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NCE U O N N A D R C H RE A A M B U L C INDY BOOK FREE

Santa Barbara

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FEB. 27 - MAR. 5, 20720 VOL. 34 • NO. 73

S E I L T WHA

H T A E N E B s k c e r w p i h S nnel Islan d ,

Cha

reak b t r a e H , m is o Her Tell Stories of High-Seas Scalawaggery and by Tyle r

ALSO INSIDE

Hayden

RA NT W EE K CH OW IN G DO W N FO R RE STAU

PA RA DI SE FE ST DO S PU EB LO S HI GH ’S JA ZZ IN INDEPENDENT.COM

FEBRUARY 27, 2020

THE INDEPENDENT

1


ON MARCH 3RD

Vote to Re-Elect Our Supervisor

Das Williams

When Santa Barbara Faces Big Challenges

DAS IS ALWAYS THERE FOR US

“As we suffered through the Thomas Fire and debris flow, Das helped assist with the emergency response, and he’s been there to help families rebuild. Santa Barbara Firefighters enthusiastically endorse Supervisor Das Williams.” BRIAN FERNANDEZ Fire Captain

“When it comes to keeping our communities safe, there is one clear choice for Supervisor: Das Williams.” ROB KIRSCH Santa Barbara County Deputy Sheriffs’ Association

“We are proud to endorse Supervisor Williams’ re-election campaign. Throughout his career, he has exhibited strong environmental leadership, support for working people, and sought solutions for mental health and homelessness issues.” GAIL TETON-LANDIS

Chair, Democratic Party of Santa Barbara County

“DAS HAS BEEN UNWAVERING in his efforts to protect our coast. He’s passed groundbreaking clean energy laws, and he’s focused on keeping us safe from the impacts of climate change.” LINDA KROP Chief Counsel,

Local Environmental Attorney

“Das is a person of action. Das’s Gun Violence Restraining Order, or ’red flag law’ is now being utilized statewide to protect us from gun violence.” TONI WELLEN Legislative Chair, Santa Barbara Coalition Against Gun Violence

Vote To Re-Elect

“DAS HAS HELPED FAMILIES like ours recover so we can rebuild faster and stay in our community.” THE OZOLINS FAMILY

DAS WILLIAMS for Supervisor Paid for by Das Williams for Supervisor 2020

2

THE INDEPENDENT

FEBRUARY 27, 2020

INDEPENDENT.COM


2020 Grammy Nominee for Best American Roots Song

Rosanne Cash with John Leventhal

She Remembers Everything

- Grammy Nomi nee ica Best Amer na Album

Wed, Mar 4 / 8 PM UCSB Campbell Hall Tickets start at $45 $15 UCSB students With an iconic sound that transcends country, pop, rock and blues, Rosanne Cash’s new album She Remembers Everything is a lush and soulful collection of songs that embraces women’s narratives and reckons with a flawed and fragile world.

Presented through the generosity of Marjorie & Barrie Bergman Part of the A Century of Empowerment series

A Blockbuster Night of Blues Sat, Mar 7 / 7 PM (note special time) Arlington Theatre Tickets start at $45 $25 UCSB students

Fri, Mar 6 / 8 PM / UCSB Campbell Hall Tickets start at $30 / $15 UCSB students With soulful vocals, rich harmonies, unwavering grooves and searing guitar work, The Wood Brothers harness a kaleidoscopic array of influences and exemplary musicianship into a must-see live show.

Buddy Guy

Jimmie Vaughan - Charlie Musselwhite

An Arlington facility fee will be added to each ticket price

Rock and Roll Hall of Famer Buddy Guy is an American treasure, guitar master and ambassador of Chicago blues. He’s joined by 2020 Grammy Award nominee Jimmie Vaughan, an Austin icon with a four-decade career of Texas Roadhouse blues, roots and jazz, and Charlie Musselwhite, whose Delta-infused harp glides seamlessly from blues to gospel to country.

Presented with additional support from Sharon & Bill Rich Corporate Season Sponsor:

(805) 893-3535 | www.ArtsAndLectures.UCSB.edu

Media Sponsor:

Arlington event tickets can also be purchased at: (805) 963-4408 INDEPENDENT.COM

FEBRUARY 27, 2020

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3


France’s National Treasure Makes its Only West Coast Appearance

Lyon Opera Ballet “Trois Grandes Fugues”

Wed, Apr 1 & Thu, Apr 2 / 8 PM / Granada Theatre Tickets start at $35 / $19 all students (with valid ID) A Granada facility fee will be added to each ticket price

photos: Bertrand Stofleth

Celebrate Beethoven’s 250th birthday with three interpretations of his beloved masterpiece “Grosse Fuge” by three female choreographers.

America’s Lucinda Childs

Belgium’s Anne Teresa De Keersmaeker

France’s Maguy Marin

Presented in association with the UCSB Department of Theater and Dance

Presented through the generosity of the Albert & Elaine Borchard Foundation

Corporate Sponsor:

Dance Series Sponsors: Annette & Dr. Richard Caleel, Margo Cohen-Feinberg & Bob Feinberg, Irma & Morrie Jurkowitz, Barbara Stupay, and Sheila Wald

Arab and Israeli musicians defying fierce political divides in the Middle East and globally

Michael Barenboim and the West-Eastern Divan Ensemble Sat, Mar 7 / 4 PM / Hahn Hall Music Academy of the West $40 / $9 UCSB students Post-show Q&A with the artists

The West-Eastern Divan Ensemble spreads the mission that opposing sides can build bridges and encourage people to imagine a better future. Experience the healing power of music as artists from Palestine, Israel, Jordan, Lebanon and Egypt perform together. Led by concertmaster Michael Barenboim, the group draws its members from the world-renowned West-Eastern Divan Orchestra in hopes of finding alternative ways to alleviate the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. The diverse program features music by Schubert, Mendelssohn, Tartini and young French composer Benjamin Attahir.

Up Close & Musical Series Sponsor: Dr. Bob Weinman

(805) 893-3535 | www.ArtsAndLectures.UCSB.edu Granada event tickets can also be purchased at: (805) 899-2222 | www.GranadaSB.org

Corporate Season Sponsor: 4

THE INDEPENDENT

FEBRUARY 27, 2020

INDEPENDENT.COM

Media Sponsor:


“Joan has be Hartmann superv en an exemp l i much sor. You can ary better ’t do t h Santa an tha Barba t.” r a In E

Re-elect

ndors

ement

de p e n d 2/13/2 ent 0

Supervisor Joan Hartmann brings people together to solve problems, earning the enthusiastic endorsement of community leaders throughout the county. Elected Officials Congressman Salud Carbajal State Senator Hannah-Beth Jackson Assemblymember Monique Limón Santa Barbara County Treasurer Harry Hagen Santa Barbara County Auditor/Controller Betsy Schaffer Supervisor Das Williams Supervisor Gregg Hart Supervisor Steve Bennett Mayor Ariston Julian (Guadalupe) Mayor Cathy Murillo (Santa Barbara) Mayor Paula Perotte (Goleta) Mayor Ryan Toussaint (Solvang) City Councilmember Stuart Kasdin (Goleta) City Council Member James Kyriaco (Goleta) City Councilmember Kyle Richards (Goleta) City Councilmember Liliana Cardenas (Guadalupe) City Councilmember Eric Friedman (Santa Barbara) City Councilmember Oscar Gutierrez (Santa Barbara) City Councilmember Kristen Sneddon (Santa Barbara) City Councilmember Gloria Soto (Santa Maria) Santa Barbara City College Trustee Jonathan Abboud Guadalupe Union School Board Member Diana Arriola Goleta Water District Board Member Lauren Hanson Goleta Water District Board Member Bill Rosen Isla Vista Community Services Dist. Director Ethan Bertrand Isla Vista Community Services Dist. Director Spencer Brandt Isla Vista Community Services Dist. Director and Retired County Auditor Controller Robert Geis Isla Vista Recreation & Park District Director Pegeen Soutar Isla Vista Recreation & Park District Director Carlos Lopez Retired County Superintendent of Schools Bill Cirone Retired Supervisor Doreen Farr Retired Supervisor Gail Marshall Retired Supervisor Susan Rose Retired Supervisor Janet Wolf Retired Santa Barbara Mayor Hal Conklin Retired Santa Barbara Mayor Sheila Lodge Judge George Eskin (Ret.)

SANTA BARBARA COUNTY DEPUTY SHERIFF’S ASSOCIATION

SANTA BARBARA COUNTY FIREFIGHTERS ASSOCIATION

Local 620 & 721

THE GOODLAND COALITION FOR GOLETA

THE GOODLAND COALITION FOR GOLETA

For complete list of endorsements, visit: JoanHartmannforSupervisor.org

Planned Parenthood Action Fund of the Central Coast

JoanHartmannforSupervisor.org Mail your ballot or VOTE MARCH 3 Paid for by Joan Hartmann for Supervisor 2020, PO Box 90610, Santa Barbara, CA 93190 ID # 1381196 INDEPENDENT.COM

FEBRUARY 27, 2020

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Free Installation on all car rack purchases! Editor in Chief Marianne Partridge

Publisher Brandi Rivera

Executive Editor Nick Welsh Senior Editors Michelle Drown, Tyler Hayden, Matt Kettmann Editor at Large Ethan Stewart

Locally owned and operated for over 40 years SANTA BARBARA | 14 State Street | 962-0049 | Mon - Sat 10 - 6, Sun 10 - 5

mountainairsports.com

Photos courtesy of Thule

March’s Pick:

Boy, Snow, Bird

VOTE!

by Helen Oyeyemi

Need more information?

Columnists Dennis Allen, Gail Arnold, Sara Caputo, Roger Durling, Jerry Roberts, Starshine Roshell Contributors Camie Barnwell, Rob Brezsny, Melinda Burns, Ben Ciccati, John Dickson, Keith Hamm, Rebecca Horrigan, Eric HvolbØll, Tom Jacobs, Shannon Kelley, Kevin McKiernan, Ninette Paloma, Carolina Starin, Brian Tanguay, Tom Tomorrow, T.M. Weedon, Maggie Yates Robert A. Sollen Fellow Brian Osgood Editorial Interns Adrianne Davies, Miranda de Moraes, Shannon Ponn

Accounting Administrator Tobi Feldman Office Manager/Legal Advertising Tanya Spears Guiliacci Distribution Scott Kaufman Columnist Emeritus Barney Brantingham Photography Editor Emeritus Paul Wellman Founding Staff Emeriti Audrey Berman, George Delmerico, Richard Evans, Laszlo Hodosy Honorary Consigliere Gary J. Hill Indy Kids Bella and Max Brown, Elijah Lee Bryant, Henry and John Poett Campbell, Chloë Bee Ciccati, Emilia Imojean Friedman, Izadora and Savina Hamm, Madeline Rose and Mason Carrington Kettmann, Olivia Pando-McGinnis, Izzy and Maeve McKinley, Sawyer Tower Stewart, Phoenix Grace White

Register and Vote Before Election Day!

visit

independent.com/indybookclub for all the details!

The Independent is available, free of charge, limited to one copy per reader. Back issues cost $2 and may be purchased at the office. The Independent may be distributed only by authorized circulation staff or authorized distributors. No person may, without the permission of publisher, take more than one copy of each Independent issue. Subscriptions are available, paid in advance, for $120 per year. Send subscription requests with name and address to subscriptions@independent.com. The contents of the Independent are copyrighted 2020 by the Santa Barbara Independent, Inc. No part may be reproduced without permission from the publisher. The publisher assumes no responsibility for unsolicited material. A stamped, self-addressed envelope must accompany all submissions expected to be returned. The Independent is published every Thursday at 12 E. Figueroa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Advertising rates on request: (805) 965-5205. The Independent is available on the internet at independent.com. Press run of the Independent is 40,000 copies. Audited certification of circulation is available on request. The Independent is a legal adjudicated newspaper — court decree no. 157386.

Contact information: 12 E. Figueroa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101 PHONE (805) 965-5205; FAX (805) 965-5518 EMAIL news@independent.com, letters@independent.com Staff email addresses can be found at independent.com/info

sbcvote.com 1 (800) SBC-VOTE FEBRUARY 27, 2020

Creative Director Caitlin Fitch Graphic Designers Ricky Barajas, Esperanza Carmona, Ben Greenberg Production Designer Ava Talehakimi Staff Photographer Daniel Dreifuss

Director of Advertising Sarah Sinclair Marketing and Promotions Manager Emily Cosentino Advertising Representatives Camille Cimini Fruin, Suzanne Cloutier, Remzi Gokmen, Stefanie McGinnis, Antonio Morales, Tonea Songer Sales Administrator Graham Brown

Forgot to Register? There’s Still Time! Avoid Long Lines!

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Associate Editor Jackson Friedman Copy Editors Alexandra Mauceri, Tessa Reeg

Digital Editor Nancy Rodriguez Digital Assistant Amber White

PRIMARY ELECTION MARCH 3

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News Reporter Delaney Smith Opinions Editor Jean Yamamura Executive Arts Editor Charles Donelan Arts Writer Josef Woodard Calendar Editor Terry Ortega Calendar Assistant Celina Garcia Sports Editor John Zant Sports Writer Victor Bryant Food Writer George Yatchisin

INDEPENDENT.COM


CLIMATE CONSCIOUS

volume 34, number 737, Feb. 27-Mar. 5, 2020

Name: Adri Davies Title: News Intern

Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  26

OBITUARIES.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 THE WEEK.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35

What got you interested in journalism, and why did you want to write for the Independent? At UCSB, I spend a lot of time working on climate policy research. That’s been great, but learning important information has only motivated me to want to share it, so I thought journalism might be that intersection. As for the Independent Independent, I’ve been coming to Santa Barbara during the summers since I was a kid and thought there was no better way to send off my senior year than diving deeper into the community I have grown to love so much.

LIVING.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Living Page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39

28

FOOD & DRINK .. . . . . . . . . . 40

COVER STORY

What Lies Beneath Channel Islands Shipwrecks Tell Stories of Heroism, Heartbreak, and High-Seas Scalawaggery

(Tyler Hayden)

ON THE COVER AND ABOVE: The Jane L. Stanford. Photos courtesy of Santa Cruz Island Foundation.

The Restaurant Guy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42

What stories have you covered for us so far? I have covered a few stories on Congressmember Carbajal, Yusef Salaam visiting UCSB, and a review of the TV at the Pollock series, with a few news briefs in between. Most recently, I helped out with research into the life of Dr. Horace McMillan.

Dining Out Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43

A&E. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45

What’re your career plans? I’m planning to take a few years off from school and go back to work for a think tank in Washington, D.C., or maybe something else in journalism or the nonprofit world. I’m interested in renewable energy and climate policy, so I hope to go to law school and practice energy or environmental law.

Arts Life . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45

Theater . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 Classical . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 Pop, Rock & Jazz . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51

ONLINE NOW AT

INDEPENDENT.COM

FILM & TV. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Movie Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53

FOLLOW US ON INSTAGRAM!

ENDORSEMENTS.. . . . . . . . . . . 9 SPORTS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 NEWS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 ODDS & ENDS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58 OPINIONS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Rob Brezsny’s Free Will Astrology . . . . . . . 58

For the latest news, faces, and places, follow @sbindependent on Instagram and tag your photos #sbindy for a chance to be featured on our feed!

Angry Poodle Barbecue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  16 This Modern World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 In Memoriam . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  23 Capitol Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  25

ERIC ISAACS

CONTENTS

CLASSIFIEDS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59

Wanna Get Away?

(without leaving town?)

Evolutions Day Spa offers an escape from life’s everyday stress. A 60 or 90 minute massage, facial, body scrub or wrap can be an amazing “mini stay-cation.” Come in by yourself or come relax with a friend or loved one. What are you waiting for? You deserve a little break! Evolutions’ Mini Stay-cation Idea #1: Sundãri™ Nourishing Wrap Your 90 minute journey begins in the Vichy shower room where you receive a full body exfoliation to remove all signs of dry, flaky skin. You then transfer to a massage hut and your choice of Ayurvedic Sundãri™ oils will be warmed and poured over your body before you are cocooned in a thermal blanket. As you enjoy the warm comfort of the wrap, you will receive a relaxing head, neck, and foot massage. Complete your treatment with a dry sauna and then a soothing cup of tea in our Tea Lounge. The next day your family and co-workers will all wonder why you look so relaxed and refreshed (and with amazingly soft skin too)!

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805.284.9007 FEBRUARY 27, 2020

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7


ts ! n e r nts a P re n o i dpa t ten Gran t A d an

Please Join Us on Friday, March 6

Teen Health Roundtable

with the Women’s Council of Sansum Clinic

PA N E L I STS

Tom R. Anderson, MD

Ryan Arnold, MD

Laura Polito, MD

Sean Johnson, MHA, BSN, RN

Urgent Care

UCSB Student Health Services

Urgent Care

VP, Applications and Analytics

Daniel Brennan, MD

Pediatrics & Adolescent Medicine

David Raphael, MD

Obstetrics & Gynecology

Bret Davis, MD, FACP Dermatology

Heather Terbell, MD

Obstetrics & Gynecology

Hear the latest on: vaping, sexually-transmitted diseases, skin cancer prevention, addiction to substances and alcohol, digital distractions, sports-related injuries. The adolescent years have a long-lasting impact on a young person’s current and future health. Today, teenagers must manage many 21st century challenges.

A panel of expert physicians from multiple specialties will discuss what the picture of health is like among teens in Santa Barbara County, the greatest health risks they face and what parents can do to encourage healthy decisions

that have a positive impact on their teens. Guests are welcome to join a reception with refreshments in the beautiful Healing Garden immediately following the panel discussion to meet the doctors and other health professionals.

DATE

Friday, March 6, 2020

PLACE

Ridley-Tree Cancer Center at Sansum Clinic Lovelace Conference Hall, 540 W. Pueblo Street

TIME

2:30 pm – 4:30 pm

CO-CHAIRS Julie Nadel & Bobbie Rosenblatt, Women’s Council EMCEE

PARKING RSVP

8

THE INDEPENDENT

FEBRUARY 27, 2020

INDEPENDENT.COM

Dr. Marjorie Newman, Newman, Medical Director

Complimentary Valet Parking

By February 27 to (805)681-1756 or RSVP@sansumclinic.org


State Senate

C

PAU L WELLM AN F I LE PHOTO

alifornia Assemblymember Monique Limón is running for State Senate to fill the massive void about to be created when the great Hannah-Beth Jackson is termed out of office. Since first running for the Santa Barbara school board 10 years ago, Limón has emerged as the political equivalent of the irresistible force. Since hitting the statehouse, Limón has landed choice assignments on powerful committees, such as the Assembly Banking Committee. Given her expertise in education policy — Limón has a master’s degree from Columbia University — we expect her to exert positive sway on matters K-12 and higher education. In her four years in the Assembly, Limón has established a reputation for carefully studying issues before arriving at solutions to complicated problems. That’s a good thing.

Steve Bennett

State Assembly, District 37

W

Federal

Congress: Salud Carbajal

State

State Assembly, District 37: Steve Bennett State Senate: Monique Limón

County

Supervisorial District 1: Das Williams

Supervisorial District 3: Joan Hartmann

PAU L WE LLM AN FI LE PHOTO

e are fortunate to have such a candidate as Steve Bennett to represent Santa Barbara and Ventura counties in the California Assembly. A 20-year veteran of Ventura’s County Board of Supervisors, he spearheaded the 1998 groundbreaking SOAR initiative that has protected Ventura’s rich farmlands from urban sprawl to this day. Bennett also helped energize the campaign to defeat a proposed liquefied natural gas plant off the coast of Ventura. He led the charge to improve foster care and, recently, participated in a difficult but eventually successful effort to open a new homeless shelter in Ventura, the first in eons.  We can count on Bennett, an informed environmentalist who has been endorsed by the Sierra Club, to protect local authority in Sacramento, where California, desperate to solve its statewide housing crisis, is trying to override regional governments’ land-use policies.  He’s been a leader in creating a network of bikeways along the coast and pushed his own public works department to create safer shoulders for cyclists. After a long career as a high school teacher and school administrator, Bennett, who was endorsed by the California Teachers Association, will be able to carefully consider education policy proposals made in the state capitol. Steve Bennett is ready to serve us all well in Sacramento.

E TAK YOU TH E WI O TH S! T LL PO

County Board of Supervisors, 3rd District

T

his is arguably the most important regional race on the ballot this March. The 3rd District is the swing district that controls how the Board of Supervisors will vote on such critical issues as climate change, oil development, housing, and cannabis. Joan Hartmann’s three years representing that district have been exemplary. Anyone paying attention quickly grasps the power of her intelligence and the stamina of her work ethic. Her key opponent, Bruce Porter, has oil money oozing out of his pockets and has personally worked to suppress voter turnout in Isla Vista. The choice is clear. Hartmann has fought for an initiative that will allow county consumers to buy their energy from renewable sources. She has also played a critical role getting the Strauss Wind Energy Project to pass. You can count on Hartmann to bird-dog greenhouse-gas emissions aggressively, pushing new onshore oil and gas proposal applicants toward solar installations as a more economically sensible choice. Hartmann has actively supported alternative transportation. And on cannabis, she voted with the board majority in making the current mess, but she’s leading the charge to put the genie back in the bottle. Joan Hartmann has been an exemplary supervisor working through difficult problems. You can’t do much better than that. PAU L WELLM AN F I LE PHOTO

Monique Limón

Joan Hartmann

Das Williams

County Board of Supervisors, 1st District

E

ndorsing a candidate in the current 1st Supervisorial District race has been among the most difficult decisions the Santa Barbara Independent has struggled to make in our 34 years. In it, we face an excruciating choice between two progressive, environmentally minded candidates, incumbent Das Williams and challenger Laura Capps. Both are serious people; both have demonstrated a serious commitment to public service. Both are clearly politically ambitious. That being acknowledged, we have decided to endorse Das Williams for a second term as county supervisor. Our decision rests on the arc of consistency Williams has demonstrated over his 17 years in public life. Though the last few years have been consumed by mistakes made in the transitional cannabis regulation and the unexpected fallout it has had in communities, we are endorsing Williams because of his notable record of accomplishments on environmental protection, climate change, and social justice. He has acquired a deep knowledge of the issues and a wide range of personal and political relationships, and has developed strong working ties with county staff and his board colleagues. He has a long record of fighting for environmental protection and civic justice. Given the urgency of the issues before us — climate change, disaster preparedness, housing, and homelessness, to name just four — these assets matter profoundly. DAN I EL DR EI FUSS

E

very election year, the Santa Barbara Independent researches the issues and the candidates as carefully as possible. In the races where we see clear choices, we make endorsements. We do not endorse in every race, but in those in which we do, we do so with confidence, or at least with a clear understanding of why we support one candidate or one ballot initiative over another. Here is a brief overview of our suggestions for the March 3 election. Whether you agree with our choices or not, we urge you to vote. One thing we can say with absolute certainty: Every vote really does count.

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Salud Carbajal Congress

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oters should send Salud Carbajal back to Congress to serve a third term representing Santa Barbara and Ventura counties. A liberal Democrat, Carbajal has spoken out against the extreme cruelties of the Trump administration, standing tall, for example, in favor of the Affordable Care Act and against the reckless hate-mongering that masquerades as White House immigration policy. Most recently, he introduced the Central Coast Heritage Protection Act, which designates 250,000 acres in Los Padres National Forest and the Carrizo Plain National Monument as safeguarded wilderness. Though it won bipartisan support in the House, it will face greater challenges in the Republicancontrolled Senate. But it is the kind of critical, thoughtful legislation we can count on from Salud Carbajal.

COU RTE SY

ENDORSEMENTS

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FEBRUARY 27, 2020

THE INDEPENDENT

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CAMP IGNITE ENROLLMENT FAIR PREVIEW GIRLS INC. SUMMER PROGRAMS! Saturday, March 14 | 1:30pm – 4:00pm

Goleta Valley & Teen Center 4973 Hollister Avenue 805.967.0319

Santa Barbara Center 531 E. Ortega Street 805.963.4757

Girls Inc. Gymnastics 531 E. Ortega Street 805.963.4757

For girls ages 5-18 and their families. Boys are welcome to attend the Gymnastics programs!

Join Girls Inc. for a hands-on, minds-on, fun-filled afternoon learning about CAMP IGNITE’S summer programs! Try out Strong, Smart, and Bold activities like healthy cooking, STEM, DIY projects, and obstacle courses! Meet the amazing mentors who will be working with your youth this summer in our pro-girl environment.

Register to win prizes, including a free week of Summer Camp!

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RESERVE YOUR SPACE AT GIRLSINCSB.ORG OR CALL YOUR CENTER

PARALLEL STORIES Juan Felipe Herrera: Writing Love in the Face of Disaster SUNDAY | MARCH 8 | 2:30 PM “I’m a political poet—let us say a human poet, a poet that’s concerned with the plight of people who suffer. If words can be of assistance, then that’s what I’m going to use.” —Juan Felipe Herrera Parallel Stories flings open the door to the exuberant experimental poetry of former California and U.S. Poet Laureate Juan Felipe Herrera in a conversation between Herrera and his fellow author and colleague in the Creative Writing program at UC Riverside, Andrew Winer. Herrera confounds all borders including that between the written and the spoken. The son of migrant farmers, which he says strongly shaped his work, he finds his stories in the landscape and language of California. This multiple award-winning author of over 30 books including poetry, fiction, and nonfiction, reminds us that we are the poetry makers and invites us to join him. Book signing to follow. 10

THE INDEPENDENT

FEBRUARY 27, 2020

INDEPENDENT.COM

$5 SBMA Members $10 Non-Members $6 Senior Non-Members Purchase tickets at the Museum Visitor Services desk, or online at tickets.sbma.net. Mary Craig Auditorium 1130 State Street www.sbma.net


FEB. 20-27, 2020

NEWS of the WEEK

PAU L WELLM AN F I LE PHOTO

by TYLER HAYDEN, NICK WELSH, DELANEY SMITH, and JEAN YAMAMURA, with INDEPENDENT STAFF

COURTS & CRIME

NEWS BRIEFS CITY With the number of flights in and out of Santa Barbara Airport up by 36 percent over the last year for the month of January, complaints about commercial planes flying over residential neighborhoods have also risen. Airport representative Aaron Keller said at Tuesday’s City Council meeting that the number of such intrusions remains very low but still the subject of many complaints. At most, he said, the airport receives about 1,600 noise complaints a month, but that noise levels fall well within ambient sound requirements.

COUNTY DON’T MESS WITH THE GUMP: Mark Melchiori (left, in glasses) was sentenced to nine years and four months for ripping off Robert Zemeckis, film director of such hits as Forrest Gump (right).

Construction Mogul Gets Nine Years Melchiori Gets Max Sentence in Fraud Case Involving Forrest Gump Director by Nick Welsh aybe Mark Melchiori’s big mistake was picking the wrong guy to rip off. It’s not clear who the right person might have been, but in hindsight, it most definitely was not Hollywood director Robert Zemeckis, famous for such blockbusters as Forrest Gump and Back to the Future. Halfway into an $8 million home addition job on Zemeckis’s Montecito estate, the movie director got wind that Melchiori, then running one of Santa Barbara’s flagship construction companies, had not paid any of the subcontractors. At that time —it was June 2012—Zemeckis had just written Melchiori a check for $350,000. As Zemeckis would testify in Judge James Herman’s courtroom last week, he called Melchiori “hundreds of times,” demanding an explanation. Not once, he claimed, did he ever get a call back. “He disappeared like a thief into the night,” Zemeckis testified. To find out where his money went, Zemeckis hired a private investigator. What the investigator discovered would provide the basis for a 47-count criminal indictment filed against Melchiori by the Santa Barbara County District Attorney’s office. Rather than go to trial and risk a 50-year sentence, Melchiori opted to plead guilty to three counts late last year. After an emotionally searing hearing last Thursday, Judge Herman imposed the maximum sentence possible. Courthouse bailiffs then put Melchiori in handcuffs, removed his necktie, and marched him into a nineyear, four-month sentence in state prison. Although Melchiori had submitted a written apology expressing regret and remorse, he chose not to address the judge directly or

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his many accusers who showed up in court. Likewise, none of the people who wrote letters on Melchiori’s behalf did either. In opting for the maximum, Judge Herman dismissed entreaties by Melchiori’s attorney, Doug Hayes, for a lighter sentence. Hayes argued for probation, pointing out his client had no prior criminal history and had been deemed a low risk for further offense. Further, he argued, Melchiori’s life had already been ruined: He lost his business, was divorced by his wife, and had disgraced his family’s good name. “This was not an accident,” Herman found. “It was not just a one-off. It was conducted over a number of years.” The many schemes Melchiori devised, Herman concluded, were “so sophisticated that it took multiple investigations by several different agencies to uncover the extent of the defendant’s criminality.” Herman cited the severity of the impact in handing down his sentence, noting that Zemeckis wound up $1 million out of pocket because of Melchiori. In addition, countless employees of Melchiori Construction lost their jobs and had their retirement accounts wiped out when the company went bankrupt shortly after Zemeckis blew the whistle. And Melchiori’s business partners found themselves sued by banks and bonding companies to the tune of $12 million for debts Melchiori incurred in the company’s name. It got so bad, said one, that he became afraid to answer his door for fear of encountering a process server on the other side. The extent of the restitution owed remains uncertain. Based on statements made in court, it appears Melchiori spent $10 million in company assets over a four-year period.

That money was used, according to prosecuting attorney Casey Nelson, to support “a lavish lifestyle” that included buying Melchiori a new Porsche and throwing his daughter a sweet-16 birthday bash at The Ritz-Carlton Bacara and giving her a new car. “It’s important to send a signal to the community that economic crime will not be tolerated just because it’s economic crime,” said Herman. For many years, Melchiori Construction signs adorned some of the biggest and most expensive construction projects on the South Coast: the Four Seasons Biltmore, San Ysidro Ranch, UCSB, and the Canary Hotel, to name a few. The company was started in 1990 by Melchiori’s father, Ugo Melchiori, an Italian immigrant who moved to Santa Barbara in 1958 and started his first construction company in 1972. Ugo Melchiori would come to enjoy a respect bordering on reverence within Santa Barbara’s construction universe, as well as its close-knit Italian community. When he died in 2009 from an especially aggressive form of cancer, it gave rise within those worlds for much grief. Mark Melchiori had worked for his father’s first company as a kid and started working for Melchiori Construction in 1993 after getting a business degree. By 1997, he was running the show. According to former business partners who testified in court, the younger Melchiori quickly became “arrogant and narcissistic,” buying fancy houses and cars. Initially, they were told, Melchiori’s wife was a trust-fund baby. Later, they claimed, they would discover Melchiori was tapping the company’s revenues to sustain an unsustainable lifestyle. Melchiori’s now ex-wife, they claimed, hired two personal assistants at company CONT’D ON PAGE 12 

The Board of Supervisors on 2/25 approved expanding the Cold Springs Debris Basin, which overfilled during 2018’s deadly 1/9 Debris Flow. With the supervisors’ unanimous agreement that expanding the Cold Springs basin to the west is environmentally sound, the Public Works director will begin taking bids on the project, which will begin this summer. Several other debris basin projects were unanimously approved for preconstruction reviews but won’t be before the board for project approval until later this year. Those projects are the proposed Randall Road Debris Basin and the San Ysidro, Romero, and Cold Springs Debris Basin Modification Projects.

HEALTH A potential coronavirus patient from Los Angeles International Airport is housed at Point Mugu, a U.S. Navy base on the edge of Ventura and Los Angeles counties, the Los Angeles Times reported on 2/26. The person flew in before dawn on Monday, the Times wrote, one day after Mugu was announced as a quarantine location by the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services (HHS). Ventura County Public Health confirmed the patient and stated the person presently had no symptoms; L.A. County’s Public Health Department emphasized the virus was unconfirmed. The HHS announcement stated American travelers through LAX who are potentially infected with COVID-19 would be monitored at Mugu based on their travel history. On Tuesday, the Centers for Disease Control stated it was advising that individuals and businesses make plans should community spread, or disease without a direct link to travel, make its expected appearance in the U.S.

COURTS & CRIME On 2/11, a routine traffic stop in Carpinteria turned into a drug bust when sheriff’s deputies found close to a pound of methamphetamine and a gun hidden in the dashboard of the car. The driver, John Scott Bavaro, 53, was arrested on-site. Narcotics detectives later served a search warrant to inspect Bavaro’s Buellton home, where they found evidence of drug sales, another seven grams of meth, and four grams of psilocybin mushrooms. Bavaro is being held on $50,000 bail in County Jail on five felony charges. n

For the latest news and longer versions of many of these stories, visit independent.com/news. INDEPENDENT.COM

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FEB. 20-27, 2020

Two Jail Workers Arrested for Sexual Assault

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wo Santa Barbara County Sheriff ’s Office employees were arrested on multiple felony sexual assault charges Friday, including forcible oral copulation, sexual activity with a person in custody, and forcible sexual penetration by a foreign object. The suspects, 34-yearold Salvador Vargas of Salvador Vargas Santa Maria and 47-yearold Gabriel Castro of Ventura, were held in Santa Barbara County Jail and Ventura County Jail on $100,000 bonds, respectively. Both were released on bail over the weekend — Vargas’s arraignment date is March 23 and Castro’s arraignment date is March 6. The charges involve at least two female victims — one per defendant — and prosecutor Jennifer Karapetian was unable to state if there were other known victims. The two confirmed victims were inmates at the Santa Barbara County Main Jail when Vargas and Castro were employees there. The arrests come after a nearly two-year internal investigation of Vargas and Castro, whose criminal activities “occurred around the same time with intertwined witnesses,” according to Raquel Zick, a spokesperson for the Santa Barbara County Sheriff ’s

Gabriel Castro

Office. Vargas was hired in April 2018 and worked as a social worker discharge planner in the main jail; Castro was hired in July 2002 and worked as a custody deputy in the main jail. Both suspects were put on administrative leave in September 2018 after the investigations commenced. Neither the Sheriff ’s Office nor the District Attorney’s Office could offer deep insight into an open case, but Zick described the investigation as intensive. “During the investigations, detectives identified an extensive list of possible witnesses and attempted to identify additional potential victims,” Zick said. “This follow-up required interviews of numerous inmates, some of whom had been transferred to custody facilities throughout the —Delaney Smith state.”

