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by

Paul W ellman

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In Memoriam . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  19 Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  23

THE WEEK.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 LIVING.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Living Page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37

FOOD & DRINK .. . . . . . . . . . 39 The Restaurant Guy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42

On a recent trip to Italy, Independent reader Olivia Gleser found herself dining solo while reading our cover story on solo dining. Gleser is an occupational therapist living in Goleta and said she’s a big fan of the story’s author, Ninette Paloma. “I enjoyed her article so much I thought I’d take a photo reading it right in front of the Duomo in Florence,” she said. “I dig dining out at Corazon Kitchen, Mesa Verde, and The Lark, to name a few faves.”

COURTESY

volume 33, number 701, June 20-27, 2019 PAUL WELLMAN FILE PHOTO

CONTENTS

Dining Out Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43

Arts Life . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45

ONLINE NOW AT

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A&E. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 Pop, Rock & Jazz . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47

Positively State Street . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 Reviews . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51

The Solstice Lens

Looking Back at Nearly Two Decades of Our Annual Summer Soiree

FILM & TV. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 Review . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55

(Paul Wellman)

Movie Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57

ON THE COVER: Summer Solstice Celebration 2014. Photo by Paul Wellman

SPORTS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61

NEWS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 ODDS & ENDS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 OPINIONS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Obituaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Angry Poodle Barbecue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 News Commentary . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17

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Rob Brezsny’s Free Will Astrology . . . . . . . 62

CLASSIFIEDS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63

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THANK YOU Earl Armstrong Chief Executive Officer Armstrong Associates General Contracting Bronze

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JUNE 13-20, 2019

NEWS of the WEEK by BLANCA GARCIA, TYLER HAYDEN @TylerHayden1, DELANEY SMITH, NICK WELSH, and JEAN YAMAMURA, with INDEPENDENT STAFF

LOCKED UP: S.B. rapper Sad Boy Loko (above), aka Mario Hernandez Pacheco, pleaded not guilty to charges of attempted murder, robbery, and assault.

Rapper Sad Boy Loko Pleads Not Guilty After Preliminary Hearing, the Santa Barbara Artist Remains in Jail without Bail by Blanca Garcia uring homegrown rap artist Sad Boy Loko’s preliminary hearing on June 17, Judge James Herman decided there was probable cause for the charges that have kept Sad Boy, legally Mario Hernandez Pacheco, in custody without bail for more than 10 months. Pacheco was arrested on August 3, 2018, on suspicion of attempted murder, robbery, and assault likely to produce great bodily harm. The charges include three gang enhancements. Pacheco pleaded not guilty to all charges and his attorneys, Adam Pearlman and J’Aimee Oxton, claim there is no digital or physical forensic evidence linking him to the crime. According to District Attorney Kimberly Siegel, Pacheco, along with two minors and another adult male known as “Yellow Shirt,” beat up, kicked, and stabbed a 19-year-old victim after stealing his backpack, which contained ecstasy, marijuana, mushrooms, and acid. Gang expert Detective Christina Marshall testified that Pacheco, Yellow Shirt, and the two minors are all active gang members, but the victim is not. During the hearing, case detective Ryan Aijian described what police believe were the events surrounding the crime. According to Aijian, the victim, whom he referred to only as AS to protect his identity, and the two minors were driving around town on July 22, 2018, drinking and smoking marijuana and trying to sell AS’s drugs. At one point, the three allegedly picked up Pacheco at a tattoo shop near Speedy Mart & Liquor on Milpas Street. A Speedy Mart surveillance video shows Pacheco going in and out of the store, and returning with the minors; he can be seen

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purchasing a Swisher Sweets cigarillo for the minors. All three exit the store at 11:33 p.m. Aijian testified that the victim, who had stayed in his car, claims he then drove everyone to the Cacique Street footbridge, where all four got out of the car and met Yellow Shirt. Yellow Shirt went back to the car with AS to buy drugs, but, according to Aijian, once inside, Yellow Shirt allegedly brandished a knife and took the backpack from AS. The two went back to the group where AS threatened to call the police if they didn’t return his backpack. Yellow Shirt then punched AS in the face and threw him to the ground. AS was kicked and stomped multiple times by all four suspects, according to Aijian. In the midst of the attack, a BB gun fell to the ground. AS picked up the BB gun and shot Yellow Shirt in the chest three to four times before Yellow Shirt grabbed the BB gun. AS then said that he believes Yellow Shirt stabbed him and hit him with the BB gun. Everyone ran off, leaving AS, who eventually called 9-1-1 at 12:37 a.m. Paramedics took him to Cottage Hospital where he remained in the ICU for three days. Aijian described his injuries as “very significant.” Under questioning, AS told police the Speedy Mart video would show the assailants. When Aijian showed AS a video still of Pacheco and the minors, AS confirmed the three were involved in the attack, as well as a video still of just Pacheco, whom AS called Mario. Pacheco was arrested on August 3, and the minors were arrested in their respective homes on August 4. Yellow Shirt is still at large. In court, Pacheco’s attorney Pearlman

called the identification process “suspect.” “It’s police telling him, ‘This is the guy,’ because they’re showing only one person,” said Pearlman, who contested much of the evidence offered by the prosecution. including discrepancies in the timing of events. According to the Speedy Mart video, AS and the three suspects left the Speedy Mart at 11:33 p.m. However, according to phone records, Pacheco received a call at 11:55 p.m., which places him near the Speedy Mart at that time. “He can’t be at both places at once,” said Pearlman. A gas station video time stamped at 11:58 p.m. shows a vehicle turning onto Montecito Street, away from the direction of Cacique bridge, and slowing down before driving off-screen. Pacheco’s sister and the gas station clerk testified the vehicle is Pacheco’s. The driver of the vehicle is not visible in the video. Then, according to phone records, Pacheco made two phone calls, at 12:02 a.m. and 12:19 a.m., during the time the crime allegedly took place. Pearlman made much of the way the victim described “Mario” to the police. AS said he was a heavy-set, short man, wearing a large blue Dodgers hat. In the Speedy Mart video Pacheco is not wearing a hat, and at the time of his arrest, Pacheco was 58 and 140 pounds. AS doesn’t mention any tattoos, though Pacheco has large tattoos on his head and sleeves on his arms. Pearlman and Oxton also emphasized that Pacheco cooperated with law enforcement. At the time of his arrest, Pacheco had both his and his daughter’s phone on his person, and he provided passcodes to both phones as well as keys to his vehicle and residence. Nothing on the phones or seized from his home or vehicle link him back to the crime, said his attorneys. Pacheco isn’t being accused of being the main assailant, but “It’s clear that it was a gang group effort,” said Judge Herman, “so no bail remains appropriate.” Pacheco’s next court date is scheduled for July 26. n PAU L WELLM AN P HOTOS

CRIME

Defense Attorney Adam Pearlman

Judge James Herman

NEWS BRIEFS CITY Excess food from supermarkets, hotels, restaurants, and caterers will now help feed hungry students at Santa Barbara City College and Allan Hancock College thanks to a new Community Environmental Council (CEC) initiative. The CEC already coordinates County Food Rescue to get excess food to those in need, but with its newly awarded $116,000 grant from CalRecycle, it can now feed area community college students struggling with food insecurity. The project will also keep an estimated 84,000 pounds of food out of landfills, said the CEC. The gun buyback on 6/15 took 145 firearms out of circulation. The owners of four assault rifles, 61 handguns, and 80 long guns brought them to Earl Warren Showgrounds to trade for Smart & Final gift cards, in an event organized by the Coalition Against Gun Violence and the Santa Barbara Police Department, which handed out gun locks to gun owners. In all, 84 cars entered the showgrounds to participate, SBPD spokesperson Anthony Wagner said. As for the fate of the removed weapons, the Coalition’s Toni Wellen said they are either melted down or cut up. The Santa Barbara Rescue Mission is celebrating its grand reopening this week after a $12 million remodel that started October 2017. The new-andimproved digs on East Yanonali Street are bigger and now include 88 beds for men and 34 beds for women. Throughout it all, the Rescue Mission kitchen and dining room still served 150 dinners a night and maintained 45 beds for drug and alcohol rehabilitation, for which it offers a 365-day program.

COUNTY The Sheriff’s Office has suspended its search for missing 68-year-old Casmalia resident Robert Brusstar, who was last seen on 6/9 walking near Vandenberg Air Force Base. On 6/11, deputies visited Brusstar’s residence on a welfare check and discovered his front door unlocked and keys, wallet, and cell phone in the residence. The public is asked to contact the Sheriff’s Santa Maria substation at 934-6150 if they know anything about Brusstar’s whereabouts. Leave an anonymous tip by calling 681-4171 or visiting sbsheriff.org/home/ anonymous-tip/. A 140-acre fire started at Vandenberg Air Force Base last Thursday evening and was completely snuffed out 22 hours later, hit by 102 fire personnel in 38 vehicles and two fixed-wing and two rotarywing aircraft. The fire sparked in the hills east of the intersection of El Rancho and Pt. Sal roads, between the coast and Casmalia. No structures at the base — which had launched and landed a SpaceX rocket only the day before — were threatened by the fire, the cause of which is under investigation. The county saw a spike in train-related deaths from 2015 to 2018, with 20 deaths occurring on the county’s 109-mile stretch of tracks. In response, CONT’D ON PAGE 14 

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Those five applicant positions — four through eight — are held by three men: Michael Bitton, Chris Hester, and Sid Dunmore. (Numbers one through three are held by the existing medical dispensaries.) They do indeed come from Los Angeles and Sacramento, and they do indeed know one another. Hester is a full-time cannabis consultant with North Coast Capital; Bitton is a partner with North Coast at the 5890 Hollister building; and Dunmore’s company, Emerald Capital Holdings, wrote the application check for North Coast. With the exception of 290 Storke Road, number seven on the list, all of Hester’s applications are buffered out, meaning they must find a viable location to stay in the game. He told the Independent that all his applications had different operators. The cannabis license has been a frustrating process, Bitton said, but he praised Goleta’s planning staff, as did other applicants the Independent spoke with. “The staff is amazing,” he said. “I get to know all these people because I’m calling, I’m asking questions, all the time. [Planner] Kathy Allen is so encouraging. ‘You’ll get through this,’ she says.” The council voted to put buffer zones of 600 feet around the Goleta Valley Community Center, K-12 schools, and between retail cannabis stores, as well as 100 feet from residentially zoned properties. Each applicant who survived the new process would be allowed to have only one cannabis retail business license — no matter how many they’d applied for—and the applicants who were bumped by the various buffers had up to six months to find a new spot and try again. After nearly four hours of listening and talking about cannabis, the council’s penultimate vote was to get rid of the list after six applicants had succeeded. On a live mic, someone could be heard saying, “Are we done?” “God willing,” was the reply. n


NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D

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‘INTEGRITY IMPUGNED’: Supervisor Das Williams addressed Carpinteria City Council during Monday’s special cannabis-related hearing.

Das Williams Defends Reputation at Marathon Vent Fest by Nick Welsh t wasn’t so much what was said or even the intensity with which it was said. Instead, it was the astonishing number of people who jammed shoulder to shoulder into the Carpinteria City Council chambers Monday night to speak their minds — pro and con — about the burgeoning cannabis industry that’s taken over the greenhouses of the Carpinteria Valley. More than 200 people showed up — a record for Carpinteria—spilling into overflow rooms and choking the aisles. More than 60 spoke. Two former city councilmembers found themselves forced to share just one seat. One councilmember lamented afterward how the crowded aisles precluded a much-needed restroom visit. At issue was a resolution expressing the City of Carpinteria’s displeasure with the County of Santa Barbara for allowing so much cannabis to be cultivated in such close proximity to two high schools —one public and one private—and within smelling distance of so many Carpinteria residents. The resolution — which carries no binding weight—castigated the county for its “permissive” regulatory environment that allowed for “an overconcentration” of commercial cannabis in Carpinteria. It complained about lack of enforcement and that the county supervisors had “largely ignored” repeated concerns expressed by the Carpinteria City Council over malodors and other issues for the past two years. County Supervisor Das Williams — who lives in Carpinteria—was as conspicuous by his presence Monday night as he was by his absence two weeks ago when the Carpinteria Council held the first of two public information sessions on cannabis. Williams chose not to attend the first meeting because, as he explained at the time, he didn’t wish to become “derailed” from issues like climate change that prompted him to run for supervisor three years ago. Since then, however, Williams’s cozy social relationships with cannabis-industry lobbyists

I

and growers were highlighted in a lengthy Los Angeles Times article about Santa Barbara’s blooming cannabis industry. “It stings to have my integrity impugned because I socialized with some marijuana growers in this city,” declared Williams, who said it’s his job to meet with all his constituents and insisted he’d met with far more critics of cannabis cultivation than its supporters. Out of those meetings, he said, he got ideas on how to better safeguard Carpinteria residents from some of the new industry’s unintended consequences. Carpinteria, he noted, is the only place in Santa Barbara to have an acreage cap on cannabis cultivation: 186. Carpinteria, he claimed, is the only community to be protected by odor-control requirements. As a result, he said, problems with the smell have “gotten better and better and better.” Williams’s remarks did little, however, to change the mind of Ann Louise Bardach, a journalist and outspoken critic of Williams and the county’s cannabis industry. “Many of us don’t feel we have a supervisor we can talk to,” Bardach said. “Our 1st District supervisor has one primary constituency, and that is the pot growers.” Bardach concluded her remarks by calling for “an immediate moratorium and an investigation into how the cannabis ordinance was written.” What set Monday night’s testimonials apart was the strong showing by growers and members of the industry, many of whom have kept low profiles for fear of being discharged by their federally regulated banks. Numerous members of the Van Wingerden and Brand families showed and testified on behalf of a crop they embraced only after international trade decimated their cutflower business. In contrast to what they used to grow, they argued, cannabis used no pesticides, less energy, and less water. They needed fewer trucks and could pay their workers better. And when it came to area nonprofits, no other donors, they pointed out, were as consistent or as generous. They disputed allegations that cannabis CONT’D ON PAGE 14 

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COUNTY

Chumash, Audubon Fight Wind Farm Sacred Sites and Bird Strikes Cited as Major Concerns by Tyler Hayden he Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Indians and two regional chapters of the Audubon Society launched their opposition this week to a commercial wind farm proposed for a ridgeline just south of Lompoc. The Strauss Wind Energy Project—put forward by BayWa, a German agricultural and renewable energy company—calls for the construction of 30 turbine generators 500 feet tall across 2,790 acres of rural land in an unincorporated area of Santa Barbara County. It would supply enough electricity for approximately 44,000 homes through a new 7.3-mile transmission line connected to the PG&E power grid. More than 600 mature oak trees would be chopped down to make room for the infrastructure and to build the roads needed to transport three 35,000-pound blades to each turbine location. In a letter sent June 14 to county planning staff, Tribal Chair Kenneth Kahn said the wind towers would desecrate the viewsheds of nearby Chumash sacred sites. According to Kahn, Tranquillon Peak (called alul, meaning “conspicuous” or “stands out”) is a “supernaturally powerful place” and was likely the site of a “great shrine” that existed in the late 1700s. “The Chumash Elders Council members consider this a sacred place, visit the site still, and its protection is a state priority for the Chumash community,” he wrote. Kahn also named Swordfish Cave and Window Cave, where the Chumash traditionally gathered to observe the winter solstice. It contains rock carvings, red and black pictographs, and what archeologists describe as “lithic scatter,” typically stone tools and debris. Kahn demanded that planners sit down with the tribe for “government-to-government” negotiations on the project. He said better mitigation measures should be considered, and he criticized planners for not consulting with him sooner. But county records show planners had met with Chumash leaders a number of times over the past year and addressed their worries about trespassing and construction noise. The county’s most recent environmental impact report states, “The Elders have not identified the visual impacts as a concern.” Kahn’s office said he was traveling this week and unavailable for comment. Meanwhile, the Santa Barbara and La Purisima chapters of the Audubon Society sent their own letter to the county, expressing serious distress over potential habitat loss and bird strikes. They say BayWa violated state and federal guidelines by not properly studying alternative locations for the turbines that might place them below the ridge-

T

line and away from flight paths. The chapters pushed for a more environmentally friendly version of the project, featuring smaller turbines with smaller blades that could be transported by airship and therefore reduce the number of trees that would have to be removed. “The site is one of the premier locations, arguably the premier location, in Santa Barbara County for seeing birds of prey that live in open country and avoid human presence, birds such as Golden Eagles, Prairie Falcons, and Ferruginous Hawks,” wrote the chapters in their joint letter. “One can also see many more common species there, including Redtailed Hawks, American Kestrels, Turkey Vultures, and Common Ravens.” The turbines pose the biggest risk to large soaring birds, including the endangered California condor. The organization is advocating for the installation of a new but proven radar detection system, called IndentiFlight, that automatically shuts down a turbine if a large bird gets too close. But Audubon said it also worries about condors attracted to roadkill getting electrocuted by new overhead lines. The county just finished taking public comment on the project and will consider the feedback as it drafts its final environmental report, due out later this year or early next year. n PAU L WELLM AN FI LE PHOTO

ABUSED by CLERGY

JUNE 13-20, 2019

TABLE TALK: Chumash Tribal Chair Kenneth Kahn asked for a “government-to-government” sit-down with county officials.


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GRAND PLANS: County supervisors voted unanimously on Tuesday to accept a planning report to guide their spending on efforts to prevent homelessness.

Supes Wrestle with Homelessness

Big Problems Beget Big Plans for S.B.’s Homeless Population

W

By Nick Welsh

hat might otherwise have been another wonky disquisition on the state of homelessness turned into a low-key battle between hope and despair, pitting Santa Barbara County Supervisor Peter Adam, who vigorously staked out the futilitarian position, against the rest of the county supervisors, who argued less energetically on behalf of measured optimism. In the end, no one really won, and the supervisors voted unanimously to accept a planning report that promises to be the first of two such documents to reportedly guide the supervisors’ spending on efforts to prevent homelessness. Addressing Dinah Lockhart, the county administrator leading the charge for the homeless plan, Supervisor Adam asked how many similar grand plans the county has undertaken. When told the last took place in 2006, Adam all but scoffed, “Yeah, how did that work out?” Explaining his pessimism, Adam noted that in every homeless count undertaken since 2011, the number countywide hovered steadily at around 1,800. “We haven’t reduced the number of homeless,” he stated. “It seems to be a persistent problem, and I’m not sure we’re addressing it.” Lockhart held her ground, explaining that the last plan got a lot of people talking about homelessness who might not otherwise have been so engaged. About 1,000 units of affordable housing were developed since then, she said. At a time when South Coast residents seem acutely aware of the issue, the total numbers of homeless people recorded during biennial counts are not merely holding steady; the number of chronically homeless people — those without fixed abodes for 12 months or more — has been dipping significantly. In 2013, for example, there were reportedly 913; in 2017, there were 226; and this year, it’s back up to 423. The report made no effort to reconcile recorded numbers with the subjective reality of public perception. Instead, it highlighted certain grim but not surprising details that Lockhart said might help focus efforts to get these people off the streets and into their own homes. Nearly 65 percent have men-

tal-health issues, 46 percent of which were “severe.” Nearly 60 percent experienced a degree of violence necessary to qualify as traumatic. Many were veterans, some were refugees from domestic abuse, and there was a significant number of grown-up foster kids. Drug and alcohol abuse were reported by many; 73 percent claimed to have been incarcerated. All this information, Lockhart said, would help devise specific strategies to maximize the odds of success. When Supervisor Adam pressed for any evidence to suggest things had improved, Supervisor Gregg Hart stepped in to suggest a more sophisticated understanding of the problem that they arrived at. Hart articulated the “housing first” credo, which holds it’s a lot more effective to expose homeless people to the services needed to turn their lives around when they’re housed than when they’re living on the streets. “Look at the glass,” Hart implored Adam. “It can be half full, too.” Adam wasn’t having it. He argued that drug addiction was a much bigger factor in homelessness than is generally acknowledged. “These are not just people who hit bottom,” he said. He expressed doubt that many people on the street can be saved. Schools, he suggested, should teach students at an early age to believe in the possibility of economic prosperity. “I would hope we could inspire people to aspire to a better life,” but in the end concluded, “I don’t know what the solution is. “Good luck,” he added grimly. Supervisor Das Williams wondered whether it made more sense for the county to spend its limited resources on those who could be kept off the streets with little cost or on “high flyers” who are drain on a myriad of public agencies. Both, he opined, were critical. In the meantime, Lockhart told the supervisors that under the first phase of the homeless plan, she projected permanent housing would be found for 326 individuals and that 955 households would be helped. In just the past nine months, she added, the city and county housing authorities had found permanent housing for 230 households. n

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JUNE 13-20, 2019

NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D COU RTESY

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nna Marie Gott — one of the City Council’s most pugnacious critics — was escorted out of council chambers by Sergeant James Ella on Tuesday after repeatedly shouting “Cathy, you are a petty tyrant!” at Mayor Cathy Murillo. The council met to vote on adoption of the budget for fiscal year 2020, but before the vote, Murillo called a recess rather than allow Councilmember Jason Dominguez to speak a second time on the budget — an unprecedented move on Murillo’s part that sparked outrage from Dominguez and prompted Gott’s yelling. “I ask everyone to rewatch today’s council meeting. It can be found on the city website,” Dominguez said in an interview outside. “The video shows an escalation of Mayor Murillo’s pattern of stifling dissent. I was elected to stand up for the residents of Santa Barbara, and I am beholden to the voters, not to City Hall’s special interests. I’m pushing for policies that support everyday residents. We will not be silenced.” (Note: The video posted online silences the part of the meeting at which Gott shouts at Murillo.) Following the recess, the budget was approved 6-1, with Dominguez the only councilmember to dissent. He said he couldn’t vote yes on the budget because “we’re not doing enough for homelessness and community development.” He mentioned a campaign in Ventura that discourages giving money to panhandlers and said Santa Barbara should consider the same before spending general fund dollars on homelessness. Councilmember Randy

PUGNACIOUS: Anna Marie Gott was escorted out of council chambers after calling Mayor Cathy Murillo a “petty tyrant.”

Rowse told him he was aware of three similar programs attempted in Santa Barbara that failed. It was when Dominguez attempted to respond to Rowse that Murillo shut the meeting down. Dominguez was ultimately able to respond to Rowse after the recess and said he still felt the city should do more and stuck to his no vote. “Once there’s a motion on the floor, I’m ruling the debate,” Murillo said in a later interview about why she stopped Dominguez from speaking. “Everyone already got their say.” Murillo said she didn’t take issue with Dominguez voting no, but she felt he had already made his point and that there wasn’t a need for a second comment. “What’s important is that we pass our budget, and I’m proud to say we did that today. I am proud of —Delaney Smith how our city functions.”

Das Williams Defends Rep fumes caused respiratory ailments, asthma, and headaches, as their critics charge. They said they grow only female plants, which have no pollen. To charges that cannabis was ruining property values, Ivan Van Wingerden retorted that property values in Carpinteria increased by 11.7 percent in 2018, five times higher than the state average. Crime in Carpinteria, he claimed, was half the state average, while violent crime in Ventura, where cannabis cultivation is not allowed, is 24 percent higher. For the councilmembers, the conclusion was foregone. The only suspense was whether they’d call for a moratorium. They did not. Instead, they called on the county

CONT’D FROM P.11

supervisors to adopt new regulations that require odor-control systems on all greenhouses as soon as possible rather than waiting until the operator has an approved project. Currently, 14 of the 26 greenhouse operations in Carpinteria have odor-control systems installed. If the process unwinds as Williams indicates, it could be another year before installation of such equipment is mandated. But under a new law proposed by Governor Gavin Newsom, that deadline could be extended to five years. The resolution will be sent to the county supervisors, the air pollution control district, the California Coastal Commission, and to every city council in the county. n

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JUNE 20, 2019

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NEWS BRIEFS CONT’D FROM P. 9 the Grand Jury of S.B. County has recommended the cities of Santa Barbara and Goleta, the county, and S.B. County Association of Governments (SBCAG) collaborate with Union Pacific Railroad, which owns the tracks, to develop a sealed corridor spanning two high-risk stretches of tracks where most of the deaths occurred: from Ortega Hill to Milpas Street and Patterson Avenue to Glen Annie Road. Both cities, the county supervisors, the Sheriff’s Office, and SBCAG have 90 days to respond to the recommendations.

The County Probation Department was selected as one of 30 recipients of the Youth Reinvestment Grant on 6/14. Awarded by the California Board of State and Community Corrections, the $795,000 grant will help divert about 800 Santa Barbara youth from entering or reentering the juvenile justice system over the next four years through “evidence-based, trauma-informed and culturally relevant diversion programs,” according to a press release. n


NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D

JUNE 13-20, 2019

SCIENCE

Major Prehistoric Debris Flow Discovered in Montecito

T

by Melinda Burns

he mud and boulders from a prehistoric debris flow, the second-to-last major flow in Montecito, have been discovered by a UC Santa Barbara geologist at the Bonnymede condominiums and Hammond’s Meadow, just east of the Coral Casino. The prehistoric flow may have occurred 1,000-2,000 years ago, said Ed Keller, a professor of earth science at the university. The “penultimate event,” as he calls it, came down a channel of Montecito Creek and was likely larger on that creek than during the disaster of January 9, 2018, Keller PENULTIMATE EVENT: The weathering “rind” on this boulder (above left) in front said. Of the 23 people who perished of the Bonnymede Condominiums indicates it came down a channel of Montecito during the 1/9 Debris Flow, 17 died Creek in a debris flow 1,000-2,000 years ago, says UCSB geologist Ed Keller along Montecito Creek. (pictured), the same prehistoric event he says deposited the conglomeration of The long interval between the two mud and rocks visible in the sea cliff at Hammond’s Meadow (right). events means that the probability of another catastrophic debris flow occurring in Montecito toric debris flows from San Roque Canyon to Monin the next 1,000 years is very low, Keller said. tecito to determine how often they have occurred. “It’s reassuring,” he said. “They’re still pretty rare events, All of Montecito and most of Santa Barbara were if you consider you need a wildfire first and then an intense built on top of such flows. rainfall. But smaller debris flows could occur, and you could To date, the team has studied seven boulder sites still get a big flash flood. If people are given a warning to at parks, creeks, and parking lots, taking 20 measurements on each of the 20 boulders at each site. In evacuate, they should heed it.” During the past three months, Keller and Chandler all, they will study about 20 locations, Keller said. Boulder Adamaitis, a UCSB graduate student in geology, together research, he said, is like going on “a giant Easter egg hunt. with several undergraduate research assistants, have photo- … You know they are out there, and you look for them. graphed hundreds of debris-flow boulders hiding in plain “Until I looked,” Keller said, “I never appreciated the role sight in Santa Barbara and Montecito. In addition to the pre- of debris flows in our landscape. I was blind, and now I see.” historic debris flow on a channel of Montecito Creek, they found evidence of two or three on Mission Creek in Santa BOULDERS AT BONNYMEDE Barbara, and four or five in Rattlesnake Canyon, a tributary. The 1/9 Debris Flow was the deadliest natural disaster in As in Montecito, Keller said, the team tracked a debris Santa Barbara County history; in addition to killing 23 people, it destroyed or damaged 470 houses and outbuildings along seven It’s reassuring. They’re still pretty rare creeks in Montecito. The flow was triggered by extreme rainfall on the events, if you consider you need a wildfire mountainside that was burned bare by first and then an intense rainfall. But smaller the Thomas Fire. Keller discovered the prehistoric debris flows could occur, and you could still debris flow in Montecito when he was investigating damage from the 1/9 get a big flash flood. If people are given a Debris Flow near the Coral Casino. warning to evacuate, they should heed it. Nearby, he spotted some boulders on the lawn at Bonnymede, noting that — Ed Keller, UCSB professor of earth science unlike the boulders that came down flow that occurred 1,000-2,000 years ago in Mission Creek; on January 9, these had been rounded by erosion — a sign it dropped a boulder field in what is now Rocky Nook of much older age. Park. But Santa Barbara, unlike Montecito, has not had a The boulders at Bonnymede also had what geologists call “weathering rinds,” orange-ish crusts that build up, catastrophic flow in recent history, Keller said. “The system is primed for a big debris flow in the Mis- layer upon layer, through oxidation. These rinds form on sion Creek basin, down to Rocky Nook, Alamar Avenue all rock surfaces that are exposed to the air. But because the and State Street, and the Oak Park area,” Keller said. “There rinds are scraped away during debris flows, the new rinds hasn’t been one for a thousand years, and there are a lot of that form on boulders after they have been through a flow boulders in the creek.” can reveal the approximate age of the flow itself. Of course, Keller said, such a flow would most likely The thicker the rinds, the older the flow, Keller said. occur in the wake of a wildfire, followed by intense rain. On the Bonnymede boulders, they are about one-eighth Keller’s team seeks to construct a chronology of prehis- of an inch thick.

MELI N DA BU R N S PHOTOS

UCSB Geologist Says ‘Penultimate Event’ Happened at Least 1,000 Years Before Last January’s Disaster, and That’s Reassuring

Just east of Bonnymede, Keller found more evidence of the prehistoric flow in the exposed sea cliff at Hammond’s Meadow, next to a popular surfing beach. The meadow sits atop a seven-foot-high conglomeration of mud and rocks that was uplifted during a major earthquake. Each of the rocks in the cliff face is encased in mud. “Most people would walk right by it, but this is the penultimate event,” Keller said. “It goes all the way to the trailhead at Hot Springs Creek.” Just north of Hammond’s, Keller found an exposed cliff 15 feet high along the railroad tracks in Montecito — more evidence of the same prehistoric flow. Hammond’s Meadow is preserved by the county as a Chumash heritage site. About 1,000 years ago, a Native American village was built on top of the debris flow there. Samples of charcoal from wildfire in the top layer of the prehistoric flow at Hammond’s will be sent to a lab for radiocarbon dating, Keller said. The results will help pinpoint the date of the flow within a few decades.

TELLTALE ROCK WALLS

Many boulders that came down in debris flows 1,000 or more years ago have been cut into blocks to fashion walls in Santa Barbara.

“You know you’re in debris-flow country when you start seeing numerous rock walls,” Keller said. “They’re all over the place.” But some boulders likely haven’t moved an inch. At Oak Park, there’s a boulder seven feet high next to the tennis courts and one at the south entrance. Both are from the same flow at Rocky Nook 1,000-2,000 years ago. That flow was triggered by a landslide in Rattlesnake Canyon and came down Mission Canyon. It too appears to have been larger than the 2018 disaster in Montecito, Keller said. The weathering rinds on the Oak Park boulders are “dead ringers” for the boulders at Bonnymede, Keller said — a sign that the two debris flows may have occurred in roughly the same prehistoric time frame. As at Hammond’s, Keller’s team will look for charcoal in the mud at other boulder sites for radiocarbon dating. Going further back in geologic time, Keller’s team also found evidence of an enormous debris flow that occurred about 100,000 years ago in Rattlesnake Canyon; it scattered boulders across what is now the Riviera. The boulders from this flow have weathering rinds one half-inch thick; on many of them, the rinds have started to crack, forming polygons that look like turtle shells. Earthquakes later pushed up the ridgeline that forms the Riviera, but boulders from the 100,000-year-old flow can be found today on either side of the ridge. One of them is visible behind the historic streetcar stop at Alameda Padre Serra and Lasuen Road. On the hillside above, and in Orpet Park below, are more boulders from this prehistoric flow, with their thick weathering rinds. “Now, I can recognize really young, intermediate-age, and old-age boulders,” Keller said. “Isn’t that cool? The things you can learn if you look at the land that you never n thought about before.”

