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CONSCIOUS ABOUT NETWORKING FORREST LEICHTBERG’S SANTA BARBARA CONSCIOUSNESS NETWORK BRINGS IN PERSONAL-GROWTH SPECIALISTS GAY AND KATIE HENDRICKS – WHO HAVE WRITTEN NUMEROUS BESTSELLERS AND WHOSE WORK HAS BEEN FEATURED ON MORE THAN 500 PROGRAMS INCLUDING THE OPRAH WINFREY SHOW ON FRIDAY, JUNE 2, IN SB (P. 28) MILLENNIALS STRUGGLE TO BUY HOMES IN THE GOLDEN STATE (P.24) REAL ESTATE SPOTLIGHT: SAMARKAND (P.5)

THE CAPITALIST P.6 • BEER GUY P.8 • FORTNIGHT P.10 • SYV SNAPSHOT P.30 REAL ESTATE MADE MODERN! 805 565-3400 | NHPP.re | JoinNHDR.Today


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Brian Goldsworthy

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Jennifer Berger

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Geoff Rue

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P.5

 eal Estate Snapshot – Kelly Mahan Herrick chronicles The Samarkand, R Adams School, what to expect this summer, interest rates, sold properties and those currently listed, and upcoming events

P.6 P.7 P.8 P.10 P.14 P.15

 iweekly Capitalist – The price is wrong: Jeff Harding’s solution to B rising health-care costs? Less regulation, more competition among providers. State Street Scribe – Santa Barbara! This beachy, sun-splashed town is all we could hope for. So why the long faces? Jeff Wing explains... Beer Guy – Zach Rosen gets his fill of Telegraph Brewing’s 3rd Annual Dia de las Obscuras Rare Beer Festival and partakes of new brews

Fortnight – SB Jewish Festival; Floor to Air fest at Lobero; I Madonnari; Bluesy Jazz Brunch & Dance at SOhO; and UCSB Script to Screen series

On Canvas – Margaret Landreau spotlights leather artisan Steve Junak and the Santa Barbara Arts and Crafts Show

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What’s Hanging – Ted Mills is drawn to Funk Zone’s art walk, Free Play, SB Visual Artists, Melange at 10 West, SBcast, Joan Rosenberg-Dent, Arts Fund, photographer Dari Mos, and abstract works at GraySpace Gallery

P.20 P.22 P.24 P.28 P.29 P.30

Food File – Christina Enoch has her eye on Big Eye Raw Bar, where the big deal is Japanese cuisine including the Salmon Poke Bowl

Plan B – Briana Westmacott attends a mother/daughter luncheon with her beloved Elli at The Impact Hub Real Estate View – Steve Decker, owner of NextHome Decker Realty, surveys the scene of California homeownership for millennials

Man About Town – A detailed look at Santa Barbara Consciousness Network, founder Forrest Leichtberg, and their events relocating to UCSB I Heart SB – Elizabeth Rose has a song in her heart and a long memory about her friend Preston’s suicide a decade ago SYV Snapshot – Eva Van Prooyen previews summer fun at Circle V Ranch; SY Valley Cottage Hospital nutrition classes; bats at Cachuma Lake; Zaca Mesa; Los Olivos Jazz & Olive Festival; and Lincourt Vineyard

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REAL ESTATE SNAPSHOT by Kelly Mahan Herrick

Kelly is a licensed realtor with the Calcagno & Hamilton team and Berkshire Hathaway. She can be reached at Kelly@homesinsantabar bara.com or at (805) 565-4000.

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Residents from The Samarkand recently toured the Santa Barbara Botanic Garden

Neighborhood Spotlight: Samarkand

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nyone living in Santa Barbara knows you’re hard-pressed to find a neighborhood that isn’t desirable or considered valuable in today’s market. With nearly 500 residences, a retirement community, and a school that continues to increase in rank, the Samarkand neighborhood is quickly becoming a sought-after area for buyers. The inventory in the Samarkand neighborhood has picked up, and there are seven homes currently on the market. This is great news, considering that in 2016 fourteen homes sold in total. As I predicted, the spring brought more listings for buyers to choose from, and I expect that to continue. In the past few weeks, we’ve seen a nice boost in inventory in Santa Barbara in general and lots of homes going into escrow. Buyers are eager to buy, and are tending to move quickly on properties they find that fit their needs. Despite the increase in inventory, I’m still considering the market “a seller’s market,” meaning that there are more buyers than sellers, and sellers can (and do!) price their properties accordingly. THE SAMARKAND At the heart of the Samarkand neighborhood is the faith-based, not-for-profit, continuing care retirement community, The Samarkand, located on Treasure Drive. With a mix of independent living apartments with about 300 residents and a higher level of care unit serving about 100, The Samarkand brings a serene, impeccably kept campus to the neighborhood, with community-wide events, classes, and engagement with the greater neighborhood. Residents from The Samarkand recently toured the Santa Barbara Botanic Garden. Herbalist Emily Sanders talked about the array of herbs and their many uses. The group also enjoyed stunning vistas of the state flower – the bright-orange California poppy. The Samarkand hosted its annual campus-wide Spring Art Show in early May.

The show featured more than 150 pieces of two- and three-dimensional art created by both seasoned professional artists and those new to the creative expression. A rich variety of media was represented, including watercolor, oils, acrylics, pastels, photography, pen and ink, pencil sketches, charcoal, and sculpture. All artists live or work at The Samarkand. “Our residents are a creative and talented group,” said Jennifer Leggett, The Samarkand’s resident life director. “Even those who don’t consider themselves artists find they have an inner artist. Our residents prove you’re never too old to learn, create, or try something new.” For more information on The Samarkand, please call (877) 231-6284or visitwww. thesamarkand.org. ADAMS SCHOOL With continually increasing test scores, the local elementary school in the Samarkand neighborhood, Adams School, is working its way up the ranks. According to GreatSchools, a nonprofit that rates schools nationwide based on academic test ...continued p.18


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The Capitalist by Jeff Harding

Jeff Harding is a real estate investor and a writer on economics and finance. He is the former publisher of the Daily Capitalist, a popular economics blog. He is also an adjunct professor at SBCC. He blogs at anIndependentMind.com

The New Robber Barons

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ottage Hospital and Sansum Clinic gave up on their proposed merger because of regulatory delays and a lack of clarity from the Federal Trade Commission (FTC), the government agency that protects us from uncompetitive trade practices and monopolies. After almost four years, the heads of Cottage and Sansum called off their attempt to create cost savings from a more efficient organization. In a fast-changing health care world, the uncertainty of their status made it difficult for them to plan for the future. It is likely that the FTC believes that these kinds of vertical mergers in the health care system will give the resulting organization “monopolistic” pricing power because a lack of competition that will lead to higher costs for consumers of health care services. That may be correct, but it is not what is driving up health care costs and the problems with our health care system. Our health care system is broken. It has been breaking since the creation of tax policies for employersponsored health insurance (WWII), the creation of Medicare (1965), and the increasing regulation of the health care industry, especially after Obamacare (Affordable Care Act, 2010). Because of these programs and regulations, there is no “free market” in health care and there hasn’t been for many, many years. As a result, the market has been herded into politically favored policies, which has led to a decline in competition and rising costs. No one questions this outcome, but the causes are usually blamed on the failure of “free enterprise.” As economist Milton Friedman once observed, if you put the government in charge of the Sahara Desert, we would run out of sand. This is more than an amusing anecdote: governments’ long history of intervention into economic affairs is a sorry one of rising costs and shortages. Health care is no different than any other product or service purchased by consumers. A good analogy is to compare health care to other

industries. Defenders of regulation are quick to point out that health care is different than other products or services because lives depend on it. But, there is one other product that is vital to health, well-being, and survival: food. It is more important than health care: without enough food, we would soon starve and die. There is little regulation of the food industry, yet our markets provide the most diverse, varied, high quality, and abundant food products available from the whole world. And the reason is that there are lots of competitors vying for our food dollars. This is exactly the opposite of health care markets. One can only imagine what would happen to food if there was an Affordable Food Act. For you fans of socialism, I recommend a visit to Venezuela, once the wealthiest country in South America, where citizens are facing starvation on the Maduro Diet. The result of this regulation of the health care industry (about one-sixth of GDP) is that providers are being squeezed and everyone wonders why that occurs. Physicians are getting less reimbursements from insurance companies and Medicare, which is why some doctors are dropping out of Medicare and many health insurance programs. Hospitals are getting squeezed by the same forces, plus an additional hit from regulations that direct them to provide more and better services despite the costs. According to Cottage, “Last year [2014], our hospitals covered more than $132 million in costs of care unreimbursed by the government (for patients using Medi-Cal, Medicare, and other government programs) – up from $124 million the previous year.” Emergency room visits went from 70,000 in 2014 to almost 76,000 in 2015 (latest available data). On a national basis, health insurance costs have climbed while deductibles have skyrocketed. New 2017 plan premium increases range from 15% to 22%, and deductibles are roughly doubling. At the same time, those insurers that are still

left are pulling out of unprofitable markets. The cost of Medicare (a single-payer system) is expected to almost double by 2026 (now it consumes 15% of the federal budget). According to Kaiser Family Foundation, it is expected to be insolvent by 2028. Unfunded Medicare liability is about $27 trillion. Enter Cottage and Sansum and their desire to merge. Because of these distortions of the health care market, hospitals must do something to remain profitable. It is possible that costs at Cottage/ Sansum will increase post-merger and it is possible that private physicians will face greater pressures as a result. If they can’t be profitable, we will find ourselves with declining services and even higher prices. These are unfortunate outcomes, but the blame should be directed at the laws that broke the system in the first place. If the merger were to create uncompetitive trade practices (it wouldn’t), it is not the fault of free enterprise. No monopolies have ever existed in history unless competition was suppressed by government action. I realize that this will create disbelief in those who haven’t studied the economics of competition and the history of the so-called Robber Barons, but those are the facts. The only Robber Barons in the days of relatively unfettered market





competition were those created by government protection or government subsidies. Yet modern economics persists in believing that monopolies are the natural result of freemarket competition. The Federal Trade Commission, a creation of Progressive thinking (1915), was founded on a rock of bad economics. Today, actual harm to the markets need not be proven – only the potential of anti-competitive behavior determined by a theory that assumes a perfect world of players with perfect knowledge and perfect competition. A dynamic, constantly changing real world never behaves like that. Unless, of course, the government rigs the table. Cottage and Sansum are treated like modern-day robber barons by the FTC in their quest to be profitable and survive. In our broken system, things cost what they cost and no wishing will change that. The question is: who will pay the cost? Right now, it seems that it will be the health care providers. It can’t last. The solution is not more regulation, but less. No singlepayer system will solve it either. The solution is more competition and less regulation. Loosen the noose on the system and let the market be flooded with competing health care providers who offer us a cornucopia of health care options. I want to see a supermarket of choices, not empty shelves.



