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Hank Pitcher’s Eco-Evolution

Santa Barbara

FREE

MAR. 7-14, 2019 VOL. 33 ■ NO. 686

Start Your DRAG RACING RETURNS TO ITS SANTA BARBARA ROOTS By Tyler Hayden

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Mozart: Violin Sonata, K. 304 Debussy: Violin Sonata Ravel: Violin Sonata No. 2 Mozart: Violin Sonata, K. 454 Poulenc: Violin Sonata

Anne-Sophie Mutter, violin Lambert Orkis, piano

Fri, Mar 8 / 7 PM / Granada Theatre “When Anne-Sophie Mutter plays, you listen. With a violinist so sturdy in tone, intense in emotion, and steely in technique, there’s actually no choice.” The London Times A fixture on the international stages of the world’s major concert halls, Anne-Sophie Mutter is making her mark on the classical music scene as a soloist, mentor and visionary. A four-time Grammy Award winner, the supreme virtuoso’s artistry embraces tonal richness, transcendent expression and profound musicianship.

Hot Club of Cowtown & Dustbowl Revival Across the Great Divide: A Celebration of the 50th Anniversary of The Band Tue, Apr 2 / 8 PM / Campbell Hall

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“Above all else, Hot Club’s music is for dancing and an oldfashioned good time.” The New York Times

Each band brings their musical alchemy to the Santa Barbara stage in a celebration of The Band, 50 years since the legendary group’s debut albums Music From Big Pink and The Band.

Event Sponsor: Anne Towbes

George Hinchliffe’s

Ukulele Orchestra of Great Britain Thu, Apr 4 / 8 PM / Campbell Hall

“Sheer fun and outright daffiness tied to first-rate musicality and comic timing.” The New York Times Expect anything from Tchaikovsky to Nirvana via Otis Redding, EDM and Spaghetti Western in this uplifting night of “unabashed genre crashing antics. Nothing is spoof proof” (The Sunday Times, U.K.).

Event Sponsor: Patricia Gregory, for the Baker Foundation

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CONTENTS

volume 33, number 686, March 7-14, 2019

Name: Paisley Shoemaker Title: Court Reporting Intern Voices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  18

21

THE WEEK.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 LIVING.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37

COVER STORY

Start Your Engines Drag Racing Returns to Its Santa Barbara Roots

(Tyler Hayden) ON THE COVER AND ABOVE: Photos courtesy Tony Baker/Prospect Archive.

27 FEATURE Hank Pitcher’s Eco-Evolution

(Roger Durling)

NEWS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 OPINIONS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Angry Poodle Barbecue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  17

FULL-COURT PRESS

Living Page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37

Starshine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39

FOOD & DRINK .. . . . . . . . . . . 41 The Restaurant Guy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45

Dining Out Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46

A&E. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47

Why do you gravitate toward court reporting? What interests you about it? After college, I plan to go to law school. Having the opportunity to go to the courthouse and research cases, interview attorneys, and try to get the scoop on different stories as a reporter allows me to interact with a field that truly interests me.

e

What’s the most interesting case you’ve written about or researched? The most interesting case I’ve researched concerned a country club getting sued for negligence after one of its members accidentally struck another member in the head with a golf club on the driving range. As your internship wraps up, what’s your biggest takeaway from the experience? Be curious. Interesting stories are hiding just beneath the surface if you dig a little.

Dance . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 Books . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51

Reviews . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 52

FILM & TV. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55

Also Inside:

Disaster Prep Guide

Movie Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55

SPORTS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59 ODDS & ENDS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

GuÍa de

preparacÍon para

Obituaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Rob Brezsny’s Free Will Astrology . . . . . . . 61

desastres naturales

This Modern World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65

CLASSIFIEDS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62

En inglés y español

PARALLEL STORIES

Dismantling Hierarchies: Alex Espinoza SUNDAY | MARCH 10 | 2:30 PM Described by Sandra Cisneros as “capable of renewing one’s faith in new fiction,” Alex Espinoza’s writing is filled with a sense of place and longing, and an idiosyncratic search for love, meaning, and unflinching truth. In an afternoon of reading and conversation, the author shares his thoughts on Southern California, masks, identity, cultural displacement, faith, the world of lucha libre, belonging, and why what should exclude us, empowers us. Parallel Stories is a literary and performing arts series that pairs art and artists with award-winning authors and performers of regional, national, and international acclaim. This series functions as a multidisciplinary lens through which to view the Museum’s collection and special exhibitions. This program is generously sponsored by the Samuel B. and Margaret C. Mosher Foundation.

$5 SBMA Members $10 Non-Members $6 Senior Non-Members Purchase tickets at the Museum Visitor Services desk, or online at tickets.sbma.net. Mary Craig Auditorium 1130 State Street www.sbma.net

Images left to right: Still Water Saints cover. Alex Espinoza.

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Presenting the world’s finest classical artists since 1919

MASTERSERIES

INTERNATIONAL SERIES

SEASON SPONSORSHIP: ESPERIA FOUNDATION

SEASON SPONSORSHIP: SAGE PUBLISHING

AT THE LOBERO THEATRE

AT THE GRANADA THEATRE

Esa-Pekka Salonen Photo Bruce Zinger

Tales of Two Cities The Leipzig-Damascus Coffee House

Conceived, programmed, and scripted by Alison Mackay Saturday, March 9 Lobero Theatre, 8:00 PM

Tafelmusik Baroque Orchestra with Alon Nashman, narrator and Trio Arabica Elisa Citterio director

It’s 1740, and coffee houses are the places to listen to music and share stories, in both the famous trading center of Leipzig and one of the oldest cities in the world, Damascus. Anyone who has attended one of Tafelmusik’s three previous multi-media concert projects at the Lobero in the past decade can attest to the incredible originality and conception of their insightful musical stage creations that combine live music, text and stunning projections transporting the audience back in time and place. Not to be missed! Concert Partners: Deborah & Peter Bertling Robert Boghosian & Mary E. Gates Warren • Bridget Colleary Dorothy & John Gardner • Elizabeth Karlsberg & Jeff Young Lynn P. Kirst

TICKETS (805) 963-0761 lobero.com

Photo Benjamin Suomela

Wednesday, March 20 The Granada Theatre, 8:00 PM

Philharmonia Orchestra

Esa-Pekka Salonen conductor Arnold Schoenberg: Verklärte Nacht, Op.4 Anton Bruckner: Symphony No.7 in E Major Local favorite Esa-Pekka Salonen, former music director of the Los Angeles Philharmonic, returns to Santa Barbara for the third time as Principal Conductor of London’s world-class Philharmonia Orchestra. This will be Salonen’s fourteenth appearance as conductor in CAMA concerts over the past 25+ years. PRE-CONCERT LECTURE BY SIMON WILLIAMS, Professor Emeritus, UCSB Department of Theater and Dance; Opera and Theater Critic. Lecture will begin at 7:00 PM; doors to The Granada Theatre will open for the lecture at 6:45 PM. Lecture seating is limited to the first 100 patrons. First come, first served. Sponsors: Anonymous • Alison & Jan Bowlus • Natalia & Michael Howe Ellen & Peter Johnson • Kum Su Kim & John Perry Co-Sponsors: Elizabeth & Andrew Butcher Chris Lancashire & Catherine Gee Jocelyne & William Meeker Val & Bob Montgomery

TICKETS (805) 899-2222 granadasb.org

C O M M U N I T Y A R T S M U S I C A S S O C I AT I O N O F S A N TA B A R B A R A , I N C 8

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FEB. 28-MAR. 7, 2019

NEWS of the WEEK PAU L WELLM AN PHOTOS

by BLANCA GARCIA , KEITH HAMM, TYLER HAYDEN @TylerHayden1, NICK WELSH, and JEAN YAMAMURA, with INDEPENDENT STAFF

BUSINESS

NEWS BRIEFS

FEB. 28-MAR. 7, 2019

CITY Owners of the now-shuttered Sears department store in La Cumbre Plaza have listed the iconic property for sale, informing would-be buyers it could be developed with as many as 546 highdensity housing units. No price was included in the offering. City Hall officials have been in contact with the family that owns Sears and have reportedly insisted that any new development take place in coordination with the entire La Cumbre Plaza. The mall is owned by at least three separate investment groups, making development complicated and problematic. City officials had not heard reports that noted real estate developer Brian Kelly, famous, among other things, for building the Lark complex in the Funk Zone, was attempting to secure control of La Cumbre. Calls to Kelly were not returned by deadline.

Goleta the Ganja Land?

Six Cannabis Shops Apply for Old Town; 15 Storefronts in Planning Stages by Jean Yamamura he riches promised by storefront cannabis shops were enough to have one landlord joking that he would be renting to the best drug dealers in Goleta. Fifteen applicants have filed with the City of Goleta to open retail stores selling cannabis products. Nine are in Old Town, though three were made inactive for being within 300 feet of an earlier applicant. But Old Town might be able to avoid having cannabis retail on every block; on Monday, the Planning Commission will consider expanding the proximity requirements between shops and around the Goleta Valley Community Center. The fervor over cannabis gold has some longtime landmarks looking to make the switch, including the palm reader on the corner of Fairview and Hollister avenues and the old Union 76 station on the corner of Hollister Avenue and Rutherford Street. The 2,500-square-foot Gimeal Restaurant on Orange Avenue has also filed. The gas station is now a Fuel Depot owned by John Price, who was told by Goleta Planning that a major, not a minor, conditional-use permit could be required: His cannabis shop would be too close to homes (within 100 feet) and the children’s day school at the Goleta Valley Community Center (600 feet). Price has a second application in for the Zizzo’s Coffee drivethru at 370 Storke Road. Contacted briefly on the phone, Price said he was reconsidering the Fuel Depot permit. Goleta’s retail cannabis rules went into

T

effect August 17, 2018, a date that saw at least nine applications filed, and next week’s Planning Commission meeting follows a January workshop on rule revisions. All the applicants were told that any permit decisions would be made according to the city rules in force at the time, a statement that has gotten pushback from Coastal Dispensary’s attorneys, Cappello & Noël. Coastal has applied for a cannabis shop at 5710 Hollister Avenue, directly across the street from the Goleta Valley Community Center. It’s already been approved for a store in Santa Barbara on Chapala Street, though the spot is currently red-tagged for premature building renovations, and Coastal’s cannabis permit has been challenged. In a letter to Goleta planning commissioners ahead of a January 23 workshop with the City Council, attorney Lawrence Conlan stated Coastal had spent more than $100,000 prepping for the permit and that in August, when the application was filed, no buffer existed for youth centers or schools. Conlan also wrote that the prior tenant “vacated the premises to accommodate Coastal’s proposed business.” That tenant disagrees. Not only is 5710 Hollister Avenue directly across from Goleta’s community center, but it also previously housed Phebe Mansur’s business, CopyRight. Mansur is the executive director of the Goleta Old Town Community Association, a major advocate for the neighborhood. Her landlord gave her early warning of Coastal’s offer of three times her rent, somewhere around $10,000 a month. Mansur

GAS TO GRASS? Among the 15 retail cannabis applications Goleta has received, four are on Hollister Avenue in Old Town, including the Fuel Depot (above), and (from left) the Palm Reader at Fairview Avenue, 5710 Hollister Avenue, and Gimeal Restaurant on Orange Avenue.

went ahead and moved, right next door in a former furniture store, but she is concerned: “Old Town could end up like Santa Barbara with exceptionally high rents,” she said. Her new lease says her landlord can raise the rent at any time if surrounding rents rise. The owner of 5710 Hollister, Michael Stiny, said the great attraction of his building is the large parking lot behind it. And the great attraction of a cannabis shop would be the work Coastal will do to upgrade the interior, the security it will be required to have, and the “jewelry store environment, like Tiffany’s,” said Stiny. He described a nearby smoke shop as one of the nicest stores in Goleta. The two existing medical cannabis shops in Old Town have both applied for storefront retail status. One of them is zoned “industrial general,” a designation that does not allow retail cannabis activity. Altering the uses allowed under that designation is among the questions before the Planning Commission on March 11 at 6 p.m. Another is whether to streamline the application, which currently includes a conditional-use permit (CUP) and a cannabis business license process. The commissioners are considering folding CUP requirements into the one-year business license, which examines owners and employees for crime convictions, outlines surveillance and financial reporting requirements, and prohibits consumption of cannabis product on-site or within 100 feet of the business, among many other conditions, such as parking. n

As the result of a $10,000 grant from the Fund for Santa Barbara, on top of the efforts of volunteers, La Casa de la Raza will soon begin broadcasting upward of 35 hours per week on its new radio station, KZAA LP 96.5 FM. That’s up from five hours per week less than a year ago. The station will focus on lifting up marginalized voices, say managers, particularly those in the Chicano/ Latino community, as well as indigenous people. Broadcasts begin at 6 a.m. on weekdays.

COUNTY Between 2014 and 2017, 160 homeless individuals died prematurely in Santa Barbara County, according to a report presented to the county supervisors this week. In 2017 — the most recent year for which records have been compiled — the number was 44; in 2015, it was 32. Of those who died in 2017, 62 percent were male, 64 percent were white, and they lived — on average — to the age of 52. That’s 25 years less than the average life expectancy in Santa Barbara County of 77. Five were veterans. Two were the victims of homicides; 15 died of accidental causes; 24 were done in by unspecified “natural causes.” Although 18 died outdoors, none of the deaths were attributed to exposure to the elements. North- and southbound travelers through Santa Barbara are able to use State Route 154 again, which reopened on 3/1. A storm in early February had blocked a culvert 40 feet under the highway near Lake Cachuma. An associated embankment has been restored and the damaged pavement repaired. One-way traffic controls may be in place until Caltrans has completed all work at the spot, which is part of the Whittier Fire burn scar from 2017. The road reopened a couple of weeks ahead of the last reported timetable. CalPortland Construction of Santa Maria was the contractor on the $2.2 million project. CONT’D ON PAGE 10 

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ifty years after 12 black students took over UC Santa Barbara’s North Hall to demand change on campus, the Black Student Union met with UCSB administrators to submit a list of demands not all that different from those students demanded five decades before. On February 9, the BSU team sent a follow-up email to the UC Regents after presenting their demands to Chancellor Henry Yang. The students iterated their demands and informed the Board of Regents about what they described as an anti-black incident that occurred before the regents joined the meeting. Students are demanding a Malcolm X Center for Black Student Development in part to commemorate the 1968 North Hall takeover during which students first sought to create a space for black students. Students are also asking the university to create an Office of Black Student Development to “increase the number of black students in college who graduate and are successful.” Currently, only 5 percent of undergraduates are black; the freshman class entering in 2014 had a 65 percent four-year graduation rate, compared to white students’ graduation rate of 76 percent. Students have spelled out a staff for the Black Student Development office, namely a director and assistant director, two academic support counselors, recruitment

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and retention specialists, a coordinator of black student life, and two advocacy counselors. “The university has continually been unable to fulfill black students’ demands without the intervention of Black students on campus who address this inability [to study, learn, and become wholly involved as campus community members],” wrote the BSU team. “The University’s reliance on Black student intervention in what should be structured efforts to support Black students is unacceptable.” “Chancellor Yang appreciates hearing from students and having the opportunity to listen to their ideas and concerns,” UCSB responded in a statement. “He is supportive of their vision and has been working with students, faculty and administrative colleagues to ensure progress is made toward planning for the establishment of such a significant academic resource.” —Blanca Garcia

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Thunderstorms lit up the sky in spectacular fashion Tuesday night, bringing with them heavy bursts of rain. Ahead of the storm, debris-flow threshold levels were anticipated across the Sherpa, Whittier, and Thomas Fire burn areas, prompting county officials to call an evacuation order for 4 p.m. Tuesday. The order was lifted on 8 a.m. Wednesday, and no major incidents were reported. Downtown Santa Barbara received nearly two inches of rain and San Marcos Pass about a half and inch more. Rainfall totals are

showing numbers not seen in seven straight years of drought; this season is now slightly wetter than an average normal year.

FEDERAL The House of Representatives, by a vote of 245 to 182, voted on 2/26 to “disapprove” President Trump’s declaration of a national emergency two weeks before to acquire billions to build a wall at the Mexican border. Trump reportedly CONT’D ON PAGE 12 

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“WE NEED TO DO BETTER”: A proposal aiming to protect tenants misses the mark, according to CAUSE leader Lucas Zucker (pictured).

Battle Brews over ‘Just-Cause Eviction’ Tenants’ Rights Advocates Turn Up the Heat

I

by Nick Welsh

n a dress rehearsal for a looming battle over renters’ rights, a subcommittee of the Santa Barbara City Council tentatively approved a measure requiring landlords pay up to $5,000 in relocation assistance to tenants displaced through no fault of their own. After struggling over where to draw the line, the council’s Ordinance Committee endorsed a “no-fault mass relocation” measure that would require such assistance if more than 20 percent of tenants occupying housing complexes of seven or more units were displaced within a 12-month period. The Santa Barbara Board of Realtors had recommended a much looser threshold, one that would allow up to five no-fault evictions a year and would require relocation assistance only in complexes 15 units or larger when 35 percent of the tenants were displaced within one year. The seven-unit solution was a compromise between the Realtors’ proposal and that of Councilmember Oscar Gutierrez, who argued the ordinance should apply to any rental properties bigger than a duplex. “I’m trying to keep our families here,” he said. “I’m trying to make sure everyone is protected.” Councilmember Randy Rowse countered that the ordinance was drafted in response to mass evictions caused several years ago when out-of-town real estate companies like Ivy Apartments bought up large apartment complexes and evicted tenants — predominantly low-income immigrant and Latino families — to cater to more upscale tenants. By crafting too broad an ordinance, he cautioned, the council might encourage longtime mom-and-pop landlords to get out of the business, thus shrinking the supply of rental housing units. Councilmember Kristen Sneddon tried to cut the proverbial baby in half by suggesting the seven-unit threshold. This marked the second consecutive week the Ordinance Committee has wrestled with a package of measures designed to provide greater protection to Santa Barbara renters. Last week, that package came under intense fire from many of the tenants’ rights advocates attending. “We need to do better

than that,” said Lucas Zucker, organizer and chief numbers cruncher for CAUSE (Central Coast Alliance United for a Sustainable Economy), which has been pushing City Hall for tougher tenant protections since December 2016. The proposals before the Ordinance Committee, Zucker charged, were “riddled” with so many exceptions and restrictions that only 37 percent of the city’s tenants would be protected. “In terms of stopping mass evictions of tenants,” he charged, “it protects virtually no one.” Based on changes made this Tuesday, however, those protections — if ultimately adopted by the entire City Council — would cover 80 percent of the city’s rental units. Last week, organizers with CAUSE cited the case of a woman and her 42-year-old son now being evicted after 16 years from their East Voluntario Street digs, reportedly because of health issues that have beset the son in the past year. But landlords showed up, too, with stories of their own to tell, like Theresa Gray talking about renting to one tenant for 27 years without increasing rents once. These issues forced their way onto City Hall’s radar two years ago when vacancy rates had dropped to 0.6 percent and the city’s Rental Mediation Task Force was handling 1,500 cases a year. Rents had reached the point where only 40 percent of the population made enough to “afford” what one-bedroom apartments were fetching on the open market. “Afford” meaning that no one pays more than onethird their income. As of this Tuesday, the issue of justcause eviction remained far from settled. Councilmembers Sneddon and Gutierrez both expressed support for throwing the issue back to the council at large. As one longtime affordable housing advocate, Mickey Flacks, noted, the County of Santa Barbara has long had a just-cause eviction ordinance, and the county government had yet to collapse due to such “socialistic” intrusions. With four council seats up for grabs this November, the politics of tenants’ rights now finds itself imbued with added n urgency.

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he electric scooter may prove just disruptive and transformative enough to challenge the automobile from primacy on South Coast roadways, but it’s not clear whether South Coast governments can agree on what to do about the popular new form of bipedal micromobility. That was one of the takeaways from last week’s “Scooter Summit” organized by the Santa Bar- SHARED MOBILITY: Francie Stefan, mobility czar for the City of Santa bara County Association Monica, spoke at a SBCAG-hosted Scooter Summit in the Faulkner Gallery. of Governments to explore the potential of electrified two-wheelers to reduce automotive vehicle embraced “scooter disruption,” despite obvimiles traveled, road congestion, and green- ous risks. With more motorists on the road these days driving longer distances, she said, house-gas emissions. In recent months, the County of Santa the greenhouse-gas emissions Santa Monica Barbara has embraced the new devices; Car- attributes to transportation had increased pinteria, Goleta, and UCSB have banned from 40 to 64 percent. For short trips, the them; and the City of Santa Barbara has scooter has proved wildly popular. A recent drawn a thick “not yet” line in the sand. survey indicated 26 percent of scooter ridRepresentatives from each of these jurisdic- ers had previously driven cars. More than 35 tions were on hand to explain why. More eye- percent used scooters to get to work. opening was the different range of scooters Stefan acknowledged risk to life and on display by the Granada parking garage limb as unschooled riders took to the new by some of the less well-known companies devices, but she said accidents are endemic seeking to establish a toehold in a market to all forms of transportation. As scooters dominated by Lime and Bird. An Oxnard- are better engineered and made safer, she based company builds and markets a device said, they can play a positive role. Santa Barthat looks like a skinny Vespa; the rider sits bara County’s 3rd District Supervisor Joan rather than stands. Another company rep- Hartmann waxed enthusiastic about the resented builds a three-wheeled contraption scooter’s potential to “take back the streets.” — one in the front, two in the back — for But she also challenged the industry to be a greater stability and safety. All denounced partner, not a parasite. As for safety, Hartthe rogue launch operations for which Lime mann’s assistant Gina Fischer demonstrated has become infamous, dropping hundreds of a collapsible bicycle helmet that can be comcheaply built devices on city streets without fortably folded into a purse. “They could be permission or coordination. as transformational as solar power or elecFrancie Stefan, mobility czar for the City tric vehicles,” she said, but “much sooner of Santa Monica, explained why that city —within a year or two.” —Nick Welsh

NEWS BRIEFS CONT’D FROM P. 10 sought around $8 billion for the “wall,” or fence or bollards at last reports, presuming to take it from monies distributed by Congress. Lawmakers included $1.3 billion for border security in the latest federal budget, approved by the president to end the 35-day government shutdown. Santa Barbara Rep. Salud Carbajal joined Democrats and 13 Republicans in voting for the disapproval resolution, which reportedly has the votes to carry the Senate. It is expected to be vetoed by the president, presenting a two-thirds vote obstacle in both houses of Congress.

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Bradley Brock has been named the new principal of La Cumbre Junior High School. He’ll be filling the position left vacant after former principal Jo Ann Caines died in June 2018. Caines held the position for more than 10 years. Under her leadership, reading proficiency scores increased by 20 percent in what was previously a struggling school. La Cumbre largely serves the Latino and low-income

population on the Westside. Last year, the junior high school had a population of 535 students, 77 percent of whom qualified for free or reduced lunch and 85 percent of whom identified as Latino. Brock has 18 years of experience as a teacher and administrator. He served middle schools in the Los Angeles Unified School District and is recognized for his role in implementing a public school STEAM (science, technology, engineering, arts, and mathematics) program for middle schoolers. The University of California has joined global efforts pushing for universal, unfettered access to publicly funded research. While libraries, universities, and research institutions across the globe have advocated for open-access publishing, the majority of research is still placed behind expensive paywalls. The UC Office of the President announced on 2/28 it would end the UC’s multimillion-dollar subscription with Elsevier, the world’s largest for-profit scientific publisher. The 10 UC campuses account for nearly 10 percent of all n U.S. publishing output


The Best Defense IsCountyaApproves Good Defense Massive Wildfire Protection Plan

TOP BRASS: County Supervisors approved an eastern Goleta wildfire protection plan after a presentation from (from left) S.B. County Deputy Fire Marshal Rob Hazard, Division Chief Steve Oaks, and Fire Chief Mark A. Hartwig.

by Keith Hamm escribed as a gazette of strategy and information designed to protect an area that’s arguably one of the most vulnerable statewide to catastrophic wind-driven wildfire, a 270page plan has been approved unanimously by the Santa Barbara County Board of Supervisors. The hefty document, titled the San Marcos Pass–Eastern Goleta Valley Mountainous Communities Community Wildfire Protection Plan, covers nearly 30 square miles, from the front-country San Marcos Foothills to the Paradise Canyon backcountry, and including the chaparralsurrounded Trout Club and Painted Cave residential areas. The plan took more than two years to craft and went through 10 versions, according to Santa Barbara County Deputy Fire Marshal Rob Hazard, who headed up the effort and presented the plan before Tuesday’s vote by the board. Boiled down, explained Hazard, the protection plan aims to “enhance communitywide preparedness and protection” through a bevy of recommendations, from public education and beefed-up evacuation plans to brush clearing and home hardening, among others. The work also officially identified wildland-urban interface areas within the plan’s 19,588-acre boundary, which helps free up future federal grant dollars if and when the county sets aspects of the plan in motion. “[This plan] is not a commitment to any particular action,” clarified County Counsel Mike Ghizzoni. It simply collects all the priorities of the communities in its scope; if the county moves forward, any aspect of the plan would be subject to the normal flow chart of approval. Supervisor Joan Hartmann stressed that the document serves as a valuable template for other county regions, including the Gaviota Coast, another mountainous expanse of drought-ravaged chaparral. All said, the plan covers 12 communities, 16 recreation facilities, 1,121 structures, and 7,322 residents in an area that hasn’t experienced a major wildland blaze since the Painted Cave Fire of 1990, an act of arson that burned 5,000 acres, destroyed more than 400 structures, and killed one civilian. While the plan emphasizes the impor-

D

tance of an individual home’s defensible space — a closely cropped buffer zone between the house and surrounding trees and shrubs — it also recommends more than three dozen potential “fuel treatment projects,” which would clear brush around community areas and roadsides along critical evacuation routes, equaling 250 total acres (1.2 percent of the plan’s scope). Another 522 acres of private fuel treatments, 183 acres of County Fire treatments, and roughly 800 acres of U.S. Forest Service fuel breaks — all existing — are also cited for maintenance and monitoring. Hazard also stressed the need for “consistent vegetation management along Highway 154.” According to 75 years of data, 77 percent of wildfires started within 50 feet of a road. On San Marcos Pass, for example, it’s not uncommon, especially during a heat wave, for overheated vehicles to pull over onto the grassy shoulder. To help prevent an accidental ignition “really only requires a small buffer of 10 feet,” Hazard said, adding, however, that such vegetation clearance needs to be diligently maintained. “Aggressive management of dry [roadside] grasses is one of the most important things we can do.” Therein lies an issue, offered Lee Chiacos, the Trout Club’s vegetation manager. Addressing the board during the publiccomment period, he explained that many wildfire starts along roadways have been quickly extinguished by community members highly tuned in to the dangers of tall grass on a hot day. “We can’t keep depending on luck,” he said, politely urging Caltrans to do a better job keeping road shoulders clear of dangerous fire fuels. “We need to make it a priority for Caltrans to be part of this comprehensive plan.” Painted Cave resident Phil Seymour emphasized that the plan “is a living document” that ought to be steadily updated as new information becomes available. Advances in evacuation planning, for example, are likely to emerge from last year’s Camp Fire tragedy in the Northern California town of Paradise. As for the plan’s long road to Tuesday’s approval, Seymour said, “It represents the values of the people who n actually live in the area.”

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Opinions COME ON: The guy sitting in the plastic chair next to me looked like a thousand solar windstorms had blown through him. The way he held him-

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self suggested another thousand might be lining up. We each knew who the other was. We didn’t talk. We were both there— waiting outside of Judge Clifford Anderson’s courtroom in the basement of the Santa Barbara Courthouse—for the same reason: his son. At that moment, his son— 27 years old, intensely handsome, and said to be off-thecharts smart —was locked up behind the Plexi-

glas partition in Judge Anderson’s chambers, dressed in jailhouse orange, and waiting for the next shoe to drop. Prosecutors are insisting he should be held without bail for bombarding an ex-girlfriend with a fusillade of text messages that constitute felonious stalking.

I don’t pretend to know the facts of this case. I do pretend, however, to know the real reason he’s facing these charges. The short answer has everything to do with guns and mental health. The longer answer has everything to do with a wildly successful pilot program the county started last September in which a sheriff’s deputy—James McKarrell —and a county mentalhealth-care-crisis outreach worker— Bradley Crable —roll out on patrol together. Their focus, among other things, is to help defuse people in the throes of mental-health crisis, making sure bad situations don’t explode even worse than they already have. In the case involving the 27-year-old

Dark Night of the Dog son in Judge Anderson’s courtroom, McKarrell and Crable—more bureaucratically known as “The Co-Response Unit of the Sheriff’s Crisis Intervention Team”—exceeded all expectations. Despite this, Crable and McKarrell were notified this Monday that the Co-Response unit would be discontinued. Two Saturdays ago, McKarrell and Crable first encountered the young man behind the glass in Anderson’s courtroom, responding to a call about a person living at home with his parents who’d

texted a long and suicidal-sounding message to relatives. What they found blew everyone’s

minds. The guy had stockpiled 13 seriously hairy firearms: Glocks, AR-15s, shotguns, long rifles. Some had been custom-made. He had 20,000 rounds of ammunition, body armor, and steel plates for added protection. One of the firearms —a long rifle—had been buried in the backyard. All, by the way, were legally registered. If suicide was the intent, he had enough to take himself out 20,000 times. But that’s not what put law enforcement in a cold sweat. In 2014, Elliot Rodger killed six people and wounded 14 more in Isla Vista. In 2006, former postal worker Jennifer San Marco went on a shooting spree at Goleta’s postal annex, killing eight people, herself included. Mass shootings are not hypothetical possibilities in Santa Barbara. Law enforcement had visions of the man taking a one-way drive to the Chumash Casino —an accomplished poker player, he had more than $40,000 in winnings in his room—strapped, packed, and body-armored for one final fling.

It’s entirely possible, as some have suggested, that they overreacted. But who in their right mind can take that chance? Here’s where having the Co-Response team show up made a huge difference. Law enforcement officers in Santa Barbara County are not allowed to make the finding that someone poses an imminent threat to themselves or to others,

known in the parlance as 5150. Santa Barbara remains the only county where this is true. But Crable, because he’s a mobile crisis-outreach worker, could and did. Not only that, the CoResponse Unit made sure the subject was placed in an involuntary hold for up to 72 hours in a state-licensed facility in Las Encinas. That fact legally precludes the young man from owning or possessing any firearms for the next five years.

Had he been kept in Cottage Hospital’s psychiatric ER instead—because it’s not licensed for involuntary holds—nothing would have legally prevented him from reclaiming his arsenal. But only for five years. The felony stalking charges were filed to make sure that’s extended to forever. A felony conviction results in a lifetime ban on gun ownership. This is hardly a typical case for the CoResponse Unit. More typically, they show up after deputies have detained someone in full meltdown mode and are waiting for mentalhealth backup. Such waits often last three hours or more. Babysitting schizophrenics on meth is not what most deputies signed up for, nor is it a good use of law enforcement. And such waits are hardly beneficial for the people—who are

already having the worst day of their life—being detained. Situations can escalate from bad to worse to unmanageable. Force can be deployed. People can get hurt. Some get killed. Even if that doesn’t happen, people who should get treatment wind up in jail,where,famously,they don’t tend to get better. If the coercive power of the state can be deployed to get this particular young dude the help he would not otherwise seek, that would seem an obvious and positive outcome. The day before sharing a short stretch of silence with the young man’s father, I’d attended

a confab of mental-health activists, providers, and government officials. The news was great.

The CEOs of all three county hospitals were talking with county administrators about providing more mental-health beds, desperately needed. We heard of new detox programs for people without money; we heard of greatly expanded rehab plans for people of means. We heard about millions of dollars in state grants all but in our pockets for new initiatives to divert the mentally ill from behind bars. Only after it was over would I hear that the plug had been pulled on the Co-Response Unit, just months after its launch. By all accounts, it had proved valuable. But because of an acute shortage of patrol officers, the department will stop assigning Deputy McKarrell to the Co-Response Unit. Barring divine intervention, the program goes dark March 25. Let’s hear it for divine intervention. Failing that, prepare to get rocked by more of those solar — NickWelsh winds.

