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FREE

Santa Barbara

FEB. 21-28, 2019 VOL. 33 ■ NO. 684

The Glorious

DKG Historian Doris Kearns Goodwin

talks Trump, Turbulent TImes, And Dead Presidents By Nick Welsh

INDEPENDENT.COM

FEBRUARY 21, 2019

+

Macduff Everton on ’60s Racism in S.B. Get Hungry FOr Restaurant Week

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Snarky Puppy Sun, Feb 24 / 7 PM / Granada Theatre “A barnstorming, groove-centric instrumental act with a rabid fan base and a blithely unplaceable style. And if the name doesn’t ring a bell, it’s probably just a matter of time.” The New York Times

Note New Venue

Beatrice Rana, piano Sun, Mar 3 / 4 PM / Hahn Hall Music Academy of the West Program

Chopin: Études, op. 25 Ravel: Miroirs Stravinsky:

The Firebird (arr. Agosti) 25-year-old Italian-born Beatrice Rana is making waves in the international classical music scene and was named Gramophone 2017 Young Artist of the Year

Event Sponsors: Marcia & John Mike Cohen

Up Close & Musical Series Sponsor: Dr. Bob Weinman

2019 Polar Music Prize Winner

Ashley Wheater, Artistic Director Tue, Mar 5 & Wed, Mar 6 / 8 PM / Granada Theatre Tue, Mar 5 Program George Balanchine:

Anne-Sophie Mutter, violin Lambert Orkis, piano Fri, Mar 8 / 7 PM Granada Theatre Program

The Four Temperaments Nicolas Blanc: Beyond the Shore Alexander Ekman: Joy

Mozart: Violin Sonata, K. 304 Debussy: Violin Sonata Ravel: Violin Sonata No. 2 Mozart: Violin Sonata, K. 454 Poulenc: Violin Sonata

Wed, Mar 6 Program Justin Peck: In Creases Nicolas Blanc: Encounter Alexander Ekman: Joy Annabelle Lopez Ochoa: Mammatus

Event Sponsor: Sara Miller McCune Dance Series Sponsors: Annette & Dr. Richard Caleel Margo Cohen-Feinberg & Robert Feinberg Irma & Morrie Jurkowitz, Barbara Stupay Presented in association with the UCSB Department of Theater and Dance

“When Anne-Sophie Mutter plays, you listen. With a violinist so sturdy in tone, intense in emotion, and steely in technique, there’s actually no choice.” The London Times “The undisputed queen of violin playing.” The Times (U.K.)

Corporate Season Sponsor: 2

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FEBRUARY 21, 2019

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Co-presented with the Walter H. Capps Center for the Study of Ethics, Religion and Public Life

Eli Saslow

Rising Out of Hatred: The Awakening of a Former White Nationalist

Lisa Genova

Still Alice: Understanding Alzheimer’s Sat, Mar 9 / 7:30 PM / UCSB Campbell Hall

Mon, Mar 4 / 7:30 PM / UCSB Campbell Hall

Rising Out of Hatred tells the powerful story of how Derek Black, a one-time heir to America’s white nationalist movement, came to question the ideology he helped spread.

“In examining disease, we gain wisdom about anatomy and physiology and biology. In examining the person with disease, we gain wisdom about life.” – Oliver Sacks Presented in association with the UCSB Writing Program

Event Sponsors: Hollye & Jeff Jacobs

Elisabeth Rosenthal

An American Sickness: How Healthcare Became Big Business and How You Can Take It Back Wed, Mar 13 / 7:30 PM / UCSB Campbell Hall

“Rosenthal’s meticulous history of the crisis in American health care should be required reading for our generation.” – Siddhartha Mukherjee, author of The Emperor of All Maladies

Journalist and Bestselling Author

Susan Orlean

in conversation with Pico Iyer Thu, Mar 14 / 7:30 PM / UCSB Campbell Hall

“The best writers make you care about something you never noticed before. Susan Orlean is a perfect example.” The New York Daily News Speaking with Pico Series Sponsors: Martha Gabbert, Laura Shelburne & Kevin O’Connor

(805) 893-3535 | www.ArtsAndLectures.UCSB.edu

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FEBRUARY 21, 2019

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Editor in Chief Marianne Partridge

Publisher Brandi Rivera

Executive Editor Nick Welsh Senior Editors Michelle Drown, Tyler Hayden, Matt Kettmann Editor at Large Ethan Stewart Photography Editor Paul Wellman News Reporters Blanca Garcia, Keith Hamm Opinions Editor Jean Yamamura Executive Arts Editor Charles Donelan Arts Writer Richie DeMaria Calendar Editor Terry Ortega Calendar Assistant Amber White Sports Editor John Zant Sports Writer Victor Bryant Food Writer George Yatchisin Copy Chief Jackson Friedman Copy Editor Tessa Reeg

mountainairsports.com

Creative Director Caitlin Fitch Graphic Designers Alex Drake, Ben Greenberg, Elaine Madsen Production Designer Ava Talehakimi Digital Editor Erika Carlos Digital Assistant Nancy Rodriguez

THE WHALES ARE WAITING FOR YOU! Gray whales, Minki Whales, humpbacks and large school of dolphin love our channel! Even in Winter… so now’s the time to enjoy it with them! Get on board the Condor Express. Now through early May, the gray whale migration will be coming through the channel on their northbound journey. We offer 3 trips per day, 9 AM, Noon and 3 PM. Departs from the Sea Landing on time.

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FEBRUARY 21, 2019

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Columnists Dennis Allen, Gail Arnold, Sara Caputo, Roger Durling, Jerry Roberts, Starshine Roshell Contributors Camie Barnwell, Rob Brezsny, Melinda Burns, Ben Ciccati, John Dickson, Rebecca Horrigan, Eric HvolbØll, Tom Jacobs, Shannon Kelley, Kevin McKiernan, Ninette Paloma, Carolina Starin, Brian Tanguay, Tom Tomorrow, T.M. Weedon, Josef Woodard, Maggie Yates Editorial Interns Amelia Buckley, Janavi Kumar, Priscilla Leung, Paisley Shoemaker Multimedia Interns Maya Chiodo, Harvest Keeney Director of Advertising Sarah Sinclair Marketing and Promotions Manager Emily Cosentino Advertising Representatives Madison Chackel, Camille Cimini Fruin, Suzanne Cloutier, Rachel Gantz, Laszlo Hodosy, Tonea Songer Sales Administrator Graham Brown Accounting Assistant Tobi Feldman Office Manager/Legal Advertising Tanya Spears Guiliacci Distribution Scott Kaufman Columnist Emeritus Barney Brantingham Founding Staff Emeriti Audrey Berman, George Delmerico, Richard Evans Honorary Consigliere Gary J. Hill Indy Kids Bella and Max Brown, Elijah Lee Bryant, Henry and John Poett Campbell, Chloë Bee Ciccati, Izadora and Savina Hamm, Madeline Rose and Mason Carrington Kettmann, Izzy and Maeve McKinley, Miranda Tanguay Ortega, Sawyer Tower Stewart, Phoenix Grace White The Independent is available, free of charge, limited to one copy per reader. Back issues cost $2 and may be purchased at the office. The Independent may be distributed only by authorized circulation staff or authorized distributors. No person may, without the permission of publisher, take more than one copy of each Independent issue. Subscriptions are available, paid in advance, for $120 per year. Send subscription requests with name and address to subscriptions@independent.com. The contents of the Independent are copyrighted 2019 by the Santa Barbara Independent, Inc. No part may be reproduced without permission from the publisher. The publisher assumes no responsibility for unsolicited material. A stamped, self-addressed envelope must accompany all submissions expected to be returned. The Independent is published every Thursday at 12 E. Figueroa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Advertising rates on request: (805) 965-5205. Classified ads: (805) 965-5208. The Independent is available on the internet at independent.com. Press run of the Independent is 40,000 copies. Audited certification of circulation is available on request. The Independent is a legal adjudicated newspaper — court decree no. 157386.

Contact information: 12 E. Figueroa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101 PHONE (805) 965-5205; FAX (805) 965-5518 EMAIL news@independent.com, letters@independent.com Staff email addresses can be found at independent.com/info


NEWS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 OPINIONS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Angry Poodle Barbecue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 15

Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  17

THE WEEK.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 LIVING.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33 Living Page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 33

Starshine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35

FOOD & DRINK .. . . . . . . . . . 36 Dining Out Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41

19

A&E. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43

Doris Kearns Goodwin

Arts Life . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43

COVER STORY

Art . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44

Titles: Photography Intern; Digital Intern How was photographing the Santa Barbara International Film Festival? Fun? Scary? JK: Pretty surreal. I had never shot on a red carpet before, so I was nervous at first, but everyone was so welcoming. I was most intimidated by all the expensive equipment I was constantly surrounded by (because I don’t own any of that), but I learned that you don’t necessarily need it. As long as you have an eye for anticipating the perfect shot or the ability to be creative with what you have, then you’re golden. What do you want to do when you graduate? HK: I hope I’ll be able to have my own photography business and freelance somewhat, but I’d also like to shoot photos or videos for some type of media outlet. I’d also love to have a job that allowed me to travel and continue taking pictures.

Knowing what you know now about school and life and whatnot, what advice would you give your younger self? JK: Don’t be so scared, sit up straight, and cool it with those late-night mozzarella sticks. HK: I would tell myself to be patient, and that things really do turn out for the best. When people say that rejection is a chance for better opportunities to come along, they’re definitely right.

Reviews . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47

Historian Doris Kearns Goodwin Talks Trump, Turbulent Times, and Dead Presidents (Nick Welsh)

23 FEATURE on ’60s Racism in S.B.

Names: Julia Keane; Harvest Keeney

Positively State Street . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45

The Glorious DKG

Macduff Everton

FILM FEST PHOTOGRAPHERS PAUL WELLMAN

volume 33, number 684, Feb. 21-28, 2019 ANNIE LEIBOVITZ

CONTENTS

FILM & TV. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49

ONLINE NOW AT

INDEPENDENT.COM

Preview . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49 Movie Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51

SUBSCRIBE TO OUR NEWSLETTER!

SPORTS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55 ODDS & ENDS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

Keep up with our latest and greatest stories. Subscribe to our daily newsletter at independent.com/indytoday.

Obituaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16 Rob Brezsny’s Free Will Astrology . . . . . . . . . . 57

CLASSIFIEDS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 58

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Dear 11-year-old me, Pretty much Imagine you are now 14. You started the same girl, just taller. lleyball, and high school, are playing vo mily. love your friends and fa rvivor. And, you’re a cancer su easy. It’s not going to always be after a w, But three years from no ge with mom tta bunch of car trips to Co nurses and and dad, to see the best your r, doctors you could ask fo wn back. gro gorgeous curls will have well . . . life. And life is going to be . . .

Faith Orcutt 14 YEAR-OLD CANCER SUR VIVOR

Love, Faith

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FEBRUARY 21, 2019

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CCMC cares for over 14,000 children a year in our Acute Pediatrics Unit, Haselton Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Pediatric Intensive Care Unit, Emergency Department, Pediatric Trauma Center and eight specialized outpatient clinics. cottagechildrens.org


FEB. 14-21, 2019

NEWS of the WEEK M ARCO FAR R ELL / R I NCON PHOTO.COM

by BLANCA GARCIA , KEITH HAMM, TYLER HAYDEN @TylerHayden1, NICK WELSH, and JEAN YAMAMURA, with INDEPENDENT STAFF

Hundreds Remember Chris Brown

S

urfers, fishers, and extended family and friends arrived by the hundreds to a paddle out (pictured) on February 16 from the Santa Barbara Harbor sandspit to celebrate the life of Chris Brown, 48, who drowned on January 19 on the rocky shoreline near Hendry’s Beach after accidentally falling from the bluff at Douglas Family Preserve. A commercial fisherman

and former professional surfer who competed at the highest level worldwide, Brown—known as a humble guy with a big smile — was praised for his endearing aloha spirit and the way he treated everybody like a best friend. His family scattered his ashes amid a wide circle of surfers and flowers. That morning before the paddle out, a standing-room-only crowd packed

Objecting to the Subjective

Calvary Chapel Santa Barbara as Brown was eulogized by family and friends, including 11-time world champion surfer Kelly Slater, who remembered staying with the Brown family during contest trips to California. Brown eventually turned away from the competitive spotlight to pursue big-wave riding while working as a commercial urchin diver. —Keith Hamm

HOUSING

by Nick Welsh fter working the levers at City Hall for more than 50 years, Sheila Lodge doesn’t appear to have lost her edge. “‘Objective design standards’?” she asked, her voice straining with theatrical incredulity. “That sounds like an oxymoron to me.” Lodge started off her political career on the city’s Planning Commission in the 1970s; then she was elected to council; then she served eight years as mayor. Now she’s a planning commissioner again. Through it all, Lodge has remained an unrepentant, old-school slow-growther, outspokenly bird-dogging big development to maintain Santa Barbara’s small-town quality of life. To that end, Lodge has routinely availed herself of such vaguely defined design criteria as “neighborhood compatibility” to bludgeon projects she’s deemed too big for their britches into a more neighborly size. That’s been the Santa Barbara way—not coincidentally—for about 50 years.

A

PAU L WE LLM A N

Regional Control in Crosshairs in State Housing Crisis

Planning Commissioner Sheila Lodge

Now, no more. For the past three years, the State Legislature has passed bill after bill to take discretionary approval authority away from local governments when it comes to housing projects. With the state facing an estimated housing shortfall of two million units, the Legislature concluded that what was once merely a “critical” problem has escalated into a full blown “crisis.” As a result, economic opportunities have been stifled, according to the preamble of one such bill, “worsening poverty and homelessness and undermining the state’s environmental and climate objectives.” In that context, local control has become a luxury Sacramento has decided the state can ill afford. The state Department of Housing and Community Development recently sued the City of Huntington Beach for adopting a zoning change that effectively reduces the number of housing units that can be built. Huntington Beach, it should be noted, has sued back. This

NEWS BRIEFS COUNTY Lisa Plowman, who served with Santa Barbara County Planning and Development from 1994 to 2005, has returned to the department as its new director. Her appointment, however, was not without reservation. Dissenting in the 3-2 vote, supervisors Steve Lavagnino and Peter Adam, who want the department more streamlined and resident friendly, were concerned in part that Plowman doesn’t represent much-needed change. She has nearly 20 years’ experience assisting private and nonprofit developers with entitlement and planning processes. For the past five years, Plowman has worked in management at RRM Design Group, a firm with more than 130 employees and four California offices. She starts with the county in March. Unhealthy levels of bacteria were found at several beaches in Santa Barbara County as of 2/11, notably Carpinteria’s city beach and Santa Barbara’s East and Arroyo Burro beaches. Warnings have been posted, mostly due to levels higher than state standards for intestinal flora of unknown animal origin, which is a usual occurrence after winter rains scour the landscape. Simultaneously, the county has been moving mud and rock from front-country debris basins to Carpinteria and Goleta, though officials are quick to point out that the organic matter in the basins had no opportunity to emanate from urban areas and are tested before being trucked to the beach. The ball is back in play regarding Camp 4 and whether it will become part of the Chumash reservation. After buying the 1,400-acre property from Fess Parker’s estate in 2010, the Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Indians has been trying since 2013 to make it part of the existing reservation. The Bureau of Indian Affairs approved the property transfer in 2014, but Barry Cappello, attorney for plaintiff Nancy Crawford-Hall, made the case that the Interior Department official who signed the final decision in 2017 had no authority to do so. According to the Central District Court ruling, the issues raised on the environmental review are now premature. Tribal Chair Kenneth Kahn termed the ruling “unfortunate,” asserting, “The tribe will continue to fight to ensure adequate housing for its members.” Caltrans workers have dug down 40 feet to the blocked culvert that keeps State Route 154 closed at Lake Cachuma. The state highway agency now estimates the road will remain closed until mid-March. CalPortland Construction of Santa Maria has been hired to make the repairs, at a cost of $2.2 million, which involves reconstructing the foundation below the culvert, repairing the embankment, and excavating and repairing part of the damaged highway. Fourth District Supervisor Peter Adam will not run for a third four-year term next year and has announced his support of Bob Nelson, 39, who now serves as Adam’s chief of staff. Nelson announced his candidacy on 2/16 at an event at

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FEBRUARY 21, 2019

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Objecting to the Subjective cont’d from p. 9 Monday, new governor Gavin Newsom put representatives of California cities — with whom he was then meeting — on notice that he would be ratcheting up the pressure on them to do more about housing. This past Thursday, members of the city’s Planning Commission got an up-close and personal tutorial on three of the 15 bills signed into law over the past two years by former governor Jerry Brown to limit the power

They’re taking away local governments’ ability to do their own planning.

— Sheila Lodge

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FEBRUARY 21, 2019

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of local governments to reject or reduce the size of multi-unit housing proposals. In addition, the Legislature is accelerating the speed with which design review boards must process such applications. Key among the reforms is a proposal requiring “objective design review” standards. No longer will it be legally defensible for bodies like the Architectural Board of Review to scale back certain proposals on the grounds of “neighborhood incompatibility” or excessive “size, bulk, and scale”—for years boilerplate verbiage in local land-use battles. Instead, such judgments must be couched in objective and quantifiable descriptions. “If we don’t have objective standards, we don’t have anything,” stated assistant city attorney Tava Ostrenger. Lodge, who has been waging a lonely battle against increased housing densities for the past 10 years—they fail to generate affordable housing, she says, and often look ugly — said the legislative changes are huge. “They’re taking away local governments’ ability to do their own planning,” she said. The nitty-gritty of the bills in question goes deep. Local governments are barred from restricting the size of any proposed developments in which the developer is willing to set aside 10 percent of the units built to tenants making 80 percent — or less — of the area median income and is also willing to pay prevailing wages. Such developments would be required to provide only one parking space per unit. If located within half a mile of a bus stop, no parking would be required. Governments that seek to whittle down the number of units of such proposals can be fined up to $10,000 per unit. If malice can be demonstrated, the fines can be as high as $50,000 per unit. In addition, developers can recoup attorneys’ fees. Judges have been empowered — for the first time — to make basic land-use decisions. In the past, they were only

authorized to order cities to correct such decisions that failed to pass legal muster. Applications must be processed faster. Proposals of 150 units or fewer must be processed within 90 days; those larger have 180 days. Every city and county in the state must submit detailed eight-year zoning plans demonstrating how they can accommodate their fair share of California’s staggering housing demand. Nearly 340 of California’s local governments are falling seriously short of attainment; only 14 are actually meeting these goals. Santa Barbara is not one of the 14. Of the 4,099 housing units the City of Santa Barbara has sought to accommodate in its latest housing plan, only 16 percent — 667 units — have been permitted. Planning Commissioner Mike Jordan terms the city’s performance “terrible.” He predicted the new laws will impose “a radical change” in how land-use business is conducted. As is often the case, Jordan appears to be of two minds about the new legislative regime. He cited a recent case of a four-story rental housing proposal slated for the 700 block of North Milpas Street. The developer initially sailed through the Architectural Board of Review (ABR) with glowing endorsements and an allbut-unanimous preliminary approval. But when it came time for the final approval, the project had generated considerable neighborhood opposition—it was too big, out of scale, out of character. The same ABR found the same project was inconsistent with the neighborhood character. Next month, the project goes to the City Council on appeal. Detty Peikert, architect for the developer, says the case highlights the need for “objective” design review guidelines. His client spent $800,000 on architectural and engineering plans after getting preliminary approval; the project, he insisted, didn’t change. Businesses need a more predictable and reliable review process, he argued. Peikert’s client won’t be saved by those state bills. His proposal was submitted before they were passed, and besides, he’s not offering to set aside 10 percent of the proposed units — 75 — to tenants composing the mythical “missing middle,” much talked about by urban planners. Planning Commissioner Lodge said that requirement, coupled with the bill’s prevailing wage mandate, is enough to discourage many developers from taking full advantage of the legislation’s advantages. “I don’t think we’re going to see a rush to the well,” she said. Jordan sees it differently. The housing crisis is real, he argued, and the same legislators who’ve stripped away much local control from city and county governments are not going away. “You don’t think they’ll be coming back?” he asked. In the meantime, City Hall has created a task force to rewrite its design review guidelines, replacing subjective descriptions with objective descriptors. They’ll be meeting twice a week for the next three months; the issue is that serious. n


COU RTESY

NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D HOUSING

Pini Forks Over $1.6 Million Ruling Sets Repairs in Motion After 10 Months of Stalemate Dario Pini

by Jean Yamamura ollowing a long, intense court hearing, landlord Dario Pini took a $1.6 million step toward fixing close to 2,000 code violations at eight of his Santa Barbara properties. Since a receiver was appointed in April 2018 for Building Code and Health & Safety Code violations, the intervening 10 months have been spent finding contractors and arguing on paper and in court, with one filing accusing the receiver of taking Pini’s stuff. Judge Colleen Sterne put her foot down in early February, ordering the payment of the most substantial funding to date on the issue at hand: substandard housing conditions at Pini’s properties. The receiver, William Hoffman of San Diego, and his management company, Trigild, had fixed by last fall about 400 violations using the rents they’d collected in Pini’s stead, but the large-scale work that can put walls back, correct wiring and plumbing, and repair rotted beams and joists require real capital. The $1.6 million kick-starts the permits and planning for Pini’s Mission Street and Arrellaga Street properties, as well as the rehousing of tenants if necessary. The apartments that remain to be fumigated for vermin should now be able to be tented, funds that had been ordered paid in September. A few tenants have refused to pay the new landlord or to allow Hoffman’s managers into their apartments to inspect for mold or code violations, adding to the delays. Among the 75 total units, 21 tenants have been served with quit notices, most for nonpayment of rent, and 13 units sit vacant, according to Hoffman’s latest report to the court. Santa Barbara law firm Cohn Rengo was hired to handle the evictions. One family evicted for the unhealthy mold in their apartment at Pini’s San Pascual Street property is entitled to relocation assistance under California’s Health & Safety Code, but Hoffman’s report for December 2018 estimated the rental compensation to be $4. Assistant City Attorney John Doimas explained the amount had to do with prevailing rents and how much the tenants paid. Their costs of moving could be reimbursable, he said, which might be discussed at the next hearing on March 8; it was up to the receiver. (Bill Hoffman did not reply to requests for information.)

F

Hoffman has stated the San Pascual property is broke, too broke to even afford the eviction attorneys’ fees. Pini’s attorney attributed this financial predicament to the high receiver fees, but Hoffman’s attorney Fernando Landa stated in January they had yet to take their fee for that property, the gardeners had quit, and only utilities were current. The family, caught in the middle, has yet to receive their deposit back, said family friend Ana Bello, though they’d reached out to Trigild to return their keys. The property on San Pascual has a large, old Victorian in the front and two other buildings, amounting to 10 units, four of

The $1.6 million kickstarts the permits and planning for Pini’s Mission Street and Arrellaga Street properties. which have tenants. It’s been the subject of a demolition proposal, more recently tapered to just the two properties in the rear. The receiver’s best bid on the original demo plan, from Pueblo Construction, was $218,000; Pini countered with one for $39,000 from Gamble Construction. Pini tried to replace the receiver with Eddie Taylor of the Northern Santa Barbara County United Way, a motion denied by Judge Sterne for the moment; Taylor had been interested in turning San Pascual into homeless housing. Pini then aimed to force Hoffman to rent empty apartments, saying too much income was lost through vacancies. Judge Sterne denied again, saying that moving in a tenant who will have to move out for repairs made little sense. She also made it clear that any rentable units were to be rented. Along with financing details, an issue likely to come up at the March hearing is the difference between junk and valuable stuff. That one concerns lengths of Victorian crown molding made of red oak Pini had acquired at an estate sale—his papers state they had sentimental value — and stored at his Carrillo Street property until the receiver cleaned up the garages. n INDEPENDENT.COM

FEBRUARY 21, 2019

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ormer San Marcos High School principal Ed Behrens was not granted access to the memo that aided members of the Santa Barbara Unified School District School Board in their decision to demote him. However, the courts did find the Statement of Reasons given to Behrens by Superintendent Cary Matsuoka to be incomplete. Behrens was demoted from San Marcos principal to Santa Barbara Junior High social studies teacher in March. Behrens is challenging the decision and suing the district for reinstatement and punitive damages. Behrens alleged that the memo presented to school boardmembers contained information that was not in his personnel file. Behrens has access to the more than 200page personnel file. The memo was authored by attorneys Craig Price and Joseph Sholder for Matsuoka. It was intended to summarize the finding of his file and was presented to the school board. On February 7, after reviewing the memo in private, the court found that “[t]he Memo purports to contain only information that was available to Plaintiff from his personnel file. It does not appear to the Court to contain any information that would have been difficult for Plaintiff to ascertain as a fact relied upon by the Board.”

Ed Behrens

However, the courts found that the Statement of Reason provided to Behrens, which lists nine specific examples of his job performance on which the demotion was based, is incomplete. “There is also an issue of the completeness of the response in its reference to the personnel file and by its statement of a list with the qualifications. The interrogatory requests a complete statement of employment job performance that played a role in the employment action,” wrote the court. The district must complete the response by including a full list of the job-performance issues the boardmembers relied on to make their demotion vote. —Blanca Garcia

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adding, “Fabricating a national emergency to divert substantial funding from wildfire victims in California and our military readiness operations is not befitting of a commander in chief.” By Monday, California and 15 other states had sued in federal court to block the taking of congressionally appropriated funds. Republicans are divided on the issue, though a recent poll by NPR/PBS Newshour/Marist reported in The Hill found 85 percent of Republicans in favor (and 84 percent of Democrats opposed).

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Orcutt Community Park. The seat will also be sought by Santa Barbara Taxpayers Association Executive Director Joe Armendariz, who has served on the Carpinteria City Council. Also opening in 2020 are the 1st and 3rd District seats now occupied by Das Williams and Joan Hartmann, respectively. The race will be on the California primary ballot in March 2020.

