Page 1

REMEMBERING RUSS SPENCER FREE

Santa Barbara

p. 28

APR. 11-18, 2019 VOL. 33 � NO.691

UCSB ARTS & LECTURES REDEFINING

CULTURAL

IMPACT p. 23

Also inside

IRON CHEF TRIAL p. 10 POODLE SAYS ‘ARGH!’ ABOUT ERG p. 16 PICO BURGER AT FARMER BOY p. 41 ALAN CUMMING INTERVIEWED p. 45 HIGH SCHOOL MUSICALS AFOOT p. 50 INDEPENDENT.COM

APRIL 11, 2019

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The Gloaming Sun, Apr 14 / 7 PM / UCSB Campbell Hall “A concert to blaze in the memory.” Sydney Morning Herald Deeply familiar and consistently surprising, The Gloaming merges Irish tunes and instrumental explorations, connecting the Irish folk tradition and New York’s contemporary music scene.

Jennifer Koh, violin Shared Madness 2

Fri, Apr 12 / 7 PM St. Anthony’s Chapel

Ballet Preljocaj

La Fresque (The Painting on the Wall)

From France

Tue, Apr 16 / 8 PM / Granada Theatre

“The recital by violinist Jennifer Koh seemed straight out of Brooklyn... But unique to Santa Barbara was the venue’s sense of spiritual remove, magnificently enhanced by a reverberant enveloping acoustic that gave Koh’s violin a lustrous aura.” – Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Featured composers include Philip Glass, David Lang, Bryce Dessner, Andrew Norman and Kaija Saariaho Presented in association with the UCSB Department of Asian American Studies and the UCSB Department of Music

Dance Series Sponsors: Annette & Dr. Richard Caleel, Margo Cohen-Feinberg & Robert Feinberg, Irma & Morrie Jurkowitz, Barbara Stupay Additional Support: Albert and Elaine Borchard Foundation Presented in association with the UCSB Department of Theater and Dance Santa Barbara Premiere

Sitar Virtuoso

Alan Cumming

Anoushka Shankar

Legal Immigrant

Thu, Apr 18 / 8 PM Granada Theatre

Wed, Apr 17 / 8 PM UCSB Campbell Hall

“He’s an icon to behold. He is unapologetically himself, and with a talent like that, he has no need to apologize.” Billboard

“No one embodies the spirit of innovation and experimentation more evidently than Anoushka Shankar.” – Nitin Sawhney, producer and composer

Event Sponsors: Marcy Carsey Audrey & Timothy O. Fisher

Event Sponsors: Luci & Rich Janssen

Corporate Season Sponsor: 2

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Michael Pollan

How to Change Your Mind Tue, Apr 23 / 7:30 PM Granada Theatre “With The Omnivore’s Dilemma, he changed the way we approach our food – and his new book could transform how America thinks of psychedelics.” Rolling Stone Books will be available for purchase and signing courtesy of Chaucer’s Presented in association with the UCSB Writing Program

Gauchos from Argentina

Che Malambo

Fun for the Whole Family!

Wed, May 1 / 7 PM / Granada Theatre

“14 stomping, drumming, roaring men pounded rapid-fire rhythms into the ground with many surfaces of their feet – and with spinning boleadoras.” The New York Times Bringing fiery, fast-paced malambo to the contemporary stage, Che Malambo celebrates the unique South American tradition of the gaucho with an exhilarating percussive dance and music spectacle that offers nonstop thrills for the entire family. Corporate Sponsor:

World Premiere Co-commissioned by UCSB Arts & Lectures 20th Anniversary Tour

Silkroad Ensemble Heroes Take Their Stands

Fri, Apr 26 / 8 PM / Granada Theatre “A roving musical laboratory without walls.” The Boston Globe

Event Sponsor: Lady Leslie Ridley-Tree Presented in association with the UCSB Department of Music Back by Popular Demand

David Sedaris Fri, May 3 / 7:30 PM Granada Theatre

Program

Pauchi Sasaki: Elektra Zhao Lin: June Snow Colin Jacobsen: Arjuna’s Revelation Jason Moran: Moderato 400 Kayhan Kalhor: The Prince of Sorrows

Dorrance Dance Sun, May 5 / 7 PM Granada Theatre

“There are funky grooves and joyous ones and acoustic tapping of terrific complexity and cogency.” The New York Times

“Sedaris’s droll assessment of the mundane and the eccentrics who inhabit the world’s crevices make him one of the greatest humorists writing today.” Chicago Tribune Books will be available for purchase and signing courtesy of Chaucer’s

Event Sponsors: Elizabeth & Andrew Butcher

Dance Series Sponsors: Annette & Dr. Richard Caleel, Margo Cohen-Feinberg & Robert Feinberg, Irma & Morrie Jurkowitz, Barbara Stupay Presented in association with the UCSB Department of Theater and Dance

(805) 893-3535 | www.ArtsAndLectures.UCSB.edu

Media Sponsor:

Granada event tickets can also be purchased at: (805) 899-2222 | www.GranadaSB.org INDEPENDENT.COM

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PARALLEL STORIES

T.C. Boyle: Outside Looking In WEDNESDAY | APRIL 17 | 5:30 PM Bestselling author and Santa Barbara native, T.C. Boyle returns to Parallel Stories to read from his new novel, Outside Looking In, a fictionalized look back at the first scientific and recreational forays into LSD and its mind-altering possibilities. Join SBMA for an utterly engaging and occasionally trippy look at the nature of reality, identity, and consciousness through the idiosyncratic and always entertaining lens of T.C. Boyle. Book signing to follow.

$5 SBMA Members $10 Non-Members $6 Senior Non-Members Purchase tickets at the Museum Visitor Services desk, or online at tickets.sbma.net. Mary Craig Auditorium 1130 State Street www.sbma.net

Images left to right: Outside Looking In cover. T.C. Boyle.

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Editor in Chief Marianne Partridge

Publisher Brandi Rivera

Executive Editor Nick Welsh Senior Editors Michelle Drown, Tyler Hayden, Matt Kettmann Editor at Large Ethan Stewart Photography Editor Paul Wellman News Reporters Blanca Garcia, Keith Hamm Opinions Editor Jean Yamamura Executive Arts Editor Charles Donelan Arts Writer Richie DeMaria Calendar Editor Terry Ortega Calendar Assistant Amber White Sports Editor John Zant Sports Writer Victor Bryant Food Writer George Yatchisin Copy Chief Jackson Friedman Copy Editor Tessa Reeg

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Media Grants

Hutton Parker Foundation and the Santa Barbara Independent are pleased to continue our Media Grant program for local nonprofit agencies. This unique opportunity provides nonprofits the ability to spread their message to the greater Santa Barbara community. Organizations apply online, and one nonprofit group is is chosen each month. The Santa Barbara Independent design team produces a custom four-page insert specific to the individual agency's needs. The insert is published and distributed in all 40,000 copies of the Santa Barbara Independent, with the cost underwritten by Hutton Parker Foundation. Find out more about this opportunity to boost your organization's marketing efforts, promote your good works, and tell your story to a wider audience. Visit HuttonFoundation.org for more information and the Media Grant application.

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For Santa Barbara County Nonprofit organizations

Editorial Interns Daniel Carroll, Bailey Emanuels, Ciara Gilmore, Sofía Mejías-Pascoe, Amarica Rafanelli, Taylor Salmons Multimedia Interns Maya Chiodo, Harvest Keeney Director of Advertising Sarah Sinclair Marketing and Promotions Manager Emily Cosentino Advertising Representatives Camille Cimini Fruin, Suzanne Cloutier, Rachel Gantz, Laszlo Hodosy, Tonea Songer Sales Administrator Graham Brown Accounting Assistant Tobi Feldman Office Manager/Legal Advertising Tanya Spears Guiliacci Distribution Scott Kaufman Columnist Emeritus Barney Brantingham Founding Staff Emeriti Audrey Berman, George Delmerico, Richard Evans Honorary Consigliere Gary J. Hill Indy Kids Bella and Max Brown, Elijah Lee Bryant, Henry and John Poett Campbell, Chloë Bee Ciccati, Izadora and Savina Hamm, Madeline Rose and Mason Carrington Kettmann, Izzy and Maeve McKinley, Miranda Tanguay Ortega, Sawyer Tower Stewart, Phoenix Grace White The Independent is available, free of charge, limited to one copy per reader. Back issues cost $2 and may be purchased at the office. The Independent may be distributed only by authorized circulation staff or authorized distributors. No person may, without the permission of publisher, take more than one copy of each Independent issue. Subscriptions are available, paid in advance, for $120 per year. Send subscription requests with name and address to subscriptions@independent.com. The contents of the Independent are copyrighted 2019 by the Santa Barbara Independent, Inc. No part may be reproduced without permission from the publisher. The publisher assumes no responsibility for unsolicited material. A stamped, self-addressed envelope must accompany all submissions expected to be returned. The Independent is published every Thursday at 12 E. Figueroa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Advertising rates on request: (805) 965-5205. Classified ads: (805) 965-5208. The Independent is available on the internet at independent.com. Press run of the Independent is 40,000 copies. Audited certification of circulation is available on request. The Independent is a legal adjudicated newspaper — court decree no. 157386.

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Voices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  17

In Memoriam . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  21

THE WEEK.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 LIVING.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Living Page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37

FOOD & DRINK .. . . . . . . . . . . 41

COVER STORY

A&E. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45 Arts Life . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45

UCSB Arts & Lectures Redefining Cultural Impact

Books . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47

ON THE COVER: Photos courtesy UCSB Arts & Lectures

Positively State Street . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55

(Charles Donelan)

28 FEATURE Remembering Russ Spencer

NEWS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 OPINIONS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Angry Poodle Barbecue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

Skiing in Japan? Yes, there is skiing in Japan — lots of it actually. Where I was, in Niseko, they get what many believe is the best and most consistent powder conditions in the world. This is the second trip I’ve made to Hokkaido, the northernmost island of Japan. What else did you do? The best things about skiing in Japan that aren’t the powder are the ubiquitous natural hot spring resorts, known as onsen, and the amazing food. Hokkaido has both farms and fisheries, so the best of Japanese cuisine is present in all its freshness and variety. What did you eat? The two weirdest things I ate were whelk, which is a carnivorous saltwater snail, and a dish called shirako, which can come either raw or cooked and consists of the contents of a male cod’s sperm sac. The name “shirako” means “white kids” in English.

Theater . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50 Dance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53

PAUL WELLMAN

23

The Restaurant Guy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42

Dining Out Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43

Name: Charles Donelan Title: Executive Arts Editor

COURTESY

SNOWY SPRING BREAK

volume 33, number 691, Apr. 11-18, 2019 COURTESY UCSB ARTS & LECTURES

CONTENTS

FILM & TV. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Movie Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57

SPORTS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 ODDS & ENDS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Obituaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18

Rob Brezsny’s Free Will Astrology . . . . . . . 63

CLASSIFIEDS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64

ONLINE NOW AT

INDEPENDENT.COM

Side Notes Presents:

Clean Spill

With a nod to its Santa Barbara seaside roots, Clean Spill offers up hook-y surf tunes that evoke sunny days with just a hint of offshore fog. The band performed “Rolling” from its 2018 Nothing’s on My Mind EP for an Independent Side Notes session. Watch the video at independent.com/ clean-spill/.

! e l a S x a T o N y a D 4We Pay the Sales Tax* this Friday thru Monday, April 12 thru 15 Only!

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Presenting the world’s finest classical artists since 1919

MASTERSERIES AT THE LOBERO THEATRE SEASON SPONSORSHIP: ESPERIA FOUNDATION

One of the world’s great violinists

WEDNESDAY, APRIL 17 The Lobero Theatre, 8:00 PM

Augustin Hadelich violin Orion Weiss piano

MONDAY, MAY 6

The Lobero Theatre, 8:00 PM

Mischa Maisky cello Lily Maisky piano

Lauded by The Guardian for his “dazzling precision, fleet brilliance, and tender lyricism”, Latvian-born Israeli cello master Mischa Maisky is considered by many worldwide to be one of the handful of greatest living cellists.

Program of Beethoven, Debussy, Francisco Coll, Ysaÿe, Brahms and John Adams

Program of Marcello, Bach, Mozart, Brahms, Tchaikovsky and Shostakovich

Co-Sponsors: Jocelyne & William Meeker • Stephen J.M. & Anne Morris Concert Partner: Lois Sandra Kroc

Co-Sponsor: Ellen & Craig Parton Concert Partners: Stephen Cloud • Raye Haskell Melville

TICKETS (805) 963-0761 lobero.com

COMMUNITY ARTS MUSIC ASSOCIATION OF SANTA BARBARA, INC 8

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APRIL 11, 2019

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Benjamin Brolet

Named “Instrumentalist of the Year” for 2018 by Musical America, Augustin Hadelich has firmly established himself as one of the world’s great violinists – and one of classical music’s most inspiring performers. His many honors also include a 2016 Grammy® and the inaugural 2015 Warner Music Prize. He returns to CAMA for the 4th consecutive year following his riveting performance of the Britten Violin Concerto with the St. Louis Symphony at The Granada Theatre last season and will once again be playing the “Kiesewetter” Stradivarius violin.

Back by popular demand

Kasskara ©Deutsche Grammophon

Luca Valentina

Instrumentalist of the Year 2018


NEWS of the WEEK

APR. 4-11, 2019

by BLANCA GARCIA , KEITH HAMM, TYLER HAYDEN @TylerHayden1, NICK WELSH, and JEAN YAMAMURA, with INDEPENDENT STAFF

NEWS BRIEFS CITY PAU L WELLM AN

PAU L WELLM AN

Restoration Collaboration

A

habitat-restoration plan for Hammond’s Meadow will be heard by the Montecito Planning Commission on April 18. Decades back, the three-acre county property — known to the Chumash as Shalawa and recognized by the National Register of Historic Places — survived surrounding seaside housing development and now maintains special protections against site disturbance. Working with Chumash and County Parks representatives, Channel Islands Restoration — the same nonprofit heading up the sheep-grazing project at the San Marcos Foothills Preserve — aims to restore native grasses, shrubs, and trees and continue with nontoxic weed abatement. The plan also includes moving the existing ceremony circle to a higher vantage point and maintaining the public trail. —Keith Hamm

The Metropolitan Transit District is holding meetings to discuss changes to several bus routes. Included is Line 3 to Oak Park and Cottage Hospital. Another change is to expand the UCSB Shuttle, Line 28, and to have fewer stops for the express routes 12x and 24x to Goleta and UCSB. Junior high school and high school rides may be affected, as could lines 4, 5, 10, 14, 15x, 17, and 20. For more information and a schedule of public meetings, go to sbmtd.gov.

COUNTY

NATURAL STATE: A plan is underway to restore native grasses and trees to Hammond’s Meadow (pictured) with respect to the land’s Chumash importance, past and present.

LAW & DISORDER PAU L WELLM AN

The Social Justice Backlash Fair Education Nonprofit Files Another Lawsuit

to continue fighting against “alt-left social justice warriors,” whom he characterized as victimizing teachers, students, and parents who wanted to speak up. “They know how to shut people like us up,” he said. Early was adamant that racism is used against white people, which audience members responded to with enthusiasm. Matthew Vadum, regular contributor to the David Horowitz Freedom Center’s FrontPage Magazine and Epoch Times, also presented to the group. Vadum has written numerous times about Just Communities and previously worked for Capital Research Center in Washington, D.C., which conducts opposition research on left-wing nonprofit and activist movements. Vadum suggested the district use the money it pays to Just Communities to “wipe feces off the floor” at Santa Barbara High School, which he described as “dilapidated.” Vadum mocked the term “Latinx” and listed other programs in the district such as AHA! and Ethnic Studies Now that were of concern. He described the programs as “wacky” and “there to corrupt the minds of the young.” Vadum’s presentation included a slideshow of pictures of “angry and not very well-informed” young people and students involved with organizations he listed. He alluded to similarities between a Santa Barbara City College Xicanx poster and the Third Reich. Presenters also spoke about and explored the term “social justice.” They equated social justice to socialism and deemed the topic inappropriate to teach in schools. PAU L WEL LM AN

T

by Blanca Garcia

he nonprofit group Fair Education organized a “Breaking the Social Justice Stranglehold on Public Education” forum on Tuesday at the Reagan Ranch Center. About 100 people, largely white and older than 50, were in attendance. While the overarching theme across several presentations was social justice, the group focused heavily on Just Communities, a Santa Barbara nonprofit under contract with the Santa Barbara Unified School District to provide implicit-bias training to district faculty and staff. Fair Education formed late last year to sue Just Communities and Santa Barbara Unified in federal court, alleging their material was anti-white, anti-male, and anti-Christian. The suit was dismissed in early March for lack of legal standing. On April 8, Fair Education filed a new complaint in Santa Barbara Superior Court, this time naming Fair Education cochairs James Fenkner and Sheridan Rosenberg as plaintiffs—both have children in the district. The two were commended several times throughout the presentations for deciding to be named in the suit. In the complaint, they allege discrimination on the basis of race, ethnicity, religion, and gender, among other things. “These laws were designed to protect minorities. Now they have to be used to protect white Americans because that’s what we’re living in,” said Fair Education attorney Eric Early. He encouraged attendees

BACKLASH : Eric Early is the attorney for Fair Education, now suing the school district. “This is great,” he said at an event Tuesday at the Reagan Ranch Center. “Rooms like this are going to take back the country.”

“Just Communities is a purveyor of social justice,” said Fenkner. He described the Just Communities teachings as “extremely disturbing and extremely divisive.” He labeled the activities at schools as a “social justice orgy.” Vicki Alger, a research fellow at the Independent Institute in Oakland and former adviser for the U.S. Department of Education, flew in from Arizona to present data on Dos Pueblos High School’s achievement gap through the years. Her slides showed fluctuations across time where the achievement gap increased and decreased. While there’s been a slight closing of the achievement gap, the fluctuations suggest improvement is not because of Just Communities involvement, she said. Alger criticized Just Communities’ claim that it could close the achievement gap through a race-based approach. The town hall ended with a Q&A session. At least two parents shared instances in which their children were allegedly harassed for being white, male, or Christian. n

The Board of Supervisors will hold budget workshops on April 15, 17, and 19 in its administrative building downtown, with remote testimony and public comment available at the Joseph Centeno Betteravia Government Administration Building in Santa Maria. The public is encouraged to attend the workshops and provide input on ideas being developed by staff to fund vital services. Final budget decisions will be made in June. The Santa Barbara County Public Health Department has announced the appointment of Dr. Henning Ansorg as the next health officer. Ansorg has served as a physician with County Health since 2016. He received his medical degree from Giessen University in Germany, along with a doctorate from Ludwig Maximilian University in Munich. Upon relocation to the United States, he achieved Foreign Medical Education accreditation and completed an Internal Medicine residency at the University of Arizona in Tucson. He spent 11 years practicing internal and integrative medicine in Sedona. He is board certified by the American Board of Internal Medicine and is a fellow of the American College of Physicians.

EDUCATION For the fifth year in a row, Santa Barbara Unified School District has been recognized for its music education by the National Association of Music Merchants and been designated “Best Communities for Music Education.” “Santa Barbara Unified School District’s strong commitment to music education is evident in the depth of programming available to students from kindergarten through 12th grade,” said Coordinator of Special Programs Kim Hoj. Just two years of music education has been shown to improve cognitive and social skills in children. Dave Bregante is stepping down as boys’ basketball coach at Santa Barbara High after an CONT’D ON PAGE 12 

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APR. 4-11, 2019

Hit-and-Run Trial Underway for Iron Chef

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COURT CASE: Judge James Herman is overseeing the vehicular manslaughter trial — expected to wrap up this week — against Iron Chef Lawrence Forgione (above).

Forgione, who was living in Napa County at the time, was in town supervising an event at a winery. He claimed he was unfamiliar with Santa Barbara and was following his rental car’s GPS directions to a Bank of America when he struck Ramirez. Forgione said he was traveling between 20 and 25 mph and that the traffic light was green. Forgione pulled over after hitting Ramirez, stayed at the scene, and gave a statement to law enforcement. Forgione is not in custody and was released on his own recognizance. The trial is being heard by Judge James Herman and is scheduled to continue on Thursday. Jury deliberations are expected to begin then. —Blanca Garcia and Sofía Mejías-Pascoe

Rep. Carbajal Honors Outstanding Women and the Great Outdoors

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ep. Salud Carbajal presented awards last week to six outstanding women, including Anahí Mendoza, in the 24th Congressional District. The Congressional Women of the Year Award, his office said, celebrates each winner by entering her story into the official Congressional Record. This year’s winners represent Lompoc, Santa Barbara, Morro Bay, Santa Maria, and San Luis Obispo. Each woman has made a OUTING: Congressional Rep. Salud Carbajal (left) meets with unique, positive impact within constituents on a recent hike to announce his proposal to protect her community, Carbajal said: Central Coast wilderness areas. Jill Anderson is a cofounder of Shadow’s Fund, a sanctuary for older dogs, Barbara County Immigrant Legal Defense pigs, and horses; Dr. Tania Israel is a profes- Center, an organization that provides inforsor at UC Santa Barbara who has worked mation and assistance to immigrants at with the area LGBTQ community to develop risk of deportation or family separation; a workshop to improve interactions with law and Sandi Sigurdson is an active commuenforcement; Dr. Leola Dublin MacMillan, nity member in San Luis Obispo, where she a Cal Poly lecturer in Ethnic Studies and advocates for the environment through her Women’s and Gender Studies, has made a work with ECO S.L.O., helps manage the lasting impact on the Morro Bay commu- award-winning S.L.O. Symphony, and serves nity through her leadership and participa- as executive director of Leadership S.L.O. tion in Just Communities Central Coast, In related news on April 6, Cabajal met RACE Matters S.L.O. County, and S.L.O. with constituents on Fremont Ridge Trail to Police Departments Police and Community announce the Central Coast Heritage ProTogether; Yessenia Marroquin has worked tection Act, which would designate 250,000 at Santa Barbara Neighborhood Clinics for acres of wilderness and help establish a 400two decades to improve the quality of patient mile trail through Santa Barbara and San care and better represent the Hispanic com- Luis Obispo counties. munity; Mendoza is the founder of the Santa —Maya Chiodo J U LI A KEA N E

Channel Your

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he Santa Barbara Superior Court trial is underway for Iron Chef Lawrence Forgione, charged for misdemeanor vehicular manslaughter. Around 6:50 p.m. on February 24, 2018, Forgione allegedly struck and killed Gilbert Ramirez in a crosswalk on the 500 block of State Street. Forgione has pleaded not guilty and is being represented by Attorney Meghan Behrens. Sarah Barkley is leading the case for the Office of the District Attorney. Barkley submitted a witness list that included Santa Barbara Police Department officers, the Santa Barbara County Sheriff’s Office deputy coroner, and civilians. According to court documents, officers obtained surveillance footage from a nearby restaurant. “The footage shows the defendant driving north in his vehicle and failing to stop at the red light signaling the mid-block crosswalk,” according to the document. “The footage clearly shows Mr. Ramirez crossing in the crosswalk at the same time the defendant’s vehicle fails to stop for the red light.” The defense’s witness list also included city and county law-enforcement officers, civilians, and a scientist specializing in human behavior with experience in collisions and driver perception and response. Forgione took the stand on Monday.


NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D

Talking Bias with

Q&A

Jennifer Eberhardt Stanford Professor Discusses New Book

by Blanca Garcia tanford professor Jennifer Eberhardt, who studied racial disparities in the crimal justice system, recently released her new book, Biased: Uncovering the Hidden Prejudice That Shapes What We See, Think, and Do. Eberhardt spoke at UCSB this Wednesday, April 10, and the Independent interviewed her about her work.

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Can you get rid of bias? If so, how? Our brains

are wired for bias — to categorize things in the world, including people and social groups. We’re also living in a world that has huge racial disparities. So our brain feeds on that so it’s hard to be colorblind in a society that is so divided by color. It’s hard to just will ourselves out of it.

How did you get into your line of work? As a kid, I moved from

an all-black neighborhood to an all-white neighborhood. I realized what a huge difference there was in terms of the resources, the teachers, the expectations. At that school, people expected that you would go to college and do great things. That really wasn’t the expectation for most of us in the Cleveland public schools. That led me to ask questions that I never really stopped asking.

How have you seen implicit bias in schools? Jason Okonofua, now

NA NA KOFI NTI

a professor at UC Berkeley, and I were interested in how a student’s race might play a role in how teachers discipline. We presented teachers with a case of a student who had misbehaved in some benign way — like sleeping in class. We hinted at the student’s race by manipu- Jennifer Eberhardt lating the name of the student. So he had a stereotypically black name or What kind of situations can trigger bias? When stereotypically white name. Initially, there wasn’t much of a differ- people are under threat, like when they feel ence if the student was black or white. Then overburdened, fearful, depleted, cognitively we had the teachers imagine that the same depleted — they can go on almost automatic child misbehaved three days later. There, we pilot and fall back on what they know and saw a huge race effect emerge. Black Dar- associations that are out there, both in the nell’s misbehavior was seen as much more world, but now also in their brains. severe than white Greg’s misbehavior. We found that teachers saw white Greg’s misbehavior as an isolated incident. But for black Darnell, that behavior was seen as indicative of a pattern.

Does implicit bias contribute to the achievement gap? Achievement gap research is now

looking at how to change the mind-set of students of color who are negatively stereotyped. The idea behind that is that students come to the classroom where they are feeling less trustful of teachers, maybe, because they know what stereotypes exist about their group, and they’re worried about confirming that stereotype. So they’re under stereotype threat. The studies are focusing on trying to change the mind-set of the students so that they trust the school more or they feel like they belong more, and then that leads to a change in their actual performance.

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Can mandatory trainings make people feel threatened and inadvertently lead to more bias? Yeah. The trainings that tend to be more effective are trainings that don’t just teach about what bias is but also teach people how to manage that bias and give them the tools to manage bias.

Is there a hyper-focus on race and should we move away from it? I think people are wor-

ried about talking about race because they don’t feel equipped to do it and they worry that people are going to get upset. So they fall back on this idea that maybe we should just not speak about it at all and we should just be colorblind. But there are real problems with being colorblind. When you teach students to not see color, they also don’t see discrimin nation. And that’s a problem.

Prof. Sarkis Mazmanian CALTECH

Dr. Jamie Hamilton

Michael J. Fox Foundation

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Isla Vista Holds a Respectful Deltopia 2019

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he weather conspired to bring a significant uptick in numbers at this year’s Deltopia spring-break celebration in Isla Vista, the Sheriff’s Office surmised, noting an estimated attendance of 12,00015,000 people this past sunny weekend compared to last year’s slightly overcast crowd of 10,000. The many visitors and residents alike were friendly, pleasant, and uninterested in causing issues with police or trashing Isla Vista, and house parties and lawn concerts got quieter by 4 p.m., ending promptly by the 6 p.m. noise curfew. The Associated Students–sponsored concert featuring electronica artist Troyboi started up Saturday evening at 7:30 p.m. and was completely sold out. The Sheriff ’s Office attributed the concert to the general peace in the evening. During the weekend, however, 19 people were taken to the hospital. Two had fallen, one off the cliffs, requiring a hospital visit, though neither was seriously injured. The other hospital transports were due to alcohol or drug issues. Spencer Brandt, president of the Community Services District for Isla Vista, noted that

19 medical assists were a good drop from 25 the year before. The district had Community Service Officer Safety Stations in two locations to give inebriated revelers a safe escort to their homes, Brandt said. His hope was to create a Deltopia that would “change the vibe of the event to something more communityoriented, artsy, and wholesome,” more of a festival than a host-free party. Over this past weekend, the usual sittingon-the-curb kids were seen chatting with the police officers; none appeared to be in handcuffs. Altogether, 38 arrests were made and 94 citations issued, the Sheriff ’s Office reported. Fewer fences and barricades went up compared to years past, though law enforcement broke up about 10 large parties. The worst incident resulted in the arrest of an 18-year-old man from Corvallis, Oregon, who was jailed on charges of knocking another young man unconscious. The parties ended with an intense street cleanup, with Isla Vista appearing totally litter- and red-cup-free by the next morning. —Jean Yamamura, with Maya Chiodo and Amarica Rafanelli

eight-year run that included four appearances in the CIF semifinals and the Dons’ first Southern Section championship in 25 years. Bregante, 74, took over in 2011 after the Dons had gone through a 2-22 season and led them to seven winning seasons (they were 7-9 in 2017-18, a year curtailed by the Thomas Fire and Montecito debris flow). They went 32-2 in 2015-16 when they won the CIF 2A title. The veteran coach’s overall record was 172-55.

21 W Anapamu St Santa Barbara

Dimitri Nakassis

Professor of Classics, University of Colorado Boulder

2015 MacArthur Fellow

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PAU L WE LLM A N

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Karpeles Manuscript Library

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KEGGER: This year’s Deltopia brought upward of 15,000 partiers to Isla Vista; authorities have reported it was a fairly peaceful weekend.

LAW & DISORDER Peter Freres, 55, was arrested last week after a concerned citizen called in a domestic violence dispute on the 900 block of East Mason Street. A police canine was used to subdue Freres, and he allegedly attempted to fight the dog, said Anthony Wagner, spokesperson for the Santa Barbara Police Department. Freres was taken to Cottage Hospital by ambulance (pictured) for

bite wounds before being transported to County Jail. He will be charged with domestic violence with injury, assault, and dissuading a witness from reporting felonies. He will most likely face additional charges for fighting the police dog. n


NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D Farren Road Vista - Carrie Givens

AGRICULTURE

Santa Barbara County Deputy CEO Dennis Bozanich

SOUTHERN CALIFORNIA ARTISTS PAINTING FOR THE ENVIRONMENT

7TH ANNUAL

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Counting Cannabis: A Numbers Update

Visions of the Gaviota Coast

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he great cannabis cash cow has not been mooing quite as loudly as government bean counters had anticipated throughout the region, even though Santa Barbara County leads the state in the number of cannabis cultivation permits. Tax revenues collected from cannabis cultivators over the last three months totaled nearly $1.4 million. That’s down from $1.8 million collected in the first three months. County administrator Dennis Bozanich attributed the drop to the statemandated pesticide and herbicide testing requirements, which recently went into effect. Across California, Bozanich said, 14 percent of all tested cannabis samples failed to meet state standards. Cannabis prices have dropped about 10 percent in recent months, as well, due to oversupply. The good news, according to Bozanich, is that the number of county cannabis cul-

— there are about 100 of them — make it to the finish line by securing what are known as “annual licenses,” Santa Barbara County will be home to the biggest legalized cannabis industry in California— California and no other county comes close. Critics of the emerging industry have coalesced into a larger umbrella group funded in part by the wine industry— industry the Coalition for Responsible Cannabis Cultivation — and are stepping up efforts to keep the cannabis genie from expanding further out of the bottle. Last week, the county’s Planning Commission heard a heated earful from critics of the new and burgeoning industry, as well as its champions. Ultimately, the planning commissioners passed something that satisfied neither camp fully, but that would give the commissioners greater discretion and latitude in denying outright— outright or conditioning— conditioning cannabis on land zoned for smaller agricultural parcels that abut suburban development. Meanwhile, the City of Santa Barbara just issued building permits to two of the three dispensary operations that won the City Hall–sponsored dispensary competition last summer. The two were the Farmacy, located at 128 West Mission Street, and Coastal Dispensary, at 1019 Chapala. Of these, the Coastal enterprise has been fraught with complications. City inspectors twice issued stop-work orders on preconstruction within the building, located across the street from the downtown bus depot. City officials issued no fines but deemed those red tags — for work done beyond the scope of permitting — remedied with the issuance of the building permit. The principals involved with Coastal — Malante Hayworth and Julian Michalowski — were the focus of a recent City Council appeal, in which their history of being red-tagged at other properties was brought up. Coastal is also the subject of a lawsuit filed by a rival dispensary owner who contends that Coastal won the highest number of points of any of the competing dispensary applicants by fraudulent means. That litigation remains far from resolved.

Santa Barbara County will be home to the biggest legalized cannabis industry in California—and no other county comes close. tivators filing tax returns — or reporting no taxable income — increased substantially between the first and second quarters. In the first quarter, roughly two-thirds of all licensed cultivators failed to file. For the second quarter, roughly two-thirds complied with tax filing requirements. Should cannabis-related tax receipts continue at the current trend, the county should collect about $6 million by the end of the first year. That’s on the low end of initial estimates, which indicated revenues could range anywhere from $5 million to $25 million. These lower revenues are noteworthy considering how cannabis growers have sought to establish themselves in Santa Barbara County. According to recent numbers, Santa Barbara County growers account for 31 percent of all temporary licenses issued within the state and 61 percent of all provisional licenses. Should these operators

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County Tax Revenue on Low End; City Issues Storefront Permits by Nick Welsh

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Protecting the rural character and environmental integrity of the Gaviota Coast for present and future generations

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Rideshare Company Lyft Goes Public

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PAU L WELLM AN F I LE PHOTO

Drought Relief Prompts Dolphin Discussion

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Media Sponsor:

yft went public in late March, ahead of rideshare competitor Uber. However, Lyft is still unprofitable and will remain so for the immediate future. Some drivers worry that Lyft will resort to pay cuts to help balance losses. Just a week ahead of Lyft’s public launch, Uber cut prices from 80 cents per mile to 60 cents for drivers in Los Angeles County. The pay cut led to a strike by both Uber and Lyft drivers. Lyft launched an initial public offering on March 29 with shares priced at $72. Since then, it’s teetered back and forth, reaching a high of $87 after YOUNGER YEARS: Back in his UCSB days, Lyft founder launching; as of print deadline, it Logan Green (pictured) wanted to make the world cleaner hovered around $67. While Lyft had and more efficient. some of the largest revenues ever for any pre-IPO company, it also has some the world’s best transportation.” Rideshare large losses, reported TechCrunch.com. In companies have put an incredible strain 2018 the company had revenues of $2.2 on taxi companies and have left many billion and $911 million in losses. without work. Rideshare drivers reportedly Lyft cofounder Logan Green attended make less than taxi drivers and rides are UCSB, where he was obsessed with less safe. Also, Uber and Lyft have been making the world “cleaner, greener, and accused of putting more cars on the road more efficient,” reported the Los Angeles rather than helping alleviate congestion. Times. While he resided in Santa Barbara, The Independent was unable to obtain the Green served on the Metropolitan Transit number of drivers specifically in Santa District (MTD) board of directors. The Lyft Barbara, but Lyft reported 1.9 million mission is to “improve people’s lives with drivers overall in 2018. —Blanca Garcia

he drought may not be technically over but with Lake Cachuma nearly 80 percent full, the Santa Barbara City Council was debating whether the time has come to allow water back into the dolphin statue at the base of Stearns Wharf. While councilmembers haggled among themselves over the optics, staff — led by Joshua Haggmark and Kelley Dyer — got a warm round of applause from the councilmembers, City Administrator Paul Casey, and APPLAUDED: City water czars Joshua Haggmark and Kelley everyone else in the council Dyer (pictured) were commended for their guidance through chambers on Tuesday. Both seven years of historic drought. were praised for competence and professionalism under fire, 100,000 acre-feet. Councilmember Kristen having guided the city through seven of Sneddon cautioned that the drought’s not the worst drought years Santa Barbara has over; City Hall simply downgraded its ever experienced. status from level III to level I. Who knows, In that time, the South Coast managed she and others asked, how much it will rain to dodge a very protracted bullet. During this winter? the depth of the drought, Lake Cachuma Councilmember Eric Friedman had been reduced to a glorified mud brought up the dolphin fountain — Was puddle and the desalination plant was it time? he asked. If so, should the water exhumed from mothballs, rebuilt, and be potable or recycled? Too many signs, fired up. Thousands of acre feet of water it turned out, would be required to warn were bought from farmers in Northern people not to drink recycled water. A California and shipped south via the State seawater fountain would require major Water Project. Customers in Santa Barbara engineering intervention. Councilmember cut back water consumption by as much as Jason Dominguez pushed to have the 40 percent. This winter, 32 inches of rain fell matter referred to the water commission. on the Gibraltar Reservoir and 23 inches —Nick Welsh fell downtown. Lake Cachuma rose by


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CHANGE: City Council voted 6-1 in favor of a proposed lumberyard in a waterfront area zoned for ocean-related uses. Lobbyist Mark Massara failed to sway the vote.

Lumberyard Project Appeal Denied

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he outcome wasn’t remotely close — or ever in doubt for that matter — but the dustup was troubling and compelling. The immediate issue before Santa Barbara City Council was whether a conditionaluse permit bestowed upon a new lumberyard and construction supply emporium at 35 North Calle César Chávez was valid. The broader issue is whether there’s enough storage space for Santa Barbara’s fishing industry to remain viable. Despite a last-minute appeal passionately waged by lobbyist and coastal crusader Mark Massara, the council voted 6-1, with Kristen Sneddon voting against, that the permit was legit and the project can go forward. Massara, who grew up in Santa Barbara, argued that the lumber operation violates the ocean-dependent zoning adopted by City Hall in 1986. An exception can be granted only if ocean-related uses — such as a boat storage yard for the commercial fishing industry — have been determined to be infeasible. The Planning Commission voted 7-0 in December to grant that exception. The owners had spent $6 million refurbishing the property. What the fishing industry could afford to spend was much less than the property owner could afford to accept, planning commissioners concluded.

