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I N FREE

M E M O R I A M :

J O B Y

Santa Barbara

N U Ñ E Z FEB 28-MAR. 7, 2019 VOL. 33 ■ NO. 685

SAD BOY IN SANTA BARBARA

AREA RAPPER ON THE COME UP GETS CAUGHT UP

BY BLANCA GARCIA

ALSO INSIDE

COFFEE WITH A BLACK GUY • GET HOOKED ON SEAFOOD DELIVERY • NETFLIX’S RUSSIAN DOLL REVIEWED INDEPENDENT.COM

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MUST SEE AT LEAST ONCE YOUR LIFETIME in

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THE NO. 1 SHOW in the world.” —Kenn Wells, former lead dancer of English National Ballet

“ I’ve reviewed about 4,000 shows. None can compare to what I saw tonight.” —Richard Connema, renowned Broadway critic

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It must be experienced.” —Christine Walevska, “Goddess of the Cello”, watched Shen Yun 5 times

“The highest and the best of what humans can produce.” —Olevia Brown-Klahn, singer and musician

“AWE-INSPIRING!” “A MUST-SEE!”

—Broadway world

MAR 29–31 Santa Barbara The Granada Theatre

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APR 2–3 Thousand Oaks The Fred Kavli Theatre

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APR 30–MAY 1 Northridge

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Beatrice Rana, piano Sun, Mar 3 / 4 PM / Hahn Hall Music Academy of the West

2019 Polar Music Prize Winner

Anne-Sophie Mutter, violin Lambert Orkis, piano

Program

Fri, Mar 8 / 7 PM Granada Theatre

The Firebird (arr. Agosti)

Program

Chopin: Études, op. 25 Ravel: Miroirs Stravinsky:

Mozart: Violin Sonata, K. 304 Debussy: Violin Sonata Ravel: Violin Sonata No. 2 Mozart: Violin Sonata, K. 454 Poulenc: Violin Sonata

25-year-old Italian-born Beatrice Rana is making waves in the international classical music scene and was named Gramophone 2017 Young Artist of the Year and the 2018 Female Artist of the Year at the Classic BRIT Awards.

“When Anne-Sophie Mutter plays, you listen. With a violinist so sturdy in tone, intense in emotion, and steely in technique, there’s actually no choice.” The London Times

Up Close & Musical Series Sponsor: Dr. Bob Weinman

Ashley Wheater, Artistic Director Tue, Mar 5 & Wed, Mar 6 / 8 PM / Granada Theatre Tue, Mar 5 Program

Wed, Mar 6 Program

George Balanchine:

Justin Peck: In Creases Nicolas Blanc: Encounter Alexander Ekman: Joy Annabelle Lopez Ochoa: Mammatus

The Four Temperaments Nicolas Blanc: Beyond the Shore Alexander Ekman: Joy

“The Joffrey dancers, costumed and lit and shockingly talented, are like a rock concert for the eyes.” Huffington Post

Event Sponsor: Sara Miller McCune Dance Series Sponsors: Annette & Dr. Richard Caleel Margo Cohen-Feinberg & Robert Feinberg Irma & Morrie Jurkowitz, Barbara Stupay Presented in association with the UCSB Department of Theater and Dance

Corporate Season Sponsor: 4

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FEBRUARY 28, 2019

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Co-presented with the Walter H. Capps Center for the Study of Ethics, Religion and Public Life

Eli Saslow

Lisa Genova

Still Alice: Understanding Alzheimer’s Sat, Mar 9 / 7:30 PM / UCSB Campbell Hall

Rising Out of Hatred: The Awakening of a Former White Nationalist Mon, Mar 4 / 7:30 PM / UCSB Campbell Hall

Rising Out of Hatred tells the powerful story of how Derek Black, a one-time heir to America’s white nationalist movement, came to question the ideology he helped spread.

A Harvard-trained neuroscientist and bestselling author, Genova will share the latest science and promising research on what each of us can do to build an Alzheimer’s-resistant brain.

Event Sponsors: Hollye & Jeff Jacobs Presented in association with the UCSB Writing Program

Elisabeth Rosenthal

Journalist and Bestselling Author

An American Sickness: How Healthcare Became Big Business and How You Can Take It Back Wed, Mar 13 / 7:30 PM The New Vic, 33 West Victoria St.

Note New Venue

“Rosenthal’s meticulous history of the crisis in American health care should be required reading for our generation.” – Siddhartha Mukherjee, author of The Emperor of All Maladies

Susan Orlean

in conversation with Pico Iyer Thu, Mar 14 / 7:30 PM / UCSB Campbell Hall

“The best writers make you care about something you never noticed before. Susan Orlean is a perfect example.” The New York Daily News Speaking with Pico Series Sponsors: Martha Gabbert, Laura Shelburne & Kevin O’Connor

(805) 893-3535 | www.ArtsAndLectures.UCSB.edu

Media Sponsor:

Granada event tickets can also be purchased at: (805) 899-2222 | www.GranadaSB.org INDEPENDENT.COM

FEBRUARY 28, 2019

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03 03 2019 Free and open to the public.

Eddy Portnoy, Ph.D.

ESTHETIC ENTER LASTIC URGERY Marc Soares, MD Julio Soares, MD

Yivo Institute for Jewish Research

The Strange Stories of Yiddishland: What the Yiddish Press Reveals about the Jews An underground history of downwardly mobile Jews, Eddy Portnoy’s book, Bad Rabbi and Other Strange but True Stories from the Yiddish Press, Press, mines century-old Yiddish newspapers to expose the seamy underbelly of pre-WWII New York and Warsaw, the two major centers of Yiddish culture in the late 19th and early 20th centuries. With true stories of Jewish drunks, murderers, wrestlers, psychics and beauty queens, all plucked from the pages of Yiddish dailies, Eddy Portnoy reveals unusual and unexpected aspects of Jewish urban life. One part Isaac Bashevis Singer, one part Jerry Springer, this irreverent, unvarnished, and frequently hilarious compendium of stories provides a window into an unknown Yiddish world that was.

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Editor in Chief Marianne Partridge

Publisher Brandi Rivera

Executive Editor Nick Welsh Senior Editors Michelle Drown, Tyler Hayden, Matt Kettmann Editor at Large Ethan Stewart Photography Editor Paul Wellman News Reporters Blanca Garcia, Keith Hamm Opinions Editor Jean Yamamura Executive Arts Editor Charles Donelan Arts Writer Richie DeMaria Calendar Editor Terry Ortega Calendar Assistant Amber White Sports Editor John Zant Sports Writer Victor Bryant Food Writer George Yatchisin Copy Chief Jackson Friedman Copy Editor Tessa Reeg Creative Director Caitlin Fitch Graphic Designers Alex Drake, Ben Greenberg, Elaine Madsen Production Designer Ava Talehakimi Digital Editor Erika Carlos Digital Assistant Nancy Rodriguez

Concerned about your memory? cerned about your memory? Ongoing Workshops for Pacifica Senior Living

Workshops for Pacifica Senior Living

Mar 12 • 5:00 - 6:00pm

prehensive series provides thly educational opportunities to re about memory. Who we are and what we do

Presenter:

Senior Living, 325 W Islay Street, Santa Barbara

pm

2019 Series Schedule Suzette Cobb

Understanding and Dementia ThisAlzheimer’s presentation will provide attendees Presenter: Suzette Cobb with an overview of the programs and Description: A workshop for anyone who would like to knowservices more about Alzheimer’s disease and related dementias.

offered by the Alzheimer’s Association

Know the 10 Signs Presenter: Suzette Cobb Description: If you or someone you know is experiencing memory loss or behavioral changes, it’s time to learn the facts. Early detection of pm Alzheimer’s disease gives you a chance to begin drug therapy, enroll in clinical studies and plan325 for the future. This interactive workshop W. Islay St. features video clips of people with Alzheimer’s disease.

To RSVP or for more information call 800.272.3900

Who we are and what we do

2 Presenter: Suzette Cobb 6 Description: THE INDEPENDENT FEBRUARY 28, 2019 INDEPENDENT.COM This presentation will provide attendees with an overview pm of the programs and services offered by the Alzheimer’s Association

Columnists Dennis Allen, Gail Arnold, Sara Caputo, Roger Durling, Jerry Roberts, Starshine Roshell Contributors Camie Barnwell, Rob Brezsny, Melinda Burns, Ben Ciccati, John Dickson, Rebecca Horrigan, Eric HvolbØll, Tom Jacobs, Shannon Kelley, Kevin McKiernan, Ninette Paloma, Carolina Starin, Brian Tanguay, Tom Tomorrow, T.M. Weedon, Josef Woodard, Maggie Yates Editorial Interns Amelia Buckley, Janavi Kumar, Priscilla Leung, Paisley Shoemaker Multimedia Interns Maya Chiodo, Harvest Keeney Director of Advertising Sarah Sinclair Marketing and Promotions Manager Emily Cosentino Advertising Representatives Madison Chackel, Camille Cimini Fruin, Suzanne Cloutier, Rachel Gantz, Laszlo Hodosy, Tonea Songer Sales Administrator Graham Brown Accounting Assistant Tobi Feldman Office Manager/Legal Advertising Tanya Spears Guiliacci Distribution Scott Kaufman Columnist Emeritus Barney Brantingham Founding Staff Emeriti Audrey Berman, George Delmerico, Richard Evans Honorary Consigliere Gary J. Hill Indy Kids Bella and Max Brown, Elijah Lee Bryant, Henry and John Poett Campbell, Chloë Bee Ciccati, Izadora and Savina Hamm, Madeline Rose and Mason Carrington Kettmann, Izzy and Maeve McKinley, Miranda Tanguay Ortega, Sawyer Tower Stewart, Phoenix Grace White The Independent is available, free of charge, limited to one copy per reader. Back issues cost $2 and may be purchased at the office. The Independent may be distributed only by authorized circulation staff or authorized distributors. No person may, without the permission of publisher, take more than one copy of each Independent issue. Subscriptions are available, paid in advance, for $120 per year. Send subscription requests with name and address to subscriptions@independent.com. The contents of the Independent are copyrighted 2019 by the Santa Barbara Independent, Inc. No part may be reproduced without permission from the publisher. The publisher assumes no responsibility for unsolicited material. A stamped, self-addressed envelope must accompany all submissions expected to be returned. The Independent is published every Thursday at 12 E. Figueroa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Advertising rates on request: (805) 965-5205. Classified ads: (805) 965-5208. The Independent is available on the internet at independent.com. Press run of the Independent is 40,000 copies. Audited certification of circulation is available on request. The Independent is a legal adjudicated newspaper — court decree no. 157386.

Contact information: 12 E. Figueroa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101 PHONE (805) 965-5205; FAX (805) 965-5518 EMAIL news@independent.com, letters@independent.com Staff email addresses can be found at independent.com/info


volume 33, number 685, Feb. 28-Mar. 7, 2019

In Memoriam . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  17 Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  20 Capitol Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  23 Voices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  25

THE WEEK.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 LIVING.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Living Page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39

FOOD & DRINK .. . . . . . . . . . 40 The Restaurant Guy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 Dining Out Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43

27

A&E. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45

COVER STORY

ON THE PATH

COURTESY

CONTENTS

Name: Amelia Buckley • Title: News Intern What have you learned about news writing? You can never ask too many questions, and unexpected sources sometimes yield the most useful information. Also, never go into an assignment with too many assumptions, because you never know where your reporting will lead you. What have you learned about Santa Barbara as a community? There are so many people working to enact positive changes in our community that I never knew about. I’ve been lucky to speak with some of these people and organizations firsthand, and it’s inspiring to see the dedication and innovation impacting Santa Barbara for the better every day. Think you’ll go into journalism when you graduate, or did we scare you off of the idea? I definitely still want to go into journalism when I graduate. Working at the Independent has taught me that it is vitally important to have a passionate group of people asking critical questions about happenings in our community, and I would love to be one of those people.

Arts Life . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45

ONLINE NOW AT

INDEPENDENT.COM

Positively State Street . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47

Reviews . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 48

& TV. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 Sad Boy in Santa Barbara FILM Review . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 Area Rapper on the Come Up Gets Caught Up

Movie Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53

(Blanca Garcia)

ON THE COVER AND ABOVE: Sad Boy on the Eastside of Santa Barbara. Photos by JJ Hernandez / @jjghernandez.

NEWS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 OPINIONS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14

Angry Poodle Barbecue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 14

SPORTS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 ODDS & ENDS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

Obituaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Rob Brezsny’s Free Will Astrology . . . . . . . 59 This Modern World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63

CLASSIFIEDS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 60

DEVELOPMENTAL DISABILITY AWARENESS MONTH

The Weitzman Family Story: Jamie and Joshua Weitzman didn’t find out that their third daughter, Hannah, had Down syndrome until the day she was born. Years later, the Weitzmans adopted a fourth child: a little boy with Down syndrome from Hong Kong named Jed. Watch the video this Sunday at 10 a.m. at independent.com/disability-awareness/.

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Presenting the world’s finest classical artists since 1919

MASTERSERIES

INTERNATIONAL SERIES

SEASON SPONSORSHIP: ESPERIA FOUNDATION

SEASON SPONSORSHIP: SAGE PUBLISHING

AT THE LOBERO THEATRE

AT THE GRANADA THEATRE

Esa-Pekka Salonen Photo Bruce Zinger

Tales of Two Cities The Leipzig-Damascus Coffee House

Conceived, programmed, and scripted by Alison Mackay

Wednesday, March 20 The Granada Theatre, 8:00 PM

Philharmonia Orchestra Esa-Pekka Salonen

Saturday, March 9 Lobero Theatre, 8:00 PM

Principal Conductor & Artistic Advisor

Tafelmusik Baroque Orchestra with

Photo Benjamin Suomela

Trio Arabica

Elisa Citterio Director It’s 1740, and coffee houses are the places to listen to music and share stories, in both the famous trading center of Leipzig and one of the oldest cities in the world, Damascus. Anyone who has attended one of Tafelmusik’s three previous multi-media concert projects at the Lobero in the past decade can attest to the incredible originality and conception of their insightful musical stage creations that combine live music, text and stunning projections transporting the audience back in time and place. Not to be missed!

Arnold Schoenberg: Verklärte Nacht, Op.4 Anton Bruckner: Symphony No.7 in E Major Local favorite Esa-Pekka Salonen, former music director of the Los Angeles Philharmonic, returns to Santa Barbara for the third time as Principal Conductor of London’s world-class Philharmonia Orchestra. This will be Salonen’s fourteenth appearance as conductor in CAMA concerts over the past 25+ years. PRE-CONCERT LECTURE BY SIMON WILLIAMS, Professor Emeritus, UCSB Department of Theater and Dance; Opera and Theater Critic. Lecture will begin at 7:00 PM; doors to The Granada Theatre will open for the lecture at 6:45 PM. Lecture seating is limited to the first 100 patrons. First come, first served. Sponsors Anonymous • Alison & Jan Bowlus • Natalia & Michael Howe Ellen & Peter Johnson • Kum Su Kim & John Perry

Concert Partners: Deborah & Peter Bertling Robert Boghosian & Mary E. Gates Warren • Bridget Colleary Dorothy & John Gardner • Elizabeth Karlsberg & Jeff Young Lynn P. Kirst

Co-Sponsors Elizabeth & Andrew Butcher Chris Lancashire & Catherine Gee Jocelyne & William Meeker Val & Bob Montgomery

TICKETS (805) 963-0761 lobero.com

TICKETS (805) 899-2222 granadasb.org

C O M M U N I T Y A R T S M U S I C A S S O C I AT I O N O F S A N TA B A R B A R A , I N C 8

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FEBRUARY 28, 2019

INDEPENDENT.COM


FEB. 21-28, 2019

NEWS of the WEEK PAU L WELLM AN F I LE PHOTOS

by BLANCA GARCIA , KEITH HAMM, TYLER HAYDEN @TylerHayden1, NICK WELSH, and JEAN YAMAMURA, with INDEPENDENT STAFF

PUBLIC ACCESS

DISTANT SHORES: A privately negotiated settlement agreement between Hollister Ranch owners and two state agencies would open Cuarta Beach (pictured) to the general public, but only to those with the financial and athletic wherewithal to arrive via small boat or personal watercraft. That’s unfair and dangerous, according to a legal challenge submitted by the Gaviota Coast Trail Alliance, overseen by Judge Colleen Sterne (below), who faces a disqualification petition filed by the Hollister Ranch Owners Association.

Hollister Ranch Moves to Oust Judge in Public-Access Battle Petition ‘Misrepresents’ Position of State Agencies by Keith Hamm n an ongoing legal battle over public access to a beach at Hollister Ranch, the Hollister Ranch Owners Association (HROA) has petitioned the California Supreme Court to disqualify Judge Colleen Sterne, who has presided over the litigation for six years. At issue is a privately crafted settlement agreement struck between the HROA and two state agencies — the Coastal Conservancy and the Coastal Commission — to expand guided-access opportunities for nonprofits while opening Cuarta Beach to the general public for daytime use. According to the settlement, the public would only be allowed to reach Cuarta Beach via small watercraft, such as paddleboard, kayak, or soft-bottom boat. The roughly four-mile round trip from Gaviota State Park would be through nearshore waters prone to suddenly changing conditions. Last May, despite objections from both sides, Sterne ordered HROA and the state

I

“new territory” by lawyers keen on the case. Among other issues, the Trail Alliance has argued that the settlement agreement is not fair because the general public was not allowed to participate in a negotiation that would require the state to abandon rights to an overland route to Cuarta Beach via a public-access offer established nearly 40 years ago when the Metropolitan YMCA of Los Angeles sought to build a recreation center on property it owned in Cuarta Canyon. Led by attorney Barry Cappello in its move to oust Sterne, HROA’s petition states that her “ruling shows a bias in favor of the Trail Alliance position” and has “prejudged the [alliance] as a better representative of the public than the [Coastal Commission and Coastal Conservancy].” In a court appearance last month, Cappello addressed Sterne directly. “Your procedures have blown up this litigation,” he said. —California Coastal Commission and Coastal Conservancy, in a joint statement In a joint statement, Coastal Commission agencies to announce the settlement agree- Chair Dayna Bochco and Coastal Conserment in a series of newspaper notifications. vancy Chair Douglas Bosco said, “We were She also allowed an ad hoc group, the Gavi- frankly surprised the Hollister homeownota Coast Trail Alliance, to intervene in the ers would file a petition to disqualify the case, a ruling called “unprecedented” and judge the day before the Trail Alliance was

If parties do not like a judge’s ruling, the proper procedure is an appeal — not a petition to disqualify the judge.

NEWS BRIEFS COUNTY This May, Rob Lewin, director of the Santa Barbara County Office of Emergency Management (OEM), will retire from the post he’s held nearly four years. Lewin led OEM during the Thomas Fire — briefly the biggest wildfire in state history — and the 1/9 Debris Flow, the deadliest natural disaster in county history. County spokesperson Gina DePinto said Lewin leaves the department stronger and more cohesive; she said no plans have been finalized as to who will fill in as interim director. Last year, Lewin applied for the appointment as the county’s new fire chief but did not get the nod. The drama has ended surrounding Camp 4, which on Monday was once again joined to the existing Chumash reservation in the Santa Ynez Valley. The Bureau of Indian Affairs’ 2014 decision to grant the land transfer was affirmed by the current assistant secretary, Tara MacLean Sweeney, on 2/25. Nancy Crawford-Hall, whose family owned Camp 4 before selling it to Fess Parker — his estate sold it to the Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Indians — had successfully charged that the deputy who signed off on the decision was not empowered to do so at the time, bringing the decision back before the BIA. In affirming the transfer, Sweeney also dismissed all appeals. The county agreement with the tribe is now back in force. Greka has been filling an unlined pit with hazardous waste without a permit at its asphalt refinery on Sinton Road in Santa Maria, the EPA announced on 2/21. Federal Environmental Protection Agency inspectors discovered the surface impoundment on December 13, 2018, which was holding water produced during the making of asphalt, naphtha, and compounds known as “light ends” from crude that was trucked in. EPA has ordered Greka to make a plan within 45 days to sample for any off-site waste migration. Farmlands lie within 90 feet of the open pit; groundwater and the communities of Guadalupe and Santa Maria are also of concern to the EPA.

to file its cross complaint. If parties do not like a judge’s ruling, the proper procedure is an appeal—not a petition to disqualify the judge. The Coastal Commission and Coastal Conservancy do not support this petition, which misrepresents our position.” In its cross-complaint, the Trail Alliance has challenged the settlement agreement on several fronts. Among them, the complaint alleges, not only did the settlement’s behind-closed-doors negotiations violate state public-process laws, but it also discriminated against people without with the financial resources—and physical abilities —to operate the personal watercraft necessary to access Cuarta Beach, according to the cross-compliant. “The settlement is not just a bad and dangerous deal for the public; it was authorized in violation of state law.”

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LAW & DISORDER A sedan crashed into the concrete roundabout on Milpas Street near midnight on 2/24. The driver of a Kia, with four passengers in it, skidded almost the length of a football field before hitting the barrier. A city police officer exiting a nearby store witnessed the Kia being followed by a vehicle, whose driver alleged a hit-and-run had occurred. After the accident, the officer immediately alerted first responders and requested the Fire Department’s “jaws of life.” Two female passengers crawled from the wreckage, police officials said, and three males were extricated. All were taken to Cottage Hospital with critical injuries. The Kia driver, Joseph David Hernandez, 23, is on probation for DUI and now faces charges of hit-and-run, drug possession, drunk driving, and driving on a suspended license. He will be booked on $100,000 bail into County Jail when released from the hospital. n

FEBRUARY 28, 2019

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CHANNEL ISLANDS Reimagining higher education for a new generation and era. We welcome and challenge every individual to channel their potential and find innovative ways to contribute to today’s world.

Saturday, March 16, 2019, 10:00 a.m. Hilton Santa Barbara Beachfront Resort

Luis Alberto Urrea House of Broken Angels

Mindy Johnson Ink & Paint

Interviewers: Dianne Dixon Tom Weitzel

Guest Authors: Sheila Aron, Julia Bricklin, Jane Sherron De Hart, Jeff Doubét, Jo Giese, Elizabeth Gould, M.S., Romy Greenwald, Rich Grimes, Jo Haldeman, Catharine Riggs Doors open at 10 a.m. for book sales and signing. Lunch served at 11:45 a.m.

For tickets call (805) 965-2376 or buy online calm4kids.org 10

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FEBRUARY 28, 2019

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PAU L WELLM AN F I LE PHOTO

M

33rd Annual Celebrity Authors Luncheon

Andrew Firestone Master of Ceremonies

Records Released in Train-Death Case

edical and mental-health records for Connor O’Keefe, the Santa Barbara High School senior killed by a train in March 2017, must be turned over to Amtrak in a wrongful-death lawsuit against the passenger rail service, Judge Colleen Sterne ruled this week. O’Keefe’s parents sued Amtrak, Caltrans, and the County of Santa Barbara in March 2018, alleging all three failed to provide adequate signage, access restrictions, and warnings for people crossing the tracks to and from the beach near Fernald Point Lane in Montecito, where O’Keefe was killed. Amtrak in turn subpoenaed O’Keefe’s records, arguing they are “directly relevant to why he decided to walk on the railroad tracks at the time of the fatal incident, in the path of a clearly visible and audible train.” That Saturday afternoon, according to the county coroner report, O’Keefe was with friends when he went back to the car alone to get his camera, walking northbound on one side of the tracks while talking on his phone. The northbound train was traveling approximately 50 miles per hour near Sheffield Drive and struck O’Keefe from behind. The coroner report ruled the death an accident. In their lawsuit, attorneys for O’Keefe’s parents claimed that train engineer Gavin Todd was not properly trained to blow the

CALM Auxiliary's

Kate Quinn The Huntress

FEB. 21-28, 2019

horn and slow down in an area described as “a concealed trap” without proper fencing. Amtrak, however, has argued that there is reason to believe O’Keefe’s death may have been self-inflicted. The coroner report detailed how the night before the incident, a depressed O’Keefe was planning to jump off a bridge and later that same night considered intentionally overdosing on pills. In her ruling to release O’Keefe’s records, Sterne said “the information is directly relevant to the defenses in the case,” explaining that they could reveal whether O’Keefe suffered from any physical medical conditions that prevented him from seeing, hearing, or reacting to the train, and if his mental state may have contributed to him not moving off the tracks. — Tyler Hayden

Judge Affirms Public Right to Know in Dirty Cop Cases

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udge Thomas Anderle rejected a procedural challenge waged by the Santa Barbara County Deputy Sheriffs’ Association against a new state law that opens up the personnel files of law enforcement officers investigated for serious misconduct allegations. That new law, SB 1421, was passed in response to public alarm over police misconduct generated in the wake of the Black Lives Matter movement and went into effect January 1. The Sheriffs’ Association — the union representing deputies and custody officers—argued Anderle should impose an injunction, limiting the public release of such personnel information to investigations taking place after the New Year. Attorneys for police unions throughout the state have filed similar motions in different jurisdictions, arguing the legislation could not be enforced retroactively, but only prospectively. Nowhere in the bill, they’ve noted, is it explicitly stated what time constraints, if any, should be placed on the public release of highly sensitive information. Until now, such information has been strictly off-limits even to criminal defense attorneys except under certain legal circumstances and in highly restricted venues, such as the private chambers of judges. Under SB 1421, the general public has access to this information as well as criminal defense attorneys. In the

PAU L WELLM AN FI LE PHOTO

CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY

Judge Thomas Anderle

courtroom were about a dozen individuals representing social justice groups. One cardboard sign read, “Deputy Sheriffs Just Follow the Law.” Judge Anderle rejected the union arguments, insisting that the legislative intent was clear even if the legislators never articulated it. After much parsing of the deeper implications of intent, Anderle articulated what to his mind was the heart of the matter. “There was and is a crisis of mistrust surrounding officer conduct that SB 1421 seeks to address,” he wrote in his ruling. “The intent is clear that the Legislature wanted broad access to reports of past as well as future instances involving the discharge of weapons, use of force, sexual assault, and dishonesty.” Different judges are issuing divergent rulings on the same matter throughout the state; it’s expected the matter will be resolved by the Califor—Nick Welsh nia Supreme Court.


NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D COMMUNITY

PLAYS WELL WITH OTHERS: James Joyce III (standing) addresses the crowd at Coffee with a Black Guy, held last weekend at the Sandbox.

‘We Have to Pull the Scab off This Thing Called Race’ James Joyce III Creates Space for Interracial Dialogue by Brandon Fastman wo and a half years ago, as the drumbeat of national news stories about police shooting and killing unarmed black men had reached a steady cadence, most recently with the additions of Philando Castile and Alton Sterling, Santa Barbara resident James Joyce III decided to act on a desire to foster cross-racial dialogues in the community. His brainchild, Coffee with a Black Guy, signifies on Coffee with a Cop, a nonprofit organization that encourages conversation between police officers and members of the community in which they work. “The cops don’t want to be demonized because of their uniforms,” Joyce said in a brief interview before the latest iteration of the event last Saturday at the Sandbox coworking space, suggesting that there’s a flip side to the coin. Joyce conjured Coffee with a Black Guy with his cousin, Jarrett Brown, who lives in Florida but visited Santa Barbara to attend. Brown said that after police shootings, he heard a lot of people asking why black people would be afraid of cops or suggesting that maybe if they just listened to the police, they wouldn’t be harmed. “Nobody was stopping to say, ‘Hey, let me hear where you’re coming from,’ ” said Brown, who livestreamed the event, the largest one yet with more than 50 people attending and the imprimatur of the Lois and Walter Capps Project. The idea behind the event is for people to ask questions and share their experiences in a judgment-free zone. When a white attendee asked what it’s like being a black man in Santa Barbara, the floodgates opened. Black men and women, some longtimers and some young professional transplants, spoke to the palpable isolation of living in an area with such a small African-American community. They spoke about being the only black person in their place of work or out having a drink. White colleagues not taking them seriously. Coworkers using the “n-word” in a business setting. Then there were the indignities of

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everyday life. Strangers asking them if they have drugs to sell, if they are athletes, if they can touch their hair. A white man shared the experience of his black partner asking a store clerk a question and the clerk answering to him, not his partner. Joyce suggested that when encountering such acts of racial bias, white folks should speak up to “check” that behavior. Perhaps the greatest tension in the room was navigating what one participant labeled the gap between intention and impact. Well-intentioned people can still say hurtful things. It’s more helpful for everyone to own up to their internalized biases, she said, than to reflexively claim they aren’t racist. Things came full circle when the last audience member to speak, a white woman, said that she doesn’t see color. As emcee, Joyce took on the tricky task of embracing friction without sparking a fire. He explained why he “wholeheartedly disagree[s]” with the concept of colorblindness — because he’s a black person in a society that isn’t colorblind — but he did so without making the questioner feel attacked. Although the conversation was fairly unstructured, Joyce noted the context of Saturday’s event. He mentioned grievances by black students at UCSB and City College, the latter having escalated after a white employee used the unabbreviated n-word in a meeting. He also played a video clip of the writer Ta-Nehisi Coates explaining why it’s offensive for white people to use the actual word. District Director for State Senator Hannah-Beth Jackson, Joyce said he asked for her blessing before launching Coffee with a Black Guy. He did not want his project to overshadow his (and his boss’s) job of representing all her constituents. As attendees of the event left their seats to mingle over tacos and refreshments, there was some evidence that Joyce might achieve his goal of encouraging everyday conversations across racial divides, even when there is no special event n or free coffee. INDEPENDENT.COM

FEBRUARY 28, 2019

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Science Discovery Day SATURDAY

MARCH 9

CITY

1-5 PM

PAU L WELLM AN

FEB. 21-28, 2019

EAST CAMPUS

Presented by

FREE event for the whole family! See interactive displays showcasing the wonders of our world • Live sea and land critters • Video game and programming demonstrations • Fun, interactive chemistry experiments • Biotechnology and glowing bacteria • Hands-on earthquake demos • Solar telescopes

OVERNIGHT LOWS: David Anderson, who became homeless after a bicycle injury, said he keeps his sleeping area discreet and packs up early.

More Money to Pop-Up Shelters Cold Weather Strains Homeless Services

Pick-up your event map at the welcome desk in front of the SBCC Campus Store

by Nick Welsh ith the Central Coast inundated with freezing rains and sustained plunging temperatures this winter, Santa Barbara’s emergency “pop-up” warming shelters have been overwhelmed by increased demand, prompting the Santa Barbara City Council to augment funding for such operations by $15,000. This brings the city’s contribution to nearly $60,000. Freedom Warming Centers — named for a homeless ex-Marine who died of hypothermia in his wheelchair outside the Cacique Street homeless shelter 10 years ago —has already run through its funding for this year, and the emergency-shelter season

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an intense debate over the trigger points at which the pop-up shelters open their doors. Thirty-five degrees, the council was told, is too low. “I challenge all of you to sleep outside at 39 degrees,” said Nancy McCradie, longtime homeless advocate. Councilmember Kristen Sneddon, a self-described ardent camper, acknowledged that at 35 degrees, “It’s unbearable to get through the night.” Mayor Cathy Murillo noted that PATH opens its emergency winter beds when the mercury hits 40 or below. She also suggested the time to debate the proper trigger points would be after this winter’s season ends. (The 35-degree limit was originally set—as opposed to the 40-degree limit advocated by homeless supporters—in order to win the political support needed to secure funding for such shelters.) If the shelters activated at 40 — Nancy McCradie, degrees, that would cost more money advocate for the homeless, to Santa Barbara City Councilmembers and require more than the 100 volunteers who now are on hand to staff the runs through the end of March. To date, shelters. Freedom Warming Centers, which operates Although the final vote to increase fundon an annual budget of $190,000, reported ing was unanimous, it was not made before providing 3,411 bed nights of respite from councilmember Jason Dominguez noted the elements. As of January 30, the shelters that city police had reported a 100 percent — 10 makeshift operations countywide, increase in the calls for service relating to mostly in churches — had provided 2,567 vagrancy. He wondered whether that meant bed nights of shelter. Last year by that same there were more homeless people or the same number of homeless people committime, the number was 1,210. Freedom Warming Centers provides ting more crime. Dominguez expressed temporary beds when the temperatures concern and horror at the encampments drop below 36 degrees or there’s more than springing up under freeway bridges on a 50 percent chance of rain two nights in a the Eastside. “What about big armchairs row. Santa Barbara’s main shelter — run by in the middle of the sidewalk?” he asked the nonprofit People Assisting the Home- CityAttorney Ariel Calonne after Calonne less (PATH) — has a maximum winter described the difficulty encountered by city capacity of 200 beds but typically screens employees in discerning refuse from perguests for sobriety. The Freedom shelters sonal property of people living on the street. admit “low-barrier” individuals, a bureauMayor Murillo suggested such statistical cratic euphemism for those too intoxicated explorations — more crime or more hometo be admitted by other shelters except dur- less people— could be better undertaken after the results of the most recent homeless ing emergency circumstances. The demand for services has triggered census are released. n

‘I challenge all of you to sleep outside at 39 degrees.’

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PAU L WELLM AN

NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D

Health Education Programs

COASTAL RELIEF: Theo Kracke (right), owner of Paradise Retreats, has won the latest round in a court battle against Santa Barbara City Attorney Ariel Calonne (left).

Judge Rules Against Vacation Rental Ban

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n a tentative decision last week, Ventura County Superior Court Judge Mark Borrell ruled that the City of Santa Barbara must allow short-term vacation rentals (STVRs) to operate near the beach. Borrell’s ruling upends a portion of the city’s 2015 enforcement crackdown against the burgeoning industry, spurred by complaints that STVRs violated zoning laws meant to protect family neighborhoods and further impacted an already strained long-term rental market. The lawsuit against the city was brought by Theo Kracke, owner of Paradise Retreats, a business that connects Santa Barbara visitors and vacationers to clients willing to rent their homes for stays of less than 30 days. “This is a tentative decision, so we are cautiously optimistic,” Kracke said in a statement. “Nevertheless, we are thrilled it appears the court embraced our arguments that the city acted improperly.”