A declaration of national emergency on Friday by President Trump to get the funds to build a border “wall” has its detractors lined up. Rep. Salud Carbajal said, “I look forward to providing oversight on this ill-considered decision as a member of the Armed Services Committee,”

The 50th anniversary of El Plan de Santa Bárbara will be commemorated with a two-day conference at UCSB on February 22-23. The first conference in 1969 united Chicano students all over California and across all levels of higher education. El Plan was the foundation for the national organization Movimiento Estudiantil Chicanx de Aztlán and for the development of Chicano studies. The conference will feature a number of panels, including one of participants from the 1969 conference. The event is free and open to the public. For more information visit www.chicst.ucsb.edu. n


NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D

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he Santa Barbara City College Board of Trustees meeting on February 14 ended in disarray, not unlike several of its most recent meetings. At this meeting, the board was considering a resolution to add the Pledge of Allegiance to board agendas. Around 250 people sat or stood in the audience. Two deputy sheriffs and campus security members were present. Just over 40 people spoke, most of whom were community members and not current students. They emphasized the importance of patriotism, quoted Martin Luther King Jr., and mentioned phrases from the pledge, particularly, “indivisible with liberty and justice for all.” One man said he understood people’s reluctance to recite the pledge but said, “We need not destroy the [pledge], only live up to it.” Several others speakers called for the resignation or firing of President Robert Miller, and others requested that boardmembers who refused to say the pledge should resign. However, about one-third of the speakers veered off topic and began criticizing student activists whom they called “social

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justice warriors.” One speaker said she was “very tired about hearing about white privilege in our universities.” Emotions in the audience were already running high when Goleta resident Gary Vandeman used the unabridged n-word. Vandeman said he stood for “equal opportunity,” which was denied to white people if only black people could use certain words. By the end of the evening, the resolution to add the pledge passed unanimously. Read more at independent.com/sbccpledge.

required to make do with only 20 percent of their normal water allotments. Tension between water districts and the County Water Agency — which holds the contract for Lake Cachuma with the Bureau of Reclamation—are already plenty tense and can be expected to get even tenser. That contract is about to expire, and the water districts that rely on Cachuma are eager to take it over from the County Water Agency, which they acerbically note has no water and no customers. Water Agency officials had hoped in the past to use the new contract to impose tighter new restrictions on water consumption based on new water supply realities born of climate change and the prospect of prolonged droughts in the future. —Nick Welsh

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Opinions CRISIS JUNKIES:

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Donald Trump is hardly the first president to flamenco dance all over the Constitution in response to a self-conjured threat for which exceptional emergency powers must be invoked. But in selecting the wall and imaginary armies of immigrant hordes, he proves yet again why we can’t have amateurs in the White House. Why pick a fight that can’t be won when there are so many others that can be? A case in point: the opioid crisis. By any reckoning, it’s real. With the death toll from the last 20 years now hovering around 400,000, we are poised to soon surpass the number of Americans killed during World War II. That’s nearly five times more than in Vietnam. Or more immediately, more than 130 World Trade Centers. If another country did to us what companies like Purdue, the sublimely cynical manufacturers of OxyContin, have, we would have bombed them back into the Stone Age. Trump, by the way, campaigned on the opioid crisis. In some ways, it’s his base. A recent medical journal report confirms that the demographics of opioid death and destruction skews heavily white, heavily male. For those still wondering, “Why Trump?”, it’s worth remembering that he performed best in districts boasting the highest rates of opioid overdose. I mention this not to ride some imaginary hobbyhorse around the block. My point is this: If Santa Barbara County Counsel Mike

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Ghizzoni has figured this out, then perhaps it’s time for Donald Trump to learn a thing or two about a thing or two. Last week, Ghizzoni and the County of Santa Barbara filed a

lawsuit against Purdue and about 12 other companies in the business of opioid-related

death and destruction. A few points need to be conceded up front. This is clearly a case of political grandstanding. If it’s also a case of ambulance chasing as some have suggested — maybe a more appropriate comparison would involve a hearse —we’re clearly in the back of the pack. At least 1,500 other cities, counties, and states have already sued the pharmaceutical companies most responsible for unleashing the opioid scourge. My response to all this? About time. What took you so long? No, Santa Barbara is not eastern Ohio or West Virginia, but we all know by first name heroin addicts who started out on painkillers. They can be found in the best of fam-

ilies. There are, of course, the 11 people who died of overdoses from drugs prescribed by Dr. Julio Diaz, a k a the Candy Man, now serving a life sentence. In the wake of the Diaz scandal, state regulators went after some of the pharmacies that turned a blind eye to Diaz’s trigger-happy script writing. Mom-and-pop operations, I am told, felt the retributive brunt a lot harder than the Big Boys, like CVS, who, I am likewise told, were equally complicit.

Between 2012 and 2016, 120 Santa Barbara County residents died of accidental opioid overdoses. Not all those involved

prescription drugs. About half of all opiate deaths involve so-called licit drugs, the other half being illicit in origin. In 2015, it’s worth knowing, Santa Barbarans were dying of opioid overdoses at twice the statewide average. In that year alone, overdoses claimed the lives of 63 people. Those numbers have climbed down since then, but they’re still too high. Since 2015, more than 400 overdose victims have been brought back to life, courtesy of the wonder drug Naloxone, which Santa Barbara county authorities were initially a little slow to embrace. Since then, about 1,500 kits have been distributed. The county’s lawsuit makes for weirdly horrific reading. Who knew that Purdue started out manufacturing a substance used to extrude earwax? In 1952, Purdue was purchased by Arthur Sackler, who emerges as the evil genius driving this disaster. Back in the ’50s, Sackler was a practicing psychiatrist. He also owned an advertising agency. Since the 1960s, he’s been strip-mining America’s psychic — and also physical — pain, and today the Sackler family is worth

about $13 billion. Sackler made his first fortune advertising a wonder drug called Valium back in the ’60s. As a psychiatrist, he emerged as the expert on “psychic ten-

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sion,” an affliction that somehow seemed

to plague women disproportionately. As an advertising guru, he directed the marketing campaign—again targeting women— for Valium, which became the first drug to break the $100 million barrier. By the ’90s, Sackler was trying to expand the branding possibilities for OxyContin—one of many synthetic opiates now wreaking havoc. Purdue spent more than $400 million on marketing since 2001; clearly it paid off. The company’s sales staff ballooned from 300 to 700; doctors were targeted and in some cases outright bribed with all the usual highminded honoraria and gifts. The drug was not addicting, the doctors were repeatedly told, if administered to people experiencing pain. It was a lie, and Purdue knew it. But with competition from Fentanyl looming —50 times stronger than heroin and up to 100 times stronger than morphine—Purdue couldn’t afford to let 50 million Americans suffer in needless pain. The consequences will be with us for eons to come. The first rule of politics? Never let a good crisis go to waste. Trump has at his disposal a fabulous crisis. It’s real. It allows him to pander to his base. He might do some actual good. To date, however, the federal government has yet to sign onto litigation like the one initiated last week by Santa Barbara County. — Nick Welsh

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obituaries

To submit obituaries for publication, please call (805) 965-5205 or email obits@independent.com

Leslie Ann (Boyd) Mann 1950-2019

Our beloved Leslie Ann (Boyd) Mann -wife, mother, grandmother, stepmom, sister, and friend to so many- passed away at 8 PM on Monday, January 28th, 2019. Family and friends were at home with her as she let go of the life she shared with husband Brian, daughter Leyla Johnson, sons Josh and Gabe Mann, son-in-law Evald Johnson, and beloved granddaughters Amelia and Ruby, sister Laurel Austin, brother-in-law Durban Lenocker, and so many dear and loved friends, cousins, nieces, nephews, grand- nieces and grandnephews. Also, through marriage, her sister Lori Erenberg, brothers Robert and Jonathan Mann, Steve Snyder, and mother Cheri Mann. In the last years of her battle with cancer, Leslie was supported and buoyed by many friends. Especially the Nagelmann family, Dr. Jim Thomas, Peggy Jo Love, Joyce Jerge, David Rockey, Bonnie and Roger Rungavac, Leslie’s book club members, Maxine Avila, Consuello Benavidez, our many wonderful and loving neighbors, and the kind people at The Ridley Tree Cancer Center, Visiting Nurses and Hospice. During the last few difficult weeks, Robert and Steve, Josh, Gabe and Leyla stepped up and took over much of the hour-tohour care and are a testament to the love and devotion Leslie inspired in all who knew her. Born and raised in a large, warm and extensive family in the small ranching town of Selma, CA, Leslie felt loved and accepted. With her aunts, uncles and grandparents all nearby, she felt secure and safe, enabling her to develop a quiet and healthy level of true self-confidence along with a steady, kind, tolerant way of being. And in her Grandpa Baba’s cotton fields and vineyards, she learned how to work. Her cousins and siblings were her best friends; with them, she developed a tremendous sense of humor, an appetite for simple pleasures, and the value of friendship. After attending Cal Poly, she transferred to UCSB with her surfer boyfriend in 1971. At first bored with the sleepy beach town of Santa Barbara, she quickly 16

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made friends working at Sees Candy then, at Diane’s with new friend, Sandy Resnick. Merle Clark, who famously could be seen walking along the boardwalk on his hands, soon swept Leslie off her feet, into a VW Van and the Mountain Road lifestyle, and soon baby Leyla was born. A couple years later, Merle’s wild man lifestyle was too much for young mother Leslie; facing the question of how to support herself and her daughter, she decided to go to Tom Hanson’s beauty school. There she met fellow student and life long friend, redheaded Peggy Jo Love. After beauty school, and for forty years hence, Leslie, with business partner and friend Peggy Jo, welcomed customers to their hair salon, Head West. There, along with beautiful haircuts and color, they offered an open hearted and non-judgmental ear, a ready laugh, advice on everything from restaurants and movies, to marriage, family, and life in general. In 1990 Leslie met her (hmm hmm, with apologies) 3rd and best husband, Brian, when both were separated from former spouses. They adopted the saying “It’s never too late to have a happy life” as their motto, and married in 1992. Bringing together Leslie’s daughter, Leyla, and Brian’s sons, Josh and Gabe, they formed a new family and proceeded to prove that motto accurate. Soon after that, tragically, Leslie lost her brother Ted to Melanoma, then a short time later, her older sister, Lynne to ALS. Then in 2007, an x-ray revealed a tumor in Leslie’s right breast, undetected for so long it was large (stage 3). Always with the brilliant and kind guidance of Dr. Tom Woliver, Leslie endured surgeries, chemo, radiation and some crazy new drugs. Though losing her beautiful hair, she was given the ‘all clear’ a year later. Remission. For now. Leyla and Evald soon brought Leslie’s first grand daughter, Amelia into the world and into her life. With much to live for, Leslie got active, and with her devoted friend and long time walking partner, Dee Nagelmann, started training, walking 5 to 8 miles several times a week. After completing the Barbara Ireland Walk, they went on to complete the Avon Breast Cancer walk in Santa Barbara (2010), then in New York City (2011). 26 miles day one…13 miles day two…and although Leslie lost a big toenail, and after a few wrong turns, they finished in the top groups and helped raise money for research and treatment. Soon grand baby Ruby was born, and a new and wonderful chapter began.

FEBRUARY 21, 2019

All through their deep, loving and devoted marriage, Leslie steadfastly supported husband Brian’s music career through its many ups and downs. Never complaining if money was tight, or the hours were late (or if the singer was a little too pretty and young). She always had faith in Brian. Brian will appreciate that and the many other things that Leslie gave him as long as he lives. Most of all he appreciates the gift of his granddaughters and daughter, the beautiful home and cottage they shared, their life in Santa Barbara with their many devoted friends, the way she loved and accepted Brian’s sons and whole family, and the feeling of being deeply loved and fully accepted for who he is. A lot of people are grateful for receiving some of those same gifts from Leslie. A memorial is being planned in Santa Barbara for mid to late March. And another in Selma, CA a bit later.

John Eugene Johnson 1925-2019

groups throughout the years, including the Opera Workshop, Santa Barbara Choral Society, and the Hollybush Singers. Identifiable to many in the community by the white beard he sported, John enjoyed hiking and bicycling until he was well into his 80’s, and continued his leisurely walks around the neighborhood in his later years. John frequently stated that the best decision in his life was “retiring” at age 51 to become his family’s chief cook and bottle washer as well as primary volunteer for his younger family’s school and extracurricular activities. He loved his life, and he loved Santa Barbara--the place where he sang, hiked, biked, sat and watched the trees grow. John is survived by his wife, Carolyn; sons Mikael (Cheryl) and Steven (Sarah), stepdaughter Christina (Scott) Bowman, daughter Laurel (Seth Baker), grandson Matthew Bowman, sister Lois Roberts, nephew Russell Crawford, nieces Anne Crawford and Susan Weinman. John was preceded in death by his parents, brother Cyrus, and son David. A celebration of John’s life will be held in early Spring.

Heidi Nunnemacher Schulz 01/27/45-01/29/19

John Eugene Johnson, age 93, passed away on January 11, 2019 in Santa Barbara. John was born in Los Angeles to Cyrus and Beatrice (Venator) Johnson. A decorated officer in the US Air Force, he served tours of duty as a radar operator/navigator in both WWII and the Korean War. Amongst medals he received are the Purple Heart and the Distinguished Flying Cross. After WWII, John finished his undergraduate education at UCLA, where he met his first wife, Barbara Hunter, whom he wed in 1948. After completing library school at USC, he was hired as a librarian at UCSB. John and Barbara had two sons, Mikael and David. John met his second wife, Carolyn (Nelson) Therianos at UCSB, and they wed in 1974. John and his two sons welcomed Carolyn's daughter, Christina, into the family, and soon thereafter Laurel and Steven were born. Throughout his life, John exuded joy when playing piano, guitar, or accordion, and that joy was especially infectious when he added his voice to the mix, as with his rollicking performances of the Marty Robbins classic, “El Paso.” He contributed his booming baritone to various local

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Heidi lived her life joyously, laughing often, speaking her mind, and making friends and adventures wherever she went. She was a hiker, gardener, camper, kayaker, expert skier and instructor, competitive sailor, professional organizer, and certified Kundalini yoga instructor. Heidi loved the outdoors, and encouraged us to notice the beauty of nature around us. Born in Milwaukee, Wisconsin, the daughter of Jean Walter and Sgt. Jacob Robert Nunnemacher of the 10th Mountain Infantry Division. Unfortunately, Heidi never knew her father; he died in combat trying to save the lives of his platoon at Torre lussi, Italy 10 days before the end of World War II. Heidi’s mother remarried twice adding 7 siblings to the family. They raced sailboats and ice boats on Lake Michigan and other Wisconsin lakes, and enjoyed winters skiing in Wisconsin and trips to the Colorado Rockies and Europe.

Heidi studied at Colorado Women’s College before marrying her high-school sweetheart, Jim Schulz. In 1974, they moved to Santa Barbara, CA for Jim to study at Brooks Institute of Photography. Since Jim was an avid fisherman, hunter and pilot, they traveled to Alaska, Canada and Mexico. With their firstborn Robyn, they ventured frequently to Baja Mexico, first camping on an island in the Sea of Cortez, and later building a home on a three-acre island alongside an extended Mexican fishing family, where their son Jason was born. In recent years, the house has been used as a research base for the University of California Santa Cruz's Marine Biology Research Laboratory. Although Heidi and Jim divorced in 2014, when Jim died in 2016 Heidi was at his bedside. In 2003, Heidi became the first Certified Professional Organizer in Chronic Disorganization and played an important role educating organizers and the public about the emotional as well as physical aspects of decluttering. She co-authored the ICD Clutter Hoarding Scale. Together with psychologist Roland Rotz, PhD., she crafted a collaborative approach to working with clients challenged by mild, moderate and severe clutter. Heidi was also a long-time volunteer for Food From the Heart in Santa Barbara preparing meals for community members in need. She participated in a number of Solstice Parades, usually on stilts, in elaborate costumes she created. In 2014 Heidi moved to Park City, Utah to be closer to her son Jason and the mountains. She quickly made new friends and found her place in the community teaching adaptive skiing and water sports at the National Ability Center (NAC). Heidi is survived by her daughter Robyn McClaine Sole and grandson Rylan McClaine of Santa Barbara, her son Jason Schulz of Salt Lake City, her mother Jean S. (Walter) Lindemann of Milwaukee, her brothers Thomas (Lynne) Lindemann, Christian Lindemann, Scott (Mary) Lindemann, and sister, Joanne (Wayne) Schelwat, the Maas, Meyer, and Nunnemacher families. Heidi was preceded in death by her step-fathers, Fritz and Walter Lindemann, sisters, Barbara Claybaugh, Julianna Lindemann, and brother Walter Lindemann. A Celebration of Life will be held in Park City on 2/23 at NAC. Please add photos and videos of Heidi to https://photos.app.goo. gl/ Donations may be sent to Food from the Heart or NAC in Heidi’s honor.


OPINIONS CONT’D

Toxic Butts

I

n June 2017, the City of Santa Barbara passed an ordinance prohibiting smoking outdoors, including on public beaches and in city parks. This city ordinance is important as many of Santa Barbara’s beaches and coastal parks have an overabundance of cigarette-butt litter that works its way into our oceans. “Cigarette butts contain nicotine and carcinogenic bits of nonbiodegradable cellulose acetate which are toxic to wildlife and pose a risk to human health,” the environmental organization Ocean Conservancy asserts; it estimates 1.69 billion cigarette butts become litter in the U.S. annually. Cigarette butts can be lethal or cause carcinogenic tumors when ingested by shore birds such as the California gull, the California brown pelican, the endangered western snowy plover, and others. When cigarette butts come into contact with water, they release a toxic mixture of nicotine, cadmium, arsenic, and heavy metals. Creatures such as sea cucumbers, sea anemones, and many others have only a thin membrane, and it does not protect them from these toxins. They intake seawater for their circulatory systems, making them especially vulnerable to these toxic chemicals. Similarly, fish are extremely vulnerable to cigarette-butt toxins as they take in seawater through their gills. As residents of the Santa Barbara, let’s work together to protect our beautiful coastal environment. Pick up litter, especially micro-trash like cigarette butts. Inform smokers in outdoor areas, including our beaches and coastal parks, of the illegality of their smoking and of the lethal effect that cigarette smoke and cigarette butts can have on our — Robert Coronado, S.B. marine environment!

Pledge Perspective

A

s a veteran and SBCC student, I must say that including the Pledge of Allegiance at a college board meeting is strange. Why recite this in an environment that invokes free thought and is supposed to be all-inclusive for students, especially when so many are unhappy with our current government? Forced patriotism is fascism, no matter how you candy-coat it. But I get the idea of wanting to show patriotism: I took the Oath of Enlistment to protect the freedoms of all Americans through Desert Storm,

ADAM ZYGLIS, THE BUFFALO NEWS, NY

Letters

the Iraq War, and Afghanistan, and I re-enlisted in the Army National Guard after a childhood friend died in the World Trade Center. The words “under God” have never sat well in any government context because whose God are we talking about? I love science and don’t believe in any God, so where do I fit in that pledge? Imagine if they replaced the word “God” with “Allah”; I’m sure lots of people would think it inappropriate. I had a very nice email exchange with the pledge proponent, Celeste Barber, and she stated, “If you don’t wish to recite the Pledge, stand or sit silent. Respect the rights of others to do so.” She also expressed how horrifying it was to be heckled and called a racist. I wrote back to say that I know how she feels. I’ve been told by people who don’t share my views to “go back to Puerto Rico” or go back “over the border.” Words hurt and have a lot of weight coming from people you thought were on the same side as you and whom you’ve been in uniform to protect. If you ask me, things are grave and I agree our country is in trouble; however, forcing people to be patriotic will likely give you the opposite of what you’re looking for. [The full version of this letter can be read at independent.com/pledge perspective.] — Alex Diaz, S.B.

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enoco is broke. (Surprise.) The platform needs management funds. (Surprise.) Oil extraction is over. Use the nearly abandoned oil rig offshore as a giant windmill base. A $3 million windmill would pay for itself in 10 years and run indefinitely. The most expensive part would be the onshore power cable ($100/meter for 10+ miles). Dispense with that expense. Either bottle electrolyzed water (hydrogen) for tankers, or run a simple, weighted funny pipe of three-quarter-inch diameter to shore and compress it into liquid-state bottles there. Hydrogen fuel sells for about $100/gallon. I’d ask the county to pick up this expense (that will pay for itself many times over) or would volunteer to be part of a co-op to do it. Not only would it provide a way to finance keeping an eye on the old wells, but it would also maintain rustproofing, employ some local divers, and provide — Les Benson, S.B. local renewable energy. INDEPENDENT.COM

ALCAZAR THEATRE • MARCH 1,2,3, 8,9,10 Fridays and Saturdays @ 8pm Sundays @ 2pm General Admission: $19 Students and Seniors $15 info & Tickets: thealcazar.org or 805.684.6380

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Special Community Event | Free Film Screening and Talk

James Balog The Human Element: A Photographer’s Journey in the Anthropocene Saturday, March 2 / 7:30 PM / Granada Theatre / FREE

photos: James Balog

Environmental hero James Balog has been tracking human-caused changes to our planet for nearly 40 years. The acclaimed photographer/filmmaker behind the documentary Chasing Ice, Balog illustrates issues ranging from rising sea levels to pollution’s impact on human health, focusing on a call for change. His new film, The Human Element, documents how the earth’s four elements – earth, air, water and fire – have all been impacted by a fifth element, homo sapiens. A scientist, adventurer and founder of the Colorado-based Extreme Ice Survey and Earth Vision Institute, Balog will give a short talk and answer questions following a screening of The Human Element. (Film running time: 80 min.)

Books will be available for purchase and signing courtesy of Chaucer’s

Presented in association with Community Environmental Council, Environmental Defense Center, Gaviota Coast Conservancy, Land Trust for Santa Barbara County, Los Padres ForestWatch, The Partnership for Resilient Communities, Santa Barbara Sierra Club, the UCSB Bren School of Environmental Science & Management, the UCSB Department of Environmental Studies, Urban Creeks Council and Wilderness Youth Project.

Event Sponsors: Audrey & Timothy O. Fisher and Erika & Matthew Fisher in memory of J. Brooks Fisher

Corporate Season Sponsor:

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(805) 893-3535 www.ArtsAndLectures.UCSB.edu INDEPENDENT.COM

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ANNIE LEIBOVITZ

F

or the better part of 40 years now, biographer/historian Doris Kearns Goodwin has been writing about dead presidents. Her focus has been on the greats: Abraham Lincoln, Teddy Roosevelt, Franklin Delano Roosevelt, and Lyndon B. Johnson, all of whom are the subjects of her new book, Leadership: In Turbulent Times. One of America’s best-known popular historians, Goodwin is famously engaging as a storyteller; she has the rare gift to tell stories people might think they already know and make them new. Documentary filmmaker Ken Burns found her an irresistible presence as a diehard Brooklyn Dodgers fan in his nine-part series on the history of baseball. As a scholar, Goodwin does not deliver lectures. She’s too alive to what’s weird, wonderful, and amazing about her subjects. She connects the dots between the personal and the political without getting gossipy or surrendering to the amber lights of nostalgia. Goodwin will be in Santa Barbara on February 22 to discuss her latest book. In some ways, Leadership: In Turbulent Times is an old-fashioned character study, examining how the upbringing, challenges, and heartbreaks helped pave the way for the two Roosevelts, Lincoln, and Johnson to do great things under unimaginable duress. Of the four presidents, Goodwin actually knew Johnson, having served as a Fellow in his White House in 1967. While there, she famously wrote an anti-war article headlined, “How to Dump Lyndon Johnson.” He responded — equally famously — by not firing her as everyone expected but instead by setting about to win her over. It’s unclear who won over whom, but it was Goodwin who wound up helping Johnson write his memoirs. It’s hard not to read Goodwin’s latest book as an implicit rebuke of Donald Trump — rarely has any president cared less about the craft of governance or the art of politics. As fascinating as Goodwin is to listen to about previous occupants of the White House, the only question people have for her these days is about its current inhabitant. I was clearly one of them, as this exchange with Goodwin indicates.

The

Glorious

DKG Historian Doris Kearns Goodwin Talks Turbulent Times, Dead Presidents, and the Demise of Presidential Dignity

I know you don’t write about Trump, but as someone who studies presidential leadership and character, how do you come to terms with the Trump phenomenon? If Trump is the answer, what’s the question? What are the structural and institutional preconditions that allow a faux reality-show star to become President of the United States? I know that’s a thesis or three unto themselves, but you must have a few thoughts on the subject other than abject despair. Though Donald Trump’s populist message may seem unprecedented, much of the polarization we see today is an echo of what the country experienced at the turn of the 20th century. Imagine what it was like for Theodore Roosevelt thrust into office after McKinley’s assassination, at a time when there was widespread talk of a coming revolution. The industrial revolution had shaken up the economy at the turn of the 20th century, much as globalization and the technological revolution have done today. Big companies were swallowing up small companies. Cities were replacing towns. Immigrants were pouring in from abroad. A threatening gap had opened between the rich and the poor. A mood of rebellion had spread among the laboring classes. Populists railed against Wall Street, against elites, against the cities. The anxiety many people feel now is caused by the same pressures that made people nervous about an America that was changing then, but with the right leader for the right time, and with citizen participation, we were able to get through the hard times.

by Nick Welsh INDEPENDENT.COM

FEBRUARY 21, 2019

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COVER STORY

THOUGH DONALD TRUMP’S POPULIST MESSAGE MAY SEEM UNPRECEDENTED, MUCH OF THE POLARIZATION WE SEE TODAY IS AN ECHO OF WHAT THE COUNTRY EXPERIENCED AT THE TURN OF THE 20TH CENTURY.

Are there any crucible moments you’ve discerned in Trump’s background — like FDR’s polio, Teddy Roosevelt losing his wife and mother — that might suggest anything other than self-immolation as an outcome? Yes, there were events that would be crucible moments, like the death of his brother or his various bankruptcies, but in order for growth to come from challenges, the challenges must be acknowledged as such. Donald Trump said in an interview, “My whole life is about winning. I don’t lose often. I almost never lose.”

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If Abraham Lincoln were not assassinated, any speculation how his trajectory may have played out? As difficult as reconstruction would have been even for Lincoln, everything we know about his leadership suggests he would have been the best person to handle that really difficult challenge. In terms of his trajectory: The last day of his life was a happy and a hopeful one. He and Mary drove out in an open carriage together and talked about their future. They had traveled an unimaginable distance together since their first dance in Springfield a quarter of a century earlier. Over the years, they had supported each other, irritated each other, shared a love of family and the loss of their son Willie, and so much more. Now, with the war coming to an end and time bringing solace to their grief, the Lincolns could plan for a happier future. They hoped to travel someday — to Europe and the Holy Land, over the Rockies to California, then back home to Illinois, where their life together had begun.

411

Lyndon B. Johnson is the truly great heroic monster of American politics. His accomplishments were so unfathomable, yet he allowed himself to be hoisted by the petard of Vietnam. Vietnam, of course, is ancient history, except it is not. Can you explain why Johnson could not declare victory and walk away? And when he thought Nixon was sabotaging his peace talks, why didn’t he do more about that? The handling of the Vietnam War will always be a scar on Johnson’s legacy. It ripped his presidency in two. We know more now than we did then about Nixon working behind the scenes to taint LBJ’s efforts at a peace initiative, even though Johnson was not seeking reelection. But what we can hold dear today is that 50 years later, LBJ’s domestic accomplishments continue to be celebrated — the 1964 Civil Rights Act, the Voting Rights Act, the War on Poverty, and immigration reform, Medicare, Medicaid, fair housing, Head Start, PBS, NPR, the National Endowment for the Arts, and federal aid to education. Of the four presidents you write about, who would you most like to hang out with? Who would drive you crazy? Having already spent time with Johnson, a gifted and colorful storyteller, I would choose Lincoln. As a historian, I know I should ask him about what he would have done differently on reconstruction, but what I would really like to do is just ask him to tell me stories and watch him come alive. It would also be fun to spend time with Theodore Roosevelt and try to match his curiosity, his

UCSB’s Arts & Lectures presents an evening with Doris Kearns Goodwin, Friday, February 22, 7:30 p.m., at The Granada Theatre, 1214 State Street. Call 893-3535 or see artsandlectures.ucsb.edu.


Ecological Restoration & Bio-Remediation to Heal the Planet

pace. Once, I was talking to a group and someone asked me, If I had a daughter, who would I want her to marry: Teddy Roosevelt or William Howard Taft? I would choose Taft for her because he was steady, cheerful, and kind. But for myself, I would choose Teddy with all of his manic energy!

