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FEBRUARY 14-20, 2018 | Volume 45, Issue 7

NEWS

I AM

.

Leroy Baca, Senior Mortgage Lender | VP NMLS ID# 299839 | Century Bank NMLS ID# 556023

OPINION 5 NEWS

Positivity is essential in life. Because buying a home can be stressful, my enthusiasm helps make the process easier for my clients. I AM Century Bank.

7 DAYS, CLAYTOONZ AND THIS MODERN WORLD 6 PARTLY SUNNY OUTLOOK 9 Lawmakers try to restore solar credit for homeowners

25

SHALL WE PLAY A GAME? 11 Details on how the machines will count rankedchoice voting ballots COVER STORY 13 SFR ENDORSEMENTS Fourteen candidates, five races, one alt-weekly THE INTERFACE 19

SILENCIO When a silent film-meetsmusic project features a 1912 short filmed entirely with dead bugs animated through stop-motion, you drop what you’re doing and pay the hell attention to them dead bugs.

ZOMBIE PUPPETS LIVE AGAIN Second act for film with a twist on the old trope Cover design by Anson Stevens-Bollen artdirector@sfreporter.com

CULTURE

EDITOR AND PUBLISHER JULIE ANN GRIMM

SFR PICKS 21 Shakespeare and Jupiter, Clueless and Gundersen THE CALENDAR 23 MUSIC 25 SILENCIO New project brings music to silent films A&C 27 STANDING FIERCE FOR FIVE Maria Hinojosa comes to town SAVAGE LOVE 28 Escapist fantasies A&C 31 DIVERSE DIALOGUES New IAIA MoCNA shows? You bet! ACTING OUT 33 THALASSOPHOBIA Teatro Paraguas tackles Mamet FOOD 37 MORE BITTER THAN SWEET An essential part of any cocktail MOVIES 39 VAZANTE REVIEW Brazil was effing insane, apparently

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FEBRUARY 14-20, 2018

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READINGS & CONVERSATIONS brings to Santa Fe a wide range of writers from the literary world of fiction, nonfiction, and poetry to read from and discuss their work.

ALEKSANDAR HEMON with

JOHN FREEMAN

ROXANE GAY with

TRESSIE MCMILLAN COTTOM

WEDNESDAY 28 FEBRUARY AT 7PM LENSIC PERFORMING ARTS CENTER

WEDNESDAY 14 MARCH AT 7PM LENSIC PERFORMING ARTS CENTER

Aleksandar Hemon’s books include the novels The Making of

Roxane Gay is an author and cultural critic. Her work includes the story collection Difficult Women and Ayiti, a blend of fiction, nonfiction, and poetry interwoven into a tale of the Haitian diaspora. In her essay collection Bad Feminist, she writes, “I never want to be placed on a Feminist Pedestal. People who are placed on pedestals are expected to pose, perfectly. Then they get knocked off. . . . Consider me already knocked off.” Gay’s most recent book is Hunger: A Memoir of (My) Body. The New York Times writes, “At its simplest, it’s a memoir about being fat — Gay’s preferred term — in a hostile, fat-phobic world. At its most symphonic, it’s an intellectually rigorous and deeply moving exploration of the ways in which trauma, stories, desire, language and metaphor shape our experiences and construct our reality.” Gay is the author of the comic series World of Wakanda and is the first African American woman to write for Marvel Comics. She is a contributing opinion writer for the New York Times.

Zombie Wars and Nowhere Man, a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award, and the story collections The Question of Bruno and Love and Obstacles. Born in Sarajevo in the former Yugoslavia in 1964, Hemon was visiting Chicago as a tourist in 1992 when the Bosnian War broke out. Unable to return home, he eventually settled permanently in Chicago. Having arrived with only a basic command of English, Hemon learned the language by reading the novels of Vladimir Nabokov; he published his first story in English in 1995. The New Yorker described him as having an “astonishing talent to notice the world with a sarcastic, wily precision that is then put in tension with his love of surreal metaphor.” Hemon’s writing has appeared in The New Yorker, Esquire, and the New York Times, with more recent work addressing issues of immigration and the Trump administration. In a piece entitled “When Neighbors Turn on Each Other, It Happens Fast,” he writes, “Nevertheless, the question remains what happens to that sense of ethical stability when there is a societal rupture, when the infrastructure that allows for essentialist individualism is damaged and destroyed?” Hemon was awarded a Guggenheim Fellowship in 2003 and received a MacArthur “genius grant” the following year. He lives in Chicago with his family.

John Freeman wrote the recently published poetry collection Maps and is editor of Freeman’s, a literary journal featuring new fiction.

Tressie McMillan Cottom teaches at Virginia Commonwealth University and is the author of Lower Ed: The Troubling Rise of For-Profit Colleges in the New Economy.

TICKETS ON SALE NOW

ticketssantafe.org or call 505.988.1234 $8 general/$5 students and seniors with ID Ticket prices include a $3 Lensic Preservation Fund fee. Video and audio recordings of Lannan events are available at:

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JANUARY 24-30, 2018

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LETTERS

Have you had a negative dental experience? Michael Davis,

DDS

New Patients Welcome

Mail letters to PO Box 2306, Santa Fe, NM 87504, deliver to 132 E Marcy St., or email them to editor@sfreporter.com. Letters (no more than 200 words) should refer to specific articles in the Reporter. Letters will be edited for space and clarity.

NEWS, FEBRUARY 7: “LOPSIDED ENROLLMENT”

KEEP THE BUILDINGS No matter which school is considered for closing, I believe that closing a school and replacing it by building another creates tremendous losses in long-term costs, compared to changing bus routes to deliver kids to different schools and changing the current use of the facility. Land and building costs will go up, as well as the disruption of everyone’s attention from other important school issues. Those additional costs by closing and later rebuilding are much better spent on current school expenses, be they teacher salaries, building repair and upgrade, or basic classroom supplies. Making the school administration a portable arm to move to underutilized schools for a limited period could also be a possibility. In the past, some schools have been closed and sold, which could now be re-used as schools. Remodeling classrooms to admin offices is not as expensive and retains the school for future school use when demands change. The national trend is for apartments ... bringing residential [buildings] back to the downtown. This could be in the future for Santa Fe also. Lastly, renting facilities for limited terms is another option to avoid the costs of building new schools.

LYNN ALLEN SFREPORTER.COM

NEWS, FEBRUARY 7: “POP QUIZ: MAYORAL CANDIDATES”

NOT SO HOT-SHOT It seems I’m always reading letters singing the praises of high-caliber, soft-touch mayoral candidate and leading fund-raiser Alan Webber. Yours last week from Kim Perry is an extreme example. Sufficiently left-wing to

have campaigned with Gloria Steinem, she touts Webber because he has not worked in government; he’s “not part of the problem.” It was a surprise to see hot-shot Webber finishing last in your pop quiz competition, with zero out of five questions answered correctly, but maybe it should not have been. It’s not just his campaign platform; his quiz results look a bit like Trump’s too. Current councilors Joseph Maestas and Peter Ives received full marks, while Kate Noble dropped one; well done to them. Obviously, they are experienced and care enough about city government to pay attention to details. Shockingly, three-term councilor Ron Trujillo flunked four out of five questions; it looks like he missed all five but bought time to Google an answer. As for Webber, a UCLA management-guru PR job is not enough. We need a competent local who knows the place.

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A FOR AMBIGUITY [With regards to what SFSWMA stands for:] Although “Agency” is the A on their web site, you can find “Authority” all over city and county documents. A change in name? Confusion? Who knows?

KAREN HELDMEYER SANTA FE

[HUMS “DECK THE HALLS”] Many Eastside folks back a man whose business success took place outside Santa Fe, and long ago. Alan Webber’s responses to your questions show an outsider’s distant understanding of Santa Fe. His progressive counterpart, Peter Ives, is knowledgeable, but he seems out of touch with ordinary taxpayers. Both men represent the “We Know What’s Best For You” Party. Do we want a replay of the divisiveness the sugar-tax fiasco amplified? On another side, we have born-and-bred New Mexicans who are familiar with HowThings-Work in Santa Fe. As his answers show, Joe Maestas is surprisingly well-informed, but his background as mayor of Española gives one pause. Ron Trujillo’s answers show a paltry knowledge of city matters—especially for a three-time city councilor. In reporting Kate Noble’s replies, you note her “Geez” and “Oy Vey.” Perhaps you thought this cute; but it was disrespectful. Your text suggests that not one of the four men uttered an “um” or “that’s a tough question.” Really? Your article reveals a truly biased point of view. Kate Noble merits serious consideration. CONTINUED ON PAGE 7

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FEBRUARY 14-20, 2018

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7 DAYS LAWMAKERS MULL FRONT LICENSE PLATES FOR NEW MEXICO VEHICLES But would they be those ugly chile ones?

USA SNOWBOARDERS ARE TAKING GOLD MEDALS AT OLYMPICS Which is, like, so totally tubular.

NEW DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AD FEATURES CONDOM-CLAD CHILE What a two-pronged waste.

SANTA FE OPERA ANNOUNCES NEW LEADERSHIP While opera remains pretty much exactly what you think it is.

EARLY VOTING STARTS FEB. 14 IN SANTA FE But the Facebook bitching has been available all along.

THIS FLU SEASON IS REPORTEDLY THE ABSOLUTE WORST Go home. Go home and go to bed. Bed!

Timmy the hair would always catch himself staring up at the sky, longing for the day that he would truly be free ...

OMG. TRUMP’S HAIR FLAPPING IN THE WIND Homeboy looked like Darth Vader sans helmet in Empire.

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FEBRUARY 14-20, 2018

SFREPORTER.COM


LETTERS A native Santa Fean, she is the only candidate who can bridge the divide in our city.

DOROTHY KLOPF SANTA FE Editor’s note: Webber said, “Oh geez, I can’t answer that,” Ives said, “I apologize, I’m not sure what that figure is off the top of my head” and Trujillo said, “I don’t know the answer to that one,” among many other quips; all of which we reported.

respect that—ranked-choice voting means you can pick her for second. That’s an option that would have changed the outcome of the last presidential race.

ZANE FISCHER SANTA FE

COVER, JANUARY 31: “THE G-WORD”

SHE’S GRRRRREAT

IT’S CALLED FASHION

As usual, the Pop Quiz feature was revealing in its focus on Santa Fe’s mayoral candidates. Only three of the five candidates had what I’d call a passing score— and it was both of the allegedly leading candidates who had the worst grades. I admire that Joe Maestas and Peter Ives are clearly more caught up in the details of governance than in the platitudes of possibility or in “making Santa Fe great again”—and the capable and ready answers from those two, along with Kate Noble, should encourage some voters to double-check their priorities. For me, there’s one candidate who combines remarkable institutional knowledge of the city, an inside view of what’s most broken, a record of working to fix it, a natural innovator’s expansive vision, and a deep compassion for the needs of our city and the plights of its most underserved populations. Santa Fe gets a tiny mulligan from our national shame here. Let’s not miss the (second) opportunity to elect the super-qualified woman with a smart, tangible policy plan and the unflagging commitment to making Santa Fe better for everyone. And if Kate can’t be your first choice—I

Alicia Guzmán’s otherwise interesting article blurs the distinction between artists and ”the art world,” and in doing so glosses over a familiar urban cycle: Artists move into a low-rent district, where they can afford living and studio space; their presence attracts the fashionable folks, whose influx drives up property values, forcing the artists and other low-income people to move elsewhere—until that place in turn becomes fashionable. Santa Fe itself is a model of this cycle: Its artistic and cultural charisma attracted the “cultured,” who have long since colonized the place and made living there unaffordable for nearly everyone else. So how to break the cycle? Perhaps the graffiti writers have shown the way: Not only are their venues even less secure than those of studio artists; not only can their work not be commodified, bought, and sold, they can go to jail for it: traits underscoring the properly outlaw character of art in relation to society and the culture as a whole.

MICHAEL KINCAID TRUCHAS

SFR will correct factual errors online and in print. Please let us know if we make a mistake, editor@sfreporter.com or 988-7530.

CHEECH & CHONG MARCH 15

MARCH 23 BUFFALOTHUNDERRESORT.COM

Nominate us NOW through February 28 at SFReporter.com/bosf 2018 CATEGORIES

Best Financial Institution AND Best Lender in 2018!

SANTA FE EAVESDROPPER Man: Hey, how’s your son doing? Woman: He’s doing great. He’s in prison. —Overheard at Allsup’s on North Guadalupe

Improving lives at dncu.org

Old Misogynist: “The wage gap does not exist in America. It’s a lie they tell us. Women seek less-valuable jobs than men.” —Overheard at Second Street Brewery Send your Overheard in Santa Fe tidbits to: eavesdropper@sfreporter.com

Image courtesy of DNCU member, Marla Gabaldon

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JANUARY 10-16, 2018

•

SFREPORTER.COM


ANSON STEVENS-BOLLEN

NEWS

Partly Sunny Outlook Legislators work to renew solar tax credits, but their efforts could be rendered irrelevant by the governor and president BY ELIZABETH MILLER e l i z a b e t h @ s f r e p o r t e r. c o m

I

n the year since New Mexico’s state tax credits for solar panel installations lapsed, Positive Energy Solar has had to lay off or leave vacant 15 jobs. The Solar Foundation reported a 14 percent decrease in the number of people employed in the solar industry statewide—from 2,929 to 2,522. Solar energy advocates say the loss of a 10 percent tax credit that expired in 2016—and was fully allocated for half a year before that—is to blame, and legislators have been working to reinstate it. “Consumers perceive a loss of value with the lost tax credit—a lot of them knew about it, a lot of them were disappointed to see it end, and a lot of them hoped it would come back,” says Regina Wheeler, CEO of SunPower by Positive Energy Solar. Two bills still alive in the waning days of the session would reinstate tax credits for solar installations, and expand those credits to include small businesses and agricultural operations. HB 87 awaits a hearing in the Taxation and Revenue Committee, and SB 79 passed the Senate on Monday.

The New Mexico tax credit for solar home installations expired in 2016.

Next, they face a grim gauntlet: Their predecessors have died on the governor’s desk. There’s a chance this year’s efforts will see the same fate, says Rep. Carl Trujillo (D-Nambé), who introduced the House version with Reps. Debbie Rodella (D-Española) and Patricio Ruiloba (D-Albuquerque), “But I think what’s important here is that it continues the discussion and shows that the Legislature is committed to this, to the use of more renewable energy.” Both bills would reinstate a 10 percent income tax credit for people who install solar panels or solar thermal systems, capped at $9,000 per recipient. The total program limit would be set at $5 million annually. The House bill ends those credits in five years. Initially, the Senate companion called for phasing credits out over 15 years, but Albuquerque Democratic Sen. Mimi Stewart, who introduced the bill, amended it on the Senate Floor to phase out over 10 years instead. The move, she said, was to garner more bipartisan support and simplify the tax credit structure. The bill passed 35-6. Objections arose over the reliability of solar and the problematic nature of long-term storage, that these credits would dispro-

I have the mind of an engineer, the heart of a public servant, and the experience to do the job. Together, we can make Santa Fe work for everyone!

On March 6th, make Joe your 1st choice! And don’t forget to rank your choices!

maestas joseph

SANTA FE MAYOR

portionately benefit wealthy families (Stewart insists the credit’s historic use shows families from all income brackets benefited), and the general approach of subsidizing private business. The longer term initially proposed offers companies consistency, Stewart says, but seems to be a sticking point with Republican lawmakers. Five years for a tax credit seemed palatable to his fellow lawmakers, Trujillo says. “If I felt that I could get mine forever, I would do that, but the chances of it getting out [of committee] are less,” he says. “Many legislators look at the fiscal impact to the budget, and when they see it for an extended period of time, it usually raises some concerns.” Both bills are good, says Sanders Moore, director of Environment New Mexico, but if she had to pick a favorite, it’d be the Senate version as introduced. “The Senate bill provides a soft landing for the solar industry, and it also allows more New Mexicans to take advantage of solar energy for more years,” she says. “We’re the second sunniest state in the country, so we really should be a national leader in renewable energy.” More than 7,700 New Mexicans used the solar tax credit in place from 2008

to 2016, according to Environment New Mexico, installing more than 46 megawatts of solar infrastructure to make use of more than 310 sunny days each year. “Just a few years ago, we were in the top 10 states for our administrative procedures and our tax credits and our promotion of solar energy,” Stewart says. “We’ve now dropped to 29th under this administration. … It just seems nuts that New Mexico would not be a leader.” She says more than 70 percent of New Mexicans favor increasing renewable power and an increasing awareness of climate change underlies that support. Both she and Trujillo spoke about the solar power installations on their own homes—something she could just barely afford on a “crappy teacher pension,” she says. Trujillo says his power bill now is just $15 a month, even while running the air conditioning in summer. The 10 percent credit could offset prices that increased when President Donald Trump imposed a 30 percent tariff on solar panels, the bulk of which are manufactured overseas. “Without the tax credit, we’ll have a difficult year,” says Wheeler, “and it’ll definitely decrease the ability of the industry to add jobs in New Mexico.”

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S FR E P O RTE R .CO M / N E WS

City hopes ranked-choice software catches miscues, delivers timely results

SFR FILE PHOTO

Shall We Play a Game?

Ballots will still be paper, but with instructions to rank each candidate.

B Y M AT T G R U B S m a t t g r u b s @ s f r e p o r t e r. c o m

C

asting a ranked-choice ballot should be a straightforward process. In half the city, voters who are faced with Santa Fe’s new ballot system will only have to worry about ranking the mayoral candidates. In the other half, they’ll rank three candidates for City Council, too. At the most, then, that’s two total ranked-choice races for any one voter. But there are enough permutations of how to rank the candidates that the math involves letters. There are 325 ways to rank just the mayoral candidates, a number that doesn’t count the ways you can do it incorrectly. And the city hopes to have considered how to count all of them. “We want to make sure we’re counting the highest-ranked continuing candidate,” says city spokesman and ranked-choice public education guy Matt Ross. That’s the simple philosophy behind the complex algorithm designed by Dominion Voting Systems: If your top choice is eliminated, who’s next? While it sounds simple, voters who are either confused or

trying to out-think the computer (as in the 1983 Cold War classic WarGames) can come up with some pretty interesting voting theories. In most situations where there’s an unorthodox ranking—like one candidate in all five positions or only a single candidate in a single position—the voting machines will signal a  ballot error and tell the voter there’s an issue. If the ballot can still be counted, the machine will let the voter verify that the “errors” are on purpose. It also gives them the option to try again. In that case, a poll worker will “spoil” the ballot and then give the voter a new one. If the offending ballot can’t be counted, such as when two candidates are ranked in the same position, the voter is forced to try again. While it may seem like all kinds of things can go wrong, you’d be surprised what the software counts as correct. Ross says one of the biggies is a voter trying to force the system to rank a candidate dead last. In this election, that would happen when a voter puts a preferred candidate as first choice in the mayor’s race, then leaves three  empty places and ranks the unfavored candidate fifth. But the software

5

races

14

candidates

325

possible combinations in mayor’s race alone

12

polling locations

1

winner in each race

NEWS

doesn’t see the empty places. It just zips down to the highest-ranked continuing candidate. The person a voter wanted to rank fifth is actually ranked second. Ranking the same candidate in all five places is the same as ranking that candidate in only the first spot. Again, the software is just looking for the highest-ranked continuing candidate. That either makes intuitive sense or it’s mystifying. But either way, keeping your ballot simple will make life easier for you. The computer really doesn’t care. Ideally, Dominion’s software will be able to determine the winner in a matter of seconds, or maybe minutes. And instead of announcing the winner of each round in dramatic fashion, the City Council, where there are  three district representatives running in the five-candidate field for mayor, told city staff it wants a winner first. The electoral archaeology can wait. “The system is described as instant runoff, so I suppose from my perspective, I think it makes sense … that one would announce the winner and then go back and analyze results as you care to,” Councilor Peter Ives told the city attorney last month. District 4 representative  Mike Harris, whose seat is not  up for re-election for another two years, was the lone voice on the council to entertain the idea of slowing things down after a hard-fought election that will decide at least three new city councilors and the city’s first full-time mayor. “Actually, I’ve thought about this and how it was going to be reported,” Harris told his colleagues at the January meeting. Given the novelty of ranked-choice voting, he wondered, as well as the work that’s been put in to explain both how to vote and how the results will be counted, and given the interest in the election itself, might it be wise to show the public how it was all playing out first? While his gut reaction was to slow it down, Harris ultimately told the council he wasn’t attached to the idea and understood the desire for an immediate result. Election night won’t be devoid of early drama, however.  In a change from years past, City Clerk Yolanda Vigil said final vote totals won’t be posted at each of the polling places. Only the results of the first round will be printed and taped to the window. The more advanced tabulation will take place at City Hall. That means campaigns with pollwatchers at each of the 12 locations will know within minutes if anyone has won the election outright or, in the alternative, who the first candidate to be eliminated is in the brave new world of ranked-choice voting.

