Santa Barbara

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$6.99 DISPLAY UNTIL 9/28/20

Cover

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WILLIAM LAMAN F U R N I T U R E • GA R D E N • AN T I Q U E S

William Laman

ITALIAN ZODIAC GUERIDON IN THE STYLE OF GIO PONTI; CIRCA 1940

149 6 E A ST VA LLE Y ROAD

MONTECITO CA 93108

TEL 805.969.2840

FA X 805.969.2839

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M O N T E C I T O E S TAT E S. C O M

Coldwell Banker - Solakian

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M O N T E C I T O E S TAT E S. C O M

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805 565/2208


Riskin Partners

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Riskin Partners

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s a n t a b a r b a r a ’s n u m b e r o n e r e a l e s t a t e t e a m DINA LANDI

SARAH HANACEK

JASMINE TENNIS

ROBERT RISKIN


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Giffin & Crane HUB OF THE HOUSE

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HALLPARDOE DESIGN

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we would like to extend our sincere gratitude for the unwaivering support & friendship of the santa barbara community & beloved visitors o v e r t h e y e a r s . w e a re h o n o re d t o b e p a r t o f t h i s re s i l i e n t c o m m u n i t y.

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U P S TA I R S AT P I E R R E L A F O N D

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ERIC HASKELL

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A REGINALD JOH N SON M AST ER P I ECE SANTA BARBARA, CA | THE AMERICAN RIVIERA

Village Properties - Dore

1915 LAS TUNAS ROAD | SHOWING UPON REQUEST

Real Estate Team Tiffany & Cathy are both Santa Barbara natives with over a decade of Real Estate teamwork. Working diligently with buyers and sellers they are ready to assist you in this new real estate environment. 805-947-0608 • info@ownsantabarbara.com • OwnSantaBarbara.com • DRE 01806890/01788156

All information provided is deemed reliable, but has not been verified and we do not guarantee it. We recommend that buyers make their own inquiries.


Cassandria Blackmore


sanc·tu·ar·y

A place of refuge or safety

Berkshire Hathaway - Scibird

2480 Whitney Avenue - Ocean View Lisa & Richard Scibird 805.570.9177 / 530.563.8117 Lisa.Scibird@bhhscal.com RScibird@gmail.com DRE 02027505 / 02028346

Asking: $1,995,000 Download the app: Montecito Santa Barbara Homes

© 2020 Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices California Properties (BHHSCP) is a member of the franchise system of BHH Affiliates LLC. BHHS and the BHHS symbol are registered service marks of Columbia Insurance Company, a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate. BHH Affiliates LLC and BHHSCP do not guarantee accuracy of all data including measurements, conditions, and features of property. Information is obtained from various sources and will not be verified by broker or MLS. Buyer is advised to independenly verify the accuracy of that information.


Sold

Listed For: $3,995,000 Represented Seller

Listed For: $2,495,000 Represented Buyer

Listed For: $1,995,000 Represented Buyer

Remodel Experts

Berkshire Hathaway - Scibird

RENEWED

REFRESHED

REIMAGINED

Lisa & Richard Scibird 805.570.9177 / 530.563.8117 Lisa.Scibird@bhhscal.com RScibird@gmail.com DRE 02027505 / 02028346

Š 2020 Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices California Properties (BHHSCP) is a member of the franchise system of BHH Affiliates LLC. BHHS and the BHHS symbol are registered service marks of Columbia Insurance Company, a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate. BHH Affiliates LLC and BHHSCP do not guarantee accuracy of all data including measurements, conditions, and features of property. Information is obtained from various sources and will not be verified by broker or MLS. Buyer is advised to independenly verify the accuracy of that information.


TABLE OF CONTENTS

45 RS

YEA

38

LETTER

40 CONTRIBUTORS 45

SUMMER OF ‘75

4 8 OJAI/VENTURA 56 SUMMERLAND/CARPINTERIA

TOC

62 MONTECITO 72

SANTA BARBARA

86

CELLAR IN THE SEA Written by Gabe Saglie. Photographs by Michael Haber

96

S.O.S. Written by Hollye Jacobs. Photographs by Sam Frost

104 MAKING WAVES Written by L.D. Porter

116 SOCIAL STUDIES Written by L.D. Porter

122 AN EVOLVING SOUNDSCAPE Written by Joan Tapper. Photographs by Sam Frost

130 Z-GIRL Written by Jim O’Mahoney

138 LIVE 32 s u m m e r 2 0 2 0

Paddle out for unity at Leadbetter


SOLD! 1800 East Mountain Drive, Montecito

Berkshire Hathaway - Easter

SOLD! 796 Park Lane West, Montecito The Easter Team is proud to celebrate over 45 years of combined experience and hard work as a family owned and operated business. Please call or email us for any information regarding the real estate market in your area - our clients and our community have always come first.

REAL Service. REAL People. REAL Trust. REAL ESTATE

JENNY EASTER I 805.455.6294 GLORIA EASTER I 805.570.0403 BROOKE EBNER I 805.453.7071 Associates@EasterTeamRealtors.com


PRESIDENT/EDITORIAL DIRECTOR

Jennifer Smith

EXECUTIVE EDITOR

Gina Tolleson CREATIVE CONSULTANT

James Timmins ART PRODUCTION MANAGER

Charlotte Bryant

CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

Tileco / Masthead

Charles Donelan Amelia Fleetwood Jennifer Blaise Kramer Christine Lennon Dawn Moore L.D. Porter Gabe Saglie Katherine Stewart Joan Tapper CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS

David Cameron Leela Cyd Andrew Durham Blue Gabor Tierney Gearon Michael Haber Brian Hodges Elizabeth Messina Nancy Neil Dewey Nicks Victoria Pearson Lisa Romerein Randall Slavin Trevor Tondro Coral von Zumwalt

INTERN

Emily LaďŹ tte


Unander Construction

Meticulous Attention to Detail Since 1977 PRE-CONSTRUCTION, PROJECT MANAGEMENT, CUSTOM HOMEBUILDING & REMODELING

UNANDERCONSTRUCTION.COM | 805.682.5685

RONALD FRINK ARCHITECTS

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D&D PAINTING

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JNL GLASS


CHAIRMAN 1999-2003

Robert N. Smith

PUBLISHER

Sarah McCormick CLIENT SERVICES + PRODUCTION DIRECTOR

Amy Lipson

©2020 BY SMITH PUBLISHING GROUP, LLC.

All rights reserved. No part of this periodical may be reproduced in any form or by any means without prior written consent from Santa Barbara Magazine.

Handelman / Masthead

TO OUR READERS

Santa Barbara Magazine invites you to share with us your reactions to our latest stories. Letters are not for publication, but please include your address in case we need to contact you. By mail: Reader Response Department, Santa Barbara Magazine, 2064 Alameda Padre Serra, Ste. 120, Santa Barbara, CA 93103. By e-mail: editorial@sbmag.com. SUBSCRIPTIONS

Single copies and subscriptions are available at shop.sbmag.com. Domestic rates are $19.95 for one year. For Canada, add $49 postage; for all other countires, add $69. For subscriber customer service, please contact 818-286-3121 or sbrcs@magserv.com ADVERTISERS

For advertising inquiries, contact Sarah McCormick, publisher, at 805-965-5999 ext. 131.


Berkshire Hathaway - Kotlyar

Four Acre Montecito Ocean View Legacy Estate | 660LaderaLane.com

MK REAL ESTATE GROUP Marsha Kotlyar | Patrice Serrani | Allie Baxter 805.565.4014 | associates@marshakotlyar.com | Lic. # 01426886

Š2020 Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices California Properties (BHHSCP) is a member of the franchise system of BHH Affiliates LLC. BHH Affiliates LLC and BHHSCP do not guarantee accuracy of all data including measurements, conditions, and features of property. Information is obtained from various sources and will not be verified by broker or MLS. Buyer is advised to independently verify the accuracy of that information.


@ sant ab arbar amag

FROM THE EDITORIAL DIRECTOR

38 s u m m e r 2 0 2 0

Edit Letter

Jennifer Smith

ILLUSTRATION: DAVID DOWNTON

S

anta Barbara is the sort of place that stays with you—in your soul—from the first time you experience all its intoxicating charms. It is straight out of central casting when you imagine a quintessential California beach town. (Maybe that’s one reason “Hollywood” started here with Flying A Studios before moving to Los Angeles in search of tax credits in the 1920s.) I can’t think of a more picturesque place, with dramatic mountains backing the ocean, vistas dotted with red tile roofs, and adobe structures aplenty. And then there are the scents of this place—night-blooming jasmine, eucalyptus, orange —that seem to blend with the sea-salted air. There’s perfection all around—visually, aromatically, and most importantly with our singular lifestyle. The cultural scene, the food and wine innovators, our educational institutions, the sporting life, the nature that surrounds us…heaven! For the 45th anniversary of Santa Barbara Magazine, we wanted to celebrate life on our shores. Although we have had our fair share of trials and tribulations, we are resilient and have come through some of the darkest times stronger together. Take Direct Relief (“S.O.S.,” page 96). The amazing nonprofit, which is based here, is a source of help globally in turbulent times. We sat down with its fearless leader, Thomas Tighe, for an exclusive interview as we highlight the best of Santa Barbara (and DRI certainly fits that bill). Santa Barbara has always stood at the forefront of sustainable living (Earth Day was born here),

and to acknowledge that we go deep with Ocean Fathoms (“Cellar in the Sea,” page 86). They have a unique way of aging and storing wines, using cool ocean waters for fermentation. We also pay homage to artist and longtime resident Hank Pitcher (“Making Waves,” page 104). Throughout his impressive and prolific career his subjects have focused on life here. A fun fact: his artwork appeared in the very first issue of this publication! Speaking of art, our special-edition cover by Santa Barbara artist Pedro de la Cruz was commissioned by our extraordinary editorial team, including some who have worked at this magazine for 20 years. I love all that the painting captures about our city, especially its joie de vivre. From cover to cover, this issue is full of interesting stories from sculptor Karon Davis (“Social Studies,” page 116) to the historic Music Academy of the West (“An Evolving Soundscape,” page 122) to ‘70s skateboarding icon Peggy Oki (“Z-Girl,” page 130). I know you will enjoy. And isn’t that the point? To discover, to experience, and to bask in all the beauty of life on the American Riviera? I, for one, am honored to have been at the helm of this magazine for more than two decades. On this important anniversary, I am still head over heels in love with this town (and this magazine)! Because, as I’ve said, from the first moment one steps on these shores, you are hooked. From the day I moved here as a teen from the Midwest, I knew I would never leave… because really once you find the Garden of Eden, where else would you go? Thank you for being a part of this magazine’s journey over the decades. We’re looking forward to the next 45!


