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FREE

Santa Barbara

AUG. 8-15, 2019 VOL. 33 ■ NO. 708

Is State Street Turning the Corner? Or Will Downtown Continue to Suffer? by Tyler Hayden

Also this week ... Seniors Review Retirement Home Film Meet the Mercury Lounge’s New Owner Council Tightens Up Park Rules PCPA’s Addams Family, Mariachi Festival Reviewed INDEPENDENT.COM

AUGUST 8, 2019

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STYROFOAM RECYCLING COMES TO SANTA BARBARA!

MarBorg Industries & Heal the Ocean have joined hands to create a Pilot Program for Styrofoam Recycling in SB. NO LONGER DO YOU HAVE TO DUMP THIS OCEAN-POLLUTING MATERIAL IN THE TRASH! Bring ALL Styrofoam to the following MarBorg locations for FREE drop-off: • Goleta - 20 David Love Place (Take 101/South Fairview exit) • Downtown - 132 Nopalitos Way (Lower Milpas area, near Post Office) It can be ANY form of Styrofoam, all the stuff electronics are shipped in, construction material, etc. even meat trays (but the Styrofoam must be clean—no tape or aluminum wrapping, concrete, food, etc.).

No More!

NOT ACCEPTED: Packing “peanuts” and the softer Polyurethane foam materials used in memory foam, packing cloth sheets, etc. These gum up densifiers. Please take to various mail services that reuse them.

In the MarBorg/HTO program, Styrofoam is “densified” into viscous material that is reformed into usable products – mirror & picture frames, even into new packing materials. This is a pilot program. Heal the Ocean & MarBorg hope the public will help make it successful by using the free drop-off locations, and by only bringing in CLEAN Styrofoam. Any size and shape is OK!

To Brian Borgatello, President of MarBorg Industries, Heal the Ocean sends a big Thank You! (All the creatures of the ocean thank you, too!) MarBorg Industries, a family-owned business that has operated waste management in Santa Barbara for over 75 years, is CalRecycle certified. • www.marborg.com • (805) 963-1852

Heal the Ocean is a 3,000-member citizens action group addressing ocean-pollution issues. 1430 Chapala St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101 • www.healtheocean.org • (805) 965-7570

HTO thanks our generous donors for funding our share of program costs. 2

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S i n g l e t i c ke t s g o o n s a l e

this Sat, Aug 10 at 10 AM Jan 21 Itzhak Perlman

Stories of His Life and Career

Jan 30 Jon Meacham

Lyon Opera Ballet

Feb 11 David Brooks

Apr 1&2

Feb 19 Anita Hill

Feb 4 Chris Thile

Oct 2 Kristin Chenoweth in Concert

2019-2020 More than 60 spectacular events to choose from!

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AUGUST 8, 2019

Mar 7 Buddy Guy

Visit us online to view a full list of events and order today!

Corporate Season Sponsor: 4

Apr 27 Gautier Capuรงon, cello and Yuja Wang, piano

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Purchase tickets early. Shows will sell out!

Oct 3 Philip Glass

in Conversation with Pico Iyer

Dec Pink Martini 8 Holiday Show

Oct 1 Tara Westover

May Jon Batise and 1 Stay Human

Oct 19 Béla Fleck, Zakir Hussain and Edgar Meyer

Apr Samin Nosrat and 3 Yotam Ottolenghi

Nov Dance Theatre 6 of Harlem

Apr 5 Bryan Stevenson

Nov Sérgio Mendes 17 & Bebel Gilberto

www.ArtsAndLectures.UCSB.edu (805) 893-3535

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AUGUST 8, 2019

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Director of Advertising Sarah Sinclair Marketing and Promotions Manager Emily Cosentino Advertising Representatives Camille Cimini Fruin, Suzanne Cloutier, Remzi Gokmen, Stefanie McGinnis, Antonio Morales, Tonea Songer Sales Administrator Graham Brown Accounting Assistant Tobi Feldman Office Manager/Legal Advertising Tanya Spears Guiliacci Distribution Scott Kaufman Columnist Emeritus Barney Brantingham Founding Staff Emeriti Audrey Berman, George Delmerico, Richard Evans, Laszlo Hodosy Honorary Consigliere Gary J. Hill Indy Kids Bella and Max Brown, Elijah Lee Bryant, Henry and John Poett Campbell, Chloë Bee Ciccati, Izadora and Savina Hamm, Madeline Rose and Mason Carrington Kettmann, Olivia Pando-McGinnis, Izzy and Maeve McKinley, Sawyer Tower Stewart, Phoenix Grace White The Independent is available, free of charge, limited to one copy per reader. Back issues cost $2 and may be purchased at the office. The Independent may be distributed only by authorized circulation staff or authorized distributors. No person may, without the permission of publisher, take more than one copy of each Independent issue. Subscriptions are available, paid in advance, for $120 per year. Send subscription requests with name and address to subscriptions@independent.com. The contents of the Independent are copyrighted 2019 by the Santa Barbara Independent, Inc. No part may be reproduced without permission from the publisher. The publisher assumes no responsibility for unsolicited material. A stamped, self-addressed envelope must accompany all submissions expected to be returned. The Independent is published every Thursday at 12 E. Figueroa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Advertising rates on request: (805) 965-5205. The Independent is available on the internet at independent.com. Press run of the Independent is 40,000 copies. Audited certification of circulation is available on request. The Independent is a legal adjudicated newspaper — court decree no. 157386.

Contact information: 12 E. Figueroa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101 PHONE (805) 965-5205; FAX (805) 965-5518 EMAIL news@independent.com, letters@independent.com Staff email addresses can be found at independent.com/info


Voices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  17

Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  22

THE WEEK.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 LIVING.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 Living Page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 36 Starshine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39

FOOD & DRINK .. . . . . . . . . . . 41 The Restaurant Guy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44

24

Dining Out Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45

A&E. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47

COVER STORY

Arts Life . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47

BACK IN THE FOLD Name: Remzi Gokmen Title: Sales Representative

PAUL WELLMAN

volume 33, number 708, Aug. 8-15, 2019 PAUL WELLMAN FILE PHOTO

CONTENTS

Welcome back to the Indy! How long was your hiatus, and where’d you go? Thanks, happy to be back! I was gone about four years, which took me a few different places. At first, I was working in technology sales in San Fran, but the show Silicon Valley, like Veep, is more reality than anyone cares to admit. Wasn’t my scene, so I moved down to Orange County and joined a medical software company. What brought you back to Santa Barbara? Neither of my experiences really matched the blend of community, purpose, and lifestyle that I had here at the Indy. Being a cog in a larger company’s machine that I had no personal connection with was challenging for me. While medical software and insurance benefits are important services, I believe what the Indy does for the community is vital and want to contribute to it and help it thrive. Any special issues or projects you’re excited about? It’s officially Best Of season, so I’m excited to see how the final ballot shakes out.

Reviews . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48

Is State Steet Turning the Corner?

FILM & TV. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51

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SPORTS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55

BEST of Santa Barbara®

ONLINE NOW AT

Movie Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51

Or Will Santa Barbara Continue to Suffer? (Tyler Hayden) ON THE COVER: Illustration by Alex Drake

NEWS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 OPINIONS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

Angry Poodle Barbecue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

Is Here!

ODDS & ENDS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Obituaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18

Don’t forget to vote online for your favorite nominees at independent.com/bestof2019.

Rob Brezsny’s Free Will Astrology . . . . . . . 56 This Modern World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59

CLASSIFIEDS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57

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LEARN. SHARE. CONTRIBUTE. MAKE A DIFFERENCE. Become a Docent at the Santa Barbara Museum of Art.

Do you have a passion for art? If you’re interested in serving your community in a challenging and rewarding way, the SBMA Docent Program is a nurturing and supportive environment in which to learn and have fun at the same time. An art background is not required. Prospective Docents should have an interest in learning about art, working with students, and facilitating positive Museum experiences for all visitors.

Join us for a Recruitment Reception on Wednesday, August 21 at 3 pm. For more information on becoming a Docent, RSVP for the recruitment reception to Elena Hancock at ehancock@sbma.net or 805.884.6457. IMAGE CREDIT: Georgia O’Keeffe, Dead Cottonwood Tree (detail), 1943. Oil on canvas. SBMA, Gift of Mrs. Gary Cooper.

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JULY 31-AUG. 8, 2019

NEWS of the WEEK by TYLER HAYDEN @TylerHayden1, NICK WELSH, DELANEY SMITH, and JEAN YAMAMURA, with INDEPENDENT STAFF

NEWS BRIEFS

HEALTH

CITY

TALK IT OUT: Leon Evans (left) met with Sheriff Bill Brown (right) and Behavioral Wellness Director Alice Gleghorn (below) to discuss his recommendations to improve Santa Barbara’s Stepping Up program.

As Easy as Wrestling Bears Mental-Health Guru Outlines How Warring Tribes Came Together to Find Success in San Antonio

O

by Nick Welsh

f course, Leon Evans wrestled a bear before. Not just once, but twice. The first time, Evans — now in his seventies—took on a 1,200-pound Kodiak from Alaska and got swatted clear across the stage at the Houston Astrodome. That was about 1973. Ten years later, Evans—then in his forties and the senior mental-health administrator in Houston—went up against a 500-pound black bear named Ginger. This time, Evans — an accomplished college wrestler — managed to take the bear down but never managed to pin her, thus losing out on the $10,000 prize money. Both bears, he explained during a recent interview, were muzzled and declawed. “I only look stupid,” he said.

YOU GUYS ARE SO CLOSE. YOU’RE ALMOST THERE.’ —Leon Evans, President/CEO at Center for Health Care Service

Not even hardly. Evans has since emerged as a semi-mythological character in the field of mental-healthcare administration. He is frequently credited for the screaming success enjoyed by Bexar County (pronounced “bear,” by the way) for its Restoration Center, a sprawling one-stopshop mental-health and homeless-services program that’s managed to divert 60,000 people into treatment who would otherwise have wound up in jail. Santa Barbara’s Sheriff Bill Brown—who was appointed by then-governor Jerry Brown

to serve on a statewide panel of experts on the subject of mental-health services—describes San Antonio’s mental-health system as “the gold standard.” Brown brought Evans to Santa Barbara to preach the gospel of collaboration and diversion to a choir of highly interested stakeholders participating in Santa Barbara County’s Stepping Up program, which Brown chairs. Attending were a smattering of law enforcement officers, court officials, highoctane county administrators, mental-health providers, prosecutors, and many mentalhealth advocates. A Texas yarn spinner, Evans knows how to tell stories. “We were a 17-year overnight success,” he cautioned. Collaboration, he stressed, was absolutely key, though it is “an unnatural act by un-consenting partners.” But behind Evan’s practiced patter — his words may twinkle, but his eyes don’t—lie some seriously hard-to-come by accomplishments. The Restoration Center started off in 2008 with a crisis care center—16 beds—for the most seriously mentally ill people in San Antonio. Eventually it picked up a detox unit —28 beds of medically supervised care—that offered 120 days’ worth of supportive inpatient treatment, including an opioid addiction center. Initially, law enforcement figured about 16 percent of the people behind bars had some form of serious mental illness; they quickly figured out the real number is closer to 40 percent. None of this was cheap or easy. It began when a Bexar County judge invited hospital administrators, medical staff, law enforcement, and mental-health workers to get together. Backing the effort was a retired executive from Valero oil, who had the money and political connections to match his commitment. The judge ordered Evans —then the senior mental-health-care administrator in the county — to make everyone work together. “We discovered we actually liked each other,” Evans said. More important

was the fact that everyone was spending millions to treat or incarcerate a relatively small minority of mentally ill patients. The hospitals alone, Evans said, were hemorrhaging more than $1 billion a year because of 2,000 repeat patients, who choked up their emergency rooms on their way back to the streets and to jail. Mentally ill inmates tend to get arrested more, stay longer, and require more expensive custody services. Armed with rigorously collected data, the parties involved discovered that treatment worked. It saved lives and it saved money. Evans’s arrival in Santa Barbara coincides with many smaller but significant mental initiatives bubbling to the surface simultaneously. The county just got a $6 million state grant to help pay for a new sobering center, 20 beds of step-down mental-health housing, and funding to sustain a second co-response unit, made up of a mental-health crisis worker and a county sheriff’s deputy. The first such unit— part of the Sheriff’s Behavioral Sciences Unit —has enjoyed some high-profile interventions in situations that otherwise could have turned violent. The county just committed another $3 million of state funds to create a new eight- to 15-bed mental-health treatment facility for patients who might have wound up as inmates instead. Even with more programs and better collaboration, the county struggles to find enough places with the right treatment for people with chronic mental illnesses. Evans shared not only his inspiring success story but also some keen-eyed advice. Data, he said repeatedly, is key to funding, performance, and outcomes. Santa Barbara’s data collection system, he said gently, is archaic and needs an expensive upgrade. “And you need to be operating more as one system, not so many individual systems.” Mostly, he stressed, “You guys are so close. You’re almost there.” Of course, Leon Evans wrestled bears. n

Fiesta 2019 was a success, said Old Spanish Days organizers, with about 100,000 people attending. Several incidents occurred involving horses during Friday’s El Desfile Histórico, however, including a few that slipped and fell by the 101 overpass and two children hit by a horse hoof during a parade. All are okay. The police put in more hours this year, clocking 2,398 hours compared to 2018’s 1,994 total. Felony arrests were up, 36 this year compared to 20 last year, and DUI arrests dropped to four this year compared to nine last year. NANCY ROD R I GU EZ

PAU L WELLM AN PHOTOS

COU RTESY PHOTOS

Santa Barbara Zoo announced two of its Masai giraffes are pregnant. The news comes just a few weeks after their species was declared endangered. This is the first pregnancy for 5-year-old Adia (top), due in April 2020, and the fifth for 11-year-old Audrey (bottom), due in July 2020. Giraffes are pregnant for about 15 months. Both calves were sired by the zoo’s male Masai, Michael. “Every single giraffe born at the zoo helps keep their species genetically diverse and thriving,” said Dr. Julie Barnes, the zoo’s vice president of animal health and care.

Ralph Armbruster-Sandoval

Upward of 70 Santa Barbarans gathered outside La Casa de La Rasa on 8/5 to hold a vigil for the victims of the mass shootings in El Paso, Texas; Dayton, Ohio; and Gilroy, California. The group formed a circle to share prayers and voice concerns about gun reform and racist political rhetoric. “We’ve had more shootings than days in the year,” said Ralph Armbruster-Sandoval, who organized the vigil. “We thought that Sandy Hook would be the last one, that Parkland would be the last one, that this would never happen again, but here we are again.” Another speaker shared a prayer song and said, “What can we do? We can vote, we can gather, we can pray, and we can take action.” CONT’D ON PAGE 12 

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AUGUST 8, 2019

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JULY 31-AUG. 8, 2019

‘Certain Discomforts’ or Mass Evictions?

O

ver on East Carrillo Street at a property owned by Santa Barbara’s infamous landlord Dario Pini, one of seven of his properties now under court-appointed receivership, at least three units have too FOR many people living in them. Just two people per studio or one-bedroom apartment constitutesGOLETA overcrowding, according to the 5757 Hollister new property manager.Ave Are they married? Are they roommates? Is one a minor? The Mahatma 2# last is a mystery that Judge Colleen Sterne has ordered the manager to suss out to better understand just who will be getting a 60-day notice to either reduce their numbers or HASS AVOCADOS leave. lb. Along with a litany of unsavory conditions like bedbugs, cockroaches, mold, and 7# ea. rotten walls, overcrowding is an illegal condition under attack in the city’s attempt to restore Health & Safety Code order at Pini’s STRAWBERRIES 1# BOX properties. But 279 people at Pini’s properties under repair by receiver Bill Hoffman are said to inhabit overcrowded apartments ea. El Pato 7 oz.— some with as many as 10 people in a twobedroom and six people in a studio. On West Arrellaga and West Mission SEEDLESS WATERMELON streets, 60-day notices were already served on eight apartments. Two sets of tenants

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reduced their “crowd” to the allowed number, one family moved, and five sets of tenants remain. By the law of large numbers, around 30 of the 44 other overcrowded Pini units are likely to end up in eviction. It’s such a large number in Santa Barbara’s nearly invisible affordable rental market that several nonprofits are joining forces to find help for them. During the course of a three-hour hearing last Friday, Judge Sterne said that housing tenants has been of tremendous interest to all involved since the first day of the case. But the intent was to return tenants to clean units that met legal standards. It was clear, she said, that “certain discomforts would be unavoidable.” Sterne held out an iota of hope for the tenants facing eviction as she pondered aloud the Housing Authority of the City of Santa Barbara’s more lenient crowding standards. She said that some, especially those with minors, who wished to return to their apartment could apply to the court to see if any special circumstance warranted it. The court had some degree of choice, she said, though “following the law is a starting place.”

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n Tuesday, Santa Barbara City Councilmember Randy Rowse lb. Springfield 15 oz.sought GOLETAto rescind a council deal SANTA BARBARA 5757 324 W. Montecito St madeHollister earlierAve this year that gives lb. Beef building-trade unions the hiring HEAD LETTUCE Mahatma 2# By the bag authority for city construction BACK RIBS projects greater than $5 million in 99But he got nowhere for his $ value. ea. lb. lb. efforts other than more frustrated. Springfield 8 oz. lb. Only Councilmember Kristen 7# Chicken Sneddon voted with him. Rowse PEACHES & NECTARINES LARGE SHRIMP on the tail end of his last year in lb. 89 $— office — castigated the agreement as political “quid pro quo” made lb.lb. ea. El Pato 7 oz. by the pro-union council majority lb. Minute Maid 59 oz. in exchange for continued political ¢ support and campaign donations Mesquite (7#) LARGE EGGS to candidates backed by the CHARCOALea. (doz.) Folgers 8 oz. Democratic Party. lb. lb. Supporters of the agreement — known as a project labor KEEP IT LOCAL: Construction company owners like Lee antacruzmarkets.com www.santacruzmarkets.com Thin sliced 89alternately $ agreement (PLA) or a community Cushman (above) have argued that the project labor agreement GOLETA GOLETA SANTA BARBARA workforce agreement — contend it will force unions to hire people from outside the area. 5757 Hollister Ave 5757 Hollister Ave 324 W. Montecito St McCormick (28 oz.) Springfield 15 oz. La Fortaleza (14 oz.) will increase the number of “local” By the bag ANANAS BANANAS LONG GRAIN RICE LONG GRAIN RICE ¢TORTILLA MAYONNAISE ¢ $ 99 lb.CHIPS BEEF TRI TIP 99 $ lb. workers hired for City Hall’s larger con- like Lee Cushman have argued that because 49 1 49 $ 59 2 EFFECTIVE 7 FULL DAYS 1 D TO STOCK ON HAND • PRICES ¢ contracts. They argue such agree- there are so few union subcontractors in the struction Chicken MESQUITE CHARCOAL MESQUITE CHARCOAL Santa Cruz NEAPPLES OCTOBER PINEAPPLES FROM THROUGH NOVEMBER 2ND 89 $ 27TH LEG QUARTERS ments give City Hall the legal authority to tri counties, the unions will be forced to hire 89 $ $ 99 $ 99 ¢ 1 El Pato 7 oz. 2 1 El Pato 7 oz. 2 69 Springfield 8 oz.require a certain percentage of jobs go to people from outside the area. HOT TOMATO SAUCE HOT TOMATO SAUCE ¢ MA TOMATOES women, minorities, veterans, and young While Rowse and Sneddon questioned PORK BUTT ¢ ROMA TOMATOES 59 59 $ 59 lb. apprentices. the agreements, the five other councilmem89 ¢ INSTANT COFFEE lb. 89 ¢ INSTANT COFFEE 1 49 $ $ 89 Thin sliced At issue Tuesday — when the council bers continued to support it. They high$ 89 5 UJI APPLES 5 FUJI APPLES CARNE RANCHERA ¢ reviewed preliminary talking points for lighted preliminary language requiring that ¢ $ 98 89 PEAS & CARROTS Minute Maid 59 oz. 89 PEAS & CARROTS 5 ¢ upcoming negotiations over the final terms workers living from Carpinteria to Goleta ¢ 89 89 Santa Cruz EDIUM YAMS MEDIUM YAMS PORK CHORIZO of such agreements — was just what differ- be given the highest hiring preference, with SANTA BARBARA GOLETA ¢ WHIP TOPPING ¢ GOLETA SANTA BARBARA WHIP TOPPING $ 49 GOLETA 59 59 $ ence89 lb.324 $ 49 2 St St $ ea. those living from Oxnard to elsewhere in it would make. Ave Currently, 75 percent 5757 Hollister Montecito W.W.Montecito 5757 Hollister Ave Ave 5757 Hollister 1 324 149 EAD LETTUCE PORK CHOPS of the city’s big construction contracts go Santa Barbara County getting secondary HEAD LETTUCE JUICE By the bag ORANGE JUICE Mahatma 2# ¢ $ 98 Mahatma 2# 79 ¢ ORANGENow $ 89 79 to “local” workers, according to a report priority. Nonunion contractors would be 89 $ 1 3 featuring LONG freshGRAIN bread 3 LONG GRAIN RICE RICEdaily from released by city public works administrato compete, but if selected could bread daily from Now featuring fresh bread daily from ¢ ¢ La Bella Rosa Bakery sa Bakery 99 the agreement, the goal will be allowed $ Under Rosa 99 $ Bakery tors. only bring a small handful of “core” workers $ TO STOCK 59 lb.ON HANDLa•Bella lb. LIMITED PRICES EFFECTIVE 7 FULL DAYS lb. —Nick Welsh 85 percent. Construction company owners to the job. FROM OCTOBER 27TH•THROUGH NOVEMBER 2ND DAYS LIMITED STOCK ON HAND PRICES EFFECTIVE 7 FULL


PAU L WELLM AN F I LE PHOTO

NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D

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INTO THE SUNSET: Parks czar Jill Zachary (above) initially argued that all parks should close at sunset but added an extra half hour of legal time at the insistence of councilmembers.

Tightening Up Park Rules City Council Votes to Shorten Park Hours for 30 City Parks, Bar Childless Adults from Play Areas by Nick Welsh n response to increasing complaints about overflowing trash, filthy bathrooms, and vandalism in city parks — not to mention reports of obnoxious and intimidating behavior by some loud and inebriated regular park users—the Santa Barbara City Council voted to shorten park hours on 30 of the city’s parks. The council also voted to bar adults from the designated children’s play areas in all parks with playgrounds or pools unless they accompany a child. Lastly, they added new safety restrictions on the use of barbecues, all of which must be portable and sit at least six inches off any hard surface when in use. Under the new scheme—adopted by a 5-2 vote—all city parks will now close half an hour after sunset. Right now, about 30 parks close at 10 p.m. and 19 close shortly after sunset. That discrepancy has caused confusion and enforcement problems, said parks czar Jill Zachary, and uniform park hours would make a positive difference. Zachary initially argued that all parks should close at sunset—as defined by the National Weather Service —but added an extra half hour of legal time at the insistence of councilmembers. Councilmember Randy Rowse, who represents the Mesa district, noted that Shoreline Park traditionally draws droves of sunset watchers, who should be given time to pack their bags before having to worry about being “dragged off ” by “sunset cops.” Councilmembers Meagan Harmon and Kristen Sneddon both pushed unsuccessfully to maintain the 10 p.m. closing time. Harmon expressed concern that her husband will be barred from the impromptu pickup soccer games he now enjoys with friends after putting the couple’s daughter to bed. “This is just so onerous,” she objected. Harmon found it unreasonable to expect her husband to obtain city permits for such games, which he will now need to do if he wishes to continue his evening games. Zachary argued her department isn’t staffed to allow all parks to remain open until 10; restrooms need to be closed for the night and, in some cases, gates locked. Harmon and Sneddon had hoped that members of the public would still be allowed free rein in

I

city park space even if such amenities were not operable. Councilmember Oscar Gutierrez expressed regret that parks would be closed early, noting that as a kid, he often “escaped” into the after-hours solace offered by city parks. City police, he noted, occasionally asked him to leave but were never harsh about it. Zachary stressed that enforcement will be left to the discretion of city cops, who will respond based largely upon complaints. The other changes in park rules — restricting kids’ play areas to kids and adults accompanying them—are designed to make parks safer and more inviting to families. For the past three years, Zachary has been expressing increasing concern that small clusters of obnoxious park users are discouraging members of the public from enjoying the abundance of public open space — 60 parks in total—that City Hall manages. According to a report issued this April, City Hall spent $1.6 million in one year cleaning up homeless camps, maintaining park bathrooms, fixing broken or vandalized equipment, and underwriting revenues lost because paying park customers were effectively chased away. City parks workers, Zachary complained, have been subjected to verbal abuse and threats. She estimated that 30 percent of the city’s 60 parks have been negatively impacted by homeless activity. Given a major appellate court decision handed down two years ago, city police cannot prevent people from sleeping in public spaces if there are not enough shelter beds available. As a result, city parks have increasingly become a place of refuge for those with no place to go. In an interview prior to Tuesday’s council meeting, Sneddon expressed concern about the competing agendas for city parks. Sneddon said she hopes the parks will be used —after dark—for sleeping. She expressed concern, however, about the consequences of closing park bathrooms earlier. “People have to go somewhere,” she observed. “Where will they go?” Councilmember Jason Dominguez had sought a middle ground, pushing for parks to close at 7:30 during winter months and 8:30 the rest of the year. That proposal got no support, and Dominguez wound up voting against the more restrictive hours. n

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UCSB Sues over Patented LED Tech

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C Santa Barbara launched a full-scale legal assault this week on five major retailers — Walmart, Target, Ikea, Amazon, and Bed Bath & Beyond — that the university claims ripped off its patented filament LED lighting technology used to make vintage-looking “Edison” light bulbs with glowing filaments. “Researchers at UC Santa Barbara have dedicated years to developing technology that reinvented the traditional incandescent light bulb,” the university said in a prepared statement, “creating an option for consumers and businesses that requires less energy, creates less heat, and distributes LIGHT-BULB MOMENT: UCSB claims five major retailers ripped off light in all directions.” UCSB says as soon as the its patented filament LED lighting technology used to make vintagebulbs came on the market in looking “Edison” light bulbs. 2014, it sent cease-and-desist notices to infringers and tried to establish the lawsuit is targeting the alleged infringelicenses with companies in the lighting ment that occurs when filament LED prodindustry, but all to no avail. “As a result, ucts arrive on U.S. soil and enter the retail UC Santa Barbara has opted to take more marketplace. aggressive action through the initiation of “The goal of this campaign is to ensure these legal actions,” the university said. The that UC’s patent rights are respected so Edison bulb industry is now worth around it can reinvest in education and research to create more world-changing technolo$1 billion. The university is being represented by law gies,” said Seth Levy with Nixon Peabody. firm Nixon Peabody LLP, which said this “It also is a message to entities throughout is a first-of-its-kind “direct patent enforce- the private sector that university intellectual ment campaign against an entire industry.” property rights cannot be infringed with Because the bulbs are mostly made overseas, impunity.” —Tyler Hayden

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For businesses leasing office space, Goleta is the new destination, according to Hayes Commercial real estate. For the first time since Hayes has been keeping track, Goleta has fewer offices vacant than Santa Barbara, which is at an all-time high of 6.8 percent. More than 235,000 square feet in 55 office spaces are available within five blocks of State Street, Hayes’s mid-year report states. Hayes cites higher rent in S.B., as much as 40 percent more expensive per square foot over Goleta, as well as housing and State Street’s problems as among the reasons businesses have chosen Goleta.

NATIONAL Congressmember Salud Carbajal joined the ranks of Democrats calling for the initiation of impeachment proceedings against President Donald Trump, citing 10 instances in which Trump sought to interfere with the investigation conducted by former special counsel Robert Mueller. Carbajal had conducted an online poll to gauge the sentiments of his constituents, and his office reported about 8,000 people responded to the survey request, with a small majority favoring impeachment. In addition, another 4,100 constituents reportedly called or emailed Carbajal on the impeachment question, with a solid majority favoring impeachment. Carbajal’s

announcement provided the 118th vote to tip congressional opinion in favor of impeachment.

PEOPLE The Sheriff-Coroner’s Office determined the cause of death for Gary Bishop, 53, and Christopher Avila, 49, the two Arroyo Grande men found on a boat about 20 miles off Santa Barbara Harbor on 6/30, to be accidental carbon monoxide poisoning. The two had been piloting Bishop’s 34-foot Sea Ray Sundowner to Port San Luis Obispo from Ventura when family members reported they could not reach the men on 6/29. The U.S. Coast Guard found the boat with the deceased men on it near Point Conception and towed it to S.B. Harbor.

COURTS & CRIME Angel Anthony Richard Sanchez, 29, was convicted on 8/2 on five charges, including assault with intent to commit rape with a special allegation of using a dangerous weapon. The charges stemmed from the 9/2/18 assault and attempted rape of a 19-year-old Santa Barbara woman in the upper State Street Dunkin’ Donuts parking lot. The attack was stopped by a Good Samaritan, who drove into the lot after hearing the woman’s screams and scared off the attacker with his car’s headlights. Sanchez’s sentence will be determined by Judge Von Deroian at an undetermined later date. n


NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D CANNABIS

Seeing Beyond the Nose

VOTE

What We Do and Don’t Know about Cannabis-Related Emissions

S

by Maya Chiodo

ince growing cannabis became legal in Santa Barbara County, most public outcry has been about the aromas wafting out of Carpinteria greenhouses, where most of the crops are grown. To reduce the smell, many growers have installed odor-control systems which spray a specially designed deodorizer. Now, however, some scientists are calling for more research into what happens when the spray mixes with the natural smells coming from the cannabis plant, as well as what effects all cannabis plant emissions — odorless or not — have in the atmosphere. Cannabis emissions are known as biogenic volatile organic compounds (BVOCs). Part of those emissions are terpenes, which cause the odors that have upset so many Carpinteria residents. Controlling terpenes, a natural compound found also in orange peels, bay leaves, and Christmas trees, is what one system produced by Byers Scientific and Manufacturing is designed to achieve. Their system uses Ecosorb CNB 100, a secret recipe protected by intellectual property law. However, the Air Pollution Control District (APCD), which is legally allowed to review the ingredients, found that, based on state standards, none of the ingredients in Ecosorb CNB 100 are considered toxic air contaminants.

I COULD HAVE GOD HIMSELF COME DOWN AND SAY IT’S SAFE, AND THEY’D STILL GO, “YEAH, BUT—.” —Marc Byers (pictured), founder of Byers Scientific and Manufacturing But Dr. Patricia Holden, a PhD in soil microbiology and a professor at UCSB’s Bren School, is calling for studies on exactly what happens when Ecosorb reacts with cannabis BVOCs — reactions that she claims could have “unusual ozone-forming potential.” Holden, who lives in More Mesa Eastern Goleta Valley, said her neighbors are asking for this kind of evidence before assuming this system is a viable solution. The founder of Byers Scientific and Manufacturing, Marc Byers, says he also values research into the safety and efficacy of his products, but he has not had a great experience dealing with Concerned Carpinteri-

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ans. He said of the group’s members, “I could have God himself come down and say it’s safe, and they’d still go, ‘Yeah, but—.’” The Santa Barbara area is already a hotspot for biogenic emissions due to the widespread agricultural industry and protected forest areas. But in Carpinteria, ozone concentrations are well below state standards and, according to APCD recordings, are showing an overall decrease lately. And those lower levels are a good thing, because as much as we need the ozone layer (high up in the atmosphere) to protect us from the sun, when ozone is at ground level, it’s actually a harmful air pollutant. It is nearly impossible to identify what causes fluctuations in ozone concentrations, however, says Dr. William Vizuete, a VOC expert at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill. Factors like innovations in transportation or demographic changes may impact the ozone concentration of any given city. This is why Vizuete’s air-quality model, which can predict “ground-level ozone concentrations” both with and without the cannabis industry accounted for, is helpful. So far, he has run the model in Denver and provided an inventory of cannabis VOC emissions, making the study the first of its kind. But he hasn’t been able to conduct his research on a larger scale due to cannabis’s illegal status at the federal level, the usual funding sources. Vizuete has yet to run his model on Santa Barbara County, but based on his findings, he estimates cannabis would add five tons of biogenic VOCs to the 40,000 emitted each year in the county. But that prediction contains a lot of uncertainties — among them whether different cannabis strains give off different VOCs at different levels and therefore may react differently with other air emissions. In this regard, Vizuete echoes Holden: “We need a lot more research.” n

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PAU L WELLM AN

NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D

OPEN FIRE: Santa Barbara County District Attorney Joyce Dudley (above), flanked by city and county fire officials, announced a false advertising civil suit against Sunseeker Enterprises over a fire-protection spray on Monday.

DA Sues Fire-Prevention-Spray Maker

W

hen Santa Barbara County District Attorney Joyce E. Dudley first saw a commercial for Sun Fire Defense’s SPF 3000 Clear Spray — which purports to be an efficient preventative tool against fires once applied to a home’s exterior — she was “immediately concerned this was a predatory company.” On Monday, August 5, Dudley announced a joint civil lawsuit with the city of Los Angeles against Sun Fire’s parent company, Sunseeker Enterprises, and its owner, James Moseley. An investigation led by S.B. Deputy DA Christopher Dalbey, who will prosecute the case, resulted in the filing of the lawsuit in Santa Barbara Superior Court for “allegedly false and misleading” advertising claims, including that the product was nontoxic, protected up to 3,000 degrees Fahrenheit, lasted more than five years, and was developed with NASA and the U.S. Forest Service. A fire protection engineer conducted lab studies on the product during Dalbey’s investigation, City Fire Marshal Joe Poiré told the Independent,

the results of which caused him to open the case. Contacted by phone, Jim Moseley said that the allegations were “entirely unfounded” and stated he would send the pages of reports and research that backed his spray. “Our product works,” he later asserted in an email accompanying the reports, and has “been tested by multiple third-party agencies.” He stated he has been cooperating with Dudley’s office “as we also want what is good for the consumer. This is a huge responsibility for a company to do what we’re doing.” At Monday’s press conference, Poiré, Dudley, and Santa Barbara County Fire Chief Mark Hartwig all emphasized their concern that consumers could be misled, especially now at the end of summer when the fire threat is high. Citing the inevitability of the next wildfire in Santa Barbara and Los Angeles, the officials underscored the need for residents who felt threatened by a fire to evacuate, even before an official notice is issued.

Mermaids & Buccaneers Day Saturday, August 24 10:00 AM–3:00 PM

Sea Center & SB Maritime Museum

Free for Members Come meet the Little Mermaid for songs and a scavenger hunt at the Sea Center. Build a ship, hunt for treasure, and hear stories at the SB Maritime Museum. Dress in costume, get your face painted, and ride Lil’ Toot Water Taxi between locations. Visit sbnature.org/mermaid for details.

— Maya Chiodo

City’s Top Five Paid Employees

T

PAU L WEL LM AN FI LE PHOTO

he highest-paid City The second-highest paid employee, City Adminisof Santa Barbara employee, Police Sertrator Casey, worked no overtime the same year. geant James Ella, brought Much of Ella’s overhome close to $399,162.03 time comes from workin pay and benefits in the 2017-18 fiscal year—more ing dispatch. To put it in than City Administrator perspective, eight sworn Paul Casey ($372,675.04); officers have worked disnow-retired Fire Chief Pat patch overtime in the past McElroy ($369,998.30); fiscal year for a total of his boss, Police Chief Lori 1,688 hours. Ella worked Luhnow ($365,616.47); 1,153 of those hours alone. and City Attorney Ariel The City of Santa Barbara puts no cap on the amount Calonne ($337,062.07), respectively. of overtime its employees Ella’s base pay, can work, since doing so WORKING OVERTIME: Sergeant $135,261.61, is lower than could “potentially and James Ella (above) remains the the base pay of the 11 high- highest-paid city employee because unnecessarily [restrict] est-paid city employees of his substantial overtime hours. the city’s ability to fully after him. He still remains respond to emergency the highest-paid city situations,” said Robert employee because of his substantial over- Samario, city finance director. The Indetime hours. He made more than his base pendent reached out to Ella for comment, pay in overtime last year — $181,149.86. but he declined. — Delaney Smith

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Opinions

Snakebit by a Dead Dog

BANG BANG: Turns out I’ve been playing Russian roulette all this time without knowing

it. Without even spinning the cylinder once. New house rules.