Massara noted that the Coastal Commission had never signed off on the plan and, in fact, had never been notified of it. City planners insisted they mailed notice to the Coastal Commission; if it wasn’t received, that wasn’t their fault. Only Councilmember Meagan Harmon expressed any doubt—the developers knew the ocean-related zoning restriction on the land when they bought it. Still, she voted to allow the project to proceed, citing the unanimous approval by the Planning Commission. While the councilmembers were openly skeptical of Massara, they were more troubled by the testimony about the acute shortage of waterfront industrial real estate affordable to those in the fishing industry. Without such support functions, a $45-million-a-year industry will likely shrivel, thus impacting tourism and jeopardizing continued federal funding for harbor dredging—funding predicated on the existence of a working fishing fleet. Agents for the developer expressed sympathy and concern for such issues — as did all the councilmembers —but insisted it wouldn’t be right to punish the wouldbe lumberyard operators who had done so much to clean up a blighted parcel.

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SB Veterans Memorial Building • May 11, 2019 • 8am - 6pm

—Nick Welsh

Supervisors Split on Union Contracts rade unions won a significant victory this week as the county supervisors voted 3-2 to initiate a new policy requiring that most employees who work on major public works projects be hired through the craft unions. Pushing this policy shift were supervisors Das Williams and Joan Hartmann—both facing reelection campaigns within the year — who argued the arrangement, known alternately as Project Labor Agreements (PLAs) or Community Work Agreements, will help ensure more public works jobs go to local workers as opposed to out-of-town employees. In addition, they argued the PLAs will give the county greater leverage to insist that some of these jobs go to women. By strengthening unions, Supervisor Hartmann argued, the county could help buttress the shrinking middle class. Many contractors opposed the plan,

Science, Healing and Hope

arguing that it will penalize nonunion shops where many local tradespeople happen to work. Supervisor Steve Lavagnino said such a sweeping change should be tested first for unintended consequences; he suggested a pilot project. Supervisor Peter Adam termed the plan a solution in search of a problem. Joe Armendariz, spokesperson for the Santa Barbara Industrial Association, termed it political pay-off by elected officials whose campaigns were bankrolled with union dollars. Armendariz told the unions they should save their money; Williams and Hartmann, he predicted, were going to win whether the unions supported them or not. Many of the details have yet to be worked out. Many basic facts remain unknown, like, for example, how many people employed by county public works projects can be considered “local” and how many from “out of —Nick Welsh town.”

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Opinions

angry poodle barbecue

Saying ‘Argh!’ About ERG LEN WOOD / SANTA MARIA TIMES

IF HORSES COULD FLY: Given Santa Barbara’s long-stand- chucker while letting loose a tsunami of profanity. Wood how fully ERG is — or is not — mitigating its greenhouse-gas ing equine obsession, it’s perversely fitting that two of the refused to comply. The next day, he turned up and loudly emissions, Beal’s hostility to renewable energy at the federal major players looming over the county’s latest knock-down, berated the umpires. For this, Wood was banished for a level should raise red flags. For all practical purposes, ERG is now Andy Beal’s company. drag-out battle over climate change and greenhouses gases full year. are both board-certified horse nuts. I am speaking about the By the time that year expired, Wood had been excomParke, it should be noted, is not out to get ERG. In fact, at fight over the proposal to vastly expand existing oil opera- municated from ERG and his company brought under the the first ERG hearing, Parke all but invited Andy Caldwell of tions in Cat Canyon. thumb of its largest creditor, Beal Bank, from which he COLAB — one of the most pro-oil voices in all of Santa BarThe ERG proposal — one of three massive onshore- had borrowed $375 million. This bank is owned by Andrew bara — to speak. Caldwell said he’d rather stick a needle in his oil-production proposals now hovering on the eye. Then Parke — who knew the Environmental Defense Center was giving about 18 minutes county’s horizon — is being gnawed upon by the county’s Planning Commission, a critical but of testimony — offered Caldwell 15 minutes. This seriously bugged some in the eco-warrior camp: often-overlooked governmental body. If built, Why was Parke going to such lengths? those three projects combined could generate 760,000 metric tons of greenhouse gases a year. For Parke, the commission, and the commuERG alone — when operating all 187 steam-injecnity, a key question is the 250,000 metric tons tion wells — could generate 250,000 metric tons. of greenhouse gases — per year — that ERG will If those numbers seem big, that’s because they are. generate. Anyone wondering about the reality of The county’s threshold is 1,000 per project. climate change and sea-level rise need only look at the recent proposal by the Bacara, the ritziest, The scrutiny the commission is now heaping upon the ERG proposal and its environmental glitziest luxury experience Goleta has to offer, impact report (EIR) is far from typical. What to move its beachfront clubhouse — dressing previously might have been accomplished in just rooms, snacks, the whole nine yards — 183 feet inland from the sea. The party line by ERG and one meeting is now taking at least three. And the county energy planners is that ERG will address outcomes — certification or approval — are by no means certain. That’s in large measure because this problem by buying the requisite number of offsets to mitigate its greenhouse emissions of John Parke, the new chair of the commission. Parke, an athletic mid-sixties litigator who looks down to zero. suspiciously like Monty Python member Michael At the most recent hearing, Parke was not Palin, is hardly the only commissioner whose satisfied. No one has seen the list of offsets, he opinion counts. But as chair, he is asking a whole objected. No one knows if they’re real or imaglot of questions about information not found in ined, conjured by some bankrupt oil company. the EIR. And he’s not satisfied with the answers. Parke then told the old joke about the chemist, Parke, who got appointed to the planning comthe engineer, and the economist who found mission a year ago, rides a 31-year-old Icelandic themselves stranded on a desert island with pony named Remington, a reportedly crotchety cans of food but no can opener. The econobut famous equine who is in the Long-Distance WALK IN PARKE? John Parke, new Planning Commission chair, has lots of questions, fewer answers. mist, Parke laughed, solved the problem, stating, “We’ll just assume the cans are open.” I don’t Horses Hall of Fame, having passed the 10,000know if either the county energy staff or ERG mile mark. More recently, Parke and Remington are patrolling ultra-marathon human races for found it amusing. Both camps contend this level runners who’ve collapsed or are about to. To date, of detail — at least now — is unprecedented. The issue is even more complicated. By they’ve rescued six. “assuming” a priori that the greenhouse gases On the flip side of this equine equation is Scott Y. Wood, formerly of ERG, a Houston-based oil could and would be mitigated, Parke has argued, company. When the company declared banksuch emissions can be categorized as a Class II environmental impact as opposed to a Class I ruptcy in May 2015, Wood, its founder and charimpact in the EIR. This difference in nomenismatic leader, was unceremoniously deep-sixed. A classic oil-patch success story, Wood was a farm clature matters. If such emissions were categoboy who saved his pennies, bought an oil well, and rized as Class I, Parke argued, the county could created his company. In 2000, he bought a few insist the EIR consider alternatives to how the thousand acres around Cat Canyon with contamisteam — that’s then injected thousands of feet nated, antiquated oil wells and reportedly sunk below the earth’s surface — is heated. The power hundreds of millions of dollars trying to bring the needed to boil so much water is what creates most of the greenhouse gases. Burning hydrooperation up to snuff. Under Wood’s leadership, carbons to get the job done is the problem. ERG hatched its current plans to add new wells to Parke and other commissioners questioned suck thick oil tars from the Sisquoc formation by injecting massive quantities of scalding steam into why solar power could not be used. They were the ground. According to one account, Wood got told it was infeasible. The sun doesn’t shine on in debt trying to do the right thing when oil prices Cat Canyon like it does in Kern County, we GOT WOOD? Polo padrone Scott Wood is the former fearless leader for ERG. tanked, causing him and his company to go belly are told, and other places where solar power has, in fact, been used to heat steam-injection up. According to another version — found in the bankruptcy records — Wood lived too lavish a lifestyle, milk- Beal, another oil-patch billionaire from Texas, who to date oil operations. That alternative was not explored in the EIR. ing his investors and creditors like they were dairy cows. has donated $10 million to help get Donald Trump elected. Likewise, Parke wondered why ERG couldn’t plug into the One of the perks he may have abused was his fondness for As reported by the New York Times, Beal likes to play high- electrical grid for juice; there are nearby power lines. After polo ponies. Wood fielded a company polo team and owned stakes poker — for millions of dollars — with the world’s all, 100 percent of all electricity in California is supposed to a few polo fields. This, according to allegations in bankruptcy best. Currently he’s leading a crusade to undermine Cali- be generated by renewables by the year 2040. records, cost the company $5 million. His divorce attorney fornia’s push for alternative energy at the Federal Energy An interesting detail. After the first meeting, someone cost another $2 million. Wood’s personal landscaping bills Regulatory Commission. Beal insists renewable energies gave Parke an old photograph of the train that used to haul allegedly cost the company $800,000. Wood was a regular enjoy unfair competitive advantages in accessing transmis- oil out of Cat Canyon back around 1908. Guess what? It was at the Santa Barbara Polo & Racquet Club, where his team sion lines, so he’s moving heaven and earth in favor of tradi- an electric-powered train. If electricity worked then, maybe kicked serious ass and he threw some legendary parties. tional, if dirty, energy sources. With assets worth $8 billion, it can work now. You don’t know until you ask. According to polo press articles, Wood was suspended for Beal can move a lot of heaven and earth. Icelandic ponies or polo ponies: you decide.      a day in 2014 for striking an opposing player with his  —  Nick Welsh When Parke and the Planning commission evaluate just   16

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CONT’D

voices

PAUL WELLMAN FILE PHOTO

Opinions

Lake Cachuma in 2013

Are We Preparing for the

Climate Crisis? The Need for an Active Community Conversation

T

BY SIGRID WRIGHT AND L I N D S E Y B A K E R

he impacts of climate change have arrived

in our region, and we are not prepared. We know this most recently from our experiences with wildfires and extreme weather events—but what other impacts are heading our way that we are not prepared for? What are we not thinking about? Increased heat, more pronounced drought punctuated by extreme rain (think microbursts and atmospheric rivers), increased danger of wildfire, and sea-level rise are key risks identified for our region in the State of California’s most recent climate assessment. Together these concerns threaten to shape a Santa Barbara very different than the one we know and love. For example, extreme heat has not historically been a significant concern for our region—but this is expected to change. While we may not get as hot, say, as the Central Valley or Inland Empire, we may get hot enough to cause severe problems, especially since our normally temperate communities don’t have the same amount of air-conditioned infrastructure as other regions. During a 2006 heat wave, coastal communities suffered higher rates of heat-related mortality compared to inland communities. Keeping our cool will become a concern for all of us, but heat poses an elevated risk for children, seniors, people of color, and people with preexisting conditions such as high blood pressure and heart disease. At a time when our health-care systems are overloaded and making up for federal cutbacks, are we prepared to see even higher demands—and in new areas? Have we thought about health impacts for our county’s 20,000 farmworkers and other outdoor workers — or for people who are homeless? Have we thought about the mental-health impacts — not just during extreme events but in the day-to-day facing of grinding uncertainties? We need to have a community conversation about climate change and its consequences. This will mean not just responding to individual disasters but look-

ing broadly and regionally at the various risks of climate change so we don’t work at cross purposes. For example, preparing the transportation network might involve getting ready for sea-level rise impacts in one corridor and wildfire evacuation needs in another corridor. Taking a holistic approach also means ensuring that those who are most at risk of climate change are at the center of the decisions about how to respond. Quite often these are members of our community who have been marginalized or have fewer resources to protect themselves. The bottom line is that we need to strengthen our community overall to be more climate-resilient. And we need to do this even as we continue to work with great urgency to reduce greenhouse-gas emissions. Working to prepare for climate change can only strengthen the case for making these reductions. As we start to understand the seriousness of the challenge we are facing, we see how much we must take action now to reduce emissions so we can stave off the most extreme effects. At a forum next week, we will hear about the key impacts from the climate crisis expected for our region. Then we will focus on two of these effects —sea-level rise and health impacts. Join us. The League of Women Voters of Santa Barbara Community Forum The Climate Crisis and Our Community: Sea-Level Rise and Health Impacts, cosponsored by the Community Environmental Council and the Santa Barbara Public Library, will be Wednesday, April 17, noon-2 p.m., in the Faulkner Gallery of the Santa Barbara Public Library (40 E. Anapamu St.). The event is free and accessible, available in Spanish, and filmed by TVSB. For more information, see lwvsantabarbara.org.

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Sigrid Wright is CEO/executive director of the Community Environmental Council. Lindsey Baker is co-president of program and advocacy for the League of Women Voters of Santa Barbara. The Community Environmental Council’s Santa Barbara Earth Day Festival will be April 27-28 in Alameda Park. For more information, see sbearthday.org.

Morton Sacks, MD 1836-A State St (805) 898-2288 INDEPENDENT.COM

APRIL 11, 2019

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17


obituaries

To submit obituaries for publication, please call (805) 965-5205 or email obits@independent.com

Stephen E. McDonough

James C. Bustillos

01/22/81-02/25/19

12/22/73-03/22/19

Bustillos. Services will be held at Carpinteria Community Church on Sat, April 27, 2019 from 11 am- 4 pm. In lieu of flowers, please send donations made to James Bustillos in care of Roxanne Canaday P.O. Box 20262,  Santa Barbara, Ca. 93120

Clarissa Luistro Morris 07/21/51-03/01/19 Stephen McDonough, 38, died peacefully at his home on February 25, 2019. He was born on January 22, 1981 in Vista, California. His family moved to San Juan Capistrano when Stephen was 3, and to Santa Barbara when he was 15. From the very beginning, his joy in life was infectious, it seems that he was always smiling. He had a great laugh and was always ready to see the humor in a situation. Stephen was a gifted athlete. He attended Cate and Laguna Blanca High Schools where he played water polo and lacrosse. He received a BA in Religious Studies from Colorado College and an MA in Business from Georgetown University. Stephen returned to Santa Barbara in 2011 and opened the Coffee Collaborative in Isla Vista. For 8 years the coffee shop was a fixture of life in the Isla Vista community. It was a place where people could always go to express their creativity - visual artists put up their work, musicians played at open mike nights and poets read their latest compositions. It was vibrant and colorful - a place for debates, late-night talks, laughter, chess and community. Stephen derived great satisfaction from supporting the creative voices of people who were just finding those voices. And he too, loved making art, playing music, philosophizing, writing poetry and finding humor in life. He is survived by his parents, Jadzia and Emmett McDonough; his brothers David and John; his sisters-in-law Catherine and Iga; his nephew Malcolm and his nieces Cassie, Margo and Maja. A memorial service will be held on Friday, April 26th at Santa Barbara Cemetery Chapel at 11 a.m. To be followed by a reception at Stella Mare restaurant. In lieu of flowers, please make donations to your favorite charity. 18

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The family and friends of James C. Bustillos, (Jimmy) mourn the loss of a devoted son, brother and devoted friend. Jimmy made his transition to the afterlife on March 22, 2019 as the hushed words " You are deeply loved" echoed through the corridors of Santa Barbara Serenity House. Jimmy possessed a childlike innocence and openness to the world that made those around him love him and want to care for him; this was demonstrated by the constant vigil of family and close friends that surrounded his bedside in the final days of Jimmy's life. Jimmy will be remembered for his signature locks of jet black curls, million -dollar smile and infectious laugh. Jimmy was born to Irma Parra Bustillos and John James Bustillos, SR. During his final days, one of the last conversations with his sister (Roxanne), Jimmy stated, sister, I'm ok. Dad is talking to me and asked if I'd like to go camping again to our favorite spot, Pendola. This was a father - son favorite until his fathers passing in 1991. Although Jimmy's life was marked by early loss he found solace in the two pillars of his life, mother, Irma and sister Roxanne. These two women where especially loved, for their care and nurturing, with blind devotion and fierce loyalty. As the American essayist Washington Irving once remarked....."There is an enduring tenderness in the love of a mother to a son that transcends all other affections of the heart." Irma gave Jimmy life and Roxanne gave him heart. Jimmy graduated Carpinteria High School in 1992. Jimmy was an ardent "Warrior' fan who loved his hometown and school. He loved fishing and was a true blue man, kind and loyal. He put everyone's needs before his very own. He will be forever missed and leave a mark on all those he touched. Jimmy is survived by his mother, Irma Bustillos, sister, Roxanne Canaday and brother John Jr

APRIL 11, 2019

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Our sweet Claire was a world citizen of the highest order. An advocate for humanity, both here and abroad. Veramente, una bella figura. Classy, elegant and truly beautiful from the inside out, her brilliant light illuminated all of those around her. She was one of those people that everyone thought of as their best friend, and they weren't wrong. An expert listener, she was always one hundred percent present and positively brimming with ideas of how to make anything happen. She was passionate about people, making connections around the world with her sunny attitude. Born in Zamboanga City in the southern part of the Philippines on July 21, 1951, she immigrated to California where she immediately enrolled in college, becoming at age 16, the youngest student ever to attend Cypress College (transferring later to Cal State Fullerton). She spent most of her life in Santa Barbara, along with several memorable years in Rome, leaving this world behind on March 1, 2019. A long time contributor to the County of Santa Barbara, she built paths to success for many through programs such as Career Pathways, YouthBuild Collaborative Project and the Workforce Investment Board. She forged community alliances, bringing together SBBC, UCSB, and Chambers of Commerce to support Summer Youth Employment efforts. She loved her work. Fearless and inspiring in equal measure, she moved to Rome

in 2005, in spite of speaking not one word of Italian. Nonetheless, she ended up working as an Operations Officer at the United Nations, a Cambridge English professor and finally an International Marketing Consultant at the Vatican. Her previous experience, as Social Services Division Chief with the County of Barbara, prepared her well for her Italian adventures as she was in charge of no less than eleven (!) public social services programs including Child Welfare and Protection Services, Adult and Senior Services, Disabled and International Refugees Program, Employment and Training Services, Child Adoption Services, Foster Care Licensing and Recruitment, as well as Facilities Management, State Conference Planning and Fiscal Budget Management. She held degrees from Antioch University with a Masters of Arts in Organizational Management and Public Administration along with California State University in Fullerton with a Bachelor of Arts in Languages and Social Sciences. She spoke Italian, French and Spanish in addition to English, but really, she could talk her way into anything, including Pope John Paul's funeral. A passionate explorer, traveler, fire starter and love giver. Wise, wonderful and mischievous. A truth teller and joy maker, blessed with an abundance of contagious laughter. She was gentle and stubborn, creative and caring, showing us all how to live by her fine example. How very lucky we were to have had her in our lives. Survived by her son Brandon, her partner Paul Collins, sister Lilli and brothers Louis and Rick, numerous nieces and nephews and a grand extended family. She was a positive and devoted leader for her family and will be truly missed by all. Preceded in death by her parents Lilia and Farnacio Luistro and beloved husband Wayne Morris. A Celebration of Life will be held at Mission Santa Barbara, at 11 am Saturday April 13 with a reception for close friends and family to follow. Please wear bright happy colors, saving your funeral clothes for another day, per Claire's wishes. In lieu of flowers, donations are being accepted

for a memorial bench near Carpinteria beach, which she loved. "A pessimist sees the difficulty in every opportunity, an optimist sees the opportunity in every difficulty". — Winston Churchill

Ronald Michael Oneto 1951-2019

Ronald M. Oneto passed away on Sunday, February 3, 2019, in Melbourne, Florida, after a long battle with Cancer. With him at his bedside was his wife, Lori, daughters, Michelle Holsten and Tanya Oneto, his sister Suzanne Bingham, and son in law, Nigel Holsten. Ron is also survived buy his mother, Rosanna Rugland, his father, Gaspare "Chuck" Oneto, daughter, Lisa Oneto, grandsons, Isaiah Oneto, Isaac Holsten and granddaughter, Olivia Holsten, Other family members include, brother in law; Peter Klippel, niece Julia Gladstone and nephew, Michael Bingham. Ron was born in Brooklyn New York and as a young boy travelled through out the USA to various Air Force Bases with his family His Dad, was a Field Engineer with the Department of Defense, installing Radar Systems. Ron's interest in the high tech world involved building model airplanes and rockets. He also played drums during his teen years. The family settled in Lompoc California, where he graduated from Cabrillo High School in 1969. He attended Allen Hancock Community College, and went to work for Federal Electric, IT&T and Martin Marietta, at Vandenberg Air Force Base. He also was a partner with his brother in law, Gregg Bingham, in a Home Decorating Business in Santa Barbara. The family moved to Florida where he opened his own business, providing services for home and business computers. Ron is loved by his family and friends and will be missed by all.


obituaries Russell Edwin Spencer

Russell Edwin Spencer passed away suddenly on March 23, 2019 at the age of 58. He had been a beloved member of the Santa Barbara community for many years.  Russ grew up in Fremont, attended Ohlone College and graduated from Cal Poly San Luis Obispo.  He then moved to Santa Barbara to begin his career.  His first job was editor of the Goleta Sun.  He moved on to The Weekly, News and Review, Independent, and finally the Santa Barbara News Press where he wrote a daily art and entertainment column using the byline Edwin Lee.  He did work for the Santa Barbara Art Museum, the Santa Barbara Film Festival and Pacifica College.  He also did many freelance projects either about art or interesting people.  His priority was quality work; he once quit a magazine job for not being allowed to write up to his high standards. He ultimately created his own company, Bison Films, where he wrote and produced films which pulled the viewer right into his vision of a spiritual and artistic world.  His work was both inspirational and uplifting.  He created documentaries that highlighted the amazing people that inhabit our world. He had a large circle of close friends; all of whom cared for him deeply.  He would never cease in giving wonderful support for them, no questions asked.  Everyone remarked at what an amazing person he was.  He was an avid surfer and very dedicated to caring for the environment.  Issues of climate change concerned him greatly.  This also tied into his spirituality, which extended from Christianity to Buddhism to Native American mysticism.  He felt the Spiritual and physical world were interconnected on a very fundamental level. Russ was very young at heart and charismatic, his appearance never betraying his true age.  His soft manner and easy good looks always made him a hit at any social gathering.  This aided him in the interview process for his documentaries. His favorite surf spot was Led-

To submit obituaries for publication, please call (805) 965-5205 or email obits@independent.com

better Beach where he could put his board in the waves and enjoy the power of the sea. He continued to surf until his mid fifties when he decided to slow down a little. Russell will be deeply missed by his mother, Sonya Spencer of Calistoga, his brother Glenn and his many friends and family.  He is predeceased by his father, Edwin and his brother Paul. A Celebration of his life will be held at Hendry's Beach April 14 at 10 am. 

Brian Dunley Flynn 1937-2019

Brian Dunley Flynn, known affectionately by friends as the “Attorney to the Stars,” the “Rooster,” and just plain “Flynn,” made a peaceful and unceremonious departure from this life in the early morning hours of a Monday in late January. Brian was born to Thomas Bernard Flynn, a professional baseball player, and Mercedes Wilkins Flynn (later President of the Republican Women’s Club), in Sacramento California, in April of 1937.   The following year, his family moved to Montecito, where he spent his formative years, attending Montecito Union, Santa Barbara High, Santa Barbara City College, and UCSB, before returning to Sacramento to attend McGeorge School of Law.   From an early age, he was an accomplished athlete, excelling at tennis and baseball.  While playing at SBCC, he was offered a contract with the Dodgers, which he turned down in favor of attending college.   A short time after graduating law school and passing the bar, he joined the law firm of his uncle, Philip C. Wilkins, a federal judge later appointed by Richard Nixon in 1969. Flynn returned to Santa Barbara in the early 80’s, practicing law, and living on the grounds of the storied, blue roofed Miramar Hotel, steps from the tennis club, where he was a member, avid player, and advisor to his youngest son, who played for SBHS in their dominant era.  Eschewing a traditional office, he often met clients at local hangouts like Pascual’s or the Sportsman, and worked from

Miramar Beach, briefcase next to his beach chair, (cocktail on the other side) and was loved for his no nonsense advice, curmudgeonly wit, and non judgmental demeanor. He despised abuse of authority, and spoke up loudly and often against its practice.  His sons will long miss the fatherly loyalty with which he defended them, sometimes legally, always steadfastly, even when undeserved.  He was a Flynn through and through, and would come to the aid of other Flynns when called upon. Brian is survived by his five sons, Kevin, Geoffrey, Colin, Owen, and Thomas, his wife of 26 years, Trudy, his twelve grandchildren, and his six nieces and nephews.  He was preceded in death by his parents, his sister Mercedes, and his older brother Philip.  At his direction, his remains were cremated and his sons are having a “Final Final” gathering for all his “Rum Cakes”, to honor the man they called “Dad”.  It will be held at 1640 Grand Ave, Saturday, the 20th of April, at 1pm

Carlton Bernard Pettersen, Jr. 03/20/30-03/05/19

Beach. In 1970 Carl and his family moved to Santa Barbara CA, where he bought and operated West Beach Marine Company on the breakwater at Santa Barbara Harbor. There he managed boat rentals, brokered yachts, taught boating and sailing, and ran charters to the S.B. Channel Islands. He was involved with S.B. Power Squadron for 20 years. He also helped build and operate the Double Dolphin catamaran. Carl spent 49 years as a loyal member and sponsor in the local AA community.  He worked as an Engineer at Hughes/Raytheon in Goleta from 1987 until he retired in 2000. Carlton passed away peacefully at home with his family by his side on the evening of March 5, 2019, amidst a huge thunder and lightning storm.  He will be loved and missed by all who knew him. Carl leaves behind his wife, Joyce, and three children, Curt, Cappy and Diane, along with six grandchildren: Alex, Trent, Drake, Sloan, Jake and Tony. A celebration of life will be held on Sunday April 28th from 12:004:00 pm at Goleta Beach site D. The family would like to thank all of the wonderful staff from Visiting Nurse & Hospice Care. Any donations in Carl's memory would be appreciated.

Lucy Schrader Archuleta 1950-2019

Carlton (Carl) was born in San Pedro, CA to Capt. Carlton B. Pettersen Sr. and Hazel (Parmenter) Pettersen. He grew up in Palos Verdes CA along with siblings Robert and Hazel (both deceased). Carl attended Malaga Cove Elementary, Redondo Beach Union High School and earned a degree in Engineering at Long Beach State University. As Carl grew up along the California coast he developed a great love and respect for the ocean, surfing, boating, and traveling. He passed that passion on to his children and grandchildren. Directly out of high school, Carl worked as a Merchant Marine on a tanker through the Panama Canal from 1948-50.  He served in the army during the Korean War 1950-53.  Carl married his wife of 65 years Joyce L. Breunig in 1953.  They lived in Palos Verdes while raising their three children. Carl worked at Standard Oil Co. as an Engineer and was owner and manager of an apartment complex in Redondo

Lucy Schrader Archuleta, 68, passed away on Saturday morning, March 30, 2019 at her home in Santa Barbara, CA. When her 19-month battle with cancer came to an end, she was surrounded by her family full of love, a home filled with memories, and a sky as blue as her eyes. Lucy was a southern Californian, 4th generation, born in Los Angeles in 1950 to the late Edward and Aileen Schrader of Whittier, CA. After attending La Habra High School, Lucy enrolled at the University of California, Irvine earning a BS in Marine Biology in 1972. While there is some goodnatured disagreement over how Lucy Schrader and Ralph Archuleta met, their 46 years of marriage, beginning seven days after Lucy INDEPENDENT.COM

graduated, was above reproach. While Ralph finished his PhD at the University of California, San Diego, Lucy worked as the office manager of a firm that provided temporary employment. In 1977 Lucy and Ralph moved up the coast to Mountain View, CA following Ralph's employment opportunity; Lucy found a job in San Jose with Main Hurdman, an accounting firm that would later become part of KPMG. She took accounting courses at night at DeAnza College and then at California State University at Hayward so that she could sit for the CPA exam; she passed on her first attempt. In 1984 they moved down the coast to Santa Barbara when Ralph accepted a position as an associate professor at the University of California, Santa Barbara. Lucy took an accounting position with Ridgeway and Warner, and in 1987 Lucy became a partner in the firm where she would work for the next 32 years until a month before her passing. Lucy was a quiet person who preferred to work out of the lights and downplayed her behind-thescenes philanthropy to those in need of shelter, clothes, education, or mystery novels with a strong female protagonist. Lucy was a strong feminist who wanted to do what she could to ensure that girls and women had every opportunity to set and attain their goals. No one ever had to ask twice if she would volunteer to help children at school. That was particularly true of helping girls achieve more out of their education. There are many local organizations that have benefitted from Lucy’s commitment to education, especially those that assist women. Lucy was self-motivated. She always gave her best effort at everything from being a wife, a mother, a friend, and a businesswoman. She was proud that her legacy would be defined by what had come from her efforts. Her accomplishments speak for themselves. Lucy is survived by her husband, two children, and three grandchildren: Jeremy Archuleta and his wife Kimberly and daughter Samantha of Mars, PA; Christine Banderas, her husband Ben and children Amelia and Miles of Redondo Beach, CA. She has three sisters, Judy Schrader of Palm Desert, CA, Carolyn Schrader (husband William Martin) of Salem, OR and Eleanor Shapton of Moses Lake, WA. Lucy requested that memorial donations be made to Transition House of Santa Barbara.

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Diana M. Kennett

May 8, 1941-March 29, 2019 Diana Margaret Kennett of Goleta, California, peacefully passed away at 77 years of age on March 29, 2019 while surrounded by her loving family. Diana loved life and adventure and was very curious; a life-long learner and educator. She was kind and gentle with a warm and captivating smile. Diana was genuinely interested in and compassionate about others. She loved children, especially her own four wonderful grandchildren. Diana accepted people without criticism and was modest about her own accomplishments. Overall, she went through life with kindness, intelligence, laughter, concern for others, a great sense of humor, and a positive outlook on life, including during her recent illness. Diana was born an only child in Wanganui, North Island, New Zealand on May 8, 1941 to Frank and Olive Dawes. She grew up on a remote dairy farm that catered to the Scottish cheese market. When she was just a toddler, Frank was drafted into the New Zealand Army in 1942 and served three years in North Africa in WWII. Her mother kept busy as a district nurse while caring for her young daughter. Diana’s childhood was filled with exploring the rolling hills and dynamic coastline of Wanganui where she began to develop her life-long love for nature and the outdoors. Life could be lonely on the farm and she developed a strong independence, a love for reading, and taking care of her pet lambs and a pony. Diana learned piano and ultimately was certified through the Royal Academy of Music, London. She retained a life-long love of music enhanced by a sweet singing voice. Her education began in a one room country school house, but she quickly transferred to Friends Quaker boarding school where she developed her strength, fortitude, compassion, and no-nonsense approach to life. Later, at Wanganui Girls College (High School), Diana’s teachers nurtured her love of science and teaching. She excelled in chemistry and geography and attended Victoria University of Wellington from 1959 to 1961 where she received a Bachelor of Science degree in Chemistry. While at Teachers College in Christchurch, South Island, the following year she met her future husband of 55 years, James Kennett, then a PhD student, who was attending a NZ Science Congress and traveling to Antarctica to conduct geological field work. Their budding romance later blossomed while Diana was teaching science at Wairarapa College in Masterton on the North Island, and the couple married in December 1964. Diana’s inherent love of native plants became apparent during hikes in the wild mountain temperate rain forests that are so well known in New Zealand. The couple emigrated to the United States on the SS Ryndam in 1966 for a life of science, education, and adventure. This was the post-sputnik period with generous opportunities for scientific endeavors and advancement. Their American life began at the University of Southern California in Los Angeles with post-doctoral and technical science positions. These were especially exciting times for the couple given the opportunities to explore the iconic native habitats of California found in the deserts, mountains, and coastal locations, and of course the remarkable national parks. They soon started a family with the birth of their son, Douglas James, and later their daughter, Mary Frances. Diana’s nurturing quality grew unabated for the next 50 years in numerous capacities including mother, wife, teacher, docent, friend, and gardener. Diana spent her children’s formative years in Rhode Island from 1970 to 1987 where she strongly supported her husband in his research and teaching career at the Graduate School of Oceanography, University of Rhode Island. She had a long-time interest and success in home gardening, her nurturing qualities again coming to the fore. Her strong interest in the regional vegetation, deciduous forests, and wetlands inspired her to pursue a Master of Science in Botany that she 20

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received from the University of Rhode Island in 1983. Diana conducted research on the chemical environment and biology of microscopic marine plants called diatoms in the Pettaquamscutt estuary. The work resulted in her discovery of a very unusual vertical distribution of diatom assemblages limited to critical chemical interfaces in this unique environment. Ultimately, her research resulted in several published scientific papers and led to her later passion for conservation efforts in this estuary. Diana and James moved to Santa Barbara in 1987 with the University of California Santa Barbara. The remarkable climate of Santa Barbara provided her with unprecedented opportunities to create and foster a beautiful and diverse home garden that continues to flourish today. In 1994, Diana started contributing her time to the Santa Barbara Botanic Garden. She gave tours, trained docents, and developed educational materials, and hands-on a l boratory experiences for children. She relished imparting her knowledge, fascination, and joy for the natural world to others. She was also involved with developing tours and educational materials for a special Santa Barbara Botanic Garden program for schools at Lake Casitas. In 1998, Diana was awarded Volunteer of the Year and in 2015 she received the Anna Dorinda Blaksley Bliss award for lifetime service, the Botanic Garden’s highest honor. In parallel with her service at the Santa Barbara Botanic Garden she worked as a docent at the Arroyo Hondo Preserve where she educated groups on coastal flora and fauna and stream ecology. Diana continued to work at both the Santa Barbara Botanic Garden and Arroyo Hondo until her illness made this too difficult. Diana was involved at Saint Michael’s Church serving on the Bishop’s committee and chairing it during the 1990s. She received an ‘Angel Award’ from Saint Michael’s for her community outreach and church work. She was always willing to give a helping hand to less fortunate people, including the homeless. She also assisted with the Faculty Women’s Club (now the Shoreliners) annual competition for graduate student research scholarships. She was particularly passionate about the role of this program in promoting women in science and engineering. Diana was a great adventurer who wanted to see the world. In the 70s and early 80s, her travel was largely limited to camping and outdoor exploration in the eastern United States. She loved the coastlines of New England and was heavily influenced by the environmentalism of Rachel Carson. Big trips were reserved for visiting family in New Zealand with the exception of a highly memorable sabbatical to Hawaii in the late 1970s where she rejoiced in the tropical flora of Oahu, Maui, and the Big Island. Most memorable were epic hikes into the Haleakala Crater to search out exotic plants, and the challenge and adventure of hiking up the Mauna Loa volcano. When the children were old enough, Jim and Diana’s persistent and life-long adventures around the world began in 1983 with a photographic safari in Tanzania where they saw diverse wildlife in all its glory. Ultimately, Diana and Jim visited six continents and at least 43 countries together and this fueled Diana’s interests in conservation and education and gardens around the world. With her beautiful smile, her compassionate disposition, and her volunteerism, Diana left the world a better place. She will be greatly missed. Diana is survived by her husband, James and her children, Douglas James and Mary Frances, along with their respective spouses, Sarah McClure and Daniel Grabenheinrich. Diana loved exploring and teaching her grandchildren, Tave and Ella Grabenheinrich and Lukas and Kyra Kennett, about the natural world, watching them grow, and nurturing their diverse interests. There will be a celebration of Diana’s life on April 27th at the Santa Barbara Botanic Garden. Please call the Garden Registrar at 805690-1129 for more information. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made in Diana’s name to the Santa Barbara Botanic Garden.