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JUNE 20, 2019

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Opinions

angry poodle barbecue

Sheriff’s Dog Days Stay Away outreach worker is teamed up with a sheriff’s deputy and sent out into the wild blue yonder in hopes of defusing situations that could otherwise lead to flying lead. The county hatched this program—old hat in other parts of the country—as an experimental effort and on a trial basis last September. Almost from the get-go, its days appeared numbered. Given chronic staffing problems with the Sheriff’s Office, it was unclear just how available departmental brass could cut Deputy James McKarrell loose to star in what could be a real-life buddy movie with mentalhealth crisis worker Bradley Crable. In previous incarnations, Crable has pretty much lived through everything his clients are going through. This — coupled with a wicked sense of humor—makes him exceptionally insightful. The chemistry between these two gentle giants makes them unusually effective. McKarrell, as a sheriff ’s deputy, can arrest people if need be. Crable, as a crisis outreach worker, is authorized to place people on involuntary psychiatric holds. Mostly, they’re all about de-escalation. They show up when someone in full meltdown has crossed a line that could get them put in jail. Traditional cops — steeped in years of command and control training — have been known to aggravate such suspects. When that happens, the results are rarely pretty and on occasion fatal. In recent years, the Powers That Be have finally realized jail is not the

SANITY STRIKES The dog days of summer

haven’t arrived yet. Mercury doesn’t launch into retrograde until next month, yet tempers are snapping louder than a fat man’s suspenders. In fact, nothing less than police intervention was required to restore order at this week’s Santa Barbara City Council meeting as Anna Marie Gott — the loudly buzzing council gadfly who has achieved acronym status of “AMG”—erupted into peals of bitter laughter, shouting that the mayor was “a tyrant.” The Mayor, known alternately as Cathy Murillo, was trying to silence the loquaciously pugnacious councilmember, Jason Dominguez. (Technically, she cut off further debate and called the question.) Jason, by way of background, has been known to provoke. Cathy, likewise, is known to overreact. Either way, it’s not a good look. (For the facts, see the news article by Delaney Smith.) All this high-profile gassing off underscored my great sense of relief upon hearing the County of Santa Barbara just won a $6 million Proposition 47 grant. Prop. 47 is the law Californians passed in 2014 intended to get people who don’t really belong behind bars somewhere else. Such as into treatment for substance-abuse or mental-health issues. The money will pay for a lot of things—a new sober center, for example, and 20 beds of step-down housing—but chief among them is the county’s obliquely named “co-response team.” That’s where a mental-health crisis

place for people in this shape to be shipped.

Bad situations tend to get worse there. After four days, “decompensation” sets in. Understanding comes easy; change, however, is hard. As such, the co-response plan constituted a wobbly first step in the right direction. Thus far, the numbers look impressive. According to the latest stats, the co-response team has had 446 encounters. Of those, 72 subjects were checked into a psychiatric hospital; 31 went voluntarily, the rest on a three-day hold against their will. Another 36 were taken to the county’s grossly underutilized Crisis Stabilization Unit (CSU), where for the last 23 years, they can chill on reclining Barca loungers, watch TV, listen to music, or engage therapeutically with the mental-health professionals on-site. (I say “grossly underutilized” because the CSU is licensed for eight coolingoff “beds,” but it has never been staffed for more than four. Although it opened four years ago, cops only first learned of its existence a year ago. I am sure there’s a logical explanation, but every time I’ve been told what it is, my mind’s gone blank.) But here’s the big number where coresponse is concerned. Of those 446 contacts, only seven people were taken to jail. Front-line cops are reportedly thrilled. With the co-response team in place, they no longer have to babysit highly agitated, potentially volatile individuals until mental-health case workers show up to relieve them, a process that reportedly often takes in excess of three hours.

A lot of what McKarrell and Crable do is preemptive hand-holding. But on occasion they also play the role of human bomb squad. Last month, for example, McKarrell and Crable rolled up on Mission Canyon stand-off in which a 56-year-old man with a long history of mental illness and criminal weirdness had broken into his parents’ home — in which, yes, there were guns—and threatened violence to both the occupants and the cops. I have no idea how it happened, but they talked him down. A couple of months earlier, they responded to a potential suicide, only to discover the 27-year-old male had enough rifles, handguns, ammo, and cash to take over a small Third World nation. By placing him on an involuntary psychiatric hold and on to a properly licensed psychiatric hospital, they made sure he couldn’t get his guns back — or legally buy new ones — for at least five years. Earlier this year, we learned that the plug was about to be pulled on this program. Santa Barbara’s coalition of mental-health advocates, predictably, went ballistic; county supervisors took note; cooler heads prevailed; and the plug was un-pulled. But only until July 1. This grant will keep the program going for at least the next three years. The City of Santa Barbara, in the meantime, has just launched its own version of co-response. The dog days of summer may be baying in the distance, but I can hear that fat man’s suspenders. ​— ​Nick Welsh

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Opinions

CONT’D

news commentary

USED MOTOR OIL & FILTERS?

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Finding the Line in the Sand

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The Miramar Is Still Breaking the Rules, but the Rules Need to Change

when the former Miramar Hotel still had blue roofs and Jacques the lifeguard patrolled the place like a hawk. If he suspected you of freeloading on the resort’s private property, he’d swoop down on his bicycle and demand in his thick French accent: “Are you a guest of the hotel?” To kids who’d sneaked into the pool, Jacques was downright scary, a tan tyrant in a bright-red speedo. But to the rest of the community, he was a funny, charming fixture who liked to flirt and did handstands on the boardwalk. There was nothing funny or charming about the three Rosewood Miramar Beach managers in dark suits who recently rousted a group of Montecito families from the beach in front of the hotel. In the fallout, the managers defended their heavy-handedness by comparing themselves to the late Frenchman. They said they were simply enforcing the rules. But Jacques never kicked people off the beach, and he cut a decidedly different figure of authority than the Men in Black who ruined the day of 6th graders celebrating their graduation. Though both sides have simmered down, the episode exposed how horribly confusing and flawed the Miramar’s private access rules really are. For one thing, the beach’s “mean high tide” mark—the point calculated by the State Lands Commission in 1958 that would normally separate the beach’s private and public zones, and that is often invoked in debates over the resort’s property rights — isn’t the literal line in the sand that matters here. The Miramar’s private beach area is actually determined by a 1975 settlement agreement between the original hotel and the County of Santa Barbara that simply carried over to the new resort when its permits were issued in 2015. The private area runs the width of the property and extends 60 feet from the edge of the boardwalk toward the ocean. (If the tide gets high enough, the settlement also states, the 60-foot limit line must move inland

to accommodate a 20-foot strip of public access between the Miramar’s beach and the ocean.) On Monday, I took a tape measure down to Montecito. I measured from the Miramar’s boardwalk to a post that marked the end point of where the hotel had set up its lounge chairs and umbrellas. The post was 85 feet from the boardwalk, 25 feet over the limit. So either the resort is intentionally breaking its own rules it’s so eager to enforce, or it’s understandably confused by the strange and outdated system with a moving target that was set up under a previous owner more than 40 years ago. Either way, in order to avoid another dust-up with neighbors and to make clear once and for all what part of Miramar Beach is private and what is public, the hotel and the county need to hash out a new set of access guidelines. To its credit, the Miramar has already removed the black ropes and stanchions that had no place on the beach in the first place, and it updated its signs to explain the posts aren’t meant to keep the public out, but to keep hotel guests drinking alcohol penned in, per the requirements of its liquor license. ABE POWELL

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It may be easy to dismiss this debate as a first-world problem pitting Montecito millionaires against jet-setting billionaires, but in the context of the long-running battle to maintain access to California’s public beaches, it’s a potentially precedentsetting moment. We need to make sure the Miramar doesn’t keep pushing the line. We need to come up with a clear set of rules and stick to them. And we need to set the record straight when wannabe tough guys in Ray-Bans say they’re just like good ol’ Jacques. n

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JUNE 20, 2019

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obituaries

To submit obituaries for publication, please call (805) 965-5205 or email obits@independent.com

Marietta Nicolina Mazza 09/26/33-06/12/19

Marietta Nicolina Mazza of Ventura passed away peacefully, on June 12, 2019, at the age of 85. Marietta was born in Los Angeles, California to Nicolo and Rose Mazzola, Sept. 26, 1933. She attended Dorsey High School in Los Angeles, CA. Marietta then went on to earn her Bachelor of Arts Degree in Journalism from Cal State University Los Angeles in 1976, as a single mother, raising four daughters. She had an illustrious 25-year career as a journalist and public relations professional at Cal State Los Angeles and Thelma Lager & Associates and wrote a column for The Daily News. At the end of her career and never afraid of a challenge, she became an integral part of the leadership team at Edge Teleservices. As well, she was an award-winning crochet artist, receiving 26 ribbons at the Ventura County Fair for her uniquely beautiful afghan creations. Marietta was a giver, and a woman who believed in mentoring and sharing her gifts. From serving on the Board of Directors of the Public Relations Association of Southern California Colleges, to generating the most successful United Way effort ever conducted at Cal State, Los Angeles, she blazed a trail for single working mothers in the 1970’s. Marietta didn’t ask anything of anyone else that she wasn’t willing to do herself. She sent a message to all women that anything was possible, including serving your community. She voluntarily worked elections for decades believing that voting was a right, not a privilege. She took her crocheting talent to the people by crocheting blankets for premature babies at local hospitals, and prayers shawls at Our Lady of Assumption Catholic Church. One stitch at a time, Marietta left a legacy of love, service and kindness to everyone she met. An avid cat lover and authentic Italian cook, Marietta took pride in everything she did. An elegant woman of great taste and style, Marietta enjoyed the art of antiquing, specifically collecting Fenton glass and creating peaceful, artistic environments with her glass collections in every room of her house. After raising her four daughters, she achieved her dream of purchasing a home at the beach and resided in Ventura for 21 years. She regularly entertained family and friends, traveled and always took time to savor the dream of living at the ocean. 18

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Our beautiful mother, nana, sister and aunt is survived by her four daughters, Patricia Helene Mazza (Monsoor), Cynthia Mazza (Rutherford), Stephanie Mazza (Bartha) and Melanie Rose Mazza (Jacobs), her sister Fara Mazzola Wexler, her son-in-laws Alex Bartha, Robert Jacobs and James Monsoor, Jr., her grandchildren, Carolyn Larsen, James J. Monsoor III, Elizabeth H. Monsoor and Danny Lee Rutherford, her great grandson Hudson J. Monsoor, her niece Marie Aiello and nephew Mark Wexler. We are forever grateful to Marietta for being a constant example of a strong, independent, loving woman. Family and friends are invited to visiting hours to be held on Thursday evening June 20, 2019 from 4 to 8pm at the JOSEPH P. REARDON FUNERAL HOME & CREMATION SERVICE, 757 E. Main Street Ventura, where a Most Holy Rosary will be recited at 7pm. A Funeral Mass of Christian Burial will be celebrated at 10am on Friday June 21, 2019 in Our Lady of the Assumption Roman Catholic Church, 3175 Telegraph Road Ventura. Interment will immediately follow in Santa Barbara Cemetery, Channel Drive Santa Barbara.

Cody Calhoun Davis 09/23/88-06/01/19

Our son Cody, so deep, so thoughtful, so emotional, and so much more, left his family way too soon, on June 1st from a heart attack. A true lover of nature, he was forever creating beautiful unique art from driftwood, shells, plants or anything from nature. Life here on earth was challenging for him. He seemed to find peace and solitude from doing one of his favorite things, surfing in the ocean. Family gatherings with his cousins, aunts, uncles, and grandparents were always special times for Cody. His parents, Bob and Annette, his sister and brother, Chelsea and Kyle, his wife Chelsea, along with all of his extended family miss and love you so much. Surf with the Angels & Dolphins Cody. You will always be in our hearts.

JUNE 20, 2019

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Jack Calvin Bechtel 11/04/24-06/08/19

Jack Calvin Bechtel was born in Venice, CA, November 4, 1924. After a short stay at the Serenity House of Santa Barbara, Jack passed peacefully in his sleep on June 8, 2019. Jack grew up in Venice, California, where he and his brother Alpha Gillett had many adventures. A veteran of WWII, Jack served in the Navy from 1943 to 1945, with most of his time spent in the Pacific Theatre. He participated in the Battle of Okinawa as a Sonar Technician aboard a submarine-chasing Patrol Craft Sweeper the US PCS1402. Upon finishing his naval career at the end of the war, he enrolled in college and graduated from the University of California, Berkeley, with a bachelor’s degree in Wildlife Conservation. The department was headed by A. Starker Leopold, Aldo Leopold’s son, and was one of the earliest programs in wildlife conservation. He started working for the State of California as a wildlife biologist studying waterfowl in the Salton Sea area as well as in the central valley. He later worked on water conservation projects that created reservoirs and recreational lakes all over the state. He ended his career as a Chief Research Statistician for the Parks and Recreation Department in Sacramento, California. This was where he met the love of his life, my grandmother, Aldona Vilkas and they were soon married in 1972. In 1987 they retired in Santa Barbara to be closer to family. They both enjoyed long walks on Leadbetter Beach and along Shoreline Park. My grandfather was more than just my “grandpa”; he was a kind, lighthearted soul who always had a smile for everyone in his path. Throughout his life, Jack was a brilliant naturalist who loved to watch and study birds. He was fiercely independent, living alone, driving, and volunteering at the Braille Institute until the very end. His family will miss him profoundly yet we know he is in a peaceful place without pain.

Jack Bechtel was predeceased by his wife, Aldona Bechtel, his step-son Audrys Vilkas, his cousin Paula Carter, and his brother Alpha Gillett Bechtel. Remaining relatives granddaughter Heidi Hullander (husband Michael, and children Megan and Ryan Hullander), granddaughter Karin Napel (husband Jonathan and children Haunna and Patrick Tomas), niece Susan Bechtel, nephew Peter Bechtel (husband Michael Wong), nephew Paul Bechtel (wife Cathy Bechtel), and niece Karen Bechtel (husband Allen O’Neil). In lieu of flowers, please donate to the Braille Institute of Santa Barbara or the Visiting Nurse & Ho pice/Serenity House of Santa Barbara.

Phillip Samuelson 04/22/64-05/31/19

Phillip Martin Samuelson passed away on May 31, 2019. A devoted husband and father, Phil was a beloved family man and friend who will be missed greatly by all who knew and loved him. Phil was born on April 22, 1964, to Peter and Joanne Samuelson at St. Francis Hospital in Santa Barbara, joining three older sisters. He grew up in Montecito and attended Crane Elementary School. Phil spent his high school years at The Dunn School in Los Olivos, where he enjoyed playing lacrosse. He attended Santa Barbara City College before graduating from Pepperdine University with a bachelor’s degree in Communications, with an emphasis in print journalism. On October 7, 1995, Phil married Kathleen Etchepare at our Lady of Mount Carmel Catholic Church. Phil and Kathleen met in 1989, while serving as magazine editors at a publishing company in Orange County that produced publications for pet owners and hobbyists. Phil loved the outdoors, especially fishing, and the natural sciences-basically anything having to do with animals, the earth, and the world around him.

Phil and Kathleen were blessed with two children, Karissa and Jake. He could not have been a prouder or more devoted father and husband. In 2004, the family relocated from California to Colorado Springs, Colorado. While in Colorado, the Samuelson family became involved in showing and breeding AKC champion Redbone Coonhounds. Phil became a well-known and respected expert and leader in the Redbone Coonhound breed. Phil had a great capacity for joy. He also had a gift for engaging people in a variety of subjects and made a significant impact on many, many lives through his authenticity, genuine love for people, and natural ability to make those around him feel at ease. Phil leaves behind his wife and children; his mother, Joanne Samuelson; uncle, Paul Samuelson; aunt, Elise Ganz; sisters, Anne Renzo, Erica Tannor, and Shelley Berger; brothers-in-law, Daniel Berger and Robert Tannor; niece, Samantha Tannor; and nephews, Bradley Tannor, Cole Tannor, William Berger, and Jesse Berger. The funeral mass will be Saturday, June 22, 2019, at Our Lady of Mount Carmel Catholic Church at 10:00 a.m., with a reception to follow.

Mary Meredith (Schmitt-Wills)

Mary Meredith (SchmittWills) died June 20, 2018 with her family cherishing her through and following her death. She is the mother of Dawn (Willie), grandmother of Maeve, Liesel, Emmet; sister of Betsy, Susan, Kimberly, pre-deceased by Jack. Mary was a beloved mother, grandmother, sister, wife, aunt, cousin, friend, teacher, nurse, caregiver and volunteer.  Mary’s nurturing, acceptance of others, enthusiasm for life & food, and loving nature are dearly missed by all whose life she touched.  In honor of Mary donations to Assistance League of SB or donor’s favorite charity are appreciated.


In Memoriam

1927-2019

BY P E T E R S C H U Y L E R

A Catalyst for Success COURTESY PHOTOS

J

Jean Kellogg Schuyler

ean Kellogg Schuyler peacefully passed away on April 17, 2019, at her home of nearly 65 years. A woman of modest tastes and boundless generosity, she quietly wove her wisdom and support into the fabric of Santa Barbara. It is relatively easy to sum up Jean’s life philosophy, but comprehending the breadth and depth of how she chose to express her values is daunting. Never one for long speeches, it seems appropriate to capture the essence of Jean in a haiku: Gentle steps through life Leading us all from behind Class act, small ego John, the youngest of Jean’s four children, spoke for all of us when he said, “Our mother was in the position to be able to have most anything: the best cars, the most elegant clothes, or the latest status symbol du jour. Instead, she chose to live simply, having things because they served a practical purpose rather than to impress. Living her life helping others and serving her community, and doing so with little or no recognition, is a true measure of her character. I will forever be in awe of how she managed to find a meaningful way to help so many people and organizations just because it was the right thing to do for her.” Jean held several priorities throughout her life: horses, family, wildflowers (including the places they grew), and making the world a better place. They gave her a filter to put her life’s ambitions and actions into perspective. Born into a well-known Southern California family with strong community ties, Jean spent her early years in Altadena, wandering the foothills and mountains on foot and horseback with her parents and brothers. Developing a lifelong passion for horses, she “trained” her first colt when she was 8 years old — which, in hindsight, she said was “probably not fair to the horse.” She was on horseback at Hearts Therapeutic Equestrian Center just a few weeks before her passing at the age of 91. In between these two points of her life, she was riding whenever she had the chance. A member of the Santa Barbara County women’s riding group the Sage Hens since 1969, she seldom missed their overnight backcountry rides three times a year. Only if it were raining would she sleep inside a tent. When we were young, she regularly rode to our school, leading a second horse so that one of us children could ride home with her. At the age of 81, while she was cleaning out her corral, she had a stroke that left her in a wheelchair for the rest of her life, except for the treasured moments when she got back on a horse with help from her friends at Hearts. Jean grew up in a close-knit family. One set of grandparents lived next door, and the other set lived with her for several years. Stories of past relatives and escapades with present ones were everyday events. Dealing with all the internal family dynamics that strong-willed and independent members bring to the table gave Jean a role of being a quiet but forceful and effective peacemaker for her entire life. Jean’s best friend in high school, Desdy Jackson, set her up with a blind date with Barry Schuyler while she was home from college one summer. Not only did Jean and Barry get married three years later, but Desdy went on to marry Jean’s older brother, thus becoming her sister-in-law. Needless to say, the families stayed close, and cousins were (and still are) good friends. Although

SAGE HEN: Jean Schuyler, pictured above on The Mormon at age 10, was a horsewoman all her life, and the outdoor life stirred a deep interest in environmental, educational, arts, and health causes, which inevitably flourished with her support.

Jean and Barry had widely divergent views on the value of horses versus boats, they were closely united in their desire to support the Santa Barbara community and were nearly unstoppable when they worked together. Jean and Barry also shared a love of the mountains and wild places. They spent days hiking and backpacking in the mountains, particularly the Sierras. Sometimes, just the two of them would go, but often they brought family (all four kids spent many summers in high mountain meadows) and friends. They reveled in sharing fastflowing streams; clear, starry nights; and the smell of the mountains with everyone they spent time with. And the alpine flowers … ah, the flowers. Native wildflowers were Jean’s passion. She was well versed in what she was looking at, whether it was from horseback, on foot, or even traveling in the car. She always had a field guide and wanted to know the name of everything. My sister, Ann, recalls Jean shrieking to our father: “Barry, stop the car! There is a purple flower over there. I don’t know it.” And off she would go, dashing across the field to discover for herself what it was. Jean knew that she had been fortunate with her position in life. She made a conscious decision to follow a simpler path that might have surprised those who didn’t know her well. One could easily consider her lifelong support for environmental, educational, arts, and health causes to be preordained. Her grandfather was friends with John Muir, taking him on his last long trip to Yosemite in 1912; her uncle was friends with Ansel Adams and often spent time hiking with him in the Sierras; her great-great-aunt Ellen Browning Scripps founded Scripps College and Scripps Institution of Oceanography, among her many projects. Jean honored the traditions of her family while defining her own standards and finding her own way of expressing her values. Above all, she lived her values and beliefs. No task was too small or menial as long as it helped others or the planet; pulling weeds, picking up trash on Cliff Drive, or just stopping in at a friend’s house to say hi and help with a small task was just as important and meaningful to Jean as chairing the board of Planned Parenthood, the Maritime Museum, or the Santa Barbara Foundation. Santa Barbara is known for the great number of nonprofit organizations that the town supports; what is not well known is how many of those groups Jean supported with time, knowledge, and resources. What is known is that number was extraordinarily high and having Jean involved was a catalyst for success. Jean was an enduring presence in the community despite a debilitating stroke nearly 10 years ago. She was able to live a full and active life, in no small part due to the love and attention she received from her caregivers. Following her stroke, Kate, her younger daughter, remarked, “Being a very involved and active person, Jean was concerned all her life at the thought of being incapacitated. Despite that, she lived her new, different, difficult life with grace and elegance and with a positive attitude and appreciation for what she was able to do.” Even in a wheelchair, Jean had a presence that commanded attention and peacefulness. The key to her happiness? To leave the community and world better than she found it. A celebration of Jean’s life will take place 3-6 p.m. on Sunday, June 30, on the hilltop at the Santa Barbara Zoo. See jeanschuyler.forevermissed.com for details and to RSVP (yes, please do!). Call 450-2613 with questions. For those who would like to honor Jean, a donation in her name to any of the countless environmental, arts, social, health, or educational organizations that she supported and nurtured would be fitting. A personal commitment to follow her motto of “do unto others as you would have them do unto you” would bring a smile to Jean’s face and joy to her heart. n

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Maria Lorena Barker

On March 14th, 2019, God took home another beautiful angel. My wife, my love, my friend and soul-mate, Maria Lorena Barker went home to be with our Lord. She was greeted by our daughter Kristin Martha Barker (whom we lost 27 years ago when Maria began her battle with cancer), her sister, my mother, father, and so many other family members on both sides that have gone before us. Now we celebrate the life of Maria Lorena Barker. She also joins her sister Elida whom she spoke so highly of. She is now in the presence of our Lord. She was a selfless, graceful and loving mother, an amazing and patient grandmother and soul mate of 31 years to her husband, Jim Barker . She was a wonderful friend to all. Maria Lorena Barker was born in Chihuahua Mexico June 24, 1959 to Maria Luz and Abel Medina. At the age of one, her family moved to Colorado. Maria graduated Battle Mountain High School in 1978. She then joined the Air Force October 4th 1978. She mentioned she had a hard time with boot camp but she never gave up. She never quit. She went on to become a Sergeant E4 in the Air Force and worked as a Financial Management Specialist. She also earned her Bachelors degree in Accounting. She served till her honorable discharge in 1984.  She received the Outstanding Unit Award, Good Conduct Medal, AF Longevity Service Award Ribbon, and an Air Force Training Ribbon. She attended La Verne College and Alan Hancock College. After she received her Bachelors while in the Air Force, she worked for Santa Barbara County at Public Works and also worked on the weekends at the Santa Ynez airport. In 1985, Maria moved up to the Treasurer Tax Collectors office. This is where she met the love of her life. Jim would work downstairs in the computer room during the graveyard shift. Maria would come down and pick up her departments paperwork and this is where they noticed one another. Maria worked in many divisions of the Santa Barbara County as an accountant. She then moved up to become an Accountant III supervisor for the Retirement department. She decided to become a cost analysis supervisor at Social Services department, which was a very important position in her field. Everyone she worked with respected and loved Maria because she showed respect and courtesy to all. Maria loved life and was determined to live it to the fullest no matter what struggles she faced. She was a strong Christian woman who overcame many difficulties in life with grace. She was selfless and knew no bounds in giving to others. Maria battled cancer for 27 years. She astounded Doctors, Nurses, and the medical field with her faith as she battled this disease. Maria is in the medical journal since no one has ever survived the amount of years that Maria endured.  Everyone that knew Maria said that she was a true warrior or as her husband calls her, “my bad ass warrior.” Maria made it her goal to spend as much time as she could with their children

1959-2019

and grandchildren. She leaves behind her daughters; Kandis L. Barker, Callie E. Barker Wass, and son, Christopher J. Barker; her son in law, Spencer Wass; her grandchildren; Evan Matthew Barker (Evan from heaven), Aaliyah L Barker (princess), and Andrew J Barker (smiley). She is survived by her father Abel Medina, her mother Maria Luz Medina, her sister Lizbeth Velasquez, her brother Jesus Medina, brothers in law Jack Velasquez, George Barker and John Bell, sisters in law Irene Bell and Chrystine Medina and cousin Federico Larrea (Fede´). She also leaves behind many dear and loved nieces and nephews. Anyone that knew Maria knew that she loved everything blue and white. She had blue willow dishes, blue and white couches, and blue and white interior design of her room. She even had a blue and white decorated Christmas tree that took awhile for the rest of the family to get used to. Maria used to say she didn’t have an artistic bone in her body but she had many talents. She was not only intelligent and great with numbers, she was amazing at making dresses for Kandis and Callie when they were younger. She made these dresses with the detail and love you could see in the end result. She was obsessed with blue willow, plaid, and floral so anything she made; whether it be dresses, comforters, pillow cases and blankets; all resembled that pattern and turned out beautifully. She was also great at making screens for the screen business. She was a perfectionist. Many workers were astonished at how fast she could make them with such detail. She reminded Jim of his mother Martha back in the day with his fathers screen business. Maria was an avid runner when she was younger. She loved running the 5K Chardonay runs with her husband Jim. She loved biking and riding along the beach. She and her husband would take their kids along with them. She used to enjoy camping and family trips. The trips that the family took included crosscountry to New York and Colorado. Maria loved to laugh and especially make others laugh. She would tell jokes to her coworkers and friends, make funny comments with her family; some of which we shouldn’t repeat. One of Maria’s passions was dancing. Disco happened to be her favorite. Whether she was in the house, outside or in the car with her husband, that era of music got her moving. Jim and Maria had a special bond. After meeting one another at their work, they knew right away that they had a connection. Her refined look, the way she dressed, her funny humor and smile are what caught Jim’s attention. Maria loved the way Jim cooked and his sense of humor. They loved to laugh and enjoy each others time together. They were married 28 years of the 31 they were together. Their lives together were exciting, blessed, full of excitement and love. They were full of challenges but together they overcame every challenge. Their love got them through everything. During the last 3 years, they enjoyed trips to Ireland and Paris,


Tomorrow is not promised. Live & cherish every moment

but their most memorable one was their trip to Spain. Marias life left such an impact on so many from her family to her friends, that she will be missed dearly. With faith and hope we will all be reunited one day. We love you Maria!! In lieu of flowers, please make any donations to the Cancer Foundation. We want to thank everyone at the Cancer foundation; the doctors, Dr. Abate, Dr. Abassi, all the nurses and staff, with all their love, their respect, their honor and courtesy that they gave to Maria through out the 27 years. Also we would like to thank Cottage Hospital and all the doctors, nurses, and staff there. Thank you to Hospice for all of your guidance and help.

Cancer Foundation 601 W. Junipero St. A celebration of life will be held on June 29th at 10am at Goleta Valley Church with a reception following the service.

Goleta Valley Church 595 N. Fairview Ave.


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OPINIONS CONT’D RJ MATSON / CQ ROLL CALL

Letters

58766

DO YOU HAVE MS OR ARE A CARE PARTNER FOR SOMEONE WITH MS? Living with MS on the Central Coast is a new local Resource for you Living with MS on the Central Coast (calcoastms.org) was started by folks with MS in central CA to provide local, fast support for folks with MS and their Care-Partners

• Participate with your peers! Join our 2019 Wellness Program for exercise, diet, lifestyle to help you overcome MS challenges • Yoga • Self Help Groups Special Events • Fun Activities

The Real Stink

O

dor is not the worst problem with cannabis. The real stink is that the chemicals emanating from the plants themselves are dangerous. To quote UCSB scientist Dr Patricia Holden’s letter to the county: “BVOCs (biogenic volatile organic compounds) are responsible for the noxious odors associated with cannabis, but it is the BVOCs, not the odors per se, that have the potential to undermine human health and environmental quality. This is an important distinction … Cannabis terpenes, like other biogenic terpenes, have the potential to be precursors of ground level ozone which is regarded by the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency as a serious human health threat.” Also, the odor reduction compound, mandated by the county for cannabis growing, adds more potentially harmful molecules into our air, including essential oils like pine oil and detergents, or surfactants, used by Byers Scientific. ​— ​Valerie Bentz, Carpinteria

Adoption Blindspot

T

hese days, anyone with $100, the resolve to fill a tube with saliva, and the patience to wait for results can learn about their ancestry through athome DNA tests. Once the results arrive, one can learn about their predisposition to certain diseases, if they carry traits for bunions or misophonia, and, of course, their biological lineage. It is incredible that this can all be uncovered through the ease of a computer or mobile device. It is natural to be curious about one’s lineage. For individuals who were adopted, this curiosity is heightened. This is particularly true for those adopted during the Baby Scoop Era or in a closed adoption. Only nine states allow adoptees unrestricted access to their Original Birth Certificate (OBC) that contains information about where they were born and, most importantly, the name of their biological parents. California is not on that list. In California, an adoptee must file a petition with the county clerk and show “good and compelling cause” for their OBC to be disclosed. This means the adoptee runs the risk of their petition being denied. No other citizen faces this challenge when seeking their birth certificate. No adoptee should be hindered from knowing their personal and biological history. I hope that in the near future, adoptees in the great state of California will be able access their Original Birth Cer— ​Angie Swanson-Kyriaco, Goleta tificate.

A Tragic Housing Policy

I

t is no secret that in the past Santa Barbara’s mayor and council have led the effort to change the face of the city and character of our community by approving high-density buildings — commonly known as AUD (Average Unit-size Density). Most have been foisted upon predominantly poorer residential neighborhoods suffering from overcrowding, lack of street parking, and environmental challenges, with the argument that they will be affordable by design, which has turned out to be fanciful. If Santa Barbara is building apartments, they should be affordable. Affordable means feasible for people making between 80 percent and 120 percent of median income, or $79,300 for a family of four. Residents who put up with the detriments of density should have a chance to benefit from it. Teachers, nurses, firefighters, and cops could more easily live in Santa Barbara, a boon every day but especially during emergencies. The sad truth is that old housing units are our most “affordable” units. Many new AUD projects are replacing “affordable” older housing with rentals that command top-tier rents. We are slated to lose around 60 units of housing. The replacements are out of reach to the dislocated residents when their homes are demolished and replaced with high-end AUD units. It’s tragic that our current policies are stripping the city of affordable housing and that many small towns like ours are under siege from legislation from Sacramento. I proposed a policy change that has the support of the majority of the City Council. This will greatly improve the AUD program by adding a modest affordability requirement of 15 percent to new development projects. This is set to be finalized on June 25 after years of stonewalling. We ask the Santa Barbara community to support affordable housing at this meeting. (See independent.com for full version.)

— ​Councilmember Jason Dominguez, S.B.

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Y R O T S R E C OV

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s n e L e c L O OKING BAC S.B.’S AN K AT NUAL

SUMMER SOIREE

TEXT AND PHOTOGRA PHY BY

T

he longest day of the year always inspires Santa Barba ra’s most colorful party. The annual Summer Solstice Parad e on State Street and festival at Alameda Park rely on score s of artists, who work hundreds of hours on dozens of floats that entertain the thousands of spectators arriving from near and far for the spectacle. Streets are closed, blankets and lawn chairs mark territories along the route, bodies are painted, confetti flies, and the impac ts from too much or too little sunscreen and margaritas will be on display this weeke nd. This seasonal institution is a most-anything-goes talent show combing art and architecture on wheels and feet with costumes and music generating laughter, awe, curiosity, and dancing, of course. At high noon on Saturday, June 22, the handmade, people-powered creations, large and small, will make their way up 10 blocks up State Street without motors or written messages. The floats hang a right at Micheltore na Street and pull over at Alameda Park, where the party will have started the night before and will continue

PAUL WELLM AN

through Sunday. There will bands onstage, food and vendors’ booths, a drum circle, and copious amounts of shade for those done with literal sun worship. This year’s Solstice parade theme is “Wonder” and marks year number 45 for what started as Michael Gonzales’s birthday celebration in 1974. The annual event blossomed with the help of the Summer Solstice Music Festival and the Santa Barbara Museum of Art to become a three-day event that is famed beyond our region. I’ve photographed the event and its workshop more than a dozen times over the past two decades, and I am sharing some of my favori te photographs from over the years here. Despite having so many parades under my belt, I’m still impressed to see the imagination that comes to life through wood , canvas, paint, coaxial cable, papier-mâché, and countless other repurposed items that become the parade stars talked about for years afterward. So grab a hat, dress colorfully, and snag a spot in front. Though it’s the longest day of the year, the parade and party always seem too short.