Gilroy. El Paso. Dayton. Thirty-four dead, not counting the angry young white guys pulling the triggers. Sixtysix wounded. Not one of them, I bet, woke up

that last day thinking, “Today’s a good day to become a statistic.” For right now, the numbers got big enough to drown out the white noise of dead people dropping. Here’s another number: More than 350 million guns in the United States, about eight million of which fall loosely into the category of AR-15-type semiautomatic weapon. They spray death. Americans constitute about 4

percent of the world’s population and own about 40 percent of the world’s guns. The

math is pretty obvious. If only a tiny sliver of less than one percent were to get into unstable hands, big problems ensue. Clearly, we are well past that tipping point. We can no longer round up the usual suspects yet again: violent video games, people with mental illnesses, and even Donald Trump. The encouraging news? There are cracks in the system. Even Republicans are waking up. Senators like Lindsey Graham are starting to champion “red flag” measures, like the ones authored in California by Santa Barbara’s own Das Williams and Hannah-Beth Jackson in the wake of Elliot Rodger’s bloody rampage in

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Isla Vista a few years ago. One of those mea-

sures empowers friends and families to petition the courts to remove guns from the hands of people who might not be safe. Although solid numbers for Santa Barbara County are not yet available, the gun-violence restraining-order program clearly works. Earlier this year, a potentially suicidal young dude—as disaffected as he was brilliant—was legally separated from a small arsenal of scary-looking guns, thousands of rounds of ammo, and body armor. What reason, authorities wondered, is

there to bury a weapon in your backyard? The gun lobby is pushing back in the courts against a new bill California passed to require background checks on people buying more than 100 rounds of ammo at a time. Attorney General Xavier Becerra claims more than 100 people with sketchy criminal pasts were stopped making purchases; the gun lobby claims tens of thousands of untainted transactions were unfairly slowed down. California has one of the lower rates of gun deaths, too. Not perfect—but it’s a step in the right direction. I get it, but I don’t. To get on a plane, you must endure the time-consuming aggravation of getting screened for explosive devices in your shampoo bottles by people often beleaguered and impatient. To drive a car, you must wear seat belts. To drive a motor vehicle on a state road you must have insurance. To get a driver’s license, you must pass a competency test. Guns, we are told, must be afforded spe-

AUGUST 8, 2019

INDEPENDENT.COM

cial privileges. Last time I checked, the right to

traverse the nation’s roads is every bit as constitutionally sacrosanct as the right to bear arms. I get it, but I don’t. Back in 1934, FDR and Congress managed to pass legislation that effectively banned the machine gun, then the equivalent of semiautomatic weapons, by taxing it and regulating it into the oblivion of extreme inconvenience. The National Rifle Association (NRA) supported this. And it worked. When was the last time you heard of a drive-by Tommy gun shooting? In America, we accept mass shootings as an occupational hazard that comes with being alive. But other places aren’t so fatalistically submissive. In Australia, for example,

when 35 people were killed during a mass shooing in 1996, the government swiftly enacted a raft of tough gun control laws, banned automatic and semiautomatic weapons outright, and launched an aggressive gun buy-back program. About 600,000 weapons were bought and destroyed in the process. It was all massively unpopular at the time, but 10 years later,

Australia reported a 59 percent drop in gunrelated homicides and gun-related suicides.

Maybe something will happen this time. In the wake of El Paso and Dayton, the screechingly conservative New York Post ran a front-page editorial headlined “It’s Time to … BAN WEAPONS OF WAR,” accompanied by a photo of an AR-15. The Post and Fox News are both owned by Rupert Murdoch. In an open

letter to Trump — the Post wrote, “Gun control works.” When the Founding Fathers wrote the constitution, it noted, the “well-regulated militia” envisioned by the Second Amendment was armed with muskets. With those, you could get off three rounds in a minute if you were skilled. Today, you can squeeze off 750-900 in 60 seconds. Maybe something will happen this time. The NRA, long regarded for good reason as political omnipotent, is imploding as longtime president Wayne LaPierre fights off financial scandal charges. LaPierre apparently spent $275,000 on clothes at the Zegna men’s boutique in Beverly Hills and another $267,000 on personal travel, perhaps with his personal

mistress. Maybe something will happen this time. In the meantime, County Supervisor Steve Lavagnino, a level-headed North County Republican until he renounced any party affiliation last year, posted a Facebook status about feeling “a little freaked out” while shopping at Walmart this weekend. What if he noticed a guy dressed in fatigues carrying a rifle into the store, he wondered, while he himself was packing heat? If he doesn’t shoot the guy right then and there, he worried, innocent people could get killed. But what if the guy was just a hunter bringing in his rifle for repair? “I decided what I would do,” Lavagnino signed off, “but what would you do?” I know what we’re doing now. Playing Rus—Nick Welsh sian roulette.


voices

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We are pleased to announce that KEVIN SIERS / THE CHARLOTTE OBSERVER, NC

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Action Now on Gun Control

S

BY TONI WELLEN

aturday, August 3, 2019, 20 people in El

Paso were killed and 26 injured with an AK47-style assault weapon in a heinous act of domestic terrorism at a Walmart where 3,000 people were shopping. The shooter told investigators he wanted to shoot as many Mexicans as he could. Sunday, August 4, 2019, nine people were killed and 27 wounded in a shooting in Dayton, Ohio. Police said the shooter was wearing body armor and was armed with a semiautomatic assault rifle, a 223-caliber high-capacity rifle with 100-round drum magazines. He was able to murder nine people, one of whom was his sister, and injure 26 others in less than a minute. The AR-15 has become the official weapon of mass killers, chosen because it’s capable of killing as many people as possible in a matter of minutes. Gun carnage unfolds across our nation with tragic shootings reported daily. While the families and community of El Paso mourn, so do the many families across the country who have also experienced the tragedy of shootings and losing loved ones. With every shooting, they relive the horror and the fear that does not fade with time. Many families in Santa Barbara have experienced the profound sorrow and America’s unanswered question: Why aren’t people and communities safe in this country? Our nation began with the Declaration of Independence: “We hold these truths to be self-evident, that all men are created equal, that they are endowed by their Creator with certain unalienable Rights, which among these are Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness.” People are being shot with firearms in “the land of the free,” and their life, liberty, and pursuit of happiness are being violently taken. The words of our founding fathers ring hollow to grieving families. While people in El Paso flocked to blood banks to donate their blood even as the dead and wounded were still being counted, President Donald Trump pledged the “total support” of the federal government, whatever that entails. The “total support” of the federal government did occur in Australia after the horrific mass shooting in Port Arthur, Tasmania, where 35 people were

murdered and 18 were wounded by an assailant with a semiautomatic rifle. The public outcry brought together Australia’s political parties from the right and the left to take major action. The government bought and destroyed more than 600,000 civilianowned firearms in a national gun buyback that cost half a billion dollars. The entire action took just months to implement. Sadly, in comparison, the U.S. Congress and Senate have done little over the years. The list of mass killings by firearms grows longer while some politicians fear for their reelection but not for the lives of Americans. All elected officials from both parties must work together to pass needed gun-violenceprevention-laws. The American public has spoken multiple times for universal background checks and banning military-style assault weapons and largecapacity magazines. We have more guns than people in this country, and we don’t know who has them. Every state should enact an Extreme Risk Prevention Law. Most of these laws have been sitting for years in Congress, waiting to be passed with bipartisan support by the House of Representatives. Majority Leader McConnell has refused to bring life-saving legislation up for a vote in the Senate. We must urge our senators to return from their August recess for an #EmergencySessionNow and insist they take meaningful action now! In the majority of states, there is no waiting period to buy a gun. The background check takes 20 minutes and is done by phone or internet. You can leave with your firearm purchase that same day. In California, there is a 10-day waiting period, including passing a licensing test. The Gilroy shooter bought his weapon in another state and brought that gun illegally into California. On Sunday, July 28, the people in Gilroy experienced yet another mass shooting. Some are still in hospital, and funerals are being planned. As tears of anguish flow, it is apparent that we are all touched by gun violence. It is long past time to not only speak but take concrete action to ensure Americans’ rights to Life, Liberty and the pursuit of Happiness. Since we are all touched by gun violence, we must all speak out now. Our collective voices must rise up and say, “We refuse to let gun violence rule our lives.” #HonorWithAction! Toni Wellen is founder and chair of Coalition Against Gun Violence.

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obituaries

To submit obituaries for publication, please call (805) 965-5205 or email obits@independent.com

Henry Harrison Null IV 04/16/1935 – 07/26/2019

Henry Harrison Null IV passed away Friday, July 26th after a brief but devastating illness. He leaves behind his wife Maureen Guerrero Null, daughter Elizabeth Maulhardt, and son Jacob Null and his wife Carol, of Bar Harbor, Maine. His son John Null of Laurinburg, North Carolina preceded him in death. He also leaves behind a coterie of friends who reveled in his uniqueness. Raconteur, art critic, bon vivant, loyal friend, Henry could hold court on almost any subject. He loved discussing and analyzing paintings or politics, Shakespeare or an opera; yet could be as enthusiastic about professional basketball or how to feed a calla lily. He followed politics passionately, and was a believer in accurate information as well as opinions. An avid swimmer he enjoyed many a morning session at the Santa Barbara Athletic Club, and also his usual meetings with the "Croissant Boys’. Henry began his life journey on April 16th, 1935 in Scranton, Pennsylvania, son of Margaret and Henry Harrison Null III, moving to the nearby town of Waverly as a young boy. It was a rural upbringing, with sleds and bikes, and learning card games and chess at the town center. His first job as a boy was delivering milk for local farm - he impressed the owner with how quickly he memorized the delivery route! His quick mind and voracious reading led to him attending the Lawrenceville School in Lawrenceville, New Jersey. Four wonderful years of his life where he made lifelong friends - he kept in touch with many of the class of 1954 for all these 65 years.  Following a brief college career at Harvard and Lafayette he decided to follow his dream and become a newspaper owner and reporter, moved to New Rochelle, married a Sarah Lawrence girl, Lisa Higgens, and had his two sons. A second life change took him to the Esalen institute in Big Sur in 1967, where he spent six years learning gardening, mastering his skills, and finally becoming the main gardener of Esalen. In the mid 1970's he moved to Santa Barbara to pursue the study of the violin, and continue his career as gardener and eventually a garden designer. The violin, chamber music, and symphony became the 18

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deepest joy of his life and he was never happier than when playing with the SBCC Symphony or in chamber music classes. On a whim in 1995 he decided to take Mark Ferrer's Shakesperare class at Adult Ed, where in the midst of Hamlet he met and fell in love with Maureen Guerrero who in 1996 became his wife, and with whom he inherited his beloved step-daughter, Elizabeth Maulhardt. It’s difficult to describe how unique Henry was, but suffice to say that he had an impact on all who met him. He did not suffer fools but was loyal to those he loved. He is deeply missed by we who loved him, and the pain of his passing is shattering. " I shall not look upon his like again”. Memorial will be held Tuesday, August 27th, at McDermottCrockett, 2020 Chapala Santa Barbara 93105, 805-699-5944

Frank Hughes 7/28/2019

On Sunday, July 28, 2019, Frank Hughes passed away suddenly at the age of 83. Frank will forever be remembered by his wife Betty Hughes, children , brother, sisters,nieces, nephews and grandchildren. Funeral services for Frank Hughes will be held On Friday, August 9, 2019  11:00 a.m at Greater Hope Missionary Baptist Church 430 E. Figueroa Street, Santa Barbara, with Rev. J, B Ficklin Jr officiating Viewing will be Thursday , August 8, 2019, at Welch-Ryce-Haider Funeral Chapel 15 E. Sola St. Santa Barbara from 4:00-7:00 pm

T. Jim Souza

2/11/1940 – 7/30/2019

John Harrison DuBois 04/02/64-06/27/19

John Harrison DuBois left this world unexpectedly on June 27, 2019. He is now resting peacefully with his mother, Elsie Lillian DuBois, who passed away in 2012. John was born April 2, 1964 in Riverside, California. His parents, Elsie and Larry DuBois, moved to Tucson, Arizona in 1969 and then came to Santa Barbara, in 1971. John attended Mountain View Elementary, Goleta Valley Junior High, and San Marcos High. John will be forever remembered for his warm, friendly and generous nature. He was a master craftsman and was well known and appreciated for his ability to solve and complete a wide variety of construction projects. He will be missed by his two children, Blake and Tianna DuBois, his father, Larry DuBois, and many other relatives and close friends. A private gathering of family and close friends celebrating John’s life will be announced in the near future.

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Jim Souza peacefully passed away on Tuesday at the Santa Barbara Cottage Hospital surrounded by his family. Jim was born in Fresno, CA and lived in the Central Valley for 56 years. Jim and his wife Agnes moved to Santa Barbara in 1996. Jim, or “Nono” as many called him, grew up in Fresno, CA and graduated from Fresno State University with a Bachelor of Science Degree in Accounting. Jim worked in the automotive industry as lead accountant or CFO for over 50 years. When he retired, he continued accounting and bookkeeping volunteer work at the San Roque Catholic Church. Jim and his wife Agnes spent many hours volunteering at the Church. He enjoyed playing bridge a few days a week and loved to walk on the beach and Shoreline Park. He also loved watching his kids and then later in life his grandkids' many sporting events and dance recitals. Jim is survived by his loving wife Agnes of 56 years, his son Kurt and his wife Stephanie, his daughter Lynette and her husband Praveen, and his three grandchildren Merissa, Hannah and Miles. Memorial service was held Saturday, August 3rd at the San Roque Catholic Church, 325 Argonne Cir, Santa Barbara, CA 93105. Donations can be made to the San Roque Catholic Church Music Department.

Dr. Thomas Francis Dixon

12/27/1946 – 5/19/2019

Tom Dixon passed peacefully at home in the loving presence of his wife Sue, son Shannon and daughters Sienna and Amy after years of struggling with Alzheimer’s Disease. The second oldest of eight siblings born into a career Air Force family, Tom felt comfortable in many environments and embraced many cultures. He was born in Pasadena, and growing up he lived in Long Beach; Edgemont, CA; Arlington, VA; Tripoli, Libya; Mount Holly, NJ; and Scott Air Force Base in southern Illinois, where he graduated from Mascoutah High School in 1964. He graduated from the University of Illinois, ChampaignUrbana in 1968 with a major in physical anthropology. Tom then served for 2 years in the Peace Corps in what is now Eritrea. Tom had developed a sense of adventure and a commitment to helping people which led him to choose a career in medicine. In 1972, he attended the University of California, Santa Barbara in order to complete the pre-med classes he needed, which is where he met Sue Giles. After completing their studies, they married and immediately set off for Guadalajara, Mexico, where Tom began his medical studies. They enjoyed seeing the amazing archaeological sites and experiencing the Mexican culture. After two years, he transferred to the University of Southern California medical school in Los Angeles, where he received his MD in 1978. He went on to complete a Family Practice residency in San Pedro, CA. After residency, Tom accepted the position of Medical Director of the Isla Vista Medical Clinic. He was also hired as a staff physician at the UCSB Student Health Center, which eventually became his primary employer until he retired in 2013. His many patients and colleagues remember him for his skill and his kind and gentle manner. Tom shared his love of nature and backpacking with Sue. Their most memorable backpacking trips included climbing Mt. Whitney (which was partially snow-covered at the time), and hiking the Grand Canyon rim-to-rim (and back again!). Tom and Sue also shared a passion for live music, and regularly enjoyed attending Telluride Bluegrass Festival, Grateful Dead concerts, and other music festivals. Tom always took his responsibilities as a citizen both locally and

globally very seriously. He served on the board of Let Isla Vista Eat, and on the predecessor of the Isla Vista Redevelopment Agency, as well as participating in countless community and political meetings for the betterment of the quality of life in Isla Vista. Tom and Sue loved to travel. They adopted children from Peru and China. With their children, they did road trips all over the US and even a trip to China. Tom and Sue traveled to Ireland, Scotland, England, Paris, Italy, Mexico, Guatemala, Alaska, Canada, Southeast Asia, Tahiti, Tibet, and Nepal in addition to the countless trips in American southwest. Telluride, Colorado was a special favorite. He was a humble, egalitarian man who quietly walked the earth with a dry sense of humor, kindness, and a powerful intellectual curiosity. He sought nothing more than to be of service to others and to live in harmony with the earth. Tom’s life will be celebrated on August 10 at 2:00 pm at the Live Oak Unitarian Universalist Congregation, 820 N Fairview, Goleta. Colorful attire encouraged. Donations may be made to the Alzheimer’s Association or Doctors Without Borders.

Tom Wagner

6/10/1951 – 7/31/1994

In memory of our dad, Tom Wagner, who passed away twenty-five years ago. Tom was born in Baraboo, Wisconsin, on June 10, 1951, and passed away in Santa Barbara, California, on July 31, 1994. Growing older, moving around a bit, and becoming a dad have helped me to gain a better perspective on my dad's life and experiences.  I took the house on Hidden Valley for granted, but now think what it was like for him, having grown up in Wisconsin, to wake up in the winter and see the mountains and ocean.  I push my kids into the waves when we are in Santa Barbara, take them on hikes in the Rockies (that they mostly enjoy and I think he would have enjoyed), sometimes make them listen to my music when we are driving, and give them room to spread out their Legos.  I now think more about how young he was when he died, and not just how young we were. I am thankful for the time we did get to spend together and the imprint he left on my life. - Conor Always missed, never forgotten. Twenty-five years on, your life continues to be an inspiration. It usually wasn't what you said, but what you did and how you did it. Your work ethic, your sense of curiosity, your love of the outdoors, your embrace of the surreal, your humor, your innate sense of self that you shared with others. It was a life lead by example, and an example I follow more closely as I get older. – Miles


obituaries Thomas George Becker 12/29/1937 – 7/25/2019

Thomas George Becker, born December 29, 1937 in Hamilton, Ohio to Phillip Paul Becker and Luella Helen (Woodruff) passed peacefully at home on July 25th, 2019 with his wife and children by his side. Tom was preceded in death by his parents, his sister Jane, and brothers Jacque, Richard, and Michael.  He is survived by his wife Melinda Marie (Gowman), daughter Leslie Colasse and her partner Robert Haggarty, son Jason Becker and his wife Gina (Turrone), as well as his brother Gerald, sister Karen, and grandsons Cayden Colasse and Tyson and Miles Becker. Tom was raised in a modest two bedroom craftsman bungalow by a blue collar Union Carpenter and stay-at-home mother.  He attended the local parochial schools and served as an altar boy for many years, where he began what would be a lifelong relationship with God. Tom served in the Navy as an Aviation Machinists Mate during peacetime between the Korean and Vietnam Wars on Midway Island (now a National Wildlife Reserve) where he gained a deeper appreciation for the beauty of nature.   He was honorably discharged in August of 1963 after a brief delay during which time the government considered recalling him to serve in the Vietnam War. Upon discharge, Tom returned to the mainland settling in El Centro, California where he met his stunning wife Melinda.  The couple were married on July 30 th, 1966 and moved to San Diego shortly thereafter where Tom received a Bachelors of Science in Accounting at San Diego State.  It was during their time in San Diego that Tom and Melinda’s first child, Leslie, was born and that Tom began a career with Frazee Paint & Wallcovering.  His position with Frazee led Tom and his family to Santa Barbara, where he was asked to open and manage a newly acquired branch store at the corner of Ortega

To submit obituaries for publication, please call (805) 965-5205 or email obits@independent.com

and State Streets – the site of the now-vacant Macy’s. Tom used to enjoy recanting the story of his first year managing the store and trying to explain to Frazee Corporate that he would need to shut down the Santa Barbara store for “some local tradition that his employees were telling him about” – Old Spanish Fiesta Days - and, how “back in the day”, the Margaritas would be made by the gallon in the paint shakers. In 1975 Tom and Melinda’s dream to have a second child was fulfilled when their son Jason was born.   Shortly after Jason’s birth, Tom began a more personal relationship with his Lord and Savior that would continue to grow and develop for the rest of his life. He continued to work in the painting trades until he secured a position at Goleta Valley Hospital, where he supported the hospital as a painter within their Facilities Management group until retirement. Tom will be remembered for his appreciation of the simple things – friends, family, meat and potatoes, a good banana cream pie, and a light hearted joke among friends.  Those who were fortunate enough to know Tom will remember him for his phenomenal blue eyes, warm smile, patience, light-hearted spirit and humble demeanor.   He was defined by a strong commitment to family, deep respect for the blue collar worker, great appreciation for nature as a manifestation of God’s handiwork, and a strong moral compass. Tom’s wife and children would like to acknowledge and thank the many doctors and nurses of Cottage Hospital, as well as, friends and caregivers who supported Tom and our family since his stroke in 2016.  In lieu of flowers, please consider a gift to The Friendship Center of Montecito, Our Daily Bread Ministries, or The Ohio Valley Construction Education Foundation (OVCEF). A memorial service for family and friends is being planned for late Fall.  If you are interested in attending, please contact Leslie at:  leslie@sculptarchitects.com.

Stephanie Dart

8/19/1947 - 7/19/2019

Katherine Frances Kiernan

On the morning of July 19, 2019, Stephanie Dart passed away peacefully at Cottage Hospital at the age of 71. Stephanie was the first child born to Col. Jim and Joyce Anderson in Rapid City, SD in 1947.  She has three younger siblings: Susan Anderson (Santa Barbara), Barry Anderson (Rapid City), and Kristen Boyle (Las Vegas).  Stephanie moved to Santa Barbara to attend UCSB, soon after starting her family of five children.  Throughout her kids’ adolescence, she proved to be the ultimate mother who seemed capable of being in three places at once.  She always showed motherhood to be effortless and joyful, even through the toughest of times.   “Mama Dart” was cherished by many beyond the family.  Over decades, friends of her kids will recall a warm house full of snacks, games, and laughter year round.  She truly was the most nurturing to all, always putting the needs of others before her own.  She took pride in making all feel special at every holiday and birthday with elaborate gift baskets and presents.  Her uncanny ability to soothe an upset baby or child will always be missed, notably by her twelve grandchildren.  When Stephanie’s children all finally left her nest, she found solace in providing childcare for other local families which brought her joy and purpose.  Stephanie was a soft spoken gentle soul and yet “tougher than a weed”.  She could make you a wonderful meal and then beat you mercilessly in a game of Jeopardy.  Truly a walking source of wisdom, her kids and friends will miss prompting her with trivia questions which were never answered without a side of dry humor.  Nothing got past her, and her kids remain amazed by the sharp poise she held up to her passing.  Stephanie is survived by her mother Joyce, her three forementioned siblings, and her five children (in order) Jason, Matthew, Erin, Meghan, and Ashley, and twelve grandchildren that span the ages of 2-23. A celebration of life will be held for family and close friends on Saturday August 10, 2-5pm. For information, please email Erin at ebb3512@gmail.com.

Katherine Frances Kiernan passed away July 26th, 2019 at age 77 from complications of Alzheimer’s Disease. Throughout the 10 years of her debilitating illness, she fought courageously and determinedly. She was a loving daughter, sister, wife, and mother, as well as a gifted artist. Her love of animals and of the beauty of Nature was profound. Katherine had a wonderful joyful spirit that infused everything she did. She will be terribly missed by all who came in contact with her. No one had a more beautiful smile! Katherine was born in Brooklyn, New York on February 12th, 1942 to Henry and Katherine Kafel. She was the eldest of 3 siblings. She loved piano and at one time considered pursuing a degree in music, but instead attended Marymount Manhattan College and received a Bachelor’s Degree in Liberal Arts. However, her love of playing the piano continued throughout her life. During her time in the bachelor’s program, she developed a lifelong interest in fine art and history. In fact, it was a graduate degree in American History that she decided to work towards at Hunter College in New York. While she was in the graduate program, she joined the 1964 World’s Fair in New York City, where she met her future husband, Ken Kiernan. Theirs was a love-atfirst-sight romance and they married shortly thereafter. Job opportunities for Ken lured them to the other side of the country. They moved to Walnut Creek, CA, where their only child, Kylie, was born. Unfortunately, Kylie was born with a serious medical condition that eventually required a series of surgeries, but Katherine always remained positive and faced all challenges with cheerful determination. After many moves, they finally settled on Santa Barbara, CA. Despite the time that had passed, Katherine was determined to finish her graduate degree. In Santa Barbara, she completed her Master’s Degree in American History from Hunter College. She worked for years as an office manager in law and retail business. She taught at Bishop Diego High School, worked for Old Spanish Days and the County Clerk Recorder’s Office. While she was there she was inspired to run for County Clerk Recorder. She was always trying to make a positive contribution to her community and the people around her. When she retired, she and Ken traveled around the country to be near their daughter and son-

2/12/1942 – 7/26/2019

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in-law. It was quite an adventure that encompassed 6 states, but she always faced challenges with a smile on her face. Whether it was taking care of her parents, her daughter, or helping a complete stranger, she was a loving and caring person. We will all miss her light! Katherine is survived by her husband, Ken Kiernan; her daughter, Kylie Kershaw (Robert); 2 brothers, Henry Kafel (Carol Prochazka) and John Kafel (Suzanne). A viewing will be held at WelchRyce-Haider Funeral Chapel (15 East Sola Street, Santa Barbara) from 2-4pm on Friday, August 9. A graveside service will take place on Saturday, August 10 at 10am at Calvary Cemetery, 199 North Hope Avenue, Santa Barbara. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to Assisted Hospice Care of Santa Barbara, or the Alzheimer's Association California Central Chapter.

Joe Aguinaga Jr.

12/12/1955 – 7/21/2019

Joe Aguinaga Jr. of Santa Barbara went to be with the Lord July 21, 2019 with the love of his life Mary by his side. With courage and strength Joe fought a long battle with cancer. His beloved wife Mary and her family provided dedicated care giving to see him through his terrible illness. Joe was born Dec. 12, 1955 in Los Angeles, Ca. His parents Joe Sr. and Pauline Aguinaga raised him in the San Fernando Valley. He later moved to Simi Valley and was a long time employee of So. Calif. Gas Co. He was a supervising mechanic for their fleet of vehicles. In 1997 Joe met the love of his life Mary Cota. They married Sept. 11, 1999. Joe loved being outdoors. Some of his favorites were camping, yard work and walking his dog Peanut. He enjoyed music and creating wood projects especially with his nephew Ryan. Joe could fix most anything and create beautiful pieces from wood. He also enjoyed sending special E-mails to his nieces Kimi and Janelle to make them laugh. Joe will be missed by his wife Mary Cota-Aguinaga, mother Pauline Aguinaga, sister Debbie Acosta, sister-in-law Pat (Joe) Saenz, sister-in-law Rosetta (Rick) Wong, nieces Kimi Wong, Janelle Wong, nephew Ryan Wong, brother-in-law Andy (Elicia) Cota, nephews Anthony Cota, Patrick Cota and niece Mariah Cota. Especially his dog Peanut. A rosary was held in his honor July 29th and a mass July 30th at St. Raphael's Catholic Church. Arrangements were entrusted by Welch-Ryce-Haider Funeral Chapel. Donations can be made to Serenity House, Santa Barbara. CONTINUED ON PAGE 20 >>>

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obituaries

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Frank R. Gamberdella, M.D. 3/12/1943 – 7/23/2019

Frank R. Gamberdella, M.D. passed away peacefully at home with his loving family by his side on July 23, 2019. Frank was born on March 12, 1943, to Ralph J. and Caroline K. (Sale) Gamberdella in New Haven, Conn. Surrounded by his large, extended Italian family, Frank grew up with his sister, Vivian, cousins who were best friends (and like brothers) as well as aunts and uncles who loved and doted on all of them. From his earliest elementary years both teachers and family said Frank was “college material” and sure to become a doctor. When Frank was 15 years old, the family moved to California and settled in Alhambra, Calif. The transition was tough on Frank and his sister. He always credited his family and his high school basketball coach for helping him reconnect and succeed in school and sports. Frank became the first in his family to attend college, earning a full scholarship to the University of Southern California and embarking on his medical education. After three years at USC he qualified to enter Medical School at UC Irvine, and he later returned to USC for his Internship and Residency. Thus began a 40+ year career as one of the premier Obstetrician / Gynecologist / Infertility Specialists in the region. While at USC Frank met the love of his life, Jacque Foley, at the Newman Club. Frank and Jacque married in 1966 and started their family during medical school. Directly after finishing his residency, Frank began his service as a Major in the U.S. Air Force and moved his family to serve at Andrews Air Force Base in Washington, D.C. In 1975 Frank returned to civilian life and once again moved the family across country. This time to join the Santa Barbara Medical Foundation Clinic as an OB/GYN. In 1978, Frank began his private practice where he would serve the Santa Barbara community until he retired in 2014. It was 20

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often joked that Frank probably delivered half the babies in Santa Barbara during his work as an obstetrician. Midway through his career, Frank retired from obstetrics and focused his medical practice on infertility and gynecological care. As a faculty member at the USC School of Medicine, Frank was on the cutting edge of infertility medicine in Santa Barbara and Southern California. For over four decades Frank cultivated profound doctor-patient relationships with generations of women and families who were so appreciative of his compassionate and skilled care. During the later years of his practice, Frank became involved in the governing bodies for his specialty as the President of the Pacific Coast Obstetrical and Gynecological Society and as Chairman of District IX of the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecology. Through many leadership positions, Frank fed his professorial passion for teaching and learning about his specialty. He was known as “the professor” among many of his colleagues. While Frank’s mark on this community as a doctor is significant, perhaps his greatest love and passion was his family. Frank was the proud father of four and grandfather to eight. He was truly the patriarch of the Sale / Gamberdella family and a mentor to many cousins, nieces and nephews. He cultivated relationships with colleagues and friends that brought them into the Gamberdella fold as family and their children raised together like siblings or cousins to his own. When his family was young, Frank relished coaching Little League and Boys’ Club and cheering from the stands at San Marcos High School. As a grandfather he became the Number One Fan at Little League, the Page Center, San Marcos, Santa Barbara and Dos Pueblos High Schools, intently following all of his grandkids’ athletic exploits. The home Frank and Jacque built in 1978 in Santa Barbara truly was his castle. The doors were always open to family and friends. His children’s friends were always welcome for family parties, casual dinners or to watch a great USC Football game. Food and good cheer were abundant, and Frank loved to “hold court” and engage in “life talks” or just shoot the breeze about USC’s chances in the National Championship.

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A longtime member of La Cumbre Country Club, Frank’s passion for golf took a close second to his passion for family. He spent countless hours on the fairways with his children, grandchildren and many friends and family. La Cumbre was his “home away from home”. The Gamberdella family extends a sincere “thank you” to the members and staff at La Cumbre who treated him like family every time he was there. Frank led by example and instilled in his family a strong sense of honor and integrity, an unrivaled work ethic as well as compassion and commitment to those you serve in whatever your chosen path. Frank is survived by his wife of 53 years, Jacque; sons Marc (Renata) and Paul (MarLa); daughters Cara (fiancé Shayne) and Jennifer; eight grandchildren – Genaro (20), Gianna (19), Lia (16), Frankie (19), Ellie (17), Vincent (15), Josie (12), Santino (10); sister Vivian (Joseph) and many nieces, nephews and cousins. He is preceded in death by his parents. Thank you for all you gave to us, Pop!! You will be missed! FIGHT ON!! The Gamberdella Family would like to extend their deepest gratitude to all of Frank’s medical team and the compassionate work of Visiting Nurse and Hospice Care. A Rosary will be held at the Serra Chapel at the Santa Barbara Mission on Thursday, August 15, at 6 p.m. Funeral Mass will be at the Old Mission on Friday, August 16, at 11 a.m. with a reception at the Gamberdella Home directly after. Please e-mail Cara Gamberdella (cara@villagesite.com) with any questions. In lieu of flowers, donations in Frank’s honor may be made to the Devereux Foothill House (please e-mail Cara for link), the Santa Barbara Athletic Round Table (sbart.org) or Visiting Nurse and Hospice Care (vnhcsb.org). To leave an online memory or condolence please visit wrhsb.com. Arrangements entrusted to Welch-RyceHaider Funeral Chapels.

Jack Hufford

3/10/1933 – 6/18/2019

Jack Hufford passed away peacefully in the early morning hours of June 18, 2019 with his loving wife at his side. Jack was born in Goleta California on March 10, 1933 to Edna Foerster Hufford and Perry Hufford. He was educated in the Goleta Union Elementary School and graduated from Santa Barbara High School in 1951. During those years he was so proud to have been one of four boys who founded the Ye Old Gang Club which is still active to this day. Shortly after graduation Jack joined the United States Navy as an electrician mate second class and served in the Korean War. He married his loving wife of 64 years, Anne Marie Proud of Lompoc California„ after his return from the war. Upon returning home Jack enrolled in Woodbury Business School then on to Santa Barbara City College and finishing with his degree at Ventura City College. Together they raised two children, John (Mary Beth) and Victoria (Steve). He Had three grandchildren Kyle, Cole,(Nathalia). Madison (Michael) and one great granddaughter Samantha whom he adored. Jack believed strongly in giving back to the community he loved. He demonstrated this by his extensive involvement in our city schools. In doing so he would see where help was needed and would organize volunteer workers, acquire donations and go to work. He re-did the baseball field at Dos Pueblos High School. While working there he was elected Booster President. He continued on his mission to Bishop Diego High School and re-did the girls softball field and the boys baseball field. His next venture was to do a complete restoration to the front of the Santa Barbara High School as well as many other repairs. Jack was honored by the Santa Barbara High School Athletic Foundation, and twice by the Athletic Round Table. He was also inducted into the Santa Barbara High School Hall of Fame. He was involved in many service organizations including The Santa Barbara High School Alumni Association, The American Legion, Santa Barbara Suburban Kiwanis, Channel City Power Boat Association, The Yacht Club, Goleta Valley South Little League, and Ye Ole Gang at Santa Barbara High School. In later years he and his wife enjoyed The Los Fiesteros Dance Club. Jack was always available to barbeque for any community fund raiser where ever he was needed. Jack was an exceptional salesman his whole life while serving many local restaurants and businesses. He was always happiest

when he made someone smile! He leaves behind a legacy of humility humor, strength, and generosity. Jack was proceeded in death by this parents and sisters Lucille and Patricia. He is survived by his older brother Perry of Senora, California. The family would like to give thanks to Doctor Michael Bordofsky, The Visiting Nurse Association and Hospice for all their loving care, especially to Maureen for all she did for Jack in his final days. The service will be private for just the family perivreitst.

Wendell Elton Hayward Lovett 9/21/1952 – 7/12/2019

Wendell Elton Hayward Lovett was born September 21, 1952 to Martha and Elton Hayward in Grand Rapids Michigan. He was later adopted by Bill Lovett along with his brothers. Wendell grew up in east Grand Rapids area. In 1982 he met Sandy, and a year later moved to Santa Barbara California. In 1985 they were married. On September 11, 1991 Sandy gave birth to their only child Autumn Corinne Lovett. Wendell had a love of music and cooking. While in Santa Barbara he was part of the Jazz society, playing drums in a band. He was also a cook at the Little Town Club and Montecito Country Club. Wendell was known very well around town as the Karaoke King of Santa Barbara. Many enjoyed his voice and passion towards music. He was best known for Motown covers. In 2016 he returned to Grand Rapids Michigan to take care of his mother. He found karaoke and continued to sing, up to his last days here on earth. Wendell and his voice will provide many memories to look back and reminisce on, forever. Wendell left us on July 12, 2019, even though he is gone his voice and love for his daughter and family will live forever. He is survived by his Mother Martha Lovett, Daughter Autumn Lovett, lastly his Brothers William and David Lovett. If you would like to support the family in funeral cost, there is a go fund me account. As Wendell would say; “In a Minuet” There will be a celebration of of life in September; if you would like to help with funeral cost go to: https://www.gofundme.com/f/ wendell-lovett-memorial?utm_ source=facebook&utm_ medium=social&utm_ campaign=fb_co_campmgmt_m (805) 372-1405


CONT’D

VOICES PAUL WELLMAN

Opinions

Where’s the Pride of Ownership?