In Memoriam

Ursula Mahlendorf 1929 – 2018

O

Scholar, Mentor, Sculptor, Psychoanalyst

BY T I M C U N N I N G H A M ur friend Ursula Mahlendorf passed away

COURTESY

After the publication of her memoir and retirement from active teaching, Ursula spent a lot of time speakon October 31, 2018. Mentor, scholar, pro- ing at universities and other venues about her experifessor, sculptor, psychoanalyst, author, phi- ence growing up in the Nazi era and her insights on lanthropist, refugee … to say she was many the psychology of political indoctrination, sometimes BE VIBRANT. BE YOU. things to many people is almost a truism. Born on the in dialogue with Holocaust survivors. In 2009, she day of the New York Stock Exchange crash of 1929, her undertook a project with George Wittenstein, a memThe Oak Cottage of Santa Barbara is the only community life spanned immense historical changes, from the ber of the White Rose resistance, to record his recolin town to provide an all-inclusive health and wellness twilight of the Weimar Republic through the advent lections of fighting the Nazis from inside Germany. experience. Designed to connect you with family, friends, of our post-truth era. To those of us who knew her outside the academic and the community, our Vibrant Life program truly inspires, world, Dr. Mahlendorf Ursula was born in a part of Gerchallenges—even dares you to be adventurous… many that is no longer Germany, in was someone we heard Where is the door to God? a barking lower Silesia, which is now part of a lot about — she sharedIn the sound ofWith a dog host of optional outings, you participate based In the ring of a hammer Poland. Her extended family of merthe trials and triumphs your Inupon a drop of rain interests and abilities—whether it is morning In the face ofa sing-a-long at the piano, a trip to local chants and farmers, hurt by Weimar of her professional life. exercise, Everyone hyperinflation in the 1920s, was furHowever, other aspects of attractions, I see or a dance with live entertainment. ther impoverished by the worldwide her personality were more Hafiz present to us. Ursula was economic downturn. Her father died Please join us for our next at various times a friend, when she was 5 years old. When she Dine and Discover luncheon. confidante, housemate, was 10, like all non-Jewish children in her town, she was inducted into the and generous host of Call us! 805-324-4391 Hitler Youth. As the Russians closed events in her beautiful 1820 De La Vina Street in near the end of the war, Ursula, then house on the Riviera (a Santa Babara, CA 93101 15, worked as a nurse at a military hosmiracle survivor of the oakcottagesb.com pital while her brother, one year older, Sycamore Fire). She had a passion for art, traveling to was drafted into the army. When the Carrara, Italy, to learn to war ended, her family were refugees, carve marble and becomending up in a camp near Bremen. Ursula quickly made up for the dising a talented sculptor. She LIC #425802118 I would like to invite you to come to a reception in honor of Ursula, POLYMATH: An acclaimed scholar whose ruption of her education, graduated found symphonic music to share memories and say good-bye together youth was compromised by the Third high school, and was admitted to the unpleasant due to its assoFriday, November 9th. 3p.m. 1505 Portesuello Ave, Santa Barbara Reich, Ursula Mahlendorf found peace University of Tubingen on a refugee ciation with music played through a preschool. scholarship. To support herself, she over the radio during the worked as a weaver in a jute factory Nazi era, but she loved Annette Leon · Reinhardt and as a waitress. After three semesters, she applied for ·chamber music and opera all her life. Although she Daniel · Klaudia a Fulbright grant to study in the United States and was swore after fleeing the Russians to never intentionone of two students, out of 300 applicants, to receive ally sleep on the ground, she changed her mind and one. She studied for a year at Brown. Returning to enjoyed camping and rafting trips. She was a bold Germany, she completed her undergraduate study in world traveler. Cruel childhood experience left Ursula, in later comparative literature and philosophy at Bonn UniAPY1 versity, but Ursula found herself deeply disillusioned life, with feelings of grief and anger. One creative with the conservative postwar political climate and and effective response to this was to volunteer at a the inadequacy of “denazification.” She returned to preschool, the Lou Grant Parent-Child Workshop. Brown, earned her PhD, and became an American. For at least five years, she went, sometimes daily, to Ursula’s acclaimed memoir, The Shame of Survival: assist in simple tasks, helping young children to learn 10 -MON T H and interact with the world: coloring, playing in the sandbox, going on My life is not this steeply sloping hour, walks. To those of us who knew her, in which you see me hurrying. there was no doubting the positive effect this had. She became a more Much stands behind me; comfortable and joyful person. It was I stand before it like a tree. a subtle but life-changing involvement. Her delight in and generosity — Rainer Maria Rilke toward our children was a joy to her Open a CD today for guaranteed Working Through a Nazi Childhood (Pennsylvania friends who are also parents. State University Press, 2010), provides much more Although she had intentionally escaped Germany, returns on your savings. detail about her early life. Ursula eventually arrived at a peaceful attitude toward Ursula thrived in American academia. Beginning her native country. Many of her extended family came as an assistant professor at Brown, she joined the to Santa Barbara, some living here for extended perifledgling University of California, Santa Barbara, in ods. In turn, many of us got to know and love her 1960 in the Department of Germanic, Oriental, and brother Hajo, her nieces and nephew Annette, KlauSlavic Studies. In 1965, she became UCSB’s first ten- dia, and Daniel, and their children. There has been ured woman professor. She was instrumental in the a lively back and forth of Ursula’s connections over 1200 State Street, Santa Barbara, (805) 560-6883 formation of the women’s studies program and took the years with many trips between Santa Barbara and a psychoanalytic approach to research, participating Bad Kreuznach, Armsheim, Hof, Krefeld, and Berlin. for several years in New Directions, a psychoanalytic For the location nearest you, please writing workshop. She served as department chair UCSB’s Department of Germanic and Slavic Studies comand associate dean of humanities and was a discerning memorates the life and work of Ursula Mahlendorf on Friday, call (855) 886-4824 or visit firstrepublic.com mentor to generations of graduate students, including April 12. Remembrances take place at UCSB’s Mosher Alumni many who became professors themselves. She was a House Library 10:30-11:45 a.m., and a musical recital at GeiAnnual Percentage Yield effective as of publication date. Limited-time offer subject to ringer Hall at 2 p.m. change without notice. $10,000 minimum balance. Penalty for early withdrawal. Fees gifted lecturer with a wonderful voice.

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L NE N FU A K E C


ANTONIO OLMOS

DIZZY GILLESPIE

JUDITH JAMISON

& GLORIA STEINEM

ANNIE LEIBOVITZ

MALALA YOUSAFZAI

ANDREW ECCLES

UCSB

ARTS LECTURES

BISHOP DESMOND TUTU

ALVIN AILEY

DAVID BYRNE Photos courtesy UCSB Arts & Lectures unless otherwise noted

AT

REDEFINING CULTURAL IMPACT FOR THE 21ST CENTURY

T

hanks to the tireless and innovative

That night, the seven members of the Ukulele Orchesprograms of UCSB Arts & Lectures, tra of Great Britain entertained a packed Campbell Hall Thursday, April 4, was ukulele day in with even more clever ukulele arrangements and their Santa Barbara. In the morning, You- signature brand of dry humor. The audience for this perTube star and ukulele virtuoso Jake formance was mostly older, and it’s possible that some of Shimabukuro got things started at the Granada in those present could remember when singer and comefront of more than 1,000 schoolchildren. The dian George Formby established the ukulele as students attended the free concert as part of a staple of popular culture in the U.K. Yet to by Arts Adventures, a collaboration between understand why this little instrument rated Charles an entire day of such varied activities, it’s Arts & Lectures and the University’s Office of Education Partnerships that links field Donelan necessary to go beyond what we know about trips to The Granada Theatre with the idea of ukulele players, past and present. possibly going to college. Later that same day, What made ukulele day such a success was Shimabukuro performed at the Isla Vista School the degree to which it fit the mission of Arts & and on campus at Storke Plaza. Lectures, which is to provide access to great events for If you haven’t yet seen him, know that this young man all ages, all the time, and all over town. In one day, this from Hawai‘i does things with his instrument that have coordinated series of concerts entertained a diverse audiearned him the accolade that he’s “the Jimi Hendrix of the ence that numbered in the thousands. Through the Arts ukulele.” What counts as high praise for his musicianship Adventures program, ukulele day brought young people does little, however, to convey the wholesome qualities to campus who might not otherwise ever visit UCSB, or he conveys as an individual. Largely self-taught, endear- consider going to college as an option for themselves. ingly humble, and devoted to bringing a message of hope For those of us who are past school age, the evening to audiences of all ages, Shimabukuro is the antithesis of performance by the Ukulele Orchestra of Great Britain negative millennial stereotypes. For a whirlwind introduc- was a fun and fresh experience, representative of the tion to what he can do, check out the video that launched unexpected offerings that Arts & Lectures provides that him, a cover of George Harrison’s “While My Guitar Gen- are often unavailable anywhere else on the Central Coast. tly Weeps” that’s been viewed more than 16 million times. From morning until night, the bright and funky sound

of the ukulele, expertly played, acted as a clarion call to community. For 60 years, UCSB Arts & Lectures has been bringing performances, lectures, and films to Santa Barbara that challenge us to become not just the most beautiful place to live in America but also one of the world’s most thoughtful and compassionate societies. Building on our city’s longstanding tradition of providing an alternative approach to living on the West Coast, Arts & Lectures dares to espouse a vision of life here that’s equally oriented toward wholeness and virtuosity. Sara Miller McCune, whose support has meant so much to the program over the past two decades, summarized its significance this way: “First and foremost is the sheer number and variety of exciting events Arts & Lectures brings to us. Second, it is virtually impossible to imagine any other community of our size — which is relatively modest— modest having as much high-quality exposure to the good and the great as we do. It is on a par with what you would normally expect if you lived in a major metropolitan area like London or New York. Third, it bridges the town-gown divide.” Echoing this estimation, but from the perspective of the program itself, Celesta Billeci, the Miller McCune executive director of UCSB Arts & Lectures, told me that “for some of our patrons, this program is why they moved here.”

For more on UCSB Arts & Lectures, including a complete schedule of this season’s events, see artsandlectures.ucsb.edu. INDEPENDENT.COM

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Cover Story PAUL WELLMAN

All Gaucho Reunion

Gaucho Professionals Showcase

Industry breakout sessions on technology,entrepreneurship, finance, and education. Open to alumni, students, local community members and business professionals.

Featured presenters: • Dr. Matt Beane, Assistant Professor, UCSB Technology Management Program • Department of Computer Science Distinguished Alumni Award Recipient, Randy Modos ‘01, President, Founder, PayJunction • Christina Ramirez ‘07, Founder, CEO, PlusUltra

SATURDAY, APRIL 27 9:00 A.M. - 2:00 P.M. UC SANTA BARBARA CAMPUS

Register: alumni.ucsb.edu/agr We Invented it. Clinically-applied Neuromodulation & Neurofeedback for psychological & brain-based disorders.

EXPANDING IN STAGES The Arts & Lectures story begins in the late 1950s, when UCSB first took possession of its current campus location on the bluffs in Goleta. Funding for cultural events at this outpost of University of California, President Clark Kerr’s “multiversity,” flowed freely, even if it did so in what are by today’s standards relatively small amounts. One of the first speakers to visit the campus under the direction of the new program was author Aldous Huxley, who gave a series of lectures that included some of his speculations on the human potential of psychedelic substances. When author Michael Pollan arrives on Tuesday, April 23, to discuss his latest book, How to Change Your Mind, the conversation that Huxley began will have come through a full 60-year circle. Although Arts & Lectures began as a faculty-run operation, the professors soon realized that the job required a full-time director, and, as a result, they appointed Margaret “Peg” Armstrong as the first head of A&L in 1959. The market for cultural events across the western United States at the time was in its infancy, but Santa Barbara, with its longstanding tradition of commitment to the arts, proved to be a particularly fertile spot for the kind of programming that Armstrong championed. With the completion of Campbell Hall in 1962, the program took off, and by 1967, Armstrong, along with the directors of similar programs at the other universities and cities across the west, had formed an organization, the Alliance of Western Colleges for Cultural Presentations, that would prove to be a crucial step in the development of a network that allowed performers from all over the world to afford regular tours in California and beyond. In 1974, the group changed its name to the Western Alliance of Arts Administrators, and in 1998, they shortened it to the Western Arts Alliance. For Armstrong’s successor, an arts administrator from the East Coast named Jan Oetinger, the economic environment beginning in 1980 was quite different.

The days of total reliance on university support were over, but the impact of federal programs like the National Endowment for the Arts (NEA) was reaching a peak. Another important organization arose in 1985 to streamline booking procedures and to generate efficiencies of scale for artists touring the West Coast, this one called California Presenters. Arts & Lectures plays a key role in the organization to this day; A&L Programming Manager Heather Jeno Silva is its current president. Following cutbacks to federal funding of the arts in the late 1990s and early 2000s, yet another era came to Arts & Lectures, and with it the dynamic leadership of the woman who heads the organization today, Celesta Billeci. With experience at UCLA’s Center for the Art of Performance and a passion for developing lasting relationships with top artists, Billeci came to town understanding that she would need a strong team of patrons from within the Santa Barbara community to realize her ambitious plans. This strategy of seeking sustained support from leading philanthropists ushered in a golden age for the program that has lasted nearly 20 years, and that looks set to continue for many decades to come. Roughly speaking then, there have been three eras in the evolution of Arts & Lectures: an initial period of relative plenty driven by California state investment in higher education, a middle period of increasing dependence on national sources of funding like the NEA and the National Endowment for the Humanities, and the current period of merging with the greater Santa Barbara community. Behind these three phases lies a single crucial factor, which is the westward pivot in American national culture. From Gustavo Dudamel at Disney

YO-YO MA

STEPHANIE BERGER

Keynote

Eric Lauterbach ‘89 President Consumer Division, Peet’s Coffee

Dr. Nicholas Dogris, QEEG-D, BCN CEO and Inventor of the NeuroField Neurotherapy System 24

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ARTS FOR ALL, ALL FOR ARTS: A&L Executive Director Celesta Billeci (pictured center) brought to the job a passion for developing lasting relationships with top artists. She and the rest of the A&L team have effectively ushered in a golden age for the program that has lasted nearly 20 years.

BILL T. JONES

ANTHONY BOURDAIN


Hall to Beyoncé and hologram Tupac at Coachella, the country’s cultural center of gravity has shifted away from the East Coast and New York to the West Coast and the cities of California. And it’s not just that people all over the world are paying more attention to live performances that originate here; there’s also a migration, in part driven by technology, of people who can choose to live anywhere and who, as a result, choose to live here.

Wings of Freedom Tour Let’s Go!

B-17 Flying Fortress

PURSUING GREATNESS, MEASURING IMPACT This year, the total number of attendees for the current Arts & Lectures season will surpass 100,000. In the 2017-18 season, which was hampered by fire and mudslides, the number was already very close: 99,771. That’s more than the entire population of the city of Santa Barbara. But push a little further into the statistical record as presented in the organization’s “Impact Report” for the 2017-18 season, and you’ll find a lot more happening below the surface of A&L’s public programming. In the 21st-century, community-driven phase of its development, A&L has adapted to the new funding environment by absorbing the lessons learned in Santa Barbara’s thriving nonprofit sector. Alongside partners like Sara Miller McCune and Lynda Weinman, the organization has become progressively savvier in the methods it uses to measure and pursue impact. Programming decisions are still made from an intuitive point of view that’s the product of decades of firsthand experience, but increasingly the way that these performances and ideas are implemented involves taking into consideration what will do the community the most good. It’s one thing to attract the best artists in every category, and another to know that what you are doing is changing the lives of the people in your region for the better. Once upon a time, it was enough to believe that arts and ideas improved people simply by being available, however narrowly the latter term was defined. Today, we expect more in the way of evidence for these claims, and Arts & Lectures stands at the forefront of that shift in understanding. Considered from this new, data-driven perspective, programming that might seem whimsical, like ukulele day, suddenly comes into sharp focus. Every component of that carefully planned April 4 operation was designed to meet an impact goal, and the whole sequence was coordinated so that each individual engagement would be treated as equally important. In the several hours that I spent discussing the organization’s goals and mission with the staff, one message kept coming through loud and clear — all of the events that Arts & Lectures presents are of equal importance. Whether you are a season ticket holder at a sold-out performance at the Granada, or a 4th grader from Lompoc taking the bus to UCSB campus for the first time, the program aims to make that moment as great as possible for you. The way that we measure the impact of the arts has evolved. It’s not just that elitism has been abandoned in favor of popularity; on the contrary, A&L’s power to mobilize elite performers and to attract discerning patrons has never been stronger. But the notion of where culture begins and ends has been transformed. What was conceived as a support for the intellectual life of university faculty who missed the cultural options they enjoyed as graduate students in Boston, New York, and Chicago is now understood as the source of potentially life-changing moments in the lives of all our citizens, including those who may be the first in their families to go to college.

P-40 Warhawk B-24 Liberator

b-25 Mitchell

P-51 Mustang

Amazing walk-through tours are $15 for adults and $5 for children 12 yrs. and younger. Bomber Flight Experiences in the B-17 or B-24 are $450. B-25 flights are $400. P-51 Mustang Flight Training: (Full Dual Control ) are $2400 for a half hour or $3400 for a full hour. P-40 Warhawk Flight Training: (Full Dual Control) are $2200 for a half hour and $3200 for a full hour. Visit our website to book your flight.

Santa Barbara Municipal Airport - april 17th to 21st Camarillo Airport - April 22nd to 25th No reservations needed for tours. For a complete schedule of tour times, flight times, directions and more information see our website. Book your flight online!

For FLIGHT RESERVATIONS, directions and information see our website www.cfdn.org or call 800.568.8924 SANTA BARBARA SYMPHONY PRESENTS

VERDI’S

REQUIEM

HERE COMES A REGULAR

LILA DOWNS

ELENA PRADO

No discussion of Arts & Lectures would be complete without confronting common misperceptions about the frequency with which certain artists return season after season. Yes, it’s true that David Sedaris is as much a regular at the Arlington as Santa Barbara International Film Festival Executive Director Roger Durling, but it’s not necessarily for the reasons you might suppose. Demand plays a role, and loyalty is a factor, but the real reason why legends such as Wynton Marsalis and Yo-Yo Ma keep coming

ALLEN GINSBERG

SAT, APRIL 13, 2019 8PM I SUN, APRIL 14, 2019 3PM AT THE GRANADA THEATRE Nir Kabaretti, conductor Colleen Daly, soprano Krysty Swann, mezzo-soprano Harold Meers, tenor Luca Dall’Amico, bass Santa Barbara Choral Society Santa Barbara City College Choirs North County Chorus Principal Sponsor

Roger & Sarah Chrisman Brooks & Kate Firestone

Verdi, Requiem

In a spirit of community collaboration, Verdi’s Requiem will see Maestro Nir Kabaretti conducting the Symphony alongside local community choirs and soloists Colleen Daly, Harold Meers, Krysty Swann and Luca Dall’ Amico. This powerful Requiem combines the drama of opera, the thrill of outstanding symphonic writing, and an abundance of virtuosic solo moments. In the words of Johannes Brahms, “Only a genius could have written such a work.”

Artist Sponsors Christine A. Green Montecito Bank & Trust Selection Sponsor Susan Aberle

805.899.2222 I thesymphony.org INDEPENDENT.COM

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JAZZ AT LINCOLN CENTER ORCHESTRA back to Santa Barbara and to Arts & Lectures lies in their capacity for growth and development. These men started out as virtuoso instrumentalists, but over time they have acquired reputations that are based on something that’s even more rare than oncein-a-generation talent, and that’s the vision needed to change the course of an art form. Through the Silkroad project, Ma has become the most influential classical musician of our time. The approach of that group — which will make a triumphant return to the Granada on Friday, April 26, for a program titled Heroes Take Their Stands that was commissioned by A&L— has influenced an entire generation of young musicians, many of whom, like Brooklyn Rider and The Knights, have also performed here. Ma will return to the Granada on the night after the Silkroad concert to offer his reflection on Culture, Understanding & Survival. There’s no one I would rather hear at this critical point in history. Marsalis, for his part, succeeded not only in establishing the Jazz at Lincoln Center Orchestra back in 1987, but in creating the world’s only venue entirely devoted to the art of jazz, the Jazz at Lincoln Center facility in Columbus Circle, Manhattan, with its three concert venues, including the 1,200-seat Rose Theater. His appearance at the Granada in the fall of

essay writing for the past two decades. Likewise, it’s Gaiman’s ability to cross from graphic novel to film and beyond that’s made his work so compelling. This spring he’ll be reading from a new collection, Norse Mythology, which he’s told in his own inimitable style. For Roman Baratiak, the programmer whose tenure exceeds that of any other such figure in the region, bringing the most important writers and thinkers in the world to Campbell Hall and the Arlington is a near obsession. Whether we are talking about His Holiness the Dalai Lama or talking with the Dalai Lama’s good friend Pico Iyer, Baratiak’s intent is always the same: to put the best in contemporary thought and knowledge up for discussion. With roots in film programming that extend back to his undergraduate days, Baratiak has pioneered several film initiatives within Arts & Lectures, including the enormously popular Free Summer Cinema series at the Courthouse.

NEXT-GENERATION INNOVATIONS

Two particularly forward-looking recent initiatives also deserve our attention before we sign off to go check out some of these amazing events. First, there’s ¡Viva el Arte de Santa Bárbara!, a Spanish-language program that brings top artists to venues like the Marjorie Luke Theatre at Santa Barbara Junior High School. Entirely free and already very popular, ¡Viva el Arte de Santa Bárbara! brings Arts & Lectures programming into the lives and hearts of a growing number of residents whose first language —Celesta Billeci, Miller McCune executive director of UCSB Arts & Lectures is not English, or who just enjoy great music. 2018 was surrounded by a whirlwind of outreach activiA&L’s new Thematic Learning Initiative derives from ties, including a thrilling Arts Adventure that exposed the support and vision of sponsors Lynda Weinman and grade-school students to the wonders of big-band jazz Bruce Heavin. This program augments the local appearances of important authors by distributing their books to and modern dance. Sedaris represents Arts & Lectures’ remarkable sen- members of the community for free and arranging for sitivity to changes in the media ecosphere. He’s a writer small groups of people who work in relevant professions who connects with his audience in a way that only a to meet with them. For example, this spring Beth Macy, small handful of writers do—another is Neil Gaiman, the author of Dopesick: Dealers, Doctors, and the Drug and both are on the spring calendar for 2019. What sets Company that Addicted America, gave a public lecture at Sedaris apart is his ability to transcend genre through Campbell Hall and also conducted grand rounds with the fundamental role of voice in both writing and audio. the doctors at Cottage Hospital. It was radio that first brought him to a broader audiIt’s innovative ideas like these that will keep UCSB ence, and the audio recordings he has made of his books Arts & Lectures at the center of our culture for many have cemented his position at the center of American decades to come. n

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APRIL 11, 2019

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27


Remembering

RUSSSPENCER A fine reporter and gifted writer, Russ Spencer, who died almost three weeks ago, was part of the Santa Barbara Independent’s news team from our first issue in 1986. In the years after he left the paper, during which time he became a talented documentarian and videographer, he remained close to the Independent and its staff members, past and present. We continued to support his video work in more recent years by posting it on independent.com. In this special memorial section, another former Independent reporter, Andrew Rice,

pens a moving, honest tribute to his friend. We’ve also included an excerpt from an article that Spencer himself wrote about his family’s Napa Valley roots; it was originally published in Virtuoso Travel + Life in 2002. And in this week’s Positively State Street column on page 55, Richie DeMaria reminds us that Russ was one of the first writers of that column. There will be a memorial service to celebrate Russ Spencer’s life this Sunday, April 14, 10 a.m., at Hendry’s Beach. Please carpool as parking will be tight.

I

n the 26 years I knew him, Russ Spencer never wanted to be trouble to anyone or

to cause any kind of a fuss. He was always the guy who sat quietly in a crowded room, listening and observing with great attention, but never vying to be the center of attention. It’s extra ironic, in light of his reserved nature, that his death at the age of 58 in the early morning of March 23 caused a traffic jam that closed the freeway for hours and then backed up traffic for almost a full day. I remember the first time we met in the early ’90s. Russ at that time was a huge fish in Santa Barbara’s small pond. He was in a band, maybe a couple of bands. He had created the most popular music and nightlife column in the city for the Independent. And recently, he’d started a full-time job as the News-Press arts and music writer at a time when the News-Press was still a respected and legitimate paper. Everyone knew who he was, and he knew everyone who mattered in town. I was a relative nobody just starting my first job out of college at the Independent when Russ Spencer walked up to me at a party and said, “Hi, I’m Russ. You’re Andrew Rice, aren’t you?” And he complimented me on a story I’d written in a way that showed he’d read it with real interest. When we parted ways that night, Russ said, “Just let me know if there’s ever anything I can do for you.” And he genuinely meant it. He provided me with lots of guidance about how to deal with the complicated internal politics of the Independent. And we also became trusted confidants about our personal lives. Since his death, I’ve heard dozens of similar stories from people of Russ’s helping hand and personal generosity over the decades. He really believed that a rising tide lifted all boats. Even when he asked you for a favor, it usually worked out for everyone. I met my wife when Russ asked me to do him a professional favor that involved me traveling to San Francisco, where I ended up meeting the woman I later married. When I told him I’d met a girl, and was crazy about her, his eyes sparkled with glee and he blurted out, “Jeez! She sounds terrific!” Like magic, without meaning to, he’d fixed me up with the love of my life. He was a connecter and loved putting people and things together to make something special, whether it was a surprise birthday party or a musical partnership. I can’t keep talking about Russ without addressing the elephant in the room — mental illness. It’s hard because Russ was extremely private and would be angry at me for what I’m about to say. Russ sometimes experienced delusions and hallucinations that were terrifying to him. He felt shame and stigma

19 6 0 -2 0 1 9

Russ Spencer’s friends and family will be gathering to celebrate his life, his spark, and his generosity at 10 a.m. on Sunday, April 14, at Hendry’s Beach with a memorial paddle-out and celebration of his life.

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APRIL 11, 2019

INDEPENDENT.COM

by Andrew Rice


about that. He did a great job of hiding his suffering from most of the world. He was worried, with good reason, that people would see him as crazy. But here’s the hard truth: Whether investigators determine that Russ’s immediate cause of death was suicide or an accident, either way, mental illness killed our friend Russ just as surely as cancer killed Steve Jobs. We should be able to talk about mental illness killing someone we love just as we do about heart attacks and diabetes and cancer. It’s not something shameful or embarrassing. During Russ’s troubled times, he sought me out. I came to know within a few words from the tone of his voice if he was okay or not. Over the years, a group of his good friends pulled together to help Russ get medical treatment. And Russ always worked really hard to get better. But I don’t think Russ ever realized how many people were watching out for him. Amazingly, these same periods of darkness were interspersed with years of great productivity and creativity. He interviewed Robert Plant and Frank Gehry. He made a beautiful feature-length documentary about young surfer girls growing up in rural Maui. He helped with selecting programming for the Santa Barbara International Film Festival. He made beautiful films about so many things. He wrote. He did yoga almost daily and sang in a choir. Whenever he would visit my family in Venice Beach, Russ asked insightful questions about our lives and observed, with special wonder, how much my kids had grown and how they were unfolding as humans. As our friend Susie Bright BACK IN THE DAY: said when she heard of Russ’s death, “He was so warm and Original members sweet and always interested in everything.” of the IndepenI was excited when Russ’s name came up in the caller ID dent staff in 1986 recently. It had been a while since I’d heard from him. A few goofing off in front months earlier, we had lunch, and things were going great for of the camera. him. It had been a long time since he’d had any symptoms, from left: news and he was feeling really positive. He had new goals and projeditor Nick Welsh, ects. I left that lunch feeling happy about his state of mind. photography editor But when I answered the call that came a few days before Chris Gardner, and his death, I knew his illness had returned. Critical voices had writer/reporter Russ questioning if he was even real. One of the most prolific Russ Spencer. and widely beloved people I know, Russ told me that he felt that his entire life added up to very little, that his accomplishments were nothing, really. He was alienated from people and felt he couldn’t connect. He told me that when he looked at friends like me with families and spouses and partners, he envied what we had but knew he would never get those things for himself. Russ felt he had made the wrong choices in life. He feared that he was going crazy and that his illness would make him unlovable. I assured Russ that he could get through whatever mental storm was coming just like in the past. I told him that his friends loved him. He promised me he was keeping his appointments to see mental-health professionals and that he had no urge to harm himself. He emailed me in the following days to say he’d seen his therapist and was doing better. The last any of us heard from Russ was the Wednesday night before he died. He called one of his closest friends to say he was feeling terrible but then called that friend back to say that he was feeling better and that he was going to Joshua Tree. Two days later, he was dead on the southbound 101, having been run over. Nobody really knows much about the time in between. None of us had been able to reach him by phone or by looking for him in person. Social media has been busy with people trying to reconstruct what happened during those lost two days, hoping to make sense of what was going on inside Russ’s head before he died. But here’s the thing. Even if we reconstruct every step he took from Wednesday night until 2 a.m. Saturday morning, it will never make sense. Nobody asks cancer to make sense or tries to figure it out by reconstructing the deceased’s last moments. Mental illness is what killed Russ, just like cancer or a heart attack or diabetes kills someone else. I’m really grateful to have had Russ Spencer as a friend, colleague, and inspiration. If there’s one thing I know he would want us to do in his honor, it would be to shake off the stigma and shame that still surrounds mental illness. He’d want us to reach out to someone suffering near us right now and to not be afraid to talk about mental illness or to offer a helping hand.

FRUITOF THEVINE

A

t Christmas dinner this holiday past, baby Amelia was clearly the star. The last time there was a birth in our family, it was her father, Pete’s, and that was 29 years ago. We had a big family table in the Napa Valley with lots of food and people, as always, but this year the scene crackled with the energy of new life. Pete and his wife, Meg, generously passed Amelia around the table as we ate, and we all got a chance to hold her. If she cried, we would all sing, “the Santas on the bus go ho, ho, ho,” until she laughed, though out of appreciation or pity, we’ll probably never know. Everyone speculated about her olive skin and wisps of dark hair. The Italian side? The dining table stretched across one entire side of the living room in my Uncle Gary’s big Tuscan-style home, set in his vineyard just off Highway 29 between Saint Helena and Calistoga, the tow northernmost towns in the valley. My mom and brothers and cousins and the husbands and in-laws sat at their places, each set with a piece of torrone, the Italian nougat candy that I didn’t like as a kid, but now, in the spirit of tradition, seemed as essential as Santa himself. There were two other stars at the table that night— night Mom’s wine and Gary’s wine. The wines, like Amelia, represent a kind of new life in our family. And like the color of Amelia’s skin and hair, they speak to the lives that came before us, our roots. Both wines were made from grapes taken from Napa Valley land that has been in the family for more than a century. My mom’s grapes were planted by her Italian-born grandmother, Argentina Falleri, on Calistoga land that Argentina and her husband, Alfredo, purchased in 1924, 10 years after arriving in the United States. Hers are old-vine zinfandel grapes, harvested and bottled by Robert Biale, a small-batch producer whose family has also lived in the valley for three generations. Uncle Gary has his own label, Shypoke, and grows charbono, an Italian varietal, on land that he and my mom’s other grandfather, Michael Heitz, cleared and planted. Charbono is so obscure that it occupies the fewest number of acres of any red wine grown in California. Even its pedigree is a mystery. Some say the grape came from the Jura region of eastern France, where it was known as charbonneau. Others say it comes from the more northern Savoie region, in the Alps. Still others say it’s actually identical to the barbera grape of northern Italy’s Piedmont region. We opened Mom’s bottle first. Her Biale Falleri Vineyard Zinfandel had recently earned a 93 score from Wine Advocate and was going for $250 a bottle in Chicago restaurants. Roll over, Argentina. The zinfandel is so in demand and expensive that our family can rarely afford to buy it— it a fact that helped me fend off the temptation to down the entire glass all at once. Savor it, bro, savor it. … I took a measured sip and concluded that Mom’s wine did not deserve a score of 93 — it was so clearly a 100. Then Gary debuted his 1999 vintage. Wines like merlot and cabernet sauvignon shake in their boots at the mere mention of charbono. It’s a big, deep red, but a wine that’s hard to tame, which is why so few people have heard of it. Every year, Gary, who grows the charbono, and his son, Pete, who oversees the winemaking, bring the murmurs as well as the shouts out of the grapes. This year was the best ever; you could taste it from the first swallow: The wine was silky, concentrated, balanced, yet full of the Italian audacity that makes charbono a dark-horse powerhouse. Everyone got delirious on it and after a while, we didn’t really know which we wanted to be passed next, the baby or the wine— wine both, our body and our blood. I’d arrived a couple of days before, after an eight-hour drive up California in a rented convertible, crossing the Golden Gate Bridge in the misty fog and then cruising low and cool into Vallejo, the big, flat, and unattractive place where the Napa River empties into San Francisco Bay. Coming up the 101, the new winter grass frosting everything from Santa Barbara to Steinbeck country with fluorescent green, I felt like I was driving through a 250-mile park belt. I came through the streets of San Francisco just after dark, stopping into Starbucks for a double latte, and as I made my way up Highway 29 through the valley, the forested ramparts on both sides closed in like comfortable old arms. Home. It started to rain just after Napa, but I kept the top down through all the little towns after that … Yountville, Rutherford, Saint Helena … the ones that tourists love so much—right on past my uncle’s house to my mom’s cottage just outside Calistoga. It was okay to be a little wet; I knew I’d be in front of the fire soon …

by Russ Spencer

A list of regional mental-health resources can be found at countyofsb.org/admhs. If you or someone you know is thinking about hurting themselves, call 9-1-1 or the 24/7 National Suicide Prevention Lifeline at 1 (800) 273-8255. For more information on suicide prevention, including warning signs and risk factors, visit suicidepreventionlifeline.org. INDEPENDENT.COM

APRIL 11, 2019

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WEEK I N D E P E N D E N T CA L E N DA R

TH

APR.

11-17

E

BY TERRY ORTEGA AND AMBER WHITE

As always, find the complete listings online at independent.com/events. And if you have an event coming up, submit it at independent.com/eventsubmit.

E. Montecito St. 7-9pm; Faulkner Gallery, S.B. Central Library, 40 E. Anapamu St. Free. Call 564-5642. sbplibrary.org

FRIDAY 4/12 4/12-4/13: Dos Pueblos High School Presents West Side Story Don’t miss this timeHarbor of Spies: A Novel of less classic that grows more Historic Havana Join Journalrelevant each year since

4/11:

ist Robin Lloyd for an illustrated its Broadway opening in talk with period paintings, 1957. The cast and crew lithographs, and photographs that are thrilled to present tell the story of Cuba’s role in the this show that has the American Civil War and other potential to instigate interesting facts. 7pm. S.B. important conversaMaritime Museum, 113 Harbor tions with songs such as Wy. $10-$20. Call 456-8747. “America,”“Gee Officer, sbmm.org Krupke!”, “Somewhere,” and more. Not recomGhostface Killah Don’t miss mended for small children. prolific hip-hop artist and Wu-Tang Fri.: 7pm; Sat.: 2 and 7pm. Clan member Ghostface Killah, who Elings Performing Arts Ctr., will perform songs like “Six Degrees” 7266 Alameda Ave. $10-$15. and “Iron Maiden.” 8pm. Velvet Jones, Call 968-2541 x4670. 423 State St. $25-$30. Call 965-8676. dptheatrecompany.org

THURSDAY 4/11 4/11-4/13, 4/17: The Theatre Group at SBCC Presents Significant Other Follow the story of Jordan, a single man, in search of Mr. Right while learning the only thing harder than looking for love is supporting the loved ones around you. This show contains adult language and situations. The show previews on April 11 and runs through April 27. 7:30pm. JurkowJurkow itz Theatre, SBCC, 801 Cliff Dr. $10-$26. Call 965-5935. Read mroe on p. 45.

theatergroupsbcc.com

4/11: Sketching in the Galleries All skill levels are invited to experience the tradition of sketching from original works of art. Guidance and materials will be provided. 5:30-7:30pm. S.B. Museum of Art, 1130 State St. Free. Call 884-6457.

sbma.net

4/11: Jarrett J. Krosoczka The library is offering two chances to see the author of the popular Lunch Lady and Jedi Academy series talk about his love of art and how he turned it into a career. 3:30-4:30pm; Martin Luther King, Jr. Wing, Eastside Library, 1102

COURTESY

4/12:

velvet-jones.com

4/12: 4th Annual Maternal Health Panel: Hot Topics in Birth Join expert panelists for a lively

discussion on rights, options, and evidencebased care in regard to some hot topics in birth. The event begins with a moms’ panel. 6:30-9:30pm. Unitarian Society of S.B., 1535 Santa Barbara St. Free.

tinyurl.com/HotTopics-Birth

4/12-4/14: Black Comedy Set in London in 1965, this one-act farcical comedy

follows a young sculptor and his debutante fiancée as they “borrow” furniture and art from their absent next-door neighbor to impress her father. But when a fuse blows just as their neighbor unexpectedly returns, they are plunged into darkness and frantically attempt to return the purloined items before the light is restored. The show runs through April 14. Fri.: 7:30pm; Sun.: 3pm. Alcazar Theatre, 4916 Carpinteria Ave., Carpinteria. $12-$15. thealcazar.org

COURTESY

4/12: Estate Planning Legal Clinic and General Legal Information

4/12:

La Septima Banda Experience a night of lively regional Mexican music from this 17-piece band performing a variety of genres, from bandas and cumbias to rancheras and their specialty, narcocorridos. 8pm. Chumash Casino Resort, 3400 E. Hwy. 246, Santa Ynez. $29-$59. Ages 21+. Call (800) 248-6274. chumashcasino.com

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Volunteer Opportunity

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4/12: Reed Trios End the work week with 30 minutes of music for oboe, clarinet, and bassoon by Gordon Jacob and Georges Auric performed by Michele Forrest, Juan Gallagos, and William Wood. 12:15-12:45pm. Trinity Episcopal Church, 1500 State St. Free. Call 965-7419.

tinyurl.com/ReedTrios

4/12: Paw Patrol Storytime Bring the kids for stories about Paw Patrol characters and other brave, strong pups, and then stick around for early literacy and STEAM activities inspired by the show. 3:30-4:45pm. Island Rm., S.B. Central Library, 40 E. Anapamu St. Free. Call 564-5602. sbplibrary.org 4/12: Amplify Adderley

OneJustice’s Justice Bus Project will be providing legal assistance to individuals of all ages interested in estate planning services. Participants will meet one-on-one with volunteers to complete simple wills, advance health-care directives, and power of attorney (no criminal cases). An appointment is required. Noon-4pm. Veterans’ Memorial Bldg., 112 W. Cabrillo Blvd., Free. Call (323) 739-8093.

The Adderley Advance Conservatory will showcase some of the area’s best youth talent for its annual fundraiser to benefit the school’s scholarship program and upcoming productions. Ticket includes dinner. 6-8pm. SOhO Restaurant & Music Club, 1221 State St. $60. Call 962-7776. sohosb.com

4/12-4/13: Seussical Jr The S.B. Junior

will deliver a dazzling program of contemporary music dedicated to exploring a broad and eclectic repertoire while promoting diversity and inclusivity. 7pm. St. Anthony’s Chapel, 2300 Garden St. $10-$35. Call 893-3535.

High School Performing Arts Club presents Horton the Elephant, the Cat in the Hat, and all of your favorite Dr. Seuss characters onstage in this fantastical musical extravaganza! 7-8:30pm. Marjorie Luke Theatre, 721 E. Cota St. $5-$10. Call 963-7751 x4028.

luketheatre.org

4/12: Jennifer Koh: Shared Madness 2 The renowned violinist

artsandlectures.ucsb.edu

>>>

Protest INDEPENDENT.COM

APRIL 11, 2019

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31


Annual Student

As always, find the complete listings online at independent.com/events. And if you have an event coming up, submit it at independent.com/eventsubmit.

