We’re going to make that a priority and we’re going to work during the interim with all parties involved to see if we can’t get to a place that everyone feels good about,” she said at a post-session meeting with reporters. Medical Marijuana, Less Drama Recreational cannabis may have suffered a setback, but the state’s more than 70,000 medical card holders will be happy to hear that, after the passage of SB 406, they don’t have to continue to

renew their license every year. The bill, which the governor is expected to sign, now only requires patients to renew their cards every three years. However, they will still need to see a doctor every year in order to keep their cards. Industrial Hemp Industrial hemp was legalized in New Mexico last year, but the Hemp Manufacturing Act, also on Gov. Lujan Grisham’s desk, would expand what can be done with the plant and allow the research and manufacture of hemp-based products. Hemp looks similar to marijuana and is in the same family, but you can’t get high from it. The plant contains less than 0.3 percent THC, the psychoactive ingredient in its sister. Instead, hemp, which has been referred to as a billion-dollar cash crop, is used for its fibers, oils and seeds to make textiles, food and cosmetics, among other uses. The bill “provides regulatory authority to a couple of state agencies to oversee hemp manufacturers,” says Brad Lewis, division director for agricultural and environmental services at the New Mexico Department of Agriculture, who spoke with SFR on Monday. “Last year’s bill was for growers,” he says in reference to the legalization of hemp farming. “The bill this year addresses the ancillary businesses, the manufacturers.” Just Chill Out, Man… Penalties for being caught with marijuana would be reduced statewide, which isn’t as great as, say, not having penalties at all. But it’s not nothing. If these changes to the criminal code come out on the other side of Gov. Lujan Grisham’s pen, anything less than half an ounce will only get you a penalty assessment and a $50 fine, but between half an ounce and an ounce could get you up to 15 days in jail. Anything between one and eight ounces has a fine that caps out at $1,000 and jail time not to exceed a year. Carrying more than that takes users to felony territory, though, and there aren’t any changes to those stiff laws. Point is, it still sucks that people are going to jail for possessing marijuana, but it might suck a little less now. Sign up for SFR’s monthly Leaf Brief newsletter at SFReporter.com/signup.

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Family-friendly healthcare across the life span Accepting all insurance plans. Sliding-fee discount program available.

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MARCH 20-26, 2019

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SA N TA F E , N E W M E X I CO M E D I C A L ▪ D E N TA L ▪ B E H AV I O R A L H E A LT H

S T T

OUR CHALLENGERS

ATURDAY, MARCH 23, 2019

D &P

Doors open at the Eldorado Hotel & Spa at 6:00 pm 309 West San Francisco Street · Santa Fe, NM 87501

rift

HE EVENT INCLUDES

orter

OUR SPONSORS

an evening of divine chocolate delights with champagne, hors d’oeuvres, music and a silent auction benefiting the patient programs and services of La Familia Medical Center.

ICKETS: $90 PER PERSON

Purchase tickets online at www.lafamiliasf.org or contact Gloria Martinez (gmmartinez@lfmctr.org)

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MARCH 20-26, 2019

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David & Lisa Barker Barker Realty | Christie’s

Stephanie Duran

Barker Realty

Lazar Properties, LLC

Omega Financial Group


WILL COSTELLO

S FR E P O RTE R .CO M / N E WS

Public banks aren’t competition for local credit unions—rather, backers say, they support them.

Banking on the Public Advocacy groups wants to let the people decide what happens with their money through public banks

BY W I L L CO ST E L LO w i l l @ s f r e p o r t e r. c o m

I

n late 2016, Wells Fargo, the consumer lending behemoth of Wall Street, attracted the eyes of the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau, the powerful government watchdog and brainchild of 2020 presidential candidate Elizabeth Warren, for allegedly opening accounts for millions of their customers without their knowledge or permission. Wells charged fees on these accounts, and made a lot of money doing so. Numerous inquiries and Congressional hearings revealed that the accounts were opened as a result of intense downward pressure on salespeople to push outlandishly high and sometimes mathematically impossible sales quotas. The bank has thrown its money behind private prisons, the NRA and the Dakota Access Pipeline, and has been charged heavy fees for insider trading and discriminatory lending (they charged black and brown people more for loans)—not to mention its CEO makes 473 times as much as its average employee, the 33rd-highest pay discrepancy among Fortune 500 companies.

Today, most of the City of Santa Fe’s money is in Wells Fargo’s vaults. A public bank would change that. Mostly a fringe idea advocated by an eclectic array of lefty finance geeks, public banking has been catching steam across the United States in recent years, including in New Mexico. The idea is pretty simple. Rather than parking public funds with a major bank, where they’re invested in all sorts of shady dealings across the world, a state or city would establish an institution to hold that money and loan it to locals for economic development, to governments for projects like affordable housing, or credit unions and community banks to help average people borrow for stuff like cars and homes—all with lower interest rates than big banks would ever offer. All of this would be managed by a board of directors that would likely be appointed by elected officials, such as the governor or the Legislature. This structure, according to David Jette, a co-founder of Public Bank LA, an advocacy group that pushed for a public bank in Los Angeles, “gives residents more control over how their tax dollars are spent.” “Basically, you multiply economic gains while divesting,” Jette says. Divesting means stopping investment in things which, in this instance, the general public decides aren’t so good, like an oil pipeline through Native territory. That’s how Public Bank LA got started; its founders wanted to push their elected officials to stop storing their tax money with banks that were using it to fund projects that threatened water resources, worsened climate change and harmed Native tribes. Eventually, they decided that the best way to do so was a public bank. SFR spoke to several members of the board of directors of the Alliance for Local Economic Prosperity, a group that sprang out of a Santa Fe-based push for a public bank, and asked them all what their eleva-

tor pitch for a public bank would be. They all gave roughly the same answer: “We want to keep New Mexico’s tax dollars local, safe and working.” They also pointed to an unassuming and perhaps unexpected case study: North Dakota. The nation’s first public bank was established there in the early 1900s, and so far, the only place to follow suit has been American Samoa, which established a public bank last year. The Samoan bank doesn’t have much of a track record yet, but the Bank of North Dakota has produced some pretty phenomenal results in its 100 years of existence. When it was founded, the

Basically, you multiply economic gains while divesting. -David Jette, co-founder, Public Bank LA

bank had $2 million ($36 million in 2019 dollars). It now manages over $7 billion, all available to be loaned to North Dakota cities, towns and businesses at interest rates unheard of on Wall Street. If that isn’t enough, North Dakota also has the lowest unemployment rate in the country. North Dakota’s annual budget over the past 10 years is also more than $300 million fatter because of the bank’s returns. So how likely is a potential Public Bank of New Mexico? It’s getting more

NEWS

realistic every year. The City of Santa Fe commissioned a feasibility study in 2016 and a task force a year later to investigate the possibility of a public bank in Santa Fe. Their conclusion: Santa Fe is too small, and the costs of establishing such an institution are too great to justify a public bank in town. But. They did recommend that the city engage wholeheartedly in any effort to establish a statewide public bank that would serve all of New Mexico. To that end, a memorial bill—albeit one that did not survive—landed in the New Mexico House of Representatives this session “requesting the Legislative Finance Committee to undertake a feasibility study of establishing a state-owned bank in New Mexico.” In pushing for barely known ideas like this one, every step counts. Public Bank LA managed to get a referendum on the 2018 ballot, Measure B, which would establish a public bank for the city. The vote didn’t pass, but the people who worked for it say that it’s a major victory. “We earned 44 percent of the vote,” Jette says of the LA effort. “Obviously that’s hundreds of thousands of votes.” That they could get that many people on board is an encouraging sign for Jette. He added that the biggest problem facing advocates is not resistance to the idea, but simply a lack of knowledge about what a public bank even does. “I don’t think people understand what role banks play in their lives,” Jette says, so helping them take that power back matters. Lovers of their local community bank or credit union need not fear though. Advocates of public banks don’t anticipate that any upstart public banks would offer personal accounts for average consumers, which could drive smaller financial institutions out of business. Rather, a public bank would partner with local banks and credit unions and throw its money behind loans on which credit unions and smaller banks had already done the legwork, potentially providing a lot more money to those institutions to make small business loans, draw up mortgages or issue student loans. Customers would still benefit from the lower interest rates that a public bank could offer. “We very much want to support credit unions and local banks,” says Elaine Sullivan, the board president of the Alliance for Local Economic Prosperity. “There are three and a half times more thriving community banks in North Dakota than the rest of the states. That comes with a level of transparency that global banks don’t have.”

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2018–2019 READINGS & CONVERSATIONS

READINGS & CONVERSATIONS

Lannan presents Readings & Conversations, featuring inspired literary writers of fiction, nonfiction, and poetry, as well as cultural freedom advocates with a social, political, and environmental justice focus.

EDWIDGE DANTICAT with

AJA MONET

WEDNESDAY 27 MARCH 2019 LENSIC PERFORMING ARTS CENTER

RUTH WILSON GILMORE with

RACHEL KUSHNER

WEDNESDAY 17 APRIL 2019 LENSIC PERFORMING ARTS CENTER

Edwidge Danticat is the author of several books, including Krik? Krak!,

Ruth Wilson Gilmore is director of the Center for Place, Culture, and

a collection of short stories that encompass both the cruelties and the high ideals of Haitian life. Danitcat’s 2004 novel The Dew Breaker spins a series of related stories around a shadowy central figure, a Haitian immigrant to

Politics and a professor of geography at the City University of New York. She is most famous for arguing that the movement for abolition, with its proud history of challenging slavery, should be applied today to the abolition of

the United States who reveals to his artist daughter that he is not, as she believes, a prison escapee but a former prison guard and skilled torturer. Danticat was born in Haiti and moved to the United States when she was 12. She currently lives in Miami with her family. She received a MacArthur

prisons. In an era when 2.3 million people are behind bars in the United States, she challenges us to think about whether it is ever necessary or productive to lock people in cages.

Fellowship in 2009. Danticat edited The Beacon Best of 2000: Great Writing by Men and Women of All Colors and Cultures, Haiti Noir (2010), Haiti Noir 2 (2014), and Best American Essays 2011. Her memoir Brother, I’m Dying was a 2007 finalist for the National Book Award and a 2008 winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award for Autobiography. Of her book The Art of Death: Writing the Final Story (2017), the New York Times said, “This book is a kind of prayer for her mother−an act of mourning and remembrance, a purposeful act of grieving.” Her book Everything Inside: Stories will be published later this year.

Aja Monet is a poet, committed activist, and musician and was a featured speaker at the Women’s March on Washington, where she read the title poem of her latest book, My Mother Was a Freedom Fighter (2017). Monet’s other books include Inner-City Chants and Cyborg Cyphers (2015) and The Black Unicorn Sings (2010).

Gilmore wrote Golden Gulag: Prisons, Surplus, Crisis, and Opposition in Globalizing California (2007) and contributed to The Revolution Will Not Be Funded: Beyond the Non-Profit Industrial Complex (2007). The American Sociological Society honored Gilmore with its Angela Davis Award for Public Scholarship in 2012. A tireless activist, she has cofounded many social justice organizations, including the California Prison Moratorium Project, Critical Resistance, and the Central California Environmental Justice Network.

Rachel Kushner’s recent book The Mars Room is the story of Romy Hall, serving two consecutive life sentences at Stanville Women’s Correctional Facility in central California. Her first novel, Telex from Cuba, is set in Oriente, Cuba, in the years leading up to Castro’s revolution. Her second novel, The Flamethrowers, is set mostly in the mid-1970s and follows the life of Reno, a young artist.

TICKETS ON SALE NOW

All events take place at 7pm at the Lensic Performing Arts Center ticketssantafe.org or call 505.988.1234 $8 general; $5 students and seniors with ID Ticket prices include a $3 Lensic Preservation Fund fee. Video and audio recordings of Lannan events are available at:

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FEBRUARY 6-12, 2019

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lannan.org


NEWS

LEAH CANTOR

S FR E P O RTE R .CO M / N E WS

Wild Horses of Placitas Sanctuary seeks to rehome wild horses was to maintain them as such. Because the animals have become increasingly reliant on humans, the sanctuary is looking for new homes. Mustang Camp, a wild horse training facility in Milan, in the western part of the state, has agreed to “gentle” 50 of the horses for private adoption. Placitas WILD is still looking for parties interested in the remaining 25. The relocation has renewed conversations among residents of Placitas about how to manage the horses still roaming free among the hills. Many residents defend the horses as integral to the identity of the town and the surrounding area, yet some conservationists regard them as a threat to the delicate desert ecosystem that has been hit hard by drought, overgrazing and erosion. Some land owners resent the destruction that the horses can cause in yards and gardens, and say that they pose a risk to the safety of drivers. The BLM classifies the horses as “feral” or “free-roaming” rather than wild, which gives the New Mexico Livestock Board license to conduct round-ups when

BY L E A H CA N TO R l e a h @ s f r e p o r t e r. c o m

LEAH CANTOR

F

ree-ranging horses have long been a feature of the landscape around the historic town of Placitas, northeast of Albuquerque. The magnificent sight of a band of dappled palominos or chestnut browns grazing and galloping along the hills at the base of the Sandia Mountains feels iconic—a classic and romantic image of the West. Among residents in surrounding communities, the horses inspire both passion and controversy. Their presence is the source of long-standing debates between wild horse advocates, land owners, conservationists, tribes and government agencies. At the heart of the issue lies the question: How wild is wild? It’s led to community spectacles, round-ups and lawsuits aplenty. And it’s the question behind current efforts to relocate a band of 75 horses from a 400-acre sanctuary on San Felipe Pueblo land. A spokesperson from San Felipe Pueblo tells SFR by phone that the sanctuary, which was established as a partnership between the pueblo and two advocacy groups—Placitas WILD and the Wild Horses Observers Association—was founded to keep herds rounded up by the US Bureau of Land Management and the New Mexico Livestock Board from 2013 to 2016 in their natural habitat between the pueblo and Placitas. The parties hoped to eventually establish a designated open space for the horses on a BLM parcel known as the Buffalo Tract that San Felipe Pueblo claims as part of its aboriginal lands. Yet conflicting claims by the BLM, gravel mining industries, the San Antonio de las Huertas Land Grant and local tribes has left the fate of the Buffalo Tract in limbo. Meanwhile, the horses sequestered at the sanctuary have slowly moved towards domestication. The pueblo says its members regard the horses as wildlife and the intention

landowners complain. Patience O’Dowd of the Wild Horses Observers Association has brought the BLM to court multiple times over this interpretation. “In our view, they are wild and belong on the range because they are part of our natural heritage,” says O’Dowd. “When they get rounded up, they could be euthanized or sold for slaughter.” Selling horses for slaughter is denounced by the BLM, though some wild horses sold at auction have ended up in slaughterhouses in Mexico and Canada. After the 2013 round-ups began, Placitas resident Clea Hall began taking in herds on her land to save them from the slaughterhouse. She has since become a certified holistic wild horsemanship trainer and she and her mother now care for over two dozen horses. “Our lives have been permanently changed because we opened our hearts and our homes to take care of these horses that we love,” Hall tells SFR. Yet keeping them up is a significant struggle, and Hall is actively looking to re-home some. Her dream is to eventually start a community therapeutic horse training program.

TOP: Wild horses roam near homes in Placitas. BOTTOM: Clea Hall grooms two of the wild horses that she rescued after roundups in 2013.

At the Placitas Café, where Hall waitresses, walls are adorned with art donated by the community to raise money for the horses’ care. Hay has nearly tripled in cost over the last few years after a series of droughts resulted in feed shortages across the region. Customers come to the counter to ask Hall about the horses, and two men in leather biker jackets add $20 to their bill to “support the noble effort.” Hall grew up in Placitas. She says the horses have been here for as long as she can remember. During a drought in 2010, people began to leave feed in their yards for the parched and bony animals. The horses have since come to depend on humans, says Hall. They now spend their time lurking around neighborhoods or waiting close to the road, where at least five have been hit in the last year alone. With the easy access to food, Hall says the population quickly grows beyond what the land can naturally sustain. “As I see it, people are as much a part of the problem as the horses are,” says Hall. She advocates for the use of the equine birth control vaccine, PZP, for population management. Sandy Johnson of Placitas WILD agrees that “use of PZP is the only humane way we will be able to sustainably maintain a herd of free-roaming horses out on the range.” In January, Sandoval County announced a new contract with Mt. Taylor Mustangs to administer the drug to animals in the area. Johnson says that she still hopes to one day create a wild horse eco-park on the Buffalo Tract, but for now her main goal is to make sure all the horses at the Placitas WILD sanctuary find proper homes. Placitas WILD hosts a fundraiser to help with relocation at Buffalo Thunder Resort and Casino on on May 17 with a performance by Chevel Shepherd, farmington native and winner of The Voice, a competition reality show. Keep up with their efforts at placitaswildhorses.org.