Kracke — represented by Rogers, Sheffield & Campbell LLP — argued that the city’s effort to ramp up enforcement violated the California Coastal Act, which requires seaside communities statewide to provide affordable visitor lodging within a close-to-shore area called the Coastal Zone. In Borrell’s ruling, the city failed to secure a coastal development permit from the California Coastal Commission, a requirement when an activity significantly “changes the intensity of use of land or water, even where no construction is involved,” according to the state agency. Citywide STVRs outside the Coastal Zone are unaffected by the court ruling. City Attorney Ariel Calonne has said he’ll appeal. Last year, the Coastal Commission denied Santa Barbara County’s attempt to ban STVRs in unincorporated neighborhoods within the Coastal Zone. — Keith Hamm

Mental-Health Team Finds Weapons

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n February 23, a new experimental lawenforcement patrol that combines a sheriff ’s deputy with a mental-health outreach worker conducted a welfare check on a potentially suicidal 27-year-old Santa Barbara city resident who had a collection of 16 weapons, at least one of which was buried in the backyard. The Crisis Intervention Team, as it’s called, conducted a welfare

The subject also made remarks expressing admiration for Isla Vista mass murderer Elliot Rodger. check after the man texted relatives a long and ominous note that they interpreted to be suicidal. The subject also made remarks expressing admiration for Isla Vista mass murderer Elliot Rodger. At least seven law enforcement officers — from both the Santa Barbara County Sheriff ’s Office and Santa Barbara Police Department — were on hand. The subject, reportedly an accomplished professional poker player who lives with his parents, did not resist. According

to one of the enforcement agents involved, all the guns were legally registered; some appeared to have been custom-made. The handguns were large-caliber weapons, and at least some of the weapons had been illegally altered to make them effectively fully automatic. The weapon buried in the yard was a long rifle. The subject was taken to Cottage Hospital, where a 5150 determination was made, meaning the subject posed an imminent threat to himself or others and could be held up to 72 hours against his will. To date, there’s no evidence that a crime has taken place. Santa Barbara police executed a gun-violence restraining order, meaning the guns have been seized and will be held pending a judicial determination. This is reportedly not the first contact law enforcement have had with the subject. More than a year ago, officers pulled him over during a traffic stop and discovered nine weapons in the car, as well as body armor. There being no evidence of a crime, he was let go. The subject has not come to the attention of mental-health workers before, however, and there’s no evidence he’s received any therapy. — Nick Welsh

Sansum Clinic’s unified, patient-first approach to healthcare is built around you. We provide health education programs at low or no-cost to the community. Learn more at www.SansumClinic.org.

March 2019 ADVANCE DIRECTIVES WORKSHOP (Free) Mon 3/11 10:00 am – 12:00 Noon

BACK WELLNESS ($10) Wed 3/6 • 3:30 – 5:00 pm BALANCE & MOBILITY ($40) 4-part program Tuesdays weekly 3/5 through 3/26, 10:00 – 11:00 am

March is National Nutrition Month!

Nutrition Navigator: a monthly discussion for people interested in food, health & longevity. Meets 1st Wednesday of every month from 5:15 to 6:45 pm at Pueblo. March 6 - Be Your Own Nutritionist April 3 -

Benefits of Seasonal Food - Spring!

Healthy Recipes

Visit the Health Resource Center for new recipes to cook at home or find them online at www.sansumclinic.org.

Oncology Patient Support Programs

Ridley-Tree Cancer Center offers a wide range of wellness activities and support programs for their patients and caregivers. Visit www.calendar.ridleytreecc.org to learn more.

Register Online

BARIATRIC SURGERY ORIENTATION (Free) Mon 3/11 • 5:45 pm

DIABETES BASICS ($15) This is a 3-part program Wed 3/13 through 3/27 5:15 – 6:45 pm

HEALTHY PEOPLE HEALTHY TRAILS (Free) See HealthyPeopleHealthy Trails.org to find maps of easy walks and a calendar of group walks NECK & POSTURE WELLNESS ($10) Wed 3/20 • 3:30 – 5:00 pm NEW TO MEDICARE (Free) Tues 3/15 • 10:00 am - 12:00 pm UNDERSTANDING DEMENTIA (Free) Thurs 3/21 • 4:30 – 6:00 pm USING MYCHART (Free) Wed 3/27 • 2:00 – 3:00 pm WOMENHEART SUPPORT GROUP (Free) Mon 3/11 • 4:30 – 6:00 pm YOGA 101 ($10) Fri 3/22 • 1:00 – 2:00 pm

For a complete schedule and detailed descriptions of all our Health and Wellness programs and events: www.Calendar.SansumClinic.org Or call (866) 829-0909

Health Resource Center

Visit or call for answers to your health questions. Free of charge and open to the community. 215 Pesetas Lane, Santa Barbara (805) 681-7672 INDEPENDENT.COM

FEBRUARY 28, 2019

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Opinions

angry poodle barbecue

Even a Blind Dog Is Wrong Twice a Day

BIG TROUBLE: Call it implicit bias. Maybe it’s profiling. The fact is I can’t tell one billionaire bald guy from the next. It’s a bigger

problem than you might think. Early Sunday morning, two weeks ago, I was shopping at Smart & Final on Gutierrez Street. I was stocking up on beans and beer and enjoying a little Sabbath solitude. But there in the aisle where pink pastries are sold, I encountered none other than Thomas Barrack II — investment mogul, owner of Michael Jackson’s Neverland Ranch, and most infamously, friend, advisor, and consigliore to Donald Trump and the chair of Trump’s inaugural committee. The guy had Barrack’s signature chrome dome; he had the same telltale squint lines, common to all visionaries who stare off into the future. And even on a cold, gray Sunday morning, the guy exuded all the gracious masculine ease that makes Barrack so irresistible. Still, it seemed a little improbable that a guy whose company, Colony Capital, oversees in the neighborhood of $44 billion would be wandering the aisles of a low-end bulk food store. I checked again. He looked the same age as Barrack—71—and was fit and trim like Barrack. He wore black athletic warm-up pants and was sporting a ball cap bearing some horse-related logo. Barrack, as everyone knows, is nuts about polo. He plays all the time; he owns his own team. An intimate moment was taking place in

front of me involving a man and his pastries. I didn’t want to intrude. Had I known then what I’ve since learned, however, it might have made more sense. Barrack has hit hard times. In fact, he just put Michael Jackson’s famed Neverland Ranch — which, in light of resurgent allegations of the pop star’s pedophilia, they’ve attempt to rebrand as the “Sycamore Valley Ranch”—on the market for a scant $31 million; that’s $69 million less than the asking price just a few years ago. In recent months, Barrack has been dragged in front of Special Counsel Robert Mueller’s inquisition chambers, where he was questioned about foreign agents seeking to curry favor with the Trump administration by making big donations. On that Sunday morning, Barrack had recently shocked the planet by trivializing the bloody bone-saw assassination of Washington Post columnist Jamal Khashoggi, a great irritant to Saudi Crown Prince Mohammed Bin Salman. “Whatever happened in Saudi Arabia, the atrocities in America are

equal, or worse, to the atrocities in Saudi Arabia,” Barrack said, thus generating a wind

storm of outrage and backpedaling that could power Melbourne, Australia, for three weeks. One day after, Barrack clarified that Khashoggi’s lethal communion with power tools was both “atrocious and inexcusable.” Barrack’s initial remarks should not have surprised anyone. Barrack was the one, after all, who in 2016 introduced then candidate Donald Trump to then political consultant

Paul Manafort to briefly run Trump’s presidential campaign. That’s the same Manafort who got puppets of Vladimir Putin “elected” in Ukraine and the very same Manafort who so softened the Republican Party’s denunciation of Putin after he invaded Ukraine. Manafort is now pleading for leniency from the judge who could put him behind bars for 22 years for multiple counts of tax fraud and lying to investigators. For more than 20 years, Manafort was part of something known as “The Torturers’ Lobby,” representing some of the bloodiest dictators in the world. He was proud of it. I would say it’s a little late to talk about mercy with the likes of Paul Manafort. Just as I was getting ready to shout out, “Hey, Tom!” at Smart & Final, I panicked. What if the guy in front of me was really Jeff Bezos, the famously shiny-pated executron of Amazon? I froze. Amazon, not coincidentally, is about to lay down some heavy footprints in downtown Santa Barbara in the Saks Off 5th building, emerging as State Street’s savior only after its online sales machine has laid waste to Santa Barbara’s retail core and that of thousands of other American downtowns. No one knows if a fulfillment center will go on the ground floor. But the upper floors will be occupied by hundreds of highly paid Artificial Intelligence geeks figuring out new things Alexa, Amazon’s omniscient android help-mate, can do for us that we should be doing for ourselves.

Classes & Workshops Start Every Week

The good news? Downtown could soon be hopping with warm young bodies with lots of spending power. The bad news? With a sudden influx of young, eager-beaver Alexa acolytes making up to $150,000, get ready for Santa Barbara’s ambient rents to escalate. As you know, Bezos — owner of the Washington Post—has just declared war on the National Enquirer —Trump’s personal newspaper and one of only a small handful of papers aside from the Santa Barbara News-Press to actually endorse Trump. The Enquirer outed an affair Bezos had been having with a television news star named Lauren Sanchez. Coincidentally—and more to the point—the Enquirer’s parent company, American Media, recently published a glossy, expensive-looking magazine extolling the visionary virtues of the new Saudi regime.

This coincidence prompted both the Saudi government and American Media to deny that the Saudi government had any role leaking news of the Bezos affair. That, of course, confirms that it did. The Post has spared little ink denouncing the Saudi government for the mutilation of its columnist. Not wanting to embarrass myself by confusing Bezos for Barrack, I bit my tongue. Two homeless guys pushing a shopping cart in the checkout line next to me did not. They let me know they approved of my choice in beer. The bottles, they said, were especially heavy. Just 30 of them could fetch $7 in recycling money. And the beer, they said, was good too. And as it turns out, they were right. — Nick Welsh

Nonviolent Communication (NVC) Conference March 29, 30, & 31, 2019 Friday, 7:00 - 9:30 p.m. Free Introduction

Saturday, 9:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. Sunday, 9:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. $95 + $5 Materials / ID# 22388 Wake Campus, Auditorium

MIND & SUPERMIND May 6, 2019 Unconditional Well-Being: How Living Mindfully Can Save the World with Dave Mochel

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www.sbcc.edu/ExtendedLearning

Monday, 7:30 - 9:30 p.m.

The easiest way to register for classes is in person at Wake or Schott Campus in Santa Barbara. For more information visit sbcc.edu/ExtendedLearning or call (805) 683-8200.

$20 in Advance / ID# 22430 Schott Campus, Auditorium

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FEBRUARY 28, 2019

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Special Community Event | Free Film Screening and Talk

James Balog The Human Element: A Photographer’s Journey in the Anthropocene Saturday, March 2 / 7:30 PM / Granada Theatre / FREE

photos: James Balog

Environmental hero James Balog has been tracking human-caused changes to our planet for nearly 40 years. The acclaimed photographer/filmmaker behind the documentary Chasing Ice, Balog illustrates issues ranging from rising sea levels to pollution’s impact on human health, focusing on a call for change. His new film, The Human Element, documents how the earth’s four elements – earth, air, water and fire – have all been impacted by a fifth element, homo sapiens. A scientist, adventurer and founder of the Colorado-based Extreme Ice Survey and Earth Vision Institute, Balog will give a short talk and answer questions following a screening of The Human Element. (Film running time: 80 min.)

Books will be available for purchase and signing courtesy of Chaucer’s

Presented in association with Community Environmental Council, Environmental Defense Center, Gaviota Coast Conservancy, Land Trust for Santa Barbara County, Los Padres ForestWatch, The Partnership for Resilient Communities, Santa Barbara Sierra Club, the UCSB Bren School of Environmental Science & Management, the UCSB Department of Environmental Studies, Urban Creeks Council and Wilderness Youth Project.

Event Sponsors: Audrey & Timothy O. Fisher and Erika & Matthew Fisher in memory of J. Brooks Fisher

Corporate Season Sponsor:

(805) 893-3535 www.ArtsAndLectures.UCSB.edu INDEPENDENT.COM

FEBRUARY 28, 2019

Media Sponsor:

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obituaries

To submit obituaries for publication, please call (805) 965-5205 or email obits@independent.com

Helen Langsev Ambler 04/29/22-02/01/19

Helen Langsev Ambler was born and raised at the confluence of the Willamette and Columbia rivers in Portland, Oregon and spent her childhood weekends on the Washougal River. Her love of rivers and ocean waters shaped and fed her spirit and she would return to them throughout her life. Helen passed away peacefully on February 1st, 2019, following a full life as an educator, designer, environmentalist, dancer, and nature lover. We like to think of her now, snorkeling in crystal blue Hawaiian waters, sitting by a rushing mountain stream, floating down the Truckee River, or paddling her inflatable boat around huge boulders at Sand Harbor in Lake Tahoe. Helen was born April 29, 1922 in her parents’ home in Portland, OR. Her father, David Bruce Ambler, County Engineer of Multnomah County, constructed many bridges in and around Portland. From him she inherited her respect for nature and natural processes and often quoted him saying, “You don’t do it until you know how to clean it up!” From her mother, Adelle May Barrett-Lyde, she inherited a love of dance, music, and adventure. Her mother also taught her the skills of sewing, tailoring, and cooking that Helen later put to use in her career. Helen was the middle of three daughters. She talked of waking up early to do chores before school, feeding the cows and tending to the chickens; roller-skating long distances in Portland to school and activities; and how her social life was organized around Job’s daughters. The family went almost every weekend, summer or winter, to their cabin on the pristine Washougal River in Washington, where they swam, rowed, and fished for trout and trapped crawfish. Pulling bracken fern, splitting wood, and drawing water were some of the tasks required before being allowed to “go down to the river,” her described goal at that time in their lives. When Helen was in Junior High School, her father’s second cousin, Sylvia Bryant, visited their home. While sitting in their comfortable living room listening to tales of Sylvia’s around-the-world cruise, Sylvia made the casual comment, “None of you have ever visited me in Hawaii.” Helen stored the offhand invitation in the back of her mind. After high school, Helen bagged ice cream bars for 25 cents an hour to earn passage to Hawaii. In June 1941, at the mailbox in front of her parents’ home, she 16

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boarded the Greyhound bus to San Francisco and from there, the USS Mariposa to Honolulu. Helen’s love affair with Hawaii began while living with Sylvia in a cottage on a sprawling estate - with an enormous lawn, coconut palms, and a rushing stream nearby. Helen enjoyed learning about the history of the people who populated the islands and the local geography, weather, and wild life. She wrote, “It rained every night in these deep valleys, encouraging the reproduction of scorpions and the heavenly fragrance of Night Blooming Cereus.” Helen was scheduled to begin at the University of Hawaii in January. On the morning of December 7th, 1941, standing outside their cottage, Helen recalls actually seeing the faces of the Japanese pilots as they flew past on their way to bomb Pearl Harbor. The attack on Pearl Harbor impacted Helen deeply; while there, she visited hospitals and wrote letters home from wounded soldiers. When visitors were ordered to leave, Helen sailed on Christmas Day, with the first convoy back to the mainland. Helen spent the next couple of years at Northwest Business College and working in Portland, OR. In April of 1943 she joined the United States Coast Guard Women’s reserve, known as SPARS. After basic training at Hunter College, Bronx, New York, she went to Palm Beach, FL where she was in the first class to graduate from Yeoman School. She was stationed at the “Captain of the port of LA” in the Los Angeles Yacht Harbor in Wilmington, CA. It was there that she met her future husband Richard “Dick” Boatman. They married in the spring of 1944 and lived on the base until he was deployed. After the war, with the help of the GI Bill, they completed their educations at Oregon State University. Helen was one of very few married, pregnant women in classes. Daughter Christine was born in 1949 while Helen was in her last year at OSU. She graduated with a BS in Sociology and a minor in Art and Home Economics. Helen’s marriage to Dick ended in 1955. While she was working toward her Master’s degree and starting her teaching career in Portland public schools, Helen met her second husband, Floyd Langsev. They married in 1956 and moved to Menlo Park, CA. where their daughter Terilynn was born in 1957. Helen was a stay-at-home mom for many years. She was a Girl Scout leader for both daughters, volunteered to support the families of disabled children, taught marketable skills to women in prison, and was also active in the American Association of University Women (AAUW). Every summer, the family camped, swam, and fished along a river in the Sierra Nevada Mountains and visited family in Oregon. It was around this time, on a trip to the Sea of Cortez, that Helen

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was introduced to snorkeling, an activity she discovered a love for. She returned to it frequently throughout her life, even up to her 90th birthday. In 1967 Helen returned to college for her Master’s Degree at San Jose State University. Subsequently she taught seven years at the College of Notre Dame in Belmont, then on to the Foothill-De Anza Jr. College District where she taught Interior Design and Textiles and wrote the course on “History of Interiors,” while working parttime as a licensed ASID Interior Designer at the Franciscan Forge. Helen was keenly aware of the challenges that women faced as homemakers and mothers when trying to get an education. Seeing an opportunity to help, she developed and taught college level, forcredit cooking and design classes on public-access television for Ohlone Junior College. She mailed workbooks to students and insisted that there be a sign language interpreter on set for deaf students. Intelligent, irreverent, outspoken, and a force to be reckoned with, Helen was a woman of depth and character and had a quick mind and keen wit. A true pioneer, she challenged the roles prescribed for women in her generation and helped to pave the way for expanding women’s rights and opportunities. She worked very hard and believed strongly that education was the path to women’s equality. When Helen’s marriage to Floyd ended after 23 years, Helen moved to Truckee, CA and joined the Interior Design professionals at the Ethan Allen Gallery in Reno, NV. On her daily commute from Truckee to Reno, she loved watching the Truckee River as it flowed through the seasons. After a couple of years being a “mountain woman,” she moved to Reno and lived on the Truckee River until retiring from Ethan Allen in 1989. Helen spent the next couple of years traveling extensively in Europe, Paris being one of her favorite destinations. She attended many Elderhostel programs and deeply appreciated the educational aspect that they offered to travelers. In 1993 Helen moved to Salem, OR and built a custom home with all the features she would include for a preferred client. Here she joined PEO and the Daughters of the Nile. In 1999 she “retired from house and yard work” and spent a winter golfing and snorkeling in Kona, Hawaii, before moving to Santa Barbara to live at Valle Verde (VV), where she nurtured many friendships and continued her involvement in AAUW and the PEO Sisterhood. She enjoyed attending Unity Church, line dancing, and choreographing dances for VV residents. She was an avid reader and bridge player, an armchair expert on Georgia O’Keeffe, and a frequent participant in the VV biannual flower show. Helen felt that her greatest contribution was teaching and said

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that her greatest joy was raising her daughters. She was motivated to work for change because she was touched deeply by the impact of social, political, and environmental injustices. She loved children and found simple, heart-felt joy when singing with others. Her nononsense, clever take on things was often shared with humor that had us laughing out loud. Helen will be missed. Helen had a debilitating stroke in 2013. She was able to enjoy fulfilling activities in the intervening years and was lovingly cared for by her daughter and a close-knit team of dedicated and skilled caregivers, to whom we are eternally grateful. Helen is survived by her daughter and son-in-law, Christine and Geoff Gross; their son Nick (the apple of Helen’s eye), and his wife Jenn; Nick and Jenn’s children Riley, 17, Lauren, 7, and Harper, 5; and Helen’s daughter Terilynn Langsev. Also, by her sister Ann Boehlke and her nieces and nephews: Adelle Kelly, Lee Merwin, Kathy Gonzalez, David Merwin, and Robert Merwin. For those wishing to remember Helen, contributions can be made to Oceana, an ocean conservation and advocacy organization.

Evelyn Rose Foxen Beraldo 06/07/23-02/21/19

Born on June 7, 1923 to Robert Louis Foxen, a musician and Marjorie Estelle West from Painesville, Ohio. Evelyn passed Feb 21, 2019. She was a Descendant of the first soldiers, pobladores and artisans who began their journey to Alta California in the late 1700's. Her second great grandparents, Benjamin Foxen from England and Charlotte (Peggy) Stewart from Tahiti, came later. Evelyn was fascinated by Peggy, a young woman who was connected to the HMS Bounty through her father, George Stewart. Mom spent her first years traveling with her parents in California. Her father was a trumpeter with many bands during the Big Band Era. Yosemite and Avalon were her favorite places. She loved music.

When ready for school Evelyn came to Santa Barbara to live with her dear grandfather, Salvador Foxen. This began her lifelong love of Santa Barbara. She attended Catholic school and transferred to SBHS in the 11th grade to finish her education. After graduation Evelyn met her future husband, Clayton Beraldo. They moved to Long Beach during the war and she was a "Rosie the Riveter". Evelyn came back to Santa Barbara to start her family. She often regaled her family with tales of coming of age in Santa Barbara. Mary Louise Days interviewed her for a project at the Santa Barbara Trust for Historic Preservation. Her interview was lively and informative and is available on the SBTHP site. After her divorce, Evelyn applied for a job at Raytheon on Gutierrez Street and became the first woman hired. She stayed with the company for over 30 years as a Electro-Mechanical Specialist and retired as a supervisor in the Microwave Division in Goleta. Retirement years were filled with various Arts & Craft classes at Adult Ed. Her love of animals gave forever homes to many rescue cats and dogs. Season tickets to various musical venues was her passion. Evelyn was a very unique, independent woman, and we will remember her for her wit and Love of Life. She is survived by her children Judy Miller (Terry), Bobby Beraldo, and Trudy Keith (Doug). She has 3 grandchildren, 7 great grands and 3 gr gr grands, her best friends Reuben Valdez (Renee), Diane Garcia and her four legged pal, Lacie. Evelyn was preceded in death by her sisters, Pat Murphy and Barbara Viera. Her brother-inlaw, Frank Viera and his sons, Steve and Michael survive. Nieces and nephews from the Beraldo Family also survive. We are very grateful to Trust Hospice for supporting mom in her final phase of life. Nurses Nancy, Elinor and caregiver Rosa were exceptional. They extended wonderful support not only for mom but for the family. Special thanks to her doctor, Robert Zylstra, who was always there for her and the family. He made mom's long journey comfortable. Per her request, funeral services will be private. A celebration of Life will be held in June. Friends may donate to ASAP in her honor. Arrangements entrusted to WelchRyce-Haider Funeral Chapels.

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In Memoriam

Joby Nuñez 1948-2019

Nuñez was born, his sister Lori tried to say “Joseph Baby,” and it came out “Joby.” He’s been Joby ever since. It is appropriate that his name resulted from a bridging of words because he will always be known for building bridges, in the form of human relationships. In a region where there are spirited athletic rivalries among three high schools — Santa Barbara, San Marcos, and Dos Pueblos — Joby was a coach at all three. When his funeral mass and celebration of life were held on February 9, hundreds of friends from Goleta to Carpinteria — and former UCSB football teammates from afar — spilled out the doors of Our Lady of Mt. Carmel Church and filled the grounds of the Carriage Museum. “He’s one of a kind,” said Mel Carrozza, who came out from New York. “I’ve never seen so many people. Everybody has a conduit to Joby.”

coached at his alma mater. He took the Dons soccer team to the CIF finals in 1989 and was defensive coordinator for Lito Garcia’s football team that won the CIF title that fall. His last years in education were as an administrator at both San Marcos and Dos Pueblos, and he continued to be a mentor to students. When his friend Hesselmeyer took over as football coach at San Marcos in 2009, Nuñez came out of retirement to lend a hand. He also got involved in the Ye Ole Gang, Santa Barbara High’s Hall of Fame organization, and other foundations. “He was always doing something for other people,” Moropoulos said.

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BY J O H N Z A N T hen Joseph Charles

Coached at All Three High Schools

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ver the years, Joby acquired a huge roster of friends. He could not go out in public without running into a former player or student. “One of my most vivid memories was of him patting me on my back as a junior,” said Eric Bittle, an offensive line coach at SBHS. “It meant the world to me and is part of why I s an athlete, Joby was a three-sport coach now, too. I loved seeing him later (football, basketball, baseball) standin my life as an adult. He’d ask about my out at Santa Barbara High. “He’s probably wife, my kids. He saw more in you than a the most underrated all-around athlete player on the field.” we’ve had,” said Mike Moropoulos, a For some, it took time to realize what longtime Dons football coach. “He was Nuñez meant to them. “In the last 10 the epitome of a single-wing tailback. He years, he was such a great guy,” Hopper said. “When we were kids, we had no could run, throw, and lead. What stands out most is his positive attitude. You never idea.” had to say, ‘Hustle!’ or ‘Come on!’ There In a poignant eulogy at the church, Joby’s son, Danny, told a story about the was something right in his upbringing.” Joby’s parents were both teachers at Christmas Eve when he was 9. Spotting GIANT KILLER: Joby Nuñez played on the famed Oregon State Beavers football squad that upset unrivaled Santa Barbara Junior High. His father died a man drunkenly staggering on the sideUSC in 1967; he went on to coach at three rival high schools in Santa Barbara and Goleta. when he was 5. Moropoulos remembers walk, his father stopped the car. Not surJoby’s mother, Beatrice, as somebody you prisingly, the man recognized him: “Joby, the kids.” That didn’t mean they always understood him. did not mess with. “She was tough on him,” he said. “Joby “He was a taskmaster, hard-core, a badger,” said Bruce is that you?” Nuñez offered to give him a ride, pulled out Hopper, one of the defensive backs assigned to the young $40, but the man refused to take it. “Just because someone was in love with her.” has a problem does not mean that he is a bad person,” Nuñez got a taste of big-time football at Oregon State coach. “I butted heads with him a lot.” Mires presided over a coaching staff that included the Danny remembered his father telling him. and was on the roster of the famed “Giant Killer” Beavers Cancer invaded Joby’s body seven years ago, and he who upset No. 1–ranked USC, 3-0, in 1967. But his heart professorial Scott O’Leary, Tom Everest, Connie Barger, was in Santa Barbara, and he finished out his career in and Jeff Hesselmeyer. Only Mires and Everest survive. They never burdened his friends with grave news. “We never 1969-71 at UCSB. had the Chargers playing at the UCSB stadium, taking on talked about cancer,” Moropoulos said. “I had no idea he Carrozza and Brock Arner were Gaucho linemen who powers like Mater Dei and St. Paul. was sick; he was always so upbeat and smiley,” Bittle said. During that time, Nuñez made an extravagant purchase: “He didn’t whine about it at all,” Jahadhmy said. “He was became lifelong friends. “Joby was about 59, 180 pounds, and could bench press 280-290,” Arner said. “He was an a red 1976 Porsche 911-S that he drove until his feet were determined to enjoy life with his family.” astonishing blocker as a wide receiver. He showed no fear. weakened by neuropathy. “It was brand-new when I went oby and Pat Nuñez, a teacher herself, were married for 41 I would stand up a 280-pound defensive tackle, and Joby to L.A. with him,” Mires recalled. “Joby was driving, and I years. They raised three thriving children, Danny and his was reading the owner’s manual to him.” would take him out, just crush him.” Nuñez also coached baseball and started the Dos Pueb- sisters, Janet Lemons and Ana Karina Arnold. Jimmy Curtice, who had been a San Marcos High quarKarina, as she is known, made it clear that her father had terback, was at the helm of the Gaucho offense. He recalled los soccer program. Abe Jahadhmy, who went on to become a 1969 game at Cal Poly: “We’re ahead 9-7 with two and a a soccer coach himself at San Marcos and is the school’s a much wider embrace than his man’s world of coaching half minutes left in the game. It’s third and two on our own athletic director, played for him. “Santa Barbara had great and games. “My dad was one of the most sensitive people 28. They’d been beating us up. We had to get a first down or soccer players, but Goleta had nothing,” Jahadhmy said. I knew,” she said. “I always found comfort in knowing that they’re going to come back and kick a field goal. We gave it “I learned about preparation from Joby. Soccer coaches no matter what it was, I could always go to my dad for to the only guy who they couldn’t touch: Joby Nuñez on a didn’t scout other teams, but he did. He started soccer at sound advice, a good laugh, or a cry. My close girlfriends reverse. He went for nine yards, first down. We milked the the Goleta Boys Club. Eight years later, DP won the CIF considered him like a second father because he loved and championship.” nurtured them as he did his own daughters. clock and won the game.” But Nuñez was laid off prior to that 1983 title because of “Words to describe my dad: approachable, loving, kind, eaching credential in hand, Nuñez got his first job widespread cutbacks in the school district. He commuted nonjudgmental, fun, generous, sensitive, intuitive, funny, at Dos Pueblos. “One of the reasons we hired him was to a job at Nordhoff High in Ojai. “I talked to [principal] sarcastic, quick-witted, family- and friend-oriented, hardthat we knew he was a very coachable as an athlete,” said Bill Jackson and said, ‘You’ve got to make room for Joby,’ ” working, sympathetic, and fair.” n Dick Mires, the Chargers football coach. “He understood Moropoulos said. For the next 10 years, Nuñez taught and That about covers it.

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obituaries

To submit obituaries for publication, please call (805) 965-5205 or email obits@independent.com

Thomas C. Bruice

(Mark), Kenton (Donna), Alec (Whitney), and 13 grandchildren. A celebration of his life will be held at a later date. Donations in his memory may be made to the Adventures in Caring Foundation (1528 Chapala Street, SB 93101) or to The Ensemble Theatre Company (P.O. Box 2307, SB 93120).

08/25/25-02/15/19

Laura Allbritton 11/24/52-02/17/19 Thomas C. Bruice passed away on February 15 from complications following a stroke. He was born on August 25, 1925 in Los Angeles. He left high school (Manual Arts) after his junior year to serve in the U.S Navy (1943-1946), assigned as a medic with the Marines in the South Pacific. After his discharge, he attended Los Angeles City College. Bruice earned his B.S. (1950) and his Ph.D. in Organic Chemistry and Biochemistry (1954) at USC and was a post-doctoral fellow at UCLA. He was a professor at Yale University School of Medicine, The Johns Hopkins University School of Medicine, and Cornell University. In 1964 he resigned his position at Cornell, telling the President of the University that he would stay if he would get rid of the snow and build him a surfing beach. His search for a place to surf led him (along with his Cornell graduate students and post-doctoral fellows) to the University of California, Santa Barbara, where he joined the faculty and surfed well into his seventies. Bruice was one of the fathers of bioorganic chemistry, applying the principles of physical-organic chemistry to understand the mechanisms of biochemical reactions. He was elected to both the National Academy of Sciences and the American Academy of Arts and Sciences in 1974. He was a Fellow of the Royal Society of Chemistry, a Fellow of the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and a Guggenheim Fellow. Among Bruice’s many awards were the National Academy of Sciences Award for Innovative Research in the Chemical Sciences, the Linus Pauling Medal, The Tolman Medal, the Repligen Medal for the Chemistry of Biological Processes, the Alfred Bader Medal for Bioorganic Chemistry, and the James Flack Norris Award in Physical-Organic Chemistry. He had over 600 publications and Science Watch listed him among “The World’s 50 Most Cited Chemists between 19841991”. He is survived by his wife of 48 years, Paula Yurkanis Bruice, and his children Tom (Corinne), Ann, Carl (Lynn), Meghan Thomas 18

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Eat right and exercise regularly. Laura Lynn (Rodenburg) Allbritton, age 66, was the embodiment of this mantra. She was the epitome of good health and did everything right but it all went horribly wrong when she was diagnosed with Glioblastoma (GBM) brain cancer 19 months ago. She fought valiantly and even participated in several experimental trials to help advance GBM research to find a cure but alas, it was not to be. Laura was born on November 24, 1952, in Council Bluffs, IA, to Wayne and Betty Rodenburg and grew up on a farm near Underwood, Iowa. She graduated from Underwood High School in 1971 and was a member of the National Honor Society. Laura pursued her undergraduate degree at the University of Iowa where she continued her education, earning her Juris Doctor diploma from the College of Law in 1977. Her legal career began in Des Moines, IA, as a law clerk for IA Supreme Court Chief Justice Ward Reynoldson. She remained in Des Moines for another year, practicing family law at a local firm. Though she didn’t know a soul in Dallas, TX, she answered an advertisement for a position with the firm of Akin, Gump, Strauss, Hauer & Feld and began in the fall of 1979. Laura enjoyed the work and excitement of living in Big D and became active in Toastmasters. Ten years after moving to TX she was awarded the honor of, “Dallas Attorney of the Year”! Through her practice of law she met her future husband, Edwin Allbritton. They were married April 25, 1992, and that’s when her life adventures really began! From the markets of Marrakesh, to the Serengeti plains, to the green beauty of New Zealand and to the glamour of Paris, she and Ed enjoyed traveling the world. She eventually retired from her law practice and went to

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work in her husband’s company, Allbritton Capital Management. After they both retired they bought a home in Santa Barbara, CA, and Laura became active in the Los Fiesteros Dance Club. Even though they both enjoyed Santa Barbara, Ed yearned for a home in the TX Hill Country so they built a home in Pipe Creek. Laura loved nothing more than donning an evening gown to dance the night away while Ed preferred donning hunting gear. They were the quintessential “Green Acres” couple, combining both lifestyles and living life to the fullest. Then suddenly, tragedy struck. Ed was killed by a distracted driver while riding his bicycle near Bandera, TX, on Mother’s Day, 2015. After that, Laura’s life pretty much “went to the dogs”. To assuage her grief, she began actively rescuing dogs. She sponsored several rescue organizations and personally provided many animals with medical care while they recovered at her ranch until they were placed in fur-ever homes around the country. To this date, she is credited with rescuing over 165 dogs and one cat! Now we can only hope and pray that “all dogs go to Heaven” as Laura will be very disappointed if there is no canine contingent to greet her at the Pearly Gates! Laura is survived by her stepdaughters, Leigh Allbritton of Dallas, TX, and Hillary (Mark) Kokes; and granddaughters, Hadley and Avery Kokes all of Palos Verdes Estates, CA; sister-in-law Marcia Fasy of Morro Bay, CA; sister Lynda (Jim) Cote; nephew Chris Cote; niece Alison (Kevin) Mock; great-nieces Sloane and Clare Mock, all of San Diego, CA. She is preceded in death by her beloved parents and husband. Visitation will begin at 1PM with services beginning at 2PM at Ebensberger-Fisher Funeral Home in Boerne, TX, on Monday, February 25, 2019. A reception will follow at Laura’s favorite Boerne restaurant, Valeria, from 4-6PM. Interment will be at 1PM on Wednesday, February 27, 2019, at the DallasFort Worth National Cemetery. In lieu of flowers, please send memorials to the Univ. of TX MD Anderson Cancer Center at P.O. Box 4486, Houston, TX 772104486 or online at www.mdanderson.org/gifts. Specify the memorial for Laura Rodenburg Allbritton and designate GBM Research, OR sponsor, support or adopt a rescue dog and keep their tails wagging! To leave condolences for the family, please visit www.ebensbergerfisher.com and select obituaries. Arrangements with EbensbergerFisher Funeral Home of Boerne.

