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T h e M a g a z i n e o f S a n ta C l a r a U n i v e r s i t y S c h o o l o f L aw

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vol 17 no 2

Law Santa Clara

Celebrating a Century of Educating Lawyers Who Lead S P E C IAL C EN T ENNIAL I S S U E


Santa Clara College, circa 1913

Santa Clara Law Magazine Summer 2011 | Volume 17 Number 2 JULIA YAFFEE M.A. ’87, M.A. ’97 Senior Assistant Dean for External Affairs Elizabeth Kelley Gillogly B.A. ’93 Editor The magazine team is grateful to the late Honorable Mark Thomas ’56 (seen above being robed by fellow alum, Superior Court Judge James Wright ’49) for his extensive and detailed history of Santa Clara Law, From Promise to Prominence (2003), which served as a key reference for this publication. Information quoted from this book is indicated by these references throughout (Thomas, [page]). Special thanks to Mary Emery, Mary Hood, Chris Tessari, and all others who helped with this project. All photos courtesy of Santa Clara University Archives and Santa Clara Law unless otherwise noted.

LARRY SOKOLOFF ’92 Assistant Editor Susan Vogel Writer Michele Waters Web Editor Jane Ludlam Copy Editor Amy Kremer GomersalL B.A. ’88 Art in Motion, Art Director, Designer

contents Beginnings The Campbell Years 1911-18 The Coolidge Years 1920-33 The Owens Years 1933-53 The Huard Years 1959-69 The Alexander Years 1970-85 The Uelmen Years 1986-93 The Player Years 1994-2003 The Polden Years 2003-Present Students in Action Women at Santa Clara Law Diversity Social Justice High Technology and Intellectual Property International Law Mapping Out Our Future The Second Century Celebrating Our Centennial Centennial Sponsors

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Charles Barry Santa Clara University Photographer

For more stories of our students, faculty, staff, and alumni, as well as video interviews and historical photos, visit law.scu.edu/100.


This issue of Santa Clara Law commemorates our centennial anniversary and describes the century of contributions to legal education and professional and community service by the school’s faculty, staff, students, and graduates. It is a proud and distinguished history. The Law School’s program continues to stand on the pillars of Jesuit education, professional development, and service. For 500 years, Jesuit education has developed competent, compassionate, and committed individuals who lead meaningful lives of leadership and service with the capacity of creating a more just global society. This tradition has inspired Santa Clara Law to create legal education programs and curricula that integrate academic excellence with social and personal responsibility. Santa Clara’s law school was formed in 1911 to serve immigrant and underserved communities through providing opportunities to learn the law and provide legal assistance to members of those communities, a tradition shared by other Jesuit law schools. Across the country and around the globe, the more than 11,000 alumni of Santa Clara Law serve as living examples that this educational model fosters lawyers who lead and serve their communities.

melissa barnes

Please enjoy this rich and colorful commemoration of the Law School’s century of service and academic excellence.

 Donald J. Polden

Dean


1912 C L A S S Dean James Havelock Campbell (seated, fourth from left) with graduates of the Law Department. Photograph by Charles B. Turrill, June 1912.

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Beginnings When Santa Clara College was founded, in 1851, it did not envision having a graduate law school. But by 1903, the children of its mainly Catholic immigrant students sought graduate school education at a Catholic college. The first suggestion of a law school at Santa Clara appears in a February 19, 1903, letter from Henry Woods, S.J., of St. Ignatius College to the Jesuit Father General asking to establish law and medical schools at Santa Clara and St. Ignatius Colleges. By the fall of 1907, Santa Clara College had a “Department of Elementary Law,” enrolling 12 students in classes in common law, contracts, and real property. Even as an undergraduate program, law study at Santa Clara College emphasized practical experience along with academic learning. “There will be a lecture every day for the law students by some prominent lawyer who will give practical experience along with the more laborious detail,” reported the San Jose Semi-Weekly Journal on September 18, 1909.

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The Campbell Years: 1911–18 Practical Training by Practicing Attorneys In 1911, the Santa Clara Institute of Law opened its doors. Grounded in the Jesuit values of competence, conscience, and compassion, it was the first law school at a Catholic college in California (the seventh law school in California overall), and the ninth law school in the country connected with a Catholic college. Applicants needed two years of post-high school education to be admitted to the three-year law program culminating in a Bachelor of Laws degree.

By fall of 1912, Santa Clara College had become Santa Clara University. Tuition for the Institute of Law, including room, board, and “washing and mending of linen,” was $200 per term for resident students. Consistent with the Jesuit value of compassion, from its inception, the Institute of Law offered a special path to admission for students not meeting formal admission requirements but demonstrating potential. These students studied for a Certificate of Law.

James Havelock Campbell Dean, 1911-1918

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“There are, however, many gifted young men whose circumstances do not permit their receiving a college education. They may, nevertheless, owing to the particular nature of their occupations, have acquired a degree of knowledge along particular lines quite equal if not superior to that of students who have had the advantage of regular academic training; while their greater maturity and seriousness, and it may be, their possession of the legal mind, renders them especially fitted for the study of law” (Thomas, 16-17, quoting an “announcement”).

Attorney James Havelock Campbell, Santa Clara College 1871, was appointed Dean of the new Institute of Law. Campbell, a native of Massachusetts, had been admitted to practice law in 1874 after study in a law office in Grass Valley. He held the position of Santa Clara District Attorney for four terms and engaged in private practice as well.


ABOVE: St. Joseph’s Hall, 1912 LEFT: First Graduates, 1914 (First person to receive LL.B. degree in 1912: John Wallace Ryland) Royal A. Bronson, John J. Jones, Edward G. White, Ervin S. Best, Frank G. Boone, Christopher A. Degnan, Dion R. Holm, Harry W. McGowan, Albert J. Newlin, Chauncey F. Tramutolo, Stephen Mallory White, Marco S. Zarick

Father James P. Morrissey Rector-President Santa Clara College

Students attended two evening lectures a day by “resident professors” and “non-resident professors.” All professors, according to the press, were also prominent attorneys. Father James P. Morrissey, Rector-President of Santa Clara College, said, “while theory is thoroughly and solidly insisted upon, the practical side of the profession is made emphatic.”

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The coolidge Years: 1920–33

From War to Depression World War I interrupted the growth of the Law School (it graduated no students in 1919), as did efforts in the early 1920s by the state legislature and the American Bar Association (ABA) to regulate law school admission requirements and curriculum. In 1920, students were required to take the State Bar Exam; previously the bar was waived for graduates of Santa Clara Law as well for graduates of Hastings, Berkeley, Stanford, and University of Southern California law schools. By 1926, the “law course” at what was now the University of Santa Clara College of Law was extended to four years. Clarence Coolidge, an 1891 graduate of Santa Clara College, joined the school as a professor in 1911, and was elected to Santa Clara County’s District Attorney prior to becoming Dean in 1920. “Coolidge was known as one of the true gentlemen of the Santa Clara County Bar” (Thomas, 36).

Clarence Coolidge Dean, 1920-1933

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Santa Clara County Judges: From left, Grandin Miller ’24, John P. Dempset ’15, Robert E. Cassin ’34, and Percy O’Connor ’15.


Mission fire, 1926 Students’ spirits must have dimmed upon learning they had to study an additional year, but they rallied, when on October 25, 1926, the old Mission Church caught fire, threatening the law library. Students worked together to carry to safety all but around 1,000 books. Three years later, in the fall of 1929, all students shifted to day classes taught by five faculty members. With the stock market crash on October 15, many students held on to their full-time jobs well after obtaining their law degrees.

Varsi, 1931 One ABA requirement was an “adequate library.” In October 1931, the Varsi Library opened, housing both the University library and the Law School library, which was moved from O’Connor Hall. It was named after SCU President Father Aloysius Varsi and built on the site of the old vineyard. The master of ceremonies at the opening on October 6 was Henry Woods, S.J., who had written the 1903 letter first asking for permission to establish the Law School.

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The owens Years: 1933–53 Building a Solid Academic Foundation Dean Edwin J. Owens (J.D. Harvard), the Law School’s first full-time dean and its longest tenured dean, is remembered as a serious man with a ready sense of humor. Owens guided the Law School through its darkest years, during the Great Depression, when enrollment dwindled and the Bar Examiners suggested it shut down, and through World War II, when it actually did shut down. Despite these challenges, Owens helped the Law School become one of the best small law schools in the country.

Edwin J. Owens Dean, 1933-1953

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In 1937, the Law School became the sixth law school in California to achieve accreditation by the ABA.

emphasis on personal contact between faculty and students. Within that framework, he insisted upon excellence

“Edwin J. Owens...more than “He [Edwin J. Owens] insisted upon any other, established legal excellence of teaching above all else education on a firm footing and enforced this standard by example at this University and gave and gentle guidance.” direction to this Law School…. —Dean Leo A. Huard, 1963 He made the University of of teaching above all else and enforced Santa Clara Law School into one of the this standard by example and gentle finest small law schools in this country. guidance.” He concurred in the desire of the —Dean Leo A. Huard, 1963. University administrators to keep the school small and thus retain a cherished

“Judge Owens’ ideals faced up to the issues of the relationship of law and morals, with the ideal of law as the foundation for community. That was Judge Owens’ deep belief and the foundation for his work.” — from the 1988 funeral homily given by Paul J. Goda, S.J.


“There are many times in the law when it is much more reasonable to say ‘seasonable’ than ‘reasonable.’ ” —Dean Edwin J. Owens Oil painting of campus, circa 1933

Bergin Hall By 1939, the Law School had all of its two dozen or so law students under one roof in a new building, Bergin Hall, named after Santa Clara College’s first graduate, Thomas I. Bergin, 1857. Law students no longer had to walk from O’Conner Hall to Varsi. “Swivel chairs” and “built-in lights” made the building the envy of the campus. With three large classrooms, student and faculty offices, a library holding up to 25,000 volumes, and a student lounge, Bergin Hall was expected to house 125 students, more than the Law School ever expected to have. It would be the main home for the Law School for the next 24 years.

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 the owens years

Ruff, Tuff Ruffo

Albert J. Ruffo B.A. ’31, J.D. ’36 attended SCU on a football scholarship and earned a place in the School’s Athletic Hall of Fame. After graduation, he coached boxing, wrestling, and football at SCU until Law School Dean Edwin J. Owens convinced him to go to law school.

“You have to like what you are doing. If you like what you are doing, you can do it until you die.” —Albert J. Ruffo

In 1944, along with former Santa Clara classmate Tony Morabito, Ruffo co-founded the San Francisco FortyNiners football team. Ruffo served two years as mayor of San Jose before embarking on a successful law practice. In 1988, the Ruffo Room of

the Heafey Law Library was named in his honor. In 2000, Dean Mack Player created the Albert J. Ruffo Golden Gavel Society, whose members are Law School alumni who graduated 50 or more years ago.

Wayne Kanemoto (1918–2008) Maseo (Wayne) Kanemoto ’42 missed his California Bar swearing-in ceremony in 1942. He was, in his words, “an unwilling guest of the U.S. government” at an internment facility for Japanese-Americans at the Santa Anita Racetrack near Pasadena, California. He later was transferred to Arizona’s Gila River Relocation Center. Kanemoto enlisted in the U.S. Army’s 442nd Regimental Combat Team. He was transferred to the 10th Army Air Force and served in India and Burma as a Japaneselanguage signal intelligence specialist for the rest of the war. After the war, Kanemoto was appointed to the San Jose Municipal Court, becoming the third Japanese-American judge in California and the first Nisei (second-generation Japanese in the U.S.) judge in Northern California. In 1972 he shared the Edwin J. Owens Lawyer of the Year Award with Michael Di Leonardo. Kanemoto’s class was the last class to graduate before the Law School closed for two years during the war.

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Class of 1948

In the fall of 1942, the College of Law closed for the duration of World War II. During that same period, many Santa Clara Law graduates held very high positions in the judiciary and other governmental offices, both in the state and nationally. In the summer of 1945, Dean Owens resumed his duties at the Law School after serving on the Alien Enemy Hearing Board for Northern California. Enrollment soared when the Law School began admitting veterans who had only two years of undergraduate work, rather than three, and offered them summer sessions that allowed them to graduate from law school in just two years. Within a year, enrollment reached an alltime high of 83 students, 69 of whom were veterans.

By 1948, the school had returned to a normal pace. The frenzy of veterans trying to quickly finalize their educations had ended and students had more time to be involved in other projects. In the spring,

graduate and the practicing attorney,” to “bring alumni closer to the classroom,” to increase recognition for the Law School, and to “aid in opening doors” to employment (Thomas, ’99, quoting The Redwood,

“During the years 1912 to 1943 the average enrollment in the College of Law was 28. During the immediate post-war years the enrollment in the Law School varied from 72 to 116.... The enrollment as of September 1958, was 124 day students. In this group were represented thirty-six colleges and universities throughout the United States.” —Warren P. McKenney, 1959 they created the Student Bar Association, which exists to this day. The first SBA president was James A. Wright, who later served for many years as a judge in Santa Clara County. The SBA was intended to close the “great gap between the law

1949). (The Student Bar Association also had more material goals: they wrangled a student lounge in Bergin Hall with a cigarette machine, soft-drink and candy machines, and a telephone booth.)

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 the owens years

Aurelius “Reo” Miles ’52 Originally from Chicago, Miles arrived at Santa Clara Law decorated with war medals, including a Silver Star and Bronze Star, and missing a leg. Dean Owens’ admonition to students not to make an issue of race was unnecessary. Miles instantly felt “like one of the family.” Miles returned to Chicago upon graduation and launched a career in real estate. Below, a shot from the 1951 Redwood. Seated, left to right: Donald Richardson, Anthony Oliver, Robert Vatuone, Keith Varni, Richard Sullivan, and Reo Miles. Standing, left to right: Steve Gazzera, Robert Lagomarsino, and Oliver Hatch.

Dean Owens and his wife, Mabel (Fairweather) Owens.

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Law School Faculty, 1958. Top row, left to right: Austen D. Warbarton, Robert G. Meiners, Patricia J. Coffman (law librarian), William D. Sawers, Harold M. Everton, George A. Strong. Bottom, left to right: Robert E. Hayes, Dean Warren P. McKenney, Dean Emeritus Edwin A. Owens, SCU President Patrick Donohoe, S.J.


Community Leader: J. Hector Moreno ’51 J. Hector Moreno (below center, with his children Hector Jr. and Marilyn), one of Santa Clara Law’s earliest Hispanic graduates (others included Demetrio Diaz ’21 and Manny C. Gomez ’42), established a law practice in San Jose upon graduation. He and his wife became leaders in promoting civic engagement of Latinos in the community: they created the first Mexican-American newspaper in Santa Clara County, El Sol. Moreno formed the Mexican American Political Organization and worked for many years to promote the inclusion of Mexican-Americans in government.

Owens Lawyer of the Year Awardees, 1966–2010 The Edwin J. Owens Lawyer of the Year Award was first presented in 1966. The first honoree was Judge Owens himself. The recipient must be a member of the bench or bar and must be either an alumnus of the School of Law or a member (or former member) of the full-time faculty or administration. He or she should be a person of high moral character and recognized intellectual ability who is devoted to the highest ideals of professional responsibility and who has made significant contributions to the University, the community, and the law.

Owens awardees include lawyers who have become leaders through competence and integrity, who have modeled professionalism, and who inspire others.

