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FROM EDUCATION TO EMPLOYMENT Preparing Jesuit-educated, Santa Clara University Graduates for the Workplace


First published August 2013 Authored by Elspeth Rossetti, Director, and Elizabeth Krishnan, Associate Director, Career Center Š 2013 by Santa Clara University All rights reserved. No part of this document may be reproduced or transmitted in any form or by any means, electronic, mechanical, photocopying, recording, or otherwise, without prior written permission of Santa Clara University Career Center.


INTRODUCTION INTRODUCTION As a university in Silicon Valley, Santa Clara is at the center of schismatic changes in the education-toemployment landscape. Universities are increasingly facing pressure to articulate the value of a college degree. Rising costs of higher education cause government, employers, students, parents, and alumni to demand a return on investment in the form of students’ career preparation and readiness for the workplace. As a Jesuit university, these shifts in education and employment present us with the unique opportunity to explore the synergy between our Jesuit values and Silicon Valley so that we successfully prepare our students for work. During spring 2013, the Career Center convened an Education to Employment Committee representing faculty and staff across our three undergraduate schools to discuss the impact of trends emerging at the intersection of education and employment. The committee’s charter as expressed by the Provost was to address students’ workplace readiness in a way that would “drive change at the University.” The committee recognized in this charge that the job of preparing students to make the transition from education to employment is the work of the entire academy, not just a career center. The preparation of students for work is “preparation for active life commitment,” one of the characteristics of Jesuit education, as expressed in “Go Forth and Teach,” published by the International Commission on the Apostolate of Jesuit Education. In this shifting landscape of education and employment, the Career Center has a unique vantage point. We straddle the boundaries between industry and education; we sit on the faultline and can see the misalignment between these two worlds. We recognize that we could play a pivotal role in developing a vision and plan for the college-to-career transition. This would require a change in the traditional role of a career center on campus and we are eager to make that change. We suggest that the career development of our students be a mission-critical component of the undergraduate experience.

Santa Clara University

CAREER CENTER SILICON VALLEY

© 2013 by Santa Clara University Career Center. All rights reserved


THE ROLE OF PROFESSIONAL TRAINING AT SANTA CLARA UNIVERSITY Discussion on the role of Santa Clara University in our students’ career preparation is as old as the University itself. The success and continued vitality of Santa Clara University has depended on our predecessors continually re-imagining the University’s response to changes in the Valley and the world.

1877 - 1st commercial building Commercial training becomes popular. Santa Clara responds by building a new Commercial Building “greatly suited to the temperament and training of the Americans who all, from their very cradle, are engaged in the accumulation of money, although this course is very foreign to our customs, by which boys are educated in the study of the humanities and natural sciences.” (SC Jesuit Report)

1910 - professional schools Both industry and students demand special training in the professions and in business. Santa Clara establishes colleges of law, engineering, and architecture. To recognize the significance of this development, the school transitioned from a “college” to a “university”.

1940S - emerging new professional Returning veterans seek out “courses of a practical nature.” SCU President William Gianera writes to his superior that a new professional is emerging in the Valley and advocates preparation for this new era.

1950S - liberal arts v. specialization “We are turning out highly trained technicians, experts in the art of ‘knowing more and more about less and less,’ but not men who have the breadth of vision to take in the whole picture...” (Austin Fagothey, SJ)

2013 We find ourselves once again called to address our students’ workplace readiness with creative responses to the ever-changing demands on higher education.

© 2013 by Santa Clara University Career Center. All rights reserved

Giacomini & McKevitt. Serving the Intellect, Touching the Heart; A Portrait of Santa Clara University 1851-2001.


Pressures and Disruptions in Higher Education

85.9%

of the national Class of 2015 pursue higher education

92%

of SCU students come to Santa Clara

“to be able to get a better job”

STUDENT

LOANS

GET A B JO GOOD

MAJORships

Top two valued attributes ers by employ ds gra hiring new

1. Intern yment during 2. Emplo college

ower, putational p m co ve si as ectivity, m given rise to Global conn achines have m t ar sm d an new media, sets ions and skill at p u cc o new

so that they can get a job

Primary reason for parents of children in 5-12th grades to send their child to college is to

2013

are the 2nd largest form of consumer debt

72%

of higher ed providers believe their students are prepared for work

coursera Facebook

"Tech boot camps with robust employer connections are launching college grads in 3 months into programming positions with competitive tech companies”

Federal Government recently launched Scorecard to gather data on the average earning of our alumni

42%

of employers believe

"Steep nation wide decline in liberal arts"

HIGHER EDUCATION

Coursera grows faster than Facebook during a similar stage in its development

data to provides le a c year S y a P the 30n o ic l b the pu rsities of unive rnings I O R t e n i ea n alumn based o

college grads are adequately prepared for the workplace

INDUSTRY

© 2013 by Santa Clara University Career Center. All rights reserved


From Education to Employment at Santa Clara University lara ique to Santa C un t no e ar es These challeng ators ard-thinking educ rw fo w fe A . ity Univers ming together to co e ar n o ti na e across th to these career es ns o sp re ve ti explore crea essures. development pr

