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NEWS

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ARTS

APR. 5-12, 2018 VOL. 32 ■ NO. 638

I

ENTERTAINMENT

WINE

GRAPES OF PAST EXPLORING SANTA BARBARA'S WINE HISTORY

• 638

BY MATT KETTMANN

P. 27

STATE ST. ART REVIVAL P. 9 ANTIOCH ANNIVERSARY P. 25 LU C I D I T Y F E ST IVAL P. 63 CHILE RELLENO BURRITOS P. 55 REMEMBERING

ALLAN GHITTERMAN P. 19

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Shakespeare and Shaw Like You’ve Never Seen Before! Two Nights, Two Different Programs from New York City’s Acclaimed Theater Company!

Saint Joan

Thu, Apr 19 / 7 PM (note special time) UCSB Campbell Hall Tickets start at $25 $15 all students (with valid ID)

Hamlet

Fri, Apr 20 / 7 PM (note special time) UCSB Campbell Hall Tickets start at $25 $15 all students (with valid ID)

Contact the A&L Ticket Office for onstage seating options, available both nights. Event Sponsors: Jody & John Arnhold

Event Sponsors: Jody & John Arnhold, Siri & Bob Marshall

Musical America’s 2016 Instrumentalist of the Year

Only West Coast Performance of a Dazzling Program of Short Works Specially Commissioned for Jennifer Koh

Jennifer Koh, violin Shared Madness

Featured Composers: Vijay Iyer, Gabriel Kahane, John Harbison, Julia Wolfe and others

Fri, Apr 27 / 7 PM (note special time) / St. Anthony’s Chapel Garden Street Academy, 2300 Garden St. $35 / $10 all students (with valid ID)

“Koh has become one of the most impressive and expressive violinists on the scene.” – Mark Swed, Los Angeles Times Koh will perform selections from this groundbreaking adventure that celebrates the creative dialogue between composer and performer as well as the commitment to fostering new music.

Back by Popular Demand

Joey Alexander Trio

Sun, Apr 29 / 7 PM (note special time) / UCSB Campbell Hall $40 / $25 / $10 all students (with valid ID)

“I love everything about his playing – his rhythm, his confidence, his understanding of the music.” – Wynton Marsalis A three-time Grammy Award-nominated jazz pianist, Joey Alexander has a “sophisticated harmonic palette and a dynamic sensitivity” (The New York Times) that draws comparisons to masters like Bill Evans. Self-taught off his father’s Thelonious Monk records as a 6-year-old in Indonesia, his musical intuition and passion have made him one of the jazz world’s most celebrated young artists. Event Sponsors: Jody & John Arnhold, Elizabeth & Andrew Butcher

Corporate Season Sponsor:

2

(805) 893-3535 www.ArtsAndLectures.UCSB.edu


Daniel H. Pink

When: The Scientific Secrets of Perfect Timing

Nadine Burke Harris, M.D. Healing the Long-Term Effects of Childhood Adversity

Mon, Apr 9 / 7:30 PM / UCSB Campbell Hall $25 / $10 all students (with valid ID)

Mon, Apr 16 / 7:30 PM UCSB Campbell Hall

FREE

MONDAY!

“Applying [these principles] could have dramatic impacts on one’s life and on society.” The Washington Post They say timing is everything, yet we make important decisions such as when to start a business, ask for a raise or get married based on intuition and guesswork. In his new book, When, bestselling author Daniel Pink draws on a rich trove of research from psychology, biology and economics to unlock the secret of how best to live, work and succeed.

“[Burke Harris] delivers revelations about what is really going on – in our bodies, in our families, in our communities – as a result of childhood toxic stress, as well as targeted solutions for individual healing.” – Ashley Judd, actress and activist Presented in association with CALM, KIDS Network, Santa Barbara Neighborhood Clinics and the Resiliency Project Thematic Learning Initiative: Creating a Meaningful Life

Building a Resilient Community: Turning Adversity into Opportunity Moderator: John Palminteri

Mon, Apr 23 / 7:30 PM / UCSB Campbell Hall / $5

First Free Ascent of the Dawn Wall

Tommy Caldwell

The Push: A Climber’s Search for the Path Wed, May 16 / 7:30 PM / UCSB Campbell Hall $30 (Includes copy of Push. Limited availability.) $20 / $10 all students (with valid ID)

“Caldwell thrives on the virtually impossible.” The New York Times Tommy Caldwell made history when he free climbed El Capitan’s Dawn Wall, an epic ascent that took him more than seven years to accomplish. Caldwell has been held hostage by militants in the Kyrgyzstani mountains, he lost an index finger in an accident and his wife and main climbing partner left him. Emerging from hardship with renewed determination, Caldwell conquered the impossible and redefined his sport.

Aging: The Lifelong Process that Unites Us All Moderator: Catherine Remak

Sat, May 19 / 3 PM (note special time) / UCSB Campbell Hall / $5 Keynote Speaker

Keynote Speaker

Nicholas Kristof

Ashton Applewhite

“[An] inspiring guide for anyone who wonders what difference a single person can make in building a more hopeful world.” – Former U.S. President Jimmy Carter

“Vibrant, energetic, fact-filled and funny, This Chair Rocks is a call to arms not just for older people but for our whole society.” – Katha Pollitt, poet, essayist and The Nation columnist

Taking Action: Resiliency, Commitment and Responsibility

This Chair Rocks: How Ageism Warps Our View of Long Life

Two-time Pulitzer Prize-winning journalist and human rights advocate Nicholas Kristof is a master storyteller with a peerless perspective on the events that shape our world, giving a voice to the voiceless.

Event Sponsors: Dorothy Largay & Wayne Rosing

Why is society’s view of aging so grim when the lived reality is so different? Anti-ageism activist and author Ashton Applewhite declares that it’s time for age pride. A TED2017 mainstage speaker, Applewhite reveals the untapped possibilities of late life – in our communities, at work and in ourselves.

Presented in association with: For information about a related TLI event and how to get a free copy of the book A Path Appears by Nicholas Kristof and Sheryl WuDunn visit www.Thematic-Learning.org

For information about a related TLI event and how to get a free copy of Ashton Applewhite’s book, This Chair Rocks, by visit www.Thematic-Learning.org

Books will be available for purchase and signing at each event

Corporate Season Sponsor:

(805) 893-3535 www.ArtsAndLectures.UCSB.edu 3


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Join Us for an Open House! Saturday, April 14th 10:30 to 1:00

Games, Crafts, Snacks and a special youth theatre show!!! Come see Boxtales Youth Theatre Group

FREE 11:30 am

401 N. Fairview Ave Please drop by or RSVP 805.683.9383 MCSSB.org American Montessori Society

Montessori Center School 5


Employment Law Attorneys OVER ONE HUNDRED EIGHTY FIVE MILLION DOLLARS ($185,000,000.00) OBTAINED FOR CALIFORNIA EMPLOYEES*

ANTICOUNI & ASSOCIATES Wrongful Termination, Sexual Harassment, Unpaid Overtime, Discrimination, Employment and Severance Agreements, Misclassification – Independent Contractors WINTER RENTALS Ski & Snowboard Tune Ups and Wax

Are foot pain and stiffness keeping you from what you love?

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Know Your Rights (805) 845-0864 AnticouniLaw.com *Every case is different. Past successes do not guarantee a result in your matter.

Editor in Chief Marianne Partridge Executive Editor Nick Welsh Senior Editors Michelle Drown, Tyler Hayden, Matt Kettmann Editor at Large Ethan Stewart Photography Editor Paul Wellman News Reporters Kelsey Brugger, Keith Hamm Opinions Editor Jean Yamamura Columnists Gail Arnold, Roger Durling, Jerry Roberts, Starshine Roshell

Photos courtesy of Toad&Co (top) Patagonia (bottom)

NOW THAT YOU HAVE CONSULTED WITH DR. GOOGLE, COME SEE US FOR A SECOND OPINION!

Executive Arts Editor Charles Donelan Calendar Editor Terry Ortega Arts Writer Richie DeMaria Copy Chief Jackson Friedman Copy Editor Athena Tan Art Directors Ben Ciccati, Caitlin Fitch Digital Editor Brandon A. Yadegari Digital Assistant Chinelo Ufondu Multimedia Interns Julia Lee, Julia Nguyen Sports Editor John Zant Food Writer George Yatchisin Contributors Rob Brezsny, John Dickson, Brandon Fastman, Rebecca Horrigan, Eric HvolbØll, Tom Jacobs, Shannon Kelley, Mitchell Kriegman, Kevin McKiernan, Ninette Paloma, Michael Redmon, Brian Tanguay, Gabriel Tanguay, Tom Tomorrow, Cynthia Carbone Ward, Maggie Yates Editorial Interns Erika Carlos, Molly Forster, Nicole Kludjian, Blaze Manzotti, Aiyana Moya, Jasmine Rodriguez, Noah Shachar Columnist Emeritus Barney Brantingham Founding Staff Emeriti Audrey Berman, George Delmerico, Richard Evans Honorary Consigliere Gary J. Hill Copy Kids Elijah Lee Bryant, Henry and John Poett Campbell, Chloë Bee Ciccati, Izadora and Savina Hamm, Madeline Rose and Mason Carrington Kettmann, Izzy and Maeve McKinley, Miranda Tanguay Ortega, Sawyer Tower Stewart Office Manager/Legal Advertising Tanya Spears Guiliacci Administrative Assistant Gustavo Uribe Accounting Assistant Tobi Feldman Distribution Scott Kaufman Advertising Representatives Camille Cimini Fruin, Suzanne Cloutier, Rachel Gantz, Lynn Goodman, Laszlo Hodosy, Tonea Songer, Brandi Webber Marketing and Promotions Manager Emily Cosentino Production Manager Marianne Kuga Advertising Designers Elaine Madsen, Alex Melton

GET BACK TO YOUR FAMILY, YOUR HOBBIES, AND YOUR LIFE. NATURALLY AND WITHOUT SURGERY.

Director of Advertising Sarah Sinclair Publisher Brandi Rivera

RECLAIM YOUR LIFESTYLE WITH REGENERATIVE THERAPY Contact Foot & Ankle Concepts to learn about a game-changing regenerative therapy to treat conditions of your foot and ankle. Dr.ALL Matthews Dr. WITHOUT Langroudi IN THE OFFICE AND SURGERY.Dr. Chandler

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The Independent is available, free of charge, limited to one copy per reader. Back issues cost $2 and may be purchased at the office. The Independent may be distributed only by authorized circulation staff or authorized distributors. No person may, without the permission of publisher, take more than one copy of each Independent issue. Subscriptions are available, paid in advance, for $120 per year. Send subscription requests with name and address to subscriptions@independent.com. The contents of the Independent are copyrighted 2018 by the Santa Barbara Independent, Inc. No part may be reproduced without permission from the publisher. The publisher assumes no responsibility for unsolicited material. A stamped, self-addressed envelope must accompany all submissions expected to be returned. The Independent is published every Thursday at 12 E. Figueroa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Advertising rates on request: (805) 965-5205. Classified ads: (805) 965-5208. The Independent is available on the internet at independent.com. Press run of the Independent is 40,000 copies. Audited certification of circulation is available on request. The Independent is a legal adjudicated newspaper — court decree no. 157386.

Contact information: 12 E. Figueroa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101 PHONE (805) 965-5205; FAX (805) 965-5518; CLASSIFIED (805) 965-5208 EMAIL news@independent.com, letters@independent.com Staff email addresses can be found at independent.com/info


OPINIONS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 16

Angry Poodle Barbecue . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  16 In Memoriam . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  19 Letters / This Modern World . . . . . . . . . . . . .  23

Voices . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  25

THE WEEK.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 LIVING.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47 Living Page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47

Starshine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49

Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 50

The Restaurant Guy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57

COVER STORY Grapes of Past

Dining Out Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59

(Matt Kettmann)

Feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67

Exploring Santa Barbara’s Wine History

ON THE COVER: left: Catherine Cavaletto is the caretaker of San Jose Winery, located in the hills above Goleta. Photo by Paul Wellman. right: Santa Barbara circa 1906. Courtesy photo.

NEWS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9

News Feature . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  15

ONLINE NOW AT

INDEPENDENT.COM

A&E. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 Arts Life . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61 Pop, Rock & Jazz . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 63 Reviews . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 65

FILM & TV. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 67 Movie Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 69

ODDS & ENDS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Obituaries . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18 Rob Brezsny’s Free Will Astrology . . . . . . . 73

CLASSIFIEDS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 74

Mark Zuckerberg

ARE YOU BOYCOTTING FACEBOOK? Most of our readers say they are, but are they really? ��������������������

independent.com/polls

Das Williams

PAUL WELLMAN

27

FOOD & DRINK .. . . . . . . . . . . 55

UCSB political science student Aiyana Moya loves carving waves, whether at Rincon or Salmon Creek near her hometown of Sebastopol. This writer-to-be and Isla Vista resident is penning articles about food and drink for us, from Los Olivos hot dogs and Islands burgers to healthy meal plans by delivery. “I get to hear about the stories behind the restaurants and food and hear people talk about their passions,” said Aiyana of her internship. “It is all very inspiring.”

TECHCRUNCH

Gypsy Canyon’s Deborah Hall makes fortified wine called Angelica from vines she believes date back to 1887.

STORYTELLING SURFER

PAUL WELLMAN

volume 32, number 638, Apr. 5-12, 2018 PAUL WELLMAN

CONTENTS

SHOCKS TO THE LIBRARY SYSTEM

We crunched the numbers and found the winners and losers. ���������

independent.com/library-budgets

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A WOMEN’S AUXILIARY FUNDRAISER benefitting The Music Academy of the West’s Full-scholarship Program

POP UP FURNITURE SALE Saturday April 14, 9am-3pm At the Music Academy of the West 1070 Fairway Road A one-day only sale of antique, vintage, and gently used furniture. Come shop from storage containers full of tables, chairs, couches, love seats, armoires, designer outdoor furniture, art, lamps, and more. PLEASE NO EARLY BIRDS | MOVERS AVAILABLE FOR HIRE | PARKING ON SITE | CREDIT CARDS ONLY

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MAR. 29-APR. 5, 2018

NEWS of the WEEK

by KELSEY BRUGGER @kelseybrugger, KEITH HAMM, TYLER HAYDEN @TylerHayden1, NICK WELSH, and JEAN YAMAMURA, with INDEPENDENT STAFF

W

MISSING LINK: At Santa Barbara’s Amtrak station, Traffic Solutions staffers showed off folding bikes — which ride as luggage and can take commuters the last mile to work — to riders on the new morning train, which suffered an hour delay due to first-day track-switching errors.

that compounded when the off-schedule Surfliner then had to wait at Oxnard for a southbound Metrolink, and again at Seacliff for a southbound Amtrak. Dyson said a number of the riders boarding in Los Angeles were students headed back to school after spring break; they normally would have taken the 7 a.m. train, which was retimed to become Santa Barbara’s morning commuter. About 25-30 people got on board at Ventura, said Story, who is chair of RailPAC’s Santa Barbara unit. Bergener said a total of 308 people took the new train that morning, about 182 of them using 10-trip passes and 32 a monthly pass. Additional siding track in the Padaro Lane area has been identified by RailPAC as

a location that would help prevent delays due to conflicts between north- and southbound train schedules, Dyson said. A passenger train might idle there for several minutes about five times a day, he theorized, and then rumble on. No siding exists between Seacliff and east Santa Barbara, he explained, and trains must therefore wait in Ventura until the track through Santa Barbara is clear. Hart noted that passengers were very patient with the delay and remained upbeat about the new service. He also promised the snafu would be worked out. Tuesday, however, was no different. This time, a mechanical problem with the locomotive delayed the train in Los Angeles, said Bergener. —Jean Yamamura

Culture. Santa Barbara Beautiful, along with the Downtown Organization and City Hall, contributed enough money to put out an open call for submissions on November 2 and convene a panel of judges with representatives from the S.B. Museum of Art, the city’s Historic Landmarks Commission, and other organizations. There were zero restrictions, said Rubin.“Artists could submit whatever they could dream.” The works were presented anonymously to eliminate any possible influence of name recognition. Between the call and the extended deadline in late January, however, Santa Barbara was hit with the doubly devastating blows of the Thomas Fire and 1/9 Debris Flow. The disasters certainly changed the direction of the pieces, said Rubin. “A lot of the artists—people who all live here—used their art as a way to address recovery and regeneration.” For instance, “Permission to Heal,” an installation made primarily of earth and sandbags created by brooke smiley and Daria Izad, is designed as a communal space for reflection and mourning.

PAU L WELLM AN

F

Adams, Foothill, Kellogg, and Montecito Union elementary schools each received the 2018 California Distinguished Schools honor, a statewide recognition of elementary schools that have made exceptional gains in academic content and performance standards. The recognition is a part of the Distinguished Schools Program, which returns after a three-year break and replaces the California Gold Ribbon Schools Program.

TRANSPORTATION

State Street Art Revival or the first time in a decade, State Street is playing host to public art installations, this time a series of eight sculptures by area artists along the lower downtown corridor. The official opening of the State of the Art Gallery takes place on 1st Thursday, April 5, accompanied by pop-up lectures, concerts, and workshops. The sculptures, all meant to invite interaction, include “California Love Locks” by Patrick Melroy, a California-shaped, chainlinked piece that will fill with locks attached by passersby. “Storycatcher Mailbox” will accept letters of praise and grief, with the artist, Danielle Siano, holding weekly letter readings with guest speakers.“These projects are intended to draw people out of the everyday grind, sparking powerful curiosity and compelling them to play along,” said Melroy. The loss of state redevelopment funding had put a stop to State Street art, but the city recently expressed an interest in reviving the tradition, explained Sarah York Rubin, director of the county’s Office of Arts &

EDUCATION

PAINTED STEEL: Artist Pattie Porter Firestone’s sculpture “Leaves of Grass” is at the corner of State and Canon Perdido streets.

Though funding for the series is for this year only, Rubin hopes it proves popular enough to keep the tradition going. “We’re hoping people find it intriguing,” she explained, noting the installations are a visual reminder of the fact that Santa Barbara is “packed with practicing artists.” The project is also part of efforts to revive the vacancyheavy downtown area. “It’s a reason to come to State Street if you haven’t in a while,” said —Tyler Hayden Rubin.

Two early-morning flights out of Santa Barbara airport are on hiatus until an overnight resurfacing project ends. United’s 5:30 a.m. flight to Denver and 5:45 a.m. to Los Angeles will be suspended from 4/8 to 5/25 while the main runway is resurfaced with asphalt after the existing grooved tarmac is removed. A second phase occurs 6/10-7/6. The daytime flights continue as usual. The $7.7 million job, won by Granite Construction, is funded through the Federal Aviation Administration, with 9 percent coming from airport sources. With SBCC/UCSB and Carpinteria bus lines slated to change, riders are asked to take a survey at sbmtd .gov/servicechanges to give input. Line 15x will be routed around SBCC and then go in one direction from UCSB to Isla Vista. Highway construction has delayed Line 21x, and the Metropolitan Transit District proposes combining it with Line 20 for more frequent service. Lines 7, 10, and 27 are also affected. Information on April meetings to discuss the route changes can be found at the web link.

LAW & DISORDER COU RTESY

hen the new morning train pulled into Santa Barbara’s Amtrak station Monday morning, spilling several anxious Cottage hospital workers onto the platform, it had moved 248 people across Ventura County, said Jennifer Bergener, whose agency, LOSSAN, runs the Pacific Surfliner. It was, however, about an hour late. Nonetheless, the Surfliner beat highway traffic from Ventura, according to Dennis Story, who had welcomed new passengers at the Ventura station as a rail ambassador. Traffic stalled on the 101 on his drive back to Santa Barbara, Story said, and the train got to town first. The hospital workers’ shifts started at 7 a.m., and they hurried to the waiting transit buses, which worked “seamlessly” to take people to their jobs, said Gregg Hart, deputy executive director for S.B. County Association of Governments (SBCAG), which has been coordinating the commuter effort on the Santa Barbara County end. Among the greeters on the platform were Traffic Solutions staffers, showing off folding bicycles—available for $50 and 40 commutes—that count as luggage on the train and can be used for “last mile” transportation to work. Hillary Blackerby with the Metropolitan Transit District said 25 people caught the shuttle into Santa Barbara and 45 took Goleta’s two shuttle buses. Having risen at 3 a.m. to catch the maiden commuter journey in Burbank, Paul Dyson, president of the Rail Passenger Association (RailPAC), said a prolonged delay is not unusual considering that there’s only one track north of Los Angeles. At the Camarillo station, the dispatcher routed the train to the wrong platform, Dyson observed, resulting in a 20-minute back-and-forth

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Morning Train Beats Cars to Santa Barbara

NEWS BRIEFS

A crewmember aboard the USS Momsen (pictured) was taken by helicopter to Cottage Hospital on 4/1, suffering from symptoms of appendicitis. The Arleigh Burke–class destroyer had been in waters near Santa Barbara when the U.S. Coast Guard at Point Mugu was notified of the emergency. The woman was hoisted from the U.S. Navy ship by a Dolphin MH-65 ‘copter crew and was last reported to be in stable condition. Justine Van Ginderachter, 19, was killed when she was flung from an automobile in a two-car collision at the intersection of Hollister Avenue and Storke Road on 3/30. She was riding without a seat belt in an Uber vehicle based in Ventura; her fellow passenger was an 18-year-old man, also not seatbelted, who sustained minor injuries. One of the three occupants in the other vehicle suffered slight injuries. Ginderachter, from Belgium, was a student of the Education First language program. n 9


Saturday, April 21, 2:00pm, Main Stage

SEALEGACY Ocean conservation & activism collective

CONNECT THE CLIMATE DOTS Art & Writing Project all weekend long along Anacapa Street

CEC invites you to take part in an interactive project to visually connect the dots between climate change, a 300% increase in extreme weather events since 1980, and the solutions we can act on today to create a climate-resilient future. Poetry, connect-the-dot drawing, life-size yarn art, and letters to officials all roll into this activist experience for children & adults.

TWO DAYS OF LIVE MUSIC, ECO-SAVVY SPEAKERS AND LOCAL FOOD & DRINKS

FLORENCIA GARCIA Author, Eat Less Water

Headliners:

EXPLORE ECOLOGY ENVIRONMENTAL STEWARDSHIP AWARDS

COU RTESY PHOTOS

ENVIRONMENTAL HERO AWARDS

MAR. 29-APR. 5, 2018

NEW HOURS!

KING ZERO 6:00pm SATURDAY ONE TWO TREE 4:30PM SUNDAY

New! Beer & Wine garden open until 8:oopm on Saturday

Saturday, April 21, 12:45 pm, Kids Stage To be followed by recognition on Main Stage Plus great jams with Grateful Shred, Spencer the Gardner, Noach Tangeres & more! at 2:00 pm

VOLUNTEER AT #SBEARTHDAY

Join 300 fellow eco-warriors for a fun 3-hour shift. Free t-shirt and tasty snacks included! Sign up today at SBEARTHDAY.ORG/VOLUNTEER.

LEARN MORE AT SBEARTHDAY.ORG

from left: Peter Fleurat, Morgan Corey, and Sawyer Corey

Wrongful-Death Lawsuits Announced

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wo families of victims of the devastating Montecito debris flow are suing Southern California Edison in separate wrongful death claims filed last week. Both civil lawsuits allege that the utility company’s failure to maintain its Santa Paula electrical facilities caused the Thomas Fire to break out on December 4, 2017. The wind-driven blaze eventually became California’s largest wildfire, which denuded the mountainsides above Montecito, resulting in deadly debris flows on January 9, according to court documents. “I’m still in shock,” said Carie BakerCorey, a single mom who lost her 12-yearold daughter, Sawyer, and 25-year-old stepdaughter, Morgan. “It’s as if the girls will walk through the door any day. I just can’t believe my girls are gone.” Sawyer’s twin sister, Summer, survived. Her arm in a sling at the press conference on Hot Springs Road, Baker-Corey stood with attorneys Jason Wansor and Travis Logue of the Santa Barbara law firm Rogers, Sheffield & Campbell, and attorneys from the Los Angeles firm Panish Shea

& Boyle. “[Southern California Edison] knew about the significant risk of wildfires stemming from its unsafe equipment, aging infrastructure and ineffective vegetation management system for many years before the Thomas Fire began, and has been repeatedly fined or cited for failing to mitigate these risks,” according to a press release. Earlier in the morning a few blocks from the Baker-Corey press conference, relatives of another disaster victim held a similar media event, announcing their lawsuit for the wrongful death of 73-yearold Peter Fleurat. Similarly, the family charged the utility company is responsible for starting the Thomas Fire and causing the catastrophic landslides. “Had SCE acted responsibly, the Thomas Fire could have been prevented,” the suit alleged, adding, “Areas of the Los Padres National Forest that had not burned in the Thomas Fire, such as Mission Canyon, experienced none of the devastation that occurred nearby in Montecito despite receiving the same amount of rainfall.” —Kelsey Brugger

Funding Sought for Expanded Mental-Health Training

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coalition of mental-health advocates is gearing up to lobby Santa Barbara County supervisors to fund expanded mental-health training for county law enforcement personnel. Activists with Families Act! and NAMI (National Alliance on Mental Illness) are calling on the supervisors to find at least $350,000, part of which would fund at least one full-time position for what’s called Crisis Intervention Training (CIT), which teaches law enforcement officers how to de-escalate potentially violent interactions with those experiencing acute mental-health crises. The money would also fund a new “co-response team” in which a mental-health professional from Behavioral Wellness would be paired up with a Sheriff’s office deputy. They are hoping the supervisors will earmark some of the new tax revenues anticipated from the nascent cannabis market. Currently, the Sheriff’s Office funds the CIT program to the tune of six hours a week — but the durability of this funding stream is highly uncertain. To date, all deputies and jail personnel have undergone eight hours of CIT, but only a handful have undergone the 40-hour program. Sheriff Bill Brown and Undersheriff Barney Melekian have expressed enthusiastic verbal support for 10

PAU L WE LL M A N FI LE P HOTO

CONNECT THE CLIMATE DOTS AT THE SANTA BARBARA EARTH DAY FESTIVAL

Ventura County Sheriff’s deputies take part in counselor training courses, with actors creating four different difficult scenarios to handle.

the program, but they have cited chronic funding shortfalls. In Ventura County, a similar program received $250,000 a year, and 80 percent of all sworn officers have received 40 hours of training. One of the two candidates opposing Sheriff Brown in his bid for a third term is Lieutenant Eddie Hsueh, who got CIT started in Santa Barbara County two years ago. Hsueh, late in announcing his candidacy, is considered a long shot. But the issue of CIT will be central to his campaign. In addition, they’ll be lobbying to maintain the limited funding now in place to implement Laura’s Law, a three-year pilot program providing aggressive outreach — including intervention by a judge, if need be — for the most service-resistant people experiencing mental illness. —Nick Welsh


PAU L WELLM AN F I LE PHOTO

NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D Presenting the world’s finest classical artists since 1919

Darrell Parker (right) at a Juvenile Justice/Delinquency Prevention Commission meeting in 2016

Juvenile Court Moving Downtown

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onstruction began earlier this week at the downtown jury assembly building to create space for juvenile proceedings. For years, juvenile court has been located at the abandoned juvenile hall on Hollister Avenue. The move downtown will centralize court proceedings and save transportation costs of court staff, said Darrel Parker, CEO of the Superior Court. Some defense attorneys protested that the move would jeopardize the confidentiality of minors as they were moved through the building; they worried the court would blur the line between the way juvenile and adult court systems should operate. “People passionately expressed their concerns,” Parker said.“Some really good points were made.” He said he invited those people to walk around the building and look at the plans. Parker said fencing would be built to

obscure the view from the street. In addition, he said, security guards would empty the lobby when the minors were brought in. The move has been in the works for four years. The construction, which is projected to cost about $135,000, is mostly for interior remodeling such as lighting and heating, and there will be private space for attorneys to talk to their clients. Parker said the remodel would pay for itself by eliminating transportation costs from downtown each day for the bailiffs, court reporter, and security guards. “It makes it more efficient to reassign staff when the court goes dark,” he said. Defense attorneys said they would closely monitor how families and minors are treated when they come to court. The new facility is expected to be ready within a month or two. —Kelsey Brugger

Invasion-of-Privacy Lawsuit Against Deputy Moves Forward

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n invasion of privacy lawsuit filed against a Santa Barbara County Sheriff’s Office deputy who allegedly improperly availed himself of information gleaned from the County Jail database for personal use won a small but significant procedural victory last week. Bakersfield man Jeffrey Whitson claimed that former custody deputy Jake Malone looked at Whitson’s jail record multiple times in 2015. At the time, Malone was in the throes of a highly charged custody dispute with Whitson, who is the biological father of Malone’s wife. Whitson had been booked into County Jail in 2011 for public intoxication in Isla Vista. During a deposition in the custody dispute, Malone admitted having looked two times at Whitson’s jail information; later, he acknowledged the number was nine. Subsequent discovery indicates Whitson’s jail records were examined 36 times, though not all by Malone. Last week, Judge Donna Geck ruled that Whitson should be allowed judicially supervised access to Malone’s personnel

records to determine if Malone had been disciplined in the past for similar actions. With law enforcement officers, access to such information is legally barred absent a court hearing. Whitson’s attorney, Diane Weissburg, is a civil rights specialist focusing on abuse of electronic records. Weissburg argued that a large number of jail database searches could cause her client to be regarded in a prejudicial light. Because the jail’s database is connected to other statewide law enforcement databases, she said, her client could suffer more broadly from whatever inferences are drawn. County Counsel Mike Ghizzoni declined to comment on the case. In legal papers opposing Whitson, the county argued Malone’s actions would not be deemed “highly offensive to a reasonable person” because the invasion was so slight. In addition, the county argued Malone did not act with “reckless disregard” and that Whitson had not suffered “severe emotional distress.” Judge Geck also ruled that court records pertaining to the underlying custody dispute should be sealed. —Nick Welsh

Join the locals at Mesa Café Open daily for breakfast, lunch, dinner and happy hour Banquet room available

1972 Cliff Drive | mesacafesb.com | 805.966.5303 11


Living Well with Parkinson’s Saturday, April 28

Elk’s Lodge, 150 N. KELLOGG Ave., Santa Barbara, 9 am-3pm

An all-day symposium featuring Parkinson Disease experts:

Dr. Carrolee Barlow Parkinson’s Institute

Dr. Indu Subramani UCLA

Dr. Sarah Kempe-Mehl Dr. Erin Presant Central Coast Movement Disorder Specialists

REGISTER ONLINE: www.mypasb.com Or send $25 check to P.O. Box 6254, SB 93160-6254 Sponsored by Acadia Pharmaceuticals Abbott • Central Coast Home Health • Medtronic

NATIONAL LIBRARY WEEK APRIL 8-14 Bilingual Family Fun Carnival Sunday @ 2 pm Book Club/Book Match Monday @ 5:30 pm Tech Extravaganza for Kids Tuesday @ 3:30 pm Digital Archives Open House Wednesday 11 am - 1 pm Book Tasting for Kids Friday @ 3:30 pm Murder Mystery Party Friday 6:30 - 8:30 pm

For adults, Registration required

12

MAR. 29-APR. 5, 2018

County Curbs Library Admin Fees

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he long-awaited consultant report that examined how all the various libraries in the county are funded failed to answer the key question of what’s in the City of Santa Barbara’s administration fee. But it contained plentiful statistics on the relative health of the libraries, most of which appear to be starving. Amid the report’s many tables that compared and contrasted funding in the county and beyond, and Library advocate Judith Dale also populations served The 66-page report emphasized that both by individual libraries, was one showing per-person spending. Only the City of Santa city and county gave roughly $4 million to Barbara libraries, at $59.18 per capita, came the libraries; it urged the county to assert close to the state average of $73.71, a number a cap on administration fees, which were that reflects 2015-16. Next highest was Santa an issue with many of the 79 stakeholders Maria at $28.61. Lowest was Orcutt at $9.78. the consultants had interviewed. The At the Board of Supervisors’ review on supervisors did so. They also agreed to Dale’s Tuesday, the turning point came when Judith proposal to set aside 5 percent of the county’s Dale, the Buellton member of the Library per-capita funding as an “equity fund” this Advisory Committee, made several “painless year to reach libraries that needed more help. and fair” recommendations to mend parts Though the consultants’ suggested one-toof the ailing system. She proposed capping one match from cities for county funds administration fees at 20 percent, and didn’t fly—the ratio of people from the city basing it on county funding, which spoke or county that use each library varies greatly, to an issue that arose last June. Though the some argued—representatives from Goleta increase could bankrupt two branches, and Carpinteria indicated that funding from the City of Santa Barbara had proposed their cities was increasing. The remainder of Supervisor Janet Wolf’s doubling its admin fee — and basing it on total income — in order to recoup all multi-part motion instructed Goleta to the costs of managing the seven libraries work with Buellton and Solvang to form the beyond city borders. The increase was scaled new Library Zone 4 within a year, removing back, but the furor brought the dwindling the three from Santa Barbara’s Zone 1. Lomresources of the branches into focus and set poc’s Zone 2 and Santa Maria’s Zone 3 were —Jean Yamamura the county consultants in motion. unchanged.

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Parkinson Association of Santa Barbara 12th Annual Symposium

Vintners Brace for Chinese Wine Tariffs

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hina hit back on President Donald Trump’s proposed steel tariffs this week with $3 billion in new fees for fruit, nuts, pork, and other exports from the United States. The laundry list of 128 items includes wine, which will require an additional 15 percent tariff, a significant sum for the $82 million of wine that the country imported last year. Exporting to China is not a huge business for most Santa Barbara vintners, according to Nicholas Miller of The Thornhill Companies, whose family owns numerous vineyards and wine brands. But he sells grapes to other California brands that export, and he calls the mood right now “guarded denial,” explaining that vintners remain hopeful that the tariffs won’t actually be enacted. A few Santa Barbara wineries have invested considerable expense in China export, including Star Lane/Dierberg. “China is about 12 percent of our current export business but was one of our fastest

growing in my tenure here,” said Dierberg’s winemaker, Tyler Thomas. “[T]he tariffs may certainly create headwinds to building that as quickly as we had hoped.” Luckily, the winery still has a good amount of already-imported inventory so can keep the price steady for now, according to JiaMin Dierberg. But fresh off the phone with that importer, she was concerned, explaining, “Building brands in wholesale market will become more difficult as we are competing with wines from all over the world, over quality and price.” About four years ago, John Kochis founded a company called Aspira that grew to sell wine in 23 Chinese cities. He’s faced numerous challenges but calls the tariff the “final nail in the coffin.” He explained,“Even before the tariff, most customers were looking for wines with a case cost of under $30, which made for very lean margins. With the tariff, there is no room at all.” —Matt Kettman


NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D DEN N IS DER HA M

YO U ’ R E CO R D I A L LY I N V I T E D

C O M P L I M E N TA R Y

Hearing Screening Day Join residents, family and friends as John “Chuck” Sasala, M.A., F AAA., an Audiology and Speech Science expert with Hearing Aid Systems in Santa Barbara, offers individual hearing screenings throughout the day. Call today and schedule your FREE 15-minute screening appointment! Complimentary refreshments will be served.

Wednesday, April 11th SEDATED: A California Department of Fish & Wildlife game warden holds the 100-pound pregnant black bear that

EVENT

presumably followed a creek to Miramar Beach, where it was tranquilized and transported back to the mountains.

Complimentary Hearing Screening Day

TIME

9:00am - 4:00pm

PLACE

GranVida Senior Living and Memory Care 5464 Carpinteria Ave., Carpinteria, CA 93013

RSVP

Call 805.881.3175 by Monday, April 9th or register at GranVidaSeniorLiving.com/RSVP

Beach Day with a Bear

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female black bear made its way into the parking lot of a gated community along Miramar Beach on Monday. “The big joke was, ‘Who gave the bear the gate code?’” laughed Marsha Darin, whose family owns one of the seaside homes. Game wardens speculated that the bear followed a nearby creek to the beach and then climbed a staircase between two houses to the parking lot.“She was not at all aggressive,” Darin added. “She was hiding behind a palm tree.” California Department of Fish & Wildlife officers estimated that the cinnamon-

colored bear weighed about 100 pounds and was 10 years old, according to Andrew Hughan, a spokesperson for the agency.“She was in reasonably good health for her age— and there’s a couple more interesting things with this bear,” he said. She was pregnant. She was wearing a tag and GPS collar. And she was the bear whose paws, badly burned during the Thomas Fire, received skin grafts made from the skin of tilapia fish. Hughan added that tranquilizing the bear and moving her “up into the forest to suitable habitat was a textbook operation.”

Small town. Great life. EQUAL HOUSING OPPORTUNITY

SSL203-01ne v1 040518

CALM Auxiliary's

32nd Annual Celebrity Authors' Luncheon

—Keith Hamm

Saturday, April 21, 2018, 10:00 a.m. The Fess Parker-A DoubleTree Resort by Hilton

Lompoc’s Green Rush

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RCFE# 425802114

PAU L WEL LM AN FI LE PHOTO

annabis growers are swooping in to buy warehouse space in Lompoc. “I get multiple calls a week,” said realtor Tom Davidson. He recently brokered the sale of an 18,000-square-foot warehouse for $1.5 million. A 50,000-square-foot building recently sold for $3.1 million. Another is in escrow and is expected to close next week. Several other warehouses are on the market. “It’s probably the hottest thing that happened for Lompoc since the Space Shuttle,” said City Councilmember Jim Mosby. Joe Garcia, Lompoc Valley Cannabis Coalition The Lompoc City Council adopted a cannabis ordinance considered are 100 people who want to go there, there favorable to the industry: There is no limit are not 100 different locations,” Davidson on the number of retail storefronts allowed said of warehouse space. While Lompoc has a tradition of conserwithin city limits. Amsterdam-like lounges, rare in California, are permitted. And coun- vative values, a majority of councilmembers cilmembers recently sweetened the deal has a libertarian attitude toward cannabis. by refraining from levying city taxes on In contrast, nearby Santa Maria banned all cannabis businesses. Joe Garcia, president cannabis businesses. Davidson estimated of the Lompoc Valley Cannabis Coalition, that more than $20 million in agriculture estimated that as many as 500 new jobs will properties sold last year went to cannabis be created in Lompoc. But there is a finite growers west of Highway 101. Though that is number of properties where growing or not in the city limits, they are going to need extracting operations can take place.“If there a place to sell the product. —Kelsey Brugger

Simon Tolkien

Lisa See The Tea Girl of Hummingbird Lane

No Man's Land

Rona Barrett Gray Matters

Interviewers: Andrew Firestone Master of Ceremonies

Dianne Dixon Tom Weitzel Guest Interviewer: Ruta Lee Guest Authors:

Doors open at 10 a.m. for book sales and signing. Lunch served at 11:45 a.m.