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S F R ENDORSEMENTS

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hy are we doing this now? Isn’t the city election on March 6? You are so right, dear reader. But as you are cracking open this edition, some voters have already cast their ballots. Early voting in the election begins today and runs through March 2 and, in recent elections, up to a third of voters chose this option. (Plus, people start calling us if we don’t truck these things out well in advance of The Big Day.) It’s worth pointing out that if the nationwide results of the 2016 presidential race are any prediction, we’re not really great at making predictions anymore. The inaugural run of ranked-choice voting in this election adds another element of unpredictability to our local races. Candidates tell us some city voters seem excited about the new ballot format and the way results will be tabulated; others are following curmudgeonly plans to resist the change by voting for just one person in each race anyway. Voters who do, we argue, are only disenfranchising themselves. Let’s be clear: We’re not guessing who the winners will

be with this round of SFR endorsements. We’ve spent hours at candidate forums, eyeing websites and social media, and meeting with most candidates for in-person talks. Some newspapers have stopped offering endorsements, and one candidate posted a comment online likening us to Hitler for creating propaganda. We’re endorsing anyway. And we totally respect your right to defy these recommendations for your own reasons. Santa Fe’s challenges are many. The city has a shortage of housing that’s within reach of young people and working families. The community is suffering from increased polarization by race, class and creed. The state and feds can’t be relied on for service growth or even for real support, yet we’re often crippled by the choices made at higher levels of government. Tourism is our bread and butter, but local quality of life should be our jam. Don’t we all deserve to eat fancy toast? See you at the polls, Julie Ann Grimm Editor and Publisher

ELECTION DAY, MARCH 6

VOTING INFO

EARLY VOTING

Through Friday March 2 CITY HALL: 8 am-5 pm Monday through Friday City Clerk’s Office, 200 Lincoln Ave., second floor GENOVEVA CHAVEZ COMMUNITY CENTER: 9 am-6 pm Tuesdays through Saturdays— except on March 2, when it closes at 5 pm 3221 Rodeo Road, community room

CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE

Rather than opening dozens of locations on Election Day, the city has switched to using voting convenience centers. Any qualified voter within the city limits may vote at any of the 12 sites between 7 am and 7 pm. Montezuma Lodge 431 Paseo de Peralta Gonzales Community School 851 W Alameda St. Salazar Elementary School 1231 Apache Ave. Atalaya Elementary School 721 Camino Cabra

St. John’s United Methodist Church 1200 Old Pecos Trail Christian Life Church 121 Siringo Road Nina Otero Community School 5901 Herrera Drive Sweeney Elementary School 4100 S. Meadows Road Southside Library 6599 Jaguar Drive Nava Elementary School 2655 Siringo Road Kearny Elementary School 901 Avenida de las Campanas Genoveva Chavez Community Center 3221 Rodeo Road

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So

SFR ENDORSEMENTS

Dia Let lo ’s gu e

MAYOR The race got off to a weird start when summer had come and gone and incumbent Mayor Javier Gonzales was still not talking about re-election. Meanwhile, challenger and 12-year council veteran Ronald Trujillo was off and running on a promise he started making years ago to seek the city’s executive post. Then, Gonzales announced during Fiestas that he wouldn’t run after all, prompting four others to quickly throw in their hats. Little-known fact: Our top pick in the five-way race also previously talked about wanting to be mayor. In August 2016, Kate Noble left City Hall during Gonzales’ tenure after eight years at work in economic development programs. As we sat on the patio of a downtown business a few weeks after that, we talked about leadership and what was going on with local government, and about how few women had filled its top tier. She said she had half a mind to run. She does not recall this conversa-

tion. A few months later, she offered herself as a school board candidate— the only person to do so in her district. And so she attained her first elected office. It might sound odd, then, that when she first said that she would run for mayor before her term on the school board is over, we were a little miffed. Why abandon that post? Today, though, we’re over it. our first choice for Santa Fe’s next mayor is Kate Noble. Noble is both an insider and an outsider. Born and raised in Santa Fe, she left for college and her first career as a business journalist, then came home to start her second career in local government. She knows the names of the city departments and their functions, she’s got a firm grasp on the financial structure as can only be seen from years on the inside, and she’s studied models of entrepreneurial support and proven they can work. Yet, she didn’t cause or have influence to fix some of the critical problems uncovered last year in the city’s financial controls. She’s an outside thinker—engaged by the intersections of ideas and problems, and oriented

to help the community solve them together. Second on our list is Joseph Maestas. In four years on the City Council here, Maestas has shown a willingness to push for new, if unpopular, initiatives. His leadership on the city’s refinancing of its water debt is a wonky, unheralded act that frees future councils to spend money on improvements rather than paying off investors. We also love the idea of making public transportation free for riders. He understands the ways in which the city is limited by state laws and wants to carve out more autonomy for our home rule charter form of government. He performed exceptionally well on our unscientific Pop Quiz, and he’s got a whole Barack Obama fitness thing going with running and cycling habits that model health beyond just telling the rest of us what kind of beverage to order. That bring us to Alan Webber as our third choice. He wowed Santa Fe with a powerful play for the Democratic gubernatorial nomination in 2014 and he’s parlayed many of his supporters in that race to this

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SFR RANKS THE MAYORAL BALLOT

one. (Disclosure: We also know the candidate from his friendship with Richard Meeker, co-owner of SFR and Webber’s former college classmate. Meeker has no editorial influence at SFR.) Webber has a sharp mind and has demonstrated a willingness to learn about parts of the city with which he’d not previously been familiar. His credentials on the national stage and in the business world are unparalleled. We only wish he already knew more about city governance, or that it didn’t feel like this was a second-best option for offering leadership. Ronald Trujillo is certainly passionate about Santa Fe. The city’s residents—whether they know it or not—owe him a debt of gratitude for keeping the idea of regional equity alive and well. He’s a reliable defender of acknowledging that the city is so much more than downtown, and that those on its developing edges deserve advocacy. Trujillo ascended to the council in a historic race where he won by just two votes; he’s never had an opponent since, and he’s got a ton of support on the Southside from the wave of resistance to Gonzales’ failed soda tax plan. On the down side, when we asked him what legislation he was proud to have introduced or sponsored on during his service, he drew a blank. Someone has to be last, and in this case, it’s Peter Ives. He’s wellversed about the issues and can put them in the context of current city policies. He’s been a steady hand on the council and challenged all of us to stretch our vocabularies. Yet, we’d rather see him stay in his District 2 seat as part of an alliance of leadership.

The mayor’s race at the top of the ballot will feature candidates in this order. Voters may fill in one oval in each “choice” column.

DISTRICT 1

SIGNE LINDELL

1

MARIE CAMPOS

2

Signe Lindell’s presence on the Santa Fe City Council doesn’t stick out as much as, say, her favorite orange pants amid a sea of dark trousers. But Sig is steady as she goes. The incumbent councilor served for seven years on the city Planning Commission before her election in 2014 to a seat vacated by Chris Calvert. For the most part, we like the way Lindell thinks and the way she conducts herself. She does her homework. She’s not afraid to shoot from the hip, to say something is a bad idea when she’s worried that it is, or to be proud and celebrate good things happening in our community along with criticizing the unhappy ones.   She was behind the city’s ultimately failed effort to ban the sale of mini bottles of alcohol, and we think of her when we step over the piles of litter they are still creating all over town due to the district

court’s refusal to enable local governance on that front. This race marks the fourth time for Marie Campos to make a run at City Council. Voters so far have not seen fit to put her in the job, and we don’t see a compelling argument for her to oust Lindell. Campos still lives in her same La Cieneguita home, but the city redrew her neighborhood out of western/southern District 3 and into District 1. She ran for the District 3 seat in 2012, earning 30 percent of the votes when Chris Rivera was elected with 58 percent. In 2014, she also came in second in a three-way race, getting 37 percent of votes when Carmichael Dominguez was elected with 45 percent. But in last year’s District 1 contest, split four ways, she took just 9 percent of votes, showing she has a long way to go with what matters to voters in the district that covers the city’s north side. CONTINUED ON PAGE 17

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T H I S I S A PA I D A D V E R T I S E M E N T

find out about our new ranked choice ballot

VoteDifferentSantaFe.com Trump’s Tariffs Can’t Stop Solar. Here’s Why. Follow us on at @SantaFeGov for more videos, resources, and sample ballots!

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Vote March 6!

This is the best time for homeowners and businessowners to switch to clean, affordable energy. On January 22nd, the Trump Administration announced a 30% tariff on US imports of solar cells and panels. But—for New Mexico homeowners and business owners—the news doesn’t change a fundamental fact: 2018 is still an extraordinarily good time to go solar. Even in the face of trade disputes, residential solar system prices remain very low. Rapid tech advances, increases in market demand, declining costs of installation and attractive solar financing assure New Mexicans that: Solar is still the most costeffective option for powering a home or business. Falling costs are just one of many reasons to go solar in 2018. There are other big reasons to act now: Some pre-tariff priced modules are still available. In anticipation of the solar tariffs, SunPower by Positive Energy Solar took steps to have pre-tariff priced modules available for residential systems in early 2018. These supplies are very limited but create a great opportunity for people ready to buy solar today. The 30% federal tax credit starts scaling down after 2019. The federal government is still offering big incentives to go solar—if you take action before the end of 2019. In the following years, tax credits will decline to 26 percent and then to 22 percent. New Mexico’s “Net Metering” rules make solar an excellent investment. Net metering enables New Mexico residents to generate their own power and get credit for what they provide to the grid for others to use. This law is in effect now, but it may not be forever. By going solar in 2018, you can get the most out of your investment. Solar is more efficient and reliable than ever. SunPower modules carry an unrivaled 25-year power and product warranty to ensure the production of clean, affordable energy from your solar system. This is the moment to help to clean our air and water. From water shortages to air pollution, there are serious rising challenges to our environment and quality of life. Going solar is a simple and effective way to be part of the solution.

Visit positiveenergysolar.com or

call 505-424-1112 for a free consultation 16

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SFR RANKS THE COUNCIL BALLOTS

DISTRICT 2 Carol Romero-Wirth is our first-place pick to fill the seat. She can seem nervous when speaking in front of a crowd, but she also seems bright and thoughtful. That kind of humility is endearing. A lawyer by training, she has worked in policymaking for most of her career and we trust her understanding of how to move the ball within the confines of the government’s jurisdiction.   Ranking a close second for us in this race is Nate Downey, who has undeniably worked really hard in this campaign—from showing up to forums and interviews on a bicycle to trying to keep water in the conversation. Permaculturist Downey would also make a fine councilor. We gave Joe Arellano our endorsement when he ran for the seat back in 2014. Arellano has on-theground experience in the construction industry and an overt frankness that we still love.

Candidates from the east and southeast District 2 are getting more attention than others this election season, but it’s not the three-way race for district representative that is generating all the interest. Both of the current councilors from the district, Joseph Maestas and Peter Ives, are trying to move up to the job of mayor. Under the city’s rule, one seat from each district is up every two years. That means one of them has to give up his council seat in order to make that leap. This time, it’s Maestas. If Ives loses the mayoral race, he gets to stay on the council, whereas when Maestas decided to run for mayor, he was also choosing to forfeit his seat on the council. The field to replace him was a domino effect from the mayor’s late announcement that he would not seek re-election. All three candidates would make good additions to the City Council, so this is a tough one.

CAROL ROMERO-WIRTH

NATE DOWNEY

1

2

JOE ARELLANO

3

DISTRICT 3 Roman “Tiger” Abeyta is not facing an opponent, and he’s been knocking on doors with Alan Webber to help garner support on the Southside for the mayoral candidate. That natural alliance will be good for the district, should Webber end up on top. Abeyta was a longtime Santa Fe County employee who left the county’s top job in the middle of the lowest thing to happen there in a while. Abeyta was not implicated during the scandal that involved one of his top department directors taking bribes, however, and more

recently, he’s been doing good deeds as head of the Boys & Girls Club of Santa Fe.

Voters cast ballots for council races only in the district where they live.

DISTRICT 4 Greg Scargall is an impressive dude, and we’re not just saying that because of his mustache grooming choices and winning smile. He’s hands-down the best choice in this field to forge new ground for District 4 as its 12-year representative Ronald Trujillo takes a run at the citywide mayor’s office and gives up his seat on the council. A Navy vet himself, Scargall runs the Santa Fe Community College Veterans Resources Center and is the only person on the ballot this year younger than 40 ( just barely!). He’s also the only candidate on the whole slate who is not registered with a major political party. City elections are nonpartisan, but that’s notable in a field of mostly party-line Dems. Scargall likes to describe himself as a tank rolling into the room

and says he represents a generation of born-and-raised Santa Feans who want movement and results. He’s studied up on development rules and has some ideas we like, such as mandatory solar power on new buildings. Next, we’d rank JoAnne Vigil Coppler, who has a long record of government jobs and is now running her own real estate business. She has her sights on helping the council keep an eye on finances and has a detail-oriented background. Last, Eric J Holmes might provide lots of charitable donations to recreational sports programs and other ventures in the city, but we’re pretty uncomfortable with his choice to spend most of his public campaign finance money at his own business.

ROMAN ABEYTA

GREG SCARGALL

JOANNE VIGIL COPPLER

ERIC HOLMES

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TECH a studio artist whose contributions to the first part of the film included puppet, costume and set design, among other jobs. Patrick Boyles, another member of what Ludlow and Caoba describe as a loose group of collaborators, also was there working on one of the sets. Everyone does a little of everything, they say. “We’re puppeteers, artists, cinematographers. We’re all wearing all the hats, we all have magical powers,” Caoba says. They liken the creative collaboration to the notion of the Exquisite Corpse, in which the final creation is unpredictable and influenced by everyone who participates. But the film—its origin, words and music—all came from Ludlow; he hopes the second part of the pilot will be ready in late spring (zombie puppet musical lovers can view the first part for free on Vimeo). The project began as most projects do—with inspiration … and a little irritation. “I got so sick of the zombie genre,” Ludlow says. “I thought, ‘This needs to be addressed with puppets.’”

Just in time for Valentine’s Day: musings on the undead, futurism and labors of love BY JULIA GOLDBERG @votergirl

W

ho do you think said the following: “What if death weren’t certain? What if we were able to break the cycle using affordable personal technology?” a. Steve Jobs b. Steve Bannon c. Steve … the puppet If you chose puppet Steve, you are correct and, like me, saw the zombie puppet musical The Love That Would Not Die (part one) created by Santa Fe’s friendly local puppet cabal, aka The Human Beast Box  (thehumanbeastbox.com). The short premiered at the Jean Cocteau in spring 2016 and its creators held an exhibit of its sets and puppets last September at Radical Abacus. Recently, I heard on the puppet grapevine (yes, there is such a thing; just ask Zozobra) that the second part of the series pilot was under production, so I set out to investigate. First, some backstory. Part one begins

with technologist Steve (a puppet) delivering his inspirational ZED Talk (Zeitgist, Entertainment, Design) regarding the iNODIE pill he’s created to deliver to consumers ever-lasting life. Yes, Steve the puppet bears a resemblance to Steve Jobs, particularly when he promises that folks can beat death and choose an individual color scheme through which to do so. Everyone takes the pill, and you know what happens next: A zombie apocalypse happens, of course, replete with hordes of zombie puppets. After all, as Stan, the film’s hard-drinking positive-thinking human survivor says later, “It’s a zombie apocalypse. … All the stories have the same ending: zombies.” These particular zombies have a few quirks but, to avoid spoilers, let’s just say the undead in this film are alive with the sound of music. As such, part one of The Love That Would Not Die incorporates my three favorite things in life: musical theater, sarcasm and metanarrative. Thus, when I learned part two was underway, I pulled some strings (sorry) and arranged on a warm summer day in January to visit the puppet lab, aka Oñate Hall on the campus of the Santa Fe University of Art and Design. On this particular Sunday, the film’s writer and director Devon Hawkes Ludlow was at work with wife Brandee Caoba,

COURTESY OF THE LOVE THAT WOULD NOT DIE

Zombie Puppets Live Again

The undead in this film are alive with the sound of music.

The songs and music came first, and the film evolved to also incorporate Ludlow’s dislike for TED Talks, iPhones and futurists (among other contemporary phenomena). Along with taking a broad (and melodic) swipe at 21st-century tropes and their bevy of posthumanist concerns, Ludlow’s project also aims to show the creative possibilities available without over-reliance on technology. Both he and Boyles have worked in the film industry (Ludlow also has a theater degree and background), and were determined to counter what they see as an alienating aesthetic dominating most cinema—what Ludlow describes as “this unnatural smoothness.” The movie was shot almost completely on an iPhone (yes, yes, irony), edited in iMovie (which even I know how to use) and lighting was provided through clip lights. Moreover, 99 percent of the materials used in the film to make the puppets and the sets are found materials. “Using existing media helps show the inherent possibilities,” Ludlow says—possibilities, he maintains, that are aesthetically flattened and zapped of energy when a film over-relies on special effects. (“We do our own stunts,” Caoba notes, but she’s not really joking. The work behind the scenes includes trial and error to produce actual physical effects, and even the occasional consultation with a physicist). Creativity and technology are not mutually exclusive (this column is purportedly about the intersection of both), but this project, though somewhat rooted in antipathy toward technology, is equally grounded in a love of artistic spontaneity. I should also mention the film invokes time travel, which is one of my favorite sci-fi tropes, and future episodes will show Stan, the antihero, traveling through time with his lovable dog (yes, a sock puppet dog can be lovable) and the Kid to save humanity from various other apocalypses. Which is worse: Zombies or a world overrun by Mary Kay cosmetics? Stay tuned.

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Spring

POETRY Search WIN!

1. Entries must be made on the contest website before midnight on March 1, 2018. SFReporter.com/poetry 2. There is no minimum or maximum word count. Entries must be typed and previously unpublished. Paid contributors to SFR in the last year are not eligible. There is no limit on the number of entries per poet, but each entry should be a single poem. 3. The winner will be awarded a prize package in the form of gift certificates at local businesses worth $100. Second and third place winners will receive prize packages for $50 and $25, respectively. Prizes are awarded solely at the discretion of SFR’s judges. 4. Winners will be published in SFR and at SFReporter.com, along with a photograph and biographical statement about the author. Winners may be invited to read works aloud at the SFR Mind Body Spirit health fair on March 24. 5. Questions? Contact Julie Ann Grimm at 988-7530 or editor@sfreporter.com

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SPACED

LEAF MOUNTAIN

COURTESY OF THE GRAND PLANET MAKING SPACE WIZARD, TIM THE MAGNIFICENT

LECTURE THURS/15

Yeah, yeah, yeah—Jupiter’s big and has that red spot and there are something like two dozen moons orbiting it. Fine. But did you know it’s the fourth brightest object in the whole effing solar system? Or that the aforementioned spot is an ever-raging storm? Jupiter’s cool, man, and there are just so many facts waiting to be unearthed (so to speak) that the Renesan Institute’s Jim Baker, an astronomy instructor, has a whole talk planned around what we at SFR call “the biggest-ass planet.” Learn something, marvel at the universe, get smart. (ADV) All About Jupiter: 1 pm Thursday Feb. 15. $10. St. John’s United Methodist Church, 1200 Old Pecos Trail, 982-5397.

COURTESY PARAMOUNT PICTURES

FILM SAT/17 AS IF! O, glory be! The Jean Cocteau Cinema heard our prayers and this week presents the seminal (yeah, we said it) 1995 Alicia Silverstone vehicle, Clueless, as the kickoff to their new Girls Night Out series. Huzzah! In the film, young Cher (Silverstone) attempts to transform a homely new classmate into what she’d call a “Betty,” but she learns a thing or two about herself and stepbrother love in the process. Sound like Jane Austen’s Emma? Good, because that’s just what it’s based upon, and we can thank director Amy Heckerling for star-making turns from the likes of Brittany Murphy, Donald Faison and Paul Rudd. Future films in the series include Mean Girls and Jawbreaker, but this one has a special place in our hearts. (ADV) Girls Night Out: Clueless: 8 pm Saturday Feb. 17. $9-$10.50. Jean Cocteau Cinema, 418 Montezuma Ave., 466-5528.

CHARLIE SHUCK

MUSIC TUE/20 THE SOUND IS COMING DOWN Never having heard of Seattle-based alt.rock musician Noah Gundersen, we turned to YouTube to help write a simple calendar listing. Before we knew it, four hours had passed, we’d cycled through dozens of songs and had fallen deeply in love with the comely guitarist. His music—which has notes of Chris Isaak, or a late-’90s John Rzeznik-y quality that is uplifting instead of overly poppy—is pensive but doesn’t bog you down; tugs at the heartstrings without taking cheap shots; gets in your head to make you hum without minding that it’s stuck there for days. Give “The Sound” or “Isaiah” a listen to see why we’re sold, and we’ll see you at the show. (Charlotte Jusinski) Noah Gundersen with Aaron Gillespie: 8 pm Tuesday Feb. 20. $18-$20. The Bridge at Santa Fe Brewing Company, 37 Fire Place, 557-6182.

