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JULY 19-26, 2018 VOL. 32 ■ NO. 653

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chocolate • 653

Unwrapping the Bean-to-Bar

Boom

Santa Barbara’s Place

in America’s Craft Chocolate

Revolution by Matt Kettmann page

23

Dean Dinning Talks Toad

Sharp Objects Cuts Deep

In Memoriam: Ken Williams

p. 44

p. 46

p. 20

Supes Vote Climate Change Is Real p. 16

active aging

Lifestyle Guide Inside GOLDEN YEARS OURessGU• NutrIDEitionTO• YOFinaURnces • Mob ility • List ings Fitn

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THE WEEK.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 31 LIVING.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Living Page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37

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Unwrapping the Bean-to-Bar Boom

Dining Out Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41

A&E. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42 Arts Life  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 42

Title: Sales Administrator As a member of our business team, what’s your day-to-day like? I communicate with clients and potential clients, place ads, and assist sales representatives. I also create our real estate section’s open house listings. As someone relatively new to the Indy, what’s your impression of the wacky world of publishing? I’ve never seen a group of professionals work harder and, at the same time, love their jobs. It’s incredible to see individuals care so deeply about their community by tirelessly providing credible, hard-hitting news coverage, and see that same appreciation reciprocated by the community. Oh, and endlessly flowing coffee. So much coffee. ONLINE NOW AT

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Pop, Rock & Jazz . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 44 Reviews . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45

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on the cover and above: Twenty-Four Blackbirds owner Mike Orlando. Photos by Paul Wellman.

TV Feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 46 Movie Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47

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Santa Barbara’s Place in America’s Craft Chocolate Revolution (Matt Kettmann)

ACTIVE AGING SPECIAL SECTION

FOOD & DRINK . . . . . . . 39

PAUL WELLMAN

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volume 32, number 653, July 19-26, 2018

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GREASE GOES BIG AT SBCC

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public access [at Hollister Ranch]. Unfortunately, even with the rights we hold from the YMCA’s offer to dedicate, we do not have the property rights that we need to implement that.” Small added that the original plan, which the settlement would extinguish, allowed for 50 visitors daily from Gaviota State Beach — via a shuttle operated by the YMCA — along the ranch’s main road to a walking path through a concrete culvert that, she emphasized, is both dark and slippery wet. Attorney Marc Chytilo took issue with that. “I would far prefer to take my 90-yearold mother through that tunnel than … put her on a kayak and paddle her for three miles and ask her to land on that beach,” said Chytilo, representing a group of nonprofits questioning the settlement. “This access by sea puts the public in harm’s way.” Teamed up with Chytilo, Susan Jordan Culvert at Cuarta Beach with the California Coastal Protection Network has taken a particular interest in Hollister Ranch’s so-called in-lieu fee program, in which any owner seeking to pull a coastal-development permit must pay $5,000 into a fund — overseen by the Coastal Conservancy — to be put toward “a clear and unambiguous” effort on behalf of the general public to create access to Hollister Ranch beaches, she said. Jordan’s contention was that Hollister Ranch ownby Keith Hamm to build an overnight camp on a nearby ers have been doing their part for decades f last week’s California Coastal Commis- Cuarta Canyon property it owned at the by paying into the fund as they constructed sion hearing on the public-access settle- time. Santa Barbara Superior Court Judge estates, guesthouses, garages, and barns.“But ment between the Hollister Ranch Own- Colleen Sterne has tentatively approved what about public access?” she asked. “Still ers’ Association (HROA) and the State the settlement but will also allow qualified none.” She put it to the Coastal Commission of California is any indication, the issue is parties to intervene in the case — by July 23 to certify that the program’s public-access provisions have been met. “I do not believe far from settled. Poised to enter a legal fray — before her final decision in September. as complicated as it is controyou can make that finding,” she versial, a band of Santa Barbara said. Jordan also expressed great attorneys and coastal-access interest in learning that comadvocates wasted little time at missioners Aaron Peskin and the Coastal Commission’s July Carole Groom had recently 13 public hearing in Santa Cruz. appealed a pair of coastalAmong other red flags, they development permits — one said, the settlement agreement for a single-family home, the puts beachgoers in harm’s way, other for a bridge — pulled by extinguishes the possibility of the present-day owners of the visitor access along a key overYMCA’s original Cuarta Can—Attorney Marc Chytilo, representing Gaviota Coast Conservancy land route, and signals a misuse yon property. Jordan and Chytilo’s testiof public funds. mony, among that of others, The issue stems from a Santa Barbara Superior Court ruling from May, At last week’s Coastal Commission meet- including two women who had driven seven when, after five years of litigation, HROA ing, Executive Director Jack Ainsworth and hours from Riverside County to speak for a and two state agencies — the Coastal Com- Mary Small, the Coastal Conservancy’s few minutes about their love of California’s mission and the Coastal Conservancy — chief deputy executive officer, laid out the coast, gave pause to at least a few commisannounced that the public would be allowed backstory and explained that their agencies sioners. “There are a lot of things pointed daytime access to Cuarta Beach inside the sympathize with the more than 1,300 letter out by the public that make me feel uneasy gated, 14,500-acre ranch, but only by soft- writers who have criticized the settlement as about the settlement.” said Commissioner bottom boat or personal watercraft. By a one-sided sweet deal for Hollister Ranch. Mark Vargas.“I sympathize with the public’s ocean, Cuarta Beach is roughly three miles However, added Small, the original plan input on this, and I’d like to have a discuswest of Gaviota State Beach. The settlement required of the YMCA’s offer to dedicate sion with staff to contemplate … how we would also require the Coastal Conservancy public access was limited in scope. would go about withdrawing from [this] to give up any rights it has to provide the “I understand that the settlement does settlement agreement.” public overland access to the same beach, not provide the level of access that the public No public speakers took the podium on as envisioned nearly 40 years ago when the expects and deserves,” she said. “The con- behalf of Hollister Ranch or in favor of the Metropolitan YMCA of Los Angeles sought servancy supports implementing broader settlement agreement. n

Will Hollister Ranch Access Deal Hold Up to Scrutiny? Deadline Approaches for Legal Intervention

I

‘I would far prefer to take my 90-year-old mother through that tunnel than put her on a kayak and paddle her for three miles and ask her to land on that beach.’

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An effort to honor the whole-child traditions of Open Alternative School (OAS) while including cuttingedge STEM (science, technology, engineering, and math) instruction goes before the Santa Barbara Unified School District Board of Education on 7/24. If approved, the state-funded K-8 charter school, renamed Open Academic School, could open as early as this coming school year with 250 students. The district shut down the original OAS last year, citing dropping enrollment and budgetary concerns. The beloved 42-year-old institution was praised for its peer mentoring and parent involvement, among other “main attributes that will be carried over,” according to alum Anthony Jackson, helping lead the new endeavor. Another goal is to situate the new OAS on the district’s Hidden Valley property, where it can grow organic produce for cafeterias district-wide.

RETAIL Target confirmed its plans for a new store for the 132,000-square-foot Kmart building in Goleta. The store, which may employ more than 200 employees, is part of the company’s “next generation” design, which nationwide includes self-checkout, a nursing room, and order pickup. The store is expected to open in 2019. This is the second announcement of a Target in the area this year; the first was in January for Santa Barbara’s Galleria, on upper State Street.

LAW & DISORDER Arrested on narcotics charges on 7/15, Mariah Lyons of Lompoc was in County Jail when deputies were informed that she might have hidden contraband. Female deputies in the medical treatment room told Lyons of their suspicions and ordered her to give up the drugs. She complied, removing a large packet from her vagina. Inside were baggies holding 44 grams of heroin and 25 grams of methamphetamine, worth roughly $12,000. She was charged with sales, possession, and conspiracy to introduce narcotics into the facility; bail was set at $280,000.

CANNABIS Lompoc City Hall has approved Santa Barbara County’s first recreational cannabis bar where on-site consumption will be allowed. The operation has yet to open its doors but will not have to wait until Lompoc voters decide the fate of a cannabis tax on the November ballot. It is the first of two retail dispensaries to be permitted by the City of Lompoc, which has imposed no cap on the number of pot shops allowed.

COUNTY County supervisors unanimously voted to put two competing redistricting measures on this November’s ballot. The first — drafted by an organization calling itself Reason in Government — collected more than 16,000 signatures to create an independent commission to draw new district lines after the 2020 census results are released. The second, dubbed You Draw the Lines, was crafted in response to the first by Supervisor Das Williams, who argued the Reason in Government commission would give more seats to Republican members than their party registration would warrant. n JULY 19, 2018

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Learn how to keep your shoulders healthy. Get informed on everything from pain relief to fixing shoulders non-operatively, and addressing osteoarthritis with total shoulder arthroplasty. 10

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JULY 19, 2018

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IN THE SPOTLIGHT: Ricardo Venegas, neighborhood and outreach services coordinator, listens as local youth share their experiences with local resource groups at the South Coast Youth Safety and Wellness Summit.

Tackling Trauma in Young, Poor

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bout 150 people from more than 50 organizations gathered at the Carrillo Recreation Center on July 16 for the annual Youth Safety and Wellness Summit. Trauma was this year’s theme. The summit was organized by the South Coast Task Force on Youth Safety that was created in 2007 after the stabbing of 15-year-old Luis Angel Linares on State Street. The task force is a collaborative effort between community organizations to improve the safety and well-being of youth in the community. The daylong event included breakout sessions on commercial sexual exploitation of children, suicide prevention, and Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals (DACA). Sexual abuse has happened to 80-90 percent of victims of sexual exploitation, reported Sally Cook, cofounder of Hope Refuge, an anti-trafficking organization. Childhood trauma is also leading to an increase in suicide attempts, said Anthony Rodriguez

with the Santa Barbara Response Network. “Nobody wants to talk about it,” he said,“but it’s so important to know we have feelings.” Before a wrap-up of the event, a teen panel was invited to share firsthand accounts of growing up and accessing local resources. The youth, all in their late teens, told stories of family hardship and poverty. “There were a lot of challenges, financially, emotionally, and physically, too,” said Paula, a senior at San Marcos High School who grew up on the Westside. Each teen had found refuge in a group or organization that had helped heal their trauma. The teens offered suggestions to better reach out and serve the community. Jose, 18, a graduate of Santa Barbara High School and current SBCC student, suggested reaching out to kids sooner.“It was not until high school that anyone asked, ‘Are you okay?’” he said. “It’s hard for kids to get help when it’s not presented to them.” —Blanca Garcia

$1M for Student Mental Health

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tarting in August, at least one mental-health therapist will be embedded at every Santa Barbara Unified School District campus. The roughly $1 million effort will cover all students, from pre-kindergarten through 12th grade. To coordinate the rollout and programming for the nine elementary schools, the district is partnering with CALM (Child Abuse Listening Mediation), a nonprofit headed by CEO Alana Walczak.“A child’s ability to learn can be affected by witnessing domestic violence, for example,” she said, adding that sexual and emotional abuse, neglect, and being negatively impacted by a caregiver’s substance abuse can also increase the risk of a child experiencing long-term mental-health issues later in life. Walczak said the project will “help classrooms to become trauma-informed” by teaching teachers to recognize behavioral red flags and to make referrals for kids who need extra, outside help. “As stress levels drop, the learning environment improves,” Walczak said. CALM is about $250,000 shy of fully funding the effort, which includes

$375,000 in district money and another roughly $250,000 raised privately, Walczak said.“If we don’t have it all by August 21, we’ll phase it in,” she added. “But we’re confident it’s going to happen.” At the secondary level, the district is contributing about $500,000 and partnering with two nonprofits, the Family Service Agency (FSA) and the Council on Alcoholism and Drug Abuse (CADA). For students in the 7th through 12th grades, anxiety and depression rank high among mental-health issues, said FSA Executive Director Lisa Brabo, adding that CenCal Health is providing funding for students in the mild to moderate range, while the Santa Barbara County Department of Behavioral Health will be more focused on moderate to severe cases. Both efforts will be evaluated as the 201819 school year progresses and, once established, will be better situated to compete for grants and state educational funding to address longevity concerns brought up by Board of Education members during last month’s public hearing. —Keith Hamm


La Casa Bankruptcy on the Ropes

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PAU L WELLM AN F I LE PHOTO

NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D a Casa de la Raza’s efforts to remove itself from financial misery by declaring bankruptcy were dealt a major setback this week as federal Judge Deborah Saltzman ruled the nonprofit’s board of directors is not legally constituted and therefore not qualified to declare bankruptcy in the first place. Saltzman ruled that boardmembers were not elected according to La Casa’s bylaws, which ONE POSSIBLE FUTURE: Earlier this year, La Casa’s Michael require general-member- Gonzalez (left) and Mark Martinez said the nonprofit wants to sell. ship meetings and votes. A bankruptcy judge recently ruled against that option. How the existing board is supposed to remedy this problem was not ventions have tried and failed. Castelo is a clear, but Saltzman’s ruling effectively blocks canny real estate investor, and his attorney, La Casa from selling off its East Montecito Tony Fischer, said he’s eager to meet with Street community center to satisfy more La Casa leadership to work something out. than $1.2 million in debt. In previous interviews Castelo has said he Fighting the bankruptcy proceeding has opposed the sale because the building was been a loose-knit confederation of some of a community asset and because it would the founding members of La Casa, which put money in the hands of the very peowas organized in the late ’60s as focal point ple responsible for La Casa’s mess. Experts for Latino activism, arts, culture, education, believe the property could fetch $5 million, and a host of community services. Leading which would leave the current organization the charge has been Tomas Castelo, whom with more than $3 million after debts are La Casa owes around $800,000. Two years paid off. Without bankruptcy protections, ago, Castelo paid off La Casa’s bank loan however, Castelo could initiate foreclosure and then threatened to foreclose on the proceedings against La Casa and wind up property. When Castelo has demanded with a property worth millions more than repayment, La Casa has balked at the price he’s currently owed. — objecting to accrued interest charges. La Castelo challenged La Casa’s bankruptcy Casa eventually declared bankruptcy about filing, arguing the organization had not held two years ago. a general-membership meeting or board La Casa’s financial woes have been the election in years, both of which — he and stuff of operatic scale and political rival- Fischer insisted — violated its bylaws. The ries dating back decades. Multiple inter- court agreed. —Nick Welsh

YO U ’ R E CO R D I A L LY I N V I T E D

More Students, Same Housing

U

C Santa Barbara has increased its number of admitted students by 10 percent, from 36,282 in 2017 to 39,921 students in 2018. UCSB claims to have adequate dorm space to accommodate its incoming class, but Isla Vista may not be so accommodating. The neighboring college community is already the most densely populated area in all of Santa Barbara County and has spread into more and more of Goleta’s family neighborhoods, in part contributing to rising rents. It is unclear how UCSB’s growing number of students will affect Santa Barbara’s already hurting renters’ market. UCSB’s admittance rate increase is in part a result of the statewide UC initiative to add an additional 10,000 Californians by the 201819 academic year and to make its campuses more accessible to transfer students by admitting one California transfer student for every two new state-resident first-years. This year, the UC system collectively admitted nearly 137,000 students to its nine campuses — record-breaking numbers. Of those 137,000 students, more than 95,000 are California residents and more than 24,000 are transfer students. The increase in admissions raised the number of offers to students from historically underrepresented

groups. Forty-six percent of California firstyears and transfers will be the first in their families to graduate from a four-year college. For UCSB, 10,139 of admitted students, or roughly 25 percent, are transfer students, with more than 90 percent coming from California community colleges. Ethnic and racial admissions have more or less stayed the same for UCSB, with 38 percent Asian American, 26 percent white, 26 percent Latino, 4 percent black, and 1 percent American Indian students. The question of housing remains. “Students who meet the housing application deadlines are guaranteed a space in the university residency halls or apartments,” said Andrea Estrada, UCSB’s director of media and news relations. However, whether extreme measures will be taken to guarantee students a space is unclear. In the 2016-17 academic year, UCLA was forced to convert dorm doubles into triples to accommodate its 750-student enrollment increase. Earlier this year, Save Berkeley’s Neighborhoods, a nonprofit advocacy group, filed a lawsuit against UC Berkeley for allegedly failing to analyze the environmental impacts of the increase in student enrollment.

The Spirit of the Fiesta! Celebrate the traditions of colorful music, dance and song at our annual “Old Spanish Days” Fiesta. Join residents, friends, families and neighbors as the charm and beauty of the Spirit and Junior Spirit team perform the dances of Spain, Mexico and early California. Complimentary delicious favorites, including a taco bar with chicken, carnitas, sautéed vegetables, salsa verde, salsa roja, guacamole and corn tortillas. And for dessert, tres leches cake. Viva La Fiesta! Friday, July 27th EVENT

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Small town. Great life.

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JULY 19, 2018

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HELPING HANDS: Debbie McCoy (left) and Ana Bello of Families Act! staff an information table outside County Jail.

Jail Grievances Drop Response Rates Up, Medical Treatment, Too by Nick Welsh he number of grievances filed by inmates at County Jail because of the medical treatment they’ve received has dropped dramatically in the past year while the number of inmates seeking medical treatment has gone significantly up. Accounting for this dramatic turnaround is a combination of factors: The jail has a new medical treatment provider—CFMG (California Forensic Medical Group) — which is now entering its second year. In addition, the Sheriff’s Office is entering its second year of operating a more formalized grievance process, run by a 32-year veteran of jailhouse operations, Lt. Mark Mahurin, who has won major praise by mental-health activists who in the past were among the jail’s most relentless critics. “It’s really quite remarkable,” said Suzanne Riordan of Families Act!, which has watchdogged mental-health care at the jail for more than 10 years.“We call Mark or Lt. Shawn Lammer with a complaint, and they’re inside the jail cell almost immediately checking it out. We still have problems. They just get resolved a lot faster now.” Families Act! helped get the new grievance program started a few years ago when they released a dossier of medical horror stories from the jail. In the first three months of 2018, the jail received a total of 477 grievances, of which 87 were related to dental care, mental health, medications, or general medical care. In the first three months of the prior year, there were 520 total complaints, of which 138 related to health-care concerns. In the first quarter of 2018, 2,244 inmates sought medical treatment; the first quarter of the prior year, the number was 1,852. In 2018, all 87 grievances were resolved in an average of 3.8 days. The prior year, it took 5.6 days for resolution to be achieved. Last year, 15 cases required some form of followup before they were settled, and three went to appeal. This year, no cases required any follow-up, and none were appealed. Resolution, however, doesn’t necessarily mean the complaint was settled to the liking of

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the inmate; it means the complaints were investigated and a determination was made. Resolution could mean getting painkillers to an inmate experiencing chronic dental issues or scheduling an appointment with a gynecologist for an inmate complaining of an ovarian cyst. In another case, it could mean denying hormones to an inmate undergoing a gender change because there’s no history of the inmate receiving such a prescription. Mahurin said once the county supervisors gave the boot to the jail’s prior health-care contractor — Corizon — the opportunities for improvement abounded. Corizon’s response to complaints, Mahurin said, were too often “too vague and too general.” Corizon professionals cited medical confidentiality rules for divulging so little information, frustrating inmates, advocates, and jail custodial staff trying to get answers. Once CFMG took over, Mahurin said the county changed to a grievance procedure, asking inmates to sign confidentiality waivers so that health-care providers could no longer hide behind vague generalities. “It used to be, ‘We’ll look into it,’ ” Mahurin recounted.“Now we’ll get,‘You’re right, that should never have happened, and we’re dealing with it.’” Mahurin praised several ideas proposed by task-force members. Thanks to Esther Lim of the ACLU Southern California Jails Project, he said, the jail website now allows inmates’ relatives to provide pertinent information to the health-care workers in the jail. Many inmates, especially those experiencing mental illness, are less than forthcoming or accurate about their conditions and the medications they need. Likewise, he gave credit to Families Act! for posting a volunteer-run informational table in front of County Jail every weekend to help inmates’ family members navigate what can be a confounding and intimidating system. Information gleaned by those volunteers, he said, has formed the basis of grievances in addition to the ones submitted by inmates themselves. In 2017, volunteers processed 33 grievances; this year it was 15. n


NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D ENERGY

PREEMPTIVE STRIKE: The County Planning Commission hearing room was packed for an informational hearing on ExxonMobil’s proposal to restart oil trucking from the Las Flores Canyon facility.

Big Oil Trucking Plan Protested Hundreds Gather at Informational Meeting

PAU L WELLM AN PHOTOS

by Blanca Garcia

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everal dozen anti-oil protesters gathered in front of the Santa Barbara County Administration Building last week to speak out against ExxonMobil’s proposal to restart its three drilling platforms off the Santa Barbara coast. The company’s proposal includes the production of 10,00012,000 barrels per day that would be trucked from Las Flores Canyon processing facility to Santa Maria and Maricopa via is very windy and extremely narrow.”With a highways 101 and 166. Up to 70 trucks per number of recent climate-related disasters day would rotate between the three locations in Santa Barbara, others asked the county around the clock. to take climate change into account. OverProduction from all southern Santa Bar- all, their message was clear: The only safe bara County oil platforms came to a screech- course of action is for the county to deny ing halt in May 2015 with the project. the Refugio Oil Spill, A number of Exxonwhen a main transporMobil supporters also tation pipeline owned occupied the filled-toby Plains All Americapacity room. Bob Poole, self-identified as can Pipeline ruptured and released more than “the oil guy,” reminded 142,000 gallons of crude attendees that Califor—Linda Krop, onto the Gaviota Coast. nia consumes two milEnvironmental Defense Center ExxonMobil is seeking a lion barrels of oil a day, trucking permit for seven years, or until the 70 percent of which is imported. “Exxon pipeline is fixed. The company has said the adheres to the most stringent environmentrucking plan will support local jobs and tal rules,” Poole said. “The best thing we can that the deliveries would be safe. do is provide it here.” Richard Atmore, board The demonstration, organized by a num- president of the Coastal Energy Alliance, ber of regional environmental groups, was echoed Poole’s sentiment. Abroad, they held an hour ahead of the 6 p.m. county don’t consider human rights or environscoping hearing that allowed the public an mental impacts, he said. “Let’s produce it opportunity to speak for or against the pro- here carefully and safely.” Kristen Monsell posal’s environmental impact report, which and Blake Kopcho with the Center for Biolooks at issues concerning air quality, traffic logical Diversity were not convinced. Safety impacts, and potential spill hazards. Speak- regulations that were put in place under the ers recalled the Refugio spill. “It’s important Obama administration are being rolled back to keep in mind what just happened in 2015 under Trump, they said.“It just increases the with the pipeline, which is supposed to be danger.” safer,” said Linda Krop, chief counsel of the The trucking proposal goes before the Environmental Defense Center.“Trucks are County Planning Commission and Board known to be dangerous,” she said.“The route of Supervisors early next year. n

‘Trucks are known to be dangerous. The route is very windy and extremely narrow.’

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PAU L WELLM AN

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Local Heroes WANTED Each year in our Thanksgiving issue, The S.B. Independent honors our Local Heroes — Santa Barbarans who make our community a better place to live.

For our 33rd Annual Local Heroes Celebration, we ask our readers to help us give thanks to those whose good works and deeds may otherwise go unsung. Please nominate a person you know who deserves such recognition. Send us his or her name and phone number and a brief summary of why you believe he or she is a Local Hero. Make sure to also include your name and phone number.

email localhero@independent.com 14

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ust days after the Holiday Fire destroyed homes in the foothills above Goleta, county and state fire officials outlined a dire scenario for California at a July 12 meeting hosted by Assemblymember Monique Limón and State Senator Hannah-Beth Jackson at Montecito Union School. “Climate change is changing the fire environment,” Thom Porter, chief of Cal Fire for Southern California, told the audience. There have been more fires in the past five years, he added, than during any other fiveyear period in state history, and eight of California’s 20 most destructive fires have occurred in the past four years. Santa Barbara County Fire Chief Eric Peterson called for connecting a historic patchwork of front-country fuel breaks, mountain roads, and wildfire-buffering orchards from Montecito to Goleta. “The interval between catastrophic events is decreasing,” he said. “We need to adapt to that. It’s not going to get better. We need a countywide fuel management working group, and we need to get a plan together.”

The strategy of creating and expanding fuel breaks has been met with opposition from environmental groups who seek to protect rare plant and animals species living in Santa Barbara’s chaparral habits. Besides, they contend, clearing vegetation doesn’t always work. According to Los Padres ForestWatch, the Thomas Fire jumped a network of 70 miles of fuel breaks around Ojai and Lake Casitas on its way to becoming the largest fire in California history.“I think everybody wants the same thing—it’s crazy we don’t sit down and figure out how to do it,” said California Chaparral Institute Director Rick Halsey in an interview. Limón and Jackson highlighted a spate of bills that would automatically enroll residents in county emergency-alert systems, translate emergency communications into languages other than English, require insurance companies to cover losses from mudslides and debris flows triggered by wildfires, and bring together federal, state, and local agencies to collaborate on forest management. —Melinda Burns

From the Rubble: Montecito

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$5,000 grant for a collaborative initiative to examine rebuilding opportunities in the wake of Montecito’s deadly 1/9 Debris Flow passed unanimously at the Board of Supervisors meeting Tuesday. The project will be led by Novim, the Davenport Institute for Public Engagement and Civic Leadership at Pepperdine University’s School of Public Policy, and Noozhawk. Novim is a UCSBbased nonprofit scientific research group that seeks to simplify issues in the hope of creating a better-informed public. Their findings will be communicated to the public via Noozhawk in an “electronic town hall,” an interactive website where visitors are encouraged to analyze group suggestions, as well as comment or submit ideas and ultimately vote on the developing options. The trio requested $5,000 for their $500,000 fundraising goal from the county

as a symbolic endorsement and to give the county more incentive to engage in the initiative. However, at Tuesday’s Board of Supervisors meeting, other news organizations, including the Santa Maria Times and the Santa Barbara Independent, pointed out a potential conflict of interest: Essentially, Noozhawk would be accepting public funds from the county to report on county activities related to the project. The grant was ultimately approved on the understanding that Novim would be the fiscal agent of the project and that the funds would be “specifically used for, not the internal overhead of Novim or Noozhawk, but basically as expenses coming in for direct consulting support,” clarified Jim Knight, Novim cofounder and executive vice president. The project is estimated to take 18-24 months to complete. —Blanca Garcia


PAU L WELLM AN

NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D ENVIRONMENT

Banned in Santa Barbara No More Plastic Straws or Styrofoam Containers by Nick Welsh Burrell Russell who read what he called “a anta Barbara has joined the ranks of about love letter to the ocean,” and then concluded, 100 California cities that have already “I do not think it’s fair for animals to have to voted to ban Styrofoam food contain- eat our trash.” In years past, such bans would have ers, and it has become at least the 10th to ban plastic straws. Plastic coffee stirrers occasioned serious debate in addition to and cutlery — knives, forks, spoons, and heartfelt theatrics. But with the exception of sporks—lived to survive another day but Councilmember Randy Rowse — who supwill be available only upon request. Excep- ported banning Styrofoam but not straws tions will be made for people with handicaps —the vote was unanimous. For the majority severe enough to meet the guidelines of the of the council, the only question was how Americans with Disabilities Act, for whom best to wordsmith the ordinance language the durability and flexto tighten the exempibility of plastic straws is tions. Rowse sought paramount. The counto draw a softer cil also voted to allow a regulatory line but onetime-only one-year got nowhere for his grace period to busiefforts. “Let’s invite nesses that can make a people to care about convincing case to city the environment like finance czar Bob Sama[people] do,” he said. “They’ll exceed your rio that any of the alternatives are prohibitively expectations every expensive or otherwise time.” People should —Nine-year-old Burrell Russell, infeasible. According be given the opportuspeaking at City Hall nity to display “good to city officials, every behavior,” he said, restaurant within city limits has already been contacted about the before the council resorted to Plan B: “You ban. Only five reportedly expressed interest better do the right thing, or we’re going to come after you.” in seeking an exception. Council deliberations on the twin bans Councilmember Jason Dominguez were bursting with astonishing factoids and countered that “we can’t always count on cute kids. Kira Redmond of Santa Barbara common sense,” adding, “We have to reguChannelkeeper noted that as many as 14 mil- late every aspect of people’s lives.” Dominlion tons of single-use plastics are dumped guez questioned what the “affordability” into the world’s oceans every year, enough, threshold would be to allow food and bevshe said, to cover every foot of coast with erage vendors to use Styrofoam. Would a five plastic bags crammed with discarded two-cent cost difference for a smoothie cup plastics. The time it takes for such mate- that would otherwise cost only three cents rial to biodegrade, she said, ranges between be enough to trigger the exemption, espe“450 years and never.” The permanent dam- cially for smoothies that cost $8? Councilmember Kristen Sneddon age inflicted upon the aquatic ecosystem is hardly worth the “few moments of plastic expressed excitement at being able to vote convenience.” Kathi King of the Community for the ban, saying Santa Barbara bore a Environmental Council said that if people “trifecta of responsibility,” stemming from keep dumping plastics into the ocean at its location on the coast, its affluence, and the current rate, the weight of plastics will its destination as a tourist magnet. Oscar exceed that of fish by the year 2050. King Gutierrez, the council’s newest member, and Redmond both gently noted Santa Bar- expressed strong support for the bans as bara was late to the regulatory party where well, likening plastic’s impact on marine Styrofoam was concerned. Carpinteria had life to that of asbestos and lead paint found beaten Santa Barbara to the Styrofoam drenched in the soil throughout the city’s punch. Picking up this theme, Mayor Cathy Eastside. Murillo noted that the mayor of Arroyo The new law goes into effect at 2:01 a.m. Grande had shamed her earlier this week on January 1, 2019, allowing food and beverfor not having acted sooner. age merchants to eke out one more New As dramatic as King and Redmond were, Year’s Eve with their environmentally outn they were upstaged by a 9-year-old named lawed inventory.

