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FREE

Santa Barbara

MAY 23-30, 2019 VOL. 33 • NO. 697

Workin’ It 2019

RIDING THE

BLUE-COLLAR

BOOM Construction Careers, Workplace Wellness, and More in Our Annual Jobs Guide By Camie Barnwell

SPORTS: BRAWLIN’ BETTIES ROCK ROLLER DERBY |FOOD: NEW LEADER FOR FAIRVIEW GARDENS|LIVING: COMMON TABLE FINDS COMMON GROUND| OPINION: JUDGE DECRIES DEPORTATION INDEPENDENT.COM

MAY 23, 2019

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I1talianMadonnari Street Painting Festival XXX111 Anniversario

May 25, 26, 27, 2019 Santa Barbara Mission

Hours: 10 a.m. to 6 p.m. • Free Festival Admission & Parking

All Proceeds Benefit the Children's Creative Project

Street paintings by 200 local artists and children will transform the Old Mission plaza. Street painting—using chalk on pavement—is an Italian tradition since the 16th century. The international competition is held each year in Grazie di Curtatone, Italy. Join our celebration and enjoy live music, an Italian market of fine foods, and Mission tours. I Madonnari benefits the Children's Creative Project, a nonprofit arts education program of the County Education Office, Susan C. Salcido, Superintendent. The Project provides resident artist workshops and performances for 50,000 children in 90 schools.

Information: 805–964-4710 ext. 4412 www.IMadonnariFestival.com Sign up at the Information Booth to be a street painting sponsor or artist next year. Featured Artist • Sharyn Chan Street painting 12x16 feet beneath the Mission steps

Kid's Street Painting Area Mission's west private parking lot

2' x 2' Square with Chalk • $12 Purchase at festival each day

Raffle Tickets $10 Buy tickets at Festival Booths. Need not be present to win

Old Mission tours: General Admission $12. Hours daily 9:00 to 4:15

Artist: Delphine Louie Anaya Photo: Nell Campbell

Street Painting Sponsors & Donors Ablitt's Fine Cleaners Advanced Veterinary Specialists Alani Gonzalez Alec Sherwin Alex Cole Construction American Riviera Bank Andrew & Adrianne Davis Annie Pham-Cheng, DMD Architectural Foundation of Santa Barbara Associated Hand Surgeons Audrey West Bio SB, Inc. • Cancer Diagnostics Bishop Garcia Diego High School Bourke Wealth Management Brandi Stankovic • Willy Kenyon Bunnies Urgently Needing Shelter Cat & Bird Clinic Cearnal Collective Chandlery Yacht Sales Christ the King Episcopal Church Healing Prayer Ministry Christopher J. Thrash MD Internal Medicine

CHS • Gallup & Stribling Cindy Star CITIG Congregation B'nai B'rith Corbu Construction LTD CorePower Yoga Crane Country Day School Danny's Barber Shop David / Webtoon David A. Goss, III, Financial Services, Inc. Dos Pueblos High School Dr. Hurtado Dentistry Ensberg Jacobs Design Inc Evolutions Medical & Day Spa FastSpring First Presbyterian Church Forms + Surfaces Franciscan Inn & Suites Girls Inc. of Greater Santa Barbara Girls with Curls Goleta Education Foundation Goleta Star LLC Grace Wenzel

Haagen Printing/Typecraft Inc. Harbor Seal Heritage House Hope School Hub International Insurance Services Hudson Institute of Coaching Ian's Tire & Auto Repair In Loving Memory of Dr. Michael Jacoby Jack 'N Tool Box, Inc. John & Claire Pendergast Judith Bennett & Stephen Schweitzer Kellogg School Kieran Meaney KCM Comix Kiwi's Auto Repair Kuya’mu Park Association La Cumbre Animal Hospital La Patera Elementary School La Playa Pilates Livescan Santa Barbara Lompoc Theater Project Marilyn D. Anticouni Attorney at Law

Mark Crittenden Structural Engineer Maryan Schall Marymount of Santa Barbara Matt Vaughan Sun Coast Real Estate McCormix Corp. Merritt Cabinets Mission City Church Montecito Union • YMCA Montecito Union School Montessori Center School NCL Leadership Team Opera Santa Barbara Pacific Premier Bank Phyllis Chiu Psychedelic Honey Swim X Active Pulverman & Pulverman Attorneys Rainbow School Rebecca Golgert, MD Resource Connect Inc. Rite Care Language Center Roberta Nielsen

Roosevelt Elementary School • 5th Grade Sandra Quintana • SB-Puerto Vallarta Sister City Committee Santa Barbara Beautiful Santa Barbara Bowl Santa Barbara Stone Santa Barbara Stone Masters Santa Barbara Travel Bureau Santa Barbara Zoo SB Body Therapy Institute SB Eyeglass Factory SB Internal Medicine Group SBToDo.com Foundation Seaside Wellness Gardens Senator Hannah-Beth Jackson Shoemaker Creative Skin Prophecy Clinic SoCal IP Law Group LLP South Coast Karate St. Athanasius Orthodox Church St. Barbara Precious Metals St. Vincent's Stephanie Tahan

Mille Grazie Festival Sponsors Angeli Sponsors

NS CERAMIC

Benefattori Sponsors 2

Daniel & Mandy Hochman

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MAY 23, 2019

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Santa Barbara – Puerto Vallarta Sister City Committee

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@SUPERPIXTER Surgical Arts • Howard Gross MD The Berry Man, Inc. The Burrows Family The Howard School The Maloco Family The Mazuk Family The Meyer Family The Purvis Law Firm The Squire Foundation The Turner Foundation Therapy Dogs of Santa Barbara Timothy West Tom Meaney • Architect TV Santa Barbara Vasta Family Via Maestra 42 Wanderful Retreats Whole Health Dentistry Wilkinson • Diaz William E. Vollero, MD, Inc. Yoga Soup Zen Yai Thai • SB Volume Lash Studio


international series

at The Granada Theatre SEASON SPONSORSHIP: SAGE PUBLICATIONS

Presenting the world’s finest classical artists since 1919

1919–2019/20

MONDAY, JANUARY 27, 2020 8:00PM

ROYAL PHILHARMONIC Pinchas Zukerman conductor & violin

FRIDAY, MARCH 6, 2020 7:00PM

LOS ANGELES PHILHARMONIC

100TH ANNIVERSARY CONCERT Gustavo Dudamel by Citizens of Humanity

Gustavo Dudamel conductor

THURSDAY, MARCH 26, 2020 8:00PM

ROTTERDAM PHILHARMONIC Lahav Shani conductor Nelson Freire piano

TUESDAY, APRIL 14, 2020 8:00PM

CHINEKE! ORCHESTRA Kevin John Edusei conductor Stewart Goodyear piano

TUESDAY, APRIL 28, 2020 8:00PM

LES VIOLONS DU ROY Jonathan Cohen conductor Avi Avital mandolin

MONDAY, MAY 18, 2020 8:00PM

LOS ANGELES CHAMBER ORCHESTRA Jaime Martín conductor Sheku Kanneh-Mason cello

masterseries

at the Lobero Theatre SEASON SPONSORSHIP: ESPERIA FOUNDATION TUESDAY, OCTOBER 29, 2019 8:00PM

STEPHEN HOUGH piano

WEDNESDAY, DECEMBER 11, 2019 8:00PM

PAMELA FRANK violin PETER SERKIN piano

a ROYAL

ANNIVERSARY SEASON 20192020 101 Concert Season st

MONDAY, JANUARY 13, 2020 8:00PM

EMANUEL AX piano 1919–2019/20

FRIDAY, FEBRUARY 14, 2020 8:00PM

SÉRGIO & ODAIR ASSAD guitars FRIDAY, MARCH 13, 2020 8:00PM

BENJAMIN

SERIES SUBSCRIPTIONS ON SALE NOW GROSVENOR piano Call CAMA 805 966-4324 or email tickets@camasb.org

COMMUNITY ARTS MUSIC ASSOCIATION OF SANTA BARBARA, INC. INDEPENDENT.COM

www.camasb.org MAY 23, 2019

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Spirit of Service Awards 2019 Looking Good Santa Barbara is proud to announce the honorees of the Fifteenth Annual Spirit of Service Awards. Recipients were honored at a luncheon on May 22nd. The Spirit of Service program honors those in the community who further the mission of Looking Good Santa Barbara by reducing waste (reduce, reuse, recycle & compost) and contributing to a clean community through graffiti and litter abatement.

Waste Reduction BELMOND EL ENCANTO Elizabeth Fajardo

Jack Cantin Youth Award ELLIE CHENOWETH

Clean Community LAURA WYATT

Waste Reduction

ALVARO CASTELLANOS ROJAS

Clean Community BISHOP GARCIA DIEGO HIGH SCHOOL L-R Back Row: Karen Regan, Cameron Medina, Sophie Kinderdick, Laylanie Valenzuela, Stacey Carr L-R Front Row: Ethan Garcia, Kathryn Roberts, Thomas Coleman Amy Mancinelli, Evelyn Pazos Ramirez Clean Community VERONICA SANCHEZ

Waste Reduction FOOD FROM THE HEART’S HARVEST PROGRAM Back Row L-R: Tom Young, John Bemis, Rob Rice, Kelly Baeza, Tim Schroeter, Bill Howard, Ron Dexter, Richard Lapaglia, Gary Krasnoff Front Row L-R: Bernadette McDermott-Lewis Karen Oxholm, John Cookson, Janice Aramaki, Jacqui Oxholm, Ruth Floyd

Looking Good Santa Barbara is a program of City Trash & Recycling. For more information on the program or to get involved, please call (805) 564-5669 or visit www.LookingGoodSB.com 4

THE INDEPENDENT

MAY 23, 2019

INDEPENDENT.COM


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MAY 23, 2019

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Editor in Chief Marianne Partridge

Publisher Brandi Rivera

Executive Editor Nick Welsh Senior Editors Michelle Drown, Tyler Hayden, Matt Kettmann Editor at Large Ethan Stewart Photography Editor Paul Wellman News Reporters Blanca Garcia, Delaney Smith Opinions Editor Jean Yamamura Executive Arts Editor Charles Donelan Arts Writer Richie DeMaria Calendar Editor Terry Ortega Calendar Assistant Amber White Sports Editor John Zant Sports Writer Victor Bryant Food Writer George Yatchisin Associate Editor Jackson Friedman Copy Editor Tessa Reeg

mountainairsports.com

Creative Director Caitlin Fitch Graphic Designers Ricky Barajas, Alex Drake, Ben Greenberg, Elaine Madsen Production Designer Ava Talehakimi Digital Editor Erika Carlos Digital Assistant Nancy Rodriguez Columnists Dennis Allen, Gail Arnold, Sara Caputo, Roger Durling, Jerry Roberts, Starshine Roshell Contributors Camie Barnwell, Rob Brezsny, Melinda Burns, Ben Ciccati, John Dickson, Keith Hamm, Rebecca Horrigan, Eric HvolbØll, Tom Jacobs, Shannon Kelley, Kevin McKiernan, Ninette Paloma, Carolina Starin, Brian Tanguay, Tom Tomorrow, T.M. Weedon, Josef Woodard, Maggie Yates

THE UPSTANDING MAN

Please give a minimum contribution of $100 by June 6. Your name or the name of the man your donation is in honor of will be listed in the Santa Barbara Independent Father’s Day issue.

“A man who takes a stand against domestic violence... he does not stand by; he is part of the solution.” LEARN MORE AT: WWW.DVSOLUTIONS.ORG/UPSTANDINGMAN Domestic Violence Solutions for Santa Barbara County • 805-963-4458 • dvsolutions.org 6

THE INDEPENDENT

MAY 23, 2019

INDEPENDENT.COM

Editorial Interns Daniel Carroll, Skyler DePaoli, Bailey Emanuels, Ciara Gilmore, Sofía MejíasPascoe, Amarica Rafanelli, Taylor Salmons Multimedia Interns Maya Chiodo, Harvest Keeney Director of Advertising Sarah Sinclair Marketing and Promotions Manager Emily Cosentino Advertising Representatives Camille Cimini Fruin, Suzanne Cloutier, Rachel Gantz, Stefanie McGinnis, Antonio Morales, Tonea Songer Sales Administrator Graham Brown Accounting Assistant Tobi Feldman Office Manager/Legal Advertising Tanya Spears Guiliacci Distribution Scott Kaufman Columnist Emeritus Barney Brantingham Founding Staff Emeriti Audrey Berman, George Delmerico, Richard Evans, Laszlo Hodosy Honorary Consigliere Gary J. Hill Indy Kids Bella and Max Brown, Elijah Lee Bryant, Henry and John Poett Campbell, Chloë Bee Ciccati, Izadora and Savina Hamm, Madeline Rose and Mason Carrington Kettmann, Olivia Pando-McGinnis, Izzy and Maeve McKinley, Miranda Tanguay Ortega, Sawyer Tower Stewart, Phoenix Grace White The Independent is available, free of charge, limited to one copy per reader. Back issues cost $2 and may be purchased at the office. The Independent may be distributed only by authorized circulation staff or authorized distributors. No person may, without the permission of publisher, take more than one copy of each Independent issue. Subscriptions are available, paid in advance, for $120 per year. Send subscription requests with name and address to subscriptions@independent.com. The contents of the Independent are copyrighted 2019 by the Santa Barbara Independent, Inc. No part may be reproduced without permission from the publisher. The publisher assumes no responsibility for unsolicited material. A stamped, self-addressed envelope must accompany all submissions expected to be returned. The Independent is published every Thursday at 12 E. Figueroa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Advertising rates on request: (805) 965-5205. Classified ads: (805) 965-5208. The Independent is available on the internet at independent.com. Press run of the Independent is 40,000 copies. Audited certification of circulation is available on request. The Independent is a legal adjudicated newspaper — court decree no. 157386.

Contact information: 12 E. Figueroa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101 PHONE (805) 965-5205; FAX (805) 965-5518 EMAIL news@independent.com, letters@independent.com Staff email addresses can be found at independent.com/info


Voices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  17, 23 In Memoriam . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  19 Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  24

THE WEEK.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 LIVING.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Living Page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33

FOOD & DRINK .. . . . . . . . . . 34 The Restaurant Guy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 38

Our Annual Jo bs Issue by

Camie Barnwell

Dining Out Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39

A&E. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 Arts Life . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 40 Books . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41

(Camie Barnwell)

ON THE COVER Morgan Mainz. Photo by Paul Wellman.

NEWS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 OPINIONS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

Angry Poodle Barbecue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

FILM & TV. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 Review . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44

Title: Advertising Representative You’re brand new! Tell us about Tony. Well, I’m a recent UCSB graduate, and I walk in June! In my free time, I love to go on runs, and I also enjoy watching basketball. (Go Kings!) I’m a hip-hop enthusiast and somewhat of a movie buff. At UCSB, I wrote for the Daily Nexus as a part of Artsweek and covered events, so I’m pretty familiar with the newspaper environment. What’s your background in sales? I am actually very new to sales. These past few weeks have been a huge learning experience. Nevertheless, I’ve enjoyed taking in all the new information and advice from the experts around me. I’ve learned sales takes a lot of patience. Which clients have you enjoyed working with? One of my clients is The Habit, and their burgers are delicious. Cassie and Tod from College Specific and Rebecca Capps from Mind-Body Thrive are really kind. It’s awesome to help people further their marketing efforts through advertising with the Indy!

ONLINE NOW AT

Construction Careers, Workplace Wellness, and More!

Reviews . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43

Name: Tony Morales

Movie Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49

SPORTS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53

ODDS & ENDS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18

Obituaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Rob Brezsny’s Free Will Astrology . . . . . . . 54 This Modern World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57

CLASSIFIEDS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55

INDEPENDENT.COM

Our Annual Jobs Issue

Pop, Rock & Jazz . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42

QUICK STUDY FRANCIS BORYS

volume 33, number 697, May 23-30, 2019

ERIKA CARLOS

CONTENTS ! N O I T C E LS A I C E P S

UC Workers Strike Unfair Labor Practices In coordination with other UC campuses, more than 100 UCSB workers and students went on strike Thursday to demand the University of California cease labor outsourcing. Watch the video at independent.com/uc-strike.

ENROLL TODAY!

CAMP IGNITE SUMMER 2019 June 17-August 9 Team Building | College Prep | STEAM | Outdoor Adventures | Sports Field Trips | Cooking | Swimming | Leadership Development

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Inspiring all girls to be strong, smart, and bold

of Greater Santa Barbara Goleta Valley Center – 805.967.0319 | Santa Barbara Center – 805.963.4017 | girlsincsb.org | INDEPENDENT.COM

MAY 23, 2019

@girlsincsb THE INDEPENDENT

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1999-2019

AH a! TM

Sing It Out TM

A Celebration of Courage, Community, & Connection

PHOTOS: Carly Otness

Special thanks to Martin Gore, Glen Phillips, and all who helped us celebrate our 20-year anniversary

AHA! Co-Founders Rendy Freedman

The City of Santa Barbara

and Jennifer Freed present the AHA!

acknowledged Jennifer and Rendy

Angel Award to sisters Tina and

with a certificate honoring their

Laura Schlieske for their many years

combined 40+ years of service to

guiding, inspiring, and supporting

the community.

AHA!’s Sing It Out teens.

thank you to donors ($500+ as of 5/17/2019) SUPERSTARS

Julia Asher • Susan Budinger • Deckers Brands • The Elizabeth Foundation • Garcia Family Foundation • Daniel Katz & Maggie Lear Kirby Foundation in Memory of Bob Kirby • Brad Lemons/Brad Lemons Foundation • Jill Martin/Kind Eyes Photography • Natalie Orfalea Foundation Otis Booth Foundation • Stacy & Ron Pulice • The Roddick Foundation • Roger S. Firestone Foundation • Rand Rosenberg The Unitarian Society of Santa Barbara • Yardi Systems

LEAD GUITAR

Lisa & Bryan Babcock/Babcock Winery & Vineyards • Lisa Foley • Elisabeth & Greg Fowler • Kerrilee & Martin Gore • The Peterson Group Marla McNally Phillips & Lee Phillips

BACK UP SINGERS Leslie & Ashish Bhutani • Dancing Tides Foundation • Rory Green • Deborah Gunther • Lobero Theatre Foundation • Manchester Capital Dean Pitchford & Michael Mealiffe • Santa Barbara Bowl Foundation • Carrie Towbes & John Lewis

STAGE MANAGERS

American Riviera, LLC • American Riviera Bank • Banc of CA • Calcagno & Hamilton Real Estate • Carolyn Chandler • Tiffany & Frank Foster Marilee & Stephen Gordon • Beryl & Neil Kreisel • Vivienne Leebosh & Ralph Thomas • Alecia & Elliot Mayrock • Bibigol Moezzi & Bill Pesso Montecito Bank & Trust • Nancy Zink O’Connor • Pacific Premier Bank • Justine Roddick & Tina Schlieske • Signature Estate & Investment Advisors, LLC Elizabeth & Kenny Slaught • Patsy Tisch • Anne Towbes • Sandra & Sam Tyler • Leslie & Bob Zemeckis

ROADIES

Xorin Balbes • Dr. Michael Brinkenhoff/Revitalash Cosmetics • Buttered Toast • Caroline & Dan Encell • Farnum Family Trust • Wendy Foster • Debra Galin Diane & Mike Giles • Greg Goodman • Nancy Grinstein & Neal Rabin • Kendra & Sean Johnson • Betsy Ingalls • Jodie Ireland • Nancy & Linus Kogevinas Oniracom • Oren’s Automotive • Susan & Bobby Shand • Alexia & Owen Stormo/Stormo Health • Mina Goena Welch • Whistle Club/Rebecca McKinney

EMPATHY 8

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RESILIENCE MAY 23, 2019

INDEPENDENT.COM

MINDFULNESS

AWARENESS

CONNECTION


MAY 16-23, 2019

NEWS of the WEEK ER I K A CAR LOS

by BLANCA GARCIA , TYLER HAYDEN @TylerHayden1, NICK WELSH, and JEAN YAMAMURA, with INDEPENDENT STAFF

S.B. Rallies to Protect Legal Abortion

J

oining actions nationwide, more than a hundred Santa Barbarans gathered at the County Courthouse to protest restrictive measures on legal abortion. The rally, organized by Planned Parenthood’s Central Coast Action Fund, responded to the increasing number of states across the country that are restricting access to abortion services. According to the Planned Parenthood website, 16 states filed, moved, or enacted six-week abortion bans within the first three months of 2019. Last week, Alabama passed a law that banned nearly all abortion and criminalized the procedure for health-care providers, who could receive up to 99 years in prison. “This is part of a 46-year plan to reverse Roe v. Wade and return to a time when abortion was illegal and unsafe,” said Jenna Tosh, president and CEO of Planned Parenthood California Central Coast. The law includes an exception for pregnant women whose —Erika Carlos lives are at serious risk, but not for those whose pregnancies are a result of rape or incest.

Who’s Enforcing the Enforcers?

ENVIRONMENT

F

Heritage workers mustered in their recreation room during an emergency gas release on the platform at 10:30 a.m. on May 19, 2015, the exact same time oil was spilling out of the broken Refugio pipeline—though the two incidents were not related.

and Environmental Enforcement (BSEE, pronounced “Bessy”)—also seemed to downplay the reports, which the center obtained through a Freedom of Information Act request. Of the 84 incidents listed, BSEE spokesperson Guy Hayes noted in an email, only 22 involved Exxon platforms. And of those 22, Hayes said, only one was for an actual pollution event, “and that was for 0.5 ounce of hydraulic fluid that leaked out of a lifeboat … Any Incidents of NonCompliance that BSEE has issued to ExxonMobil in the Pacific Outer Continental Shelf for Platforms Hondo, Harmony, and Heritage have been promptly addressed,” he said.

ExxonMobil’s ‘decrepit drilling

Exxon brushed off the critical reports. “We’ve been safely operating in Santa Barbara County in compliance with federal, state, and local regulations for nearly four decades,” said spokesperson Julie King. “We have a long history of safe operations, with 14 federal safety awards.” The company’s focus right now, she said, is securing the trucking application so Americans can buy American oil, “rather than the global impact of importing it from other countries.” The federal agency tasked with overseeing offshore oil operations—the Bureau of Safety

NEWS BRIEFS CITY

Federal Agency Unconcerned by Corrosion, Leaks on Exxon Platforms by Tyler Hayden ederal inspection and accident reports acquired by a Bay Area environmental group reveal that ExxonMobil’s three Santa Barbara Channel platforms were cited for corrosion and leakage problems around the time they were shut down by the 2015 Refugio Oil Spill. The findings were announced May 6 by the Center for Biological Diversity amid Exxon’s highly contentious bid to restart the platforms and truck oil to inland refineries. Officials who visited Platform Hondo in the spring and summer of 2015 found “numerous corrosion issues,” a “number of components out of compliance,” and “leakage rates higher than the maximum allowable,” the reports show. Platform Heritage was found to have both electrical and corrosion problems “throughout.” One accident report describes an incident on Platform Harmony in which a crate full of pipeline inspection devices—called “pigs”—broke open and tumbled into the ocean. In two separate cases, workers slipped on spilled hydraulic fluid, injuring their backs. Though Exxon’s equipment was not responsible for the Refugio spill, environmentalists argue it’s still part of the same dangerous and outdated infrastructure. “ExxonMobil’s decrepit drilling platforms need to be decommissioned, not brought back to life like Frankenstein’s monster,” said Kristen Monsell, the Center’s ocean legal director, in a press statement. “At a moment when we should be weaning ourselves from fossil fuels, these offshore drilling platforms should be among the first to go.” In a strange coincidence,

UNITE FOR RIGHTS: Retired Trinity Church rector Mark Asman spoke at Tuesday’s rally at the Courthouse Sunken Gardens.

platforms need to be decommissioned, not brought back to life like Frankenstein’s monster.

—Kristen Monsell, Center for Biological Diversity While Exxon often faces criticism over its transparency and public comments that don’t jibe with corporate practices, BSEE is struggling with its own checkered reputation. Director Scott Angelle, a former Louisiana

Last year, city sewer lines spilled more than seven times, temporarily fouling city waterways with 855 gallons of effluent. This info was released to the City Council as part of a settlement agreement to an excess-sewage-spillage lawsuit filed in 2011 by Santa Barbara Channelkeeper against City Hall. That settlement limits the number of spills to no more than eight and requires City Hall to clean, repair, or replace one of its 257 miles of sewage pipe every year. To comply with the settlement’s terms, sewage rates have been increased multiple times and are projected to increase by 5 percent next year. With nearly 30 percent of the City of Santa Barbara’s population speaking Spanish in the home, the City Council voted to set aside $10,000 to bump the pay of Spanish-speaking city employees who, during natural disasters, can perform crucial public information duties. Currently, 91 employees receive specialty pay for their language skills. This program costs City Hall $185,000 a year. In an effort to reduce severe and fatal traffic collisions, the city is proposing to revamp the intersection of Carrillo and San Andres streets by reconstructing its pedestrian crossings, adding pedestrian access ramps for the crossing at Carrillo and San Pascual Street, and adding 29 new light fixtures along Carrillo between Bath Street and Miramonte Drive. The Architectural Board of Review unanimously agreed Monday that the project was important for safety but wanted aesthetic details like lighting styles and potential landscaping to be more clearly defined before proceeding.

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he Oxnard pest-control companies that spray avocados in the Carpinteria Valley have pulled out of a proposed agreement with cannabis greenhouse operators, saying they can’t risk contaminating the marijuana crop. Under the deal, cannabis growers in the valley would have agreed not to sue the commercial sprayers during the weeks they normally spray in the spring. The companies would have been able to use pesticides that work well on avocados but are on the state’s “red list” as contaminants for cannabis. “We’re all disappointed, but we’re just not going to do it,” said Rob Scherzinger, the founder and manager of Aspen Helicopters, Inc., one of four Oxnard pest-control companies that work in the Carpinteria Valley. “It’s just a snake in the grass that will bite us one of these days. It’s a potential loss we can’t afford.” Graham Farrar, president of the Cannabis Association for Responsible Producers, or CARP Growers, said all 27 cannabis growers in the valley had been willing to sign an agreement and cooperate with the commercial sprayers. No commercial cannabis in Carpinteria has tested positive for pesticide “drift” from avocado orchards since testing began three years ago, he said.

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The whole dispute started when the cannabis growers gave the commercial sprayers their phone numbers earlier this spring and asked to be notified when spraying began so that they could close their greenhouse vents, Farrar said. Members of CARP Growers use beneficial insects, not pesticides, on cannabis. “There’s no grower that’s ever threatened to sue an applicator or an avocado guy,” Farrar said. “No cannabis growers got mad or tried to push anybody out. We were just trying to be good neighbors.” But the standoff has upended business as usual for Carpinteria avocado growers. They say they will be forced to revert to an organic pesticide they last used 25 years ago, one that is on the state’s “green list” for cannabis but is not very effective on avocados. If there is an insect infestation in the orchards this spring, the growers say, they could wind up next year with scarred fruit that resembles Russet potatoes and sells for half the market price. “So, marijuana growers will make millions, and I will lose up to half the value of my crop,” said Sharyne Merritt, who owns 13 acres of organic avocados near Cate School on Casitas Pass Road. “Doesn’t seem fair to —Melinda Burns me.”

he City of Santa Barbara has no small pile of civil and criminal enforcement cases it will now be able to litigate with the hiring of a full-time prosecutor, Denny Wei. Currently a senior assistant city attorney for Burbank, Wei has been a deputy district attorney for San Benito County, and he teaches criminal law at Glendale University College of Law. Wei has prosecuted more than 50 criminal trials, and he triples the city’s resources on code enforcement, which City Attorney Ariel Calonne described as currently a fraction of a full-time employee. Wei graduated from UC Santa Cruz and the Whittier College School of Law. THE UNTOUCHABLE: Full-time city presenter Denny Wei will The position was funded last year take on ‘rogue construction activity’ and ‘nuisance activities.’ after the City Council pressed for enforcement of “lawless, rogue construc- tion of an off-duty Glendale police officer tion activity, as well as increasing commu- in a road-rage incident, a fight aboard an nity safety through enforcement of laws that airplane at Burbank Airport, and a hidden protect public spaces from inappropriate camera at the Verdugo Aquatic Facility allegbehaviors and nuisance activities,” Calonne edly placed by a lifeguard. said. Wei has extensive experience with menHe said municipal code enforcement tal-health-related crime from his work with prosecutions wouldn’t necessarily make it Burbank’s Mental Health Evaluation Team. into the papers, but in Burbank, his cases had He also worked with Burbank’s community included hoarding, drug activity, red-tagged departments, which met to devise a game homes that were reoccupied, and other cases plan to address cases involving substandard that were important to the neighbors and community. “Some went to court, when housing. Wei has tried serious and violent cases, we had to get them to comply, but not all of as well as misdemeanors, ranging from them,” Wei said. “They affect the safety of the child molestation and domestic violence community and the people who live there.” to DUIs. According to online news reports, His first day with the City of Santa Barbara Wei’s notable cases included the prosecu- is June 17. —Jean Yamamura

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NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D MONEY THE PRICE OF MONEY: In arguing for independence for the Fed, Peter Rupert showed this $1 trillion Zimbabwean note as an example of runaway inflation brought on by government meddling.