Danya Belkin, Melissa Broughton, Kent Ferguson, Dr. Guy Clark, Steven Gilbar, Betsy J. Green, Gail Kearns & Lindsey Moran, Lida Sideris, Elizabeth Stewart Ph.D., Edie Littlefield Sundby, Howard & Judy Wang

For tickets call (805) 969-5590

calm4kids.org 13


presents The 38th Running of the

(& 5k Fun Run)*

Saturday June 23th, 2018 2018 REGISTRATION IS NOW OPEN !! www.sbhalfmarathon.com The 2018 t-shirt logo contest has started. Submit: racedirector@sbhalfmarathon.com FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK: SBHALFMARATHON

Half Marathon and 5k Race Routes

*Santa Barbara Half Marathon is in no way affilliated with the Santa Barbara Veterans Day Half Marathon, their race cancelation, or the overdue refunds that resulted. 14


MAR. 29-APR. 5, 2018

COMMUNITY

NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D

Sister Pauline: A Nun for All Seasons After 48 Years of Service, Devoted 80-Year-Old Nun Retires to Los Angeles

I

ER I K A CAR LOS

by Erika Carlos reached a breaking point. Archbishop Carn late January, Sister Pauline Krisdinal James Francis McIntyre, then head manich packed her bags and left the of the Los Angeles diocese, was outraged place she had called home for the by the sisters’ radical ideas, rejected their past 48 years. La Casa de Maria is plan outright, and barred them from teachwhere she had planned to continue ing in Catholic schools. When the Vatican, under the new pope, Paul VI, sided with her life of prayer and work until her final the archbishop, the Immaculate Heart days, but this path ended when the Montecito mudslides devastated the beautiful sisters renounced their vows and left the retreat center, rendering it totally inoperchurch, the largest Catholic order in the United States to do so. They then founded able. Remarkably, the Center for Spiritual Renewal, where Krismanich lived and the Immaculate Heart Community as an worked, remained wholly intact. As the ecumenical, independent group of women. people of Montecito continue to rebuild By 1970, La Casa de Maria was open to the their homes and community, Krismanpublic. Four years later, the community ich’s bittersweet departure from La Casa replaced the novitiate with the Immacude Maria to a permanent retirement home late Heart of Mary Center for Spiritual Renewal. in Los Angeles represents the passing of a This was around the same time that bygone era when a dedication to religious Krismanich, who had left her Brooklyn life was bound by rigid traditions. At a young age, Krismanich felt comconvent to seek the contemplative life in pelled to devote her life to religion. She a new way, encountered the Immaculate grew up in South Bend, Indiana, and Heart sisters. Immediately, Krismanich felt attended Holy Cross College for women “a directive from God” that led her to their near the University of Notre Dame. By the community. Here Krismanich worked as a time she graduated, Krismanich was cerbookkeeper and a spiritual counselor. She would “listen and try to help” the individutain “that what God wanted from me” was als and couples who stayed at the interfaith to become a nun. The year was 1948 and retreat center. Through her dedication, she Krismanich was 18 years old, the youngest age a woman could take religious vows. became known for her purity, faith, and She joined a cloistered convent in Brookadherence to tradition. lyn, where she led a simple life of silence, As the Immaculate Heart nuns pressed prayer, and work for 20 years. Simple, as forward with their revolutionary changes, well as rigorous: Krismanich described they nevertheless welcomed Krismanich how the nuns followed the ancient monasinto their community. She remained true tic ritual of praying throughout the day and to many of her traditional practices, attendnight, waking at midnight and then again ing daily mass at Mount Carmel Church, going to each prayer group at the center, at 5 a.m. “And we had an awful lot of cleaning,” Krismanich recalled. “Nuns — they and doing spiritual care work at Cottage clean too much. Everything was spotless!” Hospital every Wednesday. Throughout Then came Vatican II. In 1962, Pope these 48 years of service, Krismanich John XXIII called together a counsel of embraced her more radical sisters, finding Catholic clergy and laity to reevaluate herself “attracted to their joy.” A DIRECTIVE FROM GOD: Sister Pauline Krismanich (pictured) joined the Immaculate Heart nuns at Church liturgy with its rigid structure and On her free time, Krismanich prayed. La Casa de Maria in the early 1970s. She remembers being “attracted to their joy.” She was a constant presence at the cenpractices. He hoped this would help stem ter’s chapel, where she would sit next to a the declining numbers of practicing Catholics and bring the Church into the modern world. That radical philosophies. Their sisterhood predated the revo- window — not because it was good spiritual discipline, but period of revolutionary renewal and experimentation lasted lutionary spirit of the 1960s, some nuns becoming early “because she loved it.” “There are people that totally trust less than five years. For Krismanich, Vatican II presented an feminist theologians, some forming groups to reevaluate their tradition to be the key to life,” said Steve Jacobsen, opportunity to live the religious life differently. Though the the rituals and disciplines of traditional religious life prac- director of La Casa de Maria. “And Krismanich is one of monastery had offered her peace and contemplation, Kris- tices. Stephanie Glatt, formerly known as Sister Mary Steph- those people.” But she also drove around town with a license manich began to think about the world beyond the cloister. ano and now La Casa’s director emerita, had entered the plate reading “4RJESUS” and wore a loud, bedazzled Jesus Unknown to Krismanich, nuns belonging to the reli- Immaculate Heart Novitiate as a postulate in the ’50s and pin to “make people think of Him.” While other sisters from gious order of the Immaculate Heart of Mary were already participated in these discussions. “We experimented and the original Immaculate Heart order have gone on to purliving a more open version of Catholic service in California. tried new things out; if things weren’t working for us, we sue other professions and family life, Krismanich remained Originally from Spain, 10 Immaculate Heart nuns arrived didn’t keep doing them.” For centuries, Immaculate Heart true to her original vows of poverty, chastity, and obedience. in California during the gold rush, initially to work with the nuns would gather together every morning to pray. But now On the night of the mudslides, much of La Casa de Maria poor, but later to develop prestigious educational institu- these sisters were deciding differently. Glatt remembered, was devastated, leaving some buildings on the 26-acre proptions throughout Southern California. They began teaching “We didn’t have to be in chapel to pray, and we didn’t have to erty severely damaged or destroyed. Looking just past the in Los Angeles in 1886 and, during the next several decades, do it together, which made the biggest difference when you backdoor windows, one can see how the mud came right staffed Catholic schools, started a convent, and founded were a teaching nun or another professional.” They began up to the door of Krismanich’s home, and stopped there. the Immaculate Heart High School and Immaculate Heart wearing street clothes instead of their traditional habits, set Jacobsen claimed that there are only two explanations: One College. In 1943, they established the Immaculate Heart their own bedtimes, and chose what they wanted to read is physics. The other is that Krismanich’s pure spirit stopped Novitiate in Montecito, the property now known as La and what professions, other than teaching and nursing, they the mud before it could enter God’s house. Now KrismanCasa de Maria, to train the many young women wanting wanted to pursue. ich has moved to her new home in Los Angeles, where 21 to join the order. But the Catholic hierarchy was not prepared to tolerate elderly sisters of the Immaculate Heart of Mary will be Immaculate Heart nuns, who all received rigorous edu- such radical thinking. When the sisters presented their waiting for her, just like they did when she first met them cations, were known for their inherently liberal, deeply plans for change and renewal in October 1969, tensions so many years ago. n

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Opinions

angry poodle barbecue

Asi-9 K-9

CONNECTING DOTS: The only thing missing was a thin chocolate mint wrapped

in shiny green foil sitting on top of his pillow. Scott Pruitt, it turns out, can’t have everything. Pruitt is the head of the Environmental Protection Agency, and until a couple of days ago, he seemed politically bulletproof. That’s in part because Pruitt, 49 going on 63, is strategically polite and bland to a fault. The New Yorker calls it his “dad-next-door affability.” As an anti-environmental extremist, this makes Pruitt scary and effective. In one short year, Pruitt has repealed or delayed implementation of 30 environmental directives. Thank God for the missing chocolate. News just broke that Pruitt has been renting a two-bedroom condo in downtown D.C. for only $50 a night from the wife of a man who runs a lobbying firm that represents oil and gas companies over which the EPA has regulatory control. Federal law prohibits members of the president’s cabinet and White House staff from accepting lobbyist gifts. At the very least, it looks bad. In actual fact, it’s worse than it looks. First, there’s the question of rent: $50 a night?! That wouldn’t get you a broom closet in a Dario Pini toolshed. Second, the lobby firm in question — Williams & Jensen — represents Enbridge Inc., a pipeline company that all last year was pressuring the federal government to allow it to increase the

amount of oil pumped through its Alberta Clipper pipeline, which runs from Canada into the United States, by nearly double. For that to happen, the EPA would have to sign off. It’s worth knowing that in 2010, a 40-foot stretch of pipeline owned by Enbridge ruptured over Michigan’s Kalamazoo River, vomiting up more than a million gallons of oil into a 35-mile stretch of that waterway. By 2014, cleanup costs exceeded $1.2 billion. The company was fined $61 million by the EPA, its second biggest fine ever. Like Gaviota’s pipeline rupture in 2015, the Enbridge pipe lacked an automatic shutoff valve. A Republican congressmember named Fred Upton was the representative for the city of Kalamazoo. Upton — along with Santa Barbara’s then congressmember, Lois Capps — successfully pushed legislation requiring automatic shutoff valves on oil pipelines. Small world. Pruitt is also in the news for declaring war on California, this time over issues of air quality and fuel efficiency. In 2012, the Obama administration passed aggressive new fuel-efficiency standards that would require automobiles to average 54.5 miles per gallon by 2025. Admittedly, that’s a big jump from the 24.8 mpg we allegedly get now. Obama got the auto industry to swallow this in exchange for the $85 billion he authorized to bail out the auto industry in the wake of the 2008 Great Recession. Now some elements within that industry want to renege, but not all. Volvo and Ford have said they will stick with the Obama standards. Pruitt

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initially wanted to unveil his attack at a Chevy dealership in Virginia, but backed off when Chevy dealers — not wanting to be tarred with his brush — mutinied. Many decades ago, the EPA granted California a waiver giving the state the legal right to set its own air-quality and fuel-efficiency standards. California, having already choked to death on its own air, has always pioneered clear-air initiatives. The state’s waiver allows 12 other states and the District of Columbia to follow suit. That constitutes about 30 percent of the auto market: That’s a lot of cars and trucks. Pruitt — who had a soundproof telephone booth installed in his office — doesn’t believe in climate change. EPA staffers have been put on notice not to use that phrase, though references to “extreme events” are tolerated. For car manufacturers, building models to meet two different sets of standards constitutes an “extreme event.” Pruitt doesn’t think California should be able to call the shots for the entire country. California’s waiver is now in his crosshairs. Six Democratic senators—including both of California’s—sent Pruitt a note expressing their inalterable opposition. The higher standards, they said, would save 2.5 billion barrels of oil, reduce greenhouse gases by six billion metric tons, and save consumers $1 trillion they would have otherwise paid at the pump. Thanks to climate change, Santa Barbara’s natural feast-or-famine oscillation of extreme events has gotten significantly more violent: Worst drought in decades. Biggest forest

fire in state history. A 200-year storm. Two debris flows in back-to-back years.

Pruitt must have reasons why he wants to subsidize auto-industry inefficiency, but it’s not cheap. According to California’s Insurance Commissioner Dave Jones, victims of the 1/9 Debris Flow in Montecito have filed $421 million in insurance claims. The Thomas Fire as a whole has clocked in at $1.8 billion. Statewide, last November and December’s infernos have cost taxpayers $12.3 billion. The automobile industry has always complained about onerous regulations, yet cars have been built, trucks sold, and the regulations paid off. From 1980 to 2014, for example, Santa Barbarans nearly doubled the number of miles they drove, yet the amount of volatile organic compounds in our air dropped by 900 percent; oxides of nitrogen dropped by 300 percent. In 2000, Santa Barbara County exceeded major air-quality thresholds more than 35 times. Last year, that happened just once. Canada is also planning on the 54.5 mpg standard, and the European Union is shooting for 56.8 mpg. Other countries are poised to ban the sale of internal-combustion vehicles outright. Even China and India are jumping in. California Governor Jerry Brown denounced Pruitt’s proposal as a “cynical and meretricious abuse of power.” As usual, when Brown gets the last word, you need a dictionary to know what he means. Try attractive, alluring, but conspicuously devoid of merit. I love those chocolate mints. — Nick Welsh


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obituaries Harvey Ray Phetteplace

11/03/46-03/19/18

On March 19, 2018 Harvey Ray Phetteplace passed away. Harvey was born on 11/03/46 in Racine, Wisconsin. He leaves his wife of 31 years, Irene and 3 children, Alex, Renee and Providencia. Additionally Harvey leaves 13 grandchildren 2 great grandchildren. He has two living sisters, Sylvia Kerrzier, Nancy Rock along with a brother Wesley Phetteplace, his Aunt June Ellis, and several cousins. Harvey’s life career was being a licensed General Contractor for 40 years. He worked doing home remodels, repairs, and painting. Harvey was a Mason and Past President of the Shrine Club. Harvey was preceded in death by his Brother Loyal Phetteplace in 2004, and his parents Loyal Sr. and Mable Phetteplace. His real passion was helping others and this showed his devotion to Elkdom especially Santa Barbara Lodge # 613. He became a Member January 27th, 1998 a 23 year Member and served on many committee’s through his year as being an Elk. He incorporated his knowledge and talents into the Elks Lodge. Some of projects that he spear headed was the remodel of the Main Bar area, the Members Lounge, the Patio and BBQ area, part of the kitchen to make room for the new freezer and walk-in. He oversaw the restoration of the gym area, and the new roof, HVAC platforms. Some of the committee’s he served on, Manager of the Drum and Bugle Corp; Hoop Shoot, ENF, Elks Social Club (BF). Served on the Friday Night cook crew, the Caravaneers Spaghetti night cook crew and too many more to mention. He started his Elks Officers career with his brother Loyal as Chaplain and assistant 18

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Chaplain. He worked his way up the chairs until he became Exalted Ruler in 2007-08 then served as trustee. He also was the Ritual coach training Officers how to do their parts in movements and speech for the Ritual contest and for Initiation of new Members. His generosity both financially and volunteering his time and labor for the future of the Elks, he will be truly missed. I can just see him now telling God how to remodel heaven. Also the Members Bar is being renamed after Harvey since he was so instrumental in design and labor along with other volunteers. There will be a Celebration of Life at the Santa Barbara Elks Lodge # 613 located at 150 N. Kellogg May 5th, services from 11-12 Lunch to follow.

Barbara Gay Rinehart Kearl 10/02/32-03/26/18

A woman of many talents, quiet sparkle, quick wit and a big heart, Barbara Gay Kearl died Monday evening, March 26 in Santa Barbara California. It is hoped by her five children—who loved her dearly— that she is dancing with her parents and grand parents. Barbara, it turns out, was a wonderful dancer who moved with understated grace, style, and subtle mischief on the dance floor. At the time of her death, she had been in declining health, having endured the cruelties of Alzheimer’s the last few years of her life. She was 85. Barbara was born October 2, 1932 in Denver Colorado to Evalee Pauline Fife and Harold Lee Rinehart, an avid outdoorsman and hardware store owner. One of three children—the middle child-Barbara attended college first in Boulder Colorado and later at Bringham Young University in Provo Utah. City. It was while a student at BYU that she met James Russell Kearl, who she would marry in 1957. Bar-

bara had been good friends in Denver with one of JIm's cousins. When she moved to Utah, they shared a basement apartment in Jim's mother's house. Jim lived there too. That’s how they met. Barbara was pretty and serious. Jim was dashing and driven. After a courtship of almost a year, the two were married. Jim and Barbara had been married 61 years at the time of her death. After their wedding, the young couple moved to Southern California, where Jim first worked as an engineer and designer with the aerospace industry. Five children soon followed: Kurt Kearl (Melissa) Evaly Poole (Mitch) Jennie Welsh (Nick) Jon Kearl (Jane) and Jason Kearl (Tami.) After spending many years as a homemaker caring for her kids - her first priority – the economic downturn of the early 1970's spurred Barbara to take a job at Hoag Memorial Hospital in Newport Beach. There she worked as Executive Administrator of Personnel for over 20 years, a blend of competence, compassion and good humor. In 1991, Barbara retired to return to Utah with Jim to care for her elderly mother. Barbara is remembered by her children as a shoulder to lean on, an ear to bend, and a big loving heart. Though shrewdly perceptive, Barbara was loathe to judge. Instead, she listened; she encouraged; she accepted. She delighted in her children’s unique and often headstrong personalities. She celebrated their successes, was amused by their antics, and offered a port for their storms. Barbara’s was an easy and comforting presence. She laughed easily even when life was anything but. She was fun to be with. She made the mundane enjoyable. And she was a good sport, forever exclaiming, “Oh my heavens,” or “Oh my criminy!” when her kids pulled her leg. In those rare instances Barbara got seriously upset, she would exclaim, “What in the Sam Hill are you doing?” And when things didn't go the way she would have liked her refrain was always, "Such is life!" In some ways Barbara was very lucky. She not only loved her children, but she liked them too. They were luckier still;

they knew it. Barbara loved music of all kinds: Louis Armstrong, Bennie Goodman, Boots Randolph, John Prine, John Denver and Neil Young are just a few. An accomplished pianist she played beautifully on her baby grand; for a short time, was the organist at her church. She sang with a small and beautiful voice. Later in life, she tried her hand at a guitar that proved too big for her hands. As a maker of quilts, Barbara was phenomenal, producing a steady stream of epic masterpieces, each marking the arrival of a new grandchild. These remain treasured by all. Likewise for the blankets she so famously knit. An exceptional seamstress, Barbara made all of her daughters' clothes when they were young and later, dresses custom designed by her daughter and even suits for some of her sons. Barbara was a voracious reader; she enjoyed American literature and historical biographies. She also enjoyed a good game of cards and the playful banter that accompanied it. She was constantly teasing out crossword puzzles. Her hands were always busy. She was a good cook, too, but with her family’s Utah ranching roots— both her parents’ families came from Utah-- Barbara had a taste for certain dishes her children would never acquire: beef tongue, the Pope’s nose, and Pan Haus most notably. Barbara and Jim were both infused with powerful worth ethics. But hard work alone was not sufficient to keep certain life challenges at bay. In 1964, Jim sustained a serious head injury during a car crash caused by a faulty light signal. Barbara was warned her husband may not be the same when he returned from the hospital. In the years afterward, Barbara worked full time, maintained the household, and kept the family on an emotional even keel. Where others might be inclined to lose their cool, Barb maintained hers. Southern California never truly felt like home to Barbara and Jim. Barbara always took comfort in the sweeping embrace of Utah’s Wasatch Mountains. She loved the blue skies, the big white clouds, and the change of colors that came

with Fall. In 1991, the couple moved back to Utah first to look after Jim’s mother Jennie Kearl then dying of cancer and later to care for Barbara’s mother Evalee Rinhart, who passed away in 2001. Though raised in the Church of the Latter Day saints, Barbara’s spiritual life was not confined to the teachings of any one faith. Instead, Barbara hewed closely to the Golden Rule. She did unto others, always striving to be of service. Kindness was her moral touchstone. It was something she never preached, but—and to an uncommon extent—put into practice. Barbara Kearl is survived by her husband Jim, her five children, 14 grandchildren, 20 great-grandchildren and her two brothers, Martin and Robert Rinehart. When she passed, her daughter Jennie was at her bedside with her. No service is planned. Her remains will be buried in Brigham City Utah. In lieu of flowers, please send donations to your favorite charity.

Edward “Ed” John Langlo 12/30/37-01/13/18

Goleta native Ed passed away January 13, 2018, at the age of 80. Ed was a skilled carpenter his whole life. He worked many years at St. Vincent School and for Hydrex but he worked best when he was his own boss. He’ll be remembered for his great BBQ’s and anything dairy, milk bottles that is, being an avid collector. Ed loved country music and the old gospel hymns and telling stories of growing up in Goleta, “the good ol' days.” He is survived by his daughters Samantha & (husband), Mona Lisa, 6 grandkids and 6 great grandkids. Graveside services will be April 12, 1 pm at Goleta Cemetery followed by a Celebration of Life at Tuckers Grove. CONTINUED ON PAGE 20 >>>


In Memoriam

Allan Ghitterman 1924 -2014

at the Granada Theatre

An Impossible Dreamer COURTESY

AND SUSAN ROSE

llan Ghitterman passed away on a beauti-

ful, sunny Monday morning, while resting comfortably in his bed, with his faithful dog, Toto, by his side. Allan was 93 years young and a vibrant inspiration for his family, his friends, and his community. Engaged, involved, passionate, and compassionate, he leaves a great legacy. Allan was a knight errant, a true Don Quixote who sought to bring justice to the world. In his case, it was a quest to slay the forces that prevented workers from recovering from their injuries and providing for their families. His path there was the making of a Horatio Alger story. Born in Winnipeg, Canada, in humble circumstances, Allan experienced many hardships as a child. At an early age, he sold Liberty magazine for a nickel, putting his earnings into the family coffers. This entrepreneurial spirit followed him the rest of his life. Despite many disadvantages and struggles, Allan was able to eventually join the Royal Canadian Air Force. Too young to serve, he convinced the authorities that he was much older. After his service, he immigrated to the United States, settling in L.A. with his family. Taking a variety of jobs, including working in a bank and driving a taxicab, Allan had two experiences that changed his life forever. While in an animated conversation with a passenger, she challenged him to return to school, just one semester; if that suited him, try another. He took her up on it. The other incident was his younger brother’s death. Reeven was wearing Allan’s shoes when struck by a drunk driver. Reevie, as he was known, had wanted to be a lawyer. While Allan had always fancied going into business, he also felt the desire to honor his brother. He applied himself, graduated from night school at Hollywood High, and worked his way through undergraduate years and law school at UCLA. By 1956, Allan was on his way to becoming a force to be reckoned with in the legal community. He began working at Rose, Klein & Marias, a well-known worker’s compensation firm in the Southland. The work suited his personality; he loved going up against insurance companies, demanding that they fulfill their obligations to injured workers. Allan’s influence in the field spread from the Central Coast to the Central Valley to the State of California. More than 200 of his cases are filed with the appellate courts and Supreme Court. Whenever Allan thought his client had been denied rights by the trial court, he did not hesitate to pursue an appeal. Allan embodied the mission statement of the law firm he formed, Ghitterman, Ghitterman & Feld: “Relentless commitment to protect our clients’ rights. Always.” No one had more dedication to the working man or woman than Allan. And yet, Allan was so much more. He developed and nurtured good and true friendships. Aside from weekly poker games, he helped organize a lunch group irreverently called TANSTAAFL—There Ain’t No Such Thing As A Free Lunch. Discussions were wide-ranging, everything from politics and economics to the latest electronic gizmos. No subject was off limits, and if you didn’t speak up, you were left behind. Allan, at the front of the pack, led discussions, challenged assumptions, and, of course, provided his own unique opinions. Allan was also involved in many community and legal organizations. He served as a pro bono judge in small claims court for decades. He was a repre-

NOVEMBER 27 - 28, 2018

JANUARY 29 - 30, 2019

APRIL 9 - 10, 2019 SEASON ADD-ON/SWAP OPTION

TIKKUN OLAM: Attorney Allan Ghitterman dedicated much of his life to fulfilling the precept of tikkun olam, or repairing the world.

sentative to the regional board of the first California Coastal Commission and took pride that his name was on the landmark California Coastal Plan of 1975. He gave to many causes but mostly those that improved our community’s basic human needs. He participated on local boards, including the American Civil Liberties Union, the Anti-Defamation League, Foodbank, and New Beginnings. He was a passionate supporter of Legal Aid, believing in everyone’s right to have access to competent legal representation. Throughout his life, he took great pride in being able to help others and viewed charity as his ethical obligation. In the Jewish faith, this is referred to as tikkun olam — helping to fix a broken world. Allan valued education above all else. His law firm’s Allan S. Ghitterman Education Scholarship allows employees to further their education and professional development. Most recently, he helped endow a scholarship at UCLA Law School for those interested in pursuing social justice. For all Allan accomplished, it was his family that provided him the greatest joy. He was there to lend a hand or cheer them on at sporting events, musical performances, graduations, or just a Sunday visit. Trips with his grandchildren were a favorite. He gave support and advice when asked (and sometimes when not), always with a loving heart. This deeply devoted family man, skilled attorney, and social justice activist, opinionated always, was an all-around mensch. Allan lived the “impossible dream,” his favorite song, fortunate in a long and happy life, full of gratitude for his blessings. And we feel blessed for having known such a beacon of light. Allan, we thank you and say goodbye. You will live in many hearts forever, but especially your family’s: wife, Susan Rose; children, Jody Holmes (Ken), Russell Ghitterman (Julie Harris), Sharon Marks (David), Julie Weiner, and Carrie Pillar (Russ); eight grandchildren; and three great-grandchildren. Donations in Allan’s memory can be sent to Legal Aid Foundation of Santa Barbara County (301 E. Canon Perdido St., S.B., CA 93101). n

© 2006 The Really Useful Group Ltd

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obituaries Benny Lopez

01/10/40-03/26/18

IN LOVING MEMORY Service will be held Saturday, April 7, 2018, 11am at Welch Ryce Haider, 450 Ward Dr., Goleta Barbeque at Goleta Beach on Sunday, April 8, 2018 at 11am.

Charles Sewall Roehm 03/11/30-03/01/18

Charlie passed away in the early morning of March 1, 2018 at home with his family. Charlie was a California native with deep roots in colonial America. He was born March 11, 1930 in Alhambra, CA to Margaret Hanlon and Chauncey Sewall Roehm. Charlie was the eighth generation to carry the Sewall name---a prominent name in pre-revolutionary Massachusetts. Among his ancestors he could count officers of the Continental Army, eminent jurists, legislators and Abolitionists, author Louisa May Alcott and Judge Samuel Sewall, the judge who recanted at the Salem Witch Trials. As a lifelong student of history, Charlie was proud of his ancestry but loved the fact that he grew up out west, during what he would surely call the “golden age” of Los Angeles. Charlie graduated from South Pasadena-San Marino High School and attended Pasadena City College for a short time before enlisting in the U.S. Air Force. Trained as a B-26 navigator/bombardier, Charlie was stationed at various U.S. bases before he landed a dream assignment flying weather missions out of Nice, 20

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France. It was the early ‘50s and as Charlie said, a great time to be an American in Europe. Charlie retired from the Air Force but remained in the reserves serving with the Civil Defense Corps and earning the rank of Captain. Having fallen in love with the south of France, he headed to Santa Barbara, America’s Riviera. He enrolled at UCSB under the G.I. Bill and was a member of Sigma Phi Epsilon fraternity. He graduated with a Bachelor’s Degree in Fine Arts. In 1958 he married Judy Grant and they moved to Mesa Lane to start their family that soon included three children, Kurt, Kate and Meg. They divorced in 1982. During college Charlie worked for Roy E. Gammill Men’s Clothing. Upon graduation, he took his graphic skills to the Neal Feay Company and later worked for Pickett Industries, a division of TimesMirror Corporation, producing slide rules. Charlie started his own business, Roehm Engineering Graphics, and became an important partner in the nascent local tech industry as he provided specialized screen printing services to companies such as Circon, Delco, Raytheon, Infared Industries, Medtronics and others. He printed industrial labels and directly on instruments, computer housings, dials and motherboards and produced specialty advertising pieces. He was particularly proud of the small contributions he made to the manned space missions as one of his slide rules accompanied Apollo 11 astronauts and his labels are on items left on the moon. He volunteered with the Santa Barbara Jaycees mentoring high school students in industrial arts and was an advisor to Vocational Instruction in Public Schools (VIPS) as well as an advisor to the Graphic Arts Program at Santa Barbara Community College. He served as president of the Graphic Arts Industries Association and as a vice-president of the Greater Santa Barbara Ad Club. Charlie loved cars, planes, boats and motorcycles and throughout his life he indulged his passions. As a teenager in South Pasadena he was active in the Model Plane Club---this before climbing into the real

deal when he joined the U.S. Air Force. In Santa Barbara he raced motorcycles with the Santa Barbara Motorcycle Club and was a member of the American Federation of Motorcyclists. In the 1960s he participated in the historic Santa Barbara Road Races that took place at the Santa Barbara Municipal Airport. He was an avid Formula 1 and Indy Car racing fan and enjoyed an occasional trip to experience the thrill in person. For many years he sailed a Victory 21 sailboat with fellow sailors in the Santa Barbara Sailing Club. Until his legs gave out, he enjoyed bicycle touring and participated in several long rides. With his first family he orchestrated backpacking trips to national parks and wilderness areas. After retirement, he discovered golf and so enjoyed his weekly games with the men’s group at the Muni. In 1985, Charlie married Tish Gainey and started another chapter in his life as they welcomed their son Andrew into the world. Charlie enjoyed being a dad all over again and could be seen on the sidelines at countless soccer and baseball games. If Charlie liked something, he was “all in”. He loved living in Santa Barbara, his American Riviera; he loved his dachshunds, Prizzi, Lucky, Oscar, Angel and Rosie; he loved a good meal and a glass of merlot---especially when shared with friends and family. He loved classical music, science fiction and fantasy--whether a good book or a movie. He loved his BMW M-3 and Mini-Cooper. And he was the consummate Angels fan after following the team from its time in the Pacific Coast League. No one enjoyed an Angels game more than Charlie and he stuck with his team through thick and thin, finally seeing them win a World Series in 2002. Charlie was a good man and an honest soul and someone who knew how to accept life’s ups and downs and leave the drama to others. Charlie was predeceased by his parents, his daughter, Katherine Hogenson and daughterin-law, Janet Roehm. He is survived by his wife, Patricia

“Tish” Gainey, his daughter Margaret (Michael) Perry, his sons Kurt and Andrew, and his grandchildren Rianna Roehm, John and Margaret “Peggy” Hogenson, and Michael and Mia Perry. A celebration of Charlie’s life will take place on Friday, April 13 at 11:00 a.m. at Our Lady of Mt. Carmel Church in Montecito.

Betty Marie Marvin 1929-2018

and youngest child, daughter Claudia, and lived her final years in the loving community of Vista Del Monte. She leaves behind daughters Courtenay Marvin and Cynthia Michaels, grandson Matthew Michaels, his wife Ting, and great grandson, Peter. Betty inspired friends, family and often complete strangers with her enthusiasm for life, and she always found the adventure in everything that came her way. She will be missed, but anyone who was touched by her life knows she is yet again engaged in another incredible adventure.

Mary F. Haskin

12/28/1916-03/26/18

Betty Marie Marvin passed away in the early hours of March 9, 2018 at the age of 89, surrounded by family. Born in Burlington WA, to Sadie and Earnest Ebeling, she called Santa Barbara home for the last quarter century of her life. Upon graduation from Sedro Woolley, Washington High School she left Washington State for the first time to attend the University of California Los Angeles on a scholarship. In LA, she enrolled in the music department, made wonderful lifelong friends in the arts, and met and fell in love with Lee Marvin, a young actor, whom she later married. They had four children and wild wonderful times. When the marriage ended, Betty among other pursuits, graduated from Otis Art Institute with her MFA in painting. Her creativity and insatiable curiosity made her a lifelong world traveler, performer, storyteller, designer, and an incredible cook. When she first settled in Santa Barbara, she began a much beloved holiday event called “The Christmas Cook Off,” to which an invitation was highly coveted. Julia Child was among the many friends who were often in attendance. In her final years, Betty wrote a book about her life, Tales of a Hollywood Housewife: A Memoir by The First Mrs. Lee Marvin, which met with critical acclaim. She was preceded in death by her oldest child, son Christopher,

Mary passed away at the age of 101, she was born in Montecito at the San Ysidro Ranch, which was at that time owned by her great grandfather, Juan Ramer. Mary worked in many professions over her life. But the one she is most proud of is her time at what was then the Santa Barbara Medical Clinic, from which she retired as head of the medical records department. She was a ball of fire and could not stand still after her retirement, so she went to work part time for MTD as a cashier. Mary was known for her great baking, she loved to surprise people with her cakes. She lived life for the moment, she was sassy and bossy, but fun... As a 7th generation Santa Barbara native, she is preceded in death by her husband, Bill Haskin, and her son, Bill Haskin Jr. She leaves behind her three daughters, Mary Elizabeth Fitts of Lompoc, CA, Gerri Graham of Utah, and Willa Olson of Wisconsin. She also leaves behind her 16 grandchildren, 21 great grandchildren, and 9 great great grandchildren. Services will be held at Our Lady of Sorrows on Monday April 16 at 10am.


obituaries Julie Mooy

Ageing with grit and grace, Julie Mooy lived a life of love for family and friends and of conviction. Julie was born to Leonard and Ceil Cruess of Waterbury, Connecticut on December 28, 1928. She is the oldest loving sister of James Cruess (deceased), Marianne Wolbert, Lenne Grant, and Kiki Cruess. While attending Bryant College in Rhode Island, Julie met the love of her life, Len Mooy, and they were married on June 26, 1951. Julie and Len were amazing parents to eight children: Julie (Jill) Valentine, Michael, John (Nancy), Jo Bittner (Randy), Maureen Attebury (Tim), Marianne Schuyler (John), Jim (Liz), and Jane Mooy (deceased). As Grandma Pookie, she enjoyed her 15 grandchildren and 4 great grandchildren. Julie and Len moved to California in 1956. While her husband, Len, taught in local junior high and high schools, mom was homemaker, nurse, psychologist, chaplain, teacher, baker, and taxi driver for our family. When her last child entered high school, mom got a “real” job (yes this is sarcasm) and worked for the Goleta Union School District which she said were the happiest days of her life. In her younger years, Julie was a devout Roman Catholic and member for many years of St. Raphael’s Church. An avid reader, she taught her children the love of the written word. There was always music in our home, from classical to show tunes to pop. Mom loved to paint and, while she gave it up while raising her ever growing brood, she was able to pick it up again in her later years. Julie was a devoted daughter and mother who taught her children to always treasure family and friends. She was a living example of this when she and Len added on to their house so that our Nana could

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live with us. Later, our father, Len, suffered with Alzheimer’s and Mom steadfastly refused outside care taking loving care of him to the very end. And finally, when her own parents passed, it was our mom who took care of them through their last years. So you see, Julie has earned her rest but we know she will continue to care for us from above. Come celebrate Julie’s life with friends and family on Monday, April 9th at 10: 00 a.m. for mass with reception to follow at Saint Raphael’s Catholic Church, 160 St. Joseph’s Street. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to Visiting Nurse and Hospice Care who generously provided support and care to Mom and family.

Julie Collette (Anderson) Lyon

On the morning of December 6, as the Thomas fire was just beginning, Julie Lyon departed this life. Born in Los Angeles to adventurous ocean loving parents Julie came to Santa Barbara in 1983. Julie was a lover of life and a continual seeker of life's most joyful and exciting moments. Her sons, Spencer and Connor were her crowning glory and she will always be remembered by her family as an eternally loving and dedicated mother She found peace while living bravely with cancer for almost ten years and could be found walking with her beloved canine friends at Hendry's and Miramar beach every day, collecting sea glass and breathing the salt air that was in her blood. We will miss our sweet Julie dearly. A celebration of Julie's life will be held at Elings Park in Singleton Grove on April 25 at 12:00 noon. A potluck picnic will follow the service. Any donations in Julie's memory should be made to Hospice of Santa Barbara.

Verna Rae Herziger 04/09/21-01/03/18

Verna was born in Norfolk, VA in April, 96 years ago. As a young child, she came to California with her family and settled in Glendale - like the poster girl, 'Rosie the Riveter,' Verna supported the war effort by working at Lockheed Aircraft Factory. While working at Lockheed, she met and married Carl Lloyd Herziger. Following Carl's return from war, he and Verna moved to Carl's hometown of SB. They built 2 homes in which they raised their daughter and son. Verna loved children, animals, the outdoors - she was a member of the Montecito Garden Club and volunteered at Cottage Hospital for 20 years. She made friends wherever she went. An avid hiker and walker, she was seen daily walking most of Montecito, and on Sundays, she walked along the beach art show, always with a big smile on her face and some kind words. Verna was a devoted wife, loving mother, sister, daughter, grandmother, & great grandmother - and she was the best friend you could have. She was smart, caring, feisty, and funny, and will be missed by all that knew her. Verna peacefully left us on 1/3/18 to continue her journey. No services are planned at this time. Verna leaves behind her daughter Janice Herziger Collins, son Lloyd Herziger, grandson Dennis Nelson, granddaughter Joy Nelson and her great grandson Chase Nelson. Donations to consider are Alzheimers Association. Hospice of Santa Barbara, Humane Society of shelter of your choice. Family gives special thanks to entire staff at Heritage House. They took our mom under their wings for 5 years - making her safe, secure & loved - you are all her angels.

