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Magazine

The Craft of Authentic Living The MOVERS,

SHAKERS, and MAKERS having their moment

Cover

The EVOLUTION of ERIN WASSON and how OJAI has RECHARGED her creativity


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39

CONTENTS

Features

Finer Things in Life

Supermodel Erin Wasson dons fall’s rich trends and dishes on a revitalized life in Ojai. BY AMELIA FLEETWOOD

PHOTOGRAPHS BY ADAM SECORE

S T Y L E D BY N ATA L I E J O O S

124

TOC Secret Garden

Sun Chasers

Home Sweet Homestead

PHOTOGRAPHS BY NANCY NEIL

P H OTO G R A P H S BY H E AT H E R C U L P

PHOTOGRAPHS BY LAUREN ROSS

134

146

152

BY JENNIFER BLAISE KRAMER

BY JILL NELSEN

On Our Cover

BY JENNIFER BLAISE KRAMER

Erin Wasson on location in Ojai. Photographed by A D A M S E C O R E . Styled by N A T A L I E J O O S . Makeup by S I L V E R B R A M H A M . Hair by D R I T A N V U S H A J . For more information, see “Behind the Scenes” (page 50) and “Shopping Guide” (page 169). S A N TA B A R B A R A


54

40

CONTENTS

68

Departments Letter from the Editorial Director … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … 46 Contributors … Our writers, photographers, and more … … … … … … … … … … … … … 48 Behind the Scenes … On set in Ojai with model Erin Wasson and pals Adam Secore and

Natalie Joos, as well as a peek at Calvin Zara’s dreamy retreat … … … … … … … … … … …

50

What’s Now … A new art collective as well as staycation retreats in the Santa Ynez Valley,

a field-fresh produce stand in Carpinteria, venture capitalist John Vincent’s Youth Effort Farms program for local schools, The Towbes Group’s 60th anniversary, and more … … … …

53

Style … Vogue contributing editor Lawren Howell shares her sartorial selects for life in Ojai, K. Frank moves to Montecito, Sue Turner-Cray’s vintage boutique in Los Olivos, masculine pinstripes go feminine for fall, barre classes take over the town, and more … … … … … … …

Home … Designers Diego Monchamp and Ryan Brown put their contemporary eye on a

Lutah Maria Riggs home, luxe bachelor pad pieces, historical home tours, and more … … …

TOC

83

Taste … Convivo’s modern nomad eats, S.Y. Kitchen’s happy hour, fine vintages in town and in the valley, paleo guru Cynthia Spivey’s lifestyle book, and more … … … … … … … … …

Get Away

… Belize by beach and jungle, the Beverly Hills Hotel’s bungalows and the iconic La Quinta resort get a face lift, and more … … … … … … … … … … … … … … … …

69

93

103 83

96

104

Arts … Michelle Stuart’s natural agenda, looking back and to the future of the Santa Barbara Museum of Art, Kerrilee Gore’s avant-garde performance theater, and more … … … … …

RSVP

109

… Lotusland’s annual gala goes with the gods and goddesses, Santa Barbara Magazine fetes the Santa Barbara Polo & Racquet Club, and more … … … … … … … … …

161

#weliveinparadise … The Los Olivos AVA becomes official… … … … … … … … … …

170

S A N TA B A R B A R A


where shelter and nature converge

Porch

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PRESIDENT/PUBLISHER EDITORIAL DIRECTOR

Jennifer Hale

Magazine

EXECUTIVE EDITOR

Gina Tolleson

MANAGING EDITOR

Gina Z. Terlinden C R E AT I V E C O N S U LTA N T

James Timmins

A RT P R O D U C T I O N M A N A G E R

Charlotte Bryant SENIOR EDITOR

Jennifer Blaise Kramer CONTRIBUTING WRITERS

Charles Donelan Amelia Fleetwood Christine Lennon Dawn Moore L.D. Porter Gabe Saglie Katherine Stewart

Peregrine / Masthead

Joan Tapper

CONTRIBUTING PHOTOGRAPHERS

Blue Caleel David Cameron Leela Cyd Rob DaFoe Andrew Durham Tierney Gearon Michael Haber Brian Hodges Elizabeth Messina Nancy Neil Dewey Nicks Victoria Pearson Lisa Romerein Randall Slavin Coral von Zumwalt INTERNS

Maddie Cuttler Kayla Zola


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CHAIRMAN 1999-2003

Robert N. Smith Magazine

CHIEF FINANCIAL OFFICER

Nicholas Hale

A D V E RT I S I N G D I R E C TO R

Sarah McCormick PRODUCTION MANAGER

Amy Lipson

A D V E R T I S I N G & M A R K E T I N G C O O R D I N AT O R

Ashley Nelsen CONTROLLER

Adele Hagar

Š2 0 1 6 B Y S M I T H PUB L I S HI N G G R OUP, L L C.

Steven Handelman Studios / Masthead All rights reserved. No part of this periodical may be reproduced in any form or by any means without prior written consent from Santa Barbara Magazine. TO OUR R E ADE R S

Santa Barbara Magazine invites you to share with us your reactions to our latest stories. Letters are not for publication, but please include your address in case we need to contact you. By mail: Reader Response Department, Santa Barbara Magazine, 2064 Alameda Padre Serra, Ste. 120, Santa Barbara, CA 93103. By e-mail: editorial@sbmag.com. S UB S CR I PT I ON S

Subscribe by e-mail: sbrcs@magserv.com, call 888-592-0026, or visit sbmag.com. Domestic rates are $24 for one year; for orders outside the United States, add $20 postage. Single copies are available at newsstands and other magazine outlets throughout the United States. ADV E RT I S E R S

For inquiries, contact advertising director Sarah McCormick at 805-965-5999 ext. 131.


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46

FROM THE EDITORIAL DIRECTOR

One reason our town is so oft celebrated for its beauty (aside from the obvious breathtaking topography) is that our smart city planners of yore made a conscious effort to be different. Unlike in most American cities, you will not see large billboards, towering buildings blocking the vistas, and a mishmash of architecture. Our buildings stay within a strict design code. With those restrictions comes an authentic Old World aesthetic that is so rare in this day and age. Back to basics seems to be the trend. Beautiful things made well are being celebrated in this mass-produced, buy-on-every-street-corner world we live in. With our town as an example of Old World design still packing a powerful punch, people are excited about going back to their roots. With farmers markets aplenty, the organic field-to-table trend is an everyday occurrence in our houses and restaurants. We don’t just have an art fair once a year, but every weekend you can stroll Cabrillo Boulevard and see numerous artists touting their creations. And with that mind-set, we set out to celebrate a few key makers, creators, and crafters in our town. Supermodel Erin Wasson is renowned for her catlike beauty, which has graced many a cover, runway, and fashion campaign. But it’s her new fine jewelry collection Wasson Fine (along with her recent move to Ojai) that has captured our attention. She escapes here to get away and recharge, but these parts also inspire her as well as her designs. Wasson showcases fall’s bohemian frocks mixed to perfection with her own jewelry creations in “Finer Things in Life” (page 124). Another creation made here in Santa Barbara are superfood elixers by Sun Potion (“Sun Chasers,” page 146). From the hands and minds of Scott Linde and Nitsa Citrine, the products are sought after by many health enthusiasts, and a new creative venue on State Street is soon to follow. We went to this inspirational couple’s slice of paradise in Mission Canyon to get a glimpse into their world of natural wonder. Women’s Heritage Skillshare is pretty old-school—and that is the appeal to its followers. Happy to go back to a time when you made your own bread and preserves, harvested your own veggies, and collected fresh eggs every morning, this group of Santa Barbara women have started a salon of sorts that hosts workshops focused on homespun tricks of the trade. We profile these very modern mothers who are setting out on their own sustainable paths (“Home Sweet Homestead,” page 152). Speaking of paths, the world of big business seems a world away from the “going back to your roots” mentality. So when financier Calvin Zara bought his personal oasis in Ojai, it was a serious change of direction. Zara created a relaxing utopia (“Secret Garden,” page 134) as a dreamy weekend retreat that he shares with a lucky few. With antique silver and linens piled high, gorgeous gardens full of ripe vegetables, and his artisanal cheeses resting on the antique dining table, it doesn’t get much better. If it all seems otherworldly or from another time, perhaps that's because it is. As one season whirls into the next, this fall issue is full of the harvesters, dreamers, designers, makers, and creators that appreciate the Old World. Maybe we can all learn a lesson from them and take the time to slow down...and enjoy it all.

Edit Letter

JENNIFER HALE

S A N TA B A R B A R A


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48

CONTRIBUTORS

Gabe Saglie

Adam Secore Natalie Joos

“I think we collectively discovered the perfect recipe for a fun shoot: Gather all your closest friends and have a dress-up photo party!” says the Los Angelesbased stylist who pulled together looks for “Finer Things in Life” (page 124). “The whole day was a breeze. I put Erin Wasson in fall velvets and smooth silks and draped her over antique rugs. It didn’t look like we were in Ojai at all.”

“It’s not often that you get to work with one of your best friends. I was excited when Erin Wasson asked me to shoot her for the cover story,” says the bicoastal photographer who worked on “Finer Things in Life” (page 124). “We were given an opportunity to pull in a team we both love and respect. Natalie Joos is one of the most talented stylists I have worked with, and makeup artist Silver Bramham has the most impeccable eye for detail.”

Contributors

“Travel journalism takes me to exciting spots all over the world, but nothing beats getting to come home to Santa Barbara,” says Travelzoo senior editor and local wine writer Gabe Saglie who penned “Vineyard Retreat” (page 58) and “#weliveinparadise” (page 170). “I’ve loved watching the Santa Barbara wine industry grow over the last 15 years, both in quality and reputation. The Los Olivos District, our county’s newest AVA, is added recognition that we can grow worldclass wines here. Throw in a growing number of overnight retreats on many local vineyards, and the quintessential Santa Barbara wine country experience has suddenly become more accessible.”

Amelia Fleetwood

“I loved talking to both Erin Wasson and Lawren Howell. They are some powerhouse women of fashion for sure—both very different but still trailblazers in their own right,” says the Ojai-based writer who put together “Finer Things in Life” (page 124) and “The Insider” (page 68). “It was fun to talk with Lawren about our Vogue days and laugh about the first time I met Erin when she crashed my birthday party. I love meeting the incredible, interesting people who chose to make Ojai their home.” S A N TA B A R B A R A

“As a designer and in my life in general, the first thing I look for in a relationship, a company, or a product is authenticity. I believe this quality can be expressed in everything we do,” says the Santa Barbara-based contributor who wrote “Sun Chasers” (page 146). “I was introduced to Sun Potion when I became friends with Scott Linde and Nitsa Citrine, and I immediately connected to the honesty they project on a personal and global company level. They are people who bring their authenticity into everything they do.”

PHOTOGRAPHS: AMELIA FLEETWOOD, BLUE CALEEL; JILL NELSEN, NITSA CITRINE

Jill Nelsen


10 8 4 G O L F ROA D, M O N T EC TO w w w.10 8 4 G O L F ROA D . c o m

Berkshire Hathaway - Lorie Bartron

Beth Goodman

Lorie F. Bartron

805 563 4034 direct 805 455 1909 mobile Beth@TheBartronGroup.com

805 563 4054 direct 805 689 4613 mobile Lorie@LorieBartron.com

Š2016 Berkshire Hathaway HomeServices California Properties (BHHSCP) is a member of the franchise system of BHH Affiliates LLC. BHH Affiliates LLC and BHHSCP do not guarantee accuracy of all data including measurements, conditions, and features of property. Information is obtained from various sources and will not be verified by broker or MLS. If your home is currently listed, this is not a solicitation for your listing. BRE#01005021


50

Left to right: Secore, Wasson, and Joos take five; Wasson beats the heat on Dutch silk rug props from THE TENT MERCHANT ; JOHN DENNIS and his tin shed; Look #2 of the day.

Under THE RUG

LOCAT IO N Maricopa Highway, Ojai WHO Besties who work together stay together—photographer Adam Secore, supermodel Erin Wasson, and stylist Natalie Joos combined talents for our cover and fashion feature, “Finer Things in Life” (page 124). WHAT John Dennis of Sam Roberts LA was the host with the most, letting us set up shop at his creek-side cabin of curiosities to spotlight Wasson’s new fine jewelry line and her move to Ojai. WE A R Joos’s eye for vintage and fashion cred pulled in layered, velvety designer looks from the likes of Phillip Lim, Valentino, and Stella McCartney (featured on the cover).

Behind the Scenes

Left to right: NANCY NEIL gets carriage house details; breakfast nook in a guest cottage; TOPATOPA MOUNTAIN backdrop; dried herbs

from the garden; FARM LIFE .

Pastoral PLEASURES

LOCATIO N Thacher House, Ojai WHO Photographer Nancy Neil captures Calvin Zara’s utopian escape for “Secret Garden” (page 134). WHAT Zara traded his hectic Los Angeles commute for an authentically sustainable, organic, and elegant way of life.

S A N TA B A R B A R A


The TIFFANY HOUSE 401 East Pedregosa Street circa 1913

Berkshire Hathaways - Marsha Kotlyar (Tiffany House)

Upper East Grand Estate 6 BD / 5 1/2 BA Offered at $2,795,000 TOP SELLING TEAM

MICHELE WHITE & MARSHA KOTLYAR BRE # 0142 6 8 8 6 BRE # 13173 3 1 BRE # 0193 03 09

PROPERTIES

Representing Exceptional Properties of Montecito & Santa Barbara

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idyllic santa ynez farmhouse

Sotheby’s - Laura Drammer

IdyllIc Farmhouse on approx. 10 acres // santa ynez // oFFered at $2,495,000 I haVe the dIStInct pleaSuRe of unItIng extRaoRdInaRY pRopeRtIeS wIth extRaoRdInaRY lIVeS In Santa BaRBaRa & the Santa Ynez ValleY. the BeSt jouRneY, the jouRneY home—IS Yet to come. let’S take It togetheR.

laura drammer Representing Santa Barbara and the Santa Ynez Valley ////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////////

sotheby’s international realty and the sotheby’s international realty logo are registered (or unregistered) service marks used with permission. operated by sotheby’s international realty, inc. real estate agents affiliated with sotheby’s international realty, inc. are independent contractor sales associates and are not employees of sotheby’s international realty, inc. laura drammer is a licensed agent: calBre: 01209580.

laura@lauradrammer.com lauradrammer.com // 805.448.7500


What’ s now 53

PHOTOGRAPH: NANCY NEIL

What’s Now

A place at the table The movers and shakers from town to the valley

Local gifts, ceramics, and interior design collide at GLOBAL EYE ART COLLECTIVE in SANTA YNEZ .


54

W H AT ’ S N O W

A Good EYE

Having always toyed with the idea of opening her own storefront, GLOBAL EYE ART COLLECTIVE owner, potter Kristen Cramer, recently made it a reality with the help of

her friend, interior designer Wanda Mills. “She found the space,” says Cramer, “and it looked liked a great opportunity for us both.” Situated in a small shopping center in Santa Ynez, one side of the collective houses Cramer’s artfully arranged signature ceramic sgraffito vases, vessels, and bowls (from $15) plus other locally handmade gifts such as husband Michael’s framed photographs, as well as cutting boards, napkins and tea towels, soaps and lotions, jewelry, and more. On the other side is Mills’s company, Laval, offering interior design consultations, vintage finds, and fabrics for sale. “I have some really fun pieces in the works that are new and different,” says Cramer, who has an art degree from UC Santa Barbara, “lighting that will include more raw textured panels like my petal pendants [pictured above] in new shapes and sizes.” 1095 Meadowvale Rd., Santa Ynez, 805-259-6390. G I N A Z . T E R L I N D E N

Clockwise from top right: A selection of wares at

GLOBAL EYE ; “When I’m carving the patterns, I

think of all kinds of things: the speckles are like the patterns on birds’ feathers, the dots and lines are inspired by Native American weavings,” says potter Cramer with her daughter, Vivian.

G E A RTC O .C O M

What’s Now

Farm-Fresh C h a r m

Wednesday at Carpinteria and Walnut avenues or on Instagram (@thefarmcart_og). Along with her husband, Jason, and daughter, Chandler (named after the organic strawberries her dad used to grow), owner Katherine Lesh—the daughter of Tom Shepherd, one of the original organic farmers in Santa Barbara County—reopened the family produce stand in the same spot years after her parents retired. Acting as a “funnel” for seven local farmers—including Frecker Farms and The Weekend Farmer—the cart is one of the only places in Carp to find local produce, aside from the weekly farmers market on Thursdays, plus it offers a farm box ($18) of lettuce, citrus, fruits, herbs, and mixed veggies on Tuesdays. 5103 Carpinteria Ave., Carpinteria. JENNIFER BLAISE KRAMER

FA RMCARTORGANICS .CO M

JOIN the TRIBE

Wellness enthusiasts Erica Brophy and Taylor Winn bring their collective backgrounds in business and Eastern medicine to doorsteps via monthly WELLNESS TRIBE boxes. Inside their curated holistic health packages (from $39.95) are hard-to-find brands and products such as Tranzend detox sticks and Raw Elements sunscreen along with lifestyle guidance relating to a monthly theme such as detox, self-love, and going green. Says Brophy: “Our goal is to transcend above a collection of items and to be a positive wellness influence for our ‘tribe’ (i.e., subscribers) that they feel all month long.” J . B . K . W E L L N E S S TR I BE .C O M S A N TA B A R B A R A

PHOTOGRAPHS: GLOBAL EYE ART COLLECTIVE, NANCY NEIL

Perhaps you’ve spotted the photo-ready FARM CART ORGANICS from 11:30 am to 5:30 pm Friday through


Santa Barbara Public Market


56

W H AT ’ S N O W The seafoam green 1971

Club Med

VOLSKWAGEN

named LOLA .