It’s inconceivable that any president today could have polio and the national media would not comment on it. When it came to FDR’s polio, how did the media cover it? How did they acknowledge it? Was it like some secret mistress? You would hope in today’s world that we would be able to talk about FDR’s polio and paralysis. He made the decision at the time that the country was not ready for it. He went to painstaking efforts to hide his condition, and the press honored his decision. In 1936, when FDR was going to deliver his acceptance speech at the Democratic National Convention in Philadelphia, he was inadvertently pushed and the steel brace holding his right leg snapped out of position, causing him to fall, while the pages of his speech were tossed into the crowd. As he was raised back up on his feet and his speech collected, he said “Okay, let’s go.” He delivered a memorable speech that ended with, “This generation of Americans has a rendezvous with destiny.” Reports from the time say the cheers went on for 10 minutes. No one ever spoke of the fact that he fell. Juxtapose that with now: the images we’ve seen over and over again of President Ford falling down the steps of Air Force One, or President George H.W. Bush throwing up and fainting at a banquet hosted by the Prime Minister of Japan. There was a dignity to the office that is no longer. Reading about the profound emotional crises these figures experienced, it’s hard not to wonder what would have happened to them if they lived today. Would they have been given Zoloft or Prozac or some other mood stabilizer, lived much calmer lives, and accomplished so much less? I’m not sure that really qualifies as a question per se, but an invitation for you to riff on the mentalhealth challenges they faced and how such challenges were dealt with in their respective eras. Three out of the four seem to be strong arguments in favor of letting mental-health challenges run amok. … They got so much done. This is an absolutely fascinating question and is something I’d like to think n about. Perhaps we can talk about it another time?

As we move into a New Green Economy to help solve climate change issues, we need to respond to the toxic world that has already been created with a new toolbox of skills and knowledge. Please join us for these great events!

EVENING TALK

Friday, Feb. 22 · 6:30 to 9:00 pm · $10 at the door

WORKSHOPS

Saturday, Feb. 23 · $30 each or $40 for both Tickets at Eventbrite.com

Leila Darwish · 9:30 am to 12:30 pm

Bioremediation 101: Empowering Communities to Deal with the Legacy of Our Toxic World

Tom Duncan ·1:30 to 4:30 pm

Restoring Waterways with Floating Islands & Wetlands

A Community Event Hosted by Santa Barbara Permaculture Network Part of the Santa Barbara Permaculture Network Civics 101 for Climate Change series

All Events at Antioch University · 602 Anacapa St., Santa Barbara

margie@sbpermaculture.org · www.sbpermaculture.org · 805 962-2571

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PASS IT ON: Doris Kearns Goodwin passes on message to then president Lyndon Johnson during a White House fellowship that at one point appeared doomed but turned out to be anything but.

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FEBRUARY 21, 2019

(805) 845-9630

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february 21

Making Connections: Representations of Reflections/Refractions of Light Keith Christiansen Chairman, Dept. of European Paintings

The Metropolitan Museum of Art

february 28

Creole Degas Darcy Grimaldo Grigsby Professor of European and American Art Since 1700

UC Berkeley

march 7

3D: Double Vision Britt Salvesen Curator and Head of Photography and Prints and Drawings

LACMA

march 14

View-Master: Novelty and Nostalgia Britt Salvesen Curator and Head of Photography and Prints and Drawings

Albrecht Dürer, St.Christopher, 1511. Woodcut on paper. Santa Barbara Museum of Art, Gift of Professor Alfred Moir.

LACMA

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t h u r s day s , 4 : 3 0 — 6 : 0 0 p m Mary Craig Auditorium Santa Barbara Museum of Art 1130 State Street Single tickets: $10 SBMA Members; $15 Non-Members Free to students with valid ID & upper-level Members For more information, visit www.sbma.net/artmatters Reserve or purchase tickets at the Visitor Services desk in person, by phone 805.884.6423, or online at tickets.sbma.net


AN EPISCOPAL PRIEST

IN A TIME OF TURMOIL

Remembering How My Father Stood Against Racial Injustice in Santa Barbara

by Macduff Everton

M

y father was an EpiscopaEvery Sunday, his sermons at Trinity were essays lian missionary in Davis, on the major personal, social, political, and sciCalifornia, before the entific issues of the day. He wanted to provide a religiously grounded perspective to what everychurch appointed him one was talking and thinking about. I think it associate rector at Santa Barbara’s Trinity Episcomade him refine and reflect on his own faith. pal Church in 1961. It was My father lived what he preached. He joined quite a change to move FAIR (Fellowship to Advance Intergroup Relations), representing Santa Barbara at their from a small, rural college town to one of the prettiest cities in national conference in St. Louis. He spoke on racial injustice at Santa Barbara City College, the world. Palm trees grew in front of the where the daily paper quoted him as saying, church. Olive trees grew on Olive Street, “People are human beings regardless of color of figs on Fig Avenue. In Davis, Dad started out holding services in the local movie skin. This is a problem that concerns all of us.” theater before the Episcopal Church purToday this might sound like pretty bland stuff, chased a house we were able to convert but in the ’60s, when racial segregation was into a parish church. Parishioners from a reality across the country, when civil rights the campus theater department turned its activists were being beaten and killed in the South, it sounded to many in Santa Barbara as windows into colorful stained-glass repliradical, communist speech. cas with only glue and tissue paper. When, in 1963, the California legislature What a contrast to the imposing Trinity Church, one of the oldest Episcopal passed the Rumford Fair Housing Act, a law churches in the state. In the English intended to stop racial discrimination in the Gothic style, it is built of local sandstone selling or renting property to “colored” people, my father publicly supported it. A year later, and designed by Philip Hubert Frohman, the same architect for the Washington however, the California Real Estate Association sponsored Proposition 14 to re-legalize National Cathedral. It all seemed near perfect to me and my brother and sister, racial discrimination in housing. The John Birch Society and the California Republican especially when my parents were able to buy a house in the Samarkand, a neighAssembly endorsed the proposition. My father borhood of charming houses and underpreached against it, saying racial justice was one of Jesus’s core messages and that racial bigotry ground utilities. I loved Santa Barbara on first sight, and was un-Christian. I love it still today, but I soon discovered Evidently not everyone agreed. When Dad When my father, the Reverend Clyde W. Everton, associate rector at Trinity Church, preached that and Roy Wilkins, the executive secretary of the that not all of Santa Barbara was as pretty racial justice was one of Jesus’s core messages, many in Santa Barbara of the 1960s thought it was as it first appeared. In the 1960 election, NAACP, spoke at Santa Barbara Junior High radical communism. John F. Kennedy received only 43 percent on civil rights, the News-Press printed a photo Justice Earl Warren, CIA director Allen Dulles, other of the vote in S.B. County running against of the two men together. Soon an anonymous Richard Nixon, who many Californians already knew political and educational leaders, “and even ministers of letter arrived at our house with the clipping, on which was could be a nasty piece of work. The conservatives in Santa the Gospel.” written: “You must be proud of your Negroid brethrens Into this politically charged environment came the showing off their civilization and bestialities.” Barbara weren’t just of the blue-haired aristocrat variety. There was also an entrenched hotbed of wing-nut conspir- Everton family. That same year the church offered our family a lovely acy theorists and, as it turned out, racists. Hope Ranch still My father had attended had a racial restrictive clause in its covenant, and the ultra- Union Theological Seminary, conservative John Birch Society, a totalitarian right-wing near Columbia University in political advocacy group, opened The American Opinion New York City, when the faculty Book Store on East Canon Perdido Street in the center included Reinhold Niebuhr and of Santa Barbara, half a block from the main post office. Paul Tillich, early critics of Hitler Thomas Storke, owner and editor of the Santa Barbara and Nazism and two of the most News-Press and himself a conservative aristocrat, won the influential theologians of the 20th Pulitzer Prize in Editorial Writing in 1962 for his exposé century. Their strong social and of the Birchers. He denounced the semi-secret society’s ethical ideals influenced many, including Martin Luther house that had been donated by a generous parishioner. wild accusations against President Dwight Eisenhower, King Jr. and Clyde W. Everton, my father. It was only three blocks from Trinity and near our schools whom they called a “dedicated, conscious agent of the Dad’s time at Union provided the foundation that gave and the center of town. The only problem came when my Communist conspiracy,” as well as Supreme Court Chief him the courage to become the religious leader he was. parents had to put our Samarkand house on the market

Quite a few people in town were shocked that my family would insert their morality into their daily lives.

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t and they began looking for a Realtor who was not supporting Prop. 14. This decision upset quite a few people in town who were shocked that my family would insert their morality into their daily lives. Some parishioners thought my father was too political. One Realtor asked him directly, “Do you mean to say that you would sell to a Negro?” He told her he would sell to anyone who could meet the financial terms. That’s when rumors began to circulate, even around the church community: “Did you know that the Evertons will sell only to Negroes?” “Did you know that the Evertons turned down a perfectly good offer from a white family?” It was getting crazy. Finally, the Advisory Committee on Human Relations asked the Santa Barbara Board of Realtors to have their members cease and desist from misrepresenting the facts. Gladyce O. Kriger, a local Realtor, sent a letter to the editor, writing that she hoped the Board of Realtors would When a photo of my father and Roy Wilkens, NAACP executive secretary, appeared in the daily paper, the hate mail, such as the one ignore the request from the Advisory Commitscrawled on this clipping, began arriving at our house. tee and instead have the tax assessor investigate “the churches and their paid preachers exhorting their parishioners to vote as they dictate. We, answering the phone, which often spewed spite and the taxpayers, are paying extra so that the Churches hate. But we loved to get to the phone first. The callers may be tax free, but this should stop when they begin were speaking our language — taunts straight out of to advocate political policy. Perhaps too, Mr. Everton’s grade school. They were mostly from unsophisticated flock had better give some thought to this man’s policy people. But we all knew the callers weren’t the ones of discrimination when he passes the collection plate who had initiated the lies and innuendos. Of course, a few phone calls were genuinely scary, very real threats, around.” Happily, people came to my father’s defense, and we knew to hang up without saying a word. including Barbara Kelly, wife of Frank K. Kelly, vice Luckily for my father, Rev. James Pike was the Epispresident of the Center for the Study of Democratic copal bishop of California. He was controversial, supInstitutions, located in Santa Barbara. She replied a porting civil rights, fair housing, women’s rights, birth shepherd’s responsibility is to guide and rescue their control, abortion, the rights of homosexuals, and civil flock from straying into error and self-destruction. liberties, and he was against McCarthyism, censor“Miss Kriger should discover the emptiness of threats ship, and, eventually, the war in Vietnam (as was my against church’s pocketbook, for nothing can separate father). Pike was also critical of the theology in the the church and its members from the love of Christ. church, advocating for “less beliefs, more belief.” He The same is true about efforts to get a church’s tax thought the doctrine of the Trinity to be “excess bagexemption taken away because of ‘political issues.’ As gage.” Bishop Pike admired and supported the work a fact, however, ‘politics’ is in the finest sense means my father was doing. But even so, it wasn’t easy going against popular the work of citizens in governing themselves; clergymen must assist their people in performing this work opinion. Courage often isn’t a public spectacle. Social in truth, in honor and with due consideration for the change requires people lead by example. Every day, my rights of others. Because Proposition 14 would ‘restore’ father had to make choices between what was easier no rights but those of pre-Rumford Act, unreasonable and what was right. As a child, I thought what he did discrimination, and because every citizen needs equal- was natural. It was only when I was older that I saw ity under the law, a ‘NO’ vote is the only moral answer how difficult it was. My father’s faith was the cynosure in the debate.” of his actions. His quiet conviction and courage were For us children, it wasn’t easy to see our father formidable. He was a man of integrity and grace. He attacked. My brother, Jon; my sister, Pat; and I were was a role model I rarely measured up to but not for not as forgiving as our parents. We felt the pressure lack of trying. he was under and wanted to defend him. My parents, Before each meal, Dad would say grace: “Bless this trying to protect us from the ugliness, forbade us from food to our use and us to Thy service and make us ever mindful of the needs of others. Amen.” We repeated that prayer three times a day, a reminder to lead a Christian life, and to be “ever mindful of the needs of others” was a constant reminder to fight the good fight for justice and equality. My father wasn’t a hellfire-andbrimstone preacher threatening eternal damnation if you didn’t follow his interpretation of God’s wishes. He was a thoughtful, principled man of real faith who believed in the Biblical ethic of standing with the powerless against the powerful. He was a role model for living a Christian life. In a few years, the vestry would reward his moral courage by firing him. An Everton family portrait with my sister, Pat, and my brother, Jon (right)

CITY OF SANTA BARBARA NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

Average Unit-size Density Incentive Program Inclusionary Housing Amendments Planning Commission Thursday, March 7, 2019, 1:00 p.m. City Hall, Council Chambers (2nd Floor) 735 Anacapa Street The Planning Commission will review proposed Inclusionary Housing amendments to the Average UnitSize Density Incentive Program (AUD Program) to Title 30 of the Municipal Code. As directed by the City Council on December 4, 2018. The amendments propose to (1) require AUD Program projects with 10 units or more to provide at least 10% of the units onsite at rental rates affordable to households at the Moderate Income level (80% to 120% of Area Median Income) and (2) require AUD Program projects with less than 10 units to pay an affordable housing in-lieu fee up to $25 per square foot. Staff will also present the feasibility analysis of variations to project parking standards for AUD Program units. You are invited to attend this public hearing. The agenda, staff report, and exhibits will be available by the end of the day on Thursday, February 28, 2019 at SantaBarbaraCA. gov/PC. Additional information about this work effort and background material can be found at SantaBarbaraCA.gov/ AUD_amendments. Written comments are welcome and should be submitted prior to the hearing by mail to PC Secretary, P.O. Box 1990, Santa Barbara, CA 93102 or by email at PCSecretary@ SantaBarbaraCA.gov. In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you need special assistance to gain access to, comment at, or participate in this meeting, please contact the City Administrator’s Office at (805) 564-5305. If possible, notification at least 48 hours prior to the meeting will enable the City to make reasonable arrangements in most cases. For information, please email Jessica Metzger, AICP, Project Planner at jmetzger@santabarbaraca.gov or call 564-5470 x 4582.

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WEEK I N D E P E N D E N T CA L E N DA R

E H T

FEB.

21-27 BY TERRY ORTEGA AND AMBER WHITE

As always, find the complete listings online at independent.com/events. And if you have an event coming up, submit it at independent.com/eventsubmit. 4-7pm. Topa Topa Brewing Co. Taproom, 120 Santa Barbara St. Free. Call 324-4150.

Granada Theatre, 1214 State St. $16-$79. Call 893-3535. Read more on p. 19.

2/21: Arthur Murray Theater Show

2/22-2/24: Night Must Fall Come see the reprise of this psychological thriller about a charming, smooth-talking hotel porter who may have committed a murder. The show runs through March 10. Fri.Sat.: 7:30pm; Sun.: 2pm. Ojai Art Center Theater, 113 S. Montgomery St., Ojai. $10$25. Call 640-8797. ojaiact.org

topatopa.beer

The students and professional dancers invite you to enjoy the glitz and glamour of ballroom dancing, from sizzling salsa to sensual and romantic rumba performances. 8pm. Center Stage Theater, 751 Paseo Nuevo. $20-$25. Call 963-0408.

centerstagetheater.org

artsandlectures.ucsb.edu

COURTESY

2/22: Live Brazilian Music Sit back

Cheeeep! Thaaaaaat’s Amazing!

2/23:

2/22:

Shadow Boxes Workshop Join guest artist Caroline Hambright for a shadowYour Bitch Is box workshop inspired by Joseph Cornell. One of the Pregnant as she pioneer of assemblage. 10am-noon. Art From Scrap, shares reassuring 302 E. Cota St. $8. Children ages 6 or younger expertise on prepamust be accompanied by an adult. Free. ration, delivery, and Call 884-0459. exploreecology.org the placement of pups. 7pm. Chaucer’s Books, 3321 State St. Free. Call 682-6787.

2/21-2/24: Death of a Salesman This new look at Arthur Miller’s Pulitzer Prize– and Tony Award–winning play will feature original live music as it follows the end of traveling salesman Willy Loman’s life and his realization that his career and life as a husband and father may have all been a lie. Thu.-Sat: 8pm; Sun.: 2 and 7pm. New Vic, 33 W. Victoria St. $25-$65. Call 965-5400.

ensembletheatre.com

2/21-2/22: I Am: a theatrical dance performance This two-act production, directed and performed by Mackenzie James & Co., combines sight, sound, and movement to explore the inner beings of someone who is searching for meaning. Social hour: 6-7pm; performance: 7-8:30pm. The Community Arts Workshop, 631 Garden St. $8-$15. Call 324-7443.

sbcaw.org/events

2/21: Eleanor Green Winters

Teen Super Smash Bros. Ultimate Tournament Zair, projectile, aerial, or bair. If you are a teen and know these attack strategies, you are invited to participate or cheer on your friends at this after-hours Super Smash Bros. Ultimate Tournament with prizes, snacks, and other activities. Registration is suggested. 6-8pm. Faulkner Gallery, S.B. Central Library, 40 E. Anapamu St. Free. Ages 12-18. Call 564-5681.

chaucersbooks.com

THURSDAY 2/21

2/21: Art Matters Lecture: Making Connections: Representations of Reflections/Refractions of Light In this talk, Keith Christiansen will share some of his strategies for taking the mystery out of and looking at Renaissance and baroque paintings. 4:30-6pm. Mary Craig Auditorium, S.B. Museum of Art, 1130 State St. $10-$15. Call 963-4364. sbma.net

2/21: Trail Talk: Hiking and Backpacking on the Jessica Lang Dance This New

and relax with Marceu and Amalia, who will play sweet Brazilian sounds while you enjoy

sbplibrary.org Channel Islands Area author James Wapotich will describe an imagined traverse across what was a single island in the back ice age and the different hiking and backpacking opportunities on the islands today. 6:30-8:30pm. Faulkner Gallery, S.B. Central Library, 40 E. Anapamu St. Free. Call 564-5621.

2/21:

York–based company of 10 graceful and athletic dancers will debut a repertoire rich in stunning movement, dynamic visuals, and beautiful cinematic composition. 8pm. The Granada Theatre, 1214 State St. $20-$49. Call 893-3535.

artsandlectures .ucsb.edu

sbplibrary.org

2/21: Baynk & Golden Vessel Dance to the tropical smooth house sound and layered electronic arrangements of this New Zealand singer/songwriter, producer and multi-instrumentalist BAYNK along with special guest, Australian producer, Golden Vessel. 9pm-1:30am. Eos Lounge, 500 Anacapa St. $10. Ages 21+. Call 564-2410.

eoslounge.com

2/21: Fundraiser Night for Hospice S.B. You’re invited to share a drink, mingle, and meet some of the Hospice of S.B. (HSB) family, with 10 percent of the proceeds to benefit HSB.

FRIDAY 2/22 2/22: Doris Kearns Goodwin: LeadLead ership in Turbulent Times The Pulitzer Prize–winning presidential historian will combine her signature storytelling with lessons from four of our nation’s presidents, providing audiences with an essential road map for leaders in every field and for all of us in our everyday lives. 7:30pm. The

Hear puppy midwife and author of So

delicious food. 6:30-8:30pm. Brazil Arts Café, 1230 State St. Free. Call 845-7656. brasilartscafe.com

2/22-2/27: S.B. Restaurant Week Get your forks ready for a tasty 10-day event, and dine at the best establishments for a great price. Find participating restau restaurants and offerings online. $25 (two-course lunch)–$40 (three-course dinner). Read more on p. 36. sbrestaurantweeks.com

SATURDAY 2/23 2/23-2/24: The Watsons Go to Bir Birmingham – 1963 This play, based on Christopher Paul Curtis’s book of the same name, focuses on a loving Michigan family of five who travels south to Alabama during the turbulent summer of 1963. Sat.: 2 and 8pm; Sun.: 2pm. Performing Arts Theater, UCSB. $12-$20. Ages 9+. Call 893-2064.

theaterdance.ucsb.edu

SHARON BRADFORD PHOTO

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COURTESY

WEEK

A L W A Y S A M A Z I N G. N e v e r r o u t i n e. 5 2/2 Y A ND

fridaY

THE CLAIRVOYANTS

FEB

22

8 PM

MO

2/25:

Be at Peace with Food & Your Body Join a weekly support meeting, educate yourself on the triggers that lead to emotional eating, and focus on practicing good self-care to find peace with food and your body. 5:45pm. Family Therapy Institute, 111 E. Arrellaga St. $45. Call 722-7400 to schedule an initial phone meeting.

mindfuleatinginstitute.net

THU & FRI

pancho barraza

Chris D’Elia: Follow The Leader Tour

FEB 28 & MAR 1

8 PM

fridaY

MAR

8

8 PM

fridaY

flogging molly

MAR

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8 PM

3 4 0 0 E H i g h w a y 24 6 , S a n t a Yn e z · 8 0 0 - 24 8 - 6 2 74 · C h u m a s h C a s i n o . c o m Must be 21 years of age or older to attend. Chumash Casino Resort reserves the right to change or cancel promotions and events.

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self-esteem and social connection. Snacks and dinner will be provided as well as van rides to the event for youth from Santa Maria and Lompoc. 2-10pm. Deckers Outdoor Corp., 250 Coromar Dr., Goleta. Free. Ages 12-17. Call 963-3636.

tinyurl.com/PROUDProm2019 2/23: Coffee with a Black Guy This is the inaugural event of a new program of community conversations titled Voices of the Stranger, hosted by S.B.’s own James Joyce III, and will feature coffee, connection, and dialogue about some tough and often uncomfortable realities that impact some us and therefore all of us. Stay after and enjoy tacos, drink, and live music. 4-7pm. The Sandbox, 414 Olive St. Free (donations accepted).

coffeewithablackguy.com

2/23-2/24: S.B. Home & Garden Lifestyle Expo During this two-day home show, find the resources needed for rebuilding, reconstructing, or upgrading your home. Sat.: 10am-5pm; Sun.: 10am-4pm. Earl Warren Showgrounds, 3400 Calle Real. Free. Call 252-5227. earlwarren.com

2/23: Through-line: Brooks Institute, a culture for photographic education The Architectural Foundation of S.B. presents this exhibition, which looks at the photographs of three Brooks Institute alumni, Christopher Broughton, Christy Gutzeit, and Ralph Clevenger. The exhibit shows through March 6. 1pm. Architectural Foundation of Santa Barbara Gallery, 229 E. Victoria St. Free. Call 965-6307. afsb.org

2/23: No Indoor Voices Kimmie Dee will bring killer comedy to S.B. with Dana Gould, Emmy Award–winning writer for The Simpsons and Family Guy, and Matt McCarthy. 7:30pm. Brazil Arts Café, 1230

2/23: 6th Annual PROUD Prom & Youth Connect Conference All LGBTQ+ and allied youth are invited to join together in song, dance, and a walk on the runway toward increased

Oh my! What a pretty little bird...


FEB.

INDEPENDENT CALENDAR

21-27

As always, find the complete listings online at independent.com/events. And if you have an event coming up, submit it at independent.com/eventsubmit.

SUNDAY 2/24 2/24: All-Brahms Chamber Music Concert Listen to the chamber music of Johannes Brahms (1833-1897) with musicians Joanne Kim, clarinet; Han Kim, violin; Sang Yhee, cello; and Constantine Finehouse, piano. 3:30pm. Trinity Episcopal Church, 1500 State St. Suggested donation: $10.

CORY MOTORS Specializing in the latest Volkswagen’s with factory trained technicians!

tinyurl.com/MusicAt Trinity

2/24-2/27: Speaking of Stories: Personal Stories Enjoy an

Your trusted Volkswagen auto repair destination for over 35 years!

2/26:

Family owned & operated since 1982.

Healing Through Restorative Justice

Fania Davis

Longtime social justice activist, restorative justice practitioner, and professor Fania Davis will speak to the importance of restorative justice (based on a desired set of principles and practices to mediate conflict, strengthen community, and repair harm) and how it can contribute to processes of individual and community healing. 6pm. MultiCultural Ctr. Theater, UCSB. Free. mcc.sa.ucsb.edu

CO U R T E

SY

State St. $15 (online)–$20 (cash at the door). Call 845-7656.

tinyurl.com/KimmieDee-Comedy

2/23: ZShorts International Film Festival + Short Film Binge Watch How many short films can you watch in one sitting? Filmmakers submitted 212 short films from 30 countries. Dine on bites from a delicious food truck, and stay around for an exciting red carpet event with awards and a VIP after-party (location revealed later). 1:30-9pm. Marjorie Luke Theatre, 721 E. Cota St. $5-$50. zshorts.com

2/23: Winter 2019 Healing Arts Faire Experience energetic healing,

tinyurl.com/HealingFaire2019

2/23: A Workshop for Collectors: Connoisseurship of Japanese Woodblock Prints Dr. Ellis Tinios will lead a hands-on workshop and discussion based on ukiyo-e (floating world) prints. 2pm. Luria Activities Ctr., S.B. Museum of Art, 1130 State St. $30$45. Call 884-6425.

Also servicing Toyota, Lexus, Honda, Acura, and Subaru.

eclectic collection of original true stories of love, sex, family, childhood misadventures, and more performed by their authors. There will be cookies and milk on the patio after the show. Sun.: 2pm; Mon.-Wed.: 7:30pm. Center Stage Theater, 751 Paseo Nuevo. $18-$28. Call 963-0408.

Rachelle Cruz

A Day with the Authors

centerstagetheater.org

Bella DePaulo

sbma.net

…a celebrat ion of writ ing and r eading

BE

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psychic readings, massage, and more as S.B.’s talented practitioners offer 15-minute mini-treatment sessions for $20. Full sessions will be available at an additional cost. Noon-5pm. The Center of the Heart, 487

N. Turnpike Rd., Goleta. $20-$40. Call 964-4861.

(805) 965-4582 429 E. Montecito St.

2/27:

SATURDAY, MARCH 2, 2019 at

Harvey Mary

Chase’s 1944 Pulitzer Prize–winning comedy follows the story of Elwood P. Dowd, whose best friend is a six-foot-tall rabbit that’s invisible to others. Watch as those around George are challenged between having him committed to a sanitarium or ultimately fall under Harvey’s invisible charms. The show previews February 27-28 and runs through March 16. 7:30pm. Garvin Theatre, SBCC West Campus. $10-$18. Call 965-5935.

Randa Jarrar

Ivy Pochoda

Volunteer Opportunity

6878 Hollister Avenue Goleta, CA 93117 8:30 a.m. – 3:30 p.m.

Registration Fee: $65 includes a.m. coffee, lunch and author presentations

SEATING IS LIMITED REGISTER ONLINE NOW AT: www. womenslit erar yfest ival.com

theatergroupsbcc.com

Fundraiser

Hilton Garden Inn

Civil Discourse

Protest

>>>

Florencia Ramirez

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The Women’s Literary Festival celebrates diversity, literacy and social justice. It is formed under a non-profit status exclusively for literary and educational purposes.

FEBRUARY 21, 2019

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29


DISASTER RELIEF FUNDING

FEB.

INDEPENDENT CALENDAR

21-27

The County of Santa Barbara received federal funding to establish a Thomas Fire and 1/9 Debris Flow Disaster Relief Grant program for creative professionals and arts and culture nonprofits economically impacted by the disasters.

As always, find the complete listings online at independent.com/events. And if you have an event coming up, submit it at independent.com/eventsubmit.

WEDNESDAY 2/27 2/27: Family Night This exclusive

VISIT SBAC.CA.GOV TO APPLY

2/26-2/27:

2/24:

Banff Mountain Film Festival World Tour

Academy Awards Live Broadcast Bring your friends and watch a live broadcast of the 91st Academy Awards on the big screen beginning with the pre-show. 3pm. The Arlington Theatre, 1317 State St. Free. Call 963-4408. thearlingtontheatre.com

Enjoy the world’s best films and videos on mountain subjects with awe-inspiring thrills and grandeur captured in exotic locations all over the world. 7:30pm. The Arlington Theatre, 1317 State St. $16-$21.50. Call 893-3535. Read more on p. 49. artsandlectures.ucsb.edu

TE

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ENROLL NOW!