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JoAnne Elaine (Castro) Dommeyer 08/03/53-02/08/19

JoAnne Elaine (Castro) Dommeyer of Santa Ynez Valley received her Golden Wings when she passed away on February 8, 2019, at the St. John’s Pleasant Valley Hospital. She is now set free to dance in Heaven, and has been reunited with her beloved husband. JoAnne was born on August 3, 1953, to Eleanor and Fred Castro. She was raised with her six brothers in a lively and love filled household in Carpinteria, CA. Growing up by the beach, JoAnne had a special and deep connection with the ocean. In her time at Carpinteria High School, JoAnne was a song leader, participated in drama, and became involved with the Chicano Student Rights Movement; she was the president of M.E.C.H.A. and a proud member of the Jr. Brown Berets. She graduated from Carpinteria High School in 1971, and shortly after married her high school sweetheart, Donald J. Dommeyer. JoAnne was a loving and devoted wife. She and Don moved to North Carolina, where Don was stationed in the army. They returned to live in Summerland, and eventually moved to the Santa Ynez Valley, to raise their family on a little slice of heaven in Los Olivos. JoAnne found great joy in being of service to others. She poured love into delicious home-cooked meals that she often made for family and friends. If there were ever a friend in need, JoAnne and Don would open their home, offering a bite to eat, love, care, and a place to stay. JoAnne often said that she wanted her home to be like a lighthouse, shining light to those in need. One of JoAnne’s favorite pastimes was playing slow-pitch softball. She spent many years on a softball field developing deep connections with her teammates. The slow-pitch softball community was more like a village of people that helped raise and shape her family. Some of her closest and dearest friends were her teammates. JoAnne was an outstanding pitcher and known for remaining calm under pressure, she had a grace about her and kept her cool

in the toughest situations. She shared a love for the sport that was passed down to her five children; she took her skills and applied it to coach her children's sports teams. She was loved by all the children whose lives she touched. She coached T-ball, middle school and high school softball, AYSO soccer, volleyball, cheerleading, and was involved with Girl Scouts. JoAnne loved the Lord with all her heart; she developed an unwavering faith that fueled her soul during her most difficult times. For many years she was a member of the Santa Ynez Foursquare Church serving as a Deacon. She played the bongos on the worship team, hosted Bible studies, and prayer nights. JoAnne showed her creative side through her paintings, cards, and poetry writing. She filled journals with her insights, songs, and wisdom. She was the go-to sign maker for many community events. Her can-do attitude, punny humor, gentle softness, and empathetic understanding made her a lovely, beaming light within the community and beyond. As a mother and grandmother, she was patient and remained calm, caring, loving, and kind beyond words. She prided herself in leading by example and had a way about her that encouraged others to learn, grow, and become the best version of themselves. In 2008, she was diagnosed with a rare form of Parkinson's disease, called Multiple Systems Atrophy. For years JoAnne remained cared for in her home; although her body fell into severe decline, her mind, heart, and faith stayed strong. JoAnne was eventually admitted to Sub Acute care, where she lived out the rest of her days. During that time, she enjoyed holiday trips to Carpinteria, the occasional trip to the beach, and found joy in hearing stories about the lives of her family and friends. JoAnne continued to show an unparalleled strength and positivity, that shone through her existence like rays of sunshine; full of faith that the Lord was always with her and using her in his plan. JoAnne is survived by her five children Denicia, Erika, Bobby, Caydi and Christiana Dommeyer; her three grandchildren Anthony, Mikey and Sydney Gills; her six brothers Louie, Eddie and Bobby Calderon, Danny, Freddy and Abel Castro. Friends and family that would like to gather for a Celebration of Life, please join the family on Saturday, March 23 from 1:00 to 6:00 p.m. at Santa Ynez Valley Presbyterian Church, 1825 Alamo Pintado Rd, Solvang.


obituaries Dennis Leo Green

Dennis Leo Green, 64, of Santa Barbara died at home on February 7, 2019 after an 8-month battle with brain cancer. Dennis was born in Hollywood, California, the son of John and Peggy (Flynn) Green. After graduating from Crespi Carmelite High School and Pierce College, a lifelong career in food service led him from managing Chart Houses in California and Hawaii to opening his own restaurant, the Blue Shark Bistro, in downtown Santa Barbara. A lover of golf, Dennis was an active member of La Cumbre Country Club for twenty-five years. He shared his love of the sport for over thirteen years as a UCSB recreational golf instructor, and as assistant coach to Laguna Blanca School’s golf team. Dennis is survived by his wife, Christine, and their son, Stewart. He is also survived by his brothers Mike (Bridgett), Pat (Bonnie), and Tim, and his sister Mary (Scott), as well as many nieces and nephews. He was preceded in death by his parents. A celebration of Dennis’ life will be held at La Cumbre Country Club on Saturday, March 30, 2019 at 3:00 PM. RSVP to dennismemorial033019@gmail.com. In lieu of flowers, the family requests you make a gift to Emilio Nares Foundation, 2650 Truxtun Road, 202, San Diego, CA 92106, or a charity of your choice.

Jesse James Ficklin 11/21/36-02/01/19

Jesse James Ficklin was called to be with our Lord on February 1, 2019 in Los Angeles, CA. He is preceded in death by his parents, Thelma Jones, JB Ficklin SR., and James Jones, his aunts, Ollie Bell Bolden and Ruth Lester, and Uncle, Julius "Sonny" Crockett. He is survived by one son Richard Jenkins (Charlene) of Washington, two daughters, Diana Giles

To submit obituaries for publication, please call (805) 965-5205 or email obits@independent.com of Los Angeles, CA and Rebekah Moorhead (Robert) of Lompoc, CA, 10 grandchildren, 6 greatgrandchildren, and 2 great-greatgrandchildren, brother, Rev.JB Ficklin Jr. (Melvina), 2 sisters Mary Dixon (Archie) and Bernice Garrett (Jerome) who are all of Santa Barbara, CA, and many other relatives and friends. Jesse was born on November 21, 1936 in Clarksdale, Mississippi. He migrated from Mississippi to Santa Barbara and married hi sweetheart, Elizabeth Glover, in 1955. He entered the US Army Corps on March 25, 1960 and left with an honorable discharge on March 22, 1963. He worked at the Devroe School in Goleta, both the Riviera and Granada Theatre, and a car wash on Milpas St., all before opening his own body shop in Carpinteria, CA with his best friend, Robert Allen. A memorial service for Jesse will be held on Saturday, March 2, 2019 at 1 PM at Greater Hope Missionary Baptist Church, 430 E. Figueroa St., Santa Barbara, CA.

Laurie Lynn Richardson

Laurie Lynn Richardson was born in Walnut Creek, CA, the oldest of six children. She often helped with her younger siblings, a skill-set that served her well in her decades-long career as a teacher. Laurie graduated with a degree in Early Childhood Education from California Lutheran University (then CLC) in 1980 and began teaching preschool in Santa Barbara. Laurie and her first husband met soon after her move into town. They gave birth to twin girls in 1982. The family moved to Goleta just before the girls began grade school, and Laurie began her 32-year career at Good Shepherd Preschool. She also began attending Trinity Lutheran Church, where she was an active member, teaching Sunday School and volunteering at Transition House and Trinity Gardens. Her faith in God was expressed by caring for her wide community, be it in prayer, feeding, clothing, or teaching. Laurie loved to travel. Lifetime highlights include Rome and taking the train to Chicago. She was an avid camper throughout her life. She loved to dance, swim, walk, and do yoga. Laurie participated in

liturgical dance groups throughout high school, college, and as a young woman. She participated in races and triathlons through her forties and rode her bike to work into her fifties. She loved a long walk on the bluffs over the beach. She enjoyed water and could swim before she could walk, making the ocean one of her favorite places. Laurie was a prolific reader and writer throughout her life. She wrote poetry, journaled, and anyone close to her could count on regular cards and letters. Celebrating retirement in May of this past year, Laurie was thrilled to travel and spend more time with her granddaughter, Iris. Sadly and unexpectedly, Laurie passed away at the age of 60 after a brief illness, on December 29, 2018. Laurie is remembered with love by her daughters, Nicole (Aaron) Biergiel Laferriere and Jody (Renny) Biergiel Colclough; her granddaughter, Iris; her exhusband, Jim Biergiel; her mother, Shirley; her siblings, Dana Hart, Erika Valdivia, Matthew, Christopher, and Katrina RichardsonKeller and their partners; and many beloved nieces and nephews. A service celebrating her life will be held at Trinity Evangelical Lutheran Church, Santa Barbara, on March 30 at 11 am. Potluck lunch to follow. All who loved Laurie are welcome. In lieu of flowers, please consider a donation to KCBX, CLU, or adopting a cat.

Alfred W. Rymills 11/28/22-02/04/19

Alfred Rymills passed away on February 4 after a short illness. He was a gentleman, a loving and doting husband and father with a great sense of humor. Born in Newtonville, Massachusetts, Alfred was the second son of Harry and Maud Rymills. Harry died when Alfred was 10 months old and the following year his mother and boys moved to England, his parent’s birthplace. Alfred was raised in Epsom, Surrey where he met Maisie. They married in 1946 and in 1953, the family immigrated to the United States and settled in Dayton, Ohio. In 1956, Alfred (Al) joined Raytheon and moved to Framingham, Massachusetts. He transferred to Raytheon in Santa Barbara in 1959 and retired in 1985.

Alfred loved to travel and took his family on many trips to national parks and other destinations in the United States and Canada. In later years, he preferred cruising and visited several countries in Europe and Central and South America. Alfred was predeceased by Maisie, his wife of 61 years. He is survived by his daughters Jennifer Johnson (Stephen) and Elaine; his grandchildren, Matthew (Anna) and Rebecca Head (Jason); and three great grandsons, Jeremy, David, and James. A graveside service was held on February 12 at Santa Barbara Cemetery. In lieu of flowers please consider a donation to Direct Relief, United Way, or Visiting Nurse and Hospice Care.

Marvin Milton Maxwell 05/13/29-02/20/19

Marvin Milton Maxwell, 89, a long time Santa Barbara resident passed away at home on February 20, 2019 after a long and courageous battle with melanoma. Marv was born on May 13th, 1929 to John and Hilda Maxwell (Smelcer) in Spokane WA and was raised on the family farm in nearby Nine Mile Falls. He served in the US army during the Korean War which brought him to Louisiana, Panama, and San Pedro, CA where he met his wife Phyllis at a dance. Moving to Santa Barbara he attended UCSB, graduating in the mid 1950’s. Marv left his mark in Santa Barbara by designing and developing many fine homes as the owner/president of Arco Construction Company and Jacks Kitchens for many years. Always a true sportsman Marvin was an accomplished competitive tennis player playing in USTA tournaments as recently as September of last year. Marvin also regularly played golf, softball and pickleball. Marv is survived by his 3 children, Marcia Fraley, John Maxwell and Andrew Maxwell, grandchildren Allie Porwol (Joe) and Max Fraley, his brother Jim Maxwell and his sister Evelyn Gesik (Larry). He is preceded in death by his daughter Susan (August 1965) and his wife Phyllis (December 2013). A memorial service will be held at the First United Method-

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ist Church on March 3, 2019 at 3:00pm. In lieu of flowers, the family requests donations in his memory go to the Ridley Tree Cancer Center.

Joanne Frye Nay 12/02/35-01/13/19

Joanne Frye Nay passed away early in her eighty-fourth year from complications of dementia. She was the oldest of four children of Albert and Ruby Frye, born in Los Angeles and educated initially in La Habra and then at Stanford. Following a junior year in Berlin, she graduated in 1958, the first female student to obtain a degree in industrial engineering at Stanford. The following year she married Paul Nay. Over the subsequent years she maintained a growing family, and was employed as an industrial engineer at Ampex and then at Josten’s in Porterville, California where she had increasing responsibilities and ultimately become chief engineer. Both she and her husband, a psychology professor at Porterville College, retired in 1997 and then moved to Santa Barbara, joining the Unitarian Society of Santa Barbara in 2000, where Joanne served on the church board for several years. She also found a new talent through Santa Barbara City College, turning out a number of fused-glass works. Her interests ranged widely throughout her life, encompassing multicultural activities especially involving women, not only in her professional field as a member of the Society of Women Engineers but in more distant areas, through travels and Earthwatch expeditions. While in Porterville she served for five years on the Tulare County Commission on the Status of Women. A tragedy late in her life was the death of Kevin, the oldest of her three sons. She is survived by her husband Paul Nay, her sons Steve and John Nay, and her grandsons Ian and Andrew Nay. There will be a Celebration of Life for her at the Unitarian Society of Santa Barbara at 3:00 PM Sunday, March 3. Contributions in her name to the Alzheimers Association or other groups fighting dementia would be welcome and appropriate.

FEBRUARY 28, 2019

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Channel Your

POTENTIAL

Letters

opinions cont’d

An End of the Tale

M

acduff Everton’s article about his father, “An Episcopal Priest in a Time of Turmoil,” is so inspiring and well written. And what a way to end the article. What became of his father and his social justice work after he was fired? —Robin Brady, S.B.

•••

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Macduff Everton replied: “After Bishop Pike died, the new bishop wasn’t as supportive. He didn’t appoint my father to another church. Many of his supporters, angry at the vestry at Trinity, quit in protest to join All Saints-by-the-Sea. My father found work as a paralegal, approaching everything with equanimity and intelligence. He filled in for other priests when they needed help or vacations and was invited to give sermons on issues of the day. He never stopped fighting the good fight. My parents moved first to San Jose, then Bend, Oregon, and Boise, Idaho, where my father died in 2007, succumbing to melanoma, which the doctors attributed to his wartime service in naval intelligence while working in the South Pacific without sunscreen. “My sister wrote me after reading the article. She says better than I can what sort of people my parents were.”

W

•••

hat a heartwarming article about my American parents. The day I met them, I knew they stood for racial justice. They opened their home to a stranger they met working at an assisted living facility, a refugee from the civil war in Ethiopia. They welcomed me and my daughter with open arms, open hearts, and they taught me, too, so many times, how to become a strong, financially stable American citizen, and how to succeed as an immigrant. They not only became my parents but became grandparents to my daughter. They took her to the library, picked up the best books to read, helped her with her homework and piano, and on weekends, not only were they my childcare, but they took her hiking and to farms and children’s museums. I spent time learning the language and culture and overcoming the challenges of being new to a country I proudly call my home. I am an American, I pay taxes, I am a law-abiding citizen. I have worked 47 years as a nurse. I face challenges daily at both work and outside, but I am able to speak up, stand for what I believe, and I owe it to my American parents, Clyde and Frances Everton. Every time things get out of control, especially nowadays, I go back to their mature advice. I am not sure I could have survived without it. These past two years have been so painful when people judge you because of the color of your skin rather than your humanity. I was very fortunate to meet a family that stood for equality of both social and racial justice. I miss them dearly. I am forever grateful. —Abeba Abraha (Everton)

Dario Raves and Rails

R

egarding “Pini Forks Over $1.6 Million,” I am a parent of a City College student, whom I sent to live in an apartment on Oceano Ave. owned by Dario Pini. I assumed the apartment was in great shape. When she got there, it was horrible. My daughter cleaned, and I drove nine hours to help steam-clean the stained carpet, bleach the black mold from the shower, change the curtains (they had ticks), flea-bomb her room, and get rid of the flying bugs. The rental property managers unclogged the shower drain but otherwise could do nothing. I’m so upset they had no care to help us resolve the issues. Two weeks later, I moved my daughter to another apartment, paying almost $2,000 and losing the rent already paid for the month. — Nora Alvarez, Redding

W

•••

hen I rented from [Pini], he would never raise the rent on any of his tenants, no matter how long you lived there. What other landlord does that?

— Michele A. Lipman, S.B.

P

•••

ini has been a slumlord as long as I can remember. — Shawnte Zamora, S.B.

T

•••

he guy has offered a solution to our housing crisis by providing lower-cost rentals. If you don’t like it, don’t rent from him. — Steven Anthony, Goleta

H

•••

e also works with tenants on deposits and if you get in a bind, doesn’t do credit reports, and he has always repaired anything I’ve called his office [about]. I appreciate him. — Allison Marie, S.B.

On the Pledge

A

lex Diaz’s superb letter on the impropriety of reciting the Pledge of Allegiance at SBCC board meetings led me to recall my first day of 4th grade in 1954. The teacher led us in the daily pledge, a custom I had welcomed, but then struck a most dissonant note, intoning “under God”—two words that Congress had added that year. School had been a secular refuge from my parents’ overzealous religious indoctrination. Even now, when I attend a government meeting and hear “God” in the pledge or invocation, I cringe. How can this ostentatious show of piety not be deemed unconstitutional government endorsement of religion? The answer lies in the shamefully disingenuous “logic” of religious zealots who’ve sat on our highest court (see the Town of Greece decision, 2014). They, like local pledge proponent Celeste Barber, posit that anyone who objects to hearing “under God” in the pledge or invocation can either quietly sit or excuse themselves until that pious preliminary has ended. This ignores


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letters cont’d inconvenient facts. Try publicly disdaining “God” in a Bible Belt town where everyone knows everyone else’s business. Pious attendees will take note and proceed to ensure the infidel is forever marginalized, if not outright ostracized. The same discriminatory dynamic exists even here in supposedly pagan California. Plain and simple, true believers want “God” in government to promote their faith, the better to lord it over nonbelievers. Myself, I’m praying (not to a deity) that the day comes when enough SBCC board meeting attendees absent themselves during the pledge that the board feels compelled to do the right thing: Either recite the pledge in its pre-1954 version or omit — Roberta Helms, S.B. it altogether.

A

•••

s a onetime student and longtime financial contributor to the SBCC Foundation, I was at the meeting and spoke in favor of the Pledge and against hateful and inaccurate words used by Board President Robert Miller to describe the Pledge as “racist,” “nativist,” and “white nationalist.” I, too, was disgusted by the last speaker using a derogatory slur. SBCC needs healing, not hate. It also needs dramatically new leadership on the Board. All publicly funded educational institutions should foster an inclusive, safe environment where freedom of speech and diversity of thought are respected by all. Until SBCC returns to its roots as a place where the trustees and faculty refocus their energy into promoting character and critical thinking skills among all students, my wife and I are not writing another check. — James Fenkner, S.B.

E

•••

very time discussion of the Pledge of Allegiance appears on Facebook, I feel duty bound to post this: “To believe that patriotism will not flourish if patriotic ceremonies are voluntary and spontaneous instead of a compulsory routine is to make an unflattering estimate of the appeal of our institutions to free minds. We can have intellectual individualism and the rich cultural diversities that we owe to exceptional minds only at the price of occasional eccentricity and abnormal attitudes. When they are so harmless to others or to the State as those we deal with here, the price is not too great. But freedom to differ is not limited to things that do not matter much. That would be a mere shadow of freedom. The test of its substance is the right to differ as to things that touch the heart of the existing order.

“If there is any fixed star in our constitutional constellation, it is that no official, high or petty, can prescribe what shall be orthodox in politics, nationalism, religion, or other matters of opinion or force citizens to confess by word or act their faith therein.” — Justice Robert Jackson in West Virginia Board of Education v. — Monte Schulz, S.B. Barnette (1943)

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Of Clouds and CO2

I

n attempting to refute the science behind Santa Barbara’s sea rise planning, the letter “Sea Rise or No?” in the February 14 issue repeats two common climatedenier misconceptions. First, that warming waters and the resulting increased evaporation reduce planetary heating by increasing cloud cover, thus shielding more of the sun’s rays. The truth is the opposite: More clouds and more water vapor trap more heat, not less; warmer waters also absorb less CO2 than colder water. Warmer waters create a self-perpetuating feedback loop: More atmospheric heat-trapping leads to even warmer waters. The second misconception is that carbon dioxide is only 0.04 percent of the atmosphere. Levels of CO2 throughout human history were at about 0.03 percent until about 200 years ago, when they started to rise, thanks mostly to the burning of fossil fuels. This is a 33 percent increase caused by man, not nature. Plants and natural systems cannot adapt to this large, sudden increase. The writer sarcastically admonishes the Independent to “go back to school.” I would instead recommend the book Beyond Debate: Answers to 50 Misconceptions on Climate Change by Dr. Shahir Masri. — Robert Else, S.B.

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¶ Last week’s Wedding Guide should have said Ceremonies by Nanette are “Modern and meaningful ceremonies for ALL couples.” She can be contacted at 452-0056, ceremoniesbynanette.com. The Independent welcomes letters of less than 250 words that include a daytime phone number for verification. Letters may be edited for length and clarity. Send to: Letters, S.B. Independent, 12 E. Figueroa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101; or fax: 965-5518; or email: letters@independent.com. Unabridged versions and more letters appear at independent.com/opinions.

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PARALLEL STORIES

Dismantling Hierarchies: Alex Espinoza SUNDAY | MARCH 10 | 2:30 PM Described by Sandra Cisneros as “capable of renewing one’s faith in new fiction,” Alex Espinoza’s writing is filled with a sense of place and longing, and an idiosyncratic search for love, meaning, and unflinching truth. In an afternoon of reading and conversation, the author shares his thoughts on Southern California, masks, identity, cultural displacement, faith, the world of lucha libre, belonging, and why what should exclude us, empowers us. Parallel Stories is a literary and performing arts series that pairs art and artists with award-winning authors and performers of regional, national, and international acclaim. This series functions as a multidisciplinary lens through which to view the Museum’s collection and special exhibitions. This program is generously sponsored by the Samuel B. and Margaret C. Mosher Foundation.

Images left to right: Still Water Saints cover. Alex Espinoza.

22

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$5 SBMA Members $10 Non-Members $6 Senior Non-Members Purchase tickets at the Museum Visitor Services desk, or online at tickets.sbma.net. Mary Craig Auditorium 1130 State Street www.sbma.net


COU RTESY PHOTOS

Opinions

CONT’D

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Vocal Locals BEEF TRI TIP Daraka Larimore-Hall

Greg Gandrud

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anta Barbara conservative gadfly Greg Gandrud won election as treasurer of the California Republican Party over the weekend at a rowdy convention featuring bitter debate and demonstrations over how closely to embrace Donald Trump. “The party delegation reflects a range of views on the president,” Gandrud told us, in the understatement of the week. When the dust settled in the Sacramento Convention Center, 1,500 Republican delegates chose their first-ever woman chair in a victory for elected officials and the party’s business wing: Jessica Patterson, a millennial Latina mother of two from Simi Valley, allied with House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthy of Bakersfield, defeated Travis Allen and Steve Frank, two raw-meat, MAGA, Build-the-Wall Trumpistas. With their president hugely unpopular in California, Republicans have fallen to third place as a voter bloc, do not hold a statewide office, occupy fewer than onethird of seats in the Legislature, and just suffered a historic, midterm congressional wipeout. So, Patterson called for the party to turn down the volume on national issues in favor of attacking Dems on matters closer to home, like housing and state taxes. Pundits cast her victory as a Republican move, however belated, to expand their base beyond right-wing old white guys and align themselves more closely with California’s emergent populations, tossing Grandrud’s election into the mix. As Politico put it: “In a nod to state Republicans calling for more diversity in their ranks, delegates on Sunday also elected Peter Kuo, an East Bay businessman who is an immigrant from Taiwan, to be its vice chairman, and Greg Gandrud, who is openly gay, as its treasurer.” In an email interview, Gandrud shrugged off identity politics: “California is a diverse state and we welcome people of all backgrounds,” he said. “Being gay in the Republican Party is a non-issue.” Instead he underscored the state focus articulated by the new GOP chair: “The real issues here in California include the high cost of housing, storing more water, and maintaining and increasing roadway capacity. The majority of Californians agree that Republicans have great solutions on all of those issues.” Hic manebimus optime.

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Keynote Address by Dr. Christopher Kerr with an in-depth conversation with Dr. Michael Kearney Thursday, March 7 from 5–7 PM Hilton Santa Barbara Beachfront Resort FREE with Registration at vnhcsb.org/phorum 1.5 CE hours available* FOLLOW UP WORKSHOP Friday, March 8 from 8:30–9:30 AM VNHC Board Room 360 Olive Street, Santa Barbara $5 Admission Register at vnhcsb.org/phorum Questions 805-690-6218 1.0 CE hour available* * Provider, Visiting Nurse & Hospice Care of S.B., approved by the California Board of Registered Nurses, Provider #CEP5310 for 1.5 hours and 1.0 hour, respectively. 24

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Opinions

CONT’D

SANTA BARBARA COUNTY HIGH SCHOOL

voices

2019 Architectural Design Competition

PAUL WELLMAN FILE PHOTO

Inextricable Priorities After Housing, How Do You Get to Work?

G

MOVING THE MASSES: Successful housing solutions would address urban sprawl, traffic, and mass transit. BY STUART KASDIN overnor Gavin Newsom has set the goal

for encouraging the construction of 3.5 million new housing units in California by 2025. However, a critical element will determine the initiative’s potential for success: transportation. Successfully addressing housing critically depends on the accompanying advances we make in transportation. In Southern California, historically, new housing was added via sprawl — single-family housing replaced open space, with new houses added at points farther and farther away. It was relatively easy and inexpensive to create new housing. But as the nearby open space disappeared, creating new housing has become more difficult, and the rate of housing creation has fallen. Southern California’s transportation system was built to accommodate single-family housing. In contrast, cities like New York are built around the subway and light rail, enabling dense housing within the city and allowing large numbers of people to live away from the city and to commute. In Los Angeles and Orange counties, the traffic design was not originally built to accommodate areas of dense housing such as apartment buildings and other multifamily housing. There are limits to how many lanes the county can add to roads. Moreover, as L.A. County continued to grow out, certain major arterial roads (like the 405, the 110, and 10) received more and more traffic from the expanded city. As a result, traffic congestion has become nightmarish: L.A. drivers, on average, spent over 102 hours in traffic at peak times in 2017, the most time in rush-hour jams of any city in the world. One way for the Los Angeles region to start to solve its horrendous traffic and housing problems is through high-speed-rail projects to nearby cities. According to Trulia, the median housing prices in Lancaster are $290,000 for a median home and $286,000 in San Bernardino. High-speed-rail projects, like a maglev (“magnetic levitation”) train, could allow people to commute from these cities to downtown L.A., where housing costs are much higher. Further developing the public mass transit options can get more cars off the road, reducing greenhouse gases and congestion on the roads. Santa Barbara County has a different problem affecting housing but one that is also tied to transportation. One of the characteristics for the California Central Coast is that an ocean and a mountain range constrain housing options; they must run up and down along the coast. The traditional hub-andspoke model of a city core and surrounding suburbs isn’t available. For coastal cities, the sprawl development model

implies building in the agricultural greenbelt around cities—extending additional housing into the agricultural foothills and up the sides of the mountain ranges. It is both highly unpopular (communities often define themselves by their agricultural heritage, for example, Goleta as the Good Land) and seems to represent a risky strategy, given the mudslides and fires in Santa Barbara and Ventura counties. Moreover, water is a scarce resource, so it is hard to justify adding housing to areas where there are not adequate existing water supplies to provide for the existing housing. Commuting to nearby cities with more abundant housing might seem to be one alternative. According to Trulia, median housing costs for Santa Maria and Lompoc are $388,000 and $350,000, respectively. In contrast, the cost of a home in Santa Barbara is $1,105,000 and $779,500 in Goleta. However, commuting is a challenge. No commuter trains or light rail run along the coast. People who work in Santa Barbara and want to live in Santa Maria or Lompoc, with their cheaper housing, have no choice but to take the 101. If there were an easier commute between the northern and southern cities, building on a commuter light-rail line, more people would opt for commuting between the different cities. For example, by Glendale, on the 134, L.A. County has put a train in the center median between the north and southbound lanes. Is something like that possible for the 101? Is an elevated train above the Southern Pacific line possible? Are there other routes available? New Cuyama lies on the other side of the Sierra Madre Mountains from Santa Barbara. Median house costs in New Cuyama are $156,500, or almost $1 million less than the costs of a home in Santa Barbara. If the state built a tunnel, like those the Boring Company has started to create in different cities, that offered access between New Cuyama and Santa Barbara, workers would reduce their ridiculous housing costs, and businesses could find available workers more easily. In addition, Santa Barbara would gain an additional access point in cases of emergency, whereas now the 101 is the only point of egress or entry. The High-Speed Rail project, recently proposed for reduction (Gov. Newsom) or termination (President Trump) would connect Anaheim and Los Angeles to San Francisco via the Central Valley in 2 hours and 40 minutes. The problem with the proposed train is that its purpose is so limited. It would replace the use of airlines for long-distance trips, but it would contribute nothing to alleviating our pressing traffic and congestion concerns, nor expand housing availability. In short, California has a transportation crisis as much as it has a housing crisis, and the two cannot be separated. We need policies that consider them concurrently. n

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SAD BOY C O V E R

S T O R Y

JJ HENDANDEZ / @JJGHERNANDEZ PHOTOS

IN SANTA BARBARA

Sad Boy performing on tour and on the Eastside of Santa Barbara

AREA RAPPER ON THE COME UP GETS CAUGHT UP

S

ad Boy Loko is a name many young Latinos

recognize here in Santa Barbara; the rapper’s raw, explosive rhymes and roughly produced music was the soundtrack to summer-night cruising and lazy weekends. A Dons alum, Sad Boy was particularly well-known to Santa Barbara High students, me included. We listened as his music grew alongside us, and in 2012, when I graduated from Santa Barbara High School, he released his first album, I’m Still Here, which he made in a garage. By 2015, Sad Boy had signed to what the following year would become 4Hunnid Records, the label owned by the platinum-selling rapper YG. Since then, his popularity has grown beyond Santa Barbara to global audiences. For those of us who had followed his music, it was a source of pride that one of our own was making it in the rap game. With his music career on the rise, Sad Boy and I met on August 2, 2018, at La Tapatía — just around the corner from our alma mater — to talk about his life, music, and ambitions. Less than 24 hours later, on August 3, Sad Boy (known legally as Mario Hernandez-Pacheco) was arrested at Fiesta’s Mercado del Norte in Mackenzie Park while on a family outing with his children and partner. Pacheco has been charged with attempted murder, robbery, and felony assault by means of force likely to create great bodily injury. His charges include three gang enhancements, which allege that the crime was committed to benefit a gang. Each gang-enhancement charge can add an additional 10 years to a sentence. On August 15, 2018, in front of Supe-

rior Court Judge Clifford Anderson, Pacheco pleaded not guilty to all charges. He is currently in county jail, awaiting his preliminary hearing scheduled for March 6. He’s currently being held without bail and has been in custody for more than six months. Sad Boy’s life in Santa Barbara has been marked by recurrent hardship, his struggles reflective of the experiences of many of his Santa Barbara fans. But when I talked with him last August, things were looking up. His second album with 4Hunnid, My Evil Ways, had just been released a few months earlier in May. His first headlining performance was scheduled for August 19 in Santa Ana, and he was excited about his future as an artist. Sad Boy also spoke with great love about his family, especially his children, and talked about how determined he was to provide for them. He shared with me how his mentality and priorities had changed over the years, particularly since being signed to 4Hunnid. “I used to hang out with gangsters and wanted to be a gangster. But now I’m hanging out with millionaires, and I want to be a millionaire,” he said.

FROM THE GUTTER Sad Boy was born in Santa Barbara 29 years ago. He grew up in a big family — he has five siblings — and much of his music recounts his upbringing. In his song “Que Viva la

BY BLANCA GARCIA Raza,” he chronicles the struggles of Mexican immigrants trying to get by in the United States, mentioning his parents’ Mexican origins and his father’s deportation when Sad Boy was young. “Familias separadas, madres abandonada / Y hijos sin un padre por gobierno que nos manda,” Sad Boy sings. (Translation: “Families are separated, mothers are abandoned / And kids are left without a father all because of the government that’s in charge.”) The word “gutter” appears often in his raps; he says he came from the gutter and calls his work “gutter music.” When I asked him what that meant, he said, “Gutter is the streets, the bottom of the barrel, government cheese, Kellogg’s — the realest shit.” After Sad Boy’s father was deported, his mother continued to work two jobs to support the family but couldn’t make ends meet. The family’s situation deepened when their landlord had his property foreclosed. The family was driven into what Sad Boy called “motel living.” “I slept in every motel you can think of — Motel 6, Country Inn,” he said, listing a few. The family struggled to pay for the rooms, especially when prices surged during Fiesta and other holidays. Sad Boy tried to keep his circumstances hidden from his friends. Since most motels don’t have kitchens or microwaves, the

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C O V E R

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S T O R Y

family often had cold sandwiches and hot-water ramen for dinner. “When you live like that,” he said, “you learn to work with what you have. That’s what I mean when I say, ‘gutter.’” As Sad Boy and his family moved from place to place, music was one of the few constants in his life. He and his friends spent hours coming up with rhymes. To record their songs, they would borrow recording equipment from a young man in the neighborhood. When the man came around to retrieve his equipment, Sad Boy would pretend he had lent it to another kid so he and his friends could keep recording for a couple more days. It was these early recordings that became some of Sad Boy’s biggest hits. For example, the hypnotic, piano-threaded “Gang Signs” was written before he had a label; however, after he was signed, 4Hunnid produced a video, and the song went viral. It now has more than 34 million views on YouTube. Most of the material from his first album with 4Hunnid, The First Ese, in fact, was written when he was a teenager recording in garages. With his label promoting his work, his popularity skyrocketed. At La Tapatía, over enchiladas and Jarritos, Sad Boy talked about wanting to transition his writing into more “positive stuff.” “Back then, my mentality was different,” he explained, referencing the The First Ese. “What I said [then], I wouldn’t feed the youth now. … All that stuff is old.” As a teenager, Sad Boy’s tumultuous life led him into trouble with the law. He served time at Los Prietos Boys Camp, a juvenile detention center, but continued writing music and poems. He told me, with much pride, that other boys at the camp would ask him to write poems for their girlfriends in exchange for doing his chores. “If you had a man at Los Prietos while I was in there, like 99 percent of the stuff he wrote you was all me,” he laughed. While Sad Boy was serving time as a teenager, his first child was born. He was granted three days to see his new baby. “It was hard. I didn’t want to go back,” he said of having to return to the detention center. After Sad Boy became a father, his unlawful behavior largely came to a halt. That’s when he really got into music, he said. He started performing at

local venues like Tony Rays (now Wine Therapy) and releasing homemade music videos. To further himself in his musical aspirations, Sad Boy enrolled in piano, songwriting, and Pro Tools courses at Santa Barbara City College. “I learned structure about melodies, bridges, hooks, notes,” he said. As passionate as he was about his classes, he felt discouraged by one of his instructors. Sad Boy was a couple of minutes late to one of his courses and was subsequently asked to leave. If he wasn’t going to take the class seriously, the instructor said, then he should get out of his class. “[He didn’t know] what I did and that I was taking piano classes, [that] I was probably the one taking it the most serious,” said Sad Boy, who eventually dropped out of SBCC.