Publisher/Editor • Tim Buckley Design/Production • Trent Watanabe Columnists Man About Town • Mark Léisuré Plan B • Briana Westmacott | Food File • Christina Enoch Commercial Corner • Austin Herlihy | The Weekly Capitalist • Jeff Harding The Beer Guy • Zach Rosen | E's Note • Elliana Westmacott Business Beat • Chantal Peterson | What’s Hanging • Ted Mills I Heart SB • Elizabeth Rose | Fortnight • Steven Libowitz State Street Scribe • Jeff Wing | Holistic Deliberation • Allison Antoinette Art Beat • Jacquelyn De Longe | Behind The Vine • Hana-Lee Sedgwick SYV Snapshot • Eva Van Prooyen Advertising / Sales Tanis Nelson • 805.689.0304 • tanis@santabarbarasentinel.com Sue Brooks • 805.455.9116 • sue@santabarbarasentinel.com Judson Bardwell • 619.379.1506 • judson@santabarbarasentinel.com Published by SB Sentinel, LLC PRINTED BY NPCP INC., SANTA BARBARA, CA Santa Barbara Sentinel is compiled every other Friday 133 EAST DE LA GUERRA STREET, #182, Santa Barbara 93101 How to reach us: 805.845.1673 • E-MAIL: tim@santabarbarasentinel.com








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STATE STREET SCRIBE by Jeff Wing

Jeff is a journalist, raconteur, autodidact, and polysyllable enthusiast. A long-time resident of SB, he takes great delight in chronicling the lesser known facets of this gaudy jewel by the sea. Jeff can be reached at jeffwingg@gmail.com.

S a n ta B a r b a r a Av i at i on

Califorbearance and You

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o I finally checked my privilege. What do you think happened? That’s right; they threw it onto the wrong plane and it ended up on the tarmac in Des Moines. Note to self: next time carry your privilege on and stuff it into the overhead bin, like all the sensible people do. But the episode was instructive, and a good reminder of my – oh, heck. I’m just gonna say it. A good reminder of my privilege. In fact, it seems safe to say that we who live and prosper under the almost literal dome that encloses dear Santa Barbara... we’ve got it pretty good. Sure, it’s a struggle. But not, you know, like a STRUGGLE struggle. We’re all fairly privileged. We’re not often shot at, nor do we often suffer the indignity of pillage by bloodthirsty marauders. When we step outside in board shorts to march with sullen, tanned expressions down our famous main street in protest of this or that injustice, our police don’t descend on us with rubber truncheons, or pepper us with rubber bullets. [Second note to self: buy stock in Rubbermaid]. HARMLESS FLESH EATERS Yes, we have our share of flesh-eating bacterial outbreaks, but most of these are over-prescriptions by well-meaning weight-loss professionals. Santa Barbara is today a sun-kissed cathedral of peace and prosperity. Fragrant ocean breezes gently dance with our impossibly statuesque palm trees; symbols of plenitude that seem to say “What’re you lookin’ at, loser? Ha ha, just kidding. Look all you want, winner!” The town is peaceful, devoid of angst, pleasantly soporific. Mostly. Guess what? All is not well in the Second or Third Happiest Place on Earth. You know this to be true. We can see it on one another’s faces. In Ralph’s, at the farmers market, in any of Santa Barbara’s parking lots – not in the 99¢ store, so much, since we are usually wearing disguises in there. What is this new menace? What exactly are we seeing in one another’s faces? A little something I like to call Califorbearance©. THAT’S RIGHT. CALIFORBEARANCE© What is Califorbearance©? It’s that LOOK. When worn properly – and Santa Barbarans wield this thing like

nobody’s business – it can simultaneously convey both long-suffering patience and projectile passive-aggression. Hey, the Left Coast may be famously progressive, merciful, and benevolent, but we have our limits, and when said limits are tested, we have a look. It is the look of Califorbearance©. What does this interpersonal transaction look like on the ground? Let’s look at some examples you may find familiar from your own experiences, dear reader. Example 1: A guy in ear buds is approaching a crosswalk, doing that soulful strut that suggests the whole world can hear the bass-heavy whimsydiddle blowing through the middle of his underfurnished cranial vault. As he steps into the crosswalk, he notices that a Prius (probably metallic green) is breaching the crosswalk paint by half an inch. It’s a crosswalk incursion! As Ear Buddy passes in front of your, car he is either looking dramatically at your invasive front bumper, or staring stone-faced at you through the windshield. It’s as if you ran down his little brother moments before and he hasn’t forgotten. Yaay! You’ve just experienced Califorbearance©! The pedestrian’s stern expression is actually beaming at you a kind of brutalist forgiveness. You didn’t ask for it, and neither were you aware of needing his absolution, but there you have it. Drink in his Califorbearance© with gratitude. Example 2: You’re in Trader Joe’s and make the monstrous tactical mistake of stopping briefly to examine the several shelves of gluten-free soaps. As the words “gluten-free soap” gain puzzled traction in your gray matter and begin to occupy the little hamster wheel you keep up there, you suddenly feel a hulking negative presence to your right. When you tremulously dare to look (another mistake) you see a dreadlocked, yogic tension-guru wearing dusky purple Punjab pants and a riotous beard that might make Rip Van Winkle gag. He is attended by a patchouli cloud that could bring down an airplane. The vibe is pure frozen-faced “patience”; that projectile patience that hits you like the blast wind from a hydrogen bomb. Califorbearance©! Do you feign renewed interest in the gluten-free soap and further antagonize the organic ...continued p.27

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by Zach Rosen

Telegraph Delivers Some Sweet Sours Telegraph’s Dia de las Obscuras is a day full of groundbreaking sour and barrel-aged ales

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elegraph Brewing Co. recently held their Third Annual Dia de las Obscuras Rare Beer Festival, a sessioned event where they showcase their most groundbreaking sours and barrelaged beers. Obscura is Latin for “shadowy, indistinct” and the brews produced in this line are just that. Each one is thoughtdriven, not trend-driven, and plays with different concepts that blur the lines between styles and techniques. Every year, Dia de las Obscuras has impressed beer drinkers with unique flavors and creative blends. This event continues to cement Telegraph as local leaders in the barrel-aged and sour-beer movement with a long-standing barrel program that exhibits the care and consideration put into each brew. Many beers featured at the event contain their house souring culture, which began as a strain of Lactobacillus delbrueckii that was contaminated with a type of Brettanomyces. Over the years, the brewers would pour the dredges from their favorite wild beers, culturing the microorganisms from the bottle and creating a collective soup of inspiration. Dia de las Obscuras features vintages of Telegraph’s classic sours such as the elegant yet bold Obscura Vulpine and the bracing Obscura Peche alongside a slew of new concoctions, many of which are made only for the event. This year took a slightly different format than years past with the brewery hosting three smaller sessions rather than two larger ones. The result was an occasion

Zach Rosen is a Certified Cicerone® and beer educator living in Santa Barbara. He uses his background in chemical engineering and the arts to seek out abstract expressions of beer and discover how beer pairs with life.

that had a much more relaxed ambiance and felt like a regular night at the tasting room rather than a crowded event. This gave people more room to sit and chat with friends, and of course, a better opportunity to focus on the beers. SOME NEW BREWS Past Dia de las Obscuras have featured a tea-based sour and this year was no different. Across the Arabian Sea was a golden ale aged for about 15 months in red wine barrels from Telegraph’s neighbor, Carr Winery. It was “dryhopped” with Chinese jasmine tea and Madagascar vanilla beans. The grape character of the barrel was prominent, and the jasmine tea and vanilla added a smoothness with elements of powdered sugar and a distinct candied note. Also similar to past years, there was two beers that were not sour but still incorporate barrels or wild