EVENT FRI/16-SAT-17

Et Tu, Bro-Te? Let slip the boards of war Don’t let Kenneth Branagh or Julie Taymor trick you into thinking good Shakespeare needst be boring, countrymen, countrywomen and country gender non-conforming folk. In fact, the Bard’s works hath more sex, violence and understanding of the human condition than one might shake a cockle staff at, and nary another writer has approached a similar level before or since. And lo! It was good. But how couldst we entice a younger generation? And how might we maketh the plays presentable in new ways? Mayhap thou thinketh of Baz Luhrmann’s 1996 abomination (yeah, we said it) Romeo+Juliet, or even 1999’s brilliant (yeah, we said it) Taming of the Shrew adaptation, 10 Things I Hate About You. And though thou wouldst be right in assuming these films did make the material more digestible, Veronica Everett has a plan of her own: Skateboards. What didst thou say? Aye. Skateboards. Also punk rock, hip-hop, live music and spray paint art. Through Everett’s Skate Shake program, she

hopes to bring Julius Caesar to life in the DeVargas Skatepark (302 W DeVargas St.) this summer. “I never skated myself, but I love the idea of taking something that’s fringe culture and bringing it to the forefront of a society that’s pretty snooty,” Everett says. “It’s a story we’re all familiar with, we know the speeches, and it’s the hot political play right now.” But how to get involved? Well, it’s early yet, but the first round of local auditions goes down from 5-9 pm this Friday and Saturday Feb. 16 and Feb. 17 at Skate School Santa Fe. Everett says the process is open to all, but there’s a distinct focus on youth; good skaters or not, there are roles for everyone. Further, donations can be made to help pay for the upcoming park fees at gofundme. com/skate-shake-julius-caesar. (Alex De Vore) SKATE SHAKE: JULIUS CAESAR AUDITIONS 5-9 pm Friday and Saturday Feb. 16 and 17. Free. Skate School Santa Fe, 825 Early St., Ste. H, 474-0074

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THE CALENDAR Email all the relevant information to calendar@sfreporter.com. You can also enter your events yourself online at calendar.sfreporter.com (submission doesn’t guarantee inclusion). Need help?

COURTESY MUSEUM OF INTERNATIONAL FOLK ART

Want to see your event here?

LIMELIGHT KARAOKE Palace Saloon 142 W Palace Ave., 428-0690 You know the drill. SFR’s suggestion this week: “Rock Your Body” by Justin Timberlake. Don’t forget the claps. 10 pm, free PETE AMAHL Mine Shaft Tavern 2846 Hwy. 14, Madrid, 473-0743 Set the mood with jazzy tunes. 6 pm, free SANTA FE CROONERS Palace Saloon 142 W Palace Ave., 428-0690 Golden Age standards. 6:30-9:30 pm, free SYDNEY WESTAN Tiny's Restaurant & Lounge 1005 S St. Francis Drive, 983-9817 Folky-rocky singer-songwritery tunes. 5:30-7:30 pm, free VALENTINE'S SPECIAL Tiny's Restaurant & Lounge 1005 S St. Francis Drive, 983-9817 Enjoy some love songs with Henry, Paul and James. 7:30 pm, free

Contact Charlotte: 395-2906

WED/14 BOOKS/LECTURES DHARMA TALK BY JOHN DUNNE Upaya Zen Center 1404 Cerro Gordo Road, 986-8518 The Buddhist philosopher presents "Not Knowing, but Not Non-knowing: Embracing Uncertainty, Transcending Ignorance." 5:30 pm, free GARDEN CONVERSATIONS Stewart Udall Center 725 Camino Lejo, 983-6155 Every Wednesday, you can listen, talk, share and engage in a conversation around gardening, horticulture or whatever issue is presented that day. Noon-1:30 pm, free

EVENTS GEEKS WHO DRINK Second Street Brewery (Railyard) 1607 Paseo de Peralta, 989-3278 Is your sweetheart super smart? Perfect date alert! Take a pub quiz. 8 pm, free MATT KAZAM DINNER & COMEDY Buffalo Thunder Resort and Casino 20 Buffalo Thunder Trail, 455-5555 Romance and comedy are one and the same (and not always on purpose). These folks are combining them in a good way for a night of nice dinner and stand-up comedy. 7 pm, $59

THU/15 BOOKS/LECTURES ALL ABOUT JUPITER St. John's United Methodist Church 1200 Old Pecos Trail, 982-5397 Jim Baker discusses what we already know about Jupiter and what we hope to learn (see SFR Picks, page 21). 1 pm, $10 ARTIST TALK: LAS FAMILIAS BARELA Y SALAZAR Santa Fe Community College 6401 Richards Ave., 428-1000 In the college's visual arts gallery, participating artists discuss the current group exhibition of work by descendants and artistic heirs of notable Taos woodcarver Patrociño Barela. 1-2:30 pm, free

It’s the Year of the Dog! We’re big canine fans here at SFR (especially this one, a papier-mache statue from Takamatsu, Kagawa Prefecture, Japan, circa 1965), so we think you should head to the Museum of International Folk Art on Sunday for a celebration of the Lunar New Year with crafts, dances, food, music and a parade. NAMASTE Duel Brewing 1228 Parkway Drive, 474-5301 Get a yoga and a beer. 6 pm, $15 ONE BILLION RISING: RISE UP IN TESTIMONY The Roundhouse Rotunda 491 Old Santa Fe Trail, 986-4589 Testify and share personal stories about assault and abuse. Valentine's Day has been reclaimed as V-Day to wrestle control of women’s bodies back from oppressors. 3 pm, free

WAYWARD BACHELOR AUCTION The Burger Stand at Burro Alley 207 W San Francisco, 989-3360 Stand-up comedy from bachelors you can then purchase. 8 pm, free

FILM BIG SCREEN CLASSICS: PRETTY IN PINK Lensic Performing Arts Center 211 W San Francisco St., 988-1234 Everyone loves the '80s coming-of-age cult classic. 7 pm, free

MUSIC DANIELE SPADAVECCHIA El Mesón 213 Washington Ave., 983-6756 Acoustic jazz, swing, Latin and Italian classics singing in Italian, English and Spanish. 7 pm, free DAVID GEIST Osteria D'Assisi 58 S Federal Place, 986-5858 Broadway tunes and standards on piano. Maybe Geist will whip out all his favorite love tunes—which we will dedicate to lasagna, as it were. 6 pm, free

THE DUSTY GREEN BONES BAND Cowgirl 319 S Guadalupe St., 982-2565 Five-piece electric newgrass band out of California. 8 pm, free GERRY & CHRIS La Fiesta Lounge 100 E San Francisco St., 982-5511 Traditional Irish sounds from Gerry Carthy meld with Latin tunes by Chris Abeyta when these two longtime friends play together. 7:30 pm, free

EVENTS ARTIST-IN-RESIDENCE DEMO Buffalo Thunder Resort and Casino 20 Buffalo Thunder Trail, 455-5555 An artist from the Poeh Cultural Center gives a live demonstration in the lobby outside Red Sage restaurant. 4-7 pm, free

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THE CALENDAR CITY COUNCIL CANDIDATE FORUM Higher Education Building 1950 Siringo Road, 428-1725 The League of Women Voters hosts City Council candidates. 5:30 pm, free COMMUNITY DAY AT THE GARDEN Santa Fe Botanical Garden 715 Camino Lejo, 471-9103 Free admission for New Mexico residents and students (please provide ID). 11 am-3 pm, free CREATE THE VOTE 2018 MAYORAL CANDIDATE PANEL New Mexico History Museum 113 Lincoln Ave., 476-5100 Create the Vote Santa Fe invites mayoral candidates to share their positions and ideas about the creative economy at a public forum, moderated by Mary-Charlotte Domandi. 6 pm, free ESTHER: INNER BEAUTY Chabad Jewish Center of SF 230 W Manhattan Ave, 983-2000 Relax, refresh and rejuvenate with a spa night. Get makeup advice, learn which clothing and colors suit you best, sample revitalizing skin creams and top it off with a relaxing massage. Treat yo'self. 6 pm, $10

In Pursuit of Cultural Freedom is a lecture series on political, economic, environmental, and human rights issues featuring social justice activists, writers, journalists, and scholars discussing critical topics of our day.

NANCY MACLEAN with

GREG GRANDIN

WEDNESDAY 7 MARCH AT 7PM LENSIC PERFORMING ARTS CENTER

FOOD RANK YOUR BREW Second Street Brewery (Rufina Taproom) 2920 Rufina St., 954-1068 FairVote New Mexico hosts a happy hour that's all kinds of fun: civic engagement AND beer! Our favorite things. Practice filling a rankedchoice ballot with five beer samplers. You get to rank the brews in order of preference, which will then be tabulated and a winner declared. Noon, $5

While this is a work of history, MacLean’s overriding goal is to shed light on our current moment; to better understand the roots, arguments, goals, motives, and methods of the radical right. MacLean is interested in how we got here, but Democracy in Chains is really about what comes next — for the right and for the rest of us.

Nancy MacLean is an award-winning scholar of twentiethcentury US history and the William H. Chafe Professor of History and Public Policy at Duke University. She is the author of Democracy in Chains: The Deep History of the Radical Right’s Stealth Plan for America (2017), which was a finalist for the National Book Award for Nonfiction and has received a Lannan Cultural Freedom Award for An Especially Notable Book. She is also the author of Freedom Is Not Enough: The Opening of the American Workplace and Behind the Mask of Chivalry: The Making of the Second Ku Klux Klan. Her articles and reviews have appeared in numerous publications, including American Quarterly, Boston Review, International Labor and WorkingClass History, Journal of American History, Law and History Review, and The Nation.

MUSIC BIRD THOMPSON The New Baking Company 504 W Cordova Road, 557-6435 The local singer-songwriter plays songs from the heart to go with your brekkie burrito. 10 am, free DITCH DAISY Tiny's Restaurant & Lounge 1005 S St. Francis Drive, 983-9817 High-octane Americana and rock-roots originals. 7 pm, free GERRY & CHRIS La Fiesta Lounge 100 E San Francisco St., 982-5511 Traditional Irish sounds from Gerry Carthy meld with Latin tunes by Chris Abeyta when these two longtime friends play together. 7:30 pm, free GOT SOUL El Farol 808 Canyon Road, 983-9912 The house jazz band features members Jim Casey (guitar), Justin Bransford (bass), Brad Smith (drums), Glenn Kostur (sax 'n' keys) and Chris Ishi (also keys). 7 pm, free JOHN RANGEL'S DUET SERIES El Mesón 213 Washington Ave., 983-6756 The dynamic jazz piano maestro is joined by a special guest. 7 pm, free KATY STEPHAN Vanessie 427 W Water St., 982-9966 Standards and originals on piano and voice. 6:30 pm, free PAT MALONE TerraCotta Wine Bistro 304 Johnson St., 989-1166 Live solo jazz guitar. 6 pm, free

VINCENT COPIA Pizzeria & Trattoria da Lino 204 N Guadalupe St. 982-8474 Americana originals. 7 pm, free WHITHERWARD Cowgirl 319 S Guadalupe St., 982-2565 Acoustic power-folk. 8 pm, free

THEATER THE WATER ENGINE Teatro Paraguas 3205 Calle Marie, 424-1601 A story of corruption and violence. Tickets: 917-439-7708 (see Acting Out, page 33). 7:30 pm, $15-$25

FRI/16 ART OPENINGS ART & ACTIVISM: SELECTIONS FROM THE HARJO FAMILY COLLECTION IAIA Museum of Contemporary Native Arts 108 Cathedral Place, 983-8900 About 60 works, many of which were purchased by or gifted to Suzan Shown Harjo (Cheyenne/Hodulgee Muscogee), an important Native activist (see AC, page 31). 5 pm, free BREAKING GROUND: IAIA 2018 BFA EXHIBITION IAIA Museum of Contemporary Native Arts 108 Cathedral Place, 983-8900 Get a load of the diversity of work being created by the artists trained at the Institute of American Indian Arts. The selected works by these artists are grounded in ideas of personal, political, social, cultural, or historical import (see AC, page 31). 5 pm, free CONTINUED ON PAGE 26

COURTESY FOTO FORUM SANTA FE

— Colin Gordon, jacobinmag.com

ENTER EVENTS AT SFREPORTER.COM/CAL

TICKETS ON SALE NOW

ticketssantafe.org or call 505.988.1234 $8 general/$5 students and seniors with ID Ticket prices include a $3 Lensic Preservation Fund fee. Video and audio recordings of Lannan events are available at:

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FEBRUARY 14-20, 2018

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On Friday, Diné photographer Marina Eskeets gives an artist talk in conjunction with her solo exhibition at Foto Forum Santa Fe, which includes “Indigenous + Free Roaming” (we love this).


Ross Hamlin’s Dovetail Orchestra visits the silent film era

BY ALEX DE VORE a l e x @ s f r e p o r t e r. c o m

I

n 1991, local musician Ross Hamlin was living in Minneapolis where, he says, he caught Captain Beefheart guitarist Gary Lucas performing a live score to the 1915 silent film Das Golem. It planted a seed that  Hamlin carried with him from Minneapolis to Boston, where he attended the Berklee School of Music as a film score student, and graduated in 1996. “When I first saw Gary Lucas, I thought, ‘I have to do this shit,’” Hamlin says. And now he has. Hamlin’s upcoming event Underscore, and its band, Dovetail Orchestra, are the results of that seed: a trio, featuring Hamlin  and multiinstrumentalists Scott Jarrett and Lee Steck, that performs live alongside a series of silent film shorts. “A lot of it is written out, but some of it is improvisational,” Hamlin says. “We’re catching live cues and physical moments, so if someone falls down the stairs, we’re going to make the appropriate noise.” In total, Dovetail Orchestra accompanies eight obscure or classic silent films with an array of musical styles. Hamlin rattles off a list including jazz, metal, rock, techno, dub and—for lack of a better term, he says—“Americana.” The films are surely bizarre and include the eerily mag-

PUBLIC DOMAIN

Silencio

MUSIC

netic 1912 Russian Film  The Cameraman’s Revenge (wherein filmmaker Wladislaw Starewicz used stop-motion techniques to animate dead insects riding in cars or having sex), 1922’s  Frogland  (another from  Starewicz about frogs who pray to God for a president and instead receive a stump) and  Mary Jane’s Mishap  (a dark 1903 British number from filmmaker George Albert Smith about a goofy housewife who haunts her friends). Each  Dovetail member tackles multiple instruments as well, from traditional guitars, bass and keys to what Hamlin calls a “prepared piano,” a method by which an everyday piano is transformed by altering the strings inside with

We’re doing stuff that is traditional, but stuff that’s not ... It’s nice to have fun with some of the cliches. -Ross Hamlin

foreign materials, thereby making it more of a percussive instrument. “John Cage did it in the ’50s,” Hamlin explains. “But there are no tricks of the trade like looping; it’s literally just us watching [films] and knowing them well enough to make it happen.” This is a great direction for Hamlin, who tells SFR he struggled in music

We at SFR now love 1912’s The Cameraman’s Revenge more than pretty much anything else we’ve ever seen in our entire lives.

school with the nature of the film score. To expand, try watching a film without music and notice how you aren’t quite sure what to feel. Hamlin says he’s always found the nature of film scores to be manipulative, a stance that proved challenging for Berklee instructors who felt scores should err toward the traditional. “We’re doing stuff [with Underscore] that is traditional, but stuff that’s not, too,” he says. “It’s nice to have fun with some of the cliches, though.” Underscore seems like a welcome change from run-of-themill shows (Hamlin says he’s done with playing in bars for the moment, and brother, we hear you), it speaks volumes to SITE’s new direction post-renovation. Here we have something completely different than the usual fare, created by a local musician and existing in an art space that is generally known for challenging multimedia works. Not that Underscore is lacking cerebrally, just that it seems like it’ll be wild fun; Hamlin is, of course, a celebrated weirdo. Even better, with eight films, the running time still only hits about an hour. “I’ve seen  Metropolis  done like this, and

I’ve seen similar things, and I get bored,” Hamlin recalls. “I think it’s nice they’re short.” Additionally, local liquor store Susan’s Fine Wine and Spirits has partnered with SITE and Hamlin to provide a special drink menu for the evening including, Hamlin says, an eponymous signature cocktail he created based on The Cameraman’s Revenge. What’s in it? “You’ll see,” Hamlin quips coyly. Fingers crossed for no dead insects. Crickets are maybe OK. But, I digress. Hamlin hopes to eventually add more films to the project and possibly take it on the road. “My hope with that would be to get in touch with local musicians in these places and perform with them,” he says. “I’m certainly open to that.” For now, though, it’s born here all its life, and ready to provide a tantalizingly strange event. Score tickets immediately. Or, y’know, just show up day-of.

DOVETAIL ORCHESTRA: UNDERSCORE 6 pm Friday Feb. 16. $10-$15. SITE Santa Fe, 1606 Paseo de Peralta, 988-1199

February FREE LIVE MUSIC AT THE ORIGINAL

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SFREPORTER.COM

HAPPY HOUR 4 - 6:30 PM Daily www.secondstreetbrewery.com

FEBRUARY 14-20, 2018

25


THE CALENDAR

Year of the DOG

Celebrate

2018

Chinese New Year

FEBRUARY 15TH, 16TH,

— DINNER ONLY —

&

17TH

FREE appetizer for all dinner guests!

SPECIAL MENU!

FIREWORKS NIGHTLY @ 7PM

CHOW’S

ASIAN BISTRO

720 St. Michael’s Drive Santa Fe 505.471.7120 www.mychows.com

HEARTFELT EXPRESSIONS Alexandra Stevens Gallery 820 Canyon Road, 988-1311 The gallery artists get together to show work perfect for the season. Through Feb. 28. 5:30 pm, free JAN DENTON AND MARY THOMAS Collected Works Bookstore and Coffeehouse 202 Galisteo St., 988-4226 Botanical watercolors and still-life oils from Denton. Thomas presents oil portraits of legendary authors. 4 pm, free ROLANDE SOULIERE: FORM AND CONTENT IAIA Museum of Contemporary Native Arts 108 Cathedral Place, 983-8900 Through the use of Ojibway, Cree and Inuit syllabics, artist Souliere uses aspects of this writing system to engage in ideas about space, color, form, symbolism, surface movement and language. Her new wall painting at MoCNA is an exploration into the parallels and the multifaceted ways in which geometric building blocks have a profound affinity with Indigenous language and culture, as well as abstraction in Western art. 5 pm, free WITHOUT BOUNDARIES: VISUAL CONVERSATIONS IAIA Museum of Contemporary Native Arts 108 Cathedral Place, 983-8900 Work from Indigenous leaders in the arts whose portfolios encourage social action are on loan from the Anchorage Museum in Alaska. The pieces explore issues from decolonization to climate change. Curator Sonya Kelliher-Combs has brought together artists from North America and Greenland to create a shared visual narrative and a shared conversation about ideas and issues that separate and bind. 5 pm, free

BOOKS/LECTURES MARINA ESKEETS: ARTIST TALK Foto Forum Santa Fe 1716 Paseo de Peralta, 470-2582 Just before her super-cool exhibit at Foto Forum closes, Eskeets discusses what she's up to. She is a conceptual artist from Naná’áztiin, New Mexico (Navajo Nation). Her work is centered on energy extraction within Dinétah and the repercussions it has had on Indigenous identity. 5 pm, free

EVENTS ARTIST-IN-RESIDENCE DEMO Buffalo Thunder Resort and Casino 20 Buffalo Thunder Trail, 455-5555 A Native artist from the Poeh Cultural Center gives a live demonstration in the lobby outside the Red Sage restaurant. 4-7 pm, free

ENTER EVENTS AT SFREPORTER.COM/CAL

FILM CIVIL WAR DOCUMENTARY FEEDBACK SCREENING Santa Fe Community College 6401 Richards Ave., 428-1000 Catch an informational workin-progress film screening of a documentary about New Mexico's role in the Battle of Glorieta. Screenings are followed by a discussion with the filmmakers and historian Stephen C Martinez, who will lead the discussions. It's in room 563 of the film program editing suite. Noon-1:30 pm, free DOVETAIL ORCHESTRA: UNDERSCORE SITE Santa Fe 1606 Paseo de Peralta, 989-1199 Dovetail Orchestra, led by Santa Fe composer and multi-instrumentalist Ross Hamlin, with special guests Scott Jarrett and Lee Steck, provides live musical accompaniment and sound design to obscure silent films (see Music, page 25). 6:30 pm, $10-$15

MUSIC BETSY AND THE HOLLYCOCKS Mine Shaft Tavern 2846 Hwy. 14, Madrid, 473-0743 Alt.rock and Americana. 8 pm, free BIG CEDAR FEVER Second Street Brewery (Original) 1814 Second St., 982-3030 Western swing, classic country and jazz passing through town from Texas Hill Country. 6 pm, free BROOMDUST CARAVAN Duel Brewing 1228 Parkway Drive, 474-5301 Folk, country, blues 'n' gospel. 7 pm, free CHARLES TICHENOR'S CHAT NOIR CABARET Los Magueyes Mexican Restaurant 31 Burro Alley, 992-0304 Groovy piano, poetry and song with Tichenor and his rotating cadre of special guests. Vive la révolution! 6 pm, free CONTROLLED BURN El Farol 808 Canyon Road, 983-9912 Rock 'n' blues. 8:30-10:30 pm, $5 DJ DANY Camel Rock Casino 17486 Hwy. 84/285, Pojoaque, 984-8414 All kinds of pan-Latin jams. 8:30 pm, free DANA SMITH Upper Crust Pizza 329 Old Santa Fe Trail, 982-0000 Country-tinged folk songs. 6 pm, free DANIELE SPADAVECCHIA Inn and Spa at Loretto 211 Old Santa Fe Trail, 984-7997 Gypsy jazz guitar. 7 pm, free

