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SPECIAL GUIDE INSIDE: S.B. GIVES! FREE

Santa Barbara

NOV. 14-21, 2019 VOL. 33 NO. 722

THE

KERNEL KING CHEF CONRAD GONZALES FLEXES FARM-TO-TABLE MUSCLES BY MATT KETTMANN

NEWS: WIDOW SUES TRUTH AQUATICS FOR WRONGFUL DEATH VOICES: TREASURES, NOT TRASH: WHO DECIDES?

A & E: SPECIAL EFFECTS SERIES AT POLLOCK SPORTS: SBCC WIDE RECEIVER TURNS PAIN TO GAIN INDEPENDENT.COM

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Up icks It ity P rC

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Your City Picksgot It You options! ’ve Up Getting rid of your old mattress is easy and FREE. Use one of these 3 easy ways and then rest easy, knowing your retailer, city or curbside waste collector may be using the Mattress Recycling Council’s Bye Bye Mattress Program to recycle your old mattress.

#1: Ask your retailer. They should offer to take back your old mattress when your new one is delivered. #2: Drop off the old mattress at any participating collection site or recycling facility. Visit ByeByeMattress.com to find your closest facility.

#3: Contact your local government to learn how curbside pick up of a bulky item works in your area.

ByeByeMattress.com 2

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STOR E WID E S ALE

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GETTING SURPRISE HUGS AND KISSES IS WHY I CHOOSE TO LIVE WELL. VNA Health has earned The Joint Commission’s Gold Seal of Approval® for Home Health and Hospice Care

VNA Health, formerly known as Visiting Nurse & Hospice Care, is California’s third oldest VNA and continues to be Santa Barbara County’s leading nonprofit provider of comprehensive in-home healthcare, helping patients and their families…live well at home…wherever they reside and call home.

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Corporate Season Sponsor:

A Tuba To Cuba: Preservation Hall Jazz Band with Cuban singer Yusa and special guests Thu, Nov 21 / 8 PM / UCSB Campbell Hall Tickets start at $35 / $15 UCSB students “[Preservation Hall’s] Ben Jaffe is an evangelist for the music’s ability to bridge colors and cultures.” The New York Times Discover the musical links between the Big Easy and Havana in this immersive concert experience drawing on music from the iconic septet’s recent album, So It Is, and cinematic visuals from the documentary A Tuba to Cuba.

Back by Popular Demand

Pink Martini

Sun, Dec 8 / 7 PM / Arlington Theatre Tickets start at $40 $20 UCSB students An Arlington facility fee will be added to each ticket price

“Rich, hugely approachable music, utterly cosmopolitan yet utterly unpretentious... It seems to speak to just about everybody.” The Washington Post The internationally-acclaimed “little orchestra” Pink Martini will deck the hall with festive holiday songs from around the globe – from timeless classics like “White Christmas” to Hebrew prayers, Chinese New Year tunes and a samba-inspired version of “Auld Lang Syne.” Presented through the generosity of Patricia Gregory, for the Baker Foundation Corporate Sponsor:

Tommy Emmanuel, CGP

with very special guests Jim & Morning Nichols Sat, Dec 14 / 8 PM / UCSB Campbell Hall Tickets start at $45 / $15 UCSB students “Delivers the goods with a beam on his face and a deftness and agility of touch that leaves you wide-eyed.” The Australian Times Widely acknowledged as the international master of the solo acoustic guitar, Tommy Emmanuel’s career speaks to his musical diversity, stretching from authentic country-blues to face-melting rock shredding by way of tender and devastating pure song playing.

Sun, Nov 17 / 7 PM / UCSB Campbell Hall Tickets start at $35 / $15 UCSB students

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Media Sponsor:

Arlington event tickets can also be purchased at: (805) 963-4408 INDEPENDENT.COM

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Editor in Chief Marianne Partridge

Publisher Brandi Rivera

Executive Editor Nick Welsh Senior Editors Michelle Drown, Tyler Hayden, Matt Kettmann Editor at Large Ethan Stewart Photography Editor Paul Wellman News Reporter Delaney Smith Opinions Editor Jean Yamamura Executive Arts Editor Charles Donelan Arts Writer Richie DeMaria Calendar Editor Terry Ortega Calendar Assistant Amber White Sports Editor John Zant Sports Writer Victor Bryant Food Writer George Yatchisin Associate Editor Jackson Friedman Copy Editor Tessa Reeg Creative Director Caitlin Fitch Graphic Designers Ricky Barajas, Esperanza Carmona, Alex Drake, Ben Greenberg Production Designer Ava Talehakimi Digital Editor Nancy Rodriguez Columnists Dennis Allen, Gail Arnold, Sara Caputo, Roger Durling, Jerry Roberts, Starshine Roshell Contributors Camie Barnwell, Rob Brezsny, Melinda Burns, Ben Ciccati, John Dickson, Keith Hamm, Rebecca Horrigan, Eric HvolbØll, Tom Jacobs, Shannon Kelley, Kevin McKiernan, Ninette Paloma, Carolina Starin, Brian Tanguay, Tom Tomorrow, T.M. Weedon, Josef Woodard, Maggie Yates Editorial Interns Alexandra Mauceri, Shannon Ponn Director of Advertising Sarah Sinclair Marketing and Promotions Manager Emily Cosentino Advertising Representatives Camille Cimini Fruin, Suzanne Cloutier, Remzi Gokmen, Stefanie McGinnis, Antonio Morales, Tonea Songer Sales Administrator Graham Brown Accounting Assistant Tobi Feldman Office Manager/Legal Advertising Tanya Spears Guiliacci Distribution Scott Kaufman

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Columnist Emeritus Barney Brantingham Founding Staff Emeriti Audrey Berman, George Delmerico, Richard Evans, Laszlo Hodosy Honorary Consigliere Gary J. Hill Indy Kids Bella and Max Brown, Elijah Lee Bryant, Henry and John Poett Campbell, Chloë Bee Ciccati, Emilia Imojean Friedman, Izadora and Savina Hamm, Madeline Rose and Mason Carrington Kettmann, Olivia Pando-McGinnis, Izzy and Maeve McKinley, Sawyer Tower Stewart, Phoenix Grace White The Independent is available, free of charge, limited to one copy per reader. Back issues cost $2 and may be purchased at the office. The Independent may be distributed only by authorized circulation staff or authorized distributors. No person may, without the permission of publisher, take more than one copy of each Independent issue. Subscriptions are available, paid in advance, for $120 per year. Send subscription requests with name and address to subscriptions@independent.com. The contents of the Independent are copyrighted 2019 by the Santa Barbara Independent, Inc. No part may be reproduced without permission from the publisher. The publisher assumes no responsibility for unsolicited material. A stamped, self-addressed envelope must accompany all submissions expected to be returned. The Independent is published every Thursday at 12 E. Figueroa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Advertising rates on request: (805) 965-5205. The Independent is available on the internet at independent.com. Press run of the Independent is 40,000 copies. Audited certification of circulation is available on request. The Independent is a legal adjudicated newspaper — court decree no. 157386.

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Contact information: 12 E. Figueroa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101 PHONE (805) 965-5205; FAX (805) 965-5518 EMAIL news@independent.com, letters@independent.com Staff email addresses can be found at independent.com/info

www.kivaSB.com Call 805.284.0070 for details 6

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Letters   . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  17 Voices   . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  21

OBITUARIES.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 THE WEEK.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 LIVING.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 Living Page   . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35

FOOD & DRINK .. . . . . . . . . . 36 The Restaurant Guy   . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38

Dining Out Guide   . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39

23

A&E. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 Arts Life   . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41

COVER STORY

Theater . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43

GIVING SEASON Names: S.B. Gives! team Emily Cosentino, Brandi Rivera, and Gary Clark

PAUL WELLMAN

volume 33, number 722, Nov. 14-21, 2019 MATT KETTMANN

CONTENTS

You must be so proud to launch year three of this nonprofit booster! Yes, we are! With the Fund for Santa Barbara, the Independent is supporting 53 nonprofits this year through S.B. Gives! What’s new this year? We are focusing on cultivating new and young (ages 18 to 35) donors. And the Independent is sponsoring a $1,000 grant to the participating nonprofit who garners the most young donors during the campaign. It can’t be as easy as you make it look. Any nonprofit can tell you fundraising is hard! But we raised more than $750,000 in our first two years. Our biggest challenge has been securing partners to support the matching funds grant. We are so appreciative of the Brittingham Family Foundation, McCune Foundation, and Santa Barbara Foundation for partnering with us this year.

Pop, Rock & Jazz . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45

FILM & TV. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46

TheKernelKing

ONLINE NOW AT

INDEPENDENT.COM

Preview   . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46

Chef Conrad Gonzales Flexes Farm-to-Table Muscles

(Matt Kettmann)

ON THE COVER: Photo by Macduff Everton.

PREVENTING HIV WITH A PILL

TV X-Streamist   . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47

Movie Guide   . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49

In this video, Pacific Pride Foundation’s LGBTQ program manager, Patrick Lyra Lanier, discusses the importance of PrEP, a “once-daily pill” that works as a preventative measure for HIV, among Santa Barbara’s community. Go to independent.com for more.

SPORTS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53

NEWS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 ODDS & ENDS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 Feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14

OPINIONS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

Angry Poodle Barbecue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

Rob Brezsny’s Free Will Astrology   . . . . . . . 55 This Modern World   . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59

CLASSIFIEDS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56

pancre atic c ancer pro gr a m

“ For complex pancreatic cancer surgery, like the Whipple procedure, outcomes are best when performed by an experienced surgical oncologist in a high-volume program like we’re able to offer in Santa Barbara.” — W. CHARLES CONWAY, II, MD, FACS fellowship-trained surgical oncologist

a high-volume pancreatic surgery center Our fellowship-trained surgical oncologist performs minimally invasive cancer surgery leading to shorter hospital stays and quicker recoveries, including robotic esophageal, liver, colorectal and pancreas resections. The Ridley-Tree Cancer Center is designated as a high-volume Pancreatic Surgery Program based on The Leapfrog Group’s guidelines.

Santa Barbara • Solvang (805) 879-0680 pancreaticcancer.ridleytreecc.org

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Evolutions’ Mini Stay-cation Idea #3: Signature Salt Stone Glow Rinse your cares away with Evolutions’ signature body treatment! It starts with a hot stone massage on your back, legs, and feet and continues with a full body exfoliation under the warm, rain-like flow from the Vichy shower. If you have never had a treatment with the Vichy shower, you need to! It is a unique spa experience that consists of a “rainbar” located over the treatment table plus a hand wand controlled by your therapist. The hydrotherapy of the soothing, warm water adds another level or relaxation to your treatment. During a Salt Stone Glow your tension will melt away and your skin will be left feeling totally refreshed and new. Before or after your treatment spend a little time detoxifying in our dry sauna too! (complimentary with your treatment)

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NOV. 7-14, 2019

NEWS of the WEEK by TYLER HAYDEN, NICK WELSH, DELANEY SMITH, and JEAN YAMAMURA, with INDEPENDENT STAFF

NEWS BRIEFS

N IC K WELSH

CITY

CITY

PAU L WELLM AN

Alejandra Gutierrez

STAMP OF APPROVAL: City Council gave final approval to Ray Mahboob’s project at 11 Anacapa Street, which received praise from both County Supervisor Das Williams (below left) and former Santa Barbara mayor Hal Conklin (below right).

Ray Mahboob Is Ready for His Close-Up

Public officials, hospitality reps, and others gathered on 11/7 to celebrate the grand opening of the new State Street Visitor Center, located at 120 State Street, Suite F, on the Hotel Californian property. In addition to the usual services offered by visitor centers, the new facility also offers communal iPads and charging amenities, a wide selection of locally made artisanal retail items, and a photo booth to snapshot guests’ travels.

Funk Zone Project Wins Unanimous Council Approval

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for the convenience of restaurants, bars, and wine-tasting rooms, she argued, but should be reserved for people “who are supposed to be going to the beach.” As public figures go, Gott has been singularly indifferent to personal popularity, and Tuesday afternoon Gott and her arguments—complicated, detailed, and exhaustively researched—got absolutely no purchase with either members of the council or the large number of Mahboob supporters. They described Mahboob gushingly as a pioneering visionary and ethical entrepreneur who could save Santa Barbara from its retail doldrums. Mahboob himself never spoke, but his agent and spokesperson Jarrett Gorin dismissed Gott’s arguments as “a maelstrom of claims,” adding, “A lot of them sound like conspiracy theories.” Many of Mahboob’s tenants spoke in favor of the project. Wallace Piatt, owner of Loveworn, exclaimed, “That building seethes with creativity. We want to keep it funky down there but clean it up.” Translated, that means the Helena Avenue frontage — which sports some of the most eclectic design details in town — will be kept as it is, while the rest of the building is reinforced, reimagined within its existing footprint, and provided a substantial amount of ADA access. (The building currently has no handicapped amenities.) Speaking in favor of Mahboob and his project were a host of tenants, real estate players, and Funk Zone aficionados. As a group, they were younger, hipper, and strikingly more ethnically diverse. Former Santa Barbara mayor Hal Conklin spoke in praise of the project, as did County PAU L WELLM AN

by Nick Welsh ay Mahboob may not yet be the King of Marvin Gardens, but this Tuesday, the opinionated but soft-spoken and camera-shy downtown real estate powerhouse was all but crowned king of the city’s much-heralded Funk Zone. By a unanimous vote, the Santa Barbara City Council voted in favor of Mahboob’s latest proposal — to rehab and redevelop the old 12,000-square-foot industrial warehouse where the Castagnola Brothers, George and Mario, once sold fish into a new hippified space where house-made sausages, craft beer, high-end clothes, and skateboards can be sold out of a building adorned with enough kitchified design touches to qualify as architectural folk art. The council’s action comes on the heels of a similarly unlikely event—a unanimous vote by the city’s Planning Commission in favor of the proposed project bounded by Helena Avenue on one side and Anacapa Street on the other. In fact, the only person speaking against Mahboob’s proposal was Anna Marie Gott, City Hall’s most tireless citizen watchdog and its most outspoken gadfly. (Technically, another group, Accessible Santa Barbara, appealed as well, but its principal activist never showed up.) Gott appealed the Planning Commission’s approval to the council, arguing that city building codes require the project to provide 46 parking spaces but that Mahboob is proposing only 32. And that, she pointed out, is only when he provides valet parking. The other times, she noted, there would be only 17. The pent-up new parking demand generated by Mahboob’s new project, Gott predicted, will spill over into nearby public streets that are already congested and overburdened. The city should not give up its waterfront parking

In a City Council race that’s still too close to call, Alejandra Gutierrez remains in the lead for the Eastside’s District 1. Gutierrez was 14 votes ahead of incumbent City Councilmember Jason Dominguez following a tally of Election Day votes on Tuesday. In District 2, Michael Jordan holds his lead over closest rival Brian Campbell, 1,507 votes to 1,126. The 67 ballots still to be counted are in search of voter signatures, which are required on mail-in ballots. The final total, arriving 11/14, would include any ballots with newly confirmed signatures.

COUNTY

Supervisor Das Williams, who went to school with Mahboob since the two were in grade school. Williams talked lovingly about not only the “old Funk Zone,” where he could get his surfboards repaired, but also the new one, home to tasting rooms of all alcoholic stripes. “This is a good project, and you don’t have to choose between the old Funk Zone and the new Funk Zone,” Williams said. “You can have both.” As for the parking issues Gott raised, Mahboob’s supporters and city planners cited recent traffic surveys indicating that 35 percent of people visiting the Funk Zone got there by Uber, Lyft, bike, or bus. Drinking and driving may have been common in the ’70s, one speaker argued, but times have changed. And the Funk Zone, everyone agreed, clearly involved drinking. Parking, they argued, was a waste of a limited precious resource: land. Or as Supervisor Williams put it, “Parking orthodoxy is the enemy of progress in this community and in the state.” Before the council voted in favor of the project, City Attorney Ariel Calonne cautioned they add the legal verbiage needed to fortify their decision against an expected appeal to the California Coastal Commission and from there eventually to court. n

An up-to-date peaker-plant alternative may be destined for Goleta after a positive conceptualdesign meeting on 11/12. The energy company AltaGas plans a 60-megawatt storage facility at 6864 Cortona Drive that uses Tesla’s Megapack lithium-ion batteries. The facility would store power when the Edison grid is amplified with solar energy and emit it during demands for use in the evenings. Edison is pursuing 10- and 20-megawatt battery storage facilities in Carpinteria, Ventura, and a second one in Goleta, in line with California’s mandate to be 100 percent carbon neutral in electricity generation by 2045. Freedom Warming Centers, which provides emergency shelter to homeless people during the winter, is sprinting to raise $30,000 by 11/15 to staff five locations with counselors, doctors, and others trained to assist the vulnerable, as well as to buy mats, blankets, and meals. The group is also recruiting volunteers to cook meals and serve them to warming center clients. For more info, visit ussb.org/fwc. The Chumash of Santa Ynez Valley and their casino received recognition from Mike Stoker, the regional chief of the federal Environmental Protection Administration, as part of America Recycles Week. Stoker, a former Santa Barbara County supervisor, called the tribe “true recycling champions” for diverting as much as 2.9 million pounds of waste from the landfill in 2018. Among their efforts has been a food diversion program to CONT’D ON PAGE 12 

For the latest news and longer versions of many of these stories, visit independent.com/news. INDEPENDENT.COM

NOVEMBER 14, 2019

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Santa Barbara Maritime Museum

113 Harbor Way, Suite 190, Santa Barbara, CA 93109 • sbmm.org • 805 962 8404 113 Harbor Way, Santa Barbara • sbmm.org/public-events • 805 962-8404

Alternative Uses of the Oil Platforms Expo Wednesday, November 20 • 1:00 – 5:00pm Keynote Speaker at 4:00pm Sponsors: Chevron and Scott Newhall Topics include: Wave Energy, Aqua-culture, Desalinization, Rigs to Reefs, Complete Removal… Presenters include: Bardex Blue Latitudes Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, Pacific Region Environmental Defense Center HUBBS SeaWorld Research Institute Pacific Ocean Energy Trust

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Triple Homicide Case Postponed “

U

h, yes.” Those were the only words uttered in court by accused killer John Dungan in court Friday for what had been slated as his arraignment hearing. Dungan’s response came after Judge Clifford Anderson asked if he agreed to extend his arraignment date to November 20. Dungan, dressed in an orange jumpsuit and sitting in a wheelchair behind a Plexiglass partition in Judge Anderson’s courtroom, is charged with intentionally steering his Camaro into an oncoming Chevy Volt on Highway 154 on October 25. The ensuing collision killed the driver, Vanessa Bley, and her two young children. At issue for prosecutor Stephen Wagner, new to the District Attorney’s Office, is whether he can provide eyewitnesses who will attest to Dungan’s homicidal intent and whether Dungan left behind notes indicating a deadly purpose. Of broader community interest, however, will be how Dungan was ever allowed to get behind the wheel of that car. Earlier this year, Dungan had been placed in an involuntary mental-health hold on the grounds that he posed an imminent threat to himself or to others. A welfare check con-

ducted by the Sheriff ’s Co-Response Team at Dungan’s parents’ home unearthed a cache of handguns, rifles, 20,000 rounds of ammo, and bulletproof vests. Dungan had been pulled over previously and had weapons found in his car, not to mention a bulletproof plate. Felony stalking charges were filed: Dungan had reportedly been harassing a young woman with whom he’d gone out once and who then cut off relations. Dungan was remanded to a psychiatric hospital in Pasadena with orders he not be allowed off the grounds unless accompanied by law enforcement personnel. Judge Thomas Adams allowed Dungan to move back to Santa Barbara in late September, but only if he resided at a mental-health halfway house on Modoc Road, attended outpatient recovery treatment, took all his medications, and wore a GPS bracelet. In court exchanges, Adams had expressed alarm about Dungan’s demeanor and affect, asking his attorney at one point whether he thought Dungan might be “5150” — meaning he posed a threat to himself or others. Despite such concerns, Adams signed the release order; Dungan had been a compliant and cooperative patient. —Nick Welsh

CO U RTESY

SBMM

NOV. 7-14, 2019

PAYBACK: Former SBPD dispatcher Bridget Bryden was awarded back pay for the time she lost from the day of termination to the day she would have been eligible to retire six years later.

City Loses $1.2M Whistleblower Suit

A

Santa Barbara jury concluded that the City of Santa Barbara should pay former dispatcher Bridget Bryden $1.28 million in economic damages sustained when she was terminated in March 2016 shortly after she’d voiced concerns to her superior that reductions to the qualifications required for new dispatchers posed a health and safety risk to officers in the field and the general public. At the time, the police department was grappling with a serious shortage in dispatchers. To help increase the number of candidates, departmental brass reduced the test scores required for new applicants from 90 to 65. At issue throughout much of the nearly month-long jury trial in the courtroom of Judge Colleen Sterne was whether Bryden quit or was fired. The jury heard conflicting evidence on both sides. According to Tom Shapiro, who argued the case for the city, the jurors he spoke with ultimately concluded it didn’t matter whether she quit or not; they were upset that after 24 years in the department, Bryden was not allowed to speak to then acting chief John Crombach about

getting her job back. They were also struck, Shapiro recounted, by the timing of the termination and the speed with which it was executed. Ultimately, the jurors voted 11-1 that the city terminated Bryden for voicing her complaint about the reduction in standards, that the city’s training standards for dealing with whistleblower complaints were inadequate, and Bryden would not have been terminated had she not voiced such concerns. The jury rejected arguments, however, that the department retaliated against whistleblowers as part of a pattern and practice. As a result, Bryden was awarded back pay for the time she lost from the day of termination to the day she would have been eligible to retire six years later. Had the jury found that whistleblowers were retaliated against as a general rule, as Bryden’s attorney Jonathan Miller alleged, she would have been eligible for emotional damages and pain and suffering compensation, as well. The city is, however, on the hook for Bryden’s attorney’s fees. It remains to be seen whether the city —Nick Welsh will appeal the ruling.


NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D PAU L WELLM AN

CANNABIS

SHOWDOWN: County Planning Commissioner John Parke (left) said that if we were to approve the 22 acres of cannabis hoop houses in Santa Ynez Valley proposed by Busy Bee Organics’ Sara Rotman (right), he’d soon find himself “swinging from a lamppost.”

Wine vs. Weed Buellton-Area Cannabis Operations Get Wings Clipped By Nick Welsh n old western movies, it was the farmers and ranchers who were forever fighting over the wide open spaces. In the Santa Ynez Valley, however, they’ve been supplanted by the cannabis growers versus the wine industry. Or so it would seem from last week’s deliberations at the County Planning Commission. That’s where three approved cannabis operations — all slated for Highway 246 just outside Buellton — had been taken to the Planning Commission on appeal, two by vintner Blair Pence. Although all three were received differently by the commissioners, each had their wings clipped significantly. One was shot down outright, and the other two were approved but with heavy conditions. All three will almost certainly be appealed to the Board of Supervisors. In some instances it’s likely both sides will be doing the appealing. Of the three, the Busy Bee proposal, run by entrepreneurial branding guru Sara Rotman, is perhaps the best known. Rotman had secured a much-coveted land-use permit to grow cannabis under hoop houses on 22 acres where she lives off Highway 246. Although Rotman marshaled considerable support from her immediate neighbors, Planning Commission chair John Parke wasn’t buying it. Parke and the commissioners voted unanimously to allow Rotman’s proposal to move forward but with such intense restrictions that it remains uncertain Rotman will accept them. At his most dramatic, Parke said if he approved 22 acres of hoop houses—regarded as visual blight by many in the Santa Ynez Valley — he’d soon find himself “swinging from a lamppost.” The commission ultimately decreed that only five acres of cannabis could be cultivated under Rotman’s hoops and that the total acres of cannabis needed to be reduced from 22 to 17. With Rotman, Parke took pains to highlight the key bones of contention between the emerging cannabis industry and existing agriculture: smell, visual blight, and pesticide creep. Parke noted that one of Rotman’s neighbors, a broccoli farmer, reported receiving a warning letter from Rotman’s lawyer about pesticide creep. The

I

state has set notoriously low thresholds for cannabis pesticide exposure, and farmers of other crops have objected they might be legally liable should cannabis growers on adjoining properties find themselves adversely affected. On the issue of odor, the commissioners voted unanimously to a host of odor-control solutions suggested by Rotman in her project description. Lastly, the commissioners voted to include a “re-opener clause” that would allow the Planning director to determine in two years whether existing conditions sufficiently address these issues or not. Although Rotman technically won, neither side left the commission chambers with a smile on their face. The other two cannabis operations were appealed by Pence, who has described cannabis as an “existential threat” confronting the wine industry. Pence won big in his appeal of Santa Barbara West Coast Farms, a 73-acre cannabis proposal the commissioners denied in a 3-2 vote. Of the Santa Rita Hills cannabis project, commissioners voted to approve it after significantly scaling it back from a 37-acre cultivation site to 12.75 acres. During deliberations, Busy Bee’s attorney Susan Petrovich noted that Pence has serious permit violations with his wine-tasting room. According to county enforcement records, Pence has been operating his tasting room without all the necessary permits and is now looking at fines as high as $4,000. Pence is appealing, arguing the fines are “unprecedented.” He acknowledged he lacks all the tasting room’s necessary permits but insisted he’s working on them. Pence noted he was first found out of compliance two days after he filed his appeals. He also suggested that Petrovich would be in a good position to know about his permit vulnerabilities because she worked for him to obtain those permits. Petrovich denied Pence’s accusation, saying she’s only recently learned there might be issues. “I was surprised that he was throwing stones at cannabis growers’ projects when he hasn’t bothered to bring his own property into legal compliance with the winery permit,” she stated. “I recall something about people who live in glass houses.” n

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O ER T EMB NOV EMBER R EM

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36.5

ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION

NOV. 11-17 –

DOWN BUT NOT OUT: Patrick Nesbitt (seated next to his wife, Ursula) said he intends to appeal the City Planning Commission’s decision to the Board of Supervisors.

Nesbitt’s Helicopter Landing Denied

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THE UCSB MULTICULTURAL CENTER PRESENTS

POST TRAUMATIC SLAVE SYNDROME

As of 11/7, the City of Goleta owns its own City Hall for the first time since incorporating as a municipality in 2002. The $11.5 million purchase of the land and two-story building at 130 Cremona Drive is expected to save the city $64,000 or more per year in real estate costs. City offices occupy about two-thirds of the 40,000 square feet currently, and the city is assessing how best to use the additional space. Laura Capps stepped up her quest for the county’s 1st District supervisor seat, currently held by Carpinterian Das Williams, with a proposal to limit campaign donations to $1,000 and to “ban contributions from anyone with business before the board.” She also proposes limiting the contribution time period to a year before an election and 90 days after. Williams said he loved the idea of reform but that public financing was needed to counter the power of special interests allowed free spending by Citizens United. A new state law mandates a $4,700 limit by 1/1/21 unless a county or city writes its own ordinance.

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sion that day, either, and ultimately voted for staff to return to the November 7 hearing with findings for denial. Although staff ’s initial findings were deemed inadequate by the commission, they took a break and came back after a few hours with additional findings reflective of the substantial amount of public comment on the issue. The staff findings for denying Nesbitt’s application include that “the loud, percussive nature of the noise caused by helicopter takeoffs and landings” is incompatible with the surrounding neighborhood, adjacent trails, and nearby environmentally sensitive habitat, and that it would disturb equestrian activities on the nearby trails, among other reasons. “I want to paraphrase an old expression here,” Nesbitt said at the hearing. “If God wanted helicopters to only take off and land from airports, he wouldn’t have given them the capability to land and take off vertically.” This sentiment wasn’t enough to swing the commissioners’ votes, though, so Nesbitt will have to use the airport—for now. —Delaney Smith

NEWS BRIEFS CONT’D FROM P. 9

prevent waste that gave more than 8,000 pounds of food to Veggie Rescue to add to its healthy meals for those struggling with food insecurity.

JOY DEGRUY

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onths of neighborhood backlash against hotelier Patrick Nesbitt’s helicopter landing application came to a head November 7 when the County Planning Commission voted 3-1-1 to deny Nesbitt’s request. “Oh, we intend to appeal this,” Nesbitt said of the denial. “We will file our appeal to the County Board of Supervisors within the next 10 days.” The decision could have been made months ago, on June 26, but 175 letters of opposition pouring into the Planning Commission gave cause to move the meeting back a few months to September. Nesbitt said he spent those months in between meeting with any critics he could find to sway their disdain. But September 25 came and went, and the hearing was packed with more of the same angry neighbors, pleading with the commission not to allow Nesbitt a permit to land and take off in his helicopter from his $65 million Lambert Road property. The commission couldn’t make a deci-

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COURTS & CRIME A complaint against Youth Interactive, a nonprofit arts and entrepreneurial academy for at-risk youth in Santa Barbara, has been filed in San Luis Obispo, alleging one of the nonprofit’s former mentors raped a participant who was 14 years old at the time. S.B. Unified Superintendent Cary Matsuoka sent out a district-wide message to parents directing all staff and students to “immediately stop participating in Youth Interactive programs until further notice.” Santa Barbara insurance agent Mark Lynch was arrested 11/5 on 13 felony counts of grand theft, embezzlement, and money laundering after allegedly collecting over $72,425 in insurance premium payments from five clients — three homeowners and two small-business owners — while leaving one client uninsured during last year’s 1/9 Debris Flow. Lynch’s bail is set at $100,000; the County District Attorney’s Office is prosecuting the case. The Department of Insurance is pursuing revocation of Lynch’s n insurance license.


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WRONGFUL DEATH? The first family member of one of the 34 people killed in the Conception fire has filed a wrongful death lawsuit against the ship’s owners.

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First Family Member Files Suit over Deadly Conception Dive-Boat Fire by Delaney Smith ore than two months after the deadliest tragedy in Santa Barbara history, the first family member of one of the 34 people killed in the Conception fire has filed a wrongful death lawsuit against the ship’s owners, Glen and Dana Fritzler, and their dive-boat company, Truth Aquatics. John Hillsman of McGuinn, Hillsman & Palefsky filed the lawsuit on behalf of Christine Dignam. Her husband, Justin Dignam, was sleeping onboard the dive boat when a fire erupted in the early morning hours of September 2, killing him and 33 others sleeping aboard the ship. Only the five crew members sleeping on the sun deck, including the captain, escaped with their lives. Dignam was 58 and is survived by Christine Dignam and their two children, Taylor and Chandler Dignam. Dignam’s lawsuit is a countersuit. Just three days after the disastrous fire, the Fritzlers filed a federal lawsuit under the Limitation of Liability Act of 1851, which says the owner of any ship can limit damage claims to the value of the ship’s remains if they can prove they had no knowledge of any dangerous flaws. “The CONCEPTION, prior to and at the inception of the voyage, was tight, staunch and seaworthy,” the Fritzlers’ initial suit reads. “The Fire and all consequential alleged injuries, damages and deaths occurred without the privity or knowledge on the part of [the Fritzlers] and was not caused or contributed to by any negligence, fault or knowledge on the part of [the Fritzlers].” Dignam’s suit counters that the fire was caused by the Fritzlers’ negligence. The counterclaim says the ship’s electrical system was powered by diesel generators, which passengers were actively encouraged to use to charge devices. The suit describes the battery charging station, which was located in the galley where the fire reportedly began, as an “octopus” charger comprising multiple power strips. Although the cause of the fire is still under investigation, many have speculated that the charging of lithium-ion batteries may have sparked it. The suit says not only that the

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charging station was hazardous, but also that no crew were mandated to patrol the ship that night. Dignam’s suit describes the below-deck passenger sleeping quarters, where Justin Dignam perished, as a “space deep down in the hull itself that had no portholes, skylights, or windows,” the only emergency exit a narrow, overhead escape hatch into the galley. The suit describes the boat’s dive station as unsafe, situated on the fantail, behind the galley. “Among other things, that station housed multiple high-pressure air compressors, one or more nitrox membrane systems, highpressure piping, one or more banks of highpressure, oxygen storage bottles, and thirty or more scuba bottles,” the counterclaim states. In addition to suing for wrongful death, Dignam is also seeking survival damages, funeral and cremation expenses, punitive damages, the cost of the suit, and other court relief. The Conception was built to code and had passed all recent safety inspections at the time of the fire, prompting the question: How stringent are safety codes? After poring over 20 years’ worth of federal documents, the Los Angeles Times on Tuesday released a report with its answer: not very stringent at all. Small passenger vessels have experienced fires for years, pushing the National Transportation Safety Board to repeatedly ask the U.S. Coast Guard—the only entity that mandates safety requirements for boats — to improve fire safety standards on small vessels. Many requests were rejected because the Coast Guard called them “unnecessarily burdensome and duplicative of existing requirements.” The main issues the NTSB found—“electrical malfunction, a poorly maintained fuel line, and a failed cooling pump” — are what likely contributed to the  Conception  tragedy, though the investigation is still ongoing. Families of the remaining 33 Conception victims have six months to file counterclaims against the Fritzlers’ zero-liability suit from the time they receive notice; the original suit n was filed September 5.