CO

Applications are accepted through March 15 at sbac.ca.gov

URT

ESY

evening at the museum will offer a variety of interactive learning activities like maritime-themed Lego projects, kelp discovery, and face painting, with light food and entertainment. 4-7pm. S.B. Maritime Museum, 113 Harbor Wy. $15$25. Call 456-8747. sbmm.org

2/24: Snarky Puppy Featuring a revolv-

Master Yun Traditional Tai Chi & Kung Fu We strive to teach a new generation the practices of Traditional Chinese Martial Arts in order to promote confidence and a healthy life. 1807 East Cabrillo, Suite C info@masteryun.com | 805-837-8833 masteryun.com

“We strive to provide the Best Care” Most insurances accepted

FREE Exam & X-Ray limited time offer

Implant $700

Does not include crown, abutment or bone graft. Some restrictions apply.

Zoom Whitening

50% OFF

artsandlectures.ucsb.edu

2/24: Gospel Music: Past, Present + Future, A Celebration of Black Culture There’s nothing like live gospel music from the Greater Hope Baptist Church. Learn about its origins and how it still lives and inspires today. 6-7:30pm. S.B. Central Library, 40 E. Anapamu St. Free. Call 564-5621.

sbplibrary.org

STAR DENTAL Private Practice Crown $600

ing cast of up to 25 musicians who work with some of the biggest names in music, this Brooklyn-based collective will perform an irresistible mix of funk, fever, and finesse. 7pm. The Granada Theatre, 1214 State St. $16-$59. Call 893-3535.

Denture

50% OFF For senior citizens

2/24: Erotic Art of Japan’s Ukiyo-e Masters in a Comparative Context In this lecture, Dr. Ellis Tinios will offer comparisons with European erotic art to highlight distinctive aspects of Japanese attitudes toward sex and the representation of the human body in the Edo period (16031868). 2:30pm. Mary Craig Auditorium, S.B. Museum of Art, 1130 State St. Free. Call 963-4364. sbma.net

FARMERS

MARKET

SCHEDULE THURSDAY

SUNDAY

Goleta: Camino Real Marketplace, 10am-2pm

Carpinteria: 800 block of Linden Ave., 3-6pm

TUESDAY 2/26 2/26: Beyond Branding with Terry Duffy Graphic designer and fine artist Terry Duffy will cover a diverse range of topics, tips, and tools for any creative professional interested in developing or expanding their professional brand. Pre-registration is required. 5:30-7:30pm. Main Gathering Rm., Pilgrim Terrace, 649 Pilgrim Terrace Dr. Suggested donation: $20. Call 452-4881.

TUESDAY

FRIDAY

Montecito: 1100 and 1200 blocks of Coast Village Rd., 8-11:15am

SATURDAY

Old Town S.B.: 500-600 blocks of State St., 3-6:30pm

WEDNESDAY

Downtown S.B.: Corner of Santa Barbara and Cota sts., 8:30am-1pm

Solvang: Copenhagen Dr. and 1st St., 2:30-6pm

FISHERMAN’S MARKET

awolsb.org/bizarts

SATURDAY

Rain or shine, meet local fishermen on the Harbor’s commercial pier, and buy fresh fish (filleted or whole), live crab, abalone, sea urchins, and more. 117 Harbor Wy., 6-11am. Call 259-7476. cfsb.info/sat

*For qualified patients. Some restrictions apply. Must present advertisement.

15 E Arrellaga St. Suite 7, Santa Barbara CA Weekend Appoinments Available

30

805-560-0123

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FEBRUARY 21, 2019

Fundraiser INDEPENDENT.COM

Volunteer Opportunity

Civil Discourse

Protest


WEEK Shows on Tap 2/21, 2/23: Dargan’s Irish Pub & Restaurant Thu.: Dannsair. 6:30-8:30pm. Sat.: Mark Roberts Band. 9-11:30pm. 18 E. Ortega St. Free. Call 568-0702.darganssb.com

2/21-2/23, 2/27: The Endless Summer Bar-Café Thu.: Kylie Butler. Fri.: Nax. Sat.: Blues Bob. Wed.: Dave Vignoe. 5-8pm. 113 Harbor Wy. Free. Call 564-1200. 2/22-2/23: The Brewhouse Fri.: One Two Tree. 9pm. Sat.: The Kinsella Band. 8pm. 229 W. Montecito St. Free. Call 884-4664. 2/22: Carr Winery Barrel Rm. Shennie and Cata. 6-8pm. 414 N. Salsipuedes St. Free. Ages 21+. Call 965-7985. carrwinery.com 2/22-2/24: Cold Spring Tavern Fri.: The Nombres. 6-9pm. Sat.: Oddly Straight; 1-4pm. Spoonful; 5-8pm. Sun.: The Reserve; 1:15-4pm. Dusty Jugz. 4:30-7:30pm. 5995 Stagecoach Rd. Free. Call 967-0066. coldspringtavern.com

JUST ANNOUNCED

The Robert Cray Band MAY 17 Robert Cray has been bridging the lines between blues, soul and R&B for the past four decades, with five GRAMMY® wins, a Blues Hall of Fame inductee, recipient of the Americana Lifetime achievement award, countless tours and over 20 acclaimed albums.

2/22: Eos Lounge Justin Jay. 9pm-1:30am. 500 Anacapa St. $5-$15. Ages 21+. Call 564-2410. eoslounge.com 2/22-2/23: Maverick Saloon Fri.: Crown City Bombers. Sat.: High Voltage. 8pm. 3687 Sagunto St., Santa Ynez. Free-$5. Ages 21+. Call 686-4785. themavsaloon.com 2/22-2/23, 2/26: Mercury Lounge Fri.: The Caverns. $10. Sat.: Key Party, Cat OK. $8. Tue.: Maita & Mise. $5. 9pm. 5871 Hollister Ave., Goleta. Ages 21+. Call 967-0907.

John Pizzarelli Trio

2/22-2/23: M.Special Brewing Co. Fri.: Feral Vida. Sat.: The Revelators. 6-8pm. 6860 Cortona Dr., Bldg. C., Goleta. Free. Call 968-6500.

mspecialbrewco.com

2/22-2/24: Velvet Jones Fri.: Private Island, Kuwada, Hush. $15-$18. Sat.: KOLARS, Alex Lilly. $10-$15. Sun.: Jade Jackon. $12-$14. 7pm. 423 State St. velvet-jones.com

MARCH 5

2/23: Figueroa Mountain Brewing Co. (Buellton) Just Dave Band. 6-9pm. 45 Industrial Wy., Buellton. Free. Ages 21+. Call 694-2252 x110. figmtnbrew.com

With his hip, swinging and sophisticated style, Pizzarelli has cultivated a career of standards, late-night ballads, and by playing sublime and inventive guitar.

2/23-2/24: Figueroa Mountain Brewing Co. (Los Olivos) Sat.: Stiff Pickle Orchestra. 3-6pm. Sun.: 3 Way Stop. 3pm-1am. 2363 Alamo Pintado Ave., SY Los Olivos. Free. Ages 21+. Call TE 694-2252 x343. figmtnbrew.com CO

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Sponsored by the Bentson Kauth Family

2/23: The James Joyce Ulysses Jasz. 7:30-10:30pm. 513 State St. Free. Ages 21+. Call 962-2668.

An Evening with

sbjamesjoyce.com

MARCH 15

Mark Hummel

2/21-2/24, 2/26:

SOhO Restaurant & Music Club Thu.: Pacific Haze, Nyrus. 9pm. $8-$10. Ages 21+. Fri.: The English Beat, DJ Darla Bea. 9pm. $20. Ages 21+. Sat.: Mark Hummel’s Golden State Lone Star Revue, Anson Funderburgh. 9pm. $18-$23. Ages 21+. Sun.: S.B. Piano Boys. 7pm. $5-$10. Tues.: Kayt Mar, Peach T, Reef City, Nick Vaughan. 7pm. $10. 1221 State St. Call 962-7776.

MARCH 23

Derek Douget Douget and his stellar New Orleansbased band represent some of the finest jazz programs in the country.

It’s Magic!

Tickets are disappearing fast

SPONSORS

sohosb.com

ELAINE F. STEPANEK FOUNDATION LOBERO THEATRE ENDOWMENT FOR AMERICAN ROOTS

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805.963.0761 LOBERO.ORG FEBRUARY 21, 2019

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FEBRUARY 21, 2019

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Close Escapes

living

CHUCK GRAHAM PHOTOS

p. 33

WILLIAM SHARP

Photography

ELEVATED PERSPECTIVE: The author (pictured above and below) takes in the long view of Death Valley from Wildrose Peak, elevation 9,064 feet. The peak is 4.2 miles from the trailhead, with an elevation gain of 2,200 feet.

Much More Than a Valley Floor I

t must have been past midnight when I gave up on those raging northwesterly winds dying down for the night. They were blowing 50 mph and the temperature was in the mid-20s on Death Valley’s Wild Rose Peak. But the sweeping starry views were worth every frigid gust the Mojave Desert threw at me. I had decided not to bring a tent to this harsh and arid national park; instead, I wanted to test my new down sleeping bag out beneath the stars. The bag easily passed the test, but still, there wasn’t much sleeping going on because of those screaming winds. This starkly beautiful national park holds the lowest point in North America, and it’s one As lifeless as Death Valley can appear to be, of the hottest, driest places on those surrounding mountain ranges Earth. offer a different perspective of the desert, But there’s more to Death Valley National Park than its overlooking the diverse, unique landscape that vast valley floor. Consider that helped it become a national park in 1994. Death Valley is also flanked by two daunting mountain ranges — also within the park — the juniper-covered Panamint Range, located between Badwater Basin and Mount Whitney, and the Amargosa Range, in all its dark, Mordor-esque intrigue. Badwater, the Racetrack Playa, the Devil’s Golf Course, the Artist’s Palette, Zabriskie Point, and other desertscapes lie within the arid valley floor between these seemingly barren mountains. You can also take your pick of creaky ghost towns to explore, each possessing their own desert charm. As lifeless as Death Valley can appear to be, those surrounding mountain ranges offer a different perspective of the desert, overlooking the diverse, unique landscape that helped it become a national park in 1994. Try some hiking and backpacking in the Panamint Mountains. Follow Wildrose Canyon to the row of charcoal kilns. Along the way, keep an eye out for scruffy wild burros. It’s here you’ll find the trailheads to Telescope Peak (elevation 11,043 ft.) to the south and Wildrose Peak (9,064 ft.) to the north. The hike to Wildrose Peak is the shorter route and easier to summit. However, the views from both peaks are incredible. Planning a trip? First, visit nps .gov/deva/. — Chuck Graham

OUTRAGEOUS: Among legions of fanatics who recognize Ventura’s Lonnie Toft (pictured at Endless Wave skatepark in Oxnard, 1977), their most common flashback showcases his innovation of the eight-wheeled skateboard. Toft said recently that after his older brother Dan turned him on to the concept, circa 1973, he promptly bought a pair of clay-wheeled roller skates at a swap meet, took them apart, and fastened them to an extra-wide skateboard deck he had cut from an old door. “I liked to have a variety of boards,” he said, “and the eightwheeler was just part of my quiver.” Lesser known is that Toft — who rode for the Radon boats skateboard team before getting picked up by Santa Barbara–based Sims Skateboards in 1976 — built and rode some of the very first snowboards. Toft also tried to compel Tom Sims to introduce wider skateboards to the burgeoning industry. At the time, a Sims deck was skinny and pointed, like a miniature surfboard. “I told Tom, ‘Hey, there’s no offshore wind here, man,” Toft remembered recently. “We’re not surfing, okay? And I need a bigger place to put my feet.”

Back in the Day :

Photo Book Captures Golden Era

W

ith the hefty thump of a hardbound photo book, an advance copy of Back in the Day landed on my desk in mid-November 2017. I instantly planned to assemble a photo-heavy article in time for the holidays — a loud shout-out to photographer William Sharp, writer Ozzie Ausband, and Berkeley-based publisher Gingko Press. Then Thanksgiving arrived. Then my friend Jim died in his sleep. (I wept for Jim in the broader confusion of his early departure, but also because I had really wanted to witness the singular stoke in his eyes as he slowly flipped through the book’s 466 pages. You see, as a lifelong skateboarder and a longtime photographer for Santa Barbara’s Powell-Peralta GET HOT! Th e fi Skateboards, Jim woulda to 2,500 copi rst edition of Back in the es, half in oran Day dug it the most.) Then ge, half in blue was limited legend Tony Alva getting the Thomas Fire came to high in Arizon . That’s skate a, 1978. town, followed by that horrendous debris flow, which buried any wellintentioned goal to return to how things were before. But this isn’t an excuse-laden apology to Sharp, Ausband, and the kind folks at Gingko. It’s really a short testament to the timeless vibe and sweet power of nostalgia evoked by a collection of color and black-and-white photographs of young innovators blowing up a small region of radical. Plus, for us Santa Barbara–based fanatics, there are shots of Jay Smith, Stacy Peralta, Steve Caballero, and Ray “Bones” Rodriguez, among other Powell-Peralta team riders. — Keith Hamm


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living | Starshine

A Control Freak’s Funeral

D

early Beloved, we are gathered here today to plan a funeral. But don’t worry—it’s going to be the most soul-satisfying, lifeaffirming, totally-not-creepy sendoff that ever consecrated a cadaver. See, I recently attended the memorial service for a beloved family member who died suddenly — and much, much too young. None of us knew how she wanted to take her final leave (coffin? viewing? urn? ocean?) or to whom she wanted donations made in lieu of flowers (Humane Society? homeless shelter?) because these aren’t the sorts of things on which busy, prime-of-life people spend a lot of time ruminating. So we guessed, by god, because what else can you do? And we shuffled through the traditional paces prescribed for an aggrieved family: choosing a casket, ordering flowers, designating burial garments and jewelry, assembling a slide show, banging out a stark and bloodless obit, and attempting to sum up this woman’s life, character, and passions for the eulogizing pastor who never even met her. Not once. I can’t remember ever being at a memorial service where the officiant actually knew the deceased. What is that?? Whole church full of people who love and are desperate to remember someone— and the emcee is just spurting conjecture and hearsay. I object. So I’ve decided to plan my farewell fesemail: starshine@roshell.com tivities myself, and well in advance, to avoid the horrific eventuality of being laid to rest at a party that sucks — to prevent, as it were, my last rites from being all wrong. I mean, what if someone opts to play some sappy song by some rubbish band? Then everyone will think of me every time they hear that dreck forever after. Oh, no, you don’t. I came into this world a control freak, and I have no intention of leaving it otherwise. And I’m not alone. I discovered that some not-especially-dour friends have also given thought to their own bow-out blowout—their toodle-oo do, if you will. One dreams of her loved ones eschewing a funeral altogether and simply scarfing hot fudge sundaes in her honor. Another has collected her favorite 20 photos of herself over the years just for this purpose. Another hopes for a Sousa march and a roast. Why not?? It’s more fun, fitting, and fabulous than anything someone else could dream up to honor you. Even my 13-year-old already has opinions about his own memorial service. He’s a straight shooter who, not surprisingly, has strong language preferences. At his event, no one will be allowed to use the term “celebration of life” or any other namby-pamby euphemisms. “If anyone uses the term ‘passed away,’ ” he warns, “it’s gonna be their funeral, too.” I understand that these events exist for the mourners, not the dead — and if anyone’s busted up over my demise (Aww! You guys!), I want them to get what they came for. (Unlike my friend Andy, whose only demand is that his funeral guests listen to Justin Bieber for an hour “because I won’t be there, and I think it would be funny.”) But I’d like for my friends and family to know that if I can’t be there with them anymore, at least I tried to envelop them in my favorite things while they’re stuck being sad. There will be dancing. To something funky. A flash mob is not out of the question. There must be scrumptious comfort food (“Prepare yourself, you know it’s a must. Got to have a friend in cheeses …”). I’d love a couple of therapy dogs for snuggling. Or a temporary tattoo station with antique typewriter tats. And a table with all of my jewelry dumped on it and a sign that says, “Free! Take one!” No clergy. No saying kind things that aren’t true. And no quoting Michael Scott from The Office (Kids, I’m looking at you). Just favorite stories, a skirting-inappropriate amount of laughter, and, for dramatic flair, a spin of The Cars’ “Bye Bye Love” in closing. Don’t forget to grab your schwag bag on the way out. It’s got my ashes in it. Sprinkle me somewhere fun.

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FOOD&DRINK

ns

promotio

p.36

Restaurant Week’s 10 Days of Deals R

elatively small Santa Barbara boasts an impressively big-

city concentration of restaurants, with the next hotspot opening every few weeks. But that variety — of prices, of cuisines, of settings, of neighborhoods — can make choosing where to eat tonight a perplexing affair, handcuffing many into a safe but somewhat stale restaurant routine. It’s time to shake off those culinary chains, and Santa Barbara Restaurant Week (SBRW) is here to set you free. From February 22 to March 3, more than two dozen participating

Trying Three of the

32 MENUS in Second Annual Effort BY MATT KETTMANN

restaurants will be serving a set three-course dinner menu for $40, and some will also be serving a two-course lunch menu for $25. The 10-day promotion provides a predictably priced platform to explore the region’s edible offerings and a digestible road map of selected restaurants for focusing your hunt. (But keep in mind that beverages, tax, and gratuity are not included, so tip appropriately!) On the verge of this second annual effort, I visited three restaurants to see what they are offering.

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LUCKY’S STEAKHOUSE

CHOP DEAL: On the normal Lucky’s menu, the pork chop alone is nearly $40.

“I know we’re an expensive restaurant,” Leonard Schwartz readily admitted of Lucky’s, the classy Coast Village Road steakhouse he manages. “That pork chop alone costs almost $40.” But during SBRW, $40 gets you a choice of starter as well as that double-cut pork chop—rubbed with subtle spice, charred just right to showcase the savory meat—with ample sides of cashmere-soft mashed potatoes and bitter-salty sautéed spinach. The starter options are almost meals themselves: The French onion soup’s Gruyére and bread topping become one with the rich veal and chicken broth; the grilled artichoke gains heft with the choice of house-made mayo or hollandaise; the Lucky’s Salad combines shrimp, bacon, romaine, green beans, avocado, and Roquefort into a leafy yet cobb-like affair. And you needn’t go pig either. The other main course options are grilled salmon—crunchy outside, soft within—in a lemon-caper butter sauce and green beans, or the sautéed tofu with a miso-laced Japanese vinaigrette— requested by resident vegan activist Kathy Freston—served with green onions, shiitake, and spinach. With the choice of dessert—turtle sundae, loaded with caramel and pecans; cheesecake with luscious berry compote; apple crisp with vanilla ice cream —this is likely the best deal of the week. The bonus is that it allows entry to this hallowed space usually reserved for our wealthier neighbors, where walls are lined with portraits of celebrities, some of whom might actually be sitting at the adjacent table. Go big by ordering one of the by-the-glass cellar selections —Opus One 2015 for $98—or dive into what must be the largest Sine Qua Non lineup in town. 1279 Coast Village Rd., Montecito; 565-7540; luckys-steakhouse.com

36

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FEBRUARY 21, 2019

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THE NEWBIE:

DUE LUNE

LASAGNA LOVE: Homemade lasagna is fine winter comfort food at Due Lune.

“That’s my signature,” said Chef Elisabetta Gerli of the eponymous lasagna that’s part of Due Lune’s SBRW dinner menu. Arriving in a hot, single-serving casserole dish, the pasta sheets are layered with her homemade meat sauce, béchamel, and parmesan, cheese and sauce oozing with each forkful. Until last June, Elisabetta and Antonio Gerli ran Sorriso Italiano in Isla Vista, which they opened in 2012 after moving from Padua, Italy, to start second careers. They decided not to renew their lease, and a couple of weeks later, the Montesano Group—which owns Lucky’s, Joe’s, Tre Lune, etc.—called to inquire whether they’d want to run Due Lune, in the former Eladio’s space at the coveted, touristjammed corner of State and Cabrillo. They opened on August 1. The lasagna is part of the dinner menu, but Due Lune is also offering a $25 lunch spread. After the simple but solid bread course, featuring a non-nut spinach pesto and Italian olive oil and olives, the choice is between the vegetable soup of the day or the zesty Insalata Betty. Then, for entrées, there is the farfalle with asparagus and shrimp, eggplant parmigiana, or chicken scallopine in a tangy marsala sauce with earthy mushrooms. No dessert is included for lunch. As for the dinner menu, it starts with either soup, Insalata Due Lune, or a tuna carpaccio. Follow that with the lasagna, the Mezzelune ai Porcini (half-moon ravioli filled with porcini and a butter-parmesan sauce), or the salmon puttanesca. Dessert is three scoops of gelato or the Mousse al Cioccolato, with juicy mixed berries floating atop the airy, easy-to-accidentally-eat-all-of confection. The bonus treat at Due Lune any day of the year are the views of the waterfront, where the activity is endless even on rainy days, from the dolphin statue to the bobbing masts of the harbor. 1 State St.; 770-3112; duelunecucina.com


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Goleta’s restaurant scene is also popping these days, although The Roof Top Bar & Bistro is one of the only SBRW participants for those who live on this side of town. Hopefully that changes in the future. This restaurant occupies the, yes, rooftop of the Hilton Garden Inn, which offers stunning views in every direction: skyscraping Santa Ynez Mountains and foothill orchards that stretch from Glen Annie Golf Course toward Santa Barbara to the UCSB skyline and the ocean beyond. There’s a fireplace and kumquat trees up there, and live music every Thursday to Saturday. But food is also a focus. “We’re really elevating the culinary programs at this level of Hilton,” said the hotel’s Patricia Kimball, who moved from Hawai‘i to run its sales and marketing efforts. Their dinner-only SBRW menu is set in stone: roasted beet salad with Humboldt fog cheese, chive oil, and beet syrup, that salty, ashy-rind cheese giving funk to the earthy root veggies; braised beef short ribs, served atop horseradish creamed potatoes with an assortment of veggies; and then the foamy textured chocolate lava cake, hot with sauce yet cooled by raspberry coulis. That’s all presented with attentive service, perfect for the whole family. Said my son, Mason, as I scribbled notes, “Daddy, write down that the people are very nice.” 6878 Hollister Ave., Goleta; 562-5996

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SBRW 2019 PARTICIPANTS The following restaurants are serving special menus for lunch (two courses for $25) and/or dinner (three courses for $40), Friday, February 22-Sunday, March 3. See sbrestaurantweeks.com for details. Barbareño Bella Vista Blackbird Bluewater Grill The Brewhouse Cava Chuck’s Waterfront Grill Convivo Corktree Cellars The Dining Room Due Lune Helena Avenue Bakery

Jane at the Marketplace Jane Santa Barbara Joe’s Café Les Marchands The Little Door Loquita Los Arroyos Goleta Los Arroyos Montecito Lucky’s Steakhouse The Middle Child The Monarch Olio e Limone Ristorante The Roof Top Bistro & Bar Sama Sama Kitchen Santo Mezcal Smithy Kitchen + Bar Toma Tre Lune Ristorante Tyger Tyger Wine Cask

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e have no signage here but have been

surviving on solely the aroma alone,” says Justin West, chef of Soul Cal Smokehouse, the latest addition to the Santa Barbara Public Market. That delicious smoky smell curlicues all the way out to Chapala Street, drawing people into the carbon-y delights of brisket and more. Sometimes too much more — they’ve already set off the fire alarm. But as co-chef Jason Carter explains, “It’s not an official barbecue restaurant until you get the fire department to show.” West is no stranger to the Santa Barbara food scene, having previously helmed Foodie Award– winning Julienne and Wildwood Kitchen at The Mill on Haley Street. From a public perspective Wildwood closed all of a sudden in November, but West was ready. “We had all our government ducks in a row, so when all the shit hit the fan on Haley Street, we were ready,” he explained. “I’m just really excited to be up here at the Public Market.” And in a beat-the-SantaBarbara-red-tape miracle, they signed a lease right before Christmas and opened January 21. Both West and Carter think their new spot — the one Belcampo occupied when the S.B. Public Market first opened — is a perfect location. “We had to charge three dollars more per brisket sandwich at Wildwood,” said West, explaining how much money they save not having to pay servers, not having 1,000 square feet of dining room, not having to offer margaritas, and more. “Here people get counter service, eat off paper plates — it’s what people want from barbecue.” Said Carter, “The food just tastes better here.” They’ve received nothing but praise from Public Market owner Marge Cafarelli and their fellow vendors. West said Cafarelli tried to lure him to the Public Market when it first opened, and he’s overjoyed to be there now. “They plugged us in, and we’re just a cog in the wheel,” he said. “I’m not competing with Corazon or Empty Bowl or Dario [of Ca’ Dario] — our customers are the same, we just cater to different cravings on differ-

ent days. At the end of day, if it’s good for them, it’s good for me. That’s the culture Marge has created.” Added Carter, “We’re all about family, community, camaraderie.” Those familiar with Wildwood’s menu will feel more than at home at Soul Cal, from the housemade sausages to the tri-tip, from the BBQ beans to the Frito pie. But now there’s also smoked pork belly—West claims they’re going through a belly a day — that is also the star in a vibrant banh mi (plus some pâté to die for, no surprise given West’s skills with charcuterie). There’s also a fuller slate of burgers, the only ones in the Public Market to serve them now. And there’s even hope for those who long for Brunoise, the pop-up that West offered occasionally at Wildwood as a way to appease his old Julienne fans. “We’ve got a lot of different outlets here,” he said. “Maybe we will end up doing some more Brunoise-style high-end dinners at Wine + Beer at some point.”

Chefs Justin West and Jason Carter Bring Barbecue Back to Downtown

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And while the years-empty back corner of the Public Market they now occupy practically seemed haunted, they’re overjoyed to be there in a kitchen larger than the one they had on Haley. “It was the easiest build-out ever, as there was no build out,” quipped West. “Marge said to me, ‘You and Carter are the only two who could make this corner work. It needs big personalities, and wellknown chefs.’” And it never hurts to have all that delectable char floating toward unsuspecting noses. Santa Barbara Public Market, 38 W. Victoria St., tinyurl.com/soul-cal-bbq

John Dickson’s reporting can be found every day online at SantaBarbara.com. Send tips to info@SantaBarbara.com. 38

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FEBRUARY 21, 2019

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JULIA KEANE PHOTOS

beans

LATTES O’ LOVE: Tim and Rachel Ward are filling the java gap in Old Town Goleta with their bustling coffee shop.

Old Town Coffee’s Cups of Community “W hen we first got here, one of our pri-

“We wanted to make third-wave coffee approachable for everybody,” said Rachel. Her wealth of customer-service experience—honed while working at Starbucks and Trader Joe’s — paired with the couple’s genuine love of people infuses the shop with an easy warmth.

Seeking to open a business together, the Wards noticed the lack of coffee options in Old Town Goleta. “We walked down both sides of the street, from the 217 to Fairview and realized there was no coffee,” explained Tim. “And the space was so cool.” Their coffeeshop is inside the former home of Left

Focusing on Homegrown Products in Goleta

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FOOD & DRINK

orities was to honor and embrace the community,” says Rachel Ward, explaining the ethos that she and her husband, Tim Ward, employed while opening Old Town Coffee in the heart of Goleta. As I gaze up at the old Goleta lemon-crate artwork on the wall (a gift from an adoring customer), with the throng of students studying away at the bar with laptops plugged in and the relaxed clientele of all ages chatting away, it’s clear their “community as priority” idea remains squarely on the shelf since they opened last summer. “Everything is local, except for the tea, which is from L.A., and that’s as close as you can get,” continued Rachel, who stocks their pantry with such homegrown favorites as Eat Good Stuff Every Day cookies, Buena Onda empanadas, and Hook & Press donuts. “We help each other’s business get bigger,” she explained with a smile. Coffee connoisseurs can sip comfortably, knowing that their beans are prepared by the talented craftspeople at Rise Coffee Roasters. The company’s co-owner, Dennis Medina, formerly roasted for Handlebar Coffee in Santa Barbara and Sightglass Coffee in San Francisco. He ensures that all of Old Town Coffee’s baristas are properly trained with a fine eye for a proper pull, but that they can do so without the pretension. I was delighted by the cappuccino’s velvety texture and robust flavor, and I also enjoyed a perfect buzz provided by the hand-blended, organic matcha latte.