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FIRST PLACE

Winning poets take on sense of place in SFR’s annual contest

By Katherine Kubarski

W

hen Lauren Camp was presented with the stack of submissions to SFR’s 2019 poetry contest in our office foyer, her eyes grew wide. The breadth and depth of Santa Feans’ interest in poetry never fails to impress us; we received 156 submissions this year, and Camp read through each one, without authors’ names attached, with careful consideration. “It was challenging to narrow down to things that I cared deeply about,” Camp says, but she came up with a number of winners of which she is fond. “All of them, I believe, are strong voices, with sounds that are worth savoring in their writing, and powerful imagery that stayed with me.” Camp, a native of New York State, released a hefty book last summer: Turquoise Door came out of a 2013 residency at the Mabel Dodge Luhan House in Taos, and while it does focus intensely on Luhan (an early-20th century patroness of the arts in New Mexico), it also considers New Mexico as a personality. Camp’s connection to her adopted home is strong, and it came through in her chosen poems’ sense of place. “I think I’m especially drawn to poetry and to writing in general that is about here; that is about a place that I am very devoted to and very intrigued by,” Camp says of the winners. “I didn’t pick based on that, but I noticed it when I came back and looked at the three I had picked. They’re all about here, in a way; about the West or the Southwest.” The poems also greatly express melancholy, if not outright sadness. The trope of the tortured poet is a humorous stereotype,

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Lost in Migration

I. Stripped by wind of its Inuit kin, the young Tundra Swan surrenders south of Socorro, drops in diminishing circles into the babel of the bosque. Fields aflood with cranes, geese, ducks, coots, pelicans, gulls, grebes. Bounty of millet, chufa, tubers, roots, reeds. Safety in numbers. Rest.

and Camp says she’s not particularly drawn to melancholic work, yet there’s something to a pervasive sadness—especially now. “It’s true that poetry often is about grief, love, loss, and I think that factors in to these poems,” she tells SFR. “Maybe it’s the situation we find ourselves in in the world. I woke up this morning to the news of the New Zealand mosque, and maybe it’s that we keep on getting battered by difficult subjects. Not that that shows up in these poems, but maybe it just surrounds us, as poets.” So thank you, Santa Fe, for appreciating poetry so much, and for always making our writing contests fun. Enjoy Camp’s informed and carefully examined selections, and keep up with events related to Turquoise Door at her website, laurencamp.com. (Charlotte Jusinski)

SFREPORTER.COM

SFR SPRING POETRY SEARCH WINNERS READING 6 pm Monday March 26. Free. Collected Works Bookstore and Coffeehouse, 202 Galisteo St., 988-4226

II. Three months a vagrant, accidental avian, magnificent among the Mallards, one for the birders’ books. III. The heart is an arrow yearning for a circle at the top of the world. It knows that singular dawn when the lesser cranes lift this is no ordinary flight to forage in Cisneros’ corn stubble fields. This is the moment, odds against orphans, for the running start to rise up with whistling wings and join the great arrow home.

Katherine Kubarski has been working her magic as a grant proposal writer for the past 28 years, helping hundreds of nonprofit organizations to secure funding from major foundations and government agencies. She lives in Santa Fe where she loves to hike, cross-country ski, salsa dance and hang out with her dad.


SECOND PLACE

Aubade as it Begins to Snow By Margaret Wack

The language of the sick is one of gasps and whispers, madness halved and muted, put on like a velvet skin above the crimson nakedness of blood. It is only human, when the holy cold comes licking full of flame tongue and false promise to want to pare the bone from muscle like a butcher, press the flesh against the surface of the world and scratch the skin like silver foil—it is only natural to dream of death in the long low months like a slow snarl in the throat’s hollow saying please, please—eros the dissolver of the flesh come back again to haunt you in the body of a writhing animal, all rabbit skinned and weak kneed and hungry for blood.

Margaret Wack is a poet and writer whose work has been published in Strange Horizons, Arion, Liminality and elsewhere. More can be found at margaretwack.com.

THIRD PLACE

Ministers of Roofing By Basia Miller

Dawn just breaking, vehicles converge on my street, the plates say Chihuahua, Sonora, Santa Fe.

Now the upended wheelbarrow drops the old roof bit by bit into the dumpster. Now the crew dresses the deck in fresh tarpaper out to the parapets.

The crew gathers. Dark pants, black kneepads. Gray hoodies are pulled up, caps brim-backwards. The guys toss coffee cups and close the phones.

The drama’s at its height. Foreman Ruben and red-gloved Marco, handlers of the fire-dragon, put blowtorch to bitumen, then stomp it while it’s hot.

Boots rise in front of my kitchen window, mounting the red extension-ladder rung by rung and, like balloons, disappear on high.

They generate an asphalt spell to keep sun and snow away from me, my fireplace and all I treasure.

I hear orders barked between men whose faces I can no longer see. Shovels overhead batter at the gravel, as if beating out a fire.

The odor of tar pervades the space. I love the ritual, and I begin to love the roof that covers me.

I’m at my desk when part of the ceiling caves in and clouds cross the hole. Debris and Spanish curses filter through the gap and settle on the mantelpiece. How little thought I’ve given to the roof ! It’s been a gaping absence in my count of blessings, this layer that marks my rooms off from sky.

Basia Miller lives, hikes and writes in Santa Fe. She’s been writing since retiring from St. John’s College in Santa Fe. Her poems have appeared in Trickster, Adobe Walls, Santa Fe Literary Review and elsewhere. She particularly enjoys translating French poetry for publication in France. Her bilingual chapbook, The Next Village, appeared in 2016.

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• MARCH 20-26, 2019

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RUNNERS UP

Mourning Dove

The Longest Journey

Eyes wide open, Wings folded close. To leave her there would be to leave her For the dog to find.

By Shelley Winship

By Elizabeth Selig The dove startled As I strode through the trees Into the courtyard Slamming Into the big window Crashing to the ground Wings ragged, disoriented, distressed She and I.

The longest journey is to the center of your own heart

Best to just leave her Make sure the dog is elsewhere Give her a chance to catch her bearings Fly away.

(goddamn it)

Elizabeth Selig is a poet. And a reader, and a songwriter, and a ne’er do well, and a mindful walker, and a surfer and, most importantly, a mother. She lives in Hawaii.

Later When the obituary for my mother is done and delivered When the light on the hills Is blood red to the east I chase a squirrel away from the bird feeder And see her The mourning dove Lying still on the ground.

I walk with her To the river Past the meadow Where the young g rey horse The color of a mourning dove Still new to his maleness, Is running And tossing his head. Past the tipped-over road sign Saying, “Road Closed” To the one-lane bridge Where someone had a close call. Startled by something Thumbs and thoughts texting Or more likely, just stoned— They went off course Hitting the flimsy metal guardrail Yet somehow, miraculously Failing To fall in the river. Shaken, stunned, They managed To pull back, drive away, and vow To be more careful next time. The guardrail is beyond salvage Certainly, not able to stop the dove As she flies one last time Away from the dog Away from the window Away from my cupped hands Toward the water’s swift surface.

Shelley Winship is a nonprofit fundraiser, orchardist, acequia commissioner, accordionist and cat lover living in Chimayó, New Mexico.

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RUNNERS UP

Arroyo by Dana Lundell

What A small child’s bed frame. A frayed, ivory mattress cover reaching up into the hot, August wind for the red, cracked plastic sled enjoyed briefly and abandoned last March at the end of a surprise snow day in the high desert.

And As a green, plastic straw bent over like a teenager in sorrow, struck by the force of mid-life gravity and cut loose from certainty to fly around like a paper streamer caught in the ditch, I lost her. What A feeling I would always be loved. like New Mexico wind, a daily friend. but

I In this dry arroyo, wandering alone lost as a crinkled-up candy wrapper that once held mango sweets from Mexico— enjoyed passionately some afternoon by a small kid in a Lobos jersey and then tossed away just like that to the striped lagartija sunning on dry rocks. Lost An old rotary dial phone buzzing with fresh gossip, tossed aside one day for new sources of insanity. A direct line to abuela, tia, a kind friend or sibling, or maybe—Mom— to pick up the phone and listen to me sniffle at 3:00 am about a boyfriend or car repair bill when graduate school could not pay for new tires.

Bright Angel Creek Memorial By Sam Moorman

I Never saw it coming.

A year after she died I hiked down Grand Canyon to Bright Angel Creek and there Veered off trail and stripped to lie white on gray stone skin warmed by solar winds and there Careless butterflies flew by and lizards pushed pushups while Cold water tumbling over creek stones mumbled bye bye

Found Of all things lost and tossed to the side, why? Somewhere in this arroyo, Me.

Dana Lundell survived four years of caregiving as an only child for her mother who succumbed to Stage 4 uterine cancer in Santa Fe in August 2015. Dana, called “Dr. Dana” by her students, currently lives part-time in Santa Fe and Portland, Oregon, where she works at Portland State University. She has a doctorate in education.

Sam Moorman publishes poems and stories in various anthologies. He has a creative writing MA from San Francisco State and is on the board of directors for SouthWest Writers in Albuquerque.

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HAVANA CUBA ALL-STARS

While some music demands quiet contemplation, the fiery sounds and styles of Cuban cha-chas, rumbas, and salsa tunes demand movement—and lots of it. The Havana Cuba All-Stars are an ensemble of some of Cuba’s finest musicians. Their ASERE! (Friendship) program features three of Cuba’s most celebrated dancing couples. This energetic celebration of Cuban culture promises an evening of irrepressible, enveloping sound and movement. Quiet contemplation is neither required nor recommended.

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COURTESY AMANDA LECHNER

SFRE P O RTE R .CO M / N E WS / TH E I N TE R FAC E

Back to the Future Amanda Lechner’s Future Perfect Tense examines what has been and may be BY JULIA GOLDBERG @votergirl

“I’m here tonight to tell you: We are out of time. I wish that none of this was true. I grieved in the field and I grieve every time I talk about what’s happening to the planet now. But here we are together at this time in history, and we’re going to get to go through this together, like it or not.” I wasn’t expecting good news at the Lannan Foundation March 13 talk by Truthout.org journalist Dahr Jamail, author of the recent book, The End of Ice: Bearing Witness and Finding Meaning in the Path of Climate Disruption. But I was taken aback, no doubt naively, by the hope-free certainty he expressed about the future. Jamail’s work threads his firsthand observation of climate disruption as a mountain guide on Denali in Alaska with the ever-mounting scientific evidence

about the impact such human-caused climate disruption is having and will continue to have for the earth and its inhabitants. In a recent report for his Climate Disruption Dispatch series for Truthout, Jamail runs through some of these reports and their findings, “radical disruptions to food and water supplies for upwards of 1.5 billion people, in addition to a mass migration crisis” among them. I was thinking of Jamail’s talk as I entered Axle Contemporary two days later for the mobile gallery’s latest exhibit. Amanda Lechner’s Future Perfect Tense transformed the stepvan’s interior into what was described as an “abstracted cyclorama.” More specifically, the artist has covered the entire space, top to bottom, with an ink-on-paper painting that examines various intersections of images and ideas related to climate disruption, and the concomitant questions these raise about the future. The show’s title, a grammatical nod to the putative nature of the future, encapsulates both its inevitability and mystery. I found myself drawn to one back wall where a textured image of the planet topped two handwritten signs, one reading “Motion/Stillness,” the other “Sitting in Discomfort and Being Okay,” evoking the sense that I had entered the private sanctum of another’s thoughts in a specific moment in time, caught trying to work out an impenetrable proposition. Lechner, a Santa Fe native now living in Indiana where she is a visiting assistant professor if drawing and painting at Indiana University at Bloomington, tells me that while to some degree the work

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Amanda Lechner’s Future Perfect Tense explores ideas and questions related to science and climate disruption.

“feels like stepping into my mind space,” it also is intended more broadly to evoke the sense of “stepping into a series of thoughts.” Those thoughts run the gamut and include Lechner’s preoccupation with “deep time” and its manifestation in geology and zoology. The work includes images of plants and animals “that are living fossils that have existed relatively unchanged for hundreds of millions

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of years in some cases.” Lechner pairs those images with some that relate to volcanology research (this is the study of volcanoes, not Vulcans, although Lechner did mention Star Trek and I did grok her references) and its relation to infrasound (low-frequency sound undetectable to the human ear), and “how that ties into the predictions of the eruptions of volcanoes.” Both science and science fiction frequently inform Lechner’s work. While working on the Axle piece, she was reading NK Jemisin’s The Fifth Season, a Hugo Award-winning trilogy that explores, as the title indicates, the fifth season: a time of world-ending climate change. Science fiction and speculative fiction have long been, of course, fertile space to consider the consequences of the past and present on the unknown future. Titling her show Future Perfect Tense, Lechner says she is probing “the things that will have happened in the future; that can mean the things that are happening now, the things that happened to us in the past, or the things that are our future but are the future people’s past.” As for a viewpoint, Lechner says she is not “a particularly cynical person,” and perhaps the show reflects her vacillation between optimism and pessimism. “I’m a hopeful person,” she says, “but I also see the darkness and, in some ways, can embrace that darkness, because maybe it’s only where we can see it that we can fight against it or push away from it. I don’t want it to feel like it’s all about doom, but there is certainly some, a little bit of that. It’s that paradox of, ‘We’re in trouble,’ but maybe we can find a way out of it.” Personally, I’ll take maybe over too late.

AMANDA LECHNER: FUTURE PERFECT TENSE Through April 7. Axle Contemporary, 670-5854, axleart.com

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MARCH 20-26, 2019

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MARCH 20-26, 2019

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SFR E P O RTE R .CO M /A RTS / S FR P I C KS

OH DANG, THAT’S SEXY Often, throwback jams feel like a forced nostalgia grab meant to manipulate us into feeling the illusion of feelings. This is gross, but every so often, such tunes are so damn good, so damn sincere, so damn sexy that we realize it’s not about anything but the love of music and appreciation for enduring styles. Enter Indiana’s Durand Jones and the Indications, a soulful revival blend of Motown smoothness, shiny guitars and horns and the kind of vocals that owned your heart long before you even realized. Yeah, Jones and company are just that good. Look up their KEXP performance from April of last year if you don’t believe us. Just try not to fall in love. It might not be possible. (ADV)

COURTESY MUSEUM OF INTERNATIONAL FOLK ART

COURTESY DURAND JONES AND THE INDICATIONS

MUSIC THU/21

Durand Jones and the Indications: 8 pm Thursday March 21. $20. Tumbleroot Brewery & Distillery, 2791 Agua Fría St.

COURTESY NICO SALAZAR / FUTURE FANTASY DELIGHT

EVENT SAT/23 THE FUTURE IS SOON We at SFR obviously love local artist Nico Salazar, and we think you should, too. We’d also point out that not only can you buy original Salazar works and prints at galleries like KEEP Contemporary, but that a vast majority of his designs are available in wearable form. Salazar kicks off his 2019 collection this week with a party at Meow Wolf (where he also has a permanent installation). He’ll unveil all his newest creations influenced by street art, manga, ’90s culture and beyond. They’re the kinda duds worn by superstar members of Migos, those lucky enough to have picked up a tee from SFR’s Best of Santa Fe 2017 party or even just in-the-know fashion fans looking to make a statement. That statement, by the way? It’s “I’m cool.” We think it’s always great when a hometown artist does good—let’s show Salazar some love. (ADV) Future Fantasy Delight SS 2019 Collection Launch: 9 pm Saturday March 23. $18-$22. Meow Wolf, 1352 Rufina Circle, 395-6369

COURTESY HBO

FILM TUE/26 MOST DANGEROUS GAME Writer George RR Martin is a bit of a celeb, and part of that is due to how he did that thing we all say we’d do if we suddenly had a bunch of money: He invested in cool things for his community. Take, for example, the Jean Cocteau Cinema, a once-dead theater, where eager Game of Thrones fans can catch up (or just rewatch for the millionth time) all of the show’s seventh season as we head into the eighth this April. These weekly screenings feature two episodes per night, are first-come first-served, free, and you should be civil about the whole thing. Regardless, we can’t think of a better way to catch up with your buds like Jon Snow, Dany, Tyrion, Arya, Fonzie, Potsie, Li’l Abner and all those other zany fantasy champs from Westeros and beyond. There’s a bar there, too. (ADV) Game of Thrones Season Seven Screenings: 6:30 pm Tuesday March 26. Through April 9. Free. Jean Cocteau Cinema, 418 Montezuma Ave., 466-5528.