DAVID GEIST Pranzo Italian Grill 540 Montezuma Ave., 984-2645 Piano standards Broadway tunes. 6 pm, $2 DOUG MONTGOMERY AND KATY STEPHAN Vanessie 427 W Water St., 982-9966 PIano standards. Doug starts, Katy takes over at 8 pm. 6 pm, free GARRY BLACKCHILD Second Street Brewery (Railyard) 1607 Paseo de Peralta, 989-3278 Rustic rebel folk. 6 pm, free GERRY CARTHY Pizzeria & Trattoria da Lino 204 N Guadalupe St., 982-8474 Traditional Irish tunes. 7 pm, free HELLA BELLA Palace Saloon 142 W Palace Ave., 428-0690 Rock 'n' roll fronted by the fabulous Bella Gigante. 10 pm, $5 JESUS BAS La Boca (Taberna Location) 125 Lincoln Ave., 988-7102 Amorous and romantic Spanish and flamenco guitar. 7 pm, free JIM ALMAND Mine Shaft Tavern 2846 Hwy. 14, Madrid, 473-0743 Bluesy rock on the deck. 5 pm, free JOHN KURZWEG BAND Cowgirl 319 S Guadalupe St., 982-2565 Rock ‘n’ roll music by aficionado and renowned producer Kurzweg and fam. 8:30 pm, free JOSHUA ROMAN Lensic Performing Arts Center 211 W San Francisco St., 988-1234 Cellist Roman has earned an international reputation for his wide-ranging repertoire, a commitment to communicating the essence of music in visionary ways, artistic leadership and versatility. 7 pm, $22-$80 LITTLE LEROY AND HIS PACK OF LIES La Fiesta Lounge 100 E San Francisco St., 982-5511 Party-time rock 'n' roll. 8 pm, free MIKE MONTIEL TRIO Tiny's Restaurant & Lounge 1005 S St. Francis Drive, 983-9817 Classic rock. 8:30 pm, free NATASHA STOJANORSKA First Presbyterian Church 208 Grant Ave., 982-8544 This week's TGIF recital features pianist Stojanorska playing music by César Cui, Aleksandr Borodin, Mily Balakirev, Modest Mussorgsky and Nikolay Rimsky-Korsakov. 5:30 pm, free CONTINUED ON PAGE 28

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A&C

Standing Fierce for Five N

ew Mexican women don’t take things sitting down,” Maria Hinojosa says. Those who nourish communities and seed critical thinking, “the activists, poets, painters, writers, mothers”—that’s who Hinojosa implicates when describing her encounters with New Mexico. She is herself a fierce Latina trained in the art of observation, one who holds an “ethical responsibility to those rendered invisible.”  We all know resilient women; born from and raised up in complex Indigenous and mestizo communities, women who have experienced firsthand, and over the course of many generations, the dispossession and loss that has marked the places we call home. It’s hard not to see how the twin behemoths, patriarchy and colonialism, have left their imprint nearly everywhere. And yet, the stories of the women and women-identified members of our communities aren’t just jeremiads to cultural casualty. When NewMexicoWomen.Org was conducting dialogues throughout the state for its study, The Heart of Gender Justice in New Mexico: Intersectionality, Economic Security and Health Equity, participants across the board identified a community’s strengths as its women’s resilience and creativity. On Feb. 27 the organization, whose mission is to advance opportunities for

women and girls, celebrates its fifth anni- multiple ways of navigating the world. versary at SITE Santa Fe. They’re doing Some of NMW.O’s community partso with an apt banner: “Standing Fierce ners include Southwest Organizing Projfor Five.” With that comes a big commu- ect (swop.net), Tewa Women United nity encuentro and night of festivities, (tewawomenunited.org), Northern New including an opening from the young Mexico College Office of Equity and Dipoets of  Albuquerque’s Native American Community Academy, as well as the resonant words of former Albuquerque Poet Laureate Jessica Helen Lopez. According to the nonprofit’s press release, “‘Standing Fierce for Five’ is a celebration of the work of NMW.O, the only statewide women’s fund dedicated to gender equity, as well as the work of their community partners across New Mexico. … As a society, we are in a unique moment to create space anew for the voices, dreams, and leadership of women and girls to be centered.” To center those voices is to honor the most marginalized of our communities: intersectional women whose place in the social maLatina media titan Maria Hinojosa honors women at trix is the stuff of multiNewMexicoWomen.Org’s Standing Fierce for Five event. ple identities and, thus,

COURTESY NEWMEXICOWOMEN.ORG

BY ALICIA INEZ GUZMÁN a u t h o r @ s f r e p o r t e r. c o m

NMW.O celebrates five years with an anniversary party and special guest Maria Hinojosa

The Water Engine • by David Mamet

For full details on these and other listings, please see

www.TheatreSantaFe.org

versity (nnmc.edu), Tres Manos Weaving Studio, Navajo Nation Breastfeeding Coalition  and Mujeres de Adelante Women’s Cooperative (part of Santa Fe Public School’s Adelante program), to name only a few. Hinojosa, whose voice many have come to recognize on NPR’s Latino USA, will be the event’s guest speaker. As a veteran journalist with nearly three decades of experience, her own philosophy of centering women “goes back to the fact that that was part of my own narrative,” she tells SFR. Her mother, too, was a “powerhouse,” who “founded domestic violence programs where there were none.” Hinojosa’s ability to tell the stories about the most “disenfranchised communities” in the US and across the Americas comes, she says, from the “experiences of crossing borders growing up.” She was born in Mexico City and raised in Chicago. Combatting that omnipresent thing we call the patriarchy came in the form of founding her own company, Futuro Media Group, in 2010. During NMW.O’s community dialogues, it became clear to Program Director Fatima van Hattum that the participants all shared a sense of tenacity. Those involved spoke of “persistence in fighting for justice, the ingenuity of Norteñas as problem solvers, ancestral life ways, the role of women as negotiators, the Diné philosophy of K’é, comadrazga, querencia, and the ability to do a lot with very little.” Their evocations are a reminder, as we move into Women’s History Month, to recall the spectrum of women around us who do stand up—and fiercely so.

STANDING FIERCE FOR FIVE 5:30 pm Tuesday Feb. 27. Free. SITE Santa Fe, 1606 Paseo de Peralta, 989-1199; register: newmexicowomen.org.

UPCOMING PERFORMANCES

Feb. 22 – 25 • See details at TheatreSantaFe.org

Oasis Theatre Company at Teatro Paraguas: 3205 Calle Marie February 15 – 25 • Thursdays, Fridays, Saturdays at 7:30 p.m. • Sundays at 2 p.m.

The Amazing Acro-cats

Stop Kiss • by Diana Son, play reading

at Adobe Rose Theatre

New Mexico Actors Lab at Teatro Paraguas: 3205 Calle Marie Sunday February 18 at 6 p.m. • Free

Special thanks to the Santa Fe Arts Commission for making these announcements possible.

at Studio Center of Santa Fe ( formerly Warehouse 21)

The Roommate • by Jen Silverman Boeing Boeing • 2008 Tony Award at Santa Fe Playhouse

Poetry Reading and Conversation at Teatro Paraguas

SFREPORTER.COM

FEBRUARY 14-20, 2018

27


Get savager at: SFReporter.com/savage

I’m a 24-year-old nonbinary person living in Florida. I have two wonderful girlfriends. One I have been with for four years (we live together). The other I have been with for a year and a half. They’re both brilliant, interesting, and kind. Both relationships have their issues, but they are minor. They know each other but aren’t close. Neither is interested in people besides me right now, although my longer-term girlfriend identifies as poly. They have both said that they see a future with me, but something doesn’t feel right. I’ve been having fantasies about leaving them both. It’s not about wanting to find someone I like better—if I met someone I really liked, I could pursue it. I just feel like neither relationship can progress while both exist. My other friends are getting married. I don’t think I want to stay in this setup indefinitely. Even if my girlfriends liked each other, which they don’t, I don’t want sister wives or two families. But I also can’t imagine choosing between them. I feel like a scumbag for even thinking about it. I’ve talked to them, and they are both having reservations about the current situation. Neither of them wants some kind of three-person family structure, either. The only thing I can think to do (besides running away) is wait and see if one of these relationships fizzles out on its own. Are my fantasies of escape normal? Is wanting to be with “the one” just straight nonsense? -Engaged Now But Yearning “The one” is nonsense, ENBY, but it’s not straight nonsense—lots of queer people believe that “the one,” their perfect match, is out there somewhere. But despite the fact that there are no perfect matches, people are constantly ending loving relationships that could go the distance to run off in search of “the one” that doesn’t exist. As I’ve pointed out again and again, there are lots of .64s out there and, if you’re lucky, you might find a .73 lurking in the pile. When you find a serviceable .64 or (God willing) a spectacular .73, it’s your job to round that motherfucker up to “the one.” (And don’t forget that they’re doing the same for you—just as there’s no “the one” for you, you’re no one’s “the one.” Everyone is rounding up.) Zooming in on your question, ENBY, you say what you have now—two girlfriends who can’t stand each other—is working. Are you sure about that? While fantasies of escape are normal—we all spend time thinking about the road we didn’t take, the door we didn’t try, the ass we didn’t eat—it’s odd to hear someone with two girlfriends wish for one or both to disappear. Perhaps it’s not who you’re doing that’s the problem, ENBY, but what you’re doing. The kind of polyamory you’re practicing—concurrent and equal romantic partnerships—may not be right for you. I’m not trying to YDIW you here (“You’re doing it wrong!), but if you’re envious of your friends who are settling down with just one partner, perhaps you’d be more comfortable in an open-not-poly relationship (sex with others okay, romance with others not okay) or a hierarchical poly relationship (your primary partner comes first, your secondary partner[s] come, well, second). Finally, ENBY, it could be the stress of having two partners who don’t like each other that has you fantasizing about escape and/or one of your partners evaporating. Each of your girlfriends might make sense independently of each other, but if having to share you doesn’t work for them… it’s never going to work for you.

should tell my parents (I should), but when. The abuse fucked me up in some ways, but I have been working through it with a therapist. The problem is my siblings and cousins have started having their own children, and seeing this relative—a member of my extended family—with their kids is dredging up a lot of uncomfortable memories. I see this relative frequently, as we all live in the area and get together as a family at least once a month. I don’t have children of my own yet, but my partner and I have already decided that this relative will never touch or hold the ones we do have. So do I tell my parents now? My extended family is tightly knit, and I fear the issues that sharing this secret will inevitably create. Am I starting unnecessary drama since I’m not even pregnant yet? -My Family Kinda Sucks Your kids may not yet exist, MFKS, but your young nieces, nephews, and cousins do—and your abuser has access to them. So the drama you fear creating isn’t unnecessary—it’s incredibly necessary. And since you were planning to tell your parents eventually, the drama is inevitable. But let’s say you wait to tell your parents until you have children of your own—how will you feel if you learn, after the curtain goes up on this drama, that this relative had sexually abused another child in your family (or multiple children in your family, or children outside your family) in the weeks, months, or years between your decision to tell your parents and the moment you told them? My partner does phone sex work. A lot of the calls are from “straight” guys who ask to be “forced” to suck cock. (We assume the forced part is because they think there’s something wrong with being gay.) We’re wondering if there is a sex-positive word we should be using to describe these guys. If not, your readers should coin one, so all us straight dudes who love dick can take pride in our desires. Fill in the blank: “_______: a 100 percent straight guy who also loves sucking dick (and perhaps taking it in the ass).” -Cocksuckers Need Noun The kink you describe already has a name— forced bi—and a forced bi scene usually goes something like this: A guy who would never, ever suck a cock because he’s totally straight gets down on his knees and sucks cocks on the orders of his female dominant. Since this totally straight guy sucks cock only to please a woman, there’s nothing gay and/or bi about all the cocks he puts in his mouth. It’s one very particular way in which male bisexuality is expressed—think of it as male bisexual desire after hetero fragility, gay panic, denial, religion, gender norms, and football get through kicking the shit out of it. Paradoxically, CNN, by the time a guy asks a woman to force him to suck a cock, he’s allowing himself to suck a cock and therefore no longer in denial. (And, yes, guys into forced bi are free to identify as straight—indeed, they have to keep identifying as straight, since identifying as bi would fatally undermine the transgression that makes their perfectly legitimate kink arousing.) But what to call these guys? Well, CNN, some people into BDSM call themselves “BDSMers.” But “forcedbi’ers” doesn’t trip quite so easily off the tongue—so maybe we go with “cocksuckers”? It’s an emasculating slur, one that straight-identified men throw around to get, um, a rise out of each other. (Call an out-and-over-it gay man a cocksucker, and all you’ll get in return is a “No shit.”) But while “You’re a cocksucker” may be fighting words for a straight guy, they’re highly arousing ones for a straight-identified guy into forced bi.

I’m 27 years old and I’ve been married to my partner for two years. I’m facing a conundrum: A relative sexually abused me when I was younger. It happened a handful of times, and I’ve never told anyone other than my partner. I’m now struggling to decide not whether I

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On the Lovecast, a scientific study on gay cuckolding: savagelovecast.com mail@savagelove.net @fakedansavage on Twitter ITMFA.org

NELSON DENMAN Chez Mamou French Bakery & Cafe 217 E Palace Ave., 216-1845 Classical, folk and jazz on cello and guitar. 6 pm, free RONALD ROYBAL Hotel Santa Fe 1501 Paseo de Peralta, 982-1200 Native American flute and Spanish classical guitar. 7 pm, free THE RUSS LIQUID TEST AND CHARLESTHEFIRST Meow Wolf 1352 Rufina Circle, 395-6369 Melt Shake presents an electric jazz and funk-infused performance from New Orleans-based Russ Liquid Test, including guest acts CharlestheFirst, Beak Nasty, Gnarwhal and Cap'n Swivler. 8 pm, $20-$25 THE THREE FACES OF JAZZ El Mesón 213 Washington Ave., 983-6756 This musical institution often welcomes a fourth guest, so the number is negotiable, but it's always jazzy piano music. 7:30 pm, free TONIC HOUSE JAZZ BAND Tonic 103 E Water St., 982-1189 Jazz from Loren Bienvenu on drums, Michael Burt Jr. on bass, Chris Ishee on piano and Tom Rheam on trumpet. 9:30 pm, free

THEATER SKATE SHAKE AUDITIONS: JULIUS CAESAR Skate School 825 Early St., Ste. H Actors, skaters, musicians, artists, and all generally cool people are invited to come out for Skate Shake's Julius Caesar auditions for a contemporary, hip-hoppy, punkrocky take on Shakespeare's political tragedy (see SFR Picks, page 21). 5 pm, free THE WATER ENGINE Teatro Paraguas 3205 Calle Marie, 424-1601 Set in 1934, the story centers around a young inventor who has created an engine that runs on water. We probably don’t need to say that it doesn’t go well. For tickets, call 917-439-7708 (see Acting Out, page 33). 7:30 pm, $15-$25

SAT/17 ART OPENINGS THE BRIDGE TO ART The Bridge @ SF Brewing Co. 37 Fire Place, 557-6182 In a benefit show for the Esperanza Shelter, check out the work of many artists in many mediums for a good cause. 1-7 pm, free

BOOKS/LECTURES HOW CAN SIGN LANGUAGE HELP YOU Natural Grocers 3328 Cerrillos Road, 474-0111 Amanda Lujan of the Signed Language Interpreting Program at UNM discusses how sign language can make a major difference in effective communication for the deaf and hard-of-hearing. 10 am, free ISRAEL: THE CAN-DO NATION Temple Beth Shalom 205 E Barcelona Road, 982-1376 Ido Aharoni, professor of international relations at New York University, discusses Israel as a cultural, social and economic phenomenon. 7:30-8:30 pm, free

DANCE EMBODYDANCE SANTA FE: 18-YEAR CELEBRATION Railyard Performance Center 1611 Paseo de Peralta, 982-8309 Join the ritualistic, journey-based dance group for a celebration of its 18th birthday. Warm up, participate in a community rite of passage ritual, have dinner, then let loose at an all-out dance party. Bring a sacred object that’s had great meaning to you, so that you can give it away to someone else, and receive a new sacred object in return. We like that idea. 6:30 pm, $18 FLAMENCO DINNER SHOW El Farol 808 Canyon Road, 983-9912 Make a dinner reservation for a performance by the National Institute of Flamenco. 6:30 pm, $25

EVENTS ARMOND LARA: FLYING BLUE BUFFALO PROJECT form & concept 435 S Guadalupe St., 982-8111 Anchored by this panel discussion and reception, form & concept has launched a fundraiser for the creation of a monumental installation of 3-D printed winged buffalo, based on a series of wood carvings by artist Lara. Inspired by the MexicanDiné artist’s family history, this project tells the centuries-long story of enslaved Native American children. 2-5 pm, free ARTIST-IN-RESIDENCE DEMO Buffalo Thunder Resort and Casino 20 Buffalo Thunder Trail, 455-5555 A Native artist from the Poeh Cultural Center gives a live demonstration in the lobby outside the Red Sage restaurant. 4-7 pm, free

BIRD WALK Randall Davey Audubon Center 1800 Upper Canyon Road, 983-4609 Join the folks at Audubon every Saturday for a guided birding hike around the sanctuary with experienced bird nerds. 8:30-10 am, free GOWNS & TONIC: WERK THE RUNWAY Rio Chama Steakhouse 414 Old Santa Fe Trail, 955-0765 Get wine, appetizers, a raffle and a fashion show, all to benefit the Santa Fe Prom Closet. It's a nonprofit that helps every high school student get prom duds, even if they can't afford it (that stuff's dang expensive!). 6 pm, $50 GREAT BACKYARD BIRD COUNT Leonora Curtin Wetland Preserve 27283 West Frontage Road, La Cienega, 471-9103 Arrive by 9 am sharp (gates close at 9:10 am!) for a morning in the unique wetland habitat, helping in a citizen-scientist initiative to collect bird data. Learn about the diversity of birds from bird guide Rocky Tucker. 9 am, free

FILM GIRLS NIGHT OUT FILM SERIES: CLUELESS Jean Cocteau Cinema 418 Montezuma Ave., 466-5528 The Cocteau has partnered with makeup and wellness brand W3ll People to bring Santa Fe a series of female-centric films, starting off with Clueless, that selfsame film which seemed awfully vapid when it was released in 1995 but has since risen to cult classic prominence. Boys are totally invited, by the way (see SFR Picks, page 21). 8 pm, $8-$10

MUSIC BILL HEARNE TRIO Second Street Brewery (Original) 1814 Second St., 982-3030 Country and honky-tonk. 6 pm, free BULLY Meow Wolf 1352 Rufina Circle, 395-6369 Bully is an emotional and melodically alt.rock outfit from Nashville, Tennessee, with support from Melk Belly and Albuquerque indie locals Red Light Cameras. 9 pm, $15-$18 THE BUS TAPES Ski Santa Fe 740 Hyde Park Road, 982-4429 An eclectic mix of alt. folky and rocky originals and covers on the deck of Totemoff’s. 11 am-3 pm, free


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CANDACE VARGAS AND NORTHERN 505 Camel Rock Casino 17486 Hwy. 84/285, Pojoaque, 984-8414 Norteño tunes. 8:30 pm, free CHARLES TICHENOR'S CHAT NOIR CABARET Los Magueyes Mexican Restaurant 31 Burro Alley, 992-0304 Groovy piano, poetry and song with Tichenor and his rotating cadre of special guests. Political change starts in the bars and the cabarets, so get out there and join the cognoscenti. Vive la révolution! 6 pm, free DAVID GEIST Pranzo Italian Grill 540 Montezuma Ave., 984-2645 Santa Fe's consummate Broadway performer plays piano standards and tunes from his long career in the business. 6 pm, $2 DOUG MONTGOMERY AND KATY STEPHAN Vanessie 427 W Water St., 982-9966 Standards, classical and Broadway tunes on piano: Doug starts, Katy takes over at 8 pm. 6 pm, free THE GRUVE El Farol 808 Canyon Road, 983-9912 Soul and R&B. 9-11 pm, $5 HALF BROKE HORSES Cowgirl 319 S Guadalupe St., 982-2565 Country and Americana. 1-4 pm, free JJ AND THE HOOLIGANS Cowgirl 319 S Guadalupe St., 982-2565 Rock, blues and Americana. 8:30 pm, $5 JULIAN DOSSETT TRIO Mine Shaft Tavern 2846 Hwy. 14, Madrid, 473-0743 Delta blues on the deck from one of the best-dressed guys in the business. 2 pm, free LITTLE LEROY AND HIS PACK OF LIES La Fiesta Lounge 100 E San Francisco St., 982-5511 Party-time rock 'n' roll. 8 pm, free NATHAN SMERAGE Tonic 103 E Water St., 982-1189 Ragtime on guitar. 9:30 pm, free NELSON DENMAN Chez Mamou French Bakery & Cafe 217 E Palace Ave., 216-1845 Classical, folk and jazz on cello and guitar. 6 pm, free NEXT 2 THE TRACKS Palace Saloon 142 W Palace Ave., 428-0690 Outlaw country. 10 pm, $5

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RAILYARD URGENT CARE We put patients first and deliver excellent care in the heart of Santa Fe.

with Garry Blackchild

+ INJURIES & ILLNESS + X-RAYS + PHYSICALS + LAB TESTS + VACCINATIONS + DRUG TESTING + DOT EXAMS VANESSA BOWEN

Santa Fe’s music scene has been a big part of this town’s culture. Many local musicians have become family to some of us, or at least recognizable faces to many. One such artists is Garry Blackchild, who has been part of Santa Fe and Albuquerque’s scenes for over a decade. Blackchild told us about who he is and how New Mexico’s culture continues to mold him during what he is calling a “reinvention phase.” Blackchild stops by Second Street Brewery’s Railyard location with an acoustic set this Friday (6 pm. Free. 1607 Paseo de Peralta, 989-3278). (Juan Mendoza) Where did the pseudonym “Blackchild” come from?