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‘I do not think it’s fair for animals to have to eat our trash.’

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Opinions

angry poodle barbecue

Panting Dogs Gather No Moss

HOT ENUFF: Back in 1st grade, we were trained

to hurl ourselves under the protective cover of our rickety school desks, built—we would appreciate only later—to withstand the full withering fury of a nuclear blast. That’s when desks were built to last. That’s when Russia was still the USSR, and we thought we knew from which way any incoming would be coming. Based on this week’s Punch and Judy show from Helsinki, I’m happy to report any residual fear of mutually assured destruction was laid to rest. With Vladimir Putin’s favorite sock puppet occupying the White House, Russia’s interests and the United States have been rendered identical; nuclear peace has been achieved. I should be relieved. Instead, I find myself rummaging through thrift stores in search of old desks. UCSB Professor Leah Stokes would have me believe this is a fool’s errand. The real threat, she insists, is far more ominous. She stirred things up this past week, writing a Los Angeles Times op-ed in which she chastised reporters who cover fires, debris flows, and other disasters —in other words, the weather —for leaving climate change conspicuously out of the conversation. Reporters, as a rule, don’t like to be told how to do their jobs. They like even less being told by pointy-headed academics. I get it. Stokes may have used a little too much oregano. She failed to give credit where credit is, in fact, due. But she has a point. And it’s only

getting sharper. Yes, Southern California is the land of extreme weather oscillations; it’s always been feast or famine, fire and flood. But Stokes’s point is this: The bell curve used to depict Southern California’s traditional weather variation is flattening out. What used to look like a kid’s drawing of a mountain now looks more like a straw hat. Reporters should say so more than they do. You don’t need to be a weatherman—or a UCSB professor—to understand that the extremes are getting more extreme more frequently and more violently. The biggest fire in California history just followed the hottest, driest year, setting off Santa Barbara’s most deadly debris flow ever. Climate change is to weather what steroids are to hitting home runs. We’re seriously juiced. On July 6, it was 102 degrees Fahrenheit at the Santa Barbara Airport at 8:30 at night. A new record. Home run. One of the sneaky things about global warming is that it tends to happen more when the sun goes down; the night skies cool off less than they used to. With the oceans heating up, there’s less of a cooling tonic when the sun goes away. Also less obvious, our “cooler” seasons are getting warmer too. In the past 40 years, the acreage of the American West torched by wildfire has more than doubled. Coastal areas like Santa Barbara had been immune thanks to our marine layer. We used to have a “fire season” and a “rainy

season.” The Thomas Fire raged during the

heart of the rainy season. Earlier this month, Goleta dodged a bullet, though I might not think so if I were one of the 13 families who lost a home in the Holiday Incident when the hottest July 6 in history collided with a nocturnal fury of mini-cyclonic winds. Stokes was watching the coverage on TV. She heard newscasters invoke the names of all the usual suspects —like saints who were burned at the stake: Thomas, Sherpa, Whittier, Jesusita, Gap, Zaca, Painted Cave. She heard all the usual complaints about inadequate emergency warnings. All real, all crucial. “But if your only narrative is the failure of the warning system,” Stokes said, “the only thing you’re going to try to fix is the warning system.” Good point. Climate change is not abstract; it’s not amorphous. But weather forecasters talk about weather, not climate. Reporters tend to focus on the emergencies brought on by extreme weather, not the climate. Given that Earth’s temperature has increased by one degree Celsius already—and if we hit two our heads

explode—that’s a whole lot not to be mentioned, no matter how astonishingly heroic they’ve been pursuing the call of duty. In India, 118°F heat is playing the grim reaper. In Japan, temperatures north of 100°F have claimed the lives of 14 and inflicted heat stroke on 1,500 more. Japan’s heat wave comes after that nation’s worst floods in more than 30 years. At least 222 died.

In Santa Barbara, the good news is that

county supervisors —at least three of them —and the Santa Barbara City Council voted

to take another look at a plan to buy, produce, and consume a lot more green energy than the major utilities are otherwise planning to make available. This plan — dubbed Community Choice Energy —had been declared dead on arrival last October by a private consultant who found its costs economically unsustainable. But a subsequent consultant has since concluded the first consultant’s findings were way too dire. The second consultant concluded that the Community Choice program might pay for itself after one year and the cleaner energy provided would have the net air quality effect of taking 29,000 cars off the road. Similar programs already exist throughout the state; they allow local governments to buy and sell clean energy independently of the monopolistic strangleholds now enjoyed by utility companies. The latest report found Santa Barbara could do this for slightly less than what the major utilities now charge, while generating enough surplus to make serious investments in cleaner energy production here in Santa Barbara. Fossil-fuel shills objected to what they called creeping statism, suggesting the supervisors might soon order farmers to grow organic broccoli. Is the latest report too good to be true? A third report has been ordered to find out. Does anyone know where I can find an old— Nick Welsh school desk?

FAMILY RESOURCE CENTER

The Drawing Room

Enjoy the following free art activities and interactives inspired by works in Summer Nocturne: Works on Paper from the 1970s SUMMER HOURS THROUGH AUGUST 19: Tuesday, Wednesday, Friday, Saturday, Sunday 12 – 4 pm • Thursdays 5 – 7 pm

JULY 22 – 31

Use oil pastels to draw abstract forms, inspired by Marie Schoeff’s March-East (1979).

AUGUST 1 – 7

Create an abstract still life in tempera paint on paper, inspired by Gerd Koch’s High Spring #3 (1962).

1130 State Street | Santa Barbara, CA 93101 | www.sbma.net 16

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JULY 19, 2018

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Opinions

CONT’D

capitol letters

Three-State Solution

T

he late, great Hiram Johnson is best known as the California governor who brought forth the state’s renowned system of ballot initiatives. Johnson is less remembered as a World War I–era isolationist U.S. senator who made this immortal declaration: “The first casualty when war comes is truth.” Johnson’s historic dictum comes to mind as warring campaigns prepare to fling tens of millions of dollars in lying, deceitful, mendacious TV ads for and against a dozen election initiatives—a spectacle he would be shocked his great reform would spawn. Here is an issue-by-issue look at November’s ballot measures to help cut through the fog of political warfare.

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SURREAL STUFF: Emblematic of his plutocratic class of Silicon Valley disrupters, venture capitalist Tim Draper seems certain that his private business prowess makes him a genius about public-sector matters. Why else spend more than $1 million in couch change qualifying Proposition 9, a vanity measure to “fix” California by splitting it into three separate, and very unequal, states? The Central Coast would be part of nouveau “California”—at least we get to keep the name—running from Monterey through L.A. County. Aside from countless political obstacles —the Legislature, governor, Congress, president, and probably Putin would have to approve—a legislative analyst report shows how Draper’s “Northern California” territory would reap huge financial benefits. Hmmm. Speaking of secession, Prop. 7 seeks to make existing California the first state to operate year-round on daylight saving time (many additional approvals needed here too), the better to cure spring-ahead, fallback sleep disruption. The Humane Society is behind Prop. 12, to ban the sale of eggs delivered by hens not domiciled in free-range habitats and to improve quality of life for veal calves and pigs. Free Wilbur and All Political Prisoners! HOUSING MATTERS: Look for a huge battle over Prop. 10, a tenants’ rights proposal to lift California’s quarter-century moratorium on rent control, allowing local jurisdictions to impose new restrictions on landlords. To the surprise of no one, real estate interests are amassing piles of cash in opposition. Prop. 1 is part of the package of housing legislation that Sacramento passed in 2017. It would authorize the state to sell, and pay 30 years of interest on, $4 billion in bonds to build affordable units. Prop. 2 would authorize another $2 billion in housing, specifically for people with mental ill-

ness, and asks voters to approve a scheme to finance it with a previously approved income-tax surcharge on millionaires. Prop. 5 would give geezer homeowners (we name no names) a break by allowing them to transfer their current tax rate if they move rather than pay higher property taxes likely to be imposed by buying a new place. MEDICAL AFFAIRS: A trio of initiatives

boosted by various health-care special interests may generate an outbreak of statewide head-scratching. Key question: Qui bono—who benefits? The California Children’s Hospital Association, which won voter approval for more than $1 billion in infrastructure bonds in 2004 and 2008, backs Prop. 4, a bid for another $1.5 billion of taxpayerbacked bonding for repairs and expansions, primarily at nonprofit hospitals. Prop. 8, backed by the powerful Service Employees International Union (SEIU), would require two big private companies that operate kidney dialysis clinics to rebate profits over 15 percent to insurers; according to the respected CALmatters.org, it’s part of an SEIU organizing strategy. Prop. 11 would exempt private ambulance companies from a current law allowing EMTs to take a coffee break with their radios turned off. Seriously? Why are voters deciding stuff like this? WATER, WATER: Prop. 3 is another huge

legislative-sponsored bond measure, seeking authorization for nearly $8.9 billion in debt to fund a vast collection of watersupply infrastructure projects. The debate may be less about need than cost — should California add to its current debt load of $120 billion? Amid all these complex decisions lies the politically loaded question, posed by Prop. 6, of whether to repeal a 12-cent gastax increase, as detailed in last week’s Cap Letters. Hiram Johnson, RIP. — Jerry Roberts

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obituaries

To submit obituaries for publication, please call (805) 965-5205 or email obits@independent.com

Karen French Sears 1923-2018

Karen French Sears, shown here with 2nd husband Donald French, formerly of Montecito, died March 18th in Palm Harbor Florida in her sleep. She was 95. Karen was born in Syracuse, New York, attended Syracuse University and taught briefly at Cornell. She married her first husband, Daniel French I 1943, had two children, Karen J. and Samuel C. while living I Cazenovia, New York. The couple divorced in 1952, and she moved to Wolfeboro, New Hampshire. She then married Donald French, shown here. The family subsequently moved west and settled in Santa Barbara. She was at one time president of the local PTA, then joined the Junior League and became president of that body. Donald died in 1964 and was buried locally. After his death, Karen later met and married Allen C. Sears, a Santa Barbara insurance broker and author in 1965. They lived in Montecito until 1974, then moved eventually to Scottsdale, AZ, where they lived until Allen’s death in 1998. In 2000 Karen moved to Limerick, Pennsylvania to be near her son, Samuel and his wife Gail, daughter Gina. She lived independently until 2013, when she moved into a senior facility for independents. In 2016 she moved again to Palm Harbor, Florida to be helped through her final years by her daughter, Karen Weiss. She remained in the Manor Care facility in Palm Harbor until her passing. Karen’s parents, Marie and Edward Moyer, of Syracuse are deceased. Her Brother, Harvey 18

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has also passed away. Her first husband, Daniel, died in 1993. She has two children, Samuel C. of Holland, PA and Karen J. Weiss of Palm Harbor. She also has a granddaughter, Gina Louise French of Pottstown, PA. and a great granddaughter, Margaret Pope of Pottstown, PA. Karen has been cremated and her interment will be at the Santa Barbara Cemetery on Thursday, July 19 at 2:00 PM. She will be attended by Fr. Jerry Anderson of All Saints by the Sea, and her son, Samuel and his wife, Gail.

Alexander Ricardo Braid 07/07/72-07/05/18

Alexander Ricardo Braid, also known as Alex or Al to his colleagues, friends and family passed away on July 5, 2018. Alex was born July 7, 1972, in Wellington, New Zealand, to John & Jovita Braid. He moved with his family to Santa Barbara, California in 1974. Alex was a Santa Barbara High School graduate. He worked as a Kirby salesman for many years. Alex enjoyed surfing, nature and being outdoors. He was a collector of many things, including rocks and driftwood. Alex was genuine, loving, humorous and kindhearted. He loved God and his family. Alex is survived by his mother Jovita Braid; 4 siblings, Reyna, Carolyn, Patrick and Carl; nephews, nieces; and his longtime companion Victoria Delgado. Alex is deeply loved and will be greatly missed. A Celebration of Life Service will be held on Saturday July 21, 2018 at Free Methodist Church, 1435 Cliff Dr, Santa Barbara at 12 pm. A paddle-out ceremony will follow at 2 pm.

JULY 19, 2018

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Katina Demourkas 08/15/28-07/09/18

Our Mother Katina Demourkas was born in Ayios Pantelimon, Greece on August 15th 1928 to Apostolos and Maria Tziouvaras, she was one of six children. She fell asleep on July 9, 2018 in Santa Barbara, California; surrounded by her loving family. Katina came to the United States in 1951 through Ellis Island to escape the war torn country of Greece. She went to Seattle to stay with her Uncles but, she decided to permanently move to Santa Barbara; where she met the love of her life Peter John Demourkas. They married on August 22, 1954. They owned multiple restaurants throughout Santa Barbara. The pair had two children John Peter and Mary Katherine. They were happily married for 54 years until Peter's passing in 2008. Katina was a life long member of Saint Barbara Greek Orthodox Church here in Santa Barbara; she loved her Greek community, church, gardening, cooking and most of all her family. She will be greatly missed throughout the entire community. She is survived by her Son John Peter Demourkas, Daughter-in-Law Dana Demourkas, Daughter Mary Katherine Fictum, Son-in-Law Jeff Fictum, and her two amazing Grandchildren Katina and Jade. She is also survived by her Sister Kalliopi Agourastou in Greece, Brother Ahilleas Tziouvaras and many Nephews and Nieces. She was preceded in death by her Husband Peter, Mother and Father, Brother and two Sisters. The Trisagion will be held on Monday, July 16th at 7

o'clock P.M. in Saint Barbara Greek Orthodox Church. The interment will be on Tuesday, July 17th at 11 o'clock A.M. in Saint Barbara Greek Orthodox Church, the Makaria (Memorial Luncheon) to follow the interment. In lieu of flowers, donations can be sent to Saint Barbara’s Greek Orthodox Church; 1205 San Antonio Creek Rd. Santa Barbara, CA 93110 Μανούλα σε αγαπώ με όλη την καρδιά μου και είσαι η πρώτη αγάπη μου. Μας λείπεις Μανούλαmou Σ' αγαπάω πάρα πολύ Γιαγιά Όνειρα γλυκά Μανούλα. Σε αγαπούμε.

Gary Becker 05/08/39-06/21/18

Gary Becker was a caring family man, a dependable friend, a determined attorney, and an energetic advocate. He was curious and complicated and uniquely fashionable. He loved good food, parties, arts and culture. And he lived a radically examined life, increasingly devoted to the spirit. Gary was drawn to those in need and he promoted and supported many social justice organizations. He was particularly passionate about JustFaith Ministries, which transformed him; Fonkoze USA, which brought him into solidarity with the poor; and La Casa de Maria, which became his spiritual home. Gary was born on May 8,

1939, in Tell City, Indiana. He attended Indiana University, where he earned both a bachelors and a law degree. He was a distinguished trial lawyer for 20 years in Indiana, and another 20 years in Louisville, Kentucky. Upon his retirement in 2004, he moved to Santa Barbara, California. He died peacefully at home on June 21, 2018. Gary will be very greatly missed by Mary, his wife of 54 years, and by his daughters, Holly (married to Dermott Downs,) and Candice (married to Curt Schwarm,) and his son, Jeremy Becker, as well as by his granddaughters, Tallulah Downs and Ava Schwarm. He will live on in the memories of his sister, Meredith Oberhausen, and his many sistersin-law, brothers-in-law, nieces, nephews, and friends. His family gives thanks for the fine caregivers who tended Gary at home during his last years. And the family is grateful for the support of the members of Social Venture Partners, the Catholic Church of the Beatitudes, and the Immaculate Heart Community. Gary was always grateful for the many gifts in his life and he sometimes expressed this in poetry. Saturday, Sunshine Warm July, Strolling through the farmers’ market The harvest abundant today. Troubadours Strumming and singing, Feet tapping As they celebrate that chariot swinging low. Suddenly - Heart opens, Soul touched, Eyes fill, And I am part Of all this. Flow love, Connect, Spread, In this moment of blessing Let me share my gratitude. There will be a celebration of Gary’s marvelous life at a memorial service in Santa Barbara in late summer.


obituaries Anthony Justin “AJ” Herrera 11/30/78-07/21/13

In Memory - "AJ" Anthony Justin Herrera 11-30-78 7-21-13 It has been five long years without you. We know your busy in Heaven at the racetracks winning all the races. We miss your beautiful smile and laughter. You are missed everyday. Love you more. Mom and Dad and your Loving family Herrera Racing

Tansy Sue Birchim 02/03/48-06/26/18

It is with a heavy heart that we announce the passing of our dear Nana, Tansy Sue Birchim, who died during emergency heart surgery. She was the love our life and the center of our world. We appreciate the outpouring of love and support from our friends and family near and far, and are seeking solace knowing that she is now reunited with her daughter, Alana, and her father, John. She has gained her wings and we know her spirit is with us everywhere and forever. Her grace and heartfelt devotion shaped her loving family, keeping it whole. Memories of Nana’s life with us will always bring comfort and peace as she was a mother in the truest sense of the word. Rest in peace and pride Nana, until we all meet again. Tansy was a native Californian raised on her folks cattle and alfalfa ranch in the shadow

To submit obituaries for publication, please call (805) 965-5205 or email obits@independent.com

of the Sierra Nevada Mountains in the small town of Independence located in the Owens Valley. After High School graduation in 1966 Tansy attended and graduated from UCSB, after which she chose to remain living in Santa Barbara. Her husband of 47 years, Russ, attended school with her in Independence. After High School graduation he was drafted into the army. They lost track of each other until a chance meeting in 1969. They fell in love and were married in 1970, and settled in Santa Barbara. They raised a family of three – John, Alana and Bo. Russ worked for the Sb County Sheriff ’s Department, retiring after 31 years of service. Nana’s beautiful daughter, Alana, died in 2001 at the age of 23, eight months after being diagnosed with leukemia. This cruel loss was a heartbreak for the family. Tansy struggled to accept her death and it affected her remaining years. Tansy chose to be cremated and asked that her ashes be spread along with those of her daughter in Birchim Lake in the High Sierras. Tansy is survived by her husband, Russell; mother Tansy Smith; son John and his wife, Jenn; son Bo; 5 grandchildren – Jamyn, Zea, Cainan, Koa and Zenn; sister Cara Erikson; brother Zachery and his wife Virginia; along with numerous nephews, nieces and other loving relatives.

Livia Dodero 1924-2018

NJ. During World War II, she joined the ranks of thousands of other “Rosie the Riveters,” helping to build planes for the war effort. She met the young handsome Army Corp Officer, Louis Dodero, who became the love of her life. They married after the war, settled down and raised three children. In 1963, they fulfilled a dream they had and moved to California. Livia put her impressive cooking and managerial skills to work when she became the Cafeteria Manager at Dos Pueblos high school. She also applied these skills for her parish church, St. Raphael’s in Goleta. She was on hand to organize and oversee their Friday Fish Dinners during Lent. But she really shined as the organizing spirit behind the Knights of Columbus annual Columbus Day Feast. After Lou passed away, Livia turned her still considerable energies toward serving her church spiritually. She became a Carmelite Nun, a life-long dream, and a Eucharistic Minister for St. Raphael’s. In this capacity she devoted countless hours to visiting and ministering to the sick, allowing them to receive Communion in their sick beds. Livia led a devoted Christian life and leaves behind a loving family of children, six grandchildren, three great grandchildren and friends too numerous to count. She will be dearly missed by all.

Gary Staneff

Livia Dodero, 94, passed away after a short illness on June 19, 2018 in Santa Barbara, CA. Livia was born in 1924 in Pontecorvo, Italy. Her family immigrated to the United States in 1927 and settled in Paterson,

After a courageous battle with pancreatic cancer, Gary passed peacefully on July 9 2018, holding hands with his wife of 40 years. Gary was a lover of animals, travel and learning, and his intelligence, gentleness and quick wit were a joy to his family and friends. Stoic until the end, his calm, brave acceptance helped all of us come to terms with his disease. Gary is survived by his wife Lynn and his father John. We

will all miss him, and he’ll always live in our hearts. Honoring his request, there will be no services. Those who wish may donate in Gary’s name to Shadow’s Fund, where homeless animals find shelter and love, or Sarah House, where Gary found comfort in his final days.

Eirik Larkin 01/20/77-07/10/18

On Tuesday, July 10th, our dear Eirik Larkin (age 41) passed away. We are all heartbroken and absolutely devastated. He will be missed by so many. He is finally free and at peace. Eirik was in and out of hospitals for the past 11 months. Throughout his battles, he always had a fighting spirit; a warrior spirit. His light shined bright even on the darkest days. The love that he had for his family and friends was felt by anyone that knew him. Eirik had a Hollywood smile that would light up the room and he knew it! He was a jokester and felt it was his duty to make you laugh. His laugh was contagious and his whole body would shake when he laughed. Eirik had a big heart for animals and other people. He would give you the shirt off his back – no questions asked – and would always help the less fortunate, even if he was struggling. His love for surfing and the water was known by all who crossed paths with him. For him, being in the water was an absolute necessity, even if it was 40 degrees outside. Eirik found his peace in the water. With his shock of blond hair and blue eyes, Eirik’s Norwegian heritage was apparent. He dearly loved his Norwegian relatives. He had the biggest heart and INDEPENDENT.COM

has touched many lives with his kindness. Eirik leaves behind his beautiful daughters Ashley and Sadie and the love of his life, Courtney King. He is the son of Robert Larkin and Anne Viken Larkin. As an adult, Eirik worked at various jobs, including stunt work in Hollywood and most recently owned Bootleggers, a bar in San Antonio. He came back to Santa Barbara as often as possible, the town he called home. There will be a celebration of Eirik’s life at a date/time to be announced via his Facebook page. In lieu of flowers, please consider making a donation in Eirik’s name to the Surfrider Foundation. His sweet young spirit will be forever missed.

Wanda Lucille Stavros 08/13/31-06/27/18

Wanda Lucille Stavros passed suddenly, but peacefully with family by her side on June 27, 2018. She was born on Aug. 13, 1931. She is preceded in death by her parents, Edgar and Lottie Wilson of Carpinteria, her sister Norma Lee of Arizona, her life partner, David Castillo of Santa Barbara and her former husband Louis Stavros. She is survived by her 3 daughters, Gaylee (Mike) Nuttman, Marilee DeRosa, Terilee Stavros-Domagala and her step children Gilbert and Sandra Castillo. She leaves behind her beloved grandchildren and great grandchildren, who were the love of her life. She will be interred in Carpinteria following a private burial. A celebration of her life is being planned for a later date.

JULY 19, 2018

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K

Compassionate Friend

BY JA N FA D D E N en Williams walked the streets

of Santa Barbara for more than three decades, reaching out to the poor and the marginalized in our community. He did this long before street medicine was a buzzword and before multiple agencies began looking into the causes of chronic homelessness. Ken provided comfort and compassion to a part of society that many choose not to acknowledge. I met Ken in 2004 at Casa Esperanza. It was easy to see that he was the guy who understood the system of social services better than anyone. Ken was skilled at helping individuals obtain Social Security and thus secure income in order to obtain housing. Many of the people he helped were veterans, for whom he had a deep concern, as he himself was a veteran. I think it’s safe to say that his time in Vietnam dictated his long and successful career as a social worker in Santa Barbara. Since his death on June 10, 2018, social media has been buzzing with accolades to Ken and the work he accomplished. What I hear over and over from his colleagues is that “Ken taught me so much.” Ken’s fortitude and firm passion for social justice defined his work. Never did I witness him lose his cool or become angry with his clients. As we know, the system moves slowly; but Ken stayed the course. Ken’s deep devotion to being a voice for those who were left unheard included ruffling a few feathers. He was known by local officials and had their respect. His causes were frequently documented in the press. Some called him a “pulpit bully” as he did not back down to anyone, and this certainly made him a force to contend with. I remember my mother, who was an avid Los Angeles Times reader, calling me to ask, “Do you know this Ken Williams? He’s turning benches around on State Street.” I responded, “Yes, how do you know?” She let me know that the L.A. Times had done a big article on Ken and the benches. After I shared this story with Ken, he soon gave one of his books to my mom, with a personal note inside, which she cherished. This sort of kindness and generosity defined Ken’s personal and public work ethic. Project Healthy Neighbors was an event that Ken spearheaded with the support of Public Health, Cottage Hospital, and other service agencies. It was a three-day collaboration to provide medical and social services to the working poor and those without homes. The planning committee began organizing six months before the November event. Ken was able to orchestrate funding and gather a large, diversified group of volunteers. Hundreds of donated backpacks had to be filled with essentials. Shoes had to be gathered and food donated in order to create a successful event. In addition to all that was provided, the best part was that everyone was brought together. The homeless, the providers, local officials, and the press all gathered in the parking lot of Casa Esperanza to share stories, provide services, and create community. One of the things that brought Ken the most joy was the “100 for 100” program. Ken and a good friend decided to give out 100-dollar bills to 100 individuals living on the street during the winter holiday season. I

PAUL WELLMAN FILE PHOTO

$150 per month

1950-2018

was lucky enough to accompany him a couple of times and witness this act of spontaneous generosity. It was deeply moving, and the responses were unforgettable. The underlying sentiment was always one of gratitude and humility. With his extremely slanted script, Ken would document each and every recipient’s name and response to the donor. It was a win-win-win as everyone benefited. One of Ken’s most important and memorable qualities was his gentleness when talking with those he served. He left judgment out of the equation and dealt with each person as if they were all that mattered. In other words, he allowed the person to be seen, which is often the biggest heartbreak on the street, to not be seen. There are very few who are willing to listen to the stories that homeless people tell. Time and time again, a person would not be permitted to stay at the shelter for one reason or another. Ken would encounter these situations and strategically saunter into the director’s office, and within minutes he would emerge with that smile that let us all know that the person, usually a mentally ill woman, was secured a bed. I’m not sure Ken had a magic wand, but he certainly possessed a particular method of meeting his objectives. Ken Williams’s legacy was summed up for me last week as I drove down Anapamu Street, past the beautiful Sunken Gardens. There stood an old acquaintance, shopping cart filled to the brim with his sacred belongings, some of which made political statements. Our eyes caught, and I slowed down. He lifted his arms in the air and mouthed the words “Ken Williams.” He paused, I paused, and then he bowed his head. A public memorial for Ken Williams takes place Sunday, July 22, 11 a.m., at the Courthouse Sunken Gardens. n


Letters

OPINIONS CONT’D

SET Graduate Anna Co-Founder Le Sorelle Luxury Imports

DAVID FITZSIMMONS/ARIZONA DAILY STAR

(left) Donatella Co-Founder Le Sorelle

Military Objective

I

’ll never forget the shudder in my bones as I stepped into the elevator the first time, descending into the most dangerous and heavily guarded, top-secret Air Force facility on earth. This was in 1991, when I was an airman at age 18. The “capsule” that housed our nuclear launch facility is buried 70 feet below ground in a farmer’s field in North Dakota, hidden from Russian spy satellites and able to withstand a direct hit from a warhead equivalent to 44 tons of TNT. This place where our nukes were pointed at the Kremlin is where all humanity ends. I happened to be one of the cogs in the wheel of the end of the world, part of a team that supported the last line of defense at the very end of the Cold War. Before I left Minot Air Force Base in 1995, I can’t forget that my commanding officer (a true patriot) said to keep an eye on ex-KGB chief Vladimir Putin’s rising star, because it’ll never be over for some and the Soviet Union collapsing will have an effect on us years later. How right he was. To see our president cozying up to Putin, the most dangerous human alive to our democracy, after all our intelligence agencies have advised of Russian meddling in our election, would be unimaginable if it weren’t true. Being a Puerto Rican American who grew up in New York City when Trump was investigated for rental discrimination by the FBI, now seeing neo-Nazis chant “Russia is our friend” in Charlottesville makes sense. Through 20 years of military service, I can see our country is in serious danger. Trump’s not a patriot, and neither are you if you support him.

—Xander Diaz, S.B.

Sgt. Freddy

I

want to acknowledge the genuine hero in the article “Suicide by Cop Averted” [independent.com/ holdsfire] with a message of appreciation to Sergeant Freddy Padilla for making a difference. — Deanne California, Goleta

Good Kartma

R

egarding Starshine Roshell’s “A Cart … Apart” [independent.com/cartapart], another angle, or angel, is to return someone else’s cart from the parking lot when you head into the store; you can then use it yourself. It only takes a few calories to walk to an abandoned cart and take it with you. Then you have the righteous position of leaving it behind for someone else. — Gary Vandeman, Goleta

Rubbish!