During the 1950s, the school admitted students of color and women, and the makeup of the student body began to reflect the population of the Bay Area. The Owens Years came to a close with the 1953 appointment of Dean Owens to the Santa Clara Superior Court. He was replaced by acting dean Byron J. Snow (1953-55), followed by Warren McKenney (1955-59). Under McKenney, the first edition of The Santa Clara Lawyer, the student newspaper, was published in late 1955. The greatest change McKenney instituted was the admission of women to the Law School in 1956.

1966 – Hon. Edwin J. Owens

1988 – Phillip H. Pennypacker ’72

1967 – Harold R. McKinnon ’15

1989 – Mary B. Emery ’63

1968 – Albert J. Ruffo ’36

1990 – Richard L. Rykoff

1969 – Hon. John D. Foley ’32

1991 – Hon. Eugene Premo ’63

1970 – Leon E. Panetta ’63

1992 – Catherine C. Sprinkles ’73

1971 – Austen D. Warburton ’41

1993 – Michael A. Espy ’78

1972 – Michael Di Leonardo ’50

1994 – Hon. Rise Jones Pichon ’76

and Hon. Wayne M. Kanemoto ’42

1995 – Zoe Lofgren ’75

1973 – Richard A. McCormick ’38

1996 – Frederick M. Gonzalez ’77

1974 – Louis P. Bergna ’48

1997 – Gerald F. Uelmen

1975 – George A. Strong ’55

1998 – Georgia E. Bacil ’79

1976 – Anthony T. Oliver ’53

1999 – Joan Gallo ’75

1977 – Hon. James A. Wright ’49

2000 – Jesus Valencia, Jr. ’82

1978 – Hon. Noel E. Manoukian ’64

2001 – Daniel J. Kelly ’69

1979 – Hon. Peter Anello ’48

2002 – Hon. Mary Jo Levinger ’72

1980 – Hon. Jerome A. Smith ’65

2003 – Hon. John S. McInerny ’54

1981 – Hon. Marcel B. Poche

2004 – John R. Williams ’65

1982 – Hon. Edward A. Panelli ’55

2005 – Mack A. Player

1983 – Alan A. Parker ’64

2006 – William B. Clayton ’74

1984 – William E. Glennon ’66

2007 – Hon. Raymond J. Davilla, Jr. ’72

1985 – George J. Alexander

2008 – Paul J. Goda, S.J.

1986 – Theodore J. Biagini ’64

2009 – Ronald H. Malone ’71

1987 – B. T. Collins ’73

2010 – Gordon Yamate ’80

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The HUARD Years: 1959–69 A Visionary for Social Justice “Even the strongest adherents of the new evening program could not have foreseen its significance. The concept of Silicon Valley was in the bud. That so many highly educated people would be attracted to the area could not have been fully anticipated. The local market for career-changing students, especially women, had been untapped. The influx of new students enabled the school to hire more full-time faculty who would serve in both the evening and day programs. Looking back, it is evident that the addition of the evening program was one of the most significant events in the history of the law school” (Thomas, 146-7). Dean Leo Albert Huard (J.D. Georgetown) joined the School of Law as dean in 1959. A native of New Hampshire, he had spent a decade on the faculty of Georgetown University. Huard’s quick wit and his ability to tolerate dissent helped him tackle the challenges the Law School faced in these years, primarily questioning about

Leo Albert Huard Dean, 1959-69

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its accreditation and finances. Relying on his Georgetown experience, he successfully negotiated a constitution giving the law school academic autonomy within the University. Huard was a visionary in seeing Santa Clara Law as a leader in using law in the

pursuit of social justice. Four years before Lyndon Johnson launched his War on Poverty, Dean Huard and the Law School helped establish the Santa Clara County Legal Aid Society. Huard’s leadership in setting Santa Clara on this course was important to its future.

Huard was also a visionary in reinstating the evening program, which enabled students to “keep your job and go after an advanced degree at the same time.” (Thomas, 146, quoting Peg Major news release)


Aerial view of campus, circa 1960

The Santa Clara Lawyer newsletter became a law review in 1961.

HEAFEY LAW LIBRARY The School of Law was poised to accommodate the influx of evening students thanks to a generous gift from Edwin A. Heafey, Sr. On October 12, 1963, the 18,000-square-foot Heafey Law Library opened. It more than doubled the space available to the Law School, and provided space for 100,000 volumes, as well as offices, a faculty lounge, and research carrels.

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 the HUARD years

A Flexible FACULTY After a decade of teaching at Georgetown, Dean Huard had opinions about the teaching of law and one was “if you teach at all, you teach anything” (Thomas, 155). Law faculty members were expected to teach even classes they had never taken, sometimes with very little notice, such as a week. Still, Huard had no trouble recruiting qualified and often prominent faculty members, including Howard C. Anawalt (J.D. U.C. Berkeley, Boalt Hall ’64), Mary B. Emery (J.D. Santa Clara Law ’63) and Paul Goda, S.J. (J.D. Georgetown ’63). Recruitment was an ongoing task in light of the ever-expanding student population. Huard started out his tenure with six full-time and four adjunct faculty members. By 1965, he had 10 full-time and 14 adjunct faculty members. Numbers leveled off in the late ’60s to 11 full-time and 7 adjunct teachers. Top: Edwin A. Heafey (left), who earned his undergraduate degree from SCU, shown here with SCU President Patrick Donohue, S.J. (middle), and Dean Huard (right) at the dedication ceremony for the Edwin A. Heafey Law Library, built with funds donated by Heafey. Middle: Law school faculty members Howard Anawalt (left) and Paul Goda, S.J. (right).

evening classes return In 1962, the University announced “dawn and dark” graduate programs in engineering, business, and law. Huard did so in the face of “gripes” by the ABA that the program was not adequately funded. Beginning in 1967, students studied toward a Juris Doctor Degree rather than an LL.B. Enrollment Year Total 1959 111 1960 108 1961 117 1962 124 1963 126 1964 148 1965 173 1966 190 1967 234 1968 260 Tuition over this time doubled from $800 per year to $1,620.

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JEANNE W. HUARD Jeanne W. Huard (left) was a one-woman student services center. Her role as the Law School’s first admissions officer became official in 1970, when, after the death of Dean Huard, student applications were moved off her kitchen table and into a campus office. For nearly 20 years, she worked in the admissions office, often taking on a motherly role: she babysat for students so that they could attend classes and helped them with housing issues and personal finances. “They all start out very confused,” she noted of first-year students. “After about six weeks, they become authorities on everything” (Thomas, 233).


In taking the Law School back to its early tradition of evening classes to enable students to work during the day, Dean Huard also set it on a course that would greatly enrich the school in terms of diversity and would enable it to attract highly educated, talented students in the technology sector as the valley became Silicon Valley.

Jerry A. Kasner Jerry A. Kasner (right, J.D. Drake University Law School ’57), joined Santa Clara Law faculty as a full-time professor in 1962, after having worked for the accounting firm Arthur Young in San Francisco and Al Ruffo’s San Jose law firm. A certified public accountant and author, Kasner taught Tax, Estate Planning, Civil Procedure, Corporations, Business Planning, Community Property, and other courses. He retired in 1998, after 36 years of teaching at the Law School. Two years earlier, he was awarded the University Award for Sustained Excellence in Scholarship. Kasner died in 2004, and since then, Santa Clara Law has held a highly successful annual estate-planning conference in his name.

George Strong When Dean Huard died suddenly in 1969, George Strong (J.D. SCU 1955) became acting dean. Originally from Oklahoma, Strong taught economics to SCU undergraduates while attending Santa Clara Law. Upon graduation, he joined the Law School faculty, where he taught for 38 years. He became assistant dean in 1960 and associate dean in 1970. Huard had said that Strong was “generally regarded as the best teacher on our faculty and, in addition, he possesses unusual administrative ability….” (Thomas, 155) As a key member of the administration for more than four decades, Strong provided an important sense of continuity for students, staff, and faculty. Plus, for many years, Strong was the face of the administration as he personally handled in-person student registration. He also served as an informal mentor to many of his research assistants, who hung around his office as if it were a clubhouse, and he encouraged community among the faculty by hosting a

lunch table each day in the Adobe Lodge. Strong served as associate dean and helped lead the law school until his death in 1995. In tribute to his legacy, the faculty lounge was named the Strong Common Room.

“I don’t know of anyone in the 36, 37 years I’ve been here, where we could offer a class on wills on a Friday night and have standing room only….” —SCU Emeritus Professor of English Francis X. Duggan speaking of Strong’s popularity as a teacher.

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The ALEXANDER Years: 1970–85 Expanding from Regional to National Prominence In 1970, the School of Law was at a crossroads. It could maintain its identity as a small, regional law school graduating a hundred students a year, or seek a leading position among law schools and the legal profession. The preference of its new dean, George Alexander (LL.B. Pennsylvania Law School, LL.M. J.S.D. Yale) was clear. Prior to joining Santa Clara Law in 1970 he had taught and served as assistant dean at Syracuse Law School in New York. He was vice chairman of the board

George Alexander Dean, 1970-85

of the New York Civil Liberties Union and involved in space law. With a background in technology and civil liberties, Alexander was particularly equipped to lead the law school through the social changes of the 1970s and into the high tech 1980s.

A law degree was becoming a tool for social change and the number of students applying to law school soared. Bannan Hall opened to students in 1974, accommodating the jump in enrollment from 125 entering students in 1969 to almost three times that number in 1971. In 1972, female enrollment surpassed 100 for the first time.

Alexander’s firm vision for a global future, coupled with his passion for social justice and his commitment to adding female and minority students, led the law school through a time of great change.

“The flood of applications is again the most dramatic new development at the School of Law. After doubling last year over the prior year, applications again doubled this year.” —George Alexander, in the June 1972 annual report (Thomas, 211)

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Dean Alexander and students

Alexander’s firm vision for a global future, coupled with his passion for social justice and his commitment to adding female and minority students, led the law school through a time of great change. Bannan Hall

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 the ALEXANDER years

 FIRST PERSON Enrollment and Scholarships Climb

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hen I came to the school as dean, it was clear that its small student classes could not support the kind of program I had been asked to have us create nor would they support scholarships for the underprivileged. Much of my time in the first three years was spent recruiting. The results were encouraging. We tripled the size of the school while tightening entrance standards. It was possible to raise faculty salaries substantially to keep good faculty and to entice attractive new professors.

“Much of my time in the first three years was spent recruiting. The results were encouraging. We tripled the size of the school while tightening entrance standards.” —George Alexander

Still missing was a way to provide financial support for underprivileged students. There were no additional funds available. Why, I asked, not admit 20 additional students (each year) without charging them tuition? They could fit into already scheduled classes. Both the University and faculty agreed and the program was underway. —George Alexander, Dean Santa Clara Law Professor and then-Dean George Alexander in his office with students. Photo by William C. Wymann, 1971.

Alexander began recruiting across the country with a focus on increasing enrollment of women and minorities—he sent personal letters to minority students who had taken the LSAT encouraging them to apply. In addition, Dean Alexander recognized the increasing need for lawyers to be trained for a global understanding, and in 1974, the Law School launched its first summer abroad program, which has blossomed into the largest program of its kind in the nation. While dean, Alexander taught at least two courses a year, and one year he taught

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four. After his deanship, he was awarded the title Elizabeth H. and John A. Sutro Professor of Law, also known as the Sutro chair—the first endowed chair in the school’s history. Alexander also sowed the first seeds of the law school’s high tech program by adding intellectual property to the curriculum, a move that turned out to be essential to the school’s future in the heart of what would become Silicon Valley. Many years later after he retired as dean, Alexander and his wife endowed the school’s legal clinic and an annual prize for exceptional lawyering (see page 61).

Enrollment Year Total 1969 288 1970 463 1971 640 1972 743 1973 802 1974 906

Male 272 424 574 639 675 723

Female 16 39 66 104 127 183

Tuition rose from $1,736 per year to $2,254 (Thomas, 210).


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FACULTY Some of the faculty who joined Santa Clara Law during the Alexander years included: 1. Alan W. Sheflin, 2. Cynthia A. Mertens, Gary G. Neustadter, and Jost J. Baum, 3. Richard Berg, 4. Herman M. Levy, 5. Philip J. JimĂŠnez and students, 6. Robert W. Peterson, 7. Russell Galloway, 8. Eric W. Wright, 9. Edward Steinman and student, and 10. Kenneth A. Manaster. Current faculty not pictured include Dorothy Glancy and Kandis Scott.

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 the ALEXANDER years Students complete paper registrations for classes circa 1970.

 FIRST PERSON The Generous Faculty

I

cannot remember a single faculty member from my last year of college, yet I remember every faculty member from my first year of law school. And I will never forget that my very first grade in law school was the A-minus I got in Professor Ed Steinman’s crimes class. His classes on crimes and criminal procedure excited me about criminal law and led me into a criminal law practice upon graduation. But I don’t remember Santa Clara faculty members for what they taught me as much as for how they made me feel as a law student. It seems inadequate to say that they were always accessible, helpful, and supportive, and almost trite to say that Santa Clara was a nurturing environment. It was more than that. The professors made me feel like their success was inextricably intertwined with mine; like they had a real stake in my success in their classes and in the Law School. For example, after graduation, I, like everyone else, enrolled in a bar review course to study for the July bar exam. A classmate and I decided to take the BAR/BRI class at Stanford rather than at Santa Clara, thinking that we might feel the stress and panic less if we were surrounded by

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strangers rather than by other classmates and friends. In 1976 some of the courses were taught by live teachers and others were presented by videotaped lectures. Several weeks into the course we had our first of three videotaped lectures on torts. It was horribly disjointed, unorganized, and rambling. At the end of the lecture there was a collective moan and everyone in the room knew that we were essentially on our own. I had done well in torts and I couldn’t accept that I had come so far only to risk failing the bar because of an inadequate torts review.

students gave him a resounding ovation. I was so proud. I told this story at an alumni dinner in 2004. Professor Wright was in attendance and he didn’t remember having done this

The professors made me feel like their So I went home and I called Professor Eric success was inextricably intertwined with Wright, whose torts mine; like they had a real stake in my success class I had taken my in their classes and in the Law School. first year. I explained how bad the BAR/BRI extraordinary deed—probably because he does torts lecture had been and how worried I was. this kind of thing all the time. It is a testament He volunteered to come to Stanford to provide to his generosity and it exemplifies what is best an overview on torts to the entire class the next about Santa Clara—its faculty. day. It was pretty amazing. There were only three Santa Clara students in the class of 30 or —Phyllis J. Hamilton ’76, United States so. We turned off the video-tape player and I District Court Judge, for Northern California; introduced Professor Wright, and in four hours he member, Santa Clara Law School Board of gave us everything we needed. He was brilliant, Visitors. as usual, and at the end of the class, all of the


CHARLES BARRY

 FIRST PERSON

highlights of the alexander years

Forever Grateful In October of 1979, my first year at Santa Clara, my husband died of leukemia, due to benzene exposure at a job he held in college. My eight-year-old daughter had lost her father, and I felt even more incentive to fight for those who are wrongfully injured.

Professors at Santa Clara were inspiring, skillful educators, who taught leadership. They strove to instill in us an ethical and sound foundation in the law.

Dean George Alexander and my other professors were understanding, compassionate, and supportive. Santa Clara showed that it cared about students, not just in the classroom but in their lives as well.

caring by Santa Clara Law.