Mark Weaver


CONTRIBUTORS

@ sant ab arbar amag

HOLLYE JACOBS

PEDRO DE LA CRUZ “I’ve enjoyed contributing to the magazine. Knowing this had to be a piece of art that gave us all hope and also offered unity made it more special to me,” says de la Cruz, who did the art for this issue’s cover. S.B. MUST DOS Hiking the SB trails or going for a good swim at the beach • Picking up a warm cup of coffee at a coffee shop and sitting down to draw. • Riding my bike around town with my daughter, because it relaxes me. • Being home watching movies with my family. • I’m a big fan of eating by the harbor and having gorgeous views of Santa Barbara.

“Interviewing Thomas Tighe was a gift in my life. One of his many superpowers is the capacity to be fully and wholeheartedly present —with grace, compassion, and empathy—during the most difficult of life circumstances,” says Jacobs, who wrote “S.O.S.” (page 96). S.B. MUST DOS Deliver food for the DuoMORE project. • Physically distanced social walks on Butterfly Beach. • BOND Fitness virtual workouts. • Coffee at Merci Montecito.

Contributors

ON THE COVER

Love and Unity,

canvas, 30 x 48 in. “Working on this project gave me the opportunity to share my light and optimism for life. I have great faith for the future,” says de la Cruz.

40 s u m m e r 2 0 2 0

JIM O’MAHONEY “It was great going back to 1975—the golden year of skateboarding—and bowing to the queen Peggy Oki and the 1975 Santa Barbara City Skateboard Championships with all the skateboard royalty in tow,” says O’Mahoney, who wrote “Z-Girl” (page 130). S.B. MUST DOS Monday nights with a few drinks, loud electric blues, and BBQ • The farmers market on Saturday for premium tomatoes, fujis, avos, and flowers. • Giving diving lessons at Muller Aquatic. • Senior moves at Skater’s Point.

PHOTOGRAPHS: PEDRO DE LA CRUZ, ERIK MADRID

2020, acrylic on


MONTECITO Beautifully Restored Monterey Colonial Estate 5BD/5BA ~ POOL ~ PAVILION ~ STUDIO GUEST HOUSE ~ PRIME 1 ACRE LOCATION LISTED AT $5,650,000

Coldwel Banker - Conger

COLDWELL B A NK E R RE ALT Y

CHARLIE PETERSEN 805.637.0312 CharliePetersenProperties.com CalRE 001742017

SUSAN CONGER 805.565.8838 SusanConger.com CalRE 00545024

The property information herein is derived from various sources that may include, but not be limited to, county records and the Multiple Listing Service, and it may include approximations. Although the information is believed to be accurate, it is not warranted and you should not rely upon it without personal verification. Real estate agents affiliated with Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage are independent contractor agents and are not employees of the Company. Š2019 Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage. All Rights Reserved. Coldwell Banker Residential Brokerage fully supports the principles of the Fair Housing Act and the Equal Opportunity Act. Owned by a subsidiary of NRT LLC. Coldwell Banker, the Coldwell Banker Logo, Coldwell Banker Global Luxury and the Coldwell Banker Global Luxury logo service marks are registered or pending registrations owned by Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC.


Photograph: WhitneyHartmann.com

Bon Fortune

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Birgit Klein Bringing European Style to Santa Barbara

F

or Birgit Klein, European style is deeply rooted. Born in Germany, Bee studied interior design in London, where she opened her first studio in 2006. After launching a studio in Los Angeles in 2009, Bee opened a second office in 2015 in Montecito where her family calls home, having fallen in love with its small town feel and international sensibilities. With clients all over the world, Bee always infuses her European background into her work. Now, that cultivated, global, timeless style can be seen first-hand at Bee’s very first showroom, located right in our own backyard. Set in the heart of San Ysidro Village, the showroom and design studio is a one-stop shop for design. Clients can browse and shop European textiles, lighting, and accessories that haven’t yet been offered in Santa Barbara. Warm, inviting, and layered with ideas, the showroom is a place to shop worldly, one-off pieces, upholstery, and case goods plus Bee’s own collection (which is made in L.A.). It’s also a destination where clients can come dream up any piece of furniture they can imagine. Anything is possible and the team shows how to pull it all together, offering full-interior design services in a unique shopping experience. Together with her team here in Montecito and in LA, Bee creates timeless and livable interiors from California to The Hamptons and from London to the South of France. Services range from interior design, interior architecture to furniture design. For Bee, it’s all about offering Santa Barbara the very best of both worlds—access to modern, European style while keeping it local.

BIRGIT KLEIN 310.246.9121 info@birgitklein.com www.birgitklein.com

525 SAN YSI DRO ROAD, MONT ECI TO, CA • MON-FRI 10AM - 5PM AND BY AP POI NTMENT


JEFFREY ALAN MARKS EAST HAMPTON

MONTECITO

SANTA MONICA

JAM-DESIGN.COM 310.207.2222

Jeffrey Alan Marks


WE

@sa nta ba r ba r a m a g

LIVE

IN PARADISE

Live

SUMMER OF ‘75 Nostalgic and hopeful for the next generation, we look back at 45 years of A local’s treasure of oldschool bar and restaurant memorabilia collected by

fun in the sun…What’s your all-time favorite Santa Barbara spot?

Jim O’Mahoney.

45


TURNING

THE PAGE Santa Barbara Magazine makes its entrance Where were you in the summer of 1975? If you were in Santa Barbara you undoubtedly were intrigued by the first issue of this magazine, with an image of the Channel Islands on the cover. Inside, along with that feature were stories on actor Burl Ives, Santa Barbara history by Walker Tomkins, local theater and art—including a Hank Pitcher painting of a surfer—and diving for abalone just off the coast. Plus comings and goings on the social scene. Thanks to our readers and advertisers for coming on this 45-year journey with us. We look forward to being with you for many great issues to come!

Live The debut issue of Santa Barbara

Magazine featured a photograph of the east end of Anacapa Island at sunset by Henry L. Fechtman.

46 s u m m e r 2 0 2 0


WE LIVE IN PARADISE RETRO ACTION The local ‘70s surf scene comes alive again in a collection of Jeff Divine photos

OPPOSITE, TOP TO BOTTOM: Hollister Ranch; Shaun Tomson, the Pipeline, Oahu; Matt

Live

As a prolific shooter and photo editor for Surfer magazine four decades ago, Jeff Divine covered the close-knit, tribal surf culture from the West Coast to Hawaii, including the lively Santa Barbara scene. 70S SURF PHOTOGRAPHS ($39.95, T. Adler Books), edited by Tom Adler and Evan Backes, showcases the athletes and their oceanic feats of daring, with an occasional nod to skateboarder aficionados. “Coming to Rincon from La Jolla, where I grew up,” says Divine, “opened my eyes to different kinds of waves—long, calfaching rides.” From Shaun Tomson in top form at the Pipeline to a wave-level view off Hollister Ranch, the images will bring back memories of the way things once were. Available at artbook.com. JOAN TAPPER

Moore, Montecito Union School. THIS PAGE TOP TO BOTTOM: Scott Price, Lower Trestle, San Clemente; the book cover, California Street, Ventura.

“Rincon opened my eyes to different kinds of waves.” J E F F D I V I N E

47


WE LIVE IN PARADISE

@ sant ab arbar amag

While we’ve all been on pause and staying safe and healthy at home, our communities have made some changes. We applaud and support local businesses who have pivoted and even opened new ventures in this uncertain time… herewith, our ones to watch and welcomed new neighbors!

The former living room of the Montgomery House is now Porch Gallery’s front room. Left to right: Mahogany wood sculpture by Douglas Tausik Ryder; photographs by Victoria Pearson (archival pigment print)

Live

Although Lisa Casoni and Heather Stobo did not invent the live/work concept, they’ve certainly perfected it. Partners in life and work, Casoni and Stobo own PORCH GALLERY. Located in the historic Montgomery House (built in 1874) where the pair also reside, the gallery offers an exciting mix of contemporary art by regional artists in an intimate residential setting. Casoni and Stobo also curate the gallery’s exhibitions; currently on view is the “Six Foot Table Project,”where seven artists were invited to design their own tables; and the tables are spaced six feet apart in the gallery to reflect social distancing guidelines. Kirsten Stoltmann describes her table— The Long Conversation—as “a table filled with burnt and melted candles from hours and hours of

48 s u m m e r 2 0 2 0

conversation about what is happening in the world today, which is a lot.” All in all, the show is a varied and poignant meditation on the complex issues facing humanity at this critical moment in time. In September the gallery will focus on recent work by noted Ojai artist Dennis Mukai, a graduate of L.A.’s Art Center College of Design whose highly successful commercial art career launched in the 1980s and featured celebrity portrait illustrations of the young and beautifully restless (Pamela Anderson, Prince, and more). His move to Ojai eight years ago prompted a pivot to fine art, and his new works are sublime images of nature using pigment ink on 100% rag. (September 3 through October 26). 310 E. Matilija Street, Ojai, 805-6207589, porchgalleryojai.com. L.D. PORTER

PHOTOGRAPHS: VICTORIA PEARSON

Live Love Work


OJAI

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: Kirsten Stoltmann’s Life is

Live

a Bowl of Whatever, oil on magazine page, 8.5 x 11 in.; Stoltmann’s, The Long Conversation, 2020, wax and resin on

wood (edition of 5); the retail space at Porch Gallery; Dennis Mukai, Resilience, 2020, pigment ink on 100% rag, 33 x 17 in.

49


Plump pillows define

OJAI

a relaxation space at the Magic Hour studio (left), which offers tea and accessories (below) through subscription boxes like this Self-Love box, $66, featuring Child’s Pose tea and Japanese incense.