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CONT’D

‘KEEP IT IN THE CREEKS’: Curtis Skene (left) and Kris Kirkelie founded Partners in Community Renewal to study how Montecito’s creeks and bridges can be modified to reduce the future loss of life and property in recurrent debris flows. Larry Gurrola, a Santa Barbara geomorphologist, is the project manager. On East Valley and Glen Oaks Drive (above right), 2018’s 1/9 Debris Flow dropped a field of boulders as it surged downhill.

Making Montecito Safer: Part Two

New Group Explores Ways to Permanently Reduce Damage from Recurrent Debris Flows

W

by Melinda Burns

hat if the boulders and debris that obliterated whole neighborhoods in Montecito on January 9, 2018, could have been captured in the creeks? Partners in Community Renewal, a new nonprofit group in Montecito — RenewSB for short — is on a mission to accomplish that seemingly impossible task. Channeling the know-how of experts here and beyond California, the group has embarked on a $4 million, four-year study of the geology, hydrology, topography, and violent history of debris flows in Montecito. “This is my home; it’s our home,� said Curtis Skene, the executive director, a debris flow survivor and a cofounder of RenewSB with his partner, Kris Kirkelie. “I just feel that when you have a place that’s your home, you have to defend it; you have to rebuild it; you have to fix it.� RenewSB will design a masterplan for Montecito’s five main watersheds, encompassing Montecito, Cold Springs, Hot Springs, Oak, San Ysidro, Buena Vista, Romero and Picay creeks, showing how and where streams and bridges can be modified to reduce the future loss of life and property, Skene said. The final blueprint will include recommendations for a number of new creek basins that can trap boulders and downed trees, Skene said. All of the group’s findings will be turned over to county Flood Control. “It’s a big undertaking; you really have to look at the entire system,� Skene said. “We will do the study, identify areas where we can do things, and then go after acquiring properties. All of this ends up having to be a community discussion.� RenewSB is the second local nonprofit group to grapple with Montecito’s existential dilemma—a wealthy enclave of 11,000 people living in a high-hazard zone. The very ground under their feet is an alluvial fan, laid down through the millennia by massive debris flows that roared out of the canyons of the Santa Ynez Mountains, most recently on January 9, 2018. Since the disaster, another Montecito nonprofit group, the Partnership for Resilient Communities, has raised nearly $6 million for the installation and future cleanout of six steel-wire ring nets in the upper stretches of Cold Springs, San Ysidro, and Buena Vista creeks. The last two nets were installed last week. The Partnership is asking the county for a four-year extension of its ring-net permit. Its one-year emergency permit will expire on December 21. In search of longer-term solutions, RenewSB has finished a preliminary study of San Ysidro Creek; next, it will focus on Montecito Creek, where 17 people died below East Valley Road in last year’s disaster. The actual implementation of the masterplan by the county could take 10 to 15 years and tens of millions of dollars in private and public funds, including state and federal grants, Skene said. Early next year, he said, RenewSB will begin reaching out to landowners who lost their homes on January 9, 2018; they may want to sell all or part of their creek-side properties for debris basins instead of rebuilding in the path of danger. 14

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NOVEMBER 14, 2019

“It requires somebody like us to approach those neighbors,� Skene said. “The county can’t do it.�

THE FIRE-FLOOD CYCLE

Geologists say there is a higher risk of debris flows in Montecito through 2023 in the wake of the Thomas Fire, which laid waste to the mountainside in late 2017 and early 2018. Still, the community is approaching its third rainy season since the fire with a greater margin of safety than in January 2018. The ring nets are up, and, according to the Montecito Fire Protection District, 80 percent of the former vegetation has grown back on the slopes above town. On December 5, Montecito Fire and the County Office of Emergency Management will release a new “red zone� map showing the properties at highest risk of damage from debris flows or debris-laden floods this winter. The map will be displayed at a meeting at the Montecito Union School, beginning at 5:30 p.m. Historical records show that seven debris flows and debrisladen floods have hit Montecito since 1914; that’s an average 15-year interval between disasters. Last year’s was the deadliest. In a recent study, the U.S. Geological Survey estimates that 888,000 cubic yards of mud, rocks, and trees were deposited in Montecito during the January 9, 2018, debris flow. Adding in the debris that was removed from Montecito’s four existing debris basins, and the mud that flowed offshore, the total volume comes to about 1,004,000 cubic yards. For comparison, that’s enough mud and debris to cover 23 miles of Highway 101 three feet deep—all six lanes from Casitas Pass Road in Carpinteria to Storke Road in Goleta. On January 9, 2018, the existing debris basins on Montecito creeks captured only nine percent of the total flow. Is it even possible to trap all the boulders and trees that would come down in a similar disaster? Larry Gurrola, project manager of RenewSB, believes it is. He is a Santa Barbara geomorphologist who studies landforms, the relief features of the Earth. In addition to siting potential new debris basins, Gurrola said, the group will identify where creeks could be dredged or contoured to slow down the momentum of a debris flow, while letting the mud flow downstream. “As they come down, debris flows build up a snout of boulders, logs, and trees that can be quite high,� Gurrola said. “There would be structures in the creek to break up the flow and reduce the height.� During last year’s disaster, a number of bridges in Montecito quickly clogged with debris. Some of these bridges could be elevated or modified with hydraulic engineering to help “keep it in the creeks,� Gurrola said. “It’s well-known these bridges are under-designed for debris flows,� he said. “They were designed for clearwater flows.�

TWO-TIME SURVIVOR

On January 9, 2018, Skene witnessed the destruction of his

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childhood home at 1709 East Valley Lane as he took refuge in his backyard patio. In the following weeks, Skene came up with the concept of a new debris basin on San Ysidro Creek at Randall and East Valley Roads. He got the county and eight landowners on board, and the $20 million, eight-acre project is on a fast track. It will hold 80,000 to 100,000 cubic yards of debris and will be the second-largest debris basin on the South Coast. The Santa Monica Creek basin above Carpinteria can hold 200,000 cubic yards of debris. The new basin on San Ysidro Creek is expected to be in place by the fall of 2021, paid for in large part by the Federal Emergency Management Agency. Seeing those results, Skene said, Montecitans from other neighborhoods asked him, “‘Would you consider a broader initiative?’� The result, he said, is RenewSB; to date, the group has raised $2 million in pledges, money that was targeted but is no longer needed for the debris basin at Randall. In all, Skene and Kirkelie said, they will need to raise $2 million more to complete their watershed masterplan. “We can take this traumatic disaster and turn it into a model for other communities not to overbuild, but to rebuild and renew,� said Kirkelie, who volunteers her time for RenewSB. “We’re looking for long-term solutions to historin cal problems.�



  

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with the enigmatic and the pithy. They say things like, “The more things change, the more they stay the same.” As usual, they got it only half right. Recent experience tells us the more things stay the same, the worse they get. Bringing all this to mind is the 25th anniversary of Prop. 187, that rabidly crackpot anti-immigrant ballot measure California voters overwhelmingly approved — all 59 percent of us. The measure, predictably, never went into effect, the courts having deemed it unconstitutional almost before the election results were finalized.

Senator Dianne Feinstein in the mid-1990s

But intent counts for something and backers of 187 — coincidentally the criminal code shorthand for homicide — fully intended to

deny public education and public health care, among many other things, to anyone

who could not show proof of citizenship. Had Prop. 187 stood, public school teachers and ER doctors would have become de facto immigration agents. They would, in essence, have become The Wall. This week, the U.S. Supreme Court heard oral arguments about President Trump’s decision to abolish the so-called Dream Act — enacted in 2012 via executive fiat by President Obama — which offers legal protection from deportation for 700,000 immigrants under the age of 16 brought to this country illegally by their parents. According to the instant analysis of media observers, five of the nine Supreme Court Justices are inclined to give Trump what he wants. Were that to happen, we are told 30,000 high-achieving and law-abiding immigrants a month will begin losing the right

to drive legally or hold down a job. Fully half the Dreamers, we are told, are enrolled in school; 90 percent are working. In the 24th Congressional District — which includes Santa Barbara and San Luis Obispo counties — there are 4,800 registered Dreamers. Another 7,200, reportedly, are eligible but have not qualified. The qualification process, by the way, screens out anyone charged with a felony or multiple misdemeanors. The removal of our Dreamers from the 24th District — represented, by the way, 16

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by Congressmember Salud Carbajal, who broke into this country illegally at the tender age of 5— will lower the district’s Gross Domestic Product to the tune of $260 million a year. A couple of years ago, I found myself attending an emergency preparedness meeting on the city’s lower Westside. Those in attendance — most of whom spoke Spanish as their primary language — were not trying to learn how to be prepared for the inevitable eventuality of fires and floods. Instead, they were focused on learning what legal documents they needed to fill out so as to legally assign their parental rights to friends or relatives. Who would take care of their kids should they be suddenly deported? Who would the school district release their children to if they were not there to pick them up? That’s the sort of meeting you never forget. I also remember Prop. 187. No one took it seriously at first. It was the brainchild of two former big shots with what was then the Depart-

Republican carpetbagger who no one would have taken seriously but for the $30 million he spent of his own money to buy a senate seat. Two years prior — just six months after moving to Montecito — Huffington had already spent $5 million to knock off entrenched Republican incumbent Congressmember Bob Lagomarsino. As a Congressmember, Huffington proved pathologically secretive, refusing to disclose his whereabouts to even his own staff and ordering his press secretary to destroy all copies of his voting record. Personally, Huffington wasn’t such a bad guy; politically, he was a fla- Michael and Arianna Huffington in the mid-1990s grant nonentity. He was so frequently derided as ment of Immigration and an “empty suit” that one columnist opined the record, the thought definitely crossed Naturalization Services , this libeled the entire garment industry. my mind, but I lacked the funds to make a At the time, everyone, including the Inde- credible offer, let alone a lifetime of full-time forced to quit in disgrace. One spent $1,500 in taxpayer pendent, knew Huffington and his celebrity employment for the nanny and her extended dollars to have an oil paint- wife, Arianna Huffington, employed an family, as the Huffington campaign alleged. ing of himself commissioned. illegal nanny. However, it didn’t qualify as Personally, the experience was beneficial. Another was playing footsies a “news” story until Huffington — in a fit of All reporters should know what it’s like to be with Imelda Marcos, the Fili- bland ambition — came out in favor of Prop. on the receiving end of a public accusation. pino dictator infamous for her 187. (When conservative columnist George My trophy from all this is a letter written by pathological shoe fetish. Will asked what immigrant kids would do if Bob Dole — then a powerful U.S. Senator But when Republican Governor Pete not allowed into school, Huffington — born — to the head of INS demanding to know Wilson — normally a square-jawed moder- with a tarnished silver spoon in his ear — when the INS was going to investigate my ate — found himself facing an attack from replied, “Well, I would hope that, in many attempted bribery. his right while running for reelection, he cases, the parents would still pay for some In an attempt to salvage their campaign, resorted to the race card. Wilson will forever type of education for the children.”) the Huffingtons held a press conference at be remembered for the shrill hysteria of his When Huffington endorsed 187, Feinstein which Michael sought to accept “respon“They’re coming!” ads. Say what you want finally came out against it. But what really sibility” for the nanny but left Arianna to about shrill hysteria, but it works. By fanning saved the day for Feinstein — not to men- shoulder the “blame.” those flames, Wilson got both himself and tion her next 25 years — was “nannygate.” That didn’t fly either. Of course, that was Prop. 187 elected. Huffington had cosponsored a bill making back in the halcyon days when hypocrisy At that time, Santa Barbara was con- it a felony to transport illegal immigrants still shocked voters. Huffington wound up sumed by a freakish political sideshow across state lines for work, something he and losing by the narrowest of margins. Feinwhich would have been merely grotesque Arianna had done with their nanny multiple stein squeaked by with less than two perif not for the massive political consequences times. The Independent reported this. centage points. it would eventually have. Senator Dianne Huffington’s first response was deflection; The good news: Bullshit had conseFeinstein was fighting for her political life specifically, he publicly accused me of trying quences. The bad news: It no longer does. against Santa Barbara resident and bil- to bribe the nanny’s husband, who was at Today, we’re separating kids from familionaire Michael Huffington, a congenial home when I knocked on their door. For lies, locking them in cages, and forgetting where we put them. The nation seems too numb to muster much outrage. It’s as if we are all living under an airport: so much noise. We have a certified Manchurian Candidate-in-Chief now occupying the White House obviously fixated by white nationalist fantasies. Hate crimes are up at a record rate; in the past two years, hate crimes against Latinos have jumped 51 percent. So long as the president delivers on court appointments — as he most definitely has — his base will remain solid. The more things change, the more they stay the same? Not hardly. They’re a lot worse. Community members rallied in defense of Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA) at the Santa Barbara

PAUL WELLMAN FILE PHOTO

COME ON NOW: The French have a thing

Courthouse in 2017.

NOVEMBER 14, 2019

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—Nick Welsh


OPINIONS CONT’D

DAVID FITZSIMMONS, THE ARIZONA STAR, TUCSON, AZ

Letters

Well Done, Franklin!

A

bout six or seven years ago, I had the pleasure of working with Franklin’s fabulous teachers under Principal Casie Killgore’s leadership. I saw firsthand her clear vision; her no-nonsense, no-excuses directives to improve student learning; and her fearless insistence that teachers at Franklin meet high standards of teaching excellence. These are the characteristics of intrepid educational leadership that every school can learn from and emulate. Killgore absolutely created the “village” that she credits for shaping the students at her school. She has persisted and persevered over the years even when the district was not completely supportive, told her there was no money, or cited obstacles in her way. She always found a way. This bold approach is what is needed from our educators today, that and the love that Casie Killgore has for her students and Franklin fami. —Janet Gordon, S.B lies. She is remarkable.

Nightmare of Aera’s Cat Canyon Dreams

A

era Energy wants us to greenlight its plan to radically ramp up oil operations in Cat Canyon. The company is jointly owned by Exxon and Shell. As you read this, Exxon is awaiting a major court verdict in a suit that charges it has lied to the public for decades. Exxon knew that its business was altering the climate, bringing us more destructive wildfires, among much else. But they repeatedly deceived the public, just as tobacco companies knew their cigarettes caused cancer but denied it. Rather than act ethically and honestly, Exxon spent millions on climate-denying think tanks and researchers to confuse the public. Exxon now concedes that climate change is happening because of the burning of fossil fuels. Still, the company plans to increase its oil output by 25 percent by 2025 at a time when the world should be sharply reducing greenhouse-gas emissions. Lawsuits are an important step for society to free itself from this industry’s grasp. Most directly, the suits can provide the billions necessary for communities to repair climate damages and for-

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tify their infrastructure for the problems ahead. Big Oil would finally be forced to pay the costs they have foisted on taxpayers. It’s time to say a final “no” to new oil development in our county. No more being duped. No more pursuit of short-term profit for a few. More than enough oil is available from other places to carry us through the transition to a cleaner, safer and better economy. Good and plentiful jobs, and a healthy environment, depend on clean energy.

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Fond Remembrances

Facebook readers praised the In Memoriam for Paul Doré, written by his daughter Ava Doré, as remarkable for both its portrayal of a unique individual and its honesty about his issues. Michele B. White So beautifully written by a young woman who has an incredibly mature perspective and insight. Her open heart and message will hopefully inspire and support many others who can find hope in her strength. • Kelley Reece DeBernardi I went to high school with your dad. He was always such a fun a person and had a big, magnetic personality. He’d be so proud of your tribute. Tony Grimes It was always nice conversing with him. We shared similar tastes in music. He surprised me with a ticket to Radiohead a couple years back when he found out I was a huge fan and had never had the luck to get a ticket. I’ll never forget that kind gesture. • Scott Brichan I knew your dad before you were born. He saw me in line at the Bowl one day with disappointment written all over my face from a sold-out show. He said, hold on, went in the office, and came back with a couple tix. Definitely a Santa Barbara guy. • Ali Azarvan Beautifully written tribute to an awesome dude. Every time I saw him, he gave me a big hug and legitimately made me laugh (mostly by poking fun at me). I miss seeing his smiling face at The Bowl.

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The Independent welcomes letters of less than 250 words that include a daytime phone number for verification. Letters may be edited for length and clarity. Send to: Letters, S.B. Independent, 12 E. Figueroa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101; or fax: 965-5518; or email: letters@independent .com. Unabridged versions and more letters appear at independent.com/opinions. INDEPENDENT.COM

NOVEMBER 14, 2019

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17


obituaries

To submit obituaries for publication, please call (805) 965-5205 or email obits@independent.com

SWANN, Elizabeth Theresa (“Terry”) 2/3/1935 - 11/7/2019

Terry peacefully passed into the waiting arms of her Lord and Savior surrounded by family on Thursday, November 7 at the age of 84. Terry was born on February 3, 1935 in Dossenheim, Germany to Elizabeta and Johann Binder and was the last remaining of seven Binder siblings. Her mother (Mütter) and the early years growing up during World War II shaped how she viewed life, and the world. Following the war, Terry and her family immigrated to Toronto, Canada in 1951. It was there that she met the love of her life, Don, and they were married in 1955. They pulled up their Canadian roots and moved to Santa Barbara in 1960. Her professional career began in 1962 as a vice president’s secretary at Jefferson Electronics. When the company moved out of town, she moved on to Santa Barbara Savings and Loan where she worked in the residential loan department. This was the beginning of a distinguished career servicing real estate loans for the Santa Barbara community. She worked for a brief time as a loan officer at Montecito Bank and Trust and spent the final 20 years of her career at Santa Barbara Bank and Trust where for many years was the leading performing loan officer. She took great care in providing the best service possible to her clients. She retired in 2010. Throughout her life she was an avid sports and theater fan at San Marcos and Dos Pueblos High Schools, especially when her children and grandchildren were playing, singing, acting, dancing or coaching. She attended every San Marcos football game in the late 1970’s, every San Marcos theater event in the late 1980’s, every Dos Pueblos football game in the late 2000’s and every San Marcos softball game in the 2010’s. Her attendance at these events took her all around Southern California and on occasion, across the country. An ardent hockey fan, she followed her grandsons all over the state and country with enthusiastic, unwavering, and sometimes over-exuberant support. In her retirement, her grandchildren became a primary focus. She intently followed their progress through school, confirmation, and other activities outside of school. She frequently had lunch with each one individually, advising them of their potential and how to best invest their time and resources for the future. It was during these times that she gave them an appreciation for what they have today compared to what she grew up with in her youth in Germany. Terry was a member of Good Shepherd Lutheran Church for over 50 years where she ensured that each of her children and grandchildren 18

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were confirmed. She was also a member of the Edelweiss Choir for over 20 years, singing in concerts in many US cities and foreign countries. Terry is survived by her husband, Don, children Jeff (Cathy) and Tina Okpysh (Olie) of Santa Barbara, and Garrett of New York and grandchildren Tyler, Matthew, Nicholas, Christian and Stephanie. A “Celebration of Life” is planned for Wednesday, November 20, 2019 at 11am at Good Shepherd Lutheran Church, 380 North Fairview Ave, Goleta. Her family would like to express their sincere thanks to Dr. Darol Joseff and the SB Cottage Hospital SICU staff for the excellent attention, care, and compassion provided during her time there. In lieu of flowers, please consider donating to The Wounded Warrior Project – she was always grateful for our servicemen who sacrifice so much for our freedom.

Ruth M. Smith

10/6/1934 - 10/29/2019

Ruth M. Smith (Cuca), passed away peacefully on Tuesday, October 29, 2019, at Buena Vista Care Center. She was born October 6, 1934, in Goleta, Ca. to Isaac and Maria De Jesus (Yanez) Cuevas. She was a 1953 graduate of SBHS. She was wife (widowed) to Dan Smith Sr. they ran Smiths Sporting Good’s in old town Goleta for many years. After his death she then went to work at Raytheon in Goleta. She loved celebrating and dressing up for Fiesta and enjoying the parades with her sisters. She was a true 49er fan and loved her politics. She is survived by her son Dan Smith Jr. sister Margaret (Sylvester) Lechuga, sister Cheena (Bud) Gilbertson; and many nephews and nieces.

Edward Burgos

12/2/1953 - 11/7/2019

Eddie died peacefully at home with family by his side Nov. 7, 2019, 68 days after a cancer diagnosis. He never lost his lifelong good nature. He is survived by many friends, eleven brothers and sisters, two daughters, two grandaughters and Joy. Eddie’s wish was no service or memorial but for everyone to remember him in their own way. We will always love you and will miss you every day.

NOVEMBER 14, 2019

Donald Holden Archer

Pope Freeman

Donald Holden Archer was born to Harriet and John Archer in Omaha, Nebraska, November 22,1923. He was the third of five boys. Growing up with meager means he developed an inventiveness early in life. He started college at University of Nebraska and left to join the Army Air Corps during WWII. For his training, he was sent to Carlton College to study meteorology and became a navigator on a B25, though he did not see active duty. At the end of the war he attended MIT where he graduated in 1948 with a degree in electrical engineering. His first job was with the Naval Research Lab in Washington DC where he designed an antennae that was eventually used on the first lunar lander, and can be seen today in the Smithsonian Museum. Don married Meredith Dahl of Lowell, Massachusetts in 1955 and took a job at Raytheon, residing in Lexington, Mass. Here they had two children Lauren and Tor. In 1962 the family moved to Santa Barbara and Don continued to work for Raytheon. One of his lasting achievements was the development of the guidance system for the Patriot Missile. His tenure at Raytheon included a two-year hiatus in the mid 60’s to work for the Selenia Company in Rome, Italy. Here he developed and instilled in his family, a life long love of travel. His wife Meredith passed away in 1982. He then married Vicki Parks of Santa Barbara and they had one daughter, Allison. He retired from Raytheon when she was five and they were able to continue their love for travel. Upon retiring, Raytheon awarded him their Excellence in Technology Award and the Navy held a ceremony to recognize his many contributions in electronic countermeasures. Retirement allowed him a more involved schedule of gardening, daily workouts at the Montecito YMCA, tutoring math in the Santa Barbara school system, and having a regular glass of red wine for perceived longevity. After the disruption of the fires and mudslides in 2017, he was moved into Mariposa Assisted Living in Goleta where he enjoyed the food, the activities, and the companionship. He is predeceased by his parents, his first wife Meredith, his brothers Jack, Dean, Bob, and Gail and his daughter Lauren. He leaves behind his second wife Vicki, his son Tor (Fiona Wilson) and two grandchildren Beatrix and Lars of Berkeley, CA, his daughter Alison (Rob Decker) of Solvang, CA and many nieces and nephews. He was intently focused on living to be 100 years old. Although he was 4 years and 3 weeks shy of that goal, he was content living each day. He will be fondly remembered and missed for his extensive memory and the joy he took in recounting events from the past. In lieu of flowers, please donate to the Montecito YMCA.

“Now cracks a noble heart. Good night, sweet prince; and flights of angels sing thee to thy rest.” - Hamlet Pope Freeman, a giant in the Santa Barbara theatre community for over forty years, peacefully passed away at his home in Goleta on October 31. He had battled Parkinson’s Disease for more than two decades. He was 84. Benjamin Pope Freeman, Jr, was born in Savannah, Georgia on September 20, 1935. He grew up performing in the family living room on Sunday evenings with his younger sister Margaret Mary. Directed by his father and accompanied by his mother on the piano, the theatrical seed was planted as they performed song and dance numbers from his father’s amateur vaudeville career. Pope graduated from Savannah High School and received his BFA in Speech and Drama from the University of Georgia. He received a Master’s Degree in Theatre from Cal State LA and a PhD from Tulane University, New Orleans. After completing his PHD he returned to Cal State LA where he taught in the Theatre Arts Department. In 1963, Pope married college sweetheart Jane Armitage and adopted her son Robert. They had two other children, Meg and Davis who followed in their father’s artistic footsteps and have become successful choreographers and directors in Europe. In 1971, Pope moved to Santa Barbara to become the Producer/ Director for the Alhecama Players, a community theatre group operating through SBCC’s Adult Education Program. Over the next 15 years, he transformed the Alhecama Players into a civic treasure. He produced and directed four shows a year at The Lobero Theatre with plays ranging from King Lear to The King and I. He turned the 100-seat Alhecama Theatre into a space where edgier and more avant-garde plays were performed. He also directed for Santa Barbara Youth Theatre. During that time, The Alhecama Players merged with the Theatre Arts Department at SBCC where Pope was a major player in the expansion of the Theatre Arts Department and the construction of the Garvin Theatre. In 1977 Pope moved in to the newly completed Drama/Music complex on SBCC’s West campus and began a 26-year tenure where he taught a generation of young actors and directed over 60 shows for the SBCC Theatre Group. He retired in 2003 and was honored with the Santa Barbara Independent’s first-ever Lifetime Achievement Award for Theatre.

1923 - 2019

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09/20/1935 - 10/31/2019

In 1991 Pope married his life partner and soul mate, Jan Hanreddy. He and Jan were a team in all things and he was immensely proud his step-daughter Amy, an Associate Professor at Cal State University, Northridge. He was a doting grandfather to Kaya, Paul, Eleanor and Iris. He was an avid camper and fisherman, a frustrated golfer and a great friend and mentor to more people than he could ever imagine. A memorial celebrating the life of Pope Freeman will be held in the Garvin Theatre on January 11 at 2PM. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made in his name to The Parkinson Association of Santa Barbara, PO Box 6254, SB, CA, 93160-6254 or VNA Health, 512 E. Gutierrez, SB 93103. Heartfelt gratitude to Dr. Sarah Kempe-Mehl, VNA nurses Laura Guerrero and Melody Zaida and caregiver Luis Castenada Herrera.

Thomas Alexander Grimm 12/30/1934– 11/5/2019

Tom passed away peacefully at Villa Riviera Assisted Living. He was born in Queens, New York, to Conrad and Leona Grimm. He graduated from Far Rockaway High School and earned a Bachelor of Arts degree in history from Adelphi University. Upon graduation, he was awarded a Rockefeller Brothers Fund for Theological Fellowship for Education. He attended Princeton Theological Seminary where he earned a Bachelor of Divinity degree. In 1958 he did an internship in Westport, Mississippi, where he taught religion and conducted services. At the time, it was one of only two integrated facilities in the state. Upon his ordination in 1960, he became assistant minister at the First Presbyterian Church in Newark, Delaware. In 1962, Tom came to California as co-pastor of Hillside Community Church in El Cerrito. He married Judith Haskett, with whom he had two children. In 1968, Tom completed a Master of Arts degree in Educational Psychology at San Francisco State University and became a licensed Marriage and Family Therapist. He worked at Catholic Social Service and in 1977 entered private practice in Walnut Creek, California. Tom was also an active professional speaker with Bay Area Speakers Service speaking on relationship and personal subjects. He was also a member of Walnut Creek Rotary Club. In 1991 Tom married Diane Rosenberg Steerman. After they retired, he and Diane moved to Santa Barbara. Tom is survived by his wife Diane Alexander, son Randall Grimm, daughter Erica Grimm, and granddaughter Alexandra (Sasha) Woolery-Grimm. A memorial service will be held at Trinity Episcopal Church, 1500 State Street, at two o’clock on Sunday, November 24. Contributions may be made to Trinity Episcopal Church Justice and Outreach Fund or the environmental non-profit of your choice.


obituaries Ruben Joseph Gomez 7/12/1936 - 11/10/2019

Ruben Joseph Gomez, age 83, died in his hometown of Santa Barbara, California on November 10, 2019 after a long battle with Alzheimer’s. Ruben was born July 12, 1936 at Cottage Hospital to Angelina and Theodore Gomez. He attended Franklin School, Santa Barbara Junior High and graduated from Santa Barbara High School in 1955. After high school he served his country honorably as a Marine Corp drill sergeant. Served in the Marine Corp Reserves till August 29, 1961. Once a Marine always a Marine. Sempra Fi He began his painting career with the help of Alex Funke. Attending Santa Barbara City College for business, he went on to build a very successful company, Ruben J. Gomez Painting and Decorating INC. for thirty-four years. Join the IUPAT (Painters Union) in 1974. Retired in 2008 to enjoy his life with his family, friends and his loving dog Jewels. Survived by his children Gigi, Denise and Gina. Seven Grandchildren: Michael (Lita), Shannon, Danielle (Jake), Ruben (Tavia), Aaron (Annie), Ashley and Evan (Lara). Six Great Grandchild: Alexis, Anthony, Andin, Jonathan, Adrian, Arden, Cruz, Beau and Thomas. One Great Great Grandchild: Adaline. Sister Sally (Don), Sisters-in-Law Lupe, Maggie. Nephews & Nieces: Mike, Marina, Lynda, Anthony, Anna, John, Che and Elena. With many cousins and great nephews and nieces. Ruben is preceded in death by the love of his life, wife of forty-one years Joan (Joannie), son Ruben, brothers Tony, Lupe, Rudy and SonIn-Law Ernie. Ruben was loved by many with his quirky sense of humor, his contagious laugh, kind heart and the love for his family and friends. When he was a child, he was an altar boy at Our Lady of Guadalupe Church. In his youth he loved drag racing. He enjoyed playing golf on the weekends with Tony and every Monday morning with Bill, Chaz, Gene, Joe and Lucio. Was a member of the Los Paisanos Golf Club for many years. In 1980 he won the Bowling League Championship with his daughter Gigi, Richard and Alice. He was thrilled to be part of the 1955 Santa Barbara High School Alumni Reunion Committee. Ruben took great pleasure in showing off his ORANGE 34 Ford sedan which he loved to share at the Classic Car Shows. Was a long-time member of the Ignitors Car Club. He always looked forward to meeting up with his Franklin School buddies and

To submit obituaries for publication, please call (805) 965-5205 or email obits@independent.com

having lunch with his Tuesday and Thursday cronies. For over 30 years he shared a business relationship and strong friendship with Greg. Sincere gratitude to Dr. Robert Byers, Alzheimer’s Association (Alz. org) for many, many, many phone calls. His (lady friends) caregivers Dorie and Sally. The nurses and staff at the Serenity House for all their kindness and compassion during the last two weeks of Ruben’s life. Funeral services will take place at Welch-Ryce-Haider Mortuary, 15 E. Sola Street, on Monday 18, 2019 at 6:00 PM. Burial services will be held at Calvary Cemetery, Hope Avenue on Tuesday, November 19, 2019 at 10:00 AM. Following burials services, there will be a reception at Mulligans Café, 3500 McCaw Ave. “Ruben Here”

Karen E. (Karena) Ryals 9/18/1945 - 11/3/2019

Karena died at Serenity House after a long struggle with breast cancer. She moved to Santa Barbara in 1975 and through the years was active in property management, real estate, massage therapy, yoga practice and teaching. But most of all, Karena was a wise, vibrant, loving human being who will be terribly missed by her countless friends and family. A celebration of her life will be scheduled in early 2020.

June Pearl Ruiz 1933 - 2019

Tony Lopez

3/11/1942– 10/29/2019

Tony Lopez, born March 11, 1942, passed away peacefully at his home on October 29, 2019, surrounded by his family and loved ones after a battle with cancer. Tony was the embodiment of a kind, compassionate man that acted with integrity in every aspect of life. He is preceded in death by his parents Stanley and Ramona Lopez, brothers Tommy, Stanley Jr, Ronnie and sister Sylvia Lopez. He leaves behind the love of his life for the past 40 years, Nancy Cuellar, sons Michael, J.C., Ronald (Rolo), sister Gloria Ortega and brother Duckie Lopez, seven grandchildren, 4 great grandchildren, aunts, uncles and many nieces and nephews. Tony attended Franklin Elementary, Santa Barbara Jr High, and graduated Santa Barbara High in 1960. Once A Don, Always A Don. Tony joined the Navy in 1961 and was a proud veteran who loved his country and was also a member of the Veterans Memorial Hall on Cabrillo Blvd. He loved football, NASCAR, Harley Davidson, and traveling with his partner Nancy. Nancy and the family would like to thank Riley’s Cancer Center and Hospice for their care, help, and kindness. Services will be held Thursday, November 14, at Our Lady of Sorrow Church on Sola St at 10am Mass, burial will follow at Calvary Cemetery on Hope Ave and Reception will be afterwards at Eagles Hall on Bath St.