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microorganisms. The Last Tycoon was produced for Healthy Spirits out of the Bay Area and will be released for their membership club later this year. It was inspired by the Manhattan cocktail and aged Telegraph’s Abbey Ale for eight months in a Smooth Ambler bourbon barrel with cherries. The Last Tycoon lived up to the flavors that inspired it. The Absolute(ly Not) Zero IPA was the brewers poking fun at the concept of a new trend of “Zero IBU” IPAs. It is basically impossible to produce zero IBUs (the unit of measurement for bitterness) in a beer, so this trend in the beer industry has been met with skepticism and a touch of ridicule. The Absolute(ly Not) Zero IPA contained Simcoe, Citra, Mosaic, and Idaho 7 hops and was placed in a stainless-steel fermenter rather than a wooden barrel, but had some Brettanomyces (Bretts for short) cultures added to dry out their beer. Bretts cultures are known for their funky flavors, but they are also popular for their ability to eat every sugar they come near, producing a beer that is extra dry. The beer had a lush aroma of mango, marmalade, and passion fruit with a lime-peel bitterness and a grassy note from the extra dose of dryhopping. A BATCH OF SANGUIS A little over a year ago, Telegraph received an allotment of barrels from the local Sanguis Wines. They produced a single brew, batch 198 to be exact, of a blonde ale to fill these various barrels. A gyle is an old-school UK brewing term to describe a batch of beer as it moves through the brewing process. At Dia de las Obscuras, Gyle 198 was the most direct example of the wort destined for the Sanguis barrels. The base beer was added to a red wine barrel and aged with their house sour culture. The result was a brew with some blackberry and cherry flavors that finished with a nice cidery tang. Hemingway Never Did This references a Charles Bukowski poem and was produced from a single red wine hogshead barrel (50% more volume than a standard wine barrel) and aged on apple-wood chips that they toasted in-house and a dash of fresh spearmint. The wood chips took main stage with a warming quality that blended with a soothing acidity, while the spearmint added a breath of fresh air in the background. The One Who Knocks was constructed from 50% of the batch 198 base and 50% of their White Ale that was placed into a single barrel of Sanguis’s viognier with 40 pounds of apricot purée added in six weeks before the event. The apricot character was graceful and the barrel shined through,

lacing notes of kiwi, gooseberry, and limoncello, throughout the brew. KETTLE SOURED Kettle souring is a technique where a brewer halts the brewing process midway by letting the mash sit in the boiling kettle for an extended amount of time (usually overnight and up to two days) on a culture of Lactobacillus (Lacto for short). The brew is then resumed as normal, where it is then boiled, sterilizing the liquid. This is a quick, effective means of producing acidity in beer. While elements of this technique are not new (bourbon uses a “sour mashing” process of a similar ilk), kettle sours have reached peak popularity over the past year or two, and many craft brewers are incorporating these brews into their lineup. Of course, Telegraph, always ahead of the curve, has been using this technique for years in some of their beers such as the Reserve Wheat. There were two kettle sours at the event that were produced in small batches on their pilot system. Both used a wheat base that consisted of 60% pilsner malt and 40% wheat malt. Flower Crown was inspired by rosé wine and was fermented with cherries and pomegranate. The fruit added a smoothness to the acidity with the wheat adding a touch of bread dough. Telegraph Mule was inspired by the Moscow Mule cocktail and was brewed with a ginger-lemon juice that brewer Patrick Ceriale got from a friend’s juice company. He added a dash of lime zest to up the citrus game, and the ginger came in strong but was not overtly hot. COMING TO A BOTTLE NEAR YOU If you missed Dia de las Obscurars this year, do not fret; some of the beers may be getting bottled later this year. And fortunately for us, two of the most notable brews at the event will definitely be getting bottled later this year. Obscura Alba was a wild ale aged in Silver Wines white wine barrels with their house sour culture. This bright brew had notes of hyssop and green lemon peel with a tinge of pine resin balancing its acidity. Obscura Magnifique was aged in red wine barrels with their house sour culture and blended with raspberry and cherry purées. The raspberries had a distinct freshness to the character that were place elegantly alongside the wine tannins and followed by a crisp tang. Keep an eye out for these bottle releases later this year – and while you are looking at your calendar, make sure to plan ahead for next year’s Dia de las Obscuras, as this is one event that you do not want to miss. 






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19 MAY – 2 JUNE

by Steven Libowitz

Tell us all about your art opening, performance, dance party, book signing, sale of something we can’t live without, or event of any other kind by emailing fortnight@santabarbarasentinel.com. If our readers can go to it, look at it, eat it, or buy it, we want to know about it and will consider it for inclusion here. Special consideration will be given to interesting, exploratory, unfamiliar, and unusual items. We give calendar preference to those who take the time to submit a picture along with their listing.

Free Festival? Such a Deal!

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ack when I had my Bar Mitzvah (some, ahem, decades ago), one of our family friends gave me a copy of Leo Rosten’s The Joys of Yiddish. Oy! I was more into checks and savings bonds (remember those?) than a hardcover copy of a book that was even thicker than my thigh. But then I read it. And pretty soon I realized I must have been meshugge [crazy] not to realize what a treasure I’d been given. I’m reminded of this story because I was sorting through my books the other day and came across the original copy – still wrapped in plastic! – and spent countless hours skimming through it again, marveling at the pleasures in the nuances of the language, and re-reading the Klein’s long-forgotten, now tear-inducing inscription (“an occasion for hachus [pleasure in the achievements of a child] and kvelling [swelling with pride]). But also because this fortnight brings the annual Santa Barbara Jewish Festival, which also reminds me of my upbringing, what with the knishes and kosher hot dogs, klezmer music, and more. The festival has a new location for its 30th year, abandoning its longtime home at Oak Park – which already hosts far fewer ethnic festivals than years gone by – moving to Plaza del Mar, 23 Castillo Street, near the Santa Barbara Harbor, for the 11 am to 4 pm festival on Sunday, May 21. The Central Coast’s largest community-wide Jewish cultural festival and celebration of Israel’s Independence Day wants everyone – Jewish or not – to experience and share the best of Jewish culture, including lots of live music and Israeli dancing including Kalinka, arts and crafts vendors, family and children’s activities, local community organizations, and plenty of food. Chabad at UCSB’s Jerusalem Café will be serving pastrami and corned beef sandwiches, Congregation B’nai B’rith is bringing halva and gum, and Sababa It’s All Good Catering is offering falafel lunch plates, pita, hummus, to name just a few. Admission is free. Need another reason to go? Between the festival and the beach, it’s a great way to keep the kids out of tsuris (trouble). Schedule and more info online at www.jewishsantabarbara.org/ festival.

Getting Grounded in Order to Soar

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anta Barbara Floor to Air Festival is stepping up its game in its fourth year. The two-week affair that updates the ancient art of aerial technique unites professional artists from around the globe

for a collaborative residency here in town, which offers instruction for students before culminating in an ensemble performance. The artists – who this year include Shaina Brafman (New York City), Danielle Garrison (Boulder), Elizabeth Stich (Salt Lake City), Allie Cooper (Santa Cruz), Jenna Ober (Minneapolis), and Rachna Hailey, Isabel Musidora, Allie Cole, Luna Webster, Lydia Johnson, and Emily Stratton from Santa Barbara – create the piece in collaboration with Santa Barbara Centre for Aerial Dance and festival founder Ninette Paloma. The three works they come up with incorporate a variety of traditional apparatus in unconventional approaches, using bodies and flight as metaphors for the human condition. The show debuts on the Lobero stage at 7 pm Friday, May 26, before making its way across theaters and continents. Tickets cost $20-$55. Call 963-0761 or visit www. lobero.com.

Mad about Madonnari

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e’ve already established that I’m Jewish, not Italian. I don’t even know if the annual street painting festival is pronounced “Ee Mah-dah-nah-ree” or some other way. But I’ve really never seen anything like this Memorial Weekend festival, and if you’ve never been, you really do owe it to yourself to see these amazing artists in action. The street painters transform the Mission plaza using pastels on pavement, creating 150 incredibly vibrant and remarkably colorful, large-scale images. It’s absolutely astonishing what they can do to a slab of concrete with nothing more than a box of chalk. Sure, it’s a slog to wade through the crowds that throng to the place during the weekend – but if you think you’ve got it rough, imagine what these artists go through, spending countless hours kneeling on the ground, stretching out to fashion with great detail images from a photograph or their own imagination. The festival imports plenty of professionals to complete the work – street painters who travel from festival to festival around the world – but there are also lots of locals who participate every year. They’re the ones limping into work on Tuesday morning. Santa Barbara was the first to bring the romantic festival to the western hemisphere from its sister festival in Grazie di Curtatone, Italy, and is now celebrating its 31st year – the same number of flavors of ice cream

many moments where amid the gyrating bodies I found myself stopping to stare at the band, and especially devour Lembo’s ability to embody a song, alternately belting out the words with a soul-shouter’s power or bending notes with a jazz singer’s flexibility. The thing is, they were there virtually every week. So it became something you could take for granted. Fast-forward a couple of decades, past illnesses, relocations, personal changes, and the like, and now it’s a rarity that we get to see Lembo and her cohorts – currently (I believe) Del Franklin on sax and vocals, George Friedenthal on keyboards and vocals, and Donzell Davis on drums – in public concerts either locally in Santa Barbara or anywhere at all. And when we do, it’s almost always at night. But the band will be playing a gig that’s being billed as a “Bluesy Jazz Brunch & Dance Party” at SOhO on Sunday, May 28, smack-dab in the middle of Memorial Day Weekend. Show time is 11:30 am, admission is $15, and if you make brunch reservations, they’ll seat you up front. Info and 962-7776 or www.sohosb.com.

Design to Dream

A Baskin & Robbins use to have as its slogan, which is far fewer than the gradations of colors you’ll see at the Mission. Music, an Italian food market, and other vendors make it a full family affair, what with the grassy expanse where you can spread out a blanket and the Rose Garden just across the street. It’s fun to come more than once to see the progress of the paintings. Or if you’re out of town for the holiday weekend, drop by when you return, as the paintings remain until marine layer or a rare rainstorm washes them away. Admission is free, though sponsorship fees and percentage of sale at I Madonnari benefits the Children’s Creative Project, a non-profit arts education program of the Santa Barbara County Education Office. More info online at www. imadonnarifestival.com.