We

Santa Fe! Happy Valentine’s Day!

WHERE TO FIND US 831 South St. Francis Drive, just north of the red caboose.

(505) 501.7791

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My birth name is Garry Martin Beasley. On my dad’s side, my grandmother is Choctaw and black, so we’re pretty much black Native Americans. When I was younger, she used to call me “lusa alla,” which is a Choctaw word. It translates to “my little black child.” That was her little nickname for me. I always kept that with me. When I was 19, I was in a group called The Montezuma Project, which was with Taboo from the Black-Eyed Peas. Taboo has always been involved in his Native side. That’s when I started calling myself Garry Blackchild, and it just kind of stuck for years and years and years. I don’t think anybody knows my real name anymore. How do New Mexico’s people and landscape inspire your music? It goes hand-in-hand with my sound. I moved to New Mexico 16 years ago. I was actually on tour with a Native artist named Keith IMC, and I kind of just fell in love with it. I’m originally from Los Angeles, California, and I kind of felt like there is just no place for me there musically. I really fell in love with the Native culture here, and actually made a lot of my first fans from the Santo Domingo Pueblo. I noticed that people don’t know how to label your style of music. I’ve seen event pages label your music as Americana, folk, rock, rebel-folk and a few others. What do you think of that? It’s hard to want to put your music into a genre, but I have to in order to get signed by a label. The label has to know how they can market me. I kind of make it up. I call it ‘rebel folk’—it’s a blend of everything. I’m influenced by soul music, reggae, rock, bluegrass, old country, electronic music, hiphop—I listen to everything. The only way I can categorize it is by making up my own genre. If they had to get me into a genre, I definitely would fall under Americana.

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Half Off Oysters ($1.50)* & Drink Specials Nightly, 5-7pm Come see our newly expanded full bar! 315 Old Santa Fe Trail 505.986.9190 315santafe.com f

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Do you ever wonder what weird thing we might say about your event in one of these listings? It’s easy to find out. Email calendar@sfreporter.com. Submission doesn’t guarantee inclusion, but we try hard.

For help, call Charlotte: 395-2906.

NOCHE DE FLAMENCO El Mesón 213 Washington Ave., 983-6756 Featuring dancers La Emi and Nevarez Encinias, singer Veronica Medina and guitarist Mario Febres. Reservations are required for this one, so call 983-6756. 7 pm, $15 NUESTRA MÚSICA Lensic Performing Arts Center 211 W San Francisco St., 988-1234 The Spanish Colonial Arts Society presents New Mexican Hispano folk music from Roberto Mondragon y Amigos, Frank McCulloch y Sus Amigos, Cipriano Vigil y La Familia Vigil, El Trio Jalapeño con Antonio Apodaca and Lone Piñon. Free admission for seniors, so get those viejitos out there. 7 pm, $10 PAT MALONE Inn and Spa at Loretto 211 Old Santa Fe Trail, 984-7997 Live solo jazz guitar. 7 pm, free RAY MATTHEWS Pizzeria & Trattoria da Lino 204 N Guadalupe St., 982-8474 Acoustic singer-songwritery and rock covers. 7 pm, free RED NINJA Second Street Brewery (Railyard) 1607 Paseo de Peralta, 989-3278 Unique, synthy dub and reggae. 7 pm, free RONALD ROYBAL Hotel Santa Fe 1501 Paseo de Peralta, 982-1200 Native American flute and Spanish classical guitar. 7 pm, free SANTA FE REVUE Mine Shaft Tavern 2846 Hwy. 14, Madrid, 473-0743 Americana, folk and rock 'n' roll. 8 pm, free

ENTER EVENTS AT SFREPORTER.COM/CAL

SHOWCASE KARAOKE Tiny's Restaurant & Lounge 1005 S St. Francis Drive, 983-9817 SFR’s recommendation of the whenever: something Beastie Boys. Do they have Beastie Boys on karaoke machines? Find out for us. Report back. 8:30 pm, free WILLIE GREEN PROJECT GiG Performance Space 1808 Second St. Modern jazz group from New Orleans, infused with a spiritual sensibility that nods to Green's gospel upbringing. Featuring Green on drums, Taylor Mroski on bass, Michael Gourdin on vibraphone, Trevarri Huff-Boone on saxophone and Stephen Tumblin on congas. Go online to gigsantafe.com for tix. 7:30 pm, $20

THEATER SKATE SHAKE AUDITIONS: JULIUS CAESAR Skate School 825 Early St., Ste. H Actors, skaters, musicians, artists, and all generally cool people are invited to come out for Skate Shake's Julius Caesar auditions (the show's going up in August). It's going to be a contemporary, hip-hoppy, punk-rocky take on Shakespeare's political tragedy, and while everyone is welcome, young people are particularly invited to try out (and no, you don't have to know how to skateboard to be involved). See SFR Picks, page 21. 5 pm, free THE WATER ENGINE Teatro Paraguas 3205 Calle Marie, 424-1601 Set in 1934, the story centers around a young inventor who has created an engine that runs on water. When he tries to patent it, he soon discovers that there are forces out there that don’t want that to happen—and a story of corruption unfolds in a drama as only renowned playwright David Mamet could pen. This production, directed by Brenda Lynn Bynum and presented by Oasis Theatre Company, is staged as a combination of radio play and theatrical play. For tickets, call 917-439-7708 (see Acting Out, page 33). 7:30 pm, $15-$25

SUN/18 BOOKS/LECTURES ALLEGRA HUSTON: SAY MY NAME op.cit Books 157 Paseo De Peralta, 428-0321 The author of the memoir Love Child returns with her first novel. More than a love story, it is a call to adventures of the heart, and a whisper into every woman's ear. Sounds intriguing. 2 pm, free

GRANMARY’S WINTER STORYTELLING SERIES: EMMETT GARCIA Museum of Indian Arts and Culture 710 Camino Lejo, 476-1250 Garcia (Santa Ana/Jemez) gives two storytelling sessions (2 pm and 3 pm) for your listening pleasure. It’s free with museum admission, and kids under age 16 get free admission, so get over there! 2 and 3 pm, $6-$12 JOURNEYSANTAFE: JOE MONAHAN Collected Works Bookstore and Coffeehouse 202 Galisteo St., 988-4226 The New Mexico political analyst and blogger speaks about key moments in the current legislative session, including what happened and —perhaps more importantly—what didn’t happen. 11 am, free

EVENTS THE GATE OF SWEET NECTAR LITURGY Upaya Zen Center 1404 Cerro Gordo Road, 986-8518 Chant the Gate of Sweet Nectar Liturgy, which calls out to all those who are lost and left behind, including those parts of ourselves that we think of as insufficient and lacking. Please arrive around 5:20 pm to be polite. 5:30 pm, free LUNAR NEW YEAR CELEBRATION Museum of International Folk Art 706 Camino Lejo, 476-1200 Happy New Year, everyone! Celebrate the Year of the Dog with the Chinese community and beyond. Print your own Tibetan prayer flags with Lama Gyurme; catch the Quang Minh Temple Lion Dance Group Parade at 1 pm and 3:30 pm; at 1:30 there's also traditional mochi rice cake pounding with Santa Fe JIN; and taiko drumming at 2:30 pm. Refreshments include mochi rice cakes and tea. 1-4 pm, free MODERN BUDDHISM: BLUE SKY MIND Zoetic 230 St. Francis Drive, 292-5293 Experience the vast clarity of your mind with meditation. Thoughts and feelings are like clouds arising and dissolving, so we can control them by meditating on the mind itself and experience a deep sense peace and contentment and lasting happiness. 10:30 am-noon, $10 YOUNG DEMOCRATS OF SANTA FE COUNTY CANDIDATE MEET & GREET Paloma 401 S Guadalupe St., 467-8624 Put on your shmoozin’ shoes for a casual candidate meet ‘n’ greet for officials running for office at the municipal, county, state and federal levels. 5:30 pm, $5 CONTINUED ON PAGE 32

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COURTESY OF IAIA MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY NATIVE ARTS

A&C

Diverse Dialogues New shows at the Museum of Contemporary Native Arts speak truth to power BY IRIS McLISTER a u t h o r @ s f r e p o r t e r. c o m

J

ust a hop, skip and a jump away from the Plaza, Santa Fe’s forward-thinking Institute of American Indian Arts’ Museum of Contemporary Native Arts is situated directly across from the Cathedral Basilica of St. Francis. Last September, protesters marched down these historic streets to challenge the 108-year-old Entrada pageant, which includes a reenactment of an 17th-century encounter between the Spanish conquistador Don Diego de Vargas and a Native American leader. Critics of the Entrada, in which participants dress in conquistadorinspired costumes, say it’s revisionist and racist; supporters say it’s a celebration of history. Chad Browneagle (ShoshoneBannock/Spokane), a senior at IAIA, is featured in the school’s annual BFA show, hosted at MoCNA; he was also one of eight activists arrested during the 2017 Entrada protest. “For me, art and activism go hand-in-hand,” Browneagle says. “I guess I feel obligated to take a political approach, not out of spite or revenge, but out of respect for my culture and for my elders.” Browneagle’s intricately drawn “America’s Great Again” is pointedly political. Rendered in skinny strokes of colored marker and pen, the work depicts a Native warrior on a horse, machine gun in hand. Tied to his saddle are Star Wars Storm Trooper helmets, and just behind those, the severed head of Donald Trump. In his artist statement, Browneagle describes it as “a response to the actions against Indigenous people, other minorities, and most importantly against women.” “The Altar of my Sexuality” is an acrylic painting of two nude women, bodies intertwined, by senior Emma DeMarr (Lac Courte Oreilles Ojibwe). In their artist statement, DeMarr describes themself as two-spirit, or someone for whom male and female attributes exist simulta-

neously and harmoniously. Over Facebook messages, DeMarr explained why the piece isn’t political commentary, per se: “I don’t see this painting as a political piece because it’s rooted in my [personal] exploration of identity,” they write. “It’s more about the exaltation of my sexuality and queer sexuality in general.” In Dakota/Diné artist Avis Charley’s “A Thinking Indian,” a young Native woman wearing moccasins, traditional jewelry and an Adidas jacket sits in profile on a bench, resting her chin in her hand. Sunglasses cover her eyes, but she’s looking off into the distance, and it seems clear she’s got something on her mind. “I’m impressed by Avis Charley’s ability to convincingly depict modern, strong Native women using the traditional art form of realistic portraiture,” MoCNA’s chief curator Manuela Well-Off-Man says of the piece. Just down the hall is a separate exhibition, also opening Friday.  Art and Activism: Selections from the Harjo Family Collection feels like too big of a show for the modest gallery it occupies, but that’s probably because of the larger-than-life reputation of the collection’s namesake, Suzan Shown Harjo (Cheyenne/Hodulgee Muscogee). One of the country’s preeminent female Native American activists, she has been instrumental in advancing the rights and causes of Indigenous people for decades. (Quick example: The recent decision to remove the maniacally

Artist or activist? New exhibits at IAIA MoCNA prove you can be both. ABOVE: Leonard Peltier’s portrait of Suzan Shown Harjo. LEFT: “America’s Great Again” by IAIA student Chad Browneagle.

grinning, aggressively stereotyped Chief Wahoo from Cleveland Indians uniforms and branded items would arguably not have been possible without 72-yearold Harjo, who started campaigning pro sports teams to remove this kind of whatcentury-are-we-living-in insignia decades ago.) The show contains works drawn from the 60-piece Harjo Family Collection, recently donated to the museum and now part of its permanent holdings. Well-loved artist Dan Namingha’s (Hopi-Tewa) densely, dreamily colored abstract print shares exhibition space with the beguiling figurative sculpture of a similarly renowned Native American artist Roxane Swentzell of Santa Clara Pueblo. A classically styled portrait of Harjo, in which she appears pensively sitting by a window, caught my eye. Along the lower rim of the painting, a pair of tiny horseand-riders gallop westward, leading us visually to the bottom left, where we see the elegant signature of none other than Leonard Peltier (Turtle Mountain Chip-

pewa/Dakota/Lakota), who’s been jailed for decades for the murder of two FBI agents during a standoff at the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation in 1973; problem is, there’s no rock-solid evidence he committed the crime. “That’s really special,” Well-Off-Man said when she noticed me checking out the contents of a little, opened blue box. “President Obama presented it to Suzan in 2014 in honor of her years of activism.” It contains a Presidential Medal of Freedom—the highest civilian honor one can receive. Whether they outwardly challenge the status quo or not, the range of artworks in these provocative exhibitions offer plenty to see and ponder.

ART & ACTIVISM: SELECTIONS FROM THE HARJO FAMILY COLLECTION BREAKING GROUND: IAIA 2018 BFA EXHIBITION 5 pm Friday Feb. 16. Free. IAIA Museum of Contemporary Native Arts, 108 Cathedral Place, 983-8900

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Hosted by

FILM Saving Land. For Everyone. Forever.

COMBATANTS FOR PEACE: DISTURBING THE PEACE Unitarian Universalist Congregation 107 W Barcelona Road, 982-9674 Combatants for Peace, an organization in which fighters on both sides of an active conflict have laid down their weapons and chosen to work together for peace and justice, presents a screening of the documentary Disturbing the Peace. Additionally, two former combatants, one Israeli and one Palestinian, in a dialogue about their personal transformation from fighters into nonviolent activists. 4 pm, $10

MUSIC

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DANIELE SPADAVECCHIA La Fiesta Lounge 100 E San Francisco St., 982-5511 Gypsy jazz on acoustic guitar and singing to boot. 6 pm, free DOUG MONTGOMERY Vanessie 427 W Water St., 982-9966 Classical, standards, pop and original tunes on piano and vocals. 6:30 pm, free HIGH DESERT SAXOPHONE QUARTET WITH PEGGY ABBOTT Santa Fe Woman’s Club 1616 Old Pecos Trail, 983-9455 A selection of transcriptions and original classical works for saxophone quartet, sometimes with piano. 2 pm, $10 NACHA MENDEZ La Boca (Taberna Location) 125 Lincoln Ave., 988-7102 Creative but rooted takes on Latin music from around the world from Santa Fe's most buttery-voiced cantadora. 7 pm, free OPEN MIC Tiny's Restaurant & Lounge 1005 S St. Francis Drive, 983-9817 Come one and come all! Bring your ears (or perhaps your playin' fingers? Preferably both though) to this mic hosted by the local Mike Montiel Trio. 3-7 pm, free PAT MALONE TRIO El Farol 808 Canyon Road, 983-9912 A jazzy trio (Malone, Cal Haines and Colin Deuble) with bluesy notes on what has come to be known as Civilized Sunday at the bar. 7 pm, free THE SANTA FE REVUE Cowgirl 319 S Guadalupe St., 982-2565 Psychedelic country and Americana ... and maybe a hair of the dog. These folks make a mean mimosa. Cowgirl, that is. Though we’re sure the Revue makes a mean one too. Noon, free

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SUNDAY CONCERT SERIES Santa Fe Woman's Club 1616 Old Pecos Trail, 983-9455 Carry the amorous feelings over through the weekend. Keri Brinegar (violin), Michael Bringegar (cello) and Laurence Weinberg (piano) play romantic classical tunes for your enjoyment. 2 pm, $10 THE WESTERNHERS Cowgirl 319 S Guadalupe St., 982-2565 A female duo croons some country music. 8 pm, free WILLIE WATSON Meow Wolf 1352 Rufina Circle, 395-6369 Modern folk music rooted in older traditions; think gospel railroad tunes and Delta blues. He’s a folk singer in the classic sense: a singer, storyteller and traveler, with a catalog of songs that bridge the gap between the past and present. With support from local dynamic folksters Atalaya. 8 pm, $15-$18

THEATER STOP KISS Teatro Paraguas 3205 Calle Marie, 424-1601 Directed by Barbara Hatch and presented by the New Mexico Actors Lab, catch a staged reading of Diana Son's 1998 play. It follows the story of Sara and Callie, who are assaulted by a bystander after their first kiss, sending Sara into a coma; the intricacies of relationships, emotion and passion take the forefront. 6 pm, free THE WATER ENGINE Teatro Paraguas 3205 Calle Marie, 424-1601 Set in 1934, the story centers around a young inventor who has created an engine that runs on water. When he tries to patent it, he soon discovers that there are forces out there that don’t want that to happen—and a story of corruption and violence unfolds in a drama as only renowned playwright David Mamet could pen. For tickets, call Oasis at 917-439-7708; for a review, see Acting Out on page 33. 2 pm, $15-$25

WORKSHOP FOR THE LOVE OF PLAY Railyard Performance Center 1611 Paseo de Peralta, 982-8309 Join a multi-generational class (for ages 9 to 99) as part of a graduate thesis project exploring the healthy benefits of play. Workshops include creative expression, movement and more. Facilitator Kathryn Mark has been teaching arts and movement for over two decades. She intends to explore the healthy benefits of play and positively stimulate the brain while building creativity, trust and communication. 1-2:15 pm, free

MON/19 BOOKS/LECTURES BILINGUAL BOOKS AND BABIES Santa Fe Public Library LaFarge Branch 1730 Llano St., 955-4860 Being bilingual is the wave of the future (and the present too, to be honest), so give your kid a head start with a bilingual (English and Spanish) program for babies 6 months to 2 years old and their caregivers. It’s a play and language group featuring books, songs and finger games from the comfort of your lap. Oral traditions and books provide an important pre-reading experience, so learn how everyday experiences can pave the way to learning success. 10:15-10:45 am, free BILINGUAL BOOKS AND BABIES Santa Fe Public Library Southside 6599 Jaguar Drive, 955-2820 See above listing; here’s an evening session. 5:30-6 pm, free SOUTHWEST SEMINARS: PETROGLYPHS, SYMBOLS, & CHANGE: POWER ON DISPLAY IN THE RIO GRANDE VALLEY Hotel Santa Fe 1501 Paseo de Peralta, 982-1200 Polly Dix Schaafsma, anthropologist, archaeologist and author of numerous books about rock art (including Warrior, Shield, and Star: Imagery and Ideology of Pueblo Warfare Indian Rock Art of the Southwest), speaks as part of Southwest Seminars' Ancient Sites and Ancient Stories lecture series. These folks always get the best experts around, so this is not to be missed. 6 pm, $15

This section is essentially free advertising, folks. As a result, we have some guidelines, and we don’t include every event ever, but most stuff we’re happy to list for you. Email your event info to calendar@sfreporter.com.

For help, either send a Bat Signal or call Charlotte: 395-2906.