LECTURE SUN/24

Put Up That Wall Alas de Agua’s mural mission The Museum of International Folk Art’s curator of Latin American and Caribbean Collections Amy Groleau says that SFR’s cover story about Santa Fe arts collective Alas de Agua from last May was what clued her into the growing group’s style and mission (“Collective Unconquered,” May 8, 2018). When she brought Peruvian screen printing collective Amapolay to Santa Fe for the exhibit Crafting Memory earlier this year, our local heroes were her first choice for an artistic connection. Groleau thus commissioned Israel Francisco Haros Lopez and his Alas de Agua compatriots John Paul Granillo and Juan Lira for a new original mural just outside the museum’s Gallery of Conscience. “The idea is that it would be a work in progress,” Groleau says. “We like to emphasize process and flexibility in [the Gallery of Conscience], so that left it open to them to work on it as they wanted—I think of it as a living thing.” Lopez, Granillo and Lira have been working on the mural since December, but this weekend they finally unveil the completed piece and appear for an informal discussion on its making and meaning. A massive accomplishment of paint on tyvek (rather

than the actual wall, which allows the museum to keep the piece when it comes down), “Build Those Walls, We Come From the Stars” represents Alas de Agua’s core philosophies alongside Amapolay’s, while commenting on the current state of border and art politics as seen from a group based in the Southwest. Both Alas de Agua and Amapolay are represented through overt and subtextual imagery. It’s about connection, resistance, empowerment and the messaging power of art. “My auntie always told me, ‘Without art, there is no movement,’” Lopez tells SFR. “A lot of times, we think about protest, about marches, about the movement—and the art takes a backseat. But without those images and iconography, there is nothing that really changes the consciousness. The beauty of a mural is that you’re side by side. There’s no way you’re not going to engage in conversation. You have to work together, you have to talk to each other.” (Alex De Vore) “BUILD THOSE WALLS, WE COME FROM THE STARS” UNVEILING 2 pm Sunday March 24. Free with museum admission, which is $6-$12. Museum of International Folk Art, 706 Camino Lejo, 476-1200.

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MARCH 20-26, 2019

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COURTESY SHIDONI GALLERY & SCULPTURE GARDEN

THE CALENDAR Want to see your event here? Email all the relevant information to calendar@sfreporter.com. You can also enter your events yourself online at calendar.sfreporter.com (submission doesn’t guarantee inclusion). Need help?

Contact Charlotte: 395-2906

WED/20 BOOKS/LECTURES DHARMA TALK BY SENSEI HOZAN ALAN SENAUKE Upaya Zen Center 1404 Cerro Gordo Road, 986-8518 This week's Buddhist philosophical talk is presented by the vice abbot of Berkeley Zen Center in California. 5:30-6:30 pm, free JOE NEWMAN: SAVING THE SANTA FE CHOLLA Christ Lutheran Church 1701 Arroyo Chamiso, 983-9461 Newman is one of the founders of the Cactus Rescue Project, which advicates for the endangered Santa Fe cholla. 6:30 pm, free SOCIAL ENGAGEMENT ARTIST-IN-RESIDENCE TALK IAIA Museum of Contemporary Native Arts 108 Cathedral Place, 983-8900 Bring your lunch and join artists Terrol Dew Johnson (Tohono O'odham) and Sonya Kelliher-Combs (Inupiaq and Athabascan) as they discuss their practice. Noon-1:30 pm, free

DANCE 505 DANCE LAB Santa Fe Oxygen & Healing Bar (Kaverns) 137 W San Francisco St., 986-5037 Lindy hop ‘n’ tango for beginners ‘n’ experts alike. Grab an oxygen elixir while you’re there. 7 pm, $5

TOOT TOOT! All aboard this gosh darn CHILEMOBILE! Aooooga! These are some HOT WHEELS! ... Whew. Clearly we are very excited about this piece by the late Thomas C Hicks, Jr., founder of Shidoni. A number of his works are featured this week at the Tesuque gallery; see full listing on page 22.

SANTA FE CASINEROS: CASINO, RUEDA, SON Y CHACHACHÁ Heart and Soul Dance Studio 720 St. Michael’s Drive, 608-335-0785 Learn the casino (danced to salsa music), rueda de casino (Cuban square dancing, except it's in a circle), son (the music and dance of the Buena Vista Social Club) and chachachá (one of the oldest of Cuban social dances). 6-8 pm, $5-$10

EVENTS CHILDREN’S CHESS CLUB Santa Fe Public Library Main Branch 145 Washington Ave., 955-6780 Join other kids to play against. 5:45 pm, free COMMUNITY DAY AT THE GARDEN Santa Fe Botanical Garden 715 Camino Lejo, 471-9103 Get free admission to the garden for New Mexico residents. 11 am-3 pm, free

HEALTH FAIR Buffalo Thunder Resort and Casino 20 Buffalo Thunder Trail, 455-5555 With an emphasis on screening, education and prevention, this fair hosted by the Pueblo of Pojoaque features about 50 health care and health care-adjacent providers including insurance companies, government agencies and grocery stores, and much more. 9 am-2 pm, free

THE ILLUSIONISTS Lensic Performing Arts Center 211 W San Francisco St., 988-1234 A magic show to top all magic shows swings through Santa Fe on its national tour. 7 pm, $45-$75 LET'S TAKE A LOOK Museum of Indian Arts & Culture 710 Camino Lejo, 476-1250 Bring a a piece you know nothing about, and curators will tell you everything they can. Noon-2 pm, free

NAW-RUZ CELEBRATION: BAHÁ’Í NEW YEAR Santa Fe Woman's Club 1616 Old Pecos Trail, 983-9455 Santa Fe Bahá’ís celebrate the dawning of 176 BE with a brief program, a meal, music and socializing. The Bahá’í Faith was established in Santa Fe in 1963; current efforts focus on neighborhood community building and spiritual education. For info: 982-3788. 6 pm, free

Boultawn’s Boultawn’s

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ENTER EVENTS AT SFREPORTER.COM/CAL

SANTA FE COUNTY GENEALOGY SOCIETY MEETING The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-Day Saints 410 Rodeo Road A discussion of Family Tree Maker software. 1:30 pm, free SPRING BREAK FAMILY PROGRAM Georgia O'Keeffe Museum 217 Johnson St., 946-1000 Hands-on art activities for kids ages 4-12. 1-4 pm, free WAYWARD WEDNESDAYS Chili Line Brewing Company 204 N Guadalupe St., 982-8474 Local comedy ‘n’ an open mic! 7:30 pm, free

MUSIC FUTURE JOY Boxcar 530 S Guadalupe St., 988-7222 Electronic dance music. 10 pm, free GOLDEN GENERAL Fenix at Vanessie 427 W Water St., 982-9966 Indie rock and lounge covers. 6 pm, free JANA POCHOP Cowgirl 319 S Guadalupe St., 982-2565 From folk-rap to folk-pop to folky humor and downright beautiful folk. And also folk. 8 pm, free JOAQUIN GALLEGOS El Mesón 213 Washington Ave., 983-6756 Soulful flamenco guitar. 7 pm, free LOS PRIMOS MELØDICOS Eldorado Hotel and Spa 309 W San Francisco St., 988-4455 Afro-Cuban, romantic and traditional Latin music trio recreates the authentic sound of Latin America, Cuba and Puerto Rico, as well as flamenco, traditional and pop. With Fred Simpson (percussion and backing vocals), JJ Oviedo (bass, percussion and vocals), and guitarist Robert “Roberto” Gonzales. 6 pm, free MATTHEW ANDRAE Tesuque Casino 7 Tesuque Road, 984-8414 Folky tunes on guitalele. 6 pm, free SANTA FE CROONERS Social Kitchen & Bar 725 Cerrillos Road, 982-5952 Golden Age standards. 7 pm, free TIFFANY CHRISTOPHER La Fiesta Lounge 100 E San Francisco St., 982-5511 Electronic rock 'n' roll. 7:30 pm, free

WORKSHOP INTRODUCTION TO ZEN Mountain Cloud Zen Center 7241 Old Santa Fe Trail, 988-4396 Beginners and experienced practitioners alike can explore the basics and finer points of Zen meditation. 5 pm, free

THE CALENDAR

THU/21

MUSIC

BOOKS/LECTURES ELIZABETH HOOVER: FROM GARDEN WARRIORS TO GOOD SEEDS James A Little Theatre 1060 Cerrillos Road, 476-6429 Hoover explores traditional food practices in Native American communities. 6:30 pm, $10 ROBIN WILLIAMS: LITERACY IN SHAKESPEARE’S TIME AND IN SHAKESPEARE’S PLAYS St. John's United Methodist Church 1200 Old Pecos Trail, 982-5397 The co-founder of the International Shakespeare Center discusses what Shakespeare’s plays tell us about literacy. 1 pm, $15 SIG HECKER: WHAT’S NEXT FOR NORTH KOREA? Hotel Santa Fe 1501 Paseo de Peralta, 982-1200 The former director of Los Alamos National Labs discusses the situation in North Korea. Register: sfcir.org or 982-4931. 5:30 pm, $15-$20 TIM MAXWELL: A BRIEF HISTORY OF SANTA FE’S ARCHAEOLOGICAL ORDINANCE El Zaguán 545 Canyon Road, 982-0016 Maxwell discusses the evolution of building ordinances. 3 pm, $10

EVENTS CARLOS MEDINA'S ALL FIERCE COMEDY SHOW Jean Cocteau Cinema 418 Montezuma Ave., 466-5528 Comedy and music from the local mariachi and funnyman. 8 pm, $10 EASTERSEALS EL MIRADOR RIBBON CUTTING CEREMONY Easterseals El Mirador 8 Camino de Vaca, 424-7700 Join the org to celebrate a new care facility for adults with intellectual disabilities. 11 am, free GRIEF SUPPORT GROUP The Montecito 500 Rodeo Road, 428-7777 Anyone over 18 years can join and participate; register with Ya’el Chaikind at 303-3552. 1 pm, free O2 OPEN MIC Santa Fe Oxygen & Healing Bar (Kaverns) 137 W San Francisco St., 986-5037 Perform what you love. 7 pm, $5 PECHAKUCHA SANTA FE Second Street Brewery (Rufina Taproom) 2920 Rufina St., 954-1068 Presentations of 20 slides for 20 seconds each, explaining ideas or projects. Tonight's theme is "Place." 6 pm, free e

BERT AND MILO El Mesón 213 Washington Ave., 983-6756 Jazz. 7 pm, free DANA SMITH Upper Crust Pizza 329 Old Santa Fe Trail, 982-0000 Country-tinged folk songs. 6 pm, free DOUBLE O DJS KARAOKE Social Kitchen & Bar 725 Cerrillos Road, 982-5952 Choose your song wisely and croon away. 7 pm, free DRE Z MELODI, MISTER KALI & COMPANY DREAD Boxcar 530 S Guadalupe St., 988-7222 Reggae 'n' reggae. 10 pm, free DURAND JONES & THE INDICATIONS Tumbleroot Brewery & Distillery 2791 Agua Fría St. This band of 20-somethings are students of soul, with an aesthetic steeped in the golden, strings-infused dreaminess of early ‘70s soul—but the Indications are planted firmly in the present (see SFR Picks, page 19). 8 pm, $20 EZRA DUO: WOMEN IN MUSIC First Presbyterian Church 208 Grant Ave., 982-8544 In recognition of Women’s History Month, the duo (Jacob Clewell, viola, and Sasha Bult-Ito, piano) presents a program of female composers. 7 pm, $13-$25 JESUS BAS Tesuque Casino 7 Tesuque Road, 984-8414 Spanish and flamenco guitar. 6 pm, free JOHN RANDALL Fenix at Vanessie 427 W Water St., 982-9966 Piano standards. 6:30 pm, free SIERRA La Fiesta Lounge 100 E San Francisco St., 982-5511 Country tunes to dance to. 7:30 pm, free THROWBACK THURSDAYS SK8 SESSION Rockin' Rollers 2915 Agua Fría St., 473-7755 An additional $5 get you skates or a scooter. 7 pm, $5 TROY BROWNE TRIO Cowgirl 319 S Guadalupe St., 982-2565 Dextrous Americana. 8 pm, free

2019

Civil War

Encampment

at Pecos National Historical Park Saturday,

March 23rd

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Free Living

history

black powder demonstrations, lectures by Civil War historians, kids activities, live raptor demonstration

THEATER NEW MEXICO GAY MEN'S CHORUS: I AM HARVEY MILK Lensic Performing Arts Center 211 W San Francisco St., 988-1234 This hybrid theater performance and choral work weaves the story of Milk’s life (see Music, page 23). 7:30 pm, $20-$45

10 a.m.- 4 p.m.

505-757-7241 or www.nps.gov/peco For area information: www.pecosnewmexico.com

For more information:

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THE CALENDAR

SATURDAY 3/29

THE HIGH VIBES

THE MISER The Oasis Theatre 3205 Calle Marie, Ste. A, 917-439-7708 Comedic Molière at his best. 7:30 pm, $27 TREVOR Santa Fe Playhouse 142 E De Vargas St., 988-4262 Meet Trevor, a 200-pound chimp (see Acting Out, page 29). 7:30 pm, $15-$25

NED PARKER

FREE / 7:30 PM

MONDAY 4/1

GHOST FOOT

JESSIE DELUXE UNIVERSE CONTEST COLE BEE WILSON

WORKSHOP DRAWING AFTER-HOURS Georgia O'Keeffe Museum 217 Johnson St., 946-1000 Try drawing methods that guided O’Keeffe as a student. Space is limited, so RSVP. 5:30-7:30 pm, $20-$35 INTELLECTUAL PROPERTY INTENSIVE MAKE Santa Fe 2879 All Trades Road, 819-3502 Learn all the all the ins and outs of intellectual property and how to protect your work. 6-8 pm, $45

FREE / 8 PM

TUESDAY 4/2

DRAFT PUNX W/ BODIES

FREE / 8 PM

FRI/22 ART OPENINGS

WWW.SECONDSTREETBREWERY.COM

SLEEPING BEAR of Santa Fe

CHARLIE BURK: JOURNEY IN ABSTRACTION Winterowd Fine Art 701 Canyon Road, 992-8878 Burk's paintings revel in the detail and intricacy of grass. Through April 10. 5 pm, free FORM & CONSEQUENCE: CLIMATE CHANGE AT THE DOOR Agora Center 7 Avenida Vista Grande, Eldorado Works in response to our planet's impending death. Yikes. Through April 12. 5 pm, free GINNIE CAPPAERT: COLOR SNAPS Globe Fine Art 727 Canyon Road, 989-3888 A new series of paintings is a colorful interpretation of landscape. Through April 22. 4 pm, free NEW WORKS UNVEILING Currents 826 826 Canyon Road, 772-0953 View several new works at CURRENTS' year-round exhibition and experience space. 6 pm, free THOMAS C HICKS, JR. AND SANDRA GOLBERT Shidoni Gallery and Sculpture Garden 1508 Bishops Lodge Road, 988-8001, ext. 120 Featured artists present fiber art and bronze. Through March 28. 9 am-5 pm, free

BOOKS/LECTURES COMMUNITY READING TIME Ortiz Mountain Community Library Johnsons of Madrid Gallery, 2843 Hwy. 14, 603-1863 Kids can learn about the seasons. Spring is coming! 11 am-noon, free

ENTER EVENTS AT SFREPORTER.COM/CAL

DANCE

FOOD

ENTREFLAMENCO SPRING BREAK SEASON El Flamenco de Santa Fe 135 W Palace Ave., 209-1302 Doors open an hour early for dinner (sold separately). 7:30 pm, $25-$40 FLAMENCO DINNER SHOW El Farol 808 Canyon Road, 983-9912 A show by the National Institute of Flamenco. 6:30 pm, $25 FLAMENCO FIESTA STUDENT RECITAL AND SEVILLANAS CONTEST Teatro Paraguas 3205 Calle Marie, 424-1601 The Santa Fe-based, world-renowned flamenco group, Compañia Chuscales y Mina Fajardo, performs once again with a special spotlight on its flamenco students. Check out the dancers’ skills first, then watch (or enter!) a dance contest at 7 pm. 5:30 pm, $20-$25

COFFEE TASTING Iconik Coffee Roasters 1600 Lena St., 428-0996 Enjoy a beverage with coffee professionals. 9-10 am, free