Wilhelmina “Willa” (Olson) Ray 01/28/55-03/22/18

Wilhelmina “Willa” Ray, resident of Big Bear City, California, battled ovarian cancer for several years prior to her death on March 22nd, 2018 at age 63. She went to meet Jesus with her family surrounding her. Willa was born on January 28th, 1955 in Las Vegas, Nevada, and spent her early years in Seattle, Washington. The family later moved to Santa Barbara, where Willa attended San Marcos High School (class of '73). She enjoyed cheerleading for the Royals, and was involved in many extra-curricular activities, including the Girl Scouts, participating in two service trips to Central America with Amigos de las Americas, where she administered immunizations to hundreds of children. After marrying her high school sweetheart Mark Ray, both graduated from Westmont College. Willa earned a master’s degree in Early Childhood Development from California State University Northridge in 1983, and was assistant co-director at Sherman Oaks Day Care Center for four years. After homeschooling the couple’s five children and simultaneously directing Light House Christian School for over a decade, Willa was diagnosed with cancer, but continued her teaching career for a year in Budapest, Hungary. Willa is survived by her husband Mark of 42 years; her mother Patricia (“Patty”) Olson; her five children Linnea Hopper (Jeremy), Stefan Ray (Jen), Lukas Ray (Lauren), Osten Ray, and Jonas Ray; five siblings, Johanna Dorr (Mark), Chuck Olson (Laura), John Olson, Andrea Kulberg (Eric) and Doug Olson (Andrea); and four grandchildren, Cecelia, Johannes, Ruven and Tessa.

Willa will be remembered most for her giving spirit, artistic giftedness, strong Christian faith, ability to impart the Gospel to others, fortitude, zest for life, and the ability to find a way to love all those who crossed her path. Charitable gifts may be given to Bear Valley Hospice LLC or Apostles Church Missions of Santa Barbara. A celebration of Willa’s life will be held on April 14th at 2pm at Apostles Church, 4485 Hollister Avenue, Santa Barbara.

Donna Wustman

Donna Wustman, of Santa Barbara, California, passed away on March 7, 2018. She was 88 years old. Donna was born in Michigan. She married Jerry Wustman in 1950. They had three children; Jill, Jeff, and Jodi. In 1955 the family moved to California where they eventually settled in Santa Barbara. Donna was an accomplished artist. She often said it was what kept her going. She worked in many mediums and liked to combine different art forms into one project. Her artwork was extremely creative, and her pieces were colorful, innovative, unusual and always interesting. In 1976, Donna and Jerry’s daughter, Jodi, suffered a brain injury after being hit by a car. When they could not find a suitable place that accommodated people with brain injuries, Donna, Jerry, and their friend Louise Fields, started Jodi House. This facility, which helps brain injured adults, is still in operation today. There will be a celebration of life for Donna on May 19, 2018 at 1:00 PM in the Clubhouse at San Vicente Mobile Home Park at 340 Old Mill Road in Santa Barbara. In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to Jodi House at 625 Chapala, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. 21


JOIN US FOR AN ELEGANT EVENING

Hearts By The Shore SATURDAY, APRIL 28 AT 5:30 PMÂ Featuring Stroke Survivor Gracie Doran and Honoring Local Resident Renee Grubb

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SBHeartBall.heart.org or (805) 963-8862 22


Opinions

CONT’D

letters

Calling All Constituents

T

wo bills sponsored by Congressmember Salud Carbajal and Senator Dianne Feinstein, the Gun Violence Restraining Order Act (House Bill 2598) and Gun Violence Prevention Order Act (Senate Bill 1212), would codify gun-violence restraining orders into federal law. These two laws would allow law enforcement or family members to petition the court to prevent individuals shown to be a danger to themselves or others from having access to firearms. These restraining orders are based on the existing domestic violence protective order process, ensuring due process and the ability to appeal a court order. Gun-violence restraining orders became law in California in 2014 in response to the Isla Vista shooting. Congressmember Carbajal and Senator Feinstein reintroduced this federal legislation in May 2017, on the third anniversary of the shooting. We encourage the community to support our representatives in pursuing a safer country for all. Please contact them to share your support for commonsense gun control, and also share this message with those outside Santa Barbara County. These bills are making headway in Congress with bipartisan support, so the more constituents who call and urge their representatives to sign on to HR 2598 and S 1212, the better. Lives are literally at stake. We urge everyone to step — Catherine Swysen, up and support these bills. president, S.B. Women’s Political Committee

Rail Good Deal

C

ommuter rail could be the antidote to southern Santa Barbara County’s congestion ills as the imbalance persists between housing availability and jobs. In the decade since the “lane and a train” consensus package was included in the 101 in Motion report, resources have been disproportionately funneled into the Highway 101 expansion instead of commuter rail. Traffic models show widening 101 in Montecito will create new congestion hotspots in Santa Barbara and out to Goleta, and a decade after completion, congestion will be considerably more widespread and intense. Congestion will spill over onto surface streets

during the peak hour, creating traffic-safety issues for all roadway users. Nonetheless, sustainable transportation advocates eagerly await the April rollout of the retimed Pacific Surfliner service. We’d like to thank Marjie Kern (executive director of SBCAG) and LOSSAN (the agency that runs the Pacific Surfliner) for finally making this first step a reality. Efforts to make commuting by train a good deal and providing first- and last-mile solutions with community partners are also appreciated. We hope that momentum to provide additional rail service will endure. New trains are needed to provide more trips, and we need a second set of tracks. Commuters can work on the train, relax, and enjoy the scenic ride to and from work without the stress of the highway. Rail has much to offer, and now that increased service is coming, we invite everyone to get — Eva Inbar, president, out and ride the train! Coalition for Sustainable Transportation

For the Record

¶ To participate in the free group therapy mentioned in last week’s news story “Cottage Offers Disaster Therapy,” call 569-7501 or email howweheal@sbch .org. In another story, “Animal Rescuer Clashes with Neighbors,” the previous owners of the property at issue contacted the Independent to state they had left on good terms with their neighbors and were not run out of the neighborhood. Their pets were rescued animals, Kaaren Jordan said; they did not actively rescue animals. They had let Julia Di Sieno know, when she asked about the neighbors, that all appreciated a clean, odorless, fly-free property and a quiet neighborhood. ¶ In last week’s Summer Camp Guide, the Hendry’s Junior Lifeguard tryout dates were incorrect. This year’s tryout dates have yet to be determined; go to sbparks.org/jgs to stay up-to-date. ¶ Bluewater Grill’s happy hour is Monday-Thursday but not, as stated in last week’s Food & Drink section, on Sunday. 23


EXPERIENCE THE ANCIENT CHRISTIAN FAITH as we travel through Christ’s Passion and Resurrection!

TWO OF A KIND Please join us for these Services FRIDAY, APRIL 6

3 p.m. Burial Vespers 7 p.m. Funeral of Christ/Lamentations at His tomb

SATURDAY, APRIL 7

8:30 a.m. Liturgy celebrating Christ’s Victory over Death

SUNDAY, APRIL 8

5:00 a.m. Procession outdoors & Resurrection (Easter) Liturgy

Please note that Orthodox Christians celebrate Easter on April 8th this year. All Services in English

300 Sumida Gardens Lane Off Hollister, between Patterson and the 217 Fwy

For more information on the Orthodox Christian Faith and a complete schedule of Holy Week services, visit: stathanasius.org | 805-685-5400

Anthony Askew & Rosemarie Gebhart

Art of Heart

In the spirit of healing from life’s recent challenges, Indigo Interiors would like to show our community support and compassion through the work of our local artists.

Exhibit Runs April 5 - May 26, 2018 1st Thursday Opening April 5, 5-7pm 1321 State Street. Santa Barbara CA 93101 Mon.- Fri. 10-5pm, Sat. 11-5pm 805-962-6909 www.indigointeriors.com

Hidden Prejudices: How Implicit Bias Affects Our Work and Relationships Carmel Saad, Associate Professor of Education

5:30 p.m., Thursday, April 12, 2018 University Club, 1332 Santa Barbara Street Free and open to the public. For information, call 565-6051. The importance of being aware of inequities in our world calls on us to first more closely examine hidden prejudices in our own unconscious minds. Known as implicit bias, these prejudices are absorbed in childhood and persist into adulthood. Human brains gravitate toward biases, as we internalize society’s stereotypes unknowingly. Thus our brains reflect society’s preferences, which can insidiously undermine our best intentions toward social justice. Identifying our biases and how they affect behavior can help manage their effect on our decisions. Professor Saad will discuss the prevalence of certain biases and research on strategies that can help reduce their impact.

SPONSORED BY THE WESTMONT FOUNDATION 24


Opinions

CONT’D

The Small College That Could

voices

t’s more than 40 years

since I was hired to establish an Antioch University campus in Santa Barbara. It wasn’t easy, but it was a fulfilling professional journey, lasting from 1977 to 1988. Arriving in Santa Barbara after founding a center for returning women students at UMass Amherst, I was initially frustrated by the lack of comparable job options here. I was also shocked by the conservative nature of the Santa Barbara community at that time. For example, in 1972 the dean of HAPPY GRADS: Pictured from left, Joanna Candler, Karen Krulevitch, Kathee Miller, the SBCC Adult Education DiviAnnette Goodheart, Greg Brown, and Lois Klein celebrated receiving Antioch Santa sion told me there wasn’t a perBarbara’s first psychology graduate degrees. ceived need for additional programs for women because they already offered “Fas- the students’ trusted confidante. Antioch owes a debt cinating Womanhood” courses on How to Strengthen of gratitude to the wonderful core and adjunct faculty, Your Marriage and Enrich Your Life. all of whom made a wholehearted commitment to the The late Marya Weinstock, a UCSB psychologist, start-up effort. was the first to tell me about the Antioch position, sayAn advisory council of businesspersons and UCSB ing, “Apply for this job, and stop kvetching!” I did and friends helped me plan outreach strategies. I became a was hired by the provost of Antioch West, a constel- whirling dervish, speaking about Antioch’s uniqueness lation of five larger West Coast campuses. The other to every group I could find. Our $75 Independent ad executive directors, all men, taught me how things read: “There are two campuses in Santa Barbara. We’re worked in a system with satellite campuses and a com- the smaller one!” UCSB had 16,000 students then, and plicated governance system based in Ohio. we had 80. The ad created buzz for us. Chutzpah won! Despite my attempts to maintain a businesslike Antioch College started in 1852, led by its visionary founder and abolitionist Horace Mann. It was one of environment, given our small size, the first crop of the first nonsectarian educational institutions in the students insisted we were a “family.” We went through U.S., and the nation’s first coeducational college to life-changing personal experiences together, from offer the same opportunities to both men and women, divorces and unexpected pregnancies to breast canto appoint a woman to its faculty and board of trust- cer and deaths. ees, and to offer African Americans equal educational Many of the BA students were people who had opportunities before the Emancipation Proclama- dropped out in the ’60s to participate in the social tion. Many of the now-common elements of today’s and antiwar movements, but by 1977, they wanted to liberal arts education — self-designed majors, study complete their degrees. They forced debates about abroad, interdisciplinary study, and portfolio evalua- environmental degradation, gender, race, and peace tion — had an early start at Antioch. To keep Mann’s — topics still being debated today. Alumni became vision front and center, a framed daguerreotype of professional advocates, therapists, nonprofit agency him always hung on my office wall. leaders, teachers, poets, artists, and entrepreneurs. Finding the right facility, with the right vibe, was Although other universities were soon competing daunting. Attorney Ben Bycel, then dean of the Santa for the tsunami of older commuting students returnBarbara and Ventura Colleges of Law, let us sublet ing to college, I always believed that Mann’s historic temporary space in their beautiful Riviera Campus legacy of integrating social justice awareness with a — all for 17 cents a square foot. We loved taking cof- liberal education would distinguish Antioch from our fee breaks at the adjacent El Encanto Hotel. Antioch competitors. To gain public attention, Antioch promoved downtown in 1977, into a small corporate office duced free conferences with thought leaders, includat 10 West Figueroa. Next was 23 West Mission Street. ing The Changing Nature of the Family and Designing Finally, thanks to the generous S.B. Trust for Historic the ’80s. Preservation, Antioch moved to 914 Santa Barbara Antioch Santa Barbara — as well as its 3,000 Street. On my first date with my architect husband, he alumni — has contributed to the economic and climbed into the attic to see where the bearing walls social vibrancy of our community. With the increaswere. I had many happy days sitting in my office in ing volume of reactionary voices in our country, I see an even greater need for university students to what is now Playa Azul. I had no shame when it came to cherry-picking study and engage with society’s toughest problems Antioch’s seasoned talent from the Los Angeles and in ways that will serve the public interest. Horace Monterey campuses. Program chairs Richard Whit- Mann got it right: Education needs to inspire each ney and Terry Keeney had the expertise to hit the of us to achieve something bigger than ourselves. ground running in recruiting students and hiring faculty. Within three months, my team had enrolled a A celebration of Antioch University Santa small cohort of students in a bachelor’s in liberal stud- Barbara’s 40th anniversary will occur Sunday, ies and a master’s in psychology. Pearl Fisher became May 6, with a production of Love, Loss and an extraordinary student services administrator and What I Wore at the Lobero Theatre.

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COVER STORY

T

Santa Barbara’s Ancient Wines, Then and Now

he road to Santa Barbara County’s oldest winery

does not travel through rows of gnarled vines nor beneath the majestic native oak trees of the Santa Ynez Valley. Rather, it meanders through the suburban tract homes of the Goleta foothills and up a dead-end road, where a gigantic bougainvillea bush, brilliantly blooming poinsettias, and a cornucopia of citrus trees await. There, protected from the elements by the corrugated tin roof and wooden walls of a green barn, stand the remnants of San Jose Winery, where the padres of Mission Santa Barbara made wine almost two centuries ago. It hasn’t been in operation since Prohibition, and the surrounding seven acres of grapevines were uprooted decades ago in favor of lemon and avocado trees. But the crumbling adobe walls, dusty basket press, wickerwrapped demijohns, and well-worn ladder rungs that rise above the fermentation vat serve as fading reminders that winemaking is not just a modern pursuit in Santa Barbara. In fact, the county was one of California’s biggest and best wine regions throughout the 1800s, a century before the modern viticultural boom started here in the late 1960s. “Everything went all right until 1918, and then, boom, overnight they were out of business,” explained Catherine Cavaletto, referring to Prohibition’s effect on commercial winemaking at San Jose Winery. Her grandfather, Michele Cavaletto, started working on the property in the 1890s after immigrating from Piedmont, Italy. His employer was an Irishman named James McCaffrey, who had purchased the property in 1871 from Bishop Thaddeus Amat, the first bishop of Los Angeles. Cavaletto was able to lease the land in 1895 from an elderly McCaffrey, and then purchased it in 1900 from McCaffrey’s widow.

CURATOR OF LOST ERAS: Now 80 years old, Catherine Cavaletto is the caretaker of San Jose Winery, located in the hills above Goleta. Though weathered by nearly 200 years of time, its thick adobe walls still house old barrels, vats, presses, and bottles such as the wicker-wrapped demijohns below.

said Cavaletto, who now gives tours of the property to interested parties, although it is not open to the general public. The winery is just one of the farm’s fascinating attributes — there are 27 types of edible plants, from Asian pears, persimmons, and passionfruit to avocado, cara cara oranges, and oro blanco grapefruit. “My father liked to plant one of everything he could get his hands on,” said Cavaletto, with a yellow-skinned, pink-fleshed guava in her hand. The green barn also houses a museum of family heirlooms, including old carriages, farm tools, and the toaster and waffle iron that Cavaletto’s parents were given for their wedding — they still work, she says.“For a long time, old things are just junk,” she said. “Then they become significant.”

GRAPES OF PAST

B Y M AT T K E T T M A N N At some point around a century ago, Michele erected the barn around the adobe. “Nothing really has been done to it since the building was built around it,” explained Catherine Cavaletto, whose father was also adamant about protecting the structure.“My dad was born on this property, and he died on this property. The historical aspects were important to him. He liked to preserve things as much as he could.” Cavaletto, who just turned 80 years old, grew up on the property as well, and recalls it being very much self-sustainable, home to pigs, chickens, cows, rabbits, and even draft horses. After studying agriculture at UC Davis, she left for Hawai‘i in 1962 and wound up working for the University of Hawai‘i in sensory science for nearly four decades, helping to develop the macadamia nut and coffee industries. In 2003, she retired and started living in the house on the hill above the winery, all of which is still owned by her brother Michael, who lives in Nipomo.“I was delighted to come back,”

PAUL WELLMAN PHOTOS

Exploring San Jose Winery, Sipping Angelica, and Tasting in De la Guerra’s Bodega

A historical landmark affixed to the front door frame claims that the Cavalettos’ winery, which sits alongside San Jose Creek, was built in 1804. But archival research suggests that the winery and vineyard were more likely established somewhere between 1824 and 1834, when letter writers shift from calling the area a farm, or milpa, to a vineyard, or viña. By then, wine had been part of the Santa Barbara scene for at least two decades. It first came with Junípero Serra when he established El Presidio de Santa Bárbara in 1782, because wine is an integral part of the Catholic mass. No one’s exactly sure when the first successful vines went into ground in Santa Barbara, but there is consensus that it had happened at least by 1799.

But wine wasn’t just sacramental — it was also used recreationally by the friars, soldiers, and everyday citizens. Just a quick online search of the Santa Bárbara Mission ArchiveLibrary reveals dozens of letters of which wine and vines are the main topics: requests for barrels to be filled and empty barrels to be sent; complaints over wine that had spoiled into vinegar; concerns over the frosts; and plenty of gratitude for wine deliveries of both white and dark wine as well as brandy. Eventually, the missions of Santa Barbara, Santa Inés, and La Purísima owned numerous vineyards. Mission Santa Barbara planted the most acreage, at San Jose as well as places called La Cieneguita and Vina Arroyo. La Purísima’s friars didn’t have much luck at their property near Lompoc, so they planted one at a place called San Francisco, about a mile inland from Jalama Beach; in the 1930s, remnants of these vines were replanted next to the mission. Though today the Santa Ynez Valley is the hotbed of grape growing, Mission Santa Inés — which did own inland vineyards at College Ranch, Zaca Creek, and Rancho Corral de Cuati — struggled with their valley vines due to the frosts that stifled young crops every winter. That’s probably why that mission’s vineyards of note were on the coastal side of the range at Refugio, Tajiguas, and Arroyo Hondo. Modern farming techniques, such as sprinklers and wind fans, and possibly the warming climate, make Santa Ynez Valley frosts less of an issue now. All of the early vineyards were planted with the “mission” grape, the variety that the friars imported to Mexico in 1540 from Spain, where it’s known as listán prieto. (Today, that grape is planted all over the Canary Islands.) The mission grape made its way to New Mexico’s Rio Grande Valley in 1629 and then came to California with Serra in 1769. Though the mission vine grows vigorously, the grapes are low in acid and are notorious for making tepid wine, so they were also distilled into aguardiente, a strong type of brandy. Nonetheless, the mission grape dominated the state’s wine scene until about 1865, when other varieties started showing up in the pockets of immigrants from France and Italy. The winemaking process was rather crude, handled primarily by the native Chumash. One observer at San Jose Cont’d on p. 29 >>>

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The Must-see Recital of the Year!

Grammy Winner: Best Classical Solo Vocal Album

Metropolitan Opera superstar Joyce DiDonato will take a rare break from performing the title role in The Met’s production of Cendrillon to make her Santa Barbara debut. Don’t miss today’s reigning diva, performing live!

Joyce DiDonato,

mezzo-soprano Craig Terry, piano

Sun, Apr 15 / 7 PM / Granada Theatre Tickets start at $40 / $19 UCSB students A Granada facility fee will be added to each ticket price

“The perfect 21st-century diva – an effortless combination of glamour, charisma, intelligence, grace and remarkable talent.” The New York Times Today’s most sought-after soprano in a sumptuous program of bel canto and Handel’s “Lascia ch’io pianga” – named one of NPR’s Top 100 Songs of 2016!

Event Sponsor: Sheila Wald Promotional Partners: Music Academy of the West

Ojai Music Festival

Opera Santa Barbara Media Sponsor:

(805) 893-3535 / www.ArtsAndLectures.UCSB.edu Corporate Season Sponsor:

Granada event tickets can also be purchased at: (805) 899-2222 | www.GranadaSB.org

HOW WE HEAL: Intensive Outpatient Program

HOW WE HEAL:

Trauma and Anxiety Support

FREE Cottage Health Support Groups, Post-Disaster Relief Unless noted, groups are held at: Santa Barbara Cottage Hospital 400 W. Pueblo Street Santa Barbara, CA 93105 Programs are FREE and open to all Santa Barbara area residents. We have licensed clinicians who will assist your recovery with personal attention to your unique situation. For more information or to register, please contact program staff: 805-569-7501 or howweheal@sbch.org

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Skill Building/Seeking Safety Group: Mondays 6-7:30p.m. This group will be skill specific and will be taught in a psychoeducational fashion. The goals will be skill acquisition, meditation and mindfullness practice.

Survivor Group: Tuesdays 6-7p.m. This group will be specific to those survivors who directly experienced the disaster. Please call 806-5697501 before attending to determine eligibility for this group.

En Español Process Group: Lunes 6-7p.m. Este grupo permitirá a los participantes procesar una experiencia traumática en un espacio seguro. Este grupo estará abierto para adultos jóvenes y mayores.

Spiritual Care Group: Wednesdays 6-7p.m. A non-denominational spirituallybased support group.

School Age/Teen Group: Tuesdays Group 1: child (ages 7-12) 3:30-4:30 p.m. Group 2: adolescent (ages 13-17) 4:30-5:30 p.m. Groups will involve hands-on expressive therapeutic activities such as art therapy. Process oriented group discussions will take place to address current trauma and realtime situations. Skill-based tools to be taught to aid in dealing with current stressors and emotions.

Process Group/Inspiring Hope: Fridays 6-7:30p.m. This group will allow individuals to witness how others have healed, and provide a place to start their own healing.


COVER STORY

Winery reported that “well-bathed Indians” — wearing just loincloths, wiping sweat from their brows with another cloth, and holding a pole for balance—would crush the fruit as it sat in steer hides. The juice would spill into fermentation vats and sit there for two or so months, eventually making a somewhat weak and flabby wine. The fermented pulp would then be pressed into copper pots, heated, and condensed to make the aguardiente, which was colorless or slightly yellow when finished.

THE FIRST WINEMAKING WAVE

The friars weren’t the only ones with wine on the mind. As Santa Barbara grew into

a thriving pueblo, private citizens started planting their own grapes as well. Up the Gaviota Coast, the Ortegas planted grapes at Refugio and Irishman Nicholas Den planted 40 acres of his own at Rancho Dos Pueblos. There was plenty in downtown Santa Barbara as well. The Presidio’s Comandante Felipe de Goicoechea, who served from 1784 to 1802, planted vines between Carrillo and Castillo streets on what is today De la Vina Street, hence the name. He purchased grapes from Pascual Botiller, who reportedly brought the first wine press to the area; Botiller’s own winery survived until the 1890s. Botiller is frequently called a French immigrant, but more recent genealogic evidence suggests he was born in California. His family home at 1023 Bath Street is currently home to a small museum called Casa Dolores.

W I N E & B E E R B A R A N D R E TA I L S H O P

INSIDE THE SANTA BARBARA PUBLIC MARKET

Cont’d on p. 31 >>>

UPCOMING EVENTS AT WINE + BEER Thursday, April 5th @ 7:30 pm WINE + BEER + FOOD = MARKET GUSTO! Tuesday, April 10th @ 5 pm Voyager Passport Tasting - Burgundy Thursday, April 19th @ 5 pm Voyager Wine Club Pick Up Party

La Parra Grande at the Centennial Exposition of 1876

LEGENDARY GRAPEVINES

La Parra Grande: Legend has it that a young woman from Los Angeles named Marcelina had fallen in love with Carlos Dominguez, who gave her a young grapevine to pledge his love. She planted it in Montecito — where the two eventually married — and it grew to be one of the largest grapevines in the world. It even provided income for the family due to the 10 tons of grapes it produced per year and the shelter it provided for parties of more than 700 people. The circumference reached nearly 10 feet at its base, and its branches covered more than 10,000 square feet of land. A century later, as the vine started to die, James Ord suggested that Santa Barbara send it to the Centennial Exposition of 1876 in Philadelphia. It was quite the spectacle. La Viña Grande: Down the road in Carpinteria, another massive vine was also growing. Planted in 1842 by Joaquina Lugodi Ayala, it was popularized in St. Nicholas magazine due to letters sent by Jack Bailard and Flossie Rasor in 1906. According to an article in the March 1911 edition of Technical World Magazine, the vine could grow more than 10 tons of grapes in a year and may have served as a voting site for Santa Barbara County’s first election. Attempts by the Chicago World’s Fair and the San Francisco Mid-Winter Exposition to buy the vine for display were denied. It was located near the intersection of Via Real and Santa Monica Road and is memorialized in a mural on Linden Carpinteria’s La Viña Grande Avenue.

Monday, April 23rd Rosé Wine Seminar with Jérôme Pernot of Chateau Léoube Sunday, April 29th @ 3 pm Rosé Release Party For event updates, please visit www.wineplusbeer.com/Calendar

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COVER STORY

ADOBE WINERY: This photograph of Santa Barbara circa 1906 shows what was once Albert Packard’s El Recodo Winery, the large structure in front on West Carrillo Street.

Cont’d on p. 33 >>>

TASTING HISTORY

Though San Jose Winery isn’t producing wine anymore, there are a handful of ways to celebrate history in the glass in Santa Barbara County. PAUL WELLMAN

José Antonio de la Guerra y Noriega also made wine, as did his neighbor Don Gaspar Oreña, whose adobe still stands adjacent to Casa de la Guerra. Then came immigrants from other parts of Europe, including Jules Goux, who arrived from his native Bordeaux, France, in 1851. Goux started a small winery near his relatives’ hotel and saloon, but his lasting legacy is rooted in olive trees: He planted some of Santa Barbara’s first commercial groves near today’s Olive and De la Guerra streets, and his descendants now run Santa Barbara Olive Company. Albert Packard arrived around the same time as Goux. Originally from Providence, Rhode Island, Packard may have taken over Goicoechea’s grapevines, but other reports say that he planted his own; he most likely did a bit of both. What’s certain, though, is that he built a massive adobe on West Carrillo Street sometime around 1865, founding Santa Barbara’s first major commercial winery. With three-foot-thick walls, the four-story structure — with a stone basement and wooden third story — may have been the largest adobe in California. He branded his wine El Recodo (or “The Corner”) and made about 30,000 cases a year, which is a considerable amount even for Santa Barbara standards today. Packard sold his wine from Los Angeles to San Luis Obispo, and all the way to Texas. His vines died of disease in the 1880s, and Packard followed in 1901, his body laid to rest at the Santa Barbara Cemetery. The structure survived until the 1925 earthquake and was demolished completely in the 1950s. Then there was Santa Cruz Island, where Frenchman Justinian Caire planted a 150-acre vineyard with 20 different grape varieties that he imported from France in 1884. That became one of the more important sources of wine in the state, until economic woes and then Prohibition wiped it out. (See how Rusack Vineyards is rekindling Caire’s dream on Catalina Island on page 33, or see independent.com/catalina for a past feature on that.) According to agricultural surveys, there were 45 different vineyards in Santa Barbara County totaling 260 acres in 1843. By 1860, the county was the state’s third-largest producer of wine, and it was apparently pretty good too. Back in 1842, Sir George Simpson remarked that the wine in Santa Barbara was much better than what he’d had elsewhere in California. Surmised the authors of Aged in Oak, a history of the county’s

GYPSY GRAPES: In 1994, Deborah Hall unknowingly purchased a Sta. Rita Hills property that was already planted with wine grapes, so she brought those 1887 vines back to health and now makes fortified wine from them.

GYPSY CANYON’S ANGELICA

For a taste of California’s winemaking past, there’s nothing quite like the fortified wine called Angelica that Deborah Hall makes under the Gypsy Canyon label. It’s made from mission grapes and is based on the descriptions of Angelica, the friars’ preferred beverage, that Hall found at the S.B. Mission Archive-Library. In 1994, Hall and her late husband purchased a foreclosed property up Gypsy Canyon off Highway 246 that was dry-farming lima beans.“We discovered a vineyard on the hillside that hadn’t been farmed in 80 years,” said Hall, who believes the vines date back to 1887. Despite advice to rip them out, she brought them back to life, thinking they were zinfandel. Hall named her vineyard Doña Marcelina, after the legendary woman who planted a grapevine in Cont’d on p. 35 >>>

31


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PAUL WELLMAN PHOTOS

COVER STORY

SAVING SAN JOSE WINERY

Even after the missions were secularized in 1834, the Catholic Church kept tending to the San Jose Winery. In 1856, Bishop Amat leased the seven-and-a-half-acre vineyard to James McCaffrey, who’d been lured to the area by fellow Irishman Nicholas Den. A tailor by trade, McCaffrey first tried settling in Australia and the Bay Area, but an injury prevented him from striking it rich during the gold rush.

GENERATIONS OF COLLECTING: The Cavaletto property features both the San Jose Winery (old bottles seen below) as well as an adjacent barn that contains slices of family history (above), including a photo of the Cavaletto boys on the wagon they took fishing (top left) and a Farm Bureau sign (top right).

Upon purchasing the property in 1871, McCaffrey expanded the winery and increased the size of the vineyard, which thrived under his care. An 1883 publication called the vineyard “one of the oldest and finest in California.” Having grown up among Piedmont’s treasured nebbiolo vines, Michele Cavaletto knew a good vineyard when he saw it. After purchasing it in 1900 from McCaffrey’s widow, two months after her husband died at age 89, Cavaletto worked it for nearly two decades, until Prohibition. That spelled the end of a functioning San Jose Winery, and Cavaletto died in 1921. However, one last big batch of wine was made in 1928 to celebrate the wedding of Peter Cavaletto and Elisa Giorgi. In 2003, on what would have been their 75th anniversary—he had passed, but she was still alive, living all the way to 102 years old — the Cavalettos opened a bottle during a party at Stow Grove. “The bottle of wine went a long way,” said Catherine Cavaletto, a sly way of saying it wasn’t very good.“It tasted rather like a sherry.” (The family also made smaller batches into the 1950s.) Aside from tending to the relics of the past, Catherine is keeping an eye on the future too. In 2006, she took mission grapes from Gypsy Canyon vineyard near Lompoc and planted them to grow up her arbor. They produced decent crops at first, and then died. She’s interesting in trying again. Catherine has no children of her own and, though quite nimble and active with her many plants, is starting to issue complaints about her posture and the early stages of a mild form of Parkinson’s. She’s most concerned about preserving the winery. “I don’t know how many earthquakes it will withstand,” said Catherine, who’d really like a younger Cavaletto to care about their family history like she has. “That’s one of the things we’re trying to do,” said Catherine, explaining that they host an annual family barbecue each year, when the older generations tell stories to the younger relatives. “But it’s not enough.” n

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Cont’d from p. 31 >>>

Montecito in the 1780s that came to be known as La Parra Grande. (Read more about that in Legendary Grapevines, page 29.) She sold the grapes as such for two years, but then had them tested and found out they were mission grapes. The winemaker who thought they were zinfandel didn’t want the fruit anymore. “That was right before harPRESERVATION PRO: John Wright was a preservation architect working on vest,” said Hall.“That’s how I got into Pennsylvania barns before he started pouring his Standing Sun wine in the winemaking.” Casa de la Guerra bodega. No one knew what to do with the variety, so Hall hit the books. “The padres had the most experience with the mission STANDING SUN’S BODEGA fruit, so what did they do with it?” she wondered. “I An even easier — and cheaper way — to get a sense found winemaking notes, where they wrote about of what wine culture may have been like in the early what worked and what didn’t work.” In the book days of Santa Barbara is enjoying a glass in the same Agricultura General, which the king of Spain had room as countless revelers did in the 1800s. That’s given to the padres to teach them how to farm and what ensues at The Bodega in Casa de la Guerra, raise animals, she found a whole chapter on wine- where Standing Sun Wines has operated a tasting making, though that didn’t solve the problem. “Of room since August 2015. course, it’s in Old World Spanish,” she said. “I still “This was the original wine cellar to the property,” haven’t even had all of it translated yet.” said John Wright, a preservation architect turned One thing was certain.“The wine that the padres vintner who started his brand back in 2007. “It was were raving about was Angelica,” said Hall. She their bodega. It was their storage room for wine and food provisions. It was also an important room for entertainment. There are a lot of records of parties happening there, supposedly some wild nights. The comandante was quite the entertainer.” That comandante is José de la Guerra, who oversaw the Presidio from 1827 to 1842 and lived in Casa de la Guerra. Wright was allowed to open his tasting room after much consideration by the Santa Barbara Trust for Historic Preservation, which manages Casa de la Guerra and El Presidio State Park. The use came with restricGOLDEN JUICE: Jugs of Gypsy Canyon’s Angelica like this one are sold in 375 mL bottles. tions, of course.“There was really nothing we could do,” he explained. “I couldn’t even put believes the fortified wine was invented at Mis- a nail in.” But he loves that people can now sit aside sion San Gabriel, where they made the most wine wooden racks that held wine barrels more than 200 and brandy in the mission system, and was named years ago and is impressed with the four-foot-thick after Los Angeles.“That was the best the fruit would adobe walls, the hand-hewn window headers, and the “double roof that vents well but keeps it well make,” she said. “So that’s what I set out to do.” Hers is a luscious, brown-gold concoction that’s insulated.” sweet, smooth, and undeniably delicious. But the The space reconnected Wright with his presprocess is not cheap, so half bottles cost $175. Unfor- ervationist expertise, which was once focused on tunately, 2017 will be Hall’s last vintage as she is sell- 200-year-old barns in rural Pennsylvania. “I was ing her property. But her Angelica will be on sale a fish outta water with preservation in California,” for years to come, and Ian Cutler of Cutler’s Artisan said Wright, who started winemaking as a hobby but Spirits is also making a brandy from the mission turned professional in 2007. Now he makes about grapes. “No one’s made mission-grape brandy for 1,500 cases annually and also hosts regular concerts 150 years,” she said, explaining of a recent tasting, “it at his primary facility in Buellton. was amazing. It just went right down.” The Bodega offers a much different experience. Hall has made her historic grapevines available “It’s very character driven, and people find it interfor anyone to purchase through UC Davis. “The esting,” said Wright.“They’re really tasting wine in a vines were a gift to us,” she said, “and I feel respon- room where, 200 years ago, people were doing the sible for taking care of them and preserving this same thing. For California history, that’s pretty old.” California heritage.” The Bodega is open Thursday-Sunday, 1-6 p.m. See standingsunwines.com. See gypsycanyon.com.

SOURCES

The historical information in this article comes largely from three books that cover Santa Barbara County winemaking in depth. The most comprehensive, Aged in Oak: The Story of the Santa Barbara County Wine Industry, was published in 1998 by the Santa Barbara County Vintners Association. There also is Victor Geraci’s 2004 book Salud! The Rise of Santa Barbara’s Wine Industry and a detailed chapter on San Jose Winery in Those Were the Days: Landmarks of Old Goleta, edited by Gary Coombs in 1986.

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As always, find the complete listings online at independent.com/events. And if you have an event coming up, submit it at independent.com/eventsubmit. COURTESY UCSB ARTS & LECTURES

available to local candidates, followed by a Q&A session. Topics will include getting ready to run, making a plan, crafting a compelling message, how to get endorsements, and the role of social media. Learn from powerful campaign strategists and current and past elected officials, such as Monique Limón, Helene Schneider, Paula Perotte, Kristen Sneddon, and many more. Register online. 9:30am-2pm. High Sierra Grill, 521 Firestone Rd., Goleta. $35-$45. Call (800) 977-9348. sbwpc.org/events

Disaster Relief

4/5-4/7: Clothing Sale The Recovery Free Store is opening its doors to the public for a huge sale at low donation prices to raise funds for the new Recovery Home Essentials Free Store opening on April 11. Choose from incredible clothing and footwear from the best closets and stores in S.B. Victims who suffered loss during the Thomas Fire and mudslides are welcome to shop for free during the sale with proof of previous residency or FEMA papers. 11am-6pm. Montecito Country Mart, 1016 Coast Village Rd. Free. Call (928) 380-3088. recoveryprojectsb.com 4/8: Love Letters to the 805

4/7: Junior League of S.B. 10th Annual Gala Wear your

4/5:

Maria Popova in Conversation with Pico Iyer Author

Pico Iyer will sit down with Maria Popova, the writer and curator behind Brain Pickings, the popular online site that explores how different disciplines — art, science, poetry, design, philosophy, history, anthropology, and more — can give insight into the question of how to live well. 7:30pm. Campbell Hall, UCSB. $10-$35. Call 893-3535.

artsandlectures.ucsb.edu

4/5: Geneva Ives S.B. expert Geneva Ives will sign copies of her book Unique Eats and Eateries of Santa Barbara, about the city’s hidden gems, ranging from taco trucks to fine dining and farmers’ markets. Enjoy mini appetizers featured in the book! 6:30-8pm. Museum Store, S.B. Museum of Art, 1130 State St. Free. Call 963-4364. sbma.net

FRIDAY 4/6 4/6-4/9: Lucidity Festival: Rising Dawn Lucidity is an open-source,

Darla Bea will deliver tunes while area boutiques and L.A. designers showcase their glamorous and elegant spring gowns. Ian Harvie, a transgender comedian/actor (Transparent), Transparent), will make a Transparent special appearance to share his personal story of being a trans man in today’s society. 7pm. Lobero Theatre, 33 E. Canon Perdido St. $30-$100. Call 963-0761.

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4/7: Run Like a Woman Workshop This workshop will demystify the process of running for office in 2018, 2019, or 2020 by providing the latest strategies and tools

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SUNDAY 4/8 4/8: S.B. Poetry Series Reading Come listen to poetry read by the poets themselves, featuring Kurt Olsson, who was selected by Thomas Lux for the 2016 Spacks Prize for Burning Down Disneyland (Gunpowder Press) and whose previous collection is What Kills What Kills Us COURTESY

THURSDAY 4/5

colorful cocktail attire to complement the theme, Gala del Mar, as you enjoy cocktails, hors d’oeuvres, music, dancing, a silent auction, and a wine raffle. S.B. County District Attorney Joyce Dudley will be honored with the Woman of the Year award, and you will hear updates on the league’s signature project, SAFE House at S.B. (Saving At-Risk Youth from Exploitation). Proceeds will go toward the JLSB’s vision and mission. 6:3010:30pm. S.B. Maritime Museum, 113 Harbor Wy. $100. Call 963-2704.

transformational arts and music festival where you, family, and friends are invited to play, see art, participate in a workshop, take part in a spontaneous flash mob, embody a character from your dreams, and be silly and wild and free! Visit the website for the full schedule and prices. Live Oak Campground, Cachuma Lake Recreation Area, 4600 Hwy. 154. Read more on p. 63.