The Economy: What Sucks, What Doesn’t by Tyler Hayden ith the GDPs of Germany, France, the U.K., and Italy all trending downward, the global financial outlook “kinda sucks,” said UC Santa Barbara professor Peter Rupert at last Tuesday’s South County Economic Summit. “‘Kinda sucks’ is an economics term,” he said. “We define it as ‘not so good.’” The United States economy, on the other hand, “doesn’t suck,” Rupert continued. Our GDP is up, job growth is strong, and household net worth is better than it’s ever been. Moreover, job vacancies are especially high. “In my view, it’s a healthy labor market,” Rupert said. “During the Great Recession, you kissed the boss’s ass. Today, you can quit and move to another job because there’s a vacancy for every person who’s looking.” The $64-million question then becomes: How long will the recovery continue? “The answer?” said Rupert, pausing for effect. “We don’t know. Sorry.” He described potential challenges (Trump’s trade war with China, unfunded pension liabilities, rising minimum wages) and possibilities for continued prosperity (independence of the Fed, the cannabis industry, the nonprofit sector). Rupert then focused regionally. While wages in Santa Barbara’s South County have gone up 3 percent overall in the past year, he explained, they grew slowest on the lower end of the pay spectrum, where the majority of employees work. Eight of Santa Barbara’s largest occupations — farmworkers, retail salespeople, office clerks, cashiers, food preparers, servers, personal care aides, and secretaries — all make relatively low wages, many around $25,000-$30,000 a year. “There’s only one Pete Jordano,” Rupert said as he gestured toward Jordano in the Granada Theatre audience, “and everyone else has to work for him.” Rupert argued against a minimum wage increase, saying it would stagnate growth. He said the use of earned income tax credit is a much better idea. Over the past 20 years, employment in the farming, hospitality, and education and health services industries have increased. The number of jobs in retail, goods production, and finance have gone steadily down. Government continues to account

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for nearly 20 percent of the entire county workforce. Last year, Rupert went on, Santa Barbara was the fifth least affordable county in California, which is determined by the fraction of the population that can afford a median-priced house. This year, because of an 11 percent drop in the median house price, from $718,000 to $655,000, Santa Barbara sits in the middle of the pack as more affordable than Ventura, Alameda, and Santa Cruz counties. The South Coast also had an 11 percent decrease, which pushed its median home price from $1.34 million to $1.27 million. Total contributions to S.B. County nonprofits crested $1.5 billion, with the lion’s share going to Direct Relief. In fact, year after year, data shows Direct Relief is absorbing a growing percentage of all philanthropic giving. “Not so good,” Rupert said. Rupert described the cannabis industry as potentially a major moneymaker, noting Colorado has collected more than a billion dollars in taxes since legalizing it. S.B. County is already producing 22 percent of all the pot grown in California. Rupert said dispensary managers can make up to $52,000 a year, while master cultivators can earn as much as $120,000. The South Coast’s apartment rental market is dissected in detail in the summit’s written report. Rates “shot up 5.6 percent” this year, according to real-estate broker Dawn Dyer. Despite increased housing production, including many new “granny flat” conversions and small- to mid-sized apartment projects, the vacancy rate “remains exceptionally low at 1.85 percent in March 2019 and has remained below 2 percent since 2011.” As rents continue to climb, Dyer explained, it will become even more difficult for companies to retain a workforce. Using the appropriate third of their income for rent, tenants would need to earn more than $71,000 a year to qualify for the average South Coast apartment “at the new recordbreaking average rent of $2,073 a month.” And while the county’s average median household income is $68,023, “typical apartment renters earn much less, especially those in the hospitality and retail sectors,” Dyer wrote. n

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MAY 16-23, 2019

Mental Health: Bigger Shovel, Deeper Hole

O

n Tuesday, May 21, dozens assembled in spite of the unseasonably cold weather in the Courthouse Sunken Gardens to see a free screening of the film 55 Steps, starring Hilary Swank and Helena Bonham Carter. Shown as part of Mental Health Awareness Month, the movie is based on a groundbreaking legal case that established the rights of the mentally ill to refuse medications—if they were deemed competent. This reflects the leanings of the county’s mental-health czar Alice Gleghorn, a position at odds with many mental-health advocates who support programs such as Laura’s Law. The county supervisors approved a threeyear test run for Laura’s Law, which gives judges the right to order treatment but also mandates aggressive outreach efforts on the part of mental-health case workers. To date, that program has generated 100 referrals, and 67 people have been seen. Of those, 25

percent accepted voluntary treatment, 7.5 percent got court-ordered treatment, and 48 percent did not meet the eligibility criteria. In the past five years, Gleghorn’s department has expanded services, though the demand has continued to outstrip supply. Its budget has increased by $23 million during the same period. Five years ago, the county spent $3 million to “conserve” mentally ill clients in facilities located in other counties; none exist in Santa Barbara. This year, the estimate is $5.2 million. In the past year, there’s been an 84 percent increase in the number of days spent in the county’s locked psychiatric health facility (PHF) by criminal defendants who’ve been deemed “incompetent to stand trial.” Patients sent to the county’s PHF stay, on average, four days longer than two years ago. Now patients discharged from the PHF can see a counselor within four days, rather than the 20 days it took two years ago. —Nick Welsh

NEWS BRIEFS CONT’D FROM P. 9 The Santa Barbara Central Library has selected The Unending Hunger: Tracing Women and Food Insecurity Across Borders by Megan Carne as its Book to Action. On 5/29 at 6 p.m., the library will host a panel with representatives from organizations working on food insecurity in Santa Barbara in the Faulkner Gallery to discuss the severity of the issue in the county, particularly among single mothers and children. A typo-laden notice for a potential class-action lawsuit won landlord Ed St. George a procedural reprieve in Judge Pauline Maxwell’s courtroom this week. The potential lawsuit by aggrieved former tenant Harry Tran, who rented an Isla Vista apartment from St. George in 2015, claims, among other things, that the landlord was late in returning Tran’s security deposit. Judge Maxwell ruled that the notice, which was to be sent out to other St. George tenants by Tran’s attorney, was defective because it contained multiple typos and failed to warn recipients they could be on the hook for legal fees should the class-action suit fail. Tran and his attorney will return to Maxwell’s court on 6/12 with revisions to the proposed notices.

COUNTY Santa Barbara’s typical blue skies and sunshine in the month of May gave way to two inches of rain this past week but didn’t break the record set in May 1998, which clocked close to four inches at S.B. Airport and nearly eight at San Marcos Pass. Based on this year’s forecast, it is expected the May 1998 record will stand. Vandenberg Air Force Base was among six candidate locations named by the Pentagon this week to host the headquarters of the new U.S. Space Command. President Trump ordered the creation of the Space Command last year to consolidate military efforts to defend U.S. assets in space, a move viewed by many as a first step toward establishing Trump’s much-touted Space Force. All six bases will be surveyed over the coming months, and the Pentagon said it will announce its decision this summer. 12

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Solvang resident Pierre Josefsohn, 68, was killed in the crash of a small aircraft near Figueroa Mountain, the Santa Barbara Sheriff’s Office announced 5/16. The experienced pilot, who leaves behind a wife and two children, left Wednesday afternoon in his 2006 single-engine Aviat for a quick flight around the area, but his family became concerned when he didn’t return or contact them. A Search and Rescue team located Josefsohn’s body the next day inside his plane on the side of a steep hillside known as Goat Rock. The cause of the crash is under investigation.

LAW & DISORDER Santa Barbara police arrested two adult and three juvenile suspects on 5/17 after they allegedly robbed two people on bicycles in the Milpas Street area. Two guns were recovered in the arrest. A witness to one of the robberies flagged down an officer, who pulled over the suspect car in the Milpas Liquor Deli shopping complex next to Trader Joe’s. The officer ordered the occupants out at gunpoint, and multiple police units arrived as backup. The suspects, identified as Lompoc residents, were taken into custody without incident. A man was shot on the 500 block of Chapala Street at around 5 a.m. on 5/15. The victim, who was not identified in the police statement, said he had been “verbally confronted” by a man whom police identified as Terrence Roberson, 34. The victim sought shelter in a lobby nearby. Roberson was detained and disarmed by officers a couple of blocks away on East Cota Street. The victim’s gunshot wound was not life-threatening. A passerby discovered the body of an adult male near the 5600 block of Santa Rosa Road near Lompoc on the morning of 5/17. Santa Barbara County Sheriff’s deputies responded to the passerby’s 9-1-1 call and determined the circumstances to be suspicious. Sheriff’s detectives are conducting an investigation to determine the identity of the decedent and the


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NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D

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STOP THE VIOLENCE: Gun-control advocate David Hogg delivered a passionate talk to a nearly full Campbell Hall on Tuesday night.

Parkland Survivor Speaks at UCSB

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ust two days before the fifth anniversary of the May 23 Isla Vista killings, Parkland Shooting survivor and gun-control advocate David Hogg delivered a passionate talk to a nearly full Campbell Hall, followed by a Q&A. Presented by UCSB’s Associated Students Program Board, Hogg’s lecture addressed the full range of gun violence, from hate crimes and police brutality to gang violence, school shootings, and global conflict. He acknowledged the local community’s own experience with gun violence—three students in Isla Vista were

killed with a gun and three with a knife in 2014 — followed by his personal account of Parkland, and how he and his peers were elemental in passing 67 state gun laws and holding marches on every continent following the 2018 tragedy in Florida. In a time in the U.S. when more people die from school shootings than in active military duty, Hogg called on youth to be the change, stating, “Thoughts and prayers don’t stop shootings … we have to work to build a less violent generation in a country founded on —Skyler DePaoli violence.”

Who’s Enforcing the Enforcers?

CONT’D FROM P.9

lieutenant governor appointed by former Secretary of the Interior Ryan Zinke, is frequently called out for cozying up to industry executives. He was recently mocked by HBO’s satirical commentator John Oliver for giving out his personal cell phone number to executives interested in “business opportunities.” Angelle encouraged them to call him (as opposed to texting) to avoid public disclosure laws. BSEE rule changes under Angelle are expected to save the oil and gas industry over $1.3 billion in regulatory compliance costs over the next decade, the New York Times found. Earlier this month, shortly before the fourth anniversary of the Refugio Oil Spill and just after the ninth anniversary of the

Deepwater Horizon disaster, the Trump administration announced it will be rolling back Obama-era safety regulations for offshore drilling. The BSEE is expected to make 59 separate revisions to a 2016 law meant to prevent another Deepwater blowout. The agency says the changes will both address safety considerations and lessen the burden on operators. One revision reduces the time of a blowout safety test from 30 minutes to 5 minutes. Another limits the number of necessary connection points on blowout preventers. The public comment period for Exxon’s trucking application is open until May 28. The issue will likely go before the Planning Commission in the fall. n

circumstances surrounding his death. Individuals with information are asked to contact the Sheriff’s Criminal Investigations Division at 681-4150. To leave an anonymous tip, call 681-4171.

Alcaraz. The investigation, which is ongoing, will go to the DA’s Office for review once completed.

According to the Sheriff’s Office, police officers were serving a “high-risk” search and arrest warrant on Francisco Anthony Alcaraz Jr. for attempted murder in connection with a suspected gang-related shooting when he was killed by police gunfire on 5/7. The sheriff’s report states Alcaraz shot six bullets at officers from a secondstory stairwell and an upstairs rear bedroom window of his wife’s apartment off Turnpike Road. Five SBPD officers shot 58 rounds and hit Alcaraz four times. A 40-caliber semi-automatic handgun with an extended magazine was found with

Two more alleged victims of former Multimedia Arts and Design Academy operations director Pablo Sweeney have come forward and retained renowned sexual-abuse attorney John Manly of Irvine to represent them during law-enforcement interviews. According to Manly, his two clients, both young men who had attended the S.B. High program, want to be sure that law enforcement continues to investigate the allegations against Sweeney so that no other student would be subject to what they claim to have experienced. Manly believes Sweeney’s alleged predatory behavior was “at best, wildly inappropriate, and, n at worst, well-known grooming behaviors.”

CITY OF SANTA BARBARA NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING Average Unit-size Density Incentive Program Inclusionary Housing Amendments City Council Tuesday, June 4, 2019, 2:00 p.m. City Hall, Council Chambers (2nd Floor) 735 Anacapa Street The City Council will review proposed Inclusionary Housing amendments to the Average Unit-Size Density Incentive Program (Program) in Title 30 of the Municipal Code. The amendments propose to (1) require Program projects with 10 units or more to provide at least 10% of the units onsite at rental rates affordable to households at the Moderate Income level (80% to 120% of Area Median Income) and (2) require Program projects with less than 10 units to pay an affordable housing in-lieu fee up to $25 per square foot. You are invited to attend this public hearing. exhibits will be available by the end of the day SantaBarbaraCA.gov/CouncilVideos. Additional effort and background material can be found amendments.

The agenda, staff report, and on Thursday, May 30, 2019 at information about this work at SantaBarbaraCA.gov/AUD_

Written comments are welcome and should be submitted prior to the hearing by mail to City Clerk, P.O. Box 1990, Santa Barbara, CA 93102; or by email at SGorman@SantaBarbaraCA.gov. In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you need special assistance to gain access to, comment at, or participate in this meeting, please contact the City Administrator’s Office at (805) 564-5305. If possible, notification at least 48 hours prior to the meeting will enable the City to make reasonable arrangements in most cases. For more information, please email Jessica Metzger, AICP, Project Planner at JMetzger@SantaBarbaraCA.gov or call 564-5470 x 4582. INDEPENDENT.COM

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SPRING CLEANING? FREE RECYCLING HBJ Proposes Total Butt Ban MAY 16-23, 2019

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Cigarette butts constitute about a third of all the trash found on California’s beaches, and Santa Barbara County is no exception. In Isla Vista, the Surfrider Foundation collected 27,187 cigarette butts during the fall and winter quarters of the 2018-2019 school year. When not properly disposed of, cigarette filters make their way through storm drains into streams, rivers, and the ocean. The toxic chemicals they leach can poison sensitive marine life. In a San Diego State University study, a single cigarette butt in a liter of water killed half the fish swimming in the solution. Cigarette filters made of plastic not only pollute water sources, but they also pose a threat to wildlife when ingested as food. Plastic filters have been found in the stomachs of fish, birds, and whales, among other marine life. Last week, SB 424 passed the Appropriations Committee by a 4-2 vote and goes next to the Senate floor for a hearing, which should take place within the next two weeks, according to Senator Jackson’s office. If the Senate passes the bill before the end of this month, it will be sent —Amarica Rafanelli to the Assembly.

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igarette butts are the most littered item in the world — about 4.5 trillion are dropped on the ground each year. A new bill introduced by Senator Hannah-Beth Jackson, Senate Bill 424, is making its way through the State Legislature, seeking to reduce the toxins released to the environment by tobacco waste such as cigarette butts and single-use e-cigarettes. It would also effectively ban traditional cigarettes through its prohibition on the sale of tobacco products that have single-use filters. In other words, anything but a hand-rolled or filterless cigarette would be prohibited from “sale, gift, or other furnishing” in California. For multi-use tobacco products like e-cigarettes and vapes, the bill would implement a take-back program for nonrecyclable components, including cartridges, batteries, and filters. These can contain toxins such as arsenic, lead, and nicotine. Under the bill, tobacco manufacturers would be required to collect these nonrecyclable components and properly dispose of them at a hazardous waste facility.

INDEPENDENT.COM

‘A LITTLE SKETCHY’: Approval of the proposed three-story, 111-room hotel near East Beach, depicted in an artist rendering above, was postponed due to inconsistencies in the plan drawings.

Hotel Sent Back to Drawing Board

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inal approval to build a proposed threestory, 111-room hotel near East Beach was withheld again Monday after Architectural Review Boardmember Howard Wittausch called the plan drawings “a little sketchy.” This was the 13th time the 926 Indio Muerto Street hotel plan was brought before the board, though it was already approved by the Planning Commission last year. “I can’t read this drawing from what it says here,” Wittausch said. “These discrepancies appear once, and then twice, and then become a pattern.” Wittausch repeatedly expressed concern that details in the plan drawings are inconsistent. “It seems like you actually want us to design this building for you,” he said to architect David Thiel. “That’s not going to happen.” Board Chair Kevin Moore agreed and motioned to revisit the plan this Monday, May 27, at the consent-calendar meeting, provided applicant John Cuykendall of IWF SB Gateway LP “coordinates all details as instructed,” including finish colors, materials, and construction methods. The motion was approved 2-0, with Moore and Wit-

tausch voting yes; the other members either abstained or were absent. If approved on Monday, the project will require demolishing a 12,000-square-foot commercial building and replacing it with a 55,000 square-foot, 45-foot-tall hotel adjacent to the South Milpas Street exit and north of the Union Pacific Railroad Tracks. The hotel will also include a 115-space, partially underground parking lot. The hotel would stand out as its towering three-story structure would be the first of its kind in a neighborhood of single-story buildings. The area historically has been occupied by locally owned businesses and working-class families. Despite the scale of the project, architect Thiel attempted to blend the building into Santa Barbara’s landscape, with Spanishstyle archways resembling historic buildings such as the courthouse and varying window sizes. If approved, the hotel would be the 42nd property owned by Pacifica Hotels, which currently operates two other hotels in the area: The Wayfarer in the Funk Zone and Pacifica Suites in Goleta. There were no public commenters. —Delaney Smith


PUBLIC SAFETY

PAU L WELLM AN F I LE PHOTO

NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D

Ambulance Chasing

Who Should Run Ambulance Services, Fire Chief or Private Company? by Nick Welsh ark Hartwick has been on the job as the county’s new fire chief just three months, and already he’s making big waves. Hartwick is now quietly leading the charge to allow the Fire Department to bid on the county’s ambulance contract, which has been held since 1992 by the private company AMR. That contract was extended when it expired in 2017. This Tuesday, the county supervisors voted unanimously to extend that service contract one more year, but it was clear that a majority of the board was interested in opening the contract up to new bids rather than renegotiating another contract with AMR. Most eager apparently were supervisors Das Williams and Peter Adam, ideological polar opposites on most matters. But according to sources on the fourth floor of the county’s administration building, it’s Hartwick who’s made the biggest difference. In his previous incarnation as fire chief of San Bernardino County, Hartwick said his department ran 16 ambulances. A recent consultants’ report issued on AMR’s performance reportedly identified 35 gaps in service, Hartwick said. Perhaps the county can get better value, he suggested, if the fire department either took over the service directly or managed the service. Firefighters already show up at the scene of most ambulance calls—often providing the paramedic services necessary to stabilize the person. The fire department’s pay for this support has never satisfied departmental brass. Even though AMR — one of the largest private ambulance companies in the nation—charges $1,500 for basic lifesupport services (not counting $48 per mile of travel), the ambulance company collects just a small fraction of that. Government insurance providers such as Medicare pay only $510. MediCal is less. On paper, AMR charges about $82 million a year in services fees; in reality, it collects only $18.2 million. The most striking thing about Tuesday’s meeting was who didn’t talk. No one from AMR went to the podium to tout the company’s stellar record when it came to cardiac arrest saves—one of the best in the nation. Or how AMR stepped up when the frightening Ebola virus struck and provided an ambulance rigged especially for the job. Or how its personnel served during the Thomas Fire and subsequent debris flow. For that matter, Hartwick wasn’t even in the room. A group of AMR employees were present, however, sitting on one side of the

M

supervisors’ chambers, while a cluster of county fire officials sat on the other, arms crossed. No one said anything. Of all the contracts the county issues, ambulance service is one of the most vital. No one is saying AMR hasn’t done a good job. Emergency Medical Services chief Nick Clay noted that since the last contract was negotiated, the world has changed substantially. The county needs something more “flexible and nimble,” Clay said. “The demands of the mental-health and substance-abuse patients are crushing all aspects of the Santa Barbara emergency system,” wrote the consulting firm Fitch. The average mental health call takes AMR four and a half hours. “Often patients are transported to facilities located far outside of Santa Barbara County that will involve a sixto-ten hour round trip.” In this context, Clay and the consultants have suggested there might be ways other than an ambulance ride to get such patients from Point A to B. Likewise, they have suggested that social service workers might be made part of the mix where homeless people are concerned. As the population ages, the demand for ambulance service will only grow. At issue is not just whether AMR can shift accordingly, but how willing the county supervisors are to give the company that chance. Dr. Angelo Salvucci, medical director for the county’s Emergency Medical Services, warned that opening up the contract might be akin to opening a can of worms. Others have questioned how county firefighters — paid significantly more than AMR employees—could provide the same range of services for anywhere near the same cost. County emergency response planners have until this summer to issue yet another report before the supervisors want to get serious about opening up the contract. Other municipalities have tried to take over such services; some have succeeded, others have failed. If the ambulance services are up for grabs, what ingredients should be in the request for bids? And if the fire department is interested in submitting a bid, what role can it play in those preliminary discussions without opening the county to a lawsuit by AMR? County Counsel Mike Ghizzoni warned that the county’s “procurement integrity record” must be maintained. Exactly when the matter comes back to the board remains uncertain. But Supervisor Steve Lavagnino was abundantly clear: “We want it done,” he said, “as soon as humanly n possible.”

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angry poodle barbecue

Lyin’ Dogs Gather No Moss

CHILL, PLEASE: When it comes to the cannabis war now escalating throughout Santa

Barbara County, I got no dog in the fight. Too often, however—and increasingly—it feels decidedly otherwise. I have friends on both sides of the divide, people with whom I have long broken bread. Some are now threatening to never speak to me again. From other participants, I have received not-so-subtle intimations of great bodily harm. One managed to get me looking over my shoulder. As for all the rest, I only had to duck their flying spit. Weed is famous for inducing fits of silly giggles among those who partake. But the first casualty in this escalating war of words is a sense of humor. Both sides have assembled their armies of attorneys, lob-

byists, spin doctors, and backroom campaign donors. But before we go down that

Game of Thrones rabbit hole, let’s ponder a new endgame wrinkle that I stole from Dr. Strangelove and the good old days of the Cold War. It’s called mutually assured destruction —MAD for short. The United States and the former Evil Empire known as “the USSR” managed to coexist for the better part of 40 years because each side knew the other had a button they could push to make the skies rain bombs and the oceans boil. The great irony is that in my MAD man logic, hemp—cannabis’s low-THC, near-beer, low-rent, genetic kissing cousin— will function as the analog to The Bomb.

The federal government has just legalized hemp, which just happens to smell and look exactly like cannabis, which the feds still classify as a drug akin to heroin. Although you can’t get high from hemp, you can still harvest its CBDs. And CBDs, as we are constantly hearing, cure absolutely everything: cancer, schizophrenia, flat feet, fallen arches, itchy scalp, bunions, bad breath, insomnia, arthritis, inappropriate jokes, drooling, and erectile dysfunction. Initially, the cannabis crowd saw hemp as its ultimate nuclear option with which to threaten wine-tasting-room operators, grape growers, “ranchette vigilantes,” and any other outspoken malcontents complaining about the mephitic odors emanating from the new cannabis plantations sprouting up around the county. Unlike cannabis, hemp is legally recognized as a bona fide agricultural product and thus protected from most government regulation by “Right to Farm” laws. In other words, hemp — unlike cannabis — can be planted lot line to lot line with no odor control and no expensive land-use permits. True, it’s not nearly as lucrative as cannabis, but it’s nowhere near as much hassle and is a lot cheaper to grow. I have heard more than one pro-cannabis operator — exasperated by the opposition — talk wistfully about carpetbombing the county with hemp. It’s a legit threat. But it cuts both ways — hence its sublime utility as an agent for a Mutually Assured

Destruction scenario. Hemp, it turns out, can and does wreak havoc on cannabis plants. In fact, in some regions, commercial hemp and cannabis fields must be separated by at least 20 miles from one another. Otherwise, it turns out, the quality of the all-important cannabis flower, from which all value derives, is destroyed. Simplified to its base essentials, cannabis cultivation is nothing more—or less—than the strategically engineered sexual frustration of female cannabis plants. In nature, female plants put out sticky resins in hopes of catching the male pollen floating aimlessly in some passing breeze. But in the greenhouses and hoop houses, consummation of the act of love is strictly verboten. The more frustrated the female plants become, the more resins they toss off. The tackier and stickier the bud, the greater its psychoactive payload, and, obviously, the more lucrative its payoff. In this scenario, the presence of male plants constitutes a certified buzzkill. Male hemp plants, it turns out, are just as lethal. Given the recent legality of hemp, there’s nothing to stop wine growers from planting a few decorative acres close to the fields of their cannabis-growing neighbors. In the context of nuke speak, that would constitute a unilateral, retaliatory preemptive first strike. It might get the attention of certain cannabis growers who are perhaps otherwise distracted, understandably, by plummeting cannabis prices and the lack of essential retail

outlets, rather than being the most considerate neighbor possible. The cannabis lobby just launched a legislative Hail Mary up in Sacramento that would require local governments to approve retail cannabis outlets whether they wanted to or not. The first version of the bill would require cities and counties to allow one cannabis shop for every four liquor outlets. When that went nowhere, the bill was amended to require one for every six liquor stories or every 15,000 residents. This deserves to die a swift and speedy death. When voters overwhelmingly approved Proposition 64, legalizing recreational weed, they did so with the explicit understanding that it would be left to local governments to opt in or opt out. It turns

out 388 of California’s 540 cities and counties opted out. Santa Barbara County, for the record, has yet to accept applications for hemp cultivation. But it’s only a matter of months, and applicants are already lining up. In Ventura County, hemp has been cultivated for several years. To the extent it’s regulated at all, it’s to ensure growers aren’t cultivating cannabis but calling it hemp. Ventura’s ag czar recently speculated that the threat of “pollination pollution” is growing and that, eventually, will have to be adjudicated. But in the meantime, we’d all do well to remember that what’s good for the goose is also good for the gander. That sounds sensible enough except for one thing. I have no idea — ​Nick Welsh what a “gander” is.

PARALLEL STORIES

Geoff Dyer: All Our Yesterdays THURSDAY | MAY 30 | 5:30 PM Geoff Dyer devotes his unique critical and stylistic energies to Brian G. Hutton’s Where Eagles Dare—a thrilling 1968 Alpine adventure starring Richard Burton and Clint Eastwood. Broadsword Calling Danny Boy is Dyer’s hilarious tribute to a film that he has loved since childhood. In this special 50th-anniversary celebration of the movie, complete with clips, Dyer explains why it is indelibly imprinted on his consciousness and that of almost all British males of a certain age. Book signing to follow. Images left to right: Broadsword Calling Danny Boy cover. Geoff Dyer.

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BY FRANK J. OCHOA enior Airman E-4 Caesar

Flores is on active duty in the U.S. Air Force and can be sent to a war zone at any time to protect our homeland. Yet, on April 2, 2019, his mother, Juana Flores, was deported to Mexico, a country she had not lived in for over three decades. She could not cook dinner for her Goleta family on Mother’s Day. She appeared via Skype, unable to touch her progeny. She was ordered removed from the country in which her U.S. citizen husband, her 10 children, and her 16 THREE GENERATIONS: In the U.S. since 1988, Juana Flores (left) was grandchildren live. They are harddeported, even with a green card in the works. working, home-owning, tax-paying, productive members of our society. Juana Flores first came to the United States in Because Flores is a military mother, entered the 1988. That was a different time. In 1986, President United States without inspection, and has no crimiRonald Reagan signed the Immigration Reform nal convictions or other serious adverse factors, she and Control Act, which granted status to millions would have been eligible for PIP—except for the without documents and revised immigration con- post-funeral legal impediment to her green card. trol mechanisms. Flores complied with ICE’s order when her husOn January 19, 1989, his last day in office, band, Andres Flores, drove her across the border in President Reagan awarded Presidential Medals of the family pickup truck. ICE retains the discretion Freedom and said, “We lead the world because, to extend the stay order, today and tomorrow. Such unique among nations, we draw our people—our decisions can always be, and recently have been, strength—from every country and every corner reconsidered and vacated. of the world. … If we ever closed the door to new ICE acted knowing that our Congressmember, Americans, our leadership in the world would soon Salud Carbajal, has submitted legislation to remedy be lost.” the Flores circumstance and that of thousands of Juana Flores is 55 years old. She takes no one else’s other service members whose families are similarly job. She presents no problem for law enforcement. situated. HR 1871, the Protect Patriot Parents Act, She drains no public resource. She is a positive, will allow a pathway to lawful status for the parent of productive Goleta community member and the a U.S. military service member, if the law’s requireprimary caretaker for her adult disabled son and ments are met. ailing husband. After ICE denied Flores’s request on February In 1999, Flores made a mistake. She went back 26, her lawyers and Rep. Carbajal wrote to Kirstjen to Mexico to attend her mother’s funeral. Her exit Nielsen, then Secretary of the Department of and reentry created a legal impediment to her green Homeland Security, to request a stay extension. card application. Rep. Carbajal stated, “Mrs. Flores is a critical If Flores had not attended her mother’s funeral, component of a U.S. citizen’s familial support netshe would most likely have received lawful status work, will not displace anyone in the job market, already. has no criminal convictions, and poses no threat Stays of deportation orders are discretionary to national security. Our community has a strong calls. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) interest in maintaining her medical caretaker role stayed Flores’s removal order a number of times on and military support system.” humanitarian grounds. The stay remained in effect The congressmember’s plea fell upon deaf ears. until February 26, 2019, when the Los Angeles ICE The service member’s mother has been deported. Office “determined that (the Flores) case [did] not And the stress has only begun for Airman Flores warrant a favorable exercise of discretion, therefore and the many thousands of our sons and daughters similarly situated. And for the Flores family (her) request [was] denied.” No reason was given. What changed between 2015 and 2019? For start- in Goleta. ers, Flores’s son became an airman in the U.S. Air Our treatment of Juana Flores has a definitional Force. Her family grew and prospered. She success- impact on our society. It tells us who we are. We fully managed her disabled son’s life circumstances, can support HR 1871. We can ask ICE to reconsider her husband’s medical maladies, and many other the denial of the stay of Juana Flores’s removal. ICE family needs. She added to the foundation of her can let her return home tomorrow, or our political social environment. She took nothing away from leadership can enact HR 1871 as law and end the any U.S. citizen. Oh, and there was a change of anguish of so many military families. administrations. And Juana Flores can come home. On April 1, 2018, the Military Times said that “as many as 11,800 currently serving in the U.S. military The Hon. Frank J. Ochoa is a retired judge of the Santa are dealing with a spouse or family member who Barbara Superior Court and the pro bono counsel for Juana is facing deportation.” The Obama administration Flores. Ochoa is of counsel with the law firm Sanger, Swysen had developed a parole in place (PIP) policy for & Dunkle. For further information, contact Frank Ochoa at U.S. military service members’ immediate family. judgefrankochoa@gmail.com or Kraig Rice at kraig@ sbimmigrationlaw.com. It stayed, or suspended, such deportations.

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On Mother’s Day, Juana Flores Had Been Deported

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obituaries

To submit obituaries for publication, please call (805) 965-5205 or email obits@independent.com

Mary Eve Rem

of Santa Barbara, Mariposa at Ellwood Shores, and Serenity House of Santa Barbara. A 'Celebration of Life' is scheduled for Sunday, June 9, 2019, 12 Noon to 3:00 pm, Stow Grove Park, 600 North La Patera Lane, Goleta, Area #3. In lieu of flowers, please consider a donation to the Ridley Tree Cancer Center of Santa Barbara, or Visiting Nurses & Hospice Care Foundation of Santa Barbara.

10/16/51-04/18/19

Mary Eve Rem passed away surrounded by family and loved ones on April 18th 2019 at the age of 67. Mary loved to travel by ship or rail, whether it was sailing to the tropics or the Alaskan coast, or by rail through the Canadian wilderness and Banff National Park. At home she enjoyed playing cards with her friends and watching sports of all sorts , from golf to rodeo, her fandom seemed to wander. Mary was a cherished mother, grandmother, sister and friend. She had a calm and enduring spirit that was a comforting force in our lives. She spoke plainly and honestly and did her best to help where and when she could. She maintained a positive attitude about life through both the good times and the most adverse, often belittling her own problems and finding sympathy for whatever trivial thing you were going through. She had a brilliant smile that she flashed with childlike joy when she was with family and friends. Services at Unity Church in Santa Barbara, June 29th, 11am.

Donna Quaglia

02/27/54-05/08/19

Donna Quaglia, Santa Barbara, California, passed away peacefully on May 8, 2019 after a long illness. Donna is survived by her siblings, Donald Quaglia, Gloria Q. Chambers, Roger Quaglia and their families. Donna loved her family, friends, her beloved dog GioGio, and living life to the fullest. The family extends their thanks and appreciation to Dr. Gregg Newman, and all the wonderful staff and volunteers for their care and understanding at The Ridley Tree Cancer Center 18

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children- Pamela, Susan and Peter (Elizabeth) reside in town. She also has three grandchildren- Samantha (Sam), Tobias, and Luke. Two of her children (Milton and Catherine) predeceased her. Anne made many plans, but none for a service; so, friends are encouraged to visit their local libraries and offer a donation in her memory.

Anne M. Pursley 11/05/28-05/03/19

She utilized her first Masters degree in working for State Senator Gary Hart and the second in a long career as a social worker for Hospice of Santa Barbara. Marge was a voracious reader who also loved to travel, hike, swim and take her dogs for long walks. She was predeceased by Bob and their first born, Steven. She is survived by her daughters Alissa (Michelle), Laurie, and Carolyn (Brenda), grandchildren Claire Hummer and Drew Zecher, and dozens who knew Marge as "mom." Per her wishes, no services are planned.