Professors at Santa Clara were also inspiring, skillful educators, who taught leadership. They strove to instill in students an ethical and sound foundation in the law. They were tough, had high expectations of excellence, but cared about students as individual people. After graduation in 1982, I took the California Bar given at Bannan Hall. Dean Strong sat in the hallway cheering us on and bolstering our spirits. During breaks on the sunny patio, there was a long table with chocolate chip cookies, lemonade, black ball point pens, number 2 pencils, and aspirin. It was like Mom taking care of us...another example of

Santa Clara provided a solid foundation in the law, and instilled in its students the importance of integrity, leadership, and the pursuit of justice. I will be forever grateful to Santa Clara for the great legal education, compassion, and support they gave me. —MARY ALEXANDER ’82, Mary Alexander and Associates; past president, Association of Trial Lawyers of America; past president, Consumer Attorneys of California; member, American Board of Trial Advocates

1970 Environmental Law Society founded; Honors Moot Court began 1971 First law clinic handles more than 100 cases 1972 The Grapevine Weekly news published 1973 Bannan Hall opens; Board of Visitors forms; north wing of Law Library completed 1974 B.T. Collins serves as placement director; summer abroad programs begin; J.D./MBA program begins 1975 Current Advocate begins publishing 1979 First academic support program established; students help establish the Santa Clara Public Interest Law Foundation 1985 First issue of Santa Clara Computer & High Technology Law Journal published

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 the ALEXANDER years

B.T. COLLINS “CAPTAIN HOOK”

Brien (“B.T.”) Collins B.A. ’70, J.D. ’73, who lost a leg and arm as a U.S. Army captain in Vietnam, left a long legacy at the Law School. One is the B.T. Collins Memorial Urinal in the Heafey Library with its inscription: “If it ain’t in Gilbert’s, it ain’t the law.” Collins served as director of the California Conservation Corps and chief of staff for then-Governor Jerry Brown. He also served as deputy finance director, director of the California Youth Authority, and as an elected member of the California State Assembly. He regarded public service as a privilege, and frequently urged others to give back. Collins died suddenly in 1993 at the age of 52. In 1994, the B.T. Collins “Captain Hook” Scholarship for Public Interest was established at Santa Clara Law. It is awarded to the student who best answers the question, “Why would B.T. Collins want me to have this scholarship?”

 FIRST PERSON Learning a Passion for Law As someone who took the LSAT in Saigon and arrived in Santa Clara directly from serving with the Special Forces in Vietnam, I found the law school community to be welcoming, embracing, and challenging. Exceptional mentors and professors like George Alexander, George Strong, Paul Goda, Jerry Kasner, and Marc Poche spent hours of their personal time encouraging and infusing me with their passion for the law. And new friends from law review, state moot court competition, and our own ad hoc study group added a depth and richness to the learning experience. In those moments when I was struggling, I always knew I could have a drink with my friend B.T. Collins and come away laughing, with all the world problems in perspective. One event stands out—a combined Stanford/ Santa Clara Public Defender Clinic. Jointly taught by the well-known Stanford Professor Anthony Amsterdam and the head of the Santa Clara Public Defender Office, Rose Bird,

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it was offered to a limited number of students each of “her” who competed for the few positions. Classes students. I honor were taught in the evenings in Stanford, where her and all those Tony and Rose led us through lectures, roleother wonderful playing, practice sessions, and then videotaping people who have with daunting critique sessions. The real work, contributed to the however, was in the Public Defender Clinic, richness of the where each of us did each part of the attorney’s Santa Clara Law responsibilities, always under the watchful experience over eye of Rose or one of her subordinates. The the years. interviewing, plea negotiation, and in-court work was superb; quite valuable in later years for me when I In those moments when I was struggling, I entered other courtrooms. always knew I could have a drink with my Rose Bird, who later became friend B.T. Collins and come away laughing, the first woman chief justice with all the world problems in perspective. of the California Supreme Court, became a friend and mentor. She was quick to hold our new baby —John Cruden ’74, President, daughter (born at the Stanford Medical Center) Environmental Law Institute, former Deputy and became a friend of our entire class. At our Assistant Attorney General, Environment and graduation, where Chief Justice Earl Warren was Natural Resources Division, U.S. Department our speaker, she attended and congratulated of Justice


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 the ALEXANDER years

THREE STUDENTS, ONE VAN, AND A SHARED VISION “It started out, not unlike many companies in [Silicon Valley], as an idea. We thought we had a better idea. As Scott’s VW bus rattled past two-story pop-up buildings emblazoned with the ever-revolving names of aspiring Valley start-ups and success stories such as Intel, Amdahl, and TeleVideo, we came up with it.” —Cory H. Van Arsdale, “Reflecting Upon a Start-up,” 5, Santa Clara Computer & High Tech Law Journal, 1989

Law students studying, 1982

The idea was, of course, the Santa Clara Computer & High Tech Law Journal. Van Arsdale and Scott Ross Porter were facing their second year at Santa Clara and “that dreaded second-year law student albatross, Law Review.” Sharing an interest in computers and electronics, they found the idea of writing about computer law a way of “shaping our legal education to fit our interests.” They first considered having one or two issues of the Law Review devoted to this area of law, but then, along with “partner in crime” Amy Lundquist, decided to take on the formidable task of launching an entirely new law review. Creating a new journal was not an easy task. But the students were determined that others would share their passion in what they considered an exciting area of the law, and they persevered through two years of negotiations and many meetings (mostly seeking financial support). Finally, Volume 1 was printed. Before the printing of the second volume, they had sold nearly 500 subscriptions.

 FIRST PERSON Father Goda’s Help In 1977 when I started Santa Clara Law School I was scared to death. How would it go? Would I make it? Could I meet new friends? Would I realize my dream of becoming an attorney? Once I received all my classes I was overwhelmed—how could I keep up? I wondered—and then I looked down and saw I had Father Goda for Contracts. Oh no… everyone I’d spoken to said he was the toughest teacher on campus. Just my luck, I thought, but at the same time I figured if I passed his class, then the bar should be easy! In any event, I got my first practice exam back and the grade was awful. I went straight to Father Goda’s office and told him I needed help. I was not afraid; I knew I had to get 26

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I’m convinced it was my work with Father Goda, his willingness to work with me, and my fearlessness in not listening to others that got me through. through his class to be successful. He was taken aback at first but he began to give me practice exams and work with me, week after week. I passed his class with flying colors and went on to tutor other first-year law students in Contracts for the rest of my time at Santa Clara. When I took the bar, I recognized a lot of Contracts questions and passed the bar the first time. I’m convinced it was my work with Father Goda, his willingness to work

with me, and my fearlessness in not listening to others that got me through.

—Rolanda Pierre-Dixon ’80, Santa Clara County Assistant District Attorney


Mary Hood ’75 Executive Law Librarian, Outstanding Staff Member, 1984 Mary Hood began working at the Law Library in 1968 while an undergraduate at SCU. She attended Santa Clara’s evening program while working full-time at the library. Not one to stop at a law degree, she obtained a Master’s in Library Science (MLS) from San Jose State University, while continuing to work in different capacities at the Law Library. During her 42 years in the Law Library, Hood has seen massive changes in the role of the library and the law librarians: for example, in 1981-82, 154,000 books were reshelved, in 1997–98, fewer than 42,000. This reflected the increased use of electronic databases. In 1984–85, use of Lexis and WestLaw was less than 400 hours for each, but during the 2009–10 academic year, the number of hours of use for WestLaw and Lexis combined was 119,860 hours. During Hood’s tenure, Law Library permanent staff increased from three to 23 staff in 2011.

Faculty and staff, 1985

 FIRST PERSON Exactly What the Professor Ordered I had the privilege of working as a research assistant for now-retired Professor Howard Anawalt, who was then teaching Torts and Constitutional Law. Howard asked me to write an introduction for an article, the exact topic of which now escapes me. But, I remember his response after I turned it in: “This is exactly what I wanted—this is exactly how I would have written it.” Although I dismissed this as unusually coincidental, I remember catching up after graduating with another research assistant for Howard and mentioning an article that I was thinking of writing. It was about a recent U.S. Supreme Court decision involving an ex-CIA agent, who had authored a book that revealed CIA misdeeds and missteps in Vietnam (but no classified information). I remember outlining

how I envisioned approaching and analyzing the decision, and where I wanted to take the discussion. At each step, she said, “That’s exactly what Howard’s doing in this article.” Needless to say, I didn’t write that article, since Howard had beaten me to it. —GORDON YAMATE ’80, former Vice President and General Counsel of Knight Ridder, Inc., and co-chair of the 2009 Santa Clara Law Strategic Planning Committee

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The UELMEN Years: 1986–93 Developing a Community of Distinguished Scholars Gerald F. Uelmen, (J.D., LL.M. Georgetown), had practiced as both a criminal defense lawyer and at the U.S. Attorney’s office in Los Angeles before joining the faculty of Loyola Law School. While at Loyola, he worked on high-profile cases, including the defense of Pentagon Papers accused Daniel Ellsberg. Uelmen took a tough approach when it came to increasing student admission requirements and GPAs, but a humorous approach to many other things. At end of the semester, he hosted sing-alongs, at which he would play his accordion

Gerald F. Uelmen Dean, 1986-93

to songs of his own writing, such as “Evidence.”

Uelmen’s leadership was, like Alexander’s, fueled by a passion for diversity and for social justice. Uelmen’s leadership, like Alexander’s, was fueled by a passion for diversity and for social justice. During his tenure, student body diversity jumped from 15 percent to 30 percent and faculty diversity rose to 25 percent. Social justice programs blossomed.

Through Dean Uelmen’s leadership in taking on a delicate issue—the financial arrangement between the Law School and the University—the Law School was able to achieve greater stability. The “Memorandum of Understanding” Uelmen helped draft established that the Law School gives the University a fixed percentage of its income and retains the remainder. The MOU provided the Law School with the financial security and independence needed to move ahead on many fronts.

“A law was made a distant moon ago here, A code which doesn’t make a lot of sense, But every student of the law must know it, It’s Evidence.”

—Gerald F. Uelmen

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“Faculty Diversity and Accordion Perversity” Dean Uelmen also cemented close connections with faculty. A dinner was given in his honor by “Jerry’s kids,” faculty hired during his term as dean. Margalynne Armstrong, June Carbone, Monica Evans, Anna Han, Ellen Kreitzberg, Kerry Macintosh, Margaret Russell, Nancy Wright, and John Markham adopted the motto, “Faculty Diversity and Accordion Perversity.” Pictured above is Dean Uelmen with his faculty.

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ďƒœ the UELMEN years

Under Gerald Uelmen, the East San Jose Community Law Center opened to help day laborers. Above, law professor James Hammer, at right, discusses cases with law students.

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DEAN OF DIVERSITY Under Dean Uelmen (shown above with a law student), minority student enrollment rose to more than 30 percent and faculty diversity surged to 25 percent. EARTHQUAKE 1989 The 1989 Loma Prieta earthquake scattered books in the Heafey Law Library but did no structural damage.

highlights of the uelmen years

1987 The Intellectual Property Association formed 1987–88 Expansion of Heafey Law Library 1989 Alameda rerouted; Public Interest Endowment funded; Public Interest Certificate offered; Justice Edward Panelli Moot Courtroom dedicated 1990 High Tech Law Advisory Board established 1993 East San Jose Community Law Center established 1994 Certificates in High Technology and International Law established

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ďƒœ the UELMEN years INTEGRATED CAMPUS For many decades, Santa Clara University was bisected by a four-lane highway locally known as The Alameda. In the 1980s (top), more than 40,000 cars used this thoroughfare daily. After a 30-year effort, the road was closed to traffic in 1989 (center, left), and the project was completed with landscaping in 1994 (bottom).

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Justice Edward A. Panelli B.S. ’53, J.D. ’55 Edward A. Panelli was born across the street from Bergin Hall. At Santa Clara High School, he was class president each of his four years. After attending SCU for his undergraduate and law degrees, he co-founded Pasquinelli and Panelli in San Jose, where he practiced for 17 years and served as general counsel to SCU and the California Province of the Society of Jesus. Panelli was appointed to Santa Clara County’s Superior Court by Governor Ronald Reagan. In 1985, Governor George Deukmejian made him an associate justice of the California Supreme Court. In 1994, Justice Panelli left the Supreme Court and became a private judge for the Judicial Arbitration and Mediation Service (JAMS), a private company specializing in ADR.

“Sometimes we forget that we’re professionals and that this is not merely a business. I tell [young lawyers] that they can’t sell their souls and that the one thing they have is their integrity. You can’t let anything get in the way of what is right.”

Panelli has served for more than four decades on SCU’s Board of Trustees, including 19 years as its chair. Since 1998, Santa Clara Law has held the Justice Edward A. Panelli Golf Classic, a highly successful fundraising event to benefit the Santa Clara Law scholarship fund. Justice Panelli and his wife, Lorna, received the 2011 Paul L. Locatelli, S.J., Award for distinguished and outstanding service to the Alumni Association of Santa Clara University.

—Justice Edward A. Panelli, as told to the San Jose Business Journal, April 15, 2011

CHRIS GARDNER

Panelli moot courtroom The California Supreme Court held a session in the Edward Panelli Moot Courtroom on the day of its dedication, November 6, 1989. The Moot Courtroom hosts the California Court of Appeal annually, along with numerous moot court competitions.

the wired classroom In 2002, first-year classmates Karlyn Ching (left) and Julia Chu were just two of the many law students using laptops in class.

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The player Years: 1994–2003 The High Tech Trajectory—Meeting the Challenges of a Changing World Mack A. Player (J.D., Missouri-Columbia ’65, LL.M. George Washington ’72) arrived at Santa Clara Law for the 1994-95 academic year. Between teaching assignments at University of Georgia School of Law and Florida State University College of Law, where he was assistant dean, he had practiced at the U.S. Department of Justice and Department of Labor, gaining expertise in employment law.

Mack A. Player Dean, 1994-2003

Dean Player had a low-key approach to running a law school: he respected faculty autonomy, brought high tech capacity into the classrooms, and hired top legal scholars such as Don Chisum and Allan S. Hammond. Player, with his characteristic adroit administrative style, restructured the Law School administration for greater efficiency, and gracefully eased it through the challenges of the 1990s, when law school

applications dipped from a high of 4,000 in 1994 to 2,500 in 1999. Dean Player led the school into prominence in the areas of high tech and international law. This not only brought increased stature to the Law School in general, but allowed it to attract more applicants without sacrificing admission standards.

“[A]ll substance and very little show.” —Dean Don Weidner, Florida State University, 1994,

regarding Mack Player (Thomas, 377)

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“Santa Clara Law’s high tech and IP offerings, and our reputation, really took hold when Dean Player put resources behind this emphasis on technology and intellectual property. Without his help, these programs might have died.” —Dorothy Glancy, Professor, Santa Clara Law

Dean Player standing on the first floor of Heafey, circa 1995.

highlights of the player years

1994 Law Alumni magazine, Et Al., debuts (becomes Santa Clara Law in fall, 2004) 1995 International High Tech Law Certificate first available

1996 Bannan classrooms modernized 1997 LL.M. degree offered (U.S. Law for Foreign Lawyers); Center for Social Justice and Public Service established; Don Chisum, author of Chisum on Patents, joins faculty

2001 Professor Stephanie Wildman leads new Center for Social Justice and Public Service; The Sutro Chair established; The High Tech Law Institute develops comprehensive high tech law program; LL.M. in Intellectual Property Law offered.