Fundraiser

4/25: SBMNH: Drought, Fire & Flood: Climate Change & Our New Normal This community town hall will be emceed by UCSB Bren School Dean Steven Gaines and will provide updates on the latest data and research on fires, floods, and climate change. Four experts affiliated with the UCSB Bren School will give TED-style “flash talks”: Dr. Max Moritz (wildfires), Dr. Edward Keller (debris flows), Dr. Naomi Tague (climate modeling), and Dr. Sarah Anderson (environmental politics). Keynote speaker and former FEMA director James Lee Witt will share his experience managing more than 350 disasters during his tenure under the Clinton administration. The event will conclude with a panel discussion and public Q&A moderated by Community Environmental Council CEO/Executive Director Sigrid Wright. The public is invited to submit questions before the event via Twitter using #droughtfirefloodSB or in The Granada Theatre lobby when the doors open at 6 p.m. 7-9pm. The Granada Theatre, 1214 State St. Free. tinyurl.com/DroughtFireFlood

5/12: The 2nd Responders: Brad Paisley and Friends Country music superstar Brad Paisley will host a benefit concert to honor the first responders who were on the front lines at the recent wildfires and mudslides. Paisley, friends, and special guest Ellen DeGeneres will come together to celebrate the resurgence of the Montecito and Santa Barbara area. Proceeds from the concert will benefit the community and service workers through local organizations. 7pm. S.B. Bowl, 1122 N. Milpas St. $54.50-$204.50. Call 962-7411.

5/19: Katy Perry Katy Perry will return to her hometown for a special concert titled Witness: Coming Home – A Benefit for the Community: Our Neighbors, Our Heroes and benefiting the S.B. Foundation, 93108 Fund, Cold Spring School, and 805UndocuFund to assist those impacted by the Thomas Fire and mudslides. 7pm. S.B. Bowl, 1122 N. Milpas St. $64.50-$204.50. Call 962-7411. sbbowl.com

SATURDAY 4/7

S.B. Transgender Advocacy Network will celebrate gender diversity in our community by showcasing talented local performers coming together to provide a valuable message through song, dance, and a dazzling array of fashion. Local transgender hero and 2017 Queen of Pride host Deja Rea will host, and DJ

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4/7: Transgender Day of Visibility: Hearts on Fire Fashion Show This benefit for the

Supplies and postage will be provided for you to create handmade love/appreciation letters to send to first responders, support crews, or anyone affected by the Thomas Fire or mudslides. Donations and a portion of Topa Topa Brewing sales will go toward Direct Relief. 2-6pm. Topa Topa Brewing Company, 120 Santa Barbara St. Free.

4/6-4/8:

Out of the Box Theatre: Green Day’s American Idiot Green Day’s powerhouse Grammy Award–win-

ning album is brought to life in this electric-rock musical of youthful disillusion. This is a scorching attack on what Green Day saw as the hypocrisy and moral evils of the Bush administration after the attacks of September 11, 2001, as well as the increasingly submissive nature of the American public. The show follows three men who learn to navigate their alienation and struggle to find a new path. This production contains adult material and language and shows through April 15. Fri.-Sat.: 8pm; Sun.: 2pm. Center Stage Theater, 751 Paseo Nuevo. $15-$28. Call 963-0408.

ongoing: Free Support Groups Cottage Health will offer free support groups for one year to aid in the post-disaster healing process in response to the Thomas Fire and 1/9 Debris Flow to all who live and work in the greater S.B. area. The How We Heal: Trauma and Anxiety Support Groups will be led by well-trained and licensed clinicians to help attendees learn how to manage symptoms of anxiety, depression, and trauma. There are separate groups offered for children and teens, as well as Spanish speakers, with one group dedicated to survivors who directly experienced the disaster. Sessions began on March 19, but anyone may register or attend a group at any time throughout the program. Each session is designed to “stand on its own,” and attending every session is not required but is encouraged. For more information, contact Layla Farinpour at 569-7501 or howweheal@ sbch.org. cottagehealth.org/howweheal

centerstagetheater.org

Volunteer Opportunity

Civil Discourse

Protest

>>> 37


PARALLEL STORIES: Poetry as Portraiture Adam Zagajewski and Andrew Winer SUNDAY | APRIL 15 | 2:30 PM Prize-winning, globally-admired poet Adam Zagajewski writes with precision and wonder about the calm and courage of ordinary life. He says of poetry that it “is like a human face—it is an object that can be measured, described, catalogued, but it is also an appeal.” His most recent book, Slight Exaggeration, is a blend of memoir, essay, and anecdote, and in which he defines poetry as “a slight exaggeration, until we make ourselves at home in it. Then it becomes the truth.” Zagajewski is interviewed by fellow writer, friend, novelist, and Chair of the UC Riverside writing program Andrew Winer. Book signing to follow. Parallel Stories is a literary and performing arts series that pairs art and artists with award-winning authors and performers of regional, national, and international acclaim. This series functions as a multidisciplinary lens through which to view the Museum’s collection and special exhibitions. Images left to right: Slight Exaggeration, cover (detail). Adam Zagajewski.

38

Free for SBMA Members $10 Non-Members $6 Senior Non-Members Reserve or purchase tickets at the Museum Visitor Services desks, or online at tickets.sbma.net. 1130 State Street Mary Craig Auditorium www.sbma.net


INDEPENDENT CALENDAR

APR.

5-11

As always, find the complete listings online at independent.com/events. And if you have an event coming up, submit it at independent.com/eventsubmit.

COURTESY

(Silverfish Review Press). Pamela Davis, whose book Lunette won the ABZ Poetry Award in 2015, and poet and SBCC student Kate Morgan will also share their work. 7-8:30pm. Faulkner Gallery., S.B. Central Library, 40 E. Anapamu St. Free. Call 564-5611. sbplibrary.org

GOLETA BEACH TRIATHLON July 29, 2018 – 7:00AM

4/8: National Library Week Film: Storm Central This 1956 film stars Bette

Broadway phenomenon is based on the real-life newsboy strike of 1899 and tells the tale of how Jack Kelly, a rebellious newsboy, and his fellow newsies take action after Joseph Pulitzer, attempting to outdo his business rival, William Randolph Hearst, raises the prices that the newsies must pay. Don’t miss Dos Pueblos’ Disney pilot production as it comes to life with outstanding music, breathtaking sets, stunning choreography, and a bright student cast. The musical shows through April 21. Fri.: 7pm; Sat.: 2 and 7pm. Elings Performing Arts Ctr., Dos Pueblos High School, 7266 Alameda Ave., Goleta. $10-$15. Call 968-2541 x4670. dptheatrecompany.org

MUSIC

of

4/6: Cambridge Drive Concert: Michelle Lewis, The Harmony Sisters Michelle Lewis is a Boston singer/ songwriter living in L.A. who writes intensely visual, melodyrich songs that explore defining moments and find beauty in sadness. Her special guest will be Jena Douglas. Opening the show will be Katheryn Boisen and Mary Madden, whose voices blend so closely that they are known as The Harmony Sisters. 7:30pm. Cambridge Dr. Church, 550 Cambridge Dr., Goleta. $15-$18. Call 964-0436.

cambridgedrivechurch.org

4/6: The Fab Four Deemed the ultimate Beatles tribute band, The Fab Four will make you feel as if The Beatles were singing “Yesterday” just yesterday. From the iconic mop-top hairstyles to the pinpointed replication of the original band members’ mannerisms, you will feel as if John, Paul, George, and Ringo are performing right before your eyes. 8pm. Chumash Casino Resort, 3400 E. Hwy. 246, Santa Ynez. $25. Ages 21+. Call 686-3805. chumashcasino.com

4/7: Haim, Lizzo On the back of their critically acclaimed sophomore album, Something to Tell You, L.A.’s masters of rhythm and pop-rock heartbreak Haim will be in S.B. on their Sister Sister Sister tour. Melissa Jefferson, better known as Lizzo, an American alternative hip-hop artist based in Minneapolis, will open the show. 7pm. S.B. Bowl, 1122 N. Milpas St. $33.50-$64.50. Call 962-7411. sbbowl.com

4/7-4/8: S.B. Choral Society’s 70th Anniversary Concert Conductor JoAnne Wasserman will lead the SBCS chorus and orchestra and a quartet of fine soloists in Joseph Haydn’s Missa in Angustiis (Mass for troubled times) or Nelson Mass. In addition, the repertoire will include Ralph Vaughan Williams’s Benedicite and works by Norwegian

Fundraiser

Volunteer Opportunity

Davis as a small-town librarian who is branded a communist by local politicians when she refuses to remove a controversial book from the library’s shelves. Go Bette; go books; go librarians! 2-4pm. Faulkner Gallery., S.B. Central Library, 40 E. Anapamu St. Free. Rated NR. Call 564-5641.

sbplibrary.org

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composer Ola Gjeilo and Grammy winner Christopher Tin of video-game-soundtrack fame. There will also be an SBCS chorus alumni finale performance. Sat.: 8pm; Sun.: 3pm. First Presbyterian Church, 21 E. Constance Ave. $7-$70. Call 965-6577. sbchoral.org

4/8: The Idiomatiques CD Release Come celebrate the release of S.B.’s own hot swing band The Idiomatiques’ new CD, Out on the Town, with 11 tracks of mostly originals and a few golden standards thrown in that will take you on a tour of all of their infectious and fun sounds. A free CD is included! 6:30pm. SOhO Restaurant & Music Club, 1221 State St. $20. Call 962-7776. sohosb.com

4/10: Marc Cohn Trio After winning a

DREW GURIAN

4/6-4/7:

The Dos Pueblos Theatre Company: Disney’s Newsies The Musical This Tony Award–winning

Grammy for his soulful ballad “Walking in Memphis,” Marc Cohn continues to be one of this generation’s most compelling singer/ songwriters, combining the precision of a brilliant songwriter with the passion of a great soul man. The VIP ticket includes premier seating and a pre-show reception with drinks and hors d’oeuvres. 8pm. Lobero Marc Cohn Theatre, 33 E. Canon Perdido St. GA: $30-$40; VIP: $105. Call 963-0761. lobero.org

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Crimes of presents

“From time to time a play comes along that restores one’s faith in our theatre…” — NY Magazine

Heart

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The Kid’s Mile (free) at 10 AM will provide your little ones (ages 10 & under) an opportunity to get their Saturdaymorning energy out, all in the pursuit of a finisher’s ribbon.

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WEEK

Art Town

4/5: Paz en el Paraíso/Peace in Paradise This community-based arts-andcrafts fair will feature artifacts of the sea, land, and other organic riches of the earth as well as area artisans gathered in collaboration of healing and moving forward. There will be 20 area vendors with art, food, and kid-friendly activities; music by Ted Mills; a performance by the S.B. Ukulele Club; wine tasting; and more. 5-8pm. Casa de la Guerra, 15 E. De la Guerra St. Free.

A L W A Y S A M A Z I N G. N e v e r r o u t i n e.

tinyurl.com/PazInParadise

4/5: Family 1st Thursday Calling all families … let’s get creative! Draw close-up nature scenes on black sandpaper with gray-scale chalk pastel and then collage onto sand-colored sandpaper for contrast and texture. Afterward, you can enjoy the galleries until 8 p.m. 5:30-7:30pm. Family Resource Ctr., S.B. Museum of Art, 1130 State St. Free. Call 963-4364. sbma.net

FRIDAY

The Fab Four: The Ultimate Tribute

4/5: Opening Reception: Kaganoff Returns See works from ceramic artist Sheldon Kaganoff, who taught and mentored S.B. ceramic artists from 1965 through 1994, when he retired from UCSB as emeritus professor of art. He now works and teaches from Clay Studio in Goleta. Sharing the space with Kaganoff are eight 2D artists: Rick Doehring, Madeline Garrett, Stuart Ochiltree, Lisa Pedersen, Stephen Robeck, Mary Dee Thompson, Iben G. Vestergaard, and Kurt Waldo. The exhibit will show through April 29. 5-8pm. 10 West Gallery, 10 W. Anapamu St. Free. Call 770-7711.

April

6

8 PM

FRIDAY

Lucha Libre

April

20

8 PM

“100 Steps” by Stuart Ochiltree

4/5: Westmont Graduate Exhibition Opening Reception: Degrees of Separation Fourteen graduating art majors will show their capstone art projects, which span painting, drawing, printmaking, fiber sculpture, digital prints, welding, assemblage, and a charcoal animation. The exhibit shows through May 5. 4-6pm. Westmont Ridley-Tree Museum of Art, 955 La Paz Rd. Call 565-6162. Free. tinyurl.com/WestmontSixDegrees

FriDAY

Wayne Brady

4/5: Opening Reception: Group f/64: Legacy + Influence and Platinum + Silver In two partnered exhibitions, heritage photographers

April

27

8 PM

who are rarely seen together will be in focus for two months inside the historic Oreña Adobe. View these distinctive collections of prints from world-renowned photographers, including Edward Weston, Ansel Adams, Imogen Cunningham, and Rondal Partridge. The exhibits show through May 31. 6-9pm. Kyle Irwin Design, 39 E. De la Guerra St. Free. Call or text Henri Bristol at 660-1311 for an appointment.

FRIDAY

4/7: Opening Reception: Joys of Nature This month’s featured artists will be Jo-Neal Boic, Sheila Underwood, and Patricia Watkins. The exhibit shows through April 30. 1-4pm. Gallery Los Olivos, 2920 Grand Ave., Los Olivos. Free. Call 688-7517. gallerylosolivos.com

OUT D L O S

4/8: Studio Sundays on the Front Steps Create a clay-and-wire sculpture inspired by Masao Yamamoto’s “A Box of Ku #165 (Birds on a Small Tree),” now on view in Brought to Light: Revelatory Photographs in the Santa Barbara Museum of Art Collection. Have creative fun as you sculpt a tree base out of wire and then balance small birds molded out of white clay and decorated with tempera paint on the branches. 1:30-4:30pm. S.B. Museum of Art, 1130 State St. Free. Call 963-4364. sbma.net

Ramón Ayala

May

4

8 PM

ongoing: Our Feathered Friends: Birds of the Tri-Counties This exhibit will feature the paintings of three artists — Jim Hodgson, René C. Reyes, and George Lockwood — who share their unique artistic perspectives of bird species that can be found in the tri-county region (Ventura, Santa Barbara, and San Luis Obispo), a hotspot for birders and a stop along the migratory Pacific Flyway. The exhibit shows through July 30. Wildling Museum of Art & Nature, 1511-B Mission Dr., Solvang. Free-$5. Call 688-1082. wildlingmuseum.org

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with Daniel Sperling Learn how automated, shared and electric vehicles are fundamentally changing how we move around.

April 5, 2018, 7pm Marjorie Luke Theatre ON SAL E

F RAT I1D1aAmY

T H IS Y SATURDA

LCD SOUNDSYSTEM . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .MAY 03 BRAD PAISLEY BENEFITWITH ELLEN DEGENERES . . .MAY 12 KATY PERRY BENEFIT . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . MAY 19 JIM GAFFIGAN . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . MAY 25 TOM JONES WITH INTO THE ARK . . . . . . . . . . . . . MAY 26 WAR WITH GEORGE CLINTON . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . MAY 27 SUGARLAND WITH BRANDY CLARK, CLARE BOWEN. . . JUN 12 SLIGHTLY STOOPID WITH PEPPER, STICK FIGURE . . JUN 24 JACKSON BROWNE. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AUG 03

Doors at 6:30 p.m., talk begins at 7. Immediately following the keynote by Dr. Sperling, hear a Mobility Future Startups Panel, featuring four startups leading the way in the mobility revolution – Advanced Vehicle Manufacturing, Envoy, EVmatch, and Xtelligent. BON IVER . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AUG 08 STEVE MILLER BAND / PETER FRAMPTON . AUG 15 JACK WHITE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AUG 19 DAVID BYRNE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . AUG 24 REBELUTION WITH STEPHEN MARLEY, COMMON KINGS . SEP 09 LEON BRIDGES WITH KHRUANGBIN . . . . . . . . . . . . . SEP 12 JASON MRAZ WITH BRETT DENNEN. . . . . . . . . . . . SEP 15 CULTURE CLUB / THE B-52’S WITH THOMPSON TWINS . SEP 23 RISE AGAINST WITH AFI, ANTIFLAG . . . . . . . . . . . . SEP 29

TICKETS AVAILABLE: SB BOWL OR AT AXS.COM / SBBOWL.COM / GOLDENVOICE.COM 42

to get your tickets visit

sbindytickets.com


APR.

INDEPENDENT CALENDAR

5-11 COURTESY

As always, find the complete listings online at independent.com/events. And if you have an event coming up, submit it at independent.com/eventsubmit.

WEDNESDAY 4/11 4/11: World War I Remembrance — 100 Years Later: The Choice for War: U.S. Engagement Profes-

4/8:

El Día del Niño

4pm. Look for ORC parking signage. Ojai Raptor Ctr., 370 Baldwin Rd., Ojai. Free-$5 donation. ojairaptorcenter.org

Kids will rule the animal kingdom for a day with the ever-popular “Day of the Child” at the zoo, featuring Spanish-language music, a children’s talent show, food, and plenty of family fun. 11am-5pm. S.B. Zoo, 500 Niños Dr. Free-$17. Call 962-5339. sbzoo.org

MONDAY 4/9 4/9: Harmonic Immersion: The Art of Gong Meditation You are invited to

4/8: Sips and Succulents Come learn the art of succulent arranging from Ariel O’Hara while drinking a glass of complimentary wine. There will be pots and succulent clippings available, but you are encouraged to bring some cuttings or a container of your own to personalize your creation. New Beginnings’ Circle of Giving is a membership club for monthly donors who have pledged $20 or more a month to support programs and services. 2-4pm. S.B. Bridge Ctr., 2255 Las Positas Rd. Free-$25.

tinyurl.com/SipsAndSucculents

4/8: Ojai Raptor Center Spring Open House The

BEN CROP

public has the chance to see the center and meet the education ambassadors, such as owls, hawks, falcons, and eagles. There will be children’s activities, refreshments, and more, with proceeds going toward the Ojai Raptor Center. Noon-

relax and let the vibrations take you on an inward journey. Enter the ethereal realms of harmonic sound as you hear the live sounds of gongs, crystal singing bowls, Himalayan bowls, Halo handpan, Rav drum, and Native American flute. Please bring a mat and pillow for your horizontal comfort. 6:308pm. Center of the Heart, 487 N. Turnpike Rd. $20-$25. Call 964-4861.

Pazaski, and Charlotte Bailey Fundraiser

A PERFECT CIRCLE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . APR 17 KELSEA BALLERINI WITH WALKER HAYES. . . . APR 25 MODEST MOUSE . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .MAY 19 THEARLINGTONTHEATRE.COM / CHARGE BY PHONE 805-963-4408

TUESDAY 4/10 4/10: Mary Ann Hooper Mary Ann Hooper will sign copies of her travelogue Across America and Back: Retracing My GreatGrandparents’ Remarkable Journey Journey, about how she unearthed her great-grandparents’ diaries and retraced their 1871 trip across the U.S. — over the Great Plains and Rocky Mountains to San Francisco, with a onemonth stop in S.B. along the way, and her journey to create a thoughtful account of how the American West has changed over the last 150 years. 7pm. Chaucer’s Books, 3321 State St. Free. Call 682-6787.

chaucersbooks.com

4/11:

from left : Shay Munroe, Elaine

sor emeritus Joe White, chair of the Department of Philosophy at SBCC, will lead a group discussion on President Wilson’s decision to go to war. He will also use Wilson’s choice of war in April 1917 as a springboard for a discussion on a citizen’s democratic responsibility for choosing war. Light refreshments will be provided. Donations will gratefully be accepted toward the refurbishment of the World War Monument erected in the center of Lompoc, due for completion on November 11, 2018, the 100th anniversary of the end of World War I. 7-9pm. Stone Pine Hall, 210 S. H St., Lompoc. Free. Call 736-3888.

The Theatre Group at SBCC will conclude its 2017-18 season with the Pulitzer Prize–winning play Crimes of the Heart by Beth Henley. Follow the lives of three sisters who try to escape the past to seize the future in Hazlehurst, Mississippi, where their grandfather is living out his last hours. Lenny, the eldest sister, is unmarried with no prospects; Meg the middle sister, has returned from a failed singing career in L.A.; and Babe, the youngest, is out on bail after just having shot her husband. Don’t miss this comedy about serious matters. The show previews April 11-12 and runs through April 28. 7:30pm. Jurkowitz Theatre, SBCC, 801 Cliff Dr. $10-$18. Call 965-5935. Read more on p. 61.

Volunteer Opportunity

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SCHEDULE THURSDAY

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FRIDAY

THE TEARAWAYS

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Montecito: 1100 and 1200 blocks of Coast Village Rd., 8-11:15am

THE FULCOS, ADA PASTERNAK 4/7 - 9:00

SATURDAY

Crimes of the Heart

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Goleta: Camino Real Marketplace, 10am-2pm

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TUESDAY

Old Town S.B.: 500-600 blocks of State St., 4-7:30pm

buying

WEDNESDAY

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Solvang: Copenhagen Dr. and 1st St., 2:30-6:30pm

FISHERMAN’S MARKET SATURDAY

Rain or shine, meet local fishers on the Harbor’s commercial pier, and buy fresh fish (filleted or whole), live crab, abalone, sea urchins, and more. 117 Harbor Wy., 6-11am. Call 259-7476. cfsb.info/sat

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gaucho ALL

NEW LOCAL STUDENTS

REUNION April 26-29, 2018

GAUCHO JOIN UC SANTA BARBARA ALUMNI FOR THE

Festival The Entire Community is Invited

The all-day family friendly festival features:

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FREE Dental Day! at our NEW Goleta location!

Saturday, April 14th from 8am to 1pm 7050 Hollister Ave, Ste 101, Goleta CA

You may receive (1) of the following for FREE: Cleaning

TASTE OF UCSB WINE & BEER GARDEN $30 per person, featuring 20+ Gaucho breweries and vintners

GAUCHO GALLOP 5K + KID’S MILE

$30 per person FREE, ages 10 and under

KID’S ZONE jump house, climbing wall, rides, touch tanks. Lego robotics and much more!

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CALL TODAY 1-805-204-4682

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Food Trucks, Music, Complimentary Parking, FREE to attend

SATURDAY, APRIL 28 9:00 AM TO 3:00 PM UC SANTA BARBARA CAMPUS

SANTA BARBARA RAPE CRISIS CENTER presents

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SANTA BARBARA RAPE CRISIS CENTER CENTRO CONTRA LA VIOLACION SEXUAL SBRCC has served thousands of survivors of sexual assault and their significant others in the last 44 years.

Experience our 10th annual celebration of chocolate & wine Saturday, April 28, 2018 4–7pm Saint Barbara Greek Orthodox Church 1205 San Antonio Creek Road Santa Barbara CA 93111

Featuring…

a judged competition of chocolate creations by local chocolatiers and a variety of California wines and craft beers For more information 805.963.6832 www.chocolatedevine.org

We are committed to ending sexual assault in our lifetime.

• Expertise in all forms of sexual violence • In-person counseling for individuals, couples and families • Medical & legal accompaniment & advocacy • Self-defense workshops for women • In-service training for professionals • Sexual Harassment Prevention training for businesses, schools and nonprofit organizations

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WEEK MARC SHOWS TAP 4/5, 4/7: Carr Winery Barrel Room Thu.: The Coconuts. Sat.: Georgetown Band. 6-8pm. 414 N. Salsipuedes St. Free. Ages 21+. Call 965-7985. carrwinery.com

COURTESY

4/5, 4/7: Dargan’s Irish Pub & Restaurant Thu.: Dannsair. 6:308:30pm. Sat.: Soul Cats. 9-11:30pm. 18 E. Ortega St. Free. Call 568-0702. darganssb.com

COHN

TRIO

on

BIG NAMES. SMALL ROOM.

TUESDAY!

APRIL 10

GRAMMY® award-winning folk artist Marc Cohn solidified his place as one of the most compelling singer/songwriters with his ballad “Walking in Memphis.”

4/5: Eos Lounge Matroda. 9pm. 500 Anacapa St. Free-$5 (after 11pm). Ages 21+. Call 564-2410. eoslounge.com 4/6-4/7, 4/10-4/11: M.Special Brewing Co. Fri.: O.n.E. 6-9pm. Sat.: S.B. Sings Showcase; 2-4pm. BullFrog Blues Band; 6-9pm. Tue.: Gannon Bond. 6-8pm. Wed.: The Dark Current. 4:30-6pm. 6860 Cortona Dr., Bldg. C., Goleta. Free. Call 968-6500. mspecialbrewco.com 4/6-4/8: Cold Spring Tavern Fri.: The Agreeables Spring Rock Show. 6-9pm. Sat.: Dennis Russell; 1-4pm. MacTalley’s Trip; 5-8pm. Sun.: Tom Ball and Kenny Sultan; 1:15-4pm. Teresa Russell and Cocobilli; 4:30-7:30pm. 5995 Stagecoach Rd. Free. Call 967-0066.

Rock ‘n roll fan and music lover Hale Milgrim is back with the high-ly anticipated return of Quips & Clips. Hale (aka, the Trip Master) has mined his personal archives for rare concert footage and insider stories that celebrate 420, and–thanks to a little help from his friends–will lead a magical mystery tour from the 60’s to today on the big screen.

4/6, 4/11: Greater Goods Fri.: Bay Station. 7-10pm. Wed.: Jessica Malone and Nick Foster. 7-9:30pm. 145 W. El Roblar Dr., Ojai. Free. greatergoodsojai.org 4/6-4/7: Maverick Saloon Fri.: Molly Ringwald Project. 8:30-11:30pm. Free-$10 (after 8pm). Sat.: Tex Pistols. 8pm. Free-$5 (after 8pm). 3687 Sagunto St., Santa Ynez. Ages 21+. Call 686-4785. themavsaloon.com 4/6-4/8, 4/11: The Endless Summer Bar-Café Fri.: Jim Rankin. 5:30-8:30pm. Sat.: John Lyle. 5:30-8:30pm. Sun.: Kylie Butler. 2-5pm. Wed.: Dave Vignoe. 5:30-8:30pm. 113 Harbor Wy. Free. Call 564-1200. 4/6-4/7: Uptown Lounge Fri.: Out of the Blue. Sat.: Do Not Harm Band. 8:30-11:30pm. 3126 State St. Free. Ages 21+. Call 845-8800. www.sbuptownlounge.com 4/6-4/7, 4/9-4/11: SOhO Restaurant & Music Club Fri.: The Tearaways, The Fulcos, Ada Pasternak. 8pm. $10. Ages 21+. Sat.: Haiva Ru, Pookie, Will Breman. 9pm. $10. Ages 21+. Mon.: Jeff Elliott’s Jazz Jam Finale and Birthday Bash! 7:30pm. $8. Tue.: Zoe Guess, Amber and Smoke, Susan Marie Reeves and Sierra Reeves. 7pm. $8. Wed.: Austin Sexton, Yonas Michael, Jamey Geston, Jake Goldman. 8:30pm. $10. Ages 18+. 1221 State St. Call 962-7776.

sohosb.com

4/7: La Cumbre Plaza Frances Livings. Noon-3pm. 121 S. Hope Ave. Free. Call 687-6458. shoplacumbre.com/Events 4/7: The James Joyce Ulysses Jasz. 7:30-10:30pm. 513 State St. Free. Ages 21+. Call 962-4660. sbjamesjoyce.com 4/7: Yellow Belly Shennie and Cata. 7-9pm. 2611 De la Vina St. Free. Call 770-5694. yellowbellytap.com

Santa Barbara

CHAMBER ORCHESTRA FRI, APRIL 27 Join us in welcoming Maestro Ohyama and the Santa Barbara Chamber Orchestra back to the Lobero with a celebratory evening of Tchaikovsky, Copland and Ibert. LOBERO THEATRE ENDOWMENT FOR CLASSICAL MUSIC

ELAINE F. STEPANEK FOUNDATION LOBERO THEATRE ENDOWMENT FOR AMERICAN ROOTS MUSIC

PHOTO BY DAVID BAZEMORE

805.963.0761 / Lobero.org 45


FIDO’S

P h oto C o n t e st

presented by

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i n d e p e n d e n t . c o m / f i d o p h oto 46


Health

B

PAUL WELLMAN

irth is much more than bringing the baby safely to the outside,” said Ronda Perea. “It is a powerful spiritual journey that shapes individuals and empowers women.” Perea’s downtown Santa Barbara practice, Innate Midwifery, offers individualized maternity care that encourages women to follow their natural birthing instincts, whether it’s at home, at a birth center, or in the hospital. Her prenatal appointments cover standard fetal and maternal monitoring, and she also discusses the family support system, GANG’S ALL HERE: Midwife Ronda Perea shares the couch with (from left) Asah Zion Aijian (9 weeks), Ember Hope Naumu (11 weeks), Era Grace Lauren the psychological aspects of birth, and (5 weeks), Aria Paisley Broughton (7 weeks), and River Shane Leighland (4 the mother’s long-term health care. months). “Pregnancy puts a lot of pressure on the body,” says Perea, who, like all midwives in Cali- with medications and oxygen. “Sometimes we do need fornia, is certified through the same medical board as to medically intervene, and we are really thankful physicians. The United States has the worst rate of to doctors when it’s necessary.” Over the last several maternal mortality in the developed world, and deaths years, Perea was proud to report, Innate Midwifery are on the rise. “That’s a really big deal,” she said. Perea has maintained an extremely low hospital-transfer believes that a contributing factor is medical interven- rate. Home births can also help control runaway tion when it is not needed. “We have a lot of scientific health-care bills. They may cost 50-80 percent less than evidence that spontaneous vaginal delivery is the most hospital births. “Vaginal births and breastfeeding are two of the healthy option,” she explained, noting that natural hospital and home births are the norm in European most important influences on the lifelong health of countries, where maternal mortality and postpartum a baby,” said Perea, who has lived in Santa Barbara and worked with a diverse set of pregnant women for complications rates are lower. “Birth is very rarely a medical condition,” Perea nearly 40 years. Learn more at innatemidwifery.com. went on. Still, she arrives fully equipped to every birth —Carolina Starin

CHUCK GRAHAM

Close Escapes

Red-Hot Adventure

T

here’s no denying the arid beauty of Red Rock Canyon State Park. Desert rats enjoy its miles of meandering trails through the Mojave. Photographers and artists are transfixed by its pink, red, and orange badlands at the southern edge of the Eastern Sierra. Highway 14 rolls along northbound, leaving an army of wind turbines and fast-food joints behind, eventually splitting the buttes of Red Rock Canyon. A large dirt parking lot to the right has been a staging area for dozens of commercials and movies with a magnificent, towering cliff and blood-red bluffs serving as a stunning backdrop. This is also a surefire epic sunrise locale that crests across the desert.

On the west side of Highway 14 is the ewntrance to the state park, well worth the $25 per night to car camp. You can nestle your vehicle right up against the tan and chalky buttes that surround the western perimeter of the campground. Watch out for coyotes, roadrunners, and desert cottontails scurrying through. Come spring, it’s a herpetologist’s dream, with chuckwallas, horned lizards, and longnosed leopard lizards soaking in the sun. Virtually every canyon is a treasure trove for archaeologists, who search the dramatic formations for clues of early mammalian life. Ten million years ago, the entire region sat at the bottom of a massive lake. Over the millennia, sediment washing out of the Old Sierra Mountains and helped along by shifting plate tectonics acted as the first building blocks of rock. This forced the valley floor upward and created the magnificently colored layers we see today. The bright-red hues come from iron. When it rains, the ruddy earth turns the color of rust and trickles into small streams that spread across the landscape. —Chuck Graham

Science BRANDON YADEGARI FILE PHOTO

Following the Natural Birth Instinct

living p. 47

You, Too, Could Help Solve

Debris-Flow Mysteries

H

ow?” and “why?” have been the lingering questions since Montecito’s monstrous debris flow in January. How did enormous boulders cruise down overflowing creeks and land in people’s homes? Why did they land where they did? Among the residents asking those questions are three who happen to be scientists at UCSB and Pasadena’s Jet Propulsion Lab. And they are asking for the public’s help in reaching answers. Knowing exactly when and where the mud flowed and the boulders rolled depends on getting video, photos, and audio recordings of the phenomenon, perhaps captured on cell phones or surveillance cameras. Time stamps and geotagging would make them ultimately accurate. And images from five years past are wanted, too. “Photos of the channels within five years before the event,” Thomas Dunne said, “will be compared with our surveys of the enlarged channels.” The UCSB Bren School professor explained that measuring the now-scoured canyon bottoms and creek beds against older, geotagged photos will give a volume of boulders moved and the rate at which the flow grew as it moved downstream. Future debris flows can be estimated from such information, too. Similarly, time-stamped images or sound recordings of the debris flow at known locations can describe the dynamics of each mudflow when combined with other data. Even the speed of travel can be calculated to show why the flood could move boulders and clogged stream channels. Dunne knows his debris flows. He was at the University of Washington in 1980 and got into the thick of it when Mount St. Helens erupted, triggering multiple, huge debris flows. Since then he’s been around the world peering into volcanoes and examining rock and mud flows. His colleague Tom Farr has been caching satellite images with remote sensing, which can view soil levels and boulder placements from before and after the flood. “The images on the ground will help us ‘calibrate’ our interpretations of the airborne and satellite data,” Farr said of the need for help from the public. The two are working with noted UCSB geologist Ed Keller, whose request for images soon after the disaster has generated a small collection, said Dunne. But more are needed. Dated and geotagged still and video images, and audio, of Cold Spring, Hot Springs, Montecito, San Ysidro, and Romero creeks are requested. Please email files to debrisflow@bren.ucsb.edu, with the subject line stating which creek they capture. —Jean Yamamura 47


PUBLISHES THUR, APRIL 19 ADVERTISING DEADLINE: WEDNESDAY APRIL 11 at 3PM

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Contact your advertising rep today! 805.965.5205 Sales@Independent.com


living | Starshine

Raising a First-Person Shooter

T

he hypocrisy of my life is corroding my insides, and confession is the only cure. Outwardly—in dinner conversations, on social media, at girls’ nights—I go all frothy-mouthed about gun control, all soapbox-y on the nefarious NRA, all high-horsey over our nation’s sick obsession with firearms. But in a dimly lit corner of my home, probably even as you read this, my sweet 12-year-old son who still orders off the kids’ menu is entertaining himself by assassinating animated strangers with a digital assault rifle—the very weapon now dominating public debate. He’s playing Fortnite, the viral video game that 45+ million people are currently obsessed with. It’s a Hunger Games–style scenario: You drop into a dystopian landscape with 99 other players and try to be the last player alive at the end. An AR, a shotgun, and a sniper rifle help you accomplish this goal. I’ve never allowed shooting games in my house before. “It’s not a shooting game,” my son insists. “It’s a survival game.” Well … you survive by shooting people. So why now? Why suddenly relax my strict anti-violence entertainment standards? Mostly because this game is collaborative and he can play in real time with his equally obsessed and beloved brother, who’s at college 2,000 miles away. Apparently, the family that kills together chills together. When I ask said older brother why we should allow his baby bro to execute people on our flat screen email: starshine@roshell.com when our nation is suffering so acutely from too-many-damned-people-shooting-each-other, he assures me, “It’s not one of those games where the object is to mow down as many people as you can indiscriminately.” I’m supposed to feel relief. “I mean, you let him watch Looney Tunes when he was 5, where cartoon characters were beating the crap out of each other.” Well, yeah, but … come on, that’s … All right; point taken. Recent studies find no links between violent video games and violent real-life behavior. But in a country where nearly 100 people are shot to death daily, why in Glock’s name would we give children rifles as toys? Why teach them via repetitive motion as their brains are quite literally developing that snuffing out other humans is satisfying — and bloodless? (Did I mention that you get more points in this game for a head shot than a body shot? And you can kill foes with your ax if you’d rather not waste bullets.) I tell my kid to go outside and play with real friends. He visits a buddy’s house — where they shoot BB guns in the backyard before retiring indoors. To play Fortnite. I urge him to play a nice, old-fashioned board game instead. He and his snowflake Dad opt for Risk: “I’m attacking with cavalry. You’re all gonna die.” What is it with dudes and weapons of war? I struggle to know whether the better parent defies the mob mentality and trusts her own pacifist instincts — or keeps her paranoia in check and instead trusts the instincts of her otherwise sage and moderately kind children. I struggle to know whether I truly fear for my son’s emotional development — or am just loath to watch my youngest slip out of innocent childhood and into toughened adolescence. (Fortnite is rated T for teen; my boy isn’t a teen. Goddamn it, not yet.) I watch him play the game. I explain that taking things from abandoned houses — even to use as shields from flying bullets — is looting, and that looting is stealing. I ask how he could possibly carry all the tools he’s stealing in that tiny backpack. I inform him that “fortnight” means two weeks’ time. Turns out I’m not especially fun to have around when you’re playing a survival video game. When he aims and fires at another player, who vanishes neatly from the screen, I ask how it feels. “I know he’s not actually dead. He’s going back to the beginning, and he’ll play again,” my son says. But he volunteers that he doesn’t like the way it sounds when he hears himself say, “I killed that guy.” You and me both, kid. You and me both.

by Starshine

ROSHELL

Starshine Roshell is the author of Broad Assumptions.

FREE Dental Day! at our NEW Goleta location!

Saturday, April 14th from 8am to 1pm 7050 Hollister Ave, Ste 101, Goleta CA

You may receive (1) of the following for FREE: Cleaning Filling Extraction Services provided on a first come, first served basis.

CALL TODAY 1-805-204-4682 www.johnsonfamilydental.com

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&JUDO, JUDO,TOO 49


living | Sports

S.B. ATHLETIC ROUND TABLE:

ATHLETES OF THE WEEK

RUNNERS RULE AT THE RED PIANO BAR

PAUL WELLMAN PHOTOS

March 18-24

Allie Jones, San Marcos track & field

At the Easter Relays, the Stanford-bound senior’s time of 14.04 seconds in the 100meter hurdles shattered the meet record. She also finished second in the high jump and third in the shot put.