Raw Food at SOhO

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hen I moved back to California in the early 1990s, I settled first in Oxnard (which, by the way, still is the subject of my favorite bumper sticker of all time: “Oxnard – More than Just a Pretty Name”). Many a Sunday I would bike up the coast to Ventura for a stroll around the Ventura Harbor before continuing on to drop by Bombay, the downtown nightclub that had two separate music rooms and, not unimportantly, happy-hour prices during the day. Just about every week, Leslie Lembo & Raw Silk were the band in the main room, where they delivered set after set of remarkably good funk music, mostly cover songs, but with several originals mixed in. There were

lso in the might-be-misnamed category, UCSB Pollock Theater’s Script to Screen series stretches the boundaries of its title with its next cinema-meetsconversation event. But hey, when you’ve got a chance to host the Academy Awardwinning production designer team behind the dreamy sets and settings of the multiOscar winning film La La Land, rather than its Oscar-winning writer-director Damien Chazelle, you’re not going to turn it down for semantics. David Wasco and Sandy Reynolds-Wasco are the husband-and-wife team who created the sets for the literal flights of fancy of the film couple portrayed by Emma Stone as an aspiring actress and Ryan Gosling as a jazz musician. The (again literally) star-crossed lovers traverse a decidedly contemporary Los Angeles infused with the spirit of Hollywood’s golden-age musicals and Wasco’s and Reynolds-Wasco’s ability to render any number of scenes in the vivid primary colors of Jacques Demy’s whimsical mid-1960s work (The Umbrellas of Cherbourg, Les Demoiselles de Rochefort) was a feat of alchemy that won a great deal of deserved praise – perhaps more than the film itself – and easily garnered this year’s Academy Award for Best Production Design (not Moonlight; they got this one right the first time). The Wascos – who previously worked with Quentin Tarantino on Reservoir Dogs, Pulp Fiction, Jackie Brown, Kill Bill: Vol. 1 and Vol. 2, and Inglourious Basterds, and West Anderson on The Royal Tenenbaums – will be on hand for a Q&A moderated by Pollock Theater director Matt Ryan for the event on Tuesday, May 30, following the 7 pm screening, which, by the way, will be in Sony 4K Digital Projection, so those stars will really twinkle behind them at the Griffith Observatory. 






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Š2017 Terry Ryken. CalBRE# 01107300. Compass is a licensed real estate broker and abides by Equal Housing Opportunity laws. All material presented herein is intended for informational purposes only. Information is compiled from sources deemed reliable but is subject to errors, omissions, changes in price, condition, sale, or withdraw without notice. No statement is made as to accuracy of any description. All measurements and square footages are approximate. Exact dimensions can be obtained by retaining the services of an architect or engineer. This is not intended to solicit property already listed.


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ON CANVAS

by Margaret Landreau

In the last 18 years, Margaret Landreau has accumulated 13 years of serving on the Board of Directors of Santa Barbara County arts-related nonprofits and has worked as a freelance arts writer for 10 years. She creates her own art in her Carpinteria studio.

LEATHER FOR ARTS SAKE

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n our world of constant change, visiting a favorite artisan in a familiar place you enjoy is a treasure. Shopping for quality handcrafts at the Santa Barbara Arts and Crafts (SBAAC) Show every Sunday is one of these treasures, especially if you are there visiting leather artisan Steve Junak. Junak joined the show in 1972, selling belts and purses he crafts himself. “Back then, the show was free until you had sold $200 worth of product and then it was just a $25 fee. There were 12 leather workers and a great feeling of camaraderie; we would share tips and techniques. Everyone wanted leather and appreciated it was handmade, and there were few fairs. It was hard to get leather. There was one guy at McPherson Leather in L.A. and several artists would carpool down there. If the guy didn’t like you, you couldn’t get the supplies. I’m self-taught, from trade, sharing ideas. It’s so competitive today, when I started it was just the opposite,” Junak shares. “They wear like iron, and I’m hard on

stuff too,” says customer Keith Gartzke at the show on Easter. “I bought one two years ago and just bought another one. Others don’t last, and he’s always

the same cheerful, happy-go-lucky guy to deal with.” He admits he is a collector and owns four or five belts Junak has made for him over the years since his first purchase here at the show in 1972. “Several people have come by today wearing a belt I made for them years ago – they say they last too long. One was wearing a belt I made in 1976. I’ve run into people in other towns when I was travelling who were wearing my belts” says Junak, who still sees some of the purses he made around town. Junak also taught classes about local medicinal and edible plants in the area

before becoming Herbarium Curator and a research botanist at the Santa Barbara Botanic Garden. Retired after 37 years, he continues leading trips and talks, and documenting the plant life of the Channel Islands. He speaks at length of the problems caused by non-native plants, their effects on the native flora and fauna, and how invasive species crowd natives out of the ecosystem. Junak says, “My situation is a lot different than others at the Art Show. It’s not easy to make a living as an artist and crafter, and I get to deal with a lot of totally different kinds of people in two different contexts. For me, I’ve really enjoyed that.” Junak invites you to come meet him in Crafts Space 10 at the SBAAC Show every Sunday along Cabrillo Beach.

It’s 4 am... Do you know what your spinklers are doing? Check your sprinkler for leaks and repair.

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WHAT’SHANGING? with Ted Mills Ted Mills is a local writer, filmmaker, artist, and podcaster on the arts. You can listen to him at www.funkzonepodcast.com. He currently has a seismically dubious stack of books by his bed. Have an upcoming show you’d like us to know about? Please email: tedmills@gmail.com

MORE, MORE, MORE

I

recently spent some time down in L.A., grooving on their various art scenes, and compiling a wish list I’d like to share with you. Because as the more spiritual among us will say, to make things manifest you have to ask it to the universe. So here goes: more poster art. More zines. A broader approach to art exhibition space. More affordable live/work zones. More engagement with the art community for art- and non-art related business ventures. And more ice cream. You hear that, universe? Okay, let’s see what’s going on in the here and now and the immediate future. ON THE CORNER OF FUNK AND FIRST

current show up at the Santa Barbara Tennis Club (2375 Foothill Road). That list of folks includes Jan Baker, Sally Blevins, Catey Low Dunkley, Ann Elliott, Ivanie Finsvik, Patricia Franco, Britt Friedman, Karen Frishman, Annie Guillemette, Jane Hurd, Kenneth McAshan, Soosan Marshall, Gloria Peyrat, Maria Thayer, and Allison Wells. Through June 2. MELANGERIE

The 10 West Gallery (10 W. Anapamu) is ready for First Thursday with three guest artists among the usual gang of abstracts. “Melange” is the name of the show, and that, by George, is what you’re gonna get! You will recognize Lynn

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cross-body evening bags. That’s today only 10 am to 4 pm, 505 Owen Road. Ten percent of sales go to CALM. JRDStudio@cox.net for more info.

FREE FOR ALL

MCA SB (Paseo Nuevo, upstairs) finally opens a new show with Free Play, opening today, 6 to 8 pm and through August 20. Curated by designer Alexandra Cunningham Cameron, the international roster of artists combines contemporary furniture, architecture, artworks, and objects that question the role such things play in our lives. Artists include Elin Aasheim, Tanya Aguiñiga, Ronan and Erwan Bouroullec, Karen Chekerdjian, Front, Rhys Gaetano, Max Lamb, Gean Moreno & Ernesto Oroza, Fredrik Paulsen, Pinar&Viola, Soft Baroque, Study O Portable, and Aaron Young. ANYONE FOR TENNIS CLUB?

Santa Barbara Visual Artists have their

Cunningham Brown’s spiky 3-D works from an earlier cover of the Sentinel; Fred Wolf combines whimsy with a bit of the existential terror of Hopper and George Tooker; and Patricia Crosby Hinds is a bit of the ol’ cubism mixed in with the abstract. Through June. MEANWHILE AT SBCAST

There will be a show by Karl “Barl” Bucar of his ink/acrylic/mixed media pieces in Studio D, opening on First Thursday. Bucar is an artist who I cannot find any information on thru the Internet. You and I will both have to check this out in meatspace and report back. Meanwhile, Studio E has turned into the campaign HQ for artist Maiza Hixson’s mayoral campaign that might still be a performance piece. If you have a problem with that, I’ll say this: 2017 might just be a worldwide performance artwork. Lastly, there will be an “interactive treasure hunt” going on from 5 to 9 pm. FIRE SALE

Joan Rosenberg-Dent is doing a little bit of spring cleaning at her studio and offering her art at up to 50% off, including her contemporary ceramic pieces, both sculptural and functional, as well as one-of-a-kind, handmade,

BELMOND EL ENCANTO S A N TA B A R B A R A

OUT OF THEIR ELEMENT

First off, the Arts Fund (205-C Santa Barbara St.) opens up a new show “Disorderly Construct,” curated by Hugh Margerum and Giuliana Mottin, the latter being her first time curating. The mission for the eight artists in this show: create work outside the genre or style or subject matter they’re known for. Those who raised their hand and said “Challenge Accepted!”: Linda Daniels, Nancy Gifford, Giuliana Mottin, Karl Petrunak, Hank Pitcher, Maria Rendon, Richard Ross, and George Sanders. Through July 16. Reception 5 to 8 pm, May 26. MOS Á MONT

We’ve got both a Funk Zone art walk this coming Friday and First Thursday the following week in June (already!), so get your comfy shoes out and warm up your wine glass-holding hand. The weather will be delightful, the art will be insightful, and the urge to support your local artist will be unstoppable. There’s a lot going down, so I will do my best to get everything of import in below. If not, you know what? Drop me a line, and I’ll get it in the following-ish.