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Melchiori

expense to take care of parental volunteer obligations at Bishop Diego, where their daughter attended. One former partner, Oliviero Ziliotto, claimed he heard that daughter be instructed by Melchiori’s exwife to run him over. He also claimed that Melchiori kept a 9mm Beretta on his office desk and a shotgun slung up against the office wall. In court, Melchiori’s attorney, Hayes, would argue, “It’s only money.” In written pleadings, he was more compelling. Melchiori, he argued, found himself forced “to rob Peter to pay Paul” to keep the company afloat in response to the economic crash of 2008. Making matters worse was a $6 million legal judgement he could not collect on from developer Don Hughes, because Hughes — who referred to Melchiori as “that wop bastard”—declared bankruptcy. On top of that was his father’s death. Melchiori, Hayes argued, leveraged himself to the maximum extent possible not to support a lavish lifestyle but to keep the company going. When his wife divorced him, he insisted she sell her wedding ring so he could deposit the proceeds—$90,000 —into company coffers. Melchiori would tell evaluators with County Probation he

CONT’D FROM P. 11 “should have been more diligent,” but said he was “baffled” that any of his conduct constituted a criminal offense. In recent years, Melchiori has lived in Gilroy, where he rents a room. He makes $9,200 a month working for a construction company that specializes in hotel work. His current boss knows his legal history and wrote a strong letter of support. So, too, did Santa Barbara philanthropist Anne Towbes, who wrote warmly of Melchiori that he arranged the first date between her and developer and banker Michael Towbes, with whom she spent 12 happy years until his death. Defense attorney Hayes argued Melchiori would not be able to make restitution to his victims if he were locked up. Prosecutor Nelson mocked the idea that Melchiori had any sincere interest in restitution. To date, he argued, Melchiori had only paid $640 into a restitution fund — established only in recent months—despite earning “a sixfigure salary.” Zemeckis was likewise skeptical, describing Melchiori as “unrepentant, privileged, and arrogant,” adding, “the guy is a complete piece of shit, like a sociopath.” n


NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D

Solving Homelessness, One Block at a Time

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2020

by Nick Welsh rior to taking his show before the Santa Barbara City Council this week, Jeff Shaffer explained the secret to getting homeless people off the street. “It’s not the first time that does it,” he said. “It’s the 14th.” Such persistence, he said, is essential to establishing trust, and trust is essential to getting people to accept help they may not think they need. For the past 15 years, Shaffer has been dealing with homelessPERSISTENCE PAYS: Jeff Shaffer, who’s spent 15 years on ness one way or the other. His lathomeless issues, details how “red shirts” and “blue shirts” est organization, SB ACT (Santa made progress on the 400 and 500 blocks of State Street. Barbara Alliance for Community Transformation), is a nonprofit dedicated to a steering committee representing 18 diffomenting better collaboration among non- ferent organizations. They’ve devised flow profits, government agencies, business orga- charts and come up with a new language of nizations, and homeless people themselves. social service jargon. Last year, City Hall invested $100,000 But mostly, he said, the focus will be on in SB ACT; the Santa Barbara Foundation education and listening campaigns tartossed in another $100,000. Shaffer showed geting the city’s six districts so that each up at City Hall this Tuesday to explain what district does its fair share and isn’t overhe and SB ACT’s Rick Sanders and Barbara burdened. The aim is to short-circuit the Andersen had been doing with that money sort of angry neighborhood revolts against for the last three months. What the coun- proposed homeless housing developments cil heard was a lot of big-picture talk and a that occurred the past year involving Alisos description of some very focused outreach. Street and a parking lot by Carrillo and CasShaffer detailed, for instance, how blue- tillo streets. In both instances, the proposals shirted outreach workers with CityNet — a were sprung suddenly upon the neighbors, faith-based organization out of Orange whose reaction was volatile. County — teamed up with red-shirted Shaffer described some of the language “Ambassadors” hired by City Hall’s Public that erupted in response to a more recent Works Department to focus on the 400 and proposal slated for Hollister Avenue. One 500 blocks of State Street. Of the 120 home- side described the targeted homeless populess people known to make State Street their lation as “the worst of the worst.” The other home, he said, about 41 can be found on side dismissed concerned neighbors as those two blocks. “NIMBYs.” Such language, Shaffer cauThese individuals tend to come in tioned, does not help. More constructive, contact with law enforcement and med- he said, was an initiative launched by Westical-care providers with great frequency. mont to interview 30 residents living near By contacting these individuals “five, six, Milpas Street on the city’s Eastside to find seven, eight times a week,” Shaffer said, 17 out how they’ve been affected by homelessagreed to become clients of CityNet, which ness. The goal was not to pitch any specific enters clients’ info into a unified computer solutions, just to listen. The good news is there’s new state money program that allows the multiple agencies dealing with them to share notes as to who to deal with homelessness. The county is doing what. Of the 17 clients, nine have received $9 million last year and is slated made “street exits,” he said, meaning six to get another $4 million this year. Local have found permanent housing and three governments found themselves competing have found temporary accommodations. among one another for the first grant; the While such numbers may seem small, second was structured to place a premium they’re dramatic enough in the homeless on cooperation. outreach world to inspire the expansion of Shaffer and his colleagues got a warm such efforts to the 600 and 700 blocks of reception from the mayor and councilState Street. members. Councilmember Michael Jordan The ultimate goal, Shaffer stated, was joked that Shaffer’s presentation sounded the development of more shelter beds like “the fourth 10-year plan I’ve heard in and more affordable housing units. Get- the last 30 years.” More seriously, he said ting there, he said, requires political will, City Hall could have done a much better job finesse, and some serious listening. In the inserting itself to reduce some of the neighpast few months, he stated, SB ACT has borhood backlash that erupted in response conducted 23 interviews with major play- to previous housing proposals. “Sometimes, ers in the community. They’ve convened we’re our own worst enemy,” he said. n

2020

SB ACT’s Jeff Shaffer Shares Small Successes and Big Plans

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Rotterdam Philharmonic Orchestra LAHAV SHANI conductor & piano

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FEB. 20-27, 2020

Goleta Union Going Green

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Join us at The New Vic Theatre for five days of outstanding Jewish cinema including feature films, shorts, documentaries, guest speakers, and engaging discussions.

gram implemented last year and the installation of interior LED lighting in 2011 and low-flush urinals in 2013. The plan also incorporates an Educational Specifications Plan (Ed Specs) that was adopted last year. It is intended to guide design professionals on the educational and programmatic needs of the district— district all 15 properties on 120 acres spanning the Goleta Valley and serving nearly 4,000 students and their families in addition to more than 700 employees. It recommends at least one student design space for STEAM classes in each elementary school, for example. “I attended some of the input sessions with the parents, and it was great to hear their creativity and also their pragmatism,” Boardmember Luz Reyes-Martin said. “We are not stepping into this blindly,” Board President Sholeh Jahangir said. “We are very well-informed about what the needs of our community are, and I think this shows us that we are leading the future. We are providing a space where future minds will be challenged and enlightened.” —Delaney Smith

DEL AN EY SMITH

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he Goleta Union School District launched a massive project Wednesday night: its first-ever Facilities Master Plan, with sustainability at the heart of the plan. “I have goosebumps right now because this is so symbolic and important,” Superintendent Donna Lewis said. “With this document, we are going to be able to take Goleta Union School District to the next level.” The Board of Trustees unanimously adopted the 247-page document without much deliberation; the plan has been in the works for years. Solar energy, solar power storage, e-vehicle charging, exterior LED lighting, and bioswales are all incorporated into the Facilities Master Plan. The board’s approval of the plan is the first action step toward what has been a long journey toward sustainability. The Facilities Master Plan serves to unite the district’s past efforts and future goals into one package. Nearly a year ago, they formally passed a climate-change resolution that recognized the district’s pushes towards sustainability so far, such as the food composting pro-

JunÍpero Serra Hall Historic in Style, Timeless in Feel

Sex Ed Packs School Board TALK ABOUT SEX: Hundreds mobbed Tuesday’s school board meeting on proposed sex ed curricula.

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undreds of parents and grandparents mobbed the Santa Barbara Unified School District Tuesday night in a public comment face-off over the district’s proposed sexual education curriculum. This was the second meeting in two weeks in which the curriculum, Teen Talk, dominated the conversation. But this time there were more than just critics at the podium. Several supporters, including teens at local high schools, also spoke in support of Teen Talk. “As a young Latina, I didn’t grow up with the opportunities to talk about these topics so freely,” said Daniela Elias, a sophomore at San Marcos High School who urged the board to adopt the curriculum. “I definitely didn’t have the resources to learn about healthy relationships, sexual or not.” The topic was highly contested, with some adults, including grandparent Helene Willrich, directly addressing the students: “Sorry, guys, I guess you all know everything in 10th grade.” At the core of the issue is that most parents against Teen Talk feel it doesn’t allow them enough of a role in their child’s sexual education and that it is not age appropriate. The vast number of speakers were

vehemently against Teen Talk and instead embraced a curriculum called Heart, in which the student interviews their parents about the lesson materials at home. One parent, Justin Shores, said he even removed his children from the district because of Teen Talk, although it has not been adopted and parents can opt their child out of any or all parts of sex education, regardless of which curriculum is adopted. The district must adopt a new curriculum as soon as it can because the current one is out of compliance with state law — the California Healthy Youth Act (CHYA) — which was approved in 2016 and requires school districts to provide students with “integrated, comprehensive, accurate, and unbiased comprehensive sexual health and HIV prevention education.” The Independent could not verify whether Heart is in line with CHYA standards, but Teen Talk is one of six stateapproved curricula, despite its critics saying otherwise. The topic is still in public dialogue phase, and there is no date scheduled for a board vote to adopt Teen Talk or any other curriculum. —DS


NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D

Bill Bryson

More Beds for Psych Facility?

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Author of one of Time Magazine’s All-Time 100 Best Nonfiction Books

ER IC K M ADR I D

he county’s long-overwhelmed Psychiatric Health Facility (PHF) could handle as many as 24 patients with acute mental illnesses at any given time instead of just 16 — as has long been the case — if a resolution adopted unanimously on Tuesday by the Santa Barbara County Board of Supervisors were to eventually bear fruit. The severe shortage of PHF beds — reserved for patients deemed to pose a danger to themselves or others — has 5150 BLUES: County Supervisor Gregg Hart pushed a bedeviled mental-health providers in the resolution to allow the county’s lockdown psych unit county for at least 30 years and has occa- to expand from 16 to 24 beds. sioned outraged reports by numerous county grand juries. Causing this shorthealth-care planners to seek a waiver to age has not been a limit of physical space these federal rules. How state officials will so much as it’s been federal rules designed respond is the subject of much speculation to prevent the warehousing of people with but no certainty. Jan Winter, a longtime member of the mental illnesses in large institutions. These rules do not allow federal compensation for Behavioral Wellness Commission, said acute-care patients in stand-alone institu- 159 county mental-health patients are curtions (those not attached to a hospital) with rently housed in institutions outside county boundaries at a cost of $1,000 a day. If the more than 16 beds. At the prodding of mental-health advo- rules were changed to expand the size of the cates and with the support of Behavioral county’s PHF, she said, far more could be Wellness Director Alice Gleghorn, the treated closer to home and family at far less supervisors signed a resolution urging state cost to the taxpayer. —Nick Welsh

TVSB Sues County Supes and Cox

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VSB, Santa Barbara County’s only public-access TV station, is battling the County Board of Supervisors and Cox Communications to keep its $1 million endowment in a heels-dug-in legal feud. A trial set for March 2 in Judge Colleen Sterne’s courtroom will decide if the $1 million should be redistributed or if TVSB should remain the beneficiary. The Public Education Capi- ON-AIR PERSONALITIES: Heidi Stilwell and Rebecca Brand tal Endowment was part of prepare to record Around the World in the TVSB studio. a franchise agreement Cox Communications made with the county in 2001. The Board of Super- tions, or teaching youth and seniors about visors formed a separate nonprofit cor- media literacy in the digital age, TVSB plays poration that year to oversee the funds. a meaningful role in the lives of many local The agreement worked without issue for residents,” said its executive director, Erik 16 years, until the franchise agreement Davis. “This is … why we have worked tirebetween the county and Cox expired in 2017 lessly for the last 10 months to find partnerdue to new cable franchising laws. ship and compromise in lieu of litigation.” It was at this point the county allowed The parties did not come to a comproits agreement with TVSB to dissipate along mise, though. “Our thoughts are that TVSB with the franchise agreement, despite TVSB provides a service, and its operational agreecontinuing to operate and provide the same ment with the county expired in 2017,” said services. The county and Cox are asking Michael Ghizzoni, legal counsel for the the courts to redistribute the endowment county. “TVSB cannot compel the county money for government and emergency to buy its services, but they can present any communication projects, but TVSB is argu- business proposition to the county, and ing that the endowment was never intended that’s what most other vendors do instead for those purposes and that it should remain of litigation.” the beneficiary. Cox’s attorney, Richard Patch of San “Whether it’s advocating for freedom of Francisco, did not respond to the Indepenspeech, providing true local programming, dent’s request for comment. supporting over 250 nonprofit organiza—DS

Editor’s Note: Independent columnist Jerry Roberts hosts a show on TVSB, on which Delaney Smith and other Independent reporters have appeared.

The Body: A Guide for Occupants Mon, Mar 2 / 7:30 PM / Granada Theatre Tickets start at $25 / $15 UCSB students A Granada facility fee will be added to each ticket price

“Bryson is fascinated by everything, and his curiosity is infectious.” The New York Times Book Review The bestselling author of A Short History of Nearly Everything, Bill Bryson takes us on a head-to-toe tour of the human body that is guaranteed to provide a deeper understanding of the miracle that is life in general and you in particular.

Brian Greene

Until the End of Time: Mind, Matter and Our Search for Meaning in an Evolving Universe Mon, Mar 9 / 7:30 PM / Granada Theatre Tickets start at $25 / $15 UCSB students A Granada facility fee will be added to each ticket price

“Capable of untangling the mysteries of the universe, with a knack for clearly explaining it all to the rest of us.” Wired Celebrated theoretical physicist Brian Greene takes us on a breathtaking journey from the big bang to the end of time as he invites us to ponder meaning in the face of this unimaginable expanse.

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Opinions

angry poodle barbecue

Dogs Rolling in the Mud

WELCOME TO OUTLANDIA: The good news

is that none of us need ever be alone. At least until next Tuesday. With election season now hitting its final, fevered, flame-out frenzy, our mailboxes are always full. At the end of every day, there’s someone there to greet us. But given the tone and tenor of the messages enclosed, I’m thinking of getting a restraining order. I’d rather be stalked. Perhaps the most flamboyant are the hit pieces directed against 3rd District Supervisor Joan Hartmann — now seeking her second term — paid for by the Santa Barbara County Republican Party on behalf of her enfeebled challenger, Bruce Porter, whose plasticity with the facts is exceeded only by the extremity of his rhetoric. About the worst thing anyone can say about Hartmann is she’s really nice. But the cold, hard reality is that Hartmann is tougher than adobe dirt. As a supervisor, she works her ass off, listens to everyone, and typically asks the smartest questions in the room. She has to. Hartmann represents not only the most impossible district — which includes such wildly divergent communities as Goleta, Isla Vista, and Santa Ynez — but politically the most important. Whichever way the 3rd District blows, so blows the county. In other words, it’s for all the marbles. With redistricting right around the corner, the county Republican Party is rightly concerned how the district maps will be redrawn

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and whether they — the Grand Old Party — will become even more irrelevant than the current occupant of the White House has already rendered them. Local oil companies worry whether their proposals to drill the hell out of Cat Canyon — generating 700,000 metric tons of greenhouse gases a year in the process — will get past “Go” with Hartmann on the board. Although Hartmann is legally prevented from expressing any opinion on these proposals until they come before the supervisors — such votes qualify as quasi-judicial decisions — her planning commissioner, John Parke, has asked some of the most demanding, challenging, skeptical, impertinent, obnoxious, and creative questions of both the oil companies and county energy planners. As a result, the Republican Party has already raised $110,000 from various and sundry oil companies with interests in Santa Barbara County to pay for hit pieces savaging Hartmann. Of that, the party has already spent $60,000, mostly on mailers featuring unflattering photographs of Hartmann caught in mid-blink. By Election Day next week, I expect their piggy bank to be spent. That’s a lot; but then, Big Oil is on a political spending spree. Statewide, the industry has spent nearly $4 million on legislative races, more than twice as much as its closest competitor, the Association of Realtors, which, by the way, has spent $580,000 on hit pieces smearing local Assembly candidates Cathy Murillo and Steve Bennett.

FEBRUARY 27, 2020

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Hartmann supported a resolution supporting the Green New Deal, and naturally, the oil companies don’t like that. If the local GOP wants to call the Green New Deal “extremist” or even “socialist” on the oil industry’s behalf — as it did — that’s fine. But to assert — as these mailers do — that Hartmann somehow wants to “seize our gas-powered cars” transcends mere hyperventilation and enters the realm of bad science fiction. Clearly, someone has lost their marbles. To be kind, the local Republican Party — and the oil companies — find themselves in desperate straits. In endorsing Porter, they are backing a candidate who left the party about a year ago. Why Porter did this could be a genuinely interesting story. But when we called him months ago to talk about it, the telephone line mysteriously went dead. This radio silence manifested itself even before we exposed Porter’s schemes to deliberately and systematically suppress voter turnout

in Isla Vista, typically a reliable wellspring of young, idealistic, green-leaning, Democratic Party–affiliated votes. As a result, we’ve had a hard time determining who the real Bruce Porter actually is. Is he the environmental alternative he claims to be with I.V. voters, in favor of using oil as a transitional energy supply — “farm to fork” in his vernacular — to pave the way to a carbon-free future? The problem with this song and dance is that none of the oil companies have done a

thing to put it into practice. Ironically, Hartmann actually has. When oil companies

objected that county zoning prevented them from considering solar alternatives in Cat Canyon — which I am told holds one of the richest mother lodes of oil in the whole state — Hartmann and the supervisors voted to expand county zoning to accommodate industrial-scale solar installations beyond the Cuyama Valley, now the only place they’re allowed. Porter has also accused Hartmann of bleeding revenues from various school districts because of her anti-oil policies. But here are the facts. To the extent there’s been any loss of revenues, it’s because the Plains All American pipeline rupture five years ago effectively shut down all onshore oil production off the Gaviota Coast. A Santa Barbara jury found that pipeline rupture was caused by criminal negligence by Plains itself. The pipeline has yet to be repaired or replaced, though Plains has submitted plans for the latter. Making matters worse, Plains had adamantly refused to equip its pipeline with automatic-shutoff safety valves, equipment found on pretty much every other pipeline in the country. If Bruce Porter acknowledged any of this, I somehow missed it. If school districts have suffered because of this, it’s clearly Plains’s fault, not Joan Hartmann’s. To suggest otherwise is kind of like saying Hartmann will “seize our gas-powered cars.” —Nick Welsh


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Mike launched policies that raised air quality in New York City to the highest levels in fifty years. He has created partnerships that shut down more than half the nation’s coal-fired power plants and has led the transition to clean energy.

• Help make college more affordable to students nationwide — especially those in underserved communities who are the first in their families to ever attend college

Job Creator

Mike led his diverse city through a new era of progress and prosperity – creating 400,000 new jobs and new anti-poverty programs that became national models.

Reducing Gun Violence

Mike has taken a stand for our children’s safety and fought the NRA. He helped pass commonsense gun laws that save lives in states around the country.

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FEBRUARY 27, 2020

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obituaries

To submit obituaries for publication, please call (805) 965-5205 or email obits@independent.com

Jon Gathercole

Frank Delaun Kelsey Cox 1934 - 2020

7/11/1948 - 3/1/2019

REMEMBERING JON GATHERCOLE July 11, 1948 to March 1, 2019 His legacy: He made us smile, He made us laugh, He made us happy. Let us resolve to make others happy, to keep Jon's legacy alive. Jon's legacy survives in our hearts and through his Bright Star Foundation at BrightStarGives.org

Michael Bean

Gary Michael Bean came to Isla Vista in the late 1970s and began his life-long dedication to community, sustainability, learning, positive communication and sharing. Michael was an enthusiastic supporter of the experimental “Human Bean” farm in IV. A prescient quote by Michael appeared in The Daily Nexus (Oct. 8, 1979): “Agri-business and economics take such a small view of what’s valuable…if that could change… growing organic food would be more profitable.” Michael created his own volunteer positions in IV. For many years, he maintained the re-use and recycle project known as the “Free Box.” He also took up one-man street cleaning, as he rode his bicycle through town with his tools of grabber, gloves, and buckets. Michael graduated from the first “Community Emergency Response Team” (CERT) training in 2010, given by UCSB’s Emergency Management and Continuity department. He enjoyed his friends and deep discussions, including with members of his “Diamond Heart” group. Michael passed away on February 4, 2020. His friends and community will miss him greatly. Celebration of Michael’s Life will be held Thursday February 27, 4:30 pm in “Little Acorn Park” in Isla Vista. 18

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Frank Delaun Kelsey Cox, loving husband to Pamela Slagle-Cox and father of two, passed away peacefully at home on Jan 18, 2020, at age 86. A 59 year resident of Santa Barbara, Frank will be remembered by the community as a beloved Professor of Psychology at SB City College (1961 – 1989), a patron of the Santa Barbara Symphony, a nearpermanent and sometimes vocal fixture on the tennis courts of the Santa Barbara Tennis Club, and as an actor in the 1980’s under the direction of Pope Freeman at the Lobero Theater where he performed in a number of Neil Simon plays including his favorite role as Felix Unger in The Odd Couple. He will be remembered by his family and friends for his affability, sense of humor and love of life. While teaching was his true passion, he considered himself a ‘jack of all trades, master of none’ whose interests included tennis, skiing, sailing, camping, motorcycles, cars, travel and more. He will be remembered as a loving husband of 43 years to Pamela, with whom he enjoyed a life of love and adventure. He will be remembered as an accomplished author, who published six titles, including his marriage and family textbook, ‘Human Intimacy’, which went to eleven editions before being handed over to another author. Although proud of that work, his most gratifying writing came in recent years in the form of the 72 interviews he conducted with Santa Barbara WWII veterans. These articles were published in the Santa Barbara News Press over several years and have just been released in book form: ‘Stories of Service, Santa Barbara Veterans’. He will be remembered as an avid and adventurous traveler whose footprints may be found across the world: from overland travel through Afghanistan, trekking with Dani tribe in Irian Jaya, motorcycling in Europe, America, and Africa to finding a tennis match in Ouagadougou Burkina Fasso. Frank received a BA in Psy-

FEBRUARY 27, 2020

chology from Occidental College, after which he served two years in the Army as a medic in Germany. Determined to make the most of his time there, he learned the German language, ran hurdles for the All Army track team, read and travelled extensively. He then returned to Occidental and earned his Masters Degree, and completed his doctorate at UCSB. He is survived by his wife Pam; his son Randall and his family: wife Linda and sons Alexander, Brandon and Cameron; his daughter Michelle and her family, Stephanie (Brian), Max, Isabelle and Jake. And most recently two great granddaughters, Harley and Atlas. He is also survived by his first wife Brigitte, who remains an integral part of the family. A Celebration of Frank’s life will be held at 4pm on Saturday, March 28, 2020, at the La Cumbre Country Club. Memorial donations to Scholarship Foundation of Santa Barbara, Santa Barbara Symphony or Boys & Girls Club of Santa Barbara are preferred in lieu of flowers.

Mary Lou Brace

7/24/1935 - 1/30/2020

MARY LOU BRACE died peacefully on January 30, 2020 at the age of 84. She was born in Jacksonville, Illinois on July 24, 1935, the only child of Louis and Marie Neirman. Mary Lou met her husband, William A. Brace, while he was a student at Illinois College. They married shortly after meeting and their love and devotion reigned until her death 66 years, four children and ten grandchildren later. Their eldest child was born during Bill’s undergraduate years in Illinois and their second child was born during their Marine Corps years in Santa Ana, CA. When Bill completed his military service, they headed back to Illinois so Bill could begin law school. Once there, they realized they were meant to be Californians. They immediately turned around, landed in the San Francisco area, where Bill attended and graduated from law school. Bill was hired by the local Santa Barbara law firm known at the time as Cavalletto, Webster, Mullen

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and McCaughey on Victoria Street. Reliable sources have reported that when the firm’s lawyers met Mary Lou, pregnant with child number three, there was no doubt they wanted Bill to join their ranks. Mary Lou and Bill moved to Santa Barbara and have called it home since 1961. They completed their family in 1964 when their youngest child was born. Mary Lou and Bill embraced their new city, joined the Jaycees and Jayceettes, as well as other charitable organizations, always giving back to the community. As a result, they made lifelong friends. Mary Lou was a member and served as president of the Assistance League of Santa Barbara, served on the Juvenile Justice Commission, volunteered at Hillside House, and had a special place in her heart for the Santa Barbara Zoo. She was a member of the local sorority Sigma Tau Psi, Camp Menopause, her Birthday Club and the Los Fiesteros Dance Club. She took tap dancing lessons and was known to dance the night away. The family spent summers at their cabin in Idaho on the Middle Fork of the Salmon River. That destination still remains a family favorite but Mary Lou and Bill also traveled the world together and with friends. She recently spoke of their trip on the QE2 with a flight home on the Concord as one of her favorite adventures. With her children grown and out of the house, Mary Lou and a couple of friends started LUV YA, a company that delivered gifts from parents to students at UCSB. Though the business was successful, she decided to quit when the work got in the way of the couple’s travel. She remained an active member in her book club and her bridge group until her final days and could be seen dining with Bill and friends at Harry’s several times a week. Family gatherings at their home happened spontaneously and often. There was never a day that she couldn’t feed a crowd with what was in the refrigerator. She is survived by her husband and their children, Sandra Brace Zakis (Patrick), Robert Brace (Fernanda), Barbara Brace and William B. Brace (Meredith) and their grandchildren, William Zakis, Ryan Zakis, Stephanie Zakis, Walker Brace, Charlotte Brace, Bolden Brace, Georgia Brace, Augustine Brace, Catalina Brace and Magdalena Brace. Mary Lou was the brightest light and the warmest heart in

any room. Come party with Mary Lou one more time as we celebrate her life on March 21, 2020 from 2 PM – 4 PM at The University Club of Santa Barbara. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made in her name to the Santa Barbara Zoo or The Assistance League of Santa Barbara.

Charles Foley

10/21/1938 - 1/31/2020

Charles “Chick” Foley died peacefully in his sleep on January 31, 2020 having been with his family most of the day. Chick was born at home in Hyde Park MA (Boston) on Oct 21, 1938, the son of Audrey Ethel Foley and James J. Foley He joined the Air Force on June 29, 1956 at the age of 17 and was trained as an Air Traf Traffic Controller and stationed in Chambley and Chateauroux France. When he returned home he went to work for the Federal Aviation Administration, a profession that he was truly cut out for. He stayed in California ending his career as the Air Traffic Manager at the SBA tower/tracon for 24 years with a total of 48 years serving the flying public. He developed a love for tennis while living here and played at Cathedral Oaks Tennis Club with a group of men affectionately known as “The Grumpy Old Men” Chick and his wife, Shirley loved travel and crossed oceans a couple dozen times always in awe of the sites they beheld. Chick is survived by his loving wife Shirley of 43 yeas, his children, Wendi VanderMeer, Kelli Foley, Staci Marengo, Patrick Foley, Jennifer Miller and stepchildren Harold W Huber III (Tres)and Eric Huber as well as his grandchildren Ava, Lida, Mia, Jane, Elsa, Audrey, Flynn, Luella, Chloe, Griffin, Paige, Tristan and Lainey. Chick was a loving, caring, generous man with a sense of humor til the very end. He will be terribly missed. In lieu of flowers please make a donation in memory of Chick to VNA Health who made his last few days as comfortable as possible


obituaries Paula Duncan McDonald 12/5/1936 - 1/31/2020

Paula Jane Duncan was born in the tiny town of Wink, Texas. Her parents divorced when she was young and Paula’s childhood consisted of multiple and frequent moves between Texas, Vermont and California. Her fondest childhood memories were of spending hours at a time in the children’s reading room in the Los Angeles Public Library, and of going to movies, both of which she could walk to alone as a six year old from the family’s apartment in downtown Los Angeles. Paula eventually lived with her father in San Diego before moving to Los Angeles to attend college in the late 50s. She worked to support herself and graduated with honors from Mount St. Mary’s College with a degree in English. She met Jim McDonald in 1959, and when Jim died in 2017 they had been married for 58 years. They were best friends, companions and confidants. They had three children, Anna, David (deceased) and Catherine. Jim showered Paula with beautiful gifts, and they were known for their flare, generosity and graciousness. They lived in the San Fernando Valley before moving to Casa Dorinda in Montecito in 2012. Paula had several careers over the years, including homemaker, social worker, teacher, industrial real estate broker, psychologist and author. In the last ten years of life she completed two novels, both of which were set in West Texas and which loosely incorporated aspects of her family’s Texas roots. Paula loved her husband and life partner Jim above all else. Secondary loves included movies, reading, poetry and foot rubs. She was sophisticated and stylish, yet informal, frank and nononsense. She was well-known for modifying restaurant menus and clothing garments to suit her style and taste, and disliked things she considered fussy including violin music, frilly bows, hearts and meringue. After a long illness, she died peacefully with close family sitting vigil.

To submit obituaries for publication, please call (805) 965-5205 or email obits@independent.com Paula is survived by daughters Catherine Brunner and Anna Harbert, son-in-law Eberhard, seven grandchildren and thirteen great grandchildren. In lieu of flowers, Paula requested that donations be made to the Scholarship Foundation of Santa Barbara – “Casa Fund” – to help support Casa Dorinda employees: Scholarship Foundation of SB, P.O. Box 3620 SB, CA 93130

Gary Forssell

Gary Forssell, beloved son, husband, father, grandpa, and brother went home to be with his Lord and Savior, surrounded by members of his loving family on January 8th, 2020. Born in Northern California to his parents, Roger and Helen,Gary’s life represented integrity, love, and kindness. His birth was announced to his highly decorated pilot father while on a mission, with, “Your son has landed.” Gary spent his summers on his Grandparents’ ranch where his love for animals, the outdoors, and drawing flourished. His love for fishing and plein art continued and his comments of, “One more cast” while fishing or, “I need just a few more minutes” while painting, became predictable when it came time to pack up his gear and head home. After earning his Doctor of Pharmacy degree at UCSF Medical Center, he traveled to Hawaii for an internship where he enjoyed surfing and met his future wife, Cheryl. He was drafted while on their honeymoon. He served in the 1st Air Cavalry and earned the Bronze Star while serving in Vietnam. After successfully completing his military service, Gary and Cheryl settled in Santa Barbara where he worked as a pharmacist at Plaza Drug and Payless. They next lived in Mammoth where he was the Chief Pharmacist at Northern lnyo Hospital. He spent his weekends hiking, skiing, and fishing. He enjoyed adventure, a good laugh, and traveling. They later moved back to Santa Barbara to start their family. Gary was the manager at Scolari’s Pharmacy where

his integrity was valued and his wisdom was treasured. Upon retirement, he devoted himself to his art, hiking with his buddies, Barry and Joe, and fishing with his brother-in-law, Ron. Gary is survived by his wife Cheryl of 51 years, his four children, Heather (Jeremy), Holly (Dean), Heidi (Scott), and Trevor (Bonnie), eight grandchildren, and his siblings, Lynn, Suzanne, and Collin. A very grateful thank you to his many wonderful caregivers, especially Pablo, Enrique, Jonathon, and Elizabeth, his hospice nurse, as well as the team at Katerina’s Assisted Living Home. A memorial service will be held on March 14th at 3:00 pm at First United Methodist Church, 305 East Anapamu Street, Santa Barbara, CA. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to The School of Extended Learning Art Trust Account #770130, where Gary loved to take art classes.