11-17 COURTESY

EXHIBITION April 12 – May 3, 2019

INDEPENDENT CALENDAR

APR.

4/12, 4/14:

OPENING RECEPTION

¡Viva el Arte de Santa Bárbara!: Ballet Folklórico de Los Ángeles This acclaimed Mexican dance

Friday, April 12 5 – 7 p.m.

company will showcase traditional dance styles, costumes, and music from regions all over Mexico. 7-8pm. Fri.: Isla Vista Elementary School, 6875 El Colegio Rd., Isla Vista; call 685-4418. Sun.: Marjorie Luke Theatre, S.B. Junior High School, 721 E. Cota St.; call 884-4087. Free.

Awards and scholarships will be announced at 6 p.m. 4/12: A Day Commemorating the Life and Work of Professor Ursula Mahlendorf The Depart-

income families. 3pm. The Howard School, 5315 Foothill Rd., Carpinteria. $35. Call 745-8448. thehowardschool.org

tinyurl.com/VivaElArteMariachi

| Humanities Building 202

(805) 897-3484 | gallery.sbcc.edu | facebook.com/AtkinsonGallery

COURTESY

ment of Germanic and Slavic Studies at UCSB will host a day of commemoration in honor of this beloved professor who passed away on October 31, 2018. In 1965, she was the first woman to receive tenure at UCSB, and in 2009 she published her memoir, The Shame of Survival: Working Through a Nazi Child Childhood. Visit the website for a schedule. 10:30am-2:45pm. Mosher Alumni House and Geiringer Hall, UCSB. Free. Read more on p. 21. gss.ucsb.edu

4/12-4/14: The Miser Be prepared to laugh as you follow the story of Harpagon, whose love of money takes the place of all natural affections, in this five-act comedy classic by Molière that premiered in 1668. The show runs through April 28. Fri.-Sat.: 7:30pm; Sun.: 2pm. Ojai Art Ctr. Theater, 113 S. Montgomery St., Ojai. $10-$25. Call 640-8797. ojaiact.org

4/13:

The Spirit of Fiesta Auditions

Support some of the most talented young dancers in our community as they compete to become the 2019 Spirit and Junior Spirit of Fiesta. Your ticket includes the Los Artistas reception immediately following the audition at The Carriage and Western Art Museum (129 Castillo St.). Noon-5:30pm. La Cumbre Junior High, 2255 Modoc Rd. $30. Call 962-8101.

SATURDAY 4/13 4/13-4/14: Verdi’s Requiem The DHADKAN PRESENTS

NACHLE DEEWANE

The 6th Annual Santa Barbara Indian Dance Festival 200+ Perfomers | Bollywood & Bhangra Dance | Family-Friendly

April 20, 2019 at the Granada Theatre

Tickets are $18 to $38 and available at granadasb.org Learn more at www.dhadkan.org, call (857)342-3526 or email info@dhadkan.org

S.B. Symphony presents Verdi’s powerful Requiem, which combines the drama of opera, the thrill of outstanding symphonic writing, and an abundance of virtuosic solo moments. Sat.: 8pm; Sun.: 3pm. The Granada Theatre, 1214 State St. $44-$135. Call 899-2222.

granadasb.org

4/13-4/14: Ballroom You will tap your feet and sway in your seat as State Street Ballet’s stylish, mixed-repertory program celebrates the iconic music of Gershwin, Ellington, Piazzolla, Sinatra, and more at this crowd-pleasing event. Sat.: 7:30pm; Sun.: 2pm. Lobero Theatre, 33 E. Canon Perdido St. $24-$70. Call 963-0761. Read more on p. 53.

tinyurl.com/sof-auditions

4/13: National Library Week Open House Sample all the library has to offer and learn more about tech programs for kids, get personalized book recommendations, discover the library’s local history resources, and meet the Library Board, Friends of the Library, and the S.B. Public Library Foundation while enjoying light refreshments at this open house. 3-5pm. S.B. Central Library, 40 E. Anapamu St. Free. Call 564-5642. sbplibrary.org

4/13: Springtime in Paris Fundraiser Partake in a French-infused springtime feast with an open bar that includes hops and spirits from local craft brewers, winemakers, and mixologists. Proceeds will aid in operating costs, teacher salaries, and scholarship funds for low- and middle-

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APRIL 11, 2019

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COURTESY

lobero.org

Volunteer Opportunity

SUNDAY 4/14 4/14: Studio Sunday Play with tradition and innovation by block printing an iconic Hokusai wave in shades of blue and white over a reproduction of Asako Narahashi’s land and sea photograph featuring Mount Fuji. 1:30-4:30pm. S.B. Museum of Art, 1130 State St. Free. Call 963-4364. sbma.net

4/14:

S.B. Kite Festival Bring the family and a picnic lunch and enjoy a fun-filled day with more than a dozen kite-flying events, including the Children’s Kite Tail Chase at the top and bottom of the hour and contests for funniest, largest, most beautiful, highest flying kite, and more! 11am5pm. Great Meadow, SBCC, 973 Cliff Dr. Free. sbkitefest.net

Civil Discourse

Protest


Shows on Tap

MONDAY

WEEK

Big Names. Small Room. APRIL

15 TUES

4/11, 4/14: Dargan’s Irish Pub & Restaurant Thu.: Dannsair. 6:30-8:30pm. Sun.: Irish Jam Session. 4:30-7pm. 18 E. Ortega St. Free. Call 568-0702. darganssb.com

Putting the MOCK in Democracy

4/11-4/13, 4/17: The Endless Summer Bar-Café Thu.: Benny Collison. Fri.: Johnny Miller. Sat.: Jim Rankin. Wed.: Dave Vignoe. 5:30-8:30pm. 113 Harbor Wy. Free. Call 564-1200.

APRIL

29

4/11-4/12: Eos Lounge Thu.: Lil Debbie & Dev. Fri.: Sage Armstrong. 9pm-1:30am. 500 Anacapa St. $5. Ages 21+. Call 564-2410. eoslounge.com

MON

4/11-4/14: Maverick Saloon Thu.: Thomas Gabriel, Bear Redell. 6-11pm. $15-$20. Fri.: Molly Ringwald Project. 8:30pm. $10. Sat.: Flannel 101. 8pm. Free-$5. Sun.: Nate Latta. 1-5pm. Free. 3687 Sagunto St., Santa Ynez. Ages 21+. Call 686-4785. themavsaloon.com

sohosb.com

SPONSORS

The Tierney Sutton Band sets their sights on the wide-ranging panorama of film music with Screen Play, illuminating and revolutionizing each classic, as well as introducing a few lesser-known gems.

LOBERO THEATRE ENDOWMENT FOR AMERICAN ROOTS MUSIC ELAINE F. STEPANEK FOUNDATION

HAROLD P. MCALISTER FOUNDATION

805.963.0761 LOBERO.ORG

Donna Greene

THIS WEEKEND

Modern Genre, Jack McCain. 8pm. $15. Ages 18+. Sat.: Fish & The Seaweeds. 8pm. $10. Ages 21+. Sun.: S.B. Jazz Society Presents: Donna Greene & the Roadhouse Daddies; 1pm; $15-$25. SBCC Monday Madness Jazz Band; 6pm; $10. Tue.: A Tribute to Leonard Cohen featuring Smitty & Julija. 7:30pm. $10-$12. 1221 State St. Call 962-7776.

The Tierney Sutton Band Screen Play

COURTESY

4/11, 4/13: SOhO Restaurant & Music Club Thu.: Vista Kicks,

4/12-4/13: The Brewhouse Fri.: Stiff Pickle Orchestra. Sat.: Truckee Tribe. 8pm. 229 W. Montecito St. Free. Call 884-4664. 4/12: Carr Winery Barrel Rm. Cantillon Brothers. 6-8pm. 414 N. Salsipuedes St. Free. Ages 21+. Call 965-7985. carrwinery.com 4/12-4/14: Cold Spring Tavern Fri.: Salty Strings. 6-9pm. Sat.: Brandi Rose; 1-4pm. Jacob Cole and Friends; 6-9pm. Sun.: Tom Ball and Kenny Sultan; 1:15-4pm. Teresa Russell and Cocobilli; 4:30-7:30pm. 5995 Stagecoach Rd. Free. Call 967-0066. coldspringtavern.com 4/12-4/14: Figueroa Mountain Brewing Co. (Los Olivos) Fri.: Chilldawgs. 5-8. Sat.: The Regulars. 3-6pm. Sun.: 3 Way Stop. 3-6pm. 2363 Alamo Pintado Ave., Los Olivos. Free. Ages 21+. Call 694-2252 x343. figmtnbrew.com 4/12-4/13: M.Special Brewing Co. Fri.: Colon Angus. 7-9pm. Sat.: Joystix. 6-8pm. 6860 Cortona Dr., Bldg. C., Goleta. Free. Call 968-6500. mspecialbrewco.com 4/12, 4/17: Velvet Jones Fri.: Ghostface Killah. 8pm. $25-$30. Wed.: Hop Along. 7pm. $17-$19. Velvet Jones, 423 State St. Call 965-8676.

velvet-jones.com

4/13: The James Joyce Ulysses Jasz. 7:30-10:30pm. 513 State St. Free. Ages 21+. Call 962-2668. sbjamesjoyce.com 4/15: Mercury Lounge Emily Wren, Donald Beaman, Mara Connor. 9pm.

>>>

sponsors

5871 Hollister Ave., Goleta. $8. Ages 21+. Call 967-0907.

Join our eClub. Follow us on social

Additional support for promotions: Thanks to The Bentson Foundation and Elaine F. Stepanek Foundation

Don’t miss a beat media. See the full lineup. 805.963.0761 / LOBERO.ORG INDEPENDENT.COM

APRIL 11, 2019

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33


presents

A L W A Y S A M A Z I N G. N e v e r r o u t i n e. written by Joshua Harmon

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www.theatregroupsbcc.com NO LATE SEATING 805.965.5935 LIVE CAPTIONING

Thank you to our season sponsor:

Sun. 4/14 @ 2pm

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JEAN-CLAUDE CARBONNE

Ballet Preljocaj: La fresque (The Painting on the Wall) This ballet explores the mysterious relations between representation and reality and the symbolism and metaphor of a traditional Chinese tale, The Painting on the Wall, a tale of two travelers mesmerized by a magnificent fresco. 8pm. The Granada Theatre, 1214 State St. $20-$64. Call 893-3535.

artsandlectures.ucsb.edu

COURTESY UCSB ARTS & LECTURES

MONDAY 4/15

Season 7 of American Idol but since then has released seven albums, including last year’s Postcards in the Sky featuring all original songs that he co-wrote. Hear why he’s got the talent to last. 8pm. Lobero Theatre, 33 E. Canon Perdido St. $44-$134. Call 963-0761. lobero.org

4/16: Get It Done Today Meet with trained professionals and volunteer staff that will help guide you in completing advance health-care directives. Appointments are required. 10am-2pm. Faulkner Gallery, S.B. Central Library, 40 E. Anapamu St. Free. Call 564-5611.

TRUTH ON TRIAL

FARMERS MARKET

SCHEDULE THURSDAY

4/17: The Climate Crisis & Our Community: Sea-Level Rise and Health Impacts The League of Women Voters

FRIDAY

will host this civic forum that will explore

THE LOBERO THEATRE lobero.org 805 963 0761

Montecito: 1100 and 1200 blocks of Coast Village Rd., 8-11:15am

SATURDAY

4/17:

CAMA’s Masterpiece Series Presents: Augustin Hadelich, Violin, and Orion Weiss, Piano This riveting program will include Ludwig van Beethoven, Claude Debussy, Francisco Coll, Eugène Ysaÿe, Johannes Brahms, and John Adams. 8pm. Lobero Theatre, 33 E. Canon Perdido St. $39-$49. Call 9630761. lobero.org

APRIL 26 & 28

Carpinteria: 800 block of Linden Ave., 3-6:30pm

Downtown S.B.: Corner of Santa Barbara and Cota sts., 8:30am-1pm

SUNDAY

LOTS AVAILABLE FOR SALE

Goleta: Camino Real Marketplace, 10am-2pm

TUESDAY

Old Town S.B.: 500-600 blocks of State St., 4-7:30pm COURTESY

4/16: David Archuleta David Archuleta became a star as runner-up in

4/17: Parallel Stories Lecture: T.C. Boyle: Outside Looking In

Theoretical Physics) Graduate Fellow Gautam Reddy will share insights into the fascinating phenomenon of birds, including thermal soaring, migration, and his experiences teaching a robotic glider to soar like a bird. KITP says, “Eat, THINK, and be merry!” 6-7pm. SOhO Restaurant & Music Club, 1221 State St. Free. Call 962-7776. sohosb.com

WEDNESDAY 4/17 to laugh out loud with the side-splitting satire of The Capitol Steps, the only group in Washington attempting to be funnier than Congress. This troupe of former congressional staffers travels the country satirizing the very people and places that once employed them. 8pm. Lobero Theatre, 33 E. Canon Perdido St. $35-$45. Call 963-0761.

how the climate crisis will affect our area, what has happened so far, and what we can do. Noon- 2pm. Faulkner Gallery, S.B. Central Library, 40 E. Anapamu St. Free. Call 564-5621. sbplibrary.org

4/17: Café KITP: The Physics of Flying KITP (Kavli Institute for

sbplibrary.org

4/15: The Capitol Steps Be prepared

THE CRUCIBLE

Come explore this engaging and occasionally trippy new novel that examines the first scientific and recreational forays into LSD and its mind-altering possibilities with this best-selling author and S.B. native. A book-signing will follow the lecture. 5:30pm. S.B. Museum of Art, 1130 State St. $5-$10. Call 963-4364. Read more on p. 47. sbma.net

4/16:

TUESDAY 4/16

Robert Ward’s

As always, find the complete listings online at independent.com/events. And if you have an event coming up, submit it at independent.com/eventsubmit.

11-17

lobero.org

OPERA SANTA BARBARA

INDEPENDENT CALENDAR

APR.

3118 & 3122 PREBLE AVE

WEDNESDAY

Solvang: Copenhagen Dr. and 1st St., 2:30-6:30pm

FISHERMAN’S MARKET

426 & 410 VALMORE AVE

PROPERTY FEATURES & BENEFITS: • • • •

Four (4) R1-7 single family lots Total area of 32,671 square ft R1-7 zoning Lemon Grove Neighborhood

• Adjacent to Blanche Reynolds Park & Elementary School • No HOA • Utilities readily available for hookup

SATURDAY

Rain or shine, meet local fishermen on the Harbor’s commercial pier, and buy fresh fish (filleted or whole), live crab, abalone, sea urchins, and more. 117 Harbor Wy., 6-11am. Call 259-7476. cfsb.info/sat

Augustin Hadelich Fundraiser

Volunteer Opportunity

Civil Discourse

Protest

3•19

BID DATE: Thursday, May 9th 2019 All four lots are being offered collectively in a sealed bid process

CONTACT US FOR MORE INFORMATION

805-654-7712 www.cityofventura.ca.gov/1419/Property-Management INDEPENDENT.COM

APRIL 11, 2019

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35


Home Health | Personal Care | Palliative | Hospice

All Gaucho Reunion

HEALTHCARE EDUCATION &

Taste of UCSB

J B FA I R

Food, Beer and Wine Festival presented by Hotel Californian

APRIL 23

RN LVN CNA

PT

HHA Caregiver

Meet our Nursing Leadership and Recruiting Team, learn about job opportunities with Visiting Nurse & Hospice Care, and earn CE credits for your healthcare career. Sandwiches, salads and beverages will be served. Registration is recommended and admission is FREE.

Live Music

Being with a Person with Dementia — Listening and Speaking (1 CE)* VISITING NURSE & HOSPICE CARE 512 E. Gutierrez St TUESDAY, APRIL 23 from 5:00–6:30 PM Class starts at 5:30 PM

with Cool Water Canyon

Over 30 participating

alumni vintners, brewers and food providers

*Provider, Visiting Nurse and Hospice Care of S.B., approved by the California Board of Registered Nursing, Provider #CEP5310 for 1 hour

All Taste guests receive a Taste of UCSB logo souvenir stemless glass.

RSVP with our Recruiter Danny at 805.690.6223

..

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VNHC EMPLOYEE BENEFITS • Competitive Salary • Tuition Reimbursement • Medical, Dental, Vision • Life, AD&D, LTD & EAP • Retirement Plan & FSA • Pet Insurance • PTO & Holidays

.

WE OFFER • Onsite Interviews (English & Spanish) • CE Credit • Sandwiches, Salad & Beverages • Free Registration & Admission

YE

AR

Visiting Nurse & Hospice Care (VNHC) and its affiliates comply with applicable Federal civil rights laws and do not discriminate on the basis of race, color, national origin, age, disability, or sex. www.vnhcsb.org/nondiscrimination.

1908-2018 & Beyond Accredited in Home Health & Hospice

vnhcsb.org/careers

Come back to campus to savor all the fun. SATURDAY, APRIL 27 2:00 P.M. - 5:00 P.M. UC SANTA BARBARA CAMPUS

alumni.ucsb.edu/taste

Santa Barbara • Montecito • Summerland • Carpinteria • Goleta Lompoc • Buellton • Solvang • Santa Ynez • Santa Maria

Is Your Boss Violating Your Rights? Adams Law focuses on Advocating employee rights in claims involving: • Wrongful Termination • Pregnancy Discrimination • Disability Discrimination • Hostile Work Environment • Sexual Harassment • Racial and Age Discrimination

• Misclassified “Salaried” Employees and Independent Contractors

COUPLES

Therapeutic Coaching

The New Rules of Marriage Program (Terry Real)

• Working “Off the Clock” • Unpaid Overtime Compensation/Bonuses • Reimbursement for Work-Related Expenses

Are You In Pain About Your Marriage? Is Your Marriage in Crisis?

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Adams Law Serving the Employment Law Needs of California’s Central Coast

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APRIL 11, 2019

INDEPENDENT.COM

MARRIAGE

From Marriage Tune-up to Last Chance Intensive Therapy Fast Paced, Down-to-Earth, No Nonsence Work Promotes Long-Lasting Change

I WILL HELP YOU.


living

Education

p. 37

Spelling Champs Advance to State Comp [Correction: This story originally ran on March 28 but mistakenly listed and pictured the winners from the 2017 competition. We apologize for the mixup.]

left to right:

Elementary winners Maxine Nocker, Hudson Bonsignore, Anna Butler

left to right:

Junior high winners Aria Nafziger, Victoria Chen, Conrad Stinson

THESE GUYS: Barbers Andres “Gordy” Hernandez (left) and Gerardo “Jerry” Barajas at Imperial Barbershop. “Hey, don’t forget to put in your article that every Wednesday is First-Responder Wednesday,” says Hernandez. “First responders get $5 off a haircut!”

Education

“T

CREATIONS: Montecito Union School students crafted leather hearts under the guidance of artist Tiffani Ortega of Mi Refugio Projects.

which naturally increases the magnitude of self-love, [which] then radiates into every heart they encounter, and that is how one heart can heal many.” “The teachers were amazed that their students were so open with expressing their feelings,” Ortega continued. “I create a safe and loving environment by sharing my own story. I show them how vulnerability gives us strength.” Ortega is a Santa Barbara native and has been creating art all her life. She embraced it fully five years ago and has paused her other projects to fully focus on Hearts by Tiffani. “It is the simplest pieces of art I make, yet the most powerful due to the ability to change hearts and lives,” she said. She tailors each workshop to the needs of her audience and has participated in yoga retreats, and various school programs and with several nonprofits. “It is my intention to inspire others to become more conscious of their thoughts by living from the heart, rather from the mind that holds ego and judgement,” she said. — Rebecca Horrigan

State Street’s

COURTESY

Art Therapy Benefits School Fundraiser

o heal a community, you must get to the heart of the matter,” said artist Tiffani Ortega. “You must heal the hearts with love so they can mend as one.” This was the idea behind Ortega’s “Heart to Heart, Hand in Hand” art project at Montecito Union School. Every year, the school picks an inspirational artist to work with students to create auction items for their school fundraiser. After last year’s devastating natural disasters, Montecito Union art teacher Alyssa Gonzalez reached out to Ortega, founder of Mi Refugio Projects and leader of art therapy workshops, to bring her Hearts by Tiffani project to 6th graders. Ortega’s workshops promote transformational learning through journaling and heart-focused artwork. “The soul demands to be seen, and what better way than through art?” Ortega said. “Art has no boundaries.” At Montecito Union, students selected one word that resonated with how they felt and then journaled about why they chose it and how to cope with the feelings it conjured. Afterward, each student created a leather heart and etched their word on it. The heart was filled with cotton to absorb the love and intention behind it, Ortega explained, then hand-mended both sides of the heart into one whole. The hearts were joined together in an iron heart frame symbolizing unity. Some of the words students selected included “hope,” “trust,” “believe,” and “empathy.” “When creating a new heart, individuals learn to critically reflect on their experiences,” Ortega said. “They then begin to consciously find new ways to implement plans to create change in their life. A change of heart can positively impact their lives,

PAUL WELLMAN

Shave & a Haircut

LUIS MEDINA/SBCEO PHOTOS

A

t the Santa Barbara County Spelling Bee earlier this year, four students earned invitations to the statewide competition coming up in May. At the elementary school level, Cold Spring School 6th grader Hudson Bonsignore (center) won first place by correctly spelling “bureaucracy.” Montecito Union School 6th grader Anna Butler (right) took second with “impersonator.” Third place went to Vieja Valley School 6th grader Maxine Nocker (left) for “inflammable.” As the top-two finishers, Bonsignore and Butler have been invited to the state comp next month at the San Joaquin County Office of Education, in Stockton. In the junior high division, Goleta Valley Jr. High 7th grader Victoria Chen (center) won by spelling “acquiesced.” Second place went to Carpinteria Middle School 8th grader Conrad Stinson (right) for “annihilate.” Aria Nafziger (left), an 8th grader from Our Lady of Mt. Carmel, landed in third by spelling “emollient.” Chen and Stinson advance; the state comp runs next month in San Rafael at Miller Creek Middle School. “It takes courage to compete publicly, and we are truly impressed with the level of engagement, preparation, and excitement around this countywide bee,” Santa Barbara County Superintendent of Schools Susan Salcido said. “We also want to express our gratitude to the many volunteers, partners, parents, and schools who participated in ways big and small.” —Indy Indy Staff

Newest Barbershop A

fter graduating from Santa Barbara High School in 2012, Gerardo “Jerry” Barajas wasn’t sure exactly where he was headed in the work world. He said he considered a career in law enforcement but figured it would be tough to qualify since he wasn’t a great student. “And I always thought barbering was a really interesting trade,” he remembered. “Everybody is always going to need a haircut, right?” He enrolled in the professional barbering program at Lu Ross Academy in Ventura. “I completed the 1,500-hour course,” he said. “Then when you pass the state test to get a license, you’re pretty much on your own, out there looking for a job. And it’s hard for a barbershop to take a risk on somebody right out of barber school.” Fortunately, he got three months under his belt at the Chop Shop on upper State before moving to Goleta Barbers for more than a year. From there, he landed a position at Mesa Barbers. But still, he remembers struggling to hone his craft. “The learning process seemed like it was taking me a long time,” he said. Luckily [at Mesa Barbershop] I had four barbers there who were really experienced and helped me out a lot.” One of those mentors was his good friend Andres “Gordy” Hernandez, whom he’d known since high school. After more than three years on the Mesa, Barajas started thinking about opening his own shop. Hernandez wanted in. “And now I work for the guy!” Hernandez said. “I had been looking for a space since September of 2017,” Barajas remembered. “I wanted to do my own thing, and I did it.” He opened Imperial Barbershop late last year. Luckily, he added, more than 80 percent of his clientele followed him to the new shop— same with Hernandez’s steady customers. “Gordy has really taught me a lot,” said Barajas. “It’s been great to expand this barbershop together and build it from scratch.” — Keith Hamm

Imperial Barbershop is located at 1827 State Street. For an appointment, call 324-4689. Instagram: @imperial_barbershop_sb INDEPENDENT.COM

APRIL 11, 2019

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37


Santa Barbara’s 5-STAR FAMILY DENTAL OFFICE New Patient SAVINGS!

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$100 OFF ANY DENTAL TREATMENT

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www.johnsonfamilydental.com $100 off dental services when you purchase dental services with combined ARV (actual retail value) of $300 or more. Valid for new patients and once per person. Offer is not redeemable for cash or credit. Valid on non covered services only. Not valid on services for which reimbursement is limited due to deductibles, maximums, co-insurance, or other insurance restrictions. Offer is subject to change and cannot be combined. Treatment must be rendered by 7/10/19.

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Does not include crown, abutment or bone graft. Does not apply to past purchases. Treatment must be rendered by July 10, 2019. See office for complete details. Valid on non-covered services only. Offer is subject to change and cannot be combined. ©2019 Steven G. Johnson Dental Corporation, Steven G. Johnson, DDS. All rights reserved.

Sustainable Heart

When times are tough, you need strong representation.

Adult Ed is back.

~ Transformational Life Counseling ~

Relationships • Occupation and Career • Meditation Grief and Loss • Major Life Transitions • Anxiety Spiritual Issues • Communication • Conflict

Michael H Kreitsek, MA

Transpersonal Counseling Psychology Counseling From a Buddhist Perspective 805 698-0286 38

THE INDEPENDENT

APRIL 11, 2019

INDEPENDENT.COM

115 W. Mission Street 805-845-5405 mysantabarbaralawyer.com

Classes & Workshops Start Every Week For more information visit sbcc.edu/ExtendedLearning or call (805) 683-8200


C AITLIN FITCH

Channel Islands

living

FREE Community Event

Thu, Apr 11 / 8 PM

Under the stars at the SB County Courthouse, Sunken Garden

Last Call for

WHOA! The Santa Barbara Channel holds 28 species of marine mammals, big whales among them.

Spring Whale Watching

H

It’s Mountainfilm like you’ve never seen it before! Join us for this special free community screening in celebration of A&L’s 60th anniversary. Bring a blanket and cozy up under the stars for a selection current and best-loved films from the annual festival in Telluride. (90 min.)

Bring blankets, low-back chairs, a picnic, and your friends!

Co-presented with the Santa Barbara County Office of Arts & Culture Special thanks to Santa Barbara County Parks and the Community Services Department of Santa Barbara County

DOUG MANGUM

umpbacks breaching against the backdrop of the Channel Islands drew passengers to the bow of the boat. The captain’s voice rang out: “Okay, folks, we have a pair of humpback at 3 o’clock— lock take a look.” On this day in the Santa Barbara Channel with Island Packers Cruises, passengers saw more than 10 humpbacks, a gray whale, and several dolphin pods. Even the seasoned crewmembers called it an impressive day on the water. Boating the channel often carries the exciting potential to see some of the 28 species of marine mammals found here. Winter is the ideal season for whales, as they migrate along our coastlines. According to Judy Oberlander, a volunteer with Channel Island National Park, recent outings have even spotted orca pods. There was a feeling of awe and anticipation onboard that day as we kept our eyes peeled for the spray of a blowhole or the flash of a bowed tail. Several pods of dolphins frolicked alongside the boat throughout the day, delighting in the wake of the ship. The crew explained that for every dolphin visible on the surface, 5-10 were swimming below, meaning that at one point, we may have been visited by upward of 3,000 dolphins.

Media Sponsor:

Corporate Season Sponsor:

(805) 893-3535 www.ArtsAndLectures.UCSB.edu

A GOOD DAY: Experienced boat captions have a knack for finding the right time and place for whale sightings in Santa Barbara’s big front yard.

Boating in the channel also offers wide views of the shoreline from Ventura to Santa Barbara and a closer look at San Miguel, Santa Rosa, Santa Cruz, Anacapa, and Santa Barbara islands and their surrounding waters. After a particularly stormy winter, crewmembers said they’re excited to get back on the water more regularly and enjoy spring’s warmer weather. Island Packers operates several days a week out of Ventura Harbor, a bustling shopping and dining destination with nearly three dozen storefronts, including restaurants, galleries, and shops filled with beach essentials, local art, souvenirs, and handcrafted jewelry. Like its sister location in Santa Barbara, Ventura’s Brophy Bros. is a popular culinary experience, featuring fresh seafood, handcrafted cocktails, and harbor views. Just downstairs, Fratelli’s Pizza and Brew is ideal for familyfriendly quick bites. A short walk away, Coastal Cone serves up 46 ice cream flavors, complete with their signature Taiyaki cone, a fish-shaped waffle treat— treat a great way to end a great day on the water. — Amelia Buckley

Winter whale watching with Island Packers runs through mid-April; summer trips start up mid-June. Wildlife-viewing trips to Anacapa Island run yearround. For more info, visit islandpackers.com. INDEPENDENT.COM

APRIL 11, 2019

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39


04 14 2019 Free and open to the public.

Irvin Ungar Arthur Szyk: Soldier in Art Arthur Szyk often said “Art is not my aim, it is my means.” Yet, his contemporaries praised him as the greatest illuminator-artist since the 16th century. He saw himself as a fighting artist, enlisting his pen and paintbrush as his weapons against hatred, racism, and oppression before, during, and after World War II. As the leading anti-Nazi artist in America during the War, Szyk also created the important and widely circulated art for the rescue of European Jewry. His Passover Haggadah has been acclaimed as “worthy of being considered as one of the most beautiful books ever produced by the hand of man.” In this talk, Irvin Ungar will expose the viewer to the breadth and depth of the power, purpose, and persuasion of the great artist and the great man, Arthur Szyk.

Sunset Dinner Specials

Sunday April 14, 2019 3:00 p.m. Loma Pelona Conference Center UC Santa Barbara

From $13.99 Every Night in April! From 5:00 to 6:30pm

Books will be available for purchase and signing after the talk courtesy of Chaucer’s Books. For further information contact: Richard D. Hecht Maeve Devoy ariel@religion.ucsb.edu maeve@cappscenter.ucsb.edu (805) 893-2317

Join us for a beautiful evening

113 Harbor Way • By The Boats • Free Valet Parking

For Reservations (805) 564-1200 • www.chuckswaterfrontgrill.com

CELEBRATING 21 YEARS!

JOIN US

PROUDLY SERVING SANTA BARBARA FOR OVER 40 YEARS

EASTER SUNDAY April 21 • 10 am - 2 pm for our

EASTER BUFFET

Make Reservations Today! L O C A T I O N S Goleta (The Original) 5735 Hollister Avenue

La Cumbre Plaza 3890 La Cumbre Lane

Milpas 216 South Milpas Street

40

Lompoc 1413 N H Street

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Downtown 628 State Street

Isla Vista 888 Embarcadero Del Norte

Buellton 209 E Hwy 246

Santa Maria 985 E Betteravia Road

APRIL 11, 2019

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LIVE MUSIC Fridays & Saturdays

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PICO

BRINGS BURGER NIGHT TO TOWN

Pico Burger Night @ Farmer Boy Menu on p. 43

Pure Order Brewing Turns Five

P

ure Order Brewing Company is celebrating its five-year

anniversary at its homey Quarantina Street location on Saturday, April 13, with a day of live music, food, games, and community-oriented fun. The brewery is owned and operated by the Santa Barbara– based Burge family, who, from the beginning, have set their sights on embodying the spirit of the “American Riviera.” This ethos extends from their support of charities — including the creation of Montecito Red to honor and fundraiser for Thomas Fire and 1/9 Debris Flow victims — to their welcoming atmosphere, where smiling faces provide a relaxing vibe, much like you’ve walked over for a beer in your friend’s backyard, complete with bocce. Celebrate at Saturday’s “We are very involved with Beer Bash with Live Music our surrounding community,” said co-owner David Burge, BY REBECCA HORRIGAN who believes Pure Order offers “a family-friendly environment at the tap room for Santa Barbarians to enjoy.” The idea for Pure Order first percolated in the mind of James Burge, who developed a passion for home brewing and brought his cousin David on board to run sales and marketing. The two built the 2,000-square-foot warehouse largely themselves and created a comfortable patio with plenty of room for food trucks, games, and live music space, all set against the idyllic mountain backdrop. “We have been so surprised by the support from Santa Barbara,” said David. “Both from bars and restaurants who have generously chosen to carry our product and from our regulars at the tap room who have become not only great friends of Pure Order but great friends of James and me personally.” Pure Order’s name was derived from the German Reinheitsgebot (Purity Order) of 1516, which stated that only three ingredients — malts, hops, and water — can be used in brewing beer. (Yeast was added to modern versions of the purity order after the discovery of its role in fermentation.) The brewing team keeps this model in mind with each creation. “James and I started this company with very little experience in the beer industry, so it has been a hell of a ride,” explained David. “But as we approach our fifth year, it feels like we have really gotten the hang of it and could not be more excited for the next five years.”

FOOD & DRINK

W

hen Pico opened in the Los Alamos General Store three years ago, they wanted to support North County locals by offering half-off meals every Wednesday night to card-carrying residents. “But when winter came,” Chef Drew Terp explains, “we knew we were not going to make any money if we kept charging half price.” Instead, Terp started making a secret burger menu PATTY PARTY: Pico comes to Farmer Boy to serve this carnitas burger, the Dagwood every Wednesday night just (above), and other creations. for those regulars. Week one, they sold 19 burgers. Week two, 70. Week three, Terp says, “We sold out of burgers orite Los Alamos Fav to host the night and found one in in an hour.” Boy r e With a hit on their Farmer Boy, the big breakfastrm a F to s e Com focused classic diner on upper hands, Pico owners Will nly State Street. So on Sunday, Henry and Kali Kopfor One Night O April 14, Pico won’t be servley started opening on Sundays, strictly serving ing burgers in Los Alamos Terp’s Burger Night menu. — instead, Terp is bringing IN You could get a regular the whole crew down to host IS H C T A BY GEORGE Y with customized toppings, Santa Barbara Burger Night at the special burger of the week, Farmer Boy. or a Dagwood, Terp’s homage “Not only is Drew a great chef, but his personto the Blondie comic’s physics-defying mega- ality makes dining at his restaurant — especially sandwiches. And the crowds kept coming. burger night — even more fun,” said Robinson. One Sunday, the dining club Epicurean Santa “You can hear his laugh all the way from the Barbara (ESB) showed up with a dozen people. kitchen, and he speaks about his dishes with so “They asked, ‘How do we get this in Santa Bar- much enthusiasm and expertise. He is the type bara so we don’t have to drive here?’” recalled of talent we like to celebrate and share with the Terp. public.” The next thing he knew, ESB’s Amy Baer RobReservations are required via independent inson was looking for a Santa Barbara location .com/burgernight.

CHEERS TO THAT: Pure Order Brewing Company’s David and James Burge are throwing a bash to celebrate five years of suds this Saturday.

The fifth-anniversary party for Pure Order Brewing Company (410 N. Quarantina St.; pureorderbrewing.com) is Saturday, 4·1·1 April 13, noon-11 p.m., with yoga at 12:15 p.m., food from Buena Onda, comedy and emceeing by Terrance Washington, and live music by Afishinsea (5-7pm) and The Olés (8pm).

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42

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FOOD & DRINK

Ike’s Love & Sandwiches for State & Mission

R

eader Gina was driving by the former Subway

location at the corner of Mission and State streets, next to 7-Eleven, and noticed that a sign for Ike’s Love & Sandwiches has been posted. This would be the second South Coast location for the eatery, which opened at 6530 Seville Road in Isla Vista in April 2016. Founded in San Francisco in 2007, there are now more than 55 locations across California and Nevada. I met founder Ike Shehadeh when he was in town for the I.V. grand opening and was told that Ike’s is the kind of place that welcomes all types of eaters — whether you’re vegan, glutenfree, or eat it all, everybody can go to the same spot together and not feel like they’ve compromised. I tried the Ménage à Trois sandwich, a longtime favorite that was invented by staff members, and it’s on my top 10 list of favorite sandwiches across the South Coast. It gets its name because this chicken sandwich has three sauces (honey, honey mustard, and BBQ) and three cheeses. Visit loveandsandwiches.com. SOLVANG RAMEN: Reader Steve H. passed the word that Ramen Kotori has opened at 1618 Copenhagen Drive in Solvang. Chef Francisco Velazquez and his wife, Ikuko “Erica” Velazquez, have partnered with Budi Kazali of The Ballard Inn to open Solvang’s first ramen noodle restaurant. Francisco started cooking at The Ballard Inn and Restaurant, where he first became accustomed to using Asian ingredients under the guidance of Kazali. In 2013, Erica and Francisco met in San Diego while working together at the Marine Room, the flagship restaurant of The La Jolla Beach and Tennis Club. Together they made their way north to Napa Valley and worked at Michelin-starred restaurant La Toque, and at acclaimed Iron Chef Masaharu Morimoto’s Morimoto Napa. After leaving Napa and moving to Sonoma County, they found an opportunity to work at a small ramen shop in Sebastopol before moving back to the Santa Ynez Valley, and they hope to share their love for Japanese food and ramen with the community. Call 691-9672 or visit ramenkotori.com. NEW BAKERY FOR THE MESA: The Little Things Bakery recently took over the Your Cake Baker by

WE LIKE IKE: From the 2016 grand opening of Ike’s Love & Sandwiches in Isla Vista, here is a photo of (from left) Jessie Trimm, founder Ike Shehadeh, and Alex Bermudez Jr.