I

just read the nonsense response by Sheriff Bill Brown and the other cronies about the excuses of non-notification during the Goleta fire [independent .com/nowarning]. What on earth went wrong? I live at Friendship Manor in Goleta. We may not have been close to the fire, but we were close enough. During the Montecito fire, my phone went off constantly when I wasn’t even near Montecito. If there was mist in the air in Montecito or Carpinteria, we were getting warning about horrible rains and to evacuate! How dare they give excuses for this. Someone should be hung by their bootstraps! — John Glowicki, Goleta

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Unwrapping the

Bean -to-

Bar Boom Twenty-Four Blackbirds, Chocolate Maya,

and Santa Barbara’s Place in America’s Craft Chocolate Revolution

Y

by Matt Kettmann • Photos by Paul Wellman

B l a c k b i r d F ly ou don’t need a golden ticket to enter Santa Barbara’s chocolate factory, nor will you encounter orange-skinned creatures, navigable rivers of chocolate, or Since starting in a tiny, shared commercial kitchen on East Yanonali Street — with initial sales gravity-defying beverages inside. But if you do walk through the doors of Twentythrough The French Press coffee shop — Twenty-Four Blackbirds steadily skyrocketed in growth, nearly doubling in sales every year for a while. Today, Orlando sells his bars through Four Blackbirds Chocolate on East Haley Street, you’ll smell the warm aroma of nearly 400 retailers in the United States, with another 100 in Tokyo. roasting cocoa in the air and find delicious treats to plop in your mouth, curious “When we started, we used to process machinery to entertain your eyes, and, like the fictional Willy Wonka, a one bag of cocoa beans at a time,” said mad scientist of sweets. That’s owner Mike Orlando, a risk-taking entrepreneur and problemOrlando, who founded the company solving inventor whose work is changing the world of craft chocolate. with his then-girlfriend, Elaine Madsen. “Now we buy a ton of cacao per order. “We were one of the first to do it,” said Orlando of his entry into AmerIt’s many factors larger.” ica’s craft chocolate movement in 2010. “We lucked into the timing of After four years in a slightly larger craft chocolate. Eight years later, there must be more than 200 bean-tokitchen on De la Vina Street, Orlando bar companies in the United States alone.” moved operations to East Haley Street When Twenty-Four Blackbirds began, only about 10 other American producers were making chocolate bars out of fermented cocoa in 2016 and has been renovating the beans that they sourced directly from cacao farmers in the tropics. This 3,000-square-foot space ever since. (He hands-on, single-origin, “bean-to-bar” process is much different than and Madsen parted ways a while back, and she’s now a designer at this newsthe industrialized, corporate-controlled chocolate industry, which has paper.) Today, the low-slung warehouse ruled the planet since the 1800s and treats cocoa as a gross commodity — which was originally a glassmaking like wheat rather than a customized product like wine. Much like craft brewers and boutique coffee roasters, chocolate makfacility but spent nearly two decades as ers — distinct from chocolatiers, who take finished chocolate and make the Taka-Puna bespoke clothing store candies — continue to launch new brands throughout the country. — is a full-on chocolate factory, with Unlike beer and coffee, which are starting to show signs of contraction, refiners, roasters, winnowers, and the tempering machine humming at every the cocoa trend currently shows no signs of abating. waking hour. There remains plenty of room for growth, so existing producers are collaborating more than competing, encouraging anyone with the right The results are shiny bars that snap grinder and gumption to take the leap. Meanwhile, “Big Chocolate” and don’t melt right would-be boogeymen — corporations like Hershey and Nestlé and Mars when you touch them, — aren’t messing with the little guys yet, as the craft movement amounts but do when you put to less than one percent of the global cocoa market. them in your mouth. Explained Orlando, And yet, since many American bean-to-bar makers are focused on “All of these characterfostering fair trade, supporting sustainability, and even reviving heiristics are what make loom varieties of cacao, the social impacts of this small movement feel chocolate chocolate quite big. That’s a positive shift from chocolate’s postcolonial history, in which millions of farmers from West Africa to South America — includfor most people.” ing a rampant amount of child labor — still subsist in near-slavery What sets Orlando SWEET SCIENTIST: Twenty-Four Blackbirds owner Mike Orlando conditions due to the volatile commodity market. apart is that he also opened his retail shop on East Haley “As more companies come on, more information is being shared and designs machines to Street earlier this year. Visitors can more farms are being discovered by people who care,” said Orlando. “I help himself and othtour the facility and see the entire think we have 5-10 more years of this before it becomes the Hersheyers tackle recurrent problems, enhance process, from fermented cocoa versus-Nestlé battle and we’re competing for the same space. And that efficiency, and just make better chocobeans still in their shells (above left) late. “Because I am making chocolate time may never come.” to the finished product (above right). every single day, it’s easy for me to Welcome to the golden age of American craft chocolate. INDEPENDENT.COM

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CACAO GROW: Mike Orlando is now growing tiny cacao plants in a hot and humid room in the back of his chocolate factory. In the front, he offers tastings of five different single-origin chocolates.

SANTA BARBARA ZOO

come up with a machine that solves a problem,” said Orlando, who previously worked as a marine biologist and analytical chemist for UCSB and UC Santa W h a t : Chocolate is grown on cacao trees, Cruz. Based in the rear of whose huge pods contain beans that are fer- the factory, his technology mented and then roasted. The scientific name for development company is the plant is Theobroma cacao, which means “food called Prefix Equipment Manufacturing, and it has of the gods.” sold plans, prototypes, and W h e r e : Commercial cacao is grown almost finished products to chocoentirely in the tropics, within 20 degrees of the late makers in Los Angeles, equator around the whole world. It was first domesticated in Central America, but now West San Francisco, and across Africa grows the most. Indonesia, India, and South the United States. Most important, both for America are also major suppliers. his business and the pubW h e n : There are two seasons each year for lic, the new Twenty-Four cacao, a big peak and a little peak, typically about Blackbirds headquarters six months after big rains. is a retail front and educaH o w : See “How to Make Chocolate in the tional hub. People can taste U.S.” sidebar. the difference between V a r i e t i e s : No one yet knows how many single-origin chocolates varieties of cacao exist, as DNA testing is just from Madagascar, Ecuataking off in the field. Though even this simple dor, Tanzania, Bolivia, and classification system is criticized, the four “grand” the Dominican Republic; varieties are: Criollo (high quality, low vigor, about sample some of his wildly 5 percent of global supply); Forastero (high vigor, flavored confections (spicy lower quality, 80 percent of supply); Trinitario (a togarashi, pink peppercorn hybrid of good quality); and Nacional (rediscov- & licorice salt caramel, etc.); ered in Peru in 2011, very rare). and learn tons about chocolate. Starting this week, visitors can take a self-guided tour through the facility, from the humid greenhouse, where fledgling cacao trees are growing, through the sorting and mixing rooms, and then to where the melted beans become packaged bars. (See sidebar on page 25 for the stages of chocolate making.) “When I started, I didn’t want anything to do with retail, but I realized that I had to do it, because we were going to get left behind in terms of business growth,” said Orlando, who employs seven people.“Now that this is open, it’s time to catch up.” And to do retail, you really need to do education in order for people to understand why they’re spending $7.50 on a chocolate bar, when Hershey sells the same thing for less than $2. That’s why, he explained, “this whole place was set up so that you could do the factory tour.” Since opening in February, business has been consistent, but Orlando is very excited to launch the self-guided tours. “People are going to be pretty blown away, especially to see the tropical nursery,” said Orlando.“With that going, I am able to show the entire tree-to-bar process. That’s pretty unique. I don’t think anyone in the U.S. is doing anything like this.”

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Cover Story

Twenty-Four Blackbirds Open noon-7 p.m. daily. 428 E. Haley St.; twentyfourblackbirds.com

How to

Make Chocolate in the U.S.

Step 1: Harvest cacao pods and ferment beans. (Completed at farm level in the tropics.) Step 2: Import beans. Step 3: Hand sort the beans. Step 4: Roast beans. Step 5: Crack beans, winnow away the husks, and collect the cocoa nibs. Step 6: Refine cocoa nibs into a liquid and add desired sugar or sweetener. Step 7: “Conche” liquid, which helps reduce viscosity and develop the final flavor. Step 8: Age solid chocolate. Step 9: Temper chocolate by heating. Step 10: Pour into molds and vibrate out any air bubbles. Step 11: Package and sell!

M ay a M o t i v at i o n It’s unlikely Orlando would ever have started down this path if it weren’t for an even earlier chocolate entrepreneur in Santa Barbara: Maya Schoop-Rutten, the Swiss émigré who came to Santa Barbara in 1982, ran the Comeback Café on State Street for 16 years, and then opened her Chocolate Maya shop in 2007. In her native Switzerland, as in much of Europe, there are chocolate shops on every block, but there was nothing like that in Santa Barbara. “I used to bring back bars from Switzerland,” she said of her earliest offerings. “Little by little, we got more bars from the United States, and they were actually better than the chocolate from Europe.” Already into coffee roasting as a hobby, Orlando wandered into the new shop and bought one of the original American bean-to-bar, singleorigin chocolates: the 70 percent Madagascar bar by Patric. “It was outrageously good,” recalled Orlando, so he started making his own in a rudimentary way and sharing the results.“The positive reinforcement of making chocolate for your friends is a biofeedback loop that doesn’t quit.” Twenty-Four Blackbirds was born soon after. Decorated in moody, vivid colors with photos of cacao trees, fermenting beans, smiling farmers, and more, Chocolate Maya—which is adjacent to the coffee-bean bags of S.B. Roasting Company at State and Gutierrez streets — is reminiscent of a hip Central American café. In addition to the house-made truffles and wall full of sustainably sourced

continued >

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BEAN TO BAR TO YOU: Originally from Switzerland, Maya Schoop-Rutten started selling bean-to-bar chocolate in Santa Barbara when she opened Chocolate Maya at State and Gutierrez streets in 2007.

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bars for sale, Schoop-Rutten also offers tasting flights that show how Madagascar chocolates can be bright and citrusy while those from the Solomon Islands may be much nuttier. “Like wine, those other flavors are so important, and they should travel for a few minutes,” she said.“If you have a chocolate and the flavor is gone after you swallow it, that’s bad chocolate.” Also like wine, there is vintage variation. “We may get it from the same plantation, but it won’t ever taste CONFECTIONS, TOO: Tatiana Champetier molds chocolate into that way again,” she said. truffles that are also on sale at Twenty-Four Blackbirds, with such Her most expensive bar flavors as Spicy Togarashi Caramel and Pink Peppercorn & Lavender costs $22, but they are all more Blossom Caramel. pricey than what you’ll find at the grocery store. “They’re very expensive She also does her part to educate the farmbecause they come from places where farm- ers, like on a recent trip to Java.“They’ve never ers are making a profit,” said Schoop-Rutten. seen the end product, and they don’t know On numerous tours through cacao-growing what chocolate looks like or tastes like,” said regions, she’s seen how much of an impact Schoop-Rutten, who always travels with bars America’s fair-trade-minded bean-to-bar now. “It’s kind of sad, isn’t it?” producers can have for these family farmers, While her business wouldn’t survive just as many can now afford to send their kids to on selling those bars alone, Schoop-Rutten school or buy refrigerators. “It’s really won- explained, “They are crucial for me because derful that farmers are making more money of the education aspect of the business.” The now,” she said. number of producers sending samples continues to grow exponentially, but she remains “severe” in her assessment, noting that, while there are a lot more producers now, there are still not many that are “good, good, good.” (Twenty-Four Blackbirds made the cut from the get-go.) With time, she believes that the quality producers will rise above the rest. “Kind of like the beer market: The bad ones will go and the good ones will stay, and it will all mellow out,” she said. “Right now, we’re in the prime boom. It’s exploding. Everyone is doing it. I can’t keep up.”

Aztec to America America’s craft chocolate movement is a throwback of sorts to how chocolate was treated millennia ago by the indigenous peoples of Mexico. The Maya, Olmec, and Aztec all highly revered the cacao tree and cocoa beans, incorporating chocolate into important rituals and even using the beans as currency. When the Spaniards arrived, they took to chocolate as well. It was mostly served as a beverage back then, and the Spaniards liked to cut its bitter flavor with sugar or honey. That quickly caught on in Europe, so the Spaniards, Dutch, French, and English started planting cacao trees throughout their colonies in the tropics, from Africa to South America to New Guinea, as the trees can only grow within about 20 degrees of the equator. Today, West Africa, particularly the Ivory Coast and Ghana, grows the majority of cocoa beans on the planet, more than half of global production at last count. 26

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In 1879, after decades of development by such names as Nestlé and Cadbury, the Swiss chocolate maker Rodolphe Lindt invented the conching machine, which produced the texture and taste of chocolate that we know today. By the early 20th century, cocoa was being traded as a commodity like wheat, cotton, and rice. That’s how it’s treated today, with about 4.6 million tons per year amounting to more than $11 billion annually, depending on the market price. The American craft chocolate movement, meanwhile, is just a tiny slice of that global figure, but it’s been growing steadily since 2007. Cultural trends of such magnitude are usually hard to pin to one person, but this movement does come down to Steve DeVries, a glassworker from Colorado who stumbled into the trade while learning Spanish in Costa Rica in 1998. (Scharffen Berger — which started in San Francisco in 1996, coined the phrase “bean-tobar,” and sold to Hershey for about $50 million


Cover Story

ISSUE

in 2005—is often called a pioneer as well. But Surfing the Second Wave the insider rub is that the company started out with a corporate rather than boutique model.) Steve DeVries ran his company for 10 years, “People try to call me the godfather, but until health problems and rising rents caused I don’t have a little pinkie ring, so I don’t him to shut down in 2015 and focus on conknow about that,” said DeVries, who man- sulting. By then, the movement was in full aged to track down some Costa Rican beans, swing, starting with a first wave of producers bring them back to Denver, and make his that popped up around 2006 or so, including first batch of chocolate using his oven and Amano in Utah, Patric in Missouri, Theo in grain mill, based on the very few pieces of Seattle, and Mast Brothers in Brooklyn. published information he could find. “It was admittedly crude, but it had a complexity of flavors that I had never tasted in chocolate before,” said ‘Like wine, those other flavors DeVries. “That hooked me.” He sold his first DeVries Chocolate are so important, and they should bars in 2005. “I was the 12th-largest travel for a few minutes. If you manufacturer in the United States,” he have a chocolate and the flavor explained, “and also the smallest.” He had to crack the chocolate code —“It’s is gone after you swallow it, always been very secretive,” he said of that’s bad chocolate.’ the corporate experts — and started to confront the industry-pumped propaganda that the chocolate making starts in the factory, not the farm. “Over the years, I’ve come to realize that, when the bean gets into the Twenty-Four Blackbirds was part of the factory, 80 percent of what the chocolate can be is already determined,” he explained. “You second wave when opening in 2010, as was can go up from there or down from there, but San Francisco’s Dandelion Chocolate, accordyou can’t make a silk purse out of a sow’s ear.” ing to Greg D’Alesandre, the latter company’s (He much prefers the Spanish version of that sourcing expert and VP of R&D. Like Twentycliché, aunque la mona se vista de seda mona Four Blackbirds, Dandelion is doubling down se queda, which means that you can dress a on their retail operations, both to increase margins and educate the consumer. They have monkey in silk, but it’s still a monkey.) DeVries quickly learned why mass-pro- two locations in S.F. and four in Japan. duced chocolate was boring by design. “They “When you look at chocolate bars on a want a standard. They want you to grab a Cad- shelf, it’s hard to understand why one is $10 bury and have the same flavor from year to and one is $5,” said D’Alesandre, who said year,” said DeVries, explaining that many of that consumers have become much smarter the big companies don’t even process their in recent years — many know the difference own beans anymore, instead buying “choco- between making chocolate and making conlate liquor” from specialty “grinder” factories. fections, for instance—yet there’s plenty of “The only way you can do that is working with teaching to do. “When you have your own the lowest common denominator, so that’s location, it’s a lot easier to tell that story to why 95 percent of their bulk beans come from people.” Africa, with no complexity of flavor,” he conA former Google employee who joked tinued. “And then they blend four or five dif- for years that he’d eventually quit to make ferent beans and change their roast to come chocolate, D’Alesandre was also one of Mike Orlando’s first machine customers, specifiup with a fairly similar product.”

—Maya Schoop-Rutten

continued >

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continued from p. 27

Cover Story

cally on a device that was able to break different-sized beans more efficiently. “Mike was absolutely the person who helped bring this machine to life,” said D’Alesandre, who appreciates that Orlando is taking a step back to rethink many parts of this century-old process from step one, not just improving existing technologies. “Before that, we were scratching our heads as to what we were going to do next.” There is plenty of room for innovation at this level, said D’Alesandre, STEAMPUNK STYLE: Not only does Mike Orlando make machines to help the as the big chocolate companies, chocolate industry evolve, he also rescues and refurbishes old devices, such as this which process more than 100 tons candy-bar wrapping machine that he found in Mexico. a day, have never really focused on technology for smaller producers. “We need different them properly in order to produce a reliable crop harequipment because we’re trying to accomplish a differ- vest after harvest. “There’s still a huge disconnect with what’s called postharvest, which is the fermentation ent goal,” he said. Orlando also helped David Menkes, a former visual- and drying of the beans,” said Steve DeVries, who meets effects artist and chocolate blogger in Los Angeles. After regularly with cacao farmers all over the world, most a visit to Twenty-Four Blackbirds for his Little Brown recently in Ecuador and the Philippines. “It breaks my Squares blog, Menkes was inspired to start his own heart to see these guys spend years and so much energy company, called LetterPress Chocolate, in 2014. Based planting the plantation and taking care of it and then, in near Culver City, it remains the only bean-to-bar pro- the last two weeks, just blowing it.” Educating farmers is one of the main goals for the ducer in all of Los Angeles, and he serves as a guinea pig of sorts for Orlando’s inventions, particularly his Fine Chocolate Industry Association (FCIA), which winnowing system. represents more than 350 members, including more than “That was a huge game changer for us,” said Menkes, 200 bean-to-bar makers. “I’m always surprised at how who started with a shop vac and paint bucket, only able willing and interested they are,” said FCIA’s Bill Guyton, to make about a pound an hour. “Now we can do 100 an agricultural economist based in Arlington, Virginia, who’s worked with cocoa for two decades. “They are so pounds an hour.” excited to come to our meetings and to invite companies down to visit their farms. I see this as a growing trend, and it’s a real opportunity for smaller farms in remote areas to find other channels for their products.” The FCIA is also behind the Heirloom Cacao Preservation Fund, which is identifying farms — 15 and counting so far — that have quality genetics, as well as farmers who are meticulous about their processing. The hope is that this too will fetch a better price for the farmers. “That’s the end goal,” said Guyton. Of course, farmers are just trying to survive, so basic math comes into play when deciding between highyield/low-quality and low-yield/high-quality cacao.“If you’re gonna give me an extra 20 percent for the good stuff, but I can get three times as much for the bad stuff, No matter how good that fair-trade bar tastes or how what is your decision gonna be?” asked DeVries. He did much you’re willing to pay for it, the chocolate industry note, however, that some of the very top farmers are able remains fraught with major issues. Much of that hinges to fetch as much as $9,000 a ton for beans, while the on the vast economic disparity that exists between the commodity price sits around $2,500 a ton today. developing world, which grows all of the chocolate, and Luckily, the still-nascent bean-to-bar movement is the developed nations that eat almost all of it. diverse, ranging from people who care about social As Big Chocolate fights over slim margins, the cocoa- justice to those who are focused on genetics to those, bean commodity market stays extremely volatile, forc- like Mike Orlando, who love solving problems with new ing farmers to eke out an existence from harvest to technology. “It’s cool that you have all of these different harvest, often with children as labor. Add to that prob- people with their individual interests, and, because it’s lems with fungus, environmental pressure caused by an industry where people talk to each other, Mike can climate change, and the occasional political upheaval, make equipment for other people who are more excited and you won’t find too many folks volunteering to run about the inclusion side of things,” said D’Alesandre. “That’s one of the things I love about being in the chocoa cacao plantation. It’s a tough life. So America’s bean-to-bar makers focus on what they late industry: We’re all in this together.” can change. “For me, it’s not about ‘How do I get the For the pioneer DeVries, chocolate has always been cheapest product at the best possible price?’” explained about taste, and that’s a strong sign that all of the other D’Alesandre of Dandelion Chocolate. “It’s ‘How do I boxes are checked as well. “Trust your mouth,” he create a relationship so that we will all continue to pros- advised.“The best chocolate is the chocolate you like to per over the long haul?’” eat. If you get a really good chocolate, it didn’t happen On the ground level, that comes down to educating by accident. Everyone along the whole chain was doing n farmers on which beans to grow and how to ferment their job.”

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Celebrate Traditions La Recepción del Presidente

N ot A l l K i s s e s a n d S m i l e s

La Recepción del Presidente kicks off Fiesta week. Guests in their finest Fiesta attire are welcomed with the official receiving line of El Presidente and enjoy performances by the Spirit and Junior Spirit of Fiesta, Mexican buffet, and dance the night away. This evening is one not to be missed!

Sunday, July 29 at 5-10pm Hilton Santa Barbara Beachfront Resort 633 E. Cabrillo Boulevard

Tickets: $125 single or $1,200 table for 10 www.sbfiesta.org Fiesta Attire Encouraged! INDEPENDENT.COM

JULY 19, 2018

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29


GRANADASB.ORG

805.899.2222 U P C O M I N G

P E R F O R M A N C E S

MUSIC ACADEMY OF THE WEST

HOLST’S THE PLANETS SAT JUL 21 7:30PM

UCSB ARTS & LECTURES

AIDA CUEVAS

WITH MARIACHI JUVENIL TECALITLÁN A TRIBUTE TO JUAN GABRIEL WED OCT 10 8PM

MUSIC ACADEMY OF THE WEST

UCSB ARTS & LECTURES

MOZART’S OPERA

COMPANY WANG RAMIREZ

THE MARRIAGE OF FIGARO FRI AUG 3 7:30PM SUN AUG 5 2:30PM

THE GRANADA THEATRE CONCERT SERIES BACK BY POPULAR DEMAND

RODRIGUEZ TUE AUG 21 7:30PM

UCSB ARTS & LECTURES

CIRQUE MECHANICS SUN OCT 14 7PM

THE GRANADA THEATRE CONCERT SERIES

CAMA

BOZ SCAGGS

LOS ANGELES PHILHARMONIC

TUE SEP 11 7:30PM

SUN OCT 28 4PM

THE GRANADA THEATRE CONCERT SERIES

OPERA SANTA BARBARA

THE BEACH BOYS

LA BOHEME

FRI SEP 21 7:30PM

FRI NOV 9 7:30PM SUN NOV 11 2:30PM

UCSB ARTS & LECTURES

UCSB ARTS & LECTURES

JAZZ AT LINCOLN CENTER ORCHESTRA

COMPAGNIE KÄFIG: PIXEL

WITH WYNTON MARSALIS SAT SEP 29 8PM

30

SAT OCT 13 8PM

TUE NOV 13 8PM

STATE STREET BALLET

THEATER LEAGUE

CHAPLIN

CINDERELLA

SAT OCT 6 7:30PM SUN OCT 7 2PM

TUE NOV 27 7:30PM WED NOV 28 7:30PM

1214 State Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101 Granada Theatre Concert Series & Film Series sponsored by

Donor parking provided by

THE INDEPENDENT

JULY 19, 2018

INDEPENDENT.COM


WEEK I N D E P E N D E N T CA L E N DA R

JULY

19-25

E H T

BY TERRY ORTEGA

7/19-7/22: Grease the Musical Celebrate

PICN

Annali Fuchs-Wackowski

the ’50s with one of the best-loved musicals of all time. This Tony-nominated show takes you to Rydell High’s senior class, where head “greaser” Danny Zuko, the new (good) girl Sandy, and all their friends dance and sing their way through teen angst with songs such as “Summer Nights,” “Look at Me, I’m Sandra Dee,”“We Go Together,” and more! The show runs through July 28. 7:30pm. Garvin Theatre, SBCC, 801 Cliff Dr. $14$26. Call 965-5935. theatregroupsbcc.com

2018 S.B. Unified School District 2018 Free Meals Free breakfast, lunch, and supper for all youth 18 years and younger. All locations are open Monday-Friday unless otherwise stated. For more locations, visit the website, call 963-4338 x6387, or text “summerfood” to 877 877. Desayuno, almuerzo, y cena gratis para todos los jóvenes de 18 años o menos. Todas las ubicaciones están abiertas lunes-viernes si no se indique lo contrario. Para obtener más ubicaciones, visite el sitio web, llame al 963-4338 x6387, o envie un mensaje de texto que dice “summerfood” al 877 877.

7/19: Writing in the Galleries A visiting writer/facilitator will give you prompts partially inspired by works on view. Participants of all skill levels can write on their own and then share and comment on each other’s work. Bring a journal or notebook, laptop, or tablet. You must reserve your spot. 5:30-7:30pm. S.B. Museum of Art, 1130 State St. Free. Call 884-6457 or email lvallejo-howard@sbma.net. sbma.net

tinyurl.com/SBUSD2018SummerMeals All locations are closed August 3. Todas las ubicaciones están cerradas el 3 de agosto.

FRIDAY 7/20

Franklin School Cafeteria 1111 E. Mason St. June 11-Aug.17. Breakfast: 8-9am; lunch: 11:30am-1pm.

7/20: Flamenco en la Calle Victoria This show will feature musicians and dancers from Spain, including Manuel Gutierrez, as well as Linda Vega and Flamenco! Santa Barbara Company Dancers, including Spirit of Fiesta 2018 Jesalyn Contreras-McCollum. 7:30pm. New Vic, 33 W. Victoria St. $30-$40. Call 965-5400. etcsb.org

7/19-7/22:

This show features three contemporary artists: Taj Vaccarella (Santa Barbara), Brad Nuorala (Tucson), and Carol Paquet (Arroyo Grande). The exhibit shows through September 9. 5-8pm. MichaelKate Interiors and Gallery, 132 Santa Barbara St. Free. Call 963-1411.

7/19: Protect the Carrizo! Art Show Benefit S.B.-based photographer Jim Stoicheff has documented the Carrizo Plain for the last three years. You will be able to purchase one of his special, limited-edition prints, with 100 percent of the proceeds going to Save the Carrizo. A portion of his other sales, as well as sales from Shops@Waterline, will go toward ForestWatch. RSVP online or by email. 6-8pm. Wall Space Creative, 120 Santa Barbara St. Free. Email events@lpfw.org.

Fundraiser

I.V. Youth Projects Phelps: Mobile Café 6842 Phelps Rd., Goleta. June 11-Aug. 17. Breakfast: 8:45-9:45am; supper: 4:40-5:30pm. Parque de los Niños: Mobile Café 520 Wentworth Ave. June 11-Aug 17. Lunch: 11:30am-1pm.

I.V. Youth Projects West Campus: Mobile Café 701-H Campus Point Ln., Goleta. June 11-Aug. 17. Breakfast: 8-8:30am; supper: 4-4:30pm. McKinley School Cafeteria 350 Loma Alta Dr. June 11-Aug. 17. Lunch: 11:30am-1pm. Monroe School Cafeteria 431 Flora Vista Dr. June 11-Aug. 17. Breakfast: 8-9am; lunch: 11:30am-1pm. Oak Park: Mobile Café 502 W. Alamar Ave. June 11-Aug. 17. Lunch: 11:30am–1:00pm. Harding University Partnership 1625 Robbins St. June 11-Aug. 17. Breakfast: 8-9am; lunch: 11:30am-1pm. Westside Boys & Girls Club: Mobile Café 602 W. Anapamu St. Mon.-Sat., June 11-Aug. 18. Breakfast: 8-9am; lunch: 11:30am-1pm.

Foodbank Kids’ Summer Meals 2018 The Foodbank offers free, nutritious meals, activities, and enrichment opportunities to all children ages 1-18 in our county, Monday-Friday, June 11-August 10. Visit the website for North County locations. Call 967-5741. El Foodbank ofrece comidas nutritivas gratuitas, actividades, y oportunidades de enriquecimiento para todos los niños de 1 a 18 años en nuestro condado, del 11 de junio al 10 de agosto, de lunes a viernes. Visite el sitio web por las ubicaciones de North County. Llame al 967-5741.

tinyurl.com/CarrizoBenefit

chaucersbooks.com

Goleta Boys & Girls Club: Mobile Café 5701 Hollister Ave., Goleta. Mon.-Sat., June 11-Aug. 18. Breakfast: 8-9am; supper 4:30-5:30pm.

7/20: Opening Reception: Take Three

THURSDAY 7/19

7/19: Gary Gasaway In The Coach’s Chronicles III: Everything Matters, author Gary Gasaway explores the possibilities of looking at your life with a different set of eyes in appreciation of everything around you. 7pm. Chaucer’s Books, 3321 State St. Free. Call 682-6787.

Girls Inc.: Mobile Café 531 E. Ortega St. June 11-Aug. 17. Lunch: 11:30am-1:30pm.

MARK MONTGOMERY

Vanya and Sonia and Masha and Spike Playwright Christopher Durang’s 2013 Tony Award winner for Best Play is about the upheaval that ensues when middle-aged siblings Vanya and Sonia, who have never left their childhood home in Bucks County, PA, receive a surprise visit from their sister Masha, a successful actress who shows up with her boy toy, Spike. This play contains adult subject matter and some adult language. 8pm. Solvang Festival Theater, 420 2nd St., Solvang. $28.75$50.50. Ages 14+. Call 922-8313. pcpa.org

in e IC

RK PA

LUIS ESCOBAR REFLECTIONS PHOTOGRAPHY STUDIO

As always, find the complete listings online at independent.com/events. And if you have an event coming up, submit it at independent.com/eventsubmit.

7/19-7/21:

15th Annual California Wine Festival This event will showcase nearly 250 wines from more than 70 wineries and 30 fine-dining restaurants and gourmet food companies. Enjoy the Old Spanish Nights Wine Tasting on Thursday, Sunset Rare & Reserve Wine Tasting on Friday, and Beachside Wine Festival on Saturday. Visit the website for times and locations. Designated driver: $40-$60; GA: $70-$115; VIP: $145-$190. californiawinefestival.com

Volunteer Opportunity

Civil Discourse

endsummerhunger.org/find-a-lunch

Isla Vista Apartments 6660 Abrego Rd., Isla Vista 1-2pm

S.B. Central Library 40 E. Anapamu St. 11:30am-12:30pm

St. Vincent’s Gardens 4234 Pozzo Cir. 1-2pm

>>>

Protest INDEPENDENT.COM

JULY 19, 2018

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31


La Recepción del Presidente

As always, find the complete listings online at independent.com/events. And if you have an event coming up, submit it at independent.com/eventsubmit.