KATZ, Trevor Marshall Green 2/26/2003 - 2/3/2020

Trevor Marshall Green Katz was with us for almost 17 years. He made the most of his time, connecting with many, and adored by his family. A gentle spirit with a wry wit, Trevor was one of a kind and will be greatly missed. His memory and generous spirit will live on. Trevor was born on February 26, 2003, in Torrance, California. When he was three, his family moved to the Santa Barbara/Goleta area. Trevor had many happy days at Goleta Valley Nursery School, Kellogg Elementary School, Goleta Valley Junior High, and Dos Pueblos High School. Trevor had many friends. He loved to learn and to

help others. Trevor was a Cub Scout, with Pack 36, for 3 years. He happily worked every Kellogg School event he could, be it Movie Days or Science Night, and then returned after graduation every year to help at Carnival. He volunteered for the GUSD gifted and GVNS summer schools. He loved being an office assistant at GVJH, and returned after graduation to assist with Regatta. He enjoyed community service. One of Trevor’s greatest passions was Safety Town. He first attended at the age of five. He became a counselor the summer after 7th grade, spending his next 3 summers there. Nothing gave him greater pleasure than working with the incoming kindergarteners, serving as a role model to the students and other counselors, and singing silly songs. Trevor was a proud member of the Dos Pueblos Engineering Academy and the cross country and track teams. He was an academic mentor to the engineering freshmen during his sophomore year, and served as a math tutor, proudly wearing his PASS tshirt. His classmates and teammates, as well as those he tutored, describe him as sweet, kind, funny, thoughtful, tough, never one to complain, and always with a smile on his face. Trevor began working as a retail specialist at the Santa Barbara Zoo in the summer of 2019, and enjoyed the friendships and camaraderie of his fellow employees. Trevor was diagnosed with biliary atresia, a rare medical condition, shortly after birth. Complications of this disease led to Trevor’s sudden death on February 3, 2020. But he never once let it hold him back from all that life had to offer. When Trevor left us, he was doing what he loved, with those he loved. Trevor is survived by his parents Nicole and Jared; his older brother Owen; his younger sister Justine; his aunts and uncles Lisa Green, Deborah and Scott Suler, Aaron and Michele Katz; cousins Jack, Mitch, Allison, Elizabeth and Jordan; and grandparents Gil and Diane Green, Mary Katz and Art and Maggie Katz. Trevor was laid to rest at Goleta Cemetery. A celebration of his life was held on Sunday, February 23, at Dos Pueblos High School. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made in Trevor’s honor to Safety Town of Santa Barbara County, sbsafetytown.org, P.O. Box 146, Santa Barbara, CA 93102-4016.

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Frederick Edwin Lambert 7/22/1943-2/14/2020

Frederick Edwin Lambert, age 76, died on February 14, 2020, in Santa Barbara , California. Fred was born in Los Angeles, Calif, on July 22, 1943 adopted by Clarence and lone Lambert. Freddie was raised in Montecito and Summerland, later moving to their home in Paradise to attend Santa Ynez Valley Union High School, graduating in 1962. Fred was in the Operating Engineers first working with the family business, Lambert Construction, then with Granite Construction. After a 43 year career, he retired in 2005. In 1971, Fred married Roban Rennie, and loving the Santa Ynez Valley as he did, they moved there in 1972 first living in Santa Ynez, then moving to Los Olivos, where they raised their two sons. He was a very social and active man, enjoying most sports, hunting, cars, attending car shows, spending time with his family and friends. He had a fabulous sense of humor, was a terrific dancer and LOVED a good party! Fred was a wonderful husband, great father and adoring grandfather Fred is survived by his wife, Roban, sons Freddie of Lompoc, Michael (Mindy) of Reno, Nevada. Grandchildren, Jake Lambert , Lompoc, Madelynn and Monty Lambert, Reno Nevada. Sister, Chyrel Owens, brother-in-law, Michael Rennie (Jennifer), Buellton, nieces, Danielle, Katelyn and Heather Rennie. Nephew, Matthew Owens, San Jose. He is also survived by the Lash and Shaw families of Santa Barbara and Carpinteria and numerous friends. The family would like to sincerely thank Dr. Mariwalla, Dr. Kendle, Dr. Holve, Dr. Ashlock, Dr. Perrin, Dr. Nguyen and Dr. Lam of Sansum Medical Clinic and The Ridley Tree Cancer Center as well as the nursing staff, for their outstanding care and support of Fred. We also like to thank all of our dear friends and family for the loving care and support during his illness. It is so deeply appreciated. A celebration party will be held at the Ranch Club Mobile Estates Clubhouse, 330 W Hwy 246, Buellton, on Sunday March 22, 2020, at 1p.m. In lieu of flowers, contributions can be made in his name, to your favorite charity.

FEBRUARY 27, 2020

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obituaries

To submit obituaries for publication, please call (805) 965-5205 or email obits@independent.com

Rudolph Ray Mendoza 12/8/1930 - 12/19/2019

On Thursday, December 19, Rudy passed away peacefully with his family by his side. Rudy was born in Santa Barbara to Jess and Lucy (Grijalva) Mendoza on December 8, 1930. Rudy leaves behind his loving wife of 60 years, Dora (Curlango) Mendoza; three children: Luci (Dean) Carr, Christina Mendoza, and son, David (Maureen). Six grandchildren: Jacob Ortiz (Analise) Jasmine Elbek (Vaughn), Sam Carr, Hallie, Tristan and Russell Biolley; and three great-grandchildren: Ryleigh Ortiz, Reese and Beau Elbek, nephews, Mike and Mark Azzara, adopted brother, Rick Garcia. He is predeceased by his daughter, Lorinda Rae and sister, Gloria Roesch. Rudy attended Santa Barbara Catholic High and graduated in the class of 1951. From 1951 to 1954, he served in the US Airforce as Airman First Class during the Korean War and was stationed in Germany. After honorably completing his service, he returned home to Santa Barbara. He then began his career with GTE. It was there that he met and subsequently married his wife, Dori. Shortly after starting with GTE, he became involved in the Labor Movement and became an activist with the Communication Workers of America. In 1971 he was elected to the National Executive Board of CWA which took him and his family to Washington, D.C. During that time he became a world traveler and forged many lifelong friendships with special friends. He remained active in the labor movement even after his retirement from CWA in 2000. Shortly after his retirement he returned to his hometown of Santa Barbara where he enjoyed spending time with friends and family. He especially liked camping at the beach where he had many shared memories of extraordinary and easy-going happy times. One of his favorite hobbies was restoring his shiny, bright yellow 1953 Ford F100 pick-up truck which he entered into many car shows with his son, David and grandson, Jacob. He will be always 20

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be remembered as a proud and loving husband, father, uncle and grandfather who loved to tell a humorous story and share a conversation about a wide variety of topics from world events to mischievous childhood memories. He was dearly loved by his family and will be greatly missed. Special thanks to all the nurses and Dr. Gupta, of Ridley-Tree Cancer Center. Beth-Ann, Marlene and Rosaria of Visiting Nurse and Hospice. We are forever grateful for your kindness and care of our precious husband and father. In lieu of flowers, please consider a donation to Ridley Tree Cancer Center or Visiting Nurse & Hospice Assoc. A memorial service will be held on Friday, March 6 at 11:00 am at Welch-RyceHaider Funeral Chapel, 15 E. Sola Street, Santa Barbara. A celebration of life will be held after at a location to be announced.

John LeBaron Shellabarger

9/26/1932 - 2/19/2020

If you knew him, you knew him through one of his many volunteer activities (BoyScouts: he was Scoutmaster of Troop 105, a volunteer at Mission Council and later Los Padres Council, Sierra Club and a backpacking trek leader; the USFS Los Padres Forest and guardian of Chumash rock art), as a 31-year employee of Applied Magnetics Corporation as its chief chemist, where he developed several patented testing procedures, as a neighbor, or a parishioner and singer in the choir at St. Raphael’s Catholic Church. He was an expert on the hiking trails of our local Los Padres National Forest, particularly the many backpacking trails of the San Rafael Wilderness. As he lost his eyesight and capacity to hike those beloved trails, we could see his soul fade too.

FEBRUARY 27, 2020

We knew him as Husband, Father, Grandfather. He is survived by his wife Aida, his children Therese Shellabarger, John Shellabarger, Maria Nissen and Karen Shellabarger and his grandchildren, Daniella Nissen, Rebecca Nissen and Chandler Shellabarger. John was born on September 26, 1932, in Oxnard, California. He was an adventurer from the start. His parents Francis (“Spike”) and Lorena were living in Santa Barbara at the time of his birth, but the doctor was at St. John’s Hospital in Oxnard and his mother insisted that her doctor take care of the delivery. A drive in their Model A was just in time. Shortly after his birth, his family moved to the Porterville and Lindsay areas of central California, where he grew up during the Great Depression and World War II. During that time, his family expanded to 3 brothers and a sister. John spent much of his youth in the Sequoias and Sierra Nevada foothills, especially one of his favorite places, the Middle Fork of the Kaweah River. After graduating from Porterville High School, he hitched a ride on an asparagus truck to Los Angeles to look for work, an event that engendered his lifelong love of asparagus. Shortly after arriving in Los Angeles he was called up by the Naval Reserves during the Korean War. Following his Honorable Discharge he came back to California and attended the University of California at Berkeley where he earned a Bachelor of Science Degree in chemistry. At Berkeley he met and married his first wife, Donna, and had his first daughter, Therese Lynn. When Donna passed away, he had a young daughter to raise by himself. A workmate’s wife who was babysitting Therese had a niece who just arrived to visit her from Merida, Mexico. Through this connection, he met his future wife Aida and fell in love. She was his lifelong companion and in the last years of his life, his unflinchingly dedicated caregiver. They were married in 1960 and had a son, John Francis, in 1961. Shortly thereafter, the family moved to Santa Barbara and had two daughters, Maria Lee and Karen Dianne. The family moved to Goleta after John got a job at Applied Magnetics Corporation as its first chemist. When John Francis became a Cub Scout and later Boy Scout, John began his long career as a volunteer and supporter of Scouting. His many accomplishments and honors included Cub Scouts Assistant Packmaster and Webelos leader with Pack 27 at Hollister

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Elementary School, Assistant and later long time Scoutmaster of Boy Scout Troop 105 at St. Raphael’s Catholic Church. He also volunteered extensively for projects for the Boy Scouts Mission Council, which later became Los Padres Council. His efforts were recognized with the Boy Scouts’ Silver Beaver Award for Distinguished Service to Youth, several Awards of Merit for Outstanding Service to Boyhood, and he also completed Wood Badge, Boy Scouts’ weeklong leadership course. John also taught at Boy Scouts’ high adventure course, Poison Oak, for many years, specializing in trek planning. As scoutmaster of Troop 105, John was renowned for his high adventure backpacking trips. Many who were boys on his trips have told him how important an adventure he led was to them. As Scoutmaster, he organized and led many monthly weekend hikes throughout the Los Padres National Forest, winter hikes in Sequoia National Park, spring break hikes along the Sisquoc River in the San Rafael Wilderness and the annual summer High Sierra backpacking trips, including 5 treks up Mount Whitney. John was an advocate for backpacking and encouraged the families of the Scouts to participate in the backpacking adventures, including mothers and sisters of scouts at a time when the Boy Scout program was limited to males. Those who went backpacking with John often became ambassadors of backpacking themselves and developed a love of the outdoors that has continued throughout their lives. John continued to serve as Scoutmaster of Troop 105, even long after his son became an Eagle Scout; he was a volunteer with Boy Scouts for many years. He also continued his love for backpacking with whomever he could get together, regardless of experience, to share his knowledge and to go on a weeklong 50 mile hike in the Sierras or just a weekend trek along the Hurricane Deck in the Los Padres Forest. He also became a hiking guide and adventure trainer with the Sierra Club. John spent his retirement hiking and backpacking as often as he could, working on his many arts and craft projects and as a volunteer for the U.S. Forest Service as a rock art guardian or working at the headquarters sharing his knowledge of the local hiking trails. A memorial service will be planned for a date in the near future. In lieu of flowers, please donate to the Sierra Club or Visiting Nurses Association.

Erma Smith 3/8/1923 - 2/19/2020

Erma Smith passed away peacefully on February 19, 2020 at the age of 96 at Valle Verde in Santa Barbara, where she was an active and beloved resident for 17 years. Erma was born on March 8, 1923 in Kenesaw, Nebraska to John and Katie Finnigsmier as the seventh of nine children. She married Harold Smith on December 26, 1942 and moved to California after World War II. Guided by her strong faith, unflagging optimism and quick sense of humor, Erma lived her life in service of her community and those she loved. She raised four children, was a charter member of Faith Lutheran Church in Carpinteria, and served as president of the St. Francis Hospital Volunteer Guild in Santa Barbara. Erma and Harold had many adventures together during their two trips traveling around the world. Erma?s greatest joys, however, were closer to home: spending time with her family and friends, dancing, quilting, crosswords and gardening. She will be dearly missed. Erma was predeceased by Harold Smith, her husband of 58 years, and her sons Russell and Randy Smith. She is survived by daughters Carol Nishihara (Dave) and Barbara Smith, granddaughter Bonnie Nishihara (Chad), grandson Scott Nishihara (Bill), and greatgrandson Davy Forrester. A memorial service will be held on Monday, March 2, 2020 at 1:00 PM at Faith Lutheran Church, 1335 Vallecito Pl., Carpinteria, CA 93013. Arrangements are being made by Welch-Ryce-Haider.


obituaries Sheila Zimmerman 1/23/1939 - 2/20/2020

To submit obituaries for publication, please call (805) 965-5205 or email obits@independent.com Sergio Sanchez and their children Jamie and Hailee. The funeral mass will be held at the Old Mission Santa Barbara on Friday, February 28, 10:00 am with burial to follow at Santa Barbara Cemetery. Arrangements by Welch-Ryce-Haider

Kevin David Eliason 11/3/1940 - 2/8/2020 Sheila Zimmerman passed away peacefully surrounded by her family on 2/20/2020. Sheila grew up in Ontario, California where she met her future husband at a USO dance at March Air Force Base.  They were soon married and moved to San Luis Obispo where her husband attended Cal Poly University to study architecture, and she worked as a secretary at the school office.  After graduation, they decided to settle in Santa Barbara where she was an active member of the community for over 50 years.  Sheila and her late husband of 57 years, Jim, raised their family in SB and were very active in the Santa Barbara Yacht Club where they enjoyed sailing and everything that SB had to offer.  Sheila graduated from UCSB and earned her master’s degree in psychology and worked as a school counselor and in private practice for many years.  She dedicated herself to volunteering and was involved in school fundraising and multiple charities of which include Laguna Blanca School, Girls Inc., Calm and the S.B. Museum of Art. She was very proud of her work at Girls Inc. where she served on the board as well as board president.  She and her husband were very instrumental in the capital campaign and in the building of the Girls Inc. newer facility on Hollister Ave.  Sheila was passionate about raising girls up and teaching them that they could do anything no matter their circumstances, and to always be Strong, Smart and Bold. Sheila was a loving mother and grandmother and enjoyed spending time with her grandchildren at the zoo and the beach, as well as summers on their boat in Catalina with the family.  She will be greatly missed by all her friends and family that knew and loved her.  We take great comfort in the fact that she is at peace and that she has reunited with our dad and her true love, Jim.  She is survived by her son, Brian Zimmerman, his wife Barbi and their children Cuyler and Caylin.  Her daughter, Elaine Zimmerman-Roche, her husband Kieran and their children Connor and Declan.  Her niece Pamela Sanchez, her husband

Longtime public servant and decorated peace officer Kevin David Eliason, one of the first police officers hired in the newly incorporated city of Carpinteria, died Feb. 8 after a swift fight against an extremely rare cancer. Affectionately known as “Kevin Eleven,” he was 79 years old and died at home, surrounded by his loving family. A huge fan of old Westernthemed movies, television shows and western memorabilia, Kevin died with his boots on, as he wanted. Kevin was born Nov. 3, 1940, in Wisconsin but lived in Minnesota until the age of 13, when his family moved to Torrance. He was a 1958 graduate of Junipero Serra High School and earned an Associates Degree in Police Science from El Camino College. Kevin was a proud member of the United States Marines, serving as a reservist from 1960-65. He received an honorable discharge as a corporal for his military service. At the young age of 21, Kevin was hired in 1962 as a Police Officer for the Torrance Police Department. Just five years later, his life would change. In 1967, the newly incorporated City of Carpinteria in Santa Barbara County was hiring officers to build its own police force. Kevin and his best friend, John Frontado, were hired along with five others. Building the force from its infancy, the men became known as “The Magnificent Seven,” a reference to a popular western movie of the era. As a police officer in the small seaside town, Kevin found a community he loved. It was there that he coached his children in youth sports, was a Deacon in his church, and enjoyed the laid-back lifestyle of the beach. He was promoted to the rank of Sergeant in 1968 and became the department’s first Lieutenant in 1977, wear-

ing a badge adorned with his initials, KDE. As a Carpinteria Police Officer, he was awarded Santa Barbara County’s highest law enforcement honor — the H. Thomas Guerry Award for Valor in the line of duty. After almost 20 years wearing the Carpinteria Police Department badge, Kevin retired in 1981 and moved to Saugus (Santa Clarita). It was there that he began his second act in life, with the Southland Corp. (7-Eleven) as a Regional Security Supervisor. He maintained a close relationship with various law enforcement agencies and helped communities throughout Southern California and Arizona with crime prevention programs. In 2000, Kevin retired after nearly 20 years with Southland Corp. and began to take life more slowly. With his longtime companion Barbara, they began fostering kittens, getting them ready for adoption. With his life dedicated to law enforcement and justice, Kevin was an ardent supporter of the California Peace Officers’ Memorial Foundation in Sacramento. In lieu of flowers, Kevin requests that any donations are sent to the California Peace Officers’ Memorial Foundation or Pink Paws Rescue and Adoption, both causes important to him. Kevin was proceeded in death by his mother, Mary Ann, and father Kenneth. He is survived by his longtime companion Barbara Switzer; his three younger sisters, Gwen, of Torrance, Anna and Cheryl, both from Arizona; his three children, daughter Cyndi and husband Chuck Hookstra of Oxnard, son David and wife Krista of Hopkinton, New Hampshire and son Mike and wife Kathy of Santa Barbara. He also leaves behind two grandchildren, Tori Izquierdo of Camarillo, and Hannah Eliason, of Hopkinton, New Hampshire. Kevin was a dedicated public servant and a loving father and grandfather. He is missed. A Celebration of Life will be held at 2:00 PM Saturday, February 29, at the Desert Streams Church, 26873 Ruether Avenue, Canyon Country (Santa Clarita) “Courage is being scared to death…saddling up anyway.” – John Wayne

Robert “Chip” C. Lawson 7/2/1957 - 2/2/2020

One morning I shot an elephant in my pajamas. How he got in my pajamas, I’ll never know. That classic joke from the late great comedian, Groucho Marx, epitomized Chip Lawson’s humor. Humor carried Chip through life as an armor, as a way to disarm, charm, and deflect. It usually got him out of trouble as much as it got him into trouble. Even in the waning days of his life, before he passed away at Serenity House on a warm winter Super Bowl Sunday, humor was with him. A nurse asked him how he feels and Chip raised his hands and whispered “with my hands.” Chip was born Robert Charles Lawson, Jr. on July 2, 1957 in San Francisco to Dr. Robert C. Lawson DVM and Wendy S. Lawson, thus becoming a fourth generation Californian. Chip spent his first twelve years on ranches in Petaluma and Santa Ynez before settling into the Montecito area. Horses were core to our Dad’s life and Chip shared that enthusiasm for horses too, which gave our Mom the “vapors” often. His first mount was a pony named Smokey, followed by a succession of horses: Moon Child, Joe Cool, Spot, Rodan, and more. In the 1970’s Chip competed at equestrian shows throughout the County, with events at Earl Warren being the highlight, especially the summertime Horse and Flower show. Friendships developed through the horse world, which included the Mosely, Hill, Linfoot, and other families, endured his whole life. Under our Dad’s watchful eye, along with trainers up and down the coast, Chip had several years of success in the California show rings culminating in an invitation to train at the US Olympic Equestrian Center. Chip graduated from Laguna Blanca and then earned his AA degree at SBCC. He entered real estate sales, where his quick humor served him well. His mentor and fellow prankster Gene O’Hagan helped him get his start. Chip remained a life-long agent, thoroughly enjoying the social aspects real estate. Off hours, Chip could be found at the BBQ (steaks rare) or one of his favorite watering holes on Coast Village Road telling stories and jokes. His friends have said they will sorely miss these fun times. Dogs had a huge place in Chip’s heart. First it was Labradors and then Jack Russell Terriers, followed by Boston Terriers. He leaves behind one Boston, Apollo, whose sister Jett passed away the day after Chip. Chip is survived by his only sibling, Peter Lawson, and sister-

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in-law, Lisa Hall, and by many cousins across the globe. We appreciate all the people who came to Chip’s aid during his brief illness, your love and support propped us up during dark days. The medical staff at Cottage Hospital were phenomenal. Serenity House staff provided a wonderful space for Chip to pass peacefully. Services are not planned at this time. To honor Chip, consider donating to the Earl Warren Showgrounds Renovation Fund, (at sbequineevac.org) a place where Chip had his happiest times. Chip endeared himself to many friends with his big dreams, warm heart, and willingness to show up at a moment’s notice. He will be missed.

Kenneth R Larson 6/7/1939 - 8/10/2019

A memorial service and celebration of life for Kenneth Larson has been planned for Saturday, March 7, 2020 at 1PM. Kenneth Larson passed away suddenly on August 10, 2019. A memorial service will be held at 1PM in the sanctuary of Shoreline Church (AKA Grace Church) at 935 San Andres Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Immediately following the memorial service there will be a reception and celebration of life in the Shoreline Fellowship Hall. We will have an open microphone at the reception for anyone who would like to share memories of Ken. Ken Larson served in the US Navy aboard the USS Midway. He graduated from Westmont College and USC. He taught history at Dos Pueblos High School from the 1970's until the early 2000's. Ken was also a member or Grace Church from the 1960's until moving to Texas in 2013.

FEBRUARY 27, 2020

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FEBRUARY 27, 2020

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62728

In Memoriam COURTESY

You’re Invited

Join us for a monthly tour Find out what Transition of our family emergency House is doing to get shelter and learn more families back on their about the issue of family feet and into housing. for our monthly tour of our emergency homelessness in here Wefamily will also share ways shelter and learn more about the of Santa Barbara. you can getissue involved. family homelessness in Santa Barbara.

Join us on Friday, Mar. 6,

Find out what Transition House is doing to get families back on their and Sept. into housing. Next Tour Date:feet Friday, 6 We will also share ways you can get- involved. Time: Drop in between 11:30 am 1:00 pm

Location: Transition House Emergency Shelter NEXT TOUR DATE: FRIDAY, 434 E. Ortega Street, SantaMARCH Barbara 6 between 11:30 am - 1:00 ForDrop moreininformation call 966-9668, ext.pm 120. www.transitionhouse.com Transition House Emergency Shelter

Leslie Gangl Howe 1957-2020

434 E. Ortega Street, Santa Barbara For more info, contact Carmela at 770-5109 or ccarreno@transitionhouse.com www.transitionhouse.com

A Talented Performer, a Remarkable Woman

L

BY H O WA R D H O W E , K AT I E L A R I S , AND N A N C Y N U F E R eslie Gangl Howe was deeply loved: by her

husband, Howard Howe; her mother, Maria del Carmen Gangl; her brother Bob and his wife, Tamie; her sister, Stephanie; her brother Chris and his wife, Felicia; and her more than 20 nieces and nephews and by the hundreds of theater people — actors, technicians, designers, and directors, with whom she worked over an extraordinary 50-year career — and the thousands of audience members who had a chance to catch her breathtakingly brilliant performances. When the standard of one’s work is consistently excellent, the irony is we take that standard for granted. We find ourselves declaring: “Oh yes, she’s always wonderful!” Leslie Gangl Howe’s collective fans, friends, and collaborators felt assured that every time she stepped onstage (or in front of a camera) she would provide a thoughtful, meaningful, often hilarious performance. All while gifting us with that dazzling smile. Leslie’s extraordinary ability left audiences in tears and laughter, show after show, and she did it all with a sweetness of spirit and an unassuming dedication to the craft that was amazing to behold. For the woman inside the performer was the most remarkable. In the depth of her compassion for others, her kindness, her openness — she was a rock star. Leslie was born in St. Paul, Minnesota. Her family moved to Santa Barbara to help with their grandparents’ motel — The De Anza, now the Coast Village Inn — when Leslie was 6 years old. She attended Our Lady of Mount Carmel elementary school and La Cumbre Junior High and graduated from Santa Barbara High School. Leslie’s powerful work ethic started at an early age, when she cleaned motel rooms for her grandparents. After high school, she worked several years for Robinson’s Department Store. What followed were a series of “day jobs,” all of which allowed her to rehearse and act at night. Leslie managed the men’s clothing store called

DEDICATED TO THE SOLUTION OF FAMILY HOMELESSNESS

Gable’s on State Street for a couple of years. Her passion for travel led her to working for Global Visions, a local importer, giving her the chance to travel around the Southwest for multiple trade shows. In 1991, she had an opportunity to live in New York City, where she stayed for seven months, did a show in the Bronx, and enjoyed the big-city life. She loved that. In 2014, she started working at Valle Verde, a senior living community. She was in the life enrichment department and loved her job and the residents, who loved her in return. This proved to be a place where she could use all the different skills she had learned over the years. Over the course of her life, Leslie and Howard spent vacations in Europe, China, Mexico, and all over the western United States. Leslie was a fixture of Santa Barbara theater, appearing with almost every company and on every stage, because she was exceedingly adept at saying “yes.” Leslie confirmed life every step of the way. And she made it look so appetizing we all wanted to say “yes,” with her and to her. She always, and I mean every single time, took the high road. It was her nature to do the right thing, the generous thing. She carried with her at all times dignity, kindness, grace, and a deep caring for other people. So everyone fortunate enough to cross paths with her counted themselves as lucky. The foundation of Leslie’s love, that never-ending supply of warmth she showed the world, surely flowed from the wellspring of her happy marriage to Howard Howe. That was her bedrock, for they were truly two parts of a whole and always one another’s best friend. There is no question we will always remember her and be better for it. Her beautiful face with the twinkling eyes and that always-at-the-ready laugh. Indelible, iconic, forever in our hearts. A celebration of Leslie Gangl Howe’s life will be held at Santa Barbara City College in the Garvin Theatre on Sunday, April 5, at 2 p.m. All who knew Leslie, or saw her onstage, are invited to attend.

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Dear Santa Barbara County Families, We are writing this open letter because we believe Laura Capps should be our next 1st District County Supervisor. Laura’s values and integrity have been on full display throughout her career, most recently in her work on the Santa Barbara School Board and in her non-profit leadership positions. Laura is a responsive and innovative leader who makes sure all stakeholders have a seat at the table so their voices are heard. Laura is a devoted mom whose love of children extends to the community, where she worked to combat the high poverty rate suffered by kids in our County. Laura has a forward-looking Climate Safety Plan that addresses threats of fire, wind, drought, and sea level rise. Laura is a fierce advocate for campaign finance reform and is proposing a long overdue limit on campaign contributions, raising the bar on ethics so that everyone has a voice. Many of us are not quick to get involved in politics, but we believe this of vital importance! We need smart and ethical leaders who will listen and respond thoughtfully, rather than force decisions upon us that have been pre-promised in exchange for campaign contributions. It is on THIS subject that we come together most strongly behind Laura: Das Williams has taken an exaggerated amount of credit for the response to the Thomas Fire and Debris Flow. As involved members of this community, our experience is to the contrary. Just as he was not responsible for the water delivered to the Summerland community by the Red Cross – another blessing for which he has falsely claimed credit. Many of us who were impacted directly by the disasters found Das to be very present at the photo-ops but a reluctant partner on the less glamorous work of actually pulling the community together. Additionally, we can all see that the process of bringing cannabis to this county has greatly benefited the industry that bankrolled much of Das’ campaign ($80,000+, which he refers to as “chump change”) as Das was writing the ordinance and dispensing permits. As a result, our community has suffered - we have received very little revenue, the people of Carpinteria – especially our kids - are suffering, and our wine and avocado industry has been compromised. We want a leader who brings people together and listens, rather than talking at them. We want a leader who will admit when they could have done better. want a leader who fosters innovative ideas. We want a leader who has integrity. Please stand with us in taking back our community: Vote for Laura Capps. Sebastian Aldana Verity Allen Jack Amon Minos Athanassiadis Dr. Jeffrey Becker Michael Bennett Valerie Bentz Alan Bleecker Alexandra Bongaerts EJ Borah Ben Bycel Lou Cannon Mary Cannon Michelle Carbone Anna Carrillo Michael Cheng Stacy Christopher Scott Christopher Bill Cirone Barbara Cirone Bob Collector Betsy R. Cramer Marsha Croninger Anna Cronshaw William Curran Thomas Dabney

Robert Dautch Rogelio Delgado Jill Dexter Ron Dexter Elaine Dietsch William Dietsch Bonnie Donovan Lanny Ebenstein Brook Eiler Paul Ekstrom Linda Ekstrom Pamela Elliott Cassandra Ensberg Joan Esposito Leslie Esposito Lynda Fairly Farideh Farinpour Morey Farinpour S Figler Dawn Fitzgerald Bonnie Freeman Suzan Garner Beth Geiger Dodd Geiger Eric Georges Marilyn Gilbert

Kelly Gleason David Green Andrea Gurney Lynette Hall Richard Hecht Denise Higgins Michael Higgins Mara Hochman Rev. Anne Howard Richard Hutton Tom Jacobs Susan Jordan Katherine Corley Kenna Beverly King Beryl Kreisel Erin Leifer Daniel LeMelle Morgan LeMelle Tammy LeMelle Robert Lesser Sarada Lewis Jessica Liberman Sheila Lodge Bruce Lyon Christine Lyon Marsha Marcoe

Alixe Mattingly Rich Mayer Sarah Miller McCune D.C. McGuire Darcie McKnight Bart Mendel Sandra Mezzio Ken Millett Pilar Montoya Maureen Murdock Pedro Nava Lionel Neff Jim Neuman Tim O’Neil Bobbie Offen Patricia Owens Suzanne Peck Christina Pizarro Liz Pretzinger Tracey Reif Claudette Roehrig Deborah Rogow Dr. Tom Rook Rand Rosenberg Rob Salomon Christina Schowe

Paid for by Capps for Santa Barbara County Supervisor 2020 FPCC #142005

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Deborah L. Schwartz Bobby Shand Susan Shand Barbara Rose Sherman Mark Sherman Sudi Staub Evan Turpin Justin Tuttle Bobbie Tweddle Judi Weisbart Harry Weisbart Alison Werts William Werts Marcy Wimbish Howard Winant Lesley Wiscomb Neil Wood Tina Wood Sandra Wood Keith Yeager John Ziegler Lana Ziegler


Opinions

cont’d

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PHENOMENAL RESEARCH ON END-OF-LIFE EXPERIENCES Charles Cole

Assembly Aberration Top Two Primary Rules Aid GOP Wannabe in Heavily Dem District

A

t a recent debate, Assembly candidate Charles Cole began to answer a question about climate change by lifting his hands and making the universal sign for air quotes. “As the ‘evil Republican,’ ” he said, pointers and middle fingers punctuating his words, “climate change is not that big a deal to me.” “Why do you put that in quotes?” the moderator asked, as Cole laughed along with the audience. As a political matter, the 22-year-old Cole does represent a kind of evil figure to his six opponents in the 37th Assembly District contest — even though he’s a boyish, uncertain, somewhat shy first-time candidate who’s raised less than $3,000. As the only Republican campaigning against half a dozen Democrats, Cole has the most clearly defined political base heading into the March 3 primary: the 23 percent of the district’s 276,329 voters who are registered Republican. As the six Dems compete for the 46 percent registered with their party (and the generally Democratic-leaning 24 percent of No Party Pref Preference independents), Cole stands to benefit, both from the historic reliability of GOP voters to turn out and from the tribal passions of the Trump era, with partisan identity by far the single best demographic predictor of political and policy attitudes and behavior.

BY THE NUMBERS: A look at recent primaries involving Republicans in the Democratic district, which includes parts of Santa Barbara and Ventura counties, illustrates the point, as GOP entrants won a sizeable vote chunk — despite being largely unknown and poorly funded. In 2012, the first election using current district lines, Republican Rob Walter won 44 percent of the vote in the primary as the only candidate on the ballot besides Das Williams, then the Democratic incumbent. Two years later, GOP contender Ron DeBlauw won nearly an identical share of the vote, capturing 43 percent against Williams, then running for his third term. As every schoolchild knows, California’s primary rules, changed with the passage of Proposition 14 in 2010, decree that the two candidates with

the highest primary vote totals, regardless of party, advance to the November election. At first glance, that appears to benefit Santa Barbara Mayor Cathy Murillo and Ventura County Supervisor Steve Bennett, both of whom enjoy far more name identification — and far more financing ($261,730 for Bennett, $168,602 for Murillo) — than Cole. However, the partisan calculus of the primary presents a major challenge, especially as both also contend with the campaigns of fellow Dems Jonathan Abboud, Stephen Blum, Jason Dominguez, and Elsa Granados, several of whom are running energetic campaigns. “One of them is going to get squeezed out,” one Democratic strategist working in the race said of Bennett and Murillo. “Don’t be surprised if Cole comes in first.” Of course, even if the Republican rookie celebrates on primary night, it’s likely to be a short and pyrrhic victory. The 37th is such fallow turf for the GOP that they didn’t even put up a candidate in the last two elections. CAVEAT EMPTOR: Reminder to voters of a certain age feeling a trifle confused by the appearance of Proposition 13 on the March 3 ballot: California’s Secretary of State recycles the numbers for ballot measures once a decade, and this year’s Prop. 13 does not affect the iconic 1978 tax cut measure. This year’s version proposes $15 billion in general obligation bonds to finance renovations and construction in public school facilities — $9 billion for K-12 and $6 billion for higher ed. Jon Coupal, president of the Howard Jarvis Taxpayers Association, named for the late cosponsor of the legendary Prop. 13, told reporters that the group has received calls from some people, asking if “this is some sort of nefarious trick.” The influential anti-tax group, in fact, opposes the current iteration of Prop. 13. Reason: With interest over the 30-year bond term, total cost to taxpayers will be more than $25 billion. “That’s $12 billion that’s not going into schools,” Coupal said. “We’re sitting on a surplus. Why can we not finance this on a pay-as-you-go basis?” —Jerry Roberts

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Letters

opinions cont’d

Vote for Laura Capps

A

s Americans, I think many were ashamed of the U.S. Senator from Maine, Susan Collins, when she naively said she voted to acquit President Donald Trump of the charges he was impeached for because she thought he learned his lesson and wouldn’t make the same mistakes again. I know Susan Collins. I served in Congress with Susan Collins. And unfortunately, a recent endorsement editorial in the Independent displays the same flawed logic used by Senator Susan Collins. Last week, the Independent wrote a confusing editorial, pointing out serious questions about Supervisor Das Williams’s ethics and lack of contrition. It referenced his role in voting on regulations for an industry he was accepting large campaign contributions from — and then recommended a vote for him anyway, writing, “But we also believe Williams will learn to admit his mistakes quickly and with compassion, and that he will strive to repair relationships … ” The logic is positively Collins-ian. I write this as someone who has long admired the editorial decisions of the Independent and who has a deep respect for the vital role your reporting plays in our community. The race for county supervisor is incredibly important to people in Santa Barbara. The decisions made by the Board of Supervisors can either greatly improve the quality of life in our neighborhoods — or they can create real problems, as happened when Supervisor Williams voted on behalf of his campaign contributors instead of our families. This race is too important to send mixed messages by justifiably criticizing Williams for his missteps and failings, only to fall short of calling for the change people here deserve. On March 3, vote for a real progressive, with the integrity and record to put families first in Santa Barbara. Vote for Laura —Lois Capps, S.B. Capps.