Marjorie Hummer 05/18/30-05/13/19 Anne M. Pursley passed away peacefully at Cottage Hospital on the evening of May 3rd. The physicians, nursing staff, and the palliative care service were wonderfully gentle and loving. In her 90 years, Anne led a full and complex life. Growing up during the uncertainty of the Great Depression in Washington, D.C., her father nourished her spirit with frequent free visits to the Smithsonian and local library. She spent idyllic summers at her grandparents’ dairy where she lived among many aunts, uncles, and cousins and explored on horseback. Life changed completely in 1942 when her father rejoined the Marines as a Captain in the Air Corps. She and her mother drove across the country in a ’34 Ford to a base in El Centro, California. Married at 18, she went on to describe the births of five children as her five greatest accomplishments and proof that she could perform miracles! Teachers, mentors, and the world of ideas gave her access to an intellectual life. She cherished her time at the University of Nevada, UCSB, and Penn State. Anne worked for more than a decade as a counselor for people confronting their addictions. When at home, she devoted her time to books and writing poetry. She was a committed member of a poets’ group for decades. Santa Barbara was her home from 1969 until her passing. As life and time grew more precious, she became more and more grateful for all the gifts life had given her. Three of her

MAY 23, 2019

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Margaret Singer

Marjorie Ann Stevenson Hummer (Marge) passed away on May 13th at age 89. She was born in Ft. Worth, Texas but spent her childhood in Wichita, Kansas. An intelligent and eager student, Marge graduated from college at age 19 and headed west to join her sister and brotherin-law at the China Lake Naval Research Station in the Mojave desert, where she met - by becoming secretary to - Robert (Bob) Hummer. After a courtship that included racing their convertible Porsche through the foothills of the Sierras and hiking Mt. Whitney, they married and eventually moved to Santa Barbara where they raised their four children. Marge was the quintessential PTA mom who was volunteered for everything by her children ("my mom will drive," "she'll bake brownies," "of course we can keep the classroom rabbits all summer"). But Marge had aspirations beyond bake sales and she managed to earn a teaching credential and two Masters Degrees at UCSB, one in Public and Social Affairs and the other in Counseling Psychology, all while her kids were still in school. Marge substitute taught at local schools for years, finding her greatest satisfaction in working with the kids at Juvenile Hall.

Margaret Singer, Santa Barbara artist and poet, believed that life and the universe were good, in spite of a childhood darkened by the rise of Nazism in her native Germany and the loss of family in the Holocaust. She was born in 1921 in Frankfurt to Leon and Gitel Singer and began painting as a child. She said that a sense of malaise pervaded her family’s life as the Nazis gained power. Children threw stones and called them names, and Jewish people began to disappear. Sent by her father to America, along with her younger sister Paula, Margaret arrived in New York City in 1939 and began a new life. She worked in a factory in New York and was introduced by a friend to the American People School, where she studied art with Carl Nelson. After a chance comment by a young man on a Greyhound bus heading west, Margaret moved to Santa Barbara where she worked at different jobs, attended City College and then the University of California Santa Barbara where she received a Bachelor’s Degree in art and a Master’s Degree in educational psychology. After

graduation she became a teacher at City College Adult Education and taught portrait, figure and landscape painting for 20 years. Margaret’s vibrant, energetic paintings were featured in solo and group shows in Santa Barbara, and she said about them, “All the years I’ve been painting, I paint the same subjects… the people walking, marching and faces that haunt me.” She also wrote several poetry collections and chuckled that she could sit for hours looking for the right word while dishes piled up in the sink and laundry lay waiting to be washed. Margaret stopped eating meat as a child after witnessing a chicken being slaughtered and became a dedicated vegetarian and devotee of living a healthy life, including riding a bike until she was in her mid-eighties. Margaret was a longtime member of Congregation B’nai B’rith and the Jewish Federation of Greater Santa Barbara, both caring, engaged communities where she found friends and intellectual peers and delicious food. She relished taking out-oftown company to services and introducing them to the rabbi and members of the temple. Even at 97 Margaret marched down State Street to honor Martin Luther King earlier this year and worried anytime she saw her beloved world becoming a less hospitable, forgiving place. Margaret was preceded in death by her brother, Sidney Singer, and is survived by her sister, Paula Orbach, and brother, Henry Singer, as well as ten nieces and nephews. A nephew, Jeffrey Orbach, died in 2009. Funeral arrangements made by McDermott Crockett Mortuary.

Dylan Corselius Wilson

HAPPY BIRTHDAY DYLAN May 27, 1986 You are forever in our hearts. Your smile and love is present wherever we go. With love appreciation for the years you spent with us here. Mom, Dad, Maggie, Peter, Lorrie, David, Michael, Brad, Shayna, Hannah and all those whose lives you have touched. CONTINUED ON PAGE 20 >>>


In Memoriam

Come find

Andrew Uriel Hernandez

Sweet Strawberries, Pixie Tangerines & more!

2000-2018

BY M A R I H E R N A N D E Z

year ago, my son Andrew took his life, drowning himself off Stearns Wharf. To say that he blindsided his family, friends, teachers, and community would be an understatement, but he made a decision to end his inner pain and silent suffering. Many questions go unanswered, especially the “why” of his decision. A deep pain and hurt lingers in our hearts for our child, who truly enjoyed making other people feel acknowledged and cared for. And we have come to know that everyone who was a part of Andrew’s life gave that caring back to him. The stories, pictures, posts, videos, and FROM THE HEIGHTS: Andrew Hernandez, who stood 65, was the best selfie tributes shared at his remembrance taker ever, here with his extended family at a UCLA football game in 2017. website help us remember his smile, his spirit, and his joy. Andrew Uriel Hernandez was born on July 18, pride” or the saying “Once a Don, always a Don.” 2000, in Garden Grove, California. He was born Andrew succeeded at the impossible; he made his with the last name Solis, but he became a Hernan- dad proud to wear the Dons logo. dez in 2006 when he joined our family through He became a starter in football at SBHS, and adoption, along with his older siblings, Brenda and he received an early recruitment offer from a priMarco. My husband, Oscar, and I also had a birth vate college during preseason. Despite his signifison, Erick. cant learning disabilities and academic challenges, Andrew was the tallest of all of us. In fact, he was Andrew made us very proud when he decided to the tallest Mexican American we have ever known; accept the college’s offer. He would have been the he was 65 tall. His goal had been to be at least 67; first in his birth family to attend. he loved being tall. He had an amazing ability to get However, he injured his knee during the last prealong with all ages; he would let little kids hang on season game and sat out his senior year of football. him and play with him for hours on end. He was We didn’t realize it at the time, but this could have just as caring and patient with his older siblings as contributed to our son’s confusion, stress, and fear of disappointing us. with his younger brother, Erick. Oscar and I had decided when we were datHe ended up taking his life on May 15, 2018. ing that we would have a child and also provide More than 400 people attended the service for the a home to a child who needed one. At that time, I young man his peers had nicknamed the BFG, or had been involved in child welfare for 10 years as a Big Friendly Giant. social worker. Oscar and I chose to adopt a sibling Locally, nationally, and globally, suicide rates are group of older children, as they are harder to place. alarming for all age groups, but most alarming are Andrew and his siblings were in foster care for five the rates among our youth. Oscar and I made a years. They had serious challenges stemming from promise to our son at his memorial service: We the trauma they’d experienced and their difficulty would do whatever we had to so that his life and death were not in vain. In openly discussing these in forming normal attachments. Andrew was a boy who would take too much painful feelings, we hope other young people who responsibility and blame himself when things went are hurting and suffering in silence will reach out wrong, even when he didn’t deserve it. His older for help. siblings were the opposite, and we put a lot of time, resources, and hard work into being good parents for them. Being younger, Andrew was able to make Warning signs for suicide can include feelings of being trapped genuine attachments, especially to Erick. They were or a burden; increased use of alcohol or drugs; loss of interest like two peas in a pod, and Andrew was able to in favorite activities (“nothing matters”); suicidal thoughts, plans, or actions; sudden mood changes, even for the better; express his loving and compassionate soul. Andrew dabbled in all sports, including Little giving up on oneself; taking risks; disturbed sleep; anxiety; League, swimming, wrestling, basketball, and, of agitation; withdrawing from friends and family; extreme selfloathing; feeling like an outsider; hopelessness; and rage. If course, soccer, which was a must for all our chilyou or someone you know is considering suicide, call the 24/7 dren. But it wasn’t until his big, tall frame caught National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1 (800) 273-8255, or coaches’ eyes in his freshman year at Santa Barbara text the Crisis Text Line at 741-741. For more information on High School that he found his first love, football. suicide prevention, including warning signs and risk factors, Andrew loved being a Don, just as I do. In the visit suicidepreventionlifeline.org. A list of regional resources beginning, Oscar could never understand “Dons can be found at countyofsb.org/admhs.

COURTESY

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obituaries

To submit obituaries for publication, please call (805) 965-5205 or email obits@independent.com

Joel Adam Bott

Longtime resident of the South Coast and Illinois native Joel Bott passed away on April 21, 2019, at the age of 55 years surrounded by family and close friends including his partner of several years Justine Pannier, his mother Joanne, and best friend Yossi. Joel attended local schools in Des Plaines, IL and Elmhurst College, where he was a star tight end on the football team, winning All Conference honors in the mid 1980’s. Joel was an awesome friend, always willing to lend a hand in times of need, for example many hours helping people dig out and get back on their feet after the fire and flood in Montecito last year. He was someone you could always count on, the kind of person who would “give his shirt off his back” when the need arose. Joel was an avid skater and hockey player. When he was very young, Joel’s parents memorably created an ice rink in the backyard of the family home that they enjoyed every winter. It was here that Joel learned the sport of hockey, playing alongside brothers Jack, Jim Jr., and Jason, neighbors and friends. The Bott brothers spent many days outside in the woods near the family home and worked together with their father in the family’s Heating, Ventilation, and Air Conditioning business. When he moved to Santa Barbara, Joel quickly began playing roller hockey at local schoolyards and soon was playing ice hockey as well. He played hockey consistently for over 30 years at ice rinks in Thousand Oaks, Simi Valley, and eventually Oxnard and finally at Ice in Paradise in Goleta. It was not unusual for Joel to play in 2, 3, or even 4 hockey leagues simultaneously, participating in games several nights a week. He also coached hockey at the Montecito Y for over 7 years, introducing children and adults to the game, teaching fundamentals and skating. In the early 1990’s, skated 20

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across the country to raise money and awareness about drunk driving in “Blade Across America”. Skating took him to Hollywood, where he had a small part in the movie “Prayer of the Rollerboys”. Joel invented and patented “Bott Mountain Wheels” downhill roller skates, which he regularly rode from the top of Gibraltar Road to the Santa Barbara Mission. Joel worked for a short time at Zelo nightclub in the late ‘80s, then began a 30 year career in the local Flower industry. He was associated with companies in Carpinteria including H&M Roses. For many years, Joel was a sales manager with The Sun Valley Group in Oxnard, one of America’s largest growers, where he developed close friendships with many co-workers and customers. Living the beach front lifestyle, Joel spent countless hours aboard his boat and was known to rollerblade along Cabrillo Boulevard almost every day. Several years ago, he was reintroduced to Justine Pannier through their mutual love for skating. They developed a beautiful relationship, supporting one another in everything. Joel and Justine skated together regularly in local Christmas, Memorial Day, 4th of July, and Solstice parades.   Joel’s life changed in an instant on his birthday in May 2018, and he faced his diagnosis with courage and strength. He was thankful for the awesome daily support received from his loving partner Justine, his mom Joanne, friends Yossi, Greg, Brad and Janette, who were at his side almost every day.  Thanks to Jen, Julie, Kimber, Gina, and the doctors, nurses and staff at Cottage Hospital and the Ridley-Tree Center who provided wonderful care and support. Joel is survived by Justine, his parents Jim Sr., and Joanne, and brothers Jack and Jim Jr. Santa Barbara’s hockey family was always close by during Joel’s illness - teammates and opponents alike. Players regularly visited his home over the past year and spent many hours with him.  The hockey community organized special tributes and fund raisers including a CAN/ AM exhibition game at Ice in Paradise this spring. Two celebrations of Joel’s life will be held. Saturday May 25 at 5 PM at Ice in Paradise

MAY 23, 2019

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which will include hockey and skating. Sunday May 26 at Ledbetter Beach, beginning with a paddle out at 10 AM, followed by a beach barbeque at 12 Noon, and a beach skate at 2:00 PM. Joel would want his friends and acquaintances to attend both of these events and have a lot of fun skating on the ice and pavement, enjoying a day at the beach, and in the water. As Joel would say, anything else is “unacceptable”. In lieu of flowers, memorial donations in memory of Joel Bott can be made to Ice in Paradise, 805-879-1552, www.iceinparadise.org.

Mary Joella Thornton “Jo” Webb 04/09/44-04/23/19

Jo, the love, friend, and soulmate of mine, Don Webb, in marriage for 53 years passed away with me at her side from a brain tumor that struck 16 months ago despite otherwise excellent health. Born in Los Angeles to Tom and Margy Thornton, Jo grew up in Santa Barbara where her father was an FBI agent from 1947 until retirement in 1965 while her mother was a home maker. Jo attended San Roque school and Bishop Garcia Diego High where she graduated in 1962. She met me in the summer after graduation marrying him on January 26, 1966, while he was at UCSB. Holding many different jobs over the course of her life, she was an administrative assistant at UCSB and UCSD while supporting me as I pursued my education ultimately receiving my Ph.D. Possessing a no-nonsense attitude, she realized early on that persistence and determination overrides all else in attaining ones goals,

not education, genius, or talent. After following me in my endeavor and attending nine schools, and while working and raising our children, she earned her Bachelor's degree at CSUB when living in Bakersfield, CA. She ultimately attained a teaching credential at UNR in Reno, NV where the family eventually settled in 1980. Such tenacity was instilled in her sister, nieces and nephews whose educational pursuits were supported through care packages sent to them when away at school. After working for 24 years in Reno at our son's elementary school as a clinical aide, librarian, and ultimately a teacher, Jo retired to her beloved home, Santa Barbara. Jo was a natural giver possessing an overriding empathy for others, especially children and families. She sent candy, cards, and flowers to her elderly aunts, uncles, cousins and friends on holidays and in times of sickness. She loved creating baby quilts, blankets and pillows for newborns of friends and family, and complete strangers when she learned that they were expecting. Though outgoing, she was inherently a shy, intuitive, introvert with an uncanny judge of character and a receptive listener sought out by others and family. While not a joiner of social organizations, she enjoyed social occasions. Christmas was her favorite season baking sweets for others, and hosting parties in our home, most recently as a B.O.D. (Bring Own Desert) Party where neighbors would share their favorite deserts in celebration of the season. Love of children was obvious in her dedication as a first grade teacher leaving her students at the end of the year with the precious gift of reading, and instilling in them a curiosity about the world and a love of learning. Loved by her students and their parents, Jo continued to stay in contact with them through the years. A fiery red-head, Jo had a vivacious spirit possessing a childlike sense of wonder and excitement over simple everyday experiences, and a never-ending joy of life. Always ready for an adventure she traveled in Great Britain, China, Italy, Peru, and by motorhome with the family or me many times in every state and Canada. The pinnacle of motorhome trips was our adventure driving throughout Europe for one month for our 50th

wedding anniversary. She was an avid reader and movie-going film buff. She enjoyed decorating her home with antiques, flower arrangements, and cross stitch and embroidery wall hangings, and also her yard spending every morning tending to her flowers, especially the roses. She always looked forward to time at the family cabin in the Sierra where we went on camping outings with family and enjoyed day hikes. Moreover, she was a practical, caring, loving, compassionate, talented person, a loving wife, mother, grandmother, sister, teacher, and friend that is best summed up in an embroidery that she made that says, “The Love in your Heart was not put there to stay. Love isn't Love till it's given away.” She believed that “Life should NOT be a journey to the grave with the intention of arriving safely with a wellpreserved body, but rather to skid in sideways, champagne in one hand – strawberries in the other, body thoroughly used up, totally worn out, and screaming “WOW, WHAT A RIDE!” While it could be said that she had a fulfilling ride, unfortunately, lightening struck and her body never got to wear out. Our hearts shall forever be one. As the Arabic poet Kahil Gibran said about marriage in The Prophet: “You were born together, and together you shall be forevermore. You shall be together when the white wings of death scatter your days. Ay, you shall be together even in the silent memory of God.” Jo is survived by me, her soulmate, two sons, Christopher in Reno, NV, Michael and his wife Alicia (Davey) in Oceanside, CA, two grandchildren, Kanan (12) and Mattsen (2) by Michael, and in Santa Barbara by her older brother Tim Thornton and younger sister Mollie Mann. It is an understatement that she will be sorely missed by them and all who had the good fortune to experience her spirit. In lieu of flowers, please consider donations in her name to the Ronald McDonald House in Bakersfield CA, where the family once lived, online at https:// www.classy.org/give/39769/#!/ donation/checkout, by phone 661-327-4627, or check to The Bakersfield Ronald McDonald House, 420 34th Street, Bakersfield CA 93301. A celebration of Jo's life will be held in Santa Barbara in June.


In Memoriam

Gaston ‘Gator’ Crittendon Doke 1966-2019

G

The Mayor of Pershing Park

aston “Gator” Crittendon Doke was born and raised in Bastrop, Louisiana, the youngest in a family of five. His parents were wood craftsmen, making boats and beautiful bedroom-suite furniture. Gaston learned early and had a tremendous gift for creating items out of wood. He drew with precision and created beautiful art. His parents wrestled alligators, and at 12, Gaston wrestled the largest gator on record for his county and won. The name “Gator” stuck. At 21 years old, Sonya Blackwell laid eyes on him and was immediately drawn to him. They married and Gator took on Sonya’s two small boys, BJ and Jason, as his own. He was then a carpet installer and a good provider. He was Santa Claus, the Easter Bunny, and the Tooth Fairy, and he taught the boys to hunt, fish, and whittle. Gator had a wonderful, contagious sense of humor that children and people of all ages adored. He began a band in the 1990s called Gravel. Coming from a gig, they were broadsided, and Gator was pinned in the van. He was cut out and suffered mangled legs and many other injuries; he was hospitalized for a very long time. This began a journey of alcohol to deal with pain. He moved to Texas for a while, and then thumbed to Santa Barbara, where he ensconced himself in Pershing Park in 2006. Locals called it Gator Park for the last 10 years. Gator easily collected friends, and one of those was Jeff Shaffer, a local pastor and outreach worker, who asked if he could bring food each Wednesday night for a shared meal. Gator became his cohost. Gator was the mayor and gatekeeper at the park. Inclusive, with a large personality, his raspy voice and loud laugh drew everyone together. His openness ministered to hundreds of volunteers who continue to share and break bread together to this day. He further helped name Holy Chaos, a church for people suffering and struggling in this affluent city, hosted by Jack and Ruth Wilson and Gert and Margie Walter. Thirteen years ago, I met Gator while providing clothing, tarps, and blankets. I learned to listen and not judge. Gator taught me so much about myself with his big, loving heart. He would say, “Miss Deborah Barnes, read me a scripture.” He would name what he wanted, and before I could open my Bible, he would quote the verse. Gator was like a brother that I checked on and loved. He launched me into more than a decade of outreach for those who suffer from homelessness. His infectious charm and voice will echo in my heart all my days. Kathy Davis of Goleta told me she became a chaplain so she could visit Gator when he was jailed for his many citations for living in the park. “I grew to love him profoundly. I became Sonya’s close friend and went to visit her, became the godmother for their son Jason, and supported Gator’s sweet second wife, Filiz, through the final days of his life. I started by meeting Gator and ended my street outreach at his memorial 10 years later.”

COURTESY

BY D E B O R A H B A R N E S

NATURAL LEADER: With a large personality, raspy voice, and loud laugh, Gator drew everyone together.

Sheryl Stratman, another outreach worker, said it was easy for people to overlook the homeless people in our community because homelessness is so prevalent. “I feel so blessed not to have overlooked Gator when I met him in the park several years ago. Despite his addiction demons, Gator had a light that showed through that darkness. He had a larger-thanlife personality, a Southern drawl that would melt you when he said your name, artistic talent that was mind-blowing, plus a heart that never stopped loving. The Thanksgiving we spent together with my family in my home was unforgettable. “I was sad he never truly overcame his addiction, which ultimately led to his demise. I loved him in his brokenness and would have enjoyed seeing him operating at his full potential. I can only imagine.” After 12 years apart, his son Jason found Gator in Pershing Park, and they were reunited for four years before his passing. Gator was so proud to see his son grown to be a man. He felt it completed him in his last days. Gator could walk, but he found a wheelchair helped him panhandle better. He stayed in the wheelchair, which weakened his injured legs. Gator’s best friend was Shaky, who died at Pershing Park. This sent Gator into a deep sadness, but he then met the love of his life, Filiz Puran from Germany. She fell in love with his charms, and they developed a beautiful, deep relationship. They went to Casa Esperanza and got help. They married and got assistance with housing by Turner Foundation only two years ago. They adored each other the rest of his days. Sadly, Gator fell ill from cirrhosis. He was called home Easter weekend. His loving wife, Filiz, and son Jason were at his side. A memorial held on May 1 in Pershing Park was well-attended by the many people who knew and loved Gator. He leaves a vast hole in many hearts, having touched all of us who knew him. Gator taught us all not to judge and not to assume that everyone suffering homelessness is the same. Each and every story is unique and needs a chance to be shared. Please, each one, reach one.

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Opinions

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ARE YOU READY FOR

Stop the Shootings

MORE LOVE? In Your Relationship:

‘Extreme Risk’ Protective Orders Could Remove Weapons from Those Intending Harm his week, the Santa Barbara community

mourns the young people killed in the Isla Vista shooting five years ago. Like so many shootings, this deadly attack could have been prevented. Gun violence is a deeply personal issue for both of us. Senator Feinstein, while a member of the San Francisco Board of Supervisors, discovered her colleague Harvey Milk, after he had been shot by another supervisor. Congressmember Carbajal, at age 12, found his older sister’s body after she took her own life using a firearm. We understand through our own experiences that there can be warning signs before someone uses a gun to harm themselves or someone else. In the Isla Vista shooting, the gunman had shown signs he was going to commit violence. In the weeks and months leading up to the massacre, the gunman’s mother warned local law enforcement about his desire to kill those around him. He posted disturbing videos on social media, drafted a 140-page manifesto planning his deadly attack, and spent months stockpiling more than $2,000 worth of firearms and ammunition. Despite that disturbing behavior, his family and law enforcement were powerless to keep a gun out of his hands. Following the shooting, California passed a law that allows family members and law enforcement to ask a judge for an extreme-risk protection order, a temporary order to block dangerous individuals from purchasing a gun for 21 days and to remove any weapons they already possess. After the initial 21 days, there’s a second court hearing to determine whether the judge’s order should be extended for up to a year. This isn’t a new idea. Federal law already has nine categories that prevent someone from obtaining a gun, including people convicted of a felony, committed to a mental-health institution, or battling drug addiction. But current law in many states doesn’t provide any way to prevent people who show violent and disturbing behavior from buying a gun before they act. Think about that. Even if you know a loved one is considering violence, you would have to wait for that violent act to occur before the judicial process would allow law enforcement to temporarily remove their guns. That makes no sense. Similarly, the law doesn’t stop someone who has been abusing his or her partner from buying a gun, unless there has been a previous domestic-violence conviction. Simply put, there is still no nationwide tool that would allow law enforcement and the courts to prevent tragedies like Isla Vista.

Congress must fix that. That’s why we introduced the bipartisan Extreme Risk Protection Order Act, legislation that would give family members the tools necessary to keep guns out of the hands of dangerous people. Our bill would help states enact laws so that family members could go to court and ask a judge to prevent someone who is clearly violent or intent on committing violence from buying or having a gun. It would provide a safety measure for our homes, schools, and communities, while ensuring dueprocess rights are protected.

Give me a call.

FREE CONSULTATION (805) 845-3881 Ron Stotts, Ph.D. Transformational Guide and 3-time Bestselling Author

Serving the Santa Barbara Community since 1980.

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BY SENATOR DIANNE FEINSTEIN AND R E P R E S E N TAT I V E S A L U D C A R B A JA L

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California’s law has shown that extreme protection orders work. After the law was enacted, San Diego’s city attorney obtained 100 of these orders against people exhibiting a range of violent and threatening behavior, from domestic violence to stalking to threats on social media. Here in Santa Barbara, the county has issued another 21. Those extreme protection orders recovered 169 guns, including 16 assault rifles. In one case, law enforcement seized a cache of 56 guns, explosives, and 75,000 rounds of ammunition. Unfortunately, only a handful of states have similar laws in place. In most states, families are essentially powerless if they fear their loved ones are going to hurt themselves or others with a gun. Using the California law as model, the Extreme Risk Protection Order Act would provide all states with the same protections — a measure that even the National Rifle Association has recently supported. There is overwhelming public support for many commonsense gun-safety proposals like banning bump stocks, ensuring suspected terrorists cannot buy guns, and requiring universal background checks. In fact, in the last election, many pro-gunsafety candidates won big in traditionally Republican districts, including seven in California. But even as we debate big ideas to stop gun violence, including a ban on assault weapons, small steps like a nationwide system of extreme risk protection orders would save lives. This is a sensible way for Congress to make a significant change, and we hope our Republican colleagues will join us in the effort. n

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Letters

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he Democratic Party is on the way toward rigging the 2020 presidential election. Recently, California joined a group of mostly Democrat-run states that are restricting which candidates may be listed on the presidential election. It is a flagrant attempt to keep Donald Trump off the 2020 ballot. In early May, the California Senate approved a bill to require candidates appearing on the presidential ballot, including President Trump, to release five years’ worth of income tax returns. This radical bill “is a form of nullification of federal law,” according to thefederalist.com, is unconstitutional, and would disenfranchise a portion of California voters. Even former governor Jerry Brown said a similar bill in 2017 was unconstitutional. Why is this law unconstitutional? States may not create new requirements for federal office. The Constitution’s authors created a federal government, independent of the states. They wrote up qualifications for the House, Senate, and presidency. These were federal offices that would be governed by the federal Constitution. This was affirmed in the 1995 court case U.S. Term Limits, Inc. v. Thornton. States retain many powers after the enactment of the Constitution, but they do not get to usurp the powers of the federal government. Wake up, California. If this is allowed to happen, free and fair elections will be a thing — ​Don Thorn, Carpinteria of the past.

Friday on Milpas The arrest of five people on Milpas Street Friday evening was the subject of a May 17 Independent story and a 13-minute video at independent.com, the Indy’s website. The five were accused of brandishing a gun during an alleged robbery. Readers on Facebook commented on what they could hear and see: Michele A. Lipman That woman near the end yelling, “Just a kid, just a kid.” Must be raising some juvenile delinquents of her own to be saying something like that. Yeah, they are just kids committing adult crimes. • Gil Ramirez “Just kids” applies to kids toilet papering a house, not pulling an armed robbery. • John Chavez Easy to say they’re just kids. Until one of them spins and shoots and kills an officer. Traci J Navara Thank you SBPD for keeping our community safe! • Jose Ramirez Who let those two guys walk through a potential line of fire?

Drive to Sleep

C

ommunity college students who do not live at home find housing difficult to afford in many communities, such as ours. Studies have reported that as much as 20 percent of this population has spent some time sleeping in their car. Assembly Bill 302, by Assemblymember Marc Berman (D-Palo Alto) is being offered in Sacramento to address this problem. It requires community colleges to allow students living in vehicles to park those vehicles in campus parking lots overnight. Existing law already requires community colleges to keep certain showers and toilet areas open for access by homeless students,

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MAY 23, 2019

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and such demands have not been a burden on the college. Neither would the use of parking lots for parking student vehicles. Please support this proposal by contacting our local assemblymember and state senator urging them to do so. — ​Glen Mowrer, S.B.

Kudos for ‘Kicking a Dead Dog’

W

hile Exxon tries to convince us that trucking oil from Gaviota to refineries in Santa Maria and Bakersfield is perfectly safe, Nick Welsh rightly pointed out in last week’s Angry Poodle Barbecue that Exxon’s 70 truckloads of oil per day will be multiplied many times over by other onshore and offshore projects, resulting in increased traffic, accidents, spills, and air pollution. The day before this Poodle published, two tankers overturned in Santa Barbara and Ventura counties, killing one driver, sending the other to the hospital, and causing road closures. Neither truck was carrying oil, fortunately—but imagine if they had been? In addition to Exxon’s trucking proposal, three companies are in the approval process to drill 750 oil wells in North County; the federal Interior Department intends to begin fracking in Los Padres National Forest; and the Environmental Protection Agency has proposed to exempt 30 miles of aquifer in Cat Canyon, near Orcutt, from the Safe Water Drinking Act, thereby allowing disposal of fluids from oil and gas production into our drinking water. This is bigger than 70 trucks. Our county’s health and future are under attack by moneyed interests in collusion with politicians who choose to profit rather than to protect us, our drinking water, and our children’s future. The city of Los Angeles and the state of New York are working with labor unions to retrain oil workers in alternative-energy jobs, which are plentiful, lucrative, and safer than jobs in oil. Let’s join them.

— ​Rachel Altman, S.B.

Still in the Weeds

S

upervisor Das Williams, the architect and driver of Santa Barbara County’s Cannabis Ordinance, is now protesting that he was merely an incidental player. [independent.com/countering-cannabispropaganda] Now that’s rich! Space limits what I can correct in print (see independent.com/opinions for more), but here are some of the whoppers: Despite pleas from constituents and supervisors for a decent interval while Santa Barbara buried its dead last year, Williams refused to delay the key ordinance vote past February 6, 2018 — when most of his district was reeling in shock. Today, Santa Barbara County, with just 2 percent of California’s population, has authorized the state to issue an astounding 3,316 cannabis licenses and holds 42 percent of all provisional licenses. Humboldt County, which limits its licenses to a max of 6 acres, issued just 2,356. But Williams wanted no limits for S.B., allowing pot grows of 70-100 acres, upending the lives of residents and our lucrative wine and avocado industries. Sadly, Supervisor Williams still doesn’t grasp that his ordinance—a larded-up gift to


Tankinis One Pieces

letters cont’d the cannabis industry—is the most devastating piece of legislation since offshore oil drilling got the okay. No one knows when the cannabis “oil spill” is coming, but the damage is growing exponentially. Carpinteria High is virtually surrounded by cannabis—not by 1,000 feet as mandated by sensible federal law and urged by constituents, then-supervisor Janet Wolf, and Carp’s school superintendent (memorialized in two letters)—but by a mere 600 feet, at Williams’s urging. The unavoidable fact is that Williams is the face of Santa Barbara County cannabis — revered (and well-rewarded) by pot growers and rebuked by many residents, farmers, and vintners who say they have been thrown under the bus. Hence, it’s curious he would liken our cannabis nightmare to a sitcom. So, we’re wondering, what’s the punch line? Because we’re not laughing yet. — ​Ann Louise Bardach, Carpinteria

From Facebook: Amber McCoy Santa Barbara government officials are continuously acting without thinking or having a bigger picture outlook. I mean, at the very least, if ya don’t know what you are doing, look around for someone that is successful (perhaps a city in Colorado?) and follow their example. These people are an embarrassment

Disgust with the City

R

egarding the city’s May 14 meeting on affordable housing, I lived in the Bay Area and Redwood City, which had similar issues. Many developers of luxury market-rate apartments, when asked to pay for the costs of mitigating the affordable housing impacts their projects make, complained they couldn’t get their projects to “pencil out.” The reality is that insisting developers build affordable housing as part of their project doesn’t slow down construction one bit. In fact, when inclusionary affordable housing is passed, both market-rate and affordable housing continue to be built. Despite developer protests, it worked in Redwood City. Like other cities with such policies, Santa Barbara conducted an extensive “nexus study” proving that building market-rate luxury apartments increases the demand for affordable housing because of all the service workers needed to support new wealthy

households. The service workers need housing, too, and it needs to be affordable! If we allow the Average Unit-Size Density (AUD) developers to continue building luxury market-rate apartments without an inclusionary affordable housing provision or in lieu fee, we make the housing crisis worse for people in the moderate-to-low-income level. Write your councilmember now and tell them you support this inclusionary affordable housing provision because at prior meetings it has all been developers, architects, and businesspeople arguing against it. — ​Lisa Carlos, S.B. Speak up before it’s too late! Facebook commenters were also not impressed: Bill LaVoie I thought that was why there was an AUD program! • Nancy Ortega $3,200 a month for an apartment, absolutely disgusting. Suzanne Cohen Half a million dollars to build a single apartment is disgusting. That’s what it costs on the low end. You can build the same apartment in Ventura for half that. This issue is caused by the city. I’ve been trying to build an accessory dwelling unit (ADU) for over two years and have spent $90,000; the city still has not given me a permit. How could I ever make the rent “reasonable”? The city needs to let people build and not throw up every roadblock possible. • Chris Smith Agree; this is what’s going on: It’s not just complaining or greed. The city has made it impossible for any developer to build or make affordable housing. All the people complaining think someone should go through years of the horrendous process, outrageous fees, and permitting process just as a nice gesture? We need city councilmembers that understand the housing crisis and don’t just react to people’s complaints. Mike Aracic Forty years ago’s market-rate housing is supposed to be today’s affordable housing, but we ran out of water so they weren’t building any, so here we are. Still low on water and housing. Maybe the place is full? • Michael J. Lewis Ya think?