19-25

COURTESY

Celebrate Traditions

INDEPENDENT CALENDAR

JULY

Fox sculpture by Ellen Jewett

7/21: Opening Reception: Nature Imagined This exhibition celebrates nature through the vivid imaginations of artists Cheryl Medow, Ellen Jewett, and Hilary Brace using diverse materials and methods to create environments that will engage the imagination. 3-5pm. Wildling Museum of Art & Nature, 1511-B Mission Dr., Solvang. Free. Call 686-8315 or email mitra@wildling museum.org to RSVP.

7/20:

9th Annual Asian American Film Series: Small Enough to Jail This 2016 Oscar-nominated documentary tells the saga of the Chinese immigrant Sung family, owners of Abacus Federal Savings Bank, the only U.S. bank to face criminal charges in the wake of the 2008 financial crisis. A Q&A will follow the screening. 7pm. Alhecama Theatre, 215-A E. Canon Perdido St. Not rated. Free-$5 donation. sbthp.org/aafs

Sunday, July 29 at 5-10pm Hilton Santa Barbara Beachfront Resort 633 E. Cabrillo Boulevard

Tickets: $125 single or $1,200 table for 10

7/20-7/21: Eric Ong’s Textiles of Borneo These two days will consist of a cultural show, lecture, workshops, and trunk show. Learn about Borneo’s fiber arts, hear music, see dance, participate in basket weaving and silk scarf stamp dying workshops, and learn how to drape a sarong. Fri.: 6:30-8:30pm; Sat.: 10am-3pm, 4-7pm. Core Fitness Training, 4430 Hollister Ave. Free-$50. Call 967-7770.

corefitnesstrainingsb.com/events

SATURDAY 7/21 7/21: The Science Behind the Montecito Mudslides and What Really Happened Dr. Thomas Dunne, professor

www.sbfiesta.org

of geomorphology and hydrology at UCSB, will speak on the causes and nature of the Montecito debris flow, including the results of ongoing field research. A Q&A will follow the talk. 2-3pm. Karpeles Manuscript Library Museum, 21 W. Anapamu St. Free. Call 962-5322.

Fiesta Attire Encouraged!

7/21:

5th Annual Blondes vs. Brunettes Flag Football Fundraiser Come watch two teams of women compete in a

game of flag football to raise awareness and funds in the fight against Alzheimer’s disease. There will be beer, wine, and food available for purchase, as well as a raffle! Tailgate: 11:30am; kickoff: 2pm. Bishop Garcia Diego High School, 4000 La Colina Rd. GA: $20; VIP $75. tinyurl.com/BlondesBrunettes2018

7/21: Hoodrich Pablo Juan Rapper Hoodrich Pablo Juan, out with last October’s album Designer Drugz 3, will bring his aggressive beats to S.B. 8pm. Velvet Jones, 423 State St. $25. velvet-jones.com

7/21: Secrets of a Tamale Chef

ROD TUCKNOTT

STAY CONNECTED

COURTESY

La Recepción del Presidente kicks off Fiesta week. Guests in their finest Fiesta attire are welcomed with the official receiving line of El Presidente and enjoy performances by the Spirit and Junior Spirit of Fiesta, Mexican buffet, and dance the night away. This evening is one not to be missed!

wildlingmuseum.org

LIKE US ON

Chef Richard Lambert will demonstrate techniques to make tamales and salsa. Participants will be served samples of tamales and shown how to create them at home, leaving with handouts and an e-cookbook. Register online. Noon-1:30pm. Marine Ctr. Classroom, 125 Harbor Wy. $45. Email info@ sbtamalestogo.com.

tinyurl.com/TamaleSecretsJuly2018

FACEBOOK

7/21: Rockin’ Our Roots Concert Bring your lawn chairs

@sbindependent

FOLLOW US ON

TWITTER @SBIndpndnt

FOLLOW US ON

INSTAGRAM @sbindependent

#sbindy #sceneinSB

7/21-7/22:

Footloose This show deals with family tensions, being an outsider, fighting for what you believe in, and most importantly, proving that dancing is not a crime! More than 60 area performers, ages 9-17, will capture the look and sound of the ’80s in this fun musical. 2 and 7pm. S.B. High School Theater, 700 E. Anapamu St. $12-$25. tinyurl.com/StageLeftFootloose Fundraiser

32

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JULY 19, 2018

INDEPENDENT.COM

Volunteer Opportunity

and a picnic, sit back, relax, and enjoy the sounds of Soul Majestic and Crown City Bombers. Your ticket includes a wineglass and two glasses of wine. There will be food and wine for sale. A portion of the tickets sales will go toward Explore Ecology’s environmental education and arts programming. 2-6pm. Buttonwood Farm Winery Vineyard Pond, 1500 Alamo Pintado Rd., Solvang. $45-$50. tinyurl.com/ConcertInTheVines

Civil Discourse

Protest


WEEK Dena Derose

COURTESY

SHOWS ON TAP A L W A Y S A M A Z I N G. N e v e r r o u t i n e.

FRIDAY

OUT D L O S

Calibre 50

20

8 PM

7/19-7/24:

SOhO Restaurant & Music Club Thu.: Mojo Green, Lantz Lazwell & The Vibe Tribe. 8pm. $12. Ages 21+. Fri.: Phoebe Bridgers, Lomelda, Harrison Whitford. 9pm. $16-$18. Ages 21+. Sat.: Barbara Wood & The Moments, Shawn Thies. 8:30pm. $15. Ages 21+. Sun.: Dena Derose Trio. 1pm. $25. Mon.: Nate Birkey Quintet. 7:30pm. $10$12. Tue.: Madeleine Mayi, Mason Summit, Aluna. 7:30pm. $10. 1221 State St. Call 962-7776. sohosb.com

july

FRIDAY

Patti LaBelle

july

27

8 PM

7/19, 7/21: Dargan’s Irish Pub & Restaurant Thu.: Dannsair. 6:308:30pm. Sat.: King Bee. 8:30-11:30pm. 18 E. Ortega St. Free. Call 568-0702.

darganssb.com

7/19-7/21: M.Special Brewing Co. Thu.: College Night: Strange Brew. 6-8pm. Fri.: Grooveshine. 6-9pm. Sat.: L.T.D. 6-9pm. 6860 Cortona Dr., Bldg. C., Goleta. Free. Call 968-6500. mspecialbrewco.com

FRIDAY

DIVA 2 DIVA

7/19-7/25: The Endless Summer Bar-Café Thu.: Kylie Butler. 5:308:30pm. Fri., Mon., Tue.: TBA. 5:30-8:30pm. Sat., Wed.: John Lyle. 5:308:30pm. Sun.: Benny Collison. 2-5pm. 113 Harbor Wy. Free. Call 564-1200.

AUG

3

8 PM

7/20-7/22: Cold Spring Tavern Fri.: The Excellent Tradesmen. 6-9pm. Sat.: The Third Man; 1-4pm. Mac Talley’s Trip; 5-8pm. Sun.: Tom Ball and Kenny Sultan; 1:15-4pm. Hot Roux; 4:30-7:30pm. 5995 Stagecoach Rd. Free. Call 967-0066. coldspringtavern.com

Thunder From Down Under: Girls'

7/20-7/21: Carr Winery Barrel Rm. Fri.: Wall of Tom. Sat.: SBCC New World Jazz Ensemble. 7-9pm. 414 N. Salsipuedes St. Free. Ages 21+. Call 965-7985. carrwinery.com 7/20: Eos Lounge Grouch. 9pm. 500 Anacapa St. $5. Ages 21+. Call 564-2410. eoslounge.com

Night Outback

FRIDAY

AUG

10

8 PM

7/20-7/21: Maverick Saloon Fri.: Area 51. Sat.: Crown City Bombers. 8-11pm. Free-$5 (after 8pm). 3687 Sagunto St., Santa Ynez. Ages 21+. Call 686-4785. themavsaloon.com 7/21: La Cumbre Plaza Amber & Smoke. Noon-3pm. 121 S. Hope Ave. Free. Call 687-6458. shoplacumbre.com/events 7/21: The James Joyce Ulysses Jasz. 7:30-10:30pm. 513 State St. Free. Ages 21+. Call 962-4660. sbjamesjoyce.com 7/21: Yellow Belly Shawn Dilbeck. 7-9pm. 2611 De la Vina St. Free. Call 770-5694. yellowbellytap.com 3 4 0 0 E H i g h w a y 24 6 , S a n t a Yn e z · 8 0 0 - 24 8 - 6 2 74 · C h u m a s h C a s i n o . c o m

>>>

Chumash Casino Resort reserves the right to change or cancel promotions and events.

INDEPENDENT.COM

JULY 19, 2018

THE INDEPENDENT

33


INDEPENDENT CALENDAR

JULY

As always, find the complete listings online at independent.com/events. And if you have an event coming up, submit it at independent.com/eventsubmit.

19-25

COURTESY

7/21: Club Diversity Join DJ of Ability Chris Benedict for a relaxed nightclub/ lounge atmosphere to help members with disabilities realize their full potential through encouraging socialization and recreation with able-bodied people to reinforce self-confidence while making able-bodied people feel more comfortable with disabled people. 7-10pm. Yes Dance Studio, 705 Paseo Nuevo. $7-$10.

FREE SUMMER CONCERT SERIES

THURSDAY NIGHTS IN JULY FROM 6–8:30PM CHASE PALM PARK GREAT MEADOW STAGE

COURTESY

SUNDAY 7/22

RJ MISCHO

THU

& HIS RED HOT BLUES BAND

JULY 19

A BARBA NT

RA

SA

Blues Harmonica

7/24:

Science on Site: Scanning Electron Microscope Using the power of focused electron beams, Dr. Daniel Geiger is able to showcase magnified images of insects, shells, and more with his magnificent scanning electron microscope! Come watch a demo to learn how it works. Sign up in the courtyard at 10:30 a.m. 11am-2pm. S.B. Museum of Natural History, 2559 Puesta del Sol. Free-$12. Ages 10+. Call 682-4711 x170. sbnature.org

DENNIS FORSTER | FINANCIAL ADVISOR

7/22: Louise Goffin, Jarrod Dickenson Brooklyn-born writer, SantaBarbaraCA.gov/Concerts

/SBConcerts (805) 564-5418

★ NOMINEE! 1972 Tony Award ★

★ NOMINEE! 1994 & 2008 ★

for Best Musical and Best Book of a Musical

Tony Award for Best Revival of a Musical

presents

presents “A lively and funny musical —

multi-instrumentalist, producer, and alt-pop artist Louise Goffin (pictured) may be best known for her duet with her mom, Carole King, on the theme song for the TV show Gilmore Girls, but she’s also got eight albums to her name, including the soon-to-be-released All These Hellos. Texas-born, N.Y.C.-based musician Jarrod Dickenson will open the show with his unique take on folk, Americana, and roots blues. 7:30pm. SOhO Restaurant & Music Club, 1221 State St. $15. Call 962-7776.

sohosb.com

as well as the dancingest one in town.”

MONDAY 7/23

TUESDAY 7/24

7/23-7/25: Computer Coaching Reserve a half-hour or one-hour session with a volunteer computer coach to teach you basic computer or internet skills like how to search the web, set up free email, apply for jobs online, and more. 1-5pm. Upper Level, S.B. Central Library, 40 E. Anapamu St. Free. Ages 18+. Call 564-5604. sbplibrary.org

—New York Daily News

7/24-7/25: Summer Kids Movies: Sing Watch a mouse, an elephant, a pig, a gorilla, and a punk-rock porcupine compete in the world’s greatest singing competition to help save a theater for Koala Buster Moon in this 2016 animated film. 10am. Paseo Nuevo Cinemas, 8 W. De la Guerra St. Rated PG. $2. metrotheatres.com/events

7/24: Music at the Ranch: Donna Greene & The Roadhouse Daddies Friends and neighbors are welcome to gather to picnic and enjoy some smoky jazz, dirty R&B, and feisty blues. Food trucks will have food for purchase. 5:30-7:30pm. Rancho La Patera & Stow House, 304 N. Los Carneros Rd., Goleta. Free. Call 681-7216.

Wear your Best

50's Outfit

Opening Night

July 13

goletahistory.org/music-at-the-ranch

7/24: Tech Tasting Sample some of the awesome tech that the library has to offer in a relaxed atmosphere. Food and wine will be available for purchase. Tech paired with food paired with wine — what a combo!

7/25:

The Musical Book, lyrics and music by JIM JACOBS and WARREN CASEY Directed by KATIE LARIS | Musical Direction by DAVID POTTER Choreography by CHRISTINA MCCARTHY

www.theatregroupsbcc.com

805.965.5935

PREVIEWS JULY 11 & 12 Thank you to our season sponsor:

LIVE CAPTIONING Sun. July 15 @ 2pm



GARVIN THEATRE | SBCC WEST CAMPUS 34

THE INDEPENDENT

COURTESY

JULY 13-28

JULY 19, 2018

INDEPENDENT.COM

Fundraiser

Volunteer Opportunity

Henry Kapono Ka’aihue, Johnny Valentine Grammy-

nominated Hawaiian music icon Henry Kapono Ka’aihue will showcase all the classics as well as songs from his new album, Welcome 2 My Paradise! Hawaiian singer and guitar player Johnny Valentine will welcome the crowd with his favorite songs. 8pm. SOhO Restaurant & Music Club, 1221 State St. $17$20.Call 962-7776. sohosb.com

Civil Discourse

Protest


WEEK 6:30-8:30pm. Municipal Winemakers, 22 Anacapa St. Free. Email julie@potek. com. municipalwinemakers.com

WEDNESDAY 7/25 7/25: Free Summer Cinema: Fantastic Mr. Fox This 2009 American stop-motion animated comedy film is based on Roald Dahl’s children’s novel of the same name about a fox who steals food each night from three nasty and wealthy farmers and what they do to try and stop him. 7:30pm. Campbell Hall, UCSB. Free. Rated PG. Call 893-3535.

Animated Nights

Free Summer Cinema Premier Sponsor: Sponsor:

7/25: Solvang Summer Concert Series: Cadillac Angels Get ready

for some American rockabilly blues from the Cadillac Angels. Pick up food from nearby restaurants or food trucks. Bring blankets, chairs, and picnics. 5-8pm. Solvang Park, First St. and Hwy. 246, Solvang. Free. Email solvang3rd wednesday@gmail.com.

tinyurl.com/SolvangSummer Concerts

Wallace & Gromit

The Curse of the Were-Rabbit Fri, July 20 / 8:30 PM / Under the stars at the SB County Courthouse Sunken Garden 6:30-8:00 PM / Fiesta Stage: Create your own clay figure and use stop motion apps to record your own stop motion vignette.

artsandlectures.ucsb.edu

7/25: smART Talk: Michael Matheson Michael Matheson, who discovered his passion for printmaking while studying at SBCC and now manages the woodshop at the Department of Art at UCSB and curates art shows at The French Press, will speak about his work, which combines historical references to folk art, Americana, and popular culture in large woodblock prints and more. 6-7pm. Breakfast Culture Club, 711 Chapala St. Free. Call 966-5373 to RSVP.

tinyurl.com/smARTTalkMatheson

Fridays!

FARMERS

MARKET

SCHEDULE THURSDAY Carpinteria: 800 block of Linden Ave., 3-6:30pm

Wed, July 25 / 7:30 PM / UCSB Campbell Hall Fri, July 27 / 8:30 PM / Under the stars at the SB County Courthouse Sunken Garden Films presented by:

FRIDAY

Montecito: 1100 and 1200 blocks of Coast Village Rd., 8-11:15am

SATURDAY

Downtown S.B.: Corner of Santa Barbara and Cota sts., 8:30am-1pm

SUNDAY

Arts & Lectures CorporateSeason Sponsor: Media Sponsors:

Live set by DJ Darla Bea before the Friday screening

Bring blankets, a picnic, and your friends!

Special thanks to Santa Barbara County Parks, the Community Services Department of Santa Barbara County and Big Green Cleaning Company. Films at UCSB presented with support from the UCSB Summer Cultural and Enrichment Program and the Freshman Summer Start Program. Fiesta Stage activity courtesy of the Santa Barbara Public Library.

(805) 893-3535 / www.ArtsAndLectures.UCSB.edu Goleta Old Town Community Association & Goleta Valley Community Center present

Goleta: Camino Real Marketplace, 10am-2pm

TUESDAY

Old Town S.B.: 500-600 blocks of State St., 4-7:30pm

WEDNESDAY

7/25: Annette McGivney Author Annette McGivney will speak on her book, Pure Land: A True Story of Three Lives, Three Cultures, and the Search for Heaven, which is part true crime and part memoir and tells the gripping story of Tomomi Hanamure, a Japanese citizen who was killed as she hiked to Havasu Falls in 2006 by a distressed 18-year-old Havasupai youth. 6:30-8pm. Faulkner Gallery, S.B. Central Library, 40 E. Anapamu St. Free. Call 564-5621.

sbplibrary.org

Solvang: Copenhagen Dr. and 1st St., 2:30-6:30pm

FISHERMAN’S MARKET SATURDAY

Rain or shine, meet local fishermen on the Harbor’s commercial pier, and buy fresh fish (filleted or whole), live crab, abalone, sea urchins, and more. 117 Harbor Wy., 6-11am. Call 259-7476. cfsb.info/sat

We invite you to pick up dinner from our local restaurants and enjoy a picnic and concert at the Gazebo!

JULY 25 RICK REEVES BAND AUG 8 THE GROOVELINE AUG 22 THE RINCONS INDEPENDENT.COM

JULY 19, 2018

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35


2018 SUMMER FESTIVAL JUN 18-AUG 11 | SANTA BARBARA Takács Quartet

Elim Chan

Simon Keenlyside

SAT, JUL 21 7:30 PM

TUE , JUL 24 7:30 PM

WED, JUL 25 7:30 PM

ACADEMY FESTIVAL ORCHESTRA

FESTIVAL ARTISTS SERIES

SIMON KEENLYSIDE BARITONE

GRANADA THEATRE

LOBERO THEATRE

TCHAIKOVSKY’S SOUVENIR DE FLORENCE WITH THE TAKÁCS QUARTET

HOLST’S THE PLANETS Elim Chan conductor, London Symphony Orchestra guest artist

TICKETS & FULL SCHEDULE musicacademy.org

Community Corporate Sponsor

with MARTIN KATZ PIANO HAHN HALL MOSHER GUEST ARTIST RECITAL Works by Schubert, Wolf, Ravel & more Festival Sponsor

Women’s Auxiliary of the Music Academy of the West

Academy Festival Orchestra series supported by Mary Lynn and Warren Staley and Montecito Bank and Trust Mosher series supported by the Samuel B. and Margaret C. Mosher Foundation Festival Artists Series supported by Linda and Michael Keston

2 AUG 10 AM

CHANGE your WORLD by ASKING FOUR SIMPLE QUESTIONS.

LIVE at Home with Byron Katie Attend in person or join our live webcast D O N AT I O N S W E L C O M E

Thurs., 2 Aug. 2018 at 10 a.m. 213 N. Montgomery St. OJAI, CA

Register at the door OR Attend online: events.thework.com/sbi2a © 2018 Byron Katie International, Inc. All rights reserved. thework.com photo: Rick Rusing

36

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JULY 19, 2018

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C AROLINA STARIN

Fashion

living p. 37

Does a

Body Good

PAUL WELLMAN

Kids

Kim Leung

P GIVING BACK: Ian Bentley (above) and his wife, Brittany, opened a leather goods factory in Ethiopia that employs women, many of them young mothers, attempting to escape lives of prostitution.

Family and Justice Fuel Parker Clay

The couple quickly saw an opportunity to merge their business talents with the women’s artisanal skills. “A lot of the women wanted to use the gifts that they had,” he said of their handcrafts. “There’s this dignity piece to it.” The Bentleys began intercepting raw Ethiopian leather bound for the highend Italian market and built a leather goods factory partially run by women in the Ellilta program, providing them fair wages, pensions, vacations, and transportation. “The people behind our products mean so much to us,” Bentley said. “That has to be the integrity that we stand on.” Through Parker Clay (parkerclay.com), the Bentleys connected their workers with Western design trends to bring the company’s products to fashion markets around the world. The couple went on to adopt a second daughter in Ethiopia, and then moved back to Santa Barbara in 2014 when their eldest daughter began having seizures and needed surgery for a brain tumor. “It was a curveball,” said Bentley. “But it’s turned out to be a cool thing because it’s given us an opportunity to share and spread our work with Parker Clay.” He still frequently returns to Ethiopia to manage their factory and is now investing in a second factory to keep pace with product demand — which retails mostly online direct to consumers— and further his work with women at risk. Parker Clay has drawn support from celebrities who love the company’s fashionable handbags and hope to join its cause. Whoopi Goldberg just named the company one of her “favorite things” on ABC’s The View. Now Bentley is set to present his story at TEDxSanta Barbara on September 8. —Carolina Starin COURTESY

T

he story behind Parker Clay’s stylish leather goods and woven textiles started with a concern for family and blossomed into a passion for humanitarian justice. “I love my kids,” said Ian Bentley of his five children. He cofounded and runs Parker Clay with his wife, Brittany Bentley, whom he met at Dos Pueblos High School. “I think that is a big part of our brand’s DNA.” After the birth of their two sons, Parker and Clay, the couple began considering growing their family through adoption. “We started paying more attention, and we found there are millions of kids orphaned around the world,” said Ian Bentley. “It really kind of smacked us one day, and I couldn’t even function well.” The Bentleys went on to adopt their first daughter from Ethiopia and fell deeply in love with not just her but also the country and people. “It was a life-changing experience for us,” he said of their travels. “It’s a beautiful culture. The people are so caring, and yet there are so many challenges.” In 2012, after asking themselves what they could do to help, the Bentleys sold everything and bought oneway tickets to Africa. “It was crazy,” Bentley admitted of their family’s move to Ethiopia without having a concrete vision of their mission. However, they knew of the nonprofit organization Ellilta International, which works with Ethiopian women to break the generational cycle of prostitution. “We saw that as a significant issue,” Bentley said of the estimated 150,000 women working in prostitution in the capital of Addis Ababa, many of whom are struggling young moms. “They are brave, and they will do anything and everything to support their kids, but they don’t want to be in those positions.”

izza, hamburgers, nachos, and chicken tenders remain the kids’ go-to food choices, but Kim Leung is on a mission to change that at Goleta schools. Clocking in to her second year as the district’s food services director, Leung (pronounced lee·ung) is a registered dietician who grew up in Oregon. She spent hours at a very young age chopping green beans for her mother’s restaurant, and it took a while before she could bear to eat them. This could explain how she intuits so well the tasty sauces that kids love — as on the chipotle bean salsa salad she introduced last year and a kale salad whose honeysesame dressing was a hit: “The 5th graders were competing to see who could eat the most!” she said in wonderment. With new equipment — two gigantic cooking pots, a huge tilting frying pan, and a refrigerator-sized oven — purchased by the school board this year, Leung just needs a head chef to keep her scratchcooking program growing.“Nowhere else in the food industry can you have a job that lets you off at 2:30 in the afternoon,” she exclaimed,“and you never have to work nights or holidays!” Leung’s kitchen also won grants of more than $300,000 for stategrown foods, equipment, and nutrition education. Another grant kickstarts the district’s “cooked from scratch” program for its nine schools. Visiting the main kitchen on Fairview Avenue is an annual field trip for several classes, which gives the kids a chance to learn about foods and Leung a chance to try out recipes or new vegetables.“We do fun things, like using our senses: What does it smell like, feel like?” she said. “Are you brave enough to lick it?” During the school year, her kitchen feeds about 2,000 kids daily, and Leung constructs menus monthly, keeping nutrition and wellness in mind and also exposing the children to new foods, such as kale chips and quinoa bowls. “We are definitely cooking up change!” she said. The black-bean brownie recipe below is a case in point. Leung pointed out that whole-grain and whole-wheat items are part of a perfectly healthy meal, as well as meat and eggs, but the recipe is another way to open the students’ eyes to alternatives. For Leung, avoiding highly processed foods is the alternative she wants to give Goleta’s schoolchildren. — Jean Yamamura

Fudgy Black-Bean Brownies 1½ cups canned black beans 2 tbsp unsweetened cocoa powder ½ cup rolled oats ¼ tsp salt ⅓ cup honey 2 tbsp sugar 1¼ cup vegetable oil 2 tsp vanilla ½ tsp baking powder ½ cup semi-sweet chocolate chips

Preheat oven to 350°F. Food-process black beans until completely smooth. Combine all ingredients well. Stir in most chocolate chips. Pour into 13″x9″or 8″x8″pan. Sprinkle remaining chips on top. Bake 15-18 minutes. Let cool 15 minutes. Refrigerate for a firmer texture. Makes 24 small portions. INDEPENDENT.COM

JULY 19, 2018

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37


Bank on better. When you know your bankers and they know you, solutions happen.

Business Banking | Personal Banking | Business Loans | Residential Lending

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JULY 19, 2018

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Santa Barbara

Montecito

Goleta


FOOD&DRINK

p.39 PAUL WELLMAN

al fres co

Locally Owned and Operated

www.santacruzmarkets.com

By the bag

BEEF TRI TIP $

2

59

Chicken

PASILLA CHILES

98¢ lb.

99¢ lb.

DRUMSTICKS

SANTA BARBARA 324 W. Montecito St

Boneless Beef

BANANASMANGOS

LONG GRA

49

¢ 2/$1.00lb.

RIB EYE STEAKS

$8.99 lb.

lb.

Mahatma 2#

$

1

7#

RUSSET POTATOESMESQUITE PINEAPPLES (5# bag) LEG QUARTERS SPARE RIBS $ Chicken

Pork

AL FRESCO FUN: Kacey House and Michael Blackwell combine creative dishes and great drinks on a hotel roof in Goleta.

Rooftop Bistro & Bar 69 Fills Goleta Niche Views, Chews, Brews, and More Atop the Hilton Garden Inn

G

oleta lives up to its “Good Land”

moniker with a burgeoning brewery scene, impressive cocktail spots, and tasty bites. But it can be difficult to find all of those things in one place. That’s where the new Rooftop Bar & Bistro atop the Hilton Garden Inn comes to the rescue, offering all of the above with an exciting wine list, expansive mountain views, and live music to boot. “That’s a niche we’ve been able to fill for the community,” said the bistro’s food and beverage director, Kacey House, “providing a full experience for guests.” Relaxing in their elegant yet comfortable rooftop lounge feels like sitting atop a cloud. The cozy couches and fireplaces, festive string lights, friendly service, and enticing menu could transport any UCSB grad student, start-up employee, or weary traveler far above the stresses of the day and into a heavenly respite. “Because it’s an independent concept up here, we have a lot of freedom to do what we want,” House explained. Putting that freedom to great use is Executive Chef Michael Blackwell, formerly of the Montecito Country Club, who’s cooked up a delicious menu of shareable plates, snacks, and entrées. During a recent visit, we started off with the crispy brussels sprouts topped with crushed pistachios and tangy Peppadew peppers, which were scattered atop a bed of curried yogurt for a refreshingly unique take on this modern favorite. The fried chicken and waffle

$ 99 99¢ ea.

TILAPIA FILET

FUJI APPLES

$2.98

89

El Pato 7 oz.

