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Feature

INSIDE THE CAPPS AND WILLIAMS CAMPAIGNS

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Santa Barbara

FEB. 20-27, 2020 VOL. 34 • NO. 736

page 26

BREAKING

BARRIERS Remembering Horace McMillan, the Doctor Who Took on Big Banks and the Real Estate Lobby Over Civil Rights by Nick Welsh and Adri Davies page 21

Also Inside

ENDORSEMENTS

page 8

• TV X-STREAMIST: CONTINENTAL COPS INDEPENDENT.COM

FEBRUARY 20, 2020

page 42

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PARALLEL STORIES Jane Smiley: Love Comes First, Beauty Follows THURSDAY | FEBRUARY 27 | 5:30 PM “A novelist has two lives—a reading and writing life, and a lived life. He or she cannot be understood at all apart from this.” — Jane Smiley, 13 Ways of Looking at the Novel

$5 SBMA Members $10 Non-Members $6 Senior Non-Members Purchase tickets at the Museum Visitor Services desk, or online at tickets.sbma.net.

Take a closer look at the life-long passions, prodigious productivity, and well-honed writing practice of Pulitzer Prize-winning author Jane Smiley in a far-ranging conversation with longtime friend, fellow author, and colleague in the Creative Writing program at UC Riverside, Andrew Winer. Often epic in scale and yet intimate in telling detail, Smiley’s multigenerational tales tell the story of middle America. Hailed as one of the nation’s greatest living writers, Smiley was inducted into the American Academy of Arts and Letters in 2001, and in 2006 she received the PEN Center USA Lifetime Achievement Award for Literature.

Mary Craig Auditorium 1130 State Street www.sbma.net

Book signing to follow.

A note of gratitude from . . . ®

We finished strong and served so many during the holiday season! 3,500 families selected food, clothing, and handmade gifts for their children. Plus, our volunteers assembled and delivered care packages to 3,000 homebound seniors and disabled adults. We stand ready to work for you by providing essential services for free to nearly 15,000 folks who count on us throughout the year! For your unwavering support and volunteer partnership, we extend a huge

THANK YOU! WWW.UNITYSHOPPE.ORG

1209 STATE STREET, SANTA BARBARA 2

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Jill Lepore

UCSB Environmental Studies Program 50th Anniversary Celebration

Fri, Feb 21 / 7:30 PM / UCSB Campbell Hall Tickets start at $20 / $10 all students (with valid ID) “The most prolific, nimble, and interesting writer of American history today, vigorously kicking at the past until she dislodges it from the ossifying grip of received wisdom.”

Our Changing Climate: A Global Movement of Reform

This America: The Case for the Nation

The Washington Post Harvard historian, New Yorker staff writer and bestselling author Jill Lepore offers a magisterial account of the rise of America and an urgent reckoning with our divided nation.

Presented through the generosity of Meg & Dan Burnham Additional Support: Judy Wainwright & Jim Mitchell History Matters Series Sponsors: Loren Booth and Ellen & Peter O. Johnson Author of one of Time magazine’s All-Time 100 Best Nonfiction Books

Bill Bryson

The Body: A Guide for Occupants Mon, Mar 2 / 7:30 PM / Granada Theatre Tickets start at $25 / $15 UCSB students A Granada facility fee will be added to each ticket price

“Bryson is fascinated by everything, and his curiosity is infectious.” The New York Times Book Review The bestselling author of A Short History of Nearly Everything, Bill Bryson takes us on a head-to-toe tour of the human body. Full of extraordinary facts and irresistible Bryson-esque anecdotes, the evening is guaranteed to provide a deeper understanding of the miracle that is life in general and you in particular.

Brian Greene

Until the End of Time: Mind, Matter and Our Search for Meaning in an Evolving Universe

Bill McKibben

Sat, Feb 29 / 7:30 PM / UCSB Campbell Hall $10 / $5 UCSB students and youth (18 & under) “One of the nation’s most important environmental activists.” The Washington Post Bill McKibben offers a call to arms 30 years after he first set the stage with his watershed book The End of Nature. Presented in association with Community Environmental Council Part of the Forces of Nature series

Bestselling Author of The Uninhabitable Earth

David Wallace-Wells

Surviving the World: Making the Best of a Burdened Planet Thu, Mar 5 / 7:30 PM / The New Vic $20 / $10 UCSB students “A masterly analysis of why – with a world of solutions – we choose doom.” Nature David Wallace-Wells asks key questions and reminds us that everything is within our control, so long as we resist complacency. This, he says, is the moment to truly engage with what climate change really means. Part of the Forces of Nature series

“Capable of untangling the mysteries of the universe, with a knack for clearly explaining it all to the rest of us.” Wired

Mon, Mar 9 / 7:30 PM / Granada Theatre Tickets start at $25 / $15 UCSB students A Granada facility fee will be added to each ticket price

Celebrated theoretical physicist Brian Greene takes us on a breathtaking journey from the big bang to the end of time as he invites us to ponder meaning in the face of this unimaginable expanse.

Presented through the generosity of Dorothy Largay & Wayne Rosing

Books will be available for purchase and signing at each event courtesy of Chaucer’s Corporate Season Sponsor:

(805) 893-3535 | www.ArtsAndLectures.UCSB.edu Granada event tickets can also be purchased at: (805) 899-2222 | www.GranadaSB.org INDEPENDENT.COM

FEBRUARY 20, 2020

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2020 Grammy Nominee for Best American Roots Song

Rosanne Cash with John Leventhal

She Remembers Everything

- Grammy Nomi nee ica Best Amer na Album

Wed, Mar 4 / 8 PM UCSB Campbell Hall Tickets start at $45 $15 UCSB students With an iconic sound that transcends country, pop, rock and blues, Rosanne Cash’s new album She Remembers Everything is a lush and soulful collection of songs that embraces women’s narratives and reckons with a flawed and fragile world.

Presented through the generosity of Marjorie & Barrie Bergman Part of the A Century of Empowerment series

Fri, Mar 6 / 8 PM / UCSB Campbell Hall Tickets start at $30 / $15 UCSB students With soulful vocals, rich harmonies, unwavering grooves and searing guitar work, The Wood Brothers harness a kaleidoscopic array of influences and exemplary musicianship into a must-see live show.

Buddy Guy

A Blockbuster Night of Blues

Jimmie Vaughan - Charlie Musselwhite

Sat, Mar 7 / 7 PM (note special time) Arlington Theatre Tickets start at $45 $25 UCSB students An Arlington facility fee will be added to each ticket price

Rock and Roll Hall of Famer Buddy Guy is an American treasure, guitar master and ambassador of Chicago blues. He’s joined by 2020 Grammy Award nominee Jimmie Vaughan, an Austin icon with a four-decade career of Texas Roadhouse blues, roots and jazz, and Charlie Musselwhite, whose Delta-infused harp glides seamlessly from blues to gospel to country.

Presented with additional support from Sharon & Bill Rich Corporate Season Sponsor:

(805) 893-3535 | www.ArtsAndLectures.UCSB.edu Arlington event tickets can also be purchased at: (805) 963-4408

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FEBRUARY 20, 2020

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FEBRUARY 20, 2020

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Editor in Chief Marianne Partridge

Publisher Brandi Rivera

Executive Editor Nick Welsh Senior Editors Michelle Drown, Tyler Hayden, Matt Kettmann Editor at Large Ethan Stewart News Reporter Delaney Smith Opinions Editor Jean Yamamura Executive Arts Editor Charles Donelan Arts Writer Josef Woodard Calendar Editor Terry Ortega Calendar Assistant Celina Garcia Sports Editor John Zant Sports Writer Victor Bryant Food Writer George Yatchisin Associate Editor Jackson Friedman Copy Editors Alexandra Mauceri, Tessa Reeg Creative Director Caitlin Fitch Graphic Designers Ricky Barajas, Esperanza Carmona, Ben Greenberg Production Designer Ava Talehakimi Staff Photographer Daniel Dreifuss Digital Editor Nancy Rodriguez Digital Assistant Amber White Columnists Dennis Allen, Gail Arnold, Sara Caputo, Roger Durling, Jerry Roberts, Starshine Roshell Contributors Camie Barnwell, Rob Brezsny, Melinda Burns, Ben Ciccati, John Dickson, Keith Hamm, Rebecca Horrigan, Eric HvolbØll, Tom Jacobs, Shannon Kelley, Kevin McKiernan, Ninette Paloma, Carolina Starin, Brian Tanguay, Tom Tomorrow, T.M. Weedon, Maggie Yates

2020

2020

TUESDAY, MARCH 3, 2020 PAID POSITIONS FROM $180-$240. MUST BE AVAILABLE TO WORK 6am – 9pm For more information, please call our toll free number at

Toll Free 1-844-259-0348 For information on registering to vote or Vote by Mail, Call 1-800-SBC-VOTE or visit www.SBCVOTE.com THE OFFICE OF CLERK, RECORDER, ASSESSOR, AND ELECTIONS JOSEPH E. HOLLAND

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Contact information: 12 E. Figueroa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101 PHONE (805) 965-5205; FAX (805) 965-5518 EMAIL news@independent.com, letters@independent.com Staff email addresses can be found at independent.com/info


Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  17

Name: Daniel Dreifuss Title: Staff Photographer

OBITUARIES.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 THE WEEK.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29

What was your very first camera, and what do you shoot with now? My first camera was a Canon film camera, and it had a lens with an electric zoom, which I have never seen since. I traded a Dickies jacket for it and started taking photos of friends and family. I currently shoot with Canon gear.

In Memoriam . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  19

21

COVER STORY

Breaking Barriers

LIVING.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35

Living Page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35

FOOD & DRINK .. . . . . . . . . . . 37 The Restaurant Guy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38

Dining Out Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39

A&E. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41

Remembering Horace McMillan, the Doctor Who Took on Big Banks and Real Estate Lobby Arts Life . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 Over Civil Rights

(Nick Welsh and Adri Davies)

ON THE COVER AND ABOVE: Horace McMillan. Courtesy photos.

26 FEATURE

FILM & TV. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 TV X-Streamist . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 Movie Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43

A Look at the Lives of Das Williams and Laura Capps (Delaney Smith)

ENDORSEMENTS.. . . . . . . . . . . 8

NEW STAFFER SNAPSHOT

SPORTS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 ODDS & ENDS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49

DANIEL DREIFUSS

volume 34, number 736, Feb. 20-27, 2020

Name your top three most memorable shoots. It’s hard to choose three. The Montecito mudslide for many reasons, mostly because it was so close to home. Photographing my first L.A. Kings game. I am a huge L.A. Kings fan, and that game was during the same season they won their first Stanley Cup. My third would be covering a caravan traveling through Mexico for the United Nations Refugee Agency. The experience of being on the front lines of an international story and hearing the stories of the refugees was intense. I learned a lot about myself and what kind of person I want to be from that assignment. What advice do you have for young shutterbugs? First, learn to shoot film. Learn how to determine an exposure without a camera that does it for you. Also shoot, then shoot some more, and after that, shoot even more. Learn from your photographs. Reach out to other photographers and ask for help. Attend workshops, listen to speakers, and go to local art shows. Also, never give your work away for free. It will only hurt you in the long run. DANIEL DREIFUSS

CONTENTS

ONLINE NOW AT

INDEPENDENT.COM PHOTO GALLERY

HUNDREDS GATHER TO MOURN GOLETA COUPLE KILLED IN HIT AND RUN

Rob Brezsny’s Free Will Astrology . . . . . . . 49 This Modern World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51

Friends, colleagues, and family gathered at SBCC to remember the Corrals’ impact on the community. Only at Independent.com.

NEWS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 11 CLASSIFIEDS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 OPINIONS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

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SANrABARBARA NEWS-PREs.5

FEBRUARY 20, 2020

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7


Das Williams for Santa Barbara County Supervisorial District 1

E

ndorsing a candidate in the current 1st Supervisorial District race has been among the most difficult decisions the Santa Barbara Independent has struggled to make in our 34 years. In it, we face an excruciating choice between two progressive, environmentally minded candidates, incumbent Das Williams and challenger Laura Capps. Both are serious people; both have demonstrated a serious commitment to public service. Both are clearly politically ambitious. As unfortunately happens when such likeminded opponents square off, campaigns tend to get ugly. In the heat of battle, one side’s “facts” are the other side’s “lies.” In this campaign, we have seen enough of both to last us a few lifetimes. In taking on Williams, an established incumbent with 17 years of elected office, Capps has relentlessly challenged his ethics, casting him as a willing stooge for the cannabis industry and special interests. In response, Williams’s supporters struck back, creating an independent expenditure committee to “set the record straight.” Bad idea. They sent out literature that only succeeded in making Williams look as bad as Capps says he is — not to mention sullying their own reputations in the process. All that being acknowledged, we have decided to endorse Das Williams for a second term as county supervisor. Our decision rests on the arc of consistency Williams has demonstrated over his 17 years in public life. We are endorsing Williams because of his notable record of accomplishments on environmental protection, climate change, and social justice. He has acquired a deep knowledge of the issues, a wide range of personal and political relationships, and has developed strong working ties with county staff and his board colleagues. Given the urgency of the issues before us — climate change, disaster preparedness, housing, and homelessness, to name just four — these assets matter profoundly. But we also have serious concerns and significant reservations about Das Williams — the politician and the man. Before we address such concerns, let’s highlight some of Williams’s more recent achievements. In the past year, the Board of Supervisors voted — finally — in favor of Community Choice, a massively significant green energy measure that will allow county residents to buy renewably produced energy. Williams was in the trenches, fighting to help make this happen. That Williams has developed a close working relationship with North County Supervisor Steve Lavagnino — normally a fiscal skeptic about green energy proposals — helped secure Lavagnino’s vote. When a union that had strongly backed Williams came out against the biggest wind energy proposal in county history, Williams broke with the union to support the project. He also played a significant role in creating a process that will allow more solar and wind projects than current zoning permits. In the aftermath of the debris flow following the Thomas Fire, Williams made sure bottled water got passed out to households without such basic services. He led the county’s efforts to facilitate the building of a new debris basin proposed by homeowners on Montecito’s devastated Randall Road. Even two days before the disaster, Williams got Flood Control teams to work day and night clearing the Santa Monica Debris Basin of boulders so that it functioned properly during the deluge, most likely saving lives. While still in the Assembly, Williams stumbled onto a scheme by the state National Guard to sell its downtown Armory. He intervened, and the Santa Barbara School District was able to secure this invaluable real estate for public use. While in Sacramento he also helped push legislation that created the desperately needed Isla Vista Community Service District. In person, Williams often comes across as a weird blend of eco-minded flag-waver, evangelical Christian, and ego-driven

careerist. Admirers see in Williams the personification of the causes they support. His detractors see in him a calculating political opportunist. On his good days, he can appear stalwart and resolute; on bad days, however, he seems tone deaf and arrogant. That arrogance — both real and perceived — has finally landed Williams in serious hot water. When constituents in his hometown of Carpinteria raised the alarm over the odors and other very real problems caused by cannabis cultivation, Williams never showed much compassion or regret for the fallout. He dismissed critics as prohibitionists, and when the Carpinteria City Council held a special meeting to discuss the impacts of cannabis, Williams, astonishingly, did not show up. The Independent endorsed Proposition 64, the legalization of cannabis for recreational purposes, in 2016. Legalization offered the promise of erasing much black-market cultivation and product, making it safer for human consumption. Also, the emergence of cannabis as a new cash crop is positive, but it is one fraught with complicated challenges. If the federal government eventually legalizes the interstate commerce of cannabis, Santa Barbara County will be in an excellent position to reap needed tax revenues, but until then, it falls to county government to sort out how to regulate the industry. Unfortunately, it has become clear that the Board of Supervisors opened the doors to cannabis agriculture and trade way too wide, way too fast. In hindsight, a more gradual approach would have resulted in far less collateral damage to the grape industry, to the avocado industry, and to the many residents who find the terpene-rich vapors that carry the plant’s skunk-like aromas an invasive assault. To be fair, the supervisors were under an extreme time pressure. They had to adopt a county ordinance within one year, or they’d have to accept a one-size-fits-all solution adopted by Sacramento regulators, or not allow cannabis crops or commerce in the county. In their haste, the supervisors made some thoughtless blunders. They naively agreed to accept affidavits offered by cannabis operators swearing that they had been growing marijuana before January 2016. County administrators chose not to independently verify these claims, citing a staffing shortage. Bad call. Today, these legal non-conforming growers cultivate the bulk of Santa Barbara cannabis. So long as these farmers are going through the motions of obtaining the necessary permits, they cannot legally be shut down or sanctioned for behavior that would get other growers in serious trouble. Supervisor Williams was one of four supervisors who led the charge on behalf of the new industry. His challenger Laura Capps has focused on campaign donations Williams has taken from cannabis operators, some within days of key votes on the board. It does not make an inspiring picture. But after following Williams’s position on cannabis legalization for years, we are convinced that Williams’s support for the new industry is not a politically corrupt one. As long as he has been in elected office,

DAN I EL DR EI FU SS

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Williams has been a proponent of legalization, regulation, and taxation. He was that way when he served on the Santa Barbara City Council; he’s that way now. Laura Capps has raised significant issues that deserve to be taken seriously, and we do. She has proposed strengthening county regulations on campaign financing and on establishing an ethics commission as ways to control the influence of special interests over issues before the board. She has worked on statewide and national organizations to combat climate change. She has made tough decisions in the face of intensely emotional controversies as a member of the Santa Barbara school board. She has played a leading role in the county’s fight against poverty and hunger, and she has long been an advocate for women and children. In short, she is a candidate worth supporting. But not this year, not in this race. In deciding which candidate to endorse, we have weighed the concerns Capps has raised about Williams against his 17-year career. Is his behavior over the past three years a good enough reason to toss him overboard? We don’t think so. Do we wish he had disavowed these last-minute hit pieces immediately, instead of waiting for days? We do. But we also believe Williams will learn to admit his mistakes quickly and with compassion, and that he will strive to repair relationships with those who have been his past allies. Most importantly, we are convinced that as the 1st District Supervisor, Das Williams will continue to push home the legislation, programs, and solutions to the challenges confronting Santa Barbara County. n

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THE INDEPENDENT

FEBRUARY 20, 2020

INDEPENDENT.COM


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Joan Hartmann

Salud Carbajal for Congress

Santa Barbara County Supervisorial District 3

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PAU L WELLM AN F I LE PHOTO

uring her first term on the board of supervisors, Joan Hartmann has been nothing short of exemplary. When Hartmann shows up for work — representing parts of Goleta, Isla Vista, and the Santa Ynez Valley — it’s all about right here, right now. She brings to the position a powerful intelligence and the work ethic of a long-distance runner, which she happens to be. Though softspoken almost to a fault, Hartmann has been uncommonly, if quietly, effective when it comes to moving the needle and getting stuff done. On a wide range of difficult, emotionally explosive issues — negotiations with the Chumash, cannabis, and creating the zoning infrastructure from which a greatly expanded renewable energy industry might emerge — her fingerprints are everywhere. This race is for all the marbles as Hartmann occupies the key swing vote that determines the direction of the board of supervisors the next four years. Her key opponent in the race, Bruce Porter, is a voter-suppressing say-anything, do-anything chameleon who has been taking backdoor donations from the oil industry on one hand n while representing himself as the “environmental alternative” on the other.

for State Senate

T PAU L WEL LM AN FI LE PHOTO

State Assembly, District 37

O

T

his is an easy choice, though perhaps a cruel one. Voters should send Salud Carbajal back to Congress to represent Santa Barbara and Ventura counties in Washington D.C., a city that even on the best of days now qualifies a “hostile work environment.” A liberal Democrat, Carbajal is not in a position to sponsor major legislation. But Carbajal has used the bully pulpit at his disposal to bear witness against some of the more extreme cruelties of the Trump administration, standing tall, for example, in favor of the Affordable Care Act and speaking out against the reckless hate mongering that masquerades as White House immigration policy. But Carbajal, a former county supervisor, has never been about ideology so much as he’s focused on constituent service. In that regard, he’s delivered big time, both behind the scenes and in front of the cameras. When it’s come to securing federal resources for fire protection and disaster relief in the wake of the Thomas Fire, Carbajal delivered the goods. Running for his third term, Carbajal now knows his way around Washington enough to qualify as a well-placed investment by district voters. In this context, it would be foolhardy to consider replacing him with Andy Caldwell. For 20 years, Caldwell has been an indefatigable and often outrageous voice for COLAB, a right-wing organization that has never seen an environmental protection it didn’t hate. Although only Carbajal and Caldwell are the only two names to appear on the March ballot for this district, both men will have to face off for real in November. Our endorsement won’t change anything between now and then. But send a message: Send Salud Carbajal back to Washington. n

Monique Limón

Steve Bennett

f the seven candidates vying for this open seat, Ventura County Supervisor Steve Bennett enjoys a dramatic advantage when it comes to real-world experience — 20 years in office — and actual legislative accomplishments. Bennett is most famous for spearheading Ventura County’s signature initiative to preserve open space and ag land from the inevitable encroachment of urban sprawl. Known as the SOAR initiative, it remains the most effective line in the sand drawn by any of California’s 58 counties. That was in 1998. Much more recently, Bennett played a key behind-the-scenes role in getting the City of Ventura’s first homeless shelter opened. Along the way, he’s also been a powerful advocate for alternative transportation, bringing a big-picture view of regional transit opportunities. Given that thousands of workers commute from one county to the next twice a day, that’s critical. As a lifelong educator and school administrator, Bennett will be ideally situated to advocate strategically on behalf of education reform and funding in Sacramento. In terms of the state’s excruciating housing crisis, we expect Bennett to effectively represent the middle ground, protecting the land-use autonomy of local governments while devising reforms and incentives to increase production of genuinely affordable housing. No wonder the state real estate lobby has spent n $125,000 on negative ads to defeat him.

ENDORSEMENTS

his one is a no-brainer. State Assemblymember Monique Limón is running for State Senate to fill the massive void about to be created when the great HannahBeth Jackson is termed out of office. Send her there with your blessing; she’ll get there anyway. Since first running for the Santa Barbara school board 10 years ago, Limón has emerged as the political equivalent of the irresistible force, albeit a quietly contemplative one. Since hitting the statehouse in Sacramento, Limón has wowed party leaders and has landed choice assignments on powerful committees, like the Assembly Banking Committee. Once ensconced in the Senate, Limón will go from being one of 80 to one of 40. Given her expertise in education policy — Limón had a master’s degree from Columbia University before serving on the school board — we expect her to exert positive sway on matters K-12 and higher education. In her four years in the Assembly, Limón established a reputation for carefully studying issues into submission. She was rarely one for quick responses to complicated problems. That’s a good thing. Vote for Monique Limón for State Senate. n

Federal

Congress: Salud Carbajal

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E TAK YOU TH E WI O TH S! T LL PO

State Assembly, District 37: Steve Bennett State Senate: Monique Limón

County

Supervisorial District 1: Das Williams Supervisorial District 3: Joan Hartmann

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Elected Officials Congressman Salud Carbajal State Senator Hannah-Beth Jackson Assemblymember Monique Limón Santa Barbara County Treasurer Harry Hagen Santa Barbara County Auditor/Controller Betsy Schaffer Supervisor Das Williams Supervisor Gregg Hart Supervisor Steve Bennett Mayor Ariston Julian (Guadalupe) Mayor Cathy Murillo (Santa Barbara) Mayor Paula Perotte (Goleta) Mayor Ryan Toussaint (Solvang) City Councilmember Stuart Kasdin (Goleta) City Council Member James Kyriaco (Goleta) City Councilmember Kyle Richards (Goleta) City Councilmember Liliana Cardenas (Guadalupe) City Councilmember Eric Friedman (Santa Barbara) City Councilmember Oscar Gutierrez (Santa Barbara) City Councilmember Gloria Soto (Santa Maria) Santa Barbara City College Trustee Jonathan Abboud Guadalupe Union School Board Member Diana Arriola Goleta Water District Board Member Lauren Hanson Goleta Water District Board Member Bill Rosen Isla Vista Community Services Dist. Director Ethan Bertrand Isla Vista Community Services Dist. Director Spencer Brandt Isla Vista Community Services Dist. Director and Retired County Auditor Controller Robert Geis Retired County Superintendent of Schools Bill Cirone Retired Supervisor Doreen Farr Retired Supervisor Gail Marshall Retired Supervisor Susan Rose Retired Supervisor Janet Wolf Retired Santa Barbara Mayor Hal Conklin Retired Santa Barbara Mayor Sheila Lodge Judge George Eskin (Ret.)

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FEB 13-20, 2020

NEWS of the WEEK DEL AN EY SMITH

by TYLER HAYDEN, NICK WELSH, DELANEY SMITH, and JEAN YAMAMURA, with INDEPENDENT STAFF

POLITICS

PAC ‘Attack’ Ads Roil 1st District Election Williams Asked to Denounce Them, His Camp Accuses Capps of Hypocrisy

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CITY A ceremony on 2/14 attended by members of the Johnson family officially transformed their former home into 16 studio apartments for homeless veterans. Located on East Carrillo Street not far from the Santa Barbara Bowl, Johnson Court was named for Vernon Johnson, a military vet and the family patriarch. Its community room was dedicated to Ken Williams, a tireless homeless advocate who died in 2018 and was himself a veteran of the U.S. Marine Corps. This week, the vets, who average 60 years of age, will move into their new homes, operated by the Housing Authority of the City of Santa Barbara. They pay a monthly rent set at 30 percent of their income, with the remaining rental costs coming from vouchers from the Project Based Housing Choice program of the U.S. Housing and Urban Development department, also known as Section 8. The project cost a total of $5.8 million to build.