Most recently W ake Forest Unive rsity published a cro wdsourced pape r, an outcome of a co nference they ho sted, entitled:

g the College-to “A Roadmap for Transformin

-Career Experience. ”

tage point in the pus career center has a unique van This paper recognizes that the cam ly responsible for the ever, the career center is not unique how na; are ent ym plo -em -to ion educat nge, there must be er to seriously affect systemic cha ord “In . ion nsit tra ent ym plo -em education-to as partnerships tion, faculty commitment, as well tra inis adm ior sen ng udi incl n, atio institutional prioritiz o-career’ campus…In this manner, a ‘college-t und aro ups gro tial uen infl and ice to the between the career off lly navigate the path from college sfu ces suc to ts den stu ip equ to community must be cultivated a career center, the process no longer resides solely in ent pm elo dev eer car the e aus Bec workforce.” sultation to the entire function to one that provides con s vice ser t den stu a m fro t shif st career center mu campus community.

As a Jesuit university in Silicon Valley, our Career Center is well-positioned to be at the forefront among Jesuit universities in building a compelling vision for career development that honors the Jesuit mission to educate for human wholeness, the liberal arts, and vocation. By virtue of our location we are also able to build opportunities for our students, faculty, and staff to gain experience in Silicon Valley.

The following pages outline a proposal for re-imagining the work of the Career Center as a campus hub for consultation where we can facilitate our students’ personal and professional development, as well as educate and support our campus colleagues as the Santa Clara community prepares our graduates for the transition from education to employment.

© 2013 by Santa Clara University Career Center. All rights reserved


Introducing The CAREER CENTER re-imagined

EDUCATION TO EMPLOYMENT Jesuit-educated, Santa Clara University graduates will be able to name the thread that ties their education to their vocation. They will know how they can make a meaningful contribution and be able to articulate their value to employers because of their engagement and experience with the world.

Š 2013 by Santa Clara University Career Center. All rights reserved


The mission of the Center is realized through work in four areas

VOCATION DISCERNMENT

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT

EMPLOYER RELATIONS

CAREER DEVELOPMENT & OUTCOMES DATA

CAREER CENTER

FROM POSSIBILITIES TO PURPOSE

Transforming education into application for the common good © 2013 by Santa Clara University Career Center. All rights reserved


STRATEGY 1

Collaborate with campus departments to foster a vibrant culture where vocation discernment is encouraged throughout the campus community and recognized as an integral part of a Jesuit education. The Center will act as the catalyst to bring this topic to campus through events such as speaker series, conferences, and panels with experts from academia and industry.

3

Customize Careers for the Common Good (ELSJ 23) with tailored content to meet the vocation discernment needs of students in the 3 colleges.

4

Encourage discernment during freshman year, so that the way is opened for authentic exploration of interests and the value of every major is recognized.

5

Counsel students and alumni to help them clarify and articulate their gifts and talents and the connections to meaningful work, with career expertise provided for diverse populations.

6

Leverage the web, social media, and other communication tools to target students with customized career exploration content.

Š 2013 by Santa Clara University Career Center. All rights reserved

Career Development & Outcomes Data

Offer consultations and resources to faculty and staff to support vocation discernment in the classroom (e.g. ELSJ core requirement), and in experiential learning programs (e.g. fellowships, immersions, study abroad, athletics, etc.).

Employer Relations

2

Professional Development

The Career Center will help students and alumni name the thread that ties their education to their vocation. The Center will work at the heart of all experiential learning so as to help students integrate their self-awareness and understanding of the world’s needs into their vocational aspirations. Students will leave Santa Clara able to communicate their story, articulating how their education has developed their talents and illuminated the way in which they will contribute to the common good.

Vocation Discernment

VOCATION DISCERNMENT


STRATEGY 1

2

Provide consultations and resources for faculty and staff working with experiential learning programs to help students translate their skills onto the platforms where they need to be articulating their value to employers (e.g. online branding, LinkedIn, resumes, interviewing).

3

Collaborate with relevant stakeholders to support a global platform for professional development and networking among alumni and students.

4

Implement customized professional development programs targeted by industry and academic disciplines; provide consultations with faculty and staff who wish to adopt these programs and strategies for their students.

5

Support students with identifying and pursuing internships.

6

Promote virtual tools and alternatives to internships to encourage students’ engagement with skill-building opportunities.

7

Support the senior year transition with career preparation programs.

8

Leverage web, social media, and other communication tools to target students and alumni with customized professional development content.

Š 2013 by Santa Clara University Career Center. All rights reserved

Career Development & Outcomes Data

Engage the Jesuit network of universities in dialogue on preparing Jesuit graduates for work.

Employer Relations

1

Professional Development

The Career Center will build upon students’ and alumni vocation discernment by helping them translate their self-awareness into a package that highlights their value to an employer. The Center will work at the heart of experiential learning to provide students with meaningful professional development opportunities; to help students transform their experiences into language and media that demonstrate their skills and potential for contribution; and to prepare students to successfully navigate the internship and job search. As career direction continues to unfold the Center will provide alumni with the tools and resources to support lifelong career transitions and development.