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JOIN US!

SUMMER FESTIVAL JUN 17 – AUG 10

Purchase tickets online today!

Visit MUSICACADEMY.ORG for information about 170 classical music events in Santa Barbara.

SHOSTAKOVICH THE YEAR 1905

SAT, JUN 29, 7:30 PM | GRANADA THEATRE $10, $40, $70, $80, $100 Academy Festival Orchestra | Larry Rachleff conductor IVES “Decoration Day” from A Symphony: New England Holidays SHOSTAKOVICH Symphony No. 11, The Year 1905 The Academy Festival Orchestra Series is generously supported by Mary Lynn and Warren Staley and exclusive corporate sponsor Montecito Bank & Trust.

VOYAGER FAMILY CONCERT LONDON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA

FRI, JUL 12, 6- 7 PM | GRANADA THEATRE All adult tickets $10 / 7-17s Free Elim Chan conductor

The Granada Theatre becomes Mission Control for this space-themed family concert. Combining orchestral excerpts by Beethoven, Richard Strauss, Holst, Ives, Shostakovich, Messiaen, John Adams, and John Williams with audience participation and a specially created film, this multimedia event will thrill the entire family. The lead sponsors of the London Symphony Orchestra partnership are Linda and Michael Keston and Mary Lynn and Warren Staley. Additional support has been provided in remembrance of Léni Fé Bland.

Festival Sponsor Women’s Auxiliary of the Music Academy of the West

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Y R O T S R E V O C

R E M SUM ICE T S L O S ! A I V I TR

See how much you know about Santa Barbara’s Summer Solstice Celebration by taking our online quiz at independent.com/summersolstice.

4•1•1

The 45th Annual Summer Solstice Celebration takes place Friday-Sunday, June 21-23, with an opening ceremony Friday, 4-9 p.m., at Alameda Park (1400 Santa Barbara St.); a parade down State Street on Saturday at noon; and a festival at Alameda Park on Saturday, noon-8 p.m., and Sunday, noon-6 p.m. Call 965-3396 or visit solsticeparade.com.

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Alamar Dental Implant Center sbimplants.com Mindfulness and Loving Kindness in Relationships with Dave Richo PhD, MFT and Radhule Weininger PhD

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June 29th, 2019 10-3PM Old Mission, 2201 Laguna St. Santa Barbara, CA 93105 Tickets: $80.00 LUO Ping, Chinese, 1733–1799, Finger Painting of Crane, From “Album of Miscellaneous Subjects” with WANG Feng. Ink and color on paper; album leaf from a set of 12. Anonymous loan.

CEU's and limited scholarships available

EXHIBITIONS ON VIEW

EVENTS

Bamboo, Rocks, and Old Trees: Chinese Calligraphy and Literati Painting

Thursdays, June 20 and 27, 6 – 6:30 pm

Through June 23

Free

Drop-In Workshops in Chris Kallmyer: Ensemble Enjoy collectively created music by musicians and special guests on a handmade carillon.

FINAL WEEKEND!

Chris Kallmyer: Ensemble

Thursday, June 27, 5:30 – 6:30 pm

Through September 15

Sketching in the Galleries

Registration at mindfulheartprograms.org

SEMANA NAUTICA 2019

Free To reserve a spot, email communityprograms@sbma.net.

ENJOY HALF-PRICE ADMISSION

For more exhibitions and events, visit www.sbma.net.

82ND ANNUAL

1130 State Street, Santa Barbara, CA Tuesday–Sunday: 11 am–5 pm • Free Thursday Evenings: 5–8 pm

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WEEK I N D E P E N D E N T CA L E N DA R

TH

JUNE

20-26

E

BY TERRY ORTEGA AND AMBER WHITE

As always, find the complete listings online at independent.com/events. And if you have an event coming up, submit it at independent.com/eventsubmit.

6/20-6/23, 6/26:

A Gentleman’s Guide to Love and Mur-

SUMMER SOLSTICE COURTESY

der PCPA presents this 2014 Tony Award–winning musical. This hilarious Edwardian tale with a beautifully crafted score follows Monty Navarro as he jumps the line of succession by eliminating eight relatives (all played by one actor) who stand in his way of becoming Earl of Highhurst. The show runs through June 30. 8pm. Solvang Festival Theater, 420 2nd St., Solvang. $35.75-$55. Call 922-8313. pcpa.org

ZU MB A

Emily Trask, George Walker, Sky Privat

DO

Y

6/20-6/23, 6/26: Ensemble Theatre Company Presents

DANIELLE METHMANN

The Moontones

6/21:

The talented father-and-son duo will bring their dirty reverberated slide guitars and chest-punching drums, known as roots ’n’ roll and perform hits such as “Nothing to Lose” and “Pawn Shop Blues.” 6-9pm. Cold

Fundraiser

Friday Swing Dance: The

Moontones Start the night with a beginning swing class and then jive to the sounds of an all-star, sevenpiece band performing the best swinging dance tunes. Partners are not necessary. Class: 7:30pm; dance: 8:30-11:30pm. Carrillo Recreation Ctr. Ballroom, 100 E. Carrillo St. $15-$20 (cash only at the door). Call 897-2519.

6/20-6/24: Circus Vargas

6/20: The Hubcap Stealers

COURTESY

6/20: Garden Storytime All are welcome to enjoy outdoor storytime and crafts that provide hands-on environmental education lessons focusing on nature and nutrition. Snacks will be provided. 10:30am-noon. Upper Manning Park, 449 San Ysidro Rd., Montecito. Free. Call 969-5063. sbplibrary.org

tinyurl.com/TreeofLife Event

Celebrate the 50th anniversary of Circus Vargas as they present the show The Greatest of Ease, which will bring acrobats, daredevils, aerialists, jugglers, contortionists, motorcycle stunts, and clowns! Arrive 30 minutes early for an interactive pre-show celebration, where kids can learn circus skills such as juggling, balancing, and more! Meet the entire cast after each performance and pose for pics. Thu.: 7:30pm; Fri.: 4:30 and 7:30pm; Sat.: 1, 4, and 7:30pm, Sun.: 12:30, 3:30, and 7pm. Mon.: 6:30pm. Earl Warren Showgrounds, 3400 Calle Real. Free-$72. Call (877) 468-3861. circusvargas.com

PH

William Davies King’s entire, 2,000+ cereal box collection positioned on the floor in the form of a giant mandala, followed by a reception and discussion. 9am-7:30pm. Modern Dance Studio, 1145 HSSB, UCSB. Free.

RA

6/20: Tree of Life(TM): A Performance Event Experience Professor

G

goletahistory.org/fiesta-ranchera

TO

Fiesta best and celebrate in the Good Land with delicious appetizers and desserts, signature cocktails, area wines, and craft beers while you enjoy performances by Tony Ybarra and the 2019 Spirit of Fiesta and Junior Spirit before dancing to the music of Area 51. 5-10pm. Rancho La Patera & Stow House, 304 N. Los Carneros Rd., Goleta. Designated driver $45; GA: $70. Call 681-7216.

coldspringtavern.com

O

6/20: Fiesta Ranchera Wear your

Spring Tavern, 5995 Stagecoach Rd. Free. Call 967-0066.

PH

THURSDAY 6/20

dancesantabarbara.com

6/20:

3rd Annual Official Drink of Santa Barbara Cocktail Contest Bring your friends to this live competition copresented by Visit Santa Barbara and the Santa Barbara Independent as five finalists compete for their cocktail to be crowned the 2019 Official Drink of S.B. Tickets include event access, a glass of wine, tasty bites, and a sample of the finalists’ cocktails. 6-8pm. El Paseo Restaurant, 813 Anacapa St. $25. Ages 21+.

tinyurl.com/OfficialDrinkofSB

Volunteer Opportunity

Dancing Lessons Mark St. Germain’s heartwarming, hilarious play follows a socially awkward young man who seeks the instruction of his neighbor, a Broadway dancer, to learn enough dancing to survive an awards dinner. The show runs through June 30. Thu.-Fri., Wed.: 8pm; Sat.: 4 and 8pm; Sun.: 2pm. New Vic, 33 W. Victoria St. $25-$60. Call 965-5400. etcsb.org

FRIDAY 6/21 6/21: Thunder from Down Under Direct from Las Vegas, this all-male revue will return for the ultimate ladies’ night out, featuring entertaining dance routines

Civil Discourse

6/21-6/23:

45th Annual Summer Solstice Celebration The community and tourists alike are

invited to celebrate this year’s theme, “Wonder.” Start at the opening ceremony with a happy hour and music, and continue all weekend with music, food from a variety of vendors, a children’s area with workshops and activities, a Youth Stage, and of course, the parade! Opening Ceremony: Fri., 4-9pm. Alameda Park, 1400 Santa Barbara St. Parade: Sat., noon. State St. from Cota St. to Micheltorena St. Festival: Sat., noon-8pm; Sun., noon-6pm. Alameda Park. Free. Call 965-3396. solsticeparade.com

6/20: Teen Face Painting Workshop Teens will learn awesome face painting techniques and take home materials so that they can showcase their new skills just in time for the Summer Solstice Celebration. Participants must register for this event. 2-4pm. Martin Luther King Jr. Wing, Eastside Library, 1102 E Montecito St. Free. Call 963-3727. sbplibrary.org 6/21: Summer Solstice at Djinn Celebrate Solstice at Hotel Californian’s Djinn with food for purchase, beats by Val-Mar Records, and libations by mixologist Devon Espinosa. RSVP online. 5-10pm. Djinn, Hotel Californian, 36 State St. Free. Recommended for ages 21+. tinyurl.com/SolsticeDjinn

Continued on p. 33

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Protest INDEPENDENT.COM

JUNE 20, 2019

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PA C I F I C C O N S E R VAT O R Y T H E AT R E

JUN 13 -30

INDEPENDENT CALENDAR

JUNE

As always, find the complete listings online at independent.com/events. And if you have an event coming up, submit it at independent.com/eventsubmit.

20-26

Solvang Festival Theater

CO U R T

ESY

6/22:

“ANDREW PHILPOT GIVES A TOUR-DE-FORCE PERFORMANCE!”

energized hip-hop throw-down is a tribute to the powerful music and spirit of the hit Broadway musical and features a hand-picked, live band of musicians and vocalists performing songs from the original cast recording, The Hamilton Mixtape, and Lin-Manuel Miranda’s Hamildrops. 7:30pm. Lobero Theatre, 33 E. Canon Perdido St. $15.50-$36. Call 963-0761. lobero.org

Santa Maria Times

and cheeky humor from Australia’s hottest export. 8pm. Chumash Casino Resort, 3400 E. Hwy. 246, Santa Ynez. $19-$29. Ages 21+. Call (800) 248-6274.

chumashcasino.com

6/21, 6/23: Folk Orchestra S.B.’s Spanish Concerts Enjoy the gorgeous acoustics of the Presidio as this area orchestra plays a rich amalgam of folk and classical music in exciting, unique arrangements. Fri.: 7:30pm, Sat.: 4pm. Presidio Chapel, 125 E. Canon Perdido St. $36.50. folkorchestrasb.com

Book & Lyrics by Robert L. Freedman Music & Lyrics by Steven Lutvak Based on a Novel by Roy Horniman

TICKETS 922-8313 | BOX OFFICE 12:30-7PM WED-SUN | PCPA.ORG

6/21-6/23: Mamma Mia Follow the story of a single mother, a daughter about to be wed, and her three possible dads as they work out life’s issues through uplifting song and dance. This 2002 Tonynominated, feel-good musical will have you singing the songs of ABBA all the way home. The show runs through July 14. Fri.-Sat.: 7:30pm; Sun.: 2pm. The Ojai Art Ctr. Theater, 113 S. Montgomery St., Ojai. $10-$30. Call 640-8797. ojaiact.org 6/21: The Coterie Club w/ Fruit Bats Participants will enjoy this pop-up dining experience focused around art, music, food, and soul led by Chef Nick Bodden. Ticket includes a preshow champagne reception and raw bar, a multicourse dinner-and-drink pairing, and a performance by the Fruit Bats. Preshow: 6-7pm; dinner: 7-9 pm; show: 9pm. SOhO Restaurant & Music Club, 1221 State St. $100. Call 962-7776. sohosb.com

6/21: Teen Film Workshop Teens will learn the skills needed to make effective and engaging films in this workshop series. Visit the website for upcoming workshop themes and dates. 12:30-2:30pm. Martin Luther King Jr. Wing, Eastside Library, 1102 E. Montecito St. Free. Call 963-3727. sbplibrary.org

6/21: Charged Particles with Tod Dickow Enjoy a night of music under the oak trees, and dance along to this electrifying group. Wine, beer, soft drinks,

Fundraiser 30

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JUNE 20, 2019

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The Alexander Project: A Tribute to the Music of Hamilton This

Portrait of Ray Strong by Deborah VeldKamp and cheese and fruit plates are available for purchase. 3pm. Solvang Festival Theater, 420 2nd St., Solvang. $30. Ages 5+. Call 686-1789.

solvangfestivaltheater.org

SATURDAY 6/22 6/22: Kathryn Blanche Enjoy an afternoon of storytelling with Kathryn Blanche as she shares and signs books from her Laila of Midgard fantasy series. 2pm. The Book Loft, 1680 Mission Dr., Solvang. Free. Call 688-6010.

tinyurl.com/SeriesBookSigning

6/22: Zoe Boekbinder, Phantom Tides, Vaughn Montgomery Come hear some soulful sounds, heartbreaking songwriting, and dreamy guitar riffs. 7:30pm. Greater Goods, 145 W. El Roblar Dr., Ojai. Free (donations accepted).

greatergoodsojai.org

6/23:

Remembering Ray Strong: A Community Celebration Take

part in this special presentation in remembrance of an amazing artist, man, and environmentalist. Artists will share their stories along with collector David Parker, who will also be available to talk about the paintings in his show. Light refreshments will be provided. 3-4:30pm. Valley Oak Gallery, Wildling Museum, 1511-B Mission Dr., Solvang. Free. Call 686-8315 to RSVP.

wildlingmuseum.org

6/22: Midtown Social, Joe Marcinek Band Known for its chic and soulful sound and epic dance parties, San Francisco’s retro-soul band Midtown Social may play a few singles from the band’s upcoming release, Fantastic Colors. The Joe Marcinek Band will open the show with its blend of New Orleans funk, Chicago Blues, and jazz fusion. 8:30pm. SOhO Restaurant & Music Club, State St. $10. Ages 21+. Call 962-7776.

sohosb.com

6/22: HOPs & HAs Sip on a frosty beer and laugh along with this hilarious lineup of comedians featuring Bri Pruett, J.B. Ball, Julie Weidmann, Ben Gonzalez, Christine Medrano, and Michael Malone. 7:30pm. Night Lizard Brewing Co., 607 State St. $5. Ages 21+.

tinyurl.com/HOPs-HAs-NL

transition into wildlife activism, followed by a brief solo performance. 6pm. Lobero Theatre, 33 E. Canon Perdido St. $31-$46; VIP: $106. Call 963-0761. lobero.org

6/23: Screening: Readers In his film, James Benning confronts viewers with individuals silently reading a book for 30 minutes to reveal the sensation of the state one occupies while getting lost in the act of reading. The screening is in conjunction with the exhibit James Benning: Quilts, Cigarettes & Dirt (Portraits of America), which shows through July 14 at the Museum of Contemporary Art S.B. 3-5pm. Faulkner Gallery, S.B. Central Library, 40 E. Anapamu St. Free. Call 564-5642. sbplibrary.org

SUNDAY 6/23

MONDAY 6/24

6/23: Born to Be Wild: An Evening with John Kay of Steppenwolf Explore John

6/24: Lucy Walsh The singer/songwriter and daughter of Joe Walsh will perform original and cover songs in an intimate acoustic set on Continued on p. 32

Kay’s incredible lifetime of accomplishments from Steppenwolf’s history to his gradual

Volunteer Opportunity

Civil Discourse

Protest


WEEK Shows on Tap

A L W A Y S A M A Z I N G. N e v e r r o u t i n e.

6/20, 6/23: Dargan’s Irish Pub & Restaurant Thu.: Dannsair. 6:30-8:30pm. Sun.: Irish Jam Session. 4:30-7pm. 18 E. Ortega St. Free. Call 568-0702. darganssb.com 6/20-6/22, 6/26: The Endless Summer Bar-Café Thu.: Hosanna Alm. Fri.: Johnny Miller. Sat.: Al Vafa. Wed.: Dave Vignoe. 5:30-8:30pm. 113 Harbor Wy. Free. Call 564-1200.

Thunder From Down Under

6/20, 6/22-6/23: Maverick Saloon Thu.: The Pods. 8-11pm. $5. Sat.: SheByrd. 8-11pm. Sun.: Are We Not Horses? 1-4pm. 3687 Sagunto St., Santa Ynez. Free-$5. Ages 21+. Call 686-4785. themavsaloon.com 6/20-6/22: M.Special Brewing Co. Thu.: Kyle Swan. 6-8pm. Fri.: Left Hand Lions. 7-9pm. Sat.: Flannel 101. 6-8pm. 6860 Cortona Dr., Bldg. C., Goleta. Free. Call 968-6500. mspecialbrewco.com 6/20-6/22, 6/24-6/26: SOhO Restaurant & Music Club Thu.: Trouble in the Wind. 8pm. $8-$10. Fri.: Fruit Bats, Skyway Man. 9pm. $15-$18. Sat.: Midtown Social, Joe Marcinek Band. 8:30pm. $10. Ages 21+. Mon.: Lucy Walsh. 7:30pm. $5. Tue.: Singer-Songwriter Night: Maz Karandish, Cheyenne Skye, Moni. 7pm. $8. Wed.: Spoonful, King Dream, Cheyenne Skye, Waterstrider. 7pm. $10-$12. 1221 State St. Call 962-7776. sohosb.com

I Love The 90s Tour feat Mark McGrath & Vanilla Ice

6/21, 6/22: The Brewhouse Fri.: The Roosters. Sat.: Kinsella. 8pm. 229 W. Montecito St. Free. Call 884-4664.

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JUN

21

8 PM

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8 PM

6/21: Carr Winery Barrel Rm. The Reserve. 7-9pm. 414 N. Salsipuedes St. Free. Ages 21+. Call 965-7985. carrwinery.com 6/21-6/22: Mercury Lounge Fri.: The Internet, Late Bloomers, Bobi Rae, QVO. $7. Sat.: December’s Children, The New Yardvarks. $6. 9pm. 5871

The Midtown Men

Hollister Ave., Goleta. Ages 21+. Call 967-0907.

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CO

lac Angels. 3-6pm. 2363 Alamo Pintado Ave., Los Olivos. Free. Ages 21+. Call 694-2252 x343.

5

8 PM

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Trace Adkins

figmtnbrew.com

JUL

12

8 PM

6/22: La Cumbre Plaza Shelter. Noon3pm. 121 S. Hope Ave. Free. Call 687-6458.

The Hubcap Stealers

6/21-6/23:

JUL

6/22-6/23: Figueroa Mountain Brewing Co. (Los Olivos) Sat.: 3 Way Stop. Sun.: Cadil-

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6/21-6/22: Uptown Lounge Fri.: Missbehavin’. Sat.: Heart & Soul. 9pm-midnight. Uptown Lounge, 3126 State St. Free. Ages 21+. Call 845-8800. www.sbuptownlounge.com

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shoplacumbre.com/ Events

Cold Spring

Tavern Fri.: The Hubcap Stealers. 6-9pm. Sat.: Oddly Straight; 1-4pm. Cheyenne Skye and friends; 5-8pm. Sun.: Tom Ball and Kenny Sultan; 1:15-4pm. Spencer the Gardener; 4:30-7:30pm. 5995 Stagecoach Rd. Free. Call 967-0066.

6/23: The James Joyce Ulysses Jasz. 7:30-10:30pm. 513 State St. Free. Ages 21+. Call 962-2668.

sbjamesjoyce.com

coldspringtavern.com

3 4 0 0 E H i g h w a y 24 6 , S a n t a Yn e z · 8 0 0 - 24 8 - 6 2 74 · C h u m a s h C a s i n o . c o m

>>>

Must be 21 years of age or older to attend. Chumash Casino Resort reserves the right to change or cancel promotions and events.

INDEPENDENT.COM

JUNE 20, 2019

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31


Local Business. Local Impact.

INDEPENDENT CALENDAR

JUNE

As always, find the complete listings online at independent.com/events. And if you have an event coming up, submit it at independent.com/eventsubmit.

COURTESY

20-26

6/24:

An Evening with NASA: Mars Exploration NASA Engineer Terry Himes Learn about NASA’s Journey to Mars, including InSight, Curiosity, Mars 2020 and Helicopter, Mars Sample Return, and beyond with Terry Himes, an engineer at NASA’s Jet Propulsion Lab. 7-8:30pm. Faulkner Gallery, S.B. Central Library, 40 E. Anapamu St. Free. Call 564-5642. sbplibrary.org

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Wesman and enjoy comedy from a surprise headliner. 9pm. The Brewhouse, 229 W. Montecito St. Free. Call 884-4664.

6/25-6/27: Summer Kids Movies: Peter Rabbit This 2018

WEDNESDAY 6/26

live-action/computeranimated comedy follows the feud between Peter Rabbit and Mr. McGregor as they rival for the affections of the warmhearted animal lover who lives next door. 10am. Paseo Nuevo Cinema, 8 W. De la Guerra St. $2. Rated PG.

6/26: Wendy Dale Young The author and composer and her rescue pup Liberty Pearl will both be at this heartwarming event and booksigning of the book Behind the Eyes of Liberty Pearl, about the life of this brave four-legged survivor before she was rescued from Iraq. 7pm. Chaucer’s Books, 3321 State St. Free. Call 682-6787.

chaucersbooks.com

metrotheatres.com/events

Continued from p. 30 the piano, accompanied by a guitarist and backup singer, with all proceeds to benefit the Alzheimer’s Association. 7:30pm. SOhO Restaurant & Music Club, 1221 State St. $5. Call 962-7776.

sohosb.com

6/24: Makerspace: Light Painting Kids can create amazing images by painting with light in this creative workshop. Registration is encouraged. 2-3pm. Tech Lab, S.B. Central Library, 40 E. Anapamu St. Free. Ages 7-12. Call 962-7653. sbplibrary.org

For the location nearest you, please call (855) 886-4824 or visit firstrepublic.com Annual Percentage Yield effective as of publication date. Limited-time offer subject to change without notice. $10,000 minimum balance. Penalty for early withdrawal. Fees may reduce earnings. Cannot be combined with other offers. Member FDIC.

SCHEDULE

6/25: Music Academy of the West Presents Symphonic Dances This popular chamber music series combines unique ensembles of Music Academy teaching artists and fellows in cherished favorites and new revelations. A reception with the artists will follow the performance. 7:30pm. Lobero Theatre, 33 E. Canon Perdido St. $46. Call 963-0761. lobero.org

6/25: Nathalia | Bilingual Concert for Families The family will

1200 State Street, Santa Barbara, (805) 560-6883

FARMERS MARKET

TUESDAY 6/25

THURSDAY

SUNDAY

Goleta: Camino Real Marketplace, 10am-2pm

Carpinteria: 800 block of Linden Ave., 3-6:30pm

TUESDAY

FRIDAY

Old Town S.B.: 500-600 blocks of State St., 4-7:30pm

Montecito: 1100 and 1200 blocks of Coast Village Rd., 8-11:15am

SATURDAY

WEDNESDAY

Downtown S.B.: Corner of Santa Barbara and Cota sts., 8:30am-1pm

Solvang: Copenhagen Dr. and 1st St., 2:30-6:30pm

enjoy this infectious selection of bilingual songs, from rock to cumbia and jazz to reggaeton. 10:30am. Goleta Valley Library, 500 N. Fairview Ave., Goleta. Free. Call 964-7878.

FISHERMAN’S MARKET

6/25: Comedy on Tap Laugh along with hosts Josue Figueroa and Uriah

Rain or shine, meet local fishermen on the Harbor’s commercial pier, and buy fresh fish (filleted or whole), live crab, abalone, sea urchins, and more. 117 Harbor Wy., 6-11am. Call 259-7476. cfsb.info/sat

SATURDAY

1

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THE INDEPENDENT

JUNE 20, 2019

INDEPENDENT.COM

Fundraiser

Volunteer Opportunity

Civil Discourse

Protest


WEEK

WHAT’S ON

This weekend - tickets still remaining!

SUMMER SOLSTICE

LANNY KAUFER

Continued from p. 29

Lobero Theatre Foundation presents

BORN TO BE WILD:

JOHN KAY An Evening with

of

6/23:

Summer Solstice Nature Hike Native plant

educator Lanny Kaufer will be leading this intermediate-level summer solstice hike. Moderately experienced hikers or physically fit beginners are invited to hike through a mixed-conifer forest of pines, fir, and cedar on Pine Mountain (elevation: 7,000 feet). Lunch is not included. 8:30am-3:30p. Meet at Maricopa Plaza parking lot, 1207 Maricopa Hwy., Ojai. Free-$25. Call 646-6281.

herbwalks.com

STEPPENWOLF

From Rock Star to Wildlife Advocate

6/21: Summer Solstice Kick-Off with DJ Darla Bea Enjoy cocktails, sunset selfies with the best view of the city, and dancing to perfectly curated tunes from DJ Darla Bea while enjoying drinks for purchase, including the Summer Solstice Signature cocktail “Bea’s Knees.” 6-9pm. Kimpton Canary Hotel Rooftop, 31 W. Carrillo St. $10. Ages 21+. tinyurl

THIS SUNDAY, JUNE 23 Journey with John Kay through an incredible lifetime of accomplishments; from Steppenwolf’s history to his new role preserving wildlife and enjoy a brief solo performance. Proceeds benefit sustainability efforts at the Lobero Theatre.

.com/SolsticeKick-Off

6/21: Summer Solstice Kundalini Yoga & Gong In

this workshop you will enjoy the youthful energy of summer solstice, connect to your natural energy with Kundalini Yoga for all levels, and heal with the vibration of four gongs. Come early to find parking. 7-8:30pm. 32 E. Micheltorena St. $20. Call 965-6045.

santabarbarayogacenter.com/workshops

6/22-6/23: Solstice Children’s Festival and Parade Create a costume at the Creativity Stations inside the festival. Then, kids can take part in the Children’s Parade. Children’s Festival: Sat., noon-6pm; Sun., noon-3pm. Alameda Park, 1400 Santa Barbara St. Children’s Parade: Sun., 3pm. Main Stage through the park to the Children’s Stage, Alameda Park. Free-$10 donation. Call 965-3396. tinyurl.com/

SolsticeChildrensFest

Sign up for our eNewsletter.

6/22: COAST Solstice Parade Party 2019 Take in the Solstice

The Bentson Foundation Elaine F. Stepanek Foundation

Celebration with curbside seats at the parade, tacos, beer, margaritas, and great company! All admission proceeds go toward supporting COAST’s programs of healthy and sustainable ways of getting around, from walking and biking to taking the train and bus. 11:30am-2pm. Pacific Premier Bank, 1035 State St. $35-$40.

Hear it first. Follow us. See what’s on at 805.963.0761 / LOBERO.ORG

tinyurl.com/Coast Solstice2019

805.884.4019 www.lagsmedical.com

CO

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SUMMER SOLSTICE Festival & Parade June 21, 22, 23 SOLSTICE PARADE - Sat. June 22 Noon, State & Cota, Parade goes to Alameda Park

FESTIVAL June 21 - 23 Alameda Park

Children’s Festival: Sat. & Sun, June 22-23

www.SolsticeParade.com

City of Santa Barbara • Art from Scrap • A Litter Free Event 34

THE INDEPENDENT

JUNE 20, 2019

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Theme: WONDER


Summer Solstice 2019 Theme: WONDER

Pa s s t h e H a t E n s e m b l e Watch for the Wizards of Wonder and Keepers of Dreams, with Artist-in-Residence Lisa Thomas and her ensemble -- including Mayor Cathy Murillo and other local dignitaries. The Earth Goddess of Generosity, and the Sun are calling for your generous support as they move down the street.  Every year, the Pass the Hat float raises funds that go directly to helping us put on the parade. This ensemble will appear during the middle of the parade. Give us a High 5 by dopping $5 or whatever you can contribute into the hat. Hats off to you, our community, for helping us make this happen every year!

CHILDREN’S AREA & Art Creation Station

Sponsored by Arts for Humanity! Children’s Stage sponsored by the SB Bowl Foundation!

Sat./Sun. 12 - 6 pm at Alameda Park East Musicians, Summer Solstice inflatables, face painting, craft vendors, family fun, free games, art projects including building own costumes for the children’s parade before the Parade.

Children’s Parade - Free - Sunday 3 pm Meet at Children’s Stage at 3 pm Sunday for a walk around the Park.

Get your Solstice T-Shirts at the Festival!

This year’s Solstice Poster and t-shirt design is by artist David Mark Lane. Head for the center of Alameda Park to get your Solstice t-shirts. Also, check out the floats from the Parade on display, delicious food vendors, beer and wine garden, arts and crafts!

parade highlights:

New this year! 45th annual special edition Festival Guide Available for download at www.solsticeparade.com

ensembles and floats to watch for

La Boheme Professional Dance Company Teresa

Willie Wonka’s Whacky Wonder A journey into the

Hip Brazil Classic samba ensemble by Vanessa Isaac,

Mermaid and the Pearl Ember is a wonder from the

Kuskey Nowak kicks it off with a lineup of 90 core dancers, DJ Darla Bea and Jeff Shelton designed float.

wonky world of Charlie and the Chocolate Factory and the everlasting gobstopper. A Carey / Foreman Collaboration.

with guest collaborators Sul Da Bahia (with maestre Chin) and the Bellydance Land of Chris! Basimah.

ocean.

Nōks: Wonder if it’s hawk? Wonder if it’s a giraffe? An

The World’s Biggest Bubble Machine Artist-in-Resi-

Connecting Thru Sign Language Hearing impaired

dence Caroline Hambright’s giant bellows bubble machine made by elves, includes participants of the Solstice Teen Summer Camp

performers, dance and walk up State Street using American sign language, directed by August Vanderbeek.

aardvark? It’s a Nōk! Artist-in-Residence Claire Frandsen is pleased to release Nōks into the wilds of the Solstice Parade with puppet builder John Conroy and an amazing team of volunteer Nōk-whisperers.

What Does the Fox Say? Artist-in-Residence Tessa

wonderful than that? David Machacek, Jeff Dutcher, and friends fill the streets with their flamboyance.

Flanagan has created a giant fox puppet. What is the secret of a 9 foot tall fox, as it saunters down State Street at mid day? Ring-ding-ding-ding-dingeringeding: it’s an ancient mystery.

Trollstice Created by Artist-in-Residence Claudia

Steam Punk Circus The tail end of the parade. Artist-

Flamboyance of Flamingos What could be more

Bratton, a wonder of trolls appears to float up State Street. From Ancient Nordic folk tales to the present, trolls of all sizes, ages and shapes, along with magic mushrooms, appear in their beautiful forest.

Marley’s Wonder Garden Created by Sublime Gardens, and assisted by Cleanup Santa Barbara. A rolling garden memorial to Marley the Wonder Dog. The King and Queen It’s the Sun and Moon! Solstice royalty raffle winners ride in thrones and costumes created especially for them.

in-Residence Gregory Beeman and Michael McHugh from Grooveshine are riding a musical dragon steam punk drum wonder, with their circus of steam punkers.

Mariano Silva’s Brazillian Ensemble A wonderful cultural mashup -- Bahia Carnivale meets Tahitian ocean motion.

Wonder Bread Watch for a wandering loaf of Wonder

A Kaleidoscope of Butterflies Wow! A kaleidoscope

The Museum of Fine Art Wonders Artist Evelyn

Bread, created by Phyllis Chiu.

Jacob appearing in her 39th year creating on the street. The art gallery moves down State Street.  

World Dance for Humanity’s large dance ensemble will rock out to Queen’s greatest hits.

of butterflies on wheels! Created by Dusty Williams. 