Serving Santa Barbara for 33 Years! Famous Gyros & Tri-tip

BY REBECCA HORRIGAN Coast Books, which closed a few years ago. The Wards enlisted the help of friends to remodel the location into something that felt clean and modern yet rustic and homey. The large space showcases the work of a new artist each month, and the shop doesn’t take any cut from their sales. The back patio is home to a Ping-Pong table, plenty of games, and sunny seating. Since opening in July 2018, the Wards have only intensified their offerings. They hosted a Sofar Sounds concert and two pop-up markets, and they plan to serve beer and wine in the future. The conscientious couple is spreading its infectious energy outside the shop as well, donating coffee every Friday to nearby schools and all their day-old pastries to the Goleta Boys & Girls Club. It’s a lot of work, admitted Rachel with a laugh, explaining, “We’re here more than 85 hours a week each.” As our conversation draws to a close, a joyful young man and woman stop by our table, proudly toting a baby in hand. “Remember when I came in here four months ago and said I’m having a baby?” the beaming man said, eager to show their new addition to the Wards. As I take in this sweetly spontaneous moment, it’s clear that the love of community goes both ways at Old Town Coffee. 5877 Hollister Ave., Goleta; 845-1550; otcoffeeshop.com.

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AMERICAN LITTLE KITCHEN, 17 W. Ortega St. (805) 770-2299. “Great little neighborhood café!” Healthy, comfortable, and affordable. Lunch-Dinner-Late Night. Organic chicken and hormone/antibiotic-free burgers, local produce. Try the Chicken Tikka Masala, vegetarian options. Great local wine list and craft beers. www.littlekitchensb.com ETHIOPIAN AUTHENTIC ETHIOPIAN cuisine Featured at Petit Valentien Restaurant 1114 State St. #14, 805-966-0222. Serkaddis Alemu offers an ever changing menu with choices of vegetarian, vegan, and meat options. Catering Available for parties of up to 40 people. Sat/Sun lunch 11:30-2:30 FRENCH PETIT VALENTIEN, 1114 State St. #14, 805-9660222. Open M-F 11:30-3pm (lunch). M-Sat 5pm-Close (dinner). Sun $25.50 four course prix fixe dinner. In La Arcada Plaza, Chef Robert Dixon presents classic French comfort food at affordable cost in this cozy gem of a restaurant. Petit Valentien offers a wide array of meat and seafood entrees along with extensive small plates and a wine list specializing in amazing quality at arguably the best price in town. A warm romantic atmosphere makes the perfect date spot. Comfortable locale for dinner parties, or even just a relaxing glass of wine. Reservations are recommended. INDIAN FLAVOR OF INDIA 3026 State 682-6561 $$ www. flavorofindiasb.com Finest, most authentic Indian cuisine

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Dining Out Guide

“Home of the Educated Hamburger,” a reference to the restaurants A to Z list of available flavors, from the Amorous Burger (the regular burger, with four ounces of ground beef on a toasted bun with lettuce, tomato, pickles, and dressing) to the Zest Burger, which features one whole pound of beef. Along the way are the Great Balls of Fire (with jalapeños), the Otter Burger (with sour cream and horseradish), and the Pizza Burger. On Thursday, February 28, 5-8 p.m., wine will be part of that education, as James Sparks will be pouring three of his Kings Carey grenaches alongside three sliders for just $15. The generously

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IRISH DARGAN’S IRISH Pub & Restaurant, 18 E. Ortega St. (next to lot 10) SB, 568-0702. $$. Open 7 days 11:30a-Close (Food ‘til 10p, 11p on Sat/Sun). AE MC V Disc. Authentic Irish food & atmosphere in downtown SB. Specialties from Ireland include Seafood & Meat dishes. Informal, relaxed pub-style atmosphere. Live music Thursday nights. Children welcome. Avail. for private parties. Pool & Darts. MEDITERRANEAN FOXTAIL KITCHEN 14 E. Cota St. Lebaness cuisine, American burger, 24 craf beer, great cocktails, whiskey bar, vegan options, open late night, hookah lounge. Kitchen closes at midnight on the weekend, try our best falafel in town. www.foxtailsb.com NORTHERN EUROPEAN ANDERSEN’S DANISH Restaurant & Bakery. 1106 State St., 805-962-5085. Open Daily 8am-9pm. Family owned for over 42 years. Northern European Cuisine with California Infusion. Fresh scratch made pastries & menus everyday. Authentic Breakfasts, Lunches & Dinners. Happy Hour menu with exquisite wines & beers, 3-7pm everyday. High Tea served everyday starting at 2pm. Huge Viking Mimosas & Champagne Cocktails. Private Event spaces.

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Harvey presents

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THE RUSSIANS ARE COMING OPERA SANTA BARBARA AND CAMA TO HOST RUSSIAN MUSIC EVENTS

O

ZACH MENDEZ

n Wednesday, Februwas founded in 1990 as ary 27, the Russian a cultural signal of the National Orchestra advent of glasnost and perestroika. Conductor under the baton of foundMikhail Pletnev, who ing artistic director Mikhail won the prestigious Pletnev will invade the Tchaikovsky competiGranada for an all-Rachmaninoff program featurtion as a young pianist ing Vocalise, Op. 34, No. in 1977, chose to organize 14, the Piano Concerto No. his ensemble entirely on 2 in C Minor with soloist the basis of private fundGeorge Li, and the Syming in order to avoid the phonic Dances, Op. 45. It’s politicization of musical an ambitious night of music programming that pervaded the state orchesthat spans four decades of composition by one of Rustras of the Soviet period. sia’s greatest musicians, but In the decades that folThe cast (pictured) of Opera Santa Barbara presents Tchaikovsky’s Eugene Onegin, a tour de it is only the beginning of a lowed, through touring force demonstrating the composer’s mastery of writing for voices. five-day stretch of musical and recording, the RNO immersion that presenting organizations society in which he finds himself. Wealthy, has secured its position as the greatest conCAMA and Opera Santa Barbara have in attractive, and intelligent, he’s also arrogant, temporary Russian orchestra. Pianist George store for hardy fans of the Russian classical insensitive, and cynical in the extreme. No Li, who has a silver medal from the 2015 tradition. At the Lobero on Friday, March 1, wonder all the ladies love him. Apart from Tchaikovsky competition, has performed only two nights later, Opera Santa Barbara inciting the love of women, and then jilt- with the San Francisco Symphony and the will present the first of two performances ing them, nothing becomes a superfluous New York and Los Angeles philharmonics. of Tchaikovsky’s Eugene Onegin, a tour de man more than a good duel, and Eugene For Kostis Protopapas, the general and force demonstrating the composer’s mastery Onegin has one of the best. In it, the anti- artistic director of Opera Santa Barbara, this not only of writing for voices but also of his hero meets and kills the man who has, until “Russian Week” is an example of the kind of excellence as a purveyor of ballroom dance their rupture, been his best friend. All of fortuitous occurrence that makes Santa Bartunes. this, including the spectacular ball scene bara such a special place for fans of classical In Onegin, brilliant arias abound, includ- in which Onegin incites his friend to chal- music. He writes, “By a happy coincidence, ing the spectacular one for Tatiana that nar- lenge him by flirting with his fiancée, takes Santa Barbara has the opportunity to experirates the young woman’s night-long process place to the strains of some of Tchaikovsky’s ence perhaps the most celebrated works of of writing and revising a love letter to the most memorable music. Russian music within a three-day period. On Thursday, February 28, the hardiest We’re thrilled to have CAMA as our partner title character. Soprano Karin Wolverton will sing this role in a cast that also features of contemporary Slavophiles will gather in celebrating this rare aligning of artistic Lee Poulis as Eugene Onegin and Kevin at the Impact Hub on Chapala Street for a stars.” —Charles Donelan Langan as Tatiana’s eventual husband, the 5:30 p.m. screening of Alexander Sokurov’s noble and gracious Prince Gremin. For film Russian Ark, an experimental histori- On Wednesday, February 27, at 8 p.m., the Russian those who have not read Alexander Push- cal drama that covers Russian history from National Orchestra performs at The Granada kin’s classic novel in verse in some time, let the time of Catherine the Great to the Last Theatre (granadasb.org). On Thursday, February 28, me refresh your memory. It’s the founding Imperial Ball in 1913. Organized into a at 5:30 p.m., opera and concert ticket holders can attend a private screening of Alexander Sokurov’s document of a whole line of Russian tales single 96-minute sequence featuring thoufilm Russian Ark at the Impact Hub Chapala Center. featuring so-called “superfluous men,” a sands of characters and three orchestras, And on Friday, March 1, at 7:30 p.m., Opera Santa Russian character type derived from the the film was shot on location in the State Barbara will present the first of two performances Byronic hero. Onegin, like the many char- Hermitage Museum, St. Petersburg. of Tchaikovsky’s Eugene Onegin at the Lobero The Russian National Orchestra (RNO) Theatre (lobero.org). acters he influenced, doesn’t fit into the

POET LAUREATE SUBMISSIONS AND TINY LIBRARIES ON STATE STREET Every two years, a new poet laureate is named to represent the city. The position is up for renewal this spring, and so the City of Santa Barbara, in conjunction with the Santa Barbara Library, is asking for nominations or applications. “The person selected shall seek to advance awareness of and appreciation for poetry, spoken word, and the literary arts within the greater community,” reads the official press release. The deadline for entries is Monday, March 4. See sbac .ca.gov/poet-laureate. The city has another project in the works — in conjunction with the Santa

Barbara Office of Arts and Culture, Santa Barbara Public Library, Santa Barbara Beautiful, and Downtown Santa Barbara — to line State Street with tiny libraries. The group is currently accepting design proposals for the six libraries, which will house books that the public can borrow and replace. The S.B. Public Library will play a formidable role by keeping the wee book boxes stocked and offering events such as pop-up readings and book talks. Artists can submit their ideas until Friday, March 1. For more information, see sbac.ca.gov/tiny-libraries. —Michelle Drown

L I F E PAGE 43

CONVENIENCE STORE WOMAN

Keiko Furukura is a 36-year-old employee of a Tokyo convenience store. She’s been working at her job for 18 years, and readers — like all of Keiko’s family and friends — might expect that she would be ready to move on to the next phase of her life. Nothing, however, could be further from the truth. She loves every minute of her workday, reveling in mundane tasks such as replacing missing price tags and restocking the display cabinets. At night, she dreams of the convenience store, for it is only there, she confesses, that she can be what she longs to be: “a cog in society,” that is to say, “a normal person.” The story is told from Keiko’s point of view, and though she never comes out and says it, she clearly suffers from some form of high-functioning autism. The writing, therefore, is often like Keiko’s affect: flat and, from a social perspective, rather clueless. That might sound like a big problem for a comic novel, but author Sayaka Murata has a devilish sense of humor, even if her protagonist doesn’t. Ironies abound throughout Keiko’s day, but she plows through them, doing her best to seem “normal.” Of course, what Murata wants us to know is that Keiko has every right to live her life in the narrow confines of the convenience store, as long as she is happy. When Keiko’s sister lays into her unemployed and eminently unsuitable boyfriend, Keiko realizes that her sister is “far happier thinking [Keiko] is normal, even if she has a lot of problems, than she is having an abnormal sister for whom everything is fine.” Convenience Store Woman benefits from its brevity — it’s closer to a novella than a novel — but it’s just the right length to convey an episode in the life of a woman who, when she looks into the window of a convenience store, feels “all my cells stirring within my skin as they responded in unison to the music reverberating on the other side of the glass.” — David Starkey

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BRUSHES WITH GREATNESS: Lara Favaretto’s Coppie simplici/Simple Couples, here shown in a previous outdoor installation, is now on view at the MCA Santa Barbara in Paseo Nuevo.

ART LOST AND FOUND

T

his new exhibition from the Museum of Con- my car from the parking structure on the Chapala temporary Art, simply titled Lara Favaretto, can side of the 900 block that I realized the full impact be found in the organization’s gallery at Paseo of “We All Fall Down.” Looking up out of the dark Nuevo and in other locations, including the Glass garage through a symmetrical opening that framed Box at UCSB’s Art, Design, & Architecture Museum, the bright-green Television Hill in a gauzy cloak of fog, a storefront on the 900 block of State Street, and, I momentarily saw a fragment of Santa Barbara landeventually, in a vacant lot in the heart of the Funk scape as a heap of green-dominant confetti, executed Zone. Favaretto’s work belongs to the “expanded in the same neo-pointillist palette as the storefront field of sculpture,” a term coined by art historian piece, and only slightly less evanescent. Rosalind Krauss in 1979 to identify the multiplicity The minimalist sculptures at UCSB, Boring and Fistof opportunities for making art ing, are enormously heavy blocks of opened by the logic of postmodernconcrete that the artist has marked ism. No longer confined to creating as they were setting with a series of or finding objects for independent gestures that then give the works display, artists such as Robert Mortheir titles. Following the logic of the Process Art movement in their ris and Christo began marking and focus on the presence of body, on constructing sites and building and installing what Krauss called “axinontraditional uses of material, by Charles Donelan omatic structures,” meaning archiand on the act of formation rather tectural forms that were at than the resulting object, these monumental forms once recognizable and out also reflect another imporof place. It is at this practice of tant aspect of Favaretto’s creating axiomatic strucpractice: the challenges of tures on a monumental movement and mobility. scale that Favaretto excels. Both “Defense d’Entrer” The Coppie simplici or Sim(“Do Not Enter”) and ple Couples on display in “Lost and Found” are in the MCA space are found the MCASB gallery space, objects — the automobilealthough soon “Do Not sized rotating brushes that Enter” will move to the scrub your Prius at the property in the Funk Zone car wash — paired off and that MCASB has purchased affixed to the gallery walls with the intention to build a by imposing steel plates. permanent museum there. At irregular intervals, the “Defense d’Entrer” is a giant brushes torque into simple sign saying exactly motion, sending off waves that, the purpose of which of air and not a little menin the context of Favaretto’s ace. Deprived of their funcoeuvre is to provoke contion in the car wash, these sideration of the extreme couples “still have each CAST IN CONCRETE: For one series of large minimalist political, psychological, other,” a familiar axiom sculptures, the artist uses her hands and body to mark and and philosophical crises manipulate soft concrete before it sets. that in this case means that, of boundaries so characover time, through the fricteristic of our historical tion of their pointless spinning, they will wear one moment. “Lost and Found” takes this line of inquiry another out. further by incarnating that most threatening of modAt 907 State Street, in a piece called “Tutti giù per ern anxious objects: abandoned luggage. Favaretto terra” or “We All Fall Down,” Favaretto has filled fills suitcases obtained from flea markets with mystery a storefront with one ton of multicolored confetti. contents, then locks them and throws away the keys. Industrial fans blow the colorful circles of paper, each Once they have been sealed, explicit instructions stipa little smaller than a dime, into shifting piles that ulate that they must never again be opened by anyone. resemble dunes or rolling hills. Curious passersby To do so would, according to Favaretto, permanently on State Street are wonderstruck by this unexpected void their status as works of her art. As a result, these intervention, although some of the wonder I over- are tricky bags to travel with, especially across national heard took the form of, “I wonder how hard it will be borders. One of them sits in Paseo Nuevo right now. Is n to clean up all that confetti?” It wasn’t until I retrieved it waiting for you?

LARA FAVARETTO

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THE INDEPENDENT

FEBRUARY 21, 2019

INDEPENDENT.COM


CORTNEY ARMITAGE / RUBY RED SPECS

a&e | POSITIVELY STATE STREET

Pulitzer Prize-winning Historian

Doris Kearns Goodwin Leadership in Turbulent Times

Fri, Feb 22 / 7:30 PM / Granada Theatre

TWO OF A KIND: Rob Kolar (left) and Lauren Brown are a duo with percussive panache, combining full-bodied tap-dance drumming and glammy guitar rock for a refreshing injection of musical vitality.

FEELIN’ IT THIS FEBRUARY by Richie DeMaria

Books will be available for purchase and signing courtesy of Chaucer’s TURN IT UP: KOLARS, the raved-about live act of Rob Kolar (vocals/guitar) and Lauren Brown (tap-dance drumming), will play at Velvet Jones (423 State St.) on Saturday, February 23, with opener Alex Lilly. Their newest rocker of a single, “Turn It Up,” hints at the kind of energy they’ll bring up on that Velvet stage. Few duos have the kind of percussive panache as KOLARS, whose full-bodied tap-dance drumming meets glammy guitar rock in a refreshing injection of musical vitality. Last seen at the Starry Nites Fest of 2017, the L.A.-based group is circling back before heading to SXSW in Austin. Alex Lilly, also from L.A., will begin the ceremonies with her visionary and theatrically offbeat synth pop. Think the music of Kate Bush or St. Vincent by way of Miranda July’s visually dreamlike quirkiness. Expect a set of surreal sensuality and bright colors. Together, KOLARS and Alex Lilly shall offer an exciting and visually striking night. YOUR VERY OWN PRIVATE ISLAND: Okay, maybe not your very own, but you can at least take a musical vacation for a night when Private Island headlines on Friday, February 22, also at Velvet Jones, with openers Kuwada and Hush. The band’s music is sunny, fresh, anthemic, and full of happy lushness. If you’re itching for a dance, Private Island will likely satisfy that craving severalfold. Kuwada, meanwhile, is pretty dope. The pairing of Jonathan and Cameron Kuwada craft a summery dose of vocal chill-hop and tropical soul with beautiful beats, the kind you could blissfully lose afternoons to. Hailing from Hawai‘i, they will most certainly bring the island vibes. Hush, from L.A., led by Leben West, will help set a mellow mood with its neo-soul. LUSTROUS JADE: Rounding out that weekend at Velvet comes Santa Margarita–raised country rocker Jade Jackson on Sunday, Feb-

ruary 24. Jackson’s rock is blistering and confident, afire with the heat of the sparse oaken hills and bygone rancho feel just beyond her Central Coast hometown. Her raw talents have earned the admiration of folks such as Social Distortion’s Mike Ness and none other than Willie Nelson — she joins in on the country legend’s Luck Reunion concert in mid-March. Catch some real California country before she forges on to Texas.

Event Sponsors: Natalie Orfalea Foundation & Lou Buglioli An Evening with

Annie Leibovitz

Thu, Feb 28 / 7:30 PM / Arlington Theatre

JOIN THE ABANDONED: Speaking of California roots rock, start the weekend early Thursday, February 21, at Seven Bar and Kitchen (224 Helena Ave.), when Orphan Jon and the Abandoned will smooth out the wrinkles of your soul with bluesy, impassioned rock. Coming from Bakersfield, these are deep-running roots they pull from, musically. Expect those drawn-out, eyes-closed, almost-pained kinds of guitar solos that make the markings of great blues and classic-rock music. Serve it with one of Seven’s drinks and/or foodstuffs and enjoy. A DARING PAIRING: The following week, for a midweek catharsis, check out The Shook Twins and Rainbow Girls, who play on Thursday, February 28, at SOhO Restaurant & Music Club (1221 State St.). The Shook Twins are indeed identical twins, sisters Katelyn Shook (vocals, guitar) and Laurie Shook (banjo, vocals). Their musical synergy combines for a harmonically laden spin on Americana folk that’s inventive, hypnotic, and bewitching. It’s a beautiful reanimation of formerly familiar sounds, enlivened and emboldened with dreamy rhythms. If you haven’t seen them live yet, do yourself a favor and go. Same too goes for the Rainbow Girls, who many know as a locally grown live act worth hearing. Expect a rainbow bridge between up-tempo rockers and folky swoon-inducers, empowered with the Rainbow Girls’ luminous personalities. n

“Whether she’s photographing the famous and powerful – or simply the woman next door – Annie always captures something unexpected and deeply personal.” – Oprah Winfrey

Pre-signed books will be available for purchase courtesy of Chaucer’s

Event Sponsors: Sara Miller McCune, Susan & Bruce Worster (805) 893-3535 www.ArtsAndLectures.UCSB.edu Corporate Season Sponsor:

INDEPENDENT.COM

Media Sponsors: FEBRUARY 21, 2019

THE INDEPENDENT

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A TERRIBLE COUNTRY

O

n the face of it, not much happens in Keith Gessen’s new novel, A Terrible Country, but Gessen is such a good writer that most readers won’t mind the book’s meander meandering plot. Granted, our fascination with just how much influence Russia currently exerts over the United States may have something to do with the novel’s interest, but A Terrible Country is set in 2008, long before most people ever associated the words “President” and “Donald Trump.” The Russia of this novel is corrupt and violent, but it’s also chaotic and falter-ing and ultimately pretty endearing. Narrator and pro-tagonist Andrei Kaplan is a likeable sad-sack whose parents emigrated to America in the 1990s. They’re both dead now, and at the request of his brother, who has been forced to flee Russia due to some shady business dealings, Andrei has returned to Moscow to look after his aging grandmother. Their

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relationship is described in loving, often comic detail, and it is one of the highlights of the novel. After a number of initial stumbles, Andrei gradually expands his circle of acquaintance beyond his grandmoth grandmother’s apartment building. He joins a hockey team and throws in with “a group of friendly young socialists” called Octo October, who want to share the country’s wealth and create a more egalitar egalitarian society. The fact that they don’t have a chance in Putin’s steel-fisted oli oligarchy doesn’t mean their efforts don’t garner our admiration. Andrei even manages to find a girlfriend, the beautiful though often dis distant and judgmental Yulia, but this is a novel about failure, and the relationship seems to be always on the cusp of falling apart. In the end, Andrei’s return to Moscow leaves him sadder and somewhat wiser, and while Russia may be, as his grandmother says, “a terrible country,” it is clearly at the core of everything he is. —David Starkey

WINNERS TAKE ALL: THE ELITE CHARADE OF CHANGING THE WORLD

T

hey are the denizens of MarketWorld (a place where problems are solved by the free market), winners of the global economic game, from Wall Street, hedge funds, technology, the pharmaceutical industry, and philanthropic organizations. They present their ideas via PowerPoint. They refer to themselves as thought leaders, connectors, curators, change agents, incubators, and influencers. They talk of synergy and scale, win-win outcomes, opportunity and entrepreneurship, impact investing, and doing-goodby-doing-well at elite, corporate-sponsored, and invitation-only gatherings like TED, the Aspen Insti-tute, Summit at Sea, and the Clinton Global Initia-tive. Their vernacular, the vernacular of business, has permeated almost every sphere of our lives, displacing hoary notions like social justice and equality. The great conceit of MarketWorld and its adherents, according to Anand Giridharadas, author of Winners Take All: The Elite Charade of Changing the World, is their unshakable faith that the same tools and ideology

that created a problem like massive wealth inequality can also solve the problem of wealth inequality. Similarly, for poverty, education, access to medicines, and clean water. Name the problem, and MarketWorlders will provide a solution that emphasizes private means. Input from the people they purport to want to help is rarely sought, as democracy is not highly valued in MarketWorld. Giridharadas knows this world, having trav traveled its rarefied circuit as a fellow at the Aspen Institute. Through observation, interviews, and research, Giridha Giridharadas discovered that while MarketWorlders are often brilliant and well-intentioned, they aren’t very introspective, and most do not want to talk about their wealth and privilege as being causes of the many social problems they are keen to solve. Winners Take All is a robust and overdue critique of the status quo that has produced so much bounty for the fortunate few and so much anxiety, frustration, and alienation for the unfortunate many. — Brian Tanguay

2019-2020 WINTER

a LAUNCH PAD preview production

THE WATSONS GO TO BIRMINGHAM-1963 based on the book "The Watsons go to Birmingham - 1963" by Christopher Paul Curtis adapted by Cheryl L. West directed by Risa Brainin Performing Arts Theater Feb 14-16, 19-23 / 8pm Feb 23-24 / 2pm

THE LARAMIE PROJECT BY MOISÉS KAUFMAN AND THE MEMBERS OF TECTONIC THEATER PROJECT DIRECTED BY ERIC JORGENSEN

MAR 1 & 6-8 / 8 PM MAR 2 & 9 / 2 PM Hatlen Theater

It’s easy to find us! More info and tickets:

893.2064 theaterdance.ucsb.edu INDEPENDENT.COM

FEBRUARY 21, 2019

THE INDEPENDENT

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a&e | FILM & TV PREVIEW

DIVISION OF STUDENT AFFAIRS

UCSB MULTICULTURAL CENTER’S

UC Santa Barbara

and the UCSB Multicultural Center present

BANFF MOUNTAIN FILM FEST

T

he ever-popular Banff Mountain Film Festival, presented by UCSB’s Arts & Lectures, will once again light up the Arlington screen, showcasing 17 outdoor documentaries over two days. Here is the lineup:

Day 1: Tuesday, February 26, 7:30 p.m. Rogue Elements: Corbet’s Couloir — Mountain bikers face icy conditions as they take on Jackson Hole’s double black diamond run, Corbet’s Couloir. Land of the Wind — Filmmaker Laura Belinky trains her lens on fine-art photographer Eliseo Miciu, who shoots the wilds of Patagonia. The Mirnavator — Ultramarathon runner Mirna Valerio continues to defy stereotypes and her critics by proving that being fit and overweight aren’t mutually exclusive. Ice & Palms — Two friends try to achieve their dream of crossing the Alps under their own steam in five weeks.

RJ Ripper—Already Nepal’s national downhill mountain-bike champion, Rajesh “RJ” Magar dreams of competing in the Enduro World Series, which takes one year. Fast Horse—This doc captures the thrilling, often-perilous Indian Relay, in which teams from horse nations of the Great Plains compete for cash, prizes, and glory. How to Run 100 Miles — Casual runners Jayson Sime and Brendan Leonard decide to compete in their first ever 102.9-mile ultramarathon that includes 20,000 feet of elevation gain.

Engaging Communities with Resilient Love

th ANNIVERSARY CELEBRATION

FANIA DAVIS HEALING THROUGH RESTORATIVE JUSTICE

Restorative justice is based on the desired set of principles and practices to mediate conflict, strengthen community, and repair harm. Fania will speak to the importance of restorative justice and how it can contribute to the process of individual and community healing. Fania Davis is a long-time social justice activist, restorative justice practitioner, and professor.

TUES, FEB 26TH, 6 PM LECTURE / MCC THEATER

Skier vs. Drone — Olympic bronze medal skier Victor Muffat-Jeandet is pitted against world drone-racing champion Jordan “Jet” Temkin in a slalom race on a ski run at Snowbird.

FOR THE FULL WINTER 2019 CALENDAR, VISIT MCC.SA.UCSB.EDU

FREE AND OPEN TO THE PUBLIC

UCSBMCC

The Moment — This documentary shows the freeride mountain-bike movement as it unfolded in British Columbia. Liv Along the Way — Mountain climber Liv Sansoz attempts to scale all of the 4,000-meter peaks of the Alps (82 in total) in one year. Surface — Underwater photographer Ben Thouard uses his unique eye to capture uncommon surf images. The Frenchy — Filmmaker Michelle Smith documents the trials and tribulations of Jacques Houot, an 82-year-old ski racer, mountain biker, and road cyclist who lives life to the fullest.

Day 2: Wednesday, February 27, 7:30 p.m.

FarOut:KaiJones — Sixth-grader Kai Jones spends his days off school skiing the backcountry of Wyoming’s Jackson Hole Mountain Resort as one of the best youth skiers in the nation.