TEA TIME

Light & Space The airy studio of LIGHT AND SPACE is a sanctuary for an array of yoga classes, meditation, music, and healing bodywork. Keep up your daily practice with their virtual offerings online. 915 E. Ojai Ave., Ojai, 805-798-9029, lightandspaceyoga.com.

Zhena Muzyka’s vision is to create connection through the act of sharing tea. In her MAGIC HOUR studio she hosts tea circles and other ceremonies. To share the inspiration at home she offers curated subscription boxes that include teas, biodynamic botanicals, and spiritual jewelry. 928 E. Ojai Ave., Ojai, 805-798-9199, clubmagichour.com.

Live

Comfort Food comforting touch to a Wallace Neff estate room.

Ojai Valley Revamp Spend a staycation at one of the OJAI VALLEY INN’S newly renovated Wallace Neff estate rooms (from $399/night). Named after the famed architect of the original guestroom building, the rooms and suites now feature relaxing neutral-hued furnishings and luxe amenities—think Frette bed linens, Carrara marble-accented bathrooms, and Illy espresso machines. 905 Country Club Rd., Ojai, 855-6978780, ojaivalleyinn.com.

50 s u m m e r 2 0 2 0

Buffalo cauliflower is a menu favorite at the OJAI PUB, where casual patio dining includes a view of

the Topa Topa mountains with the burgers, plantbased fare (think crispy fried tofu sandwich), and curated cocktails—order up the Mr. Clean, a spicy turmeric-enhanced vodka libation. 914 E. Ojai Ave., Ojai, 805-669-7729, ojaipub.com.

Ojai Pub’s Superbloom Spritz.

PHOTOGRAPHS: LIGHT AND SPACE, JIRO SCHNEIDER

Frette linens add a


Compass - White

E LE GA NT M O N T EC I TO FA R MH OU S E

705 OAK GROVE DRIVE COMPLETELY RENOVATED AND REIMAGINED IN 2016 5 BED | 7 BATH | .97 ACRE | $6, 495,000

LINDSAY PARRISH 805.451.7609 lindsay.parrish@compass.com DRE 02007433 Compass is a real estate broker licensed by the State of California and abides by Equal Housing Opportunity laws. License Number 01991628. All material presented herein is intended for informational purposes only and is compiled from sources deemed reliable but has not been verified. Changes in price, condition, sale or withdrawal may be made without notice. No statement is made as to accuracy of any description. All measurements and square footages are approximate.

MICHELE WHITE 805.452.7515 michele.white@compass.com DRE 01930309


VENTURA

MUST DO CLOCKWISE FROM LEFT: The artist at a recent opening of her work at at The Basic Premise gallery in Ojai; detail from

The Kiss, 2019, collage of tissue paper, acrylic medium, and photographs, 36 x 36 in.; Reincarnation Mask, 2019,

Bring some wine and a tablecloth and pick up some fresh oysters, ceviche, or clam steamers at THE JOLLY OYSTER Shuck Shack to be enjoyed seaside at Ventura’s San Buenaventura State Beach Park. 911 San Pedro St., 805-798-4944, thejollyoyster.com

plaster mold of the artist’s face, red pigment, Painted Lady Butterflies, wax, and resin, 18 x 18 in.

One to Watch There are a multitude of layers at work in VANESSA WALLACE-GONZALES’s art. The most obvious is the textural layering of material in her “skin” collages, composed of bits of painted paper combined with organic matter—leaves, insects, flowers, abalone shells—that overlap and mingle. Her work includes masks, a traditional way to disguise identity. There’s also a layering of her own identity, a piece depicting two figures entwined is entitled Embrace Myself. And an overarching layer involves the concepts of myth and archetype, which the artist acknowledges employing as tools to explore the act of self-creation. Recently, Wallace-Gonzales expanded the scope of her work to include installations, incorporating taste (tea), smell (fragrance), and performance (live models adorned with items that appear in her work). A Ventura native, Wallace-Gonzales graduated from the Maryland Institute College of Art (one of the oldest art colleges in the United States) and studied in Florence, Italy. She’s currently at work curating a group show addressing the Black Lives Matter movement.

Vanessawallacegonzales.com. L.D.P.

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We

Live

L OVE Alchemist’s 3 Immortelles face serum ($77, narayan beauty.com) to repair damaged skin.

With a Kick At FLYING EMBER’S, named after the 2017 Thomas Fire, which nearly decimated its fermentation lab in Ojai, owner Bill Moses is now creating hard kombucha out of the Ventura brewery. Made with botanicals and adaptogens— think rhodiola rosé or grapefruit thyme with a hint of ginger and turmeric—each blend contains healthy probiotics and about as much alcohol as a bottle of beer. Cheers to that! Flyingembers.com.


T h e O l d e s t C o m m e r c i a l W i n e ry i n S a n ta B a r b a r a C o u n t y F A M I L Y O W N E D & O P E R AT E D S I N C E 19 6 2

Lafond Winery & Vine yards

Santa Barbara Winery

Pierre LaFond - Wendy Foster T H A N K Y O U T O O U R S A N TA B A R B A R A C O U N T Y C O M M U N I T Y & F R I E N D LY V I S I T O R S F O R Y O U R S U P P O R T we’d like to extend our sincere gratitude for the support & friendship of the santa barbara community & our loyal wine club members over the years. w e a re h o n o re d t o b e p a r t o f t h i s re s i l i e n t c o m m u n i t y.

P I E R R E L A F O N D . D AV I D L A F O N D . M I C H E L L E L A F O N D

S A N TA B A R B A R A W I N E RY S A N TA B A R B A R A F U N K Z O N E TA S T I N G R O O M & W I N E R Y 2 0 2 A N A C A PA S T R E E T, S A N TA B A R B A R A | 8 0 5 . 9 6 3 . 3 6 3 3 W W W . S B W I N E R Y. C O M

L A F O N D W I N E RY & V I N E YA R D S W I N E R Y & V I N E YA R D S I N S TA . R I TA H I L L S 6 8 5 5 S A N TA R O S A R O A D , B U E L LT O N | 8 0 5 . 6 8 8 . 7 9 2 1

S A N TA B A R B A R A F U N K Z O N E TA S T I N G R O O M 1 1 1 YA N O N A L I S T R E E T, S A N TA B A R B A R A | 8 0 5 . 8 4 5 . 2 0 2 0

W W W . L A F O N D W I N E R Y. C O M


Pacific Architects

Providing exceptional service, design and insights in Architecture, Interior Design and Planning.

Residential, Commercial and Institutional, for over 30 years.

Pacific Architects, Inc. 805.565.3640 | www.pacificarchitectsinc.com Photography by Jim Bartsch and Crystal Waye


Thank You.

Healthcare Professionals First Responders Sanitation Teams Grocery Store Clerks Delivery Carriers Restaurant Workers Caregivers Utility Workers

Collectors Sotheby’sWaste Martin Warehouse Workers Generous Neighbors Heroes and Helpers And so many more

In good times and bad, always committed.

Taryn Martin

805.636.6442 | Taryn.Martin@sothebyshomes.com TarynMartinRealEstate.com © Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc. All rights reserved. Sotheby’s International Realty® is a registered trademark. This material is based upon information which we consider reliable but because it has been supplied by third parties, we cannot represent that it is accurate or complete and it should not be relied upon as such. This offering is subject to errors, omissions, changes including price or withdrawal without notice. If your property is listed with a real estate broker, please disregard. It is not our intention to solicit the offerings of other real estate brokers. We are happy to work with them and cooperate fully. Operated by Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc. Real estate agents affiliated with Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc. are independent contractor sales associates and are not employees of Sotheby’s International Realty, Inc. Equal Housing Opportunity. Featured Agent: Taryn Martin DRE: 1995581


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SUMMERLAND

Design

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: Shane Brown; the original Summerland Post Office turned boutique; authentic garden details.

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Shane Brown, founder of Big Daddy Antiques, has shops in Los Angeles, San Francisco, Palo Alto, and Aspen. Now he’s joining Summerland’s evolution into a design destination (along with Garde, Field + Fort, Porch, and the Antique Collective) by transforming the former Café Luna space into a garden design center called THE WELL. Shoppers can peruse plants, gifts, books, lighting, upcycled furniture, and garden ideas, such as a 60-foot European-inspired fountain that customers can recreate. “Typically, hardscape is just part of the charm of the store, but here we are able to do the same thing in your home,” says Brown, a Montecito resident who also hopes to host on-site pop-ups and dinners. “Summerland has had its highs and lows. I hope we’re transforming it back where it used to be, where you can shop and make a day of it.” 2350 Lillie Ave., Summerland, 805-695-2545,

thewellsummerland.com. JENNIFER BLAISE KRAMER

PHOTOGRAPHS: TOP AND BOTTOM RIGHT, SAM FROST; LEFT, STUDIO ARNA

Wishing Well


CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: a custom Garde sofa; the bedroom; Ark

Journal, on offer at Garde for design inspiration.

Stay the Night Ever admired a décor store so much you wanted to move in? Garde Summerland has made that possible with GARDE HOUSE, a fully furnished, one-bedroom apartment upstairs in the firm’s chic renovated barn in Summerland. The shoppable interior includes toiletries, linens, TV, wi-fi, and a Sonos player. Rate: $350/night with a two-night minimum. Available through Airbnb.

Design

DECOR

BLACK BOOK BOTANIK, 805-565-3831, botanikinc.com, colorful home and garden goods. FIELD+FORT, 805-770-7897, fieldandfort.com, antique and bespoke wares, plus a café. GARDE, 805-845-8384, gardeshop.com, craft-focused California minimalism. PORCH, 805-684-0300, porchsb.com, furnishings and accessories for indoors and out. Coming soon to Lillie Ave. SUMMERLAND ANTIQUE COLLECTIVE, 805-565-3189, summerlandantiquecollective.com, designer-curated items large and small.

SUMMERLAND ORIENTAL RUGS, 805-565-7998, textiles from around the world.