City Report Includes Everyone but Property Owners

P

BY BRIAN FAHNESTOCK retty cool—another study about

how to fix downtown Santa Barbara. I just read the Recommendations for Downtown Revitalization report presented to the City Council on July 25. As a long-term resident of downtown — I remember when Brinkerhoff had antiques — I am always interested in how folks from Los Angeles would make my home more enjoyable. And needless to say, this latest report didn’t disappoint. It’s fascinating reading, and nowadays, since all reports are written in PowerPoint, the print is so much bigger. Pictures too! The report contains lots of statistics, city comparisons, and recommendations. In my mind, anytime you hire someone and they compare your city to Detroit — well, that’s just money well spent. I sort of write a similar recommendation report every time I walk to a restaurant or farmers’ market, but my ideas are usually different. My observations and questions are usually different, too. When I walk around my neighborhood and I see something particularly wonderful or horrible, I often start with, “Wow — who owns this place?” I didn’t see much of that in the report. Instead there is discussion about city age profiles, hotel market forces, the homeless, and shopping trends. There is a great part about social media and one about City of Santa Barbara red tape. It was like reading 80 pages of interesting factoids. Fun facts. Fascinating musings from someone who walked around my neighborhood at $125 per hour. I look at my downtown neighborhood and the challenges and opportunities before us like I’ve looked at all of the other places I’ve lived. There are good neighbors, and there are bad. Owners who care and those that don’t. Take a look at the report. I couldn’t find one sentence, one pretty picture, or one PowerPoint bullet that mentioned an

owner. Huh? All that stakeholder outreach and not one owner? There is a big apartment building behind my house. Whenever I have an important issue, I don’t knock on the apartment doors, I don’t call a consultant — I call the owner. It works. They’re my neighbors, too, even if they don’t live here. State Street is no different. Why don’t we call the owners and speak to them? Let’s face it, when it comes to State Street — the coolest place I know — we’re all renters. We just need owners who care and rent we can afford. Instead of owners, we talk to Realtors — folks who explain why that little house is so expensive with fun phrases like “San Roque charm.” Don’t get me wrong, real estate agents are wonderful people, but they’re no substitute for the shot-callers when it comes to splitting the cost of a new fence. Let’s take an easy example: About 15 years ago, Esau’s Café, a famous little restaurant in the 400 block of State, was forced to move because the place needed work. That little spot is the front door to State Street. It’s the foyer! It should be that exquisite bouquet on a fine simple table, welcoming all to the wonders that lay just an electric shuttle ride away. But no. In all these years, that wonderful place has been empty. Boarded up. Abandoned. Unfortunately, that is a Detroit comparison that works too well. Currently, downtown property rents for over $35 per square foot per year. Over the past decade, the owners of the former Esau’s Café have lost over $1 million in rent, and they don’t seem to mind. That’s not just a bad neighbor — that’s an amazingly rich bad neighbor. Who are these people? Reports on how to make downtown Santa Barbara better are always welcome, and I expect another in a few years. In the meanwhile, let’s figure out what motivates the owners — our neighbors. Let’s speak to them directly in a language they understand. It’s a block party, and they are invited. They just need to show up and care. n

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Drugs Everywhere

N

ick Welsh’s recent column about a family suing a rehab facility because their son overdosed under their care caught my attention [independent.com/rehabsued]. I have a very close relative who was an active addict for over a decade; he’s been sober for 18 months now. This was his response to the case: The first thing I can think of is a family suing McDonald’s, because their obese loved one ate there all the time, and claiming that the dbl mcfatburger did their family member in. We all know how unhealthy fast food can be. Is the restaurant liable? Shouldn’t the obese person hold some personal accountability? Same with addiction. Yeah, sure, heroin dealers are far from a great social asset, and they do sell poison, but ultimately, I don’t find them liable for someone’s death. They provide a service, an illicit one, but they are just a middleman. If our government wants to play righteous, how about bucking up and shutting down the narc market instead of openly funding it? Should the parents be able to sue the facility? I say sure, go for it. But I wouldn’t give them a dime. Drugs are literally everywhere. Rehabs. Prisons. Jails. Everywhere. Trying to hold a facility accountable is misplaced. An addict will find any way possible to use. No one, nothing, would stop them. There is nothing more important to an addict than that drug. It is why addiction is so very destructive. No drug dealer wants to kill their clientele. In fact, 95 percent of drug dealers are just trying to pay the bills or are users themselves supporting their own habit. Drug dealers want one thing: Money. Killing people is counterproductive. Many addicts seek fentanyl. They want the most potent shit they can get their hands on, and trust me, many dealers won’t even sell that if they think you’re gonna kill yourself with it. You think they want that headache? Wondering if the addict deletes their text messages or any trace back to them? Dealers hate how lethal the shit is now because it complicates business. Heroin was safe, more or less. Fentanyl has been a huge monkey wrench. So ask yourself: How, within the last five or so years, has so much of this lab-synthesized opiate become available to the street gangsters in Philly? Our government knows. We have satellites that can read your newspaper as you look at it on your own front lawn. But we can’t figure out how tons and tons and tons of this lab-made drug is coming into the country? I don’t buy it for a second. The only responsibility a drug dealer has is to sell what he says he’s selling. The rest of the responsibility lies with the addict. — ​David Heisterkamp, S.B.

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Dread of City Planning

R

egarding the stories on the Institution Ale sign, how can the city spend this much energy harrowing a great company over a very nice-looking sign? My family, along with our uncle, owns the former Van Wyk Volkswagen property at 630 Chapala. We are dreading the hassles

we and our future tenant(s) will face when we go to get permits to do improvements to occupy the property. Based on what has been happening to Institution Ale, we have very little confidence of a smooth process.

​— ​Jim Meaney, S.B.

Dario Debate Rages

“Dario Pini Comes to Tenants’ Defense” captured many readers’ attention on Facebook: Christian Maurer If I stack a bunch of concrete culverts on my property and rent them out as apartments, should I be able then to claim they should exist because they are fulfilling a need, even if they are dangerous and squalid? There is an overlap between the issue of housing standards and housing availability, but need in one issue should not preclude the proper standards and enforcement of the other. Although the Pini model does provide tenants with a place to live, the Pini business model is one of negligence. Instead of using cash to properly maintain a rental, he spends it on purchasing yet another unit, which he will allow to fall into disrepair while always finding the next more desperate tenant to move into the ever-worsening property. The bottom line is it’s bad for Santa Barbara, and the burden falls upon the tenants, the city, and the neighbors, while Pini cashes another mountain of checks on the first of the month. C. Anita Nuñez Having grown up here joking about Dario Pini my whole life, I have no idea how to feel about this. I get that people need to live in buildings that are up to code. The irony here is painful and hideous. Where are they supposed to go now? • Lizzie Rodriguez There has to be a better way. This was supposed to be about protecting tenants. Now they are being displaced. Bradley Defnet These tenants can move somewhere else more affordable, like Bakersfield or Fresno. It’s not the end of the world, people. • Annie Craton Moving costs thousands of dollars. It’s. Not. That. Easy. Tommy Trujillo Now, all of a sudden, everyone likes Dario. I rented from him, multiple houses over the years. Sure, he packed us in there, but, he’s the only landlord I’ve ever had in S.B. who was flexible on late rent. • Conrad Metzenberg Santa Barbara 2018: Dario is a slumlord! Save us, city government. Santa Barbara 2019: Dario is Robin Hood. Piss off, city government.

A Smashing Burger Week

T

hough we were in New Cuyama because it fit our driving plans, we went to the Buckhorn only because of the Independent’s Burger Week. The Angus beef “SmashBurger” we had there was, I think, our fifth burger that week. We had picked non-beef ones until then, which were all very, very good. How lucky we felt to end the week at the Buckhorn! We bought their mac ’n’ cheese, too, and added health foods, but the basic burger ingredients were topgrade and the style unique. The great food is well-priced, focused on locally sourced and place-based dishes. We loved the Buckhorn’s cloth napkins, the old-fashioned cold water bottle on the


CHRISTOPHER WEYANT, THE BOSTON GLOBE , MA

letters cont’d table, and the awesome, knotty-pine, Wild West decor, including a surprising headline, “OJ Not Guilty.” The waitress and hostess were both stand-out nice. The bathrooms are worth the trip. We noticed on the way out that the place is huge, with spiffy cute cabins refurbished in back and more being done, with Western art, sculptures, and iron gates. Our favorite thing about New Cuyama was a million stars through our moonroof. Thank you, Independent, for getting us to go. ​ ​

—​​Brenda​Barnes​and​Peter​Naughton, Southern California Travelers

About “Latinx” … Our story on “Latinos Veering off College Path” raised a debate about college degrees and also over the usage of “Latinx,” which is a contraction of Latino/a. Christine Lockwood Knight Why does every kid need to go to a four-year college? What’s wrong with a two-year, or administrative, degree from a business school? Or a trade school? • Kiel Rucker I think there are far better options for useful, valuable, practical education than assuming massive debt at a four-year institution. • Marlen Aguayo They act like a degree from a four-year institution will beat actual work experience like everyone is requesting today. If anything, the two-year institution kids will have interned somewhere and gained work experience while the rest are just graduating. Bill Clausen Why can’t people say “Hispanic”? Why must it always be politically charged rhetoric? • Jacob Leyva The headline says “Latinos” but everything else says “Latinx.” At the very least, be consistent. Christine Lockwood Knight Latino and Hispanic are different and refer to geography [Latin America versus Spain]. “Latinx” is a new word so both male and female are represented. Gender inclusivity. • Sophie Barragan “Latinx” is pronounced “Latin-ex.” • Kiel Rucker “Latinx” sounds like some kind of Latin X-Men hero. Which is dope but kind of distracting.

Good Getaway

The Indy’s suggestion of a “Weekend Getaway to Cambria” resonated with Facebook readers: Kelly Bret Almeroth The community was so welcoming when it was inundated with thousands of evacuated Santa Barbara residents during the Thomas Fire. They truly welcomed us and made us feel safe and

comfortable during a super stressful time. • Frances Watt Cardilino We got married in Cambria and we go back at least once or twice a year. Many great restaurants like the Sea Chest and Robin’s. The Fiscalini preserve is beautiful. • Bill Carlson Bring a sweater, maybe two. Good food and good wine, and nice people, too. One of our favorite getaways.

For the Record

¶ Last week’s news article “Notarios Scamming Immigrants at Record Numbers” incorrectly asserted that Santa Barbara consultant Ernesto Rodriguez was served a cease-and-desist letter on April 25 after illegally practicing immigration law under the name Honest Immigration of Santa Barbara, as had been suggested by a representative of the State Bar. Rodriguez did receive a cease-and-desist letter, but it was not for practicing immigration law. His violation was for writing a cease-and-desist letter on behalf of his grandmother-in-law to a neighbor for alleged harassment and racial discrimination. We regret the error. Also, the news item on Santa Barbara City Council candidates misstated the affiliations of Ajay Patel, standing for the Eastside’s District 1, who is a musician and Ayurvedic doctor, not a UCSB student. ¶ In last week’s Angry Poodle Barbecue, though Sam Cunningham did score a still-legendary four touchdowns in the 1973 Rose Bowl for USC — he was on the team’s 1972 roster — his segregation-busting game was in 1970 against Alabama’s Crimson Tide, in which he scored twice on 12 carries for 135 yards. ¶ The obituary for Arlene D’Amuro Blades last week should have stated she was born on August 23, 1948, not on that date in 1943. Our apologies. ¶ Our Fiesta story on the Santa Barbara Historical Museum’s photos repeated a mistaken assumption that all pale horses are palominos; the horses pictured are known as Camarillo White Horses. Also, photographer Karl Obert’s name was misspelled. The Independent welcomes letters of less than 250 words that include a daytime phone number for verification. Letters may be edited for length and clarity. Send to: Letters, S.B. Independent, 12 E. Figueroa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101; or fax: 965-5518; or email: letters@independent.com. Unabridged versions and more letters appear at independent.com/opinions.

INDEPENDENT.COM

AUGUST 8, 2019

THE INDEPENDENT

23


Is State Street Turning the Corner? Or Will Downtown Continue to Suffer? by Tyler Hayden

I

need a new couch. Nothing fancy, just a comfortable place to lie down and take a break from all this sitting. And sofas, like shoes and mattresses, are tricky to buy online. Better to find the right fit in person. So I tried shopping downtown. It didn’t go well. Santa Barbara has a handful of airy showrooms filled with beautiful fabrics, elegant designs, and $5,000 couches. It also has thrift stores and a futon shop. But none carry quite what I’m looking for. “There’s nothing in between,” said Lars Kieler, owner of Habitat Home & Garden, a stylish but affordable San Luis Obispo–based furniture company trying to open a location on State Street. “You guys don’t have anything like that here.” He’s right. I’d like to give Kieler my business — and Santa Barbara my sales tax. But Kieler, like so many downtown retailers, finds himself trapped in the red-tape straitjacket of the city’s Community Development Department. He’s spent nearly 18 months and a big chunk of his budget battling building officials over what started as a simple bathroom relocation in the property he’s leasing at the corner of State and East Gutierrez Street. Excessive nit-picking and repeated delays by inspectors, coupled with a well-intentioned but overwrought permitting process, could have easily killed his business before it began. “You’d think I was trying to build the Taj Mahal on top of downtown,” Kieler said. “It’s absolutely nuts.” But Kieler is stubborn. While other retailers might have thrown up their hands and walked away with a loss — and there are many horror stories of that happening — he’s determined to see the project

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through. “They’d have to drop me like a bull rhino to stop me,” he said. “I don’t roll over, especially not for this kind of shit, because it’s a disservice.” Meanwhile, the big white building perched over downtown’s entryway remains empty. Signs on its papered windows keep promising: Coming Soon! The same story is playing out up and down State Street, the city’s economic engine that powers everything from our fire and police departments to our schools and parks. Its vacancy rate sits at nearly 13 percent, meaning one out of every seven or so storefronts is blacked out, a slight improvement over last summer’s all-time high of 15 percent. If Kieler can’t open in the next few months, I’ll have to take my business elsewhere. I’ll drive up to S.L.O., down to Los Angeles, or buy online. It’s a silly personal dilemma, I know, but it illustrates how money, community, and vitality are still slowly bleeding from State Street, four full years after vacancies began rising. It also underscores the intense, unabating frustration felt by brick-and-mortar merchants beaten up by the Internet and looking to their local leaders for a little bit of help.

The Root of the Problem

Before any practical help can arrive, there needs to be an extensive overhaul of the city’s lengthy, expensive, unpredictable permitting process. This overhaul would include a dramatic improvement in customer service. Applicants must begin to feel the city is working with them, not trying to throw the book at

AUGUST 8, 2019

INDEPENDENT.COM

them. Then, and only then, can all the other grand plans for a downtown revival, especially the creation of new workforce housing, actually begin. Joe Andrulaitis is an architect who has been practicing in Santa Barbara for 25 years. His firm designed the Santa Barbara Public Market, lower State Street’s Loquita restaurant, and dozens of private homes. In 2018, Andrulaitis participated in the Downtown Economic Vitality Working Group convened by the city to make recommendations to revitalize State Street. The group came up with 20, including how to improve customer relations, develop faster over-the-counter permits, and so on. When the findings were presented to the council last spring, Andrulaitis was optimistic. He’s since lost hope. Last week, during one more special City Council hearing on State Street, he didn’t hide his anger. “When my clients ask how long it will take [to obtain building permits], I let them know that this one-of-a-kind city, while beautiful, has the most difficult entitlement process in the entire country,” he said. “Over the years, I’ve offered many solutions to improve the process, to no avail. I can’t help but conclude the city is in a state of denial.” Andrulaitis said it’s unfair to just blame Amazon and the rise of online shopping: “This is a city problem that’s left a self-inflicted wound on State Street.” Jarrett Gorin, a private land-use planner, didn’t hold back either. He said while the council has shown a desire to take action, their momentum gets lost in the gyre of bureaucracy. “The inertia of the city’s rank-

and-file staff is a pretty formidable force to overcome,” he said. Gorin acknowledged the difficulty in enacting a sea change across an entrenched workforce. “Your staff will complain. Your city administrator will get a lot of flak,” he said. “It’ll be painful for everyone. Most meaningful changes are painful. But these changes are worth it.” Community Development Director George Buell insisted he and his staff have received the message and are doing all in their power to fix what’s wrong. They’ve posted an online customer-service survey and are hiring a $75,000 workflow-efficiency consultant. He also talked about enforcing basic office policies, such as returning phone calls and emails. The department isn’t full of malevolent people out looking for trouble. They’re a talented, hardworking — and often overworked — bunch committed to “integrity, excellence, and a beautifully built environment,” he said. In a statement to the Independent, Buell expanded. “I am not looking to shift blame or responsibility for areas in which my department needs to improve upon,” he wrote. “That said, there are a couple things that can be done to foster a smooth permitting process: provide complete plans at initial submittal, and respond to all plan check corrections in subsequent submittals — even if there’s disagreement with the correction, we want to help resolve it! “Also,” Buell went on, “it’s always help-


COVER STORY

‘You can’t plant a tulip without pulling a permit.’

PA U L W E L L M A N F I L

E PHO TO

S

MESSAGE RECEIVED: Community Development Director George Buell, flanked by his lieutenants Andrew Stuffler and Renee Brooke, says the department is well aware of its issues and is working to resolve them. Critics say another consultant isn’t the answer.

ful when communication with our mutual customers — residents and business and property owners — is open. Sometimes we receive direct customer inquiries about plan check status, and we are put in the uncomfortable position of having to explain that we are also waiting for plans to be picked up or returned.” Buell mentioned in previous public hearings that if the city truly wants to revamp its entitlement process, it will have to dig into its charter and reexamine how the design review boards are structured. The Historic Landmarks Commission, for instance, has nine volunteer members, each with their own strong opinions and retirement hours to burn. Long meetings have contributed to delays, Buell noted. Newly ordered trainings for the review boards on their duties and purview will begin in September. Outside influences can cost time and money, too. Reams of Public Records Act requests that City Hall agitator Anna Marie Gott has been submitting across all departments over the last three years require hundreds of staff time hours to fulfill. In 2018, she made 57 requests — 15 in June alone. At the hearing last week, the council seemed just as anxious to see the planning issues solved. “This idea of being unfriendly to businesses — I kinda don’t ever want to hear about it again,” said Councilmember Kristen Sneddon. “I want it to just go away. I want it to be fixed yesterday, and I know we can do that.” But for a growing group of exasperated stakeholders, the city’s current efforts may be too little, too late. Many are now exploring their legal options. When planning staff makes major errors or in other ways causes delays, project owners are stuck with mounting costs, while the responsible city planner suffers no repercussions. Where’s the accountability, they ask? Other cities at least try to make it up to you when they mess up. Santa Barbara does not. After talking with many architects, contractors, and business owners, it became clear that not every staff planner is part of the problem. Plan checkers Lonnie Cassidy and Eric Swenumson are always described as friendly, on the ball, and mindful of their office’s big-picture mission without getting bogged down by minutiae. But when asked who exasperates the problem, the same names continually were mentioned. Jaime Limón, a retired senior planner and member of the city’s

sign committee, recently added to the city’s poor reputation when he threatened the new pub on lower State Street, Institution Ale, with a $100-per-day fine because its indoor neon sign was not set 10 feet back from the front window. It’s these attitudes, critics say, that caused the original owners of Armada Wine & Beer Merchant, hidden in an off-street courtyard, to sell their business last year. They’d tried to point pedestrians in their direction with a sidewalk sandwich-board sign, but the city wouldn’t allow it. Blue Owl restaurant’s former owner reached her breaking point with the city during construction and also sold. The opening of the new Unity Shoppe location on State Street was held up for eight months because of a minor discrepancy over rebar placement. Another downtown project was put on the back burner for 30 days because a single plant was mislabeled in the blueprints. “You can’t plant a tulip without pulling a permit,” the applicant fumed. The list goes on. And though these tensions have not disappeared, there are signs that City Hall is trying to improve. They’ve organized popup shops; reduced outdoor dining fees; allocated $500,000 so the library plaza redesign finishes when the S.B Museum of Art reopens next year; earmarked $100,000 to promote more tourism; and put on the hugely popular Experiment Weekend, when cars were blocked from lower State and hundreds of people strolled through the street, listening to live music, playing basketball and Ping-Pong, and visiting art galleries. Experiment Weekend was such a hit that officials are now figuring out how to have more temporary street closures and even considering allowing amplified music past 10 p.m.

of transients that gathered nearby. But more recently, even some of the harshest critics admit headway has been made. “It’s definitely gotten better,” said real estate broker Jason Jaeger. The clearest example of how the carrot is trumping the stick is the city’s Downtown Ambassador Program. Rob Dayton, the city’s transportation planning and parking director, employs 18 part-time civilians who act as the “eyes and ears” of State Street, patrolling from Sola Street to Cabrillo Street from 9 a.m. to 8 p.m. Called the “red shirts” because of their bright-red polo shirts, the ambassadors interact civilly with people, explain laws, and give warnings. They have a light touch, said Dayton, often distributing literature on homeless services and working closely with AmeriCorps and Home for Good, a county initiative that reconnects transients with their families. While the ambassadors don’t have the authority to write tickets or make arrests, they always have direct contact with police dispatchers. The program replaced the more heavy-handed and largely ineffective teams of “blue shirts” (community service officers) and “yellow shirts” (community service liaisons) administered by the S.B. Police Department. This Friday, at the height of Fiesta, two ambassadors spoke with an elderly couple panhandling in the 600 block with their small spotted dog. The conversation was brief but congenial, ending with a handshake and the husband promising to give the red shirts a five-star rating on Yelp. In 2016, before the red shirts hit the streets, police made 1,425 transient-related arrests in the downtown corridor. In 2017, that figure dropped to 929, falling in 2018 to 711. So far this year, there have been only 263. Some of the credit also should go to the Santa Barbara Rescue Mission, which recently celebrated its $12 million remodel and expansion on East Yanonali Street and which now includes 88 beds for men and 34 beds for women. The city also received

CONTINUED

>

Less Homeless Scapegoating For a long time, the debate around State Street was dominated by complaints over homeless people. Store managers protested that aggressive panhandlers kept customers away. Last January, for instance, the owners of Sam’s to Go considered opening their fourth sandwich shop at 609 State Street — between Night Lizard and the Levi’s store — until they saw the number

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yler Hayden Join author T rther into this as he dives fu story with a week’s cover s Street expert panel of State y, August 14, on Wednesda Night Lizard 5:30 p.m., at int, pany. Buy a p Brewing Com ur supporting o and $1 goes to journalism.

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A Benefit for the Arthritis Foundation

PAUL WELLMAN FILE PHOTO

CELEBRATING OUR 38TH YEAR! An amazing weekend of delicious culinary treats and incredible wine, beer, and spirits tastings CONNOISSEURS’ CIRCLE GALA DINNER & LIVE AUCTION Friday, September 6, 2019 6-11PM Hilton Santa Barbara Beachfront Resort

TASTE OF THE TOWN TASTING EVENT Sunday, September 8, 2019 Noon-3PM Riviera Park Santa Barbara

2019 Taste of the Town Honorees Courtney Foley The Foley Food and Wine Society Vintner of the Year

Executive Chef Mossin Sugich

Hilton Santa Barbara Beachfront Resort Lead Chef

NEW ERA: Miramar Group partners Barrett Reed (right) and Joe Corazzo say it’s time for property owners to step up. “The issue really lies with passive property owners who’ve had it easy forever,” Reed said. “Now you have to be a little more creative.” a $2.2 million state grant that’s banded together a super group of outreach workers, Cottage Hospital clinicians, and restorative police officers to work with those who are most vulnerable. Less effective has been City Hall’s quiet rearranging and removal of State Street furniture, including benches and fountains. The transients who liked to perch on the tiled fountain in front of Hotel Santa Barbara now simply sit on the patch of dirt where it used to be. And Carrie Kelly, Downtown Santa Barbara’s new director, also recently stressed to the City Council that business owners’ numberone concern is still homelessness.

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AUGUST 8, 2019

INDEPENDENT.COM

Barrett Reed is one of the very few voices in the business community that defends the city. He and his business partner Joe Corazzo run the Miramar Group, the brokerage and development outfit behind The Waterline in the Funk Zone and the newly opened Kim’s Service Department on State Street. Reed said there’s nothing wrong with the way the city vets permits. “We think the city’s process is a good process.” He called Community Development Director George Buell “exceedingly relational” and said Buell and his people are always willing to sit down and hash out an issue. Staff are bound by the bureaucracy they operate in, Reed insisted, and are not intentionally screwing with applicants. Reed also emphasized that the “draconian laws” that get complained about most often are state, not local, and that the city

tries to make the overall process easier. For instance, he said, staff recently suggested he hire a CASp (certified accessibility specialist) to help navigate the state’s complicated disability laws. He did, and it worked. Reed admits there’s room for improvement. “But if you’re not doing things that the city recommends,” he said, “and you’re still complaining, that’s insane.” Reed and Corazzo are now building out Los Arcos, a multitenant, food, drink, and retail project at 701 Anacapa Street, where Lost Horizon Bookstore and Pacific Crêpes used to be. They’re also in the early stages of developing new housing on State Street, which nearly all stakeholders in the debate agree is critical to a revival. The units are slated to replace the Hoffmann Brat Haus restaurant in Paseo Nuevo. “The issue really lies with passive property owners who’ve had it easy forever,” Reed summed up. “Now you have to be a little more creative.” On the opposite end of the city-working-relations spectrum is Jim Knell, founder and chair of the SIMA Corporation, one of the largest private holders of real estate in downtown Santa Barbara. Knell has a reputation for being openly antagonistic toward officials, from the mayor all the way down to rank-and-file staff. When an assistant city administrator floated the idea of reducing the size and prominence of “For Lease” signs and dressing up empty storefronts to reduce stretches of “dead zones,” Knell responded with a characteristically scathing email. “OMG, Are you people out of touch or just crazy!!!” he wrote. “The focus should be on ridding the streets of the panhandlers/homeless and getting rid of the city benches that they all use !!! To suggest that we remove Brokerage signs is LUDICRUS [sic].”

The Point People

Two weeks ago, a consultant


COVER STORY released a report that strongly recommended Santa Barbara hire an economic development director. It was the same recommendation made two years ago by another paid survey. Most other cities of similar size have been benefiting from one after the state in 2012 abolished Redevelopment Agencies, which had provided funding and vision to keep urban centers vibrant. Santa Barbara’s failure to fill the void, many critics feel, precipitated the current situation. Though the City Council ultimately approved $300,000 to create the position and start the hiring process, Councilmember Randy Rowse grumbled that the general job description sounded mushy and he was unclear on its “deliverables.” Charlene Rosales, who originally hails from Santa Barbara, is San Luis Obispo’s economic development manager. She said her current day-to-day consists of negotiations over a potential public-private partnership between the city, county, and a developer for a parking structure at the northern end of their downtown; implementation of cannabis-based businesses into the city; the development of two major residential and commercial projects; and San Luis Obispo’s participation in the regional effort to close Diablo Canyon Power Plant. Ventura’s job description for its economic development manager covers similar duties. Meanwhile, the new Downtown Santa Barbara leader Carrie Kelly is working hard to reestablish her 1,000-member organization as an effective voice at the table. She envisions turning the 400-600 blocks of State into some sort of Old Town district with wider sidewalks, improved lighting, and interactive displays that explain downtown’s rich history. An arcade-bar might be a good draw, she said. “Wouldn’t that be awesome?” There’s also a new director, Stephanie Armstrong, at the Chamber of Commerce—another traditional booster for Santa Barbara business that’s felt oddly disconnected from the action for some time. She’s excited about opening a big new visitors’ center at 120 State Street in

the Hotel Californian complex. Sarah York Rubin, executive director of the Santa Barbara County Office of Arts & Culture, is firing on all cylinders to enliven State with public art. This August, her office will install Tiny Libraries up and down the street: bright, sixfoot-tall punctuation-mark sculptures filled with books. Then, next April, Rubin hopes to snag a wellknown sculpture by Tom Fruin, a UCSB alumnus whose work defines Brooklyn’s Dumbo waterfront district. A garden house made with a thousand scraps of recycled plexiglass and steel, it channels stained glass or a quilt, Rubin says, and is “Instagram gold.”

GOSSIP on the STREET 1. 2.

3.

4.

5.

The former Saks Fifth Avenue building on the corner of State and Carrillo is about to open as an Amazon office. Paseo Nuevo’s Pacific Retail Capital Partners, leaseholders of the empty Macy’s now being referred to as the Ortega Building, is quietly trying to lure the Apple Store to its first floor by offering millions of dollars’ worth of improvements, according to a source with knowledge of the proposed deal. Luxury theaters are reportedly being planned for the second and third floors. Michael Rosenfeld, owner of Hotel Californian, Chapala One, and the building that used to house Staples, is reportedly thinking about repurposing that latter large space with retail in front and housing in back. Though there is less retail on State, other businesses have moved in or are in the process of doing so: gyms and workout studios such as Killer B Fitness, the Rock Gym, and Fit Buddha, along with tech companies such as Sonos, LogicMonitor, and now Amazon. The three-story, 13,200-squarefoot Scientology building in the 500 block is for sale for $5.7 million. Institution Ale next door is planning a beer garden in the pedestrian space between the two properties.

6. Shuttered since 2015, the former

Panera Bread building on the corner of State and Ortega has now been split in half. One side will soon be a 7-Eleven, and the property’s manager, The Shopping Center Group, representing a Beverly Hills LLC, is reportedly only interested in leasing the other side to another national tenant. 7. Lee Scharfeld, who owns the building at 634 State Street, where the Tonic Nightclub used to be, lowered his rent 20 percent to entice the microbrewery M.Special Brewery to sign a lease. “You have to adjust rates so that potential businesses are viable,” Scharfeld explained. “Some owners are just inflexible, though.” 8. Perhaps State Street’s deepest, darkest black hole is the old Esau’s building, sandwiched on the 400 block between the Rainbow Foot Spa and the adult bookstore. Boarded up since 2006, it’s owned by the last of the remaining Safina brothers, some of the toughest State Street landlords in memory. Bill Safina, 82, is “not gonna kill himself getting the place leased or sold,” he said, “but we’re gonna get to it soon.” 9. Here are the new and renewed leases signed over the last two quarters, according to Hayes Commercial Group: House of Clues will bring an escape room to the Aaron Bros space at 601 State Street; Restoration Hardware decided to stay at 710 (bucking the narrative that national retailers are abandoning downtown); Apna Indian Cuisine took over Goa Taco at 718; the former Palazzio restaurant at 1026 is now Oppi’z Bistro; a new restaurant called Embermill will replace the long-empty Aldo’s at 1031; Wendy Foster leased the Celadon location at 1224; Taqueria Santa Barbara is moving into the Jersey Mike’s spot at 1213; and Ebikezzz, an electric bike store, is opening at 1345. CONTINUED >

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LET’S BE HONEST: Carrie Kelly, the new director of Downtown Santa Barbara, got a big round of applause with her recent comments to the council that were optimistic about the future but direct about the issues. “Our business community is excited but frustrated,” she said.

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27


PAUL WELLMAN FILE PHOTO

CONDOR EXPRESS

Join Us for A Smooth Hawaiian Cruise

Enjoy the best in Hawaiian music courtesy of Joanie Collins & Sione Tutama. An almost-full moon will be cruising with us!! They will perform traditional and contemporary favorites along with singing hula girls aboard the Condor Express. Enjoy light appetizers, with great authentic Hawaiian entertainment. All lady passengers will receive a complimentary Lei. Joanie Collins & Sione Tutama

When: Saturday, August 17, 2019 7:00-9:00pm Boarding @ 6:45, departs 7:00pm sharp Sea Landing dock, Santa Barbara Harbor. Boarding Pass: $45in advance $55 day of the cruise Complimentary appetizers included No Host Bar

Reservations: Reserve your boarding pass today (805)882-0088 or visit condorexpress.com/party-cruises

MEN IN BLACK: Hal Conklin and Todd Capps aren’t fighting aliens. They’re battling more formidable adversaries — bad bureaucracy and community division.

Softening Rents

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At Visiting Nurse & Hospice Care we understand why you chose to become a nurse. Join us for an informal evening where you can talk to our managers and nursing professionals and learn about all the advantages of a career in the field of Home Health and Hospice Care.

Open House for RNs and LVNs Home Health & Hospice Opportunities

Wednesday, August 21, 2019 5:00–7:00 PM Refreshments will be served

Two locations in Santa Barbara County

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Bring a colleague. To RSVP or for more information contact Danny Ornelas, In-House Recruiter at hr@vnhcsb.org or 805.690.6223. Walk-ins welcome. Choose the community nonprofit health care organization that gives you the support and resources to succeed in your career as well as the flexibility and assistance you need to prosper in your life. Choose Visiting Nurse & Hospice Care.

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Santa Barbara • Montecito • Summerland • Carpinteria • Goleta • Lompoc • Buellton • Solvang • Santa Ynez • Santa Maria THE INDEPENDENT

HOW S.B. STACKS UP: State Street’s vacancy rate is about 13 percent, but the overall downtown commercial rate, including side streets, is 10.3 percent. Here’s how our vacancy numbers and rent prices compare to the downtowns of other similarly sized cities.

Been There, Done That

Hal Conklin has seen this all before. He was the mayor in the 1980s, after all, when downtown was circling the drain and extreme action was both needed and taken. A coordinated, City Hall–led campaign brought together interests and residents from all four corners of the city that combined enough energy to build Paseo Nuevo and a bustling arts district. Palm Springs, then suffering from a dying downtown center, asked Conklin to come explain how Santa Barbara succeeded. Thirty years later, Santa Barbara’s World Business Academy invited Palm Springs leaders here to remind us how to do it again. Conklin is now leading a nonprofit called the Santa Barbara Leadership Team that formed 11 months ago and now boasts more than 100 members, including property owners Richard Berti,

VACANCY

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3.3%

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5.3%

$4.57

SANTA MONICA

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$7.90

PALM SPRINGS

6.5%

$2.92

SANTA BARBARA

10.3%

$3.32

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512 E. Gutierrez Street

28

Broker Michael Martz with Hayes Commercial Group said lease rates are “definitely softening” as the market slowly catches up to the vacancy rates. “Whereas an owner might have wanted $4 [per square foot] in 2016, now they want $3,” he said. The latest retail report only confirmed what “we’ve all been talking about for three to four years,” Martz went on. “Especially the perception out there that the city is not business-friendly.” The much-touted Accelerate program, for instance, which was supposed to expedite

downtown projects through the approval pipeline, didn’t make a dent. “If the city wants to see drastic improvements,” Martz said, “it needs to make drastic changes.”

AUGUST 8, 2019

INDEPENDENT.COM


COVER STORY

PAUL WELLMAN FILE PHOTO

Ray Mahboob, and Peter Lewis; business operators Neil Ablitt, Tina Tanaka, and Alison Hardey; Community Environmental Council leader Sigrid Wright; homeless advocate Jeff Shaffer; and public affairs operator John Davies, among others. “We all want change,” said member Jason Jaeger. “Now we finally have the group that can achieve it.” Their overarching mission, Conklin explained, is to help guide the city back to being a facilitator, not an obstructor. No one is arguing we should alter Santa Barbara’s character, but there’s a way to both protect and progress, he said. “We need to create a culture of service.” Their initial recommendations to the city are ambitious but concrete. Don’t just hire an economic development director in title only. Hire someone in a management position with real authority. Assign an employee in each city department as an ombudsman to help people through the permitting process. Create a one-stop shop for applicants. “In the end, people should view the city with pride as a trusted partner, not as an uncaring parent that results in our being in therapy for years to come,” Conklin said. And finally, designate one to three blocks of downtown as a “Special Economic Revitalization Zone” for an experimental plan that includes mixed housing, street events, new businesses, and a pedestrian environment. Conklin is also chair of the Lois & Walter Capps Project, which put on the Common Table event on State last fall. Getting that permitted was two months of pain, he said. It was so bad that the organization gave up trying one on Milpas. In contrast, their event in Carpinteria took a single meeting with the mayor and city administrator to receive that city’s stamp of approval. How Santa Barbara City Council and staff react to advice from Conklin and others remains to be seen. If there’s anything the business community has lost patience for, it’s the “c-words,” said Plum Goods owner Amy Cooper: “consultants and committees.” And time is of the essence, reminded others. What if some global force intercedes before something is done? What happens if there’s a fire or a recession? Buell said the Community Development Department has put out a request for proposals for an efficient expert. City Administrator Paul Casey said the City Planning Commission will take up downtown housing discussions this fall. And City Attorney Ariel Calonne said his office has started recruiting for a land-use lawyer to help with streamlining. Calonne cautioned, however, “It’s pretty easy to say, ‘go streamline planning.’” Defining the reforms and actually getting them implemented is another matter. Calonne said it’s not so much a technical task as a political one for the council and its appointed boards and commissions to lead on. The question is, as it’s always been: “How do we write planning code that allows freedom while still preventing the destruction of our community heritage and environmental wealth?” GET IT DONE: Of everyone on the In the meantime, archicouncil, Kristen Sneddon is the tect Joe Andrulaitis told most insistent the Community the council, “One of our Development Department rehab clients, Dioji, a local dog its customer service culture. boarding shop, has been And fast. “I want it to be fixed waiting 18 months for their yesterday,” she said. permit. How do you expect businesses to succeed in such an environment?” n

Free Summer Cinema

1 0 YE A R S

THOSE FABULOUS FIFTIES!!