EVENTS ANCIENT IRELAND: A NIGHT OF MUSIC, STORYTELLING AND CHANNELED MESSAGES Healing the Scars 439 C W San Francisco St., 575-770 1228 Join harp therapist Talia Rose and channel Raphael Weisman for an evening of divine psychic wisdom. 7 pm, $20 CONNECT WITH YOUR GUIDES AND LOVED ONES Prana Blessings 1925 Rosina St., Ste. C, 772 0771 Medium Jane Phillips receives messages for guidance. Limited to 20 attendees, so sign up in advance. 6:30-8 pm, $35-$40 GARDEN SPROUTS PRE-K ACTIVITIES Santa Fe Botanical Garden 715 Camino Lejo, 471-9103 A hands-on program for 3-5 year olds and their caregivers. 10-11 am, $5 LA MODA IV Eloisa Restaurant 228 E Palace Ave., 982-0883 Local designers show off their unique wares. The show is free, but make a reservation for a meal that you buy like a normal person. These tend to sell out, so get on it. Noon, free

FILM WAGNER’S RING OF THE NIBELUNG FOR CHILDREN (AND THE YOUNG AT HEART) SITE Santa Fe 1606 Paseo de Peralta, 989-1199 A film screening of a shortened, one-act version of Richard Wagner’s magnum opus, Ring of the Nibelungs. The 15-hour epic is now a compact, humor-filled and entertaining mini-opera. Presented by the Wagner Society of Santa Fe. 6-7:30 pm, free

MUSIC ALL-AGES SK8 SESSION Rockin' Rollers 2915 Agua Fría St., 473-7755 Hit up pizza, a snack bar and DJ tunes—an additional $5 get you skates or a scooter. 6 pm, $5 BIRD THOMPSON The New Baking Company 504 W Cordova Road, 557-6435 Adult contemporary. 10 am, free BLANCHARD WITH DANCER IN THE SUN Lost Padre Records 304 Catron St., 310-6389 Local indie rockers Blanchard celebrate the release of their new EP, Imminence. 6:15 pm, $5-$10 CHANGO Tesuque Casino 7 Tesuque Road, 984-8414 Rock 'n' roll covers. 10 pm, free CHAT NOIR CABARET Los Magueyes Mexican Restaurant 31 Burro Alley, 992-0304 First-rate piano and vocals. 6 pm, free DJ D-MONIC Boxcar 530 S Guadalupe St., 988-7222 Any genre you could ever want. 10 pm, free DEAR DOCTOR Mine Shaft Tavern 2846 Hwy. 14, Madrid, 473-0743 Americana on the deck. 5 pm, free DOUG MONTGOMERY AND JOHN RANDALL Fenix at Vanessie 427 W Water St., 982-9966 Piano standards. 6 pm, free FOOL'S PLAY Starlight Lounge at Montecito 500 Rodeo Road, 428-7777 A jazzy quartet. 6 pm, $2 GLEU Santa Fe Oxygen and Healing Bar (Apothecary) 133 W San Francisco St., 986-5037 Neo-soul jazz. 7 pm, free HALF BROKE HORSES Second Street Brewery (Original) 1814 Second St., 982-3030 Americana ‘n’ honky-tonk. 7 pm, free JESUS BAS La Boca (Taberna Location) 125 Lincoln Ave., 988-7102 Spanish and flamenco guitar. 7 pm, free JULIE STEWART AND ROD WELLES El Farol 808 Canyon Road, 983-9912 Rock 'n' blues. 9 pm, $5 CONTINUED ON PAGE 24

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Silent No More

MUSIC

COURTESY NEW MEXICO GAY MEN’S CHORUS

S FR E P O RTE R .CO M /M US I C

The New Mexico Gay Men’s Chorus celebrates the life of an American hero with I Am Harvey Milk

New Mexico Gay Men’s Chorus Artisitc Director Aaron Howe conducts, too. What a guy!

BY LUKE HENLEY a u t h o r @ s f r e p o r t e r. c o m

M

artin Luther King Jr. once said “the arc of the moral universe is long, but it bends toward justice,” as he paraphrased the 19th-century abolitionist Theodore Parker. It’s optimistic, if challenged by countless acts of evil throughout our nation’s history—even in the wake of sudden tragedies, such as King’s assassination in 1968, there is often an echo of justice that can hopefully sound louder than its violent catalysts. Another civil rights hero taken from us too soon was San Francisco Supervisor Harvey Milk, who is memorialized and celebrated in Broadway songwriter Andrew Lippa’s oratorio I Am Harvey Milk, scheduled to be performed by the New Mexico Gay Men’s Chorus this week. Lippa’s commemoration of Milk’s life and death is not focused on tragedy, though that is a part of the story. Rather, he presents an abstracted expression of Milk’s spirit, taking the audience through imagined scenarios such as Milk’s childhood and first workday after taking office as the United States’ first openly gay politician. The oratorio format presents the material as halfway between choral performance and traditional theater. There are no sets, and the chorus stands behind the vocal leads as they

perform contextual narrative pieces. Bill Brooks plays Milk, with opera vet Ingela Onstad playing a motherly guiding muse alongside him. Twelve-year-old Allen Dominguez sings the pieces that imagine Milk’s childhood. The music clearly comes from Lippa’s experience as a Broadway songwriter, emphasizing genre and tone variety but delivered with theatrical gravitas. Perhaps the showstopper, “Tired of the Silence,” uses recorded snippets of Milk’s public speeches in a song that calls for members of the LGBTQ+ community not to live in secrecy, but to live out and proud. NMGMC Artistic Director Aaron Howe says the message of I Am Harvey Milk is celebratory, describing Milk almost like a showman of his time. “[Milk] finally found his calling when he started doing politics,” Howe tells SFR. “It was almost, for him, like putting on a show. He really was a galvanizing force to bring the LGBT people out of the shadows.” While the tragedy of Milk’s assassination is unavoidable, Howe says the show conveys an overall positive experience, citing Milk’s activism as being focused not just on LGBTQ+ rights, but

Harvey Milk really was for everybody. For him, it was very important that he lift all people up. -Aaron Howe, NMGMC artistic director

on human rights. “Harvey Milk really was for everybody,” says Howe. “For him, it was very important that he lift all people up.” Other pieces in the show do touch on the ugly truths of the country’s attitude toward queer folks, and also people of color, such as “Sticks and Stones.” Another piece, “I Am the Bullet,” frankly

addresses how Milk was killed for who he was. While it’s important not to erase these pieces of history, it is refreshing for a show about such an historic icon not to simply portray him as a martyr, but a complete human being, flaws and all. According to Howe, the song that perhaps best captures Milk’s spirit is titled “Leap.” Originally written by Lippa for the Broadway adaptation of the Tim Burton film Big Fish, the song was cut from that production. Here, it fits with the other songs in I Am Harvey Milk with a message to leap before you look. “Instead of being careful about it, just jump in and do it,” Howe concludes. “That really captures the spirit of Harvey Milk. It is overall a celebration and an admonition to not be afraid of who you are—we’re here, and we have an important thing to say to society; we’re an important part of society.” NEW MEXICO GAY MEN’S CHORUS: I AM HARVEY MILK 7:30 pm Thursday March 21. $20-$45. Lensic Performing Arts Center, 211 W San Francisco St., 988-1234

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23


El Museo Market

Every Weekend!

Saturday 8 - 3 pm Sunday 9 - 4 pm

Art, Antiques, Folk & Tribal Art, Books, Jewelry, Beads, Glass, Photography, Hides, Rugs and much more!!

555 Camino de la Familia Santa Fe NM 87501 (In the Railyard)

Info call: Steve at 505-250-8969 or Lesley at 760-727-8511

CELEBRATING

27 YEARS IN BUSINESS

Thank You Santa Fe

DOWNTOWN

ELDORADO

644 Paseo De Peralta

Healthcare & Massage

5 Caliente Road Bldg 2, Ste D

(505) 984-8830 • highdesertsantafe.com Relaxation & Pain Relief 24 Caring Therapists OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK

24

MARCH 20-26, 2019

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THE CALENDAR MALAA Meow Wolf 1352 Rufina Circle, 395-6369 Elecronica and balaclavas. 9 pm-2 am, $25-$30 NOSOTROS Tumbleroot Brewery & Distillery 2791 Agua Fría St. Latin rock. 8 pm, $7 RONALD ROYBAL Hotel Santa Fe 1501 Paseo de Peralta, 982-1200 Native American flute and Spanish classical guitar. 7 pm, free SANTA FE MUSIC COLLECTIVE: HILLARY SMITH SITE Santa Fe 1606 Paseo de Peralta, 989-1199 The vocalist, performs a rare and intimate jazz set. For tickets and info, call 946-7934. 7 pm, $20-$25 SAVOR La Fiesta Lounge 100 E San Francisco St., 982-5511 Cuban street music. 8 pm, free SHANE WALLIN Tesuque Casino 7 Tesuque Road, 984-8414 Soulful blues. 5 pm, free SLOAN ARMITAGE Social Kitchen & Bar 725 Cerrillos Road, 982-5952 Folk, Americana and R&B. 7 pm, free ST. RANGE Cowgirl 319 S Guadalupe St., 982-2565 Rock 'n' roll, outlaw-style. 8:30 pm, free TGIF RECITAL: BACH’S BIRTHDAY WITH LINDA RANEY First Presbyterian Church 208 Grant Ave., 982-8544 Selections on organ by Bach and Dieterich Buxtehude. 5:30 pm, free THE THREE FACES OF JAZZ El Mesón 213 Washington Ave., 983-6756 Swinging jazz. 7:30 pm, free TONIC JAZZ SHOWCASE Tonic 103 E Water St., 982-1189 Calypso jazz. 9:30 pm, free VANESSA SILBERMAN AND CARISSA JOHNSON Mine Shaft Tavern 2846 Hwy. 14, Madrid, 473-0743 Rock, grunge, pop and folk. 8 pm, free

ENTER EVENTS AT SFREPORTER.COM/CAL

SAT/23 ART OPENINGS JARED ANTONIO-JUSTO TRUJILLO: WHERE THERE IS DARKNESS, YOU ARE THE LIGHT Keep Contemporary 142 Lincoln Ave., 307-9824 Metal sculptures backlit with LED lights (see AC, page 27). 5-8 pm, free SUSANA'S ROOM El Museo Cultural de Santa Fe 555 Camino de la Familia, 992-0591 Susana Dickson Ferguson's work and memorabilia from her Mexico years is paired with work from her daughter Catherine. Through May 15. 4 pm, free TIMOTHY JASON REED: VORTEXING THE MUSES Show Pony Gallery 501 Franklin St., Ste. 4 Celebrate Show Pony's new brick-and-mortar space. Through May 5. 5 pm, free

BOOKS/LECTURES A CONTEXT FOR THE LIFE AND WORK OF EUGENIE SHONNARD St. Francis Auditorium 107 W Palace Ave., 476-5072 Eric Blinman and Karen Wening discuss the Santa Fe artist. 1 pm, free HELGA SCHIMKAT AND GREG REID: NEPAL TREK TO GOKYO LAKES AND EVEREST BASE CAMP AREA Travel Bug Coffee Shop 839 Paseo de Peralta, 992-0418 A slide lecture features a 16-day trek in Nepal. 5 pm, free LINDA TIGGES: SAN MIGUEL CHAPEL’S 1710 REBUILDING San Miguel Chapel 401 Old Santa Fe Trail, 983-3974 The historian discusses the chapel’s storied past. 4 pm, $10 VALERIE RANGEL: ENVIRONMENTAL JUSTICE IN NEW MEXICO: COUNTING COUP op.cit Books DeVargas Center, 157 Paseo de Peralta, 428-0321 Rangel describes ways to protect natural systems, religious freedom and traditions. 2 pm, free

FLAMENCO FIESTA STUDENT RECITAL AND SEVILLANAS CONTEST Teatro Paraguas 3205 Calle Marie, 424-1601 Check out the dancers' skills first, then watch (or enter!) a dance contest at 7 pm. 5:30 pm, $20-$25

EVENTS DEMOCRATIC PARTY OF SANTA FE COUNTY COUNTY CENTRAL COMMITTEE MEETING Ortiz Middle School 4164 S Meadows Road The DPSFC holds elections and talks the talk. 10:30 am, free FUTURE FANTASY DELIGHT LAUNCH PARTY Meow Wolf 1352 Rufina Circle, 395-6369 Celebrate FFD’s new collection (see SFR Picks, page 19). 9 pm-2 am, $18-$22 EL MUSEO WINTER MARKET El Museo Cultural de Santa Fe 555 Camino de la Familia, 992-0591 Part fine arts market, part flea market, all full of treasures. 8 am-3 pm, free NEW MEXICO CANNABIS EXPO Santa Fe Community Convention Center 201 W Marcy St., 955-6590 You don't have to have your medical cannabis card to check out this info day. And visit SFR, we'll have a table. 11 am-5 pm, free SANTA FE ARTISTS MARKET Santa Fe Railyard Market Street at Alcaldesa Street, 310-8766 Local art is the best art. 8 am-2 pm, free SANTA FE SEED LIBRARY KICK-OFF Santa Fe Public Library Southside 6599 Jaguar Drive, 955-2820 Celebrate the library's new project. 1-4 pm, free TRANSFORMATIVE HEALING: THE NEW PARADIGM OF PSYCHEDELIC RESEARCH Lensic Performing Arts Center 211 W San Francisco St., 988-1234 Learn more about the controversial but promising option of psychedelic microdosing. 3:30-6 pm, free

THEATER

DANCE

FOOD

THE MISER The Oasis Theatre 3205 Calle Marie, Ste. A, 917-439-7708 This classic comedy is Molière at his best. 7:30 pm, $27 TREVOR Santa Fe Playhouse 142 E De Vargas St., 988-4262 A subversive tragicomedy revolves around Trevor, a 200-pound chimpanzee (see Acting Out, page 29). 7:30 pm, $15-$25

ENTREFLAMENCO SPRING BREAK SEASON El Flamenco de Santa Fe 135 W Palace Ave., 209-1302 A dramatic new dance season. Doors open an hour early for dinner (sold separately). 7:30 pm, $25-$40 FLAMENCO DINNER SHOW El Farol 808 Canyon Road, 983-9912 A show by the National Institute of Flamenco. 6:30 pm, $25

BREWSKI Ski Santa Fe 1477 Hwy. 475, 982-4429 Nine local breweries pour their delicious craft beer, Greg Butera and the Gunsels providesome rocking tunes, and you get to enjoy a day on the slopes paired with some of New Mexico’s greatest beers! That entry fee gets you a Silipint, a beer of your choice and three samples. 11 am-3 pm, $18


THE CALENDAR

ENTER EVENTS AT SFREPORTER.COM/CAL

SANTA FE FARMERS MARKET Farmers Market Pavilion 1607 Paseo de Peralta, 983-4098 It’s a produce-o-rama, folks. 8 am-1 pm, free

with Chris Diestler

MUSIC

COURTESY CHRIS DIESTLER

Some know Chris Diestler (aka The Mighty D) as a comic book guy. To others, he’s Uncle Jesse from Hutton Broadcasting’s country station, or the mind behind radio station KBAC’s show Toast and Jam. However you know him, he’s been a mainstay at Hutton and its stations since ... forever. But now he’s also KBAC’s director of programming, a job he took over after longtime beloved radio genius Ira Gordon retired earlier this year. We’re Diestler fans, so we called him up. (Alex De Vore)

What brought you to the radio game? Originally, I moved into the dorms the first day of college [at Washington State University] and realized there was a campus radio station, and I thought that sounded like fun. And I ran over that day or the next day and said, ‘Sign me up, I’ll work for free!’ And they said ‘Good, ‘cause everyone works for free!’ I wasn’t in school for broadcasting specifically, but they had an excellent broadcasting program, and I spent all my time doing that as an extra curricular. I probably changed my major, like, five times; graduated with a fine art degree and a double minor in broadcasting and drama.

PUBLIC LECTURE Nicolasa Chavez: “The History of Dance and Flamenco in New Mexico”

What would you say is the value of community radio? There are a lot of things that community radio does that are now doable on the internet and people’s phones, but sometimes people just don’t wanna deal with that while they’re driving, so it becomes something they can tune into to hear what’s going on. And sure, there are other ways they can find that out, but radio has this weird immediacy to it. People will sometimes flip out like, ‘Ohmygod! there’s a band coming in September and I need to get tickets now!’ because they heard it on the radio, whereas when they come across it online they maybe don’t. In this day and age when we have all the information we want at our fingertips, but we rarely try to call it up. The thing I love about KBAC is that it’s kind of the radio format without a format. It’s almost freeform, like the old days of radio.