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CHARLES BARRY

 the player years

A 2002 photo from the SCU President’s Report featuring Santa Clara Law Professors Donald Chisum (left), Margaret Russell (center), and Allen S. Hammond IV (right). Leading IP Scholar: Donald Chisum Santa Clara Law took its IP program to a new level in 1997 when it hired, as a full-time faculty member, IP powerhouse Donald Chisum, sole author of a 30-volume treatise, Chisum on Patents. First published in 1978 and cited more than 700 times by the U.S. Federal Courts, Chisum on Patents is the most cited treatise in patent law today. During Chisum’s nine years at Santa Clara Law, the school’s ranking in intellectual property programs soared to second in the nation.   Chisum also directed the Santa Clara Summer Institute on International and Comparative Intellectual Property in Munich, Germany, expanding it to become one of the Law School’s most popular summer abroad programs.

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Access for All: Allen S. Hammond IV

constitutional scholar: Margaret Russell

Growing up in the inner cities of Washington, D.C., and New York City, Allen S. Hammond IV (J.D., University of Pennsylvania) saw what happened to people who had less information and less access to the public process: they got left behind.

Professor Margaret Russell (J.D. Stanford) joined the Santa Clara Law faculty in 1990. She is the author of numerous articles in the areas of civil rights, civil liberties, and the interaction of law and media culture, including recent pieces on the judiciary, the Defense of Marriage Act, and the Proposition 8 case. A member of advisory committees for the appointment of federal district judges and magistrates for the Northern District of California, she is affiliated with the Law School’s Center for Social Justice and Public Service, the Markkula Center for Applied Ethics at SCU, and the Center for Multicultural Learning at SCU. She is also a founding member and board member of the Equal Justice Society, a national legal organization focused on restoring Constitutional safeguards against discrimination.

Hammond is now committed to ensuring broadband access for all citizens, regardless of location, education, ethnicity, disability, and socioeconomic status. Hammond, who teaches Mass Communication, Cyberspace Law, Contracts Law, Telecommunications Law, and the Broadband Regulatory Clinic, directs the Broadband Institute of California, and is director of the Law and Public Policy Program at SCU’s Center for Science, Technology, and Society. He holds the Phil and Bobbie Sanfilippo Chair at Santa Clara University.


Focused on Students Jeanette Leach, Assistant Dean for Admissions and Financial Aid Since Jeanette Leach joined the law school staff as the admissions coordinator in 1989, she has had impact on hundreds of students’ lives. As Nikki Pope ’06 says, “Many SCU Law alums credit Dean Leach with helping them survive the pressures of law school. For many of us, her office was a sort of sanctuary—a place where we could vent our frustrations, find a shoulder to cry on, and get a kick in the seat of the pants when you needed it. Santa Clara Law is incredibly lucky to have someone like Dean Leach to help smooth the transition into the sometimes painful process of becoming a lawyer.” Susan Erwin, Senior Assistant Dean for Student Services Students have voted Susan Erwin Staff Person of the Year 10 times. Erwin came to Santa Clara Law two decades ago as part of the school’s Paralegal Program (it has since disbanded). In 1997 she became the school’s registrar, in 2002 she became assistant dean,

and in 2007 she took charge of the Student Services Office. According to Michelle Petlow ’11, “Dean Erwin’s door is always open. We all know that we can turn to Jeanette Leach her for all our questions. She has had a profound impact on me and every student who walks through her office door.” Julia Yaffee, Senior Assistant Dean for External Affairs Julia Yaffee joined the Law School in 1984 after a stint with the Peace Corps in Malaysia and three years teaching on Bougainville Island, Papua New Guinea. Former Dean Mack Player recalls, “It did not take long for me to discover that Julia was a most gifted and creative administrator in whose good judgment I relied upon and whose ideas I shamelessly adopted.

Julia Yaffee (left) and Susan Erwin Julia has strengthened and enriched Santa Clara in literally hundreds, if not thousands of ways.” Yaffee’s responsibilities have included serving as dean of students from 1997-2007, overseeing Law School admissions, recruiting new students, and overseeing career services. As dean of external affairs, she developed the school’s website and Internet presence while managing the school’s marketing and communications efforts and the alumni magazine. During 2010-11, she chaired the Centennial Implementation Committee.

 FIRST PERSON

A Global Education

M

y appreciation for the critical intersection of opportunity and the public good, in a truly global context, started at Santa Clara School of Law. I attribute my early career success in the high tech sector to Professor Steve Diamond’s hands-on teaching style. In each of his corporate and financial law courses, he emphasized the theoretical backdrop of the cases we were studying, and proffered review and analysis of real-life samples of the transaction documents typically involved in such matters. I remember becoming increasingly cognizant of my competitive advantage as a young associate because I knew my way around the investment and corporate documents from day one! I also attribute much of my success to SCU’s institutional positioning at the crossroads of corporate and public interest law. In my opinion, no other law school in the country offers the best professors from both worlds. As a second-year law student, I interned at both

I also attribute much of my success to SCU’s institutional positioning at the crossroads of corporate and public interest law. In my opinion, no other law school in the country offers the best professors from both worlds. the Securities Exchange Commission and the Federal Reserve in San Francisco. If not for this early exposure to public service, I may not have entered the public sector mid-career. Finally, SCU’s academic philosophy is predicated on a global vision, with regard to both the public and private sectors. Classes such as “Globalization and the Rule of Law” certainly gave me valuable insight into how the world economic and political order was evolving. The encouragement and support of Professors Berg and Jiménez to participate in SCU’s summer abroad and internship program in Singapore and Malaysia provided me with the earliest taste of the rising world of Islamic finance. Who would have guessed that, ten years after my first-year summer at SCU, I would become a

world-recognized expert in Islamic finance law and appear on CNN, CNBC, as well as other media outlets to comment, with authority, on developments in this practice area? SCU has achieved success in creating a learning environment that attracted, and continues to attract, professors who can envision that eventuality. I am incredibly grateful for their vision and support.

—Abdi Shayesteh ’01, Deputy General Counsel, Mitsubishi UFJ Financial Group, Inc., Corporate Governance Division, USA Group in New York City

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ďƒœ the player years

Bergin Hall

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8

FACULTY Some of the current faculty members who joined Santa Clara Law during the Player years include: 1. Stephen Diamond, 2. David Friedman, 3. Allen Hammond, 4. Bradley Joondeph, 5. E. Gary Spitko, 6. Jiri Toman, 7. Beth Van Schaack, and 8. Stephanie Wildman

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CHARLES BARRY

COMMENCEMENT 1995 Janet Reno (center), that year’s commencement speaker, shares a laugh with Santa Clara University President Paul Locatelli, S.J., Associate Dean Mary Emery ’63, Dean Mack Player, and Justice Edward Panelli ’55.

alumni special achievement award The Alumni Special Achievement Award was established in 2001 by the Law Alumni Association at Santa Clara Law for the purpose of publicly recognizing outstanding achievements of its alumni. Recipients have distinguished themselves in their profession, community, and in service to humanity. 2001 Brien “B.T.” Collins ’73 Zoe Lofgren ’75 Edward A. Panelli ’55 Arthur L. Jaramillo ’75

2004 Phyllis J. Hamilton ’76 Eugene M. Hyman ’77 Thomas J. Romig ’80 Gordon T. Yamate ’80

2002 Leon E. Panetta ’63 Charles S. Paul ’75 Ronald H. Malone ’71 Rolanda Pierre-Dixon ’80

2005 Eugene M. Premo ’62 Richard C. Watters ’73 Eileen A. Kato ’80 Kyong “Kenny” W. Ahn ’85

2003 Albert J. Ruffo ’36 Robert D. Durham ’72 Francis T. Dunlap ’79 Mary E. Alexander ’82

2006 James A. Wright ’49 Naomi Young ’74 John C. Cruden ’74

2007 William T. Loris ’72 Theodore J. Biagini ’64 2008 Catherine Sprinkles ’73 Salvador A. Liccardo ’61 Rodney G. Moore ’85 2009 Jean H. Wetenkamp ’76 W. David P. Carey ’81

santa clara law amicus award The Santa Clara Law Amicus Award was established in 2009 by the Alumni Association at Santa Clara Law for the purpose of honoring a person who has demonstrated the highest level of leadership in the legal profession and the community, and who has significantly advanced the mission and reputation of Santa Clara Law. 2009 Larry W. Sonsini 2010 The Honorable Ronald M. Whyte

2010 Marjorie Cohn ’75 Phil Sims ’71  

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The Polden Years: 2003–Present Spearheading Leadership “What does it mean to be a ‘lawyer who leads’? At Santa Clara Law, we recognize the key roles that lawyers play in the profession, the community, and in government and public service, and we expect our students to make a personal and professional commitment to leadership. To that end, we are striving to be a national leader in empowering future lawyers with the skills and experience they need for leadership.” —Dean Donald J. Polden With ties to Santa Clara University and a passion for leadership, Dean Donald Polden (J.D. Indiana University School of Law ’75) has led the Law School into its second century.

Dean Polden’s service as dean is highlighted by several accomplishments. He has spearheaded an effort, both on campus and nationally, to prepare law students to become lawyers who are leaders in their communities and in the legal profession (see page 42). He also led the Law School’s first, and highly successful, capital campaign that raised more than $17 million dollars between 2003 and 2007 to support faculty hiring, the school’s centers and institutes, and the addition of 43 newly endowed law student scholarships (see chart, page 43). Polden also continued to strengthen the faculty by hiring 15 new faculty members who are creative and highly productive scholars as well as dedicated teachers.

Donald J. Polden Dean, 2003-Present

Since 2008, Polden has chaired the ABA’s Standards Review Committee and led it through a comprehensive review of national legal education accreditation policies and rules of procedure. In 2010, he launched the law school’s “next century” strategic planning process, which is creating a vision for Santa Clara Law’s ambitious future. Under Dean Polden, the Law School continues to distinguish itself through its highly selective and diverse student body and its three key areas of specialization: Social Justice and Public Interest Law (Page 58), High Tech Law (Page 62), and International Law (Page 68).

“Lawyers have an obligation to serve others. By encouraging leadership, we’re making the law profession stronger.”

—Dean Donald J. Polden

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keith sutter

charles barry

Top: Gordon Yamate ’80 presents Dean Donald Polden with a record-setting check to the Law School contributed by the 2010 reunion classes. Middle left: Dean Donald Polden shares his thoughts on leadership with law students in Fall 2009. Middle right: 2008 Law Commencement speaker Honorable Phyllis J. Hamilton ’76, with SCU President Paul Locatelli, S.J., and Dean Donald Polden. Bottom: Dean Donald Polden (right) with Bryan A. Stevenson, executive director of the Equal Justice Initiative, an anti-death penalty advocacy organization which he founded in 1989. Stevenson was the 2009 Law Commencement Speaker and the recipient of the inaugural Alexander Law Prize awarded by Santa Clara University School of Law in 2008.

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 the polden years

keith sutter

Lawyers who Lead

In this photo from 2009, law students Carlos Rosario, Brandon Douglass, and Caitlin Robinett prepare for a mock trial.

“[Leadership has] several important ingredients: willingness to take risks, to make decisions about what needs to be done; willingness to be honest with the people who elect you and with yourself; and integrity, meaning doing what you say you are going to do and standing by it.” —Leon Panetta B.S. ’60, J.D. ’63, United States Secretary of Defense, former director of the Central Intelligence Agency. See page 71 for a profile.

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Santa Clara Law has a long history of educating leaders. By 1959 eighteen graduates had been appointed to the bench in California and one to the federal district court. Graduates had served as district attorneys, assistant district attorneys, and as assistants to the attorney general. As the number of graduates increased in the 1970s, so did the leadership roles they took on. In 2005, the Law School launched the first Leadership for Lawyers course in the nation. It was the idea of Robert Cullen, a lecturer in law at Santa Clara Law who became fascinated with leadership traits of lawyers with whom he worked in practice and as a mediator. He realized that such traits were learnable and therefore teachable.

Dean Donald Polden wanted all law students to have the opportunity to learn leadership skills and, ideally, to be mentored by the large numbers of law alumni in leadership positions. Polden drafted a Leadership Initiative, which the Law School adopted in 2007, with the goal of “striving to be a national leader in empowering future lawyers with the skills and experience they need for leadership.” To this end, the Law School established a Leadership Team that conducts annual Leadership Roundtables involving representatives from law schools, law firms, business, and leadership counsels from across the nation to discuss the importance of leadership in the profession and how to teach it in law school.


The First Capital Campaign Alumni Support Surges In 2001, Santa Clara Law’s administration determined that significant resources would be needed to move the Law School forward and to take advantage of the many opportunities offered by the school’s location in the heart of Silicon Valley. The Law School assembled a team and begain extensive planning for the school’s first major capital campaign. Daniel J. Kelly ’69 served as chair of the campaign committee, and numerous alumni worked diligently to raise funds for student financial aid, faculty support, and developing the Law School’s centers and institutes. From 2003 to 2007, the law school conducted the campaign “From Promise to Prominence.” Alumni participation in fundraising surged: the campaign was completed ahead of schedule and raised $5.5 million more than the targeted amount. One key result of the campaign was the addition of 43 newly endowed law student scholarships.

$8,350,487 $8,000,000 $7,000,000

Campaign Goal: $12,000,000

$6,000,000

Total raised: $17,524,044

$5,000,000

$4,470,206

$4,000,000 $3,000,000

$2,588,072 $1,777,210

$2,000,000 $1,000,000

$338,069

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Endowed Chairs and Professorships

Scholarships 43 new endowed scholarships

Programs

Unrestricted

Other

“It is well known that one of the benchmarks for evaluating a law school is its financial support from alumni and friends.... The generous response shown in this campaign is evidence that we have made economic strides never before seen at the Law School.” —DANIEL J . KELLY ’69 Campaign Chair, from the 2007 campaign report

“Scholarships are so important. There is no better way to help law students feel supported than by alleviating some of the financial pressures of law school. I am lucky to feel a part of the entire Santa Clara community. I have felt supported not only by my fellow students and the faculty, but also by the administration and alumni. Fostering community will improve our reputation and inspire more students to give back after they graduate.” — Caitlin Robinett ’10

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ďƒœ the polden years

FACULTY Some of the current faculty members who joined Santa Clara Law during the Polden years include: 1. Angelo Ancheta, 2. W. David Ball, 3. Patricia Cain, 4. Colleen Chien, 5. Kyle Graham, 6. Eric Goldman, 7. Pratheepan Gulasekaram, 8. David Hasen, 9. Marina Hsieh, 10. Jean Love, 11. Michelle Oberman, 12. Tyler Ochoa, 13. Catherine Sandoval, 14. David Sloss, and 15. David Yosifon.

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David Yosifon is a popular teacher of Professional Responsibility and Business Organizations.