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CRAWFORD WINE DINNER The celebration of handcrafted, small-batch wines paired with inspired cuisine is a unique luxury. Belmond El Encanto

Photographer Dari Mos recently journeyed to Montmarte, the section of Paris that once housed Picasso, Matisse, Van Gogh, Degas, and Renoir, but is now an unaffordable slice of real estate. (Sound familiar?) Mos’s gritty blackand-white photos focus on the faces of those who still call the street home. At Gone Gallery, 219 Gray Ave. Reception 5 to 8, May 26. TAPPY TOES, TREES, AND MORE

Executive Chef Johan Denizot has married his regionally inspired cuisine with the meticulously created and locally produced Crawford Wines and presents a glorious epicurean event. The Crawford Wine dinner will take place at The Dining Room at

Next door at GraySpace Gallery (219 Gray Ave.) Ojai-based Nash Rightmer shows “Tap Dance Danger,” a selection of abstract works from an artist who was previously working with photography and text. Through July 16. Reception 5 to 8 pm on Friday, May 26. Seahorse Gallery, 12 Helena Ave., shows the latest natural photographer of Oliver Tollison, “Beneath the Trees.” The show’s been up since April, so go check it out if you haven’t already. Also happening on May 26: “Nature Interrupted” at MichaelKate Interiors (132 Santa Barbara St.), features Dorothy Churchill-Johnson, Nancy Freeman, Valerie Freeman, and Stuart Ochiltree. “Black and White (Mostly)” at Silo Gallery (118 Gray Ave.) features Peggy Ferris, Tom Padzerski, and Roger Stevens. 





Belmond El Encanto on May 25, with a reception at 6:30pm. and is $120 per person. For reservations, please call 805 770 3530.

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...continued from p.5

LISTING SPOTLIGHT:

520 Alegria Road Charming and spacious home on a large lot, with a remodeled kitchen, gorgeous hardwood floors, lovely gardens, and majestic mountain views Listed by Linda Mason

scores, Adams is now rated at 7/10 (with 10 being the highest scores in the area). To put that in perspective, Peabody School, the highly coveted school in San Roque, is an 8 on the scale, and Roosevelt, the school near the Santa Barbara Mission that serves the Upper East neighborhood, is also ranked 7 on the GreatSchools scale as of press time. Adams, which has had historically lower test scores in the past and at one point struggled to garner enrollment from local families living in Samarkand and Hidden Valley, is now beloved by parents. Many families credit the principal, Dr. Amy Alzina, for the turnaround – though it was announced last week that Alzina is leaving the school for a new post at Cold Spring School in Montecito. Alzina implemented a Montessori program at the school, and in September 2015, a new library and Maker Space featuring science, technology, engineering, arts, and media curriculum opened, drawing attention to the school’s state-of-the-art facilities. MY SUMMER FORECAST There are several factors influencing the real estate market and property values in both Samarkand and Santa Barbara County in general, including politics around the globe and interest rates, and new state legislation concerning Accessory Dwelling Units (ADUs). Both in the Santa Barbara Sentinel and the Montecito Journal, I’ve

Roach allergens are the excrement and debris from decomposing roach bodies that become airborne and breathed in. Cockroaches transmit disease by being in contact with contaminated material and feces. They easily contaminate food by walking over preparation stations.

UPCOMING EVENTS AT THE SAMARKAND

Join The Samarkand for mind and body wellness programs and a theatrical performance of president Franklin D. Roosevelt and his wife, Eleanor. There is no charge, but reservations are required by calling (877) 231-6284. Mind & Body Wellness Programs • May 24 at 10:30 am: Join Dani Tervo-Shiffman, Fitness & Wellness coordinator at The Samarkand, for an interactive program highlighting new class styles, fitness equipment (check out the CyberCycle!), and strategies to make fitness part of your everyday life! • June 15 at 10:30 am: Get the latest healthy living tips from Dr. Todd Engstrom. He’ll share practical, proven methods to optimize your wellness every day through exercise and healthy food choices. A Theatrical Performance • July 20 at 10:30 am: Watch actors William and Sue Wills perform a theatrical dialogue that portrays the life and times of Franklin D. Roosevelt and his wife, Eleanor. written articles outlining the new legislation, and what it means for homeowners and potential property values. If you want to know more, please don’t hesitate to give me a call; I’m happy to share with you what I know about building a permitted, rentable, secondary unit on your property. My market forecast for the summer: we are going to continue to see a boost in inventory and list prices, as well as an increase in sales. RECENTLY SOLD 2620 Clinton Terrace | $1,135,000 | 3bd/2ba | sold December 2016 665 Las Positas Road | $649,000 | 3bd/2ba | sold December 2016 2932 Hermosa Road | $1,199,000 | 3bd/2ba | sold February 2017 125 Romaine Drive | $925,000 | 3bd/1ba | sold May 2017 CURRENTLY LISTED 520 Alegria Road $1,249,000 3bd/2ba 2920 Hermosa Road $989,500 3bd/1.5ba 312 Samarkand Drive $1,095,000 2bd/2ba 415 Stanley Drive $997,000 3bd/2ba (sale pending) 405 Wyola Drive $949,000 3bd/2ba 2611 Clinton Terrace $999,000 2bd/2ba (sale pending) 448 Stanley Drive $1,299,000 3bd/2ba (sale pending)



EARL WARREN SCHEDULE

Flea markets are held every Thursday from 8 am to 3 pm (www.snaauctions.com) May 19-20: Gem Faire (www.gemfaire.com) June 4: Show-n-Style Car Show (805-680-6339) June 10-11: Santa Barbara Home & Garden Lifestyle Expo (www. chargoproductions.com) June 15-19: Circus Vargas (www.circusvargas.com) July 7-9: Giant Used Car Sale (805-967-1130) July 22-23: Santa Barbara Historical Arms Association Inc. (www.sbhaa.org) August 3-6: Old Spanish Days Fiesta Rodeo (www.oldspanishdays-fiesta.org) Did You Know? Earl Warren Showgrounds has a hotline you can call if noise from a concert becomes bothersome. The hotline number is: (805) 687-0766

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$1.75 Million Price Reduction A rare opportunity to purchase an irreplaceable landmark building in downtown Santa Barbara. This commercial property sits on a ±42,688 SF lot with on-site parking and prominence on the corner of State and Carrillo Streets. The three-story building is adjacent to a 154-space public parking lot with additional public parking totaling 1,197 spaces within one block of the property. Currently 100% leased to Saks Off 5TH through 2018.

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photos and story by Christina Enoch

POKE ELEVATED Chef David Rosner elevating poke bowls, doing his magic

A

s most of places in SB Public Market, chefs/owners come from extensive culinary/fine dining experience. That is also the case for Big Eye Raw Bar. Chef David Rosner from Wine Cask and his business partner, Byron Wood, took over I’a Fish Market and Cafe and made this magical Big Eye Raw Bar. The sterile-looking fish stand is gone and it’s replaced by an inviting Japanese bar with beautiful fish-tail woodwork. SB Public Market is coming along. Just a few more spots to fill. The poke bowls you get aren’t the same you would get from a truck on the side streets of Hawaii. Rejoice! No more soy sauce and sugar marinated poke bowls. Enter the Salmon Poke Bowl with ginger vinaigrette, edamame, shallots, lemon, shiso, and sushi rice. Rice is “inked” with shiso purée. Never a

Albacore Poke Bowl with Kaffir lime vinaigrette, kimchi, watermelon, lime, and spicy wakame

dull moment. Also the Albacore Poke Bowl with Kaffir lime vinaigrette, kimchi, watermelon, lime, spicy wakame. Ahi Nigiri comes in two crispy sushi rice, chili d’avola, avocado, cilantro. That crispy rice was so perfectly crispy. It was like eating a candy bar. Ahi Tartare is prepared with taro chips, ginger, avocado, mustard seeds, garlic. Pickled mustard seeds takes the

After years of working full time for an ad agency, Christina found her passion in cooking and food. Now armed with her newfound title, “Culinary School Graduate Food Blogger,” she writes and shares her passion for food, cooking, restaurants, photography and food styling in her popular blog, black dog :: food blog. Christina’s a proud mommy of not one but two shelter dogs and lives here in Santa Barbara with her husband. She’s also an avid Polynesian dancer, beach lover, traveler, swimmer, snowboarder and most of all, a lover of anything edible and yummy. Check out her ramblings here and at www.blackdogfoodblog.com.

tartare to a next level. Oysters and a glass of Dom Perignon calls for all girlfriends for girl talk. The vegetable poke bowl was sensational as my friend Cathy says. Vegetables are kissed by heat, still crunchy and fresh. You can substitute rice with cauliflower rice deeply flavored with sushi wine. Healthy! I couldn’t wait to go back there. So I went back next day. And I want to go again tomorrow. Is that wrong?  





The Big Eye Raw Bar 38 W Victoria St., Suite 119, Santa Barbara, CA 93101 • (805) 633-0938

Salmon Poke Bowl with ginger vinaigrette, edamame, shallots, lemon, shiso, and sushi rice. Rice inked with shiso purée.

New and inviting Big Eye Raw Bar

Ahi Tartare: taro chips, ginger, avocado, pickled mustard seeds, and garlic

Blistered shishito with braised lotus root

Oysters and Dom Perignon


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C. Scott McCosker

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805.687.2436 | Scott@ScottMcCosker.com | www.ScottMcCosker.com CalBRE 00494253 Š2017 Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage. All Rights Reserved. Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage fully supports the principles of the Fair Housing Act and the Equal Opportunity Act. Owned by a subsidiary of NRT LLC. Coldwell Banker, the Coldwell Banker Logo, Coldwell Banker Global Luxury and the Coldwell Banker Global Luxury logo service marks are registered or pending registrations owned by Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. Broker does not guarantee the accuracy of square footage, lot size or other information concerning the condition or features of property provided by seller or obtained from public records or other sources, and the buyer is advised to independently verify the accuracy of that information through personal inspection and with appropriate professionals.

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PLANB by Briana Westmacott

Following Schatzle’s awakening talk, we were treated to lunch provided by Kyle’s Kitchen. Each table was lined with baskets to hold our phones. We detached from our devices and connected to the moment, another good lesson to give to the younger ladies.