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obituaries

To submit obituaries for publication, please call (805) 965-5205 or email obits@independent.com

Mark D. Mohler

06/13/52-03/08/17

“I do not wish to say that one should love death; but one should love life so magnanimously, so without calculating and selecting, that love of death (the turned-away side of life) is continually and involuntarily included - which actually happens invariably in the great motions of love, which are impetuous and illimitable.” — Rainer Maria Rilke

Julia Solis Woolfolk 01/28/23-02/20/19

Julia Solis Woolfolk, resident of Santa Barbara, passed away on February 20, 2019, at the age of 96. Our beloved Julia was born on January 28, 1923 in Fillmore, California to Rafael and Agatha Solis. She was one of nine siblings with whom she had a very close bond. She grew up in a ranch along the Sespe creek in a home that her father built by hand. She enjoyed the outdoors and would speak fondly of her memories with her sister “Tere” going to the dairy to bring back fresh eggs and milk and loved the smell of the orange blossoms. In 1931,following the great depression, her family decided to move back to Mexico to her father’s hometown of Valpariso, Zacatecas. Her father again built the family home by hand and named it, El Maguey. In 1941, at age 18, Julia left El Maguey and her parents to live with her oldest sister, Benigna Robledo in Santa Barbara. She helped care for her nieces and nephews and soon began working at the local packing house. During one of the big band dances at the KP club she first met and danced with her future husband, Oscar Woolfolk Sr. They were married November 17, 1943. They had three sons, Oscar, Joseph and Edward. They were married for 75 years. Julia loved to cook. She often 16

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expressed her deep love for her family through her food. No one ever left her home hungry. She was an avid gardener with an amazing green thumb. Anything she planted blossomed and thrived under her care. Santa Barbara was a perfect home for her with her love of the mountains and ocean. She passed on her values of kindness, perseverance and generosity through her stories and deeply held religious faith. Our mom was love, she radiated it to everyone and it didn't matter who you were or where you came from everyone always felt loved. Julia and Herman attended Our Lady of Guadalupe Church every Sunday until her health declined. Julia passed away at home peacefully on February 20,2019 after a long illness. She left this earth knowing she was loved her and the lessons taught will live on through her family. She will be sadly missed by her husband, Herman, her sons, Oscar Woolfolk (Marcella), Joseph Woolfolk (Linda), and Edward Woolfolk (Enedelia), her grandchildren Julie Woolfolk Arias (Ramon), Michael Woolfolk, Isaac Woolfolk (Edith), Monique Wildenhuse (Cole) and her great grandchildren. The family would like to extend deepest appreciation and heartfelt thanks to Julia’s caregivers, Velia Garcia and Irene Pinedo and also the Santa Barbara Visiting Nurses and Hospice. The services will be held at Our Lady of Guadalupe Church with a rosary at 7pm on Thursday March 7 and funeral mass at 10am Friday March 8.

Vern Hans Guggenmos 12/08/43-02/21/19

Verner Hans Guggenmos was born December 8, 1943 in Frankfurt, Germany. At the age of six, he, his two brothers and his mother, Luzia, immigrated to California. Vern was raised by his mother and stepfather, Adelaide Alvarado, and attended local schools. He was a member of the second graduating class of San Marcos High School and joined the Navy after high school. After completing fours years of service he met his wife of forty-six years, Mickey (Martha) Elliott Guggenmos and together they raised five children. Vern worked as a mechanic for Santa Barbara County’s Transfer Station for twenty-nine years where he established many close friendships. Vern was diagnosed with cancer 20 years ago and fought a vigilant battle until February 21, 2019 when he passed peacefully surrounded by family. Vern is survived by his wife, Mickey, his stepchildren Ronald, Jennifer, Michelle and

MARCH 7, 2019

INDEPENDENT.COM

Laurie Barene, his son, Joshua, seven grandchildren, and three great-grandchildren, along with his sisters Sharon, Joyce and Mary. The family would like to thank Dr. Mathison and her staff Martha and Rita, Dr. Newman, Dr. Koper, the staff at Sansum Clinic and Cottage Hospital, and Visiting Nurses for the excellent care over the last 20 years. We would also like to express our deep and eternal gratitude to Brian Knodel who has given an immeasurable about of time and energy to help out. In lieu of flowers, the family requests donations in his memory be made to Hearts Therapeutic Equestrian Center, PO Box 30662, Santa Barbara, CA 93130.

Eileen Syme Horton 07/31/44-02/14/19

Eileen Syme Horton passed away peacefully at home on the morning of February 14th in Santa Barbara, CA. She spent her final days surrounded by the love of friends and family, who will always remember her as a beautiful, loving, supportive, and strong woman. Eileen was born in Provo, Utah on July 31st, 1944, to George and Janice Syme, and was the fifth child of her parent’s six children. Eileen always had a great love for music, and her instrument of choice was the French horn. She received many musical honors while in school, and continued to play after she graduated high school and began attending Weber State University in Ogden, Utah. It was here that she met her future husband Roger Horton, who also shared the same love for playing the French horn. Eileen and Roger were married in Provo, Utah, on August 7th, 1964, and later moved to Grand Forks, North Dakota, where Eileen worked in the payroll department at Grand Forks Air Force Base, while her husband served in the USAF. They later moved to Santa Barbara, California, which was Roger’s hometown, where they found many lifelong friends, and had their two sons Eric and Brian. Eileen was a loving wife and mother, but was also dedicated to her work at the University of California, where she excelled in the various roles she held, and cherished the many great friends she made there. Eileen and her

husband were also co-owners of multiple successful restaurants in Santa Barbara called Omelettes Etc., where she put her exceptional organizational and accounting skills to good use. Eileen had a fascination with Dragons, and loved reading books by Anne McCaffrey about these wonderful mythical creatures. She also had a lifelong love for cats, and always had at least two feline friends to dote on in her home. She also enjoyed the intellectual exercise of completing the daily crossword puzzles in the news press, as well as her weekly games of mahjong with friends. Eileen’s religious heritage was The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, and she retained her dedication to the LDS Church throughout her entire life. Eileen’s friends and family will miss her immensely, but take comfort knowing their angel is now resting in peace. Friends are encouraged to join the family for a Memorial on Saturday, March 30th from 2:00 to 3:00PM at The Church of Jesus Christ of Latter-day Saints, located at 2107 Santa Barbara St, Santa Barbara, CA.

Michael William Ray 11/11/43-11/09/18

A Celebration of Life is planned for Michael William Ray on Sunday, March 10, 2019 at Mulligan's Cafe & Bar, 3500 McCaw Avenue from 3:00 to 6:00 p.m. Mike crossed the Bridge to Heaven on November 9, 2018 in Plano, Texas, after a 23-year battle with Parkinson's disease. Mike was born in Shreveport, Louisiana on November 11, 1943. He was owner of Mike's Drum Shop on West Figueroa in Santa Barbara. He spent over five decades in the music industry as an Instructor, Mentor and Volunteer at local schools & retirement homes. Mike graciously touched many lives and hearts with his generous and joyful spirit. He was a loving husband to Charlene, a wonderful Father to Michael James (Pepper) and Carolyn (Rob Larson), a proud Papa to Brandon & Addison, Jackson & Ava, a Brother to Mark and Tom, and an Uncle and teacher to many. Mike is missed.

Thomas C. Bruice 08/25/25-02/15/19

Thomas C. Bruice passed away on February 15 from complications following a stroke. He was born on August 25, 1925 in Los Angeles. He left high school (Manual Arts) after his junior year to serve in the U.S Navy (1943-1946), assigned as a medic with the Marines in the South Pacific. After his discharge, he attended Los Angeles City College. Bruice earned his B.S. (1950) and his Ph.D. in Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry (1954) at USC and was a post-doctoral fellow at UCLA. He was a professor at Yale University School of Medicine, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, and Cornell University. In 1964 he resigned his position at Cornell, telling the President of the University that he would stay if he would get rid of the snow and build him a surfing beach. His search for a place to surf led him (along with his Cornell graduate students and post-doctoral fellows) to the University of California, Santa Barbara, where he joined the faculty and surfed well into his seventies. Bruice was one of the fathers of bioorganic chemistry, applying the principles of physical-organic chemistry to understand the mechanisms of biochemical reactions. He was elected to both the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1974. He was a Fellow of the Royal Society of Chemistry, a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and a Guggenheim Fellow. Among Bruice’s many awards were the National Academy of Sciences Award for Innovative Research in the Chemical Sciences, the Linus Pauling Medal, The Tolman Medal, the Repligen Medal for the Chemistry of Biological Processes, the Alfred Bader Medal for Bioorganic Chemistry, and the James Flack Norris Award in Physical-Organic Chemistry. He had over 600 publications and Science Watch listed him among “The World’s 50 Most Cited Chemists between 19841991”. He is survived by his wife of 48 years, Paula Yurkanis Bruice, and his children Tom (Corinne), Ann, Carl (Lynn), Meghan Thomas (Mark), Kenton (Donna), Alec (Whitney), and 13 grandchildren. A celebration of his life will be held at a later date. Donations in his memory may be made to the Adventures in Caring Foundation (1528 Chapala Street, SB 93101) or to The Ensemble Theatre Company (P.O. Box 2307, SB 93120).


OPINIONS CONT’D RJ MATSON, CQ ROLL CALL

Letters

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Maxim Concerns

S

pecial education is a critical part of our school system. In fact, every student has special needs and should be afforded the best opportunity to learn, inquire, and express. In my many years working in the Santa Barbara Unified School District, I have never seen an outside corporation brought in to work with students. Recently, the district brought in a corporation called Maxim to staff “para-educator” positions throughout multiple schools. I quit because I saw this undermining the integrity of public education. Maxim has a history of defrauding public institutions like Medicare and Veterans Affairs. They don’t deserve a penny from taxpayers. Moreover, Maxim takes away para-educator jobs from anyone on AESOP, the district substitute job board. What we need is better training and competitive wages for those working in special education. I cannot overestimate the value of special education. So many students count on it for support. [See independent.com/specialedconcerns for full letter]

— Susan Anderson, S.B.

Funk Zone Solution?

H

ello City Officials, I’m the owner of Metro Entertainment, a 28-year-old retail store here in Santa Barbara. Please tell me why there are no homeless people in the Funk Zone. I am not asking why it’s an issue or how to solve it. I only want to know why there are none there, yet they sleep in my door every night and are having a negative impact on my business and all businesses in my area. Your quick and honest answer is appreciated.

— Bob Ficarra, Metro Entertainment, S.B.

Ahoy, Planning Department

T

hanks for Nick Welsh’s exposé on West Bluff ducking building permits and the city seemingly disregarding their arrogance in “City Takes on Cannabis Kings and Red Tag Bandits” [independent.com/ redtagbandits]. As a newcomer after 20 years in San Diego, I was shocked that this is allowed here and that not one letter was posted regarding a major issue. They and other developers have “captured the castle” and are pirating circles around city staff and officials.

— Lee Juskalian, S.B.

Be Wary

P

olitico’s Natasha Korecki recently disclosed a large, coordinated effort, perhaps by Russians (this is uncertain at the moment), to amplify one legitimate online political comment into thousands, as though all

were by different individuals. The pretend thousands of separate opinions are spread through social and print media, all directed at Democratic Party presidential candidates. They are nasty criticisms that contain false accusations and phony representations of past behavior, beliefs, or statements. The effort is to stimulate enmity among Democrats, leading to a fractured party effort to unseat Donald Trump in 2020. This is a more sophisticated attempt to influence our elections than those in the past. I appeal to all who are voting in the Democratic Party primary to avoid participating in online discussion, debate, or comment on Democrat presidential candidates. If you do, you will enhance this attempt to “divide and conquer.” Confine your relevant questions, discussions, or opinions to those in your presence, to your U.S. mail correspondents, or to telephone conversations. I understand the desire to speak your mind in online media. I am not shy about this myself. But I would hope to defeat or diminish this clever but very harmful strategy. — William Smithers, S.B.

For the Record

¶ Two images in last week’s cover story on Sad Boy Loko carried incorrect credits; they were taken by Austin William Simkins/@saltystate. ¶ The Angry Poodle Barbecue of February 21 detailed the lawsuit recently filed by the County of Santa Barbara against Purdue Pharmaceuticals and a handful of other major manufacturers of opioid pain medications. The column highlighted the role played by Arthur Sackler, whose relatives own Purdue and have been named in countless lawsuits for aggressive and deceptive marketing campaigns that contributed to the death toll inflicted by painkillers. Arthur Sackler, it should be noted, died in 1987, several years before OxyContin was released on the market. His widow has taken exception to his depiction in the county’s lawsuit, which alleges that Sackler, a practicing psychiatrist, helped purchase what would later become Purdue with two brothers in 1952. They subsequently bought him out. In addition, Sackler owned an advertising agency and a medical newspaper. By all accounts, he was a pioneer when it came to mass marketing pharmaceuticals, Librium and Valium to name just two.

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All Gaucho Reunion

CONT’D

voices

CURTIS C. SCHOTT

Opinions

Gaucho Gallop 5K

and Kid’s Mile

Gaucho Gallop 5K presented by PayJunction and the Kid’s Mile presented by the Santa Barbara Independent

HIGH RENT: This photoshopped image of The Marc’s leasing campaign illustrates the shock city officials felt when all its rents turned out to be more than twice the expectation of an AUD project.

Housing Realpolitik ‘Affordable by Design’ Became ‘Market Rate’ Without Affordability Requirement

A Ready…Set…Gallop! The Gaucho Gallop 5K course is a SBAA Grand Prix-sanctioned 5K. The Kid’s Mile (free) at 10 a.m. will provide your little ones (ages 10 & under) an opportunity to get their Saturday morning energy out, all in the pursuit of a finisher’s ribbon.

Register by April 1 to receive a “sport-tek” shirt.

SATURDAY, APRIL 27 9:00 A.M. UC SANTA BARBARA CAMPUS To register:

gauchogallop.eventbrite.com

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MARCH 7, 2019

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BY SH EILA LODGE

recent Independent article said I’d been “waging a lonely battle against increased housing densities for the past 10 years.” That’s quite an ironic statement since I suggested in September 2010 that that an experiment be made by increasing density for rental units in a limited area of the city, an experiment that became the AUD (Average Unit-size Density) Incentive Program [independent.com/statehousingcrisis]. The first project completed was The Marc. It had no affordability requirements, and its new Santa Barbara residents generated the need for even more lower-cost housing. Five years before, in 2005, the city began preparation for a General Plan Update (GPU), a plan that lays out how the city would develop over the next 20 years. Some strongly believed that if densities were increased in central areas, it would be possible for developers to build market-rate affordable housing. Others strongly believed that the city didn’t have the resources for higher densities and that no changes should be made. (The environmental impact report for the GPU said that leaving densities as they were would be the environmentally preferable alternative.) The council was at an impasse. There were numerous meetings — sometimes very stormy — of the council ad hoc GPU committee. It appeared as if there might not be a GPU. In an effort to reach a compromise between those who wanted to increase density everywhere and those who didn’t want to increase density anywhere, I proposed that in a very limited part of the city’s commercial and light industrial areas densities be increased for rental projects. Units presumably would be less expensive by design. The City Council accepted the suggestion. It decided that this experimental program would last until 250 rentals are completed or eight years had passed. It also greatly reduced parking requirements. The ordinance implementing the program was adopted in July 2013. A new way to determine how many units per acre could be built was created: Average Unit-size Density (AUD). The smaller the units, the more could be built, up to a certain average size. During the GPU process, people were asked what they loved about Santa Barbara. They said its smalltown feel, diverse population, scenic beauty, distinctive architecture, preservation of historic character, and vibrant culture. The major problem was the lack of affordable housing. This was not a new issue. One history noted that by 1930, the council’s weekly agenda contained measures to ease the housing crisis. A 1948 report said that the most

pressing problem was a critical lack of affordable housing. More than 25,000 additional dwelling units have been built since 1948, and the same problem continues. Maybe there never was a time in Santa Barbara without a housing crisis! When I made the suggestion for the test program, I had in mind Casa de Las Fuentes, a beautiful Housing Authority project at Carrillo and Castillo streets. Its density is 57 dwelling units to the acre. High-density projects that fit within the community can be done well. However, what the city got is The Marc, an 89-unit mixed-use development on upper State Street near La Cumbre Road. It is 63 units to the acre. The Marc was the first high-density test program rental project to be completed. To my dismay, its rents began at $2,445 and went up to $4,100. This was more than twice what architects and developers in a design charrette said would be the starting point: $1,200. I was naïve or just plain dumb. There is no such thing as affordable by design. Although land costs per unit are lower with higher density, rents will be whatever the market will bear. Developers have found the program so attractive that another 62 units have been completed, and there are 492 units in the pipeline. Since no one anticipated this rush to build — no apartments had been built in Santa Barbara in decades — no mechanism had been created to call a halt to new applications. By summer 2016, even some members of the development community saw the need for affordability in the AUD incentive projects. I organized an ad hoc committee to seek ways to require that affordability in fall 2016. In December 2016, the City Council directed the establishment of a Housing Task Force to seek ways to improve the AUD incentive program. To get affordability, it was necessary to require inclusionary (rent-restricted) units. But before any rent restrictions are imposed, state law requires a study showing a connection between the new residents paying market rates and the creation of an additional demand for low-income housing. That study confirmed the added demand and said that a requirement for up to 15 percent of the units to be rent-restricted could be supported. The ordinance amendment for inclusionary units will be before the Planning Commission on March 7. Assuming it is adopted by the City Council, it will still be some months before it becomes effective. It could affect 217 units in the pipeline. The AUD incentive program experiment has caused new rental units to be built; it has not provided the workforce-affordable units so badly needed. n


56657

EXPLORE ECOLOGY ENVIRONMENTAL STEWARDSHIP AWARD NOMINATIONS

PAUL WELLMAN FILE PHOTO

voices

Nominate a Teacher, Student, or Class!

No to New Oil Drilling Avoid the Climate Impacts and Leave It in the Ground

WATER RISKS: The proposed Cat Canyon wells would drill through the Santa Maria Groundwater Basin, putting the drinking water of more than 200,000 people at risk at a time when water scarcity is already a serious problem in our county.

O

B Y L E A H C . S T O K E S , D AV I D P E L L O W, A N D E M I LY W I L L I A M S n March 13, the Santa Barbara County Plan-

ning Commission is scheduled to vote on whether to approve the first of a trio of new oil projects in Cat Canyon, in the northern part of our county. Specifically, three oil companies —Aera Energy, ERG Resources, and PetroRock—are proposing 750 new oil wells near Santa Maria. If approved, these projects would triple our county’s onshore oil production and move us in the wrong direction on climate change and environmental justice. For these reasons, we, along with 80 researchers at UCSB, have signed a letter that urges county decisionmakers to consider the full costs and impacts of new oil drilling. Expanded fossil-fuel production in our county would increase our carbon emissions, worsening climate change. In fact, this proposed 40-year project is directly at odds with the county’s own goal of decreasing greenhouse-gas emissions 50 percent by 2030. Emissions from the project alone would account for about half of the county’s planned reductions, making it even harder for us to meet our goals. This is not “clean” oil: The carbon intensity of California’s oil fields is some of the highest in the country. To even get the oil out of the ground, more fossil fuels have to be burned. We’ve already seen what warming the planet by just one degree Celsius has done to our community. We have all lived through the consequences of climate change with the Thomas Fire, the Montecito debris flows, and the years-long drought. These experiences are linked to climate change. Research has shown that since the 1980s, climate change has doubled the amount of land burned in the Western United States, putting low-income populations and people of color at particular risk. Extreme precipitation, like the hard rain that fell the morning of January 9, 2018, is more likely under climate change. We can already measure climate change’s significant contribution to our latest drought. If we continue on this trajectory, some scientists project that in the next 80 years, Mediterranean regions like our own will become deserts. Santa Barbara County is highly vulnerable to climate change — we should be part of the solution, not the problem. But the issue goes beyond the local risks we face from climate change. Water is also a key concern with this development. The proposed Cat Canyon wells would drill through the Santa Maria Groundwater Basin, putting the drinking water of more than 200,000 people at risk at a time when water scarcity is already a serious problem in our county. This isn’t just our opinion. The

county’s environmental impact report for the project labels the threat to drinking water from a rupture or leak as “Class 1” — significant and unavoidable. Most communities that depend on the groundwater basin for their drinking water are lower income and communities of color, raising significant concerns for environmental justice. Imagine how you might feel if an oil company proposed to drill near Lake Cachuma. Expanding oil production in Santa Barbara County places our health and environment at great risk. This development will use our county’s precious water resources to fuel extreme extraction techniques. It’s not just researchers at UCSB that oppose this plan. Residents have attended meetings to make their voices heard. Many civil society organizations are opposed to these projects, including Safe Energy Now, the Central Coast Alliance United for a Sustainable Economy (CAUSE), Food & Water Watch, Santa Barbara Standing Rock Coalition, Sierra Club Los Padres Chapter, Environmental Defense Center, and 350 Santa Barbara. Public support is likely not on the side of these projects either. Only one in three people living in Santa Barbara County want to expand offshore drilling for fossil fuels. Instead, almost two in three people in our county want local officials to be doing more to address the climate crisis. In this year, the 50th anniversary of the Santa Barbara oil spill, we must ask ourselves: Have we finally learned our lesson? While oil development has been a key feature of our region’s past, we envision a future in which our economy is focused on low-carbon development, increased energy efficiency, and a thriving renewableenergy industry that will support thousands of jobs. We know that climate change is real. We know that it is happening now. We know that we have to stop building new fossil-fuel extraction if we plan to solve this crisis. It’s time to keep fossil fuels in the ground and to build a 21st-century economy that meets everyone’s needs in a sustainable and fair way. If you agree with us, we urge you to reach out to the planning commissioners and your county supervisor before the hearings on March 13. While it’s easy to imagine that climate change is a global problem and that there’s little we can do to stop it, that’s not true. When we act decisively, we can produce positive impacts locally and globally. We have a great opportunity to do that next week. We hope you will join us. Leah C. Stokes is an assistant professor in environmental politics at UCSB; David Pellow is the Dehlsen chair and department chair of environmental studies at UCSB; Emily Williams is a PhD student in geography at UCSB and a member of 350 Santa Barbara.

Do you know a teacher, class, or student who is committed to helping the environment? Nominate them for an Explore Ecology Environmental Stewardship Award. Winners will be honored at the CEC’s Earth Day Festival on April 27th. Nominations are being accepted until March 30th. Self-nominations are welcome.

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INDEPENDENT.COM Publication:

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56327

All Gaucho Reunion

Taste of UCSB Santa Barbara Permaculture Network

Food, Beer and Wine Festival

ECO HERO Award Honoring John D. Liu Vast areas of the Earth have been degraded and turned to desert by human activity. John D. Liu considers Global Ecosystem Restoration the great work of our time.

For an inaugural Eco Hero Award, Santa Barbara Permaculture Network honors John D. Liu, international journalist and awardwinning documentary filmmaker, founder and ambassador for the global Ecosystem Restoration Camps.

Sunday, March 17 6:30 – 9pm • Lobero Theatre 33 E. Canon Perdido St, Santa Barbara, CA TICKETS $10, $20, Friends of John D. Liu $100 Reception with John D. Liu follows in the Lobero Courtyard Tickets on Sale Now:

Lobero Ticket Office 805.963.0761 or Lobero.com

A Community Event Sponsored by Santa Barbara Permaculture Network www.sbpermaculture.org

Live Music with Cool Water Canyon

Over 30 participating

alumni vintners, brewers and food providers All Taste guests receive a Taste of UCSB logo souvenir stemless glass.

Come back to campus to savor all the fun. SATURDAY, APRIL 27 2:00 P.M. - 5:00 P.M. UC SANTA BARBARA CAMPUS

alumni.ucsb.edu/taste

DISASTER PREP GUIDE March 29, 30, & 31, 2019

Nonviolent Communication (NVC) Conference Friday, 7:00 - 9:30 p.m. Free Introduction Saturday and Sunday, 9:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. $95 + $5 Materials / ID# 22388 / Wake Campus, Auditorium

Register Now! sbcc.edu/extendedlearning 20

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MARCH 7, 2019

INDEPENDENT.COM

Don't miss our Disaster Prep Guide in the center of this issue en Inglés Y Español


S T O R Y PHOTOS COURTESY TONY BAKER / PROSPECT ARCHIVE

C O V E R

Start Your

ENGINES

SANTA BARBARA DRAGS RETURNS RACING TO ITS CENTRAL COAST ROOTS

w

RUNWAY RACE: Philip Payne racing the first Baldwin Special — an interesting mix of British style and American engineering — at the Santa Barbara airport on August 7, 1949, when he took first place in the Class III CSCC timing trials.

by Tyler Hayden

henStu Hanssen was a little boy growing up in Paso Robles, his mom drove him to school in a hot rod. He remembers the shadows of oak trees flashing over the open seats — also, the time he accidentally hit the starter and bumped the car into the barn door. “I sure got a lickin’ for that,” he said. On weekends, his dad, Bill, raced the aluminum-bodied Baldwin Special on tracks in towns up and down Highway 101 against the greats of the time, such as Carroll Shelby, Phil Hill, and Ernie McAfee. This was the early 1950s, when American hot rodding had entered a postwar golden era and the Central Coast — especially Santa Barbara—was a nursing ground for young motorheads eager to prove their mettle. Bill’s racing days ended abruptly in 1956 after he saw McAfee, a good friend, wrap his Ferrari around a pine tree at Pebble Beach; Bill had a young family to support. He sold the ’51 Baldwin Special, but he was tragically killed in a plane crash a few years later. Stu was 12 years old. When he started racing in his early twenties, Stu Hanssen also began searching for his dad’s old car, priceless not only for its sentimental value but also as a piece of automotive history. Montecito resident and Cracker Jack heir Willis M. Baldwin, a former aircraft engineer with incredible technical expertise and a keen eye for design, built only a few of his namesake hot rods that would beat some of the fastest European sports cars. “I always wondered what happened to the darn thing,” Hanssen said. “I figured it ended up in junkyard.”

SITTING PROUD: After racing a Jaguar XK 120 coupe in the early 1950s, Bill Hanssen bought the ’51 Baldwin Special and burned up tracks all over the state. This weekend, his son, Stu, will do the driving alongside Robert Manson in his ’49 Baldwin Special.

As luck would have it, in 2010, Stu received an email from the Baldwin Special’s owners in Connecticut; they’d never raced it much and heard he was looking to reclaim it. They negotiated a price—one of Hanssen’s own cars and some extra cash — and the Baldwin finally returned home. It was an emotional moment for Hanssen now 66 and living in Santa Ynez. “There’s no bringing him back,” he said of his late father. “But this feels full-circle. It brings a tear to your eye.” Before Hanssen’s mother passed away, he drove her around one last time. “God, it was something,” he said. This week, the Baldwin will head back to the starting line, this time with Stu Hanssen behind the wheel.

SEASIDE SPEED On Friday and Saturday, March 8 and 9, Santa Barbara will

host a drag racing event on Cabrillo Boulevard. For a community that likes to play it safe and is quick to naysay new things, this qualifies as a very big deal. Even the zoo’s Princess Weekend had to be rescheduled due to the road closure. Santa Barbara Drags, as it’s called, is a West Coast spinoff of The Race of Gentlemen (TROG), an annual gathering on the beaches of New Jersey that pays homage to the old days of classic hot-rodding. The competition specs are strict: Car bodies must be 1934 or older, and the engines must be American-made four-cylinder and V8 flatheads up to 1953. It’s gas-only (none of the alcohol or nitro that power more CONT’D ON P. 23

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MARCH 7, 2019

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21


welcome

SANTA BARBARA COTTAGE HOSPITAL BABIES

Baby Girls Buellton Paige Elizabeth Linton, 12/19/18 Goleta Ellie Jane Amparan, 11/11/18 Logan Ray Sherman, 1/26 Faye Phillips O’Carroll, 1/27 Santa Barbara Olivia Grace Sanchez, 1/10 Ingrid Grace Runquist, 1/25 Carmel-Rose Kronfeld Young, 1/27 Jessie Ramy Saed Eltohamy, 1/29 Jade Louise Barnett, 2/5 Sofia Alice Lunardi, 2/6 Aurelia Violet Gordon, 2/11 Aurora Michelle Espinoza, 2/12 Julia Lynne Van Lieshout, 2/19

Eli ringing the bell after his last day of chemo.

Eli

Carpinteria

Eli suffered from excruciating abdominal pain and was admitted to Cottage Children’s Medical Center where he was diagnosed with stage 3 kidney cancer. He underwent surgery to remove a two pound tumor. After 7 months of chemotherapy, Eli is now cancer-free. He’s back to school, back to playing four-square and wall ball, and back to being himself.

Baby Boys Goleta Hudson M Ochi, 12/7 Quinn Patrick Bentley, 2/9 James Nathan Shaw, 2/19

health e baby

Are you expecting? Sign up for our free pregnancy newsletter specific to your due date. cottagehealth.org/healthybaby

Cottage Children’s Medical Center cares for over 14,000 children a year in our Acute Pediatrics Unit, Haselton Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Pediatric Intensive Care Unit, Emergency Department, Pediatric Trauma Center and eight specialized outpatient clinics.

Santa Maria Jacob Gabriel Serrano, 11/11/18 Ventura Jorge Andres Maya, 1/28

Media Grants

Hutton Parker Foundation and the Santa Barbara Independent are pleased to continue our Media Grant program for local nonprofit agencies. This unique opportunity provides nonprofits the ability to spread their message to the greater Santa Barbara community. Organizations apply online, and one nonprofit group is is chosen each month. The Santa Barbara Independent design team produces a custom four-page insert specific to the individual agency's needs. The insert is published and distributed in all 40,000 copies of the Santa Barbara Independent, with the cost underwritten by Hutton Parker Foundation. Find out more about this opportunity to boost your organization's marketing efforts, promote your good works, and tell your story to a wider audience. Visit HuttonFoundation.org for more information and the Media Grant application.

School of Extended Learning

t

For Santa Barbara County Nonprofit organizations

Santa Barbara Merrick Joseph Mir Shafae, 11/16/18 Graham Thomas Kostiuk, 12/4/18 Noah Jonathan Kennedy, 1/12 Matteo Sanchez, 1/28 Ronak George Bhatt-Scharpf, 1/30 Chase Thomas Garay, 2/5 Callen Dylan Cortez, 2/12 Rodolfo Nathaniel Tamayo Coyt, 2/15 Theodore Boomer Dogris, 2/15 Noah Jude Santana, 2/18 Diego Urrutia, 2/21

MIND & SUPERMIND

Unconditional Wellbeing: How Living Mindfully Can Save the World Dave Mochel

The human brain is complicated. We are wired to seek comfort and pleasure, and to seek meaning and purpose. Sometimes these impulses compete and sometimes they are complementary. Which of these impulses we choose to nurture has enormous implications for our individual wellbeing and the survival of the planet.

Monday, May 6, 2019, 7:30 - 9:30 p.m.

www.sbcc.edu/ExtendedLearning 22

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MARCH 7, 2019

INDEPENDENT.COM


C O V E R

PAUL WELLMAN

CONT’D FROM P. 21

S T O R Y

S.B.’S NEED

FORSPEED

gets his 1927 Ford Roadster into his Goleta garage. The Roadster runs on a 1937 HAL four-cylinder double-overhead cam engine.

COURTESY

modern racers) and all running gear, paint, and tires have to be authentic to the era. The rules are similar for the motorcycles. The drivers themselves sometimes don a similar throwback aesthetic. Think greased hair and Ray-Bans. Given their vintage, it’s doubtful any of the cars or bikes will go much faster than 60-65 miles per hour along the ⅛-mile course running west to east directly in front of the Hilton hotel. But it’s not about the speed, explained Mel Van Riper Stultz III, who started TROG back in 2012. “It’s about camaraderie and people coming together,” said Stultz, who hails from Asbury Park, New Jersey, near where the first Race of Gentlemen was held. Before he did this, he was a marine, a bowling alley bartender, a punk band drummer, and an interior designer, but oil has always run in his blood. Over IPAs and shrimp Brococktails out on the Bro phy Bros. balcony, Stultz phi described the TROG philosophy as an admiration for the machines that were originally pieced together by men returning from World War II, who translated their experience maintaining tanks and fighter planes in the field to creating per personal masterpieces in their garages. Back then, Stultz said, echoing a refrain usu usuSanta Barbara Drags organizer ally dispensed by men twice Mel Stultz his age, cars and choppers were built to last, and they were made with style. “I drool over things that are decades old,” he said. “Today, everything is stream streamlined and disposable.” The race itself is mostly for fun. There’s no trophy at the finish line, just bragging rights among friends. Participants are coming from all over the U.S. and across the globe to admire the handi handiwork of their compatriots, Stultz said, and to “hear and smell his history.” Period-perfect signs and props are being constructed by Santa Barbara artist Mike Matheson, and customs car and bike shows are scheduled over the weekend at the Hilton. It’s a platform for the young guys to learn from the old, Stultz went on, and to hear stories from those bygone years, like when races were tradi traditionally held on the beach so if a car caught fire the driver could steer straight into the ocean.

HURDLES AND HOPES Getting the city to approve Santa Barbara Drags was no easy task. Stultz ran into skepticism among the public and outright hostility from some government leaders. They worried about the effects of closing Cabrillo for three days, the high decibels of

COURTESY TONY BAKER / PROSPECT ARCHIVE

S

RACE PREP: Seth Hammond (center), with a little help from Bob Foot,

anta Barbara in the late 1940s possessed three perfect ingredients for a lively hot-rod scene: teenage car nuts, returning WWII veterans, and oil-field mechanics. Out of this mix grew car clubs and race tracks that drew droves of spectators and became the envy of gearheads all over the country. The most famous of our venues was the Thunderbowl, a quarter-mile oval track located on an oceanside bluff just south of Carpinteria. Unknown to most Santa Barbarans these days, racers would also tear around an unpaved track on Salsipuedes Street next to what used to be a lemon packinghouse. And then there was the drag strip out at the city airport. The Santa Barbara Acceleration Association (SBAA), formed in 1948, turned an unused lifeguard tower into a timing stand connected to the finish line by telephone equipment left by the U.S. Marines, and voilà — the very first quarter-mile drag racing course in the United States. The following photos, reprinted with permission from author and automotive historian Tony Baker, capture a time in history when a handful of brave and brazen locals locals—many many of whom are still alive today—turned today turned hot-rodding into a source of family entertainment and regional pride for Santa Barbara County. Though their numbers are dwindling, the spark remains, and if Santa Barbara Drags is any indication, their legacy will continue to live on. Baker grew up in Hollywood during the 1960s and has written six books about California’s hot-rod culture and motor sports history for Arca Arcadia Publishing. He is also a contributing writer for Hot Rod Deluxe magazine and is a docent at the Murphy Auto Museum, where he his curat curating an exhibit about local rac racing legend Andy Granatelli. His book Hot Rodding in Santa Barbara County is available for purchase through Arcadia Publishing and at Chaucer’s Books. His new book, Southern California Road Racing Racing,, will be published this summer.