Magic Jack Solstice Maskmaker Hathor Hammett as the Wizard Wolf of Wonder. 

Cosmic Tree of Life in memory of Margaret Singer. Pali X-Mano’s new creation, a tree with aerial dance performers, surrounded by a menage of wonderful cosmic creatures, with another one of Pali’s wonderful inflatable sculptures.

Parade like an Egyptian with Kimi VanDyk & the Pink Party, Egyptianized art bikes, pink pyramids and a sphinx! Gioia A play that embodies a duality of death/fight and eternity/love with dancing, singing and magic involved.

Beaver Weavers A beaver lodge will float up state street to become a puppet stage in the Children’s Festival area. Bob’s Your Uncle Another loaf of Wonder Bread, with a statue of Bob McAllister on top.  

Corvus Skull Pirates Dancing pirates with mermaids from the Valhalla Elite Training Center.   Rocks and Drams A float celebrating the super bloom after the fire.

Solstice Festival in Alameda Park Three Days! Friday, Saturday and Sunday Friday 6/21, from 4:00 – 9:00 pm

Saturday 6/22, from Noon– 8:00 pm

Sunday 6/23, from Noon– 6:00 pm

KTYD Presents Festival Opening Night

DJ Sparx

KJEE Presents Reggae in the Park

Emcee Lin Aubachon • Happy Hour 4-5 pm

La Boheme Professional Dance Company & Darla Bea

Groovement

David Segall Band

Yoga at noon with Solstice Executive Director Robin Elander

World Dance for Humanity

No Simple Highway

Emcee Winton “Cool Ruler”

West African Drum and Dance

Area 51

Comfort Food

Paradise Kings

Grooveshine

Derinkuyu

Special Guests

Superstoked

Cydeways

Download your 45th annual special edition Festival Guide!

www.SolsticeParade.com

INDEPENDENT.COM

DJ STAGE Sat 12-7 pm, DJ Calvin Riley “Wonderground” Sun 1:30-6 pm DJ McIntyre “Slightly Darker”

JUNE 20, 2019

THE INDEPENDENT

35


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Santa Barbara


History COURTESY

PAUL WELLMAN PHOTOS

HISTORY BUFFS: Jim O’Mahoney (center) with American Pickers hosts Mike Wolfe (left) and Frank Fritz

a model Japanese motorcycle, a fish-shaped cigarette lighter, and old copies of Hot Rod magazine. He also picked up a pair of Frank Sinatra’s shoes. The episode is scheduled to air sometime in July. Despite the shopping spree, O’Mahoney’s collection is far from depleted. He still has an incredible array of artifacts, many steeped in Santa Barbara history. But with the rapid development of what used to be an edgier corner of town, O’Mahoney fears the museum’s days are numbered. His building was sold a few years ago, and rent has gone up. All around are new wineries and hotels that cater to the wealthy, not the artists and tradespeople that used to populate the Funk Zone. O’Mahoney is ready to keep selling but hopes his collection isn’t completely scattered to the wind. “I want some of this stuff to stay in Santa Barbara,” he said, waving his arm over a signal bell from the trolley that used to coast up and down State Street, which sits near a hand-drawn map of Anacapa Island from the 1800s. “These are some neat things.” It’s hard to put a price on some — what’s Potter Hotel silver or a Chumash hunting bow worth? — but there’s always room for negotiation. To make an appointment with O’Mahoney, email him at cowboystar7@verizon.net. Serious buyers only, please. —Tyler Hayden

T

L

f all the new cannabis incarnations, the edibles market shows the most unbound growth potential. Though dosage is capped at 10mg a serving (plenty for most of us) and 100mg a pack (enough to knock down a horse), there’s no end to the new flavors and textural formats — from gummies and mints to chocolates and baked goods — that these THC-laden treats may embody. Packaged as pieces of desiccated gel on rolls of wax paper, Fruit Slabs are a throwback to the fruit roll-ups of yesteryear. Each 10mg square is about the size of a silver dollar, a bit thinner than roll-ups, but about the same consistency. While you can chew them, that leads to gummed-up teeth, so they’re best left to melt in your mouth. The selling point is that Fruit Slabs are organic and vegan and contain no added sugar, yet they boast pleasant flavors like Tropical Haze and OG Mango. “We were tired of eating desserts every time we wanted to enjoy cannabis through food,” explained Oakland-based cofounder

COURTESY

Cannabis

Fruit Slabs EDIBLES O

Roxanne Dennant, so she crafted something that was all fruit-based. Apparently, the fruit itself contains terpenes that activate the clear distillate oil in these treats. As the cannabis flower market has already shown, the next horizon for edibles is about which type of cannabis is involved: The OG Mango comes from an indica strain, providing more of a cerebral, plop-on-the-couch high (and a great night’s rest), while the Tropical Haze is based on sativa, which sets the mind afire for a while (but don’t take it right before bed!). Other flavors include Grape Ape (indica) and Mango Maui Wowie (sativa), and Fruit Slabs also released a Pride Passion Fruit flavor this month to celebrate the LGBTQ+ community during June’s Pride month. They’re $20 per package. See fruitslabs.com. —Doobie Newbie

Plants

Lotusland’s JAPANESE GARDEN Reopens

Picking Through Gold he hosts of American Pickers struck gold this spring when they visited Jim O’Mahoney’s weirdly wonderful Santa Barbara Museum, a labyrinth of rooms in the heart of the Funk Zone packed with items he’s spent more than three decades collecting. Mike Wolfe and Frank Fritz, the faces of History’s popular reality TV show, walked away with a mounted leopard head, artist Channing Peake’s chaps and cowboy hat, and 1940s Fiesta posters, among armfuls of other objects. O’Mahoney ended up $20,000 richer. “It was a fun day,” he said. The crew filmed from 9 a.m. to 9 p.m. with a small army of producers sifting through shelves and boxes and loading up a big van parked on Helena Avenue. Wolfe favored the historical display items, like photographs of the Rancheros Vistadores, a silk poster of actor Errol Flynn, and a classic Heidelberg beer sign. Fritz gravitated toward the cars and toys, including

living p. 37

otusland’s Japanese Garden reopened last week after a massive $6 million renovation. The late-afternoon ribbon-cutting ceremony included cocktails and hors d’oeuvres and the usual thanking of staff and donors, but one name stood out — the garden’s original architect, Frank Fujii. Fujii was the son of Japanese immigrants who moved to Santa Barbara when he was 9 years old. He attended a single-room grammar school on the Mesa and later studied at the Riveria’s old State Teachers College under renowned South Coast horticulturalist Peter Riedel. During WWII, Fujii and his family were interned for four years at the Gila River camp in Arizona, but they returned to Santa Barbara, and in 1967, Fujii met Lotusland creator Ganna Walska. Together with stonemason Oswald da Ros, they began building what would become the botanic wonderland’s Japanese Garden. Fujii balanced Walska’s tendency for the dramatic with an insistence on simplicity. He created a space reminiscent of an Edo-era strolling garden with its Frank Fujii large central pond and used a design technique called shakkei, meaning to “borrow” a view or element from the larger landscape. It’s evident in the view of Montecito Peak framed by the garden’s Torii Gate. Fujii toiled over the space for four whole decades before retiring in 2007 at the age of 86. His colleagues always admired his passion and persistence but feared his nearly unreturnable Ping-Pong shot, called the “Fujii flop.” He passed away in 2016. During this week’s ceremony, Fujii’s and da Ros’s families were the first to pass through the gate into the enhanced expanse. They meandered around the pond and paused on the new overlook, called a miwatasu, that hangs above lotuses and koi. It’s an element Fujii had planned but was unable to complete. They ran their hands along bridges made with yellow Alaskan cedar and admired the karesansui, or “dry garden,” with patterns raked into small beige rocks. Before continuing along a path of flowering cherry trees, the families sat on boulder benches carved out of sandstone collected from the 1/9 Debris Flow. The garden’s 30 stone lanterns, ishi-doro, and pagodas have all been returned to their original positions near fresh plantings of bamboo, broadleaf trees, and six different kinds of aquatic plants, which Fujii loved so much. Lotusland CEO Gwen Stauffer said there were signs of him all around. “The garden bears his hand in a profound way,” she said. For information and tickets, visit lotusland.org. —Tyler Hayden

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p.39

COURTESY

FOOD&DRINK

trends

s weekend

COURTESY

Bubbles-Soaked INDIAN BRUNCH

S.B.

Boochcraft

@ BIBI JI

P

NOT YOUR AUNT’S KOMBUCHA: Santa Barbara is falling hard for Boochcraft, a hard kombucha made in Chula Vista.

airing heavily spiced Indian cuisine

Owners

ALEJANDRO MEDINA AND RAJAT PARR

PAUL WELLMAN

Serving Paneer with Pét-Nat All Summer Long

I

wine, beer, or liquor, finding an alternative these days is only difficult because there are so many options, from hard cider and hard root beer to hard seltzer and hard kombucha. Santa Barbara is a hotbed for the latter, as the leading San Diego County–based brand Boochcraft reports that our city is its top seller geographically. The “soft” version of kombucha is a probiotic-rich tea that is fermented with only a trace of alcohol, typically under one percent alcohol by volume (ABV). Once it tops 3 percent ABV, it’s deemed “hard.” Most producers make theirs between 4 and 8 percent ABV, while everything from Chula Vista–made Boochcraft clocks in at precisely 7 percent ABV, including such popular flavors as Ginger Lime Rosehips and Grapefruit Hibiscus Heather. Though federal laws don’t allow producers to explicitly claim that hard kombucha is good for your health, the perception that it’s better for you is rooted in reality: It has less residual sugar than flavored malt beverages, is naturally glutenfree, and is kombucha at its core, to which many attribute their well-functioning guts. “Our product has probiotics just like regular kombucha,” said BY BRIAN YAEGER Boochcraft cofounder Adam Hiner. “We use organic black tea from South Yunnan Province in China. Our sugar is certified organic cane sugar used for fermentation, but it is all fermented away. We source fruits from farms all over California and beyond, always trying to find ingredients as close to us as possible, then working out from there. Our fruit is also coming from certified organic farms 100 percent of the time.” Boochcraft isn’t the only hard kombucha on the rise. The overall kombucha industry was valued at $760 million in 2016 by market research company Grand View Research, which projected its market value would blossom to $1.15 billion by this year. The hard kombucha segment is about 10 percent of that, over half of which belongs to Boochcraft. The industry began with the New York–based Kombrewcha in 2013, which was purchased by Anheuser-Busch InBev in 2016. That same year, Boochcraft became the country’s second manufacturer and the first in California. In April, Boochcraft began offering four-packs for $14, and 86 cases sold in Santa Barbara in just one week. Lama Dog accounted for 25 of those cases, far exceeding any retailers in Los Angeles or even hometown San Diego, according to Hines. Even looking at the top five retailers — which are heavy on organic-centric grocers like Whole Foods — in all three markets, Santa Barbara nearly outsold the two SoCal megalopolises combined. “We do not know specifically why Boochcraft has done so well in Santa Barbara,” said Hiner. “We think it is the combination of the healthy, outdoor culture and the college crowd. We are still working to understand why Santa n Barbara is such a hot spot.”

Hard Kombucha Made in San Diego Sells Best Here

FOOD & DRINK

with wine can be a daunting task. So Santa Barbara’s curiosity was piqued with the opening of Bibi Ji back in February 2018, in which globally renowned Australian-Indian chef Jessi Singh teamed with powerhouse sommelier Rajat Parr, who was raised in India but lives here. However, the State Street establishment— BRIGHT BRUNCH BITES: The breakfast kati rolls (top) and uni toast (also above) led on a day-to-day basis from the get-go are two of the four entrees offered during Bibi Ji’s weekend brunch this summer. by Alejandro Medina — found quick success among fans of eye-opening food, natural wines, and cilantro. And, in the belly-filling department, the lamb curry chilaquiles rely on popadam instead and a buzzing scene. “A lot of people are making destination trips, of tortilla chips and plop watermelon pico de gallo and we’re very grateful for that,” said Medina of the atop the poached eggs. folks who travel to eat at Bibi Ji from Los Angeles But food is just part of the equation. Brunch uses and elsewhere. “People are starting to compre- the table on Bibi Ji’s back porch aside De la Guerra hend the wine program, Plaza, employs DJ Andrew Elia of Party Proper to spin on Sunand knowing that it’s a place for natural wine. It’s days, and focuses strongly on really come into fruition, beverages, particularly pét-nat, and people are asking for or pétillant-naturel, a fresh, typiorange wine left and right.” cally rustic form of sparkling What to do when your wine. Each weekend, a new unique formula works? selection will be available by the Double down on yet bottle for $35 (a popping deal for another cultural mashup: those not keeping track of escaIndian-inspired brunch. lating restaurant wine prices), BY MATT KETTMANN The new weekend menu, and there’s occasionally bound to served 11 a.m.-2 p.m. every be other options too, like when Saturday and Sunday, is very tight, with only four Parr’s team is pouring his own line of wines. items bridging South Asian flair with a nod to “It’s a much more casual, laid-back style of American expectations. The uni toast, served on brunch,” said Medina, who’s cool with people stopan activated charcoal loaf from nearby Oat Bakery, ping by for a quick bite and bottle with friends and blends fresh sea flavors with a familiar avocado base. content to host folks who prefer to linger for hours. “The primary goal is creating a really chill environment with affordable sparkling wine.” Today, Bibi Ji is very much Medina’s show. In May 2018, only three months after opening, Jessi Singh moved with his family back to Melbourne. That’s where he’d started his restaurant empire before opening Babu Ji restaurants in New York (still thriving) and San Francisco’s Mission District, which closed before he came to Santa EYE-OPENING OWNERSHIP: Alejandro Medina became a majority owner of Bibi Ji a couple of Barbara. Without any fanfare, months after the State Street restaurant opened and has managed the restaurant’s daily the resulting sale made a manoperations since conception. aging and majority partner out of Medina — who’s been running the operation since before The breakfast kati rolls combine eggs, paneer, and opening, when he still worked at Loquita — and spinach into a thick taco of sorts, with cardamom or minority partners for Parr and Gary Singh, the spicy pepper dipping sauces on the side. The ceviche executive chef who is Jessi’s cousin and opened the takes the fresh fish of the day and lifts it with cumin other restaurants as well.

f you’d like an alcoholic beverage but aren’t craving

See boochcraft.com.

Cont ’d on p. 43 INDEPENDENT.COM

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ALICIA CHO PHOTOS

COFFEE CREW: The smiling staff at Caffe Luxxe on Coast Village Road

Sip in Luxury at Montecito’s

CAFFE LUXXE

A

fter opening five successful Los Angeles

Luxxe on May 11. As a “hello” to their new home, the Luxxe team created a limited-edition Montecito Blend. “It is an iterative process of testing, tasting, taking meticulous notes, blending and then re-blending, and comparing those notes against the goals we are trying to achieve” said the owners. The blend can also be ordered online. The bright, modern interior of the new spot on Coast Village Road isn’t the only thing luxurious about this café experience. Caffe Luxxe is diligent about its sourcing, down to the plantation level. Alternating between farms in Latin America, Africa, and Southeast Asia, Caffe Luxxe sources its beans from growers who focus on sustainable practices, such as crop rotation, tree renewal, and complementary crop cultivation. They’re also fostering mutually beneficial relationships with their growers. Recently, during a considerable drop in global coffee market prices, Wain and Chau reached out to their partner farms who were struggling to keep afloat and offered

MARK WAIN AND GARY CHAU Bring Upscale Coffeehouse Formula to Town BY CIARA GILMORE

Coffee has always been more than just a pickme-up for these two. “When you live in a very large city, it can be easy to feel like just another nameless person,” said Chau. “We grew to love that welcoming, communal experience of gathering with old friends, and meeting new ones, over a cup of coffee.” After drinking many cups together during their time at USC’s business school, the duo went their separate ways in the corporate world. While Chau was visiting Wain in Seattle, where he was working at Microsoft, they explored Wain’s favorite coffee shops. The coffee was indeed delicious, but something was missing: luxury. “We realized instantly what we wanted to do together,” they explained. “Create a neighborhood café that felt luxurious while still being warm and inviting, to source and craft the best coffees in the world.” For the next six years, they saved and planned until finally pulling the trigger when Wain found himself out of a job and ready to take a risk. Returning to their Southern California roots, Los Angeles seemed like the place to make their dream come true. Thirteen years later, they expanded that dream to Montecito, opening Caffe

FOOD & DRINK

locations, Caffe Luxxe owners Mark Wain and Gary Chau are now serving their coffeehouse formula in Montecito. “It’s such a beautiful and inviting place,” said the pair of owners in an email interview, explaining that it reminds him of why they started the “approachable luxury” concept: “to offer the highest quality espresso and coffee with a friendly and genuine approach.”

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COURTESY

EST. 1998

OPEN MIC NIGHT All Ages Welcome! Mon. June 24 · 7 pm

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n November 17, 2017, I promised you that

Modern Times Beer would be coming to 418 State Street, the former home of India House. Reader Andy says that the popular brewery has finally opened its sixth location, joining Cubaneo, Shaker Mill, and Gear, in the now fully occupied space. There are also Modern Times locations in San Diego, Encinitas, Los Angeles, and Portland, Oregon. One of the first things to notice when walking into Santa Barbara’s Modern Times is a huge outdoor patio, one of the largest in Santa Barbara, and an extensive amount of art on the walls. They’re pouring 34 different beers on tap, with eight core beers and the rest rotating. The bar menu is 100 percent plant-based, yet with bold and rich flavors. They offer a double-double burger, a bratwurst schnitzel sandwich, loaded chili verde fries, and more. The cheese is made from coconut milk while the proteins are made by Beyond Meat. Continuing with the everything-done-in-house theme, I am told that Modern Times Beer also roasts its own coffee, for sale as whole bean or cold brew in cans or in draft. Hours are Sun.-Wed, 11 a.m.-11 p.m., and Thu.-Sat., 11 a.m.-midnight. Call 566-9294 or visit moderntimesbeer.com. PALACE GRILL LEGEND DIES: The Palace Grill’s popular

general manager Errol E. Williams, who’s known for his always-smiling face at the front door, has died after a very unexpected and brief battle with cancer. He was born December 1, 1951, and died June 8, 2019. Williams had been with the eatery for decades and is said to have been planning to retire this summer. According to PalaceGrill.com, Williams was born in Jamaica and honed his food-service skills at the Terra Nova Hotel. His started in the United States at the Homestead Hotel in Hot Springs, Virginia, where he became the hotel’s youngest maîtred’ in history. After working in numerous five-star establishments, Williams found his home at The Palace Grill, starting as assistant manager and becoming the general manager in 2000. “Errol is a consummate host whose love for guest satisfaction is unequalled,” says the website. “After 46 years in the restaurant industry, you’ll still find Errol at the front desk of The Palace Grill —greeting, smiling, and talking to new and longstanding customers.” ROCKET FIZZLE: Bernard in Mission Canyon reports,

Lunch & Dinner • Tuesday - Sunday 914 Santa Barbara St. • Santa Barbara • 966-2860 (Two blocks from State Street, five blocks from Alameda Park) 42

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“Rocket Fizz on State Street has closed. Not exactly a restaurant, but an important food source for all the junk food junkies in town.” I looked into this briefly and RocketFizz.com no longer lists a location in Santa Barbara and nobody answers the phone number.

CRYSTAL BALL KNOWS ALL: After intense concentra-

tion and a wave of my hand over the all-knowing crystal ball, my eatery oracle has revealed a list of food and drink locations appearing in your future:

Borrello’s, 3807 Santa Claus Ln., Carpinteria (formerly Borrello’s Pizza and Pastari) Bristol Farms, 3855 State St. (formerly Vons at La Cumbre Plaza) Cachuma Lake Café, Cachuma Lake, Santa Ynez Ca’ Dario, 1187 Coast Village Rd., Montecito (formerly Giovanni’s) Copenhagen Sausage Garden, the Funk Zone Dave’s Drip House (ice cream), 193 S. Turnpike Rd. (near Vons) Estilo Jalisco Grilled Tacos, 209 S. Milpas St. (across from The Habit) Fala Bar vegan restaurant, 38 W. Victoria St. (S.B. Public Market) Flightline, 521 Firestone Rd., Goleta (replacing High Sierra Grill) Jeannine’s Bakery, 7060 Hollister Ave., Goleta (formerly Dickey’s Barbecue Pit) La Michoacána, 21 N. Milpas St. Leadbetter, 23 E. Cabrillo Blvd (formerly Wheel Fun and L.T. Cinnamon) Little Dom’s Seafood, 686 Linden Ave., Carpinteria (formerly Sly’s) Mangione’s Italian Ice, 1222 State St. (formerly Spoon) Mesa Burger, 1209 Coast Village Rd., Montecito (formerly Coffee Bean & Tea Leaf) Oku Sushi, 29 E. Cabrillo Blvd. (formerly El Torito) Oppi’s Bistro/The Latteria, 1026 State St. (formerly Palazzio) Pizza Werk (vegan), 1429 San Andres St. (formerly Paesano’s) Renaud’s Patisserie & Bistro, Carpinteria Ave. at Holly, Carpinteria Rusty’s Pizza, 2315 Lillie Ave., Summerland (formerly Stacky’s Seaside) Sprouts, 29 S. Milpas St. (formerly Trader Joe’s, which moved up the street) Starbucks Drive-Thru, empty lot at Turnpike Ave. and Calle Real Taqueria Santa Barbara, 1213 State St. (formerly Jersey Mike’s) The Daisy Restaurant, 1221 State St. (formerly McDonald’s long ago) Vons Chicken (Korean), 955 Embarcadero del Mar, Isla Vista (formerly Sweet Alley) 7-Eleven, 700 State St. (formerly Panera Bread and Left at Albuquerque) Unnamed French Bakery, 34 E. Canon Perdido St. (formerly Miso Hungry and Sojourner Cafe) Unnamed Steakhouse, 20 W. Figueroa St. (formerly The Sportsman) Unnamed Tapas, 7 E. Anapamu St. (formerly Smithy)

John Dickson’s reporting can be found every day online at SantaBarbara.com. Send tips to info@SantaBarbara.com.


COURTESY

BIBI JI BRUNCH

Dr. Mark T. Weiser, D DS welcomes

Michelle Madrigal

Cont’d from p. 39

to his practice

“What Raj and I really wanted to do was switch ingredients to be everything hyper local,” said Medina. “Since then, everything has been hand-purchased at the farmers’ market, and for seafood, we’re still working with [Stephanie Mutz’s] Sea Stephanie Fish. [Mutz] also puts us in contact with the local fishermen. We really wanted to hammer it home on that Santa Barbara touch.” So rather than Aussie-Indian, as Bibi SAVORY MORNING: Lamb chilaquiles are the richest Bibi Ji brunch dish. Ji was initially billed, the restaurant now reflects a more assuredly Cenout. “Whether you’re moving to the next spot tral Coast–Indian cuisine. Brunch just started on Memorial Day weekor this is your ending spot,” he explained, “we end and will run through September. Though want that back patio to be your landing zone.” he’s wondering what will happen during Fiesta, when the adjacent plaza is packed with Reserve your brunch at Bibi Ji (734 State St.) on Saturbooths, bands, and dancers, Medina knows days and Sundays, 11 a.m.-2 p.m. by calling 560-6845. how he wants the rest of the summer to roll See bibijisb.com.

THE ENDLESS SUMMER BAR-CAFE, 113 Harbor Way, 805-564-4666, upstairs from Chuck’s Waterfront Grill, offers casual dining, surrounded by vintage surfboards and memorabilia. Sip on local wines, craft beers and cocktails, play a game of pool on one of our covered lanais while watching sports and surf movies on our 50” 4k TV’s. Listen to live music evenings, as you revel in the beauty that is Santa Barbara. Serving daily from 11:30 a.m. Private parties and special events accommodated.

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ETHIOPIAN AUTHENTIC ETHIOPIAN cuisine Featured at Petit Valentien Restaurant 1114 State St. #14, 805-966-0222. Serkaddis Alemu offers an ever changing menu with choices of vegetarian, vegan, and meat options. Catering Available for parties of up to 40 people. Sat/Sun lunch 11:30-2:30 AMERICAN LITTLE KITCHEN, 17 W. Ortega St. (805) 770-2299. “Great little neighborhood café!” Healthy, comfortable, and affordable. Lunch-Dinner-Late Night. Organic chicken and hormone/antibiotic-free burgers, local produce. Try the Chicken Tikka Masala, R VE TI S D vegetarian options. Great local wine list and craft beers. www.littlekitchensb.com

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CASUAL DINING CHUCKS WATERFRONT GRILL, 113 Harbor Way, 805564-1200, began serving friends and family in the Santa Barbara Harbor in 1999. We’re everyone’s favorite spot to sit and relax by the boats, watching all the action. Enjoy steaks, fresh seafood straight from the boats docked right outside, and cocktails on our radiant heated deck with fire pits. Or head inside for intimate, cozy booths and the full bar. Plus, free valet parking! Dinner 7 nights from 5 p.m., Sunday Brunch from 10 a.m. Private parties and special events accommodated.

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FRENCH PETIT VALENTIEN, 1114 State St. #14, 805-9660222. Open M-F 11:30-3pm (lunch). M-Sat 5pm-Close (dinner). Sun $25.50 four course prix fixe dinner. In La Arcada Plaza, Chef Robert Dixon presents classic French comfort food at affordable cost in this cozy gem of a restaurant. Petit Valentien offers a wide array of meat and seafood entrees along with extensive small plates and a wine list specializing in amazing quality at arguably the best price in town. A warm romantic atmosphere makes the perfect date spot. Comfortable locale for dinner parties, or even just a relaxing glass of wine. Reservations are recommended.

is affordable too! All You Can Eat Lunch Buffet $10.95 M-S dinner combos $9.95+ Specials: Tandoori- Mixed or Fish, Chicken Tikka Masala, Shrimp Bhuna. Also: meat, curries & vegetarian.Wine & Beer. Take out. VOTED BEST for 20 YEARS!

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IRISH DARGAN’S IRISH PUB & RESTAURANT, 18 E. Ortega St. (next to lot 10) SB, 568-0702. $$. Open 7 days 11:30a-Close (Food ‘til 10p, 11p on Sat/Sun). AE MC V Disc. Authentic Irish food & atmosphere in downtown SB. Specialties from Ireland include Seafood & Meat dishes. Informal, relaxed pub-style atmosphere. Live music Thursday nights. Children welcome. Avail. for private parties. Pool & Darts.

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NORTHERN EUROPEAN ANDERSEN’S DANISH RESTAURANT & BAKERY. 1106 State St., 805-962-5085. Open Daily 8am-9pm. Family owned for over 42 years. Northern European Cuisine with California Infusion. Fresh scratch made pastries & menus everyday. Authentic Breakfasts, Lunches & Dinners. Happy Hour menu with exquisite wines & beers, 3-7pm everyday. High Tea served everyday starting at 2pm. Huge Viking Mimosas & Champagne Cocktails. Private Event spaces.

Specializing in

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DINING OUT GUIDE MEDITERRANEAN FOXTAIL KITCHEN 14 E. Cota St. Lebaness cuisine, American burger, 24 craf beer, great cocktails, whiskey bar, vegan options, open late night, hookah lounge. Kitchen closes at midnight on the weekend, try our best falafel in town. www.foxtailsb.com

Michelle is warm and friendly and has over 6 years of experience as a local Medical Spa Director. She is here to answer any of your dental questions and assist you with financing your dental treatments.

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Happy Hour M-F 3-6:30 Live Music from 5:30, call for schedule

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CHRIS SHIFLETT RELEASES

HARD LESSONS

WHAT’S IN A NAME?: “I don’t think of my music as being straightforward country music at all,” said Chris Shiflett of his sound. “Rock people call it country, and country people call it cowpunk.” The singer/guitarist released his solo record Hard Lessons on June 14.

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hris Shiflett grew up in Santa Barbara and went on to become a guitar player in some of the biggest bands in the world—Foo Fighters, No Use for a Name, and Me First and the Gimme Gimmes. Now he’s got a new solo record out, a summation of all that came before: Hard Lessons, released June 14, is a record full of rocking retrospection. I spoke to Shiflett about the recording process, heartache, and the good old days of Santa Barbara’s music scene.

every song, I think. It’s certainly a more rock ’n’ roll record than the last one.

Has your work become more autobiographical over the course of your career? Without any doubt. I’ve taken such a different view on lyrics — I used to write lyrics kind of just as an afterthought, because you had to. My whole perspective on writing lyrics has changed a lot over the years. I don’t think of my music as being straightforward country music at all; rock people call it country, and country people call it cowpunk. It’s really neither. It’s sort of all the influences of what I’ve listened to over the years get jumbled together. The country-music lyrical side of things is where I’ve been influenced the most. Country tends to be stories; rock tends to be esoteric poetic ramblings.

Do you feel recording culture in Nashville is different than in L.A.? Is the former more gear-focused, for example? There’s the sort of stereotypical Nashville, where you come in for your session and get your song done in three hours, but that’s not how we make these records. The process has been different than any other records I’ve made in my life, but that comes down to Dave Cobb. He’s got a way that he makes records, and it’s a lot of fun. You get in there, play the new songs, and it’s the first time he’s heard it. He soaks it up, jams on it with me, and we come up with a basic arrangement laying down takes.