Endorsement Dismay

I

am flabbergasted by the Independent’s recent endorsement of Das Williams for supervisor. You write that Das Williams is “tone deaf and arrogant,” an “ego-driven careerist,” and that you have “serious concerns about the politician and the man.” Well, I agree, which is which is why I am fervently for Laura Capps, who is of impeccable integrity, substantive ideas and solutions for our community’s improvement, and a long record of leadership, collaboration, humility, and passion for problem solving. A true public servant. We don’t have the opportunity too often to elect someone of Laura’s high caliber to such an important local, nonpartisan position. There are many other important distinctions between these two candidates. We deserve Laura’s competence and vision.

—Alixe Mattingly, S.B.

I

...

am dismayed by the Independent’s endorsement of Das Williams for

Supervisor for District 1. You point out more negatives than positives. Do you really think he cares about the damage to the health and economy the cannabis growers have created in our community? My own experience in trying to interest him in issues of mental health and criminal justice in Santa Barbara fell on disinterested and deaf ears. Your conclusion that he has learned his lesson mirrors the naivete of Susan Collins, Lisa Murkowski, and Lamar Alexander about Donald Trump’s behavior post-impeachment. —Maureen Murdock, Carpinteria

Vote Elsa Granados for Assembly

I

have found District 37 State Assembly candidate Elsa Granados to be wellinformed, articulate, responsive, energetic, and motivated. Her decades of community involvement speak volumes. I am especially impressed with her extensive experience with women’s issues. I believe that she is uniquely positioned to best represent the constituents of our district at the state level. I encourage you to vote for her. —Charles H. Nicholson, S.B.

Vote Bruce Porter

I

wholeheartedly support Bruce Porter for 3rd District supervisor. I was born and raised in Santa Barbara, and after many years of living and working outside of the area, my husband and I chose to return to the county and make our home in the beautiful Santa Ynez Valley. We have become active members of our wonderful community by volunteering for nonprofit organizations. I have worked in both the private and public sector and was also a small business owner and employer, giving me a broad perspective on how our county supervisors can best serve 3rd District citizens. A group of Rancho Santa Ynez Estates residents in Solvang, including myself, hosted Bruce Porter to meet and speak with us, as well as those in adjoining Alisal Glen. We are a community that the county has been steamrolling over in its vision of what’s “best” for the county agenda, and it has ignored our concerns with how their proposals will negatively affect and forever change the nature of the quiet and safe neighborhood that has existed here for 50 years. Bruce, however, reached out to us, took the time to hear our concerns, answer questions, have a genuine discussion, and share his vision for the 3rd District. We desperately need a change of county leadership, and Bruce has proven himself to be a deeply committed candidate who understands the challenges we face, as well as opportunities for the future, and has the determination and the experience to produce results. Santa Ynez Valley is home to people from all walks of life. We have chosen this place as home, and most people I know want to work to make and keep our community the best that it can be. I know that Bruce wants the same, and he will fight for us all. —Denise Rose, Santa Ynez Valley


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letters cont’d

Can Voters Trust Porter?

B

ruce Porter’s slick campaign for 3rd District Supervisor has blasted Isla Vista with expensive advertising and glossy fliers, but we can’t trust him. Here’s why. Porter has been implicated in voter suppression efforts through the fake get-out-the-vote organization, Rock the Vote S.B. Porter publicly boasted that through these efforts, 1,400 fewer students will vote in Isla Vista in this election. In 2016, Porter’s campaign was supported by Big Oil, which spent over $220,000 to get him elected. Finally, Big Oil gave the Santa Barbara Republicans at least $100,000 in 2019; in turn, the party gave Porter’s campaign another $20,000 in early 2020. Porters claims to be an environmentalist, a political independent, and to care about young people. But before casting your vote, I would urge readers to ask themselves three critical questions: Can we trust a candidate who is backed by the oil industry to make decisions with integrity when it comes to oil expansion and addressing the climate crisis in Santa Barbara county? Can we trust a candidate who claims to be politically independent but whose campaign has received financial support from the Santa Barbara County Republican Party? And can we trust a candidate who would rather suppress voter turnout in Isla Vista than trust young people to make decisions for themselves? If your answer is “no” to any of these questions, then you can’t trust Bruce Porter. Don’t vote for him. —Forest Stuart, Goleta

Reelect Joan Hartmann

I

n recent campaign advertising, candidate Bruce Porter has claimed that 3rd District Supervisor Joan Hartmann had cost the Santa Ynez Valley school district millions of dollars in funding through two decisions she had made — one was a reference to “the Santa Ynez Unit” oil processing facility and the other to the agreement made between the county and the Chumash Tribe regarding Camp 4. Both assertions are patently false and so easily disproved as to suggest that Mr. Porter is not interested in educating voters, only in misleading them. First, we must assume that his reference to “the Santa Ynez Unit” was regarding the denial of an emergency permit to Exxon Mobil to truck oil 70 times a day up and down the Gaviota Coast. The

truth is Supervisor Hartmann did not participate in making that decision as it occurred in 2015, before she was even elected. Second, Supervisor Hartmann was never legally in a position to negotiate with the Tribe for Santa Ynez school district funding. She could only negotiate on behalf of the county. The school district has their own duly elected board to negotiate for the betterment of their district, of which Bruce Porter has been a member. If Mr. Porter thought that the school district should get more money from the Tribe, why didn’t he ask them when it was his legal responsibility to do so? Was it because he was quite satisfied by the funds the Tribe had already gifted to the school? Or was he too intimidated by the Tribe to ask for more funds for the students he purportedly represented? We may never know the truth. However, whether complicit or cowardly, the responsibility for negotiating with the Tribe on behalf of the school district fell squarely on Mr. Porter’s shoulders and not on Supervisor Hartmann’s. In contrast, throughout her term in office, Supervisor Hartmann has consistently been honest, transparent, courageous, and successful in asking for more resources for all her constituents. On March 3, vote to reelect Joan Hartmann. —Doreen Farr, former 3rd District Supervisor, Ojai

For the Record

¶ We neglected to credit the images in last week’s cover story on Dr. Horace McMillan to UC Santa Barbara Library’s Horace James McMillan Papers, CEMA 7, Special Research Collections, which was invaluable in providing background information, as was its Santa Barbara Afro-American oral history project collection, CEMA 42, Special Research Collections, UCSB Library. ¶ In our news story on debris flow road repairs in the February 13 issue, we correct the amount: Of the $28 million of the SoCal Edison settlement, $10.1 million will go to road repair. ¶ Also, in the Wedding Guide in that issue, we erroneously said Santa Barbara has no Ethiopian restaurant. Happily, Serkaddis Alemu corrected us, reminding that she serves up savory Ethiopian specialties at Le Petit Valentin (La Arcada, 1114 State St., #14) on Saturdays and Sundays from 11:30 a.m. to 2:30 p.m.

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What Lies

C O V E R

S T O R Y

BENEATH Channel Island Shipwrecks Tell Stories of Heroism, Heartbreak, and High-Seas Scalawaggery

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ver the last two centuries, some 300 ships have met their fate among the rocks and reefs of the Santa Barbara Channel Islands. Stately four-masted steamships ferrying gold and lumber, nimble rumrunners dodging the Coast Guard, rustbucket harpooners hunting seal and otter— otter all done in by the tricky currents and erratic weather that churn through the crossing. Fog has always been the real killer, especially in the days before GPS. It can come on fast and thick, frightening even the saltiest of captains and forcing them to navigate blindly. The curved west side of San Miguel Island is known as the “catcher’s mitt” because of it. Among the scores of wrecks out there, historians have identified just 25. The rest are either lost forever or just waiting to be discovered. But finding them isn’t easy. Their remains are often camouflaged under marine growth. “You really gotta take a loooong look,” explained Robert Schwemmer, a National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration diver and archeologist known as the Indiana Jones of West Coast shipwrecks. He uses old photos and newspaper clippings to get a general idea of where a boat might be before organizing an expedition. “You try to identify manmade shapes, like straight lines and symmetrical curves. Most people can swim right over them and not see them.” Those that do are treated to rare glimpses into our historic maritime past — visible relics such as boilers, paddle-wheel shafts, and engine LIVING HISTORY: NOAA’s blocks, as well as smaller treasures. Robert “Shipwreck Bob” Schwemmer remembers findSchwemmer (left) recently met ing a French perfume bottle with Santa Maria’s Dr. Jens Frederick in the wreck of the WinJarlshoi Birkholm, whose granddad was field Scott Scott, which went captain of the George E. Billings. down off Anacapa Island in 1853. “What’s the story

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images courtesy of the Santa Cruz Island Foundation and * AllRobert Schwemmer

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behind that?” he asked. “Did it belong to a man bringing it back for his wife? Did he trade for it in San Francisco? That’s what I love about this.” Then there is the thrill when his discoveries reach people whose ancestors had been affected by the shipwrecks. Just recently, Santa Maria resident Dr. Jens Frederik Jarlshoi Birkholm got in touch after hearing that the George E. Billings was found near Santa Barbara Island. Birkholm’s grandfather Frederik S. Birkholm had captained the Billings, and he had the pictures to prove it. He’d always hoped the ship would turn up and complete that chapter of his family’s history. “These discoveries bring to life important human stories,” Schwemmer said. As excited as Schwemmer gets about these discoveries, he gets just as serious when talking about the regulations that protect them. The wrecks sit in the jurisdiction of the Channel Islands National Marine Sanctuary, which means they’re closely guarded by federal antiquity laws. Without the proper permit, it’s illegal to remove or damage the wrecks or the artifacts among them. “Fines are steep, up to six figures,” he warned. “And if you’re doing something commercially, it could mean the loss of your boat.” If you come across a new wreck site, officials ask, note its location, take a picture, and report it to the sanctuary at (805) 966-7107. Scientists like Schwemmer are more interested in facts than legends, but some are just too enticing to ignore. One has it that a gold-filled Manila galleon—one of the famed Spanish trading ships that sailed from the Philippines to California and then to Acapulco from the 16th through the 19th centuries —might be down there. Their route went right along the islands, and around a dozen of them disappeared somewhere in the Pacific. The supposed discovery of a golden captain’s ring off San Miguel in 1974 piqued a lot of interest, but historians remained dubious. Still, it seems reasonable to assume that one of the Chumash tomols or a Chinese “junk” that used to catch abalone and smuggle opium during the late 1800s might be waiting to be discovered beneath the sea. This year, Schwemmer plans to investigate three “targets” off Anacapa Island using an ROV, or remotely operated vehicle. “They look like shipwrecks, but we’ll see,” he said. And Schwemmer hasn’t given up on the Watson A. West West, a 192-foot schooner swallowed by the sea in 1923. Her crew of nine escaped on a skiff before she sank. They rowed for 18 hours to reach Santa Barbara, where they arrived “exhausted, hungry, thirsty, and half-clad,” news reports said. The Watson is somewhere off San Miguel, and she remains the largest vessel in the area yet to be found. “I still would love to locate that,” Schwemmer said.

SAN MIGUEL ISLAND

Acknowledgement: Much of the information and many of the photographs in this story were sourced from Islapedia.com, a comprehensive database covering hundreds of topics and thousands of entries on all eight California Channel Islands. It was started in 1973 by cultural anthropologist Marla Daily, president of the Santa Cruz Island Foundation, and is a continuing research work in process.

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1. COMET

The Comet was a three-masted lumber schooner built in 1886 by the Hall Brothers of Washington State, who designed some of the finest and fastest sailing ships of the era. She was carrying 620,000 feet of redwood lumber when, at 11 p.m. on August 30, 1911, she lost her way in a pea-soup fog and ran into Wilson Rock off San Miguel Island. The captain blamed the collision on a faulty chronometer, a timekeeping device used to determine longitude, which put the vessel eight miles off its course. A 24-year-old German crew member, Hans Mailborn, was killed in the incident and his body lost at sea. Captain Henry H. Short of Santa Barbara purchased the Comet’s salvage rights. He rafted most of the lumber to South Coast lumberyards and sold the rest to the Vail & Vickers Company on San Miguel Island, which used it in the construction of new ranch buildings. The following January, Japanese fishermen found “the body of a white man on the extreme end of San Miguel,” a Los Angeles Times article states. “While not identified, it is supposed to have been that of the mate of the lumber schooner Comet, wrecked off San Miguel last fall…. The Japanese dug a grave and buried the man, marking the place. Captain Short verified the story by going to see the freshly formed mound.” The next month, Short’s right hand and leg were crushed aboard the Comet as he continued salvage operations, but he recovered at Cottage Hospital.

FLEETING: Archaeologists are always racing against the clock to find and log shipwrecks because they’re constantly being eaten away by strong currents, shifting sands, and wood-boring worms.

2. AGGI

“Lashed by mad seas and hammered against the rocks of Talcott Reef, the Norwegian ship Aggi Norge went to pieces this morning.” That was the 1915 news report describing the last moments of the Aggi at the west end of Santa Rosa Island. She was headed to Sweden, laden with 600 tons of beans and 2,500 tons of barley. All 20 of her crew survived, though the first mate, Hans Thormadsen, “became insane in Chicago on his way home to Norway,” according to the Santa Barbara Morning Press. “This is attributed to his severe experiences while this ship was battered by the storm.” Two weeks later, the Universal Film Company purchased the wreck with intentions of using it as an underwater set. Santa Barbara sailor Scott Cunningham, however, expressed doubt that the Aggi’s broken remains would stand up to the continuing bad weather. “They’ll have to hurry up with their moving pictures,” Cunningham told the Morning Press. “The wreck will soon be only a dream — and you can’t photograph a dream.” He turned out to be right, as the sea soon knocked the Aggi into even smaller scraps useless for filming. In 1967, a dive boat operator named Glenn Miller pulled up one of the Aggi’s two massive anchors and donated it to the Santa Barbara Historical Society, where it remains today. The move stirred some controversy. A letter writer to Pacific Underwater News called Miller an “incurable wreck picker” and asked, “Does Captain Miller really believe that the landlubbers visiting the Santa Barbara Historical Society will appreciate the big anchor as much as skin divers did visiting it in 40 feet of water?”

3. KATE AND ANNA

The Kate and Anna had been out hunting seal and otter when, on April 9, 1902, she made for the shelter of Cuyler’s Harbor on San Miguel Island during a particularly nasty northwester storm. There, her anchor chain broke, and she was quickly beached. “Knowing that there was little hope of saving her, [Captain C. C. Lutjens] and his men went ashore and were given shelter at the island home of Captain W. G. Waters,” reads a Santa Barbara Morning Press article at the time. “The men had left the schooner in a hurry, taking nothing with them. Most of them were wet through when they reached the house and made a sorry sight. They were given every comfort possible.” The Kate and Anna had been well-known in Santa Barbara waters even before her last voyage. A year earlier, she made headlines in town when one of her crew tried to murder the ship’s cook. And for several years before that, she was suspected of smuggling opium and Chinese immigrants from British Columbia, though the allegations were never proven.

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4. WINFIELD SCOTT

The gold rush brought throngs of fortune seekers to California, many of them by sailing ships and steamers from New York, through the Panama Canal, and into San Francisco. On December 1, 1853, the Winfield Scott—named after a Civil War general and loaded with more than $1 million in freshly mined gold bullion (worth more than $33 million in today’s dollars) — departed San Francisco on her way back east. To save time, her captain, Simon F. Blunt, decided to pass through the Santa Barbara Channel, but he miscalculated at night in a gathering An untold amount of gold went down with the Winfield Scott, which is protected by strict antiquity laws that prohibit removing any artifacts, but a 1967 article in Skin Diver Magazine ignited a modern-day rush over the wreck. “Would you believe,” the article read, “a gold strike, near a small island off Santa Barbara? Neither did we, until that warm California autumn revealed the unmistakable glint of gold nuggets in the dredge’s rifle box.” Looting became an issue, and offenders were prosecuted with fines and sometimes jail time. Today, while Park Service officials actually encourage sport divers to visit the site, they keep close watch and sternly warn: Look, but don’t touch. fog and turned southeast for open ocean too soon, crashing full speed into a large rock off Anacapa Island. More than 500 passengers and crew scrambled onto the pebbly beach of Frenchy’s Cove, where they set up camp and waited nearly a week for rescue. One woman later described the desperate scene in an 1854 letter to New York’s Sun newspaper: “What occurred during the six days’ sojourn on the island was outrageous in the extreme.… Trunks came broken open, carpet-bags cut and their contents extracted; clothing lost and strewn about — money ‘cared for,’ such a general robbery was never before perpetrated.… A Vigilance Committee was appointed, although the gold that was stolen was, under the cir-

cumstances, of no account, as the thieves could not buy anything to keep body and soul together; and a person having anything would have been murdered for it.” A passing ship eventually spotted smoke from the camp’s fires and rescued most of the marooned group. It returned two days later for the remaining few. “They were rescued just in time to prevent worse suffering,” according to the woman’s account, “as they had got down from a scanty allowance of breads to a potato a day, and the water had become salt.” During this frightening experience, many passengers found Captain Blunt’s behavior admirable, even heroic. A letter was presented at the formal investigation into the crash that 200 passengers had signed in support of Captain Blunt’s actions. According to a report in the San Diego Union, the letter read: “In the gentlemanly deportment and kind attention to his passengers, Captain Blunt is without superior indeed. [He] is of so high character as to render it superfluous to mention his sharing his last blanket with his passengers after reaching the rock, and giving his own life preserver to a passenger before leaving the ship.” Salvage operations were able to recover machinery, furniture, mail, and other items from the Winfield Scott. Soon after, Horatio Gates Trussell of Santa Barbara used some of its timbers and brass in the construction of his adobe home on Montecito Street, today known as the Trussell-Winchester Adobe, and a decorative carved eagle was reportedly found among the wreckage and installed at the Lobero Theatre.

5. GEORGE E. BILLINGS The remains of the largest and last sailing vessel built by the revered Hall Brothers was discovered only recently, in 2011, more than 70 years after she was scuttled off Santa Barbara Island. The George E. Billings, built in 1903, first hauled lumber before she was converted into a sports-fishing barge. Then, strict regulations passed in the 1940s to eliminate offshore gambling made it impossible for many older vessels like the Billings to meet compliance. She was “towed to a lonely island reef and burned,” a news account states. Archeologists and historians had been actively searching for the wreck since the ’90s.

COV ER STO RY

Winfield Scott survivor Asa Cyrus Call

6. JANE L. STANFORD

Named for Stanford University cofounder Jane Elizabeth Lathrop Stanford, this four-masted barkentine was built in 1892 for transpacific lumber routes between Hawai‘i, Australia, and China. After WWI, she was converted to a fishing barge, where the daughter of one of her captains spent seven years of childhood. In a 1992 interview, she recalled using dried shark’s eyes as marbles and stringing together necklaces of fish vertebrae. On August 31, 1929, the Jane L. Stanford was accidentally rammed by another boat that left an eightfoot hole in her hull. Deemed too costly to fix, she was towed from Santa Barbara to the east end of Santa Rosa Island, where she was demolished with dynamite by the U.S. Coast Guard. A Los Angeles Times story described the action: “The explosions, plainly heard in this city during the morning, caused some alarm among housewives who kept police busy answering telephone calls…. The terrific force of the blasts hurled parts of the barge over a space of more than two miles, scattering pieces of wood and metal along the beach. The huge boiler was blown more than twenty feet into the air in one blast.”

7. CHICKASAW

This hulking American freighter began life in 1942 as a U.S. Navy transport, operating in both Europe and the Pacific theaters, before she was demilitarized in 1946 and sold to the Waterman Steamship Company out of Alabama. On February 7, 1962, the Chickasaw was bound for Wilmington, California, from Yokohama, Japan, when she ran aground in thick fog on the south side of Santa Rosa Island. Her cargo included plywood, dishes, toys, and optical supplies. The Coast Guard rescued 46 crew plus four elderly tourists, and a salvage team removed the cargo, along with brass, copper, wiring, electric motors, and turban pieces. Later that year, in May, Santa Barbara County Sheriff ’s deputies arrested a Ventura scrap dealer for stealing remaining electronics and navigational gear from the Chickasaw. He admitted towing away one of the freighter’s lifeboats stocked full of “souvenirs,” but he claimed the boat sank in the Channel on his way back to town. INDEPENDENT.COM

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Endorsements for March 3

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U.S. CONGRESS DISTRICT 24

STATE OFFICES SALUD CARBAJAL Governor Gavin Newsom

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8. GREY GHOST

During Prohibition, rumrunners played cat and mouse with the Coast Guard among the islands, where small caves and remote coves offered convenient hiding places. On November 13, 1926, a Coast Guard patrol spotted the Grey Ghost darting along the south edge of Santa Cruz Island and fired three shots across her bow. The Grey Ghost “failed to heave-to,” the official incident report reads, and “it was then apparent to the officer-in-charge … that she was loaded with contraband and endeavoring to escape.” The Coast Guard gave chase and fired 59 shots from its autocannon, scoring six direct hits, including one through her pilothouse and another at her starboard waterline, “doing considerable damage.” Meanwhile, the machine-gunner burned through 10 magazines of ammunition, “making numerous hits.” Now close to sinking, the Grey Ghost turned toward the coast and ran ashore. Its single occupant jumped out and escaped. It took three search parties, but the Coast Guard finally found the man hiding among some boulders. They seized 200 sacks of imported whiskey and two oak halfbarrels of liquor (about 20 gallons each) from the wreck.

WATER COPS: No photos exist of the Grey Ghost, but this was the type of Coast Guard patrol boat that would have chased down Prohibition-era smugglers in the Santa Barbara Channel.

9. CUBA

Stuck with a broken radio and no fix on land, Captain Charles J. Holland was forced to creep the Cuba through the Santa Barbara Channel for three days by dead reckoning, a tricky method of navigating by course, speed, and elapsed time alone. His luck ran out when the Cuba struck a reef a quarter mile off San Miguel Island. It was 4 a.m. on September 8, 1923. Because the steamliner’s hull contained bars of silver bullion, along with mahogany and coffee, Holland and eight armed crewmen remained on board while the rest of the ship’s 115 passengers scrambled into lifeboats. Two of the boats “put upon the beach at Point Bennett after dealing with some aggressive sea lions,” a contemporary National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) report says. Distress calls went out, and all passengers and crew were rescued. Strikingly, within hours of the incident and just a few dozen miles away along the mainland coast, seven U.S. Navy destroyers steaming south at 20 knots slammed into an outcropping of rocks called Devil’s Jaw, killing 23 sailors. Known as the Honda Point Disaster, the same NOAA report said there was speculation at the time that the additional radio traffic during the Cuba rescue may have played a role in the lead destroyer making its navigation error. Ira Eaton, who was running a resort on Santa Cruz Island in those days, salvaged many of the Cuba’s furnishings, including tables, linens, and silverware. He also found 500 letters aboard that he returned to postal authorities.

10. SPIRIT OF AMERICA

Built in 1943, the wood-hulled Spirit of America was originally operated as a minesweeper out of Los Angeles. After a fire on board caused major damage, her salvage rights were purchased in the 1960s by Al Kidman, a husky ex-logger from Idaho who was known as the “Flag Officer of the Ghost Flotilla” because he bought derelict vessels and sold the recovered parts. Kidman often ran afoul of the law. After he got in Dutch with the Coast Guard for illegally docking his recovered ships in the Los Angeles Harbor, he started storing them on the bottom of the harbor instead. He’d sink the boats, and when he wanted a part, he’d simply dive down for it. “His file with the Los Angeles Harbor Master’s office regarding his misdeeds is three-inches thick,” says a Los Angeles Times article. But Kidman didn’t sink all his ships. The Spirit of America was allegedly operated as a floating bordello in San Pedro and Long Beach, and when Kidman finally towed her out to Santa Cruz Island in 1980 for salvage, she broke loose of her mooring and crashed in Scorpion’s Harbor, scattering shreds of red carpeting, mattresses, and mirrors along the shoreline. Operators of the nearby Scorpion Ranch reportedly recovered a bathtub and installed it at the property. Al Kidman

11. J.M. COLMAN

The J.M. Colman sank in heavy seas just inside Point Bennett on September 4, 1905. As the water rushed over her deck, her first mate drowned trying to drag a chest of gold from the hold. At least, that’s how one story goes. Another says he was snatched by a “devilfish,” or giant squid. While the man’s true fate remains unknown, what is known is that the Colman carried enough salvageable lumber to build a 120-foot-long ranch house on San Miguel and a cabin on Santa Cruz. She also carried loads of flour in twill bags, which, when wetted, sealed their contents and kept them dry. The flour was used on the islands for years after. The two men in charge of recovering the Colman’s cargo were described by the Santa Barbara Morning Press this way: “That enterprising mariner, Captain McGuire, and Captain Vasquez, one of the most experienced salts on the coast.” n

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As always, find the complete listings online at independent.com/events. And if you have an event coming up, submit it at independent.com/eventsubmit.

2/27-3/1:

The Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night-Time This winner of the 2015 Tony Award for Best Play is told from the perspective of a 15-year-old boy with some behavioral difficulties, living in Wiltshire, England, and the perilous adventure he goes on to uncover the truth about the murder of his neighbor’s dog that he is under suspicion for. The play previews February 27 and shows through March 14. Thu.-Sat.: 7:30pm; Sun.: 2pm. Garvin Theatre, SBCC West Campus. $10-$26. Call (805) 965-5935. Read more on p. 47.

2/27: Christian French Acclaimed Indiana-based alt-pop singer/songwriter Christian French will stop in S.B. on his Bright Side of the Moon tour, named after his 2019 album. 8:30pm. SOhO Restaurant & Music Club, 1221 State St. $12-$45. Ages 18+. Call (805) 962-7776.

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2/27-2/28, 3/4-3/5: Molière’s Tartuffe

of passionate love and murderous jealousy of a black slave in the 17th-century Ottoman court who rises to power and riches, only to come to a tragic end. A reception will follow. This event is free, but a reservation is recommended to guarantee a seat. Pollock Theater, UCSB. Free. Not rated. Call (805) 893-4637. carseywolf.ucsb.edu/events

One of the greatest farces ever written, Tartuffe is a hilarious, satiric romp that exposes hypocrisy Daniel Sabraw and greed. Follow Tartuffe as he ingratiates himself to Ogon and his mother, Madame Pernelle, at the expense of Orgon’s family members. This timeless comedy is perfect in a major election year! The show runs through March 7. Wed.-Thu.: 8pm; Fri.: 7pm; Sat.: 1pm. Hatlen Theater, UCSB. $13$19. Call (805) 893-2064. Read more on p. 46.

theaterdance.ucsb.edu

2/27: Baltra, Eros N.Y.C.-based Michael

2/27: Free Cat Spay/Neuter Clinic

Baltra will make his S.B. debut with his lo-fi house tracks that dabble in multiple genres such as breakbeat, DnB, and techno. Eros will play the opening beats. 9pm-1:30am. Eos Lounge, 500 Anacapa St. Free-$5.

Did you know that cats that are spayed or neutered are less prone to certain kinds of cancer and less likely to spray or mark their territory? In honor of World Spay Day, the S.B. Humane Society will perform 100 free spay or neuter surgeries for cats six months old and older. Make an appointment online or by calling. S.B. Humane Society, 5399 Overpass Rd. Free. Call (805) 964-4777 x281. tinyurl.com/

COURTESY

feehouse opera” retells the age-old story

Bill McKibben Author and founder of 350.org, the world’s largest grassroots climate campaign, Bill McKibben is out with his latest best seller, Falter: Has the Human Game Begun to Play Itself Out?, which offers a call to arms 30 years after he first set the stage about climate crisis. 7:30pm. Campbell Hall, UCSB. $5-$10. Call (805) 893-3535. artsandlectures.ucsb.edu Ages 21+. Call (805) 564-2410. tinyurl.com/

theatergroupsbcc.com

THURSDAY 2/27

2/29:

WorldSpayDay

2/27-2/28: UCSB Dance Company 2020 This 30th anniversary evening of choreography will offer a wide spectrum of contemporary dance that includes two new works commissioned for the company and three premieres, including a historically significant work by José Limón, Missa Brevis (1958), directed and reconstructed by Master Limón Dance Artist Alice Condodina. 8pm. HSSB Ballet Studio, UCSB. $12-$17. Call (805) 893-2064.

of all ages interested in estateplanning services such as simple wills, advanced health-care directives, and power of attorney (no criminal cases). An appointment is required. 11am-3pm. Veterans’ Memorial Bldg., 112 W. Cabrillo Blvd. Free. Call (323) 739-8093.

2/28: Belly Dance Extravaganza Celebrate the 14th Belly Dance Extravaganza showcasing 40 performers in a wide variety of styles, from folk to modern tribal. 7:30pm. Wildcat Lounge, 15 W. Ortega St. $10. Ages 21+.

tinyurl.com/BellyDance Extravaganza

2/28: Sudan Archives Don’t miss L.A.-based violinist and vocalist Sudan Archives before she heads to Europe in June. She will bring her blend of African folk music, R&B, and electronic sounds and songs like “Nont for Sale” from her sophomore EP, Sink. 9pm. SOhO Restaurant & Music Club, 1221 State St. $17-$20. Ages 21+. Call (805) 962-7776.

sohosb.com

SATURDAY 2/29 2/29: 51st Annual Dos Pueblos High School Jazz in Paradise Enjoy hundreds of students from schools around the region who will compete during the day along with an awards ceremony, a 7 p.m. concert with Hall of Fame drummer David Weckl and the horn section of Snarky Puppy, the DPHS Jazz Band, and the SBCC Lunch Break Band. Funds will go toward the jazz band, marching band, concert band, orchestra, drum line, and dance guard. 7:50am. Elings Performing Arts Ctr., Dos Pueblos High School, 7266

3/1:

Women’s March of Silence All genders, ages, political, racial, and ethnic groups are welcome to wear white and honor the women who were silenced and gave us our right to vote. Thanks to the suffragists who put their lives on the line as we continue the fight for voting rights for all. No signs allowed, as this is not a protest. 2pm. De la Guerra Plaza to the S.B. County Courthouse, 1100 Anacapa St. Free. tinyurl.com/MarchOfSilence

theaterdance.ucsb.edu A Night of Dynamic Post-Rock Korean Music with Black String This South Korean quartet led by

FRIDAY 2/28

geomungo (traditional Korean zither) player Yoon Jeong Heo incorporates traditional Asian music, jazz, blues, rock, and electronica with Korean bamboo flutes, Korean traditional percussion, and an unpredictable melody of jazz guitar. 7:30pm. MultiCultural Ctr. Theater, UCSB. $5-$15. Call (805) 8932566. mcc.sa.ucsb.edu

Fundraiser

Volunteer Opportunity

2/28: Estate Planning Legal Clinic OneJustice’s Justice Bus Project will provide one-on-one legal assistance to individuals

Civil Discourse

COURTESY

2/28:

>>>

Protest INDEPENDENT.COM

FEBRUARY 27, 2020

THE INDEPENDENT

35


As always, find the complete listings online at independent.com/events. And if you have an event coming up, submit it at independent.com/eventsubmit.

27 5

3/2 MONDAY

3/2:

Exploration Stations Calling all children ages 2-5 and their caregivers to play and learn together every Monday morning. Library staff will have eight stations of activities designed to develop early literacy skills and introduce science, technology, engineering, art, and math concepts in an age-appropriate way. 10:30-11:30am. Island Rm., S.B. Central Library, 40 E. Anapamu St. Free. Call (805) 564-5642.

an american in paris

COURTESY

tinyurl.com/LibraryExploration

march 21 + 22 | 2020

SUNDAY 3/1

Alameda Ave., Goleta. $10-$25. Call (805) 968-2541 x4670. Read more on p. 45.

The iconic musical was inspired by George Gershwin’s jazz-infused orchestral treasure of the same name, and the Santa Barbara Symphony has combined the two for an unforgettable program of music and film! Gershwin’s evocative and vivid An American in Paris is arguably the finest musical love letter ever penned to a city, while director Vincente Minnelli’s Academy Award-winning motion picture starring Gene Kelly has lost none of its insouciant charm. Come hear the Symphony, under the baton of guest conductor Constantine Kitsopoulos, provide live accompaniment to a screening of one of the world’s greatest movie musicals. Principal Sponsor: Dave & Chris Chernof Artist Sponsors: Patricia Gregory for the Baker Foundation, Nancy & Fred Golden Selection Sponsor: Chris Lancashire & Catherine Gee | Corporate Sponsor: Impulse

upcoming concerts...