Craig’s Reaction — A 100-foot fall left climber Craig DeMartino with an amputated right leg, as well as neck and spinal injuries. Rather than let that be the end of his climbing career, DeMartino has achieved numerous first ascents, including ascending the Nose on El Capitan. Brotherhood of Skiing — This is the story of the National Brotherhood of Skiers, whose mission is “to identify, develop and support athletes of color who will WIN international and Olympic winter sports competitions representing the United States and to increase participation in winter sports.” Reel Rock 12: Break on Through— This doc follows 19-year-old Margo Hayes as she moves from Boulder, Colorado, to Europe to train for two iconic climbs—Spain’s La Rambla and France’s Biographie. —Michelle Drown See artsandlectures.ucsb.edu.

AND THE OSCAR GOES TO…

F

or those of us who don’t have a golden ticket to the Sunday, February 24, glamfest that is the Academy Awards, fear not —there are two Oscar parties to attend right here in town. Metropolitan Theatres is opening up the Arlington for its live Academy Awards viewing, at no cost to attendees. Get there early (doors open at 3 p.m.) to see the glitterati walk the red carpet at 3:30 p.m., go just for the awards ceremony, which begins at 5 p.m.

For more information, see metrotheatres .com. Up at the Riviera Theatre, the Santa Barbara International Film Festival is hosting a fundraising afternoon/evening of filmmaker and actor immersion as you watch the telecast with community members — in your pajamas (such fun!). The tickets range from $100 to $20,000 with proceeds going to fund myriad SBIFF education programs. See sbiff .org for what each donation tier offers.—MD

?

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PLUS - Discover your heart’s age with our free online assessment

Take our quiz to find out! Independent.com/hearthealth FEBRUARY 14 – 27 INDEPENDENT.COM

FEBRUARY 21, 2019

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49


d l

o s

t u

All Gaucho Reunion

o

Gaucho Gallop 5K and Kid’s Mile

Gaucho Gallop 5K presented by PayJunction and the Kid’s Mile presented by the Santa Barbara Independent

AGR

all gaucho reunion

APRIL 25-28, 2019

Community Access Television VIP Reception & Awards Gala Recognizing achievements in the creation of multimedia content shown on TV Santa Barbara’s online and broadcast platforms.

Saturday

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Feb 23 at the Alcazar Theater in Carpinteria

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Ready…Set…Gallop! The Gaucho Gallop 5K course is a SBAA Grand Prix-sanctioned 5K. The Kid’s Mile (free) at 10 a.m. will provide your little ones (ages 10 & under) an opportunity to get their Saturday morning energy out, all in the pursuit of a finisher’s ribbon. Register by April 1 to receive a “sport-tek” shirt.

SATURDAY, APRIL 27, 9:00 A.M. UC SANTA BARBARA CAMPUS To register:

gauchogallop.eventbrite.com

alumni.ucsb.edu


a&e | FILM & TV

RINCON CLASSIC produced by

How to Train Your Dragon: The Hidden World

MOVIE GUIDE EDITED BY MICHELLE DROWN SPECIAL SCREENINGS Oscar Nominated Shorts 2019: Animated, Live Action, and Documentaries Animated: Late Afternoon, One Small Step, Bao, Animal Behaviour, Weekends. Sun., Feb. 24, 10am; Wed., Feb. 27, 7:30pm Live Action: Caroline, Chuchotage, Detainment, Fauve, Icare, Marguerite, May Day, Mother, Skin, Wale. Fri., Feb. 22, and Mon., Feb. 25; 7:30pm Documentaries: Black Sheep, End Game, A Night at the Garden, Lifeboat, Period. End of Sentence. Sat., Feb. 23, Tue., Feb. 26, and Thu., Feb. 28; 7:30pm Riviera

PREMIERES Arctic (97 mins., PG-13) Mads Mikkelsen (Hannibal, Doctor Strange) stars as Overgard, who is stranded in the Arctic awaiting rescue. When the helicopter sent to retrieve him crashes, he and the surviving passenger embark on a journey of survival.

The Hitchcock

How to Train Your Dragon: The Hidden World (104 mins., PG) The third installation of this delightful animated franchise sees Toothless, Hiccup (Jay Baruchel), and their ragtag crew of dragon riders continue to save captured dragons and bring them to Berk. When the dragon population becomes untenable, Hiccup and his faithful black fury go in search of the Hidden World, a safe haven for dragons. But enemies and warlords try to thwart their efforts. Cate Blanchett, America Ferrera, and Craig Ferguson also lend their vocal talents.

Camino Real/Fiesta 5 (2D & 3D)

Tyler Perry’s A Madea Family Funeral (109 mins., PG-13) For the 11th Madea franchise film, matriarch Madea (Tyler Perry) and her family convene for a reunion that turns into a nightmare in the backwoods of Georgia when the get-together becomes an unexpected funeral gathering.

Camino Real/Metro 4 (Opens Thu., Feb. 28)

NOW SHOWING Alita: Battle Angel (122 mins., PG-13) Rosa Salazar stars in this cyberpunk action film based on the Japanese graphic novel Gunnm about a bodiless “core,” Alita, who awakens in a postapocalyptic world with no memory. Dr. Ido (Christoph Waltz) finds her and gives her a new body. Soon it is discovered that Alita is more than a typical cyborg. Mahershala Ali and Jennifer Connelly also star. Camino Real (2D)/Metro 4 (2D and 3D)

PHOTO.KEW

WAITING PERIOD

MAR 2 - MAR 16 RINCON CLASSIC MOVES TO NEXT WEEKEND IN WAITING PERIOD, MAR 2/3. STAY TUNED FOR THE OFFICIAL CALL WED FEBRUARY 27 5PM @ RINCONCLASSIC.COM

O Bohemian Rhapsody (134 mins., PG-13)

Telling the tale of a beloved rock-androll enigma, especially one so notoriously private, is a daunting task, but Bohemian Rhapsody tackles Freddie Mercury’s legendary story with flourish and fervor. Admittedly, the film adopts a convenient plot line ripe with meet-cutes and oversimplifications of Mercury’s complex relationship with his family and background. It struggles the most in addressing the often-discussed queerness of Mercury’s life, at times teetering toward bi-erasure and a lessthan-delicate portrayal of AIDS. Rami Malek shines as the shy yet vivacious Queen frontman and is spellbindingly

CONT’D ON P. 53 >>>

Fighting with My Family

@olegaucho

(108 mins., PG-13)

Dwayne Johnson executive produced this biopic dramedy based on the life of British WWE professional wrestler Saraya-Jade “Paige” Bevis (Florence Pugh), who won the Divas Championship in 2014. Nick Frost, Vince Vaughn, and Lena Headey also star.

UCSB Athletics

Camino Real/Paseo Nuevo

Greta (98 mins., NR) When Frances McCullen (Chloë Grace Moretz) finds a purse in the New York City subway, she promptly returns it to its owner, Greta (Isabelle Huppert), a lonely piano teacher. Having just lost her mother, Frances grows close to Greta, but soon discovers the woman isn’t who she seems.

Fairview/Paseo Nuevo

@UCSBAthletics Fighting with My Family INDEPENDENT.COM

FEBRUARY 21, 2019

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H HOW TO TRAIN YOUR DRAGON: THE HIDDEN WORLD B Fri: 12:15, 1:30, 2:45, 5:15, 6:30, 9:00; Sat & Sun: 11:00, 12:15, 1:30, 2:45, 5:15, 6:30, 9:00; Mon to Thu: 1:30, 2:45, 5:15, 6:30 ALITA: BATTLE ANGEL C H TYLER PERRY’S A MADEA H HOW TO TRAIN YOUR 2:45, 5:30, 8:15 FAMILY FUNERAL C DRAGON: THE HIDDEN Thu: 7:30, 9:30 WORLD 3D B 4:00 PM ALITA: BATTLE ANGEL RUN THE RACE B Fri: 2:00, 3D C 4:15 PM THE HITCHCOCK 4:30, 7:00, 9:40; Sat & Sun: 11:30, 2:00, 4:30, 7:00, 9:40; CINEMA & HAPPY DEATH DAY 2U C PUBLIC HOUSE Mon to Thu: 2:00, 4:30, 7:10 Fri to Sun: 2:15, 4:45, 7:20, 9:50; ISN’T IT ROMANTIC C Mon to Thu: 2:30, 5:20, 8:00 371 SOUTH HITCHCOCK WAY, Fri: 1:20, 5:00, 7:15, 9:30; SANTA BARBARA Sat & Sun: 11:10, 1:20, 5:00, 7:15, (877)789-6684 9:30; Mon to Thu: 3:00, 5:30, 8:00 WHAT MEN WANT E Fri to Sun: 1:40, 4:25, 7:10, 9:55; THE LEGO MOVIE 2: THE H ARCTIC C 2:35, 5:00, 7:30 SECOND PART B Mon to Thu: 2:15, 5:00, 7:45 Fri to Sun: 12:00, 2:30, 3:45, 6:15, 8:45; Mon to Thu: 2:20, 4:50, 7:20 COLD WAR E 5:15 PM H TYLER PERRY’S A BOHEMIAN MADEA FAMILY THE FAVOURITE E 2:20, 7:45 RHAPSODY C 7:45 PM FUNERAL C Thu: 7:00 PM WHAT MEN WANT E Fri: 4:10 PM; Sat & Sun: 10:45, 4:10; ALITA: BATTLE ANGEL C Mon to Thu: 4:10 PM Fri to Sun: 1:30, 7:00, 9:45; Mon to Wed: 7:00 PM THE UPSIDE C 6:50 PM

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H FIGHTING WITH MY FAMILY C Fri to Sun: 11:25, 2:05, 4:40, 7:15, 9:45; Mon to Thu: 2:05, 4:40, 7:15, 9:45

Camino Real • Paseo Nuevo

52

PASEO NUEVO


a&e | FILM & TV CONT’D FROM P. 51 convincing during both Mercury’s loneliest hours and explosive moments on some of the world’s biggest stages. The rest of the casting deserves a grand tip of the hat as well. Bohemian Rhapsody, for all its narrative flaws, is an earnest tribute to the iconic rock band, and remains a spectacle of sight and sound for music, Mercury, and movie fans alike. (JK) Fairview/Fiesta 5

The Favourite (120 mins., R) Olivia Colman, Emma Stone, and Rachel Weisz star in this historical dark comedy/drama set during the reign of England’s Queen Anne in the early 18th century. A tangled love triangle emerges between Anne (Colman), Abigail Hill (Stone), and Sarah Churchill (Weisz) that leads to treachery and betrayal.

O Capernaum

O Green Book

(126 mins., NR)

Those who are extra-sensitive to tales of woe concerning children cast adrift will be pained watching the Lebanese film Capernaum (Chaos), about a tough but fragile 12-year-old (Zain al Rafeea, grim and determined until the final shot) and an Ethiopian toddler immigrant (Boluwatife Treasure Bankole — best toddler performance of the year). But anyone with an interest in bold, emotionally powered cinema and the pressing issues of poverty and refugee struggles through tender eyes shouldn’t miss Nadine Labaki’s important film, a nominee for the Foreign Film Oscar and Jury Prize winner at Cannes. Naturalism meets assured-narrative machinery and courtroom drama in the poignant, youth-driven tradition of Bicycle Thief and the fellow foreign-film Oscar nom Shoplifters. (JW) Riviera Cold Pursuit (118 mins., R) Nels Coxman’s (Liam Neeson) quiet life in a mountain resort town is thrown into chaos when his young son is mysteriously killed. As Coxman seeks vengeance, he is pulled into a world of drug lords, setting off a turf war. Laura Dern and Emmy Rossum also star.

Camino Real/Paseo Nuevo

Cold War (89 mins., R) Based loosely on the life of director Pawel Pawlikowski’s parents, this film is a historical period drama set in Poland and France during the height of the Cold War between the Soviet Union and the United States and its allies. The film follows the love story of a musical director and a young singer from the 1940s to the 1960s. The Hitchcock

The Hitchcock

(130 mins., PG-13)

Green Book is an uncommonly welltold tale of bodyguard Tony Vallelonga (Viggo Mortensen) and classically trained pianist Don Shirley (Mahershala Ali), thrown together on a concert tour through the Deep South in 1962. Dr. Donald Shirley was a child prodigy, Russian-trained, and imbued with a dignity that suffered under the shortening of his name to “Don” by his record label. The film’s greatest transformation comes from Mortensen, who put on 25 pounds before the film began and added another 20 while playing Tony Vallelonga, a k a Tony Lip. His son Nick Vallelonga wrote the script, holding off until after Don Shirley had died, as requested. It’s a restraint that Green Book plays with so well that the usually blasé Santa Barbara film audience couldn’t help but erupt with applause at film’s end. (JY) Paseo Nuevo Happy Death Day 2U (100 mins., PG-13)

In this Blumhouse Productions slasher film sequel, two years have passed since Theresa “Tree” Gelbman (Jessica Rothe) entered and then escaped the time loop that previously had her running from a killer. She’s about to enter it again, however, and must face down another killer to be released from the loop forever.

Camino Real/Metro 4

The Lego Movie 2: The Second Part (106 mins., PG) It’s been five years since Duplo invaded Bricksburg, not yet a post-apocalyptic wasteland. Despite the dire circumstances, Emmet (Chris Pratt) remains irritatingly upbeat, unlike his friends. Disliking his plucky demeanor, Mayhem

from Systar System kidnaps Emmet’s friends. A rescue mission ensues. Elizabeth Banks, Tiffany Haddish, and Will Fairview/Fiesta 5 Arnett also star. Isn’t It Romantic (88 mins., PG-13) Rebel Wilson stars in this comedy/ fantasy/satire about Natalie (Wilson), a woman who has never believed in the Hollywood rom-com fantasy. After being knocked unconscious, however, Natalie finds herself in her own cliché-filled romantic comedy and must eschew hackneyed situations to finally fall in love and be brought back to reality. Liam Hemsworth and Adam DeVine also star. Fairview/Fiesta 5 Spider-Man: Into the SpiderVerse (117 mins., PG) Marvel Comics presents this computeranimated film in which Miles Morales (voiced by Shameik Moore) becomes Spider-Man and crosses paths with his counterparts from other dimensions in order to stop a threat to reality.

Fairview

They Shall Not Grow Old (99 mins., R) Peter Jackson (Lord of the Rings trilogy) directed and produced this documentary about soldiers in WWI.

Paseo Nuevo

The Upside (125 mins., PG-13) Bryan Cranston, Kevin Hart, and Nicole Kidman star in this remake of the 2011 French film The Intouchables, which is based on the life of wealthy businessman Philippe Pozzo di Borgo, who became a quadriplegic following a paragliding accident.

FEBRUARY 22- 28

OSCAR® 2019 BEST FOREIGN FILM NOMINEE DIRECTED BY NADINE LABAKI Fri, Mon – Thurs 5:00pm Sat 2:30pm, 5:00pm / Sun 12:15pm

2019 OSCAR® NOMINATED

SHORT FILMS

Animation: Sun 10:00am, Wed 7:30pm Documentaries: Sat, Tues, Thurs 7:30pm Live-Action: Fri, Mon 7:30pm

FOR TICKETS, VISIT WWW.SBIFF.ORG AND THE THEATRE BOX OFFICE #SBIFF

Camino Real/Paseo Nuevo

What Men Want (117 mins., R) In this remake — with a twist — of 2000’s fantasy/comedy What Women Want, Taraji P. Henson stars as Ali Davis, a sports agent who is kept on the outside by her male coworkers. Then a bump to the head gives her the ability to hear men’s thoughts, and it’s game on. Tracy Morgan and Aldis Hodge also star. Camino Real/Metro 4

2/21 - 9:00

PACIFIC HAZE NYRUS

ROCK/BLUES/JAM/FUNK POWER HOUR 8-9 PM $5 SHOTS & BOTTLED BEER 2/22 - 9:00

THE ENGLISH BEAT DJ DARLA BEA

SKA, REGGAE, NEW WAVE 2/23 - 9:00

HARPBREAKER CD RELEASE

MARK HUMMEL’S

GOLDEN STATE LONE STAR BLUES REVUE 2/24 - 7:00

SANTA BARBARA

PIANO BOYS

LOCAL CLASSICAL DUO 2/25 - 6:00 - 9:00

MOTOWN MONDAY WITH

DJ GAVIN ROY DJ DARLA BEA

EXPERIENCE THE MAGIC OF MOTOWN. NO COVER 2/26 - 7:00

KAYT MAR PEACH T REEF CITY & NICK VAUGHAN

SONGWRITER SHOWCASE 2/27

PRIVATE EVENT 2/28 - 8:30

SHOOK TWINS RAINBOW GIRLS INDY FOLK-POP

The Favourite

FOR OUR FULL LINEUP, PLEASE VISIT

The above films are playing in Santa Barbara FRIDAY, February 22, through THURSDAY, February 28. Our critics’ reviews are followed by initials: JK (Janavi Kumar), JW (Josef Woodard), and JY (Jean Yamamura). The symbol O indicates the film is recommended. The symbol ➤ indicates a new review.

SOhOSB.COM 1221 STATE STREET • 962-7776 INDEPENDENT.COM

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SANTA BARBARA SYMPHONY PRESENTS

Dirk Brossé, conductor Natasha Kislenko, piano Santa Barbara Symphony Chorus Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart, composer

Experience the blockbuster film Amadeus with score performed live by the Santa Barbara Symphony!

SAT, MARCH 16, 2019 8PM I SUN, MARCH 17, 2019 3PM AT THE GRANADA THEATRE Experience the motion picture Amadeus on HD screen while Mozart’s most celebrated works are performed live by the Santa Barbara Symphony and chorus. Winner of eight Academy Awards® including Best Picture, Miloš Foreman’s sumptuous Amadeus is an aural and visual treat for all the senses.

MPAA RATING: R

Principal Sponsor Roger & Sarah Chrisman Artist Sponsor Kathryn R. & Peter Martin Selection Sponsor Arthur & Winnie Swalley Corporate Partner Impulse

805.899.2222 I thesymphony.org

Celebrate!

“I felt a change immediately in recovery. Now, my heart feels at peace.”

JAZZ

- Julie Allen

Rincon Beach Club

presented by

Julie Santa Barbara

healing the heart with the MitraClip

Julie experienced fatigue that impacted her daily walks. After an ultrasound

THE CENTER FOR SUCCESSFUL AGING

Saturday March 2, 2019 2:30-5 pm SHAWN THIES & CYNTHIA THURBER vocals TOM BUCKNER sax

of her heart revealed a leaking mitral valve, Dr. Joseph Aragon, an

GEORGE FRIEDENTHAL

interventional cardiologist affiliated with the Cottage Heart & Vascular

CHRIS JUDGE

Center, treated Julie with the minimally invasive MitraClip procedure. Today, she is back to her daily walks around her neighborhood.

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FEBRUARY 21, 2019

guitar TOM LACKNER drums RANDY TICO bass

keyboard & vocals DANCING, APPETIZERS & WINE $100 per person

To learn more about how we heal the heart, visit cottagehealth.org/heart 54

AT THE

INFORMATION /RESERVATIONS: www.csasb.org or 805-452-5900 The Rincon Beach Club, 3805 Santa Claus Lane, Carpinteria, CA INDEPENDENT.COM


PAUL WELLMAN PHOTOS

SPORTS

BRUIN BLASTERS: Pictured above, Gaucho volleyballers Ryan Wilcox (4), Keenan Sanders (5), Hayden Boehle (6) and Casey McGarry (2) are fired up during their five-set victory over UCLA. Pictured right and below, senior hitter Corey Chavers (12) pounded 20 kills through the Bruins’ block and earned his third Big West Player of the Week accolade of the season.

GAUCHO VOLLEYBALLERS SEEK FIRST NATIONAL CROWN Coach Rick McLaughlin and Hitter Corey Chavers Rise Above UCLA

A

rivalry that boiled over 45 years ago continues to fire up the crowds in UCSB’s Robertson Gym. “It’s fun to beat that team,” UCSB men’s volleyball coach Rick McLaughlin said after the Gauchos scored a stirring five-set victory over UCLA last Wednesday. “I’ve followed the history closely and know what it means.” In the first six years that the NCAA sponsored men’s volleyball championships, the Gauchos met UCLA in the final three times, and each time, the Bruins prevailed. The 1974 final was played at Rob Gym and was an epic match in which the Bruins rallied to upset the top-seeded Gauchos. That result seemed to solidify a UCLA dynasty that has brought 19 national championships to Westwood. The Gauchos, meanwhile, still seek their first NCAA volleyball crown. They have been runners-up twice more, losing in five sets to USC in 1988 and Ohio State in 2011, McLaughlin’s third year at the helm. Last week, UCSB was ranked No. 6 in the nation and UCLA No. 4. After the Gauchos won their ninth consecutive match since being swept by the Bruins a month earlier, McLaughlin declared, “In the 11 years I’ve been here, this is one of the top two teams, if not the best team, I’ve coached.” During their streak, the Gauchos defeated

five nationally ranked teams — including backto-back sweeps of then–No. 3 BYU — as well as sweeps of Ohio State and Penn State. Throughout that surge, outside hitter Corey Chavers was an inexorable force for the Gauchos, posting double-digit numbers in kills each time out. After he pounded 20 kills in a four-set victory over No. 5 Loyola-Chicago on January 26, Chavers was named the American Volleyball Coaches Association (AVCA) national player of the week, the first time a Gaucho was accorded that honor since Jeff Menzel in 2011. Chavers, a 64 senior, blasted a match-high 20 kills with a .472 hitting percentage against UCLA. He punctuated the opening set with a pair of ace serves as the Gauchos showed they were not the same team that had lost their previous match at Pauley Pavilion. Each time UCLA came back, they had a response. The set scores were 25-18, 21-25, 25-20, 19-25, and 15-12. Both teams put high power into their serves, a risk-reward calculation that either dented the attack on the other side or sent balls harmlessly into the net, resulting in 32 service errors by the Gauchos and 30 by the Bruins. “That’s the game these days,” McLaughlin said. “We weathered it a little better in the end. Our guys hung in there. They knew they were a better team.” The Gauchos trailed early in the fifth set but came back on their own steady play and UCLA errors. Chavers scored match point by blocking Austin Matautia. “It felt good ending the match like that,” he said. “He’s tough,” McLaughlin said of Chavers. “He was our best passer tonight. He’s been working on it for a long time. That’s the kind of player he is — hard work, hanging in there, getting through the highs and lows. Now he’s one of the best players in the country.” If he had not lost a bet in high school, Chavers might never have discovered his talent for volleyball. He was a sophomore basketball player at Gahr High in Cerritos. “A friend on the volleyball team always talked to me about trying out,” he said. “We made a bet on a football game, the Cowboys and Patriots or something. All I remember is, I lost the bet, and I had to try out for volleyball.” He helped Gahr’s Gladiators win their first

by JOHN ZANT

JOHN ZANT’S GAME OF THE WEEK 2/22-2/23: College Baseball: William Jessup at Westmont Two NAIA top 25 teams meet in a four-game showdown this Friday and Saturday. William Jessup, ranked No.13, is the defending Golden State Athletic Conference champion, while No. 25 Westmont finished second last year to the Warriors from Rocklin. Westmont has roared off to a 9-0 start this season, leaving coach Robert Ruiz, in his 10th season, 15 wins short of John Kirkgard’s school record. Two key players are senior infielder Luke Coffey (out of Dos Pueblos High) and outfielder Bryce Morison (Santa Barbara High). Morison’s two-run homer in the ninth inning boosted Westmont’s Warriors to a 12-10 victory over Hope International last weekend. Fri.: 11am (doubleheader); Sat.: 11am (doubleheader). Russ Carr Field, Westmont College. Free-$8. Call 565-6010.

league volleyball championship in a dozen years and make it to a CIF championship match in 2014. Chavers is the only senior starter for the Gauchos other than Hayden Boehle, who makes appearances as a libero for defensive purposes. A pair of freshmen came up big against UCLA, Ryan Wilcox making 10 kills and Brandon Hicks producing five blocks. A trio of juniors — Keenan Sanders (eight kills), Spencer Fredrick (nine digs and five blocks), and setter Casey McGarry — filled out the lineup. McGarry filled in for injured setter Randy DeWeese and delivered 33 assists. The UCLA match improved the Gauchos’ record to 12-3 before beginning their slate of Big West matches. In its second year of volleyball, the conference has emerged as the nation’s toughest. The 1-2-3 teams in last week’s NCAA rankings were Big West teams Long Beach State, the defending national champion, Hawai‘i, and UC Irvine. There is a two-week break before UCSB’s next home match on March 1 against UC San Diego. “We’ve been playing a ton of matches,” McLaughlin said. “It’s about time guys got a little rest and take midterm exams.” Long Beach State will visit UCSB on March 15. The conference tournament on April 18-20 at Hawai‘i will decide an automatic NCAA bid. McLaughlin said the Gauchos have played the nation’s toughest schedule to date, and as long as they continue playing at that level the rest of the way, they should have an argument for an at-large NCAA bid regardless of the tournament’s outcome. They would like nothing better than the opportunity to play UCLA in the postseason again. n

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02 24 2019 Free and open to the public.

The Three Cantors Cantor Marcus Feldman Named one of The Top Five Best New Voices in Jewish Music by The Forward, Marcus Feldman is the Senior Cantor of Sinai Temple.

Cantor Mark Childs Earned his Master of Sacred Music degree along with an ordination as Cantor in 1991 from Hebrew Union College Debbie Friedman School of Sacred Music in New York City.

Cantor Shmuel Barzilai Chief Cantor of Vienna’s Jewish community since 1992, was born in Jerusalem to a family of renowned cantors, and is the grandson of Cantor Rabbi Jacob Eisenbach (Pester). Organist Aryell Cohen Talented and energetic musician has earned national respect as an outstanding interpreter of Jewish liturgical music.

Sunday February 24, 2019 4:00 p.m. Congregation B’nai B’rith

Join the

Santa Barbara Independent's

For further information contact: Richard D. Hecht Maeve Devoy ariel@religion.ucsb.edu maeve@cappscenter.ucsb.edu (805) 893-2317

12th Annual

St. Patrick's Day Stroll Sunday, March 17 12 noon

Media Grants

Hutton Parker Foundation and the Santa Barbara Independent are pleased to continue our Media Grant program for local nonprofit agencies. This unique opportunity provides nonprofits the ability to spread their message to the greater Santa Barbara community. Organizations apply online, and one nonprofit group is is chosen each month. The Santa Barbara Independent design team produces a custom four-page insert specific to the individual agency's needs. The insert is published and distributed in all 40,000 copies of the Santa Barbara Independent, with the cost underwritten by Hutton Parker Foundation. Find out more about this opportunity to boost your organization's marketing efforts, promote your good works, and tell your story to a wider audience. Visit HuttonFoundation.org for more information and the Media Grant application.

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For Santa Barbara County Nonprofit organizations

, y a d a r o f h s i Ir ! e f i l r o f t n e d n Indepe Meet in front of Indy HQ at 12 E. Figueroa Street. Stroll will head down State Street. Rain or shine!


FREE WILL ASTROLOGY by Rob Breszny CANCER

ARIES (Mar. 21-Apr. 19): In December 1915, the California city

of San Diego was suffering from a drought. City officials hired a professional “moisture accelerator” named Charles Hatfield, who promised to make it rain. Soon Hatfield was shooting explosions of a secret blend of chemicals into the sky from the top of a tower. The results were quick. A deluge began in early January of 1916 and persisted for weeks. Thirty inches of rain fell, causing floods that damaged the local infrastructure. The moral of the story, as far as you’re concerned, Aries: When you ask for what you want and need, specify exactly how much you want and need. Don’t make an open-ended request that could bring you too much of a good thing.