SWEET HARVEST Tireless Summerland booster—and chatelaine of Montecito’s Letter Perfect stationery boutique— Leslie Person Ryan has added “farmer” to her already lengthy CV. Her SWEET WHEEL FARM & FLOWERS supplies truly organic food, flowers, and other delectable goodies—sticky buns!—every day from 9:30 am to 5 pm (5:30 pm closing on Saturdays). A second cart is parked at 1150 Coast Village Road in Montecito, open Tuesdays through Saturdays, 8:30 am to 4 pm. But there’s more. In addition to providing free food for the needy, Sweet Wheel has partnered with the Carpinteria Unified School District to create a pilot organic agriculture program for students in kindergarten through fifth grade. The first project focuses on pineapple farming, with each grade participating in specific projects in addition to learning how to grow and tend the plants. “I will be showing how to grow, and we will root our fruits during the summer and then plant in the fall,” says Person Ryan. “Then we’ll move to corn.” 805-770-3677, 2285 Lille Ave., Summerland, sweetwheelfarms.com. L.D.P.

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CARPINTERIA

Sea Fare “A beach town needs a real seafood place,” says Los Angeles restaurateur Warner Ebbink. The proprietor of Little Dom’s, the MiniBar Hollywood, and the 101 Coffee Shop has been a Carpinteria resident for the last five years, and he long had his eye on the corner of Linden Avenue and Seventh Street as the spot to provide what he was missing. “I grew up in Manhattan Beach where there were classic fish restaurants,” says Ebbink. “I always wanted to do that.” When Sly’s restaurant closed and the location became available, Ebbink was quick to act. With his longtime partner, chef Brandon Boudet, he began planning a local spinoff of Little Dom’s, retaining the updated Italian-American neighborhood vibe but adding a definite seafood emphasis. His century-old brick building has a bright coat of paint and a splashy Art Deco-style tile façade along one side, where there’s also a separate entrance to the new pizza bar. Inside the front door, the presence of a raw bar underscores the house specialties. Ebbink has stylishly reimagined the entire restaurant interior (in collaboration with designer Shawn Hausman), creating booths in the bar and banquettes in the dining room and installing a Deco back bar and other vintage appointments. The pandemic delayed the opening to July but allowed Ebbink and Boudet to forge valuable relationships with area producers like Alex Frecker Farms and other vendors at the Carpinteria

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farmers market as well as the fishermen who sell their catch in Santa Barbara. The results are obvious on the menu. Along with Little Dom’s classics like spaghetti and meatballs, there’s squid ink malfadine with uni butter. “We’ll have oysters and sea urchin,” adds Boudet, “smoked and cured salmon and other fish. The main focus is on what’s local.” LITTLE DOM’S SEAFOOD is also responding to changing dining habits: In the pizza bar you can pick up pizza-making kits, the restaurant’s own jarred sauces, and other deli and grab-and-go items, perfect for a picnic on the beach. After all, the ocean is only two blocks away. 686 Linden Ave., Carpinteria, 805-749-7400, ldseafood.com. J.T.

Design


DON’T MISS

Carpinteria restaurants new to the scene

A recent arrival to Padaro Beach Village, THARIO’S KITCHEN has become a locals go-to for authentic Italian pizzas, pastas, salads, and homemade desserts. 3807 Santa Claus Lane, Carpinteria, 805-684-2209, tharios-kitchen.business.site CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: Chef Brandon

Design Boudet and Warner

Ebbink toast their new

venture over delicacies

from the raw bar; a giant wooden pelican serves as a mascot; oysters and pizza headline the menu; designer Shawn Hausman worked with Ebbink to create the vintage and Deco-style

interior; signature seafood includes live uni; stools provide a view of the classic back bar; the

PHOTOGRAPHS: BLAKE BRONSTAD

perfect cocktail.

It’s dinner in the garden at the RINCON BEACH BAR, where the menu highlights cocktails, small plates, beer, and wine. 3805 Santa Claus Lane, Carpinteria, 805-566-9003, eventsbyrincon.com

Named in honor of the owner’s grandmother, TEDDY’S BY THE SEA serves up fish dishes, unique burgers, and more on its spacious patios. 5096 Carpinteria Ave., Carpinteria, 805-566-0576, teddysbythesea.com.

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Patioworld


Patioworld


MONTECITO

Garden

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LEFT TO RIGHT: Ganna Walska by the Horticultural Clock designed by Ralph Stevens, 1955; Ganna Walska picking lemons in the lemon arbor, 1957. Photograph by J.R. Eyerman.

Garden

Beautiful Dreamer “I wanted people to learn new facets of my aunt’s personality,” says Hania Tallmadge, author of the self-published GANNA WALSKA: PORTRAITS OF AN ERA ($50, available at Tecolote Book Shop, 805-969-4977, tecolotebookshop. com), a lavishly illustrated new book about the larger-than-life creator of Lotusland. The unusual “biography through images” charts Ganna Walska’s life from her time as an acclaimed beauty in czarist Russia through her career on the opera stage and as a mainstay of Parisian high society to her many marriages and her “country” life in California. A dozen spectacular portraits and countless photographs—more than half never before seen—and Tallmadge’s reminiscences reveal a woman who was theatrical, spiritual, and a friend and frequent subject of some of the most admired and famous artists of the day.

“Ganna Walska was a woman who was way before her time,” adds Bob Craig, Lotusland’s director of marketing and communication, who designed the book. “In her era a wife was expected to be her husband’s property. That’s not who she was.” After her move to Montecito, says Tallmadge, all Walska’s “energy and thoughts went into Lotusland. She had a rich life.” J.T.

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MONTECITO

TOP TO BOTTOM: Santa Barbara Postcard silk tee, $168; Gee’s signature slip dress in Celeste; a Montecito inspired mood board.

“Kim and the Dior family took me right in and it felt very natural.” SHAWN STUSSY

TOP TO BOTTOM: Limited-edition dinner plate, $110; Oversized hooded sweathsirt, $1,350; these one-ofa-kind surfboards remain true to Stussy’s surf audience and coastal roots.

Designer CATHERINE GEE embraces the chic beach lifestyle with her Santorini Collection (Spring/Summer 2020). The Santa Barbara-inspired pieces bring to life an image of palm trees on a green silk slip dress ($398). “I was at Butterfly Beach and looked up and saw this perfect cascade of palms swaying in the wind,” says Gee, who quickly called her co-print designer and talked through the idea. “It fits nicely with one of the main color stories in our collection.” Next up, Gee offered a whimsical and elevated twist on a typical tourist souvenir with a specially designed silk vintage postcard tee ($168)—another nod to our Santa Barbara coastline.

Garden

Catherinegee.com. EMILY LAFITTE

Did You KNOW

Actor Rob Lowe collabs with his jewelry designer wife, Sheryl, for his eponymous MR. LOWE line of rings, necklaces, and bracelets. The Jasper bracelet with African beads ($200, sheryllowe jewelry.com) is our summer pick.

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Must Haves Shawn Stussy’s collaboration with designer Kim Jones, aka DIOR AND SHAWN, has proved itself to be THE collection that any fashion-forward male—or female for that matter—is dying to get their hands on. Dior.com.

PHOTOGRAPHS: SHAWN STUSSY, ALFREDO PIOLA

Modern Muse


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MONTECITO

One to Watch

Local Landmark Jim Copus’s family has owned the Montecito Inn since 1989, but this is their first time in the restaurant business. Along with his brothers and parents, Copus opened COAST & OLIVE, the third restaurant at the front of the inn, following the Montecito Cafe, a 30-year establishment, and The Monarch, which had a two-year run. Now the family is taking ownership to offer something not only guests will enjoy, but also locals will love. “We wanted a place with elevated cuisine and really good food that wasn’t too expensive,” Copus says. “Somewhere that could be special enough for an anniversary or simple enough to come a few times a week.” Chef John Butler (also The Monarch’s first chef) offers French and Italian-inspired coastal cuisine, such as rustic bean and kale soup and California Niçoise salad, while signature cocktails include the yellow and purple passionfruit Mamba (a nod to Kobe Bryant’s nickname). McFadden Design Group refreshed the space with light, airy decor, while the name, Copus says, “is another nod to the community.” 1295 Coast Village Rd., Montecito, 805-

The Rosewood Miramar Beach has a new retail starlet that will only heighten the luxury of the property. THE WEBSTER has now opened an eighth location, joining sister boutiques in Los Angeles, South Beach, Houston, Costa Mesa, and New York with their first permanent store within a hotel. Creative director and store designer Stéphane Parmentier has captured The Webster’s inherent opulence by creating an architecturally sophisticated and feminine space anchored by an array of products around a sizable onyx meteorite in the middle of the neutral-hued room. The 500-square-foot store will carry a vast selection of ready-to-wear, resort wear, accessories, fine jewelry and watches from the most sought-after luxury brands and designers. Thewebster.us. E.L.

A rendering of the new retail space.

Garden

690-3920, coastandolive.com. J.B.K.

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: The Montecito Inn on Coast Village Road; a seasonal dessert; a classic martini.

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WE WANT Make a splash and make the most of your pandemic staycation with this floaty nod to the Coral Casino pool days ($24, floatnaked.com).


Ann James Interior

I

ANN JAMES N T E R I O R

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E S I G N

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MONTECITO

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: Valley Club Trail has undergone a much-needed repair and restoration; switchbacks at San Ysidro; flowing creeks after seasonal rains.

Sign of the Times Along the 90 miles of trails lacing Montecito, Summerland, and Carpinteria, hikers have it good, from mellow creekside loops through oak lands and nature preserves to canyon single tracks bound for waterfalls and peak-top views. With earth underfoot and sky above, hiking is a free and accessible break from life’s grind, a fact held dear by the MONTECITO TRAILS FOUNDATION, founded in 1964. During the past two years alone, the all-volunteer foundation has restored and created more of these spirit-lifting dirt paths, with president—and avid trail runner—Ashlee Mayfield out front. A decade ago, Mayfield was leading informal “mom hikes,” she remembers. Many of these fellow hikers turned to her for updates on trails wiped out in the wake of the Thomas Fire and Debris Flow. She wanted to help reopen these portals to nature, so she joined the foundation’s board of directors in April 2018 and the board elected her as president soon thereafter. Ever since, she’s been at the forefront to bring back several front-country favorites. She’s also partnered with public agencies and nonprofits such as the county and the Santa Barbara Bucket Brigade to build new roadside footpaths that connect Montecito neighborhoods to schools, businesses, and beaches—a goal of this growing community trail network, she says, is to someday connect Summerland to Coast Village Road. But these trails don’t build and maintain themselves. To pull it off in the long run, Mayfield

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is now spearheading the nonprofit’s first-ever endowment campaign; its goal is to raise an additional $750,000 toward establishing an annual maintenance budget. “Then we will be able to lift our eyes up off the paper and look at the big picture of what we can do better,” she says. “We couldn’t have climbed the mountains we did without a lot of support. Our scaffolding runs deep.” “Ashlee has been a godsend,” adds Jane Murray, who has been a board member for the past 25 years. “I don’t know where we would be without her.”