3/1: Getting Dirty: All Things Plants + Gardening On the first Sun-

2/29: Bear Cave Comedy Laugh

day of every month, you can learn about gardening and plant topics, from growing to pruning to history and more. 2-3:15pm. Faulkner Gallery, S.B. Central Library, 40 E. Anapamu St. Free. Call (805) 564-5621.

out loud with host Sam Bear and a bunch of comics that have played the Laugh Factory, The Ice House, Flappers Comedy Club, and more, as well as headliner Noah Copfer. A glass of wine or beer is included with your ticket. 8-10pm. Deep Sea Winery, 217 Stearns Wharf. $25-$35. Ages 21+.

tinyurl.com/SBGettingDirty

WEDNESDAY 3/4

bearcavecomedy.simpletix.com

3/4: Zoo Trivia Night Join Santa Barbara Zoo staff for animalrelated trivia on the first Wednesday of every month. A portion of beer sales will directly benefit the zoo’s conservation pro-

TUESDAY 3/3

grams. There is a maximum of six players per team. Night Lizard Brewing Company, 607 State St. $5. Call (805) 770-2956.

sbzoo.org

3/4: Creating a Circular Economy in S.B. Learn how a circular economy serves as a framework to develop profitable and socially responsible businesses with positive impacts on the environment and people. The presentation will focus on “closing the loop” of the life cycles of products, services, waste, materials, water and energy. 5:30-7:30pm. Karpeles Manuscript Library, 21 W. Anapamu St. Free. Email circularitysb@ gmail.com.

tinyurl.com/CircularEconomySB

3/4:

Rosanne Cash with John Leventhal Rosanne

COURTESY UCSB ARTS & LECTURES

Gershwin: An American in Paris Academy Award-winning film with live orchestra accompaniment!

dphsmusic.org/jazz.html

COURTESY

Constantine Kitsopoulos, C O N D U C T O R

carpenter conducts poulenc & saint-saëns

Cash, out on her She Remembers Everything tour, named after her new album, will deliver a night of poetic, lush, and soulful songs. John Leventhal, her partner in life and in music, will summon the spirit of this powerful material, rich with history, heartache, strength, and humanity. 8pm. Campbell Hall, UCSB. $15-$65. Call (805) 893-3535.

april 18 + 19, 2020 Nir Kabaretti, C O N D U C T O R Cameron Carpenter, O R G A N

3/3-3/4:

beethoven’s 250th birthday celebration

Buddy: The Buddy Holly Story

may 16 + 17, 2020 Nir Kabaretti, C O N D U C T O R Alessio Bax, P I A N O See full list of guest artists on our website!

805-899-2222 | thesymphony.org

Learn to

Speak Spanish

SCHEDULE

THURSDAY

Carpinteria: 800 block of Linden Ave., 3-6:30pm

FRIDAY

april 4 - june 26, 2020 12 sessions $350 24 sessions $700 Private $90 hr. Special semester package: 12 one-hour sessions $980

Our method calls for small groups (6 maximum) and conversation as soon as it is possible

Details:

spanishschoolsbca.com

805-252-9512

36

THE INDEPENDENT

artsandlectures.ucsb.edu

Follow Buddy Holly’s meteoric rise to fame, from the moment in 1957 when “That’ll Be The Day” hit the airwaves to his tragic death less than two years later. Hear over 20 hits, including “That’ll Be the Day,” “Peggy Sue,” “Everyday,” The Big Bopper’s “Chantilly Lace,” and more. 7:30pm. The Granada Theatre, 1214 State St. $51-$101. Call (805) 899-2222. granadasb.org

FARMERS MARKET

with Alonso Benavides, ph.d. Day and Evening Classes and Saturdays

SPANISH LANGUAGE INSITUTE SIGLO 21

Santa Barbara

FEBRUARY 27, 2020

FREEPIK

INDEPENDENT CALENDAR

FEB. MAR.

INDEPENDENT.COM

Montecito: 1100 and 1200 blocks of Coast Village Rd., 8-11:15am

SATURDAY

Downtown S.B.: Corner of Santa Barbara and Cota sts., 8:30am-1pm

Fundraiser

FISHERMAN’S MARKET

SUNDAY

Goleta: Camino Real Marketplace, 10am-2pm

SATURDAY

TUESDAY

Old Town S.B.: 500-600 blocks of State St., 4-7:30pm

WEDNESDAY

Solvang: Copenhagen Dr. and 1st St., 2:30-6:30pm

Volunteer Opportunity

Rain or shine, meet local fishermen on the Harbor’s commercial pier, and buy fresh fish (filleted or whole), live crab, abalone, sea urchins, and more. 117 Harbor Wy., 6-11am. Call (805) 259-7476. cfsb.info/sat

Civil Discourse

Protest


WEEK Shows on Tap

2/27, 3/1: Dargan’s Irish Pub & Restaurant Thu.: Dannsair. 6:308:30pm. Sun.: Irish Jam Session. 4:30-7pm. 18 E. Ortega St. Free. Call (805) 568-0702. darganssb.com

White Reaper

COURTESY

2/27-2/29: M.Special Brewing Co. Thu.: Joker’s Hand. 6-8pm. Fri.: Plastic Harpoon. 7-9pm. Sat.: Mary Clifford. 6-8pm. 6860 Cortona Dr., Bldg. C., Goleta. Free. Call (805) 968-6500. mspecialbrewco.com

ALWAYS

AMAZING.

NE VER

ROUTINE. TIERRA CALI

AND LOS CANARIOS DE MICHOACAN FEBRUARY 28 | FRIDAY | 8 PM

WHICH ONE’S PINK? 2/27-3/3: SOhO Restaurant & Music Club Thu.: Christian French. 8:30pm. GA: $12; meet and greet: $45. Ages 18+. Fri.: Alice Peacock; 6:30pm; $12. Sudan Archives; 9pm; $17-$20; ages 21+. Sat.: Salty Strings, Rose Valley Thorns, The Brambles. 8pm. $10. Ages 21+. Sun.: Joe Robinson. 7:30pm; $20-$60. Mon.: Monday Night Jazz Jam. 7:30pm. $8. Tue.:

FEBRUARY 29 | SATURDAY | 8 PM

White Reaper, The Aquadolls. 8:30pm. $16-$18. 1221 State St. Call (805) 962-7776. sohosb.com

THE BEACH BOYS

2/28-3/1: Cold Spring Tavern Fri.: Curly & Co. 6-9pm. Sat.: Green Flag Summer; 1-4pm. The Plastic Harpoons, Uncle Uncle; 5-8pm. Sun.: Tom Ball and Kenny Sultan; 1:15-4pm. Hoodlum Friends; 4:30-7:30pm. 5995 Stagecoach Rd. Free. Call (805) 967-0066. coldspringtavern.com

MARCH 6 | FRIDAY | 8 PM

2/28: The Endless Summer Bar-Café Johnny Miller. 5-8pm. 113

Harbor Wy. Free. Call (805) 564-1200.

2/28-2/29: Maverick Saloon Fri.: Crown City Bombers. 9pmmidnight. Sat.: The Reserve. 8-11pm. Sun.: Falcon Heavy. 1-5pm. 3687 Sagunto St., Santa Ynez. Free-$5. Ages 21+. Call (805) 686-4785.

themavsaloon.com

2/29: Island Brewing Company Rent Party Blues Band. 6-9pm. 5049 6th St., Carpinteria. Free. Call (805) 745-8272. islandbrewingcompany.com

JOHN FOGERTY MARCH 13 | FRIDAY | 8 PM

2/29: La Cumbre Plaza The Piano Boys. Noon-3pm. 121 S. Hope Ave. Free. Call (805) 687-6458. shoplacumbre.com/events 2/29: The James Joyce Ulysses Jasz. 7:30-10:30pm. 513 State St. Free. Ages 21+. Call (805) 962-2668. sbjamesjoyce.com

Must be 21 years of age or older to attend. Chumash Casino Resort reserves the right to change or cancel promotions and events.

2/28: Whiskey Richards The Rough, Avenue Army. 8-11:30pm. Whiskey Richards, 435 State St. Free. Ages 21+. Call (805) 963-1786.

tinyurl.com/WhiskeyRichards28FEB20

Welcome to Freedom INDEPENDENT.COM

FEBRUARY 27, 2020

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37


“I see the benefits of stable jobs for families throughout the community.”

SATURDAY

– ALBERTO ARROYO, Glass House Farms, Cultivation Manager

JUNE 27

2:00–5:00 PM Sip and savor 100+ of the Central Coast’s best wines and culinary delights while enjoying a splendid summer afternoon in the Museum’s oak woodland along Mission Creek.

GENERAL ADMISSION $100/PERSON

CREATED BY

RESPONSIBLE FARMERS IN 2018

ECONOMIC BENEFITS OF CANNABIS FARMING: $456 million added annually to SB County Economy Over 6,000 jobs created from cannabis

VIP ADMISSION $160/PERSON VIPs get early entry at 1:00 PM to the beautiful Museum Backyard with at least 10 premier wineries and food purveyors all to themselves.

Over $9 million county cannabis taxes collected to date Increased property taxes from farms directly to schools UCSB Cannabis Economic Impact Study

Buy tickets at sbnature.org/winefestival

Tuesdays & Thursdays 9am to 2pm

50% OFF

2559 Puesta del Sol, Santa Barbara, CA 93105 . 805-682-4711 ext. 110 Presenting sponsor:

®

Sponsored in part by:

ROBERTSON

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INTERNATIONAL

TRAVEL CONSULTANTS

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806-965-2422 • lwvsantabarbara.org Paid for by The League of Women Voters ® of Santa Barbara 38

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FEBRUARY 27, 2020

INDEPENDENT.COM

(805) 259-1490 2026 Cliff Drive | Santa Barbara Mesa/Vons shopping Center


Environment

living

COURTESY

p. 39

PHOTOS BY ERIC A URECH

Fun

Who Doesn’t Want

I

Butt-Kicking Beauty E

ach year, gray whales make a 12,000-mile journey between the temperate climes of Baja California to their feeding grounds in the frigid waters of Alaska. During this trip, one of the longest migrations in the animal kingdom, they pass through the waters of the Santa Barbara coast. On a sunny Friday afternoon aboard the Santa Barbara Sailing Center’s Double Dolphin (where, for the sake of transparency, I worked as a crewmember during the summers of my college years), we happen across one of these magnificent creatures. Passengers file back and forth from one side of the vessel to the other, trying to guess where the whale will emerge next. When it does, preceded by a spout of mist, murmurs float up from the crowd, and the sense of awe is shared by everyone. These animals can reach 45 feet in size, and seeing them on the ocean is an experience that’s difficult to grasp until you’ve experienced it for yourself. Because they’re a particularly coastal species of whale, gray whales are easier to spot out on the water than more elusive, deep-water varieties. In Santa Barbara, the gray migration season lasts from mid-February to mid-May, and opportunities to witness them up close and personal abound. “Seeing these animals out in their natural habitat is really something you have to experience yourself to fully appreciate,” says Skip Abed, the owner of the Santa Barbara Sailing Center. “It’s a great way to get out on the water and appreciate the beauty of what we have here in Santa Barbara.” Out on the Double Dolphin, Shirley Johnson, a volunteer from NOAA who provides passengers with information about the sea life they come across, says the trips are also a way to promote education and awareness. “Santa Barbara is a unique place because of the diversity of its marine life,” says Johnson, who has been volunteering on such trips since 2006. “If you don’t know about it, how can you love it? And if you can’t love it, how can you protect it?” On top of the wildlife, being out on the water is a great way to view the natural beauty of Santa Barbara from a different perspective than you get on land.

“The contrast of the mountains and the ocean is really beautiful,” says Katie Cassity, who was visiting from Salt Lake City. “It’s cool we saw a few whales. They make you feel so small!” Out on the water, we also come across huge pods of dolphins, who playfully surf the wake of the boat. “Things got litty,” says Anthony Spann, a student from Chapman out with his girlfriend, Lisa, for Valentine’s Day. With an abundance of whale-watching opportunities, it’s easy to forget that the ecosystem is a fragile thing. At one point, due to the excesses of a rapacious

GRAY WHALE MIGRATION

Is a Reminder to Appreciate and Protect Nature whaling industry, gray whales came close to annihilation. But thanks to conservation efforts and protective laws, the gray whale was removed from the endangered species list in 1994. Now, Coal Oil Point functions as an observation point for Gray Whale Count, a nonprofit made of volunteers who keep an eye out for the massive creatures as they lumber northward. They then use that information to keep track of the numbers of whales making the trip each year. The global population is estimated to be between 24,000 and 26,000. Dana Johnson, who has been a captain on the Double Dolphin for years, emphasized the trips are a way for people to connect with the ecosystem right in their backyard. On our way back to the harbor, Johnson and his crew stopped the boat to fish a wayward balloon out of the ocean. “Don’t let this be you, folks. Throw away your balloons!” he said over the loudspeaker. It’s a subtle reminder of our collective responsibility as stewards of the ocean that gives our community more than we can repay. “See it; experience it; feel the environment out here,” said Johnson. “Connect with what a special thing we have here and do your part to protect it.” — Brian Osgood

TO FLY?

f you’ve driven by Earl Warren Showgrounds, you may have noticed the metal poles and rigging and wondered, as I did the first time I noticed it, what is that? The apparatus went up in September 2019, when the Santa Barbara Trapeze Company ((flytrapezesantabarbara .com) literally got off the ground. On a recent sunny Saturday afternoon, I joined Dennis, Tabitha, Joe, and 8-year-old Simone Richardson for an introductory class. I signed the perfunctory waiver and gazed up at the platform from which the action starts, 23 feet from the ground, accessed by way of a very tall aluminum ladder. Our coaches were Randy Kohn, Shane Weaver, and Efe Ilkay. Seeing that Randy was wearing a bulky knee brace and moving with some difficulty was disconcerting. “Snow skiing,” he assured me with a smile. They strapped safety harnesses around our waists, explained the safety rules, and promised us that we were in for a one-of-a-kind experience. Between them, the coaches have more than 50 years of experience with trapeze and aerial arts. The trio met at a camp in 2002 and have been friends since, and now they’ve made their passion a business and brought trapeze to Santa Barbara. Before the company lifted off, the only places to experience trapeze were in Simi Valley and Santa Monica. I can’t claim that I felt at ease the first time I climbed the ladder and stood on the platform. Even though I was hooked to a safety line and don’t have a fear of heights, it’s still one thing to know intellectually that you’re in the hands of competent people and another to assess the distance between where you stand and the rectangular safety net way down below. Randy explained later that the first time on the platform is the moment novice flyers are most likely to feel a heart-in-the-throat sort of panic. Fortunately, he, Efe, and Shane coach you through it, step by step. It helps to get out of your head and simply experience your body moving in space, free from the bonds of gravity for the time it takes to swing out and back. The sensation is exhilarating, and it’s easy to see why people become addicted to it. It’s the reason why children love monkey bars, tire swings, and getting air on a skateboard. It’s pure freedom. It’s why Simone, who turned 8 a few days before and was flying as a birthday present, was beaming as she swung back and forth. I didn’t expect that in under two hours, I would hang by my knees from the bar, body arched back as far as possible, to reach out and be caught in midair by Shane. Talk about feeling a sense of accomplishment! Adrenaline junkies will definitely love Santa Barbara Trapeze, but flying is an activity people of all ages can enjoy. Not only does the trio make the experience fun with their support and exuberance, but they help you find your inner daredevil. — Brian Tanguay

INDEPENDENT.COM

FEBRUARY 27, 2020

THE INDEPENDENT

39


FOOD &DRINK T

deals

The Prix Fixe Is In Restaurant Week Dishing up Deep Discounts Until March 6

ALEX WARD PHOTOS

BY ALEX WARD

p.40

here is a magical time of year in Santa Barbara. When

the Valentine’s Day crowds have dispersed and dispensed with their wanton displays of public affection. When the icy chill of 68-degree weather has half the town hoarding Duraflames and huddling under weighted blankets. When restaurants serve extravagant fixed menus featuring reduced prices and mandatory desserts that, let’s face it, you’d be rude not to eat. What is this glorious stretch of the calendar? Why, it’s Santa Barbara Restaurant Week, a wonderfully misnomered 14-day affair currently in full swing and running until March 6. The annual event affords diners the opportunity to sample more than 30 restaurants serving three-course meals at $25, $35, and $45 price points. Some proceeds benefit ProStart, a program designed to prepare high school students for careers in the culinary industry. “It’s an opportunity for people to go try a restaurant they’ve been wanting to indulge at for an affordable price,”says event chair Leslee Garafalo,“and it’s for a great cause and helps support the community.” This year, I mustered the selfless courage to eat my way through three of Restaurant Week’s most decadent dining options. Call me a hero if you must.

For a list of participating restaurants and their menus, visit sbrestaurantweeks.com.

STELLA MARE’S, $45:

PARADISE CAFÉ, $25:

This downtown staple, which recently came under the Acme Hospitality umbrella, is participating in Restaurant Week for the first time. Manager Oliver Davis sees it as an opportunity for Paradise’s regulars to venture beyond the restaurant’s much-beloved burger, explaining, “You’re going to find some new things on an original menu that gives you a chance to explore.” For the first course, Paradise is offering a rotating roster of mostly vegetarian soups in addition to shoestring french fries, smothered in garlic butter and served with a side of rosemary aioli. But recognizing that prix-fixe meals are a marathon and not a sprint, I chose to start with the house salad, mixed greens lightly dressed with a lovely lemon vinaigrette and tossed with cucumbers and garlic croutons. For the entrée, I ordered the grilled fish of the day: oakgrilled swordfish, served atop garlic brown rice with charred broccolini and a white-wine butter sauce. Other options include orecchiette pasta, with Calabrian chilis and fennel sausage, and lemon-brined fried chicken, accompanied by crispy brussels sprouts and a drizzle of roasted chicken jus. All of this tremendous food is, of course, merely a prelude to the sugary main event. Paradise offers either a scoop of McConnell’s ice cream or a slice of their house-made Paradise Pie, a semi-sweet chocolate mousse with a cookie-crumb crust and buttercream icing. My dining companion and I wisely married the two into one magnificent triumph of delicious depravity.

702 Anacapa St.; (805) 962-4416; paradisecafe.comh

40

THE INDEPENDENT

FEBRUARY 27, 2020

OKU, $35:

Longtime S.B. restaurateurs Tina Takaya and Ted Ellis opened this waterfront restaurant in October. “What we want to get out of Restaurant Week is to just bring in people who might not have come in because they assumed that we’re too expensive, when we’ve actually priced everything to be accessible,” said Ellis. Starters selections include sesame-glazed Saigon chicken wings and a baby spinach and sautéed mushroom salad. I opted for the exquisite Crispy Korean Cauliflower: florets lightly tempura-battered and coated in gochujang with creamy swirls of yuzu aioli tempering the spice. It’s practically a meal unto itself. The roster of entrées is equally enticing: seared scallops plated atop a beet and mango puree and a flat-iron steak sauced with chimichurri and served with local root vegetables. I went with the tantalizing Piranha Roll: albacore wrapped in cucumber and avocado and partnered with ponzu sauce. Dessert is either Coffee Crème Brûlée or Yuzu Citrus Cheesecake. I chose the latter, a light and fluffy yet nonetheless massive brick of citrusy delectation; I had to take half of it home.

29 E. Cabrillo St., (805) 690-1650; okusantabarbara.com

INDEPENDENT.COM

Located in a 19th-century house overlooking the Andrée Clark Bird Refuge, Stella Mare’s is arguably the city’s most beautifully atmospheric restaurant. And with stellar service, a fantastic collection of French country cuisine, and an optional $16 wine pairing, the charming bistro just might be the Restaurant Week highlight. “We wanted to show our French country bistro style — keep it classic,” said Executive Chef Roth Ironside, whose cooking is about as strikingly awesome as his name. Tough decisions begin with the first course: country pâté served with pickled shallots and crostini as well as a Bibb lettuce salad, with fresh garden herbs and red-onion dressing. I leapt — maybe hopped? — at the chance to order the herbcrusted frog legs, bathed in a provençale white-wine sauce and piled atop a pleasingly briny blend of diced tomatoes and capers. Kermit may never have found the rainbow connection, but I found a lot to like in the meaty limbs of his fallen brothers. Entrées include Coq au Vin, stewed in red wine with pearl onions and potato batons, and Salmon Almondine, nestled into a bed of purple cauliflower puree and dressed with a sweet carrot vinaigrette. Throwing caution and calories to the wind, I ordered the masterfully prepared Short Ribs Bourguignon. Braised for four hours in a rich cabernet sauce, the flavorful beef is exceptionally tender and well complemented by salty lardons and earthy mushrooms. Desserts range from flourless chocolate torte to lemon curd cake topped with caramelized mascarpone. A Restaurant Week special is a white chocolate bread pudding, slathered in crème anglaise and laid atop a blueberry compote. I found it to be deliciously comforting and the perfect end to an absolutely perfect meal.

50 Los Patos Wy.; (805) 969-6705; stellamares.com


Super CuCaS

celebrations

JULIA CHILD

2018

Best of

Santa Barbara

Honored by Casa Dorinda

®

Runner-Up

O

ne of the reasons Julia Child can inspire an almost religious fervor in those who followed her— that is, anyone who loves food —is that, like another famous J.C., she told us all to “Take, and eat.” Or maybe that should be, “Cook, and eat.” For in the 1960s, when most food was frozen and preprepared, Child made it clear that food could be fun. And, in perhaps the most revolutionary way, she meant that both as a process—nope, that famed chicken dropped on the floor mid-episode never happened —and the product. That this famous author and television personality chose to spend the end of her life in the Santa Barbara area should come as no surprise. She visited often while growing up in Pasadena in the 1910s

VOTED SANTA BARBARA’S BEST BURRITO 27 YEARS

IN A ROW!

BREAKFAST

EVERY DAY!

BURRITO $639

e Soda w/ Lunch! High School Students Receive Fre Mesa Locations) (Mon-Fri Only - Micheltorena &

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While Child passed away 16 years ago at the age of 91, her time spent in Santa Barbara only seems to magnify and reverberate more loudly with each passing year. From March 13 to 15, the inaugural Santa Barbara Culinary Experience will celebrate all things Julia by throwing a gastronomic blowout of workshops, tastings, dinners, and hoopla in her honor. But beating that weekend to the punch was Casa Dorinda, where she lived from 2001 until her death in 2004. On February 14, her former resident friends threw a wonderful party called A Valentine Evening Remembering Julia Child. Please don’t think that something at a retireBY GEORGE YATCHISIN ment community will be stodgy. The evening kicked off in the Casa’s Game Room with a and ’20s, so there was that tug of nostalgia. But choice of wine or Julia’s beloved reverse martini Child was also a Francophile that made millions —think 5-1 vermouth over gin, easier on one’s liver feel the same, thanks to her late-life blockbuster and the rest of the evening—plus bowls full of popMastering the Art of French Cooking (written with corn with real butter (Francophile, remember?) Simone Beck and Louisette Bertholle). How could and Pepperidge Farm Goldfish (far from a snob, she not want to come to the American Riviera, then, she loved what she loved, Costco hot dogs and all). especially with its elongated growing seasons and The event moved into the auditorium for a screening of 2004’s Julia Child! America’s Favorite burgeoning wine industry? Chef, a PBS American Masters documentary rich with details, archival photos, and footage of the evening’s star. But before the screening, an aproned Bob Yamin, head of the Casa’s Entertainment Committee, paraded through with a trussed-up chicken carcass he unceremoniously dropped to the floor. That left estimable food writer Betty Fussell, a member of the James Beard Foundation Cookbook Hall of Fame (to mention just one of her honors), to pick things up from his, uh, fowl start. Fussell certainly did, sharing memories of Child from 1963 on, even if Fussell got to Casa Dorinda after Julia’s passing. Stressing that with her TV presence, Child made “canned and bland done,” Fussell also shared some of Julia’s zingers, stressing how she was a born comedienne. Insisting Child’s favorite meal was steak and gin, Fussell shared Child’s enduring quote, “Everything in moderation … including moderation.” So much of cooking, like comedy, is timing. Other Casa Dorinda-ites shared memories, too. Jane Eagleton, who knew Child first from their days together at Montecito Shores, reminisced about how she cooked for America’s Favorite Chef, who was always appreciative. One MASKED CHEF: Casa Dorinda’s executive sous chef Toi Dennis time, thinking about all the adulation for Child, donned a Julia Child mask for a laugh at a Valentine’s Day party in her honor.

CONT’D ON P. 42

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H. reports, “It looks like Lighthouse Coffee from the Mesa is taking over the former Breakfast at 711 Chapala.”

HOLDREN’S EXTENDS ANNIVERSARY SPECIAL:

Holdren’s Steaks & Seafood at 512 State Street has been celebrating their 17-year anniversary every Tuesday and Wednesday night for the month of February with $17 entrees and drink specials. It’s gone so well that they are extending the deal through March 31.

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Eagleton asked Julia how she put up with it, and Child replied, “I try not to think about it.” Cissy Hadley, who never met Child but now lives in her former apartment, has done everything she can to keep Child’s garden growing, from the fruit trees to the yellow roses that now bear Julia Child’s name. It remains, said Hadley, “a very happy place to live.” ¢ Judy Warren, who was hired when Child insisted on a female interior designer to help her build out her Casa Dorinda apartment, dug out some historic architectural drawings of her layout for Child’s famous kitchen (a smallish version of her Cambridge, Mass., one that is now at the Smithsonian). A nervous and excited-for-the-invite Warren first met Child at Julia’s Montecito Shores ¢for lunch; Child said she was on a diet, house handed Warren a banana, and said, “Here’s your lunch.” The Casa Dorinda dinner that followed was much more than bananas. The room was filled with 179 diners, a record for a single sitting. Toi Dennis, the Casa’s executive sous chef, workedGOLETA the room wearing a Julia Child Avemore laugh. Meanwhile, 5757 mask forHollister just one everyone enjoyed Child favorites like French onion soup, coq au vin, bouillabaisse, and chocolate espresso pots de crème.

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PASCUCCI IS BACK: Laura Knight, seen here from 2010 when she was named a Local Hero by this newspaper, is proud to be up and running Pascucci at 509 State Street.

John Dickson’s reporting can be found every day online at SantaBarbara.com. Send tips to info@ SantaBarbara.com.

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exciting news last Friday. “I’m excited to let you know that Pascucci has just opened tonight in our new location, after 26 years in Paseo Nuevo — 21 in our old space and five years in a small space behind Coffee Bean & Tea Leaf,” explained Knight. “We are now two GOLETA blocks closer to the beach located at 509 5757 Hollister Ave State Street, right across from Holdren’s and Natural Café, in the former home of Cadiz. It’s a great space, in a very vibrant block. It has a lot of similarities to our old space: brick walls, a sheltered recessed patio, a beautiful long marble bar and arches.” Knight said that they are paring down the menus, but also staying open later with a small late-night menu plus McConnell’s Ice Cream. They’re also participating in Santa Barbara Restaurant Week, with a $25, three-course menu.

PAUL WELLMAN FILE PHOTO

ascucci owner Laura Knight wrote with

Child would have loved that this evening in her name was all about delight.

SANTA BARBARA CULINARY EXPERIENCE This inaugural weekend of food and drink in honor of Julia Child goes down March 13 to 15. There are more than 50 events, from cooking classes to winemaker panels, but here are the three signature events. Learn more and buy tickets at sbce.events. Friday’s Opening Night Reception: Toast the week week--

end with more than two dozen Santa Barbara County wines at the Hotel Californian 5:30-7 p.m., when Chef Travis Watson will show off his small bites. $75

Saturday’s Border Grill on the Beach Lunch: Julia

Child Award winners Mary Sue Milliken and Susan Feniger will serve their modern Mexican cuisine 12:30-2 p.m. at the Chase Palm Park Carousel House. $125 Sunday’s Neighborhood Tasting at the S.B. Historical Museum: Food and drink stars from various

’hoods will be serving and pouring 12:30-3 p.m. For $30 more, come at 11 a.m. to learn about and taste with Santa Barbara’s Home Winemakers. $55-$85 n


Cook Thi

Vegan Chef Challenge Returns C

I c e C r e a m & Yo g u r t

McCONNELL’S FINE ICE CREAMS

EST. 1998

JOIN US FOR OUR WEEKLY SPECIALS MON - $3.50 Tacos TUES - All U Can Eat BBQ Baby Back Ribs $24 WEDS - All U Can Eat BBQ Beef Ribs $19 THURS - Prime Rib $21

LIVE MUSIC

Saturdays & Sundays

229 W. Montecito St., Santa Barbara 805.884.4664 | sbbrewhouse.com

PROUDLY SERVING SANTA BARBARA FOR OVER 40 YEARS

NORTHERN EUROPEAN ANDERSEN’S DANISH RESTAURANT & BAKERY. 1106 State St., 805-962-5085. Open M-Th 8a-6p, Fri/Sat 8a-9p, Sun 8a-6p. Family owned for over 42 years. Northern European Cuisine with California Infusion. Fresh scratch made pastries & menus everyday. Authentic Breakfasts, Lunches & Dinners. Happy Hour menu with exquisite wines & beers, 3-5pm everyday. High R VE TI S D Tea served everyday starting at 2pm. Huge Viking Mimosas & Champagne Cocktails. Private Event spaces. A

BRUNCH

Fridays & Saturdays

MEDITERRANEAN FOXTAIL KITCHEN 14 E. Cota St. Lebanese cuisine, American burger, 24 craft beers, great cocktails, whiskey bar, vegan options, open late night, hookah lounge. Kitchen closes at midnight on the weekend, try our best falafel in town. www.foxtailsb.com

E NT

To include your listing for under $20 a week, contact sales@independent.com or call 965-5205.

805.569.2323

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FRENCH PETIT VALENTIEN, 1114 State St. #14, 805-966-0222. Open

IRISH DARGAN’S IRISH PUB & RESTAURANT, 18 E. Ortega St. (next to lot 10) SB, 568-0702. $$. Open 7 days 11:30a-Close (Food ‘til 10p, 11p on Sat/Sun). AE MC V Disc. Authentic Irish food & atmosphere in downtown SB. Specialties from Ireland include Seafood & Meat dishes. Informal, relaxed pub-style atmosphere. Live music Thursday nights. Children welcome. Avail. for private parties. Pool & Darts.

201 West Mission St., Santa Barbara

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AUTHENTIC ETHIOPIAN cuisine Featured at Petit Valentien Restaurant 1114 State St. #14, 805-966-0222. Serkaddis Alemu offers an ever changing menu with choices of vegetarian, vegan, and meat options. Catering Available for parties of up to 40 people. Sat/Sun lunch 11:30-2:30

INDIAN FLAVOR OF INDIA 3026 State 682-6561 $$ www. flavorofindiasb.com Finest, most authentic Indian cuisine is affordable too! All You Can Eat Lunch Buffet $10.95 M-S dinner combos $9.95+ Specials: Tandoori- Mixed or Fish, Chicken Tikka Masala, Shrimp Bhuna. Also: meat, curries & vegetarian.Wine & Beer. Take out. VOTED BEST for 20 YEARS!

PA I D

DELI SAVOY CAFE & DELI 24 W. Figueroa St. 7am-9pm Monday -Saturday. A family owned and operated café featuring scratch cooking. Serving breakfast, lunch and dinner for the past 15 years. Award winning salad bar, bakery, soup, hot and cold prepared foods, coffee & tea bar and an extensive wine selection -local and import, retail and by the glass. Cozy atmosphere, dog friendly patio! www.thesavoycafe. comEthiopian

M-F 11:30-3pm (lunch). M-Sat 5pm-Close (dinner). Sun $25.50 four course prix fixe dinner. In La Arcada Plaza, Chef Robert Dixon presents classic French comfort food at affordable cost in this cozy gem of a restaurant. Petit Valentien offers a wide array of meat and seafood entrees along with extensive small plates and a wine list specializing in amazing quality at arguably the best price in town. A warm romantic atmosphere makes the perfect date spot. Comfortable locale for dinner parties, or even just a relaxing glass of wine. Reservations are recommended.

Voted BEST Ice Cream & Yogurt Store for 30 YEARS!

201 West Mission Santa Barbara- Outdoor 805.569.2323 Generous PortionsSt., - Free Parking Patio Convenient Location

Dining Out Guide

THE ENDLESS SUMMER BAR-CAFE, 113 Harbor Way, 805-564-4666, upstairs from Chuck’s Waterfront Grill, offers casual dining, surrounded by vintage surfboards and memorabilia. Sip on local wines, craft beers and cocktails, play a game of pool on one of our covered lanais while watching sports and surf movies on our 50” 4k TV’s. Listen to live music evenings, as you revel in the beauty that is Santa Barbara. Serving daily from 11:30 a.m. Private parties and special events accommodated.

McCONNELL’S FINE ICE CREAMS

rated Owned & Ope1986! ce Shop sin Voted BEST Ice Cream & Yogurt Store for 30 YEARS!

the cause by March 18 to pay for promotions. (Those who sign up before March 4 save $50.) The categories being judged include appetizer, entrée, and dessert. Awards will be based on diner comments, photos, and the dining experiences of organizers. Winners will be announced during a ceremony in May. To register, visit theveganchefchallenge.com/ —Matt Ketttmann santa-barbara.

FOOD & DRINK •

CASUAL DINING CHUCKS WATERFRONT GRILL, 113 Harbor Way, 805-5641200, began serving friends and family in the Santa Barbara Harbor in 1999. We’re everyone’s favorite spot to sit and relax by the boats, watching all the action. Enjoy steaks, fresh seafood straight from the boats docked right outside, and cocktails on our radiant heated deck with fire pits. Or head inside for intimate, cozy booths and the full bar. Plus, free valet parking! Dinner 7 nights from 5 p.m., Sunday Brunch from 10 a.m. Private parties and special events accommodated.