Carolina Pierpont has moved her MEDITERRANEE ANTIQUES into The Row in Carpinteria, neighboring with retailers and restaurants including Chocolats du CaliBressan, Juice Ranch, and The Apiary. Here, Pierpont—who also has online stores at Chairish and One Kings Lane—showcases her vintage and contemporary worldly pieces in her 1,500-square-foot space. Find furniture, wall hangings, textiles, and artwork spanning California, Europe, and Latin America. 4193 Carpinteria Ave., Ste. 6, Carpinteria, 805-695-0910. J . B . K .

Top to bottom: In addition to ANTIQUE

SNAP &

M ED IT E R R AN E EAN T I Q U E S .CO M

FURNITURE , Pierpont stocks JEWELRY AND GIFTS ; a row of VINTAGE CHAIRS hangs above

Chat

works by artists near and far.

For those looking to add a little flash to their party, meet the 805 CAMERA BUS . Owned by husband/wife duo Josh and Janelle Caballero, the 1971 Volkswagen has been rolling up to Santa Barbara-area weddings, showers, reunions, and corporate events (yep, it even rolls indoors) since its spring debut. Vanagon Shenanigans packages (from $699) include photo props and on-site printing plus an iPad kiosk for instant social media. J . B . K .

What’s Now

8 0 5 C A M E RA B US .C O M

Feel-Good Foods The food choices we make are a critical link to environmental crises, and to address this issue, Patagonia created its own food program called PATAGONIA PROVISIONS . The goal is to provide nourishment that is not only delicious and all natural, but also helps build a healthier, more sustainable food chain. “There is a great opportunity—and urgent need—for positive change in the food industry,” says Patagonia founder Yvon Chouinard in the new chapter on Patagonia Provisions in his revised and updated book Let My People Go Surfing. “With Patagonia Provisions, our goals are the same as with everything we do—make the best product, cause no unnecessary harm, and inspire solutions to the environmental crisis. But even more than that, Patagonia Provisions aims to do good with the food we produce and the harvesting practices we employ.” The online shop features hiking and camping-friendly foods—smoked salmon, fruit and almond energy bars, buffalo jerky, soup mixes, and more (from $6.50)—sourced straight from organic farmers and eco-friendly companies. M A D D I E C U T T L E R PATA G O N I A PR O V I S I O N S .C O M S A N TA B A R B A R A

PHOTOGRAPHS: PATAGONIA PROVISIONS, AMY KUMLER

Top to bottom: Soup and salmon; preparation

of garden veggie soup.


Mark Trabucco Builder

mark trabucco builder santa ynez valley | santa BarBara | Montecito MarktraBuccoBuilder.coM | 805.969.1078 caliFornia General contractor license #580058


58

W H AT ’ S N O W

Vineyard Retreat Take a staycation in the valley amid the hustle and bustle of harvest

The biggest selling point at the Carhartt Retreat (from $550/night) at CARHARTT VINEYARD , carharttvineyard.com/retreat, is the sweeping view of the Santa Ynez Valley. “We take care of everything—the shopping, filling the fridge, and providing a chef by request,” says owner Mike Carhartt. The two-bedroom custom home near Solvang, with vaulted ceilings and wood floors, is perched atop a hill in the heart of a Sangiovese vineyard from which Brooke Carhartt makes award-winning wines. KOEHLER WINERY in Foxen Canyon rents out a 4,000-square-foot Vineyard House (from $500/night), koehlerwinery.com/stay, complete with Viking appliances and original artwork, while SUNSTONE WINERY on Refugio Road offers its spectacular five-suite, Tuscaninspired Villa (price upon request), 800-313-9463, ext. 244, sunstonewinery.com/sunstone-villa, to parties of up to 10. BERNAT VINEYARDS , bernatretreats .com, boasts a four-acre organic estate in Los Olivos

with two on-site retreats (from $225 per night). The one-bedroom cottage and two-bedroom house each come fully stocked, including cruiser bikes. Other winery homes are reserved for special guests, like the Inner Circle wine club members at BECKMEN VINEYARDS , 805-688-8664, beckmenvineyards.com; they get a complimentary two-night stay in the rustic two-bedroom Guest House that’s made of reclaimed wood and surrounded by 20-year-old vines. Newlyweds who tie the knot at DEMETRIA ESTATE , 805-686-2345, demetriaestate.com, can rest knowing the site fee ($12,500) includes a two-night stay in the vineyard Guest Cottage. JCR VINEYARD , jcrvineyard .com, just outside Sta. Rita Hills provides five handcrafted log cabins (price upon request) for wine club members, including a tree house with bunk beds. And in the Santa Maria Valley, the new vineyard cottage available to friends and family at RIVERBENCH , 805-937-8340, riverbench.com, is made with materials reclaimed from the original 1890 homestead. According to communications director Wil Fernandez, “From the private deck outside the cottage bedroom, our guests experience the most breathtaking views of the Santa Maria Valley.” G A B E S A G L I E

What’s Now

The Guest House at BECKMEN VINEYARDS .

S A N TA B A R B A R A


Sullivan Goss

FROM THE EARLIEST ARTISTS: FORD, HARMER, LUNGREN, & SYKES TO GOLDEN AGE ARTISTS: COOPER, HINKLE, MARTINEZ, & PARSHALL TO MIDCENTURY MASTERS: PEAKE, DOLE, & WARSHAW TO TODAY’S LEADING LIGHTS...

11 East Anapamu Street Santa Barbara, California 93101 (805) 730-1460

www.sullivangoss.com facebook.com/sullivan.goss


60

W H AT ’ S N O W

Clean CUT

An antique 1901 KOCHS CHAIR .

Sink into one of seven refurbished antique barber chairs inside brothers Cristian and Ruben Sagastume’s WOLF’S HEAD for a classic shave and haircut surrounded by brick walls, fashion, and art. Complete any service (from $5) at the barber shop—be it a shoe shine, shave, or fade—with clothing and accessories from Carhartt Work in Progress, vintage Levi’s, Pendleton, Nudie Jeans, and streetwear favorites like Born X Raised for a downtown-cool effect. 432 State St., Santa Barbara, 805-845-0685. C . B .

Top to bottom:

Taps with custom MAKESMITH

leather markers; wall installation by Carpinteriabased BROTHERS OF INDUSTRY .

SH O P WO L F SH E A D .C O M

Pants and blazers for SALTURA .

What’s NowGoing Public

A brand-new beer garden has cropped up at the Santa Barbara Public Market. Joining other new market merchants (such as Corazon Cocina) as the space reinvents itself, THE GARDEN hopes to be an urban oasis for beer enthusiasts with 41 craft beers on tap, an elevated bar menu, window views, and a constant live feed of global sports events on TVs throughout. 38 W. Victoria St., Santa Barbara, 805-770-7702. J . B . K .

Local Motion

S BPUB L I CM A R K E T.CO M

Two displaced New Yorkers—Addison Proctor and David Malina—did what a lot of middle-aged men do when they move to California: they started surfing. But when it came time to find beach-ready, “grown-up” apparel, they found themselves at a loss. Rather than complaining about it, they decided to create their own label called SALTURA . With backgrounds in business and design, they set out to build a wardrobe for men no longer in their 20s (they actually design around love handles) that would look as good on the sand as in an office setting. “We knew whatever we created needed to embrace a modern, minimalist aesthetic but also be manufactured as sustainably as possible,” says Proctor. Vetoing mass production in overseas factories, they finally found a woman who’d been producing clothes for Patagonia for 26 years and was eager to help. Every piece of clothing (from $45)—think streamlined board shorts, tailored hoodies, and supersoft, 100 percent non-GMO cotton Ts—is made in California. In fact, everything Saltura sports is made close to the founders’ Santa Barbara homes and a mere 14 miles from their favorite point break. J . B . K . SA LTURA.CO

S A N TA B A R B A R A

Don’t Miss

Rev up for the fifth annual MONTECITO MOTOR CLASSIC on September 25 from 9 am to 3 pm along Coast Village Road, where vintage and classic models mingle with muscle and sports cars. This year also marks the centennial for BMW, and the “ultimate driving machine” is being honored with makes of various eras on display. J . B . K . M O N TE CI TO M O TO RC L A S S I C.C O M

PHOTOGRAPHS: WOLF’S HEAD, ANTHONY ARCHER

are next on deck


MONTECITO: 2.28 ACRE ESTATE $4,279,000

MONTECITO: PHENOMENAL OCEAN VIEWS $1,995,000

Coastal Properties - Gary Goldberg

MONTECITO: MOUNTAIN VIEW COMPOUND $2,995,000

MONTECITO: SYCAMORE CANYON $1,848,848

SANTA BARBARA: OCEAN $2,695,000

& MOUNTAIN VIEWS

CARPINTERIA : NEAR THE BEACH $2,250,000

GARY GOLDBERG Broker/Owner/Realtor ® Office 805.969.1258 • Mobile 805.455.8910 www.garygoldberg.net • gary@coastalrealty.com


62

W H AT ’ S N O W Left to right:

Students tending YOUTH EFFORT FARMS produce;

planting a garden.

What’s

“You’re taught all that in a book, but it’s nothing like when you’re out doing it in the garden.” Now

SPOTLIGHT: Gre en Thi n k in g

Imagine a spike in school dollars without all the constant fund-raising. Imagine kids working in gardens every week and bringing home fresh lettuces they grew. Imagine those greens raising more than $40,000 annually for their school. That’s the concept John Vincent, a general partner at venture capital firm Revel, envisioned when he wanted to give back to the community. Rather than just writing a check, Vincent used his business background to cofound YOUTH EFFORT FARMS with longtime friend Shawn Ricci. The nonprofit creates hydroponic systems in schools where kids tend to at least 24 low-water garden towers on campus. Active parents commit to weekly supervision while students grow, harvest, and sell the greens (currently bunches of arugula, kale, romaine, and butter lettuces) to families, friends, and neighbors—you don’t have to have a student to purchase—via weekly CSA boxes. “You can sell as many as you can—there is no cap,” says Vincent. “The kids make an effort and the community makes an effort.” YEF’s goal is to have 50 percent of student body participation in the CSA, however the minimum for success is 30 percent. Each student is expected to sign up at least one family, even if it’s just their own, meaning parents reallocate their produce budget, buying greens (arguably healthier and below market price) from

kids rather than at the grocery store. Financially, YEF’s goal is to create a recurring revenue system for schools, with net annual proceeds reaching at least $40,000, but depending on participation, that number could be much higher. Vincent took it one step further, creating a separate corporate arm, selling produce to businesses through commercial accounts such as Whole Foods, which ideally will match each dollar earned. Currently, YEF is in the Hope School District, and Vincent hopes to grow to about 12 more schools within Santa Barbara County next year. There is no out-of-pocket cost to any school; the Vincent Family Trust finances the set-up when a school gets the green light. “So far, we’ve had no schools say no to this; however, we may say no,” Vincent says, stressing that the support of administration, teachers, students, and parents is crucial to the program’s success. With YEF, 100 percent of proceeds and focus is on education. All grade levels participate—kindergartners help plant the seedlings and older grades transfer the seeds into towers and later harvest the produce. Kids simultaneously learn nutrition, mathematics, and science, truly getting the basics of textbook topics such as germination and photosynthesis. Adds Vincent: “You’re taught all that in a book, but it’s nothing like when you’re out doing it in the garden.” J . B . K .

S A N TA B A R B A R A


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64

W H AT ’ S N O W / G I V I N G B A C K

Sweet SIXTY

Local philanthropist SHARON

BRADFORD ,

who chaired the Music Academy’s opening gala.

The Towbes Group celebrates 60 years of doing good

Top to bottom: TOWBES

GROUP members Derek Hansen,

Craig Zimmerman, Beth Sparks, Michael Towbes, Michelle Konoske, Traci Taitt, and Jim Carrillo; breaking ground at RIVIERA

This year marks the 60th anniversary of THE TOWBES GROUP —a name that strikes chords of success and charity within Santa Barbara. Under the leadership of Michael Towbes, a man who’s served on 33 boards and has had the rare distinction of being both volunteer and philanthropist of the year, the team maintains his steady mantra of “Give Where You Live.” When it comes to choosing where to give, Towbes, 87, says, “We look at where the impact will be, staying almost entirely focused on Santa Barbara, as we can see where it goes.” To date, The Towbes Group has developed two million square feet of commercial space, including Riviera Park and Coast Village Square, and 6,000 residential units. For every residential move-in, a donation is made to a local charity, plus each new resident receives a reusable grocery bag, which eliminates the use of 1,000 plastic bags over a lifetime. In the spirit of sustainability, the business has become green certified—their slogan “Scan When You Can” has helped them achieve 85 percent waste diversion by using less paper, and employees have access to the company’s electric “Towbie” car for daily errands. “We’ve filled a need for housing between Ventura and Santa Maria,” says Towbes. “We’re very conscious of the impact of our projects and neighborhood concerns.” Staying focused on that wisdom, the Towbes Group targets social work and education to help keep people employed and off the streets, awarding grants twice a year to support community organizations. Personally, Towbes and his wife, Anne, are constantly giving to organizations they believe in. For his 80th birthday, they opted out of a traditional party and instead threw a fundraiser bash for the Granada Theatre. And there’s no telling what this anniversary or future milestone celebrations will bring. “Over the years, our philanthropy has been very public. Being public about what you do may encourage other people to give,” says Towbes, who urges people to do what they can, be it volunteering or giving dollars and cents. “Santa Barbara has been very good to me and I want to leave it better than I found it.” J . B . K .

What’s Now / Giving Back PARK , 1913; Towbes with his

longtime business partner Eli Luria.