June Pearl Ruiz peacefully passed away at home on the evening of October 21st. After a lengthy illness, June moved on surrounded by her children. Born to parents Jose Carmen Ruiz and Pearl Elizabeth Ruiz (Beraldo), Pinky and Pearl to all who knew them, June was a 9th generation native of Santa Barbara. June is preceded in death by her granddaughter Alexis Nagle and son-in-law Ronald Shahan. She is survived by sisters, Joanne Foley, and Mary Fowle (Danny) and by her children, Donald CharlesBuster (Alex), Joseph Carmen (Diane), Kathryn Louise Nagle (Joenagle), Theresa Joanne Shahan, David Christian (Suzanne), Mia Marie and Donna Kay. Along with June’s grandchildren, Kyle Greco (Gigi) Joseph Jr., Lily (Wendy), Daniel, Steven, Jason, Leah, Violet and great-grandchildren, Pearl, Emilia, Lola, Joshua, Presily, Isaac, Audrey and Christopher. Nieces and nephews include Valerie Roses (Joaquin), Mary Perry (Kevin), Jennifer Doss (Sam), Edward Foley (Julie), Craig Foley, David Davis and Aaron Lipke. Many degrees of cousins are also left behind to grieve our loss, in addition to the numerous global exchange students that to this day consider June, their American Mother, Hide, Yasue, Daisy, etc. June graduated from St Josephs Catholic Nursing College in San Francisco with her R.N. degree. While attending school in San Fransisco, she spent her free time with cousins Lilian, Luther and Donald Daniels and Lawrence and Danial Tracy. June returned to Santa Barbara and started her nursing career at St Francis Hospital E.R. Then for 17 years she helped establish and run the orthopedic clinic at the UCSB student health center. During her time at UCSB June continued her education at UCSF and Brigham

Young University earning her Nurse Practitioners license. She also worked at the Isla Vista free clinic, Memorial Rehabilitation Center, Planned Parenthood and finished her career after serving ten years as head of Student Health Services at Westmont College. June was also a world traveler. Somehow, between raising six kids by herself, working full-time to do so and continuing her education, she found time to visit numerous countries on six continents. June Pearl Ruiz was a beautiful woman, inside and out and was always generous with her time, heart and kindness. She seemed to parent many children and teens that were not biologically her own and that are still today part of our family. Her motto being, “There’s always enough to share with others.” June’s home, the Covington House, was always ground central for many neighborhood kids and family friends, all were welcome. After retirement June continued the open door policy. Many of her foreign exchange students consider the Covington House their American home, some staying on long after graduation and becoming part of an amazing extended family. Special thanks to: Hospice Senior Planning Ridley Tree Cancer Center Dr. Julie Taguchi An extra special thank you to the wonderful angels from senior planning, Lupe, Flo, Salina, Elda, April among others. A Rosary will be held at WelchRyce-Haider Chapel November 21st, 7:00 p.m. Mass will be held at Our Lady of Sorrows Catholic Church at 10:00 a.m. November 22, 2019

Steven Harold Richardson 9/18/1945 - 11/3/2019

Steve lost his five-month battle with pancreatic cancer Sunday, November 3rd. There was not a day that went by where he didn’t make more than a few fortunate people around him laugh. He was unique and loved. His greatest joys in life were his children and grandchildren. Steve had a passion for helping those in need and his hard work and determination were seen and admired by all who knew him. He spent the last years of his life traveling with his beloved puppy, Charlie. Steve will be remembered for his humor, love, compassion, generosity, commitments and so many other attributes, but the best was how he could make a person feel important, valued and loved. He is survived by his daughter, Amber, his son Tyler and their mother Verlinda. Tyler’s wife Celeste and their children Kylie, Isaac and Cyrus. His brothers Michael and Robert, and many loved nieces, nephews, cousins, and other family members. He was especially blessed by Verlinda’s sister, Paulette, for her help and support. As per his wishes, there will be No Service.

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In lieu of flowers, Amber and Tyler have asked that a donation be made in his honor to the Santa Barbara Rescue Mission, 535 E. Yanonali St., Santa Barbara, CA 93103. “You will keep him in perfect peace, whose mind is stayed on You, because he trusts in You. Trust in the Lord Forever, for in YAH the Lord is everlasting strength”. Isaiah 26:3-4 NKJV

Angela Karmis

10/17/1984 - 11/7/2019

Angela Karmis was born on October 17, 1984. She was raised in rural Illinois as an only child to a single mother. In 2005 she was accepted into the physics program at UC Santa Barbara. She moved to Lompoc and graduated with a doctorate in 2012. Angela chose physics because “she thought it was beautiful and conducive to concrete answers and tangible processes.” As a graduate student she worked as an adjunct lecturer and discovered her love for teaching. In 2014 Angela came out as transgender and began to live into her true self. She became involved in LGBTQ activism, participated in panels for youth at Pacific Pride, and hosted a KCSB radio show called “Love Letters from the Submind” which addressed trans issues. In spite of her positive transformation, steady employment was difficult and she found herself struggling to survive. The kindness of various friends provided temporary housing for a couple of years before Angela made the decision to begin camping in the woods near the Butterfly Preserve in Goleta. During this time she became a regular guest at the mobile shower trailer project called “Showers of Blessing”, which provides free showers to people experiencing homelessness. Angela became a deeply loved volunteer at the shower project and eventually she was hired as the Director of Operations. Once again Angela blossomed and with the support of the County Housing Authority she was able to secure housing in Goleta. During this time Angela also became a beloved member of the Unitarian Society of Santa Barbara. She volunteered as a teacher in the Religious Education program and shared her love of science with the kids. She was a gifted public speaker and became a lay leader on the worship team, sharing reflections on her life and participating in Sunday morning services. It seemed that Angela had found her place in the world, full of loving friends and satisfying work, but her depression returned and this time it claimed her life. She was found deceased in her apartment on October 31, 2019. A memorial celebrating Angela’s life will be held at The Unitarian Society of Santa Barbara, 1135 Santa Barbara St. at 3pm on November 24th. In lieu of flowers, please donate to the homeless shower project that she loved so much at showersofblessingiv.org.

NOVEMBER 14, 2019

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CONT’D

Discarded Treasures Will We Make a Homeless Resident Lose Their Most Precious Belongings?

I

BY D E B O R A H A L L E N f he hadn’t learned to live as a cliff dweller,

COURTESY

he might have been riding up State Street with a bike and trailer overflowing with the items he collected from various dumpsters through the city. He might have lost his “treasures” to a new ordinance under consideration by a reactive city council which allows personal items left unattended for more than four hours to be confiscated and items valued under $100 to be discarded, treasures back into the dumpsters. Councilmember Kristen Sneddon was the only one on the Ordinance Committee to vote against this heartless measure. Living inside the brain of a person with schizophrenia is like a minefield maze. He is a collector. My relative has been housed in every way possible: jail, hospital, ER, single-unit apartment, and a

closet in his son’s home, but outdoors is where he ultimately ends up. When the “aliens” torment him, he yells back. Neighbors hear him through the walls. His torment is unbearable for all who listen. Being homeless in Santa Barbara requires some street sense and skill. He had trouble getting along with his outdoor neighbors. He showed up one day with a bump on his forehead from a nearby camper who threw a bottle at him when he raged back at the voices in his mind. This is why he ended up dwelling on cliffs. No one wants to listen to the midnight rantings of a person tormented with voices. “I’m taking food to my little friends” — without human friends, he made friends with the critters, feeding the birds and gophers who came near his site. He finally found a medication without dulling side effects, which allowed him to sleep through the night. But the ups and downs of relapse and psychotic symptoms still plagued him. No one on drugs remembers to take psychiatric medication. That’s a well-known fact. It might surprise readers to learn that this man was also a husband, a father of two sons. He got his photo in the Independent one year for being an environmental hero as he rode a bike with three trailers attached full of bottles and cans on the way to the recycling center. He drove to Santa Barbara after experiencing his first psychotic episode while serving in the U.S. Army. While he couldn’t live with his family due to the severity of his illness,

he did bring them things. Little things, big things, sometimes it was too many things. Like many who suffer serious mental illness, he collected many things. The discombobulation of his belongings made sense in his unstructured mind. One year, I saw him riding his bike down from the Mesa with one hand on the handlebar and the other holding a 5-foot Christmas tree on his back that he was bringing to his boys. His gentle spirit and huge heart are amazing. This man, whom a passerby might just see as “a hopeless addict,” “a schizophrenic,” a homeless person who causes a nuisance for merchants and pedestrians alike, is one of us. There is no difference between myself and a person with mental illness or addiction other than genetics and financial advantage. Yet we, the residents of Santa Barbara, are considering letting these residents lose their most precious belongings just because they create a sense of disorder which may require walking around them. My anger and heartbreak are held closely in check as I write. This man whose belongings we would confiscate took care of his wife and her two young children from the time she was diagnosed with cancer until the day five years later when she died. He cooked and he cleaned. He didn’t function well in the “normal” way, but he was there during the hardest of times. When she died, he drowned his sorrows in a bottle of tequila and yelled at me, and I understood. I was in shock, but part of me wished I could also crawl inside a bottle to shout and drown such profound loss. He even made it two years after her death before he had a serious relapse again, which led back to homelessness. Forty years since my relative first moved here, Santa Barbara finally has funds for “housing first” and other programs to repair a mental-health system that has been plagued by gaps. The remedy is a comprehensive and coordinated continuum of care that includes creating good relationships with neighbors as small programs are integrated in communities. “I don’t understand where these people are supposed to go or what they’re supposed to do,” Councilmember Kristen Sneddon stated. Why can’t the city simply invest in storage lockers to locate behind businesses for just one person to use at each site? We can do it for food to keep bears out of campsites. Why can’t we do it for community members who have not yet found the resources or remedies for the disabilities that plague them? People don’t choose to be homeless. Economics, unemployment, and disabling conditions are the forces that bring them to such traumatic circumstances. Each person, myself included, has a story n untold.

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cover story

KERNEL

KING

THE

CHEF CONRAD GONZALES’S CORN-GROWING PROJECT FLEXES NEW FARM-TO-TABLE MUSCLES

ubiquitously in modern restaurants as forks and knives. Despite the prevalence of those three words, however, the reality is often exaggerated — perhaps referring to an ingredient or a couple of dishes on an otherwise expansive menu. (And their constant utterance is becoming grating to the ears of restaurant regulars and food writers like me.) But the widespread movement — in which chefs aspire to deliver fresh, regionally grown, often organic produce, meats, and more to their diners’ plates — continues to have primarily positive effects: Small farms now thrive as once-invisible growers approach celebrity status; everyday diners care more about the food chain than ever before, increasingly rejecting environmentally questionable, corporate-scale farming; and, when in the hands of capable chefs, the resulting meals are reliably delicious. As chefs around the world aim to intensify this ethos, there remain critical hurdles to clear. One is that there is no set of standards or verification system, other than sheer trust — you may have waiters proclaiming sustainable sourcing in the dining room as the frozen-food truck pulls away from the kitchen. Another is that many regions, such as the otherwise agriculturally blessed Central Coast, do not currently grow or raise enough staple foods — i.e., grain for bread or milk for dairy (hence that truck …) — to support a well-rounded menu. But the toughest question to answer is whether people will pay the actual amount that it costs to deliver a meal that really came from a nearby farm and landed on your table. We’re witnessing the downside of that quandary right now, as The Bear and Star — an ambitious and honest ranch-to-table restaurant opened by Chef John Cox and the Fess Parker family in Los Olivos in May 2018 — is closing at the end of this year. “In order to actually be sustainable with The Bear and Star burger, we would need to charge $30,” Cox explained when the news broke last month. “That just doesn’t work for most people.” Despite the obstacles, Chef Conrad Gon-

BY MATT KETTMANN

MACDUFF EVERTON

T

he phrase “farm-to-table” is used as

WHERE TO TASTE Chef Conrad Gonzales will be serving tortillas, posole, and more on occasion in the months to come. Supplies are limited and will go fast. Follow him on Instagram at @vallefreshca for the latest info on menu specials and pop-ups. His cooking is always available at:

CISKO KID AT THE STATION: 346 Bell St., Los Alamos; 344-1960; thestationlosalamos.com VALLE EATERY & BAR: Inside the Hilton Garden Inn, 1201 N. H St., Lompoc; 735-1880; valleeatery.com VALLE FRESH CATERING: 865-2282; vallefresh.com INDEPENDENT.COM

zales is jumping deep into the farm-to-table fray. A fourth-generation Californian born in Santa Barbara and raised in Lompoc, Gonzales is the co-owner and operator of Valle Fresh Catering, Valle Eatery & Bar in Lompoc, and the newly opened Cisko Kid in Los Alamos. The 39-year-old’s dream, though, is to cultivate heirloom varieties of corn — the most integral staple to Mesoamerican cultures — in Santa Barbara County at a grand enough scale to regularly serve his wood-fired, Mexicaninfluenced, Central Coast–sourced cuisine atop homegrown, handmade tortillas. “Tortillas have been massacred in this country and in Mexico,” said Gonzales of how this elemental food has lost all of its flavor, texture, and soul via mass production. “We felt that we should push the envelope here and be a tortilla advocate.” Along with farmer Fidencio Flores, who is the third generation in his family to work the land at Buttonwood Farm & Vineyard in the Santa Ynez Valley, Gonzales is in the early stages of a three-year trial, determining which varieties grow best where on that property. They’re testing small plots of dent corn such as Nothstine and Oaxacan Green — the kind with dry kernels used to make masa, from which tortillas are made — as well as popping corns such as Black Aztec, all distinct from the sweet, or eating, corn that we all know from backyard barbecues. The goal is to find the right types, grow the plots to 20 or even 40 acres, and create enough supply and consumer demand to serve tortillas, tamales, hominy-filled posole, and other corn dishes all year long. With a steady flow, the opportunities are exponential. “Even if you’re making Italian food, you can make polenta, or in Southern food you could make grits and cornbread, or if someone wants to make 100 percent local bourbon,” said Gonzales. “There’s a lot of other stuff you can do with this dent corn.” But making tortillas is the heart of the project. Not only does it connect both Gonzales and Flores to their Mexican heritage, but tacos are all the rage for American eaters right now. They’ve been a California hallmark for decades, but they’ve skyrocketed into trendy

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gourmet status in my kids feed weeds to the resident sheep, recent years thanks I’m standing next to to attention from a tiny plot of midseatop chefs across the son cornstalks, where globe. Their simple Gonzales and Flores yet satisfying formula shows no signs are inspecting their experiment. of fading. “We will have the “Fidencio and most authentic torI planted this oldschool, all by hand,” tilla here, definitely on the Central Coast, said Gonzales, his and maybe even ball cap brim pulled Southern California,” low as we overlook said Gonzales, who’s this yellow corn already served small planting of Nothsamounts of tortillas, tine Dent. The Black posole, and more Aztec and Oaxacan that he made from Green plots are on his first test plots of the upper ridges of corn and plans to the property this start serving the 2019 year, near the grapeGonzales (left) and Fidencio Flores in their Buttonwood harvest soon. “We’re vines. “We took the Farm corn patch. the first ones who can wine approach with say with confidence it,” said Flores. “Let’s plant different types that we’re making 100 percent handmade, sustainable tortillas from our in different places and see how it grows.” area. No one else can say that.” The two met about five years ago, soon after Gonzales started the Valle Fresh Catering. He’d already been in the food industry for two decades at that point, but CHILDREN OF THE CORN Valle Fresh was the first business of his own. Founded in the heart of the Santa Ynez Valley 51 Raised in Lompoc, his father, Conrad Gonzayears ago by Betty Williams, Buttonwood Farm is les Sr., was a widely regarded minister and youth a dynamic agricultural operation, from the many advocate, winning the town’s first-ever Valley of the varieties of peach trees that ripen in subsequent stages Flowers Peace Prize in 2011; he passed away from all summer long to the nearly 40 acres of grapevines ALS in December 2018. But the younger Gonzales planted in 1983 that power the estate winery. But on was drawn to cooking by watching his grandmother the day after the July Fourth holiday, I’m not there and started working small coffee-shop and deli jobs for peach chutney or sauvignon blanc. Instead, as back in 1995 while he was still in high school.

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ANCIENT GRAINS TO GRUB The corn project of Chef Conrad Gonzales falls into a nationwide movement to rescue and revive ancient grains. Here are three heritage-grain gurus to know.

ANSON MILLS: A pioneer in the American heritage grains movement, Glenn Roberts started

this South Carolina–based operation in 1996. They sell corn, rice, wheat, and much more retail and wholesale via their website. ansonmills.com

KANDARIAN ORGANIC FARMS: Based just up the coast in San Luis Obispo County, Larry Kandarian grows a wide variety of grains you’ve probably never heard of, such as teff, triticale, spelt, and millet. He sells at numerous farmers’ markets around the state (but not in Santa Barbara) as well as via the website. kandarianorganicfarms.com TEHACHAPI HERITAGE GRAIN PROJECT: A collaboration between Alex Weiser of Weiser Family Farms,

Glenn Roberts of Anson Mills, and Jon Hammond of Linda Vista Ranch, this project—which is based about 4,000 feet up in the mountains southeast of Bakersfield — aims to return drought-tolerant and low-gluten heirloom wheat and other grains to California. tehachapigrainproject.org

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TORTILLA-MAKING

101

STEP 1 Grow the right variety of drykernel corn, which is called dent or field corn, as compared to the sweet corn we eat fresh from the stalk. Nothstine Dent is a good choice for tortillas.

AND

E A R L M I NNI S

STEP 2

PRESENT

Mill the corn, separating the kernels from the cob.

PATTI SMITH

STEP 4 STEP 3 Boil corn in a mixture of water and slaked lime (aka lime calcium hydroxide) and then let it sit overnight. This ancient process, called nixtamalization, softens the corn while boosting calcium and niacin levels. The result is what we know as hominy, most commonly used in posole.

Grind the corn into a dough. Now you have masa!

STEP 5

A N I N T I M AT E C O N C E R T BY THE SEA

Squish balls of dough into circles on a tortilla press, warm, and serve with your favorite toppings!

T U E S D AY, M A R C H 3 , 2 0 2 0 6:30—9:30PM S A N TA B A R B A R A , CA L I F O R N I A

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Upon graduating in 1998, he moved toward a career in graphic arts but quickly grew bored. Gonzales popped his head into A.J. Spurs in Buellton one day, inquiring if they needed help. They needed a dishwasher that very night. He spent the next eight years there rising through the ranks, eventually manning the firepit and running the Grover Beach location. “That’s where I got my cooking-over-live-fire skills,” he explained. He returned to Lompoc to open a Sicilian restaurant called Saletti’s, learning more styles for a few years, and then started cooking for La Casa de Maria retreat center in Santa Barbara, where his uncle, Rene Rodriguez, had run the kitchen for a quarter century. “That introduced me to the whole farm-to-table movement,” said Gonzales, who used the center’s homegrown produce to make healthy meals for retreat attendees and planted an herb garden next door to the kitchen. “They were really supportive of everything that was just slower, and just being in touch with your food and where it comes from.” His uncle encouraged Gonzales to check out SBCC’s culinary school, where he “ran circles” around most of the students since he already had so much experience, while adding baking, pickling, fermenting, and more to his repertoire. Unlike other students, he loved the bookwork. “It connected the dots,” said Gonzales, who also took Chicano studies and history classes, finishing his degree in 2009. Then came catering jobs for Santa Barbara Barbecue and Epicurean Cowboy Catering, whose beloved owner, the late John Aspra, taught Gonzales a lot about owning a business. In 2013, he launched Valle Fresh with a pop-up in the Lompoc Wine Ghetto. “I had no master plan and no investors,” he said. “I just knew that I wanted to cook my own cuisine for my own clients.” Taco bars became the Valle Fresh calling card. “You can really capture every kind of person with a taco bar,” explained Gonzales, who also started serving his tacos from the kitchen of Babi’s Beer Emporium in Los Alamos. “You can do vegans and gluten-free people. You’ve got your beef people, your pork people, your not-pork and not-beef people. There’s something for everybody. It’s very customizable.” Through those taco-bar pop-ups, he met Flores, who was raised on Buttonwood Farm. His grandfather Armando Zepeda planted the original grapevines in 1983 and is still the vineyard manager, while his father, Lupe Flores, has been the winery’s cellar master for a quarter century. The younger Flores spent a lot of his early years with Buttonwood founder Betty Williams, who taught him about the world. “She was one of the biggest people in my upbringing,” said Flores, who started his own patch of heirloom tomatoes with her encouragement at age 12, attended Dunn School with her support, and then went to Chico State, where he studied business and ag. “For me, the whole property taught me more than just agriculture,” he said. “It taught me a way a life, a way of thinking, and it supported me to create a base for what I wanted to

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do. Buttonwood is more than home for me. It’s been my life.” Today, while managing the peaches and more at the farm, Flores runs his own vineyard management company and a wine brand called Esfuerzo, and he is considering grad school. Flores and Gonzales first connected during a pop-up at Figueroa Mountain Brewing. “I noticed the quality of the food,” said Flores. “We clicked.” Popups at Buttonwood ensued, and Flores began growing tomatoes and peppers for Gonzales, who then started canning peaches for the farm. One day, while talking business ideas together, Gonzales said he wanted to grow his own corn for tortillas. The game was afoot.

MATT KETTMANN

cover story

Tortillas and simple toppings from the 2019 corn harvest

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Test plots were planted in 2017 and 2018, when Gonzales also worked with farmer Abel Basch, who grew a small amount of corn at Fairview Gardens. In the meantime, Gonzales expanded his own empire, opening Valle Eatery & Bar as a brick-and-mortar restaurant inside Lompoc’s new Hilton Garden Inn. They quickly learned that corn requires a good amount of water, said Flores, but nothing excessive, close to what tomatoes require. They’ve been able to grow the stalks without use of pesticides, and are only seeing pest damage on the tips of the Nothstine corn, which is the most promising variety right now. The Buttonwood plantings expanded dramatically in 2019 and were harvested at the end of September. “We’re happy with this,” Gonzales told me one afternoon on the back porch of Cisko Kid, looking at the hard cobs of dark yellow, nearly orange Nothstine kernels. “This is exactly what we want in yellow corn.” He’s also intrigued by the Aztec Black, including cobs where the kernels point out like spikes rather than lay down together. “Look at how wild that looks,” said Gonzales, who’s also fascinated by the freak purple and multicolored cobs that appeared. “That’s the heirloom variety doing what it’s supposed to do. That might be what corn looked like 1,000 years ago.” The Oaxacan Green didn’t work as well in its location this year, but they’ll try again in 2020, using seeds from the bank that Gonzales is steadily building with each harvest.

POPCORN & PINOT NOIR: WINES BY JAMES ONTIVEROS

MATT KETTMANN

The Cisko Kid at the Station in Los Alamos is a collaboration between Chef Conrad Gonzales and vintner James Ontiveros, a ninth-generation Californian who’s worked in the wine industry for more than 20 years. With Gonzales in charge of the food, Ontiveros is using the space to showcase his two Santa Maria Valley–sourced wines: Native9, which is pinot noir from his family’s Ontiveros Ranch, and Rancho Viñedo, a chardonnay that comes from vines planted in 1973. But he has grander plans too, and smartly bonded the entire place as a working winery. “I’m going to freeze grapes and run fermentations in the main room all year long,” explained Ontiveros last week. “I call it ‘demonstration fermentation,’ which has a nice ring to it.” That will enable visitors to see the winemaking process up close, and perhaps even participate in punchdowns and other harvest chores. In addition to his estate wines, Ontiveros plans to start making a broader range of wines to serve at the bar under the name Los Alamos Gourmand Group. And, yes, there’s also plenty of beer on tap, which tends to go quite well with barbecue too. For more on the wine, see ranchosdeontiveros.com.

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Relationship and Intimacy Expert

MACDUFF EVERTON

An Evening with

Esther Perel “My family has grown corn in Mexico for thousands of years,” said Flores, whose ancestors come from Jalisco, in a valley between the mountain ranges where mariachi and tequila originate. “We’re getting back to our roots. This is maize.”

TUCKING INTO TORTILLA

MATT KETTMANN

On a recent Tuesday, I was the first person to try finished products from the 2019 harvest. I met Gonzales at the Cisko Kid, where he and vintner James Ontiveros manage a large property, with a huge dining room, wine bar, and large outdoor patios and picnic areas. Originally a service and gas station owned by the Scolari family, the property has sat empty for many years as Ontiveros wrangled with the county on permits and ran through a series of chef partners that all backed out. Earlier this year, as the permits finally fell into place, he heard that Gonzales was looking to break out of the small Babi’s kitchen and get back to wood-fired cuisine. “We shook hands, and two months later we had our grand opening,” said Ontiveros. “The corn project was the closer for me. I always joke that if it makes any commercial sense, I don’t want to do it. I’m always trying to figure out the longest way around the cape.” Once the corn is harvested, Gonzales mills the cobs, nixtamalizes the kernels, and then prepares the masa for tortillas. (See sidebar on page 25 for step-by-step explanation.) He’s doing this process all by hand himself right now to dial in the techniques, aiming to perfect his methods before enlisting a larger milling facility to do this tedious part of the processing. To provide a direct taste of the results, Gonzales served me the Aztec Black popcorn with seasonings and shaved manchego cheese followed by a series of simple tortillas: one with avocado, one with goat cheese and sea salt, and one with yellow and pinquito beans, both unique to this region. He also brought out a bowl of hominy in verde sauce and a quesadilla. As expected, the tortilla’s thicker, slightly gritty texture is much more dynamic than the typical taco vehicle, and rather filling. It may seem silly to say, but they taste intensely like corn — richly, deeply, truly, more savory and layered than what we’ve come to accept from tortillas from grocery stores and even many “authentic” taquerias. Gonzales shows off his Nothstine and Aztec In this case, the tortilla is the Black cobs. show, not the sidekick—like a fine piece of artisanal sourdough supporting avocado toast or a brioche bun that steals the limelight from the meat inside. When it comes to the finished product, there’s nothing left to prove: It’s deliciously unique, worthy of the extra effort, supported by a great story of sustainability and ancestry. Then it occurs to me: Whether this project is ultimately successful is not going to come down to the farming prowess of Flores or the chef skills of Gonzales. They’ll get the corn to work, and the food will be toothsome and trendy. But whether they can scale up — and deliver Gonzales his long-range dream of opening a “tortilla house” that functions like an artisan bakery — comes down to consumers. Are we ready to pay what it costs to grow this corn in our own backyard? Can enough of us pay $5 for one taco rather than $6 for four? Will we put our money where our farm-to-table mouths are? I’m down. Are you? n

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An Evening with

Thurs

9 Apr

Los Lobos

Los Lobos, the hard working, GRAMMY®-winning band comprised of David Hidalgo, Louie Perez, Cesar Rosas, Conrad Lozano and Steve Berlin has sold millions of records, won prestigious awards and made fans around the world.

DeJohnette,

Student Tickets $10

Coltrane, Garrison

“... A true collaboration. No star turns, just discovery and nuance as only masters can pull off.” - Eye On The Music A musical configuration of historical significance has been reborn. Twenty years ago, drummer Jack DeJohnette brought saxophonist Ravi Coltrane and bassist Matthew Garrison together to perform the music of John Coltrane.

Fri

6

Dec

Series Tickets and Single Tickets on sale now

Lobero Theatre Chamber Music Project Artistic and Music Director, Heiichiro Ohyama Musical Advisor, Benjamin Beilman

Sophisticated Music. Sublime Hall. SAT. JAN. 4 / 7:30 PM Bach, Busoni, Grieg

Alessio Bax, piano • Benjamin Beilman, violin

SAT. FEB. 8 / 7:30 PM

Beethoven, Prokofiev, Brahms Louis Schwizgebel, piano • Benjamin Beilman, violin Ida Kavafian, violin • Heiichiro Ohyama, viola • Clive Greensmith, cello

SUN. FEB. 9 / 4 PM Beethoven, Kodály, Brahms Louis Schwizgebel, piano • Benjamin Beilman, violin Ida Kavafian, violin • Heiichiro Ohyama, viola • Clive Greensmith, cello

22 Preacher Lawson Nov

SBL ENTERTAINMENT PRESENTS

Fri

23 Nov

Sat

A Celebration of Joni Mitchell featuring Kimberly Ford

LOBERO THEATRE ENDOWMENT FOR AMERICAN ROOTS MUSIC

28

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29 Jim Brickman Nov

Fri

SBL ENTERTAINMENT PRESENTS

A Christmas Celebration

The Bentson Foundation

3 Dec

Tues

VOLKSWAGEN PRESENTS PRESENTS

Warren Miller’s Timeless

Elaine F. Stepanek Foundation

Hutton Parker Foundation


WEEK I N D E P E N D E N T CA L E N DA R

TH

E

NOV.

14-21 BY TERRY ORTEGA AND AMBER WHITE

Garden Inn, 915 Garden St. $35-$40.

11/14:

The Midnight Hour Featuring Ali Shaheed Muhammad and Adrian Younge Come see Ali Shaheed Muhammad of A Tribe Called Quest and composer and producer Adrian Younge (the pair behind the score for the Netflix series Marvel’s Luke Cage) along with a tight rhythm section and a full orchestra for an elixir of hip-hop, R&B, and jazz. 8pm. SOhO Restaurant & Music Club, 1221 State St. $20-$25. Ages 18+. Call 962-7776. sohosb.com

11/15: Modern Colored Pencil Area artist Chelsea Ward will be sharing and signing her latest book, which delves into all the basic techniques and concepts required to create fresh, colorful works of colored pencil art. 2-4pm. The Book Loft, 1680 Mission Dr. Solvang. Free. Call 688-6010.

Adrian Younge (left) and Ali Shaheed Muhammad

bookloftsolvang.com

THURSDAY 11/14 11/14: Music Academy of the West Fundraiser Sing along to piano pop-up performer Jacopo Giacopuzzi while enjoying drinks served by special Academy bartenders. All drink purchases and tips will directly support community-based initiatives. 5-8pm. The Red Piano, 519 State St. Free. Call 969-4726. musicacademy.org

11/14: Special Effects: Russian Doll Watch the first three episodes of this Netflix series starring Natasha Lyonne followed by a post-screening discussion with production designer and Creative Arts Emmy Award winner Michael Bricker. A reservation is recommended in order to guarantee a seat. 7-10pm. Pollock Theater, UCSB. Free. Call 893-4637. carseywolf.ucsb.edu

11/14: Open Mic and an Evening of Self-Expression All are welcome to artistically express themselves using all creative outlets, including spoken word, poetry, music, and dance, at this quarterly open mic hosted by UCSB’s MultiCultural Center. 7:30pm. Biko Garage, 6612 Sueno Rd. Isla Vista. Free.

11/15: Pokémon at the Library All

11/14: Playdate: My Gym Bring the kids for activities, refreshments, giveaways, laughter, and friendship. 10am-11am. Center Ct., 651 Paseo Nuevo. Free. Ages 0-10. Call 963-7147. paseonuevoshopping.com

FRIDAY 11/15

ages are invited to celebrate the enduring love for Pokémon and to take part in Pokémon science, train your robo-Pokémon, do Pokémon crafts, find Pokémon hiding in the stacks, and play games. Bring your Pokémon Cards to play with or trade. 2:30-4:30pm. Faulkner Gallery, S.B. Central Library, 40 E. Anapamu St. Free. Call 564-5602.

sbplibrary.org

11/15-11/17: Solvang Fall Festival This three-day event will feature 25 bands on two stages, a carnival, beer and wine gardens, and food and retail vendors! Discounted carnival tickets and tickets to Saturday’s Suds at Solvang Park craft beer and wine tasting event can be purchased online. Fri.: 4-10pm; Sat: 11am-10pm; Sun.: 11am-9pm. Solvang Park, 1st St., Solvang. Festival: Free; carnival wristband: $35. Call 448-7070. solvangfallfest.com

11/15: COAST’s Annual Fall Gathering This enchanted outdoor event will feature live music, homemade taco bar, a hosted beer and wine bar, and the presentation of the Barry Siegel Award recognizing the City of S.B. Public Works’ Active Transportation Team as the 2019 award recipient. 5-7:30pm. Spanish

tinyurl.com/CoastsGathering 11/15: Los Pinguos Come ready to dance to this band from Buenos Aires, Argentina, who will perform a mixture of Latin rhythms, reggae, rumba flamenco, and rock with songs like “Fumaza,” “Soluna,” and “Cielo Escarlata.” 7:30pm. MultiCultural Ctr. Theater, UCSB. $5-$15.

mcc.sa.ucsb.edu

11/15: Misa & Martin Gallery Opening: Etherea Materia Welcome this new gallery to the S.B. art scene while you listen to music by DJ FAB, participate in a silent auction for the Teddy Bear Foundation, and take in the art of seven contemporary mid-career artists. 5-8pm. Misa & Martin Gallery, 619 State St. Free.

tinyurl.com/EthereaMateria

SATURDAY 11/16 11/16-11/17: 2nd Annual Ojai Herbal Symposium: The Wisdom of the Body There will be lectures with authors, teachers, and experts, representing a wide spectrum of medical and healing communities, an Herbal Marketplace, PhytoPhunk Dance & Elixir Bar, and The Forest Table: A Wild Food Dining Experience with herbalist/forager Jess Starwood. Visit the website for a full schedule. Sat.: 9am-5pm.; Sun.: 10am-5pm. Krotona Hall, 2 Krotona St., Ojai. $30-$265. Dining Experience: $175; Marketplace: Free. Call 646-6281. ojaiherbal.org

11/16: Opening Reception: Santa Barbara County & Beyond: Recent Photographic Landscapes Artist

Harvest “Stained Glass” Windows Workshop

Draw festive harvest scenes onto transparencies to adorn your windows with a guest artist who will help you draw something beautiful. 10am-noon. Art From Scrap, 302 E. Cota St. $8. Children ages 6 or younger must be accompanied by an adult. Call 884-0459.

exploreecology.org/calendar

George Rose will showcase more than 20 majestic landscape photographs, printed via color dye sublimation on aluminum and inkjet printing, at this reception and book-signing. The exhibit shows through March 16, 2020. 3-5pm. Valley Oak Gallery, Wildling Museum, 1511-B Mission Dr., Solvang. Free. Call 688-1082.