Featuring

Vegan Chef Challenge organizer Beth Wettstein

DINING O U T GUIDE AMERICAN LITTLE KITCHEN, 17 W. Ortega St. (805) 770-2299. “Great little neighborhood café!” Healthy, comfortable, and affordable. Lunch-Dinner-Late Night. Organic chicken and hormone/antibiotic-free burgers, local produce. Try the Chicken Tikka Masala, vegetarian options. Great local wine list and craft beers. www.littlekitchensb.com

I c e C r e a m & Yo g u r t

PAUL WELLMAN FILE PHOTO

hefs whose culinary talents can, or already

do, appeal to vegans better sharpen their meat-free knives: The second annual Santa Barbara Vegan Chef Challenge is going down throughout the month of April, and this year, organizer Beth Wettstein is inviting chefs from Oxnard and Ventura to join in the enlightened eating fun. “We hope to encourage everyone, not just vegans, to try out a dish,” said Wettstein, a vegan for the past decade who hopes the contest encourages more restaurants to serve vegan options. Participating restaurants must commit to providing a full vegan experience, offering ingredients free of dairy products, eggs, cheese, butter, meat, fish, poultry, whey, casein, gelatin, and glycerin, unless the latter is vegetablesourced. They must also offer at least three new menu items in April and donate $100 to

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FEBRUARY 27, 2020

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GranadaSB.org

805.899.2222 Goldenvoice presents

HERB ALPERT & LANI HALL Fri FEB 28 7:30 pm

UCSB Arts & Lectures presents

BILL BRYSON

THE BODY: A GUIDE FOR OCCUPANTS Mon MAR 2 7:30pm

The Broadway In Santa Barbara Series presents

Network Medical presents

SEALED

FEAT. FORMER NAVY SEAL, CHAD WILLIAMS Thu MAR 19 7 pm Santa Barbara Symphony presents

BUDDY

AN AMERICAN IN PARIS

Tue MAR 3 7:30pm Wed MAR 4 7:30pm

Sat MAR 21 8 pm Sun MAR 22 3pm

CAMA presents

CAMA presents

THE BUDDY HOLLY STORY

LOS ANGELES PHILHARMONIC Fri MAR 6 7 pm (Early Start Time)

The Film Accompanied by Live Orchestra

ROTTERDAM PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA Thu MAR 26 8pm

UCSB Arts & Lectures presents

CALM Auxiliary Presents

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Mon MAR 9 7:30 pm

Sat MAR 28 3 pm

UNTIL THE END OF TIME

COURAGE AND RESILIENCE

UCSB Arts & Lectures presents State Street Ballet presents

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1214 State Street, Santa Barbara 44

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FEBRUARY 27, 2020

Thank you to our Season Title Sponsor INDEPENDENT.COM

LYON OPERA BALLET

TROIS GRANDES FUGUES Wed APR 1 8 pm Thur APR 2 8 pm

Donor parking provided by


Snarky Puppy

DOS PUEBLOS

JAZZ IN PARADISE HIGH SCHOOL PRESENTS 51ST ANNUAL MUSIC FESTIVAL

D

espite its seemingly ripe potential as an entertainment destination, Santa Barbara has a surprisingly slender history of jazz festival action, including a several-year effort on the beach in the late ’80s/early ’90s and a brave-but-brief Solvang Jazz Festival, led by Crusaders drummer Stix Hooper. Meanwhile, though, the entity known as the Dos Pueblos High School Jazz Festival has quietly and steadily amassed an impressive half century of duty, and it eases into its 51st annual event — dubbed “Jazz in Paradise” — this Saturday on the Dos Pueblos campus, in the comfortable confines of the Elings Performing Arts Center. Jazz in Paradise has long adhered to the academic competitive model, as a magnet for high school and university big bands showcasing and vying for prizes. But its recent history has been upwardly mobile, appealing to the general jazz fan population along with the built-in contingent of students’ family and friends in the house. In recent years, the daylong event has hosted well-known artists, including saxist Tom Scott and drummer Gregg Bissonette, who give workshops by day and perform with featured

bands in the evening concert. This year’s featured big bands are the DPHS band and SBCC’s powerful “Lunch Break” group, directed by Jim Mooy. And the big news: This year’s celebrity guest is especially notable—famed drummer Dave Weckl, as well as the horn players (Chris Bullock, Jay Jennings, Mike Maher, and Justin Stanton) from the popular jazz-funk-party band Snarky Puppy. Leading the Jazz in Paradise charge for the past four years is teacher/jazz program head Dan Garske, who has taught in various area schools for decades and was recognized last year as a Santa Barbara Independent Local Hero. Garske is retiring next year but goes out on a high note with this Weckl/Puppy-featur Weckl/Puppy-featuring program. “It is truly is an amazing event for jazz lovers, and a local treasure,” said Garske. “I’ve had my big bands participate every year for 37 years and usually every local high school and junior high

has their big band participate. I have memo-ries even further back. As a student musician, when I went to La Cumbre Junior High and San Marcos High in the ’70s, I played drums in the big band and really loved the festival. The festival has continued to evolve,” he continued. “The director before me [Les Rose] brought in some really great players like Tom Scott, and that raised the bar.” That bar was raised even further this year, with the expanded artistic guest list, which Garske admitted was “a huge financial leap,” made possible with fiscal help from DPFHS band boosters, the Santa Barbara Bowl Foundation, and the Santa Barbara Education Foundation. The festival has enjoyed a tight and symbiotic relationship with veteran Nick Rail, of Nick Rail Music fame, and his connections with the influential Yamaha instrument division helps lead them to potential special guest musicians. The festival’s strong recent chapter comes at a time when the once-rare instance of jazz education has proliferated at the university level around the country, leading to earlier interest of students in pursuing a livelihood in music. “More students … are looking into careers like the music business or commercial music, since colleges have started to offer that. They get into their high school jazz band sometimes as their first exposure, but then diverge into all kinds of areas connected to music,” explained Garske. One such genre that young people are pursuing is big band. “Often, students’ early exposure to jazz, in a school setting, involves the culture of big bands,” said Garske. “And big bands nowadays don’t just play traditional swing—there are funk charts, lots of artistic modern compositions, all kinds of things being performed. In some case, in other words, we can say we heard them here at DPHS first. —Josef Woodard

4·1·1

Dos Pueblos Jazz Festival takes place Saturday, February 29, with a daytime competition and evening concert from drummer Dave Weckl and Snarky Puppy horn section at 7 p.m. Admission for the daytime program is $10; the evening program, which includes daytime admission, is $25 (general) or $20 (seniors/students). See dphsmusic.org/jazz.

INDY BOOK CLUB M A R C H

R E A D

Set in the 1950s, Boy, Snow, Bird is a retelling of the “Snow White” story. At 20 years old, Boy Novak, who lives with her abusive father, decides to run away, landing in Flaxhill, Massachusetts, where she eventually meets and marries a jeweler, Arturo Whitman, father to a young girl. While Boy is initially infatuated with her stepdaughter, Snow, she ultimately takes on the role of evil stepmother when she has a daughter of her own, Bird. Bird’s birth brings to light a secret that forces Boy to reevaluate how she views her husband’s family. Focusing on themes of vanity, race, and gender, author Helen Oyeyemi tells a complicated story while shining light on how small biases add up to full-blown prejudices. On Wednesday, March 25, 6 p.m., at Municipal Winemakers (22 Anacapa St.), we will host our first discussion meetup. We’ll swap books (bring your favorites to pass along) and reveal the next Indy Book Club selection. To find out more about the Indy Book Club, keep an eye on the print issue and independent.com/category/artsentertainment, as we will be announcing more details as they unfold. Get started by joining our Goodreads group at tinyurl .com/SBIndyGoodreads. —Caitlin Fitch

BOOK OF THE MONTH

L I F E PAGE 45 KATHEE MILLER

ROB SHANAHAN

EMAIL: ARTS@INDEPENDENT.COM

Lauren Serrano

HH11 DANCE FESTIVAL Now in its sixth season, Nebula Dance Lab’s annual HH11 Dance Festival rolls into Center Stage Theater February 27-March 1, bringing with it a powerhouse representation of California-driven dance. Tap, dance film, jazz, hip-hop, swing, modern, and contemporary dance will fill the intimate black-box space over the course of four evenings, underscoring the Golden State’s wide-ranging talent from Oakland to San Diego. Thirteen Santa Barbara companies will also be flexing their creative clout, along with this year’s wild card, REIDance, whose Chicago roots are reflected in their theater-based performances. The festival will kick off on Thursday with its annual Apogee Awards ceremony, a community event honoring dance educators that also serves as a platform for highlighting the works of Santa Barbara–based youth companies, including Santa Barbara Dance Arts, Everybody Dance Now!, and State Street Ballet Young Dancers. On Friday, the “Mix and Mingle” program will feature cocktails, live music, and an outdoor screening of filmmaker Robin Bisio’s Butterfly’s Lament before ushering the audience into the theater for a tightly curated selection of high-octane dance works. Saturday and Sunday are reserved for the fortified dance enthusiast, as no fewer than 24 companies take the stage in works ranging from the nostalgic, such as the smile-inducing “Swing”by the Dance Network, to the investigative: Marcos Duran’s 20-minute examination of politics and generational trauma in “The Underground: Heel Skull.” Throughout the weekend, an open space forum in the Paseo Nuevo Mall’s courtyard will feature dance demonstrations and improvisational works from area talent. By providing spaces of exploration and exposure to companies of varying stages in their careers, program director Devyn Duex and her stalwart sidekick Heather Shea have greatly contributed to Santa Barbara’s reputation as a significant dance resource for artists and audiences alike. Through risk and perseverance, the HH11 Dance Festival has consistently ushered in artists of wide-reaching range, encouraging a dialogue between classic and experimental forms and provoking subjective discussions about aesthetics and sensibilities. Grab a friend, pick a night or two, and join in the conversation. This homegrown festival always makes for a stimulating night at the theater. —Ninette Paloma

M O R E A R T S & E N T E R TA I N M E N T > > > INDEPENDENT.COM

FEBRUARY 27, 2020

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45


DAVID BAZEMORE

Love Yourursself

a&e | THEATER PREVIEWS

Look and Feel the Way You Want!

Join us for specials on CoolSculpting®, SkinMedica, and More! Schedule a free mini-consult for the day to be entered into raffles for free treatments.

THIS Wednesday, March 4, 4 to 7 pm RSVP or Schedule your mini-consult (805)845-2500

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Bring a donation for the women in St. Vincent’s Family Strengthening Program. Get a special thank you.

216 W. Pueblo Street, Suite A, Santa Barbara

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Jazz

a dos pueblos instrumental music benefit concert

FEB

in

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29 7pm

dos Pueblos elings Performing Arts Center 7266 alameda ave, goleta, ca special guest

dave weckl special guest

snarky puppy horns featuring

sbcc lunch break & dphs jazz bands tickets $25

student/senior $20

dPHsmusic.org/jazz

46

THE INDEPENDENT

FEBRUARY 27, 2020

INDEPENDENT.COM

L’IMPOSTEUR: Julie Fishell directs students in the classic 17th-century French comedy.

UCSB PRESENTS MOLIÈRE’S TARTUFFE

E

verything that actor, director, and professor of theater Julie Fishell does, she does with style. Whether she’s onstage delivering a blistering wisecrack as the eccentric matriarch in Enid Graham’s new play, What by Charles Donelan Martha Did, or reimagining the musical Cabaret as an immersive theater-in-the-round experience—as she did a couple of seasons ago for the UCSB theater program—there’s the sense that Fishell is profoundly connected to a rich theatrical tradition. Having served on the faculty of the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill for more than 20 years, this Juilliard graduate comes to her work with UCSB’s BFA students as one of the most experienced and sophisticated instructors of acting in the country. When UCSB’s new production of Molière’s Tartuffe opens on Thursday, February 27, at the Hatlen Theater, audiences will have a chance to see the best practices of contemporary theater training in action. Fishell’s talented cast will put on a show that embodies the ideals of a “heightened text” for the stage. So-called heightened texts are plays that, while not Shakespeare, nevertheless make similar demands on performers. These demands may include speaking in verse but are not limited to that particular discipline. What’s common to all scripts in this exalted category, whether they are by Molière, George Bernard Shaw, or David Ives, is the presence of verbal gymnastics. David Ball, author of a classic text on play analysis called Backwards & Forwards, wrote the translation of Tartuffe that the production will be using for the legendary Minneapolis theater company Theatre de la Jeune Lune. As a professor at Duke, Ball was part of Fishell’s Triangle cohort; they share an interest in the work of Jacques Lecoq, whose “neutral mask” method of actor training has influenced a wide range of directors and performers with its emphasis on the playfulness, openness, and togetherness of the ensemble. Technically polished yet also overflowing with Lecoqian vigor, Ball’s clever script promises to be an exciting point of departure for what is sure to be a memorable experience. UCSB professor Ann Sheffield designed the set, which will transform the large Hatlen stage into a 17th-century French drawing room. Tartuffe, Molière’s supreme creation, will get an outing worthy of its stylish origins in the court of Louis XIV.

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THEATER PROGRAM O F F E R S U P CLASSIC FRENCH PLAY

Tartuffe runs Thursday, February 27-Saturday, March 7, at UCSB’s Hatlen Theater. See theaterdance.ucsb.edu or call (805) 893-2064.


TARTUFFE

BEN CROP

Moliére’s

adapted by David Ball directed by Julie Fishell

WILD WORLD: Daniel Sabraw (pictured with costar Clare Carey) stars as Christopher, a high-functioning autistic teenager who gets drawn into a mystery when he discovers the neighbor’s dog murdered.

THE CURIOUS INCIDENT OF THE DOG IN THE NIGHT-TIME

S

imon Stephens’s theatrical adaptation Christopher, a neuro-atypical teenage boy, is of Mark Haddon’s mystery novel The struggling to make sense of the world around Curious Incident of the Dog in the Night- him and build human connections. Like many Time was the talk of the town in 2015 when it coming-of-age stories and stories that feature won five Tony Awards (including Best Play), the hero’s journey structure, we watch Chrissix Drama Desk Awards, and five Outer Crit- topher venture outside of his comfort zone. He ics Circle Awards for outstanding new play faces conflict and works to overcome it, with — after an equally successful run on the west the audience’s support every step of the way.” Siobhan plays a critical role in Christoend in 2013. The play, produced this spring by the pher’s development. “She works with ChrisTheatre Group at SBCC, features a teenage topher to practice life skills, identify and talk protagonist, Christopher (Daniel Sabraw), through emotions, and not just survive but whose unusual comportments and thought thrive in a world that can sometimes be loud, processes infer a level of high-functioning illogical, and generally overwhelming,” said autism. Christopher is Eve. While Siobhan narnimble with numbers but rates much of the story admits to some (relative to from a book Christopher his peer group) behavioral has written after the fact irregularities. He lives with about solving the case, his widowed father and this structure sets up a rarely interacts with the unique dynamic: The narworld beyond his home. rator is a character who is The mystery begins reading the story for the by Maggie Yates when Christopher disfirst time. “As a narrator, covers the neighbor’s dog you’d understand where viciously murdered with a pitchfork. The the story is going. Siobhan doesn’t. This is new police are called, and Christopher’s odd information for her, and reading the book social tendencies bring him into the suspi- allows her insight into Christopher’s world cious gaze of the authorities. He fixates on outside of school. This insight, this glimpse solving the murder despite his father’s order into his head … connects her to him in a to remain uninvolved. Notwithstanding his meaningful way over the course of the show.” fears and miscomprehension of the world The audience gets an insider view of outside his limited scope, Christopher sets Christopher’s experience of the world with off on an adventure that leads him from his the use of creative lighting and sound effects little neighborhood to big-city London and that bring his interior life to the surface. It’s an introduces him to a wider, wilder world than uplifting story that shows a young character taking agency, building confidence through he could have invented. “I’ve loved this play since I saw it at the life experience, and developing optimism Apollo Theatre on the West End, and I’m for the future. Christopher begins to rebuild thrilled that SBCC has chosen to produce it his relationship with his father, prepares for in Santa Barbara,” said Samantha Eve, who college, and gets a dog — positive steps for plays Siobhan, Christopher’s teacher. “It is, first anyone working toward a more nourishing and foremost, a story about being different. and meaningful lifestyle.

SBCC THEATRE GROUP

Feb 27 - Mar 7, 2020 Hatlen Theater theaterdance.ucsb.edu

Is Proud to Announce the 2020 Honorees

13

Presented by

PRESENTS TONY AWARD–WINNING PLAY

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The Theatre Group at SBCC presents The Curious Incident of the Dog in the NightTime,, which opens Friday, February 28, and runs through Saturday, March 14. See Time theatergroupsbcc.com/santa-barbara-theaters-now-playing.. theatergroupsbcc.com/santa-barbara-theaters-now-playing

Of The

th

Friday April 24 11:30am Hyatt Hotel Barbara Ben-Horin

Early bird tickets available b4 March 15 at awcsb.org

Girls, Inc, Santa Barbara

Luz Reyes-Martin SBCC & WPAC

acy voc d n” dA an ratio , e e oic en n, V ew G o i s “Vi or a N f

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“ …just terrific…a profoundly moving play about adolescence, fractured families, mathematics, colours and lights…dazzling.”

03 02 2020

presents

—Independent (London)

presents

Free and open to the public.

Capps Forum on Ethics and Public Policy

Research Ethics: Uncertainty, Reproducibility, and Truth in Science Professor Michael Kalichman UC San Diego

The promise of science is great, but the application of new technologies often raises profound ethical questions. Answering those questions depends on both critical philosophical inquiry and good data. Unfortunately, the reliability of the science is in question. Theoretical and empirical investigations have caused many to believe that science now faces a reproducibility crisis: Much that is published by one team of scientists cannot be reproduced by another. Issues to be addressed will include the magnitude of this crisis, factors contributing to research findings that are not reproducible, and identifying strategies that will promote the rigor and reproducibility of science.

A play by SIMON STEPHENS Based on the novel by MARK HADDON Directed by KATIE LARIS Winner of the

2015 TO N Y AWA R D for Best Play

FEBRUARY 28–MARCH 14

Monday March 2, 2020 7:00 p.m. Loma Pelona Conference Center UC Santa Barbara

For further information contact Capps Center Director Greg Johnson at gjohnson@ucsb.edu or (805) 893-2562

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a&e | CLASSICAL PREVIEW

Now open through May 3, 2020 MAXIMUS ART GALLERY An exhibit about the diversity and abundance of wildlife in North America in the early 19th century as witnessed by artists and ornithologists, paired with their own prophetic warnings about wilderness loss during their time.

BOLD CHOICES: Westmont’s theater program takes an interesting new approach to The Marriage Contract.

WESTMONT STUDENTS

EXPLORE CULTURE THROUGH OPERA

W

hat’s opera doing in the 21stcentury theater curriculum? At Westmont College, quite a lot. On Friday, Sunday, and Tuesday, February 28-March 3, the school will present a double feature of Puccini’s Gianni Schicchi and Rossini’s The Marriage Contract by Charles Donelan at the New Vic in downtown Santa Barbara. The production is directed by John Blondell from the theater program and Michael Shasberger from the music department and features undergraduate students in all the roles. The challenges to both students and faculty are considerable, and the rewards are immense. Last year’s production of Mozart’s The Magic Flute featured an abundance of imaginative staging ideas and inspired performances; this season promises more of that, plus an interesting new approach to The Marriage Contract that comes out of the cast’s classroom discussion. The theater program at Westmont has a long history of making bold choices. These opera performances represent the latest chapter in director/ professor Blondell’s restless, searching artistic journey, a career that has taken him around the world and that has brought together thousands of artists and performers both at the college and in many other countries. Changes that would be daunting to most instructors, such as switching from Shakespeare to opera, or taking undergraduates downtown to perform, come naturally to Blondell, who routinely directs shows for national theaters in places such as Armenia, Montenegro, and Kazakhstan and has done so for decades. Which is not to say that any of this is easy. Pushing boundaries with staging and connecting the performances of college students to the pulse of international physical theater practice requires hard work, both in the rehearsal studio and in the classroom, where students are asked to confront the social issues raised by the works they perform. It’s this emotional grounding in the history and culture of the material that gives the pop and sizzle of movement and colors its requisite heft and sense of reality. Speaking with Blondell recently about the Rossini piece, I learned that the students were shaken by the content when they began studying the story. The heroine’s father has promised her to Slook, a Canadian businessman she has never met. Fanny is already in love with someone else but is keeping her relationship a secret from Tobias, her father. It’s a comedy, so everything works out for the true-love couple, but that’s only because the Canadian turns out to be a nice guy. Fanny’s fate never comes close to being within her control. Even when she gets what she wants, it comes as the result of a decision made by a man. The exigencies of the marriage market proved to be an emotionally charged topic even at a 200-year remove. Blondell said that at one point, the students “were so upset by the way women were treated in the play that they weren’t sure they even wanted to do it.” Rather than insisting that they go on with the show, Blondell took their misgivings seriously, and put the question “can we do this?” on the table. Within a few sessions, the group came to the decision that they could, but only if saying “yes” to The Marriage Contract’s proposal meant finding a way to make it work for this time and place. To see what that is, and to enjoy the satirical farce of Gianni Schicchi, which takes aim at patriarchy from another angle, you’ll have to get to the New Vic this weekend. If you do, you’ll be sharing in a process that the students involved in the production have initiated — using opera to know ourselves, both as we were and as we are.

GIANNI SCHICCHI AND THE MARRIAGE CONTRACT

DOUBLE BILL

4•1•1

Gianni Schicchi and The Marriage Contract show Friday, Sunday, and Tuesday, February 28 and March 1 and 3, at the New Vic (33 W. Victoria St.). Call (805) 965-5400 or see ensembletheatre.com.

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03 05 2020 Free and open to the public.

Barry Wimpfheimer Northwestern University

The Talmud as Icon The Babylonian Talmud is a Jewish scripture whose content has been central to the practice of Judaism and Jewish ideology for over a millennium. Because of this centrality, the Talmud has also found itself reviled and persecuted as the paradigmatic symbol of Jews and Judaism. This talk will focus on various aspects of the Talmud’s symbolic life.

Thursday March 5, 2020 4:00 p.m. Loma Pelona Conference Center UC Santa Barbara

Professor Wimpfheimer is a recent recipient of the National Jewish Book Award for The Talmud: A Biography. Books will be available for purchase and signing after the talk, courtesy of Chaucer’s Books

AARP FOUNDATION TAX-AIDE FREE TAX ASSISTANCE For further information contact: Richard D. Hecht Maeve Devoy ariel@religion.ucsb.edu maeve@cappscenter.ucsb.edu (805) 893-2317

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Bring photo ID and all pertinent documentaion with you.


COURTESY

a&e | POP, ROCK & JAZZ PREVIEW

BLUEGRASS BROS: Salty Strings members range from Bren School students to a KCRW radio host.

SALTY STRINGS SOAKS UP SOHO C

town and play the occasional festival such as Earth Day. Cold Spring Tavern is a staple of ours and really suits our music, but our favorite place to play is at the Douglas Nature Preserve on the Mesa on Sunday afternoons. We use this space to practice and run through new songs, and it’s actually proven pretty great in increasing our following, as people will be walking their dogs or strolling around for sunset and come across a bluegrass band under a setting sun, and it’s quite a magical experience. After our big headlining debut at SOhO, we are actually going up to Santa Cruz to record our firstever album with our originals and a few special covers. This is important to us just so we can begin by Matt Kettmann to share our music with friends around the globe.

ountless NPR fans in Santa Barbara start their weekday morning with the sound of Jonathan Bastian’s voice as the host of Morning Edition on KCRW. Little did we know that Bastian’s true talent is in his fingers, picking a banjo as part of the bluegrass quintet Salty Strings. Originally formed by UCSB grad students before Bastian hopped on, the band is headlining their first big gig at SOhO on Saturday, February 29. Bastian and mandolinist Danny Elkin, a founding member, answered a few of my questions recently.

BLUEGRASS BAND

You are a KCRW host by day. Have you always been a musician? Jonathan Bastian: Definitely. I started piano and guitar at age 6 and minored in music in college. I was an early member in a band called The Low Anthem, which eventually got signed by Warner Brothers Records. But my love for bluegrass developed when I worked for the NPR station in Louisville, Kentucky. That city is full of amazing musicians. I would also drive around the state listening to old-timers keeping the tradition alive. When I moved to Santa Barbara, I met our mandolinist, Danny Elkin. He was playing in this trio called Salty Strings, and I realized they needed a banjo player. So, inspired by my time in Kentucky, I learned the instrument, and the rest is history.

TO HEADLINE THEIR FIRST BIG GIG

How did the Salty Strings get started? Danny Elkin: We all sort of found each other with a home base at the Bren School of Environmental Science and Management at UCSB. I first met Ilan Macadam-Somer (cello) in September of 2017, when I started school at UCSB, and shortly after found Zach Witter (guitar) through a mutual love of bluegrass. Jonathan Bastian (banjo) knew the crew and joined the band the following summer after teaching himself the banjo, and Kai Kopecky (bass) saw us playing at a show and noticed we didn’t yet have a bass player and offered up his services for the cause. We’re a bunch of nature lovers, avid surfers, with a similar passion for bluegrass and live music, and it’s worked out pretty well so far. Where else have you been playing? Any records on the way? DE: We’re all full-time workers/students with other jobs around town, so we play out as much as our schedules allow. We hit most of the breweries and wineries in

4•1•1

What is the state of bluegrass in Santa Barbara today? JB: It’s on the rise. When you think of bluegrass, you often think of mountains or the roots in the southeast portion of this country. Well, we’ve discovered that bluegrass sounds just as good on the beach. A big reason we love this style of music is because of the inspiration we’ve gathered through seeing concerts and the wonderful people and amazing scene that comes with bluegrass music. Live music brings people together, and we’ve truly seen that at our shows. They have become a sort of reunion for our friends to join together and celebrate our life and love together. Our goal is to inspire those around us to listen to more bluegrass, maybe even pick up an instrument of their own and begin to pick. As small as Santa Barbara is, there are other bluegrass bands in town that we hope to collaborate with some day, and we are so excited to be joined by the Rose Valley Thorns and The Brambles to help us make the upcoming SOhO show all it can be. What can folks expect at the show on February 29? DE: A huge part of what makes this music so special is the energy, and we have some very high-level, energetic members in the band. We are debuting several new originals and some well-known covers that we think people will really enjoy. There will be a lot of smiling faces, and we hope for some serious audience engagement during this performance. It’s going to be a Leap Day Party, y’all!

Salty Strings plays with the Rose Valley Thorns and The Brambles on Saturday, February 29, at SOhO Restaurant & Music Club (1221 State St). Call (805) 962-7776 or see sohosb.com.

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Wed, March 11 & Thu, March 12 7:30 PM / Arlington Theatre $18 / $14 UCSB students and youth (18 & under)

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a&e | FILM & TV

MOVIE GUIDE

Edited by Michelle Drown THIS

FRIDAY

February 28 th at 7:30pm

The Invisible Man

SPECIAL SCREENINGS O Beanpole

(130 mins., NR)

In this remarkable, unique film, this year’s Oscar bid from Russia, life after World War II is not at all pretty but flecked with alternating currents of hope and despair, as well as a palpable desire for healing and resolution. Winner of last year’s Cannes Festival Best Director award, director Kantemir Balagov has concocted a stunning film about the twined destinies of two young women— Iya (“Beanpole”) and Masha, powerfully played by Viktoria Miroshnichenko and Vasilisa Perelygina—who are damaged in various ways during the war. A paralyzed sniper seeks to end his “emptied” life, our heroines seek to find escape from their postwar freeze, and Iya is tasked with giving life and death. Agony meets ecstasy and back again, often conveyed in subtle gestures and nuanced facial expressions. It’s a haunting film, but on emotionally embedded terms rather than via explicit violence, which draw us into its world with its visual poetry of long takes, empathic close-ups, and several memorable-verging-on-unforgettable scenes along the tale’s dizzying path. (JW) Riviera (Sat.-Sun., Feb. 29-Mar. 1, 10:30am)

Color Out of Space (111 mins., NR) Nicolas Cage and Joely Richardson star in this sci-fi/horror film about a family who move to rural New England for reprieve from the rat race of the 21st century. Soon after they settle into their new house, a meteor crashes into their front yard and subsequently messes with the space-time continuum and floods the world with a strange color. Riviera (Fri.-Sat., Feb. 28-29, 9pm)

PREMIERES Emma. (124 mins., PG) Anya Taylor-Joy is the titular star of this latest cinematic adaptation of Jane Austen’s 1815 novel, which tells the story of

Emma Woodhouse, who, despite herself not wanting to marry, revels in playing matchmaker for her friends and family. Fairview/Paseo Nuevo (Opens Thu., Mar. 5)

Impractical Jokers: The Movie (92 mins., PG-13)

Director Chris Henchy helms this reality comedy film in which comedy troupe the Tenderloins (aka the Impractical Jokers) hit the road, competing in hidden-camera challenges in an attempt to redeem themselves from a humiliating 1992 high school mishap. Camino Real/Paseo Nuevo

The Invisible Man (124 mins., R) Elisabeth Moss stars in this modern retelling of both H.G. Wells’s 1897 novel and the eponymous 1933 film. Moss plays Cecilia Kass, the ex-girlfriend of a rich, brilliant, controlling scientist, Adrian Griffin. Griffin commits suicide, leaving much of his fortune to Kass. Soon, however, things go awry, and Kass is convinced she’s being stalked by her invisible ex. Camino Real/Metro 4 Onward (109 mins., PG) Pixar’s latest is an urban fantasy about magic and two brothers’ quest for their father, who died when they were babies. Tom Holland, Chris Pratt, Julia LouisDreyfus, and Octavia Spencer lend their voices. Fairview/ Fiesta 5 (Opens Thu., Mar. 5)

➤ O Portrait of a Lady on Fire

(120

mins., R)

After exploring contemporary comingof-age themes, French writer/director Céline Sciamma (Water Lilies, Girlhood) journeys to another time and place for her brilliant latest film, awarded Best Screenplay at Cannes. In France circa the late 18th century, artist Marianne (Noémie Merlant) is hired to paint a wedding portrait of a beautiful aristocrat fresh out of the convent, Héloïse (Adèle Haenel). It’s a simple narrative structure yielding

surprisingly rich and moving results, with unabashed feminist overtones. Key scenes include a telling image of Héloïse with her dress on fire—prescient of love and fates to come — an abortion scene with the patient lying next to a baby, and a tragically doomed love theme linked to Eurydice. Portrait is a quiet, slowbrewing, uniquely sensual film, spare and minimalist but never cool to the touch. It’s also a rare story about the art of painting, detailing the art-making process, marked by prolonged gazing and ultimate meeting of artist and subject, turned intimate and sexual. Early in their relationship, Héloïse asks her lover,“Do all lovers think they’re inventing something?” With Portrait, Sciamma has invented a fine, subtle portrait of taboo love. (JW) Riviera

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Seberg (103 mins., R) Kristen Stewart stars in this political thriller as real-life actress Jean Seberg, who was under investigation by the FBI in the 1960s for supporting various civil rights groups, including the NAACP, Native Americans, and the Black Panthers. Jack O’Connell, Anthony Mackie, and Margaret Qualley also star. The Hitchcock

Bright Eyes has partnered with PLUS1 so that $1 from every ticket sold will go to the Florence Project and their work providing direct legal and social services for detained adults and children under threat of deportation. FIRRP.ORG

NOW SHOWING 1917 (119 mins., R) Sam Mendes helms this film about trench warfare in World War I. Using long takes to simulate “one continuous shot,” 1917 tells the story of Lance Corporal William Schofield (George MacKay) and Lance Corporal Tom Blake (Dean-Charles Chapman), two British soldiers tasked with getting a message across enemy lines to another U.K. battalion before they march into an ambush. Fairview/Paseo Nuevo

Bad Boys for Life (123 mins., R) Will Smith and Martin Lawrence reunite for the third and last installment of the Bad Boys trilogy. At this point in their

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Friri to Fr t Su Sun un: 12:30, 3:00, 5:30, 8:00; M n to Mo t Th T u: 3:00, 5:30, 8:00 H IMPRACTICAL JOKERS: THE Friri to t Su Sun un: 12:20, 2:40, MOVIE C Fr 5:00, 7:15, 9:35; Mo M n to t Th T u: 2:40, 5:00, 7:15, 9:35

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a&e | FILM & TV CONT’D FROM P. 53 the actors’ skills, making for a slow, notso-funny sequel. The film does pick up at the end, however, when the four teens are back in their original hosts, which is where they should have been all along. (MD) Fiesta 5

Onward lives, Burnett (Lawrence) has become a police inspector enjoying his quiet years, while Lowrey (Smith) now heads up a group of millennial cops, called AMMO, whom he can’t relate to. But when a cartel boss raises his nasty head, the two old friends reunite to defeat the bad guy. Fiesta 5

(Margot Robbie). She just got dumped by the Joker, and a couple of hangovers and cheese sandwiches later, she is fighting a villain named Black Mask (Ewan McGregor) with her female partners in crime. Together they put the “fun” in “funhouse mirrors,” killing bad guys in extravagant action sequences set in (where else?) amusement parks. (AL)

(86 mins.,

Fairview/Metro 4

This sequel to 2016’s The Boy picks up nicely where the first film left off and still brings a fresh, interesting story to the table. After a traumatic event, Liza (Katie Holmes); her husband, Sean (Owain Yeoman); and their son, Jude (Christopher Convery), decide to spend some time in the English countryside in a guesthouse near the infamous Heelshire Mansion. When Jude makes friends with a lifelike doll named Brahms, it soon becomes clear that the doll has a dark history and may be planning an equally sinister future. Holmes and Yeoman have good chemistry as parents who want to do their best for the family, Convery gives a performance impressive in its subtlety, and even Brahms has a presence that makes him feel like another member of the cast. The clever buildup of suspense and the further delving into the doll’s history make this film a delightfully creepy addition to the lineup of “haunted doll” films. Annabelle, watch your back. (TR)

Jojo Rabbit (108 mins., PG-13) This black comedy is an adaptation of the book Caging Skies, which tells of a Hitler Youth member, 10-year-old Jojo Betzler, who discovers that his mother (Scarlett Johansson) has been hiding a Jewish girl, Elsa (Thomasin McKenzie), in their attic. Rather than turning her in, Jojo interviews her for a research book for the Nazis about Jews. Sam Rockwell and Rebel Wilson also star. The Hitchcock

➤ O Brahms: The Boy II PG-13)

Camino Real/Fiesta 5

The Call of the Wild (100 mins., PG) Harrison Ford stars in this cinematic adaptation of Jack London’s 1903 novel. Ford plays John Thornton, a recluse living in the Yukon who comes across a dog named Buck, who was stolen from his California home and sold into service as a sled dog in the 49th state. Together, Buck and Thornton set out on an adventure in the wilds of Alaska.