HOT TOMA

ROMA TOMATOES 69¢

5

sandwich featured Lay’s-potato-chiplb. lb. and-panko-crusted chicken wrapped in a cheddar-thyme waffle, with jalapeño Folgers 8 oz. lb. jam, arugula, and maple-bourbon baconlb. Santa Cruz ROMA TOMATOES served with a side of perfectly done fries. PORK CHORIZO And the empanada trio proved a very fun Thin sliced and shareable plate, showcasing a rotatlb. lb. ing selection of meats and vegetarian fillings wrapped in house-made dough Springfield 15 o SANTA BARBARA and complemented with the flavor kick 57 324 W. Montecito St LARGE SHRIMP FRESH CORN of a fresh chimichurri. That sauce is so lb. lb. good that I recommend slathering it on Mahatma 2# By the bag anything from the menu. Their extensive Santa cocktail list features Cruz lb. $ the expected classics, as well as custom lb. Springfield 8 oz creations such as their Piñas y Piñas, an Aquafina (1 ltr.) Springfieldlb.(1#) 7# original take on the “spicy marg” with Chicken WATER BUTTER tequila, fresh pineapple, lime, jalapeño, lb. and agave syrup. I was entranced by thelb. $ wine list, a thoughtful exploration of wines mostly created within 150 miles lb. ea. El Pato 7 oz. of Goleta. I highly enjoyed Brave & Minute Maid 59 Sun Vista (40 oz.) Hidden Valley (24 oz.) Maiden’s Union red blend from the Santa Ynez Valley and also tried Aaron’s Sand PINTO BEANS RANCH DRESSING & Stone Rhône blend. Thanks to their Folgers 8 oz. ea. lb. Coravin system, the Rooftop staff canlb. lb. pour pricier wines without pulling the www.santacruzmarkets.com cork. Said House, “We can access whatwww.santacruzmarkets.com Thin sliced $ Zulka (2#) Celeste (Asst.) would be really expensive wine by the glass.” Springfield 15 oz. CANE SUGAR By the bag FROZEN PIZZA By the bag Their craft beers are mostly from BANANAS BANANAS LONG GRAIN RICE LONG GRAIN RICE BEEF TRI TIPCaliBEEF TRI TIP ¢ lb. ¢ 99 $ lb. 49 $ 59 favorites 49DAYS $199 $ 59 fornia, featuring neighborhood 2 2 EFFECTIVE 7 FULL LIMITED TO STOCK ON 1 HAND • PRICES ChickenFatty’s, and like M.Special and Captain Chicken MESQUITE CHARCOAL MESQUITE CHARCOAL Santa Cruz PINEAPPLES PINEAPPLES FROM OCTOBER NOVEMBER 2ND QUARTERS $ 27TH LEG QUARTERS $ 89 289 THROUGH happy hour is becomingLEG quite 2 $ 99 $ 99 ¢ popular, ¢ 1 1 69 El Pato 7 oz. 69 Springfield 8 oz. El Pato 7 oz. as are the live music nights on Thursday, Philadelphia (8 oz.) HOT TOMATO SAUCE HOT TOMATO SAUCE PORK BUTT ¢ ROMA TOMATOES PORK BUTT ¢ ROMA TOMATOES Friday, and Saturday.“This has definitely 59 59 $ 59 CREAM $ 59 CHEESE TUB lb. 89 ¢ INSTANT COFFEE lb. 1 ” House 89 ¢ INSTANT COFFEE 1 turned into a locals’ hangout, $ Thin sliced $ 89 Thin sliced 89 $ said. 5 FUJI APPLES 5 FUJI APPLES CARNE RANCHERA CARNE RANCHERA $ sunset $ 98 As I sipped my wine, the 89 ¢ PEAS & CARROTS Minute Maid 59 o 89 ¢ PEAS & CARROTS 598 lit up 5 ¢ ¢ 89 Santa Cruz the mountains in a dusky glow, friends MEDIUM YAMS 89 Santa Cruz MEDIUM YAMS PORK CHORIZO PORK CHORIZO SANTA BARBARA got up to dance to the bluegrass of ¢ GOLETA SANTA BARBARA $ SANTA 49 tunes WHIP TOPPING $ 49 GOLETA BARBARA 59 ¢ WHIP TOPPING 59 $ 2 lb. $ 49 2 $ ea. 324 W. Montecito St 5757 Hollister Ave Ave 5757 Hollister W. Montecito 1 324 W. Montecito St the Bryan Titus Trio, and324 others snug- St 149 PORK CHOPS HEAD LETTUCE PORK CHOPS HEAD LETTUCE gled closer to the fireplaces. I couldn’t JUICE By the bag ORANGE JUICE Mahatma 2# $ the ¢ $ 98 Mahatma 2# By 79 ¢ ORANGENow $ 89 198bag 79daily $ 89 1 fresh bread 3 help but plot my next trip back into the featuring from 3 LONG GR LONG fresh GRAIN RICE Now featuring fresh bread daily from daily from dreamy realm of The Rooftop. ¢ ¢Now featuring La Bella Bakery La Bella Rosa Bakery $ La Rosa Bella Rosa Bakery 99 $ bread

6878 Hollister Ave., Goleta; 562-5996; hiltongardeninn.hilton.com

$

159

¢

INSTANT C

www.santacruzmarkets.com

FOOD & DRINK

BY REBECCA HORRIGAN

PORK BUTT

1

$1.98 lb.

¢lb.

79¢ $2.49 FUJI APPLES CARNE RANCHERA ¢ $ 98

5

BEEF TRI TIP $5.98

BANANAS 3/$1.00

LEG QUARTERS

PINEAPPLES

PORK CHORIZO 2 $

$

2

49

PEAS & CA

MEDIUM YAMS 49

59

8 1

LONG GRAIN

¢

59$¢ 99 WHIP TOP$2

MESQUITE C

99¢

$3.99 69 ¢

1

1

HOT TOMATO HEAD LETTUCE PORK BUTT ROMA TOMATOES J ¢ ¢ ORANGE59 $ 59 7989 INSTANT CO$ 1 $2.19 $4.29

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198

APPLES CARNE fresh RANCHERA Now featuring breadFUJI daily from 98 Rosa Bakery La$5 Bella 89 ¢ GOLETA 5757 Hollister Ave

SANTA BARBARA 324 W. Montecito St

Mahatma 2#

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lb.

$1.49

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ea.

lb.

lb.

$

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Folgers 8 oz.

lb.

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ea.

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1

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$

259

ea.

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LEG QUARTERS ¢

By the bag

59 249

BANANAS ea.

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TO STOCK ON HAND • PRICES EFFECTIVE 7 FULL DAYS LIMITED TO STOCKlb. ONLIMITED HAND • PRICES EFFECTIVE 7 FULL DAYS FROM OCTOBER 27TH THROUGH NOVEMBER 2ND lb. FROM OCTOBER 27TH NOVEMBER7 2ND LIMITED STOCK ON HAND •THROUGH PRICES EFFECTIVE FULL DAYS

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Mission Street Featuring Mission Street I c e C r e a m & Yo g u r t

McCONNELL’S FINE ICE CREAMS

Featuring

COURTESY PHOTOS

I c e C r e a m & Yo g u r t

McCONNELL’S FINE ICE CREAMS

Voted BEST Ice Cream & Yogurt Store for 30 YEARS! Voted BEST Ice Cream & Yogurt Store for 30 YEARS!

201 West Mission Santa Barbara- Outdoor 805.569.2323 Generous PortionsSt., - Free Parking Patio Convenient Location 201 West Mission St., Santa Barbara

MILPAS MOO: Santa Barbara’s Old Dairy is instantly recognized by the iconic cow on the roof.

805.569.2323

McConnell’s

Yanni’s Greek & American Deli

Serving the Funk Zone

Serving Santa Barbara for 32 Years! Famous Gyros & Tri-tip Full Service Deli Catering

3102 State Street • 682-2051

JOIN US HAPPY HOUR!

for Our Award-Winning

Voted the BEST 8 years in a row!

Monday-Friday: 4-8pm Sunday: 5pm-close 225 State Street • 805-962-3313 www.enterprisefishco.com Parking available at Rey Rd./Montecito St. 40

THE INDEPENDENT

JULY 19, 2018

INDEPENDENT.COM

FOOD & DRINK

Located at MacKenzie Market

R

eaders PK, Molly, and Cris let me know that McConnell’s Fine Ice Creams opened their second downtown dessert destination on July 12 at 120 State Street, directly across the street from Rusty’s Pizza on the edge of the Funk Zone. This “junior” location offers 16 flavors, compared to the 32 flavors at 728 State Street, their flagship location. Creative director Tom Stanley says they were approached by the Hotel Californian two years ago about bringing their HISTORY: Built in 1934, The Old Dairy was the largest of 10 family-run dairies that famous ice cream to lower State once operated in downtown Santa Barbara. Street, so the space was built for them. Patio seating will be added in the near future. MIZZA OPENS DOWNTOWN: Proprietor Brendan McConnell’s Fine Ice Creams was founded Searls recently opened Mizza, an Italian resby husband and wife Gordon “Mac” and Ernes- taurant, at 1112 State Street, the former home teen McConnell in Santa Barbara in 1949 with of La Arcada Bistro, Café Shell, and Barcliff & the goal of producing “the finest ice creams in Bair. A longtime Santa Barbara restaurateur, the world.” Mac and Ernie spent months devel- Searls has owned (and since sold or divested oping their own recipes and opened their first from) Video Shmideo in Victoria Court, Bogshop in December 1950. It was an immediate art’s in La Arcada, Padaro Beach Grill in Carsuccess and quickly became a Santa Barbara pinteria, Dargan’s Irish Pub on Ortega Street, institution. For more than a decade, customers and three regional Brendan’s Irish Pub & Reslined up for Mac & Ernie’s ice creams at the taurants. Searls currently owns Pizza Mizza in store’s original location on Mission and State La Cumbre Plaza and Viva Modern Mexican streets, where Garrett’s restaurant is now. in La Arcada, where Acapulco restaurant used In 1962, with Gordon’s passing, Ernesteen to be. “Our kitchen uses the freshest, locally sold McConnell’s to Jim and Jeney McCoy, who sourced produce,” says Searls, who, with his built on the legacy by expanding distribution wife, Kourtney, opened Mizza Artisan Pizza across Southern California and bought The Old & Italian Cuisine last month. “We make our Dairy on the Eastside in 1975. In 2012, McCo- pizza dough and pasta fresh daily. We smoke nnell’s was purchased by Michael Palmer and our chicken and salmon and only use freeEva Ein, who employed dairy industry veteran range chicken, sustainably farmed fish, and Charley Price to overhaul the old systems with USDA Choice Harris Ranch beef. All our state-of-the-art equipment. In 2013, the flagship sauces and dressing are made from scratch. McConnell’s Fine Ice Creams store opened on Real whole food — from our kitchen to you!” Call 883-3935 or visit mizzasb.com. State Street.

John Dickson’s reporting can be found every day online at SantaBarbara.com. Send tips to info@SantaBarbara.com.


PAUL WELLMAN FILE PHOTO

Sip This

efore there was M.Special’s tangerine-tastic

25% OFF HANA KITCHEN SANTA BARBARA

brewing duo concocted a Belgian-style witbier, typically spiced with orange peels and coriander. But they added ginger, cardamom, cinnamon, and peppercorns, which are the ingredients found in chicken jalfrezi, Hawking’s favorite spicy Indian dish. The beer bursts with a bouquet of freshground cardamom (sourced from State Street’s Vices & Spices) yet remains savory, not sweet. It would pair wonderfully with either BrewCo’s maple-glazed salmon or The Brewhouse’s apricot-chipotle-glazed pork chop. Take a sip at S.B. BrewCo (501 State St.) and The Brewhouse (229 W. Montecito St.) while supplies last! — Brian Yaeger

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PAID

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To include your listing for under $20 a week, contact sales@independent.com or call 965-5205.

AMERICAN LITTLE KITCHEN, 17 W. Ortega St. (805) 770-2299. “Great little neighborhood café!” Healthy, comfortable, and affordable. Lunch-Dinner-Late Night. Organic chicken and hormone/antibiotic-free burgers, local produce. Try the Chicken Tikka Masala, vegetarian options. Great local wine list and craft beers. www.littlekitchensb.com ETHIOPIAN AUTHENTIC ETHIOPIAN cuisine Featured at Petit Valentien Restaurant 1114 State St. #14, 805-966-0222. Serkaddis Alemu offers an ever changing menu with choices of vegetarian, vegan, and meat options. Catering Avaliable for parties of up to 40 people. Sat/Sun lunch 11:30-2:30

IRISH DARGAN’S IRISH Pub & Restaurant, 18 E. Ortega St. (next to lot 10) SB, 568-0702. $$. Open 7 days 11:30a-Close (Food ‘til 10p, 11p on Sat/Sun). AE MC V Disc. Authentic

MEDITERRANEAN FOXTAIL KITCHEN 14 E. Cota St. Tue-Sat 12pm-12am, Open Late Night. Happy Hour $5 any craft beer 2pm-6pm. Lebanese cuisine, great cocktails, American burgers , vegan falafel, or try red falafel wrap, order online. www.foxtailsb.com

503 State St. Santa Barbara , CA 93101 Follow Us

Isla Vista Lompoc 888 Embarcadero Del Norte 1413 North H Street Buellton 205 East Hwy 246

NORTHERN EUROPEAN

ANDERSEN’S DANISH Restaurant & Bakery. 1106 State St., 805-962-5085. Open Daily 8am-9pm. Family owned for over 42 years. Northern European Cuisine with California Infusion. Fresh scratch made pasteries & menu’s everyday. Authentic Breakfasts, Lunches & Dinners. Happy Hour menu with equisite wines & beers, 3-7pm everyday. High Tea served everyday starting at 2pm. Huge Viking Mimosa’s & Champagne Cocktails. Private Event spaces. STEAK RODNEY’S Grill, 633 East Cabrillo Boulevard at The Fess Parker – A Doubletree by Hilton Resort 805-564-4333. Serving 5pm -10pm Tuesday through Saturday. Rodney’s Grill is a fresh American grill experience. Enjoy all natural hormone-free beef, locally-sourced seafood, appetizers, and incredible desserts. The place to enjoy dinner with family and friends by the beach. Private Dining Room for 30. Full cocktail bar with specialty cocktails. Wine cellar with Santa Barbara County & California’s best vintages by-the-glass. VEGAN MEXICAN TACO TUYO offers amazing food that people of all diets will enjoy, whether you are herbivore, omnivore, locavore, or who-cares-ivore. Mexican vegan food is a great way to know, by experience, that vegan isn’t bland, but rather healthful and even crave worthy. Open Tues - Thurs 5-8pm, Fri 11:30-2pm, 5-8pm. 724 E. Haley, SB. 805.319.3627. Catering Available.

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INDIAN FLAVOR OF INDIA 3026 State 682-6561 $$ www. flavorofindiasb.com Finest, most authentic Indian cuisine is affordable too! All You Can Eat Lunch Buffet $10.95 M-S dinner combos $9.95+ Specials: Tandoori- Mixed or Fish, Chicken Tikka Masala, Shrimp Bhuna. Also: meat, curries & vegetarian.Wine & Beer. Take out. VOTED BEST for 20 YEARS!

Irish food & atmosphere in downtown SB. Specialties from Ireland include Seafood & Meat dishes. Informal, relaxed pub-style atmosphere. Live music Thursday nights. Children welcome. Avail. for private parties. Pool & Darts.

Excludes Taco Tuesday Pricing. In store only, no additional coupons will be accepted. Certain additional restrictions may apply. We have the right to change this promotion at any time. Not all stores may participate or may have varying conditions.

KS

EL

FRENCH PETIT VALENTIEN, 1114 State St. #14, 805-9660222. Open M-F 11:30-3pm (lunch). M-Sat 5pm-Close (dinner). Sun $25.50 four course prix fixe dinner. In La Arcada Plaza, Chef Robert Dixon presents classic French comfort food at affordable cost in this cozy gem of a restaurant. Petit Valentien offers a wide array of meat and seafood entrees along with extensive small plates and a wine list specializing in amazing quality at arguably the best price in town. A warm romantic atmosphere makes the perfect date spot. Comfortable locale for dinner parties, or even just a relaxing glass of wine. Reservations are recommended.

3 PM - 5:30 PM

Pete Johnson

13

Guide

All Purchases

Dining Out Guide

DINING OUT

HAPPY HOUR SUMMER SPECIAL

FOOD & DRINK •

Sabado Tarde, before there was Topa Topa’s hop-powered Chief Peak IPA, and even before Telegraph opened pre–Funk Zone, the 805 was nearly bereft of breweries. In fact, when the Santa Barbara Brewing Company (BrewCo) opened in 1995, it beat Firestone Walker to market by a year. BrewCo introduced craft beer to 21-year-olds undertaking the State Street crawl whose birthday bashes had previously only consisted of comped Jägerbombs and Flaming Dr. Peppers. Within a couple of years, The Brewhouse opened on Montecito, causing some to wonder whether this town was big enough for two, count ’em two, brewpubs. Time-warp to present-day S.B., home to a dozen breweries/tasting rooms by year’s end. While beer lovers will welcome Modern Times’ dank IPAs and roasty stouts and Institution Ale’s Mosaic Pale Ale, BrewCo and The Brewhouse aren’t letting their age—or a kitchen fire—keep them from their deserving spot in our beersoaked sandbox. Earlier this year, as The Brewhouse reopened from said fire, BrewCo’s Dave “Zambo” Szamborski and Brewhouse’s Pete “Hop Duvel” Johnson — both veterans of the science sector and avowed space geeks—put their heads together to come up with the perfect homage to the late astrophysicist, Stephen Hawking. For the man who explained the cosmos to millions, the star

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EMAIL: ARTS@INDEPENDENT.COM

MOON DIVER TO RELEASE DEBUT EP “

I

FORMER GHOST TIGER MEMBERS ARE BACK WITH NEW BAND AND SOUND LEELA CYD

t’s all about taking that leap,” said singer/guitarist Alixandra Macmillan-Fiedel of her new music project, Moon Diver. The idea of taking bold risks extends far beyond the name; it was an integral part of the band’s process in creating its captivating debut EP, Laze. Macmillan-Fiedel, Chris Norlinger (vocals, guitar, bass), Chris Nava (keys, synth), and Maxx Farris (drums) started their project in 2016 by building their own studio, writing songs, self-producing, and fine-tuning their sound all before playing a live show. “Allowing ourselves the time to discover the sound of the project resulted in a much more collaborative writing process, with Chris Norlinger and myself both writing songs and cowriting some tunes as well (‘Feathers,’ ‘Wand,’ ‘Perennials’). The sound is more To hear Moon Diver’s music, modern, edgier, and driven,” see moondivermusic.com. Macmillan-Fiedel said. For information on the July 26 Macmillan-Fiedel and event at Sama Sama, Norlinger, who are a couple, see nightout.com/ were formerly in the Santa events/moondiver. Barbara indie-rock band Ghost Tiger. After three of FROM LEFT: Maxx Farris, Alixandra Macmillan-Fiedel, Chris Norlinger, and Chris Nava the original members dropped out at the end of 2014, Farris joined as drummer, and the group continued under the same name and Norlinger wrote their new single “El Santa Barbarans will get to celebrate style. However, the group realized they were Camino” after the passing of his father. The Moon Diver’s debut as a band at a summer moving in a new musical direction, so with song hypnotizes with driving guitar and party at Sama Sama on July 26. Party Proper the addition of keys player Chris Nava, they emotionally raw lyrics. “Our songs are a Productions will be throwing the event, so evolved into Moon Diver in 2016, entrench- marriage of vulnerable lyrics and textured in addition to Moon Diver’s first-ever live ing themselves in experimenting, writing, soundscapes,” Macmillan-Fiedel said. performance of Laze, guests can plan on The EP boasts a diverse range of tracks, groovy sets by DJ Persian House Cat openand demoing all-new material. Laze, which debuts digitally (Spotify, highlighting the richness of a collaborative ing and closing the night, cocktails, and free iTunes, etc.) July 23, is a propulsive collec- recording process. “Wand,” a sexy, synth- bites from local vendors. “It’s going to be a tion of beautifully produced songs that soar laden single, purrs with catchy vocals and magical night of celebration,” Macmillanon the wings of layered synths, a beat-heavy a new-wave vibe, while “Firefly” embarks Fiedel said. The band plans to tour in the near future rhythm section, driving guitar, and powerful on a dreamy path of empowerment, gifting in order to share its songs with a wider audivocals expressing a range of emotions.“A lot golden lines such as “You broke me open, but of the songs on Laze touch on themes of loss I found buried treasure.” ence. “As of now we are putting together and separation, as well as discovering your Farris’s friend Daniel Good, a live and stu- some local shows, and we’re taking the time own voice,” Macmillan-Fiedel said of their dio mixing engineer whose impressive cli- to curate them and make them feel really lyrical inspiration.“This isn’t a huge surprise ent list includes artists such as Nick Murphy special,” Macmillan-Fiedel said. If the textured sound and detail-oriented when you look at some of the events that (Chet Faker) and Surfer Blood, put the final production evident in Laze are any indicatouched all of our lives in the past couple touches on their debut, mixing and masof years, with Chris Norlinger’s dad passing tering the songs into a cohesive and clear tion, Moon Diver’s show should be just as away and Maxx’s job as a lighting designer product.“His great work with the mix really rich, meaningful, and deep an experience as (Tycho, Blood Orange) taking him on the finished off the sound of the EP, and we listening to its stellar new EP. road for months,” Macmillan-Fiedel said. couldn’t be happier,” said Macmillan-Fiedel. — Rebecca Horrigan

POET LAUREATE NOMINATIONS California’s poet laureate, Dana Gioia, is completing his two-year appointment at the end of this year, and the California Arts Council (CAC) has put out a call for nominees for the next term, 2019-2021. The duties of the poet laureate, as described on CAC’s website, “include advocating for poetry in classrooms and boardrooms across the state, to inspire an emerging generation of literary artists, and to educate all Californians about the many poets and authors who

have influenced our great state through creative literary expression.” Nominees must already be recognized for their work and considered a poet of stature and “willing to undertake a specific project that shall last through the term, agreed to by the California Poet Laureate and the Arts Council.” For more information, see cac.ca.gov/initiatives/pl.php or email poetlaureate@arts.ca.gov. — Michelle Drown

L I F E PAGE 42

“Read 2” by Kenton Nelson

L.A. IN S.B.

Works of art by masters of the Los Angeles modern art scene are currently on view at Sullivan Goss, An American Gallery (11 E. Anapamu St.) in the second installment of L.A. in S.B. The showing features more than 15 artists from the contemporary and postwar period, including Ed Ruscha, David Hockney, Patssi Valdez, and Ken Price. Betye Saar’s 1976 lithograph “Keep for Old Memoirs” is an intimate gem. The black-and-white work depicts an assemblage of torn photographs, a feather, and a stuffed bird placed on top of various textiles. Known for her exploration of African-American culture in politically charged works of art, Saar turned her focus during this period to more nostalgic creations that pulled from her own family history. Reflective and ethereal, the work also integrates Saar’s fascination with African-American folk and shamanistic traditions. Contemporary artist Dave Lefner’s linocut playfully explores Spam’s iconic food can. Depicting a colorful rendition of the tin underneath a riff of its logo featuring a neon sign, the work is an example of Lefner’s conflation of pop art and advertising. Influenced by sign painting, Southern California’s urban landscape, and car culture, Lefner’s work harks back to early paintings by Ed Ruscha and John Baldessari — continuing the conversation about pop art across generations of Los Angeles artists. While some works are surprises from the likes of Ynez Johnston, Leonard Edmondson, and Kenton Nelson, others, such as a Frank Gehry chair drawing, are instantly recognizable. Together, the pieces are a modest but fine grouping of important artists from Los Angeles who helped define the region’s history. L.A. in S.B. II is on view through August 19. — Rachel Heidenry

M O R E A R T S & E N T E R TA I N M E N T > > > 42

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JULY 19, 2018

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a&e | CLASSICAL REVIEW

LOOKING AT THE

MUSIC ACADEMY OF THE WEST

Chi-chi Nwanoku

T

his Music Academy of the West season, off to Wind Serenade in E-flat Major, K. 375 by Wolfgang an exciting start, can be appreciated from more Amadeus Mozart as the final work in a sequence that angles than ever before. Here are four ways of included the early 20th-century French neoclassilooking at the Music Academy, or MAW, suggested cism of Francis Poulenc; the edgy, late 20th-century neoromanticism of Polish composer Krzysztof Pendby events held thus far this summer. The season began with the academy serving as erecki; and Failing: a very difficult piece for solo string a site for cultural leaders to meet and discuss the bass, a witty piece by Tom Johnson from 1975 that future of music. Now in its second year, the MAW’s includes a spoken-word element. Classical Evolution/Revolution conference on June The Poulenc, scored for oboe, bassoon, and piano, 22 addressed the theme of the “arts as the cultural introduced the evening’s main subject, which was the fabric of society.” To explore the challenging terrain many colors and textures of the wind instruments. In of access and diversity, organizers invited a range of Penderecki’s Quartet for Clarinet and Strings, faculty experts, from Los Angeles community theater mak- member Richie Hawley’s clarinet combined with ers to State Department officials. The presence and violin, viola, and cello to explore the outer limits of involvement of the winners of the academy’s inau- sound and technique. And finally, after Nico Abongural round of Alumni Enterprise dolo’s dexterous navigation of a Awards showed that this was more very difficult piece for solo string than just talk about change. bass, there was the Mozart, an In addition to the summer’s extravagant five-movement work major announcement of a new scored for eight wind instruments four-year partnership between the — two each of oboes, clarinets, Music Academy and the London bassoons, and horns. At this point, by Charles Donelan students and civilian audience Symphony Orchestra, there were other voices and perspectives members alike, steeped in the from around the world present at Evolution/Revolu- subsequent history of classical writing for winds, tion. Gillian Moore, director of music for London’s refreshed themselves at the source for 25 glorious Southbank Centre, moderated the panel on Gender minutes.  and Power Dynamics in Classical Music, and ChiA third way to look at the Music Academy unfolds chi Nwanoku, the founder and executive director every Saturday night in the splendor of the Granada, of Chineke! and a professor of double bass at the where the Academy Festival Orchestra (AFO) does its Royal Academy of Music, provided valuable insight thing. An exciting symphony orchestra with a rotating into the blind spots within existing classical music cast of distinguished conductors from on the podium, organizations.  the AFO always has a surprise or two in store. On SatChineke! is a British group that has the distinction urday, June 30, maestro Larry Rachleff drew out all the of being the first professional orchestra in Europe to nuances and set off all the fireworks in compositions be made up of black and minority ethnic musicians. by Hector Berlioz, Manuel de Falla, and Ludwig van It has only been around since 2015, and already one Beethoven. The latter’s Symphony No. 6 in F Major, of the group’s young members, cellist Sheku Kanneh- Op. 68 was particularly ravishing, with outstanding Mason, has become an international sensation, win- performances from the winds and brass.  Finally, a fourth aspect of the academy laid siege ning the BBC Young Musician award in 2016, going viral with a video of his performance at the 2017 BBC to the organization’s Miraflores location on Monday, Proms, and eventually earning an invitation from July 2, when performers in the vocal program staged Meghan Markle to perform at the recent royal wed- an OperaFest billed as a “campus takeover.” In pracding. Nwanoku’s extraordinary personal story and tice, this meant that several scenes, the majority of her tough-minded, honest critique of contemporary them drawn from very recent operas, were played attitudes within the classical music establishment in different locations both in and out of doors as the elicited heartfelt witness from several of the Music audience moved from one site to the next. After this Academy fellows in the audience. wild opening ride and a brief intermission, the comA second way to look at the academy is as a stage plete audience gathered in Hahn Hall, where maestro for experienced, world-class players to perform for an Edwin Outwater conducted an electrifying version audience that includes their students. On Tuesdays, of Leonard Bernstein’s short opera Trouble in Tahiti. we sit with the fellows at the Lobero as they listen to Judging by the terrific performances elicited by directheir teachers demonstrate where chamber music tor James Darrah in the campus takeover scenes, the performance is going. The concert on Tuesday, July 3, upcoming production of Mozart’s The Marriage of for example, presented the unusual and challenging Figaro on August 3 and 5 will be a can’t-miss event. n

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a&e | POP, ROCK & JAZZ PREVIEW

TOAD THE WET SPROCKET PLAYS THE LIBBEY BOWL

I

t’s no wonder why hometown hero Toad Our new song “California Wasted” is about the Wet Sprocket continues to enjoy suc- the contrast of living in a beautiful place and cess, nor why the band keeps coming back still not being happy, and asking yourself, — and come back it will, at Ojai’s Libbey “Why am I still not happy with all that beauty Bowl on Friday, July 20. With a multi-decade around me?” career that includes some That’s something I can relate of the most enduring cuts from the 1990s (soon to to, and something in Toad’s see a vinyl rerelease), the sound, with more pensive lyrthoughtful alt-rockers ics even if the song’s upbeat … quietly hold a place as one There’s always a balance, of the 805’s greatest conyou know. Two bands we tributions to rock music were very influenced by since the area code was growing up, The Cure and coined. I talked on the The Smiths, both marry by Richie DeMaria phone with bassist Dean a happier musical sound Dinning about the upcoming show, the sound with a more somber and even morose lyrical of Santa Barbara, and the band’s comforting tone; it’s that the music is deceptively happy. catalog. While it’s not necessarily a conscious choice on our part, it’s a quality that often carries What can fans expect from this set? We do about over. The music’s often cheerier than the lyr22 or 23 songs a night, and we have a very large ics, and it allows people to appreciate it on catalog. Believe it or not, there’s some things different levels. we either haven’t played at all or played very little or haven’t played for a number of years. Gratitude’s a frequent theme in the band’s songs. Last year, for the Coil 20th anniversary, I really What are you grateful about these days? I’m defifelt like we got the set really right in terms of nitely grateful for my family, and I’m grateful the balance of new and older material. We got to be a creator and have so many great opporinto a real groove last year. It had a sense of tunities. When I think of the fact that we still polish that it hadn’t had since when we were have an audience after all this time, and what doing a lot more in the ’90s. This time, we’re it takes to build an audience and keep an audipicking up where we left off, adding in songs ence and a community of people that want to from New Constellation that we did in 2013 hear this music and appreciate what we create and some other treats. We’re looking for an and what we say. Every year we go around, excuse to do something different every time. I’m continually amazed that it has lasted as long as it has. How would you say the Santa Barbara area shaped your sound? I think that where we come from Why should people go see Toad the Wet Sprocket in has a lot to do with how we sound. Take a song 2018? I think that we’ve got a great catalog, and like “Walk on the Ocean.” We’re coming from the songs are all very meaningful for people. Santa Barbara, which might just be the place … This year, I don’t feel like people need to where yacht rock was born. You got Kenny be stirred up or made angrier than they are Loggins singing songs about being on a sail- right now. I actually think what people need boat, David Crosby’s “Wooden Ships,” and is comforting: to put your arm around them all kinds of stuff. I wouldn’t necessarily lump and say,“It’s going to be okay, and we’re going us on a yacht-rock playlist, but some of the to make it.” To offer hope is a great thing, and songs in the Toad catalog could fit. It’s infused it’s one of the privileges of this job. Hopefully, by the ocean and the salt and the air and the people walk out just on a high that life is sunshine, in much the same way the climate good, that they had a great night and a great of Seattle influenced the grunge movement. experience.

TALKIN’ WITH DEAN DINNING ABOUT THE BAND’S SOUND, CATALOG, CAREER

Congratulations!