Montecitotrailsfoundation.info. KEITH HAMM

PHOTOGRAPHS: COURTESY OF MONTECITO TRAILS FOUNDATION

Garden


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Cottage quality. Urgent care. Coming to the Central Coast

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Cottage Urgent Care – Goleta Hollister Village Opening Summer 2020

Cottage clinical providers Goal of complete care in 30 minutes Walk-ins and online appointments Open 8 am–8 pm, 365 days a year

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SANTA BARBARA An Educated Eye

thematically and is considering mounting a show on mid-20th century abstraction culled from the museum’s collection. “I’m curious to do a show that thinks about ways that abstraction means different things in different contexts,” he says. “In the Latin context it’s one thing, in New York City it’s another thing, in Europe it’s another thing again. I’m also keen to present some of the Latin American abstract painters in dialogue with their North American counterparts.” Glisson spent his youth shuttling between his native Florida and New York City, where he fell in love with the sculpture garden at the Museum of Modern Art. He earned a master’s degree from New York’s Stonybrook University, and a PhD from Northwestern University in Illinois. 1130

Arts

State St., Santa Barbara, 805-963-4364, sbma.net.

L.D.P.

CLOCKWISE FROM TOP RIGHT: Frederick Hammersley, Four awhile , 1974, oil on linen, 45 1/8 x 45 in.; SBMA’s Curator of Contemporary Art, James Glisson; Eduardo Paolozzi,

Pacific Standard Time , from the series “Zero Energy Experimental Pile (Z.E.E.P.),” 1970, screenprint and lithograph, AP 6/20, 27 3/4 × 19 in.

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PHOTOGRAPH: JAMES GLISSON, IAN BYERS-GAMBER; ARTWORKS COURTESY OF SANTA BARBARA MUSEUM OF ART

“I’m really pleased to be joining the team at this important moment,” says James Glisson, the newly appointed curator of contemporary art at the SANTA BARBARA MUSEUM OF ART. His arrival is another pivotal event in SBMA’s history, as the museum unveils its first exhibition space dedicated exclusively to contemporary art. Glisson delightedly describes the space as “a really magnificent, sky-lit, purpose-built gallery.” Glisson’s task is to fill that new gallery, and he’s clearly up to it, having spent the past eight years curating shows at San Marino’s Huntington Library, Art Museum, and Botanical Gardens, where he cocurated the well-received exhibition dedicated to “hard-edge” abstract painter Frederick Hammersley (1919-2009), that featured a painting by the artist on loan from SBMA. Of course, Glisson’s familiarity with the museum’s collection is definitely a bonus; even so, he admits to being impressed by the extent of its holdings, including several “absolutely beautiful” pieces by artist John McLaughlin, a friend of Hammersley’s. As a curator, Glisson tends to work


PHOTOGRAPH: COURTESY OF SANTA BARBARA COUNTY OFFICE OF ARTS AND CULTURE

Arts

Now You See It A luminous installation of welded steel, salvaged signage, and reclaimed acrylic scraps, CAMOUFLAGE HOUSE is the creation of artist and UCSB alumnus Tom Fruin, and thanks to the support of the SB County Arts Commission the public sculpture has a temporary home at Arroyo Burro Beach. During the day sunlight bounces off

the upcycled multicolored sheets; at night the artwork is illuminated from within. Fruin envisions his piece as a communal opportunity for reflection and meditation. “It is an act of standing out with warmth and brilliance,” he says. Beachgoers can get a close-up look until the end of August; the sculpture moves to Elings Park in September. J.T.

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SANTA BARBARA

TOP TO BOTTOM: The artist in her studio; signature tiles; finalizing the design.

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Sealed with a Kiss There’s no shortage of decorative tiles in Santa Barbara. You see them on everything from buildings to benches, an intrinsic element of this town’s signature appearance. Now, Ojai artist Cassandra C. Jones has added her playful trompe l’oeil touch to the ceramic cityscape with LOVE LETTERS. The 600-tile double mural at Paseo Nuevo’s lower north court entrance was commissioned by Paseo Nuevo in partnership with the Museum of Contemporary Art Santa Barbara. Be sure to take a close-up look. The abstract patterns—which at first glance appear to be waves, curlicues, and starbursts—are carefully collaged photographic images of guitars, Spanish fans, and surfboards, among other things, that pay affectionate homage to Santa Barbara’s architecture, culture, and heritage. J.T.

PHOTOGRAPHS: TOP AND BOTTOM LEFT, MARC ALT

Arts


WE ARE ONE.

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SANTA BARBARA TOP TO BOTTOM: The open-air zen space; the retail boutique offers clean beauty products.

Nailing It SPRINGTIDE NAILS is raising the bar for beauty in Santa Barbara. In its new minimal, beachy-chic space, the salon will offer both regular polish and gel manicures and pedicures using only toxinfree products to provide their customers with the cleanest, purest experience. Elevate your nail service with complimentary wine and beer selections as well as add-ons like nail art and relaxing massages using organic body oils and essential oils. Hop on this summer’s trends with negative-space nail art or pastel polish. 15 W Anapamu, 805-770-8090, springtidenails.com. E.L.

Alexandra Chandler, owner of Slate Catering Co., has added a cozy experience to the firm’s expertise in charcuterie: BACKYARD BISTROS. The signature grazing-style cheese boards and housecrafted cocktails can now be savored in a cool surf van on Stearns Wharf or at any preapproved location you desire. With a setting that’s styled to perfection with pillows, flowers, and wood, Backyard Bistros offers two hours per reservation to enjoy the sea breeze while munching on locally sourced, organic fare. Their signature beverages can be extended with a minibar for purchase or a mezcal experience. The farm-to-table dining is $225 for two people or $325 for four. Slatecatering.com. 805-3642699. E.L.

The stylish setting offers plenty of room for food and drinks.

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WANT SEAVEE’s neon lime legend sneaker ($88, seavees.com) provides the pop of DayGlo color a beachgoer needs after a surf session.

Arts

Owner Trevor Gordon with a quiver of boards.

BEACH WARES The Funk Zone welcomes its newest addition, MOLLUSK SANTA BARBARA. With two other locations in San Francisco and Venice Beach, Mollusk opens its doors to locals for unique beach and surf wear. The raw and relaxed aesthetic of plywood and natural materials perfectly displays their men’s, women’s, and kid’s apparel, wetsuits, surf gear, boards, and all of your beach needs. It’s difficult to miss with the outside walls painted brightly with a sunray mural by Schuyler Beecroft. 205 Santa Barbara St, Ste. C, Santa Barbara, 805-

568-0908, mollusksurfshop.com. E.L.

PHOTOGRAPHS: SPRINGTIDE, STUDIO ARNA

Dinner With a View

We


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SANTA BARBARA

WOMEN IN PRINT PRINT POWER is a dynamic group of four

female printmakers headed by Claudia Borfiga along with Bay Hallowell, Meagan Stirling, and Sara Woodburn. Joined by the power of art, these creative women host free printmaking workshops to individuals affected by sexual assault. This year, thanks to an Arts Making Impact grant from the Santa Barbara’s Office of Culture and Arts, the group offered its workshops in collaboration with Domestic Violence Solutions. When COVID-19 put their workshops on hold, the group created at-home print-making kits sent via “snail” mail. Participants used the kits to make art, returned them, and received someone else’s creation in return. Claudiaborfiga.com. L.D.P.

An exhibition of flags that were threaded on rope and installed in the vast space at Community Arts Workshop.

Grab One If You Can

Kudos for Change

MCASB X XAVIERA SIMMONS limited-edition 50 States sweatshirt ($50, shop.mcasantabarbara.org).

Photographed as One To Watch for our Summer 2017 issue, activist RASHELLE MONET played a role in the decision of local pancake house Sambo’s to change its culturally sensitive moniker. “Even though it didn’t come from a bad place, it is still a very hurtful term for a lot of people,” said Monet. Owner Chad Stevens agreed the time was right and the sign was temporarily changed to read “peace and love” until the new name Chad’s was chosen.

Must Haves

Kevin Martin Jr.’s Cali Casual 7 slip-on ($174, aliveshoes.com).

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Wear your solidarity on your sleeve with this Angela Davis enamel pin ($18, movementismomentum. com). It’s your daily reminder and promise to educate, activate, and never stop working for justice.

PHOTOGRAPHS: RASHELLE MONET, SAM FROST

Arts


Curated by the editors of C Magazine, Studio C brings together the finest fashion, beauty and home goods from the Golden State’s shores.

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Walk This Way A large portion of STATE STREET has recently been transformed into a car-free pedestrian promenade that offers pedestrians room to pursue the many eateries and shops of downtown. For now, the new thoroughfare is open to foot traffic and cyclists alike—plus a new outcropping of “parklets” for outdoor dining—in addition to hosting the Tuesday night farmers market.

PHOTOGRAPH: BLAKE BRONSTAD

Arts

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THE OAK COTTAGE OF SANTA BARBARA A unique approach to memory care . . . The Oak Cottage of Santa Barbara is home of the signature Vibrant Life program, specializing in unique activies such as gardening, walking clubs, scenic drives and more. Designed to connect residents with family, friends, and the local community, our Vibrant Life program truly inspires. Oak Cottage is specifically designed for residents with cognitive impairment including Alzheimer’s disease and age-related dementia. Call now to sign up for our next “lunch and learn!”