For my city, the place I call home Right next to the beach where pretty girls roam I was born and raised up in the gutter, the trenches Up in the hood where there’s tagged up fences. — “My City” 28

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De la Guerra Plaza Revitalization Community Workshop

See, everyone has their needs, dawg. I have my own

Saturday, March 9th 2:00 PM – 3:30 PM Casa de la Guerra Directly Across the street from the Plaza

Want a house on them hills I can call a home. — “I Want It All”

ON THE COME UP

You are invited to learn more about the Plaza’s rich history and to share your ideas about revitalizing this community gathering space first dedicated as a “Public Square” in 1853

Sad Boy was again living in a motel with his family in 2015 when he unexpectedly got a FaceTime call from YG, a successful young rapper out of Compton who in 2016 founded his record label 4Hunnid Records. Sad Boy had just turned 25 when YG invited him to his studio in Los Angeles. On the drive down, his car started sputtering just before exiting the freeway; he pulled into the studio’s parking lot as it gave out. In the studio, YG ran Sad Boy through what amounted to an audition. YG played the beat to a song he was working on — it was later released as “Don’t Come to L.A.” on 2016’s Still Brazy—and Sad Boy began rapping as YG and his team listened. The session went well, and a week later, Sad Boy signed with what would become 4Hunnid. For the first time, Sad Boy was paid real money for his music. When YG and his team found out that his family was living in a Santa Barbara motel, they asked why he hadn’t come to them for help. “I worked for it. I worked for mine,” said Sad Boy. With his first check, he put a deposit down on an apartment and bought his mom a car. At the time, she was commuting to her two jobs by bus. “I took care of everything. My mom, family … I took care of all that stuff. All my debts. I can supply for my family. That’s a man’s dream,” said Sad Boy. Sad Boy can be heard on YG’s “Don’t Come to L.A.” and “Blacks and Browns,” and the two were featured on Slim 400’s single “Bruisin’. ” YG asked Sad Boy to join him on his 2016 Fuck Donald Trump Tour. Life on the road was an eye-opener for Sad Boy. On tour, everyone was given a $100-per-day food-expense account, which seemed excessive to Sad Boy, whose gutter days were not far behind him. “How could I spend $100 on myself in one day to eat? I can bring that back and feed my kids. … That’s my job as a man, as a father.” During lunch, Sad Boy told me stories about how his music had helped bridge gaps between him and his former rivals. “When a man starts respecting your work and craft, [there’s] nothing to do but respect back,” said Sad Boy. Initially, it was love from older homies and even some of his rivals who liked his music that Sad Boy points to as motivation to continue with and pursue music.

Come rain or shine; outdoor event under a tent, please dress accordingly

• What does the Plaza mean to you?

• Together with the SB Farmer’s Market Association, the City intends to relocate the Saturday’s Farmer’s Market to the Plaza; what additional activities would you like to see in the Plaza? • What kind of improvements should be considered? • Parking? Lighting?

ATENCIÓN:

• Concrete? Lawn? Pavers?

Traducción al español These topics and more estará disponible en el taller will be discussed

Media Grants

For Santa Barbara County Nonprofit organizations

t

JJ HENDANDEZ / @JJGHERNANDEZ

Please Join Us!

Hutton Parker Foundation and the Santa Barbara Independent are pleased to continue our Media Grant program for local nonprofit agencies. This unique opportunity provides nonprofits the ability to spread their message to the greater Santa Barbara community. Organizations apply online, and one nonprofit group is is chosen each month. The Santa Barbara Independent design team produces a custom four-page insert specific to the individual agency's needs. The insert is published and distributed in all 40,000 copies of the Santa Barbara Independent, with the cost underwritten by Hutton Parker Foundation. Find out more about this opportunity to boost your organization's marketing efforts, promote your good works, and tell your story to a wider audience. Visit HuttonFoundation.org for more information and the Media Grant application.

Sad Boy holding the Mexican Flag as he raps “Que Viva la Raza”

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Sad Boy looking over notes at Universal Music Publishing Group’s studio in L.A. and hyping up the crowd Sad Boy credits music for changing the trajectory of his life from a troublemaking teen to an ambitious musician and a providing and loving father. “I gotta give programs respect,” said Sad Boy about programs such as the Boys & Girls Club’s Notes for Notes and the S.B. Teen Center, both of which offer free recording equipment to teenagers. “I know why they do it—to save the youth. That’s what saved me. They’re trying to get kids off the street. It’s what kept me out of trouble to this day!” Sad Boy told me that he wanted to focus on being a good example for kids. “I don’t want to lead [the kids] to the wrong circle,” he said. He grew up rapping about what he was seeing in his Eastside neighborhood, which was largely gang activity. “I don’t rap about jewelry and fancy cars,” said Sad Boy. “That’s nothing I’ve seen in my life.” As Sad Boy’s outlook on life has evolved, so has his lyrical content. He’s more heavily addressing the struggles of growing up poor and brown in America. “Even [Latino] rappers out now are not really focused on our struggle,” he said. “In the timeline of hip-hop for Latinos, it’s something we’ve skipped, so we gotta do it.” His collaboration with YG on “Blacks and Browns” directly addresses the difficulties faced by minorities. “I’m not just entertaining the hood; [I’m] entertaining the world now,” he said. However, if he had it his way, Sad Boy would be working on love songs. “If it was for me, I’d be dropping love albums.” When we spoke on that summer day, Sad Boy also said he’s focused on making it big in the music industry. That ambition is reflected in lyrics for “I Want It All,” which talks about his career aspirations and his

rise from poverty. “I want it all / I’m a ball like monopoly / And own properties / Can’t nobody stop a G,” raps Sad Boy. He wants to make enough money to buy a house for his kids. “That’s my goal,” he said. “Or else, I look at my career and say, ‘For what? Just for fun?’ Yeah, there’s passion, but I have priorities and mouths to feed.”

UNCERTAIN FUTURE Pacheco was arrested August 3, 2018. According to court documents, the alleged incident took place the evening of July 23, 2018, at the Cacique Street footbridge on the Eastside. Prosecuting Attorney Kimberly Siegel claims that Pacheco, two teen assailants, and a fourth unidentified adult suspect “repeatedly stabbed, stomped, punched and kicked” a 19-year-old victim and stole his backpack. According to Siegel, the victim allegedly believed that he, the two juveniles, and Pacheco were going to the Cacique bridge to smoke marijuana. When they arrived at the footbridge, the fourth unidentified adult suspect took the backpack from the victim. Allegedly, when the victim warned the suspects that he was going to call the police, he was attacked. The

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FEBRUARY 28, 2019

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What would you do? What, what would you do? Would your bandana be red or be blue?’ — “What Would You Do”


C O V E R

S T O R Y

I’m a Chicano, and I can’t go outside A brown cop harassing me, guess we all look alike.

Faith Orcutt

— “Blacks and Browns”

14 YEAR-OLD CANCER SUR VIVOR

photographs documenting the severity of the alleged victim’s injuries. While a significant amount of Pacheco’s music falls into the category of gangster rap, he has never been arrested for or convicted of a gang-related charge. As for the gang-association claims, Siegel pointed to documented incidents in 2011, 2012, and 2016 when police officers interacted with Pacheco. Pearlman clarified for the court that the three incidents were field interrogation cards, which are notes officers keep on informal questioning or contact they have with citizens who may be able to help in an investigation. Siegel also pointed to a 2010 incident in which Pacheco was the victim of a stabbing. Pearlman challenged the incident, saying, “The fact that he was a victim and was stabbed do not show that he’s a danger to others.” Pacheco was denied bail on October 10, 2018. Judge James Herman cited the “severe injury” inflicted on the alleged victim and Pacheco’s alleged gang affiliation as the reasons why. “I also take issue with the idea that the fact that he was a victim of gang violence is somehow exonerating or shouldn’t be looked at,” Herman said. “Field interrogation cards are something that does collect intelligence and information on gang activity. So irrespective of the fact that he does not have a prior criminal conviction except for a DUI [in 2010], it’s pretty clear that for the purposes of this bail hearing that he has a long history as a member of the Eastside Gang with the violent tendencies that the gang imposes on the community.” Just seven months after his arrests, the preliminary hearing is scheduled for March 6, at 8:30 a.m. in Courtroom 1. On that day, evidence will be presented from both sides for the first time. The Santa Barbara Independent will continue covering the case as n it unfolds.

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contents of the backpack were not revealed. According to Siegel, the victim has “no known gang ties or affiliation.” Pacheco is currently being held without bail at the Santa Barbara County Jail. Pacheco’s attorney, Adam Pearlman, submitted a motion to have him released on his own recognizance with conditions set forth by the courts or to have his bail reduced. Bail was originally set at $1.1 million, the standard bail amount for attempted murder in Santa Barbara County. Pearlman made the case that Pacheco is not a flight risk. He presented the courts with a number of options, including house arrest on an electronic monitor and no contact with known gang members. Pacheco’s production company offered to put him up in Los Angeles to keep him out of Santa Barbara if the courts were concerned about him being in the county, with a condition that he only return to Santa Barbara for court appearances. According to court documents submitted by Pearlman, “The proof against the defendant is not substantial because there is an identity issue.” His motion goes on to state that the police never had the victim identify a known picture of Pacheco. Instead, police showed the victim a Speedy Mart security video that allegedly shows Pacheco walk in — and later out of — the store with the two alleged juvenile assailants and the victim. (Speedy Mart is next to La Tapatía, where Sad Boy and I met in August.) Pearlman continues, writing that “the surveillance videos at Speedy Mart are notoriously bad quality” and that “it is the only thing tying Mr. Pacheco to this case.” Siegel opposed Pacheco’s release out of concern for public safety, citing his alleged gang ties and the severity of the injuries the alleged victim sustained. According to the courts, the alleged victim suffered a skull fracture. Siegel submitted to the court 11

Sad Boy on the road

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Sant a Barbara’s favorite comed y and m h s o y w t e i r agic va MAR

It’s Magic! M I LT L AR S E N AN D T E R R Y H I LL P R E S E N T

23 SAT

2 & 6:30 PM

At Oak Cottage, we make dreams come true, stay connected to the local community and showcase the rich lives of our residents through the Vibrant Life program. Oak Cottage is specifically designed for residents with cognitive impairment, including Alzheimer’s disease and age-related dementia.

SPONSORS

America’s longest-running magic revue returns to the Lobero to dazzle audiences with an all-new lineup of top illusionists direct from exotic showrooms and Hollywood’s famous Magic Castle.

ELAINE F. STEPANEK FOUNDATION

805.963.0761 LOBERO.ORG

HAROLD P. MCALISTER FOUNDATION

Living life to the fullest through our signature Vibrant Life program.

For a limited time: Purchase three days’ respite and receive three days’ additional respite.

Please join us for our next Dine and Discover luncheon! Call us today! (805) 324-4391 1820 De La Vina St. | Santa Barbara, CA 93101

oakcottagesb.com Lic #425802118

DIJO Productions Presents

Música, Danza, y Mucho Más

the tony award winning comedy

Música de fiesta del pueblo de perú Village fiesta Music froM peru

Featuring Ed Giron, Bill Waxman and Geren Piltz Directed by Jerry Oshinsky

¡Entrada Gratuita! / FrEE

VIERNES, 8 DE MARZO / FRIDAY, MARCH 8 7 pM  isla Vista school, 6875 el colegio DOMINGO, 10 DE MARZO / SUNDAY, MARCH 10 7 pM  Marjorie luke theatre, santa barbara junior high, 721 e. cota street Las puertas se abrirán a las 6:30 pm. / Doors open 6:30 pm. Habrá recepción después del espectáculo. / Reception follows the performance. ¡Viva el Arte de Santa Bárbara! is sponsored by SAGE Publications, The Roddick Foundation, Anonymous, Russell Steiner, Monica and Tim Babich, Montecito Bank & Trust, National Endowment for the Arts, UCSB Office of Education Partnerships, The Stone Family Foundation, Linda Stafford Burrows, Marianne Marsi and Lewis Manring, and the Santa Barbara County Arts Commission Community Arts Grant Program, with funds provided by the City of Santa Barbara, in partnership with the Santa Barbara County Office of Arts and Culture. Additional support comes from The Marjorie Luke Theatre’s Dreier Family Rent Subsidy Fund. The program is supported in part by the Santa Barbara Independent, the Santa Maria SUN, El Latino CC, Radio Bronco, Entravision/Univision Costa Central, the Best Western South Coast Inn, the Hilton Garden Inn Santa Barbara/Goleta, Pacifica Suites, La Quinta Inn & Suites, and the Santa Barbara Unified School District. Viva is co-presented by The Marjorie Luke Theatre, the Guadalupe-Nipomo Dunes Center and UCSB Arts and Lectures, in partnership with the Isla Vista School Parent Teacher Association.

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THE INDEPENDENT

FEBRUARY 28, 2019

INDEPENDENT.COM

/vivaelartesb

ALCAZAR THEATRE • MARCH 1,2,3, 8,9,10 Fridays and Saturdays @ 8pm Sundays @ 2pm General Admission: $19 Students and Seniors $15 info & Tickets: thealcazar.org or 805.684.6380 4916 Carpinteria ave., Carpinteria


WEEK I N D E P E N D E N T CA L E N DA R

FEB. MAR.

28 6

E H T

BY TERRY ORTEGA AND AMBER WHITE

Sun.: 2pm. Garvin Theatre, SBCC West

s ga

Campus. $10-$26. Call 965-5935.

theatergroupsbcc.com

2/28: Weaving as Meditation Create a simple handweaving in a slow rhythmic process with Kate Kilmurray in this mindful workshop. Price includes a metal loom and enough cotton loops to make two weavings. 5:30-7:30pm. Millworks, 408 E. Haley St., Ste. 1. $60. Call (617) 838-6646. SY

3/1: Reconnecting Kids to Nature: Jon Young & Kathleen Lockyer

3/2: Chamber on the Mountain

3/1, 3/3, 3/5: The Magic Flute This

Darcy Grimaldo Grigsby: Creole Degas This Art Matters Lecture will analyze the intersection of sight, blindness, race, and Creole identity in the writings and art of Edgar Degas in 1872, when he traveled to New Orleans to visit his Creole family, and his return to Paris. 4:30-6pm. Mary Craig Auditorium, S.B. Museum of Art, 1130 State St. $10-$15. Call 884-6457.

THURSDAY 2/28 2/28-3/2: 24th Annual Gospel Music Workshop Be a part of Mama Pat’s Inner Light Gospel Choir as you learn five to eight songs over three sessions of instruction and rehearsal and then perform in a final concert with Grammy-nominated composer, Steven Roberts. Thu.-Fri.: 6:30-9pm; Sat.: 9:30am-noon; concert: 7:30pm. First Congregational Church, 2101 State St. $50. Call 729-1159.

2/28: An Evening of Self-Expression with Fong Tran Spoken-word poet Fong Tran will emcee this open mic to give anyone the opportunity to artistically express themselves using all creative outlets that include spoken word, poetry, music, and dance. 7:30-9pm. Biko Garage, 6612 Sueño Rd., Isla Vista. Free.

sbplibrary.org

Award-winning cellist Zlatomir Fung and pianist Janice Carissa will lead this program featuring selections from 11 Capricci for Solo, Cello, Baal Shem, B. 47, Sequenza XIV for Cello, Sonata in E Minor, Op. 38, and more. Meet the artists at a reception following the performance. 3pm. Logan House, 8585 Ojai-Santa Paula Rd., Ojai. $25. Call 646-9951.

chamberonthemountain.com

SATURDAY 3/2 3/2: 50th Annual Jazz in Paradise

3/2: 57th Annual Doll & Toy Sale People of all ages are invited to this pop-up doll and toy sale. There will be a wonderful assortment of dolls, teddy bears, toys, action figures, miniatures, accessories, and children’s antiques. 10am-3pm. Warren Hall, Earl Warren Showgrounds, 3400 Calle Real. Free-$5. Call 698-1415.

tinyurl.com/2019DollShow

3/2: 13th Annual Women’s Literary Festival Contemporary female authors continue to celebrate diversity, literacy, and social justice through the five distinguished authors invited this year, including Rachelle Cruz, the

Wayne Bergeron, Grammy-nominated

tinyurl.com/Fong-Tran

O

RE

will give an illustrated lecture about her life and career as one of the most astute observers of contemporary culture, depicting great personalities in images that are both iconic and intimate, followed by a Q&A with Pico Iyer. 7:30pm. The Arlington Theatre, 1317 State St. $17-$128.50. Call 893-3535.

Pulitzer Prize–winning comedy follows the story of Elwood P. Dowd, whose best friend is a six-foot-tall rabbit that’s invisible to others. Watch as those around George are challenged between having him committed to a sanitarium or ultimately falling under Harvey’s invisible charms. The show previews February 28 and runs through March 16. 7:30pm. Thu.-Sat.: 7:30pm;

BA

D

2/28-3/3: Harvey Mary Chase’s 1944

DA VI

2/28: An Evening with Annie Leibovitz This visionary photographer

artsandlectures.ucsb.edu

centerstagetheater.org

Parents, teachers, and anyone interested in how nature can guide child development are invited to join author Jon Young and pediatric occupational therapist Kathleen Lockyer to learn about some of the best practices for development and learning. Meet and greet: 3:30pm; program: 4:306pm. Los Olivos Library, 2374 Alamo Pintado Ave., Los Olivos. Free. Call 688-4214.

dphsmusic.org/jazz.html

3/2:

ZE

innerlightchoir.com

within three unique shows, plus the Apogee Awards and kickoff that will highlight Arts Education & Youth performances. Friday’s performance will include a mixer before and a reception after the performance. Thu.: 7pm; Fri.-Sat.: 8pm; Sun.: 2pm. Center Stage Theater, 751 Paseo Nuevo. Awards: $15; GA: $18-$24; pass: $58-$68. Call 963-0408. Read more on p. 45.

M

sbma.net

2/28-3/3: 5th Annual HH11 Dance Festival Enjoy 30+ works

TE

contemporary staging of Mozart’s beloved opera brings the fairy tale story about love’s trials into the present day, with music by Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart and libretto by Emanuel Schikaneder performed by members of the Westmont Orchestra, led by Dr. Michael Shasberger. 7pm. New Vic, 33 W. Victoria St. $12-$17. Call 965-5400. Read more on p. 45. ensembletheatre.com

American trumpeter Building a Bouquet and lead trumpeter in many with Marilee Krause soundtracks, such as the movie Join guest artist Marilee Krause in this The Incredibles, will give a clinic workshop where kids will use ripped-paper to the Dos Pueblos High School collages to make spring bouquets. 10amJazz Band and SBCC Jazz Band, noon. Art From Scrap, 302 E. Cota St. $8. as well as schools from Santa Children ages 6 or younger must be accomYnez to L.A. After the competipanied by an adult. $8. Call 884-0459. tion, students will perform in a exploreecology.org concert with Bergeron. 7pm. Elings Performing Arts Ctr., Dos Pueblos High School, 7266 Alameda Ave., Goleta. Free-$25.

FRIDAY 3/1

2/28:

UR

katekilmurray.com

CO

lle Musson Degas, 1 of Este 872, t i a r ” by rt o P Edg “ ar De

As always, find the complete listings online at independent.com/events. And if you have an event coming up, submit it at independent.com/eventsubmit.

3/1-3/2, 3/6:

The Laramie Project This 2000 play by

Moisés Kaufman reveals a complex truth of the October 1998 anti-gay hate crime against Matthew Shepard through text taken verbatim from hundreds of interviews. The show runs through March 9. Fri., Wed.: 8pm; Sat.: 2pm. Hatlen Theater, UCSB. $12-$20. Call 893-2064.

theaterdance.ucsb.edu

Fundraiser

Volunteer Opportunity

Civil Discourse

>>>

Protest INDEPENDENT.COM

FEBRUARY 28, 2019

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33


INDEPENDENT CALENDAR

FEB. MAR.

As always, find the complete listings online at independent.com/events. And if you have an event coming up, submit it at independent.com/eventsubmit.

28 6

F E S T I V A L

na rice Ra Beat

3/2: The Official Moon’s Eye View Road to Lucidity The transformational arts and music festival Lucidity is a month away. Join the Lucid family for the annual pre-party with a treasure trove of samplebased and remixed works celebrating folk music and regional dance by Maryland’s Soohan. 8pm. SOhO Restaurant & Music Club, 1221 State St. $15. Ages 21+. Call 962-7776. sohosb.com

SUNDAY 3/3

MARCH 9-10, 2019

great food! live music! at the base of the pier!

3/3-3/6: Opening Reception: S.B. Visual Artists Exhibit Art at the JCC presents Transfor-

*No pets allowed*

Donʼt miss our hand crafted mermaids in Cayucos during the entire month of March! New this year, live wire wrapping demos from Beads by the Bay! Learn how to make your own sea glass jewelry.

CO

Join us for the

3/3:

cayucosseaglass.com

Beatrice Rana

SUNDAY, MARCH 17 at FLYING FLAGS RV RESORT • 12 - 4:30 pm

artsandlectures.ucsb.edu

TH

literary laureate for the Inland Empire; and Dr. Bella DePaulo, author, professor, speaker, and social scientist. Included with a ticket is morning coffee, lunch, and author presentations. 8:30am-3:30pm. Hilton Garden Inn, 6878 Hollister Ave., Goleta. $65.

womensliteraryfestival.com

3/2: The Human Element: A Photographer’s Journey in the Anthropocene Environmental

presented by

30+ WINERIES, BREWERIES & SPIRITS 25+ CHILI & SALSAS & more BUELLTONWINEANDCHILIFESTIVAL.COM

BUS TRANSPORTATION • SANTA MARIA, LOMPOC, GOLETA, SANTA BARBARA

E

Come hear Gramophone’s 2017 Young Artist of the Year in her S.B. recital debut with a program featuring Chopin’s Études, Op. 25, Ravel’s Miroirs, and Stravinsky’s The Firebird (arr. Agosti). 4pm. Hahn Hall, Music Academy of the West, 1070 Fairway Rd. $10-$37. Call 893-3535.

March 8, 2019

LIVE MUSIC: DUSTY JUGS & NOBLE GRIZWALD

RT

SY

Mermaid maid Ball

U

hero James Balog’s latest film documents how the earth’s four elements—earth, air, water, and fire—have all been impacted by a fifth element, Homo sapiens.. Balog will give a short talk with a Q&A to follow the screening. Tickets will be distributed one hour before the event on a first-come, first-served basis. 7:30pm. The Granada Theatre, 1214 State St. Free. Call 893-3535.

artsandlectures.ucsb.edu

3/2: Ceramic Studio Sat-urdays This two-part course for students of all ages and skill levels can create ceramics through hand building or throwing without longterm commitment. Return on March 9 to glaze your works of art. 10am-

1pm. SBMA’s Ridley-Tree Education Ctr., McCormick House, 1600 Santa Barbara St. $70-$80. Participants ages 7-12 must be accompanied by an adult. Call 963-4364.

sbma.net

3/2: 2019 S.Y.V. Touch-A-Truck

Kids will get to climb on, climb in, and honk horns and turn on sirens of all kinds of vehicles at this family-friendly event. There will be bounce houses, face painting, a splash zone, and a chance to meet the women and men who protect, serve, work, and build in our community. All proceeds will benefit Bethania Preschool and Afterschool. 10am. Bethania Preschool, 611 Atterdag Rd., Solvang. $5.

tinyurl.com/PEPEvent

mation by Lynn Dodge, inspired by real-life events, from personal experiences to witnessing the natural and human tragedies that unfold in our daily lives. Enjoy live jazz piano music, appetizers, and wine. Part of the proceeds will go to Jewish Family Service (JFS). The exhibit shows through April 17. 2-4pm. Jewish Federation of Greater S.B., 524 Chapala St. Free. Call 957-1115.

jewishsantabarbara.org

3/3: Food for Thought Series: Saving the Planet’s Vultures Learn more about vultures in crisis across the globe and the measures being taken in the race to save them from guest speaker Dr. Estelle Sandhaus, director of conservation and science at the S.B. Zoo. 2-4pm. Neal Taylor Nature Ctr., 2265 Hwy. 154. Free ($10/vehicle fee). Call 693-0691. clnaturecenter.org

3/3: Artist Talk with Richard Schloss As part of an ongoing series of talks bringing area artists and the community together, hear renowned artist Richard Schloss talk about his 45-year career as a landscape painter. 3-5pm. S.B. Fine Art, 1324 State St. Free. Call 845-4270.

tinyurl.com/FineArt-Talk

3/3: Lions Park Open House Discover more than 20 area wedding and event vendors, including photographers, florists, coordinators, caterers, deejays, and more, while sipping on Champagne and touring this beautiful venue. 4-7pm. Lions Park,

3/4:

Rising Out of Hatred: The Awakening of a Former White Nationalist Join Pulitzer Prize–winning Washington Post reporter Eli Saslow as he reveals the human stories behind some of the most divisive issues of our time, such as racism, poverty, addiction, and Camp school shootings. 7:30pm. Campbell Hall, UCSB. Free-$20. Call 893-3535. artsandlectures.

ucsb.edu

Fundraiser 34

THE INDEPENDENT

FEBRUARY 28, 2019

INDEPENDENT.COM


WEEK John

Pizz

a re

lli

A L W A Y S A M A Z I N G. N e v e r r o u t i n e.

THU & FRI

3/5:

pancho barraza

The John Pizzarelli Trio World-renowned

guitarist, singer, and contemporary interpreter of the Great American Songbook John Pizzarelli will draw from a repertoire that includes Paul McCartney, Joni Mitchell, Neil Young, the Beatles, and more. 8pm. Lobero Theatre, 33 E. Canon Perdido St. $39-$105. Call 963-0761. lobero.org

CO U

RTE

SY

Barrymore,” along with opening acts Travis Thompson, 7715, and Kid Quill. 7pm. Velvet Jones, 423 State St. $20-$25.

velvet-jones.com

Chris D’Elia:

MONDAY 3/4 3/4: Makerspace Kids are invited to 6197 Casitas Pass Rd., Carpinteria. Free.

lionspark.com

3/3: Bryce Vine, Travis Thompson, 7715, Kid Quill Dance along with American rapper and singer Bryce Vine as he performs hits such as “Drew

Follow The Leader Tour

tinker with technology, explore new worlds with the art of virtual reality, build, create, invent, make, and more. 4-5pm. Tech Lab, S.B. Central Library, 40 E. Anapamu St. Free. Ages 7-12. Call 564-5642.

FEB 28

& MAR 1

8 PM

fridaY

MAR

8

8 PM

sbplibrary.org

fridaY

TUESDAY 3/5 3/5: Community Guided Meditation & Energy Healing Evening Join like-minded people for meditation and a healing circle followed by a one-to-one energy healing session with trained practitioners. 7pm. Healing in America Holistic Healing Center, 107 West Aliso St., Ojai. $20.

flogging molly

MAR

22

8 PM

fridaY

Rob thomas

MAR

29

8 PM C

HE R

YL

M

AN

N

3/5-3/6:

The Joffrey Ballet This wide-ranging program will display the limitless skill of the Joffrey Ballet’s dancers, classically trained to the highest standards, featuring one of Balanchine’s earliest experimental works, two pieces by modern ballet master Nicolas Blanc, the unique cinematic vision of Swedish choreographer Alexander Ekman, and more. 8pm. The Granada Theatre, 1214 State St. $21-$129. Call 893-3535. artsandlectures.ucsb.edu

3 4 0 0 E H i g h w a y 24 6 , S a n t a Yn e z · 8 0 0 - 24 8 - 6 2 74 · C h u m a s h C a s i n o . c o m Volunteer Opportunity

Civil Discourse

Protest

>>>

Must be 21 years of age or older to attend. Chumash Casino Resort reserves the right to change or cancel promotions and events.

INDEPENDENT.COM

FEBRUARY 28, 2019

THE INDEPENDENT

35


INDEPENDENT CALENDAR

FEB. MAR.

As always, find the complete listings online at independent.com/events. And if you have an event coming up, submit it at independent.com/eventsubmit.

28 6

Rachelle Cruz

Call 640-0211.

healinginamerica.com

at

Hilton Garden Inn

Randa Jarrar

6878 Hollister Avenue Goleta, CA 93117 8:30 a.m. – 3:30 p.m.

3/6: 2019 S.B. Jewish Film Festival Experience the power of

Registration Fee: $65 includes a.m. coffee, lunch and author presentations

Ivy Pochoda

SEATING IS LIMITED REGISTER ONLINE NOW AT: www. womenslit erar yfest ival.com Florencia Ramirez

The Women’s Literary Festival celebrates diversity, literacy and social justice. It is formed under a non-profit status exclusively for literary and educational purposes.

exceptional films by American, European, and Israeli filmmakers with themes of Jewish culture and identity. The festival runs through March 10. Visit the website for a full schedule. New Vic, 33 W. Victoria St. GA: Free-$18; pass: $118. Call 957-1115.

sbjewishfilmfestival .org

SY

SATURDAY, MARCH 2, 2019

writer and guitarist with humor and heart, Griffin House sings about his world observations, life story, family, and lessons learned. Hear hits like “The Guy That Says Goodbye to You Is Out of His Mind” and “When the Time Is Right” and maybe his new single, “Natural Man.” 8pm. SOhO Restaurant & Music Club, 1221 State St. $14-$18. Call 962-7776. sohosb.com

TE

Bella DePaulo

3/6: Griffin House A singer/song-

UR

…a celebrat ion of writ ing and r eading

WEDNESDAY 3/6

CO

A Day with the Authors

3/6:

Theater of the Feminine Underground: Anima Ten

area powerhouse female artists will bare their souls, sharing dreams, fantasies, secrets, rants, and revelations through dance, song, spoken word, and performance art in this ritual theater project. 7pm. Center Stage Theater, 751 Paseo Nuevo. $23-$28. Call 963-0408. centerstagetheater.org

3/6: Get Involved with Nature The Land Trust for S.B.

Harvey presents

presents

by Mary Chase

directed by R. Michael Gros

County and the Arroyo Hondo Preserve need docent volunteers for special projects, including help with public events, preparation of mailings, habitat restoration, and trail-keeping. Classes will be held Wednesdays through March 20. 1-4pm. Arroyo Hondo Preserve, CA-1, Goleta. Free. Call 966-4520. sblandtrust.org

3/6: UCSB Ensemble for Contemporary Music The UCSB Ensemble for Contemporary Music will present favorites from the contemporary music repertoire and new works by UCSB faculty and students. 5:30pm. Lotte Lehmann Concert Hall, UCSB. Free$10. Call 893-2064. music.ucsb.edu

FARMERS MARKET

SCHEDULE THURSDAY

SUNDAY

Goleta: Camino Real Marketplace, 10am-2pm

Carpinteria: 800 block of Linden Ave., 3-6pm

TUESDAY

FRIDAY

Montecito: 1100 and 1200 blocks of Coast Village Rd., 8-11:15am

SATURDAY

MARCH 1-16

THE INDEPENDENT

Rain or shine, meet local fishermen on the Harbor’s commercial pier, and buy fresh fish (filleted or whole), live crab, abalone, sea urchins, and more. 117 Harbor Wy., 6-11am. Call 259-7476. cfsb.info/sat

805.965.5935 LIVE CAPTIONING Sun. March 3 @ 2pm



GARVIN THEATRE | SBCC WEST CAMPUS 36

SATURDAY

www.theatregroupsbcc.com

Thank you to our season sponsor:

FEBRUARY 28, 2019

Solvang: Copenhagen Dr. and 1st St., 2:30-6pm

FISHERMAN’S MARKET

—New York Post

PREVIEWS FEB. 27 & 28

WEDNESDAY

Downtown S.B.: Corner of Santa Barbara and Cota sts., 8:30am-1pm

“A show for the entire family, from kids to grandparents.”

Old Town S.B.: 500-600 blocks of State St., 3-6:30pm

INDEPENDENT.COM

Fundraiser

Volunteer Opportunity

Civil Discourse

Protest


Shows on Tap

THIS WEEKEND!

WEEK 2/28-3/1, 3/3: Dargan’s Irish Pub & Restaurant Thu.: Dannsair. 6:30-8:30pm. Fri.: Salty Strings. 7-9:30pm. Sun.: Irish Jam Session. 4:30-7pm. 18 E. Ortega St. Free. Call 568-0702. darganssb.com 2/28-3/2, 3/6: The Endless Summer Bar-Café Thu.: Charlie Baker. Fri.: John Lyle. Sat.: Al Vafa. Wed.: Dave Vignoe. 5-8pm. 113 Harbor Wy. Free. Call 564-1200. 2/28: Eos Lounge Valentino Khan. $20. 9pm-1:30am. 500 Anacapa St. Ages 21+. Call 564-2410. eoslounge.com 2/28-3/1, 3/3-3/6: SOhO Restaurant & Music Club Thu.: Rainbow Girls, Shook Twins. 8pm. $14-$18. Ages 18+. Fri.: Darlingside, River Whyless. 8:30pm. $16-$20. Sun.: The Phone Booth, The Peer Council, Gunpowder Empires. 9pm. $10. Ages 21+. Mon.: Jazz Jam with Kimberly Ford. 7:30pm. $8. Tue.: Glen Phillips, Omar Velasco. 7:30pm. $15-$18. Wed.: Griffin House. 8pm. $18-$20. 1221 State St. Call 962-7776.

sohosb.com

3/1-3/2: The Brewhouse Fri.: Spoonful. Sat.: Teresa Russell and Tom B. 8pm. 229 W. Montecito St. Free. Call 884-4664. 3/1: Carr Winery Barrel Rm. Karlin Ladera Band. 6-8pm. 414 N. Salsipuedes St. Free. Ages 21+. Call 965-7985. carrwinery.com 3/1-3/3: Cold Spring Tavern Fri.: Grass Mountain. 6-9pm. Sat.: Fort Taylor, CA; 1-4pm. The Excellent Tradesmen; 5-8pm. Sun.: Tom Ball and Kenny Sultan; 1:15-4pm. Low Down Dudes. 4:30-7:30pm. 5995 Stagecoach Rd. Free. Call 967-0066. coldspringtavern.com

TUESDAY!