Thanks to all the contestants, sponsors, and attendees 44

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JULY 19, 2018

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4•1•1

Toad the Wet Sprocket plays Friday, July 20, 5 p.m., at the Libbey Bowl (210 S. Signal St., Ojai). Call (888) 645-5006 or see libbeybowl.com.


POP, ROCK & JAZZ

O

n Saturday, July 7, Goldenvoice presented myriad musicians for a celebration of freestyle, a dance and music genre that dominated clubs in New York and Miami in the 1980s. The capacity crowd at the Bowl made it clear that freestyle is still a nationwide pheAt the S.B. Bowl, nomenon. The lineup of this revuestyle concert featured the distinctive Sat., July 7. voices of Nu Shooz, Taylor Dayne, Stevie B, Lisa Lisa, Exposé, Debbie Deb, and The Jets. In its prime, freestyle energized dance floors through its vigorous electronic beats and upbeat tempos. This was certainly still true on Saturday night, with people rushing back from the concessions to dance to their favorite tunes.

REVIEWS 

FREESTYLE EXPLOSION

& ENTERTAINMENT

Even after 30 years of playing their hits, these artists still bring endless amounts of passion and enthusiasm to their performances, so much so that the crowd rose to their feet time after time, song after song. It was a unique experience in many ways: The atmosphere at the Bowl felt very nostalgic and emotional; several artists spoke of the gratitude they felt for the support they had received for their music over the years, and all were clearly moved to be playing for such a large and enthusiastic crowd. Dayne’s “Tell It to My Heart”— an anthem from that period — was received with screams of delight from fans. The audience, loyal supporters since the start, danced all night, escaping for a moment from their dayto-day troubles and reconnecting with their youth. — Maggie Newell

BOOKS

STAMPED FROM THE BEGINNING

I

wish every American would read Stamped from the Beginning by Ibram X. Kendi because our history as a nation cannot be fully understood without an understanding of racism. Racist ideas echo from the slave markets of Charleston, South Carolina, to the pulpits of New England churches; across the battlefields of the Civil War to Montgomery, Alabama, and the black ghettos of Chicago, Detroit, Newark, and Los Angeles; from the Lincoln Memorial to the Washington Monument to Ferguson, Missouri, to the election of Donald Trump — down the decades, waiting for the moment when political or economic expediency needed them again. “Hate and ignorance have not driven the history of racist ideas in America,” writes National Book Award winner Kendi. “Racist policies have driven the history of racist ideas in America. And this fact becomes apparent when we examine the causes behind, not the consumption of racist ideas, but the production of racist ideas.”

TYRANT

S

tephen Greenblatt has written a book about Donald Trump’s presidency without ever mentioning him by name. He doesn’t have to: The connections between Shakespeare’s most villainous tyrants and demagogues and the current occupant of the White House are too obvious to miss. Discussing, for instance, the “fraudulent populist” Jack Cade, a character in the second part of Henry VI, Greenblatt notes: “The absurdity of [his] campaign promises is not an impediment to their effectiveness. On the contrary: Cade keeps producing demonstrable falsehoods about his origins and making wild claims about the great things he will do, and the crowds eagerly swallow them.” Greenblatt also makes implicit comparisons between Trump and King Lear, Macbeth, Caesar, Leontes, and Coriolanus, who cannot disguise his contempt for the “rabble,” “curs,” “scabs,” and “slaves” that he would rule. Based on the number of pages Greenblatt devotes to him, the tyrant most closely resembling Trump is Richard III. Richard, who brags in his opening monologue that he is “determined to prove a villain,” is, according to Greenblatt, “not merely indifferent to the law; he hates it and takes pleasure in breaking it. He hates it because it gets in his way and stands for a notion of the public good that he holds in contempt.” Like Trump, Richard sees only winners and losers. He scorns the latter, while the “winners

Kendi uses the work of five individuals to tell this history — Cotton Mather, Thomas Jefferson, William Lloyd Garrison, W.E.B. DuBois, and Angela Davis — a n d t h rou g h t h e m traces the progression and consequences of racist ideas in all their guises: the curse of Ham, biological inferior inferiority, the notion that slavery benefited black people because it civilized them, the white terrorism of the Reconstruction Era, Jim Crow, and the Black Power movement and the backlash it spurred — the War on Drugs that was felt disproportionately in black communities. Through brilliant, unflinching scholarship, Kendi shows the remarkable consistency and resiliency of bigotry in America’s history. — Brian Tanguay

PA C I F I C C O N S E R VAT O R Y T H E AT R E

“A COMIC FIREWORKS SHOW!” SANTA MARIA SUN

JUL 12 - 22 SOLVANG FESTIVAL THEATER

Vanya & Sonia & Masha & Sp ike

THE TONY AWARD WINNING COMEDY! BY CHRISTOPHER DURANG

LAST W EEKEND !

ADULT LANGUAGE

JUL 27 - AUG 26

SOLVANG FESTIVAL THEATER

BOOK BY Catherine Johnson MUSIC & LYRICS BY Benny Andersson & Björn Ulvaeus & some songs with Stig Anderson

arouse his regard insofar as he can use them for his own ends.” Greenblatt provides plenty of quotations from the plays to justify the claim that Tyrant is a book about Shakespeare, but its real power and energy come when the author tacitly indicts the actions of the current president of the United States, who apparently believes that he — like his English precursors from centuries earlier — is essentially above the law. By the end of the book, dispirited readers may be asking, if Shakespeare was able to anticipate our “general woe,” did he have any solutions for it? Yes, according to Greenblatt: The solution is to join forces in opposing the tyrant, however flawed members of the opposition may be. Ultimately, Shakespeare’s tyrants fail because while they may be experts at coming to power, they have no real plan or interest in actually governing. Instead, they are “brought down by their own viciousness and by a popular spirit of humanity that could be suppressed but never completely extinguished.” — David Starkey

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a&e | FILM & TV FEATURE

SKELETONS IN THE CLOSET: Amy Adams stars as Camille Parker, a troubled reporter who takes on an assignment in her hometown, in this limited series adapted from Gillian Flynn’s debut novel.

SHARP OBJECTS HBO Adapts Gillian Flynn’s Book into Stylish, Arty Thriller by Josef Woodard

W

Attention

Santa Barbara County Nonprofit organizations Hutton Parker Foundation and The Santa Barbara Independent are pleased to announce the continuation of our Media and Marketing Grant partnership for 2018. The Media and Marketing Grant program provides Santa Barbara-based organizations an opportunity for targeted, timely community outreach with a professionally produced newspaper insert specific to selected applicants.

For more information and to apply for this program, please visit HUTTONFOUNDATION.ORG 46

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JULY 19, 2018

INDEPENDENT.COM

ith the premiere episode of HBO’s Sharp Objects, a limited series adapted from Gillian Flynn’s 2006 novel, the stage is richly set for gothic goings-on. Amy Adams stars in a glumly captivating performance lined with booze and sarcasm, our troubled tour guide to a community and a story line that can be deceptively quiet and dread-laced, not to mention the missing and/or dead girls. So why are we compelled not to miss a single episode? Adams’s charismatic powers, in an edgy mode à la her Sunshine Cleaners performance, have something to do with it; we won’t grouse spending time in her world for eight weeks. Stylish and arty thriller tactics from Quebecois director Jean-Marc Vallée are another draw. And you gotta love the vibe of early Led Zeppelin tracks booming in a vintage Volvo. But there’s a larger contextual backdrop to the appeal. Yes, we are back in a rugged landscape roughly reminiscent of recent television of late, the grisly yet somehow warm and binge-able stuff of Ozark, Big Little Lies (also directed, beautifully, by Vallée), Twin Peaks: The Return, and especially Jane Campion’s Top of the Lake. Elizabeth Moss’s character in that show, the second season of which was one of last year’s tops of the tube, is a troubled detective with an all-too-personal connection to the sexual dastardliness she is investigating. Ditto Adams’s Camille Parker, a St. Louis–based newspaper writer who is a professional investigator figure — from the journalism angle — with a past trauma and time spent in an institution. She reluctantly takes on an assignment in her hometown, knowing that personal ghosts, demons, and associations will be lurking as she goes about her job. Episode 1 of Sharp Objects is coyly titled “Vanish,” when in fact there is a slow reveal at play in this opening “chapter.” It begins with a bright but loaded wistfulness, with shots of the drab but gleaming, unpeopled small town of Wind Gap, Missouri. Flashbacks and erratic memories flutter by throughout the show in the form of Camille’s fever dreams or backstory enhancements, reminiscent of the tangled narrative of Big Little Lies. Speaking of the lies-truth equation, a central paradox of this complicated tale involves the dual narratives of a journalist’s quest for truth behind the collective lies and buried secrets in Wind Gap and the track of her own history in this place. As she tries to coax information out of uncooperative police, family members of victims, and other locals, Camille loses her objective detachment when encountering scenery loaded with distressing and fragmented memories. It is significant that the final scene of the first episode finds her in the bathtub, cradling vodka and revealing her scarred back — a palimpsest of a past we’ve yet to discover. There are plenty of story elements slyly hinted at in the initial installment, including the town’s true-crime stories, the nature of Camille’s meltdown history, and her relationship with her half sister, Amma (Eliza Scanlen). The “stay tuned” meter is running high, coated with the show’s seductive neo-noirish atmospherics. See you at the end, around many sharp and dark corners to come. n


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MOVIE GUIDE SPECIAL SCREENINGS

Abacus: Small Enough to Jail (88 mins., NR)

This Oscar-nominated film tells the story of the Sung family, Chinese immigrants who owned Abacus Federal Savings in New York City, which was the only bank to face criminal charges in the wake of the 2008 financial crisis. Alhecama Theatre (Fri., July 20, 7pm)

The Beatles: Yellow Submarine (87 mins., G)

It’s been 50 years since Sgt. Pepper’s Lonely Hearts Club Band had to save Pepperland from the music-hating Blue Meanies. For its golden anniversary, this iconic film is back on the big screen in all of its psychedelic, animated glory. Riviera (Fri.-Sat., July 20-21, 9:45pm)

The Curse of the Were-Rabbit (85 mins., G)

Wallace and his pet dog, Gromit, face new adventures when they are called upon to eradicate rabbits that are plaguing a village in the run-up to a vegetable competition. Mayhem and hilarity ensue. S.B. County Courthouse Sunken

Johansson, Seth MacFarlane, Taron Egerton, and Jennifer Hudson are just a few of the stars who lend their voices to this animated film. Paseo Nuevo (Tue.-Wed., July 24-25, 10am)

PREMIERES The Equalizer 2 (129 mins., R) Director Antoine Fuqua (Training Day, The Magnificent Seven) helms this sequel to the 2014 film. Denzel Washington stars as a retired CIA Black Ops operative who, after his friend is murdered, decides to find and punish the perpetrators. Camino Real/Fiesta 5 Hotel Transylvania 3: Summer Vacation (97 mins., PG) The gang is back for this third iteration of the Hotel Transylvania franchise. This time, Dracula (Adam Sandler) and his family shutter the hotel and go on a cruise. Also on the trip is Ericka (Kathryn Hahn) who happens to be Dracula’s old opponent Van Helsing. Ericka kidnaps Drac, and mayhem ensues. Andy Samberg, Selena Gomez, Kevin James, and Molly Shannon also star. Fairview/Fiesta 5

Gardens (Fri., July 20, 8:30pm)

Fantastic Mr. Fox (87 mins., PG) George Clooney stars as the voice of Mr. Fox, a wily critter who cannot curb his farm-raiding ways. Things go awry, however, when the farmers seek revenge on the animal community. Directed by Wes Anderson, the animated film also stars the voice talents of Meryl Streep, Jason Schwartzman, and Bill Murray. UCSB’s Campbell Hall (Wed., July 25, 7:30pm)

Sing (108 mins., PG) Koala Buster Moon (Matthew McConaughey) owns a theater that has fallen upon financial difficulties thanks to a series of flops he’s produced. In an attempt to raise funds to save the theater, Moon holds a singing competition, which brings unlikely hopefuls to audition. Reese Witherspoon, Scarlett

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7/21- 7:30

BARBARA WOOD & THE MOMENTS 7/22 - 1:00-4:00

DENA DEROSE TRIO 7:30

LOUISE GOFFIN

WITH JARROD DICKENSON 7/23-7:30

NATE BIRKEY QUINTET 7/24 - 7:00

MADELEINE MAYI WITH MASON SUMMIT & ALUNA 7/25- 8:00

HENRY KAPONO

Teen Titans Go! to the Movies

WITH JOHNNY VALENTINE

(88 mins., PG)

The superheroes from the TV series move to the big screen in this animated comedy. Distraught by the fact that every DC superhero has their own film, the ragtag crew searches for a director who will make a film about them. Fairview/Fiesta 5 (Opens Thu., July 26)

Three Identical Strangers (96 mins., PG-13)

This documentary tells the story of Eddy Galland, David Kellman, and Robert Shafran, who in 1980, at the age of 19, discover they are actually triplets who were separated at birth. The Hitchcock

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Unfriended: Dark Web (88 mins., R) In this stand-alone sequel to 2014’s Unfriended, twentysomething Matias finds a laptop with secret files on it in a dumpster. He and his friends soon discover they are being watched by the previous owner, who will stop at nothing to get the computer back. Metro 4

NOW SHOWING Ant-Man and the Wasp (118 mins., PG-13)

Mamma Mia! Here We Go Again (114 mins., PG-13) This musical comedy picks up where the last one left off. While Sophie is pregnant with her first child, she learns about her mother’s adventurous past. Meryl Streep, Amanda Seyfried, and Lily James star. Camino Real/Paseo Nuevo Mission: Impossible — Fallout (147 mins., PG-13)

Tom Cruise is back as Impossible Mission Force (IMF) agent Ethan Hunt in this sixth iteration of the film franchise. Solomon Lane (Sean Harris) has escaped custody, and once again Hunt and his crew must save the world from dire consequences. Henry Cavill, Ving Rhames, and Simon Pegg also star. Arlington (2D)/Camino Real (2D)/ Metro 4 (2D & 3D) (Opens Thu., July 26)

Paul Rudd reprises his role as the tiny superhero in this sequel, but this time he is joined by a partner, the Wasp (Evangeline Lilly). The story picks up where Captain America: Civil War left off, with Ant-Man on house arrest, trying to be a good citizen—until he is called back into action to reveal secrets of the past. Michael Peña, Michelle Pfeiffer, Judy Greer, and Michael Douglas also star. Arlington/Camino Real/Fiesta 5

O Incredibles 2

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Finally, 14 years after Pixar unleashed The Incredibles, the paragon animation studio has released the long-awaited sequel, Incredibles 2. The high expectations for the follow-up to such an iconic film—especially after more than a decade—can be both its bane and its attraction. Fortunately, Incredibles 2 doesn’t disappoint. It is a fantastic film

CONT’D ON P. 49 >>>

Formerly Santa Barbara Rape Crisis Center

866-624-1191 1129 State St., Suite 3F INDEPENDENT.COM

24/7 HOTLINE: 805.564.3696 STESA@sbstesa.org

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Burger JUNE 28 Week JULY 4 THANKS TO EVERYONE T H R O U G H

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48

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JULY 19, 2018

INDEPENDENT.COM

(PG-13)

Starts Thursday, July 26

PASEO NUEVO

JURASSIC (2D) WORLD: (PG-13)

2

(R)

2D Daily: (PG-13) 12:00 2:30 5:00 7:35 10:00

2D Daily: (PG-13) 11:10 2:00 4:45 7:30 10:10

Starts Thursday July 26

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Arlington Theatre www.AXS.com


a&e | FILM & TV CONT’D FROM P. 47 Skyscraper (103 mins., PG-13) Dwayne Johnson stars in this highoctane action film about a former FBI agent, Will Sawyer (Johnson), and his family, who live in Hong Kong in the tallest building in the world. When the building is attacked by terrorists, Sawyer, who is head of security, must take action.

“SPRAWLING AND BRILLIANT” – INDIEWIRE

Camino Real/Metro 4

Sorry to Bother You

➤ O Sorry to Bother You whose breadth of story and concepts match perfectly with its characters and imagination. Taking up where the original story left off, Incredibles 2 answers the original film’s dangling questions, continues plot themes, and interweaves the Parr family’s (aka the Incredibles) challenges and humanity seamlessly into the story. This iteration dives deeper into the larger implications and politics of reintroducing “Supers” into society and is exactly the sequel that this series deserves. Incredibles 2 is a mustsee Pixar classic—but definitely watch the original first. (NS) Fairview/Fiesta 5 Jurassic World: Fallen Kingdom (128 mins., PG-13) Three years after the dinosaurs ran amok on Isla Nubar, a mercenary team returns to the abandoned island to get DNA from a T. rex’s carcass, which lies inconveniently at the bottom of a lagoon where a Mosasaurus lives. One thing leads to another, and, after retrieving one of the T. rex’s bones, the DNA extractors flee from the attacking Mosasaurus and forget to close the gate, thus releasing the monster into the sea. Mayhem and destruction follow. Chris Pratt, Bryce Dallas Howard, B.D. Wong, and Jeff Goldblum reprise their roles.

O Ocean’s 8

(105 mins., R)

(110 mins., PG-13)

The ladies are doing it for themselves in this offshoot of Steven Soderbergh’s Ocean’s trilogy. Sandra Bullock and Cate Blanchett star as Debbie Ocean (Danny Ocean’s sister) and Lou, respectively, two criminal masterminds who put together a crack team of thieves to pull off a heist at the New York Metropolitan Museum of Art’s annual Met Gala. The film gets off to a bit of a slow start as Debbie and Lou assemble their crew, but once the plan is put into action, the plot clips along nicely. The actors in the talented ensemble, which also includes Anne Hathaway, Mindy Kaling, Sarah Paulson, Awkwafina, Rihanna, and Helena Bonham Carter, do an expectedly fine job in their roles, all of them infusing appeal and humor into their characters. James Corden gives a delightful turn as an insurance investigator, and Hathaway is absolutely delightful as a shallow movie star. Cameos abound as guests arrive to the party, and clever plot twists keep the audience engaged until the end. Overall, Ocean’s 8 does a nice job of staying true to the previous films’ formula while introducing a whole new cast of characters who are just as cunning and charming as Soderbergh’s originals. (MD) Metro 4

Camino Real/Metro 4

O RBG ➤ O The King

(107 mins., R)

What makes The King much more than a garden-variety music documentary are the chances and detours it takes. Director Eugene Jarecki has created an inventive portrait with a wide range of subjects—including celebrities Ethan Hawke, John “Riding with the King” Hiatt, Alec Baldwin, and Emmylou Harris, for instance—talking about “the King” while driving around in his Rolls Royce. Elvis’s history, from Tupelo, Mississippi, to Memphis to Las Vegas, is interwoven with footage-enriched commentary (from the ever-articulate Chuck D and others) about his “racial appropriation” and modern racism in these Trump times. It’s a fascinating, venturesome, and often moving film with an underlying message: The King is dead, but he’s not forgotten. (JW) Riviera

Leave No Trace (109 mins., PG) Ben Foster and Thomasin McKenzie star in this survival story about a veteran and his daughter who live off the grid in a park in Portland, Oregon, until one day they are discovered. Paseo Nuevo

(97 mins., NR)

In this illuminating and warmhearted doc about longstanding Supreme Court Justice Ruth Bader Ginsburg, directors Betsy West and Julie Cohen blend archival and modern footage to capture the diminutive, deceptively calm powerhouse —aka her rapper handle, “Notorious RBG”—in midstream, still going strong and adhering to her critical left position at age 85. Among the doc’s highlights: Ginsburg’s friendship with conservative Justice Antonin Scalia, a segment on her damnation of Trump (and subsequent apology), and the general sense of getting inside the story of a remarkable, operaloving seeker of justice—who happens to be a woman. (JW) Riviera (Sat.-Sun., July 21-22, noon)

Sicario: Day of the Soldado (122 mins., R)

In this sequel to the 2015 film Sicario, Benicio Del Toro and Josh Brolin reprise their roles as CIA agents who continue to investigate the escalating drug wars occurring on the U.S.-Mexico border. This time, cartels are transporting terrorists into the country.

Words are not enough to describe Boots Riley’s Sorry to Bother You. The director manages to spin a hurricane of strange, gripping, dada-esque events into a stirring spotlight on the problems prevalent in our capitalist culture. The film follows Cassius Green (Lakeith Stanfield, Get Out) as he lands a job as a telemarketer in Oakland, California, and lives off the meager commission he earns. However, he hopes to one day move up from the basement to the top floor of the office building and make the big bucks as a power caller. His dream begins to come true when he learns a vocal trick from a fellow African-American colleague. After modulating his voice, Stanfield’s sales drastically increase. Sorry to Bother You turns a simple premise on its head, creating a gripping and entertaining story. And although it seems paradoxical, the strangeness of the film is all too realistic, making this a film you should not miss. (NS) Paseo Nuevo

A FILM BY EUGENE JARECKI

SHOWING JULY 20 - 26 Fri, Mon - Thurs 5:00pm 7:30pm Sat, Sun 2:30pm 5:00pm 7:30pm

BACK BY POPULAR DEMAND!

SHOWING JULY 21 - 22 Sat, Sun 12:00pm

FOR TICKETS, VISIT WWW.SBIFF.ORG AND THE THEATRE BOX OFFICE #SBIFF

O Won’t You Be My Neighbor? (93 mins., PG-13)

No contemporary American media personality has attended to the special needs of children with the singular respect, tenderness, and tenacity that Fred Rogers did in the three-odd decades that Mister Rogers’ Neighborhood aired on PBS. With Won’t You Be My Neighbor?, director Morgan Neville and his team capture the potency of Rogers’s voice through touchstones from his series, behind-the-scenes footage, and recent interviews with his family, friends, and collaborators. The documentary is a fluid blend of biography and cultural history. Incidentally released with the aggressive expansion of immigrant family separation, Won’t You Be My Neighbor? incites viewers to reflect on the integrity and vulnerability of childhood. How a society treats children — all of them, regardless of origin — is a hallmark of its overall moral and ethical orientation. Neville’s film reminds us that Fred Rogers would no doubt have crumbled at the notion that some children’s well-being must be sacrificed for the future of others’. And in its measured portrait of Rogers’s philosophy, it nudges us toward a framework for thinking otherwise. (AT) The Hitchcock

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The above films are playing in Santa Barbara FRIDAY, July 20, through THURSDAY, July 26. Our critics’ reviews are followed by initials: MD (Michelle Drown), NS (Noah Shachar), AT (Athena Tan), and JW (Josef Woodard). The symbol O indicates the film is recommended. The symbol ➤ indicates a new review. INDEPENDENT.COM

JULY 19, 2018

THE INDEPENDENT

49


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The six-time national champion Santa Barbara Foresters are playing their 2018 summer season at Pershing Park in downtown Santa Barbara.

DON’T MISS A MINUTE OF THE ACTION. 50

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JULY 19, 2018

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TICKETS ARE ALWAYS AVAILABLE AT THE GATE!

WWW.SBFORESTERS.ORG

L


PAUL WELLMAN PHOTOS

PRETTY SKIES AND DARN GOOD BASEBALL

SPORTS

Santa Barbara Foresters Continue to Crush It Like No Other Team Before

S

anta Barbara is No. 1 in the nation when it comes to weather, according to U.S. News & World Report, which researched the variations in temperature and counted the cloudy days. The media outlet could have surveyed the Santa Barbara Foresters and come up with the same ranking. “The weather’s so nice,” said Logan Allen, one of 26 college baseball players who have come from out of state to play for the Foresters this summer. Their hometowns are in the states of Texas, Oklahoma, Ohio, Arkansas, Kansas, Nebraska, Tennessee, Georgia,West Virginia, Colorado, Arizona, and Hawai‘i. There also are nine California players on the roster. Besides the temperate climate, the players are lured by the opportunity to swing wooden bats — such a glorious “crack” at solid contact compared to the“ping” of the metal models — and the club’s winning tradition. Since their founding in 1991, the Foresters have never had a losing season. Under Bill Pintard, their manager for the past 24 years, they have won 957 games while losing 291 — a winning percentage of .767 that surpasses any single season in the history of the major leagues (the 1906 Cubs reached the .763 mark). The 2018 ’Sters are winning at a ridiculous .909 pace (30-3). They have qualified for their 26th consecutive appearance at the National Baseball Congress (NBC) World Series, the longest streak for any team since Wichita, Kansas, hosted the first NBC tournament in 1935. Santa Barbara has brought home six national championship trophies, tied for the most with the Alaska Goldpanners of Fairbanks. Collegiate Summer Baseball, which covers more than 250 teams across the nation, has ranked the Foresters No. 3 this week behind a pair of teams in the prestigious Cape Cod League.

by JOHN ZANT

PAUL WELLMAN

FORESTERS PLAYER OF THE WEEK

“I can’t explain it,” outfielder Luke Ritter said of the Foresters’ success.“I’ve never been on a team like this.We find ways to win.” On paper, their players do not have extraordinary college résumés. Ritter arrived in Santa Barbara last summer after hitting .223 as a Wichita State sophomore. His average blossomed to .353 with the Foresters, and that carried over to his junior year with the Shockers, as he hit .341. Ritter returned for a second summer in Santa Barbara — “The weather’s so good”— and has been on a tear that earned him the sobriquet“Ritter the Hitter” the past two weeks. In Santa Barbara’s 18-7 road victory over the Orange County Riptide, he went walk-homer-double-single-single-triple, becoming the only Forester in recent memory to hit for the cycle. The Foresters’ experience goes beyond baseball. Ever since his son Eric’s life was cut short by cancer, Pintard has made his ball club a source of comfort and encouragement for kids with cancer. He calls the program Hugs for Cubs (the grown-up Foresters are modeled after Smokey the Bear). Their players are making two visits to Cottage Hospital this season, and during the NBC World Series, they annually deliver cheer to young patients at Wichita’s Via Christi Hospital. Pintard makes sure that the players he recruits to the Foresters will not flake out of such commitments. He told the story of a surefire hitting prospect whose coach let on that“he’s an a--hole.” “I said, ‘Good, I don’t want him,’” Pintard recalled. “‘But he can really hit.’‘I don’t care. I don’t want him.’” [The coach said,] “Pinner, I love you. Now I can tell him at practice,‘You smell so bad, they can smell you in California.’” So Pintard picked up Logan Allen, a pleasant Division 2 outfielder from the University of Arkansas–Fort Smith.“I was a late bloomer,” said Allen, who did not play baseball until his senior year in high school at Bryant,Arkansas. Evan Lee, one of last year’s top Foresters who played for the Arkansas Razorbacks, hailed from the same town, and he recommended Allen to the Foresters. Allen is hitting .348 as Santa Barbara’s leadoff hitter. He has made some spectacular running catches in the outfield, and last Sunday, when an Orange County Surf baserunner tried to score from second on a single to right field, Allen gunned him down with a strong throw to catcher Turner Gauntt. The Foresters, who won their first 15 games of the summer, brought their latest winning streak to seven with their 7-2 victory over the Surf at Pershing Park. The previous night, they shellacked the Valley Bears from Fresno, 17-0. That could have been expected; the Bears agreed to play Santa Barbara as a late replacement after they had played a double-header in Los Angeles earlier Saturday.

The Bears were obviously short on pitching, and besides not delivering the ball with much velocity, they had control problems, issuing 13 walks. The Foresters remained patient, refusing to chase bad pitches.“Coach told us,‘You’ve got to stay focused. Keep your approach,’ ” Allen said. Pintard explained, “I don’t want them to develop bad habits.” John Jensen, the Foresters’ lone hometown player, was their first baserunner after singling with one out in the second inning. He proceeded to steal second base. Then he stole third. He came home on an error, the first blow of a five-run inning. Allen, who leads the club with 25 stolen bases, likes Pintard’s aggressive approach to the game. “He’s a go-getter,” Allen said. “He likes to put pressure on the other team. We force a lot of errors.” The Foresters also put an emphasis on fresh arms.“This is the deepest pitching staff we’ve ever had,” Pintard said. Seventeen different Foresters pitchers have wins on their records. Caleb Sloan (TCU), Jackson Wolf (West Virginia), and Michael Hobbs (St. Mary’s) are the top three hurlers in the California Collegiate League, as rated by coaches and scouts. The freewheeling Foresters will play five more games at Pershing Park this summer, beginning Friday evening, July 20, when the Surf makes a return visit. They’ll take on the Valley Bears in their home finale on July 27, and after the league playoffs, they’ll board the bus for the 84th NBC World Series. The Foresters have established the Wichita Fund (details on their website, sbforesters.org) to help support their bid for a n seventh national title.

Luke Ritter

The Wichita State outfielder wins the award for the second consecutive week after putting up phenomenal offensive numbers in four games. He went 10-for-14 (.714) with 13 RBIs, including a 5-for-5 game at Orange County in which he hit for the cycle and drove in six runs.

JOHN ZANT’S

GAME OF THE WEEK 7/21-7/22: Baseball: Conejo Oaks at Santa Barbara Foresters This weekend’s games will have an impact on the

California Collegiate League playoffs, which the Oaks will host at Sparky Anderson Field in Thousand Oaks on July 28-29. The Foresters already clinched the No. 1 seed. The Oaks are among four teams in contention for the other three spots. Conejo third baseman Brandon Lewis boasts a league-leading .397 batting average with eight home runs. Santa Barbara catcher Chase Illig (.376, seven homers) is close behind him. At Sunday’s game, the Foresters will honor the host families who have provided room and board for their players. Sat.: 6pm; Sun.: 2pm. Pershing Park, 100 Castillo St. $3-$7. Visit sbforesters.org.