 FIRST PERSON

A Greater Purpose he last class of Criminal Procedure with Professor Jeff Kroeber was not a typical “review for the final exam.” His final lesson was about the responsibility of entering the noble profession of law. Professor Kroeber explained that our first act of entering the profession is to swear an oath. This oath forms the bedrock of our system and binds us to each other and to our fellow citizens. What flows from that oath is an immense responsibility, a duty to fight for justice and to work on behalf of those most in need. Taking the oath and accepting that responsibility, therefore, was what made our profession noble. As Professor Kroeber laid this awesome lesson and responsibility on us, many of our classmates were moved to tears. No one had ever so clearly and convincingly told us what we were supposed to do with our law degree—that regardless of practice area, there was a greater purpose for our legal education. We took Professor Kroeber’s class a year apart, but the lesson of his final class stayed the same. Today, we have taken his lesson to heart. We both work with victims of domestic violence in different capacities (Kristin as a staff attorney at Bay Area Legal Aid, and Chris as a deputy district attorney in Santa Clara County). When we see other lawyers falling short of their oaths, failing to fight for justice, we are reminded of Professor Kroeber’s lesson. We are reminded that each of us who took his class has been put on notice. We swore the oath, entered the profession, and

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must now live up to its ideals. We were lucky to have a great model in Professor Kroeber. And to those of you reading this now, regardless of whether you had the privilege of hearing Professor Kroeber’s final lesson or not, you too must remember your oath and take up your duty in our noble profession. —Christopher Boscia ’08 and Kristin Love Boscia B.A. ’03, J.D. ’08

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 the polden years

KEITH SUTTER

Law students enjoy a break at the bench near the statue of St. Ignatius.

highlights of the polden years

2003 From Promise to Prominence, a history of the law school, by Hon. Mark Thomas ’56, published; Santa Clara Journal of International Law launched; Thanks to a generous endowment created by former Dean George Alexander, and his wife, Katharine, the East San Jose Community Law Center becomes the Katharine and George Alexander Community Law Center and opens new offices on the Alameda. 2004 Law School admitted to the Order of the Coif. 2005 The Center for Global Law and Policy is founded, building on the former Institute of International and Comparative Law; First Leadership for Lawyers course offered in nation.

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2006 “From Promise to Prominence” capital campaign ends successfully, raising $17.5M and exceeding its goal by $5.5M. 2007 Inez Mabie Chair established. 2008 Santa Clara Law launches redesigned website, expands iTunes presence, and creates Facebook page and Twitter feed; Katharine and George Alexander Law Prize established. 2009 Santa Clara Law hosts first annual Leadership Education Roundtable, a national conference for law schools that provide leadership education for law students; Santa Clara Law holds a recruitment workshop in Second Life, a

three-dimensional virtual world in which avatars interact, socialize, and conduct business using voice and text. 2010 Santa Clara Law develops all three floors in Bannan Hall and coalesces from space in 13 buildings on or near campus in 2003 to three buildings—Bannan, Heafey, and Bergin Hall. 2011 The Bannan Student Lounge is remodeled and nearly doubles in size; NCIP celebrates its 10th anniversary and its 12th exoneration; Santa Clara Law completes strategic planning process and publishes its “next century” strategic vision and plans.


 FIRST PERSON

A Lifelong Connection

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anta Clara Law has assembled a large number of first-rate scholars, and taking classes from such faculty influenced my judgment toward my education and my career path in the law profession. I can still vividly remember Professor Cynthia Mertens discussing real-life real estate finance legal issues, and Professor Robert Peterson in Evidence bringing in props to demonstrate admissibility of evidence in court. Faculty at SCU were always available to me for academic and career advice. I recall my multiple

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My connection with SCU alumni continued after I graduated from law school, at my first and second jobs, where all the attorneys were Santa Clara Law alumni. meetings with Professor Gary Neustadter and receiving valuable advice. He would generously take the time to introduce me to his former students, who were successfully practicing estate planning, the field that I chose to practice. My connection with SCU alumni continued after I graduated from law school, at my first and second jobs, where all the attorneys were Santa Clara Law alumni.

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Having benefited from Santa Clara Law, its faculty and alumni, I was in a position to give back to my alma mater. I volunteered as a judge at the school mock trials, participated in career panels, and served as a mentor for law students. Most recently, I have been actively involved with the planning committee of the Jerry Kasner Estate Planning Symposium. Through my board membership in this committee, I bring additional professional recognition to SCU and generate funds for the school’s professorship. —Camelia Mahmoudi ’03

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students in action

As the Law School grew not only in student population but in diversity, student activities provided learning opportunities nearly equal to that of the classroom. Today, student organizations enrich law student education through externships, service projects, pro bono service, and networking. The earliest student organizations were the SBA, founded in 1948: Phi Alpha Delta, 1966; Environmental Law Society, 1970; International Law, 1970. Today the Law School has nearly 1,000 students from almost every state and more than 12 foreign countries, and there are more than 40 student groups. The organizations vary depending on student interest; new ones are founded each year.

Right: Santa Clara Law Honors Moot Court External Team, Dean Jerome Prince Memorial Evidence Competition, Brooklyn Law School, April 2010, (L to R) Christine Cusick, Adam Flores, and Corey Wallace.

Above: Criminal Law students. Right: A 1967 photo of Phi Alpha Delta members at Santa Clara Law.

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Below: 2008-2009 Student Bar Association Officers; from back left, Marina Wiant, and Gemma Daggs; center Chris Rusca, and Art Sripipat; front Mercedes Roy, and Caitlin Robinett.

Santa Clara Law students have been successful in moot court competitions throughout the years. Left: law student Robin King in the 2008 Gerald Moore Moot Court Competition. Right: Roger Marzulla ’71 (left) and R.B. Lilley ’71 (right) with 1970 Traynor Moot Court Competition Trophy.

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 students in action

Above: At the Annual Club Day event, law students can learn about and join one of Santa Clara Law’s many student clubs and organizations. Below: The Class of 2012 pauses to cheer during their Orientation in fall 2009.

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1998 APLSA Group In the 1998 fundraising telethon, the Asian Pacific Law Students Association raised the most money for the Law School. From left to right, seated: Gemma Nazareno ’00, Narissa Tirona ’00, and Elizabeth Loh ’00. Standing: Marie Vida ’01, Judie Plell ’00, Brandon Murai ’00, and Laura Nakashima ’01. The telethon brought in more than $41,000.

Left: 1989-90 Law Review editor in chief Debora Dimino Kristensen (standing) and managing editor Janet Craycroft research the next issue. Right: Law student Sabin “Issac” Escobedo discusses options with a client in one of the many free clinics offered by Santa Clara Law’s Katharine and George Alexander Community Law Center.

Santa Clara Law students Chelsea Hopkins and Martin Kopp, ABA Law Student Division, Negotiations Competition, Denver, November 2010

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WOMEN

at Santa Clara Law

“I do not think it necessary to ask permission for them (women students in our College of Law) from Rome.” —SCU President Herman J. Hauck, S.J., to the Jesuit Provincial in San Francisco, Carroll M. Sullivan, S.J., February 22, 1955

Santa Clara Law consistently ranks near the top in the nation as a school that supports and encourages women in the legal profession. Since women were first admitted in 1956, Santa Clara Law’s female graduates have broken down barriers to women on the bench, in law firms, in corporate legal departments, and in the legislative branches of government in the U.S. and abroad. Female graduates of Santa Clara Law have worked in the U.S. House of Representatives, the Korean National Assembly, the federal and state judiciary, general counsel’s offices in major high tech corporations, universities, and top government agencies.

The first woman to study at Santa Clara Law was Liane P. Stewart, age 21, from Honolulu, Hawaii. She did not finish the year. Two other female students began in 1957, but did not finish. In 1963, Santa Clara Law graduated its first three women, one of whom, Mary B. Emery, is still working at the Law School today. Women were an important part of law school even before they were admitted. One group, called the Law Wives Club, was organized in 1955 and the next year began bestowing on themselves “Ph.T.” degrees signed by Dean McKenney: the Ph.T. stood for Putting Hubby Through, and recognized the contributions they made to their husbands’ educations. Ph.T.s were being awarded as late as 1970 (Thomas, 208).

Milestones for Santa Clara Law Women

March 24, 1955 Fr. O’Sullivan grants permission for women to attend Santa Clara University School of Law.

1957 Two women law students are admitted; both later dropped out of the program.

1955 The Law Wives Club is created with the encouragement of the Student Bar Association. The group continues to exist until 1970.

1959 Ruth A. Llorett is the sole woman to enroll in the Law School. She left the school after one year to pursue a career in accounting at San Jose State College.

1956 Santa Clara Law admits Liane P. Stewart of Honolulu, Hawaii. Stewart did not finish the school year for reasons unknown.

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1963 Santa Clara Law graduates women for the first time: Mary B. Emery, Lois Mitchell, and Patricia W. Stanton, wife of Assemblyman William F. Stanton. Shortly after graduation, Emery accepts a position as the director of the law school library, which she still holds. 1971 Law students Joanna Beam ’74 and Patricia Campbell petition Dean George Alexander for the admission of more women law students and request the Law School offer a class entitled Women and the Law.


LAW HOUSEWIVES That was the headline that ran with this historic photo in the Oct. 27, 1960, edition of the San Jose Mercury News. The original caption read: “George A. Strong, associate professor of law at University of Santa Clara, is confronted this fall by something unusual but not rare in law education: prospective women attorneys. Law students are (left to right) Mrs. John F. Emory [sic], Mrs. Lois L. Mitchell, and Mrs. William F. Stanton.”

1972 Female enrollment surpasses 100 for the first time in the Law School’s history. The Feminist Law Students Association is formed with 15 women and three men. 1973 Santa Clara Law hosts a successful national conference on Women and the Law, featuring speakers and legal professionals from around the country.

1974 The Feminist Law Students Association, with the assistance of local attorneys, organizes the Women’s Law Center at San Jose State University; the center offers legal services to low-income women. 1975 Margaret “Peggy” Holm ’76 is elected the first woman president of the Student Bar Association. Holm is the granddaughter of Dion Holm, a member of the Law School’s first graduating class in 1914 and the niece of Thomas N. Holm ’52.

1978 The Law School forms a women’s flag football team, Eleven Easy Pieces. In 1984, the name is abandoned, and the team splits in two: the Attractive Nuisances and the Unfair Competition. 1988 Female enrollment surpassed male enrollment for the first time.

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 women at santa clara law

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Leading in Academia: Mary Emery ’63 Professor of Law, Associate Dean, and Director of the Heafey Law Library at Santa Clara Law “Well-behaved women rarely make history,” reads the quote on Dean Mary Emery’s office door outside of Santa Clara Law’s Heafey Law Library. Emery (below, right, shown with Mary Beth “Molly” Long J.D. ’82, MBA ’85, left, and Asa Pittman ’09) made history in 1963 as one of Santa Clara Law’s first female graduates. Upon graduation, Emery accepted Dean Leo Huard’s invitation to stay on at Santa Clara Law as director of the law library and as an assistant professor teaching business organizations. In addition to overseeing the law library, during her 47-year tenure Dean Emery has also spearheaded successful efforts to admit more female students and hire more female faculty. The increased inclusion of women and racial minorities at Santa Clara Law is the development of which she is most proud.

Busting Down Barriers: Eleven Easy Pieces It’s hard not to trace the tenacity of Santa Clara Law women back to the Eleven Easy Pieces, despite the “unfortunate” name. Between 1979 and 1983, more than 25 female Law School students and professors played on the team, and many male law professors and law students served as battering rams, water boys (Professor Dennis Lilly was both), and coaches. Today, the Eleven Easy Pieces scholarship provides financial support to two students per year. In qualifying, “a sense of humor is a plus,” says Mary Emery, who helps administer the scholarship. Easy Pieces alumnae included: Mary Beth “Molly” Long B.A. ’79, J.D. ’82, MBA ’85, Kandis “Mad Dog” Scott, Law Professor, Jill “Hands” Hanau ’81, and Bonnie MacNaughton ’82. 54

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THE POWER OF WOMEN’S STORIES In 2007, Santa Clara Law Professor Stephanie M. Wildman (left) organized a gender and law conference, “The Power of Women’s Stories: Examining Women’s Role in Law and the Legal System.” In 2010, the conference was held again, and a companion book of essays was published: Women and the Law Stories, edited by Elizabeth M. Schneider and Stephanie M. Wildman (Foundation Press). Pictured below with Wildman (left) are other Santa Clara Law faculty members in 2007: Margalynne Armstrong, Marina Hsieh, Catharine Sandoval, Michelle Oberman, and Lia Epperson.

Leading Legislator: U.S. Representative Zoe Lofgren ’75 Lofgren’s political career began with her election in 1979 to the board of the San Jose-Evergreen Community College District. At the time, she was a partner in an immigration law firm and taught immigration law as an adjunct professor at Santa Clara Law. In 1981 she became a member of the Santa Clara County Board of Supervisors, and in 1994, she was elected to Congress. Lofgren has become one of the most knowledgeable lawmakers on technology issues. She is a regular speaker at events sponsored by Santa Clara Law’s High Tech Law Institute and she has served on the advisory board of Santa Clara Law’s Santa Clara Computer & High Technology Law Journal. She serves on the Dean’s High Tech Law Advisory Council. 100 YEARS | 1911-2011

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Diversity

“[As a student you want to study] in a place where the issue is not you.” —David Wallace ’10

Santa Clara Law’s minority graduates are successful lawyers, business leaders, and judges. They help ensure that all members of the community see themselves reflected in the legal system.

Santa Clara Law is among the top ten most diverse law schools in

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the U.S. In the most recent academic year, more than 40 percent of the student body was racially or ethnically diverse. Santa Clara Law ranks second in the country in the number of Asian students. Between 1985 and 2005, Santa Clara Law’s minority student population more than doubled, and the percentage of minority students has stayed at or more than 40 percent ever since. In 2011, National Jurist magazine listed Santa Clara Law as the most diverse law school in California.

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Diversity achievements

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Visit us online for profiles of faculty and alumni leaders in diversity.

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“People who do not perceive themselves as beneficiaries of society’s laws will be reluctant to uphold those laws.” —Santa Clara Law Professor Allen S. Hammond IV


leaders in diversity

“Advocating for social justice seemed like a powerful thing to do. As a young kid, this caught fire with me.” —Rodney Gregory Moore ’85

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The Civil Rights era, especially the Supreme Court opinions of Justice Thurgood Marshall, sparked Rodney Gregory Moore’s commitment to social responsibility. Study at Santa Clara affirmed it. After law school, he joined the board of trustees of the East Side Union High School District and, in 1997, became employed as general counsel. Three years later, he became general counsel of Atlanta Public Schools. Moore is now in private practice in Atlanta in the areas of business litigation and employment law. In 2008, Moore served as president of the National Bar Association, a network of 22,000 African-American lawyers, judges, law professors, and law students. Moore has also served on the Santa Clara Law’s Alumni Board and on the Board of Visitors.

Victor M. Marquez ’90 and Rodney Moore ’85

“[At SCU Law] I always felt a sense of community, of nourishment, that everyone cared. My professors knew I was a person of color and they were committed to my success.” —Victor Marquez, past president, Hispanic National Bar Association An immigrant from a small mining town in Mexico, Victor M. Marquez ’90 was the first in his large family to attend college. Marquez, who has a boutique firm in San Francisco, was the first openly gay president of the Hispanic National Bar Association. He served as general counsel of the San Francisco La Raza Lawyers Association for four different terms. For his community work, Mr. Marquez has been recognized by the Hispanic Chamber of Commerce as one of the most influential leaders in the San Francisco Bay Area and by Hispanic magazine as one of the 100 Most Influential Hispanics in the U.S. He was given the Hero Award by AGUILAS, a gay men’s support group in San Francisco. 100 YEARS | 1911-2011

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SOCIAL JUSTICE at Santa Clara Law Santa Clara Law lights a fire that never goes out.

the community’s most powerful advocates for social justice.

—Rolanda Pierre-Dixon ’80 Santa Clara County Assistant District Attorney and founder of its Domestic Violence Unit

Social justice has long been a part of the Santa Clara Law curriculum. As a Jesuit school, Santa Clara Law’s mission has always included service to the community and working to help those in need. In the 1970s, social justice came to the forefront, where it has remained, with the Center for Social Justice and Public Service, one of the Law School’s three Centers of Excellence.