Premier Sponsor:

On the Waterfront Marlon Brando - Eva Marie Saint - Karl Malden

Friday, August 9 / 8:30 PM Under the stars at the SB County Courthouse Sunken Garden Live DJ set by Darla Bea at 7 PM

Bring blankets, low-to-the-ground chairs, a picnic and your friends!

Special thanks to Santa Barbara County Parks, the Community Services Department of Santa Barbara County and Big Green Cleaning Company.

Films presented by:

Media Sponsors: Arts & Lectures CorporateSeason Sponsor:

(805) 893-3535 / www.ArtsAndLectures.UCSB.edu

iona sabout s te a P ?

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September 5 issue

Advertising Deadline Monday, SEptember 2, at noon

Contact your advertising representative today!

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AUGUST 8, 2019

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29


welcome SANTA BARBARA COTTAGE HOSPITAL BABIES

Baby Girls

Baby Boys

Carpinteria Lizeth Daniela Sanchez Ortiz, 5/19 Blake Naomi Pollard, 6/18

Buellton Emmet McLean Crookston, 5/9 Ronald Annan Whitmire III, 5/11

Goleta Maple Madelyn Eckert, 7/3

“We received the highest level of care at Cottage.”

Lompoc Vienna Dior Castellanos, 5/23 Daniela Sophia Botello Vazquez, 7/9

—Brian and Elise, Nico’s parents

Nico Santa Barbara Nico had an emergency appendectomy for a ruptured appendix and spent nearly two weeks at Cottage Children’s Medical Center under the expert care of doctors and nurses. Today, Nico is back to his very active life enjoying sports, the beach and being silly with his family and friends.

Santa Barbara Chiara Lucia Foschi, 3/19 Poppy Anne Susan Sweeney, 5/3 Cora Isabella Sandoval, 5/10 Katherine Xu Li, 5/11 Kaia Ruth Mañach, 5/25 Matea Harper Kirk, 5/28 Mia Soraya Wagner, 5/30 Lucy Schiff, 6/25 Mila Jordan Solis, 6/27 Ellie Elaine Richardson, 6/27 Emerson Beatriz Ann Harriston, 7/3 Parker Jane Powell, 7/6 Eriel Nicole John, 7/8 Ynez Tristine Ponce, 7/8 Santa Ynez Tyler Anne Jacobsen, 7/1 Viviana Elaine Bruner 7/12

health e baby

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Cottage Children’s Medical Center cares for over 14,000 children a year in our Acute Pediatrics Unit, Haselton Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Pediatric Intensive Care Unit, Emergency Department, Pediatric Trauma Center and eight specialized outpatient clinics.

PLEASE NOMINATE a person you know who makes our community a better place to live and whose good works and deeds may otherwise go unsung.

SUBMIT AT: independent.com/local-hero

SUBMISSION DEADLINE:

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WANTED Santa Barbara

Friday, September 6 30

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Goleta Luka Adrian HigueraGarcia, 5/23 Leonardo Llewellyn Arienzo, 6/6 Tomás Arlo Gomez, 6/26 Makoa Cruise Provan, 7/4 Bert Michael Dieter Ahlers, 7/15 William Ellis Van McEuwan, 7/16 Lompoc Oliver Cash Coleman, 6/20 Colton David Carlson, 7/7 Santa Barbara Bennett Jonathan Jordan, 4/24 Lucas Ryan Moesker, 5/1 Santiago Mendoza Munoz, 5/2 Talon Asher Longaberger, 5/4 Río Alexander Cardenas, 5/22 Jack Rohleder Urton, 5/23 Michael Henry Canaca, 5/26 Ryder Max Kearns, 5/27 Ethan William Hofmann, 5/28 Locke Francis Oliver Ferguson, 6/25 Henry Knight Holehouse, 6/29 Henry Alexander Vernon, 7/8 Olive Devi Cicci, 7/8 Waylon James Ramirez, 7/18

Santa Maria Jace Caiden Orozco, 6/29 Solvang Mario M Herrera, 5/4 Wyatt Gabriel Garcia, 6/24

Santa Barbara County

PITCH IN. GIVE BACK. JOIN US. SATURDAY

9.14.19 9AM-12PM TO VOLUNTEER VISIT

unitedwaysb.org/dayofcaring AUGUST 8, 2019

INDEPENDENT.COM


WEEK I N D E P E N D E N T CA L E N DA R

TH

AUG.

8-14

E

BY TERRY ORTEGA AND AMBER WHITE

As always, find the complete listings online at independent.com/events. And if you have an event coming up, submit it at independent.com/eventsubmit.

PICN

Summer Fix The hypnotic work of Benjamin Anderson features large-scale, realistic renditions of race cars, pickup trucks, and cars submerged in water, suspended at the mercy of gravity in a dazzling web of refracted sunlight. A portion of sales go toward Ocean Futures Society. The exhibit shows through September 4. 10am6pm. Person Ryan Gallery, 2346 Lillie Ave., Summerland. Free. Call 770-3677.

S.B. Unified School District Summer 2019 Free Meals

RK PA

8/8-8/14:

in e IC

All locations are closed July 4. Todas las ubicaciones están cerradas el 4 de julio.

2019

Free breakfast, lunch, and supper for all youth 18 years and younger. All locations are open Monday-Friday unless otherwise stated. For more locations, call 963-4338 x6387, or text “summerfood” to 877 877. Desayuno, almuerzo, y cena gratis para todos los jóvenes de 18 años o menos. Todas las ubicaciones están abiertas lunes-viernes si no se indique lo contrario. Para obtener más ubicaciones, llame al 9634338 x6387, o envie un mensaje de texto que dice “summerfood” al 877 877.

personryangallery.com

tinyurl.com/SBUSD2018SummerMeals Positas Rd. Free.

Bohnett Park: Mobile Café

mesabusinessassociation.org 8/8: Young the Giant, Fitz and The Tantrums This night under the stars will “77 Degrees” by Benjamin Anderson

THURSDAY 8/8 8/8-8/11, 8/13-8/14: The Addams Family This new musical, based on the classic Addams characters and inspired by the vintage television series, is an original story of the madcap and macabre Addams family in a satirical comedy about every parent’s nightmare. Watch as Wednesday Addams, the ultimate princess of darkness, falls in love with a sweet young man from a respectable family. 8pm. Solvang Festival Theater, 420 2nd St., Solvang. $35.75-$49. Ages 5+. Call 922-8313. pcpa.org

8/8: Concerts in the Park Pack a picnic and dance to the blues sounds of Lightnin’ Willie and the Poorboys. 6-8:30pm. Chase Palm Park, 323 E. Cabrillo Blvd. Free. Call 897-1983.

tinyurl.com/ConcertsChasePark

8/8: Memoir in Poems Workshop for S.B. Seniors with Poet Laureate Laure-Anne Bosselaar Beginning poets and accomplished writers will enjoy this interactive workshop that focuses on writing poetry that looks back to a moment in the past. 2-4:30pm. Tech Lab, S.B. Central Library, 40 E. Anapamu St. Free. sbplibrary.org

8/8: Upcycle Art Day Families can

8/8: Mesa Music Nite Bring

enjoy a hands-on creative activity for all ages. Bring an empty egg carton, cereal box, or can and turn it into art. 9:30am-noon. Goleta Valley Community Ctr., 5679 Hollister Ave., Goleta. Free. Call 967-1237.

lawn chairs, blankets, family, and friends to enjoy music by Acre(s). All proceeds will benefit future Mesa-area safety and beautification projects. 5:30-7:30pm. Singleton Pavilion, Elings Park 1298 Las

5315 Foothill Rd., Carpinteria. June 10-Aug. 17. Breakfast: 8-9am; lunch: 11am-1pm.

Carpinteria Middle School: Mobile Café 5351 Carpinteria Ave., Carpinteria. June 11-Aug. 17. Breakfast: 8-9am; lunch: 11am-1pm.

Eastside Boys & Girls Club: Providence School

8/8: A World of Blue: Creating a More Ocean Literate Society Through Marine Education Marine biologist,

630 E. Canon Perdido St. June 10-Aug. 16. Supper: 4-4:30pm.

educator, and naturalist Holly S. Lohuis will share stories and images from around the world on why it is critical we understand both the ocean’s influence on us and our influence on the ocean. 7pm. S.B. Maritime Museum, 113 Harbor Wy. $10-$20. Call 4568747. sbmm.org

5701 Hollister Ave., Goleta. June 10-Aug. 17. Breakfast: Mon.-Sat., 8-9am; Supper: 4:30-5:30pm.

Goleta Community Ctr.: Mobile Café

Fundraiser

COURTESY

799 Juniper Walk, Isla Vista. June 10-Aug. 16. Supper: 5:45-6pm.

5679 Hollister Ave., Goleta (behind bldg.). June 10-Aug. 16. Lunch: 11am-1pm.

The Village Apartment: Mobile Café

Harding University Partnership Program

West Campus Food Pantry: Mobile Café

524 W. Canon Perdido St. June 10-Aug. 16. Supper: 4:40-5:10pm.

1625 Robbins St. June 10-Aug. 16. Breakfast: 8-9am; lunch: 11am-1pm.

736 Bolton Walk. June 10-Aug. 16. Supper: 5:40-6pm.

I.V. Youth Projects Phelps: Mobile Café

Westside Boys & Girls Club: Mobile Café

6842 Phelps Rd., Goleta. June 10-Aug. 16. Breakfast: 8:45-9:45am; supper: 4:40-5:30pm.

602 W. Anapamu St. Mon.-Sat., June 10-Aug. 16. Breakfast: 8-9am; lunch: 11am-1pm.

Foodbank Kids’ Summer Meals 2019

tinyurl.com/PicnicInThePark2019

artsandlectures.ucsb.edu

Volunteer Opportunity

Storke Community Ctr.: Mobile Café

The Foodbank offers free, nutritious meals, activities, and enrichment opportunities to all children ages 1-18 in our county, Monday-Friday, June 10-August 16, unless otherwise stated. Visit the website for North County locations. Call 967-5741. El Foodbank ofrece comidas nutritivas gratuitas, actividades, y oportunidades de enriquecimiento para todos los niños de 1 a 18 años en nuestro condado, del 10 de junio al 16 de agosto, de lunes a viernes si no se indique lo contrario.. Visite el sitio web por las ubicaciones de North County. Llame al 967-5741.

8/9:

Watercolor

Monroe School Cafeteria

520 Wentworth Ave. June 10-Aug 16. Lunch: 11am-1pm.

Goleta Boys & Girls Club: Mobile Café

tinyurl.com/upcycleart-goleta

1508 San Pascual St. June 10-Aug. 16. Supper: 4-4:30pm.

Parque de los Niños: Mobile Café

531 E. Ortega St. June 10-Aug. 16. Lunch: 11:30am-1pm.

centerstagetheater.org

The Lighthouse Learning Ctr.: Mobile Café

502 W. Alamar Ave. June 11-Aug. 18. Lunch: 11am–1:00pm. Closed: July 4, 12, 26, and 29.

Girls Inc.: Mobile Café

they dance a selection of classic and modern ballets. 7pm. Center Stage Theater, 751 Paseo Nuevo. $15-$20. Call 963-0408.

2255 Modoc Rd. June 10-Aug. 16. Breakfast: 8-9am; lunch: 11am-1pm.

Oak Park: Mobile Café

1111 E. Mason St. June 10-Aug. 16. Breakfast: 8-9am; lunch: 11am-1pm.

8/9: Goleta School of Ballet presents The Summer Intensive Workshop Performance Join students as

La Cumbre Middle School

431 Flora Vista Dr. June 10-Aug. 16. Breakfast: 8-9am; lunch: 11am-1pm.

Franklin School Cafeteria

FRIDAY 8/9

while Alexis Pittmon leads you through basic watercolor On the Waterfront techniques to help you Follow the story of explore a seasonal ex-prize-fighter-turned-longshoreman still life with your Terry Malloy (Marlon Brando) as he struggles eyes and brush. to stand up to his corrupt union bosses and 7-9pm. Municipal teams up with a murder victim’s sister, Edie (Eva Winemakers, 22 Marie Saint), and a streetwise priest (Karl MalAnacapa St. $30. den) to testify. 8:30pm. Sunken Gardens, S.B. Ages 21+. Call County Courthouse, 1100 Anacapa St. Free. 637-9646. tinyurl Not rated. Call 893-3535. .com/Municipal

701-H Campus Point Ln., Goleta. June 10-Aug. 16. Breakfast: 8-8:30am; supper: 4-4:30pm.

Carpinteria Girls Inc.: Mobile Café

feature two California indie-pop bands performing hits like “Cough Syrup” and “My Body” as well as “The Walker” and “HandClap.” 6pm. S.B. Bowl, 1122 N. Milpas St. $35-$55. Call 962-7411. sbbowl.com

8/8: Municipal Watercolor Club Sip on a glass of red or white

I.V. Youth Projects West Campus: Mobile Café

900 San Pascual St. June 10-Aug. 16. Supper: 5:15-6pm.

Civil Discourse

Carpinteria Public Library 5141 Carpinteria Ave., Carpinteria Noon-1pm.

Jardin de las Rosas 510 Salsipuedes St. Mon.-Thu., 11:30am12:30pm

Positano Apartments 11 Camino de Vida Noon-1pm

Casas de los Carneros 10 Longshore Pl., Goleta. 1-2pm

Jonny D. Wallis Neighborhood Park 170 S. Kellogg Ave., Goleta 12:30-1:30pm

S.B. Central Library 40 E. Anapamu St. 11:30am-12:30pm

>>>

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INDEPENDENT CALENDAR

AUG.

Santa Maria Sun

COURTESY

AUG 2 - 25 SOLVANG FESTIVAL THEATER

“Masterpiece of the macabre!”

As always, find the complete listings online at independent.com/events. And if you have an event coming up, submit it at independent.com/eventsubmit.

8-14

PA C I F I C C O N S E R VAT O R Y T H E AT R E

8/10:

Workshop with Sharon Nigh: Kindness Rocks

Project Kids will love decorating rocks with words of kindness with guest artist Sharon Nigh. Rocks can be taken home or planted around town to brighten someone’s day. 10am-noon. Art From Scrap, 302 E. Cota St. $8. Children ages 6 or younger must be accompanied by an adult. Call 884-0459 x13. exploreecology.org

8/9: Movie Night: WALL-E Follow the journey of a small, waste-collecting robot as he inadvertently embarks on a space journey that will ultimately decide the fate of mankind in this Oscar-winning animated film. 6pm. Montecito Country Mart, 1018 Coast Village Rd. Free. Rated G.

tinyurl.com/MoviesattheMart

SATURDAY 8/10 8/10-8/11: 4th Annual UCSB Summer Music Festival This festival

music.ucsb.edu

8/10: Hearts 101: An Inclusive Tour Experience the heart and soul of this organization, learn about the expanded programs

8/10: Tyler Henry Hollywood Medium and author Tyler Henry will share his gifts and insights, along with personal stories, followed by an audience Q&A. 8pm. Chumash Casino Resort, 3400 E. Hwy. 246, Santa Ynez. $49-$79. Ages 21+. Call (800) 248-6274. chumashcasino.com

8/10: Summer Sips Series Enjoy CO U

RT

ES

Y

wine tasting paired with delicious appetizers and conversation with the local sponsoring vintner in the Garden’s Courtyard before adjourning to the library for a featured presentation. 4-6pm. Blaksley Library, The S.B. Botanic Garden, 1212 Mission Canyon Rd. $60-$95. Ages 21+. Call 682-4726.

Santa Barbara Choral Society Nickelodeon’s JoJo Siwa D.R.E.A.M The

Tour YouTube personality, singer, dancer, entrepreneur, social media influencer, New York Times best-selling author, and star on Nickelodeon’s Lip Sync Battle Shorties JoJo Siwa will provide positive messages live through her hugely popular singles like “Boomerang,” “Kid in a Candy Store,” “Hold The Drama,” and “High Top Shoes.” 7pm. S.B. Bowl, 1122 N. Milpas St. $44.50-$74.50. Call 962-7411. sbbowl.com

Bernstein: Chichester Psalms Lauridsen: Lux Aeterna Schubert: Magnificat Beethoven: Mass in C Major and much more!

tects will follow the performance. 4-6pm. Architectural Foundation of S.B., 229 E. Victoria. $20. Call 965-6307. afsb.org

8/10: Comedy Night/9th Anniversary Party Laugh along with comedy sets by Tre Lamb, Fiona Reid, Aurelio Mayesh and Jerry Casanova along with beats by Chadillac Green during this anniversary party. 4:20pm. High Tide S.B. 334 Anacapa St. Call 845-2924.

tinyurl.com/HighTideComedy

8/10: “Our Lutah” Brings Lutah Maria Riggs to Life

Jo Anne Wasserman, Artistic Director

Anthropology Collections Manager Tacy Kennedy, MA, to learn how archaeologists studying human remains tackle the complex task of estimating sex and ascribing gender in ancient cultures. 6:30-8pm. Dargan’s Irish Pub & Restaurant, 18 E. Ortega St. Free. Call 682-4711 x170. sbnature.org

basic fishing skills at this workshop led by expert fishermen and women in honor of fishing extraordinaire Neal Taylor. All equipment will be provided, but feel free to bring your own if you have it. There is a $10 County Park fee per vehicle. 8:45am-12:30pm. Nature Ctr., 2265 Hwy. 154. Free. Call 693-8381. clnaturecenter.org

sbbg.org

2019 l 2020 Choral Artistry

Science Pub: Sexing the Skeleton: Nuancing Gender in Archaeology Join

8/10: Kids & Parent Fishing Workshop Learn

TICKETS 922-8313 | BOX OFFICE 12:30-7PM WED-SUN | PCPA.ORG

8/11:

8/12:

CO U R T E S Y

will feature performances by L.A.-based Isaura String Quartet, violist and UCSB Music alumnus Jonathan Morgan, Adelfos Ensemble, Sahlala Band, UCSB University Carillonist Wesley Arai, dancers from the Santa Barbara community, and UCSB Music graduate students and alumni. Visit the website for a full schedule. Times and locations vary. Free. Call 893-3230.

and recent news, and hear about the amazing people with special needs who can benefit from therapeutic horsemanship. 10:30-11:30am. Hearts Therapeutic Equestrian Ctr., 4420 Calle Real. Free. Call 364-5201. heartsriding.org

The Architectural Foundation of Santa Barbara, in collaboration with DramaDogs, a theater company, is pleased to present “Our Lutah”, a monologue performance. The event will feature a staging of Terre Ouwehand’s Lutah Maria Riggs monologue, performed by E. Bonnie Lewis, with live flute music and projected old photos of Lutah, whose designs include the Lobero Theatre, El Paseo, the Vedanta Temple, and more. A reception and a brief talk by local female archi-

8/10: El Capitan Canyon Summer Concert Series Dance under the big sky as Alastair Greene Band performs rocking blues. 7-9pm. El Capitan Canyon. 11560 Calle Real. $10.

tinyurl.com/ElCapitan2019

SUNDAY 8/11 8/11: Studio Sunday Participants will enjoy creating a weather pattern design with a printing plate and ink inspired by Utagawa Hiroshige’s color woodblock print Station 46, Driving Rain at Shōno.

AUGUST 17 by appointment auditions@sbchoral.org

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AUGUST 8, 2019

Fundraiser INDEPENDENT.COM

Volunteer Opportunity

Civil Discourse

Protest


WEEK

JUST ANNOUNCED

Richard Thompson

Shows on Tap

with special guest

Eliza Gilkyson Sat. Nov 9

8/8-8/14: The Endless Summer Bar-Café Thu.: Barry McGuire. 5:30-8:30pm. Fri.: Benny Collison. 5:30-8:30pm. Sat.: The Wrinkled Teenagers. 5:30-8:30pm. Sun.: Jim Rankin. 2-5pm. Mon., Wed.: Dave Vignoe. 5:30-8:30pm. Tue.: Brian Kinsella. 5:30-8:30pm. 113 Harbor Wy. Free. Call

“The finest rock songwriter after Dylan and the best electric guitarist since Hendrix.”

564-1200.

8/9-8/10: The Brewhouse Fri.: Stiff Pickle Orchestra. 8pm. Sat.: Left Hand Lion. 9pm. 229 W. Montecito St. Free. Call 884-4664.

- Los Angeles Times

8/9-8/11: Cold Spring Tavern Fri.: Stray Herd. 6-9pm. Sat.: Brandi Rose; 1-4pm. Studio C; 5-8pm. Sun.: Tom Ball and Kenny Sultan; 1:15-4pm. Teresa Russell and Cocobilli. 4:30-7:30pm. 5995 Stagecoach Rd. Free. Call 967-0066. coldspringtavern.com

2019

8/9: Figueroa Mountain Brewing Co. (Santa Barbara) Whesli.

7-10pm. 137 Anacapa St., Ste. F. Free. Ages 21+. Call 694-2252 x344.

figmtnbrew.com

8/9-8/11: Maverick Saloon Fri.: Led Zepplica. 8-11pm. Sat.: Just Dave. 8-11pm. Sun.: Nate Latta. 1-5pm. 3687 Sagunto St., Santa Ynez. Free-$5. Ages 21+. Call 686-4785. themavsaloon.com Erin Baiano

8/9-8/10: Mercury Lounge Fri.: Dan Zimmerman Trio; 5-6:30pm; free. Zach Madden and special guests. 9pm. $5. Sat.: The Advocates, Yello Heart. 9pm. $5. 871 Hollister Ave., Goleta. Ages 21+. Call 967-0907.

8/9-8/10, 8/13: M.Special Brewing Co. Fri.: Bamblume. 7-9pm. Sat.: Paradise King. 5-8pm. Tue.: Salty Strings. 6-8pm. 6860 Cortona Dr., Bldg. C., Goleta. Free. Call 968-6500. mspecialbrewco.com 8/10-8/11: Figueroa Mountain Brewing Co. (Los Olivos) Sat.: 3 Way Stop. 7-10pm. Sun.: Kenny Taylor. 3-6pm. 2363 Alamo Pintado Ave., Los Olivos. Free. Ages 21+. Call 694-2252 x343. figmtnbrew.com

Welcome

DOUG VARONE AND DANCERS

8/10: The James Joyce Ulysses Jasz. 7:30-10:30pm. 513 State St. Free. Ages 21+. Call 962-2668.

sbjamesjoyce.com

Eilen Jewell

8/10: La Cumbre Plaza Piano Boys. Noon-3pm. 121 S. Hope Ave.

Free. Call 687-6458. shoplacumbre.com/Events

Sept. 6 & 7

8/11: Dargan’s Irish Pub & Restaurant Irish Jam Session. 4:30-7pm. 18 E. Ortega St. Free. Call 568-0702. darganssb.com

The Bentson Foundation Elaine F. Stepanek Foundation

8/11: Figueroa Mountain Brewing Co. (Buellton) Chilldawgs. 2-5pm. 45 Industrial Wy., Buellton. Free. Ages 21+. Call 694-2252 x110. figmtnbrew.com

In Residence & creating an original work based on the score of West Side Story Learn more at SBDANCEworks.com

805.963.0761 / LOBERO.ORG

JEWELRY AND WATCH REPAIR

8/14: Island Brewing Company The Coconuts. 6-7pm. 5049 6th St., Carpinteria. Free. Call 745-8272.

islandbrewingcompany.com

8/8-8/11, 8/14:

“Many choreographers can create interesting movement; few can make it mean so much.”– Chicago Tribune

SOhO Restaurant & Music Club Thu.: Eilen Jewell.

6-7:30pm. $18-$22. Fri.: Petmedz, The Grownups, Railer, The Dorys. 9pm. $8. Ages 21+. Sat.: Stevie Nicks Illusion: A Tribute to Fleetwood Mac & Stevie Nicks. 8:30pm. $12. Ages 21+. Sun.: Abba Dabba Doo! 7:30pm. $15-$18. Ages 18+. Wed.: ChiChis Christ, Leaping Lena. 7:30pm. $10. Ages 21+. 1221 State St. Call 962-7776. sohosb.com

>>>

RAPID SERVICE ~ QUALITY WORK

805.569.3393 poshsb.com | info@poshsb.com

3317 State St. Loreto Plaza - Santa Barbara

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Wednesday, Aug. 14th Z500m, 1K

Z5K Run Z5K Walk

& 2K Swim ZKids Runs

ZFood & Ice Cream,

ZSponsor Giveaways

ZRaffle Prizes ZLive Music

A L W A Y S A M A Z I N G. N e v e r r o u t i n e.

Z805 & DBA Beer

On site Registration at Leadbetter Beach • Starts 5pm Swim starts 6:25pm • 5k starts 6:35pm • Kids Sprint 7:35pm

fri & SAT

tyler henry

Los Rieleros Del Norte & Special Guest

Regulo Caro

Martin Nievera + Pops Fernandez

AUG

9 & 10

www.nitemoves.org

8 PM

FRIDAY

AUG

16

8 PM

saturday

AUG

17

8 PM

coastal legacy 2019 Saturday September 21 st

Music Academy of the West

FRIDAY

Big & Rich

AUG

SOLVANG FESTIVAL THEATER

23

AUG 2 - 25

“MasterpieceSantaofMariatheSun macabre!”

8 PM

AUG 29 - SEP 8 By Oscar Wilde

3 4 0 0 E H i g h w a y 24 6 , S a n t a Yn e z · 8 0 0 - 24 8 - 6 2 74 · C h u m a s h C a s i n o . c o m Must be 21 years of age or older to attend. Chumash Casino Resort reserves the right to change or cancel promotions and events.

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BOX OFFICE 12:30-7PM WED-SUN | TICKETS 805-922-8313 | PCPA.ORG


WEEK 8/13:

Gary Corbin Meet mystery and suspense author, Gary Corbin, as he shares and signs his fourth novel, A Woman of Valor, about a rookie policewoman whose mission is to take serial child molesters off the streets of her small hometown. 7pm. Chaucer’s Books, 3321 State St. Free. Call 682-6787. chaucersbooks.com Ojai Park & Ride, 450 E. Ojai Ave., Ojai. Free-$20. Call 646-6281. herbwalks.com

8/14: Concerts at the Gazebo Bring a picnic and enjoy a night of music and dancing with SoLuna! 6-8pm. Goleta Valley Community Ctr., 5679 Hollister Ave., Goleta. Free. goletaoldtown.org

1:30-4:30pm. S.B. Museum of Art, 1130 State St. Free. Call 963-4364. sbma.net

8/11: SNAP! Drag Queen Brunch This fun and fabulous brunch hosted by Borgia Bloom Facade will feature beats by DJ Darla Bea, mimosas, Bloody Marys, brunch, and a killer show from the hottest drag queens from L.A. and the Central Coast. Noon. SOhO Restaurant & Music Club, 1221 State St. $15. Ages 18+. Call 962-7776.

sohosb.com

8/11: Double Vision Revisited Take in a night of jazz featuring Bob James, David Sanborn, and Marcus Miller, with guests Billy Kilson & Larry Braggs performing hits like “Maputo” and “Since I Fell For You.” 7pm. The Granada Theatre, 1214 State St. $55-$105. Call 899-2222.

granadasb.org

MONDAY 8/12 8/12: Tao Calligraphy Writing and Tracing Meditation Learn to write Tao calligraphy with Lilan Smyth during this two-hour workshop. 2:30pm. Goleta Valley Library, 500 N. Fairview Ave., Goleta. Free. Call 964-7878. tinyurl.com/GoletaValleyLibrary

TUESDAY 8/13 8/13: Trance Channeling: The Assembly of Light Through Abby Isadora Haydon Sit down with Abby Isadora Haydon for inspiring, beneficial messages from spirit guides, departed loved ones, and ascended masters. Receive suggestions for health, relationships, career, and spiritual growth. 6:30-8:30pm. Bride’s Rm., Unity of S.B., 227 E. Arrellaga St. Donations appreciated. santabarbaraunity.org

8/13: Perler Beads Pixel Art Kids are invited to make pixel art with Perler beads during this fun workshop. Registration is encouraged. 4-5pm. Island Rm., S.B. Central Library, 40 E. Anapamu St. Free. Ages 7-12. Call 564-5602.

sbplibrary.org

WEDNESDAY 8/14 8/14: Sunset Moonrise Herb Walk Hike with Ojai native plant educator Lanny Kaufer to a vista point above the Ojai Valley where participants can watch the simultaneous sunset and moonrise, stopping along the way to meet some valuable native plants, including coastal sagebrush, elderberry, purple sage, and toyon. 6-9pm.

FARMERS MARKET SCHEDULE THURSDAY Carpinteria: 800 block of Linden Ave., 3-6:30pm

FRIDAY

Montecito: 1100 and 1200 blocks of Coast Village Rd., 8-11:15am

GYMNASTICS FALL CLASSES BEGIN AUGUST 26 Girls and boys – 18 months to 18 years

SATURDAY

Downtown S.B.: Corner of Santa Barbara and Cota sts., 8:30am-1pm

Beginner through competitive

SUNDAY

level instruction

TUESDAY

Girls Inc. Gymnastics 531 E. Ortega Street 805.963.4492

Goleta: Camino Real Marketplace, 10am-2pm Old Town S.B.: 500-600 blocks of State St., 4-7:30pm

WEDNESDAY

Solvang: Copenhagen Dr. and 1st St., 2:30-6:30pm

FISHERMAN’S

MARKET SATURDAY

Rain or shine, meet local fishermen on the Harbor’s commercial pier, and buy fresh fish (filleted or whole), live crab, abalone, sea urchins, and more. 117 Harbor Wy., 6-11am. Call 259-7476. cfsb.info/sat

of Greater Santa Barbara girlsincsb.org | INDEPENDENT.COM

@girlsincsb AUGUST 8, 2019

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Public Safety

Health & Beauty

Maison Caulières at the Miramar

O COURTESY

n a recent summer evening, Xavier Deforges, founder of Maison Caulières, shared his homeland with a group of locals through a collaboration with the Rosewood Miramar Beach Resort and its Sense Spa.

The French skin-care line on display in Montecito

“Scent is deeply connected to memory,” Deforges said, addressing the crowd who’d gathered on the hotel’s Lanai Lawn for his Farm to Skincare reception. I brought an oil decanting belle to my nose and inhaled the yellow-flower aroma of the French Loire Valley. Suddenly I was taking in the smells of the French countryside, where Deforges grew up. Maison Caulières’s inception story is truly homegrown. It began when Deforges’s father noticed that the oils from harvested produce moisturized his skin. In 2011, Deforges and his five siblings joined together as an entrepreneurial team to develop skin-care products using ingredients from their parents’ farm. Growing up in the countryside, they were immersed in colors, smells, and atmosphere — elements they’ve successfully captured in their skin-care line. Launched at the Rosewood London in October 2014, Maison Caulières has grown into a global brand. The products 36

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AUGUST 8, 2019

are divided into four groups, each representing a different season. However, according to Deforges, they can — and should — be used year-round. “Even if it’s not cold here, you need to deeply moisturize your skin,” Deforges said as we rubbed a creamy Flocon Blanc into the soft part of our forearms. Karina Chung, director of Sense Spa, believes that skin-care product ingredients should, like the Maison Caulières line, be safe enough to eat. After the reception, I was lucky enough to receive the spa’s Like a Fertile Land Massage. It’s a 90-minute journey into olfactory bliss, during which I experienced the scents of a bouquet plucked from the Loire Valley. Chung hopes to spread the word that the spa’s treatments aren’t just for Rosewood Miramar guests — they’re for us locals, too. Hands down, the Cuvée d’Or dry body oil was the afternoon favorite. After sampling it, Gina Brooke, an internationally acclaimed beauty expert, pronounced, “I didn’t just like it; I loved it.” Apparently, Elizabeth II, Queen of the United Kingdom, is of the same opinion. After the Duchess of Kent gifted her a bottle, she requested more on a regular basis. I could see, or rather smell, why. Each product unlocks one of Deforges’s memories, such as picking apples with his great-grandmother to make compote for the winter. We soaked in the nostalgic moments while making new, happy associations. “These scrubs, creams, and oils contain the history of my family,” Deforges told us. “The scents are our legacy.” The skin-care line is offered exclusively through Sense Spa at Rosewood Miramar Beach. — Rachael Quisel

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Community

Seniors Review Retirement Home Film

W

hat happens when two dozen adult day center participants, ages 68-98, come together to critique The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel? A handful walked out, some fell asleep, and a core group of 10 thoroughly embraced the opportunity to share their ideas on the 2011 film that follows a group of British retirees who travel to India to take Friendship Center critics, clockwise from up residence at the titular top left: Ron, Betsy, Richard, and Stella hotel. On May 6, Friendship Center Montecito hosted the screening in support of Wise Up on Aging, a statewide initiative sponsored by the California Commission on Aging to encourage the entertainment industry to more authentically represent older adults. Friendship Center’s critics had plenty to say, mostly good and all relevant considering the film’s content and likely intended viewers. Here’s what they offered: COURTESY PHOTOS

L

PAUL WELLMAN

Translator Talks Disaster Prep iliana Encinas, the city Fire Department’s Bilingual Outreach Coordinator and a crack Spanish translator, was recently invited up to Sacramento by Governor Gavin Newsom’s office to discuss best practices of emergency preparedness. She took part in a panel discussion with state officials at Univision headquarters, where she talked about the popular Listos program created right here in Santa Barbara. Listos, a disaster-readiness program for Span- Liliana Encinas was recently invited to speak in Sacramento. ish speakers, was originally put together in 2009 by the county in partnership with the Orfalea als and CERT trainings. In March, she translated the Foundation. Encinas got involved the following Santa Barbara Independent’s Disaster Prep Guide. year—revising the curriculum and developing a train- “Lastly, but most importantly,” she said, “I am a wife the-trainer element—and Listos has since expanded and mother of four children who enjoys spending free to 32 communities across California. Just recently, the time with my family.” Encinas applauded Newsom’s new California for state awarded a $2.2 million grant to the Fire Service Training Institute (FSTI), a Santa Barbara nonprofit, All initiative that’s working to ensure emergency prep information reaches all segments of the poputo continue spreading the Listos word. Born in El Paso but raised in Juarez, Encinas said lation, including those living in isolation or poverty, she “crossed the border every day of my life to have and those with language barriers or special needs. a bilingual, bicultural upbringing.” She started her Listos is currently being translated into five addicareer in Santa Barbara as a volunteer for a local family tional languages, she noted. For more information resource and immigration center, and she’s now execu- on Listos and available trainings, contact Encitive manager of the entire statewide Listos program, nas at 564-5778 or liencinas@santabarbaraca.gov. in addition to previously translating FEMA materi— Tyler Hayden

living p. 36

Realistic content: • Difficulties of sorting affairs once a spouse passes away • Family “obligation” to be a grandparent only and not pursue your own life • Adult children “forgetting we’ve lived much longer than they have and made it out alive” Less realistic or relatable: • Portrayal of older adults readily accommodating changes to plans • Elders easily traveling on packed buses and tuk-tuks — physical and mental limitations would make “riding on a squished bus absolutely terrible” Particularly offensive: • Characters polarized as either grumpy curmudgeons — “How older people are so often portrayed” — or free spirits • One character falling out of his chair and the others thinking he’s dead until he coughs — none found this funny Favorite scenes: • An elder character revealing he was gay — “You don’t think of grandpas being gay.” • Characters “trying to get their groove on” in the dating scene The post-film discussion produced unique insights. Though the critics found the film entertaining, they all agreed The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel was overall unrealistic in its portrayal of older adults. Simply picking up and moving to another country was “too fantastical.” Granted, 10 people do not make a representative sample, but they did offer some often-overlooked perspectives. Hollywood’s filmmakers would be wise to take these notes as they seek to entertain, accommodate, and monetize the increasing older adult population. — Kathryn Cherkas

Kathryn Cherkas, MIPH, is program manager at Friendship Adult Day Care Center in Montecito. She has a master’s degree in international public health focusing on aging and caregiving.