Wayne Kjar location at 2018 Cliff Drive on the Mesa. Owners Celia Figueroa and Leah Hodson both worked and trained under Wayne Kjar, son of local legend Henning Kjar. “We want our customers to get exactly what they envisioned,” said Hodson. “We know that event planning can be stressful, and we want to help alleviate some of that stress by offering step-by-step guidance through the ordering process of all our cakes and desserts for any event.” Call 845-5519 or visit thelittlethings bakerysb.com CUBANEO CONTINUED: After writing about the opening of Cubaneo last week, owner Jesse Gaddy gave me more details. “We’re doing our soft opening as of now, and in a couple of weeks we’ll be opening for lunch and expanding our late-night menu as well,” he said. “For now, we’re really focusing on training our staff and making sure the product is on point every time.” Gaddy also owns and operates sister eatery Barbareño at 205 West Canon Perdido Street. SUNDAYS AT LITTLE DOOR: Reader Xavier says that The Little Door at 129 East Anapamu Street will be finally opening its doors on Sundays, starting April 14. I’m told that they will be featuring a different chef (Clark Staub from Full of Life Flatbread, Los Alamos) and an entirely different menu. FOXTAIL FUN: Owner Falah Maayah is celebrating the two-year anniversary of Foxtail Kitchen & Bar (14 E. Cota St; 845-6226; foxtailkitchen.com) with a full-day happy hour on Friday, April 12. It features $5 craft beers, special cocktails, free hookah at the patio, live music, and free Lebanese dessert. CLOSURES AND MOVEMENT: Reader Primetime tells me that Borrello’s Pizza and Pastaria, which opened in September 2015 at 3807 Santa Claus Lane in Carpinteria, is scheduled to close and that new owners will take over the space within a week. … Reader Shabadoo says that Il Fustino closed up shop in the Santa Barbara Public Market and moved out. … Reader Jennifer says that the building at 1031 State Street, formerly the home of Aldo’s Italian Restaurant, is getting a facelift. Aldo’s closed in January 2017.

John Dickson’s reporting can be found every day online at SantaBarbara.com. Send tips to info@SantaBarbara.com.


38th Annual

UCSB ECONOMIC SUMMIT

Pico Burger Night @ Farmer Boy Menu Cont’d from p. 41 option, you choose any five toppings, from five cheeses (cheddar, pepper jack, Drunken Goat, Manchego, provolone) to sautéed mushrooms and more, atop Terp’s ¾-pounder blend of ribeye, short rib, and brisket that he developed working for years at butcher shop in Alabama. “We do a double grind on a third of the meat,” he explained, “and the different textures hold the burger together, so you get a nice crust on the outside but it’s soft on the inside.” He uses cast iron pans to add that outer sear.

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FRENCH PETIT VALENTIEN, 1114 State St. #14, 805966-0222. Open M-F 11:30-3pm (lunch). M-Sat 5pm-Close (dinner). Sun $25.50 four course prix fixe dinner. In La Arcada Plaza, Chef Robert Dixon presents classic French comfort food at affordable cost in this cozy gem of a restaurant. Petit Valentien offers a wide array of meat and seafood entrees along with extensive small plates and a wine list specializing in amazing quality at arguably the best price in town. A warm romantic atmosphere makes the perfect date spot. Comfortable locale for dinner parties, or even just a relaxing glass of wine. Reservations are recommended. INDIAN FLAVOR OF INDIA 3026 State 682-6561 $$ www.flavorofindiasb.com Finest, most authentic Indian cuisine is affordable too! All You Can Eat Lunch Buffet $10.95 M-S dinner combos $9.95+ Specials: Tandoori- Mixed or Fish, Chicken Tikka Masala, Shrimp Bhuna. Also: meat, curries & vegetarian.Wine & Beer. Take out. VOTED BEST for 20 YEARS! MEDITERRANEAN FOXTAIL KITCHEN 14 E. Cota St. Lebaness cuisine, American burger, 24 craf beer, great cocktails, whiskey bar, vegan options, open late night, hookah lounge. Kitchen closes at midnight on the weekend, try our best falafel in town. www.foxtailsb.com

$200 (includes copy of annual publication and continental breakfast). Available at artsandlectures.sa.ucsb.edu or call the A&L box office at 805.893.3535. For event information, call 805.893.5148.

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Dining Out Guide

LITTLE KITCHEN, 17 W. Ortega St. (805) 7702299. “Great little neighborhood café!” Healthy, comfortable, and affordable. Lunch-Dinner-Late Night. Organic chicken and hormone/antibioticfree burgers, local produce. Try the Chicken Tikka Masala, vegetarian options. Great local wine list and craft beers. www.littlekitchensb.com

ETHIOPIAN AUTHENTIC ETHIOPIAN cuisine Featured at Petit Valentien Restaurant 1114 State St. #14, 805-966-0222. Serkaddis Alemu offers an ever changing menu with choices of vegetarian, vegan, and meat options. Catering Available for parties of up to 40 people. Sat/Sun lunch 11:30-2:30

Check-In/Breakfast: 7:30-8:30 am Presentations: 8:30-10:45 am

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evil villain when asked about this creation, so take Baer Robinson’s description: “It’s an experience in its own right.” Expect an average of 15-20 items per burger, something as tall as a wine glass, and each one is different as they’re made from “leftovers” from the kitchen. That means kimchi and/or beet risotto, Hasselback potatoes and/or oxtail jus, and so on. “I’ve only seen one person eat it by picking it up,” Terp reported, “but then he had to get a straw to drink his glass of wine because he couldn’t put it down.” n

week, Terp reprises a Los Alamos favorite: an eight-ounce burger with four ounces of house-made carnitas. The unctuous pile of meat is cut with “smoked guacamole, which adds some acid, and fried shoestring onions, which add some crunch.” It’s the special side

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The Granada Theatre

The Dagwood: Terp just laughs like an

Carnitas Burger: For the burger of the

DINING OUT

MAY 16, 2019

of dirty rice that makes Terp ooh with pleasure. Zipped up with jalapeño, pork fat, and schmaltz, all Terp can confirm is that: “It’s dirty.” (The other burgers come with a mixed green salad and mustard vinaigrette, for as Terp put it, “I’d be happy to eat a salad after a 12-ounce burger.”)

Regular (ha!) Burger: For the “basic”

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Ridley-Tree Cancer Center

Spring 2019

Lecture Series Improving Outcomes from Colorectal Cancer: Diet, Lifestyle, and Chemoprevention

Featured Speaker

Dr. Ng will discuss dietary and lifestyle behaviors that may reduce the risk of developing colorectal cancer and improve prognosis in colorectal cancer patients.

Thursday, April 25, 2019 6:00 pm – 7:00 pm

Wolf Education & Training Center at Ridley-Tree Cancer Center 540 W. Pueblo Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93105 Free-of-charge. Reservation required. RSVP by April 23 to (805) 879-5698 or events@ridleytreecc.org. Ofreceremos interpretación al español. Si desea reservar auriculares, por favor llame al (805) 563-5802.

NORTHERN EUROPEAN ANDERSEN’S DANISH RESTAURANT & BAKERY. 1106 State St., 805-962-5085. Open Daily 8am-9pm. Family owned for over 42 years. Northern European Cuisine with California Infusion. Fresh scratch made pastries & menus everyday. Authentic Breakfasts, Lunches & Dinners. Happy Hour menu with exquisite wines & beers, 3-7pm everyday. High Tea served everyday starting at 2pm. Huge Viking Mimosas & Champagne Cocktails. Private Event spaces.

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at Sansum Clinic

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Yanni’s Greek & American Deli

Located at MacKenzie Market

Serving Santa Barbara for 33 Years!

e r u t u f r u o y r e v o c Dis graduate school

EXPERIENCE PACIFICA

at our Information Weekend

April 27th-28th, 2019

Join us in Santa Barbara for our Information weekend and learn about our various degree programs in Depth Psychology, Humanities, Clinical Psychology, Counseling and Mythological Studies. Faculty from each of the programs will be hosting program-specific information sessions throughout the day. Don't miss out on this event! At our April Introduction weekend, you will: Experience Pacifica’s unique interdisciplinary degree programs led by our renowned faculty.

Learn how to navigate the admissions and financial aid processes to make graduate school a reality. Enjoy complimentary continental breakfast and lunch. We will be giving away a $200 bookstore gift certificate. Experience staying overnight and participate in a Sunday lecture on Dream Tending with Dr. Stephen Aizenstat.

Sunday, April 28, 2019 9:00 AM – 12:00 PM

Evening Featured Presentation Mary Watkins

Mutual Accompaniment and the Creation of the Commons

Dinner, Wine Tasting and Evening Presentation Also, join us on Saturday evening for a catered dinner, wine tasting and evening presentation. We will be giving away two-for-one tasting coupons and a bottle of Summerland’s Proprietor’s Reserve Collection.

Now Enrolling for Fall 2019. Apply Online at

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Goleta Valley Community Center

320 East Gutierrez Street

5679 Hollister Ave Goleta

Starts Tuesday, February 5, 2018

Starts Friday February 1st, 2018

Walk-ins only

Walk-ins only

Tuesdays and Wednesdays, 1 to 5 PM*

Fridays, 9 AM – Noon and 1 to 4 PM

*Last check in at 4 PM 44

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Full Service Deli

Saturday, April 27, 2019 10:00 AM – 4:00 PM 5:00 PM – 9:00 PM

Dr. Mary Watkins will illustrate both clinical and non-clinical expressions of accompaniment. While linking the private practice of psychology to various modes of public practice, she hopes to nourish your own imagination of the kinds of work you could do while and after studying at Pacifica.

Tour both of our beautiful campuses including the Joseph Campbell Archives and the Research Library.

Famous Gyros & Tri-tip

Weekend Schedule

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3102 State Street • 682-2051

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2019

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Thursday, May 2

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Wednesday, April 24 @ noon Contact your advertising representative today sales@ independent.com  965-5205


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ALAN CUMMING’S PHILIP TOLEDANO

LEGAL IMMIGRATION

SCOTTISH ACTOR, SINGER BRINGS CABARET TO TOWN

Tell me about your cabaret show. It’s 10 years since I became a citizen of America. And so [this show is] to talk about that and how that experience has changed. I called it Legal Immigrant because I don’t really think it matters anymore what prefix you use before the word “immigrant”—just the notion of immigration itself has been so denigrated. The [impe-

tus] for me was when I read that the U.S. Immigration Services had removed the phrase “nation of immigrants” from its website, which I thought was weird and huge and historical. And so I talk about how I feel about that, about the fact that I’m always going to be Scottish first. I also talk about getting older and other things. But mostly I wanted it to be a celebration of immigration. When you were doing research for the show, did you find that this is an atypical time regarding immigration? I read an interesting thing recently that during the Second World War after Japan hit Pearl Harbor, Asian people on the subway in New York would wear a sign saying, “I am Chinese.” They felt they had to discern. I feel there have been times when [anti-immigration sentiment was caused by] more extenuating circumstances — the country’s at war, a country invaded us. Now it’s just based on fear. The president has validated flying your racist flag, so to speak. Totally. The other day, I was in Boston … and I did an interview with a local [news outlet], and the man asked me: “Sum up Trump in one sentence.” And I said, “If you elect a clown, you’re going to get a circus.” That’s brilliant. I was very proud of myself. [Laughs.] I think we all need to be on guard; let’s not fall into the trap of doing what [the president is] doing, just blaming the Other. We all elected this guy. I didn’t vote for him. But I’m part of the society that voted for him. Now, how did that happen? How did we get to … the place where this happening? We have to take responsibility for it. We can’t just throw our heads in the sand.

COURTESY

PAGE 45

THE TEMPTATIONS I just think everyone’s shouting at each other now. Nobody’s going to have their mind changed from being shouted at. You have to be kind and listen to people and ask them to see your point of view. What have people’s responses been to your show? People are very positive about the fact that I’m saying these things. The reason I called it Legal Immigrant is because the whole notion of immigration is off limits now. In certain places, [the audience has] been quite contentious and noisy. I did a concert in December in West Palm Beach … it got really intense. I got heckled; some man said, “Go back to where you came from.” And I went, “It’s my show; it’s called Legal Immigrant. You might have expected some chat [about that].” Also, I’m talking about my experience. It’s very interesting that people can’t hear; they just can’t engage with any discussions. That’s what I want: I want people to talk; I want people to discuss things. — Michelle Drown

UCSB’s Arts & Lectures pres4·1·1 ents Alan Cumming Thursday, April 18, 8 p.m., at The Granada Theatre. Call 893-3535 or see artsandlectures.ucsb .edu.

The Temptations set the bar high as Motown Records’ oftenimitated but never-matched finest vocal group with the best choreography from its golden era. With classic songs such as “My Girl,” “Cloud Nine,” “Psychedelic Shack,” and “Papa Was a Rollin’ Stone,” the group has garnered 43 Top 10 hits, 15 No. 1 R&B singles, three Grammys, induction into the Grammy Hall of Fame and Rock and Roll Hall of Fame, a star on the Hollywood Walk of Fame, and — most recently — a Broadway musical. I recently spoke over the phone with Temptations’ leader and baritone singer Otis Williams in advance of the group’s April 12 concert at Ojai’s Libbey Bowl. For a longer version of this interview, see independent.com/temptations.

What was it like working with producer Berry Gordy, choreographer Cholly Atkins, and the Funk Brothers? Motown … was just a wonderful place to be. I had no idea that it would turn out like it did, but I look back on it, and I’m very thankful and blessed to be associated with … great people that instilled in us being professionals in show business.

What are your memories of James Jamerson laying down that beautiful bass line on “My Girl,” and of lead vocalist David Ruffin? James Jamerson … set the tone for a lot of bass players that are playing today. … As far as David Ruffin is concerned … [he] could really sing; then he would throw the microphone up, and spin around and drop to his knees. It was a sight to see. [David] joined [The Temptations] in 1964. … From that point on, we had magic. We already had a name in Detroit, so we just started exploding. David added that extra little fire that helped make the Tempts be known for what we are.

Tell me about Motown artists’ ability to help advance civil rights during the ’60s. That’s the BEN CROP

SBCC’S SIGNIFICANT OTHER Touted by the New York Times as “a tenderly unromantic romantic comedy, as richly funny as it is ultimately heart-stirring,” Joshua Harmon’s play Significant Other tells the story of Jordan, a single twentysomething looking for “the one.” Along the way, Jordan discovers that finding a partner is just one of life’s challenges and that discovering your path and supporting your friends and loved ones are equally difficult tasks. For its final production of the season, the Theatre Group at SBCC presents Significant Other Other, April 12-27, at the Jurkowitz Theatre. The play, which ran on Broadway in spring 2017, is directed by Katie Laris with an ensemble cast including Hazel Brady, Christian Duarte, Marion Freitag, Manuel Davila, Aurora C. Gooch, Justin Kang, Irving Soto, and Annabell Walker. The play’s dialogue contains adult language and explores mature situations, so you may want to leave the kiddies at home. —MD

L I F E

e

A

lan Cumming is an actor, author, singer, comedian, and social activist. He has starred in myriad films, won awards for his theater performances, and written a best-selling memoir and several children’s books. He is also an immigrant. And it is that fact around which he created his one-man show Legal Immigrant. Born in Aberfeldy, Perthshire, Scotland, Cumming came to the United States in the late 1990s to play Master of Ceremonies in Cabaret on Broadway and never left. He settled in New York City, and in 2008 he became an American citizen. Through the years, Cumming has always been a proud transplant. But in today’s world, being an immigrant carries a negative association. Legal Immigrant explores — through song, dance, and humor— what it’s like to live in America these days, when the concept of “the Other” as enemy is so inflamed. “It’s only just over 400 years since English-speaking people came here,” Cumming said in a recent interview with the Independent. “It’s such a short time in history since everyone was an immigrant. It’s a very young country, so to be suddenly turning on yourself—it’s just so sad. The emotion of immigration itself is what has always been at the heart of America.” During our chat, Cumming spoke about the impetus for the show, audience reactions, and why immigration has become so topical. The following is an edited version of our conversation.

power of music! … It was so crazy back then as far as the civil unrest. And we were right there in the thick of all that craziness. But music would really calm a lot of situations. I remember once when we were down in Columbia, South Carolina, and there was a rope right down the center of the auditorium [segregating the races]. We came back the next year, and there was no rope down the center; blacks and whites were sitting side by side, having a great time. —Sean Mageean The Temptations play Friday, April 12, 5:30 p.m., at the Libbey Bowl (210 S. Signal St., Ojai). Call (888) 645-5006 or see libbeybowl.org.

Significant Other previews April 11 and runs April 12-27 at SBCC’s Jurkowitz Theatre. Call 965-5935 or see theatergroupsbcc.com.

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a&e | BOOKS PREVIEW

All Gaucho Reunion

T.C. BOYLE TAKES ON

O

f course T.C. Boyle’s new book is about psychedelics. The peacocking and impossibly prolific word wizard of Montecito released his 20th novel this month, and, on its face, Outside Looking In is in perfect lockstep with so much else in the mainstream vernacular these days. It checks all the boxes of the modern Psychedelic Renaissance that we are currently experiencing: psilocybin, LSD, rumors of medical value, and hopes of better decoding the wilderness of human consciousness. But, with Boyle being Boyle, that is where the predictability ends. Outside Looking In is, in turns, a raucous and reserved cannonball into the deep end of the baby boomer mind-set and the ongoing experiment of American mythmaking. “Look, when I was doing drugs — and I have done most of them — we weren’t looking for God. It was all about getting high and going crazy,” explained Boyle to me recently while sipping sparkling water in a sun-soaked corner of his side porch in Montecito. We were snacking on cherry tomatoes and crackers with hummus while watching one of the first true days of spring shine bright through the small forest of trees that surround his Frank Lloyd Wright– designed home. I had asked him about his interest in psychedelics and how exactly he came to write Outside Looking In,, a novel largely inspired by the real-life events of Dr. Timothy Leary’s now infamous Psilocybin Project at Harvard University. The 70-years-young author, dressed head to toe in

AUTHOR GOES BEHIND THE SCENES OF

OUTSIDE LOOKING IN by Ethan Stewart black save for his trademark red Converse sneakers, continued, “Personally, I never had a very good experience with [psychedelics]. All this business about it being able to change your life—I don’t know anything about that. … I got interested in this question: Is it possible to connect to something larger than yourself through a simple chemical process in the brain? You know, is God in the experience? I merely followed that curiosity.” Specifically, where he followed it was to the years 1956-1964 — a time when the soil of the American psyche was equal parts fertile for and fearful of change. Much like he did with novels The Road to Wellville, The Women, The Inner Circle, and When the Killing’s Done, Boyle takes real-life events and well-known people, employs them as key plot points and characters, and then brilliantly conjures the rest with his imagination and his gift for observing human behavior (much like Jane Goodall might observe a family of chimpanzees).

4•1•1

JAMIESON FRY

ACID

Gaucho Gallop 5K

and Kid’s Mile

Gaucho Gallop 5K presented by PayJunction and the Kid’s Mile presented by the Santa Barbara Independent

T.C. Boyle

And so, Outside Looking In has very real things in it, such as Albert Hofmann’s Bicycle Day, the now-famous Good Friday Experi Experiment at Marsh Chapel at Boston University, and Harvard’s aforementioned Psilocybin Project, as well as very real people, including Tim Leary, Walter Pahnke, Richard Alpert, and so on. But the way these events get fleshed out and the way these people come to life is 100 percent pure T.C. Boyle. More to the point, with the creation of the main characters, Fitzhugh Loney (an imagined graduate student at Harvard who is an advisee of Leary) and his wife, Joanie, Boyle is to able to offer more insight and exploration into this radical and often romanticized time than any straight recounting could hope to achieve; there is more recognizable and messy humanity on display in Boyle’s telling than any pure history book on the topic. “That is the freedom of fiction,” said Boyle of his process. “I simply inhabit that period and those characters and that space to see how it might have been. I don’t ever go into [writing] a story knowing the solution—that would be boring.” Indeed, for an author who has made much of his reputation through his hyper-creative exploration of the unknown within otherwise well-known stories of Americana, Outside Looking In represents a master at the peak of his form. It is both entertaining and insightful without ever losing its core authenticity. Even the most jaded LSD-heads will find much to appreciate in Boyle’s observations and suppositions. But the real value of the book likely lies in the afterglow of finishing it, when the plot twists are done and the buzz of being transported to Boyle’s imagined version of history is over. It’s then that you realize what the author’s real magic was — that he was somehow able to time travel from the throes of the full-blown psychedelic revival that we currently find ourselves in back to the mid-20th century to mine the origin stories of our nation’s first mainstream psychedelic obsession to help illuminate not just where we have been but, more importantly, where we might be going.

Ready…Set…Gallop! The Gaucho Gallop 5K course is a SBAA Grand Prix-sanctioned 5K. The Kid’s Mile (free) at 10 a.m. will provide your little ones (ages 10 & under) an opportunity to get their Saturday morning energy out, all in the pursuit of a finisher’s ribbon.

Register by April 1 to receive a “sport-tek” shirt.

SATURDAY, APRIL 27 9:00 A.M. UC SANTA BARBARA CAMPUS To register:

gauchogallop.eventbrite.com

buying

coins jewelry diamonds gold&silver Paul A. Brombal coins & jewelry

3000 State St. 805.687.3641 pbrombal.com

T.C. Boyle will be reading excerpts from and discussing his new novel, Outside Looking In, Wednesday, April 17, at the Santa Barbara Museum of Art (1130 State St.) as part of its Parallel Stories lecture series. See sbma.net.

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T H E U C S B M U LTI C U LT U R A L C E N T E R P R E S E N T S

HERE COMES EARTH DAY... WE’RE CELEBRATING IN A BIG WAY!

Giant Beach Cleanup! APRIL 12, 2019

HE OC

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FRI, APRIL 12TH, 7:30 PM MUSIC PERFORMANCE THE HUB AT UCSB $5 for UCSB students and youth under 12; $15 for general admission. For tickets, go to http://goo.gl/9JQhtf

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& EF International School 1421 Chapala St. | Santa Barbara, CA 93101

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a&e | BOOKS FEATURE

APRIL IS NATIONAL POETRY MONTH, PART II F

David Starkey Reviews a Book a Day

ormer Santa Barbara poet laureate, and a book reviewer for the Independent Independent, David Starkey does something special each year in honor of National Poetry Month (i.e., April) — he writes one review for every day of the month. Last week we ran the first 15 selections (see independent.com/poetry2019 for the complete list). The following are the next 15 book selections.

Doireann Ní Ghríofa, Lies: While these poems were originally written in Irish, the author’s facing page renderings into English never feel like mere translations. Instead, the poems are vibrant and musical, full of yearning for everything from the shadow of a lover’s hand to the “Secret melodies … concealed under winter wings.” Danielle Boodoo-Fortuné, Doe Songs: Trinidadian poet Boodoo-Fortuné is also a visual artist, a gift she expresses not just through the fanciful shape of her concrete poems, but also through her deft use of imagery and metaphor. “What is this body,” she asks, “if not a map of punctures, / a glossary of bruises?” Nicole Cooley, Of Marriage: The titles of these short, enigmatic poems — “Marriage as a Plate of Spinach” and “Marriage as a Skateboard Flung off a Bridge” — imply something of the book’s playfulness, but there’s also a real artistry in the connection between those titles and the poems themselves, as in the openopen ing line of “Marriage as Motel 6 on Airline Highway”: “Tonight I rinse my black tights in the sink, twist the nylon tight.” Sarah Corbett, A Perfect Mirror: Corbett’s creative engagement with earlier literary figures, including Marvell, Blake, and especially Dorothy Wordsworth and Sylvia Plath, is only part of the pleasure of this book, in which the poet treads care-fully from line to line while retaining much of the wildness of spirit and thought she so clearly values. Kevin Young, Brown: When Young quotes James Brown, “The one thing that can solve most / our problems is dancing,” you know he’s too wise to ever truly believe that, yet the power of music — and sports and poetry — to overcome at least some of the perils of life for African Americans is manifest throughout this wide-ranging book. John Montague, A Spell to Bless the Silence: Selected Poems: Montague died in 2016, and this selection of his best poems is a worthy summing up of the work of one of Ireland’s most revered poets. Among his many gifts was an impeccable ear, as demonstrated in this description of driving along the then-border between the Republic and Northern Ireland: “the glistening main road / snowplough-scraped, salt-sprinkled, / we sail, chains clanking, / the surface bright, hard, treacherous.” Jenny Xie, Eye Level: Xie’s poems are adventurous yet nuanced. Above all, she is a master of metaphor. “Sleep is a narrow corridor,” she writes in one poem, and in another, “The new country is ill fitting, lined / with cheap polyester, soiled at the sleeves.”

Terrance Hayes, American Sonnets for My Past and Future Assassin: Every poem in this powerful and angry collection is titled “American Sonnets for My Past and Future Assassin,” and all of them attempt, in one way or another, to address the catastrophe of race relations in this country. “Even the most kindhearted white woman,” Hayes writes, “Dragging herself through traffic with her nails / On the wheel & her head in a chamber of black / Modern American music may begin, almost / Carelessly, to breath nwords.” Robin Robertson, The Long Take: A Noir Narrative: The Long Take was shortlisted for the Man Booker Prize in fiction, and yet this book-length work about a Canadian World War II veteran in America is clearly a work of poetry. Scottish poet Robertson skillfully creates the world of a man who has left a place that “was just the past” for one where “they’re only thinking about the future — / the past is being torn down every day.” Emily Pettit, Blue Flame: “My name tag reads rabbit,” Pettit writes. “I am / the best refrigerator ever.” Many of her poems ping-pong from one subject to the next in a similar fashion. It’s an approach to language that will put off some readers, but excite many others who will enjoy the kinetic, rollercoaster experience of her poetry. Steve McOrmond, Reckon: Canadian poet Steve McOrmond is an expert at sifting through the detritus of the modern world and separating the genuine from the phony, as in “Night of the Sitcoms,” where the “bread is sprayed with / lacquer, there’s no plumbing / under the sink, the stairs / dead-end in air.” Sherwin Bitsui, Dissolve: In this collection of short, untitled poems, Navajo poet Bitsui slips in and out of the present and the past, reality and imagination. Almost every poem contains at least one striking, possibly indecipherable image like this one: “Semicolons coughed out by the final raven / sizzle the hand’s parched memory.” Alice Miller, Nowhere Nearer: A New Zealander who has studied in America and now lives in Austria, Miller has a wide and varied perspective. Her poems aren’t quite surrealistic, but there is a strangeness to them that at times is eerie. “If you see them come,” the poet says of the those coming to take her to her grave, “warn them I plan / to sing my way out.” Monica A. Hand, DiVida: Despite — or because of — the energy and life in DiVida, one can’t help feeling great sorrow that this posthumous collection was only Hand’s second book. Among the many treats in store for readers is an imagining of Othello at a house party: “how much money / do you even have Moor // just wait she will cuckold you / once she sees how black // you really are.” Erika Meitner, Holy Moly Carry Me: Meitner writes with passion and insight about the America some of us would just as soon forget, one inhabited by Dollar General and Food Lion stores, where people spend their days jackhammering limestone and watching college football games, the names of their Wi-Fi networks popping up as you drive down the freeway: “default, linksys, virus, / GodisGreat, youfoundme, getlost, / JEMguest, batcave, funkchance.” n INDEPENDENT.COM

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a&e | THEATER PREVIEW

IT’S HIGH SCHOOL MUSICAL TIME AREA STUDENTS BRING CLASSIC PRODUCTIONS TO THE STAGE

This spring’s musicals include classics and new favorites, and the educators helming the ships are using these pieces to start conversations about social issues within the context of theatrical presentation. Dos Pueblos High School presents the enduring favorite West Side Story, a Romeo and Juliet tale in mid-century New York. Maria is a young Puerto Rican woman who falls in love with Tony, who’s white. Beyond young love, the story highlights racial prejudice and gang violence—social ills we still contend with today. Director Clark Sayre chose this piece for its “amazing potency and relevance for our world today, dealing with our nation’s hot-button issues, like immigration, #MeToo, Black Lives Matter, and the March for Our Lives. West Side Story doesn’t tell us how we need to feel about these issues, it presents them in a way that we can draw our own conclusions,” he said. Sayre’s hope is that this piece, which portrays a population divided, can bring some sense of reconciliation and awareness to our area population, similarly divided along racial lines. “I feel a connection to this story because, as a Chicano, my people have fought to be known like everyone else in the U.S., and to be welcome,” said student actor David Aguirre. “West West Side Story shows that we Hispanics want to be in this country … a lot of us are willing to do whatever it takes to create a life here for ourselves and our families.”

SAY IT LOUD, AND THERE’S MUSIC ‘PLAYING / SAY IT SOFT, AND IT’S ALMOST LIKE PRAYING.’

LIVE AND IN ‘LIVING COLOR!’

San Marcos High School presents Catch Me If You Can May 2-3 and 9-11 at 7 p.m. and May 4 at 2 and 7 p.m. See smhstheaterdept.com. 50

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Laguna Blanca presents Once Upon a Mattress May 2-4 at 7 p.m. See lagunablanca.org/arts/upcoming-productions. CHRIS ORWIG

San Marcos and Santa Barbara high schools are producing newer musicals — Catch Me If You Can and Matilda, respectively. Shannon Saleh, who previously ran the Outburst youth theater program, is in her first year at San Marcos and wanted to produce a big ensemble show with “pizzazz.” “Catch Me if You Can features some very sassy numbers involving nurses and stewardesses,” said Saleh. “Although it is staged in the 1960s and uses some of the stereotypical gender roles of that time period, we are changing up some of the roles to modernize the show.” Saleh has focused the students toward learning about the changing gender-based social norms of the last 60 years in their character preparation. “I hope my students learn about the progress we have made as women in society, in terms of respect, power, and personal freedom, but also in concrete areas like job availability.” Indeed, this generation of female students knows that nurses and stewardesses aren’t the steel beams holding up the glass ceiling. Based on the popular film, which was based on the almost-unbelievable true story of a brilliant conman playing cat and mouse with the FBI, Catch Me If You Can tells of a man with skill and charm who finds success as a high-end grifter. Student performer Eva Moschitto describes the show as being about a teenager who gets lost in a world of crime and family turmoil— turmoil certainly a relatable concept to a young cast. Summed up by student actor Jack Boyd, Catch Me If You Can is a show about “a real family dynamic, one in all its imperfect glory.” Said Boyd: “Being able to show an audience through high-powered [musical] numbers that everything is not the black-and-white we expect it to be, but rather a wash of Technicolor, is simply wonderful.”

At Laguna Blanca, director Dana Caldwell and her student actors are producing another classic: Once Upon a Mattress, the quirky musical take on The Princess and the Pea. Laguna Blanca is in its second year of partnership with Ensemble Theatre Company, so these students get personal mentorship from area professionals. Once Upon a Mattress offers important, albeit light, life lessons. Beau Glazier, who will be portraying the wacky Princess Winnifred, offers a profound take on the importance of this show’s comedic characters. “This musical is about accepting our individual quirks, which each of the characters, especially Princess Winnifred, does,” Glazier said. “I love this eclectic cast of characters because they remind us that if you are brash and loud, or quiet and shy, you are still lovable.” This comedic take on a childhood favorite brings raucous royal shenanigans to the Spaulding Theater, which is being transformed into a castle to set the scene for fairy-tale frolic. Watch for what Caldwell calls the most intimidating challenge of creating this show: “That darn mattress!”

TOO FORMAL. ‘ WINNIFRED’S YOU CAN CALL ME BY MY NICKNAME … FRED.’

Dos Pueblos High School presents West Side Story April 12 at 7 p.m. and April 13 at 2 and 7 p.m. See dptheatrecompany.org.

CATCH ME IF YOU CAN

ONCE UPON A MATTRESS

MATILDA Santa Barbara High School’s Otto Layman has wanted to produce Matilda with his students since he saw the show in London several years back. Layman calls this new musical, based on Roald Dahl’s classic book, a show with “crazy comic energy, and a lot of great roles, especially for women. Matilda is a brilliant child of proudly anti-education, con-artist parents. She finds joy in books but lives in a world of tyranny from the adults in her life— life until she discovers a secret skill that lets her take control and bring order to her world. Said freshman performer Bridget DeVine, “I think most kids want education to be meaningful. They want to know why we do the things we are asked to do. We don’t want the teachers who can’t answer that question, or the ‘Trunchbulls’ who think education is meant to break the spirit of a child.” With an incredible moving set made from books, alphabet building blocks, and giant Scrabble tiles, the stage is a temple to the written word. Bella Holland, a senior performer, said “Matilda, to me, shows what we do best at SBHS … the shows here are actor-centered, and we are allowed — encouraged! — to create and invent.” Layman wants Matilda to connect with students and audiences alike, to remind everyone that reading is a political act.

CLAIRE FISCHER

WEST SIDE STORY

Shannon Saleh, and Clark Sayre. Don’t sleep on the area’s high school spring musicals: These productions feature professionallevel design in beautiful venues, giving young performers the experience of treading the boards in a working theater. These teens are talented and dedicated, and many go on to continue their work in art after graduation.

COURTESY

by Maggie Yates

MATTHEW MCKENZIE

T

he art scene in Santa Barbara boasts a wide array of media and genres from creators ranging from talented enthusiasts to world-class professionals. But more importantly, this community is planting seeds in schools across town and carefully cultivating the next generation of artists. Spring has sprung, and high school theater practitioners are blooming under the guidance of educators such as Dana Caldwell, Otto Layman,

‘WE ARE REBELLIOUS CHILDREN!’

Santa Barbara High School presents Matilda May 3-4 and 10-11 at 7 p.m., May 9 at 10 a.m., and May 11-12 at 2 p.m. See sbhstheatre.com.


DAVID BAZEMORE

a&e | THEATER PREVIEW

HISTORY LESSON: The play follows a writer, Jonathan (Jeremy Kahn, pictured center), on a pilgrimage with his grandfather (Adrian Sparks, right) through Ukraine to Trochenbrod, a shtetl that was converted into a ghetto during Nazi occupation. The two are helped along the way by Ukranian guide Alex (Matt Wolpe).

ETC PRESENTS

EVERYTHING IS ILLUMINATED A

s the generation that lived through Jonathan and Alex as they experience this World War II slowly ages out of exis- tour through history, also shows glimpses tence, memories of the conflict that of the war era of the 1940s and the original killed millions of soldiers, civilians, and Jewish community that existed on the land war prisoners, including those lost to the in the 1800s. “It’s an incredibly complex feat Holocaust, are more frequently rendered as to adapt such a novel and make the story artistic representations rather than firsthand dramatic for the stage,” explained Fox. A fan accounts. The war affected so many people all of Foer’s work, Fox described this adaptation over the world that stories of (by Simon Block) as capturing the era offer points of view as the novel’s “acerbic, ironic wit varied as the people who surand tone.” Kahn described the vived to tell their story. One show as a “sprawling journey such example is Ensemble across the Ukrainian counTheatre Company’s upcoming tryside” complemented by the production of Everything Is intimacy of the three men in Illuminated, a stage adaptathe car. tion of Jonathan Safran Foer’s Beyond the challenge of by Maggie Yates acclaimed novel of the same balancing comedy and pathos, name, directed by Jonathan there’s the varied linguistics Fox. across eras and characters to contend with. This play follows a young writer, Jona- “Every character uses language in a different than (Jeremy Kahn), on a pilgrimage road kind of way,” said Kahn. “My character has trip with his grandfather (Adrian Sparks) a very flowery way of speaking and often through Ukraine to return to Trochenbrod, examines his own language as he’s using it; a long-ago shtetl that was converted into a Alex has a more ‘creative’ use of the English ghetto during Nazi occupation. Jonathan’s language. The grandfather uses words spargrandfather was housed there and subse- ingly, and the characters from centuries past quently saved from annihilation by a woman have their own way of speaking. That tonal lost to time. Their Ukrainian guide, Alex shift is a challenge in acting, and it can be jar(Matt Wolpe), provides a dramatically differ- ring for an audience to experience that shift.” ent worldview (and comic foil) to Jonathan’s Other challenges include a canine characAmerican college student. “It’s very funny ter and the road-trip vehicle onstage. “We’re in some parts, and very dark and gripping not looking at it as realism, but as hints of in some parts,” said Fox, who describes Act realism,” Fox said. “It’s a landscape littered I as a bizarre road trip through the Ukraine, with representation: stacks of books, piles of and Act II as the reckoning with the ghosts shoes, that sort of thing.” This is an important piece for Fox, who, of the past. “There are moments where characters as the artistic director of Ensemble Theatre recount the horrors they experienced during Company and a fan of Foer’s work, is pleased the Holocaust,” said Fox, “but at one point, to present the Southern California premiere Alex says to Jonathan, ‘You think you guys of this show. Fox hopes Everything Is Illumiare the only ones who have suffered; there are nated will inspire connection between the people suffering today.’ … The story is larger audience and their own personal history, as than the Holocaust.” Similarly, Kahn encour- well as with the experiences of those around ages audiences to think of Everything Is Illu- them in realization of the grander tapestry minated as more than a play about the Jewish of human history across the world — much experience: “It’s not just a Jewish story,” he in the way that Jonathan discovers his own said. “It’s about how everyone has the right to history, one that is intertwined with the hislive, and the right to live in the way that they tories of Alex, a man from the other side of do without having to apologize for it.” the world, and his grandfather, a man from Foer’s novel, which follows the stories of a different time.

STAGE ADAPTATION EXPLORES

AFTEREFFECTS OF WWII

4•1•1

Ensemble Theatre Company presents Everything Is Illuminated April 11-28 at the New Vic. Call 965-5400 or see ensembletheatre.com.