One hundred years after its founding, Santa Clara Law’s mission of educating lawyers to serve clients with a high degree of professional competence, an enduring commitment to social justice, and a deep devotion to public service remains unchanged. Whether working in private firms, the public sector, not-for-profit organizations, or devoting themselves to community service and volunteer work, Santa Clara Law graduates provide leadership as some of

In 1997, Santa Clara Law established the Center for Social Justice and Public Service with the mission of promoting and enabling a commitment to social justice through law. Professors Nancy Wright

Alumni Leaders in Social Justice Our social justice leaders inspire and mentor students doing pro bono work, oversee student externships, and guide our students in their professional development. Go online for profiles of Santa Clara Law’s many alumni leaders who serve the community.

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Cynthia Mertens and El Salvador Professor Cynthia Mertens, a longtime Santa Clara Law professor who directed the Katharine and George Alexander Community Law Center for several years, has led groups of law students studying human rights in El Salvador since 2004. At right, Gemma Daggs grins with her new friends during her 2009 trip to El Salvador.

and Eric Wright served as the founding directors and, consistent with Jesuit ideals, sought to encourage the use of the law to improve the lives of marginalized, subordinated, or underrepresented clients and causes.    The Center brings law students the Law School’s many resources dedicated to ethics, public service, social justice, and community service: diversity lectures, social justice workshops, internships, practical skills clinics, Public Interest Law Career Services, and the school’s Public Interest and Social Justice Law Certificate. Consistent with the Jesuit commitment to service, the Center helps encourage a sense of social justice throughout the Law School.


Northern California Innocence Project at Santa Clara Law: 10 years, 12 exonerations Founded in 2001, the Northern California Innocence Project (NCIP) celebrated its 10th anniversary in 2011. Co-founded and directed by Kathleen “Cookie” Ridolfi, NCIP works to exonerate innocent prisoners and pursue legal reforms that address the causes and consequences of wrongful convictions. Under the supervision of experienced attorneys, law students investigate and identify innocence claims and, when viable, file habeas corpus petitions on behalf of those wrongfully convicted to win their freedom and exoneration. Under the Veritas Initiative, the policy arm of NCIP, students study criminal justice policy

issues, research aspects of the system known to be systemic factors in the conviction of innocent people, and pursue law reforms to reduce wrongful conviction in the future. In its first 10 years, NCIP has been successful in winning the freedom of 12 innocent prisoners who together served over 120 years behind bars. By engaging students in this critical social justice service, NCIP is helping to teach excellence in areas of law, research, and social policy and students learn first hand that a license to practice law carries with it a responsibility to perform service in the public interest.

“The thought of an innocent person serving time for a crime that he or she did not commit is so repugnant that I felt it was my duty as a human being to volunteer at the Northern California Innocence Project.” —Marcia Raymond ’01

Kathleen “Cookie” Ridolfi Santa Clara Law Professor Kathleen “Cookie” Ridolfi (J.D., Rutgers) has been actively engaged in social justice work since 1970. At age 23, she was one of the Camden 28, a group prosecuted for acts of civil disobedience in opposition to the Vietnam War. She represented herself in a four-month-long jury trial and was acquitted. She later worked as a jury consultant in the public interest, directed the Women’s Self-Defense Law Project at the Center for Constitutional Rights, and served for 10 years as a public defender in Philadelphia. She joined Santa Clara Law in 1989. In 2004, Ridolfi co-founded the Innocence Network, a collaboration of over 50 innocence projects across the United States, Canada, and Australia. She served as commissioner on the California Commission for the Fair Administration of Justice, which evaluated the efficacy of the death penalty in California. She was named a 2011 Attorney of the Year by California Lawyer magazine and has been named among the Top Women Litigators in California in 2011 by the Daily Journal. WITCH HUNT “Witch Hunt,” a powerful 2008 documentary by co-directors Dana Nachman (seated, left) and Don Hardy (seated, right), chronicles an infamous child abuse case in which John Stoll (seated, center) was wrongly convicted and served 12 years in prison. With the help of Linda Starr (standing, left), Cookie Ridolfi (standing, center), and many law students working with the Northern California Innocence Project at Santa Clara Law, Stoll was exonerated.

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 social justice

Leaders in Social Justice

Eric Wright The Wrights’ names have, at Santa Clara Law, become synonymous with social justice. Professor Eric Wright (J.D., Stanford) joined Santa Clara Law in 1971 after working as a Fulbright Fellow at the London School of Economics and a Reginald Heber Smith Fellow at San Mateo County Legal Aid. Eric Wright, along with Nancy Wright, directed the now KGACLC from 1997 to 2001. Wright continues to teach in the areas of Torts, Consumer Law, and Social Justice and does extensive pro bono work on behalf of low-income clients for the East Palo Alto Community Law Project, Consumers Union, and Mid-Peninsula Citizens for Fair Housing.  

Nancy Wright Nancy Wright ’80, worked as a juvenile probation officer for dependent and delinquent children in foster-home placements before enrolling in law school at Santa Clara. Prior to joining Santa Clara Law in 1984, she taught Public Interest Representation and Moot Court at Stanford Law School and coordinated Stanford’s externship program. Wright teaches Torts, Moot Court, Social Justice, and Juvenile Law courses. Like Eric, she has a long history of pro bono work in her areas of passion: consumer protection and prisoners’ and children’s rights.

Stephanie M. Wildman Not content to have social justice law merely accepted by law schools, Stephanie M. Wildman (J.D., Stanford) wanted to see it integrated into the curriculum. So she co-authored a casebook on social justice, a major step toward making the field a legitimate area of law school study. Wildman joined the Santa Clara Law faculty in 2001. In 2007, she received the highest honor a law school professor can achieve: the Society of American Law Teachers’ (SALT) Great Teacher Award, which recognizes “individuals who have made especially important contributions to teaching.” Other recipients have included Cruz Reynoso and Ruth Bader Ginsburg.

social justice milestones

1911 Institute of Law founded as night school. 1933-53 Dean Owens envisions law as the foundation for community. 1960 Dean Huard and the Law School help create the Santa Clara County Legal Aid Society. 1971 First law clinic handles more than 100 cases in its first year. 1979 Students help found the Santa Clara Public Interest Law Foundation.

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1980-81 Public Interest Law Program introduced. A consortium with Bay Area law schools (USF, Golden Gate, and Hastings) offers students the opportunity to specialize in public interest law.

1991 Pro Bono Project and the Public Interest Resource Center (later Public Interest Law Career Services) established to provide current law students and graduates with externships and employment opportunities in the public interest and public sector. 

1989 Public Interest Law Certificate offered. 1989 Public Interest Endowment funded to provide summer grants, scholarships, and income supplements for graduates in social justice law.

1993 East San Jose Community Law Center (ESJCLC) launched by La Raza Law Students Association to help day laborers collect unpaid wages. 1994 Students reorganize the Public Interest Law Foundation and it becomes the Public Interest/Social Justice Coalition (PISJC) with the mission of raising awareness among law students about issues and careers in public interest.  


Katharine & George Alexander Community Law Center In 1993, La Raza Law Students Association at Santa Clara formed the East San Jose Community Law Center (ESJCLC) to assist day laborers who were not being paid their wages. In 2004, in recognition of their generous donation to the center’s endowment, the Law School renamed the ESJCLC the Katharine and George Alexander Community Law Center, or KGACLC. Today, the KGACLC provides pro bono advice and representation in Consumer Law, Immigration Law, and Workers’ Rights. It serves about 1,000 clients on-site per year and 1,200 individuals through its mobile workshops given throughout the community. The Katharine & George Alexander Prize brings recognition to lawyers who have used their legal careers to help alleviate injustice and inequity. Winners receive a substantial cash award to use as they choose and are invited to participate in lectures and classes and to serve as teachers, mentors, and scholars at the School of Law. Former Dean George Alexander and his wife, Katharine, created the endowment that has made the award possible.

1997 The Center for Social Justice and Public Service (CSJ&PS) is founded with Professors Nancy and Eric Wright as co-directors. 2001 Professor Stephanie M. Wildman takes charge of CSJ&PS. 2001 The Northern California Innocence Project at Santa Clara Law is launched. 2002 Herman Wildman Social Justice Law Writing Award established for the best student essay on a Public Interest and Social Justice Law topic.

2003 The ESJCLC is renamed the Katharine and George Alexander Community Law Center in recognition of their large gift to its endowment. It opens new offices on the Alameda.

2008 Public Interest and Social Justice Law Board created from old Endowment Board to engender broader support for student social justice work.

2003-04 Certificate in Public Interest & Social Justice Law with Special Emphases first offered: Consumer Law, Criminal Justice, Critical Race Jurisprudence.

2009 Alumni Leadership Council formed to strengthen the public interest and social justice network for alumni, students, and legal community.

2007-08 Certificate in Public Interest & Social Justice Law adds Special Emphases in Health Law, Immigration, and Refugee Law.

2010 Pro Bono Placement Project developed with PILCS to expand opportunities for law students to gain hands-on skills working in nonprofit legal services organizations.

2008 The Katharine and George Alexander Law Prize established.

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high technology and intellectual Property at Santa Clara Law

Santa Clara Law’s location in the heart of Silicon Valley has given it a clear advantage in achieving success in its high tech law program. But it is the early vision and leadership of its deans, especially the reinstitution of the evening program, and the insight and tireless work of faculty, administration, students, and alumni that have turned the program into one of the top-ranked high tech law programs in the nation. Santa Clara Law’s high tech location, combined with its popular evening program that enables working professionals to go to law school, has resulted in a student body with vast experience in a wide range of technology fields. Students in the high tech

Dorian Daley ’86, Senior Vice President, General Counsel and Corporate Secretary of Oracle Bonnie MacNaughton ’82, Senior Attorney, Microsoft

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program inevitably report that they learn as much from their classmates as from their teachers. On campus, the high tech law program maintains a high profile. High tech law is not discussed just in the classroom—it is the subject of conferences, lunchtime lectures, and workshops, often featuring high tech corporate insiders and practitioners, including alumni. During the past two years, more than 1,000 lawyers, judges, academics, and students have participated in high tech law events sponsored by the High Tech Law Institute and student organizations, including the Computer and High Technology Law Journal, the Student Intellectual Property Association, and the Biotech Law Group.


Alumni and Faculty Leaders in High Tech Law Alumni working in high tech industries and law firms are invaluable in keeping Santa Clara Law apprised of the most pressing issues in high tech. Many alums return to Santa Clara Law as guest speakers or adjunct lecturers, and others serve on the High Tech Advisory Board. Visit law.scu. edu/lawyerswholead for profiles of Santa Clara Law’s many alumni high tech leaders.

nancy martin

Santa Clara Law’s High Tech faculty includes a dozen full-time faculty members with expertise on almost every aspect of intellectual property and high tech law, plus two dozen part-time faculty working on the front lines of IP and high tech law at leading Silicon Valley law firms and technology companies. Visit law.scu.edu/ faculty for faculty profiles. Tom Lavelle ’76, Vice President and General Counsel of Rambus

 FIRST PERSON Intel SCU BSTZ Patent Engineer Program

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n 1975, I was a product engineer at Intel on the 4K DRAM (that is not a typo, in those days the largest memory contained 4096 bits). My career goal was to combine engineering (the study of the laws of science) with law (the study of the laws of man) into a useful skill set that would open up unique job opportunities. I was accepted into the part-time program of Santa Clara Law and applied for tuition reimbursement from Intel. My manager approved the request; so did his boss and the VP of the division. However, Human Resources rejected the request on the grounds that a legal degree was not relevant to my job as an engineer. I believed that the combination of an engineering degree with a law degree would open up many challenging positions in the future, so I paid the tuition myself. During the next four years I enjoyed my job as an engineer at Intel during the day, as well as the intellectual challenge of law school at night. After graduating in 1979, I transferred to the Intel legal department, working on various matters but focusing on patent and technology

As general counsel at Intel, I worked with Human Resources to develop the solution known as the Patent Engineer Program. This was a cooperative program among Intel, the law firm Blakely, Sokoloff, Taylor and Zaffman, and the Santa Clara Law part-time program. license agreements. In 1983, I became general counsel of Intel, which reached $1B in annual revenue that year. Then in the decade of the ’90s, it became very difficult to hire and retain patent attorneys. As general counsel, I worked with Human Resources to develop the solution known as the Patent Engineer Program. This was a cooperative program among Intel, the law firm Blakely, Sokoloff, Taylor and Zaffman (BSTZ), and the Santa Clara Law part-time program. The Intel legal department recruited engineers who were interested in going to law school; Intel agreed to reimburse them for their tuition, and the engineers were transferred to the legal department. They spent most of their day writing patent applications supervised by BSTZ, and then went to Santa Clara Law

at night. When these engineers graduated, they were experienced patent attorneys who were familiar with the relevant Intel technology, understood the Intel business direction, and were in position to know how to obtain the best patent protection for Intel products. Many of the patent engineers are still Intel employees and some have moved into positions of senior management in the legal department. So, while my personal career plan was a bit ahead of its time, the Patent Engineer Program ultimately developed attorneys who had the engineering and legal skills needed by Intel. —Tom Dunlap ’79

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keith sutter

 high technology and intellectual property

michelle oberman Professor Michelle Oberman (J.D., University of Michigan) is a nationally recognized scholar on the legal and ethical issues surrounding adolescence, pregnancy, and motherhood. A member of Santa Clara Law’s faculty since 2004, Oberman is the author of When Mothers Kill (2008), which won the Outstanding Book Award from the Academy of Criminal Justice Sciences. Thomas B. Schatzel Professor Thomas B. Schatzel (LL.B., U of Colorado) joined the Law School as an adjunct faculty member in 1975. Holding a degree in engineering, he taught IP law back when it was simply trademark, copyright, and patent. Now a Senior Fellow, he continues to teach introductory courses in IP law as well as such specialized classes as the LL.M. in IP Seminar.

Santa Clara Law Professor Tyler Ochoa (J.D., Stanford) is a recognized expert in copyright law and rights of publicity. He joined the Santa Clara Law faculty in 2003, and he served as academic director of the High Technology Law Institute for the 2005–06 academic year. Prior to joining Santa Clara Law, he served as a professor and co-director of the Center for Intellectual Property Law at Whittier Law School. He has also served as a clerk for the Honorable Cecil F. Poole of the U.S. Court of Appeals for the Ninth Circuit, and as an associate with the law firm of Brown & Bain in Palo Alto, California, where he specialized in copyright and trade secret litigation involving computer software. He is also a two-time “Jeopardy!” champion and a champion on “Win Ben Stein’s Money.”

high tech milestones

1975 Santa Clara Law Adjunct Professor Tom Schatzel introduces a course on patent law.

1979 Law School first offers Communications and Computer Law, later taught by Howard Anawalt.

1976 Santa Clara Law first offers a trademark course.

1985 Santa Clara Law publishes first issue of the student-initiated Santa Clara Computer & High Technology Law Journal.

1977 Santa Clara Law graduates its first two recipients of the new J.D./MBA degree.

1987 Elizabeth Enayati Powers ’90 and Carolyn Peters ’89 entered the Giles Rich Moot Court Competition on behalf of Santa Clara Law.

1989 Dean Uelmen sends a letter to faculty proposing formulating a program in high technology law. Students found the Intellectual Property Law Association. 1990 The High Tech Advisory Board is established. 1995 The High Tech Law Certificate is created. 1996 High Tech Moot Court team established.