SHOW OF FORCE: Flanked by supporters on the steps of the County Administration Building, Capps holds a press conference regarding PAC ads.

by Delaney Smith ith only 22 days until Election Day, tensions between county supervisor incumbent Das Williams and challenger Laura Capps have escalated into an all-out political war. Anti-Capps mailers and radio messages are flying around the 1st District in response to what Williams’s supporters call a “hypocritic campaign” by Capps. The three consultants behind the anti-Capps crusade — Democrats Mollie Culver and Tyler Gibson, and Republican-turned-no-party-preference Cory Bantilan — have formed a pro-Williams independent expenditure committee. “I got involved because I am tired of hearing Laura misrepresent the facts about Das and his record,” said Bantilan, who is an aide to 5th District Supervisor Steve Lavagnino, about his PAC. “One of the behaviors I dislike most is hypocrisy, and her campaign is displaying it on a regular basis.” The central issue driving the 1st District race is Williams’s hand in crafting the county’s cannabis cultivation ordinance; his partner on the ad hoc committee was Lavagnino. Capps, while she doesn’t disapprove of legal pot, feels Williams opened the cannabis floodgates too far and believes the $62,000 in campaign donations he received from cannabis interest groups influenced him while writing and enacting the law. Williams vehemently denies the cash had any influence on policy. Capps has called for a campaign finance reform law to limit campaign contributions to $1,000 and bar groups and individuals with projects before the board from contributing to campaigns. Though Williams promised to stop accepting money from cannabis interests, Capps believes the PAC is his backdoor way to achieve the same goal. “We aren’t going to win despite this PAC attack; we’re going to win because of it,” Capps said at a last-minute press conference Friday morning to address the recent mailer attacks. “The only reason to have a PAC is to hide something.… This PAC has given [Williams] a way to continue to benefit from cannabis money while trying to claim otherwise.” Although none of the money in the PAC is currently tied to cannabis interests, Capps claimed that Culver and Gibson’s involvement is a clear tie. Capps said Culver and Gibson were the lead lobbyists who wrote much of the cannabis ordinance for Santa Barbara County. She said Culver, specifically, as representative of the Cannabis Business Council, strongly lobbied for the most problematic features of the policy, including allowing growers to obtain unlimited state licenses prior to obtaining county permits. “I am proud of the work that I did to help advocate for a sen-

NEWS BRIEFS

sible cannabis ordinance that addresses the nuisance issues that have plagued the 1st District for years, such as odor, and that provides muchneeded revenue for issues such as enforcement on illegal operations, community libraries, and public safety,” Culver said in response. Culver added that Gibson never worked with her on the cannabis ordinance or at any other time, and that their PAC was not cannabis related. An overriding part of the “hypocrisy” the committee refers to is Capps’s acceptance of “at least 41 contributions over $1,000, including more than $30,000 from a single wealthy donor. She has accepted thousands from donors with land-use appeals before the Board of Supervisors.” Capps, however, maintains that she has been transparent since day one of her election bid. She says she “has to win in order to make a change,” and therefore has not self-imposed her own ethics-reform plan on her campaign. She cited her average donation as $350 and Williams’s average as over $2,100. At her press conference Friday morning, Capps addressed the PAC’s mailers, which she called “attacks” and said that they refer to her, as well as former supervisors Janet Wolf and Susan Rose, as “extreme progressives.” One ad also references her mother, former congressmember Lois Capps, by stating that “Liberal Laura Capps makes her mom, Lois, look like a moderate.” Bantilan said that Capps is “confusing mentioning and attacking.” “We are not attacking them,” he said. “We are just mentioning them.” Wolf, Rose, and Lois Capps also described the ads as “attacks” and asked Williams to denounce them. “We call on Das Williams to denounce these ads and dissolve the PAC,” said Wolf. Williams, Bantilan, Culver, and Gibson deny Williams had any involvement or knowledge of the PAC — which would be illegal. Capps claims that too many close allies are involved, making it near impossible for Williams to be unaware. Shawnda Deane, listed as assistant treasurer of the PAC, has been treasurer of Williams’s campaigns going back over a decade, and as recently as 2019. She also said his first PAC donor is close family friend Lee Heller. “I think I did my equivalent of denouncing the ads by publicly urging my supporters to stay positive,” Williams said Friday morning. “I do not ask my supporters to be negative and attack her back.” When asked about dissolving the PAC, Williams said that it would “defeat the spirit of independent expenditure committees — I’m litern ally not allowed to talk to them about that.”

The Santa Barbara Municipal Airport clocked 998,691 passengers for 2019, a hefty 27.1 percent bump from 2018. Passenger traffic has been steadily increasing since 2016, officials said, and the latest numbers made Santa Barbara airport the fastestgrowing Southern California airport two years running, beating out LAX, Burbank, and Orange County’s John Wayne Airport. Officials said more good news is coming in 2020. On 5/21, Alaska Airlines will add a morning flight to Seattle to complement its current afternoon departure, Frontier Airlines will resume its service three times weekly to Denver on 6/9, and United Airlines will start offering daily service to Chicago on 6/4.

ENVIRONMENT Concerned about the death knell being sounded for the planet, about two dozen members of the Society of Fearless Grandmothers rallied in front of the County Building in downtown Santa Barbara and signed a giant valentine telling the supervisors not to allow one more single oil permit. “We’re taking part in Fire Drill Fridays,” said Irene Cooke, “and plan to be here every Friday at noon.” They’re committed to slowing climate change for the sake of their grandchildren’s future, she said. Cooke said the Society of Fearless Grandmothers and their friends would work with Extinction Rebellion (@xrsantabarbara) to learn techniques of civil disobedience and staying safe in the streets. Their peaceful climate activism will ramp up in Santa Barbara this year, she added.

COURTS & CRIME Saturday afternoon, a blast and smoke coming from an apartment disrupted the town of Orcutt. By the time officials arrived, a seriously injured resident was being transported by American Medical Response. Deputies found a sliding door had been blasted off its rails from the explosion and evidence to believe the apartment was used as a butane honey oil lab. Santa Maria resident Albert Alvarado was later arrested and charged with four felonies and one misdemeanor. His charges include child endangerment and arson causing injury, among others. n

For the latest news and longer versions of many of these stories, visit independent.com/news. INDEPENDENT.COM

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oleta held a kickoff event on Thursday to begin a major sidewalk project that adds concrete walkways to one side of the streets north of Hollister Avenue in the neighborhood known as Old Town. About 40 people came to the pocket park on Nectarine Avenue to talk with the project managers, designers, and construction crew on hand. Mayor Paula Perotte noted that several of the big trees that residents loved were being saved, with sidewalks being built around them where necessary. Curbs, gutters, and a repaving of all the streets are included in the project, which grew to $1.8 million over its original price tag. In a City Council meeting in December, the city’s public works department had to defend the cost overrun, with councilmembers asking for no more surprises and expressing disappointment that the money couldn’t be used for other equally important projects. Project manager James Winslow explained there was no lack of work for construction companies and that bids were on the high side. The project was designed to minimize disruption in the densely populated area, he said, with work split into segments. That added to project costs as well but was necessary to

avoid taking away everyone’s parking at one time. Additionally, Public Works director Charlie Ebeling said, given the quantity of cuts into the road the original project caused, it made sense to repave the entire area now. Otherwise, potholes would develop, and residents would face another major street disruption in three, five, or seven years. The project’s contingency fund increased from 15 to 20 percent as well, because about 100 property owners would be affected, Winslow said. As of December, all but three had signed onto the project and its effects on their hedges, fences, and mailboxes that were in the public right of way, he told the councilmembers. Winslow said the livability and walkability of the area would be helped by the much-needed improvements to drainage from pervious pavement and sidewalks, as well as retention basins and the addition of 17 parking spaces on Magnolia from back-in angled parking. The winning contractor was Toro Enterprises Inc., which is based in Oxnard, with a bid of $3.2 million. The project starts March 2 and is expected to be completed by November. —Jean Yamamura

Mattei’s Tavern Braces for Big Changes

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attei’s Tavern, the historic Santa Ynez Valley stagecoach stop and designated county landmark, braces for big changes as its new owners plan to bring luxury to the property by the time it reopens in 2021. The Inn at Mattei’s Tavern will be operated by Auberge Resorts Collection, and the 6.5-acre property will see a ritzy renovation upgrade of 67 cottage-style accommodations, a restaurant featuring the “seasonal flavors of Los Olivos,” an outdoor pool, and what a press release called “countryinspired” event spaces and a signature spa. Originally opened in 1886 by SwissAmerican Felix Mattei in the small town of Los Olivos, the guesthouse provided an inn, a dining room, and a bar for travelers. The tavern has remained a social hub ever since, serving as a stomping ground during the California Gold Rush, a speakeasy during Prohibition, and an automobile touring stopover. Despite turnover in the property’s management over the decades, the tavern’s pastoral charm and historical significance have persisted. 12

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However, the impending changes have concerned some community members and visitors. One valley resident said in a letter to the county Historic Landmarks Advisory Commission (HLAC), “I would hate to see the Tavern be altered in any such a way that it would diminish this rich history of Los Olivos and our Santa Ynez Valley.” Auberge Resorts Collection will manage the existing restaurant on behalf of the owner, Los Angeles lawyer Brian R. Strange, who purchased the tavern with his wife, Shamra Strange, in August 2017. Brian Strange said all historical buildings will be kept in place, though the structures will be enhanced. “The Inn at Mattei’s Tavern will seek to redefine laid-back wine country luxury, blending the historic beginnings of the property with modern touches,” Strange said in answer to written questions. “Revered and enjoyed for generations, The Inn at Mattei’s Tavern looks forward to reintroducing the storied property to guests and locals in 2021.” —Miranda de Moraes


NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D HEALTH DAN I EL DR EI FU SS

1919–2019/20

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Grassroots Efforts Fight Coronavirus in China UCSB Prof and Wenzhou Partner to Protect Medical Workers in Epidemic

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by Jean Yamamura

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Another concern in China is that a second wave of virus carriers may hit when the New Year holiday ends in mid-February, said Dr. Yang, who directs the Confucius Institute at UCSB and is a full-time professor in the school’s departments of Religious Studies and East Asian Studies. Workers who returned to their hometowns will be journeying back to their jobs in other cities, potentially bringing disease with them. It’s a dilemma, she said. “You can’t have a lockdown and quarantine forever. It may stem the disease, but the economy takes a giant hit. They can’t have that either.” In the United States, among the 600 people flown by the State Department from Hubei Province back to four airbases in California, Texas, and Nebraska, those who came down with COVID-19 doubled the number of cases to 29, according to media reports. The monitoring of the initial 195 evacuees gave the Centers of Disease Control some perspective on the virulence of the disease. It took about 14 days to clear patients, and the monitors learned to take a second test when the first was taken too early in the cycle, the CDC’s Dr. Nancy Messonier told reporters in a phone conference on February 15. Their initial analysis was that this flu acted much like a regular flu in its spread through sneezes and coughs. That was not much of a panacea, however, as the seasonal flu has affected 26 million, hospitalized a quartermillion, and caused 14,000 deaths, Messonnier said. Worldwide, nearly 1,900 people had died of COVID-19 as of February 18, including two new deaths outside China, in Japan and France. Altogether, 73,332 infections were confirmed. A daily CONT’D ON PAGE 16 

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t the coronavirus epicenter in China, the reality on the ground is dire. When UCSB Professor Mayfair Yang asked her Chinese colleagues in a neighboring province if they needed any help after news of the epidemic broke, their response was: “Desperately.” The plea was made for doctors and nurses, increasingly falling ill from repeated exposure, and also for the upcoming wave of workers returning after the Lunar New Year and potentially bringing disease with them. Dr. Yang has studied cultural anthropology and religious studies in the Wenzhou region of China for the past 30 years, and she knew the commercial life of the area depended on workers from nearby Hubei Province and its principal city Wuhan. After weeks of paperwork by Yang and her colleagues, a shipment of medical supplies went last week from Santa Barbara’s Direct Relief to Wenzhou Central Hospital. All the protective gear — coveralls and full-body hazmat suits, hospital gloves and shoe covers, face masks of different types — are much needed by medical personnel treating patients with the pneumonia-causing disease, recently dubbed COVID-19, for coronavirus disease 2019, by the World Health Organization. In its eight shipments so far, Direct Relief has sent a half-million N95 masks to China. The medical system in China is under an enormous strain, said Yang, with doctors from across the country being called to treat residents in Wuhan and in Hubei Province, where the viral epidemic broke out at the end of December. The doctor who first identified the unusual virus, Dr. Li Wenliang, died on February 7, to a great outcry from the Chinese citizenry, who criticized the government for initially suppressing his findings.

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LAW ISN’T JUST FOR LAWYERS

Hundreds Mourn Couple Killed in Hit-and-Run

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ough.” That word was Adolfo Corral’s famous catchphrase—his response to any situation. At the vigil held in honor of him and his wife, Mary Jane Becerra Corral, hundreds of students, colleagues, friends, and family gathered en masse on Santa Barbara City College’s West Campus to remember the couple’s impact and Adolfo’s “tough” attitude Wednesday evening. “As I stand before you today with a heavy heart, I am at a complete loss for words,” said Alisha Sanchez, who works in the college’s Extended Opportunity Programs and Services department, where she first met Adolfo. “There is one word that I keep repeating in my head, and that’s ‘tough.’ Yep, Adolfo’s favorite word no matter what the context of the conversation.

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“That man saw something in me I never saw in myself,” Sanchez said, sobbing. “He was my go-to, my mentor, my friend, and my number-one supporter.” The Goleta couple, both 43, were struck and killed in a pedestrian hit-and-run accident on Sunday on Cathedral Oaks Road. Adolfo recently took the position of equity, diversity, and cultural competency coordinator at Santa Barbara City College last summer, though he previously worked in EOPS and STEM, among other departments. Mary

Jane was a computer specialist and teacher at La Patera Elementary School in Goleta. The man accused of killing the couple, Eric Mauricio Ramirez-Aguilar, 39, was charged this week with two counts of gross vehicular manslaughter while intoxicated, among other charges. He is currently in County Jail with bail set at $1 million. His preliminary hearing setting is set for March 9. The couple are survived by their four children: Azalea (20), Dahlia (17), Dominic (14), and Rose (10). All four children attended the vigil, listening to their parents’ former colleagues and students share the positive impacts they made on their lives. Many described the couple as invaluable mentors both in education and in life. Azalea, the eldest child, was the last to speak. “‘He [Adolfo] always took the high road, he always put the students first, and I will miss him every day,’ ” said Azalea, reading comments about her father. “About my mom, someone said, ‘Mary Jane did so much for the students of La Patera, and her kindness extended way beyond the computer classes she taught.’ ” Michael Medel, the director of admissions and records at SBCC and a close family friend to the Corral family, sat directly behind the couple’s children with his wife, Assemblymember Monique Limón. Medel knew Adolfo in college but lost contact and reconnected 16 years ago when they began careers at SBCC. They had spent every day working together since then. “If you knew Adolfo, you knew he created a new meaning for the word ‘tough,’ ” Medel said. “In fact, he created an entire dictionary of meanings for ‘tough.’ “Azalea, Dahlia, Dominic, Rose. Your parents were the true definition of heroes.” —Delaney Smith


NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D ENVIRONMENT

Relic of Past Fire-Fighting Foam Contaminated One Well by Jean Yamamura he use of highly fluorinated chemicals of the group known as PFAS ended in 2015 in the United States, but the long life and ubiquity of the manmade compounds raised concerns about their harmful effects and presence in drinking water. The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency issued health-effects advisories in 2016, including potential fetal-development effects, testicular and kidney cancers, and immune effects. In Santa Barbara County, water wells in Goleta and Santa Maria and on Vandenberg Air Force Base were identified on an Environmental Working Group (EWG) map as potentially contaminated with the perand polyfluoroalkyl substances, a k a PFAS, from foams developed to fight liquid-based fires, like kerosene or jet-fuel fires. For that reason, the California Water Board has issued testing orders to water agencies with wells within two miles of an airport or a mile of a landfill. The PFAS chemicals have such an ability to repel water and grease that since the 1940s, they were widely used in products like nonstick cookware, fire- or water-resistant clothing, leather, carpeting, paper, and packaging, as for microwavable popcorn. Products containing PFAS were manufactured on a global scale, and the long-lived, or “persistent,” chemicals were found in the blood of all the EPA tested, and near manufacturing or disposal sites. The most consistent human findings, the EPA stated, were increased cholesterol levels, effects on the immune system and infant birth weight, cancer, and thyroid hormone disruption. PFAS were phased out beginning around 2000, but since then, the Gen X “high-performance fluoropolymer” has replaced it; that compound is under review by the EPA. At Santa Barbara Municipal Airport, one well — out of four possible at-risk wells — was found to contain contaminants. Though located out in Goleta, the airport belongs to the City of Santa Barbara. The well in question registered belowthe-threshold levels of perfluorooctanoic acid, best known by its acronym PFOA, in August and September 2019, said David Matson, assistant general manager of the Goleta Water District. The state had notified his agency because “aqueous filmforming foams” were used at the airport in the past for fire suppression and fire training.

T

The airport well tests found PFOA, at a level of 38 and 35 parts per trillion (ppt), respectively. Since then, monthly tests have detected zero levels, Matson said. California lowered the response level, or the point at which a well is taken out of the distribution pipeline, from 70 ppt of the two substances combined to 10 ppt for PFOA and 40 ppt for PFOS, which stands for perfluorooctanesulfonic acid, as of February 6. Should wells reach that level, the water is treated and customers are notified. The notification level, or the point at which monitoring is necessary, was lowered last August to 5.1 ppt for PFOA (from 14 ppt) and 6.5 ppt for PFOS (from 13 ppt). Vandenberg’s public affairs officer

At Santa Barbara Municipal Airport, one well — out of four possible at-risk wells — was found to contain contaminants. Robin Ghormley stated no PFAS compounds were found when their water wells were tested in 2016 and 2019. Santa Maria’s water agency was not able to return the Independent’s request for information by publication deadline, but the state’s PFAS map shows the subject wells to be at less than the notification limit. Though the City of Santa Barbara is not on either the EWG or state contamination maps, its Water Division has tested the water it provides from Lake Cachuma and Gibraltar Reservoir, as well as its groundwater wells. All have had a clean bill of health for PFAS since 2014, when testing began. Levels for both component chemicals (PFOA and PFOS) were less than 2 ppt. Cater and the desal plant use two methods that are known to remove PFAS from water: reverse osmosis and activated carbon filters, respectively. The active ingredient in Phos-Chek, the most commonly used fire retardant dropped from aircraft, is the fertilizerlike salt called ammonium phosphate. Based on its Material Safety Data Sheet and the manufacturer, the product — dropped liberally on Santa Barbara’s hillsides during wildfires — contains no PFAS compounds. n

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COU RTESY

NEWS of the WEEK

Carbajal’s Wilderness Bill Passes House

T UCSB Professor Mayfair Yang (center) in Wenzhou with colleagues Gang Zhou (left) and Qingyong Pan

Coronavirus cont’d from p. 13 reported increase of 14,000 in China on February 13 was extraordinary, with the World Health Organization stating it was linked to China’s usage of clinical diagnoses rather than laboratory results. In Wenzhou, where 9.5 million people live, the shipment from Santa Barbara has been a boost for spirits, said Yang. Her friend Gang Zhou “went into hyperdrive” to do the groundwork to make sure the shipment could arrive: finding out what the hospitals needed, filling out forms, getting translators, and dealing with customs, she said.

The main city is in partial lockdown, with households issued permits that allowed only one person out at a time. Outsiders were viewed as potential disease carriers, and small towns had blocked their roads. People had been feeling discouraged in the face of the overwhelming crisis, said Yang. But knowing that people in the United States were eager to help strangers was giving everyone a boost, the hospital’s director, Dr. Jun Sun, commented. “The news that people were reaching out from across the seas,” said Yang, “is helping to galvanize the n struggle against this virus.”

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J U LIA KEAN E F I LE PHOTO

he Central Coast Heritage Protection Act (HR 2199), a bill introduced by Rep. Salud Carbajal, passed through the House last Wednesday with bipartisan support. The bill is a part of the largest public lands protection package in over a decade, the Protecting America’s Wilderness Act. HR 2199 passed regardless of a veto threat from the White House in opposition to the bill. Additionally, some Republicans argued Salud Carbajal on the floor that the legislation may impede future development. The Heritage Protection Act designates tee on Natural Resources, said that the act about 250,000 acres of land in Los Padres “was developed through a multi-year colNational Forest and the Carrizo Plain laborative process with a diverse and locally National Monument as safeguarded wilder- driven coalition that has demonstrated these ness areas. In addition, the bill creates a 400- places are worthy of protection as wildermile long Condor National Recreation trail, ness,” he continued, expressing that “As clistretching from Los Angeles to Monterey mate change increasingly impacts our natuCounty. ral world, designating pristine landscapes “Protecting our environment, enhanc- as wilderness is one of the most important ing public safety, and growing our economy actions Congress can take in response to the are not mutually exclusive. The passage of climate crisis.” the Central Coast Heritage Protection Act California senators Kamala Harris and proves this, and it’s a huge step forward for all Dianne Feinstein introduced a companion of us,” said Representative Carbajal. package of three public lands bills with the The last public lands bill for Los Padres same Central Coast provisions last WednesNational Forest passed in 1992. During the day. While it is a success that the legislation debate on the House floor, several members has passed the House, it may not move as advocated for HR 2199. Rep. Raúl Grijalva easily through the Republican-majority Sen(R-AZ), the chair of the House Commit- ate. —Adrianne Davies

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OPINIONS CONT’D TAYLOR JONES

Letters

Vote Jason Dominguez

running against three female candidates, but does he expect to win by cornering the votes of misogynistic males? Would he attack a male opponent the same way? This is hardly the type of leadership Santa Barbara County needs. I may be a “country rube,” but Porter’s smear campaign insults both my intelligence and my values. Knowledgeable 3rd District residents will vote for Joan Hartmann, who is honestly mindful of the concerns of county residents.

S

anta Barbara and Ventura County voters, remember Jason Dominguez for State Assembly. As a City Councilmember, Dominguez proved to be an independent thinker who asked the tough questions. He also fought against overdevelopment. The son of a teacher, Dominguez earned degrees from Stanford, UC Berkeley, and Heidelberg University. Always committed to our youth and schools, he has taught at both the high school and college levels. He is currently a law professor. Dominguez has worked as a criminal prosecutor, taking on tough cases and serious crimes. He has a strong record of fighting for the environment. In fact, Dominguez has a master’s degree in environmental law. As a Republican who has known Dominguez since 2015, he is a Democrat that I support. He puts people over politics. Independents and his fellow Democrats should support him, too. Let’s bring common-sense solutions to Sacramento. Vote Jason Dominguez for State Assembly.

—Lansing Duncan, Solvang

For the Record ¶ Last week’s “Capitol Letters” included Andrew Yang among the presidential candidates; he dropped out after the paper’s print deadline. ¶ In the “Ethiopian Wedding in Santa Barbara” story, the last line, which was cut off by accident, should have said: “You leave home,” said Tewolde with the wisdom that comes with loss, rebuilding, and finding new direction, “but you find home.”