11/16: S.B. Blues Society Presents L.A. Big Daddy’s Bassist Matt

11/15: Banda Los Sebastianes

Bragg and drummer David E. Jackson, along with their seven-piece band, which includes a blazing horn section, will perform soul and blues music. Guitar wizard Kenny Sultan and singer Tina Dabby will open the show. Enjoy free BBQ snacks. 7-10pm. Carrillo Recreation Center, 100 E. Carrillo St. Free-$40. sbblues.org

Hear Banda Los Sebastianes de Mazatlan, Sinaloa, with special guest La Bandononona Rancho Viejo, perform songs like “Mi meta contigo” and “En eso no quedamos.” 8pm. Chumash Casino Resort, 3400 E. Hwy. 246, Santa Ynez. $39-$69. Ages 21+. Call (800) 248-6274. chumashcasino.com

11/16: City of Solvang’s Annual Community Clean-Up Dispose of bulky items (furniture), green waste, comingled (aluminum, glass, cardboard), scrap metal, and some hazardous waste. Visit website for a full list of acceptable items. 8am-noon. Oak Street Public Parking Lot #4. Free. Call 688-5575.

Opening Reception: Dream Weavers & Embroiderers of Truth See how support and inspiration lead to expression and

deep community during this reception featuring area fiber artists who use natural or synthetic fiber, such as fabric or yarn, to create art. The exhibit shows through January 5, 2020. 6-8pm. Art From Scrap, 302 E. Cota St. Free. Call 884-0459.

exploreecology.org

Fundraiser

11/16:

wildlingmuseum.org

“Fall” by Maria Dzreeva

mcc.sa.ucsb.edu/events

11/15:

COURTESY

COURTESY

As always, find the complete listings online at independent.com/events. And if you have an event coming up, submit it at independent.com/eventsubmit.

tinyurl.com/SolvangCleanUp Volunteer Opportunity

Civil Discourse

>>>

Protest INDEPENDENT.COM

NOVEMBER 14, 2019

THE INDEPENDENT

29


INDEPENDENT CALENDAR

NOV.

As always, find the complete listings online at independent.com/events. And if you have an event coming up, submit it at independent.com/eventsubmit. COURTESY

14-21

kabaretti conducts

mozart & mahler

granadasb.org

SUNDAY 11/17 11/17: Estate and Legacy Planning Essentials Workshop A panel of exceptional speakers, including an estate attorney, accountant, private fiduciary, and former planned giving advisor, will offer an overview of estate planning fundamentals, tools, timely issues, and more, including a Q&A and light refreshments. 3-5pm. S.B. Museum of Natural History, 2559 Puesta del Sol. Free-$15. Call 682-4711 x179. sbnature.org

november 16 + 17 | 2019 Nir Kabaretti, C O N D U C T O R Anya Matanovič, S O P R A N O Mozart: Exsultate, jubilate, K.165 Julia Wolfe: Fuel for Strings Mahler: Symphony No. 4 in G major

Anya Matanovič

11/17: Sérgio Mendes & Bebel Gilberto: 60th Anniversary of Bossa Nova Multi-Grammy-winning

This weekend the Symphony performs the music of Mozart, Mahler, and Pulitzer Prize-winner Julia Wolfe with a thrilling addition of American soprano Anya Matanovič. From Mozart’s joyous Exsultate, jubilate to a musical view of heaven through a child’s eyes in Mahler’s 4th symphony, this is a timely program for this year’s season of thanksgiving. Artist Sponsor: Christine A. Green Selection Sponsors: Sam & Alene Hedgpeth, Dr. Robert W. Weinman

11/17:

Holiday Bazaar & Craft Fair Shop a variety of items — including jewelry, ceramic and mosaic art, candles, photographic prints, gourmet foods, books, and toys — while enjoying live music, doughnuts, snacks, and a silent auction with proceeds to benefit the Jewish Federation. 11am-4pm. Bronfman Family Jewish Community Ctr., 524 Chapala St. Free; childcare available for $5 per hour. Call 957-1115. jewishsantabarbara.org

upcoming concerts... subscribe and get the

BEST SEATS

december 7, 2019

Andy Einhorn, C O N D U C T O R Christiane Noll, V O C A L S UCSB Chamber Choir & Women’s Chorus

CHOOSE 4 starting at $99

new year’s eve pops - women rock december 31, 2019

Bob Bernhardt, C O N D U C T O R Cassidy Catanzaro, Brie Cassil & Tameka Lawrence, V O C A L S

“eroica” symphony january 18 + 19, 2020

11/16: 7th Annual Ballroom Dance Competition The Cotillion Dance Club at UCSB will host this competition open to amateurs of all skill levels and feature dances in salsa, tango, swing, rumba, and more with a grand finale showcase by U.S. Professional Rising Star Latin finalists Umario Diallo and Tessa Marie. 8:30am-10pm. Robertson Gym, UCSB. $10-$25.

ucsbbeachball.com

Nir Kabaretti, C O N D U C T O R Sivan Silver & Gil Garburg, P I A N O

805-899-2222 | thesymphony.org

where Foodbank staff and volunteers will unload your donated food items. Disaster Food Boxes will also be for sale. 9am-3pm. Warehouse, Foodbank of S.B., 4554 Hollister Ave., Goleta. Free. Email iskvarla@foodbanksbc.org.

tinyurl.com/FillTheFoodbank

producer, composer, keyboardist, and vocalist Sergio Mendes will transport you to where the bossa nova was born. Thrilling vocalist Bebel Gilberto and daughter of João Gilberto will also deliver the best of this musical style. 7pm. Campbell Hall, UCSB. $15-$35. Call 893-3535. artsand

lectures.ucsb.edu

MONDAY 11/18 11/18: Ashleigh Brilliant Artist, philosopher, and author Ashleigh Brilliant will sign copies of his first book in 20 years, I Need More Time — and I Probably Always Will, a collection of more than 400 humorous, ironic, extraordinary, and illustrated epigrams never longer than 17 words, with the theme of time itself. 7pm. Chaucer’s Books, 3321 State St. Free. Call 682-6787.

chaucersbooks.com

11/16-11/17: Kabaretti Conducts Mozart & Mahler The S.B. Symphony

11/16: Fill the Foodbank: Drive-Thru Food Drive Bring

COURTESY

O U R S E L L- O U T P O P S S P E C I A L S !

holiday pops

presents this evening with Croatian soprano Lana Kos performing Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart’s joyous religious motet Exsultate, Jubilate composed by Pulitzer Prize winner Julia Wolfe. Sat.: 8pm; Sun.: 3pm. The Granada Theatre, 1214 State St. $31-$137. Call 899-2222.

nonperishable foods to the warehouse

$1395 SHRIMPFEST Lunch Dinner7 7Days Daysa aWeek Week Lunchand & Dinner

11/18:

Home for Good: Homelessness 101 S.B. County (South) Join this discussion asking questions about homelessness, including: What is it? What leads to it? What is the current state of it in S.B. County? Can it be solved? Break down the myths and discover ways to play a key role in changing the lives of our neighbors experiencing homelessness. 5:30-7:30pm. Community Covenant Church, 5070 Cathedral Oaks Rd. Free.

Goleta Beach Park • beachsidebarcafe.com

Happy Hour! Mon-Fri 3-8pm • All Day Sat-Sun 5905 Sandspit Rd. • 805-964-7881 30

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tinyurl.com/SBHomelessness

Fundraiser

Volunteer Opportunity

Civil Discourse

Protest


WEEK Shows on Tap

11/14-11/17: Dargan’s Irish Pub & Restaurant Thu.: Dannsair; 6:308:30pm. Pretty Cheek & Xan Louis. 10:30pm-12:30am. Fri.: Derek Warfield & The Young Wolfe Tones. 7:30-10pm. Sat.: Alastair Greene. 9-11:30pm. Sun.: Irish Jam Session. 4:30-7pm. 18 E. Ortega St. Free. Call 568-0702. darganssb.com

A L W A Y S A M A Z I N G. N e v e r r o u t i n e.

11/14-11/18: Red Piano Thu.-Sun., Tue.-Wed.: Jason Libs; 5-8pm. Matt Fertbrandt; 8pm-1am. Mon.: Randy Rich and the Ravens. 8pm-midnight. 519 State St. Free. Call 358-1439.

BANDA LOS SEBASTIANES

11/14-11/15, 11/17-11/18, 11/20: SOhO Restaurant & Music Club Thu.: The Midnight Hour featuring Ali Shaheed Muhammad & Adrian Younge. 8pm. $20-$25. Ages 21+. Fri.: Strung Out, The Casualties, Spider. 9pm. $20-$23. Ages 21+. Sun.: Young Singers Recital; 5:30pm; Free. DJ Quik; 9pm; $27-$30; ages 21+. Mon.: Young Singers Recital. 5:30pm. Free. Wed.: Tyrone Wells, Dan Rodriguez, RIVVRS. 7:30pm. $20-$52.50. 1221 State St. Call 962-7776. sohosb.com

WITH

RANCHO VIEJO

11/15-11/16: The Brewhouse Fri.: Back Pocket. Sat.: Sean Wiggins. 8pm. 229 W. Montecito St. Free. Call 11/15: Carr Winery Barrel Rm. Wall of Tom. 6-8pm. 414 N. Salsipuedes St. Free. Ages 21+. Call 965-7985. carrwinery.com

15

8 PM

FRIDAY

38 SPECIAL

11/15-11/17: Cold Spring Tavern Fri.: Jumpstart. 6-9pm. Sat.: Let Go Flo; 1-4pm. Back Pocket; 5-8pm. Sun.: Dusty Jugz. 4:307:30pm. 5995 Stagecoach Rd. Free. Call 967-0066.

coldspringtavern.com

Nov

COURTESY

884-4664.

FRIDAY

Nov

22

8 PM

Wall of Tom

11/15-11/16, 11/20: The Endless Summer Bar-Café Fri.: Benny Collison. Sat.: Mark David. Wed.: Dave Vignoe. 5:30-8:30pm. 113 Harbor Wy. Free. Call 564-1200.

FRIDAY

11/15-11/17: Maverick Saloon Fri.: Livewire. 8-11pm. Sat.: Tex Pistols. 8-11pm. Sun: Tales from the Tavern Presents Robert Cray. Noon-3pm. 3687 Sagunto St., Santa Ynez. Free-$5. Ages 21+. Call 686-4785. themavsaloon.com

98 DEGREES

Dec

6

8 PM

11/15: Mercury Lounge Flannel 101. 9pm. 5871 Hollister Ave., Goleta. $8. Ages 21+. Call 967-0907.

11/15-11/16: M.Special Brewing Co. Fri.: Art of Funk. Sat.: Bamblume. 7-9pm. 6860 Cortona Dr., Bldg. C., Goleta. Free. Call 968-6500. mspecialbrewco.com

FRIDAY

11/16: Figueroa Mountain Brewing Co. (Buellton) Just Dave. 6-9pm. 45 Industrial Way, Buellton. Free. Ages 21+. Call 694-2252 x110. figmtnbrew.com

FELIPE ESPARZA

11/16-11/17: Figueroa Mountain Brewing Co. (Los Olivos) Sat.: Kenny Taylor. Sun.: Dan Cressler. 3-6pm. 2363 Alamo Pintado Ave., Los Olivos. Free. Ages 21+. Call 694-2252 x343. figmtnbrew.com

dec

20

8 PM

11/16: Figueroa Mountain Brewing Co. (S.B.) Angie and the Nightmares; 7-8pm. 50 Sticks of Dynamite; 8-10pm. 137 Anacapa St., Ste. F. Free. Call 324-4461. figmtnbrew.com 11/16: The James Joyce Ulysses Jasz. 7:30-10:30pm. 513 State St. Free. Ages 21+. Call 962-2668. sbjamesjoyce.com 11/16: La Cumbre Plaza Piano Boys. Noon-3pm. 121 S. Hope Ave. Free. Call 687-6458. shoplacumbre.com/Events 11/16: Night Lizard Brewing Co. Chillpoint. 9-11pm. 607 State St. $5. Call 770-2956. nightlizardbrewingcompany.com 3 4 0 0 E H i g h w a y 24 6 , S a n t a Yn e z · 8 0 0 - 24 8 - 6 2 74 · C h u m a s h C a s i n o . c o m

>>>

Must be 21 years of age or older to attend. Chumash Casino Resort reserves the right to change or cancel promotions and events.

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Come try our new

INDEPENDENT CALENDAR

NOV.

As always, find the complete listings online at independent.com/events. And if you have an event coming up, submit it at independent.com/eventsubmit.

14-21

and support Veterans with Hollister Brewing Company

A portion of the proceeds go to the Gary Sinise Foundation, an organization that helps wounded veterans and first responders all over the world.

1/19

TUESDAY 1

11/19:

Tom Voss Iraq War combat veteran Tom Voss will share and sign his new memoir, Where War Ends: A Combat Veteran’s 2,700 Mile Journey to Heal, a riveting journey from suicidal despair to hope. 7pm. Chaucer’s Books, 3321 State St. Free. Call 682-6787. Lobero Theatre, 33 E. Canon Perdido St. $15-$30; VIP $65. Call 963-0761. lobero.org

HBC owner, Tom Fuhrmann, a Veteran himself, serving 9 years in the United States Air Force, had the opportunity to participate in a Veterans Blend Hop event, at the Craft Brewers Conference in Denver, which allowed veterans to develop a blend of hops to be brewed for Veterans Day.

FARMERS

MARKET SCHEDULE THURSDAY

WEDNESDAY 11/20 11/20: Expo: Alternative Uses of the Oil Platforms

805.968.2810 6980 Marketplace Dr., Camino Real marketplace hollisterbrewco.com

Join this open discussion of ideas about the different options available for creating alternative uses of the S.B. Channel oil platforms as many of them head toward decommissioning. 1pm. S.B. Maritime Museum, 113 Harbor Wy. Free. Call 456-8747. sbmm.org

Carpinteria: 800 block of Linden Ave., 3-6:30pm

11/20: Girls Night Out: The Show Whether you’re celebrating a bachelorette, a birthday, bad poetry day, or you’re just bored, these ripped men will provide a “man-tastic” night of entertainment. 9:30pm. Eos Lounge, 500 Anacapa St. GA: $21.95; VIP: $39.95-$74.95. Ages 21+. Call 564-2410. tinyurl.com/TheShowEOS

FRIDAY

Montecito: 1100 and 1200 blocks of Coast Village Rd., 8-11:25am

SATURDAY

Downtown S.B.: Corner of Santa Barbara and Cota sts., 8:30am-1pm

SUNDAY

Goleta: Camino Real Marketplace, 10am-2pm

TUESDAY

11/20:

Lindsey Stirling’s Warmer in the Winter Christmas Tour 2019

Critically acclaimed and multi-awardwinning electronic violinist Lindsey Stirling will welcome in the season with hit songs like “I Wonder as I Wander,”“Santa Baby,” and “Dance of the Sugar Plum Fairy,” as well as original tracks, including “Christmas C’mon” and “Warmer in the Winter.” 8pm. The Arlington Theatre, 1317 State St. $35.50-$85.50. Call 963-4408. thearlingtontheatre.com

Old Town S.B.: 500-600 blocks of State St., 4-7:30pm

WEDNESDAY

Solvang: Copenhagen Dr. and 1st St., 2:30-6:30pm

FISHERMAN’S MARKET SATURDAY

Rain or shine, meet local fishermen on the Harbor’s commercial pier, and buy fresh fish (filleted or whole), live crab, abalone, sea urchins, and more. 117 Harbor Wy., 6-11am. Call 259-7476. cfsb.info/sat

Lindsey Stirling Fundraiser 32

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Volunteer Opportunity

Civil Discourse

Protest


COURTESY

To See or Ought to See

11/14-11/17: Big River: The Adventures of Huckleberry Finn Winner of

eight Tony Awards, this rollicking river adventure, based on Mark Twain’s timeless 1884 novel, follows the rebellious young Huck as he resists polite society and his abusive father and takes off on a raft with the runaway slave Jim. Propelled by a soul-stirring score of country, pop, gospel, and bluegrass music, this coming-of-age story is also a celebration of pure Americana. Thu.: 7pm; Fri.: 8pm; Sat.: 2 and 8pm; Sun.: 2pm. Rubicon Theatre, 1006 E. Main St., Ventura. $31-$76. Call 667-2900.

rubicontheatre.org

11/14-11/17, 11/20: The Theatre Group at SBCC Presents Sense and Sensibility This playful adaptation of Jane Austen’s beloved novel is set in gossipy late 18th-century England and follows the fortunes (and misfortunes) of the Dashwood sisters — sensible Elinor and hypersensitive Marianne — after their father’s sudden death leaves them financially destitute and socially vulnerable. The show runs through November 23. 7:30pm. Jurkowitz Theatre, SBCC, 721 Cliff Dr. $10$18.Call 965-5935.

theatergroupsbcc.com

11/15-11/17: Head over Heels: A New Musical This modern fairy tale and

11/15-11/16:

Distracted In this dramedy, two parents explore a variety of treatments for their son diagnosed with ADHD. A panel of mental-health professionals will answer questions after the show, which covers weighty topics ranging from anxiety and depression to selfharm and bipolar disorder and features “distracted” characters who break character and talk with the audience at times. 7pm. Elings Performing Arts Ctr., Dos Pueblos High School, 7266 Alameda Ave., Goleta. $15. Recommended for ages 14+ because of mature content and theme. Call 968-2541 x2345.

jukebox musical set to the music of the GoGo’s and Belinda Carlisle follows the escapades of a royal family who sets out on a journey to save its beloved kingdom from extinction and preaches unconditional love and acceptance of everyone, no matter their gender or sexual identity. Hear classics such as “We Got the Beat,” “Our Lips Are Sealed,”“Mad About You,” and more! Fri.: 7pm; Sat.: 2 and 7pm. S.B. High School Theatre, 700 E. Anapamu St. $5-$25. Call 966-9101 x5029.

surrounding the confederate flag and those who fly it, as well as take it down, and deals with themes of racism, stereotypes, and diversity from a historical and cultural perspective. Fri.-Sat.: 7pm; Sun.: 1pm; Mon.: 8pm. Studio Theater, UCSB. $3 suggested donation. Call 893-2064.

sbhstheatre.com

tinyurl.com/BlackFlagUCSB

11/15-11/17: Out of the Box Theatre Company Presents American Psycho This musical adaption of the

11/15-11/17, 11/19-11/20: Launch Pad Preview Production: What Martha Did Follow a fractured family

Bret Easton Ellis novel with music and lyrics by Duncan Sheik, tells the story of Patrick Bateman, a Wall Street banker with impeccable taste and unquenchable desires, in a satire that paints a pointed picture of the consumerism and misogynistic attitudes of the ’80s corporate world, a theme still relevant today. This production contains mature content and language. The show runs through November 24. Fri.-Sat.: 8pm; Sun.: 2pm. Center Stage Theater, 751 Paseo Nuevo. $20-$35. Call 963-0408. Read more on p. 41.

centerstagetheater.org

dphs.myschoolcentral.com

who gathers together to commemorate the 25th edition of Martha Fisher’s celebrated book of poems, all except Martha who killed herself soon after the book’s publication in this darkly funny drama about regret, facing the truth, and finding forgiveness. The show runs through November 24. Fri.-Sat.: 7pm; Sun.: 1 and 7pm; Tue.-Wed.: 8pm. Performing Arts Theater, UCSB. $13-$19. Call 893-2064.

theaterdance.ucsb.edu

11/19-11/20: Broadway in S.B. Series Presents Bandstand This

2017 Tony Award–winning musical follows 11/15-11/17: S.B. School of Performing Arts Presents Honk Jr. Bring Private First Class Donny Novitski and his the family to see this musical adaptation of the Ugly Duckling story featuring actors ages 8-11. Fri.: 6:30pm; Sat.-Sun.: 2 and 6:30pm. Jo Ann Caines Theatre, La Cumbre Junior High School, 2255 Modoc Rd. $5-$15.

daurikennedy.com

11/15-11/18: Black Flag This play by Idris Goodwin explores the discourse

wise-cracking gang of jazzers after the war to a national radio contest in search of America’s next big swing band. With a young war widow as their singer, the group struggles from the effects of the battlefield through toe-tapping music and high-octane dancing. 7:30pm. The Granada Theatre, 1214 State St. $46-$91. Call 899-2222. granadasb.org

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Public Safety

COURTESY

happy with my style; I just felt it wasn’t developing the way I wanted it to,” she said. “So I thought I’d play around with different mediums. I tried watercolors, and then I tried pencils, and it was like coming home lice Joy Murphy grew up in Hampshire, England. From a young age, she was in love with horses. — everything just fell into place. With pencils, what I Riding them, caring for them (her first horse could see in my head went onto paper in a way that it hadn’t done with paints, and it just was called Barbie), learning about totally and utterly flowed.” them, jumping over things, and Just a few years after her pencil drawing them. discovery, Murphy has become After two years studying art folone of the foremost equine and lowed by a degree in equine busipet artists in the Santa Ynez Valness management, Murphy found ley. With commissions from Ausherself in banking. An Ameritralia, Europe, and all over the can husband followed, as did two U.S., Murphy can draw just about children, and Murphy eventually anything she sees. “Most artists relocated to the Santa Ynez Valplan,” she said. “I don’t plan. I just ley. Having not done anything get a picture and I get a piece of art-related in many years, a chance paper, and I go from there.” encounter at a local moms’ group Murphy will spend up to 15 would set Murphy on a new path hours on a single portrait using and a new career. a tray of 72 pencils. Not just any “A couple of women came to BROWN BEAUTY: Alice Joy Murphy will pencils, but oil-based pencils that speak at my preschoolers’ group,” spend up to 15 hours on a single portrait are “lightfast.” They don’t fade in Murphy said. “They were artists. I using a tray of 72 oil-based pencils. saw their work and thought, ‘I can do that.’ So I went UV light and can be layered up to 23 times. Murphy has been steadily building her portfolio home, set up a canvas, and just started painting. I just went mad; it was just something in me. It just all came and hopes to turn her passion into a full-time career. Her work can be found at the Outpost Trading back, and I didn’t want to stop.” Initially, Murphy was painting with acrylics on can- Company in Santa Ynez or on her website at alicejoy vas. But as much as she was enjoying her new artistic murphyart.com. —Gareth Kelly freedom, something didn’t feel right. “I just wasn’t

COURTESY

Art

Health

Doctors Donate Reconstructive Hair Surgery to Veteran A

COURTESY

Santa Barbara plastic surgeon is providing, free of charge, reconstructive hair surgery to a U.S. Air Force veteran who’s spent the last 13 years battling the Department of Veterans Affairs for coverage. “All of us finally gave up fighting the VA and just decided to do the right thing for this woman,” reads a statement from the office of Dr. Gregory Keller, who’s teaming up with the Santa Barbara SurgiHAIR CARE: Dr. Gregory Keller is providing Laura K.’s reconstructive hair surgery cal Arts Center and Celling Bio in free of charge. Texas to carry out the procedure. Laura was medically discharged in 1996 and Laura K., 51 years old, joined the Air Force as a medical technician in 1993. Two weeks into training, returned to school for nursing. But in 2004, she however, she fell and hit her head, and subsequent was diagnosed with another brain tumor and MRI scans revealed she had brain cancer. A surgery again underwent surgery, this time accompanied was scheduled to remove a walnut-sized tumor by radiation and chemotherapy. Since then, she’s suffered from memory loss, fatigue, and migraines. from the left side of her head. Before the procedure, Laura wore her hair down She is not able to work and lives on her VA and to her waist. It was a source of pride for her, so she Social Security disability. And her hair has never only allowed half of her head to be shaved. Only grown back. Laura’s baldness is a big source of pain for her. two months into her recovery, she was asked to volunteer for a special covert-op mission in Bosnia. Life is difficult enough, even without the insecurity She accepted and spent weeks rendering medical she feels in public. She’s received counseling, but she aid to war victims and disposing of dead bodies, has always wanted this piece of her identity back. “As mostly women. The experience left her with PTSD such, we are taking care of her to make sure that she receives proper care,” Dr. Keller’s office said. —TH and night terrors.

BE PREPARED: The Mountain Ember Team volunteer fire department has formed to watch over the Painted Cave community.

Meet the

MOUNTAIN EMBER TEAM O

ut of the ashes of the Painted Cave Volunteer Fire Department has risen the Mountain Ember Team, or MET, a group of rural residents dedicated to fortifying and protecting their Painted Cave community against the next threat. The department closed its doors earlier this year amid allegations of financial mismanagement by its former chief, who has since sold off the neighborhood’s firefighting equipment to pay his own legal bills. The case is working its way through court, and as it does, explained Nic Proctor, a retired electrician and volunteer captain, he and the other volunteer firefighters have stepped up to fill the public-safety void. “We decided there was definitely still a need to continue what the department was doing,” he said. That means fuel management and mitigation with tools they’ve scraped together, as well as lessons for homeowners on defensible space and what to do if a fire is bearing down, like removing outside furniture and wood piles. The biggest concern, said Proctor, is embers, hence the name of their group. Their whole function, Proctor went on, is to do what they can to put out spot fires and help with evacuations before the cavalry arrives. “We’re not trying to replace County Fire or the Forest Service,” he said. “Our purpose is to be first responders until the professionals get here. If they ask us to go away, we will. If they ask us to help, we will.” The Mountain Ember Team officially incorporated as a 501c3 in May and boasts nearly two dozen members. It has so far raised $11,000 that will go toward purchasing a portable water tank and pump that can fit in the back of a pickup truck. It’s also received donations of chainsaws and personal protection equipment, but the group still needs a lot of help. A full protective outfit costs around $1,000, Proctor said, and MET would like to provide more trainings on topography, weather patterns, when to attack a fire, and when to not. Because the name of the game, he emphasized, is “safety, safety, safety, safety.” In the meantime, MET has adopted three miles of Highway 154 and is partnering with the county’s Transportation Division to keep brush and weeds at bay. It’s also organizing a CERT class in January. To learn more and donate, visit mountainemberteam.com. —Tyler Hayden

INDEPENDENT.COM

NOVEMBER 14, 2019

THE INDEPENDENT

35


s ’ n a i d n I a Apn

openings

SPICY SIBLINGS: Brothers Ninder Josan (right), Kuldeep Singh (center), and line cook Gopi Josan (left) offer a wide range of Indian foods at 718 State Street.

s e b i V g n i Welcom Ninder Josan W

alking into Apna Indian Kitchen’s

glowing dining room, filled with the scent of fresh curry, tables dotted with steaming familystyle meals, and a beautiful Indian elephant tapestry lining the wall, it’s hard not to feel instantly welcomed and relaxed. It’s no wonder Apna means “Ours” in Indian — brothers Ninder Josan and Kuldeep Singh have truly made this shifting space, which used to be Goa Taco, into an oasis where anyone can feel at home. The road to running their own spot has been a long time coming. Josan learned his recipes from their mother, and the family owns two other restaurants: Saffron in Newbury Park and Tantra in Oak Park. Said Josan, “This was us venturing out on our own.”

Brothers and Break Out on Their Own in State Street Restaurant

Kuldeep Singh

BY REBECCA HORRIGAN

For main courses, the butter chicken, marinated in a cream tomato sauce made complete with a pat of butter melting atop it, is otherworldly. Enjoy it with their fluffy garlic naan or, better yet, try their cheese naan topped with mozzarella and herbs for a decadent dipping experience. The family is from Northern India, where a lot of stews and dishes are served in clay pots; the aptitude for creating incredible sauces is in their blood. When they first moved to America, their father opened a restaurant in downtown Los Angeles. Josan would do his homework and then help out at the restaurant, honing his craft. “The sauces we make here take about four to four and a half hours,” Josan said. You can taste the simmeredto-perfection flavors in any dish, especially in their saag paneer, consisting of fresh spinach sautéed with ginger, garlic, roasted cumin, and fenugreek. An Apna specialty with an American spin are their curry CLASSICS: Apna serves traditional Indian dishes like the garlic naan, butter chicken, India latke, and rice, pictured above. fries, a hearty plate of waffle fries topped with fenugreek, herbs, and It’s fun to hear the brothers banter curry sauce. Gearing their concept toward the Santa about which recipes work best and to witness their genuine engagement with Barbara palate, the duo hopes to add more the happy community of diners popping seafood dishes in the future and eight more in. Although they’ve only been open draft beers to their already strong list. Topa since July, they’ve generated a following Topa’s Chief Peak and Golden Road’s Mango due to their unpretentious service, led by Cart make appearances as well as Indian Singh’s calm and friendly front-of-house beers, such as the Taj Mahal lager. “Beer and Indian food work amazingly well together,” demeanor. “Once you start seeing people come said Josan, who also serves some wine. back, you know you’re doing something For dessert, gulab jamun (Indian fried rose-sugar-syrup doughnuts) and pistachio right,” Josan said. The food is endlessly pleasing at Apna. kulfi (homemade ice cream) can be paired Start with their enticing appetizers. The with a warm masala chai or a refreshing warm samosa pastries are filled with mango lassi. potatoes, peas, and spices; Indian latkes The variety of textures, flavors, smells, are topped with zesty onions and daikon and overall sensory enjoyment at Apna is radish; and the amritsari fish pakora is difficult to put into words, so I’ll take a cue delicately marinated in flour and chick- from Josan’s simple encouragement for Santa pea batter with spices. “We let the food Barbarans to “come and try the food.” do the talking,” Josan explained. 718 State St.; 770-8479 36

THE INDEPENDENT

NOVEMBER 14, 2019

INDEPENDENT.COM

PAUL WELLMAN

PAUL WELLMAN PHOTOS

FOOD&DRINK

p. 36 patios

CLASSIC YET FRESH: La Cocina is serving traditional Mexican fare with an upscale spin, such as these enchiladas with fromage-basil stuffing, walnuts, cotija, and guajillo sauce.