An entertaining performance and lecture detailing the artistry and legacy of dance in New Mexico and its roots in Spain. Tuesday, March 26, 6:00 pm; doors open at 5:15 St. Francis Auditorium at the New Mexico Museum of Art, 107 West Palace Ave., Santa Fe Admission: $10 at the door; free for Members and Volunteers of El Rancho de las Golondrinas and the New Mexico Museum of Art.

OK then, big boss—what’s in the future for KBAC then? I don’t know. I didn’t think I would [advance]. … I thought I’d reached the top of the ladder over here, but it turns out I was wrong. I’ve been doing it for 34 years now, and I’ve always enjoyed it. As long as I get to play some good records and turn people on to information they can use, I feel like I’ve done a good job for the day. It’s kind of like being the town crier—you’re standing there clanging a bell shouting ‘Hear ye! Hear ye!’

P H OTO: M A R Y- C H A R LOTT E D O M A N D I , R A D I O CA F E . O R G

THE BARBEDWIRES Mine Shaft Tavern 2846 Hwy. 14, Madrid, 473-0743 Soulful blues on the deck. 3 pm, free BARD ERDINGTON AND PALM IN THE CYPRESS Second Street Brewery (Rufina Taproom) 2920 Rufina St., 954-1068 Mississippi Delta blues and Appalachian folk music, with support from Ry Warner and his country-adjacent tunes. 7:30 pm, free THE BUS TAPES Second Street Brewery (Original) 1814 Second St., 982-3030 Alternative folk-rock. 7 pm, free CHANGO Cowgirl 319 S Guadalupe St., 982-2565 Danceable cover tunes. 8:30 pm, free CHAT NOIR CABARET Los Magueyes Mexican Restaurant 31 Burro Alley, 992-0304 A subversive piano cabaret. 6 pm, free CLAUDIO TOLOUSSE Tonic 103 E Water St., 982-1189 Latin jazz. 9:30 pm, free DANA SMITH Upper Crust Pizza (Eldorado) 5 Colina Drive, 471-1111 Country-tinged folk songs. 6 pm, free DAVID LIEBE HART Meow Wolf 1352 Rufina Circle, 395-6369 A music/puppets/storytelling extravaganza. 8-11 pm, $15 DOUG MONTGOMERY AND JOHN RANDALL Fenix at Vanessie 427 W Water St., 982-9966 Piano standards. 6 pm, free FELIX Y LOS GATOS El Farol 808 Canyon Road, 983-9912 Blues, cumbia, rock y más. 9 pm, $5 FOX WHITE Mine Shaft Tavern 2846 Hwy. 14, Madrid, 473-0743 Rock 'n' roll ‘n’ punk. 8 pm, free FULL OWL Social Kitchen & Bar 725 Cerrillos Road, 982-5952 Americana. 7 pm, free GARY BARTEN'S SOUND PAINTINGS Paradiso 903 Early St. New compositions on synthesizer, steel guitar, dulcimer, mandolin and percussion. 8 pm, $10-$15

For more information go to golondrinas.org or call 505-471-2261. presented by

support provided by the city of santa fe arts commission and the 1% lodgers’ tax, county of santa fe lodgers’ tax, new mexico arts, and new mexico bank and trust

CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE

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THE CALENDAR HALF BROKE HORSES Cowgirl 319 S Guadalupe St., 982-2565 Country and Americana. 1-4 pm, free INVOCATION Santa Fe Oxygen & Healing Bar (Kaverns) 137 W San Francisco St., 986-5037 Immersive dance music. 8 pm, free LITTLE LEROY AND HIS PACK OF LIES Tesuque Casino 7 Tesuque Road, 984-8414 Rock 'n' roll. 10 pm, free THE REAL MATT JONES Tesuque Casino 7 Tesuque Road, 984-8414 Country ‘n’ country. 5 pm, free RHOMBUS ENSEMBLE El Mesón 213 Washington Ave., 983-6756 Weirdo jazz. 7:30 pm, free RON ROUGEAU The Dragon Room 406 Old Santa Fe Trail, 983-7712 Acoustic rock. 5:30 pm, free RONALD ROYBAL Hotel Santa Fe 1501 Paseo de Peralta, 982-1200 Flute ‘n’ guitar. 7 pm, free ROVER Cava Lounge Eldorado Hotel, 309 W San Francisco St., 988-4455 Flamenclasica guitarra. 6 pm, free SAVOR La Fiesta Lounge 100 E San Francisco St., 982-5511 Cuban street music. 8 pm, free TIFFANY CHRISTOPHER AND JAKE REYNOLDS Tumbleroot Brewery & Distillery 2791 Agua Fría St. Rock 'n' roll from two locals. 7 pm, free WESTIN LEE & COMPANY Iconik Coffee Roasters (Lupe) 314 S Guadalupe St., 428-0996 American folk. 11 am-1 pm, free

THEATER THE MISER The Oasis Theatre 3205 Calle Marie, Ste. A, 917-439-7708 Comedic Molière at his best. 7:30 pm, $27 TREVOR Santa Fe Playhouse 142 E De Vargas St., 988-4262 A tragicomedy revolves around Trevor, a chimpanzee (see Acting Out, page 29). 7:30 pm, $15-$25

WORKSHOP FAMILY PROGRAM: GROWING TOGETHER IN THE GARDEN Santa Fe Botanical Garden 715 Camino Lejo, 471-9103 Make "seed dumplings," full of wildflower seeds plus everything they need to flourish. 2-3 pm, $10-$15

ENTER EVENTS AT SFREPORTER.COM/CAL

SANTA FE LANDSCAPING FROM THE GROUND UP Stewart Udall Center 725 Camino Lejo, 983-6155 Learn to establish a successful landscape in New Mexico. 1-5 pm, $15-$25

SUN/24 BOOKS/LECTURES BUILD THOSE WALLS, WE COME FROM THE STARS Museum of Int’l Folk Art 706 Camino Lejo, 476-1200 Artists discuss their commissioned mural at MOIFA (see SFR Picks, page 19). 2 pm, $6-$12 JOHN DORSEY AND VICTOR ADAM CLEVENGER Teatro Paraguas 3205 Calle Marie, 424-1601 Poets present unique works. 5 pm, free JOURNEYSANTAFE: REPRESENTATIVE ANDREA ROMERO Collected Works Bookstore and Coffeehouse 202 Galisteo St., 988-4226 Words from the Rep. 11 am, free SUNDAY LECTURE SERIES: NUMEROLOGY AND EMPATHY Prana Blessings 1925 Rosina St., Ste. C, 772-0771 Hear from numerologist John Holmes and energy healer Genai Ellen Wachs. Noon-2 pm, free YA BOOKCLUB: TWEAK: GROWING UP ON METHAMPHETAMINES Collected Works Bookstore and Coffeehouse 202 Galisteo St., 988-4226 For teens aged 14-18. 4:15 pm, free

DANCE BELLY DANCE WITH AREENA Lightfoot Studio 332 Camino del Monte Sol, 369-2055 Learn the essentials of belly dance technique in a superfun, all-ages, multi-level class. Your first class is free! 1:30-3 pm, $15

EVENTS EL MUSEO WINTER MARKET El Museo Cultural de Santa Fe 555 Camino de la Familia, 992-0591 Part fine arts market, part flea market, all full of treasures. 9 am-4 pm, free MEDITATIONS IN MODERN BUDDHISM Zoetic 230 St. Francis Drive, 292-5293 Open to all levels. 10:30 am-Noon, $10 RAILYARD ARTISAN MARKET Farmers Market Pavilion 1607 Paseo de Peralta, 983-4098 Get art right from the source. 10 am-4 pm, free

FILM INDIAN 101 Museum of Indian Arts & Culture 710 Camino Lejo, 476-1250 Native activist and national civil rights leader LaDonna Harris, after entering the world of politics via her US Senator husband, was tasked with educating the US government on American Indian Tribes. This course was called “Indian 101;” learn more from this award-winning film. She’ll be present at MIAC, too. 1-3 pm, free

FOOD GARDEN TO MUG: CLASS ON TEA Santa Fe Botanical Garden 715 Camino Lejo, 471-9103 Drink and learn all about tea, then taste samples of different types. 2-3:30 pm, $15-$20

MUSIC BLACK UHURU The Bridge @ SF Brewing Co. 37 Fire Place, 557-6182 Grammy-winning reggae. 8 pm, $25-$30 CRAWFISH BOYZ Tesuque Casino 7 Tesuque Road, 984-8414 New Orleans-flavored jazz. 11:30 am, free DOUG MONTGOMERY Fenix at Vanessie 427 W Water St., 982-9966 Piano standards. 6:30 pm, free HER'S Meow Wolf 1352 Rufina Circle, 395-6369 The UK’s premier crank-pop duo. 7-10:30 pm, $15-$18 J REYNOLDS Cowgirl 319 S Guadalupe St., 982-2565 Psychedelic funk 'n' folk. 8 pm, free JOAQUIN GALLEGOS La Fiesta Lounge 100 E San Francisco St., 982-5511 Flamenco guitar. 6 pm, free NACHA MENDEZ La Boca (Taberna Location) 125 Lincoln Ave., 988-7102 Smooth Latin tunes. 7 pm, free PAT MALONE AND JON GAGAN El Farol 808 Canyon Road, 983-9912 A jazzy duet. 7 pm, free READ STREET SUNDAY SESSIONS: JOHN FRANCIS TRIO Santa Fe Spirits 308 Read St., 780-5906 Finely arranged original music. 7 pm, free RED LIGHT CAMERAS Tumbleroot Brewery & Distillery 2791 Agua Fría St. Soulful rock and garage pop. 7 pm, free SUGAR MOUNTAIN Cowgirl 319 S Guadalupe St., 982-2565 Neil Young tribute. Noon, free CONTINUED ON PAGE 28

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S FR E P O RTE R .CO M /A RTS

ALEX DE VORE

JARED TRUJILLO

Curatorial

KEEP Contemporary’s Jared Antonio-Justo Trujillo on the gallery’s present and future, and his own artistic pursuits

LEFT: Jared AntonioJusto Trujillo didn’t title this piece, but we love an astronaut. RIGHT: The artist/gallerist/curator himself.

BY ALEX DE V0RE a l e x @ s f r e p o r t e r. c o m

I

was running two galleries and doing 24 shows a year at the Jean Cocteau [Cinema] and KEEP,” Jared Antonio-Justo Trujillo explains. We’re sitting inside his space, KEEP Contemporary at Lincoln Avenue and Marcy Street, on a recent gray afternoon, and he seems tired—but good-tired. The kind of tired that comes from realizing you don’t have to do 24 shows a year anymore because your gallery has been packed for every opening since day one. Trujillo still curates at the Cocteau, but KEEP is his main focus these days, and he’s upped the exhibit schedule in recent months due to community and artist feedback. Things are undoubtedly going well. His business partner Katy O’Sullivan busies herself nearby as Trujillo explains his past is mostly off-limits. He’s more interested in the present. The future, he says, is not a major concern. This feels wise, and Trujillo does seem to have grown as a curator and gallerist since he originally opened KEEP on San Francis-

co Street in December of 2016. The cluttered feel of too-many-artists remains in the new space (“I can’t help myself,” Trujillo says, “I’ve gotta work on that”). But even with pieces spilling onto the floor and nearly into one another, it’s hard to ignore that the vast majority are quite good or—at the very least—things you won’t find elsewhere. You’ll see Farmington artist Rosemary Meza-DesPlas’ pieces, which experiment with hair sewn into paper, alongside Santa Fe-based (and SFR favorite) Sienna Luna’s emotional and mathematical hybrid illustration-paintings; Christian Ristow— perhaps best known for the massive robot in the Meow Wolf parking lot—shows mixed-media statuary (a torso growing seamlessly from birch) nearby Dylan Pommer’s black and greyscale resin sculpture reminiscent of Fleischer Studios characters. Elsewhere you’ll find work from Albuquerque’s Leo Gonzales, and KEEP has shown or continues to show work from New York tattooer Zach Scheinbaum, locals Katy Kidd, Nico Salazar and Wonky, plus Instagram-famous creators, outsider weirdos, co-owner O’Sullivan and … the

list goes on. It’s impressive particularly in its emphasis on current and former locals who eschew tired landscape-and-clouds pieces for work inspired by tattoo, skate culture, anime, lowriders et al. “You’ve got to involve the locals—and I own the place, so I can do whatever I want,” Trujillo says with a laugh. “But I think KEEP has a great thing going by showcasing work most galleries won’t.” This isn’t just a story about KEEP’s rise as a self-described community gallery, or its apparent need to tone down the number of pieces on the walls—it’s meant to highlight Trujillo’s own return to creation. After the move to Lincoln Avenue late last year, and at the urging of O’Sullivan, he’s beginning to explore and show his own work more often, pursuits that had taken a bit of a backseat while he got the gallery off the ground. Trujillo unveils some of these new works this Saturday in Where There is Darkness, You Are the Light, a small but intriguing spate of pieces that reside someplace between graffiti-esque street art and sign-making. Trujillo designs the pieces on paper then has them fabricated and cut in

Trevor

by Nick Jones At the Santa Fe Playhouse 142 E. DeVargas Street

March 21–31 For full details and to buy tickets:

www.TheatreSantaFe.org

Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays at 7:30 pm; Sundays at 2 pm

A&C

powder-coated metal and vinyl with jetpowered water. In these pieces, which he calls “symbiosis,” certain distortedthough-recognizable elements, such as Zia symbol iconography or tribal tattooesque design, peek out. LED lights are affixed to their flip sides, which cast shadows and create a three-dimensional effect. Some even create the illusion of movement with the light cast against the wall at an angle. Some have already sold. Trujillo says he’s designed them as far back as he can recall but that the fabrication method is new. He developed the technique while working as a sign-maker; it is indeed the type of thing you might not see anyplace else, and works well alongside the broader themes of the gallery. “Judging from what people say when they come in, it’s refreshing to have something so different,” Trujillo says. “There are tons of galleries downtown. They’re all kind of the same thing. And don’t get me wrong—I love Santa Fe, the culture, the regional art, the Native art; it’s here for a reason. But to me, this, what we’re doing? This is not new. It’s everywhere: LA, New York, Vancouver. This is why [people] love Pop Gallery or Stranger Factory [in Albuquerque]; it’s the most exciting and honest work out there.” And, he says, there’s lots more to come, which can only mean good things for the subversion of the accepted downtown artscape, as well as for lesser-known artists currently toiling to change the script. “As a kid growing up in Santa Fe, I would have never dreamt of being where I am now,” Trujillo adds. “What made Santa Fe beautiful? Creativity did. And I guess what I’m trying to say is that everything about KEEP is not normal. We’re unorthodox.” JARED ANTONIO-JUSTO TRUJILLO: WHERE THERE IS DARKNESS, YOU ARE THE LIGHT 5 pm Saturday March 23. Free. KEEP Contemporary, 142 Lincoln Ave., 307-9824

The Miser

by Molière With a new translation by David Carter At the Oasis Theatre 3205 Calle Marie, Suite A

March 21–April 7 Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays at 7:30 pm; Sundays at 3 pm

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YO U ’ L L L OV E W H AT YO U S E E ! WED | MAR 20 | 7 pm

THE CALENDAR THE UKULELE ORCHESTRA OF GREAT BRITAIN Lensic Performing Arts Center 211 W San Francisco St., 988-1234 Folk songs, classical music favorites and original songs. 7:30 pm, $29-$50

THEATER THE MISER The Oasis Theatre 3205 Calle Marie, Ste. A, 917-439-7708 This classic comedy is perhaps Molière at his best. 3 pm, $27 TREVOR Santa Fe Playhouse 142 E De Vargas St., 988-4262 A subversive tragicomedy revolves around a chimpanzee (see Acting Out, page 29). 2 pm, $15-$25

WORKSHOP “A HIGH-TECH MAGIC

EXTRAVAGANZA” -NEW YORK TIMES

LENSIC .ORG NONPROFIT, COMMUNITY-SUPPORTED

SEASON SPONSOR

5 0 5 - 9 8 8 -1 2 3 4 SERVICE CHARGES APPLY AT ALL POINTS OF PURCHASE

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LENSIC PRESENTS SUPPORT

DECORATIVE WIRE WRAPPING MAKE Santa Fe 2879 All Trades Road, 819-3502 Embellish everyday objects. 1:30-3 pm, $35 SOILS TESTING WORKSHOP New Mexico Wildlife Center 19 Wheat St., Española, 753-9505 Learn how to interpret lab results and treat deficiencies. 1-4 pm, free