C

andidate Bruce Porter must think 3rd District residents are a bunch of “country rubes.” Why else would he send out a slick, malicious “big city” mailer portraying Supervisor Joan Hartmann as misleading voters with false promises while she crosses her fingers behind her back? Considering Porter’s lack of credibility recently exposed in the Independent, perhaps it is not surprising that he would attack Hartmann’s credibility. Despite denials, Porter was clearly involved in a scheme to disenfranchise 3rd District voters through the misnamed “Rock the Vote S.B.” that was designed to reduce local voter turnout. Porter obviously has plenty of special-interest money to burn by commissioning his disinformation campaign, but his message is blatantly at odds with reality. We all know that Joan Hartmann is one of the most hardworking, civil, competent, and candid supervisors to serve Santa Barbara County. Porter attempts to add insult to injury and distortion by including an unflattering doctored portrait of Hartmann in his mailer. It is true that Porter is

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obituaries Jessie Estelle Breytspraak 11/05/1931 - 02/12/2020

Jessie Estelle Breytspraak was born on November 5, 1931 in Teaneck, New Jersey to Edward R. and Estelle nee Fastbender, Boyd. She died on February 12, 2020 in Santa Barbara, California of natural causes. After her father’s death in 1938, Jessie and her brother lived with relatives until their mother’s remarriage. She and her brother then spent most summers at summer camp and winters at boarding schools. She graduated in 1949 from Kemper Hall Episcopal School for girls in Kenosha, Wisconsin and briefly attended Knox College in Galesburg, Illinois. In 1950 she married William Vaile Culver (deceased) in Anchorage, Alaska. Jessie is survived by their two children, Jeffry William (Linda) Culver and Susan Gale Culver. After a divorce in 1974 she moved to Santa Barbara where she married her high school sweetheart, George Merrick Breytspraak (deceased) with whom she spent 40 special years. They owned and operated Glamour House, a wellknown and popular lingerie store in Montecito Village for 26 years. They enjoyed cruising, road trips across the country with their two dogs to visit family and friends and spending weekends at their Cambria, California home. Jessie was a prominent volunteer in the community: five years with the County Animal shelter and DAWG; Recording for the Blind; Pet Therapy; and later she served as a chaplain’s assistant with Spiritual Care. In addition, she was a weekly fixture for many years serving as a volunteer in the office of Trinity Episcopal Church. She and George sang together in the Trinity choir as well. Jessie and George were especially familiar faces at Trinity Backstage productions. Jessie’s baked goods were infamous especially her coconut cake. All Jessie’s dogs were rescues and much loved. Little ‘Joey’ was her constant companion during her later years living at Valle Verde retirement community, in Santa Barbara. Along with her two children she is survived by four grandchildren; Michael (Kelly) Fish; Lesley Anne nee Culver, Arthurs; Matthew (Heather) 18

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To submit obituaries for publication, please call (805) 965-5205 or email obits@independent.com Fish; Katherine nee Fish, (Michael) Perry; and seven great-grandchildren. She is also survived by her brother, Edward R. (Mary Kay) Boyd, Jr., her very special niece, Sarah nee Boyd, (Jeff) Chester, a great-nephew, five stepchildren. and many, many loving, supportive church family members. Memorial services will be held at Trinity Episcopal Church on Saturday, March 28 at 10:00 AM. In lieu of flowers please support Trinity Episcopal Church and their Outreach programs, 1500 State Street, Santa Barbara, California 93101; or Santa Barbara Humane Society, 5399 Overpass Road, Santa Barbara, California 93111.

Elaine Wood of Santa Barbara. A mass was held in Memphis, Tennessee, for Elizabeth on February 2nd. A memorial service will be held for Elizabeth in Santa Barbara on March 7th at Alpha Resource Center on Cathedral Oaks Road at 2 pm. In place of flowers, you may wish to make donations to VNA Hospice and Alpha Resource Center

Ada Pinga Hass

10/03/1944 - 01/03/2020

surrounded by family. Her her husband Jeremy Hass passed away on June 30 th , 2014. She is survived by her daughter Melinda Hass, sonin-law Robert Ciano, and her siblings, Amando “Boy” Pinga, Elena Gaceta, Nora Cordero, and Eden Villena, and her two cats Bubbles and Pretty Boy. A celebration of her life will be held on February 22, 2020 at 3:00pm at the Filipino Community Center, 425 State Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101

Sally Jane Hammel

11/02/1953 - 01/25/2020

Elizabeth Louise MacKenzie 07/29/1981 - 01/23/2020

Elizabeth Louise MacKenzie was born on July 29th, 1981, to Louise and Bruce MacKenzie of Santa Barbara. Elizabeth came into the world with many challenges, but an immense life force that allowed her to survive and overcome profound health barriers and participate in the community. She passed away peacefully on January 23, 2020, at home with her family and devoted caretakers surrounding her. In her pre-school years, Elizabeth was a pioneer, first challenging the norms for who could go to regular classes. She attended Montecito Union School, where she was welcomed by staff and students, who became her friends and included her and accommodated her needs. She went on to Santa Barbara Junior High and Carpinteria High School, where she learned from her peers and they from her. As an adult, she attended Alpha Resource Center day program, with her many friends and neighbors. For the past several years, she lived in her own apartment, supported and cared for by a loving group of care providers and her family. Elizabeth is survived by her parents and her three siblings: Walter Wood and David MacKenzie of Santa Barbara, and Emily MacKenzie of New Orleans, who will carry her light forever in their hearts. She is also survived by her brother-in-law Gus Hoffman of New Orleans, and sister-inlaw Patricia Wood and niece

FEBRUARY 20, 2020

Born Ada Saavedra Pinga on October 3, 1944 in the Margosatbuig, Zamboanga Del Sur, Philippines. She was one of 10 children born to Judge Edmundo S Pinga and Pantaleona S Pinga. Ada spent her childhood living in Zamboanga City and graduated from Universidad De Zamboanga (formerly Z.A.E.C.) in 1961 before moving to Manila to attend University of the East where she graduated a Doctor of Dental Medicine in 1967. In 1971, Ada was the only of her siblings to move to the United States. While living in Los Angeles, she met her future husband, Jeremy Dennis Hass. After making him wait until she got her green card on her own merit, they were married in the Old Mission in Santa Barbara on April 4, 1976. She gave birth to her only daughter, Melinda Judith Hass, on October 31, 1977. After moving to the US, Ada no longer had interest in pursuing dentistry. During her professional career, she worked as a medical claims examiner and retired from Sansum Clinic in 2007. She loved animals and always had multiple pets in the house. She taught her daughter to sew at a young age, they were often making clothes and costumes together, which eventually lead to her daughter’s career in fashion. Ada was an amazing cook and loved to feed people. She was a master at preparing traditional Filipino dishes as well as American and international cuisines. Coming from a large family she was happy to cook for big parties and bake sales either for her daughter’s school or the Filipino Community Center, where for many years she sat on the Board of Directors. Ada Pinga Hass passed away on January 3, 2020 in Zamboanga City, Philippines,

INDEPENDENT.COM

With deep sadness, we announce the passing of Sally Jane Hammel, beloved sister, aunt, niece, cousin, and dear friend of countless people in Santa Barbara, the Lake Tahoe area, and beyond. During the last six months of her life, Sally determinedly fought an aggressive form of cancer, then died at Renown Hospital in Reno with her siblings surrounding her, prayers and songs accompanying her. Born in St. Francis Hospital in Santa Barbara to parents Melvin C. Hammel and Rita Doreen (Hay) Hammel, Sally was the third of four children, tracing her ancestry to the local Santa Ynez Band of the Chumash and to Scotland. She attended Franklin School, Cleveland School, Santa Barbara Junior High School and High School, and Santa Barbara City College, later going back to college and proudly graduating from Sierra Nevada College with her BA degree in 2015. As a young adult, she lived on Oahu for several years before settling on the north shore of Lake Tahoe, returning often to Santa Barbara and to Helendale, CA to be with family and friends. She worked for the U.S. Postal Service for many years, singing as she carried mail in Sacramento and happily greeting customers at the Carnelian Bay Post Office. In March of 1987, Sally married Mark Glass, a Sacramento lobbyist, but he tragically died of a heart attack eight months later. She never remarried and, after a long period of grieving, learned to revel in being an independent woman. It was as an accomplished singer and thespian that Sally was best known in the Tahoe area, singing in church and

community choirs and acting in local productions. Twice, she toured European cities, singing in some of the great cathedrals, with The Orchestra and Community Choral Artists of the Tahoe Area (TOCCATA). She loved traveling and did so extensively, instantly making friends because of her exuberant personality. She was a devoted member of St. Patrick's Episcopal Church in Incline Village, considering its members to be part of her large extended family. While attending Sierra Nevada College, she discovered the art of ceramics and became a fine potter, gifting family and friends with sometimes lovely, sometimes humorous pieces. Sally loved life, living it to the brim, leaving us too soon. We, her siblings, Susanne Hammel-Sawyer (Benjamin) of Goleta, Thomas (Judy) Hammel of Shady Cove, OR, and Trudy (John) Bilodeau of Helendale, CA, her aunt Dorothy Sierra of Santa Ynez, her seven nieces and nephews and their families, who knew her as Auntie Silly Sally, Cameron (Sybille) Tummel of Oxnard, Jeremy (Alexandra) Tummel of Santa Barbara, Adam (Amanda)Hammel of Cottage Grove, OR, Melissa (Michael) Westfall of Medford, OR, Gwendolyn (Jeff Nighman) Kilfoyle of Santa Barbara, Joseph (Ashley) Kilfoyle of Simi Valley, and Elizabeth Ceballes of Chandler, AZ, cousins in California and in Canada, long-time friend Don Stone, and many friends who loved her dearly, mourn her loss and give thanks for her vibrant life among us. A service will be held at St. Patrick's Episcopal Church in Incline Village, NV at 2:00 pm, on Sunday, March 29, and a Celebration of Life will be held in Santa Barbara at a later date. In lieu of flowers, please consider a donation to the RidleyTree Cancer Center or to an animal shelter of your choice.

Joseph John Andrach

10/02/1943 – 01/14/2020

Joseph John Andrach died unexpectedly at home on January 14, 2020 in Santa Barbara, CA at the age of 76. Joe is survived by his sister, Diane Garcia, brothers Peter Andrach, Teddy Andrach and Wayne Andrach along with several nieces and nephews. Joe was born on October 2, 1943 in Santa Barbara, CA to Peter and Lena Andrach. Joe enjoyed his career as a butcher and spent his time doing what he loved most; fishing, hunting and making the best jerky! He was incredibly generous, always willing to help a friend or family member and could make anyone laugh. He will be missed by all who knew him.


In Memoriam

Valéry Ryvkin

We are pleased to announce the affiliation of

1960-2020

BY F R E D E R I C G O L D E N e wasn’t central casting’s version of a mae-

stro. Without curly locks like Dudamel’s or Lenny’s silvery hair, Valéry Ryvkin was short and bald-pated and boasted a cherubically rotund stomach. But when his glistening head popped up in the orchestra pit at the Lobero or Granada, audiences whooped with delight. “Bravo, bravo, Valéry!” they shouted. Whether it was opera, concert, or other musical entertainment, they knew they’d be in store for another enchanted evening of beautiful sounds. The beloved Ryvkin, who died January 22 of a rare cancer at the terribly youthful age of 59, led Opera Santa Barbara for more than a decade, first as principal conductor and later as artistic director. He oversaw its growth from what he fondly called a “mom-and-pop” shop into a respected regional company. His productions included grand opera’s ABCs (Aida, La bohème, Carmen) as well as many lesser known works. Invariably lauded by critics (“…coaxes the best out of cast and chorus alike” —Los Angeles Times), he received invitations to conduct with companies on both coasts and as far off as China. Perhaps his finest hour came when he was asked by Broadway legend Stephen Schwartz (Godspell, Wicked, The Hunchback of Notre Dame) to oversee Opera S.B.’s premiere of his first opera, Séance on a Wet Afternoon. For those who knew and worked with him, Valéry was very special, making friends as easily as he flicked his baton. Rarely did he just shake your hand. He hugged and bussed you like a long-absent relative. Circling the room with a tumbler of vodka in hand at post-performance receptions, he warmly greeted everyone in sight. Without a hint of a prompt sheet, he’d rattle off the names of every member of the cast and crew and throw in fitting words of praise and biography. As someone told to lip-sync during grade school music classes, I won’t pretend to pontificate about Valéry’s musical credentials. I’ll defer to Opera S.B.’s current artistic director, Kostis Protopapas, no slouch on the podium himself. “He was a singer’s conductor,” Kostis told me. “He loved the voice, and he could help singers bring out their best.” The celebrated bass Ferruccio Furlanetto, who sang Mussorgsky’s Boris Godunov for Valéry at San Diego Opera, recalled him as “unforgettable to work with.” Especially memorable was Valéry’s nonoperatic temper. Hearing a misplaced high C or a screechy string during rehearsals, he’d respond with encouragement rather than rebuke. At no time were these abilities on better display than last March when Valéry returned to Santa Barbara to guest conduct Tchaikovsky’s Eugene Onegin as part of Opera S.B.’s 25th anniversary. For most of the singers, Russian was an unfamiliar language, and Tchaikovsky’s score was a demanding potpourri — folk tunes, soaring arias, a ballroom promenade. But the Russian-born maestro turned the performance into a triumph for singers and orchestra alike. Sadly, it would be last time we’d see him in the pit. Growing up in what was then Leningrad, the son of a physician, Valéry showed his musical inclinations early. “I remember music always playing in our home, on record or the radio, especially opera,” he recalled. By age 7, he was studying piano. Despite the hardships of the Soviet era, the Ryvkins had first-rate performances available at such theaters as the Kirov (now Mariinsky), home to famed opera and ballet companies. Still, for a young Jewish music maker, the USSR wasn’t a promising place for a career.

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At 18, Valéry boldly announced he’d move to the United States. Giving the tough-minded teen their blessings, his parents later joined him. In New York, Valéry scrambled to get by, taking any work he could get, including toiling in the hustle-bustle of Manhattan’s garment industry, until he gained admission to the Mannes School of Music, then Juilliard. There he decided his real passion was not the piano but conducting opera. “I felt too bored practicing alone for eight hours a day,” he explained. “I wanted to make music with other people. I love people.” At Juilliard, his classmates included, among others, the future opera star soprano Renée Fleming. But the climb up to the podium requires an apprenticeship. He worked as a vocal coach and rehearsal conductor at a number of opera companies, most notably the Met. There, no less than the peripatetic Russian conductor Valery (no accented é for him) Gergiev recruited him to lead rehearsals for the Met’s production of Shostakovich’s Lady Macbeth of the Mtsensk District. While Valéry was vocal coaching at the Music Academy of the West in the 1990s, he caught the attention of a local opera maven, Marilyn Gilbert. A singer herself, Gilbert and her husband, Nathan Rundlett, had a dream: They wanted to start their own opera company. By 1999, after several DIY productions, they realized they needed full-time professional help and hired Valéry. It was something of a package deal. Joining him was his wife (and ex-Manhattan landlady), soprano Victoria Hart. While studying for a PhD in music at UCSB, Victoria occasionally joined his casts, as when she took a powerful turn as the Principessa in Puccini’s one-act Suor Angelica. My own introduction to her occurred when I saw her singing, with Valéry at the piano and their adorable toddler Amanda listening raptly, in a national television commercial for Merrill Lynch. Until his departure in 2010, Valéry watched over the production of some two dozen operas, typically conducting two per year himself. He went on to lead other companies and teach at Temple University and Carnegie Mellon. Even while tending to a dying mother, he kept his illness quiet, even from friends. That makes his sudden passing all the more shocking. And it makes the memory of his smiling face and warm embraces with vodka in hand all the more n poignant.

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C OV E R S T O R Y

BREAKING BARRIERS B Y N I C K W E L S H A N D A D R I D AV I E S

H

orace McMillan was properly mystified. He’d just moved to Santa Barbara with his young wife and baby daughter, and they were looking to buy a house. In his early thirties, McMillan was educated and easygoing. He’d served nearly five years in the military. He was a doctor with all the privileges needed to practice in the local hospitals. Yet his agent was showing him nothing but dreck. “This is strange,” McMillan would recall. “All the beautiful homes up for sale and he’s showing me all these dumps.” McMillan asked the agent, “This is all you have?” The agent’s answer? “This is all we have.”

As it turns out, he was lying. The year was 1953, two years before the bus boycotts of Birmingham, Alabama, helped trigger what would become the Civil Rights movement. And Horace McMillan was a black man. For black people in Santa Barbara, buying or renting property anywhere outside of a few designated neighborhoods on the city’s lower Eastside was all but impossible. In some places — like Hope Ranch — deed restrictions specifically barred the sale of property to persons of “African, Japanese, Chinese, or Mongolian descent.” But in most places, such deed restrictions weren’t necessary. Everyone understood; it just wasn’t done. And at that time, that understanding was 100 percent legal. Eventually, Horace McMillan and his wife, Jessie, would come to buy a house on the Mesa. The woman who sold it happened to be a white member of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP). Two years later, the McMillans would need new digs. They were shown an exceptionally sweet property in Mission Canyon. The owner was in a hurry to sell and the price was right. But the owner refused to sell to black people. To get around this, the real estate agent and the McMillans availed themselves to the services of a white “nominee.” That’s someone who would buy properties on behalf of black purchasers who would otherwise be iced out of Santa Barbara’s real estate market. Many “nominees” charged $100 for their help. In the McMillans’ case, there was no fee. Before Horace McMillan, Santa Barbara had never had a black doctor. Even now, nearly 20 years after his death, Santa Barbara has never had a doctor— doctor black or white — remotely like Horace McMillan. That his name is not better

Remembering Horace McMillan, the Doctor Who Took on Big Banks and Real Estate Lobby Over Civil Rights known throughout the South Coast is further evidence that history is far too interesting to be entrusted to the care of historians — let alone white historians. Dr. McMillan did not just get mad. He organized. He lobbied. He agitated. And he moved the needle. For more than 15 years, he assembled a mountain of research documenting how much housing and job discrimination took place in Santa Barbara. As chairman of the NAACP’s Housing and Labor Committee, McMillan sought to shatter Santa Barbara’s comfortable illusions that discrimination was a problem exclusive to the American South. He took his case to City Hall. He took it to the press. He took it to the churches. He took it to the medical establishment. He took it to the chief of police, and he took it to the most powerful man in Santa Barbara, News-Press owner and publisher Thomas Storke—and eventually he got all their attention. But mostly, McMillan took it straight into the teeth of Santa Barbara’s then-powerful real estate lobby, relentlessly shaming them with facts and figures documenting the extent of discriminatory practices. “They really hated my

guts,” McMillan would later say. The feeling was mutual. McMillan would call Santa Barbara’s real estate industry at that time “one of the most vicious in the United States,” adding, “In the South, at least you knew where you stood.” McMillan also focused in on income inequality. In the middle of the 1960s, at a time when one-third of family households brought home $10,000 a year or more, oneeighth took home less than $3,000. That those households happened to be located in Santa Barbara’s black neighborhoods, he noted, was hardly coincidental. He and the NAACP targeted Bank of America, charging the financial giant had never hired a single black person. When McMillan was done, federal regulators were breathing down the necks of Santa Barbara bank managers. Stories started showing up in the News-Press. Eventually, the Bank of America started hiring black people reportedly. Along the way, McMillan — who spent about 72 hours a week tending to his patients — also changed the culture of Santa Barbara’s medical establishment. Not only was he the first black doctor in town, but he eventually created CONTINUED

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One of three kids, McMillan was born in Waco, Texas, in 1919, just a few months after bloody race riots erupted in numerous cities throughout the United States, leaving hundreds of black people dead and thousands maimed. The family would move to Dallas, where McMillan’s father sold insurance. His mother died when he was 7. McMillan would later describe what a ¢ Jim Crow childhood looked and felt like. Although his father was college educated and owned his own home, McMillan noted, he could not vote. Instead, he lived “in constant fear of sadistic whites.” As a kid, McMillan grew up riding segregated public transportation in a neighborhood with no library and no playground. The movie theater was segreGOLETA gated with people Ave restricted to the fifth 5757black Hollister floor. They could go to the zoo only on special days and to the state fair only one day a year. He wrote all this in an August 1967 let-

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the most ethnically diverse medical practice, boasting one Japanese, one Latino, one black — himself — and one white doctor. As such, they were the medical equivalent of the Mod Squad. Together, they would build a medical office building that still stands at the corner of Chapala and Arrellaga. As a general practitioner, McMillan chafed at the restrictions imposed by Santa Barbara’s exploding population of medical specialGOLETA ists hoping to protect their turf. In response, 5757 Hollister Ave McMillan formed a partnership with seven other doctors — all general practitioners —to start a new hospital in Goleta. By 1968, Goleta Valley Hospital would open its doors to patients. McMillan would later attempt to start an HMO in 1970. Economically, he was about 15 years ahead of his time, and that effort never got off the ground. But he had already made a lasting mark.

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ter to Santa Barbara’s police chief at the time, Jack Hawe. The ostensible topic was whether race riots might erupt during Santa Barbara’s annual Fiesta celebration. By then, the nonviolent civil disobedience espoused by Civil Rights leader Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. was increasingly being challenged by more militant younger protestors whom McMillan dubbed “Patrick Carmichaels,” a mix on the names of Patrick Henry and Black Power leader Stokely Carmichael. In the letter, McMillan playfully warned, “I have often said ‘the young negro of America (the land of plenty) is the most dangerous non-feathered mammalian bi-ped on this earth.’”

BECOMING DR. MCMILLAN That letter was written 25 years after McMillan first moved to Santa Barbara with his wife, Jessie, and daughter, Yvonne. Jessie and Horace first met at a mutual friend’s house in Dallas. He was in college, and she was in high school. He was smart, good-looking, and ambitious; she was smart, beautiful, and formidable. World War II was raging, and young couples tended to be in a hurry. Horace and Jessie were among them. He joined the Coast Guard, where he would earn the distinction of becoming the first black Pharmacist’s Mate in Coast Guard history. After a few months in Brooklyn, McMillan was dispatched to St. Louis with his young family, where they lived for five years. Baseball diamonds, he would tell reporters later, were segregated when they got there; they weren’t when the family left. Jessie engaged in a lunch counter sit-in as early as 1944 — about 20 years before such tactics became the staple of the Civil Rights movement. Worried for her safety, he urged her not to go. She ignored his advice. After getting out of the Coast Guard, McMillan used the GI Bill to enroll at medical school in Tennessee, one with which his uncle


C OCVOEVRE R S TSOTROYR Y

— a doctor who owned a small sanitarium in Texas — was affiliated. Upon graduation, McMillan conducted his residency with a hospital in Sacramento. After completing that, the family explored settling down in a number of Southern California towns. Having been misinformed that Santa Barbara

come. McMillan opened an office on the 600 block of Milpas, strategically close to Santa Barbara’s black population. A year later, he moved to bigger digs on the 700 block. Business was good. McMillan saw a mix of patients: black, Latino, and white. Many were poor. He took his time with patients, explaining things thoroughly. He had presence. One girl with a peanut stuck in her throat — now a 70-year-old woman — recalled being struck at the immediacy with which the peanut dislodged itself after he asked, “What seems to be the problem?” He had that effect on people in his care. If patients needed special treatment, McMillan bird-dogged the specialists. According to one press account, he saw as many as 30 patients a day, a number that borders on the impossible — even with today’s HMO requirements. From the start, there were issues. At St. Francis Hospital, McMillan was given a statue of a black saint and told to keep it on his desk at all times. When he sought to admit patients there, he chafed at being asked what their race was. Black patients, he would discover, were segregated in private rooms. White patients, by contrast, would share rooms and wards. In his oral history, McMillan recounted he didn’t want to start “any form of resentment or resistance,” but he bristled nonetheless. He questioned the policy, pointing out to one administrator, “You let people who are not citizens in this hospital. You put them anywhere. You let Germans who we just got

Before Horace McMillan, Santa Barbara had never had a black doctor. Even now, nearly 20 years after his death, Santa Barbara has never had a doctor — black or white — remotely like Horace McMillan.

had 4,000 black people — the real number was closer to 1,800 — the McMillans decided to check out the central coast. The Medical Society was less than inviting. He was told he’d “meet with greater success” if he moved to Pasadena, where allegedly there were more black patients. “They didn’t want me here; that’s all it was,” McMillan recalled as part of an oral history taken in 1989. Undaunted, the McMillans moved to Santa Barbara in 1952 anyway. The same Medical Society that urged him to settle elsewhere gave him a warm wel-

through fighting, and you let Mexicans who are not citizens, and yet you deny blacks.” Although the policy eventually changed, he remained wary of St. Francis. When one of his staff nurses, a black woman, was forced to pay the premium rate for a private room when giving birth, he exploded in a letter written in 1969, “This style of exploitation smells to the heavens. The lowest economic group is forced to pay the most.” In addition, he blistered St. Francis for its discriminatory hiring practices. “The hospital has been prejuC O N T I N U E D >>>

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diced so long. A Negro would not dare apply for a job unless he is a newcomer to the community.”

FINDING HOME Mostly, however, McMillan focused on issues of fair housing. Often, black people didn’t realize they were being denied housing based on their race, he stated, because landlords and Realtors rarely said as much. Typically, they were told the property in question had already been sold. But McMillan used the students of one of his patients — a UCSB sociology professor — to conduct endless surveys designed to plumb the extent of housing discrimination. In 1963, only 30 percent of those polled stated they’d rent or sell to black people; the rest said they would not. They also ran tests to substantiate their findings, sending in white would-be renters to apartments after black prospective tenants had been informed they’d just been rented. In 1963, the state legislature passed what was called the Rumford Fair Housing Act, meaning Realtors could no longer legally refuse to sell based on race. In retaliation, the real estate lobby teamed up with the John Birch Society to qualify a statewide ballot initiative — Prop. 14 — that would repeal the Rumford Act. California was engulfed in the controversy. It didn’t pass Santa Barbara by. Things got hot. When Episcopal minister Clyde Everton (tinyurl .com/clydeeverton) announced he would not list his home for sale with any real estate agent who supported Prop. 14, the industry flooded Everton with angry phone calls from people demanding why he insisted

fair housing, stated he was denied a chance to rent many apartments because of the color of his skin, even though he offered to put up a $50,000 cash bond. McMillan tried to alert News-Press publisher Thomas Storke to the problem but said he got nowhere. “Nobody believed me. And when a newspaper editor who has lived here all his life didn’t know what was going on in his community, who thinks it’s a fair city, you have a hard time.” Prop. 14 passed at the polls with Santa Barbara voters weighing in overwhelmingly in favor of it. Ultimately, however, the California Supreme Court ruled the initiative unconstitutional in 1966, thus opening the floodgates to $22 million in federal housing funds.