THUNDERBOWLING: Carpinteria’s Thun Thun-derbowl track was used for jalopy racing. Owner J.F. Slaybaugh, pictured here in 1958 with his wife, Pearl, raced sprint and midget cars in the 1930s and still enjoyed an occasional run on the track. That’s his Pontiac coupe in the background. Admission to the Thunderbowl was $1.25 (children got in free), and in addition to regular racing, it hosted “powder puff derbies” (for all female drivers) and television giveaways. In the 1960s during the Highway 101 expansion project, Caltrans needed a place to put all the displaced dirt, and it made Slaybaugh an offer he couldn’t refuse.

LIKE ALL THE EARLY CALIFORNIA HOT-RODDERS, THE SANTA BARBARA BOYS HAD TO CHOOSE BETWEEN ILLEGAL STREET DRAGS OR FOUR-HOUR DRIVES OUT TO EL MIRAGE DRY LAKE.

— Tony Baker, Hot Rodding in Santa Barbara County

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MARCH 7, 2019

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23


CALM Auxiliary's

33rd Annual Celebrity Authors Luncheon

Kate Quinn The Huntress

Luis Alberto Urrea House of Broken Angels

Mindy Johnson Ink & Paint

Interviewers: Andrew Firestone Master of Ceremonies

Dianne Dixon Tom Weitzel

Guest Authors: Sheila Aron, Julia Bricklin, Jane Sherron De Hart, Jeff Doubét, Jo Giese, Elizabeth Gould, M.S., Romy Greenwald, Rich Grimes, Jo Haldeman, Catharine Riggs Doors open at 10 a.m. for book sales and signing. Lunch served at 11:45 a.m.

For tickets call (805) 965-2376 or buy online calm4kids.org

CONT’D FROM P. 23 unmuffled motors, and the sort of visitors the event might attract. Would the Hells Angels descend on State Street? Would the Mongols take over the bathhouse? No, said Stultz. TROG has never tolerated gang activity, and the Santa Barbara race will be no different. He promised he

WE MIGHT HAVE NECK TATTOOS, BUT WE CARE ABOUT PEOPLE.

—Mel Stultz

and his team are extremely vigilant about keeping their venues clean and safe out of respect for their hosts and a desire to be invited back. “We don’t want this to be a one-time thing,” he said. “We want this to be a tradition that Santa Barbara can be proud of. We might have neck tattoos, but we care about people.” In the end, it came down to cash. City Hall couldn’t resist the idea of 7,000 expected attendees each spending approximately $300 during their visit, not including what they’ll fork over for hotel rooms, and pumping life into a sluggish downtown. (Other estimates put the number of visitors at closer to 20,000.) When Pismo Beach hosted The Race of Gentlemen in 2016, it sold out every one of its campgrounds and hotels. “They had no idea what they were getting themselves into,” said Stultz. As such, the doubters wonder if Stultz and his team will be able to pull off the Santa Barbara event without any major issues. Remember the West Beach Music & Arts Festival? they ask. Remember all the complaints over noise, litter, and unruly behavior? Stultz is determined to prove them wrong. And he’s got the support of Santa Barbara’s old guard of racers excited to relive a bit of their glory days. Seth Hammond is among the biggest boosters. He’s donated a ton of the equipment and labor necessary to make the thing happen,

4•1•1

including all 68 pieces of the K-rail that will line the two-lane course. Hammond is a legend in the ultra-elite world of land speed record chasers — in fact, all five members of the Hammond family have piloted rocket cars over 300 mph, including his wife and daughter—but for this race, he’s dusting off his ’27 Ford Roadster with a twin overhead cam. He said he was happy to contribute to the cause, alongside fellow gearheads at MarBorg, Granite Construction, and other area companies. “All these guys are car guys,” Hammond explained. “This is our way of saying, ‘Welcome to Santa Barbara.’ ” Hammond has been hooked on racing since he was a kid. He remembers riding his bike to what was then the El Camino Pharmacy across from the Montecito Inn, where he’d drink cherry Cokes and read Hot Rod Magazine right off the rack. Hammond, now in his seventies, counted among his mentors Fred Dannenfelzer and Lee Hammock, both in their eighties (or close to it) and event ticket-holders. “They influenced us COURTESY

Saturday, March 16, 2019, 10:00 a.m. Hilton Santa Barbara Beachfront Resort

youngsters,” he said. This weekend promises to be a blast, he went on, and a proper reminder of the days when Santa Barbara was a true racing mecca. “I’m going to have fun no matter what,” he said.

Santa Barbara Drags kicks off with a party on Friday, March 8, and hosts race day on Saturday, March 9, along Cabrillo Boulevard near the Hilton Santa Barbara Beachfront Resort (633 E. Cabrillo Blvd.). Passes are $40 or $60 (includes pit pass), and kids under 10 get in free. No dogs or people under 18 are allowed in the pit area. See theraceofgentlemen.com/santa-barbara.

24

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MARCH 7, 2019

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Lisa Genova

S T O R Y

Still Alice: Understanding Alzheimer’s PHOTOS COURTESY TONY BAKER / PROSPECT ARCHIVE

C O V E R

Sat, Mar 9 / 7:30 PM / UCSB Campbell Hall “In examining disease, we gain wisdom about anatomy and physiology and biology. In examining the person with disease, we gain wisdom about life.” – Oliver Sacks A Harvard-trained neuroscientist and bestselling author, Genova will share the latest science and promising research on what each of us can do to build an Alzheimer’s-resistant brain. Books will be available for purchase and signing

IGNITERS UNITE: One of the

Event Sponsors: Hollye & Jeff Jacobs

region’s longest-lasting car clubs was the Santa Barbara Igniters. In this group shot taken in front of Santa Barbara High School are (from left) Dave Boccalli, Sam Foose, Tony Cavalli, Phil Salter, Barry Atsatt, Dick Jeffers, Karl Hove, and Ben Rockwell.

Presented in association with the UCSB Writing Program

Elisabeth Rosenthal An American Sickness: How Healthcare Became Big Business and How You Can Take It Back Wed, Mar 13 / 7:30 PM / The New Vic 33 W Victoria St. (note new venue) “Rosenthal’s meticulous history of the crisis in American health care should be required reading for our generation.” – Siddhartha Mukherjee, author of The Emperor of All Maladies BALDWIN BRIT: Philip Payne, an Englishman who helped develop some of the first fighter jets of WWII, was the owner and driver of the first Baldwin Special. He raced it throughout Southern California between 1947 and 1949 before returning with it to England, where the British press and public had a difficult time believing an Americanmade car could attain speeds over 100 mph.

A former ER physician and award-winning reporter covering health and health policy issues at The New York Times, Dr. Rosenthal unpacks one of America’s most complex institutions and examines what doctors, patients and providers can do to help repair it. Journalist and Bestselling Author

Susan Orlean

in conversation with Pico Iyer

CENTRAL COASTING: Two-door sedans duel as the flagman goes airborne during the start of a race in Santa Maria in the 1950s. At left is a stock 1949 Oldsmobile and at right is a custom shoebox Ford with a 1947 Buick grill.

Thu, Mar 14 / 7:30 PM / UCSB Campbell Hall “The best writers make you care about something you never noticed before. Susan Orlean is a perfect example.” The New York Daily News Susan Orlean’s latest work is The Library Book Book, a quest to solve a notorious cold case: Who set fire to the Los Angeles Public Library in 1986, destroying 400,000 books. Don’t miss this engaging evening with two celebrated authors. Books will be available for purchase and signing

Speaking with Pico Series Sponsors: Martha Gabbert, Laura Shelburne & Kevin O’Connor

(805) 893-3535 www.ArtsAndLectures.UCSB.edu Corporate Season Sponsor:

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Media Sponsors: MARCH 7, 2019

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F E A T U R E

HANK PITCHER:

l a m i r P

’S WARM: Hank Pitcher’s new work, such as “Bees and Wild Radishes” from 2018 (pictured), takes on current concerns such as the impact of climate change.

New Work Confronts Issues of Recovery,

Environment, and Immigration

W

by Roger Dur ling

hatever’s going on in the world

ends up in your work. I like the idea of painters being witnesses — of showing truth as it is. I like painters being able to develop and discover an image of who we are.” This is how Hank Pitcher describes the intention behind his latest work, an exhilarating and career-defining series that’s now on view at Sullivan Goss in a show called Primal. After writing a story about the venerated painter in this paper two years ago, Pitcher and I have become best friends. He’s invited me to his studio for long chats about art and life. Late last spring in 2018, when Pitcher summoned me to see his latest work, he mentioned on the phone that it was a response to the disasters of January 2018. Bracing for the worst, I drove to his studio expecting bleak images of nature devastated. Instead my heart stopped as I walked into his workspace. Yes, I could see the landscape paintings he’s known for, as well as his iconic surfboards. Yet I saw canvases bursting with exhilarating colors and kinetic compositions that instilled a visceral reaction like I’d never experienced before in Pitcher’s oeuvre. Most importantly, I understood the complexity to this set of paintings, comprising three different groups. Each of them deals with one of three important issues that our community—and our nation — is currently grappling with: immigration, the environment, and recovery from disaster. “All of these things are fundamental issues,” says Pitcher. “You look back to nature for answers. What are the essential issues? Making these

paintings brings these questions up. I’m not trying to make political statements. Those political statements are in nature.” Over the past six weeks, Pitcher and I met three times to discuss Primal, this sacred and profane new series that he started painting in February 2018.

JANUARY 16, 2019 — IMMIGRATION “Everything is about everything else,” is how Pitcher greets me on an evening with heavy rain. Yet we share a sigh of relief that the storm hasn’t caused major damage like the year before. He’s quoting marine biotechnologist Dr. Kathy Foltz, who was interim dean of the College of Creative Studies at UCSB, where Pitcher has been teaching for decades. “In a welcome speech to the students at the beginning of her tenure, she said that ‘everything is about everything else,’ and I love that description of the interconnectedness of things. I love that it applies equally to atoms, parts of a painting, and to our place on the planet. Working with and sometimes teaching with the scientists at UCSB has informed my work and inspired me. I find that scientists tend to be much more creative and curious than artists.” I stare at a particular group of paintings that are set in Point Conception. When he steps up on that Point, Pitcher can see his studio at UCSB — and the whole Gaviota Coast.

“The winds blow so hard I have to hide in the weeds,” he explains. “There used to be a giant Victorian house up there. That’s a square piece of land which has mystical meaning for the Chumash. It is the gateway to the Western world.” He tells me there’s always some weird cloud formation. There’s a temperature differential on either side of the point — sometimes referred to as the “elbow for California” — for this is where the cold current coming out of the Pacific from Japan meets the warmer current of the Channel Islands. “I feel like a white man there,” Pitcher confides. “I feel like I’m on somebody else’s territory. Sometimes I feel at peace there, but most of the time it’s strange.” One of the most remarkable things about the flat part of Point Conception is the way that in the Point’s short spring between March and May, and at the same time when the wind blows its hardest, all varieties of different native and non-native plants are blooming at once. “It’s a funny metaphor for immigration issues,” observes Pitcher. “Simultaneously you have native Giant Coreopsis as well as aloes and ice plants from the coast of South Africa. The ice plant is invasive—it has just taken over a lot of grazing now that it has become ‘naturalized.’ When this simultaneous blooming of native and non-native plants happens, there’s a cacophony of colors and shapes. I’m looking at this same landscape and seeing it differently. I’m able to observe. This endangered plant blooms with these plants that are not native. The ice plant becomes stressed at CONT’D ON P. 28

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27


All Gaucho Reunion

WINGSPAN: “Vulture, Wings Spread at Northpoint” strikes an ominous note not previously sounded in the oeuvre of Hank Pitcher (pictured).

Gaucho Professionals Showcase

PAUL WELLMAN

Keynote

Eric Lauterbach ‘89 President Consumer Division, Peet’s Coffee

Industry breakout sessions on technology,entrepreneurship, finance, and education. Open to alumni, students, local community members and business professionals.

Featured presenters: • Dr. Matt Beane, Assistant Professor, UCSB Technology Management Program • Department of Computer Science Distinguished Alumni Award Recipient, Randy Modos ‘01, President, Founder, PayJunction • Christina Ramirez ‘07, Founder, CEO, PlusUltra

SATURDAY, APRIL 27 9:00 A.M. - 2:00 P.M. UC SANTA BARBARA CAMPUS

Register: alumni.ucsb.edu/agr

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The New Rules of Marriage Program (Terry Real) Are You In Pain About Your Marriage? Is Your Marriage in Crisis?

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this point. This idea of what is native — what should stay and what should go—is on my mind. How do you allow all the dreamers — if you allow everyone in? This is something that gets acted out in the landscape. I really don’t have an answer at all. The more I learn about ecology and the environment, the harder the question becomes. Where do you draw the line when something is not native?” Besides the urgency in the themes of Pitcher’s new paintings, I notice something else unusual. Most of his paintings in his long career have been about the light at the end of the day. “Like the fall, the end of the day is about reflection,” he says. But these new paintings are about spring and depict the world as it appears in morning light, when things are in bloom. “I think we’re in the beginning of something in our culture,” Pitcher reflects. “Something is blooming — the power of new life. I’m going to turn 70 this year. I’m still not able to fully accept that I can no longer physically do the things I did when I was in my twenties. I’m not physically strong enough to ride those waves anymore. One of the reasons I always wanted to be a painter was because I could do it until the very end. For a painter, the last paintings are the best paintings. I realize I’m at the beginning of a new stage in my life. What I can do now as an artist is take this talent and skill I’ve accumulated and decide what else I can do with it. As an artist, I feel something has just begun.”

JANUARY 21 — RECOVERY — ‘CREATION VERSUS DESTRUCTION’ Pitcher and I met again on the Martin Luther King Jr. Day holiday, and as I pulled up to his studio, he

pointed out the total lunar eclipse. Later, when I ask about the painting titled “Bees and Wild Radishes,” he says that it is his response to last year’s fires. The work bursts with a life force, the Dionysian energy of spring. Bees circle pollen-bearing wild radishes in euphoria. The painting is so visceral you can hear the buzzing. Passion and danger mix in this landscape. “I capture that moment when it’s springtime and everything is fighting for attention and propagation,” says Pitcher. “The fire is the end of things, but there’s new life after. It’s a competition for light, and all of that that makes for an incredible beauty — all of that stuff blooming.” Pitcher explains that in paintings, spring is usually represented as bucolic and pretty, “but when you see something being born, there’s the fighting for life — coming out of the ground and fighting for space. Flowers are all about sex. It’s like a party—all about rituals and plumage.” “Between what was happening politically and the fires and the mudslide, the best way I could react to it was to do something very positive,” he reflects. “I felt the same way during the Vietnam War. For a while, I felt guilty that I didn’t drop out of college and go to battle, fighting in the war or protesting the war. I finally realized that the best thing I could do was to make the best art that I could make. In a way it was the story of Mars and Venus, but it was more about believing that we have to fight for art, for truth and beauty, to keep it alive, in the best way we can. I think of making art as creation versus destruction. So I painted bees making honey. I understood the importance of painting and stories about peaceful times instead of death.” “People in Santa Barbara make paintings of landscapes so pretty — so cloying and saccharine,” says Pitcher. “There’s chaos in my paintings. There’s an energy to this life that includes death and destruction.” The color palette in the Primal paintings is new for Pitcher’s art. “Magenta and orange are so rich, juicy,” he exults. “There are not many opportunities when you can put those colors together. Green and purple. It could easily become a psychedelic poster. I wanted it to be sensuous — strange chords coming together. I couldn’t have thought of going on that journey before. I go from yellow to pink. I kept wondering, How far can you push it before it becomes garish? How hot can the sauce be before it becomes too hot? Prior to these paintings, my palette was in the blue spectrum.” He reveals that when the color is just right, “I can feel what


F E A T U R E it’s like to be there. I’ve been reading about the Impressionists. They didn’t paint about impressions, but rather about sensations — how nature stimulated them. When I work on big, complex paintings, I live with them and make little adjustments.”

De la Guerra Plaza Revitalization Community Workshop

JANUARY 28—THE ENVIRONMENT “My works speaks to a spirituality,” says Pitcher. “I paint landscapes that are beautiful, mysterious. Greeks had divinities for places. Santa Barbara — this area I’ve painted my entire life — is so incredible, so precious, so beautiful. The more I travel, the more beautiful this place becomes. By painting these things as extraordinary things, I’m preserving them. They’re the opposite of postcard paintings of Santa Barbara, which actually devalue the place.” The last group of paintings in Primal return to the blue spectrum palette and depict both sand dunes in the Coal Oil Preserve and the classic monolithic Pitcher surfboard. “The Burning Spear” showcases a Hamish Graham design. The stomp pad, with the leash cord that attaches to the ankle, recalls a bee’s antennae. In Pitcher’s work, everything is about everything. “All of my paintings are about me, aspects of me,” he says. “They represent what I get caught up in.” But the main focus of these artworks is on the sand dunes in Coal Oil point. “I was so uncomfortable making these paintings,” the artist reveals about his perspective. “It was unnatural for me turn my back to the ocean.” The Coal Oil Point Reserve is part of the University of California Natural Reserve System. Largely undisturbed coastal dunes support a rich assortment of dune vegetation and rare wildlife, including the dune spider, the globose dune beetle, and the threatened western snowy plover. “They’ve put a fence around the sand dunes,” Pitcher says. “You get these beautiful ripples on the sand where there are no footprints. You notice footprints of beetles and birds.” Not allowing people on the sand dunes has allowed the snowy plovers to recover. They too have blossomed. Some activists want access to preserves for public access and recreation. “It’s such a sensitive habitat,” Pitcher states. “If you allow unlimited access, it would destroy it. It is a very complicated issue. Santa Barbara beachfront is as nice as it is because the community restricted and oversaw development. I have known developers over the years who hated the zoning restrictions and the Architectural Board of Review, but look at what a mess most of Southern California coast is because there was too little oversight. “The other very big issue is preserving nature and natural habitats. During my lifetime, I have seen the beaches around Coal Oil Point change from a remarkably rich shoreline teeming with clams and lobster and abalone and crab to what is now, in comparison, a desert. At low tide, I see crowds of people with buckets and sticks killing and collecting what little sea life is left in the tide pools. They leave behind trash that kills more animals. Most of the birds are gone. It is rare to see a shell on the beach anymore. How do we decide how many and what people are allowed to go on the beaches that are still alive? Are we willing to lose what little natural landscape we have left? I have been fortunate growing up here to get to know people who have let me visit their private property to paint areas that have not been ruined. I hope that by celebrating these areas, that may help in some ways to preserve these places. I am against artists who make pictures of the undeveloped land around us that look like they are real estate ads. I think these landscapes should be shown as the homes of plants and animals and geography that we must preserve, that Hank Pitcher: Primal we must leave alone. There is on view at Sullivan Goss, are a lot of places that I have An American Gallery not been able to get to, but, (11 E. Anapamu St.) knowing how delicate some through April 21. See of these environments are, I sullivangoss.com and would be willing to give up ever hankpitcher.com going there if that would help protect them.”

Saturday, March 9th 2:00 PM – 3:30 PM Casa de la Guerra Directly Across the street from the Plaza You are invited to learn more about the Plaza’s rich history and to share your ideas about revitalizing this community gathering space first dedicated as a “Public Square” in 1853

Come rain or shine; outdoor event under a tent, please dress accordingly

• What does the Plaza mean to you?

• Together with the SB Farmer’s Market Association, the City intends to relocate the Saturday’s Farmer’s Market to the Plaza; what additional activities would you like to see in the Plaza? • What kind of improvements should be considered? • Parking? Lighting? • Concrete? Lawn? Pavers?

ATENCIÓN: Traducción al español These topics and more estará disponible en el taller will be discussed

Please Join Us!

Adult Ed is back.

4•1•1

SPRING BREAK ADVENTURE CAMP Monday 3/25 - Friday 3/29 Youth (Ages 6-14). CIT (Ages 15-18) For full week adventures or drop-in per day registration available!

HIKING + BIKING + CLIMBING SAILING + SURFING + KAYAKING STAND UP PADDLING MARINE BIOLOGY TERRESTRIAL + CREEK ECOLOGY SUSTAINABILITY + ENVIRONMENTAL EDUCATION TEAM BUILDING + SPORTS + NATURE ARTS and more!

Classes & Workshops Start Every Week For more information visit sbcc.edu/ExtendedLearning or call (805) 683-8200

Register online:

WWW.PEAK2PACIFIC.COM Looking forward to Adventuring with you for Peak2Pacific's Summer Camps too! INDEPENDENT.COM

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BROADWAY IN SANTA BARBARA SERIES

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WED MAR 20 8PM STATE STREET BALLET

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SHEN YUN FRI MAR 29 7:30PM SAT MAR 30 2 & 7:30PM SUN MAR 31 1PM

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WEEK I N D E P E N D E N T CA L E N DA R

MARCH

7-13

E H T

BY TERRY ORTEGA AND AMBER WHITE

As always, find the complete listings online at independent.com/events. And if you have an event coming up, submit it at independent.com/eventsubmit. University Archives Photographs collection. The exhibit will show through May 31. 5-8pm. Casa de la Guerra, 15 E. De la Guerra St. Free. Call 965-0093. sbthp.org

“Beneath the Sky a #refreshening pool” by Scott A. Trimble

3/7, 3/9: Awakening by Lisa Trivell Step into a world of projections, paintings, and sound-bath experience with artworks inspired by Lisa’s meditation practice. The show provides a visual and sound experience integrating the artist’s paintings with sound and projections. Thu.: 6-8pm; Sat.: 4-6pm. SBCAST, 513 Garden St. Free. Call (917) 923-5504. lisatrivell.com

3/7: Nikki Barthelmess Come meet this best-selling author and 2017 winner of the Children’s Literature Legacy Award as she reads excerpts and signs her latest book, The Quiet You Carry. 7pm. Chaucer’s Books, 3321 State St. Free. Call 682-6787.

chaucersbooks.com

3/7: Reception: Birds of a Feather

3/7: THURSDAY 3/7 3/7-3/13: March Featured Show This month’s show features watercolors by Peggy Fletcher and jewelry by Patricia Watkins and shows through March 31. 10am-5pm. Gallery Los Olivos, 2920 Grand Ave., Los Olivos. Call 688-7517.

gallerylosolivos.com

3/7-3/9: The Laramie Project This

will explore the history of 3D art with examples from the realms of art, science, and popular culture. 4:30-6pm. S.B. Museum of Art, 1130 State St. Free-$15. Call 884-6457.

miss this exhibition highlighting Channing Peake, a renowned California artist and onetime Casa del Herrero apprentice. Peake’s work from S.B. County’s permanent collection will also be displayed as an important component of the exhibition, which will be on display through September 30. 5-7pm. Channing Peake Gallery, 105 E. Anapamu St. Free. sbac.ca.gov

3/7: 2nd Annual International Women’s Day In celebration of #Inter-

theatergroupsbcc.com

3/8-3/10: Night Must Fall It has been 80 years since the Ojai Art Center Theater opened in 1939 with Night Must Fall. Come see the reprise of this psychological thriller about a charming, smooth-talking hotel porter who may have committed a murder. Fri.-Sat.: 7:30pm; Sun.: 2pm. Ojai Art Ctr. Theater, 113 S. Montgomery St., Ojai. $10-$25. Call 640-8797. ojaiact.org

3/8: Anne-Sophie Mutter Listen to the lovely sounds of this four-time Grammy Award–winning violinist with a program featuring Mozart, Debussy, Ravel, Mozart, and Poulenc. 7pm. The Granada Theatre, 1214 State St. $16-$69. Call 893-3535.

artsandlectures.ucsb.edu

FRIDAY 3/8 3/8: YK Osiris, YFL Kelvin Come hear rapper/R&B vocalist deliver hits like “Valentine” and “Timing.” YFL Kelvin will open the show. 7pm. Velvet Jones, 423 State St. $18-$23. Call 965-8676.

velvet-jones.com

sbma.net

3/8: Artist Reception: Light Water Fire Earth Artist Ed Cohen works with the medium of fluid acrylic to manipulate the flow and drip of paint to create a sense of fluidity in this exhibition of circles that represent the harmony within the cosmos. The exhibit shows through April 5. 5:307:30pm. S.B. Tennis Club, 2375 Foothill Rd. Free. Call 682-4722.

3/8, 3/10: Women Who Defied the Odds Six historical santabarbaratennisclub.com/art

3/7: Opening Ceremony: The Anna S.C. Blake Manual Training School: The Remarkable Antecedent of UC Santa Barbara In 1892, Anna S.C. Blake opened a sloyd school on the site of what is today Anacapa School. Sloyd schools emphasized manual training and emphasized both intellectual and practical knowledge in order to develop educated citizens. The exhibition focuses on the school’s early years with photos from the UCSB Library

Volunteer Opportunity

1944 Pulitzer Prize–winning comedy follows the story of Elwood P. Dowd, whose best friend is a six-foot-tall rabbit that’s invisible to others. Watch as those around George are challenged between having him committed to a sanitarium or ultimately falling under Harvey’s invisible charms. The show runs through March 16. Thu.-Sat.: 7:30pm; Sun.: 2pm. Garvin Theatre, SBCC West Campus. $14-$26. Call 965-5935. Read more on p. 52.

folkorchestrasb.com

women—Harriet Tubman,

Y

Fundraiser

3/7: Britt Salvesen: A History of 3D in 12 Examples This Art Matters lecture

3/7: Opening Reception: Exhibition Highlighting Paintings at Casa del Herrero and Works from the S.B. County Collection You won’t want to

3/7-3/10: Harvey Mary Chase’s

program of the 2019 season with gorgeous acoustics and songs from Ireland, Wales, Scotland, England, and Galicia like “Shebeg and Shemore,”“Whiskey,”“Suo Gan,” and more. Have a tasty sip of beer or wine at intermission. Fri.: 7:30pm; Sun.: 4pm. El Presidio de Santa Barbara State Historic Park, 123 E. Canon Perdido St. $36.50.

ES

sbjewishfilmfestival.org

strive to capture and express the essence of things like an object, a moment in time, a person, a concept, a memory, or an emotion in this group show. The exhibit shows through March 25. 5-8pm. 10 West Gallery, 10 W. Anapamu St. Free. Call 770-7711.

mance from Opera Santa Barbara in the galleries or sculpt a seated figure with armature wire and paper clay inspired by Allison Saar’s “Inheritance” (2009), on view in Out of Storage and into the Light: Sculptures That Tell Stories. You can also view the galleries and see the newly installed work by Kehinde Wiley between 5 and 8 p.m. Pop-Up Opera: 5:30-6:30pm; Family 1st Thursday: 5:30-7:30pm. S.B. Museum of Art, 1130 State St. Free. Call 963-4364. sbma.net

RT

ence the power of exceptional films by American, European, and Israeli filmmakers with themes of Jewish culture and identity. Visit the website for a full schedule. New Vic, 33 W. Victoria St. GA: Free-$18; pass: $118. Call 957-1115.

Reception: Essentia Artists

3/7: Family 1st Thursday or Pop- 3/8, 3/10: Folk Orchestra of S.B.: Up Opera Choose to hear a perforCeltic and British Isles Enjoy the first

U

3/7-3/10: 2019 S.B. Jewish Film Festival Our community can experi-

gallery113sb.com

Jeannette Rankin, Lutah Maria Riggs, Margaret Sanger, Marian Anderson, and Rachel Carson—will come alive as actresses deliver dramatic monologues accompanied by live music and projected photos. Fri.: 4-6pm. Multipurpose Rm., Carpinteria Library, 5141 Carpinteria Ave., Carpinteria. Sun.: 3-5pm. Faulkner Gallery, Central Library, 40 E. Anapamu St. Free. Call tinyurl.com/Ontraport-WomensDay 564-5608. sbplibrary.org

CO

2000 play by Moisés Kaufman reveals a complex truth of the October 1998 anti-gay hate crime against Matthew Shepard through text taken verbatim from hundreds of interviews. Thu.Fri.: 8pm; Sat.: 2pm; Hatlen Theater, UCSB. $12-$20. Call 893-2064. Read more on p. 52. theaterdance.ucsb.edu

Artist of the month Allison Gobbell paints whimsical birds in historical art backgrounds. The exhibit shows through March 31. 5pm. Gallery 113, 1114 State St. Free.

nationalWomensDay2019, area genderbalanced advocates, including women in tech, business leaders, and more will discuss overcoming the challenges women face in business. Girls Rock S.B. will be playing music, and there will be light snacks and refreshments. 5:30pm. Ontraport, 2040 Alameda Padre Serra. Free.

3/8-3/10:

¡Viva el Arte de Santa Bárbara!: La Patronal Village

Fiesta Music from Perú This 10-member brass band from

Lima composed of the country’s best musicians and masked dancers will perform traditional regional music of Perú. A reception and CD signing with the artists will follow the evening performances. Join the band in a traditional procession starting at the S.B. Museum of Art on Sunday from 1:30-2:30 p.m. 7-8pm. Fri.: Isla Vista Elementary School, 6875 El Colegio Rd., Isla Vista; Sat.: Guadalupe City Hall, 918 Obispo St., Guadalupe; Sun.: Marjorie Luke Theatre, S.B. Junior High School, 721 E. Cota St. Free. tinyurl.com/VivaElArteMariachi

Civil Discourse

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Protest INDEPENDENT.COM

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TH SUNDAY, MARCH 17 at FLYING FLAGS RV RESORT • 12 - 4:30 pm

MARCH

7-13

COURTESY

LIVE MUSIC: DUSTY JUGS & NOBLE GRIZWALD

INDEPENDENT CALENDAR

As always, find the complete listings online at independent.com/events. And if you have an event coming up, submit it at independent.com/eventsubmit.

painting, raffle prizes, and a wine raffle. Registration/checkin: 8:30am; opening ceremony: 9:30am; 1K walk: 10am; awards/closing ceremony: 11:30am. Chase Palm Park, 323 E. Cabrillo Blvd. Free-$30. Call (424) 227-6475. sclerowalk.org

3/9: Still Alice: Understanding Alzheimer’s presented by

30+ WINERIES, AND CRAFT BREWERIES 25+ CHILI & SALSAS & more BUELLTONWINEANDCHILIFESTIVAL.COM

BUS TRANSPORTATION • SANTA MARIA, LOMPOC, GOLETA, SANTA BARBARA

3/9:

Foraging and Survival Field Workshop with Christopher Nyerges Participants will learn to

Harvey presents

by Mary Chase

directed by R. Michael Gros

herbwalks.com

grams at the United Boys & Girls Clubs of S.B. County in Buellton and Solvang during this fun-filled evening of casino-style games, wine tasting, tasty bites, and great prizes. 6-9pm. Hotel Corque, 400 Alisal Rd., Solvang. $50-$75. Call 681-1315.

tinyurl.com/CorksForKids

3/8: Young Million Album Release Show Celebrate the release of the debut full-length album Chasing Threads from S.B.’s own rock band Young Million. Glossies, Noble Grizwald, and Kyle Nicolaides will open the show. 8pm. SOhO Restaurant & Music Club, 1221 State St. $8-$10. Ages 21+. Call 962-7776.

sohosb.com

SATURDAY 3/9 3/9: A Talk by Mark Humpal & Book-Signing Author Mark Humpal will discuss his book Ray Stanford Strong: West Coast Landscape Artist, which coincides with the Wildling Museum’s main gallery exhibit Ray Strong: A Collectors Passion, on display through July 8. 3-4:30pm. Valley Oak Gallery, Wildling Museum, 1511-B Mission Dr., Solvang. $5-$10. Call 688-1082.

“A show for the entire family, from kids to grandparents.” —New York Post

PREVIEWS FEB. 27 & 28

MARCH 1-16

www.theatregroupsbcc.com

805.965.5935

Thank you to our season sponsor:

LIVE CAPTIONING Sun. March 3 @ 2pm



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3/9: Origami Tales In her new

show, Kuniko Yamamoto will share heartfelt stories from ancient Japan identify wild edible greens, make cordage while simultaneously making mythofrom yucca, and watch a demonstration of logical character masks, puppets, primitive fire making. 10am-3pm. Euterpe amazing flowers, and a dragon from Farms and Ventura River Preserve, 587 origami onstage. 2pm. Ojai Art Ctr., 113 S. Rice Rd., Ojai. $75. Call 646-6281. S. Montgomery St., Ojai. $10-$15.