Ballroom This weekend !

at the Lobero April 13 -14 lobero.org

Season Sponsors: Tim Mikel, Margo Cohen-Feinberg and Robert Feinberg Ballroom Sponsor: The Mosher Foundation Modern Masters Sponsor: Andre Yew Additional Funding: Barbara Burger, Paul E. Munch, and Lillian Lovelace

Modern Masters at the New Vic May 10-11 statestreetballet.com l 805 965 5400 INDEPENDENT.COM

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DAVID BAZEMORE

a&e | DANCE PREVIEW UCSB MULTICULTURAL CENTER PRESENTS

RHYTHM, RAP, AND RESISTANCE

DANCING SPIRIT: State Street Ballet will perform six dances, including “Misty,” set to the Ella Fitzgerald song, and “Bubbles,” which SSB’s Leila Drake Fossek describes as “the kind of dance that makes it impossible to stop smiling.”

STATE STREET BALLET PRESENTS

BALLROOM

W

ith celebrity competitions such as put it to me, “It’s all about the songs.” Nicole Dancing with the Stars driving popu- Thompson’s costumes and Sammy Jelinek’s lar appreciation for ballroom danc- lighting and scenic designs are sure to make ing to new levels, State Street Ballet (SSB) this one pop visually. Likewise with Sund’s takes a deeper, more historically informed “BAND,” with costumes by Barbara Drake approach in Ballroom, which the company and Barbara Whalen. This jazz-oriented will present at the Lobero Theatre this week- ensemble piece, which will cap the evening’s end, Saturday, April 13-Sunday, April 14. first half, is set to syncopated music by Duke But don’t think for a minute that this means Ellington, the Andrews Sisters, and Bing they lose any of the sizzle. On the contrary, Crosby. More than a dozen performers will the experience these dancers have gained appear in a nonstop sequence that includes through performing a wide range of dance in some of State Street techniques. Ballet’s other recent Perhaps the most evening-length producanticipated piece of the tions such as Chaplin evening is a recent work and An American Tango by Eisenhower, foundhas given them an edge ing artistic director of that no pro athlete or the renowned Eisenby Charles Donelan reality star can touch. hower Dance Detroit. This company sees and The septet is called feels the spirit of ballroom through the “Bubbles” in honor of Lawrence Welk and encompassing high-resolution lens of ballet. his orchestra, the musical inspiration for Three of the evenings six dances are by the work. According to SSB’s Leila Drake State Street’s co-artistic director, William Fossek, it’s “the kind of dance that makes it Soleau, and three are by other choreogra- impossible to stop smiling,” as it is loaded phers, all of whom will be familiar to fans of with humor and joy. Welk, best known the company: Kassandra Taylor Newberry, for his wholesome (yet somehow also Robert Sund, and Laurie Eisenhower. Sole- champagne-saturated) Saturday-evening au’s duo setting of “Misty” as sung by Ella national television broadcasts, first rose Fitzgerald will make a splendid romantic to fame in the ballrooms of Los Angeles, story for Anna Carnes to tell in the arms where he and his band drew thousands of of her partner Noam Tsivkin. That piece dancers nightly. is a world premiere, as is “Stand by Me,” The evening’s finale, “Nuevo Tango,” another duet, this one by Newberry and set stands as one of Soleau’s most ambitious and to the song as done by Otis Redding. Ahna passionate compositions. Set to the exquiLipchik and Nickolas Topete will bring hip- site music of tango master Astor Piazzolla, hop moves to this classic soul celebration of this broad canvas extends ample room for the featured duet of Deise Mendonça and the power of love. Soleau’s “Five by Gershwin” has been Francois Llorente along with eight ensemble a signature piece for the company since it dancers to ravish us with nearly half an was created in 2002. Three pairs of dancers hour’s worth of romance, Argentine-style. have almost 20 minutes to explore the many In the context of the Lobero, Ballroom will colors and moods present in the work of be an intimate experience guaranteed to America’s greatest songwriter. For Soleau, renew your excitement about what unites it’s a chance to show his profound respect the social and the spectacular aspects of for the quality of these compositions; as he couples’ dance.

DANCE COMPANY TAKES A HISTORIC APPROACH TO THE SOCIAL DANCE

4•1•1

State Street Ballet presents Ballroom on Saturday, April 13, at 7:30 p.m. and Sunday, April 14, at 2 p.m. at the Lobero Theatre. Call 963-0761 or see lobero.org.

THURS, APRIL 18TH

FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

7:30 PM PERFORMANCE

MULTICULTURAL CENTER THEATER

2019 SPRING DANCE CONCERT

FRACTURE Hatlen Theater APR 11-13 / 8 PM APR 14 / 2 PM theaterdance.ucsb.edu INDEPENDENT.COM

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TICKETS AVAILABLE: SB BOWL OR AT AXS.COM / SBBOWL.COM / GOLDENVOICE.COM 54

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AUG 11 AUG 17 AUG 24 AUG 25 SEP 05 SEP 17 SEP 20 SEP 27 SEP 29 OCT 16 OCT 24 TICKETS: ARLINGTON THEATRE / BY PHONE 805-963-4408 / THEARLINGTONTHEATRE.COM


KEN SCHWARTZ

a&e | POSITIVELY STATE STREET

Música, Danza, y Mucho Más

MUSIC MAN: In addition to writing and filmmaking, Russ Spencer (second from left) had a passion for music. He sang and played guitar in a band called Frank Jaegers, which also included (from left) Grant Friedrich, Ellen Turner, and Pete Lester.

POSITIVELY

RUSS SPENCER by Richie DeMaria

REMEMBERING RUSS: I never knew Russ Spencer, but in a way, he helped give me a purpose. One of the original columnists for the Positively State Street column, he benefited generations of musicians, artists, and writers alike as a spokesperson of Santa Barbara’s music scene. Russ passed away in the early hours of Saturday, March 23, on the 101 freeway; it was likely a suicide. The world stopped for a moment the day he passed. I remember: Traffic came to a standstill. Someone had been on the road, I’d heard, but details were then publicly unknown. I was stuck in traffic on the 126 near Fillmore that Saturday morning due to another, different car collision that ended someone’s life mere hours and miles apart. The two major highways were gridlocked in the halting presence of death. For those who knew Russ, the days since have been both tremendously heartbreaking and suffused with brightness upon remembering the kind of person he was. Jeff Gordinier, his Positively State Street successor, shared his reflections on Facebook. He recalls when he “faced an impossible and unforeseen challenge” of taking on the column’s helm: “I had to follow in the footsteps of Russ Spencer. … Russ was a star, the supremo, the unofficial mayor of the 805,” he wrote. Gordinier remembers him as a “talented journalist,” a “deft, compassionate filmmaker,” a “dedicated surfer,” but above all, “a man of almost supernatural kindness — alert, attentive, intuitive.” Music writer and area musician Josef Woodard started Positively State Street with Russ under the name Edwin Lee—“the combined personality of Russ and I, using our middle names,” Woodard said. A member of the band the Frank Jaegers, Russ was both an active member and documenter of the area’s creative scene. “His own complex personality included such seeming contradictions as the fact that he was very social and moved easily in many circles, but he was also a mysterious, private person,” Woodard said. “But basically, I feel that he embodied that romantic idea that a good local music scene—or any creative scene, in art, theater, whatever—is a healthier one when a good and passionate writer is part of the package.” Woodard added: “Despite his struggles and the later turns in his life, Russ seems like a good role model of how to live a life, with curiosity, adaptability, compassion for others, and creative chutzpah intact.” Depression is a monster far too many know well. Locally, resources such as Santa Barbara’s Mental Wellness Center (mentalwellnesscenter.org) or the National Alliance on Mental Illness (nami.org) are vital, life-saving resources for the very common phenomena of mental illness and brain disorders. Organizations like these are incredibly important for transferring the isolation of depression, schizophrenia, bipolar, anxiety, and other conditions into the supportive hands of a knowledgeable and compassionate community network. Perhaps one of Russ’s further gifts is showing that even the brightest, most positive people carry in them the darkest of depths, and for that, he gifts us a sense of understanding. For some, tragically, family and friends can do everything right, and yet the inner demons may still get the upper hand. But in this case, I don’t think they exactly won. Russ’s legacy continues to live on not just in the column he co-created, but in all the lives he touched, the people he inspired, the careers he furthered, the good times he sparked. I never knew Russ, but I have felt directly his gifts as a person and feel n very grateful. Thank you, Russ, and rest in positive peace.

¡No te pierdas esta emocionante y colorida presentación de baile para toda la familia! - La Opinion

Ballet Folklórico de Los Ángeles VIERNES, 12 DE ABRIL / FRIDAY, APRIL 12 7 pm  Isla VIsta school, 6875 El colEgIo Road

DOMINGO, 14 DE ABRIL / SUNDAY, APRIL 14

7 pm  maRjoRIE lukE thEatRE, santa BaRBaRa junIoR hIgh, 721 E. cota stREEt

¡Entrada Gratuita! / FrEE Las puertas se abrirán a las 6:30 pm. / Doors open 6:30 pm. Habrá recepción después del espectáculo. / Reception follows the performance.

/vivaelartesb ¡Viva el Arte de Santa Bárbara! is sponsored by SAGE Publications, The Roddick Foundation, Anonymous, Russell Steiner, Monica and Tim Babich, Montecito Bank & Trust, National Endowment for the Arts, UCSB Office of Education Partnerships, The Stone Family Foundation, Linda Stafford Burrows, Marianne Marsi and Lewis Manring, and the Santa Barbara County Arts Commission Community Arts Grant Program, with funds provided by the City of Santa Barbara, in partnership with the Santa Barbara County Office of Arts and Culture. Additional support comes from The Marjorie Luke Theatre’s Dreier Family Rent Subsidy Fund. The program is supported in part by the Santa Barbara Independent, the Santa Maria SUN, El Latino CC, Radio Bronco, Entravision/Univision Costa Central, the Best Western South Coast Inn, the Hilton Garden Inn Santa Barbara/Goleta, Pacifica Suites, La Quinta Inn & Suites, and the Santa Barbara Unified School District. Viva is co-presented by The Marjorie Luke Theatre, the Guadalupe-Nipomo Dunes Center and UCSB Arts and Lectures, in partnership with the Isla Vista School Parent Teacher Association.

/vivaelartesb

Join Today to Secure the Best Seats!

FEBRUARY 5 - 6, 2020

NOVEMBER 19 - 20, 2019

MAY 11 - 12, 2020 SEASON ADD ON/ SWAP A SHOW OPTION

MAY 19 - 21, 2020

MARCH 3 - 4, 2020

BroadwaySantaBarbara.com · 805.899.2222

Broadway In Santa Barbara

@BroadwaySantaB

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@BroadwaySantaBarb #SBarbBway

APRIL 11, 2019

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55


Paseo Nuevo Cinemas, Theater #3 $8 per film (except Obey Giant which is free) / $40 festival pass Saturday, May 4 11 AM

1 PM

3 PM

7 PM

Bauhaus Spirit

A celebration of the famed Bauhaus architecture school, noted for design, innovation and its belief in a peaceful society everyone could be a part of. (90 min.)

Burden

Whether he shot himself, squeezed into a locker for five days, or mounted iconic sculptures, Chris Burden rocked the art world. (87 min.)

Kusama: Infinity

Known for her mirrored “Infinity” rooms and vast polka-dotted surfaces, top-selling female artist Yayoi Kusama overcame impossible odds to bring her radical artistic vision to the world stage. (80 min.)

Obey Giant FREE

The Art and Dissent of Shepard Fairey – from his roots in punk rock and skateboarding to creating iconic images like the Obama HOPE poster. (90 min.)

Sunday, May 5 11 AM

Kochuu

Japanese Architecture / Influence & Origin (53 min.)

Great Expectations

A journey through the history of visionary architecture. (52 min.) 1 PM

3 PM 7 PM

Leaning Into the Wind

Andy Goldsworthy explores the impact of the years on himself and his work in this exquisite film that illuminates his mind as it reveals his art. (93 min.)

REM

Special Guest: Filmmaker Tomas Koolhaas

The works of legendary architect and master provocateur Rem Koolhaas. (75 min.)

Faces Places

89-year-old French New Wave director Agnès Varda and 33-year-old muralist JR forge an unlikely friendship. (90 min.)

Curated by Bruce Heavin and Roman Baratiak

Special thanks to our partner Metropolitan Theatres Corporation

Presented in association with the Santa Barbara Museum of Art, the UCSB Art, Design & Architecture Museum and the UCSB Department of the History of Art & Architecture A&L Corporate Season Sponsor:

Media Sponsor:

(805) 893-3535 | www.ArtsAndLectures.UCSB.edu 56

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a&e | FILM & TV

4/11 - 8:00

VISTA KICKS

W/ MODERN GENRE & JACK MCCAIN BAND

BOOTIE SHAKIN’ ROCK N ROLL 4/12 - 5:30 - 8:00

THE ADDERLEY ADVANCED CONSERVATORY PRESENTS:

AMPLIFY 10:00

LATIN MOTIONS PRODUCTIONS PRESENTS:

LIVE SALSA!

9-10 PM SALSA LESSON 4/13 - 8:30

FISH AND THE SEAWEEDS

SO CAL SURF ROCK AS SEEN AT SB HARBOR FEST! 4/14 - 1:00 - 4 :00

SB JAZZ SOCIETY:

DONNA GREENE & THE ROADHOUSE DADDIES

Little

6:00

MOVIE GUIDE

SBCC MONDAY MADNESS JAZZ BAND

AND THE GOLETA VALLEY JUNIOR HIGH JAZZ BAND 4/15- 6:00-9:00

MOTOWN MONDAY DANCE PARTY! FEAT DJ GAVIN ROY W/ DJ DARLA BEA EXPERIENCE THE MAGIC OF MOTOWN! NO COVER!

Edited by Michelle Drown

4/16 7:30

TRIBUTE TO LEONARD COHEN

FEAT SMITTY & JULIJA

PREMIERES After (146 mins., PG-13) Based on the 2014 “new adult” romance/ drama novel of the same name, this film tells the story of Tessa Young (Josephine Langford), a college student who begins questioning herself and her world after meeting rebel Hardin Scott (Hero Fiennes Tiffin). Paseo Nuevo Breakthrough (116 mins., PG) Chrissy Metz (This Is Us) stars in this screen adaptation of the Christian novel The Impossible, which tells the story of a teenage boy who fell through the ice of a Missouri lake. As he lies in a coma, his mother prays to God he will pull through. Topher Grace and Josh Lucas also star. Fairview/Paseo Nuevo (Opens Wed., Apr. 17)

➤ O The Brink

(101 mins., NR)

From the cottage industry of “ones that got away” (or were sent away) from Trump’s inner circle comes a beguiling documentary about right-wing zealot and ex-Trump insider Steve Bannon. Director Alison Klayman, behind the fine doc Ai Weiwei: Never Sorry, follows Bannon’s path, post-Trump. What begins as a fly-on-the-wall fashion includes more direct questioning by Klayman and a brisker, more nervous pace as the film proceeds — from Bannon’s West Wing resignation through his galvanizing campaign with European right-wing leaders and pumping up conservatives before the 2018 midterm elections. In that process, he brings along his self-admittedly propagandistic film TRUMP @ WAR and waves his Citizens of the American Republic banner. Clearly brighter, wittier, and more scarily cunning than Trump, Bannon comes off as both a fascinating behind-thescenes manipulator and a shark who

puts the “right” in “frightening.” At one point, he flashes a bemused grin at Klayman, saying, “I’m so bad. I’m gonna get so crushed in this film.” Well, yes, and no. (JW) Riviera The Curse of La Llorona (93 mins., R) Linda Cardellini stars as Anna, a social worker/widow raising her kids in L.A., who is called to check on one of her cases who has been the victim of foul play. There she finds similarities to the supernatural instances she and her family have been experiencing.

4/17 6:00

opportunity to relive her childhood. Issa Rae, Marsai Martin, and Justin Hartley also star. Camino Real/Paseo Nuevo

CAFE KITP

“THE PHYSICS OF FLYING”

FOR OUR FULL LINEUP, PLEASE VISIT

Mia and the White Lion (Mia et le Lion Blanc) (98 mins., PG) When Mia Owen’s family uproots from London to manage a lion farm in South Africa, the 10-year-old feels her life has been turned upside down. Then a white lion named Charlie is born, and Mia and the cub experience a bond only found between human and animal.

SOhOSB.COM 1221 STATE STREET • 962-7776

Fiesta 5

Camino Real/Fiesta 5 (Opens Thu., Apr. 18)

Hellboy (148 mins., R) David Harbour (Stranger Things) stars as the titular character in this third installment of the Hellboy film series. In this iteration, Hellboy and his compatriots try to keep the undead Blood Queen (Milla Jovovich) from destroying the world. Arlington/Camino Real/Metro 4 Little (109 mins., PG-13) Jordan Sanders (Regina Hall) is a ruthless tech mogul who gets “wished” back to her younger self, thus getting the

Missing Link (95 mins., PG) In this stop-motion animated comedy/ adventure, Sir Lionel Frost (Hugh Jackman) heads into the Pacific Northwest forest to prove the existence of the mythological creature Susan (Zach Galifianakis). Fairview/Fiesta 5 Penguins (96 mins., G) Disney’s latest nature documentary tells the story of an Antarctic Adélie penguin named Steve on his quest to build a nest, find a partner, and start a family. Paseo Nuevo (Opens Wed., Apr. 17)

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Hellboy

CONT’D ON P. 59 >>> INDEPENDENT.COM

APRIL 11, 2019

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57


BUCKLES ‘N’ BREWS

BEER FEST Apr. 20

metrotheatres.com Starts Thursday

TICKETS AVAILABLE AT THE ARLINGTON BOX OFFICE and www.AXS.com

NEEDTOBREATHE Fri, 4/5 - 7:00pm

SWITCHFOOT Sat, 4/6 - 7:15pm

Ad insertion date: Friday, April 5-11, 2019 Shazam!

Fiesta • Camino

KANSAS Sun, 4/7 - 7:30pm

UNSTOPPABLE: Bethany Hamilton Story Sun, 4/14 - 2:00pm

Features and Showtimes for April 5-11 H = Subject to Restrictions on “SILVER MVP PASSES”

www.metrotheatres.com

FAIRVIEW

SATURDAY APRIL 20th

11:30a - 4:30p at the Santa Barbara Carriage Museum

OVER 30 CRAFT

225 N FA F IRVIEW AV A E, GOLETA T TA (805) 683-3800

Pet Sematary

Metro • Camino

Friri:i: 1:00, 2:20, 3:40, H DUMBO B Fr 5:00, 6:15, 7:45; Sa S t & Su Sun un: 11:45, 1:00, 2:20, 3:40, 5:00, 6:15, 7:45; M n to Mo t Th T u: 1:00, 2:20, 3:40, 5:00, 6:15, 7:45

BREWERIES & WINE • LIMITED TICKETS!!!

CAMINO REAL

Live Music by

e Th les b ram

H THE BEST OF ENEMIES C 1:30, 4:30, 7:30

The Dusty Jugz

7040 MARKETPLA L CE DR, LA GOLETA T TA (805) 968-4140

The Public

B

Paseo

H PET SEMAT ATA AT TARY R E 12:30, 2:55, 5:20, 6:30, 7:45, 9:00, 10:10

H SHAZAM! C 11:45, 1:00, 2:45, 4:00, 5:45, 7:00, 8:45, 9:55

USE PROMO CODE “INDY”

THE BEACH BUM E 1:50, 4:10

TO SAVE $10 on VIP!!!

Friri to t We W d: d 1:30, 4:20, 7:10, 9:50; US E Fr T u: 1:30, 4:20 Th

BucklesandBrews.com Sunset

CAPTA T IN MARV TA R EL C 12:20, RV 3:20, 6:20, 9:15

Hitchcock BENEFITS THE

58

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APRIL 11, 2019

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T u: 7:00, 9:50 H HELLBOY E Th

METRO 4

PASEO NUEVO

618 STA TAT TA ATE STREET, T T, SANTA T BARBARA TA (805) 965-7684

8 W. DE LA L GUERRA PLA L CE, LA SANTA T BARBARA TA ((805) 965-7451

H PET SEMAT ATA AT TARY R E Fr Friri:i: 2:30, 5:00, H THE BEST OF ENEMIES C Friri to Fr t Su Sun un: 1:00, 3:50, 7:00, 9:30; 7:30, 10:00; Sa S t & Su Sun un: 12:00, 2:30, 5:00, M n to Mo t Th T u: 2:00, 5:20, 8:15 7:30, 10:00; Mo M n to t Th T u: 2:30, 5:00, 7:30

H PET SEMAT ATA AT TARY R E Friri to Fr t Su Sun un: 1:10, 3:40, 6:10, 8:40; M n to Mo t Th T u: 1:20, 3:45, 6:10, 8:40

THE BEACH BUM E Friri to Fr t Su Sun un: 4:45, 9:45; Mo M n to t Th T u: 2:10, 8:00

US E Fr Friri to t Su Sun un: 1:30, 4:20, 7:10, 9:50; M n to Mo t Th T u: 2:20, 5:15, 8:00

HOTEL MUMBAI E Friri to Fr t Su Sun un: 12:50, 4:00, 6:45, 9:55; M n to Mo t Th T u: 2:30, 5:00, 7:50

CAPTA T IN MARV TA R EL C RV Friri to Fr t Su Sun un: 12:50, 3:50, 6:45, 9:40; M n to Mo t Th T u: 1:45, 4:45, 7:45

SUNSET E Fr Friri to t Su Sun un: 1:40, 3:30, 6:35, 9:40; Mo M n to t Th T u: 2:20, 4:30, 7:40

THE HITCHCOCK CINEMA & PUBLIC HOUSE 371 SOUTH HITCHCOCK WA WAY AY, Y, SANTA T BARBARA TA (805) 682-6512

THE PUBLIC 2:20, 5:00, 7:30

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ARLINGTON

THE AFTERMAT A HE AT Friri to Fr t Su Sun un: 12:55, 7:10; M n to Mo t Th T u: 5:30 PM

FIESTA 5 916 STA TAT TA ATE STREET, T T, SANTA T BARBARA TA (805) 963-0455

H SHAZAM! C Fr Friri:i: 12:30, 2:15, 3:30, 5:15, 6:30, 8:15, 9:30; S t & Su Sa Sun un: 11:15, 12:30, 2:15, 3:30, 5:15, 6:30, 8:15, 9:30; Mo M n to t Th T u: 2:15, 3:30, 5:15, 6:30, 8:15

1317 STA TAT TA ATE STREET, T T, SANTA T BARBARA TA (805) 963-9580

H DUMBO B Fr Friri:i: 1:20, 2:40, 4:10, 5:25, 6:45, 8:00, 9:20; Sa S t & Su Sun un: 12:00, 1:20, 2:40, 4:10, 5:25, 6:45, 8:00, 9:20; M n to Mo t Th T u: 1:30, 2:40, 4:10, 5:25, 6:45, 8:00

CALL THEAT A RE FOR AT MOVIES AND SHOWTIMES

H UNPLANNED E Fr Friri:i: 2:00, 4:30, 7:00, 9:35; Sa S t & Su Sun un: 11:30, 2:00, 4:30, 7:00, 9:35; Mo M n to t Th T u: 2:00, 4:30, 7:00


a&e | FILM & TV CONT’D FROM P. 57

The Best of Enemies

NOW SHOWING The Best of Enemies (133 mins., R) Based on the book by Osha Gray Davidson, the film tells of the decade-long rivalry between civil-rights activist Ann Atwater (Taraji P. Henson) and Ku Klux Klan leader C. P. Ellis (Sam Rockwell). When they decide to co-chair a community meeting in 1971, both of their lives change. Fairview/Paseo Nuevo Captain Marvel (124 mins., PG-13) Brie Larson stars as Carol Danvers (a k a Captain Marvel), a former U.S. Air Force fighter pilot and current member of an elite military unit, Starforce. Danvers gets her superhuman abilities when her DNA is accidentally fused with that of a Kree, a scientifically and technologically advanced race. Djimon Hounsou, Samuel L. Jackson, and Annette Bening also star. Camino Real/Metro 4 Dumbo (112 mins., PG) Director Tim Burton reimagines Disney’s 1941 animated classic for this live-action telling of the famous, floppyeared elephant who overcomes his oversize feature to become a circus star. Danny DeVito, Colin Farrell, Eva Green, and Michael Keaton star.

Fairview/Fiesta 5

Hotel Mumbai (125 mins., R) Dev Patel and Armie Hammer star in this thriller based on the documentary Surviving Mumbai, which explores the 2008 attacks by an Islamic terrorist group who carried out 12 coordinated shootings and bombings over four days at various locations across Mumbai, including the India’s Taj Mahal Palace Hotel. Paseo Nuevo

as Dr. Louis Creed, who, along with his wife (Amy Seimetz) and kids, moves to Maine and finds a mysterious burial ground deep in the woods.

Camino Real/Metro 4

The Public (119 mins., PG-13) Emilio Estevez wrote, directed, and stars in this tale about a library in downtown Cincinnati, Ohio, where a group of homeless patrons refuse to leave the library at closing time due to a bitter cold front blowing outside. What begins as a sit-in quickly escalates. Alec Baldwin, Christian Slater, and Jena Malone also star. The Hitchcock Shazam! (132 mins., PG-13) Zachary Levi (Chuck) is Shazam, the alter ego to William “Billy” Batson (Asher Angel), in DC’s latest celluloid superhero fare. Billy/Shazam must use their powers to stop the villainous Dr. Thaddeus Sivana (Mark Strong), who has powers of his own, from causing death and destruction.

Camino Real/Fiesta 5

Unplanned (110 mins., R) This Christian-based drama tells of a young woman working at Planned Parenthood who has a change of heart regarding abortions. The Hitchcock

OUs

(116 mins., R)

family beach vacation gone horribly wrong in Santa Cruz, California. Midway through Us, there is a moment when you will think you have Jordan Peele’s latest horror-satire all figured out. But this is a Peele horror film. As fans of Get Out know all too well, he is the most brilliantly manipulative director at work today. He makes you feel comfortable, and then too comfortable with your genre expectations. He makes you trust characters you shouldn’t trust. He sets up plots that play into your cultural assumptions and stereotypes, especially about race. Then he radically subverts expectations to teach us a lesson. Us grips emotionally as well as intellectually. It’s a horror film with the gravitas of a profound allegory for our troubled cultural moment. Next to Get Out, it may be the superior work of art because it is at once urgently entertaining and it yields more and more to those willing to reflect on it. (KM) Camino Real/Metro 4

OWomen at War

(101 mins., NR)

In Icelandic director Benedikt Erlingsson’s fascinating, layered, and agreeably quirky film, the “woman” in question (Halldóra Geirharðsdóttir) is an environmentally conscience-stricken and driven choir director. Her “wars” of note involve her extreme personal response to threats of industrialization and ecological disaster, and efforts to adopt a war-afflicted Ukrainian girl. An empathetic eco-activist, she sabotages power grids and distributes a manifesto warning “we are the last generation that can stop the assault against our Earth.” What might be only a tense and/or sobering premise finds its load lightened by dry Icelandic humor and inventive, Kaurismaki-ish narrative twists. For example, musicians producing the beguiling folksy Icelandic score — a tuba/drums/ accordion trio and traditionally dressed female folk singers — regularly show up in the scenes like a Greek chorus coloring a climate-change-era fable of looming doom and anti-heroism. (JW)

“ENGAGING & ENRAGING, DISTURBING & HIGHLY REVEALING” – VARIETY

Riviera (Sat.-Sun., Apr. 13-14)

Starring Black Panther’s Lupita Nyong’o and Winston Duke, the film depicts a

The Mustang (96 mins., R) Matthias Schoenaerts stars as Roman Coleman, an imprisoned convict who is allowed to train wild mustangs as part of a rehabilitation therapy program.

DIRECTED BY ALISON KLAYMAN • STARRING STEPHEN K. BANNON

Fri, Mon – Thurs: 5:15pm, 7:30pm Sat, Sun: 3:00pm, 5:15pm, 7:30pm

The Hitchcock

Pet Sematary (100 mins., R) This is the second cinematic adaptation of Stephen King’s best-selling horror novel. In this version, Jason Clarke stars

APRIL 12 - 18

Dumbo

The above films are playing in Santa Barbara FRIDAY, April 12, through THURSDAY, April 18. Our critics’ reviews are followed by initials: KM (Kevin Moore) and JW (Josef Woodard). The symbol O indicates the film is recommended. The symbol ➤ indicates a new review.

Sat,Sun: 12:45pm

FOR TICKETS, VISIT WWW.SBIFF.ORG AND THE THEATRE BOX OFFICE #SBIFF INDEPENDENT.COM

APRIL 11, 2019

THE INDEPENDENT

59


Student Art Contest

An art contest sponsored by the Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Indians asks local students, "How do you keep your heart healthy?" Finalists will be invited to attend and receive recognition at the Heart Ball.

Survivor Speaker

Co-Chairs

Dr. Joseph Aragon Interventional Cardiologist Sansum Clinic

Join us as we celebrate Ben Blankenhorn, a senior at San Marcos High School and a cardiac survivor. In 2017, Ben collapsed on school campus in sudden cardiac arrest. Ben feels extremely fortunate to be alive today, and now hopes that sharing his story ill in at the Heart Ball will inspire people to ified. become CPR certified.

Janet Drayer Vice President Sansum Santa Barbara Medical Clinic Inc.

Saturday, May 11, 2019 at Goleta Valley Cottage Hospital Registration: 7:30 am | Walk/Run start: 9 am

MAY THE FOURTH BE WITH YOU STEPHENS PHENS ESTATE ES SBHEARTBALL.HEART.ORG (805) 05) 963963-8862

Music, prizes, refreshments, gifts for participating moms, kids fun run and more! Run or walk with mom, or in her honor.

Locally sponsored by

Register at cottagehealth.org/milesformoms Proceeds from the Miles for Moms 5K go directly to the Goleta Valley Cottage Hospital Foundation to ensure continuing life-saving, life-changing care.

SANTA BARBARA EARTH DAY FESTIVAL

EVENING in the PARK T E B A ND N

O

C EM

BY DJ S PA EE’D

R

FIRESTONE BEER, CAMBRIA WINES AND CUYAMA CIDER SAMPLING IN THE BEER & WINE GARDEN (NO EXHIBITORS)

Full park activities open on Saturday morning at 11am. APRIL 11, 2019

Adam Gray Founder, CTO Novacoast, Inc.

Learn more & get your tickets at www.mitcentralcoast.org

$5 BEER SPECIAL ALL NIGHT LONG

THE INDEPENDENT

Joseph Stronks EVP Community West Bank

Cyber attacks continue to evolve. As they become more advanced and more sophisticated, government and business must stay ahead of cyberspies and criminals to ensure they remain protected – no matter what threats the future will bring. We are facing the 5th generation of attacks, but most businesses only have 2nd or 3rd generation security.

GOOD TIMES

60

Giovanni Vigna Prof. Computer Science UCSB, & Cofounder/CTO Lastline

Cyber threats capable of massive economic and social disruption are poorly understood and vastly underestimated. Cybersecurity is a continuing arms race. This panel/presentation will review the state of the art in cyber threats, security, and both offensive and defensive cybertactics.

BUENA ONDA EMPANADAS

   #SBEarthDay

Michael Soltys Prof. & Chair Dept. Computer Science CSU Channel Islands

CECSB.ORG

INDEPENDENT.COM

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Wednesday, April 17, 2019 | 5-8 PM Rockwood, Santa Barbara Woman’s Club 670 Mission Canyon Rd. | Santa Barbara, CA

LE HIGHWAY

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CyberSecurity:

5th Generation Threats - What We Know. Should Know. And, Don’t Know.

5:00 - 9:00 pm

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APRIL 26

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PAUL WELLMAN

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SPORTS

THEN AND NOW: Larry Stark of Carpinteria High wins the 220-yard dash at the Russell Cup track meet in 1970 (above right). Competing in the 100th Russell Cup on Saturday will be Carpinteria junior Victor Rinaldi (above left), winning a 400-meter race last week in 51.21 seconds.

CARPINTERIA HIGH HOSTS

100TH RUSSELL CUP Which Future Olympians Will Compete in This Saturday’s Track & Field Meet?

JOHN ZANT’S GAME OF THE WEEK 4/13: College Men’s Volleyball: UC Irvine at UCSB The Gauchos will try to maintain their No. 3 national ranking Saturday night in the regular-season finale against No. 9 UC Irvine. Senior mainstays Corey Chavers, UCSB’s leading hitter, and Hayden Boehle, the best digger, will play their final home match. The only teams to defeat the Gauchos in the last three months are No. 1 Hawai‘i and No. 2 Long Beach State. Hawai‘i had a perfect record of 74-0 in sets throughout the season until the Gauchos took the third set in a 25-16, 25-21, 23-25, 25-19 result in Honolulu last weekend. The match drew a sell-out crowd of 10,300 at the Stan Sheriff Center, where the Big West tournament will take place April 18-20. 7pm. Robertson Gym, UCSB. $5-$8. Call 893-UCSB (8272) or visit ucsbgauchos.com.

BOSTON BATTALION: If you wonder where all the road runners

have gone this weekend, the answer is Boston. Fifty runners from Santa Barbara and Goleta are registered to run in the 123rd Boston Marathon on Monday, April 15. It’s not enough to put the granddaddy of all road races on your bucket list; you have to achieve a reasonably swift qualifying time. Rusty Snow and Mike Swan, coaches of the Santa Barbara Running and Racing team, will lead a pack of 41 to the starting line in Hopkinton. A dozen of them, ages 48-62, could potentially run national-class times, Snow said. But it’s not an event where you can count on a fast time. The conditions can be cold, wet, and windy.

11th inning of a 14-12 win Saturday; and freshman left-hander Rodney Boone did not allow a hit until the eighth inning of a 7-0 shutout Sunday. The Gauchos (23-5) will host UC Irvine (21-5) in a Big West showdown series this weekend. The opening game is Friday, April 12, at 3 p.m. TRAILBLAZER: Emma Foster, a 7th grader at La Colina Junior

High and baseball infielder/pitcher in Santa Barbara’s Pony League, will play this weekend in the Trailblazer Series, sponsored by Major League Baseball as one of the activities surrounding Jackie Robinson Day. About 100 girls ages 11-13 from around the nation will take part in the event at the MLB Academy in Compton. Besides playing ball, they will meet with women’s baseball pioneers, including former players from the All-American Girls Professional Baseball League. “Emma grew up with baseball,” said her father, Michael Foster, who played at Westmont College. “My uncle [Brian Asselstine] was a major leaguer. We ask her about softball, and she says, ‘It’s not basen ball.’”

S.B. ATHLETIC ROUND TABLE ATHLETES OF THE WEEK COURTESY

by JOHN ZANT

relay team. The Frank Wykoff Trophy is awarded to the boys’ 100-meter champion. Since 1968, the Russell Cup has maintained a small-school format. Carpinteria itself produced two of the best prep milers of the century, state champions Tom Grewe (1982) and Coley Candaele (1990). Grewe will be among the legendary athletes in attendance Saturday. Others include Bob Looney, the 1959 state champion pole vaulter from Santa Barbara High, and Sari Small, who was among the first female athletes to compete in 1960. Memorabilia will be on display at Saturday’s meet, and a post-meet barbecue in the gymnasium will be an occasion to bring up many memories. To learn more, visit russellcup .com.

PAUL WELLMAN

T

rack and field is a special sport at Carpinteria High. Head Coach Van Latham and his staff know how to run a meet efficiently. They carefully record for posterity the Warriors’ records in every meet. They are carrying on a tradition that goes back to the dawn of prep athletics in California. In 1913, Carpinteria held a track meet pitting hometown schoolboys against Ventura counterparts. It was well received, and the next year, Mr. and Mrs. Howland Shaw Russell donated a silver cup as a prize for winning teams. The 1914 meet became known as the Russell Cup, and it has been held every year (except for a hiatus during World War II) to the present day. This Saturday, April 13, the 100th Russell Cup will take place at Carpinteria Valley Memorial Stadium. In its long history, the meet featured five future Olympians, from Lompoc’s Nick Carter — who won the Russell Cup mile in 1920 and ran in the 1928 Games at Amsterdam — to sprinter Allyson Felix, who raced as an L.A. Baptist freshman in 2000 and went on to become the most decorated U.S. female track athlete with nine Olympic medals (six gold and three silver) from 2004 to 2016. Frank Wykoff was a Carpinteria schoolteacher when he ran an exhibition 100-yard dash at the 1934 Russell Cup, two years before he won his third gold medal on the U.S. 4x100

GOING VERTICAL: The Sam Adams Multi-Events meet at Westmont College’s Thorrington Field last weekend produced a world-leading high jump of 2.31 meters (76 ¾) by Canada’s Mike Mason. Grenada’s Lindon Victor, a member of the Santa Barbara Track Club, broke his national record in the pole vault by clearing 4.90 meters (16¾). EVERY WHICH WAY BUT LOSE: Base-running, slugging, and

pitching carried UCSB’s nationally ranked baseball team to a three-game sweep over visiting Stephen F. Austin last weekend. Tommy Jew stole home for the deciding run in a 3-2 victory when the Gauchos managed only two hits; Kyle Johnson’s walk-off grand slam capped a five-run rally in the

Josy Uyesaka, Dos Pueblos softball

Isaac Stone, S.B. High golf

The senior outfielder hit a threerun double in a 3-2 victory over Oxnard at the Thousand Oaks Tournament and had a fence-crashing catch in another game

The senior broke par at the Santa Barbara Golf Club by shooting 69 to lead the Dons to a 391-430 win over San Marcos. They are 6-0 in the Channel League.