A

n adult basketball fan could have chosen any number of downtown watering holes to watch Villanova throttle Michigan in the NCAA final on Monday night. For the Champions League soccer quarterfinals this week and next, The Press Room will be packed, and other locations may add Ronaldo and Messi to their midday menus. Then there’s the Masters, must-see TV for anybody who’s teed up a golf ball. There is a bar where friends of Santa Barbara’s active running community can celebrate their sport — and support it at the same time — on Thursday, April 5. The Red Piano (519 State St.) does not have any TV screens, but it will have live music and lively runners serving as bartenders. The occasion is a fundraiser for FINISH LINE: Cindy Abrami, one of Santa Barbara’s most accomplished distance runners, strides past The Red Piano, the State Street bar that will be a destination for running various running programs, including enthusiasts Thursday evening. high school track-and-field teams that encompass hundreds of participants. Twenty percent of the sales at the bar and all of the tips from for the longest continuous piano-bar performance — 63 5 to 8 p.m. will be donated to those causes. hours and 11 minutes — about a day short of Patty Bryant’s It’s the latest in a series of events that have raised $13,000 persistence on her feet. for nonprofits since January, according to Colin Campbell and Jason Jones, the proprietors of The Red Piano. B-BALL FINALISTS: UCSB seniors Gabe Vincent and Recent beneficiaries were the Cancer Foundation and the Leland King II helped carry the Big West Conference to Foodbank. The Goleta Valley South and Dos Pueblos Little second place in the inaugural 3×3U National Championship, a three-on-three basketball tournament held in San Leagues will have a date in the future. “It’s going to be a big, fun event,” Antonio in conjunction with the NCAA Final Four. Vicsaid John Lofthus of the Santa Bar- tor Joseph of Cal Poly and Chance Murray of UC Riverbara Athletic Association, the oldest side complemented the roster with the two Gauchos. They running club in town that is hosting defeated five other conferences, including the Big East, to Thursday’s gathering. He will be one reach the final, where the Big Ten team stood up for the of the bartenders. “I am well trained majors and won, 21-13. The title was worth $50,000 to the to pour beers,” he said. “I’ll have to winners, while the runners-up had to settle for $5,000, a rise to the occasion when it comes to cocktails.” grand for each win. Behind the bar at 7 p.m. will be a pair of amazing ultraWestmont College reaped the riches of recognition after distance runners. Patty Bryant, 58, completed the Tahoe finishing second in the NAIA women’s basketball cham200-mile endurance run last year in 89 hours, 51 minutes, pionship. All-America citations were accorded to senior and 17 seconds. Cassie Scallon, 35, finished second among forwards Lauren McCoy (first team) and Morgan Haskin 124 runners in the Ray Miller 50-miler on the Malibu coast. (honorable mention). Joining McCoy on the all-tournament team was first-year guard Lauren Tsuneishi, while Her time was 7:38:58. Brittni Hutton, training for the 2020 Olympic Tri- sophomore Joy Krupa took the Hustle Award. “If the NAIA als in the women’s marathon, will be dispensing drinks at had a sixth-man award, there is no doubt that Jae Ferrin 7:30 p.m. along with aspiring decathlete Ben Kirkwood. would have won it,” Warrior coach Kirsten Moore said of The Red Piano was opened in August 2016. Jones had her other senior. bought a bar of the same name on the island of Saint Martin “one night at 5 a.m. when I was hammered on rum,” he GAUCHO HALL OF FAME: Orlando Johnson, who powsaid. He now eschews strong drinks — nonalcoholic drinks ered UCSB into two NCAA men’s basketball tournaments, might be popular Thursday — and indulges in his passion is fast-breaking into the UCSB Intercollegiate Athletics Hall for music, scheduling artists from 1 p.m. to 1 a.m. every day. of Fame. The class of five new inductees also includes legBrandon Birdsong will be performing on guitar and endary volleyball coaches Kathy Gregory (38 years with vocals at 5 p.m. He is Hutton’s fiancé, having proposed to the Gaucho women) and Ken Preston (30 years with the her when he finished the Olympic Marathon Trials in 2016, men), Olympic heptathlete Barbara Nwaba, and men’s and music has kept him going since he was badly injured in water polo player John Anderson. The induction ceremony will take place on Saturday, April 28, at the Lobero a bicycle-truck collision last May. House regular Jason Libs will be at the piano — yes, it’s Theatre, at 6 p.m. There will be a reception in the lobby red — until 8 p.m., when Tim Buie takes over the rest of beforehand. Tickets are $75 if purchased before April 14, n the evening. Buie claims to hold the Guinness world record $100 thereafter. Visit ucsbgauchos.com.

PAUL WELLMAN

Guest Bartenders Serve Up Fundraiser; Plus Basketball Awards and Gaucho Hall of Fame

Matt Mills, San Marcos swimming

The junior won the 50- and 100-yard freestyles (22.21 seconds and 48.45) and anchored 200 medley and 400 free relay teams to victories in meet against Dos Pueblos.

March 25-31 Elle Smith, Cate track & field

In a dual meet against Carpinteria, the junior sprinted to victories in the 100 and 200, as well as helping the Rams win the 4x100 relay. She recently was named All-CIF in basketball.

Dylan Kelley, Dos Pueblos baseball

The senior led the Chargers to the championship of the Rancho Cucamonga Cougar Classic, pitching five innings and going 4-for-5 at the plate in a 14-8 win over the host school.

by John

ZANT

50

JOHN

ZANT’S

GAME OF THE WEEK

4/6-4/7: College Men’s Volleyball: Hawai‘i at UCSB Two weeks remain in the regular season, and four

teams are tied for second place behind No. 1–ranked Long Beach State in the Big West — UCSB, Hawai‘i, UC Irvine, and Cal State Northridge — all with 3-3 records. The No. 11 Gauchos forced the logjam by taking down No. 9–ranked CSUN last week. It ended their four-match losing streak against top-10 teams. They hope to keep up their momentum Friday and Saturday night against the No. 6 Rainbow Warriors, followed by their last home match on Thursday (4/12) against No. 3 UCI. The final standings will determine the seedings for the first Big West men’s volleyball tournament April 19-21 at Long Beach. 7pm. Robertson Gym, UCSB. $5-$8. Call 893-UCSB (8272) or visit ucsbgauchos.com.


Campaign Chair Lady Leslie Ridley-Tree and cabinet members Dan Gainey, Sue and Ed Birch, Maryan Schall and Peter MacDougall

we couldn’t have done it without you!

Sansum Clinic and the Cancer Foundation of Santa Barbara would like to thank Lady Leslie Ridley-Tree and the Campaign Cabinet for their leadership of the Campaign for Our New Cancer Center which resulted in more than $48 million for the new Ridley-Tree Cancer Center! We are proud to welcome a new era in cancer care for patients in our community, close to home, family, friends and work.

Santa Barbara • Lompoc • Solvang ridleytreecc.org

Corporate Business to Intuitive Practice

ALLYSON GOMEZ, CAMTC Massage Therapist since 2010, www.IAMHealing.us

“When I lost my corporate job, SBBTI and Workforce Investment Act opened doors for me to retrain as a massage therapist. I now operate my own business, “I AM Healing,” providing bodywork for transformational festivals nationwide, like Lucidity Festival. I AM Healing provides Lucidity with 30 exceptional healers to offer donation based healing all weekend long to participants, collaborators, and staff. Bodywork has given me a platform to do what I love, awakening consciousness with individuals and groups.”

250 hr Massage Practitioner Program Day or Night classes; starting April 6, April 12 or May 24th.

SANTA BARBARA BODY THERAPY INSTITUTE

516 North Quarantina Street, Santa Barbara • 805-966-5802 • www.sbbti.com 51


Special Thanks to Our Donors Sansum Clinic and the Cancer Foundation of Santa Barbara would like to thank our donors for ushering us into a new era of cancer care with the opening of the Ridley-Tree Cancer Center.

$10,000,000+

Lady Leslie Ridley-Tree

$5,000,000 – $9,999,999 Cancer Foundation of Santa Barbara

$2,500,000 – $4,999,999

Virgil Elings, PhD • Santa Barbara Cottage Hospital Foundation The Wolf Family Foundation

$1,000,000 – $2,499,999

Roger K. Bower • Jim & Wendy Drasdo • Hugh & Hunter Foster Family Anna & David Grotenhuis • Judy & Jeff Henley • Jurkowitz Family • William & Nancy Kimsey Shirley & Seymour Lehrer & The Lehrer Family Foundation • Lillian & Jon* Lovelace Dr. Nancy O’Reilly & Daughters Lauren, Leigh & Ragan • Sansum Clinic • Maryan Schall Elaine Stepanek Foundation, Trust & Estate

$500,000 – $999,999

Bossé Foundation • Haigh Estate • Ann Jackson Family Foundation • Herbert & Elaine Kendall The Lyons Family • Dale Marquis • Mosher Foundation • The RoKe Foundation • Tippy & Eric Schulte

$250,000 – $499,999

Victor Atkins • The Bollag Family • G.L. Bruno Associates • Les & Zora Charles Harchalk Estate • Hutton-Parker Foundation • Outhwaite Foundation • Santa Barbara Foundation Ann & Ken Stinson • Williams-Corbett Foundation • Otis Williams Trust • Ron & Betty Ziegler

$100,000 – $249,999

Christopher & Anita Anderson • Bitsy & Denny Bacon • Lee Bacon • Leslie & Philip Bernstein • Sharon & David Bradford Change A Life Foundation • Dougherty Trust • Errett-Fisher Foundation • Julie & Bill Esrey • The Hunter Foster Family Felicie & Paul Hartloff • Vicki & Bob Hazard • Joan & Robert Hollman • Jackie Inskeep • The Kemmerer Family Foundation Eralda Kogan Charitable Remainder Trust • Christy & George Kolva • Fred & Joyce Lukas • Jim & Alicia McFarlane Susan & William McKinley • William & Jocelyne Meeker • Carolyn & Art Merovick • The Merovick Family (W. S. Farish Fund) Val & Bob Montgomery • The Ogle Family • Bobbie & Gerry Rubin • Alison Wrigley & Geoffrey Claflin Rusack John & Randi Sanger • Snider Foundation • Mary Lynn & Warren Staley • Judy Stanton* • Carole & Sebastiano Sterpa Alice Tweed Tuohy Foundation

$50,000 – $99,999

Jeffrey & Margo Baker Barbakow • Tim & Ginny Bliss • Kelly & Hugh Boss • James S. Bower Foundation • Tim & Louise Casey • Bob Christie Dan & Diane Gainey • Albert & Caroline Gazin • Howard & Nancy Gilmore • Joe & Beverly Hardin • Jim & Chana Jackson • Janeway Foundation Kenneth & Frances Jewesson • Mithun Foundation • Montecito Bank & Trust • Ron & Susan Morrow • Bob & Lynn Nakasone • QAD Bobbie & Eddie Rosenblatt • Selby* & Diane Sullivan • Anne Smith Towbes • Turpin-Allebrand Families • Jack Votey

$25,000 – $49,999

Brier & Kent Allebrand • Patricia Aoyama & Chris Kleveland • B & B Foundation • Don & Susan Bennett Family Fund • Ed & Sue Birch Barbara Clark • Michael & Marni Cooney • Robert & Christine Emmons • Dennis & Frederika Emory • Roberta & Stan Fishman Dan & Debbie Gerber • Robert & Nancy Gregory • Bob & Robyn Howard-Anderson • Sarah & Fred Kass • David Keller • Bill & Marian Nasgovitz Regina & Rick Roney • Rick & Carolyn Scott • Jim & Ingrid Shattuck • Candace Waldron • Dr. Tom & Diane Weisenburger

focused on cancer. centered on you. 52


Over $48 Million Raised! $10,000 – $24,999

Anonymous • Peter & Becky Adams • Cooper Allebrand • Ellery Allebrand • Bonnie Baas • Brent & Sue Bickett • Jill & John C. Bishop, Jr. • Peter & Kati Buehler • Tom Campbell • Catherine Cavaletto • Tom & Christy Condon – Condon Family Foundation • Janet & Richard Danehy, Sr. • Sheila & Jim Davidson • Reece & Christine Duca • Tom and Nancy Elsaesser Foundation • Nayda Escalera • Jan Everote • David & Monica Fishman • Don & Kristen Galloway • Bill Hepp • Kurt & Pamela Stafford Huffman • Shari & George Isaac • Brian Johnson • Gertrude Johnson • Todd & Donna Jones • Dennis & Katharine Jorgensen • Rebecca & Charles Kaye • Tom Kenny & Susan McMillan • The Kunkel Family • The Lawrence Family • Elizabeth Leddy • Judy Little • Donald R. Logan • Don & Rose* Louie • The Lucky Fund • Calvin & Phyllis Marble • Kathleen Mayes • Julie & Steve McGovern • Steve & Nicole McHugh • Kay McMillan • Tim & Cindy Metzinger • Gene Miller & Sharyne Merritt • Jim & Mary Morouse • Roger & Almeda Morrison • Julie & Jack* Nadel • The Neary Family • The Nissenson Family Fund • Richard Nordlund • Walter Orso & Family • Jany & Dick Pearson • Constance & James Pollak • Elizabeth Rand & Family • Dr. & Mrs. Kurt N. Ransohoff • Julie & George Rusznak • Mark Shipp/HUB International • Kimberly Schizas & Mark Linehan • Nancy Schlosser • Scott Family Foundation • George & Sally Serpa • Herbert Simon Family Foundation • Ellen & Rick Stein • Dr. Warren & Heather Suh • Francis & Helga Sulger • W. Pendleton & Mary Alice* Tudor • Union Bank • United Way of Santa Barbara County • Nicholas & Patricia Weber • Richard & Frederica Welch • John Wilke • Harold Williams* & Nancy Englander

Up to $9,999

Anonymous (3) • Edward & Linda Aasted • Mark & Caroline Abate • Ross & Mary Adams • Melanie & Joseph Allen • Mark Alvarez • Cindy Ambriz-Gasser • American Riviera Bank • Youngmi An • Jose & Maria Andrade • Marc Appleton & Joanna Kerns • James N. Arabian & Mary B. Rogers • Meredith Armienti • Lee & Sheila Asseo • George & Gage Azelickis • Alison Baistorcchi • Col. & Mrs. Michael Baker • Margery Baragona & Jim Wilson • Charles Bargiel • Rona Barrett • Diane Baskin • Dr. Robert & Esther Baum • Joan Bennett Family Fund • Alan & Marilyn Bergman • Dr. Jonathan & Stephanie Berkowitz • Rodney Berle • Helen Bernson • Michael & Shannon Bernstein • Jack & Marguerite Bianchi • Linda Bird • Marcus & Nancy Bird • Jennifer Blankenbeckler • Gill & Linda Blonsley • Geoff & Polly Bloomingdale • Lindsay Blount, MD • Dr. David & Joan Bohn • John & Pamela Bond • Blanca Bordas • David & Louise Borgatello • Beverly & Peter Borneman • Marc & Carol Borowitz & Rincon Events • Boulder Associates • Paul Bowron • Brittany Braden • Bragg Crane & Rigging • Merna Braun • Kelley & Bill Brennan • Joyce Brisby • Susie Briseno • Brittingham Family Foundation • Helen Brown • Judy Senning-Brown & Willie Brown • Lois & Sonny Brown • William Brown & Helen Ines • Michele & Arnold Brustin • Bob & Patty Bryant • Karl & Katherine Burrelsman • Marcy Burton • Nigel & Connie Buxton • Jack & Karen Byers • Annette & Dr. Richard Caleel • Tom & Karen Carey • Dr. David & Sarah Carlson • Stephanie & Dana Carlyle • Dr. Lillian Carson • Vic Castanon • Fee Chang • Cecily Chavez • Drs. George Cheng & Annie Pham-Cheng • Friends & Family of Carolyne Cherry • Mouline Chiourn • Paul & Mary Jo Chrestenson • Felicia Chukwuka • Jonathan & Wendy Church • Drs. Louise Clarke & John Carbon • Gloria Clements • Monica Cluff • Ken & Betsy Coates • Tom Colbert • Lyndsy Collier • Mary Conrad • Charles Conway, MD • Yvonne Cooper • Chris Corpuz & Donna Kell, MD • Daniel & Lindsay Cortina • Drs. Shane Cotter & Jessica Sexton • Alfred* & Johanna Crain • Joanie & Roger Craton • Lillian Cross-Szymanek • John & Danielle Crowder • Gary Cummings • Norma Curtis • Edith Dartanner • Bret E. Davis, MD, FACP • Suzanne Dean • Michele DeCant • Kristin DeHahn • Elliott & Linda Dell • Suzanne de Ponce • Sherri Diaz • James Dixon • Billie Dodson • Dick & Robin Drew • Barbara Dunaway • Sean Dunn • Rob & Susan Dunton • Jane Dyruff • Jason Ealand • Julie Elledge • Bobbi & the Elliott Family • Dawn Elliott • Dr. Eugene & Ruth Ellis* • Katina Etsell, RN • Julie Evans • Karen & Bill Evenden • The Falstrom Family • Sally Fauntleroy • Beverlye Hyman Fead & Bob Fead • Sherri Feldman • Amy & Frazier Findlay • Gary & Peggy Finefrock • Robert A. Finkelstein • Regina Fletcher • Mr. & Mrs. J. Thomas Fly • John Flynn • Paul & Kee Flynn • Mia Marie Fonseca • Jill & Joseph Fonte • Judy Foreman • Vicki & John Fowler • Robyn Freedman • Tom & Jacque Fuller • Eric & Teri Gabrielsen • Caroline Gadsby • Gregory Gallant & Christine Nolte • Bill & Karen Gallivan • Garden Club of Santa Barbara • Janet A. Garufis • Dianne & Ray Gateley • Carol Geer • John Gehret • Ben & Dorothy Georges • John & Elizabeth Gerig • David & Anne Gersh • Arnold Gilberg, MD, PhD • Marilyn Gilbert • Gilead Sciences • Dolores Gillmore • Carmine & Dolores Giorgio • Gail Goldmuntz • Ann Goodrich • Ruth & David Green • Dr. Dan Greenwald & Anita Presser • Suzanne Gregory • Sharon Grix • Pamela Grossman • Mukul Gupta, MD & Bindu Kamal, MD • Norm & Jane Habermann • Terry & Tessa Hamermesh • Dru A. Hartley • Dennis & Lucinda Hartman • Evelyn Heinrichs • Heidi Heitkamp’s Friends & Family • Sandra Helps • Denise Hengels • Marianne & James Henry • The Higgins Trapnell Family Foundation • Harold & Shirley* Hill • Chad & Lilia Hine • Thomas Holt & Myra Fujimoto-Holt • Jerry Horan • Barbara & Joe Howell • Sam Howland • Heather & Ben Hudson • Kim Hurley • Jim Hyman & Leslie Weisberg • Friends & Family of Beatriz Hyp • Marion Inchaustehui • Nancy Irvine • William & Virginia Isbell • Hollye & Jeffrey Jacobs • Doralee Jacobson • Teresa Jellison • Penny Jenkins & Gregg Hackethal • Joan Jennings • Alvin & Helen Jermagian • David & Lillian Jewell • Dorothea Johnson • Sean & Kendra Johnson • Gwen Jones • Gerd & Pete Jordano • Karen Jorgensen • Nancy Kaplan • Karl & Patty Kassity • Louise & Bruce Keeler • Bruce & Michelle Kendall • James & Diana Kennett • Mrs. Mansouren Khalafi • Linda Kiefer • Ethel King • Linda & Bill Kitchen • Barry & Jill Kitnick • Terry Kleid • Wayne & Audrey Kliman • David & Susan Kohl • P. Kohlen • Beth Koss • Karen Kowalski • Andrew Kröes • Elizabeth & Philip Kryder • Collene Kuesis • Barbara Kummer • Bill & Carolyn Kyle • Patricia Latham* • Robert & Maryann Latham • Dr. Ronald & Beverlie Latimer • Marjorie Layden • Ken & Teri Lebow • Frank* & Hing Lee • Vivian Leslie • Jon Levin & Diane Miller-Levin • Anita Lewis* • Ethel Li • Bruce & Noreen Livingston • Joel & Kay Lopate • Doug Lorch & Martha Inman Lorch • Ann Lorimer • Connie Lund • Tom & Christy Luria • Gloria Lushing • Peter & Leslie MacDougall • James & Charlotte MacMillan • Kimba Madsen • Mary R. Mamey • B.L. Manger Foundation, Inc. • Elizabeth & Peter Mann • MarBorg Industries • Carol Marsch • Fred & Mary Marsh • Alan* & Pamela Martin • Audrey Martinson • John & Dinah Mason • Sherry Massey • Mary Ellen & Daniel McCammon • Carolyn McCarl • Carol McHenry • Jaci & Marly McMurry • Kathryn McMurray* • Dr. James & Christine McNamara • John & Joanne Meaney • Nona Medina • Craig & Sharon Meister • Hale & Anne Milgrim • Janet Millar • Alan & Mary Jane Miller • Chris & Mireille Mills • Gene Montesano • Ralph & Charlotte Moore • Cat Morales • Mark & Susan Mosby • Craig & Terri Mulford • Dennis & Anne Murphy • Tahmineh Myers • Mrs. Raymond King Myerson • Spencer & Myra Nadler • Egidio Natale • Jennifer Neal • Gary & Anna Nett • Drs. Gregg & Marjorie Newman • Peter, Mirielle & Natalie Noone • Duane Nordlund • Northern Trust • Robert & Alexandra Nourse • Steve Oliver • Belita Ong & Gordon Auchincloss • Eric & Kelly Onnen • Maria Ordaz • D. Bruce Ostermann • Kay Ostermann’s Family & Friends • Jeff Overeem • Peter & Shelley Overgaag • Dr. William & Jennifer Pace • Nancy Palke • Anastasia Patchick • Phoebe & Jack Patterson • Pearson Automobile Co. • Drs. Juliet & Brandon Penn • Terry Perkins • Jean Perloff • Rosemary Peters • Tricia Peters • Donald & Doris Peterson • Eugene Peterson* & Nancy Darrow • Peterson Family • Carol & Jeff Petrini • Kenneth Pettit • Roger & Diana Phillips • Ann Picciuto & Rick Gehrke • Meriann Plamondon • Mike Poley & Family • Laura Polito • Alan Porter & Brenda Blalock • Cherry Post • Dr. Pamela Post • Don & Linda* Pratt • Sheila & Thomas Prendiville • Joan & David Price • Cliff & Jan Purcell • Martha Purl • David & Lisa Raphael • Amy Rauch • Barry & Margaret Reis • Joshua Reis • Morgan Reis • Erica Reynolds’ Family & Friends • Doris & Donald Ribble • George & Marlene Riemer • Rebecca Riskin* • Victoria Riskin & David W. Rintels • John & Barbara Ritter’s Family & Friends • Judith Roberson • Jennie Rodriguez • Thomas Rollerson & Michael Erickson • Ron & Therese Romanelli • Jim Romeo & Christine D’Arco • Inge Rose • Dr. Joel & Molly Rothman • Scott & Karen* Rowland • Travis & Julie Rushing • Kevin & Susan Ryan • Martha Saatjian • Mr. & Mrs. Andre Saltoun • James & Glenda Sampson • Steve Sander • Sheldon & Alice Sanov • Santa Barbara Tennis Club • Santa Barbara Water Vendors • Christi Satchwell • Diane & Douglas Scalapino • Ethel & Howard Scar • David & Judy Schiefen • Beth Sexsmith • Otto & Myra Schleich • Stanley Schlosser • Patricia Schuette • Pete Schulte & Family • Henry & Suzanne Schwake • Gail Shannon • Danielle Sharaga • Fred & Stephanie Shuman • John Shute • Halina Silverman • Bob & Lynn Sinclair • Sidonia Slaff • Ken & Elizabeth Slaught • Alan Slifka Foundation • Debra Smalley • Alan & Laura Smith • Andrea Smith • Marilyn Smith • Mary Solis • David & Carolyn Spainhour • Kurt & Jan Speier • Scott & Terri Speier • Lynn Sprecher • Steve Starkey • Nancy Steele • Heather & Ben Stefanski • Jay & Connie Stein • Charles Stevens • Frank & Kay Stevens • Jacqueline Stevens • Gail Stichler • Tammy Stockero • Ana & Todd Sullivan • Jack Suzar & Linda May • Jean K. Svoboda • Betsy Sweda • Amanda Sweet • Julie Taguchi, MD • Masoumeh Tajbakhsh • Carmelo & Antonia Tasca • Susan Taylor • Roberta Teague • Lillian Teran • Chris Terpening • Clarence & Shalea Thompson • Cassandra Thomsen • Beverly & Pat Toole • Robert & Ann Townsend • Paul & Vivi Tziouvaras • Talitha Ulloa • Lisa Valencia • Ann Veazey • Bob & Marlene Veloz • Cecilia Villines • Elizabeth Vos • Laura Waisler • Jo Wagner • Thomas Walsh • C.J. & Beth Ward • Montague & Nancy Ward • Sarah Washburn • William L. Wayne • Barbara Weaver • Robert Webb & Michael Corbett • Seth Weingarten & Lynne Silbert • Margaret Weiss • Alan & Sharon Werthheimer • Frank & Parm Williams • Cheryll Willin • Lori Willis • Wilson Foundation • Peter & Jan Winn • Tracie Winstrom • William & Mona Wise • Dr. Tom & Virginia Woliver • Alison Wollitzer • Rev. Michelle Woodhouse • Dan Wright & Joyce Jerge • Ralph Wright & Laurel Posey • Thomas & Tracy Wright • Dr. N. Genevieve Wu • Carolyn & Phil Wyatt • Grace & Edward Yoon • Eric Zahm & Stacey Geldin • Jane Zonka • Patricia Zucherman • Neil & Karla Zuehlke *Deceased

540 W. Pueblo Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93105 • ridleytreecc.org 53


Jodi House’s 4th Annual

Locally Owned and Operated

www.santacruzmarkets.com Chicken

ROMA TOMATOES

98¢ lb.

69¢ lb.

Pork

HEAD LETTUCE

DRUMSTICKS

$1.69 lb. Beef

PERUANO BEANS

$5.98 lb.

$ lb.99 89¢

PORK CHOPS

Italian & Mexican

Walk or roll a 1/2 mile route, or hike a 5K trail, in support of our community’s brain injured members. Following the event will be a BBQ lunch generously provided by the Kiwanis Club of Santa Barbara. Join us for live music, raffle drawings, and fun activities for the whole family!

lb.

ea.

TONGUE

Saturday, April 14, 2018

GOLETA 5757 Hollister Ave 8:30am to 2:00pm Godric Grove at Elings Park

To register or make a donation: jodihouse.kintera.org/hike2018

¢ 49 69¢

TRI-TIP

1

ea.

About Jodi House Jodi House empowers brain injury survivors to not merely survive, but thrive. Through its day program, Jodi House offers activities to reignite interests, foster new relationships and encourage the physical, cognitive, and behavioral recovery of each brain injury survivor.

SQUASH

$1.98 lb.

59 ¢

69¢ lb. ¢

89

Beef

Seedless

$4.98 lb.

59¢ lb.

lb.

For additional information about the event, please contact: lindsey@jodihouse.org or call (805) 563-2882 ext.3 To volunteer, please contact: nadia@jodihouse.org

WATERMELON

T-BONE STEAKS

89 ¢

SANTA BARBARA Fresh 324 W. Daily Montecito St

BROWN ONIONS

$2.29 lb.

4 lbs./$1.00

GROUND BEEF

GOLETA 5757 Hollister Ave

lb.

89 ¢

49 ¢ lb.

Springfield (2 lb.)

LONG GRAIN RICE

$1.39 69 ¢

59$¢ 99

Capri Sun (10 10 ct.)

DRINKS

Knorr (15 oz.)

Kraft (18 oz.)

$3.29

ea. $1.9989

CHICKEN BOUILLON

79

B-B-Q SAUCE ¢

$1.69

59 ¢

¢

lb.

BREWERIES

1 99

$1.39

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bread daily from sa Bakery

ES EFFECTIVE 7 FULL DAYS UGH NOVEMBER 2ND

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Minute Maid (59 oz.)

ORANGE JUICE

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$

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TO STOCK ON HAND • PRICES EFFECTIVE 7 FULL DAYS LIMITED TO STOCKlb. ONLIMITED HAND • PRICES EFFECTIVE 7 FULL DAYS FROM OCTOBER 27TH THROUGH NOVEMBER 2ND FROM OCTOBER 27TH NOVEMBER7 2ND LIMITED STOCK ON HAND •THROUGH PRICES EFFECTIVE FULL DAYS

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SATURDAY APRIL 21ST 12/1 - 5 P.M. ***** 20+ CRAFT

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www.BucklesAndBrews.com


s roundup

CHEESE LIFE: Rudy’s chile relleno burrito is just one of the many tasty versions in Santa Barbara.

PAUL WELLMAN

p.55 NINETTE PALOMA

FOOD &DRINK

nutrition

Dining Out Guide

H

ealthy Warrior is a comprehensive organic meal plan,

Best Chile Relleno Burritos I

• WINE GUIDE

n 1923, when the aviation industry dominated At Los Agaves Restaurant (los-agaves Los Angeles and the paint on the Hollywood .com), nods to the old 19th-century recipes of sign was still wet to the touch, Rosa and Ale- Puebla are manifested in a rich chipotle cream jandro Borquez quietly sauce poured over a delicate tortilla filled with savory opened a Mexican eatery on The Story Behind and the city’s south side, ushering black beans and a charred Where to Find This in America’s love affair with poblano chile. Sink your Meal Within a Meal south-of-the-border cuisine. knife through the center, Their legendary El Cholo Café and you’ll be rewarded with BY NINETTE PALOMA immortalized some of Mexico’s a shimmering river of Monmost beloved culinary offerterey Jack cheese, held at bay ings, centuries-old recipes reflecting both indig- by the large pyramid of Spanish rice that accomenous and Spanish influences that migrated north panies every entrée. as Alta California became part of the American More is more at Super Cucas Restaurant (cucasrestaurant.com), where all of the usual Southwest. Mrs. Borquez’s fire-roasted poblano peppers external accoutrements can be found tucked stuffed with queso blanco and her pillowy flour neatly inside of a gargantuan flour shell, includtortillas folded around savory fillings became ing creamy pinto beans, seasoned rice, pico de instant hits, launching food obsessions that gallo, and two crisp poblano peppers wrapped in would spread throughout California and across fluffy omelet blankets. Order yours in the mornthe country. Somewhere along their journey, the ing, and they’ll even throw in a generous helping stuffed peppers surreptitiously slid in between the of roasted potatoes. folds of a warm flour tortilla, and the chile relleno At Rudy’s Mexican Restaurant (rudysburrito was born. mexican.com), the secret is in the sauce, an The balanced textures of a chile relleno’s smoky alchemical blend of garlic, tomatoes, and dried frame stuffed with soft, melting cheese and guajillo chiles simmered slowly in the early dipped in a creamy egg batter before being fried morning and poured over its burritos “mojado” to a delicate crisp has long enjoyed whimsical sta- style before being topped lavishly with a blend of tus as the molten cake of the Mexican foodscape shredded cheeses. The poblano chile takes center — see the 1992 film Like Water for Chocolate for stage at Los Arroyos (losarroyos.com), stuffed a walnut-cream version that will make you weep with velvety black beans and a creamy queso with delight. Enter the pragmatic roots of the fresco filling before being slow roasted until its humble burrito, which was popularized among ribs collapse in surrender. the wheat-producing regions of Alta California, In 2010, UNESCO inscribed the cuisine of where flour tortillas were rolled out and stuffed Mexico on the Representative List of the Intangible Cultural Heritage of Humanity, describing with daily leftovers. Thrown together, what you have is nothing it as a “comprehensive cultural model comprising short of a quixotic meal within a meal, the kind farming, ritual practices, age-old skills, culinary of fantastical request an 8-year-old might sling at techniques, and ancestral community customs you when asked what they’d like to have for din- and manners.” Here in Santa Barbara, that tradiner. Even in Santa Barbara, where tri-tip reigns tion lives on in the kitchens of the city’s familysupreme, the chile relleno burrito stands boldly owned establishments and in their adaptations of among its meat-laden cousins, firing on all cyl- a deeply intricate gastronomic history. Anyone inders of comfort, decadence, and complexity. hungry yet? n

cooked and prepared by Mia Pasqualucci and delivered to your doorstep. But it’s so much more than that. The menu is catered to your dietary needs (gluten- free and vegan, anyone?), but the service also forms around your lifestyle. “For every potential client, I will schedule a meeting with them to talk about their daily routines,” said Pasqualucci. “This way, I can get a feel for what they need health-wise and structure the meal package around what their body needs.” Pasqualucci went to culinary school and has worked as a yoga and fitness instrucMia Pasqualucci’s Organic Meal tor, so she has extenPlan Delivery Service Fits into sive experience with balancing nutrition Your Lifestyle with lifestyle. She has worked in the kitchen BY AIYANA MOYA of the Four Seasons Biltmore for the past seven years but also spent time cooking at D’Angelo Pastry & Bread, the Santa Barbara Fish Market, and the Boathouse. Food is in her family blood: Her grandparents ran an Italian restaurant when she was a kid, and the family’s life revolved around food.“Anytime we go home, we cook,” she said.“Some of my earliest memories are sitting at the counter, stirring the tomato sauce, and baking cookies. Pesto, marinara, and cookies were my favorite foods as a kid.” Pasqualucci incorporates those childhood lessons with her professional experience for Healthy Warrior. “It is kind of a blend of everything I have learned,” she said. “I have taken the homey comfort food and adjusted it and applied it to really healthy meals using nutritious ingredients.” With the Biltmore closed as a result of the Montecito mudslide, Pasqualucci is using her unexpected time off to start the business she’s always dreamed of.And she’s spreading the love by hiring coworkers from the Biltmore who are also out of work.“I get to bring the two things I love the most, health and food, while also helping the community by providing an option that doesn’t really exist,” she said.“And I get to employ my friends from the Biltmore who need the work right now.” The Healthy Warrior meal plan uses all organic, locally sourced foods, and the top tier supplies three meals a day with snacks for the entire week. Every meal is tailored individually, differing in portion size and proteins depending on the goals and activities of each person. There are a variety of plans, schedules, and prices. n See healthywarriorsb.com.

Dining Out Guide

FOOD & DRINK •

Healthy Warrior Pumps You Up

FOOD & DRINK •

• WINE GUIDE

MAKING THE BEST: With disaster shutting down her work at the Four Seasons Biltmore, Mia Pasqualucci started her own business, delivering healthy meals and employing her out-of-work colleagues.

55


The Herman P. and Sophia Taubman Foundation Endowed Symposia in Jewish Studies at UCSB ~ Special Yom HaShoah Event ~

The Testament Central Coast Premiere of Amichai Greenberg’s award-winning film

Breakfast Enchiladas & Jake’s Bloody Open Daily 6AM to 9PM

CLASSIC FOOD FULL BAR EVENT ROOM

Groups Welcome! Gift Cards Available! 4898 Hollister Avenue • (805) 683-5141 www.codyscafesb.com

Yanni’s Greek & American Deli

Located at MacKenzie Market

Serving Santa Barbara for 32 Years! Famous Gyros & Tri-tip Full Service Deli Catering

Thursday, April 12 / 7:00 p.m. / Free Congregation B’nai B’rith, 1000 San Antonio Creek Road For assistance in accommodating a disability, please call 893-2317.

3102 State Street • 682-2051

genuine • local • casual

WEEKEND BRUNCH Saturday & Sunday 9:30AM - 1PM Benedicts • House Made Cinnamon Rolls • Full Bar Mimosas • Sangria • Bloody Marys Reservations Family Friendly Weekly Happy Hour Large Open Patio Seating

EXPIRES 4-12-18

EXPIRES 4-12-18

benchmarkeatery.com • 805.845.2600 genuine local casual

On the Corner of State St. & Anapamu 56

CALM Auxiliary 32nd Annual Celebrity Authors Luncheon

Saturday, April 21 at 10AM Fess Parker’s DoubleTree Resort

EXPIRES 4-12-18

Tickets + Info 805.969.5590 calm4kids.org


JAKOB LAYMAN

A

fter the rebuilding that followed the dev-

astating debris flows, Frankland’s Crab & Co. opens this Friday, April 6, inside the Montecito Inn (1295 Coast Village Rd.). According to the company’s press release, Scratch|Restaurants, the restaurant group known for Encino establishments Scratch|Bar, Sushi|Bar, and Woodley Proper, is the first hotel venture outside of Los Angeles for chef-owners Phillip Frankland Lee and Margarita Kallas-Lee. They plan to open three more concepts at the inn. Upon entering the windowed storefront, diners order at the counter from a wall-sized menu. Wooden tables and stools fill the interior, anchored by distressed concrete and the Crab & Co. sign that’s lit with exposed bulbs. Pops of red and Astroturf decorate the room. “Capturing fond early memories of jaunts to the Santa Barbara coast and weekend drives down Pacific Coast Highway, Lee reminisces through the nostalgia of lobster rolls, peel-andeat shrimp, clam chowder, and good times with loved ones — arriving at the modern-day, casual seafood shack that is Frankland’s Crab & Co.,” says the release. The menu features Santa Barbara ridgeback shrimp and wild-caught crab, clams, and oysters, served raw, steamed, fried, or whipped with butter and other accoutrements in house-baked brioche sandwiches. The fish and chips showcase branzino battered in Scrimshaw brew, while the “Chowda” features a stock made from a variety of shellfish, including house-cured bacon, crab, lobster, and prawn. There are also fried local oysters and clams and a Mary’s fried chicken roll topped with a tangy giardiniera. Corn on the cob is brushed with lobster butter, which is freshly churned and steeped with lobster shells. Beachcomber and wine-tasting picnic baskets make for an easy grab-and-go option. For dessert, Margarita’s homemade ice-cream sandwich rotates through flavors such as Peruvian dark chocolate chip cookies surrounding Madagascar vanilla bean ice cream and Latvian-style

sgushenka (a type of sweetened condensed milk). To drink, the homemade root beer, fresh lemonade, and iced tea can be spiked with mini bottles of premium gin, vodka, tequila, and other spirits. The house keg will rotate through regional brews while a selection of individual wine cans showcase favorites from the region. Future Montecito Inn eateries coming later this year include Margarita’s Snacks (late summer), The Monarch (late summer), and Silver Bough (winter). Frankland’s Crab & Co. is open daily from 11 a.m. to 10 p.m. See franklands crabandcompany.com. VINEYARD HOUSE CLOSES: Reader Annie let me

know that The Vineyard House Restaurant at 3631 Sagunto Street in Santa Ynez closed on March 10. BILTMORE AND SAN YSIDRO RANCH UPDATE: This just

in from reader Gary: “I was told yesterday by a Biltmore employee that the hotel and restaurants will now not reopen until the summer because of the damage from the mudslides. I think they were hoping to reopen earlier. He also said the San Ysidro Ranch reopening could be a year—or even two years—away.” The original opening date for the Biltmore was April 2, but my call to the Four Seasons resort confirmed that the opening will be in June.