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For the Record

¶ The news story last week on the rally at Fairview Shopping Center for more sidewalks should have said a Dollar Tree (not Dollar Store) is going into a section of what is now Sprouts on a sublease, not the old Radio Shack space.

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WEEK I N D E P E N D E N T CA L E N DA R

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ONNO SWEEP

As always, find the complete listings online at independent.com/events. And if you have an event coming up, submit it at independent.com/eventsubmit.

SATURDAY 5/25 5/25: Coffee with a Cop

5/23:

S.B. Centre for Aerial Dance Presents On Threaded Wings Watch performers take to the air in a kinetic journey of ritual and release with contemporary dance and aerial arts during a transformative evening. 7pm. Lobero Theatre, 33 E. Canon Perdido St. $25-$42; VIP: $62. Call 963-0761.

lobero.org

The community is invited to enjoy pastries and coffee or a “Heroes at Heart” tea blend specifically made to raise money for area first responders. There will be a fire engine, K9 unit, craft activities for children, and a raffle. 8:3010:30am. Coffee Bean & Tea Leaf, 5745 Calle Real, Goleta. Free. tinyurl.com/Coffee-Cops

There will be exclusive videos, a Q&A, and more. Noon-2pm. Metro Entertainment, 6 W. Anapamu St. Free.

colincantwell.com

5/25: PlayFest 2019 Workshop and Staged Reading Playwright Anna Nicholas will guide writers of all ages through a series of writing experiments at a workshop in the Faulkner Gallery followed by a staged reading of her play Out There Right Here in the library’s Fireplace Room. Workshop: 10am-noon; Reading: 6-9pm. S.B. Central Library, 40 E. Anapamu St. Free. sbplibrary.org

5/25: 10th Annual Harbor Nautical Swap Meet Treasure-seekers can

5/25: Carpinteria Museum shop from dozens of vendors featuring tackle Marketplace & Annual Plant & Flower Sale Shop exotic orchids, cut and gear, surfboards, fishing poles, inflatable boats, boat motors, coffee, refreshments, and more. 8am-noon. Main Harbor Parking Lot. Free. Call 897-1962.

tinyurl.com/2019NauticalSwap

5/23: 2019 Downtown Live Art & Wine Tour Travel to beautiful venues downtown on a self-guided art walk and enjoy food and wine, live art, and a silent auction followed by an afterparty at The Arlington Theatre, with proceeds to benefit the Downtown Public Art Fund. Visit the website for participating venues. 5:309:30pm. $65. Ages 21+. Call 962-2098.

downtownsb.org

5/23-5/24: Regine Velasquez and Ogie Alcasid Widely known as Asia’s Songbird and hailed as the Philippines’ bestselling artist of all time, Regine Velasquez and her husband, balladeer and actor Ogie Alcasid, will perform love songs and their greatest hits. 8pm. Chumash Casino Resort, 3400 E. Hwy. 246, Santa Ynez. $49-$79. Ages 21+. Call (800) 248-6274.

chumashcasino.com

5/25: Colin Cantwell According to

5/23-5/24: UCSB Dance Company

Wookiepedia, Colin Cantwell “was one of the first people George Lucas brought on board to work on what was then called The Star Wars.” Meet the man who designed the Death Star, Millennium Falcon, Imperial Cruiser, X-Wing, the Y-Wing, and more.

This evening of choreography will offer a spectrum of contemporary dance featuring new works, and restagings, including a significant work by José Limón. 8pm. Center Stage Theater, 751 Paseo Nuevo. $16-$23. Call 963-0408. centerstagetheater.org

5/23: S.B. Junior High School Spring Concert Support the young

talented musicians of the SBJHS Jazz Band, Concert Band, and Orchestra performing a mixture of musical arrangements. 7-8:30pm. Marjorie Luke Theatre, Butterflies 721 E Cota St. Free. Call Alive! and Prehis884-4087. luketheatre.org toric Forest Exhibit Openings Walk through a beautiful butterfly garden as they flutter freely and then take a stroll back in time and come face-to-face with dinosaurs 5/24: The Hawon the banks of Mission Creek. Both exhibits thorns and Friends will be open through September 2. 10amAlice Wallace and St. 5pm. S.B. Museum of Natural History, John’s Dance L.A.-based 2559 Puesta del Sol. Free-$12. Call Americana-roots band The 682-4711. sbnature.org Hawthorns will deliver an evening of lush vocal harmonies, soul-filled lap steel intricacies, and distinctive instrumental blues-infused edge. 7:30pm. Standing Sun Wines, 15 E. De la Guerra St. $12-$17. standingsunwines.com

carpinteriahistoricalmuseum.org

5/25-5/26: 42nd Annual Art in the Park Spend a day in this beautiful park setting while perusing the works of

COURTESY

THURSDAY 5/23

flowers, garden plants, and houseplants, as well as antiques, collectibles, handcrafted gifts, and more. 8am-3pm. Carpinteria Valley Museum of History, 956 Maple Ave., Carpinteria. Free. Call 684-3112.

5/25:

COURTESY

FRIDAY 5/24

5/24: 2019 Marilyn Horne Song Competition Winners Recital Mezzo-soprano Kelsey Lauritano and pianist Andrew Sun will perform Schubert, Ravel, Falla, and the world premiere of a song cycle by Ricky Ian Gordo. 7:30pm. Hahn Hall, Music Academy of the West, 1070 Fairway Rd. $10. Call 969-4726.

tinyurl.com/MarilynHorneRecital Fundraiser

Volunteer Opportunity

Civil Discourse

5/24:

Brett Dennen The singer/songwriter will bring his signature

songs, including “Already Gone” from the 2018 EP Here’s Looking at You Kid, showcasing his off-kilter vocals, diverse musical influences, and vivid storytelling abilities. 8pm. Lobero Theatre, 33 E. Canon Perdido St. $30$35. Call 963-0761. lobero.org

>>>

Protest INDEPENDENT.COM

MAY 23, 2019

THE INDEPENDENT

27


Santa Barbara Permaculture Presents

INDEPENDENT CALENDAR

MAY

Reverse Climate Change

As always, find the complete listings online at independent.com/events. And if you have an event coming up, submit it at independent.com/eventsubmit.

23-29

with Marine Permaculture

COURTESY

Strategies for Ocean Regeneration

with Dr. Brian von Herzen of the Climate Foundation & Project Drawdown Advisor

5/25-5/27:

I Madonnari Italian

Street Painting Festival This famous street art festival will transform the Mission plaza as artists use pastels on pavement to create 150 vibrant, colorful, large-scale images with an Italian market offering food and specialty items. The festival benefits the Children’s Creative Project, a nonprofit arts education program of the S.B. County Education Office that serves 50,000 children in more than 100 schools with visual and performing arts workshops and performances. 10am-6pm. Old Mission S.B., 2201 Laguna St. Free.

Can we halt global warming in our lifetime? With innovative strategies for reforesting the ocean, Dr Brian von Herzen & his Climate Foundation team thinks so.

Evening Talk Friday, May 31, 6:30-9:00 pm

imadonnarifestival.com

Fe Bland/BC Forum SBCC West Campus

Saturday Morning Workshop, Saturday, June 1, 9:30am -12:30pm

Stage Theater, 751 Paseo Nuevo. $18-$23. Call 963-0408.

centerstagetheater.org

Antioch University Santa Barbara

80 artists showcasing a variety of wares while enjoying live music and food trucks. 10am-5pm. Libbey Bowl, 269 E. Ojai Ave., Ojai. Free. Call 646-0117.

sbpermaculture.org

Photo: PatríciaR

ojaiartcenter.org

Trust Your Smile to One of America’s Top Cosmetic Dentists “I can make your Smile Fabulous. My patients recognize how they look impacts their confidence, social, career and happiness. You deserve to look & feel great.” — Dr. Mark Weiser

5/25: William Butler Yeats: Poetry, Politics, and Mysticism This forum will offer a broad panorama of the life and work of William Butler Yeats as a role of Irish mythology and folklore in his early work and some later poems, as well as his role in the Irish Literary Renaissance. 3-5pm. Concord Hall, Institute Of World Culture, 1407 Chapala St. Suggested donation: $2. worldculture.org

5/25-5/26: Peter and the Wolf and Les sylphides S.B. Festival Ballet will present the infectious and funny ballet based on the children’s tale set to music by Russian composer Sergei Prokofiev, along with the ballet blanc classic Les sylphides and short contemporary works. Sat.: 7pm; Sun.: 3 and 7pm. Center

SUNDAY 5/26 5/26: Hoppy Hour and Pignic Enjoy a light refreshments as your furry friend socializes with other rabbits and guinea pigs. 1-3:30pm. S.B. Humane Society, 5399 Overpass Rd. $10. Call 964-4777.

tinyurl.com/may-hoppyhour

MONDAY 5/27 5/27: Nature Hike in Matilija Canyon Join Ojai naturalist Lanny Kaufer on a two-mile hike into the heart of the Matilija Wilderness and enjoy views of the surrounding mountains while identifying, sampling, and discussing the great diversity of riparian and chaparral life. 9:30am-2:30pm. Maricopa Plaza, 1207 Maricopa Highway, Ojai. Free-$25. Call 646-6281. herbwalks.com

5/27:

Memorial Day Mass Honor

those who have given the greatest sacrifice for our country at this patriotic program featuring the S.B. Choral Society, bagpipers, and keynote speaker Sgt. Major John L. Canley, USMC, ret., recent recipient of the Medal of Honor. 10am11am; arrive by 9:45am. S.B. Cemetery, 901 Channel Dr. Free. Call 259-4394.

pcvf.org

COURTESY

Solutions to Sleep Apnea & Snoring Beautiful Veneers • Zoom Teeth Whitening Pain-Free Dental Work • Ozone Therapy

Call Today!

santabarbaradds.com 805-899-3600 1511 State St. Santa Barbara

FIRST SATURDAYS at Coal Oil Point Reserve

Guided Tours First Saturday of every month 10:00 am – 12:00 pm Tours focus on history, ecology, and wildlife. RSVP required: email copr.conservation@nrs.ucsb.edu Public Visiting Hours at the Nature Center The first Saturday of every month 9:00 am – 1:00 pm Located on Slough Road, Bldg 7060. See Google Maps for directions or email copr.conservation@nrs.ucsb.edu 28

THE INDEPENDENT

MAY 23, 2019

INDEPENDENT.COM

5/26:

Desert Hearts Block

Party Dance all day and into the night with 12 hours of techno featuring Mikey Lion, Lee Reynolds, Marbs, RYBO, and Lubelski while indulging in specialty cocktails, food trucks, and live art. 1pm1:30am. Eos Lounge, 500 Anacapa St. $25. Ages 21+. Call 564-2410. eoslounge.com

Fundraiser

Volunteer Opportunity

Civil Discourse

Protest


Shows on Tap

THIS WEEKEND

WEEK

Big Names. Small Room.

5/23, 5/25-5/26: Dargan’s Irish Pub & Restaurant Thu.: Dannsair. 6:30-8:30pm. Sat.: Radiokeys. 9-11:30pm. Sun.: Irish Jam Session. 4:30-7pm. 18 E. Ortega St. Free. Call 568-0702. darganssb.com

Numbskull & New Noise present

Brett Dennen FRIDAY, MAY 24 “The breezy songs of California native Brett Dennen combine the earnest sentiments of activist folk with briskly sweet-natured pop.” – NPR

5/23-5/25, 5/29: The Endless Summer Bar-Café Thu.: Hosanna Alm. Fri.: Johnny Miller. Sat.: Charlie Baker. Wed.: Dave Vignoe. 5:308:30pm. 113 Harbor Wy. Free. Call 564-1200.

TONIGHT

5/23-5/25: M.Special Brewing Co. Thu.: Bryan Titus. 6-8pm. Fri.: Sycamorestrings. 7-9pm. Sat.: MiDMiND. 6-8pm. 6860 Cortona Dr., Bldg. C., Goleta. Free. Call 968-6500. mspecialbrewco.com 5/23-5/29: SOhO Restaurant & Music Club Thu.: Tops, Video Age, Glossies. 9pm. $15-$18. Ages 18+. Fri.: King Bee. 8:30pm. $8. Ages 21+. Sat.: Ryan Nealon Band, Savannah Wilder, Mendeleyev, Kylie Rothfield. 8:30pm. $12. Ages 21+. Sun.: Young Singers Recital. 5:30-7:30pm. Free. Mon.: Motown Mondays. 6-9pm. $5. Tue.: The Talbott Brothers. 8pm. $10$12. Wed.: Young Singers Recital. 6-8pm. Free. 1221 State St. Call 962-7776. sohosb.com

MAY

23 THURS

5/23-5/24: Velvet Jones Thu.: Wilderado, Duncan Fellows. $12-$15. Fri.: A Dustland Fairytale (A Tribute to the Killers), Greywell. $10. 7pm. Velvet Jones, 423 State St. velvet-jones.com

MAY

29 WED Santa Barbara Youth Symphony

5/24-5/25, 5/29: The Brewhouse Fri.: The Olés. Sat.: Kinsella Band. Wed.: Open Mic Night. 8pm. 229 W. Montecito St. Free. Call 884-4664. 5/24: Carr Winery Barrel Rm. Left Hand Lions. 7-9pm. 414 N. Salsipuedes St. Free. Ages 21+. Call 965-7985. carrwinery.com

JUNE

22 SAT

5/24-5/27: Cold Spring Tavern Fri.: The Nombres. 6-9pm. Sat.: Robert Thomas Blues; 1-4pm. Rankin File; 5-8pm. Sun.: Tom Ball and Kenny Sultan; 1:15-4pm. Sean Wiggins and Lone Goat. 4:30-7:30pm. Mon.: Tina Schlieske and the Graceland Exiles; 1-4pm. Paradise Road; 4-7pm. 5995 Stagecoach Rd. Free. Call 967-0066. coldspringtavern.com

5/24-5/26: Maverick Saloon Fri.: Bryan Titus Trio. 8pm. Sat.: Pull the Trigger Band. 8pm. Sun.: Wil Ridge; 1pm. Master of Puppets; 8-11pm. 3687 Sagunto St., Santa Ynez. Free-$5. Ages 21+. Call 686-4785. themavsaloon.com

EMPORIUM PRESENTS

COURTESY

The Alexander Project: Santa Barbara A Tribute to the Youth Symphony Music of Hamilton

Slanted Land

5/24-5/25: Mercury Lounge Fri.: Slanted Land, Reef City. Sat.: Rafa Rose. 9pm. 5871 Hollister Ave., Goleta. $5. Ages 21+. Call 967-0907.

5/24-5/25: Uptown Lounge Fri.: Elements. Sat.: Heart and Soul. 9pm-midnight. Uptown Lounge, 3126 State St. Free. Ages 21+. Call 845-8800.

www.sbuptownlounge.com

5/25-5/26: Figueroa Mountain Brewing Co. (Los Olivos) Sat.: The Vineyard Byrds. 3-6pm. Sun.: Just Dave. 2-5pm. 2363 Alamo Pintado Ave., Los Olivos. Free. Ages 21+. Call 694-2252 x343. figmtnbrew.com 5/25: The James Joyce Ulysses Jasz. 7:30-10:30pm. 513 State St. Free. Ages 21+. Call 962-2668. sbjamesjoyce.com

>>>

sponsors

5/25: La Cumbre Plaza Piano Boys. Noon-3pm. 121 S. Hope Ave. Free. Call 687-6458. shoplacumbre.com Harold P. McAlister Foundation The Bentson Foundation Elaine F. Stepanek Foundation

Join our eClub. Follow us on social

Don’t miss a beat media. See the full lineup. 805.963.0761 / LOBERO.ORG INDEPENDENT.COM

MAY 23, 2019

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29


The Touches of Sweet Harmony Words by William Shakespeare

in modern choral setting by Vaughan Williams, Larsen, Macfarren, Johanson, Diemer, Mäntyjärvi, Lang Zaimont, Mathias, and others.

A L W A Y S A M A Z I N G. N e v e r r o u t i n e.

Regine VelasquezAlcasid and Ogie Alcasid

Saturday, June 1 • 7:30 pm Sunday, June 2 • 3:00 pm

Trinity Episcopal Church 1500 State st, SB

3

THU & FRI

Tickets available at the door and online at adelfosensemble.org $20 general • $15 students/seniors 65+

MAY 23 & 24 8 PM

ESCAPE COUPON PACKAGE Rooms from

boz scaggs: out of the blues tour

chiquis rivera & special guest el Dasa con mariachi

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Includes two dinner entrees & a bottle of House wine plus Breakfast Buffet Nightly entertainment in the Fireside Lounge Outdoor heated pool & spa 25 acres of Monterey pines & gardens Package only bookable by phone at 800-966-6490

Special Code SBMJ

Limited number of packages available. Does not apply to groups. Subject to availability. Not available on holidays. Not valid with other discounts or promotions. Must mention this coupon when making reservation and present at check-in. Does not include tax. This deal is only bookable by calling 800-966-6490. Expires 6/30/19.

800-966-6490 805-927-4200 2905 Burton Drive, Cambria, CA 93428

Thunder from down Under

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fridaY

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21

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25-50% OFF all items in stock!

8 PM

3 4 0 0 E H i g h w a y 24 6 , S a n t a Yn e z · 8 0 0 - 24 8 - 6 2 74 · C h u m a s h C a s i n o . c o m

Artisan Iron Lighting

Must be 21 years of age or older to attend. Chumash Casino Resort reserves the right to change or cancel promotions and events.

716 N. Milpas St. • 805-962-5119

THE INDEPENDENT

MAY 23, 2019

INDEPENDENT.COM


MAY

COURTESY

23-29

INDEPENDENT CALENDAR

As always, find the complete listings online at independent.com/events. And if you have an event coming up, submit it at independent.com/eventsubmit.

MAY 25–SEP 2

5/29:

IMPROVology This event

has grown so popular that it had to move to a bigger venue! Audience participation is encouraged at this lively family-friendly show featuring animal experts, a celebrity panel of judges, and L.A.’s Impro Theatre using the night’s stories as fuel for hilarious skits and songs created on the spot. 8pm. Lobero Theatre, 33 E. Canon Perdido St. $25-$70. Call 963-0761. lobero.org

TUESDAY 5/28 5/28: TEDxSantaBarbara Salons: Who’s Watching Us? Dive into the conversation of smart technology, privacy, how to stay safe, and who’s doing what with your information. 6:459pm. Impact Hub Chapala Ctr., 1221 Chapala St. $20. tedxsantabarbara.com

5/28: The Talbott Brothers This Portlandbased duo will perform its alternative blend of folk, rock, and blues, including hits like “Stay” and “Down the Line.” 8pm. SOhO Restaurant & Music Club, 1221 State St. $10-$12. Call 962-7776.

sohosb.com

WEDNESDAY 5/29 5/29: 73rd KITP Public Lecture: Quantum Theory of the Classical Listen to the leading authority on quantum theory, Wojciech Hubert Zurek, whose work on decoherence established a major bridge between the quantum and the classical and whose no-cloning theorem is the cornerstone of quantum information theory. 7pm. Kohn Hall, Main Seminar Rm., UCSB. Free. Call 893-6307. www.kitp.ucsb.edu

5/29: Dating for Dinosaurs & How to Keep Love from Becoming Extinct Baby boomers can learn the insider secrets from three relationship experts who will discuss dating after age 50 and how to keep love and passion strong in your relationship. 7pm. Chaucer’s Books, 3321 State St. Free. Call 682-6787.

chaucersbooks.com

FARMERS MARKET SCHEDULE THURSDAY Carpinteria: 800 block of Linden Ave., 3-6:30pm

FRIDAY

Montecito: 1100 and 1200 blocks of Coast Village Rd., 8-11:15am

SATURDAY

Downtown S.B.: Corner of Santa Barbara and Cota sts., 8:30am-1pm

SUNDAY

Goleta: Camino Real Marketplace, 10am-2pm

TUESDAY

Old Town S.B.: 500-600 blocks of State St., 4-7:30pm

WEDNESDAY

Solvang: Copenhagen Dr. and 1st St., 2:30-6:30pm

FISHERMAN’S MARKET SATURDAY

Rain or shine, meet local fishermen on the Harbor’s commercial pier, and buy fresh fish (filleted or whole), live crab, abalone, sea urchins, and more. 117 Harbor Wy., 6-11am. Call 259-7476. cfsb.info/sat

INDEPENDENT.COM

MAY 23, 2019

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31


Feel The Power of a New Home from the Leader in Sustainable Living Following a decade of building homes for families throughout California, City Ventures is proud to announce $5,000 in incentives* when you purchase a new home NOW through May 31st, 2019! THE OFFICE NEAR THE BEACH HOME Work hard. Play hard. Surf often. Ground level office with living space above.

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FROM THE LOW $700,000s Up to 2,083 Sq. Ft. & 4 Bedrooms | Solar, All-Electric Homes

WinsloweNewHomes.com | 805.647.0838

*$5,000 in credits may be used towards Design Studio, preferred lender or closing cost credits. Available for select homesites at participating communities only. Interested parties must pre-qualify with City Ventures’ preferred lender. Home must be placed under contract by May 31, 2019 and close escrow by June 30, 2019. All renderings, floor plans, and maps are concepts and are not intended to be an actual depiction of the buildings, fencing, walkways, driveways or landscaping. Walls, windows, porches and decks vary per elevation and lot location. In a continuing effort to meet consumer expectations, City Ventures reserves the right to modify prices, floor plans, specifications, options and amenities without notice or obligation. Square footages shown are approximate. Broker/agent must accompany and register their client(s) with the onsite sales team on their first visit to the community in order to be eligible for any broker referral fee. Additional terms are on broker registration form. Please see Sales Manager for details. Š2019 City Ventures. All rights reserved. BRE LIC # 01979736.

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THE INDEPENDENT

MAY 23, 2019

INDEPENDENT.COM


living

People

Nature

NOT A SEA MONSTER: Ecologist Steven Whitaker does some intertidal monitoring. Wyatt Dennett

ing event this week, he’ll talk about what he’s gone through and how his support network has provided him a life worth living. The Ochsners will also talk about why they took Dennett into their home. “Before the accident, I took everything for granted,” Dennett said. “I was a young, healthy dude. I still am. I just can’t move my limbs very well. Yet.” —Tyler Hayden

Hear Wyatt Dennett’s story on Thursday, May 23, 6-7 p.m. at the Impact Hub located at 1117 State Street. Donate toward his continued care at gofundme.com/ donate4dennett.

Social

I

t all started last June in Montecito. A series of free, open “Common Table” events with one simple goal in mind: to get people from different corners of the community around a long table of food so they could meet, talk, and remind one another that we’re all in this difficult dance of life together. The State Street event in September was a big success, as was the one in Isla Vista last Saturday. On May 23, SITTING ROOM ONLY: Last weekend’s Isla Vista Common Table drew there will be another Common Table, this time a big crowd. smack in the middle of Carpinteria on Linden Avenue. “No speeches, no awards, no politics,” hasn’t been the case in Carpinteria. “It has been a joy organizers with the Lois & Walter Capps Project like to to work with the people of Carpinteria in preparing say, “just food, connection, and community.” this event, starting with Carpinteria City Council, Attendees are asked to bring their own food, non- who voted unanimously in favor of the event and even alcoholic drinks, and utensils. Cook your own dishes waived our registration fee as an added gesture of supor, better yet, support nearby restaurants by ordering port,” Capps said. a few items to go. Linden Avenue’s weekly Farmers’ Scientific evidence shows that too few in-person (as Market will take place that afternoon and give way to opposed to virtual) connections erodes empathy in a Common Table at 5 p.m. There’ll be live music, too. community, Capps went on. That divide ripples into “There is no hidden agenda, no specific issue to debate the world. “Sharing a meal together tends to rekindle or goal to achieve,” said Project director Todd Capps. a sense of fellowship,” he said. “And this too seems “The purpose is a return to human connection, neigh- to have the potential for a powerful ripple effect. It’s bor to neighbor, face to face.” simple and fun, but it is also an essential starting point.” Though Capps, who’s perpetually positive, doesn’t —Tyler Hayden like to talk about it, Santa Barbara’s red tape and high fees almost killed the State Street Common Table. That For more information, visit cmntbl.com.

ERIK A C ARLOS

Have a Seat at the Common Table

COURTESY PHOTOS CHANNEL ISLANDS NATIONAL PARK

ast October, Wyatt Dennett fell from a third-story balcony during a party and broke his neck. The 21-year-old Santa Barbara High School graduate spent the next two months slipping in and out of consciousness with family and friends huddled by his hospital bedside. When he finally fully awoke, Dennett said, it felt like a dream. He was paralyzed. “At first, I could only communicate with my eyes,” he told the Independent through a family representative. “I couldn’t talk on the ventilator until they put in a ‘whisper valve.’ The first time I spoke, my voice scared me.” The pain was immense. Dennett tried channeling it into one of the few objects in his field of vision—the little red light on his room’s smoke detector. The pain came back, and got worse, when he moved to a rehabilitation facility and doctors drained his spinal fluid. “There was no longer a little red light in my room,” he said. It helped when his brother would read him all the cards people sent. Since then, Dennett’s condition has stabilized. He’s regained some use of his right arm, and he can now feed himself. But the road ahead is steep. Doctors aren’t sure how much mobility he’ll get back, and insurance only covers a fraction of his 24-hour care. His future originally lay in an assisted-living facility for the elderly, but family friends Eileen and Tom Ochsner stepped in to help. They invited him to move into their house. “I feel blessed to be a part of Wyatt’s healing journey,” said Eileen. “It’s made me appreciate life more as I gain inspiration from Wyatt’s positive attitude.” Dennett hasn’t given up. Far from it. At a fundrais-

COURTESY PHOTO

Wyatt Dennett Knows Pain and Gratitude L

p. 33

Back in Black:

Abalone Return to SoCal

T

hirty years ago, black abalone ruled the intertidal zones of Southern California and the Channel Islands. By 2009, the species had become so depleted that it was put on the Endangered Species List, but a recent study published by a diverse group of researchers shows that the tides may be turning back in the abalone’s favor. In certain areas of the islands, where there had been only a handful of abalone just a few years ago, there are now dozens, and the populations seem to be growing at a nearly exponential rate. National Park researcher Steve Whitaker said the resurgence is occurring much faster than he could have ever imagined. At first blush, this appears to be a simple win for black abalone, but to understand if these growth patterns are natural or not, the help of archaeologists is necessary. The authors of the study used a specialized research method called historical marine archaeology. They compared the sizes of abalone shells discarded more than 10,000 years ago by Chumash people to those found in more recent centuries. “If you really want to know what the population looked like, what better way than to go back as far as you can possibly go?” asked Whitaker. After European colonists pushed the Chumash off the islands, the next group of people to actively fish for black abalone in the area were Chinese immigrants. At that time, in the early 1800s, abalone was plentiful because their natural predator, the native sea otter, had been hunted to near extinction. According to archaeologist Todd Braje, the Chinese assumed the proliferation of black abalone was natural, so they began intensive harvesting. This started the process of a population collapse. Following 1993, when regional abalone fisheries were shut down, conditions only worsened as the damaged ecosystem bred disease, including withering foot syndrome, the leading cause of black abalone decline. While it’s still not clear what exactly is bringing the abalone back, or if they’re here to stay, the study itself is a success. It’s rare for interdisciplinary work, in this case among biologists and archeologists, to actually come to fruition. “I’ve been doing this for 10-15 years, and [interdisciplinary work] is not the norm,” says Braje. “It takes a lot of patience, a lot of learning, a lot of dialogue, and a lot of willingness to be outside of your comfort zone.” —Maya Chiodo INDEPENDENT.COM

MAY 23, 2019

THE INDEPENDENT

33


faces

New Leader for Fairview Gardens

PAUL WELLMAN

FOOD&DRINK

p.34

FRESH FACE: With a background in banking, Jon Aimonetti hopes to help the nonprofit urban farm Fairview Gardens gain more solid financial footing.

W

ith spring in full swing, many of us start property in 1996. (Roger’s child Dallas Chapman still thinking of the fresh fruits and vegetables sits on the board today.) Since then, it’s gone through that we can start to enjoy, whether from numerous ups and downs, from political skirmishes the farmers’ marwith neighbors over farming needs to the usual funding ket or our own gardens. But issues that many nonprofits Jon Aimonetti is meeting face. schoolkids who don’t realize that fresh vegetables are grown Today, money is an issue in the ground. As the new again for the farm, and lack leader of Fairview Gardens of it led to the shutdown of —the nearly 13-acre, certifiedthe farmstand and the loss of organic urban farm founded a full-time manager. As such, BY BAILEY EMANUELS two decades ago in the heart there is renewed interest from of Goleta—this banker turned the nonprofit’s board of direcnonprofit director is embracing these opportuni- tors to expand funding and partnerships. Aimonetti’s ties to educate the public about the origins of real background in commercial lending is key to that food, recognizing that this education can potentially goal, and he knew that he could provide the nonprofit with just what they needed. change someone’s life. “We strive to provide educational opportunities “My experience from the corporate world, specififor growth at all age levels, in order to cause a ripple cally banking, gives me a different perspective,” said effect with the hope that these individuals will take Aimonetti, of his financial acumen and entrepretheir experiences back to their communities,” said neurial spirit. “Our focus now is to get the farm back Aimonetti, who employs a dozen part-time educa- on track so we have a solid foundation on which to tors, farmers, and admin staff. Together, they must build.” He hopes to open the farmstand by the end balance those educational initiatives with the actual of the summer. But the educational focus remains steady. Most farming operation, which provides revenue through sales at the Goleta farmers’ market, the Isla Vista programs are geared toward children, including the Co-op, and the menu of Barbareño in downtown Sprouts! program, which is aimed at getting infants Santa Barbara. engaged with nature. There’s also an after-school pro“Ideally, farming and education are not mutually gram where kids learn the importance of knowing exclusive, and my goal is to build us to the point where food comes from, the best practices to get that where the two are seamlessly combined,” said Aim- food, and why it’s important to support small regional onetti, who also grows food for Sansum Diabetes farms, especially organic, sustainable ones. “I’ve had Research Institute’s Farming for Life program. parents tell me stories about how kids didn’t like a “Everything we do here has the potential to provide veggie, and then they tried it from Fairview and liked it because they had a connection with it,” said Aimonetti. an educational opportunity.” Aimonetti first learned about Fairview Gardens As to what to expect from the farm, Aimonetti is through his job at Pacific Premier Bank, which excited about the strawberries and mulberries, which helped with the nonprofit farm’s sponsorships. That he said are “hard not to overeat.” Tomatoes and zucinspired him to start volunteering at the farm as well. chini are on their way too, and there will be a pumpAimonetti left the bank to pursue a passion project kin patch planted in June as well. Promised the new and was traveling when the top job at Fairview Gar- director, “Everything we are producing is amazing!” dens opened. “Everything fell into place,” he said of taking the job. The property has been a farm since 1895 — possibly making it the oldest organic farm in Southern Two events are on the horizon for Fairview Gardens: the Volunteer California—and was owned for three decades by Day is on Saturday, May 25, 9 a.m.-1 p.m., the Chapman family. When UCSB music professor and the annual Farm to Table Dinner fundRoger Chapman died in 1994, farm manager Michael raiser is on Saturday, June 1, at 5 p.m. It will Ableman, who’d worked there since 1981, formed feature beer by M.Special, cocktails by T.W. the nonprofit organization to buy and manage the

Jon Aimonetti

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NOT JUST TUESDAYS: Tacos and beer are on the menu every day at this I.V. eatery.