Indulge in Ambience at A

LA COCINA

s the sun’s rays dance so perfectly from

also translates into their drink menu. Picante mirror to mirror, the twisting tree de la Casa is one of their more popular limbs overhead softly rustle in house margaritas, created with the breeze, and the murmur mezcal, basil, cucumber, jalaof laughs, clinking glasses, and peño, lime, and agave. Other guest favorites include the music fill the air, it’s no wonPisco Sour cocktail, preder visitors of La Cocina stay from happy hour ’til close. pared with pisco, lemon, simple syrup, egg white, The newly opened Mexican restaurant, located at 7 Puts a Twist on Tradition and Peruvian bitters, and East Anapamu Street, invites the Piña Amarilla cocktail, BY SHANNON PONN guests to escape the daily hummade with rum, lime juice, drum and reconnect with family pineapple, and coconut. and friends while indulging in unique “The inspiration for La Cocina Mesoamerican, Spanish, and Mexican-Cali- came from this beautiful space,” Meraz said. “It’s so unique and amazing, and we knew the fornian foods. “Prepare yourself to have a completely food should be the same. When people come different experience,” said general manager here, they forget about everything and just live Johana Meraz. “Our chefs created the menu in the moment.” The restaurant’s relaxed and communal to echo a particular family feeling. For those who don’t know how Mexican families are in atmosphere inspires guests to stay a while the home, we use different ingredients lying and feel at home when dining. La Cocina around and put them into our recipes. We combines the bright and open concept comdon’t waste anything.” monly seen in Santa Barbara architecture It may come as a surprise that the conven- with accents of warmth and comfort. The tional options like burritos and quesadillas most popular seating area is the back patio, do not exist on the menu. Instead, from their as its ability to transport visitors to a calm, Baked Chicken Enfrijolada (made with aged fantasy-like environment is something specheddar, ancho chile, crema, and chive) to cial. With delicate green vines trickling over their Carne Asada (with papas fingerling, the tops of the walls, soft yellow lights peeking sprouting caulilini, enfrijolada puree, and through the tree branches, and a great towerchipotle salsa), La Cocina’s menu encourages ing fireplace crackling in the back, this cozy all to open their minds and enjoy delicious patio is an exceptional aspect La Cocina has twists on traditional Mexican cuisine. above the rest. Executive Chef Mario Alberto brings Since its grand opening at the end of June a wealth of culinary expertise to the new —following the closures of both Somerset establishment, adding a unique flair to every and Smithy’s in the same space—La Cocina menu option. “I want to offer locals food that has already experienced much growth. is flavorful, clean, and light, as an ode to our From date nights and birthdays to wedding favorite Mexican dishes, but with a subtle and rehearsal dinners and company celebrations, unexpected twist,” Alberto said. “This may the restaurant will continue to serve as a space be with a flavor or spice, or how the dish is everyone feels at home in. “It’s all about the presented.” experience and the ambiance,” said Meraz. La Cocina’s theme of curving expectations 7 E. Anapamu St.; 277-7730; lacocinasb.com

Not-So-Typical Mexican Restaurant


PAUL WELLMAN

aRies anniVeRs

Seven Turns Seven REAL DEAL DRINKS: The team at Seven Bar in the Funk Zone keeps cocktails real.

S

pend an hour in the Funk Zone and you’re bound to hear a

Funk Zone Favorite

Throws Funk Fall Fest on November 16

Open until 12

On nOv. 28 fOr thanksgiving

pick up Orders Only individual dinner s available for $16.95

FOOD & DRINK

gaggle of tourists in festival wear wondering aloud how the neighborhood got its name. And you can’t blame them — while the current iteration of the Funk Zone is well stocked with twee tasting rooms, upscale boutiques, and Eater-endorsed restaurants, it seems to be suffering from a conspicuous deficiency of funk. In such moments, you may wish to direct curious visitors to the less-traveled northern end of Helena Avenue. There, just around the corner from a strip club and an adult bookstore, the Seven Bar and Kitchen is helping to maintain the last vestige of the area’s eponymous funk. Set on a distinctively grimy and relatively underdeveloped block of the Funk Zone’s outer limits, Seven serves up stiff drinks, live music, good food, and great times to customers in the know. And this year, Seven celebrates its seventh anniversary. That’s no small feat in a town where the lifespan of such establishments is typically measured in months. Owner Mike Gomez attributes the bar’s longevity to its emphasis on providing attentive service and a welcoming atmosphere for residents. “Santa Barbara locals grab onto this spot,” said Gomez. “They come in and just appreciate the vibe and the staff.” But with the encroachment of lower State’s gentrification wave and the attendant rise in competition and operating costs, the survival of this stalwart favorite is hardly assured. “We’re in our seventh year, and I’ve never had to try so hard,” explained BY ALEX WARD Gomez. “It’s like everyone’s gunning for us, you know?” So far, Seven has been able to distinguish itself and keep business flowing by offering shows with no cover charge and serving food and drinks at prices that belie the quality of their ingredients. “You’re getting a craft cocktail, fresh juices, good liquor, homemade infusions, not, like, this poisonous beverage,” said Gomez. The recently revamped dinner menu also reflects a commitment to quality. With fresh, never-frozen ingredients, the upscale pub grub offers creative re-imaginings of bar food favorites. Highlight dishes include the Truffle Mushroom Burger, the Summer Solstice Salad (featuring heirloom tomatoes and fresh peaches), and the Chicken and Waffle Nugs — chicken tenders dipped and fried in waffle batter. But the bar’s most compelling feature may well be its palpable air of authenticity. Seven employs a pastiche of styles, with architectural holdovers from the building’s prior incarnations as a motorcycle shop in the ’40s and as a gay dance club in the ’70s and ’80s. Exposed brick and fieldstone sit behind a hodgepodge of decorations ranging from country kitsch to vibrant modern art. The place is coated with an unmistakable patina of history, serving as an aesthetic counterpoint to the pristine industrial-chic breweries and stark Mediterranean hotels that have become de rigueur in the area. On November 16, Seven is celebrating its seventh year with the Funk Fall Fest, a collaborative party with the Wayfarer Hotel that features live music and vendors. Proceeds benefit One805 and the Environmental Defense Center.

FRESH LOCAL CUISINE BREAKFAST & PEET’S COFFEE BEAUTIFUL SALADS SANDWICH PLATTERS HORS D’OEUVRES CATERING

justencater@cox.net

THANKSGIVING TO YOU! Generous Full Dinner serves 10 • $185.00 Fresh Roasted California Turkey • Herb Stuffing • Yams • Fresh Green Beans • Mashed Potatoes & Gravy • Cranberries • Rolls

Order by Monday, Nov. 25 Also Fresh Apple & Pumpkin Pies – $15 ea. Pick up on Thanksgiving Day 12 noon At 53 S. Milpas St. or Carpinteria Restaurant Call Justen Alfama 805-319-0155 Bistro Dining 6:30 a.m. - 3 p.m. Weekends 7 a.m. - 3 p.m.

5050 Carpinteria Avenue • Downtown Carpinteria

224 Helena Ave.; 845-0377; sevensb.com INDEPENDENT.COM

NOVEMBER 14, 2019

THE INDEPENDENT

37


COURTESY

Yanni’s Greek & American Deli

Located at MacKenzie Market

Serving Santa Barbara for 34 Years! Famous Gyros & Tri-tip Full Service Deli Catering

3102 State Street • 682-2051

Who’s Serving Thanksgiving? FOOD & DRINK

PROUDLY SERVING SANTA BARBARA FOR OVER 40 YEARS

L O C A T I O N S Goleta (The Original) 5735 Hollister Avenue

La Cumbre Plaza 3890 La Cumbre Lane

Milpas 216 South Milpas Street

Lompoc 1413 N H Street

Downtown 628 State Street

Isla Vista 888 Embarcadero Del Norte

Buellton 209 E Hwy 246

Santa Maria 985 E Betteravia Road

Organic

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Schedule a Consultation with

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THE INDEPENDENT

• Over 600 Satisfied Customers

(805) 965-9292

E

ach November, my inbox is swamped with

the same question: Which restaurants serve a traditional turkey dinner on Thanksgiving Day? Last week, I made a hundred phone calls to find the answer. Make your reservations early, because many places will sell out. If the place you’d like to go is already sold out this year, then make reservations at least three months in advance next year. Joining my 13th annual Thanksgiving list in 2019 are the three dining options at the Rosewood Miramar Beach, including Caruso’s, Malibu Farms, and the Chandelier Ballroom. The popular Stonehouse and Plow & Angel restaurants at the San Ysidro Ranch have returned to the list this year, having recovered from the devastating Montecito floods of 2018. Though the following info is specifically about turkey dinners, other entrées may be available. •

Aly’s Restaurant; Solvang; $100; 4:30 + 7:30pm;

Ritz-Carlton Bacara: Angel Oak; $139; 5-9pm;

Ritz-Carlton Bacara: Banquet Room; $145 adults,

697-7082

571-4444

$75 ages 3-12; 10:30am-2pm; 571-4220

Chumash Casino Resort: Willows; $65; 3-9pm;

Cold Spring Tavern; $75 adults, $35 ages 12 and

• • • • • • • • •

Ritz-Carlton Bacara: The Bistro; $95; 5:30-9pm,

• •

Ballard Inn Restaurant; $85; 3-8pm; (800)

• • • • • • • •

571-4217

638-2466

Bella Vista, The Biltmore; $145 adults, $75 ages

5-12; 10am-7pm; 969-2261

Blackbird, Hotel Californian; $125 adults, $55 ages

4-12; 5-10pm; 882-0135 Black Sheep; $65; 5-10pm; 965-1113 bouchon (sold out); $85; 3:30-8:30pm; 730-1160 Brewhouse; $41.99 adults, $15 ages 10 and below; 11am-6pm; 884-4664 Brothers Restaurant at the Red Barn; Santa Ynez; $80 adults, $40 ages 12 and below; 1-6pm; 688-4142 Ca’ Dario Ristorante & Pizzeria; ~$30; 3-10pm; 884-9419 Chumash Casino Resort: The Buffet; $45 adults, $14.95 ages 12 and below; 1-9pm; 686-0855

• •

686-0855

below; 11am-7:45pm; 967-0066

Convivo Restaurant, Santa Barbara Inn; $70 adults, $20 ages 12 and below; 11am-9pm; 845-6789 Crocodile Restaurant & Bar, Lemon Tree Inn; $30; 4-9:30pm; 687-6444 Dargan’s Irish Pub & Restaurant; $25.95; 11:30am9pm; 568-0702 Dining Room, Belmond El Encanto (sold out); $125 adults, $60 kids; 3-10pm; 845-5800 Finch & Fork, Kimpton Canary Hotel; $90 adults, $45 ages 3-10; 2-7:30pm; 879-9100 First & Oak, Mirabelle Inn (sold out); Solvang; $69; 4-8pm; 688-1703 Harbor Restaurant; $75 adults, $15.95 ages 10 and below; noon-9pm; 963-3311 Harry’s Plaza Café; $26.95; 11am-9pm; 687-2800 Helena Avenue Bakery; everything but turkey; takeout with at least four days’ notice; priced à la carte; 880-3383 Hilton, The Set; priced à la carte; 3-8pm; 564-4333 Holdren’s Steaks & Seafood; $32; noon-8:30pm; 965-3363 Jack’s Bistro & Famous Bagels; takeout only, order at least three days in advance; $185 feeds 10 people, $16.95 by the plate; 319-0155 Joe’s Café; ~$26; noon-9pm; 966-4638

Live Oak Café, Best Western Plus Encina Inn & Suites; $25; 11am-4pm; 845-5193 Louie’s California Bistro, The Upham; $65;

Moby Dick Restaurant; $29.99; 11-8:30pm;

• • •

2-6:30pm; 963-7003 965-0549

Montecito Wine Bistro; $65 adults, $35 ages 12

and below; 11am-7pm; 969-7520

Mulligans Café & Bar, Santa Barbara Golf Club;

$30.99 adults, $16.99 ages 10 and below; noon5pm; 682-3228 The Outpost, Goodland Hotel; $55; 4-8pm; 964-1288

Santa Barbara, CA CA Lic. C10- 860806

NOVEMBER 14, 2019

INDEPENDENT.COM

John Dickson’s reporting can be found every day online at SantaBarbara.com. Send tips to info@SantaBarbara.com.


• • • • • • • • •

$17.50 ages 10 and below; 11am-7pm; 688-5581 Root 246; $69 adults, $35 ages 12 and below; 2-8pm; 686-8681 Rosewood Miramar Beach: Caruso’s; $165 adults, $65 ages 4-12; 11:30-9pm; 303-6169 Rosewood Miramar Beach: Chandelier Ballroom;

brunch buffet; $135 adults, $45 ages 4-12; noon5:30pm; 303-6169 Rosewood Miramar Beach: Malibu Farms; $150 adults, $65 ages 4-12, 11:30am-5:30pm; 303-6169 Roy; $65 adults, $20 ages 12 and below; 3-9pm; 966-5636 Shoals Restaurant, Cliff House Inn; ~$65; 2-7pm; 652-1381 Stella Mare’s (sold out); $59 adults, $29 ages 12 and below; noon-8pm; 969-6705 San Ysidro Ranch: Plow & Angel; $65; 4-7pm; 565-1720 San Ysidro Ranch: The Stonehouse; $135; noon7pm; 565-1720 Sunshine Café; $19.99; 11:30am-2:30pm; 898-9121

Tee-Off Restaurant & Lounge; $26.95; 3-9pm;

Treehouse Restaurant, Best Western Plus Pepper Tree Inn; $23.99; noon-8pm; 687-2426 Wine Cask; $85; 4-9pm; 966-9463

687-1616

ago, I reported that The Daisy is coming to 1221 State Street, opposite The Granada Theatre. It opens on Monday, November 18, at 8 a.m. “The Daisy is a fresh, beautiful, and friendly restaurant, marketplace, and beer & wine bar in the heart of Santa Barbara,” reports the press release. “Sit inside the light and airy space or out on the patio, watching the world go by on State Street; sipping a glass of wine from one of our sixteen taps or nursing a cup of locally roasted Low Pigeon coffee. Everything is made in-house and our produce is sourced from the nearby farmers’ markets.” There will also be veggie-grain salads, sandwiches, house-made hummus, and house-smoked salmon to go. Visit thedaisyrestaurant.com or call 845-0188.

INDIAN FLAVOR OF INDIA 3026 State 682-6561 $$ www.flavorofindiasb.com Finest, most authentic Indian cuisine is affordable too! All You Can Eat Lunch Buffet $10.95 M-S dinner combos $9.95+ Specials: Tandoori- Mixed or Fish, Chicken Tikka Masala, Shrimp Bhuna. Also: meat, curries & vegetarian.Wine & Beer. Take out. VOTED BEST for 20 YEARS!

CASUAL DINING CHUCKS WATERFRONT GRILL, 113 Harbor Way, 805-5641200, began serving friends and family in the Santa Barbara Harbor in 1999. We’re everyone’s favorite spot to sit and relax by the boats, watching all the action. Enjoy steaks, fresh seafood straight from the boats docked right outside, and cocktails on our radiant heated deck with fire pits. Or head inside for intimate, cozy booths and the full bar. Plus, free valet parking! Dinner 7 nights from 5 p.m., Sunday Brunch from 10 a.m. Private parties and special events accommodated.

IRISH DARGAN’S IRISH PUB & RESTAURANT, 18 E. Ortega St. (next to lot 10) SB, 568-0702. $$. Open 7 days 11:30a-Close (Food ‘til 10p, 11p on Sat/Sun). AE MC V Disc. Authentic Irish food & atmosphere in downtown SB. Specialties from Ireland include Seafood & Meat dishes. Informal, relaxed pub-style atmosphere. Live music Thursday nights. Children welcome. Avail. for private parties. Pool & Darts.

ETHIOPIAN AUTHENTIC ETHIOPIAN cuisine Featured at Petit Valentien Restaurant 1114 State St. #14, 805-966-0222. Serkaddis Alemu offers an ever changing menu with choices of vegetarian, vegan, and meat options. Catering Available for parties of up to 40 people. Sat/Sun lunch 11:30-2:30

MAKE YOUR RESERVATION TODAY 805-884-4664 sbbrewhouse.com • 229 W. Montecito Street

TAKE US HOME FOR THE HOLIDAYS...

Happy Holidays PIES! fromICEallCREAM of us to all of you!

CHOOSE ANY FLAVOR INCLUDING PUMPKIN PIE

Mission Street Ice Cream & Yogurt

Fine Ice Cream and Yogurts

201&West Mission St.since • 569-2323 ~ An Independently Owned Operated Shop 1986 ~ 201 West Mission St. • 569-2323

MEDITERRANEAN FOXTAIL KITCHEN 14 E. Cota St. Lebanese cuisine, American burger, 24 craft beers, great cocktails, whiskey bar, vegan options, open late night, hookah lounge. Kitchen closes at midnight on the weekend, try our best falafel in town. www. foxtailsb.com NORTHERN EUROPEAN ANDERSEN’S DANISH RESTAURANT & BAKERY. 1106 State St., 805-962-5085. Open Daily 8am-9pm. Family owned for over 42 years. Northern European Cuisine with California Infusion. Fresh scratch made pastries & menus everyday. Authentic Breakfasts, Lunches & Dinners. Happy Hour menu with exquisite wines & beers, 3-7pm everyday. High Tea served everyday starting at 2pm. Huge Viking Mimosas & Champagne Cocktails. Private Event spaces.

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Side Salad Plated Turkey Dinner with all the Fixings Pumpkin Pie House Beer or Wine

E

FRENCH PETIT VALENTIEN, 1114 State St. #14, 805-966-0222. Open M-F 11:30-3pm (lunch). M-Sat 5pm-Close (dinner). Sun $25.50 four course prix fixe dinner. In La Arcada Plaza, Chef Robert Dixon presents classic French comfort food at affordable cost in this cozy gem of a restaurant. Petit Valentien offers a wide array of meat and seafood entrees along with extensive small plates and a wine list specializing in amazing quality at arguably the best price in town. A warm romantic atmosphere makes the perfect date spot. Comfortable locale for dinner parties, or even just a relaxing glass of wine. Reservations are recommended.

ITALIAN FINE DINING ACTOR’S CORNER CAFÉ Please reserve for a romantic dinner and an evening celebration. A unique wine and food pairing experience. Our castle like setting is also for sale. Check us out ActorsCornerCafe.com 805-686-2409

Includes

Dining Out Guide

AMERICAN LITTLE KITCHEN, 17 W. Ortega St. (805) 770-2299. “Great little neighborhood café!” Healthy, comfortable, and affordable. Lunch-Dinner-Late Night. Organic chicken and hormone/antibiotic-free burgers, local produce. Try the Chicken Tikka Masala, vegetarian options. Great local wine list and craft beers. www.littlekitchensb.com

$41.99 per person $15 for kids under 12

FOOD & DRINK •

DINING O U T GUIDE

THE ENDLESS SUMMER BAR-CAFE, 113 Harbor Way, 805564-4666, upstairs from Chuck’s Waterfront Grill, offers casual dining, surrounded by vintage surfboards and memorabilia. Sip on local wines, craft beers and cocktails, play a game of pool on one of our covered lanais while watching sports and surf movies on our 50” 4k TV’s. Listen to live music evenings, as you revel in the beauty that is Santa Barbara. Serving daily from 11:30 a.m. Private parties and special events accommodated.

Join us for THANKSGIVING DINNER

THE DAISY OPENS NOVEMBER 18: More than a year

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EMAIL: ARTS@INDEPENDENT.COM Tyler Matthew Burk

I

n 1985, when Bret Easton Ellis burst onto the best-seller list with his first novel, Less Than Zero, he was just 21 years old. The novel’s corrosive account of debauchery among privileged Los Angeles teens touched a nerve with the New Wave generation, and, in the wake of its success, Ellis plunged into the heart of another, even more decadent situation — New York City in the 1980s. Welcomed at every chic new restaurant and lured nightly to drug-fueled parties that lasted until after the sun came up, Ellis encountered a world where the provocative transgressions of his high school and college chums paled in comparison to the escapades of an even more uninhibited generation of privileged adults. The inspiration for American Psycho, which remains his best-known work, came at a private dinner party in the late ’80s featuring a guest list drawn from Wall Street’s young elite. Looking around and listening to his amped-up companions as they speed-talked about fashion, money, and sex, Ellis reimagined the manuscript he had been working on as the diary of a serial killer. The rest is history, or at least publishing and censorship history. Simon & Schuster

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dropped Ellis after seeing the final draft, and although Vintage published the book in the United States as a paperback original in 1991, the first hardcover edition in this country didn’t come out until 2012. Outcry against the book’s coolly cynical satire mistook the representation of homicidal misogyny for the real thing — an understandable error. It’s still only available to those 18 years of age and over in Australia and New Zealand, a situation that Ellis has described as “adorable.” The fortunes of American Psycho took a distinct turn in 2000, when Mary Harron’s film version, starring Christian Bale as Patrick Bateman, became an unexpected success, earning praise as a “horror comedy classic” from the New York Times’ Stephen Holden. The film gave visceral life not only to the gratuitous gore of the novel, but perhaps more effectively to its wicked japes at the popular music of the period. Bateman famously performs an elaborate critical evaluation of the music of Huey Lewis and the News as prelude to one grisly sequence.

OUT OF THE BOX REVISITS THE WICKED ’80S

American Psycho runs November 15-24, at Center Stage Theater (751 Paseo Nuevo). Call 963-0408 or see outoftheboxtheatre.org.

GIRLS ROCK S.B. JOINS FORCES WITH LIBRARY For the past seven years, Girls Rock Santa Barbara has offered a creative safe space for musically inclined girls to explore, learn, and collaborate with like-minded youth. This past October, GRSB partnered with the Public Library in an effort to make music education accessible to a broader audience. The collaboration has resulted in the availability of 10 instruments — electric, acoustic, and bass guitars, amps, and ukuleles — for library-goers to check out. The lending program also featured guitar classes for middle and high school students, which began mid-October and will culminate with a performance in December. Another session is planned for the spring. Visit your area library to check out instruments or enroll in classes. See sbplibrary.org. —MD

L I F E PAGE 41 JER EMY DAN IEL

AMERICAN PSYCHO, THE MUSICAL

It was this connection, between the apparent innocence of ephemeral ’80s pop and the ironic spectacle of graphic violence, that triggered Ellis to begin a Kickstarter campaign in 2013 with the goal of funding a stage musical version of American Psycho. After enlisting the considerable talents of Duncan Sheik, who wrote the music and lyrics for the Tony-winning Broadway hit Spring Awakening, the Psycho musical team gained momentum. Runs in London and New York were short, but the appetites of fans of off-center musicals was whetted for exactly what’s happening here in Santa Barbara at Center Stage Theater November 15-24. That’s when Out of the Box Theatre Company will present its production of American Psycho, the musical. For two weekends — Friday and Saturday nights at 8 p.m., and Sundays at 2 p.m. — Patrick Bateman will work out, dress for dinner, oh, and murder people, all to a throbbing electronic soundtrack featuring versions of some of the best-known hits of the period. Tyler Matthew Burk is Bateman, and Renee Cohen is Evelyn Williams, his girlfriend. The large cast, which includes Out of the Box veterans Zachary Thompson as Luis Carruthers and Deborah Bertling as Pat’s mom, has been rehearsing the show’s original choreography by Chloé Roberts for weeks, and singing their hearts out under the musical direction of Kacey Link. For Samantha Eve, the producer-director behind every Out of the Box show, this one offers a chance to revisit New York, the place where she attended college (NYU) and where she continually returns for musical theater inspiration. It’s a mixedup, shook-up world that’s portrayed in this show, and if that content advisory doesn’t give you pause, consider this: Patrick Bateman’s original ’80s idol was none other than Donald Trump. —Charles Donelan

BANDSTAND LIVE

It’s 1945 in Cleveland, Ohio, and World War II vet Donny Novitski is trying to make a go of it as a musician but struggling to find his niche. After hearing about a national radio swing band competition in tribute to the troops, Novitski puts together a band composed of war veterans and enters the contest. This is the plot of Bandstand, a musical about the postwar reality for returning veterans as they try to re-assimilate into society. The play made its Broadway debut in 2017 and is now being performed in cities across the country. On November 19-20, Santa Barbarans can see the Tony Award–winning (for best choreography) show at The Granada Theatre, presented by Broadway in Santa Barbara. While Bandstand is ostensibly about four lads and a musical dream, the plot’s underpinnings are the dire struggles each veteran faces trying to keep his PTSD at bay. For example, the band’s bassist, Davy Zlatic, played by Benjamin Powell, uses alcohol to drown his demons and humor to hide his pain. “It was a really challenging but substantial and fulfilling process to discover this character and his motivation,” said Powell in a recent interview with the Independent. “A major contributing factor to his addiction is that he was part of the liberation force of Dachau. I have not personally struggled with addiction, so I had to do some digging and research on what that’s like … but I have been to a concentration camp in Southern France, and I was able to draw from my experience visiting there.” Although the subject matter can be dark at times, it is buoyed by humor, catchy songs, and a love story. The tour, which kicked off October 29 and is booked until next June, is “going very, very well,” according to Powell. “The show’s great, and we keep growing and expanding and developing [it]. And I think we’re all doing a really great job of keeping the show alive and fresh and new every time we do it.” Bandstand runs Tuesday-Wednesday, November 19-20, at The Granada Theatre (1214 State St.). Call 899-2222 or see granadasb.org. —Michelle Drown

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DAVID BAZEMORE

a&e | THEATER PREVIEW

Department of Music

Fall 2019 Concert Series

WRITER IN THE ROOM: Playwright Enid Graham, director Risa Brainin, and actors discuss What Martha Did.

Wind Ensemble

BUILDING A BIGGER DRAMA

P

Thursday, November 21 | 7:30 pm Lotte Lehmann Concert Hall

Chamber Choir + Women’s Chorus Friday, November 22 | 7:30 pm Trinity Episcopal Church

laywrights today struggle with certain unyielding insight, structure, and some of the darkest dialogue this constraints: They can abandon Aristotle’s unities side of Edward Albee. Without giving too much of the story away, What at will, but they cannot go over budget. In many instances, the high cost of production means restrict- Martha Did concerns the legacy of a young woman who died early after writing a besting the size of the cast. Through selling inspirational book. Her its Launch Pad program for new family must now decide how the plays, the UCSB Theater Departconsiderable revenue from Marment lifts that burden in order to tha’s great work will be divided in make the development of shows featuring larger casts possible. the event that her mother, Mrs. For example, take What Martha Fisher, who currently receives by Charles Donelan that income, passes away. EveryDid, which runs November 15-24 at the school’s Performing Arts one involved has their own needs Theater. and opinions, and no one expects the answer that Mrs. The playwright, Enid Graham, comes from New Fisher proposes. York City, where she has lived and worked as an actor in Their infighting triggers some intensely bitter and film, television, and theater since graduating from the personal attacks, along with several key revelations Juilliard School. She’s written five plays, of which What about the circumstances surrounding Martha’s death. Martha Did is the second, and she freely admits that Asked about how mean the characters sometimes are until now, it’s been a challenge to bring it to the stage. “I to one another, Graham said, “It’s family, right? You was frustrated because I had this big script and I knew can be meaner to family than you can be to anybody it needed work, but no theaters could develop it because ever, because you can’t lose them.” After conceding that of what it would cost,” Graham told me. Launch Pad, “obviously you can” lose family members, she went to however, was looking for big plays like this. Graham explain that “they’re harder to lose than your friends; said that it’s the talent pool in the UCSB BFA program they tend to stick around no matter what.” that drove that connection. “They want to have a lot This aspect of the script brought out another unexof characters because they’ve got a lot of good people pected advantage of working with the BFA cohort of who need to work,” she said. UCSB’s status as the only performers. Graham said that “we’re in luck with this BFA-granting theater and dance department in the UC setup here, because there’s already a family feeling that system means that top performers from all over come exists between these people.” here to participate in the school’s conservatory-style The play was offered at UCSB over the summer in a program. staged reading format; this version will be given a full Graham’s approach to writing plays derives from her production, with sets, costumes, and a fully rehearsed acting experience, and this gives her certain advantages, cast. Only three performers are returning from the especially in this process-oriented setting. She sees reading. Two of them are professionals: UCSB profesherself as someone who creates scenes from a per- sor Julie Fishell as Mrs. Fisher, and Indy Award winner former’s perspective and who has “an instinct for what’s Brian Harrell as Mr. Green, an old friend of the family. playable.” Her dialogue is exuberant, provocative, and The third is Alexandra Singleton, a BFA candidate who remarkably distinctive. While we may have seen fami- Graham feels has found a special affinity with her role. lies in turmoil gathering around a difficult matriarch “We were lucky to find her,” Graham said of Singleton. before, What Martha Did makes this premise fresh with “She incites my imagination.”

UCSB’S LAUNCH PAD PRESENTS

WHAT MARTHA DID

Middle East Ensemble

Saturday, November 23 | 7:30 pm Lotte Lehmann Concert Hall

Chamber Orchestra + Chamber Players Monday, December 2 | 7:30 pm Lotte Lehmann Concert Hall

Jazz Combos

Tuesday, December 3 | 7:30 pm Lotte Lehmann Concert Hall

Gospel Choir

Friday, December 6 | 7:30 pm Lotte Lehmann Concert Hall

Use code F19INDY for 15% off! music.ucsb.edu/news/purchase-tickets (805) 893-2064 Offer valid online or over the phone only

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COURTESY

a&e | POP, ROCK, & JAZZ PREVIEW

s o Lguos

THE UCSB MULTICULTURAL CENTER PRESENTS

Ritmo Y Sonido Latino

n i P

FROM PUNK TO ROCK: Throughout Strung Out’s journey, their music has explored motifs of humanity that give voice to a haunting vision of American culture and its dark foibles.

F

STRUNG OUT AT SOHO

rom Simi Valley punks to career musi- punk sound has elevated the SoCal hard rock cians, rock band Strung Out has been scene, but Cruz rejects any labels or compariblowing out speakers for 30 years. sons. “Punk rock, whatever,” he said. “None Three decades in any relationship of those terms mean anything to me. Esperequires passion and dedication — especially cially after the acoustic album we did.” Cruz when that bond is built on the do-or-die credits the skill and creativity of the band rebellious ideals of the fringe music scene. members, two of whom, Jake Kiley and Rob After 16 albums, EPs, and compilations, Ramos, have been there since 1989, for Strung this favorite of the ’90s Out’s unique presence. SoCal skater-punks con“My favorite thing about tinues to bring an edgy being around these guys energy, shameless intelis you’re with a group ligence, and devil-mayof people who’ve grown care panache to the stage, together. … You leave a making even the most lot of people behind in your life because they aggressive of anthems seem sultry. don’t grow. It’s an impor“I was one of those kids tant thing as an adult to who was always looking be around people who for something,” said lead show signs of growth.” by Maggie Yates singer Jason Cruz in a The fans have also recent phone interview aged, providing a comwith the Independent. “I honestly thought that pletely different crowd atmosphere with each music and punk rock was a way of saving the passing year. The punk kids of late Gen X world. When I was young, I wanted to join and the early millennia are now parents and some great battle … I wanted there to be some professionals and people with work in the kind of meaning in my existence. That’s where morning. They’re at the show to hear their music came in.” favorite band, not to release angsty energy by Throughout the band’s journey, the music guzzling beer and shoving each other around. has explored motifs of humanity that give “Our crowd is a lot older now,” said Cruz. voice to a haunting vision of American “More watching. Less pit. … It’s a mind-fu*k culture and its dark foibles. “Every record up there, wondering what people are thinkhas a theme to it. A kind of searching,” said ing. We just watch each other.” Cruz, before offering the gruff vulnerability While the scene may have changed, some evident throughout Stung Out’s anthology things are always the same: “We’re better with of music: “I lost my best friend to cancer a strong drink,” Cruz joked. And though tourmonth before the new record [Songs of Armor ing is exhausting, Cruz continues to bring 100 and Devotion] was recorded. So this record is percent passion to the stage. “I don’t relax,” about loss and love, and about songs being he said. “Not until you’re dead?” I ask, and he there as shields and armor.” pauses. “I guess,” he responds with a verbal Strung Out’s more intricate take on the shrug. “Hopefully not even then.”

FRI, NOV 15th, 7:30 PM Music Performance MCC Theater $5 for UCSB students and youth under 12; $15 for general admission. Tickets: https://bit.ly/2YYJB5B. FOR THE FULL FALL 2019 CALENDAR VISIT MCC.SA.UCSB.EDU

UCSBMCC

ROCK BAND

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COURTESY

a&e | FILM & TV PREVIEW

DÉJÀ VU: Production designer Michael Bricker won an Emmy for his work on the TV series Russian Doll, starring Natasha Lyonne (pictured) as a New York City game designer caught in a recurring lifecycle in which she repeatedly dies, then reawakens.