CONTINUED ON PAGE 34

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THEATER

ACTING OUT

Thalassophobia BY C H A R LOT T E J U S I N S K I c o p y e d i t o r @ s f r e p o r t e r. c o m

S

All cast members carried their weight, proving the show competently cast by director and Oasis Artistic Director Brenda Lynn Bynum. At times, Montoya, as the fresh-faced but wary young inventor, lacked the urgency we wanted from Charles; but this could also be interpreted as a nervous inventor trying to play it cool in the presence of folks who could destroy his reputation (and him). Even so, it wasn’t permeating enough to be considered “a concern” with the casting. Tallis Rose, for one, has always been impressive, even in goofy roles (when you’re still thinking about a bit character in the Playhouse’s campy Fiesta Melodrama back in September, it’s a sign that the actor knew what they were doing). Here, primarily as Lang’s sister Rita, Rose is nuanced, a balance between paranoid and hopeful, dreaming about what their house in the country will look like once Charles’ money from the engine starts coming in. Pursed and proper, she isn’t simply scared, and she isn’t simply simple. She’s treading a fine, cerebral line, and Rose portrays it well. Later, Rose appears again as a paperboy. In a cap and slouchy jacket, she marches down the theater’s aisle and chucks a bundle of newspapers onstage, yelling a single word (“Papers!”)—and just this was enough to make the audience laugh. Of course, that adage comes to mind: There are no small parts, only small actors. Also worth noting was an ensemble performance from Talia Pura, who plays a gossip in an elevator, a flirty secretary and—most heartbreakingly—a neighbor of the Langs, a deeply accented immigrant simply trying to do the right thing, but who only seals the Langs’ fate. The elevator

BRENDA LYNN BYNUM

trange stories are portrayed on sound effects from stage manager Suzanne stages every day. It’s easy to show Cross at a table visible off to stage left and an audience something unnerv- an omnipresent recorded audio voiceover ing and for them to walk out of from D Davis. the theater thinking, “Man, that sucked Overall, the staging took a bit to get for those characters, huh?” used to (at intermission, I said to my comIt’s another step entirely for a theater panion: “I don’t know how this could be company to draw the audience into the on the radio; I really need my eyes”), but story, throwing the viewer off-balance the actors’ deft handling of the switching along with the characters; the attentive characters and ultimately flawless blockviewer, then, gets an extra dose of stimula- ing rendered it a potent communication. tion, the proverbial rug not entirely pulled Further, the number of distinct, dyout—but shifted a few inches every few namic characters conveyed the whole minutes. Stand firm. world of 1934 Chicago, rather than just Such is the effect of The Water Engine, the snapshot of Lang’s life. Once you figan oft-overlooked 1977 show from mega- ure out what everything means (Ballas playwright David Mamet, as staged by wearing one hat in particular, ringing a Oasis Theatre Company. Originally triangle, indicates an elevator; ensemble penned as a radio drama, Mamet adapted member Karen Gruber Ryan in a military it for the stage, and left future companies coat, barking political commentary, brings the ability to render it a hybrid of the two us to the “free speech zone” of Bughouse styles. That is precisely what Oasis has Square), a whole city materializes. Each done here, to effective and surprisingly character we meet, even if only for a few unsettling effect. lines, becomes tangible and sympathetic. Set in 1934 Chicago (during the World’s Fair, no less), the action follows budding inventor Charles Lang (Matthew Montoya), who has created an engine that can run on water. He attempts to patent it with a couple shady lawyers (Nicholas Ballas and James Jenner), and soon begins to fear for his own safety and that of his sister Rita (Tallis Rose). The basic plot is simple, then; it is the wild embellishment from side characters and faux radio performance that makes the show worthwhile. Each actor plays multiple roles, changing hats and voices. Sometimes they stand behind microphones on a riser onstage, holding scripts, under an “ON THE AIR” sign; sometimes Going down. The elevator operator (Nicholas Ballas—note hat and triangle) takes Charles Lang (Matthew they’re downstage acting in a traMontoya) and the elevator ladies (Karen Gruber Ryan and Talia Pura) below—to who-knows-where. ditional performance; there are

scenes, signaled by Ballas’ ringing of the triangle, are a fun glimpse into the middle-class world of 1934, where “science” was a word akin to “abracadabra” and rumors were passed along from hearing stuff over your shoulder. Ballas, too, shows versatility, shifting from slimy lawyer to elevator operator to hard-working journalist. (We would like to note from our perch in the newsroom: How refreshing to see Charles desperately calling a newspaper reporter, sure that the press could literally save his life.) Jenner is believable both as Ballas’ equally slimy partner in law and a lovable shopkeeper who tries to keep Charles safe. Ryan (who, by the way, opens the show with a really beautiful a cappella rendition of the Illinois state song, charmingly setting the stage for a time when people actually knew the words to their state song) disappears into each of her many roles; it was even hard to remember afterward which roles she played, as each seemed like it was played by a different actor. Precious and precocious Bernie (a boy under 12), a side-eye dealing secretary, and a political activist on a soapbox? All Ryan, all ultimately believable. If the swirling actors and shifting style grow easier to follow as the show goes on, there is one aspect that creates deeper unease: an eerie voiceover from D Davis. The disembodied voice reads through the text of a chain letter (remember chain letters?), telling of the fate that befell folks who didn’t send a $1 money order to the three people on the top of the list, or of the lucky breaks of those who did. The voice comes back again and again, repeating certain words and looping us back into an atmosphere of paranoia, suspicion and superstition. Additionally, a number of small but foreboding details do more and more to unnerve the audience: A few scenes see actors talking over each other, leaving us unsure of who we should listen to, a clever device to bring us into the action. In the script, the phrase “going down” (which occurs most often in the elevator, of course) takes on an increasingly sinister tone. Overall, Oasis’ intricate interpretation of The Water Engine pulls off what could have easily been muddy in the hands of less capable actors and a less confident director. Just bring your thinking cap and pay attention. THE WATER ENGINE 7:30 pm Thursday-Saturday Feb. 15-17; 2 pm Sunday Feb. 18. Through Feb. 25. $15-$25. Teatro Paraguas, 3205 Calle Marie, 917-439-7708

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EVENTS ARTIST-IN-RESIDENCE WELCOME DINNER AND STUDIO TOURS Institute of American Indian Arts 83 Avan Nu Po Road, 424-2351 Join newly arrived IAIA Artists-in-Residence Christa Cassano and Wayne Nez Gaussoin, as well as continuing artist Orlando Dugi, for dinner in the academic building followed by studio tours at 5:45 pm of the AiR Studio, Allan Houser Haozous sculpture and foundry building and the performing arts costume shop. 5 pm, free GEEKS WHO DRINK Draft Station Santa Fe Arcade, 60 E San Francisco St., 983-6443 Stellar quiz results can win you drink tickets for next time. Isabel is your host, and she's wicked smaht. 7 pm, free LIZ BRINDLEY: MORNING COFFEE NO LAND 54 E San Francisco St., Ste. 7, 216-973-3367 In conjunction with a solo exhibition of Brindley's drawings, prints, a wall mural and installations of garlic skins, join the artist, who specializes in food- and vegetable-related art, for coffee to discuss her work and process. 9 am, free THE SANTA FE HARMONIZERS REHEARSAL Zia United Methodist Church 3368 Governor Miles Road, 471-0997 Have you been itching to start singing again? The local choral group invites anyone who can carry a tune to its weekly rehearsals. Directed by Maurice Shepard, join in on any of the four-part harmony parts. 6:30-8 pm, free

MUSIC

, our

1050 Old Pecos Trail

THE CALENDAR

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BILL HEARNE TRIO La Fiesta Lounge 100 E San Francisco St., 982-5511 Honky-tonk and Americana from a Santa Fe legend. 7:30 pm, free COWGIRL KARAOKE Cowgirl 319 S Guadalupe St., 982-2565 Michèle Leidig hosts Santa Fe's most famous night of karaoke. 9 pm, free DANIELE SPADAVECCHIA TerraCotta Wine Bistro 304 Johnson St., 989-1166 Smooth crooning and gypsy jazz guitar. 6 pm, free DOUG MONTGOMERY AND ELIZABETH YOUNG Vanessie 427 W Water St., 982-9966 Classical, standards, pop and original tunes on piano, with violin from Young. 6:30 pm, free

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JAMIE RUSSELL Pizzeria & Trattoria da Lino 204 N Guadalupe St., 982-8474 Americana, pop and rock originals and covers. 7 pm, free SANTA FE GREAT BIG JAZZ BAND Tiny's Restaurant & Lounge 1005 S St. Francis Drive, 983-9817 An aptly named 16-piece band led by Kurt Carr and with vocals by Joan Kessler. They always play great, but never the same, so you don't want to miss out! 7 pm, free

TUE/20 BOOKS/LECTURES EDGE OF EQUITY: INVESTMENT WITHOUT DISPLACEMENT Jean Cocteau Cinema 418 Montezuma Ave., 466-5528 A conversation about how to invest one's extra dollars without displacing or disenfranchising those who don't have extra dollars to invest. Hosted by the Chainbreaker Collective. 5:30 pm, free PRESCHOOL STORY TIME Santa Fe Public Library LaFarge Branch 1730 Llano St., 955-4860 Three branches of the Santa Fe Public Library have preschool story times, so you have at least three opportunities to get yourself and your kid out of the house and see other real live humans. 10:30 am, free SHADES OF COLOR Santa Fe Community College 6401 Richards Ave., 428-1000 In the college's Jemez Rooms, celebrate Black History Month as writer and genealogist George Geder presents a multimedia overview of black history—plus other fun stuff and refreshments too. The program continues tomorrow, so pick up that paper too. 11:30 am-1 pm, free

DANCE ARGENTINE TANGO MILONGA El Mesón 213 Washington Ave., 983-6756 Bring your dancing shoes and join in—or, if you're clumsy, just watch. 7:30 pm, $5 CIRQUE ÉLOIZE: SALOON Lensic Performing Arts Center 211 W San Francisco St., 988-1234 Inspired by the classic showdowns, bravado and frontier spirit of the Wild West, the Quebéc-based performance and acrobatics troupe weaves together acrobatics and rootsy live music for 85 minutes of strength, agility and original choreography. 7:30 pm, $39-$75

EVENTS CRAFT 'N' DRAFT Second Street Brewery (Rufina Taproom) 2920 Rufina St., 954-1068 A laid-back monthly gathering for those who love crafts and beer. All crafters, genders and ages welcome. 6 pm, free GEEKS WHO DRINK Boxcar 530 S Guadalupe St., 988-7222 This quiz can win you drink tickets for next time. 8 pm, free METTA REFUGE COUNCIL Upaya Zen Center 1404 Cerro Gordo Road, 986-8518 A gathering for people who are struggling with illness and loss in a variety of its forms. 10:30 am, free

MUSIC BILL HEARNE TRIO La Fiesta Lounge 100 E San Francisco St., 982-5511 Honky-tonk and Americana. 7:30 pm, free CANYON ROAD BLUES JAM El Farol 808 Canyon Road, 983-9912 A night of music, improv and camaraderie. 8:30 pm, $5 CHUSCALES La Boca (Original Location) 72 W Marcy St., 982-3433 Exotic flamenco guitar. 7 pm, free G.ALLEN Pizzeria & Trattoria da Lino 204 N Guadalupe St., 982-8474 Rhythmic tunes. 7 pm, free GARY GORENCE Cowgirl 319 S Guadalupe St., 982-2565 Local bluesy-folky singer-songwriter. 8 pm, free JORMA KAUKONEN James A Little Theatre 1060 Cerrillos Road, 476-6429 American roots music, blues and Americana. 7:30 pm, $35 LUKE SLOTT Santa Fe Woman's Club 1616 Old Pecos Trail, 983-9455 Join a spirited musical journey inspired by the life and teachings of Baha'u'llah, Founder of the Baha'i Faith. The concert is free, that $5 is a suggested donation—but honestly, dude came from Ireland, so give him a few bucks, will ya? 7 pm, $5 NOAH GUNDERSEN WITH AARON GILLESPIE The Bridge @ SF Brewing Co. 37 Fire Place, 557-6182 A dreamy Seattle-based indie singer-songwriter (see SFR Picks, page 21). 8 pm, $18-$20 PAT MALONE TerraCotta Wine Bistro 304 Johnson St., 989-1166 Live solo jazz guitar. 6 pm, free


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COURTESY HARWOOD MUSEUM OF ART

MUSEUMS

THE CALENDAR

In Work By Women: Nature Altered, a unique exhibit up at the Harwood Museum in Taos, women whose work is featured elsewhere in the museum or its archives have each contributed a smaller piece from their studios to give an alternate view of important female artists. Here, Jennifer Lynch’s “Iridium” evokes prisms, mountains, spilled gasoline—you be the judge. (By the way, the Harwood Museum has immense collections on view right now by tons of women, so we think it’s about time for a day trip.)

GEORGIA O’KEEFFE MUSEUM 217 Johnson St., 946-1000 Journey to Center: New Mexico Watercolors by Sam Scott. Through Nov. 1. HARWOOD MUSEUM OF ART 238 Ledoux St., Taos, 575-758-9826 Helen Gene Nichols: Industrial Paisley. Through Feb. 25. Work By Women. Erin Currier: La Frontera. Jolene Nenibah Yazzie: Sisters of War. Both through May 13. MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY NATIVE ARTS 108 Cathedral Place, 983-8900 IAIA 2018 BFA Exhibition: Breaking Ground. Through May 12. Art & Activism: Selections from The Harjo Family Collection. Through May 13. The Abundant North: Alaska Native Films of Influence. Through June 3. Action Abstraction Redefined. Through July 27. Without Boundaries: Visual Conversations. Through July 29. Rolande Souliere: Form and Content. Through Jan. 27, 2019.

MUSEUM OF ENCAUSTIC ART 623 Agua Fría St., 989-3283 American and international encaustic art. MUSEUM OF INDIAN ARTS & CULTURE 710 Camino Lejo, 476-1250 Frank Buffalo Hyde: I-Witness Culture. Through April 30. Stepping Out: 10,000 Years of Walking the West. Through Sept. 3. Lifeways of the Southern Athabaskans. Through Dec. 31. MUSEUM OF INTERNATIONAL FOLK ART 706 Camino Lejo, 476-1200 Negotiate, Navigate, Innovate. Through July 16. Crafting Memory: The Art of Community in Peru. Through March 10, 2019. MUSEUM OF SPANISH COLONIAL ART 750 Camino Lejo, 982-2226 Time Travelers: and the Saints Go Marching On. Through April 20. NEW MEXICO HISTORY MUSEUM 113 Lincoln Ave., 476-5019 Voices of Counterculture in the Southwest. Through Feb. 11. A Mexican Century: Prints from the Taller de Gráfica Popular. Through Feb. 18.

NEW MEXICO MUSEUM OF ART 107 W Palace Ave., 476-5072 Contact: Local to Global. Through April 29. Shifting Light: Photographic Perspectives. Through Oct. 8. Horizons: People & Place in New Mexican Art. Through Nov. 25. PALACE OF THE GOVERNORS 105 W Palace Ave., 476-5100 Tesoros de Devoción. POEH CULTURAL CENTER AND MUSEUM 78 Cities of Gold Road, Pojoaque, 455-3334 In T’owa Vi Sae’we. SANTA FE BOTANICAL GARDENS 715 Camino Lejo, 471-9103 Dan Namingha: Conception, Abstraction, Reduction. Through May 18. SITE SANTA FE 1606 Paseo De Peralta, 989-1199 Luke DuBois: A More Perfect Union. Through April 4. Future Shock. Through May 1. WHEELWRIGHT MUSEUM OF THE AMERICAN INDIAN 704 Camino Lejo, 986-4636 Beads: A Universe of Meaning. Through April 15.

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More Bitter than Sweet

Local bitters outfit makes cocktails shine

BY MARY FRANCIS CHEESEMAN a u t h o r @ s f r e p o r t e r. c o m

I

MARY FRANCIS CHEESEMAN

@THEFORKSFR

’ve seen a new trend on the rise in the beverage industry. Culturally, our palates are changing. Once upon a time, sugar was a precious commodity and sweetness was a rare treat; but now, “I don’t like sweet wines” is a phrase that I hear constantly, and it has never been easier for me to sell a bottle of brut nature Champagne on the promise that contains “the lowest amount of added residual sugar possible for a sparkling wine.” Zero dosage champagnes, extrahopped IPAS, and amaros like Fernet-Branca have never been more popular. Is it that sweet things are seen as corruptible and indulgent? Among all the possible flavors people can prefer to take the place of sugar (spicy or sour flavors that pack their own unique kind of punch), the appeal of bitterness eclipses them all. Perhaps it is related to our perception of what’s healthy—the equivalent of choosing a salad bowl full of kale over a plate of cookies. After all, drinking alcohol in moderation and maintaining

one’s health are not mutually exclusive. In fact, the alcoholic preparation of roots, barks and spices known as bitters best represents the intersection between the recreational and restorative properties of alcohol. Originally used as medicine from the time of the ancient Egyptians to the Europeans of the Middle Ages and onwards, bitters are an intrinsic part of any cocktail, and play a major role in the current classic drinks renaissance. Angostura and Peychaud’s are the two most commercially successful bitters companies today, but before Prohibition wiped any appreciation for handcrafted alcoholic beverages from the American consciousness, there were many more examples. In fact, arguably the first recorded mention of a cocktail, in an 1803 agricultural magazine called The Farmer’s Cabinet,, specifically references bitters as an essential ingredient. So when I encountered a bottle of The Bitter Heart ($13), a small-batch cocktail bitters created by Meghan Henshaw of Ocotillo Herbals, I was immediately drawn to its herbal and unapologetically earthy taste,

drinking it in soda water with little slices of orange and lime. Too many modern bitters are fruity or clouded with additives that make them seem, well, not very bitter at all. Henshaw, however, makes two cocktail bitters (as well as two medicinal types, for digestive and immune support, respectively). The Bitter Heart, flavored with black walnut and hawthorn, is delicate and subtle, and could easily replace a dash of Peychaud’s in any cocktail recipe. Her other offering, a cardamom molasses bitters, begins fragrantly spiced but transitions to a sweeter finish, due to the use of molasses in the rich syrup she makes for the sake of finishing her product into something pleasingly palatable. The Mighty Immune Support and Digestive Bitters are intensely mouth-puckering, though with ingredients like schisandra and devil’s club (foraged by  Henshaw herself ), they have innumerable healthful applications, although I would advise drinking them on their own rather than throwing them in a Manhattan. If ever there were a person uniquely suited to craft a proper tribute to the modern application of the ancient herbal medicine that is bitters, that person is Henshaw. She received her bachelor’s of science in herbal science from Bastyr University, where her credentials includ-

Bitters, when used well, are an essential cocktail ingredient.

FOOD

ed a focus on the historical uses of herbal medicines, in addition to biochemistry, pharmacology, ethnobotany, plant identification and research. Under her Ocotillo Herbals line, she also produces massage creams and teas and provides private consultations. She also works as a botanical researcher for ecological surveys, and this informs her perspective on crafting herbal concoctions. “There’s lots of intersections between how we treat the people around us and how we treat the environment; the attitude of, ‘Am I in it to just make money,’ or am I willing to be flexible,” Henshaw says. “With herbalism, that’s a really complicated dance.” Her research helps her keep a finger on the pulse of conservation efforts, and  she is mindful of the impact of sourcing ingredients. Thus, her bitters are a mix of traditional flavors like gentian root, and her own additions, sourced as sustainably as possible. There is a transparency to Henshaw’s products that you definitely won’t see in the likes of Angostura, the recipe for which is a famously well-guarded secret. Find Henshaw’s bitters at Alembic Apothecary (1200 Hickox St., 310-403-6139) or online at ocotilloherbals.com. Meanwhile, Henshaw’s calling as a researcher and conservationist is the kind of work that often draws her away from making her handcrafted bitters, which  means they’ll  usually be small in scale and limited in production. But maybe it’s better that way. Here’s  a simple cocktail suggestion, best suited to letting the flavors of the bitters shine: THE OLD-FASHIONED BITTER HEART Place a sugar cube in the bottom of a tumbler and saturate with bitters (I use about three dashes.) Add a little wawa ter, and muddle until dissolved. Add ice and roughly two ounces of a spirit of choice (rye or bourbon would be best.) Stir and garnish with an orange slice.

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10 9 8 7 6 5 4 3 2 1 WORST MOVIE EVER

Vazante Review 8

Fear and loathing in 1800s Brazil

+ STUNNING

CINEMATOGRAPHY; INCREDIBLY WELL-MADE - NARRATIVE CHOICES LACKING; SOMETIMES TOO LONG

BY ALEX DE VORE a l e x @ s f r e p o r t e r. c o m

Every single frame of Vazante from Brazilian filmmaker Daniela Thomas is like a gorgeous painting or a fleeting moment lost too soon. Here, in crisp and glorious black and white, Thomas offsets the  bitter ugliness of  1800s agrarian Brazil without ignoring it, creating a world populated with pitiless businessman-farmers and undue inheritors, slaves and madwomen. We follow António (Adriano Carvalho), the owner of a sprawling farm estate that came with his wife’s dowry. Within the film’s first few moments, as António heads home from business, black slaves in tow,  his wife  dies during childbirth. Tragedy leaves Antonio listless and lazy as the farm chugs along in his periphery. He marries again in short order, this time to his wife’s niece Beatriz (Luana Nastas), a girl so young as to be creepy to the viewer but probably commonplace for the people of the time. Regardless, it’s uncomfortable; and when

António leaves once more, Beatriz finds herself in charge of the fields and working alongside a young slave named Virgilio (Vinicius Dos Anjos) whose mother, we see, has been forced to sleep with António on more than one occasion. If the setup seems simple enough, it does falter under artistic choices and a running time that could have been more concise had Thomas not decided to let symbolism come to the forefront almost always. This  art-film tack, while  visually stunning, could prove tedious for viewers who prefer a simple narrative. We see, for example, that the lives of slaves was hardly easy—but, then, we already knew that, even if it hadn’t occurred to us that something like 5 million such people had been shipped to the South American nation at or around the time the film is set. Catching a glimpse into the lives of those

who owned them, tragic or not, seems to overshadow their suffering, even as the film dances around focusing on it repeatedly. At its core, Vazante  appears to want to dissect ideas of colonialism, patriarchy and gender, like a look at the bedrock of today’s sociopolitical shortcomings in almost all milieus, but elongated scenes and an almost sickening pallor throughout constantly distracts us from any sort of central premise. This film is beautiful and unbelievably well-shot, yes, but it is also a challenge; and not always in the best ways.