Producer David Cobb wanted you to use a Marshall JCM800 guitar amp for this record. How did it shape the sound? It shaped it in a big way. Cobb had that in mind for whatever reason. The JCM800 kind of became the center piece for the guitar tone; it’s on just about

One of the lead singles is “Welcome to Your First Heartache.” Do you remember your first heartache? It’s funny you bring that up. That’s what I was kind of writing the song about. My oldest son is 15, going on 16, and he had his first teenage romance. I sort of wrote that

song projecting onto him that he was going to get his heart broken, sort of reflecting on my own romantic failures as a kid, but I think you do that a lot as a parent. Being a parent dredges up all this stuff that you’ve sort of lived through. Does being from Santa Barbara inspire your current musicianship? Without a doubt. We didn’t know how good we had it. There was a really vibrant music scene here, and I’m talking about in the ’80s and the ’90s. I moved out of Santa Barbara in January 1990. All those years in high school playing around town, there were so many other bands, so many places to play. All the bands that came out of there — Toad the Wet Sprocket, Ugly Kid Joe, Summer Camp, Dishwalla — all those cats were around and playing, and a whole lot more. I might be looking back with rose-colored goggles, but it seemed like we were playing all the time, whether at keg parties or Carnival or Club Iguana. I see with my kids now; they don’t have that — that whole “let’s form a band and play our friend’s party or talent show.” I don’t think that exists anymore. How has being in a nonvocal or supportive role in other bands influenced or informed you as a frontman? They’re very different roles. In Foo Fighters, I have a front-row seat to watch Dave [Grohl] do his thing as a band leader or frontman playing live — you can’t help but learn some good lessons there. He’s one of the best. What’s something you’ve learned from him? I wish I had his ability to command a crowd. That guy is just next level. If there’s one thing, it’s the way that he connects to a crowd by telling a story between songs, which is, I think, important when you’re playing live. People are there and want to be entertained and feel like they’re with you and you’re with them. There’s a million different ways to do it, but it’s more fun for me if I feel there’s some kind of connection. Anything else you’d like to say? I’m glad the Independent’s still going when most of the local weekly print magazines and newspapers are gone. It’s a little piece of my childhood. — Richie DeMaria

L I F E PAGE 45 COURTESY

KELLY DUN

S.B.-BORN FOO FIGHTERS GUITARIST TALKS NEW SOLO RECORD

///INTERNET Santa Barbara’s art-punk band ///Internet, like its namesake network, has evolved since its early days and is now hitting creative heights. In its first phases, a bedroom solo project by vocalist and keyboardist Marvin Dominguez, the ///Internet has rounded out to include Steve Oh Prat (guitar and vocals), Tommy Curran (bass), and Jay Brooks (drums). The band will play at the Mercury Lounge (5871 Hollister Avenue, Goleta) on Friday, June 21, with Late Bloomers, QVO, and Bobi Rae. Taking its name from early explorations across forums such as GameFAQs, the band has stepped out of the bedroom and onto the dance floor. Its new album, Semicolon Forward Slash, is bursting with energetic melodies, fuzzy synths and guitars, and interesting sonic tidbits. You can hear a blend of influences like ’90s alternative music, first-wave punk bands such as X, and the fast-rocking S.B. music scene that shaped them. With all members cutting their teeth in various 805 punk and alt acts, they bring a vitality to the stage and studio. “There’s a driving energy that characterized our local music scene into punk and metal, and has been for decades,” Brooks said. “We’ve bridged that almost psychedelic feel, but our roots are in that driving aggressive energy all of us were familiar in in the past. It’s really shining through in this iteration of the band in a pretty innovative way.” Grandiosely catchy and quirkily self-deprecating all, their new album is a delightful confetti of synthy punk moods with some real lyrical substance. “My left eye is blind, and psychologically that ends up being a big part,” Brooks said. “Growing up a somewhat crazy person into the more stable, successful person I am now, it was a struggle to get here.” “Some are sentimental, some are satirical, some are rooted in dark existentialism,” Curran said. “Every song sounds different, and in my eyes it culminates what the actual Internet itself represents: a lot of different things,” Prat added. “We just wanted to capture a really fun time and get people dancing — to capture that energy response from punk shows.” Their upcoming Mercury Lounge show promises playfully provocative punk energy aplenty. “We want to be the best band in S.B.,” Dominguez said. “I’m not an anarchist, but I’m unafraid of lighting fires.” — RD

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COURTESY

a&e | POP, ROCK & JAZZ PREVIEW

Free Summer Cinema

8:30 PM / Friday nights under the stars at the SB County Courthouse Sunken Garden

e FRUIT BATS RELEASE GOLD PAST LIFE

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ew things deliver more sensory satisfac- were. … It’s more about embracing right now. tion than great music or a fantastic meal. Which is kind of what the central theme of SOhO Restaurant & Music Club and the record is: emotional displacement, fate, underground restaurant pop-up the Coterie heartache … all the good stuff! Club are ringing in Solstice Friday, June 21, with an evening that combines both of these What is your songwriting process like? I don’t really pleasures. Celebrating the release of folk-rock have one. I’m not super prolific, though lately band the Fruit Bats’ new album, Gold Past a little more so. My songs can take a pretty Life, the Coterie Club will present a preshow long time. I carry around notes — some actual champagne reception and raw bar with a notes, some in my brain — with images, ideas multicourse dinner and beverage of words. I’ll come up with some musical ideas and try pairing on SOhO’s patio. Led by Chef Nick Bodden, some mumbling the Coterie Club hosts its eventalong. Sometimes driven dinners in intimate you walk way down locations. Bodden’s Michelinthe wrong path starred kitchen experience and end up someshowcases the beauty of S.B. where interesting. produce and shines a light on Sometimes you end the expanding arts scene as up right where you well. “Building relationships intended to head. with venues and musicians Every once in a while, is important to us,” Bodden I’ll write something in one big blast. Fresaid. Reflecting on the relationship between music and quently my most food, Bodden explained, “I popular fan-favorite think when you pull away songs are written all the layers, it comes down that way. Folks can to the stimulation of the sense that immedisenses. It’s just raw human acy. But some songs by Rebecca Horrigan emotion. … It’s an instincare intricate like tile tual sense of seeking out murals. pleasure. It’s also just fun.” The Independent caught up with the Fruit How do you feel your sound has evolved over the Bats’ singer/songwriter Eric D. Johnson in years? The first three records have some sort advance of the band’s album release soiree. of world and mojo to them. But my writing and record-making was very cautious at that The Fruit Bats were formed in 1997, you were a mem- time. Tempos were slow, I was singing like I ber of the Shins for four years, and your seventh Fruit was trying not to stick out too much. I’ve gotBats album, Gold Past Life, is due out June 21. To what ten more confident, musically and otherwise. do you attribute your longevity? I’ve been patient I started off as a bedroom recordist on a four — or foolish (reckless?), depending on how track. My first records sound like I’m trying you look at it. I’ve managed to just not stop. I not to wake up the neighbors. Now I’m ready think it’s got to be harder now to get started for to wake them up. a young singer/songwriter. I do feel pretty fortunate to have gotten a break in 2002 getting Where do you find inspiration? Anywhere! The signed to Sub Pop. Fruit Bats never really got world is a sad and beautiful place. big, but getting to play in the Shins for a few years made it so that I could focus on music We’re thrilled you’re celebrating your record release in moving forward. I’ve been mega-lucky, and Santa Barbara. Do you have a connection to the area? patient, and probably a little relentless. Nope, other than I live just down the road in L.A., and I love going to Santa Barbara. What’s Where did you get the name Gold Past Life from? Is not to like? there a theme of nostalgia to the album? No, sort of the opposite of nostalgia! The song “Gold What can the audience expect from your show? Full Past Life” is about rose-colored glasses, about band playing medium loud, and me shooting yearning for things in the past that never really emotional lasers out of my eyes at you.

INTERVIEW WITH SINGER ERIC D. JOHNSON

4•1•1

Premier Sponsor:

The Fruit Bats play SOhO Restaurant & Music Club (1221 State St.) on Friday, June 21, at 9 p.m., following The Coterie Club: Solstice Pop Up Dinner and preshow reception starting at 6 p.m. Call 962-7776 or see sohosb.com.

THOSE FABULOUS FIFTIES!!

Bring blankets, low-to-the-ground chairs, a picnic and your friends!

Roman Holiday | Friday, July 5 North by Northwest | Friday, July 12 Rebel Without a Cause | Friday, July 19 Some Like It Hot | Friday, July 26 On the Waterfront | Friday, August 9 High Noon | Friday, August 16 Sunset Boulevard | Friday, August 23 Special thanks:

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Congratulations to our Summer Camp

WINNERS!

Produce, Film, and Edit a Real Documentary TVSB—Santa Barbara’s Community Access Media Center—is offering a new Teen Documentary Camp for students age 13 to 18. Guided by TVSB staff, students will spend five days learning basic field production techniques as they produce, film, and edit a short documentary that will air on TVSB; and be submitted for an Alliance for Community Media Award.

Monday–Friday July 8–12 Noon–5:00pm Limited to 12 students, ages 13 to 18 $200 per student Space is Limited— Register Now for Assured Placement

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a&e | POSITIVELY STATE STREET

Meat me at the Ranch!

rLUCY WALSH PLAYSFOR

ALZHEIMER’S FOUNDATION

by Richie DeMaria

STORIES TO TELL: Lucy Walsh’s homecoming show on Monday, June 24, will be a special one for the multitalented performer/writer/actor/musician. Her performance at SOhO Restaurant & Music Club (1221 State St.) will be personal, as it both connects her to her roots and helps others in the process —all proceeds from the concert will benefit the Alzheimer’s Foundation. Walsh’s life has been musical since the day it began. “Right when I was born, my dad took me into the other room and turned on classical music. It’s in my blood,” said Walsh, whose dad is Joe Walsh, the Eagles’ guitarist and vocalist. She grew up with music on all sides, with a gospel-singing grandmother and the Eagles’ soaring harmonies often in the formative backdrop of her childhood. The classically trained pianist will blend a mix of new songs, old songs, and covers at her SOhO gig. Creatively, she’s led by a mission of “following curiosities, and being okay with uncertainty” as she explores her own expressivity. Walsh also has had an illustrious career onstage and on-screen. She most recently performed in an NAACP Theater Award–winning production of Antony and Cleopatra, and she can also be seen in TV shows like Curb Your Enthusiasm. Though a “much different discipline” than musicianship, she does find common ground between creativities. “Acting and music are ultimately the same to me in that they are both a form of storytelling,” she said. “We’re the oldest profession in human history — storytellers would go from town to town and share information about what was going on in other places; and in that way, they blend together for me.” Of late, she’s been working on telling the story of her grandparents through an as-yet unpublished novel based around their World War II love letters. Her grandfather died of Alzheimer’s, and Walsh has since become actively involved in Alzheimer’s awareness activism. “Alzheimer’s is so common, and the facts about it are just shocking,” Walsh said. If music is in her blood, then maybe helping others is, too. She’s also an active member of the Santa Cruz Islands Foundation, of which her father is chair of the board. She decided to do a show in Santa Barbara after attendees to her concert in a church on Santa Cruz Island urged another. When I first met Walsh, she had just visited the remains of her childhood home in Montecito, which had burned down in the Thomas Fire. She had collected a few stones. Though the family had since moved, the place holds special meaning for her. “My hometown in Montecito has been through hell the last couple years, and they need all the hope and connection and support that they can get,” Walsh said. “I want to create an experience with this show by telling my personal stories where everyone feels less alone. It’s in telling our stories that we do that for each other … to admit those very human things that are hard to say out loud. I think that gives other people the gift of being human, and that’s all we can really do for each other.” The dinner show with table seating begins at 7:30 p.m. GARDENING GANGSTER: Spencer the Gardener has released his long-awaited album, Organic Gangster Vol. 2. Featuring songs like “Ballad of the Strawberry,” “Hey Whale,” and “Sweet Potato,” it’s a kid-friendly musical exploration of the world of plants and animals. A nutritious and delicious album many years in the making, Spencer reminds us that some of the best produce takes a long time to grow. Hear it on Spotify or CD Baby. The Solstice Parade is around the corner. It wouldn’t be Solstice without Spencer, and luckily, he’ll be around to mark the coming of the summer. Hear him in the club at an After-Solstice Parade Party at the Wildcat (15 W. Ortega St.) at 3:30 p.m. on Saturday, June 22, or with a side of tri-tip up at Cold Spring Tavern (5995 Stagecoach Rd.) at 4:30 p.m. on Sunday, June 23. n

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Appetite for Growth? “American Riviera Bank has been our financial partner since we started growing. Now we have five restaurants, and more on the way.” — Carlos Luna, Los Agaves owner

Los Agaves owners Christian and Carlos Luna meeting with Francisco Cabazos at the Milpas location.

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Since 1989, changing the world for one cat at a time.

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On Saturday, July 13th, 2019, from 5pm-9:30pm, join us at the beautiful QAD campus in Summerland. You won’t want to miss a fun-filled reception hour, amazing auction items, scrumptious food, and dancing under the stars with an amazing view overlooking the Pacific.

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Volunteer

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ASAP’s 200+ volunteer force gives over 25,000 HOURS of their time every year to the care and wellbeing of the cats and kittens at ASAP. In 2018 alone they served over 157,000 meals! Our volunteers do everything from cleaning litter boxes to bottlefeeding newborns, training Tiny Lions™, and managing and directing many of our unique and amazing programs: Shelter Administration, Feline Behavior, Feline Retention, Foster, Social Media, and our Working Cats Program. With just a few hours a week, you can make a profound difference in the lives of the cats at our shelter. Learn how you can get involved and help save lives at www.asapcats.org.

Adopt

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ASAP is celebrating 30 years of saving lives only because of the support of our community. Through your generosity we save approximately 1,000 cats each year. Before ASAP, hundreds of these cats would have had no chance for a forever home, but thanks to you, our doors have been open since 1989 to offer them hope. Help us continue for years to come and consider a tax deductible contribution by mail to: ASAP PO Box 357 Goleta, CA 93116 or online at www.asapcats.org.

June is Adopt a Shelter Cat Month! At ASAP we believe there is a home for every cat, and every cat deserves a home. In fact, all of the cats in the photos of this section are looking for their forever homes at the time of publication! Fill out our adoption application online, and stop by our shelter and speak with one of our adoption counselors to find the perfect match for you. All cats adopted from ASAP are spayed or neutered, vaccinated, and microchipped. ASAP finds homes for 100% of adoptable cats and kittens at our shelter.

Foster

You Can Help

ASAP’s foster program has been a part of ASAP’s life-saving success since 1992. Supporting and growing the tiniest kittens at the start of their journey, or giving comfort and love at the end with a senior hospice foster, our foster families help us save so many more cats than the physical shelter can contain. They allow us to provide additional resources and real home environments to the most special cats and kittens. If you or your family may not be ready for the life-long commitment of adoption, consider becoming an ASAP foster. Learn more at www.asapcats.org or contact foster@asapcats.org.

ASAP - Animal Shelter Assistance Program (805) 683-3368 5473 Overpass Road, Santa Barbara, CA Monday-Saturday 10:00am–4:45pm Open Until 7pm Wednesday and 12pm–3pm Sunday ASAP is a 501(c)(3) non-profit organization

Federal Tax ID: 77-0283500


T

rain commenced its Tuesdaynight set at the Santa Barbara Bowl with “Calling All Angels,” the band’s 2003 Grammy-nominated single from My Private Nation. It was a brilliant tune to begin with as it sent an already anticipatory audience through the figurative roof with delight, whooping and whistling as lead singer Pat Monahan sang the opening lines. With screens behind and above the band projecting images of a wide-open blue sky, Monahan encouraged the crowd to “put your hands in the air” and sing the lyric “I won’t give up, if you don’t give up.” The audience gleefully complied. On tour for its Greatest Hits record, which consists of songs plucked from eight of the band’s 10 albums, Train offered up one fan favorite after another, including the rollicking, mariachiAt the Santa Barbara Bowl, Tue., June 11. tinged “50 Ways to Say Goodbye,” which had everyone out of their seats dancing; the funk-infused “Get to Me”; and “Call Me Sir,” which included a duet with Travie McCoy via Facetime. Train’s songs ranged from ballads (“Marry Me”) to spritely (“Hey, Soul Sister”) to pop rock (“Drive By”). One of the highlights from the show was a cover of Queen’s “Under

REVIEWS

PAUL WELLMAN

TRAIN

& ENTERTAINMENT 

POP, ROCK & JAZZ

D E D I C AT E A S T O N E AT O U R DREAM PLAZA AND GIVE LIFE TO FINAL DREAMS

Pressure.” Monahan enlisted bassist Hector Maldonado on David Bowie’s part and guitarist Luis Maldonado for Freddie Mercury’s; the two talented musicians delivered an electrifying rendition, Luis nailing Mercury’s difficult vocal range. Amusing and engaging, Monahan offered up quippy bon mots, threw T-shirts into the crowd, and kept the evening’s vibe lively and fun. The end result was an amazing concert that was musically satisfying and tremendously entertaining. —Michelle Drown

H

earing jazz violin powerhouse Mads Tolling performing on the Solvang Festival Theater patio on Sunday afternoon triggered memories of the massive Copenhagen Jazz Festival, which includes music in outdoor cafés and beer gardens. The déjà vu factor zoomed upward when the Copenhagen-born, Bay Area– based Tolling launched into an old Danish folk song, arranged by the late, great Danish jazz bassist Niels-Henning Ørsted Pedersen (NHØP), and later, during Tolling’s own tuneful jazz-pop song “Danish Dessert,” based on his mother’s special dessert. Tolling and his Mads Men — bassist Owen Clapp (who played a graceful, Charlie Haden– ish solo on the Danish folk song) and versatile keyboardist Colin At Solvang Festival Hogan — were on Theater, Sun., June 16. hand to launch the summer’s Jazz & Beyond series, a fundraiser for the Solvang Festival Theater. They were also mostly plugged into a specific milieu linked to the double Grammy-winning violinist’s newest album, Playing the ’60s, with lighthearted variations on ’60s-era classics. Opening with the famously jazz-rooted Flintstones theme song in a medley with “I Got Rhythm” (the TV theme is based

JOSEF WOODARD

MADS TOLLING AND THE MADS MEN

The Dream Plaza is a beautiful oasis in front of downtown Santa Barbara’s historic Hotel Californian in a highly trafficked and visible location. Every contribution to this beautiful plaza will support Dream Foundation programs and bring thousands of Dreams to life. Please contact Dream Foundation by phone at 805-539-2208 or email plaza@dreamfoundation.org.

Learn how you can be a part of Conde Nast Traveler’s 2018 Best Hotels in the World. Choose from four sizes of stone to be elegantly engraved in this one-of-a-kind gift opportunity. Every stone purchased is eligible for a tax-deductible contribution.

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with UCSB Affiliates and Media Sponsor Santa Barbara Independent present

Profs at the Pub An engaging, free speaker series featuring UCSB professors at Santa Barbara’s favorite watering holes.

Doing Good Versus Doing Right; Medical Ethics in the ER on Gershwin’s “Rhythm” changes), the set included a suitably soulful “Georgia on My Mind,” a Cuban-timba-inflected “All Along the Watchtower,” and a wah-wah-tinged take on Brian Wilson’s “pocket symphony,” “Good Vibrations.” Other Danish flavors snuck into the delightful mix with 1962’s kitschy “Alley Cat”—a Grammy winner penned by Dane Bent Fabric — with crowd-baiting shticks attached; Tolling played keyboard alongside Hogan, who later juggled while playing. As if to remind us of his serious jazz cred and passion, Tolling went solo on Bill Evans’s haunting ballad “Blue in Green,” done in his “Green and Bluegrass” style. To close, the Men dove into the cozy Ellingtonia of “It Don’t Mean a Thing (If It Ain’t Got That Swing).” It had plenty and meant plenty. — Josef Woodard

Reviews cont’d on p. 52

A quick tour of memorable places, fascinating experiments, and ecological surprises.

Jason Prystowsky ‘05 MD, MPH

Academic coordinator for UCSB Medical Humanities Initiative and a emergency physician at Cottage Health Systems.

Wednesday, June 26, 6:00 p.m. Third Window Brewing Co. Santa Barbara

REGISTER: https://juneprofs.eventbrite.com

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COURTESY

CLASSICAL

Santa Barbara Human Resources Association presents

HOW TO ATTRACT & RETAIN DIVERSE TALENT IN SANTA BARBARA COUNTY Hiring talent in Santa Barbara County is hard. Really hard. Retaining that talent is even harder. Join us for a panel discussion with local experts on how to authentically attract and retain diverse talent in Santa Barbara County. Come to learn about best practices and pitfalls and to connect with your local HR/Talent community. Light food and beverage will be served.

Moderated by Shaina Semiatin, Talent Acquisition Manager for Apeel Sciences, our panel will feature the following local experts…

WHEN: Thursday, June 27, 2019, 5:30 pm – 7:30 pm

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Andrea Nelson: VP of People & Culture, FastSpring Anthony Schuck: Strategic Sourcing & Pipelining Consultant, Corning Glass Microsystems James Joyce III: District Director for Senator Hannah-Beth Jackson John Greathouse: Professor of Practice at UCSB’s TMP Program, Venture Capitalist & Angel Investor

QUESTIONS? Contact Chery Cerise, Chapter Administrator, SBHRA + info@sbhra.org + (805) 259-3033

MUSIC ACADEMY HONORS JEROME LOWENTHAL

T

he Music Academy of the West kicked off its season with a gala honoring longtime faculty member Jerome Lowenthal. Lowenthal, who has clocked an amazing 50 years at the academy, is one of the world’s foremost pianists and teachers of the instrument. In tribute to the master, four of his former students — Orion Weiss, Elizabeth Joy Roe, Micah McLaurin, and At the Music Academy’s Hahn Hall on Fri., June 14. Evan Shinners — along with his partner and fellow piano legend, Ursula Oppens, joined him onstage for a dazzling program of approximately an hour. This was followed by an al fresco dinner and the dedication of a piano studio to Lowenthal, who in addition to his extraordinary musicianship also happens to be a very funny storyteller. The concert opened with an amusing speech and performance by the Bach specialist Shinners, who chose a 17th-century Dutch work about the fleeting nature of youth. He was followed by Oppens, who played the Caténaires of Elliott Carter, a fiendishly dif-

ficult composition that she performed with spectacular ease and panache. Next up was Micah McLaurin, whose sparkling bomber jacket might have pleased Franz Liszt, the composer of the work he chose. Elizabeth Joy Roe shifted the mood with a tinge of blue — George Gershwin’s “The Man I Love” in a swanky original arrangement. The centerpiece of the concert was a suite by Samuel Barber about the Plaza Hotel called “Souvenirs, Op. 28,” which was written for four hands. Lowenthal held down the left side of the keyboard as Shinners, Weiss, and Roe took turns sitting to his right for the different movements. Then Orion Weiss performed a gorgeous Dohnányi “Pastorale” based on a Hungarian folk song. A second piano was brought on at this point for the final two performances, a fast waltz by Rachmaninoff for Lowenthal and McLaurin, and the finale, Witold Lutosławski’s awesome Variations on a Theme by Paganini, which belonged to Lowenthal and Oppens, who clearly enjoyed performing every note of this dizzying tour de force. — Charles Donelan

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overnments, politicians and corporations,” writes Stephen Davis, an investigative journalist, editor, and television producer, “have always attacked reporting and reporters that they do not like.” While there isn’t much that is new or revelatory in Truthteller, Davis does provide a window on the challenges of reporting when a powerful corporation, govern-ment agency, or individual is determined to suppress the truth. As Americans have witnessed since 2016, Donald Trump attacks the credibility and competence of the media at every opportunity and deems any story not to his liking as “fake news.” Trump also attacks indi individual reporters with a vehemence not seen since the Nixon administration. Reporting is dangerous work in Russia, China, Mexico, Turkey, Saudi Arabia, and the Philippines. Reporters who dig too vigorously often wind up murdered & ENTERTAINMENT in these countries. In the United States,

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the means of suppressing news stories and confounding the public are less violent but still ver y effective. Davis lays out more than a half dozen techniques used by the powerful, includ including attacking the messenger, delaying, and manufacturing an alternative truth. The lat latter tactic was mastered first by the tobacco industry and later turned into an art form by the fossil fuels industry. Creation of an alternative truth also comes into play when a military mission goes wrong. Truthteller reinforces the value of journalism and the need for rigorous investigative reporting in a democracy. No democracy can function when the truth is whatever the leader claims it to be, regardless of reason, logic, or evidence. In a world awash in information, citizens need to be even more media savvy. “It is not hyperbole to say that there is a war on journalism,” Davis writes. “But don’t call it a war on journalism — it’s a war on truth.” —Brian Tanguay


THEATER

& ENTERTAINMENT

DANCING LESSONS



T

wo lonely yet passionate people, one a successful scientist who’s on the autism spectrum and the other an injured, “neurotypical” Broadway dancer who has been doubly traumatized, meet and connect in this funny and touching play. Although there are real dancing lessons involved, the lessons at the core of this show are the ones that Senga Quinn (Leilani Smith) and At the Ensemble Ever Montgomery (Trevor Theatre Company’s Peterson) learn about New Vic on Sat., June 15. themselves as they team up Shows through June 30. to overcome their fears and go through on their desires. Two terrific performances and a light touch by director Saundra McClain combine with a new angle on the script to make this a refreshing experience and a great finale to the season at Ensemble Theatre Company.

REVIEWS

Although it’s easy to be swept along by playwright Mark St. Germain’s clever dialogue, especially when Ever slings one of his unintentional put-downs, it’s the slow burn of the actors’ physicality that makes this production special. Smith delivers Senga’s long arc of self-realization with precision and grace. She builds tension with the obstacle of the brace that she must wear on one of her fine dancer’s legs, and Peterson ratchets that tension up exponentially when he reveals Ever’s phobia of touching or being touched by another person. Occasional contrivances such as Ever’s connection to climate science or a conversation about old sitcoms that could be from any random show cannot undermine the propulsive dramatic energy of these two actors as they push deeper into one another’s worlds. See it for the performances and relish the way these wonderful actors do the world’s oldest dance. — CD

THOM YORKE TOMORROW’S MODERN BOXES

A GENTLEMAN’S GUIDE TO LOVE AND MURDER

and asking for a position at the family’s bank house, to no avail. Spurned by his newfound relations, Monty uses nefarious schemes to eliminate the competition. But as the line to the earldom gets shorter, things go pear-shaped for Monty. The talented actors deliver the Tony Award–winning play’s clever dialog and droll songs—“I Don’t Understand the Poor,” “Why Are All the D’Ysquiths Dying,” and “Poison in My Pocket,” for example—with aplomb, eliciting consistent laughter from theatergoers. Walker’s nimble comedy skills made him an excellent Monty, and Emily Trask’s turn as Sibella was first-rate. But the biggest kudos go to Philpot, who deftly played all of the D’Ysquiths, which included a vegetarian bodybuilder, an unmarried social-climbing woman of a “certain age,” a country squire, and a drunken clergyman. — Michelle Drown

F RAT I1D0 aAmY

COURTESY

A

crisp wind kept the audience bundled up at Solvang’s Festival Theater as we settled in for the first performance of PCPA’s first show of the summer season, A Gentleman’s Guide to Love and Murder. Set in Edwardian England, the murder/musical tells the story of Montague “Monty” Navarro (George Walker), a washerwoman’s son who, upon his mother’s death, discovers that he is ninth in line to the earldom of Highhurst. His mom, Isobel, belonged to the aristocratic D’Ysquith clan but was disowned when she married Monty’s dad, a Castilian musician. In an Presented by PCPA. At attempt Solvang Festival Theater, to ingratiate himself with his Sat., June 15. Shows long-lost kin, Monty sends through June 30. a letter to Lord Asquith D’Ysquith Sr. (Andrew Philpot), revealing his lineage

ON SAL E

FRIDAY OCTOBER 25, 7:00PM

NATIVE COUNTRY OF THE HEART

A

t the center of Cherríe Moraga’s moving memoir, Native Country of the Heart,, stands her diminutive but feisty mother, Elvira, the undisputed head of the household and the Moraga clan. The relationship between mother and daughter is complex, bound up with cultural expectations, the dictates of the Catholic Church, and the larger Anglo society of Southern California in the early 1960s. Moraga, a poet, playwright, educator, and longtime Chicana activist, weaves her coming out as a lesbian with her mother’s efforts to instill Mexican sensibilities in her children, the family’s rifts and travails, and a poignant account of Elvira’s last

years as Alzheimer’s claims her mind and a broken hip her body. Moraga leaves her childhood home in the shadow of the San Gabriel Mountains to work, travel, and raise a family of her own, but she returns over and over, and in the returning discovers her indigenous roots and those of her mother. Mother and daughter share a sense of the pres presence of the mission and desert Indians. “Somehow,” Moraga writes, “the Indians buried beneath the tiled floor of that Old Mission Church were not strangers to me.” As much as Native Country of the Heart is about Elvira’s life, the memoir is also a paean to place, identity, and concon nection to the past as a way to more fully inhabit the present. — BT

SLIGHTLY STOOPID . . . . . . . AUG 04

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STEELY DAN . . . . . . . . . . SEP 24

YOUNG THE GIANT / FITZ & THE TANTRUMS AUG 08

INCUBUS . . . . . . . . . . . . SEP 26

JOJO SIWA. . . . . . . . . . . . AUG 11

GARY CLARK JR . . . . . . . . SEP 27

SEBASTIAN MANISCALCO. . . . AUG 17

ROD STEWART. . . . . . . . . SEP 28

THE AVETT BROTHERS . . . . . AUG 24

BANDA MS DE SERGIO LIZARRAGA . SEP 29

IRATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . AUG 25

VAN MORRISON . . . . . . . . OCT 05

JOSH GROBAN. . . . . . . . . . SEP 05

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MAGGIE ROGERS . . . . . . . . SEP 17

LILA DOWNS: CALAVERA . . . OCT 26

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July 12 - 18, 2019 7 DAYS OF 11 NEW FRENCH FILMS @ SBIFF’S RIVIERA THEATRE

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LACED UP: The miniseries based on Joseph Heller’s picaresque war novel falls flat.

CATCH-22

S

ometime after George Clooney’s nostalgic, offbeat rapid-fire retorts and mind-boggling logic that define dark comedy Suburbicon (2017) flamed out at the Heller’s world have been stretched thin with sequences box office and critics argued over whether it was of head-scratching, longwinded explanation. merely a smoldering fire hazard or a massive five-alarm At the center of all this incredulity is Captain John dumpster fire, Hulu decided to greenlight Clooney for Yossarian, a man who understands that the logical another nostalgic, offbeat dark comedy. It’s hard to conclusion to all the military’s illogical policies is him imagine Hulu found comfort in the source material: dying on the battlefield, and that’s one proposition he Joseph Heller’s 1961 picaresque war novel, Catch-22, refuses to make sense of. Christopher Abbott, who plays already the progenitor of one box-office disappoint- Yossarian, cuts a perfect mid-century all-American boy ment back in 1970. Heller’s book swings madly from in the sepia-tone postcard moments of the soldiers takabsurdism to hyperrealism and ing a dip in the sea or enjoying plays notes of comedy and traga few magic-hour beers, but his edy against each other with comedic flair is lacking and his nimble dexterity, a difficult feat dramatic range butts up against on paper and, so far, an inimirepetitive material. table challenge for those who Every episode finds Yossarian have attempted to adapt Heller’s begging to be discharged until work, Clooney and company his mission quota gets raised included. and he’s once again in the nose Catch-22 would appear a of a bomber plane taking aim by T.M. Weedon fitting canvas for Clooney and at the next enemy target. His showrunner David Michôd friends call him “Yoyo”: Up and (War Machine) to let their irreverent impulses run wild, down and up and down he goes, mission after mission. but instead, the miniseries comes across hobbled and Yossarian’s buddies — the colorful panoply of charactame. The culprit behind all this unwanted straight- ters that animate Heller’s novel — are given short thrift lacing is perhaps fellow showrunner Luke Davies, who in the miniseries. Few are fleshed out enough to have counts Lion (2016) and Beautiful Boy (2018) among his any weight, so the simple story of Yossarian’s endless writing credits. Like his other projects, this adaptation back and forth with military command to be relieved of of Catch-22 leans heavily into the drama, but this time it duty is the sole dramatic tension, and that tension pulls comes at the expense of everything that makes Heller’s pretty slack over six episodes. If not for a faithful adaptation of Heller’s work, which classic novel worthwhile. Davies’s even-keeled dramaturgy unruffles all the wrong material. The unruly kinks this miniseries is not, it seems reasonable to ask, why have been ironed out, but the result is flat, lacking the then do a remake of Catch-22 at all? You could argue that as long as war is in fashion, antiwar art is never punch and verve of Heller’s storytelling. Heller presents war as an insane proposition, masked irrelevant, but too much of this modern Catch-22 feels only by insane rationalizations that themselves beget like a nostalgia trip rather than a drive at the zeitgeist. more insane propositions. To live by these propositions, The most durable character through the half century a person must also be insane, so the American soldiers that separates the novel and the series is the weaselly who populate Heller’s fiction are just as insane as the mess officer Milo Minderbender (Daniel David Stewsituation they find themselves in. art). Like a true Pentagon contractor, Milo sees war as Clooney & Co. can’t quite reconcile themselves to a growth industry. After capitalizing on some initial Heller’s caricature, and they sacrifice wit and satire in investments in Scottish lamb chops, he’s soon runtheir overreach for dramatic realism. They fill their ning a multinational syndicate that specializes in arms version of Heller’s WWII airbase with plausible men dealing and oil production, working both sides of the struggling to come to terms with implausible circum- battlefield. Now that’s a man for our time! stances, and there are few things less funny than watching rational people make peace with irrationality. The Catch-22 streams on Hulu.

MINISERIES FAILS TO CAPTURE NOVEL’S MAGIC

Hotel Transylvania 3 June 20

Peter Rabbit June 25, 26 & 27

Rise of the Guardians July 2, 3 & 4

How to Train Your Dragon: Hidden World July 9, 10 & 11

Cloudy with a Chance of Meatballs 2 July 16, 17 & 18

Dr. Suess’ The Grinch July 23, 24 & 25

Minions July 30, 31 & August 1

Small Foot August 6, 7 & 8

Sing August 13, 14 & 15

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A YEAR-END FUNDRAISING PROGRAM FOR SANTA BARBARA NONPROFITS

ACCEPTING

Toy Story 4

MOVIE GUIDE SPECIAL SCREENING

Peter Rabbit (95 mins., PG) It’s great being a parent these days, as many so-called “kid” films manage to thoroughly entertain adults, whether through over-the-children’s-heads jokes or just plain great storytelling and animation. Peter Rabbit doesn’t aspire to that category; it’s a worthy romp for the kids, but that’s about it. From a dad’s perspective, the jokes are overly cheeky, the plot is formulaic, and the banter is simple, but the four kids in attendance with me all thought it was swell enough. The narrative concerns protagonist Peter and his clan adapting to the new owner of McGregor’s (Domnhall Gleeson) garden, and his budding love affair with their good friend Bea (Rose Byrne), a welcome and well-integrated nod to literary legend creator Beatrix Potter. The animated bunnies tuck seamlessly into the live-action humans, and there’s plenty of humorous physical fun throughout. (Apparently some parents object to the blackberry allergy attack employed at one point, which is just ridiculous.) Still, it’s as if the filmmakers briefly considered making one of those great kid films-for-adults-too, yet gave up halfway through and just sent it to the finishing room. (MK)

Anna (118 mins., R) Director Luc Besson’s (The Professional, Lucy) latest cinematic offering is an action-thriller about a top model, Anna (Sasha Luss) who is a secret government assassin. Helen Mirren, Luke Evans, and Cillian Murphy star.