GETTING A JOB By then, McMillan shifted his focus to employment discrimination and issues of economic inequality. That was easier to prove. McMillan was part of an effort to flood the Bank of America with 15-20 overly qualified black candidates for bank teller positions. All were told the position had been filled. Then, McMillan had a white woman from Canada —the mother of one of the young women who had just been denied — call the bank, inquiring about the job, and she was told it was available. Once exposed, bank officials got really mad, McMillan recounted, complaining they’d been trapped. When McMillan sent his information to federal bank regulators, they showed up in town to talk to him, Storke, and the bank administrators.

If America can declare war on medical diseases, then why not a similar declaration against such social illnesses as deprivation and racism? —Horace McMillan

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on selling “to negroes only.” When one real estate agent, Eric Lyons, announced he supported the Rumford Act and opposed Prop. 14, he was kicked off the board of Realtors. Lyons sued for $100,000 and was eventually readmitted. McMillan engaged in a running war of words with real estate hotshots who insisted on the primacy of property rights. Prejudice, others argued, could not be solved by passing a new law. McMillan, ever outspoken, dismissed such arguments as “a Pandora’s box of lies, halftruths, and ill-disguised racism.” In 1963, a young black woman named Julie Ann Steven sued a landlord for refusing to rent to her based on her race. She won $250. Henry Robertson, an active crusader for

McMillan also blew the whistle on the Metropolitan Transit District after it received a large infusion of federal funds. Not one black person worked for the transit agency at that time, he said. “Now it’s just full of them.” For all the bills passed by Congress and all the rulings issued by various courts, racism, he argued, was still alive and well in Santa Barbara. McMillan described how he and his wife had made reservations at Somerset, an upscale Montecito restaurant. When they showed up, the hostess said she had no such reservations; if the McMillans sat at the bar, she suggested, perhaps something would open up. McMillan quickly called friends, a white


DANIEL DREIFUSS

C OV E R S T CO OR VY ER S TO RY

FROM SHOULDER TO SHOULDER Isaac Garrett’s been selling real estate in Santa Barbara for 46 years. He experienced precisely the sort of housing and job discrimination Horace McMillan talked about. McMillan, it turns out, was also Garrett’s physician. As a doctor, Garrett said McMillan was thorough and thoughtful. An activist, Garrett worked with McMillan in the NAACP. McMillan, he said, was deliberate in what he said and how he said it. “It took a lot for him to get angry, but when he did, he’d let you know.” Garrett said he was initially concerned whether McMillan was “a family man and a community man” as well as just “a business man.” Garrett would conclude he was all three.

couple named Robert and Marjorie Frost. When the Frosts showed up 15 minutes later, the restaurant staff raised no issue about reservations. The McMillans sued, and the case settled for $1,000. McMillan served on numerous city commissions designed to promote health, housing, and human rights. He found himself crossing swords with thenMayor Don MacGillivray over proposals to create a new city watchdog agency to combat housing discrimination. MacGillivray always had arguments why such plans couldn’t work or went too far. Shortly after Martin Luther King Jr. was assassinated in 1968, McMillan delivered a 15-page blueprint for what the City Council needed to do to avoid a possible racial conflagration. He called for the construction of a $10 million one-stop-shop social service center — a hospital of sorts to help victims of discrimination heal. In it, he included dramatic statistics highlighting the great divide between the “richest of the rich” and the “poorest of the poor.” If Cottage Hospital could spend $8 million on new hospital construction, he argued, then certainly the community could find $10 million for such a center. After the Watts riots, he noted, City Hall expanded the number of police officers by 23. The salary of just three officers could go a long way in providing the sort of services such a facility could provide. “If America can declare war on medical diseases, then why not a similar declaration against such social illnesses as deprivation and racism?” he asked.

Ultimately, the council balked at McMillan’s grand plans. It was too expensive. Others recoiled when it was suggested that some of the funds City Hall set aside for lawn bowling might prime the fundraising pump for this enterprise. Although McMillan’s proposal would never be built, it provided the impetus for what would ultimately emerge as the Franklin Community Center located on the Eastside. For McMillan, the gap between his dream and the Franklin Center’s reality was too great. “If no progress is made in this direction, I for one have no hope,” he had warned, “and I will retire from public life.” McMillan didn’t quite make good on that threat. Instead, he threw his energies into building the new Goleta hospital, a massive undertaking. He continued to sit on numerous boards and commissions dedicated to public health and affordable housing until he had a serious heart attack in 1978 and finally retired 10 years later. In 2001, at age 81, Horace McMillan — the Coast Guard’s first black Pharmacist’s Mate, the first black doctor in Santa Barbara, and the first black doctor to start a new hospital in Santa Barbara — was done in by a fatal stroke. The only record of McMillan’s remarkable life is a photograph on the hallway wall just off Goleta Valley Hospital’s emergency room. He’s one of the hospital’s eight original doctors posing with their shovels during the groundbreaking ceremonies.

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DAS LAURA AND

The Santa Barbara Independent Talks with the Two Candidates Running for 1st District County Supervisor by Delaney Smith

A

s political tensions continue to skyrocket between

incumbent Santa Barbara County Supervisor Das Williams and his challenger, school board president Laura Capps, voters only have a few more days before the March 3 election to choose their next supervisor for the 1st District, which encompasses Carpinteria, Cuyama, Montecito, Summerland, and most of Santa Barbara. Both Democrats share similar values when it comes to the district’s top issues — the environment, homelessness, and housing

DAS WILLIAMS

Das Williams knew from a young age that he wanted to change the world — even if he didn’t know how yet. Williams is an activist at heart. Aside from running for president in the 6th grade at San Antonio Elementary School in Ojai, he was not headed down a political career path until after childhood. Instead, Williams fought for what he believed in throughout his formative years. “As a young brown man, I thought I could make the world better with force,” Williams said. “I was the kid that fought the kid bullying the gay kid. That’s just who I was.” Williams grew up with his single mother, brother, and half-brother. Williams was the oldest and often took care of his siblings and young cousins. His mother was a teacher and his father, though not in the picture, was a well-known radio deejay for KTYD and KCSB and a surf historian. The family moved numerous times — eight moves alone in his elementary years. Much of the time, he attended schools in Isla Vista. It wasn’t until he later moved to Paso Robles that he dropped out of high school at 16 because the other students did not share his passion for environmental activism. He moved back to Isla Vista and lived in his van during the warmer half of the year; he'd park it at Leadbetter Beach and take classes at SBCC. During his time at the college, he also became a born-again Christian. “I received so much mentorship from poli-sci professors at SBCC,” Williams said. “They even helped me get scholarships to Berkeley. Dr. Eskandari’s classes were life-changing.” Before completing UC Berkeley, though, Williams went on the detour of his life in 1994. With only one campaign under his belt — Supervisor Bill Wallace’s 1992 3rd District campaign — Williams flew to South Africa to work on Nel26

THE INDEPENDENT

FEBRUARY 20, 2020

— and only clash over Williams’s approval of cannabis cultivation sites in Carpinteria. Capps, while she doesn’t disapprove of legal pot, feels Williams opened the cannabis floodgates too far and believes the $62,000 in campaign donations Williams received from cannabis interest groups influenced him while writing and enacting the law. Capps is calling for an ordinance on campaign finance reform to bar groups and individuals with projects before the board from contributing to campaigns.

Williams has consistently denounced Capps’s charges, writing off the $62,000 as “chump change.” He insists that the county goes to painstakingly rigid lengths to ensure the grows are in compliance with the law, and that they benefit the community by helping to defeat the black market and funnel extra property taxes into local schools. With only one major policy issue dividing the candidates, personalities and track records will decide the outcome of this race. The Independent interviewed the candidates and their current and former colleagues to learn more about them.

son Mandela’s African National Congress campaign. “I just showed up asking for a job, and luckily I made it,” he said. “They probably were like, ‘Who is this teenager?’ but they took me on and paid me $20 a day.” His biggest takeaway from his time working for Mandela was how fortunate Americans are for our government. He said he worked with people who were forced to “do terrible things to make political change,” and knowing he could make changes in the U.S. through democracy sealed the deal for his political career. “I definitely think the way he grew up impacts Das’s work,” said Janice Rocco, who worked with Williams on Hannah-Beth Jackson’s State Assembly campaigns in the ’90s and later served as Hannah-Beth’s chief of staff. “He felt like an outsider as a kid, so he always makes himself available so nobody else will feel like he did.” Rocco described Williams as being passionate and deeply knowledgeable about a wide range of policies — more so than the average. Despite his apparent knack for politics, Williams tried to escape after working on more than two dozen elections and twice finding himself backing the wrong candidate. “Honestly, Das is the only elected official I’ve met who literally lives their values,” said Darcel Elliott, Williams’s current chief of staff, who began working for him 12 years ago. “He is crazy about reducing carbon emissions. He will only drive electric cars; he has to go the speed limit. Even his outfits have to be secondhand or American made.” Because of his values, Williams tried to quietly leave politics by working as a support manager for an internet startup and as an advanced ESL and history teacher at 24. That only lasted a few years before his values pulled him back in — but this time to be a candidate himself.

Williams ran as the youngest candidate in a 10-person Santa Barbara City Council race in 2003 after the living wage campaign drew him in. He won and served on the council until 2010 before going on to serve in the State Assembly from 2010 to 2016. He was elected to his current supervisor position in 2016. Williams, along with then-councilmember Helene Schneider, championed the Living Wage Ordinance in 2006 on the council. In 2014 in the Assembly, one of his greater accomplishments was co-authoring a bill that allows family members or police officers to petition the courts to temporarily remove a firearm from a person who is believed to be at risk of harming themselves or others. “For most of my life, I’d be racked in pain if I wasn’t making a difference,” Williams said. “That’s why I keep doing this.”

INDEPENDENT.COM

LAURA CAPPS

Laura Capps’s childhood in Santa Barbara could be described as nothing short of picturesque. “I remember riding my bike all over town,” Capps said. “We basically lived at the beach. I have a strangely positive association with the smell of lighter fluid because my mom always kept some on the porch to remove the tar from our feet.” Capps was younger than her two siblings, Todd and Lisa. Though a descendant of the Capps dynasty — both of her parents, Walter and Lois Capps, represented Santa Barbara in Congress — Laura wasn’t always set on politics. In fact, her parents didn’t discuss politics with her much at all until she was in her twenties. She knew from an early age, though,


DANIEL DREIFUSS PHOTOS

F E A T U R E

that she had a need to know how the world works and what drives it. “I guess I was a huge nerd in junior high and high school,” Capps confessed, laughing. “I found out that if you write a letter to a senator, they send a photo back. So I’d write to all of them, and my wall was filled with Democratic senators.” Her father, who died from a heart attack a year into his first congressional term, was a religion and ethics professor at UC Santa Barbara. He traveled to write religious history books, often taking the entire family with him. One such trip brought them to a monastery in Washington, D.C. “I remember my dad telling me in D.C., ‘You could work here when you grow up one day,’” Capps said. “I remember just thinking, ‘Wow, maybe I will.’” Capps initially wanted to be a reporter, interning at KEYT for John Palminteri, the Independent, and CNN before deciding journalism wasn’t her path. She took her father up on what he told her as a child and went to D.C. after college, where she got her political start as a White House aide to Senior Advisor George Stephanopoulos before becoming a speechwriter for President Bill Clinton. Her favorite job in D.C., she said, was working as communications director for Senator Ted Kennedy. “Laura is a masterful communicator and has an excellent policy mind,” said Melissa Wagoner Olesen, who worked for Kennedy with Capps. “She started out as a colleague, then she became a mentor, and now she’s my friend,” Wagoner Olesen said. “I learned so much from watching her. Her writing and speaking skills are eloquent, and she is graceful under pressure.” Capps’s work on a bipartisan immigration reform measure initially known as the Secure America and Orderly Immigration Act — which involved Kennedy teaming up with Republican Senator John McCain — was some of her proudest work despite the bill failing. Two of the women from McCain’s team who worked on the bill are her best friends to this day.

After her job as Clinton’s speechwriter and before she worked for Kennedy, Capps, then 28, had to leave D.C. and drop her career in 1999 when she got the call that her sister Lisa had stage four cancer. At only 35, Lisa died within a year of her diagnosis and was survived by her husband and young sons. Capps stayed around another year to help her brother-in-law before heading back to D.C. “The deaths of my dad and sister so close together in my twenties were pivotal points in life for me,” Capps said. “They both taught me a lot. Lisa taught me to talk to kids like they’re people.” Children are a huge part of Capps’s life. She has an 8-year-old son, Oscar, and feels passionate about protecting the county’s youth. Capps currently serves as the president of the Santa Barbara Unified School District’s Board of Education after going unchallenged in 2016. Capps spearheaded a local No Kid Hungry coalition that provides kids throughout Santa Barbara County with free, healthy breakfasts and lunches in the summer. She also served as president of Working Hero Action, a nonprofit working in four states to increase the Earned Income Tax Credit program, which helps lift families out of poverty. She also has pushed for sustainability in Santa Barbara public schools, including adopting a climate-change resolution and hiring a district sustainability director. As of December 16, 2019, the school board voted to move off of fossil fuels and build microgrids to make schools safe havens during disasters. Her ability to push such initiatives goes back to her ability to communicate. “Laura has this ability to put thoughts into really clear and concise sentences that can be summarized to the rest of the board,” said Kate Ford, a current school boardmember who works with Capps. “She doesn’t sugarcoat or BS the issues, either. If she doesn’t understand something, she’ll call and ask me or someone else before taking action on the board.” n

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As always, find the complete listings online at independent.com/events. And if you have an event coming up, submit it at independent.com/eventsubmit.

2/20:

Improvology The S.B. Zoo will host actors from L.A.’s Impro Theatre, who will create

skits and songs accompanied by live music when prompted by animal experts. Local celebrity judges will award points that don’t really count in this family-friendly and fun evening. 8pm. Lobero Theatre, 33 E. Canon Perdido St. $30-$70. Call (805) 963-0761. lobero.org

raised go toward Starr King Parent-Child Workshop. Early bird: 7am-8am. $15. GA: 8am-3pm. Free. Earl Warren Showgrounds, 3400 Calle Real. Call (805) 9661325. Read more on p. 35.

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abundance in our community garden, community, and throughout Isla Vista with a taste of New Orleans flare. This Mardi Gras feast will offer fresh fruits and vegetables,

2/20: Lyle Lovett and His Acoustic Group This Texas trailblazer will be joined in concert by his long-running backup band, combining his rich sound, singular gift for storytelling, and wry sense of humor in an intimate acoustic performance. 8pm. Campbell Hall, UCSB. $19-$125. Call (805) 893-3535.

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2/20: TV at the Pollock: The West Wing and Veep Watch a screening of one episode from The West Wing and Veep followed by a post-screening discussion with writer/producer/director David Mandel (Veep) and

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tinyurl.com/GoletaValleyLibrary

2/20: Climate Change – Social Change: The Next 50 Years of Coastal Protection The S.B. Surfrider Foundation general meeting will host Dr. Charles Lester, who will reflect on California’s original vision for coastal management and discuss some of the core challenges facing the state. 7pm. Watershed Resource Ctr., Arroyo Burro Beach, 2981 Cliff Dr. Free.

2/21: Doublewide Kings This S.B.based band will perform an evening of Stones, Floyd, Neil, Dead, and more as well as a few originals. 8-10pm. Alcazar Theatre, 4916 Carpinteria Ave., Carpinteria. $25. Call (805) 684-6380. thealcazar.org

2/21: Science Friday: Engineering with Marshmallows Explore engineering concepts by creating and designing with marsh marsh-

Top coaches will be on the ice to assist children in experiencing youth hockey by learning the basics. No previous skating or hockey experience is required. A limited amount of equipment is available to borrow. Ice in Paradise, 6985 Santa Felicia Dr., Goleta. Free. Ages 4-9. (805) 879-1550 or email gyhl@iceinparadise .org tryhockeyforfree.com .org.

chaucersbooks.com

2/23: 5th Annual Colors of Love Dance Show This diverse dance show will feature professional dancers and singers who will blend their unique talents into expressions of love through burlesque, Latin, samba, belly dance, and Argentine tango. This show will be a benefit for Arts Without Limits. 7pm. Center Stage Theater, 751 Paseo Nuevo. $25-$40. Call (805) 963-0408. centerstagetheater.org

SATURDAY 2/22

santabarbara.surfrider.org

FRIDAY 2/21

2/22:

Try Hockey for Free Day

Emile Millar for an afternoon of storytelling and music with his children’s adventure storybook Eagle vs. Bear: Adventures of a Child Cub, about a cub who grows and finds his place among the tribe, with each chapter containing its own rock ’n’ roll song. 2-4pm. Chaucer’s Books, 3321 State St. Free. Call (805) 682-6787.

COURTESY

2/23: Gospel Brunch and Garden Party: Mardi Gras Edition Celebrate

writer/producer Eli Attie (The West Wing). A reservation is recommended to guarantee a seat. 7-9:30pm. Pollock Theater, UCSB. Free. Call (805) 893-4637.

tinyurl.com/MardiGrasBrunch

2/23: Emile Millar Join area author

SUNDAY 2/23

THURSDAY 2/20

traditional foods, and live music from the St. Mike’s Band. 12:30-2pm. St. Michael’s University Church, 6586 Picasso Rd., Isla Vista. Free. Call (805) 968-2712.

2/22: 71st Annual Starr King Rummage Sale Rummage through antiques, designer clothing, toys, books, garden supplies, outdoor items, housewares, and furniture. There will also be a bake sale with donations from the best eateries in town. All funds

2/21:

Jill Lepore: This America: The Case for the Nation At a time of much despair over the future of liberal democracy, Jill Lepore — professor of American history at Harvard University, staff writer at The New Yorker, and author of The Secret History of Wonder Woman, These Truths: A History of the United States, and This America: The Case for the Nation — will share her insights. 7:30pm. Campbell Hall, UCSB. $10-$35. Call (805) 893-3535. artsandlectures.ucsb.edu

Fundraiser

Volunteer Opportunity

Civil Discourse

>>>

Protest INDEPENDENT.COM

FEBRUARY 20, 2020

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29


INDEPENDENT CALENDAR

FEB. 20-26

As always, find the complete listings online at independent.com/events. And if you have an event coming up, submit it at independent.com/eventsubmit.

2/23:

¡Viva el Arte de Santa Bárbara! Presents Los Utrera Don’t miss

your chance to listen to guitars, zapateado (foot percussion), violin, quijada (donkey jaw), and more from this group founded in 1992 in the state of Veracruz, Mexico. They explore the traditional roots of son jarocho and show the relationships between diverse cultures and contemporary world music genres such as Spanish, African, and Indigenous. 7-8pm. Marjorie Luke Theatre, 721 E. Cota St. Free. Call (805) 893-3535. COURTESY

luketheatre.org

2/24: Teen Guitar Class with Girls Rock S.B. Junior or high school students of any gender are welcome to bring a guitar to this beginning class (there are a limited number available for checkout). Participants should be committed to attending all four sessions and register online. If you are interested in songwriting, check out the Teen Songwriting Workshop with Girls Rock on Mondays (5:30-6:30pm). 4:30-5:20pm.

Tech Lab, S.B. Central Library, 40 E. Anapamu St. Free. Call (805) 564-5605 or email lneubert@santabarbaraca.gov.

sbplibrary.org

WEDNESDAY 2/26 2/26: Cup of Culture: Singing Our Way to Freedom This character-driven

COURTESY UCSB ARTS & LECTURES

MONDAY 2/24

film about the life of San Diego Chicano musician, composer, and community activist Ramon “Chunky” Sanchez reminds the viewer about how the battle for freedom has to be fought anew by every generation. A post-screening talk will follow with the filmmaker, Paul Espinosa. 6pm. MultiCultural Ctr. Theater, UCSB. Free. Not rated. Call (805) 893-8411. mcc.sa.ucsb.edu

2/25:

Grupo Corpo Brazil’s leading contemporary 21-member dance troupe will return with a double bill of two wildly different works. Gira, inspired by AfroBrazilian religious rituals, will be set to music by the Brazilian fusion group Méta Méta, and Bach will feature dancers in brilliant colors dropping from a set of enormous organ pipes. 8pm. The Granada Theatre, 1214 State St. $20-$56. Mature content. Call (805) 893-3535. Read more on p. 41.

“ …just terrific…a profoundly moving play about adolescence, fractured families, mathematics, colours and lights…dazzling.”

presents

—Independent (London)

presents

artsandlectures.ucsb.edu

Last Chance to Play

shows what happens when a young biology student raised by two mothers decides to learn more about her DNA and reaches out to the man she believes to be her father. Thu.: 7pm; Fri.: 8pm; Sat.: 2 and 8pm; Sun.: 2pm. Rubicon Theatre, 1006 E. Main St., Ventura. $29-$64. Call (805) 6672900. rubicontheatre.org A play by SIMON STEPHENS Based on the novel by MARK HADDON Directed by KATIE LARIS

2/20-2/23:

Winner of the

2015 TO N Y AWA R D for Best Play

FEBRUARY 28–MARCH 14

PREVIEWS FEB. 26 & 27

www.theatregroupsbcc.com

Thank you to our season sponsor:

805.965.5935

LIVE CAPTIONING Sun. Mar. 1 @ 2pm

THE INDEPENDENT

FEBRUARY 20, 2020

theaterdance.ucsb.edu

Jane Austen’s Emma: A Romantic Musical This charming and

clever musical adaptation of Jane Austen’s beloved novel from the Tony Award–nominated composer of Jane Eyre and Daddy Long Legs follows the beautiful, witty, determined Emma as she plays matchmaker. Thu.-Sat.: 8pm; Sun.: 2 and 7pm. New Vic, 33 W. Victoria St. $25-$72. Call (805) 965-5400. etcsb.org



GARVIN THEATRE | SBCC WEST CAMPUS 30

2/21-2/23: Hookman This biting story of teen angst and loss written by rising contemporary playwright Lauren Yee has been described as mysterious, often hilarious, and even a “slasher comedy.” Fri.: 7pm; Sat.: 1 and 7pm; Sun.: 1pm. Performing Arts Theater, UCSB. $13-$19. Call (805) 893-2064.

DAVID BAZEMORE

2/20-2/23: Never, Not Once This beautiful, searing play

INDEPENDENT.COM

James Daniel Olivas & Samantha Eggers Fundraiser

Volunteer Opportunity

Civil Discourse

Protest


WEEK

ALWAYS

AMAZING.

Shows on Tap

2/20, 2/23: Dargan’s Irish Pub & Restaurant Thu.: Dannsair. 6:308:30pm. Sun.: Irish Jam Session. 4:30-7pm. 18 E. Ortega St. Free. Call (805) 568-0702. darganssb.com

NE VER

2/20-2/26: SOhO Restaurant & Music Club Thu.: Trouble in the Wind, Kevin Cappon (of Uncle Uncle). 8pm. $10. Ages 21+. Fri.: Soul Majestic, King Zero. 9pm. $12-$15. Ages 21+. Sat.: Doctor Wu: A Tribute to Steely Dan. 6pm. $18-$20. Sun.: Sandy Cummings’s Jazz du Jour; 1pm; $10. The Idiomatiques; 7:30pm; $20. Mon.: The SBCC Monday Madness Jazz Orchestra: The Music of Sinatra & Basie. 7:30pm; $10. Tue.: Motown Monday (on a Tuesday) Benefitting World Dance for Humanity. 6pm. $10. Wed.: Sasami, Mandy Harris Williams. 8:30pm. $12-$15. Ages 18+. 1221 State St. Call (805) 962-7776.

ROUTINE.

sohosb.com

2/21-2/23: Cold Spring Tavern Fri.: The Nombres. 6-9pm. Sat.: Will Breman; 1-4pm. Paradise Road; 5-8pm. Sun.: Tom Ball and Kenny Sultan; 1:15-4pm. Paradise Kings; 4:30-7:30pm. 5995 Stagecoach Rd. Free. Call (805) 967-0066. coldspringtavern.com

TIERRA CALI

AND LOS CANARIOS DE MICHOACAN

2/21-2/23, 2/26: The Endless Summer Bar-Café Fri.: Brian Kinsella. 5-8pm. Sat.: Cyrus Clark. 5-8pm. Sun.: Famous Benny. 2-5pm. Wed.: Dave Vignoe. 5-8pm. 113 Harbor Wy. Free. Call (805) 564-1200.

FEBRUARY 28 | FRIDAY | 8 PM

2/21-2/22: M.Special Brewing Co. Fri.: Conner Cherland. 7-9pm. Sat.: The Reserves. 6-8pm. 6860 Cortona Dr., Bldg. C., Goleta. Free. Call (805) 968-6500. mspecialbrewco.com 2/22-2/23, 2/26: Island Brewing Company Sat.: Cadillac Angels. 6-9pm. Sun.: Rick Reeves. 2-5pm. Wed: Dry and Dusty. 5-8pm. 5049 6th St., Carpinteria. Free. Call (805) 745-8272. islandbrewingcompany.com

WHICH ONE’S PINK?