SPECIAL EFFECTS SERIES AT THE POLLOCK

M

y job is building the world of the As the set producer, you’re creating the brick-and-mortar show,” said Michael Bricker, pro- tone of the film. Yeah, my job is building the world duction designer for Russian Doll. of the show. Then the decorator and the draftsAnd so he did—with aplomb. men and the prop people come in—all those The clever, twisty, darkly humorous series different departments report to me—and so I’m stars Natasha Lyonne as Nadia, a New York guiding their different decisions by establishing City game designer who, on her 36th birthday, color palettes and times of year, times of day, becomes caught in a recurring lifecycle in and giving them the broad design strokes of the which she is killed only to reawaken inside the world, and then guiding the set designers on bathroom of her friend’s how I want the layout of the loft during her birthday set to be. soiree. Bricker brilliantly wove the real-life grit of Each week, you get a new script New York with nuanced with new locations, etc. How do fantastical design, which you keep ahead of the filming? worked synergistically with It’s a constant turnover. You’re the direction and script to planning, you’re scouting for convey mood and ambilocations; I review things ance. In recognition of his that the location manager is by Michelle Drown work, Bricker and his team finding, and narrow those won an Emmy for Outstanding Production down to my top two picks, and then share those Design for a Comedy or Drama Series (Half with the director and the cinematographer. We go visit, we learn the restrictions and realities, Hour) and Animation. Santa Barbarans have the opportunity to we pick our favorites, and then that becomes see several episodes of Russian Doll followed that place. Then I do another round with my by a Q&A with Bricker on Thursday, Novem- department, with the set decorator, and the art ber 14, as part of Carsey-Wolf’s Special Effects director; it gets drafted. Then I say, “These are all series, which runs through December 5. I the things I want to change.” spoke over the phone with Bricker ahead of It’s usually [shooting in] someone’s home, his Emmy win about his career and Russian so you’re moving all their furniture out and Doll. The following is an edited version of then bringing in all new furniture, repaintour conversation. (For the full interview, see ing the whole thing, wallpapering the whole shebang. That takes anywhere from a day to a independent.com/RussianDoll.) week to two weeks, depending on how much Tell me a bit about the Russian Doll set and why you work there is, and it has to be done by the time decided to use a bathroom as the door between the the camera arrives, and then they have to put lifecycles. That was all scripted. Nadia [Nata- it all back. sha Lyonne] was scripted to reset in the bathroom in front of a mirror, and the door was How do you feel about being nominated for an Emmy? scripted as some sort of art piece — it wasn’t It’s totally cool. Production design in general is specific. And the revolver door handle was in not something that is really talked about — it’s the script as well. There was also some sort usually the acting, the cinematography, and the of indication that as Nadia passed through directing. I cannot believe that so many people that threshold — i.e., the door — there was have just loved the design of [Russian Doll]. … a kind of party that had a Wonderland feel. I think it’s cool to, in a small way, to educate That made me think that the bathroom was people on how all that stuff really does influence basically the rabbit hole, and that is also why how you perceive a character or a story or a tone, I wanted the mirror to be round, to feel like or whether you laugh or not. It’s all there and it’s all thought through. a hole.

RUSSIAN DOLL’S

MICHAEL BRICKER INTERVIEWED

ADY BARKAN

Political activist, founder of the Be A Hero campaign, and author of Eyes to the Wind: Love and Death, Hope and Resistance

TALK LOVE AND DEATH, HOPE AND RESISTANCE NOVEMBER 21 | 4:00 PM McCune Conference Room, 6020 Humanities and Social Sciences Building Free public event, no reservations needed

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Special Effects: Russian Doll, a Q&A with Production Designer Michael Bricker takes place Thursday, November 14. Don’t miss the last two events in the series, They Shall Not Grow Old, with assistant editor Elliot Travers, Wednesday, November 20; and Beetlejuice, with award-winning makeup artist Ve Neill, Thursday, December 5. All shows are at 7 p.m. at UCSB’s Pollock Theatre. See carseywolf.ucsb.edu/cwc-presents.


FALL

a&e | FILM & TV

2019 2020

The Fall

SHE’S NO LADY; SHE’S A COP

FIVE WOMEN WITH BADGES

I

f you’re still jonesing for Helen Mirren’s venerable DCI Tennison in Prime Suspect, stream these series starring female detectives.

TV

X-STREAMIST

Happy Valley (Netflix): Sarah Lancashire BY RUSTY UNGER gives an indelible and award-winning performance as a Yorkshire police sergeant on the trail of a criminal with a dark family connection to her. Surprisingly tense and twisty, there’s a second season that’s equally excelHappy Valley lent. Above Suspicion (Amazon): Based on novels written by Lynda La Plante (the writer-creator of Prime Suspect), rookie British Constable Anna Travis encounters bad guys both on the street and within her department for four seasons that were originally aired from ’09-’12.

a LAUNCH PAD preview production

WHAT MARTHA DID

A NEW PLAY BY ENID GRAHAM

DIRECTED BY RISA BRAININ

NOV 15-24 Performing Arts Theater

THE WHITE CARD

BY CLAUDIA RANKINE DIRECTED BY SHIRLEY JO FINNEY

NOV 21-24 Studio Theater

The Fall (Netflix): Set in Ireland and starring Gillian Anderson as a detective superintendent up against Jamie Dornan as a serial killer, it’s a full-fledged creepy nail-biter, but you can skip Season 3. And I know, I know: If you are in any way serious about streaming TV, you’ve already seen it. Marcella (Netflix): Marcella features a neurotic London detective on the trail of — yes, another — serial killer. It’s gripping, and you’ll be entertained, but here’s a warning about Season 2: It’s terrible. The Commander (Amazon): This is an oldie (’03-’08), but since it too was created by Lynda La Plante and stars the wonderful Amanda Burton as head of an elite London homicide team, it’s well worth the watch. There are five seasons, and even though the bobbies don’t have cell phones and the detectives don’t have laptops, it only makes solving the cases tougher. Plus, the Commander’s evolution from bumbling to brilliant is engrossing.

The Commander

Rusty Unger has been a New York–based magazine and book editor and writer as well as a film executive. She has written for television, motion pictures, and many national publications.

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What is

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a&e | FILM & TV

Ford v Ferrari

MOVIE GUIDE EDITED BY MICHELLE DROWN

SPECIAL SCREENINGS The Room (99 mins., NR) See the film that became a cult legend and spawned a best-selling book by its star Greg Sestero, The Disaster Artist, and the James Franco film of the same name. The Room was written and directed by, and stars Tommy Wiseau and tells the story of a love triangle, includes myriad unrelated subplots, and has been deemed one of the worst films ever made. Riviera (Fri., Nov. 15, 9 p.m.)

PREMIERES

their own Bosleys. This time, Sabina (Kristen Stewart), Elena (Naomi Scott), and Jane (Ella Balinska) must work together to deactivate a dangerous technology. Camino Real/Metro 4 Depeche Mode: Spirits in the Forest (95 mins., NR) Anton Corbijn directed this film, which includes live footage of the band’s last two concerts of their Global Spirit Tour in Berlin, Germany, and delves into the lives of six über-fans as they make their way from their hometowns to the show.

Metro 4 (Opens Thu., Nov. 21, 7 p.m.)

A Beautiful Day in the Neighborhood (109 mins., NR) Tom Hanks dons Fred Rogers’s buttonup sweater and sneakers for his portrayal of the TV icon in this biopic. Based the 1989 Esquire article, the film shows how the jaded journalist Lloyd Vogel’s (Matthew Rhys) life is transformed after spending time with Rogers for the story.

Metro 4 (Opens Thu., Nov. 21)

Charlie’s Angels (118 mins., PG-13) Elizabeth Banks wrote and directed this iteration of the Charlie’s Angels storyline. The Townsend agency has gone international, with multiple teams, each with

Camino Real/Paseo Nuevo

Frozen II (104 mins., PG) It’s been three years since Elsa (Idina Menzel) and Anna (Kristen Bell) and company’s last adventure, and they are about to embark on a new one. Elsa begins hearing strange sounds that call her to the north beyond Arendelle. Elsa, Anna, Kristoff (Jonathan Groff), Olaf (Josh Gad), and Sven journey afar and end up saving their kingdom.

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Arlington/Fairview/Fiesta 5 (Opens Thu., Nov. 21)

The Good Liar (109 mins., R) Sir Ian McKellen stars in this thriller as a Roy, a con artist who begins to fall in love with his mark, a wealthy widow, Betty (Helen Mirren). Based on Nicholas Searle’s book of the same name.

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Fairview/Fiesta 5

The Irishman (209 mins., R) Director Martin Scorsese brings Charles Brandt’s 2004 memoir, I Heard You Paint Houses, to the big screen in this crime drama about the life of mafia hit man Frank Sheeran (Robert De Niro). The all-star cast includes Al Pacino, Bobby Cannavale, Anna Paquin, Joe Pesci, and Harvey Keitel. Riviera

Camino Real/Paseo Nuevo (Opens Thu., Nov. 21)

21 Bridges (99 mins., R) Chadwick Boseman plays NYPD detective Andre Davis, who makes the call to shut down the 21 bridges leading in and out of Manhattan in order to trap —and find—two alleged cop killers. Stephan James, Taylor Kitsch, Sienna Miller, and J.K. Simmons also star.

the Ferrari racing team at the 1966 24 Hours of Le Mans race in France.

Jojo Rabbit Ford v Ferrari (152 mins., PG-13) James Mangold (Logan, 3:10 to Yuma) directs this biopic about the Ford visionary designer, Carroll Shelby (Matt Damon), and his British driver, Ken Miles (Christian Bale), who were determined to build a car that could beat

Warrior Queen of Jhansi (102 mins., R)

This period drama tells the story of the Rani of Jhansi (Devika Bhise), a feminist icon known as the Joan of Arc of the East, who led her people in the 1857 rebellion against the British East India Company, which loosened Britain’s stronghold. The Hitchcock

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Sustainable Heart

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Relationships • Occupation and Career • Meditation Grief and Loss • Major Life Transitions • Anxiety Spiritual Issues • Communication • Conflict

Michael H Kreitsek, MA

Transpersonal Counseling Psychology Counseling From a Buddhist Perspective 805 698-0286

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LAST CHRISTMAS LASER PROJECTION C Fri to Sun: 9:45 PM; Thu: 2:05, 4:30 MIDWAY C Mon to Thu: 1:40, 4:40, 7:40 H MIDWAY C Fri to Sun: 12:30, 3:30, 6:30, 9:30 JOKER E Fri to Sun: 1:10, 4:00, 6:45, 9:35; Mon to Wed: 2:00, 5:00, 8:00; Thu: 2:00, 5:00

JOJO RABBIT C Fri to Sun: 1:15, 4:30, 7:00, 9:35; Mon to Thu: 2:20, 5:10, 7:40

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a&e | FILM & TV CONT’D FROM P. 49

NOVEMBER 15 - 21 “THE MOVIE EVENT OF THE YEAR” – ROLLING STONE

Arctic Dogs

NOW SHOWING Doctor Sleep (151 mins., R) See Danny Torrance all grown up in this sequel to The Shining. Danny (Ewan McGregor), who struggles with PTSD from his experience at the Overlook Hotel, where he and his parents spent a horrific winter, has kept his psychic powers at bay enough to create a peaceful life. Everything changes, however, when he meets Abra Stone (Kyliegh Curran), who also has “the shine,” and she enlists his help to defeat the evil Rose the Hat. Camino Real/Fiesta 5 Downton Abbey (121 mins., PG) See the Crawley family and its servants as the beloved series makes the leap to the big screen. The Hitchcock Harriet (125 mins., PG-13) Cynthia Erivo (Widows, Bad Times at the El Royale) stars in this titular role about the courageous, legendary abolitionist who guided hundreds via the Underground Railroad to freedom in the North. Leslie Odom Jr., Joe Alwyn, and Janelle Monáe also star.

Fairview/Fiesta 5

O Joker

(122 mins., R)

Todd Phillips’s Joker is one of the year’s most jarring and introspective films. As Arthur Fleck (aka Joker), Joaquin Phoenix’s transition from shy recluse to absolute maniac is done perfectly, using pivotal moments in the film as fuel for quintessential character development. The music score complements the immense levels of suspense, paralleling the deterioration of Arthur’s wellbeing. While there are a few weak bits and pieces of the narrative, they aren’t enough to take away from Phoenix’s superb performance and the film as a whole. (AM)

Jojo interviews her for a research book for the Nazis about Jews. Sam Rockwell and Rebel Wilson also star. Paseo Nuevo Last Christmas (102 mins., PG-13) Paul Feig (Bridesmaids, Spy) offers up this rom-com about Kate (Emilia Clarke), a down-on-her-luck woman who takes a job as a department store elf during Christmas. While there, she meets Tom (Henry Golding) who ends up changing the direction of her life. Camino Real/Metro 4

Midway (138 mins., PG-13) Six months after the Pearl Harbor attack, the U.S. struck back with a devastating Naval assault in the Pacific Theater that proved irreparable for the Japanese Imperial forces. Director Roland Emmerich brings that epic battle to the big screen, following the U.S. sailors and aviators who fought. Camino Real/Metro 4

Motherless Brooklyn (144 mins., R) Edward Norton wrote, produced, directed, and stars in this crime drama based on Jonathan Lethem’s book of the same name. Norton plays Lionel Essrog, a 1950s private investigator with Tourette syndrome, who is on a mission to discover what happened to his mentor. Bruce Willis, Alec Baldwin, and Willem Dafoe also star. The Hitchcock

O Pain and Glory

(113 mins., R)

Deep into the layered folds of Pedro Almodóvar’s atmospheric and powerful new film, a typically stylish and slyly semiautobiographical entry in the

director’s filmography, our aging director protagonist (Antonio Banderas) utters a mantra-like statement: “Cinema saved me.” In his own way, the sensual iconoclast Almodóvar has helped saved cinema. The film is a triumphant late-period, valedictory self-reflection, sometimes evocative of a quieter, gentler variation on Fellini’s artfully navel-gazing cinematic tour de force. (JW)

Riviera

Parasite (133 mins., R) Director Bong Joon-ho (The Host, Snowpiercer) helms this black comedy thriller about two families—one rich, one poor —whose lives become inextricably and murderously entwined.

Paseo Nuevo

Playing with Fire (96 mins., PG) This family-friendly film stars John Cena, Keegan-Michael Key, and Jon Leguizamo as firefighters who rescue three kids. Mayhem ensues.

STARRING ROBERT DE NIRO, AL PACINO, & JOE PESCI FRI: 2:30pm | SAT: 7:15pm | SUN: 3:30pm | MON: 1:00pm TUES: 7:00pm | WED: 3:30pm | THURS: 1:00pm

Fairview/Fiesta 5

Terminator: Dark Fate (128 mins., R) This is the sixth installment in the Terminator franchise, and, according to director James Cameron, a direct sequel to his 1991 Terminator 2: Judgment Day. It’s nearly 30 years later and there is a new, liquid metal Terminator (Gabriel Luna) sent from the future to kill Dani Ramos. Enter Sarah Connor (Linda Hamilton), T-800 (Arnold Schwarzenegger), and hybrid cyborg/human Grace (Mackenzie Davis) to save her from her fate. Fiesta 5

A NEW FILM BY PEDRO ALMODÓVAR STARRING ANTONIO BANDERAS & PENELOPE CRUZ

pain and glory

FRI: 12:00pm, 6:30pm | SAT: 1:30pm | SUN: 1:00pm, 7:30pm MON: 5:00pm | TUES: 2:00pm, 4:30pm | WED: 1:00pm, 7:30pm THURS: 5:00pm

Arlington/Camino Real/Metro 4

Jojo Rabbit (108 mins., PG-13) This black comedy is an adaptation of the book Caging Skies, which tells of a Hitler Youth member, 10-year-old Jojo Betzler, who discovers that his mother (Scarlett Johansson) has been hiding a Jewish girl, Elsa (Thomasin McKenzie) in their attic. Rather than turning her in,

A MARTIN SCORSESE PICTURE

The cult movie that inspired “The Disaster Artist”

Doctor Sleep

The above films are playing in Santa Barbara FRIDAY, November 15, through THURSDAY, November 21. Our critics’ reviews are followed by initials: AM (Antonio Morales) and JW (Josef Woodard). The symbol O indicates the film is recommended. The symbol ➤ indicates a new review.

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FESTIVAL CONFERENCE NOVEMBER 20-22

THE HILTON BEACHFRONT RESORT SANTA BARBARA, CA Live music, engaging panels, parties & more with performers Jon Anderson (Yes), Skip Martin (Kool & The Gang), Ray Parker, Jr. (Ghostbusters), Dylan McDonald & The Avians + much more “It’s an honor to receive the FestForums Sustainability Award. The conference was a perfect opportunity to further conversations and inspire people to take the next steps in greening festivals across the country.” — Jack Johnson Recording Artist “Informative, educational, fun and wonderful memories created.” — Chuck Leavell The Rolling Stones Info@FestForums.com | Tickets at www.FestForums.com

or call 401.835.8813

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NOVEMBER 14, 2019

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PAUL WELLMAN PHOTOS

SPORTS

REBIRTH OF A RECEIVER: Wide receiver Cyrus Wallace overcame an ACL tear to lead Dos Pueblos High to the championships in 2017 and is now a formidable force on the SBCC Vaqueros, with dreams of landing on a fouryear university team.

CYRUS WALLACE TURNS PAIN INTO GAIN

or standout high school athletes who end up at community colleges, the road to success in intercollegiate athletics can be daunting. Whether it’s the uptick in competition, academic difficulties, or the rigors of adult life, it takes a special player and person to take advantage of the opportunity that community college athletics provide. By every measure, Cyrus Wallace was an athletic phenom at Dos Pueblos High. In his junior year, he was second in the entire CIF Southern Section across all divisions with 91 catches in 12 games and was named All-CIF first team in football. In addition, he captured Channel League MVP in basketball. “We just used to throw him the fade or a jump ball because we had so much confidence that he would come down with it,” said former Dos Pueblos High head football coach Nate Mendoza, who coached Wallace in both his varsity seasons. “We had other plays built around just getting him the ball because of our confidence in his hands and route-running ability.” At 63 with soft hands and a sturdy frame, Wallace toyed with the competition and dominated physically to lead both teams deep into the playoffs. “Going all the way into junior year, I just relied on my ability,” Wallace said. “I didn’t really work out too much on my own.” Wallace’s exploits on the gridiron and hardwood were beginning to put him on the radar of college programs, especially in football. All signs pointed toward a historic senior year for Wallace that would cement him as a Division 1 prospect. But the summer before his senior season in 2017, Wallace tore his ACL. “Going through that put a lot in front of me as far as knowing that anything can be taken away from me at any point in time,” Wallace said of the knee injury. “It definitely humbled me.” The devastating news was almost too much to bear for his coaches and his teammates as well, as they seemed to be losing the most gifted athlete

in town. Wallace was unwilling to miss out on his senior season. “The big thing is his character. It has always been real strong. Due to the nature of his ACL tear, he opted to avoid surgery and His work ethic is real strong, so that helps his development,” simply do rehab, which is largely unheard of, as conventional Moropoulos said. “He struggled early because before, it was wisdom is to have reconstructive surgery. just like, ‘Go up, Cyrus.’ He was such a good athlete you would “I thought … we’d have to plan just throw the ball up to him and he would go up and get it. … around not having him that year,” Well, at this level, there’s a lot of guys like that, so he has learned Mendoza said. “But the guy rehabbed how to be a better receiver.” his knee so well and strengthened the Since joining the SBCC program, Wallace has poured muscles around that ACL ligament that his orthopedic doctor his heart and soul into his craft in order to become the best actually cleared him going into week four of the season.” receiver he can be. The results are showing on the field, as he After missing those first four games, Wallace returned to has improved from week to week and become a huge problem action in a bulky knee brace, catching two touchdown passes for opposing defenses. in a 49-0 victory over San Luis Obispo. That led to a dream “I feel like I got a whole lot better, especially … my first two season for the Chargers, who advanced all the way to the CIF- games in comparison to my last couple,” Wallace said. “That’s SS Division 10 championship game, where they lost to Quartz all because of [SBCC wide receiver] coach Rob Adan. He’s got Hill 26-21. Wallace made three unbelievable catches on the final me so much better. We’ve got a lot of good players on defense drive of the game, but the Chargers ended up falling inches that are giving us good looks all the time, getting everybody short of the end zone on the final play of the game. better.” “The things he was doing on a torn ACL are just unheard Wallace’s journey is already an incredible success story, but of and unseen. You just don’t see players perform the way he he’s not finished yet. His goal remains to land an offer to a fourdid and make cuts and moves the way he was making them,” year university. Once again, Division 1 programs are beginning Mendoza said. “He wasn’t as explosive as the year before as a to take notice. Said Moropoulos, “He’s getting a great education, he’s getjunior, but even Cyrus at 60 or 70 percent was better than most people’s 100 percent. On top of it, his desire to win and compete ting a great experience in football, and something good is going on a daily basis just set him above his competitors.” to happen.” n Despite the team’s success, college coaches were skeptical of Wallace’s knee — recruiting dried up completely. “I was talking to some schools, and they found out about the knee and they kind of lost interest,” Wallace said. “Of course I was bitter about it, but I understand you’re putting money into someone and you want to make sure they are fully [healthy].” As a young child, Wallace decided that he was going to take athletics as far as he could go. That commitment opened the door to SBCC, where head coach Craig Moropoulos provided an opportunity to extend his career. “I didn’t know about the knee at the time, but when I recruited him, we found out that he had played all football season and all basketball season and then he had surgery in the summer,” Moropoulos said. “I thought it couldn’t be an ACL. You couldn’t have done all that on a torn ACL, but it was.” The surgery Wallace had after his senior year of high Phoebe Wolfe-Lyons, Deacon Hill, school ensured better stability going forward. He took a Dos Pueblos Cross Country Santa Barbara Football grayshirt year to recover before fully participating on the The junior Wisconsin commit led the The freshman won the Channel League SBCC football team for this 2019 season. He is now a key championship. The Chargers also won Dons to their first playoff victory in 30 contributor at wide receiver with 31 catches for 354 yards years. He threw for 4 touchdown passes the team title. Wolfe-Lyons won all three and three touchdowns so far. Channel League meets this season. in the 44-0 victory over Gahr.

by VICTOR BRYANT

11/16: Men’s Basketball: UCSB vs. Rice The Gauchos (1-1) look to bounce back from a rough second half at UCLA when they host Rice on Saturday. Max Heidegger has come out of the gate hot to start the season, averaging 20 points on 61-percent shooting from the field through the first two games. The visiting Owls hail from Conference USA and are led by sophomore Trey Murphy III, who averages 11 points and 1.7 blocks per game. 2pm. UCSB Events Center (Thunderdome). $8-$24. Call 893-UCSB (8272) or visit ucsbgauchos.com.

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COURTESY

GAME OF THE WEEK

S.B. ATHLETIC ROUND TABLE: ATHLETES OF THE WEEK

PAUL WELLMAN FILE PHOTO

F

SBCC Wide Receiver from Dos Pueblos High Overcomes Knee Injury to Attract Division 1 Attention

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FREE WILL ASTROLOGY by Rob Breszny

WEEK OF NOV. 14

ARIES

CANCER

LIBRA

CAPRICORN

(Mar. 21-Apr. 19): If there are any potential Aries heroes

(June 21-July 22): “Maturity is having the ability to escape

(Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Every now and then, I authorize

(Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Many books have been written about

or leaders or saviors out there, the coming weeks will be a favorable time for you to fully bloom and assert your practical magnificence. The lessons you have learned while improvising workable solutions for yourself are ripe to be applied to the riddles that are puzzling your tribe or group or gang. I want to let you know, however, that to achieve maximum effectiveness, you should be willing to do good deeds for people who may not be able to pay you back.

TAURUS (Apr. 20-May 20): You’re entering a phase of your astro-

logical cycle when it’s crucial that your receptivity be as robust as possible. To guide you in this delightful but perhaps challenging work, here are good questions for you to pose. (1) Do you know what help and support you need most, and are you brave and forthright enough to ask for it? (2) Is there any part of you, perhaps unconscious, that believes you don’t deserve gifts and blessings? (3) Do you diligently cultivate your capacity to be refreshed and restored? (4) Are you eagerly responsive when life surprises you with learning experiences and inspirations?

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): “Many people will not be honest

because they fear loss of intimacy and togetherness,” writes self-help author Henry Cloud. But the truth, he adds, is that “honesty brings people closer together,” because it “strengthens their identities.” Therein lies the tender paradox: “The more you realize your separate identities, the closer you can become.” Living according to this principle may not be as easy or convenient as being deceptive and covert, but it’s ultimately more gratifying. Henry Cloud concludes, “Telling loved ones what is really on your mind and telling others what you really think is the foundation of love.”

categorization,” said poet Kenneth Rexroth. That’s the opposite of the conventional wisdom. For many people, the process of growing up and becoming a seasoned adult means trying to fit in, to find one’s category, to be serious and steady and stable. Rexroth, on the other hand, suggested that when you fully ripen into your potentials, you transcend standard definitions; you don’t adhere to others’ expectations; you are uniquely yourself, outside and HOMEWORK: beyond all pigeonholes and classifications. The coming weeks will be an excellent time for you to practice and cultivate this sacred art.

LEO

you Libras to shed your polite, tactful personas and express the angst you sometimes feel but usually hide. That’s now! To egg you on, read this mischievous rant by Libran blogger Clary Gay (claryfightwood.tumblr. com): “We Libras are constantly thinking about how to make everyone else comfortable and happy. There’s not a minute going by when we’re not worrying about radiating a soothing and comforting aura so everyone can have a good “How easy it is time. If a Libra is cranky, it’s because to make people happy when you don’t they snapped! Because of some nonwant or need anything from them,” Libra who doesn’t appreciate them! said Gail Godwin. Give an example. If a Libra is mean to people, it’s their Freewillastrology.com. own damn fault!”

(July 23-Aug. 22): Is there an event from your past that

would be empowering for you to remember in detail? Is there a neglected but still viable dream you could resurrect, thereby energizing your enthusiasm for the future? Are there old allies you’ve lost touch with but who, if you called on them, could provide you with just the boost you need? Is there a familiar pleasure you’ve grown numb to but could reinvigorate by visualizing the original reasons you loved it? The coming weeks will be a favorable time to meditate on these questions.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Catholic saint St. Francis (1181–1226) loved animals and the natural world. According to one folkloric tale, he was once traveling on foot with several companions when they came upon a place where the trees were filled with birds. Francis said, “Wait for me while I go preach to my sisters the birds.” He proceeded to do just that. The birds were an attentive audience for the duration of his sermon, apparently captivated by his tender tones. Seven centuries later, author Rebecca West offered a critique of the bird-whisperer. “Did St. Francis preach to the birds?” she asked. “Whatever for? If he really liked birds he would have done better to preach to the cats.” In the coming weeks, Virgo, I encourage you to do the metaphorical equivalent of preaching to both the birds and the cats.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Poet Robert Bly tells us that the door to the soul is unlocked. You don’t have to struggle through any special machinations to open it or go through it. Furthermore, the realm of the soul is always ready for you. Always! It harbors the precise treasure you need in order to be replenished and empowered. I bring this to your attention, Scorpio, because I think that during the next two weeks, you should abide as much as possible in the soul’s realm — the cornucopia of holy truths and ever-fresh riches.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): In my estimation, what you’ve experienced lately has been akin to a fermentation process. It’s as if you’re undergoing a transformation with resemblances to the way that grapes turn into wine or milk becomes yogurt or dough rises before being baked into bread. You may have had to endure some discomfort, which is the case for anything in the midst of substantial change. But I think you’ll ultimately be quite pleased with the results, which I expect will be ready no later than 10 days after your birthday — and quite possibly sooner.

Joan of Arc, a 15th-century teenage peasant girl whose improbable ascent to military leadership, under the guidance of her divine visions, was crucial in France’s victory over the English. Among the many miraculous elements of her story was the fact that less than a year before she led troops into battle on horseback, she didn’t know how to ride a horse. She learned by riding around her father’s farm astride his cows. I foresee an equivalent marvel in your future, Capricorn. By this time next year, you will have developed an aptitude that might seem unimaginable now. (P.S. There’s evidence Joan was a Capricorn.)

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): The Divine Comedy is one of history’s

greatest literary works. Its author, Dante Alighieri, was 43 when he began writing the Inferno, the first part of his three-part masterpiece. Up until that time, he had published just one book and a few poems, and he had also abandoned work on two unfinished books. Early on in the Inferno, the not-yet-renowned author presents a fictional scene in which he meets with the spirits of antiquity’s most famous authors: Virgil, Homer, Horace, Ovid, and Lucan. Those illustrious five tell Dante he is such an important writer that he ranks sixth, after them, in his excellence. I’m going to encourage you to dare indulging in behavior like Dante’s: to visualize and extol — and yes, even brag about — the virtues and skills that will ultimately be your signature contribution to this world.

PISCES (Feb. 19-Mar. 20): The Latin word for sea is mare. Flustra

is the calm sea. Undisonus means “resounding with waves.” Caeruleus is the sea’s deep shade of blue, aestus is the tide, and aequoreus means “connected with the sea.” My hope is that as you meditate on these lyrical terms, you’ll be moved to remember the first lakes, rivers, and oceans you ever swam in. You’ll recall your time floating in your mother’s womb and your most joyous immersions in warm baths and hot springs. Why? It’s a favorable time to seek the healing and rejuvenating powers of primal waters — both metaphorically and literally.

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700.

Media Grants

t

For Santa Barbara County Nonprofit organizations

The Unfinished Gender Revolution Hutton Parker Foundation and the Santa Barbara Independent are pleased to continue our Media Grant program for local nonprofit agencies. This unique opportunity provides nonprofits the ability to spread their message to the greater Santa Barbara community. Organizations apply online, and one nonprofit group is is chosen each month. The Santa Barbara Independent design team produces a custom four-page insert specific to the individual agency's needs. The insert is published and distributed in all 40,000 copies of the Santa Barbara Independent, with the cost underwritten by Hutton Parker Foundation. Find out more about this opportunity to boost your organization's marketing efforts, promote your good works, and tell your story to a wider audience. Visit HuttonFoundation.org for more information and the Media Grant application.

HUTTONFOUNDATION.ORG

Wednesday, November 20, 2019 | 5:00 - 8:00 PM Rockwood, Santa Barbara Woman’s Club 670 Mission Canyon Rd. | Santa Barbara, CA Learn about the program & get your tickets at

www.mitcentralcoast.org

Mary Kennett Deckers Brands

Tristan Bridges UCSB, Sociology

Cate Taylor UCSB, Sociology

Valerie Jackson Procore

PREMIER SPONSORS

follow us @mitefcc

INDEPENDENT.COM

NOVEMBER 14, 2019

THE INDEPENDENT

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INDEPENDENT CLASSIFIEDS

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PHONE 965-5205

E M A I L S A L E S @ I N D E P E N D E N T. C O M

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reaching 100,000 readers each week

EMPLOYMENT ADMIN/CLERICAL

CCDC ADMINISTRATIVE COORDINATOR

ELECTRICAL & COMPUTER ENGINEERING Provides administrative and budgetary support for the Director and Associate Director of the Center for Control, Dynamical‑systems and Computation (CCDC). Duties also include providing support to Center members, postdoctoral researchers and graduate students as needed. Assumes complete project planning for Center events including: workshops, weekly seminars and the annual Mohammed Dahleh Distinguished Lecture, as well as other special events and international conferences. Manages arrangements for long and short‑term visitors. Tracks and projects all expenditures for the CCDC Center. Coordinates travel arrangements, prepares travel and entertainment reimbursements. Assists Center with purchasing activities. Produces highly complex technical word processing material, visual presentation aids, and updates the Center’s web site. Reqs: High level of administrative and organizational skills and ability to handle multiple tasks with frequent interruptions, as well as meet deadlines with minimal supervision. Strong interpersonal skills working with a diverse group of people. Proven excellent oral and written communication skills. Demonstrated knowledge of a variety of applications (i.e.,MS Word, Excel). Ability to organize, coordinate, and prioritize workload, along with editing and proofreading material. Must be detail oriented with a high degree of accuracy. Note: Criminal history background check required. $23.19/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For primary consideration apply online by 11/24/19, thereafter open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #20190628

EMPLOYMENT SERVICES

PROFESSIONAL

AIRLINES ARE HIRING ‑ Get FAA approved hands on Aviation training. Financial Aid for qualified students ‑ Career placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 888‑686‑1704

FINANCE OVER $10K in Debt? Be debt free in 24 to 48 months. No upfront fees to enroll. A+ BBB rated. Call National Debt Relief 1‑888‑508‑6305. (Cal‑SCAN)

HEALTH & FITNESS LOWEST PRICES on Health Insurance. We have the best rates from top companies! Call Now! 1‑888‑989‑4807. (Cal‑SCAN)

HOSPITALITY/ RESTAURANT Hotel Operations Manager in California’s eastern sierra. 9 unit hotel, live onsite, full time person. Salary plus housing including utilities. Small skiing + fishing resort community. Send resume to abjFC2@gmail.com

LEGAL DID YOU KNOW that the average business spends the equivalent of nearly 1½ days per week on digital marketing activities? CNPA can help save you time and money. For more info email cecelia@cnpa.com or call (916) 288‑6011. (Cal‑SCAN)

MEDICAL/HEALTHCARE ATTENTION DIABETICS! Save money on your diabetic supplies! Convenient home shipping for monitors, test strips, insulin pumps, catheters and more! To learn more, call now! 844‑698‑4858 RARE OPPORTUNITY for caregiver experienced with Alzheimers care. Weekly live‑in position Thursday ‑ Sunday caring for piano playing former USC professor. LVN/CVN preferred, experience may substitute. Must have reliable car and valid driverâs license. To apply, send email about yourself, three references and current resume to Molly Burns at mollyburns70@ gmail.com.