S A N TA B A R B A R A


SBMA- 75 Years Tribute


The following names include all of the trustees since the Museum’s founding. Those in bold represent the founders, presidents, and current board. Names in red comprise the event committee for the SBMA gala, 75: A Cause to Celebrate. Mrs. Tirey C. Abbot (1955–1961); Jan Abel (1974–1980, 1982–1987); Jesse Alexander (1972–1984); John Alexander (1980); Thomas C. Amory (1990–1994); Kenneth Anderson (2005–2015); J. Robert Andrews (1973–1976, 1980, 1984–1989, 1994–2003, 2005–2006); Patricia Aoyama (2013–Present); Mrs. Wallace  W. Arendt (1972–1974); Mrs. James Argyropoulos (1991–1997); Mrs. Horace  W. Armstrong (1950, 1952–1953, 1955–1956, 1958, 1961, 1964); Richard Reed Armstrong (1987–1992); Margaret Arvey (2000–2006); Standish Backus (1950–1957, 1960, 1965, 1968–1970, 1972–1976); Gwen Baker (2013–Present); Mrs. Arthur Balinger (1980– 1985); Richard Banks (2009–2013); Jeffrey C. Barbakow (1996–1998); Col. Joseph Howard Barnard (1940–1944); Wilford Lloyd Baumes (1994–1997); Esther Bear (1968–1969, 1972– 1976); Mrs. Frederick William Beckman (1950, 1952); Richard C. Bergen (1984–1989); Mrs. Barry Berkus (1981–1986, 1988–1989, 1992–1994); Mrs. Alfred E. Bieterich (1953); S.R. Bill (1971–1973); John C. Bishop, Jr. (2001–2008, 2010–Present); Mrs. Francis E. Bishop (1953– 1956); Mrs. Frank Bishop (1944–1952); Mrs. John C. Bishop, Jr. (1989–1994); Patricia Blake (2010–2015, Present); Patty Bliss (1976–1990); Robert Woods Bliss (1940–1943, 1945–1946, 1948, 1950–1952); Mary Jane Bloom (1999); Mrs. Sanford Bloom (1994–1998); Mrs. Ann Booth (1974, 1980–1984); Donald Bowey (2004–2006); Susan Bowey (2009–Present); Mrs. Joseph Bradley (1972–1973); Mrs. Wilson Bradley Jr. (1991–1992); Mrs. Arthur Bromfield (1974–1981); Merryl Brown (1995–1998; 1999–2000); Arnold Brustin (2001– 2008); Mrs. Earnest A. Bryant III (1989–1991); Col. Henry T. Bull (1946–1947, 1949–1953, 1956, 1959); Mrs. Sellar Bullard (1950–1951, 1953–1954, 1956, 1972–1974); Mrs. Donald 1957 Burden (1969–1970); Shirley Burden (1966–1968, 1970–1976); Mrs. Royal Robert Bush (1975–1980); Mrs. Vreeland Bush (1949); Mrs. William Butterworth (1949–1950, 1952– 1953); Mrs. Ina Therese Campbell (1940–1943, 1945–1946, 1948, 1950–1952); Dow Carpenter (1972); Mrs. Robert C. Carty (1968–1970, 1972–1976); Dr. Michael Caston (1998); Mrs. Rowe Giesen (1980–1981); Harold Gladwin (1943, 1950); Admiral William A. Glassford (1952–1953, 1955–1956, 1958); Richard Godfrey (2001–2006); Melinda Goodman (1999– 2000); Jane Gottlieb (2003–2008); Dr. Samuel Gould (1961); Mrs. Frederic Saltonstal Gould (1940–1946); Harriet Cowles Hammet Graham (1946–1956, 1958, 1961, 1968– 1974); Campbell Grant (1968–1969, 1972–1976); David Gray (1940–1942); Elaine Gray (2015–Present); Mrs. David Gray Sr. (1943, 1946, 1949–1950, 1959); Mrs. David Gray, Jr. (1972–1975); Paul Gray (1976–1979, 1986, 1989–1991); H. Royce Greatwood (1957); Joseph Green (2000–2003); Mrs. Caroline P. Green (1975–1981); Mrs. John H. Green (1951, 1953– 1954, 1956–1957, 1960, 1963, 1968–1974); Luther Greene (1945–1946); Gregg Hackethal (2003–Present); Girard Van Barkaloo Hale (1940–1944, 1946, 1949–1950, 1952–1953, 1956, 1958); Col. George L. Hamilton (1940–1941); Col. Pierpont Hamilton (1954); Michael Armand Hammer (2011–2015); Buell Hammett (1940–1943); Lawrence  T. Hammett (2001–2012); Betsy Hannaford (2014–Present); Perri Harcourt (2011–Present); Jeffrey Harding (1986–1990, 1992–1996); Anne Harte (2004–2006, 2009–2011); Michael Healy (2007–2012); Lorna Hedges (1982–1987, 1989–1995, 1998–2004); Dr. MacKinley Helm (1955–1957, 1960, 1963); Mrs. William C. Henderson (1989–1990, 1992); Mrs. Harold Hicks (1983–1988); Clarence K. Hinkle (1940–1945, 1948–1951, 1953); Bernard Hoffman (1940, 1943); Mrs. John J. Hollister, Jr. (1964, 1966, 1968); Judith Hopkinson (2005–Present); Mrs. Harry Hovey (1990–1995); Cyndee Howard (2009–2016); Harris Huey (1980–1984, 1986– 1990s 1991); Brig. Gen. Henry C. Huglin (1969–1976); James Hutchinson; Samuel Ilsley (1940– 1943); Joan Jackson (2011–2015); Dr. Einer Jacobsen (1949–1950); Gina Jannotta (2011–Present); Robert Jones (1957–1967, 1969–1979, 1982–1987); Mrs. William H. Joyce, Jr. (1972–1976, 1979–1987); William H. Joyce (1964, 1966); Stuart L. Kadison (1991–1994, 2000–2003); Mrs. Burke Kaplan (1990–1991); Ms. Patricia Kaplan (2000–2003); Francis M. Kauffman (1956); Spencer Kellogg (1944); Herbert Kendall (1994–1999); Mrs. H.T. King (1944–1947); Mrs. Hugh Kirkland (1953, 1972–1976); Jacquelyn Klein-Brown (2012–Present); Mrs. Hilmar  O. Koefod (1944–1950, 1952–1953, 1955–1956, 1972–1973); Douglass Ewell Parshall (1940–1943, 1946–1950, 1952–1953, 1955–1956, 1958, 1961, 1964, 1968, 1972–1976); Dr. Donald S. Patterson (1956–1957, 1960, 1972–1976); Mrs. Donald S. Patterson (1963, 1966, 1969–1976); Mrs. Eugene L. Patterson (1950–1951, 1953–1954, 1956– 1957, 1960, 1963, 1968–1970); Joe D. Paxton (1943–1954, 1972–1976); Mrs. Catherine Peake (1970–1971); Channing Peake (1940–1943, 1946, 1949–1950, 1952–1953, 1956, 1958, 1972– 1976); Joey Pearson (2010–Present); Charles  E. Perkins (1952); Mrs. Charles  E. Perkins (1953–1956, 1958, 1972–1976); Hugh E. Petersen (1983–1987); Herbert Peterson (1973–1977, 1980–1992); Mrs. Priscilla Pillsbury (1979); Richard M. Polsky (1959); Donald Pond (1944– 1946, 1948, 1950–1951, 1953, 1972–1976); Ned  S. Porter (1940); Michael Patrick Porter (2015–Present); Mrs. Annie E. Preisker (1940–1942); Mrs. Rhoda Prud’homme (1948–1951, 1953, 1972–1976); Ceil Pulitzer (2010); Hugh  J. Ralston (1995–2000); Dr. Richard  C. Raymond (1959–1960); Mrs. Charles Beebe Raymond (1940, 1943); E.  Douglas Reddan (1970–1971); John Rex (1974–1981, 1983–1985, 1987–2004); Zola Rex (1976–1982, 1996, 1999–2011); Miss Frances Rich (1943); H. Smith Richardson III (1998–2002, 2005–2006, 2009); Mrs. Will Richeson Jr. (1987–1989); Lady Leslie Ridley-Tree (1991–2014); Mrs. William Robbins (1974–1979); John  D. Romo (1993–1999, 2003–2006); Guy Roop (1972); Mrs. Guy Roop (1968–1971); Lou Rose (1957, 1960, 1972–1976); Albert Ruddock (1952–1953, 1955–1956, 1958, 1961, 1968–1970); Annie Laurie Ryerson (1948–1952); Joe T. Ryerson (1945–1946); Harrison Ryon (1940–1953, 1956, 1959, 1962, 1965, 1968–1970); Arthur Sachs (1943–1944, 1947, 1949–1950); Nancy Schlosser (2009–Present); George 2000s Schoellkopf (2010–Present); Alice Schott (1943, 1946–1947, 1950, 1953–1956, 1959, 1962, 1965, 1968–1970); Max Schott (1942, 1944); Arthur W. Schultz (1988–1993, 1995–Present); Francis  M. Sedgwick (1956–1957, 1960, 1963, 1965–1966); Mrs. Francis Sedgwick (1954, 1970–1976); Paul Selwyn (2007–2008); Mrs. Stanley Sheinbaum (1966, 1968, 1972–1973); Laura Lewis Shelburne (2007–Present); Mrs. Jack Shields (1972–1976); David N. Siebert (1957, 1960–1964); Philip  S. Siff (1972–1976); Phillip  F. Siff (1962–1963); Eric  A. Skipsey (1994–1998); John Smith (1954, 1956–1957, 1960); Mrs. Gordon  K. Smith (1975–1981);

SBMA


Mrs. George Cavaletto (1971); Dan Cerf (2015–Present); Les Charles (1998–2006, 2011– Present); Harold Stuart Chase (1940); Vernon I. Cheadle (1968, 1972, 1974); Ernest  M. Clark, Jr. (1990–1991); Mrs. Alfred B. Clark (1962, 1965, 1968, 1972–1973); Mrs. Richard C. Cleveland (1972–1973); Mrs. Tukey Cleveland (1974–1976); John Mike Cohen (2015– Present); Peter Colefax (1973–1978); Converse M. Converse (1945–1946); Charles E. Craig (1971–1983); J.  Hewes Crispin (1980–2010); Dodge Crockett, Jr. (1975–1981); Marceline Cronan (1940); Elizabeth Cudahy (1944–1947, 1949–1950); Lorenzo Dall’armi (1968); Mrs. Gerald Dalton (1981–1983); Charles Cabot Daniels (1940, 1943); James E. Davidson (1986– 1996, 1999); Joan Davidson (2012–Present); Mrs. Eugene Davidson (1979–1986, 1988– 1996); Robert  A. Day, Jr. (1983–1988); Lockwood de  Forest (1940–1942, 1948–1949); Elizabeth de  Forest (1950–1957, 1960–1977, 1979–1983); John de Laittre (1972–1974); Stanislao De  Santis (1981); Willard  G. DeGroot (1983–1987); Jelinda DeVorzon (1997– 1999); William Dole (1954, 1956, 1972–1976); Dr. Henri Dorra (1969–1978, 1980–1992); Diandra de Morrell Douglas (1998–2000); R. Chad Dreier (2001); Katy E. Drew (2001– 2004); Robert  W. Duggan (1990); Dr. Beatrice Farwell Duncan (1994–1996); Amy  E. DuPont (1943–1947, 1949–1953); David Dvorak (1990–1993); Mrs. George  D. Eagleton (1993–1995); George D. Eagleton (1996–2001); Jane Eagleton (2010–Present); Mrs. Robert Easton (1940–1942); Mrs. Archie Edwards (1940–1941); Mrs. Muriel Edwards (1945–1946); 1985 Mrs. Wagner Edwards (1943); Mercedes H. Eichholz (1985–2014); Dr. Robert J. Emmons (1989–1994, 1997–2012); Lois Erburu (2013–Present); Alice  R. Erving (1953–1957, 1959–1974); Reginald Faletti (1950–1989); Beatrice Farwell (1971–1976; 1993–1996); Constance Fearing (1962, 1965, 1968–1976, 1995–Present); Larry J. Feinberg; Jean Fenton (1966, 1968–1969, 1972–1976); Melissa Fetter (1999–2004); George H. Finley (1945–1947, 1950, 1972–1976); Audrey  H. Fisher (2005–Present); Greg Fowler (2009–2014); Connie Frank (2015–Present); Mrs. Claire Franklin (1940, 1943); Len Freedman (1996–1998); Mrs. Alex Funke (1958, 1960, 1963); John Gamble (1940–1952); Roy  E. Gammill (1944–1947, 1950); Gilbert Garcia (1991); John Gardner (2013–Present); Blas  M. Garza (1995); Mrs. Joseph Koepfli (1963–1971, 1973–1976); Paul D. Kolyn (1968–1976); Norman Kurland (2001–2002); Mark Lansburgh (1960, 1963, 1966); Mrs. Charles R. L’Ecluse (1985–1989); Robert M. Light (1991–1996); Dr. R.D. Lindquist (1945–1948); Mrs. Frances Burns Linn (1940–1942); Judith Little (1997–2001, 2004–Present); Paul Longanbach (2015–Present); Mrs. William Longstreth (1973–1976); Lillian Lovelace (1974–1979, 1983–1988, 2009); Jon B. Lovelace, Jr. (2009–2012); Mrs. H. Lowenhaupt (1947); Wright S. Ludington (1940– 1943, 1947–1953, 1956, 1958–1963, 1965, 1967–1970, 1972–1977, 1980–1992); Eli Luria (1990–2006); Anne Luther (2003–2008); Bernard  J. MacElhenny, Jr. (1975–1978, 1980, 1982); Craig Madsen (2001–2006); Margaret Mallory (1960, 1963, 1966, 1968–1998); Cheech Marin (2005–2008); Bob Marshall (2010–Present); Mrs. Gottgried Mayer (1971); Mrs. Patricia  S. McClure (1982–1987); Katharine McCormick (1940, 1942–1944, 1946– 1947, 1950, 1953, 1956, 1959, 1962, 1965); Frank McCoy (1940–1943, 1946, 1949); Andrew McDonough (1951, 1953–1954, 1956, 1972–1974); Mrs. John McFadden (1962, 1965); Sheila Bourke McGinity (1998–2000, 2009–2011); Amanda Nyce McIntyre (1996–2001, 2009– Present); Donald McLure (1966); Putnam Dana McMillan (1953, 1956, 1959); Arthur Merovick (2007–2010); Marshall C. Milligan (2005–2012); Ellen Romero Morales (1988–1989); Dudley E. Morris (2009–2012); Mrs. McLennan Morse (1962, 1965, 1968); Sterling Morton (1949–1951, 1953–1954, 1956); Preston Morton (1961, 1964, 1968); Carl T. Mottek (1996–2003); Frank Mulhauser (1943–1946); Elsa Mulhauser (1947, 1949–1953, 1955–1956); William G. Myers (1992–1994); Ilene Nagel (2002–2004); Howard J. Nammack 1992 (1958); Pedro Nava (2003–2004); Mrs. Stanhope Nixon (1940–1943, 1946); Chapin Nolen (1997–2002, 2009); Mrs. Frank  W. Norris (1987–1992); Betsy Northrop (2000– 2006); Kathy  J. Odell (1993–1995); James  P. Owen (1993–1998); Mrs. Zebulon Owings, Jr. (1952–1953, 1955–1956, 1958, 1960–1961); Mrs. Alwilda  M. Owings (1972–1973); Kenneth Palmer (1970–1971); Gerald Parent (2000–2011); Alice Keck Park (1972–1974); Françoise Park (2012–Present); Mrs. David Edgar Park (1968–1970); Mrs. John A. Parma (1940–1943, 1972–1975); DeWitt Parshall (1940–1943, 1945–1946, 1948, 1950–1951); Mrs. Edward Snider (1994–1996); Kenneth C.T. Snyder (1975–1980); Selden Spaulding (1966–1970); Mariane Sprague (2010–2014); Mrs. Samuel J. Stanwood (1940–1943); Jack Gage Stark (1944, 1946, 1949–1950); Elaine Stepanek (2007–2010); Mrs. John Stewart (1961, 1964–1965, 1968–1969, 1971–1976); Patrick Stone (2002–2008); Mrs. Barbara Storke (1974–1976); Mrs. Charles A. Storke (1944–1947, 1950, 1953, 1956, 1959, 1972–1973); Mrs. Thomas More Storke (1940–1943, 1945–1946, 1972–1976); Robert K. Straus (1971– 1996); Diane Sullivan (2013–Present); Susan Sweetland (2007–2010); William Sykes (1980–1985); Maurice Taylor (1979–1981); Mrs. Harvey Taylor (1965, 1968–1972); Clay Tedeschi (2015–Present); Mrs. E.L. Thayer (1948, 1950–1951, 1953); Dr. Bertram Thomas (1970–1982); William S. Thomas, Jr. (1999–2004); Robert L. Thornburgh (1959, 1961, 1964, 1972–1976); Jeanne Towles (2014–Present); Stokley Towles (2011); Katharine Tremaine (1953, 1956, 1959, 1965, 1968–1970); Emily Hall Tremaine (1940–1944, 1972–1976); Mrs. Francis T. Underhill (1940–1953); Mrs. Kenneth C. Urton (1955–1959, 1965–1966, 1968– 1976); Carol Lapham Valentine (1966–1983); David W. Van Horne (1997–2004, 2007); F. Bailey Vanderhoef, Jr. (1954, 1956–1960, 1963, 1966–1971, 1973–2008); Kent M. Vining (1986–1998); Mrs. Hamilton Von Breton (1968–1968, 1972–1976); Hubert Vos (2003– 2008); Mrs. John T. DeBlois Wack (1940–1943, 1972–1973); Mrs. Forrest Wallace (1976– 1985); Mrs. Elsie Waller (1940, 1943); Harold R. Ward (1953, 1956–1959, 1964, 1968–1969, 1972–1979); Jane Watson (1964, 1968–1969, 1972–1976, 1981–2004); Dody Waugh (2011– 2016); Mrs. S. Robert Weltz, Jr. (1986–1990); William W. Wheeler III (1954–1956, 1958, 1961, 1964, 1972–1976); Huyler White (1961, 1964, 1972–1976); Mrs. Van Rensselaer Wilbur (1953, 1956, 1959, 1962); Donald  J. Willfong (1993–1998); Mrs.  Williams (1961); Mrs. Arthur Williams (1971); Mrs. L Kemper Williams (1952–1953, 1955–1956, 1958, 1964); Michael G. Wilson (1994–1996, 1998, Present); Shirley Wilson (1972–1974, 1992–2008); William Wilson (1957); Dr. George Wittenstein (1970–1974); Otto Wittman (1991–1996); Lisa Wolf (2009–2010); Frances Slater Wolseley (1958–1969, 1972–1976); Miss Cynthia Wood (1968); Mrs. A.G. Wood (1943–1944); Mrs. J.B. Yager (1943); Karen Yonally (1996–2001)

Happy anniversary,

sBMa!

SBMA


Daniel Gibbings

DANIEL GIBBINGS flagship store 1143 coast village road santa barbar a, ca 93108 1 877 565 1284 da nielgibbings.com


Style 69

Town & Country Relaxed, laid-back luxury is taking its turn

PHOTOGRAPH: NICOLE LAMOTTE

Style

LAWREN HOWELL at THE OJAI VALLEY INN & SPA .


70

The Insider

STYLE

For the past year, LAWREN HOWELL , contributing freelance editor for Vogue, has claimed the everevolving small town of Ojai—a community she finds captivating and full of surprises—as home for herself and her family (husband Kristopher Moller and kids Louisa and Peter). “Ojai has a great beauty that is inspiring on a daily basis,” she says. “It also seems to attract a lot of people with independent and adventurous spirits, and we love that!”

day dressing has changed since moving to Ojai. Part of good style is being appropriate, so I’m not wearing here what I would wear in Paris. I like to juxtapose masculine with feminine, old and new, rough and soft in the way I dress, and I’m really aware of balancing textures and proportions. For example, if I wear a bohemian top, I will balance it with a tailored pant or skirt.

WHAT ARE YOUR THOUGHTS ABOUT WEST COAST FASHION? I think that people often

mistake California style for being just a pair of jeans and a T-shirt, but in recent years that has been proven not to be the case. The West Coast is full of

Lawren’s

OJAI FAVES Visiting MEDITATION MOUNT , 805-646-5508, meditationmount.org. Eating at NOCCIOLA , 805-640-1648, nocciolaojai.com. Shopping at IN THE FIELD , 310-403-4292, inthefieldojai.com. Working out at ARROW HEART YOGA ,

805-669-8143, arrowheartyoga.com.