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How One Restaurant Is Surviving at a Historically Challenging Isla Vista Corner BY DANIELLE RICCARDO ily-owned enterprise has a running start, already operating restaurants in Solvang and Buellton. As I arrived, Chef Jesus Bulfeda was just perfecting his Mexican caramel-infused churros that will soon be added to the dessert menu. As I sampled the delicious treat, Bulfeda talked about how the restaurant has surpassed the three-month mark that many places did not in this property. In fact, they’ve passed the six-month mark and are continuing to evolve to serve the Isla Vista eater by integrating into the town’s freespirited culture. “What separates us from other establishments around I.V. is our high level of quality of ingredients and authentic and immersive community involvement,” said general manager Sheldon Katz. He explained that the number-one rule is to have a good time and be present while eating at Cali Tacos, which he hopes to make a pillar of the community. Some of the big plans include live music, weekend brunch with bottomless mimosas, and a customizable stein club to take advantage of the 12

beers on tap. On Tuesdays and Thursdays, they have deejays on the large open-floor patio. No matter what time you arrive, the atmosphere is perfect for watching the game with friends, because the outdoor patio is lined with televisions. The restaurant’s social media director Lily Wright said one of the crowd favorites is the slushy margarita machine — the only one in I.V. And Bulfeda’s team take pride in their house-made, gluten-free tortillas, which are cooked daily to order. Popular dishes include the Cali Nachos, which is like an opened-up Cali burrito: a bed of tortillas and French fries, layered with cheese, pico de gallo, sour cream, carne asada, waca chilé sauce, and jalapeños. The Hawaiian pork burrito is a unique take on fusion food, with carnitas, adobada, rice, Peruvian beans, lettuce, cilantro, onions, green salsa, pineapple, and waca chilé sauce. With so many

goleta residents, visit one of these

FOOD & DRINK

iving in Isla Vista for several years now, I’ve seen a revolving door of restaurants trying to serve the student town. That’s been especially true at the corner of Embarcadero del Norte and Seville Road, where a number of establishments have come and gone — in just the past few years, the same building has been home to the Grilled Cheese Truck, Santa Ynez Burrito, Kogilicious, Korean BBQ House, and Berrilicious. The latest contender is California Tacos and Taproom, and the fam-

free collection centers in your neighborhood Auto Zone at 5799 Hollister Ave., (805) 770-4019 Fast Lane Oil Change at 180 N. Fairview Ave., (805) 683-9640 Jiffy Lube at 6015 Hollister Ave., (805) 683-4100 MarBorg Industries at 20 David Love Place, (805) 964-1498 O’Reilly Auto Parts at 5754 Hollister Ave., (805) 683-1318 Toyota of Santa Barbara at 5611 Hollister Ave., (805) 967-5611 UCSB Campus at Mesa Road, Building 565, (805) 882-3602 Please call ahead for hours of operation. Find additional collection centers and other helpful recycling information at:

www.LessIsMore.org/oil In partnership with:

PROUD PAIR: Cali Tacos’ GM Adam Taylor (left) and Chef Jesus Bulfeda

ingredients, it is packed with a blend of sweet and savory flavors. Overall, California Tacos and Taproom is a friendly place, with a staff that’s focused on “good vibes, great drinks, and delicious food.” They’ve got a good chance of surviving in a notoriously tough location. 956 Embarcadero del Norte, Isla Vista; 770-8226; californiatacos.net

visit santa barbara county’s recycling resource:

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MAY 23, 2019

THE INDEPENDENT

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armic Circle Coffee

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Rae Tran and Daniel Woodman

Connect Southeast Asian Growers to American Aficionados BY CIARA GILMORE Karmic Circle uses both of the major species of beans, Arabica and Robusta, to cultivate a spectrum of flavor. The elongated Arabica bean makes up 75 percent of the world’s coffee and requires extra care during cultivation to create its high sugar and fat content and sweet taste. The Robusta bean is less popular but is high in antioxidants, has almost twice as much caffeine, maintains a lower fat content, and offers more earthy flavors. As a staple beverage in American culture, everybody is looking for that perfect roast to complement their morning. Karmic Circle thinks they’ve got it. “Karmic Circle Coffee is less acidic and oily than typical specialty coffees,” said Tran. “This really allows the deep, dark chocolate, caramel, and nutty flavors to stand distinctly on their own.” And for us coffee drinkers who just need to get it down the hatch before we’re able to function, Tran promised, “It’s got a lot more caffeine!” The couple is hoping Santa Barbarans will appreciate Vietnamese coffee the same way they do. “There is something wonderful and unique about Vietnamese coffee,” said Tran. “The more I learned about the industry the more I thought, ‘I’d like to offer America a metaphorical cup of coffee, on behalf of Vietnam.’” Karmic Circle Coffee is currently not offered at any Santa Barbara coffee shops, but it will soon be unveiling small, intimate coffee shops to serve as “lived-in art” and neighborhood hubs, inspired by the naturalistic sanctuary of tea houses in Saigon. It can currently be purchased on Amazon and will be making a return to the Santa Barbara Night Market this November. n See karmiccirclecoffee.com.


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hether they just want to be more knowledgeable foodies or get inspired to embark on careers as chefs, culinary journalists, or even food reformers, UCSB students can now take a class called the History of Food. The enlightening and literally appetizing course was designed about a decade ago by two Department of History professors, Lisa Jacobson and Erika Rappaport, who transformed their research on book projects into the class. While studying the dynamics of alcoholic beverages, food shortages, and wars, it dawned upon Jacobson that these topics were so vast that they had potential to be a full quarter-long course. “Even though food is something we have every day, the class gets students to reimagine the way they see it,” explained Jacobson. “The course sets the table for thinking about questions focused

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learned about how Campbell’s created and endorsed a tomato carrot-cake recipe to pump up their tomato soup. A fellow student baked the recipe for the class to try, which was an interesting, savory-sweet blend, to say the least. “The course content changes each time we offer it because food history is a very vibrant field,” said Jacobson. “We are modern historians with an abundance of material to cover, and there is Professors always new information that is Lisa Jacobson ” and Erika Rappaport uncovered. Our course Teach Dynamic Course mostly examined modern on Culinary Cultures interactions with food, but BY DANIELLE RICCARDO it began with the extravagance of the Spice Trade, covered the migration on justice, access to food, hunger, reform, of food in the post-Columbus era, and touched on legislative food and the way food creates identities.” With topics that include industrial reforms in the 20th century, like regufoods, the intersections of gender and lating the meat packinghouses. It then food work, and “counter-cuisines” focused on our contemporary percep— efforts to grow and cook natural tions of wellness, obesity, and eating compared to industrialized foods — disorders. students’ eyes are opened to how food Jacobson, who is researching a book is viewed across different cultures and project called Fashioning New Cultures how culinary culture evolves over time. of Drink: Alcohol’s Quest for Legitimacy As a student in the class last quarter, I After Prohibition, handles classes about learned that food has been the reason how perceptions of alcoholic beverfor the rise and fall of empires, and that ages have evolved over time, among it frequently dictates global trade. While other topics. Rappaport, who wrote food brings people together, it also tears the 2017 book A Thirst for Empire: How us apart, and it is woven into the fabric Tea Shaped the Modern World, taught us how caffeinated beverages have of our cultural differences. Jacobson encourages students to streamlined social change, with cafés consider how what they eat commu- creating hotbeds for intellectual discusnicates who they are — essentially, are sions. Two of the most compelling for we what we eat? Students are encour- our class were Rappaport’s lecture on aged to incorporate their day-to-day life “The Caffeine Revolution” and Jacobexperiences with food into classroom son’s discussion of “Intoxicating Foods discussions. We also conducted fam- and Beverages.” ily interviews and had opportunities By exploring these topics, the “Histo cook and sample wartime recipes. tory of Food” stimulates curiosity Because of that, Jacobson said that the about something so familiar as what class “accounts for a higher-than-usual we eat and makes us think critically about our choices. It’s a great way to student participation.” In a lesson on how food companies learn more about something that we all n rebrand products to increase sales, we do every day.

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JOHN DICKSON

New Sunset Dinners For $1399 in May! From 5:00 to 6:30pm

MALA TOWN MOVES IN: A Chinese restaurant serving hotpots, crepes, barbecue, and bento boxes is now open at 6555 Pardall Road.

Mala Town Opens in Isla Vista

PLUS, New Happy Hour 5-6:30 in the Cove Mon-Fri

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THE INDEPENDENT

MAY 23, 2019

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M

ala Town has opened at 6555 Pardall

Road in Isla Vista. The Chinese restaurant occupies the former home of One Piece and HiWi Tropical Fusion. Mala Town offers Mala Tang (hotpots) and Jian Bing (Chinese crepes). The eatery also serves a long list of Chinese BBQ (beef and chicken skewers, chicken wings, chicken heart, Spam, beef balls, fish tofu, crab stick, squid ball, cod fish ball, eggplant, lotus root, needle mushroom, tofu skin, bamboo shoot, potato slices, and corn), as well as Bento Box (teriyaki chicken, Spam with pan-fried egg, vegan deep-fried tofu). Hours are Monday-Thursday, 11 a.m.-3 p.m. and 5-9 p.m.; Friday, 11 a.m.-10 p.m.; and Saturday-Sunday, noon-10 p.m. CAJÉ ON HALEY: Reader Eric walked by 416 East

Haley Street recently and noticed that Cajé has opened. The coffee shop has another location in Isla Vista that opened in January 2009. The Daily Nexus writes that the Isla Vista location offers bagels, açai bowls, and smoothies while the new downtown food menu right now consists of a tortilla española and an avocado toast. I’m told that downtown Cajé has formed a collaboration with Sama Sama Kitchen, an Asian fusion restaurant, to diversify Cajé’s menu. CACHUMA LAKE CAFÉ: On April 8, 2016, I wrote that

Santa Barbara County Parks department was getting set to open a new café near the boat marina at Cachuma Lake. Then a few years went by, but the space continued to be empty. Now I am hearing from reader Steve H. that the place is partially open now and will fully open in a few months, but there are some new details. It will be brought to you by Craig Lingham, whose family operated the Cachuma Lake Recreation Area snack shack and marina for years, along with business partner Dustin Farnum. Lingham is a chef and partner at Roost restaurant on State Street. I am told that the Santa Barbara County Board of Supervisors

newly approved their concession agreement and that the eatery will offer Cachuma burgers, breakfast burritos, and fresh seafood dishes. Word on the street is that they may offer delivery to campsites and the pool area. DAVE’S DRIP HOUSE COMING TO GOLETA: Reader Don

noticed a Coming Soon photo on Instagram for Dave’s Drip House, an ice cream place coming to 193 South Turnpike Avenue near Vons. The new dessert destination will be brought to you by the same friendly guy behind Dave’s Dogs, across the parking lot at 149 South Turnpike Road.

MERCI MONTECITO OPENS: Reader John let me know

that Merci Montecito has opened at 1028 Coast Village Road next to the brand-new Caffe Luxxe, which opened two weeks ago, and the not-sobrand-new Vons, opened in 1968. Both new venues occupy the former home of Xanadu Bakery. Merci Montecito is a boutique artisanal café created by acclaimed pastry chef Elizabeth Colling, who earned her degree at the Ritz Escoffier in Paris before working at Spago Beverly Hills and becoming the pastry chef at Bastide. Elizabeth was also a food editor of Martha Stewart Living and Martha Stewart Weddings magazines, developing and styling desserts for both publications. Merci Montecito is primarily an organic homemade food shop, serving lunch, dinner, and desserts that are easy to take on the go. Visit mercimontecito.com. S.Y. KITCHEN GOES LUNCH? Reader SY Foodie said S.Y. Kitchen is taking over the space on Sagunto Street in Santa Ynez that was formerly occupied by Ranch and Reata Road House and will turn it into a casual lunch spot. RUMORED CLOSURES: Rumors and reports are

coming in saying that Señor Frog’s at 892 Linden Avenue in Carpinteria and the Coffee Bean & Tea Leaf at 1209 Coast Village Road have closed.

John Dickson’s reporting can be found every day online at SantaBarbara.com. Send tips to info@SantaBarbara.com.


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MEDITERRANEAN FOXTAIL KITCHEN 14 E. Cota St. Lebaness cuisine, American burger, 24 craf beer, great cocktails, whiskey bar, vegan options, open late night, hookah lounge. Kitchen closes at midnight on the weekend, try our best falafel in town. www.foxtailsb.com

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ETHIOPIAN AUTHENTIC ETHIOPIAN cuisine Featured at Petit Valentien Restaurant 1114 State St. #14, 805-966-0222. Serkaddis Alemu offers an ever changing menu with choices of vegetarian, vegan, and meat options. Catering Available for parties of up to 40 people. Sat/Sun lunch 11:30-2:30

IRISH DARGAN’S IRISH PUB & RESTAURANT, 18 E. Ortega St. (next to lot 10) SB, 568-0702. $$. Open 7 days 11:30a-Close (Food ‘til 10p, 11p on Sat/Sun). AE MC V Disc. Authentic Irish food & atmosphere in downtown SB. Specialties from Ireland include Seafood & Meat dishes. Informal, relaxed pub-style atmosphere. Live music Thursday nights. Children welcome. Avail. for private parties. Pool & Darts.

PA I D

THE ENDLESS SUMMER BAR-CAFE, 113 Harbor Way, 805-564-4666, upstairs from Chuck’s Waterfront Grill, offers casual dining, surrounded by vintage surfboards and memorabilia. Sip on local wines, craft beers and cocktails, play a game of pool on one of our covered lanais while watching sports and surf movies on our 50” 4k TV’s. Listen to live music evenings, as you revel in the beauty that is Santa Barbara. Serving daily from 11:30 a.m. Private parties and special events accommodated.

INDIAN FLAVOR OF INDIA 3026 State 682-6561 $$ www.flavorofindiasb.com Finest, most authentic Indian cuisine is affordable too! All You Can Eat Lunch Buffet $10.95 M-S dinner combos $9.95+ Specials: Tandoori- Mixed or Fish, Chicken Tikka Masala, Shrimp Bhuna. Also: meat, curries & vegetarian.Wine & Beer. Take out. VOTED BEST for 20 YEARS!

License & High-Limit Insurance Bus. License # 69390

Dining Out Guide

CASUAL DINING CHUCKS WATERFRONT GRILL, 113 Harbor Way, 805564-1200, began serving friends and family in the Santa Barbara Harbor in 1999. We’re everyone’s favorite spot to sit and relax by the boats, watching all the action. Enjoy steaks, fresh seafood straight from the boats docked right outside, and cocktails on our radiant heated deck with fire pits. Or head inside for intimate, cozy booths and the full bar. Plus, free valet parking! Dinner 7 nights from 5 p.m., Sunday Brunch from 10 a.m. Private parties and special events accommodated.

ing in amazing quality at arguably the best price in town. A warm romantic atmosphere makes the perfect date spot. Comfortable locale for dinner parties, or even just a relaxing glass of wine. Reservations are recommended.

after

We clean, polish, hone & seal your indoor/outdoor floors, countertops, showers, tile & grout.

FOOD & DRINK •

DINING OUT GUIDE AMERICAN LITTLE KITCHEN, 17 W. Ortega St. (805) 770-2299. “Great little neighborhood café!” Healthy, comfortable, and affordable. Lunch-Dinner-Late Night. Organic chicken and hormone/antibiotic-free burgers, local produce. Try the Chicken Tikka Masala, vegetarian options. Great local wine list and craft beers. www.littlekitchensb.com

before

shrimp are also available as part of the program, with prices starting at $75 for a glass of vintage bubbly and three oysters or six clams. At a recent media showcase, guests were treated to Dom Pérignon from 2006 that easily demonstrated why there’s so much excitement around vintage Champagne. The Kumai oysters were perfectly fresh and tender, making an ideal counterpoint to the wine and the golden-hour ambiance of the hotel’s spectacular Butterfly Beach location. If the end of your week isn’t already celebratory enough, take it up a notch with this happy new Santa Bar— Charles Donelan bara Friday sunset ritual.

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W

ARTIST PRESENTS IDIOSYNCRATIC PORTRAITS OF AMERICA

hat is there to say about these idiosyncratic “portraits of America” from the materialist mystic James Benning? The quirky litany of the show’s title, Quilts, Cigarettes & Dirt, arises out of an approach that’s at once transparent — the show really does consist in part of the items listed — and transcendental, in the tradition of the American sublime that stretches back to Walt Whitman and Henry David Thoreau. Benning swims in the same great river of everyday art and democratic culture “After Missouri Pettway” by James Benning as Grandma Moses and Walker Evans, picking up images and ideas as he paddles toward the delta of the future. A master of the cinema of the extended gaze, Benning has taken Andy Warhol’s aesthetic strategy of long takes with little or no action out of the Factory and into the fields, highways, and backyards of the American West and South. Benning is perhaps best known for two cabins he built “Portrait of 7 Boxes” by James Benning on the same remote property in the Sierras. One is a replica of Thoreau’s house on Walden Pond; the other copies the vinyl labels more frequently encountered layout of Ted “the Unabomber” Kaczyn- in museums and galleries, the viewer walks ski’s survivalist shack. While film and video along two sides of the big room before finally make up the bulk of Benning’s oeuvre, he’s coming into the main space at the other side always been a deep and free-ranging reader, of the gallery from where he or she entered. and a chronicler through his activities of the It’s a simple gambit, and an effective one. The main gallery looks different when you unique historical circumstances that have reach it this way, and the show’s spare instalmade the improbable idea of these United lation lends an eerie dignity to the humble States possible. As evidenced in the subtitle boxes of Alabama dirt and the quilt handof this exhibit, Portraits of America, this dedication to the unfinished project of America stitched from potato sacks that one finds remains central to his vision. at the outlet of the show’s entry tunnel. In The striking physical design of the show the next room, a triple feature of Benning’s indicates the aesthetic that MCA’s new recent video works plays on a loop. These executive director, Abaseh Mirvali, brings compositions range from the relatively short to the organization’s Paseo Nuevo space. It’s 2017 video After Warhol, which comes in a memorable transformation that promises at a modest 11 minutes and 40 seconds, to to reveal the gallery’s previously untapped the durational grandeur of Twenty Cigarettes potential. Upon entry, the exhibit’s initial (2011), in which 20 people take a total of one wall text pulls visitors to the left of the main hour and 39 minutes to puff through their space and down a corridor formed by an butts. READERS (2017) takes an hour and L-shaped freestanding wall. Traveling along 48 minutes to show just four people—Dick this entryway, one encounters a series of Hebdige, Simone Forti, Clara McHalesmall, square photos of the cast of Ben- Ribot, and Rachel Kushner — sitting and ning’s film Twenty Cigarettes. Guided by a reading quietly to themselves for nearly half brochure/map, rather than by the standard an hour each.

It takes patience to stand or sit on the floor through these long takes of people reading or smoking silently, but there are multiple rewards for doing so. As with much of Benning’s recent work, some of these dividends are only available to viewers with the cultural knowledge to recognize them. These hidden intellectual Easter eggs tend to ironize themselves even as they add a certain kind of interest. Yes, that’s Rachel Kushner, author of The Flamethrowers and The Mars Room, critically acclaimed recent novels about the New York art scene of the 1970s and the inside of a women’s prison, respectively, but what does it mean to watch her read? Ditto the presence of UCSB’s Dick Hebdige, he of the seminal postmodern critical text Subculture: The Meaning of Style, and of Simone Forti, the choreographer whose work influenced everyone from John Cage to minimalist icon Robert Morris. There’s something there, but what? It’s left up to the viewer to fill in the blanks. The wooden boxes and the quilts are at once easier to resolve and more timely in their presentation. Benning became interested in quilting after learning about the Gee’s Bend group of African-American artists. He titles his quilts—there are two in the show—with the names of women from the isolated artistic community: ‘After Missouri Pettway’ and ‘After Maggie Louise Gudger,’ both from 2019. The show’s wooden boxes full of different-colored dirt represent Benning’s interest in and awareness of local differences in soil and in culture throughout the state of Alabama. Having grown up working class in Wisconsin’s Industrial Valley, Benning remains acutely aware of both the persistence of social segregation and the potential for class unity across racial lines. This is a show for repeated visits, and for extended research to meet Benning’s thoughtful and patient extended gaze. — Charles Donelan

4·1·1

James Benning’s Quilts, Cigarettes & Dirt shows at MCASB through July 14. There will be an artist talk with Benning at MCASB on Thursday, May 23, at 5 p.m. See mcasantabarbara.org.

L I F E PAGE 40

COURTESY

JAMES BENNING’S QUILTS, CIGARETTES & DIRT AT MCASB

SAN MARCOS MADRIGALS “It is extremely rewarding as a teacher to be able to delve deep into the study of music with students who are extremely passionate about their work,” said Eleni Pantages, the vocal musical director at San Marcos High School. The madrigal singers’ dedication was rewarded recently when they earned top scores at the prestigious WorldStrides Festival of Gold in March. The event is a national, invitation-only music competition, during which students get a private clinic with Dr. Craig Jessop, a former conductor of the Mormon Tabernacle Choir. It’s a feather in Pantages’s cap, as this is her first year as vocal director. Below, Pantages answered a few questions about what it takes to be part of a competition like the Festival of Gold. While the Madrigals perform regularly in the community, the Festival of Gold is “an extremely rigorous competition requiring a lot of detailed preparation,” Pantages explained, so it was the only competition they participated in this year. To be named top group, the singers must be exacting in their vocal execution, so they devote an impressive amount of time to practicing. “The Madrigals dedicate 90 minutes of every school day to rehearsing as an ensemble,” said Pantages. “During our time together, we study vocal technique, music theory, history, and traditional performance practice of all the different time periods from which our repertoire originated. We work on pitch and rhythmic accuracy, tone quality, pronunciation, dynamics, expression, and unification of our sound.” For Pantages, being at San Marcos is life come full circle — she was a student in the program many years ago. “[I] sang with the Madrigals my junior and senior year in high school,” she said. “I am thrilled to be back to continue the tradition of excellence I experienced when I was a student.” Hear the San Marcos High School Madrigals perform Chichester Psalms by Leonard Bernstein at UCSB Chamber Singers’ spring concert on Friday, May 31, at 7:30 p.m. at Trinity Episcopal Church (1550 State St.). See music.ucsb.edu. — Michelle Drown

M O R E A R T S & E N T E R TA I N M E N T > > > 40

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a&e | BOOKS PREVIEW

GEOFF DYER READS ‘BROADSWORD CALLING DANNY BOY’

A

t first glance, Geoff Dyer’s approach his initial attachment to the film, Dyer invents to literary nonfiction appears nothing a fascinating intermediate fantasy space in if not perverse. He’s that rare prolific which both of these personal worlds—and writer who is most prolific when he’s least all the life experience in between them—exist predictable. With four novels and loads of simultaneously. excellent, award-winning art criticism to his Dyer will be in Santa Barbara on Thursday, credit, it’s still the books that reject known May 30, to present clips from Where Eagles categories that have become his calling cards. Dare and read along to them as part of the The latest of these oddball jeu d’esprit is a Santa Barbara Museum of Art’s Parallel Stopetite morsel of a little over 100 pages titled ries series. In a recent phone conversation, ‘Broadsword Calling Danny Boy’: Watching he promised both new, post-publication Where Eagles Dare. insights and moments of Reichian (as in Novella-length companion essays to great Steve) phase-shifting as his account of the films are not a new genre for either the book film falls in and out of synchronization with world — see the British Film Institute’s excel- the moving image. Dyer’s restless eye and lent series of volumes perky, uninhibited zeal on “Film Classics”— for deflationary irony or for Dyer, who pubmake him an intimidatlished Zona: A Book ing interview subject, About a Film About a but in point of fact he’s Journey to a Room in warm and generous tribute to Andrei Tarwith his observations. by Charles Donelan kovsky’s film Stalker Among his particular back in 2012, but this concerns at this time are one treads a road less taken. Whatever else the photographer Garry Winogrand, about one might say about the 1968 thriller Where whom he has recently published a bookEagles Dare, starring Richard Burton, Clint length essay, and the maintenance of his Eastwood, hordes of Nazis, and the Alps, it’s position at the top of the book-introduction not the kind of underappreciated work of art writing game. Perhaps the most revealing thing that that would seem to call for Dyer’s notoriously came out of our conversation was Dyer’s obsessive/digressive approach. And yet, after an evening lost in the interest in the problem of writerly urgency. wonder and frequent laughter of reading, I I brought this up inadvertently by praising can testify that however one feels about the his writing for this quality, while at the same film Where Eagles Dare, learning what Dyer time admitting that urgency was easily felt but thinks about it, or rather what Dyer thinks difficult to locate or prove. Dyer responded by during it, is unquestionably worth the time. saying that he fears losing the ability to write, Speculations about the relative state of Rich- and that he has recently become a student of ard Burton’s liver and the future of Clint East- careers like that of the 19th-century poet Wilwood’s grimace rub shoulders with delightful liam Wordsworth, who struck literary gold excursions through such Dyer-esque territory as a young writer and then lived another 40 as the photographer Piotr Uklański’s epic years during which he failed to write anything 1998 photomontage The Nazis, which fea- as good again. Acknowledging that there have tures 164 tightly cropped pictures of famous been times when he was “convinced [he] was actors playing Nazis, including several of finished” as a writer, Dyer went on to say that the cast members from Where Eagles Dare. he still worries about waking up some day Darting back and forth between his eclectic and no longer having anything to say. Well, contemporary consciousness and the early- this certainly hasn’t happened yet, and that’s adolescent state of mind in which he formed a good thing all around.

AUTHOR’S NOVELLA

Wednesday, June 5, 5:30-7:30 pm

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Tickets — awcsb.org Members Free, NonMembers $20 **includes one glass of wine & pizza from Lucky Penny**

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WHERE EAGLES DARE

4•1•1

Geoff Dyer will present clips from Where Eagles Dare and read along to them as part of the Santa Barbara Museum of Art’s Parallel Stories series on Thursday, May 30, at 5:30 p.m. See sbma.net.

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MAY 23, 2019

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COURTESY

a&e | POP, ROCK & JAZZ PREVIEW

TICKETS ON SALE FRIDAY, 5/31 AT 10AM

R

ELLE KING HEADLINES GRANADA SHOW

ocking women will step to the front redefine what is considered possible. Born on May 30 when Elle King headlines a with an umbilical cord strangulation, docshow at The Granada Theatre in part- tors predicted Schuster would never have a nership with Girls Rock S.B. Joining King speaking, let alone singing, voice; now she will be not only opener Barns Courtney but can move audiences to tears with her singing also some of the area’s best Girls Rock–grown and musicianship abilities. She credits Girls musical talent, including Sofia Schuster, Jaz- Rock as being instrumental to her growth. ara Hutton, Katy Caballero, Gianna Macioce, “I’ve grown vocally, and I’ve become a much and Sophie Rose. The show coincides with stronger performer,” she said. “It’s taught me King’s announcement that she will be joining so much about learning to accept yourself the advisory board of Girls Rock S.B., the larg- for your flaws. Raising your self-esteem est of the world’s Girls Rock networks. through music is one of the greatest lessons King comes to town just months after the I’ve learned.” release of her most recent album, Shake the Other performers, like her co-songwriter Spirit, a pop powerhouse and performer Jazara Hutwritten in the aftermath ton, have learned through of a divorce. “It was the Girls Rock to shed the best therapy I could have comparatively restrictive ever had,” King said of her pains of fear and hesitation. new album. Shake the Spirit “When I was younger, I had carries on King’s rocking massive stage fright — it ways, with an air that’s both really hurt when I would assured and reflective. “It’s sing,” she said. “This has by Richie DeMaria very, very freeing; I really made me more confident released a lot of darkness I in who I am and what I sing was holding onto,” she said. “The beauty of it and how I sing. It’s been a great opportunity is people have felt a connection to it. Whether and a great stepping stone for me.” they’re going through a divorce, or mental Hutton and Schuster will be performhealth, or just anything that someone could ing an original song together, along with a be going through, that there’s someone out lineup of Girls Rockers who will showcase there singing about struggles, to understand their talents. Schuster lauded the choice for King as a Girls Rock advisor. “Elle is all people aren’t alone.” King is a natural choice as an ambassador about female empowerment and lifting girls and advisor for the program, having experi- up. The whole mission of Girls Rock is about enced firsthand the importance of arts educa- building self-esteem, encouraging girls to be tion as a teen. “I think young girls should see brave, not perfect.” For performers new and veteran, it’s a someone perform that maybe doesn’t look or sound like what society thinks people should night about hearing and raising women’s sound like,” the famously rebellious King said. voices in a world that often orders them “Believe it or not, at one time in my life, I was silent. “Find out what makes you you; take a young teenage girl, and I started playing your individuality and let it shine,” King said music when I went to a performing arts camp. as advice to young women performers. “The It really shaped me, really sharpened a lot of kinder, more loving, and more honest you my creativity skills.” The Granada show, she are to yourself, the louder you can hear your said, “is a cool way for me to get in touch with own voice and the more your voice can be young girls and show them that it’s totally heard. It took me a long time, and if I could possible.” somehow get through to these young girls, A few of the performers, such as 2019 Teen maybe they could figure it sooner that I had Star Sofia Schuster, have grown to defy and to figure it out.”

REBELLIOUS ROCKER JOINS GIRLS ROCK S.B. PERFORMERS

TRAIN / GOO GOO DOLLS. . . . JUN 11

MAGGIE ROGERS . . . . . . . . SEP 17

REBELUTION . . . . . . . . . . . . . JUN 16

OF MONSTERS AND MEN . . . SEP 19

LIONEL RICHIE. . . . . . . . . . AUG 06

MARK KNOPFLER . . . . . . . SEP 20

ELVIS COSTELLO / BLONDIE . . AUG 07 YOUNG THE GIANT / FITZ & THE TANTRUMS AUG 08 JOJO SIWA. . . . . . . . . . . . AUG 11 SEBASTIAN MANISCALCO. . . . AUG 17

INCUBUS . . . . . . . . . . . . SEP 26 GARY CLARK JR . . . . . . . . SEP 27 ROD STEWART. . . . . . . . . SEP 28

THE AVETT BROTHERS . . . . . AUG 24

BANDA MS DE SERGIO LIZARRAGA . SEP 29

IRATION . . . . . . . . . . . . . AUG 25

VAN MORRISON . . . . . . . . OCT 05

JOSH GROBAN. . . . . . . . . . SEP 05

HOZIER. . . . . . . . . . . . . OCT 24

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4•1•1

Goldenvoice presents Elle King Thursday, May 30, 7:30 p.m., at The Granada Theatre. Call 899-2222 or see granadasb.org.