COMPUTER/TECH

EDUCATION AIRLINE CAREERS Start Here – Get trained as FAA certified Aviation Technician. Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877‑205‑4138. (Cal‑SCAN)

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THE INDEPENDENT

ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH & SAFETY Performs a variety of technical duties at the operational level in the Santa Barbara County Household and Small Business Hazardous Waste Management Program. Must demonstrate experience handling operational aspects of hazardous waste program and knowledge of applicable federal, state and local regulations related to hazardous waste management and related programs. Reqs: BA/BS degree in biochemistry, biology, chemistry, environmental sciences, geology or equivalent combination of education and experience. 1+ years of relevant work experience in the operational aspects of the hazardous waste field. Knowledge of applicable federal, state, and local laws and regulations. 3+ years of relevant work in the environmental health and safety field could be substituted for the education and work experience requirements. Notes: Criminal history background check required. Must maintain a CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record and enrollment in the DMV Employee‑Pull Notice Program. Work schedule: Fri ‑ Mon; 7am‑6pm. Must pass a pre‑employment physical examination and be medically qualified to wear respiratory equipment including a SCBA and other types of chemical protective equipment. Must be willing to work with and respond to emergencies (on and off‑hours) involving potentially hazardous materials. Ability to lift 50 pounds and manipulate drums weighing up to 500 pound using a drum cart. $29.74 ‑ $32.63/yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For primary consideration apply by 11/20/2019, thereafter open until filled. Apply online at https://Jobs. ucsb.edu Job #20190622

“If it turns out there IS a God, I suppose the worst you can say about him is that basically he’s an underachiever. To you, I’m an atheist. To God, I’m the loyal opposition.”

Woody Allen (1935 --- )

Humanist Society of Santa Barbara

santabarbarahumanists.org

805-769-4772

NOVEMBER 14, 2019

FOR EVERYONE IN OUR CARE.

COMMUNITY HAZARDOUS WASTE OPERATIONS PRINCIPAL TECHNICIAN

COMPUTER & IT TRAINING PROGRAM! Train at home to become a Computer & Help Desk Professional now! Call CTI for details! 888‑449‑1713 (M‑F 8am‑6pm ET) IT ERP Application Lead Work on ERP implementation & support. Analyze issues with application software, ensure system design & test plans. Resume to: Cottage Health, Attn: Elena Tapia‑Trejo, P.O. Box 689, Santa Barbara, CA, 93111.

COMPASSION

INDEPENDENT.COM INDEPENDENT.COM

It’s one of our core values. In the experience Cottage Health provides to our patients, clinical skill and state-of-the-art technology are only part of the equation. Equally important is compassion – the demonstration of sincere caring, as fellow human beings, for each patient we are privileged to serve. Along with excellence and integrity, compassion is a Cottage core value. Join us in putting it into practice every day.

Santa Barbara Cottage Hospital

Non-Clinical

Cottage Rehabilitation Hospital

• Admin Assistant

• Lifeguard – PT

Nursing

• CCRC Associate Family Consultant

• Physical Therapist – PD

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

• CCRC Family Consultant

• Recreational Therapist – PD

• • • • •

Birth Center Community Nurse Educator – FT Educator, Lactation Emergency Hematology/Oncology Infection Control Practitioner Med/Surg Float Pool MICU Mother Infant NICU Operating Room Orthopedics PACU Peds Peds OP Clinic – PT Peds Outpatient RN PICU Pre/Post Surgery Psych Nursing Pulmonary, Renal, Infectious Disease Recuperative Care Nurse SICU Surgical Trauma Telemetry Utilization Case Manager – PD

Clinical • • • • • • • •

Clinical Dietitian Director Urgent Care Operations ED Tech Patient Care Tech I Patient Care Tech II – FT Pharmacist – FT Surgical Tech (CVOR) Unit Care Tech

• CCRC Office Assistant • Concierge

Goleta Valley Cottage Hospital

• Cook – FT, PT

• Relief Nursing Supervisor – PD

• Director of Technology Operations

• RN, ED - PT

• Environmental Services Rep

• RN, ICU

• Environmental Services Supervisor

• RN, Med/Surg – PD

• Food Service Rep

• Security Officer – FT, PT – Days, Evenings, Nights

• Room Service Server • Sales Associate

Santa Ynez Valley Cottage Hospital

• Security Officer – FT Evenings

• Radiographer – PT

• Sr. Instructional Designer, Optime (RN) • Sr. Quality Analyst

• Security Officer – FT, PT – Days, Evenings, Nights

• Teacher – PT

• Sonographer – PD

Allied Health

• Sr. Security Officer – FT

• Case Manager – SLO Clinic

Pacific Diagnostic Laboratories

• Dietitian Specialist – PT

• Certified Phlebotomist Technician

• MRI Tech – FT

• Clinical Lab Scientist - FT/PT (SBCH and CoreLab)

• Occupational Therapist – PD • Pharmacy Tech • Physical Therapist II • Recuperative Care Nurse

• Director Testing Operations • Sr. Sales Representative

• Please apply to: www.pdllabs.com

• Special Procedures Tech – FT

Cottage Business Services • HIM Manager • Sr. Marketing Events Coordinator • Supervisor of Telehealth

• RENTAL & RELOCATION ASSISTANCE AVAILABLE FOR SELECT FULL-TIME POSITIONS • CERTIFICATION REIMBURSEMENT

We offer an excellent compensation package that includes above-market salaries, premium medical benefits, pension plans, tax savings accounts, rental and mortgage assistance, and relocation packages. What’s holding you back?

Please apply online at jobs.cottagehealth.org. Candidates may also submit a resume to: Cottage Health, Human Resources, P.O. Box 689, Pueblo at Bath Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93102-0689 Please reference “SBI” when applying. EOE

Excellence, Integrity, Compassion

For volunteer opportunities at Cottage Health, visit: www.cottagehealth.org/volunteer

www.cottagehealth.org


INDEPENDENT CLASSIFIEDS

EMPLOYMENT CONTRACTS & GRANTS ANALYST

COMPUTER SCIENCE Responsible for developing and submitting research proposals, awards and/or transactions related to contract and grant management and maintains contract and grant records in compliance with institutional and research sponsor policies. Responsible for the post‑award administration, financial management, and analysis of the Contracts and Grants for the Computer Science Department. Additionally, will backup/support the Contracts and Grants Manager with Award Closeout. Responsible for the completion of post‑award activities of research awards totaling more than $12M annually. Duties include setting up new awards and analyzing award terms and conditions, advising faculty, staff, and students of proper University and agency policies regarding extramural funding policies and procedures. Maintains knowledge of policies and procedures associated to Academic Personnel, Staff Personnel, Graduate Division, Accounting, Travel Accounting, Purchasing, and Business Services. Demonstrates flexibility in learning, interpreting, and adapting to new policies, procedures, and computer applications. Analyzes, interprets, and implements new and frequently changing campus, federal, and funding agency policies and procedures. Maintains effective working relationships with Principal Investigator, department staff, Office of Research, other campus central and academic departments, funding agencies, and external collaborating individuals and institutions. Maintains current, in‑depth knowledge of University, Federal, and various funding agency‑specific Contract and Grant policies. Maintains general knowledge of UC fund accounting and related policies and procedures pertaining to research compliance, payroll, Academic personnel, Graduate Division, travel, purchasing, Equipment Management, record retention, and Business Services contracts. Reqs: Excellent organizational skills with the ability to pay strict attention to detail. Ability to work on multiple projects simultaneously, meeting various deadlines while maintaining a high level of accuracy. Ability to prioritize workload within deadlines. Excellent communication skills. Proficiency in Microsoft Excel. Knowledge of Fund Accounting principles and practices. Note: Criminal history background check required. $25.00‑$28.00/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For primary consideration apply online by 11/24/19, thereafter open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #20190631

DIRECTOR OF DEVELOPMENT, HUMANITIES & FINE ARTS

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PHONE 965-5205

GUEST HOUSE MANAGER

CONFERENCE & HOSPITALITY SERVICES Responsible for the year‑round scheduling, reservations, management, administration and support services, and billing for the 34 guestrooms, as well as The Club’s four meeting facilities. With anticipated guestroom revenue of approximately $2,000,000 annually, monitors the operational priorities and provides oversight for the provision of hospitality services and implements hospitality standards and policies. Oversees systems and procedures for customer service, as well as for operational and fiscal efficiency related to residential and meeting room assignments at The Club, ensuring accuracy, efficiency, profitability, and customer satisfaction. Reqs: 2 years hotel front desk experience. 2 years supervising multiple employees. Experience with a hotel or conference management software like Kinetic. Previous experience handling individual and group reservations. Exceptional customer service and hospitality skills.

Proven ability to organize and manage multiple, concurrent tasks and projects with frequent interruptions. Strong communication, analytical, and problem solving skills. Ability to work with a high profile and diverse client base. Comfortable working with a variety of individuals and departments across campus. Experience working with databases and shared electronic interfaces. Proficient in Microsoft and Google Suite applications. Notes: Fingerprint background check required. Must maintain a valid CA driver’s license. May need to work and/ or be on call on weekends, holidays and evenings in order to support the operational needs of the department. $65,000 ‑ $74,300/yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For primary consideration apply by 11/20/19, thereafter open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs. ucsb.edu Job #20190627

PHYSICAL THERAPIST

A PLACE FOR MOM has helped over a million families find senior living. Our trusted, local advisors help find solutions to your unique needs at no cost to you. Call 855‑741‑7459

MASSAGE (LICENSED)

DEEP TISSUE QUEEN

Expert in Deep Tissue, 20 yrs exp. Work w/chronic pain, stress & injuries. 1st time Client $50/hr. Gift Cert available, Outcall. Laurie Proia, LMT 886‑8792

WELLNESS ATTENTION: OXYGEN Users! Gain freedom with a Portable Oxygen

COMPUTER ISSUES? FREE DIAGNOSIS by GEEKS ON SITE! Virus Removal, Data Recovery! 24/7 EMERGENCY $20 OFF ANY SERVICE with coupon 42522! Restrictions apply. 866‑996‑1581 (AAN CAN)

FINANCIAL SERVICES ARE YOU BEHIND $10k OR MORE ON YOUR TAXES? Stop wage & bank levies, liens & audits, unfiled tax returns, payroll issues, & resolve tax debt FAST. Call 855‑970‑2032. (Cal‑SCAN) STRUGGLING WITH Your Private Student Loan Payment? New relief programs can reduce your payments. Learn your options. Good credit not necessary. Call the Helpline 866‑305‑5862 (Mon‑Fri 9am‑5pm Eastern) (Cal‑SCAN) STRUGGLING WITH Your Private Student Loan Payment? New relief programs can reduce your payments. Learn your options. Good credit not necessary. Call the Helpline 888‑670‑5631 (Mon‑Fri 9am‑5pm Eastern) (AAN CAN)

GENERAL SERVICES BECOME A PUBLISHED AUTHOR! We edit, print and distribute your work internationally. We do the work… You reap the Rewards! Call for a FREE Author’s Submission Kit: 866‑951‑7214

STUDENT HEALTH Provides physical therapy services to students upon referral. This includes assessing patient needs, developing patient treatment goals, planning and implementing the appropriate patient treatment programs and utilizing a variety of professional physical therapy procedures. Reqs: Must be a CA licensed physical therapist with experience in outpatient orthopedic therapy. Notes: Must successfully complete and pass the background check and credentialing process before employment date. Must have a current CA physical therapist license at all times during employment in order to practice and function in this clinical role. This is a limited position requiring up to but not exceeding 16 hours/week during the school year. Hours will vary based on based on patient load. $45.64 ‑ $48.44/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Apply online at https://Jobs.ucsb.edu Job #20190629

HOME SERVICES

SALES/MARKETING

STAY IN your home longer with an American Standard Walk‑In Bathtub. Receive up to $1,500 off, including a free toilet, and a lifetime warranty on the tub and installation! Call us at 1‑855‑534‑6198

EVERY BUSINESS has a story to tell! Get your message out with California’s PRMedia Release – the only Press Release Service operated by the press to get press! For more info contact Cecelia @ 916‑288‑6011 or http://prmediarelease.com/ california (Cal‑SCAN)

VOLUNTEERS NEEDED

A PLACE FOR MOM has helped over a million families find senior living. Our trusted, local advisors help find solutions to your unique needs at no cost to you. 1‑855‑993‑2495 (AAN CAN) A PLACE FOR MOM. The nation’s largest senior living referral service. Contact our trusted,local experts today! Our service is FREE/no obligation. CALL 1‑855‑467‑6487. (Cal‑SCAN)

MARKET PLACE

MEDICAL SERVICES

ANNOUNCEMENTS

ATTENTION OXYGEN THERAPY USERS! Inogen One G4 is capable of full 24/7 oxygen delivery. Only 2.8 pounds. FREE information kit. Call 877‑929‑9587 ATTENTION: OXYGEN USERS! The NEW Inogen One G5. 1‑6 flow settings. Designed for 24 hour oxygen use. Compact and Lightweight. Get a Free Info kit today: 1‑844‑359‑3976 (CalSCAN) CASH PAID for unexpired, sealed DIABETIC TEST STRIPS! 1 DAY PAYMENT & PREPAID shipping. HIGHEST PRICES! Call 1‑888‑776‑7771. www. Cash4DiabeticSupplies.com DENTAL INSURANCE. Call Physicians Mutual Insurance Company for details. NOT just a discount plan, REAL coverage for 350 procedures.888‑623‑3036 or http:// www.dental50plus.com/58 Ad# 6118 MOBILEHELP, AMERICA’S Premier Mobile Medical Alert System. Whether You’re Home or Away. For Safety and Peace of Mind. No Long Term Contracts! Free Brochure! Call Today! 1‑855‑401‑6993 STAY IN your home longer with an American Standard Walk‑In Bathtub. Receive up to $1,500 off, including a free toilet, and a lifetime warranty on the tub and installation! Call us at 1‑844‑252‑0740 (Cal‑SCAN)

ATTENTION: HAVE you or a loved one used Juul or another e‑cigarette vaping device & developed a serious health condition such as stroke, seizure, convulsions, lung damage, pulmonary issues including heart attacks? You may be entitled to compensation! Call now: 844‑392‑9703

VIAGRA AND CIALIS USERS! 100 Generic Pills SPECIAL $99.00 FREE Shipping! 100% guaranteed. 24/7 CALL NOW! 888‑445‑5928 Hablamos Espanol

PERSONAL SERVICES

55 Yrs or Older?

Need Help At Home? Call REAL HELP because this Non‑profit matches workers to your needs. 965‑1531

PROFESSIONAL SERVICES

DISH TV $59.99 For 190 Channels + $14.95 High Speed Internet. Free Installation, Smart HD DVR Included, Free Voice Remote. Some restrictions apply 1‑800‑718‑1593

BATHROOM RENOVATIONS. EASY, ONE DAY updates! We specialize in safe bathing. Grab bars, no slip flooring & seated showers. Call for a free in‑home consultation: 888‑912‑4745

ELIMINATE GUTTER cleaning forever! LeafFilter, the most advanced debris‑blocking gutter protection. Schedule a FREE LeafFilter estimate today. 15% off and 0% financing for those who qualify. PLUS Senior & Military Discounts. Call 1‑855‑995‑2490

NEED HELP with Family Law? Can’t Afford a $5000 Retainer? Low Cost Legal Services‑ Pay As You Go‑ As low as $750‑$1500‑ Get Legal Help Now! Call 1‑844‑821‑8249 Mon‑Fri 7am to 4pm PCT (AAN CAN) https://www.familycourtdirect.com/?‑ network=1

LOOKING FOR self storage units? We have them! Self Storage offers clean and affordable storage to fit any need. Reserve today! 1‑855‑617‑0876 (AAN CAN)

RECOVERY COACH‑ Coaching for co‑dependancy: substance abuse, relationships and other psychological/ emotional conditions. (480) 619‑1445 or santabarbaraqrecoverycoach@ gmail.com

WATER DAMAGE to Your Home? Call for a quote for professional cleanup & maintain the value of your home! Set an appt today! Call 855‑401‑7069 (Cal‑SCAN)

Volunteer Mentors Needed Help youth realize their full potential. 1‑4 hours/week. A Senior Corps’ Retired Senior Volunteer Program. Call 805‑965‑1001 x232 today!

Concentrator! No more heavy tanks and refills! Guaranteed Lowest Prices! Call the Oxygen Concentrator Store: 1‑844‑653‑7402 (Cal‑SCAN) CATHETER SUPPLIES. We offer a complete line of popular and lesser known product to fit your needs. Even the discreet “pocket catheter.” To learn more or get free samples, Call 844‑540‑2092

BECOME A Published Author. We want to Read Your Book! Dorrance Publishing‑Trusted by Authors Since 1920 Book manuscript submissions currently being reviewed. Comprehensive Services: Consultation, Production, Promotion and Distribution. Call for Your Free Author`s Guide 1‑877‑538‑9554 or visit http://dorranceinfo.com/Cali (Cal‑SCAN) DID YOU KNOW 7 in 10 Americans or 1158 Million U.S. Adults read content from newspaper media each week? Discover the Power of Newspaper Advertising. For a free brochure call 916‑288‑6011 or email cecelia@cnpa. com (Cal‑SCAN) DID YOU KNOW that newspapers serve an engaged audience and that 79% still read a print newspaper? Newspapers need to be in your mix! Discover the Power of Newspaper Advertising. For more info email cecelia@cnpa.com or call (916) 288‑6011. (Cal‑SCAN) GET RID of your timeshare today! Safely, ethically and legal. Don’t delay call today. 1‑844‑757‑4717 (AAN CAN) IF YOU or a loved one worked around the pesticide Roundup (glyphosate), for at least two years and has been diagnosed with non‑Hodgkin’s lymphoma, you may be entitled to compensation. To learn more, call now: 855‑408‑0787 INVENTORS ‑ FREE INFORMATION PACKAGE Have your product idea

REPAIR SERVICES

AUTO PARTS CASH FOR CARS: We Buy Any Condition Vehicle, 2002 and Newer. Nationwide Free Pick Up! Call Now: 1‑800‑864‑5960.

DONATE YOUR CAR, TRUCK OR BOAT TO HERITAGE FOR THE BLIND. FREE 3 Day Vacation, Tax Deductible, Free Towing, All Paperwork Taken Care of. Call 1‑844‑491‑2884 (Cal‑SCAN)

TECHNICAL SERVICES

DOMESTIC CARS

COMPUTER MEDIC

CARS/TRUCKS WANTED!!! 2002 and Newer! Any Condition. Running or Not. Competitive Offer! Free Towing! We’re Nationwide! Call Now: 1‑888‑416‑2330.

Gif Guide 201 9

Reservation Deadline: Friday, November 22, @ 3pm

CLASSIC CARS WANTED ‑ running or not. Local to S.B Foreign/Domestic. Porsche 1‑800‑432‑7204

DONATE YOUR CAR, BOAT OR RV to receive a major tax deduction. Help homeless pets. Local, IRS Recognized. Top Value Guaranteed. Free Estimate and Pickup. LAPETSALIVE.ORG 1‑833‑772‑2632 (Cal‑SCAN)

965-5205 or sales@independent.com

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HOME FURNISHINGS FRENCH VINTAGE furniture. specializing in Art Deco Club Chairs. frenchvintages.net

MISC. FOR SALE ORLANDO + Daytona Beach Florida Vacation! Enjoy 7 Days and 6 Nights with Hertz, Enterprise or Alamo Car Rental Included ‑ Only $298.00. 12 months to use. Call Now! 855‑403‑8409 (24/7)

PETS/ANIMALS

DANDY DOGS

We’re Here For You 35 Years in Business GROOMING and BOARDING TUESDAY thru SATURDAY 805‑768‑5650

WANT TO BUY CASH FOR unexpired DIABETIC TEST STRIPS! Call 1‑855‑440‑4001 Free Shipping, Best Prices & 24 hr payment! BBB Rated A+ www.TestStripSearch. com. CASH PAID for concert posters from the 1960’s. Call Jim 209‑471‑7577.

LUXURY CARS WANTED! OLD Porsche 356/911/912 for restoration by hobbyist 1948‑1973 Only. Any condition, top $ paid! PLEASE LEAVE MESSAGE 707 965‑9546. Email: porscherestoration@ yahoo.com (Cal‑SCAN)

TRUCKS/RECREATIONAL

FreeStyleTrailerCo WHO WE ARE We are a vintage trailer redesign company, based out of Santa Barbara California. We are restoration specialists who work with you to design and execute the retro camper of your dreams. WHAT WE DO We take vintage trailers in all states of disrepair, utilizing contemporary designs and dedicated craftsmanship to create a unique nostalgic travel experience. WHAT CAN WE DO FOR YOU? Looking for something unique and special? Give us a call! FreeStyleTrailerCo Maxwell Torres 805 963 0072 contact@freestyletrailerco.com https://freestyletrailerco.com/

MUSIC BM, MM, 30 yrs exp sbHarpist.com Call 969‑6698

MUSIC LESSONS

WONDERFUL TEACHER

Contact your advertising representative today!

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CAR CARE/REPAIR

HANDYMAN BENSON 805‑705‑3315

H O L I D AY

developed affordably by the Research & Development pros and presented to manufacturers. Call 1‑888‑501‑0236 for a Free Idea Starter Guide. Submit your idea for a free consultation.

AUTO

CASH FOR CARS! We buy all cars! Junk, high‑end, totaled – it doesn’t matter! Get free towing and same day cash! NEWER MODELS too! Call 1‑866‑535‑9689 (AAN CAN)

CLASSIC CARS

Virus/Spyware Removal, Install/ Repair, Upgrades, Troubleshoot, Set‑up, Tutor, Networks, Best rates! Matt 682‑0391

WELL BEING FAMILY SERVICES

E M A I L S A L E S @ I N D E P E N D E N T. C O M

SERVICE DIRECTORY

(CONTINUED)

OFFICE OF DEVELOPMENT Focuses about eighty percent time on major gift ($100k+) fund raising activities. Twenty percent is focused on prospect discovery and lower level gift solicitations ($10,000+), pipeline building, and administrative duties such as planning, coordinating and executing aspects of the HFA development program. With regard to major gift fund raising, the Director is responsible for designing and executing planned strategies for the identification, cultivation, solicitation, closing and stewarding of gifts from individuals, corporations and foundations. Works personally with donor prospects and supports the Dean, faculty and volunteers in prospect relationships, in order to maximize philanthropic support for the division, interdisciplinary initiatives, and the university overall to raise gifts to meet identified fund raising priorities. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree or equivalent combination of education and experience required. Five to ten years of experience in individual major donor development or related profession. Proven success in the major gift fundraising; experience in higher education preferred. An understanding of the culture of Division/Area departments. With training, ability to articulate the programmatic objectives of the Division/Area with clarity and passion. Highest ethical standards, demonstrated empathy and a positive attitude in the face of difficulty and challenge. Notes: Fingerprint background check required. Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record and enrollment in the DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program. Annually renewable contract position. Ability and willingness to travel frequently and work weekends and evenings. Salary is competitive, commensurate with qualifications and experience. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Open until filled. Apply online at https://Jobs.ucsb.edu Job #20190155

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RANCH/ACREAGE FOR SALE 39 ACRE NORTHERN ARIZONA WILDERNESS RANCH $183 MONTH ‑ Outstanding buy on quiet secluded off grid northern Arizona homestead at cool ‑clear 6,000’ elev. Blend of mature evergreen woodlands & grassy meadows with sweeping views of surrounding mountains and valleys from elevated ridgetop cabin sites. Borders 640 acres of uninhabited State Trust woodlands. Free well water access, rich loam garden soil, ideal climate. No urban noise & dark sky nights amid complete privacy & solitude. Camping and RV ok. Maintained road access. $19,900, $1,990 down with no qualifying seller financing. Free brochure with additional properties, prices & descriptions, photos/terrain maps/ weather data/ nearby town & fishing lake info. 1st United Realty 1‑602‑ 264‑0000. (CalSCAN)

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LEGALS LEGAL NOTICES ADMINISTER OF ESTATE NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: THOMAS B. WHITE aka THOMAS BRADY WHITE Case No.: 19PR00482 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of THOMAS B. WHITE aka THOMAS BRADY WHITE A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by: CHARLOTTE LYNNE MORGAN in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara THE PETITION for probate requests that: CHARLOTTE LYNNE MORGAN, aka LYNNE MORGAN be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The Independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held in this court as follows: 12/19/2019 AT 9:00 a.m. Dept: 5 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, 1100 Anacapa Street, P.O Box 21107 Santa Barbara, CA 93102 Anacapa Division. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: Margaret V. Barnes; Barnes & Barnes (805) 687‑6660 1900 State Street, Suite M, Santa Barbara, CA 93101, Published Nov 07, 14, 21 2019. NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: AMY LORRAINE SMITH NO: 19PR00319 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of AMY LORRAINE SMITH A PETITION FOR PROBATE: has been filed by: NORMA E. HUBBARD in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara THE PETITION for probate requests that (name): NORMA E. HUBBARD be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any be admitted to probate. The will and any

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codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The Independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held in this court as follows: on 11/21/2019 AT 9:00 a.m. Dept: 5 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, located at 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Anacapa Division. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special notice form is available from the court clerk. Petitioner: Miles Lang Bonaventure Law Group, Post Office Box 7576, Ventura, CA 93006; (805) 622‑7576. Published Nov 07, 14, 21 2019. NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: FRANK BUSO Case No.: 19PR00496 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of FRANK BUSO A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by: SANDRA ROBLES in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara. THE PETITION for probate requests that: SANDRA ROBLES be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The Independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held in this court as follows: 12/12/2019 AT 9:00 a.m. Dept: 5 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, located at 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Anacapa Division. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of

NOVEMBER 14, 2019

the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: Alexander Saunders:15 W. Carrillo St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101, (805) 699‑5086 Published Nov 14, 21, 27 2019. NOTICE OF ADMINISTRATION OF THE ESTATE OF Robert Wayne Richards (NAME) DECEDENT NOTICE TO CREDITORS 1. (Name): Kathryn Ann Atelian (Address): c/o Mark R. Wietstock P.O. Box 40123 Santa Barbara, CA 93140 (Telephone): (805) 899‑3545 is the personal representative of the ESTATE OF (name): Robert Wayne Richards , who is deceased. 2. The personal representative HAS BEGUN ADMINISTRATION of the decedent’s estate in the a. SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF (specify): Santa Barbara STREET ADDRESS: 1100 Anacapa Street MAILING ADDRESS: CITY AND ZIP CODE: Santa Barbara, CA 93101 BRANCH NAME: Anacapa Division b. Case number (specify): 19PR00309 3. You must FILE YOUR CLAIM with the court clerk (address in item 2a) AND mail or deliver a copy to the personal representative before the last to occur of the following dates: a. four months after (date): October 21, 2019 , the date letters (authority to act for the estate) were first issued to a general personal representative, as defined in subdivision (b) of section 58 of the California Probate Code, OR b. 60 days after (date): October 30, 2019, the date this notice was mailed or personally delivered to you. 4. LATE CLAIMS: If you do not file your claim within the time required by law, you must file a petition with the court for permission to file a late claim as provided in Probate Code section 9103. Not all claims are eligible for additional time to file. See section 9103(a). EFFECT OF OTHER LAWS: Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. WHERE TO GET A CREDITOR’S CLAIM FORM: If a Creditor’s Claim (form DE‑172) did not accompany this notice, you may obtain a copy of the form from any superior court clerk or from the person who sent you this notice. You may also access a fillable version of the form on the Internet at www. courts.ca.gov/forms under the form group Probate—Decedents’ Estates. A letter to the court stating your claim is not sufficient. FAILURE TO FILE A CLAIM: Failure to file a claim with the court and serve a copy of the claim on the personal representative will in most instances invalidate your claim. IF YOU MAIL YOUR CLAIM: If you use the mail to file your claim with the court, for your protection you should send your claim by certified mail, with return receipt requested. If you use the mail to serve a copy of your claim on the personal representative, you should also use certified mail. I am over the age of 18 and not a party to this cause. I am a resident of or employed in the county where the mailing occurred. 2, My residence

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or business address is (specify): P.O. Box 40123 Santa Barbara, CA 93140 3. I served the foregoing Notice of Administration to Creditors and a blank Creditor’s Claim form* on each person named below by enclosing a copy in an envelope addressed as shown below AND a. RI depositing the sealed envelope with the United States Postal Service with the postage fully prepaid. b. I I placing the envelope for collection and mailing on the date and at the place shown in item 4 following our ordinary business practices. I am readily familiar with the business’s practice for collecting and processing correspondence for mailing. On the same day that correspondence is placed for collection and mailing, it is deposited in the ordinary course of business with the United States Postal Service in a sealed envelope with postage fully prepaid. 4. a. Date of deposit: October 30, 2019 b. Place of deposit (city and state): Santa Barbara, California I declare under penalty of perjury under the laws of the State of California that the Date: October 30, 2019 Mark R. Wietstock. Published Nov 14, 21, 27 2019.