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805-451-4999 | 805-451-4801 THEMONTECITOGROUP@GMAIL.COM CALRE# 01957054 & #01962161 The property information herein is derived from various sources that may include, but not be limited to, county records and the Multiple Listing Service, and it may include approximations. Although the information is believed to be accurate, it is not warranted and you should not rely upon it without personal verification. Real estate agents affiliated with Coldwell Banker Realty are independent contractor sales associates, not employees. ©2020 Coldwell Banker. All Rights Reserved. Coldwell Banker and the Coldwell Banker logos are trademarks of Coldwell Banker Real Estate LLC. The Coldwell Banker® System is comprised of company owned offices which are owned by a subsidiary of Realogy Brokerage Group LLC and franchised offices which are independently owned and operated. The Coldwell Banker System fully supports the principles of the Fair Housing Act and the Equal Opportunity Act.


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LAURA DRAMMER Top Half of the 1% of Berkshire Hathaway Agents Worldwide

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Ex plo r e the Prop erty at w w w . 392 0In dian.com It may be large but lives super cozy! At approx. $270/sq ft this property is amazing! Add to that pool/spa, tennis court, guest house, barns and pastures. Idyllic Santa Ynez Valley! Staying at Home here feels like resort living! Š 2020 Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices California Properties (BHHSCP) is a member of the franchise systemof BHH Affiliates LLC. BHHS and the BHHS symbol are registered service marks of Columbia Insurance Company,a Berkshire Hathaway affiliate. BHH Affiliates LLC and BHHSCP do not guarantee accuracy of all data including measurements, conditions, and features of property. Information is obtained from various sources and will not be verified by broker or MLS. Buyer is advised to independently verify the accuracy of that information.


Well Opener

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Well Opener

Pedro de la Cruz

Viva la 45, 2020, acrylic on canvas, 30 x 20 in.

45 YEAR

S


Cellar in OCEAN FATHOMS dives deep to age

fine wine in the waters off Santa Barbara

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WRITT E N B Y G A B E S A G L I E

P HOTO G R A P H S B Y M I C H A E L HA BER

the Sea

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After spending many months at a depth of 70 feet below the ocean’s surface, Ocean Fathoms’ bottles become studded with a myriad of sea life, including the occasional octopus.


A

s a diver, you’re always looking for something,” says Emanuele Azzaretto as he recalls his youth and the countless summer days diving off his father’s boat in the waters of his native Italy. “But what you really want is to find treasure!” Azzaretto’s life reads a lot like an adventure itself, from a stint in the Italian Navy to decades running big-game sanctuaries in eastern Africa to his latest career move in Europe and the United States as an alternative energies consultant. He’s remained an avid diver through it all. The intrepid entrepreneur moved to Santa Barbara 10 years ago, just when news of a rare underwater treasure began to circle the globe: Divers had recovered the wreckage of a schooner that had sunk in the Baltic 170 years earlier. Onboard were dozens of bottles of French bubbly that, according to the few who got to sip it, remained remarkably drinkable. “The fizz was gone, but it was still a quality white wine,” says Azzaretto, who wondered, with the rest of the world, just how this wine had aged so well for so long. He spent years trying to obtain a bottle for his own curious enjoyment, but to no avail. “So,” he declares, “I decided to do it myself.” Indeed, four years ago, Azzaretto joined Todd Hahn, a former sports and entertainment talent agent, and winemaker Jordane Andrieu, a recent transplant from Burgundy who runs lucrative Heritage Fine Wines in Beverly Hills, to found Ocean Fathoms. The label tells the story: The trio dropped two thousand bottles of wine inside a metal cage off the coast of Santa Barbara and let them age, in murky waters teeming with sea life, for a year. The results— which included comparative tastings with bottles that

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below the water’s surface, about 1.2 miles off the coast of Montecito; Emanuele Azzaretto is a diver by training and used his technical savvy to devise and patent metal cages to age wine bottles that generate a constant electrical charge; Ocean Fathoms’ latest extraction in March included about 1,500 bottles that aged under the sea for a year; the shells that adorn Ocean Fathoms’ wines after underwater aging make each bottle a one-of-a-kind collector’s item.

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The latest batch of bottles to be reeled in after a year of underwater aging included bottles of Sandhi wines, the celebrated Santa Barbara label from winemaker Rajat Parr. OPPOSITE: Special conditions underwater, including no UV light, no sound, and a constant temperature of about 55 degrees help, make it a unique spot for aging fine wines.

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Wine negociant Jordane Andrieu, part of the Ocean Fathoms trio, says the quality of wine aged underwater is enhanced by the physical uniqueness of each bottle, which he calls “super Instagrammable.” OPPOSITE: Winemaker, sommelier, and restaurateur Rajat Parr, left, was amazed by the quality of his own wine after it was aged underwater for a year, saying, “The wine is so fresh still!”

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Feature - Fathoms had been simultaneously aged in cellars on land— were stunning. “The wines were delicate and had finesse,” says Andrieu. “It was a double impact: The wines seemed more mature and complex but younger and fresher at the same time!” There are a handful of below-the-surface wine-aging trials being conducted today, mainly in Europe, though two things make the Ocean Fathoms experiment unique. A patent, for one, which stems from Azzaretto’s diving and engineering expertise, turns the team’s cages into working batteries. Two metal sheets on either end— zinc and copper—interact chemically underwater, driving ions from one plate to the other and sending charged currents through the bottles. The perpetual reaction “breaks down the harshness of the wine’s tannins,” according to Andrieu, something usually achieved with years, if not decades, of cellar aging. Then there’s Ocean Fathoms’ secret location, a spot about 1.2 miles off the coast of Montecito that the team is tending with the blessing of the Santa Barbara Harbormaster, the California Coastal Commission, and the U.S. Coast Guard. “If you’re

sitting at the Rosewood Miramar, just look straight out toward the island,” says Hahn. Pinned after more than 20 test dives, and at no more than 70 feet below the surface to preserve the pressurization of corks, it offers optimum wine-aging conditions: a year-round temperature of 54 to 55 degrees, no ultraviolet light, no sound and, thanks to the constant current that’s squeezed through the channel, between the coastline and the islands, a perpetual pulsation of the bottles. “There’s no oxygen down there either, so no oxidation of the wine,” adds Andrieu. “So they keep their freshness and vibrancy.” The plethora of marine life in the nutrient-rich waters off Santa Barbara’s shores plays a role, too, enhancing allure by turning each bottle into a oneof-a-kind and natural work of art. Studded with barnacles, shells, coral, and traces of creatures like sea worms and octopi, “every bottle is unique to itself,” says Hahn, “like a snowflake.” Ocean Fathoms’ drops (the most recent one done in March) include proprietary wines made with Santa Ynez Valley fruit, as well as bottles by other select winemakers. Rajat Parr, the man behind

Continued on page 137

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The unique decorations on each Ocean Fathoms bottle are a testament to the richness of the sea animal and plant life that thrives in the Santa Barbara Channel.


S. O. S.

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When the world is in crisis,

Direct Relief International

is here, there, and everywhere

WRIT T E N BY HOLLY E J A C O B S PHOTO GRA P HS BY S A M F R O S T

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Thomas Tighe, president & CEO of Direct Relief International at the Goleta headquarters.

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anta Barbara has an uncanny ability to attract some of the most interesting, engaging, passionate, and philanthropic citizens of the world. Thomas Tighe is no exception. As the president and chief executive officer of Direct Relief International— with compassion, grace, and steadfast equanimity—he stewards vital medical and disaster relief support to communities in need in all 50 states and more than 100 hundred countries annually from their distribution center based in Santa Barbara. HOW DO YOU PRIORITIZE WHERE YOU ARE GOING TO DEPLOY DIRECT RELIEF ASSETS? With a keen sense of responsibility,

empathy, and pragmatism. For 72 years, Direct Relief has prioritized the places and people with the fewest resources, in the greatest need, and with the least access to the type of essential medical resources the organization typically provides. And we assign a

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higher priority to activities focused on women’s and children’s health, in large part because those areas have not received anywhere close to what makes sense from almost any perspective. HOW HAS COVID-19 IMPACTED YOUR DAY-TO-DAY OPERATIONS?

The effects of the pandemic have been profound for every person, business, government, and organization, and Direct Relief is no exception. Because much of what’s been needed to respond to the crisis are things that Direct Relief does routinely, it’s required a rapid scaling-up and readjustment to do more, faster, and in more places simultaneously than at any time in our organization’s history. We did have the benefit of an early signal of just how serious the situation was likely to be based on our experience in China when the outbreak of a novel coronavirus first occurred. Despite having done very little in China historically and zero


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Tighe wears a DRI branded N95 mask originally manufactured for the Thomas Fire/Debris Flow crisis in 2018. OPPOSITE: Hollye Jacobs interviews Tighe in times of COVID-19. The conference room was retrofitted with plexiglass separations for proper social distancing and masks required.


Feature - DRI "Heroes abound, and they never think of themselves as heroic.” THOMAS TIGHE

expectation of being either asked by or permitted to assist in China, we were contacted directly by the largest medical facility in Wuhan and asked for urgent assistance. We were in a position to respond, recognized that containment of the virus was essential, so we moved fast and were able to assist with emergency charters that FedEx arranged to deliver PPE and other items that we stockpile routinely. Having seen how events unfolded there, we were already sprinting when the first cases appeared on the West Coast, and then everywhere else in the United States and in other countries. WHAT IS YOUR MOST MEMORABLE EXPERIENCE WITH DIRECT RELIEF?

My time at Direct Relief has left me with a mosaic of experiences—both inspiring and heartbreaking— that are burned into my memory. Those that surface

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most often are not associated with a major event like the pandemic we’re in or being in the mountains of Nepal when an 8.0 quake happened. They are variations of our work bringing me into contact with a person whose actions or entire life reflect such a pure dedication or selflessness that is far beyond what I could ever express in words. Heroes abound, and they never think of themselves as heroic. I think everyone on the Direct Relief team has their own version of these experiences, which is a rare privilege in life. HOW DID YOUR PERSONAL EXPERIENCES WITH NATURAL DISASTERS (I.E., THE DEBRIS FLOW OF 2018) IMPACT YOUR PROFESSIONAL DECISION-MAKING? It was a sharp reminder to me that

every disaster is not only a local event but a very personal one to everyone affected by it. The human


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Ghana , 2007, by Randy Olsen in the conference room paints the picture of a clinic supported by DRI in Africa. OPPOSITE: From intensive-care-unit kits to oxygen concentrators, protective gear, and medications, DRI’s warehouse distributes healthcare needs in the United States and around the world.