3/8: 2nd Annual Corks for Kids Support the growing pro-

presents

Harvard-trained neuroscientist and bestselling author Lisa Genova will share the latest science investigating Alzheimer’s disease and promising research on what each of us can do to build an Alzheimer’s-resistant brain. 7:30-9:30pm. Campbell Hall, UCSB. $10-$35. artsandlectures.ucsb.edu

wildlingmuseum.org

tinyurl.com/Origami-Tales

3/9: Tafelmusik Baroque Orchestra: Tales of Two Cities: The LeipzigDamascus Connection Travel through time and space during this show that boasts live music, text, and stunning projections that will transport the audience back in time and place. 8pm. Lobero Theatre, 33 E. Canon Perdido St. $39-$49. Call 963-0761.

lobero.org

3/9: S.B. Stepping Out to Cure Scleroderma Join this 1K charity walk to raise awareness and funds for the Scleroderma Foundation Southern California Chapter. This rare autoimmune disease affects more than 300,000 Americans. Enjoy music, a health fair, food trucks, CO U R

3/9: Mardi Gras Night This Cajuninspired evening will have cuisine from the Big Easy Catering Company, live jazz from the Black Market Trio, and, of course, wine from Zaca Mesa. 5-7pm. Zaca Mesa Winery, 6905 Foxen Canyon Rd., Los Olivos. $40-$50. Call 688-9339. zacamesa.com 3/9-3/10: Configuration S.B. Dance Arts and The Arts Mentorship Program present this youth dance performance featuring high-energy hip-hop, evocative contemporary, and entertaining jazz numbers. Sat.: 7pm; Sun.: 2pm. Center Stage Theater, 751 Paseo Nuevo. $17-$50. Call 963-0408.

centerstagetheater.org

3/9: Wooden Hall Concert: Idiomatiques Get out for a unique listening experience of gypsy jazz, Latin, mainstream jazz, and R&B with the Idiomatiques. All proceeds go to the artists and the Trust for Historic Preservation for the use of the venue. 7:30pm. Alhecama Theatre, 914 Santa Barbara St. $22-$25. Call 966-1279. sbama.org

SUNDAY 3/10 3/10: Parallel Stories Lecture: Alex Espinoza: Dismantling Hierarchies In an afternoon of reading and conversation, author Alex Espinoza will share his thoughts on Southern California, masks, identity, cultural displacement, faith, the world of lucha libre, belonging, and why what should exclude us empowers us. 2:30pm. S.B. Museum of Art, 1130 State St. $5-$10. Call 963-4364. sbma.net

T E SY

3/10:

SBHS Music Mattress Fundraiser The cafeteria of S.B. High School will turn into a showroom with brand-name mattresses such as Simmons, Southerland, and more, for sale at a 50 percent discount. There will also be pillows, mattress protectors, sheets, and frames available. Delivery and old mattress haul-away is offered as well as most forms of payment. Every purchase will benefit the music programs at the high school. 10am-5pm. S.B. High School, 700 E. Anapamu St. Free.

tinyurl.com/Mattress-Fundraiser

Fundraiser


Art, 1130 State St. Free. Call 963-4364.

sbma.net

3/10: A Conversation in Poems and Stories Performance poet Steve Braff will emcee this program featuring the work of two accomplished artists: Jerry Dipego and Ron Colone. 3-4pm. Wildling Museum, 1511-B Mission Dr., Solvang. Free. Call 686-8315.

THIS WEEKEND!

THIS WEEKEND!

WEEK wildlingmuseum.org

3/10: Exhibit Opening: Out of Storage and into the Light: Sculptures That Tell Stories This exhibit

Eileen McMillen

Former educator and author Eileen Ryan McMillen will sign copies of her book, The Little Greeter: A Grunion Tale, told from the perspective a young child on his first midnight grunion run under a full moon along the California coast. 2pm. Chaucer’s Books, 3321 State St. Free. Call 682-6787. chaucersbooks.com

3/10: Mountainfilm on Tour Kids’ Showcase This special all-ages program will feature a fun, engaging playlist of outstanding, entertaining short films sourced from the festival. It’s an experience of art, adventure, culture, and the environment in one exciting program. Arrive an hour before the show for balloons, face painting, and crafts. 3pm. Campbell Hall, UCSB. $5-$10. Call 893-3535. artsandlectures.ucsb.edu

3/10: La Patronal This unique brass band from Lima, Peru, with members who are direct descendants of rural Peruvian musicians, will perform music rooted in the tradition of fiestas populares, or “town fairs,” common in rural villages across Latin America. They will begin in a lively procession from the Museum Store on State Street, down Anapamu Street, around to the library plaza and into the museum, where they will perform outside the Family Resource Center during SBMA’s Free Studio Sunday art activity. 1:30-2pm. S.B. Museum of

3/10: Mindful Nature Connection: Touching the Earth Workshop Explore how bringing mindfulness and nature connection together can quiet the mind, open the heart, and bring a sense of interconnectedness to the rest of your life. Four Continuing Education credits will be provided to psychologists, registered nurses, MFTs, and LCSWs. 1-5pm. Unitarian Society of Santa Barbara, 1535 Santa Barbara St. $25-$70.

tinyurl.com/MindfulNature

3/10: Studio Sundays Sculpt a kneeling figure in air-dry clay, inspired by the approximately 500-year-old, pre-Columbian “Kneeling Figure” in Out of Storage and into the Light: Sculptures That Tell Stories. 1:30-4:30pm. Family Resource Ctr., S.B. Museum of Art, 1130 State St. Free. Call 963-4364.

sbma.net

sponsors

3/10:

features more than 50 objects from the permanent collection, many of which have never before been exhibited, that include pre-Columbian, ancient Egyptian, ancient Greek and Roman, 11th- to 17th-century Southeast Asian, ancient to 13th-century Chinese, 19thcentury African, and 19th- to 21stcentury French, English, and American sculpture. The exhibit shows through June 23. 11am-5pm. S.B. Museum of Art, 1130 State St. Free-$5. Call 963-4364. sbma.net

Additional support for promotions: Thanks to The Bentson Foundation and Elaine F. Stepanek Foundation

Join our eClub. Follow us on social media. See the full lineup.

Don’t miss a beat! 805.963.0761 / LOBERO.ORG

3/11:

Science Pub: UFOs & Aliens – What Does Science Say? Prof. Donald R. Prothero of the

COURTESY

Department of Geological Sciences at Cal Poly Pomona will discuss the probability that there is intelligent life that can visit earth, as well as topics such as Area 51, Roswell, and more. 6:308pm. Dargan’s Irish Pub & Restaurant, 18 E. Ortega St. Free. Call 682-4711 x170.

sbnature.org

Volunteer Opportunity

Civil Discourse

Protest

>>>

SOUTHWEST INDIAN JEWELRY

805.569.3393 poshsb.com | info@poshsb.com

3317 B State St. Loreto Plaza - Santa Barbara

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MARCH

DIJO Productions Presents

7-13

the tony award winning comedy kend!

COURTESY

ee closing w

Featuring Ed Giron, Bill Waxman and Geren Piltz Directed by Jerry Oshinsky ALCAZAR THEATRE • MARCH 8,9,10 Fri @ 8pm • Sat @ 8pm • Sun @ 2pm General Admission: $19 Students and Seniors $15 info & Tickets: thealcazar.org or 805.684.6380 4916 Carpinteria ave., Carpinteria

DEBT RELIEF

~DEBT SETTLEMENT & BANKRUPTCY~

Tax debt • Credit cards • Medical bills Foreclosure • Garnishments FREE CONSULTATION 7 W. Figueroa Street (805) 335-2466

youngerlawsb.com

Sustainable Heart

3/13:

UCSB Jazz Ensemble: Then and Now This concert, directed by Jon Nathan, will explore five important works from the historical jazz repertoire, including two Benny Goodman staples, Ferdinand “Jelly Roll” Morton’s “King Porter Stomp,” and more. 7:30pm. Lotte Lehmann Concert Hall, UCSB. Free$10. Call 893-2064. music.ucsb.edu/news

MONDAY 3/11 3/11: S.B. Newcomers Prospective & New Member Orientation This meeting is open to all those who have moved to Carpinteria, Goleta, Montecito, S.B., and Summerland within the last 18 months. Come at 6:30 p.m. to meet and greet. 7pm. The University Club of S.B., 1332 Santa Barbara St. Free.

tinyurl.com/NewcomersClub

TUESDAY 3/12 3/12: Cutler’s Spirits & Goa Taco Tasting Join Ian Cutler, owner and head distiller of Cutler’s Spirits, as he pours samples and discusses how his artisanal liquors are created. Goa Taco will provide their scrumptious, buttery, flaky flatbread tacos. 5:30-7:30pm. S.B. Gallery, Museum of Natural History, 2559 Puesta del Sol. $30. Ages 21+. tinyurl.com/Tastings-Tacos

~ Transformational Life Counseling ~

WEDNESDAY 3/13

Michael H Kreitsek, MA

3/13: The Mythology of Wine Enjoy a glass of wine as mythologist, cultural historian, and winemaker Arthur George explores the mythology of wine in various cultures over the ages. 5:30-7:30pm. Carr Winery Barrel Rm., 414 N. Salsipuedes St. Free. Ages 21+. Call 965-7985. carrwinery.com

Relationships • Occupation and Career • Meditation Grief and Loss • Major Life Transitions • Anxiety Spiritual Issues • Communication • Conflict Transpersonal Counseling Psychology Counseling From a Buddhist Perspective 805 698-0286 34

INDEPENDENT CALENDAR

As always, find the complete listings online at independent.com/events. And if you have an event coming up, submit it at independent.com/eventsubmit.

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MARCH 7, 2019

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Fundraiser

FARMERS MARKET

SCHEDULE THURSDAY

SUNDAY

Goleta: Camino Real Marketplace, 10am-2pm

Carpinteria: 800 block of Linden Ave., 3-6pm

TUESDAY

FRIDAY

Montecito: 1100 and 1200 blocks of Coast Village Rd., 8-11:15am

SATURDAY

Old Town S.B.: 500-600 blocks of State St., 3-6:30pm

WEDNESDAY

Downtown S.B.: Corner of Santa Barbara and Cota sts., 8:30am-1pm

Solvang: Copenhagen Dr. and 1st St., 2:30-6pm

FISHERMAN’S MARKET SATURDAY

Rain or shine, meet local fishermen on the Harbor’s commercial pier, and buy fresh fish (filleted or whole), live crab, abalone, sea urchins, and more. 117 Harbor Wy., 6-11am. Call 259-7476. cfsb.info/sat

Volunteer Opportunity

Civil Discourse

Protest


WEEK Shows on Tap 3/8-3/9, 3/11-3/12: COURTESY

Sure Sure

Velvet Jones Fri.: YK Osiris, YFL Kelvin. 7pm. $18-$23. Sat.: Tyler Carter. $15-$17. Mon.: Sure Sure. $13-$15. Tue.: 1TakeJay, AzChike. $17-$20. 7pm. 423 State St. Call 965-8676. velvet-jones.com 3/7-3/9: The Brewhouse Thu.: Kulchin from the Caverns.

7pm. Fri.: Stiff Pickle Orchestra. 8pm. Sat.: The Reserve. 8pm. 229 W. Montecito St. Free. Call 884-4664.

3/7, 3/9-3/10: Dargan’s Irish Pub & Restaurant Thu.: Dannsair. 6:30-8:30pm. Sat.: Radio Keys. 9-11:30pm. Sun.: Irish Jam Session. 4:30-7pm. 18 E. Ortega St. Free. Call 568-0702. darganssb.com

A L W A Y S A M A Z I N G. N e v e r r o u t i n e.

Chris D’Elia: Follow The Leader Tour

fridaY

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8 PM

3/7-3/9, 3/13: The Endless Summer Bar-Café Thu.: Kylie Butler. Fri.: Johnny Miller. Sat.: Nax. Wed.: Dave Vignoe. 5-8pm. 113 Harbor Wy. Free. Call 564-1200. 3/7-3/8, 3/10: Eos Lounge Thu.: Greek Night: Kyla J Buffy, Vicky Vo, Byron Millan, Gerry, Ou. 9pm-1:30am. Free with RSVP. Fri.: 12th Planet. 9pm1:30am. $15. Sun.: Luca Lush. 9pm-1am. $10. 500 Anacapa St. Ages 21+. Call 564-2410. eoslounge.com

fridaY

flogging molly

3/7-3/13: SOhO Restaurant & Music Club Thu.: Chris Fossek Trio; 6pm; $15. Shylah Ray Sunshine, Sophie Holt, Elisa Rose; 9pm; $12; ages 21+. Fri.: Young Million, Glossies, Noble Grizwald, Kyle Nicolaides. 8pm. $8-$10. Ages 21+. Sat.: No Simple Highway. 8pm. $10-$15. Ages 21+. Sun.: Young Singers Recital. 5:30pm. Free. Mon.: Leanna Movillian’s Spring Student Piano Showcase. 5pm. Free. Tue.: Young Singers Recital. 5:30-7:30pm. Free. Wed.: Millennial Jazz Jam. 7:30pm. $5. 1221 State St. Call 962-7776.

Rob thomas

3/8-3/10: Maverick Saloon Fri.: Area 51. 8pm. Sat.: Hollywood Hillbillies. 8pm. Sun.: Nate Latta. Noon. 3687 Sagunto St., Santa Ynez. Free-$5. Ages 21+. Call 686-4785. themavsaloon.com

8 PM

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8 PM

3/8-3/10: Cold Spring Tavern Fri.: Uncle Uncle. 6-9pm. Sat.: RJ Mischo; 1-4pm. Flight 805; 5-8pm. Sun.: Tom Ball and Kenny Sultan; 1:15-4pm. Teresa Russell and Cocobilli; 4:30-7:30pm. 5995 Stagecoach Rd. Free. Call 967-0066. coldspringtavern.com 3/8, 3/10: Figueroa Mountain Brewing Co. (Los Olivos) Fri.: Chilldawgs. 5-8pm. Sun.: Matt Sayles. 3-6pm. 2363 Alamo Pintado Ave., Los Olivos. Free. Ages 21+. Call 694-2252 x343. figmtnbrew.com

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sohosb.com

3/8: Carr Winery Barrel Rm. SBCC New World Jazz Ensemble. 6-8pm. 414 N. Salsipuedes St. Free. Ages 21+. Call 965-7985. carrwinery.com

MAR

fridaY

wfc 102: mixed martial arts

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5

6 PM

3/8-3/10: Mercury Lounge Fri.: Desert Squall. $5. Sat.: Wall of Tom. $7. Sun.: Sam Valdes, Rodes Rollins. $8. 9pm. 5871 Hollister Ave., Goleta. Ages 21+. Call 967-0907.

3/8-3/9: M.Special Brewing Co. Fri.: Flannel 101. 7-9pm. Sat.: Salty Strings. 6-8pm. 6860 Cortona Dr., Bldg. C., Goleta. Free. Call 968-6500.

mspecialbrewco.com

3/9: Figueroa Mountain Brewing Co. (Buellton) OutOfTheBlue. 6-9pm. 45 Industrial Wy., Buellton. Free. Ages 21+. Call 694-2252 x110. figmtnbrew.com 3/9: The James Joyce Ulysses Jasz. 7:30-10:30pm. 513 State St. Free. Ages 21+. Call 962-2668. sbjamesjoyce.com 3 4 0 0 E H i g h w a y 24 6 , S a n t a Yn e z · 8 0 0 - 24 8 - 6 2 74 · C h u m a s h C a s i n o . c o m Must be 21 years of age or older to attend. Chumash Casino Resort reserves the right to change or cancel promotions and events.

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EVENT KICK-OFF PARTY SATURDAY, MARCH 11 SATURDAY, MARCH 11

WEDNESDAY, MARCH 13 • 5:00 - 7:00 PM

18 E. Ortega St., Santa Barbara

Drinks • Appetizers • Music • Silent Auction

Join us for an evening in celebration of local breast cancer research and programs! $15 in advance, $20 at the door. TICKETS AVAILABLE @ CFSB.ORG/IRELANDWALK2019

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living

My Life

p. 37

COURTESY

PAUL WELLMAN

Education

MEMORY LANE: The author’s grandfather originally paid $21,000 for the little wood home on Padaro Lane in Carpinteria, where homes now sell for tens of millions of dollars.

Reflections on Granddad’s Padaro Lane Beach House I n 1950, my grandfather bought a beach house on the sleepy, mostly empty lane of Padaro, paying $21,000 for the little wood home, low and wide on its sandy lot that stretched out to the mean high-tide line. At night, the view across the sea was beautifully dark until the 1960s, when oil rigs were constructed out in the Santa Barbara Channel. Though dismayed by the structures, my grandfather made the best of the new view by seeing how the lighted rigs at night resembled old Spanish galleons. As score by score of years passed, the beach cove has been developed, and these days it features more than 100 homes that have increased sharply in value and a dozen years ago defied a widespread, national downturn in real estate prices, continuing

IRON MAN: Triathlete, full Iron Man, and Washington Elementary parent Matt Genovese will run upward of 100 miles in 24 hours to raise money and awareness for public education in the Santa Barbara area.

Runner Launches 100-Miler for Public Schools

to go up in cost. The strand has been discovered by New York tycoons, Hollywood-industry folks, and a former U.S. Secretary of State, who moved into homes that today sell for tens of millions of dollars. In the many years after my grandfather purchased his home, the lane consisted mostly of second homes, many owned by residents of Pasadena or Bakersfield. My grandfather hailed from Bakersfield, where he ran a large independent dairy with a cattle ranch of more than 500 cows. He credited his Santa Barbara visits with keeping up the health of his mind and heart, as his work was stressful, beginning with the launch of Wayne’s Dairy in the 1930s when he went against some of Bakersfield’s Depression-era politics. Granddad

M

BY JILL PEACOCK

cont’d on p. 38

Holy Mola tecta ! A

TOM TURNER

Natural History hunt for a species’ identity crossed time zones last week when the Coal Oil Point Reserve near Isla Vista noted on its Facebook page that a very unusual, seven-foot-long fish had washed up on shore. It was likely a Mola mola, or sunfish, conservation specialist Jessica Nielsen speculated on February 19, after an intern told her of the find. That got Tom Turner heading down to the beach for a glimpse. He’s an evolutionary geneticist with UCSB’s Ecology, Evolution, and MYSTERY OF THE DEEP: A seven-foot sunfish that washed up Marine Biology department, and he posted more on the shores of Coal Oil Point Reserve near I.V. drew the curiosity of passersby and the scientific community alike. photos of the giant fish — flat, tailless, with dorsal and ventral fins that work like flippers — on iNatu- Australia’s Murdoch University, asked Turner for ralist, an online social network of naturalists. Those more photos and to examine the back part of the photos in turn alerted Ralph Forster, the fish cura- fish’s body, where a tail would be, for a determinator of the South Australian Museum, who thought it tive notch called a clavus. Turner and Nielsen had looked a whole lot like a Mola tecta, or hoodwinker to wait until another daytime low tide exposed the sunfish. That would be remarkable, as the Mola fish for viewing. A few undergrads seeking taco tecta, first described by Marianne Nyegaard in 2017, meat had to be warned that the fish had been dead has only been found in the Southern Hemisphere. for some time. When the more detailed photos transpired, “[W]hat a hoot if it turns out to be the HoodNyegaard confirmed enthusiastically, typing, winker!” he wrote. Forster and Nyegaard, a sunfish expert with cont’d on p. 38

att Genovese has completed more than 70 triathlons and a full Iron Man, but this week he tackles a new challenge: publiceducation funding. Genovese, an area athlete and father, will run upward of 100 miles in 24 hours to raise money and awareness for public education in the Santa Barbara area. Beginning the morning of March 7, Genovese’s route will pass by all 26 public elementary schools in the greater Santa Barbara area, starting at his own kids’ school, Washington Elementary. After finishing this initial loop, Genovese plans to keep running five-mile loops in the La Mesa Park area for as long as he can. His goal is to hit 100 miles or 24 hours, whichever comes first. This is Genovese’s first year organizing this fundraiser. He was motivated after experiencing underfunding in public schools. “Our public schools are struggling to stay afloat,” said Genovese. He said he believes the money for public education is mismanaged and he has seen the effects of poor funding firsthand with high principal turnover rates, lack of athletic facilities, and understaffing. Genovese said Washington Elementary alone —Matt Genovese raises more than $400,000 annually through private funding, but he feels this is not enough. “This is my way of trying to help without getting caught up in all the red tape,” he said. Via GoFundMe, Genovese had raised nearly $4,000 by print deadline Tuesday. He has been participating in triathlons and Iron Man events for 15 years. Although he prefers biking and swimming, he picked running for the event because “running is something that anyone in the community can do.” Genovese has been fundraising via GoFundMe for five months and has raised almost $4,000. According to Genovese, he has additional per-mile contributions that will be added to this fund after his final mile count. He also has several corporate sponsors providing funding and materials for his run including Rabbit, Mesa Burger, Lighthouse Coffee, Dog Jog, and his own company, Finance of America. According to Genovese, he has already had some people reach out to him about participating in the event next year. Ideally, he hopes to have representatives from every school take part, even if just for a couple of miles. When it comes to supporting local education, Genovese said, “We can all put on running shoes and join each other and go out.” — Amelia Buckley

INDEPENDENT.COM

This is my way of trying to help without getting caught up in all the red tape.

MARCH 7, 2019

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1 THURSDAY MAR. 7, 5-8PM ST

1st Thursday is an evening of art and culture in Downtown Santa Barbara. On the first Thursday of each month, participating galleries and cultural art venues are open from 5-8PM offering the public FREE access to art in a fun and social environment. In addition, State Street comes alive with performances and interactive exhibits. 1ST THURSDAY PARTICIPATING VENUES M I C H EL T O REN A S T RE E T

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SUMMER SOLSTICE EXHIBIT (HOSTED BY DISTINCTIVE FRAMING N’ ART) 1333 State Street

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EARLY CALIFORNIA ANTIQUES 1331 State Street, 805-837-8735

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SANTA BARBARA FINE ART 1324 State Street, Suite J, 805-845-4270

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SANTA BARBARA ART WORKS 28 East Victoria Street

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STATE GALLERY AT YOUTH INTERACTIVE 1219 State Street, 805-617-6421

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GRASSINI FAMILY VINEYARDS 24 El Paseo, 805-897-3366

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SANTA BARBARA TRUST FOR HISTORIC PRESERVATION Casa de la Guerra, 15 East De la Guerra Street

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living

Granddad’s House cont’d from p. 37

took the step of employing many workers who’d just arrived in the county, fleeing the Dust Bowl of Arkansas and Oklahoma. They were known at that time as Arkies and Okies. He incurred the wrath of many fellow prominent businessmen who did not want the exceedingly poor out-of-towners to settle in the area. Work and social life around Bakersfield could be bumpy — surely rude and very cold for Granddad. In the following decades, he developed the dairy ranch and milk plant with dozens of home-delivery milk routes. Every year, he gave away a weekend at the Padaro beach house as a prize to the milkman who added the most deliveries to his route. The Padaro structure originally had no garage. The downstairs sunk low in the sand while the upstairs area was a couple of rooms of knotty wood-paneled walls and no doors. A simple curtain shielded entry to the small room in the back. In the ’60s, the place was remodeled and included a chic-for-the-time turquoise-colored counter in the kitchen, replete with white-leather bar chairs. In the ’70s, the Formica flooring in an indoor porch area was covered with a pale green carpet, and the more rustic living of the place was altered with a new rule of what to do before entering from the beach. It had become necessary to do more than simply swat off sand from our feet; guests had to be de-tarred. Like many other regional beaches, the Padaro strand is sometimes covered with thick oil that sticks to the soles of the feet and other body parts of kids playing hard in the shallow surf (or a couple in a clench, should they ever roll around in a From Here to Eternity kiss). We rubbed hard with salad oil to remove the black spots and streaks. Though a look out to sea seems to show that the oil seeps might be due to the drilling off the coast, they are not. The tar is a natural aspect of the beach. Indeed, the Santa Barbara Channel has the largest natural petroleum seep in the world, with tar deposits greater in the summer and fall. In 2013, the family sold the beach house for $4.9 million; it’s not been altered very much since. I remain grateful for all the memories of beach walks and swims with my grandfather. For strolls along the surf, views were rife with sights of dolphins swimming a little downwardly and then a little upwardly, sewing their bodies through the ocean, and with pelicans winging widely over the waters, then stopping short midair and letting go completely in freefalls to hunt fish, their mighty beaks first. When swimming, we grandkids used to follow Granddad out perpendicular to the waves and well beyond the breakers to where seals sometimes frolicked. On the rare occasion of seeing one, we surely left the creature ample space. On the way in, we stopped off in the swells to float in the rock-a-bye ocean. We grandkids stretched out prone like our grandfather with our heads, stomachs, and feet poking above the surface. We occupied ourselves meditatively as otters seem to do, deeply content to lounge on the seawater. n

Holy Mola tecta ! cont’d from p. 37

“HOLY MOLA!!!! @tomleturner you are a superstar and @rfoster I am sooo excited to join you out on your brave and well-picked hoodwinker limb!!!! OMG!!!!” She told UCSB’s The Current, “I literally, nearly fell off my chair (which I was already sitting on the edge of!). Tom Turner and Jessica Nielsen … had photographed and examined it, and taken a tissue sample. A huge amount of extremely clear photos was in my inbox, and there was just no doubt of the ID. They had also examined the clavus by hand to confirm the number of ossicles, which was just brilliant.” The Mola mola inhabits the Santa Barbara Channel, while the Mola tecta lives off the coast of Chile and South Africa as well as Australia. One other northern specimen had beached in the Netherlands in 1890, Nyegaard’s research found. UCSB’s parasitology lab took samples of the fish to learn more, but how a Mola tecta ended up on a Santa Barbara County beach will likely be the subject of speculation for years to come. — Jean Yamamura


living | Starshine

Kids’ Showcase

MY CLIMATE JUST CHANGED

A

n iceberg twice the size of Manhattan is moments away from breaking off of Antarctica and calving into the Atlantic Ocean. A large-footed mouse from Australia, the Bramble Cay melomys, was just identified as the first mammal to go extinct from human-driven climate change. And last month’s weather broke snow, rain, and heat records from coast to coast in the United States. So I feel I should apologize, as I may be to blame. You see, my internal climate is suddenly warming at an alarming rate. Like, a wildfire-through-drought-ravaged-chaparral rate. These hot flashes I’m having, I can’t say they’re a complete surprise. Scientists have been predicting them for years. Friends said they were inevitable. But I guess you can call me a hormone-change denier because, like the maniacal weather that’s beginning to wreak havoc on our lil blue planet, I just didn’t think that Aging Broad Syndrome would happen so soon, or that it would begin impacting my daily life quite this quickly. I was the girl who spent my life shivering. Shoving bloodless fingers deeper into jacket pockets and hopping from one leg to the other to revivify my circulation whenever the air plunged cruelly below 68 degrees. I stashed extra socks in my purse and stuffed hoodies and windbreakers into the nooks of my car for those emergency situations when I might have to endure an offshore breeze. Then a few weeks ago, from out of thin-but-highly-combustible air, my core reactor began to randomly ignite at inopportune moments. Dinner parties. Meetings with my boss. The midemail: starshine@roshell.com dle of exercise class, when I’m already flushed and dewy with exertion. Add “flushed and dewy with lack of estrogen” to that mix, and suddenly I’m drenched and feverish, like a wet sponge in a microwave, cooking from the inside out, eyes bulging with blazing confusion. The cause of hot flashes is “They literally have no idea at all,” and natural remedies include avoiding caffeine and alcohol, which I’m unlikely to do, and ingesting something called dong quai, which … you know what? I’ll skip the coffee and booze, thanks. So I face this menopausal metamorphosis the same way we all face global warming: against my will, with no choice and in need of stronger deodorant. I can’t help noticing quite a few parallels between climate change and, well, “the change.” As sea levels rise and coastal cities flood, I’m waking at night in pools of my own sweat. As drought shrivels our landscapes, I’m told that my own biology will begin to make my skin dry. As hurricanes tear through powerless communities, I await the squall of mood swings that may eventually hijack my mind and bedevil my family. And these similarities are just the tip of the iceberg … as it were. Perhaps it’s a stretch. I realize that one of these changes is happening on a microscale sparked by infinitesimal shifts in invisible hormones within the perspiring body of a lone middle-aged suburban chick, and the other will play out over the entire tortured Earth, devastating nations and oceans, altering human life as we know it and annihilating entire species. #MelomysWeHardlyKnewYou. But they are both fairly epic to me. I don’t care for change, particularly of the uninvited, irreversible, existential variety. The kind that stirs insomnia, irritability, and uncontrolled weeping — and both of these types do. There’s no denying it, though: A different, decalescent world is asserting itself all up in our business. And if we’ve learned anything from the Bramble Cay melomys, it’s that adaptation is life. I can adapt. I will adapt, and so will you. Scientists say mammals and birds are better suited than other animals for surviving global warming. So when the floods come, look for me on high ground. My metabolism will have slowed, so you may not recognize me. I’ll be the one with the dry skin and the wet shirt, fanning myself with my “You’re Not Losing Your Mind, You’re Losing Your Hormones” booklet. And snorting dong quai off a rock.

Sun, Mar 10 / 3 PM UCSB Campbell Hall Mountainfilm on Tour returns with a special all-ages program that families can enjoy together! With a mission to educate and inspire audiences about issues that matter, cultures worth exploring, environments worth preserving and conversations worth sustaining, Mountainfilm’s fun, engaging playlist features outstanding, entertaining short films sourced from the festival in Telluride.

by Starshine

ROSHELL

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ENTERPRISE FISH COMPANY

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Thursday, March 21 | 5:30- 7:00pm Light snacks will be provided.

Register for free at: 1-844-51-HEART or visit Cottagehealth.org/heartmtd 40

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CECILIA ROSELL / VISIT SANTA BARBARA

splurges

FOOD &DRINK

p.41

f there was any confusion about what to expect during a multicourse meal that costs as much as a plane flight across the country, the first proper dish flickers with gold flakes, as if to reassure that the cost is warranted. Beneath that is a mound of caviar, floating in a transparent gelée of lobster essence, strategically pockmarked with miniscule dollops of hazelnut cream and square nuggets of smoked eel that circle like the hands of a clock. Encasing it all is an iridescent bowl, its color somewhere between silver and platinum, with handcrafted floral flourishes framing those flickering flakes and black fish eggs. But over-the-top opulence is not the only technique on display at The Silver Bough, the eightseat, $550-per-person culinary experience now served in a hidB R E A K S E X P E C TAT I O N S I N den corner of the MULTICOURSE, METICULOUSLY Montecito Inn. The t h re e - p lu s - h ou r CRAFTED, $550 MEAL experience — which involves tastes of by Matt Kettmann nearly two dozen different creations and sips of about a dozen expertly curated beverages — is a culinary lesson of the highest order, featuring techniques both primal and prototypical that are dutifully explained, if you so desire. Yet it’s also like visiting a fine art gallery, in the eyewowing manner that each dish is presented, complete with custom-made utensils and flatware; like a night at the theater, with storytelling and performance interwoven; like enjoying the ballet, with carefully choreographed kitchen movements and simultaneous server deliveries; and like a hangout with old pals, as the banter is convivial and casual, and diners are encouraged to linger long over post-everything beers and digestifs. And, oh yeah, you eat and drink ’til your stomach and soul are more than content.

THE SILVER BOUGH

THE IDEA

T

his is the dream project, first envisioned a decade

ago, of 32-year-old Chef Phillip Frankland Lee, his pastry-pro wife, Margarita Kallas-Lee, and their all-

star team of assembled chefs, servers, and sommeliers, who hail both from the Lees’ Scratch|Restaurant empire as well as other hallowed kitchens across the country. “I much prefer that it took extra time,” said Lee, who wooed investors when he was just 22 years old with a PowerPoint presentation on The Silver Bough idea, “so I could learn to cook better.” So Lee, who built his career in the San Fernando Valley and competed in the Top Chef television series, knew what he wanted when signing a lease for the Montecito Inn’s various restaurant spaces in November 2016. “From when we originally took the space, we were all about this concept,” said Lee of The Silver Bough, which started serving on January 31. The overall project has not been without stumbles: Lee’s first idea, Frankland’s Crab & Co., opened in April 2018 but only lasted about four months. The bar that followed, Chaplin’s Martini Bar, was also just shuttered after less than six months. (Sushi|Bar is slated to open in the space this spring, with an emphasis on Santa Barbara Channel seafood.) But The Monarch, a full-service restaurant that consumes the most square footage, started with a bang last August, and the crowds haven’t stopped coming, despite some staff turnover. The Silver Bough — whose eight seats pull up to a Brazilian quartzite countertop with the entire kitchen behind in full view — is carved out of a small corner of The Monarch and was the true centerpiece of the entire Montecito Inn project for Lee, even though it’s just 32 meals a week at max capacity. The limited turnover, in part, explains the $550 price, but it mostly comes down to staff-to-customer ratio, which is essentially one-to-one for a full house, and the quality of the food. “It allows us to get the best ingredients in the world and run the logistical challenges that come with running an eight-seat restaurant four days a week with only one seating a night,” said Lee. He’s dialing deep into regional purveyors of produce and protein — “We’re staying in Santa Barbara as much as we can,” he explained — but he is also locally resourceful when having to go beyond, such as sourcing Castelvetrano-olive-finished Wagyu beef from Japan through a Santa Barbara–based importer. “We’re trying to find these local connections even in the worldly ingredients,” said Lee.