“A RAVISHING MASTERPIECE” – THE OSBSERVER

Knives Out (130 mins., PG-13) Rian Johnson (Looper, Star Wars: The Last Jedi) wrote and directed this whodunit about a dysfunctional family that reunites for patriarch Harlan Thrombey’s (Christopher Plummer) 85th birthday. The next morning, Harlan is found dead, and everyone is a suspect. Despite an excellent cast that includes Daniel Craig, Chris Evans, Jamie Lee Curtis, Toni Collette, and Lakeith Stanfield, and some clever dialogue, the film falls a bit short in both humor and mystery. (MD) The Hitchcock

O Little Women

(135 mins., PG)

Greta Gerwig (Lady Bird) is back behind the camera (and is the screenwriter) for this adaptation of Louisa May Alcott’s classic story about the March sisters as they try to find their way as young adults in New England at the end of the American Civil War. Saoirse Ronan, Emma Watson, Florence Pugh, Laura Dern, and Timothée Chalamet star. Paseo Nuevo My Boyfriend’s Meds (Las Píldoras de mi Novio) (100 mins., R) A tropical holiday turns farcical when a woman’s boyfriend forgets to bring his prescription medication on the trip and succumbs to his myriad anxieties.

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Fiesta 5

Jumanji: The Next Level (123 mins., PG-13)

Dwayne Johnson, Karen Gillan, Jack Black, and Kevin Hart reprise their avatar roles for this fourth installment of the Jumanji franchise. This time around, Spencer, feeling inadequate in his new life at NYU, returns home for the holidays with his mom and grandpa (Danny Devito). Longing to be his old avatar Dr. Bravestone (Johnson), Spencer reenters the game, which he had secretly saved. When his friends Bethany, Fridge, and Martha realize he has returned to Jumanji, they go after him. Things go awry, however, as they are paired with different avatars and Grandpa and his friend Milo (Danny Glover) also enter the game. The new pairings prove incongruent to

O Parasite

(133 mins., R)

Director Bong Joon-ho (The Host, Snowpiercer) helms this black comedy/thriller about two families—one rich, one poor —whose lives become inextricably, murderously entwined. Fairview/Metro 4 Sonic the Hedgehog (100 mins., PG) The video-game hero Sonic, a blue, talking hedgehog, comes to Earth to escape evildoers on his planet who wish to harness his super speed. After causing a power outage, Sonic is aided by a smalltown sheriff (James Marsden) who helps hide him from the U.S. government and an unhinged roboticist (Jim Carrey).

BEANPOLE TWO DAYS ONLY! SAT & SUN: 10:30am

Camino Real/Fiesta 5

Camino Real/Paseo Nuevo

O Harley Quinn: Birds of Prey

FEB 28 - MARCH 5

NICOLAS CAGE

(109

mins., R)

Martin Scorsese has famously called superhero movies “theme park rides.” This latest addition to the DC Universe takes his words literally by adding confetti colors and festive set pieces to Gotham City. The hero is Harley Quinn

Seberg

TWO NIGHTS ONLY! FRI & SAT: 9:00pm

The above films are playing in Santa Barbara FRIDAY, February 28, through THURSDAY, March 5. Our critics’ reviews are followed by initials: MD (Michelle Drown), AL (Asher Luberto), TR (Tessa Reeg), and JW (Josef Woodard). The symbol O indicates the film is recommended. The symbol ➤ indicates a new review.

FOR TICKETS VISIT SBIFFRIVIERA.COM OR THEATRE 2044 ALAMEDA PADRE SERRA

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Media Grants

Hutton Parker Foundation and the Santa Barbara Independent are pleased to continue our Media Grant program for local nonprofit agencies. This unique opportunity provides nonprofits the ability to spread their message to the greater Santa Barbara community. Organizations apply online, and one nonprofit group is is chosen each month. The Santa Barbara Independent design team produces a custom four-page insert specific to the individual agency's needs. The insert is published and distributed in all 40,000 copies of the Santa Barbara Independent, with the cost underwritten by Hutton Parker Foundation. Find out more about this opportunity to boost your organization's marketing efforts, promote your good works, and tell your story to a wider audience. Visit HuttonFoundation.org for more information and the Media Grant application.

56

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SPORTS ON TO ATLANTA: Curly Guillen (left) and Addi Zerrenner will be racing in the 2020 U.S. Olympic Marathon Trials on Saturday.

MARATHON RUNNERS EYE OLYMPICS

S.B. ATHLETIC ROUND TABLE:

NIC BLASKOVICH

ATHLETES OF THE WEEK

by JOHN ZANT

Hannah Meyer, San Marcos water polo

The USC-bound senior’s tough defense and decisive goal carried the Royals to a 5-4 win over Mater Dei in the CIF Division 1 quarterfinals. They went on to finish fourth.

NIC BLASKOVICH

Zerrenner made her 26.2-mile debut at Grandma’s Mara Marathon in Duluth, Minnesota, last June. She blew past the women’s Olympic Trials standard (2:45) by finishing in 2:37:51. “I knew she could handle the distance,” Howell said. “I told her what she was allowed to do — run six minutes a mile, no faster — and that’s what she did.” In the wake of that race, Zerrenner said she got carried away in her training. “I was feeling pretty invincible,” she said. “I got greedy and did extra miles.” As a result, she incurred some stress injuries and just recently said, “I’m getting comfortable running in my body again. Non-runners in my life say, ‘Oh, go out and make the Olympic team,’ but for me, it’s about getting my feet wet and seeing what the Olympic Trials is all about.” Howell predicted that Zerrenner, 23, “is going to be at her best four years from now,” when Paris will host the Olympics. “She will be a major contender in 2024.” As his reputation spread through social media, Howell became the coach of three male marathoners who have top-10 potential at the trials: Jarrett LeBlanc, the only Louisiana runner in the men’s race; Ryan Miller of San Antonio, Texas; and Dan Nestor of Boulder, Colorado. All of them, including Guillen and Zerrenner, train on their own with custom-made prescriptions and advice from Howell. He keeps track of their workouts through a computer app that sends him their mileage, running pace, and heart rate. “We call our group ‘blue-collar runners,’ ” Howell said. Guillen works as a TSA agent and nighttime deejay, while Zerrenner holds down three part-time jobs. “They don’t get the frills most runners have,” Howell said. “They don’t have support crews. They don’t have nutritionists. They just run.” With every life-affirming stride in Atlanta, Guillen and Zerrenner intend to honor their families and their community. They were saddened to hear that a bright Dos Pueblos student, Trevor Katz, died after collapsing at a track practice on February 3. It turned out he had a rare liver disease. “We’ll be thinking of him,” Guillen said Sunday. That night, Guillen and his children, Noah and Mackenzie, visited his ailing grandfather, Ramiro Guillen Sr., at Cottage Hospital. Curly was christened Ramiro Guillen III but is seldom known by that name. At daybreak Monday, Curly received word that the family patriarch had passed away. He went out and did a tune-up run with Zerrenner at 6:45 a.m. “It helped dry my tears,” he said. “Now I will be running in Atlanta in my grandfather’s memory.” n

Juan Carlos Torres, S.B. High soccer

The senior striker finished his career with 58 goals, including the game-tying and winning scores in a 3-2 overtime victory over Harvard Westlake in the CIF playoffs.

PAUL WELLMAN FILE PHOTO

O

n Saturday, February 29, Curly Guillen and Addi Zerrenner will be racing on the road to the 2020 Tokyo Olympic Games: Atlanta’s Peachtree Street. The road will end for all but the top three men and women competing in the U.S. Olympic Marathon Trials, but just to be in that fast company is to be branded as an elite American distance runner. Guillen and Zerrenner developed their running chops in Santa Barbara and Goleta, as did their coach, Terry Howell. The two marathoners graduated from Dos Pueblos High 14 years apart— Guillen in 2000 and Zerrenner in 2014— apart 2014 and Howell is a San Marcos grad. After a workout last weekend, Howell reminded them how far they’ve come. “You are the cream of the crop,” he said. “Atlanta is going to be rolling out the red carpet for these runners more than I’ve seen in any Olympic trials. There are going to be thousands of people watching along the course, and millions more on TV [starting at 9 a.m. Pacific time on NBC]. Just going for it is an asterisk you can put on the story of your life.” Guillen’s story is one of a late bloomer who had let his fitness deteriorate after a brief running career at UCSB. He got married and had two children, and his former wife shamed him into running again after almost a decade of inactivity. “She pushed me out the door,” he recalled. “I huffed and puffed for two miles. I almost fainted.” Howell, building his résumé as a running guru, made a project of Guillen. “I saw Curly run a 10K in 2001 or ’02 and knew he was something special,” the coach said. Guillen ran his first marathon in 2012. He finished 75th out of 36,000 in the 2014 Boston Marathon. He set his sights on the 2016 Olympic Trials but missed the qualifying standard by less than two minutes. Finally, at the 2017 California International Marathon in Sacramento, Guillen beat the qualifying standard (2 hours, 19 minutes) by finishing in 2:17:35. “My greatest accomplishment,” he said last weekend. “Nine years of running have come together for this moment. I’m feeling great.” Howell can see Guillen, 37, setting a new personal marathon record at Atlanta, even though the course will traverse a number of hills. Zerrenner’s story is still unfolding. She was a precocious cross-country runner at DPHS, taking second place in the State Championships, and she was an All-Pac-12 runner at Arizona. “I thought I’d reached all my potential as a runner and looked into becoming a triathlete,” she said. “Then I reached out to Curly, and he connected me with Terry. As cheesy as it sounds, I thank God every day that Terry has agreed to put up with me and has instilled such belief in myself.”

Feb. 16-22 Elliot Redkey, Bishop Diego basketball

The junior point guard scored 18 points in the Cardinals’ 42-36 CIF semifinal victory over Calvary Chapel. She made five of six free throws down the stretch to seal the win.

NIC BLASKOVICH

Curly Guillen and Addi Zerrenner Train Under Coach Terry Howell

Feb. 9-15

Kai Morphy, Bishop Diego basketball

GAME OF THE WEEK NIC BLASKOVICH

2/29: High School Basketball: CIF-SS Championships — Bishop Diego vs. Ganesha (Girls Div. 5A) & Bishop Diego vs. Arrowhead Christian (Boys Div. 5AA) It’s a 132-mile trip to a neutral site in Ontario, but Bishop fans are not complaining. Rarely does a school get an opportunity to play for two CIF titles on the same day. Each Cardinals team had to get through four playoff games without faltering. The No. 2– seeded girls (23-8) will go up against No. 1 Ganesha (24-3), a powerhouse that won its four playoff games by an average margin of 46 points. The unseeded Bishop boys (21-11) knocked off No. 2 Estancia and will face another Cinderella team in Arrowhead Christian (16-12). Girls: 2pm; boys: 4pm. Colony High School Gym, 3850 E. Riverside Dr., Ontario. $5-$15. Visit cifss.org.

The 6’3” sophomore scored 20 points as the Cardinals upset Estancia, 49-46, in the CIF quarterfinals. He scored 12 points in their 59-50 semifinal victory over Vistamar.

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FREE WILL ASTROLOGY by Rob Breszny ARIES (Mar. 21-Apr. 19): You may sometimes reach a point

where you worry that conditions are not exactly right to pursue your dreams or fulfill your holy quest. Does that describe your current situation? If so, I invite you to draw inspiration from Spanish writer Miguel de Cervantes (1547-1616), who’s regarded as one of history’s foremost novelists. Here’s how one observer described Cervantes during the time he was working on his masterpiece, the novel titled Don Quixote: “shabby, obscure, disreputable, pursued by debts, with only a noisy tenement room to work in.” Cervantes dealt with imperfect conditions just fine.

TAURUS (Apr. 20-May 20): “True success is figuring out your

life and career so you never have to be around jerks,” says Taurus filmmaker, actor, and author John Waters. I trust that you have been intensely cultivating that kind of success in the last few weeks, Taurus — and that you will climax this wondrous accomplishment with a flourish during the next few weeks. You’re on the verge of achieving a new level of mastery in the art of immersing yourself in environments that bring out the best in you.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): I would love for you to become more

powerful, Gemini — not necessarily in the sense of influencing the lives of others, but rather in the sense of managing your own affairs with relaxed confidence and crisp competence. What comes to mind when I urge you to expand your self-command and embolden your ambition? Is there an adventure you could initiate that would bring out more of the swashbuckler in you?

CANCER (June 21-July 22): For my Cancerian readers in the Southern Hemisphere, this oracle will be in righteous alignment with the natural flow of the seasons. That’s because February is the hottest, laziest, most spacious time of year in that part of the world — a logical moment to take a lavish break from the daily rhythm

WEEK OF FEBRUARY 27

and escape on a vacation or pilgrimage designed to provide relaxation and renewal. Which is exactly what I’m advising for all of the earth’s Cancerians, including those in the Northern Hemisphere. So for those of you above the equator, I urge you to consider thinking like those below the equator. If you can’t get away, make a blanket fort in your home and pretend. Or read a book that takes you on an imaginary journey. Or hang out at an exotic sanctuary in your hometown.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Leo author Walter

your guideposts in the coming weeks. These observations are all in synchronistic alignment with your current needs. (1) “Sometimes a thing that’s hard is hard because you’re doing it wrong.” (2) “You have to break through the structure of your own stonework habit just to make yourself listen.” (3) “Something is always happening, even on the quietest days and deep into the night, if you stand a while and look.” (4) “The world is full of abandoned meanings. In the commonplace I find unexpected themes and intensities.” (5) “What we are reluctant to HOMEWORK: Try to identify touch often seems the very fabric of which aspect of your life needs our salvation.”

Scott (1771-1832) was a pioneer in healing more than any other aspect. the genre of the historical novel. His SCORPIO FreeWillAstrology.com stories were set in various eras of the Scottish past. In those pre-telephone (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): “I remember a and pre-Internet days, research was time when a cabbage could sell a demanding task. Scott traveled widely to gather tales itself just by being a cabbage,” wrote Scorpio author from keepers of the oral tradition. In accordance with Jean Giraudoux (1882-1944). “Nowadays it’s no good current astrological omens, Leo, I recommend that you being a cabbage — unless you have an agent and pay draw inspiration from Scott’s old-fashioned approach. him a commission.” He was making the point that for Seek out direct contact with the past. Put yourself in us humans, it’s not enough to simply become good at the physical presence of storytellers and elders. Get a skill and express that skill; we need to hire a publicist firsthand knowledge about historical events that will or marketing wizard or distributor to make sure the inspire your thoughts about the future of your life story. world knows about our offerings. Generally, I agree with Giraudoux’s assessment. But I think that right VIRGO now it applies to you only minimally. The coming (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Over a period of 40 years, the artist weeks will be one of those rare times when your interRembrandt (1606-1669) gazed into a mirror as he cre- estingness will shine so brightly, it will naturally attract ated more than 90 self-portraits — about 10 percent of its deserved attention. Your motto, from industrialist his total work. Why? Art scholars don’t have a defini- Henry J. Kaiser: “When your work speaks for itself, tive answer. Some think he did self-portraits because don’t interrupt.” they sold well. Others say that because he worked so slowly, he himself was the only person he could get SAGITTARIUS to model for long periods. Still others believe this was (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): When he was 29 years old, Sagittarian his way of cultivating self-knowledge, equivalent to an composer Ludwig van Beethoven published his String author writing an autobiography. In the coming weeks, Quartet, Op. 18, No. 4. Most scholars believe that the I highly recommend that you engage in your personal piece was an assemblage of older material he had creequivalent of extended mirror-gazing. It’s a favorable ated as a young man. A similar approach might work time to understand yourself better. well for you in the coming weeks, Sagittarius. I invite you to consider the possibility of repurposing tricks LIBRA and ideas that weren’t quite ripe when you first used (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): From author Don DeLillo’s many them. Recycling yourself makes good sense. literary works, I’ve gathered five quotes to serve as

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Are there parts of your life that seem

to undermine other parts of your life? Do you wish there was greater harmony between your heart and your head, between your giving and your taking, between your past and your future? Wouldn’t it be wonderful if you could infuse your cautiousness with the wildness of your secret self? I bring these questions to your attention, Capricorn, because I suspect you’re primed to address them with a surge of innovative energy. Here’s my prediction: Healing will come as you juxtapose apparent opposites and unite elements that have previously been unconnected.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): When he was 19, the young poet Rob-

ert Graves joined the British army to fight in World War I. Two years later, the Times of London newspaper reported that he had been killed at the Battle of the Somme in France. But it wasn’t true. Graves was very much alive and continued to be for another 71 years. During that time, he wrote 55 books of poetry, 18 novels, and 55 other books. I’m going to be bold and predict that this story can serve as an apt metaphor for your destiny in the coming weeks and months. Some dream or situation or influence that you believed to be gone will in fact have a very long second life filled with interesting developments.

PISCES (Feb. 19-Mar. 20): If you’re like most of us, you harbor

desires for experiences that might be gratifying in some ways but draining in others. If you’re like most of us, you may on occasion get attached to situations that are mildly interesting but divert you from situations that could be amazingly interesting and enriching. The good news, Pisces, is that you are now in a phase when you have maximum power to wean yourself from these wasteful tendencies. The coming weeks will be a favorable time to identify your two or three most important and exciting longings — and take a sacred oath to devote yourself to them above all other wishes and hopes.

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700.

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UNIVERSITY CENTER FOOD SERVICE Responsible for the daily operation of the Arbor store. The Arbor operates 7 days/week with an annual budget of $2.8M and a staff of 70‑80 part time student employees. Primary responsibilities include Training and Supervision, Purchasing and Inventory Management, Financial Duties, and Safety and Sanitation. Reqs: 1‑2 years of management experience in a food service or retail operation, or equivalent education and experience in food service or retail operations. Strong interpersonal skills with the ability to effectively supervise others and provide guidance to personnel. Ability to effectively work with partners on joint projects. Demonstrated knowledge and experience in retail or food service related financial management & reporting. Basic mathematical and cash control skills to accurately complete drawer counts and prepare deposits. Knowledge in inventory control functions. Notes: Criminal history background check required. Ability to work a flexible schedule including nights and weekends. Days and hours may vary at times. $47,476.00‑$48,950.00/ yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For primary consideration apply 3/8/20, thereafter open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #20200081

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DEVELOPMENT ANALYST, ENGINEERING & THE SCIENCES

OFFICE OF DEVELOPMENT Serves as a key analyst for the Engineering and Sciences Development Office (“Office”), supporting a complex and multifaceted fundraising program covering all departments, institutes and centers within the College of Engineering and the Division of Math, Life and Physical Sciences. Researches individual and corporate prospects, maintain the integrity of Engineering and Sciences prospect data, and to track salient prospect fundraising events and make portfolio recommendations. Candidates must have a strong understanding of the fundraising goals and programs within the College of Engineering and the Division of Math, Life and Physical Sciences, and assist Directors with their long range fundraising goals and portfolio development. Must be able to prioritize a diverse workload in order to fulfill the Office’s research, project management and analytic fundraising needs. Reqs: Demonstrated management and supervisory experience. Excellent skills in analysis, problem solving, working with detail while applying and understanding broader contexts as they affect a diverse

customer base: faculty, staff, students, and donors. The ability to establish a cooperative working relationship with staff; the ability to work as a member of a team, and to support the Development Office structure, obtaining approvals and coordinating as needed. Notes: Criminal history background check required. May be called upon to work occasional evenings and weekends at various Development Office, Institutional Advancement or campus‑wide events. $24.52‑ $26.50/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For primary consideration apply online by 3/9/20, thereafter open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #20200085

DIRECTOR OF DEVELOPMENT, REGIONAL GIVING

OFFICE OF DEVELOPMENT Increases philanthropic support to UCSB by maximizing the interest, involvement and commitment of alumni, parents and friends as well as select corporations and foundations in the assigned region. Focuses on the identification, cultivation, and solicitation of individual prospects, including alumni, parents, and friends of the University. Primary solicitation focus will be based on a donor‑centric approach with emphasis on major gifts ($100Kor more) and new and renewing Chancellor’s Council (annual) level gifts ($1Kto $99K). Designs and executes planned strategies for the identification, cultivation, solicitation, closing and stewardship of gifts from individuals. Focuses about seventy percent time on activities directly related to the fundraising gift cycle. Thirty percent time is focused on other activities related to fundraising, including events, volunteer committee management and administrative and managerial duties, such as planning and coordinating. In close collaboration with the Sr. Director of Development, Regional Giving, Northern CA/Bay Area is the targeted geographic region and a regional network is developed and sustained. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree or equivalent combination of education and experience required. Five to ten years of experience in individual major donor development or related profession. Proven success in the major gift fundraising; experience in higher education preferred. An understanding of the culture of Division/Area departments, and a basic grasp of the social, political, and economic issues that these faculty members study. Notes: Criminal history background check. Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record and enrollment in the DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program. Annually renewable contract position. Flexibility and willingness to travel frequently. Ability to work some weekends and evenings. Salary is competitive and commensurate with qualifications and experience. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without

regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For primary consideration apply online by 3/9/20, thereafter open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #20200084

HUMAN RESOURCES GENERALIST/HR BUSINESS PARTNER

OFFICE OF THE CIO (OCIO) AND ENTERPRISE TECHNOLOGY SERVICES (ETS) This position is characterized by a high degree of collaboration and coordination in the delivery of professional level HR services to support OCIO organizational objectives and strategies, in partnership with the campus HR office. Responsible for coordination and delivery of HR services; assessing and anticipating OCIO organizational needs; and working with campus HR and OCIO leadership to develop integrated solutions for a high performing culture, including implementation of University of California (UC) system, UCSB campus HR, and Associate Vice Chancellor for IT and CIO (or OCIO) specific HR‑related initiatives. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree in related area and/or equivalent combination of education/experience. Significant, progressive generalist experience in the field of Human Resources that demonstrates HR leadership, advanced knowledge of human resources concepts, best practices, risk implications, and compliance requirements of Federal and State laws/ regulations across the full scope of HR functions. Direct experience with the following HR functions: recruitment, employee onboarding, separation and off‑boarding, records management, employee relations, compensation administration and job evaluations, and performance management. Notes: Criminal history background check required. Candidate must be legally authorized to work in the United States without the need for employer sponsorship currently or in the future. May be required to report to duty in the event of emergency and may need to help mobilize other staff members during and after an emergency. Work schedule may require occasional evening and weekend work. $69,435‑ $91,400/yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For primary consideration apply by 3/5/20, thereafter open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #20200075

RESIDENTIAL & COMMUNITY LIVING

RESIDENTIAL FACILITIES COORDINATOR Analyses and resolves cases stemming from the 11,000 residents living in 16 Housing and Residential communities who encounter emergency facility

issues; directing the relocation process and reimbursement for the University Housing residents. Institutional contact and referral point for students, parents and clients who have questions and concerns regarding a facility problem. Advises live‑in professional staff on facility/resident concerns. Provides training for live‑in staff on resident safety issues. Works collaboratively and determines the move‑in processes for university apartment residents. Reqs: Proven ability to independently analyze and solve complex problems. Knowledgeable, experienced, and enthusiastic user of technology to resolve organizational issues. Able to understand process flow, and troubleshoot issues. Experience with data analysis, reporting, and interpretation of data analysis to end users. High level of proficiency with data analysis concepts and tools. Experience in an administrative setting, supporting multiple customers/staff while creating, implementing and monitoring efficient/ effective administrative systems and procedures. High comfort level with technology, and an ability to learn new software/systems quickly. Ability to grasp and empathize with multiple styles of completing tasks with an ability to accommodate them in your workflow. Ability to work with little supervision, to establish priorities and manage time to balance workload and meet deadlines. Organized and detail‑oriented, able to track a problem through many contexts to a final resolution. Notes: Criminal history background check required. $58,825‑ $67,400/yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For primary consideration apply online by 3/3/20, thereafter open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #20200077

WATER TREATMENT SPECIALIST

FACILITIES MANAGEMENT Performs a variety of skilled tasks in the maintenance, alteration and repair of buildings and related facilities and equipment, utilizing one or more of the building trades. Works independently or as part of a maintenance crew and performs other related duties as required. Focus is on the campus water services which encompass hot and chilled loop systems for 64 academic buildings on campus. Responsible for troubleshooting issues, maintaining required records, conducting scheduled testing, and analyzing reports on a daily and/or weekly basis, for the: hot water boiler services, steam boiler water services, cooling water services, towers/condensers and soft water systems. Works with campus Engineers, vendors, academic departments and researchers, outside contractors and UCSB Design & Construction Services in the construction of water treatment facilities, start‑up testing, chemical cleanings and analyzing boiler or system failures. Responsible for the chemicals used in the campus water systems, including; ordering, storage, labeling and disposal. Reqs: 3yrs experience testing, analysis, maintenance and repair of hot water, steam, and chilled water systems.

3yrs experience inspecting and testing of cooling water for cooling towers. 3yrs experience maintaining and repairing water treatment chemical feeder systems. Certification: SWRCB Water Distribution Operator D1 or SWRCB Treatment Operator T1. Notes: Criminal history background check required. Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record and enrollment in the DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program. May be required to work other days/hours to meet the operational needs of the department. $31.34/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For primary consideration apply online by 3/3/20, thereafter open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #20200076

INTERNATIONAL PROGRAM SPECIALIST

UC EDUCATION ABROAD PROGRAM (UCEAP) Independently performs the full range of responsibilities within the function; possesses broad job knowledge; analyzes problems and issues of diverse scope and determines solutions. Independently advises and resolves a full range of issues. Works within the organization to recommend changes to policies, practices, and procedures. Provides guidance on issues requiring in‑depth knowledge of specialized programs. Serves as the primary operating liaison between the University of California Education Abroad Program, Systemwide Office and UC Study Center staff worldwide; Study Abroad offices on the UC campuses; and UC students participating in UCEAP. Directly responsible for all operational and logistical activities pertaining to an assigned portfolio within the more than 5,500 UCEAP program participants each year, in over 40 countries worldwide. Collaborates with all regional teams to develop and integrate best practices and provide back‑up support. Works to ensure these processes are as advanced and efficient as possible. Maintains primary responsibility for communicating to the Study Center Directors and personnel, campus offices, UCEAP staff, and students on UC and UCEAP policies pertaining to all operational aspects of students’ programs. Reqs: BA/BS degree in related area and four or more years of relevant experience, including two or more years of administrative experience, or equivalent combination of education, training, and work experience. Previous project management experience. Excellent oral and written communication skills. Sound judgment, with decision‑making and problem‑solving skills. Ability to develop original ideas to solve problems; ability to work collaboratively and coordinate within a complex organization; interpersonal skills, multicultural competencies and ability to work with diverse populations; computer skills, (complex database management, spreadsheet, e‑mail, internet, etc.). Experience interpreting and applying

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NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: DEIRDRE D. KIECKHEFER NO: 20PR00049 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of DEIRDRE D. KIECKHEFER A PETITION FOR PROBATE: has been filed by: ROBERT M. KIECKHEFER in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara THE PETITION for probate requests that (name): ROBERT M. KIECKHEFER be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The Independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held in this court as follows: on 3/19/2020 AT 9:00 a.m. Dept: 5 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, located at 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Anacapa Division. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: James P. Griffith, Esq., Howell Moore & Gough 812 Presidio Avenue, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; (805) 805‑962‑0524 x6 Published Feb 13, 20, 27 2020. NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: SALVADOR APARICIO, JR. NO: 20PR00071 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of SALVADOR CENEN APARICIO, JR. AKA SAL APARICIO, JR. AND SAL C. APARICIO A PETITION FOR PROBATE: has been filed by: ROBERT APARICIO in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara THE PETITION for probate requests that (name): ROBERT APARICIO be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or

consented to the proposed action.) The Independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held in this court as follows: on 4/2/2020 AT 9:00 a.m. Dept: 5 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, located at 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Anacapa Division. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: Lori A. Lewis, Esq., Mullen & Henzell, L.L.P. 112 E. Victoria Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; (805) 966‑1501. Published Feb 27. Mar 5, 12 2020. NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: JAMES SERENO BRETT NO: 20PR00069 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of JAMES SERENO BRETT A PETITION FOR PROBATE: has been filed by: SERENA EVANS BEEKS and ROBERT JOHN EVANS, Jr. in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara THE PETITION for probate requests that (name): SERENA EVANS BEEKS and ROBERT JOHN EVANS, Jr. be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The Independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held in this court as follows: on 4/2/2020 AT 9:00 a.m. Dept: 5 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, located at 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Anacapa Division. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney

knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: Douglas D. Rossi, Price Postel & Parma LLP 200 E. Carrillo St. Ste. 400 Santa Barbara, CA 93101; (805) 805‑962‑0011 Published Feb 27. Mar 5, 12 2020.

FBN ABANDONMENT STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF USE OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME The following Fictitious Business Name is being abandoned: LOVE’S TOWING SERVICE at 211 East Haley St Santa Barbara, CA 93101; The original statement for use of this Fictitious Business Name was filed 10/4/2019 in the County of Santa Barbara. Original file no. 2019‑0002463. The person (s) or entities abandoning use of this name are as follows: Livesley Love’s Towing Service 1543 Live Oak Lane Santa Barbara, CA 93105 This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 30, 2020. I hereby certify that this is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by John Beck, Published: Feb 6, 13, 20, 27 2020. STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF USE OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME The following Fictitious Business Name is being abandoned: CALLE BONITA STUDIOS at 3150 Calle Bonita Santa Ynez, CA 93460; The original statement for use of this Fictitious Business Name was filed 10/16/2018 in the County of Santa Barbara. Original file no. 2018‑0002789. The person (s) or entities abandoning use of this name are as follows: Leann Joseph 726 Tallac Ave. South Lake Tahoe, CA 96150. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 27, 2020. I hereby certify that this is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by John Beck, Published: Feb 13, 20, 27. Mar 5 2020. STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF USE OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME The following Fictitious Business Name is being abandoned: PLANET432 at 1660 Shoreline Drive Santa Barbara, CA 93109; The original statement for use of this Fictitious Business Name was filed 8/20/2018 in the County of Santa Barbara. Original file no. 2018‑0002331. The person (s) or entities abandoning use of this name are as follows: 4thPlanet, LLC 1660 Shoreline Drive Santa Barbara, CA 93109 This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 24, 2020. I hereby certify that this is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by John Beck, Published: Feb 13, 20, 27. Mar 5 2020.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: GTM RESIDENTIAL INS INSPECTIONS at 169 Gemini St Lompoc, CA 93436; Gary Shaw (same address) conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on January 28, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jan Morales. FBN Number: 2020‑0000298. Published: Feb 6, 13, 20, 27 2020. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: SB EVOLUTION LANDSCAPE at 278 Pebble Beach Drive Goleta, CA 93117; Jorge Cortez (same address) conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on January 07, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by John Beck. FBN Number: 2020‑0000071. Published: Feb 6, 13, 20, 27 2020.