Camino Real/Paseo Nuevo

EDITED BY MICHELLE DROWN

The Dead Don’t Die (113 mins., R) Jim Jarmusch’s (Dead Man, Paterson) latest cinematic offering is a comedy that follows a small-town community that must pull together and battle zombies who suddenly rise from the graveyards and terrorize folks. Adam Driver, Bill Murray, Chloë Sevigny, and Danny Glover star. Paseo Nuevo

Annabelle Comes Home (106 mins., R)

The Fall of the American Empire

The latest installation in the Conjuring film universe, this supernatural horror continues the story of demonic doll, Annabelle, who, despite being caged behind glass in Ed (Patrick Wilson) and Lorraine (Vera Farmiga) Warren’s locked artifacts room, manages to call upon other evil spirits to continue her reign of terror.

(105 mins., NR)

Camino Real/Metro 4 (Opens Tue., June 25)

Child’s Play (120 mins., R) This reboot/remake of the 1988 slasher film, Karen Barclay (Aubrey Plaza) gives her son Andy (Gabriel Bateman) an impish-looking doll for his birthday. They soon find that the doll, Chucky, is an evil killer. Camino Real/Metro 4

Talk aplenty mixes with gritty action and satirical fizz in The Fall of the American Empire, the latest from FrenchCanadian director Denys Arcand (The Barbarian Invasions, Jesus of Montreal, and a precursor film, 1986’s The Decline of American Empire). The Fall tells the tale of a cynical and idealistic intellectual (Alexandre Landry) who bumps into a bundle of dirty money from a botched heist and is drawn into an elaborate scheme involving a sex worker/ love interest (Maripier Morin) and an ex-con with hearts of gold. Comeuppance, of the bloody and career-sabotaging sort, is in store for criminals of both the gangland and high finance kind, along with other subplotting detours. From these materials, Arcand

2019 APPLICATIONS

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Camino Real (Thu., 10 a.m.)/ Paseo Nuevo (Tue.-Wed., 10 a.m.)

PREMIERES American Woman (111 mins., R) Jake Scott (son of Ridley Scott) directs this drama about a woman (Sienna Miller) who must raise her infant grandson when her teenage daughter goes missing. Aaron Paul, Christina Hendricks, and Amy Madigan also star.

Metro 4 (Fri.-Mon. 4:10 p.m.)

Godzilla: King of the Monsters

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H ANNABELLE COMES HOME E LATE NIGHT E Fri to Wed: 12:35, 3:00, Tue: 5:00, 7:30, 10:00; Wed & Thu: 1:50, 5:30, 8:00; Thu: 12:35, 3:00, 5:30 4:30, 7:10, 9:45

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THE SECRET LIFE OF PETS 2 B 12:45, 3:10, 5:20, 7:30 ALADDIN B 1:45, 4:45, 7:45

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H YESTERDAY C Thu: 8:00 PM

Toy Story 4

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H ANNABELLE COMES HOME E Tue: 7:00, 10:25; Wed & Thu: 12:00, 2:30, 5:05, 7:40, 10:10 H ANNA E Fri: 1:35, 4:25, 7:10, 9:55; Sat & Sun: 10:50, 1:35, 4:25, 7:10, 9:55; Mon to Thu: 1:35, 4:25, 7:10, 9:55 H CHILD’S PLAY E Fri: 12:35, 2:50, 5:15, 7:30, 10:00; Sat & Sun: 10:20, 12:35, 2:50, 5:15, 7:30, 10:00; Mon to Thu: 12:35, 2:50, 5:15, 7:30, 10:00

Anna

Paseo• Camino bara a Bar Sant

H TOY STORY 4 A Fri: 11:10, 12:25, 1:45, 3:00, 5:30, 6:45, 8:00, 9:15, 10:25; Sat & Sun: 10:00, 11:10, 12:25, 1:45, 3:00, 5:30, 6:45, 8:00, 9:15, 10:25; Mon: 11:10, 12:25, 1:45, 3:00, 5:30, 6:45, 8:00, 9:15; Tue to Thu: 11:10, 12:25, 1:45, 3:00, 4:15, 5:30, 6:45, 8:00, 9:15 H TOY STORY 4 IN DISNEY DIGITAL 3D A Fri to Mon: 4:15 PM MEN IN BLACK: INTERNATIONAL C 11:20, 2:00, 4:40, 7:20, 9:45 H SHAFT E Fri to Tue: 9:50 PM

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Child’s Play

Metro • Camino

ROCKETMAN E Fri: 1:15, 4:05, 7:00; Sat & Sun: 10:30, 1:15, 4:05, 7:00; Mon: 1:15, 4:05, 7:00; Tue: 1:15, 4:05 PETER RABBIT B Thu: 10:00 AM

AMERICAN WOMAN E Fri to Mon: 4:10 PM H CHILD’S PLAY E Fri to Mon: 12:30, 2:45, 5:00, 7:15, 9:30 H CHILD’S PLAY (LASER PROJECTION) E Tue: 12:30, 2:45, 5:00, 7:15, 9:30; Wed & Thu: 12:30, 2:45, 5:00, 7:20, 9:35 MEN IN BLACK: INTERNATIONAL C 1:20, 4:00, 6:40, 9:20 GODZILLA: KING OF THE MONSTERS C Fri to Mon: 1:10, 6:50, 9:45; Wed & Thu: 12:50 PM GODZILLA: KING OF THE MONSTERS C Tue: 1:10 PM JOHN WICK: CHAPTER 3 PARABELLUM E Fri to Tue: 12:50, 3:50, 7:00, 9:55; Wed & Thu: 3:50, 7:00, 9:55

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H TOY STORY 4 IN DISNEY DIGITAL 3D A 2:40, 5:10

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a&e | FILM & TV CONT’D FROM P. 57 mayhem. In fact, it all becomes such a roaring good time that you can only wish that noise-cancelling headsets were Metro 4 at hand. (JY) John Wick: Chapter 3 – Parabellum (131 mins., R)

Keanu Reeves reprises his role as John Wick, a notorious hitman, for this third installment of the franchise. In this film, Wick has a $14 million contract on his head and so becomes the target for assassins from around the globe. Halle Berry and Laurence Fishburne also star.

Metro 4

Yesterday spins a charming though sometimes didactic yarn, addressing the evils — and American empire values — of capitalist greed and money obsession, but also the possibilities of redemption. Arcand also extends compassion for the homeless — in Montreal and elsewhere in the American empire. (JW) Riviera Toy Story 4 (100 mins., G) Sheriff Woody (Tom Hanks), Buzz Lightyear (Tim Allen), Jessie (Joan Cusack), Rex (Wallace Shawn), and the rest of the toy gang get a new addition to their group when Bonnie makes new toy Forky (Tony Hale). But, Forky suffers from an existential crisis and Woody must help him understand what it really means to be a toy.

Camino Real (2D and 3D)/Fiesta 5 (2D and 3D)

John Chester rolled camera(s), extensively and obsessively, on the project he undertook with his wife, Molly, tracing the radical transformation of a neglected plot of land in Ventura County into a wildly diversified farm — now a model of sustainability worthy of visitor tours. Sidestepping the “dry doc” syndrome, the film depicts their so-far seven-year adventure and arc of selfeducation with seductive visuals and an engaging dramatic moxie. On the sonic front, Jeff Beal’s Disney-fied orchestral music seems all wrong for such a literally organic tale, which cries out for something acoustic and rootsy. That quibble aside, The Biggest Little Farm charms and inspires with an epic DIY story from deep inside the 805. (JW)

Riviera

Echo in the Canyon Yesterday (112 mins., PG-13) Danny Boyle (Trainspotting, 127 Hours) directs this musical/fantasy/comedy about struggling singer/songwriter Jack Malik (Himesh Patel), who, after a freak bus accident and a global blackout, finds that no one remembers the Beatles’ music. Malik then passes off the Fab Four’s songs as his own and becomes a star. Fairview/Paseo Nuevo (Opens Thu., June 27)

NOW SHOWING Aladdin (128 mins., PG) Will Smith plays Genie (voiced fabulously by Robin Williams in the 1992 animated film) in this updated, liveaction version of the folktale One Thousand and One Nights. The story remains the same: Aladdin (Mena Massoud) falls in love with Princess Jasmine (Naomi Scott), finds a magic lamp, and frees Genie; mayhem ensues.

Fairview/Fiesta 5

O Biggest Little Farm (91 mins., PG) Perhaps the biggest triumph at this year’s Santa Barbara International Film Festival was The Biggest Little Farm, a fascinating documentary on the humble beginnings, struggles, and ultimate success story of Apricot Lane Farms in Moorpark. Urban refugee filmmaker

(82 mins., PG-13)

This documentary explores the L.A.’s Laurel Canyon 1967-69 music scene, which produced iconic groups such as the Byrds, the Beach Boys, and Buffalo Springfield. Great interviews with Roger McGuin, Ringo Starr, and the late Tom Petty, among others. The Hitchcock

O Godzilla: King of the Monsters (132 mins., PG-13) The world is doomed. Giant monsters from the mists and myths have clambered into view and are fighting tooth, nail, and typhoon-blasting wing to claim the planet in Godzilla: King of the Monsters. The computer-generated creatures (Godzilla, Mothra, Rodan, King Ghidorah) appear alongside a group of human actors equally well-recognized for their larger-than-life roles — from Eleven in Stranger Things (Millie Bobby Brown) to Tywin Lannister (Charles Dance) to the dweeb-in-chief of Silicon Valley (Thomas Middleditch). It’s a cast no latex-suit-wearing actor (as in the original Gojira films of the 1950s) could possibly hope to defeat. While the monsters thunder their atomic breath at each other, it’s up to the humans to carry the plot, boldly giving their lines to move the story along, almost incidentally giving sense to the next barrage of long, loud, and violent “crypto-zoological”

Late Night (102 mins., R) Mindy Kaling wrote and costars in this dramedy about a famous talk show host (Emma Thompson) who hires a female writer (Kaling) to help her resurrect her flagging career. Fairview/Paseo Nuevo Men in Black: International (115 mins., PG-13)

This fourth installment in the Men in Black franchise follows agents H (Chris Hemsworth) and M (Tessa Thompson) who work out of the London MIB office. A rollicking time of chasing aliens ensues. Liam Neeson and Emma Thompson also star.

Arlington/Camino Real/Metro 4

➤ O Rocketman (121 mins., R) Dexter Fletcher’s Elton John biopic is an engaging representation of the legendary artist’s rise to fame and struggle with drug abuse. The film has some issues with a scattered narrative and shaky dialogue, but remains striking nonetheless. Through a powerful performance from lead Taron Egerton and a flamboyant visual aesthetic, the film captures unique nuances of Elton’s career such as his outrageous costumes and wild sense of humor. However, some tropes of the music biopic stick out with elements like an overly dramatic first artistic breakthrough scene and a stereotypical record agent. Despite this, Rocketman is a mustsee for any music fan as the musical and aesthetic nostalgia of the film is very much worthwhile. (MPG)

JUNE 21 - 27 “FUNNY & ENGROSSING” – NEW YORK TIMES

Camino Real/The Hitchcock/ Paseo Nuevo

The Secret Life of Pets 2 (86 mins., PG) This sequel to the 2016 film follows Max (Patton Oswalt) the Jack Russell Terrier on a family trip to a farm, where he meets a menagerie of critters and characters. Kevin Hart, Jenny Slate, and Tiffany Haddish also lend their voice talents. Fairview/Fiesta 5 Shaft (111 mins., R) Jessie T. Usher stars as Shaft Jr., son of legendary Shaft (Samuel L. Jackson), who teams up with his father to uncover the truth about the suspicious disappearance of his best friend.

Camino Real/Fiesta 5

The above films are playing in Santa Barbara FRIDAY, June 21, through THURSDAY, June 27. Our critics’ reviews are followed by initials: MK (Matt Kettmann), MPG (Maz Pasion-Gonzales), JW (Josef Woodard), and JY (Jean Yamamura). The symbol O indicates the film is recommended. The symbol ➤ indicates a new review.

Fri, Sat, Sun: 2:30pm, 7:30pm / Mon, Wed: 5:00pm Tues, Thurs: 2:30pm, 7:30pm

Fri: 5:15pm / Sat: 5:15pm / Sun: 12:15pm, 5:15pm Mon, Wed: 2:45pm, 7:45pm / Tues, Thurs: 5:15pm

FOR TICKETS, VISIT WWW.SBIFF.ORG AND THE THEATRE BOX OFFICE #SBIFF INDEPENDENT.COM

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COURTESY

PAUL WELLMAN FILE PHOTO

SPORTS FATHERS AND SONS: Santa Barbara Foresters manager Bill Pintard (pictured, right, with his son Eric in 2003) says Eric has been “with me every game” since he died of cancer 15 years ago. Augie Johnson often makes a rigorous hike up to Cathedral Peak, where a plaque has been situated in memory of his son Nick.

TWO FATHERS INSPIRED BY LOST SONS Bill Pintard and Augie Johnson Remember Their Boys Johnson, who had previously hiked the trail in midsummer, was told that crampons and ice axes would be needed to prevent slipping and falling on an icy slope. A search-andrescue expert recommended they carry beepers in case of an avalanche. Johnson called off the trip two days before their planned departure. “I felt a big weight off my chest,” he said. “There was a reverberation from Nick, like maybe he’s telling me something. If somebody slipped and fell, if I lost somebody on this hike — I listened to that. If you never had a significant loss, you retain that bulletproof feeling. Now, doing things together with my children, I don’t have to take a huge risk to make it satisfying. Cathedral Peak is risky enough. We can always sign up [for Mount Whitney] again.” Another experience amplified Johnson’s sense of foreboding. He’d seen enough of avalanches after the night of January 9, 2018, when the massive Montecito debris flow surged into his house. Miraculously, his family was unharmed. “We were so amazingly lucky in that mudslide,” Johnson said. “So many things had to happen for us to get out of there. If I hadn’t woken up, I would have died. If my wife and kids hadn’t gone upstairs…. “I feel so many things occurred; wow, there’s something there. We were guided through a matrix of decisions, every decision the right one, down to finding that baby boy in mud.” Johnson decided to check on a neighbor’s house and heard a cry, leading him and a firefighter to pull a 2-year-old toddler out of the mud. Just as Nick would have been, he was a rescuer.

WONDER WOMEN: While U.S. soccer stars like Alex Morgan, Carli Lloyd, and Julie Ertz make headlines in the Women’s

World Cup, in the smaller world of water polo, the U.S. has a squad that has been quietly winning almost everything in sight since 2012. The women’s national team has won the last two Olympic water polo championships and will be going for a third next year. The Americans punched their ticket to the 2020 Tokyo Games by defeating Italy 10-9 in this month’s FINA World League Super Final at Budapest, Hungary. It was their sixth straight Super Final crown, and three Santa Barbara athletes played a part in it: Stanford graduates Kiley Neushul, an Olympic gold medalist in 2016, and her younger sister Jamie Neushul; and Paige Hauschild, a USC junior. The Neushuls were Dos Pueblos High standouts, and n Hauschild ruled the pool at San Marcos.

by JOHN ZANT

FORESTERS PLAYERS OF THE WEEK PAUL WELLMAN

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ife was too short for Eric Pintard and Nick Johnson to become fathers, but they have achieved a sort of paternal influence over their own fathers. Before he became manager of the Santa Barbara Foresters in 1995, Bill Pintard watched Eric pitch for the summer baseball club. The youngster’s playing career was cut short when he was diagnosed with ependymoma, a rare and deadly type of cancer. He survived for 10 years, during which he was the pitching coach and a cheerful presence on his father’s staff. “It is a special day,” Bill Pintard said last Sunday, on Father’s Day, after the Foresters completed another 3-0 weekend at Pershing Park by defeating the Orange County Riptide, 10-4. “There’s two things I loved being called: Dad and Coach. I got to be [Eric’s] dad, and I got to coach with him.” The elder Pintard wears his son’s No. 19. “He’s with me every game,” he said. He could imagine Eric, who was 31 when he died in 2004, becoming head skipper of the Foresters. “I’d be his assistant,” he said. “He was smarter than I was anyway. Eric was amazing because he had such feel as a pitching coach, even when he was in a wheelchair.” Eric inspired the Foresters to become advocates for children with cancer. The program is called Hugs for Cubs and includes hospital visits and outings. “Hugs for Cubs keeps me going,” Bill Pintard said. “I still have a passion for coaching.” Nick Johnson was only 19 when he died in a tragic drowning accident five years ago. The oldest of Karen and Berkeley “Augie” Johnson’s four children, he was an exemplary son, student, and athlete, a water polo player at UCSB. “He wanted to be a rescue swimmer, and I’m convinced that’s what he’d be doing today,” Augie Johnson said. “I try to live in a way he would be proud of.” An adventurous streak runs through the Johnson family. Nick took frequent hikes up Cathedral Peak, one of the most challenging destinations in Santa Barbara’s front country. His father was preparing to lead a climb of Mount Whitney, the highest peak (14,505 feet) in the lower 48 states, after receiving six coveted one-day permits through a lottery last month. Nick’s younger brothers, Sam and Cooper, were eager to go along. “What say you, oh great ones?” Augie asked in an invitation to his friends. “Shall we sit on our couch drinking beer and watching Cops reruns or cast our lances at nature’s greatest windmills?” But a week before their May 30 expedition, snow was falling in the Sierras, adding to an already substantial snowpack that was covering much of the steep Whitney Trail. The elder

JOHN ZANT’S GAME OF THE WEEK 6/23: Baseball: Orange County Riptide at Santa Barbara Foresters The championship of the California Collegiate League could well be decided by the games between the Riptide and the Foresters. They split their first two, the Riptide winning 3-2 in Irvine and Santa Barbara taking a 10-4 victory at home last Sunday. The Foresters unleashed their running game in the rematch, stealing seven bases. A two-run triple in the seventh inning by centerfielder Diego Harris highlighted Santa Barbara’s offense. Cole Quintanilla, a righthander from Texas, and three relief pitchers held the Riptide to one run, a homer by Miami’s Chad Crosbie, over the last six innings. After this weekend, the Riptide will make two more visits to Santa Barbara: a late-afternoon game on the Fourth of July, and another Sunday matinee on July 14. 2pm. Pershing Park, 100 Castillo St. $3-$7. Visit sbforesters.org.

Zach Presno

The catcher from Fresno State went 6-for-15 (.400) over a four-game span, including a five-RBI game at Conejo in which he had a home run and a triple. He threw out a runner on an attempted steal to stymie an early Orange County threat on Sunday.

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FREE WILL ASTROLOGY by Rob Breszny

WEEK OF JUNE 20

ARIES

CANCER

LIBRA

(Mar. 21-Apr. 19): Orfield Laboratories is an architec-

(June 21-July 22): Some traditional astrologers believe

(Sept. 23-Oct. 22): In 1903, the Wright Brothers put

tural company that designs rooms for ultimate comfort. They sculpt the acoustic environment so that sounds are soft, clear, and pleasant to the human ear. They ensure that the temperature is just right and the air quality is always fresh. At night, the artificial light is gentle on the eyes, and by day, the sunlight is rejuvenating. In the coming weeks, I’d love for you to be in places like this on a regular basis. According to my analysis of the astrological rhythms, it’s recharging time for you. You need and deserve an abundance of cozy relaxation.

TAURUS (Apr. 20-May 20): I hope that during the next four

weeks, you will make plans to expedite and deepen your education. You’ll be able to make dramatic progress in figuring out what will be most important for you to learn in the next three years. We all have pockets of ignorance about how we understand reality, and now is an excellent time for you to identify what your pockets are and to begin illuminating them. Every one of us lacks some key training or knowledge that could help us fulfill our noblest dreams, and now is a favorable time for you to address that issue.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): In the next four weeks, you’re not

likely to win the biggest prize or tame the fiercest monster or wield the greatest power. However, you could very well earn a second- or third-best honor. I won’t be surprised if you claim a decent prize or outsmart a somewhat menacing dragon or gain an interesting new kind of clout. Oddly enough, this less-than-supreme accomplishment may be exactly right for you. The lower levels of pressure and responsibility will keep you sane and healthy. The stress of your moderate success will be very manageable. So give thanks for this just-right blessing!

solar eclipses are sour omens. They theorize that when wings on a heavy machine and got the contraption the moon perfectly covers the sun, as it will on July to fly up off the ground for 59 seconds. No one had 2, a metaphorical shadow will pass across some part ever done such a thing. Sixty-six years later, American of our lives, perhaps triggering crises. I don’t agree astronauts succeeded at an equally momentous feat. with that gloomy assessment. I consider a solar eclipse They piloted a craft that departed from the Earth and to be a harbinger of grace and slack and freedom. In landed on the surface of the moon. The first motorcycle my view, the time before and after this cosmic event was another quantum leap in humans’ ability to travel. might resemble what the workplace is like when the Two German inventors created the first one in 1885. But boss is out of town. Or it may be a it took 120 years before any person sign that your inner critic is going HOMEWORK: It’s my birthday. did a backflip while riding a motorto shut up and leave you alone for a cycle. If I had to compare your next If you feel moved, send me love and potential breakthrough to one or while. Or you could suddenly find blessings! Info about how to do that that you can access the willpower the other marvelous invention, I’d at Freewillastrology.com. and ingenuity you need so as to say it’ll be more metaphorically change something about your life similar to a motorcycle flip than the that you’ve been wanting to change. So I advise you to moon landing. It may not be crucial to the evolution of start planning now to take advantage of the upcoming the human race, but it’ll be impressive — and a testablessings of the eclipse. ment to your hard work.

LEO

SCORPIO

(July 23-Aug. 22): What are you doing with the fertility

(Oct. 23-Nov. 21): In the year AD 37, Saul of Tarsus was traveling by foot from Jerusalem to Damascus, Syria. He was on a mission to find and arrest devotees of Jesus, then bring them back to Jerusalem to be punished. Saul’s plans got waylaid, however — or so the story goes. A “light from heaven” knocked him down, turned him blind, and spoke to him in the voice of Jesus. Three days later, Saul’s blindness was healed, and he pledged himself to forevermore be one of those devotees of Jesus he had previously persecuted. I don’t expect a transformation quite so spectacular for you in the coming weeks, Scorpio. But I do suspect you will change your mind about an important issue and consider making a fundamental edit of your belief system.

and creativity that have been sweeping through your life during the first six months of 2019? Are you witheringly idealistic, caught up in perfectionistic detail as you cautiously follow outmoded rules about how to make best use of that fertility and creativity? Or are you being expansively pragmatic, wielding your lively imagination to harness that fertility and creativity to generate transformations that will improve your life forever?

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Mythologist Joseph Campbell said

that heroes are those who give their lives to something bigger than themselves. That’s never an easy assignment for anyone, but right now it’s less difficult for you than ever before. As you prepare for the joyous ordeal, I urge you to shed the expectation that it will require you to make a burdensome sacrifice. Instead, picture the process as involving the loss of a small pleasure that paves the way for a greater pleasure. Imagine you will finally be able to give a giant gift you’ve been bursting to express.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): You could be a disorienting or even

disruptive influence to some people. You may also have healing and inspirational effects. And yes, both of those statements are true. You should probably warn your allies that you might be almost unbearably interesting. Let them know you could change their minds and

disprove their theories. But also tell them that if they remain open to your rowdy grace and boisterous poise, you might provide them with curative stimulation they didn’t even know they needed.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Some children are repelled by the taste

of broccoli. Food researchers at the McDonald’s restaurant chain decided to address the problem. In an effort to render this ultra-healthy vegetable more palatable, they concocted a version that tasted like bubble gum. Kids didn’t like it, though. It confused them. But you have to give credit to the food researchers for thinking inventively. I encourage you to get equally creative, even a bit wacky or odd, in your efforts to solve a knotty dilemma. Allow your brainstorms to be playful and experimental.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Spank yourself for me, please. Ten

sound swats ought to do it. According to my astrological assessments, that will be sufficient to rein yourself in from the possibility of committing excesses and extravagance. By enacting this humorous yet serious ritual, you will set in motion corrective forces that tweak your unconscious mind in just the right way so as to prevent you from getting too much of a good thing; you will avoid asking for too much or venturing too far. Instead, you will be content with and grateful for the exact bounty you have gathered in recent weeks.

PISCES (Feb. 19-Mar. 20): Your inspiration for the coming weeks

is a poem by Piscean poet Henry Wadsworth Longfellow. It begins like this: “The holiest of all holidays are those / Kept by ourselves in silence and apart; / The secret anniversaries of the heart, / When the full river of feeling overflows.” In accordance with astrological omens, Pisces, I invite you to create your own secret holiday of the heart, which you will celebrate at this time of year for the rest of your long life. Be imaginative and full of deep feelings as you dream up the marvelous reasons why you will observe this sacred anniversary. Design special rituals you will perform to rouse your gratitude for the miracle of your destiny.

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700.

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For Santa Barbara County Nonprofit organizations


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EMPLOYMENT ACCOUNTING/ BOOKKEEPING ACCOUNTING TECHNICIAN I/II/III $3,930 ‑ $6,222 / Month The SBCAPCD is seeking entry level or an experienced Accounting Technician. For a complete announcement and application materials visit the District website at www.ourair.org or call (805) 961‑8800. FFD: 07/12/19 EOE‑Drug Free Workplace

ADMIN/CLERICAL

DOMESTIC

LEGAL

Housekeeper Needed

DID YOU KNOW that the average business spends the equivalent of nearly 1½ days per week on digital marketing activities? CNPA can help save you time and money. For more info email cecelia@cnpa.com or call (916) 288‑6011. (Cal‑SCAN)

Loving family of 5 with school‑age children in Montecito is looking for a full time housekeeper with experience from Monday through Friday sometimes 8‑4 and sometimes 9‑5. Start August 18th. Preference given to those that can travel with us and do not mind helping with the children occasionally. Text or call 307‑699‑9601

Weekend Housekeeping ASSISTANT PARKING OPERATIONS

Parking Office Processes daily deposits for Parking Services. Assist in the operational needs of Transportation & Parking Services Operations to include, Permit Sales, Adjudication and Transportation Alternatives Program (TAP). Integrates cash management across multiple function areas, each of which is identified with an individual revenue account with an associated general ledger account/fund number. Working knowledge of MS Office software, campus specialized computerized programs, and a capacity for learning third party Point of Sale software programs. Significant organization skills and flexibility in changing from multiple diverse clerical tasks with frequent interruptions due to a broad range of Departmental needs is required. Supports Information Kiosk as needed with friendly support for directions, visitor center, other campus related information focused around parking. Reqs: Minimum of 2 years experience or equivalent combination of education and experience, in, cashiering, accounts receivable, account reconciliation and/ or financial reporting. Demonstrated experience in, and understanding of internal controls and best practices concerning cash and cash equivalents. Excellent communication and customer service skills including the ability to actively listen and effectively convey information, policy and procedures both orally and in writing. Demonstrated experience with accuracy, attention to detail, and organization. Significant organization skills and flexibility in changing from multiple diverse clerical tasks with frequent interruptions due to a broad range of Departmental needs is required. Proficient in MS Office. Ability to work effectively as part of a diverse team. Notes: Fingerprint background check required. Maintain a valid CA driver’s license. Must be able to work evenings and weekend on an as‑needed basis. $24.09‑ $27.07/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For primary consideration apply by 7/1/19, thereafter open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #20190333

Needed in Montecito/Carpenteria Experience Required Sat & Sun 9‑12 Start August 24th 307‑699‑9601

EDUCATION AIRLINE CAREERS Start Here – Get trained as FAA certified Aviation Technician. Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877‑205‑4138. (Cal‑SCAN)

EMPLOYMENT SERVICES AIRLINES ARE HIRING ‑ Get FAA approved hands on Aviation training. Financial Aid for qualified students ‑ Career placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 888‑686‑1704

Field Representative For SEIU Local 620 (labor union) Santa Barbara, California. Negotiating contracts, disciplinary appeals, organizing workers Competitive salary based on qualifications, plus full benefit package including retirement; health, dental, vision & disability insurances; auto allowance, & more. Please mail resumes to: SEIU Local 620; Attn: Ronna Hooper 114 Vine St., Santa Maria, CA 93454, call: 805‑963‑0601, fax: 805‑614‑7620 or email: ronna@seiulocal620.org

FINANCE OVER $10K in Debt? Be debt free in 24 to 48 months. No upfront fees to enroll. A+ BBB rated. Call National Debt Relief 1‑888‑508‑6305. (Cal‑SCAN)

LOWEST PRICES on Health & Dental Insurance. We have the best rates from top companies! Call Now! 888‑989‑4807. (Cal‑SCAN) SUFFERING FROM an ADDICTION to Alcohol, Opiates, Prescription PainKillers or other DRUGS? There is hope! Call Today to speak with someone who cares. Call NOW 1‑855‑266‑8685 (AAN CAN)

FOR EVERYONE IN OUR CARE. It’s one of our core values.

In the experience Cottage Health provides to our patients, clinical skill and state-of-the-art technology are only part of the equation. Equally important is compassion – the demonstration of sincere caring, as fellow human beings, for each patient we are privileged to serve. Along with excellence and integrity, compassion is a Cottage core value. Join us in putting it into practice every day.

ACADEMIC PERSONNEL ANALYST – CONFIDENTIAL

OFFICE OF ACADEMIC PERSONNEL Provides direct analytical and organizational support to the Executive Vice Chancellor (EVC), Associate Vice Chancellor (AVC), and senior staff in Academic Personnel while maintaining at all times a high level of confidentiality and accuracy. Requires knowledge of budgeting, academic compensation, and academic personnel policy. Interacts with over 80 campus academic departments, center and programs, various administrative offices, the Academic Senate, other UC AP offices, and the Office of the President. Primary campus contact on all issues related to academic compensation. Uses strong analytic and organizational skills in working on multiple projects with frequent interruptions. Reqs: Bachelors or equivalent combination of education and experience. Ability to apply and interpret campus and system‑wide academic personnel and workforce administration policies and procedures. Must have high level of administrative and organization skills in addition to excellent oral and written communication skills. Ability to handle multiple, often conflicting tasks, with frequent interruptions. Note: Fingerprint background check required. $23.95‑$29.34/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For primary consideration apply online 6/27/19, thereafter open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #20190328

ACADEMIC PERSONNEL COORDINATOR

SOUTH HALL ADMINISTRATIVE DEPARTMENT Independently organizes, plans, coordinates and manages the department’s Academic Personnel activities such as faculty recruitment, UCPath payroll, and academic merit and promotion review process. Performs other related duties as assigned. Reqs: Demonstrated administrative and organizational skills. Analytical skills including the ability to understand, interpret, apply,

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PROFESSIONAL

HEALTH & FITNESS DENTAL INSURANCE. Call Physicians Mutual Insurance Company for details. NOT just a discount plan, REAL coverage for 350 procedures. 1‑855‑472‑0035 or http://www.dental50plus.com/canews Ad# 6118 (Cal‑SCAN)

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Santa Barbara Cottage Hospital

Non-Clinical

Cottage Rehabilitation Hospital

• Advanced Care Facilitator

• Lifeguard – PD

Nursing

• Concierge

• Manager, CRH Therapy

• Cook

• Occupational Therapist – PD

• Environmental Services Rep

• Patient Care Tech – PT

• Environmental Services Supervisor

• Physical Therapist – PD

• EPIC Clarity Writer Sr.

• Recreational Therapist – PD

• Manager, Clinical Research Coordinator

Cottage Business Services

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Access Case Manager Birth Center Educator, Lactation Emergency Endoscopy Eye Center – PT Hematology/Oncology Infection Control Practitioner Injury Prevention, Outreach & Education Coordinator Manager, Surgery Med/Surg Float Pool MICU Mother Infant NICU Nurse Practitioner – Palliative Care Operating Room Orthopedics PACU Patient Relations/ Accred Coordinator RN Peds Peds Outpatient RN PICU Psych Nursing Pulmonary, Renal, Infectious Disease Recuperative Care Nurse SICU Surgical Trauma Telemetry Utilization Case Manager – PD

Clinical • • • • • • • •

Advanced Care Planning Emergency Department Tech Patient Care Tech I Pharmacy Tech – PD Surg Tech – Eye Center Surgical Tech II Unit Care Tech Unit Coordinator

• Nutrition Lead – FT

• Director, Patient Access

• Nutrition Supervisor

• Government Reimbursement Analyst

• Patient Financial Counselor II • Research Coordinator – Non RN • Research Coordinator, RN • Research Department Coordinator

• HIM Manager • HIM Outpatient Data Specialist • Manager, Denials and Utilization Review • Manager, Patient Access

• Room Service Server

• Retirement Plan Admin Sr.