RUN, STEAL, WIN: Above, Logan Allen (17) of the Foresters beats the throw as he steals second base against the Orange County Riptide last Friday. At top, after nailing down their 4-2 victory — clinching the best record in the California Collegiate League — Foresters catcher Chase Illlig and relief pitcher Dane Acker start off a round of hugs and high fives. INDEPENDENT.COM

JULY 19, 2018

THE INDEPENDENT

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living |

FREE WILL ASTROLOGY by Rob Breszny

WEEK OF JULY 19

ARIES

CANCER

LIBRA

CAPRICORN

(Mar. 21-Apr. 19): “Take a lover who looks at you like

(June 21-July 22): Self-described skeptics sometimes say

(Sept. 23-Oct. 22): A reader asked Libran blogger Ana-

(Dec. 22-Jan. 19): I swear the astrological omens are

maybe you are magic.” Whenever that quote appears on the internet, it’s falsely attributed to painter Frida Kahlo. In fact, it was originally composed by poet Marty McConnell. In any case, I’ll recommend that you heed it in the coming weeks. You really do need to focus on associating with allies who see the mysterious and lyrical best in you. I will also suggest that you get inspired by a line that Frida Kahlo actually wrote:“Take a lover who looks at you like maybe you are a bourbon biscuit.” (If you don’t know what a bourbon biscuit is, I’ll tell you: chocolate buttercream stuffed between two thin, rectangular chocolate biscuits.)

TAURUS (Apr. 20-May 20): Here’s what author Franz Kafka wrote

in his diary on August 2, 1914: “Germany has declared war on Russia. I went swimming in the afternoon.” We could possibly interpret his nonchalance about world events to be a sign of callous self-absorption. But I recommend that you cultivate a similar attitude in the coming weeks. In accordance with astrological omens, you have the right and the need to shelter yourself from the vulgar insanity of politics and the pathological mediocrity of mainstream culture. So feel free to spend extra time focusing on your own well-being. (P.S.: Kafka’s biographer says swimming served this role for him. It enabled him to access deep, unconscious reserves of pleasurable power that renewed his spirit.)

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): Am I delusional to advise a perky,

to me,“How can any intelligent person believe in astrology? You must be suffering from a brain dysfunction if you imagine that the movements of planets can reveal any useful clues about our lives.” If the “skeptic” is truly open-minded, as an authentic skeptic should be, I offer a mini-lecture to correct his misunderstandings. If he’s not (which is the usual case), I say that I don’t need to “believe” in astrology; I use astrology because it works. For instance, I have a working hypothesis that Cancerians like myself enjoy better-than-average insight and luck with money every year from late July through the month of August. It’s irrelevant whether there’s a “scientific” theory to explain why this might be. I simply undertake efforts to improve my financial situation at this time, and I’m often successful.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): Here are some of the fine gifts you’re

eligible for and even likely to receive during the next four weeks: a more constructive and fluid relationship with obsession; a panoramic look at what lies below the tip of the metaphorical iceberg; a tear-jerking joyride that cracks open your sleeping sense of wonder; erasure of at least 20 percent of your self-doubt; vivid demonstrations of the excitement available from slowing down and taking your sweet time; and a surprising and useful truth delivered to your soul by your body.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): During the last three months of 2018,

Sofia Cardelle,“How does one become more sensual?” I’ll ask you to meditate on the same question. Why? Because it’s a good time to enrich and deepen your sensuality. For inspiration, here are some ideas that blend my words with Cardelle’s:“Laugh easily and freely. Tune in to the rhythm of your holy animal body as you walk. Sing songs that remind you why you’re here on earth. Give yourself the luxury of reading books that thrill your imagination and fill you with fresh questions. Eat food with your fingers. Allow sweet melancholy to snake through you. Listen innocently to people, being warm-hearted and slyly wild. Soak up colors with your eager eyes. Whisper grateful prayers to the sun as you exult in its gifts.”

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): “If people aren’t laughing at your

goals, your goals are too small.” So says bodybuilder Kai Greene. I don’t know if I would personally make such a brazen declaration, but I do think it’s worth considering — especially for you right now. You’re entering into the Big Bold Vision time of your astrological cycle. It’s a phase when you’ll be wise to boost the intensity of your hopes for yourself, and get closer to knowing the ultimate form of what you want, and be daring enough to imagine the most sublime possible outcomes for your future. If you do all that with the proper chutzpah, some people may indeed laugh at your audacity. That’s okay!

SAGITTARIUS

telling me to tell you that you have license to make the following requests: (1) People from your past who say they’d like to be part of your future have to prove their earnestness by forgiving your debts to them and asking your forgiveness for their debts to you. (2) People who are pushing for you to be influenced by them must agree to be influenced by you. (3) People who want to deepen their collaborations with you must promise to deepen their commitment to wrestling with their own darkness. (4) People who say they care for you must prove their love in a small but meaningful way.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): You will never find an advertisement for Nike or Apple within the sacred vessel of this horoscope column. But you may come across plugs for soul-nourishing commodities like creative freedom, psychosexual bliss, and playful generosity. Like everyone else, I’m a salesperson — although I believe that the wares I peddle are unambiguously good for you. In this spirit, I invite you to hone your own sales pitch. It’s an excellent time to interest people in the fine products and ideas and services that you have to offer.

PISCES (Feb. 19-Mar. 20): Would you do me a favor, please?

Would you do your friends and loved ones and the whole world a favor? Don’t pretend you’re less powerful and beautiful than you are. Don’t downplay or neglect the magic you have at your disposal. Don’t act as if your unique genius is nothing special. Okay? Are you willing to grant us these small indulgences? Your specific talents, perspectives, and gifts are indispensable right now. The rest of us need you to be bold and brazen about expressing them.

(Nov. 22-Dec. 21): This mini-chapter in your epic life talkative Gemini like yourself to enhance your comstory is symbolically ruled by the fluttering flights of munication skills? How dare I even hint that you’re not butterflies, the whirring hum of hummingbird wings, quite perfect at a skill you were obviously born to excel the soft, cool light of fireflies, and the dawn dances of seahorses. To take maximum advantage of the blessings at? But that’s exactly what I’m here to convey. The comlife will tease you with in the coming weeks, I suggest ing weeks will be a favorable time to take inventory of you align yourself with phenomena like those. You will how you could more fully develop your natural ability HOMEWORK: Tell a story about the time Spirit tend to be alert and receptive in just the right ways if to exchange information. You’ll be in robust alignment reached down and altered your course in one tricky, with cosmic rhythms if you take action to refine the you cultivate a love of fragile marvels, subtle beauty, manic swoop. Freewillastrology.com way you express your own messages and receive and and amazing grace. respond to other people’s messages. Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700.

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JULY 19, 2018

I suspect you will dismantle or outgrow a foundation. Why? So as to prepare the way for building or finding a new foundation in 2019. From next January onward, I predict you will reimagine the meaning of home.You’ll grow fresh roots and come to novel conclusions about the influences that enable you to feel secure and stable. The reason I’m revealing these clues ahead of time is because now is a good time to get a foreshadowing of how to proceed. You can glean insights on where to begin your work.

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EMPLOYMENT BUSINESS OPPORTUNITY $500 ‑ $1000 Daily Returning Phone Calls! No Selling, No Explaining! Not MLM! Call 1‑844‑427‑0313

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MEDICAL/HEALTHCARE

motivate others. Must successfully pass a background check before date of hire. Notes: Fingerprint background check required. Mandated reporting requirements of Child and Dependent Adult Abuse. Must provide evidence of annual influenza vaccination, or wear a surgical mask while working in patient care areas during the influenza season. Any HIPPA/FERPA violation may be subject to disciplinary action. Some evening hours may be required. Student Health is closed between Christmas and New Year’s Day holidays. $49,000‑$61,000/ yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For primary consideration apply by 7/26/18, thereafter open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #20180378

PHARMACY TECHNICIAN ‑ ONLINE TRAINING AVAILABLE! Take the first step into a new career! Call now: 855‑669‑2185 PRIMARY AND URGENT CARE medical group employing MDs, PAs and NPs, 3 locations, serving the Santa Barbara community for 34 years, has an opening for a full or part time provider. Very flexible schedule will accommodate a variety of lifestyles. Congenial practice with pleasant and well trained staff, interesting patients and no management responsibilities. Lab and Xray on site with extensive, readily available sub‑specialist support. Salary plus incentive, health insurance, malpractice, 401k. Applicant should be comfortable with the full range of outpatient primary and urgent care, office ortho, suturing, foreign body removal, aspiration etc. Recent graduates considered with comprehensive training and backup available. This is a dream job with all the benefits of living and working in one of the most beautiful small cities in the country. Why not enjoy your career as much as you had hoped? Please respond with CV by email wmeller@gmail.com.

PROFESSIONAL

ADMINISTRATIVE OPERATIONS SUPERVISOR

UCSB, STUDENT HEALTH Provides immediate supervision and direction to the Senior Storekeeper and Storekeeper to ensure the efficient operation of the Storeroom and compliance with departmental policies and procedures. Participates in the recruitment, selection, hiring, development and evaluation of staff. Responsible for inventory control, purchasing and shipping & receiving of medical/office equipment and supplies. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree in Business Administration or related area and/or equivalent experience/training. Strong service orientation with the ability to effectively manage multiple projects and priorities. Interpersonal skills including verbal and written communication, active listening, critical thinking, persuasiveness, advising, and counseling to effectively motivate others. Must successfully pass a background check before date of hire. Notes: Fingerprint background check required. Mandated reporting requirements of Child and Dependent

Adult Abuse. Must provide evidence of annual influenza vaccination, or wear a surgical mask while working in patient care areas during the influenza season. Any HIPPA/FERPA violation may be subject to disciplinary action. Some evening hours may be required. Student Health is closed between Christmas and New Year’s Day holidays. $49,000‑$61,000/ yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For primary consideration apply by 7/26/18, thereafter open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #20180378

…Our core values Having a positive impact on others, and feeling fulfillment in return, is a cornerstone of the Cottage Health culture. As a community-based, not-forprofit provider of leading-edge healthcare for the Greater Santa Barbara region, Cottage emphasizes the difference each team member can make. It’s a difference you’ll want to experience throughout your entire career. Join us in one of the openings below.

Santa Barbara Cottage Hospital Nursing

ASSESSMENT, ACCREDITATION & PROGRAM REVIEW ANALYST

OFFICE OF ACADEMIC PROGRAM REVIEW Provides expertise in support of the assessment of student learning in academic degree programs across the campus, accreditation policy and practice, and the evaluation of academic programs. Serves as a member of the Assessment Research Group and as a consultant to the UCSB Council on Assessment. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree and three years’ work experience in higher education. Excellent communication, analytical, organizational and interpersonal skills; assertiveness and diplomacy; the exercise of good judgment, common sense, and discretion; and careful attention to detail. Excellent professional writing skills in a variety of formats, e.g., email, analytical summaries, reports. Ability to directly advise academic administrators, faculty and staff. Ability to manage multiple, competing tasks. Mastery of Microsoft Excel and Word software; proficiency with Microsoft PowerPoint, Adobe Acrobat. Knowledge of, and experience with, quantitative and qualitative research methods, survey research methods,

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

NOW HIRING

Manufacturing Operators High School Diploma / GED Preferred Entry Level Jobs Available

Semiconductor Industry Experience A Plus Benefits Include: Paid vacation, annual bonus

program, educational reimbursement, medical/ dental/vision, fitness program, and more

Apply to Job #13687 at

CorningJobs.Corning.Com

Access Case Manager Birth Center Cardiac Cath Lab Cardiac Telemetry Clinical Manager, Surgical Intensive Care Unit Clinical Nurse Specialist, NICU Diet Tech ED Educator, Lactation Hematology/Oncology Mammographer Med/Surg Float Pool Medical Social Worker MICU MRI Tech NICU Operating Room Peds PICU Pulmonary, Renal, Infectious Disease Radiology Tech Rehabilitation SICU Sonographer Surgical Trauma Telemetry

Allied Health • • • • •

Occupational Therapist – PD Pharmacy Tech – PD Physical Therapist Physical Therapist II Speech Language Pathologist – PD

Clinical • • • •

ADMINISTRATIVE OPERATIONS SUPERVISOR

UCSB, STUDENT HEALTH Provides immediate supervision and direction to the Senior Storekeeper and Storekeeper to ensure the efficient operation of the Storeroom and compliance with departmental policies and procedures. Participates in the recruitment, selection, hiring, development and evaluation of staff. Responsible for inventory control, purchasing and shipping & receiving of medical/office equipment and supplies. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree in Business Administration or related area and/or equivalent experience/training. Strong service orientation with the ability to effectively manage multiple projects and priorities. Interpersonal skills including verbal and written communication, active listening, critical thinking, persuasiveness, advising, and counseling to effectively

EXCELLENCE, INTEGRITY, COMPASSION

• • • • • •

Cardiovascular RN Clinical Dietitian Diet Tech Instrument Tech, Sterile Processing Patient Care Tech Perfusionist Pulmonary Patient Specialist, Respiratory Unit Care Tech Unit Coordinator Utilization Review Nurse

Non-Clinical

Santa Ynez Valley Cottage Hospital

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

• • • • •

Admin Assistant, Physical Therapy Assistant to President Chaplain Clinical Documentation Specialist Concierge Cook – PT Data Analyst Environmental Services Rep Environmental Services Supervisor Environmental Services, Unit Support EPIC Beaker Analyst, Lead EPIC Beaker Analyst Sr. EPIC Clin Doc Analyst EPIC Clin Doc Analyst Sr. EPIC Clin Doc/Stork Lead EPIC Cupid Analyst Sr. EPIC Revenue Cycle Analyst Sr. EPIC Systems Support Specialist (Trainer) ERP Instructional Designer Food Services Rep, Cafeteria/Deli Healthcare Interpreter II Information Security Analyst

Cardiac Rehab Nurse Radiology Tech – PD RN, Emergency RN, Med/Surg – FT/PT/PD Security – PT

Goleta Valley Cottage Hospital • Occupational Therapist – PD • Patient Care Tech I • RN, Emergency • RN, ICU • RN, PreOp/PACU • Surgical Tech II – PD

Cottage Rehabilitation Hospital • Driver – PT • Lifeguard • Lifeguard PD • Occupational Therapist – FT • Physical Therapist – PD • Speech Therapist – FT/PD

• Inventory Tech, Luma • Patient Transporter – PT/PD

Pacific Diagnostic Laboratories

• PC Tech • Personal Care Attendant I

• Certified Phlebotomist Technician – FT/PT

• Physician & Contract Specialist

• CLS, Santa Ynez/Microbiology/Core Lab

• • • • •

• Courier

Security Officer, SBCH Service Delivery Analyst Sr. Dept. Assistant Stationary Engineer I Trauma Registrar

• Lab Assistant II • Outreach Connectivity and Strategy Coordinator • Sr. Sales Representative (San Luis)

Cottage Business Services

• System Support Specialist – PDL • Transfusion Safety Coordinator

• Advancement Systems Analyst

• Please apply to: www.pdllabs.com

• Director, Planning and Analysis • Donor Relations Liaison • HIM Manager

• RENTAL & RELOCATION ASSISTANCE

• HIM Outpatient Data Specialist • Manager, Denials and Utilization Review

AVAILABLE FOR SELECT FULL-TIME POSITIONS

• CERTIFICATION REIMBURSEMENT

• Sr. Revenue Integrity Analyst

We offer an excellent compensation package that includes above-market salaries, premium medical benefits, pension plans, tax savings accounts, rental and mortgage assistance, and relocation packages. What’s holding you back?

Please apply online at jobs.cottagehealth.org. Candidates may also submit a resume to: Cottage Health, Human Resources, P.O. Box 689, Pueblo at Bath Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93102-0689 Please reference “SBI” when applying. EOE

For volunteer opportunities at Cottage Health, visit: www.cottagehealth.org/volunteer INDEPENDENT.COM

Excellence, Integrity, Compassion

www.cottagehealth.org JULY 19, 2018

THE INDEPENDENT

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EMPLOYMENT statistics, and the ability to process and synthesize information from multiple sources. Note: Fingerprint background check required. $58,500‑$73,850/yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For primary consideration apply by 7/25/18, thereafter open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs. ucsb.edu Job #20180379

BUSINESS & FINANCIAL ANALYST

GEVIRTZ GRADUATE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION Analyzes, recommends and implements changes in existing administrative policies, procedures, guidelines and initiatives for more efficient and effective operations. Uses independent judgment, decision making and initiative to set priorities, plan, and coordinate projects and activities. Maintains and applies working knowledge of fund accounting, UC policies

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Humanist Society of Santa Barbara

santabarbarahumanists.org

805-769-4772

Healing Prayer

Christ The King Hotline EPISCOPAL CHURCH 284-4042 Jing Wu Foot & Body Spa Licensed and experienced massage therapists providing deep tissue massage to help with stress and pain. 9:30am – 10pm Daily 805-899-7791 ask for Tina 1500A Chapala St. – SB

Jesus sanchez Owner | Lic # 74855 805.886.8583 jjscleaningservice805@gmail.com

E M A I L S A L E S @ I N D E P E N D E N T. C O M

SERVICE DIRECTORY sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For primary consideration apply by 7/25/18, thereafter open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs. ucsb.edu Job #20180377

HAZARDOUS MATERIALS TECHNICIAN

ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH & SAFETY Conducts operational aspects of the Santa Barbara (SB) County Hazardous Waste Management Program including all physical handling of hazardous waste generated by the SB community (small business and household) in accordance with all applicable federal, state and local regulations as well as the University policies and procedures. Assures continuous flow of materials through the facility to appropriate disposal options. Collects, segregates, packages, manifests and prepares shipments of hazardous waste. Reqs: 1‑3 years of hazardous waste, recycling, solid waste or related scientific or trade experience. Knowledge of applicable federal, state, and local regulations related to hazardous waste management and related programs. Ability to read, write and communicate in English. Notes: This is a 50% time per year, career position. Schedule: Sat & Sun 9am‑ 5pm & Mon. 9am‑4pm. Must pass a physical exam. Must be medically qualified to wear self‑contained breathing apparatus. Willing to work/ respond to emergencies involving potentially hazardous chemicals. Able to move heavy objects by dolly (e.g. 55‑gallon drums filled with liquid). Fingerprint background check required. Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, and a clean DMV record. $23.29/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity /Affirmative Action Employer and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Apply by 7/25/18. Apply online at https:// jobs.ucsb.edu Job #20180380

LICENSING ANALYST

OFFICE OF TECHNOLOGY & INDUSTRY ALLIANCES (TIA) Responsible for supporting the management and patent prosecution of the UCSB technology portfolio, which consists of over 650 technologies, and related patent prosecution activities. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree or equivalent combination of education and experience. 2+ years professional work experience. High attention to detail and accuracy. Strong writing, communication and critical analysis skills. Ability to understand and communicate scientific and engineering subject matter. 3‑5 years of experience reviewing, drafting and negotiating contracts, particularly contracts involving federal funding. Note: Fingerprint background check required. $49,000‑$65,000/yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For primary consideration apply by 7/31/18, thereafter open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #20180373

JJ’s cleaning service

Complete Commercial & Residential Service THE INDEPENDENT

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(CONTINUED)

and procedures, internal control practices as well as numerous sets of personnel policies and procedures. Coordinates training and provides recommendations on implementation of enterprise wide systems. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree in related area and/or equivalent experience/ training. Thorough knowledge and understanding of internal control practices. Understanding of accounting principles including knowledge of fund accounting. Thorough knowledge of financial data management and reporting systems. Proficiency with MS Office suite. Service orientation, active listening, critical thinking, attention to detail, ability to multi‑task in a high volume environment, organizational skills, sound judgment and decision making. Strong verbal and written communication skills. Ability to develop original ideas to solve problems. Strong skills in analyzing, researching and synthesizing data for preparing sound and relevant proposals/ analyses. Ability to function effectively as a member of a team as well as independently, working with minimal direction and frequent interruptions. Note: Fingerprint background check required. Salary starting at $53,200/yr, commensurate with experience. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion,

“I distrust those people who know so well what God wants them to do because I notice it always coincides with their own desires.” — Susan B. Anthony (1820-1906)

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JULY 19, 2018

INDEPENDENT.COM

PROGRAM COORDINATOR

MCNAIR SCHOLARS PROGRAM (ISBER) Responsible for assisting with developing, implementing, and coordinating a two‑year pre‑graduate preparation and undergraduate research program, in accordance with the goals of the program and federal grant. These activities include assisting with programs, seminars, and presentations for first generation college‑bound, low income, and/ or ethnically underrepresented undergraduates pursing doctoral degrees. Coordinating and/or providing advising, mentorship, and organizational assistance to undergraduates preparing to apply to graduate school. Working with program staff, faculty, and graduate students to assist in development of programs that offer assistance with undergraduate research, graduate school application process, and academic preparation. Reqs: Bachelor’s Degree or equivalent combination of education and experience. Experience working with target population (first generation college‑bound students, low‑income students, and/or students who have historically been underrepresented in graduate education) and familiarity with Excel and other software systems. Notes: Fingerprint background check required. Must be able to work occasional evenings and weekends. $23.47‑$28.26/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For primary consideration apply by 7/26/18, thereafter open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs. ucsb.edu Job #20180383

UCPATH (PEOPLESOFT) ANALYST 2

HUMAN RESOURCES The UCPath Analyst 2 is a new role in the UCSB Human Resources department as a result of the upcoming deployment of UCPath/PeopleSoft as UC’s new HRIS, and new standardized HR business processes. Supports several key areas and interactions in the new UCPath environment: Position administration, UCPath campus training, campus liaison with the UCPath Center for Workforce Administration (WFA) inquiries/ escalations, wage implementations, UC policy programs in specific areas, compliance reporting in key areas of UCPath data integrity, and UCPath reports monitoring. Applies acquired job skills, policies, and procedures to complete substantive assignments/ projects/tasks of moderate scope and complexity; exercises judgment within defined guidelines and practices to determine appropriate action, and uses professional HR/compensation concepts to resolve a variety of compensation‑related issues that are of moderate scope and impact where analysis of situations and data requires a review of a variety of factors. Reqs: Demonstrated experience in the field of human resources, with a Bachelor’s degree in related area and/or equivalent combination of education and experience/training. Working knowledge of the applicable laws and regulations related to human resources management. Working knowledge of the compensation functions as well as general knowledge of other areas of human resources. Experience interfacing with enterprise human resources systems and with extracting data and information from such systems in support of analysis, reporting, and tracking. Demonstrated

knowledge and experience with data analysis, query tools, data extraction, and data summation. Analytical skills to conduct analysis and develop recommendations as well as effective written and verbal communication skills to convey findings and recommendations clearly and concisely. Note: Fingerprint background check required. $53,200‑60,000/yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #20180328

SKILLED

SR. CUSTODIAN

FACILITIES MANAGEMENT Under the supervision of the working Senior Lead Laborer and/or Lead Laborer, performs a wide variety of cleaning tasks and is responsible for minor maintenance and storage of equipment. Required to comply with the Physical Facilities Safety Program. Reqs: At least 1 to 2 years of custodial experience or combination of experience, training and education, preferably in school or business setting. Ability to use and care for janitorial supplies and equipment. Able to observe and use safe working conditions. Ability to understand and apply University and Department policies and procedures to specific situations. Ability to exercise sound judgment in solving problems. Ability to accomplish work within deadlines; may handle more than one project at a time. Needs to be able to work effectively in a team environment and needs to receive and follow instruction from supervisors. Visual acuity: Eyesight correction to 20‑20. Depth perception: Average depth perception. Hearing: Ability to effectively hear and comprehend oral communication. Sense of smell: Ability to distinguish smells of various chemicals used in the cleaning process and to detect odors emanating from potentially hazardous conditions. Working under pressure: Will assist emergency clean‑up projects, maintain closet inventory of equipment and supplies, and maintain work assignment to department standards. Ability to accomplish work within deadlines; may handle more than one project at a time. Working with others: Needs to be able to work effectively in a team environment and needs to receive and follow instruction from supervisors. Ability to read, write and follow oral and written instructions in English. Notes: Fingerprint background check required. May be required to wear an UCSB provided uniform. $18.98‑20.54/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For primary consideration apply online by 7/24/18, thereafter open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #020180376

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PERSONAL SERVICES

55 Yrs or Older?

Need Help At Home? Call REAL HELP because this Non‑profit matches workers to your needs. 965‑1531 HOTELS FOR HEROES – to find out more about how you can help our service members, veterans and their families in their time of need, visit the Fisher House website at www. fisherhouse.org PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Call us first. Living expenses, housing, medical, and continued support afterwards. Choose adoptive family of your choice. Call 24/7. 1‑877‑879‑4709 (Cal‑SCAN)

PROFESSIONAL SERVICES BATHROOM RENOVATIONS. EASY, ONE DAY updates! We specialize in safe bathing. Grab bars, no slip flooring & seated showers. Call for a free in‑home consultation: 888‑912‑4745 ISLA VISTA ADVENTURE SERVICES. Certified paragliding instruction, local SB paragliding site guidance & trail guide. Email: chrisgoglide@gmail.com

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NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: Patricia M. Nygren NO: 18PR00295 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of Patricia M. Nygren A PETITION FOR PROBATE: has been filed by: Richard W. Nygren in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara THE PETITION for probate requests that (name): Richard W. Nygren be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate.

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The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The Independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held in this court as follows: on 8/16/18 AT 9:00 a.m. Dept: 5 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, located at 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Anacapa Division. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: Richard W. Nygren; PO Box 8675, Goleta, CA 93117; (661) 765‑6461. Published JUL 05, 12, 19, 2018.

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E M A I L S A L E S @ I N D E P E N D E N T. C O M

Tide Guide Day

High

Low

High

Low 11:26 pm 1.5

Sunrise 6:03 Sunset 8:07

High

Thu 19

3:25 am 3.9

9:44 am 1.0

4:42 pm 5.0

Fri 20

5:02 am 3.4

10:41 am 1.5

5:36 pm 5.2

Sat 21

12:42 am 1.0

6:39 am 3.3

11:40 am 1.9

6:25 pm 5.4

Sun 22

1:41 am 0.5

7:57 am 3.4

12:36 pm 2.2

7:09 pm 5.6

Mon 23

2:27 am 0.2

8:55 am 3.5

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Tue 24

3:06 am -0.1

9:38 am 3.6

2:06 pm 2.4

8:24 pm 5.8

Wed 25

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10:12 am 3.7

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Thu 26

4:12 am -0.3

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crosswordpuzzle

tt By Ma

Jones

“The Curly Shuffle”-- it’s stylin’ in each theme answer.

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: ARISTEA G. PADILLA NO: 18PR00284 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of ARISTEA G. PADILLA A PETITION FOR PROBATE: has been filed

Across 1 Collaborative website

5 Not as many 10 Sign-___ (farewells) 14 Like fine whiskeys 15 Up and about 16 Sci-fi royal 17 Naomi Campbell or Cindy Crawford, e.g. 19 It might be hammered out 20 Chips go-with 21 Tooth material 23 Article from France 24 Channel with “Wheel of Fortune” repeats 27 “Respect for Acting” author Hagen 28 Primus frontman Claypool 31 Chute opening? 33 It’s a real grind at dinner? 36 Finnish Olympic runner Nurmi 38 Wireless company named after a Finnish city 39 Top of the corporate ladder 44 Practiced 45 Swashbuckler who left his initial as a mark 46 Place to extract some chalcopyrite 49 Business reps. 53 Start of many Quebec place names 54 Opposite of old, in German 55 Pasture mom 57 British isle that sounds like a number 58 Ending of many nonprofit URLs

61 Old voting machine part 63 Box office event 65 2001 Nintendo video game with a really thin premise? 68 Dot on a state map 69 Mushroom in miso soup 70 Holed, as a putt 71 Lion lairs 72 Star-___ mole 73 “___ quam videri” (North Carolina’s motto)

Down

1 “Hey, how’s it going?” 2 Pet lizard 3 Astronomer Johannes 4 March middle 5 Direct relatives, slangily 6 “Mr. Blue Sky” band 7 Expansive 8 Balance 9 Be sympathetic 10 “Ye ___ Shoppe” 11 Prefer 12 Ominous sight in shark movies 13 Took to the couch 18 Dusting item 22 “Silas ___” (George Eliot novel) 25 Email that gets filtered 26 Cal ___ Resort & Casino (Lake Tahoe property once co-owned by Frank Sinatra) 29 Tiger Woods’s ex Nordegren 30 Bed frame piece 32 “Not ___ out of you!” 34 Guy with an eponymous scheme

INDEPENDENT.COM

JULY 19, 2018

35 Jason who plays Aquaman 37 Impassioned 39 Lines at the checkout? 40 Scheme 41 “Quiet!” 42 Top quality 43 Sprung up 47 Come back after renovation 48 Nissan SUV named for a suburb of Venice 50 “Z” director Costa-___ 51 Advertising promos of sorts 52 Minigolf motion 56 State tree of North Dakota 59 Possesses 60 Mailing centers, for short 62 Facilitate 63 Pt. of PST 64 Long-handled farm tool 66 Make do, with “out” 67 Relieve ©2018 Jonesin’ Crosswords (editor@ jonesincrosswords.com) For answers to this puzzle, call: 1-900-226-2800, 99 cents per minute. Must be 18+. Or to bill to your credit card, call: 1-800-6556548. Reference puzzle #0884

LAST WEEK’S SOLUTION:

THE INDEPENDENT

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INDEPENDENT CLASSIFIEDS

LEGALS

by: ANDRES RAMIREZ in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara The Petition for Probate requests that (name) ANDRES RAMIREZ THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The Independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held in this court as follows: on 08/09/2018 AT 9:00 a.m. Dept: 5 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, 1100 Anacapa Street P.O. Box 21107 Santa Barbara, CA 93121‑1107 IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: Diana B. Mercier 116 E. Sola Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101; (805) 965‑0523. Published Jul 19, 26. Aug 1 2018.