When Briana isn’t lecturing for her writing courses at UCSB and SBCC, she contributes to The Santa Barbara Skinny, Wake & Wander and Flutter Magazine. Along with her passion for writing and all things Santa Barbara, much of her time is spent multitasking through her days as a mother, wife, sister, want-to-be chef and travel junky. Writing is an outlet that ensures mental stability... usually.

WHO ARE WE, ANYWAY? Here we are, Elli and I

Some of the stars from “I Am Her She Is Me” (from left): Alana Tillim, Jenna McCarthy, Jenny Schatzle, and Leslie Scott

S

he sat across the table from me. We were separated by a potted arrangement of succulents and 30 years of life. I looked at her as she gracefully sipped her lemonade and a small smile crept onto my face. She is growing into quite the little lady, my daughter. I AM HER This spring, some powerful people got together to throw a communitybased mother/daughter luncheon. The sold-out event gathered hundreds of women, girls, mothers, daughters, sisters, aunts, and grandmothers together at The Impact Hub. The “I Am Her She Is Me” luncheon was built by

a committee associated with the Arts Mentorship Program, a local non-profit organization. Chaired by Sylvie Rich, the concept behind the event was to bring together mothers and daughters in a conscientious setting rooted in strength and empowerment. How appropriate: my daughter and I were seated at the table named Empowerment. We were submerged in a sea of tables branded with positive messages such as Valued, Wise, Bold, Talented, and Worthy just to name a few. The event commenced with a funny, heartfelt welcome from local author Jenna McCarthy. Jenna’s witty welcoming words were followed by a

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rousing speech from fitness guru Jenny Schatzle. Schatzle highlighted the ways in which women can and should love their bodies and themselves. Schatzle said, “I’m here to wake you up! Who you are is who you get to be. Stop wishing for things that you don’t have and obsess about what you do have. Love what you’ve got!” Schatzle never fails to bring alacrity to a room. She used her words to remind all women and girls to live strong and be at peace with what life has given you. She pleaded with us to stop comparing ourselves to others and to look inside to our own successes and beauty.

BRIANA’S BEST BET

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he Arts Mentorship Program (AMP) was established in 2004 in Santa Barbara to support young performing artists. AMP gives scholarships, training, education, and mentorships to low-income and at-risk youth in our community. They have a partnership with Santa Barbara Dance Arts and just seem to be doing a whole lot of great things for our local youth. Please go to the website for more information and find out how you can support their cause: www.ampsb.org The Impact Hub graciously donated their entire space to house the “I Am Her She Is Me” luncheon. If you have not been into the Hub’s State Street location to check out all that they have going on, you must go see it! Impact Hubs have a global network of more than 15,000 members in 80 locations around the world. Santa Barbara now has two Hubs, the original location on State Street and a new space in the Funk Zone. You can explore more of the Impact concepts at www.impacthubsb.com.

SHE IS ME After lunch, we participated in breakout workshop sessions facilitated by Leslie Scott. Leslie is a local choreographer, activist, and mother. With the help of Santa Barbara Dance Arts owner Alana Tillim, we were split into groups to reflect on our own strengths and weaknesses, and to recognize the components that make up our mother/daughter relationship. During one workshop, my daughter wrote the following words to me: Dear Mom, I admire your bravery and your faith in yourself and everyone else around you. Love, Elli To say my eyes were dry would be a lie. What a special community we live in here in Santa Barbara! The team behind “I Am Her She Is Me” set forth with intentions to bridge the relationship between mothers and daughters while reinforcing the need to say “yes to independence, but not to wide, open spaces.” Even adults struggle to figure out who they are in this wild world. With the teenage years being flooded with emotions, no doubt, they have gained a bad reputation that needs to be reevaluated and rejuvenated. This pivotal time in a girl’s life does not have to be surrounded by conflict and controversy. It’s a time of growth and vision and transformation. If we can harness these changes that our daughters are experiencing and embrace the beauty behind the development, it can (and will) lead to a happier, healthier transition into adulthood. The luncheon reminded us that our relationships flourish when we lead with open eyes and ears, and most importantly, a solid heart.

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Set back from the street behind CalBRE 01201456 brick and wrought ironwork, magnolia trees and flowerbeds, this home is one of the largest and most magnificent in this neighborhood of great architectural gems. Meticulously restored 1904 Colonial Revival with three stories of secret passages and rooms, lawns, patios Estate Director 805.895.2760 and balconies. Surprises around pamela.regan@compass.com every corner. Formal living, dining, CalBRE 00863811 family, parlor, office, game room, sun porch, exercise room, and light-filled finished third floor attic used in the past as an art studio, and now a child’s delight complete with ballet studio, bedroom, bathroom and play areas.

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Compass is a licensed real estate broker (01991628) in the State of California and abides by Equal Housing Opportunity laws. All material presented herein is intended for informational purposes only. Information is compiled from sources deemed reliable but is subject to errors, omissions, changes in price, condition, sale, or withdraw without notice. To reach the Compass main office call 805.253.7700

805.253.7700 | compass.com

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REAL ESTATE VIEW by Steve Decker Steve Decker is the broker/owner at NextHome Decker Realty. A full-service, technology-based real estate brokerage serving Santa Barbara and San Luis Obispo counties. As a 46-year veteran of the real estate industry, he has successfully pursued many areas of the industry, including brokerage, investing, and development. He can be reached at NHDR.net or (805) 565-3400.

Difficult Times for Millennial Home Ownership in the Golden State

I

am 72 years old. At age 27, I bought my first home in 1971. It cost $38,700, which is $237,765 in today’s dollars. With a 10% down payment, I was able to obtain a conventional mortgage loan through a community savings and loan bank. The interest rate was 7.5% on a 30-year loan. The home was a two-family duplex in downtown Ridgewood, N.J. A demographically upscale suburban community. The home was a half-block from the center of the town and all its amenities and services. I rented out one of the two units to help pay for the mortgage, taxes, et cetera. I lived in the other unit. After three years in the Army, in 1969, I went into the building business. I built mid-level residential homes on speculation. I built 4-bedroom, 3-and-a-half-bath homes, with a two-car garage on a half-acre lot. The construction loans to build these homes came from the same savings and loan bank that lent the mortgage financing to buy my first home. The time taken to build these homes, from applying for the building permit to full completion and ready for occupancy, was 10 months. Fast-forward to today. A different time and a far different world it is here in California. The notion that today’s 20-somethings can do here what I did in my 20s is a pipe dream. California housing costs are the highest in the U.S., 230% higher than the national average. This has caused a substantial out-migration from California in the past 15 years. Those leaving are mostly in their 30s to 40s. The millennial generation, those born between 1980 and 2004, are the largest generation in American history. They are also facing an economy that has produced too few permanent, high-paying jobs. Millennials 25-34 years of age have incomes

20% less than the same age group in 1989. Here in California, more than half of this age group are failing to go out on their own, still living with relatives. Neither renting nor buying their own homes. In the past 25 years, the rate for home ownership among millennials has dropped 25%. The cost of renting is so high here that about 40% of income goes to rent, compared to 15% nationally, which substantially undermines the ability to save for a down payment. Despite historically low interest rates (virtually half of what I had to pay), the cost of a home here still puts the likelihood of acquisition much further down the road. Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) research has found that the rising disparity between the wealth and income of millennials and that of older generations has its basis in housing. A home being a store of wealth that can grow while you live in it. MIT further concluded that land use and building regulations are a major factor in restricting the production of housing. Not the availability of suitable land.

California housing costs are 230% higher than the national average

Recognizing the housing crisis here in California, while loath to reform the tangled regulatory mess strangling the production of housing, state legislators recently adopted a law allowing a home owner the ability to add an attached or detached “Accessory Dwelling Unit” to their homes. Such units are also known as second units, in-law units, or granny flats. To that list of names “a somewhat separate home, for at least one of our millennial children” should be added. However, the cost of construction here still doesn’t make these units inexpensive. A UC Berkley study held that one of these so called affordable accessory units can range up to $200,000 to build. Where does such funding come from? How many home owners are ready or willing to take on such a time-consuming project or expense? Is this really a solution to housing for young millennials? Of course not. The future for California millennials will be focused on their ability to become homeowners themselves. Have their own separate housing. Their own path to wealth creation. The ability of millennials to form families under a roof they can call their own, and all the long-term security that it brings, will depend on changes to policies that thwart such aspirations. 