Style

Taking in some art at PORCH GALLERY , 805-620-7589,

porchgalleryojai.com.

Having a night out at CHIEF’S PEAK bar located at the Rancho Inn,

805-646-1434, ojairanchoinn.com/ chiefspeak.

Top to bottom: Howell with Louisa and Peter at HiHo! burger; Howell in Albertus Swanepoel hat, HOPE shirt, AG jeans from WENDY FOSTER , and KENDALL CONRAD bag.

interesting designers. I especially love Co, Rodarte, DOEN, Sacai, the punkish brand Libertine, and The Elder Statesman for that California-luxe surf-culture look. West Coast fashion feels like a creative frontier; most of the companies are independently owned and more free to do what they want. They are complete originals and not afraid to crosspollinate into other art forms. I find them to be really inspiring. A M E L I A F L E E T W O O D FALL MUST HAVES From top: Silk robe by Lawren’s sister, Stevie Howell, $395, steviehowell .com; sailor pants, $395, jessekamm.bigcartel.com; Bo Ceppo ankle boots, $1,130, monamoore.com.

S A N TA B A R B A R A

PHOTOGRAPHS: NICOLE LAMOTTE

HOW HAS A MOVE TO THE COUNTRY INFORMED YOUR STYLE? I definitely have to say that my day-to-


Abejas

䄀瘀愀渀琀 吀漀椀Ⰰ 䌀愀爀椀渀攀 䜀椀氀猀漀渀Ⰰ 䘀愀氀椀攀爀漀 匀愀爀琀椀Ⰰ 䘀椀氀甀Ⰰ 䜀椀愀搀愀  䘀漀爀琀攀Ⰰ 䜀漀氀搀攀渀 䜀漀漀猀攀Ⰰ 䠀甀洀愀渀漀椀搀Ⰰ 䬀䨀愀挀焀甀攀猀Ⰰ 䰀愀甀爀攀渀  䴀愀渀漀漀最椀愀渀Ⰰ 䴀愀爀猀攀氀氀攀Ⰰ 一椀氀椀 䰀漀琀愀渀Ⰰ 伀昀昀椀挀椀渀攀 䌀爀攀愀琀椀瘀攀Ⰰ 倀攀琀攀爀  䌀漀栀攀渀Ⰰ 刀愀焀甀攀氀 䄀氀氀攀最爀愀Ⰰ 匀椀戀攀氀 匀愀爀愀氀Ⰰ 匀漀昀椀攀 䐀✀䠀漀漀爀攀Ⰰ   匀瀀椀渀攀氀氀椀 䬀椀氀挀漀氀氀椀渀Ⰰ 夀瘀攀猀 匀愀氀漀洀漀渀⸀

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Legacy Of Luxury

WHO Designer/fashion brand consultant Marin Hopper

from Hollywood royalty—the daughter of actor/photographer/artist Dennis Hopper and actress/author Brooke Hayward, granddaughter of mega-agent/producer Leland Hayward and silver screen star Margaret Sullavan, not to mention her step-grandmother was best-dressed icon Slim Keith.

Clockwise from top left: MARIN HOPPER with a

collection of her father’s photographs; DENNIS HOPPER on the set of Blue

Velvet; Hopper as a toddler with her mother, BROOKE HAYWARD , at a cottage on MIRAMAR BEACH .

WEAR Steeped in style from birth, Hopper

has taken her work with Italian luxury brands Tods and Hogan—and her own sartorial family history—to create Hayward Luxury, an accessories collection of handbags, and soonto-be launched Hopper Goods, a menswear line featuring clothing, sunglasses, and other masculine accoutrements inspired by her late father. NORTH OF HOLLYWOOD “I grew up going to Santa Barbara in the 1970s with

my mom and staying at the San Ysidro Ranch, which I still love. At one point, when I was 13, she decided to buy a house there, and for a time, I kept my horse at the hotel's stable. I loved it then and still do now—very luxurious, but still with that seductively down-to-earth touch. Just rugged enough to enjoy the outdoor nature of the beautiful surroundings of Santa Barbara.” G I N A T O L L E S O N

Style

CINEMA CHIC “The fall 2016 collection was named ‘This is It’ from the

neon sign of the same name in Dad’s movie Blue Velvet. We had a lot of velvets in the fall collection, including brocades—some in the shade of blue from the movie—but also inspired by the palette of Isabella

MUST HAVES Look for a HAYWARD trunk

Rossellini’s character, Dorothy Vallens, who wore mostly deep-rich shades of raspberry and crimson-colored wine.”

show in Santa Barbara this fall. Above, left to right: Navy glazed python Bobby clutch, $1,890; lizard Box clutch, $1,690; rust/wine suede Shopper, $690, haywardluxury.com.

Power Play NARS ’s velvet lip glide is this season’s gloss revolution. Try Deviant ($26, sephora.com) for a deep-burgundy shine. G . T .

We’re Obsessed...

Loungewear takes on a high-fashion mix with FOR RESTLESS SLEEPERS ’ luxe artisanal pajamas. Undeniably chic, designer Francesca Ruffini’s ensembles (F.R.S is her monogram) are veritable pantsuits (separates from $165) that can be worn day or night for the utmost comfort. G . T . F O RR E S TL E S S S L E E PE R S .CO M

PHOTOGRAPHS: MARIN HOPPER, COURTESY OF THE HOPPER ART TRUST

WHAT The former fashion director at Elle hails


Julianne


TREND REPORT

72 STYLE

Top to bottom: Marissa Webb top, $345, INTERMIX ;

Dries van Noten

GIVENCHY jumpsuit $2,880,

net-a-porter.com; Altuzarra blazer, $1,795, JULIANNE .

Tibi

PINCH of PINSTRIPE Style Dust off your dad’s suits and lengthen your look with masculine lines

Top to bottom: Purse, $1,750, PRADA Beverly Hills; Shona Joy skirt, $248, BLANKA ; Norma Kamali jacket, $315, shirt $135, and pant $170, ALLORA BY LAURA .

LUCKY PENNY

S A N TA B A R B A R A


In The Field - Ojai

730 OJAI AVE. OJAI, CALIFORNIA 805.633.0021 INTHEFIELDOJAI.COM

IG: @IN_THE_FIELD

M-TU: BY APPT. W-F: 11-6 SA: 11-6 SU: 11-4 INFO@INTHEFIELDOJAI.COM


76

STYLE

Left to right: K. FRANK ’s new

Montecito digs; store details; windows showing a revolving display of sophisticated looks.

The Change UP

After nine successful years at their bustling State Street location, K. FRANK owners Kevin and Katie Frank decided to reevaluate and relocate to a new Coast Village spot. With a contemporary gallerylike feel, the new men and women’s store continues to curate American and Italian clothing lines while also adding everything from fashion basics to high-end accessories and shoes by new designers every season—look for Mara Hoffman and The Office of Angela Scott this fall. 1150 Coast Village Rd.,

Montecito, 805-560-7424. M A D D I E

CUTTLER

K- FRANK.MYS HOP IFY.C O M

Style

Left to right: SUE TURNER-CRAY at her Los Olivos boutique; Alexander McQueen Union Jack booties.

GET IT Score hard-to-find, limited-edition items with PS DEPT. , the luxury-shopping concierge app developed by UC Santa Barbara grads Michelle Goad and Wolf Klinker. PS Dept. works with more than 10,000 sales associates and 110 luxury retail partners around the world to find your most-wanted merchandise and deliver it to your doorstep. “We do a global search of all facets—in department stores, boutiques, specialty stores,” says Goad. “If it’s out there, we’ll find it.” A S H L E Y N E L S E N

Hidden Gem

Left to right: Some of Turner-Cray’s favorite vintage moments: ALEXANDER MCQUEEN ’s tartan couture; ’90s VERSACE .

WHO Sue Turner-Cray, Brit beauty and owner of The Style Junction, Los Olivos WHAT Vintage curator

extraordinaire who rocks McQueen and Gaultier like nobody’s business.

WEAR Cray has her eye and connections all over Europe for designers and frocks you can’t find in department stores. If you are looking for retro YSL, Dolce & Gabbana, Versace, Lagerfeld, and more, ring her up. 2963 Grand Ave., Ste. C, Los Olivos, 805-455-1008. G . T . THES TYLEJUNCTION.C O M

S A N TA B A R B A R A

PHOTOGRAPHS: K. FRANK, AZARIA CHAVIRA; SUE TURNER-CRAY, NANCY NEIL

PS D E PT.C O M


Romp


78

H E A LT H + B E A U T Y

DOOR to DOOR No gluten, no dairy, no GMO—no problem. Now delivering to clients in Santa Barbara, THE RANCH DAILY —a meal delivery service (from $240/plan) presented by Malibu-based The Ranch fitness and wellness retreat— creates nutritious, plant-based meals bursting with rich, exciting flavors. With little to no preparation required, you can sit down to any of The Ranch Daily’s meal options— including chickpea and kale salad and mushroom and scallion pizza—relaxed and confident that your body is getting the nutrients it needs. All meals are prepared less than 24 hours before delivery and draw from seasonal, fresh fruits and vegetables. K AY L A Z O L A

TH E RA N CH D A I LY.CO M

Health + Beauty Top to bottom: COCO-

NUT YOGURT PAR-

FAIT ; preparation of the TOONA WRAP .

Board ROOM Be seen at exercise guru Johnny G and wife Jodi’s IN-TRINITY studio. Part yoga, part Pilates, part martial arts, the classes (from $25) focus on physical and mental conditioning and well-being. 311 Paseo Nuevo, Santa Barbara, 805-963-2292. IN -T R IN IT Y. C O M / S B - D O J O / Left to right: An IN-TRINITY board; Jodi and Johnny G.

S A N TA B A R B A R A

Raising the BARRE The latest fitness trend is popping up all over town When THE BAR METHOD , 805-

898-9000, santabarbara.barmethod .com, studio owner Kendall Clark

first tried a class back in 2009, she immediately fell in love with the unique and rewarding form of exercise. By combining dance, body sculpting, and isometrics, The Bar Method elongates and tones muscles while improving posture, flexibility, and mind-set. Now having been open for a year in its La Cumbre Plaza location, Clark and the rest of her team have built a community environment filled with positive energy to help others achieve their fitness goals through fun and inspiring exercise. Embracing a whole-body health philosophy while combining aspects of ballet, yoga, and Pilates, BARRE3 , 805-845-9380, barre3 .com, on Chapala Street focuses on providing clients with a mindbody connection, whole-food nutritional advice, and a positive environment to transform your workout and your life. This barre franchise is for people of all ages and also offers more than 250 workouts streaming on its website and mobile app. Having recently opened a State Street location, CARDIO BARRE , 805-206-6831, cardiobarre.com, is a unique barre method studio that offers a fun, no-impact, fat-burning workout to tone your body. Cardio Barre is fast paced with an aerobic feel, which maximizes both calorie burning and body sculpting. All of the studio’s qualified instructors are experienced in ballet as well as trained in the barre industry, ensuring you a safe workout in a personalized environment. M . C .


SALON AT THE FOUR SEASONS RESORT THE BILTMORE SANTA BARBARA

Jose Eber

B E V E R LY H I L L S

S A N TA B A R B A R A

PA L M S P R I N G S

DALLAS

SHORT HILLS

DUBAI

FOUR SEASONS THE BILTMORE RESORT SALON I 1260 CHANNEL DRIVE I SANTA BARBARA, CA 93108 I 805.770.3000

WWW.JOSEEBER.COM


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H E A LT H + B E A U T Y

APP Therapy

Left to right: COLOURPOP brow pencil in Dope Taupe ($5); La La eye shadow ($5).

Ever wanted to turn your home into a spa? ZEEL MASSAGE ON DEMAND can do just that in an hour’s notice—whether you’re home or traveling. The Zeel app, available for iPhone and Android, takes care of booking and payment for last-minute appointments (from $116) or for those who are planning a month out. After a few clicks, licensed therapists are sent out (Zeel books any day of the week throughout Southern California and beyond) with a massage table and music, promising comfort and safety while you unwind. K . Z .

POP STAR

For makeup artists and cosmetics junkies, COLOURPOP is an open secret. The online-only, on-trend cult makeup brand’s lip colors ($6) have been seen on the likes of Taylor Swift, Kristen Stewart, and Taraji P. Henson. Based in Oxnard, ColourPop is the brainchild of supersmart siblings Laura and John Nelson who relied exclusively on social media to promote their reasonably priced, fashion-savvy cosmetics. The result? A media superstar (three million Instagram followers) and e-commerce phenomenon. L . D . P O R T E R

ZEEL. C O M

Health + Beauty

C O L O UR PO P.C O M

PERFECT SKIN

With more than 20 years of honing in on the best possible products and treatments for your skin, Lisa Pfeiffer, owner of PEACHES SKIN CARE , has mastered exactly what you need to do to make your face glow. The signature facials (from $89) at her Santa Barbara salon (she has two more locations in Ohio and Long Beach) are more like a regimen to uncover the cleanest, purest, freshest-looking skin. Clients—everyone from teenagers learning about hygiene and people with acne and scarring to elderly men and women—come in for “a resultsoriented facial,” says Pfeiffer. “We not only clean your skin and change it from the inside out, but we educate you.” By incorporating organic products—for example, Bragg’s apple cider vinegar is used to tone the skin—as well as exfoliants, cleansers, and masks that Pfeiffer created specifically based on scientific studies, her facials are individually tailored and include a deep cleansing, microdermabrasion, extractions, retinol or Co-Q10 oxygen treatments, microcurrent muscle work, and more. Plus, Peaches is one of the few salons in the area certified to use microcurrent gloves. Worn by the aestheticians as they pull up various facial muscles, the gloves emit low-level electrical currents to stimulate and recharge tissue. “We have helped women with Bell's palsy and countless clients with severe scarring and muscle loss,” says Pfeiffer. For anyone planning to embark on the process, Pfeiffer is

Left to right: Peaches’ line of skin care products (from $21).

happy to put together a custom cost-efficient package, which can also include other services such as waxing and lash/brow tinting. “From your first facial, you will see results,” says Pfeiffer, who notes that by following their “prescription” sheet, most clients see a remarkable difference within six months, sometimes less. “Like a workout regime, you will only continue to see healthy, brighter, firmer skin.” 6 E. Arrellaga St., Santa

Barbara, 805-563-9796. G I N A

S A N TA B A R B A R A

Z. TERLINDEN

PE A C H E S S K I N C A RE - S A N TA BA R BA R A .CO M


NEGATIVE SPACE

Absence of design to add balance to a piece.

MOVEMENT

Directing flow using lines and shapes.

CONTRAST

Architectural Millwork Using opposing features to attract focus.

REPETITION

Establishing continuity through recurring elements.

BALANCE

Allowing symmetry to create stability.

UNITY

Creating solidarity using similar aspects.

PROXIMITY

How elements of the product fit together.

RCHITECTURAL ILLWORK TM

OF SANTA BARBARA, INC. www.Archmill.com


Shouldn’t You Be Living with MichaelKate?

Michael Kate Interiors

• MICHAEL KATE INTERIORS / SANTA BARBARA / 132 SANTA BARBARA ST. / (805) 963-1411 / OPEN 6 DAYS, CLOSED WED. / WWW.MICHAELKATE.COM


Home 83

PHOTOGRAPH: MATT WEIR

Home

High Contrast Warm interiors, cool ideas

For this Montecito dining room,

BROWN DESIGN GROUP used Benjamin Moore Black to define a hutch integrated within the white tongue and groove walls. To the left is a hidden door panel that leads to a study.

EDITED BY

J E NN I F ER B LA I SE KRA MER


84

HOME

Home

Clean SLATE

To reinvent this rare 1960s Lutah Maria Riggs Japanese-style home in Montecito, designers DIEGO MONCHAMP and RYAN BROWN of BROWN DESIGN GROUP carefully took it down to the studs. Working with their team’s lead designer, Erin McClelland, and DD Ford Construction, they knocked down nearly every interior wall to modernize the house for a young family. Maintaining the original footprint, they created an airy indoor-outdoor kitchen by combining what was previously two rooms separated by a masonry fireplace. There they designed what Monchamp calls “a good example of a double island,” where one is extended with butcher block for cooking and prep so that the main island, complete with bar stools, can exist with an uninterrupted flow for entertaining. For an interior palette of coastal-inspired blues and complementary grays, the designers infused sophisticated yet playful touches throughout— from hot-air balloon wallpaper in the nursery to vintage tennis rackets hung above a bed to whimsical shapes in the living room. Layering in graphic pillows and an Alpaca throw on the daybed adds texture while other key pieces, such as a custom live-edge dining table, lend “an organic feel to an otherwise straight-laced room.” Outside, landscaper Rob Maday surrounded the exterior with Asian-inspired grasses and rocks—further homage to the home’s design roots. Adds Monchamp: “It looks similar to the original, but we made it much cooler.” 303 Palm Ave., Santa Barbara,

805-228-4114. J E N N I F E R

BLAISE KRAMER

BR OW NDES IGNINC.COM Top to bottom: Living room grays are lit by a LINDSEY ADELMAN chandelier; designers RYAN BROWN (left) and DIEGO MONCHAMP .