MON/25 BOOKS/LECTURES

SFR 2019 Spring Poetry Search THE

WINNERS READ THEIR POEMS FREE | 6 PM MONDAY,

MARCH 25 at Collected Works 202 Galisteo St. Santa Fe, NM 87501

MONDAY STORY TIME Bee Hive Kid's Books 328 Montezuma Ave, 780-8051 Story time for all ages. 10:30 am, free SFR SPRING POETRY SEARCH WINNERS Collected Works Bookstore and Coffeehouse 202 Galisteo St., 988-4226 Winners of SFR's poetry contest read their winning pieces (see Cover, page 12). 6 pm, free SOUTHWEST SEMINARS: GROWTH OF PUEBLO SOCIETY IN THE LOWER RIO CHAMA VALLEY Hotel Santa Fe 1501 Paseo de Peralta, 982-1200 Archaeologist Timothy Maxwell lectures. 6 pm, $15 THE CODED LANGUAGE OF COLOR: AN ESOTERIC JOURNEY Santa Fe Public Library Main Branch 145 Washington Ave., 955-6780 An introductory talk and practical demonstrations of the electromagnetic basis of color and its effect on life. 6:30 pm, free WOMEN MARKED FOR HISTORY Montezuma Lodge 431 Paseo de Peralta, 670-3068 Rosanne Roberts Archuletta and Phil Archuletta discuss the women on historical markers all over New Mexico. 5:45 pm, $5

ENTER EVENTS AT SFREPORTER.COM/CAL

EVENTS

WORKSHOP

FINDING CALM IN THE STORM Thubten Norbu Ling Tibetan Buddhist Center 1807 Second St., Ste. 35, 660-7056 Explore the nature of the emotion of anger and learn Buddhist methods to help reduce its harmful effects. Noon-1 pm, $10 SANTA FE INDIVISIBLE MEETING Center for Progress and Justice 1420 Cerrillos Road, 467-8514 Join these politically progressive folks for group activism. 7 pm, free THE SANTA FE HARMONIZERS REHEARSAL Zia United Methodist Church 3368 Governor Miles Road, 699-6922 The barbershop chorus is looking for men and women who can carry a tune. 6:30 pm, free

TAX-AIDE SANTA FE Higher Education Building 1950 Siringo Road Call 505-946-3615 or go online at sfcc.edu/taxaide to reserve a time for free tax help. 8 am-4 pm, free

MUSIC BILL HEARNE TRIO La Fiesta Lounge 100 E San Francisco St., 982-5511 Honky-tonk and Americana. 7:30 pm, free DOUG MONTGOMERY AND ELIZABETH YOUNG Fenix at Vanessie 427 W Water St., 982-9966 Standards on piano and violin. 6:30 pm, free ENCUENTROS INTIMOS CON ENGINE Paradiso 903 Early St. The Franco-Argentinean trio performs Latin-rock-ish tunes. 7:30 pm, $15-$20 EUFORIA TRIO Tesuque Casino 7 Tesuque Road, 984-8414 A breakout trio from the all-female Mariachi Buenaventura. 6 pm, free RAYLAND BAXTER Meow Wolf 1352 Rufina Circle, 395-6369 After three months hiding out in a rubber band factory in Kentucky, Baxter had penned more than 50 tunes and crafted a detailed blueprint for a record of easygoing, soulful tunes with British Invasion melodies and rock and roll swagger. 7-10:30 pm, $15-$18

THEATER YOUNG PLAYWRIGHTS PROJECT Santa Fe Public Library Southside 6599 Jaguar Drive, 955-2820 Santa Fe kids aged 8 to 12 years old are invited to participate in this theater boot camp to dive into improvisation, theater games, creating scenes and characters, and developing character monologues. For more more information, call Marguerite at 795-0739 or email her at ypp@santafeplayhouse.org. 3:30-5 pm, free

TUE/26 BOOKS/LECTURES KATIE ARNOLD: RUNNING HOME Garcia Street Books 376 Garcia St., 986-0151 Arnold, contributing editor at Outside magazine, presents her memoir about the stories we tell ourselves to make sense of our world. 6 pm, free NICOLASA CHÁVEZ: THE HISTORY OF FLAMENCO AND DANCE IN NEW MEXICO St. Francis Auditorium 107 W Palace Ave., 476-5072 Chávez lectures as part of El Rancho de las Golondrinas' Speaking of Tradition series. 6 pm, $10 SRIVIDYA IYER-BISWAS: LAWS OF LIFE, TIME AND CHANCE Lensic Performing Arts Center 211 W San Francisco St., 988-1234 Iyer-Biswas works to discover the basic physical laws that govern the probabilistic behavior of single cells. 7:30 pm, free

EVENTS ARTIST-IN-RESIDENCE DINNER Institute of American Indian Arts 83 Avan Nu Po Road, 424-2351 Join IAIA artists-in-residence for dinner in the Balzer Contemporary Edge Gallery. 5-7 pm, free METTA REFUGE COUNCIL Upaya Zen Center 1404 Cerro Gordo Road, 986-8518 A support group for sharing life experiences around illness and loss in a variety of its forms. 10:30 am, free

FILM GAME OF THRONES SEASON 7 SCREENING Jean Cocteau Cinema 418 Montezuma Ave., 466-5528 Screen two episodes (see SFR Picks, page 19). 6:30 pm, free

MUSIC BILL HEARNE TRIO La Fiesta Lounge 100 E San Francisco St., 982-5511 Honky-tonk and Americana. 7:30 pm, free BLUEGRASS JAM Social Kitchen & Bar 725 Cerrillos Road, 982-5952 Three guesses to what this is. 6 pm, free CONTINUED ON PAGE 30

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SFRE PORTE R .CO M /A RTS /ACTI N G O UT

ACTING OUT Working for Peanuts or anyone who’s ever loved an animal; for anyone who’s ever taken care of something simultaneously helpless and challenging, if not deadly; for anyone who’s ever listened to a guinea pig wheeping in its cage and wondered what the hell it thinks it’s saying (because it seems awfully passionate); we have a play for you. Loosely based on the true story of a pet chimpanzee named Travis who injured a Connecticut woman nearly fatally in 2009, Trevor is playwright Nick Jones’ incredibly smart script, here placed in capable hands. Currently onstage at the Santa Fe Playhouse, this production doesn’t have a weak link. That’s quite a feat for a complex work that could easily stymie a small theater community. Actress Marguerite Louise Scott is Sandra, a doting if eccentric widow whose country home features scribbles on the walls, a large cage in the yard and a roving adolescent chimp. Trevor, played by Evan Dalzell, speaks in perfectly good— and perhaps even haughty—English. He tells Sandra how he wants to get a job and is discouraged by his inability to get back into acting (he once starred in a pilot with Morgan Fairchild, after all), and laments discrimination against chimpanzees in the workplace. Okay, that makes it sound trite and precious. It’s not. Especially when we realize, when Sandra begins baby-talking Trevor and using rudimentary sign language to communicate, that she has no idea what he’s saying. To her, all he’s doing is making nonsense noise. Vice versa, Trevor doesn’t understand Sandra except for select words or objects (Hollywood, coffee, wine, Morgan Fairchild), and watching them try to talk is both funny and frustrating in turn. For example, when Trevor says eloquently that he’d like to send emails

to his business contacts and get in touch with the Screen Actors Guild about his desire to get back into show business, Sandra smiles and coos sweetly: “Oh, you wanna say hellooooo to your friends on the compuuuuter?” Simultaneously, though, Sandra’s anthropomorphizing of her pet actually contains kernels of truth—a particularly funny device for anyone who’s had to deal with pet owners in service settings. When apologizing for Trevor’s increasingly aggressive behavior, she pleads: “He’s frustrated! What he needs is a creative outlet!” Of course, without Trevor’s insight, this CARRIE McCARTHY

F

BY C H A R LOT T E J U S I N S K I c o p y e d i t o r @ s f r e p o r t e r. c o m

would sound ridiculous. But with his insight, we know it is perhaps actually true. Also an aid in the show’s dramatic impact, rather than the childishness that could be inherent in a talking-animal trope, is Dalzell’s subtle characterization as a chimp. Wearing overalls and a T-shirt, he could still pass for a human character. But his bowed legs, bare feet, doing everything with his knuckles and occasional flying leaps across the stage (seriously, they’re shocking in their athleticism) keep him in the realm of apedom. Oliver, another chimp-actor that occasionally advises Trevor in dreams or hallucinations (played by RJ Henkel, who comically wears spats on his bare feet) employs similar characterization to nice effect. This kind of script is incredibly difficult to perform, and these actors deserve commendation for delivering it without any perceptible hiccups. When two characters are “conversing” with lines that have absolutely no relation to each other, it takes just about forever to remember what comes next (if you ever do). But they pull it off, with virtually no dead air and a swift pace that evoked laughter and exasperated sighs alike in the audience. A cast of characters moves in and out in side-plots around Sandra and Trevor, including flashbacks and fantasies featuring Fairchild herself (a very funny Isabel Madley) and a production assistant (Evan Galpert), a terrified neighbor who fears for her baby’s safety (Veronica Everett) and

THEATER

a cop in charge of laying down some kind of law (Stephen Rommel). While each are strong, none of the side characters are a caricature, and the solid ensemble front presented by this cast serves the knotted story well. This show is a particular triumph for Scott. A mainstay in the Santa Fe theater scene, particularly at the Santa Fe Playhouse, Scott is excellent at portraying goofy, comedic characters. She has done so many a time and to great success on this stage, and Trevor includes tons of laugh-out-loud moments. However, any time heretofore that Scott has been cast as a straight or less-wonky character, she’s faltered—not based on her ability, in my estimation, but rather due to her tendency toward self-deprecation. She doesn’t give her own natural grace enough credit. But here, at last, Scott has taken charge of her ability to break our hearts. Her heartfelt dialogues with her beloved charge brought me to tears. We feel her breathlessness as she tries desperately to control him—but he can’t possibly understand. And as he tries in vain to communicate with her, in Dalzell’s often tender performance, we forgive Trevor’s transgressions, though we know there’s really only one way this is going to end up. Director Monique Lacoste had her work cut out for her with this one. The sheer logistics of casting an ape, not to mention finding actors who can hold the duality of howling laughter and wrenching poignancy, was likely no easy feat. I imagine that weeks of table work went into the nuance and motivation of characters that can change on a dime. Coincidentally, on the Sunday of opening weekend, Lacoste shared a story on Facebook that told a tale almost tailor-made for those considering Trevor: In 2010, a bunch of monkeys in Japan managed to escape a research center by using trees to catapult themselves over an electric fence. It’s a story perhaps scary in its implications about the primates’ problem-solving intelligence and desire for autonomy. But the monkeys were easily lured back into the facility with peanuts. How a creature can be so complex and simultaneously so simple applies to everyone here: to Trevor, of course, both potentially violent and enamored of his stuffed bunny—but also to the humans, whose love of each other, rules, success or their kin dictates their actions, sometimes to disastrous ends. TREVOR

Marguerite Louise Scott hits her stride as Sandra, caring for her beloved chimpanzee Trevor. Evan Dalzell, who plays the titular ape, creates an animal character without being cartoonish.

7:30 pm Thursdays-Saturdays March 21-30; 2 pm Sundays March 24-31. $15-$25. Santa Fe Playhouse, 142 E De Vargas St., 988-4262.

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THE CALENDAR CANYON ROAD BLUES JAM El Farol 808 Canyon Road, 983-9912 Sign up to sing or play if you desire. 8 pm, $5 CHUSCALES La Boca (Original Location) 72 W Marcy St., 982-3433 Exotic flamenco guitar. 7 pm, free GARY GORENCE Cowgirl 319 S Guadalupe St., 982-2565 Classic rock. 8 pm, free JOHN RANDALL Fenix at Vanessie 427 W Water St., 982-9966 Piano standards. 6:30 pm, free

ENTER EVENTS AT SFREPORTER.COM/CAL

MIKE DOUGHTY Meow Wolf 1352 Rufina Circle, 395-6369 Doughty, founder of seminal '90s band Soul Coughing, gets support from Wheatus. 8 pm, $22-$25 RICK MENA Tesuque Casino 7 Tesuque Road, 984-8414 Classical and flamenco guitar, country, bluegrass, Cajun, blues, pop, rock and jazz. 5 pm, free VINTAGE VINYL NITE The Matador 116 W San Francisco St., 984-5050 DJ Prairiedog and DJ Mama Goose spin the best in garage, surf, country and rockabilly till the wee hours. 9 pm, free

WORKSHOP PRO-TEC PROGRAM INFO SESSION NM Workforce Connections 301 W DeVargas St. PRO-TEC offers training in a variety of industries. It starts on April 22; get all the info you need at this session. For more info, call 428-1748. 4 pm, free TAX-AIDE SANTA FE Higher Education Building 1950 Siringo Road Santa Fe Community College and the AARP have teamed up again to offer tax help to ust about anyone who wants it. Visit sfcc.edu/taxaide to reserve a time for free tax help. 8 am-4 pm, free

P R E S E A S O N S A L E A L L B I K E S T E N T O T H I R T Y P E R C E N T OFFUNTIL T A X D AYA P R I L FIFTEENTH MMXIX

Downtown Santa Fe 30

MARCH 20-26, 2019

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CENTER FOR CONTEMPORARY ARTS 1050 Old Pecos Trail, 982-1338 Jeremy Thomas: Unintended Consequences. Sharon Bartel Clements: Warrior Women Torso Project. Both through April 21. GEORGIA O’KEEFFE MUSEUM 217 Johnson St., 946-1000 The Candid Camera. Through April 22. HARWOOD MUSEUM OF ART 238 Ledoux St., Taos, 575-758-9826 The Legacy of Helene Wurlitzer: Works from the Harwood Collection. Through May 5. Izumi Yokoyama and Tasha Ostrander: Birds of Appetite: Alchemy & Apparition. Lynda Benglis: Bird’s Nest. Both through May 12. IAIA MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY NATIVE ARTS 108 Cathedral Place, 983-8900 #NOFILTER: IAIA 2019 BFA Exhibition. Through May 11. Action/Abstraction Redefined. Through July 7. Robyn Tsinnajinnie and Austin Big Crow: The Holy Trinity. Through Oct. 31. Wayne Nez Gaussoin: Adobobot. Through Nov. 30. Heidi K Brandow: Unit of Measure. Through Jan. 31. MUSEUM OF ENCAUSTIC ART 632 Agua Fría St., 989-3283 National and international wax artists. MUSEUM OF INDIAN ARTS & CULTURE 710 Camino Lejo, 476-1250 What’s New in New: Selections from the Carol Warren Collection. Through April 7. Lifeways of the Southern Athabaskans. Through July 7. Beyond Standing Rock: The Past, Present, and Future of the Water Protectors. Through Oct. 27. MUSEUM OF INT’L FOLK ART 706 Camino Lejo, 476-1200

KATHY WHITMAN ELK WOMAN “CHOOSING OIL OVER WATER...WATER IS SACRED”

MUSEUMS

Beyond Standing Rock at the Museum of Indian Arts & Culture doesn’t mince words—or imagery. A Gathering of Voices: Folk Art from the Judith Espinar and Tom Dillenberg Collection. Through Sept. 8. Gallery of Conscience: Community Through Making from Peru to New Mexico. MUSEUM OF SPANISH COLONIAL ART 750 Camino Lejo, 982-2226 GenNext: Future So Bright REBOOT. Through March 29. NM HISTORY MUSEUM 113 Lincoln Ave., 476-5019 Atomic Histories. Through May 26. On Exhibit: Designs That Defined the Museum of New Mexico. Through July 28. The First World War. Through Nov. 11, 2019. NM MUSEUM OF ART 107 W Palace Ave., 476-5072 Shots in the Dark; Carved & Cast: 20th-Century New Mexican Sculpture. All through March 31. Wait Until Dark; Night Life Imagination Station. Both through April 21. PALACE OF THE GOVERNORS 105 W Palace Ave., 476-5100

Closed for renovations. POEH CULTURAL CENTER AND MUSEUM 78 Cities of Gold Road, Pojoaque, 455-3334 In T’owa Vi Sae’we. EL RANCHO DE LAS GOLONDRINAS 334 Los Pinos Road, 471-2261 Closed for the season; to reopen June 1. SANTA FE BOTANICAL GARDENS 715 Camino Lejo, 471-9103 Dan Ostermiller: Gardens Gone Wild! Through May 11. SITE SANTA FE 1606 Paseo de Peralta, 989-1199 Jacob Hashimoto: The Dark Isn’t The Thing to Worry About. Through March 24. WHEELWRIGHT MUSEUM OF THE AMERICAN INDIAN 704 Camino Lejo, 986-4636 LIT: The Work of Rose B Simpson. Bob Haozous: Old Man Looking Backward. Both through Oct. 6.