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1396 Danielson Road

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delightful surprise awaits behind the gates of this fully fenced and comfortable single story ranch style home close to Miramar and Butterfly Beach. This approximately 1,798+/- sq. foot, 3 bedroom and 3 bathroom home offers living room with raised ceilings and large dining room with fireplace off the kitchen. All bedrooms are en-suite and master bedroom has access to the back patio. Updated kitchen includes a Viking four-burner stove and oven and Bosch dishwasher. Great outdoor patio for bar-b-ques, as well as an outdoor shower for washing off the day’s sand and surf. Conveniently located in close proximity to beach, Coast Village Road shopping, restaurants, and Montecito Union School. This is the perfect home to experience all the wonderful amenities Montecito has to offer. Offered at $1,795,000

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2244 East Valley Road

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xceptional gated and private Mediterranean estate built in 2001 with mountain views. Grand open floor plan with formal living and dining rooms. Gourmet chef’s kitchen adjacent to breakfast room and great room. Master suite with spa-like bath. Designer details throughout with 11’ ceilings & 8’ doors. Large backyard with sunny terraces. Room for a pool. Shared well. Lovely koi pond completes serene and peaceful backyard. Offered at $4,375,00 OPEN HOUSE: SUNDAY 2 – 4PM

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...continued from p.7

downer, or do you yield and hustle on to the carob-flecked mashed potato rosettes? You yield. YOU YIELD. Example 3: You’re at Saturday’s farmers market. Sunshine is falling all over the place, and Santa Barbarans are milling about and chatting and gesturing. The crowd has about it the electric happiness of a community fully and consciously inhabiting its gorgeous Saturday morning. The sky is so clear and blue and cloudless, you begin to suspect a trap. Or maybe that’s just me. You bump into some friends you haven’t seen in a while and it’s marvelous! You begin to gab and hug and affectionately wrinkle noses, and you’re all standing in the middle of one of the sun-struck market lanes with puh-lenty of room to pass on either side. Despite the breadth of the lane and the ease with which the other happy congregants walk around you, an older couple in straw hats stop dead in their tracks and begin blasting Califorbearance©. It is simply too awkward a Next Move to pivot to them and give them the Marceau for “Walk Around Us, Angrily Patient Oldsters.” So you keep talking with your friends and gesturing and sharing news, and all the while the oldsters are standing there like the chilling couple in Grant Woods’s

famous painting American Gothic, except the man isn’t holding a pitchfork and couldn’t be more frightening if he was. They’re holding satchels full of nature’s bounty and staring straight ahead like Manchurian assassins. As you hurriedly wrap up your conversation with the friends you see once in a blue moon, the couple and their Califorbearance©

that afflict and improve our counterparts outside the dome. EXALTATION AT HARRY’S Some years ago at Harry’s, I carefully watched the restaurant’s costumed manager as he made the rounds in his superfluous, ceremonial red vest, rubbing shoulders and making polite

The sky is so clear and blue and cloudless, you begin to suspect a trap. Or maybe that’s just me. remain lodged in the pedestrian flow like an arterial blockage. You finally move to concede their victory, and they pass you with a glance that is as communal and loving as Karloff’s face in a rainstorm. What is behind these increasing instances of Califorbearance©? Have we got it so good here? Are we so blessed by the g*ds of easy living that the sleepy and sated citizenry simply must find SOMETHING to be rankled by, some rattling inconvenience to push back against? It’s just possible that in a town as stripped of fear, privation, and the ordinary tractions of everyday living as Santa Barbara is, we secretly yearn for the therapeutic workaday vicissitudes

conversation with the diners. He stopped along a highball-and-platelittered table to speak to a man dining gingerly, and somewhat embarrassedly, it seemed, with his elderly and fraillooking mother. In the sepia light of the chandeliers, the scene, some tables distant, was without sound, but not without effect. The manager engaged the man’s mother in conversation, at one point placing his hand on her shoulder as would a congenial confidant. She tilted her beautiful face to receive his attentions, and I saw that her expression was alight, suddenly. Her lovely eyes blazed at this sincere businessman,

blazed with utter, unshielded delight, not with a simple explicable smile, but with a clear, radiant expression of bliss, an absolute incandescence, a contagion. He was only talking to her, but I could see he wasn’t approaching the conversation like a mincing stranger in the presence of the “old.” How long might it have been since she’d been spoken to as a woman, as a person – and not in the lilting baby talk we reserve for our elderly? I watched her grown son’s own face as he followed their exchange. When the manager leaned laughing into his brittle and ecstatic and beautiful mom and she laughed easily in return, the son’s face became beatific. It shone. The three comprised a bliss circuit. I could feel it from across the room. I’ve never forgotten it. So, yeah. There is some full-frontal Califorbearance© afflicting our leafy little paradise by the sea. On the other hand, here and everywhere else – in our restaurants and parlors and living rooms, our classrooms and public parks, and on the day-lit street corners of this sometimes startling burst of color and feeling – we find simple love, simple beauty, and the means to be lifted. If there is a little trouble in Eden, so be it. Trouble in Eden is, according to some, the beginning of something better anyway.

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with Mark Léisuré

Mark spends much of his time wandering Santa Barbara and environs, enjoying the simple things that come his way. A show here, a benefit there, he is generally out and about and typically has a good time. He says that he writes “when he feels the urge” and doesn’t want his identity known for fear of an experience that is “less than authentic.” So he remains at large, roaming the town, having fun. Be warned.

Conscious Networking Event

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he Santa Barbara Consciousness Network’s monthly Conscious Networking Event reached its one-year anniversary of the communitybuilding gatherings held at Unity of Santa Barbara in February. What did founder Forrest Leichtberg do to celebrate? Nothing. That’s not entirely true. There was a gathering off-site among friends and invited guests to mark the occasion, and one more Conscious Networking Event back at Unity. But then Leichtberg decided to take a step back to re-evaluate the reality of the previous events against his vision. You know, as in actually living the title of his organization and being more conscious about what was going on. Leichtberg, a relatively newcomer to Santa Barbara in his early 20s, created the organization and the monthly gatherings to realize his vision of hosting networking events where “conscious people could come together and nurture their collaboration in their efforts to impact the world and build community.” “People want to connect with others of like mind,” he explained. “The idea was to create a hub where everyone could get together, meet each other, connect, get some inspiration from each other to take home and make a difference.” The format was to start with an hour

for vendors in such area as healing arts, practitioners, healthy food, and more to mingle with potential clients before bringing everyone together in the hall for music followed by a presentation by a speaker. The events were an immediate hit. Seventy people showed up to the first Conscious Networking Event in February 2016, and by the time Rikka Zimmerman was the featured presenter in September, more than 200 people were attending each month. Rinaldo Brutoco, the past president of Chopra Foundation, and Pamela Oslie, the popular psychic and coach who specializes in color and auras, were also among the guests. Accordingly, Leichtberg’s learning took place in leaps and bounds. “At the beginning, it was like diving into the deep end of a pool without knowing how to swim,” he said. “I just had an idea and made it happen. But over the last several months, it’s taken on a life of its own. As it unfolds, it’s easy to see and feel into what needs to happen next to impact the audience and the community more. The experience we’ve had at each of the events has led to the next step; the ideas come from the trenches.” What that mostly looks like is going bigger. “A lot bigger, and better, and more organized,” Leichtberg said.

“Maybe 40 to 70 vendors. Bigger names “We’ve never done an event that’s as speakers. Getting the word out so that centered about love and intimate it becomes a staple in Santa Barbara. And relationships,” Leichtberg said. “For so then using that reputation to replicate many people, it’s one of the core drivers in other areas. Creating a community in their lives. The Hendricks’s work newsletter to connect events. Becoming touches people’s hearts. (After hearing a nonprofit and connecting with others.” them) people can make real changes in Leichtberg has been touched their lives and take something away.” frequently by the response in the first Indeed, the couple plan to offer onyear, nothing that feedback has moved site experiences, as well as tools to take him. “One woman came up to me and home at the June 2 presentation, Gay said, ‘Each time I come to your event, Hendricks said. The information they1987 Since I meet someone who changes my life impart comes directly from their own completely,’” he recalled. “There are lives. lots of magic moments, things that “It’s 100 percent,” he said. “We’re IansTire.com make a difference. I want to create a completely transparent. Everything we VOTED BES Se habla stronger way to be more cohesive for teach isespañol kitchen- and bedroom-tested. PLACE TO that collaboration to happen, so people We do everything at home before weSinc GET TIRES can experience things that might never bring it to the world. We never ask any happen any other way. We’re working person to do anything we haven’t done • Results Guaranteed on finding more ways to cause that to ourselves and found to be IansTire.co useful.” • FourOne Wheel happen during the expo networking method is to set aside time for parts of the event.” regular conversations toVOT Se intentional habla español Alignments Later this summer, the gatherings handle conflicts or challenges, he said.PLA – with a new name that’s still being “We separate business and romanticGET finalized to more accurately reflect the relationships, and partition those things We off. SellIf• Results updated vision – will move to UCSB’s there’s something going on, we Guaranteed All Major Lotte Lehmann Concert Hall, which don’t do it on the fly because relationship Brands • Four Wheel seats nearly 500, more than twice is a sacred space.” Of Tires Alignments Unity’s capacity. There are improved The Hendrickses will also talk and more focused efforts to reach more about individual growth as it relates members of the community, vendors to relationship, he said, focusing on Sell and individuals who might benefit. “the We importance of authenticity – All Major But first there’s one more transition beingBrands yourself. It’s learning how to event back at Unity, with a couple who communicate Of Tireswho you really are in your are among the biggest names in the work and coming from the deepest part personal growth field. Gay and Katie of your own authenticity, instead of Hendricks, who have written more than occupying a façade or what you think 40 books combined including numerous they would like… As people get more bestsellers, and whose work has been 4299½ deeply into that, all of their relationships State St. · Santa B featured on The Oprah Winfrey Show work better, both at work and at home.” and more than 500 radio and television For more information about the programs, will be on hand on Friday, Consciousness Network and the Events, June 2. They’ll talk about “Improving visit www.sbconsciousnessnetwork. Your Relationships Consciously”. com.