Vocation Discernment

PROFESSIONAL DEVELOPMENT


STRATEGY Serve as a catalyst to connect employers with campus departments to explore partnerships in areas such as student and faculty research, internships, and job opportunities.

2

Leverage alumni connections, in collaboration with Alumni Relations and Development, to build employer relationships with new companies and target industries.

3

Provide customized opportunities for employers to engage students to support employer branding and recruiting at events such as career fairs, networking events, virtual “hangouts” for company information sessions, on-campus interviewing, class presentations, mock interviews, industry panels, student fellowships, and course projects.

4

Employer Relations

1

Professional Development

In support of the Un iversity’s strategic plan to engage with Silicon Valley, the Career Center will cultivate and maintain strong relationships with employers. We will serve as the channel through which the University markets the value of a Santa Clara education and work to promote SCU students to recruiters so that our students have opportunities for competitive internships and employment. We will serve as a catalyst for University conversations and partnerships with industry to educate on industry, workplace trends, and the skills needed for the 21st century. We will leverage our relationships with multi-national corporations and alumni so that we extend beyond Silicon Valley and reach across the globe to provide international experiences for SCU students.

Vocation Discernment

EMPLOYER RELATIONS

Maintain ongoing conversations with recruiters from various industries to stay abreast of the current skills they look for in new hires and educate the campus community on these trends (e.g. employer site visits for faculty, staff, and students; employer lunches for faculty/staff; “international treks” to expose students to international industries; industry panels).

Career Development & Outcomes Data

© 2013 by Santa Clara University Career Center. All rights reserved


Dialogue with the University community to articulate the key messages that define the value of a Santa Clara University graduate to employers.

2

Partner with assessment providers and leverage existing tools to gather career development and outcomes data of students, recent grads, and alumni.

3

Support and build on channels to communicate SCU’s return on investment to key stakeholders.

4

Implement systems for ongoing tracking of students’ engagement with their career preparation, to allow for targeting students with customized career development content.

© 2013 by Santa Clara University Career Center. All rights reserved

Career Development & Outcomes Data

1

Employer Relations

STRATEGY

Professional Development

The Career Center will gather data to communicate the value of a Jesuit-educated, Santa Clara University graduate in the workplace. We will publicize and report these data broadly each year to all stakeholders to make clear SCU’s return on investment in terms of employment. The Center will also track our students’ engagement with their career preparation while at Santa Clara and use this data to evaluate our programs, target students with customized career content, and communicate the value of engaging in their career development. All reports will be designed so that they are easy to understand, transparent, and accessible.

Vocation Discernment

CAREER DEVELOPMENT AND OUTCOMES DATA


INTRODUCTION references Giacomini, George & McKevitt, Gerald SJ. Serving the Intellect, Touching the Heart; A Portrait of Santa Clara University 1851-2001. Santa Clara University. Santa Clara, CA. 2000. “Historia Domus [Santa Clara Jesuit Community Report], 1877,” ACPSJ. George Leonard Sullivan, “Engineering and the Sullivans come to Santa Clara, Memorial Edition,” pamphlet, ASCU. William Gianera, SJ, The Monthly Santa Claran (January 1947), n.p., ASCU; Gianera to Joseph O’Brien, Sept. 16, 1948, ACPSJ. Professor Austin J. Fagothey, SJ, The Santa Claran, January-March 1953. The American Freshman: National Norms Fall 2011. Cooperative Institutional Research Program at the Higher Education Research Institute at UCLA. http://www.heri.ucla.edu/PDFs/pubs/TFS/Norms/Monographs/TheAmericanFreshman2011-Expanded.pdf Jobs, Value, and Affirmative Action: A Survey of Parents About College. Inside Higher Ed. March 20, 2013. http://www.insidehighered.com/news/survey/jobs-value-andaffirmative-action-survey-parents-about-college Student Debt Domino Effect? Consumer Financial Protection Bureau. May 13, 2013. http://www.consumerfinance.gov/opeds/student-debt-domino-effect/ US Department of Education. College Affordability and Transparency Center. College Scorecard. http://collegecost.ed.gov/scorecard/ The Role of Higher Education in Career Development: Employer Perceptions. Chronicle of Higher Ed & American Public Media’s Marketplace Report. December 2012. http://chronicle.com/items/biz/pdf/Employers%20Survey.pdf Education to Employment: Designing a System that Works. McKinsey & Company. Fall 2012. http://www.mckinsey.com/client_service/public_sector/mckinsey_center_for_government/education_to_em ployment The Year of the MOOC. New York Times. November 2, 2012. http://www.nytimes.com/2012/11/04/education/edlife/massiveopen-online-courses-are-multiplying-at-a-rapid-pace.html?pagewanted=all A Roadmap for Transforming the College-To-Career Experience. Crowdsourced paper edited by Andy Chan and Tommy Derry, Wake Forest University. May 2013. http://rethinkingsuccess.wfu.edu/files/2013/05/A-Roadmap-forTransforming-The-College-to-Career-Experience.pdf Universum Student Survey 2013, Santa Clara University Report.

© 2013 by Santa Clara University Career Center. All rights reserved


Education to Employment