Along the way, Lee educates about each taste and technique in layman’s terms, freely sharing his kitchen wisdom, popping the occasional joke, and doing it all with an infectious, childlike sense of wonder and glee. “With this much pomp and circumstance,” he explained, “we still want it to be fun.”

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The World’s Best Restaurant ? o it c te n o M in — I he Silver Bough menu is broken into three acts:

Ocean, Land, and Sweets. Throughout the savory courses, Lee intentionally breaks the rule laid down by French culinary pioneer Auguste Escoffier of never serving the same primary ingredient twice in a multicourse meal. Rather, Lee presents a full set of proteins at the start of each act: baskets full of urchin, lobster, king crab, and golden eye snapper (flown in from Tokyo); heaps of venison, pigeon, duck liver, and that olive-fattened ribeye, alongside red-hot charcoal balancing a simple grill. Then he directs the team in presenting almost all of them in almost every dish, yet each individual incarnation is unidentifiable from the previous — pigeon-bone tea and egg in a venison soup dish, then the same bird’s barbecued breast with pistachio crust in the next, for instance, or lobster tartare set in a green tea/urchin sauce with tomato aspic and carnations, followed by a potato puff filled with lobster innards and topped with bright-orange urchin. “You’ve had lobster and sea urchin for five courses now,” he explained after the Ocean act, “but hopefully not in a repetitive way that makes it seem like you’ve had five courses of lobster and sea urchin.” The Land act culminates in the delicately olive-oily Wagyu, first as a rib-eye cap sashimi with soy chicharron, pink pepper skins, and porcini aioli, then as a familiar chunk of steak, with mashed potatoes and ample amounts of shaved truffles. “From the first Scratch Kitchen, we’ve always made it a tradition to end the savories with steak and potatoes,” explained Lee. The Sweets act is the domain of Margarita Kallas-Lee,

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MARCH 7, 2019

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JOE SCHMELZER

Reception & Presentation David V. Feliciano, MD Clinical Professor of Surgery University of Maryland SOM

Attending Surgeon Shock Trauma Center, Department of Surgery

Please Join Us Thursday, March 21, 2019 5:30 pm to 7:00 pm Reception Presentation

TEAM LEE: The Silver Bough Chef Phillip Frankland Lee (center) prepares one of nearly two dozen dishes with the help of Danielle Van Steen (left) and sommelier Benjamin Schrader (right).

5:30 pm 6:00 pm

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Corner of Cabrillo Blvd. & Garden St.

Registration opens at 8:00am Group warm-up at 8:30am Walk & Roll at 9:00am

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MARCH 7, 2019

an actress/model by first career (she was in that Michelob Ultra Super Bowl commercial with robots) who years ago surprised Lee with her pastry prowess. Her creations are revelatory from the use of savory ingredients, like duck-liver mousse with white chocolate, and it’s hard to find verbal descriptions to do them justice. Even your eyes struggle to digest the alchemical desserts, although your taste buds have no trouble relishing in the haute hedonism, an edible encounter somewhere between Willy Wonka and Gustav Klimt. And if that’s not convincing, the final dessert, a chamomile custard with truffles and candied bee pollen, also flickers with 24-karat gold leaves. For me — and I mentioned this to the Lees over complimentary beers and digestifs after the meal, which you are encouraged to enjoy as long as you’d like—the only missing piece was a prominent salad course, something fresh and crunchy and zesty, perhaps between the Ocean and Land courses. Aside from enlivening the palate amid all the savories, it would provide a stage to brightly showcase our farmers as the stars, rather than just as the supporting ensemble.

THE EFFECT

beach

C H A S E PA L M Z A PA R K P L A

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Everything You Wanted to Know about Trauma in the United States

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S

o is this the best restaurant in the world, as my clickbait headline

asks? It’s a silly, unanswerable question, entrenched in insurmountable subjectivity, life experience, and personal preference. In recent years, I’ve been lucky enough to eat at some of the world’s top tasting menu restaurants: Pujol in Mexico City, Manresa in Los Gatos, Alter in Miami, and Six Test Kitchen in Arroyo Grande, to name a few. From my admittedly unique experience at The Silver Bough—just two journalists total on their second night of service ever, neither of us having to pay—I can confidently say that what the Lees are doing in Montecito is safely on the same playing field, if not often surpassing the masters. Is it worth $550? Again, another quandary that depends on your income and your interests. But considering that thousands of people spend the same every day for good seats at sporting events, high-profile concerts, and Broadway shows, all of which take about the same amount of time, I’d say the cost is far from outlandish—not only is the entertainment intense, but they feed you too. Indeed, for foodies who dig tweezer food in its most extreme expression, it’s a good investment. Memories are priceless, and it will be a long time before you forget these dishes. Perhaps the real question, with a verifiable answer that we will all discover one day, is, Will The Silver Bough succeed? The Lees are aware that there are not enough wealthy people in the Santa Barbara area to rely on, but they believe that the well-to-do tourists at the Miramar, Biltmore, San Ysidro Ranch, and so forth will help keep things afloat, as will the food tourists who travel from Los Angeles and the Bay Area in search of the next shiny thing. And if they keep the experience as exquisite as it was when I visited, I’m sure the word-of-mouth will lure eaters from all over to see for themselves if the world’s best restaurant calls Montecito home. Montecito Inn, 1295 Coast Village Rd.; silverboughmontecito.com


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be viewed as an equal in the eyes of my superior. March 8, nearly two dozen women winemak- I had a deep desire to prove myself to anyone and ers and 10 female chefs are gathering this Friday everyone. I still pull from this experience to keep in Solvang for the third straight year to toast myself motivated and hungry. Santa Barbara County’s strong tradition of female vintners. “Santa Barbara County boasts a much Tired or proud of being labeled a woman winemaker? higher percentage of women winemakers than I have a strong love and admiration for my felmost places in the world, with nearly double the low ladies of industry. I feel honored even being average,” explained Buttonwood winemaker Karen placed in the same sentence as them. I only tire Steinwachs, who cofounded the dinner. And the being grouped when “Women in Wine” is ranks appear to be growing steadily, portrayed as a gimmick for companies to with younger faces popping sell wine — less about the talent of the indiup all the time. vidual and more about their gender. To Here are two of this next me, talent should be genderless. generation, Kat Gaffney of Spear Vineyards and McKenna How was living with two other winemakGiardine of Andrew Murray/ ers? We are friends who shared many E11even Vineyards. They were great bottles, meals, and laughs under actually roommates for two the same roof. Kat and Wynne are both N N A TTM BY MATT KE incredibly talented winemakers with years, along with their friend, Wynne Solomon, who is now the remarkable palates. They are and will be the “ones winemaker for Peake Ranch. See the extended ver- to watch.” I hope their good juju rubbed off on me. sion of these interviews at independent.com/ww19.

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cal work, requiring endurance, muscle, and grit. I think women can be treated with bias in this aspect, treated as not physically capable to perform at the level of a man. My first harvest in New Zealand was the first exposure to this bias toward women. The winery split us up into teams: cellar, ferments, lab, and presses. The majority of cellar and press work was allocated to men, while women were sent to the lab. It was a palpable separation. Luckily, one of my coworkers took me under his wing and showed me the ropes. Soon I was dragging four-inch must lines, carrying full buckets up four flights of stairs, and pushing pumps around the winery like a maniac. I pushed myself hard to

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it was important for me to create deeper bonds and connections within the wine community. So I established Women in Wine Central Coast to cultivate networking, support, and growth for women in Santa Barbara County. This group is not just established winemakers, but for all levels of experience (interns, students, etc.). We set up an annual “Intern Meetup” when harvest season rolls around, so newbies to our area can meet other interns and establish some good connections.

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KAT GAFFNEY Spear Vineyards and Winery Advantages as a woman? The advantage to being a woman in the business is that as women, and relative minorities in this industry, we’ve cultivated our own networks and support systems. I know many

CONT’D ON P. 46

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Imagine uncovering your story

Adam Shoebridge @ Helena Avenue Bakery

EXPERIENCE PACIFICA at our Information Day

Experience a day in the life of a Pacifica Graduate Institute student. This one-day introduction showcases the distinctive educational features of our masters and doctoral programs in depth psychology, counseling, mythology, and the humanities. At our March 22nd Introduction Day, you will: Experience Pacifica’s unique interdisciplinary degree programs led by our renowned faculty. Hear from alumni about their experiences & career outcomes. Listen to a talk by Pacifica alum Dr. Siri Sat Nam. Tour both of our beautiful campuses including the Joseph Campbell Archives and the Research Library. A special complimentary yoga session will be hosted by Dr. Siri Sat Nam during the event. Learn how to navigate the admissions and financial aid processes to make graduate school a reality. Enjoy complimentary continental breakfast and lunch. We will be giving away a $200 bookstore gift certificate.

March 22, 2019 | 9:30 am — 4:00 pm 801 Ladera Lane, Santa Barbara, CA

Chef Adam Shoebridge became infatuated with cooking, recalling how naturally it came to him. Ever since he can remember, the North Carolina native has always held a job, sometimes multiple, at a restaurant. Today, he works at Helena Avenue Bakery in the Funk Zone, where he’s shedding light on the Southern cuisine of his youth.

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On the Road: Shoebridge’s kitchen experiences span geographi-

FOOD & DRINK

Friday, March 22, 2019

Growing Up: Upon taking culinary classes as an early teenager,

cally—from Hong Kong to Australia—and culturally, cooking everything from Jamaican to Lebanese. In his early years, he jumped from restaurant to restaurant, though he had a formative time working at Avondale in Colorado, where he commiserated with well-known chefs from Chicago, New York, and Washington, D.C. Southern Star: After a few more jobs, Shoebridge found himself

employed in “the hardest job he has ever had,” working for legendary Southern, low-country cuisine expert Sean Brock at Husk Nashville. Shoebridge spent long days doing his own prep work, a philosophy aimed at teaching chefs to learn all the steps and processes that go into making a dish. He then moved to Australia, cooking at a wine bar where he never created the same dish twice, and then Hong Kong. Current Mission: Shoebridge followed his girlfriend to her home-

town of Santa Barbara in 2017. Here, the chef wants to “shed a new light on Southern cuisine” and show people that Southern cooking is more than just “fried chicken and mayonnaise sandwiches.” Case in point is his Suite C Dinner series, in which the menu promises a Southern-inspired dinner where “high society meets blue collar.” Tasting Suite C: The starters for the first Suite C Dinner last

month impressed: There was caviar with potato chips (a great textural vehicle for the eggs), barbecued oysters with country ham and XO sauce (whose charred flavor contrasted the light and bright ocean flavor), and black truffle with cornbread and popcorn cream, which came through in a salty, velvety aftertaste that was reminiscent of movie-theater popcorn. They were followed by shrimp and grits, short rib with scallion and embered mushrooms, and a cherry pie. Then came the March 1 Nashville hot chicken night and a Fat Tuesday dinner on March 5. Upcoming Suite Cs: You can find Shoebridge making a variety

of sandwiches and salads every day, 7 a.m.-3 p.m., at Helena Avenue Bakery (31 Anacapa St., Ste. C; helenaavenuebakery .com). But dive deeper into his cuisine by attending one of the next Suite C dinners: Memphis Ribs on March 12 ($17), more Nashville Hot Chicken ($17) on April 5, and another Memphis Ribs on April 12. Make reservations via nightout.com or call 880-3383. —Bailey Emanuels

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COURTESY

corner chef’s


COURTESY

CARUSO COMETH: Developer Rick Caruso was on hand last Thursday to open the Rosewood Miramar, whose flagship restaurant (its deck seen here) is called Caruso’s and helmed by Chef Massimo Falsini.

Rosewood Miramar Opens in Montecito N ineteen years was a long time to be closed

Located at MacKenzie Market

TWO NEW MESA BURGERS? Last week, I reported

that Kahuna Grill at Camino Real Marketplace in Goleta has closed and is being replaced by a second location for Mesa Burger, whose flagship is at 315 Meigs Road on the Mesa. A rumor circulating around town is that another new Mesa Burger may open at 1250 Coast Village Road, the former home of Trattoria Mollie, which moved to State Street. NAME CHANGES: Reader Primetime let me know that

Crush Tasting Room and Kitchen, which opened last September at 432 East Haley Street, has a new name: Uncorked Wine Tasting and Kitchen. They have a new website too: uncorkedwinesb.com. Reader Cris let me know that the Spyglass Bistro and Bar on the fourth floor of the Hilton Garden Inn at 6878 Hollister Avenue in Goleta is now officially The Rooftop Bistro and Bar, and that the sign on the building was updated with the new name.

FOOD & DRINK

for renovation, but it was worth the wait. The Miramar Hotel in Montecito—which closed in 2000, changed ownership a few times, and survived a gauntlet of design reviews and public hearings — has opened as the Rosewood Miramar Beach. Owned and developed by Los Angeles–based real estate developer Rick Caruso, the man behind many acclaimed shopping, dining, and lifestyle destinations, Rosewood Miramar Beach was eagerly awaited by the community. “Rosewood Miramar Beach is the culmination of years of hard work and dedicated service to the Montecito community,” said Caruso. “What makes Miramar Beach so special, beyond the incomparable setting, is its history as a beloved icon of hospitality—it’s simply embedded in the land. We’re honored to now usher in a new era of hospitality and welcome locals and travelers back to this cherished retreat.” Rosewood Miramar Beach features seven distinctive restaurants and bars. Helmed by Executive Chef Massimo Falsini — who joins the property with experience leading a Michelinstarred restaurant — the resort’s culinary program is characterized by locally and sustainably sourced produce. The new food and drink destinations include: • Caruso’s, the oceanfront restaurant, features al fresco seating over the sand with views only the South Coast can offer. Chef Massimo introduces a taste of Southern Italy to coastal Montecito through signature dishes. Caruso’s hopes to become a dining destination that locals and visitors will seek to experience time and time again. • Malibu Farm at Miramar, a farm-to-table concept by Helene Henderson, offers all-day dining in a “refined yet laid-back” setting. The restaurant serves simply prepared plates crafted from fresh and locally sourced ingredients. • Miramar Beach Bar, the Miramar’s oceanfront oasis with a sailing vessel theme, invites guests to enjoy an array of craft cocktails and snacks.

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OBBI’S BISTRO REPLACING PALAZZIO: Readers Steve H.

and Annie let me know that a sign for Obbi’s Bistro, brought to you by “The Latteria,” has been posted at 1026 State Street, the former home of Palazzio, which closed in 2015. Steve H. points out that latteria means “dairy” in Spanish. SANTABARBARA.COM OVERHAUL AND ANNIVERSARY: As

you might have noticed, the Restaurant Guy blog updates have been sparse and sporadic in 2019. That’s because I’m working on a complete overhaul of SantaBarbara.com in time for the 25th anniversary this summer. I’m scrapping the whole site, except for the blog, which will remain similar. To say it is long overdue is an understatement. In the summer of 1994, I first posted scattered info about businesses and tourist spots around town with a few photos. The photos were scanned from negatives until 1995, when I bought a Kodak DC-40 digital camera for $700 that could hold a then-whopping 30 pictures. That year I also bought SantaBarbara.com to try to boost traffic, which more than solved the problem.

John Dickson’s reporting can be found every day online at SantaBarbara.com. Send tips to info@SantaBarbara.com.

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The County of Santa Barbara received federal funding to establish a Thomas Fire and 1/9 Debris Flow Disaster Relief Grant program for creative professionals and arts and culture nonprofits economically impacted by the disasters.

Applications are accepted through March 15 at sbac.ca.gov

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women in production here who have my back if I need help, and it’s easier for me to ask for help from that network than from a male colleague.

be included in such an esteemed group — the energy among women in wine production is inspiring and infectious. After every encounter, I leave feeling refreshed and reenergized. The Kat Gaffney fact that sometimes my name comes up in the same sentence as theirs is mind-boggling. I would like the reaction from consumers to change from one of surprise — to me, it isn’t surprising that women are winemakers or GMs or owners! Does the world know about our concentration of women winemakers? In my experience, that fact

is somewhat shocking to people. Santa Barbara

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MARCH 7, 2019

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dinner with pairings that follows). It will be held at K’Syrah Catering & Events, 478 4th Place, Solvang. See womenwinemakersdinner2019.eventbrite.com.

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AMERICAN LITTLE KITCHEN, 17 W. Ortega St. (805) 770-2299. “Great little neighborhood café!” Healthy, comfortable, and affordable. Lunch-Dinner-Late Night. Organic chicken and hormone/antibiotic-free burgers, local produce. Try the Chicken Tikka Masala, vegetarian options. Great local wine list and craft beers. www.littlekitchensb.com

FRENCH PETIT VALENTIEN, 1114 State St. #14, 805-9660222. Open M-F 11:30-3pm (lunch). M-Sat 5pm-Close (dinner). Sun $25.50 four course prix fixe dinner. In La Arcada Plaza, Chef Robert Dixon presents classic French comfort food at affordable cost in this cozy gem of a restaurant. Petit Valentien offers a wide array of meat and seafood entrees along with extensive small plates and a wine list specializing in amazing quality at arguably the best price in town. A warm romantic atmosphere makes the perfect date spot. Comfortable locale for dinner parties, or even just a relaxing glass of wine. Reservations are recommended.

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of living with someone who works in the same industry as you is that there’s already an understanding of what exactly your day-to-day looks like. Being a winemaker means different things in different wineries, though. Our job descriptions have less in common than you might think! Having a sympathetic ear at home to talk shop, vent, or celebrate milestones is always a plus! They’re talented winemakers and incredible people — if you haven’t met them or tasted their wines, you’re missing out.

INDIAN FLAVOR OF INDIA 3026 State 682-6561 $$ www. flavorofindiasb.com Finest, most authentic Indian cuisine is affordable too! All You Can Eat Lunch Buffet $10.95 M-S dinner combos $9.95+ Specials: Tandoori- Mixed or Fish, Chicken Tikka Masala, Shrimp Bhuna. Also: meat, curries & vegetarian.Wine & Beer. Take out. VOTED BEST for 20 YEARS! IRISH DARGAN’S IRISH Pub & Restaurant, 18 E. Ortega St. (next to lot 10) SB, 568-0702. $$. Open 7 days 11:30a-Close (Food ‘til 10p, 11p on Sat/Sun). AE MC V Disc. Authentic Irish food & atmosphere in downtown SB. Specialties from Ireland include Seafood & Meat dishes. Informal, relaxed pub-style atmosphere. Live music Thursday nights. Children welcome. Avail. for private parties. Pool & Darts. MEDITERRANEAN FOXTAIL KITCHEN 14 E. Cota St. Lebaness cuisine, American burger, 24 craf beer, great cocktails, whiskey bar, vegan options, open late night, hookah lounge. Kitchen closes at midnight on the weekend, try our best falafel in town. www.foxtailsb.com NORTHERN EUROPEAN ANDERSEN’S DANISH Restaurant & Bakery. 1106 State St., 805-962-5085. Open Daily 8am-9pm. Family owned for over 42 years. Northern European Cuisine with California Infusion. Fresh scratch made pastries & menus everyday. Authentic Breakfasts, Lunches & Dinners. Happy Hour menu with exquisite wines & beers, 3-7pm everyday. High Tea served everyday starting at 2pm. Huge Viking Mimosas & Champagne Cocktails. Private Event spaces.

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flies under the radar in comparison to a lot of the larger regions, so it doesn’t surprise me that this fact is relatively unknown. How was living with two other winemakers? The advantage

Tired or proud of being labeled a woman winemaker? I’m honored to

DINING OUT

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The program’s ultimate orientation points beyond the stage to address the role of performance and conscious presence in real life.

COURTESY

BRAD ELLIOTT

n Ben Jonson’s eulogy for William Shakespeare, which appeared in the preface to the First Folio — 36 of the Bard’s comedies, histories, and tragedies — he wrote, “He was not of an age, but for all time!” As dozens of Santa Barbara teachers and hundreds of their students learned during the week of February 25-March 1, this observation of Jonson’s was much more than well-deserved praise; it was prophecy. Thanks to a team of artist-practitioners from Shakespeare’s Globe Theatre in London, and to their sponsors, the Léni Fund and Sara Miller McCune, the Bard’s time in our Shakespeare-loving city is now BARD DAYS: Within minutes, Globe artist Tas Emiabata (pictured second from right) had students smiling and and, through the influence of laughing through a fast-paced warm-up exercise designed to activate them physically in preparation for the learning generations to come, potentially activities to come. forever. These visits, which are in their third year, represent a significant boost tive authenticity to the occasion that was very moment and more aware of the force and to the culture of Santa Barbara’s secondary much in line with the Globe’s direct, open- significance of the playwright’s language. schools, not only for teachers of drama and air approach. Within minutes of his arrival, While theater directors and students English literature, but for any instructor who Emiabata had the 20 AP English students of acting might find some of the exercises desires to implement teaching strategies that smiling and laughing through a fast-paced familiar, the program’s ultimate orientation activate student engagement with the tech- warm-up exercise designed to activate them points beyond the stage to address the role niques of rhetoric. Although I reported on physically in preparation for the learning of performance and conscious presence in last year’s visit for the Independent, this time activities to come. By the end of the hour, real life. In a sequence called “Duels and around I was fortunate enough to observe a which seemed to fly by, the group had learned Dialogue,” we alternated between activiclass conducted by Globe artist Tas Emia- multiple techniques not only for improving ties such as the finger-fencing mentioned bata and then to participate, alongside 20 their performances in an upcoming produc- above and rounds of reflection and feedback enthusiastic educators from the Santa Bar- tion of Twelfth Night, but more importantly designed to put our experiences in a larger bara Unified School District (SBUSD), in for deepening their understanding of Shake- context. For example, Emiabata asked us a three-hour workshop for teachers. As a speare’s language and its meanings. Most of to consider our tactics, to think about how result, I got a close look at how these artists all, the entire activity was clearly a lot of fun. those strategies reflected our understanding Later that same day, I joined a group of of the characters and their situation, and to communicate the Globe’s sophisticated and teachers at the SBUSD imagine what these actions meant for our headquarters on Santa relationships. Barbara Street for three These discussions eventually led all the hours of training in a way from a series of short play fights and session that was also exchanges of lines to ideas about ultimate led by Emiabata. As a moral values. Gradually, through what began veteran teacher with as a distracting frenzy of activity, the sensadecades of experience, tions of our bodies aligned with those of our I’ve participated in tongues, ears, and brains until the short scene untold hours of pro- we were practicing between Ophelia and strikingly effective strategies for teaching fessional development, and I can say with- Hamlet coalesced into a flowing current of students about the powers of persuasion out qualification that I have never seen a meaning coursing through the room. through reading and performing Shake- more positive reaction to a presentation. Coming from an AP English setting, I speare’s plays. The material (drawn mostly from Hamlet), found it easy to imagine how all the new stratWhen Emiabata arrived at Laguna Blanca was made fresh and challenging through an egies I learned could become integral aspects School early on Monday, February 25, he had ingenious sequence of exercises that had us of my curriculum. However, it was not until already done one workshop at San Marcos by turns on our feet and fencing with our the end of the evening, when we went around High School with the students of 9th-grade fingers, carving out dynamic single-word the room sharing what we would take away English teacher Nicole Powers. Thanks to a exchanges from lines of iambic pentameter, from the session, that I realized the true scope break in the rainy weather, he could use the and challenging ourselves and one another of the program’s impact. —Charles Donelan school’s outdoor amphitheater, lending a fes- to become at once more present in the

CONFIGURATION

Last year’s shattering natural disasters had a profound effect on the work being created by Santa Barbara artists. Programs such as Configuration, Santa Barbara Dance Arts’ annual showcase of new work, reflected the moody angst of a community struggling to overcome tragedy. This week, Configuration is back at Center Stage Theater with a fresh lineup of work in a variety of styles that suggests a brighter, more colorful outlook. “Last year was an emotional time,” said Santa Barbara Dance Arts owner and Configuration director Alana Tillim. “This year it feels like we’re lifting up.” This week’s performance features the up-andcoming generation of dance students, ranging in ages from 10 to 17 years old. These dancers are dedicated to their craft, often putting 10-15 hours a week or more into refining and developing their work. The numbers chosen for this year’s program indicate sophistication beyond the dancers’ young ages; pieces such as “Rainbow” offer a succinct emotional arc that dancer Frankie Harman describes as “getting to a place where you can really be yourself. The entire piece is the process of getting there and finally reaching that place.” The program continues in this theme, expressing the voices of these young dancers through the language of movement. Along with student-devised work, Configuration features choreography by area dance artists Brittany Sandoval, Chloe Roberts, Lauren Serrano, and Alana Tillim, and L.A. choreographers Phil Wright and Richard Elszy. The SBDA artists have also created a short film focusing on female empowerment, a concept that the dancers are embodying within their arts education and perpetuating into the community with the presentation of their work. Configuration is presented in collaboration with the Arts Mentorship Program, an organization that offers financial assistance and mentorship to community members seeking an education in the arts. This showcase runs March 9-10 and March 15-16 at Center Stage Theater (751 Paseo Nuevo). Call 963-0408 or see centerstagetheater.org. — Maggie Yates

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COLORFUL HEIGHTS: Artist Tamika Rivera (left) and S.B. Centre for Aerial Dance’s Ninette Paloma sit in a pile of yarn below an aerial silk, both main ingredients in Haven.

A HAVEN FOR AERIALISTS

C

ertain conventions in art, such as the share a remarkable gift for systematic thinkdistinctions between the studio and ing about the role of art in an era of rapid the stage, or the performers and the social change, and Haven manifests several audience, are so thoroughly internal- of their best and strongest innovations. The ized that they seem almost invisible—until bonds between performers and their teachers someone comes along and tosses them out. and between performers and one another in When Haven: Weaving Spaces of Refuge and the field of aerial dance are not what one finds Significance touches down on Thursday, in more established traditions of dance study. March 7, at SBCAST, that’s exactly what’s As Paloma told me, “Aerial dance is a matrigoing to happen. Deeply entrenched patterns archy—believe me, I know most of the teachof behavior and accompanying structures ers not just in this country, but all over the of feeling in dance performance will sim- world, and they are pretty much all women.” mer, oscillate, blur, and Likewise, weaving skills possibly even explode as and fiber art has long been ARTIST Ninette Paloma’s squad associated with the alterof dancers from the Santa native structures of power and lineages of genealBarbara Centre for Aerial ogy maintained among occupy a space created by Tamika Rivera especially women. Combining these for them by covering their two forms—fibers woven beloved aerial apparatus in and around objects in in colorful wraps of fabthe world, and dancing ric and yarn. Paloma and bodies woven through by Charles Donelan Rivera have been quietly fabrics and cords in the air nurturing this organized — doubles down on the subversion over several years and across mul- subtly subversive strategies that have allowed tiple continents. Now their innovative project women and other marginalized groups to is ready to be born. assert their claims on life in surprising ways From one angle, the idea behind Haven for centuries. is a simple one. Rivera wraps things in The artists frame the project as an explicit brightly colored yarns and fabrics; Paloma’s response to what they have termed a “conever-evolving community of aerial dancers veyor belt of jolting news regarding the politiperforms on a variety of platforms, from cal and humanitarian state of global affairs,” trapezes and suspended hoops to silks and but the Haven is no “safe space” for sheltering corde lisse. For Haven, Rivera will wrap the fragile snowflakes. It is rather an intense aerial apparatus, both the moving parts and expression of the radical desire to bring the structures that support them, to create an something new into the world on a spiritual aerial sanctuary. Inside this sacralized space, level and to grant that sense of freedom to the performers will interact with the fiber performers who have achieved a state of surfaces coating their familiar tools while consciousness that has rendered them ready cocooned in a giant fabric hive. Spectators at to accept and cherish it. The verb that these the event may observe their flights, but only women use to describe what they intend with performers will be allowed inside the Haven. Haven is “to activate,” meaning the impact of Talking with the two artists at the S.B. the choreography and of the structure within Centre for Aerial Dance studio last week, which it will take place. The physical sensait quickly became clear that this seemingly tions the performers experience in contact simple act of wrapping the equipment was with the wrapped equipment and in their only the beginning of a wide-ranging and existential duets with gravity send powerprofound re-imagination of the conventions ful impulses through them and out into the of staged performance. Rivera and Paloma world.

TAMIKA RIVERA COLLABORATES WITH AERIAL DANCERS AT SBCAST

4•1•1

Haven takes place Thursday, March 7, 6-8 p.m. at SBCAST, 513 Garden Street. The event is free and open to the public.

the

Jungle Book produced by Rodney Gustafson l original score by Milan Svoboda

Mar 24

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Rodney Gustafson & William Soleau, Artistic Directors Season Sponsors: Tim Mikel, Margo Cohen-Feinberg and Robert Feinberg Performance Sponsor: Sara Miller McCune Additional Funding: Barbara Burger, Paul E. Munch, and Lillian Lovelace

PHOTO BY ROSE EICHENBAUM

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nly a writer such as Susan Orlean something I’ve noticed in libraries all over the could take a historical event like the country, in Canada, and in other countries. devastating 1986 Los Angeles Cen- Libraries everywhere seem to have the same tral Library fire and from it create quality of busyness, a purposeful, bustling, a fascinating, multilayered, meticulously purring sound. researched, personal story that seamlessly weaves Your relationship with librarLos Angeles history, a ies and your mother figure politically charged arson prominently in The Library investigation, and a cast Book. I hadn’t really of unique characters. The thought about it, but as Library Book, Orlean’s I worked on the book, I latest, was just selected was flooded with memoby Brian Tanguay as a finalist for the Los ries of visiting the library Angeles Times Book Prize. with my mother. At the The acclaimed author of numerous books, risk of sounding touchy-feely, these trips including The Orchid Thief and Rin Tin Tin, were almost sacred to us. They felt different from going anywhere else, and they Orlean spoke recently with the Santa BarBar bara Independent ahead of her always had this quality of being appearance on UCSB Arts & a combination of adventure and Lectures, Speaking with Pico sacrament. I hadn’t thought of this series, on Thursday, March 14. in a long time. What follows is an edited ver-sion of the conversation. Libraries stand as one of the last true public spaces, open to all, free of The cover and interior design of The charge, and yet they are uniquely Library Book is unusual. Were you vulnerable. Libraries are often targeted by vandals because involved in that process? I was involved far more than I usually they preserve the memories of am because I had a very strong cultures and societies. While sense in my head of what this book libraries are, or seek to be, permanent repositories of should look like. I pictured it withwith out a dust jacket. I wanted it to look knowledge, their openness classic, but not old-fashioned. I makes them vulnerable. This wanted it to have a look of timecontradictory quality is quite lessness. interesting.

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4•1•1

THE LARAMIE PROJECT BY MOISÉS KAUFMAN AND THE MEMBERS OF TECTONIC THEATER PROJECT DIRECTED BY ERIC JORGENSEN

MAR 1 & 6-8 / 8 PM MAR 2 & 9 / 2 PM Hatlen Theater

In all the research you did about the Central Library fire, was there some fact or individual that intrigued you more than another? I became smitten with Charles Lummis. I hadn’t heard of him before I began working on the book. He’s not an unknown figure in Southern California history, but he was unknown to me. I felt like I couldn’t get enough of him. He was a romantic, dramatic, and eccentric character. I found myself sort of in love with him.

Best-selling author Susan Orlean will appear on UCSB Arts & Lectures’ Speaking with Pico series on Thursday, March 14, 7:30 p.m., at UCSB’s Campbell Hall. Call 893-3535 or see artsandlectures.ucsb.edu.

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Mar 12 • 5:00 - 6:00pm

prehensive series provides thly educational opportunities to re about memory. Who we are and what we do

Presenter:

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Understanding and Dementia ThisAlzheimer’s presentation will provide attendees Presenter: Suzette Cobb with an overview of the programs and pm Description: A workshop for anyone who would like to knowservices more about Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias.

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Know the 10 Signs Presenter: Suzette Cobb Description: If you or someone you know is experiencing memory loss or behavioral changes, it’s time to learn the facts. Early detection of pm Alzheimer’s disease gives you a chance to begin drug therapy, enroll in clinical studies and plan325 for the future. This interactive workshop W. Islay St. features video clips of people with Alzheimer’s disease.