Dining Out Guide

Frankland’s Crab & Co. Opens at Montecito Inn

FOOD & DRINK •

INN EATS: Phillip Frankland Lee and Margarita Kallas-Lee are opening the first of four eateries inside the Montecito Inn this Friday.

• WINE GUIDE

YASMIN ALISHAV

JOIN US FOR

lunch NOW SERVED IN INTERMEZZO

DOWNTOWN SANTA BARBARA

BEST BURGERS, SALADS + FLATBREADS DAILY SPECIALS FULL BAR TUESDAY-SATURDAY 11:30AM-4PM ALL YOUR WINECASK AND INTERMEZZO LUNCH FAVORITES VIEW LUNCH MENU AT

INTERMEZZOSB.COM 819 ANACAPA ST.

SANTA BARBARA

Mission Street Ice Cream & Yogurt

GIVING ROOST A BOOST: Readers tell me that the pre-

viously unnamed restaurant coming to 1305 State Street, the former longtime home of Downey’s, will be called Roost. BUENA ONDA UPDATE: This just in from Matias

Requena Mackinlay, owner of Buena Onda Empanadas at 724 East Haley Street: “We are now serving lunch from 11 a.m. until 2 p.m. Wednesday through Saturday, in addition to our current 4 to 8 p.m. on the same days. We will have a selection of artisanal empanadas ready to grab and go as well as tables for people to enjoy and eat there. SB Menus also available for delivery!”

John Dickson’s reporting can be found every day online at SantaBarbara.com. Send tips to info@SantaBarbara.com.

THE PLACE WHE

RE LOCA L S GO

Voted Best Ice Cream Year After Year!

Same Convenient Location • Free Parking Outdoor Patio • Friendly Service • Generous Portions

Mission Street Ice Cream & Yogurt ~ An Independently Owned & Operated Shop since 1986 ~ 201 West Mission St. • 569-2323

57


The Herman P. and Sophia Taubman Foundation Endowed Symposia in Jewish Studies at UCSB

Abigail Pogrebin

My Amazing, Demanding, Indelible Jewish Year

Did You Miss Our

MMER U S CAMP Issue?

Abigail Pogrebin is the author of the recently published book, My Jewish Year: 18 Holidays, One Wondering Jew, which was reviewed by David Gregory in The New York Times and featured on the Today Show. Her first book, Stars of David: Prominent Jews Talk about Being Jewish, was adapted for the Off-Broadway Stage and her second book, One and the Same, covered her every aspect of being a twin. A former producer for Mike Wallace at 60 Minutes and for Bill Moyers at PBS, she has written for numerous publications including Newsweek, New York Magazine, The Daily Beast, the Forward and Tablet, and has moderated conversations at the JCC in Manhattan, the 92Y, the Skirball Center, and the Shalom Hartman Institute. She currently serves as President of Central Synagogue in Manhattan.

A reception will follow Ms. Pogrebin’s talk. Sunday, April 22 / 3:00 p.m. / Free Congregation B’nai B’rith, 1000 San Antonio Creek Road For assistance in accommodating a disability, please call 893-2317.

Isla Vista Lompoc 888 Embarcadero Del Norte 1413 North H Street Buellton 205 East Hwy 246 58

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ETHIOPIAN AUTHENTIC ETHIOPIAN cuisine Featured at Petit Valentien Restaurant 1114 State St. #14, 805-966-0222. Serkaddis Alemu offers an ever changing menu with choices of vegetarian, vegan, and meat options. Catering Avaliable for parties of up to 40 people. Sat/Sun lunch 11:30-2:30

INDIAN FLAVOR OF INDIA 3026 State 682-6561 $$ www. flavorofindiasb.com Finest, most authentic Indian cuisine is affordable too! All You Can Eat Lunch Buffet $10.95 M-S dinner combos $9.95+ Specials: Tandoori- Mixed or Fish, Chicken Tikka Masala, Shrimp Bhuna. Also: meat, curries & vegetarian.Wine & Beer. Take out. VOTED BEST for 20 YEARS! IRISH DARGAN’S IRISH Pub & Restaurant, 18 E. Ortega St. (next to lot 10) SB, 568-0702. $$. Open 7 days 11:30a-Close (Food ‘til 10p, 11p on Sat/Sun). AE MC V Disc. Authentic Irish food & atmosphere in downtown SB. Specialties from Ireland include Seafood & Meat dishes. Informal, relaxed pub-style atmosphere. Live music Thursday nights. Children welcome. Avail. for private parties. Pool & Darts. ITALIAN FINE DINING ACTOR’S CORNER CAFÉ a fine dining restaurant presents: “Cook with Love” the workshop. Each

MEDITERRANEAN FOXTAIL KITCHEN 14 E. Cota Street, open late night, daily specials, 24 craft beers, great cocktails, American burgers. Try our green falafel and red falafel www. foxtailsb.com. Food till 11 Tue-Thu,12 Fri , Sun. NORTHERN EUROPEAN ANDERSEN’S DANISH Restaurant & Bakery. 1106 State St., 805-962-5085. Open Daily 8am-9pm. Family owned for over 42 years. Northern European Cuisine with California Infusion. Fresh scratch made pasteries & menu’s everyday. Authentic Breakfasts, Lunches & Dinners. Happy Hour menu with equisite wines & beers, 3-7pm everyday. High Tea served everyday starting at 2pm. Huge Viking Mimosa’s & Champagne Cocktails. Private Event spaces. VEGAN MEXICAN TACO TUYO offers amazing food that people of all diets will enjoy, whether you are herbivore, omnivore, locavore, or who-cares-ivore. Mexican vegan food is a great way to know, by experience, that vegan isn’t bland, but rather healthful and even crave worthy. Open Tues - Thurs 5-8pm, Fri 11:30-2pm, 5-8pm. 724 E. Haley, SB. 805.319.3627. Catering Available. STEAK RODNEY’S Grill, 633 East Cabrillo Boulevard at The Fess Parker – A Doubletree by Hilton Resort 805-564-4333. Serving 5pm -10pm Tuesday through Saturday. Rodney’s Grill is a fresh American grill experience. Enjoy all natural hormone-free beef, locally-sourced seafood, appetizers, and incredible desserts. The place to enjoy dinner with family and friends by the beach. Private Dining Room for 30. Full cocktail bar with specialty cocktails. Wine cellar with Santa Barbara County & California’s best vintages by-the-glass.

EVERY DAY!

BURRITO $599

Soda w/ Lunch! High School Students Receive Free Locations) (Mon-Fri Only - Micheltorena & Mesa

DAILY $739 LUNCH

SPECIALS

2030 Cliff Dr, Mesa Daily 7am–10pm 966-3863

626 W. Micheltorena, SB Daily 6am–10pm 962-4028 6527 Madrid Rd, IV Thurs-Sat 24 hrs Sun-Wed 7am-3am 770-3806

HAPPY HOUR!

SERVED IN OUR LOUNGE & OYSTER BAR

Mon – Fri 3 to 8pm • All Day Sat. & Sun.

• WINE GUIDE

FRENCH PETIT VALENTIEN, 1114 State St. #14, 805-966-0222. Open M-F 11:30-3pm (lunch). M-Sat 5pm-Close (dinner). Sun $25.50 four course prix fixe dinner. In La Arcada Plaza, Chef Robert Dixon presents classic French comfort food at affordable cost in this cozy gem of a restaurant. Petit Valentien offers a wide array of meat and seafood entrees along with extensive small plates and a wine list specializing in amazing quality at arguably the best price in town. A warm romantic atmosphere makes the perfect date spot. Comfortable locale for dinner parties, or even just a relaxing glass of wine. Reservations are recommended.

Saturday the workshop starts at 12:00 PM and ends at 4:00 PM. To book your seat please call: 805 686-2409. More information is available at www.actorscornercafe.com

BREAKFAST

Dining Out Guide

Guide

z

PAID

IN A ROW! 2 0 1 7

FOOD & DRINK •

DINING OUT

BARBARA’S BEST BURRITO 26 YEARS

uzu is one of the more fascinating fruits, especially if

you love cooking. Though usually quite seedy and extremely tart on the inside, the grapefruit-like fruit— fruit which grows primarily in Japan and Korea, where it’s known as yuja—features features a peel with vivid aromatics, like lemons and mandarins and pomelos on methamphetamine. This new liqueur from Soh Spirits (makers of the very popular Kikori Whiskey) involves handpicking the whole fruit each fall and steeping it for 30 days with rice spirits, Japanese sugar beets, and Australian sugarcane. The result is a swirl of sweet, sour, hot (due to the alcohol), and cool (due to the desired temperature), making it a great option to add a unique citrus blast to cocktails or just to sip on its own. I found the 30 percent alcohol drink a little too thick on its own, and though I fancy myself a good cook, I am not a cocktail wiz. So I found my best success by simply adding a splash of Yuzuri ($45) to scotch or bourbon on ice, as the yuzu flavors added intrigue and roundness to each sip. —Matt Kettmann See yuzuriliqueur.com.

VOTED SANTA

Goleta Beach Park • beachsidebarcafe.com

Indoor & Outdoor Patio Dining With a View 5905 Sandspit Rd. • 805-964-7881

10 %

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OF

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F

ORs 4/1 E 1/18 ON . LY

WEEKLY SPECIALS Local Black Cod F illet $11.95 lb

Eastern O ysters $0.85 ea / $1.35 ea shucked W ild Shr imp Burger Paddy $4.75 each

117 Harbor Way, Suite A, Santa Barbara, CA 93109 • 805.965.9564 • sbfish.com

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TICKET GIVEAWAY!

APRIL 5 – 11 Enter to win a 4-pack of tickets to Paw Patrol, coming to Santa Barbara April 13 & 14.

independent.com/pawpatrol © 2017 Spin Master PAW Productions Inc. All Rights Reserved. © 2017 Viacom.

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EMAIL: ARTS@INDEPENDENT.COM

MURAL SIDINGS

L I F E

ARTIST KARINA SANCHEZ ADDS COLOR TO BUELLTON BARN establishing a faux treatment service — i.e., paint finishes that replicate marble, wood, or stone — with her father’s company Santa Barbara Stone Masters, a natural-stone restoration company. In addition to stone faux finishes, Sanchez’s rich portfolio also includes fine and scenic artwork, including a series of five striking paintings titled “Anxiety” (I-V) and, most recently, a texture-rich mural of the American flag on a barn in Buellton. For her Anxiety series, Sanchez “asked people what they do with their hands when they feel anxious. I think that hands can really show the power of this emotion,” she said. Each oil-oncanvas painting depicts the gripping, wringing, and clenching that many do when anxious, the intensity of each brush stroke adding to the emotion conveyed. Sanchez’s knowledge of dramatic lighting is also essential to the paintings; her use of shadows accentuates the mood of each piece. Sanchez’s understanding of lighting is visible in her faux treatment work, as well as her recent mural project—a skillfully realistic rendition of the American flag painted on the side of a barn in Buellton, Califor-

CRIMES OF THE HEART

BEN CROP

In 1981, writer Beth Henley penned a play that would go on to receive a Pulitzer Prize for Drama and a Tony nomination for Best Play. The play, Crimes of the Heart Heart, is set in Hazlehurst, Mississippi, where three sisters — Meg, Babe, and Lenny — reunite from left: Shay Munroe, Charlotte Bailey, and after Babe shoots her abusive husElaine Bazaski band. While they’re in town, the siblings’ conversations ebb and flow from past memories to current events. Santa Barbarans have a chance to listen in on the Magrath sisters when The Theatre Group at SBCC presents the show April 13-28, with previews on April 11-12, at the Jurkowitz Theatre. Directed by R. Michael Gros, the cast includes Charlotte Bailey (Meg Magrath), Leesa Beck (Chick Boyle), George Coe (Barnette Lloyd), Shay Munroe (Babe Botrelle), Elaine Pazaski (Lenny Magrath), and Nicholis Sheley (Doc Porter). Call the box office at 965-5935 or see theatregroupsbcc.com. —Michelle Drown

PAGE 61 TONY MASTRES

T

alented artists possess the ability to look uniquely at the world, and Karina Sanchez fits that description to a T. A graduate of Dos Pueblos High School, Sanchez has lived and traveled all over the world, moving to Chile from Santa Barbara when she was 10 and returning in 8th grade. Sanchez said her international experience is a big part of her artistic inspiration, as it allowed her to develop “a strong, openminded mentality, which allows me to show different types of creativity.” After graduating cum laude from Ithaca College’s Department of Theater Arts with a degree in lighting design, Sanchez returned to S.B. and has spent the last eight months

ARTIST

YUMIKO GLOVER

nia. The mural’s texture and rendering create an optical illusion that gives dimensions to the work. “Fabric is a subject I love to paint and draw. I have my own process and technique to provide that signature satin look,” Sanchez explained. Indeed, the piece looks as if one could reach out and feel the silk. Sanchez hopes this mural is the first in a series of projects. “I’ve been getting lots of requests, which take a long time to [follow] through … but I’m very excited about them,” she said. Many families in Buellton have barns, said Sanchez, and she is looking forward to a countryside blooming with paint. See karinarosesanchez.com.

NOTES FOR NOTES NEWS

—Noah Shachar

For more than a decade, area kids have had the opportunity to pursue their love of music — whether it be singing, recording, engineering, playing instruments, or all of those things — for free thanks to the nonprofit Notes for Notes. Started in Santa Barbara in 2007 at the Eastside Boys & Girls Club, N4N now has two studios in town filled with guitars, drums, keys/synths, deejay gear, and digital music stations, and has expanded to Boys & Girls clubs nationwide. Now 11 years old, the two original studios needed some refurbishing, which they received thanks to Kenny Loggins and the Good Tidings Foundation. On April 11, folks can participate in the grand reopening event, which includes tours, record presentations, and a special appearance by Loggins. See notesfornotes.org. —MD

At Silo118 gallery, Yumiko Glover presents paintings that examine Japanese history, youth culture, and technology. Using bold colors and abstract forms, the works are not only strikingly vibrant but full of sociopolitical critique. Glover’s relationship to her war-ravaged hometown of Hiroshima and larger Japanese culture is central to her work. The title of the exhibition, For Your Eyes Only Only, draws from phrasing used by Japanese intelligence operatives, as well as the classic 1981 James Bond film. Critical of the Japanese government’s strategy of recruiting youth through romanticized notions of war, Glover’s paintings juxtapose symbols of combat with depictions of teenage schoolkids. The most successful works combine figuration with abstraction so that historical references are in contrast to contemporary culture. In one painting, two young men wear matching white button-ups; one holds an umbrella, another binoculars. Their bodies are dotted with blue and red paint to create an almost shard-like effect, while the background is a brilliant turquoise blue that is cut by one red abstract form alluding to warfare. Glover’s play between realism and abstraction gives an atmosphere of suspense to the fixed canvases, with the monochrome backdrop serving as the ideal base to suggest concepts of pixilation and virtual reality. In other paintings, abstraction takes center stage as lines and shapes form clouds of smoke or pieces of shrapnel. While the execution of these works feels unresolved, they still inform the show’s concept, the manual to deciphering Glover’s other paintings. For the artist, who completed her MFA at UC Santa Barbara in 2017 and is a 2017-2018 artist in residence there, the relationship to historical memory and how it continues to influence the present is key. From divisions of gender to the concept of innocence, she is interested in the way new technologies deviate from and continue to build off of the past — creating subcultures within an already well-defined one. Ultimately, For Your Eyes Only is a worthwhile show by an emerging artist at the onset of an important idea. —Rachel Heidenry For Your Eyes Only is on view at Silo118 (118 Gray Ave.) through April 30.

M O R E A R T S & E N T E R TA I N M E N T > > > 61


An Evening with

Anne Lamott

Tue, Apr 24 / 7:30 PM / Granada Theatre Tickets start at $20 / $10 UCSB students A Granada facility fee will be added to each ticket price

“Patron saint of writers everywhere.” The Washington Post Profound, caring and hopeful, author Anne Lamott is known for addressing complex subjects like addiction, motherhood and faith with self-effacing humor and ruthless honesty. Lamott’s numerous works of fiction and memoir include Grace (Eventually), Traveling Mercies and Imperfect Birds. With her latest, Hallelujah Anyway: Rediscovering Mercy, Lamott ventures to explore where to find meaning in life.

TICKET GIVEAWAY!

Event Sponsors: Heather & Tom Sturgess Thematic Learning Initiative: Creating a Meaningful Life

Pulitzer Prize-winning Author

Anthony Doerr

In Conversation with Pico Iyer Thu, May 3 / 7:30 PM / UCSB Campbell Hall Tickets start at $20 / $10 UCSB students

“Strange and beautiful… Doerr writes about the big questions, the imponderables, the major metaphysical dreads, and he does it fearlessly.” The New York Times Book Review

APRIL 5 – 11 Enter to win a 4-pack of tickets to Paw Patrol, coming to Santa Barbara April 13 & 14.

Lauded for his lyricism, precise attention to the physical world and his gift for metaphor, Anthony Doerr’s bestselling novel All the Light We Cannot See won the Pulitzer Prize and the Andrew Carnegie Medal for Excellence in Fiction. With the eye of a scientist and the heart of a poet, the prose stylist reveals his keen naturalist’s perception and his empathetic engagement with humanity’s largest questions.

Sponsored in part by Virginia Castagnola-Hunter Books will be available for purchase and signing at both events

(805) 893-3535 www.ArtsAndLectures.UCSB.edu Corporate Season Sponsor:

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Granada event tickets can also be purchased at: (805) 899-2222 | www.GranadaSB.org

independent.com/pawpatrol © 2017 Spin Master PAW Productions Inc. All Rights Reserved. © 2017 Viacom.


LOUIS FISHER

a&e | POP, ROCK & JAZZ PREVIEW

2017-2018 WINTER 2018 Spring Dance Concert

Kalopsia Delusions of Beauty

ELEMENTAL REALMS: Lucidity Festival returns to Live Oak for a weekend of music, art installations, and interactive environments April 6-8.

LUCIDITY’S RISING DAWN

E

ach year, Santa Barbarans proudly honor with attributes of those elements. Each village our community, culture, and planet with also hosts an elemental avatar — a performer Earth Day and Fiesta celebrations. For embodying the element of each area who the past six years, Santa Barbara has also paid will stay in character throughout the entire homage to enlightenment via the Lucidity event, offering up a unique piece of the RisFestival, which is dedicated to “a creative life- ing Dawn narrative. Haas explained: “Guests style for expanding consciousness,” according will be invited, after an oracle reading, to meet to its mission statement. an avatar and learn a piece of information Taking place April 6-8, leading to the location of this year’s event represents our closing performance.” the seventh chapter in These pieces of the Lucidity the festival’s 12-year-long puzzle are significant to the narrative, which festival atmosphere of the event, creators constructed with he said, representing the the first Lucidity in 2012. implementation of self-dis“We originally wanted to covery into a larger comtell a six-year-long story,” munity. The festival is an by Noah Shachar explained Jonah Haas, “experiment of large-scale Lucidity cofounder, “but collaboration,” continued last year marked our sixth Haas. “We’re a community year, and we received a lot of feedback from of like-minded people with shared values.” people in the community, especially the artisIn addition to the elemental realms’ worktic community, who wanted us to keep going.” shops, Lucidity held its Lucid University The festival’s subtitle this year, Rising the week prior to the festival (April 2-5), Dawn, marks the first installment in Lucid- offering courses that focused on four topity’s final, six-chapter saga. Festival themes ics: Drama-Free Love, Permaculture Design are created by 17 cofounders and build for Regenerating the California Landscape, upon seven core values: participation and Building the Lighthouse: Big Art at Lucidity, immersion in the artistic process, personal and Independent Study with the Art Temple growth and global healing, awake and aware Templars. Each course was a rigorous exploconsciousness, environmental and social ration of creativity, knowledge, and nature responsibility, family fun and creative play, and the connectivity between them. Addicommunal reciprocity, and transparency. tionally, this year Lucid University included With Rising Dawn, festival founders hope three courses in body works, spirit works, and to show the potential of humanity as a whole creative works. and our connections with all life through a Lucidity has an armada of more than 300 narrative that, Haas said, “will be woven into artists, musicians, performers, and contributhe experience of our event more than previ- tors for the event. There are four stages positioned throughout the elemental realms, each ous years.” In previous years, Lucidity’s framework containing dozens of art installations and consisted of seven archetypal villages that interactive environments. Music will also be each centered on a different concept. This heavily represented, with more than 50 acts, year, however, the event is structured around including Rainbow Girls and deejays Craze, five elemental realms: earth, wind, fire, water, Afrolicious, and Ardalan. For Haas, the festival is all about “small and spirit. Approximately 150 workshops will be spread throughout the elemental realms shifts in perspective. It’s these small shifts that with each centered on its host element. make Lucidity meaningful, not just the huge, Attendees will learn about different aspects profound, life-changing moments that we of themselves and each other that resonate sometimes hear about,” he said.

ANNUAL EVENT BRINGS ART, MUSIC, AND CONSCIOUSNESS TO LIVE OAK

4•1•1

Lucidity: Rising Dawn takes place April 6-8 at the Live Oak campground (Hwy. 154). See 2018.lucidityfestival.com.

New Works by Senior BFA Choreographers: Patricia Martin Mica Moody Bianca Salazar Moira Saxena Dianne Robleza Katie Winans and the UCSB Dance Company in Moss Variation #3 by Jacqulyn Buglisi with concert lighting design by Mitchell Jakubka

Hatlen Theater April 12,13,14 / 8pm April 14 / 2pm matinee followed by a Q&A with the choreographers

Tickets: theaterdance.ucsb.edu

Use code SPRING20 for 20% off your ticket price!

It’s easy to find us! More info and tickets:

893.2064 theaterdance.ucsb.edu

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1st THURSDAY April 5, 5-8PM WORKZONES

64

M I C H EL T O REN A S T RE E T

S O LA S T RE E T Ar l i n g t i o n

1 2 3

V I C T O R I A S T RE E T The New Vic

C o un t y A d m i ni s t ra t i v e

AN A P A M U S T REE4E T

G ra aan a d a ran 5

6

7M us e u m / L i bra r y 8 10

LLaa A Arc a d a 9

C o uur t H o us e

F I G UE U E R O A S T RE E T

CAR R I LL O S T RE E T Lobero

11

A N O N P ER D I D O S T RE E T CA

DE LA G UER R A S T RE E T

City Hall

15

O R T E G A S T RE E T

H ALE Y S T RE E T

EAST GUTIERREZ STREET

TREET ANACA PA STREET

C O T A S T RE E T

SPONSORS

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GARDEN STREET

12 13

P as e o Nuu e v o 14

SANTA BARBAR A STREET

STATE STREETT

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1130 State Street, 805-963-4364 • Enjoy a Pop-Up Opera performance 357 Paseo Nuevo, Second Floor, 805-966-3722 • WORKZONES is a by Opera Santa Barbara, 5:30 – 6 pm. Create sandpaper collages in the modern collaborative workspace. This month we are featuring the artwork Family Resource Center inspired by works in “Brought to Light,” 5:30 – 7:30 of Brie Ehret Barron. Brie brings her emotions to canvas, letting them be pm. Book signing with Geneva Ives in the Museum Store, 6:30 pm. Free! alive, uncensored and not judged. Come interact with Brie and view 21 of her heart-felt pieces while enjoying a glass of wine. 8 GALLERY 113 1ST THURSDAY PARTICIPATING VENUES 1114 State Street, La Arcada Court #8, 805-965-6611 • Members of 16 SANTA BARBARA HISTORICAL MUSEUM the Santa Barbara Art Association exhibit here. Artist of the month is Jane 1 DISTINCTIVE FRAMING ‘N’ ART 136 East De la Guerra Street, 805-966-1601 • Join us for Only the Oaks Hurd with paintings inspired by the Central Coast landscape. Featured artists are Barry Briggs, Jessica Altstatt, Michael Marzolla, Dan Givens, Remain: The Story of Tuna Canyon Detention Station and Displaced: The 1333 State Street, 805-882-2108 • The Places We Love: Plein Air Brooke Baxter, Suemae Willhite, and Lynn Humphrey. Detention & Internment of Santa Barbarans During WWII. Also on exhibit: paintings of Santa Barbara by Chris Potter. From our city streets to our The Story of Santa Barbara, Missions In Watercolor by Edwin Deakin and idyllic coastline, come see new paintings of the places we love. Framing 9 AUGUST RIDGE VINEYARDS discounts available with purchase. the Edward Borein Gallery. Always family friendly. 5 East Figueroa Street, 805-770-8442 • Educational happy hour at August Ridge! Come taste our delicious Italian varietals (grown in Paso 2 EARLY CALIFORNIA ANTIQUES 17 SBCAST Robles) for $7 per glass while learning fun trivia facts and recipe pairings! 1331 State Street, 805-708-9280 • Early California Antiques first 513 Garden Street, 805-450-3799 • Have a spring blast at SBCAST. gallery exhibit of the year will display over 50 Original California and 10 BELLA ROSA GALLERIES Surprises await. Media Arts & Technology from UCSB in Studio F. The usual European Portraits By Noted California and European artists. Priced from 1103-A State Street, 805-966-1707 • Renowned painter Lizabeth supporting activities around the complex and studios. Enjoy and suppport $250-$3500 there will be something for everyone. From Heads of States to Madal depicts the beauty of our beloved Central Coast through her our unique and creative environment. Spanish ladies. Refreshments served. composition and design, coupled with a sensitive handling of paint. 18 KEEFRIDER CUSTOM FURNITURE Originals & prints available for sale. Also, Edward Borein & Ronald Stevens 3 INDIGO INTERIORS Gemstone Carvings. Visit with Lizabeth, enjoy wine tasting to benefit the 434 East Haley Street, Unit C, Entrance on Olive Street, 805-6171321 State Street, 805-962-6909 • In the spirit of healing, Indigo would SB Breast Cancer Resource Center. 3342 • Join us for an evening of Wine & Design in the Keefrider Workshop! like to show the community our Heartfelt support through the creative Spring has sprung and our imaginations have been in overdrive with works of local artists. This juried multi-artist, multi-media exhibit show- 11 PATHPOINT some super cool new projects, including this giant Queen on Queen cases their expressions of the IDEA of HEART as a basic human condition 902 Laguna Street, 805-966-3310 • handmade bunkbed. Come find inspiration for your own unique piece and You’re invited to PathPoint’s 1st Thursday Event! Come see the impact that matures in the face of crisis. (Photo: Rosemarie Gebhart) PathPoint is making in the community for youth and those with disabili- reinvigorate your space for spring! 4 10 WEST GALLERY ties. Explore our art gallery and enjoy refreshments! 2018 State of the Art 10 West Anapamu Street, 805-770-7711 • Kaganoff Returns Ceramicist 12 GRASSINI FAMILY VINEYARDS Sheldon Kaganoff joins painters Rick Doehring, Madeline Garrett, Stuart 1ST THURSDAY PERFORMERS Ochiltree, Lisa Pedersen, Stephen Robeck, Mary Dee Thompson, Iben G. 24 El Paseo, 805-897-3366 • Test your wine knowledge and join us for an exciting game of trivia at our tasting room from 5:00pm - 7:30pm! We Vestergaard and Kurt Waldo. Thursday April 5 through Sunday April 29. will be offering special by the glass pricing and complimentary popcorn (Hours: Wednesday - Monday 11 am - 5:30 pm. Sunday noon to 5pm.) GALLERY EXHIBITION pairings. (Image: Sheldon Kaganoff) Announcing the City of Santa Barbara’s 2018 State of the Art Gallery Exhibition, featuring work exclusively by local artists. Each piece offers 13 JAMIE SLONE WINES 5 SULLIVAN GOSS – AN AMERICAN GALLERY unique or interactive elements celebrating Santa Barbara’s culture, spirit 23 East De la Guerra Street, 805-560-6555 • 1ST THURSDAY’S BEST 11 East Anapamu Street, 805-730-1460 • Following her nearly WINE CELEBRATION PARTY. Stop by anytime between 5-8pm and enjoy and resilience. The opening reception will take place on State Street. See sold-out debut show with the gallery, Phoebe Brunner opens her latest $9 wines by the glass, hang out and experience the sights and sounds of map for specific locations. show with some of the best paintings of her career. Also on view, Whitney “A Year in CHAMPAGNE”, showing on three screens! Cheese, chocolate and Brooks Abbott, Colin Campbell Cooper, and our Winter Salon. light snacks for sale. Bring your taste buds and friends too! ART CRAWL 6 CHANNING PEAKE GALLERY 14 MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY ART SANTA 735 Anacapa Street • BARBARA 105 East Anapamu Street, 1st Floor • Please join us for the opening The Santa Barbara Arts 653 Paseo Nuevo Terrace, 805-966-5373 • Enjoy an evening at reception of the American Institute of Architects, Santa Barbara Design Collaborative, in partnership with Downtown Santa Barbara, will lead Museum of Contemporary Art Santa Barbara as DJ Crash brings the sounds Awards 2017 Exhibition. The entries reflect the diverse range of current a curated Art Crawl through 1st Thursday festivities. The Art Crawl of the British Invasion to Paseo Nuevo’s beautiful Upper Arts Terrace! Sip thought about architectural design in our community. Also featured in sumptuous signature cocktails, engage in interactive art activities, and starts at 5:30 pm in De la Guerra Plaza on the back steps of City Hall the gallery are illustrations by local architects from the book, Coloring explore MCASB’s current exhibitions featuring Cecily Brown and Midori Santa Barbara. (735 Anacapa Street, then head around to the back). Hirose with friends.

FIG AVENUE

SANTA BARBARA MUSEUM OF ART

WWW.D O W N T O W N S B . O R G

CHAPALA STREET

7

A R T · MUSIC · THEA TR E

DE LA VINA STREET

1st Thursday is an evening of art and culture in downtown Santa Barbara. On the first Thursday of each month, participating galleries and cultural art venues are open from 5-8pm offering the public free access to art in a fun and social environment. In addition, State Street comes alive with performances and interactive exhibits.

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18


CIRCUS OF THE QUEENS

& ENTERTAINMENT

REVIEWS 

BOOK

I

n Circus of the Queens: The For Fortune-Teller’s Fate,, Audrey Berger Welz covers a tremendous amount of ground, from St. Peters-burg in Czarist Russia to a farm in Savannah, Georgia, and many places in between. Welz’s protagonist is Donatalia Petrovskaya, a product of the Russian aristocracy and an aspiring ballerina whose life is repeatedly sundered by events but who, by dint of her own fortitude, intuition, and pluck— pluck and a measure of good fortune reminiscent of Dickens — always manages to land on her feet. With revolution brewing in Russia and violence spreading, Donatalia’s father sends his daughter to America to continue her ballet studies. On the ocean voyage to New York, Donatalia suffers a freak accident and breaks her leg, effectively ending her dream of becoming a ballerina. Alone in a strange country, she is befriended by another Russian expatriate and winds up on a large plantation in Savannah, but only for a short time, as soon after her arrival in the South she reconnects with old family friend Vladimir Vronsky, a high-wire artist in a traveling circus that bears his name. Not only does Vladimir find a place in the circus for Donatalia, as a fortune-teller, but for many years to come he will be her only living connection to Russia. Donatalia is a strong, resilient character who approaches life with an admirable openness. She becomes a fixture not only in the Vronsky circus but also in the lives of Vladimir’s wife, four daughters, and a host of other characters with whom she shares numerous adventures. Circus of the Queens is a sweet, satisfying tale of one woman’s determination, heart, and love. —Brian Tanguay

WHERE THE PARTY STARTS!

FESTIVAL WEAR • PARTY SUPPLIES COSTUMES • SMOKING ACCESSORIES

OPEN 7 DAYS A WEEK! 805.968.1395 6529 Trigo Rd, IV • Near the Amazon pick-up

ALBUM

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JIMI HENDRIX

BOTH SIDES OF THE SKY

B

oth Sides of the Sky completes the trilogy of posthumous Hendrix albums of previously unreleased studio recordings from Jimi’s archives — which began with Valleys of Neptune and continued with People, Hell and Angels — all mixed by Eddie Kramer. It showcases a bunch of tunes from 1968-70, and includes Johnny Winter (on “Things I Used to Do”), Stephen Stills (singing and playing on “20 Fine,” and “Woodstock,” with Hendrix on bass), and Lonnie Youngblood (on “Georgia Blues”). The Band of Gypsys grooves hard with Hendrix on a gorgeous, up-tempo cover of “Mannish Boy,” while “Cherokee Mist” finds him killing it on sitar while riffing bits from “If 6 Was 9.” The haunting “Hear My Train A Comin’” (by The Jimi Hendrix Experience) is the most potent track, foreshadowing Jimi’s untimely passing … although his phenomenal music remains immortal. — Sean Mageean

Bank of the Sierra was built on a promise: to help make every community we’re part of better. More than 40 years later, we stay true to this vision by always putting our customers, their families, and our communities first.

1.888.454.BANK BankoftheSierra.com

© Bank of the Sierra. All rights reserved. 65


presents

Bootstrapping to Success When: Wednesday, April 18, 2018 | 5:00 - 8:00 PM

670 Mission Canyon Rd. | Santa Barbara, CA

SPEAKERS:

Scott Stefan Jim Semick Scott Stefan Scott Stefan Jim Semick Jim Semick Ombudsman Scott Stefan Founder Ombudsman Ombudsman ScottStefan Stefan Jim Semick Semick Draughtsmen Scott Founder Founder Aleworks Jim Jim Semick Ombudsman ProductPlan Draughtsmen Aleworks Draughtsmen Aleworks Ombudsman Founder Ombudsman ProductPlan Founder ProductPlan (Speaker)Aleworks Founder Draughtsmen (Speaker) (Speaker) Draughtsmen Aleworks (Speaker) ProductPlan Draughtsmen Aleworks (Speaker) ProductPlan (Speaker) ProductPlan (Speaker) (Speaker) (Speaker)

(Speaker) (Speaker) (Speaker)

David Kronen David Kronen David Kronen David Kronen Director, Regional David Kronen David Kronen Director, Regional Director, Regional Director, Regional Manager Director, Regional Director, Regional Manager Manager Manager Bank of the West Manager Manager Bank of the West Bank of the West Bank of the West Bank of the West (Moderator) Bank of the West (Moderator) (Moderator) (Moderator)

Poetry Reading: Of Great Importance NACHOEM M. WIJNBERG The poems in Of Great Importance discuss taxes and debts, stocks and flows, citizenship and labor contracts, notaries and accountants, freedoms and fundamental rights, how to make money and how to win elections. Nachoem M. Wijnberg is an acclaimed Dutch poet and novelist and a professor at the University of Amsterdam Business School.

(Moderator) (Moderator)

THURSDAY, APRIL 12 | 4:00 PM

Think bootstrapping a company and making money from the get go is a quaint so last century idea? Think again, and learn why these entrepreneurs prefer bootstrapping over VC funding. Learn the pros and cons of bootstrapping, and how and why they chose to do it this way

Free and open to the public.

Learn more and get your early-bird tickets at www.mitcentralcoast.org

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Where: Rockwood, Santa Barbara Woman’s Club

6020 HSSB, UCSB

Visit www.ihc.ucsb.edu or call (805) 893-2004 for more information.

SEASIDE GARDENS!

‑‑‑‑‑‑‑‑ Lobero Theatre Doors Open 5pm

Bar & Live Music

Santa Barbara Transgender Advocacy Network Presents

ShowStarts 7pm

April 7, 2018

Celebrating Transgender Day Of Visibility

Hearts On Fire Benefit Fashion Show Purchase tickets at: www.SBTAN.org

Visit us during the Carpinteria Greenhouse and Nursery Tour, Saturday April 14. (www.carpinteriafarmtours.com) Also, join us for a fun presentaCon on “Everything Tomato” by Valerie Rice, 11 a.m. April 7. Tomatomania is sCll here! 3700 Via Real, Carpinteria, (805)684-6001, www.seaside-gardens.com, Open 7 days 66

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a&e | FILM & TV FEATURE

Annual

Wedding Guide HIT YOUR MARK: Bill Hader is the cocreator and star of HBO’s Barry, a dark comedy series about a hitman who gets bit by the acting bug.