2/22: The James Joyce Ulysses Jasz. 7:30-10:30pm. 513 State St. Free. Ages 21+. Call (805) 962-2668. sbjamesjoyce.com

FEBRUARY 29 | SATURDAY | 8 PM

Michelle Malone

COURTESY

2/22: La Cumbre Plaza Nic & Joe. Noon-3pm. 121 S. Hope Ave. Free. Call (805) 687-6458. shoplacumbre.com/Events

THE BEACH BOYS MARCH 6 | FRIDAY | 8 PM

2/22-2/23, 2/26: Maverick Saloon Sat.: Pull the Trigger. 8-11pm. Sun.: Johnny Clashers. Noon-4pm. Wed.: Tales from the

JOHN FOGERTY

Tavern: Michelle Malone. 7-9pm. 3687 Sagunto St., Santa Ynez. Free-$5. Ages 21+. Call (805) 686-4785. themavsaloon.com

MARCH 13 | FRIDAY | 8 PM

Must be 21 years of age or older to attend. Chumash Casino Resort reserves the right to change or cancel promotions and events.

Welcome to Freedom

>>> INDEPENDENT.COM

FEBRUARY 20, 2020

THE INDEPENDENT

31


From Brazil

Grupo Corpo

Paulo Pederneiras, Artistic Director

Bach & Gira Tue, Feb 25 / 8 PM / Granada Theatre Tickets start at $35 / $19 UCSB students A Granada facility fee will be added to each ticket price

“The virtuosic dancers of the Brazilian troupe Grupo Corpo carry fire in their veins and history in their muscles.” The Boston Globe

Brazil’s leading contemporary dance troupe returns with a phenomenal double bill that showcases the 21-member group’s extraordinary range and delivers a dazzling celebration of Brazil in all its diversity. (Mature content.)

France’s National Treasure Makes its Only West Coast Appearance

Lyon Opera Ballet “Trois Grandes Fugues”

Wed, Apr 1 & Thu, Apr 2 / 8 PM / Granada Theatre Tickets start at $35 / $19 all students (with valid ID) A Granada facility fee will be added to each ticket price

photos: Bertrand Stofleth

Celebrate Beethoven’s 250th birthday with three interpretations of his beloved masterpiece “Grosse Fuge” by three female choreographers.

Belgium’s Anne Teresa De Keersmaeker

France’s Maguy Marin

America’s Lucinda Childs

Presented through the generosity of the Albert & Elaine Borchard Foundation Corporate Sponsor:

Presented in association with the UCSB Department of Theater and Dance

Dance Series Sponsors: Annette & Dr. Richard Caleel, Margo Cohen-Feinberg & Bob Feinberg, Irma & Morrie Jurkowitz, Barbara Stupay, and Sheila Wald

(805) 893-3535 | www.ArtsAndLectures.UCSB.edu Corporate Season Sponsor: 32

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Granada event tickets can also be purchased at: (805) 899-2222 | www.GranadaSB.org FEBRUARY 20, 2020

INDEPENDENT.COM

Media Sponsor:


WEEK COURTESY

K K K C C A A L L L B Y B Y B BS R RY OR T TO S ST HIIIIS

H H N TH H H H T O N O M M M M

Love Yourursself Look and Feel the Way You Want!

Join us for specials on CoolSculpting®, SkinMedica, and More! Schedule a free mini-consult for the day to be entered into raffles for free treatments.

Wednesday, March 4, from 4 to 7 pm

Petrella

2/23:

All Aboard Black History’s Country Soul Train: Petrella and Mixed Influence Come

hear the country-flavored soul, gospel, and roots sounds from HistoryMaker and “The First Lady of Country Soul,” Petrella, and learn about The HistoryMakers of Chicago, the nation’s largest African American Video Oral History Archive, housed at the Library of Congress’s Reading Room. 6-7:15pm. S.B. Central Library, 40 E. Anapamu St. Free. Call (805) 564-5621. sbplibrary.org

2/22: Live Music Performance: The Cookies Industry veterans Maxayn Lewis (vocals), Bobby Watson (bass), Allen Hinds (guitar), and Land Richards (drums) will celebrate Black History Month with their jazz, funk, soul, and fusion sound. 1-4:30pm. Black History Month Culture House, 1219 State St. Free. tinyurl.com/SBBHMCultureHouse

RSVP or Schedule your mini-consult (805)845-2500

Love Othererss

Bring a donation for the women in St. Vincent’s Family Strengthening Program. Get a special thank you.

2/22: Black Art Now! Paint & Sip. 11am-1:30pm. $30. Paseo Nuevo

(next to Nordstrom). sbybp.com

2/22: Black Art Now! Exhibition S.B. Young Black Professionals will close out Black History Month with their annual pop-up art showcase. Enjoy small bites, drinks, music, and lively conversations with the artists presenting their works. 7pm. Paseo Nuevo (Next to Nordstrom). Free. sbybp.com 2/23: Mandrill: Live at Montreux Jazz Festival 2002 This film shows legendary funk/R&B/Latin/jazz/rock Mandrill perform a concert of greatest hits and one-time-only performances at the prestigious Stravinski Hall in Switzerland. Black History Month Culture House, 1219 State St. 1-3pm.

tinyurl.com/SBBHMCultureHouse

FARMERS MARKET

SCHEDULE THURSDAY

SUNDAY

Goleta: Camino Real Marketplace, 10am-2pm

Carpinteria: 800 block of Linden Ave., 3-6:30pm

FRIDAY

TUESDAY

Montecito: 1100 and 1200 blocks of Coast Village Rd., 8-11:15am

Old Town S.B.: 500-600 blocks of State St., 4-7:30pm

SATURDAY

WEDNESDAY

Downtown S.B.: Corner of Santa Barbara and Cota sts., 8:30am-1pm

216 W. Pueblo Street, Suite A, Santa Barbara

visageattheveinclinic.com

Jazz

a dos pueblos instrumental music benefit concert

in

FEB

paradise

29 7pm

dos Pueblos elings Performing Arts Center 7266 alameda ave, goleta, ca special guest

dave weckl

Solvang: Copenhagen Dr. and 1st St., 2:30-6:30pm

special guest

snarky puppy horns

FISHERMAN’S MARKET SATURDAY

Rain or shine, meet local fishermen on the Harbor’s commercial pier, and buy fresh fish (filleted or whole), live crab, abalone, sea urchins, and more. 117 Harbor Wy., 6-11am. Call 259-7476. cfsb.info/sat

featuring

sbcc lunch break & dphs jazz bands tickets $25

student/senior $20

dPHsmusic.org/jazz

INDEPENDENT.COM

FEBRUARY 20, 2020

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33


Michael Barenboim and the West-Eastern Divan Ensemble Arab and Israeli musicians defying fierce political divides in the Middle East and globally Sat, Mar 7 / 4 PM / Hahn Hall Music Academy of the West $40 / $9 UCSB students Post-show Q&A with the artists

The West-Eastern Divan Ensemble spreads the mission that opposing sides can build bridges and encourage people to imagine a better future. Experience the healing power of music as artists from Palestine, Israel, Jordan, Lebanon and Egypt perform together. Led by concertmaster Michael Barenboim, the group draws its members from the world-renowned West-Eastern Divan Orchestra in hopes of finding alternative ways to alleviate the Israeli-Palestinian conflict. The diverse program features music by Schubert, Mendelssohn, Tartini and young French composer Benjamin Attahir.

Up Close & Musical Series Sponsor: Dr. Bob Weinman Corporate Season Sponsor:

(805) 893-3535 | www.ArtsAndLectures.UCSB.edu

International

www.herfestivalsb.com @herfestivalsb

Women's Day

@herfestival

EARL MINNIS PRESENTS

Everyone Welcome

March 8, 2020 Girsh Park, Goleta Sunday, 12 PM - 4 PM

Free to attend Inspirational Speakers Live Music | Food Trucks on Activities | Information

Join Us For a Day Of Celebration and Empowerment

®

Free Prize Drawing Booths | Climbing Wall Free Face-Painting

Is Your Boss Violating Your Rights? Adams Law focuses on Advocating employee rights in claims involving: • Wrongful Termination • Pregnancy Discrimination • Disability Discrimination • Hostile Work Environment • Sexual Harassment • Racial and Age Discrimination

• Misclassified “Salaried” Employees and Independent Contractors

• Working “Off the Clock” • Unpaid Overtime Compensation/Bonuses • Reimbursement for Work-Related Expenses

CALL US TODAY 805-845-9630 Visit our website at www.adamsemploymentlaw.com

Adams Law Serving the Employment Law Needs of California’s Central Coast 34

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FEBRUARY 20, 2020

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Teen Star

(805) 845-9630

2020 A LAMBERT PRODUCTION

Finale at the

ARLINGTON THEATRE February 22nd • 7pm Purchase your tickets at AXS.com The Arlington Theatre box office 1317 State Street Santa Barbara or call (805) 963-4408 www.TeenStarUSA.com • info@teenstarusa.com Facebook.com/TeenStarSB


Tech

Sewer Inspections Now a Whole Lot Easier

Starr King

This Saturday, February 22, the 71st iteration of the rummage sale will take place from 8 a.m. to 3 p.m. at Earl Warren. Parking is free, and so is the entry, except for early birds who arrive at 7 a.m. and pay $15. For more information, visit starrking-pcw.org. starrking-pcw.org Many of the items for sale—houseware, sports he Starr King rummage sale, the granddaddy of all Central Coast rummage sales, started out equipment, books, garden supplies, toys, furniture, rather modestly. It was back in 1949, the same and more—were donated by graduates of the preyear the preschool began, and was only a single blan- school’s unique and popular parent-child workshop ket laid out with a few items of clothing. Over the program. The rest comes from residents far and years, it grew and grew and grew some more — to the wide. All of the cribs, car seats, and strollers are safe up to modern standards, Medina-Garcia stressed, and there’s even a special room for antiques and collectibles. Kids’ clothing is neatly organized by size, and the adult section includes some designer items with the tags still attached. “The quality is really what I want to emphasize,” Medina-Garcia went on, explaining Starr King doesn’t sell any donations with rips, snags, or missing parts, and anything left over from the sale also goes to thrift stores. Pastries and breakfast burritos will be sold in Starr King director Yolanda Medina-Garcia and Rummage Sale Chairperson Isis Wills the morning, with Indian fare offered point it couldn’t be contained by Starr King’s class- at lunch. Every penny of proceeds goes back to the school, rooms any longer and moved to Earl Warren Showgrounds. “It’s a huge success,” said director Yolanda which is funded entirely by tuition and the rummage sale, Medina-Garcia said. Medina-Garcia. “It’s quite a community gathering.” —TH

Rummage Sales

DANIEL DREIFUSS

T

COURTESY PHOTOS

I

PAUL WELLMAN

Cannabis Corner

f you’re a property owner, you know this—sewer lateral inspections are a major pain in the butt. At least, they used to be. This December, the City of Santa Barbara partnered with a software developer to dramatically streamline the review process. Forward Lateral (go forwardlateral.com), explained creator Jesse Aizenstat, replaces literal paper-pushing with a fully digitized cloud system that makes life much easier for homeowners, plumbers, and city workers alike. “This really is a win-win across the board,” agreed Bradley Rahrer, Santa Barbara’s wastewater system superintendent. “It’s been a great Forward Lateral developer Jesse Aizenstat public-private partnership.” Here’s how it works: When someone “This is a tech start-up solving a problem,” Aizenbuys or adds onto a property, they’re responsible for making sure the lateral connection from their stat went on, “but we believe we’ll also have a major home to the city’s sewer system is up to code. A environmental impact with our efforts. By elimiplumber does an inspection, submits it to the city, nating plumbers driving to the city regularly in big then the city tells the owner what work, if any, is trucks, that reduces fuel and traffic.” Plus, he said, required. Before Aizenstat stepped in — after he it will mean no more wasted thumb drives which, endured his own lengthy headache with the old for liability reasons, were only used once and then process — plumbers had to fill out hardcopy forms thrown away. Now that Santa Barbara has adopted the software, and drive thumb drives with their video inspections down to the city’s offices. Now, plumbers sub- which costs $20 per new inspection, Aizenstat has mit everything digitally, the homeowner can more aspirations of expanding it to other communities. easily bid out the work, and the city stays connected “My goal is 100 percent of the market,” he said. and communicative the whole time. That saves “There’s no reason why someone shouldn’t use it.” —Tyler Hayden everyone time and money.

The Granddaddy of All

living p. 35

F/ELD live resin

Dab on the Go

But Be Careful—This Little Sauce Pen Packs Quite a Punch

F

/ELD’s Sauce Pen taught me a few things. First, my THC toler tolerance—especially in today’s market of concentrates, distillates, ance and other high-potency products— products is even wimpier than I thought. I’m not just a lightweight; I’m a flyweight. Second, it’s possible to hit a vape pen without hurting yourself. The tobacco industry gave the technology a bad rap by adding volatile compounds to their nicotine mixtures, but vaporizing pure cannabis is an entirely different story. And third, even if you have a low tolerance like me, you can still enjoy concentrates, as long as you’re careful. F/ELD is a Colorado-grown cannabis brand that started out making hash and now produces some of the industry’s very best “live resin” out of Los Angeles. They partner with premium growers throughout the state, and their live resin, explained Director of Sales Chelby Dufourg, is a type of full-spectrum extract derived from whole marijuana plants that were flashfrozen immediately after harvest and kept cold during the extraction process. “By doing this, the plant retains its valuable terpene profile, thus retaining its original flavor and fragrance,” Dufourg explained. Live resin, which is thick and waxy, is normally dabbed or smoked out of a rig, meaning packed in the bowl of a bong-like device and heated up with a blowtorch. That does the trick, Dufourg said, but it’s an involved and somewhat intimidating process. So F/ELD liquified their pure blend, which doesn’t contain any common vaping additives like vegetable glycerin, and put it in pens, one refillable (the Sauce Pen) and the other disposable (the Sauce Pen Mini). “It’s basically dab on the go,” said Dufourg, “the perfect option for a discreet, quick, and flavorful hit.” I went with the Mini filled with Larry Pie, a hybrid strain created by crossing Larry OG and Grape Pie. I started out with two healthy drags. That was a mistake. I got way too high way too quickly and spent the evening avoiding eye contact and trying to untighten my chest. The next day, with that first botched trial out of the way, I tried a single small puff. That was perfect. After the air cleared of Larry’s lemon and pine aroma, my body relaxed while my mind stayed sharp. I happily glided through a couple hours of weekend after afternoon and gently landed just in time for dinner with company. The 0.4-gram reservoir of the Mini, which costs $35, holds enough resin for 100 puffs. That’s some serious bang for your buck. The 0.5-gram cartridges for the full-size pen cost $40. Check out F/ELD’s other products, including its solvent-less premium rosin, rosin jam, and rosin sugar, by visiting field.la. F/ELD Sauce Pens are available in Santa Barbara at The Farmacy (128 W. Mission St.; [805] 880-1207; thefarmacysb.com). —TH

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FEBRUARY 20, 2020

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Meat me at the Ranch!

SANTA BARBARA 2618 De La Vina St Open 7 Days 11 am–10pm 805.569.1872

GOLETA 149 N. Fairview Ave. Open 7 Days 11 am–9 pm 805.692.9200

Visit our 2020 Wedding Guide online at

SB Chicken Ranch It’s STILL the best!

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Let us help cater your holiday parties from 2 to 200 we’re here for you!! 2020

SUMMER

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805-965-5205 • SALES@INDEPENDENT.COM

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Veils and Tails Photography

Thursday,

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p.37

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Fresh and Flavorful Formula MORE MENU HIGHLIGHTS: Carmen Deforest shows off The Daisy’s mezze plate. See more menu highlights online at independent.com/ the-daisy.

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afoot in modern culinary culture. Whether talking wine and cocktails or design and dishes, restaurateurs, producers, and consumers alike are opting for freshness and clarity in their sensory experiences, elevating, perhaps unwittingly, truth and purity in these days of lies and discontent. The Daisy crystallizes such sentiments. Opened last November by the wife-and-husband team of Carmen Deforest and Dominic Shiach — previously behind Book Ends Café on the top floor of Antioch University’s downtown campus — the State Street restaurant is full of light and energy, from the stark white, sandy wood interior to the garden-grown vibrancy of Deforest’s California-meets-Levant cooking. “Food has always they lived in Brooklyn, where BY MATT KETTMANN been the most imporShiach also dabbled in theater tant part of our lives,” production. explains Deforest. The tiny spot atop Antioch “What we do here is the stuff we like to eat at on the corner of Anacapa and Cota streets had no proper kitchen, so they had to prepare many home.” Originally from Palm Springs, Deforest had of the salads and sandwiches at a commercial her first career in public relations for the fash- kitchen in the Funk Zone. “It was never going ion industry. She met Shiach in Los Angeles, to be a forever thing for us,” explained Shiach, where he worked in the film business like his to which Deforest added, “We always knew we screenwriting father, who’s penned and pro- wanted something bigger.” duced numerous films and plays under the Upon closing Book Ends in 2016, they took pseudonym Allan Scott. As his accent reveals, a year off and then rented the current spot in Shiach hails from the United Kingdom, where Victoria Court on the 1200 block of State Street his dad worked by day under his birth name, in November 2017. As is the typical Santa BarAlan Shiach, as the seventh generation of their bara story, it took 18 months of wrangling with family to run Macallan Distillery in Scotland. the city over permits and the usual construcThe Scottish Highlands are also at the root tion timeline to get the place opened, which of The Daisy’s origin story, for the couple happened on November 19 of last year. moved there to have their son, James, now 14. Cooking is primarily handled by Defor“There was a shortage of places to go out to est — known by most of her friends as Daisy, eat,” explained Shiach. “By necessity, Carmen hence the restaurant’s name — while Shiach handles the front of the house and the beverstarted cooking a lot, and every day.” Upon returning to California in 2011, they age selection. He’s particularly proud of the 16 decided to reinvent themselves by settling in wines he has on tap, both for their ecological Santa Barbara, where Shiach’s parents had a implications and the ability to serve a full glass home. “It’s a magical place to raise a kid,” said of wine for much less than most places. Shiach. “Given we were looking to change our He believes the restaurant takes cues from careers, where’s better?” the culture of Southern France. “It’s not overly They wrote a business plan and, in 2013, fussy,” he explained. “It’s just a lot of very good opened Book Ends Café. “Before that, neither ingredients, well managed.” As is common of us had been working in hospitality in any today, the process is a casual affair, with cusway before,” said Shiach, although he had stud- tomers ordering at the counter and taking a ied restaurant business at the Culinary Institute seat to wait for their food. of America. That was during the two years that As to the style of food, Deforest was

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S.B. RESTAURANT WEEK IS HERE T begins on Friday, February 21, and runs until March 6. The special promotion features three-course prix fixe dinner menus for $25, $35, and $45 at 30 different restaurants, with seven wine tasting rooms and seven hotels also offering deals. Proceeds from the event will be donated to ProStart, a two-year culinary arts and hospitality management program supported and managed by the California Restaurant Association Foundation (CRAF). Nearly 150 public high schools in California (including our own San Marcos High School) use this curriculum, which reaches more than 13,500 students every year. The concept of Restaurant Week was launched in 1992 in New York City by Tim Zagat and Joe Baum, who initially just offered a lunch option during the Democratic National Convention. It was such a success in the first year that it became a four-week phenomenon, and other regions have since adopted the format all around the world. With more than 450 restaurants in Santa Barbara, there was no reason not to bring this opportunity to our beautiful city. See sbrestaurantweeks. com for a complete list of participating vendors. SAVOY WINE BECOMING MERITAGE WINE: Wine retail

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icon Bob Wesley let the world know this past weekend that Savoy Wine will be turning into Meritage Wine Market (18 W. Anapamu St.) very soon. “I’m extremely pleased to announce that the wine shop formerly known as Savoy is undergoing a stunning renaissance that would make Michelangelo jealous, though he’s not involved in the interior painting,” writes Wesley. “I’ll once again be at the vino-slinging helm, operating the establishment under the ownership of two locally connected wine industry veterans: Dustin Cano and Dave Wiegel, proprietors of the longstanding and highly regarded Meritage Wine Market in Encinitas, down San Diego way. Who wouldn’t want an additional store up the coast in beautiful Santa Barbara? I’m just glad to be part of the team!”

They plan to unlock the doors on March 3 and host a grand opening on March 7. LOCALS’ NIGHT AT LAMA DOG: Tuesday nights are for the locals at Lama Dog and The Nook (116 Santa Barbara St.). Now happening every week beginning at 6 p.m., locals can take advantage of 15 percent off draft beer and wine on tap at Lama Dog, as well as 15 percent off the entire Nook menu. Lama Dog offers 20 revolving craft beers and wine on tap while The Nook serves burgers, tacos, sandwiches, and small snacks. Visit lamadog.com. RHÔNE WINE AT MIRAMAR: On February 27, the

Rosewood Miramar Beach will present its inaugural Vintner Dinner in partnership with Guigal Winery, which hails from the legendary Rhône region of France. Patrick Will of Vintus Wines will represent Philippe and Eve Guigal, the family’s third generation of winemakers, to carry on founder Etienne’s enduring legacy. Together with Executive Chef Massimo Falsini and Wine Director Daniel Fish, Patrick will pour a selection of white, rosé, and rare red wines from the famed Guigal Estate, served in the resort’s elegant Founder’s Dining Room. The evening will begin with a welcome reception on the private outdoor terrace, followed by a six-course dinner menu designed to delight the senses and complement the distinct tasting notes of each vintage. The event will mark the first of six Vintner Dinners offered throughout the year, with each showcasing a prestigious winemaker or vineyard. Tickets are $240 per person, excluding taxes and fees. See tinyurl.com/vintnerdinner. SCARLETT BEGONIA MOVING: Reader Mary reports

on good authority that Scarlett Begonia in Victoria Court is moving to 21 West Victoria Street (next to the New Vic theater), which is the former home of Locavore Kitchen, The Nugget, Arlington Tavern, HobNob Tavern, and Epiphany Restaurant & Bar. Scarlett Begonia will remain open in their Victoria Court location until the move occurs, which they expect will happen in May.

John Dickson’s reporting can be found every day online at SantaBarbara.com. Send tips to info@SantaBarbara.com.


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photo by Kelsey Crews

Support local organizations and groups in their efforts to enhance & beautify the communitythrough grants for Arts & Culture and Horticulture projects accessible to the public.

SCHOLARSHIPS Active educational outreach through scholarships with SBCC (Environmental Horticulture) & Architectural Foundation of SB (Architecture/ Landscape Architecture.) photo by Arthur Fisher


ART

IN PUBLIC PLACES Vital ongoing program to bring temporary and permenant art installations to public locations throughout the city.

ARBOR DAY Annual Tree planting ceremonies with children at local schools and tree-related book donations to school libraries teach the benefits of trees.

NEIGHBORHOOD STREET TREE PROGRAM Since 1977 SBB has planted over 12,000 city street trees in an ongoing effort to improve the quality of life for our community & maintain the Urban Forest.

TREE OF THE MONTH Popular monthly articles promoting a local tree along with its natural attributes. Current and past articles are available on the website.

COMMEMORATIVE TREE PROGRAM Dedicate a city street tree to a loved one or special occasion with a personalized tree plaque.


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MATT KETTMANN

THE DAISY cont’d from p. 37 heavily influenced by Israeli cookbooks during their Scottish sojourn, but the menu bridges the New and Old Worlds with ease. “We do modern American with a Middle Eastern twist,” said Shiach. So far, the lunch crowds keep The Daisy quite busy, although they are still working on attracting people later into the evening — the 2-6 p.m. happy hour with $1 off all wines and beers certainly helps. “Night times are a work in progress,” said Shiach. They are also developing a market in the back of the restaurant, with to-go salads, sandwiches, spreads, and even beer and wine that is not on the normal menu. “We want to get to the point where you can have lunch here and then take dinner home,” said Deforest. To Shiach, running The Daisy is not unlike his work on the stage. “A restaurant is a bit like a theatrical product,” he explained. “You’re doing it anew and have a new audience every day.”