VAZANTE Direcred by Thomas With Carvalho, Nastas and Dos Anjos Center for Contemporary Arts, NR, 116 min.

QUICKY REVIEWS

8

A STUPID AND FUTILE GESTURE

7

HOSTILES

9

PHANTOM THREAD

9

A STUPID AND FUTILE GESTURE

8

David Wain’s new Netflix original, A Stupid and Futile Gesture, explores the rise and rise (and fall) of The National Lampoon magazine.

+ VERY FUNNY; REVERES

COMEDY HISTORY RIGHT

- WE STILL DON’T LIKE CHEVY CHASE

Art had Warhol, jazz had Davis, rock had The Beatles and comedy had National Lampoon magazine. It is, in fact, so very possible to trace the roots of much seminal modern comedy back to the brainchild of Douglas Kenney and Henry Beard, two Harvard students turned utterly brilliant satirist-comedians, that it’s about a great a debt as can be owed. Murrays, Belushis, Chases, Saturday Night Live, The Simpsons, Ghost Busters; Ivan Reitman, Harold Ramis, John Hughes, Caddyshack, Animal House—the list could and does go on and on—all began with the magazine and its outlying projects. Director David Wain (The State, Wet Hot American Summer), arguably one of the funniest people in comedy today, understands this probably better than most and tells the eye-opening tale in the new Netflix original film, A Stupid and Futile Gesture. A sort of hybrid comedy-drama, Gesture examines the founding, rise and ultimate fall of the comedic empire, delving into its print product, its stage shows, radio programming and beyond. Wain somehow encapsulates the era in a completely accessible way, forming

I, TONYA

9

THE POST

a subtle biopic of Kenney (SNL alum Will Forte) along the way and proving that the very funny and too-smart-for-their-own-good are often haunted and tragic, hiding from their demons behind a thin wall of jokes. National Lampoon is obviously a name known to many, perhaps depressingly so by this point (thanks for nothing, Van Wilder), but how many comedy titans started formidable careers there— and even how Saturday Night Live owes much, if not all, of its iconic status to poaching Kenney’s staff—is both fascinating and heartbreaking. Forte makes a perfectly fine Kenney, though the legendary Martin Mull as the could-havebeen narrative device steals much of his thunder. Star Wars’ Domhnall Gleeson may be the most surprising performance, however, slowly gaining traction as Henry Beard, a wonderfully hysterical straight-guy counterpoint to Kenney’s absurdities and a charming example of how deadpan sells satire so much better than off-thewall does. Other famous faces show up as well, from Joel McHale’s not-quite-right Chevy Chase and Natasha Lyonne’s boundary-breaking Anne Beatts to Thomas Lennon’s pitch-perfect asshole performance as the explosively dark and outrageous writer Michael O’Donoghue. The takeaway, though, may be in A Stupid and Futile Gesture’s willingness to never take itself CONTINUED ON NEXT PAGE

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MOVIES

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toward the white folk, even if they’re presented as monsters more often than not—but we certainly won’t say our perspective on a number of things didn’t shift. (ADV) Violet Crown, R, 134 min. PHANTOM THREAD

9

Margot Robbie takes it to another level in I, Tonya.

too seriously, even as it calls out drug abuse, toxic work environments and the inherent pressures of extreme popularity. Still, it’s a riveting watch for comedy fans who fall anywhere on the spectrum and a loving portrayal of the men and women who forever changed the game. (Alex De Vore) Netflix, TV-MA, 111 min. HOSTILES

7

+ GORGEOUS; NEW MEXICO! - GIVE US MORE STUDI!

At about the 10th scene that finds its principal cast gathered around a campfire silently distrustful of one another, it starts to feel like Hostiles, the new Western from Crazy Heart director Scott Cooper, could have focused more effort elsewhere. It is late-1800s New Mexico; a post-Wounded Knee, post-Little Big Horn world where the white settlers simply take whatever land they want and the Indigenous people are understandably (like, 100 percent understandably) pissed. But when aging US Army Captain Joe Blocker (Christian Bale) is forced to free and transport a dying Native prisoner named Chief Yellow Hawk (hometown hero Wes Studi) to Montana so he can die of cancer in peace and among his people, the divisions between mankind slowly fade and everyone involved learns valuable lessons—or dies trying. Along for the ride are various other soldiers

and Yellow Hawk’s family, plus the recently widowed and childless Rosalie Quaid (Rosamund Pike), whose family was cut down by Natives not of Yellow Hawk’s ilk. Every step of the way is rife with further terror, and every mile gained seems to present new obstacles; from racial tensions and violent fur trappers to ruthless fellow soldiers and the unforgiving elements. Hostiles is an absolutely gorgeous view of New Mexico and the hardscrabble way of life during the era, but when it comes right down to it, the bigger picture it tries to present winds up feeling diluted. Yes, Bale is the draw here, and we get how the business of movies works, but Studi’s performance as the once-formidable Yellow Hawk could have hit much harder had they given him a few more lines or some definitive moment. We’re honestly left to believe that Bale’s character just kind of comes to release his hatred toward Indigenous people by the end with very little input from Yellow Hawk, other than a thoughtful word here or there. Seriously, though, one solid monologue from Studi could have completely turned this thing around. Which isn’t to say it’s all bad. Breaking Bad alum Jesse Plemons comes in with a solid supporting role, and Ben Foster (Hell or High Water) shows up briefly as an unexpected villainous type who does have an interesting point about who ought cast the first stone. Even Pike’s ultimate badass moment makes some otherwise bizarre missteps with her character totally worth it. Sad, though, that the narrative skews more

+ DANIEL DAY-LEWIS ALWAYS SLAYS - PERHAPS NOT WIDELY ACCESSIBLE

Paul Thomas Anderson’s newest film reunites him with There Will Be Blood star Daniel DayLewis, but the bulk of its promotion has had something or other to do with Day-Lewis’ announcement that it would be his final film. Le sigh. Fitting, then, that they’d go out with a bang and healthy dose of Anderson’s patented tortured-genius narrative style. Day-Lewis is Reynolds Woodcock, a highly sought-after and eccentric dress designer in London circa 1950-something. The dresses are gorgeous, his ego less so, and his relationships with his sister (Lesley Manville) and modelmuses both are strained, if not downright abusive and fleeting. Strange, then, that he’d fall so quickly and deeply for young Alma (Vicky Krieps). The pair becomes inseparable, though neither is truly who the other believes; the work suffers, the

relationship falters, the price of genius is laid bare. Day-Lewis, as always, disappears completely into the role, bringing equal parts intensity and narcissistic charm to the talented yet childish Reynolds. The man always gets his way, even as those around him take great, pained strides to accommodate his nonsense. Alma becomes his match, though, proving there are nearly no depths to which she won’t sink to render him helpless in her care. Krieps shines in her more vulnerable moments, transitioning from starry-eyed country girl to sneakily cutthroat hanger-on. Is she in awe of Reynolds’ work and ethics, or does she simply gravitate toward him because it seems he could live without her? Even she can’t decide, perhaps, but even in her darker moments we understand— or at least try to—how she could hurt so bad and act so recklessly. Anderson, of course, wrote and directed the film, and music from Radiohead’s Jonny Greenwood (who also scored There Will Be Blood) is so subtle yet so essential that it drives us in a way few other scores really can without us ever noticing, moving seamlessly from minimalist, noise-adjacent moments of tension to light and airy jazz-like tunes during brief happy respites. Day-Lewis has remained adamant that he doesn’t wish to discuss his retirement with the world at large, and that’s fine—but it really is a shame he’s chosen to call it quits. Reynolds may not prove to be his most-remembered role, though it certainly does allow him to go out strong. Phantom Thread is jarring and challenging, but unlike almost anything else out there. Surely that’s worth your attention. (ADV) Violet Crown, R, 130 min. I, TONYA

8

So long, Day-Lew. We hardly knew ye.

+ ROBBIE IS FANTASTIC; FUNNY - BOBBY CANAVALE’S POINTLESS ROLE

Who among us doesn’t recall when figure skater Nancy Kerrigan was clubbed in the ’90s and the whole wide world implicated rival Tonya Harding? Chances are, the way it really went down is nothing like what you think. It was, in fact, so much stupider than one could possibly imagine, but with Suicide Squad‘s Margot Robbie leading the charge in I, Tonya from director Craig Gillespie (Lars and the Real Girl), we do get an inside glimpse at Harding and her outliers, ultimately gaining much-needed perspective toward a sympathetic figure who was more tragic victim of circumstance than maniacal villain. Robbie completely dominates as Harding, an abused and disadvantaged skater with stars in her eyes and just enough terrible hangers-on to make it all impossible. Whether skating was her own dream or one thrust upon her remains unclear, but as the first US athlete to pull off the mind-bogCONTINUED ON PAGE 43

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SHOWTIMES FEB 14 – 20, 2018

• HEARING & SIGHT ASSISTIVE DEVICES NOW AVAILABLE • Wednesday, Feb 14 1:00p Bombshell: Hedy Lamarr 1:30p The Insult* 3:00p The Insult 3:45p Happy End* 5:15p The Insult 6:00p Mary & the Witch’s Flower* 7:30p The Insult 8:00p Bombshell: Hedy Lamarr* Thursday, Feb 15 1:00p Bombshell: Hedy Lamarr 1:30p The Insult* 3:00p The Insult 3:45p Loving Vincent* 5:15p The Insult 5:45p Mary & the Witch’s Flower* 7:30p The Insult 7:45p Loving Vincent* Friday - Saturday, Feb 16 - 17 11:00a Bombshell: Hedy Lamarr* 11:15a Beuys 1:00p Bombshell: Hedy Lamarr* 1:30p Loving Vincent 3:15p Beuys* 3:30p The Insult 5:30p Bombshell: Hedy Lamarr* 5:45p Loving Vincent 7:30p Vazante* Sunday, Feb 18 11:00a Santa Fe Jewish Film Fest: Foxtrot 11:15a Loving Vincent* 1:15p Bombshell: Hedy Lamarr* 1:30p Loving Vincent 3:15p Beuys* 3:30p The Insult 5:30p Bombshell: Hedy Lamarr* 5:45p Loving Vincent 7:30p Vazante* 7:45p Beuys Monday - Tuesday, Feb 19 - 20 3:00p Loving Vincent 3:15p Beuys* 5:15p Loving Vincent 5:30p Bombshell: Hedy Lamarr* 7:15p The Insult 7:30p Beuys*

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MOVIES

YOUR HOMETOWN MOVIE THEATRE WEDNESDAY, FEB. 14TH 1:20 VERTIGO (1958) 4:00 WALK WITH ME 6:00 MATTHEW BOURNE’S CINDERELLA 8:30 MY BLOODY VALENTINE THURSDAY, FEB. 15TH 1:20 VERTIGO (1958) 4:00 WALK WITH ME 8:45 ICHI THE KILLER: THE DIGITALLY RESTORED DIRECTOR’S CUT FRIDAY, FEB. 16TH 2:00 VERTIGO (1958) 4:40 THE GREAT BUDDHA + 7:00 THE FEMALE BRAIN 9:10 HAVE A NICE DAY SATURDAY, FEB. 17TH 1:40 THE GREAT BUDDHA + 3:45 HAVE A NICE DAY 5:30 THE FEMALE BRAIN 8:00 GIRL’S NIGHT OUT SERIES - CLUELESS

Hostiles: Heavy on the drama, light on the Wes Studi. glingly difficult triple axel jump, she clearly had talent. Still, it was either unappreciated by snobby professional figure skating entities or squandered by her ruthless, self-interested mother (played brilliantly by recent Golden Globe winner Allison Janney) and abusive husband Jeff Gillooly (Sebastian Stan). According to the film, if Harding’s mother wasn’t hitting her, her husband was and, all the while, poverty prevented her from being presentable in the eyes of judges. Things get pretty rough, but Robbie’s performance perfectly defines a flawed anti-heroine for whom things might have worked out so differently if not for her hot-headed temper and piss-poor relationships. We get the things out of her control almost immediately, and we really do feel for her—especially upon learning it was Gillooly’s thick-headed pal/Harding’s bodyguard, Shawn, who had planned and executed the incident. This isn’t to say, however, that I, Tonya isn’t also very funny at times. Super Troopers’ Paul Walter Hauser sneaks up on you as the idiotic Shawn, and Julianne Nicholson (Black Mass) has an understated excellence as Harding’s coach and more positive maternal figure. Still, it’s Robbie who makes the film worth watching, even if its faux-documentary style errs a little more toward Ferris Bueller than Goodfellas. She showcases a natural depth and emotional access heretofore unseen from the relative rookie, and it couldn’t have been easy to make an audience root for a figure once so hated. All the same, at this point, Robbie could probably do whatever she felt like. We’d line up to see it. (ADV) Violet Crown, R, 120 min. THE POST

9

score from John Williams.) When the paper was halfway through a front-page series, a judge enjoined the Times against printing any more about the top-secret documents, and the competing Post got in on the story. Director Steven Spielberg focuses on the evolution of publisher Katharine Graham (Meryl Streep) at the side of pirate editor Ben Bradlee (Tom Hanks) as they navigate the choppy waters that ensue. Streep’s Graham is more heroine in our book than Gal Gadot’s Wonder Woman, and we’d make the argument that her courage as the head of her father’s newspaper, a woman in a man’s world, is a bigger stride for feminism than swordfighting in a skirt. It’s her newspaper now. (Or it was, until it went public—and now, um, Amazon has it or something, but that’s another story.) Hanks brings to Bradlee the gravely voice and straight-from-the-newsroom aggression that the editor was known for, and Bob Odenkirk (Better Call Saul) is a treasure as tenacious reporter Ben Bagdikian. We can’t wait to hear some of these iconic lines again. (Julie Ann Grimm) Violet Crown, PG-14, 116 min.

SUNDAY, FEB. 18TH 2:20 IF A TREE FALLS: A STORY OF THE EARTH LIBERATION FRONT 4:15 THE GREAT BUDDHA + 6:30 THE FEMALE BRAIN 8:45 HAVE A NICE DAY MONDAY, FEB. 19TH 1:40 THE GREAT BUDDHA + 4:00 WALK WITH ME 6:00 THE FEMALE BRAIN 8:15 HAVE A NICE DAY TUESDAY, FEB. 20TH 1:40 HAVE A NICE DAY 3:20 THE FEMALE BRAIN 5:30 EDGE OF EQUITY: INVESTMENT WITHOUT DISPLACEMENT

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How hopeful for our future that Hollywood produced a prequel that’s not fiction about a galaxy far, far away. Released 42 years after Robert Redford and Dustin Hoffman won hearts for journalism on the big screen, The Post is what happened just before All the President’s Men—the story of the story that finally took United States troops out of Vietnam. At its locus is Daniel Ellsberg (Matthew Rhys), who you could think of the Edward Snowden of the analog era. The sheer mechanics of his leaking thousands of pages of top-secret Pentagon files to the New York Times required months of late-night copy sessions on a machine half the size of a Volkswagen. (From typewriters to rotary phones, hot lead setters and the printing press, it’s a kick to watch the machines in the movie—all thrummed along by an emotional

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48 Goof 51 Teensy carpenter 1 1/1760th of a mile 52 European peak 5 Baseball Hall of Famer Ripken 53 Tiny mythical creatures on 8 Came down softly? patrol? 14 Margarine, colloquially 59 2004 Jude Law drama 15 Brewhouse brew 61 “Music for Airports” com16 Party appetizer poser 17 Poet/dramatist Hughes 62 “Come ___, we’re expect19 Quirky French title role of ing you ...” (“The Love Boat” 2001 theme lyrics) 20 Furniture to display 63 Confident finish? cheesy stuff? 64 Armitage who plays 22 ___ Soundsystem “Young Sheldon” 23 Baled stuff 65 Frosty maker 24 Symptom that might 66 ___ Thérèse, Quebec require eye drops 67 Gambler’s numbers 26 Attach, as a button 29 Pre-flight org. DOWN 31 Stewart who sang “Maggie 1 Part that’s egg-centric? May” 2 Jai ___ (fast-moving sport) 32 Till the soil 3 Landlord’s check 33 Hot off the presses 34 Changes gradually, graphi- 4 Competition for toys? 5 Comic strip character cally 37 Kiwi’s much larger cousin known for saying “Ack!” 6 Tons 38 Go faster 7 “Girls” creator Dunham 40 Sturdy tree 8 Balancing device 41 Dress shirt component 9 Mention a connection, perhaps 43 Connectivity issue 44 U.S. : counter(clockwise) 10 “First of all...” 11 Body of water that’s sur:: U.K. : ___(clockwise) 45 “Captain Underpants” cre- rounded? 12 Humongous movies ator Pilkey 13 “Dirty ___ Done Dirt 46 Two-___ toilet paper Cheap” (AC/DC song) 47 Incas’ mountains

18 Read a QR code 21 Underwire’s locale, maybe 25 Neither companion 26 Built to ___ 27 “Sesame Street” character voiced by Ryan Dillon since 2013 28 Is totally up for nestling in bed? 29 Golf prop 30 Get bigger 33 “Science Friday” airer 34 Cocoa container 35 Really dislike 36 Equipment used at the Winter Olympics 38 Viciousness 39 Sunup to sundown 42 Back muscle, for short 44 Actor Banderas 46 Shepherd’s pie bit 47 “Black Beauty” novelist Sewell 48 Colorful parrot 49 “___ right back!” 50 Many residents of Erbil in Iraq 51 Limber 54 Some baseball stats 55 “Gosh darn it!” 56 Name in spiral notebooks 57 Noddy creator Blyton 58 Mumford & ___ 60 Melancholy

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PETCO: 1-4 pm Thursday, Friday, Saturday & Sunday TECA TU at DeVargas Center: 10 am-2 pm First Saturday of each month Please visit our cats at PETCO and TECA TU during regular store hours. FOSTER HOMES URGENTLY NEEDED FOR ADULT CATS OF VARIOUS AGES

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SARAH JANE is currently in a foster home. Please call or email to set up a meeting.

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Come meet sweet DIXIE at our Adoption Center inside Petco.

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but her family abandoned her at an area shelter instead of returning her to Felines & Friends: so it has taken her some time to get over losing her home and learing to trust again. TEMPERAMENT: SARAH JANE is a sweet kitty who enjoys the attention of humans. Although she is still easily startled by loud noises, she made herself at home with her foster family which includes a gentle dog. SARAH JANE is a beautiful Manx girl with a short, mostly-white coat and brown tabby patches around her face and in spots along her body. AGE: born approx. 9/5/13.

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cats lost the only home they had ever known due to a drastic change in their owner’s life. All the cats had senior blood panels and dentals in September 2017 and are doing very well on a more healthy diet. TEMPERAMENT: DIXIE 3 is a sweet cat, but is shy until she gets to know new people. She enjoys one on one petting, so would probably thrive as the only pet in her new home. DIXIE is a petite, beautiful girl with a medium length coat and tortoiseshell markings. AGE: born approx. 6/7/03.

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COMMUNITY ANNOUNCEMENTS JOHREI CENTER OF SANTA FE. JOHREI IS BASED ON THE FOCUS AND FLOW OF THE UNIVERSAL LIFE ENERGY. When clouds in the spiritual body and in consciousness are dissolved, there is a return to true health. This is according to the Divine Law of Order; after spiritual clearing, physical and mental- emotional healing follow. You are invited to experience the Divine Healing Energy of Johrei. All are Welcome! The Johrei Center of Santa Fe is located at Calle Cinco Plaza, 1500 Fifth St., Suite 10, 87505. Please call 820-0451 with any questions. Drop-ins welcome! There is no fee for receiving Johrei. Donations are gratefully accepted. Please check us out at our new website santafejohreifellowship.com We will be closed Feb. 15, 16, and 17. We will reopen on Tuesday, Feb. 20 at 2:00pm.

Come Celebrate Embodydance Santa Fe’s 18th Anniversary with Co-Founder Tracy Collins Saturday, February 17th, 2018 Railyard Performance Center 6:30 - 10 pm 6:30- 7:45 Warm up and Deep Journey Dance 7:45 - 8:15 Community Rite of Passage Ritual accompanied by Visionary Songstress Wendy Rule. 8:15 pm - 8:45 Healthy Delicious Food and Desserts provided by wonderful Santa fe Eateries. Entertainment by, Amina Re & Lee Contact Improv, Cellist Lisa Marie Stuart and Harpist Haley Ackerman of Marigold Sound & other Special Guest Performers (TBA). 8:45 - 10 PM Dance Party! Bring a Sacred Object that has meaningly served your life that you are ready to pass along to another and Receive one in return. $18.00 at the door includes everything!