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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SPA LOVERS at 136 Sumida Gardens Ln #204 Goleta, CA 93111; Matthew Joshua Rico (same address) conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on January 22, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Maria F. Sanchez. FBN Number: 2020‑0000234. Published: Feb 6, 13, 20, 27 2020.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: CORNEJO CONSTRUCTION COMPANY at 4754 Avalon Avenue Santa Barbara, CA 93110‑1908; Jesus Cornejo (same address) conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on January 29, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Thomas Brian. FBN Number: 2020‑0000327. Published: Feb 6, 13, 20, 27 2020.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SERGIO’S CARPET & CLEANING SERVICE at 1430 Tomol Dr. Carpinteria, CA 93013; Sergio Rodriguez (same address) conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on January 08, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Armando Luna Jr.. FBN Number: 2020‑0000082. Published: Feb 6, 13, 20, 27 2020.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SUPERIOR SECRET SOCIETY at 318 W Mission St #8 Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Brandon Duplisse (same address) conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on January 28, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Thomas Brian. FBN Number: 2020‑0000314. Published: Feb 6, 13, 20, 27 2020.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: MASSAGE GEEN SPA at 2026 Cliff Drive Santa Barbara, CA 93109; Massage Bloom, LLC 1450 Alameda Padre Serra Santa Barbara, CA 93103 conducted by a Limited Liability Company Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on January 22, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Tara Jayasinghe. FBN Number: 2020‑0000230. Published: Feb 6, 13, 20, 27 2020.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: PRIDE BARCO LOCK COMPANY at 116 N. Nopal St. #4 Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Ian Renga (same address) conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on January 21, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by John Beck. FBN Number: 2020‑0000216. Published: Feb 6, 13, 20, 27 2020.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: CHEEPRO INC. at 7127 Hollister Ave, Suite 25A‑101 Goleta, CA 93117; Yunski Inc. (same address) conducted by a Corporation Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on January 28, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Margarita Silva. FBN Number: 2020‑0000305. Published: Feb 6, 13, 20, 27 2020.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: EYE OF HORUS PRIVATE INVESTIGATIONS at 623 De La Vina St. #C Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Nathaniel Dye (same address) conducted by a Individual Signed: Nathaniel Dye Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on January 29, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by John Beck. FBN Number: 2020‑0000322. Published: Feb 6, 13, 20, 27 2020.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: RADIANT BEAUTY at 1819 Cliff Dr Unit B Santa Barbara, CA 93109; Shanel Pincheira 1177 Harbor Hills Dr Santa Barbara, CA 93109 conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on January 29, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Thomas Brian. FBN Number: 2020‑0000324. Published: Feb 6, 13, 20, 27 2020.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: YAMASAKI ART PRODUCTIONS at 121 S Voluntario St Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Troy Yamasaki (same address) conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on January 17, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by John Beck. FBN Number: 2020‑0000199. Published: Feb 6, 13, 20, 27 2020.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: ISAAC ORNAMENTAL METAL at 709 E. Mason St Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Isaac Auguiano 218 S. Steckel Dr Santa Paula, CA 93060 conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on January 13, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Thomas Brian. FBN Number: 2020‑0000138. Published: Feb 6, 13, 20, 27 2020. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: PARADISE CUSTOM DESIGN at 5525 Somerset Drive Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Monica Gagne (same address) conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on January 29, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by John Beck. FBN Number: 2020‑0000336. Published: Feb 6, 13, 20, 27 2020.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SKUNK BEAR TACTICAL at 1140 Edgemound Drive Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Pasi Puntes (same address) conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on January 30, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by John Beck. FBN Number: 2020‑0000341. Published: Feb 6, 13, 20, 27 2020. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: O’CONNOR WEST COAST at 2940 De La Vina Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Terminix Inyternational Inc. 150 Peabody Pl. Memphis, TN 38103 conducted by a Corporation Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on January 27, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by John Beck. FBN Number: 2020‑0000282. Published: Feb 6, 13, 20, 27 2020. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: RENGA BROTHERS INTERIORS at 2614 De La Vina Street Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Jessie Anito Renga 65 Placer Drive Goleta, CA 93117; Kirk William Renga (same address) conducted by a Married Couple Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on January 31, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) byThomas Brian. FBN Number: 2020‑0000364. Published: Feb 6, 13, 20, 27 2020.

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E M A I L S A L E S @ I N D E P E N D E N T. C O M

Tide Guide Day

High

Thu 27 Fri 28

Sunrise 6:25 Sunset 5:56

Low

High

Low

High

5:21 am 1.3

11:17 am 4.0

5:28 pm 0.9

11:54 pm 4.3

5:49 pm 1.4

6:07 am 1.4

11:56 am 3.5

Sat 29

12:25 am 4.2

7:06 am 1.5

12:50 pm 2.9

6:07 pm 1.9

Sun 01

1:04 am 4.2

8:33 am 1.5

2:42 pm 2.4

6:23 pm 2.3

Mon 02

2:01 am 4.2

10:23 am 1.2

Tue 03

3:21 am 4.3

11:41 am 0.6

7:18 pm 2.9

10:04 pm 2.9

Wed 04

4:42 am 4.6

12:32 pm −0.0

7:35 pm 3.2

11:34 pm 2.7

Thu 05

5:46 am 5.1

1:12 pm −0.6

7:57 pm 3.6

9D

16

24 D

2H

Source: /tides.mobilegeographics.com

crosswordpuzzle crossword puzzle

tt By Ma

Jones

“On the Map” -- representing a few locations.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: L.A. LEPIANE WINES at 75 Los Padres Way Buellton, CA 93427; L.A. Lepiane Wines, LLC 1168 More Ranch Rd Santa Barbara, CA 93111 conducted by a Limited Liability Company Signed: Alison Thomson, Owner Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on February 03, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Maria F. Sanchez. FBN Number: 2020‑0000369. Published: Feb 6, 13, 20, 27 2020.

35 Use clippers 36 Croatian-born engineer Nikola 37 Manta’s cousin 1 Like some dental floss 38 Do really poorly 5 1988 Dennis Quaid movie 40 Pizza chain started in 8 Regretful feeling Chicago, informally 13 Brightness output? 41 Obsessive anime fan 14 ___ Domani (wine brand) 45 Least spiteful 16 Made mellow 46 “SNL” alum Gasteyer 17 Monkees member Peter 49 Country house 18 “Champagne music” 50 Line to the audience bandleader Lawrence 51 Toy company known for pop 19 Ages from oxidation culture collectibles 20 Swiss flag feature 52 “Good ___!” 22 Cafe ___ (coffee drink) 1 Halloween costume option 53 Designation of some meat 24 Put a curse on 2 Really dig markets 25 Marker on a wall map 3 Company known for copying 55 “That’s a mistake ...” 27 Leftover others’ material? 57 Do stuff? 30 Musical comedian Minchin 4 Talks too much 58 List closing 31 Editor’s “put it back in” 5 Morning droplets 59 “Read Across America” org. 32 Knee injury site, briefly 6 Atlantic, e.g. 60 Long-nosed fish 34 They’re next to some records 7 “Know your rights” org. 62 “The Joy Luck Club” author 8 Unwilling to bend 38 Gin fizz fruit Amy (editor@ 9 French word before “cuisine” ©2020 Jonesin’ Crosswords (editor@jonesincrosswords. 39 Where the grid’s circled com) For answers to this puzzle, call: 1-900-226-2800, or “couture” 99 cents per minute. Must be 18+. Or to bill to your credit letters denote the NW, NE, card, call: 1-800-655-6548. Reference puzzle #0968 10 Breakfast hrs. SW, SE and centermost 11 Ran across locations LAST WEEK’S SOLUTION: 12 Book reviewers, briefly 42 Be compatible 15 “Time to get a move on!” 43 “Meh” 21 Former VP Agnew 44 “Blueberries for ___” 23 Body spray brand 45 Grandmas, for some 26 “Deal!” 47 Bookcase material 28 Mango dip 48 Praising enthusiastically 29 Do a kitchen job 50 Make a request 30 Word in many college names 51 E-I link 31 Brakes too fast, maybe 54 Mythical flyer 33 ___-majeste (high treason) 56 Crewmate of Spock and Sulu 34 Twenty dispensers

Across

58 “A Wrinkle in Time” author Madeleine L’___ 61 Take ___ (lose some money) 63 Indigo dye source 64 Bluish greens 65 “Baby” character in “The Mandalorian” 66 Furniture chain to meander through 67 Jeweler’s weight measure 68 Layer on the farm 69 “Hilarious!,” online

Down

INDEPENDENT.COM FEBRUARY 27, 27, 2020 2020 INDEPENDENT.COM FEBRUARY

THE INDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT THE

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INDEPENDENT CLASSIFIEDS

LEGALS

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: GET IT DONE SB at 33 Ocean View Ave. #8 Santa Barbara, CA 93013; David J. Perez (same address) conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on February 03, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Thomas Brian. FBN Number: 2020‑0000375. Published: Feb 6, 13, 20, 27 2020.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: YOGURTLAND at 621 State St Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Ozig Inc 5003 Dobkin Ave Tarzana, CA 91356 conducted by a Corporation Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 6, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Thomas Brian. FBN Number: 2020‑0000054. Published: Feb 13, 20, 27. Mar 5 2020.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SB HEMP, SB HEMP CO, SB TRADING CO at 1834 Bath Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Santa Barbara Hemp Company, LLC (same address) conducted by a Limited Liability Company Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 04, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, (SEAL) by Maria F. Sanchez. FBN Number: 2020‑0000395. Published: Feb 13, 20, 27. Mar 5 2020.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: ABATEX at 1 N. Calle Cesar Chavez #11 Santa Barbara, CA 93103; PBM San Bernardino, Inc. (same address) conducted by a Corporation Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 3, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Brenda Aguilera. FBN Number: 2020‑0000377. Published: Feb 13, 20, 27. Mar 5 2020.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: REVENUE PROPERTIES USA at 597 Ave. of The Flags, Ste 104 Buellton, CA 93427; Kerry Moriarty (same address) conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 28, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, (SEAL) by John Beck. FBN Number: 2020‑0000297. Published: Feb 13, 20, 27. Mar 5 2020. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: KIDS AT WEDDINGS, THE PAPER POISE PUBLISHING COMPANY at 1209 Manitou Road Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Penelope Colvill Paine (same address) conducted by a Individual Signed: Penelope C. Paine Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 05, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Thomas Brian. FBN Number: 2020‑0000413. Published: Feb 13, 20, 27. Mar 5 2020. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: ECO SB DESIGN INC at 1716 Pampas Ave. Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Eco SB Design Inc. (same address) conducted by a Corporation Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 30, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Thomas Brian. FBN Number: 2020‑0000343. Published: Feb 13, 20, 27. Mar 5 2020. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SANTA BARBARA SENDING at 1002 Cieneguitas Rd Santa Barbara, CA 93110; Trinity Baptist Church of Santa Barbara (same address) conducted by a Corporation Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 03, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Maria F. Sanchez. FBN Number: 2020‑0000371. Published: Feb 13, 20, 27. Mar 5 2020. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: NIELSON WINES at 5475 Chardonnay Lane Santa Maria, CA 93454; Jackson Family Wines, Inc. 421 Aviation Blvd. Santa Rosa, CA 95403 conducted by a Corporation Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 24, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, (SEAL) by John Beck. FBN Number: 2020‑0000257. Published: Feb 13, 20, 27. Mar 5 2020.

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: STRUXURE OUTDOOR OF SANTA BARBARA at 6585 El Colegio Road Goleta, CA 93117; Santa Barbara Smart Patio (same address) conducted by a Corporation Signed: David Wilcox, President Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 17, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Thomas Brian. FBN Number: 2020‑0000195. Published: Feb 13, 20, 27. Mar 5 2020. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: POPPY at 911 State Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Sjt Sales, LLC 10635 San Marcos Rd Atascadero, CA 93422 conducted by a Limited Limted Company Signed: Sophia Tolle, Manager Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 7, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by John Beck. FBN Number: 2020‑0000434. Published: Feb 13, 20, 27. Mar 5 2020. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: KIMBERLY CARE CENTER, SANTA MARIA POST ACUTE at 820 W. Cook St. Santa Maria, CA 93548; Santa Maria Post Acute, LLC 5404 Whitsett Ave., Suite 182 Valley Village, CA 91607 conducted by a Limited Limted Company Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 3, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Maria F. Sanchez. FBN Number: 2020‑0000378. Published: Feb 13, 20, 27. Mar 5 2020. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SANTA BARBARA HIIT at 2621 Orella St Apt 5 Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Katherine Garcia (same address) conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 05, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, (SEAL) by Margarita Silva. FBN Number: 2020‑0000408. Published: Feb 13, 20, 27. Mar 5 2020. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: HERCULES HANDYMAN at 7636 Hollister Ave #260 Goleta, CA 93117; Melanie Latimer (same address) conducted by a Individual Signed: Melanie Latimer Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 06, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Thomas Brian. FBN Number: 2020‑0000420. Published: Feb 13, 20, 27. Mar 5 2020.

THE INDEPENDENT

FEBRUARY 27, 2020

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PHONE 965-5205

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: BOCCE BALL WINE, CLEAN SLATE, CLEAN SLATE WINE BAR at 448 Atterdag Rd, Unit 1 Solvang, CA 93463; Wine Club Marketing, Inc. 7603 Atron Ave West Hills, CA 91304 conducted by a Corporation Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 4, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by John Beck. FBN Number: 2020‑0000383. Published: Feb 13, 20, 27. Mar 5 2020. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: AESTHETIC CENTER FOR PLASTIC SURGERY at 5333 Hollister Ave., #195 Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Marc Soares 5315 Plunkett Lane Santa Barbara, CA 93111 conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 3, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Maria F. Sanchez. FBN Number: 2020‑0000373. Published: Feb 13, 20, 27. Mar 5 2020. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: CRAVIOTTO STATE STREET PROPERTY at 1806 Robbins Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101‑4628; Darlene S. Levien Craviotto 6230 Marlborough Drive Goleta, CA 93117‑1638; Daniel F. Craviotto Jr. 500 Puente Drive Santa Barbara, CA 93110; James Craviotto 1806 Robbins Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101‑4628; Marcella Craviotto 1148 North Patterson Avenue Santa Barbara, CA 93111‑1114 conducted by a General Partnership Signed: James Craviotto Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on February 04, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by John Beck. FBN Number: 2020‑0000388. Published: Feb 13, 20, 27. Mar 5 2020. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: JERRY THE PLUMBER, INCORPORATED at 1521 San Miguel Ave Santa Barbara, CA 93109; Jerry The Plumber, Incorporated (same address) conducted by a Corporation Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on January 27, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by John Beck. FBN Number: 2020‑0000296. Published: Feb 13, 20, 27. Mar 5 2020. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: MICHAEL RENGA FLOORING, INC at 2610 De La Vina Street Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Michael Renga Flooring, Inc. (same address) conducted by a Corporation Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on January 31, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Thomas Brian. FBN Number: 2020‑0000363. Published: Feb 13, 20, 27. Mar 5 2020. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: CARPENTER ILLUSTRATION AND DESIGN at 2539 Puesta Del Sol Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Michael J Carpenter (same address) conducted by a Individual Signed: Michael J. Carpenter Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 03, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Margarita Silva. FBN Number: 2020‑0000370. Published: Feb 13, 20, 27. Mar 5 2020. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: MKR COMMUNICATIONS at 309 Por La Mar Circle Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Maureen Russell (same address) conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 04, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Thomas Brian. FBN Number: 2020‑0000389. Published: Feb 13, 20, 27. Mar 5 2020.

INDEPENDENT.COM INDEPENDENT.COM

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: RESIDUAL SAUCE CLOTHING, RSC at 5731 Hollister Ave. Goleta, CA 93117; Steven Fuentes 429 Valerio St. Apt 42 Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Andrew Gonzales 468 Venado Dr. Santa Barbara, CA 93111 conducted by a Copartners Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 04, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Brenda Aguilera. FBN Number: 2020‑0000390. Published: Feb 13, 20, 27. Mar 5 2020. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: BUNNIN CHEVROLET CADILLAC at 301 S Hope Ave Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Believe Automotive Inc 9230 Olympic Blvd #203 Beverly Hills, CA 90212 conducted by a Corporation Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 29, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by John Beck. FBN Number: 2020‑0000326. Published: Feb 13, 20, 27. Mar 5 2020. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: INSURANCE PROFESSIONALS OF SANTA BARBARA; NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF INSURANCE WOMEN, INC. at 1411 North Curryer Street Santa Maria, CA 93458; National Association of Insurance Women, Inc. (same address) conducted by a Corporation Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 28, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, (SEAL) by Maria F. Sanchez. FBN Number: 2020‑0000320. Published: Feb 13, 20, 27. Mar 5 2020. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: GOODLAND DOULA at 237 Daytona Drive Goleta, CA 93117; Stephaine Reed Drake (same address) conducted by a Individual Signed: Stephaine R. Drake Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 06, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Thomas Brian. FBN Number: 2020‑0000419. Published: Feb 13, 20, 27. Mar 5 2020. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: GIANT BEAVER TREE SERVICES at 130 Garden Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Keith Bradford Strauss 340 Old Mill Road Santa Barbara, CA 93110 conducted by a Individual Signed: Keith Strauss Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 13, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Margarita Silva. FBN Number: 2020‑0000490. Published: Feb 20, 27. Mar 5, 12 2020. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: WAE DESIGNS at 228 W Anapamu St. Apt. A Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Kathryn Grace Eberle (same address) conducted by a Individual Signed: Katie Eberle Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 10, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by John Beck. FBN Number: 2020‑0000451. Published: Feb 20, 27. Mar 5, 12 2020.

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E M A I L S A L E S @ I N D E P E N D E N T. C O M

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: FLAIR PROJECT at 522 East Anapamu D Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Ivaylo Peshev (same address) conducted by a Individual Signed: Ivaylo Peshev Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 27, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Maria F. Sanchez. FBN Number: 2020‑0000289. Published: Feb 20, 27. Mar 5, 12 2020. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: GRATEFUL DAY MUSIC, SANTA BARBARA VINTAGE PHOTOGRAPHY at 1318 Mountain Avenue Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Anita Frances Bayley (same address) Bradford Jay Bayley (same address) conducted by a Married Couple Signed: Brad Bayley Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 24, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Maria F. Sanchez. FBN Number: 2020‑0000267. Published: Feb 20, 27. Mar 5, 12 2020.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: TRAVEL WITH ANAIYA, VILLA ORGANIC CLEANING SERVICES at 516 W Islay Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Anaiya Latwai Mussolini (same address) conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 11, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Maria F. Sanchez. FBN Number: 2020‑0000470. Published: Feb 20, 27. Mar 5, 12 2020. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SB TILE AND STONE at 93 Castilian Dr Goleta, CA 93117; Laura Prieto 1116 Bath St Apt J Santa Barbara, CA 93101 conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 12, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Maria F. Sanchez. FBN Number: 2020‑0000476. Published: Feb 20, 27. Mar 5, 12 2020.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SALON DEL MAR at 633 East Cabrillo Blvd. Santa Barbara, CA 93103; SDM Hair Studio, LLC 19 Oak St. #B Santa Barbara, CA 93103 conducted by a Limited Liability Company Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 5, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Thomas Brian. FBN Number: 2020‑0000409. Published: Feb 20, 27. Mar 5, 12 2020.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: JESSICA BARKER MEDICAL AESTHETICS at 300 Salida Del Sol Santa Barbara, CA 93109; JHB Medical Aesthetics, PC (same address) conducted by a Corporation Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 12, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Margarita Silva. FBN Number: 2020‑0000481. Published: Feb 20, 27. Mar 5, 12 2020.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: CALM PHOTOGRAPHS at 5 La Cadena St Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Moises Lopez (same address) conducted by a Individual Signed: Moises Lopez Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 11, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Margarita Lopez. FBN Number: 2020‑0000466. Published: Feb 20, 27. Mar 5, 12 2020.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: GOLDEN COAST BURLS at 1243 Bel Air Dr. Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Robert Brandt Golden (same address) conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 3, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Maria F. Sanchez. FBN Number: 2020‑0000368. Published: Feb 20, 27. Mar 5, 12 2020.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: CRUZ BUSINESS SERVICES at 5276 Hollister Ave. Suite 406 Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Guisela Nohemi Cruz 7190 Davenport Rd. #108 Goleta, CA 93117 conducted by a Individual Signed: Guisela Nohemi Cruz Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 13, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by John Beck. FBN Number: 2020‑0000493. Published: Feb 20, 27. Mar 5, 12 2020. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: DIALYN at 1485 East Valley Road #6 Montecito, CA 93108; Dialyn LLC 2207 State Street Santa Barbara, CA 93105 conducted by a Limited Liability Company Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 12, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Margarita Silva. FBN Number: 2020‑0000478. Published: Feb 20, 27. Mar 5, 12 2020. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SWOOSH SCOOTERS at 5432 Tree Farm Ln Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Swoosh Electric Transportation Inc. (same address) conducted by a Corporation Signed: John Feeley Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 6, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by John Beck. FBN Number: 2020‑0000433. Published: Feb 20, 27. Mar 5, 12 2020. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: BEACH CITY at 831 Cliff Drive, Suite 100 Santa Barbara, CA 93109; Unknown Drean, LLC (same address) conducted by a Limited Liability Company Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 18, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by John Beck. FBN Number: 2020‑0000519. Published: Feb 27. Mar 5, 12, 19 2020.

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING CITY COUNCIL MEETING March 17, 2020 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City Council of the City of Goleta will conduct a public hearing on the following matter:

Measure A Five-Year Program of Projects for Fiscal Years 2020-2025 The City Council will consider adoption of the City’s five-year program of projects to be funded by Measure A sales tax funds pursuant to Local Transportation Authority Ordinance No. 5, the Road Repair, Traffic Relief and Transportation Safety Measure (“Measure A”.) MEETING DATE/TIME:

Tuesday, March 17, 2020, 5:30 P.M.

PLACE:

Goleta City Hall, Council Chambers 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B, Goleta, CA 93117

PUBLIC COMMENT: All interested persons are encouraged to attend the meeting and to present written and/or oral comments. All letters should be addressed to Public Works Department, 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B, Goleta, CA 93117. Letters must be received by Public Works Department on or before the date of the meeting or can be submitted at the meeting. DOCUMENT AVAILABILITY: The staff report may be obtained at the City of Goleta, 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B, Goleta, CA 93117. The documents will be posted on the City’s web site at www.cityofgoleta.org. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION: Additional information is on file at Public Works Department, Goleta City Hall, 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B, Goleta, CA 93117. Contact James Campero, Deputy Public Works Director at (805) 961-7561. Note: In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you need special assistance to participate in this meeting, please contact the City Clerk’s Office at (805) 961-7505. Notification at least 72 hours prior to the hearing will enable City staff to make reasonable arrangements. Publish:

Santa Barbara Independent – February 27, 2020


INDEPENDENT CLASSIFIEDS

LEGALS

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: JUAN GUARNEROS PAINTING at 3702 Amalfi Way #B Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Juan A. Guarneros (same address) conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 18, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by John Beck. FBN Number: 2020‑0000528. Published: Feb 27. Mar 5, 12, 19 2020. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: LAROSSA LUNDY LANDSCAPE at 1120 San Pascual #3 Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Larossa Lundy Landscape LLC (same address) conducted by a Limited Liability Company Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 18, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by John Beck. FBN Number: 2020‑0000525. Published: Feb 27. Mar 5, 12, 19 2020.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: BETTY PAGE RUM, HIGH ROLLER TIKI LOUNGE at 433 Alisal Rd, Ste A Solvang, CA 93463; Cardiff Giant Enterprises, LLC (same address) conducted by a Limited Liability Company Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 11, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by John Beck. FBN Number: 2020‑0000469. Published: Feb 27. Mar 5, 12, 19 2020. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: PACIFIC SCHOOL OF WRITING at 88 S. Patterson Ave #106 Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Marcia Meier (same address) conducted by a Individual Signed: Marcia Meier Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 11, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Margarita Silva. FBN Number: 2020‑0000463. Published: Feb 27. Mar 5, 12, 19 2020.

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: GOODLAND COMMERCIAL CLEANING at 170 Nectarine Ave Apt A Goleta, CA 93117; Mario Avila Cornejo (same address) conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 13, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Margarita Silva. FBN Number: 2020‑0000487. Published: Feb 27. Mar 5, 12, 19 2020. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SKIN CARE INSTITUTE, SKIN PROPHECY CLINIC at 130 S. Hope Ave Space F‑127 Suite #107 Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Darlene Serpa‑Wickman 1012 West Sola St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101 conducted by a Individual Signed: Darlene Serpa‑Wickman Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 4, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by John Beck. FBN Number: 2020‑0000381. Published: Feb 27. Mar 5, 12, 19 2020.

ORDINANCE NO. 20-__ AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF GOLETA, CALIFORNIA, ADOPTING THE NEW ZONING ORDINANCE AS TITLE 17 OF THE GOLETA MUNICIPAL CODE, REPEALING VARIOUS CITY ORDINANCES, AND REPEALING OR AMENDING VARIOUS SECTIONS OF THE GOLETA MUNICIPAL CODE On March 3, 2020 at Goleta City Hall, 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B, Goleta, California, the City Council of the City of Goleta will conduct the second reading and adoption of a proposed ordinance that would provide rules and regulations for land use and development on private property. The purpose of the New Zoning Ordinance is to implement the General Plan, and to protect and promote the public health, safety, peace, comfort, convenience, prosperity, and general welfare. Any interested person may obtain a copy of the proposed ordinance at the City Clerk’s Office, City Hall, 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B, Goleta, California 93117 or by calling City Hall at (805) 961-7505. Deborah Lopez City Clerk Publish:

Santa Barbara Independent February 27, 2020

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING Design Review Board Goleta City Hall – Council Chambers 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B Goleta, CA 93117 Tuesday, March 10, 2020 at 3:00 P.M.

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Design Review Board (DRB) of the City of Goleta will conduct a public hearing on the date set forth above to consider the following new project: Conceptual Review Appfolio Landscape and Site Improvements 70 Castillian Drive (APN 073-330-022) Case No. 20-0001-DRB Design Review Wendy’s Restaurant Exterior Alterations 5724 Hollister Avenue (APN 071-081-014) Case No. 20-0005-DRB PUBLIC COMMENT: This hearing is for design review only. All interested persons are encouraged to attend the public hearing and to present written and/or oral comments. All letters should be addressed to City of Goleta, Planning and Environmental Review, 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B, Goleta, CA 93117 or email to mchang@cityofgoleta.org. Letters must be received by Planning and Environmental Review no later than 24 hours prior to the DRB meeting. Materials received after this time may not be reviewed prior to the DRB meeting. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION: The items in this notice are new items. The DRB agenda may also include items continued from prior meetings. All persons wanting to review any project applications may do so by contacting City of Goleta, Planning and Environmental Review at (805) 961-7543. The Agenda, staff reports and project plans will be available approximately one week before the hearing on the City’s website at www.cityofgoleta.org. Publish:

Santa Barbara Independent, February 27, 2020

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E M A I L S A L E S @ I N D E P E N D E N T. C O M

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: IMAGINE X FUNCTIONAL NEUROLOGY at 804 Anacapa St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Adam Harcourt Chiropractic, P.C. (same address) conducted by a Corporation Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 18, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Margarita Silva. FBN Number: 2020‑0000515. Published: Feb 27. Mar 5, 12, 19 2020.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: OAM FINE ART at 802 W. Micheltorena St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Olivia Anna Mohler‑Masclet (same address) conducted by a Individual Signed: Olivia Mohler‑Masclet Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 20, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by John Beck. FBN Number: 2020‑0000560. Published: Feb 27. Mar 5, 12, 19 2020.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: ST. GEORGE & ASSOCIATES at 831 Cliff Drive, Suite 100 Santa Barbara, CA 93109; Community Housing Management Group, LLC (same address) conducted by a Limited Liability Company Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 18, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Brenda Aguilera. FBN Number: 2020‑0000513. Published: Feb 27. Mar 5, 12, 19 2020.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: AMY HAGEN at 6522 Camino Caseta Goleta, CA 93117; Amy Hagen Violin Studio LLC (same address) conducted by a Limited Liability Company Signed: Amy Hagen, Manager Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 18, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by John Beck. FBN Number: 2020‑0000510. Published: Feb 27. Mar 5, 12, 19 2020.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: ACE HEATING & AIR CONDITIONING CO. at 875 Amethyst Drive Santa Maria, CA 93455; Daniel B. Arellano (same address) conducted by a Individual Signed: Daniel B. Arellano Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 7, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Margarita Silva. FBN Number: 2020‑0000438. Published: Feb 27. Mar 5, 12, 19 2020.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: MOUSAI PUBLISHING at 1240 Estrella Drive Santa Barbara, CA 93110; Glenys Archer (same address) conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on January 31, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by John Beck. FBN Number: 2020‑0000367. Published: Feb 6, 13, 20, 27 2020.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: QUEVOLA LEARNING SERVICES at 5074 Ella Lane Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Dawer Perez Canete (same address) conducted by a Individual Signed: Dawer Perez Canete Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 18, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Maria F. Sanchez. FBN Number: 2020‑0000505. Published: Feb 27. Mar 5, 12, 19 2020.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: MCFADDEN & MCFADDEN PUBLIC RELATIONS at 945 Ward Dr. #128 Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Maureen McFadden (same address) conducted by a Individual Signed: Maureen McFadden Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 21, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by John Beck. FBN Number: 2020‑0000573. Published: Feb 27. Mar 5, 12, 19 2020.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: CIRCLE BAR B, CIRCLE BAR B RANCH, CIRCLE BAR B STABLES at 1800 Refugio Road Goleta, CA 93117; PMB Stock Company (same address) conducted by a Corporation Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 19, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Margarita Silva. FBN Number: 2020‑0000536. Published: Feb 27. Mar 5, 12, 19 2020.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: INTERMEZZO, WINE CASK, INTERMEZZO BY WINE CASK, THE WINE CASK at 813 Anacapa Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101; SB Wine Cask Ventures, LLC (same address) conducted by a Limited Liability Company Signed: Lisa Velez, Agent Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 13, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by John Beck. FBN Number: 2020‑0000494. Published: Feb 27. Mar 5, 12, 19 2020.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: OT INSPIRED at 405 Ellwood Beach Dr. Apt A Goleta, CA 93117; Kristina Fluitt (same address) conducted by a Individual Signed: Kristina Fluitt Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 13, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by John Beck. FBN Number: 2020‑0000497. Published: Feb 27. Mar 5, 12, 19 2020.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: JORDAN KUYKENDALL FITNESS at 1331 San Andreas St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Jordan Kuykendall 4128 Via Andorra, Apt B Santa Barbara, CA 93110 conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 24, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Thomas Brian. FBN Number: 2020‑0000580. Published: Feb 27. Mar 5, 12, 19 2020.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: DG PRIVATE TR, DG PRIVATE TRUST at 100 N. La Cumbre Rd #6 Santa Barbara, CA 93110; Danielle Guerrera Trustee (same address) conducted by a Trust Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 20, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by John Beck. FBN Number: 2020‑0000548. Published: Feb 27. Mar 5, 12, 19 2020. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: JOSH OF ALL TRADES at 401 Chapala St., #205 Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Josh Blair (same address) conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 20, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by John Beck. FBN Number: 2020‑0000562. Published: Feb 27. Mar 5, 12, 19 2020.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SAN MIGUEL ASSOCIATION at 6274 Shamrock Ave Goleta, CA 93117; Louise Ann Cruz (same address) conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 24, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Maria F. Sanchez. FBN Number: 2020‑0000581. Published: Feb 27. Mar 5, 12, 19 2020. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: PROCESS TECHNOLOGY SOLUTIONS at 415 Alameda Padre Unit A Santa Barbara, CA 93103; David Nathaniel White (same address) conducted by a Individual Signed: David White Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 20, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Brenda Aguilera. FBN Number: 2020‑0000556. Published: Feb 27. Mar 5, 12, 19 2020.

NAME CHANGE IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF TERESA RODRIGUEZ AND CLEMENTE MUNOZ ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 20CV00196 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: AMBER ALYSSA CAMPOS TO: AMBER ALYSSA MUNOZ FROM: ALEXANDER CAMPOS TO: ALEXANDER MUNOZ FROM: ANGEL OMAR CAMPOS TO: ANGEL MUNOZ THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING March 11, 2020 9:30am, Dept 6, Courthouse, 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101 A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated January 13, 2020 by Pauline Maxwell, Judge of the Superior Court. Published: Feb 13, 20, 27. Mar 5 2020. IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF BARBARA GEORDIE ARMSTRONG ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 20CV00639 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: BARBARBA GEORDIE ARMSTRONG TO: GEORDIE ESME ARMSTRONG THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING April 8, 2020 9:30am, Dept 6, Courthouse, 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101 A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks

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prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated February 13, 2020 by Thomas P. Anderle, Judge of the Superior Court. Published: Feb 20, 27. Mar 5, 12 2020. IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF FRANCESCA ISABELLE BANZON TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 20CV00533 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: FRANCESCA ISABELLE BANZON aka FRANCESCA ISABELLE G BANZON aka FRANCESCA ISABELLE G SEN TO: FRANCESCA ISABELLE SEN THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. NOTICE OF HEARING April 1, 2020 9:30 am, Dept 6, Courthouse, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St. Santa Barbara, CA 93121‑1107 Anacapa Division A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated Feb 13, 2020. by Donna D. Geck of the Superior Court. Published. Feb 27. Mar 5, 12, 19 2020. IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF LINDA SUSAN WEINMAN TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 20CV00526 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: LINDA SUSAN WEINMAN TO: LYNDA SUSAN WEINMAN THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. NOTICE OF HEARING April 8, 2020 9:30 am, Dept 6, Courthouse, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St. Santa Barbara, CA 93121‑1107 Anacapa Division A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Stephen N. Yungling, SBN 197832; MULLEN & HENZELL, LLP 112 E. Victoria Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101; (805) 966‑1501 Dated Feb 13, 2020. by Donna D. Geck of the Superior Court. Published. Feb 27. Mar 5, 12, 19 2020.

PUBLIC NOTICES NOTICE OF HEARING‑ GUARDIANSHIP OR CONSERVATORSHIP CASE NUMBER BPB‑18‑XXXXXX Superior Court of California, County of Kern 1215 Truxtun Avenue, Bakersfield, CA 93301, Metropolitan Division. Guardianship of the person of: John Doe and Jane Doe, Minors. This notice is required by law. This notice does not require you to appear in court, but you may attend the hearing if you wish. 1. NOTICE is given that: Jane Doe has filed: A Petition for Appointment of Guardian of Minor. 2. You may refer to documents on file in this proceeding for more information. (Some documents filed with the court are confidential. Under some circumstances you or your attorney may be able to see or receive copies of confidential documents if you file papers in the Proceeding or apply to the court) 4. A HEARING on the matter will be held as follows: a. Date: Month Day, 2016 Time: 8:30 A.M. Dept: P b. Address of the court: same noted above. Jane Doe, Esq. SBN 000000, Greater Bakersfield Legal Assistance, Inc. 615 California Avenue, Bakersfield, CA 93304 (661) 321‑3996, Attorney for: Jane Doe. Published Feb 6, 13, 20, 27 2020.

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Santa Barbara Independent, 2/27/20  

February 27, 2020, Vol. 34, No. 737

Santa Barbara Independent, 2/27/20  

February 27, 2020, Vol. 34, No. 737