S A N TA B A R B A R A


85

HOME

Clockwise from top right: The low-profile MASTER BEDROOM opens up to the

backyard; black and gold accents give contrast to the room’s white walls; the two-tone walnutwhite KITCHEN keeps a clean, streamlined look thanks to minimal hardware; vintage tennis rackets hung above the GUEST BED nod to nearby Knollwood; the LANDSCAPING around the pool and tennis court mix a Santa Barbara feel with Asian garden elements to maintain the home’s original Japanese style.

PHOTOGRAPHS: MATT WEIR

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Interior designer LESLIE LUNDGREN spent years working at Christie’s auction house and doing visual merchandising for Williams-Sonoma before branching out on her own. With clients spanning the coast between Santa Barbara and San Francisco, Lundgren says her style ranges from “cottage to castle,” mixing low and high in fresh ways. “My design philosophy combines new furnishings with antiques, family heirlooms, and collected treasures that all speak to a unique and beautiful story of the people that occupy the spaces,” she says. Based in Montecito, Lundgren bought a 1964 house that most people wanted to tear down. Instead, she saw potential past the shag carpet and algae-covered pool, envisioning a family home that reminded her of California’s Cliff May ranch homes iconic to that era. After several updates—and many trips to the San Ysidro Ranch for garden ideas—Lundgren’s home now inspires friends and clients with its modern-yet-classic global signature style. 415-203-9278. J . B . K . L E S L I E L U N D GR E N D E S I GN .COM

Left to right: A collection of blue and white porcelain mixed with antiques create a global look; LESLIE LUNDGREN .

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Michelle Ramirez lived two years abroad in Bahrain, educating herself on culture, handicraft, and sourcing before opening up her Ventura storefront, PASSPORT HABITS . “Bartering as a woman in souks was my favorite thing to do, yet it was hard to break down walls as the men there are used to dealing with other men,” Ramirez says. “I was taken under the wings of Mr. Hamood, my Persian carpet guru, and together we would sit with tea and he would educate and quiz me daily.” Now, Ramirez has the answers, the goods (from carpets to tribal textiles to Tunisian towels), and the backstories for customers looking for that perfect worldly rug or exotic home accessory. 1987 E. Main St., Ventura, 808-645-6708. J . B . K . PAS S P O R T H AB IT S. C O M

S A N TA B A R B A R A

Middle Eastern wares at PASSPORT HABITS .

PHOTOGRAPHS: LESLIE LUNDGREN, EVAN JANKE

ONE TO WATCH

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Don’t Miss... On October 1, the Santa Barbara chapter of the American Institute of Architects is hosting its eighth annual ARCHITECTOURS under the theme of “Spirit of Santa Barbara—Past & Present.” From 10 am to 4 pm, the tour (from $25) includes seven sites ranging from historic to contemporary, residential to commercial. Highlights include the Jorgensen Ranch House, SBCAST, The Braille Institute, and Westmont’s modern LEED arts building with impressive architecture old and new at every stop. J . B . K . ARCHITECTOURS2016.EVENTBRITE.COM

See decoupage master JOHN DERIAN at Upstairs at Pierre Lafond on October 10 from 2 to 6:30 pm to sign and talk about his new John Derian Picture Book ($75, Artisan). Filled with 350 colorful images and a foreword by Anna Wintour, this oversized beauty is a must-have for fans. 516 San Ysidro

Don’t Miss / Tileco

Rd., 805-565-1503. J . B . K

UP S TAIRS ATP IERREL AF O N D . C O M

Put on your walking shoes and join the 20th annual OJAI HOLIDAY HOME TOUR & MARKETPLACE , produced by Ojai Festivals Women’s Committee. Four distinct and historical Ojai homes are open November 12 and 13 for the self-guided tour (from $40) from 10 am to 4 pm with shuttle service provided. Highlights include a restored 1929 Spanish revival estate and the home of Loretta Young, complete with Hollywood treasures. The weekend also hosts the accompanying holiday marketplace featuring more than 40 vendors selling lifestyle and fashion goods at the Matilija Junior High School gymnasium. Proceeds from the event benefit the Ojai Music Festival and its BRAVO! education and community program. K A Y L A Z O L A OJAIFES TIVAL.ORG/H O L ID AYHOM E- LOOK- IN


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Left to right: Pasadena chair, $4,174, Erinn V. Collection; Beat light, $550, Tom Dixon; tobacco leather pouf, $249, One Kings Lane; airplane stir sticks, $15.99, Still.

BACHELOR

Landing Pad Menswearinspired + geo finds for the GUYS

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Clockwise from below: Gem faceted chest, $5,400, Cuff Home; zinc models, $195, William Laman; Creed lounge sofa, $8,692, Minotti Los Angeles; Ralph Lauren Cantwell decanter, $495, MH Home; 19thcentury African mud cloth pillows, $700/pair, William Laman.


Kathryne Designs Inc.

CREATING SANTA BARBARA INTERIORS FOR 20 YEARS

ART INTERIORS GIFTS 1225 Coast Village Road I 805 565 4700 I KathryneDesigns.com


Majestic

Tranquility

Abundance

Price Upon Request | Ultimate-Retreat.com

Exquisite

Luxurious Sumptuous Compass - Terry Ryken Offered at $9,988,000 | VillaVistaBella.com

Grandeur

Elegance

Price Upon Request | MontecitoGrandeur.com

TR

Style

Terry Ryken 805.896.6977 TerryRyken.com | terryryken@aol.com

Š2016 Terry Ryken. CalBRE# 01107300. Compass is a licensed real estate broker and abides by Equal Housing Opportunity laws. All material presented herein is intended for informational purposes only. Information is compiled from sources deemed reliable but is subject to errors, omissions, changes in price, condition, sale, or withdraw without notice. No statement is made as to accuracy of any description. All measurements and square footages are approximate. Exact dimensionscan be obtained by retaining the services of an architect or engineer. This is not intended to solicit property already listed.


Ramsey Asphalt


Conceptually born from a delicate duality, Angel Oak offers a taste of the familiar and the unexpected. Be drawn in and be rewarded.

Angel Oak at Bacara

ANGELOAKSB.COM

|

8301 Hollister Avenue, Santa Barbara, CA 93117

|

Reservations 877 935 6113


Taste 93

Culinary Spotlight Eating and drinking around town and in the Santa Ynez Valley

Taste

The dining room at CONVIVO .


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Beachside Bites The latest hot spot to open its doors: CONVIVO . A partnership of epicurean minds Larry Mindel (owner of Il Fornaio restaurants), and award-winning Bay Area chef Peter McNee, Convivo offers seasonal menus of “nomad Italian” food with a broader Mediterranean influence—think artfully arranged farm-fresh cicchetti (small plates), house-made pasta, wood-fired pizza, and family-style platters of seafood and meats. The restaurant’s atmosphere comes alive inside as well as on the patio where guests can dine alfresco amid the palm trees. Or, grab a drink and sit by the brick fireplace with stunning views of the Pacific. 901 E. Cabrillo Blvd., Santa Barbara, 805-845-6789. H A N N A H N E L S O N CO N V I V O RE S TA U RA N T.C O M

Left to right: PESCE MISTO of seafood, Roman artichokes, and salsa verde; a LA PALOMA cocktail; SPAGHETTI with head-on prawns,

shellfish brodo, and Santa Barbara SEA URCHIN BUTTER .

Aging wine under water is a trend Italian-born Emanuele Azzaretto has been following since learning of a 2010 discovery of 162 bottles of champagne in a shipwreck in the Baltic Sea. Since then, a handful of European wineries have sunk wines off of Spain, Italy, and France, and one Napa Valley winery has done so off South Carolina. “I tried to buy some of these wines and it was never available. I thought, Why not do my own?” says the Santa Barbara resident who, along with Section winemaker Marco Lucchesi, conceptualized the 50 FATHOMS WINE CLUB about two years ago. After building crates in his own garage, Azzaretto, an avid diver, filled them with 900 bottles of Il Bianco—a Central Coast white blend of Marsanne, Grenache Blanc, Roussanne, and Viognier—a rosé, a Napa Valley Pinot Noir, cognac, and rum. Then he and his pal Danny Castagnola took them out on Castagnola’s tugboat and dropped them 70 feet into the middle of the Santa Barbara Channel. There, they aged for 12 months before Azzaretto pulled them out at the beginning of July. “I was surprised—and happy—that they survived El Niño and that we got the pressure right for the bottles,” he says. Now, wine club members (memberships start at $350) can obtain access to purchasing the bottles, and a portion of the sales from the rosé is being donated to the Channel Island Marine and Wildlife Institute rescue. G I N A Z . T E R L I N D E N

Top to bottom: 50 FATHOMS

Pinot Noir; lifting the wines from the sea floor.

50FATHOMS WINECLUB.C O M S A N TA B A R B A R A

PHOTOGRAPHS: 50 FATHOMS, AMY BUCHANAN

VINO Del Mare

Taste


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PHOTOGRAPHS: CAKE AND PORTRAIT, BLUE CALEEL; BOOK AND ILLUSTRATIONS, JOYA ROSE GROVES

Palatable Paleo Six months after the start of Cynthia Spivey’s foray into the paleo lifestyle (read: lifestyle, not diet), friends consistently commented on her weight loss, glowing skin, svelte physique, and enthusiastic energy. I was one of many who—desirous of a similar physical transformation—pebbled her with questions: “What is paleo?” “Why does it work?” “How do I do it?” Some of the questions asked of Spivey were easy to answer, others more difficult. Always up for a challenge, Spivey became an expert who not only understands and lives the paleo lifestyle, but can explain it. Thankfully, Spivey condensed her hundreds of hours of research into a book she wishes she had when she started on this transformative path. HOW TO EAT PALEO (WHEN YOU DON’T LIVE IN A CAVE) (from $19.95, Smiling Water Group, available at Tecolote Book Shop, 805-969-4977, tecolotebookshop.com) is an informative, accessible, and practical resource for anyone interested in learning about the paleo lifestyle. In addition to answering the fundamental who, what, and why questions, Spivey also offers the how-to of paleo in the form of 24 beginner recipes contributed by friends in the know (Maili’s tomato ginger salmon anyone?) and additional, trusted resources to learn more. H O L L Y E J A C O B S

Sanford’s Shishitos

Taste

8 OZ. FRES H S HIS HITO P EP P E R S 2 T SP. OLIV E OIL 1/2 TS P. S ALT

Heat olive oil in large pan over mediumhigh heat and add peppers. Toss peppers in pan for six to eight minutes or until blistering, turning soft. Sprinkle with salt and serve.

Clockwise from top: Jenni’s almond cake; Cynthia Spivey; HOW TO EAT PALEO (WHEN YOU DON’T LIVE IN A CAVE) ; the book’s

whimsical illustrations by Joya Rose Groves.

S A N TA B A R B A R A


HAPPY Hour S.Y. Kitchen’s Aperitivo celebrates la dolce vita Born and raised in Italy, S.Y. KITCHEN chef Luca Crestanelli grew up with an innate understanding of la dolce vita—“the good life.” In every Italian town, “there’s a city center—a bar, a butcher, a pharmacist,” says Crestanelli, a father of two. “That’s where people gravitate; you know you will find someone you know.” To inspire this sense of community in Santa Ynez, the restaurant hosts an aperitivo hour in the late afternoon, offering small bites with a selection of cocktails, wines, and beers. Throughout much of Europe, aperitivo hour signals a moment when one can pause in the day, gather with friends, and simply enjoy each other’s company. This communality—also the essence of family—is important to Crestanelli. Not only is the sous chef, Francesco, his brother, but the chef’s 22-month-old daughter, Violet, can often be found cruising the kitchen during prep time.

Luca Crestanelli and his wife, Pearl Brouillet, with their daughters,

Taste Work and family go hand in hand. In the fall, Crestanelli’s favorite aperitivo combination is a slice of bruschetta with either an Aperol spritz or an Americano, both classic, lowalcohol cocktails with a bitter orange character and a touch of fizz. In addition to traditional aperitivos, mixologist Alberto Battaglini offers cocktails such as a Back Garden and a pineapple and basil margarita that feature his house-made infusions and bitters. Chef Crestanelli complements these drinks with light nibbles such as salami, cheeses, oven-roasted olives and almonds, and fried artichoke hearts. At other times, guests can enjoy flight nights where wine director Emily Johnston invites local winemakers to discuss their vintages with enthusiasts. Likewise, Battaglini, a whiskey enthusiast, curates whiskey flights, which might even include a tasting of the bartender’s own blend, which arrived in the restaurant from England in early July. The concept of aperitivo hour is one that busy Americans could learn from. At S.Y. Kitchen, “The food is important. The drinks are important,” says Crestanelli. “But you go to a place to be around people you know.” 1110 Faraday St., Santa Ynez, 805-691-9794. L E S L E Y J A C O B S S O L M O N S O N S YK I TC H E N .CO M

S A N TA B A R B A R A

PHOTOGRAPHS: ROB DAFOE

Violet and Josephine.


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Clockwise from top middle: Mixologist ALBERTO BATTAGLINI concocting

a creation; a SLOW-DRIP OLD FASHIONED; house-made garnishes;

roasted octopus and tomatoes; a BACK GARDEN cocktail. Opposite: A

happy hour PINEAPPLE AND BASIL MARGARITA and BRUSCHETTA.

Taste

Back Garden 2 O Z. B ASIL, J ALAP E N O , AN D CU CU M BE R - I N F US E D GI N 1 O Z. F R E SH LIM E JU IC E 1 / 2 O Z. H O N E Y SY R U P B ASIL AN D C U C U M B E R F O R GA R N I S H

Combine gin, lime juice, and honey syrup in a cocktail shaker with ice, shake until well blended, and strain over ice in a tumbler. Garnish with basil and cucumber. Serves one.

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Consuming the Santa Ynez Valley TA S T E

Head to the valley. You’re in for a treat—there’s a whole new crop of places to eat and drink Buellton

In the Buellton Bodegas, Tuscan-born, Napa-trained winemaker Marco Lucchesi and pal Rory Garzot produce SECTION WINES —big, bold red blends of locally sourced fruit boasting labels by local artist Wallace Piatt. Winemakers Etienne Terlinden and Rob DaFoe run Terlinden’s co-op winery and tasting room, EASY STREET WINE COLLECTIVE , where their respective labels, Cordon and Rake, join an exclusive handful of others. At HELIX: THE EVOLUTION OF WINE , taste Kalyra Winery’s sparkling and dessert wines plus winemaker Mike Brown’s new 239 label. Jay and Jeff Lockwood handcraft spirits—think vodka, agave azul, malt whiskey, and limoncello—out of their BROTHERS SPIRITS distillery and tasting lounge.

Solvang

British chef Steven Snook—with his Michelin-starred, Gordon Ramsay résumé—brings locally sourced fine dining to FIRST & OAK . Chef Pink and Courtney Rae moved BACON & BRINE to larger, indoor-outdoor digs, featuring brunch, lunch, and dinner service. The dog-friendly tasting room for Brent Melville’s LUCKY DOGG WINERY showcases his estate vineyard wines ranging from Viognier to sparkling.

Taste

Santa Ynez

Jake O. Francis raises heritage-breed pigs at VALLEY PIGGERY for catered roasts, his pork CSA, and famed butchery workshops. Chefs Cynthia Miranda and Alicia Valencia outfit the eat-in/takeaway THE LUCKY HEN LARDER with cheeses, charcuterie, and international and locally made proprietary provisions.

BARBIERI WINES pours master sommelier Paolo Barbieri and partner Erin Kempe’s Barbieri and KEMPE labels, and the on-site cheese shop stocks local artisanal salami. After four decades of growing and selling their sought-after grapes, BIEN NACIDO & SOLOMON HILLS vineyards have their own labels and tasting room, while the J. WILKES tasting room displays “Wines of Character, Wines of Place” with a bonus: appointment-only “office hours” with winemaker and wine educator Wes Hagen. Enjoy Cupcakes’ Kevin and Amber Joy Vander Vliet operate THE DOGGY DOOR , a walk-up window serving elevated hot dogs and “Cookiewich”(es).

Los Alamos

A new kitchen for chef Conrad Gonzales’s VALLE FRESH—dispensing tacos and tapas, including ceviche—now adjoins Sonja Magdevski’s BABI’S BEER EMPORIUM. From Edible Communities cofounders Tracey Ryder and Carole Topalian, PLENTY ON BELL serves straight-from-their-farm dishes crafted by chef Jesper Johansson. At PICO, Will Henry and his wife, Kali Kopley, offer chef Drew Terp’s locally sourced, luxurious comfort food alongside a meticulously curated Californian and international wine list. A U B R E Y G A B R I E L S A N TA B A R B A R A

PHOTOGRAPHS: EASY STREET WINE COLLECTIVE, ELIZABETH PEACE; MARCO LUCCHESI, JESS DALENE. OPPOSITE, BACON & BRINE: TENLEY FOHL PHOTOGRAPHY; JAKE FRANCIS, ANN B. SHEA

Los Olivos


Where to FIND SECTION WINES BUELLTON BODEGAS

65 Los Padres Way, Buellton, 805-450-2257, sectionwines.com.

EASY STREET WINE COLLECTIVE 90 Easy St.,

Buellton, 805-452-9685, easystreetwine collective.com.