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ast Friday, under a full moon, Kali Uchis and Jorja Smith indulged a Santa Barbara Bowl audience in musical delights of feel-good grooves and celestial vocals, respectively. Smith opened the evening, her invigorating vocals and the band’s accompanying percussion being the focal points of the stripped-down set. The singer created an intimate setting with jazz-R&B performances of moody ode-to-love tracks such as “February 3rd” and “The One,” the audience raising At the S.B. Bowl their arms and closing their eyes to bask in Smith’s vocals. Fri., May 17. “Blue Lights” and the upbeat “On My Mind” showed Smith is just as comfortable singing magnetic bangers as acoustic ballads. Sultry songstress Uchis took the stage to an uproar of applause as she danced around an electric-powered winding staircase. Audience energy was high as they sung the chorus to the Uchis and Steve Lacy song “Just a Stranger.” “She wants my hundred-dollar bills, she don’t want love” echoed throughout the amphitheater as Uchis danced onstage. She introduced her performance of the 2015 single “Ridin’ Round” by thanking all the fans who had been following her artistic journey since her beginning projects. One of the night’s highlights was Uchis’ performance of “Nuestro Planeta,” sung entirely in Spanish. While Smith’s set was lowkey, meant to captivate the audience through her vocal strength, Uchis brought a high-energy glitz and glamour to the second half of the night. Smith joined Uchis for the show’s encore with a medley of hits including Erykah Badu’s “On & On,” Destiny’s Child’s “Say My Name,” and Amy Winehouse’s “Stronger Than Me.” The friends closed out the night by performing their collaborative track, “Tyrants,” and making their way up the staircase to say their goodbyes and thank-yous to the audience. — Jasmine Rodriguez

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ndrew Solomon,” declared Pico Iyer in his introduction of his acclaimed guest in the fourth and final installment of this season’s Speaking with Pico series, “is a voice of elevation.” And indeed, the author of The Noonday Demon: An Atlas of Depression, Far from the Tree: Parents, Children, and the Search for Identity, and Far and Away: Reporting from the Brink of Change, spoke with stunning eloquence about his travels in Afghanistan, Libya, Russia, China, and Senegal. Though he had a privileged and sheltered upbringing in New York City, Solomon suffered from anxiety in childhood and adolescence, and he has endured debilitating depression in adulthood. Solomon learned Presented by Arts & to walk straight into places and situations Lectures, Speaking with Pico Series, where he felt stripped UCSB Campbell down to his essence. Hall, Thu., May 16. As always, Pico Iyer guided the conversation masterfully without resorting to a single note, from travel to understanding and treating depression to what constitutes a family unit to who the author turns to for sustenance (William James, Virginia Woolf), and the impact Solomon’s coming out as a gay man had on his traditional parents, particularly his mother. When asked what gives him hope in these dark times, Solomon said he is often inspired by the idealism of young people. Resilience and hope are at the core of Andrew Solomon’s prodigious body of work, as is valuing differences, not merely tolerating them. — Brian Tanguay


a&e | FILM & TV REVIEW

Edito The forll’os Note: contain wing for Seassspoilers on 8.

GAME OF THRONES WHAT IS DEAD MAY NEVER DIE • BY T.M. WEEDON

G

ame of Thrones enamored us because it defied us. It enticed our engagement but refused to bend to our will. Week to week, season to season, it invited us to inspect its machinery closely, to try to see how the gears interlock, and to forecast the turning of its wheels. Daenerys said she would one day break the wheel. We watched with bated breath to see which wheel, on which turn, and which cogs of the machinery would be left intact. This level of engagement is a rare species in the age of streaming platforms. Consider the colloquial verbiage: “binging.” It refers to mindless, uncontrollable consumption. When we binge-watch, we’re being force-fed content, eliding moments to ingest and contemplate what we are taking in for evermore auto-plays of the next episode. The weekly gaps between GOT episodes and the months-to-years that lagged between seasons infused the ritualized screen time of its devotees with fervency and anticipation. These waiting periods allowed us to take the imaginative reins of the storytelling for a week, or even a year, and plot the story forward along our own logic and desire. Podcasts, YouTube channels, fanfictions, and article after article on all the largest and smallest media websites dedicated themselves to nothing more than breaking down episodes and prognosticating what is possibly to come. Amid this media storm, spoiler-hysteria was at a fever pitch for those not yet inducted into the sacred mysteries of the latest episode. To be in the know was to belong, to participate. GOT was able to enjoy this robust off-screen life because the world it presented onscreen was so complete. Fantasy author George R.R. Martin charted the whole expanse of Westeros and beyond in his multi-volume epic, A Song of Ice and Fire. In translating and condensing his novels for the screen, showrunners David Benioff and D.B. Weiss had a world rich with political intrigue and military strategy at their fingertips. But, most importantly, they had a world populated with characters who were as close to flesh and blood as any literary imagination could conceive. These characters were smart, deadly, heroic, and flawed. They animated the landscape of GOT with insight and action, and they seemed natural to that world because they were not immune from it. The hermetic seal of a fictionalized world peels back when we see the writer’s pen at play or the audience’s desires appeased for the mere sake of appeasement. In these moments, staginess and fan service transport us from a believable place to a film set. But, over and over again, GOT proved itself faithful to its fiction. When Ned Stark lost his head, audiences nearly

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lost their own. Where was the deus ex machina to pull him from the executioner’s block? What is a story without its main character? We learned early on that no character, regardless of screen time, was impervious to the bloody sport of Westerosi politics. And, so it went. The Red Wedding and the Sept of Baelor sated a bloodthirst that belonged to the characters, not its audience. Characters moved plot. Ambitions led to choices, and choices led to consequences. We could watch the chess pieces move, but often strategy and outcome were only a privilege of hindsight. The players above the board were unknowable. The chess pieces seemed possessed of independent spirit.

The outcry over the final season has been primarily targeted at the unmasking of the players, specifically writers David Benioff and D.B. Weiss. When the seams of plot defy the credulity of character, the handiwork of the craftsman is made plain. Narrative pivots occurred obtusely with blatant telegraphed intention. Setup usurped motivation. Characters acted, frankly, out of character in order to progress the story from plot point to plot point. Would Varys (Conleth Hill), the Master of Whisperers, the most clandestine of the clandestine, commit treason out in the open on a sandy shore, easily viewed by anyone from the cliffs above? Varys was robbed of his characteristic discretion for no reason other than to rob him of his life two scenes later. The rushed dispatch of Varys is just one narrative shortcut among many this final season and is not even the most egregious by a long shot. But the purpose here is not to enumerate grievances. Scour your local Internet, and you’ll find plenty of that to go around. There is no denying, however, that the end of GOT has been decried as incredibly disappointing from all corners of its fanbase. From the haphazard way some character arcs were completed to the

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careless way others just fizzled out, these final two seasons of GOT left much to be desired. The common refrain is that the sloppy finish was a product of the abridged ending, with only seven episodes in the prior season and a mere six in its final one. Others make it more personal, attacking Benioff and Weiss for not being skilled enough storytellers to conclude Martin’s saga without his books as a guide (Benioff ’s and Weiss’s post-episode commentaries certainly didn’t win them many defenders). With sore feelings in heavy supply, the final episode was not the balm many of us hoped it would be—not for our expectations and not for the writers’ reputations. We were given a dragon with a surprising penchant for metaphor; a prisoner who devises a unanimous new system of a governance within a single speech while still chained; a murderous army commander who is able to just sail away with thousands of his men; a wordless reunion between Jon (Kit Harington) and the most quotable personality on the show (thank god, Jon pet his dog at least); the crowning of the most emotionally distant character; and the revealing of Arya’s (Maisie Williams) hidden passion: cartography (who knew?). Perhaps, Bran (Isaac HempsteadWright) warged into the dragon, but the episode didn’t want to waste time on anything so satisfying. That happened off-screen. King’s Landing will be rebuilt. The small council has reconvened, and they are going to begin interviewing for a new Master of Whisperers and a new Master of War. A few spokes have changed, but the wheel seems far from broken. And this is where we leave our characters. Some right back where we found them, a few others where they should have always been, and others almost as if thrown to the wind to land where they might. In many ways, we say goodbye not to the characters we’ve watched grow and have grown to love, but to shadows of their former selves, limping half-formed to their end of days. We said our goodbyes to the fully formed characters last season or perhaps even the season before that, before we even knew farewells were in order. In memoriam, many of us will try to erase the final turgid days of our heroes and villains and remember them as they were in their former glory. For some fans, this final season deprived them of their mourning period, and it will perhaps not be the last desecration against these characters’ memory. A resurrection is assured. A prequel has already been greenlit by HBO. The new show will take place 5,000 years before the original series, plenty of narrative real estate for an IP franchise. n What is dead may never die.


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CAREER WOES: Bill Hader (pictured) plays Barry Berkman, a professional hitman who longs to become an actor in HBO’s Barry.

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he greatest fight sequence premiering with his dark side. Meanwhile, that’s the very on screens the first weekend of May side he’s trying to leave behind. didn’t have 20 superheroes in it or The show may have a formula, but it earn a billion dollars, nor did it pit a band of has yet to feel stale. Beneath Barry’s now warriors against an army of the dead for an well-worn narrative tracks, each episode epic battle eight years in the making. It was mines an impressive amount of depth and two guys and a little girl clumsily, awkwardly variety. Each contract killing comes replete swatting and tearing at each other, blood- with its own captivating dynamics, setting ied and out of breath, up sequences that are both over the course of one psychologically grueling well-lit 30-minute epiand physically gruesome. sode. It started in one Likewise, Barry’s deepening guy’s house, continued seriousness for acting allows in another guy’s car, and continuous opportunities culminated at the grofor him to excavate objects cery store. It’s funny; it’s of his personal history and by T.M. Weedon violent. It’s heartfelt; it’s repressed trauma, affording cruel. It’s Barry (cue title us evermore intimacy with his character. card and theme music). But, by far, the most delightful variable in The HBO series Barry, now in its second season, is so redundant in plot it’s become Barry’s tragicomic equation is Noho Hank a running gag in the show itself. Barry (Anthony Carrigan), the effeminate, hairBerkman (Bill Hader) is a professional hit- less, Chechen mob boss with a heart of gold. man. But Barry doesn’t want to be a hitman Hank’s gooey soft side makes gang warfare anymore. After each person he kills, he vows look like vying for the cool kids’ table in a never to kill again. Then someone draws high school cafeteria. It’s petty. It’s juvenile. him back in, and again he’s killing. So, he It just happens to involve assault rifles and renews his vow. “Starting now!” he pledges. drug smuggling. Season 2 starts out more promising for Barry’s most daring feat is achieving this Barry, if not in circumstances, then at least in precarious balance of humor and violence willpower. He manages to avoid murdering within such cramped quarters. Other shows, anyone, despite being dragged into unend- such as The Sopranos and Breaking Bad, have ing contracts to do exactly that. It’s almost a been able to harmonize these notes in the relief when the police finally catch up with past, but they have benefited from complex him and the tiresome push-pull can come to multi-track narratives and longer episodes, an end. But, no — not quite. giving them a more commodious berth for The other side of Barry’s life has a similar tonal variance. Barry accomplishes this vercircularity. Barry joins an acting class, hop- satility within a form more akin to a sitcom. ing this newfound passion can move him It keeps this unwieldy combination past his career as a hired gun. If he can act grounded by asking fundamental questions like somebody else — the thinking goes — of the human condition that bridge the two then maybe he can be somebody else. The sides of Barry’s life: “Can a person ever truly problem is, in order to truly embody some- change?” “What is the real nature of evil?” one else’s pain and emotions, you need to be The show’s interrogation into the roots of in full contact with your own. That’s what selfishness is especially fruitful. On this topic Barry’s acting teacher, Gene Cousineau at least, you may be surprised to see how (Henry Winkler), and Barry’s girlfriend, much career assassins and aspiring actors Sally Reed (Sarah Goldberg), tell him. Igno- have in common. Or you may not. rant of his double life as an assassin, they are constantly coaching Barry to get in touch Barry streams on HBO.

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05 29 2019 Free and open to the public.

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How to Win the Fight against Gun Violence in America Robyn Thomas

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Robyn Thomas is the Executive Director of the Giffords Law Center to Prevent Gun Violence. She supervises the Center’s work drafting and defending safer gun laws, as well as educating legislators about evidence-based gun policy. Under her leadership, the Giffords Law Center has advanced robust policies that are proven to be most effective in solving our nation’s gun violence epidemic. A nationally-known expert on gun violence, Thomas has served as an expert witness before state, local, and national lawmakers. In 2008, she oversaw the Center’s efforts to coordinate the drafting and filing of all amicus briefs in the landmark Supreme Court case District of Columbia v. Heller and continues to supervise the legal team’s tracking and analysis of Second Amendment litigation. Most recently, Robyn spearheaded the creation of the Firearms Accountability Counsel Taskforce, a joint venture between top law firms and the gun violence prevention movement, and Giffords Law Center’s Urban Gun Violence Initiative, aiming to save lives through a combination of community intervention strategies and gun laws.

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mins., PG-13)

Aladdin (128 mins., PG) Will Smith plays Genie (voiced fabulously by Robin Williams in the 1992 animated film) in this updated, liveaction version of the folktale One Thousand and One Nights. The story remains the same: Aladdin (Mena Massoud) falls in love with Princess Jasmine (Naomi Scott), finds a magic lamp, and frees Genie; mayhem ensues.

Fairview (2D & 3D)/Fiesta 5 (2D & 3D)

All Is True (101 mins., PG-13) Kenneth Branagh directs this historical-fiction film about Shakespeare’s (Branagh) return to Stratford, with his wife Anne (Judi Dench) in tow, after the Globe Theatre goes up in flames during a performance of Henry VIII in 1613.

The Hitchcock

Booksmart (102 mins., R) Kaitlyn Dever and Beanie Feldstein star in this comedy about two high school seniors who decide to go against their characters, break rules, and party their way to graduation. Billie Lourd, Jason Sudeikis, and Lisa Kudrow also star. Camino Real/Paseo Nuevo

Brightburn (90 mins., R) David Yarovesky directs this horror film about a couple, Tori (Elizabeth Banks) and Kyle (David Denman), who find a baby boy and raise him as their own. As the boy, Brandon, hits his tween years, he begins to change from a sweet kid to a vicious predator. Camino Real/Metro 4

The second film in the Godzilla franchise, King of the Monsters, sees the ancient super-species—Godzilla, Mothra, Rodan, and the three-headed King Ghidorah—vying to be the supreme monster, as humankind gets trampled in their wake.

Rocketman (121 mins., R) Taron Egerton stars as Elton John in this biopic/musical about the singer/ songwriter’s early years at the Royal Academy of Music and eventual partnership with lyricist Bernie Taupin (Jamie Bell).

Arlington/Camino Real/Paseo Nuevo (Opens Thu., May 30)

Camino Real/Metro 4 (Opens Thu., May 30)

Ma (99 mins., R) Octavia Spencer stars as the titular Ma, a recluse who begins offering her home as a place for local teens to party. What begins as a dream for the young revelers turns into a nightmare of horrific proportions. Luke Evans, Juliette Lewis, and Missi Pyle also star.

NOW SHOWING Avengers: Endgame (180 mins., PG-13) Avengers: Infinity War ended with Thanos (Josh Brolin) having killed half of all life across the universe, including several Avengers. In Endgame, the surviving Avengers regroup for a final attempt to defeat Thanos.

Camino Real/Metro 4

Fiesta 5 (Opens Thu., May 30)

Photograph (110 mins., PG-13) Nawazuddin Siddiqui and Sanya Malhotra star in this young-adult romance/ drama about a Mumbai street photographer (Siddiqui) who tries to convince one of his subjects, Miloni (Malhotra), to pose as his fiancée so his grandmother will stop pressuring him to marry. Paseo Nuevo

A Dog’s Journey (108 mins., PG) In this sequel to 2017’s A Dog’s Purpose, Josh Gad voices the dog(s) Bailey, Molly, Max, and Toby, as the canine is reincarnated over and over, always finding his/ her way back to Ethan Montgomery (Dennis Quaid) and his family. Fairview/Fiesta 5

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A DOG’S JOURNEY B Fri to Mon: 12:00, 2:40, 5:20, 8:00; Tue to Thu: 2:40, 5:20, 8:00

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POKÈMON DETECTIVE PIKACHU B Fri to Wed: 11:10, 1:40, 4:10, 6:45, 9:15; Thu: 11:10, 1:40, 4:10

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a&e | FILM & TV CONT’D FROM P. 49 Non-Fiction

stunning Anne Hathaway and clumsy Rebel Wilson team up to con rich men out of their money. The story arc felt rather formulaic, as the two leads initially dislike each other only to find friendship in their common goal of grifted wealth. Although the talented actresses have undeniable chemistry, the filmic effort falls flat in sloppy moments of mid-level humor that often come at the crude expense of Wilson. Despite this, the film is still a fun and entertaining experience that positively contributes to the trend of strongfemale-driven cinema. (MPG) Camino Real/Paseo Nuevo

➤ ONon-Fiction

(108 mins., R)

Affairs of the heart and loins and the rapidly changing state of publishing in the digital age become the dominant touchpoints of this shamelessly talky but wickedly fun number from writer/ director Olivier Assayas. Alain (Guillaume Canet) is a publisher, an ostensibly suave bourgeois figure and spouse of Selena (Juliette Binoche), who is playing cat and mouse with bohemian “auto-fiction” writer Léonard (Vincent Macaigne). Much is read between the script’s furious flow of lines, which can sometimes nudge the film to the verge of melodrama. But it keeps retreating

The Hustle John Wick: Chapter 3 - Parabellum (131 mins., R)

Keanu Reeves reprises his role as John Wick, a notorious hitman, for this third installment of the franchise. In this film, Wick has a $14 million contract on his head and so becomes the target for assassins from around the globe. Halle Berry and Laurence Fishburne also star.

in a blur of ideas, as well as bitchy intellectual conversation and speculation on, for example, existential matters, the volatile book market, and who’s zooming who. Beneath the surface buzz of chatter and bedroom antics, it’s clear that the filmmakers are having ironic-insider fun with the piece, as when Alain men-

tions excitedly that he has asked Juliette Binoche to read a book on tape, a connection made by his wife, played by … Binoche. (JW) Riviera Pokémon Detective Pikachu (104 mins., PG)

The immensely popular Japanese card game comes to life in this tale of a son (Justice Smith) who works with a CGI version of Pikachu (voiced by Ryan Reynolds) to track down his missing father. Lots of fantasy, funnies, and fun ensue. Arlington/Camino Real/Fiesta 5 The Sun Is Also a Star (94 mins., PG-13) Based on the young-adult book of the same name, this romantic drama follows quantum physics student Natasha (Yara Shahidi), who meets and quickly falls for exchange student Daniel (Charles Melton). Their love is tested when Natasha’s family faces deportation. Fiesta 5 Trial by Fire (127 mins., R) Laura Dern, Jack O’Connell, and Emily Meade star in this biopic about Cameron Todd Willingham (O’Connell), who was executed for killing his three children despite expert testimony and scientific evidence that supported his innocence. Paseo Nuevo

MAY 24 - 30 “GENTLE HOMESPUN MAGIC” – VARIETY

The White Crow (127 mins., R) Ralph Fiennes helms this biopic about legendary dancer Rudolf Nureyev, based on Julie Kavanagh’s book about the Kirov ballet dancer and his roommate Yuri Soloviev. The Hitchcock

Camino Real/Metro 4

DIRECTED BY RON MANN FEATURING RICK KELLY AND PROMINENT MUSICIANS AND ARTISTS

Fri: 7:30pm / Sat: 2:30pm, 7:30pm Sun: 12:00pm, 5:00pm / Mon: 2:30pm, 7:30pm

Long Shot (125 mins., R) This rom-com stars Seth Rogen as a free-spirited journalist who unexpectedly hits it off with his former babysitter and first crush (Charlize Theron), now one of the most influential women in the world. When she decides to make a run for the presidency, she hires him on a whim to be her speechwriter — much to her advisers’ dismay. Paseo Nuevo

STARRING JULIETTE BINOCHE DIRECTED BY OLIVIER ASSAYAS

Rocketman The above films are playing in Santa Barbara FRIDAY, May 24, through THURSDAY, May 30. Our critics’ reviews are followed by initials: MPG (Max Pasion-Gonzales) and JW (Josef Woodard). The symbol • indicates the film is recommended. The symbol ** indicates a new review.

Fri: 5:00pm Sat, Mon: 12:00pm, 5:00pm Sun: 2:30pm, 7:30pm Tues – Thurs: 5:00pm, 7:30pm

FOR TICKETS, VISIT WWW.SBIFF.ORG AND THE THEATRE BOX OFFICE #SBIFF INDEPENDENT.COM

MAY 23, 2019

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G et

wit y t f t ra e C rd 3

Photo courtesy of Blake Bronstad

In the spirit of further elevating Santa Barbara’s cocktail culture, Visit Santa Barbara and the Santa Barbara Independent have teamed up once again, to designate an official signature Santa Barbara mixed drink that celebrates the distinctive attributes of The American Riviera®. “The Official Drink of Santa Barbara” cocktail competition calls upon local restaurants, bars and lounges to craft their libation interpretation of Santa Barbara’s one-of-a-kind sense of place.

VOTING OPEN NOW THROUGH JUNE 5 Independent.com/ official-drink-of-santa-barbara

2018 Official Drink of Santa Barbara “Biltmore Fuerte”

by Four Seasons Resort The Biltmore santa Barbara

52

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MAY 23, 2019

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SPORTS

MEET THE MISSION CITY

BRAWLIN’ BETTIES PAUL WELLMAN

Now in Its 10th Year, Our Roller Derby Squad Takes On Beach Cities Team This Weekend

W

hen Rachael Warand Bryce Morison, a pair rington told her parof hometown players. They picked up another ents in southwest England about her first this week when Bishop Diego pitcher Gabe foray into team sports, it took a Arteaga, who compiled moment to sink in. “My mum said it sounded fun that I’d be a 0.91 ERA, signed with roller-skating,” she said. “I used Westmont. to skate around our cul-de-sac at Meanwhile, UCSB’s home. But my dad knew about Cole Mueller came through with a two-out, roller derby. He said, ‘That’s a bit two-RBI single in the of a tough sport.’ My mum said, ninth inning to erase a ‘Oh, dear, you’d better be safe.’ ” Warrington, a postdoctoral 3-1 deficit at Hawai‘i, and researcher at UCSB’s Neuroscithe Gauchos went on to ence Research Institute, joined win in 11 innings. A loss the Mission City Brawlin’ Betties would have dealt a blow a year ago. “I went to recruitment to their hopes for a high night, and everybody seemed so seeding in the NCAA enthusiastic, open, and friendly,” tournament. It may she said. “You start out as a Nughave been their most get [a developmental program], significant win, because learn to be safe on your feet, how it was just the kind of to stop, and other things before high-pressure game they will likely face in the you do any contact.” GOODHEARTED BRAWLING: The Mission City Brawlin’ Betties take a break from practicing at Earl Warren Showgrounds, where they’ve honed their postseason. She took to the sport so well skating skills for a decade now. that, when the Betties stage their Hawai‘i’s fans turned first home bout of the year Satout in droves at Les urday, May 25, she will be in their starting lineup as a blocker. bold.” Roller derby newcomers have to learn “to be comfort- Murakami Stadium for the three-game series: a total attenOne of the first requirements was that Warrington come up able being uncomfortable,” Semper Fatale said. “You’re going dance of 10,658, including 4,296 on Saturday night when the with a roller derby name, along the lines of Bettie teammates to fall. Get used to it.” Gauchos blasted the Rainbow Warriors, 11-1. UCSB’s support Semper Fatale, Bobbie Bash-eh, Cinco de Mayhem, Crissy Bang “It’s awesome to have roller derby in Santa Barbara,” said at Caesar Uyesaka Stadium is sparse by comparison, topping Bang, Leada Riot, and Lady Vulvamort. Betties coach Lady Faga (York Shingle-Killebrew). “They’re a out at 773 for a March 23 game against Missouri State. If there She decided on something sweetly dedicated group of incredibly strong women keeping it alive.” ever was a reason to get out to the ballpark, it’s this week when different: Jammie Dodger. “It’s a Saturday’s bout at Girls Inc. (4923 Hollister Ave.) will begin the Gauchos wrap up the regular season against Cal Poly. cookie in England,” she said. “There’s at 5 p.m. Doors open for presale attendees at 4 p.m. and for Gaucho catcher Eric Yang has posted a team-leading batjam in it, and in roller derby, there’s general admission at 4:30. For tickets and information, see ting average of .389 with an on-base percentage of .500. The a jammer and a jam. I introduced brawlinbetties.com. junior is one of 14 national finalists for the Buster Posey Award myself to the team with a packet of that goes to the nation’s top collegiate backstop. jammie dodgers.” DRAMA ON THE DIAMOND: Westmont College’s dream of Jammie Dodger and other Betties blockers will be trying reaching the NAIA World Series for the first time stayed alive LEAPIN’ ROYALS: San Marcos high jumpers Jaydn Mata and to fend off the jammer from the opposing Beach Cities Roller when Travis Vander Molen’s home run in the ninth inning sent Beau Allen are off to the CIF State Track & Field ChampionDerby team in the whirlwind of action that constitutes a jam the last week’s winner-take-all game between the Warriors ships after clearing 610 and 68, respectively, at the Southand top-seeded University of Science and Arts of Oklahoma ern Section Masters Meet. SBCC triple jumper Brian Nnoli, a during Saturday’s bout. “The perception of roller derby is that they’re going to lay (USAO) into extra innings. Alas, in the 12th inning, USAO former San Marcos athlete, finished third in the state comyou out, they’re mean and aggressive, all that kind of thing,” — the home team although the game was played at Westmont munity college championships by hitting 14.18 meters (466 ¼) on his last attempt. Mata will be Jammie Dodger said. “People are trying to gain position and — got a three-run walk-off homer to win, 7-4. points [by passing the blockers], but it’s done safely. You’re not It was still a terrific year for Westmont, which won three competing for the Vaqueros next allowed to hit or target your spine or anything above the neck. do-or-die games to reach the final showdown. The Warriors year, while Allen is bound for You’re not supposed to be flying through with your head. You went 37-16 with a lineup that featured seniors Luke Coffey Duke. n can use your hips.” Cinco de Mayhem (Andrea Alvarez), a third-year English student at UCSB, has been competing in roller derby since she was 13. “It’s empowering; it’s fun; it’s action-packed,” she 5/23-5/25: College Baseball: Cal Poly at UCSB It’s been 33 years since UCSB last won a conference basesaid. She is a former cheerleader and would much rather keep ball championship. The magic number is one for the Gauchos to end that drought this week. With a nation-leading people pumped up as a player. “It’s organized chaos. There’s 44-7 record (26-1 at home) and a Big West–leading 18-3 ledger, they hold a three-game lead over Cal Poly (26-27, 15-6) and UC Irvine. They could break a couple of records in Thursday’s opening game: most wins against a Division 1 opponent (currently 44, tied always something going on, compared to sports like baseball, with the 1986 team) and winning streak (currently at 13, matching a streak earlier this season). On paper, UCSB holds every advantage in where there’s too much sitting around.” the Blue-Green rivalry with the Mustangs: batting average (.304-.261), slugging average (.514-.335), runs (345-215), home runs (59-10), The Brawlin’ Betties were founded in 2009. They’ve had ups stolen bases (74-18), and earned-run average (3.37-4.57). Yet Poly managed to stay within striking distance of the Gauchos throughout the and downs over the years. “We’re growing this year,” said Semleague campaign, and this series would have been much tighter if not for a two-game swing Sunday, when the Gauchos rallied to defeat per Fatale (Christina Wilburn), a 10-year veteran. “It’s really nice Hawai‘i in 11 innings, 6-3, and Cal Poly lost to UC Riverside, 6-5. Thu.-Fri.: 3pm; Sat.: 1pm. Caesar Uyesaka Stadium, UCSB. $5-$8. to see.” She noted that Girls Inc., which will provide its gym for Call 893-UCSB (8272) or visit ucsbgauchos.com. Saturday’s bout, has a fitting slogan: “Be strong, smart, and

by JOHN ZANT

JOHN ZANT’S GAME OF THE WEEK

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MAY 23, 2019

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FREE WILL ASTROLOGY by Rob Breszny ARIES

CANCER

(Mar. 21-Apr. 19): In the coming weeks, I suspect you will

(June 21-July 22): “People will choose unhappiness over

have the wisdom to criticize yourself in constructive ways that will at least partially solve a long-standing problem. Hallelujah! I bet you will also understand what to do to eliminate a bad habit by installing a good new habit. Please capitalize on that special knowledge! There’s one further capacity I suspect you’ll have: the saucy ingenuity necessary to alleviate a festering fear. Be audacious!

TAURUS (Apr. 20-May 20): What standards might we use in evalu-

ating levels of sexual satisfaction? One crucial measure is the tenderness and respect that partners have for each other. Others include the ability to play and have fun, the freedom to express oneself uninhibitedly, the creative attention devoted to unpredictable foreplay, and the ability to experience fulfilling orgasms. How do you rate your own levels, Taurus? Wherever you may currently fall on the scale, the coming months will be a time when you can accomplish an upgrade. How? Read authors who specialize in the erotic arts. Talk to your partners with increased boldness and clarity. While meditating, search for clues in the depths.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): If there were a Hall of Fame for writ-

ers, Shakespeare might have been voted in first. His work is regarded as a pinnacle of intellectual brilliance. And yet here’s a fun fact: The Bard quoted well over a thousand passages from the Bible. Can you imagine a modern author being taken seriously by the literati if he or she frequently invoked such a fundamental religious text? I bring this to your attention so as to encourage you to be Shakespeare-like in the coming weeks. That is, be willing to draw equally from both intellectual and spiritual sources; be a deep thinker who communes with sacred truths; synergize the functions of your discerning mind and your devotional heart.

WEEK OF MAY 23

define the nature of your problems; you’ve got to do the framing and defining yourself. One more thing: don’t fantasize about the arrival of the “perfect moment.” The perfect moment is whenever you decree it is.

uncertainty,” writes Cancerian author and entrepreneur Timothy Ferriss. He doesn’t do that himself, but rather is quite eager to harvest the perks of dwelling LIBRA in uncertainty. I presume this aptitude has played a (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): In the coming weeks, I hope you’ll role in his huge success; his books have appeared on regularly give yourself to generous, expansive expebest seller lists and his podcasts have riences. I hope you’ll think big, funny been downloaded more than 300 thoughts and feel spacious, experimenmillion times. In telling you this, HOMEWORK: Make up tal emotions. I hope you’ll get luxuriI’m not encouraging you to embrace a secret identity for yourself. ous glimpses of the promise your future the fertile power of uncertainty 24 What is it? How do you use it? holds, and I hope you’ll visualize yourhours a day and 365 days of every Testify at Freewillastrology.com. self embarking on adventures and projyear. But I am urging you to do ects you’ve been too timid or worried just that for the next three weeks. to consider before now. For best results, There’ll be big payoffs if you do, including rich teachbe eager to utter the word “MORE!” as you meditate ings on the art of happiness. on the French phrase “joie de vivre” and the English phrase “a delight in being alive.” LEO

(July 23-Aug. 22): Many 18th-century pirates were com-

mitted to democracy and equality among their ranks. The camaraderie and fairness and mutual respect that prevailed on pirate ships were markedly different from the oppressive conditions faced by sailors who worked for the navies of sovereign nations. The latter were often pressed into service against their will and had to struggle to collect meager salaries. Tyrannical captains controlled all phases of their lives. I bring this to your attention, Leo, with the hope that it will inspire you to seek out alternative approaches to rigid and hierarchical systems. Gravitate toward generous organizations that offer you ample freedom and rich alliances. The time is right to ally yourself with emancipatory influences.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Don’t wait around for fate to decide

which decisions you should make and what directions you should go. Formulate those decisions yourself, with your willpower fully engaged. Never say, “If it’s meant to be, it will happen.” Rather, resolve to create the outcomes you strongly desire to happen. Do you understand how important this is? You shouldn’t allow anyone else to frame your important questions and

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): According to Popular Mechanics mag-

azine, over three million sunken ships are lying on the bottoms of the world’s oceans. Some of them contain billions of dollars’ worth of precious metals and jewels. Others are crammed with artifacts that would be of great value to historians and archaeologists. And here’s a crazy fact: less than one percent of all those potential treasures have been investigated by divers. I bring this to your attention, Scorpio, because I hope it might inspire you to explore your inner world’s equivalent of lost or unknown riches. The astrological omens suggest that the coming weeks will be an excellent time to go searching for them.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): “Some days you need god’s grace,”

writes poet Scherezade Siobhan. “On other days: the feral tongue of vintage whiskey and a mouth kissed by fire.” I’m guessing, Sagittarius, that these days you might be inclined to prefer the feral tongue of vintage whiskey and a mouth kissed by fire. But according to my astrological analysis, those flashy phenomena would not motivate you to take the corrective and

adaptive measures you actually need. The grace of god—or whatever passes for the grace of god in your world—is the influence that will best help you accomplish what’s necessary. Fortunately, I suspect you know how to call on and make full use of that grace.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Capricorn poet William Stafford artic-

ulated some advice that I think you need to hear right now. Please hold it close to your awareness for the next 21 days. “Saying things you do not have to say weakens your talk,” he wrote. “Hearing things you do not need to hear dulls your hearing.” By practicing those protective measures, Capricorn, you will foster and safeguard your mental health. Now here’s another gift from Stafford: “Things you know before you hear them—those are you, those are why you are in the world.”