1221 State St.; (805) 845-0188; thedaisyrestaurant.com

PROUDLY SERVING SANTA BARBARA FOR OVER 40 YEARS

L O C A T I O N S Goleta (The Original) 5735 Hollister Avenue

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Dominic Shiach

ETHIOPIAN AUTHENTIC ETHIOPIAN cuisine Featured at Petit Valentien Restaurant 1114 State St. #14, 805-966-0222. Serkaddis Alemu offers an ever changing menu with choices of vegetarian, vegan, and meat options. Catering Available for parties of up to 40 people. Sat/Sun lunch 11:30-2:30

Isla Vista 888 Embarcadero Del Norte

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Located at MacKenzie Market

Serving Santa Barbara for 34 Years! Famous Gyros & Tri-tip Full Service Deli Catering

3102 State Street • 682-2051

Get a FREE Week Of Service! when you book 4 consecutive weeks Clean-ups Hauling Mowing Hedge Trimming Installation & repair irrigation Organic vegetable gardens Planting of fruit trees SOD & Turf installation systems & timers Tree Trimming Rose Pruning Fertilizing

NORTHERN EUROPEAN ANDERSEN’S DANISH RESTAURANT & BAKERY. 1106 State St., 805-962-5085. Open M-Th 8a-6p, Fri/Sat 8a-9p, Sun 8a-6p. Family owned for over 42 years. Northern European Cuisine with California Infusion. Fresh scratch made pastries & menus everyday. Authentic Breakfasts, Lunches & Dinners. Happy Hour menu with exquisite wines & beers, 3-5pm everyday. High Tea served everyday starting at 2pm. Huge Viking Mimosas & Champagne Cocktails. Private Event spaces. R VE TI S D

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FRENCH PETIT VALENTIEN, 1114 State St. #14, 805-966-0222. Open M-F 11:30-3pm (lunch). M-Sat 5pm-Close (dinner). Sun

MEDITERRANEAN FOXTAIL KITCHEN 14 E. Cota St. Lebanese cuisine, American burger, 24 craft beers, great cocktails, whiskey bar, vegan options, open late night, hookah lounge. Kitchen closes at midnight on the weekend, try our best falafel in town. www. foxtailsb.com

A

DELI SAVOY CAFE & DELI 24 W. Figueroa St. 7am-9pm Monday -Saturday. A family owned and operated café featuring scratch cooking. Serving breakfast, lunch and dinner for the past 15 years. Award winning salad bar, bakery, soup, hot and cold prepared foods, coffee & tea bar and an extensive wine selection -local and import, retail and by the glass. Cozy atmosphere, dog friendly patio! www.thesavoycafe.com

IRISH DARGAN’S IRISH PUB & RESTAURANT, 18 E. Ortega St. (next to lot 10) SB, 568-0702. $$. Open 7 days 11:30a-Close (Food ‘til 10p, 11p on Sat/Sun). AE MC V Disc. Authentic Irish food & atmosphere in downtown SB. Specialties from Ireland include Seafood & Meat dishes. Informal, relaxed pub-style atmosphere. Live music Thursday nights. Children welcome. Avail. for private parties. Pool & Darts.

PA I D

THE ENDLESS SUMMER BAR-CAFE, 113 Harbor Way, 805564-4666, upstairs from Chuck’s Waterfront Grill, offers casual dining, surrounded by vintage surfboards and memorabilia. Sip on local wines, craft beers and cocktails, play a game of pool on one of our covered lanais while watching sports and surf movies on our 50” 4k TV’s. Listen to live music evenings, as you revel in the beauty that is Santa Barbara. Serving daily from 11:30 a.m. Private parties and special events accommodated.

INDIAN FLAVOR OF INDIA 3026 State 682-6561 $$ www.flavorofindiasb.com Finest, most authentic Indian cuisine is affordable too! All You Can Eat Lunch Buffet $10.95 M-S dinner combos $9.95+ Specials: Tandoori- Mixed or Fish, Chicken Tikka Masala, Shrimp Bhuna. Also: meat, curries & vegetarian.Wine & Beer. Take out. VOTED BEST for 20 YEARS!

Dining Out Guide

CASUAL DINING CHUCKS WATERFRONT GRILL, 113 Harbor Way, 805-5641200, began serving friends and family in the Santa Barbara Harbor in 1999. We’re everyone’s favorite spot to sit and relax by the boats, watching all the action. Enjoy steaks, fresh seafood straight from the boats docked right outside, and cocktails on our radiant heated deck with fire pits. Or head inside for intimate, cozy booths and the full bar. Plus, free valet parking! Dinner 7 nights from 5 p.m., Sunday Brunch from 10 a.m. Private parties and special events accommodated.

$25.50 four course prix fixe dinner. In La Arcada Plaza, Chef Robert Dixon presents classic French comfort food at affordable cost in this cozy gem of a restaurant. Petit Valentien offers a wide array of meat and seafood entrees along with extensive small plates and a wine list specializing in amazing quality at arguably the best price in town. A warm romantic atmosphere makes the perfect date spot. Comfortable locale for dinner parties, or even just a relaxing glass of wine. Reservations are recommended.

FOOD & DRINK •

DINING O U T GUIDE AMERICAN LITTLE KITCHEN, 17 W. Ortega St. (805) 770-2299. “Great little neighborhood café!” Healthy, comfortable, and affordable. Lunch-Dinner-Late Night. Organic chicken and hormone/antibiotic-free burgers, local produce. Try the Chicken Tikka Masala, vegetarian options. Great local wine list and craft beers. www.littlekitchensb.com

La Cumbre Plaza 3890 La Cumbre Lane

For free estimate call 805.708.0595 $50 minimum per visit (depending on size of yard) INDEPENDENT.COM

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GranadaSB.org

805.899.2222

THE GRANADA THEATRE

Peter Wolf presents

and the

Sun FEBRUARY 23 2 pm

UCSB Arts & Lectures presents

UCSB Arts & Lectures presents

GRUPO CORPO

BRIAN GREENE

Tue FEB 25 8pm

Mon MAR 9 7:30 pm

BACH & GIRA

Goldenvoice presents

HERB ALPERT & LANI HALL Fri FEB 28 7:30 pm

UCSB Arts & Lectures presents

BILL BRYSON

THE BODY: A GUIDE FOR OCCUPANTS Mon MAR 2 7:30pm

The Broadway In Santa Barbara Series presents

SLEEPING BEAUTY Sat MAR 14 7:30 pm

Network Medical presents

SEALED

FEAT. FORMER NAVY SEAL, CHAD WILLIAMS Thu MAR 19 7 pm Santa Barbara Symphony presents

AN AMERICAN IN PARIS

Tue MAR 3 7:30pm Wed MAR 4 7:30pm

Sat MAR 21 8 pm Sun MAR 22 3pm

CAMA presents

CAMA presents

LOS ANGELES PHILHARMONIC Fri MAR 6 7 pm (Early Start Time)

1214 State Street, Santa Barbara THE INDEPENDENT

State Street Ballet presents

BUDDY

THE BUDDY HOLLY STORY

40

UNTIL THE END OF TIME

FEBRUARY 20, 2020

The Film Accompanied by Live Orchestra

ROTTERDAM PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA Thu MAR 26 8pm

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GRUPO CORPO

L I F E PAGE 41

COMES TO S.B.

JOHN SAYLES INTERVIEWED

BRAZIL DANCE COMPANY EMPHASIZES CULTURAL FUSION

S

yncretism, or the blending of distinc- contemporary in approach, Brazilian in tive beliefs, has long informed the spirit, and universal in appeal. The name cultural identity of Brazil, where itself — “Body Group” in English — a swirl of African, European, Asian, and reflected the dismissal of a singular idenindigenous traditions pushes against the tity in favor of a unified voice. Would they confines of a nation. In the late 19th century, fall under the categorization of Afro-Latin, Catholicism and African ritualism collided, contemporary ballet, or modern dance? and the Afro-Brazilian religion known as Yes. And if the success of their first producUmbanda was born. As cities such as São tion, Maria Maria, was any indication (a Paulo began swelling with industrial oppor- six-year run across 14 countries), the world tunity, eclecticism would win out didn’t seem to care much about over stodgy classicism, and fusty labels. They were too baroque and Art Noubusy marveling over veau influences would the collective genius soon begin popping of the Pederneiras Thrusting arms and up along the city’s family, who, 45 unruly pelvises shift from years later, conboulevards. black to blue to shimmering And so it was tinue to preside gold against the linear within Brazil’s shiftover Brazil’s most severity of an iron forest. ing and evolving influential dance landscape that Paulo company. Pederneiras, a dance On Tuesday, Febstudent from the town of ruary 25, UCSB Arts & Belo Horizonte, would envision Lectures will present a double and plot a syncretic revolution of his own, bill of entrancing works from Grupo recruiting his younger siblings Rodrigo, Corpo’s extensive catalogue: the 1996 poetic Miriam, and Pedro along the way to form a elephant known as Bach, and the 2017 cerdance company that emphasized the wide- emonial powerhouse Gira — both concepreaching implications of cultural fusion. tualized by Rodrigo, the company’s resident He called his company Grupo Corpo: choreographer.

4·1·1

In the former, Johann Sebastian Bach’s baroque compositions are painted across the Minas Gerais landscape, where the bustle of a mining industry is represented by an ensemble of thrusting arms and unruly pelvises that shift from black to blue to shimmering gold against the linear severity of an iron forest. In the latter, Rodrigo spent months studying Umbanda’s elaborate ceremonies and rituals for the creation of a metaphysical homage to self-discovery. Bare-chested and raw, with billowing white skirts that frame a purity of movement at once moody and activating, the dancers float through a rigorous incantation of Brazilian history to glorious effect. With stinging focus over the past several decades, Grupo Corpo has been exploring a movement language all its own while continuing to wrap itself firmly around a diverse national identity. With more than 35 company works under his belt, Rodrigo is often asked about the pressures of generating fresh choreography with each passing season, and his answer underscores the company’s continued commitment to integration: “It’s not hard to come up with new ideas. When composers arrive, they always bring new ideas. We prefer to be influenced.” —Ninette Paloma

UCSB Arts & Lectures presents Grupo Corpo on Tuesday, February 25, 8 p.m., at The Granada Theatre (1214 State St.). Call (805) 893-3535 or see artandlectures.ucsb.edu.

ON THE COME UP

INDY

BOOK CLU B

John Sayles is best known as an important American filmmaker, with a long filmography auspiciously launched with his classic protoindie film Return of the Secaucus 7 and including Matewan, Eight Men Out, Lone Star, and The Brother Star from Another Planet.. But Sayles’s particular skill in mediating social, historical, and progressive political interests with art has also graced the pages of literature, going back to 1977’s Union Dues, nominated for a National Book Award. The seventh and latest Sayles novel is the timely Yellow Earth, about Native American land preservation struggles in North Dakota, faced with the aggressive naturalresource-tapping interests of an oil company. Recently, Sayles the Novelist passed through the 805 — a former stomping ground — for a special book signing at Chaucer’s. I caught up with the director-author over the phone just before his visit.

What was the impetus for writing Yellow Earth? I’ve always been fascinated by these economic feeding frenzies — could be oil or buffalo or gold. I started following the Bakken boom while it was happening. Once I started going, it wrote pretty fast, though I don’t always write in continuity but jump around from scene to scene and then put things in order.

The novel has roots in the real world, relating to the Standing Rock protest and tragedy. Did the weight of that subject force you into creative action? Standing Rock hadn’t hit the news when I was writing. I was more interested in the human impact of that kind of invasion, both on the residents and the newcomers.

Is writing a novel an entirely different process from making a film, or are they artistic expressions with different means toward similar ends? Writing a film is like making a blueprint for a building a house — it’s only a plan. Making the actual thing, you have the help of lots of talented people. Book writing is a solo act, but you are more godlike. If you want the sun to shine, you just write that it’s shining.

Angie Thomas’s young adult novel On the Come Up tells the story of 16-year-old Bri, who dreams of following in her father’s footsteps and becoming a professional rapper. Although nothing seems to be going her way, Bri doesn’t let expectations or hardships derail her pursuit. On the Come Up takes place in Garden Heights, as did Thomas’s debut novel, The Hate U Give, and touches on what it’s like growing up as a young black girl in a single-parent working-class household. This is a story about dreams and shooting for them even when history and circumstance are telling you it’s impossible. The audiobook is narrated by Bahni Turpin, who raps Bri’s rhymes right into your headphones. It is the perfect touch to completely immerse you into Bri’s world. —Emily Cosentino

Are there other novels or book projects you are engaged in? I’ve already written another novel, Jamie MacGillivray set in the mid-1700s, and I have a half-dozen MacGillivray, screenplays I’d like to make movies from. Just add money. —Josef Woodard

M O R E A R T S & E N T E R TA I N M E N T > > > INDEPENDENT.COM

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da

a ¡entr

ita! Gratu

Free C

a&e | FILM & TV

onC

ert!

Money Heist

Los

Utrera

Viernes/Friday • Feb 21 • 7 pm

isla Vista school

6875 EL COLEGIO ROAD

son jarocho

domingo/sunday • Feb 23 • 7 pm

marjorie luke theatre 721 E. COTA STREET

/vivaelartesb

Las puertas se abrirán a las 6:30 pm / Doors open 6:30 pm Habrá recepción después del espectáculo / Reception follows the performance Para más información, por favor llama / For more information, please call : (805) 343-2455

¡Viva el Arte de Santa Bárbara! is sponsored by Kath Lavidge & Ed McKinley, Audacious Foundation, Loren Booth, Anonymous, Russell Steiner, The Roddick Foundation, Audrey & Timothy O. Fisher, the National Endowment for the Arts, Monica & Timothy Babich, UCSB Office of Education Partnerships, The Stone Family Foundation, Linda Stafford Burrows, Marianne Marsi & Lewis Manring. Additional support comes from SAGE Publishing and The Marjorie Luke Theatre’s Dreier Family Rent Subsidy Fund. The program is supported in part by the Santa Barbara Independent, the Santa Maria SUN, El Latino CC, Radio Bronco, Entravision/ Univision Costa Central, the Ramada Santa Barbara, Pacifica Suites, Best Western South Coast Inn, and the Santa Barbara Unified School District. Viva is co-presented by The Marjorie Luke Theatre, the Guadalupe-Nipomo Dunes Center and UCSB Arts & Lectures, in partnership with the Isla Vista School Parent Teacher Association.

RUSTY CHECKS OUT EUROPEAN CRIME SERIES

O

f course, Europeans commit the same crimes we do, but they’re often carried out in prettier settings, and the detectives who solve them can be much sexier.

Spiral (Amazon; subtitles): I think this was the very first series I ever binged, and to my horror, they kept shooting more and even better seasons. It takes a little while to adjust to this very fast-paced French cop show with its sinuous plots and textured cast of characters, but it’s completely worth it (unless you value your sleep). The focus is on a homicide squad in a gritty neighborhood, along with the lawyers who represent the accused and the politicians who oversee them. The major characters return each season, so you may become involved with them to an unhealthy degree. One major (usually grisly) crime dominates each season, with an array of smaller crimes to settle every week. The fast slang dialogue requires a high level of subtitle reading. Salamander (Amazon; subtitles): I watched this Belgian thriller series quite a while ago, but it always stayed with me. A flashy robbery leads an unconventional detective into a rarefied terrain populated by some frighteningly powerful and duplicitous characters.

THE UCSB MULTICULTURAL CENTER PRESENTS

RESILIENT LOVE SERIES

The Creative Imagination & Race Claudia Rankine Thurs, Feb 27th 6 PM Lecture/ UCSB Corwin Pavilion

Claudia Rankine will share how she came into her work and inspire us to be as unapologetic in the spaces we take up. Rankine is the author of five collections of poetry and the editor of several anthologies. Among her numerous awards and honors, she is the recipient of the Bobbitt National Prize for Poetry and the Poets & Writers’ Jackson Poetry Prize.

CONTINENTAL COPS

FOR THE FULL WINTER 2020 CALENDAR VISIT MCC.SA.UCSB.EDU UCSBMCC

TV

X-STREAMIST BY RUSTY UNGER

Zen (Amazon; no subtitles): The awful thing about this is that there is just one season and only three episodes. An inordinately attractive Roman detective has to solve some complicated and related murder cases while under mounting pressure from higher-ups both in the force and in the government. It’s very suspenseful, and luckily for us as well as him, Zen gets to work alongside a gorgeous colleague against the backdrop of Rome and the surrounding countryside. Money Heist (Netflix; subtitles): “Rollercoaster” is the operative descriptor here when a complex plot to rob the Royal Mint of Spain gets underway. The team assembled to pull off the heist is composed of wild characters who each have a unique skill and a story to match. The electrifying plot twists don’t dampen the dark humor in every episode. The criminal mastermind and cohorts are more vivid than any of the cops caught in their web (the main detective is a woman, which is sort of becoming a trope). I could do without the last season, so I did. Undercover (Netflix; subtitles): This Dutch-language production takes place on the border between Belgium and the Netherlands and is loosely based on a true story. Two mismatched agents go undercover in a cheesy campground to live as a couple where a drug kingpin vacations. When they befriend a small-time Tony Soprano and his family, the innocent and the guilty come under threat along with the agents. Meanwhile, there’s a simmering attraction between them to which they shouldn’t yield, even though we really want them to.

Rusty Unger has been a New York–based magazine and book editor and writer as well as a film executive. She has written for television, motion pictures, and many national publications. 42

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FEBRUARY 20, 2020

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a&e | FILM & TV

MOVIE GUIDE

Edited by Michelle Drown

ON SAL E

F RAT I1D0 aAmY

The Call of the Wild

SPECIAL SCREENINGS The Host (119 mins., R) Academy Award–winning director Bong Joon-ho’s 2006 film is about a deformed river monster that kidnaps a young girl and her father’s quest to save her. Riviera (Fri.-Sat., Feb. 21-22, 9 p.m.) Wilder vs. Fury II (4 hrs., 30 mins., NR) Watch heavyweight World Champion Deontay Wilder face off against lineal champ Tyson Fury, live from Las Vegas. Metro 4 (Sat., Feb. 21, 6 p.m.)

PREMIERES ➤ O Beanpole

(130 mins., NR)

In this remarkable, unique film, this year’s Oscar bid from Russia, life after WWII is not at all pretty but flecked with alternating currents of hope and despair, as well as a palpable desire for healing and resolution. Winner of last year’s Cannes Festival Best Director award, director Kantemir Balagov has concocted a stunning film, about the twined destinies of two young women—Iya (“Beanpole”) and Masha, powerfully played by Viktoria Miroshnichenko and Vasilisa Perelygina

—damaged in various ways during the war. A paralyzed sniper seeks to end his “emptied” life, our heroines seek to find escape from their post-war freeze, and Iya is tasked with giving life and death. Agony meets ecstasy, and back again, often conveyed in subtle gestures and nuanced facial expressions. It’s a haunting film, but on emotionally embedded terms rather than via explicit violence, which draws us into its world with its visual poetry of long takes, empathic close-ups, and several memorable-verging-on-unforgettable scenes along the tale’s dizzying path. (JW) Riviera Brahms: The Boy II (86 mins., PG-13) Katie Holmes stars in this horror/ mystery/thriller about a family who moves into the Heelshire Mansion and their son makes friends with a lifelike doll named Brahms, who is said to be inhabited by a child who died in a fire two decades ago. Camino Real/Fiesta 5 The Call of the Wild (100 mins., PG) Harrison Ford stars in this cinematic adaptation of Jack London’s 1903 novel. Ford plays John Thornton, a recluse living in the Yukon who comes across

a dog named Buck, who was stolen from his California home and sold into service as a sled dog in the 49th state. Together, Buck and Thornton set out on an adventure in the wilds of Alaska. Camino Real/Paseo Nuevo

Bright Eyes has partnered with PLUS1 so that $1 from every ticket sold will go to the Florence Project and their work providing direct legal and social services for detained adults and children under threat of deportation. FIRRP.ORG

The Invisible Man (110 mins., R) Elisabeth Moss stars in this modern retelling of both H.G. Wells’s 1897 novel and the eponymous 1933 film. Moss plays Cecilia Kass, the ex-girlfriend of a rich, brilliant, controlling scientist, Adrian Griffin. Griffin commits suicide, leaving much of his fortune to Kass. Soon, however, things go awry and Kass is convinced she’s being stalked by her invisible ex. Camino Real/Metro 4 (Opens Thu., Feb. 27)

My Boyfriend’s Meds (Las Pildoras de mi Novio) (100 mins., R) A tropical holiday turns farcical when a woman’s boyfriend forgets to bring his prescription medication on the trip and succumbs to his myriad anxieties. Fiesta 5

NOW SHOWING 1917 (119 mins., R) Sam Mendes helms this film about trench warfare in World War I. Using long takes to simulate “one continuous shot,” 1917 tells the story of Lance Corporal William Schofield (George MacKay) and Lance Corporal Tom Blake (Dean-Charles Chapman), two British soldiers tasked with getting a message across enemy lines to another U.K. battalion before they march into an ambush. Fairview/Paseo Nuevo

STICK FIGURE

W/ COLLIE BUDDZ, THE MOVEMENT . . . . . .MAY 29

REBELUTION

W/ STEEL PULSE, THE GREEN, KEZNAMDI . . AUG 16

JOHN LEGEND

My Boyfriend’s Meds (Las Piladoras de mi Novio)

CONT’D ON P. 45 >>>

W/ THE WAR & TREATY . . . . . . . . . . . . . . SEP 17

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H FA F NTA T SY TA S ISLAND C Fr Friri:i: 1:00, 4:10, 6:45, 9:20; Sa S t:t 4:10, 6:45, 9:20; H THE CALL OF THE WILD B Sun Su un: 1:00, 4:10, 6:45, 9:20; Friri to Fr t Su Sun un: 12:15, 2:45, 5:15, 7:45; M n to Mo t We W d: d 2:05, 5:40, 8:15; Th T u: 5:40, M n to Mo t Th T u: 2:45, 5:15, 7:45 8:15

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a&e | FILM & TV CONT’D FROM P. 43 holidays with his mom and grandpa (Danny Devito). Longing to be his old avatar Dr. Bravestone (Johnson), Spencer reenters the game, which he had secretly saved. When his friends Bethany, Fridge, and Martha realize he has returned to Jumanji, they go after him. Things go awry, however, as they are paired with different avatars and Grandpa and his friend Milo (Danny Glover) also enter the game. The new pairings prove incongruent to the actors’ skills, making for a slow, not-so-funny sequel. The film does pick up at the end, however, when the four teens are back in their original hosts, which is where they should have been all along. (MD)

FEBRUARY 21 - 27 “FEROCIOUS & EXTRAORDINARY” – VARIETY

Fiesta 5

Downhill The Assistant (85 mins., R) Julia Garner (Ozark, Dirty John) stars as a film graduate student who, after getting a job with a production company, discovers a tangled web of dubious behavior and business practices. Matthew Macfadyen and Kristine Froseth also star. Paseo Nuevo Bad Boys for Life (123 mins., R) Will Smith and Martin Lawrence reunite for the third and last installment of the Bad Boys trilogy. At this point in their lives, Burnett (Lawrence) has become a police inspector enjoying his quiet years, while Lowrey (Smith) now heads up a group of millennial cops, called AMMO, whom he can’t relate to. But when a cartel boss raises his nasty head, the two old friends reunite to defeat the bad guy. Metro 4

O Harley Quinn: Birds of Prey

(109

mins., R)

Martin Scorsese has famously called superhero movies “theme park rides.” This latest addition to the DC Universe takes his words literally by adding confetti colors and festive set pieces to Gotham City. The hero is Harley Quinn (Margot Robbie). She just got dumped by the Joker, and a couple of hangovers and cheese sandwiches later, she is

fighting a villain named Black Mask (Ewan McGregor) with her female partners in crime. Together they put the “fun” in “funhouse mirrors,” killing bad guys in extravagant action sequences set in (where else?) amusement parks. (AL) Camino Real/Metro 4

RUSSIA’S OFFICIAL OSCAR® SUBMISSION

BEANPOLE

FRI: 3:00pm, 6:00pm | SAT: 12:00pm, 3:00pm, 6:00pm SUN: 2:00pm, 5:00pm, 7:50pm | MON - THURS: 5:00pm, 7:50pm

The Hitchcock

Downhill (85 mins., R) Julia Louis-Dreyfus and Will Ferrell team up in this black comedy about a family whose ski trip to the Alps is marred by an avalanche. Camino Real/ Paseo Nuevo

Fantasy Island (109 mins., PG-13) Blumhouse Productions has reimagined the eponymous 1977-’84 television series as a supernatural/horror film where guests go to a remote tropical resort to live out their secret dreams. On this island, however, dreams turn to nightmares as guests fight for their lives. Michael Peña, Maggie Q, and Lucy Hale star. Camino Real/Metro 4 Jojo Rabbit (108 mins., PG-13) This black comedy is an adaptation of the book Caging Skies, which tells of a Hitler Youth member, 10-year-old Jojo Betzler, who discovers that his mother (Scarlett Johansson) has been hiding a Jewish girl, Elsa (Thomasin McKenzie), in their attic. Rather than turning her in, Jojo interviews her for a research book for the Nazis about Jews. Sam Rockwell and Rebel Wilson also star. The Hitchcock

Jumanji: The Next Level (123 mins., PG-13)

Brahms: The Boy II

Knives Out (130 mins., PG-13) Rian Johnson (Looper, Star Wars: The Last Jedi) wrote and directed this whodunit about a dysfunctional family that reunites for patriarch Harlan Thrombey’s (Christopher Plummer) 85th birthday. The next morning, Harlan is found dead, and everyone is a suspect. Despite an excellent cast that includes Daniel Craig, Chris Evans, Jamie Lee Curtis, Toni Collette, and Lakeith Stanfield, and some clever dialogue, the film falls a bit short in both humor and mystery. (MD)

Dwayne Johnson, Karen Gillan, Jack Black, and Kevin Hart reprise their avatar roles for this fourth installment of the Jumanji franchise. This time around, Spencer, feeling inadequate in his new life at NYU, returns home for the

O Little Women

(135 mins., PG)

Greta Gerwig (Lady Bird) is back behind the camera (and is the screenwriter) for this adaptation of Louisa May Alcott’s classic story about the March sisters as they try to find their way as young adults in New England at the end of the American Civil War. Saoirse Ronan, Emma Watson, Florence Pugh, Laura Dern, and Timothée Chalamet star.

FOUR-TIME OSCAR® WINNER DIRECTOR BONG JOON HO’S

The Hitchcock/Paseo Nuevo

O Parasite

(133 mins., R)

Director Bong Joon-ho (The Host, Snowpiercer) helms this black comedy/ thriller about two families—one rich, one poor—whose lives become inextricably, murderously entwined.