HELIX: THE EVOLUTION OF WINE 140 Industrial

Way, Buellton, 805-693-8864, kalyrawinery.com/ Tasting-Room.

BROTHERS SPIRITS 201 Industrial Way, Ste. D, Buellton, 805-691-9259, brothersspirits.com.

Clockwise from top left: Succulent eats at BACON & BRINE ; ERIN KEMPE and PAOLO BARBIERI

with Penny; the dining room at PLENTY ON BELL ; PICO ’s trio

of organic local tomatoes layered with a vegan rosemary dressing,

Taste

cold-smoked cherry tomatoes,

and a side of green tomato hush puppies; Valley Piggery’s JAKE FRANCIS . Opposite, top to

FIRST & OAK 409 First St., Solvang, 805-6881703, firstandoak.com. BACON & BRINE 1622 Copenhagen Dr., Solvang,

805-688-8809, baconandbrine.com.

LUCKY DOGG WINERY 1607 Mission Dr.,

Ste. 102, Solvang, 805-691-9774, luckydogg winery.com.

VALLEY PIGGERY valleypiggery.com.

bottom: EASY STREET WINE COLLECTIVE ’s offerings of

Bandolet, Rake, and Cordon; Section Wines’ MARCO LUCCHESI .

THE LUCKY HEN LARDER 1095 Meadowvale Rd., Santa Ynez, 805-729-3120, thelucky henlarder.com. BARBIERI WINES 2369 Alamo Pintado Ave., Los Olivos, 805-688-8882, barbieriwines.com. BIEN NACIDO & SOLOMON HILLS TASTING ROOM 2963 Grand Ave., Ste. B, Los Olivos,

805-691-9913, biennacidoestate.com.

J. WILKES 2963 Grand Ave., Ste. A, Los Olivos, 805-318-6680, jwilkes.com. THE DOGGY DOOR 2446 Alamo Pintado

Ave., Ste. D, Los Olivos, 805-455-4115, doggy doordogs.com.

VALLE FRESH (at BABI’S BEER EMPORIUM )

380 Bell St., Los Alamos, 805-865-2282, vallefresh.com.

PLENTY ON BELL 508 Bell St., Los Alamos,

805-344-3020, plentyonbell.com.

PICO 458 Bell St., Los Alamos, 805-344-1122,

losalamosgeneralstore.com.


Buzz Worthy

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After two years as a barista and trainer at The French Press, June Haupts has launched her own business, WELCOME COFFEE CART . It’s already wheeled its way into The Mill and the Montecito Country Mart, however the cart mostly appears at private events. “I had the idea from seeing all of the different food and espresso carts when I would travel around Europe and New Zealand,” Haupts says. “Eventually, I would like to open up my own cafe and start roasting and sourcing my own beans.” Until then, check out her blog for future locations or to hire your own pop-up barista. J E N N I F E R B L A I S E K R A M E R W ELCOMECOFFEECAR T. C O M

We Want...

Taste

Coffee KLATCH Start your day with these new local roasters New to the scene, CARP COFFEE , 805-451-6535, carpcoffee.com, offers three roasts made in small, one-pound batches. The spirit of Carpinteria is captured in the names of the beans: the dark roast is Tarpits, the medium roast is named Campgrounds, and the medium roast from Costa Rica is called Carpinterican. Started by Todd Stewart and Julia Mayer of The French Press, CASTLE COFFEE ROASTERS , 805-962-7706, castlecoffeeroasters.com, brings freshly roasted beans to the popular coffee shop, which now has two locations in Santa Barbara and one in Goleta. The duo seeks to bring the community together by sharing their passion for great coffee. Sourcing organic, fair-trade coffee beans to create specialty roasts, DART COFFEE CO. , 805-452-6127, dartcoffeeco.com, is committed to the local community. Through The Yanonali Street Artist Fund, Dart uses coffee bean sales to support Santa Barbara artists. In addition, the company offers Dart-to-Doorstep deliveries for all orders in the Santa Barbara area.

Top to bottom: Le Creuset stoneware FRENCH PRESS , $65, Williams-Sonoma; Le Creuset stoneware ESPRESSO CUPS AND SAUCERS , $29.99,

Bed, Bath & Beyond.

K AY L A Z O L A

S A N TA B A R B A R A


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Get away 103

Get Away

Belize Times Two A sophisticated waterside retreat and a stylish jungle lodge reveal two sides of a Central American getaway

MATACHICA RESORT & SPA


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By the Sea

A short plane ride from Belize’s interior brings visitors to San Pedro, the low-key main town on Ambergris Caye. From there, it’s just 15 minutes by boat up along the island’s coast to MATACHICA RESORT & SPA, where the view is all about white sand, azure water, and waves breaking on a spectacular barrier reef. Bright colors liven the exteriors of the resort’s 31 casitas and villas, while their well-appointed interiors are sleekly white and contemporary, with artisanal chests and handcrafts and romantic mosquito netting over the bedsteads. Not surprisingly, activities center on water sports— canoeing, sailing, paddle boarding, and diving. “I’d get a kayak and snorkeling gear and go out to the reef, tie up to a buoy, and snorkel,” remembers a guest. Fresh seafood was another high point. “The restaurant was fantastic, five-star,” he adds, praising everything from fish tacos to the seafood pasta. “Overall, the attention to detail was special.” Rates: From $225/night. J O A N T A P P E R

Get Away

MATACHICA.COM

Clockwise from top left: MATACHICA ’s serenity; a sea breeze suite; a beach-front casita; the Belize barrier reef reserve’s GREAT BLUE HOLE ; arriving at SAN PEDRO ; the CARIBBEAN SEA .

Opposite, clockwise from top left: Mayaninspired interiors at BLANCANEAUX ; a luxury cabana; XUNANTUNICH ; guest

S A N TA B A R B A R A

accommodations; imbibing and exploring.


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In the Trees

For more than a decade, Francis Ford Coppola maintained

BLANCANEAUX LODGE in a forest reserve in western Belize

as a private family retreat. Since 1993, however, guests have been able to enjoy this luxe 20-room resort, whose thatched-roof cabanas and villas are arrayed along a river and appointed with Belizean furniture, colorful decor, and handcrafted accessories. A three-and-a-half-acre organic garden provides the vegetables and most of the fruit served in the lodge’s restaurants, one highlighting Italian cuisine and the other focusing on Guatemalan dishes. Surrounded by jungle, the resort allows one to totally decompress, while excursions offer the chance to explore the tropical landscape and the area’s Mayan heritage. One recent guest went horse trekking “down a dirt road to an incredible waterfall.” Another day, he traveled to the ruins of Xunantunich, where a pyramid centers an ancient Mayan settlement. “I went to Blancaneaux to be off the grid,” he says, “and it was the ultimate relaxation spot.” Rates: From

Get Away

$289/night. J . T .

TH E FA M I LYC O PPO L A RE S O RTS .C O M / E N / BL A N CA N E A UX - L O D G E


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D e s e r t Domain

Celebrating its 90th anniversary this year, the historic LA QUINTA RESORT & CLUB —Greta Garbo, Clark Gable, and Frank Capra, among others, have famously roamed its meandering paths—remains as one of Palm Desert’s most sought-after destinations. Set at the foot of the Santa Rosa Mountains, La Quinta is known for its top-notch spa and golf courses. Leading up to the anniversary, the sprawling Spanish-style property recently underwent a multimillion dollar renovation of the 620 casitas and 98 villas, which are all situated among 41 swimming pools, so you’re never far from a refreshing dip on a warm desert day.

Rates: From $199. 49-499 Eisenhower Dr., La Quinta, CA, 760-564-4111. G I N A Z . T E R L I N D E N

Left to right: Approaching LA QUINTA RESORT & CLUB ; a young

Shirley Temple at the original desert hideaway.

LA QUINTARES ORT.COM

La Grande DAME

Left to right: The iconic Bungalow 5; GLORIA SWANSON .

Known for its generations of star-studded guests and luxurious accommodations, the iconic BEVERLY HILLS HOTEL is undergoing a restoration of one of its most recognized features—its bungalows. Slated to be completed in 2018, the renovation is upgrading rooms to the latest state-of-the-art technology while maintaining the “home away from home” feel of the hotel. Five distinct bungalows inspired by notable celebrity frequenters from the past century—including Frank Sinatra and Elizabeth Taylor—are also set to be unveiled, paying tribute to the hotel’s legendary heritage. Rates:

From $665. 9641 Sunset Blvd., Beverly Hills, CA, 310276-2251. M A D D I E C U T T L E R

D O R CH E S TE RC O L L E C TI O N .CO M / E N / L O S - A N G E L E S/ TH E - BE V E R LY- H I L L S - H O TE L

Left to right: Thoroughbred

Off to the Races

owner, actor LOU COSTELLO ; the bar in the Chandelier Room.

Set at the foothills of the San Gabriel Mountains and just outside downtown Los Angeles is the iconic SANTA ANITA PARK . For more than 80 years, this historic fixture has hosted a number of prestigious thoroughbred races such as the Santa Anita Handicap as well as world-renowned horses Seabiscuit and American Pharoah. Along with the hoofed stars that have graced its track, the park has also attracted a number of Hollywood’s Golden Age celebrities in its stands—Betty Grable, Cary Grant, and Jane Russell to name a few. The “West Coast Jewel of American Racing” recently underwent a $40 million renovation, upgrading its design to showcase the park’s original historic architecture and adding luxury accommodations so guests can better enjoy the races. Don’t miss the Breeders’ Cup world championships on November 4 and 5. 285 W. Huntington Dr., Arcadia, CA, 626-574-7223. M . C . SA NTAANITA.COM S A N TA B A R B A R A

PHOTOGRAPHS: GLORIA SWANSON, COURTESY OF THE BEVERLY HILLS HOTEL AND BUNGALOWS—THE FIRST 100 YEARS BY ROBERT S. ANDERSON, AVAILABLE AT THEBEVERLYHILLSCOLLECTION.COM

Get Away


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SB Historical Museum


Arts 109

Natural selection A cornucopia of local artists who amaze and inspire us

COURTESY OF THE ARTIST AND MARC SELWYN FINE ART, BEVERLY HILLS

Arts

MICHELLE STUART ’s Blecknum

Brasiliense, extinct series 1993, plant, ink, beeswax, and pine.


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ARTS

LAND LOVER

Arts

Clockwise from top: NIAGARA GORGE PATH RELOCATED, 1975,

paper; Michelle Stuart: Sculptural Objects: Journeys In & Out of the Studio; SEED CALENDAR: SANTA BARBARA,

1993, seeds, china paper, 18.75 x 18 in.

Artists involved in the Land Art movement (from the late 1960s to early ’70s) placed themselves outside the traditional art world, creating site-specific works that radically reshaped the natural landscape. Of the few women working in that genre, MICHELLE STUART ’s art is notable for its transitory nature and lack of destructiveness. She’s especially known for unfurling a 460-foot-long paper scroll over a cliff into the Niagara River where Niagara Falls flowed centuries earlier, and leaving the scroll to degrade with the elements. But Stuart defies easy categorization; while her work retains its earthly focus (using seeds, feathers, and stones gathered on travels), over time it has become more intimate in scale. Always seeking an evolutionary path, Stuart, now in her eighth decade, currently employs photography as her primary medium. Critically acclaimed and exhibited worldwide—including a 2014 show at the Santa Barbara Museum of Art—Stuart, a part-time resident of Carpinteria, is represented by Marc Selwyn Fine Art in Los Angeles as well as Leslie Tonkonow Artworks + Projects in New York. L . D . P O R T E R M I C H E L L E S TU A RTS TU D I O .CO M

Music director HEIICHIRO OHYAMA .

For 37 years, the SANTA BARBARA CHAMBER ORCHESTRA has been an integral part of Santa Barbara’s cultural repertoire, captivating audiences with classical music performances conducted since 1983 by renowned music director Heiichiro Ohyama. SBCO’s 2016-2017 season is offering concertgoers the opportunity to savor tango music in the historic mural room at the Santa Barbara County Courthouse on November 15; celebrate the holidays with baroque music in the sanctuary of All Saints-by-the-Sea Episcopal Church on December 13; and enjoy a romantic Valentine’s Day at the Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History, where Maestro Ohyama is demonstrating his virtuosic talent on the viola next February 14. SBCO’s four Lobero Theatre concerts will feature exciting solo turns by guest pianists Wendy Chen and Alessio Bax and violinist Paul Huang. Already known for its family education program that provides free concert entry for students, SBCO is poised to launch an innovative outreach program— Classical Connections—to study the effect of live music on individuals suffering cognitive or neurological impairment. L . D . P . SB CO .O R G S A N TA B A R B A R A

PHOTOGRAPH: MICHELLE STUART, COURTESY OF THE ARTIST AND MARC SELWYN FINE ART, BEVERLY HILLS

Ear Candy


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ARTS An ethereal image of When the Lights Go Out creator KERRILEE GORE .

Arts

PHOTOGRAPH: TRAVIS SHINN

Curtain CALL All eyes—and bodies—will be on stage when dancer and creator Kerrilee Gore and Zen Arts bring their mesmerizing show WHEN THE LIGHTS GO OUT to the Lobero Theatre from October 20 through 22. Guests literally sit on the stage, which is transformed into a curated lounge space with chairs and sofas, for this intimate theatrical experience (tickets from $44, seating is limited) that combines burlesque, cabaret, multimedia, acrobatics, and aerial performing. The choreographer and dancers have worked on tours with performers including Britney Spears

and Madonna, while Depeche Mode founder Martin Gore (Kerrilee’s husband) contributed to the music. Gore calls the show dark, sexy, quirky, dreamy, fun, and edgy. “I was inspired by David Lynch, Alfred Hitchcock, and Pulp Fiction,” she says. “It is my hope that you leave yourself at the door and enter the world of When the Lights Go Out. It is what happens inside your dreams, between the sheets, and in the secrets that we keep.” 33 E. Canon Perdido St., Santa Barbara, 805-963-0761. J E N N I F E R B L A I S E K R A M E R L O BE R O .C O M

S A N TA B A R B A R A


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ARTS Clockwise from top left: PERRY FARRELL , 2015,

acrylic on canvas, 40 x 40 in.; FRIDA “CUIDADO CON EL ANGEL,”

2016, spray and bucket paint on wall, Mexico City; CITY OF ANGELS , 2016,

spray and roller, 44 x 100 ft., Los Angeles.

Wonder WALLS Given artist DAVID FLORES ’s eminence in the world of skateboard graphics, he could be customizing decks into his 90s. But a bigger canvas to display his talent beckoned; now Flores, 44, is one of the most sought-after muralists worldwide. Along the way, he’s also managed to apply his signature style—often described as stained glass—to toys: Disney’s Mickey Mouse, Medicom’s Be@rbrick and Kidrobot’s Dunny (his version ended up in the Museum of Modern Arts’s collection), and other products. Santa Barbara played a part in Flores’s artistic evolution; he studied with Ed Inks at Santa Barbara City College and did stints at Shorty’s Skateboards and the Santa Barbara Independent. You can see his work (Max from Where the Wild Things Are) on the back side of the now-shuttered Church of Skatan on Gutierrez Street. His mural commissions often depict important cultural icons (William Shakespeare, Albert Einstein, Frida Kahlo), and Flores recently returned from Mexico City, where he completed a multistory mural of the country’s national hero, José Maria Morelos. L . D . P .

Arts

D AV I D F L O RE S A R T.C O M

Grande Dame

Hail to the Chiefs An election year when public discourse is focused on who will become the next President of the United States is an opportune moment to gain a perspective on the high office’s prior occupants. Luckily, a large portion of that information (117,666 documents and counting) is available from THE AMERICAN PRESIDENCY PROJECT website. Conceived in 1999 when John Woolley, professor of political science at UC Santa Barbara, and Gerhard Peters of Citrus College constructed an online document resource for students in Woolley’s American presidency course, the project’s website—which receives roughly 10,000 hits each day—has become the definitive online nonpartisan source for presidential documents, including inaugural addresses, proclamations, executive orders, convention speeches, radio addresses, televised speeches, and debates. The task of maintaining the website is such that neither Woolley nor Peters has had time to post the numerous awards and accolades their American Presidency Project has garnered. It’s a nice problem to have. L . D . P . P RES IDENCY.UCS B.ED U S A N TA B A R B A R A

Transforming the Spanish-style Granada Theatre into a hub of Italian theatrical tradition, OPERA SANTA BARBARA ushers in its 23rd season packed with talent and entertainment. Planned by artistic director Kostis Protopapas, the season opens on November 4 with Georges Bizet’s Carmen—the romantic tale of a gypsy, bullfighters, dancers, and a soldier—and culminates with Giacomo Puccini’s La Rondine on April 30. 805-898-3890. K A Y L A Z O L A O PE R A S B.O RG

RONALD REGAN ,

40th President of the United States from 1981 to 1989.