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Healthy Habits for a Healthy You Presenter: Suzette Cobb Description: A one hour workshop for individuals of any age who are looking for information on ways to age as well as possible. At any age, pm there are lifestyle habits we can adopt to help maintain or even potentially improve our health. These habits may also help to keep our brains healthy as we age and possibly delay the onset of cognitive decline. To RSVP or for more information please call

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HARVEY

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or its winter production, the SBCC theater department is staging the beloved, time-honored play Harvey. Written by Mary Chase, the lively comedy premiered on Broadway in 1944 and garnered Chase the Pulitzer Prize for Drama in 1945. These days, the story is most likely best known thanks to the 1950 film starring Jimmy Stewart. The plot centers on Elwood P. Dowd, a mild sot who believes his best friend is a six-foot-plus rabbit named Harvey. He spends his time playing cards and drinking in Raymond Wellenthin the local bars, always with his best friend Harvey, who Elwood insists Ruth Kelly). Coe gives a strong performance as the noon introducing to everyone he meets. Though affable, nonsense sanitarium orderly, while Wallenthin does Elwood’s behavior causes his social-climbing sister a fine job as the unperturbed, good-natured Elwood. Veta much consternation, as she worries that his pecu- Jackson brings smile-inducing folly to his role, while liar behavior will hinder her Smith is convincing as the arrogant Sanderson. upwardly mobile aspirations. SBCC has outdone itself with spectacular sets and Presented by The Theatre When Elwood (along with costumes. The book-lined library of the Dowd home is Group at SBCC. At Garvin Theatre, Thu., Feb. 28. Harvey) shows up during a the essence of a cozy manor room, while the sanitarium Shows through Mar. 16. party Veta has thrown for transports the audience to the late 1940s, with its crisp the town’s society ladies, it’s white walls, glass bricks, and white metal furniture. the last straw — she decides to commit Elwood to a Resident costume designer Pamela Shaw’s choice of erasanitarium. A comedy of errors ensues as taboo topics appropriate outfits adds to the post-WWII feel. Chase’s play is rife with quick-witted dialogue that such as mental health and alcohol abuse are explored in takes nuanced comedic timing. I saw the SBCC produca buoyant fashion. R. Michael Gross directs SBCC’s offering, which tion during previews, and the cast was still in the process stars Raymond Wallenthin as Elwood and Nita June of smoothing out the give-and-take between characters. Davanzo as Veta. The cast also includes Matt Smith (Dr. As a result, some of the humorous lines fell flat. Even so, Lyman Sanderson), Sean Jackson (Dr. William Chum- the production garnered many laughs from the attentive ley), Don Margolin (Judge Omar Gaffney), George audience who clearly enjoyed an entertaining evening Coe (Duane Wilson), and Madison Widener (Nurse of theater. — Michelle Drown

THE LARAMIE PROJECT

T

wo decades ago, the vicious murder of college student Matthew Shepard in Laramie, Wyoming, forced a festering boil of homophobia to the surface of the American consciousness. Shepard’s brutal slaying and the ensuing criminal trial was documented in a variety of media, including The Laramie Project, a theater piece that gives cultural context to the murder. Created by the Tectonic Theater Project, a New York–based theater company, The Laramie Project uses interviews with Laramie locals to Presented by UCSB explore how the Department of Theater community strugand Dance. At Hatlen gles to accept the fact that their Theater, Sat., Mar. 2. town, where “things like this don’t happen,” is a place where two men beat Shepard until he was mortally injured, tied him to a fence post, stole his shoes, and left him to die. UCSB’s production of The Laramie Project, directed by Eric Jorgensen, is quietly complex. Bold colors and a clean set support focus on the performers, and, while everyone in the cast plays multiple characters, smooth character choreography eases the audience through transitions without awkwardness. It’s put together well, and the story is beautifully told. The talented cast exudes an authenticity & ENTERTAINMENT with the material that highlights the continuing impor-

REVIEWS 

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Ongoing Workshops for Pacifica Senior Living

Workshops for Pacifica Senior Living

THEATER

COURTESY

Concerned memory? cerned aboutabout your your memory?

tance of fighting for inclusion and empathy across social divides. UCSB’s production is poignant and deferential, but at almost three hours long, there are some dawdling moments. The first act is slowed by Tectonic’s overinsertion of themselves in the narrative as “characters.” The relationship between the two communities is crucial to the success of the project, but the story is about the people of Laramie, not about New Yorkers in Laramie. The pacing and intensity pick up speed as the play progresses, culminating in a bring-thehouse-down monologue in which Shepard’s father, Dennis (Jason Bowe), addresses his son’s killer at his sentencing. The Laramie Project is an important piece of theater that requires finesse from the performers, and the UCSB department of theater delivers. — Maggie Yates


CLASSICAL

REVIEWS

THE MAGIC FLUTE



U

sing the stage at the New Vic as a blank canvas, the team responsible for Westmont’s production of The Magic Flute painted a vivid and memorable moving picture full of delightful details and striking images. Delivered in an accessible English translation, Mozart’s classic opera made a joyous and profound vehicle for the talented cast. The nonstop inventiveness of the show’s director, John Blondell, gained in excitement and resonance through tight integration with Yuri Okahana’s At the New Vic, amazing set, the impressive lightSun., Mar. 3. ing of designer Jonathan Hicks, and the raucous choreography of Victoria Finlayson. Among many excellent performances, a few stood out. John Butler consistently drew the night’s biggest laughs as the bumbling, fearful everyman Papageno. Michelle Vera delivered a pair of magnificent arias as the Queen of the Night, and Fitz Mora fully inhabited the central role of Prince Tamino. As Pamina, daughter of the Queen of the Night and Tamino’s beloved, Jessica Lingua gave the evening’s most layered performance, adding significant acting skills to complement her wonderful voice.

From left, Fritz Mora, Michelle Vera, and Jessica Lingua

Although much of the material was played for laughs —Jared Huff was hilarious as an unruly, nearly feral Monostatos—through the staging and the majesty of the music, this production retained an edge of darkly speculative wonder. Without the timely interventions of the delightful Three Ladies — Nina Fox, Lillyana Huerta, and Alyssa Mae Tumlos—all kinds of mayhem would have taken place within the borders of the cultlike community ruled by Sarastro (Nate Sirovatka). The Westmont Theater program, with the invaluable collaboration of maestro Michael Shasberger and his musicians, has discovered a bright new vein of creative inquiry in these opera productions at the New Vic. Here’s hoping this fabulous and fun annual event becomes a tradition. — Charles Donelan ZACH MENDEZ

EUGENE ONEGIN

O

pera Santa Barbara’s Eugene Onegin brought a large and enthusiastic crowd to the Lobero Theatre on Friday, March 1, for a splendid evening featuring some of Tchaikovsky’s greatest music and a host of excellent performances. As Tatiana, the country girl who becomes a princess, Karin Wolverton wove a tapestry of gorgeous sounds, from childish naivete to a dawning sense of self-worth after passing through the crucible of Onegin’s rejection. She gave a particularly convincing account of Tatiana’s nightlong writing of a love letter. This substantial solo requires audiences to accept what amounts to a Presented by Opera Santa hybrid form, the epistolary Barbara. At the Lobero aria, and Wolverton made Theatre, Fri., Mar. 1. every moment of it into mesmerizing bliss. As Onegin, Lee Poulis moved easily from the court and the dance floor to the dueling ground, where his “duel-et” with best-friend-become-rival Lenski (Elliott Deasy) was easily one of the highlights of the night. Special credit for the success of this Russian treasure should go to maestro Valéry Ryvkin and his orchestra. Eugene Onegin is packed with thrilling instrumental

BRAD ELLIOTT

& ENTERTAINMENT

Department of Music

Winter Concert Series Wind Ensemble Thursday, March 7 | 7:30 pm Lotte Lehmann Concert Hall Chamber Choir and Women’s Chorus Friday, March 8 | 7:30 pm Trinity Episcopal Church Middle East Ensemble Saturday, March 9 | 7:30 pm Lotte Lehmann Concert Hall Faculty Chamber Music Showcase Monday, March 11 | 7:30 pm Lotte Lehmann Concert Hall Jazz Ensemble Wednesday, March 13 | 7:30 pm Lotte Lehmann Concert Hall

colors and reflections that add enormously to the subtlety and nuance of what’s happening onstage, and this production made every one of those details count. The stage direction by Jonathan Fox was spot-on; the choreography, especially of such sequences as the peasant dance, was delightful; and Steven C. Kemp’s simple yet effective set design came across as clear as day, especially when the giant circular moon over Tatiana’s bedroom changed color and became the rising sun. Congratulations to the large and talented cast for doing an exceptional job of recreating musical Russia in Santa Barbara. —CD

Music of India Ensemble Thursday, March 14 | 7:30 pm Karl Geiringer Hall Gospel Choir Friday, March 15 | 7:30 pm Lotte Lehmann Concert Hall music.ucsb.edu or (805) 893-2064

Use code W19INDY for 15% off!

FILM

BANFF MOUNTAIN FILM FESTIVAL

E

ach October, folks from far and wide gather in Canada’s stunning mountain town of Banff for nine days of tantalizing cinema devoted to outdoor adventures. For those who can’t make it, it’s no worry, as select films are culled from the several hundred original entries to make up a slate that then tours the world. UCSB Arts & Lectures, which has brought the prestigious Banff Mountain Film Festival to Santa Barbarans for 28 years, hosted Presented by UCSB Arts & the popular tour for two Lectures. At The Arlington nights last week. Theatre, Wed., Feb. 27. As usual, the celluloid fare was dynamic, broad in subject matter, and exciting. On Wednesday, the night began with Far Out: Kai Jones, a delightful five-minute film about tween skiing sensation Kai Jones. At 12 years

old, the Idaho native is already turning heads with his masterful snow skills, which include backflips and three-story jumps off cliffs into waist-high powder. Another highlight of the evening was RJ Ripper, a 19-minute peek into the life of Nepalese mountain biker Rajesh Magar, who began his riding career through the streets of Kathmandu on a homemade bike and is now an international racer and National Geographic’s 2018 Adventurer of the Year. The evening’s slate also included Fast Horse, How to Run 100 Miles, Skier vs. Drone, Craig’s Reaction, Brotherhood of Skiing, and Reel Rock 12: Break on Through. Next year when the tour comes back around, do yourself a favor and get tickets—it’s one of the best armchair adventures going. —Michelle Drown

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a&e | FILM & TV

MOVIE GUIDE Edited by Michelle Drown

Five Feet Apart

PREMIERES

NOW SHOWING

Captain Marvel (124 mins., PG-13) Brie Larson stars as Carol Danvers (a k a Captain Marvel), a former U.S. Air Force fighter pilot and current member of an elite military unit, Starforce. Danvers gets her superhuman abilities when her DNA is accidentally fused with that of a Kree, a scientifically and technologically advanced race. Djimon Hounsou, Samuel L. Jackson, and Annette Bening also star.

Arlington/Camino Real (2D & 3D)/ Metro 4 (2D & 3D)

Apollo 11 (93 mins., G) This documentary stitches together film footage and more than 10,000 hours of recorded audio to give audiences a glimpse of what it was really like to be part of NASA’s epic feat—putting the first human on the moon.

Paseo Nuevo

Five Feet Apart (116 mins., PG-13) Cole Sprouse and Haley Lu Richardson star in this romantic comedy about two young cystic fibrosis patients who fall in love. Moises Arias and Parminder Nagra also star.

Camino Real/Paseo Nuevo (Opens Thu., Mar. 14)

No Manches Frida 2: Paradise Destroyed (102 mins., NR) Ex-con Zequi (Omar Chaparro), his flame Lucy (Martha Higareda), and the rest of the gang return for this sequel in which wedding plans are thwarted, old loves come into the picture, and Frida High faces being closed down.

Fiesta 5 (Opens Thu., Mar. 14)

Wonder Park (85 mins., R) In this 3D computer-animated film, a girl named Cameron “June” Bailey must find the imagination she lost after her mother died. She does so when she comes across an amusement park in the woods facing destruction by Chimpanzombies. Fairview/Fiesta 5 (Opens Thu., Mar. 14)

Alita: Battle Angel (122 mins., PG-13) Rosa Salazar stars in this cyberpunk action film based on the Japanese graphic novel Gunnm about a bodiless “core,” Alita, who awakens in a postapocalyptic world with no memory. Dr. Ido (Christoph Waltz) finds her and gives her a new body. Soon it is discovered that Alita is more than a typical cyborg. Mahershala Ali and Jennifer Connelly also star. Fairview/Fiesta 5 Arctic (97 mins., PG-13) Mads Mikkelsen (Hannibal, Doctor Strange) stars as Overgard, who is stranded in the Arctic awaiting rescue. When the helicopter sent to retrieve him crashes, he and the surviving passenger embark on a journey of survival.

The Hitchcock

Birds of Passage (125 mins., NR) This Oscar-nominated Best Foreign Language film takes place in the late 1960s and 1970s and follows a Colombian family’s rise and demise in the illegal drug trade. The Hitchcock

O Bohemian Rhapsody (134 mins., PG-13)

Telling the tale of a beloved rock-androll enigma, especially one so notoriously private, is a daunting task, but Bohemian Rhapsody tackles Freddie Mercury’s legendary story with flourish and fervor. Admittedly, the film adopts a convenient plot line ripe with meetcutes and oversimplifications of Mercury’s complex relationship with his family and background. It struggles the most in addressing the often-discussed queerness of Mercury’s life, at times teetering toward bi-erasure and a lessthan-delicate portrayal of AIDS. Rami Malek shines as the shy yet vivacious Queen frontman and is spellbindingly convincing during both Mercury’s loneliest hours and explosive moments on some of the world’s biggest stages. The rest of the casting deserves a grand tip of the hat as well. Bohemian Rhapsody,

for all its narrative flaws, is an earnest tribute to the iconic rock band, and remains a spectacle of sight and sound for music, Mercury, and movie fans alike. (JK) Fiesta 5

O Capernaum

(126 mins., NR)

Those who are extra-sensitive to tales of woe concerning children cast adrift will be pained watching the Lebanese film Capernaum (Chaos), about a tough but fragile 12-year-old (Zain al Rafeea, grim and determined until the final shot) and an Ethiopian toddler immigrant (Boluwatife Treasure Bankole— best toddler performance of the year). But anyone with an interest in bold, emotionally powered cinema and the pressing issues of poverty and refugee struggles through tender eyes shouldn’t miss Nadine Labaki’s important film, a nominee for the Foreign Film Oscar and Jury Prize winner at Cannes. Naturalism meets assured-narrative machinery and courtroom drama in the poignant, youth-driven tradition of Bicycle Thief and the fellow foreign-film Oscar nom Shoplifters. (JW)

Riviera (Sat., Mar. 9)

Everybody Knows (Todos lo saben) (133 mins., R) Penelope Cruz stars with her real-life husband Javier Bardem in this psychological thriller about a woman who returns to Spain from her home in Argentina to attend a wedding where long-buried secrets come into the open.

Sunday August 25 at 5:30 PM ZEDD

Paseo Nuevo

APR 19

RUFUS DU SOL

The Favourite (120 mins., R) Olivia Colman, Emma Stone, and Rachel Weisz star in this historical dark comedy/drama set during the reign of England’s Queen Anne in the early 18th century. A tangled love triangle emerges between Anne (Colman), Abigail Hill (Stone), and Sarah Churchill (Weisz) that leads to treachery and betrayal.

APR 20

THE 1975 APR 21

KALI UCHIS & JORJA SMITH MAY 17

TRAIN / GOO GOO DOLLS JUN 11

JOJO SIWA AUG 11

THE AVETT BROTHERS AUG 24

The Hitchcock

MARK KNOPFLER SEP 20

GARY CLARK JR SEP 27

CONT’D ON P. 57 >>>

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Música, Danza, y Mucho Más metrotheatres.com Música de fiesta del pueblo de perú Village fiesta Music froM peru

Metropolitan Theatres - The Independent adsource@exhib p. 888.737.2812 f. 2 2col (3.667”) x 7” Ad insertion date: Friday, March 8-14, 2019 Ad creation/delivery date: Tuesday, March 5, 2019 at 2:12:21 PM caind_met0308-031 ¡Entrada Gratuita! / FrEE

VIERNES, 8 DE MARZO / FRIDAY, MARCH 8 7 pM  isla Vista school, 6875 el colegio DOMINGO, 10 DE MARZO / SUNDAY, MARCH 10 7 pM  Marjorie luke theatre, santa barbara junior high, 721 e. cota street Las puertas se abrirán a las 6:30 pm. / Doors open 6:30 pm. Habrá recepción después del espectáculo. / Reception follows the performance. ¡Viva el Arte de Santa Bárbara! is sponsored by SAGE Publications, The Roddick Foundation, Anonymous, Russell Steiner, Monica and Tim Babich, Montecito Bank & Trust, National Endowment for the Arts, UCSB Office of Education Partnerships, The Stone Family Foundation, Linda Stafford Burrows, Marianne Marsi and Lewis Manring, and the Santa Barbara County Arts Commission Community Arts Grant Program, with funds provided by the City of Santa Barbara, in partnership with the Santa Barbara County Office of Arts and Culture. Additional support comes from The Marjorie Luke Theatre’s Dreier Family Rent Subsidy Fund. The program is supported in part by the Santa Barbara Independent, the Santa Maria SUN, El Latino CC, Radio Bronco, Entravision/Univision Costa Central, the Best Western South Coast Inn, the Hilton Garden Inn Santa Barbara/Goleta, Pacifica Suites, La Quinta Inn & Suites, and the Santa Barbara Unified School District. Viva is co-presented by The Marjorie Luke Theatre, the Guadalupe-Nipomo Dunes Center and UCSB Arts and Lectures, in partnership with the Isla Vista School Parent Teacher Association.

Features and Showtimes for March 8-14 H = Subject to Restrictions on “SILVER MVP PASSES”

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H CAPTAIN MARVEL C H FIVE FEET APART C Fri: 1:15, 4:15, 7:15, 10:15; Sat: 10:15, 1:15, Thu: 7:45 PM 4:15, 7:15, 10:15; Sun: 10:15, 1:15, 4:15, 7:15; Mon to Thu: 1:15, 4:15, 7:15

FIESTA 5

H CAPTAIN MARVEL C Fri to Sun: 12:30, 3:30, 6:30, 9:30; Mon to Thu: 3:30, 6:30, 8:45

H CAPTAIN MARVEL IN DISNEY DIGITAL 3D C Fri to Sun: 11:45, 2:45, 5:45, 8:45; Mon to Thu: 2:45, 5:45

916 STATE STREET, SANTA BARBARA (877)789-6684 HOW TO TRAIN YOUR DRAGON: THE HIDDEN WORLD B Fri to Sun: 12:30, 1:30, 3:00, 4:00, 5:30, 6:30, 8:00; Mon to Wed: 1:30, 3:00, 4:00, 5:30, 6:30, 7:40; Thu: 1:30, 3:00, 4:00, 5:30, 6:30

TYLER PERRY’S A MADEA FAMILY FUNERAL C Fri to Sun: 12:00, ALITA: BATTLE ANGEL C 2:20, 4:40, 7:00, 9:20; Mon to Thu: 1:25, Fri to Sun: 1:20, 4:10, 7:00, 9:30; 3:45, 6:10, 8:35 Mon to Wed: 1:45, 4:45, 7:50; Thu: 1:45 PM

THE HITCHCOCK CINEMA & PUBLIC HOUSE

ISN’T IT ROMANTIC C Fri to Sun: 12:00, 2:10, 7:20, 9:45; Mon to Thu: 2:45, 5:20, 8:00 THE LEGO MOVIE 2: THE SECOND PART B Fri to Sun: 2:45, 5:15; Mon to Thu: 2:00 PM

371 SOUTH HITCHCOCK WAY, SANTA BARBARA BOHEMIAN RHAPSODY C (877)789-6684 Fri to Sun: 7:45 PM; Mon to Thu: 7:30 PM

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ARCTIC C 5:00, 7:45

H NO MANCHES FRIDA 2 Thu: 7:40 PM

THE FAVOURITE E 2:15, 7:30

H WONDER PARK B Thu: 4:30, 7:00


a&e | FILM & TV CONT’D FROM P. 55

Birds of Passage Fighting with My Family (108 mins., PG-13)

Dwayne Johnson executive produced this biopic dramedy based on the life of British WWE professional wrestler Saraya-Jade “Paige” Bevis (Florence Pugh), who won the Divas Championship in 2014. Nick Frost, Vince Vaughn, and Lena Headey also star.

Paseo Nuevo

O Green Book

(130 mins., PG-13)

Green Book is an uncommonly welltold tale of bodyguard Tony Vallelonga (Viggo Mortensen) and classically trained pianist Don Shirley (Mahershala Ali), thrown together on a concert tour through the Deep South in 1962. Dr. Donald Shirley was a child prodigy, Russian-trained, and imbued with a dignity that suffered under the shortening of his name to “Don” by his record label. The film’s greatest transformation comes from Mortensen, who put on 25 pounds before the film began and added another 20 while playing Tony Vallelonga, aka Tony Lip. His son Nick Vallelonga wrote the script, holding off until after Don Shirley had died, as requested. It’s a restraint that Green Book plays with so well that the usually blasé Santa Barbara film audience couldn’t help but erupt with applause at film’s end. (JY) Camino Real/Paseo Nuevo Greta (98 mins., R) When Frances McCullen (Chloë Grace Moretz) finds a purse in New York City subway, she promptly returns it to its owner, Greta (Isabelle Huppert), a lonely piano teacher. Having just lost her mother, Frances grows close to Greta, but soon discovers the woman isn’t who she seems.

The Lego Movie 2: The Second Part (106 mins., PG) It’s been five years since Duplo invaded Bricksburg, not yet a post-apocalyptic wasteland. Despite the dire circumstances, Emmet (Chris Pratt) remains irritatingly upbeat, unlike his friends. Disliking his plucky demeanor, Mayhem from Systar System kidnaps Emmet’s friends. A rescue mission ensues. Elizabeth Banks, Tiffany Haddish, and Will Arnett also star. Fairview/Fiesta 5 Isn’t It Romantic (88 mins., PG-13) Rebel Wilson stars in this comedy/ fantasy/satire about Natalie (Wilson), a woman who has never believed in the Hollywood rom-com fantasy. After being knocked unconscious, however, Natalie finds herself in her own cliché-filled romantic comedy and must eschew hackneyed situations to finally fall in love and be brought back to reality. Liam Hemsworth and Adam DeVine also star. Fiesta 5 Never Look Away (188 mins., R) Director Henckel von Donnersmarck, who dropped moviegoers into the paranoid landscape of East Berlin with his Oscar-winning 2006 film The Lives of Others, stirred controversy with his new film about another slice of German life, Never Look Away, loosely based on the life; times; and fascinating, mercurial work of Gerhard Richter. Richter, 87, a recluse considered one of our most

important living artists, was none too pleased. Opening with a “degenerate art” show in Dresden, circa 1937, and moving through Communist bloc life, studies with Joseph Beuys and his “blurpainting” breakthrough, the three-hour film feels tame and glossy compared to the challenges of Richter’s art over the decades. Still, it conveys a compelling, polished tale, a portrait of an artist who filtered troubled times into a suitably complex, blurry, layered aesthetic voice. Richter deserves better. (JW) Riviera

O A Star Is Born

MARCH 8 - 14

OSCAR® 2019 BEST FOREIGN FILM NOMINEES

“ABSORBING AND RUMINATIVE” – LOS ANGELES TIMES

(117 mins., PG)

Bradley Cooper marks his directing debut with an ode to the 1937 romantic melodrama A Star Is Born, famously remade in 1954 with Judy Garland and James Mason and again in 1976 with Barbra Streisand and Kris Kristofferson. Cooper plays famous countryrock musician Jackson Maine, whose drunken search for more alcohol leads him to a drag bar where he stumbles into Ally (Lady Gaga), an unknown singer who Jackson then mentors. Soon, Ally and Jackson enter into a romantic relationship that is often overshadowed by Jackson’s alcoholism and prescription drug abuse. As Ally takes on her selfdoubt and fear of performing in front of Jackson’s sold-out crowds, she makes sacrifices in her own burgeoning career for love and authenticity. Cooper and Lady Gaga depict the rawness and erosion of their relationship with aplomb. (JR) Fiesta 5 Tyler Perry’s A Madea Family Funeral (109 mins., PG-13) For the 11th Madea franchise film, matriarch Madea (Tyler Perry) and her family convene for a reunion that turns into a nightmare in the backwoods of Georgia when the get-together becomes an unexpected funeral gathering.

Camino Real/Metro 4

Isn’t It Romantic

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How to Train Your Dragon: The Hidden World (104 mins., PG) The third installation of this delightful animated franchise sees Toothless, Hiccup (Jay Baruchel), and their ragtag crew of dragon riders continue to save captured dragons and bring them to Berk. When the dragon population becomes untenable, Hiccup and his faithful black fury go in search of the Hidden World, a safe haven for dragons. But enemies and warlords try to thwart their efforts. Cate Blanchett, America Ferrera, and Craig Ferguson also lend their vocal talents. Fairview/Fiesta 5 The above films are playing in Santa Barbara FRIDAY, March 8, through THURSDAY, March 14. Our critics’ reviews are followed by initials: JK (Janavi Kumar), JR (Jasmine Rodriguez), JW (Josef Woodard), and JY (Jean Yamamura). The symbol O indicates the film is recommended. The symbol ➤ indicates a new review.

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DISASTER PREP GUIDE Don't miss our Disaster Prep Guide in the center of this issue en Inglés Y Español What you'll find inside:

•How to fortify your home •How to speak to kids about difficult subjects •Info on shelters, pets, and volunteer opportunities •Maps & personalized fill-in-the-blank sections •How to create an emergency kit and “Go Bag”

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Cancer Foundation of Santa Barbara Presents

5K•10K•15K Saturday, March 16 Lunch, Raffle & Yoga Included!

Register for only $60! Register today! www.cfsb.org/irelandwalk2019 100% of registration fees and pledges benefit the Ridley-Tree Cancer Center’s breast cancer research & supportive care programs.


SPORTS

AMI LAKOJU

ASPIRES TO INSPIRE Meet the Harlem-Raised UCSB Basketball Player Who Nearly Died on the Court

T

PAUL WELLMAN

wo words are useful to aid the recall of showboat, just a good guy on and off the court. I Ami Lakoju’s name: Amiable and likwish he came here sooner.” able. They fit the demeanor of the UCSB Blackmon, a valuable asset on defense, and basketball player, a bear (69 and 260 Kupchak, who seldom plays, have been Lakoju’s pounds) of a man. teammates for four years. “Kupchak is a unique dude,” he said. “We have conversations about how A fifth-year senior, Lakoju played his final he approaches life. It keeps me grounded. Jarriesse home game at the Thunderdome last Thursday along with teammates Jarriesse Blackis really loyal. If you need a guy to talk to at two in mon, Maxwell Kupchak, and Ar’mond Davis. the morning, grab a bite to eat if you’re having a They are a closely knit group, centered around bad day, he’s always there. I’m the oldest player on Lakoju, to whom friendships are especially the team, but I feel like Kupchak and Jarriesse have precious. been like big brothers to me. I look up to them. Alex and Agatha Lakoju came from Har“We need to lead by example, keep younger lem to see their son honored with the other guys in check. We’re never going to get too low on ourselves or too high on ourselves. We have to graduating Gauchos. They will return in June stay the course.” to see him (full name: Aminenye-jesu Ohabamewo Lakoju) receive his bachelor’s degree The Gauchos are coming off a rollercoaster week. Five days after a rousing 82-67 victory over in history, the culmination of one of the more Cal State Fullerton, their Senior Night ended in remarkable journeys by any college athlete. TAKING HOOPS AND ART TO HEART: Ami Lakoju (14) fights for a rebound against UC Irvine this season. a disappointing 69-64 loss to Long Beach State. When he arrived from New York to begin on basketball, focus on friends, focus on what I’m doing now. With a record of 19-9 (8-6 in the Big West), they his UCSB career, it was the first time Lakoju set foot on the West Coast. He was recruited through a Twit- Life is what you make it. I want to make the rest of my time will try to gain momentum for the March 14-16 conference tournament at Anaheim in this week’s road games at Cal State ter message from a Gaucho assis- here memorable.” When he was unable to play, Lakoju started to dabble in Northridge and Cal Poly. tant coach. A welcome addition to the Gauchos’ front line, he saw 27 art. He has created some striking digital content. During road minutes of action in the first three trips, he has produced portraits of his fellow Gauchos. In his WINNING WOMEN: After getting off to a 1-7 start in the Big studies of world history, he has been fascinated by the feudal West, UCSB’s women’s basketball team improved to 5-10 and games of the 2014-15 season. clinched a berth in the conference tournament last week by Then time stopped, along with his heart, for 90 frightening Japanese empires. “I’ve met a lot of great people, made a lot of friends, been battling to a 44-42 win over Cal Poly and stunning UC Riverseconds. During a pregame practice at Oregon’s Matthew Knight with different teams,” he said. “I’m fortunate to have had two side, 61-44. They won their last four home games. Paris Jones, Arena on December 21, Lakoju collapsed to the floor. Team head coaches [Bob Williams and Joe Pasternack] with differ- a reserve guard, is their lone senior. “We call her Momma P,” trainer Katie Susskind found him unresponsive and admin- ent styles. This school’s been amazing. I really like this side of said Coco Miller, a junior guard who put up 19 points, five istered CPR. Thoughts of Hank Gathers — the Loyola Mary- America. From the basketball aspect and life aspect, it’s been assists, and three steals against UCR. mount star who suffered a fatal heart stoppage during a game a good five years.” Westmont College made history in the Golden State Athin 1990 — ran through the mind of Bill Mahoney, UCSB’s Pasternack took over as head coach in 2017-18 and con- letic Conference tournament by winning the women’s chamlongtime sports information director. But while Mahoney tinued to use Lakoju as a backup to tangle with opposing big pionship for the fourth consecutive year. The Warriors will was dialing 9-1-1, an Oregon official retrieved a defibrillator men. “I just do what I can when I come in,” he said. “It’s the go off to the NAIA national tournament in Billings, Monon hand for such emergencies. Several jolts from the machine coach’s prerogative. We had the best turnaround in college tana, next week with a young team (the only senior is reserve Roberta Hay) and a 24-7 record. They bought into coach Kirsten restored Lakoju’s heartbeat. His life was saved by treatment basketball last year.” He might have been ready for a starting role this season, but Moore’s emphasis on defense and downed The Master’s by a that had not been immediately available for Gathers. With an automatic defibrillator implanted in his chest, the Gauchos recruited Amadou Sow, whom Lakoju dubbed score of 60-50 in the GSAC finale. n Lakoju was cleared to play the next season. But he had another “our freshman superstar.” Sow is UCSB’s second leading scorer setback: a broken foot that required another surgery and put (11.7 average) and leading rebounder (6.6). “He’s going to have him on crutches for two months. “It was funny,” Lakoju said, a great career here,” Lakoju said. “He’s a hard worker on the “but not really funny.” Yet he realized how much worse his court, a good guy off the court. He asks me questions; he’s plight could have been. “I’m able to walk, talk, breathe, and really a student of the game. Some people might be upset seeing a freshman come in and take minutes, but honestly be alive.” He played in 15 games as a redshirt freshman in 2015-16. He speaking, I just want to win, and he’s a big part of our successwas rusty and prone to commit fouls. The 2016-17 season got ful season.” Maddy Leung, off to a promising start, but after 10 games, Lakoju was deemed Lakoju has seen action in every game and is averaging 2.8 San Marcos softball academically ineligible. points and 2.0 rebounds. In his longest stint against Bethesda, The senior had five RBIs in the “My mom’s a schoolteacher, and she talked to me about it,” he posted a double-double of 16 points and 11 rebounds. He is last two innings (a two-run he said. “She told me I could do better if I wanted it. Everybody making a robust 56.6 percent of his shots. double and three-run homer) makes mistakes and has those times, but if you want someLeading scorer Ar’mond Davis, who transferred from Alaas the Royals rallied to defeat thing, you should go after it.” bama into UCSB’s graduate school, is another Lompoc, 11-10. He made up his mind not to dwell on the past. “Moving newcomer who’s made an impact. “He’s forward, I wanted to change my mentality,” he said. “Focus an amazing guy,” Lakoju said. “He’s not a

by JOHN ZANT

S.B. ATHLETIC ROUNDTABLE

PAUL WELLMAN PHOTOS

ATHLETES OF THE WEEK

Brent Hyman, San Marcos baseball

JOHN ZANT’S GAME OF THE WEEK

The senior pitcher gave up an unearned run in the first inning and shut down Dos Pueblos the rest of the way in a 3-1 win over the Chargers.

3/8: High School Baseball: Santa Barbara at San Marcos If both teams put their aces on the mound, Friday’s game shapes up as a pitchers’ duel between Derek True and Brent Hyman. Both right-handers recorded complete-game victories last week. True tossed a two-hit shutout as Santa Barbara defeated Lompoc, 4-0, and Hyman allowed four hits as San Marcos took down defending champion Dos Pueblos, 3-1. The Dons and Royals are both within the top three of the Channel League standings with the Chargers, with records of 2-1 and 2-2, respectively. 3:15pm. Joe Mueller Field, 4750 Hollister Ave. Free. Call 967-4581. INDEPENDENT.COM

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FREE WILL ASTROLOGY by Rob Breszny ARIES

CANCER

(Mar. 21-Apr. 19): Genius inventor Thomas Edison rebelled

(June 21-July 22): The otters at a marine park in Miura

against sleep, which he regarded as wasteful. He tried to limit his time in bed to four hours per night so he would have more time to work during his waking hours. Genius scientist Albert Einstein had a different approach. He preferred 10 hours of sleep per night, and he liked to steal naps during the day, too. In my astrological opinion, Aries, you’re in a phase when it makes more sense to imitate Einstein than Edison. Important learning and transformation is happening in your dreams. Give your nightly adventures maximum opportunity to work their magic in your behalf.