TAURUS (Apr. 20-May 20): Actors Beau Bridges and Jeff Bridges

are brothers born to parents who were also actors. When they were growing up, they already had aspirations to follow in their mom’s and dad’s footsteps. From an early age, they summoned a resourceful approach to attracting an audience. Now and then, they would start a pretend fight in a store’s parking lot. When a big enough crowd had gathered to observe their shenanigans, they would suddenly break off from their faux struggle, grab their guitars from their truck, and begin playing music. In the coming weeks, I hope you’ll be equally ingenious as you brainstorm about ways to expand your outreach.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): According to Edward Barnard’s book

New York City Trees, a quarter of the city is shaded by its 5.2 million trees. In other words, one of the most densely populated, frantically active places on the planet has a rich collection of oxygen-generating greenery. There’s even a virgin forest at the upper tip of Manhattan, as well as five botanical gardens and the 843-acre Central Park. Let’s use all this bounty-amidthe-bustle as a symbol of what you should strive to foster in the coming weeks: refreshing lushness and grace interspersed throughout your busy, hustling rhythm.

(June 21-July 22): As a poet myself, I regard good poetry

WEEK OF FEBRUARY 21

offerings. (2) Don’t allow huge, impersonal forces to exploit your resources. (3) Be tough and discerning, not lax and naïve, as you negotiate deals.

as highly useful. It can nudge us free of our habitual thoughts and provoke us to see the world in ways we’ve never imagined. On the other hand, it’s not useful in LIBRA the same way that food and water and sleep are. Most (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Sixteenth-century Italian artist Danpeople don’t get sick if they are deprived of poetry. But iele da Volterra wasn’t very famous for his own paintI want to bring your attention to a poem that is serving ing and sculpture. The work for which we remember a very practical purpose in addition to its inspirational him today is the alterations he made to Michelangelo’s giant fresco “The Last Judgment,” function. Simon Armitage’s poem which spreads across an entire “In Praise of Air” is on display in an HOMEWORK: Choose one area wall in the Sistine Chapel. After outdoor plaza at Sheffield Univerof your life where you’re going to Michelangelo died, the Catholic sity. The material it’s printed on is stop pretending. Report results to Church hired da Volterra to “fix” designed to literally remove a potent FreeWillAstrology.com. the scandalous aspects of the people pollutant from the atmosphere. And depicted in the master’s work. He what does this have to do with you? I painted clothes and leaves over the suspect that in the coming weeks, you will have an extra capacity to generate blessings that are like Armitage’s originals’ genitalia and derrieres. In accordance with poem: useful in both practical and inspirational ways. astrological omens, I propose that we make da Volterra your anti–role model for the coming weeks. Don’t be like him. Don’t engage in cover-ups, censorship, or LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): In 1979, psychologist Dorothy Ten- camouflage. Instead, specialize in the opposite: revelanov published her book Love and Limerence: The tions, unmaskings, and expositions. Experience of Being in Love. She defined her newly SCORPIO coined word “limerence” as a state of adoration that may generate intense, euphoric, and obsessive feelings (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): What is the quality of your access to for another person. Of all the signs in the zodiac, you life’s basic necessities? How well do you fulfill your Leos are most likely to be visited by this disposition need for good food and drink, effective exercise, deep throughout 2019. And you’ll be especially prone to it sleep, thorough relaxation, mental stimulation, soulin the coming weeks. Will that be a good thing or a ful intimacy, a sense of meaningfulness, nourishing disruptive thing? It all depends on how determined beauty, and rich feelings? I bring these questions to you are to regard it as a blessing, have fun with it, and your attention, Scorpio, because the rest of 2019 will enjoy it regardless of whether or not your feelings are be an excellent time for you to fine-tune and expand your relationships with these fundamental blessings. reciprocated. I advise you to enjoy the hell out of it! And now is an excellent time to intensify your efforts.

VIRGO

(Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Based in Switzerland, Nestlé is the largest food company in the world. Yet it pays just $200 per year to the state of Michigan for the right to suck up 400 million gallons of groundwater, which it bottles and sells at a profit. I nominate this vignette to be your cautionary tale in the coming weeks. How? (1) Make damn sure you are being fairly compensated for your

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): Michael Jackson’s 1982 song “Beat It” climbed to number three on the record-sales charts in Australia. On the other hand, “Weird Al” Yankovic’s 1984 parody of Jackson’s tune, “Eat It,” reached number one on the same charts. Let’s use this twist as a metaphor that’s a good fit for your life in the coming weeks.

According to my analysis of the astrological omens, you may find that a stand-in or substitute or imitation will be more successful than the original. And that will be auspicious!

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): The Space Needle in Seattle, Washing-

ton, is 605 feet high and 138 feet wide: a tall and narrow tower. Near the top is a round restaurant that makes one complete rotation every 47 minutes. Although this part of the structure weighs 125 tons, for many years its motion was propelled by a mere 1.5-horsepower motor. I think you will have a comparable power at your disposal in the coming weeks: an ability to cause major movement with a compact output of energy.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): In 1941, the Ford automobile com-

pany created a “biological car.” Among its components were “bioplastics” composed of soybeans, hemp, flax, wood pulp, and cotton. It weighed a thousand pounds less than a comparable car made of metal. This breakthrough possibility never fully matured, however. It was overshadowed by newly abundant plastics made from petrochemicals. I suspect that you Aquarians are at a phase with a resemblance to the biological car. Your good idea is promising but unripe. I hope you’ll spend the coming weeks devoting practical energy to developing it. (P.S. There’s a difference between you and your personal equivalent of the biological car: little competition.)

PISCES (Feb. 19-Mar. 20): Cartographers of Old Europe some-

times drew pictures of strange beasts in the uncharted regions of their maps. These were warnings to travelers that such areas might harbor unknown risks, like dangerous animals. One famous map of the Indian Ocean shows an image of a sea monster lurking, as if waiting to prey on sailors traveling through its territory. If I were going to create a map of the frontier you’re now headed for, Pisces, I would fill it with mythic beasts of a more benevolent variety, like magic unicorns, good fairies, and wise centaurs.

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700.

Cancer Foundation of Santa Barbara Presents

5K•10K•15K Saturday, March 16 Lunch, Raffle & Yoga Included!

Register by February 28 for only $50! Register today! www.cfsb.org/irelandwalk2019

Talk: Environmental Justice as Freedom

100% of registration fees and pledges benefit the Ridley-Tree Cancer Center’s breast cancer research & supportive care programs.

FEBRUARY 28 | 4:00 PM

JULIE SZE

McCune Conference Room, 6020 HSSB

UC Davis

Free public event, no reservations needed

Visit www.ihc.ucsb.edu or call (805) 893-2004 for more information INDEPENDENT.COM

FEBRUARY 21, 2019

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E M A I L S A L E S @ I N D E P E N D E N T. C O M

EMPLOYMENT

DEDICATION TO BEING OUR BEST.

It’s our highest priority. Setting high standards is one thing. Embracing them is another. At Cottage Health, we make it top priority to work constantly at being our best...for patients, their families, our communities and fellow team members. If you would enjoy living up to your potential at a health system that strives for – and achieves – excellence, come to Cottage.

Santa Barbara Cottage Hospital

Non-Clinical

Santa Ynez Valley Cottage Hospital

• Cafeteria Cashier

• Security Officer – PD Weekends

Nursing

• Cook

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Access Case Manager Birth Center Cardiac Cath Lab Cardiac Telemetry Clinical Nurse Specialist, NICU Clinical Resource Nurse – Surgery (Weekends/Baylor) Educator, Lactation Emergency Hematology/Oncology Med/Surg Float Pool MICU Mother Infant NICU Nurse Practitioner – Palliative Care Operating Room Orthopedics PACU Patient Relations/ Accred Coordinator RN Peds PICU Psych Nursing Pulmonary, Renal, Infectious Disease SICU Surgical Trauma Telemetry

Goleta Valley Cottage Hospital

• Data Analyst • Environmental Services Rep • Environmental Services Supervisor • Food Services Rep • Inventory Tech, Luma • IT Business Analyst – Kronos • Librarian • Manager, Benefits • Patient Financial Counselor II • Research Coordinator, RN • Research Department Coordinator • Research Finance Analyst • Room Service Coordinator • Room Service Server • Security Officer – FT Nights/Evenings • Supervisor, Childcare Center • Trauma Program Manager • Volunteer Coordinator

Allied Health • CT Tech – FT • Occupational Therapist • Pharmacy Manager – Clinical • Pharmacist – PT • Physical Therapist II • Radiology Tech – PT

• Cardiovascular RN • Patient Care Tech • Patient Relations/Accreditation Coordinator – FT • Pharmacy Tech • Surgical ED Coordinator • Surgical Tech II • Unit Care Tech • Unit Coordinator

• Sonographer – PD

Hyperbaric Tech – FT Occupational Therapist – PD Patient Care Tech – FT Physical Therapist RN, ICU RN, Surgery Surgical Tech – FT

Cottage Business Services • • • • • • • • • • • •

Director, Patient Access Director, Planning and Analysis Financial Assistant Financial Reporting Analyst Sr. HIM Manager HIM Outpatient Data Specialist Manager, Denials and Utilization Review Manager, Patient Access Manager, Payroll Manager, Revenue Cycle Engineering Philanthropic Coordinator Sr. Revenue Integrity Analyst

Pacific Diagnostic Laboratories

• MRI Tech

Clinical

• • • • • • •

• Speech Language Pathologist II

Cottage Rehabilitation Hospital

• • • • • •

Certified Phlebotomist Technician – FT/PT CLS, Core Lab, Micro, SBCH Lab Assistant II, Specimen Processing – FT Revenue Cycle Coordinator Sales Support Representative Sr. Sales Representative

• Please apply to: www.pdllabs.com

• Recreational Therapist – PD

• RENTAL & RELOCATION ASSISTANCE AVAILABLE FOR SELECT FULL-TIME POSITIONS

• Speech Therapist

• CERTIFICATION REIMBURSEMENT

• CCRC Family Consultant – SLO • Physical Therapist – PD

We offer an excellent compensation package that includes above-market salaries, premium medical benefits, pension plans, tax savings accounts, rental and mortgage assistance, and relocation packages. What’s holding you back?

Please apply online at jobs.cottagehealth.org. Candidates may also submit a resume to: Cottage Health, Human Resources, P.O. Box 689, Pueblo at Bath Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93102-0689 Please reference “SBI” when applying. EOE

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Excellence, Integrity, Compassion

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ADMIN/CLERICAL

ACCOUNTS PAYABLE PROCESSOR

BUSINESS & FINANCIAL SERVICES In the accounts payable/vendor disbursements unit of Business & Financial Services: Responsible for reception duties, including greeting guests, answering phones and routing calls to appropriate staff. Responsible for mail processing and distribution duties: opening, date stamping, and sorting by unit and distributing incoming U.S. and campus mail. Responsible for adding new vendors into PeopleSoft. Is back up to AP Check Audit Desk as needed. Reqs: High School Diploma or equivalent. Work experience in a customer service environment. Excellent written and oral communication skills, effective interpersonal skills. Must be organized, detailed oriented, accurate and dependable. Note: Fingerprint background check required. $19.48‑$20.36/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For primary consideration apply by 3/3/19, thereafter open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #20190092

BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY AVON ‑ Earn Extra $$. Sell online or in person from home or work. Free website included. No inventory required. For more info, Call: 855‑812‑5674

EDUCATION AIRLINE CAREERS Start Here – Get trained as FAA certified Aviation Technician. Financial aid for qualified students. Job placement assistance. Call Aviation Institute of Maintenance 877‑205‑4138. (Cal‑SCAN)

EMPLOYMENT SERVICES AIRLINES ARE HIRING ‑ Get FAA approved hands on Aviation training. Financial Aid for qualified students ‑ Career placement assistance. CALL Aviation Institute of Maintenance 888‑686‑1704

FINANCE OVER $10K in Debt? Be debt free in 24 to 48 months. No upfront fees to enroll. A+ BBB rated. Call National Debt Relief 1‑888‑508‑6305. (Cal‑SCAN) UNABLE TO work due to injury or illness? Call Bill Gordon & Assoc., Social Security Disability Attorneys! FREE Evaluation. Local Attorneys Nationwide 1‑844‑879‑3267. Mail: 2420 N St NW, Washington DC. Office: Broward Co. FL (TX/NM Bar.) (Cal‑SCAN)

Administrative Assistant. To learn more, call Ultimate Medical Academy. 855‑629‑5104 LUNG CANCER? And Age 60+? You And Your Family May Be Entitled To Significant Cash Award. No Risk. No Money Out Of Pocket. Call for Information 866‑830‑3010 PHARMACY TECHNICIAN ‑ ONLINE TRAINING AVAILABLE! Take the first step into a new career! Call now: 833‑221‑0660

NONPROFIT COMMUNITY EDUCATION SPECIALIST FT/benes. Eng/Span REQUIRED Coordinate Ed Program in Span. Present trainings on sexual assault in Span. See www.sbstesa.org/careers. Cover Letter, resume & 3 refs: stesa@sbstesa.org

PROFESSIONAL

HEALTH & FITNESS DENTAL INSURANCE. Call Physicians Mutual Insurance Company for details. NOT just a discount plan, REAL coverage for 350 procedures. 1‑855‑472‑0035 or http://www.dental50plus.com/canews Ad# 6118 (Cal‑SCAN) LOWEST PRICES on Health & Dental Insurance. We have the best rates from top companies! Call Now! 888‑989‑4807. (Cal‑SCAN)

LEGAL DID YOU KNOW that the average business spends the equivalent of nearly 1½ days per week on digital marketing activities? CNPA can help save you time and money. For more info email cecelia@cnpa.com or call (916) 288‑6011. (Cal‑SCAN)

MEDICAL/HEALTHCARE ATTENTION: OXYGEN Users! Gain freedom with a Portable Oxygen Concentrator! No more heavy tanks and refills! Guaranteed Lowest Prices! Call the Oxygen Concentrator Store: 866‑642‑3015 (AAN CAN) HEALTHCARE CAREER TRAINING ONLINE. Start a New Career in Medical Billing & Coding. Medical

Advertising Sales Representative The Santa Barbara Independent has a rare opportunity in our Advertising Sales division. We are in search of an ideal candidate to join our well-established team of sales professionals. This full-time position requires: ability to sell multimedia products -- print, online, and other developing industry offerings; excellent organizational and time-management skills to meet deadlines crucial to our production process; superb verbal and written communication skills; the ability to build strong client relationships via collaborative selling and excellent customer service; as well as the charisma to be a strong ambassador of The Independent in our community. With a 30-year history of serving Santa Barbara, our awardwinning products are an integral part of our community and are well-respected on a national level. We offer a competitive commission structure along with a strong benefits package, including health and dental insurance, Section 125 cafeteria plan, 401(k), and vacation program. Please send résumé along with cover letter to hr@independent.com EOE F/M/D/V. No phone calls, please.

ASSISTANT COMPLEX COORDINATOR

DEAN STUDENT RESIDENTS Responsible for community development, resident government advising, newsletter, safety, supervision and administration of residents. Is a member of the Residential and Community Living Lead Staff team responsible for assisting with the comprehensive living learning program for the 10,000+ residents in Housing utilizing a residential curriculum approach. Assists the Complex Coordinator in responding to all resident issues, co‑creating neighborhood programs, training and supervising Resident Assistants and various student staff positions, providing on‑call assistance and responding to emergencies as needed. Liaisons with various campus and departmental offices to provide outstanding service to residents. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree, or equivalent combination of education and experience required. Ability to establish priorities, manage time, adapt to change and work collaboratively with others. Strong written, verbal and interpersonal communication skills. Ability to interact with a diverse group of students and staff. Able to engage positively with students. Strong conflict resolution skills. Experience working with university/college level students. Notes: Fingerprint background check required. Twelve month, live‑in, contract position starting early August with possibility of renewal for a maximum of one additional term. This position will require night and weekend hours as needed. Position also includes a furnished apartment. Multiple positions available. $49,000/ yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For primary consideration apply by 2/26/19, thereafter open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #20190088


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EMPLOYMENT ASSISTANT RESIDENT DIRECTOR

RESEARCH PROGRAM COORDINATOR

ELECTRICAL & COMPUTER ENGINEERING Responsible for the budgetary and administrative management of the Electrical & Computer Engineering’s ComSenTer: A Center for Converged TeraHertz Communications and Sensing. Provides budget projections, monitoring and analysis, and advises Director on budget strategies to meet the Center’s objectives and deliverables. Serves as liaison for the Director to all internal and external constituencies, particularly, the Semiconductor Research Corporation. Coordinates academic appointment and visa documentation, plans and organizes program reviews and events, is responsible for all reporting under the center as requested by SRC, and coordinates and maintains the ComSenTer web pages. Reqs: Working knowledge of financial processes, policies, and procedures. Strong knowledge of financial data management and reporting systems. Ability to prepare reports and analyses to include summaries of financial transactions, evaluation of current and projected spending trends, etc. for management review and decision making. Ability to work under pressure of multiple concurrent deadlines, with frequent interruptions. Demonstrated knowledge of MS Office (Word, Excel, PowerPoint). Note: Fingerprint background check required. $23.47‑$25.00/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran

PHONE 965-5205

SENIOR DIRECTOR OF DEVELOPMENT, UNIVERSITY LIBRARY

OFFICE OF DEVELOPMENT Serves as the Senior Director of Development, Library. Works to optimize philanthropic support for the Library, in response to academic priorities established by the University Librarian. Fund‑raising efforts are devoted primarily to the Library; the remaining time may be directed to other University initiatives, as appropriate. Focuses about eighty percent time on major gift ($100k +) fund‑raising activities. Twenty percent is focused on other activities related to fund raising, including some lower level gift solicitations, development of campaign materials, assistance with programs and marketing materials for external and community relations, and administrative duties such as planning, coordinating and executing aspects of the Library Development Program. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree or equivalent combination of education and experience required, Master’s degree preferred. Five to ten years of experience in individual major donor development or related profession. Proven success in the major gift fundraising; experience in higher education preferred. An understanding of the culture of a research university and/or library, and a basic grasp of the range of academic and research topics faculty members and librarians focus upon. With training, ability to articulate the programmatic objectives of the Library with clarity and passion. Highest ethical standards, demonstrated empathy and a positive attitude in the face of challenge. Notes: Fingerprint background check required. Annually renewable contract position. Ability and willingness to travel frequently and to work weekends and evenings. Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record and enrollment in the DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program. Salary is competitive and commensurate with qualifications and experience. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For primary consideration apply by 2/25/19, thereafter open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs. ucsb.edu Job #20190082

TRANSITIONAL WORK PROGRAM (TWP) COORDINATOR

HUMAN RESOURCES Responsible for helping administer the campus return to work/transitional work program for employees with temporary work restrictions. Develops, implements, and monitors temporary modified and alternate work assignments for employees healing from an injury or illness. Develops, maintains, and updates the case management database. Identifies and analyzes data for trends; develops and produces a variety of reports on an ad hoc/quarterly/annual basis; assists with development and implementation of training modules for managers, supervisors and employees. Reqs: Ability to interpret, apply, and explain policies and procedures and regulations. Organized, detail oriented with excellent follow up/case management

E M A I L S A L E S @ I N D E P E N D E N T. C O M

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REAL ESTATE

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status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #20190006

DEAN STUDENT RESIDENTS Acts as a live‑in building staff assisting in all aspects of the student life program in their residence hall building of 400‑1400 student residents utilizing a residential curriculum approach. This includes 24/7 on‑call responsibilities, student contact and counseling, supervising the front desk operation, co‑supervision of the RAs and other student staff positions, full oversight and advising of hall government, and management of the building’s community development. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree or an equivalent combination of education and experience required. Strong written, verbal, and interpersonal communication skills. Ability establish priorities, manage time, adapt to change and work collaboratively with others. Excellent communication skills for interacting with a diverse group of students and staff. Ability to engage constructively with students. Strong Conflict Resolution skills. Experience working with university/college level students. Excellent organizational skills. Notes: Fingerprint background check required. 10.5 month, live‑in, contract position starting in early August, with the possibility of renewal for a maximum one additional term. Position will require night and weekend hours as needed. Position includes a furnished apartment and meal plan. Multiple positions available. $49,000/yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For primary consideration apply by 3/11/19, thereafter open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs. ucsb.edu Job #20190091

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skills. Ability to prioritize workload with frequent interruptions. Excellent oral and written communication skills. Demonstrated experience working with a diverse population with tact and sensitivity. Proficiency with Word, Excel, Powerpoint and database programs. Notes: Fingerprint background check required. This is a grant funded position; subject to annual renewal. $23.95 ‑ $26.57/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For primary consideration apply by 2/24/19, thereafter open until filled. Apply online at https://Jobs.ucsb.edu Job #20190080

SALES/MARKETING EVERY BUSINESS has a story to tell! Get your message out with California’s PRMedia Release – the only Press Release Service operated by the press to get press! For more info contact Cecelia @ 916‑288‑6011 or http://prmediarelease. com/ california (Cal‑SCAN)

SKILLED

$18/HR & UP DOE

Tile & Stone Cleaner / Polisher / Driver ‑ Hardworking and reliable ‑ Clean drivers license ‑ Learn skilled trade Contact Norma @ 805‑409‑8705

MUSIC MUSIC LESSONS

WONDERFUL TEACHER

Enjoy Piano, Voice or Harp Lessons. Exciting new approach to a full musical experience. Read, memorize, compose or improvise any music w/ ease. Vocal audition prep. $52/hr. 1st lesson 50% off!! Christine Holvick, BM, MM, 30 yrs exp sbHarpist.com Call 969‑6698

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HARPIST VIRTUOSO

FOR ALL EVENTS. Weddings, Concerts, Parties, Churches, Recording Studios. Classical, pop, folk, jazz...Christine Holvick, BM, MM www.sbHarpist.com 969‑6698

WELL BEING FAMILY SERVICES A PLACE FOR MOM has helped over a million families find senior living. Our trusted, local advisors help find solutions to your unique needs at no cost to you. Call 855‑741‑7459

HOLISTIC HEALTH

Herbal Health-care

Herbal programs for weight‑loss, heart conditions, inflammation & pain, blood sugar conditions, digestion, liver detox. Naturopath, Herbalist, Khabir Southwick, 805‑308‑3480, www. KSouthwick.com

MASSAGE (LICENSED)

DEEP TISSUE QUEEN

Expert in Deep Tissue, 20 yrs exp. Work w/chronic pain, stress & injuries. 1st time Client $50/hr. Gift Cert available, Outcall. Laurie Proia, LMT 886‑8792

KC BUYS HOUSES ‑ FAST ‑ CASH ‑ Any Condition. Family owned & Operated . Same day offer! (951) 777‑2518 WWW. KCBUYSHOUSES.COM (Cal‑SCAN) NORTHERN AZ WILDERNESS RANCH $198 MONTH ‑ Quiet & secluded 37 acre off grid ranch in AZ’s best year‑round climate. No urban noise /sunny days /dark sky nights. Blend of mature evergreen trees & grassy meadows with sweeping views across surrounding wilderness mountains and valleys. Abundant clean groundwater/ free well water access/ loam garden soil & maintained road to property. Near historic pioneer town & fishing lake. Camping and RV ok. $23,000, $2,300 dn. Free brochure with similar properties includes photos/topo maps/ weather/ town info. 1st United Realty 800.966.6690. (CalSCAN)

REAL ESTATE FOR SALE HOMES/DUPLEXES FOR SALE

Charming Cottage

2BR 1BA. New kitchen/bathrm. Lrg backyard. $875,000. 805‑953‑5021

RANCH/ACREAGE FOR SALE REDDING AREA: 27‑1/2 Acres in 6 Separate Parcels. Trees, Views, dirt road. $28,000. Down, $1,600./ Mo., $189,000. Cash Price All 6. Lg. Family/ Group. OWC, OWNER 530‑605‑8857 (Cal‑SCAN)

RENTAL PROPERTIES

across the street from Oak Park. NP. $1320. Call Cristina 687‑0915 1BD NEAR SBCC & beach @ Carla Apts NP. 530 W Cota $1320 Rosa 965‑3200 2BDS $1740+ & 3BD flat or townhouses $2490. Near UCSB, shops, park, beach, theater, golf. Sesame Tree Apts 6930 Whittier Dr. Hector 968‑2549 STUDIOS $1320+ & 1BDs $1440+ in beautiful garden setting! Pool, lndry & off‑street parking at Michelle Apartments. 340 Rutherford St. NP. Call Erin 967‑6614

APARTMENTS & CONDOS FOR RENT

HOUSES/DUPLEXES FOR RENT

$1320 1BD Corner of Hope & San Remo‑N State St‑Barbara Apts Quiet NP 687‑0610

$2150 2 BD/1 BA

1 BED 1 Bath townhomes, $1575‑$1650, off‑st pkg, near UCSB & beach. 805‑968‑2011 Model open ‑ 6707 Abrego Rd #100

Recently Renovated Santa Barbara House for Rent

1BD NEAR Cottage Hospital. 519 W Alamar. Set among beautiful oak trees

DUPLEX 1214 Chino St. Unit A & B saracarter782@gmail.com

Located in quiet San Roque/Mission district, with unobstructed views of the Santa Ynez mountains from the dining room, kitchen and deck. If interested, pls email alberto.lapuz@ outlook.com for address and to arrange a house visit.

MISC. FOR RENT NEED A roommate? Roommates. com will help you find your Perfect Match™ today! (AAN CAN)

ROOMS FOR RENT PRIVATE ROOM in gated condo community. Furnished, private bath & smart TV, freshly painted. Balcony overlooks wooded canyon. Ample parking. Short walk to LogMeIn & Goleta Butterfly Grove. 7606 Hollister Ave. (805) 450‑3574.

Starting 1 March, this 3 bedrm, 2 bath, 1,700 sq ft house is available for 2‑year lease, at $6,000/month.

SERVICES FINANCIAL SERVICES 70 YEARS old, kids are grown. Still need your life insurance? Or is a big LIFE SETTLEMENT CASH PAYOUT smarter? Call Benefit Advance. 1‑877‑710‑4660

(Cal‑SCAN) DISH TV $59.99 For 190 Channels + $14.95 High Speed Internet. Free Installation, Smart HD DVR Included, Free Voice Remote. Some restrictions apply 1‑800‑718‑1593

ARE YOU BEHIND $10k OR MORE ON YOUR TAXES? Stop wage & bank levies, liens & audits, unfiled tax returns, payroll issues, & resolve tax debt FAST. Call 855‑970‑2032. (Cal‑SCAN)

DISH TV $59.99 For 190 Channels $14.95 High Speed Internet. Free Installation, Smart HD DVR Included, Free Voice Remote. Some restrictions apply. 1‑844‑536‑5233. (Cal‑SCAN)

AUTO INSURANCE STARTING AT $49/ MONTH! Call for your fee rate comparison to see how much you can save! Call: 855‑780‑8725 (AAN CAN)

Panel Upgrades.Rewiring Small/ Big Jobs! Lic707833 698‑8357

GENERAL SERVICES BECOME A PUBLISHED AUTHOR! We edit, print and distribute your work internationally. We do the work… You reap the Rewards! Call for a FREE Author’s Submission Kit: 866‑951‑7214

HOME SERVICES A PLACE FOR MOM. The nation’s largest senior living referral service. Contact our trusted,local experts today! Our service is FREE/no obligation. CALL 1‑855‑467‑6487. (Cal‑SCAN) DIRECTV & AT&T. 155 Channels & 1000s of Shows/Movies On Demand (w/SELECT Package.) AT&T Internet 99 Percent Reliability. Unlimited Texts to 120 Countries w/AT&T Wireless. Call 4 FREE Quote‑ 1‑866‑249‑0619

ELECTRICIAN-$AVE!