PAUL WELLMAN FILE PHOTOS

Travel

living

2.00 5-MONTH

TIP-TOP: The inn’s hilltop location is the same, but everything else is revolutionarily improved, especially the individual rooms (below).

Love and Rockets at Hotel Skyview

F

ifteen years, four addresses, and two kids ago, family got out of winemaking more than a decade my now-wife, Joanna, and I decamped to the tiny ago. We served their pinot gris at our wedding back in town of Los Alamos for our first overnight date. 2007, and a chat with Stephan is always an intellectually Compared to today, when every storefront of Bell enriching affair — everything from mushroom huntStreet houses a restaurant, tasting room, or tenant that ing to severed thumbs to the state of the Los Alamos Library are on the table, as are his exploratory wines otherwise appeals to wine-country-chic clientele, the that include rare varieties, hidden regions, and Los Alamos of 2003 was a much sparser affair. often older vintages. Yet the Skyview Motel still loomed over it Returning to Also heady is a stop in Lo-Fi Winery all, and that’s where we checked in for the Our First Overnight (lofi-wines.com), where Mike Roth and night to sleep in that slightly rundown Date in the Craig Winchester push the natty-wine, highway-side inn, where the ceilings were painted as sky and crumbling Refurbished Roadside Inn vinyl-loving, long-beard, dare-we-sayhipster vibe. Their low-intervention, wagon wheels decorated the grounds. of Los Alamos fresh-forward versions of gamay noir, Last fall, we decided to re-create that BY MATT KETTMANN cabernet franc, malbec, and more slip two-day escapade, this time staying in the down the gullet with glou-glou glee and sell recently refurbished Hotel Skyview (skyviewlos out like coveted concert tickets.   alamos.com). The prominent hilltop location is the Hopping off the tasting-room circuit, we ventured same, but everything else is revolutionarily improved. Unlike millennial-targeting hoteliers throwing cos- to Bodega Los Alamos (bodegalosalamos.com), where metic updates on outdated motels — a process I call wine but also cider and beer are enjoyed at picnic “putting hipstick on a pig,” and, to be clear, I like those tables beneath oak trees toward the north end of town. spots, too — the team behind the Granada Hotel in There’s a garden shack of sorts where seasonal produce downtown San Luis Obispo wrangled the Skyview by and flowers are for sale, a welcome diversion when just its circa 1950s horns. The rebranded Hotel Skyview’s 33 sunny relaxing grows monotonous. guestrooms, which opened last summer, are comfortable and stylishly rustic, surrounded by landscaping that mashes high desert and grapevines with a Laurel Canyon vibe, all totally Instagram-tastic. But the hotel was just part of our mission. On that first trip, we sipped Bedford Thompson wine aside a shack on Alisos Canyon Road, ate breakfast at Café Quakenbush, perused paintings at the Art Brut Gallery, and haggled over beer mugs and Harry Belafonte albums at the antique store. Only the latter exists as it did then. Back at the Skyview, we settled into the room, full We began at Thompson Vineyard (thompsonvineyard .com), where Noah and Tamara Rowles steward the of trendy nourishments like gummy bears, animal historic property’s coveted syrah, grenache, and other crackers, Scar of the Sea pinot noir, and Basil Hayden’s grapes, but also make their own Dovecote Wine (dove bourbon. We dined on lamb sausages, seasonal salads, cotewine.com). As “Take Me Home, Country Roads” and craft cocktails at the hotel’s restaurant Norman played over the pond house’s speakers, we sipped (skyviewlosalamos.com/norman), a nod to Anthony the couple’s Red Tail blend while watching birds zip Perkins’s Psycho character, since so many are reminded across the water, an experience anyone can set up with of the Bates Motel when looking at the hilltop Skyview. We stepped out from beneath the Norman’s staradvance reservations. Then we continued the five-minute drive into shaped chandeliers to join the crowd of winemakers, town for lunch, stopping at Bell’s (bellsrestaurant.com), urchin divers, and other locals outside, who were where Greg and Daisy Ryan are serving Central Coast assembling for a different celestial show: SpaceX was bistro fare in an ever-exquisite and authentic manner. lifting off from Vandenberg Air Force Base, this time Between sips of loureiro by D’Alfonso-Curran and with its booster returning to land nearby after sendcarbonic listan negro from the Canary Islands, we ing its payload into orbit. The launch was psychedelic munched arugula-kabocha-crunchy farro salad and beyond belief, halos of space dust and science-fictionperfect flashes of the future flickering before our eyes. slurped spoonfuls of clams in a savory broth.  “Is it always like this?!?” screamed one visitor. “No Less than a block away is Bedford Winery (bedford winery.com), whose proprietor Stephan Bedford way,” many replied, as I thought to myself, “This one is n ditched the “Thompson” part of his brand when that special.”

Learn to

Speak Spanish 7/25/19

with Alonso Benavides, ph.d.

September 16 - December 6 Day and Evening Classes and Saturdays Our method calls for small groups (6 maximum) and conversation as soon as it is possible

Details:

SPANISH LANGUAGE INSITUTE SIGLO 21

spanishschoolsbca.com

805-252-9512

COUPLES

12 sessions $300 24 sessions $600 Private $75 hr.

Santa Barbara

MARRIAGE

Therapeutic Coaching

The New Rules of Marriage Program (Terry Real) Are You In Pain About Your Marriage? Is Your Marriage in Crisis?

WENDY ALLEN,

From Marriage Tune-up to Last Chance Intensive Therapy

Ph.D, MFT 1207 De La Vina Santa BarBara 805-962-2212 www.wendyphd.com #MFC21158

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living | Starshine

Pink Tax Got You Blue?

W

hat could I do with $64, 843? I could buy an all-wheel-drive Performance Model 3 Tesla—it’s the cheap kind, but still. I could sponsor 133 kids at the border for a year through Save the Children. I could get a massage at a fancy spa every week for nearly a decade, or have PoopSenders.com mail 1,666 gallons of steaming elephant excrement to the White House—any of which would give me nearly pornographic pleasure. I’m told $64,843 is about what I’ve handed over so far in my lifetime to the Pink Tax—the upcharge added onto goods and services that are marketed specifically to women. From toys to clothing to grooming products, a 2015 study by the New York City Department of Consumer Affairs showed that women pay 7 percent more than men do for similar items. For example, many hair salons charge more for “women’s haircuts” than for men’s—even when the woman’s hair is short or the man’s is long. Women’s jeans cost an average of 10 percent more than men’s, and personal-care products, from shampoo and deodorant to razors and shaving cream, cost a whopping 13 percent more! And if we weren’t already bleeding money, there’s the “tampon tax,” the (ahem) padded fee we pay in 39 states, including California, where feminine hygiene products are taxed as luxuries rather than necessities. Critics of the Pink Tax — which include our very own State Senator Hannah-Beth Jackson, who introduced a now-stalled bill to fight the practice—point to fairly shocking side-by-side photos of children’s bike helmets, calculators, and even walking canes where the only difference appears to be color (one is pink, the other is … not) and price (guess which one costs a pretty penny?). Certainly women pay less for some things in life. Statistics show men pay email: starshine@roshell.com higher auto insurance rates and … I mean … can’t get into the bar for free on Ladies Nights. But the N.Y.C. genderpricing study found that while men’s products cost more than women’s 18 percent of the time, the reverse is true 42 percent of the time. Anomaly? I don’t pink so. And when you consider that women on average are already earning 79 cents for every dollar a man makes, that adds up to … okay, look, that’s a complicated equation, and I couldn’t afford that pink calculator, so just take my word for it: It’s every color o’ crooked. Is this all part of a patriarchal plot to render pink-prone people penniless and powerless? Alas — there are actually some reasonable explanations for the Pink Tax. One is misconception. For example, many women complain that dry cleaners charge more for women’s shirts than men’s. But men’s dress shirts are typically washed and auto-pressed, while women’s blouses — often ornamented and made of more delicate material—are dry-cleaned and must be hand-pressed. The process just costs more. Basic supply-and-demand economics are also at play: A smaller niche of any market tends to want, say, a hot-pink walking cane than a neutral-colored one; not all women want it, and virtually no men. Therefore, fewer are manufactured; that means they cost more. Finally — and this may sting a bit, ladies, so have your pricey pink Band-Aids handy—we are to blame. They charge us more because they can. Because we up and pay it. It’s how a free market works: Companies charge what they can get away with, and consumers pay what they feel is fair. So if paying more for the pink product makes you see red, then just buy the men’s version. I’ve been wearing men’s deodorant for a decade because I am loath to have water-lily-scented armpits, and I promise you I have yet to sprout testes. But if paying more for the “women’s” version makes you feel feminine, fabulous, and splurge-worthy, then have at it, sister! Economists say variety in the market is a good thing. Heads up, though, to companies that overcharge women just because they can: Know that we’re onto you. Your racket will be photographed and called out on social media with the #axthepinktax hashtag. Oh, and you just may get a delivery from PoopSenders.com — no extra charge.

by Starshine

ROSHELL

Read more at starshineroshell.com.

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Wine & Fire

Honoring Bruce McGuire F or the better part of 40 years, a gentle

he moved to California in 1979 to work for giant has ruled Santa Barbara’s urban a year and gain residency. “But I was winemaking scene, from when he was a winemaker before the year was up,” the only one fermenting fruit and said McGuire. “I didn’t quite see going filling barrels down by the waterfront to back to school, because I was making today’s Funk Zone reality, where the tastmoney and learning a shitload.” ing room scene is denser than most anyIn 1981, he heard about a winemakwhere in the world. Along the way, this ing job at Santa Barbara Winery, which humble, soft-spoken craftsman helped Pierre Lafond founded in 1962, the BY MATT KE TTMANN usher in pinot noir and chardonnay as county’s first commercial winery since Prohibition. McGuire was hearing the the region’s most renowned wines and menbuzz about the 1976 Sanford & Benedict tored scores of young winemakers on their way into the pinot noir. “The ’76 was being sold in San Francisco, and industry. So on the verge of Bruce McGuire’s 38th harvest for everyone was like, ‘Whoa,’ ” he recalled. “I knew Pierre’s Santa Barbara Winery, the Sta. Rita Hills Winevineyard was two miles away, and that in itself was growers Alliance is bestowing the 63-year-old very compelling.” The fact that the winery Mesa neighborhood resident with a lifewas two blocks from the beach didn’t hurt time achievement award next weekend either. during the association’s annual Wine It was also a very exciting time in & Fire event. Greg Brewer, arguably the region. “It was the new frontier,” McGuire’s most accomplished mentee, said McGuire. “People were learning will present the honor during the barn how to grow grapes in the right places.” PLUS RUM-RUNNING McGuire settled into pinot noir and party at Foley Winery, which is on FriAND FESS PARKER TASTING chardonnay as the Santa Barbara Winday, August 16, 5-8 p.m.  ery flagships. To this day, McGuire makes “I’m definitely doing what I wanted to the best entry-level versions of those wines be doing,” said McGuire recently, reflecting — I challenge anyone to produce a better version on his young dreams of becoming a winemaker. of either for $18, a price that’s often much lower on retail “Just how I got to this point was a real journey.” McGuire first learned about wine from an uncle who shelves—while also crafting single-vineyard expressions made it at home. After working a post-college year at a under the Lafond label that compete with the Sta. Rita Boston wine shop, he planned to attend UC Davis, and Hills’ cult superstars. 

BOTT & BALRERSE LS

38TH HARVEST FOR

S.B. WINERY VET;

RUM-RUNNING EXHIBIT: If you include the Channel Islands, Santa Barbara County boasts 125 miles of coastline, the longest of any county in the country and loaded with coves, caves, and covert spots to hide conspicuous cargo. So when Prohibition ended legal sale of liquor, the illegal stuff that arrived by boat flowed onto Santa Barbara beaches, giving rise to a speakeasy culture in Santa Barbara. Sneaky sips could be obtained at places like Casa de Sevilla (that sandstone brick building on lower Chapala Street), in a bar beneath the Balboa Building, for members at RUM MEMORIES: Scenes from the Maritime Museum’s rum-running exhibit. the Santa Barbara Club, and, during the last years of Prohibition, at El Club Chico, a private club atop The Arlington Theatre. The Santa Barbara Maritime Museum is toasting those days with an ongoing exhibit called Rum Running, Sailors & Prohibition, which is on display until October 20. To bring life to the exhibit, the museum is hosting a “Rum-Raiser” on Sunday, August 11, 4-6 p.m., featuring tastings of Real McCoy Rum, Black Bart Navy Rum, and Goleta Red Distilling Company, which makes numerous rums.  Tickets are $40 for museum members, $50 otherwise. See sbmm.org or call 456-8747.

FOOD & DRINK

HUMBLE HERO: Bruce McGuire started working for Santa Barbara Winery after the harvest of 1981, building its reputation for pinot noir and chardonnay while mentoring many young winemakers along the way.

There is a bit of change on the horizon: After a half century of making wine in the Funk Zone, Santa Barbara Winery’s production facility (which still handles white wines) will soon be consolidated at the Lafond Winery off of Santa Rosa Road, where they’ve been processing the reds since 2000. “It’s gotten really challenging to make wine down here,” said McGuire, whose fruit often comes in during the busy tourist time of Labor Day weekend. “Truckloads of grapes and forklifts and traffic can get kinda interesting.” But the tasting room is staying put, as it remains popular, despite the vast competition. “We make high-quality wine at a good price, and people seem to appreciate that,” said McGuire, who isn’t going anywhere either. “I want to be here as long as it’s enjoyable.” For tickets and more information about Wine & Fire, which includes events, tastings, and meals from August 16 to 18, see staritahills.com.

COURTESY PHOTOS

PAUL WELLMAN

FOOD&DRINK

p.41

FESS PARKER TASTING: As of press time, there were a few

tickets remaining for a retrospective tasting of Fess Parker wines on Saturday, August 17, 11:30 a.m.-1:30 p.m., at which I will sit on a panel with winemakers Eli Parker and Blair Fox and company president Tim Snider as part of their ongoing 30th anniversary celebration. Last week I tasted through the old vintages, including 2006 Ashley’s pinot noir and a 2000 syrah from Rodney’s Vineyard, and it will be a session to remember. See fessparker.com for n tickets.

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BARBERA BYRGE

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FOOD & DRINK

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he space at 5871 Hollister Avenue in Goleta

G

Fortunately, those anxieties were revealed to be had been occupied by Gus’s Cocktail Lounge unfounded as the bar came under the ownership since the building was constructed in 1957. It of O’Brien’s friends and Mercury Lounge regulars Jennifer and Patrick Housh, who are committed to was, by all accounts, a real dive. When the grimy watering hole hit the rental maintaining the spot’s distinctive aesthetic. market in the mid-’90s, it was hardly Dawn “I mean, we’d be crazy to change it,” says JenniO’Brien’s ideal location for a follow-up to her fer Housh. “Dawn did such an amazing job. Why downtown bar, Elsie’s. Yet the turnkey solution ulti- would we want to come in and change it?” mately proved too tempting to pass up. Indeed, even the bar’s most consistent customers have failed to register any “When are you ever going to get OLD TOWN GOLETA’S sense of loss subsequent to the sale. the chance to rent a bar?” O’Brien “We haven’t really noticed a recalled. “The bar was there; the back bar was there; the soffit change,” says Joanne Murray, was there. Those are the diffiwho has been coming to the CELEBRATES 24TH Merc since its first year in busicult things.” O’Brien signed the lease and ness. “It still maintains that great UNDER NEW OWNERSHIP The Mercury Lounge opened funkiness.” in August 1995. From the outset, Thus far, the few alterations BY ALEX WARD it was something of a neighbormade have been generally additive hood non sequitur—a meticulously rather than transformative—more beer curated gallery of mid-century modern furon tap, more art on the walls, and significantly nishings serving craft beer and wine in the midst more live events. With a calendar stacked full of of a predominantly working-class, Latino area of local and touring bands, the new iteration of the Old Town. Mercury Lounge has emerged as one of the area’s The Mercury Lounge—or “the Merc” as its more viable music venues. regulars tend to call it—quickly developed a repu“There’s really not that many music venues in tation as a “grad school bar” (apparently one can’t Santa Barbara anymore, like there used to be, and throw around words like Foucault and hegemony outlets for smaller bands,” Housh explained. “So it in just any old place) and the scene of an unusually was important to us to bring that in.” quiet sophistication. Leaving behind the cacophWith its imminently welcoming environment, ony of Hollister’s bustling traffic and entering the the bar continues to feature one of the more bar was like walking into a particularly lavish liv- diverse clientele in town, drawing its customer ing room set from Mad Men, low-lit by vintage base from an eclectic mix of Old Town residents, table lamps and scored by Édith Piaf on crackling UCSB faculty, rockabilly scenesters, and anyone vinyl. The net effect was something akin to blood- with an appreciation for good drinks in a great pressure-attenuating ASMR. In a world full of bars atmosphere. “It’s really fun getting to look at everybody sitmeant to excite and agitate, the Mercury Lounge ting at the bar on any given night,” says Housh, was soothing. It was, simply put, the first cool place in Goleta. “because some nights you may have a dishwasher If one can apply cinema’s auteur theory to a bar, that just wants to come in after work and enjoy a then O’Brien was surely the Mercury Lounge’s cold beer sitting next to a Nobel Prize–winning Hitchcock, whose creative fingerprints were visible physicist. And everybody’s equal.” on every inch of the place, from the hand-painted Uniting this ragtag gang of regulars is the colmatchbooks and just-so arrangements of ceramic lective relief that the Mercury Lounge will contchotchkes to the cursive “M” painstakingly poured tinue to be what it’s always been: one of the Central into the froth of every Guinness. Coast’s very best bars. And so it was with some trepidation that the Even the Merc’s original proprietor can rest Merc’s longtime patrons learned that the bar had easy, knowing that her creation has come under been sold in September 2018. Would the new the caring guidance of like-minded owners. “I owner preserve O’Brien’s decorative details? Would feel that the spirit and the character lives on,” said the bar lose its retro kitsch? Was the Mercury O’Brien, “in capable, loving hands.” Lounge doomed to become just another sports 5871 Hollister Ave., Goleta; 967-0907 bar?

BEER BAR ANNIVERSARY


PAUL WELLMAN PHOTOS

lunches

FUN WITH FALAFEL: Fala Bar’s Far Rahimian is serving falafels and more at his stall inside the Santa Barbara Public Market, the latest outpost for the Los Angeles–based chain.

A New Door has Opened.

Fala Bar’s Filling, Fair-Priced Fare

C

ertain restaurants enter the Santa Barbara scene so seamlessly, you wonder how we survived before. Fala Bar, the recently opened, 100 percent plant-based, organic, vegan Mediterranean restaurant, is now filling the need in the Santa Barbara Public Market for fresh, filling vegetarian lunch options that won’t leave diners or their bank accounts feeling the least bit sluggish.

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Organic, Vegan Falafels Now Served in Public Market dient of applesauce. Falafel is naturally gluten-free, and if people are looking for a gluten-free burger or sandwich, they can get theirs wrapped in cabbage. A top seller is the Kaleifornia Burger, a super satisfying combination of kale falafel patty, house-made Thousand Island dressing, lemony kale, pickled purple cabbage, grilled onions, and avocado. Diners looking to try a bit of everything can have their taste buds fully entertained by the Fala Plate, which consists of four falafel balls, hummus, tahini, Israeli salad, quinoa tabouli, and white and purple cabbage. The restaurant also features a variety of salads and thoughtful sides such as Gigi’s snack cup. This combination of Brussels sprouts, hummus, quinoa tabouli, Israeli salad, tahini, and falafel fits right in a car’s cup holder and is ideal for people on the go looking for a nutritious treat.

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FOOD & DRINK

The original Fala Bar opened in Los Angeles in 2014, and they’ve since expanded with two more L.A. locations. They opened their light, bright, friendly space in the former home of Flagstone Pantry in June. Staying true to the original locations’ dedication to sourcing ingredients locally, Fala Bar gets all of its produce from Santa Barbara’s farmers’ markets and Plow to Porch Organics. With such thoughtfully procured ingredients, it’s refreshing to see that Fala Bar’s pricing is fair, with large falafel burgers costing only $9.95. “We want to make sure that we’re offering fresh food, large portions, and it’s affordable,” said Far Rahimian, manager of the Santa Barbara location. With six different kinds of falafel ranging from spicy to sweet potato, there’s something for everyone. The original falafel was my favorite, consisting of chickpea, cilantro, parsley, garlic, cumin, onion, and jalapeño. These flavors are tastefully highlighted in the American Burger, which features sliced tomato and onion, dill pickles, ketchup, mustard, and veggie mayo. “Our pitas and hamburger buns are homemade,” Rahimian said of their beautifully textured vegan bread, which stays moist thanks to the secret ingre-

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Montecito, CA • 805.969.8011 Casa Dorinda is a private LifeCare community, type A CCRC, owned and operated by the Montecito Retirement Association, a nonsectarian, nonprofit, tax-exempt organization. State of California Licenses RCFE #421700160, SNF #050000112, CCRC Certificate of Authority #126.

with UCSB Affiliates and Media Sponsor Santa Barbara Independent present

Profs at the Pub

An engaging, free speaker series featuring UCSB professors at Santa Barbara’s favorite watering holes.

The Black Plague This talk will examine this cataclysmic event, focusing on contemporary accounts of the plague, medical explanations of it, and the wider political and social changes that came in its wake.

All of the salads and sauces are prepped in house. The falafel patties and sweet potato fries are fried in grapeseed oil, which lends a lightness to these dishes rarely felt after French fries. Fala Bar’s quick service and unpretentious attitude also sets it apart. With each visit, friendly faces such as Rahimian’s happily explain ingredients to customers with genuine enthusiasm. And there may be more to come. Said Rahimian, “We expect to open another location downtown in the near future.” In the Santa Barbara Public Market, 38 W. Victoria St.; falabar.com

Brad Bouley, Assistant Professor of History at UC Santa Barbara Specializing in the histories of religion and science

Thursday, August 8, 5:30 p.m. Impact Hub 1117 State Street, Santa Barbara

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COURTESY

Mission Street Featuring Mission Street I c e C r e a m & Yo g u r t

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Oppi’z Opens on State Street

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PROUDLY SERVING SANTA BARBARA FOR OVER 40 YEARS

L O C A T I O N S Goleta (The Original) 5735 Hollister Avenue

La Cumbre Plaza 3890 La Cumbre Lane

Milpas 216 South Milpas Street

Lompoc 1413 N H Street

Downtown 628 State Street

Isla Vista 888 Embarcadero Del Norte

Buellton 209 E Hwy 246

Santa Maria 985 E Betteravia Road

Yanni’s Greek & American Deli

Located at MacKenzie Market

Serving Santa Barbara for 33 Years!

ppi’z Bistro and Natural Pizza has opened at 1026 State Street, the former home of Palazzio. Oppi’z is a modern, nonconventional, healthy food concept rooted in the tradition of the Italian cuisine and the “Slow Food” manifesto. Motivated by his love for simple but genuine foods that characterize the Italian cuisine, namesake owner Guido Oppizzi has reinterpreted the traditional concept of the pizzeria by designing a unique menu with a variety of gourmet pizzas and a selection of light dishes. There is a display in the back of the restaurant where you can see their dough, both the regular and charcoal-infused versions, rising in the glass cabinet at controlled humidity. “Our gourmet pizzas are prepared with a secret recipe of naturally slow-fermented dough, combining high-quality, farm-fresh, and local ingredients,” Oppizzi said. “Our signature dishes include rice in a bottle, savory cheesecakes, fresh tartares, and many other healthy vegetarian and gluten-conscious options.” Pizza menu highlights include the Oppi’z (mozzarella, stracciatella cheese, cherry tomato confit, marinated anchovies, basil sauce, $18), Black Margherita (homemade tomato sauce, mozzarella, stracciatella cheese, fresh basil served on black dough crust, $16), Farmer’s Market (homemade tomato sauce, mozzarella, stracciatella cheese, mixed seasonal vegetables, $18), Pere e Zola (mozzarella, stracciatella cheese, gorgonzola, julienned pears, walnuts, $23), Feta (mozzarella, stracciatella cheese, feta, cherry tomatoes, roasted almonds, fresh basil, $19), Cinque Terre (mozzarella, stracciatella cheese, pecorino, taggiasche olives, pine nuts, Genoa pesto drizzle, $22), Radicchio (mozzarella, stracciatella cheese, pecorino, red radicchio, Amaretti cookie crumbles, honey, $23), and the Mediterraneo (mozzarella, stracciatella cheese, shaved grana padano, taggiasche olives, sun-dried tomatoes, honey, olio al peperoncino, $23). Oppi’z is open daily, 11:30 a.m.-9:30 pm. Call 770-7390 or visit oppiz-sb.com.

BLACK SHEEP SUNDAY SUPPERS: The Restaurant

Famous Gyros & Tri-tip Full Service Deli Catering

3102 State Street • 682-2051 44

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Guy and family ended our Fiesta celebration last weekend at Black Sheep restaurant, 26 East Ortega Street, where Chef Robert Perez just introduced a brand-new prix fixe “Sunday Supper” for $35. Global in scope, the Black Sheep menu features Latin, Asian, and Italian flavors but relies heavily on classic French technique. The Sunday Supper

menu will change weekly to reflect the seasons. For our Sunday Supper, my wife and I sampled most of the menu. Our first courses included Roasted Kabocha Potage (accented with apple, ginger, fenugreek, turmeric) and Heirloom Tomatoes (with gorgonzola walnut “pâté” and frisée). The second courses were Seafood Risotto (Maine diver scallops, gambas, salmon, sweet corn) and Coq au Vin (chicken braised in red wine with potatoes, carrots, mushrooms, pearl onion). Perez also let us try a vegan option, Feuille de Brick, which has a thin, flaky pastry crust. It is the size of a burrito and includes roasted vegetables and tofu. Everything is cooked separately, then they wrap it and bake it in the oven. It is probably best described as a vegetarian chimichanga. We finished Sunday Supper with a delicious dessert including Tiramisu (classic tiramisu, mascarpone and espresso-dunked lady fingers) and Bittersweet Chocolate Mousse (orange segments, coco nib brittle and vanilla bean sauce). Sunday Supper at Black Sheep opens at 5 p.m. The menu will be posted online each week at black sheepsb.com. JOHN DICKSON PHOTOS

201 West Mission St., Santa Barbara

FRESH ITALIAN NOW SERVED: Guido Oppizzi and his team are preparing pizza and more at Oppi’z, located in the former Palazzio location.

SEASIDE VIEWS: Santa Barbara’s best views are offered atop the Hotel Californian.

HOTEL CALIFORNIAN’S SUNDAY SESSIONS: The Hotel

Californian at 36 State Street boasts what might be the best view in Santa Barbara from its rooftop overlooking Stearns Wharf. Fortunately, now it is not just for guests staying at the seaside resort. They have a new offering for the general public called Sunday Sessions running for the next six weeks. Each Sunday starting at 4 p.m., the hotel sets up a lounge on the rooftop where guests can watch the sunset and listen to a deejay for $20. Food and drinks are available for purchase. The entrance is just to the left of Finney’s Crafthouse & Kitchen.

John Dickson’s reporting can be found every day online at SantaBarbara.com. Send tips to info@SantaBarbara.com.


F

Celebrate with Family & Friends

REBECCA HORRIGAN

r

Dinnertime @ Eat This Honey B Kitchen

For lunch, dinner, happy hour or just a perfect sunset & drinks. We’ve got you covered!

rom my first trip to the Honey B Kitchen—the

satisfy. Fans of “breakfast for dinner” can indulge in egg sandwiches or their dreamy waffled vegan French toast stacked with strawberries, avocado, lemon Chantilly cream, candied almonds, and balsamic. Finish off with their vegan soft-serve ice cream, made from coconut cream, vanilla bean, and coconut sugar. It will certainly have me buzzing back to this —Rebecca Horrigan hive of goodness very soon. 602 Anacapa St.; 895-4248; thehoneybkitchen.com

DINING OUT GUIDE

ETHIOPIAN AUTHENTIC ETHIOPIAN cuisine Featured at Petit Valentien Restaurant 1114 State St. #14, 805-966-0222 Serkaddis Alemu offers an ever changing menu with choices of vegetarian, vegan, and meat options. Catering Available for parties of up to 40 people. Sat/Sun lunch 11:30-2:30

Brander Vineyard

2401 N REFUGIO ROAD . SANTA YNEZ . CA 93460 (805.688.2455)

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Los Amigos del Arte Popular

Mexican Folk Art Marketplace Art • Food • Wine • Raffle

SATURDAY, 10 AUGUST . 11AM TO 4PM SUNDAY, 11 AUGUST . 11AM TO 3PM

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MEDITERRANEAN FOXTAIL KITCHEN 14 E. Cota St. Lebanese cuisine, American burger, 24 craft beers, great cocktails, whiskey bar, vegan options, open late night, hookah lounge. Kitchen closes at midnight on the weekend, try our best falafel in town. www. foxtailsb.com NORTHERN EUROPEAN ANDERSEN’S DANISH RESTAURANT & BAKERY. 1106 State St., 805-962-5085. Open Daily 8am-9pm. Family owned for over 42 years. Northern European Cuisine with California Infusion. Fresh scratch made pastries & menus everyday. Authentic Breakfasts, Lunches & Dinners. Happy Hour menu with exquisite wines & beers, 3-7pm everyday. High Tea served everyday starting at 2pm. Huge Viking Mimosas & Champagne Cocktails. Private Event spaces. SWEETS & TREATS PARADICE HAWAIIAN SHAVE ICE, 11 W De La Guerra St. (Next to the Paseo Nuevo Cinemas) 805-560-8644. Delicious all natural Hawaiian shave ice made R VE TI S with real fruit. Add a scoop of ice D cream and toppings for the full experience. Local business. Real shave ice, real ingredients, really good! Check Google for hours. M

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To include your listing for under $20 a week, contact sales@independent.com or call 965-5205.

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FRENCH PETIT VALENTIEN, 1114 State St. #14, 805-966-0222. Open M-F 11:30-3pm (lunch). M-Sat 5pm-Close (dinner). Sun $25.50 four course prix fixe dinner. In La Arcada Plaza, Chef Robert Dixon presents classic French comfort food at affordable cost in this cozy gem of a restaurant. Petit Valentien offers a wide array of meat and seafood entrees along with extensive small plates and a wine list specializing in amazing quality at arguably the best price in town. A warm romantic atmosphere makes the perfect date spot. Comfortable locale for dinner

IRISH DARGAN’S IRISH PUB & RESTAURANT, 18 E. Ortega St. (next to lot 10) SB, 568-0702. $$. Open 7 days 11:30a-Close (Food ‘til 10p, 11p on Sat/Sun). AE MC V Disc. Authentic Irish food & atmosphere in downtown SB. Specialties from Ireland include Seafood & Meat dishes. Informal, relaxed pub-style atmosphere. Live music Thursday nights. Children welcome. Avail. for private parties. Pool & Darts.

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THE ENDLESS SUMMER BAR-CAFE, 113 Harbor Way, 805564-4666, upstairs from Chuck’s Waterfront Grill, offers casual dining, surrounded by vintage surfboards and memorabilia. Sip on local wines, craft beers and cocktails, play a game of pool on one of our covered lanais while watching sports and surf movies on our 50” 4k TV’s. Listen to live music evenings, as you revel in the beauty that is Santa Barbara. Serving daily from 11:30 a.m. Private parties and special events accommodated.

INDIAN FLAVOR OF INDIA 3026 State 682-6561 $$ www.flavorofindiasb.com Finest, most authentic Indian cuisine is affordable too! All You Can Eat Lunch Buffet $10.95 M-S dinner combos $9.95+ Specials: Tandoori- Mixed or Fish, Chicken Tikka Masala, Shrimp Bhuna. Also: meat, curries & vegetarian.Wine & Beer. Take out. VOTED BEST for 20 YEARS!

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CASUAL DINING CHUCKS WATERFRONT Grill, 113 Harbor Way, 805-564-1200, began serving friends and family in the Santa Barbara Harbor in 1999. We’re everyone’s favorite spot to sit and relax by the boats, watching all the action. Enjoy steaks, fresh seafood straight from the boats docked right outside, and cocktails on our radiant heated deck with fire pits. Or head inside for intimate, cozy booths and the full bar. Plus, free valet parking! Dinner 7 nights from 5 p.m., Sunday Brunch from 10 a.m. Private parties and special events accommodated.

parties, or even just a relaxing glass of wine. Reservations are recommended.

Dining Out Guide

AMERICAN LITTLE KITCHEN, 17 W. Ortega St. (805) 770-2299. “Great little neighborhood café!” Healthy, comfortable, and affordable. Lunch-Dinner-Late Night. Organic chicken and hormone/antibiotic-free burgers, local produce. Try the Chicken Tikka Masala, vegetarian options. Great local wine list and craft beers. www. littlekitchensb.com

113 Harbor Way • By The Boats • Free Valet Parking Reservations (805) 564-1200 • www.chuckswaterfrontgrill.com

FOOD & DRINK •

hidden gem atop Antioch University where Chef Katie Belanger’s welcoming vibe serves ocean-tomountain view and an affordable array of healthy eats—I was hooked. Yet because of the 4 p.m. closing time, I haven’t been there nearly enough. Thankfully, in time for summer nights and fall sunsets, the Honey B Kitchen is now open for dinner. In addition to the daytime menu, Belanger is making weekly specials inspired by seasonal produce, the weather, and life, from oyster mushroom ceviche to mushroom meatball subs. “I had so many ideas just building up in my head,” Belanger said of channeling creativity into her work.  A recent special was walnut-chorizo butter-leaflettuce wraps. Perfectly suited for warmer temperatures, this crisp and flavorful dish consisted of walnut chorizo layered with carrots, avocado, and black sesame seeds, served with a cooling ginger cashew dip.  Longtime favorites such as their soulbread—a cornbread and chive waffle sandwich stuffed with black-bean hummus, chipotle, garlic, jackfruit, arugula, tomato, red onion, and avocado — are sure to

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SUPER GLOOP BRIAN ROCHEFORT’S RADICAL SCULPTURE AT MCASB

L I F E PAGE 47

COURTESY

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ou might be able to count the colors used in any single work by Brian Rochefort, but it would take a long time. The hybrid ceramic sculptures coming out of this young artist’s downtown Los Angeles studio that currently fill the Museum of Contemporary Art Santa Barbara (MCASB) gallery space offer a vision that’s so charged with shifting textures and ENDLESS MUTATION: Brian Rochefort’s ceramic sculptures are fired in a kiln up to five times, changing the shape and bright hues that it demands a texture of the piece with each re-firing. visceral response. It’s not just that these unruly vessels have so clearly pro- development that may involve mud, sand, deeper connection may be to more complex gressed beyond all practical considerations molten glass, and any number of dazzling issues of growth and decay raised by climate of form and function; it’s that they force cer- glazes. Some of these objects have seen the change. For MCASB Associate Curator Alexantain questions, such as, “What’s that growing inside of the kiln as many as five times in there?” and, “How did that surface happen?” order to arrive at their current state of reve- dra Terry, who organized the show, AbsorpIn an era that’s often dependent on contexts latory overstimulation. The artist’s popular tion by the Sun represents a new chapter and concepts for the perception of aesthetic and fascinating Instagram account is named for the museum’s Bloom Projects program. value, these spectacular works assert the pri- “energygloop,” but to a newcomer, it What began as an idea for using macy of the object, imbued with power and might be more accurate to call the relatively small space near energy through direct perception. In other the work “supergloop,” after the museum’s entrance as words, they don’t need words to work. They the saturated experience a miniature gallery in just are. of endlessly mutating which to show the work Brian Rochefort’s Absorption Operating at a generational remove from color, shape, and texture of emerging artists has by the Sun shows through the tradition of kiln-fired sculpture that’s it offers. been ramped up by September 8 at the MCASB, new director Abaseh often associated with California thanks to Although an intense 653 Paseo Nuevo. See artists like Ron Nagle, Ken Price, and Peter work ethic and years of Mirvali into an enviably mcasantabarbara.org. Voulkos, Rochefort’s prolific oeuvre endows study and experimentation comprehensive invasion the medium with palpable fresh momen- in the studio form the founof the main space. Visitors tum. He’s harnessing a sense of freedom dation of his achievement, there’s are likely to be stunned by the derived from intervening chapters in the his- another dimension to Rochefort’s project sheer volume of exciting work in this tory of contemporary art, particularly those that has to do with the natural world. In show, and artists of Rochefort’s generation that include makers of the ugly and abject, recent years, he has gone on a series of expe- will certainly take note of this compelling such as Paul McCarthy and Mike Kelley, and ditions to threatened ecosystems in Cen- new option available in Santa Barbara. he’s doing so in a way that blurs the distinc- tral and South America and in East Africa. Although he has had many gallery shows tions that created those categories of value Inspired by an initial trip to the Galapagos and his work has been purchased by some in the first place. Islands, on which he encountered volcanic of the world’s most discerning collecTo make his work, Rochefort has devised craters, Rochefort has sought out other loca- tors, this is Rochefort’s first solo museum a process that involves repeated firings. tions where he can examine what he calls show. If it’s any indication, the future of the Beginning with big hunks of raw clay, he “big holes in the earth.” It’s easy to see the MCASB Bloom Projects program is bright — Charles Donelan puts each piece through multiple phases of influence of lava flows on the work, but the — and colorful.