3/1-3/2: Maverick Saloon Fri.: Molly Ringwald Project. Sat.: Tex Pistols. 8pm. 3687 Sagunto St., Santa Ynez. Free-$5. Ages 21+. Call 686-4785. themavsaloon.com 3/1-3/2: Mercury Lounge Fri.: Blussh, Uncle Uncle, Jamey Geston. Sat.: Joystix. 9pm. 5871 Hollister Ave., Goleta. $8. Ages 21+. Call 967-0907.

John Pizzarelli Trio

3/1-3/2: M.Special Brewing Co. Fri.: O.n.E. 6-9pm. Sat.: LetFloGo. 7-9pm. 6860 Cortona Dr., Bldg. C., Goleta. Free. Call 968-6500.

mspecialbrewco.com

MARCH 5

3/2-3/3: Figueroa Mountain Brewing Co. (Los Olivos) Sat.: Stiff Pickle Orchestra. Sun.: 3 Way Stop. 3-6pm. 2363 Alamo Pintado Ave., Los Olivos. Free. Ages 21+. Call 694-2252 x343. figmtnbrew.com

With his hip, swinging and sophisticated style, Pizzarelli has cultivated a career of standards, late-night ballads, and by playing sublime and inventive guitar.

3/2: The James Joyce Ulysses Jasz. 7:30-10:30pm. 513 State St. Free. Ages 21+. Call 962-2668. sbjamesjoyce.com

2/28, 3/3:

Sponsored by the Bentson Kauth Family

Velvet Jones Thu.: Crumb. 7pm. $15. Sun.:

Bryce Vine, Travis Thompson, 7715, Kid Quill. 7pm. $20-$25. 423 State St. Call 965-8676.

An Evening with

velvet-jones.com

MARCH 15 sponsors

Crumb

LOBERO THEATRE ENDOWMENT FOR AMERICAN ROOTS MUSIC

Additional support for promotions: Thanks to The Bentson Foundation and Elaine F. Stepanek Foundation

Derek Douget Douget and his stellar New Orleansbased band represent some of the finest jazz programs in the country.

Join our eClub. Follow us on social media. See the full lineup.

Don’t miss a beat! 805.963.0761 / LOBERO.ORG

INDEPENDENT.COM

FEBRUARY 28, 2019

THE INDEPENDENT

37


Make it easy.

Ask your retailer to take back your old mattress when they deliver your new one.

And it’s FREE!

To learn more about the benefits of mattress recycling, visit ByeByeMattress.com Delivery or set-up fees for new purchases may still apply. Common carriers that deliver mattresses from internet sales are exempt from the take back requirement. Old mattresses that pose health or safety risks may be refused.

38

THE INDEPENDENT

FEBRUARY 28, 2019

INDEPENDENT.COM


Travel

New York in the chill of the winter, the proverbial “off-season,” makes it an out-of-season apple well worth the partaking.

JOSEF WOODARD

s much as we Santa Barbarans tend to be a smugly self-admiring lot and — on most days — convinced that we reside on a particularly Godkissed little acreage, we also love getting love from reliable outside sources. There was the New York Times recently, mighty arbiter of American taste, deeming Santa Barbara as the third-best destination spot — mostly as a new foodie magnet this time — on a list of 52. (We got beat by Puerto Rico and Hampi, India.) Of course, New Yorkers and other Easterners (such as the bone-chilled Chicagoans who settled here starting in the late 19th/early 20th century) love Santa Barbara partly because of its temperate climate, a delectable escape route for the serious winter-afflicted. They like us. And vice versa. Consider this reverse logic: New York in the chill of the winter, the proverbial “off-season,” makes it an out-of-season apple well worth the partaking. Hotel prices drop, the cultural season is fully REFRIGERATED: Recent N.Y.C. vistor Peggy Grossman stops by “Snowman,” in gear, but tourist hordes are managean installation in the sculpture garden at the Museum of Modern Art. ably minimal. With the proper layers of coats-gloves-hat-scarf garmenting, the subfreezing weather is doable, even weirdly roman- a-half stretch on elevated and formerly dormant railroad tracks, rescued from development. Now, it tic, for winter-deprived Santa Barbarans. My wife and I were there for the business of affords visitors and locals a meandering hang zone N.Y.C.’s Winter Jazz Festival last month, a crazy, and sight lines on a New York civic landscape of dense thicket of showcases at various venues. Much both the vintage structures and wild new buildings, of our music time was spent at the Village’s Le Pois- like the soon-to-open puffy-skinned performance son Rouge for a two-night mini-fest of artists on the space/tilted romper room The Shed and a dazzling 50-year-old ECM label, including Norwegian sweet- new apartment complex by the late and heralded heart Mathias Eick and a riveting piano duo set from architect Zaha Hadid, blessed with visionary “JetVijay Iyer and Craig Taborn (check out their forth- sons chic” flair. In and around N.Y.C., Ruben sandwiches beckon, coming jewel of an album, The Transitory Poems). Having not spent much concentrated time in as does theater: We took in Blue Ridge at Atlantic N.Y.C. for a few years, the “new” lures put a spring Theater Company, a tasty and cathartic halfway house number, and grabbed some delectable cioppino and oysters in the tiny, loud, delicious and freezer-free restaurant Upstate. Tipped by the New Yorker, we swung by the new Taiwanese street food eatery called 886, ordering everything mentioned in the review and happy we did. On a more sobering note, just as New Yorkers in Santa Barbara might in our step, and most of the savory “old” entice- feel obligatorily drawn to La Super-Rica and the ments remain. On the latter list: a cheap breakfast Old Mission, we were pulled inexorably to the now at Zabar’s, mass at St. Patrick’s Cathedral, and a lazy elaborately developed memorial site of the World strolling around Rockefeller Center and Radio City Trade Center. The impressively imposing strucMusic Hall. Of course, there was also the day-long tures on the site — the winged shopping behemoth pilgrimage to MoMA, currently hosting dryly mad- that is the Oculus, the jaggedly elegant Memorial cap conceptualist Bruce Naumann’s Disappearing and Museum, the towering World Trade building Acts, and such permanent-collection crowd-pleasers — are hauntingly offset by the hole in the center. The dark, mournful chasm and reflecting pool, fringed as Van Gogh’s kitschy-by-proxy “The Starry Night.” The “new” riverfront Whitney Museum, for by a scroll of thousands-fold victims’ names, pays instance, is an asymmetrical architectural wonder disarmingly effective homage to 9/11’s horror and in the Meatpacking District, presently awash in the humanity. The site also bespeaks the resiliency of America, multi-floor Warholia of its big Andy overview. That very spot is also a fine entry point to the miraculous and her most prominent city — ever a prime destina“High Line.” The grassroots-energized pedestrian tion, even in the lively dead of winter. pathway along the Hudson is a magical mile-and— Josef Woodard

Community

JULIA KEANE PHOTOS

Plucking the Frozen Apple A

living p. 39

JACK’S BENCH: From left, Abe Powell, Lauren Cantin, David Mosely, and Kim Cantin sit on the memorial bench for Jack Cantin located in Upper Manning Park in front of the Scout House, where Jack was an Eagle Scout. Across from Jack’s bench is a bench dedicated to his father, David Cantin, who served as Troop 33 scoutmaster. Both benches were built by Mosely from slabs milled from a redwood tree felled at Lotusland several years ago.

Memorial Bench Project Honors

Dave and Jack Cantin

T

earful smiles and big hugs made their way around a crowd of about a hundred friends and family gathered on the afternoon of February 24 for the dedication of memorial benches for David Cantin and son Jack Cantin, both lost to last year’s 1/9 Debris Flow. The event was held at Montecito’s Manning Park Youth Center, more commonly called the Scout House, where the elder Cantin served as Troop 33 scoutmaster and Jack, 17, was an Eagle Scout. Many of the scouts in attendance had just returned that afternoon from a backpacking trip to Bear Trap campground, in the Sespe Wilderness, “a spot I visited with Dave and Jack a few years ago,” Scoutmaster Telford Work told the crowd. “The memories are rich.” Echoing the inscriptions, both father and son were praised for their SHOW OF SUPPORT: Family, friends, and dedication to helping Boy Scout Troop 33 attended the Cantin meothers. “They were shinmorial bench dedication at Manning Park. ing examples of what it means to be a community member,” remembered Abe Powell, executive director of the nonprofit Santa Barbara Bucket Brigade. Sunday’s dedication ceremony marked the first of a planned 23 memorial benches — one for each victim of the debris flow — coordinated and financed by the Bucket Brigade and built by David Mosely, a lifelong woodworker born and raised in Romero Canyon. “It’s an honor to try to bring some good feelings to the families of the victims,” Mosely said. Widow Kim Cantin organized Sunday’s event, attending with daughter Lauren, whose dramatic rescue on the morning of the January 9, 2018, disaster drew national attention. “Thank you for showing up today,” Kim Cantin told the crowd. “You’re helping Lauren and me to heal.” — Keith Hamm

INDEPENDENT.COM

FEBRUARY 28, 2019

THE INDEPENDENT

39


FOOD &DRINK

p.40 COURTESY

FESS PARKER WINERY CELEBRATES 30 YEARS Plus, What to Expect During World of Pinot Noir 2019

A

fter a successful career playing pioneers Davy

Crockett and Daniel Boone on television, Fess Parker embarked on a new frontier in the late 1980s by starting a winery in the Santa Ynez Valley. He’d purchased a ranch along Foxen Canyon Road in 1987 after the Hope Ranch home he’d been remodeling suddenly slid off of the cliffs toward the sea. After considering the options, Parker, who loved the outdoors as much as his characters did, figured the next best step was to start growing grapevines and making wine. A few neighbors were already doing so, and it seemed like a venture that could one day involve the whole family. “I remember standing in a field, with him pointing in one direction and Eli pointing in the other, saying, ‘Let’s build it here,’ ” recalled Ashley Parker Snider last week, of her dad and brother’s initial arguments. “We were scrambling not only to build a winery but to purchase fruit. It was a little bit of the blind leading the blind. It was stressful. But it brought everybody together. You could see the potential, and it was gratifying when people started rolling in.” It’s been more than three decades since the Parkers took the leap into wine, which made them the 11th member of the Santa Barbara County Vintners Association. “It was never looked at as a hobby,” Eli Parker told me during a visit to their property a couple of years ago. “It was always a business.” And as the family celebrates the winery’s 30th anniversary in 2019, the winery’s success is eclipsing that celebrity buzz: Many of their customers know the name of Fess Parker, who died in 2010, more for fine wine than Hollywood. “For the first 40 years of my life, people always told me, ‘I grew up with your dad,’ ” said Parker Snider, who is vice president of sales and marketing. But those comments are dwindling as wine-loving baby boomers get replaced by millennials. “There are a lot of younger people coming in who don’t know Fess Parker the actor, but they do know the pinots and the chardonnays — they know they’re from the Sta. Rita Hills and they’re all about it. It’s really shifted.” Explained the organization’s president and her husband, Tim Snider, “It’s become an interesting, unique, and genuine backstory to the family behind the wines.” The shift also indicates how much the family has evolved over the decades. Today, in addition to the Fess Parker label — which produces mainly pinot noir and chardonnays as well as syrah, viognier, and riesling — there is the Epiphany brand (for Rhône grapes and blends), Fesstivity (sparkling wines), and the Fess Parker Wine Country Inn in Los Olivos, which is also home to The Bear and Star restaurant, which sources produce and meat from the nearby Parker ranch. They are also planning a new waterfront hotel in Santa Barbara.

40

THE INDEPENDENT

FEBRUARY 28, 2019

FAMILY PRIDE: Almost a decade after patriarch Fess Parker passed away, the extended Parker family is making his eponymous winery more successful than ever. Today, the third generation is actively involved in running the business.

Winemaker Blair Fox — now in his 15th year at Fess Parker Winery — makes about 65,000 cases of wine each year across all of the brands. But only four wines rise above the 5,000-case threshold. That means the many other bottlings, including a number of single-vineyard or clone-specific pinot noir and chardonnays, are boutique affairs of fewer than 1,000 cases, with some barely scratching 100. Compared to the 2,000-plus wines I review from all across the Central Coast each year, these small bottlings compete with the best of the region, regularly getting scored 92+ points, and their appellation blends are among the most reliably delicious wines you can find for the price. Many of the region’s renowned winemakers cut their teeth in the same cellar, as alumni include Joey Tensley, Dave Potter, Larry Schaffer, and Mikael Sigouin. “We call it the university of Fess Parker,” Blair Fox likes to say. Of all those, what was Fess’s favorite? “He loved riesling with breakfast, especially with eggs Benedict or his pancakes, and then he loved syrah,” said Parker Snider. But he also loved to quip, “I like syrah. Mrs. Parker really likes pinot noir, so I drink a lot of pinot noir.” When it came time to say goodbye for good, Fess did get what he wanted. “Here’s a little-known fact,” said Parker Snider. “My brother put a bottle of our syrah in with him when we laid him in the ground.” If he’s looking down from above with a glass of syrah in hand, Fess Parker must be enjoying how his family continues to manage the winery with hands-on care, now including four of his adult grandkids. “The thing he would be most proud of is that we have the third generation working in the business,” said Parker Snider. “He’d also be super, super pleased about The Bear and Star and the way we’ve integrated the ranch with that restaurant. He’d be eating well and seeing a lot of grandkids, so he’d be happy.” They will be celebrating this weekend at World of Pinot Noir (see sidebar for details) and again at the Hilton Santa Barbara Beachfront Resort (formerly known as the Fess Parker DoubleTree) on Friday, March 22, 6-9 p.m. Email SBAFP_SpecialEvents@hilton.com for the $125 tickets. See fessparker.com.

INDEPENDENT.COM

BOTTLES LS & BARRE BY MATT KETTM

ANN

FESS 30TH @

World of Pinot Noir The Fess Parker Winery is hosting a 30th anniversary dinner — catered by Chef John Cox of The Bear and Star — on Friday, March 1, 7 p.m ($165), as part of World of Pinot Noir (WOPN) at The Ritz-Carlton Bacara, Santa Barbara. In addition to that, WOPN (which everyone pronounces as “whoppin’”) is presenting its usual full slate of tastings, seminars, and dinners all weekend. Here’s a quick rundown: Grand Tastings: Taste more pinot noir

than you can imagine during the grand tastings on Friday and Saturday, 3:30-6 p.m., or at 2:30 p.m. for VIPS. ($95-$175)

Seminars: Wines from Burgundy,

Oregon, Sonoma, and beyond will be explored in detail by presenters such as Elaine Chukan Brown and Esther Mobley. (Fri.-Sat., various times; $65-$275)

Dinners: There are three special dinners

each night ($165-$450), including The Stars of the Central Coast on Saturday night, hosted by yours truly and featuring 12 of my favorite wineries from Thomas Fogarty in the Santa Cruz Mountains down to Samsara in Goleta. See worldofpinotnoir.com for tickets.


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Connects Consumers to Sustainable Seafood

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im Selkoe and Victoria Voss spend their

health of marine ecosystems. “We want Santa weekends visiting docks to buy this week’s Barbara to be a working waterfront and for a new fresh catch, which they process and deliver generation of fishermen to be able to make a living to more than 100 Santa Barbara families. here,” said Selkoe. “And it’s really on the edge of Their goal is to increase appreciation for the deli- not being able to happen.” cious health benefits of seafood while sourcing By buying from fishermen in the Santa Barbara it locally to support fishermen and sustainable Harbor, who are subject to California’s strict fishfishing practices. ing regulations, Get Hooked ensures that Through their company, Get these species are sourced sustainably. International commercial fishHooked, subscribers can choose ing often over-exploits species, weekly or biweekly collections of seafood from one of their 11 explained Selkoe, and transpickup sites located throughportation of catch over long out Goleta, Santa Barbara, distances is energy intensive. Montecito, and Carpinteria. Get Hooked currently Subscribers can also choose works with nine fishermen between small, medium, or in the Santa Barbara area BY AMELIA BUCKLEY large portions, depending on and has 165 subscribers. The their household needs. customers are families, retired In a predominantly male field, residents, and young professionals the female duo is working to get people who are passionate about the local, excited about eating seafood from the Santa sustainable angle. “These people are doing Barbara Channel and supporting the waters it this because they are motivated and dedicated,” comes from. “Building local support comes from said Selkoe. people engaging with their ocean in a way that Subscribers receive weekly emails with details affects them personally,” said Selkoe, “and the about the daily catch as well as recommended most intimate way to interact with the ocean is recipes for that week’s seafood. Selkoe and Voss by eating the products in it.” are also on standby and often field calls from subSelkoe and Voss work closely with Central scribers around dinner time with questions about Coast fishermen to assess current water condi- how to prepare tricky seafood like oysters. tions and species availability. Selkoe, a marine The type of seafood provided depends on seabiologist, and Voss, the daughter of the president son, weather, and ocean currents, but Selkoe says of the Commercial Fisherman of Santa Barbara, the productive ecosystem of the Santa Barbara have collaborated to understand the importance Channel allows them to offer subscribers someof supporting these fishermen for the long-term thing new every week. Recent popular species

New Subscription Service BRINGS S.B. CHANNEL CATCHES TO YOUR TABLE

cont ’d on p. 43

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Registration Fee: $65 includes a.m. coffee, lunch and author presentations INDEPENDENT.COM

FEBRUARY 28, 2019

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41


PAUL WELLMAN

DOWNTOWN SUCCESS: The crew of Los Arroyos on West Figueroa Street is about to celebrate the restaurant’s 20-year anniversary.

Los Arroyos Turns 20

Yanni’s Greek & American Deli

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Serving Santa Barbara for 33 Years! Famous Gyros & Tri-tip

FOOD & DRINK

Located at MacKenzie Market

Full Service Deli Catering

3102 State Street • 682-2051 CELEBRATING 20 YEARS!

JOIN US FOR OUR WEEKLY SPECIALS

os Arroyos Mexican Restaurant & Take Out

is celebrating 20 years in downtown Santa Barbara on March 4, according to a press release from its marketing and office manager, Natalie Hernandez. Owner and founder Tony Arroyo has had a passion for food since he was a young boy. Inspired by the culinary magic his mom performed in the kitchen and the delicious, authentic recipes she taught and passed down to him, Tony always had the dream of one day opening a restaurant. Los Arroyos opened its first location in a small, 590-square-foot space in downtown Santa Barbara on West Figueroa Street. Two years later, it expanded next door into to its current location at 14 West Figueroa Street. Tony Arroyo thanks the Santa Barbara community for opening their arms to Los Arroyos 20 years ago and contributing to the continued success and growth of the company. Since 1999, Los Arroyos has opened in Montecito (2004), Camarillo (2009), Indiana (2016), Goleta (2017), and, most recently, in Solvang (2018). “Los Arroyos stands for family, and I am grateful to all the employees who have become family and the community that has made Los Arroyos a part of theirs,” said Arroyo. The downtown location will be offering special menu prices all weekend as well as live music and giveaways at the West Figueroa Street restaurant on March 4. CHAPLIN’S CLOSES, SUSHI COMING? Word on the street

is that Chaplin’s Martini Bar, which opened last September at 1295 Coast Village Road in Montecito (replacing Frankland’s Crab & Co. in the Montecito Inn which opened last April), has also closed its doors. Reader Annie says that plastic covers the inside of the windows and that the interior has been stripped back to bare flooring. “Staff says that the owners are turning it into a sushi spot,” says reader Kevin. “They also own SushiBar in L.A. so hopefully it’s amazing.”

MON- $2 Tacos TUES- All U Can Eat BBQ Baby Back Ribs $22 WEDS- All U Can Eat BBQ Beef Ribs $17 THURS- Prime Rib $19

ESTILO JALISCO GRILLED TACOS ON MILPAS: Reader

LIVE MUSIC Fridays & Saturdays

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229 W. Montecito St., Santa Barbara 805.884.4664 | sbbrewhouse.com 42

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FEBRUARY 28, 2019

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Steve H. sent me a tip that Estilo Jalisco Grilled Tacos and Take Out is coming to 209 South Milpas Street, across from The Habit Burger

Grill. Look for updates on Instagram at @EstiloJaliscoSB. KAHUNA GRILL CLOSES: Reader Cris let me know

that Kahuna Grill at Camino Real Marketplace in Goleta has closed. Kahuna was one of the original restaurants to open at the marketplace and had a second location in Paseo Nuevo downtown from 2008 to 2014. “Kahuna Grill is officially closed,” the eatery said in an announcement on their Facebook page. “It’s been fun! Thanks for many years of business! We’ll miss you.” Word on the street is that Mesa Burger is opening its second location in this space, though I have not yet confirmed it. OCEAN-FRIENDLY RESTAURANTS: The Surfrider

Foundation, a nonprofit organization dedicated to keeping our oceans healthy, is working to expand its Ocean Friendly Restaurants program in Santa Barbara to help reduce food service industry waste to keep our coasts cleaner. “We started the program last summer and already have 15 participating restaurants,” said representative Sandra Fogg. “We would love to see more restaurants striving for sustainability and waste reduction, and awareness of restaurants that are making that effort would be a great way to set an example.” Mandatory practices include: no expanded polystyrene use (aka Styrofoam); proper recycling practices; reusable tableware is used for onsite dining and to-go utensils are provided only upon request; no plastic bags are offered for to-go orders; and straws are provided only upon request. Additional best practices are listed online at santabarbara.surfrider.org. BETTINA HOSTING BAROLO DINNER: Rachel Greens-

pan and Brendan Smith are hosting a dinner at their Coast Village Road restaurant Bettina to showcase the Barolo wines of S&B Borgogno. The $75, three-course dinner on Friday, March 1, at 9 p.m. includes crudite with bagna cauda, mortadella, and robiola cheese; pizza with chanterelle and truffle cheese; braised beef with polenta; and olive oil cake. Go to exploretock .com/bettinapizzeria for tickets.

John Dickson’s reporting can be found every day online at SantaBarbara.com. Send tips to info@SantaBarbara.com.


PAUL WELLMAN

Mission Street Featuring Mission Street I c e C r e a m & Yo g u r t

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HARBOR TIME: The Get Hooked team spends plenty of time in the Santa Barbara Harbor.

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has substitutes available to accommodate personal preferences or allergies. “A lot of folks opt out of mussels or oysters,” said Selkoe. Get Hooked launched in September 2018 with funding from the USDA Local Food Promotion Program. Moving forward, they hope to expand their drop locations farther south into areas such as Westlake and Santa Monica. They also want to get seafood into Santa Barbara restaurants and school cafeterias and to add pick-up locations in corporate spaces. For now, Voss and Selkoe are keeping the business focused on consumers. “We are really motivated by the educational component, and we want to work directly with the people eating the seafood,” said Selkoe.

See gethookedseafood.com.

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include black cod, oysters, halibut, rockfish, and mussels. Earlier this month, they supplied spiny lobster for Valentine’s Day. The company has also been dabbling in more exotic species, such as shark, swordfish, and grenadier, a fish that is often thrown out by fishermen due to its odd appearance. Selkoe laughed as she explained to me that, when cooked, this “hidden gem” is flaky and moist, but the fish itself looks like “a cross between a snake, rat, and a fish.” Get Hooked has options for those subscribers that aren’t up for trying more adventurous foods. “We recognize that people have their preferences, so we allow them to customize what they’re doing with us,” said Voss. Subscribers can opt out of certain types of fish, and the company

McCONNELL’S FINE ICE CREAMS

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IRISH DARGAN’S IRISH Pub & Restaurant, 18 E. Ortega St. (next to lot 10) SB, 568-0702. $$. Open 7 days 11:30aClose (Food ‘til 10p, 11p on Sat/Sun). AE MC V Disc. Authentic Irish food & atmosphere in downtown SB. Specialties from Ireland include Seafood & Meat dishes. Informal, relaxed pub-style atmosphere. Live music Thursday nights. Children welcome. Avail. for private parties. Pool & Darts. MEDITERRANEAN FOXTAIL KITCHEN 14 E. Cota St. Lebaness cuisine, American burger, 24 craf beer, great cocktails, whiskey bar, vegan options, open late night, hookah lounge. Kitchen closes at midnight on the weekend, try our best falafel in town. www.foxtailsb.com NORTHERN EUROPEAN ANDERSEN’S DANISH Restaurant & Bakery. 1106 State St., 805-962-5085. Open Daily 8am-9pm. Family owned for over 42 years. Northern European Cuisine with California Infusion. Fresh scratch made pastries & menus everyday. Authentic Breakfasts, Lunches & Dinners. Happy Hour menu with exquisite wines & beers, 3-7pm everyday. High Tea served everyday starting at 2pm. Huge Viking Mimosas & Champagne Cocktails. Private Event spaces.

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43


b a B

n o s

H is

! e er

Hundreds of orphaned and injured babies will be brought to Santa Barbara Wildlife Care Network for rescue, rehabilitation, and a second chance at life in the wild.

a e S y


We are the

k r o w t e N e r a C e if l d l i W a r a b r a B a t San

Our Mission

To rescue, rehabilitate, and release wild animals in need. Whether they are sick, injured, orphaned, or oil-impaired, we will respond to the needs of wild birds, mammals, and reptiles. We educate the public so the community can live in harmony with our wild neighbors.

3,297 animals cared for last year, including...

197 Opossums

76 Pelicans

2,390 animals cared for

during baby season

234

active volunteers

365

Open days per year

10,000

calls to the helpline per year Helpline: (805) 681-1080

84 Squirrels

132 Ducks

From All Over SB County Santa Maria 2.7%

Unknown 1.6%

Lompoc 3.2% Santa Barbara 51.1% Goleta 15.9%

Montecito 2.4%

Carpinteria 4.0%

Ventura 11.1%

Oxnard 6.5% Port Hueneme

Address: 1460 N. Fairview Ave., Goleta, CA 93117

1.6%


March 1st - September 1st is “ Baby Season” Did you know?

So you found a baby bird... now what? Was it picked up by a cat, dog, or other predator?

Is it injured?

NO

NO

YES

YES

Does it have feathers?

Call SBWCN (805) 681-1080 NO

NO

This bird is a NESTLING

Can you see the nest?

Are the parents still active near the nest?

This bird is a FLEDGLING Is it in immediate danger? (cats, dogs, cars?)

YES

NO

YES

YES YES

Place the bird back in the nest (Don't worry, parents will still take care of it!)

Move it to safety outside (under a hedge)

NO Leave the bird alone It's normal for fledglings to spend time on the ground while they develop.

• Baby mammals must be fed every 2-3 hours around the clock • Baby birds must be fed every 20-30 minutes from dawn to dusk • SBWCN cares for up to 200 baby animals at a time • Over 4,000 feedings are performed by staff and volunteers per day! • SBWCN is entirely supported by volunteers and individual donors, foundations, and local businesses

Still unsure? Call the Helpline! (805) 681-1080

Mailing Address: PO Box 6594, Santa Barbara, CA 93160

Office Line: (805) 681-1019


HOW CAN YOU HELP? 1. Save the Helpline number to your phone

(805) 681-1080 2. Volunteer

• Feed baby animals • Keep the center clean • Answer the Helpline

• Prepare meals for animals • Transport animals • And much more!

Fill out a volunteer application at www.sbwcn.org

3. Donate

We need supplies to help babies this spring!

• Birdseed • Nitrile gloves • Gas gift cards

• Kleenex • Paper Towels • Walnuts

• Amazon gift cards • Tall trash bags • And much more!

To donate directly visit www.sbwcn.org/donate

4. Take Action

• Only trim trees between • Don’t use rat poison September 1st-February 1st • Keep cats inside, or use • Use UV window decals breakaway bell collars

Pledge to use SBWCN as a resource for wildlife in need!

Physical: 1460 N. Fairview Ave, Goleta CA 93117 • Mailing: P.O. Box 6594, Santa Barbara, CA 93160 Rescue Helpline: 805.681.1080 • Office line: 805.681.1019 www.sbwcn.org • Santa Barbara Wildlife Care Network • @sbwildlifecarenetwork SBWCN is licensed by the USFWS and CDFW • Federal Tax ID #77-0201505


GRANADASB.ORG

805.899.2222 U P C O M I N G

P E R F O R M A N C E S

UCSB ARTS & LECTURES

JAMES BALOG

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THE MAGIC FLUTE

From left, Fritz Mora, Michelle Vera, and Jessica Lingua

L I F E PAGE 45

W

ith an abundance of musically talented students and a disproportionate percentage of them trained as singers, Westmont College enjoys an unusual advantage when it comes to producing operas featuring undergraduates. Thus, with years of experience conducting the college’s chorus and orchestra in a wide variety of contexts, Adams Professor of Music and Worship Michael Shasberger was ready when his colleague Professor John Blondell from the theater department approached him about collaborating on Gilbert and Sullivan’s The Pirates of Penzance in 2014. That show, the pair’s first opera collaboration, went on to win three national awards, including two from Kennedy Center for the Performing Arts — Distinguished Production of a Musical and Distinguished Director of a Musical. Coming from an extensive background in directing Shakespeare and other canonical playwrights both here and internationally, Blondell found that the challenges presented by such subsequent offerings as Dido and Aeneas and Die Fledermaus meshed productively with the freewheeling, visually arresting style of presentation he has developed in the theater. This weekend, the Westmont team brings its most ambitious operatic production yet to the New Vic, which has proved to be an excellent fit for these fast-paced and unamplified performances. The opera this time is The Magic Flute, Mozart’s extravagant dis-

play of immortal musicianship and fairy-tale flights of imagination. Inspired in part by Swedish director Ingmar Bergman’s 1975 film version, Blondell told me that his aim was to “clear away the confusion of the libretto” in order to “allow the music to speak.” Although it was actually filmed in a studio at the Swedish Film Institute in front of cameras, Bergman’s film includes establishing shots intended to evoke baroque venues such as Stockholm’s Drottningholm Palace Theater and the Theater auf der Wieden in Vienna. For Blondell, the notion that audience members should remember that they are in a theater is key to the production’s design, which, while taking full advantage of the New Vic’s state-of-theart technical capacities, remains simple and abstract rather than overtly representational. These sets, while extremely beautiful, are not images of other things; they’re sets. With an orchestra of 17 musicians and a cast of 24 actors and singers, the task of directing a work as complex and difficult as The Magic Flute would seem overwhelming, especially when so many of the performers are relatively new to the school and the program, but Blondell turns this seeming obstacle on its head. “I love working with students who are this age [approximately 18-22] on

BRAD ELLIOTT

WESTMONT BRINGS MOZART TO THE NEW VIC

this kind of material,” he said, adding that “less trained and mature voices bring a freshness of youth to the music that is captivating. Their innocence has a kind of innate charm.” Not one to neglect the opportunities afforded by any teachable moment, Blondell attributed the progress he felt that the cast had made in recent weeks to an increased intellectual appreciation of the work’s roots in the social movements of the Enlightenment. “The Enlightenment context has really started to hit home in the last four rehearsals,” he said. “We’ve been talking a lot about how Sarastro is trying to create a Utopia, and what we know from other examples of this Enlightenment tendency about what that impulse can bring about.” — Charles Donelan

4·1·1

The cast features Fritz Mora as Tamino, John Butler as Papageno, Jessica Lingua as Pamina, and Michelle Vera as the Queen of the Night. Performances are on Friday, March 1; Sunday, March 3; and Tuesday, March 5; at 7 p.m., at Ensemble Theater Company’s New Vic (33 W. Victoria St). See newvictheater.com.

HH11 DANCE FESTIVAL COURTESY

Swish, swish, thump. Listen carefully, and you might hear the feverish sounds “I love to show dance films in a live dance fest,” said area filmmaker Robin of Santa Barbara dancers tapping and leaping in studios across the city as they Bisio, who will be showcasing three collaborative film works throughout the put the final touches on their entries for this year’s HH11 Dance Festival. Now in weekend, including her highly acclaimed What Green Altar, which will be proits fifth year, this lively celebration of “art in motion” jected against the side of the theater during Friday’s will once again offer dance audiences the opporevent. “It’s so rewarding on so many levels to share dance films with a discerning audience.” tunity to take in a sweeping variety of genres and approaches, and area dance companies are busily The festival will kick off on Thursday with the prepping for the occasion. presentation of the HH11 Apogee Awards, honor“At the end of every festival, I wonder how we ing community leadership in dance advocacy and could possibly make it better,” said festival director education, followed by three days of showcase — Devyn Duex, “and then every year the level of new format dance performances with a distinctive selectalent just blows us away once again.” tion of works each night. New to 2019 is the addition From Thursday, February 28, through Sunday, ART IN MOTION: The HH11 festival will see dancers flex of a Friday Mix and Mingle event, where a food and March 3, dancers throughout California — and from their bodies Thursday, February 28–Sunday, March 3. cocktail reception on the theater’s terrace will be as far away as Hungary — will flex and hinge their followed by a tightly curated, 55-minute evening bodies around disciplines that include modern dance, contemporary ballet, East of dance before progressing over to the Bobcat Lounge for a lively after-party. Indian classical dance, and tap, as well as dance film and performance art. Cen- “We want to reach new dance audiences,” stressed Duex, “and what better way ter Stage Theater (751 Paseo Nuevo), will provide the intimate setting for the to do that than to make an evening of dance appealing and approachable to all four-day event and, at just over 125 seats, will give the audience an up close and types of aficionados.” For tickets and info, see centerstagetheater.org. —Ninette Paloma personal look into the intricacies of the kinetic arts.