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keith sutter

kate burgess

charles barry

colleen chien

DOROTHY GLANCY

Eric Goldman

Professor Colleen Chien (J.D., Boalt Hall School of Law, U.C. Berkeley) is nationally known for her research and publications surrounding domestic and international patent law and policy issues. Her work has been cited by the FTC and in Congress. She has testified before the DOJ/FTC/PTO on patent issues, frequently lectures at national law conferences, and has published in-depth empirical studies of patent litigation and non-practicing entities (NPE) and litigation at the International Trade Commission.

Professor Dorothy Glancy (J.D., Harvard), who joined Santa Clara Law in 1975, is nationally known for her extensive work in the area of public transportation. Under a grant from the Federal Highway Administration of the U.S. Department of Transportation, she directed a legal research project regarding privacy and intelligent transportation systems. A prolific scholar, she has also been a consultant to the Metropolitan Transportation Commission (MTC) in the San Francisco Bay Area, worked with the United States Department of Transportation regarding privacy policy issues, and served as a consultant regarding legal and regulatory issues for the United States Department of Transportation’s Rural Interstate Corridor Communications Study Report to Congress (2007).

In 2005, at the urging of two students, Associate Professor Eric Goldman (J.D., MBA UCLA), started a blog on technology and marketing law. It quickly became one of the most influential Internet blogs and was listed on the ABA’s list of top 100 blawgs, where it was ranked fourth in the Legal Tech category by ABA Journal readers.

2001 Santa Clara Law establishes the High Tech Law Institute. The LL.M. in IP is first offered.

degree, one of the few such programs in the country. The High Tech Law Institute launches its Twitter account (@scuhtli).

2006 Eric Goldman named Director of the High Tech Law Institute.

2010 Santa Clara Law added a new academic honor, the High Tech Excellence Award, for top-performing students, and changed the High Tech Law Certificate to add a new Honors version. Santa Clara Law student Linda Wuestehube won the Jan Jancin award, given to the best IP student in the country.

Prior to joining the Santa Clara Law faculty in 2007, she prosecuted patents at Fenwick & West LLP in San Francisco, where she remains Special Counsel.

1997 Donald Chisum, author of Chisum on Patents, joins Santa Clara Law faculty. Santa Clara Law establishes Munich study abroad program focused on high tech/ IP law. 1999 Santa Clara Law appoints Ruth C. Erdman ’94 as its first Assistant Dean for Law and Technology; U.S. News and World Report lists Santa Clara Law IP program as one of the top ten in the U.S.

2008 Students establish Santa Clara Law’s Biotechnology Law Group. 2009 Forty percent of students who apply to Santa Clara Law say they are interested in IP law. Santa Clara Law launches the J.D./MSIS

Goldman, academic director of the High Tech Law Institute, practiced as an Internet attorney in Silicon Valley for eight years before becoming a full-time academic. Goldman says he stays focused on “what the Law School needs to do next to keep its edge. Our challenge is to continually evolve and improve our curriculum to reflect the realities facing 21st-century lawyers.”

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 high technology and intellectual property

The Valley Advantage: It’s a High Tech Neighborhood The growth of Santa Clara Law’s High Tech program has paralleled that of Silicon Valley, the 25-mile-long, 10-milewide former agricultural treasure called “The Valley of the Heart’s Delight.” As the valley’s resources have changed from apricots and prunes to semiconductors and chips, so has Santa Clara Law transformed its class offerings and academic focus.

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Google Facebook

LinkedIn

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HP

Intel Fujitsu

SILICON VALLEY

Oracle Xerox

Applied Materials 101

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Some of the advantages students, faculty, and alumni have enjoyed thanks to the Law School’s location include:

Agilent

A Apple

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access to practitioners in high tech as adjunct faculty, speakers, advisory board members, and mentors n student externships in companies and law firms grappling with the most current and pressing high tech issues n students who are Silicon Valley working professionals and bring to the classroom their abundant experience and education in technology n collaboration with other Silicon Valley high tech groups

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eBay

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IBM

CHARLES BARRY

ALUMNI IN THE VALLEY Hundreds of Santa Clara Alumni work in-house at some of the country’s top corporations including: eBay, Cisco, and Facebook. Scott Shipman ’99 The Silicon Valley start-up was 70 employees strong—and growing—when Scott Shipman (right) was an intern at eBay back in the summer of 1998. Shipman, interning for credit through Santa Clara Law, found himself dividing up the legal baskets with the company’s one lawyer, from user agreements and domain names to privacy policy, Internet advertising, and commercial agreements. That fall the company went public—the eBay explosion was underway. Shipman went back to classes but also kept his job, and after law school signed on with eBay as a full attorney. Today, Shipman is eBay’s Associate General Counsel, Global Privacy Leader.

Adobe


CHARLES BARRY

ALUMNI IN THE VALLEY Top: Allison Hendrix ’08 works on the legal team at Facebook. She says she carefully selected the law school she would attend. “I chose Santa Clara for its status and also its focus on intellectual property. I wanted to go to the best school and Santa Clara was the best one.”

SCOTT LEWIS

Left, Andy Kryder B.S. ’74, J.D./MBA ’77, was one of the first graduates of Santa Clara Law’s J.D./MBA program. He served for a decade as general counsel of network applications at NetApp, before retiring in late 2010.

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International Law at Santa Clara Law

Launched in the 1970s by former Dean George Alexander, along with Professors Robert Peterson and Philip Jiménez, the international program was first seen as a way to broaden students’ educational opportunities and to help faculty develop relationships overseas. Today, it serves all law students, because an understanding of global issues, differing countries’ legal systems, and different cultures is now necessary to nearly every area of law practice. Santa Clara Law’s international programs, facilitated through the Center for Global Law and Policy, continue to be “destination” programs that draw students from across the country and around the globe. Designed to offer a wide range of academic and experiential opportunities, with several faculty members who are internationally renowned legal experts, the program trains students for important roles in the international business, judicial, and human rights communities.

CENTER FOR GLOBAL LAW AND POLICY The Center for Global Law and Policy coordinates work on the extensive international law programs that Santa Clara offers. The academic experience includes a broad offering of courses in private and public international law, and development of an understanding of the evolving global legal issues through presentations by international scholars and speakers throughout the year. Santa Clara Law offers countless opportunities for faculty and students to examine, experience, and contribute to international law, establishing a platform for scholarly exchange. The Center accomplishes an important goal of facilitating academic and experiential learning through extensive overseas academic and externship opportunities. For more information, see law.scu.edu/international. At Santa Clara Law, students learn that all law is global. Below: Santa Clara Law 2010 summer abroad students at the High Court in Hong Kong.

International Law Facts

Approximately 200 students from 50 U.S.

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law schools study in Santa Clara Law summer abroad programs every year.

Santa Clara Law has summer abroad

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programs in more locations than any law school in the United States. In 2011, summer abroad programs are offered in Geneva, Strasbourg, The Hague, Istanbul, Hong Kong, Shanghai, San Jose (Costa Rica), Oxford, Seoul, Singapore, Sydney, Tokyo, Vienna/Budapest, and Munich. Internships are available in about 25 countries in Europe, Australia, the Middle East, Latin America, and Asia, including Japan, China, India, Korea, and many others.

More than a dozen faculty members

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currently teach subjects related to international and comparative law.

“In my opinion, no other law school has a better program than Santa Clara for studying global law. The opportunities available to students to study abroad and take international law courses are unprecedented.” —JESSICA TIPTON ’09 (left)

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 FIRST PERSON

THE COMPANY OF FRIENDS

CHARLES BARRY

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International Moot Court Santa Clara Law students have the opportunity to compete in several international moot court competitions in English and in other languages. Santa Clara Law’s International Moot Court team, which included (from left) Adam Birnbaum, team coach and law Professor Beth Van Schaack, Brandon Douglass, and Ann Marie Ursini, took first place at the 2009 Pace University School of Law’s International Criminal Court (ICC) Moot Competition, held in January at Pace University. More than 500 law schools from 80 countries compete in the largest international moot court, the Philip C. Jessup International Law Moot Court Competition, involving a dispute before the International Court of Justice, the judicial organ of the United Nations. For the Concours Jean-Pictet Competition, students from all over the world resolve an international dispute in English or French. In 2009-10, the Santa Clara Law team was the only team from the U.S. to compete entirely in French at the finals in Paris.

left my home country of Korea and its political confusion when I was young, roaming the world until Santa Clara embraced my alien soul. During the past quarter-century since then, I have been a part of Korean democratization—as a professor, dean, writer, columnist, civil society leader, and high-ranking government officer. All the capital and energy I mustered up in my fights in Korea was nurtured at Santa Clara—tenacity, balanced thinking, a philanthropic mind-set and, above all, a firm belief that the world is progressing toward a better society. From George Alexander I learned how to be a dignified yet warm-hearted dean. He graciously allowed me to call him Pap. I am often remembered as the most reform-oriented dean in Korean law schools, but I must confess that I just tried to copy Pap George. The late law professor Russell Galloway inspired me to translate his book The Rich and the Poor in Supreme Court History (1983), which was published as a gift to my homeland. Philip Jiménez showed me the art of care and love for a teacher and friend, and he and I are the best of friends. Undisputedly, Phil is the most renowned American law professor in the Korean legal profession. I developed a companionship with Robert Peterson much later. I have vivid memories of Bob in his classes, citing Shakespeare, who has been quite alive between us and our families. I have been associated with some twenty-odd schools, at home and abroad. I have gone by Mr. Ahn for a long time. But in the company of Santa Clara friends, I still prefer their nickname for me, “Kenny,” inseparable from my life with my alma mater, Santa Clara.

Leading International Law Scholars Visit us online for profiles of Santa Clara Law Professors David Sloss (left), Director of the Center for Global Law and Policy; Jiri Toman (right); and Beth Van Schaack (top, center).

—“Kenny” Kyong-Whan Ahn ’85 Former Chairperson of the National Human Rights Commission of Korea

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 international law

 FIRST PERSON A LESSON IN TRUTH AND OBSERVATION

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t was 1970. Santa Clara Law Professor Howard Anawalt began his lecture by reviewing the rules of evidence examined in the last class. He then began peppering the hall with questions. I cannot remember the exact questions, but they were something like: What weight should we give evidence provided by eye witnesses? What problems might there be with evidence provided by eye witnesses? What ways are there to deal with those problems? Did we think that lawyers and law students would be better eye witnesses than bus drivers? We thought they would and offered comments supporting the high opinion of our powers of observation.

back in the room when they were needed. One by one the students were called back into the classroom to provide “testimony” on the classroom disturbance. As the student-witnesses testified one by one, our faith in the reliability of witnesses and the special powers of observation of law students crumbled. We heard several versions about what had happened and what was said. Each witness described the young man and what he was wearing in a different way. We laughed at the witnesses’ answers. Each of us seemed to have seen and heard something else.

What Professor Anawalt taught... is always with me. The search for reliable facts and an honest and disciplined pursuit of the truth are the hallmarks of our profession.

Suddenly, a young man burst into the lecture hall. He shouted out diatribes against the good professor, who seemed shocked and off balance. Professor Anawalt tried to calm the man, but the shouting went on. The young man then turned to the rest of us in the classroom and yelled something. He stormed out of the classroom and slammed the door.

The class ended. There was no reason to sum up. We understood. I have spent most of my legal career working on rule of law issues in developing countries and countries emerging from violent conflict. To get my bearings, I need to understand how current systems are falling short and why, and to understand who is doing what to whom. I need to sift through piles of documents and talk to everyone who has something relevant to say. Hearsay, unfounded opinions,

The classroom burst into noisy exclamations of amazement. We forgot about the lesson. Professor Anawalt then stepped forward and requested our silence. One by one he pointed to four or five students and asked them to leave the classroom. He asked them not to talk to each other and said that we would call them

and downright inaccuracies are in high supply in this process, just as they would be in a trial or in the due diligence process in connection with a corporate merger. As I proceed with my work, what Professor Anawalt taught us that day in the classroom is always with me. The search for reliable facts and an honest and disciplined pursuit of the truth are the hallmarks of our profession and a core feature of any system of justice. As far as we lawyers and judges go, it is perhaps equally accurate to say both that in establishing facts we can never be too careful and that we can never be forgiven for being careless. —William T. Loris ’72, program director and senior lecturer, LL.M. program on Rule of Law for Development-PROLAW, Loyola University Chicago School of Law; former legal officer for the U.S. Agency for International Development; and co-founder and Director General of the International Development Law Organization. Recipient of Santa Clara Law’s Alumni Achievement Award, 2007.

international LAW milestones

1970s Institute for International Law established. 1974 First summer abroad program, seven-week touring summer program in Europe (Professor Gerald Solk). 1975 Strasbourg summer abroad program established.

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1976 Summer program established at the International Institute of Human Rights, Strasbourg (which is now the Geneva/ Strasbourg program). 1977 Tokyo summer program established in conjunction with Notre Dame Law School.

1985 SCU established the Singapore summer program in cooperation with the National University of Singapore, and subsequently added externships in Bangkok, Ho Chi Minh City, Cambodia, Kuala Lumpur, and several cities in India. 1995 International Law Certificate offered.

1978 Oxford and Tokyo summer programs established.

1996 International Moot Court begins.

1980 Hong Kong summer program established.

1997 International High Tech Law Certificate available.


getty images

LEADERS IN INTERNATIONAL LAW: Leon Panetta B.S. ’60, J.D. ’63

Alumni International Leaders

Leon Panetta B.A. ’60, J.D. ’63, served eight terms in Congress as representative from California’s 16th (now 17th) district. He authored the Hunger Prevention Act of 1988, the Fair Employment Practices Resolution, and legislation extending Medicare and Medicaid to hospice care for the terminally ill. He introduced legislation to protect the California coast, including the creation of the Monterey Bay National Marine Sanctuary.   Panetta has a strong record of leadership. He served on the House Committee on the Budget for 14 years and chaired it from 1989 to 1993. In 1993, he left Congress to become President Clinton’s director of the Office of Management and Budget. Subsequently, he became chief of staff to President Clinton and served in that position until 1997. In 2009, President Barack Obama chose Panetta to head the CIA, and in April 2011, President Obama named Panetta Secretary of Defense, and he was unanimously confirmed.   In 1997, Panetta and his wife, Sylvia, established the Leon and Sylvia Panetta Institute for Public Policy. In 2006, Santa Clara Law and the Panetta Institute launched a joint venture called The Panetta Institute Fellows Program (now the Policy Research Fellows Program). This externship was developed to provide an opportunity for law students interested in the law and government, political science, or public policy to work with professional staff at the Panetta Institute. Panetta served on SCU’s Board of Trustees from 1988 to 2009.

Our international law alumni leaders are a key component of our alumni network. Their expertise runs the gamut from international human rights to complex international business transactions. Go online for profiles of Santa Clara Law’s many international law alumni leaders. Shown above: Kirsten Bowman ’05 has worked for the International Criminal Tribunal for Rwanda in the Prosecutor’s Office, at the International Criminal Court as the legal officer to the vice president of the court, and as the legal officer to Vice President Blattmann of the International Criminal Court.

1997 Munich summer program established after the arrival of Don Chisum (Theo Bodewig taught at Munich summer program 1998-2002). 1997-98 Santa Clara Law first offers the LL.M. in United States Law. 2001 LL.M. in International and Comparative Law established.