TWO NIGHTS ONLY! – FRI 2/21 & SAT 2/22 9:00pm NICOLAS CAGE

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The Photograph (106 mins., PG-13) Issa Rae and Lakeith Stanfield star in this romcom about a woman, Mae, who falls for a journalist, Michael, assigned to cover her late mother, from whom she was estranged. Fairview/Fiesta 5 Sonic the Hedgehog (100 mins., PG) The videogame hero Sonic, a blue, talking hedgehog, comes to Earth to escape evildoers on his planet who wish to harness his super speed. After causing a power outage, Sonic is aided by a small-town sheriff (James Marsden) who helps hide him from the U.S. government and an unhinged roboticist (Jim Carrey). Camino Real/Fiesta 5

The above films are playing in Santa Barbara FRIDAY, February 21, through THURSDAY, February 27. Our critics’ reviews are followed by initials: MD (Michelle Drown), AL (Asher Luberto), and JW (Josef Woodard). The symbol O indicates the film is recommended. The symbol ➤ indicates a new review.

FRI 2/28 & SAT 2/29 9:00pm

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SPORTS

SANDRINE KRUL ELEVATES

SBCC’S HOOP STARS

ERIC A ULRECH PHOTOS

Head Coach for Vaqueros Women’s Team Believes Basketball Is More Than a Game

BALL IS LIFE: SBCC head coach Sandrine Krul and assistant coach Devin Engebretsen use basketball to empower young women. Cavaletto of Dos Pueblos High and Tori Kelley of Carpinteria High also provided strong contributions. “I love recruiting. You’ll see me at the local high school games. We want to keep our local talent local,” TAKE YOUR BEST SHOT: Former Santa Barbara High standout Sophia Torres is averaging 16.6 points and 9.7 rebounds Krul said. “For per game for SBCC. one, Santa Barbara City College is an t’s rare for seasons to go exactly as planned at any level of amazing academic institution, and two, my basketball phicompetitive athletics. Even successful campaigns that end losophy is coaching holistically, and I think that’s what sepain championships often have their fair share of ups and rates me from other people. We don’t just play a top five or six. downs. Everyone has to contribute.” For SBCC women’s basketball coach Sandrine Krul, the A key component to SBCC’s success on the court is journey itself is a process that can be used to build up young Jimenez, who transferred to SBCC from Vanguard University, women and put them on a path to success that extends well where she was recruited to play out of high school. Jimenez is averaging 16.9 points per game and five assists. Her return to beyond the basketball court. “Basketball is going to end for Santa Barbara has been an overwhelming success. them. I want them to have a posi“I love it here. I’m actually having fun. The coach accepts tive experience and for them to me for who I am,” Jimenez said. “My teammates are just so understand that strong women nice, and they’re all very welcoming. I’m just having fun ballcan empower each other,” Krul ing up again.” said. “I am not the enemy. We’re going to be intense, but we’re This season provided a unique challenge when two of also going to be fair.” SBCC’s Western State Conference foes, Cuesta and L.A. With a strong roster bolstered by top talent from regional Pierce, cancelled their seasons due to low numbers just days high schools, the Vaqueros jumped out to a 12-3 record before the first games were to be played. The cancellations crethrough the non-conference portion of their schedule. Former ated a quirk in SBCC’s schedule that gave them a 36-day break Santa Barbara High standouts Alondra Jimenez and Sophia in between games before conference play began. Torres spearheaded the strong start to the season. Sierra “That break at that time was like starting over again, because you can’t mimic game [situations] in practice no matter how much you try,” Krul said. “There was a lot of film study. There were a lot of individual skill workouts, but again, you can’t simulate that game-like intensity.” 2/22: Women’s College Basketball: UC Riverside at After the long break, the Vaqueros struggled to regain their UCSB Only a half game separates the Gauchos and rhythm and lost their first three games of conference play. The Highlanders in the muddled Big West Conference slow start to an already abbreviated conference slate signifi signifistandings. UCSB looks to avenge a 66-61 loss to cantly damaged SBCC’s chances of making the playoffs. UC Riverside on 1/18 as both teams jockey for With their season in a downward spiral, the Vaqueros position ahead of the conference tournament. Freshman Ila Lane has emerged as a force regrouped to win two of their past three games, including inside for the Gauchos, including her 16-point, a crucial 70-69 victory over Oxnard on Saturday that epit17-rebound performance against CSUN on omized Krul’s focus on depth and team building. Reserve 2/15. Sat., Feb. 22, 2pm. The Thunderdome, guard Ciera Van Quick, a 58 freshman from Biggs, CaliforUCSB. $8-$29. Call (805) 893-UCSB (8272) or visit nia, tied the game with 15 seconds to play with a short jumper

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and then stole the ball on the ensuing Oxnard possession, setting the stage for Jordan Parkhurst’s game-winning free throw. Van Quick’s game-tying shot was her only attempt of the game as she finished with two points in 17 minutes. “She’s been in during big games, so it’s not unusual for her,” said Krul of Van Quick’s heroics. “She knows her role and everybody on our team knows that we can’t just win with our starting five. We cultivate that in our program.” With two games remaining, SBCC (14-7 overall, 2-4 WSC) likely needs one more victory to secure a playoff berth. Regardless of the final result, Krul is already convinced that she has an extraordinary group of young women. “I haven’t had a special team like this in a decade. They work so hard,” Krul said. “We are having more fun coaching than we have in years.” “We just have to take it one step at a time,” added Torres of the playoff push. She is averaging 16.6 points and 9.7 rebounds as the Vaqueros’ primary inside presence. For Krul, success is not measured simply in wins and losses. The ultimate goal is to make a positive impact in the lives of players by helping provide opportunities to further their academic and athletic prospects for the future. Last season, four out of six sophomores went on to play basketball at four-year universities, and another player went to UC Berkeley based on her academic prowess. That falls in line with the typical rate of success during Krul’s 16-year tenure. “As women, we don’t succeed alone. We need other women championing us, not tearing us down,” Krul said. “We promote that through teaching basketball.” CONTROVERSIAL CALL DOOMS DONS: A thrilling CIF-SS

Division 2A second-round playoff game at the No. 6 seed Hesperia ended in controversy for the Santa Barbara High boys’ basketball team. With just over one second remaining in the second overtime, the Dons were inbounding the ball with the scored tied at 58 when Bryce Warrecker was called for a loose ball foul that resulted in two free throws for Hesperia. The Scorpions converted one of two free-throw attempts to come away with a 59-58 victory. Warrecker was initially at the line to shoot free throws before the call was overturned. “It was definitely a tough way to have our season come to an end. I just told my guys, although we may have lost this game, the way you competed, represented yourselves and the green and gold, and the class and humility you showed demonstrates you are true champions,” said Santa Barbara coach Corey Adam. “I told them I loved them and am fortunate to have known most of them for the past four years.” Santa Barbara finished the season with a 19-9 record and shared the Channel League championship with San Marcos, which dropped its second-round game at Bonita, 63-48. n

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C A LM Au xi li a r y

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FREE WILL ASTROLOGY by Rob Breszny ARIES

CANCER

(Mar. 21-Apr. 19): Do you feel ready to change your mind

(June 21-July 22): Cancerian novelist William Makepeace

about an idea or belief or theory that has been losing its usefulness? Would you consider changing your relationship with a once-powerful influence that is becoming less crucial to your lifelong goals? Is it possible you have outgrown one of your heroes or teachers? Do you wonder if maybe it’s time for you to put less faith in a certain sacred cow or overvalued idol? According to my analysis of your astrological omens, you’ll benefit from meditating on these questions during the coming weeks.

TAURUS (Apr. 20-May 20): When she was alive more than 2,500 years

ago, the Greek poet Sappho was so famous for her lyrical creations that people referred to her as “The Poetess” and the “10th Muse.” (In Greek mythology, there were nine muses, all goddesses.) She was a prolific writer who produced over 10,000 lines of verse, and even today she remains one of the world’s most celebrated poets. I propose that we make her your inspirational role model for the coming months. In my view, you’re poised to generate a wealth of enduring beauty in your own chosen sphere. Proposed experiment: Regard your daily life as an art project.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Have you ever dropped out of the daily

grind for a few hours or even a few days so as to compose a master plan for your life? The coming weeks will be an excellent time to give yourself that necessary luxury. According to my analysis, you’re entering a phase when you’ll generate good fortune for yourself if you think deep thoughts about how to create your future. What would you like the story of your life to be on March 1, 2025? How about March 1, 2030? And March 1, 2035? I encourage you to consult your soul’s code and formulate an inspired, invigorating blueprint for the coming years. Write it down!

WEEK OF FEBRUARY 20

prognostications that are interesting. In that spirit, I make the following forecasts: The number of homeless Virgos will decrease dramatically in the near future, as will the number of dream-home-less Virgos. In fact, I expect you folks will experience extra amounts of domestic bliss in the coming months. You may feel more at home in the world than ever before.

Thackeray (1811–1863) is famous for Vanity Fair, a satirical panorama of 19th-century British society. The phrase “Vanity Fair” had been previously used, though with different meanings, in the Bible’s book of Ecclesiastes, as well as in works by John Bunyan and St. Augustine. Thackeray was lying in bed near sleep one night when the idea flew into his head to use it for his own story. He was so thrilled, LIBRA he leaped up and ran around his room chanting “Vanity (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): I don’t require everyone I learn from to Fair! Vanity Fair!” I’m foreseeing be an impeccable saint. If I vowed to draw at least one epiphany like this for inspiration only from those people who you in the coming weeks, CanceHOMEWORK: I declare you flawlessly embody every one of my ethical rian. What area of your life needs champion, unvanquishable hero, and principles, there’d be no one to be inspired a burst of delicious inspiration? title-holder of triumphant glory. Do by. Even one of my greatest heroes, Martin you accept? Freewillastrology.com. Luther King Jr., cheated on his wife and plagiarized parts of his doctoral dissertaLEO tion. Where do you stand on this issue, (July 23-Aug. 22): Who loves you Libra? I bet you will soon be tested. How much imperfecbest, Leo? Which of your allies and loved ones come clostion is acceptable to you? est to seeing you and appreciating you for who you really are? Of all the people in your life, which have done the most to help you become the soulful star you want to SCORPIO be? Are there gem-like characters on the peripheries of (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Scorpio comedian John Cleese cofounded your world that you would like to draw nearer? Are there the troupe Monty Python more than 50 years ago, and he energy drains that you’ve allowed to play too prominent has been generating imaginative humor ever since. I suga role? I hope you’ll meditate on questions like these in gest we call on his counsel as you enter the most creative the coming weeks. You’re in a phase when you can access phase of your astrological cycle. “This is the extraordinary a wealth of useful insights and revelations about how to thing about creativity,” he says. “If you just keep your mind skillfully manage your relationships. It’s also a good time resting against the subject in a friendly but persistent way, to reward and nurture those allies who have given you sooner or later, you will get a reward from your unconso much. scious.” Here’s another one of Cleese’s insights that will serve you well: “The most creative people have learned to tolerate the slight discomfort of indecision for much VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Doom and gloom dominate the forecasts longer, and so, just because they put in more pondering time, their solutions are more creative.” made by many prophets. They experience perverse glee in predicting, for example, that all the rain forests and rivers will be owned by greedy corporations by 2050, or SAGITTARIUS that extraterrestrial invaders who resemble crocodiles (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Sagittarian philosopher Baruch Spinoza will take control of the U.S. government “for the good of (1632–1677) developed a vigorous and expansive vision. the American people,” or that climate change will eventu- That’s why he became a leading intellectual influence in ally render chocolate and bananas obsolete. That’s not the era known as the Enlightenment. But because of his how I operate. I deplore the idea that it’s only the nasty inventive, sometimes controversial ideas, he was shunned

by his fellow Jews and had his books listed on the Catholic Church’s Index of Forbidden Books. Understandably, he sometimes felt isolated. To compensate, he spent lots of time alone taking wide-ranging journeys in his imagination. Even if you have all the friends and social stimulation you need, I hope you will follow his lead in the coming weeks—by taking wide-ranging journeys in your imagination. It’s time to roam and ramble in inner realms.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): “Absolute reason expired at 11 o’clock last

night,” one character tells another in Henrik Ibsen’s play Peer Gynt. I’m happy to report that a different development is on the verge of occurring for you, Capricorn. In recent days, there may have been less than an ideal amount of reason and logic circulating in your world. But that situation will soon change. The imminent outbreak of good sense, rigorous sanity, and practical wisdom will be quite tonic. Take advantage of this upcoming grace period. Initiate bold actions that are well-grounded in objective rather than subjective truth.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Renowned Aquarian composer Franz

Schubert (1797–1828) created more than 700 compositions, some of which are still played by modern musicians. Many of his works were written on and for the piano—and yet he was so poor that he never owned a piano. If there has been a similar situation in your life, Aquarius—a lack of some crucial tool or support due to financial issues—I see the coming weeks as being an excellent time to set in motion the plans that will enable you to overcome and cure that problem.

PISCES (Feb. 19-Mar. 20): In 1908, British playwright W. Somerset

Maugham reached the height of success. Four of his plays were being performed concurrently in four different London theaters. If you were ever in your life going to achieve anything near this level of overflowing popularity or attention, I suspect it would be this year. And if that’s a development you would enjoy and thrive on, I think the coming weeks will be an excellent time to set your intention and take audacious measures.

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700.

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ADMINISTER OF ESTATE NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: DEIRDRE D. KIECKHEFER NO: 20PR00049 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, con‑ tingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of DEIRDRE D. KIECKHEFER A PETITION FOR PROBATE: has been filed by: ROBERT M. KIECKHEFER in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara THE PETITION for probate requests that (name): ROBERT M. KIECKHEFER be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. THE PETITION requests author author‑ ity to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal rep‑ resentative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The Independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objec‑ tion to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held in this court as follows: on 3/19/2020 AT 9:00 a.m. Dept: 5 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, located at 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Anacapa Division. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hear hear‑ ing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal author author‑ ity may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law.

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E M A I L S A L E S @ I N D E P E N D E N T. C O M

Tide Guide Day

High

Sunrise 6:34 Sunset 5:50

Low

High

Low

High

Thu 20

1:17 am 2.2

7:24 am 5.6

2:29 pm −0.9

9:02 pm 3.9 9:28 pm 4.0

Fri 21

1:57 am 1.9

8:03 am 5.6

3:01 pm −0.9

Sat 22

2:32 am 1.7

8:38 am 5.6

3:30 pm −0.8

9:52 pm 4.1

Sun 23

3:04 am 1.5

9:10 am 5.5

3:56 pm −0.6

10:15 pm 4.2

Mon 24

3:35 am 1.4

9:41 am 5.3

4:20 pm −0.3

10:39 pm 4.2

Tue 25

4:08 am 1.3

10:12 am 5.0

4:44 pm 0.0

11:02 pm 4.3

Wed 26

4:43 am 1.3

10:43 am 4.5

5:07 pm 0.4

11:27 pm 4.3

5:21 am 1.3

11:17 am 4.0

5:28 pm 0.9

11:54 pm 4.3

Thu 27

8D

23 D

15

1H

Source: /tides.mobilegeographics.com

crosswordpuzzle crossword puzzle

tt By Ma

Jones

“Alphabet Run” -- the quick part of the song.

32 Driver’s license agcy. 33 “The King and I” star Brynner 35 “___ Miserables” 1 Tres ___ cake 36 Hematite and pyrite 7 Dangerous reptiles 37 Close, as a jacket 11 Indicted Giuliani associate 38 Exhibit site Parnas 39 10% of MXX 14 Breathe out 40 High-end 15 Monument Valley state 16 Windows file extension 44 Two-ended tile 17 100% correct 45 De Niro’s wife in “Meet the 18 It may be an acquired taste Parents” 20 Comment about a loud 47 Smallest possible quantities blockbuster after thinking it 1 Apartment renter 48 Bordeaux red wine was a Chaplin movie? 49 Aplenty 2 Become invalid 22 “___ Tu” (1974 hit song) 51 “American Chopper” network 3 Irascibility 23 Shoe bottom 53 Hulkamania figure 4 Has no love for 24 “Nailed It!” host Nicole 54 “Mean Girls” actress Lindsay 5 Tesla CEO Musk 26 Mountain suffix 56 “Trouble’s in store” 6 Airmailed 27 Permit 57 “Mambo King” Puente 7 Pub quiz round format, 29 “Beefy” Trogdor feature 58 “Happy Birthday” writer maybe 31 Academic URL ender 59 Indy 500 month 8 “A Streetcar Named Desire” 32 Fake device ©2020 Jonesin’ Crosswords (editor@jonesincrosswords. (editor@ shout 34 “Where did ___ leave off?” com) For answers to this puzzle, call: 1-900-226-2800, 9 Four-time Masters champion 99 cents per minute. Must be 18+. Or to bill to your credit 36 Phrase you won’t hear from card, call: 1-800-655-6548. Reference puzzle #0967 10 It’s between the knee and me or other solvers? the ankle 39 Winding LAST WEEK’S SOLUTION: 11 2020, for one 41 Den-izens? 42 Planned Airbnb event in 2020 12 Goes beyond 13 “Oy ___!” 43 Throw in 46 “A Dream Within a Dream” 19 Summer cookout leftover 21 Aperture setting on a camera writer 47 “Charlie’s Angels” director, 25 9-to-5 grind 2000 27 “Threepenny Opera” star 50 “That ___ funny” Lotte 52 Island with Pearl Harbor 28 “Baudolino” author Umberto 54 Country singer McCann 30 Creator of Piglet and Pooh

Across

55 Like the most lenient newspaper ever? 59 Word before band or papers 60 2001 A.L. MVP Suzuki 61 Pint at a pub 62 Service rank 63 Home-___ (local athlete) 64 “That’s it” 65 Steering wheel adjunct 66 Finely decorated

Down

INDEPENDENT.COM FEBRUARY FEBRUARY 20, 2020 THE THE INDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT.COM 20, 2020

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INDEPENDENT CLASSIFIEDS

LEGALS

PHONE 965-5205

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E M A I L S A L E S @ I N D E P E N D E N T. C O M

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YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: James P. Griffith, Esq., Howell Moore & Gough 812 Presidio Avenue, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; (805) 805‑962‑0524 x6 Published Feb 13, 20, 27 2020.

FBN ABANDONMENT STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF USE OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME The following Fictitious Business Name is being abandoned: STILWELL CONSTRUCTION at 425 Sea Ranch Drive Santa Barbara, CA 93109; The original statement for use of this Fictitious Business Name was filed 01/05/2015 in the County of Santa Barbara. Original file no. 2015‑0000031. The person (s) or entities abandoning use of this name are as follows: Jstilco (same address) This state‑ ment was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan. 23, 2020. I hereby certify that this is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Maria F Sanchez, Published: Jan 30. Feb 6, 13, 20 2020. STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF USE OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME The following Fictitious Business Name is being abandoned: LOVE’S TOWING SERVICE at 211 East Haley St Santa Barbara, CA 93101; The original statement for use of this Fictitious Business Name was filed 10/4/2019 in the County of Santa Barbara. Original file no. 2019‑0002463. The person (s) or entities abandoning use of this name are as follows: Livesley Love’s Towing Service 1543 Live Oak Lane Santa Barbara, CA 93105 This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 30, 2020. I hereby certify that this is a correct copy of the origi‑ nal statement on file in my office, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by John Beck, Published: Feb 6, 13, 20, 27 2020. STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF USE OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME The following Fictitious Business Name is being abandoned: PLANET432 at 1660 Shoreline Drive Santa Barbara, CA 93109; The original statement for use of this Fictitious Business Name was filed 8/20/2018 in the County of Santa Barbara. Original file no. 2018‑0002331. The per per‑ son (s) or entities abandoning use of this name are as follows: 4thPlanet, LLC 1660 Shoreline Drive Santa Barbara, CA 93109 This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 24, 2020. I hereby certify that this is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by John Beck, Published: Feb 13, 20, 27. Mar 5 2020. STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF USE OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME The following Fictitious Business Name is being abandoned: CALLE BONITA STUDIOS at 3150 Calle Bonita Santa Ynez, CA 93460; The original statement for use of this Fictitious Business Name was filed 10/16/2018 in the County of Santa Barbara. Original file no. 2018‑0002789. The person (s) or entities abandoning use of this name are as follows: Leann Joseph 726 Tallac Ave. South Lake Tahoe, CA 96150. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 27, 2020. I hereby certify that this is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by John Beck, Published: Feb 13, 20, 27. Mar 5 2020.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: MASSAGE CLUB SB at 3455 State St. Ste. #4 Santa Barbara, CA 93117; Henry Lawrence Aizpuru 5514 Armitos Ave. #63 Goleta, CA 93117 conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on January 27, 2020. This state‑ ment expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Thomas Brian. FBN Number: 2020‑0000287. Published: Jan 30. Feb 6, 13, 20 2020.

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: R&R INTERPRETING/TRANSLATING SERVICES at 610 Calle Ecuestre Goleta, CA 93117; Rosa M. Rodriguez RR 2 Box 237A El Capitan Ranch Goleta, CA 93117 conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on January 7, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by John Beck. FBN Number: 2020‑0000068. Published: Jan 30. Feb 6, 13, 20 2020. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: THE HIVE at 130 S. Hope Ave. #F127, Suite 108 Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Connie L. Orud 4726 Camino Del Rey Santa Barbara, CA 93110 conducted by a Individual Signed: Connie Orud Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on January 10, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by John Beck. FBN Number: 2020‑0000113. Published: Jan 30. Feb 6, 13, 20 2020. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: DELGADO LANDSCAPE AND TREE SERVICE at 159 South Kellogg Ave Apt #204 Goleta, CA 93117; Esteban Delgado (same address) conducted by a Individual Signed: Esteban Delgado Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on January 21, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by John Beck. FBN Number: 2020‑0000203. Published: Jan 30. Feb 6, 13, 20 2020. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: NATALIE OCHSNER PLANNING SERVICES at 1920 San Pascual St. #1 Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Natalie Anne Ochsner (same address) conducted by a Individual Signed: Natalie Ochsner Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on January 21, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by John Beck. FBN Number: 2020‑0000202. Published: Jan 30. Feb 6, 13, 20 2020. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: D&D PAINTING at 3853 Crescent Drive Santa Barbara, CA 93110; Greenside Inc. (same address) conducted by a Corporation Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on January 21, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Thomas Brian. FBN Number: 2020‑0000204. Published: Jan 30. Feb 6, 13, 20 2020. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: FLUTTER & FLIRT at 1819 Cliff Dr #B Santa Barbara, CA 93108; Andrea Franccesca Castro 1127 Portesuello Ave Santa Barbara, CA 93105 conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on January 03, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Thomas Brian. FBN Number: 2020‑0000031. Published: Jan 30. Feb 6, 13, 20 2020. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: WALK 4 FITTNESS AND HEALTH at 223 Por La Mar Circle Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Eva Chicken‑Koester (same address) conducted by a Individual Signed: Eva Chicken‑Koester Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on January 22, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by John Beck. FBN Number: 2020‑0000227. Published: Jan 30. Feb 6, 13, 20 2020.