City, Japan, are friendly to human visitors. There are holes in the glass walls of their enclosures through which they reach out to shake people’s hands with their webbed paws. I think you need experiences akin to that in the coming weeks. Your mental and spiritual health will thrive to the degree that you seek closer contact with animals. It’s a favorable time to nurture your instinctual intelligence and absorb influences from the natural world. For extra credit, tune in to and celebrate your own animal qualities.

LEO

(Apr. 20-May 20): The Danish flag has a red background

(July 23-Aug. 22): Between 1977 and 1992, civil war raged

in Mozambique. Combatants planted thousands of land mines that have remained dangerous long after the conflict ended. In recent years, a new ally has emerged in the quest to address the problem: rats that are trained to find the hidden explosives so that human colleagues can defuse them. The expert sniffers don’t weigh enough to detonate the mines, so they’re ideal to play the role of saviors. I foresee a metaphorically comparable development in your future, Leo. You’ll get help and support from a surprising or seemingly unlikely source.

(May 21-June 20): On June 7, 1988, Gemini musician Bob Dylan launched what has come to be known as the Never Ending Tour. It’s still going. In the past 30+ years, he has performed almost 3,000 shows on every continent except Antarctica. In 2018 alone, at the age of 77, he did 84 gigs. He’s living proof that not every Gemini is flaky and averse to commitment. Even if you yourself have flirted with flightiness in the past, I doubt you will do so in the next five weeks. On the contrary. I expect you’ll be a paragon of persistence, doggedness, and stamina.

SCORPIO a skill worth cultivating. It serves your urge to gather and manage power. You’re aware that information is a valuable commodity, so you guard it carefully and share it sparingly. This predilection sometimes makes you seem understated, even shy. Your hesitancy to express too much of your knowledge and feelings may influence people to underestimate the intensity that seethes within you. Having said all that, I’ll now predict that you’ll show the world who you are with more dazzle and flamboyance in the coming weeks. It’ll be interesting to see how you do that as you also try to heed your rule that information is power.

SAGITTARIUS

VIRGO

GEMINI

erature are entertaining. According to one survey of editors, writers, and librarians, Goethe’s Faust, Melville’s Moby Dick, and Cervantes’s Don Quixote are among the most boring masterpieces ever written. But most experts agree that they’re still valuable to read. In that spirit, and in accordance with astrological omens, I urge you to commune with other dull but meaningful things. Seek out low-key but rich offerings. Be aware that unexciting people and situations may offer clues and catalysts that you need.

(Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Many of you Scorpios regard secrecy as

TAURUS emblazoned with an asymmetrical white cross. It was a national symbol of power as early as the 14th century and may have first emerged during a critical military struggle that established the Danish empire in 1219. No other country in the world has a flag with such an ancient origin. But if Denmark’s Prime Minister Lars Løkke Rasmussen, who’s a Taurus, came to me and asked me for advice, I would urge him to break with custom and design a new flag—maybe something with a spiral rainbow or a psychedelic tree. I’ll suggest an even more expansive idea to you, Taurus: Create fresh traditions in every area of your life!

WEEK OF MARCH 7

(Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Imagine a stairway that leads nowhere;

as you ascend, you realize that at the top is not a door or a hallway, but a wall. I suspect that lately you may have been dealing with a metaphorical version of an anomaly like this. But I also predict that in the coming weeks, some magic will transpire that will change everything. It’s like you’ll find a button on the wall that when pushed opens a previously imperceptible door. Somehow, you’ll gain entrance through an apparent obstruction.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Not all of the classic works of great lit-

HOMEWORK: Think of the last person you cursed, if only with a hateful thought if not an actual spell. Now send them a free-hearted blessing.

(Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Sagittarian actress and producer Deborra-

Lee Furness has been married to megastar actor Hugh Jackman for 23 years. Their wedding rings are inscribed with a motto that blends Sanskrit and English, “Om paramar mainamar.” Hugh and Deborra-Lee say it means “we dedicate our union to a greater source.” In resonance with current astrological omens, I invite you to engage in a similar gesture with an important person in your life. Now is a marvelous time to deepen and sanctify your relationship by pledging yourselves to a higher purpose or beautiful collaboration or sublime mutual quest.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): In 1997, a supercomputer named Deep Blue won six chess matches against chess grandmaster

Gary Kasparov. In 2016, an Artificial Intelligence called AlphaGo squared off against human champion Lee Sedol in a best-of-five series of the Chinese board game Go. AlphaGo crushed Sedol, four games to one. But there is at least one cerebral game in which human intelligence still reigns supreme: the card game known as bridge. No AI has as yet beat the best bridge players. I bring this to your attention, Capricorn, because I am sure that in the coming weeks, no AI could outthink and out-strategize you as you navigate your way through life’s tests and challenges. You’ll be smarter than ever. P.S.: I’m guessing your acumen will be extra soulful, as well.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): At regular intervals, a hot stream of boiling water shoots up out of the earth and into the sky in Wyoming’s Yellowstone National Park. It’s a geyser called Old Faithful. The steamy surge can reach a height of 185 feet and last for five minutes. When white settlers first discovered this natural phenomenon in the 19th century, some of them used it as a laundry. Between blasts, they’d place their dirty clothes in Old Faithful’s aperture. When the scalding flare erupted, it provided all the necessary cleansing. I’d love to see you attempt a metaphorically similar feat, Aquarius: Harness a natural force for a practical purpose, or a primal power for an earthy task.

PISCES (Feb. 19-Mar. 20): Who was the model for Leonardo da

Vinci’s iconic painting “Mona Lisa”? Many scholars think it was Italian noblewoman Lisa del Giocondo. Leonardo wanted her to feel comfortable during the long hours she sat for him, so he hired musicians to play for her and people with mellifluous voices to read her stories. He built a musical fountain for her to gaze upon and gave her a white Persian cat to cuddle. If it were within my power, I would arrange something similar for you in the coming weeks. Why? Because I’d love to see you be calmed and soothed for a concentrated period of time, to feel perfectly at ease, at home in the world, surrounded by beautiful influences you love. In my opinion, you need and deserve such a break from the everyday frenzy.

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700.

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MARCH 7, 2019

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EMPLOYMENT

DEDICATION TO BEING OUR BEST.

It’s our highest priority. Setting high standards is one thing. Embracing them is another. At Cottage Health, we make it top priority to work constantly at being our best...for patients, their families, our communities and fellow team members. If you would enjoy living up to your potential at a health system that strives for – and achieves – excellence, come to Cottage.

Santa Barbara Cottage Hospital Nursing • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Access Case Manager Birth Center Cardiac Cath Lab Cardiac Telemetry Clinical Resource Nurse – Surgery (Weekends/Baylor) Educator, Lactation Emergency Hematology/Oncology Infection Control Practitioner Med/Surg Float Pool MICU Mother Infant NICU Nurse Practitioner – Palliative Care Operating Room Orthopedics PACU Patient Relations/ Accred Coordinator RN Peds PICU Psych Nursing Pulmonary, Renal, Infectious Disease SICU Surgical Trauma Telemetry

Clinical • Cardiovascular RN • Patient Care Tech I, II • Patient Relations/Accreditation Coordinator – FT • Pharmacy Tech • Surgical ED Coordinator • Surgical Tech II • Unit Care Tech • Unit Coordinator

Non-Clinical

Goleta Valley Cottage Hospital

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

• • • • • • • •

Cafeteria Cashier Cook Environmental Service Manager Environmental Services Rep Food Services Rep IT Business Analyst – Kronos Librarian Manager, Benefits Nutrition Lead Nutrition Supervisor Patient Financial Counselor III, Hollister Research Coordinator, RN Research Data Analyst Research Department Coordinator Research Finance Analyst Room Service Coordinator Room Service Server Security Officer – FT Nights/Evenings Supervisor, Childcare Center Trauma Program Manager Volunteer Coordinator

Allied Health • • • • • • • •

MRI Tech Occupational Therapist Pharmacy Manager – Clinical Pharmacist – PT Physical Therapist II RCP II Sonographer – PD Speech Language Pathologist II

Cottage Rehabilitation Hospital • • • •

CCRC Family Consultant – SLO Physical Therapist – PD Recreational Therapist – PD Speech Therapist

Occupational Therapist – PD Patient Care Tech – FT Physical Therapist RN, First Assist – FT RN, ICU RN, Infusion Suite RN, Med/Surg – FT Surgical Tech – FT

Cottage Business Services • • • • • • • • • • • •

Director, Patient Access Director, Planning and Analysis Financial Assistant Financial Reporting Analyst Sr. HIM Manager HIM Outpatient Data Specialist Manager, Denials and Utilization Review Manager, Patient Access Manager, Payroll Manager, Revenue Cycle Engineering Retirement Plan Admin Sr. Sr. Revenue Integrity Analyst

Pacific Diagnostic Laboratories • • • •

Certified Phlebotomist Technician – FT/PT Client Services Rep CLS II, Core Lab, Micro, SBCH Lab Assistant II, Specimen Processing, Histology Lab – FT • Revenue Cycle Coordinator • Sales Support Representative • Sr. Sales Representative

• Please apply to: www.pdllabs.com

Santa Ynez Valley Cottage Hospital

• RENTAL & RELOCATION ASSISTANCE AVAILABLE FOR SELECT FULL-TIME POSITIONS

• Patient Care Tech – PPD

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We offer an excellent compensation package that includes above-market salaries, premium medical benefits, pension plans, tax savings accounts, rental and mortgage assistance, and relocation packages. What’s holding you back?

Please apply online at jobs.cottagehealth.org. Candidates may also submit a resume to: Cottage Health, Human Resources, P.O. Box 689, Pueblo at Bath Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93102-0689 Please reference “SBI” when applying. EOE

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GENERAL PART-TIME Academic Coordinator for the UC Global Health Institute (UCGHI) Planetary Health Center of Expertise (PHCOE) The UC Global Health Institute (UCGHI) Planetary Health Center of Expertise (PHCOE) is seeking an Academic Coordinator II to serve several related, but distinguishable administrative and development functions that stretch across the 10 UCs: 1. Development, recruitment, oversight and management of the PHCOE ambassadors and interns across the 10 UC campuses. 2. Developing and managing PHCOE event programming across the 10 UCs 3. Developing and coordinating on events with UCGHI. 4. Organizing and managing grant and developing fundraising opportunities in coordination with UCGHI. 5. Developing and managing outreach to partner institutions such as EAP, the Blum Center, and PHCOE core partners across the 10 UCs 6. Recruiting new UC and non‑UC partners, and furthering relationships with existing partners. 7. Developing and managing PHCOE core projects 8. Serving as a liaison with UCGHI core staff. 9. Liaising and leading PHCOE staff at other UCs.

10. Serving as a liaison between the UCSB Office of Research and ISBER for budget development, reports, and research development. Required: PhD in a Social Science or a related field. Preferred: Experience organizing events, building databases, writing grants, mentoring undergraduates and managing multi‑site projects. Familiarity with a university setting. Initial appointment is for 3 months (beginning approximately May 1st, 2019) at 50%, with a partial benefit package. Continuation beyond three months will be based on performance and availability of funding. The salary is based on UCSBâs salary scales and dependent upon qualifications. To apply, please go to the following link https://recruit.ap.ucsb.edu/apply/ JPF01474 on or after 3/4/19. The Department is especially interested in candidates who can contribute to the diversity and excellence of the academic community through research, teaching and service. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law.

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PROFESSIONAL

ASSISTANT DEAN OF DEVELOPMENT, SCIENCES

OFFICE OF DEVELOPMENT Works closely with the Dean of the Sciences to create and implement fund‑raising and campaign plans for these major campus units. Plays a critical role in the overall campus fund‑raising program. Designs and executes planned strategies for the identification, cultivation, solicitation, closing and stewardship of major gifts ($100k+) with a focus on gifts of $1M+ from individuals and foundations and provides management oversight for annual giving and identification of new donors to build for the future. Manages a select portfolio of major and leadership gift prospects, guides, and manages other the Sciences Development Officers in their donor prospect relationships, supporting the Dean, faculty and volunteers in top prospect relationships, in order to maximize philanthropic support for UC Santa Barbara, raising gifts to meet identified fund‑raising priorities. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree or equivalent combination of education and experience. Minimum of 5‑7 years of major gift experience, including raising seven figure gifts. Proven track record of successfully managing current and prospective benefactors at the leadership level. Demonstrated skill at gift negotiation and gift solicitation to engage complex and sophisticated individual, corporate, and foundation donors toward significant philanthropic outcomes. Notes: Fingerprint background check required. This is an annually renewable contract position. Flexibility and willingness to travel frequently. Ability to work some weekends and evenings. Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record and enrollment in the DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program. Salary is competitive and commensurate with qualifications and experience. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For primary consideration apply by 3/13/19, thereafter open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs. ucsb.edu Job #20190113

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ASSISTANT FINANCIAL ANALYST

CHANCELLOR’S OFFICE Plays a critical role in providing, financial, administrative, and personnel analysis and coordination for the Office of the Chancellor. Duties include: monitoring budgets for multiple programs/units; reviewing monthly financial statements; researching, analyzing and resolving errors and discrepancies; analyzing spending patterns; creating and providing financial reports and summary analyses; performing financial forecasting; coordinating the


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EMPLOYMENT review, analysis and processing of a variety of financial, administrative and personnel actions; and handling the review, analysis and implementation of all payroll actions for the programs and units managed by the Chancellor’s Office. In consultation with the Budget & Finance Manager, analyzes and resolves problems and provides input towards maintaining efficiency and accuracy of financial operations. Reqs: Ability to understand internal control practices and their impact on protecting University resources. Experience in independently accomplishing tasks in an environment with changing priorities; ability to work under pressure of deadlines. Excellent interpersonal skills with an ability to develop and maintain effective, productive and cooperative professional relationships and work collaboratively with individuals and groups. Note: Fingerprint background check required. $25.00‑$28.00/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For primary consideration apply by 3/17/19, thereafter open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #20190118

ASSOC DIRECTOR OF DEVELOPMENT, ECOLOGICAL & ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE

OFFICE OF DEVELOPMENT Works with donor prospects to optimize philanthropy to benefit UC Santa Barbara and to support a compliment of initiatives prioritized by academic and program leadership and the Director of Development, Ecological and Environmental Sciences. Primary portfolio includes the Natural Reserve System, the Cheadle Center for Biodiversity and Ecological Restoration, the Marine Science Institute, UCSB Sustainability, and other special projects as assigned. Primary emphasis is on the identification, cultivation, solicitation, and stewardship of individual prospects (alumni, parents and friends), foundations, and corporations. Focus will be on organizing donor outreach, securing new and renewing annual gifts ($1,000+), with an added emphasis on building and maintaining an active pipeline of $1,000 ‑ $24,999 gifts, as well as helping to identify, cultivate and solicit major gift prospects starting at $25,000. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree or equivalent combination of education and experience. Prior experience preferred in individual major donor development or related profession. Proven success in the development, sales, or related business field. An understanding of building professional relationships in a Development environment. With training, ability to articulate the programmatic objectives with clarity and passion. Highest ethical standards, demonstrated empathy and a positive attitude in the face of difficulty and challenge. Notes: Fingerprint background check required. This is an annually renewable contract position. Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record and enrollment in the DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program. Flexibility and willingness to travel frequently. Ability to work some weekends and evenings. Salary is competitive and commensurate with qualifications and experience. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For primary consideration apply

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(CONTINUED)

by 3/18/19, thereafter open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs. ucsb.edu Job #20190122

CAREER CONNECTION PROGRAM COORDINATOR

DEPARTMENT OF ECONOMICS Manages all aspects of the Career Connection Program in the Department of Economics. Contacts and engages alumni and southern California businesses for partnership with department and Economics students. Creates surveys and various data collection sheets in order to project greatest needs for our students. Develops long range plans and vision for the center, which includes fundraising efforts. Works closely with UCSB Development office, Alumni Association, as well as alumni and outside businesses for internships and fellowships, and to gather information for long‑range planning. Sets goals and objectives for unit in conjunction with department Chair, business officer, and ad hoc committees. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree or equivalent combination of education and experience. Experience with UC procedures. Excellent oral and written communications skills. Ability to organize and prioritize, managing multiple tasks at once, even with frequent interruptions, while paying attention to detail. Strong computer skills, including experience with spreadsheet and database applications. Ability to effectively solve problems and demonstrate sound reasoning and judgment. Ability to establish and maintain cooperative working relationships within the department, the Development Office and with the broader campus community. Note: Fingerprint background check required. $50,000‑$62,493.84/ yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For primary consideration apply online by 3/12/19, thereafter open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #20190108

EMPLOYMENT & TRAINING ANALYST 2

HUMAN RESOURCES Performs a wide range of complex services related to staff employment and recruitment, placement and retention activities, diversity and outreach, and training. Manage recruitments and assist University staff and external applicants. Serve as the lead for the planning, coordination, and representation of UCSB at diversity and outreach events. Serves as the primary liaison for campus, community and diversity partners. Plan, develop, and market HR staff training programs, courses, and workshops. Serve as the rehired retiree program administrator. Serve as an OACIS and UCLC systems liaison. Uses professional employment and staffing techniques and concepts for employment, sourcing programs, and complying with policies for the organization. Recruitment and employment efforts are of moderate scope and complexity. Works on staffing/employment for skilled operational and technical and professional level positions. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree in related area and / or equivalent experience / training. Working knowledge of organizational policies and procedures; knowledge of functional area and understands how work may impact other areas.

Effective communication and interpersonal skills as well as active listening and critical thinking skills. Demonstrated abilities associated with problem identification; reasoning; ability to work with business units in the development of ideas to solve staffing issues. Demonstrated analytical skills to conduct analysis and develop recommendations. Working knowledge of the recruitment, screening, interviewing and referral processes. Knowledge of HR processes and forms and knows organizational and departmental principles. Note: Fingerprint background check required. $23.95‑$26.64/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For primary consideration apply by 3/17/19, thereafter open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #20190125

support to five faculty members and coordinates all travel, updates BioBibs, and keeps busy calendars. Reqs: Detail oriented with the ability to multitask. Must be able to work with frequent interruptions. Proficient in Excel, Word, and database applications. Experience working with office equipment. Basic knowledge of fund accounting. Excellent oral and written communication skills. Must have strong organizational, analytical, and problem solving skills with demonstrated ability to meet deadlines. Excellent customer service skills. Note: Fingerprint background check required. $22.51 ‑ $23.58/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For primary consideration apply online by 3/17/19, thereafter open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #20190120

EVENT COORDINATOR

GRADUATE ADVISOR

OFFICE OF EVENT MANAGEMENT & PROTOCOL Provides event coordination, oversight and production management for certain UCSB events as assigned. Provides analytical and administrative support for special projects assisting the Director, Event Management & Protocol. Covers other staff assignments related to campus events. Provides and tracks budget data for programs and activities being coordinated. Reqs: BA/BS and two years of experience planning and coordinating large events, or AA and five years of experience planning and coordinating large events, or equivalent combination of years of experience. Clear written and verbal communication skills, knowledge of public address systems, experience using PowerPoint and Microsoft Office Suite applications. Notes: Fingerprint background check required. Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record and enrollment in the DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program. Must be able to work some evening and weekends. This is a 50% time per year career position. $23.47‑$29.41/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For primary consideration apply by 3/10/19, thereafter open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #20190106

FINANCIAL & FACULTY ASSISTANT

SOLID STATE LIGHTING & ENERGY CENTER Responsible for the overall completion of the fiscal affairs of the Solid State Lighting & Energy Center (SSLEC) in accordance with university policies and procedures. Responsibilities include: purchasing, reviewing of expenditures, income accounts, reconciliation of general ledgers, travel and expense reimbursement documentation. Collects financial data and recommends courses of action to the MSO for all fiscal activities and SSLEC budget activities. Maintains substantial knowledge of University policies and procedures related to purchasing, accounting and travel/ entertainment and updates skills to perform high level functions including multiple spreadsheets and databases. Uses independent judgment, initiative, analytical skills. Provides

COMPUTER SCIENCE Participates in all aspects of student life in Computer Science. Coordinates and manages the graduate admissions program, advises approximately 190 graduate students and 400 undergraduate students on a wide variety of issues, including requirements for graduate admissions, program requirements and options, grades, courses, financial aid, petitions, leaves, exam schedules, housing, cost of living, community issues, employment, and other personal and academic issues related to their welfare. Position requires extensive knowledge of University and Graduate Division policies and procedures regarding graduate and undergraduate student affairs, and requires the ability to interpret regulations from various administrative offices to students and faculty, extensive teamwork and cooperation within the Student Affairs Area by assisting with the on‑going workload and acting independently. Reqs: Strong written and verbal communication skills. Ability to organize and prioritize, managing varying workloads. Ability to work with a diverse group of students, faculty, staff, and other campus offices on a variety of tasks. Strong problem‑solving skills. Ability to be accurate and thorough with careful attention to details. Ability to use various programs (Excel, Word, Google) to complete required tasks. Note: Fingerprint background check required. $22.56‑$25.94/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity /Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For primary consideration apply online by 3/13/19, thereafter open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #20190111

HOUSING BILLING ASSISTANT

BILLING OFFICE Provides primary contact with the public for the Billing Office. Provides telephone and in‑person advising for problem resolution and complex transactions, often involving coordination with other departments or outside agencies. Maintains internal controls for large volume of refund checks, ensuring verification of recipient and safeguarding of checks. Processes Housing Contract refunds. Audits Student Emergency Loan and short term loan applications. Maintains

loan disbursement records. Reqs: Computer skills, including working knowledge of word processing and spreadsheet software applications and internet browsers. Ability to effectively interact with a diverse workforce and customers. Excellent written and oral communication skills. Knowledge of general accounting principles with the ability to follow an audit trail and analyze billing accounts. Demonstrated organizational skills while working on multiple tasks. Ability to deal with frequent interruptions and prioritize multiple task assignments while maintaining accuracy, paying attention to detail and meeting deadlines. Notes: Fingerprint background check required. May be required to work overtime during peak periods. $19.48‑$20.36/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For primary consideration apply by 3/18/19, thereafter open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs. ucsb.edu Job #20190128

PEOPLESOFT BUSINESS SYSTEMS ANALYST

BUSINESS & FINANCIAL SERVICES Supports BFS in the areas of reporting and strategic planning, identifying business processes, and problem solving through analysis of business systems and user needs. Documents complex business processes and systems; prepares plans and proposals for the improvement of systems,

procedures and processes; writes test scripts and tests system changes; writes functional design documents; ensures business continuity; and develops reports and tools for internal and external clients. Maintains high level of proficiency with PeopleSoft FSCM and HCM. Possesses solid operational and accounting skills, general ledger reconciliations and budget transactions, and campus financial systems. Possesses ability to work under deadline pressure, handling multiple projects concurrently. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree in Computer Science, Engineering, Business or related or combination of relevant professional experience and education. Proficiency with MS Office and Visio. Experience analyzing large‑scale business processes and problems; developing solutions involving the use of computer systems, information flow and architecture; creating specifications for systems to meet requirements; validating requirements against needs; designing details of automated systems; developing user interface design; planning and executing unit integration and acceptance testing; developing user reference materials and trainings. Ability to work with stakeholders at multiple levels to ensure the application meets business objectives. Must be self‑motivated, detail oriented and able to manage one’s own work independently. Note: Fingerprint background check required. $67,710‑$89,200/ yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For primary consideration apply by 3/17/19, thereafter open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #20190119

RADIATION AND CHEMICAL SAFETY MANAGER

ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH & SAFETY (EH&S) Responsible for managing campus research safety programs. Acts as an authorized agent of the California Department of Public Health, Radiologic Health Branch, by overseeing the preparation and revisions of the campus Radioactive Material License, Radiation Safety Committee Bylaws, Radiation Safety Manuals, Radiation Emergency Procedures Manual, and the Laser Safety Manual. Manages the UCSB Chemical Hygiene Program, including developing and implementing chemical hygiene policies and practices that are in full compliance with the Laboratory Standard and Hazard Communication Standard. Contributes technical expertise towards the development and implementation of the Chemical Hygiene Plan, and assists the Research Safety Division Manager with overseeing the campus‑wide development and maintenance of standard operating procedures (SOP’s). Reqs: Bachelor’s degree in Health Physics, Chemistry, Toxicology or related fields. Must be, or have been, a Radiation Safety Officer or Alternate Radiation Safety Officer on a broad scope type A license, or be able to provide a state‑recognized signed attestation letter from another broad scope type A license Radiation Safety Officer. Supervisory or managerial experience in research or environmental health and safety. Knowledge and skill in applying and interpreting local, state and federal regulations and standards in the field of radiation and chemical safety. Notes: Fingerprint background check

NOW HIRING

GRAPHIC DESIGNER The Santa Barbara Independent is seeking a part-time in-house graphic designer. Candidate must have knowledge of Adobe Creative Suite on a Mac platform. Candidate will preferably have experience in font management and familiar with print publishing and file handling. The candidate will possess strong and professional communication skills, and be able to work well under pressure. This position works alongside multiple departments and under strict deadlines. Please send resumes and online portfolio links to hr@independent.com. No phone calls. EOE F/M/D/V

Please email resume and/or questions to

hr@independent.com

Advertising Sales Representative The Santa Barbara Independent has a rare opportunity in our Advertising Sales division. We are in search of an ideal candidate to join our well-established team of sales professionals. This full-time position requires: ability to sell multimedia products -- print, online, and other developing industry offerings; excellent organizational and time-management skills to meet deadlines crucial to our production process; superb verbal and written communication skills; the ability to build strong client relationships via collaborative selling and excellent customer service; as well as the charisma to be a strong ambassador of The Independent in our community. With a 30-year history of serving Santa Barbara, our awardwinning products are an integral part of our community and are well-respected on a national level. We offer a competitive commission structure along with a strong benefits package, including health and dental insurance, Section 125 cafeteria plan, 401(k), and vacation program. Please send résumé along with cover letter to hr@independent.com EOE F/M/D/V. No phone calls, please. INDEPENDENT.COM

MARCH 7, 2019

THE INDEPENDENT

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INDEPENDENT CLASSIFIEDS

EMPLOYMENT required. Maintain a valid CA driver’s license. Must be physically able to wear a self‑contained breathing apparatus. Move heavy objects (i.e., 55‑gallon drums filled with liquid). Must be willing to work and respond to emergencies. $76,100‑$125,550/ yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For primary consideration apply by 3/14/19, thereafter open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #20190112

SENIOR COLLECTIONS REPRESENTATIVE

BILLING ACCOUNTS RECEIVABLE COLLECTIONS (BARC) Responsible for the management of student loan portfolios and sundry debts as assigned. Maintains knowledge of Federal, State and University policies and procedures. Maintains standards in accordance with departmental Mission Statement and Customer Service program. Participates in Employee Partnership program and trains Collection Unit team members on areas of expertise. Reqs: Proven excellent financial and analytical skills and experience working on an inclusive, effective, service‑oriented team. Excellent communication, analytical, and technical skills. Ability to work with minimal direction to coordinate and execute numerous tasks simultaneously. Requires demonstrated ability to effectively apply analytical, organizational, and problem‑solving skills to interpret Federal student loan regulations and strong interpersonal skills to communicate those regulations to UCSB cohort. Must be able to maintain confidentiality and exercise good judgment, logic, tact, and diplomacy while performing the critical duties of the position. Bachelors degree in accounting, economics or business, or equivalent combination of education and experience. Note: Fingerprint background check required. $24.48‑$25.67/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For primary consideration apply by 3/18/19, thereafter open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs. ucsb.edu Job #20190127

UCIV PARDALL CANTER PROGRAM COORDINATOR

ASSOCIATED STUDENTS Provides support for the student staff and volunteers who interact with Isla Vista residents and visitors to provide them with knowledge and resources to make informed decisions about their own and the community’s well‑being. Prevents conflict and promotes peaceful interactions between public safety officers and Isla Vista residents, visitors to the community, and visitors to the Pardall Center. When needed, the volunteers connect people with medical services or other public safety officials. Knowledge of physical facilities and project management. Reqs: Excellent verbal and written communication skills. Ability to work with a diverse community and student population. Must be sensitive to unique issues that have faced Isla Vista, particularly over

64

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COMPUTER SCIENCE Responsible for all aspects of the Computer Science (CS) undergraduate programs. Serves as the initial source of information, advises major, partner major, and prospective major students regarding general and admissions information. Monitors every aspect of progress towards degree, and counsels students as appropriate. Initiates, maintains, and evaluates students’ academic records, processes all petitions, checks prerequisites, and performs other administrative tasks. Ensures grades are reported for both graduate and undergraduate students and develops and updates the Schedule of Classes and other publications. Requires knowledge of policy and procedures for the College of Engineering (COE), College of Letters and Science (L & S), and the College of Creative Studies (CCS). Drafts original correspondence regarding undergraduate matters for the Chair, Vice Chair, Undergraduate Faculty Advisor, MSO, and SAM. Serves as the departmental liaison with the Office of the Registrar on all matters pertaining to departmental courses grades and undergraduate records. Works within a team environment within the Student Affairs area and department, assists with the ongoing workload, and acts as backup to the Graduate Program Coordinator when they are unavailable. Reqs: Strong written and verbal communication skills. Ability to organize, prioritize, and complete work with frequent interruptions. Ability to work with a diverse group of students, faculty, staff, and other campus offices on a variety of tasks. Strong problem solving skills. Ability to be accurate and thorough with careful attention to details. Ability to use various programs (Excel, Word, Google) to complete required tasks. Note: Fingerprint background check required. $22.56‑$24.81/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For primary consideration apply online by 3/18/19, thereafter open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #20190129

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MARCH 7, 2019

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the last several years. Good judgement especially in identifying students and members of the community that may have issues in regard to mental health, drugs or alcohol or may be houseless. Strong organizational skills attention to detail. Knowledge of office automation systems, procedures, and methods. Ability to solve problems, conduct research and present solutions to management. Notes: Fingerprint background check required. Must be able to work some evenings and weekend evenings. $22.56‑$23.00/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For primary consideration apply by 3/17/19, thereafter open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs. ucsb.edu Job #20190117

THE INDEPENDENT

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INDEPENDENT CLASSIFIEDS

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E M A I L S A L E S @ I N D E P E N D E N T. C O M

LEGALS ADMINISTER OF ESTATE NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: RUTH P. BERNHARDT aka RUTH BERNHARDT Case No.: 19PR00051 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of RUTH P. BERNHARDT aka RUTH BERNHARDT A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by: PETER BERNHARDT in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara THE PETITION for probate requests that: PETER BERNHARDT be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The Independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held in this court as follows: 03/21/2019 AT 9:00 a.m. Dept: 5 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, 1100 Anacapa Street, P.O Box 21107 Santa Barbara, CA 93102 Anacapa Division. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general

personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: Steven F. Barnes; CA Bar #101561 (805) 687‑6660 Barnes & Barnes, 1900 State Street, Suite M, Santa Barbara, CA 93101, Published Feb 28. Mar 7, 14, 2019.

FBN ABANDONMENT STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF USE OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME The following Fictitious Business Name is being abandoned: FOOTHILL PET HOSPITAL at 675 Cieneguitas Road Santa Barbara, CA 93110; The original statement for use of this Fictitious Business Name was filed 08/30/2017 in the County of Santa Barbara. Original file no. 2017‑0002453. The person (s) or entities abandoning use of this name are as follows: Michael Dean Rittenberg DVM 1894 W Chapel Drive Camarillo, CA 93010 This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 25, 2019. I hereby certify that this is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy, Published: Feb 28. Mar 7, 14, 21 2019. STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF USE OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME The following Fictitious Business Name is being abandoned: INTERNATIONAL SPORTS SCIENCES ASSOCIATION, ISSA at 1015 Mark Avenue Carpinteria, CA 93013; The original statement for use of this Fictitious Business Name was filed 03/01/2016 in the County of Santa Barbara. Original file no. 2016‑0000626. The person (s) or entities abandoning use of this name

are as follows: Sal A Arria (same address) Fred Hatfield 902 Wyngate Court Safety Harbor, FL 34695 This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 26, 2019. I hereby certify that this is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Margarita Silva, Published: Mar 7, 14, 21, 28 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: HAVEN PROPERTY MANAGEMENT at 964 W Campus Ln. Goleta, CA 93117; Eric L. Dahl (same address) This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company Signed: Eric L. Dahl Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 21, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2019‑0000435. Published: Feb 28. Mar 7, 14, 21 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SOMATIC SKILLS COACHING at 933 Castillo St. #3, Santa Barbara CA 93101; Anna Reidenbach 309 E Micheltorena St. Apt G, Santa Barbara, CA 93101 This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Anna Reidenbach Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 25, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Margarita Silva. FBN Number: 2019‑0000212. Published: Feb 21, 28. Mar 7, 14 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SWR SOFTWARE SOLUTIONS 2569 Treasure Dr. Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Steve Reed (Same Address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: STEVE REED Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 05, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2019‑0000310. Published: Mar 7, 14, 21, 28 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: INFINITIQUES at 1219 De La Vina Street, Apt 2 Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Timothy Lance Borkowski (same address) Xiaomeng Zhang (same address) This business is conducted by a Married Couple Signed: Timothy L. Borkowski Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 8, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Adela Bustos. FBN Number: 2019‑0000341. Published: Feb 14, 21, 28. Mar 7 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: FITZ’S CATERING at 1015 Laguna Street #6 Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Fitz’s Catering, Inc. (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: Mareike Schmidt‑Agent Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 7, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Brenda Aguilera. FBN Number: 2019‑0000323. Published: Feb 14, 21, 28. Mar 7 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: ROSEWOOD MIRAMAR BEACH MONTECITO at 1555 South Jameson Lane Montecito, CA 93108; Miramar Acquisition Co. LLC 101 The Grove Drive Los Angeles, CA 90036 This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company Signed: John Han, Director of Finance Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 5, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jan Morales. FBN Number: 2019‑0000312. Published: Feb 14, 21, 28. Mar 7 2019.