2003 Center for Global Law and Policy founded, and incorporated functions of the Institute for International Law.

2010 Santa Clara Journal of International Law Symposium, “Corporations and International Law.”

2009 Major conferences offered include Santa Clara Journal of International Law Symposium, “The Future of International Criminal Justice,” as well as “International Law in the Supreme Court: Continuity or Change?”

2011 Santa Clara Journal of International Law Symposium, “Religion and International Law.” 2011 International Human Rights Clinic established.

2002 Journal of International Law launched.

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MAPPING OUT Santa Clara Law’s Strategic Plan

As we celebrate Santa Clara University School of Law’s Centennial, we are launching and implementing the school’s strategic plan—a map for the next century. Santa Clara Law is starting its second century with a vibrant and ambitious plan for its future. A group of distinguished graduates, judges, lawyers, administrators,

and faculty members comprised our Strategic Planning Committee, co-chaired by Gordon Yamate ’80 and Professor Brad Joondeph. The group met over the course of more than a year to articulate a plan for the Law School’s future. Educating law students for the roles and responsibilities they will undertake in today’s increasingly complex

Strengthen the educational program to meet the challenges of a changing world. Santa Clara Law will provide an excellent and pertinent foundation so our students will meet the emerging challenges of tomorrow’s practice settings. In addition, to prepare our graduates for the challenges of tomorrow’s practice of law, we will provide robust opportunities for our students to acquire and develop the key lawyering skills necessary to competently, ethically, and effectively represent clients and serve the community.

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kate burgess

kate burgess

Santa Clara Law Goals and Strategies for 2010-2020

Attract and retain a highly diverse and talented student population.

Attract, retain, and inspire a faculty of distinguished teachers and scholars.

We will maintain our commitment to a highly diverse student body. The school’s future will be built on our ability to educate a socially engaged group of men and women who are committed to improving society and their communities. In an increasingly global workplace, Santa Clara Law must increase students’ ability to work with a highly diverse group of peers. We will seek to enroll an increasingly talented student body that is attracted by the strength of the faculty, the breadth of the curriculum, and the values of the University.

Consistent with Santa Clara University’s teaching scholar model, our talented faculty will continue to balance the demands of teaching, scholarship, and service. Santa Clara Law will provide our faculty with the resources necessary to expand the world’s store of knowledge and to engage with the pressing policy issues of the day.


Our FUTURE workplaces will require more than a change in the Law School curriculum. It will require a faculty with a broader reach of teaching and research interests and abilities, and an educational infrastructure that will permit and foster a bolder vision of educating lawyers for tomorrow’s law practice. Students will need facilities that permit the development of a wider range of skills and abilities—including leadership, communication,

innovation, cross-cultural competencies, and teamwork—that their employers and global legal systems will require. Santa Clara Law will address these challenges from a position of strength, with the wisdom of a century of experience in educating men and women for competent, ethical, and engaged leadership and service.

For a link to the full text of the strategic plan, visit law.scu.edu/sclaw.

kate burgess

CHARLES BARRY

S A N TA CLARA L AW

Integrate Santa Clara Law with its communities and constituents.

Develop the physical and financial infrastructure to support Santa Clara Law.

Santa Clara Law’s unique location, relationships, and connections in Silicon Valley provide a powerful portal to a global community. This law school is well positioned to advance the values of Santa Clara University through civic engagement and community service. Santa Clara Law draws strength from the communities that support or are served by it—indeed, this institution embraces the Silicon Valley ethos of innovation, hard work, and collaboration.

Our future demands the best learning environment for our students, including a physical campus that fosters greater opportunities for student/ faculty interaction and provides space for skills development, group projects, and creative thinking. The use of technology plays an essential part of preparing students for a world characterized by collaborative work environments, global communication, and continuous learning and change. Recognizing the foundational role that facilities and technologies play in shaping our future, Santa Clara Law will build state-of-theart facilities, integrate innovative technology into teaching and learning, and secure funds to support these initiatives.

1911-2011

A Century of Educating Lawyers Who Lead

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The Second Century at Santa Clara Law

For the past year, other staff members and I have spent hours combing the University archives, sorting through all the wonderful memorabilia in Mary Emery’s office, recording oral histories from more than 20 alums, and probing collective memories. The goal has been to put together the Santa Clara Law story of our first 100 years. This print edition of the magazine is part of the story, and there is even more online at law.scu.edu/100. We’ve learned a lot as we sorted through conflicting reports about how many students were in the first graduating class, who was the first Hispanic student, what was the first high tech course taught. It has been a lot of fun. Our research has had its serious side, too, as we try to catalog the Law School’s accomplishments and the impact the school has had over the past 100 years. But as much as we have enjoyed looking back, this moment is also about looking ahead. For one view into the future, I asked three of our top 2011 graduates what role they would like to see Santa Clara Law play in the next century. Jessica Jackson, who received the inaugural Dean’s Leadership Award, remarked, “I’d love to see the Law School continue to expand its public interest and social justice programs to reach even more indigent and underrepresented people in the community.” Jessica was one of the many Santa Clara Law students who together performed more than 12,000 hours of pro bono work during the 2010– 11 academic year. She will be working as a staff attorney at the Habeas Corpus Resource Center, where she will represent death row inmates in their post conviction appeals.

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Lara Muller, who received the Mabie Outstanding Law Graduate Award, says she would like to see the Law School “continue to create great lawyers who will impact Silicon Valley and the world. They will help Silicon Valley companies to grow while improving the reputation of lawyers in society.” Lara will be working at Fenwick & West.

CHARLES BARRY

Dear Alumni and Friends,

Julia Yaffee

ALI-ABA award winner Daniel Richards says he wants Santa Clara “to continue on our current path, translating Jesuit theory and practice into how law should be practiced, not just in public interest but in all areas of law.” He will be working at Goodwin Proctor, where he plans to help companies be more effective through patent and commercial litigation. Three hundred students graduated on May 21, 2011, as members of our Centennial class. They represent the future of Santa Clara Law, and I am proud to say our future is in good hands. As the Law School begins its second century, there is every reason to believe that our graduates will continue our legacy of service and leadership. Thank you for your part in our journey, and I look forward to the path ahead with you. Julia Yaffee Senior Assistant Dean, External Relations and Centennial Implementation Chair


CHARLES BARRY

Jessica Jackson (left), Daniel Richards (center), and Lara Muller (right).

Ronald Malone ’71 and Sara Malone

SUPPORTING THE FUTURE

“Sara and I are honored to support the visionary leadership and high aspirations of Santa Clara Law as it moves into its second century. For the Law School to continue on its ever-increasing path of excellence, it needs the support of all alumni. We want to help build the financial foundation that the Law School needs in order to give future generations of students the kind of opportunities that we all have enjoyed.”

CHARLES BARRY

—Ronald Malone ’71, partner, Shartsis, Friese & Ginsburg

Graduates enjoy the Centennial Commencement, May 2011.

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 celebrating our centennial

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1. Jean High Wetenkamp (left), and Rise Pichon (right) at a Centennial gathering; 2. Santa Clara Law Deans Donald Polden, Mack Player, Gerald Uelmen, and George Alexander; 3. Justice Panelli and his wife, Lorna, in San Jose; 4. Santa Clara Law alumni and friends at the Centennial Swearing-In at the United States Supreme Court in Washington, D.C., in May; 5. 2010 classmates Isra Abid, Joseph Naegele, Jamal Modir, and Aileen Kim at a Centennial gathering in San Jose.

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Opposite page: 1. 2011 grads Monica Guzman, Janina Maniaol, and Fanny Chu at the 2011 Graduation Lunch; 2. 2011 graduate Jessica Jackson, who received the inaugural Dean’s Leadership Award; 3. Honorable Jerome Smith, sculptor, at the Centennial sculpture unveiling; 4. Celebrating the Centennial in Hawaii with Laurent Remillard ’87, Ryan Akamine ’86, and Robert Ichikawa ’87.

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SANTA CLARA LAW CENTENNIAL COMMITTEE Co-Chairs Theodore Biagini ’64 Mary B. Emery ’63 Gala Chair William Clayton ’74 1

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Committee John Bates ’74 Mark Bonino ’76 Peter Boutin ’75 Hon. Thomas P. Breen (Ret.) ’63 J. Dominic Campodonico ’96 Hon. James C. Emerson (Ret.) ’73 Mike Gencarella ’97 Paul Goda, S.J. Elizabeth Gong Landess ’88 Frederick Gonzalez ’77 Vernon Granneman ’78 Mary Dullea Hood ’75 Jeanne Huang Li ’02 Eric Hutchins ’06 Daniel Kelly ’69 Erik Khoobyarian ’03 Nancy Leasia ’77 Stephen Pahl ’80 Hon. Edward A. Panelli (Ret.) ’55 Hon. Phillip H. Pennypacker ’72 Nikki Pope ’04 Patrick Premo ’96 Noreen Raza ’90 Carlos Rosario ’11 Christopher Schumb ’84 Hilary Sledge ’06 Hon. James Stoelker ’74 Hon. Kathryn A. Sure ’80 Stephen Sutro ’94 Maureen Tabari ’87 Hon. Mark E. Thomas ’56* Bernard Vogel ’56 Nancy Wright ’80 Dori Yob ’03 Santa Clara Law Donald J. Polden, Dean Julia Yaffee, Chair Nancy Diaz Lawrence Donatoni Susan Erwin Ellen Lynch Susan Moore Joan Nelson Schuller Jacqueline Wender *deceased

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Centennial sponsors Visionary Sponsors ($15,000)

Leadership Sponsors ($2,500)

Littler Mendelson P.C. President Speaker Series  

W. David P. Carey III/Outrigger Enterprises Group Greenberg Traurig, LLP Hoover Bechtel, LLP Keesal, Young & Logan Martine Penilla & Gencarella, LLP Oracle Corporation, Dorian Daley ’86 Rick Watters ’73  

Milestone Sponsors ($10,000) Cotchett, Pitre & McCarthy Fenwick & West LLP Rambus Inc. Centennial Student Writing Competition   Pioneer Sponsors ($5,000) Berliner Cohen Theodore J. Biagini – Centennial Sculpture J. P. DiNapoli – Centennial Sculpture Mary B. Emery – Centennial Sculpture Steve and Pat Gazzera Hayes Scott Bonino Ellingson & McLay, LLP Colleen Davies Ronan and Joe Ronan Michael M. Shea – Centennial Sculpture  

Centennial Circle Sponsorship ($1,500) Peter C. Califano Teresa M. Corbin Tom and Pauline Ferrito Michael A. Isaacs Lundell & Spadafore ’75 Anthony T. Oliver Donald and Susie Polden Reich and Walner, LLP Bob Wall Julia and Jerry Yaffee Honoring the Judiciary Sponsors Adleson Hess & Kelly Casas Riley & Simonian Clapp, Moroney, Bellagamba & Vucinich Corsiglia McMahon & Allard McCurdy & Fuller Nixon Peabody Law Office of Christopher Schumb ’84 John “Sam” Winter ’83

Fenwick & West is proud to support the Santa Clara Law Centennial

www.fenwick.com silicon valley san francisco seattle

650.988.8500 415.875.2300 206.389.4510

Congratulations on one hundred years of service and your continued dedication and contribution in educating lawyers who lead the community. 78

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SANTA CLARA LAW


Littler Mendelson is proud to support the Santa Clara Law Centennial and congratulates the school and its alumni for this significant milestone.

With more than 800 attorneys and 51 offices, Littler Mendelson is the largest U.S.-based law firm exclusively devoted to representing management in employment and labor law matters. Established in 1942, Littler has litigated, mediated and negotiated some of the most influential employment law cases and labor contracts on record. Given our singular focus, many Littler attorneys have spent their careers cultivating full-time practices solely devoted to employment law subspecialties, such as class action prevention and litigation, immigration and global migration, unfair competition and trade secrets, labor relations, privacy and employee benefits. Every day Littler strives to simplify the business of employment law—leaving clients free to focus on the bottom line. To learn more, visit us online at littler.com.

littler.com • Littler Mendelson, P.C. 50 West San Fernando Street, 15th Floor, San Jose, CA 95113 • 408.998.4150


Rambus Congratulates Santa Clara University School of Law on a Century of Service to the Community. ®

PROUD SUPPORTERS OF THE

SANTA CLARA LAW CENTENNIAL

AND CONGRATULATES THE SCHOOL FOR THIS SIGNIFICANT MILESTONE Niall P. McCarthy, SCU Law 1992 Phil L. Gregory, SCU Law 1980 Niki B. Okcu, SCU Law 2003 Hester H. Cheng, SCU Law 2010 Cotchett, Pitre & McCarthy, LLP, based on the San Francisco Peninsula for over 40 years, engages exclusively in litigation. The firm’s dedication to prosecuting or defending socially just actions has earned it both a national and statewide reputation. With offices in Burlingame, Los Angeles, New York and the Washington D.C. area, the core of the firm is its people and their dedication to principles of law, their work ethic and commitment to justice. COTCHETT, PITRE & McCARTHY, LLP 840 Malcolm Road, Burlingame, CA 94010 • (650) 697-6000 • www.cpmlegal.com


S A N TA C L A R A L AW

100 YEARS 1911–2011

Centennial Gala weekend September 9–11, 2011 Friday, September 9

Saturday, September 10

Sunday, September 11

Tee times begin at 9:00 a.m. Golf Cinnabar Hills Golf Club 23600 McKean Road San Jose

10:00 a.m. Trial of Our Century Professor Gerald Uelmen will present a lively reenactment of the 1911 Los Angeles trial of Clarence Darrow, who was charged in Los Angeles for jury tampering. Recital Hall

10:00 a.m. Liturgy Celebrated by Paul Goda, S.J. Jesuit Residence Chapel 801 Franklin Street

6:30 - 7:30 p.m. Reception for all Alumni and Reunion Classes St. Ignatius Lawn

12:00 noon BBQ Lunch Mayer Theatre Lawn

10:30 a.m. Brunch With Dean Donald Polden Nobili Hall

6:30 p.m. Centennial Gala Imperial Ballroom Fairmont Hotel online registration

law.scu.edu/100/gala.cfm

Santa Clara Law, founded in 1911 on the site of Santa Clara University, California’s oldest operating higher-education institution, is dedicated to educating lawyers who lead, with a commitment to excellence, ethics, and social justice. One of the nation’s most diverse law schools, Santa Clara Law offers its 975 students an academically rigorous program, including graduate degrees in international law and intellectual property law; a combined J.D./MBA degree; a combined J.D./MSIS degree; and certificates in intellectual property law, international law, and public interest and social justice law. Santa Clara Law is located in the world-class business center of Silicon Valley, and is distinguished nationally for its top-ranked program in intellectual property. For more information, see law.scu.edu. The diverse opinions expressed in Santa Clara Law do not necessarily represent the views of the editor or the official policy of Santa Clara University. Copyright 2011 by Santa Clara University School of Law. Reproduction in whole or in part without permission is prohibited. Santa Clara Law Magazine | 500 El Camino Real, Santa Clara, CA 95053-0435 | law.scu.edu | 408.554.4361

Santa Clara Law is printed on paper and at a printing facility certified by Scientific Certification Systems to Forest Stewardship Council (FSC) standards. From forest management to paper production to printing, FSC certification represents the highest social and environmental standards. The paper contains 10 percent post-consumer recovered fiber. AIM 7/11 11,000


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CHANGE SERVICE REQUESTED

law.scu.edu/100

Celebrating a Century of Educating Lawyers Who Lead

CHARLES BARRY


Santa Clara Law Centennial Book