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IHeart SB

29

By Elizabeth Rose

I Heart SB is the diary of Elizabeth Rose, a thirty-something navigating life, love, and relationships in the Greater Santa Barbara area. Thoughts or comments? Email ihearterose@gmail.com

PRESTON

W

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hile driving to the library to finish my next I Heart, I turned on the radio just as a Robert Earl Keen song started to play:

You say you’re clearing out, the devil’s in your eyes No time to walk, no time to talk, no time for long goodbyes. The ticket’s in your hand, you’ve made that final call, The hard words flying by like punches in a barroom brawl… As the words came back to me, tears streamed down my face. It had been over a decade since I’ve heard this song and a year, almost to the day, since my friend Preston took his life. This old Texas country singer was his favorite, and I took it as a sign that he was right there singing along with me. I had known Preston since my sophomore year of high school. He sat next to me in Spanish II and his bright blonde hair and chocolate-brown eyes made girls blush, including me. He was an observer, a bit mysterious, maybe even a little shy. My high school sweetheart was best friends with him and six other guys, and that’s how we really got close. He and “the boys” became the brothers I never had. I loved to hug Preston a little too long, just to get on his nerves as a little sister would, then give him a big wet kiss on the cheek before letting him go. Some of my favorite memories of him are from college. The boys lived in a two-story townhouse about a half-mile from campus. It was a mecca for preparties, tailgating, kegs, after parties, you name it – and the perfect place to nurse a hangover. Preston would be the only one up early the next day, cleaning up, making breakfast, and doing his best to make the place a little less sinful. Hanging out with the guys meant endless pranks fit for middle schoolers so of course, I joined in. I once bought a glittery pink bumper sticker that read, “I Don’t Need A Man, I Have Batteries At Home”. My friend Ray and I snuck out to the parking lot and slapped it on the bumper of Preston’s cherry-red truck. We laughed our butts off when he drove away not knowing a thing. It wasn’t until much later when I realized he had taken the sticker off his bumper and put it on mine. I ran around town with that damn sticker for almost a week. I can still picture him giggling about it. His laugh sounded like a little kid being tickled. Preston had his quirks. Like the time I walked into his room around 8 in the morning and noticed he had been up all night studying for an economics exam with the “Bud Light Presents: Real Men of Genius” commercials playing on repeat. They went something like: Today we salute you, Mr. Really Bad Toupee Wearer… Made of space-age fibers, it can repel anything. Rain, wind, snow, and especially young women. This was typical Preston. He romanticized the simple working man and loved every bit of what it meant to be a Southerner – his Georgia accent was slow and sweet. His momma raised him with manners of a gentleman. We lost touch after college, but I kept up with him through mutual friends as best I could. I wasn’t able to make it to his memorial service as I hoped, but I’ll always remember him dressed in his signature style of khaki shorts, a red polo shirt, penny loafers without socks, a sun-bleached University of Georgia hat, and sportfishing sunglasses resting at the nape of his neck. My memory of us will live on the back porch of that old college townhouse, surrounded by friends, with Preston and I linked arm in arm screaming out lyrics of that same Keen song to the late-night sky: I am just what I am, I won’t apologize So if you go you’ll surely know you’ll have to come to realize Love don’t walk away, only people do So if you go or if you stay, you know I’ll keep on loving you. And after the song was over, I’d hug him a little too long, just to get on his nerves as a littler sister would, then give him a big wet kiss on the cheek before letting him go.  





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SYVSNAPSHOT

by Eva Van Prooyen Keeping a finger on the pulse of the Santa Ynez Valley: what to eat, where to go, who to meet, and what to drink. Pretty much everything and anything situated between the Santa Ynez and San Rafael Mountains that could tickle one’s interest.

DESTINATION: LOS PADRES CLASSIC KID CAMP FUN

CIRCLE V RANCH CAMP FOR KIDS re you ready for the summer? Are you ready for the sunshine? It is camp season and Circle V Ranch has announced eight summer camp sessions of six days and five nights of traditional, supervised activities for boys and girls ages 7 to 13; 14 to 17; and a Camper in Leadership Training (CILT) program on their 30-acre facility in the Los Padres National Forest across from Cachuma Lake. Campers enjoy a classic roundup of activities including archery, arts and crafts, hiking, swimming in the pool, learning about nature, reading skills, painting, photography, playing baseball, basketball, table tennis, foosball, soccer, miniature golf and of course, campfires, skits, and singing. There is no television, radio, or Internet; campers stay in wooden cabins or traditional canvas tents, and the three nutritious daily meals served family-style in the dining lodge are not only for food but also for more quintessential camp camaraderie and fellowship. Ray Lopez started as a counselor at Circle V Ranch Camp in1993 and has been camp director since 2008 says, “This year marks 72 years of welcoming campers from throughout Southern California. No child is turned away, since we have camperships to help pay the fees due to generous donors. I just know you’ll want to have your kids or grandkids attend Circle V, and I hope they will keep coming back like I did.”

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Summer Session Dates and Themes Session One: June 27 to July 2, Pirate Week Session Two: July 5-10, Holiday Week Session Three: July 11-16, Space Week Session Four: July 19-24, Talent Show Week Session Five: July 25-30, Carnival Week Session Six: August 2-7, International Week Session Seven: August 9-14, Medieval Week Session Eight: August 15 -20, Adventure Week Last year, the camp hosted more than 1,000 children. The fee for six days and five nights includes lodging, all meals, activities, recreation, and supervised fun is $450 per child. Scholarship (“campership”) requests are now being accepted for 2017 summer season. Founded by the Society of St. Vincent de Paul Los Angeles Council in 1945, Circle V Ranch Camp & Retreat Center is open to people of all beliefs and has been in operation in Santa Ynez Valley since 1990. Cost: $450 per camper – scholarships available Info: call (323) 224-6213 or visit www.circlevranchcamp.org FREE SUMMER NUTRITION CLASSES A quasi-summer camp option for adults comes in the form of free nutrition and diabetes education classes throughout the summer at Santa Ynez Valley Cottage Hospital. Encouraging healthy eating habits for all ages, clinical dietitian Stacey Bailey, MS, RD, CDE, says, “Summertime is a perfect time to practice healthier eating habits, especially with so many colorful, flavorful fresh fruits and vegetables around.” Participants can bring their own lunch to eat during the class. Class Schedule Friday, June 2, from 12 to 1 pm – What is the Ornish Diet? Friday, June 9, from 12 to 1 pm – Healthy Eating on a Budget Friday, June 30, from 12 to 1 pm – Potluck Strategies! Friday, July 7, from 12 to 1 pm – Let’s Talk About Coffee Friday, July 14, from 12 to 1 pm – Alcohol & Your Health Friday, July 21, from 12 to 1 pm – What is “Clean Eating?”

Friday, July 28, from 12 to 1 pm – Let’s Compare Protein Powders Friday, August 4, from 12 to 1 pm – Summer Time Smoothies Friday, August 11, from 12 to 1 pm – Grocery Store Tour Friday, August 18, from 12 to 1 pm – Keys to Weight Loss: What Works & What Doesn’t Friday, August 25, from 12 to 1 pm – Q & A Session: You Ask & The Dietitian Answers Where: Santa Ynez Valley Cottage Hospital, 2050 Viborg Road in Solvang Cost: Free and no RSVP required Info: For more information, contact Stacey Bailey directly at (805) 694-2351.

EVA’S TOP FAVES: MY PERSONAL PICKS, BEST BETS, HOT TIPS, SAVE THE DATES, AND THINGS NOT TO MISS!

GOING BATTY AT CACHUMA LAKE dventurers, nature-enthusiasts, and all those in celebration of the webbed winged and echolocation. Do you have a deep affinity for bats? What about a deep fear of them that you think you should overcome? In either case, the “Going Batty” events at the Cachuma Lake Nature Center are here to help. Whatever your reason – recreational, therapeutic, or scholastic, get an up-close and personal look at this creature in its natural habitat. When: All summer long starting Saturday, May 27, through Sunday August 27, at dusk – around 7:45 pm. Where: Cachuma Lake Neal Taylor Nature Center Cost: Free Info: www.clnaturecenter.org

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MEMORIAL DAY AT ZACA pend a warm wine-drenched Memorial Day afternoon at Zaca Mesa with complimentary live music from Sean Wiggins. Known for her guitar and vocals that are reminiscent of Melissa Etheridge and Bonnie Raitt and “hot enough to cook your dinner,” guests are encouraged to bring their friends, pack a picnic, enjoy a bottle of wine and listen to songs from Sean’s latest album, Clothing Optional Fridays. When: Saturday, May 27, from 12 to 4 pm Where: Zaca Mesa Winery & Vineyards, 6905 Foxen Canyon Road in Los Olivos Cost: free live music – wines and tastings at regular price Info: www.zacamesa.com

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THE 13TH ANNUAL LOS OLIVOS JAZZ & OLIVE FESTIVAL pend the afternoon tasting wine from 30 local wineries alongside 30 different olive-themed dishes prepared by Valley chefs, and sampling olive products by vendors while listening to live jazz by the Los Angeles Jazz “A-Team” musicians: Rich Ruttenberg, Bob Sheppard, Alex Boneham, Larry Koonse, and Mark Ferber, along with Grammy nominee vocalist Denise Donatelli. The Jazz and Olive Festival is presented by the Los Olivos Rotary Club, and all funds generated from the event are used for charitable projects supported in part by the Rotary Club. This year, the event will be limited to 650 olive lovers. When: Saturday, June 3, from 1 to 4 pm Where: Lavinia Campbell Park in downtown Los Olivos Cost: $65 per person Info: Call (805) 325-9280 for check or credit card orders, order online at jazzandolivefestival.org, or purchase tickets at The Book Loft in Solvang and at the Corner House Coffee in Los Olivos.

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PLEIN AIR PINOT Spend Memorial Day weekend painting in the vineyards at Lincourt winery. Known for small-lot bottlings of pinot noir and chardonnay bearing the names of women who have influenced and shaped owner Bill Foley’s life – including his wife, mother, grandmother, and aunt – this boutique winery invites you to grab a glass, a brush, and enjoy a stress-free vineyard environment to inspire your creative palette or palate. No previous painting experience necessary; a trained artist will walk you through the entire painting process step-by-sip. When: Sunday, May 28, and/or Monday, May 29, from 10:30 am to 1 pm Where: Lincourt Vineyard, 1711 Alamo Pintado Road in Solvang Cost: $65 per painter – includes a full tasting of Lincourt wines and all supplies Info: GypsyStudiosArt.com/events/ for more information 






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