"When going through a tough time, knowing that someone is pulling for you and cares about you helps you get up in the morning." THOMAS TIGHE

dimension is much more complex and far less visible than the necessary practical actions that need to be taken after a tragedy like the debris flow, and both take a long time to deal with and bounce back from. We are a support organization, so the critical decision at work is always where the support is aimed. In Montecito, it was easy to plug in immediately with our local first responders because we know them and also know that they’re among the most skilled and talented in the world. But we also saw how important the start-up groups were, with the Santa Barbara Bucket Brigade being a perfect example of inviting participation, organizing in a thoughtful practical way, and just showing through their words and action empathy and personal concern for their neighbors. When going through a tough time, knowing that someone is pulling for you and cares about you helps you get up in the morning. Direct Relief always tries to do that, and we did everything we could think of to help in our hometown.

who just can’t afford what’s needed, anticipating and responding to large-scale emergencies—by simply focusing on the issues and inviting the participation of everyone who has an important piece of the puzzle. When I was growing up, “public service” meant “working for the government.” Things are much different now. Working for the government may not seem as attractive, but the underlying idea of public service—doing things that help our neighbors who need it, preserving our natural environment—are pretty basic, good, important things. Those things can be done, including at scale as we’ve seen at Direct Relief. So, the big challenge that we see as an enormous opportunity is to harness all the talent and tools and resources that exist, but in a different way that invites folks to participate.

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WHAT ARE YOUR BIGGEST CHALLENGES? Direct Relief faces the same challenges every nonprofit organization that relies entirely on private support confronts in economically uncertain times. The organization is assiduously apolitical and always has been, which presents some challenges during what I think is fair to say is a time of heightened political intensity. I think huge opportunities exist to address vexing problems that Direct Relief focuses on—access to health services for people

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HOW DID YOUR EXPERIENCE WITH THE PEACE CORPS INFLUENCE YOUR WORK AT DIRECT RELIEF? Being a Peace Corps volunteer

gave me such a different view of everyday life in a place so different from everything I knew. I was there to work, but like every other Peace Corps volunteer ever, I learned that I’d fail miserably unless I understood the culture, language, and customs so I could communicate and navigate in a way that made sense where I was, not where I came from. That experience has been particularly helpful at Direct Relief particularly with regard to scale, embracing technology to do things differently, and making sure that any money being spent was advancing the mission in the most efficient way possible. •


"Being a Peace Corps volunteer gave me such a different view of everyday life in a place so different from everything I knew,� says Tighe, who later served for five years as chief of staff and chief operating officer of the Peace Corps before coming to DRI in 2000.

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Making Feature - Pitcher


Waves A new monograph celebrates the art of HANK PITCHER

WRIT T E N BY L .D. P O RT E R

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Feature - Pitcher Looking East, Los Baños del Mar , 2009, oil on canvas over board, 24 x 36 in. OPPOSITE, CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: The artist painting Pink Drinks at Montecito’s Coral Casino; Yater Surftech , 2006, oil on canvas over board, 96 x 48 in.; Pink Drinks , 1993, oil on canvas over board, 36 x 72 in.

F

or nearly five decades, Hank Pitcher has painted what he knows best: Santa Barbara and the people who inhabit it. Now his gallery of 20 years, Sullivan Goss—An American Gallery, has produced an impressive monograph (Hank Pitcher, available at Upstairs at Pierre LaFond) packed with vibrant images accompanied by thoughtful essays penned by scholars, colleagues, and friends. It’s a well-deserved paean to the artist’s oeuvre. Arriving in Santa Barbara in 1951 at the age of 2, Pitcher grew up in Isla Vista (he was a star fullback at San Marcos High School) and studied art and literature at U.C. Santa Barbara’s newly minted College of Creative Studies (he’s been a core faculty member there since 1971). Fully embracing the California lifestyle, Pitcher became an avid surfer and created the infamous—and

still extant—logo for Mr. Zogs surfboard Sex Wax brand. Only love could convince him to leave Santa Barbara, and it did, in 1980, when he moved to New York City to follow his soon-to-be wife, Susan, a fashion trendsetter. They returned to California a year later, bringing memories of the Mudd Club, punk music, and the thriving art world scene. As an artist, Pitcher has always been true to his vision. Resisting art world trends, his paintings are straightforward and devoid of irony or sentimentality; from his totemic surfboard portraits, sweeping Gaviota Coast landscapes, surfers captured at the shore, to his stately serene nudes—Pitcher distills his subject matter to its essence and makes every brushstroke count. It's a fearless approach, and the work's lack of pretension belies the masterful technique required to produce it. •


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TOP TO BOTTOM: Umbrella and King Palms Over Miramar Cove , 2007-8, oil on canvas over board, 35 x 114 in.; Miramar Beach , 1987, oil on canvas over board, 34 x 68 in.;

East Beach , 1998, oil on canvas, 18 x 48 in. OPPOSITE: Roy at Coal Oil Point , 1986, oil on canvas, 84 x 72 in.


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North Point 1 , 2018, oil on canvas over board, 48 x 68 in.


Feature - Pitcher North Point 3 , 2018, oil on canvas over board, 48 x 68 in. OPPOSITE: A Woman Holding a Shell , 1987, oil on canvas, 84 x 68 in.

“I like painting portraits, though it can be challenging. It is relatively easy to paint someone from a photo, but being with a live person for long periods of time staring at their face has risks.� HANK PITCHER

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“For over 30 years Michael Drury and I have gone to Point Conception to paint on the shortest day of the year.” HANK PITCHER

TOP TO BOTTOM: Pitcher’s logo design for Mr. Zogs surfboard wax; the artist with his giant Butterfly Beach painting (c. 1993). OPPOSITE, TOP TO BOTTOM: The artist painting at Point Conception (c. 1980) photographed by Tom de Walt; Pitcher with his students at the U.C. Santa Barbara's College of Creative Studies.

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Social Sculptures by Karon Davis

reflect the zeitgeist

Studies

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WRIT T E N B Y L .D. P O RT E R

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Karon Davis pauses during work in her Ojai studio.

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ABOVE AND OPPOSITE: Davis’s sculpture installation, The Mother, The Son and The Holy Spirit, 2020, combines freestanding and wall-mounted pieces comprised of plaster strips, glass eyes, cowrie shell headdress, 24K gold leaf, hemp, steel.

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PHOTOGRAPH: PREVIOUS PAGES, COURTESY OF GENEVIEVE GAIGNARD; ARTWORK, COURTESY OF WILDING CRAN GALLERY AND THE ARTIST

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he devastating 2017 Thomas Fire that forced artist Karon Davis to evacuate from her Ojai home prompted the creation of one of her most compelling life-size plaster sculptures, Noah and his Ark. Currently on view at U.C. Santa Barbara’s Art, Design & Architecture Museum until December, the work depicts a woman and child seated in a rowboat filled with personal objects—perhaps their only remaining possessions—guided by a man attempting to navigate though thigh-high water. The piece is part of Davis’s Muddy Water series, a title that refers to “Muddy waters caused by natural disasters or manmade systems that fail us,” according to the artist. Contemporary collector (and seasonal Santa Barbara resident) Beth Rudin DeWoody, who owns several works by Davis—including Noah and his Ark—says “Karon’s work always has the sense of now. Reflections of the black community with so much power. I feel privileged to have these works and to know such an amazing woman.” Originally from Reno, Nevada, Davis studied theater at Spelman College and cinema at the University of Southern California before pivoting

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to sculpture. Her first solo show was at L.A.’s Underground Museum, which she cofounded with her late husband, Noah Davis, in 2012. Davis’s work is highly acclaimed and widely exhibited. She is represented by L.A.’s Wilding Cran Gallery (wildingcran.com).

“Karon’s work always has the sense of now. Reflections of the black community with so much power.”

BETH RUDIN DEWOODY


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Quaratini, 2020, plaster cloth, synthetic hair, glass eyes, martini glass, resin and steel base, 64 x 24 x 24 in. OPPOSITE: Noah and his Ark, 2018, mixed-media sculpture, collection of Beth Rudin DeWoody


The Music academy of the we st

continues to find new ways to embrace its mission and the community

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W RIT T E N BY JOA N TA P P E R PH OT OGRA P HS B Y S A M F R O S T

An Evolving

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Soundscape


f

or 73 years, the greater Santa Barbara community has had a love affair with the Music Academy of the West. And even in the unparalleled circumstances of the summer of 2020, that relationship has been carried on with the imagination, innovation, and pursuit of excellence that have distinguished the Academy since it was founded as a summer music school by luminaries including opera star Lotte Lehmann and conductor Otto Klemperer, along with prominent Southern California art patrons. “The community has always cherished the Academy,” says president Scott Reed, “and the Academy has created programs to welcome the community. We have performance-based training, and the community is vital to our success.” Traditionally the fellows—as the talented young vocalists, pianists, and instrumentalists are known— gather on the gracious Miraflores estate in Montecito for classes and seminars with faculty drawn from world-class conservatories and orchestras. They perform in master classes, picnic concerts, chamber music, operas, and much more. “It’s important to get the fellows out on stage as much as possible,” he adds. “It enhances their experience.” This summer, of course, things were a bit different. “We are embracing the virtual environment,” says Reed. “We are trying to deliver our mission in a different way” with the Music Academy Remote Learning Institute (MARLI). Each of this year’s 134 fellows—based all over the world—got state-ofthe-art technical equipment that allowed them to participate in a four-week curriculum of seminars and one-on-one teaching with faculty members who were also geographically scattered. Then, during a two-week creative extension, fellows were invited to “take their training and put it into action,” says Reed, by creating content, pitching new project ideas, and auditioning for 10 days of training with the London Symphony Orchestra, which has partnered with the Academy for several years. Meanwhile the community was also able to enjoy virtual picnic concerts, layered orchestral performances, and other special events at a daily online concert hall. The popular compeer program, which pairs a fellow with a local resident, went virtual as well but remained a crucial element of the summer festival. “The compeer program creates a relationship,” says Reed. “There’s no better way to learn about the Academy’s impact or the life of a classical musician than by being a compeer.” MARLI is just the latest development in the evolution of the Music Academy, which was first proposed at a luncheon meeting of the Montecito Country Club in September 1946. The idea of a training ground for talented young musicians in the West proved popular, and the first summer session,

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Charming statues occupy quiet corners throughout the grounds. OPPOSITE TOP TO BOTTOM: Stone-and-wrought-iron entrance gates reflect the classical style of the property; the Don Quixote Fountain adds decorative ceramic touches to the landscape. PREVIOUS PAGES: The rear terrace of Miraflores and the pool below showcase the elegance of what was a private Montecito residence in 1915 and is now home to the Music Academy of the West.