THE PHONE BOOTH’S SONIC EPITAPH The Phone Booth’s release party for its new album, Roman, will be more than a celebration of an album — it’ll be the celebration of a life. The Santa Barbara band’s show on Sunday, March 3, at SOhO Restaurant & Music Club will honor the memory of Steven Roman Gonzales, the album’s namesake who passed away from cancer in 2016 at the age of 30. Michael Easbey (vocals, guitar) helms the band, along with Josh Blumenthal (bass), Ben Pecorari (drums), and Tony Pennington (guitar). Genrewise, the band takes inspiration from lo-fi indierock greats like Guided by Voices, Sparklehorse, and The Mountain Goats. Joining the band will be S.B.’s The Peer Council, who play emo revival à la early Death Cab for Cutie, and the post-hardcore band Gunpowder Empires. Roman’s is a one-of-a-kind, intensely personal sound, intimately built around Gonzales’s voice, transmitted through phone messages. Easbey considered Gonzales a close friend and frequent collaborator, and his “forever lo-fi” spirit leaves a sonic imprint on the album. His voice remains in messages sprinkled throughout; his legacy is retold in Easbey’s lyrics. “I saved every interesting voicemail he ever left me since about 2003 and used them … to work into the story of the album,” Easbey said. The two met at Monte Vista Elementary, and the album begins thematically around their days in Dos Pueblos High School theater. Easbey knew Gonzales as an exceptionally inspiring individual. “He was insanely passionate. When meeting people, he would infamously ask, ‘What are you passionate about?’” Easbey said. “That was his opener for conversations: How are you creative in this world, what kind of art do you contribute, where do you really derive joy?” The recording process, of course, was emotional. “It was an incredibly therapeutic and cathartic experience — the most satisfying cry I had about Steve’s death was after we got the mixes back. It just unloaded so much for me,” Easbey said. As memorials go, Roman is a heartfelt one, with a proportionally heavy sound. The guitars crunch and sizzle with sorrowful heft. Built for headphones, it’s an intricately crafted rock of love. The Phone Booth plays with the Peer Council and Gunpowder Empires on Sunday, March 3, 9 p.m., at SOhO Restaurant and Music Club (1221 State St.). See sohosb.com. —Richie DeMaria

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Sun, Mar 10 / 3 PM UCSB Campbell Hall

by Richie DeMaria

MILLIONS AND MILLIONS: SOhO Restaurant & Music Club (1221 State St.) will be rich with the sound of homegrown rock ’n’ roll riffs when Young Million headline an album-release show on Friday, March 8. Comprising siblings Kyran Million (guitar, vocals) and Michael Million (guitar), along with Erich Riedl (drums) and Nate Modisette (bass), the four-piece plays a pumped-up classic alt-rock sound. The show will commemorate the release of the band’s debut full-length album, Chasing Threads. “It feels amazing,” Michael Million said of the album release. “It’s such a big milestone for us to finally put our sound into the world, and with a full-length album nonetheless.” Recorded at Santa Barbara Sound Design, the record had some heavy hitters at the sound board. Mixed by Ryan Williams (Rage Against the Machine, Stone Temple Pilots) and mastered by Jon Davis (Led Zeppelin, The Killers, Foals), the record packs a big rock sound spiked with raw energy. “Jon is a legend. Great guy, and his reputation speaks for itself. … Ryan gave us an amazing mix that really helped add to the live feel of the record, which is what we were going for,” Michael Million said. “We’re a rock band, and what you see is what you get,” Million added. “With the exception of vocals, the entire album was recorded live, so we want people to feel that when they hear it.” Openers for the band include Glossies (formerly known as Dot Plaza), the über-talented area musician Erich Tomkinson taking his turn at timelessly jangly, melodic indie rock. Kyle Nicolaides, from S.B., and Ventura’s Noble Grizwald round out the evening. FEELING FINE WITH BRYCE VINE: On Sunday, March 3, you can catch Bryce Vine at Velvet Jones (423 State St.) at 7 p.m., with openers Travis Thompson (from Seattle) and Kid Quill (from Shelbyville, IN). Velvet Jones has quickly re-established itself as being one of the best places in town to catch the R&B and hip-hop artists of absolutely right now, and Bryce Vine is no exception. His hit “Drew Barrymore” has made many a listener swoon in its alluring YouTube soul glow. His good looks don’t seem to hurt his talents, either. FOSSEK’S FAMED FLAMENCO: Many, but not enough, know the soothing sounds of Chris Fossek’s Mediterranean-style guitar playing. If you haven’t yet heard his lovely work, you’re in luck, as he plays an early show at SOhO on Thursday, March 7, at 6 p.m. With a musical vocabulary that stretches across Mediterranean cultures, his guitar speaks in beautiful Spanish flamenco, Macedonian folk, and other stringed-instrument tongues. He’ll be joined by sax player Peter Slocombe from L.A. and Nashville percussionist Nate Keezer, so it’ll be extra special. PHILLIPS AND VELASCO: One a venerated veteran of the S.B. stage, the other a relatively rising newcomer, each uniquely talented unto themselves: The billing of Glen Phillips and Omar Velasco will be a perfect way to spend your Tuesday, March 5, starting at 7:30 p.m at SOhO. Phillips, a local legend, is famed for both his solo works and his days with Toad the Wet Sprocket. Velasco, meanwhile, has excited many with his own indie rock compositions and with his band Amo Amo. NEW MUSIC ALERT: Chaye Tione, one of our area’s most gifted hip-hop artists, is coming into the New Year with a musical fitness resolution in the form of “Jiu Jitsu,” an ode to his favorite martial art. Late last year, he released Binary Insight, a rather brilliant work that this listener was too slow on the draw to hear in the year of its release. The young Katy Caballero, meanwhile, just released her song “Unlovable,” a poignant piano ballad lifted by her sweet voice. Last year, the precocious Caballero earned praise for her song “Not Not a Love Song,” released as she finished up 8th grade. Available on the usual streaming platforms. n

Mountainfilm on Tour returns with a special all-ages program that families can enjoy together! With a mission to educate and inspire audiences about issues that matter, cultures worth exploring, environments worth preserving and conversations worth sustaining, Mountainfilm’s fun, engaging playlist features outstanding, entertaining short films sourced from the festival in Telluride.

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white balloon attached to his wrist had been wandering through the crowd. What really exemplified Burr’s mastery, however, was his casual stream-of-consciousness approach that makes him appear to be in the moment and not overrehearsed. Burr would often throw out a comment on a controversial topic as a premise, drawing clear discomfort from portions of the crowd. He’d then make subtle jokes, eventually arriving at one big killer that always won back the audience. Burr’s new material is testament to why he is regarded as one of the best stand-ups in comedy. Burr is filming the tour in March live at the Royal Albert Hall and is working on the fourth season of his Netflix show, F Is for Family. —Daniel Carroll

POP, ROCK & JAZZ BRIAN TANGUAY

before

omedian Bill Burr ripped through an hour of material from his latest tour, Bill Burr: 50, on Friday, February 15, to a packed Arlington Theatre. Burr tackled a wide range of topical issues, such as artificial intelligence, the #MeToo movement, and the president, earning constant big laughs and a standing ovation at show’s end. At The Arlington Consistent with his loose style, Theatre, Fri., Burr strayed from scripted mateFeb. 15. rial to poke fun at Santa Barbara, asking why people would want to visit just to walk along a street for hours and get lost in retail. He even took a swing at an usher’s poofy white hairdo, much to the delight of the audience and the usher himself. Burr said he didn’t understand why a little boy with a

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SNARKY PUPPY Presented by UCSB Arts & Lectures. At The Granada Theatre, Sun., Feb. 24.

S

narky Puppy put on a great show at the Granada on Sunday, February 24, in a UCSB Arts & Lectures performance. The 13-member jazz-rock-fusion ensemble thundered through a fluid set of mostly new songs from its upcoming album, Immigrance. Funkily onomatopoeic songs such as “Chonk” made up a brawnily rhythmic, flowingly inventive set of massive and grooving compositions, graced with hypnotically quivering synth and flute. With hardly a break between songs, they conducted audience foot-tapping and seat-dancing en masse with & ENTERTAINMENT their ever-changing grooves,

REVIEWS 

48

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ries emotional power.” A highlight of the evening came when Trick was joined at the piano by her husband, the acclaimed pianist Paolo Alderighi, for a rousing fourhands-on-one-piano rendition of Duke Ellington’s “It Don’t Mean a Thing.” — Brian Tanguay

COURTESY UCSB ARTS & LECTURES

IN 2018

or two hours, Isla Vista’s Aladdin Café was filled with the uniquely American sound of stride piano stylings, thanks to pianist Stephanie Trick. Stride piano is a form of jazz music that descended from ragtime and came into its own in Harlem in the 1920s, pioneered by artists like James P. Johnson, Willie “The Lion” Smith, and Thomas “Fats” Waller. The heyday of stride may have ended in the early 1940s, but the contrapuntal, improvisational, bluesAt Aladdin Café, influenced style is alive and Wed., Feb. 20. well, its legacy carried on by the evening’s main attraction, Trick. Trick’s Isla Vista appearance was one in a pop-up series called Jeffrey’s Jazz Coffeehouse (faceboook.com/JJCIslaVista), conceived by Jeffrey C. Stewart, a professor of black studies at UCSB. Stewart set the scene for the evening and then turned the stage over to Trick, who is known internationally as a virtuoso interpreter of the stride piano genre. Trick had no trouble holding the audience of UCSB students and others spellbound. Playing compositions from James P. Johnson such as “Carolina Balmoral,” “A-Flat Dream,” and “Carolina Shout,” Trick gave an intimate concert and taught a class containing history and music theory. Trick’s expressive playing set feet tapping and heads nodding. “This music doesn’t die,” she said. “It still car-

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all cohesively in tandem. The band gave thanks to their friend and area musician David Crosby (with whom they’ve collaborated in the past) and humble gratitude to the audience. It was an electrifying night. — Richie DeMaria


CLASSICAL

Celebrate!

& ENTERTAINMENT

REVIEWS 

CHRIS OWYOUNG

JAZZ

AT THE

Rincon Beach Club

presented by

THE CENTER FOR SUCCESSFUL AGING

Saturday March 2, 2019 2:30-5 pm

NEW YORK POLYPHONY

E

arly music for vocal chamber groups is trending, and with good reason. Take New York Polyphony, the impressive quartet that performed for UCSB Arts & Lectures’ Up Close and Musical series at the Music Academy’s Hahn Hall last Wednesday. Not only do Geoffrey Williams (countertenor), Steven Caldicott Wilson (tenor), Christopher Dylan Herbert (baritone), and Craig Phillips (bass) have the discipline and scholarly passion to perform 16th-century music at the highest possible level, but they also have the imaginaPresented by UCSB tion to connect that Arts & Lectures. At music to the 21st centhe Music Academy tury in unique and of the West’s Hahn Hall, Wed., Feb. 20. compelling ways. The concert began with a Mass for Four Voices by Thomas Tallis (1505-1585), which was bookended with two shorter pieces, both of them written in the same musical idiom and bearing specific relations to certain aspects of that work. Andrew Smith, who wrote Kyrie: Cunctipotens Genitor Deus, was born in 1970, and Gabriel Jackson, composer of Ite Missa Est, was born in 1962. The opening set served as an extended introduction to the overall strength and memo-

rable individuality of these men’s voices. If you’ve never heard this music sung by a quartet before, it is, at least when New York Polyphony does it, a revelation. The group opened the second half with a remarkable work by another relatively young composer, Gregory Brown. His Missa Charles Darwin was composed for the group and was first suggested to the composer by bass Craig Phillips, who drafted the libretto from the writings of the great naturalist Charles Darwin. It was unsettling to hear, in the Kyrie—where the words “lord have mercy” would ordinarily be sung — the line “let the strongest live and the weakest die,” but the overall effect of the piece was in most ways the opposite of something done for shock value. Darwin’s ideas do benefit from “the application of an accepted musical form that is uniquely suited to enhance the expressive potential of language,” as composer Brown writes in the program notes. The group delivered this complex mixture of ideas and music with total conviction, and they followed it with four exquisite songs, including a special treat chosen specifically for the Santa Barbara audience, “The Dying Californian.” — Charles Donelan

DANCE

K

nowing just the right moment to leave a party is an astute exercise in social awareness, and Jessica Lang subscribes to the philosophy that one should always exit on an upswing. After seven seasons of prolific work as the founder and artistic director of Jessica Lang Dance, Lang announced she would be dismantling the company come spring to focus on indeAt The Granada pendent projects. Thanks Theatre, Thu., to the programming prowFeb. 21. ess at UCSB Arts & Lectures, their 19-city farewell tour made a one-evening stop at The Granada Theatre on Thursday, February 21, where Lang laid bare a dazzling catalog of work as versatile as the dancers themselves. Company members Kana Kimura and Jammie Walker echoed grace and towering presence in their respective solos “The Calling” and “Solo Bach,” before blending seamlessly into their ensemble roles in “Thousand-Yard Stare,” a tableau of movement precariously cooperative and delicately balanced, with waves of a Beethoven score

TOM BUCKNER sax

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INFORMATION /RESERVATIONS: www.csasb.org or 805-452-5900 The Rincon Beach Club, 3805 Santa Claus Lane, Carpinteria, CA

THE LARAMIE PROJECT BY MOISÉS KAUFMAN AND THE MEMBERS OF TECTONIC THEATER PROJECT DIRECTED BY ERIC JORGENSEN

MAR 1 & 6-8 / 8 PM MAR 2 & 9 / 2 PM Hatlen Theater

TAKAO KOMARU

JESSICA LANG DANCE

SHAWN THIES & CYNTHIA THURBER vocals

floating in and around the formation of human hieroglyphics. Adaptability is what the Jessica Lang dancers have come to be known for, and nowhere was that trait more evident than in Lang’s final piece of the evening, an ode to the music of Tony Bennett titled “This Thing Called Love.” Bursting onto the stage with fingersnapping vibrancy and infectious optimism, the dancers leapt and slid in uniform ease as audio quips of Bennett himself offered insight into his method and motivation. True to form, Lang exited on an upswing, and the crowd jumped to their feet in roaring approval. — Ninette Paloma

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BACK TO THE FUTURE: Nadia (Natasha Lyonne, pictured) is a software engineer caught in an endless time loop. Each go round she gathers more clues, strategizing new plans of attack against her imminent demise.

RUSSIAN DOLL

F

or most of us, we play the game of life new universe and a capitulation to a new with the seriousness of a heart attack. death. First she’s the victim of a fatal car We have no other choice. Each day we crash, then a drowning, then several failed wake up and try to cheat death to the next attempts to descend the stairs. Each time, sunrise. Few of us are given the opportunity she finds herself back in the bathroom and to re-spawn and attempt to survive the same Mr. Nilsson back on the stereo. “Gotta get day over and over again like we’re the heroes up, gotta get out.” of our very own role-playing game. In the Nadia isn’t about to take this cosmic joke Netflix original series Ruslying down. As a softsian Doll, Nadia (Natasha ware engineer, she knows Lyonne) designs those very every game is governed games, until suddenly she by rules. If she can figure seems to be living one. out the rules, she can figIt’s Nadia’s 36th birthure out how to win. Each day, and she’s enjoying it new go at life is a chance to the utmost with some to gather more clues by T.M. Weedon drinks, some drugs, a little and strategize a different plan of attack against her bit of sex, and an unending parade of cigarettes to her increasingly repetitive, lips. Nadia seems to have a death wish, even imminent demise. Over eight digestible if she doesn’t know it. Her rowdy, debauched 25-minute episodes, Russian Doll is a whirllifestyle throws caution to the wind as she wind of sleuthing out the supernatural. blows incessant clouds of carcinogenic Leslye Headland, writer of the feature smoke along with it. Her embrace of life is films Bachelorette and Sleeping with Other as reckless as it is carefree, as morbid as it is People, is a co-creator of Russian Doll, along affirmative. She curses like a particularly irri- with Amy Poehler, who needs no introductable sailor—as likely to extend an “eff you” tion, and Lyonne, best known for her role as as a “how you do?” — but there’s something “Nicky” in Orange Is the New Black. Of the endearing in her abrasiveness. Like all self- three of them, it’s Lyonne, the star, who most imposed outcasts, you can tell she has a soft has her fingerprints on the series. Poehler’s spot guarded behind the cultivated cynicism suburban sensibilities are nowhere to be and isolation. On this birthday, though, a found in the concrete landscapes of Russian snag in the fabric of space-time forces Nadia Doll’s Alphabet City and her guffaws style of to examine her usual tendencies and discover humor has been bulldozed by a whip-smart, what it is she’s been hiding from, both in the foul-mouthed, urban erudition that’s more world and within herself. Andrew Dice Clay than Andy Samberg. The series begins at Nadia’s birthday party. Like Dice Clay, Nadia is a factory of vulHarry Nilsson’s “Gotta Get Up” commences garities, insults, and aphorisms, and much over the sound system like a call to arms: of the pleasure of the series is watching her “Gotta get up, gotta get out, gotta get home elbow her way through the world while before the morning comes.” Nadia gives her simultaneously trying to make amends. But billowing fountain of long red locks one last don’t let the faint whiff of simplistic moraladjustment in the bathroom mirror before izing deter you — Russian Doll eschews easy turning to rejoin her fellow carousers. The answers and trite narratives of personal bathroom door, an art-installation designed growth. Nadia doesn’t find the straight and by her two best friends, is embellished with narrow; she and the show are more intera phosphorescent triangle that glows like a ested in life’s bends and vortices. cosmic vagina and opens with the pull of a handgun door-handle. Nadia will soon learn each exit from the bathroom is a birth into a Russian Doll streams on Netflix.

NETFLIX SERIES REVELS IN LIFE’S BENDS AND VORTICES

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Metro 4 (2D & 3D) (Opens Thu., Mar. 7)

paranoid landscape of East Berlin with his Oscar-winning 2006 film The Lives of Others, stirred controversy with his new film about another slice of German life, Never Look Away, loosely based on the life, times, and fascinating and mercurial work of Gerhard Richter. Richter, 87, a recluse considered one of our most important living artists, was none too pleased. Opening with a “degenerate art” show in Dresden, circa 1937, and moving through Communist bloc life, studies with Joseph Beuys and his “blur-painting” breakthrough, the three-hour film feels tame and glossy compared to the challenges of Richter’s art over the decades. Still, it conveys a compelling, polished tale, a portrait of an artist who filtered troubled times into a suitably complex, blurry, layered aesthetic voice. Richter deserves better. (JW) Riviera

Everybody Knows (Todos lo saben) (133 mins., R) Penelope Cruz stars with her real-life husband Javier Bardem in this psychological thriller about a woman who returns to Spain from her home in Argentina to attend a wedding where long-buried secrets come into the open.

Tyler Perry’s A Madea Family Funeral (109 mins., PG-13) For the 11th Madea franchise film, matriarch Madea (Tyler Perry) and her family convene for a reunion that turns into a nightmare in the backwoods of Georgia when the get-together becomes an unexpected funeral gathering.

Paseo Nuevo

Camino Real/Metro 4

PREMIERES Birds of Passage (125 mins., NR) This Oscar-nominated Best Foreign Language film takes place in the late 1960s and 1970s and follows a Colombian family’s rise and demise in the illegal drug trade. The Hitchcock Captain Marvel (124 mins., PG-13) Brie Larson stars as Carol Danvers (aka Captain Marvel), a former U.S. Air Force fighter pilot and current member of an elite military unit, Starforce. Danvers gets her superhuman abilities when her DNA is accidentally fused with that of a Kree, a scientifically and technologically advanced race. Djimon Hounsou, Samuel L. Jackson, and Annette Bening also star. Arlington/Camino Real/

➤ Never Look Away

(188 mins., R)

Director Henckel von Donnersmarck, who dropped moviegoers into the

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NOW SHOWING Alita: Battle Angel (122 mins., PG-13) Rosa Salazar stars in this cyberpunk action film based on the Japanese graphic novel Gunnm about a bodiless “core,” Alita, who awakens in a postapocalyptic world with no memory. Dr. Ido (Christoph Waltz) finds her and gives her a new body. Soon it is discovered that Alita is more than a typical cyborg. Mahershala Ali and Jennifer Connelly also star.

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Arctic (97 mins., PG-13) Mads Mikkelsen (Hannibal, Doctor Strange) stars as Overgard, who is stranded in the Arctic awaiting rescue. When the helicopter sent to retrieve him crashes, he and the surviving passenger embark on a journey of survival. The Hitchcock

O Bohemian Rhapsody (134 mins., PG-13)

Telling the tale of a beloved rockand-roll enigma, especially one so notoriously private, is a daunting task, but Bohemian Rhapsody tackles Freddie Mercury’s legendary story with flourish and fervor. Admittedly, the film adopts a convenient plot line ripe with meet-cutes and oversimplifications of Mercury’s complex relationship with his family and background. It struggles the most in addressing the often-discussed queerness of Mercury’s life, at times teetering toward bi-erasure and a lessthan-delicate portrayal of AIDS. Rami Malek shines as the shy yet vivacious Queen frontman and is spellbindingly convincing during both Mercury’s loneliest hours and explosive moments on some of the world’s biggest stages. The rest of the casting deserves a grand tip of the hat as well. Bohemian Rhapsody, for all its narrative flaws, is an earnest tribute to the iconic rock band,

Never Look Away

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THE METROPOLITAN OPERA: LA FILLE DU REGIMENT I Sat: 9:55 AM H TYLER PERRY’S A MADEA FAMILY FUNERAL C Fri to Sun: 12:45, 3:00, 5:20, 7:40, 10:00; Mon to Thu: 2:10, 5:30, 8:15

COLD PURSUIT E 2:00 PM THE LEGO MOVIE 2: THE SECOND PART B Fri: 2:30, 5:00, 7:30; Sat & Sun: 12:00, 2:30, 5:00, 7:30; Mon to Thu: 2:30, 5:00

ALITA: BATTLE ANGEL C Fri to Sun: 1:10, 4:10, 7:00, 9:50; Mon to Thu: 2:20, 5:10, 8:00

WHAT MEN WANT E Fri to Sun: 6:40, 9:20; Mon to Wed: 7:45 PM BOHEMIAN RHAPSODY C Thu: 5:00 PM Fri to Sun: 4:45 PM; Mon to Thu: 4:45, 7:30

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THE UPSIDE C Fri: 1:00, 6:50; Sat: 6:50 PM Sun: 1:00, 6:50; Mon to Thu: 4:40 PM SPIDER-MAN: INTO THE SPIDER-VERSE B Fri to Sun: 1:20, 4:00; Mon to Wed: 2:00, 5:00 Thu: 2:00 PM

H TYLER PERRY’S A MADEA A STAR IS BORN E Fri to Sun: 3:50, FAMILY FUNERAL C 12:00, 2:30, 9:40; Mon to Wed: 2:30, 7:30 PM; 5:00, 7:30, 9:50 Thu: 2:30 PM FIGHTING WITH MY H CAPTAIN MARVEL C FAMILY C Fri: 1:40, 4:10, 6:50, 9:40; Thu: 8:00, 11:00 Sat & Sun: 11:00, 1:40, 4:10, 6:50, 9:40; Mon to Wed: 1:40, 4:10, 6:50, 9:40; Thu: 1:40, 4:10 H CAPTAIN MARVEL IN DISNEY DIGITAL 3D C Thu: 9:00 PM H HOW TO TRAIN YOUR DRAGON: THE HIDDEN WORLD B Fri: 11:30, 1:00, 2:00, 3:30, 4:30, 6:05, 7:00, 8:35, 9:30; Sat & Sun: 10:30, 11:30, 1:00, 2:00, 3:30, 4:30, 6:05, 7:00, 8:35, 9:30; Mon to Wed: 1:00, 2:00, 3:30, 4:30, 6:05, 7:00, 8:35, 9:30; Thu: 1:00, 2:00, 3:30, 4:30, 6:05, 7:00, 9:30 ALITA: BATTLE ANGEL C Fri: 1:30, 4:20, 7:10, 9:55; Sat & Sun: 10:40, 1:30, 4:20, 7:10, 9:55; Mon to Wed: 1:30, 4:20, 7:10, 9:55; Thu: 1:30, 4:20 GREEN BOOK C Fri to Wed: 12:20, 3:20, 6:20, 9:15; Thu: 12:20, 3:20, 6:20 H CAPTAIN MARVEL C Thu: 7:00, 7:45, 8:30, 9:15, 10:00, 10:45, 11:30

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BIRDS OF PASSAGE 2:00, 4:50, 7:45 ARCTIC C 5:00 PM THE FAVOURITE E 2:15, 7:30

THE LEGO MOVIE 2: THE SECOND PART B Fri: 2:30, 5:00; Sat & Sun: 11:15, 2:30, 5:00; Mon to Thu: 2:30, 5:00 BOHEMIAN RHAPSODY C Fri: 7:30, 9:30; Sat & Sun: 11:30, 7:30, 9:30; Mon to Thu: 2:00, 7:30


a&e | FILM & TV CONT’D FROM P. 53 Capernaum

MARCH 1 - 7

Emmet’s friends. A rescue mission ensues. Elizabeth Banks, Tiffany Haddish, and Will Arnett also star.

OSCAR® 2019 BEST FOREIGN FILM NOMINEES

Fairview/Fiesta 5

and remains a spectacle of sight and sound for music, Mercury, and movie fans alike. (JK) Fairview/Fiesta 5

O Capernaum

(126 mins., NR)

Those who are extra-sensitive to tales of woe concerning children cast adrift will be pained watching the Lebanese film Capernaum (Chaos), about a tough but fragile 12-year-old (Zain al Rafeea, grim and determined until the final shot) and an Ethiopian toddler immigrant (Boluwatife Treasure Bankole — best toddler performance of the year). But anyone with an interest in bold, emotionally powered cinema and the pressing issues of poverty and refugee struggles through tender eyes shouldn’t miss Nadine Labaki’s important film, a nominee for the Foreign Film Oscar and Jury Prize winner at Cannes. Naturalism meets assured-narrative machinery and courtroom drama in the poignant, youth-driven tradition of Bicycle Thief and the fellow foreign-film Oscar nom Shoplifters. (JW) Riviera Cold Pursuit (118 mins., R) Nels Coxman’s (Liam Neeson) quiet life in a mountain resort town is thrown into chaos when his young son is mysteriously killed. As Coxman seeks vengeance, he is pulled into a world of drug lords, setting off a turf war. Laura Dern and Emmy Rossum also star. Fairview

The Favourite (120 mins., R) Olivia Colman, Emma Stone, and Rachel Weisz star in this historical dark comedy/drama set during the reign of England’s Queen Anne in the early 18th century. A tangled love triangle emerges between Anne (Colman), Abigail Hill (Stone), and Sarah Churchill (Weisz) that leads to treachery and betrayal. The Hitchcock

Fighting with My Family (108 mins., PG-13)

Dwayne Johnson executive produced this biopic dramedy based on the life of British WWE professional wrestler Saraya-Jade “Paige” Bevis (Florence Pugh), who won the Divas Championship in 2014. Nick Frost, Vince Vaughn, and Lena Headey also star. Camino Real/Paseo Nuevo

O Green Book

(130 mins., PG-13)

Green Book is an uncommonly welltold tale of bodyguard Tony Vallelonga (Viggo Mortensen) and classically trained pianist Don Shirley (Mahershala Ali), thrown together on a concert tour through the Deep South in 1962. Dr. Donald Shirley was a child prodigy, Russian-trained, and imbued with a dignity that suffered under the shortening of his name to “Don” by his record label. The film’s greatest transformation comes from Mortensen, who put on 25 pounds before the film began and added another 20 while playing Tony Vallelonga, a k a Tony Lip. His son Nick Vallelonga wrote the script, holding off until after Don Shirley had died, as requested. It’s a restraint that Green Book plays with so well that the usually blasé Santa Barbara film audience couldn’t help but erupt with applause at film’s end. (JY) Camino Real/Paseo Nuevo

Greta (98 mins., R) When Frances McCullen (Chloë Grace Moretz) finds a purse in New York City subway, she promptly returns it to its owner, Greta (Isabelle Huppert), a lonely piano teacher. Having just lost her mother, Frances grows close to Greta, but soon discovers the woman isn’t who she seems. Fairview/Paseo Nuevo How to Train Your Dragon: The Hidden World (104 mins., PG) The third installation of this delightful animated franchise sees Toothless, Hiccup (Jay Baruchel), and their ragtag crew of dragon riders continue to save captured dragons and bring them to Berk. When the dragon population becomes untenable, Hiccup and his faithful black fury go in search of the Hidden World, a safe haven for dragons. But enemies and warlords try to thwart their efforts. Cate Blanchett, America Ferrera, and Craig Ferguson also lend their vocal talents.

Isn’t It Romantic (88 mins., PG-13) Rebel Wilson stars in this comedy/ fantasy/satire about Natalie (Wilson), a woman who has never believed in the Hollywood rom-com fantasy. After being knocked unconscious, however, Natalie finds herself in her own clichéfilled romantic comedy and must eschew hackneyed situations to finally fall in love and be brought back to reality. Liam Hemsworth and Adam DeVine also star. Fairview/Fiesta 5

DIRECTED BY FLORIAN HENCKEL VON DONNERSMARCK

Daily: 3:00pm, 7:00pm

Spider-Man: Into the SpiderVerse (117 mins., PG) Marvel Comics presents this computeranimated film in which Miles Morales (voiced by Shameik Moore) becomes Spider-Man and crosses paths with his counterparts from other dimensions in order to stop a threat to reality. Metro 4

O A Star Is Born

(117 mins., PG)

Bradley Cooper marks his directing debut with an ode to the 1937 romantic melodrama A Star Is Born, famously remade in 1954 with Judy Garland and James Mason and again in 1976 with Barbra Streisand and Kris Kristofferson. Cooper plays famous countryrock musician Jackson Maine, whose drunken search for more alcohol leads him to a drag bar where he stumbles into Ally (Lady Gaga), an unknown singer who Jackson then mentors. Soon, Ally and Jackson enter into a romantic relationship that is often overshadowed by Jackson’s alcoholism and prescription drug abuse. As Ally takes on her selfdoubt and fear of performing in front of Jackson’s sold-out crowds, she makes sacrifices in her own burgeoning career for love and authenticity. Cooper and Lady Gaga depict the rawness and erosion of their relationship with aplomb. (JR) Metro 4

DIRECTED BY NADINE LABAKI Sat & Sun: 12:15pm

FOR TICKETS, VISIT WWW.SBIFF.ORG AND THE THEATRE BOX OFFICE

The Upside (125 mins., PG-13) Bryan Cranston, Kevin Hart, and Nicole Kidman star in this remake of the 2011 French film The Intouchables, which is based on the life of wealthy businessman Philippe Pozzo di Borgo, who became a quadriplegic following a paragliding accident. Metro 4

Camino Real/Fiesta 5 (2D & 3D)

The Lego Movie 2: The Second Part (106 mins., PG) It’s been five years since Duplo invaded Bricksburg, not yet a postapocalyptic wasteland. Despite the dire circumstances, Emmet (Chris Pratt) remains irritatingly upbeat, unlike his friends. Disliking his plucky demeanor, Mayhem from Systar System kidnaps

What Men Want (117 mins., R) In this remake — with a twist — of 2000’s fantasy/comedy What Women Want, Taraji P. Henson stars as Ali Davis, a sports agent who is kept on the outside by her male coworkers. Then a bump to the head gives her the ability to hear men’s thoughts, and it’s game on. Tracy Morgan and Aldis Hodge also star. Metro 4

The above films are playing in Santa Barbara FRIDAY, March 1, through THURSDAY, March 7. Our critics’ reviews are followed by initials: JK (Janavi Kumar), JR (Jasmine Rodriguez), JW (Josef Woodard), and JY (Jean Yamamura). The symbol O indicates the film is recommended. The symbol ➤ indicates a new review. INDEPENDENT.COM

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Cancer Foundation of Santa Barbara Presents FREE MEET THE DOCTOR IN SANTA BARBARA

HEART EVENT

5K•10K•15K Saturday, March 16 Lunch, Raffle & Yoga Included!

Register by February 28 for only $50!

A vascular surgeon who specializes in vascular and vein therapy will discuss the newest technologies in treating aortic aneurysms.

Register today! www.cfsb.org/irelandwalk2019 100% of registration fees and pledges benefit the Ridley-Tree Cancer Center’s breast cancer research & supportive care programs.

Kevin M. Casey, MD, Board Certified Vascular Surgeon Santa Barbara Cottage Hospital | Amphitheatre

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PAUL WELLMAN PHOTOS

SPORTS mirror Robinson’s breakthrough in major league baseball by becoming the first black filmmaker to win the Oscar for best director. It did not happen, but Lee did share the trophy for his work on the screenplay of BlacKkKlansman. CATCHING UP: Santa Barbara trail runner Dani Moreno (fea-

S.B. BASEBALL Fred Warrecker Watches Grandson Bryce Play for Dons

FEELS LIKE SPRING: Fred Warrecker (below), recovering from a stroke, watched the league baseball opener at Santa Barbara High last Friday. Dos Pueblos pitcher Nico Martinez (above) had a strong outing in the Chargers’ 4-3 victory.

by JOHN ZANT

Feb. 10-16 Danae Miller, UCSB basketball

The sophomore guard made all 13 of her shots (5-5 FG, 8-8 FT) for 20 points, plus five rebounds, five assists, and four steals, in a 71-52 win over UC Irvine.

Noah Nuño, Carpinteria basketball

The senior led the Warriors into the CIF semifinals by scoring 28 points in a second-round win over Vistamar and 23 points in a 51-46 victory over rival Cate.