RECENTLY DIAGNOSED with LUNG CANCER and 60+ years old? Call now! You and your family may be entitled to a SIGNIFICANT CASH AWARD. Call 877‑648‑6308 today. Free Consultation. No Risk. STAY IN your home longer with an American Standard Walk‑In Bathtub. Receive up to $1,500 off, including a free toilet, and a lifetime warranty on the tub and installation! Call us at 1‑855‑534‑6198 WATER DAMAGE to Your Home? Call for a quote for professional cleanup & maintain the value of your home! Set an appt today! Call 855‑401‑7069 (Cal‑SCAN)

MEDICAL SERVICES ATTENTION OXYGEN THERAPY USERS! Inogen One G4 is capable of full 24/7 oxygen delivery. Only 2.8 pounds. FREE information kit. Call 877‑929‑9587

ATTENTION: OXYGEN Users! Gain freedom with a Portable Oxygen Concentrator! No more heavy tanks and refills! Guaranteed Lowest Prices! Call the Oxygen Concentrator Store: 1‑844‑653‑7402 (Cal‑SCAN) DENTAL INSURANCE. Call Physicians Mutual Insurance Company for details. NOT just a discount plan, REAL coverage for 350 procedures.888‑623‑3036 or http://www.dental50plus.com/58 Ad# 6118 FDA‑REGISTERED Hearing Aids. 100% Risk‑Free! 45‑Day Home Trial. Comfort Fit. Crisp Clear Sound. If you decide to keep it, PAY ONLY $299 per aid. FREE Shipping. Call Hearing Help Express 1‑ 844‑234‑5606 (Cal‑SCAN) MEDICAL‑GRADE HEARING AIDS for LESS THAN $200! FDA‑Registered. Crisp, clear sound, state of‑the‑art features & no audiologist needed. Try it RISK FREE for 45 Days! CALL 1‑877‑736‑1242 (Cal‑SCAN) OXYGEN ‑ Anytime. Anywhere. No tanks to refill. No deliveries. The All‑ New Inogen One G4 is only 2.8 pounds! FAA approved! FREE info kit: 844‑359‑3976. (Cal‑SCAN) SAVE ON YOUR NEXT PRESCRIPTION! World Health Link. Price Match Guarantee! Prescriptions Required. CIPA Certified. Over 1500 medications available. CALL Today For A Free Price Quote. 1‑866‑293‑9702 Call Now! SUFFERING FROM an ADDICTION to Alcohol, Opiates, Prescription PainKillers or other DRUGS? There is hope! Call Today to speak with

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PERSONAL SERVICES

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Need Help At Home? Call REAL HELP because this Non‑profit matches workers to your needs. 965‑1531

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TECHNICAL SERVICES

COMPUTER MEDIC

Virus/Spyware Removal, Install/ Repair, Upgrades, Troubleshoot, Set‑up, Tutor, Networks, Best rates! Matt 682‑0391

LEGALS FBN ABANDONMENT STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF USE OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME The following Fictitious Business Name is being abandoned: VIA VENETO at 331 Milpas St #1A Santa Barbara CA 93103; The original statement for use of this Fictitious Business Name was filed 05/17/2018 in the County of Santa Barbara. Original file no. 2018‑0001480. The person (s) or entities abandoning use of this name are as follows: Angela Merli 1023 Cacique St. Apt A Santa Barbara, CA 93103 This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 22, 2019. I hereby certify that this is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Tara Jayasinghe, Published: Jan 30. Feb 7, 14, 21 2019. STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF USE OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME The following Fictitious Business Name is being abandoned: BLUE SANDS INN at 421 S Milpas St Santa Barbara CA 93103; The original statement for use of this Fictitious Business Name was filed 02/13/2017 in the County of Santa

Barbara. Original file no. 2017‑0000450. The person (s) or entities abandoning use of this name are as follows: BLUE SANDS LLC 647 Park Lane Santa Barbara, CA 93108 This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 22, 2019. I hereby certify that this is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Brenda Aguilera, Published: Jan 30. Feb 7, 14, 21 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: SOMATIC SKILLS COACHING at 933 Castillo St. #3, Santa Barbara CA 93101; Anna Reidenbach 309 E Micheltorena St. Apt G, Santa Barbara, CA 93101 This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Anna Reidenbach Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 25, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Margarita Silva. FBN Number: 2019‑0000212. Published: Feb 21, 28. Mar 7, 14 2019.

INDEPENDENT.COM

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: FUND FOR CARPINTERIA at 4700 Sandyland Rd Apt 21 Carpinteria, CA 93013; David M. Welkowitz 249 Verano Dr Apt #15 Santa Barbara, CA 93110 This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: David M. Welkowitz Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 22, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Brenda Aguilera. FBN Number: 2019‑0000155. Published: Jan 30. Feb 7, 14, 21 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: THE UPS STORE #23 at 27 West Anapamu Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Transport United, LLC 1226 1/2 State Street Floor 2, Suite 1 Santa Barbara, CA 93101 This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 22, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Adela Bustos. FBN Number: 2019‑0000167. Published: Jan 30. Feb 7, 14, 21 2019.

FEBRUARY 21, 2019

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: TOPOLOGY PARTNERS at 923 W Anapamu St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Shana R. Lynde (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 25, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Margarita Silva. FBN Number: 2019‑0000209. Published: Jan 30. Feb 7, 14, 21 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: ALPHA CLEANING SERVICES at 1130 Punta Gorda St Spc 29 Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Diego Barreiro Berga (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 04, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Sandra E. Rodriguez. FBN Number: 2019‑0000038. Published: Jan 30. Feb 7, 14, 21 2019.

THE INDEPENDENT

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INDEPENDENT CLASSIFIEDS

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PHONE 965-5205

E M A I L S A L E S @ I N D E P E N D E N T. C O M

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: DEEP CLEANING at 934 Pear St. Carpinteria, CA 93013; Alma Ruiz Lustre (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 04, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Sandra E. Rodriguez. FBN Number: 2019‑0000039. Published: Jan 30. Feb 7, 14, 21 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: 805 ROYALTY INC. at 1515 San Andres St. #D Santa Barbara, CA 93101; 805 Royalty Inc. (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: Brian Cho/CFO Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 24, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Sandra E. Rodriguez. FBN Number: 2019‑0000193. Published: Jan 30. Feb 7, 14, 21 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SWEET CREAMS at 651 Paseo Nuevo #607 Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Tayfun Erhan 4133 San Martin Way Unit A Santa Barbara, CA 93110 This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 24, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Connie Tran. FBN Number: 2019‑0000201. Published: Feb 7, 14, 21, 28 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SOULJAH FITNESS at 792 Hot Springs Rd Montecito, CA 93108; Austin Oreilly Nealon (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Austin Nealon Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 31, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Sandra E. Rodriguez. FBN Number: 2019‑0000266. Published: Feb 7, 14, 21, 28 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: MXMAIL at 10 E. Yanonali Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Hertza, L.L.C. (same address) This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 16, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2019‑0000120. Published: Jan 30. Feb 7, 14, 21 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: DJ AUTO, MAHNEKE MOTORS at 5737 Thornwood Dr. Goleta, CA 93117;­Mahneke Enterprises, Inc. (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 23, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Tara Jayasinghe. FBN Number: 2019‑0000177. Published: Jan 30. Feb 7, 14, 21 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SUN BARBARA FUN at 651 Paseo Nuevo #315 Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Tayfun Erhan 4133 San Martin Way Unit A Santa Barbara, CA 93110 This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 24, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Connie Tran. FBN Number: 2019‑0000202. Published: Feb 7, 14, 21, 28 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SKILLS DEVELOPMENT at 7320 Freeman Place Goleta, CA 93117; Randy John Wilson (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Randy J. Wilson Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 25, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Christie Potter. FBN Number: 2019‑0000211. Published: Feb 7, 14, 21, 28 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: JAYA at 596 Vereda Parque Goleta, CA 93117; John Birchim (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 24, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Adela Bustos. FBN Number: 2019‑0000194. Published: Jan 30. Feb 7, 14, 21 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as:THE GOOD SHEPHERD LLC at 6268 Aberdeen Avenue Goleta, CA 93117; The Good Shepherd LLC (same address) This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 23, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Tara Jayasinghe. FBN Number: 2019‑0000175. Published: Jan 30. Feb 7, 14, 21 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: VANLIFE TRADER, VANLIFETRADER, VANLIFETRADER.COM at 1128 1/2 Castillo St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Vanlifetrader LLC (same address) This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 29, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2019‑0000244. Published: Feb 7, 14, 21, 28 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: CURVES SANTA BARBARA at 185 S Patterson Avenue Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Hippogriff LLC (same address) This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 1, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2019‑0000274. Published: Feb 7, 14, 21, 28 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: HUSBAND MATERIAL at 2030 Bath St. A Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Andrew Alexander Boa (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 24, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Connie Tran. FBN Number: 2019‑0000203. Published: Jan 30. Feb 7, 14, 21 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: AAA STORAGE, AVENUE 2509 at 479 Santa Rosa Lane Montecito, CA 93108; El Toro Holdings LLC (same address) This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company Signed: Audrey Singh, Attorney Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 25, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Margaritta Silva. FBN Number: 2019‑0000210. Published: Jan 30. Feb 7, 14, 21 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: FINE FABRICS OF SANTA BARBARA, FORCE FIN at 1307 B State St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Bob Evans Designs Inc. 27 W. Anapamu #318 Santa Barbara, CA 93101 This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 24, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Brenda Aguilera. FBN Number: 2019‑0000183. Published: Jan 30. Feb 7, 14, 21 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: ATLAS AIR at 1210 Edison St. Santa Ynez, CA 93460; Samuel Richard Berrett (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Sam Berrett Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 16, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2019‑0000119. Published: Jan 30. Feb 7, 14, 21 2019.

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as:SECRET BEACH PILATES AND AESTHETICS at 601 East Micheltorena Unit 28 Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Martha Solodkin (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 02, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Sandra E. Rodriguez. FBN Number: 2019‑0000011. Published: Jan 30. Feb 7, 14, 21 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: VALLEY DOG TRAINING at 430 La Lata Pl Buellton, CA 93427; Sarah Houchens (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Sarah Houchens Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 10, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Connie Tran. FBN Number: 2019‑0000083. Published: Feb 7, 14, 21, 28 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: NOAH PRODUCTS, NOAHBEARS.COM at 1021 Tremonto Rd. Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Avrick Consulting, LLC (same address) This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 22, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Connie Tran. FBN Number: 2019‑0000165. Published: Jan 30. Feb 7, 14, 21 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: A & I TRIMM at 485 Kellogg Way Goleta, CA 93117; Arlene Alicia Lopez 124 Sumida Gardens Ln #104 Santa Barbara, CA 93111 This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 22, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Sandra E. Rodriguez. FBN Number: 2019‑0000169. Published: Feb 7, 14, 21, 28 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: JENAVI LLC, RICCAVALLE at 338 Toro Canyon Road Carpinteria, CA 93013; Jenavi LLC (same address) This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 16, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Tara Jayasinghe. FBN Number: 2019‑0000117. Published: Jan 30. Feb 7, 14, 21 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: HANNAH CHILDS LIFESTYLE at 1715 Pampas Ave Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Hannah Childs LLC (same address) This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 4, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Margarita Silva. FBN Number: 2019‑0000290. Published: Feb 7, 14, 21, 28 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: BLUE SANDS INN at 421 S Milpas Santa Barbara, CA 93103; 421 S Milpas LLC 10000 Washington Blvd. Suite 600 Culver City, CA 90232 This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 22, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Brenda Aguilera. FBN Number: 2019‑0000157. Published: Jan 30. Feb 7, 14, 21 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: RANCH READY at 1670 1st Ct. Solvang, CA 93463; Lilinoe Gale 8 Hollister Ranch Gaviota, CA 93117 This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 31, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Brenda Aguilera. FBN Number: 2019‑0000265. Published: Feb 7, 14, 21, 28 2019.

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FEBRUARY 21, 2019

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: TREASURED MIRACLES PHOTOGRAPHY at 1325 1/2 Panchita Place Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Anita Schade (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Anita Schade Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 4, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Margarita Silva. FBN Number: 2019‑0000287. Published: Feb 7, 14, 21, 28 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: CLEARLY SUPERIOR WASHING at 1432 San Pascual St #48 Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Jose Antonio Segundo‑Gil (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 1, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Brenda Aguilera. FBN Number: 2019‑0000270. Published: Feb 7, 14, 21, 28 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: OPPI’S, OPPISBISTRO, THE LATTERIA at 1026 State Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101; The Latteria 325 K Street Apt 89 Davis, CA 95616 This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 22, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Brenda Aguilera. FBN Number: 2019‑0000163. Published: Feb 7, 14, 21, 28 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: C.E. WILLIAMS & ASSOCIATES at 5290 Overpass Road, Suite 132 Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Carl E Williams 1206 Portesuello Avenue Santa Barbara, CA 93105 (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 30, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Adela Bustos. FBN Number: 2019‑0000254. Published: Feb 7, 14, 21, 28 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SEE INTERNATIONAL at 175 Cremona Drive, Suite 100 Santa Barbara, CA 93117; Surgical Eye Expeditions International, Inc. (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: Mayra Garcia Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 4, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2019‑0000282. Published: Feb 14, 21, 28. Mar 7 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: CHANNEL VIEW APARTMENTS, THE BONSAI at 515 Red Rose Lane #18 Santa Barbara, CA 93109; Mark Abate 480 Glen Annie Road Goleta, CA 93117; John Whitehurst 515 Red Rose Lane #18 Santa Barbara, CA 93109 This business is conducted by a General Partnership Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 5, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Tara Jayasinghe. FBN Number: 2019‑0000309. Published: Feb 14, 21, 28. Mar 7 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: EMC at 401 N Milpas St #C Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Engaging In Molding Choices, Inc (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 5, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Brenda Aguilera. FBN Number: 2019‑0000299. Published: Feb 14, 21, 28. Mar 7 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: FIREWISE, KITTS MCCABE at 625 West Ortega St Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Firewise Solutions LLC (same address) This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company Signed: Christopher McCabe, President Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 5, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Tara Jayasinghe. FBN Number: 2019‑0000307. Published: Feb 14, 21, 28. Mar 7 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: INFINITIQUES at 1219 De La Vina Street, Apt 2 Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Timothy Lance Borkowski (same address) Xiaomeng Zhang (same address) This business is conducted by a Married Couple Signed: Timothy L. Borkowski Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 8, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Adela Bustos. FBN Number: 2019‑0000341. Published: Feb 14, 21, 28. Mar 7 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: BASKING IN GOODNESS at 27 West Anapamu St Suite 303 Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Emma Malina 2545 Medcliff Rd Santa Barbara, CA 93109 This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 5, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Brenda Aguliera. FBN Number: 2019‑0000300. Published: Feb 14, 21, 28. Mar 7 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: ROSEWOOD MIRAMAR BEACH MONTECITO at 1555 South Jameson Lane Montecito, CA 93108; Miramar Acquisition Co. LLC 101 The Grove Drive Los Angeles, CA 90036 This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company Signed: John Han, Director of Finance Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 5, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jan Morales. FBN Number: 2019‑0000312. Published: Feb 14, 21, 28. Mar 7 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: RH MANAGEMENT INC. at 431 Corona Del Mar Santa Barbara, CA 93103; RH Management 1650 Veteran Ave. #307 Los angeles, CA 90024 This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 28, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2019‑0000227. Published: Feb 14, 21, 28. Mar 7 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: ROMEO REAL ESTATE INC. at 431 Corona Del Mar Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Romeo Real Estate Inc. 1650 Veteran Ave. #307 Los Angeles, CA 90024 This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 28, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2019‑0000226. Published: Feb 14, 21, 28. Mar 7 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: FITZ’S CATERING at 1015 Laguna Street #6 Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Fitz’s Catering, Inc. (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: Mareike Schmidt‑Agent Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 7, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Brenda Aguilera. FBN Number: 2019‑0000323. Published: Feb 14, 21, 28. Mar 7 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: THE FRANKLIN LAW OFFICE at 252 Ancona Ave. Goleta, CA 93117; Lisa Franklin (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Lisa Franklin Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 1, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2019‑0000275. Published: Feb 21, 28. Mar 7, 14 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: JEFF CARROLL PLUMBING at 375 Pine Ave #4, Goleta, CA 93117; Jeffrey David Carroll 596 San Marino Dr., Santa Barbara, CA 93111 This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Jeffrey Carroll Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 15, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Sandra E. Rodriguez. FBN Number: 2019‑0000393. Published: Feb 21, 28. Mar 7, 14 2019.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: THE LOFT SALON at 446 Alisal Rd. Suite #19 Solvang, CA 93463; Kristy Jensen 3011 Country Rd. Santa Ynez, CA 93460 This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 11, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Connie Tran. FBN Number: 2019‑0000349. Published: Feb 21, 28. Mar 7, 14 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: FUNKIDSSB at 516 E. Victoria St. Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Tracy Jackson (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 24, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Connie Tran. FBN Number: 2019‑0000195. Published: Feb 21, 28. Mar 7, 14 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: FIG MOUNTAIN FOOD FACTORY, PIZZA MIZZA, PIZZA MIZZA DELIVERY at 1114 State Street #20 Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Delivery SB LLC (same address) This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 11, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Adela Bustos. FBN Number: 2019‑0000350. Published: Feb 21, 28. Mar 7, 14 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: INDIGO JUNE at 5817 Encina Road Apt 102 Goleta, CA 93117; Shauna Seale (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Shauna Shea Seale Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 24, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Connie Tran. FBN Number: 2019‑0000197. Published: Feb 21, 28. Mar 7, 14 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: VIRTUAL BUSINESS VIEWS at 1117 State Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101; John Michael Orrico 226 E. Sola Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101 This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: John Orrico Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 1, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Sandra E. Rodriguez. FBN Number: 2019‑0000273. Published: Feb 21, 28. Mar 7, 14 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: THE PROJECT: CORAZON COCINA & TAPROOM at 214 State Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Cerveceria + Taco Project, LLC 49 Via Alicia Santa Barbara, CA 93108 This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 29, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2019‑0000240. Published: Feb 21, 28. Mar 7, 14 2019. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: GONZALES GARDEN SERVICES at 4002 Via Lucero #10 Santa Barbara, CA 93110; Edgardo Gonzalez (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Edgardo Gonzalez Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 13, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Brenda Aguilera. FBN Number: 2019‑0000374. Published: Feb 21, 28. Mar 7, 14 2019.


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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: BACKYARD BOWLS at 331 Motor Way, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; PHDG, LLC (Same Address) This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 14, 2019. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2019‑0000388. Published: Feb 21, 28. Mar 7, 14 2019.

NAME CHANGE IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF ALANA MOUSSO ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 19CV00385 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: ALANA BLYTHE MOUSSO TO: ISLA FREYA AURORA ALYSSENDRA ASTER WILDING FROM: RUBY FLORENCE MOUSSO TO: RUBY FLORENCE EMMA FREYA MOUSSO WILDING THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. NOTICE OF HEARING Apr 10, 2019 9:30am, Dept 6, Courthouse, 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101 A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated Jan 29 2019 by Pauline Maxwell, Judge of the Superior Court. Published. Feb 14, 21, 28. Mar 7 2019.

SUMMONS SUMMONS (CITACION JUDICIAL) NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: (AVISO AL DEMANDADO): DAVID RICHARDSON and CARINA RICHARDSON and DOES 1 to 50 YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF: (LO ESTA DEMANDANDO EL DEMANDANTE): CASEY LEE JOHNSON NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this Summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self‑Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca. gov/ selfhelp), your county law library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self‑Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca. gov/ selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award of

$10,000 or more in a civil case. The court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case. AVISO! Lo han demandado. Si no responde dentro de 30 días, la corte puede decidir en su contra sin escuchar su version. Lea la informacion a continuacion. Tiene 30 DIAS DE CALENDARIO después de que le entreguen esta citación y papeles legales papa presentar una respuesta por escrito en esta corte y hacer que se entregue una copia al demandante. Una carta o una llamada telefónica no lo protegen. Su respuesta por escrito tiene que estar en formato legal correcto si desea que procesen su caso en la corte. Es posible que haya un formulario que usted pueda usar para su respuesta. Puede encontrar estos formularios de la corte y mas información en el Centro de Ayuda de las Cortes de California (www.sucorte.ca.gov), en la biblioteca de leyes de su condado o en la corte que le quede mas cerca. Si no puede pagar la cuota de presentación, pida al secretario de la corte que le de un formulario de exención de pago de cuotas. Si no presenta su respuesta a tiempo, puede perder el caso por incumplimiento y la corte le podrá quitar su sueldo, dinero y bienes sin mas advertencia. Hay otros requisitos legales. Es recomendable que llame a un abogado inmediatamente. Si no conoce a un abogado, puede llamar a un servicio de remisión a abogados. Si no puede pagar a un abogado, es posible que cumpla con los requisitos para obtener servicios legales gratuitos de un programa de servicios legales sin fines de lucro. Puede encontrar estos grupos sin fines de lucro en el sitio web de California Legal Services, (wwwlawhelpcalifornia.org), en el Centro de Ayuda de las Cortes de California, (www.sucorte.ca.gov) o poniéndose en contacto con la corte o el colegio de abogados locales. AVISO: Por ley, la corte tiene derecho a reclamar las cuotasy los costos esentos por imponer un gravamen sobre cualquier recuperacion de $10,000 o mas de valor recibida mediante un acuerdo o una concesión de arbitraje en un caso de derecho civil. Tiene

que pagar el graveman de la corte antes de que la corte pueda desechar el caso. CASE NO: (Numero del Caso) 18CV05605 The name and address of the court is: (El nombre y dirección de la corte es): SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA 312‑C East Cook Street Bldg. E, Santa Maria, CA 93456 The name, address, and telephone number of the plaintiff’s attorney, or plaintiff without an attorney, is: (El nombre, la dirección y el numero de telefono del abogado del demandante, o del demandante que no tiene abogado, es): Dustin Tardiff (Bar#281241) Tardiff Law Offices PO Box 1446, San Luis Obispo, CA 93406; Fax No. 805‑544‑4381; Phone No. (805) 544‑8100 DATE: Nov 13, 2018; 11:22am. Elizabeth Spann Deputy Clerk; Published. Feb 14, 21, 28. Mar 7 2019.

30; 921 St. Vincent Ave. SB; Cash/ credit cards

Furniture (indoor and out), piano, desks, household items, craft and art supplies, women’s clothes, bedding and comforters, DVD’s, sports equipment. Saturday, February 23, 9:00 AM to 3:00 PM. 1135 W. Valerio St, SB. Cash only.

Tide Guide Day

High

Thu 21 Fri 22

Low

High

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High

4:26 am 0.9

10:30 am 5.9

5:08 pm -0.6

11:31 pm 5.0

5:23 am 0.9

11:22 am 5.1

5:47 pm 0.1

Sat 23

12:14 am 5.0

6:26 am 0.9

12:21 pm 4.3

6:28 pm 0.8

Sun 24

1:02 am 5.0

7:40 am 1.0

1:35 pm 3.5

7:13 pm 1.5

Mon 25

1:57 am 4.9

9:08 am 0.9

3:21 pm 3.1

8:10 pm 2.1

Tue 26

3:02 am 4.8

10:40 am 0.7

5:28 pm 3.1

9:35 pm 2.5

Wed 27

4:13 am 4.8

11:54 am 0.3

6:53 pm 3.3

11:06 pm 2.6

Thu 28

5:20 am 4.9

12:48 pm 0.0

7:40 pm 3.6

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Sunrise 6:33 Sunset 5:50

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19 D

26 H

crosswordpuzzle

tt By Ma

Jones

“Half-Human”-- a short list of hybrids.

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INTERIOR DESIGNER MOVING SALE

Lighting, furniture, wall items, design books, fabrics, desks. Sat/Sun 8:30‑3:‑

AUTO AUTO PARTS

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TRUCKS/RECREATIONAL GOT AN older car, boat or RV? Do the humane thing. Donate it to the Humane Society. Call 1‑ 844‑335‑2616 (Cal‑SCAN)

GARAGE & ESTATE SALES

Estate Sale:

includes furniture, household accessories, tv, lamps, kitchenware, art. SAT. 8am‑4pm; Sun. 10am ‑ 3pm 4645 Via Bendita, SB CA 93110

INTERIOR DESIGNER MOVING SALE

Furniture, desks, lighting, wall items, design books, IMacs, collectibles, fabrics. Sat/Sun 8:30‑3:30; 921 St. Vincent Ave. SB; Cash/credit cards Westside Moving Sale - 2/23

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46 May preceder (abbr.) 48 Napoli’s nation 49 Like most customers 1 ___ Xtra (Dr Pepper rival) 50 Former Arsenal manager 5 Group of eight Wenger whose nickname is “Le 10 Do really badly Professeur” 14 Out on the open water 53 Gwyneth Paltrow’s daughter 15 Done for one, for one 54 1930s DuPont fabric invention 16 Skate park fixture 56 First presidential surname to 17 Bremner of “Trainspotting” and appear twice 1 Rice dish made with saffron “Wonder Woman” 58 Molecular unit 2 “Honestly!” 18 Gives the ax 3 Short-sleeved Hanes product 59 Playwright Moss or lyricist 19 Competently Lorenz 4 African linguistic group 20 Political position that’s half5 “Carmina Burana” composer 60 Not again? human, half-horse? 61 “All in the Family” producer Carl 23 Easy basketball shot Norman 6 In fashion 24 “Agnus ___” 62 Opening word of “Monty 7 Car part, in Britain 25 Swiss peak Python’s Flying Circus” 8 Improve on 28 Gallery works episodes 9 Villa ___ (estate near Rome) 29 Standard pinball feature 63 Grumpy ___ (Internet celebrity 10 Bavarian title 33 “8 Seconds” venue with the real name Tardar 35 Bar activity with request slips 11 Common breed for guide dogs Sauce) 12 It may be essential (but isn’t 38 Stick with a spring actually essential) 39 Carnival attraction that’s half©2019 Jonesin’ Crosswords (editor@ 13 Paper layer human, half-goat? jonesincrosswords.com) For answers to 21 Winfrey in “A Wrinkle in Time” this puzzle, call: 1-900-226-2800, 99 43 Former Montreal ballplayer cents per minute. Must be 18+. Or to bill 22 Bubble wrap component 44 Of food regimens (like 26 “The ___ Movie 2” (February to your credit card, call: 1-800-655-6548. 36-Down) Reference puzzle #0915 2019 release) 45 One-named supporting actress 27 Low-grade LAST WEEK’S SOLUTION: on “Parks and Recreation” 30 Former Yankee nickname 47 Salsa ___ (red condiment) 31 Haleakala locale 48 Bar brew, briefly 32 Tough puzzle 51 Rain-___ (gumball brand) 34 Grand Ole ___ 52 Roasting receptacle 55 World Cup 2022’s host country 35 Shoelace issue 57 Seasonal greeting that’s half- 36 Regimen with a high-fat focus 37 Key with four sharps, for short human, half-bird? 39 “Phineas and ___” 62 Mariska Hargitay’s longtime 40 Ice skating jump costar 41 Where you may have had it? 64 Triple Seven, for one 42 From Basra, perhaps 65 “That’s ___!”

Across

66 Purplish ingredient of bubble tea and milk tea 67 Poet Federico GarcÌa ___ 68 Neighbor of Wisc. 69 Part of a goblet 70 Type in 71 Stuffing herb

Down

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Profile for SB Independent

Santa Barbara Independent, 2/21/19  

February 21, 2019, Vol. 33, No. 684

Santa Barbara Independent, 2/21/19  

February 21, 2019, Vol. 33, No. 684