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): “Love is an immoderate thing / And

can never be content,” declared poet W.B. Yeats. To provide you with an accurate horoscope, I’ll have to argue with that idea a bit. From what I can determine, love will indeed be immoderate in your vicinity during the coming weeks. On the other hand, it’s likely to bring you a high degree of contentment—as long as you’re willing to play along with its immoderateness. Here’s another fun prediction: I suspect that love’s immoderateness, even as it brings you satisfaction, will also inspire you to ask for more from love and expand your capacity for love. And that could lead to even further immoderate and interesting experiments.

PISCES (Feb. 19-Mar. 20): You will know you are in sweet alignment with cosmic forces if you have an impulse to try a rash adventure, but decide instead to work on fixing a misunderstanding with an ally. You can be sure you’re acting in accordance with your true intuition if you feel an itch to break stuff, but instead channel your fierce energy into improving conditions at your job. You will be in tune with your soul’s code if you start fantasizing about quitting what you’ve been working on so hard, but instead sit down and give yourself a pep talk to reinvigorate your devotion and commitment.

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700.

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Media Grants

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For Santa Barbara County Nonprofit organizations Hutton Parker Foundation and the Santa Barbara Independent are pleased to continue our Media Grant program for local nonprofit agencies. This unique opportunity provides nonprofits the ability to spread their message to the greater Santa Barbara community. Organizations apply online, and one nonprofit group is is chosen each month. The Santa Barbara Independent design team produces a custom four-page insert specific to the individual agency's needs. The insert is published and distributed in all 40,000 copies of the Santa Barbara Independent, with the cost underwritten by Hutton Parker Foundation. Find out more about this opportunity to boost your organization's marketing efforts, promote your good works, and tell your story to a wider audience. Visit HuttonFoundation.org for more information and the Media Grant application.

LET US HANDLE THE TICKETING FOR YOUR NEXT EVENT for more ticketing information email

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MAY 23, 2019

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EMPLOYMENT ADMIN/CLERICAL

PERSONNEL AND FINANCIAL ASSISTANT

MATHEMATICS DEPARTMENT Assists with the full cycle of academic merits, promotions, recruitments, and appointments. Maintains all academic files, tracks eligibility of faculty for merits and advancements, prepares case files for review and analysis by the Academic Personnel Analyst, and advises faculty on standard or routine policies and procedures. Responsible for payroll and employment actions for the department. Maintains Department of Mathematics personnel files. Maintains working knowledge of University payroll policies and procedures. Processes monthly and biweekly payroll transactions, leave reporting and resolves problems with payroll transactions. Acts as liaison between campus central administrative offices including Human Resources, Business and Financial Services, Graduate Division, Office for International Students and Scholars. Demonstrates flexibility in learning, interpreting and adapting to new policies and procedures. Reqs: Requires excellent communication skills, the ability to work accurately and effectively with complex tasks, and demonstrated ability to respond quickly to changing priorities and deadlines. Must possess computer skills including Word, Excel, e‑mail, and database management. Must be able to interact well with faculty, staff, students, and other campus departments. Note: Fingerprint background check required. $22.51‑$23.58/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For primary consideration apply online by 5/29/19, thereafter open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #20190265

EMPLOYMENT SERVICES AIRLINES ARE HIRING ‑ Get FAA approved hands on Aviation training. Financial Aid for qualified students ‑ Career placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 888‑686‑1704

ENGINEERING SENIOR ANTENNA Engineer sought by Sonos, Inc. in Santa Barbara, CA: Dvlp & validate antenna solutions. Req: MS + 1yr. Resume to: Carmen Palacios, Sonos, Inc., 614 Chapala St, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. REF. JOB CODE: QQ0318

FINANCE OVER $10K in Debt? Be debt free in 24 to 48 months. No upfront fees to enroll. A+ BBB rated. Call National Debt Relief 1‑888‑508‑6305. (Cal‑SCAN) UNABLE TO work due to injury or

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HEALTH & FITNESS DENTAL INSURANCE. Call Physicians Mutual Insurance Company for details. NOT just a discount plan, REAL coverage for 350 procedures. 1‑855‑472‑0035 or http://www.dental50plus.com/canews Ad# 6118 (Cal‑SCAN) LOWEST PRICES on Health & Dental Insurance. We have the best rates from top companies! Call Now! 888‑989‑4807. (Cal‑SCAN) SUFFERING FROM an ADDICTION to Alcohol, Opiates, Prescription PainKillers or other DRUGS? There is hope! Call Today to speak with someone who cares. Call NOW 1‑855‑266‑8685 (AAN CAN) VIAGRA USERS: Generic 100 mg blue pills or 20 mg yellow pills. Get 95 + 5 free $99 + S/H. Guaranteed, No prescription necessary. Call: 888‑622‑9995 (AAN CAN)

HOSPITALITY/ RESTAURANT

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PART TIME and FULL TIME positions available! HOSTS, SERVERS, POOL SERVERS, RUNNERS/BUSSERS, FRONT DESK AGENTS, ROOM ATTENDANTS, HOUSE ATTENDANTS, LINE COOKS. DATE: Saturday, June 1st TIME: 10:00AM ‑ 1:00PM Address: 5650 Calle Real, Goleta, CA 93117. At Kimpton, its always personal. We focus on what it means to be human and an individual. Here, you will join a mission to make lives better. We look forward to meeting you!

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E M A I L S A L E S @ I N D E P E N D E N T. C O M

COMMITMENT

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TO OUR COMMUNITIES.

ACADEMIC ADVISOR

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING The College of Engineering central office Academic Advisor has expert knowledge in current university and college degree requirements, and in college policy, procedures and precedents related to undergraduate matters. Contributes to the design, implementation and evaluation of revisions in university or college policy or procedure. Analyzes, acts independently, and makes decisions on matters of significance, including petitions for exceptions to college and university policy, dismissal, continuation, continuation on contract, reinstatement, and readmission. Uses seasoned knowledge to advise students in developing educational plans that will help identify and achieve life and career goals. Supervises students in academic difficulty and develops appropriate action plans. Responsible for various programs and implementation of academic policy as assigned. Evaluates transfer admissions applications and makes recommendations for admission. Reviews articulation agreements and other transfer related matters. Manages all aspects of the Engineering Science program. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree or equivalent combination of education and experience. Demonstrated experience in college‑level student academic advising. Thorough knowledge of department/school policies, procedures, and requirements. Demonstrated interpersonal skills including sensitivity, diplomacy, and flexibility in dealing with students, staff, faculty, and the public. Skills in judgement and decision‑making, problem solving. Ability to manage multiple projects simultaneously, prioritize, and accurately complete highly detailed work. Note: Fingerprint background check required. $49,000‑$65,700/yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For primary consideration apply online 6/4/19, thereafter open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs. ucsb.edu Job #20190275

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DATA VISUALIZATION & DECISION SUPPORT ANALYST

BUDGET & PLANNING OFFICE Duties include the design, implementation and deployment of accurate, visually appealing and informative data displays and dashboards in support of campus decision support using Tableau Desktop or a similar data visualization tool. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree or equivalent combination of education and experience. 3‑5

Because we care for our neighbors.

A career at Cottage Health is an experience in caring for and about the people who call our coastal area of California home. Our not-for-profit health system identifies closely with the communities we serve and has a long tradition of providing area residents with highly personalized, clinically excellent care. Patients aren’t just patients here – they’re neighbors. Be there for them through one of the openings below.

Santa Barbara Cottage Hospital Nursing • Access Case Manager • Birth Center • Clinical Resource Nurse – Surgery (Weekends/Baylor) • Educator, Lactation • Emergency • Eye Center – PT • Hematology/Oncology • Infection Control Practitioner • Manager, Surgery • Med/Surg Float Pool • MICU • Mother Infant • NICU • Nurse Practitioner – Palliative Care • Operating Room • Orthopedics • PACU • Patient Relations/ Accred Coordinator RN • Peds • Peds Outpatient RN • PICU • Psych Nursing • Pulmonary, Renal, Infectious Disease • SICU • Surgical Trauma • Telemetry • Utilization Case Manager – PD

Clinical • • • • • • • •

Advanced Care Planning Emergency Department Tech Medical Assistant – FT Medical Receptionist Patient Care Tech I Surg Tech – Eye Center Surgical Tech II Unit Care Tech

Non-Clinical

Cottage Rehabilitation Hospital

• Advanced Care Facilitator

• Manager, CRH Therapy

• Concierge

• Occupational Therapist – PD

• Cook

• Patient Care Tech – PT

• Diet Tech • Environmental Services Rep

• Physical Therapist – PD

• Environmental Services Supervisor

• Recreational Therapist – PD

• EPIC Clarity Writer Sr.

Cottage Business Services

• IT Business Analyst, Kronos • Lead Concierge

• Director, Patient Access

• Manager, Benefits

• Financial Assistant

• Manager, Clinical Research Coordinator • Nutrition Lead – FT

• Government Reimbursement Analyst • HIM Manager

• Nutrition Supervisor

• HIM Outpatient Data Specialist

• Patient Financial Counselor II • Research Business Analyst

• Manager, Denials and Utilization Review

• Research Coordinator, RN

• Manager, Patient Access

• Research Department Coordinator

• Payroll Analyst Sr.

• Room Service Coordinator

• Payroll Specialist

• Room Service Server

• Retirement Plan Admin Sr.

• Security Officer – FT Nights/Evenings

• Sr. Revenue Integrity Analyst

• Sr. Instructional Designer, Optime (RN)

Pacific Diagnostic Laboratories

• Sr. Quality Analyst • System Support Tech

• Certified Phlebotomist Technician – FT/PT

Allied Health

• CLS II, Core Lab, SBCH, Micro

• Case Manager – PD

(Evening/Night)

• Case Manager – SLO Clinic

• Lab Assistant II – PT, FT, PD

• Lead Case Manager

• Sales Support Representative

• Manager, Therapy Services

• Sr. Sales Representative

• Occupational Therapist – PD • Physical Therapist II – PD

• Please apply to: www.pdllabs.com

• Sonographer – PD • Speech Language Pathologist II

Goleta Valley Cottage Hospital • Physical Therapist – PD

• RENTAL & RELOCATION ASSISTANCE AVAILABLE FOR SELECT FULL-TIME

• RN, First Assist – FT

POSITIONS

• RN, ICU

• CERTIFICATION REIMBURSEMENT

• RN, Med/Surg – FT

We offer an excellent compensation package that includes above-market salaries, premium medical benefits, pension plans, tax savings accounts, rental and mortgage assistance, and relocation packages. What’s holding you back?

Please apply online at jobs.cottagehealth.org. Candidates may also submit a resume to: Cottage Health, Human Resources, P.O. Box 689, Pueblo at Bath Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93102-0689 Please reference “SBI” when applying. EOE

For volunteer opportunities at Cottage Health, visit: www.cottagehealth.org/volunteer INDEPENDENT.COM INDEPENDENT.COM

Excellence, Integrity, Compassion

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INDEPENDENT CLASSIFIEDS

EMPLOYMENT years of experience in the field of Institutional Research or a related profession. Previous experience with SAS, SPSS, STATA or similar statistical analysis software in a business setting. Excellent organizational skills and attention to detail. Strong verbal and written communication skills. Note: Fingerprint background check required. $67,710‑$79,900/ yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu. For primary consideration apply by 5/23/19, thereafter open until filled. Apply online at https://Jobs.ucsb.edu Job #20190250

DIRECTOR OF DEVL, STUDENT AFFAIRS GRANTS & DEVL

OFFICE OF DEVELOPMENT Serves as the Director of Development for Student Affairs and works to optimize philanthropic support for the University. Executes the identification, cultivation, solicitation, closing and stewardship of gifts from individuals, corporations and foundations to secure $2M+ in philanthropic support for 20+ departments within the Division of Student Affairs. Priorities are established in consultation with the Vice‑Chancellor of Student Affairs, and Assistant Vice Chancellor for Enrollment Services, and Associate Vice Chancellor, Development to help sustain, enhance, and expand Student Affairs programs and services. Focuses about eighty percent time on major gift fund‑raising activities. Twenty percent is focused on other activities related to fund raising, mostly major gifts of $100,000+ level, but also including some lower level gift solicitations at $10,000 and up, and administrative duties such as planning, coordinating and executing aspects of the Student Affairs’ development program. With regard to major gift fund raising, the Director is responsible for designing and executing planned strategies for the identification, cultivation, solicitation, closing and stewardship of gifts from individuals, corporations and foundations. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree or equivalent combination of education and experience required. Five to ten years of experience in individual major donor development or related profession. Proven success in the major gift fundraising; experience in higher education preferred. An understanding of the culture of Division/Area departments, and a basic grasp of the social, political, and economic issues that these faculty members study. With training, ability to articulate the programmatic objectives of the Division & Student Affairs with clarity and passion. Highest ethical standards, demonstrated empathy and a positive attitude in the face of difficulty and challenge. Notes: Fingerprint background check required. This is an annually renewable contract position. Flexibility and willingness to travel as needed. Ability to work some weekends and evenings. Salary is competitive and commensurate with qualifications and experience. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For primary consideration apply by 6/2/19, thereafter open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job#20190263

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E M A I L S A L E S @ I N D E P E N D E N T. C O M

WELL BEING

(CONTINUED)

FINANCIAL ANALYST

HUMANITIES ADMINISTRATIVE SUPPORT CENTER Administers all financial activities for the Department of Religious Studies. Processes monthly review and reconciliation of ledgers, provides timely reporting, identifies and initiates corrective actions, and ensures compliance with University, Federal, and State accounting policies and procedures on all transactions. In collaboration with management, establishes best‑practices for procurement, payroll, record retention, and accounts payable functions. Funds administered include a variety of state operating funds, gifts, endowments, fellowships, and grants. Requires considerable initiative, multi‑tasking, communication, attention to detail, and problem solving abilities. Must possess a strong knowledge of UC and departmental policies and procedures as they relate to financial services. Advises faculty on policies and procedures that govern the full‑range of accounting processes, gift and award administration, and academic and staff payroll. Processes gifts and monitors endowment accounts. Responsible for assisting faculty with logistical arrangements and all financial aspects of conferences, colloquiums, seminars, and events. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree or equivalent combination of education and work experience in a higher education setting. Strong analytical skills and the ability to handle multiple tasks under pressure of deadlines, large workload, and frequent interruptions. Excellent communication and interpersonal skills, ability to work independently, and critical attention to detail. Able to exercise good judgment, common sense, and discretion, while providing careful attention to detail. Ability to prioritize multiple tasks with minimal supervision; set boundaries and adhere to them. Creatively problem‑solve. Ability to work effectively and cooperatively as a staff team member, and to work well with faculty members. Note: Fingerprint background check required. $23.47‑$25.30/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For primary consideration apply online by 5/30/19, thereafter open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #20190268

GRADUATE PROGRAM COORDINATOR

POLITICAL SCIENCE Responsible for independently managing the graduate program in Political Science under the general direction of the Faculty Graduate Advisor and the Business Officer. Actively participates in key decisions involving students and the program along with the Faculty Graduate Advisor, Graduate Admissions Committee Chair, Department Chair, and the Graduate Committee. Independently advises students, maintaining a climate of interpersonal support by identifying problems students encounter, finding persons and resources to assist them, and by providing reliable and accurate information about departmental and university policies to help students meet individual goals. Acts as a major information conduit for political science graduate students, faculty, staff, other departments, the administration, graduate alumni, applicants and potential applicants to the program. Coordinates operational procedures of the graduate program to ensure the efficient retrieval and flow of information. Manages the graduate

THE INDEPENDENT

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MAY 23, 2019

admissions process and communicates with the Faculty Graduate Advisor, Graduate Admissions Committee, faculty members, and applicants to ensure that the process works smoothly. Maintains communications with Graduate Division personnel. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree or equivalent combination of education and experience. Strong written and verbal communication skills. Ability to organize, prioritize, and complete work with frequent interruptions. Ability to work with a diverse group of students, faculty, staff, and other campus offices on a variety of tasks. Strong problem solving skills. Ability to be accurate and thorough with careful attention to details. Ability to use various programs (Word, Excel, Google, database programs) to complete required tasks. Note: Fingerprint background check required. $22.56‑$25.94/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For primary consideration apply online 6/3/19, thereafter open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #20190272

HUMAN RESOURCES MANAGER

DESIGN, FACILITIES & SAFETY SERVICES Provides leadership, guidance and analysis in the management of all personnel issues on behalf of the Director of Facilities Management, Director of Campus Design & Construction Services, Director of Environmental Health & Safety and on behalf of the Associate Vice Chancellor. Provides analysis, policy interpretation and guidance in managing staff, development, forecasting staffing needs and establishing a system of accountability to improve work performance when needed. Plans, organizes and directs the daily operations of the human resource, personnel and payroll staff, responsible for approximately 360 career and/or limited FTE, and 50 to 100 student employees. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree in related area and/or equivalent experience/ training. Knowledge of UC and UCSB policies and procedures. Working knowledge of personnel policies and applicable laws and regulations. Capacity to organize, independently prioritize, and handle a variety of responsibilities accurately, consistently and under rigorous and changing deadlines. A high level of discretion, initiative, independence, flexibility and excellent judgment are required. High level of written and verbal skills. Ability to work and communicate with a diverse group of employees. Experience with UCPath, or similar HR system application. Familiarity with all HR related activities such as Compensation, Employment, and Employee and Labor Relations. Working knowledge of the university’s HR information systems. Experience working in a union environment with knowledge of Skilled Trades, Service, Clerical and Technical memoranda and contracts. Experience with electronic timekeeping system, preferably Kronos. Supervisory experience. Note: Fingerprint background check required. Maintain a valid CA driver’s license. $64,500‑ $99,900/ yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For primary consideration apply online by 5/30/19, thereafter open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #20190271

INDEPENDENT.COM INDEPENDENT.COM

PROGRAM COORDINATOR

MULTICULTURAL CENTER Assumes primary responsibility for researching, developing, planning, and implementing programs and events such as lectures, films, discussions, musical performances, spoken word events, film discussions, workshops representing a wide range of perspectives based upon race, class, national origin, sexual orientation, ethnicity and other issues pertaining to marginalized communities. Designs and implements programs to convey the MCC’s philosophy and mission to the university community and surrounding communities in a timely manner and advises and works with student groups affiliated with the MCC in planning and implementing programs and events that create a safe space through creating a platform/community space. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree in Sociology, History, Ethnic Studies, and/or Social Justice or equivalent combination of years of experience. Experience in developing social justice programming that respond to the needs and concerns of students from diverse backgrounds and understands the challenges of marginalized and underrepresented communities. Ability to adapt to a diverse faculty, staff, and student population and meet competing deadlines. Understanding of budget, time and policy constraints. Demonstrated political acumen and social perceptiveness to identify good programming decisions and identify potential issues and resolutions for them. Experience with social media, Adobe Creative Suite, Photoshop, and Word. Notes: Fingerprint background check required. Mandated reporting requirements of Child Abuse. UCSB Campus Security Authority under Clery Act. Frequent evening and weekend work required. $61,180‑$66,500/yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For primary consideration apply online by 5/29/19, thereafter open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #20190247.

WEBMASTER

COLLEGE OF ENGINEERING Develops, and maintains the web presence for the College of Engineering (CoE) and its departments, institutes, centers, programs, and faculty. Primary responsibility for the development and maintenance of the college’s web sites, content management systems, and web applications. Provides web development, planning, search engine optimization, database architecture, analytics, training, and consultation to other college affiliated units on a recharge basis. Implements new tools, user interfaces, and applications on the web in a variety of programming languages. Adheres to laws and policies regarding accessibility, security, and data protection. Coordinates with server provider to ensure software upgrades and maintenance are current. Provides technical support to users as needed. Performs website‑related duties in a Linux environment and configures the web server and databases. Works collaboratively with the ECI team to ensure efficient integration with existing College infrastructure and with UCSB campus IT professional organizations to ensure integration with campus serving architectures. Identifies and improves the online needs for students, faculty, staff, alumni, the media, industry, and other college affiliated audiences. Performs creative layout, graphics creation, and

design tasks, and advises the College on web development decisions. Reqs: Knowledge of Drupal 7 and Drupal 8 and staying current on future versions. Proficient with HTML 5. Experience in CSS. Experience in Adobe Photoshop. Problem solver, quick learner, detail oriented and able to meet the deadlines. Communication skills and very reliable. Understanding of accessibility and SEO best practice. Experience with media and social media integration. Experience with coding in all browsers. Eye for the details (pixelperfect coding). A positive attitude and team player. Desire to create best in class products and stay on top of the latest web technologies. Note: Fingerprint background check required. $23.95‑$29.33/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For primary consideration apply online by 5/31/19, thereafter open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #20190226

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COUNSELING

MASSAGE (LICENSED)

Spiritual Counseling Life is about learning to be ever more skillful as we grow through our experiences. Deepen and ground your story, find new ways to make meaning, and develop your sense of spirituality. Ordained UU minister. www.rev.lora.young.com

DEEP TISSUE QUEEN

FAMILY SERVICES A PLACE FOR MOM has helped over a million families find senior living. Our trusted, local advisors help find solutions to your unique needs at no cost to you. Call 855‑741‑7459

HEALING GROUPS

SMARTRecovery!

Empowering, practical, non‑religious alternative for anyone in recovery. SmartRecovery.org for info. Wed. 6:30pm. Vet’s Hall, 112 West Cabrillo Blvd. 805‑886‑1963

HOLISTIC HEALTH

Herbal Health‑care

Herbal programs for weight‑loss, heart conditions, inflammation & pain, blood sugar conditions, digestion, liver detox. Naturopath, Herbalist, Khabir Southwick, 805‑308‑3480, www.KSouthwick.com

Expert in Deep Tissue, 20 yrs exp. Work w/chronic pain, stress & injuries. 1st time Client $50/hr. Gift Cert available, Outcall. Laurie Proia, LMT 886‑8792 HOLISTIC HEALING MASSAGE with Kiyoko Soaring‑Eagle www.truetoyou.abmp.com 805 698‑5861

MUSIC MUSIC LESSONS

WONDERFUL TEACHER

Enjoy Piano, Voice or Harp Lessons. Exciting new approach to a full musical experience. Read, memorize, compose or improvise any music w/ ease. Vocal audition prep. $52/hr. 1st lesson 50% off!! Christine Holvick, BM, MM, 30 yrs exp sbHarpist.com Call 969‑6698

NOW PLAYING

HARPIST VIRTUOSO

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HOME SERVICES A PLACE FOR MOM has helped over a million families find senior living. Our trusted, local advisors help find solutions to your unique needs at no cost to you. 1‑855‑993‑2495 (AAN CAN) A PLACE FOR MOM. The nation’s largest senior living referral service. Contact our trusted,local experts today! Our service is FREE/no obligation. CALL 1‑855‑467‑6487. (Cal‑SCAN) DIRECTV & AT&T. 155 Channels & 1000s of Shows/Movies On Demand (w/SELECT Package.) AT&T Internet 99 Percent Reliability. Unlimited Texts to 120 Countries w/AT&T Wireless. Call 4 FREE Quote‑ 1‑866‑249‑0619 (Cal‑SCAN) DISH TV $59.99 For 190 Channels $14.95 High Speed Internet. Free Installation, Smart HD DVR Included, Free Voice Remote. Some restrictions apply. 1‑844‑536‑5233. (Cal‑SCAN) DISH TV $59.99 For 190 Channels + $14.95 High Speed Internet. Free Installation, Smart HD DVR

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apply

ELECTRICIAN‑$AVE!

Panel Upgrades.Rewiring Small/ Big Jobs! Lic707833 698‑8357 RECENTLY DIAGNOSED with LUNG CANCER and 60+ years old? Call now! You and your family may be entitled to a SIGNIFICANT CASH AWARD. Call 877‑648‑6308 today. Free Consultation. No Risk. STAY IN your home longer with an American Standard Walk‑In Bathtub. Receive up to $1,500 off, including a free toilet, and a lifetime warranty on the tub and installation! Call us at 1‑855‑534‑6198 WATER DAMAGE to Your Home? Call for a quote for professional cleanup & maintain the value of your home! Set an appt today! Call 855‑401‑7069 (Cal‑SCAN)

MEDICAL SERVICES ATTENTION OXYGEN THERAPY USERS! Inogen One G4 is capable of full 24/7 oxygen delivery. Only 2.8 pounds. FREE information kit. Call 877‑929‑9587 ATTENTION: OXYGEN Users! Gain freedom with a Portable Oxygen Concentrator! No more heavy tanks and refills! Guaranteed Lowest Prices! Call the Oxygen Concentrator Store: 1‑844‑653‑7402 (Cal‑SCAN) DENTAL INSURANCE. Call Physicians Mutual Insurance Company for details. NOT just a discount plan, REAL coverage for 350 procedures.888‑623‑3036 or http://www.dental50plus.com/58 Ad# 6118 FDA‑REGISTERED Hearing Aids. 100% Risk‑Free! 45‑Day Home Trial. Comfort Fit. Crisp Clear Sound. If you decide to keep it, PAY ONLY $299 per aid. FREE Shipping. Call Hearing Help Express 1‑ 844‑234‑5606 (Cal‑SCAN) LIVING WITH KNEE OR BACK PAIN? Medicare recipients that suffer with pain may qualify for a low or

no cost knee or back brace. 844‑308‑4307

Call

MEDICAL‑GRADE HEARING AIDS for LESS THAN $200! FDA‑Registered. Crisp, clear sound, state of‑the‑art features & no audiologist needed. Try it RISK FREE for 45 Days! CALL 1‑877‑736‑1242 (Cal‑SCAN) OXYGEN ‑ Anytime. Anywhere. No tanks to refill. No deliveries. The All‑ New Inogen One G4 is only 2.8 pounds! FAA approved! FREE info kit: 844‑359‑3976. (Cal‑SCAN) SAVE ON YOUR NEXT PRESCRIPTION! World Health Link. Price Match Guarantee! Prescriptions Required. CIPA Certified. Over 1500 medications available. CALL Today For A Free Price Quote. 1‑866‑293‑9702 Call Now! VIAGRA AND CIALIS USERS! 100 Generic Pills SPECIAL $99.00 FREE Shipping! 100% guaranteed. 24/7 CALL NOW! 888‑445‑5928 Hablamos Espanol

PROFESSIONAL SERVICES BATHROOM RENOVATIONS. EASY, ONE DAY updates! We specialize in safe bathing. Grab bars, no slip flooring & seated showers. Call for a free in‑home consultation: 888‑912‑4745 SPECTRUM TRIPLE Play! TV, Internet & Voice for $29.99 ea. 60 MB per second speed No contract or commitment. More Channels. Faster Internet. Unlimited Voice. Call 1‑877‑338‑2315 WESTERN EXTERMINATOR: pest control solutions since 1921. Protect your home from termites, ants, spiders, fleas, roaches and more—365 days a year! Call 1‑844‑817‑4126. Schedule your FREE Pest Inspection. (Cal‑SCAN)

TECHNICAL SERVICES

COMPUTER MEDIC

Virus/Spyware Removal, Install/ Repair, Upgrades, Troubleshoot, Set‑up, Tutor, Networks, Best rates! Matt 682‑0391


INDEPENDENT CLASSIFIEDS

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E M A I L S A L E S @ I N D E P E N D E N T. C O M

REAL ESTATE RETIRED COUPLE $$$$ for business purpose Real Estate loans. Credit unimportant. V.I.P. Trust Deed Company www.viploan.com Call 818 248‑0000 Broker‑principal BRE 01041073. No consumer loans. (Cal‑SCAN)

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE HOMES/DUPLEXES FOR SALE

Charming Cottage

2BR 1BA. New kitchen/BA. House completely re‑done. Lrg yard/mature trees $734,000. 805‑953‑5021

RANCH/ACREAGE FOR SALE 39 ACRE NORTHERN ARIZONA WILDERNESS RANCH $183 MONTH ‑ Outstanding buy on quiet secluded off grid northern Arizona homestead at cool ‑clear 6,000’ elev. Blend of mature evergreen woodlands & grassy meadows with sweeping views of surrounding mountains and valleys from elevated ridgetop cabin sites. Borders 640 acres of uninhabited State Trust woodlands. Free well

water access, rich loam garden soil, ideal climate. No urban noise & dark sky nights amid complete privacy & solitude. Camping and RV ok. Maintained road access. $19,900, $1,990 down with no qualifying seller financing. Free brochure with additional properties, prices & descriptions, photos/terrain maps/ weather data/ nearby town & fishing lake info. 1st United Realty 1‑602‑264‑0000. (CalSCAN) WOODED NEW Mexico high country getaway. 3‑7 acre parcels with underground utilities surrounded by public lands. Low down owner financing from $24,995 total. Hitching Post Land 1‑575‑773‑4200 (CalSCAN)

WANTED: REAL ESTATE FOR SALE KC BUYS HOUSES ‑ FAST ‑ CASH ‑ Any Condition. Family owned & Operated . Same day offer! (951) 777‑2518 WWW. KCBUYSHOUSES.COM (Cal‑SCAN)

RENTAL PROPERTIES APARTMENTS & CONDOS FOR RENT $1320 1BD Corner of Hope & San

Remo‑N State St‑Barbara Apts Quiet NP 687‑0610 1 BED 1 Bath townhomes, $1575‑$1650, off‑st pkg, near UCSB & beach. 805‑968‑2011 Model open ‑ 6707 Abrego Rd #100 1BD NEAR Cottage Hospital. 519 W Alamar. Set among beautiful oak trees across the street from Oak Park. NP. $1320. Call Cristina 687‑0915 1BD NEAR SBCC & beach @ Carla Apts NP. 530 W Cota $1320 Rosa 965‑3200 2BDS $1740+ & 3BD flat or townhouses $2490. Near UCSB, shops, park, beach, theater, golf. Sesame Tree Apts 6930 Whittier Dr. Hector 968‑2549 STUDIOS $1320+ & 1BDs $1440+ in beautiful garden setting! Pool, lndry & off‑street parking at Michelle Apartments. 340 Rutherford St. NP. Call Erin 967‑6614

HOUSES/DUPLEXES FOR RENT

Costa Rica Bungalow for Rent by Owner

WiFi, monkeys, toucan & macaws ‑10 minutes from Manuel Antonio National Park& beach. ‑ Week, month or 6 month rental. $1,000 per month + Util. 1,500 sq. ft. ‑ Responsible renters only. Beautiful pool!!! ‑ Kathryn (805) 452‑6026 KLEMAY1064@aol.com

Tide Guide Day

MISC. FOR RENT

Thu 23

NEED A roommate? Roommates. com will help you find your Perfect Match™ today! (AAN CAN)

Fri 24

ROOMS FOR RENT ROOM FOR RENT private entrance, private bathroom, kitchen privleges. 10 min to UCSB. Ready June 1st, 2019. (805) 845‑8325

WANT TO RENT GREATINGS! 55 year old woman, actor‑comedian looking for a safe quiet place to live. Low‑key lifestyle, frequent traveler, Finnacial stability, and apprieciation of your property. Thank you (805) 636‑0335

High

Low

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12:26 am 4.92 8:14 am −0.21 3:47 pm 3.38 1:13 am 4.48

9:11 am 0.08

Sunrise 5:50 Sunset 8:01

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7:18 pm 3.03

4:58 pm 3.53

8:55 pm 3.11 10:43 pm 2.93

Sat 25

2:16 am 4.06 10:08 am 0.31

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3:36 am 3.73 11:01 am 0.49

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Mon 27

12:02 am 2.53

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Tue 28

12:55 am 2.02

6:10 am 3.49

12:26 pm 0.81

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Wed 29

1:37 am 1.47

7:10 am 3.50

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2:14 am 0.91

8:02 am 3.54

1:33 pm 1.15

8:01 pm 5.23

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6:50 pm 4.25

26 H

crosswordpuzzle

tt By Ma

Jones

“It’s an Honor to Be Nominated” -- yet they never won.