4·1·1

SBIFF ACCEPTING ROSEBUD APPLICATIONS Four years ago, the Santa Barbara International Film Festival added another facet to its swath of offerings — an educational experience for 10 area college students to immerse themselves in the world of film. Called Rosebud, the program features myriad opportunities, including SBIFF’s Cinema Society’s 20+ screenings and Q&As with the filmmakers (Sep.–Dec.); small-group film analysis discussions led by SBIFF Executive Director Roger Durling; and the chance to research and help develop study guides for films from the Cinema Society slate. Applications are now being accepted through August 31, 11:59 p.m. The program is free. See sbiff.org/ rosebud. — Michelle Drown

UCSB SUMMER MUSIC FESTIVAL On Saturday and Sunday, August 10 and 11, the UCSB campus will be alive with a wide range of music. The fourth annual UCSB Summer Music Festival runs from noon on Saturday until well after dark on Sunday and features performances by graduate students and alumni of the school’s music department, along with several other ensembles, including the Isaura String Quartet, which will perform the event’s final show at 7:30 p.m. on Sunday in Lotte Lehmann Hall. Founded in 2016 by UCSB graduate composer Federico Llach, the festival is programmed and managed entirely by students. The concerts, exhibits, and panel discussions are free, and the venues include the MultiCultural Center Theater; Storke Tower; the Digital Arts and Humanities Commons; the Art, Design & Architecture Museum; and the Music Department’s Karl Geiringer Hall and Lotte Lehmann Concert Hall. Saturday’s programs begin at 1 p.m. with The World on a String, a concert created to demonstrate the variety of plucked string instruments that exist around the world. There will be world premieres of works by UCSB composers, and a concert/panel discussion on Sunday on the theme of exploring women’s creativity and expanding options for women artists in music. Violist Jonathan Morgan, a UCSB PhD and music faculty member at Cal Poly in San Luis Obispo, will perform solo on Saturday at 2:30 p.m. and again with the Isaura String Quartet on Sunday evening. Morgan’s fellow musicians in Isaura include several graduates of the Cal Arts music program, and their specialty is performing contemporary music. Fans of choral music should make sure to catch the Adelfos Ensemble on Sunday at 3:30 p.m., and people with children should consider bringing them to the Kalinka show at 11 a.m. on Sunday in the outdoor Music Bowl. There’s even a dance concert on Saturday at 5:30 p.m., so there is sure to be something for every performing arts lover at UCSB this weekend. See music.ucsb.edu/summerfestival. — CD

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POP, ROCK & JAZZ

ESEQUIEL AGUILAR PHOTOS

MARIACHI FESTIVAL

Ángela Aguilar

5:30PM - 6:30PM

at

NIGHT LIZARD BREWING COMPANY

Join Santa Barbara Independent’s senior editor, Tyler Hayden, as he dives further into this week’s cover story.

independent.com/extra

anging out on the Fiesta flatlands of State Street last weekend, it could seem that an unofficial mariachi festival was unfolding. But Saturday night brought this great American music in a fuller, high-end form with the 24th annual Santa Barbara Mariachi Festival at the Santa Barbara Bowl. This year’s affair featured the polished sounds At the Santa Barbara Bowl, of Mariachi Garibaldi de Sat., Aug. 3. Jaime Cuéllar, Mariachi Aztlán, and Mariachi Divas de Cindy Shea, joined by bold-piped singers Shaila Dúrcal, the striking 15-year-old Ángela Aguilar (daughter of Pepe Aguilar) and seasoned heroine/ranchera queen Aida Cuevas. This festival was sold out, with proceeds funding scholarships for area Hispanic youths. Though timed during Old Spanish Days, the festival is really more about Old Mexico — mariachi is a rich and evolving

THE ADDAMS FAMILY include a hilarious bit requiring Fester to cross an entire row of seated audience members. George Walker gives a dazzling performance as Gomez Addams. This fast-talking Latin patriarch has great dance moves, a supple singing voice, and a dilemma that’s the logical outcome of his proudly uxorious nature: an inability to stand up to his wife. As Morticia Addams, Melinda Parrett gives a performance that grows more complex and interesting with each scene. Stunning newcomer Jisel Soleil Ayon makes a glamorous and lively Wednesday. There’s great fun to be had when George Walker and Melinda Parrett Wednesday tortures her brother, Pugsley (Stephanie Roman), and there’s strong hanks to PCPA, we can now snap fin- chemistry in her scenes both with Gomez gers along with America’s First Family and with her boyfriend, Lucas Beineke of Goth as the stars of a musical com- (Tiago Santos). edy. This excellent production succeeds Andrew Philpot and Jennie Greenthanks not only to a superb cast but also berry start out providing contrast as to a magnificent collaborative effort by the Mal and Alice Beineke, the conventional parents who come to dinner, but director and his team of choreographers and scenic and costume after Pugsley slips something Presented by PCPA. designers. from Grandma’s stash into Alice’s At the Solvang Tyler Matthew Campbell nar- Festival Theatre, drink, Greenberry lights up the rates as the Sat., Aug. 3. Shows game of “Full Disclosure” with her genial, gen- through Aug. 25 honest abandon. Congratulations der-ambiguto the entire crew on creating this ous Uncle Fester. His dark and delicious entertainment. & ENTERTAINMENT comings and goings — Charles Donelan

T

REVIEWS 

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AUGUST 8, 2019

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musical tradition with roots in 19th-century Jalisco, and a robust, always sharply dressed modern-day culture. Deep respect for tradition is the norm, but there can be occasional detours, as with Aguilar’s periodic “pop-iachi” moves, a surprise heavy-metal moment in the Mariachi Aztlán set, with an electric guitarist wailer making a cameo, and Latin jazz asides in the Cuevas/Garibaldi set. Among the newer developments in the genre is the matter of gender rejiggering. At Saturday’s festival, the all-female (and all-powerful) Mariachi Divas de Cindy Shea were on hand, and the other bands at least included a few women in the ranks. And it was a woman who left the most lingering memory: Cuevas doled out hits; sang a semiposthumous duet with late ally Juan Gabriel (d. 2016), who sang his part via pre-recorded video; and generally owned the Bowl for a night. Her set was a little Fiesta of her own devising. — Josef Woodard

THEATER

LUIS ESCOBAR REFLECTIONS PHOTOGRAPHY STUDIO

Wednesday AUGUST 14

H

Shaila Dúrcal

Aida Cuevas


A

Books fo r B r e a k fa s t

lar set by François-Pierre Couture, brilliant lighting, costumes, and projections, and a large chorus and cast superbly directed by James Darrah and Kate Bergstrom. From the pit, an awesome sound arose as conductor Daniela Candillari led the academy’s fellows through the complex yet always direct and emotionally grounded score. Sangmoon Lee made a terrific villain as Teague, and Talin Nalbandian and Andrew Zimmerman excelled as Ruby and Veasey, respectively. Highlights included a tender scene between Bravos as Inman and Meagan Martin as the bereft young widow Sara. The cumulative impact, especially of the wild second act, left the audience both stunned and thrilled as they stood to offer a long ovation. — CD

Read and discuss with the author Writing for Bliss: A Seven-Step Plan for Telling Your Story and Transforming Your Life by Diana Raab while enjoying breakfast with new and old friends.

Wednesday, August 14, 8-9:30 a.m. Moby Dick Restaurant 220 Stearns Wharf Santa Barbara, CA 93101

teachers fund

EDGAR MEYER

Summer Reading Program

BACK TO SCHOOL SUPPLIES DRIVE

PHIL CHANNING

O

n a beautiful Fiesta weekend, The Granada Theatre was filled with a massive, almost otherworldly vision of North Carolina in the waning days of the Civil War. The Music Academy’s production of Jennifer Higdon’s opera Cold Mountain proved to be just that — a mountain —but not a cold one. This big, multifaceted opera will almost certainly earn a place Presented by in the Music Academy of permanent repertoire, the West. At The and the MAW’s impresGranada Theatre, Fri., Aug. 2 sive West Coast premiere will go down in history as a part of that development. Anneliese Klenetsky (Ada) and Evan Bravos (Inman) kept us riveted as the protagonists of this epic story, which included extremes of every imaginable variety, from scenes of great tenderness to savage acts of violence. Despite the significant alterations necessary to bring Charles Frazier’s sprawling text to the operatic stage, the message of his novel nevertheless came through—it’s dangerous to be saved in an unsaved world. Higdon and the MAW team brought a panoply of resources to bear on this tragic theme of American entrapment, including a spectacu-

REVIEWS

PHIL CHANNING

COLD MOUNTAIN OPERA

& ENTERTAINMENT 

CLASSICAL

lthough it hasn’t been confirmed, a Music at architect Barton Myers’s Romero Canyon Academy of the West first may have home, and classical settings. He returns to occurred during last Thursday’s Edgar Campbell Hall on October 19 with Béla Fleck Meyer recital at Hahn Hall, when the double and Zakir Hussain. Looking something like a film noir gumbass master ended his bright, virtuosic recital with a jig. Jigs and the other traditional folk and shoe but playing like a tough-love angel, Americana-fired elements aren’t often featured Meyer made a strong first impression by in Music Academy’s programming, but then proving his unique perspective on the Bach again, Meyer is hardly a typical entrant in the suites, bringing his lower, richer-toned timbre and character to the landmark institution’s musical orbit. He handily demonstrated his Presented by work. His “work-in-progress” shifted organic instrumental prowess and Music Academy from tautly planned outer movements musicality by moving from the first of of the West. — call it Americana minimalism — Bach’s “cello” suites through a three- At Hahn Hall, and a bluesy, improvisational nougat movement original work-in-progress Thu., Aug. 1. center. A second set of such fetching, and a second half of mostly assorted glissando-goosed tunes as “Barnyard Meyer originals. Disturbance,” “Please Don’t,” and the pizzicato A sophisticated but still down-home Nash- percolations of “Frog-Like” led to an endgame ville cat, Meyer has occasionally played Santa of covers: a Jobim tune and a jig, reminding us Barbara, including progressive “newgrass” that we weren’t in conventional Music Acadat the Live Oak Festival, a memorable recital emy land anymore. — JW

LET’S HELP OUR LOCAL TEACHERS! join us for a pizza party & ice cream social benefiting our local teachers on October 4th from 4 - 7pm at Village Properties’ Santa Barbara Office Courtyard WOODSTOCK’S PIZZA PARTY

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a&e | FILM & TV

MOVIE GUIDE

TONIGH

T

EDITED BY MICHELLE DROWN

The Art of Racing in the Rain

SPECIAL SCREENING On the Waterfront (108 mins., NR) UCSB’s Arts and Lectures presents director Elia Kazan’s 1954 classic. See Marlon Brando in his Oscar-winning performance as longshoreman Terry Malloy, an ex-prize fighter who teams up with his murdered colleague’s sister Edie (Eva Marie Saint’s film debut) to help take down his corrupt union bosses. Courthouse Sunken Gardens (Fri., Aug. 9, 8:30 p.m.)

a ruined underwater city where they become trapped — and hunted — in a maze of caves. Camino Real/Metro 4 (Opens Thu., Aug. 15)

The Angry Birds Movie 2 (96 mins., PG) The Angry Birds crew is back in this sequel to the 2016 original. This time the gang must fend off the Bad Piggies, who seek revenge for their devastated homeland. But when a new threat arrives — a purple bird named Zeta — Piggies and Angry Birds band together against Zeta. Fairview/Fiesta 5

Sing (108 mins., PG) In this animated tale, an all-star cast voices the anthropomorphic animals — which include a koala, mouse, pig, gorilla, elephant, and a porcupine — who hold a singing competition to save a struggling theater. Includes talents of Matthew McConaughey, Taron Egerton, Reese Witherspoon, and Scarlett Johansson.

Camino Real (Thu., Aug. 15, 10 a.m.)/ Paseo Nuevo (Tue.-Wed., Aug. 13-14, 10 a.m.)

PREMIERES 47 Meters Down: Uncaged (89 mins., PG-13)

In this sequel to 2017’s 47 Meters Down, once again a demon shark terrorizes a gaggle of young women, this time in

(Opens Tue., Aug. 13)

The Art of Racing in the Rain (109 mins., PG)

Based on Garth Stein’s best-selling novel, in this film, golden retriever Enzo (voiced by Kevin Costner) ponders his relationship with his human pals, Denny (Milo Ventimiglia) and Eve (Amanda Seyfried) and what it means to be there for them in times of need. Fiesta 5

Blinded by the Light (117 mins., PG-13) This British dramedy stars Viveik Kalra as Javed, a teen living in 1987’s workingclass Luton, England, who finds solace — and his voice — thanks to Bruce Springsteen’s music. Paseo Nuevo (Opens Mon., Aug. 12)

Brian Banks (99 mins., PG-13) Greg Kinnear and Aldis Hodge star in this biopic about football player Brian Banks, who was falsely accused of rape and sent to jail until his lawyer (Kinnear) of the California Innocence Project helped clear him of charges.

Metro 4

➤ O David Crosby: Remember My Name (95 mins., NR) Remember My Name, taken from the title of famous/infamous Santa Barbaran rock star David Crosby’s masterpiece album If I Could Only Remember My Name, finds the hirsute vet in a strangely candid, openly self-reflective mood, partly thanks to the fluffresistant interrogations of interviewer Cameron Crowe. Santa Barbarans tend to be overly familiar with the Crosby saga-in-progress, but a weird charm is embodied in this refreshingly honest, one-stop historical overview of Crosby’s large-living life story — from the Byrds to Crosby, Stills and Nash and assorted entities, alienation from long-suffering friends like Graham Nash, a Texan drug-related jail stint, and creative rejuvenation of recent years. (JW) Riviera Good Boys (89 mins., R) Jacob Tremblay (Room, Wonder) stars as Max in this coming-of-age comedy about three 6th graders who must learn some moves before attending a “kissing party.” With help from his two friends, Thor and Lucas, Max makes a daring plan to spy on a teenage couple with disastrous consequences.

Camino Real/Metro 4 (Opens Thu., Aug. 15)

The Kitchen (102 mins., R) Director/screenwriter Andrea Berloff (World Trade Center, Straight Outta Compton) helms this crime drama about three Irish mob wives — Kathy (Melissa McCarthy), Ruby (Tiffany Haddish), and Claire (Elisabeth Moss) — who

The Kitchen

CONT’D ON P. 53 >>>

Sunday, August 25 at 5:30 PM

JOJO SIWA W/THE BELLES . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AUG 11 THE AVETT BROTHERS . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AUG 24 OF MONSTERS AND MEN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . SEP 19 MARK KNOPFLER. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . SEP 20 STEELY DAN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . SEP 24 INCUBUS W/ DUB TRIO . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . SEP 26 GARY CLARK JR W/MICHAEL KIWANUKA . . . . . . . . . . SEP 27 ROD STEWART. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . SEP 28 BANDA MS DE SERGIO LIZARRAGA . . . . . . . . . . . SEP 29 VAN MORRISEN W/MELODY GARDOT . . . . . . . . . . . . OCT 05 HOZIER W/FREYA RIDINGS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . OCT 24 THOM YORKE. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . OCT 25 LILA DOWNS: DIA DE MUERTOS: AL CHILI . . . . . . OCT 26 SBBOWL.COM INDEPENDENT.COM

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8/8 - 6:00

EILEN JEWELL

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COUNTRY-INSPIRED ROOTS ROCK

8/9 - 9:00

PET MEDZ THE GROWNUPS RAILER THE DORYS

starts Thursday, August 8

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The Arlington Theatre 

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Monday, August 12 7:00 PM only PAseo nUeVo

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SUMMER KIDS MOVIES

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PASEO NUEVO CINEMAS Tuesday & Wednesday at 10am

CAMINO REAL CINEMAS Thursday at 10am

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8/13, 14 & 15

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BRIAN BANKS C

PASEO NUEVO 8 W. DE LA GUERRA PLACE, SANTA BARBARA (805) 965-7451

H BLINDED BY THE LIGHT C Mon: 7:00 PM; Thu: 7:00, 9:40

Wed & Thu: 12:15, 2:45, 5:15, 7:45

Fri to Wed: 1:50, 4:20, 6:50, 9:20; Thu: 1:50, 4:20

H DORA AND THE LOST CITY OF GOLD B 12:00,

H SCARY STORIES TO THE FAREWELL B TELL IN THE DARK LASER PROJECTION C Fri to Wed: 12:45, 3:05, 5:20, 7:45;

H THE KITCHEN E 12:30,

MARIANNE & LEONARD: WORDS OF LOVE E

2:30, 5:00, 7:30

3:00, 5:30, 8:00

SPIDER-MAN: FAR FROM HOME C Fri to Mon: 1:45, 4:45, 7:45; Tue: 1:45 PM

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PINK MARTINI Sun, 12/8 7:00pm ON-SALE 8/10 @10am

Tickets available at THE ARLINGTON Box Office & www.AXS.com

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AMERICA FERRERA Fri, 10/11 adsource@exhib 7:30pm

TONY BENNETT Tues, 9/17 8:00pm

ZZ TOP Tues, 8/27 8:00pm

HOSTED BY BORGIA BLOOM _____________________

8/13 - 7:00 REWIND TUESDAYS!

TOM SEGURA Sun, 9/22 7:00pm

BEN HARPER & THE INNOCENT CRIMINALS Fri, 9/13 - 8:00pm

STEVIE NICKS ILLUSION:

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ONCE UPON A TIME... IN HOLLYWOOD E 12:35, 2:15, 4:00, 5:45, 7:30, 9:10

Fri to Wed: 12:40, 3:10, 5:40, 8:15; Thu: 12:40, 3:10

H SCARY STORIES TO TELL IN THE DARK C 2:00, 4:30, 7:05, 9:40

FAST & FURIOUS PRESENTS: HOBBS & SHAW C Fri to Sun: 12:30,

3:30, 6:30, 9:30; Mon: 12:30, 3:20, 6:30, 9:30; Tue to Thu: 12:30, 3:30, 6:30, 9:30

H 47 METERS DOWN: UNCAGED C Thu: 7:15, 9:30

Thu: 12:45, 3:05, 5:20

Fri to Sun: 1:45, 4:15, 6:45, 9:20; Mon: 1:45, 4:15; Tue & Wed: 1:45, 4:15, 6:45, 9:20; Thu: 1:45, 4:15

SING B Tue & Wed: 10:00 AM H WHEREâ&#x20AC;&#x2122;D YOU GO, BERNADETTE C Thu: 7:45 PM

FIESTA 5 916 STATE STREET, SANTA BARBARA (805) 963-0455

H THE ANGRY BIRDS MOVIE 2 B Tue: 4:00, 6:30, 8:50 Wed & Thu: 11:05, 1:30, Thu: 7:30, 9:50 4:00, 6:30, 8:50 H SCARY STORIES TO TELL IN THE DARK C THE ART OF RACING 12:00, 2:30, 5:00, 7:30, 10:00 THE HITCHCOCK H IN THE RAIN B Fri: 11:20,1:50, 4:20, 6:50, 9:20; Sat & Sun: 11:20, 1:50, 4:20, CINEMA & FAST & FURIOUS PRES6:50, 9:20; Mon & Tue: 1:50, 4:20, ENTS: HOBBS & 9:20; Wed & Thu: 11:20, SHAW C Fri to Wed: 12:45, PUBLIC HOUSE 6:50, 1:50, 4:20, 6:50, 9:20 3:50, 6:50, 8:15, 9:50; Thu: 12:45, 3:50, 6:50, 9:50 H DORA AND THE LOST 371 SOUTH HITCHCOCK WAY, CITY OF GOLD B SANTA BARBARA Fri: 11:10, 1:40, 2:40, 4:10, 5:05, ONCE UPON A TIME... (805) 682-6512 6:40, 9:10; Sat & Sun: 11:10, IN HOLLYWOOD E 1:40, 2:40, 4:10, 5:05, 6:40, 9:10; Fri to Wed: 12:30, 2:20, 4:15, 5:45, Mon & Tue: 1:40, 2:40, 4:10, 5:05, 7:45, 9:25; Thu: 12:30, 2:20, 4:15, ONCE UPON A TIME... 6:40, 9:10; Wed & Thu: 11:10, 7:45 IN HOLLYWOOD E 1:30, 3:20, 1:40, 4:10, 6:40, 9:10 6:45 H THE KITCHEN E Fri: 11:30, 2:00, 4:30, 7:00, 9:30; THE LION KING B B MAIDEN 1:00, 4:55, 7:15 Sat & Sun: 11:30, 2:00, 4:30, Fri to Wed: 11:45, 1:00, 2:40, 3:45, 7:00, 9:30; Mon & Tue: 2:00, 4:30, 5:20, 6:30, 9:15; Thu: 11:45, 1:00, 7:00, 9:30; Wed & Thu: 11:30, 2:40, 3:45, 6:30, 9:15 ARLINGTON 2:00, 4:30, 7:00, 9:30 THE LION KING B SING B Thu: 10:00 AM Fri: 11:45, 1:00, 2:10, 3:40, 4:50, 1317 STATE STREET, 6:20, 7:30, 9:00; SANTA BARBARA Sat & Sun: 11:15, 1:00, 2:10, (805) 963-9580 H 47 METERS DOWN: 3:40, 4:50, 6:20, 7:30, 9:00; UNCAGED C Thu: 7:00, 9:20 Mon: 1:00, 2:10, 3:40, 4:50, 6:20, 7:30, 9:00; Tue: 1:00, 2:10, 3:40, FAST & FURIOUS 6:20, 9:00; Wed & Thu: 1:00, 3:40, PRESENTS: HOBBS & H GOOD BOYS E Thu: 7:15, 6:20, 9:00 SHAW C 1:45, 4:45, 7:45 9:30 H GOOD BOYS LASER PROJECTION E


a&e | FILM & TV CONT’D FROM P. 51 decide to take over when their husbands are sent to prison.

Fairview/Fiesta 5

Marianne & Leonard: Words of Love (102 mins., R) This documentary focuses on the relationship between musician Leonard Cohen and his muse Marianne Ihlen while the pair was living on the Greek island of Hydra between 1960 and 1970.

Paseo Nuevo

Scary Stories to Tell in the Dark (111 mins., PG-13)

This Guillermo del Toro–produced horror film is based on Alvin Schwartz’s kids’ book series of the same name. Set in 1968 Mill Valley, a group of teens comes across an old book written by Sarah Bellow, a young girl who, generations ago, wrote her horrible secrets down as scary stories. As the teens read, Sarah’s tales become all too real.

Blinded by the Light front, Jeff Beal’s Disney-fied orchestral music seems all wrong for such a literally organic tale, which cries out for something acoustic and rootsy. That quibble aside, The Biggest Little Farm charms and inspires with an epic DIY story from deep inside the 805. (JW)

Riviera

Camino Real/Metro 4

Dora and the Lost City of Gold Where’d You Go, Bernadette (130

(102 mins., PG)

mins., PG-13)

Isabela Moner stars as the titular Dora in this live-action cinematic version of the popular Nickelodeon animated television series. As Dora begins high school, her parents are kidnapped, and the intrepid explorer and her friends must venture into the deep jungles surrounding a lost Inca civilization to rescue them. Fairview/Fiesta 5

Cate Blanchett stars as the titular Bernadette in this mystery/dramedy about a woman who hates everything — people, leaving her house, other parents. When Bernadette disappears, her daughter Bee (Emma Nelson) sets about finding out what really happened to her mother. Billy Crudup and Kristen Wiig also star.

Paseo Nuevo (Opens Thu., Aug. 15)

NOW SHOWING O Biggest Little Farm (91 mins., PG) Perhaps the biggest triumph at this year’s Santa Barbara International Film Festival was The Biggest Little Farm, a fascinating documentary on the humble beginnings, struggles, and ultimate success story of Apricot Lane Farms in Moorpark. Urban refugee filmmaker John Chester rolled camera(s), extensively and obsessively, on the project he undertook with his wife, Molly, tracing the radical transformation of a neglected plot of land in Ventura County into a wildly diversified farm — now a model of sustainability worthy of visitor tours. Sidestepping the “dry doc” syndrome, the film depicts their so-far seven-year adventure and arc of selfeducation with seductive visuals and an engaging dramatic moxie. On the sonic

Good Boys

The Farewell (98 mins., PG) Awkwafina (Ocean’s Eight, Crazy Rich Asians) and Tzi Ma (Man in the High Castle) star in this dramedy about a family who gathers together one last time before grandma Nai Nai’s passing.

Paseo Nuevo

Fast & Furious Presents: Hobbs & Shaw (134 mins., PG-13) In this spin off of the Fast & Furious franchise, Diplomatic Security Service agent Luke Hobbs (Dwayne Johnson) and former British Special Forcesturned-mercenary Deckard Shaw (Jason Statham) pair up to help Shaw’s sister, Hattie (Vanessa Kirby), an MI6 agent tasked with bringing down rogue MI6 agent Brixton Lore (Idris Elba).

Arlington/Camino Real/Metro 4

The Lion King (118 mins., PG) Jungle Book director Jon Favreau helms this photorealistic computer-animated remake of Disney’s 1994 animated original, which tells the story of lion cub Simba as he fights to remain heir of the Pride Lands. Includes the voice talents of Donald Glover, Seth

Rogen, Chiwetel Ejiofor, and James Earl Jones.

Camino Real/Fiesta 5

Maiden (97 mins., PG) This documentary tells the story of British sailor Tracy Edwards, who, in 1989, skippered the first all-female crew in the nine-month long Whitbread Round the World Yacht Race. The Hitchcock

➤ Once Upon a Time ... in Hollywood (161 mins., R) Love letters typically come in the form of words on paper; from Quentin Tarantino, they come as passion-filled cinematic pieces. His latest, Once Upon a Time ... in Hollywood, is a nostalgiainducing ode to Los Angeles and classic film. For his ninth offering, the director/screenwriter teases a fairy tale from the very real 1969 tragedy — the brutal murder of Sharon Tate and her friends by the Manson Family. Eschewing his trademark merciless brutality from opening to end credits, Tarantino instead sprinkles scenes throughout that bristle with the threat of violence, keeping the emotional tension simmering close to the surface. Margot Robbie as Sharon Tate brilliantly evokes the wideeyed wonder of a young ingenue. Leonardo DiCaprio delivers a sympathetic performance of aging TV actor Rick Dalton, who requires the constant moral support of his stuntman Cliff Booth, brought to electrifying life by Brad Pitt. Although the storyline develops leisurely, Tarantino nonetheless delivers an engaging snapshot of a moment in time with a thrillingly ruthless finale in this valentine to Hollywood. (AM)

Camino Real/The Hitchcock/ Paseo Nuevo

Spider-Man: Far from Home (129 mins., PG-13)

Still mourning the death of his mentor Tony Stark/Iron Man, Peter Parker/Spider-Man (Tom Holland) resumes life as a high school student and goes on a trip to Europe with his classmates. While there, former SHIELD director Nick Fury (Samuel L. Jackson) teams him up with Quentin Beck/Mysterio (Jake Gyllenhaal) for a special mission to fight the evil Elementals. Fairview

The above films are playing in Santa Barbara FRIDAY, August 9, through THURSDAY, August 15. Our critics’ reviews are followed by initials: AM (Antonio Morales) and JW (Josef Woodard). The symbol O indicates the film is recommended. The symbol ➤ indicates a new review.

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SPORTS

THE FORESTERS’ ORIGIN STORY

B

ob Townsend is rightfully proud

Bob Townsend Started Santa Barbara’s Summer Baseball Team 28 Years Ago

COURTESY

JOHN Z ANT

2018. of the baseball team he got started The Foresters are trying to add an 28 years ago: the second coming eighth trophy to their unrivalled collecof the Santa Barbara Foresters. tion. When they opened the 2019 NBC Out of his love of baseball and his comWorld Series last Friday with a 1-0 win munity spirit, it has grown into an extraorover the Haysville (Kansas) Aviators, it dinary summer pastime. was the 1,000th win in Pintard’s 25 years Appropriately nicknamed “Towny,” as skipper. during the 1970s, he played for legendary “I laid the foundation; Bill built the baseball coaches Fred Warrecker (Santa house,” Townsend said. “He’s taken them Barbara High), Rusty Fairly (SBCC), and places I never could have taken them. He’s Dave Gorrie (UCSB). He was the type of so engrossed, has done such a great job for player that Fairly deemed to call Santa the team, for the community, for all the cancer kids. I realized from growing up Barbara’s “Charlie Hustle.” Townsend went to work as a building contractor, and here, it couldn’t be just a baseball team; it he got into coaching after hours, learnhad to be a community team. We want to ing the ropes from Scott O’Leary at Dos give back to the community with athletes Pueblos High. kids could look up to.” Townsend was coaching with Al FerIn Santa Barbara, and in Wichita. rer and Bob Brontsema at UCSB in 1991 when Gaucho outfielder Nick Satriano FLYING SQUIRREL: As if his major league– TOWNY AND PINNER: Bob Townsend got the Santa Barbara Foresters started in 1991 and saw them make the cover of asked him if he knew of a program where leading batting average was not amazing the Independent in 1994. Bill Pintard (below, right), with Foresters Hall of Famer Jeff McNeil, won his 1,000th game as he could sharpen his skills during the enough, Jeff McNeil of the New York Mets the club’s manager last week. summer. made a highlight-reel catch last week in “There was not a big presence of summer appearances. Chicago, leaping toward the seats along baseball in California,” Townsend said. “We kind of jokingly “Before our trip, I had the team sign three dozen base- the right-field line to snag a foul fly hit by Eloy Jiménez of said, ‘Wouldn’t it be nice to play here?’ The conversation started balls,” Townsend recalled. “We played the Beatrice Bruins from the White Sox. McNeil, my wheels turning. Who wouldn’t want to play ball here?” Missouri in our first game. After warm-ups, we gave kids the nicknamed “Squirrel” by Townsend heard that amateur baseball was booming in baseballs. It was amazing, watching them come down to our the Mets, landed in the Santa Barbara during the 1950s. He went to the library archives dugout. The stands were packed. The balls were getting tossed extended netting that had and read about the teams: the Missions, the Merchants, the around like flies. I put one in my pocket, and a lady came down just been installed to proForesters. He sat down with Tim Badillo, the impresario of with her grandson. She asked if we had any more balls. ‘It just tect the fans from hardcommunity baseball in that era, and became convinced that it so happens I have one.’ It was such a moment to see this young driven balls. In this case, could happen again. boy get this ball, holding it like a treasure. I get goosebumps it saved them from being slammed by McNeil’s all“We were going to be called the Rangers, just a name I came remembering it. “Most teams won’t interact much with fans,” Townsend said. out effort. up with,” Townsend said. He changed his mind after researchThe Foresters bening the team that had “I figured if we interacted, got them going, every year we’d be been sponsored by welcome. We’ve become a fan favorite there.” efitted from such plays The Foresters also nurtured goodwill at home, even the by the hustling Santa the erstwhile Order of Foresters lodge. “They caught my eye because of the people out-of-town players. When a donor backed out shortly before Barbara native when he that played on the team: [Fred] Warrecker, the Schmandt broth- they were to leave for Wichita in 1994, Townsend had them played a key role on their ers, Vaughn Wipf, Bill Oakley, Roy Askins. All the players were wear their caps and uniform tops and hold signs at freeway off- 2011 NBC championship still in the community and proponents of sports here. Also, the ramps. “I went on the radio and got the word out in the papers,” team. Even though his name was unique.” he said. “People started driving to the off-ramps and donating major-league career was With players drawn from area colleges and a smattering of money. We fell short, but I was able to foot the rest of the bill.” just getting started, McNeil was inducted into the Foresters n ex-minor leaguers, the Foresters went 21-7 in 1991, the first of SBCC’s Eric Pintard was a pitcher for the Foresters in 1993. Hall of Fame at their annual banquet last February. 29 straight winning seasons. Their home diamond was at Santa A year later, he was diagnosed with terminal brain cancer. Barbara High. (Later homes were Westmont College, UCSB, Bill “Pinner” Pintard, his father, replaced Townsend’s pitching coach, who also had cancer. Unbeknownst to the team, Bill flew and, currently, Pershing Park.) Townsend enrolled the Foresters in the National Baseball Eric to Wichita for the 1994 NBC series. Congress. When they won their league in 1992, they could “Eric was undergoing chemo,” Townsend said. “We had EP not afford a trip to Wichita for the NBC World Series. They 19 [his number] on our hats. We’re warming up for the game, did make it in 1993, beginning a streak of 27 consecutive the gate opens, and Bill is rolling Eric out in a wheelchair. He’s bald, and the whole team put their hands on his head. We called it the rally dome.” Bill Pintard said, “The NBC gave [Eric] the most inspiraJOHN ZANT’S tional player award even though he hadn’t set foot in a game. GAME OF THE WEEK Now it’s called the Eric Pintard Most Inspirational Player 8/9, 8/11: Polo: USPA America Cup It will be brother vs. brother Award.” in Friday’s second semifinal match as Henry Walker’s FMB Too! faces Townsend decided to step down for personal reasons after off against Danny Walker’s Farmers & Merchant Bank. Competing the 1994 season. He turned the Foresters over to Bill Pintard, for the other spot in Sunday’s final will be Lucchese and Klentner whose love for baseball and the community matched his own. Ranch. FMB Too! is vying for its second trophy of the 16-goal The boys from Santa Barbara made it to the NBC championseason. Santi Wulff led the foursome to the Bob Skene championship last month. The crowning tournament, the Silver Air Pacific ship game in 2003 (when Townsend was one of Pintard’s assisSanta Barbara’s mission at the 85th annual NBC World Series started with Coast Open, will commence Thursday, August 15, and conclude on tant coaches), losing to the Chinese Taipei team. They finally Bergert, a right-hander from West Virginia. He hurled six innings of one-hit September 1. Fri.: Semifinals, 1 and 4pm. Sun.: Final, 3pm. S.B. broke through in 2006 against the Derby (Kansas) Twins. balls while striking out six in the Foresters’ 1-0 win over Haysville. Polo & Racquet Club, 3300 Via Real, Carpinteria. $15-$25. Call Championships followed in 2008, 2011, 2012, 2014, 2016, and

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FREE WILL ASTROLOGY by Rob Breszny ARIES

CANCER

(Mar. 21-Apr. 19): When it came time to write your horo-

(June 21-July 22): In 1993, I began writing a book titled

scope, I was feeling unusually lazy. I could barely summon enough energy to draw up the planetary charts. I said a weak prayer to the astrological muses, pleading, “Please don’t make me work too hard to discover the message that Aries people need to hear; just make the message appear in my mind.” As if in response, a voice in my head said, “Try bibliomancy.” So I strolled to my bookcase, shut my eyes, pulled out the first book I felt, and went to a random page. Here’s what I saw when I opened my eyes: “The Taoist concept of wu-wei is the notion that our creative active forces are dependent on and nourished by inactivity; and that doing absolutely nothing may be a good way to get something done.”