GAUCHO REVIVAL: UCSB, coming

off two disappointing baseball seasons after its appearance in the 2016 College World Series, had a blast in its first home series last weekend, sweeping Hartford by scores of 10-5, 6-4, and 14-0. “I’ve been looking forward to this season,” junior outfielder Armani Smith said. “It’s a totally different vibe. I’m speaking for everyone on the team. We have the confidence to put it together and be dangerous this season.” Smith had seven hits against Hartford, including a home run to dead center in his first at-bat of the series. SPIKE’S DREAM: January 31 was the 100th birthday of Jackie Robinson and also the day Spike Lee was honored at the Santa

Barbara International Film Festival. During his interview at the Arlington Theatre, Lee brought up the possibility that he could

PAUL WELLMAN

from the sidewalk on Canon Perdido Street. The baseball diamond, bathed in soft winter sunlight, was a beautiful and welcome sight. “I had a stroke right there behind the backstop,” Warrecker said. He had been watching a practice session last October when he collapsed. Immediate medical attention saved him, but he is still recovering. “This is my first day out since then,” he said. “It’s the first day of spring for me.” He showed up last Friday afternoon to watch the Santa Barbara Dons take on the Dos Pueblos Chargers in their Channel League baseball opener. Warrecker, 80, has been devoted to the Dons most of his life. He was their head coach for 43 years, retiring after the 2015 season. His son Donny Warrecker took over the next three years. Now there is a new head coach, Steve Schuck, but Fred’s grandson, junior pitcher/first baseman Bryce Warrecker, keeps the family name in the program. The field was in good shape for the early-season game, a point of pride for the elder Warrecker. He pointed to the tile-roofed dugouts, built during his tenure. The home dugout has ivy-covered walls. “No graffiti,” he said. More often than not, Santa Barbara and Dos Pueblos have battled for the league title. The Chargers have had the upper hand lately, winning six championships in the last seven years, but often by just a game or two over the Dons. Dos Pueblos stuck the first blow of the 2019 season, winning Friday’s game, 4-3. Senior right-hander Nico Martinez shut out the Dons for six innings—including the second when he struck out the side after loading the bases—and reliever Mason Boelter survived a Santa Barbara rally in the seventh. Santa Barbara starter Derek True, who’s signed with Cal

Poly, sailed through the first three innings, but DP scored three runs in the fourth, capped by Conner Gleissner’s tworun single. “In my four years playing Santa Barbara, there’s always close games,” Martinez said. “It’s a dogfight, a battle to the end.” Both teams felt they have some kinks to work out. Cold, wet weather has limited their practices. Bryce Warrecker was still playing basketball for the Dons — they went into the Division 3 state regionals this week after a heartbreaking 57-55 defeat to Palm Springs in the Southern Section semifinals — and he went 0-for-3 as a designated hitter in the baseball game. “I’m not worried,” said Schuck, a former prep coach in Arizona who’s spent the last five summers helping coach the Santa Barbara Foresters. “Dos Pueblos is a good ball club. They got key hits, and we didn’t. We’ll play again.” The Dons and Chargers will meet at DP’s Scott O’Leary Field on March 12 and will return to Santa Barbara on March 15.

ATHLETES OF THEWEEK

Feb. 17-23 Sydney Brown, Westmont basketball

The freshman forward had 16 points and 15 rebounds against Hope International, her second double-double of the week, as the Warriors took over second place in the GSAC.

PAUL WELLMAN

F

red Warrecker looked down on Eddie Mathews Field

S.B. ATHLETIC ROUNDTABLE

TONY MASTRES

THREE GENERATIONS OF

tured in the Dec. 20, 2018, Independent) knocked off her first ultra-distance race, winning the Fourmidable 50k, so named because of four daunting climbs on the course in Auburn, Calif. Moreno was clocked in a near-record 4:12 despite wet, muddy conditions. She earned a ticket to the 2019 Trail World Championship on June 8 in Portugal. Sam Alen and Sage Kerst (featured Jan. 10), who made history for Goleta’s Ice in Paradise by qualifying for the 2019 U.S. Figure Skating Championships at Detroit, finished 10th out of 12 couples in n the intermediate pairs division.

JOHN ZANT’S GAME OF THE WEEK

Logan Hotchkiss, UCSB swimming

INDEPENDENT.COM

The senior freestyler won three individual races (1650, 500, and 200) in school-record times, as well as swimming in two UCSB relay wins at the MPSF championships.

TONY MASTRES

2/28: College Men’s Basketball: Long Beach State at UCSB The Gauchos (19-8) can reach the 20-win milestone and build momentum for a run at March Madness in their last home game of the season. They rebounded from a 0-3 patch last week with victories over Hawai‘i (79-61) and a surging Cal State Fullerton (82-67). In the latter game, a strong defensive effort stymied the Titans in the first half. Max Heidegger (19 points), Amadou Sow (16), JaQuori McLaughlin (16), and Devearl Ramsey (13) all shot 50 percent or better. “Sharing the ball is a mantra for us,” Head Coach Joe Pasternack said. Thursday’s game will mark the last home appearance for seniors Jarriesse Blackmon, Ami Lakoju, and leading scorer Ar’mond Davis, a graduate student. Davis had a doubledouble (24 points, 11 rebounds) in UCSB’s 82-71 victory at Long Beach State last month. 7pm. The Thunderdome, UCSB. $8-$29. Call 893-UCSB (8272) or visit ucsbgauchos.com.

FEBRUARY 28, 2019

THE INDEPENDENT

57


JODI HOUSE

beach

It’sTime

WALK & ROLL

Each year our kids lose another school program, teacher, or opportunity and those losses directly impact their futures. I am tired of hearing about it and want to do something.... I can’t just write a check to fix the problem, so on March 7th Thursday at the morning bell of Washington Elementary School, I am going to start running, and I am going to keep running until I can’t run anymore. It’s that simple. My goal is to be there 24 hours later to hear the morning bell again with the kids of Washington Elementary on Friday, March 8th. Who knows, maybe they will bring me water, coffee, and some food to keep me going!?

FOR BRAIN INJURY Join us for Jodi House's 5th Annual 5K and 1-miler event! Participants can choose to walk or roll a 1-mile route through Chase Palm Park, or a 5K route from Chase Palm Park to the Bird Refuge and back.

The course: the first 50 miles will be to touch every public school in the county, all 26 of them. I plan to place a bumper sticker on each Principal’s office door that says, “Run2Fund Cares”, then I - and anyone who wants to join me! - will run around the Mesa 4.8-mile loops until the next morning on Friday covering 100+/- miles in total. I would run around the track, but the school currently has no track, nor do we have a gym; we have a field, but even it needs a ton of work.

SATURDAY, APRIL 6 8:30AM-11:00AM C H A S E PA L M Z A PA R K P L A

The overall goal is to raise enough money to build a fund so that we can assist in building/ maintaining sporting facilities. Who knows, we might just make a difference!? Please make your donations on a per hour basis. For example: if you are willing to donate $10 per hour and you think I can run for 10 hours, please donate $100. If you are like me and only prefer to pay for results, just email me your hourly pledge amount. I will make sure to reach out for the proper donation shortly after I wake up from a well-deserved nap.

Corner of Cabrillo Blvd. & Garden St.

Registration opens at 8:00am Group warm-up at 8:30am Walk & Roll at 9:00am

Thank you for believing in me and thank you for believing in our kids!

-Matt Genovese

Learn more and donate at:

Register online at www.jodihouse.org or by calling 805.563.2882

run2fundsb.com

Register by March 31st to include a t-shirt in your registration.

t

ependen d n I e h T g, This Sprin s first-ever it will host

v

d r a y k c a B unch Br April 6, 2019 12:30pm-3pm

Enjoy BRUNCH

FOOD and

DRINKS FROM A VARIETY OF S A N TA B A R B A R A

HOTSPOTS

Snacks & Coffee Health & Resource Fair Music & Lawn Games & Raffle

Doors open at 11:30 for V.I.B.s (very important brunchers)

S.B. Museum of Natural Histor y All profits benefitting

Santa Barbara Gives!

DISASTER PREP GUIDE guía de preparación para desastres NATURALES

march 7/7 de Marzo en Inglés Y Español PRODUCED IN PARTNERSHIP WITH THE SANTA BARBARA FOUNDATION

What you’ll find inside

• How to fortify your home • • How to speak to kids about difficult subjects •

• Info on shelters, pets, and volunteer opportunities • • Maps & personalized fill-in-the-blank sections • • How to create an emergency kit and “Go Bag” • THIS INFORMATIVE GUIDE WILL BE INDISPENSABLE IN ANY DISASTER AND RELEVANT FOR YEARS TO COME. Unlike a cell phone or laptop, it won’t run out of batteries when the power goes out, and it doesn’t need Wi-Fi to operate.

Tickets Available

INDEPENDENT.COM/BRUNCH To advertise in this important issue, contact your advertising representative

805.965.5205 • sales@independent.com

58

THE INDEPENDENT

FEBRUARY 28, 2019

INDEPENDENT.COM


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY by Rob Breszny

WEEK OF FEBRUARY 28

ARIES

CANCER

LIBRA

(Mar. 21-Apr. 19): South Koreans work too hard. Many

(June 21-July 22): Scientist Michael Dillon was shocked

(Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Charles Grey was the second Earl of

are on the job for 14 hours a day, six days a week. That’s why a new concept in vacations has emerged there. People take sabbaticals by checking into Prison Inside Me, a facility designed like a jail. For a while, they do without cell phones and Internet and important appointments. Freed of normal stresses and stripped of obsessive concerns, they turn inward and recharge their spiritual batteries. I’d love to see you treat yourself to a getaway like this—minus the incarceration theme, of course. You’d benefit from a quiet, spacious, lowpressure escape.

when he learned that some bees can buzz around at lofty altitudes where the oxygen is sparse. He and a colleague even found two of them at 29,525 feet—higher than Mt. Everest. How could the bees fly in such thin air? They “didn’t beat their wings faster,” according to a report in National Geographic, but rather “swung their wings through a wider arc.” I propose that we regard these high-flying marvels as your soul animals for the coming weeks. Metaphorically speaking, you will have the power and ingenuity and adaptability to go higher than you’ve been in a long time.

TAURUS

LEO

(Apr. 20-May 20): The astrology column you’re reading

(July 23-Aug. 22): Do you find it a challenge to commit

is published in periodicals in four countries: the U.S., Canada, Italy, and France. In all of these places, women have had a hard time acquiring political power. Neither the U.S. nor Italy has ever had a female head of government. France has had one, Édith Cresson, who served less than a year as Prime Minister. Canada has had one, Kim Campbell, who was in office for 132 days. That’s the bad news. The good news is that the coming months will be a more favorable time than usual to boost feminine authority and enhance women’s ability to shape our shared reality. And you Tauruses of all genders will be in prime position to foster that outcome. Homework: Meditate on specific ways you could contribute, even if just through your personal interactions.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): A 19-year-old guy named Anson Lem-

mer started a job as a pizza delivery man in Glenwood, Colorado. On his second night, he arrived with a hot pizza at a house where an emergency was in progress. A man was lying on the ground in distress. Having been trained in CPR, Lemmer leaped to his rescue and saved his life. I expect that you, too, will perform a heroic act sometime soon, Gemini—maybe not as monumental as Lemmer’s, but nonetheless impressive. And I bet it will have an enduring impact, sending out reverberations that redound to your benefit for quite some time.

Grey, as well as Prime Minister of England from 1830 to 1834. His time in office produced pivotal changes, including the abolition of slavery, reform of child labor laws, and more democracy in the nation’s electoral process. But most people today know nothing of those triumphs. Rather he is immortalized for the Earl Grey tea that he made popular. I suspect that in the coming weeks, one of your fine efforts may also get less attention than a more modest success. But don’t worry about it. Instead, be content with congratulating yourself for your excellent work. I think that’s the key to you ultimately getting proper appreciation for your bigger accomplishment.

SCORPIO to an entirely plant-based diet? If so, you might appreciate flexitarianism, HOMEWORK:Write a short essay (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): At a young age, which is a less-perfectionist approach budding Scorpio poet Sylvia Plath on “How I Created Something Out of that focuses on eating vegetables but came to a tough realization: “I can RealAstrology.com Nothing.” Go to doesn’t make you feel guilty if you eat never read all the books I want,” and click on “Email Rob.” a bit of meat now and then. In general, she wrote in her journal. “I can I recommend you experiment with a never be all the people I want and similar attitude toward pretty much live all the lives I want. I can never train myself in all everything in the coming weeks. Be strong-minded, the skills I want. And why do I want? I want to live idealistic, willful, and intent on serving your well- and feel all the shades, tones, and variations of mental being—but without being a maniacal purist. and physical experience possible in life.” Judging by current astrological omens, I can imagine you saying VIRGO something like that right now. I bet your longing for (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): If you gorge on sugary treats and total immersion in life’s pleasures is especially intense soft drinks, you ingest a lot of empty calories. They and a bit frustrated. But I’m pleased to predict that in have a low nutrient density and provide you with a the next four weeks, you’ll be able to live and feel more scant amount of minerals, vitamins, protein, and other shades, tones, and variations of experience than you necessities. Since I am committed to helping you treat have in a long time. yourself with utmost respect, I always discourage you from that behavior. But I’m especially hopeful you will SAGITTARIUS avoid it during the next three weeks, both in the literal (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): When Europeans invaded and occuand metaphorical senses. Please refrain from absorb- pied North America, they displaced many indigenous ing barren, vacant stuff into the sacred temple of your people from their ancestral lands. There were a few mind and body—including images, stories, sounds, notable exceptions, including five tribes in what’s now and ideas, as well as food and drink. Maine and Eastern Canada. They are known as the Wabanaki confederacy: the Passamaquoddy, Penobscot, Micmac, Maliseet, and Abenaki. Although they had to adjust to and compromise with colonialism,

they were never defeated by it. I propose we make them your heroic symbols for the coming weeks. May their resilient determination to remain connected to their roots and origins motivate you to draw ever-fresh power from your own roots and origins.

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Capricorn javelin thrower Julius Yego

won a silver medal at the 2016 Summer Olympics. How did he get so skilled? Not in the typical way. He gained preliminary proficiency while competing for his high school team, but after graduation, he was too poor to keep developing his mastery. So he turned to YouTube, where he studied videos by great javelin throwers to benefit from their training strategies and techniques. Now that you’re in an intense learning phase of your cycle, Capricorn, I suggest that you, too, be ready to draw on sources that may be unexpected or unusual or alternative.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): The first edition of Action Comics,

which launched the story of the fictional character Superman, cost 10 cents in 1938. Nowadays it’s worth $3 million. I’ll make a bold prediction that you, too, will be worth considerably more on December 31, 2019 than you are right now. The increase won’t be as dramatic as that of the Superman comic, but still: I expect a significant boost. And what you do in the next four weeks could have a lot to do with making my prediction come true.

PISCES (Feb. 19-Mar. 20): Until the 16th century in much of

Europe and the 18th century in Britain, the New Year was celebrated in March. That made sense given the fact that the weather was growing noticeably warmer and it was time to plant the crops again. In my astrological opinion, the month of March is still the best time of year for you Pisceans to observe your personal New Year. The coming weeks will be an excellent time to start fresh in any area of your life. If you formulate a set of New Year’s resolutions, you’re more likely to remain committed to them than if you had made them on January 1.

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700.

SUMMER C A MP KI DS’ 2019

SAN TA BA

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EMPLOYMENT

DEDICATION TO BEING OUR BEST.

It’s our highest priority. Setting high standards is one thing. Embracing them is another. At Cottage Health, we make it top priority to work constantly at being our best...for patients, their families, our communities and fellow team members. If you would enjoy living up to your potential at a health system that strives for – and achieves – excellence, come to Cottage.

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Cottage Business Services

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Access Case Manager Birth Center Cardiac Cath Lab Cardiac Telemetry Clinical Resource Nurse – Surgery (Weekends/Baylor) Educator, Lactation Emergency Hematology/Oncology Infection Control Practitioner Med/Surg Float Pool MICU Mother Infant NICU Nurse Practitioner – Palliative Care Operating Room Orthopedics PACU Patient Relations/ Accred Coordinator RN Peds PICU Psych Nursing Pulmonary, Renal, Infectious Disease SICU Surgical Trauma Telemetry

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• Certified Phlebotomist Technician – FT/PT

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Clinical

• Physical Therapist II

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• Cardiovascular RN • Patient Care Tech I, II • Patient Relations/Accreditation Coordinator – FT • Pharmacy Tech • Surgical ED Coordinator • Surgical Tech II • Unit Care Tech • Unit Coordinator

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• Please apply to: www.pdllabs.com

Cottage Rehabilitation Hospital • Physical Therapist – PD • Recreational Therapist – PD

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We offer an excellent compensation package that includes above-market salaries, premium medical benefits, pension plans, tax savings accounts, rental and mortgage assistance, and relocation packages. What’s holding you back? Candidates may also submit a resume to: Cottage Health, Human Resources, P.O. Box 689, Pueblo at Bath Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93102-0689

For volunteer opportunities at Cottage Health, visit: www.cottagehealth.org/volunteer 60

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FEBRUARY 28, 2019

EMPLOYMENT

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GRAPHIC DESIGNER The Santa Barbara Independent is seeking a part-time in-house graphic designer. Candidate must have knowledge of Adobe Creative Suite on a Mac platform. Candidate will preferably have experience in font management and familiar with print publishing and file handling. The candidate will possess strong and professional communication skills, and be able to work well under pressure. This position works alongside multiple departments and under strict deadlines. Please send resumes and online portfolio links to hr@independent.com. No phone calls. EOE F/M/D/V

Please email resume and/or questions to

hr@independent.com

Advertising Sales Representative The Santa Barbara Independent has a rare opportunity in our Advertising Sales division. We are in search of an ideal candidate to join our well-established team of sales professionals. This full-time position requires: ability to sell multimedia products -- print, online, and other developing industry offerings; excellent organizational and time-management skills to meet deadlines crucial to our production process; superb verbal and written communication skills; the ability to build strong client relationships via collaborative selling and excellent customer service; as well as the charisma to be a strong ambassador of The Independent in our community. With a 30-year history of serving Santa Barbara, our awardwinning products are an integral part of our community and are well-respected on a national level. We offer a competitive commission structure along with a strong benefits package, including health and dental insurance, Section 125 cafeteria plan, 401(k), and vacation program.

Please apply online at jobs.cottagehealth.org.

Please reference “SBI” when applying. EOE

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PROFESSIONAL

COMMUNICATIONS/ DEVELOPMENT ASSOCIATE

COLLEGE OF CREATIVE STUDIES Integral part of a small and dedicated team, providing essential analytical and administrative support to the CCS Dean, Associate Deans, and Assistant Dean as well as to the Director of Development in order to ensure the effective and accurate dissemination of information about the College and a successful fundraising operation. Conceptualizes, plans and implements the College’s publicity and commu‑ nications, including writing articles and press releases, and creating digi‑ tal, printed, and social media com‑ munications. Provides administrative, financial, and analytical support to the Director of Development, including managing, researching and steward‑ ing a dynamic portfolio of donors and prospective donors. With the support of technical resources, main‑ tains departmental website, includ‑ ing restructuring and redesigning as necessary. Ensures that all activities and processes are conducted in com‑ pliance with University and College policies, procedures, and audit requirements. Reqs: Strong organiza‑ tion skills with ability to maintain a high level of accuracy. Ability to work under pressure of strict dead‑ lines while using independent judge‑ ment. Demonstrated professional‑ ism, initiative, and analytical skills. Ability to prioritize workload within deadlines. Works well independently and as a part of a team. Detail ori‑ ented and ability to bring projects to completion. Ability to transition between administrative type of work to creative type of work. Knowledge of computer systems, and graphic design and video editing software. Notes: Fingerprint background check required. May be called upon to work occasional evenings and weekends at various College events. $23.95‑26.00/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employ‑ ment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gen‑ der identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For primary consideration apply online by 3/10/19, thereafter open until filled. Apply online at https:// jobs.ucsb.edu Job #20190107

DIRECTOR OF RESIDENTIAL DINING SERVICES

RESIDENTIAL & DINING CENTRAL FOOD SERVICE Serves as a member of the Senior Management Team in Campus Dining. Functional responsibility for the administration and management of the Residential dining operations component for HDAE. Includes policy management, budget development, culinary innovation, resource coor‑

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dination, personnel administration, customer service, and facilities man‑ agement for four dining facilities. Responsible for a $28 million oper‑ ating budget as well as the overall supervision of 260 FTE which includes 202 regular employees and more than 600 student employees. During the academic year, the Director oversees a dining staff that is responsible for the daily feeding of 5,800 residents. Works closely with the Director of Retail & Business Management to pro‑ vide for the complete food needs of the entire campus. Reqs: Bachelors/ Culinary degree or equivalent combi‑ nation of education and experience. Ten years leadership/ progressive management experience, preferably in food service industry or univer‑ sity auxiliary service unit. Advanced knowledge in food service operations and sanitation regulations, ideally in high volume year‑round university, multi‑unit dining or events services operations. Effective interpersonal and work leadership and management skills with strong track record hir‑ ing, developing and mentoring staff. Advanced verbal and written com‑ munication skills, including active lis‑ tening, dynamic flexibility, and critical thinking skills. Ability to make sound decisions, develop original ideas, and to multi‑task, ensuring effective time management. Must be proficient with desktop and mobile productivity tools. Financial analysis and strategic planning experience in Food Services including developing new culinary concepts, and implementing cost control efficiencies and budgets for multiple locations. Notes: Fingerprint background check required. Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record and enrollment in the DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program. $76,100‑$125,500/yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive con‑ sideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, pro‑ tected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For primary consideration apply online by 3/12/19, thereafter open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #20190097

FINANCIAL ANALYST

ARTS & LECTURES Responsible for complex analy‑ sis, processing, documentation, reconciliation, quality control and archiving of all payroll, purchasing, travel, TOFs, TOEs, deposits, UDEVS, invoicing, sponsorship, venue settle‑ ments, chargebacks, and dona‑ tions. Responsible for maintenance and system improvements in GUS, the department’s financial manage‑ ment system, utilizing a complex structure and coding system for all budgets, revenues and expenses in dual reporting methods. Includes bud‑ geting and management of over 40 account‑funds, over 400 active proj‑ ects and cost types annually, and mul‑ tiple complex revenue accounts with high volume transactions. Interfaces professionally with a broad range of artists, staff, faculty, students, per‑ formers, and others on behalf of the Department. Reqs: Three years experience in an advanced clerical or paraprofessional capacity in finan‑ cial, operational, and administrative work. Demonstrated ability to effec‑ tively present information verbally and in writing clearly and concisely. Ability to quickly assess and annotate financial data. Ability to adjust pri‑ orities adeptly, while balancing a high volume workload. Excellent service orientation; must be proactive, flex‑ ible, and diligent in work approach. Notes: Fingerprint background check required. Occasional evenings or weekend work may be required. Will be responsible for daily/weekly runs to various UCSB campus departments. Work location for this position is cur‑ rently off campus at 110 Castilian Dr. in Goleta. Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record and enrollment in the DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program. $22.50‑$25.00/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employ‑ ment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gen‑ der identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For primary consideration apply by 3/4/19, thereafter open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #20190090

EVENT COORDINATOR

OFFICE OF EVENT MANAGEMENT & PROTOCOL Provides event coordination, over‑ sight and production management for certain UCSB events as assigned. Provides analytical and administrative support for special projects assisting the Director, Event Management & Protocol. Covers other staff assign‑ ments related to campus events. Provides and tracks budget data for programs and activities being coordi‑ nated. Reqs: BA/BS and two years of experience planning and coordinating large events, or AA and five years of experience planning and coordinating large events, or equivalent combina‑ tion of years of experience. Clear writ‑ ten and verbal communication skills, knowledge of public address systems, experience using PowerPoint and Microsoft Office Suite applications. Notes: Fingerprint background check. Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record and enrollment in the DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program. Must be able to work some evening and weekends. This is a 50% time per year career position. $23.47‑$29.41/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive con‑ sideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, pro‑ tected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For primary consideration apply by 3/10/19, thereafter open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #20190106

UCPATH ACADEMIC PERSONNEL MANAGER

OFFICE OF ACADEMIC PERSONNEL Provides leadership, management and supervision of the UCPath Unit in the Academic Personnel office. Oversees professional staff who research, ana‑ lyze and advise regarding position administration, leave administration, academic compensation, and all other aspects of academic employment managed through UCPath. Maintains a broad and functional understating of academic personnel policies and procedures and Peoplesoft/ UCPath functionality to provide oversight and training for the campus. Reqs: Ability to analyze complex situations and provide appropriate solutions. Ability to prioritize and work under dead‑ lines. Demonstrated strong oral and written communication skills. Skill in leading and working as a member of a team. Ability to interact effec‑ tively and professionally with a wide range of members of the campus and UC‑wide community. Requires a high level of initiative, problem solving ability, independence and judgment, a strong professional ori‑ entation, and the capacity to organize and handle a wide range of respon‑ sibilities accurately and consistently. Ability to interpret, apply, and explain a wide range of policy, procedure and regulations. Must be detail ori‑ ented with a high degree of accu‑ racy. Note: Fingerprint background check required. $64,500‑ $82,225/ yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action

Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employ‑ ment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gen‑ der identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For primary consideration apply online by 3/11/19, thereafter open until filled. Apply online at https:// jobs.ucsb.edu Job #20190105

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E M A I L S A L E S @ I N D E P E N D E N T. C O M

LEGALS LEGAL NOTICES ADMINISTER OF ESTATE NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: RUTH P. BERNHARDT aka RUTH BERNHARDT Case No.: 19PR00051 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of RUTH P. BERNHARDT aka RUTH BERNHARDT A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by: PETER BERNHARDT in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara THE PETITION for probate requests that: PETER BERNHARDT be appoint‑ ed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the dece‑ dent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. THE PETITION requests author‑ ity to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the per‑ sonal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or con‑ sented to the proposed action.) The Independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the peti‑ tion and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held in this court as follows: 03/21/2019 AT 9:00 a.m. Dept: 5 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, 1100 Anacapa Street, P.O Box 21107 Santa Barbara, CA 93102 Anacapa Division. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contin‑

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gent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal represen‑ tative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal represen‑ tative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or per‑ sonal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: Steven F. Barnes; CA Bar #101561 (805) 687‑6660 Barnes & Barnes, 1900 State Street, Suite M, Santa Barbara, CA 93101, Published Feb 28. Mar 7, 14, 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: VANLIFE TRADER, VANLIFETRADER, VANLIFETRADER.COM at 1128 1/2 Castillo St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Vanlifetrader LLC (same address) This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 29, 2019. This state‑ ment expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2019‑0000244. Published: Feb 7, 14, 21, 28 2019.

FBN ABANDONMENT

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SWEET CREAMS at 651 Paseo Nuevo #607 Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Tayfun Erhan 4133 San Martin Way Unit A Santa Barbara, CA 93110 This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 24, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Connie Tran. FBN Number: 2019‑0000201. Published: Feb 7, 14, 21, 28 2019.

STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF USE OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME The following Fictitious Business Name is being abandoned: FOOTHILL PET HOSPITAL at 675 Cieneguitas Road Santa Barbara, CA 93110; The original statement for use of this Fictitious Business Name was filed 08/30/2017 in the County of Santa Barbara. Original file no. 2017‑0002453. The person (s) or entities abandoning use of this name are as follows: Michael Dean Rittenberg DVM 1894 W Chapel Drive Camarillo, CA 93010 This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 25, 2019. I hereby certify that this is a correct copy of the original state‑ ment on file in my office, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy, Published: Feb 28. Mar 7, 14, 21 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SOMATIC SKILLS COACHING at 933 Castillo St. #3, Santa Barbara CA 93101; Anna Reidenbach 309 E Micheltorena St. Apt G, Santa Barbara, CA 93101 This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Anna Reidenbach Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 25, 2019. This state‑ ment expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Margarita Silva. FBN Number: 2019‑0000212. Published: Feb 21, 28. Mar 7, 14 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: HANNAH CHILDS LIFESTYLE at 1715 Pampas Ave Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Hannah Childs LLC (same address) This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 4, 2019. This state‑ ment expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Margarita Silva. FBN Number: 2019‑0000290. Published: Feb 7, 14, 21, 28 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: VALLEY DOG TRAINING at 430 La Lata Pl Buellton, CA 93427; Sarah Houchens (same address) This busi‑ ness is conducted by a Individual Signed: Sarah Houchens Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 10, 2019. This state‑ ment expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Connie Tran. FBN Number: 2019‑0000083. Published: Feb 7, 14, 21, 28 2019.

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FEBRUARY 28, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: SUN BARBARA FUN at 651 Paseo Nuevo #315 Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Tayfun Erhan 4133 San Martin Way Unit A Santa Barbara, CA 93110 This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 24, 2019. This state‑ ment expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Connie Tran. FBN Number: 2019‑0000202. Published: Feb 7, 14, 21, 28 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: C.E. WILLIAMS & ASSOCIATES at 5290 Overpass Road, Suite 132 Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Carl E Williams 1206 Portesuello Avenue Santa Barbara, CA 93105 (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 30, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Adela Bustos. FBN Number: 2019‑0000254. Published: Feb 7, 14, 21, 28 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: RANCH READY at 1670 1st Ct. Solvang, CA 93463; Lilinoe Gale 8 Hollister Ranch Gaviota, CA 93117 This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 31, 2019. This state‑ ment expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Brenda Aguilera. FBN Number: 2019‑0000265. Published: Feb 7, 14, 21, 28 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: OPPI’S, OPPISBISTRO, THE LATTERIA at 1026 State Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101; The Latteria 325 K Street Apt 89 Davis, CA 95616 This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 22, 2019. This state‑ ment expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Brenda Aguilera. FBN Number: 2019‑0000163. Published: Feb 7, 14, 21, 28 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: CLEARLY SUPERIOR WASHING at 1432 San Pascual St #48 Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Jose Antonio Segundo‑Gil (same address) This business is con‑ ducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 1, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Brenda Aguilera. FBN Number: 2019‑0000270. Published: Feb 7, 14, 21, 28 2019.

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: TREASURED MIRACLES PHOTOGRAPHY at 1325 1/2 Panchita Place Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Anita Schade (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Anita Schade Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 4, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Margarita Silva. FBN Number: 2019‑0000287. Published: Feb 7, 14, 21, 28 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SOULJAH FITNESS at 792 Hot Springs Rd Montecito, CA 93108; Austin Oreilly Nealon (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Austin Nealon Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 31, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Sandra E. Rodriguez. FBN Number: 2019‑0000266. Published: Feb 7, 14, 21, 28 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: CURVES SANTA BARBARA at 185 S Patterson Avenue Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Hippogriff LLC (same address) This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 1, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2019‑0000274. Published: Feb 7, 14, 21, 28 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SKILLS DEVELOPMENT at 7320 Freeman Place Goleta, CA 93117; Randy John Wilson (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Randy J. Wilson Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 25, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Christie Potter. FBN Number: 2019‑0000211. Published: Feb 7, 14, 21, 28 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: A & I TRIMM at 485 Kellogg Way Goleta, CA 93117; Arlene Alicia Lopez 124 Sumida Gardens Ln #104 Santa Barbara, CA 93111 This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 22, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Sandra E. Rodriguez. FBN Number: 2019‑0000169. Published: Feb 7, 14, 21, 28 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: ROSEWOOD MIRAMAR BEACH MONTECITO at 1555 South Jameson Lane Montecito, CA 93108; Miramar Acquisition Co. LLC 101 The Grove Drive Los Angeles, CA 90036 This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company Signed: John Han, Director of Finance Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 5, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jan Morales. FBN Number: 2019‑0000312. Published: Feb 14, 21, 28. Mar 7 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: EMC at 401 N Milpas St #C Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Engaging In Molding Choices, Inc (same address) This business is con‑ ducted by a Corporation Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 5, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Brenda Aguilera. FBN Number: 2019‑0000299. Published: Feb 14, 21, 28. Mar 7 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: CHANNEL VIEW APARTMENTS, THE BONSAI at 515 Red Rose Lane #18 Santa Barbara, CA 93109; Mark Abate 480 Glen Annie Road Goleta, CA 93117; John Whitehurst 515 Red Rose Lane #18 Santa Barbara, CA 93109 This business is conducted by a General Partnership Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 5, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Tara Jayasinghe. FBN Number: 2019‑0000309. Published: Feb 14, 21, 28. Mar 7 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: BASKING IN GOODNESS at 27 West Anapamu St Suite 303 Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Emma Malina 2545 Medcliff Rd Santa Barbara, CA 93109 This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 5, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Brenda Aguliera. FBN Number: 2019‑0000300. Published: Feb 14, 21, 28. Mar 7 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: THE FRANKLIN LAW OFFICE at 252 Ancona Ave. Goleta, CA 93117; Lisa Franklin (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Lisa Franklin Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 1, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2019‑0000275. Published: Feb 21, 28. Mar 7, 14 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: VIRTUAL BUSINESS VIEWS at 1117 State Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101; John Michael Orrico 226 E. Sola Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101 This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: John Orrico Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 1, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Sandra E. Rodriguez. FBN Number: 2019‑0000273. Published: Feb 21, 28. Mar 7, 14 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: INDIGO JUNE at 5817 Encina Road Apt 102 Goleta, CA 93117; Shauna Seale (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Shauna Shea Seale Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 24, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Connie Tran. FBN Number: 2019‑0000197. Published: Feb 21, 28. Mar 7, 14 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: INFINITIQUES at 1219 De La Vina Street, Apt 2 Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Timothy Lance Borkowski (same address) Xiaomeng Zhang (same address) This business is conducted by a Married Couple Signed: Timothy L. Borkowski Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 8, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Adela Bustos. FBN Number: 2019‑0000341. Published: Feb 14, 21, 28. Mar 7 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: THE PROJECT: CORAZON COCINA & TAPROOM at 214 State Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Cerveceria + Taco Project, LLC 49 Via Alicia Santa Barbara, CA 93108 This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 29, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2019‑0000240. Published: Feb 21, 28. Mar 7, 14 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: FIG MOUNTAIN FOOD FACTORY, PIZZA MIZZA, PIZZA MIZZA DELIVERY at 1114 State Street #20 Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Delivery SB LLC (same address) This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 11, 2019. This state‑ ment expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Adela Bustos. FBN Number: 2019‑0000350. Published: Feb 21, 28. Mar 7, 14 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SEE INTERNATIONAL at 175 Cremona Drive, Suite 100 Santa Barbara, CA 93117; Surgical Eye Expeditions International, Inc. (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: Mayra Garcia Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 4, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2019‑0000282. Published: Feb 14, 21, 28. Mar 7 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: GONZALES GARDEN SERVICES at 4002 Via Lucero #10 Santa Barbara, CA 93110; Edgardo Gonzalez (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Edgardo Gonzalez Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 13, 2019. This state‑ ment expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Brenda Aguilera. FBN Number: 2019‑0000374. Published: Feb 21, 28. Mar 7, 14 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: FUNKIDSSB at 516 E. Victoria St. Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Tracy Jackson (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 24, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Connie Tran. FBN Number: 2019‑0000195. Published: Feb 21, 28. Mar 7, 14 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: FIREWISE, KITTS MCCABE at 625 West Ortega St Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Firewise Solutions LLC (same address) This business is con‑ ducted by a Limited Liability Company Signed: Christopher McCabe, President Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 5, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Tara Jayasinghe. FBN Number: 2019‑0000307. Published: Feb 14, 21, 28. Mar 7 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: BACKYARD BOWLS at 331 Motor Way, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; PHDG, LLC (Same Address) This business is con‑ ducted by a Limited Liability Company Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 14, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2019‑0000388. Published: Feb 21, 28. Mar 7, 14 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: ROMEO REAL ESTATE INC. at 431 Corona Del Mar Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Romeo Real Estate Inc. 1650 Veteran Ave. #307 Los Angeles, CA 90024 This business is con‑ ducted by a Corporation Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 28, 2019. This state‑ ment expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2019‑0000226. Published: Feb 14, 21, 28. Mar 7 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: THE LOFT SALON at 446 Alisal Rd. Suite #19 Solvang, CA 93463; Kristy Jensen 3011 Country Rd. Santa Ynez, CA 93460 This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 11, 2019. This state‑ ment expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Connie Tran. FBN Number: 2019‑0000349. Published: Feb 21, 28. Mar 7, 14 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: RH MANAGEMENT INC. at 431 Corona Del Mar Santa Barbara, CA 93103; RH Management 1650 Veteran Ave. #307 Los angeles, CA 90024 This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 28, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2019‑0000227. Published: Feb 14, 21, 28. Mar 7 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: JEFF CARROLL PLUMBING at 375 Pine Ave #4, Goleta, CA 93117; Jeffrey David Carroll 596 San Marino Dr., Santa Barbara, CA 93111 This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Jeffrey Carroll Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 15, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Sandra E. Rodriguez. FBN Number: 2019‑0000393. Published: Feb 21, 28. Mar 7, 14 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: FITZ’S CATERING at 1015 Laguna Street #6 Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Fitz’s Catering, Inc. (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: Mareike Schmidt‑Agent Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 7, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Brenda Aguilera. FBN Number: 2019‑0000323. Published: Feb 14, 21, 28. Mar 7 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: LIFESTYLE DESIGN, LIFESTYLEDESIGN at 216 E. Cota St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Global Lifestyle Design, Inc. (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 25, 2019. This state‑ ment expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Sandra E. Rodriguez. FBN Number: 2019‑0000466. Published: Feb 28. Mar 7, 14, 21 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: FAIRY & FROG at 1607 Mission Dr Suites 109/110 Solvang, CA 93463; Nancy Schulte 6154 Caleta Ave Goleta, CA 93117 This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Jeffrey Carroll Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 19, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Sandra E. Rodriguez. FBN Number: 2019‑0000406. Published: Feb 28. Mar 7, 14, 21 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: STUDIO 920 at 1606 Grand Ave Apt E Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Rafael Parmegiani Coelho (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 8, 2019. This state‑ ment expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Brenda Aguilera. FBN Number: 2019‑0000344. Published: Feb 28. Mar 7, 14, 21 2019.