• Security Officer – FT Nights/Evenings

• Sr. Revenue Integrity Analyst

• Sr. Instructional Designer, Optime (RN)

• Telehealth Coordinator

• Sr. Quality Analyst

Pacific Diagnostic Laboratories

• Sr. QI Specialist • Therapy Aide – PD

• Certified Phlebotomist Technician – FT/PT

Allied Health

• CLS II, Core Lab, Micro – FT/PT (Evening/Night)

• Case Manager – PD

• Cytotech – PD

• Case Manager – SLO Clinic

• Lab Assistant II – FT/PT

• Community Nurse Practitioner

• Sales Support Representative

• Manager, Therapy Services

• Sr. Sales Representative

• Occupational Therapist – PD

Santa Ynez Valley Cottage Hospital

• Physical Therapist II – PD

• RN Med/Surg – PD

• Recuperative Care Nurse • Sonographer – PD

• Please apply to: www.pdllabs.com

Goleta Valley Cottage Hospital • Physical Therapist – PD

• RN, ICU

• RENTAL & RELOCATION ASSISTANCE AVAILABLE FOR SELECT FULL-TIME POSITIONS

• RN, Med/Surg – PD

• CERTIFICATION REIMBURSEMENT

• Relief Nursing Supervisor – PD • RN, First Assist – FT

We offer an excellent compensation package that includes above-market salaries, premium medical benefits, pension plans, tax savings accounts, rental and mortgage assistance, and relocation packages. What’s holding you back?

Please apply online at jobs.cottagehealth.org. Candidates may also submit a resume to: Cottage Health, Human Resources, P.O. Box 689, Pueblo at Bath Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93102-0689 Please reference “SBI” when applying. EOE

Excellence, Integrity, Compassion

For volunteer opportunities at Cottage Health, visit: www.cottagehealth.org/volunteer

www.cottagehealth.org

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JUNE 20, 20, 2019 2019 JUNE

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EMPLOYMENT and communicate complex polices and procedures. Ability to deal with sensitive and confidential information. Accuracy and attention to detail is essential. Ability to prioritize and coordinate projects simultaneously. Outstanding written skills to write and edit chairs memo’s and letters. Excellent verbal and communication skills to interact professionally with faculty, staff, students and the public. Computer literacy required with knowledge of Word and Excel and ability to learn and become proficient with a wide range of online systems. Note: Fingerprint background check required. $22.51‑$23.58/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For primary consideration apply online 6/24/19, thereafter open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #20190318

DESIGN & CONSTRUCTION

Construction Analyst Responsible for the administration of capital improvement projects of various sizes and complexity up to $35,000k. Develops the scope of work narrative and associated work diagrams, conducts site visits, initiates appropriate contracts, and monitors the work. Supports and assists Project Managers on Major Capital Improvement Projects above $750,000k. Responsible for the oversight and administration of capital improvement projects of various sizes and complexity up to $35,000k. Verifies contract and cost controls compliance. Responsible for the implementation, coordination, and management of all project document exchanges, and administers and implements program management system software. Interfaces and coordinates with other UC Departments and outside Agencies. Schedules and provides information on upcoming construction activities, disturbances, impacts, and potential closures. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree in related area and/or equivalent experience/training. Demonstrated ability to provide support to the DC&S Group as follows: Collaborate with Project Managers in preparing construction contract documents and change orders initiated by project managers. Review professional services agreements initiated by project managers. Ensure agreements are executed in a timely manner. Draft amendments and revisions to the agreements. Prepare Capital Improvement Budgets and Minor Capital Improvement documents in collaboration with Budget and Planning, Campus clients and Office of the President. Conduct research and analysis on a variety of issues including technical problems, maintenance problems, costs, and building code requirements. Collaborate with FM Fiscal Group to interpret and maintain project budgets and work orders. Ensure changes do not exceed available funding on phased funded projects. Notes: Fingerprint background check required. Maintain a valid CA driver’s license a clean DMV record and enrollment in the DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program. This is a two year contract position. Multiple positions available. $53,200‑ $63,600/ yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For primary consideration apply online by 06/25/19, thereafter open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #20190321

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DEVL. ANALYST, ECOLOGICAL & ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCES

Office of Development Supports a complex and multifaceted program in coordination with Central Development’s Development and Advancement Services team and Donor Relations and Stewardship team. Provides leadership for all analytical functions that support EES development’s strategic goals and activities leading toward philanthropic support from individuals, foundations and organizations. Reports to the Director of Development, Ecological and Environmental Sciences, but serves the Development Officers from all initiatives and programs represented by EES and maintains close and effective working relationships with other development units, facilitating collaborative efforts between teams. Supports the EES Development team in short and long term strategic planning, including preparing materials and reports that analyze the activities, progress and goals of the EES team. Analysis includes accessing comprehensive information from the development database, Advance, independently and in coordination with Central Development Office. Oversees prospect tracking and moves management, including proactively planning, organizing and attending strategy meetings and coordinating follow up regarding major gift prospects. Processes gifts, produces acknowledgement letters, and at the direction of Development Officers, helps create stewardship reports for donors. Reqs: Demonstrated experience in the maintenance of databases, expertise in the use of Word, Excel, and other office software and/or web‑based applications. Excellent skills in analysis, problem solving, working with detail while applying and understanding broader contexts as they affect a diverse customer base. Notes: Fingerprint background check requires. Willingness to work evenings and weekends as needed. $23.47 ‑ $25/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For primary consideration apply by 6/23/19, thereafter open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs. ucsb.edu Job #20190304

DIRECTOR OF DEVELOPMENT, REGIONAL GIVING

Office of Development Focuses on the identification, cultivation, and solicitation of individual prospects, including alumni, parents, and friends of the University. Primary solicitation focus will be based on a donor‑centric approach with emphasis on major gifts and new and renewing Chancellor’s Council (annual) level gifts. Designs and executes planned strategies for the identification, cultivation, solicitation, closing and stewardship of gifts from individuals. Works personally with top donor prospects and also supports the Senior Director of Development, Regional Giving, the Associate Vice Chancellor of Development, other campus administrators and key volunteers in top prospect relationships, in order to maximize philanthropic support of UC Santa Barbara. Focuses about seventy percent time on activities directly related to the fundraising gift cycle. 30% of time is focused on other activities related to fundraising, including events, volunteer committee

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JUNE 20, 2019

management and administrative and managerial duties, such as planning and coordinating. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree or equivalent combination of education and experience required. 5‑10 years of experience in individual major donor development or related profession. Proven success in the major gift fundraising; experience in higher education preferred. Notes: Fingerprint background check required. Maintain a valid CA driver’s license. This is an annually renewable contract position. Flexibility and willingness to travel frequently. Ability to work some weekends and evenings. Multiple positions available. Salary is competitive and commensurate with experience and qualifications. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For primary consideration apply by 6/20/19, thereafter open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs. ucsb.edu Job #20190310

ETHICS AND COMPLIANCE MANAGER

Vice Chancellor Administrative Services Provides strategic leadership and coordination over ethics and compliance risk management activities across the UC Santa Barbara campus. Serves as a strategic advisor to the Vice Chancellor of Administrative Services and works collaboratively with system‑wide and campus leadership and stakeholders to identify and highlight critical compliance and other risks facing the campus. Collaborate with campus leadership in developing mitigation strategies to ensure a high level of compliance. Works with campus leadership to promote a culture of accountability, ethics, compliance, and risk intelligence, and advises leadership and other stakeholders on issues of significant consequences and risk to the campus. Oversees compliance governance, policies and procedures, training and education, communication and reporting, internal monitoring, and Improper Governmental Activities/ Whistleblower investigations. Manages the campus‑wide Enterprise Risk Management (ERM) program and annual compliance plan. Establishes campus‑wide goals and objectives, in collaboration with the campus Ethics and Compliance Risk Committee. Drives continuous improvement work to achieve a “best practices” standard in all areas of compliance. Functions with significant autonomy. Oversee incoming reports of Improper Governmental Activities and campus Whistleblower complaint investigations through the work of the Senior Campus Complaint Investigator. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree in related area and/or equivalent experience/ training and progressively responsible compliance management‑related experience. Broad and thorough knowledge of the compliance and ethics profession, theories, and standards. Commitment to the highest ethical and professional standards and ability to serve as a guidepost for the UCSB ethics and compliance community. Notes: Fingerprint background check required. Form 700 Statement of Economic Interest Flier required. $112,850‑ $140,500/yr. Salary is commensurate with qualifications and experience. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For primary consideration apply by 7/8/19, thereafter open until filled.

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Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #20190311

FINANCIAL & BUSINESS OPERATIONS ANALYST

International Students Provides organizational support, project management and administrative support to the department Directors. Plays a key role in ensuring effective and efficient financial and payroll business functions and multiple programs for the departments of International Students & Scholars (INTS) and Student Affairs Academic Initiatives (SAAI). Responsible for complex professional financial and payroll analysis and processing, including extracting, researching, and analyzing financial and payroll data and developing, creating, and presenting budget data, projections, and reports to Directors. Provide policy information to staff and handles multiple complex and confidential projects that require strong analytical and organizational skills. Serves as a primary preparer for personnel & payroll adjustments and completes salary adjustments requiring accurate interpretation of policies and procedures affecting staff salaries. Responsible for analyzing staff funding and staffing lists and determines cost effective funding changes ensuring staffing lists are reconciled per policy. Develops appropriate business procedures and best practices with procurement, financial, and payroll and personnel processes ensuring that department is in compliance with University Business & Financial policies. Analyzes and interprets new campus business processes and provides recommendations to Director and writes and disseminates information to department staff members. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree or equivalent combination of education and experience. Experience working with and creating budgets. Experience working with policies and procedures. Experience with processing payroll. High level of proficiency with Microsoft software products, such as Excel and Word. Notes: Fingerprint background check required. Occasional weekend and evening work required. $23.47‑ $25.00/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For primary consideration apply by 6/3/19, thereafter open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #20190273

PROGRAMS DIRECTOR

Office of Public Events Responsibility for campus programming for public events intended to foster a culture of philanthropy. Responsible for strategic planning and design of programs that achieve Event Management and Protocol, campus, division and department goals and objectives. Contributes to long‑range planning, decision‑making and policy and procedure formulation and management, both related to primary program areas as well as objectives needed to reach department, division and campus goals. Reqs: 3+ years of significant event management experience handling events with 100‑500 attendees. Bachelor’s degree in communication, marketing, public relations, or other field related to event management, and /or equivalent combination of education and experience. Advanced

knowledge of concepts, principles, and best practices of event planning, including design and organizational production of complex events. Knowledge and skills to apply event management principles, practices, and techniques in support of effective event management, particularly high visibility, high impact, and high risk events. Highly developed political acumen skills and social perceptiveness to successfully meet the needs of clients and ensure guest satisfaction. Notes: Fingerprint background check required. Maintain a CA driver’s license. Must be available to work weekends and evenings as needed. $58,000‑$63,000/yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For primary consideration apply by 6/10/19, thereafter open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs. ucsb.edu Job #20190287

SETTLEMENT ANALYST

Purchasing Office Independently manages the Virtual Card component of the Procurement Card program under the direction of the Settlement Manager. Identifies candidates for settlement and coordinates conversion from check payment. Serves as the primary point of contact between the University, administering bank and vendors to resolve all issues related to payment, and reconciling all payment transactions between the University, administering bank and funding bank. Reconciles all balance sheet and other accounts related to the Virtual and Procurement Card programs, processing correcting journals as appropriate. Serves as primary backup for the Procurement Card Coordinator. Reqs: Significant expertise with MS Excel. Note: Fingerprint background check required. $23.47‑ $27.46/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For primary consideration apply by 6/24/19, thereafter open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #20190312

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SKILLED

PLUMBER

Maintenance Design, redesign and assembles from working drawings and blueprints various systems including water, steam, sanitary and storm drains, vacuum and compressed airlines. Installations require a thorough knowledge of all building and safety codes, the ability to work from blueprints and make working drawings, and the ability to use appropriate formulas and computations for pipe sizing and fitting related to pressure and flow; perform welding, soldering and brazing as required; install and repair plumbing fixtures, steam systems and hot water heaters. Reqs: Must possess the skills, knowledge and

abilities essential to the successful performance of Journey Level Plumber duties as evidenced by a journeyman plumber certificate or an equivalent combination of education and experience. Substantial journey level experience in institutional, industrial and commercial plumbing installation and maintenance. Thorough knowledge of all building and safety codes. Ability to work from blueprints and make working drawings. Ability to use appropriate formulas and computations for pipe sizing and fitting related to pressure and flow. Excellent interpersonal and customer service skills. Notes: Fingerprint background check required. Maintain a valid CA driver’s license a clean DMV record and enrollment in the DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program. Must be able to take night and weekend call‑backs. May be required to work alternate days and hours to meet the operational needs of the department. Multiple positions available. $36.47/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity /Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For primary consideration apply online by 06/26/19, thereafter open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #20190326

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WONDERFUL TEACHER

Enjoy Piano, Voice or Harp Lessons. Exciting new approach to a full musical experience. Read, memorize, compose or improvise any music w/ ease. Vocal audition prep. $52/hr. 1st lesson 50% off!! Christine Holvick, BM, MM, 30 yrs exp sbHarpist.com Call 969‑6698

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FOR ALL EVENTS. Weddings, Concerts, Parties, Churches, Recording Studios. Classical, pop, folk, jazz...Christine Holvick, BM, MM www.sbHarpist.com 969‑6698

SERVICE DIRECTORY FINANCIAL SERVICES ARE YOU BEHIND $10k OR MORE ON YOUR TAXES? Stop wage & bank levies, liens & audits, unfiled tax returns, payroll issues, & resolve tax debt FAST. Call 855‑970‑2032. (Cal‑SCAN)

GENERAL SERVICES

SR. CUSTODIAN

Facilities Management Under the supervision of the Custodial Supervisor, performs a wide variety of cleaning tasks and is responsible for minor maintenance and storage of equipment. Required to comply with the Physical Facilities Safety Program. Reqs: 1‑2+ years of custodial experience or combination of experience, training and education, preferably in school or business setting. Must be able to communicate orally and in writing in English. Ability to use and care for janitorial supplies and equipment. Able to observe and use safe working conditions. Ability to understand and apply University and Department policies and procedures to specific situations. Ability to exercise sound judgment in solving problems. Ability to accomplish work within deadlines; may handle more than one project at a time. Ability to work effectively in a team environment and needs to receive and follow instruction from supervisors. Notes: Fingerprint background check required. Maintain a valid CA driver’s license a clean DMV record and enrollment in the DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program. May be required to wear an UCSB‑provided uniform. Days and hours may vary to meet the operational needs of the department. $18.98‑$20.54/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For primary consideration apply online by 6/26/19, thereafter open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #20190325

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TRUCKS/RECREATIONAL GOT AN older car, boat or RV? Do the humane thing. Donate it to the Humane Society. Call 1‑ 844‑335‑2616 (Cal‑SCAN)

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HEALING GROUPS

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Empowering, practical, non‑religious alternative for anyone in recovery. SmartRecovery.org for info. Wed. 6:30pm. Vet’s Hall, 112 West Cabrillo Blvd. 805‑886‑1963

LEGALS

FBN ABANDONMENT STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF USE OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME The following Fictitious Business Name is being abandoned: SVENDSGAARD’S DANISH LODGE at 1711 Mission Drive Solvang, CA 93463; The original statement for use of this Fictitious Business Name was filed 01/16/2019 in the County of Santa Barbara. Original file no. 2019‑0000126. The person (s) or entities abandoning use of this name are as follows: True Blue Solvang LLC 341 Mowetza Drive Ashland, OR 95720 This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on May 28, 2019. I hereby certify that this is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Christine Potter,

HOLISTIC HEALTH

Herbal Health‑care

Herbal programs for weight‑loss, heart conditions, inflammation & pain, blood sugar conditions, digestion, liver detox. Naturopath, Herbalist, Khabir Southwick, 805‑308‑3480, www.KSouthwick.com

MASSAGE (LICENSED)

DEEP TISSUE QUEEN

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Published: Jun 6, 13, 20, 27 2019. STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF USE OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME The following Fictitious Business Name is being abandoned: SANTA BARBARA SENIOR CARE LLC at 2839 Foothill Rd Santa Barbara, CA 93105; The original statement for use of this Fictitious Business Name was filed 05/21/2018 in the County of Santa Barbara. Original file no. 2018‑0001516. The person (s) or entities abandoning use of this name are as follows: Carlos E Avelar Guzman (same address) This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jun 06, 2019. I hereby certify that this is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Thomas Brian, Published: Jun 13, 20, 27. Jul 3 2019.

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Day

High

Low

High

Low

High 11:59 pm 5.14

Thu 20

6:54 am −0.50 1:54 pm 3.54

5:54 pm 2.79

Fri 21

7:36 am −0.20 2:46 pm 3.57

6:47 pm 2.93

Sat 22

3:38 pm 3.67

Sunrise 5:47 Sunset 8:14

12:40 am 4.73

8:19 am 0.11

7:58 pm 3.00

Sun 23

1:28 am 4.27

9:03 am 0.43

4:26 pm 3.85

9:29 pm 2.91

Mon 24

2:30 am 3.81

9:48 am 0.75

5:07 pm 4.09

11:02 pm 2.60

Tue 25

3:49 am 3.41 10:32 am 1.04

5:42 pm 4.39

Wed 26

12:14 am 2.09

5:18 am 3.18

11:15 am 1.31

6:14 pm 4.73

Thu 27

1:07 am 1.50

6:38 am 3.12

11:58 am 1.54

6:45 pm 5.10

3

9

17 D

25 H

crosswordpuzzle

tt By Ma

Jones

“E’s Here!” -- grid only, though.

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GARAGE & ESTATE SALES

River rock baskets available for sale each $150.00

Delivery available to driveway/ curbside for $100.00 fee (Will coordinate delivery with other drop offs) Boulder sizes: 4‑8” 4‑10” Each basket holds 150 boulders +‑ 80ft linear +‑ Stop by our yard for viewing: 415 North Quarantina Street SB CA 93103 anytime between 9‑5:30pm (call or text before so I can make sure I am here 805‑698‑6961 Lorena)

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME S TAT E M E N T T h e f o l l o w i n g person(s) is/are doing business as: THE SANDLOT S U P P LY C O M PA N Y a t 8 1 3 W Va l e r i o S a n t a B a r b a r a , CA 93101; The Sandolt, LLC ( s a m e a d d re s s ) c o n d u c t e d b y a Limited Liability Company Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on May 21, 2019. This s t a t e m e n t e x p i re s f i v e y e a r s from the date it was filed i n t h e O ff i c e o f t h e C o u n t y Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, C o u n t y C l e r k ( S E A L ) b y Ta r a Jayasinghe. FBN Number: 2019‑0001198. Published: May 30. Jun 6, 13, 20 2019.

Tide Guide

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME S TAT E M E N T T h e f o l l o w i n g person(s) is/are doing business as: CHANNEL ISLANDS WINE at 880 Cambridge Dr Goleta, CA 93111; Jason Liehr (same address) conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on May 21, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Thomas Brian. FBN Number: 2019‑0001207. Published: May 30. Jun 6, 13, 20 2019.

65 “Wordplay” and “Simpsons” crossword guy with Will 66 Bob who did “Hollywood Nights” 1 ___ out a living (got by) 67 Russo of “Tin Cup” 5 KFC drumsticks, basically 68 “Compás” point 9 Half a cartoon duo with a platypus 69 In ___ (actually) 13 Matt’s “Wild Things” costar 70 Toboggan 14 Didn’t do it right 16 Actor Omar of “Almost Christmas” 17 Form an opinion 18 Pupil, in Paris 1 Conclusion, in Koln 19 Handbook info 2 Boat bottom 20 “Finding Dory” star 3 Bus-jumping stunt cyclist, casually 23 “Dr. Mario” and “Duck Hunt” 4 Folk/country musician Iris platform 5 City not far from Kingston upon 24 Quattro minus uno Hull 25 School tasks using Scantrons 6 Oil tycoon Halliburton 28 Big buy for suds 31 K-pop group with a 2019 Grammy 7 “Diary of a Wimpy Kid” kid 8 Golf pro who won post-Fuzzy nomination 9 Dug around, with “out” 33 “Lucky Man” prog rock trio, for 10 Olympics sword short 11 D&D and similar campaign 34 “Tommy” song on day two of pursuits Woodstock 39 “___ Griffin’s Crosswords” (2007- 12 Flimflams, for short 15 Auto body flaw 2008 show) 21 Loch for cryptozoologists 41 Gallup poll finding 22 Kathryn of “Oz” and “L&O: C.I.” 42 TV cook Paula 25 Mall Santa job or sub at work, say 43 HOF Brooklyn shortstop with 26 Robt. ___ (Civil War fig.) uniform no. 1 27 Buying outing 46 Physics unit of work 28 TV cook Graham and family 47 “Chicago” lyricist 29 Abu Dhabi VIP (var.) 48 Promgoing kids, for short 30 Mutation factors 49 Poly finish 32 Bad driving condition 51 21___ (Shaq’s foot stat) 35 July and August, to Balzac 53 180˚ from WSW 36 Gps. that assist putting out 54 Hashtag post that’s always apt conflagrations 62 WWF’s “Hitman” Hart 37 Nothing but 63 War of 1812 pact city 38 RPI grad’s abbr. 64 Raison d’___

Across

Down

INDEPENDENT.COM INDEPENDENT.COM

JUNE 20, 20, 2019 2019 JUNE

40 Car also known as a Bug 44 Hairstylist known for cowboy hats 45 Throat doc that also works in ophthalmology 50 Conduits found in “TMNT” 52 Ovoids in a carton 53 ___ nous 54 “So ___ to you, Fuzzy-Wuzzy” (Kipling) 55 Not horiz. 56 Syngman ___ of 1950s Asian politics 57 Brain activity monitors 58 Suffix for carbon compounds, plural 59 Child star who was Damian in “Millions” 60 Grayish-brown aquatic bird 61 Angry, with “off” 62 MIT study topic including hospitals, diagnostics and MRIs ©2019 Jonesin’ Crosswords (editor@ jonesincrosswords.com) For answers to this puzzle, call: 1-900-226-2800, 99 cents per minute. Must be 18+. Or to bill to your credit card, call: 1-800655-6548. Reference puzzle #0932

LAST WEEK’S SOLUTION:

THE INDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT THE

65 65


INDEPENDENT CLASSIFIEDS

LEGALS

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: BAD KITTY KREATIONS at 2538 Murrell Rd Santa Barbara, CA 93109; Bad Kitty Kreations LLC (same address) conducted by a Limited Liability Company Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on May 22, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Michelle Lvoff. FBN Number: 2019‑0001219. Published: May 30. Jun 6, 13, 20 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: ELLES CALIFORNIA at 315 Meigs Rd Ste A154 Santa Barbara, CA 93109; Maeva LLC (same address) conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on May 09, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Thomas Brian. FBN Number: 2019‑0001128. Published: May 30. Jun 6, 13, 20 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: XARABYTE CREATIVE PRODUCTIONS at 915 W Valerio St Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Benjamin Hurst (same address) conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on May 20, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Sandra E. Rodriguez. FBN Number: 2019‑0001192. Published: May 30. Jun 6, 13, 20 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: 3 MINUTE FILM FESTIVAL, INTERNATIONAL FINE ARTS FILM FESTIVAL, RIVER MOSS PRODUCTIONS at 3463 Garden Street #148 Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Lynn M Holley 1502 Garden Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101 conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on May 14, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Sandra E. Rodriguez. FBN Number: 2019‑0001150. Published: May 30. Jun 6, 13, 20 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: CHI BEAUTY ARTISTRY at 914 Anacapa Street, Suite D Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Chi Jou Lin 2625 Montrose Pl. Santa Barbara, CA 93105 conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on May 20, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Connie Tran. FBN Number: 2019‑0001193. Published: May 30. Jun 6, 13, 20 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: JIVE TOURS at 1015 Orilla Del Mar #5 Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Jive Tours LLC (same address) conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on May 23, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Thomas Brian. FBN Number: 2019‑0001237. Published: May 30. Jun 6, 13, 20 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: MINDFUL OUTDOOR RETREATS at 1362 Farren Rd Goleta, CA 93117; Kristen Kelly Ruskey (same address) conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on May 21, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Christine Potter. FBN Number: 2019‑0001204. Published: May 30. Jun 6, 13, 20 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: TY.T FISHING at 223 Calle Serrento Goleta, CA 93117; Kyle Tapia (same address) conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on May 28, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Brenda Aguilera. FBN Number: 2019‑0001255. Published: May 30. Jun 6, 13, 20 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: JAMES MARTIN GALLERY at 619 State Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101; James C. Martin 1726 Calle Boca Del Caon Santa Barbara, CA 93101 conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on May 29, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Adela Bustos. FBN Number: 2019‑0001268. Published: Jun 6, 13, 20, 27 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: ESPANA’S CARPET CLEANING & JANITORIAL SERVICES at 111 South ‘I’ St Suite 1‑E Lompoc, CA 93436; Maribel Espana 1205 North Third St Lompoc, CA 93436 conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on May 30, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Margarita Silva. FBN Number: 2019‑0001275. Published: Jun 6, 13, 20, 27 2019.

|

PHONE 965-5205

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: LEVELEX at 5569 Ekwill St Santa barbara, CA 93111; PM & RC Builders, Inc. (same address) conducted by a Corporation Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on May 24, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2019‑0001244. Published: Jun 6, 13, 20, 27 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: GPS RIVER ROCK COMPANY at 1333 Kern Street Taft, CA 93268; Smith‑Mabry Company (same address) conducted by a Corporation Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on May 24, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2019‑0001248. Published: Jun 6, 13, 20, 27 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: HOPE 4 KIDS, HOPE 4 KIDS PRESCHOOL, HOPE SANTA BARBARA, HOPE 4 KIDS EARLY LEARNING CENTER, HOPE 4 KIDS PRESCHOOL & INFANT/TODDLER CENTER, HOPE 4 KIDS EARLY LEARNING CENTERS, HOPE COMMUNITY CHURCH at 560 N La Cumbre Road Santa Barbara, CA 93110; Missionary Church of Santa Barbara, Inc. (same address) conducted by a Corporation Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on May 16, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2019‑0001178. Published: Jun 6, 13, 20, 27 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SCREEN ENVY at 347 Dayton Dr Goleta, CA 93117; Jeanine Elizabeth Byers. (same address) conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on May 29, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Tara Jayasinghe. FBN Number: 2019‑0001265. Published: Jun 6, 13, 20, 27 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: SANTA BARBARA ADOBE CO. at 619 State Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101; James C. Martin 1726 Calle Boca Del Caon Santa Barbara, CA 93101 conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on May 29, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Adela Bustos. FBN Number: 2019‑0001267. Published: Jun 6, 13, 20, 27 2019.

REAL ESTATE RETIRED COUPLE $$$$ for business purpose Real Estate loans. Credit unimportant. V.I.P. Trust Deed Company www.viploan.com Call 818 248‑0000 Broker‑principal BRE 01041073. No consumer loans. (Cal‑SCAN)

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE HOMES/DUPLEXES FOR SALE

2911 Kenmore Pl, Santa Barbara, CA

FOR SALE BY OWNER. Unobstructed views of the Pacific ocean, Channel Islands, Harbor, and city. Updated two bedroom, one bath home. Visit www.KenmorePlace.com or call 805‑569‑5699 for more information. OPEN HOUSE Saturday, June 22nd and Sunday June 23rd, 1‑3PM OFFERED AT $947,000

RANCH/ACREAGE FOR SALE 39 ACRE NORTHERN ARIZONA WILDERNESS RANCH $183 MONTH ‑ Outstanding buy on quiet secluded

66

off grid northern Arizona homestead at cool ‑clear 6,000’ elev. Blend of mature evergreen woodlands & grassy meadows with sweeping views of surrounding mountains and valleys from elevated ridgetop cabin sites. Borders 640 acres of uninhabited State Trust woodlands. Free well water access, rich loam garden soil, ideal climate. No urban noise & dark sky nights amid complete privacy & solitude. Camping and RV ok. Maintained road access. $19,900, $1,990 down with no qualifying seller financing. Free brochure with additional properties, prices & descriptions, photos/terrain maps/ weather data/ nearby town & fishing lake info. 1st United Realty 1‑602‑264‑0000. (CalSCAN) WOODED NEW Mexico high country getaway. 3‑7 acre parcels with underground utilities surrounded by public lands. Low down owner financing from $24,995 total. Hitching Post Land 1‑575‑773‑4200 (CalSCAN)

WANTED: REAL ESTATE FOR SALE KC BUYS HOUSES ‑ FAST ‑ CASH ‑ Any Condition. Family owned & Operated . Same day offer! (951) 777‑2518 WWW. KCBUYSHOUSES.COM (Cal‑SCAN)

APARTMENTS & CONDOS FOR RENT $1320 1BD Corner of Hope & San Remo‑N State St‑Barbara Apts Quiet NP 687‑0610 1 BED 1 Bath townhomes, $1575‑$1650, off‑st pkg, near UCSB & beach. 805‑968‑2011 Model open ‑ 6707 Abrego Rd #100 1BD NEAR Cottage Hospital. 519 W Alamar. Set among beautiful oak trees across the street from Oak Park. NP. $1320. Call Cristina 687‑0915 1BD NEAR SBCC & beach @ Carla Apts NP. 530 W Cota $1320 Rosa 965‑3200 2BDS $1740+ & 3BD flat or townhouses $2490. Near UCSB, shops, park, beach, theater, golf. Sesame Tree Apts 6930 Whittier Dr. Hector 968‑2549 STUDIOS $1320+ & 1BDs $1440+ in beautiful garden setting! Pool, lndry & off‑street parking at Michelle Apartments. 340 Rutherford St. NP. Call Erin 967‑6614

MISC. FOR RENT NEED A roommate? Roommates. com will help you find your Perfect Match™ today! (AAN CAN)

RENTAL PROPERTIES

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JUNE 20, 2019

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: JESSANY HOPE PHOTOGRAPHY at 465 North Turnpike Road Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Jessany Hope Rodenas (same address) conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on May 28, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Adela Bustos. FBN Number: 2019‑0001260. Published: Jun 6, 13, 20, 27 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: NKH GLOBAL MARKETING SOLUTIONS at 98 South Patterson Ave Apt 102 Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Lani Elizabeth Fox (same address) conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on May 31, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Christina Potter. FBN Number: 2019‑0001301. Published: Jun 6, 13, 20, 27 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: ROY TREVINO ELECTRIC at 487 Calor Dr Buellton, CA 93427; Rolland Trevino Jr. (same address) conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on May 22, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2019‑0001226. Published: Jun 13, 20, 27. Jul 3 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: PLANET FITNESS at 1505 S Broadway Santa Maria, CA 93454; PF Santa Maria, LLC 9 Grand Avenue Suite 2D Toms River, NJ 08753 conducted by a Individual Signed: Ira Warhaftig Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jun 03, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2019‑0001310. Published: Jun 13, 20, 27. Jul 3 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: SANTA BARBARA PERMIT SERVICE at 190 Salisbury Dr. Goleta, CA 93117; Kathrine Peden(same address) Carson Pierce (same address) conducted by a General Partnership Signed: Carson Pierce Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on May 20, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Tara Jayasinghe. FBN Number: 2019‑0001185. Published: Jun 13, 20, 27. Jul 3 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: LIQUID CULT at 5038 La Ramada Drive Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Onyx And Redwood LLC (same address) conducted by a Limited Liability Company Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jun 4, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Adele Bustos. FBN Number: 2019‑0001336. Published: Jun 13, 20, 27. Jul 3 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: HAVEN BARBER AND SHOP at 1924 1/2 De La Vina Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Alejandro Guerena 735 West Pedregosa Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Erin Guerena (same address) conducted by a General Partnership Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jun 10, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Adele Bustos. FBN Number: 2019‑0001388. Published: Jun 13, 20, 27. Jul 3 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: WEXFORD CORP. WEXFORD COSMETIC CORP. at 845 Norman Lane Santa Barbara, CA 93108; Wexford Industrial Corp. (same address) conducted by a Corporation Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on May 31, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Connie Tran. FBN Number: 2019‑0001290. Published: Jun 13, 20, 27. Jul 3 2019.