TAURUS (Apr. 20-May 20): There’s an old Rosicrucian vow you might

have fun trying out: “I pledge to interpret every experience that comes my way as a communication of God with my soul.” If you carry out this intention with relaxed playfulness, every bird song you hear is an emblem of Divine thought; every eavesdropped conversation provides hints of the Creator’s current mood; the shape that spilled milk takes on your tabletop is an intimation of eternity breaking into our time-gripped realm. In my years of offering you advice, I have never before suggested you try this exercise because I didn’t think you were receptive. But I do now. (If you’re an atheist, you can replace “God,” “Divine,” and “Creator” with “Life.”)

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Below are unheralded gifts possessed by

many Geminis but not commonly identified by traditional astrologers: (1) a skill for deprogramming yourself: for unlearning defunct teachings that might otherwise interfere with your ability to develop your highest potentials; (2) a sixth sense about recognizing artificial motivations, then shedding them; (3) a tendency to attract epiphanies that show you why and how to break taboos that may once have been necessary but aren’t any longer; (4) an ability to avoid becoming overwhelmed and controlled by situations you manage or supervise.

fulness. Now, as those illusions dissolve, they will begin to serve you anew, turning into fertile compost for your next big production.

The Televisionary Oracle. By 1995, I had generated over 2,000 pages of material that I didn’t like. Although I LIBRA was driven by a yearning to express insights that had (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Old rules and traditions about how been welling up in me for a long time, nothing about best to conduct intimate relationships are breaking the work felt right. I was stuck. But finally I discovered down. New rules are still incubating. Right now, the an approach that broke me free: I started to articulate details about how people express their needs to give difficult truths about aspects of my life about which and receive love seem to be riddles for which there are I was embarrassed, puzzled, and no correct answers. So what do you ashamed. Then everything fell into do? How do you proceed with the place. The process that had been HOMEWORK: Make a playful necessary blend of confidence and agonizing and fruitless became flueffort to change something you’ve receptivity? Can you figure out flexidic and joyful. I recommend that always assumed you could never ible strategies for being true both you try this strategy to dissolve any change. FreeWillAstrology.com to your need for independence and mental blocks you may be suffering your need for interdependence? I from: Dive into and explore what bring these ruminations to your makes you feel ashamed, puzzling, or embarrassed. attention, Libra, just in time for the “Transforming I bet it will lead to triumph and fulfillment, as hapTogetherness” phase of your cycle. pened for me.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): I am overjoyed that you’re not com-

peting for easy rewards or comparing yourself to the mediocre crowd. Some people in your sphere may not be overjoyed, though. To those whose sense of self isn’t strong, you may be like an itchy allergen; they may accuse you of showing off or acting puffed up. But freaks like me appreciate creative egotists like you when you treat your personality as a work of art. In my view, you’re a stirring example of how to be true to one’s smartest passions. Keep up the good work! Continue to have too much fun! I’m guessing that for now you can get away with doing just about anything you want as long as it doesn’t hurt anyone.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Let’s enjoy a moment of poignant silence in honor of your expired illusions. They were soulful mirages: full of misplaced idealism and sweet ignorance and innocent misunderstandings. Generous in ways you may not yet realize, they exuded an agitated beauty that aroused both courage and resource-

SCORPIO

(Oct. 23-Nov. 21): It’s time for your once-a-year shout-

out to your most audacious possibilities. Ready? Go ahead and say, “Hallelujah! Hosanna! Happiness! Hooray for my brilliant future!” Next, go ahead and say, “I have more than enough power to create my world in the image of my wisest dreams.” Now do a dance of triumph and whisper to yourself, “I’m going to make very sure I always know exactly what my wisest dreams are.”

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): During the next three weeks, I advise

you to load up on copious amounts of caffeine from Monday at 8 a.m. until Friday at 6 p.m. Then drastically cut back on the coffee and consume large amounts of alcohol and/or marijuana from 6:01 p.m. on Friday through 6 p.m. on Sunday. This is the ideal recipe for success. JUST KIDDING! I lied. Here’s the truth, Sagittarius: Astrological indicators suggest you would benefit from making the coming weeks be the most undrugged, alcohol-free time ever. Your potential for achieving natural highs will be extraordinary, as will your potential to generate crucial breakthroughs while

WEEK OF AUG. 8 enjoying those natural highs. Take advantage!

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): I don’t presume you should or will

gleefully embrace the assignment I’ll propose. The task may indeed be too daunting for you to manage right now. If that’s the case, don’t worry. You’ll get another chance in a few months. But if you are indeed ready for a breathtaking challenge, here it is: Be a benevolent force of wild nature; be a tender dispenser of creative destruction; be a bold servant of your soulful dreams — as you demolish outmoded beliefs and structures that have been keeping a crucial part of your vitality shackled and latent.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): I have cast a feisty love spell that will

be triggered in anyone who reads the first line of this horoscope. And since you have done that, you are now becoming even smarter than you already were about getting the most out of your intimate alliances. You’re primed to experiment with the delights of feeling with your head and thinking with your heart. Soon you’ll be visited by revelations about any unconscious glitches that might be subtly undermining your togetherness, and you’ll get good ideas about how to correct those glitches. Astrological rhythms will be flowing in your relationships’ favor for the next seven weeks!

PISCES (Feb. 19-Mar. 20): I estimate that about 25 percent of

your fear results from your hesitation to love as deeply and openly and bravely as you could. Another 13 percent originates in an inclination to mistake some of your teachers for adversaries, and 21 percent from your reluctance to negotiate with the misunderstood monsters in your closet. But I suspect that fully 37 percent of your fear comes from the free-floating angst that you telepathically absorb from the other 7.69 billion humans on our planet. So what about the remaining 4 percent? Is that based on real risks and worth paying attention to? Yes! And the coming weeks will be an excellent time to make progress in diminishing its hold on you.

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700.

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COMPUTER/TECH SENIOR TECHNICAL Project Leader (Goleta, CA): Lead dvlpmt of property mgmt s/ware features. Provide direction & training to tech’l writers, QA specialists & s/ware engineers. Create project plans detailing effort & time reqd & communicate plan to the team. Lead team reviews as projects pass through stages of completion. Provide assessments for performance reviews. Plan & dsgn enhancements & new products. Use prgmg languages to create functions & reports. Use Microsoft Visio to dsgn, specify or update UML d/bases or object model diagrams. 3 yrs’ exp as s/ware dvlpr, comp systems analyst or related reqd. Resumes: Yardi Systems, Inc. Attn: Francesca Ortega, 430 S. Fairview Ave, Goleta, CA 93117.

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EMPLOYMENT SERVICES AIRLINES ARE HIRING ‑ Get FAA approved hands on Aviation training. Financial Aid for qualified students ‑ Career placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 888‑686‑1704 CORING RESEARCH & Development Corporation in Santa Barbara, CA seeks Senior Process Engineer. Responsible for researching and developing processes for structuring and laser bonding glass and semiconductor materials. Duties will include: planning and executing experiments; troubleshooting laser and laser processing software issues; analyzing results via metrology and other techniques; analyzing data and characterizing materials defects; communicating results and writing reports; applying Statistical Process Control and Design of Experiment methods to research and development projects; guiding technicians and operators; planning and executing technology development projects; transferring projects to manufacturing; supporting yield and process improvement initiatives; and managing projects and project teams. Requires 10% domestic travel. Position requires Masterâs degree in Materials Engineering, Materials Science, or related field (e.g. Bioengineering or Physics) + 3 years of experience in laser processing of glass and semiconductor substrates in an industrial research and development setting. Must include experience with: metrology on glass substrates; semiconductor fabrication processes (i.e. photolithography or etching); developing laser structuring and bonding processes for glass substrates; and materials characterization. Send resume describing qualifications to the attention of Ms. Karen Clarkson at careers@corning.com or by mail to Ms. Karen Clarkson, Corning Incorporated, MP‑HQ‑01‑E04, Corning, NY 14831. Please reference âSenior Process Engineerâ in e mail or cover letter. DECKERS OUTDOOR Corporation in Goleta, CA seeks an Oracle Applications DBA responsible for backups, maintenance, installation, administration, and availability of all Oracle databases for the organization. Reqs BS + 5 yrs exp. or 8 yrs exp with oracle implementation; For further reqs. & to apply visit www.deckers. com/careers, Must Ref. Job Title: Oracle Applications DBA, Job ID:8453 WRITER SERVICES Your Masterpiece (Book) Is Done‑Now What? Sell It Is What! Professional Book Marketing www.JayNorthMarketing.com & www.JayNorthProfessionalWriter.com FREE Consultation 805‑794‑9126

FINANCE OVER $10K in Debt? Be debt free in 24 to 48 months. No upfront fees to enroll. A+ BBB rated. Call National Debt Relief 866‑243‑0510 OVER $10K in Debt? Be debt free in 24 to 48 months. No upfront fees to enroll. A+ BBB rated. Call National Debt Relief 1‑888‑508‑6305. (Cal‑SCAN)

HEALTH & FITNESS DENTAL INSURANCE. Call Physicians Mutual Insurance Company for details. NOT just a discount plan, REAL coverage for 350 procedures.

SATISFACTION

1‑855‑472‑0035 or http://www.dental50plus.com/canews Ad# 6118 (Cal‑SCAN) LOWEST PRICES on Health & Dental Insurance. We have the best rates from top companies! Call Now! 888‑989‑4807. (Cal‑SCAN)

LEGAL

FROM MAKING A DIFFERENCE.

DID YOU KNOW that the average business spends the equivalent of nearly 1½ days per week on digital marketing activities? CNPA can help save you time and money. For more info email cecelia@cnpa.com or call (916) 288‑6011. (Cal‑SCAN)

Come experience it here. Having a positive impact on others, and feeling fulfillment in return, is a cornerstone of the Cottage Health culture. As a community-based, not-for-profit provider of leading-edge healthcare for the Greater Santa Barbara region, Cottage emphasizes the difference each team member can make. It’s a difference you’ll want to experience throughout your entire career. Join us in one of the openings below.

MANAGEMENT

ASSOC. DIR OF DEVELOPMENT, EXECUTIVE DEVELOPMENT

OFFICE OF DEVELOPMENT Works with current donors to recognize and optimize philanthropy to benefit UCSB, particularly to support fundraising efforts for the AVC senior development team. Focuses on recognizing and renewing giving from individuals. Focuses on both the solicitation and stewardship of individual prospects, foundations and corporations to renew giving, requiring the identification, cultivation, solicitation of donors for results. Primary solicitation focus is securing new and renewing Chancellor’s Council level gifts and helping to pipeline major gift prospects. Responsible for strategies that maintain ongoing annual support through digital fundraising, equivalent to $1M to annually. Strategist to Managing Senior Director to help execute digital appeals and the biennial university‑wide give day. Focuses on direct fundraising activities, and program administration and planning/oversight of AVC senior development team donor relations and communications, and direct management of the student positions. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree or equivalent combination of education and experience required. Prior experience preferred in individual major donor development or related profession. Proven success in the development, sales, or related business field. Notes: Criminal history background check required. Annually renewable contract position. Flexibility and willingness to travel frequently. Ability to work some weekends and evenings. Salary is competitive and commensurate with qualifications and experience. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity /Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #20190415.

Santa Barbara Cottage Hospital

• • • • • • • • • • • •

Access Case Manager Birth Center Cardiac Services Nurse Liaison – FT Educator, Lactation Emergency Endoscopy Hematology/Oncology Injury Prevention Coordinator RN Infection Control Practitioner Med/Surg Float Pool MICU Mother Infant NICU Nurse Practitioner – Palliative Care Operating Room Orthopedics Peds Peds Outpatient RN PICU Psych Nursing Pulmonary, Renal, Infectious Disease Recuperative Care Nurse SICU Surgical Trauma Telemetry Utilization Case Manager – PD

• Director, Patient Access

• Director of Population Health • Director of Technology Operations • Environmental Services Rep • EPIC Clarity Writer Sr.

Emergency Department Tech Obstetrical Tech Patient Care Tech I Patient Care Tech II – FT Pharmacist – FT Sr. QI Specialist Surgical Tech II Unit Care Tech

• HIM Manager • Major Gift Officer • Manager, Patient Access • Marketing Coordinator • Sr. Benefits and Wellness Consultant

• Food Service Rep

• Telehealth Coordinator

• Lead Cook

• Website Specialist

• Nutrition Lead – FT

Goleta Valley Cottage Hospital

• Nutrition Supervisor • Patient Financial Counselor I • Patient Financial Counselor II (Hollister) • Research Coordinator – Non RN • Research Department Coordinator • Room Service Coordinator • Room Service Server • Security Officer – FT Nights/Evenings • Sr. Instructional Designer, Optime (RN) • Sr. Quality Analyst

• Diet Clerk • Manager, Radiology • Nursing Supervisor • Relief Nursing Supervisor – PD • RN, ICU • RN, Med/Surg – PD

Santa Ynez Valley Cottage Hospital • ED Tech – PD

• Teacher – PT

• RN, ED – PD

Allied Health

• RN, Med/Surg – PD

• Behavior Health Clinician – FT • Case Manager – PD

Pacific Diagnostic Laboratories

• Case Manager – SLO Clinic

• Certified Phlebotomist Technician

• Community Nurse Practitioner

• CLS II, Core Lab, Microbiology, SBCH –

• Echocardiographer – FT

FT/PT (Evening/Night)

• Occupational Therapist – PD

• Lab Assistant II

• Physical Therapist II – PD

• Sr. Sales Representative

• Recuperative Care Nurse

Clinical • • • • • • • •

Cottage Business Services

• Concierge • Cook

Nursing • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Non-Clinical

• Please apply to: www.pdllabs.com

• Sonographer – PD

Cottage Rehabilitation Hospital • Lifeguard – PD

• RENTAL & RELOCATION ASSISTANCE AVAILABLE FOR SELECT FULL-TIME POSITIONS

• Occupational Therapist • Physical Therapist – PD • Psychotherapist • Recreational Therapist – PD

• CERTIFICATION REIMBURSEMENT

We offer an excellent compensation package that includes above-market salaries, premium medical benefits, pension plans, tax savings accounts, rental and mortgage assistance, and relocation packages. What’s holding you back?

Please apply online at jobs.cottagehealth.org. Candidates may also submit a resume to: Cottage Health, Human Resources, P.O. Box 689, Pueblo at Bath Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93102-0689 Please reference “SBI” when applying. EOE

Excellence, Integrity, Compassion

For volunteer opportunities at Cottage Health, visit: www.cottagehealth.org/volunteer

www.cottagehealth.org

INDEPENDENT.COM INDEPENDENT.COM

AUGUST 8, 8, 2019 2019 AUGUST

THE INDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT THE

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INDEPENDENT CLASSIFIEDS

EMPLOYMENT PROFESSIONAL

PRODUCTION ANALYST

BUSINESS & FINANCIAL SERVICES Researches, analyzes, and resolves exceptions to complex database systems housed in Business & Financial Services (BFS). Subject matter expert for the Person Index Database, General Ledger System (GL), GL data, and data conversions. Identifies and researches discrepancies working with campus departments to determine correct information. Takes initiative to prevent future problems by changing (or requesting changes) various business processes. Coordinates and controls the alteration of data systems as needed. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree in related area and / or equivalent experience / training. Demonstrated ability to communicate technical information to technical and non‑technical personnel at various levels in the organization. Must act confidentially, professionally, and utilize superior judgment. Demonstrated testing and test planning skills. Notes: Criminal history background check required. Limited time off during fiscal close and month end closing. $27.18 ‑ $28.74/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity /Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For primary consideration apply online by 8/14/19, thereafter open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #20190428

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E M A I L S A L E S @ I N D E P E N D E N T. C O M

WELL BEING

REAL ESTATE

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research, training and public service where the campus is a prime awardee and the sponsor is a federal or State of California agency with annual direct costs up to $2M. Independently reviews and endorses proposals that are subject to the Research Terms and Conditions (RTC) and are within a $2M threshold in annual direct costs. For proposals that are not within the RTC, collaborates with the Sponsored Projects Officer, department administrator, and principal investigator in their timely completion and submission to multiple deadlines. Reviews all proposals for compliance with university, federal, and sponsor policies. Independently negotiates and executes grants for research, training, and public service for projects up to $2M in annual direct costs, which are received under the RTC. Performs primary review of all other awards identifying terms and conditions in coordination with the Sponsored Projects Officer. Tracks, analyzes, and processes post‑award actions autonomously for those awards that contain RTC provisions, and as a team with the Sponsored Projects Officer for those awards that contain other terms. Advises department administrators and other staff across campus to ensure proper administrative stewardship. Reqs: Ability to prioritize and perform detailed work with frequent interruptions and deal effectively with strict and continual deadlines. Experience with Microsoft Office, computerized database systems and internet. Ability to draft correspondence. Notes: Criminal history background check required. This is a multi‑hire position with two vacancies. $57,000 ‑ $60,000/ yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #20190412

SPONSORED PROJECTS ANALYST

VICE CHANCELLOR OF RESEARCH Approves proposals and accept or execute contracts or grants for

RETIRED COUPLE $$$$ for business purpose Real Estate loans. Credit unimportant. V.I.P. Trust Deed Company www.viploan.com Call 818 248‑0000 Broker‑principal BRE 01041073. No consumer loans. (Cal‑SCAN)

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE HOMES/DUPLEXES FOR SALE

Charming Cottage

2BR 1BA. New kitchen/BA. House completely re‑done. Lrg yard/mature trees $734,000. 805‑953‑5021

RANCH/ACREAGE FOR SALE 39 ACRE NORTHERN ARIZONA WILDERNESS RANCH $183 MONTH ‑ Outstanding buy on quiet secluded off grid northern Arizona homestead at cool ‑clear 6,000’ elev. Blend of mature evergreen woodlands & grassy meadows with sweeping views of surrounding mountains and valleys from elevated ridgetop cabin sites. Borders 640 acres of uninhabited State Trust woodlands. Free well water access, rich loam garden soil, ideal climate. No urban noise & dark sky nights

amid complete privacy & solitude. Camping and RV ok. Maintained road access. $19,900, $1,990 down with no qualifying seller financing. Free brochure with additional properties, prices & descriptions, photos/terrain maps/ weather data/ nearby town & fishing lake info. 1st United Realty 1‑602‑264‑0000. (CalSCAN) WOODED NEW Mexico high country getaway. 3‑7 acre parcels with underground utilities surrounded by public lands. Low down owner financing from $24,995 total. Hitching Post Land 1‑575‑773‑4200 (CalSCAN)

WANTED: REAL ESTATE FOR SALE KC BUYS HOUSES ‑ FAST ‑ CASH ‑ Any Condition. Family owned & Operated . Same day offer! (951) 777‑2518 WWW. KCBUYSHOUSES.COM (Cal‑SCAN)

BECOME A Published Author. We want to Read Your Book! Dorrance Publishing‑Trusted by Authors Since 1920 Book manuscript submissions currently being reviewed. Comprehensive Services: Consultation, Production, Promotion and Distribution. Call for Your Free Author`s Guide 1‑877‑538‑9554 or visit http://dorranceinfo.com/Cali (Cal‑SCAN)

1 BED 1 Bath townhomes, Starting Sept. $1,750, 9‑month lease, off‑st pkg, near UCSB & beach. 805‑968‑2011 Model open ‑ 6707 Abrego Rd #100 1BD NEAR Cottage Hospital. 519 W Alamar. Set among beautiful oak trees across the street from Oak Park. NP. $1320. Call Cristina 687‑0915 1BD NEAR SBCC & beach @ Carla Apts NP. 530 W Cota $1320 Rosa 965‑3200 2BDS $1740+ & 3BD flat or townhouses $2490. Near UCSB, shops, park, beach, theater, golf. Sesame Tree Apts 6930 Whittier Dr. Hector 968‑2549

RENTAL PROPERTIES

STUDIOS $1320+ & 1BDs $1440+ in beautiful garden setting! Pool, lndry & off‑street parking at Michelle Apartments. 340 Rutherford St. NP. Call Erin 967‑6614

APARTMENTS & CONDOS FOR RENT

HOUSES/DUPLEXES FOR RENT

$1320 1BD Corner of Hope & San Remo‑N State St‑Barbara Apts Quiet NP 687‑0610

NEWLY RENOVATED house 2BD,1BA Alamar/Cottage Hospital. All new appliances, Prvt driveway, gated backyard, No Pets. $2,600/ month. 805‑683‑1179 Frieda.

MARKET PLACE ANNOUNCEMENTS

$285/WK $800/MO SPECIAL PRICE in Buellton Motel. Incl all utils, cbl TV, frig., Micro, lndry. 805‑688‑6638

Advertising. For a free brochure call 916‑288‑6011 or email cecelia@cnpa. com (Cal‑SCAN) DID YOU KNOW that newspapers serve an engaged audience and that 79% still read a print newspaper? Newspapers need to be in your mix! Discover the Power of Newspaper Advertising. For more info email cecelia@cnpa.com or call (916) 288‑6011. (Cal‑SCAN)

DENIED SOCIAL Security Disability? Appeal! If you’re 50+, filed for SSD and denied, our attorneys can help get you approved! No money out of pockets! Call 1‑844‑218‑7289 (AAN CAN)

ELIMINATE GUTTER cleaning forever! LeafFilter, the most advanced debris‑blocking gutter protection. Schedule a FREE LeafFilter estimate today. 15% off and 0% financing for those who qualify. PLUS Senior & Military Discounts. Call 1‑888‑654‑1784 (Cal‑SCAN)

DID YOU KNOW 7 in 10 Americans or 1158 Million U.S. Adults read content from newspaper media each week? Discover the Power of Newspaper

HARRIS DIATOMACEOUS EARTH FOOD GRADE 100%. OMRI Listed. Available: Hardware Stores, The Home Depot, homedepot.com (Cal‑SCAN)

INVENTORS ‑ FREE INFORMATION PACKAGE Have your product idea developed affordably by the Research & Development pros and presented to manufacturers. Call 1‑888‑501‑0236 for a Free Idea Starter Guide. Submit your idea for a free consultation.

GARAGE & ESTATE SALES Estate/Moving SALE Sat. (8/10) @ 9:00 – 2:00 Sun. (8/11) @ 9:00 – 12:00 1192 Camino Meleno SB 93111 Furniture (large and small), Beds, Mirrors, Paintings, Art Work, Dressers, Tables, Desks/ Chairs, Dining Tables/ Chairs, Sleeper Couch, Recliner, T.V’s, Armoire, Lamps, Rugs, Iron Patio Sets/ Umbrellas, Various Clothing, Children Items, Toys, Bikes, Portable Room A/C Units, Battery Mower w/ accessories, Yard Items, Dog houses, and more.

FAMILY SERVICES

HOLISTIC HEALTH

A PLACE FOR MOM has helped over a million families find senior living. Our trusted, local advisors help find solutions to your unique needs at no cost to you. Call 855‑741‑7459

Herbal Health‑care

ADOPTION: YOU are not alone. For immediate counseling, help choosing a loving family, and financial assistance, call 24/7 (800) 658‑8284 / Text (646) 988‑6281. Expenses Paid. Confidential. www.adoptionsfirst. com (Cal‑SCAN)

Herbal programs for weight‑loss, heart conditions, inflammation & pain, blood sugar conditions, digestion, liver detox. Naturopath, Herbalist, Khabir Southwick, 805‑308‑3480, www.KSouthwick. com

MASSAGE (LICENSED)

DEEP TISSUE QUEEN

Expert in Deep Tissue, 20 yrs exp. Work w/chronic pain, stress & injuries. 1st time Client $50/hr. Gift Cert available, Outcall. Laurie Proia, LMT 886‑8792

LEGALS ADMINISTER OF ESTATE NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: D. DARLENE KUEHL NO: 19PR00245 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of D. DARLENE KUEHL, DONNA DARLENE KUEHL, DARLENE KUEHL A PETITION FOR PROBATE: has been filed by: DEBORAH KUEHL in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara THE PETITION for probate requests that (name): DEBORAH KUEHL be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The Independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held

in this court as follows: on 08/22/2019 AT 9:00 a.m. Dept: 5 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, located at 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Anacapa Division. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special notice form is available from the court clerk. Petitioner: Deborah Kuehl, PRO SE 106 Walnut Lane, Santa Barbara, CA 93111; (805) 696‑5414. Published Jul 25, 31. Aug 8, 15 2019..

AUTO CASH FOR CARS! We buy all cars! Junk, high‑end, totaled – it doesn’t matter! Get free towing and same day cash! NEWER MODELS too! Call 1‑866‑535‑9689 (AAN CAN)

AUTO PARTS

Condition Vehicle, 2002 and Newer. Nationwide Free Pick Up! Call Now: 1‑800‑864‑5960.

CAR CARE/REPAIR AIS MOBILE AUTO REPAIR‑ 20 yrs. exp. I’ll fix it anywhere! Pre‑Buy Inspections & Restorations. 12% OFF! 805‑448‑4450

DONATE YOUR Car to Veterans Today! Help and Support our Veterans. Fast ‑ FREE pick up. 100% tax deductible. Call 1‑800‑245‑0398

CASH FOR CARS: We Buy Any

SERVICE DIRECTORY FINANCIAL SERVICES

HOME SERVICES

ARE YOU BEHIND $10k OR MORE ON YOUR TAXES? Stop wage & bank levies, liens & audits, unfiled tax returns, payroll issues, & resolve tax debt FAST. Call 855‑970‑2032. (Cal‑SCAN)

A PLACE FOR MOM has helped over a million families find senior living. Our trusted, local advisors help find solutions to your unique needs at no cost to you. 1‑855‑993‑2495 (AAN CAN)

Need Help with Family Law? Can’t Afford a $5000 Retainer? Low Cost Legal Services‑ Pay As You Go‑ As low as $750‑$1500‑ Get Legal Help Now! Call 1‑844‑821‑8249 Mon‑Fri 7am to 4pm PCT (AAN CAN) https://www.familycourtdirect. com/?network=1 Need IRS Relief $10K ‑ $125K+ Get Fresh Start or Forgiveness‎ Call 1‑855‑399‑2890 Monday through Friday 7AM‑5PM PST (AAN CAN)

GENERAL SERVICES BECOME A PUBLISHED AUTHOR! We edit, print and distribute your work internationally. We do the work… You reap the Rewards! Call for a FREE Author’s Submission Kit: 866‑951‑7214

58

A PLACE FOR MOM. The nation’s largest senior living referral service. Contact our trusted,local experts today! Our service is FREE/no obligation. CALL 1‑855‑467‑6487. (Cal‑SCAN) DIRECTV & AT&T. 155 Channels & 1000s of Shows/Movies On Demand (w/SELECT Package.) AT&T Internet 99 Percent Reliability. Unlimited Texts to 120 Countries w/AT&T Wireless. Call 4 FREE Quote‑ 1‑866‑249‑0619 (Cal‑SCAN) DISH TV ‑ $59.99/month for 190 channels. $100 Gift Card with Qualifying Service! Free premium channels (Showtime, Starz, & more) for 3 months. Voice remote included. Restrictions apply, call for details. Call 1‑844‑581‑5004. (Cal‑SCAN) DISH TV ‑ Over 190 Channels Now ONLY $69.99/mo! 2yr price guarantee, FREE Installation! Save

THE INDEPENDENT

AUGUST 8, 2019

FREE 3 Day Vacation, Tax Deductible, Free Towing, All Paperwork Taken Care of. Call 1‑844‑491‑2884 (Cal‑SCAN)

DOMESTIC CARS

DONATE YOUR CAR, TRUCK OR BOAT TO HERITAGE FOR THE BLIND.

CARS/TRUCKS WANTED!!! 2002 and Newer! Any Condition. Running

HUNDREDS over Cable and DIRECTV. Add Internet as low as $14.95/mo! Call Now 1‑800‑373‑6508 (AAN CAN)

AWARD. Call 877‑648‑6308 today. Free Consultation. No Risk.

DISH TV $59.99 For 190 Channels + $14.95 High Speed Internet. Free Installation, Smart HD DVR Included, Free Voice Remote. Some restrictions apply 1‑800‑718‑1593 ELIMINATE GUTTER cleaning forever! LeafFilter, the most advanced debris‑blocking gutter protection. Schedule a FREE LeafFilter estimate today. 15% off and 0% financing for those who qualify. PLUS Senior & Military Discounts. Call 1‑855‑995‑2490 ENERGY SAVING NEW WINDOWS! Beautify your home! Save on monthly energy bills with NEW WINDOWS from 1800Remodel! Up to 18 months no interest. Restrictions apply. Call Now 1‑855‑900‑7192 (AAN CAN) PROTECT YOUR HOME AND FAMILY with Vivint Smart Home. Call 844‑475‑6160 today to receive a FREE $50 GIFTCARD with your purchase. Use promo code: FREE50 RECENTLY DIAGNOSED with LUNG CANCER and 60+ years old? Call now! You and your family may be entitled to a SIGNIFICANT CASH

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STAY IN your home longer with an American Standard Walk‑In Bathtub. Receive up to $1,500 off, including a free toilet, and a lifetime warranty on the tub and installation! Call us at 1‑855‑534‑6198 WATER DAMAGE to Your Home? Call for a quote for professional cleanup & maintain the value of your home! Set an appt today! Call 855‑401‑7069 (Cal‑SCAN)

MEDICAL SERVICES **STOP STRUGGLING ON THE STAIRS** Give your life a lift with an ACORN STAIRLIFT! Call now for $250 OFF your stairlift purchase and FREE DVD & brochure! 1‑866‑520‑1931 (Cal‑SCAN) ATTENTION OXYGEN THERAPY USERS! Inogen One G4 is capable of full 24/7 oxygen delivery. Only 2.8 pounds. FREE information kit. Call 877‑929‑9587 ATTENTION: OXYGEN Users! Gain freedom with a Portable Oxygen Concentrator! No more heavy tanks and refills! Guaranteed Lowest Prices! Call the Oxygen Concentrator

or Not. Competitive Offer! Free Towing! We’re Nationwide! Call Now: 1‑888‑416‑2330. DONATE YOUR CAR, BOAT OR RV to receive a major tax deduction. Help homeless pets. Local, IRS Recognized. Top Value Guaranteed. Free Estimate and Pickup. LAPETSALIVE.ORG 1‑833‑772‑2632 (Cal‑SCAN)

Store: 1‑844‑653‑7402 (Cal‑SCAN) DENTAL INSURANCE. Call Physicians Mutual Insurance Company for details. NOT just a discount plan, REAL coverage for 350 procedures.888‑623‑3036 or http:// www.dental50plus.com/58 Ad# 6118 MEDICAL‑GRADE HEARING AIDS for LESS THAN $200! FDA‑Registered. Crisp, clear sound, state of‑the‑art features & no audiologist needed. Try it RISK FREE for 45 Days! CALL 1‑877‑736‑1242 (Cal‑SCAN) MOBILEHELP, AMERICA’S Premier Mobile Medical Alert System. Whether You’re Home or Away. For Safety and Peace of Mind. No Long Term Contracts! Free Brochure! Call Today! 1‑855‑401‑6993 OXYGEN ‑ Anytime. Anywhere. No tanks to refill. No deliveries. The All‑ New Inogen One G4 is only 2.8 pounds! FAA approved! FREE info kit: 844‑359‑3976. (Cal‑SCAN) START SAVING BIG On Medications! Up To 90% Savings from 90DAYMEDS! Over 3500 Medications Available! Prescriptions Req’d. Pharmacy Checker Approved. CALL Today for Your FREE Quote. 844‑584‑5104

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PERSONAL SERVICES

55 Yrs or Older?

Need Help At Home? Call REAL HELP because this Non‑profit matches workers to your needs. 965‑1531

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TECHNICAL SERVICES

COMPUTER MEDIC

Virus/Spyware Removal, Install/ Repair, Upgrades, Troubleshoot, Set‑up, Tutor, Networks, Best rates! Matt 682‑0391

Free computer, WiFi, and printer access Free basic computer skills classes Free English language development Room 13B of GVCC in Old Town Goleta Libre acceso a la computadora Libre acceso al WiFi e impresora Clases gratuitas de informática Aprende gratis el idioma inglés GVCC, Sala 13B, Old Town Goleta 805‑323‑3653


INDEPENDENT CLASSIFIEDS

LEGALS

PHONE 965-5205

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NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: ROBERT WAYNE RICHARDS NO: 19PR00195 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of ROBERT WAYNE RICHARDS; ROBERT W. RICHARDS; “BOB” RICHARDS A PETITION FOR PROBATE: has been filed by: KATHRYN ANN ATELIAN in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara THE PETITION for probate requests that (name): KATHRYN ANN ATELIAN be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The Independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not

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grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held in this court as follows: on 09/05/2019 AT 9:00 a.m. Dept: 5 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, located at 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Anacapa Division. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or

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account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special notice form is available from the court clerk. Petitioner: Mark R. Wietstock P.O. Box 40123, Santa Barbara, CA 93140; (805) 899‑3545. Published Jul 25, 31. Aug 8, 15 2019.. NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: JOSEPH ARTUSO Case No.: 19PR00328 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of JOSEPH ARTUSO A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by: SERENO STRADIOTTO and MUFG UNION BANK, N.A in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara THE PETITION for probate requests that: MUFG UNION BANK, N. A., and SERENO STRADIOTTO be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The Independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held in this court as follows: 09/12/2019 AT 9:00 a.m. Dept: 5 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, 1100 Anacapa Street, P.O Box 21107 Santa Barbara, CA 93102 Anacapa Division. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to

consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: Jeffrey B. Soderborg; CA Bar #264666 (805) 687‑6660 Barnes & Barnes, 1900 State Street, Suite M, Santa Barbara, CA 93101, Published Aug 8, 15, 22 2019.

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STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF USE OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME The following Fictitious Business Name is being abandoned: STRANGE FAMILY VINEYARDS at 1062 Drum Canyon Road Lompoc, CA 93436; The original statement for use of this Fictitious Business Name was filed 11/04/2014 in the County of Santa Barbara. Original file no. 2014‑0003131. The person (s) or entities abandoning use of this name are as follows: Brian R Strange 12100 Wilshire Blvd. Suite 1900 Los Angeles, CA 90025 This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jul 15, 2019. I hereby certify that this is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy, Published: Jul 25, 31. Aug 8, 15 2019.

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME S TAT E M E N T The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: THE ACADEMY at 812 E Gutierrez St Ste B Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Augustine Detar 5512 Cathedral Oaks Rd Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Joseph Detar 2460 Lillie Ave Summerland, CA 93067 conducted by an General Partnership Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jul 09, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Thomas Brian. FBN Number: 2019‑0001648. Published: Jul 18, 25, 31. Aug 8 2019.