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FREE WILL ASTROLOGY by Rob Breszny ARIES

CANCER

(Mar. 21-Apr. 19): The Qing dynasty controlled China

(June 21-July 22): Christopher Robin Milne was the from the mid-17th century to the early 20th century. son of author A.A. Milne, who wrote the Winnie-theIt was the fifth biggest empire in world history. But Pooh stories. He said there are two ways to navigate eventually it faded, as all mighty regimes do. Revolu- through life. Either you “take a bearing on something tion came in 1911, forcing the last emperor to abdicate in the future and steer towards it, or take a bearing on and giving birth to the Republic of China. I’m inclined something in the past and steer away from it.” So in to think of your life in 2019 as having some similarities his view, “There are those who look ahead and pull to that transition. It’s the end of one era and the begin- and those who look behind and push.” I’m hoping ning of another, a changing of the guard and a passing that in the coming weeks and months, you will make of the torch. The coming weeks will be a favorable time a delighted commitment to the first option: taking to be very active in deciding and visualizing the empire a bearing on something in the future and steering towards it. I think that approach you want next. will inspire you toward the most HOMEWORK: What other sign TAURUS interesting success. would you want to be if you could take a vacation from your actual (Apr. 20-May 20): I hope that someLEO sign? Why? Write Freewillastrology time soon you’ll acquire a new (July 23-Aug. 22): The national ani.com. source of support or inspiration. mal of Finland is the brown bear. Now is a phase of your astrologiThe national insect is the ladybug, cal cycle when you’re likely to attract influences that are in alignment with your deep values. This addition and the national instrument is a stringed instrument might be a person or animal. It could be a vibrant sym- known as the kantele. As for the national author, it’s bol or useful tool. It may even be a fantasy character Aleksis Kivi, who produced just one novel that took or departed ancestor that will stimulate vitality you him 10 years to write. He also published a short colhaven’t been able to summon on your own. Be on the lection of odes and a few plays, adding up to a grand total of less than 800 pages of work. I think that the lookout for this enhancement. efforts you make in the coming weeks could have a GEMINI disproportionately large impact, as well, Leo. What you (May 21-June 20): Poet David Hinton analyzed the Chi- lack in quantity will be irrelevant compared to the sheer nese word for “poetry.” Its etymological meaning is quality you generate. “words spoken at the fertility altar.” Let’s make that your theme, even if you don’t write or read poetry. I suspect VIRGO the coming weeks will be a favorable time to take a vow (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): I follow the blogger Evanescent or utter a solemn intention in front of a homemade Voyager because she makes me cry with sad joy and fertility altar. The oath you speak might express a desire exultant poignance on a regular basis. One of her other to boost your use of your physical vitality: your lust for fans wrote her a love note I could have written myself. It life, your adoration of the natural world, or your power said, “Your emotional brilliance and thoughtful passion to produce new human life. Or your vow to foster your break me into pieces and then weave me back together fertility could be more metaphorical and symbolic in with more coherence than I had before reading you. I nature: the imaginative intimacy you will explore or revere your alchemical talent for undoing me so you the creativity you’ll express in future works of art or can heal me; for lowering my defenses so I can be open to your riches; for demolishing my habitual trance so the generous effects you want to have on the world. you can awaken my sleeping genius.” I believe that in

WEEK OF APRIL 11

the coming weeks, life itself will offer to perform these same services for you, Virgo. I urge you to accept!

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): “Love is no assignment for cowards.”

That’s a quote attributed to the ancient Roman poet Ovid. What did he mean? Was he foreshadowing the wisdom of pop singer Pat Benatar, who in 1983 told us, “Love is a battlefield”? Was Ovid implying that to succeed in the amorous arts we must be heroic warriors prepared to overcome fears and risk psychological dangers? Probably. But I will also point out that it takes as much courage to create fun, interesting togetherness as it does to wrestle with the problems that togetherness brings. You need just as much bravura and panache to explore the sweet mysteries of intimacy as you do to explore the achy mysteries of intimacy. Keep these thoughts in mind as you marshal your audacity to deepen and expand your best relationships in the coming weeks.

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): The literal meaning of the French term

jolie-laide is “pretty and ugly.” Bloggers at wordsnquotes .com define it as follows: “It’s a fascinating quirkiness that’s irresistible, like a face you want to keep looking at even if you can’t decide whether it is beautiful or not.” Jolie-laide overlaps with the Japanese term wabisabi, which describes a person or thing that is lovely because of its imperfection and incompleteness. I bring these facts to your attention because I think you have extraordinary potential to be a master embodier of both jolie-laide and wabi-sabi in the coming weeks.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): As Czech playwright Václav Havel

(1936-2011) matured, he became a political dissident who opposed the Soviet Union’s authoritarian grip on his country. Eventually he was a key player in the Velvet Revolution that banished Communism. When Czechoslovakia emerged as a new democracy, its people elected him president. Havel later thanked Lou Reed and the band the Velvet Underground for fully

awakening his liberationist leadership. He said their unruly music stoked his longing to establish a culture where total creative freedom was possible. I mention this, Sagittarius, because now is a favorable time to identify the music or art or films or literature that might fuel your emancipation in the coming months.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Capricorn author J.R.R. Tolkien toiled on his masterpiece The Lord of the Rings for 12 years. Once he finished, it wasn’t published for more than five years. So 17 years passed between the time he launched his precious project and the time when it reached an audience. I don’t think you will need that much patience in shepherding your own venture to full expression, Capricorn. But I hope you’ll summon as much faith in yourself as Tolkien had to rouse in himself. To do so will bring out the best in you!

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Released in 1998, The Prince of Egypt is an animated film that tells the story of the Hebrew prophet Moses. In the climactic event, the hero uses magic to part the waters of the Red Sea, allowing his people to run across the sea floor and escape the army that’s chasing them. To make that seven-minute scene, 28 professional animators labored for 318,000 hours. In the coming months, you could create your own version of that marvel, Aquarius. But you’ll need a team to help you, and that team is not yet ready to go. The coming weeks will be a favorable time to get it ready, though.

PISCES (Feb. 19-Mar. 20): Piscean businessman Steve Jobs testi-

fied that taking LSD was “one of the two or three most important things” he ever did in his life. It opened his mind in ways he felt were crucial to his development. What are the three most important things you’ve ever done, Pisces? I invite you to revisit at least one of them, and see if you can take it to the next step of its power to inspire you. What if it has even more to offer you in your efforts to become the person you want to be?

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700.

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OFFICE OF DEVELOPMENT Manages online calendar, screens incoming calls, makes travel and entertainment arrangements, completes all necessary paperwork in compliance with policies and procedures, and compiles and analyzes data and information from various sources including Advance database, requiring high degree of independence, initiative, professionalism, confidentiality, sound judgment and discretion, and strong analytical and technical skills. Reqs: High School Diploma. Strong organizational skills and unfailing attention to detail and accuracy. Excellent interpersonal communication and customer service skills are required, as is the ability to maintain confidentiality and act with discretion. Highly organized with the ability to manage multiple projects and calendars under tight deadlines and deal with frequent interruptions. Excellent computer skills including proficiency in Word, Excel, Powerpoint, Internet and e‑mail and demonstrated ability to quickly learn various software programs. High level of initiative, creativity, and energy. Ability to work independently. Notes: This is a limited appointment working until 9/30/19. Fingerprint background check required. $22.51‑$24.09/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For primary consideration apply by 4/11/19, thereafter open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #20190169

DEVELOPMENT EDUCATION ASSISTANT, AIRLINE CAREERS Start Here – Get ENGINEERING & THE trained as FAA certified Aviation Technician. Financial aid for qualified SCIENCES students. Job placement assistance. OFFICE OF DEVELOPMENT Serves as the primary initial contact for five Directors of Development in the Engineering and the Sciences Development Office and provides essential administrative and financial support that is critical to the successful operation of a complex fund raising program. Assists with analysis, planning and implementation strategies to secure support from private donors. Reqs: Strong organizational skills and unfailing attention to detail and accuracy. Exceptional verbal and interpersonal skills that foster positive relationships with diverse populations. Excellent computer skills including proficiency in Word, Excel, PowerPoint, Internet and e‑mail and demonstrated ability to quickly learn various software programs. High level of initiative, creativity, and energy. Ability to work independently. Ability to maintain strict confidentiality in all aspects of work. Ability to prioritize duties and achieve planned goals for a complex program. Ability to work under tight and shifting deadlines. Ability to effectively solve problems and demonstrate sound reasoning and judgment. Ability to establish and maintain cooperative working relationships within the division of Institutional Advancement, the Development Office and with the broader campus community. Excellent grammar, composition and proofreading skills. Notes: Fingerprint background check required. Occasional evenings and weekends at various Development Office, Institutional Advancement or campus‑wide events. $22.51‑$24.09/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law.

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GRADUATE DIVISION Works independently, counseling and advising students, faculty and staff concerning University‑wide, campus‑wide and departmental graduate academic policies and procedures. Working with approximately 50 graduate academic departments and 3,000 graduate students, and over 85 degrees, certificates, and emphases, advising graduate students, individually or in groups, about academic standards, degree requirements, progress to degree and degree completion, and requests for exceptions to policy. Coordinates with graduate academic programs to ensure that departmental requirements reflect UC or UCSB graduate requirements; works with departments and students to maximize graduate enrollment each quarter; and shares responsibility for the entry of degree milestones into Graduate Division and Registrar’s Office systems. Supervises students in the filing of electronic theses and dissertations. Works with the Director of Academic Services and academic departments and programs to foster graduate student retention and degree completion. Works as a collaborative member of the Academic Services team. Works with staff from other Divisions to facilitate the timely and accurate dissemination of information for enrollment, employment, and commencement to other offices on campus. Updates procedures in the section desk manual and assists in training of work‑study. Reqs: Ability to interpret, apply, and disseminate a wide scope of policy and procedure regulations approved by the Office of the President, Academic Senate/ Graduate Council and Graduate Division. Capable of working with a high level of detail and high degree of accuracy in application of policy, procedures, review of documents and data entry into multiple systems. Ability to maintain focus despite multiple interruptions. Ability to assimilate, analyze, and communicate complex information from multiple sources. Requires skill in defining a problem or goal, identifying the key issues relevant to it, and finding or recommending the appropriate solution. Requires strong interpersonal skills for effective interaction with graduate students, faculty, staff, and other campus offices. Ability to work under pressure. Demonstrated strong

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oral and written communication skills. Familiarity and experience with word processing (Microsoft Word), spreadsheets (Excel), online systems, and databases (Microsoft Access). Ability to work independently and within a close team. Note: Fingerprint background check required. $49,000‑$55,660/yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For primary consideration apply online by 4/17/19, thereafter open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #20190174

BANKING SERVICES AND COMMUNICA COMMUNICATIONS ANALYST

BUSINESS AND FINANCIAL SERVICES (BFS) This position reflects a dual classification recruitment at the Financial Services Analyst (FSA) 2 or 3 level. The ultimate decision to fill the position at either the FSA 2 or FSA 3 level will be based on the combination of expertise, experience, and skills in finance and internal controls subject matter, analytical and critical thinking, communication, and project planning. Provides day to day support and coordination of all campus merchant accounts and cash handling activities. Provides analysis, project management and implementation support to highly complex projects related to compliance with Payment Card Industry Data Security Standards (PCI DSS); and federal, state, University, and card association requirements and internal financial/audit policies and controls for credit card and cash handling activities. At the FSA 3 level, will also be responsible for assisting with identifying and investigating new product opportunities within a defined range of responsibility. Develops project plans and manages the design, development, testing, and documentation of select products, services or enhancements. Reqs: FSA 2 ‑Working knowledge of financial processes, policies and procedures. Strong knowledge of financial data management and reporting systems. Intermediate knowledge

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DEVELOPMENT ANALYST, HUMANITIES & FINE ARTS

OFFICE OF DEVELOPMENT Establishes, develops and maintains comprehensive systems within the unit in coordination with Central Development; supports the Humanities & Fine Arts Development Team in short and long‑term strategic planning and project and events management for program development and implementation that is focused on achieving operational and fundraising goals for the Humanities & Fine Arts. Proactively plans, organizes, and attends strategy meetings and coordinates follow up for Major Gift prospects; prepares materials and reports that analyze the activities, progress, and goals of the Humanities & Fine Arts Team; ensures

the consistency, timeliness and accuracy of information disseminated to donors, prospects, and internal constituents. Reviews and analyzes data as it relates to fundraising strategies, prospect identification, prospect management and associated trends. Reqs: Excellent communication and interpersonal skills. Excellent skills in analysis, problem solving, working with detail while applying and understanding broader contexts as they affect a diverse customer base: faculty, staff, students, and donors. The ability to establish a cooperative working relationship with staff; the ability to work as a member of a team, and to support the Development Office structure, obtaining approvals and coordinating as needed. Ability to interpret policies and procedures and accurately communicate them to others. Strong customer service skills. Ability to prioritize and meet deadlines. Notes: Fingerprint background check required. May be called upon to work occasional evenings and weekends at various HFA, Development Office, Institutional Advancement or campus‑wide events. May be called upon to work occasional evenings and weekends at various HFA, Development Office, Institutional Advancement or campus‑wide events. Requires the utmost degree of confidentiality. $23.47‑$25.00/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For primary consideration apply by 4/11/19, thereafter open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs. ucsb.edu Job #20190164

GIFT COMPLIANCE OFFICER

UC SANTA BARBARA FOUNDATION Serves as the point person for all gift compliance issues and works directly with the Director of Finance on such matters. The Officer optimizes the current procedures for proper use of gift funds concerning gift purpose and timeliness. As a member of the accounting team, most efforts are devoted to gift compliance issues but the remaining time is directed to accounting work, as appropriate. The Officer will be privy to sensitive

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and understanding of internal control practices and their impact on protecting University resources. Work history demonstrating strong administrative, organizational, and interpersonal skills. Highly professional telephone manner and excellent writing skills with careful attention to detail, grammar, punctuation and proofreading. Strong customer service skills, dealing with a wide variety of clientele. In addition, the FSA 3 requires someone who is self‑motivated, detail oriented and able to manage one’s own work independently in a fast paced environment with changing priorities. Demonstrated ability to prioritize multiple task assignments while maintaining accuracy, detail, and meeting deadlines. Proficient written communications skills to draft clear, concise documentation, reports, and specifications. Strong problem recognition and problem solving skills; ability to develop original ideas to solve problems. Note: Fingerprint background check required. $49,000‑$60,500/yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For primary consideration apply by 4/14/19, thereafter open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs. ucsb.edu Job #20190173

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RANCH/ACREAGE FOR SALE 39 ACRE NORTHERN ARIZONA WILDERNESS RANCH $183 MONTH ‑ Outstanding buy on quiet secluded off grid northern Arizona homestead at cool ‑clear 6,000’ elev. Blend of mature evergreen woodlands & grass meadows with sweeping views of surrounding mountains and valleys from elevated ridgetop cabin sites. Borders 640 acres of uninhabited State Trust woodlands. Free well water access, rich loam garden soil, ideal climate. No urban noise & dark sky nights amid complete privacy & solitude. Camping and RV

ok. Maintained road access. $19,900, $1,990 down with no qualifying seller financing. Free brochure with additional properties, prices & descriptions, photos/terrain maps/ weather data/ nearby town/lake info. 1st United Realty 1‑800‑966‑6690. (CalSCAN)

WANTED: REAL ESTATE FOR SALE KC BUYS HOUSES ‑ FAST ‑ CASH ‑ Any Condition. Family owned & Operated . Same day offer! (951) 777‑2518 WWW. KCBUYSHOUSES.COM (Cal‑SCAN)

RENTAL PROPERTIES APARTMENTS & CONDOS FOR RENT $1320 1BD Corner of Hope & San Remo‑N State St‑Barbara Apts Quiet NP 687‑0610 1 BED 1 Bath townhomes, $1575‑$1650, off‑st pkg, near UCSB & beach. 805‑968‑2011 Model open ‑ 6707 Abrego Rd #100 1BD NEAR Cottage Hospital. 519 W Alamar. Set among beautiful oak trees across the street from Oak Park. NP. $1320. Call Cristina 687‑0915

RESTAURANT LOOKING FOR PARTNER Very established, local Santa Barbara restaurant for over 20 years looking for Partner. Ideal candidate is a BOH Guru who wants to work in the business. Will consider an investor with restaurant experience. Reply in confidence to iugrad742@gmail.com materials, information and data; therefore, the position requires the utmost degree of confidentiality and integrity. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree in accounting or similar field, or equivalent combination of education and prior work experience. Proficient in use of Microsoft Office and common desktop/web applications, especially in Excel. Knowledge of data organization, data maintenance, and data analysis. Excellent communication and interpersonal skills. Ability to present information in a clear and concise manner both in writing and verbally to different constituencies in a university environment: faculty, staff, students, alumni, and donors. Knowledge of accounting function, assignments, and generally accepted accounting principles and practices. Ability to gather, organize, and perform basic accounting related analysis. Ability to work both independently and as a team member. Ability to juggle heavy deadline‑driven workload and set priorities. Note: Fingerprint background check required. $61,180‑$72,000/yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For primary consideration apply by 4/11/19, thereafter open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs. ucsb.edu Job #20190163

Apts NP. 530 W Cota $1320 Rosa 965‑3200 2BDS $1740+ & 3BD flat or townhouses $2490. Near UCSB, shops, park, beach, theater, golf. Sesame Tree Apts 6930 Whittier Dr. Hector 968‑2549

LA COLINA GARDEN LUXURY APART­ MENTS *CURRENT RENT SPECIALS*

$1000 off 2 Bedrooms $1500 off 3 Bedrooms 2 Bedrooms $2900 with enclosed backyards 3 Bedrooms $3700 with washer & dryers & enclosed backyards STUDIOS $1320+ & 1BDs $1440+ in beautiful garden setting! Pool, lndry & off‑street parking at Michelle Apartments. 340 Rutherford St. NP. Call Erin 967‑6614

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SALES/MARKETING EVERY BUSINESS has a story to tell! Get your message out with California’s PRMedia Release – the only Press Release Service operated by the press to get press! For more info contact Cecelia @ 916‑288‑6011 or http://prmediarelease.com/ california (Cal‑SCAN)

SKILLED

House Cleaners/ Driver

FT/PT ‑ must be reliable, have prev. exp., references, Spanish speaking, clean DMV, willing to work weekends. DOE. Paid vacation. 805‑886‑8155

VOLUNTEERS NEEDED

Senior volunteers needed to mentor youth. 1‑4 hrs/wk. This is a Senior Corps’ Retired and Senior Volunteer opportunity. Call 805‑965‑1001 x232

WELL BEING FAMILY SERVICES A PLACE FOR MOM has helped over a million families find senior living. Our trusted, local advisors help find solutions to your unique needs at no cost to you. Call 855‑741‑7459

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SMARTRecovery!

Empowering, practical, non‑religious alternative for anyone in recovery. SmartRecovery.org for info. Wed. 6:30pm. Vet’s Hall, 112 West Cabrillo Blvd. 805‑886‑1963

HOLISTIC HEALTH

Herbal Health­care

Herbal programs for weight‑loss, heart conditions, inflammation & pain, blood sugar conditions, digestion, liver detox. Naturopath, Herbalist, Khabir Southwick, 805‑308‑3480, www. KSouthwick.com

MASSAGE (LICENSED)

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Expert in Deep Tissue, 20 yrs exp. Work w/chronic pain, stress & injuries. 1st time Client $50/hr. Gift Cert available, Outcall. Laurie Proia, LMT 886‑8792 HEALING MASSAGE www.truetoyou.abmp.com Kiyoko Soaring‑Eagle 805 698‑5861

1BD NEAR SBCC & beach @ Carla

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APRIL 11, 11, 2019 2019 APRIL

THE INDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT THE

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LEGALS ADMINISTER OF ESTATE NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: ANGELO V. DELGADO NO: 19PR00120 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of ANGELO V. DELGADO, aka ANGELO

DELGADO A PETITION FOR PROBATE: has been filed by: SUZANNE M. CASTELLANOS in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that SUZANNE M. CASTELLANOS be appointed as personal representatives to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent

SERVICE DIRECTORY FINANCIAL SERVICES ARE YOU BEHIND $10k OR MORE ON YOUR TAXES? Stop wage & bank levies, liens & audits, unfiled tax returns, payroll issues, & resolve tax debt FAST. Call 855‑970‑2032. (Cal‑SCAN)

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HOME SERVICES A PLACE FOR MOM has helped over a million families find senior living. Our trusted, local advisors help find solutions to your unique needs at no cost to you. 1‑855‑993‑2495 (AAN CAN) A PLACE FOR MOM. The nation’s largest senior living referral service. Contact our trusted,local experts today! Our service is FREE/no obligation. CALL 1‑855‑467‑6487. (Cal‑SCAN) DIRECTV & AT&T. 155 Channels & 1000s of Shows/Movies On Demand (w/SELECT Package.) AT&T Internet 99 Percent Reliability. Unlimited Texts to 120 Countries w/AT&T Wireless. Call 4 FREE Quote‑ 1‑866‑249‑0619 (Cal‑SCAN) DISH TV $59.99 For 190 Channels $14.95 High Speed Internet. Free Installation, Smart HD DVR Included, Free Voice Remote. Some restrictions apply. 1‑844‑536‑5233. (Cal‑SCAN) DISH TV $59.99 For 190 Channels + $14.95 High Speed Internet. Free Installation, Smart HD DVR Included, Free Voice Remote. Some restrictions apply 1‑800‑718‑1593

ELECTRICIAN‑$AVE!

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MEDICAL SERVICES ATTENTION OXYGEN THERAPY USERS! Inogen One G4 is capable of full 24/7 oxygen delivery. Only 2.8 pounds. FREE information kit. Call 877‑929‑9587 ATTENTION: OXYGEN Users! Gain freedom with a Portable Oxygen Concentrator! No more heavy tanks and refills! Guaranteed Lowest Prices! Call the Oxygen Concentrator Store: 1‑844‑653‑7402 (Cal‑SCAN) DENTAL INSURANCE. Call Physicians Mutual Insurance Company for details. NOT just a discount plan, REAL coverage for 350 procedures.888‑623‑3036 or http://www.dental50plus.com/58 Ad# 6118 FDA‑REGISTERED Hearing Aids. 100% Risk‑Free! 45‑Day Home Trial. Comfort Fit. Crisp Clear Sound. If you decide to keep it, PAY ONLY $299 per aid. FREE Shipping. Call Hearing Help Express 1‑ 844‑234‑5606 (Cal‑SCAN) MEDICAL‑GRADE HEARING AIDS for LESS THAN $200! FDA‑Registered. Crisp, clear sound, state of‑the‑art features & no audiologist needed. Try it RISK FREE for 45 Days! CALL

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PROFESSIONAL SERVICES BATHROOM RENOVATIONS. EASY, ONE DAY updates! We specialize in safe bathing. Grab bars, no slip flooring & seated showers. Call for a free in‑home consultation: 888‑912‑4745 SPECTRUM TRIPLE Play! TV, Internet & Voice for $29.99 ea. 60 MB per second speed No contract or commitment. More Channels. Faster Internet. Unlimited Voice. Call 1‑877‑338‑2315 WESTERN EXTERMINATOR: pest control solutions since 1921. Protect your home from termites, ants, spiders, fleas, roaches and more—365 days a year! Call 1‑844‑817‑4126. Schedule your FREE Pest Inspection. (Cal‑SCAN)

TECHNICAL SERVICES

COMPUTER MEDIC

Virus/Spyware Removal, Install/ Repair, Upgrades, Troubleshoot, Set‑up, Tutor, Networks, Best rates! Matt 682‑0391

AUTO AUTO PARTS CASH FOR CARS: We Buy Any Condition Vehicle, 2002 and Newer. Nationwide Free Pick Up! Call Now: 1‑800‑864‑5960. DONATE YOUR Car to Veterans Today! Help and Support our Veterans. Fast ‑ FREE pick up. 100% tax deductible. Call 1‑800‑245‑0398

CAR CARE/REPAIR AIS MOBILE AUTO REPAIR‑ 20 yrs. exp. I’ll fix it anywhere! Pre‑Buy Inspections & Restorations. 12% OFF! 805‑448‑4450 DONATE YOUR CAR, TRUCK OR BOAT TO HERITAGE FOR THE BLIND. FREE 3 Day Vacation, Tax Deductible, Free Towing, All Paperwork Taken Care of. Call 1‑844‑491‑2884 (Cal‑SCAN)

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TRUCKS/RECREATIONAL GOT AN older car, boat or RV? Do the humane thing. Donate it to the Humane Society. Call 1‑ 844‑335‑2616 (Cal‑SCAN)

THE INDEPENDENT

APRIL 11, 2019

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Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The Independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held in this court as follows: on 05/16/2019 AT 9:00 a.m. Dept: 5 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, located at 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Anacapa Division. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: James F. Cote 222 East Carrillo Street, Suite 207 Santa Barbara, CA 93101; (805) 966‑1204. Published Apr 11, 18, 25 2019. NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: ALFRED BRADLEY NAEGLE, also known as A. BRADLEY NAEGLE and ALFRED B. NAEGLE Case No.: 19PR00116 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of ALFRED BRADLEY NAEGLE, also known as A. BRADLEY NAEGLE and ALFRED B. NAEGLE A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by: MUFG Union Bank, N.A. in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara THE PETITION for probate requests that: MUFG Union Bank, N.A. be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The Independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held in this court as follows: 05/16/2019 AT 9:00 a.m. Dept: 5 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, 1100 Anacapa Street, P.O Box 21107 Santa Barbara, CA 93102 Anacapa Division. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an

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inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: Jeffrey B. Soderborg; (805) 687‑6660 1900 State Street, Suite M, Santa Barbara, CA 93101, Published Apr 11, 18, 25 2019. NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: REGINA BERNES NO: 19PR00121 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of REGINA BERNES A PETITION FOR PROBATE: has been filed by: MARSHALL BERNES, ELINOR FISHER, AND JUDITH DANNETT in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that MARSHALL BERNES, ELINOR FISHER, AND JUDITH DANNETT be appointed as personal representatives to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The Independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held in this court as follows: on 05/16/2019 AT 9:00 a.m. Dept: 5 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, located at 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Anacapa Division. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: James F. Cote, Esq P.O. Box 20146 Santa Barbara, CA 93120‑0146; (805) 966‑1204. Published Apr 11, 18, 25 2019. NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: MARVIN M. MAXWELL NO: 19PR00119 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of MARVIN M. MAXWELL, aka MARVIN MILTON MAXWELL A PETITION FOR PROBATE: has been filed by: MARCIA M. FRALEY in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that MARCIA M. FRALEY be appointed as personal representatives to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The Independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held in this court as follows: on 05/16/2019 AT 9:00 a.m. Dept: 5 SUPERIOR COURT OF

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CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, located at 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Anacapa Division. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: James F. Cote 222 East Carrillo Street, Suite 207 Santa Barbara, CA 93101; (805) 966‑1204. Published Apr 11, 18, 25 2019.

FBN ABANDONMENT STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF USE OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME The following Fictitious Business Name is being abandoned: BARRELWORKS, FIRESTONE WALKER BREWING CO., THE TAPROOM, THE TAPROOM AT FIRESTONE, WALKER BREWING CO. at 620 McMurray Road Buellton, CA 93427; The original statement for use of this Fictitious Business Name was filed 06/10/2014 in the County of Santa Barbara. Original file no. 2014‑0001712. The person (s) or entities abandoning use of this name are as follows: Firestone Walker LLC (same address) This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 7, 2019. I hereby certify that this is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy, Published: Mar 21, 28. Apr 4, 11 2019. STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF USE OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME The following Fictitious Business Name is being abandoned: CHAPLAIN 24/7 at 4575 Hollister Ave. Santa Barbara, CA 93110; The original statement for use of this Fictitious Business Name was filed 04/13/2015 in the County of Santa Barbara. Original file no. 2015‑0001191. The person (s) or entities abandoning use of this name are as follows: Believer’s Edge 2822 Puesta Del Sol Santa Barbara, CA 93105 This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 14, 2019. I hereby certify that this is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Thomas Brian, Published: Mar 21, 28. Apr 4, 11 2019. STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF USE OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME The following Fictitious Business Name is being abandoned: CHERRY DETAIL at 2109 Chapala St Santa Barbara, CA 93105; The original statement for use of this Fictitious Business Name was filed 01/15/2019 in the County of Santa Barbara. Original file no. 2019‑0000114. The person (s) or entities abandoning use of this name are as follows: Behrooz Falsafi (same address) This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 19, 2019. I hereby certify that this is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Adela Bustos, Published: Mar 28. Apr 4, 11, 18 2019. STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF USE OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME The following Fictitious Business Name is being abandoned: SANTA BARBARA PLUMBING SUPPLIES at 621 N. Milpas Street Santa Barbara, CA 93103; The original statement for use of this Fictitious Business Name was filed 02/04/2015 in the County of Santa Barbara. Original file no. 2015‑0000407. The person (s) or entities abandoning use of this name are as follows: S.B. Plumbing Supplies, Inc. (same address) This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 28, 2019. I hereby certify that this is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Connie Tran, Published: Apr 4, 11, 18, 25 2019. STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF USE OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME The following Fictitious Business Name is being abandoned: SANTA BARBARA GRAPHICS, SANTA BARBARA SIGNS, SANTA BARBARA

SIGNS & GRAPHICS at 3019 Stae St Santa Barbara, CA 93105; The original statement for use of this Fictitious Business Name was filed 01/25/2017 in the County of Santa Barbara. Original file no. 2017‑0000272. The person (s) or entities abandoning use of this name are as follows: Santa Barbara Signs, Inc (same address) This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 1, 2019. I hereby certify that this is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Christine Potter, Published: Apr 4, 11, 18, 25 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: HABRA INVESTMENT PROPERTIES, HIP PROPERTIES at 1221 Chapala Street #8 Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Jacques Habra 3425 Sea Ledge Lane Santa Barbara, CA 93109 This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 15, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Sandra E. Rodriguez. FBN Number: 2019‑0000627. Published: Mar 21, 28. Apr 4, 11 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: CCSB, COMPLETE CARE SANTA BARBARA, COMPLETE CARE, COMPLETE CARE AT HOME at 1160 N. San Marcos Rd. Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Complete Care Santa Barbara LLC (same address) This business is conducted by an Limited Liability Company Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 14, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2019‑0000620. Published: Mar 21, 28. Apr 4, 11 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: BARRELWORKS, THE TAPROOM AT FIRESTONE WALKER BREWING COMPANY, FIRESTONE WALKER BREWING COMPANY, THE TAPROOM at 620 McMurray Road Buellton, CA 93427; Firestone Walker Inc. (same address) This business is conducted by an Corporation Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 7, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2019‑0000546. Published: Mar 21, 28. Apr 4, 11 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: HECTOR’S PAINTING at 66 Ocean View Ave Apt 34 Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Hector E Casas (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 5, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Sandra E. Rodriguez. FBN Number: 2019‑0000528. Published: Mar 21, 28. Apr 4, 11 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SAFE SOLUTIONS at 1415 Revere Street Santa Barbara, CA 93455; Jacob Shanbrom (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 21, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Debra Sanchez. FBN Number: 2019‑0000433. Published: Mar 21, 28. Apr 4, 11 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: AHUSTALYNN, AREBELLYNN ARTISTA, ATHERAPLYNN at 1564 Los Canoas Rd Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Amy Clark (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 4, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Brenda Aguilera. FBN Number: 2019‑0000509. Published: Mar 21, 28. Apr 4, 11 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: 7959 WINES at2111 Hill Haven Rd Solvang, CA 93463; Real Wine Trail, LLC (same address) This business is conducted by an Limited Liability Company Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 14, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2019‑0000610. Published: Mar 28. Apr 4, 11, 18 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: MONTECITO ADVENTURE COMPANY at 2246 Lillie Ave Summerland, CA 93067; Peter V Berkey 931 Castillo Santa Barbara, CA 93101 This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 12, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Christine Potter. FBN Number: 2019‑0000597. Published: Mar 21, 28. Apr 4, 11 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SANTA BARBARA SMART CONNECTIONS at 323 Mellifont Ave #A Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Samuel Ramirez (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 12, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Brenda Aguilera. FBN Number: 2019‑0000588. Published: Mar 21, 28. Apr 4, 11 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SANTA BARBARA COURTHOUSE WEDDINGS, VIVA TACO BAR, SB COURTHOUSE WEDDINGS, VIVA EVENTS at 1114 State St #20 Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Viva LLC (same address) This business is conducted by an Limited Liability Company Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 12, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Christine Potter. FBN Number: 2019‑0000590. Published: Mar 21, 28. Apr 4, 11 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: PATTERSON IMAGING at 122 S. Patterson Ave #202 Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Kevin T. Miller DDS, Inc. (same address) This business is conducted by an Corporation Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 11, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2019‑0000578. Published: Mar 21, 28. Apr 4, 11 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: FIREBRIX, HERE TO GO, INDUSTRIAL EATS at 181 Industrial Way Ste B Buellton, CA 93427; New West Catering Inc (same address) This business is conducted by an Corporation Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 07, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2019‑0000548. Published: Mar 28. Apr 4, 11, 18 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: MAGICAE DRACO at 315 Bell St Unit #A, CA 93440; Seamus Ethridge (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 19, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Christine Potter. FBN Number: 2019‑0000654. Published: Mar 28. Apr 4, 11, 18 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: EVENT PLANTING at 2800 Grand Ave. Los Olivos. CA 93441; Event Planting (same address) This business is conducted by an Limited Liability Company Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 19, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Brenda Aguilera. FBN Number: 2019‑0000650. Published: Mar 28. Apr 4, 11, 18 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: GRIFFIN PUBLISHING at 3868 Pueblo Avenue Santa Barbara, CA 93110 This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 25, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Connie Tran. FBN Number: 2019‑0000700. Published: Mar 28. Apr 4, 11, 18 2019.


INDEPENDENT CLASSIFIEDS

LEGALS

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: NEXT GENERATION, WWW. NEXTGENERATIONSB.COM, NEXT GENERATION ONLINE ESTATE SALES AUCTIONS AND CONSIGNMENT, NEXT GENERATION SANTA BARBARA at 5760 Thornwood Dr Goleta, CA 93117; Taste of BLTS, Inc 680 Arundel Rd Goleta, CA 93117 This business is conducted by an Corporation Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 21, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Sandra E. Rodriguez. FBN Number: 2019‑0000673. Published: Mar 28. Apr 4, 11, 18 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: 805 COLLEGE PLANNING, CROSS COLLEGE PLANNING at 257 San Nicolas Ave Santa Barbara, CA 93109; Rebecca Cross (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 25, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Sandra E. Rodriguez. FBN Number: 2019‑0000697. Published: Mar 28. Apr 4, 11, 18 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: ISOQUE at 75 Aero Camino Suite 203 Goleta, CA 93117; Stel, LLC (same address) This business is conducted by an Limited Liability Company Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 11, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2019‑0000579. Published: Mar 28. Apr 4, 11, 18 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: REAGAN PROFESSIONAL SERVICES at 170 Brandon Drive Goleta, CA 93117; Sally Reagan (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 20, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Tara Jayasinghe. FBN Number: 2019‑0000659. Published: Mar 28. Apr 4, 11, 18 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: PHYSICALLY HEALING PERSON at 7798 Wagon Wheel Drive Goleta, CA 93117; Jeanine Wright (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 20, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Brenda Aguilera. FBN Number: 2019‑0000664. Published: Mar 28. Apr 4, 11, 18 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: MOUNTAIN AND SEA DENTAL, MOUNTAIN AND SEA DENTAL AND ASSOCIATES at 2780 State St. Ste 6 Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Michael D. Carley DDS Inc. 209 Calle Granada Santa Barbara, CA 93105 This business is conducted by an Corporation Signed: Michael Carley Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 04, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2019‑0000523. Published: Mar 28. Apr 4, 11, 18 2019.