Tide Guide Day

High

Sunrise 7:16 Sunset 7:02

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2:21 am 4.6

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Thu 14

3:31 am 4.7

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20 D

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crosswordpuzzle

tt By Ma

Jones

“Not the Best of 2018”-- we’ve saved the very worst for last.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: BASKING IN GOODNESS at 27 West Anapamu St Suite 303 Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Emma Malina 2545 Medcliff Rd Santa Barbara, CA 93109 This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 5, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Brenda Aguliera. FBN Number: 2019‑0000300. Published: Feb 14, 21, 28. Mar 7 2019.

44 Moving day rental 45 Corney key 46 Paid no heed to 1 Santa-tracking defense gp. 48 Entertainer criticized for a racially 6 Not yet decided, briefly insensitive tweet in October--not a good look for the Divine Miss M 9 Club counterpart 52 Chip in a Mexican dish named for 14 NBA venue its inventor 15 Regret 53 Canceled Fox sitcom with a first 16 “Citizen Kane” director Welles episode aptly titled “Pilot” (that’s 17 Extremely annoying kids’ song Pilot with a capital “P”) (“doo doo doo doo doo doo”) 57 Western film, slangily which also featured in themed 58 “Let’s call ___ day” clothing like a pajama set or 59 You are here graphic T 60 Great honor 19 Greek goddess trio, with “the” 61 Laze, with “out” 20 Action sequel called the worst movie of 2018 by multiple critics 62 Nine, in some “Sesame Street” episodes (with hastily-edited ads ending in “Rated R”) 22 They use toner 25 Abbr. for some low-income 1 Apprehend shoppers 2 “Been Lying” singer Rita 26 Goes outside of coverage 3 Civil War soldier, for short 27 Grass or weed 4 Day or night 29 Network bringing back 5 Some Morse code symbols “Temptation Island” in January 6 Links hazards 2019 7 “Perry Mason” star Raymond 32 One of 30 on a dodecahedron 8 Apollo astronaut Slayton 33 Words in an infomercial 9 Convertible furniture for sleeping disclaimer 10 Chris of “The Lego Movie 2” 35 Collectible disk for ‘90s kids 11 On the subject of 36 Stout relative 12 Active type 37 College football team ranked 13 Funny duo? 121st out of 129 by CBS Sports 18 “On ___ Majesty’s Secret (between New Mexico and Kent Service” State U.) 21 Leave the airport 38 AAA map abbr. 22 Origami step 23 A bunch 39 To be, in Toledo 24 Cellphone forerunners 40 Receipt figure 27 Excavate 41 “The Shape of Water” director 28 Greg who missed the entire Guillermo del ___ 2007-08 season after his #1 42 Curve in a figure eight NBA draft pick 43 Chicken, pejoratively

Across

Down

INDEPENDENT.COM

MARCH 7, 2019

29 Commotion 30 “I totally agree” 31 Dating from time immemorial 33 Pedicurist’s stone 34 Cartoon crimefighter ___ Ant 37 Progressive online news site since 2004 41 “Walden” author 44 Lopsided 45 Early anesthetic 46 Item on a dog collar 47 Day-___ (fluorescent) 48 Deity worshiped by Canaanites 49 ___ Cooler (“Ghostbusters”themed Hi-C flavor) 50 1054, in Roman numerals 51 “Must’ve been something ___” 52 December drink 54 Ph.D. hopeful’s exam 55 Off-road ride, briefly 56 “___-Ra and the Princesses of Power” ©2019 Jonesin’ Crosswords (editor@ jonesincrosswords.com) For answers to this puzzle, call: 1-900-226-2800, 99 cents per minute. Must be 18+. Or to bill to your credit card, call: 1-800-655-6548. Reference puzzle #0917

LAST WEEK’S SOLUTION:

THE INDEPENDENT

65


INDEPENDENT CLASSIFIEDS

LEGALS

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: RH MANAGEMENT INC. at 431 Corona Del Mar Santa Barbara, CA 93103; RH Management 1650 Veteran Ave. #307 Los angeles, CA 90024 This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 28, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2019‑0000227. Published: Feb 14, 21, 28. Mar 7 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: ROMEO REAL ESTATE INC. at 431 Corona Del Mar Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Romeo Real Estate Inc. 1650 Veteran Ave. #307 Los Angeles, CA 90024 This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 28, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2019‑0000226. Published: Feb 14, 21, 28. Mar 7 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: FIREWISE, KITTS MCCABE at 625 West Ortega St Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Firewise Solutions LLC (same address) This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company Signed: Christopher McCabe, President Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 5, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Tara Jayasinghe. FBN Number: 2019‑0000307. Published: Feb 14, 21, 28. Mar 7 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: CHANNEL VIEW APARTMENTS, THE BONSAI at 515 Red Rose Lane #18 Santa Barbara, CA 93109; Mark Abate 480 Glen Annie Road Goleta, CA 93117; John Whitehurst 515 Red Rose Lane #18 Santa Barbara, CA 93109 This business is conducted by a General Partnership Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 5, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Tara Jayasinghe. FBN Number: 2019‑0000309. Published: Feb 14, 21, 28. Mar 7 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: EMC at 401 N Milpas St #C Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Engaging In Molding Choices, Inc (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 5, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Brenda Aguilera. FBN Number: 2019‑0000299. Published: Feb 14, 21, 28. Mar 7 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SEE INTERNATIONAL at 175 Cremona Drive, Suite 100 Santa Barbara, CA 93117; Surgical Eye Expeditions International, Inc. (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: Mayra Garcia Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 4, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2019‑0000282. Published: Feb 14, 21, 28. Mar 7 2019.

66

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: FIG MOUNTAIN FOOD FACTORY, PIZZA MIZZA, PIZZA MIZZA DELIVERY at 1114 State Street #20 Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Delivery SB LLC (same address) This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 11, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Adela Bustos. FBN Number: 2019‑0000350. Published: Feb 21, 28. Mar 7, 14 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: THE LOFT SALON at 446 Alisal Rd. Suite #19 Solvang, CA 93463; Kristy Jensen 3011 Country Rd. Santa Ynez, CA 93460 This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 11, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Connie Tran. FBN Number: 2019‑0000349. Published: Feb 21, 28. Mar 7, 14 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: FUNKIDSSB at 516 E. Victoria St. Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Tracy Jackson (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 24, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Connie Tran. FBN Number: 2019‑0000195. Published: Feb 21, 28. Mar 7, 14 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: INDIGO JUNE at 5817 Encina Road Apt 102 Goleta, CA 93117; Shauna Seale (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Shauna Shea Seale Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 24, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Connie Tran. FBN Number: 2019‑0000197. Published: Feb 21, 28. Mar 7, 14 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: VIRTUAL BUSINESS VIEWS at 1117 State Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101; John Michael Orrico 226 E. Sola Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101 This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: John Orrico Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 1, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Sandra E. Rodriguez. FBN Number: 2019‑0000273. Published: Feb 21, 28. Mar 7, 14 2019.

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PHONE 965-5205

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: WILD BELONGING at 2429 Bath Street Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Alexis Slutzky 2429 Bath St Unit A Santa Barbara, CA 93105 This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 29, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2019‑0000239. Published: Feb 28. Mar 7, 14, 21 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: FAIRY & FROG at 1607 Mission Dr Suites 109/110 Solvang, CA 93463; Nancy Schulte 6154 Caleta Ave Goleta, CA 93117 This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Jeffrey Carroll Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 19, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Sandra E. Rodriguez. FBN Number: 2019‑0000406. Published: Feb 28. Mar 7, 14, 21 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: ONE CARAT MANI & PEDI at 8 W Figueroa Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Takako Sato 6623 Calle Koral Goleta, CA 93117 This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 29, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Brenda Aguilera. FBN Number: 2019‑0000242. Published: Feb 28. Mar 7, 14, 21 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: BACKYARD BOWLS at 331 Motor Way, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; PHDG, LLC (Same Address) This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 14, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2019‑0000388. Published: Feb 21, 28. Mar 7, 14 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: LIFESTYLE DESIGN, LIFESTYLEDESIGN at 216 E. Cota St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Global Lifestyle Design, Inc. (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 25, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Sandra E. Rodriguez. FBN Number: 2019‑0000466. Published: Feb 28. Mar 7, 14, 21 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: JOHN L’S PRODUCTIONS at 4144 Vista Clara Rd Santa Barbara, CA 93110; John Lewellen Pitcher (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 21, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Tara Jayasinghe. FBN Number: 2019‑0000430. Published: Feb 28. Mar 7, 14, 21 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: PERCH CO WORKING, THE PERCH, PERCH GOLETA, PERCH SB at 250 Storke Road Suite 10 Goleta, CA 93117; Alexander R. Markovich 2833 Spring Meadow Drive Corona, CA 92881 This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 14, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Brenda Aguilera. FBN Number: 2019‑0000384. Published: Feb 28. Mar 7, 14, 21 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: JEFF CARROLL PLUMBING at 375 Pine Ave #4, Goleta, CA 93117; Jeffrey David Carroll 596 San Marino Dr., Santa Barbara, CA 93111 This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Jeffrey Carroll Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 15, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Sandra E. Rodriguez. FBN Number: 2019‑0000393. Published: Feb 21, 28. Mar 7, 14 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: GOLETA CONCRETE PUMPING at 222 W. Haley St Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Sergio Corona Borrayo (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 4, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Margarita Silva. FBN Number: 2019‑0000292. Published: Feb 28. Mar 7, 14, 21 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: TYPE RAMP at 133 East De La Guerra #298 Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Samuel Gates 930 Carpinteria Street Santa Barbara, CA 93103 This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 20, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Brenda Aguilera. FBN Number: 2019‑0000414. Published: Feb 28. Mar 7, 14, 21 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: THE FRANKLIN LAW OFFICE at 252 Ancona Ave. Goleta, CA 93117; Lisa Franklin (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Lisa Franklin Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 1, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2019‑0000275. Published: Feb 21, 28. Mar 7, 14 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: THE PROJECT: CORAZON COCINA & TAPROOM at 214 State Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Cerveceria + Taco Project, LLC 49 Via Alicia Santa Barbara, CA 93108 This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 29, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2019‑0000240. Published: Feb 21, 28. Mar 7, 14 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: MODERN EYE CARE at 3890 La Cumbre Plaza Lane Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Douglas A. Katsev 4225 Via Presada Santa Barbara, CA 93110; Nina Katsev (same address) This business is conducted by a Married Couple Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 25, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2019‑0000464. Published: Feb 28. Mar 7, 14, 21 2019.

MARCH 7, 2019

E M A I L S A L E S @ I N D E P E N D E N T. C O M

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: GONZALES GARDEN SERVICES at 4002 Via Lucero #10 Santa Barbara, CA 93110; Edgardo Gonzalez (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Edgardo Gonzalez Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 13, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Brenda Aguilera. FBN Number: 2019‑0000374. Published: Feb 21, 28. Mar 7, 14 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: INTERACT THEATRE SCHOOL at 535 La Marina Santa Barbara, CA 93109; Eirene Maya Smith (same address) Monty D Smith (same address) Natalia Emily Smith (same address) This business is conducted by a General Partnership Signed: Eirene Maya Smith Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 20, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Brenda Aguilera. FBN Number: 2019‑0000420. Published: Feb 28. Mar 7, 14, 21 2019.

THE INDEPENDENT

|

INDEPENDENT.COM

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: BIKE RENTAL BY WHEEL FUN RENTALS at 24 E Mason St Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Wheel Fun Rentals (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 15, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2019‑0000392. Published: Feb 28. Mar 7, 14, 21 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: CAMINS 2 DREAMS at 313 N F St. Lompoc, CA 93436; Kalawashq’ Wine Cellars, Inc. (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: Randolph G. I CE Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 21, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2019‑0000425. Published: Feb 28. Mar 7, 14, 21 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: STUDIO 920 at 1606 Grand Ave Apt E Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Rafael Parmegiani Coelho (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 8, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Brenda Aguilera. FBN Number: 2019‑0000344. Published: Feb 28. Mar 7, 14, 21 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: HOG WASH WELDING at 86 Six Flags Circle Buellton, CA 93427; April Trieger (same address) Trevor Trieger (same address) This business is conducted by a Married Couple Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 4, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Sandra E. Rodriguez. FBN Number: 2019‑0000295. Published: Feb 28. Mar 7, 14, 21 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SCOR PRODUCTIONS at 16030 Tupper Street North Hills, CA 91343; Ice Productions, Inc. (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: Randolph G. I CE Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 30, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Connie Tran. FBN Number: 2019‑0000258. Published: Feb 28. Mar 7, 14, 21 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: PUEBLO REALTY GROUP, PUEBLO REALTY GROUP REFERRALS at 144 E. Carrillo St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Elizabeth Briggs 1826 Overlook Lane Santa Barbara, CA 93103 This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Elizabeth Briggs Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 21, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2019‑0000434. Published: Feb 28. Mar 7, 14, 21 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: FOOTHILL PET HOSPITAL at 675 Cieneguitas Road Santa Barbara, CA 93110; Santa Barbara Animal Integrative Medicine, Inc. (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 25, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2019‑0000462. Published: Feb 28. Mar 7, 14, 21 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: MONTECITO OPTOMETRY at 1147 Coast Village Road Santa Barbara, CA 93108; Strickland Optometry (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: Gary Strickland, President Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 14, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2019‑0000383. Published: Feb 28. Mar 7, 14, 21 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: MOKE SB BY WHEEL FUN RENTALS at 24 E Mason St Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Wheel Fun Rentals (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 15, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2019‑0000391. Published: Feb 28. Mar 7, 14, 21 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SUPPORTTK at 726 East Cota St Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Supporttk LLC (same address) This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company Signed: Natascha Cohen Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 1, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Tara Jayasinghe. FBN Number: 2019‑0000271. Published: Feb 28. Mar 7, 14, 21 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: CVS/ PHARMACY #11216 7030 Hollister Avenue Goleta, CA 93117; Garfield Beach CVS, L.L.C. 1 CVS Drive Woonsocket, RI 02895 This business is conducted by an Limited Liability Company Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 25, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2019‑0000455. Published: Mar 7, 14, 21, 28 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: WRITE KINDA GIRL, WRITEKINDAGIRL 216 West Gutierrez Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Nicole Wald 772 Palermo Drive Santa Barbara, CA 93105 This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 1, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Adela Bustos. FBN Number: 2019‑0000501. Published: Mar 7, 14, 21, 28 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: ELECTRICARE at 133 E De La Guerra Unit 224 Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Neev Naor 11024 Balboa Blvd #275 Granada Hills, CA 91344 This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 21, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2019‑0000427. Published: Mar 7, 14, 21, 28 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: ALLIED CENTRAL COAST DISTRIBUTING 815 S. Blosser Road Santa Maria, CA 93458 This business is conducted by an Limited Liability Company Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 25, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2019‑0000453. Published: Mar 7, 14, 21, 28 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: HIDEAWAY WINE COMPANY, HIDEAWAY WINES, THE HIDEAWAY at 92 2nd Street, Ste C & D Buellton, CA 93427; Standing Sun Wines Inc. (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 19, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2019‑0000399. Published: Mar 7, 14, 21, 28 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: GABRIELLE ANNEGRET at 118 W. Victoria #7 Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Gabrielle Barysch‑Crosbie (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 26, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Brenda Aguilera. FBN Number: 2019‑0000467. Published: Mar 7, 14, 21, 28 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: ROSE CAFE CATERING at 1816 Cliff Dr. Santa Barbara, CA 93109; Rosanna Barajas 321 N. Voluntario St. Santa Barbara, CA 93103 This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 22, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2019‑0000445. Published: Mar 7, 14, 21, 28 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: YOUR ERRAND RUNNER 5662 Calle Real #481 Goleta, CA 93117; Dee Wingo (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 4, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2019‑0000517. Published: Mar 7, 14, 21, 28 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: HONEYBEE TREE CARE at 252 San Nicolas Ave. Santa Barbara, CA 93109; Jeffrey D Stark (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 22, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Sandra E. Rodriguez. FBN Number: 2019‑0000447. Published: Mar 7, 14, 21, 28 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: COLLECTIVELY CLEAN 927 1/2 East Montecito St. Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Juan Gonzalez 4132 Constellation Rd Lompoc, CA 93436; Victoriano Perez 927 1/2 East Montecito St. Santa Barbara, CA 93103 This business is conducted by an General Partnership Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 12, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Thomas Brian. FBN Number: 2019‑0000354. Published: Mar 7, 14, 21, 28 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: A HARLEQUIN’S KOMBUCHA, HARLEQUIN KOMBUCHA at 2985 Steele St. Los Olivos, CA 93441; Pacific Rim Adventures Inc (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 27, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Sandra E. Rodriguez. FBN Number: 2019‑0000482. Published: Mar 7, 14, 21, 28 2019.

NAME CHANGE IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF ALANA MOUSSO ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 19CV00385 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s):


INDEPENDENT CLASSIFIEDS

LEGALS

FROM: ALANA BLYTHE MOUSSO TO: ISLA FREYA AURORA ALYSSENDRA ASTER WILDING FROM: RUBY FLORENCE MOUSSO TO: RUBY FLORENCE EMMA FREYA MOUSSO WILDING THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. NOTICE OF HEARING Apr 10, 2019 9:30am, Dept 6, Courthouse, 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101 A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated Jan 29 2019 by Pauline Maxwell, Judge of the Superior Court. Published. Feb 14, 21, 28. Mar 7 2019. IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF JONATHAN ROBERT SWEITZER ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 19CV00900 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: JONATHAN ROBERT SWEITZER TO: JONATHAN ROBERT MCGREGOR THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. NOTICE OF HEARING Apr 17, 2019 8:30am, Dept ONE, 312‑C Santa Maria, CA 93436 Superior Court Of California, County of Santa Maria A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated Feb 18 2019. by Timothy J. Staffel, Judge of the Superior Court. Published. Mar 7, 14, 21, 28 2019. IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF MICHAEL JOSEPH ANGEL GOMEZ ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 19CV00907 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: MICHAEL JOSEPH ANGEL GOMEZ TO: MICHAEL JOSEPH ANGEL GUTIERREZ THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must aooear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition withouta hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING April 5, 2019 9:00 am, Dept SM2, SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA 312 E. Cook Street Santa Maria, CA 93454 A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated Feb 19, 2019. by Darrel E. Parker, Executive Officer; J.,­ Nicola , Deputy Clerk; James F. Rigali Judge of the Superior Court. Published. Mar 7, 14, 21, 28 2019. IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF KYLE JASMINE MCBEATH ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 19CV00920

TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: KYLE JASMINE MCBEATH TO: JASMINE MCBEATH NATION THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. NOTICE OF HEARING May 08, 2019 9:30am, Dept 6, 1100 Anacapa St PO Box 21107 Santa Barbara, CA 93101 Superior Court Of California, County of Santa Barbara A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated Feb 27 2019. by Pauline Maxwell, Judge of the Superior Court. Published. Mar 7, 14, 21, 28 2019.

PUBLIC NOTICES EXTRA SPACE STORAGE will hold a public auction to sell personal property described below belonging to those individuals listed below at the location indicated: 6640 Discovery Drive, Goleta, CA 93117 March 28, 2019 @ 3:30PM George Deak Household, clothes, restaurant equipment Ryan Barge Musical equip. Veronico De Jesus Clothes Tanisha Harris Clothing Purchases must be made with cash only and paid at the above referenced facility in order to complete the transaction. Extra Space Storage may refuse any bid and may rescind any purchase up until the winning bidder takes possession of the personal property.

STATEMENT OF DAMAGES STATEMENT OF DAMAGES (Personal Injury or Wrongful Death) JORDAN D. HANKEY (SBN 266995) Attorney for PLAINTIFF: JEFFREY HARRIS, et al. Case number: 18CV04918. TO: DEFENDANT: ROBERT DECKER, et al. 1. General Damages a. Pain, suffering, and inconvenience $100,000.00 b. Emotional distress $100,000.00 c. Loss of consortium $10,000.00 2. Special damages a. Medical expenses (to date) $3,263.12 b. Future medical expenses (present value) $15,000.00 expenses c. Loss of earnings (to date) $250,000.00 d. Loss of future earning capacity $500,000.00 (present value) 3. Punitive damages: Plaintiff rexerves the right to seek punitive damages in the amount of (specify) $150,000.00 when pursuing a judgement in the suit filed against you. seeks damages in the above‑entitled action, as follows: The name, and address, and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney, or plaintiff without an attorney, is: Jordan D. Hankey (SBN 266995) Law Office of Jordan D. Hankey 903 State Street, Suite 205 Santa Barbara, CA 93101 805‑682‑3352 Published Date: Feb 28. Mar 7, 14, 21 2019. STATEMENT OF DAMAGES (Personal Injury or Wrongful Death) JORDAN D. HANKEY (SBN 266995) Attorney for PLAINTIFF: JEFFREY HARRIS, et al. Case number: 18CV04918. TO: DEFENDANT: ROBERT DECKER, et al. 1. General Damages a. Pain, suffering, and inconvenience $100,000.00 b. Emotional distress $100,000.00 c. Loss of consortium $10,000.00 2. Special damages a. Medical expenses (to date) $2,500.00 b. Future medical expenses (present value) $15,000.00 expenses 3. Punitive damages: Plaintiff rexerves the right to seek punitive damages in the amount of (specify) $150,000.00 when pursuing a judgement in the suit filed against you. seeks damages

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PHONE 965-5205

in the above‑entitled action, as follows: Date: February 11, 2019. The name, and address, and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney, or plaintiff without an attorney, is: Jordan D. Hankey (SBN 266995) Law Office of Jordan D. Hankey 903 State Street, Suite 205 Santa Barbara, CA 93101 805‑682‑3352 Published Date: Feb 28. Mar 7, 14, 21 2019.

SUMMONS SUMMONS (CITACION JUDICIAL) NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: (AVISO AL DEMANDADO): DAVID RICHARDSON and CARINA RICHARDSON and DOES 1 to 50 YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF: (LO ESTA DEMANDANDO EL DEMANDANTE): CASEY LEE JOHNSON NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this Summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self‑Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.­g ov/ selfhelp), your county law library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self‑Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.­g ov/ selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. AVISO! Lo han demandado. Si no responde dentro de 30 días, la corte puede decidir en su contra sin escuchar su version. Lea la informacion a continuacion. Tiene 30 DIAS DE CALENDARIO después de que le entreguen esta citación y papeles legales papa presentar una respuesta por escrito en esta corte y hacer que se entregue una copia al demandante. Una carta o una llamada telefónica no lo protegen. Su respuesta por escrito tiene que estar en formato legal correcto si desea que procesen su caso en la corte. Es posible que haya un formulario que usted pueda usar para su respuesta. Puede encontrar estos formularios de la corte y mas información en el Centro de Ayuda de las Cortes de California (www.­sucorte.ca.gov), en la biblioteca de leyes de su condado o en la corte que le quede mas cerca. Si no puede pagar la cuota de presentación, pida al secretario de la corte que le de un formulario de exención de pago de cuotas. Si no presenta su respuesta a tiempo, puede perder el caso por incumplimiento y la corte le podrá quitar su sueldo, dinero y bienes sin mas advertencia. Hay otros requisitos legales. Es recomendable que llame a un abogado inmediatamente. Si no conoce a un abogado, puede llamar a un servicio de remisión a abogados. Si no puede pagar a un abogado, es posible que cumpla

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E M A I L S A L E S @ I N D E P E N D E N T. C O M

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING City Council March 19, 2019; 6:00 p.m.

Ellwood Mesa Monarch Butterfly Habitat Management Plan-MND Adoption NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Goleta City Council will conduct a public hearing to consider Resolutions adopting the Ellwood Mesa Monarch Butterfly Habitat Management Plan (MBHMP) and the associated Initial Study/Mitigated Negative Declaration. The date, time, and location of the public hearing are set forth below. The agenda for the hearing will also be posted on the City website (https://tinyurl.com/GoletaMeetings). HEARING DATE AND TIME: PLACE:

Tuesday, March 19, 2019, at 6:00 P.M. City of Goleta, Council Chambers 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B Goleta, California 93117

PROJECT LOCATION: The Coverage Area for the MBHMP is located within the City-owned Ellwood Mesa Open Space, a regional open space. The entire Coverage Area is within the Coastal Zone. PROJECT DESCRIPTION: The MBHMP outlines the programmatic approach and methods for the City to manage and improve the Ellwood Mesa eucalyptus forest for the benefit of the overwintering behavior of the monarch butterfly (Danaus plexippus), other wildlife, and the public’s use and enjoyment. Two key local policy documents drive the protection of the monarch butterfly: the Goleta General Plan/Coastal Land Use Plan and the Ellwood-Devereux Coast Open Space/Habitat Management Plan. The MBHMP entails 22 programs integrating diverse aspects of habitat management. Each specific program identifies goals, policies, and actions to establish an efficient process leading to a management strategy for the sustainability of monarch habitat at Ellwood. The programs are followed by implementation priorities, schedules, needs, and contacts for those responsible for implementation. The 22 programs are organized into four categories as follows: • 9 Administrative Programs are designed to assist the City with and inform the MBHMP stakeholders of the details regarding implementation. • 7 Natural Resources Management Programs articulate the goals, policies, and actions necessary to maintain and improve key natural resources, including biological diversity and ecosystem functions associated with Ellwood eucalyptus groves and the monarch butterfly aggregation sites they support. • 3 Outreach Programs will provide information for visitors, educators, and students to develop appreciation for natural resources and local natural heritage, with a focus on monarchs. • 3 Monitoring, Research, and Adaptive Management Programs provide a mechanism for assessing environmental conditions and conducting studies to help understand the ecology of monarchs at Ellwood. Information obtained from these programs will inform MBHMP updates. Funding for implementation of the MBHMP will be drawn from a variety of sources, which may include grants, donations, mitigation fees, and City funds. The California state budget for the 2018–2019 fiscal year allocated 3.9 million dollars to the City for management and restoration of the monarch butterfly habitats on Ellwood Mesa. Environmental Review: Pursuant to the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA), City staff drafted an Initial Study/ Mitigated Negative Declaration (IS/MND) for the project. The IS/MND identified mitigation measures to reduce all impacts to less than significant levels and did not identify any residually significant impacts. DOCUMENT AVAILABILITY: The staff report may be obtained at the City of Goleta, 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B, Goleta, CA 93117. The documents will be posted on the City’s web site at www.cityofgoleta.org at least 72 hours ahead of the meeting. PUBLIC COMMENT: All interested persons are encouraged to attend the public hearing and to present written and/or oral comments. Written submittals concerning agenda items may be sent to the City Clerk e-mail: dlopez@cityofgoleta.org; or mail: Attn: City Council and City Clerk at 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B Goleta, California 93117. In order to be disseminated to the City Council for consideration during the Council meeting, written information must be submitted to the City Clerk no later than Monday at noon prior to the City Council meeting. Material received after this time may not be reviewed by the City Council prior to the meeting. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION: Additional information is on file at the Planning and Environmental Review Department, Goleta City Hall, 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B, Goleta, CA 93117. Contact Anne Wells at (805) 961-7557 or awells@ cityofgoleta.org for more information regarding the project or visit https://www.cityofgoleta.org/city-hall/planning-andenvironmental-review/monarch-butterfly-inventory-and-habitat-management-plan. [Para información en español, por favor llame Sr. Jaime Valdez, (805) 961-7568.] Note: In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you need special assistance to participate in this hearing, please contact the City Clerk’s Office at (805) 961-7505. Notification at least 72 hours prior to the hearing will enable City staff to make reasonable arrangements Note: If you challenge the City’s final action on this project in court, you may be limited to only those issues you or someone else raised at the public hearing described in this notice, or in written correspondence delivered to the City on or before the date of the hearing (Government Code §65009[b][2]). Publish:

Santa Barbara Independent, March 7, 2019

con los requisitos para obtener servicios legales gratuitos de un programa de servicios legales sin fines de lucro. Puede encontrar estos grupos sin fines de lucro en el sitio web de California Legal Services, (wwwlawhelpcalifornia.­ org), en el Centro de Ayuda de las Cortes de California, (www. sucorte.ca.­ g ov) o poniéndose en contacto con la corte o el colegio de abogados locales. AVISO: Por ley, la corte tiene derecho a reclamar las cuotasy los costos esentos por imponer un gravamen sobre cualquier recuperacion de $10,000 o mas de valor recibida mediante un acuerdo o una concesión de arbitraje en un caso de derecho civil. Tiene que pagar el graveman de la corte antes de que la corte pueda desechar el caso. CASE NO: (Numero del Caso) 18CV05605 The name and address of the court is: (El nombre y dirección de la corte es): SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA 312‑C East Cook Street Bldg. E, Santa Maria, CA 93456 The name, address, and telephone number of the plaintiff’s attorney, or plaintiff without an attorney, is: (El nombre, la dirección y el numero de telefono del abogado del demandante, o del demandante que no tiene abogado, es): Dustin Tardiff (Bar#281241) Tardiff Law Offices PO Box 1446, San Luis Obispo, CA 93406; Fax No. 805‑544‑4381; Phone No. (805) 544‑8100 DATE: Nov 13, 2018; 11:22am. Elizabeth Spann Deputy Clerk; Published. Feb 14, 21, 28. Mar 7 2019. SUMMONS (CITACION JUDICIAL) NOTICE

TO DEFENDANT: (AVISO AL DEMANDADO): ROBERT DECKER; VICTORIA L. ARCHER; Does 1‑10 YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF: (LO ESTA DEMANDANDO EL DEMANDANTE): JEFFREY HARRIS (In Pro Per); KIMBERLY HARRIS (In Pro Per) NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this Summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self‑Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.­g ov/ selfhelp), your county law library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the

California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self‑Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.­g ov/ selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. AVISO! Lo han demandado. Si no responde dentro de 30 días, la corte puede decidir en su contra sin escuchar su version. Lea la informacion a continuacion. Tiene 30 DIAS DE CALENDARIO después de que le entreguen esta citación y papeles legales papa presentar una respuesta por escrito en esta corte y hacer que se entregue una copia al demandante. Una carta o una llamada telefónica no lo protegen. Su respuesta por escrito tiene que estar en formato legal correcto si desea que procesen su caso en la corte. Es posible que haya un formulario que usted pueda usar para su respuesta. Puede encontrar estos formularios de la corte y mas información en el Centro de Ayuda de las Cortes de California (www.­sucorte.ca.gov), en la biblioteca de leyes de su condado o en la corte que le quede mas cerca. Si no puede pagar la cuota de presentación, pida al secretario de la corte que le de un formulario de exención de pago de cuotas. Si no presenta su respuesta a tiempo, puede perder el caso por incumplimiento y la corte le podrá quitar su sueldo, dinero y bienes sin mas advertencia. Hay otros requisitos legales. Es recomendable que llame a un abogado inmediatamente. Si

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MARCH 7, 2019

no conoce a un abogado, puede llamar a un servicio de remisión a abogados. Si no puede pagar a un abogado, es posible que cumpla con los requisitos para obtener servicios legales gratuitos de un programa de servicios legales sin fines de lucro. Puede encontrar estos grupos sin fines de lucro en el sitio web de California Legal Services, (wwwlawhelpcalifornia.­ org), en el Centro de Ayuda de las Cortes de California, (www. sucorte.ca.­ g ov) o poniéndose en contacto con la corte o el colegio de abogados locales. AVISO: Por ley, la corte tiene derecho a reclamar las cuotasy los costos esentos por imponer un gravamen sobre cualquier recuperacion de $10,000 o mas de valor recibida mediante un acuerdo o una concesión de arbitraje en un caso de derecho civil. Tiene que pagar el graveman de la corte antes de que la corte pueda desechar el caso. CASE NO: (Numero del Caso) 18CV04918 The name and address of the court is: (El nombre y dirección de la corte es): SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT ANACAPA DIVISION, 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara CA 93101 The name, address, and telephone number of the plaintiff’s attorney, or plaintiff without an attorney, is: (El nombre, la dirección y el numero de telefono del abogado del demandante, o del demandante que no tiene abogado, es): Jeffrey Harris and Kimberly Harris; 167 Vista del Mar, Santa Barbara, CA 93109 Phone No. (805) 455‑4545 DATE: Oct 05, 2018 Sarah Sisto Deputy Clerk; Published. Feb 28. Mar 7, 14, 21 2019.

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Santa Barbara Independent, 3/7/19  

March 7, 2019, Vol. 33, No. 686

Santa Barbara Independent, 3/7/19  

March 7, 2019, Vol. 33, No. 686