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FEBRUARY 20, 2020

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: BOTANICAL VETERINARY PRODUCTS at 3623 Oak View Road Santa Ynez, CA 93460; Eileen Gillen (same address) conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on January 22, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by John Beck. FBN Number: 2020‑0000236. Published: Jan 30. Feb 6, 13, 20 2020.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: BEACHSIDE DENTAL at 1933 Cliff Drive Santa Barbara, CA 93109; Bryan Peters, DDS, Inc. (same address) con‑ ducted by a Corporation Signed: Bryan Peters, DDS, CEO Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on January 17, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Maria F. Sanchez. FBN Number: 2020‑0000194. Published: Jan 30. Feb 6, 13, 20 2020.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: SUPERIOR SECRET SOCIETY at 318 W Mission St #8 Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Brandon Duplisse (same address) conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on January 28, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Thomas Brian. FBN Number: 2020‑0000314. Published: Feb 6, 13, 20, 27 2020.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: YAMASAKI ART PRODUCTIONS at 121 S Voluntario St Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Troy Yamasaki (same address) conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on January 17, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by John Beck. FBN Number: 2020‑0000199. Published: Feb 6, 13, 20, 27 2020.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: SANTA BARBARA TRAVEL BUREAU, INC at 1028 State Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Santa Barbara Travel Bureau, Inc (same address) conducted by a Corporation Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on January 22, 2020. This state‑ ment expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Maria F. Sanchez. FBN Number: 2020‑0000222. Published: Jan 30. Feb 6, 13, 20 2020.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: CHROMA OWL at 1805 Somerset Ct Lompoc, CA 93436; Stephen Scopatz (same address) conducted by a Individual Signed: Stephen Scopatz Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on January 27, 2020. This state‑ ment expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by John Beck. FBN Number: 2020‑0000285. Published: Jan 30. Feb 6, 13, 20 2020.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: SERGIO’S CARPET & CLEANING SERVICE at 1430 Tomol Dr. Carpinteria, CA 93013; Sergio Rodriguez (same address) conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on January 08, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Armando Luna Jr.. FBN Number: 2020‑0000082. Published: Feb 6, 13, 20, 27 2020.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: O’CONNOR WEST COAST at 2940 De La Vina Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Terminix Inyternational Inc. 150 Peabody Pl. Memphis, TN 38103 con‑ ducted by a Corporation Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on January 27, 2020. This state‑ ment expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by John Beck. FBN Number: 2020‑0000282. Published: Feb 6, 13, 20, 27 2020.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: PARADISE CUSTOM DESIGN at 5525 Somerset Drive Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Monica Gagne (same address) conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on January 29, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by John Beck. FBN Number: 2020‑0000336. Published: Feb 6, 13, 20, 27 2020.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: SB EVOLUTION LANDSCAPE at 278 Pebble Beach Drive Goleta, CA 93117; Jorge Cortez (same address) conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on January 07, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by John Beck. FBN Number: 2020‑0000071. Published: Feb 6, 13, 20, 27 2020.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: FH TILE & MARBLE CO. at 517 Richardson Ave Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Filemon Hernandez (same address) conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on January 16, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Thomas Brian. FBN Number: 2020‑0000178. Published: Jan 30. Feb 6, 13, 20 2020.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: CALIFORNIA HOBBIES at 5118 Hollister Ave Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Ken Chalfant 185 Lassen Dr. Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Pauline Chalfant (same address) conducted by a Married Couple Signed: Ken Chalfant Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on January 27, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Brenda Aguilera. FBN Number: 2020‑0000288. Published: Jan 30. Feb 6, 13, 20 2020.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: EYE OF HORUS PRIVATE INVESTIGATIONS at 623 De La Vina St. #C Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Nathaniel Dye (same address) conducted by a Individual Signed: Nathaniel Dye Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on January 29, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by John Beck. FBN Number: 2020‑0000322. Published: Feb 6, 13, 20, 27 2020.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: SPA LOVERS at 136 Sumida Gardens Ln #204 Goleta, CA 93111; Matthew Joshua Rico (same address) conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on January 22, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Maria F. Sanchez. FBN Number: 2020‑0000234. Published: Feb 6, 13, 20, 27 2020.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: GLIMMER DESIGN STUDIO at 375 Pine Ave #10 Goleta, CA 93117; Emmy L Mackenzie 333 Old Mil Rd #39 Santa Barbara, CA 93110 con‑ ducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on January 23, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Tara Jayasinghe. FBN Number: 2020‑0000246. Published: Jan 30. Feb 6, 13, 20 2020.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SAN ROQUE PILATES STUDIO at 3419 State St Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Tasha Holmstrom 704 Calle Palo Colorado Santa Barbara, CA 93105 conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on January 27, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Thomas Brian. FBN Number: 2020‑0000294. Published: Jan 30. Feb 6, 13, 20 2020.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: PRIDE BARCO LOCK COMPANY at 116 N. Nopal St. #4 Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Ian Renga (same address) conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on January 21, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by John Beck. FBN Number: 2020‑0000216. Published: Feb 6, 13, 20, 27 2020.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: FORNO CLASSICO, LLC at 53 Aero Camino Goleta, CA 93117; Forno Classico, LLC (same address) con‑ ducted by a Limited Liability Company Signed: Giuseppe Crisa, Managing Partner Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on January 02, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Maria F. Sanchez. FBN Number: 2020‑0000019. Published: Jan 30. Feb 6, 13, 20 2020.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: GET IT DONE SB at 33 Ocean View Ave. #8 Santa Barbara, CA 93013; David J. Perez (same address) con‑ ducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on February 03, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Thomas Brian. FBN Number: 2020‑0000375. Published: Feb 6, 13, 20, 27 2020.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: CORNEJO CONSTRUCTION COMPANY at 4754 Avalon Avenue Santa Barbara, CA 93110‑1908; Jesus Cornejo (same address) conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on January 29, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Thomas Brian. FBN Number: 2020‑0000327. Published: Feb 6, 13, 20, 27 2020.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: GEA at 4751 Avalon Ave Santa Barbara, CA 93110; Aide Medina (same address) Gloria Y. Perez 20 W Valerio St Apt #D Santa Barbara, CA 93101 conducted by a Copartners Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on January 23, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Maria F. Sanchez. FBN Number: 2020‑0000244. Published: Jan 30. Feb 6, 13, 20 2020.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: CCM REAL ESTATE SERVICES at 590 Miles Ave. Santa Maria, CA 93455; Cheryl Mouyeos (same address) James Mouyeos (same address) conduct‑ ed by a Married Couple Signed: Cheryl Mouyeos Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on January 27, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Thomas Brian. FBN Number: 2020‑0000284. Published: Jan 30. Feb 6, 13, 20 2020.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: BURNING STONE & TILE at 1610 Villa Ave Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Iban Rosas Silva (same address) conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on January 24, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Margarita Silva. FBN Number: 2020‑0000260. Published: Jan 30. Feb 6, 13, 20 2020.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: MASSAGE GEEN SPA at 2026 Cliff Drive Santa Barbara, CA 93109; Massage Bloom, LLC 1450 Alameda Padre Serra Santa Barbara, CA 93103 conducted by a Limited Liability Company Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on January 22, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Tara Jayasinghe. FBN Number: 2020‑0000230. Published: Feb 6, 13, 20, 27 2020.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: T‑MOBILE at 3959 State Street Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Hit Mobile, Inc. 3200 Park Center Dr. Suite #200 Costa Mesa, CA 92626 conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on January 24, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by John Beck. FBN Number: 2020‑0000263. Published: Jan 30. Feb 6, 13, 20 2020.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: ISAAC ORNAMENTAL METAL at 709 E. Mason St Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Isaac Auguiano 218 S. Steckel Dr Santa Paula, CA 93060 conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on January 13, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Thomas Brian. FBN Number: 2020‑0000138. Published: Feb 6, 13, 20, 27 2020.

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: RADIANT BEAUTY at 1819 Cliff Dr Unit B Santa Barbara, CA 93109; Shanel Pincheira 1177 Harbor Hills Dr Santa Barbara, CA 93109 conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on January 29, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Thomas Brian. FBN Number: 2020‑0000324. Published: Feb 6, 13, 20, 27 2020. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: SKUNK BEAR TACTICAL at 1140 Edgemound Drive Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Pasi Puntes (same address) conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on January 30, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by John Beck. FBN Number: 2020‑0000341. Published: Feb 6, 13, 20, 27 2020.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: CHEEPRO INC. at 7127 Hollister Ave, Suite 25A‑101 Goleta, CA 93117; Yunski Inc. (same address) con‑ ducted by a Corporation Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on January 28, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Margarita Silva. FBN Number: 2020‑0000305. Published: Feb 6, 13, 20, 27 2020. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: GTM RESIDENTIAL INS INSPECTIONS at 169 Gemini St Lompoc, CA 93436; Gary Shaw (same address) conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on January 28, 2020. This state‑ ment expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jan Morales. FBN Number: 2020‑0000298. Published: Feb 6, 13, 20, 27 2020. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: RENGA BROTHERS INTERIORS at 2614 De La Vina Street Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Jessie Anito Renga 65 Placer Drive Goleta, CA 93117; Kirk William Renga (same address) conducted by a Married Couple Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on January 31, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) byTho‑ mas Brian. FBN Number: 2020‑0000364. Published: Feb 6, 13, 20, 27 2020. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: L.A. LEPIANE WINES at 75 Los Padres Way Buellton, CA 93427; L.A. Lepiane Wines, LLC 1168 More Ranch Rd Santa Barbara, CA 93111 conducted by a Limited Liability Company Signed: Alison Thomson, Owner Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on February 03, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Maria F. Sanchez. FBN Number: 2020‑0000369. Published: Feb 6, 13, 20, 27 2020.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: STRUXURE OUTDOOR OF SANTA BARBARA at 6585 El Colegio Road Goleta, CA 93117; Santa Barbara Smart Patio (same address) conducted by a Corporation Signed: David Wilcox, President Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 17, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Thomas Brian. FBN Number: 2020‑0000195. Published: Feb 13, 20, 27. Mar 5 2020. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: POPPY at 911 State Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Sjt Sales, LLC 10635 San Marcos Rd Atascadero, CA 93422 conducted by a Limited Limted Company Signed: Sophia Tolle, Manager Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 7, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by John Beck. FBN Number: 2020‑0000434. Published: Feb 13, 20, 27. Mar 5 2020. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: KIMBERLY CARE CENTER, SANTA MARIA POST ACUTE at 820 W. Cook St. Santa Maria, CA 93548; Santa Maria Post Acute, LLC 5404 Whitsett Ave., Suite 182 Valley Village, CA 91607 conducted by a Limited Limted Company Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 3, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Maria F. Sanchez. FBN Number: 2020‑0000378. Published: Feb 13, 20, 27. Mar 5 2020. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: BOCCE BALL WINE, CLEAN SLATE, CLEAN SLATE WINE BAR at 448 Atterdag Rd, Unit 1 Solvang, CA 93463; Wine Club Marketing, Inc. 7603 Atron Ave West Hills, CA 91304 conducted by a Corporation Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 4, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by John Beck. FBN Number: 2020‑0000383. Published: Feb 13, 20, 27. Mar 5 2020. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: AESTHETIC CENTER FOR PLASTIC SURGERY at 5333 Hollister Ave., #195 Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Marc Soares 5315 Plunkett Lane Santa Barbara, CA 93111 conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 3, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Maria F. Sanchez. FBN Number: 2020‑0000373. Published: Feb 13, 20, 27. Mar 5 2020. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: CARPENTER ILLUSTRATION AND DESIGN at 2539 Puesta Del Sol Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Michael J Carpenter (same address) con‑ ducted by a Individual Signed: Michael J. Carpenter Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 03, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Margarita Silva. FBN Number: 2020‑0000370. Published: Feb 13, 20, 27. Mar 5 2020. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: CRAVIOTTO STATE STREET PROPERTY at 1806 Robbins Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101‑4628; Darlene S. Levien Craviotto 6230 Marlborough Drive Goleta, CA 93117‑1638; Daniel F. Craviotto Jr. 500 Puente Drive Santa Barbara, CA 93110; James Craviotto 1806 Robbins Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101‑4628; Marcella Craviotto 1148 North Patterson Avenue Santa Barbara, CA 93111‑1114 con‑ ducted by a General Partnership Signed: James Craviotto Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on February 04, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by John Beck. FBN Number: 2020‑0000388. Published: Feb 13, 20, 27. Mar 5 2020.


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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: JERRY THE PLUMBER, INCORPORATED at 1521 San Miguel Ave Santa Barbara, CA 93109; Jerry The Plumber, Incorporated (same address) conducted by a Corporation Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on January 27, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by John Beck. FBN Number: 2020‑0000296. Published: Feb 13, 20, 27. Mar 5 2020. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: MICHAEL RENGA FLOORING, INC at 2610 De La Vina Street Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Michael Renga Flooring, Inc. (same address) conducted by a Corporation Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on January 31, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Thomas Brian. FBN Number: 2020‑0000363. Published: Feb 13, 20, 27. Mar 5 2020. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: MKR COMMUNICATIONS at 309 Por La Mar Circle Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Maureen Russell (same address) con‑ ducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 04, 2020. This state‑ ment expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Thomas Brian. FBN Number: 2020‑0000389. Published: Feb 13, 20, 27. Mar 5 2020. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: RESIDUAL SAUCE CLOTHING, RSC at 5731 Hollister Ave. Goleta, CA 93117; Steven Fuentes 429 Valerio St. Apt 42 Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Andrew Gonzales 468 Venado Dr. Santa Barbara, CA 93111 conducted by a Copartners Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 04, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Brenda Aguilera. FBN Number: 2020‑0000390. Published: Feb 13, 20, 27. Mar 5 2020. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: BUNNIN CHEVROLET CADILLAC at 301 S Hope Ave Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Believe Automotive Inc 9230 Olympic Blvd #203 Beverly Hills, CA 90212 con‑ ducted by a Corporation Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 29, 2020. This state‑ ment expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by John Beck. FBN Number: 2020‑0000326. Published: Feb 13, 20, 27. Mar 5 2020. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: INSURANCE PROFESSIONALS OF SANTA BARBARA; NATIONAL ASSOCIATION OF INSURANCE WOMEN, INC. at 1411 North Curryer Street Santa Maria, CA 93458; National Association of Insurance Women, Inc. (same address) conducted by a Corporation Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 28, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, (SEAL) by Maria F. Sanchez. FBN Number: 2020‑0000320. Published: Feb 13, 20, 27. Mar 5 2020. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: REVENUE PROPERTIES USA at 597 Ave. of The Flags, Ste 104 Buellton, CA 93427; Kerry Moriarty (same address) conduct‑ ed by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 28, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, (SEAL) by John Beck. FBN Number: 2020‑0000297. Published: Feb 13, 20, 27. Mar 5 2020.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SB HEMP, SB HEMP CO, SB TRADING CO at 1834 Bath Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Santa Barbara Hemp Company, LLC (same address) con‑ ducted by a Limited Liability Company Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 04, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, (SEAL) by Maria F. Sanchez. FBN Number: 2020‑0000395. Published: Feb 13, 20, 27. Mar 5 2020. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SANTA BARBARA HIIT at 2621 Orella St Apt 5 Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Katherine Garcia (same address) conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 05, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, (SEAL) by Margarita Silva. FBN Number: 2020‑0000408. Published: Feb 13, 20, 27. Mar 5 2020. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: NIELSON WINES at 5475 Chardonnay Lane Santa Maria, CA 93454; Jackson Family Wines, Inc. 421 Aviation Blvd. Santa Rosa, CA 95403 conducted by a Corporation Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 24, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, (SEAL) by John Beck. FBN Number: 2020‑0000257. Published: Feb 13, 20, 27. Mar 5 2020. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: SANTA BARBARA SENDING at 1002 Cieneguitas Rd Santa Barbara, CA 93110; Trinity Baptist Church of Santa Barbara (same address) con‑ ducted by a Corporation Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 03, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Maria F. Sanchez. FBN Number: 2020‑0000371. Published: Feb 13, 20, 27. Mar 5 2020. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: HERCULES HANDYMAN at 7636 Hollister Ave #260 Goleta, CA 93117; Melanie Latimer (same address) conducted by a Individual Signed: Melanie Latimer Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 06, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Thomas Brian. FBN Number: 2020‑0000420. Published: Feb 13, 20, 27. Mar 5 2020. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: GOODLAND DOULA at 237 Daytona Drive Goleta, CA 93117; Stephaine Reed Drake (same address) conducted by a Individual Signed: Stephaine R. Drake Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 06, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Thomas Brian. FBN Number: 2020‑0000419. Published: Feb 13, 20, 27. Mar 5 2020. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: KIDS AT WEDDINGS, THE PAPER POISE PUBLISHING COMPANY at 1209 Manitou Road Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Penelope Colvill Paine (same address) conducted by a Individual Signed: Penelope C. Paine Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 05, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Thomas Brian. FBN Number: 2020‑0000413. Published: Feb 13, 20, 27. Mar 5 2020. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: ECO SB DESIGN INC at 1716 Pampas Ave. Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Eco SB Design Inc. (same address) conducted by a Corporation Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 30, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Thomas Brian. FBN Number: 2020‑0000343. Published: Feb 13, 20, 27. Mar 5 2020.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: YOGURTLAND at 621 State St Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Ozig Inc 5003 Dobkin Ave Tarzana, CA 91356 con‑ ducted by a Corporation Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 6, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Thomas Brian. FBN Number: 2020‑0000054. Published: Feb 13, 20, 27. Mar 5 2020. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: ABATEX at 1 N. Calle Cesar Chavez #11 Santa Barbara, CA 93103; PBM San Bernardino, Inc. (same address) conducted by a Corporation Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 3, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Brenda Aguilera. FBN Number: 2020‑0000377. Published: Feb 13, 20, 27. Mar 5 2020. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: SALON DEL MAR at 633 East Cabrillo Blvd. Santa Barbara, CA 93103; SDM Hair Studio, LLC 19 Oak St. #B Santa Barbara, CA 93103 conducted by a Limited Liability Company Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 5, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Thomas Brian. FBN Number: 2020‑0000409. Published: Feb 20, 27. Mar 5, 12 2020. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: CALM PHOTOGRAPHS at 5 La Cadena St Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Moises Lopez (same address) conducted by a Individual Signed: Moises Lopez Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 11, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Margarita Lopez. FBN Number: 2020‑0000466. Published: Feb 20, 27. Mar 5, 12 2020. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: TRAVEL WITH ANAIYA, VILLA ORGANIC CLEANING SERVICES at 516 W Islay Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Anaiya Latwai Mussolini (same address) conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 11, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Maria F. Sanchez. FBN Number: 2020‑0000470. Published: Feb 20, 27. Mar 5, 12 2020.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: DIALYN at 1485 East Valley Road #6 Montecito, CA 93108; Dialyn LLC 2207 State Street Santa Barbara, CA 93105 conducted by a Limited Liability Company Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 12, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Margarita Silva. FBN Number: 2020‑0000478. Published: Feb 20, 27. Mar 5, 12 2020. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SWOOSH SCOOTERS at 5432 Tree Farm Ln Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Swoosh Electric Transportation Inc. (same address) conducted by a Corporation Signed: John Feeley Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 6, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by John Beck. FBN Number: 2020‑0000433. Published: Feb 20, 27. Mar 5, 12 2020. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: GIANT BEAVER TREE SERVICES at 130 Garden Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Keith Bradford Strauss 340 Old Mill Road Santa Barbara, CA 93110 conducted by a Individual Signed: Keith Strauss Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 13, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Margarita Silva. FBN Number: 2020‑0000490. Published: Feb 20, 27. Mar 5, 12 2020. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: WAE DESIGNS at 228 W Anapamu St. Apt. A Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Kathryn Grace Eberle (same address) conducted by a Individual Signed: Katie Eberle Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 10, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by John Beck. FBN Number: 2020‑0000451. Published: Feb 20, 27. Mar 5, 12 2020. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: FLAIR PROJECT at 522 East Anapamu D Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Ivaylo Peshev (same address) conducted by a Individual Signed: Ivaylo Peshev Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 27, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Maria F. Sanchez. FBN Number: 2020‑0000289. Published: Feb 20, 27. Mar 5, 12 2020.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: JESSICA BARKER MEDICAL AESTHETICS at 300 Salida Del Sol Santa Barbara, CA 93109; JHB Medical Aesthetics, PC (same address) conducted by a Corporation Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 12, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Margarita Silva. FBN Number: 2020‑0000481. Published: Feb 20, 27. Mar 5, 12 2020.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: GRATEFUL DAY MUSIC, SANTA BARBARA VINTAGE PHOTOGRAPHY at 1318 Mountain Avenue Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Anita Frances Bayley (same address) Bradford Jay Bayley (same address) conducted by a Married Couple Signed: Brad Bayley Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 24, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Maria F. Sanchez. FBN Number: 2020‑0000267. Published: Feb 20, 27. Mar 5, 12 2020.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: GOLDEN COAST BURLS at 1243 Bel Air Dr. Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Robert Brandt Golden (same address) conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 3, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Maria F. Sanchez. FBN Number: 2020‑0000368. Published: Feb 20, 27. Mar 5, 12 2020.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SB TILE AND STONE at 93 Castilian Dr Goleta, CA 93117; Laura Prieto 1116 Bath St Apt J Santa Barbara, CA 93101 conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 12, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Maria F. Sanchez. FBN Number: 2020‑0000476. Published: Feb 20, 27. Mar 5, 12 2020.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: CRUZ BUSINESS SERVICES at 5276 Hollister Ave. Suite 406 Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Guisela Nohemi Cruz 7190 Davenport Rd. #108 Goleta, CA 93117 conducted by a Individual Signed: Guisela Nohemi Cruz Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 13, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by John Beck. FBN Number: 2020‑0000493. Published: Feb 20, 27. Mar 5, 12 2020.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: MOUSAI PUBLISHING at 1240 Estrella Drive Santa Barbara, CA 93110; Glenys Archer (same address) con‑ ducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on January 31, 2020. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by John Beck. FBN Number: 2020‑0000367. Published: Feb 6, 13, 20, 27 2020.

NAME CHANGE IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF TERESA RODRIGUEZ AND CLEMENTE MUNOZ ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 20CV00196 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: AMBER ALYSSA CAMPOS TO: AMBER ALYSSA MUNOZ FROM: ALEXANDER CAMPOS TO: ALEXANDER MUNOZ FROM: ANGEL OMAR CAMPOS TO: ANGEL MUNOZ THE COURT ORDERS that all per‑ sons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objec‑ tion at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING March 11, 2020 9:30am, Dept 6, Courthouse, 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101 A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the

date set for hearing on the petition. Dated January 13, 2020 by Pauline Maxwell, Judge of the Superior Court. Published: Feb 13, 20, 27. Mar 5 2020. IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF BARBARA GEORDIE ARMSTRONG ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 20CV00639 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: BARBARBA GEORDIE ARMSTRONG TO: GEORDIE ESME ARMSTRONG THE COURT ORDERS that all per‑ sons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objec‑ tion at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING April 8, 2020 9:30am, Dept 6, Courthouse, 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101 A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the

date set for hearing on the petition. Dated February 13, 2020 by Thomas P. Anderle, Judge of the Superior Court. Published: Feb 20, 27. Mar 5, 12 2020.

PUBLIC NOTICES NOTICE OF HEARING‑ GUARDIANSHIP OR CONSERVATORSHIP CASE NUMBER BPB‑18‑XXXXXX Superior Court of California, County of Kern 1215 Truxtun Avenue, Bakersfield, CA 93301, Metropolitan Division. Guardianship of the per‑ son of: John Doe and Jane Doe, Minors. This notice is required by law. This notice does not require you to appear in court, but you may attend the hearing if you wish. 1. NOTICE is given that: Jane Doe has filed: A Petition for Appointment of Guardian of Minor. 2. You may refer to documents on file in this proceeding for more information. (Some documents filed with the court are confidential. Under some circumstances you or your attorney may be able to see or receive copies of confidential documents if you file papers in the Proceeding or apply to the court) 4. A HEARING on the matter will be held as fol‑ lows: a. Date: Month Day, 2016 Time: 8:30 A.M. Dept: P b. Address of the court: same noted above. Jane Doe, Esq. SBN 000000, Greater Bakersfield Legal Assistance, Inc. 615 California Avenue, Bakersfield, CA 93304 (661) 321‑3996, Attorney for: Jane Doe. Published Feb 6, 13, 20, 27 2020.

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING CITY COUNCIL March 3, 2020 at 5:30 P.M. 5631 Calle Real General Plan Amendment Initiation Case No. 19-0001-GPA APNs 069-160-057, -058 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that pursuant to California Government Code Section 65358, the City Council will consider a request to initiate an amendment to the General Plan to change the land use designation for the property located at the above-mentioned address and Assessor Parcel numbers (Project Site) by Sarah Bronstad of Vanguard Planning, Inc. (Agent) on behalf of The Sun Group, LLC (property owner). A public hearing will be held to consider initiating the processing to amend General Plan Land Use Element Figure 2-1 to change the land use designation of the approximately 4,355 square-foot (0.1-acre) Project Site from Public/Quasi-Public (P-QP) to Community Commercial (C-C). The initiation request will be considered on: HEARING DATE/TIME: Tuesday, March 3, 2020, at 5:30 P.M. PLACE:

City of Goleta (Council Chambers) 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B Goleta, California 93117

If initiated, City staff would be authorized to further study the proposed land use designation change. No physical changes to the already-developed property are currently proposed. The proposed General Plan Amendment would allow the Project Site to be consistent with (1) nearby land use designations on Calle Real, (2) the Project Site’s original Land Use Permit (95-LUS-392), and (3) the site’s existing uses (real estate services and personal services). The City Council decision on the General Plan initiation request has no effect on how the City Council may ultimately act on the General Plan Amendment in the future. PUBLIC COMMENT: All interested persons are encouraged to attend the public hearing and to present written and/or oral comments. Written submittals concerning agenda items may be sent to the City Clerk Group e-mail: cityclerkgroup@cityofgoleta.org; or mail: Attn: City Council and City Clerk at 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B Goleta, California 93117. Comments must be received by the City Clerk on or before the date of the hearing or can be submitted at the hearing. In order to be disseminated to the City Council for consideration during the hearing, written information must be submitted to the City Clerk no later than March 2nd at noon. Material received after this time may not be reviewed by the City Council prior to the hearing. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION: Additional information is on file at the Planning and Environmental Review Department, Goleta City Hall, 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B, Goleta, CA 93117. The hearing documents will be posted on the City’s website at www.cityofgoleta.org. Contact Chris Noddings at (805) 961-7566 or cnoddings@cityofgoleta.org for more information. Note: The action of the City Council is not appealable. If you challenge the nature of the action in court, you may be limited to raising only those issues you or someone else raised at the public hearing described in this notice, or in written correspondence delivered to the City Council at, or prior to, the public hearing (Government Code §65009[b][2]). Note: In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you need assistance to participate in the hearing, please contact the City Clerk’s Office at (805) 961-7505. Notification at least 72 hours prior to the hearing will enable City staff to make reasonable arrangements. INDEPENDENT.COM FEBRUARY FEBRUARY 20, 2020 THE THE INDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT.COM 20, 2020

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Santa Barbara Independent, 2/20/20  

February 20, 2020, Vol. 34, No. 736

Santa Barbara Independent, 2/20/20  

February 20, 2020, Vol. 34, No. 736