DARK COMEDY BARRY DAZZLES

I

t has become a ritual in the national sport of culture a warm-up exercise before an acting class led by the watching to trace the trajectory of the most beloved dubious acting coach Gene Cousineau (played by Saturday Night Live (SNL) cast members as they Henry Winkler, with touches of the hokum that made evolve — or don’t — into life beyond the mother- his Fonzie character in Happy Days stick to our percepship. Bill Hader, who was on SNL from 2005 to 2013, has tion of him). definitely blossomed since his departure, lending his In the series’s premise, acting is the intended voice to numerous animated films, “fallback” career for Barry, who participating in the clever mockustumbles on an acting class while mentary series Documentary Now!, on a hit job in Los Angeles. The and starring in the Amy Schumer hit Midwesterner protagonist has gone to Hollywood for a break, Trainwreck. Now Hader is back on TV as a taking on a hit job for the Chechen reluctant hitman on HBO’s fab new mob, and, like many who land in show, Barry, whose dazzling series L.A., intentionally or otherwise, by Josef Woodard opener (also directed by Hader) is a the showbiz bug is temptingly abuzz. As he tells his agent in the prize unto itself. Barry is a comedy of the dark sort, about an assassin and former U.S. Marine killing game, he is contemplating trading in his life of (Hader) who is very good at his job but is seeking crime — he imagines juggling the two worlds until the another way of life and livelihood. In collaboration with new “gig” catches on: “I could do night hits,” he says Alec Berg (writer/director connected to Seinfeld, Curb with a childish grin. Your Enthusiasm, and Sacha Baron Cohen vehicle The Thus, alongside the skullduggery and bungling maliDictator), Hader has thrown his energies into the new cious actions of the mob-hitman action, we also follow show, and on the evidence of the two episodes aired so Barry Berkman’s transition into Barry Block, the stage name given him by his target turned classmate, Ryan far, it’s a thumbs-up scenario all the way around. Who woulda thunk that the burned-out hitman Madison. Of course, it helps that he has been lured into genre is where Hader would find a place to shine? But the class and the acting sphere by an alluring woman yes, there is our man Hader, beloved for his uncanny (Sally Reed, played by Sarah Goldberg), who we assume knack to slip into bizarre SNL characters such as the will eventually break through Barry’s stunted emotional kinky N.Y.C. tour guide Stefon; the bumbling, cynical inner life. TV reporter Herb Welch (who insults his subjects in the In an odd twist of screen-culture circuitry, the field and bonks them with his oversize microphone); or cynical hitman genre reached one of its recent pinnacles the Italian cinema snob/talk-show host Vinny Vedecci. with the wild performance of nervous-breakdownLike Kristen Wiig, Hader was an empty vessel of a fringing James Gandolfini in Killing Them Softly, personality unto himself but sprang zanily to life once upping the ante of neurotic criminality so well estabthrown into character, endearing himself to the Ameri- lished by the late Gandolfini’s Tony Soprano. Following can collective memory. the historical math, the lingering power of The Sopranos Although Hader has shown up in films and televi- helped to create today’s vastly richer and smarter TV sion since leaving the SNL nest, with Barry it feels landscape, and Hader’s Barry is a descendant of Tony’s like the “real” Hader stepping forward and taking his nagging internal confusion and quest for self-discovery. deserved close-up. In the opening shot of episode two, Stay tuned: While Barry’s second episode slips into a we see just that, in telegraphic hints of the Hader we now familiar groove of Fargo-like black-comic toothihave known on SNL, as his rubbery, adaptable face ness and pales a bit by comparison with episode one, shows multiple expressions in short order — part of the series may be on the road to art-lined hitsville. n

BILL HADER

STARS AS A RELUCTANT HITMAN IN FAB NEW SHOW

PUBLISHES April 26 ADVERTISING DEADLINE

Wednesday, April 18, at noon

Contact your advertising representative 805.965.5205 or sales@independent.com

67


metrotheatres.com THE ARLINGTON: Upcoming Events

INVITATIONAL

BEER FEST at the Santa Barbara

April 6: La Primer Batalla April 17: A Perfect Circle April 25: Kelsea Ballerini film April 26: AVENGERS: Infinity War May 8: Earth, Wind & Fire May 19: Modest Mouse film May 24: SOLO: A Star Wars Story

12/1 - 5 P.M. ***** 20+ CRAFT

BREWERIES Live Music by the

The Dusty Jugz WINE & FRESH BBQ

Buckles AndBrews .com Benefitting

MET Opera

Saturday April 14 - 9:30 am

Metro 4

Now On Sale for Thursday

Information: Fri.-Thu. April 6 - 12

THE HITCHCOCK CINEMA

METRO 4

618 State Street

 BLOCKERS (R) Unravel the Mystery and Fri-Sun: 12:30 2:10 3:05 Intense Relationships! 4:40 5:40 7:10 8:20 9:45 Mon-Wed: 2:10 3:05 GEMINI (R) 4:40 5:40 7:10 8:20 Daily: 2:45 5:00 7:45 Thu: Steve Buscemi 2:10 3:05 4:40 5:40 8:20 371 Hitchcock Way

Jeffrey Tabor

THE DEATH OF STALIN (R)

Daily: 2:30 5:10 7:30

FIESTA 5

916 State Street

 A QUIET PLACE Fri-Sun: 1:10 3:30 5:45 7:15 8:20 9:35 (PG-13) Mon-Thu: 2:35 5:30 8:00  THE

MIRACLE SEASON (PG)

Fri-Sun: 1:40 4:10 6:40 9:15 Mon-Thu: 2:25 5:00 7:40

SHERLOCK GNOMES Fri-Sun: 2:40 Mon-Wed: 6:05

(PG) (2D)

READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) (2D)

APRIL 12

CC

 = Restrictions on Silver MetroValuePasses (MVP)

ARLINGTON 1317 State Street

READY PLAYER ONE (PG-13) (2D)

Sat-Thu: 1:30 4:45 8:00 No Show Friday

CAMINO REAL

CAMINO REAL MARKETPLACE

GAME NIGHT (R) Fri-Sun: 4:50 8:55 Mon-Thu: 8:15

A LIGHT IN DARKNESS

Fri-Sun: 12:30 Mon-Thu:3:30

Starts Thursday, April 12

 SGT.

STUBBY:

(PG)

AN AMERICAN HERO Thu 4/12: 6:05

 TRUTH OR Thu 4/12: 8:00

DARE (PG-13)

(PG-13)

 A QUIET PLACE Fri-Wed: 12:50 2:00 Fri-Sun: 3:10 4:15 5:25 6:30 7:45 12:20 3:25 6:30 9:35 8:50 10:00 (PG-13) Mon-Thu: 1:55 5:00 8:10 Thu: 12:50 2:00 3:10 4:15 5:25 7:45 10:00

BLACK (PG-13) PANTHER (2D)

Fri-Sun: 12:15 3:15 6:20 9:20 Mon-Thu: 1:45 4:50 7:50

Starts Thursday, April 12

 RAMPAGE (PG-13) 2D Thu: 7:10

PASEO NUEVO 8 W. De La Guerra Place

 BLOCKERS (R) Fri-Wed: 12:15 1:20 2:40 3:50 5:05 6:20 7:35 9:00 10:10 Thu: 12:15 1:20 2:40 3:50 5:05 7:35 10:10

LOVE, SIMON (PG-13)

TRUTH OR DARE (PG-13)

BLACK (PG-13) PANTHER (2D)

Daily: 12:25 3:30 6:35 9:40

Fri-Sun: 1:20 3:55 6:30 9:05 Starts Thursday, April 12 An Animated Epic Mon-Wed: 2:15 5:10 7:50  RAMPAGE (PG-13) Journey of Canine Pets! Thu: 5:10 2D Thu 4/12: 7:30 10:00  ISLE OF DOGS Fri-Sun: (PG-13) A WRINKLE IN  TRUTH OR DARE 1:20 3:50 6:20 8:50 Thu 4/12: 7:00 9:30 TIME (PG) (2D) Mon-Thu: 2:20 4:50 7:30 (PG-13) Fri-Sun: 1:00 3:40 6:20 Mon-Thu: 2:50 4:50 7:30

 RAMPAGE

Hollister & Storke

Thu: 2:15  CHAPPAQUIDDICK READY PLAYER Fri-Sun: (PG-13) ONE (PG-13) (2D) 1:30 4:05 6:40 9:20 I CAN ONLY Daily: 12:35 3:40 6:45 9:50 Mon-Thu: 2:40 5:20 7:50 IMAGINE (PG)

GOD’S NOT DEAD: (PG)

68

Arlington Theatre www.AXS.com

Verdi’s  Luisa Miller

Carriage Museum

SATURDAY APRIL 21ST

CONCERT TICKETS

 SGT. STUBBY AN AMERICAN HERO

Now On Sale for Thursday

APRIL 26

FAIRVIEW

Fri-Sun: 225 N. Fairview Ave. 1:40 4:15 6:30 9:10 Mon-Thu: 2:10 5:00 7:40  CHAPPAQUIDDICK Daily: 2:30 5:00 7:30 (PG-13)

ACRIMONY (R)

Fri-Sun: 1:00 3:45 6:50 9:35 Mon: 2:30 5:10 8:00 Ends Tue: 2:30 5:10

Starts Tuesday, April 10 Jon Hamm Rosamund Pike

 BEIRUT (R) Tue: 8:00 Wed: 2:30 5:10 8:00

SHERLOCK GNOMES Fri-Wed: 2:15 5:30 7:15 Thu: 2:15 5:30 (PG) (2D)

ACRIMONY (R)

Daily: 2:40 4:30 7:45

Starts Thursday, April 12

 SGT.

STUBBY:

(PG)

AN AMERICAN HERO Thu 4/12: 7:15

2D: Arlington 2D & 3D: Metro 4 2D: Camino Real


a&e | FILM & TV Rampage

FREE Dental Day! at our NEW Goleta location!

Saturday, April 14th from 8am to 1pm 7050 Hollister Ave, Ste 101, Goleta CA

MOVIE GUIDE PREMIERES

Beirut (109 mins., R) Jon Hamm and Rosamund Pike star in this espionage thriller about a former U.S. diplomat, Mason Skiles (Hamm), who returns to Lebanon in 1980 to negotiate the release of a colleague who has been taken hostage by one of the warring factions of the country’s civil war. Paseo Nuevo (Opens Tue., Apr. 10) Blockers (102 mins., R) Pitch Perfect screenwriter Kay Cannon makes her directorial debut with this comedy about three parents — played by John Cena, Leslie Mann, and Ike Barinholtz — who, when they discover their daughters’ plan to lose their virginity on prom night, fly into action to stop their spawn from doing the deed.

her assistant, Jill LeBeau (Lola Kirke), who is the prime suspect in the case. Jill must solve the murder to clear her name while battling her own demons. John Cho and Ricki Lake also star. The Hitchcock

Isle of Dogs (101 mins., PG-13) Wes Anderson (Fantastic Mr. Fox, The Grand Budapest Hotel) directs this stopmotion-animation film about a dystopian future in which there is a canine flu outbreak and all of the dogs are sent into quarantine on Trash Island. Six months later, a 12-year-old boy named Atari goes looking for his dog, Spots, on the island. Voice talents include Bryan Cranston, Edward Norton, Bill Murray, Jeff Goldblum, Greta Gerwig, Frances McDormand, and Scarlett Johansson. Paseo Nuevo

Camino Real/Metro 4

Chappaquidick (101 mins., PG-13) This historical drama documents the 1969 inquest into the death of political strategist Mary Jo Kopechne, who drowned after U.S. Senator Teddy Kennedy drove his car, in which Kopechne was a passenger, off the Chappaquidick bridge. Jason Clarke, Kate Mara, and Ed Helms star. Fairview/Paseo Nuevo

Gemini (92 mins., R) This mystery/thriller revolves around the killing of a Hollywood starlet, Heather Anderson (Zoë Kravitz), and

Sgt. Stubby : An American Hero

The Miracle Season (99 mins., PG) Based on a true story, this drama follows the Iowa City West High School girls’ volleyball team as it pulls together after the unexpected death of team leader Caroline “Line” Founder in hopes of winning the state championship. Helen Hunt and William Hurt star. Fiesta 5

A Quiet Place (90 mins., PG-13) John Krasinski directs and stars in — with his wife, Emily Blunt — this horror/thriller about a family that must live hidden and in silence to stay off the

You may receive (1) of the following for FREE: Cleaning Filling Extraction radar of the highly intelligent, vicious creatures that have taken over the earth. Camino Real/Fiesta 5

Rampage (107 mins., PG-13) Dwayne Johnson and Naomie Harris (James Bond’s Miss Moneypenny, Moonlight) star as a primatologist and genetic engineer, respectively, who must stop the rampages of a silverback gorilla, gray wolf, and crocodile and find out who mutated the animals’ genes and made them aggressive. Camino Real/Metro 4 (Opens Thu., Apr. 12)

Sgt. Stubby: An American Hero (85 mins., PG)

This animated biopic tells the story of the real-life WWI canine hero, Sergeant Stubby, who served 18 months in the 102nd Infantry Regiment and was on the Western Front for 17 battles. Logan Lerman, Helena Bonham Carter, and Gérard Depardieu lend their voice talents. Fairview/Fiesta 5 (Opens Thu., Apr. 12)

Truth or Dare (98 mins., PG-13) Inspired by the game of the same name, this supernatural horror sees teens getting picked off by someone — or something — when they either lie instead of telling the truth or refuse the dare they are tasked with. Lucy Hale, Tyler Posey, and Violett Beane star.

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“EXQUISITELY GRIPPING DRAMA” – LOS ANGELES TIMES

Camino Real/Fiesta 5 (Opens Thu., Apr. 12)

➤ OThe Workshop (L’Atelier) (114 mins., NR)

This intriguing French film takes on subjects including Islamophobia, tensions among social-media-fied youths, and racism in an unusual, enclosed context — a summer writing workshop, led by a novelist (Marina Foïs), in which a group of adolescents is working on a story for a thriller. In Laurent Cantet’s (The Class) film, our troubled young protagonist (Matthieu Lucci) struggles to find his bearings in a world of videogame violence (a world we’re plunged into in the film’s opening scene), French Army recruitment commercials, residual anger over the Bataclan terrorist attack, and — not incidentally — a secret affection for his teacher. Reciprocity,

CONT’D ON P. 71 >>>

SHOWING APRIL 6 - 12

Fri, Mon - Thurs 5:00pm / 7:30pm Sat 2:30pm / 5:00pm / 7:30pm Sun 12:00pm / 2:30pm / 5:00pm / 7:30pm FOR TICKETS, VISIT WWW.SBIFF.ORG AND THE THEATRE BOX OFFICE #SBIFF 69


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Sponsored by: BRITTINGHAM FAMILY FOUNDATION

RSVP for next INFO SESSION in GOLETA BA Psychology + BS Business Wednesday, April 18 • 5:30 pm

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Combinable 1 with EPD and past guest discount. 3If you make a booking with us for a land or cruise vacation offered by one of our Preferred Travel Providers 1 or a “Qualifying AAA Vacation” and you find a Valid Better Rate for the exact same itinerary within 24 hours of your booking, AAA and/or AAA , as applicable, will match the lower rate and send you a $50 AAA or AAA Vacations ® Future Travel Credit Certificate (limit one certificate Vacations 1 April 26, 2018 or 45 days to departure, whichever is sooner. Nottime. applicable to 2017-2018 Fall, Winter, Spring brochure departures. EPD isof our not valid on all trips; subject availability &Other may bethe withdrawn at any EPD not valid with other promotional offers; bevacation combined is accepted thePayment United States. Discount Offers per mayprior beto withdrawn atEPD anycomplete time. conditions andland-only restrictions apply. EPDisand past guest discount. 3If you make a booking us forwith a landmay or cruise offered bywith oneby 5% within Early (EPD): applies to portion ofwith trips. Must book & deposit within 3with days full payment made AAA Vacations Best Price Guarantee (Terms and Conditions), contact your booking). For terms and conditions forCombinable the AAA Travel and 2 to availability ® ® ® not valid on all trips; subject & may be withdrawn at any time. EPD not valid with other promotional offers; may be combined with $150 VISA Card isRate valid on AAA Vacations Luxury byVacations, Insight specifi ed One most brochure discounts. April 26, 2018 45Discount days prior to departure, whichever is Not applicable to 2017-2018 Fall, Winter, Spring departures. is local AAA branch oraapplies visit AAA.com/Bestprice. A Valid Better Rate isyour a lower rate offered by awithin North American IATA/ARC registered business 1 Preferred Travel Providers or aor “Qualifying AAA Vacation” and youEPD fi ndGift Valid Better for theonly exactsooner. same2018 itinerary within 24 hours ofis booking, AAAGold and/or AAA as Vacations applicable, willbrochure match the lower rateitineraries. and sendmade youEPD a $50 AAAthat or 5% Early Payment (EPD): tovalid the portion of trips. Must book & deposit 3 ®days with full payment by 2 ® ® ® 4 Gift Cards $150 VISA Gift Card is only on 2018 AAA Vacations Luxury Gold by Insight Vacations specifi ed itineraries. One most brochure discounts. are only valid forby use Card willall betrips; given per passenger and will be sent to land-only guests in the offi documents prior to departure. VISA 24/7 Member Care is provided Allianz satisfi es the requirements ofFor the Terms and Conditions ascial determined by the Club in itsGuarantee sole discretion. not valid on subject to availability & may be withdrawn at any time. EPD is not valid with other promotional offers; may be combined with AAA Gift Vacations® Future Travel Credit Certifi cate (limit one certifi cate per booking). complete terms and conditions for the AAA Travel and AAA Vacations Best Price (Terms and Conditions), contact your local AAA branch or visit AAA.com/ April 26, 2018 oris 45 days prior to departure, whichever is sooner. Not applicable to 2017-2018 Fall, Winter, Spring brochure departures. EPD is ® ® 2 ® ® ® Gift Cards are only valid for use Gift Card will be given per passenger and will be sent to guests in the offi cial documents prior tonot departure. VISA accepted within the United States. Offers may be withdrawn atMember any time. Other conditions and restrictions apply. Combinable wherever VISA Global Assistance, AAA’s preferred travel insurance provider. 24/7 Care is travel insurance. $150 VISA Gift Card is valid only on 2018 AAA Vacations Luxury Gold by Insight Vacations specifi ed itineraries. One most brochure discounts. not on allpast subject toa availability & may be withdrawn any time. EPD is not with other promotional offers; may be combined Bestprice. Avalid Valid Better Rate istrips; aislower rate offered by North American IATA/ARC registered business that satisfiat esbe thefor requirements ofor theat Terms andvalid Conditions as determined bysurcharges, the Club in its®ofsole discretion. 424/7apply. Member Care isProviders providedwith byterms/ Allianz ® 3 accepted within the United States. Offers may withdrawn any time. Other conditions and restrictions Combinable wherever VISA If you make a booking with us a land cruise vacation offered by one our Preferred Travel with EPD and guest discount. Certain restrictions may apply. Rates, terms, conditions, availability, itinerary, taxes, fees, deposit, payment, cancellation Gift Cards are only valid for use Gift Card will be given per passenger and will be sent to guests in the offi cial documents prior to departure. VISA 2 ® ® ® $150 VISA Gift Card is only on restrictions 2018 AAA Vacations Luxury Gold by Insight Vacations specifi edAAA itineraries. most brochure discounts. 3 Member Globalwith AAA’s preferred travel insurance provider. 24/7 is aStates. notValid travel insurance. Certain may apply. Rates, terms, availability, itinerary, taxes, fees, surcharges, payment, cancellation terms/One conditions ® AAA conditions & the policies subject change without notice any time. Advance reservations through Ifyou you make atovalid booking with us for aatland or vacation offered by one ofyour our deposit, Preferred Travel Providers EPD and past guest discount. Vacation ” and fiCare nd Better Rate for the exact same itinerary within 24 hours of booking, and/or AAA orAssistance, a “Qualifying is accepted within United Offers may be withdrawn atcruise anyconditions, time. Other conditions and wherever VISA ® restrictions apply. Combinable Cards only valid forcate use Gift Card will given per passenger and be sent to guests the offi cial prior departure. VISA ® to AAA Travel required to obtain Member Benefi &afor savings may vary based departure date. 3 the AAA Vacation ” Advance and fiwill nd a Valid Better Rate the exact itinerary within 24 hours ofofGift your AAA and/or AAA or asubject “Qualifying & policies without notice at any time. reservations through AAA Travel required totsin obtain Member Benefi tsAAA &same savings which may on vary based on Travel departure Not ,change asbe applicable, will match lower rate and send you $50 AAA ordocuments Vacations Future Credit Certifi cateare (limit one certifi Vacations Ifyou you make a booking with us for a which land or vacation offered by date. one our booking, Preferred Travel Providers with EPDto and past guest discount. ® iscomplete accepted within the United States. Offers may be withdrawn atcruise any time. Other conditions and restrictions apply. Combinable wherever VISAFor Not responsible for errors or omissions. Your local AAA club acts as an agent for Insight Vacations. ® applicable, will the lower rate and send you a©2018 $50 AAA AAA Vacations Future Travel Credit Certifi cate (limit one certificate Vacations AAA Vacations Best Price Guarantee (Terms and Conditions), contact your perabooking). terms conditions for the AAA Travel and responsible for“Qualifying errors ,oras omissions. Your local AAA clubmatch acts asand an agent for Insight Vacations. CST 1016202-80. Auto Clubor Services, LLC. Allitinerary Rights Reserved. AAA Vacation ” and find a Valid Better Rate for the exact same within 24 hours and/or AAA or 3 you CST 1016202-80. ©2018 Auto Services, LLC. All Rights Reserved. If you make a Club booking with us for a land or cruise vacation offered by oneofofyour our booking, Preferred AAA Travel Providers with EPD and past guest discount. 1

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AAAor Vacations Best Guarantee (Terms and Conditions), contact your per booking). complete terms and conditions for the AAA you Travel and local AAA ,branch or visit AAA.com/Bestprice. A Valid Better Ratea is a lower rate offered byPrice a® North American IATA/ARC registered business that as For applicable, will match the lower rate and send $50 AAA AAA Vacations Future Travel Credit Certifi cate (limit one certificate Vacations AAA Vacation ” and you find a Better Rate exact same itinerary withinAmerican 24424/7 hours of your booking, AAA and/or AAA or a “Qualifying local AAA branch or visit AAA.com/Bestprice. A Valid Valid Better Rate for isand athe lower rate offered byPrice a North IATA/ARC registered business that Member is provided by Allianz satisfi es the requirements of the Terms and Conditions as determined by theVacations Club in its sole discretion. AAA Best Guarantee (Terms andCare Conditions), contact your per booking). For complete terms and conditions for the AAA Travel ® , as applicable, will match the lower rate and send you a $50 AAA or AAA Vacations Future Travel Credit Certifi cateis(limit one certifi cate Vacations 4 24/7 Member Care provided by Allianz satisfi esAssistance, the requirements of the Terms and Conditions as determined by the Club in itstravel sole discretion. Global AAA’s travel insurance provider. 24/7 Care is not insurance. local AAA branch or visit preferred AAA.com/Bestprice. A Valid Better Rate isMember a lower rate offered byPrice a North American IATA/ARC registered business that AAA Care Vacations Best Guarantee (Terms and Conditions), contact your per booking). For complete terms and conditions for provider. the AAA Travel and 4 Global Assistance, AAA’s preferred travel insurance 24/7 Member is not travel insurance. 24/7 Member Care iscancellation provided by Allianz satisfi es restrictions the requirements of the Rates, Terms terms, and Conditions as determined by therate Club in its fees, sole discretion. Certain conditions, availability, itinerary, taxes, surcharges, deposit, payment, terms/ local AAA branch ormay visit apply. AAA.com/Bestprice. A Valid Better Rate is a lower offered by a North American IATA/ARC registered business that Certain restrictions may apply. terms, conditions, availability, itinerary, taxes, fees, surcharges, deposit, payment, terms/ GlobalesAssistance, AAA’s preferred travel insurance provider. 24/7 isinnot insurance.424/7 conditions policies subject to Rates, change without notice at any time.Member Advance reservations through Member Care iscancellation provided by Allianz satisfi the&requirements of the Terms and Conditions as determined by theCare Club itstravel sole discretion. conditions & policies subject to Rates, change without notice atwhich any time. Advance reservations through AAA Travel required to obtain Member Benefi ts & savings may vary based on date. Certain restrictions may apply. terms, conditions, availability, itinerary, taxes, fees, surcharges, Global Assistance, AAA’s preferred travel insurance provider. 24/7 Member Care isdeparture not travel insurance. deposit, payment, cancellation terms/

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a&e | FILM & TV CONT’D FROM P. 69 with a twist, may be lurking. Although innately a talky picture rather than one of action per se, The Workshop skillfully infuses the chatter with issues and stresses of the day, for teens facing rites of passage or adults less wise about a topsy-turvy world than they pretend to be. (JW) Riviera

NOW SHOWING O Black Panther

(134 mins., PG-13)

There are some really wonderful things about Black Panther, Disney/Marvel’s latest comic-book adaptation. It’s led by a nearly all-black cast and is set to smash not just box office records but also the long-held Hollywood notion that films starring African Americans don’t make big money. It’s also the latest movie in a lengthening line of both serious and kid-friendly studio films that feature lead characters with different genders, sexualities, and skin colors. But there are some disappointing things, too. Black Panther settles too easily into tired and predictable superhero tropes. It never jumps out of third gear, and its cultural significance is hardly matched by its entertainment value. (TH) Camino Real/Metro 4

The Death of Stalin (107 mins., R) In this political satire, Joseph Stalin hears a Mozart recital broadcast by Radio Moscow and subsequently demands a copy of the recording. Not having recorded it, the radio employees scramble to restage — and record — the live performance, which leads to farcical situations. Steve Buscemi, Paddy Considine, Michael Palin, and Jason Isaacs star. The Hitchcock

O Game Night

(100 mins., R)

Hilarious and captivating, Game Night is an exceptional story of dramatic irony. The film centers on the ultracompetitive couple Max (Jason Bateman) and Annie (Rachel McAdams), who get together each week for game night with three of their close friends. Their weekly ritual goes awry, however, when Max’s über-successful older brother, Brooks (Kyle Chandler), invites the group to the home he’s renting while in town for a “murder mystery.” What ensues is a delightfully farcical evening in which the participants must fight for their lives. The result is a suspenseful,

Blockers side-splittingly funny film with a twist at every turn. (NS) Fiesta 5

teenage boys, and definitely worth seeing. (NS) Paseo Nuevo

God’s Not Dead: A Light in Darkness

Ready Player One (140 mins., PG-13) Steven Spielberg directs this highly anticipated cinematic imagining of the popular sci-fi novel by Ernest Cline. Tye Sheridan stars as Wade Watts, a teenager living in the slums in Columbus, Ohio, who enters the VR world of OASIS and discovers a game that will change his life. Simon Pegg, Olivia Cooke, and Ben Mendelsohn also star.

(113 mins., PG)

David A.R. White and John Corbett star in this Christian drama about a pastor (White) and his atheist brother (Corbett), who set aside their differences when the pastor’s church burns down. Fiesta 5

I Can Only Imagine (110 mins., PG) J. Michael Finley stars as lead singer of the Christian band MercyMe, Bart Millard, who wrote the 2001 song “I Can Only Imagine” for his deceased father. The song is the most-played contemporary Christian song ever. Dennis Quaid, Trace Adkins, and Cloris Leachman also star. Fiesta 5

O Love, Simon

(110 mins., PG-13)

A beautifully crafted coming-of-age dramedy, Love, Simon, from TV and film writer/director/producer Greg Berlanti (Arrow, The Flash, Riverdale), tells a vivid and gripping story. Simon (Nick Robinson) is a closeted gay high school senior struggling with the idea of revealing his closely guarded secret to his parents (Jennifer Garner and Josh Duhamel) and best friends (Katherine Langford, Alexandra Shipp, and Jorge Lendeborg Jr.) for fear of turning his — and their — world upside down. Things change, however, when an anonymous classmate announces his own homosexuality on the school’s unofficial blog. As Simon builds a digital relationship with this student, Simon’s last months before college take him far outside his comfort zone. Love, Simon is a fun film of exploration, a breath of fresh air in a genre saturated with awkward heterosexual

Arlington (2D)/Camino Real (2D & 3D)/ Metro 4 (2D)

Sherlock Gnomes (86 mins., PG) In this animated romp, garden gnomes are disappearing at an alarming rate in the yard where Gnomeo (James McAvoy) and Juliet (Emily Blunt) live. They recruit famous detective Sherlock Gnomes (Johnny Depp) and his sidekick, Gnome Watson (Chiwetel Ejiofor), to investigate the mystery.

PUBLISHES THUR, APRIL 19

Fairview/Fiesta 5

Tyler Perry’s Acrimony (120 mins., R) Tyler Perry directs this psychological thriller that tells of a wife (Taraji P. Henson) who takes action on her devious husband (Lyriq Bent), who has betrayed her. Fairview/Paseo Nuevo

O A Wrinkle in Time

ADVERTISING DEADLINE: WEDNESDAY APRIL 11 at 3PM

(109 mins., PG)

Premiering on International Women’s Day, Ava DuVernay’s theatrical interpretation of Madeleine L’Engle’s bestselling children’s novel A Wrinkle in Time is an empowerment powerhouse, starring women in virtually all leading roles, with women of color being especially visible. Oprah Winfrey, Reese Witherspoon, and Mindy Kaling star as Mrs. Which, Mrs. Whatsit, and Mrs. Who, respectively, who all help relatable and intelligent tween Meg (Storm Reid); her brother, Charles Wallace (Deric McCabe); and her friend Calvin (Levi Miller) travel across the galaxy to find Meg’s father (Chris Pine). The dialogue is a bit cheesy at times and the plot had a few inconsistencies, but these were easily ignorable in a movie made for children. Replete with beautiful backdrops and stunning effects, this story possesses both significance and magic. (NS)

Contact your advertising rep today! 805.965.5205 Sales@Independent.com

Fiesta 5

Love, Simon The above films are playing in Santa Barbara FRIDAY, April 6, through THURSDAY, April 12. Our critics’ reviews are followed by initials: TH (Tyler Hayden), NS (Noah Shachar), and JW (Josef Woodard). The symbol O indicates the film is recommended. The symbol ➤ indicates a new review. 71


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3 Revolutions with Daniel Sperling Learn how automated, shared and electric vehicles are fundamentally changing how we move around.

April 5, 2018, 7pm Marjorie Luke Theatre

FREE TAX ASSISTANCE

February 2nd, 2018 to April 13th, 2018 United Way of Santa Barbara County 320 East Gutierrez Street Starts Tuesday, February 6, 2018 Walk-ins only Tuesdays and Wednesdays, 1:00PM – 5:00PM Goleta Valley Community Center 5679 Hollister Ave. Goleta Starts Friday February 2nd, 2018 Friday, 9AM – Noon and 1PM – 4PM Walk-ins only – No Appointments this year. AARP Foundation Tax-Aide

72

Doors at 6:30 p.m., talk begins at 7. Immediately following the keynote by Dr. Sperling, hear a Mobility Future Startups Panel, featuring four startups leading the way in the mobility revolution – Advanced Vehicle Manufacturing, Envoy, EVmatch, and Xtelligent.

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a&e | ROB BREZSNY’S FREE WILL ASTROLOGY WEEK OF APRIL 5 CAPRICORN

ARIES

CANCER

LIBRA

(Mar. 21-Apr. 19): Eighty-three-year-old author Harlan Ellison has had a long and successful career. In the course of publishing hundreds of literary works in seven different genres, he has won numerous awards. But when he was in his thirties, there was an interruption in the upward arc of his career. The film production company Walt Disney Studios hired him as a writer. During his first day on the job, Roy Disney overheard Ellison joking with a coworker about using Disney characters in an animated pornographic movie. Ellison was fired on the spot. I am by no means predicting a comparable event in your life, Aries. On the contrary. By giving you this heads-up, I’m hoping you’ll be scrupulous and adroit in how you act in the early stages of a new project — so scrupulous and adroit that you will sail on to the next stages.

(June 21-July 22): Actor Keanu Reeves’s career ascended to a higher level when he appeared as a lead character in the film Speed. It was the first time he had been a headliner in a big-budget production. But he turned down an offer to reprise his starring role in the sequel, Speed 2. Instead he toured with his grunge band Dogstar and played the role of Hamlet in a production staged by a local theater company in Winnipeg, Manitoba. I admire him for being motivated more by love and passion than by fame and fortune. In my estimation, Cancerian, you face a choice that in some ways resembles Keanu’s, but in other ways doesn’t. You shouldn’t automatically assume that what your ego craves is opposed to what your heart yearns for and your soul needs.

(Sept. 23-Oct. 22): According to my analysis of the cosmic omens, your impact is rising. You’re gaining influence. More people are tuning in to what you have to offer. And yet your stress levels also seem to be increasing. Why is that? Do you assume that having more power requires you to endure higher tension? Do you unconsciously believe that being more worried is the price of being more responsible? If so, banish that nonsense. The truth is this: The best way to manage your growing clout is to relax into it. The best way to express your growing clout is to relax into it.

(Dec. 22-Jan. 19): The French government defines books as an “essential good,” along with water, bread, and electricity. Would you add anything to that list of life’s basics? Companionship? Stories? Deep sleep? Pleasurable exercise and movement? Once you identify your “essential goods,” I invite you to raise the level of reverence and care you give them. Take an oath to treat them as holy treasures. Boost your determination and ability to get all you need of their blessings. The coming weeks will be a favorable time to enhance your appreciation of the fundamentals you sometimes take for granted.

SCORPIO

AQUARIUS

TAURUS (Apr. 20-May 20): Are you an evolving Taurus or an unevolving Taurus? Are you an aspiring master of gradual, incremental progress or a complacent excusemaker who secretly welcomes inertia? Will the theme of your next social media post be “The Smart Art of Compromise” or “The Stingy Glory of Stubbornness”? I’m hoping you will opt for the former rather than the latter in each of the three choices I just offered. Your behavior in the coming weeks will be pivotal in your long-term ability to animate your highest self and avoid lapsing into your mediocre self.

(July 23-Aug. 22): A Leo sculptor I know is working on a 40-foot-long statue of a lion. Another Leo friend borrowed $30,000 to build a recording studio in her garage so she can pursue her quixotic dream of a music career. Of my other Leo acquaintances, one is writing a memoir of her time as a black-market orchid smuggler, another just did four sky dives in three days, and another embarked on a long-postponed pilgrimage to Slovenia, land of her ancestors. What about you? Are there any breathtaking challenges or smart gambles you’re considering? I trust you can surf the same astrological wave.

GEMINI

VIRGO

(May 21-June 20): If you fly in a passenger jet from New York to London, the trip usually takes more than six hours. But on January 8, 2015, a powerful jet stream surging across the North Atlantic reduced that time significantly. With the wind’s extra push, several flights completed the trip in five hours and 20 minutes. I suspect you’ll have comparable assistance in the course of your upcoming journeys and projects, Gemini. You’ll feel like the wind is at your back.

(Aug. 23-Sept. 22): How sexy is it possible for you to be? I’m referring to authentic soul-stirring sexiness, not the contrived, glitzy, counterfeit version. I’m alluding to the irresistible magnetism that wells up in you when you tap in to your core self and summon a reverent devotion to your life’s mission. However sexy it is possible for you to be, Virgo, I suggest you unleash that magic in the coming weeks. It’s the most reliable strategy for attracting the spiritual experiences and material resources and psychological support you need.

Homework: Buy or make yourself a present that encourages you to be more generous. Report results at Freewillastrology.com.

LEO

(Oct. 23-Nov. 21): The immediate future will challenge you to revisit several fundamental Scorpio struggles. For best results, welcome these seeming intrusions as blessings and opportunities, and follow these guidelines: (1) Your control over external circumstances will increase in direct proportion to your control over your inner demons. (2) Your ability to do what you want will thrive to the degree that you stop focusing on what you don’t want. (3) Your skill at regulating and triumphing over chaos will be invincible if you’re not engrossed in blaming others.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): I’m about to say things that sound extraordinary. And it’s possible that they are in fact a bit overblown. But even if that’s the case, I trust that there is a core of truth in them. So rejoice in their oracular radiance. First, if you have been hoping for a miracle cure, the next four weeks will be a time when you’re more likely than usual to find it or generate it. Second, if you have fantasized about getting help to address a seemingly irremediable problem, asking aggressively for that help now will lead to at least a partial fix. Third, if you have wondered whether you could ever retrieve a lost or missing part of your soul, the odds are more in your favor than they’ve been in a long time.

(Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Buckingham Palace is the home and office of the Queen of England. It has been the main royal residence since Queen Victoria took the throne in 1837. But in earlier times, the site served other purposes. The 17th-century English lawyer Clement Walker described the building occupying that land as a brothel, a hotbed of “debauchery.” Before that the space was a mulberry garden where silkworms tuned mulberry leaves into raw material for silk fabrics. I see the potential for an almost equally dramatic transformation of a certain place in your life, Aquarius. Start dreaming and scheming about the possibilities.

PISCES (Feb. 19-Mar. 20): Poet Carolyn Forché is a role model for how to leave one’s comfort zone. In her early career, she earned writing degrees at placid universities near her childhood home in the American Midwest. Her first book mined material about her family; its first poem is addressed to her grandmother. But then she relocated to El Salvador, where she served as a human rights advocate during that country’s civil war. Later she lived and wrote in Lebanon at the height of its political strife. Her drive to expand her range of experience invigorated her poetry and widened her audience. Would you consider drawing inspiration from Forché in the coming weeks and months, Pisces? I don’t necessarily recommend quite so dramatic a departure for you, but even a mild version will be well rewarded.

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700.

Turn fear into faith Choose perfect names – Hope and Haven Learn twin parenting skills from nurses Realize that miracles often come in the most unexpected ways Jenny Schatzle’s pregnancy was going flawlessly until her water broke two months early. Her twin girls were born at 30 weeks and weighed less than three pounds. They were rushed to the neonatal ICU at Cottage where they spent seven weeks under expert care. Today, they are growing strong and thriving. Our NICU is proud to celebrate its 30 year anniversary. Visit cottagechildrens.org to learn more about our specialists and services offered. CCMC cares for over 14,000 children a year in our Acute Pediatrics Unit, Neonatal and Pediatric ICUs, the emergency department, pediatric trauma center, and eight specialized outpatient clinics.

It didn’t go as planned – but went the way it was supposed to happen. – Jenny Schatzle, Hope and Haven’s mother

Dreams Made Real. 73


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E M A I L S A L E S @ I N D E P E N D E N T. C O M

EMPLOYMENT

COMMITMENT

TO OUR COMMUNITIES. Because we care for our neighbors.