FBN ABANDONMENT STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF USE OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME The following Fictitious Business Name is being abandoned: SANTA MARIA TOWN CENTER The original statement for use of this Fictitious Business Name was filed 09/18/2017 in the County of Santa Barbara. Original file no. 2017‑0002607 The person(s) or entities abandoning use of this name are as follows: ERGS XIV REO Owner, LLC 2001 Ross Avenue, Suite 2800 Dallas, TX 75201 This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jun 19, 2018 I hereby certify that this is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy Published Jun 28, July 5, 12, 19, 2018 STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF USE OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME The following Fictitious Business Name is being abandoned: PATHPOINT EMPLOYEES at 315 W. Haley St, Suite 202, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. The original statement for use of this Fictitious Business Name was filed 03/28/2018 in the County of Santa Barbara. Original file no. 2018‑0000966. The person(s) or entities abandoning use of this name are as follows: Pathpoint at 315 W. Haley St, Suite 202, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on JUN 14, 2018. I hereby certify that this is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Connie Tran. Published. Jun 28. Jul 5, 12, 19, 2018. STATEMENT OF ABANDONMENT OF USE OF FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME The following Fictitious Business Name is being abandoned: RENT A HANDYMAN SB at 823 Bond Ave, Santa Barbara, CA 93103. The original statement for use of this Fictitious Business Name was filed 02/27/2018 in the County of Santa Barbara. Original file no. 2018‑0000608. The person (s) or entities abandoning use of this name are as follows: Elekatek Construction INC at

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823 Bond Ave, Santa Barbara, CA 93103. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jun 28, 2018. I hereby certify that this is a correct copy of the original statement on file in my office, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Tara Jayasinghe, Published: Jul 5, 12, 19, 26, 2018.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: VARIANT TRAINING LAB at 314 State Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Arthrokinetic Institute, LLC 319 Anacapa Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company, Signed: Evan Pratt, Manager Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on JUN 13, 2018. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Melissa Mercer. FBN Number: 2018‑0001732. Published: JUN 28, JUL 05, 12, 19, 2018. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SB ACE DELIVERY at 1910 North San Marcos Lane Santa Barbara, CA 93111. Dee Wingo 3454 Richland Dr, APT 5 Santa Barbara, CA 93105. This business is conducted by an Individual, Signed: Dee Wingo Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on JUN 13, 2018. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Rachel N. Hillman FBN Number: 2018‑0001728. Published: JUN 28, JUL 05, 12, 19, 2018. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: ELIXIR WINERY SERVICES at 2447 Calle Linares Santa Barbara, CA 93109 Elaina Kroll Consulting Services Inc (same address). This business is conducted by a Corporation, Signed: Elaina Kroll Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on JUN 01, 2018. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Margarita Silva. FBN Number: 2018‑0001612. Published: JUN 28, JUL 05, 12, 19, 2018. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: TAPROOTS at 1326 East Mason Street Santa Barbara, CA 93103. Anne Elizabeth Flett (same address). This business is conducted by an Individual, Signed: Anne E. Flett Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on JUN 05, 2018. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Adela Bustos. FBN Number: 2018‑0001637. Published: JUN 28, JUL 05, 12, 19, 2018. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: MOUNTAIN CANNA CONSULTING at 903 State Street, Suite 207 Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Jason Holland (same address). This business is conducted by an individual , Signed: Jason Holland Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on JUN 20, 2018. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Margarita Silva. FBN Number: 2018‑0001804. Published: JUN 28, JUL 05, 12, 19, 2018. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: A.L. RICO TRUCKING at 1434 Lou Dillon Lane, Unit B Santa Barbara, CA 93103. Alvaro Lopez Rico (same address). This business is conducted by an Individual, Signed: Alvaro Lopez Rico Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on JUN 20, 2018. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Adela Bustos. FBN Number: 2018‑0001803. Published: JUN 28, JUL 05, 12, 19, 2018.

THE INDEPENDENT

JULY 19, 2018

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: CENTRAL COAST PRESSURE WASHING at 1831 Castillo Street Unit A Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Ian Todd Humphrey (same address) and Zackary Daniel Shorts (same address). This business is conducted by a General Partnership, Signed: Ian Humphrey Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on JUN 21, 2018. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2018‑0001817. Published: JUN 28, JUL 05, 12, 19, 2018. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: SANTA MARIA TOWN CENTER at 142 Town Center East Santa Maria, CA 93454. SMTC Acquisition LLC 200 Liberty Street, 22ND Floor New York, New York 10281. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company , Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on JUN 19, 2018. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy FBN Number: 2018‑0001785. Published: JUN 28, JUL 05, 12, 19, 2018. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: SANTA BARBARA MOBILE MASSAGE & SPA at 133 E. De La guerra St # 297, CA 93101. Mary Jeanne Ernst: 4791 Ashdale St, Santa Barbara, CA 93110. This business is conducted by an Individual, Signed: Mary Jeanne Ernst. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on JUN 27, 2018. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Connie Tran. FBN Number: 2018‑0001872. Published: JUL 05, 12, 19, 26, 2018. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: AVANTI AGENCY, AVANTI GROUP at 1187 Coast Village Rd, Suite 461, Santa Barbara, CA 93108. Avanti Industries, Inc (same address). This business is conducted by a Corporation, Signed: Alexis C. Ramirez. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on JUN 22, 2018. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Margarita Silva. FBN Number: 2018‑0001835. Published: JUN 28, JUL 05, 12, 19, 2018. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: ALMOST BANKABLE MORTGAGE CO. at 747 Garden St, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Carl E. Lindros: 727 Garden St, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. This business is conducted by an Individual, Signed: Carl E. Lindros. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on JUN 18, 2018. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Connie Tran. FBN Number: 2018‑0001779. Published: JUN 28, JUL 05, 12, 19, 2018. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: PATHPOINT at 315 W. Haley., Suite 202, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Pathpoint (same address). This business is conducted by a Corporation, Signed: Rachel McCormack. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on JUN 14, 2018. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Connie Tran. FBN Number: 2018‑0001741. Published: JUN 28, JUL 05, 12, 19, 2018. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: 7TRAILS PHOTOGRAPHY at 430 Dogwood Dr, Buellton, CA 93427. Kevin M. Gallagher (same address). This business is conducted by an Individual, Signed: Kevin M. Gallagher. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on MAY 31, 2018. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2018‑0001599. Published: JUN 28, JUL 05, 12, 19, 2018.

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: BEACH COTTAGE SB at 129 San Nicolas Ave, Santa Barbara, CA 93109. Steven Russell Kubes (same address). This business is conducted by an Individual, Signed: Steven Russell Kubes. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on JUN 22, 2018. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2018‑0001825 Published: JUN 28, JUL 05, 12, 19, 2018.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: A TURNING POINT CENTER OF INTEGRATIVE CHINESE MEDICINE & ACUPUNCTURE at 1114 E Haley St., CA 93103. Peggy Nicole Thiel (Same Address). This business is conducted by an Individual, Signed: Peggy Nicole Thiel. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on JUN 28, 2018. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2018‑0001897. Published: JUL 05, 12, 19, 26, 2018.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: OCHO SURF at 5 Arroyo Quemada Ln, Goleta, CA 93117. J. Bjorn Kallerud (same address). This business is conducted by an Individual, Signed: J. Bjorn Kallerud. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on JUN 27, 2018. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2018‑0001873. Published: JUL 05, 12, 19, 26, 2018.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: DELTA CLEANING SOLUTIONS at 1010 W. Valerio St, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Fredy De La Luz Aguas, Iris Roman Sanchez (same address). This business is conducted by a General Partnership, Signed: Iris Roman. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on JUN 22, 2018. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2018‑0001832. Published: JUL 05, 12, 19, 26, 2018.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SMILING SUN BREWING COMPANY at 410 n. Quarantina St, Santa Barbara, CA 93103. Pure Order Brewing Company, LLC (same address). This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company, Signed: Kevin Neumen. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on JUN 27, 2018. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2018‑0001874. Published: JUL 05, 12, 19, 26, 2018.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: OUTLAW COOKIE CO., OUTLAW COOKIE COMPANY at 418 E. Micheltorena st #4, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. John Piazza (Same Address). This business is conducted by an Individual, Signed: John Piazza. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on JUN 27, 2018. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Rachel N. Hillman. FBN Number: 2018‑0001881. Published: JUL 05, 12, 19, 26, 2018.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: CRUZ CONSTRUCTION at 236 W. Sola St, CA 93101. Cruz Family Enterprises Inc (same address). This business is conducted by a Corporation, Signed: Maria Cruz, Secretary. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on JUN 26, 2018. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Tara Jayasinghe. FBN Number: 2018‑0001856. Published: JUL 05, 12, 19, 26, 2018.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: HABITAT HOME & GARDEN SB at 400 State St Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Life Home And Garden SB 1291 Mesa View Drive Arroyo Grande, CA 93420 This business is conducted by a Corporation, Signed: Lars Kieler Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jun 25, 2018. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Connie Tran. FBN Number: 2018‑0001852. Published: Jul 12, 19, 26, Aug 01, 2018.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: BARBARA’S HEART TO HOME PET GROOMING at 449H Cannon Green Dr., Goleta, CA 93117. Barbara Morrow (Same Address). This business is conducted by an Individual, Signed: Barbara Morrow. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on JUN 22, 2018. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Connie Tran. FBN Number: 2018‑0001830. Published: JUL 05, 12, 19, 26, 2018.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: HIGH VELOCITY MEDIA at 1117 State Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Ben Boyce 1502 Chapala St Apt H Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Devin Mallonee 322 W Anapamu Santa Barbara, CA 93101 This business is conducted by a General Partnership, Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jul 09, 2018. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Melissa Mercer. FBN Number: 2018‑0001965. Published: Jul 12, 19, 26, Aug 01, 2018.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SAN YSIDRO ESTATE MANAGEMENT at 1170 Coast village Rd, Montecito, CA 93108. Sina Omidi: 332 W. Figueroa St #D, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. This business is conducted by an Individual, Signed: Sina Omidi. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on JUN 26, 2018. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Melissa Mercer. FBN Number: 2018‑0001859. Published: JUL 05, 12, 19, 26, 2018. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: THE BAZAAR ISTANBUL at 651 Paseo Nuevo, Santa Barbara, CA 93463. Cevat Guroglu: 1116 Bath St. Apt J, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. This business is conducted by an Individual, Signed: Cevat Guroglu. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on JUN 29, 2018. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Rachel N. Hillman. FBN Number: 2018‑0001900. Published: JUL 05, 12, 19, 26, 2018.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: RAD CYCLE WORKS at 148 Aero Camino Suite G Goleta, CA 93117; Jeremy Larue Platt 5982 Cuesta Verde Goleta, CA 93117 This business is conducted by a General Partnership, Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jul 09, 2018. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2018‑0001965. Published: Jul 12, 19, 26, Aug 01, 2018. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: MEGA LAUNDRMAT at 1775 S. Broadway Santa Maria, CA 93454; SM Wash Business, LLC 3055 Wilshire Blvd., Ste 405 Los Angeles, CA 90010. This business is conducted by an Limited Liability Company, Signed: Jangwon Lee, Managing Member. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jul 02, 2018. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Connie Tran. FBN Number: 2018‑0001913. Published: Jul 12, 19, 26, Aug 01, 2018.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: MI CASITA MINI MARKET & DELI at 516 North l St., Lompoc, CA 93436. Roberto Herrera Jr.: 720 N. Fifth St, Lompoc, CA 93436. This business is conducted by an Individual, Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jun 25, 2018. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Marlene Ashoom. FBN Number: 2018‑0001843. Published: JUL 12, 19, 26, Aug 01, 2018. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: ICAREHEALTHCARE at 150 Via Lee, Santa Barbara, CA 93111. Catherine Ann Callahan (Same Address). This business is conducted by an Individual, Signed: Catherine Ann Callahan. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jun 29, 2018. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Margarita Silva. FBN Number: 2018‑0001898. Published: Jul 12, 19, 26, Aug 01, 2018. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: BUBBLE POP at 651 Paseo Nuevo #301 Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Stageone International Inc. 6940 Beach Blvd Buena Park, CA 90621 This business is conducted by a Corporation, Signed: Ray Hamilton. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jul 02, 2018. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2018‑0001909. Published: Jul 12, 19, 26, Aug 01, 2018. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SYNERGY BUSINESS & TECHNOLOGY CENTER at 1 N. Calle Cesar Chavez, Suite 102, Santa Barbara, CA 93103. Entheos Associates, INC (Same Address). This business is conducted by a Corporation, Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on JUN 19, 2018. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Connie Tran. FBN Number: 2018‑0001795. Published: Jul 12, 19, 26, Aug 01, 2018. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: MACFARLANE, FALETTI & CO LLP at 115 East Micheltorena Street #200 Santa Barbara, CA 93101; William L Jackson 2701 Via La Selva Santa Ynez, CA 93460; Jane E Russel 519 West Pueblo Street #A Santa Barbara, CA 93105 This business is conducted by an Limited Partnership, Signed: . Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jun 18, 2018. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Adele Bustos. FBN Number: 2018‑0001783. Published: Jul 12, 19, 26, Aug 01, 2018. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: GOODCOLOR, GOODCOLOR STUDIO at 148 Aero Camino Unit G Goleta, CA 93117. Christopher James Bellerue 2541 Modoc Rd. Apt #27 Santa Barbara, CA 93117 This business is conducted by a Individual, Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jul 09, 2018. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2018‑0001960. Published: Jul 12, 19, 26, Aug 01, 2018. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: PIRATE RADIO at 6381 Rose Ln, Carpinteria, CA 93103. Media Labs INC (Same Address). This business is conducted by a Corporation, Signed: Ray Hamilton. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jul 02, 2018. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2018‑0001908. Published: Jul 12, 19, 26, Aug 01, 2018.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: RISEUP FITNESS at 2273 Las Positas Rd, Santa Barbara, CA 93105. Riseup Fitness LLC (Same Address). This business is conducted by an Limited Liability Company, Signed: Addison Clarke. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jun 27, 2018. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Rachel N. Hillman. FBN Number: 2018‑0001879. Published: Jul 12, 19, 26, Aug 01, 2018. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: LIGHTHOUSE COFFEE, LIGHTHOUSE COFFEE CO., LIGHTHOUSE COFFEE COMPANY at 201 Santa Cruz Boulevard, Santa Barbara, CA 93109. Mesa Coffee, LLC (Same Address). This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company, Signed: Chris Chiarappa, Manager Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jun 29, 2018. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Rachel N. Hillman. FBN Number: 2018‑0001902. Published: JUL 12, 19, 26, Aug 01, 2018. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: WAGNER AND WOOLF ELITE SPORTS RECRUITMENT at 3520 Pinewood rd, Santa Maria, CA 93455. Wagner and Woolf Elite Sports Recruitment LLC (Same Address). This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company, Signed: Philippa Murphy. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on JUL 02, 2018. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2018‑0001911. Published: JUL 12, 19, 26, AUG 02, 2018. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: AWAKENED BEAUTY at 601 E. Anapamu st #223, Santa Barbara, CA 93103. Melissa McLaughlin (Same Address). This business is conducted by an Individual, Signed: Melissa McLaughlin. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on JUN 25, 2018. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Connie Tran. FBN Number: 2018‑0001851. Published: JUL 12, 19, 26, AUG 02, 2018. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: MARIQUITA ORGANICS at 925 Via Docena, Santa Barbara, CA 93110. Donald S. Zellet­ (Same Address). This business is conducted by an Individual, Signed: Donald S. Zellet. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on JUN 12, 2018. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Connie Tran. FBN Number: 2018‑0001722. Published: JUL 12, 19, 26, AUG 02, 2018. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as SABORES ARGENTINOS at 423 W Victoria St Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Salem Samaan 629 Del Monte Ave Santa Barbara, CA 93101 This business is conducted by an Individual, Signed:. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jun 26, 2018. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Connie Tran. FBN Number: 2018‑0001855. Published: Jul 19, 26, Aug 01, 09 2018. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as ZDE DESIGNS at 2755 Williams Way Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Zachary Daniel Eichert (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual, Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jul 10, 2018. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Adela Bustos. FBN Number: 2018‑0001973. Published: Jul 19, 26, Aug 01, 09 2018.


INDEPENDENT CLASSIFIEDS

LEGALS

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as G M FENCE COMPANY at 30 Plumas Ave, Goleta CA 93117; Gerardo R. Martinez II (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Gerardo R. Martinez II Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jul 02, 2018. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2018‑0001906. Published: Jul 19, 26, Aug 01, 09 2018. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as SANTA BARBARA ART WORKS at 28 East Victoria Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101; UCP Work Inc. 5320 Carpinteria Avenue Suite G, CA 93013 This business is conducted by an Corporation, Signed: Jacob Allio Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jul 11, 2018. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jacob Allio. FBN Number: 2018‑0001985. Published: Jul 19, 26, Aug 01, 09 2018. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as GREEN RAY SCIENCES at 1028 Via Regina Santa Barbara, CA 93111‑1340; David Bruce Mills (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual, Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jul 12, 2018. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Rachel N. Hillman. FBN Number: 2018‑0002009. Published: Jul 19, 26, Aug 01, 09 2018. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as ELDER STUDIO at 1485 East Valley Road, Studio 8 Santa Barbara, CA 93108; Carabetta & Sanders, LLC 2020 Alameda Padre Serra #223 Santa Barbara, CA 93103 This business is conducted by an Limited Liability Company, Signed: George Sanders, Managing Member Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jul 12, 2018. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Melissa Mercer. FBN Number: 2018‑0002020. Published: Jul 19, 26, Aug 01, 09 2018. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as MACS BURRITOS at 501 Anacapa St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Edwin Isidro Magana 1517 Castillo St Apt #10 Santa Barbara, CA 93101 This business is conducted by an Individual, Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jun 25, 2018. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2018‑0001841. Published: Jul 19, 26, Aug 01, 09 2018. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as RANCHO DEL MAR at 662 Vereda Del Ciervo Goleta, CA 93117; Lili Earline Walker Schafer (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual, Signed:. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jul 16, 2018. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Tara Jaya Jayasinghe. FBN Number: 2018‑0002041. Published: Jul 19, 26, Aug 01, 09 2018. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as EDUCATIONAL INTERVENTION SERVICES/EIS at 662 Vereda Del Ciervo Goleta, CA 93117; Lili Earline Walker Schafer (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual, Signed:. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jul 16, 2018. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Tara Jaya Jayasinghe. FBN Number: 2018‑0002043. Published: Jul 19, 26, Aug 01, 09 2018.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as LIGHTHOUSE COFFEE & BEER/ LIGHTHOUSE COFFEE AND BEER at 201 Santa Cruz Boulevard Santa Barbara, CA 93109; Mesa Coffee, LLC (same address) This business is conducted by an Limited Liability Company, Signed: Chris Chiarappa, Manager. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jul 03, 2018. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2018‑0001932. Published: Jul 19, 26, Aug 01, 09 2018. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as BERRY CREATIVES at 24 La Vuelta Rd Santa Barbara, CA 93108; Sally J Berry (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual, Signed: Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jul 11, 2018. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Rachel N. Hillman. FBN Number: 2018‑0001995. Published: Jul 19, 26, Aug 01, 09 2018. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as JOSUE’S AUTO DETAILING at 158 Walnut Lane Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Josue David Arias Leiva (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual, Signed:. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jun 28, 2018. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Margarita Silva. FBN Number: 2018‑0001889. Published: Jul 19, 26, Aug 01, 09 2018.

NAME CHANGE IN THE MATTER OF Gustavo Alonzo Hernandez ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 18CV03024 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: Gustavo Alonzo Hernandez TO: Gustavo Alonzo Leor THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING August 22, 2018 9:30 am, Dept 6, Courthouse, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101. A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated: June 25, 2018 by Darrel E. Parker, Executive Officer; Terri Chavez, Deputy Clerk; Pauline Maxwell, Judge of the Superior Court. Published: JUL 05, 12, 19, 26, 2018. IN THE MATTER OF Christina Antonia Kolb ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 18CV03130 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: Christina Antonia Kolb TO: Christina Antonia Aguirre‑Kolb THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a

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PHONE 965-5205

written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING September 12, 2018 9:30 am, Dept 6, Courthouse, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101. A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated: June 25, 2018 by Darrel E. Parker, Executive Officer; Terri Chavez, Deputy Clerk; Pauline Maxwell, Judge of the Superior Court. Published: JUL 05, 12, 19, 26, 2018. IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF YUE LI TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 18CV03319 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: ANDREA YIHAN TONG TO: ANDREA LEHAN TONG THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. NOTICE OF HEARING Aug 29, 2018 9:30am, Dept 6, Courthouse, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated Jun 26, 2017. By Pauline Maxwell. of the Superior Court. Darrel E. Parker, Executive Officer; By, Teri Chavez Published. Jul 12, 19, 26. Aug 1 2018. IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF AUSTIN TREVILLIAN HERRICK TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 18CV03078 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: AUSTIN TREVILLIAN HERRICK TO: AUSTIN HERRICK TREVILLIAN THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. NOTICE OF HEARING Aug 29, 2018 9:30am, Dept 6, Courthouse, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated Jun 26, 2017. By Pauline Maxwell. of the Superior Court. Darrel E. Parker, Executive Officer; By, Teri Chavez Published. Jul 12, 19, 26. Aug 1 2018.

NOTICE TO CREDITORS AMENDED NOTICE to CREDITORS In re Charles C. and Georgetta M. Craviotto Survivor’s Trust, dated March 18, 2005 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF Santa Barbara CASE: 18PR00300 Notice is hereby given to the credtors and contingent creditors of Georgetta M. Craviotto (Decedent), that all persons having claims against decedent are required to file them with the Santa Barbara Superior Court, Anacapa Division, at 1100 Anacapa Street, PO Box 21107, Santa Barbara, CA 93121‑1107 and deliver a copy to James Craviotto, as trustee of the Georgette M. Craviotto Survivor’s Trust, dated March 18, 2005, of which Decedent was the settlor, at the Law Offices of James F. Cote, 222 East Carrillo Street, Suite 207, Santa Barbara, California 93101, as provided in Probate Code 1215 within the later of 4 months after July 19, 2018, (the date of the first publication of notice to creditors) or, if notice is mailed or personally delivered to you, 60 days after the date this notice is

mailed or personally delivered to you, or you must petition to file a late claim as provided in Probate Code 19103. For your protection, you are encouraged to file your claim by certified mail, with return receipt requested. Dated 7/10/18. Published Jul 19, 26. Aug 1, 9 2018.

SUMMONS SUMMONS (CITACION JUDICIAL) NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: (AVISO AL DEMANDADO): Charity Lynn Dubberley, and DOES 1 through 10 YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF: (LO ESTA DEMANDANDO EL DEMANDANTE): Madel Refugio Preciado NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below. You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this Summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff. A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use your for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self‑Help Center(www.courtinfo. ca.­gov/selfhelp), If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money and property may be taken without further warning from the court. There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www. lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self‑Help Center (www. courtinfo.ca.­gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association. Tiene 30 DIAS DE CALENDARIO despues de que le entreguen esta citacion y papeles legales papa presentar una respuesta por escrito en esta corte y hacer que se entregue una copia al demandante. Una carta o una llamada telefonica no lo protegen. Su respuesta por escrito tiene que estar en formato legal correcto si desea que procesen su caso en la corte. Es posible que haya un formulario que usted pueda usar para su respuesta. Puede encontrar estos formularios de la corte y mas information en el Centro de Ayuda de las Cortes de California (www.­ courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp/espanol/), en la biblioteca de leyes de su condado o en la corte que le quede mas cerca. Si no puede pagar la cuota de presentacion, pida al secretario de la corte que le de un formulario de exencion de pago de cuotas. Si no presenta su respuesta a tiempo, puede perder el caso por incumplimiento y la corte le podra quitar su sueldo, dinero y bienes sin mas advertencia. Hay otros requisitos legales. Es recomendable que llame a un abogado inmediatamente. Si no conoce a un abogado, puede llamar a un servicio de remision a abogados. Si no puede pagar a un abogado, es posible que cumpla con los requisitos para obtener servicios legales gratuitos de un programa de servicios legales sin fines de lucro. Puede encontrar estos grupos sin fines de lucro. Puede encontrar estos grupos sin fines de lucro en el sitio web de California Legal Services, (www.­ lawhelpcalifornia. org), en el Centro de Ayuda de las Cortes de California, (www.courtinfo.ca.­ gov/selfhelp/espanol/) o poniendose en contacto con la corte o el colegio de abogados locales. CASE NO: 18CV01063 The name and address of the court is: (El nombre y direccion de la corte es) Superior Court for the State of California, County of Santa Barbara 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. The name, address, and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney, or plaintiff without an attorney, is: (El nombre, la direccion y el numero de telefono del abogado del demandante, o del demandante que no tiene abogado, es): Douglas Russell Hayes. 125 E. Victoria St., Ste H, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; (805) 966‑4171 DATE: 03/2/2018, Darrel E. Parker, Executive Officer, By Penny Wooff, Deputy (Delegado) Published: Jul 12, 19, 26, Aug 01, 2018.

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E M A I L S A L E S @ I N D E P E N D E N T. C O M

NOTICE OF ELECTION NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that a General Municipal Election will be held in the City of Goleta, on Tuesday, the 6th of November 2018, for the following Measures and Officers: Submitting to the voters at the General Municipal Election to be held on November 6, 2018, the following: • One (1) Mayor for full term of two years. • Two (2) Members of the City Council for full terms of four years.

“Shall an ordinance be adopted establishing an annual salary for members of the City Council set at seventy-five percent (75%) of the nonfamily household median income for the City of Goleta as determined by the United States Census Bureau (resulting in a salary of $42,134) and for the Mayor at ninety percent (90%) of the nonfamily household median income for the City of Goleta (resulting in a salary of $50,561)?” “Shall an ordinance be adopted establishing a Cannabis Business Tax on gross receipts of cannabis businesses from the sale of cannabis and related products, whether at wholesale or retail, at a rate not to exceed 10%, with initial rates of 5% (retailers), 2% (manufacturers), 4% (cultivators), and 1% (distributors and nurseries) estimated to raise $334,000 to $1,423,000 for unrestricted general revenue purposes, such as street repair, parks and police, until ended by voters?”

Yes No

Yes

No

The nomination period for these offices begins on July 16, 2018 and closes on August 10, 2018, at 12:00 p.m. If nomination papers for an incumbent officer of the city are not filed by August 10, 2018, the nomination period is extended to August 15, 2018, at 5:00 p.m. If no one or only one person is nominated for an elective office, appointment to the elective office may only be made as prescribed by Section 10229 of the Elections Code of the State of California. The polls will be open between the hours of 7:00 a.m. and 8:00 p.m. Deborah Lopez City Clerk

NOTIFICACIÓN DE ELECCIONES POR LA PRESENTE SE NOTIFICA que se llevará a cabo una Elección Municipal General en la ciudad de Goleta, el martes 6 de noviembre de 2018 sobre las siguientes medidas y funcionarios: En la Elección Municipal General que se llevará a cabo el 6 de noviembre de 2018 se someterá lo siguiente a los votantes: • Un (1) alcalde por un término completo de dos años. • Dos (2) miembros del concejo municipal por dos términos completos de cuatro años.

“Se debería adoptar una ordenanza que establezca un sueldo anual para miembros del concejo municipal fijado en setenta y cinco por ciento (75%) de los ingresos promedio de un hogar no familiar para la ciudad de Goleta según determinado por la oficina de censos de Estados Unidos (lo que resulta en un sueldo de $42,134), y para el alcalde, de noventa por ciento (90%) de los ingresos promedio de un hogar no familiar para la ciudad de Goleta (lo que resulta en un sueldo de $50,561)?” ¿Se debería adoptar una ordenanza que establezca un impuesto comercial de cannabis sobre los ingresos brutos de negocios de cannabis proveniente de la venta de cannabis y productos relacionados, ya sea al por mayor o al por menor, a una tasa que no exceda el 10%, con tasas iniciales de 5% (minoristas), 2% (productores), 4% (cultivadores), y 1% (distribuidores y viveros) que se estima reunir $33.000 a $1.423.000 con la finalidad de obtener ingresos generales ilimitados para, por ejemplo, reparación de calles, parques, policía, hasta que los votantes lo culminen?

Sí No

No

El período de nominación para estos funcionarios comienza el 16 de julio de 2018 y culmina el 10 de agosto de 2018 a las 12:00 p.m. Si los papeles de nominación para un funcionario municipal titular no se presentan antes del 10 de agosto de 2018, el período de nominación se extenderá al 15 de agosto de 2018 a las 5:00 p.m. Si no se nomina a nadie o solamente a una persona para un cargo electivo, se puede realizar el nombramiento al cargo elegido según lo dispuesto por la Sección 10229 del Código Electoral del Estado de California. Los centros electorales estarán abiertos de las 7:00 a.m. a las 8:00 p.m. Deborah Lopez Funcionaria municipal INDEPENDENT.COM

JULY 19, 2018

THE INDEPENDENT

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Santa Barbara Independent, 07/19/18  

July 19, 2018, Vol. 32, No. 653

Santa Barbara Independent, 07/19/18  

July 19, 2018, Vol. 32, No. 653