64 Pestered 65 Lyft transactions, e.g. 66 Magazine with “Spy vs. Spy” 67 Bisected 68 Alleges as fact

39 Designer in “The Incredibles” 40 Is on top of 43 Chardonnay feature 1 Photo session 44 Skiing event with gates 6 Flame followers 45 Singer/actress Gray who was 11 Current measure on Season 1 of “American 14 Barbera’s animation partner Idol” 15 “So long” 46 Like a wincer’s expression 16 “Come Get It ___” (2014 48 Large wine cask 1 Scold loudly Pharrell Williams single) 49 World capital that lent its 2 Consonant, musically 17 Snacks in sleeves name to a type of goat or 3 ___ Man (anime series about 18 Fred who directed “High rabbit an extremely powerful hero) Noon” and “From Here to 51 “Dancing With the Stars” 4 “Happy Xmas (War Is Over)” Eternity” judge Goodman cowriter 20 Baseball arbiter 54 It’s often iodized 5 ___-Freez (soft-serve chain 21 Really cold temperature range 55 Had more than a feeling mentioned in “Jack and 23 Quickly 56 Edit menu option Diane”) 24 False cover? 59 ___ Lanka 6 Activity on a placemat 26 John of “Star Wars: The Rise 60 Score an upset, say 7 Slayer of Ymir, in myth of Skywalker” 62 1990s R&B group Bell ___ 8 Baking pans 28 “Walking on Broken Glass” DeVoe 9 One with a nest egg? singer 10 Take legal action 32 Singer Lana ___ Rey ©2019 Jonesin’ Crosswords (editor@ 11 Put down 33 Involuntary movements jonesincrosswords.com) For answers to this 12 Be in charge of puzzle, call: 1-900-226-2800, 99 cents per 34 “___ kidding, right?” minute. Must be 18+. Or to bill to your credit 13 Long-distance letter writer card, call: 1-800-655-6548. Reference puzzle 35 Transportation link between 19 Theresa who announced #0939 Folkestone, Kent and she’ll resign in June 2019 Coquelles, Pas-de-Calais 22 Wriggly animal 41 “___ of many colors” 25 Galileo Galilei Airport locale LAST WEEK’S SOLUTION: 42 Words of confession 26 Ancient Irish king Brian ___ 44 Prominent NASCAR sponsor (anagram of O, RUB) 47 Role revived in “Fuller House” 27 Yoked team 50 Second-smallest Teletubby 29 “___ Springfield” (Kent 52 Apprehensive Brockman show) 53 Geneva girlfriend 30 Baseball Hall-of-Famer Ryan 54 Polecat 31 Wacky 57 Sch. week start 36 Zip 58 Super Bowl X MVP 37 “March Madness” hoops org. 61 Ranking higher than 38 Billiard ball with a yellow 63 Raw metal source stripe

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: NEURORESTORATIVE CALIFORNIA at 1135 North Patterson Avenue Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Caremeridian, LLC 313 Congress Street, 5th Floor Boston, MA 02210 conducted by an Limited Liability Company Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jun 27, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Connie Tran. FBN Number: 2019‑0001565. Published: Jul 18, 25, 31. Aug 8 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: 805 STIX & STONES at 2810 Vista Elevada Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Jenna Cosio 747 Kingfisher Way Oxnard, CA 93030 conducted by an Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jun 24, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2019‑0001524. Published: Jul 18, 25, 31. Aug 8 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: PETERS & MILAM INSURANCE SERVICES at 360 S Hope Ave. Suite C‑120 Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Steven P Milam 7750 Wagon Wheel Drive Goleta, CA 93117; David L. Peters 4126 Hidden Oaks Road Santa Barbara, CA 93105 conducted by an Copartners Signed: Steven P. Milam Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jul 08, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2019‑0001622. Published: Jul 18, 25, 31. Aug 8 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: TONI D’ANCA CONSULTING at 1015 Orilla Del Mar #3 Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Toni L D’Anca (same address) conducted by an Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jul 09, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Sandra E. Rodriguez. FBN Number: 2019‑0001646. Published: Jul 18, 25, 31. Aug 8 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: CITYWALK APARTMENT HOMES at 1402 and 1404 San Pascual Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Santa Barbara Citywalk, LLC 1801 Century Park East Suite 2400 Los Angeles, CA 90067 conducted by an Limited Liability Company Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jul 01, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Sandra E. Rodriguez. FBN Number: 2019‑0001592. Published: Jul 18, 25, 31. Aug 8 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: CALIFORNIA DEFENSIVE DRIVING SCHOOL, CDDS at 5960 Mandarin Avenue Goleta, CA 93117; California Defensive Driving School LLC (same address) conducted by an Limited Liability Company Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jul 11, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Brenda Aguilera. FBN Number: 2019‑0001673. Published: Jul 18, 25, 31. Aug 8 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: TARGET MARKETING OF SANTA BARBARA at 211 East Victoria Suite E Santa Barbara, CA 93101; James B Sterne 1130 Arbolado Road Santa Barbara, CA 93103 conducted by an Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jul 12, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Connie Tran. FBN Number: 2019‑0001680. Published: Jul 18, 25, 31. Aug 8 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: CRYSTAL CLEAR VIEW WINDOW CLEANING at 2910 State St ‑ 4 Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Maria Luisa Keagan (same address) conducted by an Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jul 12, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Connie Tran. FBN Number: 2019‑0001681. Published: Jul 18, 25, 31. Aug 8 2019.

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: JULIA CHILD FUND FOR THE SANTA BARBARA CULINARY EXPERIENCE at 1111 Chapala Street Suite 200 Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Santa Barbara Foundation (same address) conducted by an Corporation Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jul 10, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Connie Tran. FBN Number: 2019‑0001659. Published: Jul 18, 25, 31. Aug 8 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: NATE’S GLASS at 5959 Hollister Ave. Goleta, CA 93117; Nathan Cetti 875 Windsor Ct. Santa Barbara, CA 93111 conducted by an Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jul 12, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Thomas Brian. FBN Number: 2019‑0001687. Published: Jul 18, 25, 31. Aug 8 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: WHOLLY SMOKE LOMPOC at 800 E Ocean Ave Lompoc, CA 93436; Lompoc Tobacco Inc (same address) conducted by an Corporation Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jul 01, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Sandra E. Rodriguez. FBN Number: 2019‑0001593. Published: Jul 18, 25, 31. Aug 8 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: ENCHANTED ROSE SPA at 415 E Ocean Ave Suite F Lompoc, CA 93436; Jessica Cutrone 1629 Calle Nueve Lompoc, CA 93436 conducted by an Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jul 10, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Mary Soto. FBN Number: 2019‑0001664. Published: Jul 18, 25, 31. Aug 8 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: SCS TRACER ENVIRONMENTAL TRACER ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES & TECHNOLOGIES, SCS TRACER ES&T, TRACER at 3900 Kilroy Airport Way, Suite 100 Long Beach, CA 90806‑6816; Stearns Conrad And Schmidt Consulting Engineers Inc (same address) conducted by an Corporation Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jun 26, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Connie Tran. FBN Number: 2019‑0001553. Published: Jul 18, 25, 31. Aug 8 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: SANTA BARBARA SALTY at 215 Oak View Ln. Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Melissa Hepp (same address) conducted by an Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jun 27, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Connie Tran. FBN Number: 2019‑0001572. Published: Jul 18, 25, 31. Aug 8 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: UNCLUTTER at 7202 Fordham Place Goleta, CA 93117; Nicole Eskenazi (same address) conducted by an Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jul 08, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Connie Tran. FBN Number: 2019‑0001634. Published: Jul 18, 25, 31. Aug 8 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: PASSION 4 PAINTING at 563 Halkirk St. Santa Barbara, CA 93110; Alejandro R Garcia (same address) conducted by an Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jul 09, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Sandra E. Rodriguez. FBN Number: 2019‑0001647. Published: Jul 18, 25, 31. Aug 8 2019.

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: ElITE PERFORMANCE & REHABILITATION CENTER at 5152 Hollister Avenue Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Elite Rehabilitation Center, Inc. (same address) conducted by an Corporation Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jun 26, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Thomas Brian. FBN Number: 2019‑0001551. Published: Jul 18, 25, 31. Aug 8 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: LILAC PATISSERIE, A DEDICATED GLUTEN FREE BAKERY AND CAFE at 1017 State Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Lilac Patisserie LLC (same address) conducted by an Limited Liability Company Signed: Gillian Muralles, President Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jul 8, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Margarita Silva. FBN Number: 2019‑0001629. Published: Jul 18, 25, 31. Aug 8 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: ASIE RESTAURANT at 511 State St Santa Barbara, CA 93101; BZB Investment Inc 6371 Sultana Ave San Gabriel, CA 91775 conducted by an Corporation Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jul 17, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Brenda Aguilera. FBN Number: 2019‑0001732. Published: Jul 25, 31. Aug 8, 15 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: INSPIRE DANCE SANTA BARBARA at 4141 State St Ste F‑6 Santa Barbara, CA 93110; Children’s Montessori School of Lompoc, Inc. 3910 Constellation Rd. Suite 101 Lompoc, CA 93436 conducted by an Corporation Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jul 16, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2019‑0001712. Published: Jul 25, 31. Aug 8, 15 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: ORGANIZATIONISTA at 314 W. Canon Perdido St. #11 Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Organizationista (same address) conducted by an Limited Liability Company Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jul 16, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Thomas Brian. FBN Number: 2019‑0001722. Published: Jul 25, 31. Aug 8, 15 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: YOUR MARKETING CONCIERGE at 4697 La Espada Dr. Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Ashley Kartchner (same address) conducted by an Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jun 27, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Connie Tran. FBN Number: 2019‑0001563. Published: Jul 25, 31. Aug 8, 15 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: BACCHUS, COLLECTION 35 WINES, FOUR BRIX WINERY, MANUSCRIPT CELLARS, PREMESI WINES, SHEESH! WINE, SUMMERLAND WINERY, TIDAL FORCE WINES, UNEARTHED WINES, CHARLTON FAMILY INDUSTRIES, COMPLEXITY WINES, GRAPESEED WINES, MCKELVEY VINEYARDS, PRIME CUTS WINE, STEEPLE VIEW MANOR, TERRAVANT WINERY, TINES CELLARS, WINNERS CUP WINES, CHEF’S COAT CELLARS, DEAD ON CELLARS, JEANNE MARIE, MEADOW LARK COUNTRY CLUB, ROSENTHAL‑THE MALIBU ESTATE, SUMMERLAND WINE BRANDS, THE DUDE’S BREWING COMPANY, TWIN SUNS at 35 Industrial Way Buellton, CA 93427; Terravant Wine Company, LLC (same address) conducted by an Limited Liability Company Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jul 18, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Kathy Gonzales. FBN Number: 2019‑0001736. Published: Jul 25, 31. Aug 8, 15 2019.

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: CAL COAST DRAFT at 715 W. Valerio St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Vincent S. Clark (same address) conducted by an Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jun 28, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Margarita Silva. FBN Number: 2019‑0001584. Published: Jul 25, 31. Aug 8, 15 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: COPPER MOOSE ORGANICS AND TEXTILES at 956 Don Pablo Dr Santa Maria, CA 93455; Copper Moose, LLC (same address) conducted by an Limited Liability Company Signed: Heather McCaslin, Manager Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jun 26, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Deborah Sanchez. FBN Number: 2019‑0001558. Published: Jul 25, 31. Aug 8, 15 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: SCHMIDTCHEN, ALVARADO & COMPANY at 1500 Anacapa Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Patrick Hartmann 217A Stearns Wharf Santa Barbara, CA 93101 conducted by an Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jul 17, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Brenda Aguilera. FBN Number: 2019‑0001727. Published: Jul 25, 31. Aug 8, 15 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: ADHERION at 423 Mountain Dr Santa Barbara, CA 93103; SB Innovations LLC (same address) conducted by an Limited Liability Company Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jul 19, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Brenda Aguilera. FBN Number: 2019‑0001756. Published: Jul 25, 31. Aug 8, 15 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: KELLY KOEHLER SALON, SHEAR WEST SALON, TOUCH‑UP COLOR BAR S.B, SALON SANTA BARBARA, SHEAR WEST SALON SANTA BARBARA, TOUCH‑UP COLOR BAR SANTA BARBARA, SHEAR WEST, TOUCH‑UP COLOR BAR at 1412 San Andres St Suite C Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Kelly Jo Koehler 639 Fellowship Rd Santa Barbara, CA 93109 conducted by an Individual Signed: Kelly Jo Koehler Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jul 16, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Margarita Silva. FBN Number: 2019‑0001717. Published: Jul 25, 31. Aug 8, 15 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: CARATS PLACEMENT at 2929 Verde Vista Drive Unit D Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Stephanie L Cleere (same address) conducted by an Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jul 17, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Thomas Brian. FBN Number: 2019‑0001731. Published: Jul 25, 31. Aug 8, 15 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: ECOPRODUCTS INTERNATIONAL at 1720 Las Canoas Rd Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Carolyn MacDougall (same address) conducted by an Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jul 11, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Brenda Aguilera. FBN Number: 2019‑0001667. Published: Jul 25, 31. Aug 8, 15 2019.

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E M A I L S A L E S @ I N D E P E N D E N T. C O M

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: STRANGE FAMILY VINEYARDS at 1062 Drum Canyon Road Lompoc, CA 93436; Railway, LLC 1050 Drum Canyon Road Lompoc, CA 93436 conducted by an Limited Liability Company Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jul 15, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2019‑0001698. Published: Jul 25, 31. Aug 8, 15 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: FROM THE HOME & CLOSET at 3411 State Street Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Sarah Thompson (same address) conducted by an Individual Signed: Sarah Thompson Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jul 15, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Margarita Silva. FBN Number: 2019‑0001699. Published: Jul 25, 31. Aug 8, 15 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: VALENCIA TREE & LANDSCAPE at 321 N Quarantina St Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Rosendo Valencia, Inc (same address) conducted by an Corporation Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jul 16, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Margarita Silva. FBN Number: 2019‑0001715. Published: Jul 25, 31. Aug 8, 15 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: HOOKIPA CONSTRUCTION at 6 Harbor Way #193 Santa Barbara, CA 93109; Scott J Quittner (same address) conducted by an Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jul 10, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Tara Jayasinghe. FBN Number: 2019‑0001655. Published: Jul 25, 31. Aug 8, 15 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: BODY AND MIND HEALING JEWELRY at 1125 De La Vina St, Unit D Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Jessica Honor (same address) conducted by an Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jul 17, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Thomas Brian. FBN Number: 2019‑0001728. Published: Jul 25, 31. Aug 8, 15 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: FAMILY‑CRAFT, ILLUMINATED AVOCADO at 831 W Anapamu St #1 Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Todd Eaton (same address) Tomi Eaton (same address) conducted by an Married Couple Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jul 02, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2019‑0001601. Published: Jul 25, 31. Aug 8, 15 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: PERCH COWORKING, THE PERCH COWORKING, PERCH SB, THE PERCH at 250 Storke Road Ste 10 Goleta, CA 93117; The Perch LLC (same address) conducted by an Limited Liability Company Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jul 10, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Thomas Brian. FBN Number: 2019‑0001657. Published: Jul 31. Aug 8, 15, 22 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SOMERSET VINEYARDS STA. RITA HILLS at 4650 Sweeney Road Lompoc, CA 93436; Yawndog, LLC (same address) conducted by an Limited Liability Company Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jul 15, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2019‑0001692. Published: Jul 31. Aug 8, 15, 22 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: YOURPLUSHYBUDDY at 168 Camino De Vida Apt B Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Anoushavan Bogharyan (same address) Abraham K Kesablyan 4422 Hollister Ave #202 Santa Barbara, CA 93110 conducted by an General Partnership Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jul 19, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2019‑0001747. Published: Jul 31. Aug 8, 15, 22 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: CONNECTED at 405 South U Street Lompoc, CA 93436; Noe Rigoberto Romero (same address) conducted by an Individual Signed: Noe Rigoberto Romero Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jul 23, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Margarita Silva. FBN Number: 2019‑0001782. Published: Jul 31. Aug 8, 15, 22 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: BELLA VIEW WINDOWS at 423 Pacific Oak Rd Goleta, CA 93117; Rigo’s Windows, LLC (same address) conducted by an Limited Liability Company Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jul 25, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Thomas Brian. FBN Number: 2019‑0001809. Published: Jul 31. Aug 8, 15, 22 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: THE G SPA at 33 West Mission Street, Suite 204 Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Kathleen Griffin M.D. INC. (same address) conducted by an Corporation Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jul 22, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Adela Bustos. FBN Number: 2019‑0001772. Published: Jul 31. Aug 8, 15, 22 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SERVPRO OF OJAI AND MONTECITO at 16060 Ventura Blvd., Suite 110 Encino, CA 91436; One Silver Serve, Inc. (same address) conducted by an Corporation Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jul 11, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Brenda Aguilera. FBN Number: 2019‑0001674. Published: Jul 31. Aug 8, 15, 22 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: MAR HOOPS at 831 Via Granada Santa Barbara, CA 93103; David Joseph Marcotte (same address) Margaret Geyer Marcotte (same address) conducted by an Married Couple Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jul 26, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Adela Bustos. FBN Number: 2019‑0001816. Published: Jul 31. Aug 8, 15, 22 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: CFI CHARLTON FAMILY INDUSTRIES, FOX FIRE WINES, CROSSRIDGE PEAK, KALI KREME, EDENBROOK VINEYARDS, STEEPLECHASE CELLARS at 35 Industrial Way Buellton, CA 93427; Terravant Wine Company, LLC (same address) conducted by an Limited Liability Company Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jul 10, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Brenda Aguilera. FBN Number: 2019‑0001658. Published: Jul 31. Aug 8, 15, 22 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: RUIZ & SON LANDSCAPE at 1130 East Haley Street Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Everado Ruiz (same address) conducted by an Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jul 29, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Thomas Brian. FBN Number: 2019‑0001821. Published: Jul 31. Aug 8, 15, 22 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: RINGER CONSTRUCTION at 415 E Figueroa St Apt D Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Michael Bryan Ringhausen (same address) conducted by an Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jul 05, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Brenda Aguilera. FBN Number: 2019‑0001611. Published: Jul 31. Aug 8, 15, 22 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: GOODLAND NOTARY at 5667 Gato Ave Goleta, CA 93117; Pamela J. Rangel (same address) conducted by an Individual Signed: Pamela J. Rangel Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jul 22, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2019‑0001760. Published: Jul 31. Aug 8, 15, 22 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: HAPPIKNACK at 2530 Las Positas Rd Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Jonathan Chappell (same address) conducted by an Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jul 25, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Thomas Brian. FBN Number: 2019‑0001808. Published: Aug 8, 15, 22, 29 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: THE FARMACY SB at 128 W. Mission St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Farmacy SB, Inc. (same address) conducted by an Corporation Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jul 30, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Brenda Aguilera. FBN Number: 2019‑0001856. Published: Aug 8, 15, 22, 29 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: HELPING HEARTS THRIFT STORE AND DONATION CENTER at 611 E Main St Santa Maria, CA 93454; Argelia Perez 2009 Pinnacle Dr. Santa Maria, CA 93458; Maria M Velasco 1627 N Depot Santa Maria, CA 93458 conducted by an General Partnership Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jul 29, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Brenda Aguilera. FBN Number: 2019‑0001826. Published: Aug 8, 15, 22, 29 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: SWING TRADER WEEKLY at 133 E De La Guerra St #332 Santa Barbara, CA 93101; William Cottingham (same address) conducted by an Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jul 29, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Sandra E. Rodriguez. FBN Number: 2019‑0001830. Published: Aug 8, 15, 22, 29 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: REVER ATELIER at 618 Anacapa St. Suite B Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Haley Chapman 1300 Tunnel Road Santa Barbara, CA 93105 conducted by an Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jul 29, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Margarita Silva. FBN Number: 2019‑0001833. Published: Aug 8, 15, 22, 29 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: WYE MATERIALS at 5708 Hollister Avenue #110 Goleta, CA 93117; Sierra Crystals, Inc. (same address) conducted by an Corporation Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jul 29, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Thomas Brian. FBN Number: 2019‑0001832. Published: Aug 8, 15, 22, 29 2019.


INDEPENDENT CLASSIFIEDS

LEGALS

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: ANGKOR SALES, FAB BROWS USA at 335 Rosario Drive Santa Barbara, CA 93110; Angkor Sales (same address) conducted by an Corporation Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jul 30, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Brenda Aguilera. FBN Number: 2019‑0001842. Published: Aug 8, 15, 22, 29 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: GG CREATIVE at 30 Winchester Canyon Rd, Spc 115 Goleta, CA 93117; Gail Anne Gallessich (same address) conducted by an Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jul 30, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Margarita Silva. FBN Number: 2019‑0001844. Published: Aug 8, 15, 22, 29 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: GEOCOMB HOMES at 976 Miramonte Drive #3 Santa Barbara, CA 93109; James Alex Spitzer (same address) conducted by an Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jul 30, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Tara Jayasinghe. FBN Number: 2019‑0001848. Published: Aug 8, 15, 22, 29 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: ALEOS IN WONDERLAND at 114 Conejo Rd Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Jeff Chemnick (same address) conducted by an Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jul 30, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Brenda Aguilera. FBN Number: 2019‑0001854. Published: Aug 8, 15, 22, 29 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: GARAGE GEMS at 8 West Constance Ave #1 Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Jonathan Brandan (same address) conducted by an Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jul 31, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Thomas Brian. FBN Number: 2019‑0001861. Published: Aug 8, 15, 22, 29 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: GODINEZ GARDEN & MAINTENANCE at 705 N. C St. Apt #2 Lompoc, CA 93436; Daniel Martinez Godinez (same address) conducted by an Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jul 26, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Connie Tran. FBN Number: 2019‑0001820. Published: Aug 8, 15, 22, 29 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SANTA BARBARA ROADSIDE, SB TOWING, SANTA BARBARA TOWING, SB ROADSIDE at 218 East Ortega St Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Santa Barbara Towing Inc (same address) conducted by an Corporation Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Aug 05, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Brenda Aguilera. FBN Number: 2019‑0001889. Published: Aug 8, 15, 22, 29 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: ST. HILAIRE TRAVEL at 58 McDonald Pl. #303 Goleta, CA 93117; Lindsay Marcus (same address) conducted by an Individual Signed: Lindsay Marcus Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jul 30, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Sandra E. Rodriguez. FBN Number: 2019‑0001843. Published: Aug 8, 15, 22, 29 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SOL CONSTRUCTION at 945 Guadalupe St. Guadalupe, CA 93434; Scott Hansen (same address) conducted by an Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Aug 05, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Brenda Aguilera. FBN Number: 2019‑0001887. Published: Aug 8, 15, 22, 29 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: LA MICHOACANA AZTECA‑SANTA MARIA at 722 East Main Street #108 Santa Maria, CA 93454; Los 4 Aces, Inc. (same address) conducted by an Corporation Signed: Hector Garcia Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jul 30, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Brenda Aguilera. FBN Number: 2019‑0001849. Published: Aug 8, 15, 22, 29 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: RISK REWARD MEDIA at 760 Alisal Road Solvang, CA 93463; Daniel Kormos (same address) conducted by an Individual Signed: Daniel Kormos Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jul 29, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Brenda Aguilera. FBN Number: 2019‑0001828. Published: Aug 8, 15, 22, 29 2019.

NAME CHANGE IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF SHERI LYN HOLLAWAY ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 19CV03358 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: SHERI LYN HOLLAWAY TO: SHERI LYN MARTIN THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. NOTICE OF HEARING August 04, 2019 9:30am, Dept 6, 1100 Anacapa St Santa Barbara, CA 93101 Superior Court Of California, County of Santa Barbara A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated JuL 15 2019. by Pauline Maxwell, Judge of the Superior Court. Published. Jul 25, 31. Aug 8, 15 2019. IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF JASON LEVI LOYLE ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 19CV03413 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: JASON LEVI LOYLE TO: JASON LEVI BLAKEMORE THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. NOTICE OF HEARING August 28, 2019 9:30am, Dept 6, 1100 Anacapa St Santa Barbara, CA 93101 Superior Court Of California, County of Santa Barbara A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated JuL 15 2019. by Pauline Maxwell, Judge of the Superior Court. Published. Jul 25, 31. Aug 8, 15 2019.

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PHONE 965-5205

IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF MARIA GOVIND ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 19CV03490 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: MARIA GOVIND TO: MITHRA MOON THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. NOTICE OF HEARING August 28, 2019 9:30am, Dept 6, 1100 Anacapa St Santa Barbara, CA 93101 Superior Court Of California, County of Santa Barbara A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated JuL 15 2019. by Pauline Maxwell, Judge of the Superior Court. Published. Jul 25, 31. Aug 8, 15 2019.

PUBLIC NOTICES EXTRA SPACE STORAGE will hold a public auction to sell personal property described below belonging to those individuals listed below at the location indicated:

6640 Discovery Drive, Goleta, CA 93117 August 29, 2019 @ 3:30PM Anita Madero Clothes, Personal, Computer, Bike Phillip Thomas Lots Bicycles, Bike Parts Phillip Thomas Personal, Tools, Electronics, Bike, Drums, Stereos, Totes Marissa Velez Household Items, Furnishing, Tools, Fishing Poles, Sports Equip. Electronics, Art Michael Geraghty Personal, Furnishing, Electronics, Car parts, Tools, Bags, Totes, Racks Petra M D Whiteheadsellersygarcia Personal, Household Goods Jacob Ahrens Furniture, Personal, Boxes, Toys, Safe, Lamp, Cabinet Jacob Ahrens Furniture, Appliances, Boxes, Sports Equipment, Christmas Decor, Electronics Torben Ytting Personal, Household, Boxes, Bags, Bicycles, Electronics, Pet Accessories, Appliances Jose Farias Garage Items, Tools, Tool Chest, Generator, Bicycle, Boxes, Totes, Car Parts Purchases must be made with cash only and paid at the above referenced facility in order to complete the transaction. Extra Space Storage may refuse any bid and may rescind any purchase up until the winning bidder takes possession of the personal property.

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E M A I L S A L E S @ I N D E P E N D E N T. C O M

CITY OF GOLETA ORDINANCE NO. 19-__ AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF GOLETA, CALIFORNIA, AMENDING SECTION 2.01.010 OF THE GOLETA MUNICIPAL CODE CHANGING THE TIME OF REGULAR MEETINGS FROM 1:30 AND 6:00 P.M. TO 4:00 P.M FOR CLOSED SESSION AND 5:30 FOR OPEN SESSION

On August 20, 2019 at Goleta City Hall, 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B, Goleta, California, the City Council of the City of Goleta will conduct the second reading and possible adoption of a proposed ordinance that would change to evening-only City Council meetings. If adopted, the regular meetings of the Goleta City Council shall commence at 5:30 p.m. If the date of any regular meeting falls on a holiday, the regular meeting shall be held at the designated hour on the next succeeding day which is not a holiday. Closed sessions and public comment associated therewith may be held between 4:00 p.m. and 5:30 p.m. No other public agenda items will be considered between 4:00 p.m. and 5:30 p.m. unless a regular meeting is adjourned to that time or a special meeting is called for that time. No closed session or study session will be held during that hour unless the posted agenda of that evening’s regular meeting indicates that such session will take place; in the absence of such notification in the agenda, the regular meeting shall commence at the hour of 5:30 p.m. Any interested person may obtain a copy of the proposed ordinance at the City Clerk’s Office, City Hall, 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B, Goleta, California 93117 or by calling City Hall at (805) 961-7505. Deborah Lopez City Clerk

Publish:

Santa Barbara Independent August 8, 2019

REQUEST REQUEST FOR FOR QUALIFICATIONS QUALIFICATIONS FOR FOR ON-CALL ON-CALL PROFESSIONAL PROFESSIONAL ENGINEERING, ENVIRONMENTAL OF SERVICES REQUEST FOR QUALIFICATIONSAND FORRIGHT ON-CALL PROFESSIONAL ENGINEERING, ENVIRONMENTAL AND RIGHT OF WAY WAY SERVICES ENGINEERING, ENVIRONMENTAL AND RIGHT OF WAY SERVICES

The The City City of of Goleta, Goleta, Public Public Works Works Department, Department, invites invites you you to to submit submit a a Statement Statement of of Qualifications Qualifications (SOQ) (SOQ) to to become become eligivble eligivble to to perform on-call professional environmental of relating to disciplines: perform on-call professional engineering, environmental and right of way wayaservices services relating to the the following following disciplines: The City of Goleta, Public engineering, Works Department, invites and you right to submit Statement of Qualifications (SOQ) to become eligivble to •• Project Management perform on-call professional engineering, environmental and right of way services relating to the following disciplines: Project Management •• Engineering, including: Engineering, including: • Project Management •• Engineering Design Engineering Design • Engineering, including: •• Drawing and Services Drawing and CAD CAD Services • Engineering Design •• Environmental (may Environmental services (may be be provided provided by by a a subconsultant) subconsultant) • Drawing andservices CAD Services •• Geotechnical Engineering and Testing Geotechnical Engineering and Material Material Testing • Environmental services (may be provided by a subconsultant) •• Traffic Engineering Traffic Engineering • Geotechnical Engineering and Material Testing •• Surveying Surveying • Traffic Engineering •• Landscape Landscape Design • SurveyingDesign •• Environmental Planning Environmental Planning and and Permitting Permitting • Landscape Design •• Development Review Development Review • Environmental Planning and Permitting •• Construction Management, including: Construction Management, including: • Development Review •• Construction Management Construction Management • Construction Management, including: •• Inspection Inspection • Construction Management •• Testing (may Testing (may be be provided provided by by a a subconsultant) subconsultant) • Inspection •• Right Services Right of of •Way Way Services Testing (may be provided by a subconsultant) • Right all of Way Servicesas SOQs information SOQs should should include include all information as outlined outlined in in Attachment Attachment A, A, Requirements Requirements for for Statement Statement of of Qualifications. Qualifications. Attachment Attachment B, B, Preliminary Description for discipline attached information. is that provide Preliminary Description of Services for each each discipline is attached for for your information. It is not not necessary necessary that a a firm firmAttachment provide all all B, SOQs should include of allServices information as outlined in is Attachment A, your Requirements for It Statement of Qualifications. disciplines as above, however firms specify services are being proposed separate each disciplines as listed listed above, of however firms should specify what what servicesfor areyour being proposed on on and submit separate SOQs for each all Preliminary Description Services for should each discipline is attached information. It isand notsubmit necessary that SOQs a firm for provide discipline. discipline. disciplines as listed above, however firms should specify what services are being proposed on and submit separate SOQs for each discipline.on the City’s pre-approved list of consultants (shortlist) does not constitute a contract nor does it guarantee any award Placement Placement on the City’s pre-approved list of consultants (shortlist) does not constitute a contract nor does it guarantee any award of services contracts for work. City to all on shortlist some level of in of Placement services or or on contracts forpre-approved work. However, However, the City does does try try to allow allowdoes all consultants consultants on the the shortlistnor some level of participation participation in the City’s list the of consultants (shortlist) not constitute a contract does it guarantee any award projects over course the life the The City reserves the right out for any on projects over the the course of offor thework. life of ofHowever, the shortlist. shortlist. The does City also also reserves the right to to go goon out forshortlist any of of these these services on a a project project in of services or contracts the City try to allow all consultants the some services level of participation specific basis at any time of shortlist. of the is approximately three (3) specific basis at the any course time during during the life of the the shortlist. The life of reserves the shortlist shortlist is anticipated anticipated toforbe beany approximately threeon (3) ayears. years. projects over of thethe lifelife of the shortlist. TheThe Citylife also the right to go outto of these services project Sample consultant agreement and are as Attachment C. be to Sample consultant agreement and insurance insurance requirements are included included asshortlist Attachment C. Consultants Consultants will be expected expected to comply comply specific basis at any time during the life of requirements the shortlist. The life of the is anticipated to be will approximately three (3) years. with agreement terms and requirements after Concerns regarding documents be in with agreement termsagreement and insurance insurance requirements after selection. selection. Concerns regarding these these documents must be submitted submitted in Sample consultant and insurance requirements are included as Attachment C. Consultants willmust be expected to comply writing with the SOQ SOQ if they they areinsurance to be be considered. considered. writing the if are to with with agreement terms and requirements after selection. Concerns regarding these documents must be submitted in writing with the SOQ ifno they are than to be considered.(25) pages, including resumes attachments, and required documents. Interested SOQ’s shall SOQ’s shall be be limited limited to to no more more than twenty-five twenty-five (25) pages, including resumes attachments, and required documents. Interested firms shall submit three (3) hard copies and twenty-five an electronic electronic color pdf of of their SOQ SOQ for each each discipline in in and a sealed sealed envelope, clearly Interested marked firms shall submit three (3) hard copies and an color pdf their for discipline a envelope, clearly marked SOQ’s shall be limited to no more than (25) pages, including resumes attachments, required documents. “On-Call Professional Engineering, Environmental and of – Qualifications [Specify Discipline]” the “On-Call Professional Engineering, Environmental and Right Rightcolor of Way Way Services – Statement Statement of Qualifications [Specify Discipline]” on the firms shall submit three (3) hard copies and an electronic pdfServices of their SOQ for eachof discipline in a sealed envelope, clearlyon marked outside of envelope. SOQs received than 1:30 p.m., August 29, the following outside of the the envelope. Engineering, SOQs must must be be received no no later later than of 1:30 p.m., August 29, 2019 2019 at atof the following address: address: “On-Call Professional Environmental and Right Way Services – Statement Qualifications [Specify Discipline]” on the Mr. James Campero, Deputy Public Works Director Mr.outside James of Campero, Deputy Public Works Director no later than 1:30 p.m., August 29, 2019 at the following address: the envelope. SOQs must be received City of Goleta City ofJames GoletaCampero, Deputy Public Works Director Mr. 130 Cremona Drive, 130 Cremona Drive, Suite Suite B B City of Goleta Goleta, CA Goleta, CA 93117 93117Drive, Suite B 130 Cremona 93117 late if received at any time after 1:30 p.m., Thursday, August 29, 2019. SOQs received after the stated date and AnGoleta, SOQ is is CA considered An SOQ considered late if received at any time after 1:30 p.m., Thursday, August 29, 2019. SOQs received after the stated date and time will not be considered and will be be returned returned to the the submitting firm unopened and29, marked “LATE SUBMITTAL.” time not considered will to submitting unopened and marked Anwill SOQ is be considered lateand if received at any time after 1:30 p.m.,firm Thursday, August 2019. “LATE SOQs SUBMITTAL.” received after the stated date and time will not be considered and will be returned to the submitting firm unopened and marked “LATE Firms interested interested in in submitting submitting and and RFQ(s) RFQ(s) should should go go to to the the City City of of Goleta Goleta Website Website (cityofgoleta.org) (cityofgoleta.org) SUBMITTAL.” and click click on on “City “City Hall” Hall” and and Firms and then click on under the Works and on Website “Request(cityofgoleta.org) for Qualifications for On-Call Professional then clickinterested on “Bid “Bid Opportunities” Opportunities” under the Public Public Works header, and click on “Request for Qualificationsand for click On-Call Professional Firms in submitting and RFQ(s) should go toheader, the City of click Goleta on “City Hall” and Engineering, Environmental and of Engineering, Environmental and Right Right of Way Way Services”. then click on “Bid Opportunities” under theServices”. Public Works header, and click on “Request for Qualifications for On-Call Professional Engineering, Environmental and Right of Way Services”. Statement of Qualifications, please contact me at (805)961-7561 or If you have any questions regarding this Request If you have any questions regarding this Request for for Statement of Qualifications, please contact me at (805)961-7561 or jcampero@cityofgoleta.org jcampero@cityofgoleta.org If you have any questions regarding this Request for Statement of Qualifications, please contact me at (805)961-7561 or jcampero@cityofgoleta.org Sincerely, Sincerely, James Campero James Campero Sincerely, Deputy Director of Deputy Director of Public Public Works Works James Campero DeputyThe Director of Public Works The following following attachments attachments are are available available on on the the City City of of Goleta Goleta Website, Website, EBid EBid Board, Board, Public Public Works Works Department: Department: A for A– – Requirements Requirements for Statement Statement of Qualifications The following attachments are available on the Cityof ofQualifications Goleta Website, EBid Board, Public Works Department: B Description of Professional B– –A Preliminary Preliminary Description of On-Call On-Call Professional Engineering Engineering – Requirements for Statement of Qualifications and Environmental Services Discipline and Environmental Services by Discipline B– Preliminary Description of by On-Call Professional Engineering C – Sample Consultant Agreement and Insurance Requirements C – Sample Consultant Agreement Insurance Requirements and Environmental Services and by Discipline C – Sample and Insurance Requirements Published: Santa Barbara Independent AugustConsultant 8, 2019 & Agreement August 22, 2019 INDEPENDENT.COM INDEPENDENT.COM

AUGUST 8, 8, 2019 2019 AUGUST

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Santa Barbara Independent, 8/8/19  

August 8, 2019, Vol. 33, No. 708

Santa Barbara Independent, 8/8/19  

August 8, 2019, Vol. 33, No. 708