S FR E P O RTE R .CO M / FO O D

BY ZIBBY WILDER a u t h o r @ s f r e p o r t e r. c o m

D

oes anyone want to feed me? I went to Radish & Rye‘s new location (505 Cerrillos Road, 930-5325) only to find it closed for a private event, with no notification on its website or social media. Hungry in Tesuque, Google said El Nido (1577 Bishops Lodge Road, 954-1272) was open on a Monday evening. It wasn’t. Craving seafood, a group of us planned to meet at the Santa Fe location of Crackin’ Crab.. It’s front and center on the Crackin’ Crab website, yet apparently went out of business months ago (RIP). In all my years of writing about dining out, this has never happened. Is it just me? Does this happen to other people? Is the universe telling me to go on a diet? Is it the altitude? Is Mercury in retrograde? Please let it be a temporary astrological alignment because, according to the Tourism Santa Fe 2015 visitor report, the top attraction in our city is dining out. Imagine the disappointment of someone spending time planning a visit to Santa Fe around its beautiful eats, only to find the places they so carefully chose aren’t open when, or where, they say they are. This goes

MARCH

A plea to the restaurant marketers of Santa Fe

double for locals who, left hanging once, may not choose to return. I get that it’s hard enough just running a restaurant, much less dealing with all the marketing channels that have popped up over the years: Facebook, Instagram, Google business, websites, menu apps, online reservation systems and the like. Restaurants are in the business of feeding people, after all. But, to feed people, a restaurant needs to attract them. A fivestar Google business rating, pretty pic-

a lifestyle marketing consultant, my most repeated refrain was, “Why do you want to do it, who is your audience, is someone tasked with regular maintenance and do they have the skills for it?” For a business that does not have good answers to such questions, the best course of action might be not doing anything until it does. “Just because it’s there” doesn’t work for customers. Far better is to do it right in one place, then decide if the good work can be replicated and maintained elsewhere. Start with a website that is updated regularly and answers every question a potential customer may have. If that can be managed, then perhaps consider claiming a Google business listing. Google searches and map listings are likely among the top referrers to a business and take just minutes to set up and proactively manage. Once the basics are tackled, only then consider expanding to, and committing to, other avenues of communication. What good is a pretty picture of a dish on Facebook if someone shows up to eat it and finds the door is locked? Santa Fe has that “mañana” thing, but there’s no time like the present for restaurants (indeed, any service businesses) to take care of the business of their customers. Ponder getting rid of tools that aren’t really being used, or commit to using them properly. Spend a few minutes each week to ensure the information being put out there is up to date. Show customers you care enough to make sure you aren’t accidentally leaving them out in the cold. These efforts will go a long way toward keeping mouths wagging about, and at, your restaurant. ANSON STEVENS-BOLLEN

Use it or Lose it

tures, reviews, updated menus and media pages can do the trick, but if a restaurant is going to make use of such tools, it’s important to do so properly. So I say either use them right, or lose them. For customers, a website with all of the correct information and no social media presence at all is more useful than a website and a Facebook page which contradict each other. It shouldn’t be up to diners to have to check an establishment’s website, Facebook and Google listing to try and discern which information is correct. Diners shouldn’t bear the brunt of an establishment’s inability to manage its own vitals. Restaurants show they care about their customers by making sure the information they put out there is as good as the food they serve. For any business, it’s a good idea to regularly take stock of the communication tools at its disposal. In a former life as

FOOD

FREE LIVE MUSIC

Saturday

Friday

AT THE ORIGINAL SECOND STREET

22 23 THE BUSTAPES

HALF BROKE HORSES Americana, 7-10 PM / FREE

Folk Rock, 7-10 PM / FREE

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in history & heritage

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Report the Future. Apply now to join the next student reporting cohort. Our second student journalism internship program focuses on environmental issues. Applications are open for the 2019 paid internship program. Deadline for students is April 1.

NMJournalism.org

132 E. Marcy St., Santa Fe, New Mexico 87501

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MOVIES

RATINGS BEST MOVIE EVER

10 9 8

To Dust Review Mysteries of the corpus

8

BY JULIE ANN GRIMM e d i t o r @ s f r e p o r t e r. c o m

7

+ POIGNANT

A new twist on the odd-couple trope brings Matthew Broderick and Géza Rhorig to the center of this exploration of grief. Rhorig’s sensitive take on recently widowed Hasidic cantor Schmuel collides with Broderick’s awkward underachieving professor-type in filmmaker Shawn Snyder’s To Dust, a drama centered on death that also achieves the rare feat of being funny in the right dose. Though the audience never sees her face, the absence of Schmuel’s late wife is a character in itself—his inability to quickly let her go and move on is what defines him. When consultation with the rabbi does not settle his trouble, Schmuel seeks other counsel, ultimately landing in Albert’s community college classroom. Albert (Broderick) is at first a reluctant partner in Schmuel’s quest to understand the division between his wife’s physical body and the freedom of her immortal soul.

6 5 4 3 2 1 WORST MOVIE EVER

AND TENDER; ABSURD HILARITY - SUSPENSION OF DISBELIEF REQUIRED

As Schmuel tries to justify his orthodox beliefs with the earthly reality of decomposition, a series of unholy science experiments ensue, and the pair go on a bizarre journey. Broderick’s deadpan desire for distance is soon replaced by a kinship of sorts, and the characters unfold just enough to tug on the heartstrings. While there’s no doubt some stereotype about the sect of Judiasm is built in, the treatment of Schmuel’s faith and his traditions feels more reverent than exploitive. Schmuel’s sons (Leo Heller, Ready Player One, and Sammy Voit, The Americans) are splendid, attempting to solve their father’s adult problem while coming to terms with their childish ones. Toss in a critical cameo from Natalie Carter and

a bit of a melodramatic and kinda-sorta predictable twist in the end, and voila, existential crisis averted. Kinda-sorta. We appreciate the choice of sparse, deliberate dialog and poignant cinematography, and we’re relieved that there’s nothing too slapstick, allowing the natural funniness of humans being human to come through. While Albert ostensibly is helping Schmuel, they both seem to be unhinged enough to value a new friend and perhaps learn some things. TO DUST Directed by Snyder With Rhorig and Broderick Jean Cocteau Cinema, R, 105 min.

QUICKY REVIEWS

8

TO DUST

8

CAPTAIN MARVEL

6

9

YARDIE

7

LEAVING NEVERLAND

THE INVENTOR: OUT FOR BLOOD IN SILICON VALLEY

7

The newest documentary from HBO paints a chilling picture of Silicon Valley zealotry.

+ THE JOURNOS; THE COMPANY FOOTAGE

- THE STOCK FOOTAGE; PACING

When Silicon Valley med-tech startup Theranos promised it could conduct hundreds of consumer-ordered tests from a drop or two of finger-drawn capillary blood, often within a small, self-contained box device, big-name investors lined up and the all-too-powerful encircled CEO and founder Elizabeth Holmes. Holmes was young—a Stanford dropout with a great big idea. Billions were generated for a company cloaked in secrecy that promised far more than it could ever deliver. But as the misinformation grew and the apparent fraud mounted, Theranos doubled down on false data, ultimately bringing about its own demise amid a mountain of dangerous allegations and seeming insanity on the part of Holmes and her one-time COO, Ramesh “Sunny” Balwani. Documentarian Alex Gibney brings us all the gory details in The Inventor: Out for Blood in Silicon Valley, the newest HBO documentary. It’s a gripping tale that starts with hope, winds through schadenfreude and ultimately ends

BAUHAUS SPIRIT

up as a cautionary tale about the dangerous intersection of the American healthcare system, money and influence. We hate that it’s like this, but we strangely enjoy the ride. The Inventor predictably features numerous doctors, former employees and experts in candid interviews, but it’s the journalists throughout, from those who were duped by Holmes’ seemingly revolutionary ideas to those who recognized the grift and exposed it wholesale, who really bring the heat. With a nigh-unprecedented amount of footage from within the company—not to mention tech conferences, television appearances, photo shoots, etc.—Gibney deftly grasps and guides our emotions, of which there are many. We want to like Holmes, then we do like her, but we are eventually disgusted by her ego; or, as New Yorker contributor Ken Auletta, who wrote of Theranos, describes, her zeal. But mostly, we’re disappointed that this story is not uncommon in an America that lionizes the likes of Elizabeth Holmes and Steve Jobs while ignoring the facts in deference to charismatic businesspeople. Gibney does make bizarre choices now and then, from archival footage that just barely applies to offscreen narration or Holmes’ speeches to the glossing-over of a Theranos CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE

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• MARCH 20-26, 2019

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WEDNESDAY, MARCH 20 12:45p Ruben Brandt, Collector 2:45p Ruben Brandt, Collector 4:45p Ruben Brandt, Collector 7:00p NOW: Equal Means Equal THURSDAY, MARCH 21 12:45p Ruben Brandt, Collector 2:45p Ruben Brandt, Collector 4:45p Ruben Brandt, Collector 7:00p Ruben Brandt, Collector FRI - SUN, MARCH 22 - 24 10:45a Gloria Bell 1:00p Gloria Bell 3:15p Gloria Bell 5:30p Gloria Bell 7:45p Gloria Bell

Captain Marvel is fun, OK? Sometimes it’s OK to just like fun.

MON - TUES, MARCH 25 - 26 12:30p Gloria Bell 2:45p Gloria Bell 5:00p Gloria Bell 7:15p Gloria Bell

employee’s suicide committed in the face of rising scrutiny from regulators. Even so, The Inventor shines a light on the pressures of entrepreneurship and consumer fervor, the toxic and far-too-secretive culture of Silicon Valley and the illusion of success when a distorted idea of legacy becomes the powerful’s primary guiding light. (Alex De Vore) HBO, NR, 119 min.

SPONSORED BY

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8

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 20 1:00p Apollo 11* 1:45p Never Look Away 3:00p Climax* 5:00p Climax* 5:15p Apollo 11 7:00p Apollo 11* 7:15p Climax

FRI - SAT, MARCH 22 - 23 10:45a Wedding Guest 11:15a Woman at War* 12:45p Never Look Away 1:30p Wedding Guest* 3:30p Woman at War* 4:15p Apollo 11 5:45p Woman at War* 6:15p Wedding Guest 8:00p Woman at War* 8:15p Climax FINAL SHOWS SUNDAY, MAR 24 10:45a Wedding Guest 11:15a Woman at War* 1:00p SFJFF: Stockholm 1:30p Wedding Guest* 3:30p Woman at War* 4:15p Apollo 11 5:45p Woman at War* 6:15p Wedding Guest 8:00p Woman at War* 8:15p Climax FINAL SHOWS MON - TUES, MARCH 24 - 25 12:15p Never Look Away 1:00p Wedding Guest* 3:00p Woman at War* 3:45p Apollo 11 5:15p Woman at War* 5:45p Wedding Guest 7:30p Woman at War* 7:45p Wedding Guest

MARCH 20-26, 2019

SPOTLIGHT ON WOMEN HEROES - TOO MANY ’90S REFERENCES

Well, it only took about a million years, but Marvel has finally unleashed a standalone film with a woman lead, and anyone left who wants to whine about the woman-ness of it all is clearly destined for the wrong side of history. Captain Marvel is fantastic. We follow Vers (or Carol Danvers if you like; Brie Larson) as she is swept up in an interstellar war between the Kree and the Skrull, alien races locked in battle for who even knows how long. Vers fights for the Kree, but it’s mostly about having shown up on their planet six years back with no memory than it is about being one of them. She’s powerful but, we’re told by her mentor Yon-Rogg (Jude Law), too emotional to harness her singular powers effectively. Yawn, Yon. Yawn, bro. Hijinks ensue and ass-kickery commences, but when a seemingly simple mission goes awry and thus strands Vers on Earth alongside a young Nick Fury (Samuel L Jackson), alliances shift, the mystery unfolds and Vers spends a solid two hours being an absolute badass. Turns out emotions are part of that—who knew? Everyone. Anyway … Larson is pitch-perfect as the burgeoning superhero, all sly smiles and wise-cracking jokes that humanize her otherwise otherworldly powers without muting her flair. We instantly love her and side firmly with her no matter how the tide turns. The best scenes involve Larson and Jackson’s chemistry, however. You can practically feel the fun they’re having together, and whatever tech Marvel is using to make Jackson look 20 (or more) years younger is flawless. There are a few missteps, however, from being beaten within an inch of our lives with ’90s references (we get it, Marvel: Blockbuster and grunge and No Doubt were things then) to the studio’s insistence on cramming as many fan-service-y Easter eggs into the fray as possible. Still, by the time Vers realizes what’s really going on, she embraces her human side

THURSDAY, MARCH 21 1:00p Apollo 11* 1:45p Never Look Away 3:00p Climax* 5:00p Climax* 5:15p Apollo 11 7:15p Climax

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+ LARSON KICKS ASS; FINALLY A

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and gets down to beating the shit out of anyone who’s asking for it, the only feeling left is that of being utterly psyched. Let us only hope the entitled comic book brats check their misogyny at the door long enough to take Captain Marvel for what it is; namely, a triumphant expansion of the Marvel universe with one of the most memorable and exciting characters on its roster. More like this, please! (ADV) Violet Crown, Regal, PG-13, 124 min.

YARDIE

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+ ELBA PROVES PROMISING; THE SOUNDTRACK

- AMEEN IS OK; STRANGE NARRATION

Idris Elba’s directorial debut is bursting with good ideas and an understanding that future films from the Luther star might be worthwhile. But wooden performances and a run-of-themill gangster narrative hold Yardie, based on the 1992 Victor Headley novel, back from greatness. In 1970-something Kingston, Jamaica, young D (for Dennis; Antwayne Eccleston as the young version) watches as his brother uses reggae to usher in a tenuous peace between two prominent street gangs after a young girl is killed in the crossfire of a daytime shootout. All is well, briefly, but when Dennis’ brother is gunned down by another mysterious youth, he’s thrust into the world of violent gangland nonsense and drug-running himself, working for the notorious King Fox (Sheldon Shepherd). Cut to 10 years later, and Dennis (Aml Ameen) is sent to London to deliver cocaine to British crimelord-lite Rico (Snatch‘s Stephen Graham), but a series of confusing double- or triple- or quadruple-crosses enmeshed with some really boneheaded maneuvers sends our hero spiraling out of control and running from the only family he’s really known, while uncovering the truth behind his brother’s murder. Elba proves capable in the director’s seat, though Yardie stumbles to find any original footing within the gangster genre. D could have proven explosively interesting, but Ameen’s take on an overwhelmed and emotional kid in over his head feels irritatingly dimensionless. He has anger down pat, and there are moments where he reels us in, but he squanders any chance at nuance with shouting, leaving us without any particular emotional connection beyond his murdered brother and unsure of why we should be in his corner. Yardie does provide a smattering of breathless action-y scenes, and the soundtrack backdrop of Britain’s much-ballyhooed 1980s


FOR SHOWTIMES AND MORE REVIEWS, VISIT SFREPORTER.COM

MOVIES

GEORGE R.R MARTIN’S Yardie represents Idris Elba’s directorial debut. It’s a good start, but let’s see what he does next before we count any chickens. reggae, rocksteady and ska uprising makes for some electric feelings. But the film can’t seem to decide if it wants to be a crime drama or character study, which winds up diluting its chances at either. We’re more interested to see if Elba continues to sharpen his already distinctive directorial style. He’s off to a good start, he just needs some better players. (ADV) Jean Cocteau Cinema, NR, 101 min.