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PHONE 965-5205

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: PUFF SMOKE SHOP AND SOCIAL CLUB at 315 Bell St Unit B, CA 93440; Seamus Ethridge (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 19, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Christine Potter. FBN Number: 2019‑0000655. Published: Mar 28. Apr 4, 11, 18 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SANTA BARBARA PLUMMBING SUPPLIES at 711 N. Milpas Street Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Capitol Hardawre, Inc. (same address) This business is conducted by an Corporation Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 28, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Connie Tran. FBN Number: 2019‑0000745. Published: Apr 4, 11, 18, 25 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: S.A.F.E. HOUSE at 229 East Victoria Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101; The Junior League of Santa Barbara, CA 93101 This business is conducted by an Corporation Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 26, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Christine Potter. FBN Number: 2019‑0000723. Published: Apr 4, 11, 18, 25 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: CASA DE TERPENOS at 315 Bell St Unit #C, CA 93440; Seamus Ethridge (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 19, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Christine Potter. FBN Number: 2019‑0000656. Published: Mar 28. Apr 4, 11, 18 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: BORRELLO’S PIZZA & PASTARIA at 3807 Santa Claus Lane Carpinteria, CA 93013; MTR46, Inc (same address) This business is conducted by an Corporation Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 1, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Brenda Aguilera. FBN Number: 2019‑0000766. Published: Apr 4, 11, 18, 25 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: ELLIE’S TAP & VINE at 3640 Sagunta Street CA 93460; Joy Lee Reinhardt 1996 N Refugio Rd Santa Ynez, CA 93460 This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 26, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Sandra E. Rodriguez. FBN Number: 2019‑0000717. Published: Apr 4, 11, 18, 25 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: SANTA BARBARA SONSHINE at 836 Anacapa Street, Suite 24036; Jonathan McKee (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 25, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Margarita Silva. FBN Number: 2019‑0000692. Published: Mar 28. Apr 4, 11, 18 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: KAWAII BODY WAX at 323 Mellifont Ave #A Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Marlin L Navas (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 28, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Sandra E. Rodriguez. FBN Number: 2019‑0000747. Published: Apr 4, 11, 18, 25 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: EJ’S CLEANING at 719 W Micheltorena St Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Joyce Hulsebos N Ontare Rd. Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Esdwin M Lopez 719 W Micheltorena St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101 This business is conducted by an General Partnership Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 27, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Connie Tran. FBN Number: 2019‑0000734. Published: Apr 4, 11, 18, 25 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: C2I FILM, CREATE 2 INSPIRE FILM at 5715 Alondra Dr. Goleta, CA 93117; Omar Aleandro Espinoza (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 28, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2019‑0000740. Published: Apr 4, 11, 18, 25 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: ABLITT’S, ABLITT’S FINE CLEANERS, ABLITT’S FINE CLEANERS & LAUNDERERS, ABLITT’S FINE CLEANERS & TAILORS at 14 W Gutierrez St Santa Barbara, CA 93101; SABLITT Co. (same address) This business is conducted by an Corporation Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 27, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Tara Tarasinghe. FBN Number: 2019‑0000734. Published: Apr 4, 11, 18, 25 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: AALAAF FLOWERS SHIPPERS at 4711 Foothill Rd Carpinteria, CA 93013; Luis Lopez Arroyo 644 Orwell Ln Ventura, CA 93003 This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 12, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Sandra E. Rodriguez. FBN Number: 2019‑0000589. Published: Apr 4, 11, 18, 25 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: TEORI AESTHETICS at 3568 Sagunto Street Suite B Santa Ynez, CA 93460; Christopher John Flynn, MD Inc. 875 Woodland Drive Santa Barbara, CA 93108 This business is conducted by an Corporation Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 25, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2019‑0000702. Published: Mar 28. Apr 4, 11, 18 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: LAUREN MAEVE PHOTOGRAPHY INC. at 3620 Mibek Road Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Lauren Maeve Photography Inc. (same address) This business is conducted by an Corporation Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 19, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2019‑0000643. Published: Apr 4, 11, 18, 25 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: MICHELLE DILLON PHOTOGRAPHY, TASTE OF SB at 5760 Thornwood Drive Goleta, CA 93117; Michelle Dillon 680 Arundel Rd Goleta, CA 93117 This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 21, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Brenda Aguilera. FBN Number: 2019‑0000674. Published: Mar 28. Apr 4, 11, 18 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: PORTER & TAN LAW PRACTICE at 933 East Yanonali Street Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Joakim Ivan Tan (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Joakim Tan Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 29, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Brenda Aguilera. FBN Number: 2019‑0000753. Published: Apr 4, 11, 18, 25 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: JOY IN THE SMALL THINGS at 1035 W Pedregosa St Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Jill A Dixon (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 1, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Brenda Aguilera. FBN Number: 2019‑0000759. Published: Apr 4, 11, 18, 25 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SANTA BARBARA SIGNS & GRAPHICS at 3019 State St Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Nu Image Ad Group, Inc 6175 Manzanillo Dr Goleta, CA 93117 This business is conducted by an Corporation Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 1, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Brenda Aguilera. FBN Number: 2019‑0000772. Published: Apr 4, 11, 18, 25 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: RENAISSANCE ANTIQUES, RENAISSANCE COMPANIES, RENAISSANCE ANTIQUES AND DESIGN, RENAISSANCE DESIGN, RENAISSANCE ANTIQUES OF SOLVANG, RENCO, INC. at 496 First Street Solvang, CA 93463; Renco, Inc. (same address) This business is conducted by an Corporation Signed: Julie Palladino Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 19, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2019‑0000642. Published: Apr 4, 11, 18, 25 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: DEVIL & DEEP BLUE SEA at 219 Stearns Wharf Suite A Santa Barbara, CA 93001; JBC Investment Holdings1, LLC 1630 Mira Vista Ave Santa Barbara, CA 93103 This business is conducted by an Limited Liability Company Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 27, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Brenda Aguilera. FBN Number: 2019‑0000736. Published: Apr 4, 11, 18, 25 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: INTREPID FLORAL CO. at 114 W Valerio St Unit 1 Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Rebekah Elise Hofberg (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 27, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Tara Jaysinghe. FBN Number: 2019‑0000729. Published: Apr 4, 11, 18, 25 2019.

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E M A I L S A L E S @ I N D E P E N D E N T. C O M

Tide Guide

Sunrise 6:30 Sunset 7:28

Day

High

Low

High

Low

Thu 11

1:40 am 4.82

9:43 am 0.16

5:23 pm 3.04

8:21 pm 2.84

Fri 12

2:55 am 4.68 11:03 am −0.03 6:35 pm 3.38

10:27 pm 2.85

Sat 13

4:25 am 4.66 12:09 pm −0.28 7:15 pm 3.77

Sun 14

12:01 am 2.45

5:48 am 4.81

Mon 15

1:07 am 1.84

6:56 am 5.02

1:47 pm −0.58 8:20 pm 4.64

Tue 16

2:01 am 1.15

7:55 am 5.15

2:28 pm −0.52 8:52 pm 5.07

2:50 am 0.48

8:49 am 5.14

3:05 pm −0.30 9:25 pm 5.45

Wed 17 Thu 18

3:37 am −0.08 9:41 am 4.98

5

11

High

1:02 pm −0.49 7:49 pm 4.20

3:42 pm 0.05

19 D

9:58 pm 5.72

26 H

crosswordpuzzle crossword puzzle

tt By Ma

Jones

“Shore Thing”-- from one side to another.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: CARPINTERIA COIN‑OP LAUNDRY at 1102 Casitas Pass Road Carpinteria, CA 93013; Susana Estrada 1474 Eucalyptus Street Carpinteria, CA 93013 This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 8, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Brenda Aguilera. FBN Number: 2019‑0000821. Published: Apr 11, 18, 25. May 2 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: ESSENTIAL WELL‑BEING, ESSENTIAL WELL‑BEING COACH, ESSENTIAL WELL‑BEING COACHING at 26 West Mission St #4 Santa Barbara, 93101; Tracy Lynne Johansson 3718 Hitchcock Ranch Rd Santa Barbara, CA 93105 This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 26, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Connie Tran. FBN Number: 2019‑0000724. Published: Apr 11, 18, 25. May 2 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: MORE MESA PRESS at 1085 Vista De La Mesa Drive Santa Barbara, CA 93110; Barbara Greenleaf (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 2, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Brenda Aguilera. FBN Number: 2019‑0000781. Published: Apr 11, 18, 25. May 2 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: GRANADOS INNOVATIONS at 5395 E Camino Cielo Santa Barbara, CA 93001; Frank Granados (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 2, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Margarita Silva. FBN Number: 2019‑0000782. Published: Apr 11, 18, 25. May 2 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: KEYNOTE PRESS at 652 S. San Marcos Rd. Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Kimberly Lynn Miller (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 2, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Brenda Aguilera. FBN Number: 2019‑0000773. Published: Apr 11, 18, 25. May 2 2019.

Across

1 “In ___” (Nirvana album of 1993) 6 506, in Roman numerals 9 Breaks down 13 Diminished 15 Youngest woman to serve in Congress, initially 16 “___ for Steve” (Morley Callaghan short story) 17 Coen Brothers movie of 1991 19 Zip 20 Internet annoyance 21 Lazybones 22 Lenny’s friend on “The Simpsons” 25 2007 T-Pain song feat. Yung Joc 28 Garden pests 30 March Madness org. 31 Queen of Quebec? 32 Sandcastle tool 34 “A Midsummer Night’s Dream” disguise 37 Good value, slangily 41 “___ y Plata” (Montana motto) 42 “Tres ___” (“Very well,” in Paris) 43 Bindi and Robert Irwin’s mother 44 Crawl around? 46 Bedazzler item 47 Color categorized as #DA1884 and Pantone 219C and trademarked by Mattel 52 Diamond experts? 53 Bird-related 54 Laissez-___ 56 Tolkien trilogy, to fans 57 Islands off the North Carolina coast, or the theme of this puzzle

62 One in the red 63 Volcanic dust 64 “The Death of Actaeon” painter 65 ___ buco (Italian veal dish) 66 ATM charge 67 Word of the future?

36 Onion peels 38 Award co-presented by the American Theatre Wing 39 State hwy. 40 Hand down to heirs 44 Food court pizza chain 45 Get a victory 46 Go around, as an issue 47 “The Jungle Book” bear 48 Affirms as true 1 Flash drive letters 49 Formal ceremonies 2 “___ Carter V” (Lil Wayne album 50 “___ shoe fits ...” of 2018) 51 No, in Scotland 3 Goof 55 Triple Crown category in 4 Sounding like a clunky engine baseball 5 ___ about (approximately) 57 Ungainly one 6 Every 24 hours 58 Take advantage of 7 Actor Max ___ Sydow 59 Actress Vardalos 8 “Ew!” 60 Penn of the “Harold & Kumar” 9 Actress Bullock of “Bird Box” films 10 Central Florida city 61 Show with Ego Nwodim, briefly 11 City in the Black Forest, when doubled 12 Inspire, as Kondoesque joy ©2019 Jonesin’ Crosswords (editor@ jonesincrosswords.com) For answers to 14 Radio features, once this puzzle, call: 1-900-226-2800, 99 cents 18 It might give you chills per minute. Must be 18+. Or to bill to your credit card, call: 1-800-655-6548. Reference 21 “Princess ___” (Gilbert & puzzle #0922 Sullivan operetta) LAST WEEK’S SOLUTION: 22 ___ loading (marathon runner’s strategy) 23 “... partridge in ___ tree” 24 Horned charger 26 Part of SOTU 27 “Because Freedom Can’t Protect Itself” org. 29 ___ Jam Records 32 Dress up fussily 33 Consenting vote 34 Gold, in Latin 35 Monetary stand-in

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Down

APRIL 11, 11, 2019 2019 APRIL

THE INDEPENDENT INDEPENDENT THE

67 67


INDEPENDENT CLASSIFIEDS

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PHONE 965-5205

LEGALS NOTICE OF CANCELLATION OF PUBLIC HEARING CITY COUNCIL APRIL 16, 2019 AT 1:30 PM

ORDINANCES TO ADD CHAPTER 12.20 TO THE GOLETA MUNICIPAL CODE REGARDING WIRELESS FACILITIES IN THE PUBLIC RIGHT-OF-WAY AND ASSOCIATED FEE RESOLUTION NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City Council of the City Goleta WILL NOT conduct a public hearing on the above referenced project previously scheduled for Tuesday April 16, 2019 at 1:30 pm. When the item is rescheduled for hearing before the City Council additional notice will be provided. For more information please contact Current Planning Manager, Lisa Prasse at lprasse@ cityofgoleta.org or 805-961-7542. Publish: Santa Barbara Independent, April 11, 2019

PUBLIC NOTICE HOUSING AUTHORITY OF THE COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA SECTION 8 ADMINISTRATIVE PLAN REVISIONS FOR THE HOUSING CHOICE VOUCHER PROGRAM NOTICE OF PUBLIC REVIEW PERIOD AND PUBLIC HEARING The Housing Authority of the County of Santa Barbara is inviting all interested parties to review revisions to the agency’s Section 8 Administrative Plan for the Housing Choice Voucher Program Interested parties may download a copy of the draft plan from the Housing Authority’s website: www.hasbarco.org or you may request a copy by calling the Housing Authority at (805) 736-3423. The draft plan is also available for review at the Housing Authority’s main office located at 815 West Ocean Avenue, Lompoc Written comments may be sent to the Housing Authority at P. O. Box 397, Lompoc, CA. 93438-0397. The deadline for submitting written comments is May 25, 2019. A public hearing on the draft plan will be held on Thursday, June 18, 2019 at 5:00 p.m. The location of the public hearing will be 815 West Ocean Avenue, Lompoc, CA 93436 In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you need special assistance to participate in this public hearing, please contact the Housing Authority of the County of Santa Barbara at (805) 736-3423. Notification at least 24 hours prior to the meeting will enable the Housing Authority to make reasonable arrangements. April 10, 2019

NOTICIA PÚBLICA AUTORIDAD DE VIVIENDA DEL CONDADO DE SANTA BARBARA REVISIONES DEL PLAN ADMINISTRATIVO DE SECCIÓN 8 PARA EL PROGRAMA DE CUPONES DE ELECCIÓN PARA CONSEGUIR VIVIENDA AVISO DE PERÍODO DE REVISIÓN PÚBLICA Y AUDIENCIA PÚBLICA La Autoridad de Vivienda del Condado de Santa Bárbara está invitando a todas las partes interesadas para revisar las revisiones del Plan Administrativo de Sección 8 para el Programa de Cupones de Elección para Conseguir Vivienda. Los interesados podrán descargar una copia del proyecto de plan de la página web de la Autoridad de Vivienda: www.hasbarco.org o puede solicitar una copia llamando a la Autoridad de Vivienda al (805) 736-3423 El borrador del plan también está disponible para su revisión en la oficina principal de la Autoridad de Vivienda ubicada en 815 West Ocean Avenue, Lompoc. Los comentarios escritos pueden enviarse a la Autoridad de Vivienda en P.O. Box 397, Lompoc, CA. 93438-0397. El plazo para presentar comentarios por escrito es el 25 de Mayo de 2019. Una audiencia pública sobre el proyecto de plan se llevará a cabo Jueves, el 18 de Junio, 2019 al 5:00 p.m. El lugar de la audiencia pública será 815 West Ocean Avenue, Lompoc, CA 93436 En cumplimiento de la Ley de Americanos con Discapacidades, si necesita asistencia especial para participar en esta audiencia pública, por favor, póngase en contacto con la Autoridad de Vivienda del Condado de Santa Barbara al (805) 736-3423. Notificación al menos 24 horas antes de la reunión permitirá a la Autoridad de Vivienda de hacer arreglos razonables. April 10, 2019

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: KROTTER FARMS at 286 Winchester Canyon Rd Goleta, CA 93117; White Light Farms, LLC (same address) This business is conducted by an Limited Liability Company Signed: Jack E Motter Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 1, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Tara Jayasinghe. FBN Number: 2019‑0000761. Published: Apr 11, 18, 25. May 2 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: LOMPOC COIN LAUNDRY at 1004 North H St. Lompoc, CA 93436; Aaron Alexander Boucher 434 Farmland Dr. Buellton, CA 93427 This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 27, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Sandra E. Rodriguez. FBN Number: 2019‑0000733. Published: Apr 11, 18, 25. May 2 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: CAVALETTO GROUP at 3530 Madrona Drive Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Alan Julian Cavaletto (same address) Candace Faye Cavaletto (same address) This business is conducted by an General Partnership Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 20, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Connie Tran. FBN Number: 2019‑0000665. Published: Apr 11, 18, 25. May 2 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: OPPI’S, THE LATTERIA, OPPI’Z, OPPISBISTRO at 1026 State Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101; The Latteria 325 K Street Apt 89 Davis, CA 95616 This business is conducted by an Corporation Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 8, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Adela Bustos. FBN Number: 2019‑0000829. Published: Apr 11, 18, 25. May 2 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: COMMUNITY HEALING at 402 E. Valerio St Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Interplay 3370 Braemar Dr. Santa Barbara, CA 93109 This business is conducted by an Corporation Signed: Brad Smith, agent Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 3, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Tara Jayasinghe. FBN Number: 2019‑0000795. Published: Apr 11, 18, 25. May 2 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: HARBOR MEAT AND SEAFOOD at 215 Helena Ave Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Sovereign Seafoods, Inc. (same address) This business is conducted by an Corporation Signed: Al Ballabio Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 19, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Margarita Silva. FBN Number: 2019‑0000649. Published: Apr 11, 18, 25. May 2 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: ALMA ROSA WINERY, ALMA ROSA WINERY & VINEYARDS at 250A Industrial Way Buellton, CA 93427; Vin De Zo, LLC (same address) This business is conducted by an Limited Liability Company Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 5, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Adela Bustos. FBN Number: 2019‑0000815. Published: Apr 11, 18, 25. May 2 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: GLASHEEN DESIGN at 429 E. Figueroa St. #5 Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Emily O. Glasheen (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Emily O. Glasheen Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 28, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2019‑0000744. Published: Apr 11, 18, 25. May 2 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: ERIC’S GUITAR AMPLIFIER REPAIR at 2025 Bath St. Apt 22 Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Eric Feeser (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 3, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Tara Jayasinghe. FBN Number: 2019‑0000793. Published: Apr 11, 18, 25. May 2 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: COMPLETE HOME MANAGEMENT at 960 West Mountain Dr Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Kristine Mae Taylor (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Kristine M. Taylor Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 5, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Christine Potter. FBN Number: 2019‑0000818. Published: Apr 11, 18, 25. May 2 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: PARADISE TOBACCO INC at 1926 De La Vina St Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Paradise Tobacco Inc (same address) This business is conducted by an Corporation Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 4, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Christine Potter. FBN Number: 2019‑0000808. Published: Apr 11, 18, 25. May 2 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: BARONESS JEWELERS at 5730 Calle Real Goleta, CA 93117; Irene Baroni Bifano 5493 Hanna Dr Santa Barbara, CA 93117 This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 3, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Tara Jayasinghe. FBN Number: 2019‑0000794. Published: Apr 11, 18, 25. May 2 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: COMMERCE A1, LLC at 440 Commerce CT. Ste A Lompoc, CA 93436; Commerce A1, LLC 320 North Palm Canyon Dr Palm Springs, CA 92262 This business is conducted by an Limited Liability Company Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 26, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Sandra E. Rodroguez. FBN Number: 2019‑0000719. Published: Apr 11, 18, 25. May 2 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: ROBERT TOVAAS CENTRAL COAST INSPECTIONS at 1115 Kathryn Way Santa Maria, CA 93454; Robert Gordon Tovaas (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Robert G. Tovaas Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 4, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Margarita Silva. FBN Number: 2019‑0000801. Published: Apr 11, 18, 25. May 2 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: CK PROPERTIES at 801 Chapala St Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Geoffrey Cockrell 404 W. Ortega St Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Tyler Kallenbach 513 E. De La Guerra Santa Barbara, CA 93103 This business is conducted by an General Partnership Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 08, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2019‑0000832. Published: Apr 11, 18, 25. May 2 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: CARHARTT FAMILY WINES at 1541 Rancho Santa Ynez Rd Solvang, CA 93463; Carhartt Vineyard, Inc. (same address)This business is conducted by an Corporation Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 04, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Connie Tran. FBN Number: 2019‑0000810. Published: Apr 11, 18, 25. May 2 2019.

Notice Date: April 11, 2019 NOTICE OF INTENT TO ISSUE Cabrillo Business Park Revised Project Clearance April 22, 2019 at 5:00 P.M. Pacific Beverage Office/Warehouse 355 Coromar Drive (Lot 19 of Map No. 32,046) APN 073-610-036 Case No. 18-118-PCR-RV NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Director of Planning and Environmental Review of the City of Goleta intends to issue a Revised Project Clearance pursuant to the Cabrillo Business Park Specific Plan (City Ord. 13-04) for the following individual project described below, on April 22, 2019 at 5:00 P.M. Case No. 18-118-PCR-RV: The project is located on Lot 19 of Tract 32,046 within the Cabrillo Business Park (CBP), which is 7.60 gross acres in size. The property’s zoning is SP-CBP (CBP Specific Plan), with subzoning of Business Park and Service Industrial (I-BP and I-S). The Project is a request for revisions to the previously approved Project Clearance, Case No. 14-070-PCR-LLA-OSP. As revised, one building will be constructed and one building will be removed from the previously approved project (Case No. 14-070-PCR-LLA-OSP). The office/warehouse building to be constructed would decrease in overall building area from 98,780-square feet to 77,394-square feet. The building to be removed from the previously approved project would be a 3,200-square foot maintenance building located at the southeast corner of the lot. The building coverage for the revised project will be reduced from 27.44% to 21.00% and the landscaping coverage will increase from 28.26% to 32%. Other minor changes as part of the Revised Project Clearance include the addition of a 932-square foot nonhabitable truck wash structure, the relocation of the trash enclosure to the rear of the building, and minor sign and façade changes. No native vegetation or specimen trees would be removed as part of this revised project and all landscape plans associated with the 50-foot wetland buffer will stay in effect. All remaining aspects entitled through Case No. 14-070-PCR-LLA-OSP and Case No. 14-032-LUP remain in effect. These unchanging aspects include, but are not limited to, the design and landscaping of the 50-foot wetland buffer area and detention basin, the Lot Line Adjustment, the Overall Sign Plan, the Vehicle Trip Allowance transfer of 78 PM Peak Hour Trips (PHT) from Lot 19 to Lot 9, the allotted 42 PM PHT for Pacific Beverage, and the allotted Maximum Development Yield of 1,078 PM PHT for the entire Cabrillo Business Park Specific Plan area. The project is in substantial conformance (as documented in Case No. 18-118-SCD) with Case No. 14-070-PCR-LLA-OSP, and therefore all approval findings, consistency analyses, and conditions of approval from Case No. 14-070-PCR-LLA-OSP and Case No. 14-032-LUP will remain in effect and are incorporated by reference. The Revised Project Clearance was filed by Kenneth Marshall of Dudek, agent, on behalf of Jeff Jordano of Pacific Beverage, LLC, property owner. ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW FINDINGS: The project falls within the scope of the CBP Specific Plan approved earlier as part of the CBP Final EIR. The CBP Final EIR adequately describes the project for the purposes of CEQA. No new effects would occur and no new mitigations would be required as the project falls within the scope of the project covered by the CBP Final EIR. The project is also found to be consistent with the Environmental Thresholds Checklist in the CBP Specific Plan; therefore, no further environmental review under CEQA is required. (CEQA Guidelines Sections 15162 and 15168). CORTESE LIST: The project site is not listed on the Cortese List (Gov’t Code §65962.5) as a hazardous materials site, and as such, project implementation would not result in a significant impact on the public and/or environment due to development on a designated hazardous site. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION: The project plans and submittal may be reviewed at the City of Goleta, Planning and Environmental Review Department, located at 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B, Goleta, CA 93117. The Planning and Environmental Review Department is open Monday through Thursday from 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. and on Friday from 8:00 a.m. to noon. For further information please contact Darryl Mimick, Associate Planner, at (805) 961-7572 or via email at dmimick@cityofgoleta.org. APPEALS PROCEDURE: The action of the Director may be appealed to the City of Goleta Planning Commission within ten (10) calendar days following final action. If you challenge the City’s final action in court, you may be limited to raising only those issues you or someone else raised in written or oral testimony and/or evidence provided to Planning and Environmental Review Department prior to final decision-maker action (Government Code § 65009(b)(2)).

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APRIL 11, 2019

INDEPENDENT.COM INDEPENDENT.COM


INDEPENDENT CLASSIFIEDS

LEGALS

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: MARCO LUCCHESI WINES at 65 Los Padres Way Buellton, CA 93427; Section Wines, LLC (same address) This business is conducted by an Limited Liability Company Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 26, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Brenda Aguilera. FBN Number: 2019‑0000709. Published: Apr 11, 18, 25. May 7 2019.

NAME CHANGE IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF JAMAAL WILKES ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 19CV01214 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: JAMAAL ABDUL‑LATEEF WILKES TO: JAMAAL KEITH WILKES THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. NOTICE OF HEARING May 08, 2019 9:30am, Dept 6, 1100 Anacapa St PO Box 21107 Santa Barbara, CA 93101 Superior Court Of California, County of Santa Barbara A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated Mar 13 2019. by Thomas P. Anderle, Judge of the Superior Court. Published. Mar 21, 28. Apr 4, 11 2019.

IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF PEDRO LAZARO DE JESUS ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 18CV05812 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: PEDRO LAZARO DE JESUS TO: SORAIDA MONIC LAZARO DE JESUS THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. NOTICE OF HEARING Jan 30, 2019 9:30am, Dept 6, 1100 Anacapa St PO Box 21107 Santa Barbara, CA 93101 Superior Court Of California, County of Santa Barbara A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated Mar 13 2019. by Pauline Maxwell, Judge of the Superior Court. Published. Apr 11, 18, 25. May 2 2019.

SUMMONS SUMMONS (PARENTAGE‑Custody and Support) CITACION (Parternidad‑Custodia y Manutencion) NOTICE TO RESPONDENT (Name)‑ (Aviso Al Demandad (Nombre): JOSE ANTONIO BARRIENTOS SILVA YOU HAVE BEEN SUED. Read the information below and on the next page (Lo han demandado. Lea la informacion a continuacion y en la pagina siguiente). PETITIONER’S NAME (Nombre del demandante): ANITA LOPEZ PALMA

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You have 30 calendar days after this summons and petition are served on you to file a Response (form FL‑120 or FL‑270) at the court and have a copy served on the petitioner. A letter, phone call, or court appearance will not protect you. If you do not file your Response on time, the court may make orders affecting your right to custody of your children. You may also be ordered to pay child support and attorney fees and costs. For legal advice, contact a lawyer immediately. Get help finding a lawyer at the California Courts Online SelfHelp Center (www.courts.ca.gov/selfhelp), at the California Legal Services website (www.lawhelpca.org) or by contacting you local county bar association. Notice: The restraining order on page 2 remains in effect against each parent until the petition is dismissed, a judgement is entered, or the court makes further orders. this order is enforceable anywhere in California by any law enforcement office who has received or seen a copy of it. Fee Waiver: If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the clerk for a fee waiver form. The court may order you to pay back all or part of the fees and costs that the court waived for you or the other party. Tiene 30 dias de calendario despues de haber recibido la entrega legal de sesta Citacion y Peticion para presentar una Respuesta (formulario FL‑120 or FL‑270) ante la corte y efectuar la entrega legal de una copia al demandante. Una carta o llamada telefonica o una audiencia de la corte no basta para protegerio. Si no presenta su Respuesta a tiempo, la corte puede dar ordenes que afecten la custodia de sus hijos. La corte tambien le puede ordenar que pague manutencion de los hijos, honorarios y costos legales. Para asesoramiento legal, pongase en contacto de inmediato con un abogado. Puede obtener informacion para encontrar un abogado en el Centro

NOTICE OF PLANNING COMMISSION HEARING April 22, 2019 at 6:00PM Crown Castle Small Cell Node Utility Pole Site (#ATTSBW02) Northwest Corner of the Intersection of Calle Real and Ellwood Station Road 18-084-CUP

de Ayuda de las Cortes de California (www.sucorte.ca.gov), en el sitio web de los Servicios Legales de California (www.lawhelpca.org) o poniendose en contacto con el colegio de abogados de su condado. AVISO: La Orden de proteccion que aparecen en la pagina 2 continuara en vigencia en cuanto a cada parte hasta que se emita un fallo final, se despida la peticion o la corte de otras ordenes. Cualquier agencia del orden publico que haya recibido o visto una copia de estas orden puede hacerla acatar en cualquier lugar de California. Exencion de Cuotas: Si no puede pagar la cuota de presentacion, pida al secretario un formulario de exencion de cuotas. La corte puede ordenar que usted pague, ya sea en parte o por completo, las cuotas y costos de la corte previamente exentos a peticion de usted o de la otra parte. CASE NO: 18FL01936 The name and address of the court is: (El nombre y direccion de la corte es) SUPERIOR COURT OF THE COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, 1100 Anacapa Street P.O Box 21107 Santa Barbara, CA 93121‑1107. The name, address, and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney, or plaintiff without an attorney, is : Charter Claiborne Hughes 329 E Cabrillo St. Ste. H Santa Barbara, CA 93101 805‑965‑6810 DATE: Aug 07, 2018. By Thomas Hernandez, Deputy Published Mar 21, 28. Ar 4, 11 2019..

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NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING Design Review Board Goleta City Hall – Council Chambers 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B Goleta, CA 93117 Tuesday, April 23, 2019 at 3:00 P.M. NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Design Review Board (DRB) of the City of Goleta will conduct a public hearing on the date set forth above to consider the following new project: Sign Review Goleta Neighborhood Clinic Signage 5850 Calle Real (APN 069-160-050) Case No. 19-022-DRB Revised Design Review Village at Los Carneros – Comstock Homes Revised Floor Plans 6646, 6648, 6650 & 6654 Sand Castle Place (APN 073-740-006, 007, 008 & 016) Case No. 19-021-DRB PUBLIC COMMENT: This hearing is for design review only. All interested persons are encouraged to attend the public hearing and to present written and/or oral comments. All letters should be addressed to City of Goleta, Planning and Environmental Review, 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B, Goleta, CA 93117 or email to mchang@ cityofgoleta.org. Letters must be received by Planning and Environmental Review no later than 24 hours prior to the DRB meeting. Materials received after this time may not be reviewed prior to the DRB meeting. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION: The items in this notice are new items. The DRB agenda may also include items continued from prior meetings. All persons wanting to review any project applications may do so by contacting City of Goleta, Planning and Environmental Review at (805) 961-7543. The Agenda, staff reports and project plans will be available approximately one week before the hearing on the City’s website at www.cityofgoleta.org www.cityofgoleta.org. Publish:

Santa Barbara Independent, April 11, 2019

NOTICE OF AVAILABILITY OF ADDENDUM AND PLANNING COMMISSION HEARING Monday, April 22, 2019 at 6:00 PM Hollister Village 27 Apartment Unit Project Unaddressed parcel north of 7000 Hollister Avenue APNs: 073-030-026, -027, -028, & -033 Case No. 18-152-GPA- RZ- LLA- DPRV NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City of Goleta has completed an Addendum to the Westar Village Mixed-Use Final Environmental Impact Report (FEIR) SCH#201007106 for the Hollister Village Apartment Project described below. (Hollister Village was originally known as the Westar Village Project). A public hearing to consider the adequacy of the Addendum and merits of the Project has been scheduled as indicated below. The Planning Commission’s action will be advisory to the City Council. The City Council will be the final decision maker for the Project. The public hearing before the Planning Commission will occur on: HEARING DATE AND TIME:

Monday, April 22, 2019 at 6:00 PM

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Planning Commission will conduct a discussion to consider a request for a Conditional Use Permit to allow for a small cell node on an existing utility pole within the Public Right-of-Way.

HEARING LOCATION:

City of Goleta City Hall Council Chambers 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B Goleta, CA 93117

HEARING DATE AND TIME:

Monday, April 22, 2019 at 6:00PM

HEARING LOCATION:

City of Goleta City Hall Council Chambers 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B, Goleta, CA 93117

ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW FINDINGS: The Addendum was prepared pursuant to the requirements of the California Environmental Quality Act (Public Resources Code §§ 21000, et seq., CEQA), the regulations promulgated thereunder (14 California Code of Regulations, §§ 15000, et seq., CEQA Guidelines), and the City’s Environmental Review Guidelines. The City of Goleta is acting as the Lead Agency.

ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW FINDINGS: A Notice of Exemption has been prepared pursuant to the requirements of the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) (Public Resources Code §§ 21000, et. seq.), the regulations promulgated thereunder (14 Cal. Code of Regulations, §§ 15000, et. seq.), and the City’s Environmental Review Guidelines. The City of Goleta is acting as the Lead Agency for this project. Pursuant to Sections 15301(b) and 15303(d) of the CEQA Guidelines, the project is not anticipated to have an adverse effect because the project involves a negligible expansion of existing utilities and construction and installation of small facilities/equipment; also, there are no unusual circumstances creating the reasonable possibility of significant environmental effects. PROJECT DESCRIPTION SUMMARY: In addition to the CEQA Exemption, the Planning Commission will review and take action on a Major Conditional Use Permit (CUP) request to allow installation and operation of a small cell node and associated equipment on an existing SCE utility pole within the City of Goleta (City) pursuant to the City of Goleta Inland Zoning Ordinance (GMC § 35-292h and 35-315). The Planning Commission is the decision-making body for the items described. PROJECT LOCATION: The Project site is located within the Public right-of-way (“ROW”) on the northwest corner of the intersection of Calle Real and Ellwood Station Road in the Inland Zoning area of the City. CORTESE LIST: The site is not listed on any hazardous waste facilities or disposal sites as enumerated under Section 65962.5 of the California Government Code (the “Cortese list”) DOCUMENT AVAILABILITY: The hearing documents and all documents referenced therein may be obtained at the City of Goleta, 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B, Goleta, CA 93117. The Planning Commission staff report will be posted at least 72 hours prior to the hearing on the City’s web site at www.cityofgoleta.org. PUBLIC COMMENT: All interested persons are encouraged to attend the meeting and to present written and/or oral comments. Written submittals concerning this project may be emailed to Wendy Winkler, Management Assistant, e-mail: wwinkler@cityofgoleta.org; or mail: Attn: Planning Commission at 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B Goleta, California 93117. In order to be disseminated to the Planning Commission for consideration during the meeting, written information must be submitted no later than Monday by noon prior to the Planning Commission meeting. Materials received after this time may not be reviewed by the Planning Commission prior to the meeting.

The Addendum is appropriate pursuant to CEQA Guidelines §15164 since only minor changes and additions to the prior CEQA analyses associated with the Westar Village Mixed-Use project are necessary to address the Project, the Rezone, and the General Plan Amendment and no circumstances exist calling for the preparation of a subsequent or supplemental environmental impact report pursuant to CEQA Guidelines §§15162 and 15163. PROJECT DESCRIPTION: Goleta Hollister LLC, property owner, seeks approval of Hollister Village Apartments, a 27-unit apartment project with five affordable units (Project). The 1.84-acre Project site is the undeveloped portion within the Hollister Village complex and is located at the southwest corner of Village Way (a private road) and S. Glen Annie Road. The site has a Community Commercial (C-C) Goleta General Plan land use designation and is zoned Shopping Center (SC) in the Inland/Coastal Zoning Ordinance. The Project requires approval of the following: • A Development Plan Revision to allow the construction of 27 apartment units (14 studio and 13 one-bedroom units of which 5 units will be income restricted), 35 parking spaces, and a 0.42-acre park on a 1.84-acre site with associated setback modifications. The setback modifications would allow mailbox clusters and trash enclosures to encroach into the front yard setback along Village Way (a private, internal road) and eight parking spaces and one carport to encroach into an internal side yard setback between existing Lot 10 and revised Lot 11; • A Lot Line Adjustment to merge three lots, Lots 4, 5, and 6, into a new Lot 11 of Tract 32,048, to accommodate the proposed layout of the building and financing requirements of the applicant; • A Rezone from Shopping Center (SC) to Design Residential (DR-20); • A General Plan Amendment to change the Project site’s land use designation under General Plan/Local Coastal Land Use Plan Figure 2-1 (the Land Use Map) from Community Commercial (C-C) to Residential Medium Density (R-MD); and • An Addendum to the Westar Village Mixed-Use FEIR that analyzes the impacts of the Project and the General Plan Amendment. CORTESE LIST: The Project site is not listed on any hazardous waste facilities or disposal sites lists as enumerated under Government Code §65962.5 65962.5 (the “Cortese list”). DOCUMENT AVAILABILITY: The proposed Addendum and all documents referenced therein are currently available and may be obtained at the City of Goleta, 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B, Goleta, CA 93117. The proposed Addendum is posted on the City’s web site at www.cityofgoleta.org. www.cityofgoleta.org. Staff reports and related materials for the Planning Commission hearing will be available at least 72 hours prior to the meeting. PUBLIC COMMENT: All interested persons are encouraged to attend the meeting and to present written and/ or oral comments. Written submittals concerning this project may be emailed to Wendy Winkler, Management Assistant, e-mail: wwinkler@cityofgoleta.org; wwinkler@cityofgoleta.org; or mail: Attn: Planning Commission at 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B Goleta, California 93117. In order to be disseminated to the Planning Commission for consideration during the meeting, written information must be submitted no later than Monday by noon prior to the Planning Commission meeting. Materials received after this time may not be reviewed by the Planning Commission prior to the meeting.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION: Additional information is on file at the Planning and Environmental Review Department, Goleta City Hall, 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B, Goleta, CA 93117. Contact Joe Pearson II, Associate Planner at 805-961-7573 or Jpearson@cityofgoleta. org.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION: Additional information is on file at the Planning and Environmental Review Department, Goleta City Hall, 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B, Goleta, CA 93117. For more information, contact Mary Chang, Supervising Senior Planner at 805-961-7567 or mchang@cityofgoleta.org.

Note: If you challenge the City’s final action on this project in court, you may be limited to only those issues you or someone else raised in written or oral testimony and/or evidence provided to Planning and Environmental Review on or before the date of the hearing (Government Code Section 65009(b)[2]).

Note: If you challenge the City’s final action on this Project in court, you may be limited to only those issues you or someone else raised in written or oral testimony and/or evidence provided to the City on or before the date of the public hearing (Government Code Section 65009(b) [2]).

Note: In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you need special assistance to participate in this hearing, please contact Deborah Lopez, City Clerk, at (805) 961-7505. Notification at least 72 hours prior to the hearing will enable City staff to make reasonable arrangements.

Note: In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you need special assistance to participate in this hearing, please contact Deborah Lopez, City Clerk, at (805) 961-7505. Notification at least 72 hours prior to the hearing will enable City staff to make reasonable arrangements. Publication: Santa Barbara Independent April 11, 2019 INDEPENDENT.COM INDEPENDENT.COM

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Santa Barbara Independent, 4/11/19  

April 11 2019, Vol. 33, No. 691

Santa Barbara Independent, 4/11/19  

April 11 2019, Vol. 33, No. 691