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A Tellington TTouch Workshop on Saturday Feb. 24th from 12:00-4:00pm at Lucky Dawg Daycare can help you and your dog with the following: If your dog feels shy and insecure in new situations with people or dogs; becomes fearful during thunderstorms ; is reactive on a leash towards other dogs, people or bicycles, this workshop will give you a tool, in addition to obedience training, to help influence your dog’s behavior and to help your dog learn to trust you in new ways. If you and your dog need more practice working around a few more dogs and people to build your and your dog’s confidence, this workshop can assist you in learning a calm and safe approach to understanding your dog more clearly. For more information contact Connie Dillon of Amazing Dogs, a certified Professional Dog Trainer and longtime Tellington TTouch Practitioner at 505-982-1583, cdillon@cybermesa.com, amazingdogssantafe.com ATTENTION SANTA FE Would you like to help our city eliminate its plastic straw waste? Become part of the movement! Please visit StrawlessSantaFe.com to sign the petition and get involved.

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Meet Kodi! He is a 8 month old mixed breed pup who weighs about 60 pounds currently. He still has some growing to do and we estimate that he’ll be a big boyaround 90 pounds as an adult. He is doing well with the commands “Sit” and “Down” and would love to learn more. Kodi is also energetic-loves to run, wrestle and play with squeaky toys. He does well playing with dogs his size too. He came to us from an owner who could no longer keep him due to landlord restrictions. The prior owner spoke wonderful things about him and described him as friendly and crate trained. Kodi is a super cool pup who wants to come home with you today!

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SERVICE DIRECTORY BLUE SKY MIND Discover the peace and clarity of your own mind, it’s true nature, by meditating on the mind itself. When we experience the vast, clear nature of our mind, we begin to see how our thoughts and feelings are like clouds in the sky, simply passing through with no real power to make us unhappy, angry or disappointed. If we don’t follow them, they simply dissolve and disappear. “Happiness and suffering are states of mind, so their main causes cannot be found outside the mind. If we want to be truly happy and free from suffering, we must learn how to control our mind.”—Geshe Kelsang Gyatso Derived from the Buddhist Mahamudra Tradition, these sublime meditations lead you on a voyage to find your inner potential for lasting peace and happiness and freedom from conflict, frustration, and the disappointment of unfilled desires. ”If you realize your own mind you will become a Buddha; you should not seek Buddhahood elsewhere.” —Buddha Please join us and learn this simple yet profound meditation practice. By accessing the pure, clear nature of our mind we gain the insight, flexibility and freedom to respond to our thoughts and feelings in the most constructive ways possible. Uncontrolled desire is the source of all problems in our own life and in the world today. In these mediations we learn to control our mind and advance to higher and higher states of being. Lead by Gen Kelsang Inchug, an experienced American Buddhist nun and Resident Teacher at the KMC Temple in Albuquerque, whose teachings and guided meditations are accessible, inspiring and offer profound insight - transmitted with warmth and humor. *While most benefit comes from attending the entire series, you may drop in at any time for individual classes. $10/class. Everyone Welcome! Week 1: Clarity of Mind Week 2: What is Consciousness? Week 3: Root of Awareness Week 4: Developing Concentration Week 5: Everything is the Nature of Mind February 18 - March 18 Sunday mornings, 10:30am - 12:00pm at ZOETIC 230 S. St. Francis Drive, Santa Fe, NM 87501

MARKETPLACE This girl has quickly become one of our favorites and her name is Persephone! Better known by her friends as Seffie, this two year old mixed breed came to the shelter because her owner sadly passed away. She has a beautiful soft coat and currently weighs about 37 pounds-fully grown. Seffie loves to go for walks and enjoys working for treats, especially hot dogs! She’s a smart girl who knows “Sit” and likes to play too. Once she gets to know you, she is quite snuggly and will occasionally give out the most gentle kiss. We think Seffie might have a bit of Cattle dog in her breed mix-what do you see in her? Seffie would love to be your new best friend, and perhaps walking or hiking companion too!

CALL: 505.988.5541

CHIMNEY SWEEPING

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CASEY’S TOP HAT CHIMNEY SWEEPS Be Careful! There are “Professionals” sending a camera down your chimney telling you a $5000 repair is needed. Call Casey’s for an honest assessment Call 989-5775

KITCHENS - BATHS PERGOLAS Remodeling, Renovations and Additions Excellent Craftsmanship Fantastic Prices Foji Construction RJ 505-629-6934 fojiconstruction@yahoo.com

$20 off chimney cleanings! Offer ends soon! Prevent chimney fires! Call Santa Fe’s premier chimney service company for Safety, Value, and Professionalism. Baileyschimney.com. Call Bailey’s today 505-988-2771

PERSONAL & PROFESSIONAL SERVICES HANDYPERSON CARPENTRY to LANDSCAPING Home maintenance, remodels, additions, interior & exterior, irrigation, stucco repair, jobs small & large. Reasonable rates, Reliable. Discounts avail. to seniors, veterans, handicap. Jonathan, 670-8827 www.handymannm.com

FENCES & GATES PEACEFUL RESOLUTION

SPACE SAVING FURNITURE. Murphy panel beds, home offices & closet combinations. wallbedsbybergman.com or 505-470-8902

PHILIP CRUMP Mediator I can help you work together toward positive goals that create the best future for all • Divorce, Parenting plan, Family • Business, Partnership, Construction

SANTA FE COYOTE FENCING Specializing in Coyote Fencing. License # 18-001199-74. We do it all. Richard, 505-690-6272 Visit our work gallery santafecoyotefencing.com SFREPORTER.COM

Mediate—Don’t Litigate! FREE CONSULTATION

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MIND BODY SPIRIT

Rob Brezsny

Week of February 14th

ARIES (March 21-April 19): At 12,388 feet, Mount Fuji is Japan’s highest peak. If you’re in good shape, you can reach the top in seven hours. The return trip can be done in half the time—if you’re cautious. The loose rocks on the steep trail are more likely to knock you off your feet on the way down than on the way up. I suspect this is an apt metaphor for you in the coming weeks, Aries. Your necessary descent may be deceptively challenging. So make haste slowly! Your power animals are the rabbit and the snail.

omens, I urge you Virgos to finally put an end to your equivalent of the maddening alarm clock. (Read the story: tinyurl.com/alarmclockmadness.)

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Was Napoléon Bonaparte an oppressor or liberator? The answer is both. His work in the world hurt a lot of people and helped a lot of people. One of his more magnanimous escapades transpired in June 1798, when he and his naval forces invaded the island of Malta. During his six-day stay, he released political prisoners, abolished slavery, granted religious freedom to Jews, opened 15 schools, established the right to free TAURUS (April 20-May 20): In 1903, Orville and Wilbur Wright made a few short jaunts through the air speech, and shut down the Inquisition. What do his heroics have to do with you? I don’t want to exaggerate, but I in a flying machine they called the Flyer. It was a germinal step in a process that ultimately led to your abili- expect that you, too, now have the power to unleash a blizzard of benevolence in your sphere. Do it in your own ty to travel 600 miles per hour while sitting in a chair style, of course, not Napoléon’s. 30,000 feet above the earth. Less than 66 years after the Wright Brothers’ breakthrough, American astroSCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): “Trees that are slow to grow nauts landed a space capsule on the moon. They had bear the best fruit,” said French playwright Molière. I’m going to make that your motto for now, Scorpio. You have with them a patch of fabric from the left wing of the pursued a gradual, steady approach to ripening, and soon Flyer. I expect that during the coming weeks, you will it will pay off in the form of big bright blooms. be climaxing a long-running process that deserves a Congratulations on having the faith to keep plugging away comparable ritual. Revisit the early stages of the work in the dark! I applaud your determination to be dogged that enabled you to be where you are now. and persistent about following your intuition even though GEMINI (May 21-June 20): In 2006, five percent of the few people have appreciated what you were doing. world’s astronomers gathered at an international conference and voted to demote Pluto from a planet to a SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): The growth you can “dwarf planet.” Much of the world agreed to honor their and should foster in the coming weeks will be stimulated by quirky and unexpected prods. To get you declaration. Since then, though, there has arisen a started, here are a few such prods. 1. What’s your hidcampaign by equally authoritative astronomers to den or dormant talent, and what could you do to restore Pluto to full planet status. The crux of the issue awaken and mobilize it? 2. What’s something you’re is this: How shall we define the nature of a planet? But afraid of but might be able to turn into a resource? 3. for the people of New Mexico, the question has been resolved. State legislators there formally voted to regard If you were a different gender for a week, what would you do and what would your life be like? 4. Visualize Pluto as a planet. They didn’t accept the demotion. I a dream you’d like to have while you’re asleep tonight. encourage you to be inspired by their example, Gemini. 5. If you could transform anything about yourself, Whenever there are good arguments from opposing what would it be? 6. Imagine you’ve won a free vacasides about important matters, trust your gut feelings. tion to anywhere you want. Where would you go? Stand up for your preferred version of the story. CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): You may think you have CANCER (June 21-July 22): Ray Bradbury’s dystopian uncovered the truth, the whole truth, and nothing but bestseller Fahrenheit 451 was among the most success- the truth. But according to my analysis of the astrologiful of the 27 novels he wrote. It won numerous awards cal omens, you’re just a bit more than halfway there. In and has been adopted into films, plays, and graphic order to get the rest of the goods, you’ll have to ignore novels. Bradbury wrote the original version of the story your itch to be done with the search. You’ll have to be in nine days, using a typewriter he rented for 20 cents unattached to being right and smart and authoritative. per hour. When his publisher urged him to double the So please cultivate patience. Be expansive and magnanimanuscript’s length, he spent another nine days doing mous as you dig deeper. For best results, align yourself so. According to my reading of the planetary configura- with poet Richard Siken’s definition: “The truth is comtions, you Cancerians now have a similar potential to plicated. It’s two-toned, multi-vocal, bittersweet.” be surprisingly efficient and economical as you work on an interesting creation or breakthrough—especially AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): The posh magazine Tatler came up with a list of fashionable new names for parif you mix a lot of play and delight into your labors. ents who want to ensure their babies get a swanky start LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Poet Louise Glück has charac- in life. Since you Aquarians are in a phase when you can terized herself as “afflicted with longing yet incapable generate good fortune by rebranding yourself or remakof forming durable attachments.” If there is anything in ing your image, I figure you might be interested in using you that even partially fits that description, I have good one of these monikers as a nickname or alias. At the news: In the coming weeks, you’re likely to feel blessed very least, hearing them could whet your imagination to come up with your own ideas. Here are Tatler’s chic by longing rather than afflicted by it. The foreseeable avant-garde names for girls: Czar-Czar; Debonaire; future will also be prime time for you to increase your motivation and capacity to form durable attachments. Estonia; Figgy; Gethsemane; Power; Queenie. Here are some boys’ names: Barclay; Euripides; Gustav; Take full advantage of this fertile grace period! Innsbruck; Ra; Uxorious; Wigbert; Zebedee. VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): In 2004, a man named PISCES (Feb. 19-March 20): Now that you have finally Jerry Lynn tied a battery-operated alarm clock to a paid off one of your debts to the past, you can start string and dangled it down a vent in his house. He window-shopping for the future’s best offers. The comwas hoping that when the alarm sounded, he would get a sense of the best place to drill a hole in his wall ing days will be a transition time as you vacate the power spot you’ve outgrown and ramble out to reconto run a wire for his TV. But the knot he’d made wasn’t perfect, and the clock slipped off and plunged noiter potential new power spots. So bid your crisp into an inaccessible spot behind the wall. Then, every farewells to waning traditions, lost causes, ghostly temptations, and the deadweight of people’s expectanight for 13 years, the alarm rang for a minute. The tions. Then start preparing a vigorous first impression battery was unusually strong! A few months ago, Lynn to present to promising allies out there in the frontier. decided to end the mild but constant irritation. Homework: Confess, brag, and expostulate about Calling on the help of duct specialists, he retrieved what inspires you to love. Got to freewillastrology.com the persistent clock. With this story as your and click on “Email Rob.”. inspiration, and in accordance with astrological

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s Expanded Weekly Audio Horoscopes and Daily Text Message Horoscopes. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone © CO P Y R I G H T 2 0 1 8 R O B B R E Z S N Y at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700. 46

FEBRUARY 14-20, 2018

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ACUPUNCTURE

REFLEXOLOGY

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UNIQUE TO YOU Our health is reflected through the feet as an array of patterned and flexible aspects also conveyed in the body and overall being. Discomfort is a call for reorganization. Reflexology can stimulate your nervous system to relax and make the needed changes so you can feel better. “Going Inward to Heal where you hurt... as a compliment to counseling, surgery and pain meds. as stand-alone, personalized relief and wellness care. SFReflexology.com, (505) 414-8140 Julie Glassmoyer, CR

ASTROLOGY

COUNSELING & THERAPY ASTROLOGY SANTA FE MARATHON CONTINUES 15 minute power reading to analyze your Doshas for betterment of Body, Mind & Spirit. $20 Every Monday 10 am until 4pm 103 Saint Francis Dr, Unit A, Santa Fe, NM 87501 Please call Bina Thompkins for appointments - 505 819 7220

PSYCHICS

LOVE. CAREER. HEALTH. Psychic readings and Spiritual counseling. For more information call 505-982-8327 or go to www.alexofavalon.com. Also serving the LGBT community.

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Time to get real—YOUR LIFE IS UP TO YOU Feeling stuck, lost, depressed? Anxious about where you are in life? You don’t have to handle these tough times alone. Therapy is about having support while working to unblock what is keeping you from being your most vibrant, loving self. Amy Finlayson MA, LPCC (Licensed Professional Clinical Counselor) Amy.innernavigation@gmail.com 505-204-5288 $80/HOUR—NO INSURANCE ACCEPTED!!! SLIDING SCALE AVAILABLE

MASSAGE THERAPY

TANTRA MASSAGE & TEACHING Call Julianne Parkinson, 505-920-3083 • Certified Tantra Educator, Professional Massage Therapist, & Life Coach

Massage Therapist - Santa Fe, Albuquerque - Specialize in client-centered, focused Swedish, Medical, Deep Tissue, Myofascial, Relaxation, Sports, Shiatsu - my studio, your home. East-West influenced bodywork - table and chair. Treat yourself and your loved one to therapeutic bliss. $55 $ 85 hour, sliding scale Ira - LMT 1-917- 881-2436, singlewhip98@yahoo.com

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LEGALS LEGAL NOTICE TO CREDITORS/NAME CHANGE

STATE OF NEW MEXICO COUNTY OF SANTA FE FIRST JUDICIAL DISTRICT COURT IN THE MATTER OF A STATE OF NEW MEXICO PETITION FOR CHANGE OF COUNTY OF SANTA FE NAME OF Gail Lorraine Aycock FIRST JUDICIAL DISTRICT Case No.: D-101-CV-2018-00079 COURT NOTICE OF CHANGE OF NAME IN THE MATTER OF THE TAKE NOTICE that in ESTATE OF PAUL WILLIAM accordance with the provisions GRACE, Deceased. of Sec. 40-8-1 through Sec. No. D-101- PB-2018- 00002 40-8-3 NMSA 1978, et seq. the AMENDED NOTICE OF HEARING Petitioner Gail Lorraine Aycock Notice is hereby given that will apply to the Honorable this matter has been called for FRANCIS J. MATHEW, District hearing before the Judge of the First Judicial court, for the time, place, date District at the Santa Fe Judicial and purpose indicated: Complex, 225 Montezuma DATE: February 26, 2018 Ave., in Santa Fe, New Mexico, TIME: 10:00 a.m. at 11:15 a.m. on the 30th day PLACE: Judge Steve Herrera of March, 2018 for an ORDER Judicial Complex FOR CHANGE OF NAME from PURPOSE OF HEARING: Petition for Adjudication Gail Lorraine Aycock to Gail of Intestacy and for Lorraine Klemetti. Appointment of Joint Personal STEPHEN T. PACHECO, Representatives District Court Clerk ALLOCATED: 10 Minutes By: Jill Nohl JUDGE ASSIGNED: Deputy Court Clerk Honorable David K. Thomson Submitted by: THE HONORABLE DAVID K. Gail Lorraine Aycock THOMSON Petitioner, Pro Se /s/ Heather Sanchez Martinez, STATE OF NEW MEXICO TCAA COUNTY OF SANTA FE Secretary FIRST JUDICIAL DISTRICT STATE OF NEW MEXICO COURT IN THE PROBATE COURT IN THE MATTER OF A SANTA FE COUNTY PETITION FOR CHANGE OF No. 2018-0004 IN THE NAME OF CHRISTOPHER MATTER OF THE ESTATE ANDREW FRANCISCO OF Margaret Garduno, Case No: D-101-CV-2018-00354 DECEASED. NOTICE OF CHANGE OF NAME NOTICE TO CREDITORS TAKE NOTICE that in NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN accordance with the provisions that the undersigned has of Sec. 40-8-1 through Sec. been appointed personal 40-8-3 NMSA 1978, et seq. representative of this estate. the Petitioner Christopher All persons having claims against this estate are required Andrew Francisco will apply to the Honorable Gregory S. to present their claims within Shaffer, District Judge of the four (4) months after the First Judicial District at the date of the first publication Santa Fe Judicial Complex, 225 of this notice, or the claims Montezuma Ave., in Santa Fe, will be forever barred. Claims New Mexico, at 11 a.m. on the must be presented either to 28th day of February, 2018 the undersigned personal for an ORDER FOR CHANGE representative at the address OF NAME from Christopher listed below, or filed with the Andrew Francisco to Chris Probate Court of Santa Fe, County, New Mexico, located at Andrew Francisco. Stephen T. Pacheco, the following address: District Court Clerk 102 Grant Ave., By: Jorge Montes, Santa Fe, NM 87501. Ruth Salazar Deputy Court Clerk 8760 Kenosha Dr Submitted by: Co Springs, CO 80908 Christopher Andrew Francisco 719-351-7293 Petitoner, Pro Se

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WE BUY DIAMONDS GOLD & SILVER GRADUATE GEMOLOGIST THINGS FINER Inside La Fonda Hotel 983-5552

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Tennis Lessons W/ A PRO WHO HAS 25 YRS. EXPERIENCE Kids of all ages & adults welcome! Racquets Included! Call Coach Jim 505.795.0543

i LOVE TO ORGANIZE MICROSOFT ACCESS Experienced References DATABASES Sue 231-6878 Design - Training Troubleshooting BODY OF SANTA FE

Destin / 505-450-9300 LOVE richter@kewa.com GIFT CARDS AVAILABLE An Evening with Lisa Marie Toal Friday, Feb 23 7-9pm MAINTENANCE & REPAIR. Restorative Yoga & ALL ISSUES RESOLVED. Acupuncture MODERN AUTOWORKS. Saturday, February 24 1900 B CHAMISA ST. 3-5pm 505-989-4242. YOGA & CHOCOLATE Feb 25 2-5 pm MASSAGE | FACIALS | YOGA For 1 hr • sliding scale • & NIA www.duijaros.com CHILDCARE | BOUTIQUE CAFE | CHOCOLATE bodyofsantafe.com 505-986-0362 Empowering Women in their 333 W. Cordova 60’s, 70’s, and 80’s Empowerment Support Group Video/Individual Counseling, Office Visits Mondays 5:15-7:15 pm CLSiwula MFT magamam.com 619-436-8780 505-501-5389 www.konkoni.org

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BEING HELD

MAGNIFICENT ACHIEVING MUSES

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Artists: Rent our studio for your Workshops large well-lit space, central location, Julie 505-603-1259.

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SFR BACK PAGE BASE PRICE: $25 (Includes 1 LARGE line & 2 lines of NORMAL text) CUSTOMIZE YOUR TEXT WITH THE FOLLOWING UPGRADES: COLOR: $12/Line (Choose RED ORANGE GREEN BLUE orVIOLET) ADDITIONAL LINES: $10/Line | CENTERED TEXT: $5/AD HIGHLIGHT $10

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Thur 2/22 5:45 90 mins @ Unitarian Church Free, Donations accepted

SOUND AND MOVEMENT

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XCELLENT MACINTOSH SUPPORT

20+yrs professional, The new ARCANE album is here! Apple certified. Available at: Studio Center SF/ xcellentmacsupport.com • Warehouse 21 | CD - $8 Randy • 670-0585

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I LOVE TO COACH

Leaders, Business Owners, Entrepreneurs Donna Karaba, MA, Positive Psychotherapy Transpersonal Psychology, Career Counseling Naropa University Schedule a free initial consult or appt: 982-7434 • www.shafferphd.com www.DonnaKaraba.com/contact 505-954-1011

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INNER FOR TWO 106 N. Guadalupe Street (505) 820-2075

“YOU ARE WHAT YOU INK”

happy hour!

WEDNesday – Sunday from 4 pm to 6:30 pm Enjoy treats like: • grilled patagonia pink shrimp • Garlic truffle fries • mesquite smoked prime rib sliders • salmon fish n’ chips • mussels in heirloom tomato broth • grilled tenderloin beef tips • wine • local brews... and lively conversation. See you there!

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February 14, 2018 Santa Fe Reporter  

February 14, 2018 Santa Fe Reporter: SFR Endorsements — VOTE!

February 14, 2018 Santa Fe Reporter  

February 14, 2018 Santa Fe Reporter: SFR Endorsements — VOTE!

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