‑ 2 bed/2bath, AC +fans, parking,

MARKETPLACE ANNOUNCEMENTS DENIED SOCIAL Security Disability? Appeal! If you’re 50+, filed for SSD and denied, our attorneys can help get you approved! No money out of pockets! Call 1‑855‑980‑5461

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DID YOU KNOW 7 in 10 Americans or 1158 Million U.S. Adults read content from newspaper media each week? Discover the Power of Newspaper Advertising. For a free brochure call 916‑288‑6011 or email cecelia@cnpa. com (Cal‑SCAN)

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KILL BED BUGS! Buy Harris Sprays, Traps, Kits, Mattress Covers. DETECT, KILL, PREVENT Available: Hardware Stores, The Home Depot, homedepot. com. (Cal‑SCAN)

FINANCIAL BENEFITS for those facing serious illness. You may qualify for a Living Benefit Loan

KILL ROACHES‑GUARANTEED! Buy Harris Roach Tablets, Sprays, Traps, Concentrate. MOST EFFECTIVE! Available: Hardware Stores, The Home Depot, homedepot.com (AAN CAN)

GARAGE & ESTATE SALES

River rock baskets available for sale each $150.00

Delivery available to driveway/curbside for $100.00 fee (Will coordinate delivery with other drop offs) Boulder sizes: 4‑8” 4‑10” Each basket holds 150 boulders +‑ 80ft linear +‑ Stop by our yard for viewing: 415 North Quarantina Street SB CA 93103 anytime between 9‑5:30pm (call or text before so I can make sure I am here 805‑698‑6961 Lorena)

MISC. FOR SALE

Cemetery Gravesite for Sale ‑ $10,950

Prime Mtn & Ocean Views in SB Originally purchased in 1959 Central section block D #31 Casket & Urn allowed in same grave. Call Mike 805‑682‑7534

53 “Back at One” R&B singer with 16 Grammy nominations and no wins 1 “Who’s there?” reply 57 Involving both sides of the body 6 Sitcom set in suburban Houston 58 “Camelot” collaborator 10 Org. overseeing summer and 61 Idyllic setting winter competitions 62 Ride share amount, maybe 13 NASCAR participant 63 Distraught 14 “___ Through the Gift Shop” 64 Cranberry color 15 “It’s ___ sham!” 65 Go along with 16 Maker of the 2600 66 Allots, with “out” 17 Late arrival 19 “1984” actor with 7 Oscar nominations and no wins 21 President between Roosevelt 1 George Gershwin’s brother and Wilson 2 Inked art, for short 23 “Carte” or “mode” preceder 3 1983 Pacino pic 24 “Watchmen” actor Jackie ___ 4 Raise reason Haley 5 “Tim and ___ Awesome Show, 25 Go to hell ___ handbasket Great Job!” 26 Jost cohost 6 Consignment shop transaction 27 Practice figures, for short? 7 Especially 29 Committed response 8 Part of the Woodstock logo 30 Chocolate source 9 Run up ___ (drink at the bar) 32 Most negligible 34 Composer/lyricist of “Godspell” 10 “Allow me ...” with 6 Tony nominations and no 11 Soccer stadium chant 12 “Bette Davis Eyes” singer Kim wins (not counting an honorary 15 “Slumdog Millionaire” locale Tony) 18 Milton Bradley game featuring 40 Lacking enthusiasm facial features 41 Lift with force 20 “Yeah right!” 42 Brandenburg Concertos 21 Muscular contractions monogram 22 Art sch. class 45 Freestyle, perhaps 26 Intelligible 46 “Ballers” network 27 12th of 12 48 “All Songs Considered” network 28 Crowd noise 49 Compensate 31 On point 51 Mediterranean or Baltic, e.g. 32 Timothy Leary’s hallucinogen 52 Othello foe 33 ___ kwon do

Across

Down

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MAY 23, 23, 2019 2019 MAY

35 Org. that’s supposed to be green 36 Little drink 37 Did some diagnostic work, maybe 38 “Modern Family” rating 39 One of many in a googol 42 Talk incessantly 43 Giant step 44 Prepared, as water for pasta 46 “The End of the Innocence” singer Don 47 “The Crow” actress ___ Ling 50 Bread from a tandoor 51 Take to the rink 52 “Fingers crossed” 54 “Desus & ___” (2019 late-night Showtime TV show) 55 Seafood dip ingredient 56 Dour 59 Tiny 60 Romulans, e.g. ©2019 Jonesin’ Crosswords (editor@ jonesincrosswords.com) For answers to this puzzle, call: 1-900-226-2800, 99 cents per minute. Must be 18+. Or to bill to your credit card, call: 1-800-655-6548. Reference puzzle #0928

LAST WEEK’S SOLUTION:

THE INDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT THE

57 57


INDEPENDENT CLASSIFIEDS

LEGALS ADMINISTER OF ESTATE NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: GIORGIO PERISSINOTTO NO: 19PR00195 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of GIRGIO PERISSINOTTO A PETITION FOR PROBATE: has been filed by: GLORIA PERISSINOTTO in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara THE PETITION for probate requests that (name): GLORIA PERISSINOTTO be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The Independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held in this court as follows: on 06/20/2019 AT 9:00 a.m. Dept: 5 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, located at 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Anacapa Division. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special notice form is available

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from the court clerk. Petitioner: Gloria Perissinotto 14936 Grove Street Healdsburg, CA 95448; (617) 584‑9884. Published May 23, 30. Jun 6 2019.

FBN ABANDONMENT STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF USE OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME The following Fictitious Business Name is being abandoned: MOBY DICK RESTAURANT at 220 Stearns Wharf Santa Barbara, CA 93101; The original statement for use of this Fictitious Business Name was filed 2/6/2019 in the County of Santa Barbara. Original file no. 2019‑0000322. The person (s) or entities abandoning use of this name are as follows: Stearns Wharf (same address) West Beach Investors (same address) This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 17, 2019. I hereby certify that this is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy, Published: May 2, 9, 16, 23 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: SANTA BARBARA GREASE SERVICE LLC at 54 Alameda Padre Serra, Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Santa Barbara Grease Service LLC (Same address) conducted by a Limited Liability Company Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on May 13, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Brenda Aguilera. FBN Number: 2019‑0001133. Published: May 16, 23, 30. Jun 6 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: ONE STOP SMOKE SHOP at 701 E North Ave #A, Lompoc, CA 93436; Rami Alsamaan 5280 Colodny Dr. #4, Agoura Hills, CA 91301 conducted by an Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on May 08, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Thomas Brian. FBN Number: 2019‑0001103. Published: May 16, 23, 30. Jun 6 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: SUSHI COWBOY’S at 6 Harbor Way #118 Santa Barbara, CA 93109; Stephen Jubina (Same Address) conducted by an Individual Signed: S. Jubina Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on May 03, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Brenda Aguilera. FBN Number: 2019‑0001071. Published: May 16, 23, 30. Jun 6 2019.

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: THE MATILIJA PLAZA GROUP at 855 Woodland Drive Santa Barbara, CA 93108; Donna L Salomon, Trustee (Same Address) Ernest J Salomon, Trustee (Same Address) conducted by a Trust Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 26, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Thomas Brian. FBN Number: 2019‑0001001. Published: May 16, 23, 30. Jun 6 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SANTA BARBARA BOHO, SANTA BARBARA BOHO ORIGINAL WARES BY TERA at 136 Loury Ero #B Santa Barbara, CA 93018; Terri R Carraher (Same Address) conducted by an Individual Signed: Terri R Carraher Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on May 08, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Brenda Aguilera. FBN Number: 2019‑0001117. Published: May 16, 23, 30. Jun 6 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: WILD WEST FLORALS at 1512 Shoreline Drive Santa Barbara, CA 93109; Sarah Westervelt (same address) conducted by an Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 10, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Sandra E. Rodriguez. FBN Number: 2019‑0000852. Published: May 2, 9, 16, 23 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: THE GOODLAND PET HOSPITAL at 7126 Hollister Avenue Goleta, CA 93117; Goodland Veterinary Services conducted by an Corporation Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 23, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Adela Bustos. FBN Number: 2019‑0000968. Published: May 2, 9, 16, 23 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: MONTECITO MANAGEMENT, SAVANT ESTATES at 3589 Modoc Road Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Tygan Inc. (same address) conducted by an Corporation Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 23, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Adela Bustos. FBN Number: 2019‑0000969. Published: May 2, 9, 16, 23 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: AIZE PROPERTY at 1815 Pampas Ave Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Jesse A Aizenstat (same address) conducted by an Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 22, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Sandra E. Rodriguez. FBN Number: 2019‑0000964. Published: May 2, 9, 16, 23 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: ISABEL JOSIE at 4040 Via Zorro #A Santa Barbara, CA 93110; Isabel Campanelli (same address) conducted by an Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 15, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Christine Potter. FBN Number: 2019‑0000895. Published: May 2, 9, 16, 23 2019.

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: LA BELLE VIE SANTA BARBARA at 315 Meigs Road Suite A154 Santa Barbara, CA 93109; Maeva LLC (same address) conducted by an Limited Liability Company Signed: Karine Rodriguez Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 12, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Brenda Aguilera. FBN Number: 2019‑0000876. Published: May 2, 9, 16, 23 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SB EMBASSADOR HOUSE & TANGOS at 1187 Coast Village Rd Santa Barbara, CA 93108; Peter M Chiarenza 667 A# Del Parque Santa Barbara, CA 93103 conducted by an Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 25, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Connie Tran. FBN Number: 2019‑0000993. Published: May 2, 9, 16, 23 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: MOBY DICK RESTAURANT, THE STEARNS WHARF COMPANY at 220 Stearns Wharf Santa Barbara, CA 93101; El Patio Corporation (same address) West Beach Investors Group Inc. (same address) conducted by an Joint Venture Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 17, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2019‑0000937. Published: May 2, 9, 16, 23 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: HAZEL EYED SWAN at 1423 Harbor View Dr #2 Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Lori B OfStead (same address) conducted by an Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 26, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Tara Jayasinghe. FBN Number: 2019‑0000999. Published: May 2, 9, 16, 23 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: ROMALDO RANCH ROAD ASSOCIATION at 5615 West Camino Cielo Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Jonathan Blum 5617 W. Camino Cielo Santa Barbara, CA 93105; David Gibson 5615 W. Camino Cielo Santa Barbara, CA 93105 conducted by an Unincorporated Association Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 26, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Tara Jayasinghe. FBN Number: 2019‑0001000. Published: May 2, 9, 16, 23 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: MORA DAY CARE at 1040 Cliff Drive Apt 24 Santa Barbara, CA 93109; Nora A Mora (same address) conducted by an Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 16, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Adela Bustos. FBN Number: 2019‑0000915. Published: May 2, 9, 16, 23 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SEIGE LAW at 7 W. Figueroa Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101; H. Frederick Seigengeld 831 San Pascual Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101 conducted by an Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 29, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Margarita Silva. FBN Number: 2019‑0001006. Published: May 2, 9, 16, 23 2019.

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: KETOBRAINZ at 2430 De La Vina Street Santa Barbara, 93105; Kiel Rucker (same address) Mollee Rucker 70 South Linden Ventura, CA 93004 conducted by an General Partnership Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 29, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Adela Bustos. FBN Number: 2019‑0001010. Published: May 2, 9, 16, 23 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: B AND B ENTERPRISES at 1072 Casitas Pass Road, Suite 156 Carpinteria, CA 93013; Serena Paddle Sports, LLC (same address) conducted by an Limited Liability Company Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on May 6, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Christine Potter. FBN Number: 2019‑0001080. Published: May 9, 16, 23, 30 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: CHANNEL ISLAND SURGICAL ASSOCIATES at 2305 De La Vina St Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Christopher Bernal Quijano 1672 South Penrose Gilbert, AZ 85295; Allison Sarah Quijano (same address) conducted by an Married Couple Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 18, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Connie Tran. FBN Number: 2019‑0000942. Published: May 9, 16, 23, 30 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: THURO ACCOUNTING at 6594 Pipeline Place Goleta, CA 93117; NPN Financial Group LLC (same address) conducted by an Limited Liability Company Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 24, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Connie Tran. FBN Number: 2019‑0000984. Published: May 2, 9, 16, 23 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: LANA SMITH HALE THERAPY at 924 Anacapa Street Suite 2‑I Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Lana S Smith Hale 416 Albany Court Goleta, CA 93117 conducted by an Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on May 2, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Sandra E. Rodriguez. FBN Number: 2019‑0001057. Published: May 9, 16, 23, 30 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: WHATS GOOD at 403 Northgate Dr. #B Goleta, CA 93117; Jennifer Hannon (same address) conducted by an Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on May 02, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Margarita Silva. FBN Number: 2019‑0001054. Published: May 9, 16, 23, 30 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: TAQUERIA SANTA BARBARA at 1213 State Street Suite A Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Taqueria Santa Barbara, LLC 435 Mills Way Goleta, CA 93117 conducted by an Limited Liability Company Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 29, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Sandra E. Rodriguez. FBN Number: 2019‑0001016. Published: May 2, 9, 16, 23 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: CENTRAL COAST CARDIOVASCULAR GROUP, INC at 334 South Patterson Ave #208 Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Central Coast Cardiovascular Group, Inc. (same address) conducted by an Corporation Signed: David Orias, President Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 30, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Brenda Aguilera. FBN Number: 2019‑0001023. Published: May 9, 16, 23, 30 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: RIVIERA BREAD at 215 W. Constance Ave Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Vanessa Bolden (same address) conducted by an individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on May 1, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2019‑0001032. Published: May 9, 16, 23, 30 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: GODPLEX, SIMPLE, CUTE, & FASHIONABLE, TWENTY SOMETHING at 4 San Mateo Ave. Goleta, CA 93117; Linda Stephanie Chavez (same address) Starrr William Martin (same address) conducted by an General Partnership Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on May 6, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Margarita Silva. FBN Number: 2019‑0001076. Published: May 9, 16, 23, 30 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: ENCHANTED ASTROLOGY at 455 Poppinga Way Orcutt, CA 93455; Barbara Armstrong (same address) conducted by an Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 18, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Kathy Gonzales. FBN Number: 2019‑0000944. Published: May 9, 16, 23, 30 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: CREATIVE KITCHEN SPACES at 22 W. Calle Laureles Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Steve Ledesma Construction Inc. 89 Kinman Ave Goleta, CA 93117 conducted by an Corporation Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on May 6, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Tara Jayasinghe. FBN Number: 2019‑0001074. Published: May 9, 16, 23, 30 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: MAGNOLIA HOME THEATER at 7090 Market Place Dr. Goleta, CA 93117; BBC Property Co. Which Will Do Business In California As Minnesota BBC Inc. 7601 Penn Avenue South Richfield, MN 55423 conducted by an Limited Partnership Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on May 1, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2019‑0001038. Published: May 9, 16, 23, 30 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: AVALON COMICS AND GAMES at 185 S. Patterson Ave., Ste. E Goleta, CA 93111; Jon Givetz 2541 Modoc Rd. Apt. #31 Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Lisa Van Dillon 45 Dearborn Pl. Apt #40 Goleta, CA 93117 conducted by an General Partnership Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on April 16, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Connie Tran. FBN Number: 2019‑0000910. Published: May 9, 16, 23, 30 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: DEL MONTE LANDSCAPING at 601 Eucalyptus Ave Apt 6 Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Javier Romero (same address) conducted by an Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on May 2, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Thomas Brian. FBN Number: 2019‑0001064. Published: May 9, 16, 23, 30 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: ANGEL’S AUTO REPAIR at 61 Depot Rd D Goleta, CA 93117; Angel Tirado Gomez 617 Sutton Ave B Santa Barbara, CA 93101 conducted by an Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on May 2, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Thomas Brian. FBN Number: 2019‑0001061. Published: May 9, 16, 23, 30 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: ATMA HEALING YOGA at 771 N. San Marcos Road Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Iris Kein (same address) conducted by an Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 23, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murohy. FBN Number: 2019‑0000976. Published: May 9, 16, 23, 30 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SMART ALEC PRESENTS at 598 Sycamore Vista Road Santa Barbara, CA 93108; Alec Beloin (same address) conducted by an Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 25, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Adela Bustos. FBN Number: 2019‑0000996. Published: May 9, 16, 23, 30 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: HEALTHCARE ENVIRONMENTS, HUNTER GROUP at 509 Garden Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101; HGDB, Inc. 3463 State Street St. #421 Santa Barbara, CA 93105 conducted by an Corporation Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 15, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2019‑0000894. Published: May 9, 16, 23, 30 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: ICHIBAN JAPANESE RESTAURANT at 1812 Cliff Drive Ste A Santa Barbara, CA 93109; WRML Ichiban, Inc (same address) conducted by an Corporation Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on May 8, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Brenda Aguilera. FBN Number: 2019‑0001108. Published: May 16, 23, 30. Jun 6 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: SANTA BARBARA CHANNEL HOPPERS at 132 Harbor Way Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Colton Dykes 3377 Harbor Blvd Oxnard, CA 93035 conducted by an Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on May 8, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Thomas Brian. FBN Number: 2019‑0001101. Published: May 16, 23, 30. Jun 6 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: FLUENTESL at 802 E. Canon Perdido St. Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Danny Chun‑Fu Tsai (same address) conducted by an Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 19, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Connie Tran. FBN Number: 2019‑0000960. Published: May 16, 23, 30. Jun 6 2019.


INDEPENDENT CLASSIFIEDS

LEGALS FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: SANTA BARBARA LENDING GROUP, SB MORTGAGE GROUP at 1601 Anacapa St Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Reliance Mortgage Solutions Inc. 7127 Hollister Ave, Suite 25A‑329 Goleta, CA 93117 conducted by an Corporation Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 16, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Sandra E. Rodrihuez. FBN Number: 2019‑0000922. Published: May 16, 23, 30. Jun 6 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: OMAR’S LANDSCAPING at 1320 San Pascual Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Omar Soto Organista (same address) conducted by an Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 19, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2019‑0000959. Published: May 16, 23, 30. Jun 6 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: PARENTING MATTERS CONSULTING at 248 San Nicolas Ave Santa Barbara, CA 93109; Judy Sullivan Osterhage (same address) conducted by an Individual Signed: Judy Osterhage Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on May 7, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Christine Potter. FBN Number: 2019‑0001044. Published: May 16, 23, 30. Jun 6 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: HILLSIDE at 1235 Veronica Springs Rd Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Hillside House (same address) conducted by an Corporation Signed: Angela De Bruyn Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 24, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Thomas Brian. FBN Number: 2019‑0000982. Published: May 16, 23, 30. Jun 6 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: B&E PHOTGRAPHY at 1427 Laguna Street Apt #73 Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Brandon Brown (same address) conducted by an Individual Signed: Brandon Brown Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on May 1, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2019‑0001044. Published: May 16, 23, 30. Jun 6 2019.

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: SLEEP NUMBER at 2710 Gateway Oaks Drive Suite 150N Sacramento, CA 95833; Select Comfort Retail Corporation 1001 Third Avenue South Minneapolis, MN 55404 conducted by an Cororation Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 12, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2019‑0000579. Published: May 16, 23, 30. Jun 6 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: ONE STOP SMOKE SHOP at 701 E. North Ave #A Lompoc, CA 93436; Rami Alsamaan 5280 Colondny Dr #4 Agoura Hills, CA 91301 conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on May 08, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Thomas Brian. FBN Number: 2019‑0001103. Published: May 23, 30. Jun 6, 13 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: CHAPLIN 24/7 at 4575 Hollister Ave Santa Barbara, CA 93110; Calvary Chapel of Santa Barbara, CA 93110 conducted by an Cororation Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on May 07, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Brenda Aguilera. FBN Number: 2019‑0001094. Published: May 16, 23, 30. Jun 6 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: THE TECHE INSTITUTE FOR THE ALLEVIATION OF SUFFERING at 1525 State Street Suite 301 Santa Barbara, CA 93101; The Teche Institute For The Alleviation of Suffering: A Marriage And Family Therapist Corporation (same address) conducted by a Corpration Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on May 02, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Connie Tran. FBN Number: 2019‑0001058. Published: May 23, 30. Jun 6, 13 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: AAA STORAGE, AVENUE 2509, EL TORO STORAGE at 479 Santa Rosa Lane Montecito, CA 93108; El Toro Holdings LLC (same address) conducted by an Limited Liability Company Signed: Oliver Maize, Agent Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on May 2, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Sandra E. Rodriguez. FBN Number: 2019‑0001006. Published: May 16, 23, 30. Jun 6 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: DANCEKIDSFUN at 2209 Vista Del Campo Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Leslie Sokol (same address) conducted by an Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 29, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Thomas Brian. FBN Number: 2019‑0001008. Published: May 16, 23, 30. Jun 6 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: TO‑GO‑AT THE WINDOW at 1210 Mission Drive, Suite 110 Solvang, CA 93463; Golzar Barrera 3326 Pine Street Santa Ynez, CA 93460; Victoria Louise Smith 1678 Eucalyputus Drive Unit B Solvang, CA 93463 conducted by a Copartners Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on May 17, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Christine Potter. FBN Number: 2019‑0001180. Published: May 23, 30. Jun 6, 13 2019.

NAME CHANGE IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF LUCAS PINOLI RICKMAN ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 19CV02201 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: LUCAS PINOLI RICKMAN TO: LUKE PINOLI THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. NOTICE OF HEARING Jun 12, 2019 9:30am, Dept 6, 1100 Anacapa St PO Box 21107 Santa Barbara, CA 93101 Superior Court Of California, County of Santa Barbara A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated Apr 25 2019. by Pauline Maxwell, Judge of the Superior Court. Published. May 9, 16, 23, 30 2019. IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF IRENE ORTIZ ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 19CV02130 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING City Council Meeting 1:30 p.m. June 4, 2019 NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City Council of the City of Goleta will hold a public hearing on Tuesday, June 4, 2019 at 1:30 p.m., at the City of Goleta, City Hall, 130 Cremona Drive, Suite. B, Goleta, CA to: Consider adoption of resolutions modifying the City of Goleta User Fees and Charges Schedules. The User Fees schedules include but are not limited to all City service, permitting and use fees with the exception of Developer Impact Fees. A list of proposed fees is available for public viewing during normal business hours at the City of Goleta Offices, at 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B, Goleta, CA. PUBLIC COMMENT: All interested persons are encouraged to attend the public hearing and to present written and/or oral comments. Written submittals concerning agenda items may be sent to the City Clerk Group e-mail: cityclerkgroup@cityofgoleta.org; or mail: Attn: City Council and City Clerk at 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B Goleta, California 93117. In order to be disseminated to the City Council for consideration during the Council meeting, written information must be submitted to the City Clerk no later than Monday at noon prior to the City Council meeting. Material received after this time may not be reviewed by the City Council prior to the meeting. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION: Please see the posted agenda, available on Thursday, May 30, 2019, on the City’s web site at www.cityofgoleta.org. Note: In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you need special assistance to participate in this hearing, please contact the City Clerk at (805) 9617505. Notification at least 72 hours prior to the hearing is required to enable City staff to make reasonable arrangements. Publish: May 23, 2019 Publish: May 30, 2019

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THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. NOTICE OF HEARING Jul 10, 2019 9:30am, Dept 6, 1100 Anacapa St PO Box 21107 Santa Barbara, CA 93101 Superior Court Of California, County of Santa Barbara A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated May 03 2019. by Pauline Maxwell, Judge of the Superior Court. Published. May 16, 23, 30. Jun 6 2019.

name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: IRENE ORTIZ TO: IRENE PEREZ ROBLES THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. NOTICE OF HEARING Jul 17, 2019 9:30am, Dept 6, 1100 Anacapa St PO Box 21107 Santa Barbara, CA 93101 Superior Court Of California, County of Santa Barbara A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated Apr 25 2019. by Pauline Maxwell, Judge of the Superior Court. Published. May 16, 23, 30. Jun 6 2019.

IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF PATRICK BRENDAN O’NEILL ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 19CV02386 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: PATRICK BRENDAN O’NEILL TO: BRENDAN O’NEILL THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. NOTICE OF HEARING Jul 24, 2019 9:30am, Dept 6, 1100 Anacapa St PO

IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF KARISA ROXANNE GOMEZ ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 19CV01953 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: KARISA ROXANNE GOMEZ TO: ROXANNE KARISA GOMEZ

Box 21107 Santa Barbara, CA 93101 Superior Court Of California, County of Santa Barbara A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated May 16 2019. by Pauline Maxwell, Judge of the Superior Court. Published. May 23, 30. Jun 6, 13 2019. AMENDED IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF NICHOLAS HUYNH ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 19CV01252 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: NICHOLAS HUYNH TO: NICHOLAS BAETGE THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. NOTICE OF HEARING Jul 03, 2019 9:30am, Dept 6, 1100 Anacapa St PO Box 21107 Santa Barbara, CA 93101 Superior Court Of California, County of Santa Barbara A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county,

at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated May 16 2019. by Pauline Maxwell, Judge of the Superior Court. Published. May 23, 30. Jun 6, 13 2019. IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF CRYSTA RUTH METZGER ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 19CV02227 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: CRYSTA RUTH METZGER TO: CRYSTA BLACKWELL METZGER FROM: EMILIA PEARL BLACKWELL TO: PEARL RUTH BLACKWELL THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. NOTICE OF HEARING Jul 10, 2019 9:30am, Dept 6, 1100 Anacapa St PO Box 21107 Santa Barbara, CA 93101 Superior Court Of California, County of Santa Barbara A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated May 16 2019. by Pauline Maxwell, Judge of the Superior Court. Published. May 23, 30. Jun 6, 13 2019.

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING CITY COUNCIL June 4, 2019; 6:00 p.m. Amendments to the Cannabis Land Use Ordinance NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Goleta City Council will conduct a public hearing to consider adopting amendments to the Cannabis Land Use Ordinance (Case No.: 18-135-ORD). The date, time, and location of the public hearing is set forth below. The agenda and staff report for the hearing will be posted on the City website (www.cityofgoleta.org). HEARING DATE AND TIME: PLACE:

Tuesday, June 4, 2019, at 6:00 P.M. City of Goleta, Council Chambers 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B Goleta, California 93117

PROJECT LOCATION: The amended regulations would apply citywide, including the area of the City within the Coastal Zone. PROJECT DESCRIPTION: The City has an adopted Cannabis Land Use Ordinance (Ord. No. 18-03) that allows for and regulates a range of cannabis uses throughout the City. With direction given during a Cannabis Land Use Ordinance Workshop held by the City Council on January 23, 2019, a recommendation hearing before the Planning Commission on March 11, 2019, and a hearing in front of the City Council on April 16, 2019, the City Council will consider several amendments to the Cannabis Land Use Ordinance, including: • Eliminating zoning permit requirements for cannabis businesses in the Cannabis Land Use Ordinance and relying on the recently adopted Cannabis Business License Ordinance (Ord. No. 19-07) to ensure implementation of standards and requirements. • Adopting buffers for storefront retail cannabis uses near sensitive receptors, including residential land uses, schools, and the Goleta Valley Community Center. • Adopting a greater separation requirement between storefront retail cannabis uses. • Allowing non-storefront cannabis retailers in the Regional Commercial (C-R) and Community Commercial (C-C) land use designations. • Reducing the storefront cannabis retail use cap. • Allowing storefront cannabis retailers in General Industrial (I-G) land use designations only in locations where a cannabis dispensary was located prior to June 16, 2009, the date of the City’s former ban on cannabis businesses. • Allowing cannabis distribution in Business Park (I-BP) land use designations but limiting the floor area of each licensed distributor to a maximum of 30,000 square feet per parcel. • Allowing cannabis microbusiness licensing in I-G and Service Industrial (I-S) land use designations without storefront cannabis retailers, except for existing storefronts. • Allowing cannabis microbusiness licensing in General Commercial (C-G) land use designations only where a cannabis business legally existed prior to June 16, 2009. • Deleting standards that have been moved to the recently adopted Cannabis Business License Ordinance. ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW: Pursuant to California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) Guidelines §15061(b)(3) this proposed, amended Ordinance is exempt from CEQA because there is no potential for causing a significant effect on the environment. In addition, pursuant to CEQA Guidelines §15060(c), the proposed amended Ordinance is not subject to CEQA because the activity will not result in a direct or reasonably foreseeable indirect physical change in the environment (see §15060(c)(2)) and because the project does not qualify as a “project” for the purposes of CEQA because the Ordinance does not result in either a direct physical change in the environment, or a reasonably foreseeable indirect physical change in the environment (see §15060(c)(3) and §15378(a)). DOCUMENT AVAILABILITY: The staff report may be obtained at the City of Goleta, 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B, Goleta, CA 93117 and on the City’s web site at www.cityofgoleta.org at least 72 hours ahead of the meeting. PUBLIC COMMENT: All interested persons are encouraged to attend the public hearing and to present written and/or oral comments. Written submittals concerning agenda items may be sent to the City Clerk Group e-mail: cityclerkgroup@cityofgoleta.org; or mail: Attn: City Council and City Clerk at 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B Goleta, California 93117. In order to be disseminated to the City Council for consideration during the Council meeting, written information must be submitted to the City Clerk no later than Monday at noon prior to the City Council meeting. Material received after this time may not be reviewed by the City Council prior to the meeting. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION: Additional information is on file at the Planning and Environmental Review Department, Goleta City Hall, 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B, Goleta, CA 93117. Contact Anne Wells at (805) 9617557 or awells@cityofgoleta.org for more information regarding the project or visit http://www.cityofgoleta.org/ projects-programs/studies-and-other-projects/cannabis-regulations. [Para información en español, por favor llame Sr. Jaime Valdez, (805) 961-7568.] Note: In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you need special assistance to participate in this hearing, please contact the City Clerk’s Office at (805) 961-7505. Notification at least 72 hours prior to the hearing will enable City staff to make reasonable arrangements Note: If you challenge the City’s final action on this project in court, you may be limited to only those issues you or someone else raised at the public hearing described in this notice, or in written correspondence delivered to the City on or before the date of the hearing (Government Code §65009[b][2]). Publish: Santa Barbara Independent, May 23, 2019 INDEPENDENT.COM INDEPENDENT.COM

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Santa Barbara Independent, 5/23/19  

May 23, 2019, Vol. 33, No. 697

Santa Barbara Independent, 5/23/19  

May 23, 2019, Vol. 33, No. 697