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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: INTERACT THEATRE SCHOOL at 535 La Marina Santa Barbara, CA 93109; Eirene Maya Smith (same address) Monty D Smith (same address) Natalia Emily Smith (same address) This business is conducted by a General Partnership Signed: Eirene Maya Smith Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 20, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Brenda Aguilera. FBN Number: 2019‑0000420. Published: Feb 28. Mar 7, 14, 21 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: MONTECITO OPTOMETRY at 1147 Coast Village Road Santa Barbara, CA 93108; Strickland Optometry (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: Gary Strickland, President Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 14, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2019‑0000383. Published: Feb 28. Mar 7, 14, 21 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: TYPE RAMP at 133 East De La Guerra #298 Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Samuel Gates 930 Carpinteria Street Santa Barbara, CA 93103 This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 20, 2019. This state‑ ment expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Brenda Aguilera. FBN Number: 2019‑0000414. Published: Feb 28. Mar 7, 14, 21 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: PUEBLO REALTY GROUP, PUEBLO REALTY GROUP REFERRALS at 144 E. Carrillo St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Elizabeth Briggs 1826 Overlook Lane Santa Barbara, CA 93103 This busi‑ ness is conducted by a Individual Signed: Elizabeth Briggs Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 21, 2019. This state‑ ment expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2019‑0000434. Published: Feb 28. Mar 7, 14, 21 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: GOLETA CONCRETE PUMPING at 222 W. Haley St Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Sergio Corona Borrayo (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 4, 2019. This state‑ ment expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Margarita Silva. FBN Number: 2019‑0000292. Published: Feb 28. Mar 7, 14, 21 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SUPPORTTK at 726 East Cota St Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Supporttk LLC (same address) This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company Signed: Natascha Cohen Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 1, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Tara Jayasinghe. FBN Number: 2019‑0000271. Published: Feb 28. Mar 7, 14, 21 2019.

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: MOKE SB BY WHEEL FUN RENTALS at 24 E Mason St Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Wheel Fun Rentals (same address) This busi‑ ness is conducted by a Corporation Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 15, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2019‑0000391. Published: Feb 28. Mar 7, 14, 21 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: BIKE RENTAL BY WHEEL FUN RENTALS at 24 E Mason St Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Wheel Fun Rentals (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 15, 2019. This state‑ ment expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2019‑0000392. Published: Feb 28. Mar 7, 14, 21 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: WILD BELONGING at 2429 Bath Street Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Alexis Slutzky 2429 Bath St Unit A Santa Barbara, CA 93105 This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 29, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2019‑0000239. Published: Feb 28. Mar 7, 14, 21 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: HOG WASH WELDING at 86 Six Flags Circle Buellton, CA 93427; April Trieger (same address) Trevor Trieger (same address) This business is conducted by a Married Couple Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 4, 2019. This state‑ ment expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Sandra E. Rodriguez. FBN Number: 2019‑0000295. Published: Feb 28. Mar 7, 14, 21 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: PERCH CO WORKING, THE PERCH, PERCH GOLETA, PERCH SB at 250 Storke Road Suite 10 Goleta, CA 93117; Alexander R. Markovich 2833 Spring Meadow Drive Corona, CA 92881 This business is con‑ ducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 14, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Brenda Aguilera. FBN Number: 2019‑0000384. Published: Feb 28. Mar 7, 14, 21 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SCOR PRODUCTIONS at 16030 Tupper Street North Hills, CA 91343; Ice Productions, Inc. (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: Randolph G. I CE Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 30, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Connie Tran. FBN Number: 2019‑0000258. Published: Feb 28. Mar 7, 14, 21 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: HAVEN PROPERTY MANAGEMENT at 964 W Campus Ln. Goleta, CA 93117; Eric L. Dahl (same address) This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company Signed: Eric L. Dahl Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 21, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2019‑0000435. Published: Feb 28. Mar 7, 14, 21 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: JOHN L’S PRODUCTIONS at 4144 Vista Clara Rd Santa Barbara, CA 93110; John Lewellen Pitcher (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 21, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Tara Jayasinghe. FBN Number: 2019‑0000430. Published: Feb 28. Mar 7, 14, 21 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: ONE CARAT MANI & PEDI at 8 W Figueroa Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Takako Sato 6623 Calle Koral Goleta, CA 93117 This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 29, 2019. This state‑ ment expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Brenda Aguilera. FBN Number: 2019‑0000242. Published: Feb 28. Mar 7, 14, 21 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: CAMINS 2 DREAMS at 313 N F St. Lompoc, CA 93436; Kalawashq’ Wine Cellars, Inc. (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: Randolph G. I CE Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 21, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2019‑0000425. Published: Feb 28. Mar 7, 14, 21 2019.

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E M A I L S A L E S @ I N D E P E N D E N T. C O M

Tide Guide Day

High

Low

High

5:20 am 4.9

12:48 pm 0.0

7:40 pm 3.6

Fri 1

12:13 am 2.5

Sat 2 Sun 3 Mon 4

Sunrise 6:25 Sunset 5:56

Low

High

6:14 am 5.0

1:30 pm -0.2

8:13 pm 3.7

12:59 am 2.3

6:58 am 5.2

2:05 pm -0.3

8:39 pm 3.9

1:36 am 2.1

7:36 am 5.3

2:35 pm -0.3

9:01 pm 4.0

2:07 am 1.8

8:09 am 5.4

3:01 pm -0.3

9:22 pm 4.1

Tue 5

2:37 am 1.6

8:41 am 5.4

3:26 pm -0.2

9:43 pm 4.2

Wed 6

3:08 am 1.4

9:12 am 5.3

3:50 pm -0.1

10:05 pm 4.3

Thu 7

3:40 am 1.3

9:43 am 5.1

4:14 pm 0.1

10:29 pm 4.4

Thu 28

6

14

20 D

27 H

crosswordpuzzle

“”-Matt Jo

s tt Jone By Ma

Across

“Birthday Holiday”

Down ©2018

35 Best-case 36 Soup du ___ 37 Up to this point 1 Palestinian president 38 Opens a bottle 6 Indira Gandhi’s son 39 Okra portion 11 Actor Shepard of “Idiocracy” 42 Crème de ___ (strawberry 14 Ben Stiller’s mom Anne liqueur) 15 Edit out 43 Tanner of ‘70s-’80s tennis 16 Brand of pads 44 Garfield’s girlfriend 17 Scottish singer born 45 Got overexcited over niche pop 12/25/1954 culture, with “out” 19 Pince-___ glasses 47 Hockey pucks, e.g. 1 Dresden Dolls lead vocalist 20 Do, for instance 49 Gargantuan Palmer 21 Island instrument 51 Strong ___ ox 2 1984 marathon gold medalist 22 Porgy’s love 52 Loretta played by 56-Across Joan 24 Conversation 54 Print maker 3 Not a big chicken 26 Dish with peanut and lime 55 Id’s counterpart 4 “The Little Mermaid” heroine garnish 57 Upscale hotel amenity 5 Enclosure to an ed. 29 It’s been alternately called a 58 Circumference-to-diameter 6 Need a bath “cash point” or “bankomat” ratios 7 Obama education secretary 30 One who takes things the Duncan wrong way? 8 It’s somehow National Soup 33 “___ Lang Syne” ©2019 Jonesin’ Crosswords (editor@ Month, for short jonesincrosswords.com) For answers to 34 Not so puzzling this puzzle, call: 1-900-226-2800, 99 9 Line on a weather map 35 Cold storage? cents per minute. Must be 18+. Or to bill 10 Perturbed 36 Canadian world leader born to your credit card, call: 1-800-655-6548. 11 Longtime Dolphins coach Reference puzzle #0916 12/25/1971 12 Prop for Paul Bunyan 39 Juan ___ de León (Fountain of 13 W’s successors? Youth seeker) LAST WEEK’S SOLUTION: 18 Bela of monster roles 40 Did penance 23 Completely fake 41 Put ___ signal 42 Citrus soft drink introduced in 25 Speak before a crowd 26 2000 Alejandro Iñárritu drama the 1960s “Amores ___” 43 Scott Joplin song 27 Baseballer Felipe, Matty, or 46 Hang on the line Jesus 48 “An Inconvenient Truth” 28 Promising words presenter 31 Where 100 is 4 50 Princess who became a 32 Midler of “Beaches” general 34 Word before artist, clause, 51 High point or room 53 Tahiti, e.g.

Across

54 Stationery store purchase 56 American actress born 12/25/1949 59 “Many years ___ ...” 60 “Washington Journal” network 61 “___ ear and out the other” 62 Blow away 63 Actor ___ William Scott 64 Knight’s mount

Down

INDEPENDENT.COM

FEBRUARY 28, 2019

THE INDEPENDENT

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INDEPENDENT CLASSIFIEDS

LEGALS

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: FOOTHILL PET HOSPITAL at 675 Cieneguitas Road Santa Barbara, CA 93110; Santa Barbara Animal Integrative Medicine, Inc. (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 25, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2019‑0000462. Published: Feb 28. Mar 7, 14, 21 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: MODERN EYE CARE at 3890 La Cumbre Plaza Lane Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Douglas A. Katsev 4225 Via Presada Santa Barbara, CA 93110; Nina Katsev (same address) This business is conducted by a Married Couple Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 25, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2019‑0000464. Published: Feb 28. Mar 7, 14, 21 2019.

NAME CHANGE IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF ALANA MOUSSO ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 19CV00385 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: ALANA BLYTHE MOUSSO TO: ISLA FREYA AURORA ALYSSENDRA ASTER WILDING FROM: RUBY FLORENCE MOUSSO TO: RUBY FLORENCE EMMA FREYA MOUSSO WILDING THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indi‑ cated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. NOTICE OF HEARING Apr 10, 2019 9:30am, Dept 6, Courthouse, 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101 A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the peti‑ tion. Dated Jan 29 2019 by Pauline Maxwell, Judge of the Superior Court. Published. Feb 14, 21, 28. Mar 7 2019.

STATEMENT OF DAMAGES STATEMENT OF DAMAGES (Personal Injury or Wrongful Death) JORDAN D. HANKEY (SBN 266995) Attorney for PLAINTIFF: JEFFREY HARRIS, et al. Case num‑ ber: 18CV04918. TO: DEFENDANT: ROBERT DECKER, et al. 1. General Damages a. Pain, suffer‑ ing, and inconvenience $100,000.00 b. Emotional distress $100,000.00 c. Loss of consortium $10,000.00 2. Special damages a. Medical expens‑ es (to date) $3,263.12 b. Future medical expenses (present value) $15,000.00 expenses c. Loss of earn‑ ings (to date) $250,000.00 d. Loss of future earning capacity $500,000.00 (present value) 3. Punitive damages: Plaintiff rexerves the right to seek punitive damages in the amount of (specify) $150,000.00 when pursu‑ ing a judgement in the suit filed against you. seeks damages in the above‑entitled action, as follows: The name, and address, and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney, or plain‑ tiff without an attorney, is: Jordan D. Hankey (SBN 266995) Law Office of Jordan D. Hankey 903 State Street, Suite 205 Santa Barbara, CA 93101 805‑682‑3352 Published Date: Feb 28. Mar 7, 14, 21 2019. STATEMENT OF DAMAGES (Personal Injury or Wrongful Death) JORDAN D. HANKEY (SBN

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266995) Attorney for PLAINTIFF: JEFFREY HARRIS, et al. Case num‑ ber: 18CV04918. TO: DEFENDANT: ROBERT DECKER, et al. 1. General Damages a. Pain, suffering, and inconvenience $100,000.00 b. Emotional distress $100,000.00 c. Loss of consortium $10,000.00 2. Special damages a. Medical expenses (to date) $2,500.00 b. Future medical expenses (present value) $15,000.00 expenses 3. Punitive damages: Plaintiff rexerves the right to seek punitive damages in the amount of (specify) $150,000.00 when pursuing a judgement in the suit filed against you. seeks damages in the above‑enti‑ tled action, as follows: Date: February 11, 2019. The name, and address, and telephone number of plaintiff’s attor‑ ney, or plaintiff without an attorney, is: Jordan D. Hankey (SBN 266995) Law Office of Jordan D. Hankey 903 State Street, Suite 205 Santa Barbara, CA 93101 805‑682‑3352 Published Date: Feb 28. Mar 7, 14, 21 2019.

SUMMONS SUMMONS (CITACION JUDICIAL) NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: (AVISO AL DEMANDADO): DAVID RICHARDSON and CARINA RICHARDSON and DOES 1 to 50 YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF: (LO ESTA DEMANDANDO EL DEMANDANTE): CASEY LEE JOHNSON NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this Summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self‑Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.­gov/self‑ help), your county law library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may call an attorney referral ser‑ vice. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal ser‑ vices program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www. lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self‑Help Center (www. courtinfo.ca.­gov/selfhelp), or by con‑ tacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. AVISO! Lo han demandado. Si no responde dentro de 30 días, la corte puede decidir en su contra sin escuchar su version. Lea la informa‑ cion a continuacion. Tiene 30 DIAS DE CALENDARIO después de que le entreguen esta citación y papeles legales papa pre‑ sentar una respuesta por escrito en esta corte y hacer que se entregue una copia al demandante. Una carta o una llamada telefónica no lo protegen. Su respuesta por escrito tiene que estar en formato legal correcto si desea que procesen su caso en la corte. Es posible que haya un formulario que usted pueda usar para su respuesta. Puede encontrar estos formularios de la corte y mas información en el Centro de Ayuda de las Cortes de California (www.­sucorte.ca.gov), en la biblioteca de leyes de su condado o en la corte que le quede mas cerca. Si no puede pagar la cuota de presentación, pida al secretario de la corte que le de un formulario de exención de pago de cuotas. Si no presenta su respuesta a tiempo, puede perder el caso por

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incumplimiento y la corte le podrá quitar su sueldo, dinero y bienes sin mas advertencia. Hay otros requisitos legales. Es reco‑ mendable que llame a un abogado inmediatamente. Si no conoce a un abogado, puede llamar a un servi‑ cio de remisión a abogados. Si no puede pagar a un abogado, es posible que cumpla con los requisitos para obtener servicios legales gratuitos de un programa de servicios legales sin fines de lucro. Puede encontrar estos grupos sin fines de lucro en el sitio web de California Legal Services, (wwwlawhelpcalifornia.­ org), en el Centro de Ayuda de las Cortes de California, (www.sucorte.ca.­ gov) o poniéndose en contacto con la corte o el colegio de abogados locales. AVISO: Por ley, la corte tiene derecho a recla‑ mar las cuotasy los costos esentos por imponer un gravamen sobre cualquier recuperacion de $10,000 o mas de valor recibida mediante un acuerdo o una concesión de arbitraje en un caso de derecho civil. Tiene que pagar el graveman de la corte antes de que la corte pueda desechar el caso. CASE NO: (Numero del Caso) 18CV05605 The name and address of the court is: (El nombre y dirección de la corte es): SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA 312‑C East Cook Street Bldg. E, Santa Maria, CA 93456 The name, address, and telephone number of the plaintiff’s attorney, or plaintiff without an attor‑ ney, is: (El nombre, la dirección y el numero de telefono del abogado del demandante, o del demandante que no tiene abogado, es): Dustin Tardiff (Bar#281241) Tardiff Law Offices PO Box 1446, San Luis Obispo, CA 93406; Fax No. 805‑544‑4381; Phone No. (805) 544‑8100 DATE: Nov 13, 2018; 11:22am. Elizabeth Spann Deputy Clerk; Published. Feb 14, 21, 28. Mar 7 2019. SUMMONS (CITACION JUDICIAL) NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: (AVISO AL DEMANDADO): ROBERT DECKER; VICTORIA L. ARCHER; Does 1‑10 YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF: (LO ESTA DEMANDANDO EL DEMANDANTE): JEFFREY HARRIS (In Pro Per); KIMBERLY HARRIS (In Pro Per) NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this Summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self‑Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.­gov/self‑ help), your county law library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may call an attorney referral ser‑ vice. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal ser‑ vices program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www. lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self‑Help Center (www. courtinfo.ca.­gov/selfhelp), or by con‑ tacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. AVISO! Lo han demandado. Si no responde dentro de 30 días, la corte puede decidir en su contra sin escuchar su version. Lea la informa‑ cion a continuacion. Tiene 30 DIAS DE CALENDARIO después de que le entreguen esta

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citación y papeles legales papa pre‑ sentar una respuesta por escrito en esta corte y hacer que se entregue una copia al demandante. Una carta o una llamada telefónica no lo protegen. Su respuesta por escrito tiene que estar en formato legal correcto si desea que procesen su caso en la corte. Es posible que haya un formulario que usted pueda usar para su respuesta. Puede encontrar estos formularios de la corte y mas información en el Centro de Ayuda de las Cortes de California (www.­sucorte.ca.gov), en la biblioteca de leyes de su condado o en la corte que le quede mas cerca. Si no puede pagar la cuota de presentación, pida al secretario de la corte que le de un formulario de exención de pago de cuotas. Si no presenta su respuesta a tiempo, puede perder el caso por incumplimiento y la corte le podrá quitar su sueldo, dinero y bienes sin mas advertencia. Hay otros requisitos legales. Es reco‑ mendable que llame a un abogado inmediatamente. Si no conoce a un abogado, puede llamar a un servi‑ cio de remisión a abogados. Si no puede pagar a un abogado, es posible que cumpla con los requisitos para obtener servicios legales gratuitos de un programa de servicios legales sin fines de lucro. Puede encontrar estos grupos sin fines de lucro en el sitio web de California Legal Services, (wwwlawhelpcalifornia.­ org), en el Centro de Ayuda de las Cortes de

E M A I L S A L E S @ I N D E P E N D E N T. C O M

California, (www.sucorte.ca.­ gov) o poniéndose en contacto con la corte o el colegio de abogados locales. AVISO: Por ley, la corte tiene derecho a recla‑ mar las cuotasy los costos esentos por imponer un gravamen sobre cualquier recuperacion de $10,000 o mas de valor recibida mediante un acuerdo o una concesión de arbitraje en un caso de derecho civil. Tiene que pagar el graveman de la corte antes de que la corte pueda desechar el caso. CASE NO: (Numero del Caso) 18CV04918 The name and address of the court is: (El nombre y dirección de la corte es): SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT ANACAPA DIVISION, 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara CA 93101 The name, address, and telephone number of the plaintiff’s attorney, or plaintiff without an attorney, is: (El nombre, la dirección y el numero de telefono del abogado del deman‑ dante, o del demandante que no tiene abogado, es): Jeffrey Harris and Kimberly Harris; 167 Vista del Mar, Santa Barbara, CA 93109 Phone No. (805) 455‑4545 DATE: Oct 05, 2018 Sarah Sisto Deputy Clerk; Published. Feb 28. Mar 7, 14, 21 2019.

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NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING Planning Commission March 11, 2019; 6:00 p.m. Amendments to Cannabis Land Use Ordinance and General Plan/Coastal Land Use Plan NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Goleta Planning Commission will conduct a public hearing to consider resolutions recommending to the City Council adoption of amendments to the Cannabis Land Use Ordinance (Case No: 18-135-ORD) and associated amendments to the General Plan/Coastal Land Use Plan (General Plan). The date, time, and location of the public hearing are set forth below. The agenda for the hearing will also be posted on the City website (www.cityofgoleta.org). HEARING DATE AND TIME: PLACE:

Monday, March 11, 2019, at 6:00 P.M. City of Goleta, Council Chambers 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B Goleta, California 93117 PROJECT LOCATION: The amended regulations would apply citywide, including areas of the City within the Coastal Zone. PROJECT DESCRIPTION: The City has an adopted Cannabis Land Use Ordinance (Ord. No. 18-03) that allows for and regulates a range of cannabis business types and activities throughout the City. The Cannabis Land Use Ordinance currently requires all cannabis business to obtain a zoning permit of some type. With direction received during a Cannabis Land Use Ordinance Workshop held by the City Council on January 23, 2019, the Planning Commission will consider recommending to City Council several amendments to the Cannabis Land Use Ordinance with associated amendments to the City’s General Plan, including: • Eliminating zoning permit requirements for cannabis businesses in the Cannabis Land Use Ordinance and relying on the Cannabis Business License Ordinance to ensure implementation of standards and requirements. • Adopting standards for cannabis uses in close proximity to sensitive receptors. • Adopting a greater separation requirement between storefront cannabis retailers. • Adding language to the General Plan and the Cannabis Land Use Ordinance clarifying the regulatory framework for accessory uses. • Amending the General Plan and Cannabis Land Use Ordinance to allow storefront cannabis retailers in the General Industrial (I-G) land use designation but only in locations where a cannabis dispensary was located prior to June 16, 2009 (the date of the City’s former ban on cannabis businesses). • Amending the General Plan and Cannabis Land Use Ordinance to allow cannabis distribution licensing in the Industrial Business Park (I-BP) land use designation where each licensed distributor shall not exceed 30,000 square feet of floor area. • Amending the General Plan and Cannabis Land Use Ordinance to allow cannabis microbusinesses in the I-G and Service Industrial (I-S) land use designations without storefront cannabis retail (except for existing storefront cannabis retailers). Environmental Review: Pursuant to the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA,) City staff drafted an Addendum to the City’s General Plan/Coastal Land Use Plan 2006 Final Environmental Impact Report (EIR), 2009 Supplemental EIR, and subsequent addenda to analyze impacts of the amendments to the General Plan and the Cannabis Land Use Ordinance. The Addendum did not identify any new impacts not identified in the previous CEQA documents. DOCUMENT AVAILABILITY: The staff report may be obtained at the City of Goleta, 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B, Goleta, CA 93117 and on the City’s web site at www.cityofgoleta.org at least 72 hours ahead of the meeting. PUBLIC COMMENT: All interested persons are encouraged to attend the public hearing and to present written and/or oral comments. Written submittals concerning agenda items may be emailed to Wendy Winkler, Management Assistant, e-mail: wwinkler@cityofgoleta.org; or mail: Attn: Planning Commission at 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B Goleta, California 93117. To be disseminated to the Planning Commission for consideration during the meeting, written information must be submitted no later than Monday by noon prior to the Planning Commission meeting. Material received after this time may not be reviewed by the Planning Commission prior to the meeting. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION: Additional information is on file at the Planning and Environmental Review Department, Goleta City Hall, 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B, Goleta, CA 93117. Contact Anne Wells at (805) 9617557 or awells@cityofgoleta.org for more information regarding the project or visit http://www.cityofgoleta.org/ projects-programs/studies-and-other-projects/cannabis-regulations. [Para información en español, por favor llame Sr. Jaime Valdez, (805) 961-7568.] Note: In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you need special assistance to participate in this hearing, please contact the City Clerk’s Office at (805) 961-7505. Notification at least 72 hours prior to the hearing will enable City staff to make reasonable arrangements Note: If you challenge the City’s final action on this project in court, you may be limited to only those issues you or someone else raised at the public hearing described in this notice, or in written correspondence delivered to the City on or before the date of the hearing (Government Code §65009[b][2]). Publish: Santa Barbara Independent, February 28, 2019


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LEGALS

ORDINANCE NO. 19-05 ORDINANCE NO. 19-03

AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF GOLETA, CALIFORNIA AMENDING CHAPTER 6.01 (ANIMALS AND FOWL) OF TITLE VI (ANIMALS) OF THE GOLETA MUNICIPAL CODE TO ADOPT THE MOST RECENT VERSION OF THE SANTA BARBARA COUNTY ANIMALS AND FOWL CODE BY REFERENCE

AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF GOLETA, CALIFORNIA, AMENDING TITLE 2 OF THE GOLETA MUNICIPAL CODE TO ADD CHAPTER 2.14 TO ESTABLISH A LIBRARY ADVISORY COMMISSION On February 19, 2019, at Goleta City Hall, 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B, Goleta, California, the City Council of the City of Goleta adopted an ordinance that would add Chapter 2.14 of Title 2 of the Goleta Municipal Code to establish a Library Advisory Commission. The City Council of the City of Goleta passed and adopted Ordinance No. 19-03 at a regular meeting held on the 19th day of February 2019, by the following vote: AYES: MAYOR PEROTTE, MAYOR PRO COUNCILMEMBERS ACEVES, KASDIN AND KYRIACO NOES:

NONE

ABSENT:

NONE

ABSTENTIONS:

NONE

TEMPORE

RICHARDS,

On February 19, 2019, at Goleta City Hall, 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B, Goleta, California, the City Council of the City of Goleta adopted an ordinance that would adopt the most recent version of the Santa Barbara County Animals and Fowl Code by reference. The City Council of the City of Goleta passed and adopted Ordinance No. 19-05 at a regular meeting held on the 19th day of February 2019, by the following vote: AYES: MAYOR PEROTTE, MAYOR PRO COUNCILMEMBERS ACEVES, KASDIN AND KYRIACO

TEMPORE

RICHARDS,

NOES:

NONE

ABSENT:

NONE

This ordinance shall take effect on the 31st day following the date of its final adoption.

ABSTENTIONS:

NONE

Any interested person may obtain a copy of the ordinance at the City Clerk’s Office, City Hall, 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B, Goleta, California 93117 or by calling City Hall at (805) 961-7505.

This ordinance shall take effect on the 30th day following the date of its final adoption.

Deborah Lopez City Clerk

Any interested person may obtain a copy of the ordinance at the City Clerk’s Office, City Hall, 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B, Goleta, California 93117 or by calling City Hall at (805) 961-7505.

Publish:

Santa Barbara Independent, Thursday, February 28, 2019

ORDINANCE NO. 19-02 AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF GOLETA, CALIFORNIA, AMENDING CHAPTER 2.13 (ESTABLISHMENT OF MUNICIPAL LIBRARY AND LIBRARY BOARD OF TRUSTEES) OF TITLE 2 OF THE GOLETA MUNICIPAL CODE TO DESIGNATE THE GOLETA CITY COUNCIL AS LIBRARY BOARD OF TRUSTEES PURSUANT TO EDUCATION CODE SECTIONS 18910 ET SEQ.

Deborah Lopez City Clerk Publish:

Santa Barbara Independent, Thursday, February 28, 2019

ORDINANCE NO. 19-__ AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY OF GOLETA AMENDING CHAPTER 12.06 (BICYCLES, SKATEBOARDS, ETC.) OF TITLE 12 (STREETS, SIDEWALKS AND PUBLIC PLACES) OF THE GOLETA MUNICIPAL CODE TO REGULATE SKATEBOARD USE AND PUBLIC SKATEBOARD PARKS

On February 19, 2019, at Goleta City Hall, 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B, Goleta, California, the City Council of the City of Goleta adopted an ordinance that would designate the City Council of the City of Goleta as the Library Board of Trustees. The City Council of the City of Goleta passed and adopted Ordinance No. 19-02 at a regular meeting held on the 19th day of February 2019, by the following vote: AYES: MAYOR PEROTTE, MAYOR PRO TEMPORE RICHARDS, COUNCIL MEMBERS ACEVES, KASDIN AND KYRIACO NOES:

NONE

ABSENT:

NONE

ABSTENTIONS:

NONE

On March 5, 2019, at Goleta City Hall, 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B, Goleta, California, the City Council of the City of Goleta will conduct the second reading and possible adoption of a proposed ordinance that would amend Title 12 of the Goleta Municipal Code regarding skateboard parks. Any interested person may obtain a copy of the ordinance at the City Clerk’s Office, City Hall, 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B, Goleta, California 93117 or by calling City Hall at (805) 961-7505.

This ordinance shall take effect on the 31st day following the date of its final adoption. Any interested person may obtain a copy of the ordinance at the City Clerk’s Office, City Hall, 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B, Goleta, California 93117 or by calling City Hall at (805) 961-7505.

Deborah Lopez City Clerk Publish:

Santa Barbara Independent, Thursday, February 28, 2019

Deborah Lopez City Clerk Publish:

ORDINANCE NO. 19-04

Santa Barbara Independent, Thursday, February 28, 2019 NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING Design Review Board Goleta City Hall – Council Chambers 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B Goleta, CA 93117 Tuesday, March 12, 2019 at 3:00 P.M.

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Design Review Board (DRB) of the City of Goleta will conduct a public hearing on the date set forth above to consider the following new project:

AN ORDINANCE OF THE CITY COUNCIL OF THE CITY OF GOLETA, CALIFORNIA, REPEALING GOLETA MUNICIPAL CODE SECTIONS 16.12, 16.15, 16.18, 16.19, 16.20, AND 16.21 AND ORDINANCE NO. 14-10, AND AMENDING THE INLAND ZONING ORDINANCE TO ADD SECTION 35-333 AND COASTAL ZONING ORDINANCE TO ADD SECTION 35187 TO REQUIRE THE PAYMENT OF DEVELOPMENT IMPACT FEES FOR DEVELOPMENT PROJECTS WITHIN THE CITY, PURSUANT TO THE MITIGATION FEE ACT

Sign Review Dollar Tree Signage 175 N. Fairview Avenue (APN 077-170-025, 041, 042) Case No. 19-016-DRB

On February 19, 2019, at Goleta City Hall, 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B, Goleta, California, the City Council of the City of Goleta adopted an ordinance that would locate all the current DIF regulations into the City’s Zoning Ordinance and repeal the existing DIF ordinances that will be located in the new DIF Ordinance.

One Stop Shop Monument Signage 7020 Calle Real (APN 077-155-003) Case No. 18-088-DRB

The City Council of the City of Goleta passed and adopted Ordinance No. 19-04 at a regular meeting held on the 19th day of February 2019, by the following vote:

Conceptual/Design Review Kellogg Crossing Self-Storage Façade/Site Revisions 10 South Kellogg (APN 071-090-082) Case No. 19-003-DRB

AYES: MAYOR PEROTTE, MAYOR PRO COUNCILMEMBERS ACEVES, KASDIN AND KYRIACO

Cox Communications Development Revisions 22 S. Fairview Avenue (APN 071-021-001, 044) Case No. 18-093-DRB PUBLIC COMMENT: This hearing is for design review only. All interested persons are encouraged to attend the public hearing and to present written and/or oral comments. All letters should be addressed to City of Goleta, Planning and Environmental Review, 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B, Goleta, CA 93117 or email to mchang@cityofgoleta.org. Letters must be received by Planning and Environmental Review no later than 24 hours prior to the DRB meeting. Materials received after this time may not be reviewed prior to the DRB meeting. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION: The item in this notice is a new item. The DRB agenda may also include items continued from prior meetings. All persons wanting to review any project applications may do so by contacting City of Goleta, Planning and Environmental Review at (805) 961-7543. The Agenda, staff reports and project plans will be available approximately one week before the hearing on the City’s website at www.cityofgoleta.org. Publish:

Santa Barbara Independent, February 28, 2019

NOES:

NONE

ABSENT:

NONE

TEMPORE

RICHARDS,

ABSTENTIONS: NONE This ordinance shall take effect on the 60th day following the date of its final adoption. Any interested person may obtain a copy of the proposed ordinance at the City Clerk’s Office, City Hall, 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B, Goleta, California 93117 or by calling City Hall at (805) 961-7505. Deborah Lopez City Clerk Publish:

Santa Barbara Independent, Thursday, February 28, 2019

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