Pacific Patio


Once 114

ARTS

& Future Museum Feature The Santa Barbara Museum of Art celebrates 75 years with renewed vitality

WRITTEN BY

J O A N TA PPER


115

ARTS

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S A N TA B A R B A R A


Top to bottom: DONALD BEAR , 1940s, SBMA

archives; ALA STORY , mid-1950s, SBMA archives; installation photograph of “PAINTING TODAY AND YESTERDAY,” 1941, the

first exhibition at the Santa Barbara Museum of Art, SBMA archives. Previous pages, left to right: Detail of DAVID ALFARO SIQUEIROS , Portrait of

Mexico Today, 1932, fresco on cement, 99 x 384 x 100 11/16 in., SBMA, anonymous gift; WILLIAM DOLE , Tower of Babel, 1962, watercolor

It was an astonishing act of recycling, an incredibly imaginative solution to what was basically a civic bureaucratic issue. In 1937, when Santa Barbara’s abandoned post office building was about to be sold, artist Colin Campbell Cooper proposed instead that the glorious Italianate structure, built in 1912, be turned into a museum. It took four years for his suggestion to become reality, but on June 5, 1941, the Santa Barbara Museum of Art opened its doors. This year, SBMA celebrates its 75th anniversary, and once again, it is seizing the opportunity to restore the building and envision the future. From the very first exhibition of 140-plus works—“Painting Today and Yesterday in the United States,” which included pieces by Winslow Homer and Edward Hopper, as well as the popular Buffalo Hunter—the institution’s ambitions were obvious. “The founders were worldly, sophisticated, passionate about art, and well traveled,” says Larry Feinberg, SBMA’s Robert and Mercedes Eichholz Director and CEO. “They took it on themselves to create a museum with an international perspective. They were not out to build a regional museum or to focus on California art.” Early on, patrons such as Wright Ludington and Katharine Dexter McCormick, among others, donated works that formed the core of a wide-ranging collection—Greek and Roman antiquities; ancient Chinese, Thai, and Cambodian sculptures; drawings and prints by modern European and American masters like Edgar Degas, Pablo Picasso, Marsden Hartley, and Joseph Stella; and a number of important Impressionist paintings, including several by Claude Monet. McCormick also contributed the funds for a new gallery named for her husband, the first of several wings to be added to the original building over the decades. These gifts were later joined by outstanding collections of American art, photography, and works from Asia and India. Equally important were the museum’s visionary directors, beginning with Donald Bear, who set a high bar, notes Feinberg. Bear was followed by Ala Story—“one of the first women directors, who also brought great knowledge of the international art world.” In the 1960s, Tom Leavitt, who came from the Pasadena Museum of Art, further enhanced SBMA’s reputation. Says Feinberg, “It’s very fortunate for a museum in a city of this size to attract people of that stature and intellectual curiosity. It separates Santa Barbara from other beach towns of the West Coast. This is an extremely vibrant cultural community.” Over the years, the museum expanded several

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and collage on board, 35 x 23 in., SBMA, gift of Dean

Valentine and Amy Adelson, Los Angeles.

“What can we do to make it a better museum? The public will get to see the full range of the collection.”

S A N TA B A R B A R A


EDGAR DEGAS , Ballet

Dancer Resting, c. 19001905, charcoal on surfaced cardboard, 19 5/8 x 12 1/4 in., SBMA, gift of Wright S. Ludington.

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ARTS

times, adding the Preston Morton and Sterling Morton wings in 1961 and 1962, the Alice Keck Park Wing in 1985, and the Jean and Austin Peck Wing in 1998. Each addition had been designed independently, however, and a survey a couple of years ago of the roofing and mechanical systems revealed problems. The museum board took the opportunity to address the issues of the aging facility by initiating widespread structural and seismic renovations that would improve both the building and the experience for the visitor. A $50 million capital campaign is under way, and phase one of the renovation has already begun while the museum remains open and accessible. “We’re solving some age-old problems,” says project manager Gregg Wilson. “This is the first time we’ve been able to treat the building as a single structure.” The initial phase, scheduled to take 18 to 22 months, involves the McCormick wing and the lower level of the museum, which, though out of sight of visitors, is crucial for the ability to receive, store, and transport art. “There are some 28,000 works in the collection,”

he adds. “Better storage equals quicker access. We’ll be able to rotate works more easily and frequently.” The museum will also be able to show some larger pieces of contemporary art. Mechanical systems—temperature, humidity, lighting—will all be brought up to state-of-the-art quality, and in keeping with an emphasis on sustainability, the project is aiming at a high LEED (Leadership in Energy and Environmental Design) rating. “It’s skillfully crafted to keep within the El Pueblo Viejo guidelines,” says Wilson, noting that from the outside, hardly any changes will be visible. The overall footprint of the museum will remain the same, yet about 14,000 square feet will be added, including new galleries for contemporary art and photography, and expanded space for the growing Asian collection. Phase two will focus on the original post office building, encompassing familiar Ludington Court and a new circulation pattern that will make it easier for visitors to go from gallery to gallery. The finished project will include a new park entrance, inviting

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S A N TA B A R B A R A


Clockwise from top right: JOHN SINGER SARGENT , Perseus at

staircases to upper levels, and a rooftop pavilion as well as an expanded education center. “We emphasize that this is not about expansion,” says Feinberg. “Eighty-five percent of the costs are on unglamorous but absolutely necessary things. But as long as we’re going to all that trouble…what can we do to make it a better museum for the community? Finally the public will get to see the full range of the collection.” He points to works that will be on view permanently—including a contemporary sculpture by Anish Kapoor and important pieces of Latin American and 19th and 20th-century American art. “It’s important to have gallery space for growth areas,” he adds, as well as the ability to stage larger exhibitions like Vincent van Gogh and Mark Rothko shows that are being considered for the future. In the meantime, the museum has been celebrating its 75th anniversary since the spring and is holding a fundraising gala at the Santa Barbara County Courthouse with proceeds to go primarily to the education program. Says Feinberg, “It will be elegant…but fun!” ●

Night, ca. 1907, oil on canvas, 50 3/4 x 36 1/8 in., SBMA, gift of Mrs. Sterling Morton to the Preston Morton Collection; virtual rendering of LUDINGTON COURT

showing the new staircase and arches, Kupiec Architects; LANSDOWNE HERMES , first half of 2nd

c. CE, marble, 86 1/4 x 40 x 13 1/8 in., SBMA, gift of Wright S. Ludington. Opposite: BUFFALO HUNTER , undated (c.

1844), Oil on canvas, 40 x 51 1/8 in. SBMA, gift of Harriet Cowles Hammett Graham in memory of Buell Hammett.

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S A N TA B A R B A R A


We are pleased to announce that

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Let’s talk about something Maravilla retirement communities hardly ever mention. Accreditation. Because having the confidence and peace of mind of accreditation is important. So, let’s talk. Maravilla is accredited by CARF International. It’s an independent organization that sets exceedingly high standards for care and service. It’s a lot like an accreditation for a hospital or college. Or a five-star rating for a hotel. But like most things in life, you have to see it to believe it. So, let’s talk some more at a complimentary lunch and tour. Please call 805.576.7407 to schedule.

I n de p e n de n t & A s s i s t e d L i v i ng • M e mor y C a r e

5486 Calle Real • Santa Barbara, CA SRGseniorliving.com • 805.576.7407 RCFE# 425801937


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FINER THINGS IN LIFE

Finer THINGS in life Feature

Erin Wasson is a little bit country, a little bit rock-and-roll. But the selfproclaimed tomboy beauty fits into no mold. The Texas-born supermodel, designer, collaborator, and creator of her namesake jewelry line, Wasson Fine, explains the attraction to her newfound home in Ojai AMELI A F LEET WO O D A DA M SECO RE S T Y L E D B Y NATA LI E J O O S

WRITTEN BY

PHOTOGRAPHS BY

S A N TA B A R B A R A


Dress, $9,000, VALENTINO . AGL pumps,

$472, ALLORA BY LAURA . Earrings, $2,200,

and rings, from $440, WASSON FINE .

Rugs throughout, price upon request, THE TENT MERCHANT .

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Blazer, $110, TOPSHOP . Jumper, $995, ZIMMERMANN . Vintage scarf, $125, THE WAY WE WORE . Earrings, $3,450, and pendant, $1,300, WASSON FINE .


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Top, $595, ZIMMERMANN . Dress, $1,095, 3.1 PHILLIP LIM . Boots, $525, EUGENIA KIM . Earrings, $2,300, and

rings, from $440, WASSON FINE . Knuckle ring, model’s

own. Opposite: ALC dress, $595, INTERMIX . ROCHAS pants, $1,109, Style Bop. Vintage jacket, stylist’s own. Boots, price upon request, 3.1 PHILLIP LIM . Earrings,

$1,020, necklace, from $1,320, and rings, from $440, WASSON FINE .


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Coat, $1,600, and top, $565, ZIMMERMANN . Tank,

price upon request, AUDRA . Pants, $995, BREELAYNE . Boots, $940, SERGIO ROSSI . Necklace, $1,320,

bracelet, $2,550, and rings, from $440, WASSON FINE . Knuckle ring, model’s own.


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HAIR BY DRITAN VUSHAJ. MAKEUP BY SILVER BRAMHAM. PHOTO ASSISTANTS: ALEX JAREZ AND BOB HEUERMAN. DIGITAL TECH: CLAY RASMUSSEN, MILK STUDIOS. INTERN: MADDIE CUTTLER.

A love affair that started off as an innocent camping trip turned full-on when Erin Wasson bought an older Spanish cottage in the heart of Ojai. “I’m a Texas girl. I like big, open spaces and nature. I was missing that feeling of community that you most definitely get living in a small town. I moved to Ojai a year ago,” she says, smiling, “and it has changed me. I have a place to grow my ideas. Ojai affects how I live and work and the way that I design. It has allowed me the space to create. “At the end of the day, I’m a jeans and T-shirt kind of girl. But add on the extra touches of a good handbag, shoes, and some jewelry, and you have the whole package,” says Wasson. “It’s the nuance of accessories that tells the story of who the woman really is. I am consistently drawn to that.” Creativity has always been Wasson’s driving force. She credits her design endeavors with maintaining her stamina in the modeling world. “I came up in the industry when models were to be seen and not heard. I confused lot of people,” she laughs. “I came out of the gate very opinionated, with a lot to say. I have a voice.” Accessing and acting on her creativity helped Wasson blur the lines drawn for the models of her time. Not content to work solely as a model, about 10 years ago, Wasson got a chance to branch out when her friend, designer Alexander Wang, asked her to create the jewelry for his runway show. “I started making these diamond body chains,” she says. “That was the inception of Low Luv, my costume jewelry company.” Low Luv became a successful brand and served as Wasson’s training ground, teaching her the basics of production, manufacturing, and sales. It helped her to understand what it takes to have a product on the market. “After seven years of doing costume jewelry, I evolved,” she says. “I wanted to get back to the intention of what making jewelry represents for me: to create something that was less disposable and trend driven, with a sense of permanence and longevity attached to it.” Today, Wasson has returned to what she loves about jewelry—working with gold, silver, and stones— through Wasson Fine and rediscovering the romance of working with elements that have staying power. “I am making jewelry that inspires me—wearable pieces that dance a fine line between femininity and edginess,” she says. ”It’s a reflection of who I am.” Living part-time in Ojai helps Wasson achieve the perfect mind-set for inspiration: “I always say, ‘The second I turn on to the 33 freeway, my whole life changes.’ I joke with friends that I can literally feel the cells in my body cooling out and suddenly, I can breathe again!” ●


Dress, $4,135, STELLA MCCARTNEY . Earrings,

$2,200, necklaces, from $1,320, rings, from $440, WASSON FINE .

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Secret Garden WRITTEN BY

J ENNI F ER B LA I SE KRAMER NA NCY NEI L

PHOTOGRAPHS BY

It’s all about thoughtful details and slowing down at Ojai’s sprawling Thacher House

Rooms are filled with found and HANDMADE FURNITURE for fireside SITTING AREAS .

Opposite: The THACHER HOUSE on Thacher Road.

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Feature If handed a lemon, Calvin Zara is going to make you the best glass of lemonade you’ve ever had. Chances are he’s also going to serve you homemade yogurt with fruit from the garden or a bowl of gazpacho made with handpicked yellow tomatoes. While living and working in finance in Beverly Hills, he transformed the top of a neighboring six-car garage into a green roof with container gardens and citrus trees. Constantly looking for ways to make things better, the single dad of two teenagers admittedly “freaked out” when his daughter was set to enter Beverly Hills High and began to search for real estate elsewhere. After he combed through homes from Irvine to Santa Barbara, it was a dilapidated property in Ojai that caught his eye, both as an investment and a major change of pace. “I don’t know what got into me…but I immediately wanted it,” Zara says, adding that he initially planned to fix up just the main house for his family and find tenants for the smaller dwellings, while establishing a garden. “I wanted to make sure my kids were not spoiled and have a good sense of sources— where we’re getting things from.” But as Zara got his hands into renovating, he realized the potential for this compound surrounded by lavender and lemon trees. He started obsessing


Opposite, clockwise from top left: Many corners are filled with BOOKS ; owner CAL ZARA at home in the

kitchen; UNEXPECTED ART graces the walls;

Zara believes in using REAL SILVER and FINE LINENS every day.

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ANTIQUE PIECES are

sourced by Zara at estate sales and auctions, lending an OLD WORLD look and feel.


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The CARRIAGE HOUSE is what Zara calls the HEART OF THE PROPERTY where guests

connect, read, and play games by the fire.


The FORMAL DINING ROOM is set with CRYSTAL, SILVER, AND VINTAGE AND HEIRLOOM LINENS .

Zara, whom guests can hire as a PRIVATE CHEF, feels that dining

should not be rushed but rather a proper SIT-DOWN AFFAIR .

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The HUTCH in the main house is one of the many pieces of furniture Zara MADE BY HAND .


FOOTPATHS for

meandering wind around the house’s separate COTTAGES and

through Zara’s carefully planted GARDENS .

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over design details in both the main house and the four cottages. Being a carpenter, he was able to work quickly, renovating within one year, salvaging the 1898 home’s original character and history while updating each structure. “I can’t fix anything half-heartedly,” he says. “This took on my whole entire life.” In the end, he created the Thacher House—named after its original architect Edward Thacher (plus, it’s located on Thacher Road near the eponymous school)—where guests can spend weekends in a gorgeous dwelling, sharing Zara’s passion for organic living. Born in Baghdad, Zara lived in Athens and New York City—“major hubs of humanity” as he calls them—before coming to California. He learned to cook from his parents and started making furniture at the age of 16 when his family needed something to sit on. In Ojai, he didn’t want his guests to have to spend huge sums to stay nor did he want any element to feel corporate. Simple principles and Old World traditions are still part of his family’s daily life and what guests experience firsthand. “It’s not a hotel, I call it a secret garden,” he says. “People are coming to be home away from home.” The cottages are full of handmade furniture mostly from reclaimed wood (the tables in the carriage house are made from former siding), along with pieces found at auctions and estate sales. Corners are filled with artwork, antiques, and old books. Organic bedding is hand washed and line dried in the sun. Table linens are vintage and heirloom and never cleaned

with or touched by chemicals. Meals are served on china with crystal and sterling silver—which Zara says was intended for food as it does not change the taste and keeps a proper weight on the fork. Guests often hire Zara as a personal chef, which he jokes is “kind of like having the parties I always had, cooking and entertaining, now they’re just paying me to do it.” Mealtime, Zara says, should be more than just a sandwich, but rather a sit-down affair that’s visual and tasteful. His five-course dinners are made with organic produce and products from local farmers who have become friends. “In the grocery store, you’re alone with your phone and your basket and the cashier maybe says hi, but with a farmer, it’s walking through the gardens and trees, seeing what’s ripe, buying only what you need, and having conversations,” Zara says. “This leads to a real, proper life.” Between working from home (he still has his day job) and being with his kids, Zara tends to his own garden every day, growing everything from tomatoes and beans to arugula and watermelon. He now makes his own goat cheese and yogurt, which has helped eliminate his lactose-intolerant kids’ allergies. This type of living and learning has been life altering for his family as well as his guests, who can pitch in by milking the goats, picking fruit, or even making soap. Anyone who comes to Zara’s secret garden is bound to gain everyday wisdom from someone bold enough to change up his whole life. ●


ORGANIC BEDDING and

locally made mattresses are topped with hypoallergenic cotton pillows. Zara says his guests tell him they’ve never slept so well. Opposite: An old STONE FIREPLACE

makes a focal point in the CARRIAGE HOUSE .

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Sun Chase WRITTEN BY

J I LL NELSEN HEAT HER CU LP

PHOTOGRAPHS BY

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SCOTT LINDE and NITSA CITRINE at

their MISSION CANYON home.


nrs Feature

Scott Linde and Nitsa Citrine’s passion for organic tonic herbs and medicinal plants have informed their line of superfoods and life in Mission Canyon


Founded in 2010 and based in Santa Barbara, Scott Linde’s transformational food company Sun Potion offers wild-crafted organic tonic herbs, medicinal plants, and superfoods designed to be life enhancing. Linde, with his partner and creative director, Nitsa Citrine, promotes the philosophy that nature provides an abundance of everything we need for health, beauty, and wellness. “We want you to feel amazing” is their tag line, and this Mission Canyon-based couple walks the talk. WHAT FUELED YOUR PASSION FOR HEALING HERBS AND CREATING SUN POTION?

When I was first introduced to tonic herbalism more than 10 years ago, I was blown away by the sensory experience that this category of plants had to offer. I fell in love with the clarity, ease, and sense of well-being that I received through making these herbs a central part of my daily rituals. Without knowing where it would take me, I became very passionate about finding the best-quality examples of supportive plant allies for my own use. This love affair with plants and tonic herbs later became a vehicle to share these experiences with others.