FBN ABANDONMENT STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF USE OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME The following Fictitious Business Name is being abandoned: MORTGAGE CO. OF SANTA BARBARA at 747 Garden Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101; The original statement for use of this Fictitious Business Name was filed 03/04/2019 in the County of Santa Barbara. Original file no. 2019‑0000521. The person (s) or entities abandoning use of this name are as follows: Carl E. Lindros 727 Garden St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101 This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 29, 2019. I hereby certify that this is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Brenda Aguilera, Published: Nov 7, 14, 21, 27 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: AJAO MUSIC, MUSIC ALLEY at 423 State St., Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Ajao Entertainment and Music, Inc. at 836 Anacapa St., #2323, Santa Barbara, CA 93103, conducted by a Corporation, Signed: John Adewale Agao Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Nov 1, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Brenda Aguilera. FBN Number: 2019‑0002740. Published: Nov 7, 14, 21, 27 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SUEMAE ART, 4747 Glenbrook St., Santa Barbara, CA 93110; Suemae Willhite (same address), conducted by an Individual Signed: Suemae Willhite Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 17, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Brenda Aguilera. FBN Number: 2019‑0002605. Published: Nov 7, 14, 21, 27 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: MGB CONTRACTING at 5227 San Simeon Drive, Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Brian P. Anderson (same address), Michael Jacobs, 2210 Oak Park Lane, #A, Santa Barbara, CA 93105, Guy Smithson, 5093 Oleander Place, Santa Barbara, CA 93111 conducted by Joint Venture. Signed: Brian Anderson Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Nov 1, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL)

by Maria F. Sanchez. FBN Number: 2019‑0002739. Published: Nov 7, 14, 21, 27 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: MAITRI WELLNESS CENTER at 5266 Hollister Ave., Suite 220, Goleta, CA 93117; Deborah Diane Atkinson 6588 Calle Koral Goleta, CA 93117, Jacob Chain Atkinson 6588 Calle Koral, Goleta, CA 93117; conducted by a Married Couple, Signed: DEBORAH D. ATKINSON Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 31, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by John Beck. FBN Number: 2019‑0002728. Published: Nov 7, 14, 21, 27 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SB NAILBAR at 632 State St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Ivy Lu Mai, 111 Dearborn Place, Apt. 77, Goleta, CA 93117 conducted by an Individual Signed: Ivy Lu Mai Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Nov 4, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by John Beck. FBN Number: 2019‑0002750. Published: Nov 7, 14, 21, 27 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: HELLO BAG, HELLO‑BAG at 1103 Portesuello Avenue, Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Chris Blaul (same address), Delfina A Blaul (Same Address) conducted by a Married Couple. Signed: Chris Blaul Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Nov 1, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Thomas Brian. FBN Number: 2019‑0002743. Published: Nov 7, 14, 21, 27 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: BIG CLEAN at 1125 Mercedes Lane, #A, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Agustin Rivera Arroyo (same address) conducted by an Individual Signed: Agustin Rivera Arroyo, Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Nov 1, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Thomas Brian. FBN Number: 2019‑0002746. Published: Nov 7, 14, 21, 27 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: JULES BY THE SEA, JULES BY THE SEA, SB at 209 Anacapa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Evokelife LLC, 804 Grove Lane, Santa Barbara, CA 93105, conducted by a Limited Liability Company Signed: Julianne Kramer Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Nov 4, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Margarita Silva. FBN Number: 2019‑0002755. Published: Nov 7, 14, 21, 27 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: A COMPANY at 660 Hot Springs Road, Montecito, CA 93108; Etcetera PR, Inc. (same address) conducted by a Corporation, Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Nov 4, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Brenda Aguilera. FBN Number: 2019‑0002747. Published: Nov 7, 14, 21, 27 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: LILSY WOOD FIRED PIZZA at 2840‑B De La Vina St. Santa Barbara, CA 93105; RQ Project Inc. 16849 Bircher St. Granada Hills, CA 93144 conducted by an Corporation Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 17, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it

was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2019‑0002615. Published: Oct 24, 31. Nov 7, 14 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SOUTH OF SOMEWHERE at 970 E Carrillo Rd Apt A Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Brittney Raymond (same address) conducted by an Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 15, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Thomas Brian. FBN Number: 2019‑0002569. Published: Oct 24, 31. Nov 7, 14 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: VITAMIN ANGELS at 111 W Micheltorena St., #300 Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Vitamin Angel Alliance Inc. (same address) conducted by an Corporation Signed: Bonnie Forssell CFO Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 01, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Brenda Aguilera. FBN Number: 2019‑0002415. Published: Oct 24, 31. Nov 7, 14 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: OLIVO SANTA BARBARA at 130 Middle Road Santa Barbara, CA 93108; Barbara J Hill (same address) conducted by an Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 10, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Brenda Aguilera. FBN Number: 2019‑0002515. Published: Oct 24, 31. Nov 7, 14 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: CHIEF SOLUTIONS, OAKS 911, VIKING RESEARCH at 1854 Lewis St. Solvang, CA 93463; Steven Lee Oaks (same address) conducted by an Individual Signed: Steven Lee Oaks Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 11, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Kathy Gonzales. FBN Number: 2019‑0002537. Published: Oct 24, 31. Nov 7, 14 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: BLOSSOM TOOLS at 1526 Bath Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Victoria Helena Bernstein (same address) conducted by an Individual Signed: Victoria H. Bernstein Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 10, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Brenda Aguilera. FBN Number: 2019‑0002514. Published: Oct 24, 31. Nov 7, 14 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: TIERRA BUENA LANDSCAPE at 3417 Via Dona Lompoc, CA 93436; Janitzio Ocampo (same address) conducted by an Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 11, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Thomas Brian. FBN Number: 2019‑0002540. Published: Oct 24, 31. Nov 7, 14 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: THE PEACE CRANE PROJECT at 455 Por La Mar Cir Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Armed With The Arts Inc (same address) conducted by an Corporation Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 15, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the


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LEGALS Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2019‑0002577. Published: Oct 24, 31. Nov 7, 14 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: CHRISTYCOOKIES at 312 Cordova Dr. Santa Barbara, CA 93109; Christina Koontz (same address) conducted by an Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 15, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2019‑0002578. Published: Oct 24, 31. Nov 7, 14 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: GENTLE TIDES MASSAGE at 903 State St Suite 211 Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Holly Delaney Oakander 1120 San Pascual St Apt #3 Santa Barbara, CA 93101 conducted by an Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 16, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Thomas Brian. FBN Number: 2019‑0002589. Published: Oct 24, 31. Nov 7, 14 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SLINGSHOT ART FORUM at 4501 Cathedral Oaks Road Santa Barbara, CA 93110; Alpha Resource Center of Santa Brabara (same address) conducted by an Corporation Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 10, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Brenda Aguilera. FBN Number: 2019‑0002526. Published: Oct 24, 31. Nov 7, 14 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: NICK RAIL MUSIC at 2801 De La Vina St. Santa Barbara, CA 93105; LHP Music, Inc. 165 San Miguel Dr. Camarillo, CA 93010 conducted by an Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 03, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk.

Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Thomas Brian. FBN Number: 2019‑0002448. Published: Oct 24, 31. Nov 7, 14 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SANTA BARBARA DENTAL SLEEP MEDICINE at 23 W. Micheltorena St Santa Barbara, CA 93101; George R Walseth DDS 4415 Vieja Drive Santa Barbara, CA 93110 conducted by an Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 14, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Brenda Aguilera. FBN Number: 2019‑0002564. Published: Oct 24, 31. Nov 7, 14 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: HERITAGE GATHERINGS at 5100 Carpinteria Ave Carpinteria, CA 93013; Lauren Malloy 293 McAndrew Ojai, CA 93023; Emma Moore 3102 Calle Madera Santa Barbara, CA 93105 conducted by an General Partnership Signed: Emma Moore Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 17, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Tara Jayasinghe. FBN Number: 2019‑0002609. Published: Oct 24, 31. Nov 7, 14 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: JEFFREY S. SANGER, ATTORNEY AT LAW at 318 E Carrillo St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Jeffrey S Sanger (same address) conducted by an Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 17, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Brenda Aguilera. FBN Number: 2019‑0002606. Published: Oct 24, 31. Nov 7, 14 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SEACOAST YACHT SALES, SEACOAST YACHTS, SEACOAST YACHTS OF SANTA BARBARA at 125 Harbor Way #11 Santa Barbara, CA 93109; Seacoast of Santa Barbara, Inc. (same address) conducted by an Corporation Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 16, 2019.

This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Brenda Aguilera. FBN Number: 2019‑0002601. Published: Oct 24, 31. Nov 7, 14 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: GURUU INTERNATIONAL at 3463 State Street, Suite 523 Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Steve M Thompson 3700 Cedar Vista Santa Barbara, CA 93105 conducted by an Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 18, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Thomas Brian. FBN Number: 2019‑0002620. Published: Oct 24, 31. Nov 7, 14 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: LOTUS NAILS‑LOUNGE & SPA at 238 E. Betteravia Rd., Suite B Santa Maria, CA 93454; CN Beauty, Inc. (same address) conducted by an Individual Signed: Kim Uyen Thi Le Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 14, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Brenda Aguilera. FBN Number: 2019‑0002566. Published: Oct 24, 31. Nov 7, 14 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: BIONICORE MUSIC at 1805 Grand Ave #A Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Henrieta Misurakova (same address) conducted by an Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 18, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2019‑0002626. Published: Oct 24, 31. Nov 7, 14 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: CHUBBIES HAMBURGERS at 2908 De La Vina Street Santa Barbara, CA 93105‑3310; Helen Condon McGillivray 736 Chiquita Road Santa Barbara, CA 93103‑2424; Richard R McGillivray (same address) conducted by an Married Couple Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 18, 2019. This statement expires five years

from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Thomas Brian. FBN Number: 2019‑0002621. Published: Oct 24, 31. Nov 7, 14 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: HIGH DESERT DISTRIBUTING at 5901 Bolsa Avenue Huntington Beach, CA 92647; Harbor Distributing, L.L.C 6250 N. River Road, Suite 9000 Rosemont, IL 60018 conducted by an Limited Liability Company Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 16, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Brenda Aguilera. FBN Number: 2019‑0002593. Published: Oct 24, 31. Nov 7, 14 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: KAPLAN INTERNATIONAL LANGUAGES at 27 East Cota Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Kaplan International North America, LLC 900 North Point Pkwy Suite 250 Alpharetta, GA 30005 conducted by an Limited Liability Company Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 16, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Brenda Aguilera. FBN Number: 2019‑0002599. Published: Oct 24, 31. Nov 7, 14 2019.

E M A I L S A L E S @ I N D E P E N D E N T. C O M

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08:53 am 3.1

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4:59 am 4.5

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Thu 21

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crosswordpuzzle

Source: usharbors.com

s tt Jone By Ma

“Be a Superhero” -- they all wear one.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: WESTSIDE YOUTH INITIATIVE at 1111 Chapala Street Suite 200 Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Santa Barbara Foundation (same address) conducted by an Corporation Signed: Jonathan Bower‑Agent Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 16, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Brenda Aguilera. FBN Number: 2019‑0002596. Published: Oct 24, 31. Nov 7, 14 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: HANDS OF SOLEIL at 3015 State Street Suite A Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Michelle Freniere 350 Chapala St. Unit 205 Santa Barbara, CA 93101 conducted by an Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 22, 2019. This statement

34 “The People’s Princess” 36 Where zebras may be spotted 38 Fortify for fighting 1 Technique taught at the 39 Pizzeria order Groundlings and UCB 40 “Pulp Fiction” role 7 Here, in Paris 41 “Nurse Jackie” settings 10 Like 7 or 13 42 “Star Trek” captain Jean-___ 13 Airport serving Tokyo Picard 14 Magnetic metal 46 Notable timespans 15 “La ___ en Rose” 48 Org. with wands and X-ray 16 ___ Berry Farm (California machines theme park) 50 The Duchess of Sussex’s 17 1991 De Niro thriller, or what original surname you shouldn’t have when 51 Partners answering the theme clues? 1 Type of computer printer 52 Dry zone 19 “Caribbean” plant more 2 Bahrain’s capital (not to 54 Center of Disney World commonly called allspice be confused with a Central 56 Director Michael of the “Up” 21 Holy Roman leader (abbr.) American country) series (now at “63 Up” in 22 Golf course supply 3 On time 2019) 23 Piano exercises 4 “One Day at a Time” star 57 Make on a loom Moreno 26 “I’m off!” 60 Amenable 5 Super Bowl XXV MVP Anderson 61 Cartoon unit 28 Chiwetel Ejiofor, in 2019’s 6 Explorer ___ da Gama “The Lion King” 62 Hit the ground 7 “Dies ___” (“Day of Wrath”) 31 Donut maneuver 63 Right this moment 8 Duracell battery feature 32 Start of many rap names 64 Knack for detail 9 Unskillful 35 Cracker in sleeves ©2019 Jonesin’ Crosswords (editor@jonesincrosswords. 37 ___ Wonder (Robin’s nickname) 10 Adds vocals to, maybe com) For answers to this puzzle, call: 1-900-226-2800, 99 cents per minute. Must be 18+. Or to bill to your credit 11 ___ de los Muertos 38 Puzzle activities where you card, call: 1-800-655-6548. Reference puzzle #0953 12 ___ Spiegel want to leave? LAST WEEK’S SOLUTION: 14 Gathering of the Juggalos 41 Film street of nightmares band, to fans 43 Turn from bad to mad, maybe? 18 Family conflict 44 Luau paste 20 Freemium game breaks, often 45 Inventive Goldberg 24 “Achtung Baby” co-producer 47 “Eat It or ___ It” (Smosh Pit Brian show on YouTube) 25 Tough section of a jigsaw 49 “Diary of ___ Black Woman” puzzle, maybe (2005 film) 27 “Happy Days” hangout 53 Phobic 29 Minotaur’s island 55 Old saying 30 Go on the radio 58 Drink that may be pale or 33 Neat drink’s lack Scotch

Across

59 Key ingredients in boba tea 63 1990s web browser now owned by Verizon 65 Silent film’s successor 66 Olive loved by Popeye 67 Scott Turow memoir about law school 68 More malevolent 69 Small, in Scotland 70 Former M&M hue 71 Can’t stand

Down

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LEGALS expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Thomas Brian. FBN Number: 2019‑0002650. Published: Oct 31. Nov 7, 14, 21 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: AFFINITY SHINE CLEANING & CARPET CARE at 6621 Abrego Rd #4 Goleta, CA 93117; Daniel Costa (same address) conducted by an Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 22, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Margarita Silva. FBN Number: 2019‑0002656. Published: Oct 31. Nov 7, 14, 21 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: JUICE & CO at 1212 State St Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Shaken & Stirred LLC (same address) conducted by an Limited Liability Company Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 16, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Brenda Aguilera. FBN Number: 2019‑0002590. Published: Oct 31. Nov 7, 14, 21 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: TAQUERIA LA MISION at 1410 Burton Mesa Blvd Lompoc, CA 93436‑2102; Susana L Flores 932 De La Guerra St. Santa Barbara, CA 93103 conducted by an Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 23, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Brenda Aguilera. FBN Number: 2019‑0002660. Published: Oct 31. Nov 7, 14, 21 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: TILL DEATH DO US PARTY at 3331 Baseline Ave Santa Ynez, CA 93460; Ashley Gheno (same address) Joseph Herrera 11269 Beechnut St Ventura, CA 93004 conducted by an Joint Venture Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 09, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Thomas Brian. FBN Number: 2019‑0002509. Published: Oct 31. Nov 7, 14, 21 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: GOODLAND BROKERAGE at 423 Pacific Oaks Rd Goleta, CA 93117; Rosa De La Mora (same address) conducted by an Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 23, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Thomas Brian. FBN Number: 2019‑0002661. Published: Oct 31. Nov 7, 14, 21 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: ELEGANT NAILS & SPA at 5915 Calle Real Unit F Goleta, CA 93117; Thu Mai Anh Le 6422 Caroldale Ln Goleta, CA 93117; Cam Thanh Thi Le (same address) conducted by an General Partnership Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 21, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Brenda Aguilera. FBN Number: 2019‑0002630. Published: Oct 31. Nov 7, 14, 21 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: PEARL SOCIAL at 131 Anacapa St. Suite B Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Acme Anacapa LLC 218 Helena Ave. Ste A Santa Barbara, CA 93101 conducted by a Limited Liability Company Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa

60

Barbara County on Oct 23, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Brenda Aguilera. FBN Number: 2019‑0002658. Published: Oct 31. Nov 7, 14, 21 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: BUCKS MOVERS, LLC at 309 Palm Ave Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Bucks Movers, LLC (same address) conducted by an Limited Liability Company Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 09, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Brenda Aguilera. FBN Number: 2019‑0002512. Published: Oct 31. Nov 7, 14, 21 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: PRO FARMS at 6495 Santa Rosa Rd. Lompoc, CA 93436; Heirloom Valley LLC (same address) conducted by an Limited Liability Company Signed: Wil Crummer, CEO Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 25, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Thomas Brian. FBN Number: 2019‑0002681. Published: Oct 31. Nov 7, 14, 21 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: PODER MEDIA at 1801 De La Vina St. Apt C Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Sergio Armando Lagunas (same address) conducted by an Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 28, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2019‑0002696. Published: Nov 7, 14, 21, 27 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: BRANDED CRATE at 1430 Laguna St Unit B Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Stephen Crosby (same address) conducted by an Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 10, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Brenda Aguilera. FBN Number: 2019‑0002532. Published: Nov 7, 14, 21, 27 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: WE R FILMS

at 23 Camino De Vida Apt 138 Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Raul Rodriguez JR (same address) conducted by an Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 29, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Thomas Brian. FBN Number: 2019‑0002710. Published: Nov 7, 14, 21, 27 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: STONE ROSE PROPERTY CARE at 6200 Foxen Canyon Rd Los Olivos, CA 93441; Andrew Veao Peterson (same address) conducted by an Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 28, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Brenda Aguilera. FBN Number: 2019‑0002698. Published: Nov 7, 14, 21, 27 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: ROCKLEDGE CREATIVE at 266 Por La Mar Circle Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Carly Bates (same address) conducted by an Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 25, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Thomas Brian. FBN Number: 2019‑0002684. Published: Nov 7, 14, 21, 27 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: LELAMOOI at 433 Calle Las Caleras Santa Barbara, CA 93109; Kristen Hawkes (same address) conducted by an Individual Signed: Kristen Hawkes Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 15, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Margarita Silva. FBN Number: 2019‑0002582. Published: Nov 7, 14, 21, 27 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: HI TIME LIQUOR at 4010 Calle Real Santa Barbara, CA 93110; Telemarkm, Inc (same address) conducted by a Corporation Signed: Bassam Abdulha Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 31, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by John Beck. FBN Number: 2019‑0002726. Published: Nov 7, 14, 21, 27 2019. FICTITIOUS

BUSINESS

NAME

STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SONRISA ENTERPRISES at 2982 Foothill Road Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Jack Camiel (same address) conducted by an Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 07, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Tara Jayashinge. FBN Number: 2019‑0002475. Published: Nov 7, 14, 21, 27 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: MAGNOLIA CLEANING SERVICES at 3130 Skyway Dr. Unit 404 Santa Maria, CA 93455; KW Holding, LLC 416 S. Elm St. Unit B Arroyo Grande, CA 93420 conducted by an Limited Liability Company Signed: Khan J. Webb Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 24, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Mary Soto. FBN Number: 2019‑0002677. Published: Nov 7, 14, 21, 27 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: MORTGAGE CO. OF SANTA BARBARA at 747 Garden Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Santa Barbara Commercial Mortgage, Inc. 2257 Las Canoas Road Santa Barbara, CA 93105 conducted by a Corporation Signed: Andrew Fuller, President Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 29, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by John Beck. FBN Number: 2019‑0002718. Published: Nov 7, 14, 21, 27 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: BILL’S PLUMBING & BUILDING at 4725 9th St #7 Carpinteria, CA 93103; Bill Babcock (same address) conducted by an Individual Signed: Bill Babcock Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 18, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2019‑0002627. Published: Nov 7, 14, 21, 27 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: RV LANDSCAPING, INC. at 2915 De La Vina Street Santa Barbara, CA 93105; RV Lanscaping, Inc. conducted by a Corporation Signed: Esperanza L. Vargas Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 29, 2019. This statement expires five

ORDINANCE NO. 19-14 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF GOLETA, CALIFORNIA, ADDING CHAPTER 3.09 TO TITLE 3 (REVENUE AND FINANCE) OF THE CITY OF GOLETA MUNICIPAL CODE ESTABLISHING A DISPOSITION OF SURPLUS PROPERTY On November 5, 2019, at the Goleta City Hall, 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B, Goleta, California, the City Council of the City of Goleta (“City”) adopted an ordinance that establishes a policy and set procedures for the sale, donation, trade, or other disposal of the city’s surplus personal property. The City Council of the City of Goleta passed and adopted Ordinance No. 1914 at a regular meeting held on the 5th day of November 2019, by the following vote: AYES: MAYOR PEROTTE, MAYOR PRO TEMPORE RICHARDS, COUNCILMEMBERS ACEVES, KASDIN AND KYRIACO NOES:

NONE

ABSENT:

NONE

ABSTENTIONS:

NONE

[REVISED] NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING Planning Commission November 18, 2019 at 6:00 P.M. General Plan Housing Element Inclusionary Policy Amendment (Case No. 19-089-GPA) NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Goleta Planning Commission will conduct a public hearing to consider a Resolution recommending the City Council adopt a General Plan amendment to the Housing Element. The date, time, and location of the public hearing are set forth below. PROJECT DESCRIPTION: The Planning Commission will conduct a Public Hearing to consider Case No. 19-089-GPA, a Resolution recommending that the City Council approve a General Plan Amendment to Housing Element policy HE 2.5 to include rental housing projects in the Housing Element Inclusionary Housing requirements, pursuant to California Government Code Section 65358. PROJECT LOCATION:

The policies and regulations would apply citywide, including areas within the Coastal Zone.

DATE AND TIME:

Monday, November 18, 2019, at 6:00 P.M.

PLACE:

City of Goleta, Council Chambers 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B Goleta, California 93117

PUBLIC COMMENT: All interested persons are encouraged to attend the continued public hearing and to present written and/or oral comments. Written submittals concerning agenda items may be emailed to Kim Dominguez, Management Assistant, e-mail: kdominguez@cityofgoleta.org; or mail: Attn: Planning Commission at 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B, Goleta, California 93117. To be disseminated to the Planning Commission for consideration during the meeting, written information must be submitted no later than Monday by noon prior to the Planning Commission meeting. Material received after this time may not be reviewed by the Planning Commission prior to the meeting. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION: Additional information is on file at the Planning and Environmental Review Department, Goleta City Hall, 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B, Goleta, CA 93117. Contact J. Ritterbeck at (805) 961-7548 or jritterbeck@ cityofgoleta.org or more information regarding the project. More information is also posted on www.CityofGoleta.org. [Para información en español, por favor llame Sra. Imelda Martin, (805) 562-5510.] Note: In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you need special assistance to participate in this hearing, please contact the City Clerk’s Office at (805) 961-7505. Notification at least 72 hours prior to the hearing will enable City staff to make reasonable arrangements. Note: If you challenge the City’s final action on this project in court, you may be limited to only those issues you or someone else raised at the public hearing described in this notice, or in written correspondence delivered to the City on or before the date of the hearing (Government Code Section 65009[b][2]). Originally published in the Santa Barbara Independent, November 7, 2019 Revised notice published in the Santa Barbara Independent, November 14, 2019

ORDINANCE NO. 19-15 An Ordinance Of The City Council Of The City Of Goleta, California, Amending The Following Chapters To Title 15 “Building And Construction” Of The Goleta Municipal Code: Chapter 15.01 “Building Code”, Chapter 15.03 “Electrical Code”, Chapter 15.04 “Plumbing Code”, Chapter 15.05 “Mechanical Code”, Chapter 15.08 “Administrative Code”, Chapter 15.11 “Residential Code”, Chapter 15.12 “Green Building Code”, Chapter 15.15 “Energy Code”, Chapter 15.16 “Historical Code”, Chapter 15.17 “Existing Building Code, And Adding Chapter 15.19 “The International Property Maintenance Code” Adopting By Reference the Above-Listed Codes In The California State Building Standards Codes And Adopting Local Amendments To Those Codes. On November 5, 2019 at Goleta City Hall, 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B, Goleta, California, the City Council of the City of Goleta adopted an ordinance that Amends the Following Chapters to Title 15 “Building and Construction” of The Goleta Municipal Code: Chapter 15.01 “Building Code”, Chapter 15.03 “Electrical Code”, Chapter 15.04 “Plumbing Code”, Chapter 15.05 “Mechanical Code”, Chapter 15.08 “Administrative Code”, Chapter 15.11 “Residential Code”, Chapter 15.12 “Green Building Code”, Chapter 15.15 “Energy Code”, Chapter 15.16 “Historical Code”, Chapter 15.17 “Existing Building Code, and Add Chapter 15.19 “The International Property Maintenance Code” Adopting By Reference the Above-Listed Codes in the California State Building Standards Codes and Adopting Local Amendments to Those Codes. As part of the ordinance, Class ‘A’ roofing materials are to be required throughout the City. A hearing to consider establishing local building laws more stringent than the statewide standards is allowed by Public Resources Code Section 25402.1(h)2. The City Council of the City of Goleta passed and adopted Ordinance No. 19-15 at a regular meeting held on the 5th day of November 2019, by the following vote: AYES: MAYOR PEROTTE, MAYOR PRO TEMPORE RICHARDS, COUNCILMEMBERS ACEVES, KASDIN AND KYRIACO NOES:

NONE

ABSENT:

NONE

ABSTENTIONS:

NONE

The Ordinance will be effective on the 31st day following adoption by the City Council. Any interested person may obtain a copy of the proposed ordinance at the City Clerk’s Office, City Hall, 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B, Goleta, California 93117 or by calling City Hall at (805) 961-7505.

The Ordinance will be effective January 1, 2020.

Deborah S. Lopez City Clerk

Deborah Lopez City Clerk

Publish:

Publish:

THE INDEPENDENT

Santa Barbara Independent, November 14, 2019

NOVEMBER 14, 2019

INDEPENDENT.COM INDEPENDENT.COM

Any interested person may obtain a copy of the proposed ordinance at the City Clerk’s Office, City Hall, 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B, Goleta, California 93117 or by calling City Hall at (805) 961-7505.

Santa Barbara Independent November 14, 2019


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LEGALS years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Connie Tran. FBN Number: 2019‑0002713. Published: Nov 7, 14, 21, 27 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: LA CALENDA TALAVERA at 2915 De La Vina St Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Esperanza Lopez Vargas 160 La Venta Dr. Santa Barbara, CA 93110 conducted by an Individual Signed: Esperanza L. Vargas Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 28, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2019‑0002708. Published: Nov 7, 14, 21, 27 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: BOMBAZOS BURRITOS at 1917 De La Vina St Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Rene Herrera 801 E. Anapamu Street Apt 1 Santa Barbara, CA 93103 conducted by an Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 24, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Margarita Silva. FBN Number: 2019‑0002675. Published: Nov 7, 14, 21, 27 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: HAVEN DESIGN STUDIO at 301 S. Hope Ave. #F108 Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Constance L Orud 4726 Camino Del Rey Santa Barbara, CA 93110 conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Nov 06, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Brenda Aguilera. FBN Number: 2019‑0002784. Published: Nov 14, 21, 27. Dec 5 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: LA BELLA ROSA CAKE SHOP at 1407 San Andres Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Rosa Maria Cardenas Guajardo 5679 Gato Avenue Goleta, CA 93117; Edward Richard Guajardo (same address) conducted by a Married Couple Signed: Rosa Maria Cardenas Guajardo Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Nov 06, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Maria F. Sanchez. FBN Number: 2019‑0002785. Published: Nov 14, 21, 27. Dec 5 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: ADNO at 430 Sea View Road Montecito, CA 93108; Obliki (same address) conducted by a Corporation Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Nov 05, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Margarita Silva. FBN Number: 2019‑0002764. Published: Nov 14, 21, 27. Dec 5 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: INDUSTRY WINE MERCHANT at 6489 Calle Real Ste E Goleta, CA 93117; Industry Wine Merchant, LLC (same address) conducted by a Limited Liability Company Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 15, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Brenda Aguilera. FBN Number: 2019‑0002575. Published: Nov 14, 21, 27. Dec 5 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following

person(s) is/are doing business as: WHO’S WALKING WHO at 7622 Evergreen Dr Goleta, CA 93117; Wynter Halingten (same address) conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 22, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Thomas Brian. FBN Number: 2019‑0002648. Published: Nov 14, 21, 27. Dec 5 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: GOODLAND TECHNOLOGIES at 7 Willowglen Place Santa Barbara, CA 93105; W Three Industries LLC (same address) conducted by a Limited Liability Company Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 29, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by John Beck. FBN Number: 2019‑0002715. Published: Nov 14, 21, 27. Dec 5 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: MACALUSO AND COMPANY INCORPORTED at 139 Aero Camino Unit C Goleta, CA 93117; Macaluso + Company (same address) conducted by a Corporation Signed: Jamesan Macaluso‑Owner Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Nov 07, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by John Beck. FBN Number: 2019‑0002796. Published: Nov 14, 21, 27. Dec 5 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: LA BELLA ROSA CAKE SHOP at 1411 San Andres Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Rosa Maria Cardenas Guajardo 5679 Gato Avenue Goleta, CA 93117; Edward Richard Guajardo (same address) conducted by a Married Couple Signed: Rosa Maria Cardenas Guajardo Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Nov 06, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Maria F. Sanchez. FBN Number: 2019‑0002783. Published: Nov 14, 21, 27. Dec 5 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: BOUTIQUE BY THE SEA at 2135 Mountain Ave Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Kristina Goodwin (same address) conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Nov 04, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Thomas Brian FBN Number: 2019‑0002754. Published: Nov 14, 21, 27. Dec 5 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: LIVING THE ONE LIGHT at 7628 Hollister Ave. #235 Goleta, CA 93117; Martha Hines (same address) conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Oct 21, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Brenda Aguilera. FBN Number: 2019‑0002642. Published: Nov 14, 21, 27. Dec 5 2019.

NAME CHANGE IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF JOHN LEE BROUSSARD TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 19CV05241 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a

change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: JOHN LEE BROUSSARD TO: JOHN LEE SLAGLE THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. NOTICE OF HEARING November 27, 2019 9:30am, Dept 6 1100 Anacapa St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101; SANTA BARBARA DIVISION Superior Court Of California, A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated Oct 11 2019. by Pauline Maxwell, Judge of the Superior Court. Published. Oct 24, 31. Nov 7, 14 2019. IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF KEITH JOSEPH MAUTINO ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 19CV05305 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: KEITH JOSEPH MAUTINO TO: KEITH WHITING MOORE THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. NOTICE OF HEARING Dec 04, 2019 9:30am, Dept 6, Courthouse, 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101 A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated Oct 11 2019 by Pauline Maxwell, Judge of the Superior Court. Published. Nov 07, 14, 21, 27 2019. IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF RANDALL EDWIN PELLETIER ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 19CV05471 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: RANDALL EDWIN PELLETIER TO: RANDAL JAMES LYNCH THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. NOTICE OF HEARING Jan 08, 2020 9:30am, Dept 6, Courthouse, 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101 A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated Nov 07 2019 by Pauline Maxwell, Judge of the Superior Court. Published. Nov 14, 21, 27. Dec 05 2019. IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF RAUL JIMENEZ ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 19CV05831 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: RAUL JIMENEZ TO: RAOUL WOLFKILL FROM: JANELLE NICOLE JIMENEZ TO: NICOLE SKYE WOLFKILL THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter

shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. NOTICE OF HEARING Jan 15, 2020 9:30am, Dept 6, Courthouse, 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101 A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated Nov 07 2019 by Pauline Maxwell, Judge of the Superior Court. Published. Nov 14, 21, 27. Dec 05 2019.

PUBLIC NOTICES EXTRA SPACE STORAGE will hold a public auction to sell personal property described below belonging to those individuals listed below at the location indicated: 6640 Discovery Drive, Goleta, CA 93117 November 29, 2019 @ 3:30PM Chyanne Garcia Household Items Adriel Arias Personal Petra M D Whiteheadsellersygarcia Personal Purchases must be made with cash only and paid at the above referenced facility in order to complete the transaction. Extra Space Storage may refuse any bid and may rescind any purchase up until the winning bidder takes possession of the personal property.

de las Cortes de California (www. sucorte.ca.gov), en el sitio web de los Servicios Legales de California (www.lawhelpca.org) o poniendose en contacto con el colegio de abogados de su condado. AVISO‑LAS ORDENES DE RESTRICCION SE ENCUENTRAN EN LA PAGINA 2: valen para ambos conyuges o pareja de hecho hasta que se despida la peticion, se emita un fallo o la corte de otras ordenes. Cualquier autoridad de la ley que haya recibido o visto una copia de estas ordenes puede hacerlas acerlas acater en cualquier lugar de California. EXENCION DE CUOTAS: Si no puede pagar la cuota de presentacion, pida al secretario un formulario de exencion de cuotas. La corte puede ordenar que usted pague, ya sea en parte o por completo, las cuotas y costos de la corte previamente exentos a peticion de usted o de la otra parte. 1.The name and address of the court are (El nombre y direccion de la corte son): SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT 1100 Anacapa St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101. The name, address, and telephone number of the petitioner’s attorney, or the petitioner without an attorney, are: Bruce D. Glesby 137394 Griffith & Thronburgh, LLP 805‑965‑5131 8 East Figueroa Street, Suite 300 Santa Barbara, CA 93101 (El nombre, direcion y numero de telefono del abogado del demandante, o del demandante si no tiene abogado, son): Dated July 30, 2019. Darrel E. Parker, Execcutive Officer; Clerk, by (Secretario, por) Caitlin Colyer, Deputy (Asistente) Published Nov 14, 21, 27. Dec 4 2019..

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SUMMONS SUMMONS ‑ (Family Law) NOTICE TO REPONDENT: WENDY MAPEL AVISO AL DEMANDANDO: Petitioner’s name is: DARYN MAPEL Nombre del demandante: CASE NUMBER: (Numero del caso) 19FL01630 You have 30 calendar days after this Summons and Petition are served on you to file a Response (form FL‑120) at the court and have a copy served on the petitioner. A letter, phone call will not protect you. If you do not file your Response on time, the court may make orders affecting your marriage or domestic partnership, your property, and custody of your children. You may be ordered to pay support and attorney fees and costs. For legal advice, contact a lawyer immediately. Get help finding a lawyer at the California Courts Online Self‑Help Center (www. courts.ca.gov/selfhelp), at the California Legal Services website (www.lawhelpca.org), or by contacting your local county bar association. NOTICE‑RESTRAINING ORDERS ARE ON PAGE 2: are effective against both spouses or domestic partners until the petition is dismissed, a judgment is entered, or the court makes further orders. These orders are enforceable anywhere in California by any law enforcement officer who has received or seen a copy of them. FEE WAIVER: If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the clerk for a fee waiver form. The court may order you to pay back all or part of the fees and costs that the court waived for you or the other party. Tiene 30 dias calendario despues de haber recibido la entrega legal de esta Citacion y Peticion para presentar una Respuesta (formulario FL‑120) ante la corte y efectuar la entrega legal de una copia al demandante. Una carta o llamada telefonica o una audiencia de la corte no basta para protegerto. Si no presenta su Respuesta a tiempo, la corte puede dar ordenes que afecten su matrimonio o pareja de hecho, sus bienes y la custodia de sus hijos. La corte tambien le puede ordenar que pague manutencion, y honorarios y costos legales. Para asesoramiento legal, pongase en contacto de inmediato con un abogado. Puede obtener informacion para encountrar un abogado en el Centro de Ayuda

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Santa Barbara Independent, 11/14/19  

November 14, 2019, Vol. 33, No. 722

Santa Barbara Independent, 11/14/19  

November 14, 2019, Vol. 33, No. 722