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E M A I L S A L E S @ I N D E P E N D E N T. C O M

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: ORTHOPEDIC SURGICAL PRACTICE OF SANTA BARBARA. at 5333 Hollister Ave Suite 150 Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Daniel F. Craviotto, JR., MD., INC. 5327 Paseo Rio Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Matthew Pifer MD 1020 Alston Road Montecito, CA 93108; Bryan C. Emmerson MD 333 El Cielito Road Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Victor A. Tacconelli MD., INC. 1310 Robbins Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Steven B. Hollister MD. 1390 N. Fairview Ave Goleta, CA 93117 conducted by a Unincorporated Association Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on May 31, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Connie Tran. FBN Number: 2019‑0001288. Published: Jun 13, 20, 27. Jul 3 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: CHALLWA at 724 E. Haley St. Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Challwa LLC 1021 De La Vina St. #C Santa Barbara, CA 93101 conducted by a Limited Liability Company Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jun 05, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Sandra E. Rodriguez. FBN Number: 2019‑0001348. Published: Jun 13, 20, 27. Jul 3 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: FAMILY MATTERS CONSULTING at 248 San Nicolas Ave Santa Barbara, CA 93109; Family Matters Consulting (same address) conducted by a Corporation Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jun 5, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Brenda Aguilera. FBN Number: 2019‑0001346. Published: Jun 13, 20, 27. Jul 3 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SANJUAN PAINTING at 4820 San Gordiano Ave Apt A Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Florencio Sanjuan (same address) conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on May 31, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Thomas Brian. FBN Number: 2019‑0001299. Published: Jun 13, 20, 27. Jul 3 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: IVAN’S CONSTRUCTION at 1610 Villa Ave Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Iban Rosas Silva (same address) conducted by a Individual Signed: Iban Rosas Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jun 07, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Margarita Silva. FBN Number: 2019‑0001369. Published: Jun 13, 20, 27. Jul 3 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: BAYOU PIVOT at 421 1/2 W. De La Guerra St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Macy Cornerstone LLC1423 Kenwood Road Santa Barbara, CA 93109; Siobhan McCleary 421 1/2 W. De La Guerra St Santa Barbara, CA 93101 conducted by a General Partnership Signed: Sibhan McCleary Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on May 13, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Brenda Aguliera. FBN Number: 2019‑0001139. Published: Jun 13, 20, 27. Jul 3 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: NORTHERN PROPERTIES at 800‑836 East Ocean Ave Lompoc, CA 93436; Ellen Dorwin 166 Pelican Lane Guadalupe, CA 93434; John Gaymon Montfort 585 Iao Valley Road Wailuku, HI 96793 conducted by a Copartners Signed: John Gaymon Montfort Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on May 22, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2019‑0001213. Published: Jun 13, 20, 27. Jul 3 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: HEALTH SCIENCE at 199 Winhester Canyon Rd Goleta, CA 93117; Patricia Bragg Books, LLC (same address) conducted by a Limited Liability Company Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jun 4, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Tara Jayasinghe. FBN Number: 2019‑0001334. Published: Jun 13, 20, 27. Jul 3 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: BLUE CORN TACOS at 152 Aero Camino Goleta, CA 93117; Paulo Ruiz 1627 Bath Street #5 Santa Barbara, CA 93101 conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jun 11, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Sandra E. Rodriguez. FBN Number: 2019‑0001397. Published: Jun 20, 27. Jul 3, 11 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: THE BARBER SHOP at 1233 State Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101; The Barber Shop At State Street LLC (same address) conducted by a Limited Liability Company Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jun 4, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Adele Bustos. FBN Number: 2019‑0001333. Published: Jun 13, 20, 27. Jul 3 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: SANTA BARBARA BOTANICALS, SANTA BARBARA MEDIATION CENTER, SB COCTAILS, SANTA BARBARA BOTANICS, SB BOTANICALS, SB EVENTS, SANTA BARBARA COCKTAILS, SB BOTANICS at 845 Via Hierba Santa Barbara, CA 93110; Eve Ventures, LLC (same address) conducted by a Limited Liability Company Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jun 13, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Brenda Aguilera. FBN Number: 2019‑0001420. Published: Jun 20, 27. Jul 3, 11 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: THE VITALITY METHOD at 116 N Nopal St #2 Santa barbara, CA 93103; Santa Barbara Fitness & Wellness Services LLC (same address) conducted by a Limited Liability Company Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jun 05, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Connie Tran. FBN Number: 2019‑0001344. Published: Jun 20, 27. Jul 3, 11 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: PLUM LUXURY RENTALS at 646 North Hope Avenue Santa barbara, CA 93110; DJJ Property Rental Group, LLC (same address) conducted by a Limited Liability CompanySigned: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jun 12, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Adele Bustos. FBN Number: 2019‑0001417. Published: Jun 20, 27. Jul 3, 11 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: MARIA’S LAB at 620 W. Carrillo Street, Unit C Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Maria De Jesus Maso (same address) conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jun 06, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Thomas Brian. FBN Number: 2019‑0001351. Published: Jun 20, 27. Jul 3, 11 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: WILLCUNNINGHAM. COM at 449 Cannon Green Drive, Unit D Goleta, CA 93117; William E. Cunningham (same address) conducted by a Individual Signed: William E. Cunningham Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jun 11, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Adela Bustos. FBN Number: 2019‑0001402. Published: Jun 20, 27. Jul 3, 11 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: SHIPSHAPE YACHT MANAGEMENT at 963 Barcelona Dr. Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Lee Phillips (same address) conducted by a Individual Signed: Lee Phillips Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jun 10, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Brenda Aguilera. FBN Number: 2019‑0001381. Published: Jun 20, 27. Jul 3, 11 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: FUNK ZONE FARM at 136 East Yanonali Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Carter Hallman 108 Chapala Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Samantha Weiss (same address) conducted by a General Partnership Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jun 03, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Adela Bustos. FBN Number: 2019‑0001324. Published: Jun 20, 27. Jul 3, 11 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: OJAI PLANT WORKS at 2031 Castillo St Apt B Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Socal Plant Works LLC (same address) conducted by a Limited Liability Company Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jun 17, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Brenda Aguilera. FBN Number: 2019‑0001452. Published: Jun 20, 27. Jul 3, 11 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: REVER at 618 Anacapa St. Suite B Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Haley Chapman 1300 Tunnel Rd Santa Barbara, CA 93105 conducted by a Individual Signed: Haley Chapman Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jun 13, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Sandra E. Rodriguez. FBN Number: 2019‑0001426. Published: Jun 20, 27. Jul 3, 11 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: GRAND CRU VENTURES at 946 Cheltenham Rd Santa barbara, CA 93105; Donald ernest Donaldson (same address) Karen Ellen Donaldson (same address) conducted by a Married Couple Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jun 13, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Tara Jayasinghe. FBN Number: 2019‑0001457. Published: Jun 20, 27. Jul 3, 11 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: DRD ASSOCIATES at 14 W. Valerio Street, #B Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Daniel K. Michealsen Trustee of the Daniel K. Michealsen Family Trust 4584 Camino Molinero Santa Barbara, CA 93110; Julie B. Michealsen Trustee of The Daniel K. Michealsen and Julie B. Michealsen Family Trust (same address) June M. Michealsen Trustee of the Russell S. Michealsen and June M. Michealsen Family Trust 115 East Pueblo Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Russell S. Michealsen Trustee of the Russell S. michealsen and June M. Michealsen Family Trust conducted by a General Partnership Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jun 11, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Sandra E. Rodriguez. FBN Number: 2019‑0001399. Published: Jun 20, 27. Jul 3, 11 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: YOGURTLAND at 621 State St Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Oh Oh Inc. (same address) conducted by a Corporation Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jun 10, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Brenda Aguilera. FBN Number: 2019‑0001389. Published: Jun 20, 27. Jul 3, 11 2019.


INDEPENDENT CLASSIFIEDS

LEGALS

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: PHENIX SALON SUITES at La Cumbre Plaza #F‑127, 121 South Hope Ave Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Cards Holdings LLC 9740 Wren Bluff Drive San Diego, CA 92127 conducted by a Limited Partnership Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jun 10, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2019‑0001375. Published: Jun 20, 27. Jul 3, 11 2019.

NAME CHANGE IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF ADELE RUSSELL ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 19CV02565 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: STELLA DELANIA AMUNDSEN TO: STELLA DELANIA RUSSELL THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. NOTICE OF HEARING Jul 10, 2019 9:30am, Dept 6, 1100 Anacapa St PO Box 21107 Santa Barbara, CA 93101 Superior Court Of California, County of Santa Barbara A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated May 21 2019. by Pauline Maxwell, Judge of the Superior Court. Published. Jun 6, 13, 20, 27 2019. IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF SHARON ANN SPEITEL ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 19CV02699 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: SHARON ANN SPEITEL TO: SHARON LEANN BROWN THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. NOTICE OF HEARING Jul 24, 2019 9:30am, Dept 6, 1100 Anacapa St PO Box 21107 Santa Barbara, CA 93101 Superior Court Of California, County of Santa Barbara A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated Jun 04 2019. by Pauline Maxwell, Judge of the Superior Court. Published. Jun 13, 20, 27. Jul 3 2019. IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF SHAWN ANTHONY SEIBERT‑DUCA ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 19CV02544 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: SHAWN ANTHONY SEIBERT‑DUCA TO: SHAWN ANTHONY SEIBERT DUCA THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. NOTICE OF HEARING Jul 24, 2019 9:30am, Dept 6, 1100 Anacapa St PO Box 21107 Santa Barbara, CA 93101 Superior Court Of California, County of Santa Barbara A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated Jun 04 2019. by Pauline Maxwell, Judge of the Superior Court. Published. Jun 13, 20, 27. Jul 3 2019.

PUBLIC NOTICES NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING FOR THE MOSQUITO AND VECTOR MANAGEMENT DISTRICT OF SANTA BARBARA COUNTY FOR THE SERVICE ZONE NO. 1 ASSESSMENT AND SERVICE ZONE NO. 2 ASSESSMENT FOR FISCAL YEAR 2019‑20 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Board of Trustees of the Mosquito and Vector Management District of Santa Barbara

County intends to conduct public hearings for the CONTINUATION of a benefit assessment in fiscal year 2019‑20 that funds the District’s mosquito, vector control and disease prevention services and projects in Santa Barbara County. The public hearing to consider the ordering of services and projects, and the levy of the continued assessments for fiscal year 2019‑20 for the Service Zone No. 1 and Service Zone No. 2 Assessments shall be held on Thursday, July 11, 2019 at 2:00 p.m. at the Hope School District Board Room, 3970 La Colina Road, Santa Barbara, CA 93110. The proposed assessment rate for fiscal year 2019‑20 is eleven dollars and sixty‑three cents ($11.63) per single‑family equivalent benefit unit for Service Zone 1, and is eleven dollars and sixty‑three cents ($11.63) per single‑family equivalent benefit unit for Service Zone 2. Members of the public are invited to provide comment at the public hearing, or, in writing, which is received by the District on or before Thursday, July 11, 2019. If you desire additional information concerning the above, please contact the Mosquito and Vector Management District of Santa Barbara County at (805) 969‑5050. Dated June 20, 2019 Mosquito and Vector Management District of Santa Barbara County COMPLAINT FOR DAMAGES 1. WRONGFUL DEATH 2. NEGLIGENCE JURY TRIAL DEMANDED McNICHOLAS & McNICHOLAS, LLP Juan C. Victoria, State Bar No 224176 10866 Wilshire Blvd., Suite 1400 Los Angeles, California 90024 Tel: (310)474‑1582 Fax: (310) 475‑7871 Attorneys for Plaintiffs ANTHONY FILOSO and DOMENIC FILOSO VENTURA SUPERIOR COURT FILED SEP 12 2018 MICHAEL D. PLANET Executive Officer and Clerk BY: Deputy Katie Deutinger SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA FOR THE COUNTY OF VENTURA ANTHONY FILOSO, individually and as Successor‑In‑Interest on behalf of Decedent CASE NO. 56‑2018‑00517605‑CU‑PA‑VTA KENNETH FILOSO; DOMENIC FILOSO, individually and as Successor‑In‑Interest on behalf of Decedent KENNETH FILOSO, Plaintiff, v. COMPLAINT FOR DAMAGES 2. NEGLIGENCE JURY TRIAL DEMANDED LILIAN AI LY PHAM; and DOES 1‑100, Inclusive, Defendants. THE PARTIES 1. KENNETH FILOSO died on August 17, 2017. 2. KENNETH FILOSO (herein after “Decedent FILOSO”) was a resident of the County of Los Angeles, State of California. Decedent FILOSO was born on October 22, 1949. FILOSO was 67‑years old at the time of his death. 3. Plaintiff ANTHONY FILOSO (hereinafter “ANTHONY”) is the son and lawful heir of Decedent FILOSO. Decedent FILOSO was ANTHONY’S biological father. Plaintiff ANTHONY is a successor‑in‑interest to Decedent FILOSO and will file a declaration with this Court in compliance with the provisions of Section 377.32 of the California Code of Civil Procedure. 4. At all relevant times, Plaintiff ANTHONY was a resident of the County of Los Angeles, State of California. 5. Plaintiff DOMENIC FILOSO (hereinafter “DOMENIC”) is the son and lawful heirof Decedent FILOSO. Decedent FILOSO was DOMENIC’S biological father. Plaintiff DOMENIC is a successor‑in‑interest to Decedent FILOSO and will file a declaration with this Court in compliance with the provisions of Section 377.32 of the California Code of Civil Procedure. 6. At all relevant times, Plaintiff DOMENIC was an individual residing in the County of Los Angeles, State of California. 7. At all relevant times, Defendant LILIAN AI LY PHAM (herein after “PHAM”) was an individual residing in the County of Santa Barbara, State of California. 8. The true names and capacities of any defendants designated herein as DOES 1 through 100, inclusive, whether an individual, a business, a public entity, or otherwise, are presently unknown to Plaintiffs, who therefore sues said defendants by such fictitious names, pursuant to Code of Civil Procedure§ 474. Plaintiffs are informed and believe, and on such information and belief allege, that each DOE defendant is responsible in some manner for the events alleged herein, and Plaintiffs will amend the complaint to state the true names and capacities of said defendants when their true names and capacities have been ascertained. 9. Plaintiffs are informed and believe and

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thereon allege that at all times herein mentioned, each of the Defendants sued herein as DOES 1 through 100, inclusive, was the agent and employee of each of the named Defendants and was at all times acting within the course and scope of such agency and employment with the full knowledge, consent, authority, ratification and/or permission of each of the named Defendants. 10. At all times herein mentioned, of each of the remaining defendants, and in doing the things hereinafter mentioned, each defendant was acting within the course and scope of their employment and authority as such agent, servant and employee and with the consent of their co‑ defendants. The conduct of each defendant combined and cooperated with the conduct of each of the remaining defendants so as to cause the herein described incidents and the resulting injuries and damages to Plaintiffs. 11. Plaintiffs are informed and believe, and based thereon, allege that at all times mentioned herein, each of the defendants was the agent, servant, employee, and/or joint venturers of each of the remaining defendants and at all times, was acting within the course and/or scope of such employment, agency, service, or venture. 12. Plaintiffs allege that each and every defendant ratified the acts and/or omissions of each and every other defendant named in this matter. 13. Plaintiffs are informed and believe and based thereon allege that at all times herein mentioned, each of the defendants was the co‑tortfeasor of each of the other defendants and responsible for the total harm, damages and wrong suffered by Plaintiffs. Plaintiff’s; claims are within the monetary jurisdiction of this honorable Court. GENERAL ALLEGATIONS 14. The incident, which is the subject of this action, occurred on August 7, 2017 at approximately 2:38p.m., in the City of Thousand Oaks, within the County of Ventura, State of California. 15. On August 7, 2017, at approximately 2:38p.m., Decedent FILOSO drove and operated his motorcycle, a 2006 Harley Davidson Heritage, northbound on Highway US 101 (Ventura Freeway), approximately 865 feet south of Rancho Conejo Boulevard, in the City of Thousand Oaks, County of Ventura, State of California. 16. Highway US 101 is a northbound‑southbound highway with direction of travel separated by a center median. The section of Highway US 101 where the instant collision occurred has four lanes for each direction of traffic. 17. On August 7, 2017, at approximately 2:38p.m., Decedent FILOSO lawfully drove his motorcycle northbound on the number one lane of northbound Highway US 101, approximately 865 feet south of Rancho Conejo Boulevard. 18. At said time, weather conditions were clear, and the roadway was dry. 19. At the same time, Defendant PHAM drove her 2016 Honda in the number one lane on northbound Highway US 101, approximately 865 feet south of Rancho Conejo Boulevard. Defendant PHAM’S vehicle was situated two vehicles ahead of Decedent FILOSO’S vehicle, separated by a gray pick‑up truck. 20. At said time, Decedent FILOSO was driving his motorcycle and was sufficiently, safely, and reasonably spaced behind the gray pick‑up truck. Upon information and belief, Defendant PHAM failed to keep a reasonably safe distance between her vehicle and the vehicle immediately ahead of hers for traffic conditions. 21. Immediately thereafter, traffic came to a complete stop, and Defendant PHAM slammed on her brakes to prevent a collision with the car ahead of her, forcing the gray pick‑up truck to take immediate action to avoid a collision and maneuvered and veered into the lane to the right (number 2 lane). During this sequence, Decedent FILOSO was unable to perceive Defendant PHAM’S stopping vehicle due to the profile of the gray pick‑up truck and the movement of said vehicle and subsequently came into contact and struck the rear left portion of Defendant PHAM’S vehicle. 22. Defendant PHAM failed to safely space her vehicle and to safely and reasonably stop her vehicle and was forced to unreasonably and unsafely slam on her brakes given traffic conditions. Defendant PHAM’S operational actions in this sequence created a chain reaction whereby the gray pick‑up truck barely avoided collision with her car but trapped Decedent FILOSO into the subject collision with Defendant PHAM’S vehicle. Decedent FILOSO did not have sufficient

time to safely apply his brakes or to fully avoid PHAM’S vehicle to the left or right of her vehicle immediately before the subject collision. 23. At the time, Defendant PHAM was driving at unsafe speeds given traffic conditions, i.e. slowing or stopped traffic, was driving too close to the vehicle ahead of her vehicle and was inattentive to other vehicles in front of them. 24. Decedent FILOSO sustained severe and fatal injuries as a result of the collision. Specifically, Decedent FILOSO was separated from his motorcycle upon impact and he sustained blunt force head trauma. Decedent FILOSO was lawfully wearing a helmet at the time of the collision. On August 17, 2017, Decedent FILOSO ultimately died from the injuries sustained in this collision. 25. On August 7, 2017, at approximately 2:38p.m., Defendant PHAM drove and operated her vehicle in a negligent manner, which caused the collision between her vehicle and that of Decedent FILOSO’S motorcycle as Defendant PHAM drove at an unsafe speed northbound in the number one lane of Highway US 101. Defendant PHAM failed to operate her vehicle in a reasonable, prudent, and safe manner, which caused the collision with Decedent FILOSO’S motorcycle. 26. On August 7, 2017 at approximately 2:38p.m., Defendant PHAM drove and operated her vehicle in a negligent, careless, and reckless manner, driving her vehicle inattentively and at an unsafe speed, failing to stop in a reasonably safe manner, and operating her vehicle unreasonably considering all factors such as weather, traffic, visibility, and other related matters as PHAM traveled northbound on Highway US 101. 27. As a driver of a motor vehicle, Defendant PHAM owed a duty to her fellow motorists and to the public at large to exercise reasonable care in the operation of her motor vehicle, to keep a look out for other vehicles, and to reasonably control the speed and movement of her vehicle. 28. Defendant PHAM failed to use reasonable care by operating her vehicle negligently, by failing to reasonably control the movement of her vehicle, by failing to drive at a speed that is safe for slowing traffic conditions, by failing to be attentive to the traffic conditions and other vehicles on the road around her, and by failing to properly maintain her vehicle in a safe manner for the road. As such, Defendant PHAM failed and was unable to prevent her vehicle from causing the collision with Decedent FILOSO’S motorcycle. 29. As a direct and proximate result of the negligence of Defendant PHAM, Decedent FILOSO sustained severe injuries, and died from those injuries. FIRST CAUSE OF ACTION WRONGFUL DEATH (As Against All Defendants PHAM and DOES 1‑50) 30. Plaintiffs reallege and incorporate by reference every allegation contained in paragraphs 1 through 29 as through fully set forth herein. 31. Plaintiffs ANTHONY and DOMENIC are the heirs of Decedent FILOSO and are entitled to maintain an action for damages against Defendants for the wrongful death of Decedent FILOSO, including but not limited to damages as set forth in C.C.P. Section 377.61. 32. As a result of the injuries to and death of Decedent FILOSO, Plaintiffs are entitled to damages, including, but not limited to: loss of Decedent’s respective love, companionship, comfort, care, assistance, protection, affection, society, moral support, and loss of Decedent’s respective training and guidance. Additionally, Plaintiffs are entitled to recover damages, including, but not limited to: any special damages, such as financial support that the Decedent would have contributed to the family during either the life expectancy that Decedent had before his 1 death or the life expectancy of the Plaintiffs, whichever is shorter; loss of gifts or benefits that Plaintiffs would have expected to receive from the Decedent; funeral and burial expenses; and the reasonable value of household services that Decedent would have provided. 33. As a direct and proximate result of the wrongful death of Decedent FILOSO, Plaintiffs ANTHONY and DOMENIC sustained pecuniary loss resulting in the loss of society comfort, attention, services, and support from Decedent FILOSO. 34. As a direct and proximate result of Defendant PRAM’S negligence and the death of Decedent FILOSO, Plaintiffs incurred funeral and burial expenses, as well as suffering extreme and severe emotional distress, pain, anguish, and other economic and non‑economic damages in amounts to be proven at trial. SECOND CAUSE OF ACTION NEGLIGENCE (As Against All Defendants PHAM and DOES 1‑50)

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35. Plaintiffs reallege and incorporate by reference every allegation contained paragraphs 1 through 34 as though fully set forth herein. 36. Defendants PHAM, and DOES 1 through 50, inclusive, owed Decedent FILOSO a legal duty to use reasonable care and caution when driving on public roadways, including but not limited to keeping a lookout for other vehicles, controlling the speed and movement of their vehicles, following other vehicles at a distance that is reasonable and prudent, having due regard for the speed of other vehicles on the roadway, the traffic on the roadway, and the condition of the roadway. 37. Defendants PHAM, and DOES 1 through 50, inclusive, breached that duty of care by failing to operate their vehicles in a safe and reasonable manner. Defendants PHAM and DOES 1 through 50, knew, or should have known, that driving at an unsafe speed for slowing and stopped traffic would result in serious injury or death Decedent FILOSO and others on the roadway. 38. Defendants PHAM and DOES 1 through 50, inclusive, failed to take reasonable and necessary precautions while operating their vehicles before and at the time of the collision on northbound Highway US 101 on August 7, 2017 at approximately 2:38 p.m. 39. On August 7, 2017, at approximately 2:38p.m., Defendants PHAM and DOES 1 through 50, inclusive, negligently drove and operated their vehicles so as to proximately cause the injuries to and wrongful death of Decedent FILOSO and statutory damages alleged by Plaintiffs ANTHONY and DOMENIC herein. 40. In contrast, at said time and place, Decedent FILOSO was acting with due caution, attention and care, and did not contribute to or cause the collision and/or injuries as described hereinafter. 41. Plaintiffs allege that Defendant PHAM is responsible for all injuries and eventual death of Decedent FILOSO sustained as a result of the accident. 42. Defendant PHAM failed to use reasonable care by operating her vehicle negligently, by failing to reasonably control the movement of her vehicle, by failing to drive at a speed that is safe for slowing traffic conditions, by failing to be attentive to the traffic conditions and other vehicles on the road around her, and by failing to properly maintain her vehicles in a safe manner or the road. As such, Defendant PHAM failed and was unable to prevent her vehicle from causing the collision with Decedent FILOSO’S motorcycle. 43. As a direct and proximate result of Defendant PHAM’S negligence, Decedent FILOSO was seriously injured after the motor vehicle collision caused by Defendant PHAM and DOES 1 through 50. Decedent FILOSO thereafter died as a result of these injuries. PRAYER FOR RELIEF WHEREFORE, Plaintiffs ANTHONY FILOSO and DOMENIC FILOSO, individually, and as Successors‑In‑Interest on behalf of Decedent KENNETH FILOSO, pray for judgment against Defendant LILIAN AI LY PHAM and DOES I through I 00 as follows: I. For general damages according to proof; 2. For hospital, medical, professional and incidental expenses, according to proof; 3. For funeral and burial expenses, according to proof; 4. For special damages, according to proof; 5. For all past and future damages, according to proof; 6. For costs of suit; 7. For prejudgment interest, according to proof; 8. For all statutorily allowed damages; and 9. For such other and further relief as the Court may deem just and proper. Dated: September II , 2018 McNICHOLAS & McNICHOLAS, LLP Juan C. Victoria Attorneys for Plaintiffs ANTHONY FILOSO and DOMENIC FILOSO DEMAND FOR TRIAL BY JURY Plaintiffs ANTHONY FILOSO and DOMENIC FILOSO, individually, and as Successors In‑Interest on behalf of Decedent KENNETH FILOSO, hereby demand trial of all causes of action by jury. Dated: September 11, 2018 McNICHOLAS & McNICHOLAS, LLP Published Jun 6, 13, 20, 27 2019.

SUMMONS SUMMONS(CITACION JUDICIAL)CASE NUMBER (Número delCaso):18VECV00373NOTICE TO DEFENDANT (AVISOAL DEMANDADO): DAVID FEE,an individual; and DOES 1 through10, inclusiveYOU ARE BEING SUED BYPLAINTIFF (LO ESTÁDEMANDANDO ELDEMANDANTE): UNION HOMELOAN,

INC., a CaliforniacorporationNOTICE! You have been sued.The court may decide against youwithout your being heard unlessyou respond within 30 days. Readthe information below.You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff.A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self‑Help Center(www.courtinfo.ca.gov/ selfhelp),your county law library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money,and property may be taken without further warning from the court.There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may want to call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you maybe eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site(www. lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self‑help Center(www.courtinfo. ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The court;s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case.¡AVISO! Lo han demand ado. Si no responde dentro de 30 días, la corte puede decidir en su contra sin escuchar su versión. Lea la información a continuación.Tiene 30 DÍAS DE CALENDARIO después de que le entreguen estacitación y papeles legales para presentar una respuesta por escrito en esta corte y hacer que se entre gue una copia aldemandante. Una carta o una llamada telefónica no lo protegen.Su respuesta por escrito tiene que estar en formato legal correcto sidesea que procesen su caso en lacorte. Es posible que haya un formulario que usted pueda usarpara su respuesta. Puede encontrar estos formularios de lacorte y más información en el Centro de Ayuda de las Cortes de California (www. sucorte.ca.gov),en la biblioteca de leyes de sucondado o en la corte que le que demás cerca. Si no puede pagar la cuota de presentación, pida al secretario de la corte que le dé un formulario de exención de pago de cuotas. Si no presenta su respuesta a tiempo, puede perderel caso por incumplimiento y la corte le podrá quitar su sueldo,dinero y bienes sin más advertencia. Hay otros requisitos legales. Es recomendable que llame a un abogado inmediatamente. Si no conoce a un abogado, puede llamar a un servicio de remisión a abogados. Si no puede pagar a un abogado, es posible que cumpla con los requisitos para obtener servicios legales gratuitos de un programa de servicios legales sin fines de lucro. Puede encontrar estos grupos sin fines de lucro enel sitio web de California Legal Services,(www. lawhelpcalifornia.org), en el Centro de Ayuda de las Cortes de California, (www. sucorte.ca.gov) oponién dose en contacto con lacorte o el colegio de abogados locales. AVISO: Por ley, la corte tiene derecho a reclamar las cuotas y los costos exentos por imponer un gravamen sobre cual quier recuperación de $10,000ó más de valor recibida mediante un acuerdo o una concesión de arbitraje en un caso de derecho civil. Tiene que pagar el gravamende la corte antes de que la cortepueda desechar el caso.The name and address of the courtis (El nombre y dirección de lacorte es): LOS ANGELESSUPERIOR COURT, 6230 SylmarAve., Van Nuys, CA 91401The name, address, and telephonenumber of plaintiff's attorney, orplaintiff without an attorney, is (Elnombre, la dirección y el númerode teléfono del abogado deldemandante, o del demandanteque no tiene abogado, es): JosephD. Curd SBN 115764, Curd,Galindo & Smith, LLP 301 E.Ocean Blvd., #1700, Long Beach,CA 90902 (562) 624‑1177 Fx 562‑624‑1178DATE (Fecha): 12/28/2018Sherri R. Carter Executive Officer/Clerk (Secretario), by AngelicaSalcedo, Deputy (Adjunto) (SEAL)6/13, 6/20, 6/27, 7/4/19CNS‑3262104#SANTA BARBARAIN DEPENDENTSUMMONS(CITACION JUDICIAL) NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: (AVISO AL DEMANDADO): LILIAN AI LY PHAM; and Does 1‑100 InclusiveYOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF: (LO ESTA DEMANDANDO EL

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DEMANDANTE): ANTHONY FILOSO, individually and as Successor‑In‑Interest on behalf of Decedent Kenneth Filoso; NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below.You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this Summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff.A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self‑Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), your county law library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia. org), the California Courts Online Self‑Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case.AVISO! Lo han demandado. Si no responde dentro de 30 días, la corte puede decidir en su contra sin escuchar su version. Lea la informacion a continuacion. Tiene 30 DIAS DE CALENDARIO después de que le entreguen esta citación y papeles legales papa presentar una respuesta por escrito en esta corte y hacer que se entregue una copia al demandante. Una carta o una llamada telefónica no lo protegen. Su respuesta por escrito tiene que estar en formato legal correcto si desea que procesen su caso en la corte. Es posible que haya un formulario que usted pueda usar para su respuesta. Puede encontrar estos formularios de la corte y mas información en el Centro de Ayuda de las Cortes de California (www.sucorte.ca.gov), en la biblioteca de leyes de su condado o en la corte que le quede mas cerca. Si no puede pagar la cuota de presentación, pida al secretario de la corte que le de un formulario de exención de pago de cuotas. Si no presenta su respuesta a tiempo, puede perder el caso por incumplimiento y la corte le podrá quitar su sueldo, dinero y bienes sin mas advertencia.Hay otros requisitos legales. Es recomendable que llame a un abogado inmediatamente. Si no conoce a un abogado, puede llamar a un servicio de remisión a abogados. Si no puede pagar a un abogado, es posible que cumpla con los requisitos para obtener servicios legales gratuitos de un programa de servicios legales sin fines de lucro. Puede encontrar estos grupos sin fines de lucro en el sitio web de California Legal Services, (wwwlawhelpcalifornia.org), en el Centro de Ayuda de las Cortes de California, (www.sucorte.ca.gov) o poniéndose en contacto con la corte o el colegio de abogados locales. AVISO: Por ley, la corte tiene derecho a reclamar las cuotasy los costos esentos por imponer un gravamen sobre cualquier recuperacion de $10,000 o mas de valor recibida mediante un acuerdo o una concesión de arbitraje en un caso de derecho civil. Tiene que pagar el graveman de la corte antes de que la corte pueda desechar el caso. CASE NO: (Numero del Caso) 56‑2018‑00517605‑CU‑PA‑VTAThe name and address of the court is: (El nombre y dirección de la corte es): VENTURA COUNTY SUPERIOR COURT, 800 S. Victoria Ave., Ventura, CA 93009 The name, address, and telephone number of the plaintiff’s attorney, or plaintiff without an attorney, is: (El nombre, la dirección y el numero de telefono del abogado del demandante, o del demandante que no tiene abogado, es): Juan C. Victoria, McNicholas & McNicholas, LLP, 10866 Wilshire Blvd, #1400, LA CA 90024 Phone No. (310) 474‑1582 DATE: Oct 05, 2018 Katie Deutinger Deputy Clerk; Published. Jun 6, 13, 20, 27 2019.

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Santa Barbara Independent, 6/20/19  

June 20, 2019, Vol. 33, No. 701

Santa Barbara Independent, 6/20/19  

June 20, 2019, Vol. 33, No. 701