SCOTT:

WHAT IDEAS CURRENTLY INSPIRE YOU MOST?

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I am inspired by beauty, design, quality, attention to detail, and offering one’s best to the world. I am excited by the idea that tonic herbs can support people in cultivating more beauty, refinement, gratitude, and sensitivity in their daily lives. These plants work with the body to bring more equilibrium and balance. They both fortify the system as well as make

SCOTT:

Top to bottom: SUN POTION is sold online

at sunpotion.com and in specialty food and conscious lifestyle stores worldwide; Linde and Citrine’s MORNING RITUAL consists of rising

between 4 and 6 am, preparing several rounds of their current favorite tea, and finishing with a daily potion (#APOTIONADAY ) followed by a brief MEDITATIVE PRACTICE

or chanting an ANCIENT SHINTO PRAYER .


Citrine’s practices for a HEALTHY LIFE include

“Listening to the body, LISTENING TO THE MIND, HEART AND SPIRIT ,” she says.

“Being receptive to our innate intelligence.”

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the body more adaptable to stressors. If people are looking and feeling their best, with even a little support from Sun Potion, the brand is accomplishing its purpose. For me, the ultimate success comes with seeing others strike up a relationship with one or a few of these individual plants. The subtitle of the brand is “Transformational Foods” for a reason. NITSA: These days, I am inspired by beings, actions, and ideas that embody a state of brilliant and expansive love, honesty, sincerity, and courage. WHICH HERBS ARE YOUR FAVORITES AND WHY?

In truth, all 26 of Sun Potion’s offerings are among my favorites—otherwise they wouldn’t be in the line. I personally love Mucuna pruriens—it is the first herb in this family that I was introduced to. Dopamine is an essential key to overall health of the nervous system, and having a healthy supply of it in the body lends itself to feelings of joy, contentment, peace, and bliss. Because it is a plant, the body metabolizes it as food, and naturally knows how to make use of its plant chemistry. We sometimes refer to this product as the “dopamine bean.” I also love astragalus because it is protective, supports healthy circulation, and has an optimistic feeling to it when I have it in my morning tea. NITSA: I am a lifelong lover of pine pollen—an excellent herb for nourishing the brain and creative energy. Pine pollen is a soft, fluffy, golden powder that I love to take as an activating supplement for creative work or to whip up into a little aphrodisiac in the evenings. SCOTT:

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WHAT ARE YOU MOST EXCITED ABOUT RIGHT NOW?

NITSA: Matcha! We are about to release our white dragon matcha that we sourced on our last trip to Japan. This is a delicate, verdant plant grown in harmony with the surrounding forests. Natural farming is used in this tea process—it is a rare and very peaceful, symbiotic way to cultivate plants. Absolutely no pesticides, chemicals fertilizers, or even organic amendments are used.

WHAT DO YOU FEEL ARE THE MOST IMPORTANT PRACTICES FOR LIVING A HEALTHFUL LIFE?

SCOTT: One of the easiest and simplest life hacks in the arena of health and wellness is to simply consume the best quality tonic herbs everyday. A small amount (one half to one teaspoon) in my morning tea, coffee, water, etc., is the easiest way for me to feel my best and allow my inner gifts, strengths, and beauty shine. NITSA: Listening to the body, listening to the mind, heart, and spirit. Being receptive to our innate intelligence. ●


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Through Sun Potion, Linde has become involved with WOMEN’S ECONOMIC VENTURES

and SCORE . “Through all of this support,” he says, “the main GUIDING PRINCIPLE has been

the CULTIVATION OF INTUITION .”


Home Sweet 152

HOME SWEET HOMESTEAD

Homestead Feature

How a trio of friends is reviving old-fashioned heritage skills for the modern woman WRITTEN BY

JEN N IF E R B L A I S E K R A M E R LA UR E N R O S S

PHOTOGRAPHS BY

S A N TA B A R B A R A


The founders of WOMEN’S HERITAGE SKILLSHARE (left

to right) are herbalist ASHLEY MOORE , animal specialist LAUREN MALLOY , and cook EMMA MOORE .

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ASHLEY MOORE leads a

workshop on FORAGING, explaining the nutrition and vitamins in edible greens, followed by a HARVEST MEAL . Her next foraging

workshop is in March.

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Three Santa Barbara women hatched a homespun plan that turned into a series of sold-out workshops, creating a movement that would make Martha proud. Likely, it would even make Laura Ingalls Wilder fist bump them with approval. Ashley Moore, Lauren Malloy, and Emma Moore, an herbalist, animal specialist, and cook respectively, launched Women’s Heritage Skillshare in an effort to teach modern women traditional skills of decades past such as pickling, welding, wreathing, mulling, soap making, and raw baking. Once they realized the topics they wanted to cover were endless, they knew they needed to take it mainstream. “We thought if there’s something awesome, let’s share it with everyone,” recalls Ashley as they first merged their passions and early ideas from foraging herbs to making healthy gummies for kids. “Lauren said, ‘Let’s make it accessible, share a meal, and have others take something to their own homes.’ We thought, at the worst, the three of us will have a great time.” Workshops (which start at $40) began in February, and every single one has sold out so far. The classes pop up throughout the city and valley and aim to bring various elements of the homestead past into everyday life. “It’s easy to glamorize that life, but full-blown homestead is so much work,” says Ashley. “For example, slaughtering animals—that wouldn’t interest people.” By learning simple skills such as making herbal salves, natural face serums, kefir cheese, peach jam, and plant-dyed napkins, the founders educate and

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Top to bottom: Emma cooks up FARMFRIENDLY RECIPES ,

many of which she shares on the blog; NATURAL BEAUTY WORKSHOPS

(the next one is in May) teach how to make simple, organic FLOWER-BASED FACIAL SERUMS .


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Learning new skills such as foraging, BREAD MAKING, and

working with NATURAL INGREDIENTS are all

part of the sisterhood and togetherness the founders aim for in workshops, which are often followed by a SHARED MEAL .


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connect people. While skeptics might suggest these workshops are reversing feminism, Ashley reiterates their goal is to empower women rather than send them back in time. “In some ways, it looks like a step backward, but not in a bad way. It’s really a step toward connection,” she says. While anyone these days can walk into a bakery and buy a loaf of bread, they want to teach women how things come together from the beginning. In this spirit, the team is working on a line filled with “helpful things from the homestead”—from aprons to beauty products. For example, herbal, organic skincare will be

Clockwise from top: A HOMEGROWN COCKTAIL with edible

flowers; the founders met through their children, who regularly HELP ON THE FARM ; Emma’s home-

brewed CORIANDER ALE (recipe on the blog).

sold, along with directions on how to make the product, so when you run out, you can reuse the jar and recreate it yourself, which Ashley says is further “connecting you to what you’re putting on your skin.” Through every Women’s Heritage Skillshare workshop, their aim is to instill confidence along with an appreciation of the past. Simultaneously, the trio is also evoking a sense of sisterhood and effectively slowing people down. Adds Emma: “In our fastpaced society, it’s so refreshing to see women carve out this time for togetherness.” ●


LAUREN MALLOY has

worked with animals all over the world and lives with dozens of them, including 20 chickens, on her GAVIOTA FARM .

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Revelry Event Designers

revelryeventdesigners.com 323-263-1657 Floral Design: Celio’s Design Photography: Katie Beverly Photographer Official Event Photographer: Gloria Mesa Photography


161

RSVP

Polo in Paradise DELFINA BLAQUIER and NACHO FIGUERAS at the SANTA BARBARA POLO & RACQUET CLUB .

S A N TA B A R B A R A


162

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On a warm summer evening, more than 300 guests gathered at the SANTA BARBARA POLO & RACQUET CLUB for a celebration of the club’s Polo magazine in partnership with Santa Barbara Magazine. Featured guest Nacho Figueras spoke and signed copies of his new novel, High Season (Hachette), while other famed local polo players rode on the field. A well-dressed crowd sipped Veuve Clicquot champagne, Summerland Winery vintages, and Jardesca summer cocktails and dined on passed appetizers from Los Agaves. Near the champagne tower, Revelry Event Designers created outdoor living rooms right on the field, complete with leather sofas, lanterns, and throws. As the sunset gave way to stars, DJ Fab moved people off the grass and onto the dance floor. PHOTOGRAPHS: BLUE CALEEL AND STEVEN SIMON

RSVP

Clockwise from top right: Charles Ward; Annette and Richard Caleel; Stephane Colling and Bilo Zarif; Kathy Nicolson, Delfina Blaquier, and Kyle Brace; the Jardesca bar; Carlos Eric Lopez; Xavier Scordo, Nicolas BertrandScordo, Lisa Bassler, and Daniel Gibbings; Mallory Price, Daryl Stegall, and Stephanie Nicks; Rebecca de Ravenel.


163

RSVP

RSVP

Clockwise from top middle: Monique Rodriguez; Leo Basica and Catherine Gee; Revelry Event Designers decor; Daniel and Elena De Meyer; Gina Tolleson; Johnny Irion and Joel Mallet; Nacho Figueras and Jennifer Hale; Jules Allen at the Veuve Clicquot bar; a glass of bubbly; Francesca Hunter; Justine Hamilton and Elizabeth Colling.


164

RSVP Clockwise from top right: Lily

Garden GODDESS The 21st annual LOTUSLAND CELEBRATES gala brought Greek and Roman mythology to life. Dressed to the theme of “Gods and Goddesses,” guests journeyed through the gardens, which were transformed into a mythical world of muses, nymphs, and Mediterraneaninspired food and drinks. The event and live auction raised $400,000 for Lotusland to cover operating expenses and benefit the Fourth Grade Outreach program at Santa Barbara County schools.

Hahn, Thomasine Richards, and Belle Hahn Cohen; Yasmine and Sam Zodeh; Brian King and Leslie Ridley-Tree; Crystal Wyatt and Jennie Grube; Hania Puacz Tallmadge and Lynda Weinman.

PHOTOGRAPHS: ROE ANNE WHITE AND NELL CAMPBELL

RSVP

High STYLE

To celebrate the new fashion tome Advanced Style (powerHouse Books), Tanya Thicke invited 80 guests to her Greer Valley Ranch for a book signing. Author Ari Seth Cohen spoke about his passion for photographing older men and women with style, while cover girl Valerie Sobel discussed her own signature sartorial taste. A silent auction raised $10,000 for the ANDRE SOBEL RIVER OF LIFE FOUNDATION , which provides financial assistance to single-parent families of terminally ill children. PHOTOGRAPHS: CAMERON DEXTER

Left to right: David and

Arlene Montesano, Valerie Sobel, Tanya

Sharon Bradford; Marilyn Horne

Thicke, Ursula Nesbitt, Teran Davis,

and Scott Reed.

guest, and Ari Seth Cohen

Music of the NIGHT

Dressed to impress, the MUSIC ACADEMY OF THE WEST hosted the black-tie opening-night gala with entertainment from MAW alumni who are now stars of the Metropolitan Opera. The event raised $550,000 to benefit the full-scholarship training program for Music Academy fellows. The gala also honored international opera star and voice program director Marilyn Horne by dedicating the academy’s newly renovated Main House to her. P H O T O G R A P H S : B A R O N S PA F F O R D

S A N TA B A R B A R A


Image: WhitneyHartmann.com

Bon Fortune

CELEBRATIONS GIFTS HANDCRAFTED TREASURES

For Children of All Ages 9 2 9 L I N D E N AV E N U E , C A R P I N T E R I A C A 9 3 0 1 3 • W W W. B O N F O RT U N E . C O M


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MAGAZINE


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Shopping GUIDE Magazine

COVER Dress, $4,135, Stella McCartney, stellamccartney.com. Wire

hoop earring, $2,200, gold choker with ball $4,200, dainty chain necklace with white sapphires, $1,320, gold clasp bracelet with white sapphire, $2,550, band ring, $640, gold with white sapphire pin disc ring, $440, pavé diamond ring with white sapphire, $1,150, and tube ring, $560, Wasson Fine, wassonfine.com. Rugs throughout, price upon request, The Tent Merchant, thetentmerchant.com. PAGE 125 Pleated velvet dress, $9,000, Valentino, valentino.com.

AGL Matrioska Mary Jane pumps, $472, Allora by Laura, 805-5632425. Wire hoop earrings, $2,200, and band ring, $640, gold with white sapphire pin disc ring, $440, pavé diamond ring with white sapphire, $1,150, and tube ring, $560, Wasson Fine, wassonfine.com.

Santa Barbara Magazine

PAGES 126-127 Blazer, $110, Topshop, us.topshop.com. Jumper,

is published quarterly with an

$995, Zimmermann, zimmermannwear.com. Vintage scarf, $125, The Way We Wore, 323-937-0878. Gold with white sapphires big moon and coin statement earrings, $3,450, and gold with white sapphires hoop and pin pendant, $1,300, Wasson Fine, wassonfine.com.

PAGE 128 ALC dress, $595, Intermix, 805-969-2184. Rochas floral

multicolor pants, $1,109, Style Bop, stylebop.com. Vintage jacket, stylist’s own. Velvet boots, price upon request, 3.1 Phillip Lim, 31philliplim.com. Gold cross chain earrings, $1,020, gold with white sapphire link and chain collar, $3,250, dainty chain necklace with white sapphires, $1,320, flex and lock and pearl bracelet, $2,700, band ring, $640, gold with white sapphire pin disc ring, $440, pavé diamond ring with white sapphire, $1,150, and tube ring, $560, Wasson Fine, wassonfine.com.

(ISSN 0744-5199. USPS 112-990) Fall 2016, Volume 43/Number 5

additional issue in February by Smith Publishing Group, LLC. Periodical postage paid at Santa Barbara, CA, and additional mailing offices. Editorial office: 2064 Alameda Padre Serra, Ste. 120, Santa Barbara, CA 93103.

Shopping Guide / Pub Statement

PAGE 129 Copper top, $595, Zimmermann, zimmermannwear.com.

Kimono dress, $1,095, 3.1 Phillip Lim, 31philliplim.com. Fran velvet ankle boot, $525, Eugenia Kim, eugeniakim.com. Clasp hoop earrings, $2,300, band ring, $640, gold with white sapphire pin disc ring, $440, pavé diamond ring with white sapphire, $1,150, tube ring, $560, Wasson Fine, wassonfine.com. Knuckle ring, model’s own.

PAGES 130-131 Floral coat, $1,600, and rose gold top, $565,

Telephone: 805-965-5999, fax: 805-

965-7627, editorial e-mail: editorial@ sbmag.com. POSTMASTER: Send

address changes to Santa Barbara Magazine, P.O. Box 16386, North

Zimmermann, zimmermann wear.com. Velvet burnout tank, price upon request, Audra, audraofficial.com. Ruffle pants, $995, Breelayne, breelayne.com. Christabel boots, $940, Sergio Rossi, sergiorossi.com. Dainty chain necklace with white sapphires, $1,320, gold clasp bracelet with white sapphire, $2,550, band ring, $640, gold with white sapphire pin disc ring, $440, pavé diamond ring with white sapphire, $1,150, tube ring, $560, Wasson Fine, wassonfine.com. Knuckle ring, model’s own.

Hollywood, CA 91615. Subscriptions:

PAGES 132-133 Dress, $4,135, Stella McCartney, stellamccartney.

throughout the United States.

com. Wire hoop earrings, $2,200, gold choker with ball $4,200, dainty chain necklace with white sapphires, $1,320, gold clasp bracelet with white sapphire, $2,550, band ring, $640, gold with white sapphire pin disc ring, $440, pavé diamond ring with white sapphire, $1,150, and tube ring, $560, Wasson Fine, wassonfine.com.

telephone: 888-592-0026, e-mail: sbrcs@magserv.com. Domestic rates are $24 for one year (five issues), $36 for two years (10 issues). For airmail, add $40 postage. For orders outside the United States, add $20 postage. Single copies are available at newsstands and other magazine outlets


170

#weliveinparadise What’s in a name? For winemaker Fred Brander, it’s 10 years of rigorous research and an arduous federal petition process. In the end, the LOS OLIVOS DISTRICT ’s green light earlier this year created Santa Barbara County’s sixth American Viticultural Area (AVA). It recognizes the nearly 23,000 acres’ unique weather and geological conditions for the ability to grow world-class wine grapes. There are four towns within its boundaries—Ballard, Solvang, Santa Ynez, and Los Olivos—and more than a dozen wineries, including the legacy property established by Brander in 1975. The AVA distinction allows winemakers to use the Los Olivos District name on their labels as a way to denote pedigree and better inform consumers; until now, they were limited to more general identifiers like “Santa Ynez Valley” or “Santa Barbara County.” Says Brander, who’s already updated the labels on several of his Sauvignon Blanc, Merlot, and Cabernet Sauvignon wines: the AVA “helps bring the whole geography of the valley together.” G A B E S A G L I E

A bucolic view of BRAVE & MAIDEN ESTATE ,

part of the LOS OLIVOS AVA , losolivosava.com

S A N TA B A R B A R A

PHOTOGRAPH: JASON DJANG, © BRAVE & MAIDEN ESTATE

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Bryant & Sons

Santa Barbara  

Fall 2016

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