LEAVING NEVERLAND PARTS 1 & 2

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+ EYE OPENING; THOROUGH - QUITE LONG; PERHAPS TOO PAINFUL FOR SOME

Content warning: This review contains disturbing information and language. After making waves and shocking audiences at Sundance, filmmaker Dan Reed’s explosive two-part, four-hour documentary Leaving Neverland finds its way to HBO, where it finally digs deep into allegations that pop superstar Michael Jackson molested several young boys throughout his career. For some, the film will be a painful sojourn through in-depth interviews with survivors of Jackson’s abuse; for others it will affirm what they’ve believed since charges were first levied against Jackson in 1993. Regardless of which camp you fall into, however, it’s certain that we can no longer ignore the testimony of those who’ve come forward, and it is no longer and option to defend Jackson in any way. The bulk of the interviews come from Wade Robson and Jimmy Safechuck, each of whom speak at length about their complicated relationships with Jackson. Each met the man by different means, and through a combination of celebrity obsession, missteps from parents and Jackson’s well-planned psychological manipulation, they were molested for years while on tour with Jackson, at his Neverland Ranch home and at so-called “hideaway” apartments. The hardest pill to swallow may be interviews with the parents who insist that, at the time, they felt it perfectly normal that Jackson invited children into his room and bed or, in one case, that they left their child alone with him for an entire week while they visited the Grand Canyon. Robson and Safechuck’s accounts are damning and detailed—and incredibly similar in terms of how the abuse played out. We believe them. This makes the first part of Neverland difficult to bear, as it is explicit. The second part isn’t much easier, however, and the personal toll it took on the young men—not to mention the survivor’s guilt they still harbor—becomes the real tragedy. As we know, both men refused to besmirch Jackson’s name for years, discrediting other survivors who were strong enough to come

forward and deepening the aftermath’s affect on their lives and families. Reed provides countless pieces of evidence in the form of photos, video, audio recordings and faxes sent from Jackson to Robson that start seemingly friendly, but devolve into obsessive and terrifying. We learn of houses bought and gifts obtained, of Jackson’s cold and cruel ability to teach children as young as 7 that sexual acts are just how people show love, regardless of age. And it is every bit as riveting as it is nauseating. This might dredge up uncomfortable feelings about how we regard celebrities, but as Robson points out at one point, people feel like they knew Jackson; he was a part of our lives as far back as we can remember. The resolution, as it were, is not satisfying. Jackson of course dodged prison and died before he was ever brought to justice. Still, Neverland does force us to ask big questions: Can we still enjoy the music knowing he was a monster? Why are we so quick to defend the famous on such charges? We believe Robson and Safechuck, but we still aren’t quite sure how to feel about it all. Not good, though—that’s for sure. Regardless, any Jackson defenders need to reassess, and anyone with the fortitude to watch Leaving Neverland should certainly do so. (ADV) NR, HBO, 240 min.

CINEMA

Fo r S h ow t i m e s a n d I n f o r m a t i o n Vi s i t www. jean coc teaucin ema.com 418 Montezuma Ave, Santa Fe, NM 87501

(505) 466-5528

CCA CINEMATHEQUE 1050 Old Pecos Trail, 982-1338

JEAN COCTEAU CINEMA 418 Montezuma Ave., 466-5528

REGAL STADIUM 14 3474 Zafarano Drive, 844-462-7342 CODE 1765#

THE SCREEN 1600 St. Michael’s Drive, 473-6494

VIOLET CROWN 1606 Alcaldesa St., 216-5678

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BE MY FUR-EVER FRIEND!

“It’s an Honor to Be Nominated”—Yet They Never Won. by Matt Jones

CALL FELINES & FRIENDS

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YOU CAN VISIT BOTH CATS BY APPOINTMENT.

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PETCO: 1-4 pm Thursday, Friday, Saturday & Sunday TECA TU at DeVargas Center: 12 noon-3 pm, First Saturday of each month Please visit our cats at PETCO and TECA TU during regular store hours. FOSTER HOMES URGENTLY NEEDED FOR ADULT CATS OF VARIOUS AGES SANTA FE CATS not only supports the mission of FELINES & FRIENDS from revenue generated by providing premium boarding for cats, pocket pets and birds, but also serves as a mini-shelter for cats awaiting adoption. For more information, please visit www.santafecats.com

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COOKIES ‘N CREAM was rescued with his siblings by a kind person in the Santa Fe area, and transferred to F&F to find forever homes. COOKIES ‘N CREAM was adopted in 2017, but was recently returned because the relationship between him and the other older cats in the home deteriorated. Although COOKIES ‘N CREAM would probably enjoy the company of a playful cat of similar age, we believe he would be quite happy to be the only pet in his new home. COOKIES ‘N CREAM is a handsome boy with a short black & white coat. AGE: born approx. 4/19/17.

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This sweet young cat was rescued after a driver saw her fall from a engine compartment of a car. TW [aka T-WRECKS], was taken to an emergency clinic, but she required more care and was transferred to F&F. TW is a very loving girl that enjoys playing with other cats. Her broken leg and the burn on the back of her neck has fully healed. Despite efforts to save her right eye, it was removed and we believe the vision in her left eye is limited to light and shadow. However, that doesn’t stop TW running around and playing energetically. AGE: born approx. 6/1/18.

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JOHREI CENTER OF SANTA FE. Skillfully Managing Your Consciousness: JOHREI IS BASED ON THE FOCUS AND FLOW OF THE Introduction to Buddhist Psychology w/ Ralph Steele UNIVERSAL LIFE ENERGY. La Fonda Hotel When clouds in the spiritual April 5, 6, 7 Friday-Sunday 24 Continuing Education Units body and in consciousness are for NM Counselors dissolved, there is a return to I. Creating a Pychological true health. This is according to Framework using Buddhist the Divine Law of Order; after Concepts: 6 CEU spiritual clearing, physical and II. Practical Application of Buddhist mental- emotional healing follow. Psychological Skills: 6 CEU You are invited to experience the III. Buddhist Skills in the Divine Healing Energy of Johrei. Enhancement of Spiritual Development: 6 CEU All are Welcome! The Johrei IV. Buddhist Skills for Awakening Center of Santa Fe is located at to Inner Peace: 6 CEU Calle Cinco PLaza, 1500 Fifth $495 for 24 CEU $155 for 6 CEU St., Suite 10, 87505. Please call www.lifetransition.com 820-0451 with any questions. 505-982-4183 Drop-ins welcome! Open Tuesday, Wednesday, Thursday, ADVERTISE AN 2-5pm. Friday 2-4pm. Saturday, 10am-1pm. Closed Sunday and EVENT, WORKSHOP Monday. There is no fee for OR LECTURE HERE IN receiving Johrei. Donations are gratefully accepted. Please check THE COMMUNITY us out at our new website: ANNOUCMENTS Santafejohreifellowship.com

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UPAYA ZEN CENTER: A GLOBAL LEADER IN ENGAGED BUDDHISM Upaya is open to the community for daily meditation and Wednesday Dharma Talks at 5:30 to 6:30p.m. April 6 and April 13, 6:00a.m. to 9:00p.m. ZAZENKAIs are Daylong Silent Meditation Retreats offering meditation instruction to beginners. These retreats include sitting and walking meditation, an hour of work practice, a talk, and three meals for $50. Retreat registration: Upaya.org/programs, registrar@upaya.org, or 505-986-8518. 1404 Cerro Gordo, SF, NM. Enjoy a taste of Southeast Asia Food prepared by Chef Nath at Love Yourself Cafe (199 Paseo de Peralta) from 5:30-8:30 pm the next two Sundays, March 24th and 30th. All inclusive 2 course organic & vegetarian meal for $45. Call 505-577-2460 or visit www.lightvesselsantafe.com/ love-yourself-pop-up-dinners/ to RSVP

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• 40 Years in Business • Casey’s Chimney Sweeps has been entusted to restore the fireplaces at: Make sure all the workers for your chimney service company are covered by worker’s comp insurance. (Hint: the cheapest chimney sweeps do not insure their workers.) Be safe! Baileyschimney.com. Call Bailey’s today 505-988-2771

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505-753-8662 EspanolaHumane.org • petango.com/espanola Sweet Aries is the most darling dog around. He’s affectionate yet playful and absolutely adores being spoiled. This adult dog is the perfect companion for somebody who wants a dog they can take for walks but also cuddle on the couch with. Although Aries has been diagnosed with heart-worm disease we have already began treating it and he will continue to be seen by our Veterinarians after adoption at no additional charge. Please consider giving Aries a chance in your home, he gets along with other dogs but has the urge to chase cats so his home should be feline free. Aries is about 5 and half years old.

Aries

Tilt is feline leukemia positive and she also came to us with such a severe ear infection that she could only walk in circles – her head tilted completely to the side, and she would also just topple over. The ear and tilt issues are mostly resolved, but we will need someone who can have a feline leukemia positive cat in their home. This gorgeous kitty has been lovingly fostered back to health. She is a snuggly purr-monster who loves to be held. Call the shelter today to set an appointment to meet Tilt.

HANDYPERSON SANTA FE COYOTE FENCING. Specializing in Coyote Fencing. License # 19-001199-74. Thinking about upgrading or building a new fence? Schedule your Spring/Summer appointment starting March, 1st! Give Richard a call: 505-690-6272 santafecoyotefencing.com

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ACUPUNCTURE Rob Brezsny

Week of March 20th, 2019

ARIES (March 21-April 19): During the coming weeks, everything that needs to happen will indeed happen only if you surprise yourself on a regular basis. So I hope you will place yourself in unpredictable situations where you won’t be able to rely on well-rehearsed responses. I trust that you will regard innocence and curiosity and spontaneity as your superpowers. Your willingness to change your mind won’t be a mark of weakness but rather a sign of strength.

explosive devices before they detonated. Over the course of his career, he defused an estimated 50,000 bombs and mines. Let’s make him your patron saint for the coming weeks. Why? Because I suspect you will be able to summon a metaphorical version of his power: an extraordinary capacity to keep volatile situations from blowing up. You’ll be a virtuoso at waging peace and preventing strife.

comparable to it in their previous experience. One of the porcupines says she would be less afraid of it if she just knew what it was called, whereupon the red squirrel suggests that from now on they refer to it as “Steve.” After that, they all feel better. I recommend that you borrow their strategy in the coming weeks. If a Big Unknown arrives in your vicinity, dub it “Steve” or “Betty.”

as a child. With these facts as your keystone, and in accordance with astrological omens, I encourage you to experiment with your own gender expressions in the coming weeks. It’s prime time to have fun with the way you interpret what it means to be a man or woman—or any other gender you might consider yourself to be.

DR. JOANNA CORTI, DOM, Powerful Medicine, Powerful SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): There was a time, less than Results. Homeopathy, Acupuncture. Micro-current a century ago, when pink was considered a masculine TAURUS (April 20-May 20):In the animated kids’ film (Acupuncture without needles.) Over the Hedge, ten talking animals come upon a mascolor and blue a feminine hue. In previous eras, many Parasite, Liver/cleanses. Nitric sive, towering hedge they’ve never seen. The friendly European men sported long hair, wore high heels, and Oxide. Pain Relief. Transmedium group consists of a skunk, red squirrel, box turtle, two favored clothes with floral patterns. Franklin D. Roosevelt, Energy Healing. Worker’s opossums, and five porcupines. The hedge perplexes and one of America’s most prominent twentieth-century presCompensation and Auto Accidents mystifies them. It makes them nervous. There’s nothing idents, sometimes wore skirts and feather-bedecked hats Insurance accepted 505-501-0439

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): I urge you to locate a metaphorical or very literal door that will give you access to a place that affords you more freedom and healing and support. Maybe you already know about the existence of this door—or maybe it’s not yet on your radar. Here’s advice from Clarissa Pinkola Éstes that might help. “If you have a deep scar, that is a door,” she writes. “If you have an old, old story, that is a door. If you love the sky and the water so much that you almost cannot bear it, that is a door. If you yearn for a deeper life, a full life, a sane life, that is a door.”

AYURVEDIC ASTROLOGY

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Dr. Wendy Feldman, Jamie Compton Network Spinal Care. Certified advanced Rolfer and Tea with Dr. Wendy on Wednesdays Somatic Experiencing Practitioner 3/20, 3/27, & 4/3, 3-4:30pm. • Healing trauma • Better Ask Dr. Wendy, while we sip tea, posture • Feel better from the any questions you may have about inside out Experience your Network Spinal Care and your Core • 24 yrs experience. spine. RSVP to reserve your place, 505 699-0323 rolfnet.com and, for address. 505-310-5810

LIFE COACH

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): According to estimates by population experts, about 109 billion humans have been born on planet Earth over the millennia. And yet I’m quite sure that not a single one of those other individuals has been anything like you. You are absolutely unique, an unmatched treasure, a one-of-a-kind creation with your own special blend of qualities. And in my prophetic view, you’re ready to fully acknowledge and celebrate these facts on a higher octave than ever before. It’s high time for you to own your deepest authenticity; to work with extra devotion to express your soul’s code; to unabashedly claim your idiosyncratic genius.

Aging Misery and Joy Bring Purpose and Creativity Ayurveda looks into bringing To the late phase of your life! balance to the body so that no Shanti E. Bannwart disease can take over. Astrology Licensed Psychotherapist L.P.C.C gives us your DNA and can easily CANCER (June 21-July 22): Musician Carole Kaye is CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): We don’t know as •Life-Coach• Diagnose the disease or imbalance. the most famous bass guitarist you’ve never heard of. much about European history between the sixth and (505) 466-2705 Over the course of five decades, she has plied her soul- ninth centuries as we do about other eras. Compared to Together the 2 ancient arts can ful talents on more than 10,000 recordings, including the times that preceded and followed it, cultural and lit- help treat all ailments including CANCER, DIABETES Etc. Power gems by Frank Zappa, Stevie Wonder, Frank Sinatra, erary energies were low. Fewer records were kept. readings 20 min for $15. Please call HYPNOTHERAPY Simon and Garfunkel, and the Beach Boys. TwentyGovernments were weaker and commerce was less vig505 819 7220 for your appoint& NLP seven-time Grammy winner Quincy Jones has testified orous. But historians don’t like to use the term “Dark ments. 103 Saint Francis Dr, SF, NM that Kaye has written “some of the most beautiful themes I’ve ever heard in my life” and that she “could do anything and leave men in the dust.” I trust this horoscope will expand the number of people who appreciate her. I also hope you’ll be inspired to become more active in spreading the word about the gifts that you have to offer the world. It’s high time to make sure that people know more of the beautiful truth about you. LEO (July 23-Aug. 22):”When you want happiness, what are you wanting?” asks aphorist Olivia Dresher. The repeat of an event that made you feel good in the past? A sweet adventure you’ve thought about but never actually experienced? Here’s a third possibility. Maybe happiness is a state you could feel no matter what your circumstances are; maybe you could learn how to relax into life exactly as it is, and feel glad about your destiny wherever it takes you. In my opinion, Leo, that third approach to happiness will be especially natural for you to foster in the coming weeks. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22):There are old traditions in many cultures that pay special attention to the first brick or stone that is laid in the earth to initiate the construction of a future building. It’s called a cornerstone or foundation stone. All further work to create the new structure refers back to this original building block, and depends on it. I’m pleased to inform you that now is a favorable phase to put your own metaphorical cornerstone in place, Virgo. You’re ready to begin erecting a structure or system that will serve you for years to come. Be sure you select the right place for it, as well as the best building materials. LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Born under the sign of Libra, Ivan Kharchenko (1918–1989) was a military officer and engineer for the Soviet army. His specialty was disarming

Ages” to name that period because it brought many important developments and activities, such as improvements in farming techniques. So in some ways, “Lost Ages” might be a more apropos descriptor. Now let’s turn our attention to a metaphorically comparable phase of your own past, Capricorn: an era that’s a bit fuzzy in your memory; a phase about which your understanding is incomplete. I suspect that the coming weeks will be an excellent time to revisit that part of your life and see what new evidence and insights you can mine.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Why do some American libraries ban certain books, ensuring they’re unavailable to local readers? The reasons may be because they feature profanity or include references to sex, drug use, the occult, atheism, and unusual political viewpoints. Marjane Satrapi’s Persepolis is one of the most frequently censored books. Others are Maya Angelou’s *I Know Why the Caged Bird Sings*, Beloved, by Toni Morrison, and The Kite Runner, by Khaled Hosseini. In my astrological opinion, these are exactly the kinds of books you should especially seek out in the coming weeks. In fact, I suggest you commune with a variety of art and ideas and influences that are controversial, provocative, and intriguing.

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s Expanded Weekly Audio Horoscopes and Daily Text Message Horoscopes. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone © CO P Y R I G H T 2 0 1 9 R O B B R E Z S N Y at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700. 38

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PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): At the age of 97, Piscean cartoonist Al Jaffee is still creating new material for the satirical Mad magazine, where he has worked since 1964. There was one 63-year stretch when his comic stylings appeared in all but one of Mad’s monthly issues. I nominate him to be your role model during the next four weeks. It’s a favorable time for you to access and express a high degree of tenacity, stamina, and consistency. Homework: What’s the thing you lost that should stay lost? What’s the thing you lost that you should find? FreeWillAstrology.com.

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