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A venerable fig tree holds pride of place overlooking a corner of Anne’s Garden.


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in June 1947, welcomed students from California, Texas, Utah, and Vancouver, Canada, to the classes, which were held at Cate School. In 1951, the Music Academy acquired Miraflores, originally built in 1909 as the Santa Barbara Country Club and converted in 1915 to an elegant Spanish revival residence for the Jefferson family. By 1952, the mansion and its grounds had been adapted for teaching and practice studios and concerts, though the students lived at Cate School. The star-studded faculty in the early years ranged from Lehman, who pioneered the idea of master classes here, to composers Darius Milhaud and Arnold Schoenberg and pianist Gregor Piatigorsky, among many others. Over the decades, both the vocal and instrumental programs earned international attention that was enhanced by former students who went on to become acclaimed opera and concert performers. There were many notable landmarks—the decision to become a full scholarship institution in the 1990s, the arrival of Marilyn Horne to head the voice program in 1997, the addition of Claeyssens Hall in 1993 for studios, the superb acoustic and architectural renovation of Hahn Hall in 2008, the addition of the Luria Education Center in 2012, and long-term partnerships with the New York Philharmonic and the London Symphony Orchestra. During the last 10 years, the emphasis on

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years the interaction with the community has continued to grow.” SCOTT REED

interaction with the community has continued to grow. “You have to be relentless to get off campus,” says Reed, “out to Santa Barbara and Goleta.“ Community access tickets—at just $10—allow everyone to come and hear world-class musicians. Large public concerts at the Santa Barbara Bowl, which once occurred at five-year anniversaries, now are part of the city’s summer traditions. In 2021 the summer festival is slated to return to a more traditional format. This year’s fellows are already invited back to the campus, and live classes and concerts are anticipated. “But there is no turning back,” insists Reed. “This is a new platform. We’re finding a solution that has given us something to be excited about. A new step in how we communicate. MARLI demonstrates our adaptability. That’s a silver lining.”


Inside the ornate faรงade of the Marilyn Horne Main House are several intimate concert venues. OPPOSITE: The Singer-Chough Water Garden invites music lovers to picnic alfresco before a summer performance.

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Z-Girl Feature - Oki

Revolutionary skater, surfer, artist and activist peggy oki keeps the stoke alive W R I T T EN BY J IM O 'MA H O N EY

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1975 was the golden year of skateboarding. Peggy Oki triumphed in the downhill race at the Santa Barbara City Skateboard Championships held on Shoreline Drive. She was later inducted into the Skateboard Hall of Fame in 2012.

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urethane , d r a o b e t a k odern day s m e h t f o h t Hasn't . il Bir a t k ic k a earings and b d le a e s , ls e whe Enter the Zephyr Team: Dogtown's finest, feral and years. 5 4 in d e g n a ch

Feature - Oki

on fire, led by Jeff Ho and Craig Stecyk lll. These guys attacked with nonstop grind, handstand, powerslide, low hand plants, surf moves with skate tricks thrown in and with a lot of improv.

'70s

The crowd howled a nonstop hoot! When the boys were done, Zephyr's only female member surfer, skater Peggy Oki was called up. When rolling into the arena she immediately slowed down the pace with a controlled and focused routine, hand down low turns, wheelies, , a perfect flowing surf skate presentation softening the blow of rad.

360s

When the smoke cleared,

Peggy Oki

had won the gold and became the first National Freestyle Skateboard Champion.

132 s u m m e r 2 0 2 0


Feature - Oki OPPOSITE, LEFT TO RIGHT: Profile in Santa Barbara Magazine , June/July 2007, photographed by Coral Von Zumwalt; Oki skates TK photographed by Craig Stecyk III. CLOCKWISE FROM TOP LEFT: Skateboarder magazine, 1975; Oki is the founder and director of the Origami Whales Project, origamiwhalesproject.org; Oki at the 1975 National Skateboard Championships at the Del Mar Fairgrounds.


Feature - Oki

134 s u m m e r 2 0 2 0


“I’m as passionate about my activism as I've been for skateboarding." PEGGY OKI

Feature - Oki

Since her skating days with the Z-Boys, Peggy Oki went on to UC Santa Barbara to study environmental biology, eventually receiving her Bachelor of Arts in painting at The College of Creative Studies. The theme of her paintings reflect the landscapes, seascapes, and marine mammals that she loves. A tireless advocate for cetacean rights through her Origami Whales Project, and “Let's Face It” Visual Petition campaign, Oki has a deep commitment to our planet that drives her to inspire people around the world to make a difference through her public speaking. At 64, and living in Carpinteria for many years now, Oki still practices yoga, surfs, skates and plays the cello — a true renaissance woman. Photographed by Dylan Catherina.


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continued from page 93

Santa Barbara’s celebrated Sandhi wines, tasted his own wine at a private event this past winter, after a year-long drop was reeled to the surface. “I remember thinking, ‘Wow, this is crazy, the wine is so fresh still!’” he says. “The texture was amazing.” Parr plans on aging sparkling wine underwater soon. The label is awaiting federal approval for retail sales, so distribution is limited to private collectors for now, with prices starting at about $300 a bottle. Moving forward, Oceans Fathoms plans to build

The trio dropped two thousand bottles of wine inside a metal cage off the coast and let them age, in murky Runover / Pub waters teeming with sea life, for a year. inventory with multiple drops a year and by aging wines over a several months and years. There are high-profile partnerships in the works, too, with labels like Dierberg and Star Lane, Francis Ford Coppola, and Taittinger. "We are proud of what we're doing," says Azzaretto. "We're working with the ocean instead of against it." •

Statement of Ownership, Management, and Circulation, PS Form 3526 1. Publication title: Santa Barbara Magazine. 2. Publication number: 1129-90. 3. Filing date: October 1, 2019. 4. Issue frequency: Quarterly with one additional issue. 5. Number of issues published annually: 5 (five). 6. Annual subscription price: $19.95. 7. Complete mailing address of known office of publication (not printer): 2064 Alameda Padre Serra, Suite 120, Santa Barbara, CA, 93103; contact person: Sarah McCormick; Telephone: 805965-5999. 8. Complete mailing address of headquarters or general business office of publisher (not printer): Same as above. 9. Full names and complete mailing addresses of the publisher, editor: publisher: Sarah McCormick; editor: Gina Tolleson. 10. Owner: Smith Publishing Group, LLC, 2064 Alameda Padre Serra, Suite 120, Santa Barbara, CA, 93103. 11. Known bondholders, mortgagees, and other security holders owning or holding one percent or more of the total amount of bonds, mortgages, or other securities: None. 12. Nonprofit tax status: Has not changed during preceding 12 months. 13. Publication title: Santa Barbara Magazine. 14. Issue date for circulation data below: October 1, 2019. 15. Extent of nature of circulation: Lifestyle magazine; Average number of copies each issue during preceding 12 months; number of copies of single issue published nearest to filing date: a. Total number of copies (net press run): average: 30,000; actual: 30,000. b. Paid circulation: (1) Mailed outsidecounty paid subscriptions (including paid distribution above nominal rate, advertiser’s proof copies, and exchange copies): Average: 25; actual: 25. (2) Mailed incounty paid subscriptions: Average: 9,702; actual: 10,367. (3). Sales through dealers and carriers, street vendors, counter sales, and other paid distribution outside USPS: average: 6,521; actual: 5,995. (4) Paid distribution by other classes mailed through the UPSP: Average: 200; actual: 200. c. Total paid distribution (sum of 15b(1), (2), (3), (4): average: 16,448; actual: 16,587. d. Free or nominal rate distribution by mail: (1) Free or nominal rate outside county copies: Average: 0; actual: 0. (2): Free or nominal rate in-county: Average: 0; actual: 0. (3). Free or nominal rate copies mailed at other classes: Average: 20; actual: 0. (4). Free or nominal rate distribution outside the mail (carriers or other means): average: 12,120; actual: 12,364. E. Total free or nominal rate distribution (sum of 15d (1), (2), (3) and (4)): Average: 12,140; actual: 12,364. f. Total free distribution (sum of 15c and 15e): Average: 28,588; actual: 28,951. g. Copies not distributed: Average: 1,412; actual: 1,049. H. Total (sum of 15f and 15g): Average: 30,000; actual: 30,000. i. Percent paid (15c/15f x 100): average: 57.5%; actual: 57.2%. 16. Electronic Copy Circulation. A. Paid electronic copies: Average: 0; actual: 0. b. Total paid print copies (15c) + paid electronic copies (16a): Average: 16,448; actual: 16,587. C. Total print distribution (15f) + paid electronic copies (16a): Average: 28,588; actual: 28,951. d. Percent paid (16b/16cx100): Average: 57.5%; actual: 57.2%. 17. Publication of statement of ownership: Publication required. Will be printed in the Winter 2020 issue of this publication. 18. I certify that all information furnished on this form is true and complete. I understand that anyone who furnishes false or misleading information on this form or who omits material or information requested on the form may be subject to criminal sanctions (including fines and imprisonment) and/or civil sanctions (including multiple damages and civil penalties). Signature and title of editor, publisher, business manager, or owner: Sarah McCormick.

Statement


WE LIVE IN PARADISE

CommUNITY The message was clear when an estimated 1,200 people gathered for a paddle out at Leadbetter Beach on June 6 to pay respects to George Floyd, who had died in police custody, and to support the Black Lives Matter movement. Said organizer Chris Ragland, “It left people with a deep sense 138 s u m m e r 2 0 2 0

of place and purpose during a time of immense confusion. It put the unity back into our community.� On the horizon, fundraising and volunteer opportunities to work on SEA NO-ENEMY, a new organization that will diversify ocean spaces and address intersectional environmentalism in Santa Barbara. Stay informed @chrisraglandd.

PHOTOGRAPH: BLAKE BRONSTAD

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