A career at Cottage Health is an experience in caring for and about the people who call our coastal area of California home. Our not-for-profit health system identifies closely with the communities we serve and has a long tradition of providing area residents with highly personalized, clinically excellent care. Patients aren’t just patients here – they’re neighbors. Be there for them through one of the openings below.

Santa Barbara Cottage Hospital

Non-Clinical

Cottage Business Services

• Catering Set Up Worker – PD

Nursing

• Concierge

• Director, Women’s Services

• • • • • • • •

• Employee Relations Consultant Sr. –

Santa Ynez Valley Cottage Hospital

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

• Cook – PT

Access Case Manager Birth Center Cardiac Cath Lab Cardiac Telemetry Clinical Nurse Specialist, NICU Educator, Lactation Hematology/Oncology MICU NICU Nurse Educator, Diabetes Operating Room Orthopedics Peds Psych Nursing Pulmonary, Renal, Infectious Disease RN Eye Center Service Director, Critical Care SICU Surgical Trauma Telemetry

• Data Analyst • Data Quality Analyst • Diet Specialist

FT & Temp • Environmental Services Rep • Environmental Services Supervisor • EPIC Beaker Analyst • EPIC Beaker Analyst, Lead • EPIC Beaker Analyst Sr. • EPIC Clin Doc Analyst Sr. • EPIC Clin Doc/Stork Lead • EPIC Instructional Designer Sr. • EPIC Revenue Cycle Analyst Sr. • EPIC Systems Support Specialist (Trainer) • Food Services Rep, Cafeteria/Deli

Allied Health • Occupational Therapist PD • Physical Therapist • Speech Language Pathologist – PD

Clinical • Behavior Health Clinician • Cardiovascular RN • Case Manager/Primary Counselor, Psych Nursing • CT Tech • Emergency Dept Tech • Instrument Tech Sterile Processing • Medical Receptionist, Peds GI • Obstetrical Tech, Birth Center • Patient Care Tech • Perfusionist • Pharmacy Tech • Surgical Tech III • Telemetry Tech – PT • Unit Care Tech • Unit Care Tech, Surgery • Utilization Review Nurse

• Healthcare Interpreter – PD • Healthcare Interpreter II • Information Security Analyst • Information Security Engineer • Manager, Research Compliance • Patient Finance Counselor II – PT

• • • •

Advancement Systems Analyst Director, Revenue Integrity HIM Manager HIM Outpatient Data Specialist Manager, Annual Giving Manager, Denials and Utilization Review Patient Financial Counselor Sr. Revenue Integrity Analyst

Radiology Tech – PD RN, Emergency RN, Med/Surg – FT/PT Security – PT

Goleta Valley Cottage Hospital • • • • • • •

Concierge Dietary Specialist Food Service Rep Physical Therapist Registered Nurse, Emergency Registered Nurse, ICU Registered Nurse, Surgery – PD

Cottage Rehabilitation Hospital • • • •

CCRC Family Consultant Occupational Therapist – PD Physical Therapist – PD Speech Therapist – FT & PD

Pacific Diagnostic Laboratories

• Sales Associate

• Anatomic Pathology Tech • Certified Phlebotomist Technician – FT & PT • CLS, Santa Ynez/Microbiology • Lab Assistant II • Mobile Cert Phleb Tech, Lab • Quality Coordinator • Sr. Sales Representative (San Luis) • Transfusion Safety Coordinator

• Security Officer, SBCH

• Please apply to: www.pdllabs.com

• Patient Finance Counselor II – PD • Personal Care Attendant – PD • Physician & Contract Specialist • Research Coordinator (Non-RN) • Research Scientist • Room Service Coordinator • Room Service Server

• Stationary Engineer I • Systems Support Coordinator (PC Tech)

• RENTAL & RELOCATION ASSISTANCE

AVAILABLE FOR SELECT FULL-TIME POSITIONS

• Utilization Management Case Manager

• CERTIFICATION REIMBURSEMENT

ADMIN/CLERICAL CALM HR Assistant (Part Time) The HR Assistant works with the Director of Human Resources to accomplish the goals and objectives of the department. Please visit http://calm4kids.org/jobs/ for a complete job description and instructions on how to apply

COMPUTER/TECH

BUSINESS SYSTEMS ANALYST

UNIVERSITY OF CALIFORNIA EDUCATION ABROAD PROGRAM (UCEAP) Acts as a liaison between end users/ business and IT to help ensure project outcomes meet business needs and requirements for projects and processes that are moderate in scope. Assists in defining business requirements, software specifications, applications and workflow processes. Consults with end users and management to identify and document business requirements of proposed application systems or business mandates. Evaluates current and future business needs to recommend appropriate solutions to improve existing systems. Collects, organizes, measures, monitors, and analyzing web site activity. Works with cross‑functional teams to implement Google Analytics, Tag Manager, monitor traffic, and monitor conversions, site member interactions, activities, and stability. Oversees the MyEAP Helpdesk to support users (both local and remote), routing and answering technical and business related inquiries as needed. Prepares training materials and conducts training for local and remote staff. Reqs: BA degree in related field and 3‑5 years of experience or equivalent combination of education, training and experience. Intermediate knowledge of related areas of IT. Knowledge relating to software design. In‑depth understanding and skill in process and systems requirement documentation standards, such as Use Case modeling, User Story creations and narrative descriptions. Experience translating business information requirements into data models, diagrams, use

cases and testing scripts. Ability to quickly understand business process issues and gather the necessary information to document business/ technical requirements in an evolving end‑user environment. Demonstrated understanding of business priorities, challenges, and direction to drive change and desired outcomes. Must be able to balance the user needs with overall organizational needs including efficient, cost effective operations. Strong analytical, problem solving, critical thinking, and organizational skills. Must be an adaptable problem solver. Ability to develop test scripts with direction from test lead and assist with end‑user testing. Excellent time management skills; able to meet deadlines. Demonstrated ability to communicate technical information to technical and non‑technical personnel; ability to work productively with both technical and non‑technical personnel at various levels in the organization. Strong collaboration and teamwork skills. Notes: Fingerprint background check required. Full‑time, on‑site position with a regular daily schedule at the UCEAP System‑wide Office, near UCSB. $25.13‑$35.21/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For primary consideration apply by 4/15/18, thereafter open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #20180156

DATABASE ADMINISTRATOR TEAM LEAD

ENTERPRISE TECHNOLOGY SERVICES Responsible for the setup, administration, and ongoing performance management of the development, test, and production instances of the complex, mission critical Enterprise Technology Services databases (like UC Path, Gateway, Financial Systems, BARC, Kronos, etc) that serve the enterprise, administrative and financial

COME TO OUR HIRING EVENT! Tues, April 17th | 11am-6pm Employees’ University Center

267 Camino del Remedio, Santa Barbara We offer an excellent compensation package that includes above-market salaries, premium medical benefits, pension plans, tax savings accounts, rental and mortgage assistance, and relocation packages. What’s holding you back?

Hiring For Manufacturing Operator Jobs

Please apply online at jobs.cottagehealth.org.

Entry-Level Available (HS Diploma/GED Req)

Candidates may also submit a resume to: Cottage Health, Human Resources, P.O. Box 689, Pueblo at Bath Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93102-0689 Please reference “SBI” when applying. EOE

For volunteer opportunities at Cottage Health, visit: www.cottagehealth.org/volunteer 74 74

THE INDEPENDENT

APRIL 5, 2018

Semiconductor Industry Experience A Plus Excellence, Integrity, Compassion

www.cottagehealth.org INDEPENDENT.COM

Apply to Job #13687 at

CorningJobs.Corning.Com

needs of UCSB. Interaction with UCOP which hosts the payroll and personnel data that will populate the ODS nightly, integration of this data with UCSB’s financial system, conceptualization of database design and support from high level requirements and business processes, design and modeling, adherence to industry and UC standards for system lifecycle standards, data security, data integrity. Responsible for researching and recommending technology infusions which will lead Enterprise Technology Services and business processes into an efficient future. Reqs: 7+ years of experience administering Microsoft SQL Server at the enterprise level. 7+ years of experience developing, implementing and testing disaster recovery functions using backup technologies. 7+ years of experience performing database design, including relational constructs, database normalization, indexes and constraints. Demonstrated excellence in problem analysis, problem solving, ability to lead projects and work effectively with others in a diverse team environment. Excellent communications skills and the ability to work both independently or as part of a team. BS in Computer Science or another Information Systems related discipline or equivalent education and experience. Note: Fingerprint background check required. $78,100‑$106,300/yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For primary consideration apply by 4/12/18, thereafter open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs. ucsb.edu Job #20180153

END USER COMPUTING ENGINEER ‑ TELECOM ‑ SR.

ENTERPRISE TECHNOLOGY SERVICES Will serve as an End User Computing Engineer ‑ Telecom or a Senior End User Computing Engineer ‑ Telecom for the Enterprise Technology Services organization. This position reflects a dual classification recruitment at the Computer Network Technologist 2 or Computer Network Technologist (CNT) 3 level. The ultimate decision to fill the position at either the CNT 2 or CNT 3 level will be based on the combination of education, experience and qualifications. Reqs: CNT 2, End User Computing Engineer ‑ Telecom: 3+ yrs experience as a customer service representative. Focus on quality control, efficient and prompt service. 3+ yrs experience with service intake system. Ability to collect and analyze requests of varying complexity. 2+ yrs experience in high volume call center. Ability to present complex information to varying levels of customers. Knowledge of NEC products and services; QueWorX, SV8500 PCPro. Knowledge of Waypoint/Nupoint call management and voicemail system. Ability to collect customer needs, design, develop and implant solutions. Knowledge and experience with TCP/ IP and related internet protocols,


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i.e. OSPF. Knowledge of DS1 and DS# concepts. Knowledge and experience with NEC GNAV or any Call Management System. 2+ years working as a help desk technician. Intermediate knowledge of desktop hardware: replacing cards, memory and peripherals. Advanced user of Microsoft Windows OS & Office suites. Beginner knowledge of Mac OS. Ability to prioritize tickets, requests and escalate trouble as required. In addition to the reqs described above, the CNT 3, Senior End User Computing Engineer requires: 5+ yrs experience as a customer service representatives. 5+ yrs experience with service intake system. 5+ yrs experience in high volume call center. Advanced knowledge of NEC products and services; QueWorX, SV8500 PCPro. Advanced knowledge of Waypoint/Nupoint call management and voicemail system. Notes: Fingerprint background check required. Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record and enrollment in the DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program. Must be legally authorized to work in the United States without the need for employer sponsorship currently or in the future. Multiple positions available. $52,461‑$88,793/yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For primary consideration apply by 4/12/18, thereafter open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs. ucsb.edu Job #20180143

EDUCATION

Is recruiting for the faculty position of Chair, Masters of Clinical Psychology. This position is responsible for administering all aspects of the MACP degree program, including hiring and supervision of program faculty, leading program faculty and student recruitment and retention efforts, and, in conjunction with the MACP faculty, coordinating and implementing all phases of program assessment. As a member of the core faculty, the chair also has teaching, advising, and committee responsibilities as well as responsibility for new course, concentration, and degree development. This position is full‑time with benefits which will give you the opportunity to work with experienced educators, engaged students and be part of a dynamic and diverse community established over 40 years ago. The complete job description and application requirements can be found at https:// www.antioch.edu/santa‑barbara/job/ chair‑master‑arts‑clinical‑psychology ‑faculty‑position/

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LEGAL DID YOU KNOW Information is power and content is King? Do you need timely access to public notices and remain relevant in today’s hostile business climate? Gain the edge with California Newspaper Publishers Association new innovative website capublicnotice.com and check out the FREE One‑Month Trial Smart Search Feature. For more information call Cecelia @ (916) 288‑6011 or www. capublicnotice.com (Cal‑SCAN)

PROFESSIONAL

ACCOUNTANT I

BUSINESS & FINANCIAL SERVICES Responsible for Private Contract and Private Grant Agencies. Duties include: compliance to fiduciary and agency protocols, financial reporting, cash and expenditure reconciliation, expenditure monitoring, and problem resolution. Posting of wire and check payments received into specific award revenue accounts and Accounts Receivable. Knowledgeable in specific agency policy, U.C. policy, specific agency databases, and fund accounting. Reqs: B.A. degree in Accounting plus a minimum of 2 years of relevant accounting experience, or equivalent combination of education and experience. Demonstrated proficiency in Excel. Strong analytical skills and the ability to communicate effectively. Excellent customer service skills. Ability to perform multiple tasks, simultaneously, with frequent interruptions. Notes: Fingerprint background check required. Occasional overtime during peak periods. $22.85‑$25.59/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For primary consideration apply by 4/12/18, thereafter open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #20180151

DIRECTOR OF BUDGET & ADMINISTRA ADMINISTRATION

STUDENT ACADEMIC SUPPORT SERVICES (SASS) Serves on the SASS cluster management team and participates in its assessment and strategic planning efforts. Provides critical thinking, problem solving and decision‑making as a member of the cluster management team and the Student Affairs Business Officers team. Participates with other division cluster Business Officers on the development and strategic planning of resources for the Division of Student Affairs. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree or equivalent combination of education and experience. Must have five years of professional experience working in budget analysis, administration, and payroll and personnel functions. Extensive knowledge and an in‑depth understanding of policies and procedures applicable to these functions. Ability to interact effectively with multiple managers and department business officers. Prior experience mentoring or supervising staff employees. Advanced experience with Excel and financial and personnel online systems. Notes: Fingerprint background check required. Occasional evenings and weekends may be required. Mandated reporter for requirements of child abuse. UCSB Campus Security Authority under Clery Act. $57,718‑$67,000/ yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration

for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For primary consideration apply by 4/12/18, thereafter open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #20180147

DIRECTOR OF COMMUNITY AFFAIRS, STUDENT DEVELOPMENT AND LEADERSHIP

ASSOCIATED STUDENTS Oversees and builds teams to advance community affairs, guides student co‑developed curricula and experiential learning, provides mentoring and resources that advance student initiated projects. Sets ethical standards for a community with a public university ethos, values of transparency, accountability and integrity. Supervises the Assistant Director for Student Leadership and Government Affairs and the Assistant Director for Student Development, and Civic Engagement. Ensures excellent stewardship of departmental resources. Manages a budget of approximately 1.7 million dollars. Reqs: Must have expert knowledge of student development theories and practice along with considerable political acumen to handle sensitive and contentious issues relevant to both the university and community affairs. Advanced knowledge of advising. Skill with assessment and measurement of programs of an intangible nature. Skill in building consensus and conflict resolution. Knowledge and experience in strategic planning for a multi‑faceted organization. Budgetary Experience required. Supervisory experience needed. Advanced degree in a related field is preferred. Notes: Fingerprint background check required. Mandated reporter for requirements of child abuse. $63,453‑$75,000/ yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #20180146

FINANCIAL SERVICES MANAGER

COMPUTER SCIENCE Manages the financial administration of all research funds totaling over $18 million and department funds totaling over $4 million. Includes signature authority for all funds, proposal preparation, reconciling and analysis of financial reports, including monitoring and analyzing expenditures and spending patterns, and advising faculty of proper university guidelines regarding financial matters. Establishes procedures and develops standards for the operation of financial functions to ensure that high service standards and audit requirements are met, including record retention. Reqs: Thorough knowledge of financial UC processes, policies and procedures. Proficiency in campus systems including GUS, PPS, Online GL, Data warehouse, Gateway and Gateway Management Console, Espresso, ORBiT, Fastlane and Excel. Thorough knowledge and understanding of internal control practices and their impact on protecting University resources. Ability to adapt to changing priorities and ability to develop original ideas to solve problems. Strong interpersonal skills and the ability to work effectively across the university at all levels. Strong analytical, organizational

and critical thinking skills. Ability to multitask in high volume environment. Effective written and communication skills. Leadership skills to provide guidance, coaching and mentoring to professional and support staff. Note: Fingerprint background check required. $4,809.83‑$5,291/ mo. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For primary consideration apply by 4/12/18, thereafter open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #20180150

SALES/MARKETING

TELEGRAPH BREWING Sales Rep. Seeking a shared Sales Representative with Epic Brewing to be based in Santa Barbara, CA that will cover the Tri‑Counties area which includes Ventura, Santa Barbara and San Luis Obispo counties with some additional travel and coverage possible. ‑ Please email Caitlin@epicbrewing.com

SKILLED HELP WITH WEEDING LANDSCAPE $20/hour. Estimate 2‑4 hours weekly. Call Nancy 310‑709‑3503

HVAC MECHANIC

MAINTENANCE Working on a zone maintenance team composed of all trades, incumbent performs HVAC maintenance work. Installs, repairs, maintains, and inspects heating, ventilating, air conditioning and pneumatic systems and equipment. Installs, repairs and maintains pumps, air compressors, steam and hot water boilers, heating and boiler tubes, heat exchangers, fans, dampers, hydraulic units, control and monitoring systems. Makes working drawings and control diagrams for heating, ventilation and air conditioning equipment. Works with others as part of a team. Provides direct customer service to campus community. Reqs: Four years journeyman experience as a trades craftsman in the area of heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems. EPA Technicians certification required. Experience with large commercial boilers, chillers, cooling towers and fans. Experience with diesel engines and compressors, preferred. Notes: Fingerprint background check required. EPA Universal Technician Certificate. Hours and days may vary to meet the operational needs of the department. Must be able to take night and weekend call‑backs. $35.41/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For primary consideration apply online by 4/11/18, thereafter open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 20180141

SR. BUILDING MAINTENANCE WORKER

RESIDENTIAL OPERATIONS Under the supervision of the Custodial Supervisor or Residence Hall Manager, the Building Maintenance Worker performs duties in accordance with established standards and instruction, for University owned Residence Halls, Apartments and Dining Facilities. Reqs: Training in the basics of plumbing repairs, patch and painting, simple beginning carpentry repairs, and simple (non‑licensed) electrical repairs. Experience making apprentice level repairs in plumbing, patch and paint, carpentry, and electrical. Basic knowledge of the safe use of maintenance equipment such as drills, saws, cordless screwdrivers, and some drain snakes. Experience as an exceptional customer service representative with the ability to communicate effectively and professionally with diverse student and family clientele. Demonstrated ability to work effectively with others as a team. Notes: Fingerprint background check required. Maintain a valid CA driver’s license. May work shifts other than those assigned in order to meet the operational needs of the department. May be required to perform other duties as assigned to meet the operational needs of the department. $19.80‑$22.74/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For primary consideration apply by 4/12/18, thereafter open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #20180155

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MEDICAL SERVICES

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DENTAL INSURANCE. Call Physicians Mutual Insurance Company for details. NOT just a discount plan, REAL coverage for 350 procedures. 1‑855‑472‑0035 or http://www. dental50plus.com/canews Ad# 6118 (CalSCAN)

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EMPLOYMENT

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Complete Commercial & Residential Service APRIL 5, 2018

THE INDEPENDENT

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: A. WOOD ELECTRIC at 310 E. Gutierrez Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Big Phase Inc. (same address). This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: Andrew Wood, CEO. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on March 6, 2018. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Christine Potter. FBN Number: 2018‑0000696. Published: Mar 15, 22, 29 Apr 5, 2018. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: ARETE ADVENTURES, ARETE INTERNATIONAL at 2101 Refugio Road, Goleta, CA 93117; Pamela L. Nichols (same address). This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Pamela L. Nichols. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on March 6, 2018. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Margarita Silva. FBN Number: 2018‑0000686. Published: Mar 15, 22, 29 Apr 5, 2018. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SWORN CLOTHING COMPANY at 270 Valley Station Circle, Buellton, CA 93427; Jaime Escamilla and Andy Rodriguez (same address). This business is conducted by a General Partnership Signed: Andy Rodriguez. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on March 7, 2018. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Margarita Silva. FBN Number: 2018‑0000702. Published: Mar 15, 22, 29 Apr 5, 2018. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: YULIA STYLE NY at 809 Bath Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Yulia Turusinova (same address). This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: YULIA TURUSINOVA This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on February 21, 2018. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Melissa Mercer. FBN Number: 2018‑0000564. Published: March 15, 22, 29 April 5, 2018.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: ACACIA EROSION CONTROL at 604 S. San Marcos Road, Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Acacia Environmental Construction, Inc. (same address). This business is conducted by an Corporation Signed: Acacia Environmental Construction Inc. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 2, 2018. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Tera Jayasinghe. FBN Number: 2018‑0000652. Published: March 15, 22, 29 April 5, 2018. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: IPHONE REPAIR SANTA BARBARA at 1117 State Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; iPhone Repair Santa Barbara LLC (same address). This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company Signed: Travis Thomas, Manager. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on March 16, 2018. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Melissa Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2018‑0000831. Published: Mar 22, 29 Apr 5, 12, 2018. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: HOPE COMMUNITY CHURCH at 4141 State Street, Suite E‑14, Santa Barbara, CA; Missionary Church of Santa Barbara (same address). This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: Elizabeth K. Milne. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 6, 2018. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Connie Tran. FBN Number: 2018‑0000684. Published Mar 22, 29, Apr 5, 12, 2018. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: NATURE’S WAY at 324 Barranca Avenue, Apt. 8, Santa Barbara, CA 93109; Matthew Eric Ellis (same address). This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Matthew Ellis. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 13, 2018. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Melissa Mercer. FBN Number: 2018‑0000781. Published. Mar 22, 29, Apr 5, 12, 2018.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SUPERIOR HOME HEALTH, SUPERIOR HOME HEALTH AND HOSPICE, SUPERIOR HOSPICE CARE, SUPERIOR SENIOR HOME CARE at 320 E Walnut Avenue, Lompoc, CA 93436; IAATK Inc. 1220 Onslott Road, Lompoc, CA 93436. This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: Pablo Martinez, CEO. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on March 12, 2018. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Mary Soto. FBN Number: 2018‑0000753. Published: Mar 22, 29 Apr 5, 12, 2018. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: JO TAYLOR READINGS at 307 Por La Mar Circle, Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Jo Anne Taylor (same address). This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Jo Anne Taylor. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on March 13, 2018. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Adela Bustos. FBN Number: 2018‑0000776. Published: Mar 22, 29 Apr 5, 12, 2018. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: MISSION COLLECTIONS at 532 Fireside Lane, Goleta, CA 93117; Ortiz Schneider Interpreting & Translation (same address). This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: Lorena Ortiz Schneider. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on March 14, 2018. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Tara Jayasinghe. FBN Number: 2018‑0000788. Published: Mar 22, 29 Apr 5, 12, 2018. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SELENA MARIE WEDDINGS AND EVENTS, THE WEDDING TRASHERS at 864 Cheltenham Road, Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Selena Marie Sweeney (same address). This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Selena Marie Sweeney. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on March 9, 2018. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Melissa Mercer. FBN Number: 2018‑0000744. Published: Mar 22, 29 Apr 5, 12, 2018.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: 805 PROPERTIES at 705 Summerwood Lane, Lompoc, CA 93436; Dewey Faulkner III 701 Summerwood Lane, Unit 1, Lompoc, CA 93436. This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Dewey Faulkner III. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on March 15, 2018. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Connie Tran. FBN Number: 2018‑0000808. Published: Mar 22, 29 Apr 5, 12, 2018. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SEASIDE GREENS at 7375 Freeman Place, Unit B, Goleta, CA 93117; Julian Mark Cantando (same address). This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Julian Cantando. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on March 14, 2018. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Melissa Mercer. FBN Number: 2018‑0000801. Published: Mar 22, 29 Apr 5, 12, 2018.

Tide Guide Day

High

Low

High

Low

Thu 5

12:58 am 4.6

8:22 am 0.5

3:10 pm 3.0

7:12 pm 2.5

Fri 6

1:42 am 4.3

9:35 am 0.7

5:15 pm 3.0

8:17 pm 2.9

Sat 7

2:46 am 4.0

10:54 am 0.7

6:47 pm 3.2

10:29 pm 3.0

Sun 8

4:13 am 3.9

Sunrise 6:34 Sunset 7:26

High

12:02 pm 0.6

7:25 pm 3.5

Mon 9

12:04 am 2.7

5:34 am 4.0

12:52 pm 0.4

7:51 pm 3.7

Tue 10

12:58 am 2.4

6:35 am 4.2

1:31 pm 0.3

8:12 pm 3.9

Wed 11

1:38 am 2.0

7:23 am 4.4

2:04 pm 0.2

8:33 pm 4.2

Thu 12

2:13 am 1.5

8:05 am 4.6

2:33 pm 0.1

8:54 pm 4.5

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8H

crosswordpuzzle crossword puzzle

tt By Ma

Jones

“The Jokers”-- and the ones seen with them.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: RALPH SIPPER BOOKS at 10 West Micheltorena Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Ralph Sipper and Carol Sipper as trustees of the Sipper Trust, 12 W Micheltorena Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. This business is conducted by a Trust Signed: Ralph Sipper. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on March 15, 2018. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Christine Potter. FBN Number: 2018‑0000813. Published: Mar 22, 29 Apr 5, 12, 2018. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: LUCENT SKINCARE at 1525 State Street, Suite 206, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Natalie Benavidez 431 Via Roma, Santa Barbara, CA 93110. This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Natalie Benavidez. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on March 12, 2018. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Melissa Mercer. FBN Number: 2018‑0000764. Published: Mar 22, 29 Apr 5, 12, 2018.

60 Constellation with a “belt” 61 Catch on clothing 62 “___ Kommissar” (1983 1 ___ Lama (Tibetan leader) pop hit) 6 Some football linemen, briefly 9 “The Destroyer,” in Hinduism 63 Jury members 13 Oak-to-be 14 Slip up 1 Irish comedian ___ ” Briain 15 McGregor in a hyped 2017 2 Hydrochloric ___ boxing match 3 In ___ parentis (legal doctrine) 16 “Super Freak” singer 4 Boat with a pair of bears 18 The Mad Hatter’s guest 5 Monopoly board words near 19 Commotion “Just visiting” 20 Roths, for short? (abbr.) 6 2011’s “Arthur,” e.g. 21 “King Lear” daughter 7 Duane Allman’s brother 22 Tree with an extract that 8 Near-grads, for short purportedly helps memory 25 Sea of ___ (Biblical location) 9 Without help 10 “The Princess Bride” 28 Word before bump or boom character ___ Montoya 29 It’s a sign 30 Actor Benicio del ___ of “Star 11 Word knowledge, briefly 12 Scene of action Wars: The Last Jedi” 31 Daily ___ (political blog since 15 Arctic herd 17 Actress Hathaway of “The 2002) Princess Diaries” 34 Worth a “meh” response 39 D&D game runners, for short 22 “I Just Wanna Stop” singer ___ Vannelli 40 Quicker than quick 23 Wind section member 41 Participate in a poll 24 Surname of two brothers 42 Letters over 0 on older behind a root beer brand touchtones 25 Beyond passable 43 Stretchy shirt of sorts 46 He was assassinated on the 26 Radio band letters 27 Microscope piece Ides of March 30 Cough syrup amt. 50 ___ to arms 31 Shape of a pretzel (but not a 51 Winter ride pretzel stick) 52 Diddley and Derek, for two 32 Septa- plus one 55 Bete ___ (nemesis) 33 Dissipate slowly 56 Jokers, usually (or what the 35 Juliet’s surname circled letters represent) 36 Medical suffixes 58 Not yet burning 37 Drug bust participant 59 Gator or Power follower

Across

Down

INDEPENDENT.COM

APRIL 5, 2018

38 At any point 42 Offshore drilling structure 43 Half of a headliner at the Rio in Las Vegas 44 Like cheaper textbooks 45 The rougher interrogator, in procedurals 46 Roman god with two faces 47 Home of the Huskies, for short 48 Boxer Ali 49 Stage whisper, perhaps 52 Cheese that goes with red wine 53 Quality of some cheeses 54 Some bank acct. data 56 Stack of cash 57 “___ you for real?” ©2018 Jonesin’ Crosswords (editor@jonesincrosswords.com) ©2017 Jonesin’ Crosswords (editor@ jonesincrosswords.com) For answers to this puzzle, call: 1-900-226-2800, 99 cents per minute. Must be 18+. Or to bill to your credit card, call: 1-800-655-6548. Reference puzzle #0869

LAST WEEK’S SOLUTION:

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: PEAK2PACIFIC at 324 Samarkand Drive, Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Karen Keltner (same address). This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Karen Keltner. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on March 16, 2018. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2018‑0000832. Published: Mar 22, 29 Apr 5, 12, 2018. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: S.E. SCHWARTZ MOTORCARS at 1205 Laguna Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Steven Schwartz (same address). This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Steve Schwartz. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on March 15, 2018. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Connie Tran. FBN Number: 2018‑0000809. Published: Mar 22, 29 Apr 5, 12, 2018.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SANTA BARBARA SEGWAY & SLINGSHOT ADVENTURES, SANTA BARARA SEGWAY TOURS, SANTA BARBARA SLINGSHOT RENTALS, SEGWAY OF SANTA BARBARA, SEGWAY TOURS OF SANTA BARBARA, THINGS 2 DO RENTALS at 122 Gray Avenue, Unit B, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Things2Do Rentals 340 Rosewood Avenue, Unit G, Camarillo, CA 93010. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company Signed: Things2Do Rentals, LLC. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on March 16, 2018. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Adela Bustos. FBN Number: 2018‑0000835. Published: Mar 22, 29 Apr 5, 12, 2018.

AVISO DE DISPONIBILIDAD AVISO DE DISPONIBILIDAD PARA LA REVISION PÚBLICA DE 30 DIAS: PROPUESTO PROGRAMA DE SUBSIDIOS GLOBALES PARA EL DESARROLLO COMUNITARIO (CDBG) 2018-2019 PLAN DE ACCIÓN DE CDBG El AVISO SE DA que la Ciudad de Goleta está conduciendo un período de revisión público de 30 días acerca del Propuesto Plan de Acción de 2018-2019. El Propuesto Plan de Acción resume la estrategia de la Ciudad para perseguir las metas generales del Departamento de Vivienda y de Desarrollo Urbano (HUD en inglés) de los E.E.U.U., para proporcionar la vivienda decente; para establecer y mantener un medioambiente sostenible; y para ampliar oportunidades económicas de la revitalización. El Plan de Acción también contiene los puntos de referencia para medir progreso por las metas, objetivos y estrategias de desarrollo de la comunidad para realizar las necesidades de la vivienda en la Ciudad y para proporcionar servicios a la gente de bajos ingresos, a los desamparados y a la gente con necesidades especiales dentro de la Ciudad. El Propuesto Plan de Acción también dispone asignaciones de financiación específicas para el período de planeamiento de 2018-2019. El período de revisión proporciona una oportunidad para que el público ofrezca sus opiniones y recomendaciones a la Ciudad a propósito de actividades por medio de CDBG relacionadas al financiamiento de la vivienda y del desarrollo comunitario. El Propuesto Plan de Acción de 2018-2019 CDBG está disponible en el sitio web de la Ciudad en: http://www.cityofgoleta. org/city-hall/neighborhood-services-and-publicsafety/neighborhood-services/communitydevelopment-block-grant-program, y copias también están disponibles para la revisión en El Ayuntamiento, 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B, Goleta; y el Centro Comunitario del Valle de Goleta situado en 5679 Hollister Avenue. Para información en español, por favor llame al (805) 961-7555 y pregunte por Vyto Adomaitis o vadomaitis@cityofgoleta.org PERÍODO DE REVISIÓN PÚBLICA: Los comentarios sobre El Propuesto Plan de Acción para 2018-2019 se están aceptando durante un período de revisión de 30 días empezando el jueves, el 5 de Abril, 2018 y concluyendo sábado, el 5 de Mayo de 2018, a las 5:00 P.M. Los comentarios se deben someter a: City of Goleta, Attn: Dana Grossi, 130 Cremona Drive Goleta, CA 93117. 78 78

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APRIL 5, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: MODISH SEAL DESIGN CO. at 4022 Primavera Road, Unit A, Santa Barbara, CA 93110; Kala Van Gompel (same address). This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Kala Van Gompel. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on March 9, 2018. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Adela Bustos. FBN Number: 2018‑0000736. Published: Mar 22, 29 Apr 5, 12, 2018. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SMART OFFICE INTERIORS at 18 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Smart Office Interiors, Inc. (same address). This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: Neil Coffman‑Grey, Agent. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on March 19, 2018. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Christine Potter. FBN Number: 2018‑0000849. Published: Mar 22, 29 Apr 5, 12, 2018.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SANTA BARBARA IMAGES at 1180 San Antonio Creek Road, Santa Barbara, CA, 93111; Mark Blickley (same address). This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Mark Blickley This statement was filed Blickley. with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on March 19, 2018. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Christine Potter. FBN Number: 2018‑0000847. Published: Mar 22, 29 Apr 5, 12, 2018.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: VINO DIVINO at 2012 De la Vina Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Fine Wine Cellar, LLC. 307 Meadowbrook Drive, Santa Barbara, CA 93108. This business is conducted by a Limitied Liability Company: Craig McGinnis, Owner Owner. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on March 13, 2018. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Connie Tran. FBN Number: 2018‑0000780. Published: Mar 22, 29 Apr 5, 12, 2018.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: BELLA TEORI AESTHETICS at 3568 Sagunto Street, Santa Ynez, CA 93460; Christopher J Flynn, MD Inc. 875 Woodland Drive, Santa Barbara, CA 93108. This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: Christopher J. Flynn, COO. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on March 20, 2018. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Christine Potter. FBN Number: 2018‑0000865. Published: Mar 22, 29 Apr 5, 12, 2018.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SANTA BARBARA WINE TOUR COMPANY at 2550 Eastman Avenue #6, Ventura, CA 93003; Executive Limousine & Coach, Inc. (same address). This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: Liza L Raftery, Secretary. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 16, 2018. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Adela Bustos. FBN Number: 2018‑0000830. Published: Mar 22, 29 and Apr 5, 12, 2018.

NOTICE OF AVAILABILITY NOTICE OF AVAILABILITY FOR 30-DAY PUBLIC REVIEW: DRAFT COMMUNITY DEVELOPMENT BLOCK GRANT (CDBG) 2018-2019 CDBG ACTION PLAN NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the City of Goleta is conducting a 30-day public review period on the Draft 2018-2019 CDBG Action Plan. The Draft Action Plan outlines the City’s strategy for pursuing the overall goals of the U.S. Department of Housing and Urban Development (HUD) to provide decent housing; to establish and maintain a suitable living environment; and to expand economic revitalization opportunities. The Action Plan also contains identifiable benchmarks for measuring progress through goals, objectives and community development strategies to meet the City's housing needs and to provide services to the low-income, homeless and special needs populations within the City. The Draft 2018-2019 Action Plan also sets forth funding allocations for the 2018-2019 planning period. The review period provides an opportunity for the public to offer their views and recommendations to the City on the subject of CDBG funded housing and community development related activities. The Draft 2018-2019 CDBG Action Plan is posted on the City’s website at http://www. cityofgoleta.org/city-hall/neighborhood-servicesand-public-safety/neighborhood-services/ community-development-block-grant-program and copies are also available for review at the Goleta City Hall, 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B, Goleta; and the Goleta Community Center located at 5679 Hollister Avenue. PUBLIC REVIEW PERIOD: Comments on the Draft Action Plan are being accepted during a 30-day public review period beginning Thursday, April 5, 2018, and ending Saturday, May 5, 2018, at 5:00 pm. Comments should be submitted to: City of Goleta, Neighborhood Services & Public Safety Department, Attn: Dana Grossi, 130 Cremona Drive Goleta, CA 93117. For more information you may contact Dana Grossi, Management Analyst at dgrossi@ cityofgoleta.org or at (805) 562-5507.

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: AMAZING GRACE URNS AND FANCIFUL DESIGN CO. at 1331 Santa Barbara Street #1, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Lemon Tree Partners, LLC (same address). This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company Signed: Noel Solomon, Manager. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 26, 2018. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Tara Jayasinghe. FBN Number: 2018‑0000930. Published: Mar 29, Apr 5, 12, 19, 2018. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: ALISOS VINEYARD at 9100 Alisos Canyon Road, Los Alamos, CA 93440; Flower & Vine LLC, 5933 Bowcroft Street, Los Angeles, CA 90016. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company Signed: Deborah Feldman, Attorney. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 22, 2018. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Christine Potter. FBN Number: 2018‑0000902. Published: Mar 29, Apr 5, 12, 19, 2018. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SHOPS@ THEWATERLINE at 120 Santa Barbara Street, Suite C, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; The Guilded Table, LLC, 1187 Coast Village Road #303, Santa Barbara, CA 93108. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company Signed: Kassie Goodman, Manager. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 23, 2018. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Adela Bustos. FBN Number: 2018‑0000914. Published: Mar 29, Apr 5, 12, 19, 2018. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: DAILY GREENZ, ETC. at 724 East Haley Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Elsa Marie Cisneros and Cristina Ann Gonzalez 2223 Cliff Drive, Santa Barbara, CA 93109. This business is conducted by a Married Couple Signed: Elsa M. Cisneros. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Feb 26, 2018. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Tara Jayasinghe. FBN Number: 2018‑0000591. Published: Mar 29, Apr 5, 12, 19, 2018.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: COSTA DEL MAR APARTMENTS at 1045, 1047, and 1049 Elm Lane, Carpinteria, CA 93013; MP APW LLC 6133 Bristol Parkway, STE 270, Culver City, CA 90230. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company Signed: This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 23, 2018. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Christine Potter. FBN Number: 2018‑0000916. Published: Mar 29, Apr 5, 12, 19, 2018. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SAGE AND CROW STUDIO at 612 Mulberry Avenue, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Sarah Anne Clark (same address). This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Sarah A. Clark. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 21, 2018. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Connie Tran. FBN Number: 2018‑0000888. Published: Mar 29, Apr 5, 12, 19, 2018. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: ONE CARAT MANI & PEDI at 1329 State Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Takako Sato 6623 Calle Koral, Goleta, CA 93117. This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Takako Sato. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 20, 2018. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Adela Bustos. FBN Number: 2018‑0000874. Published: Mar 29, Apr 5, 12, 19, 2018. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: XINACATL at 1629B Castillo Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Mayra Padilla Castillo (same address). This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Mayra Padilla. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 19, 2018. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Christine Potter. FBN Number: 2018‑0000850. Published: Mar 29, Apr 5, 12, 19, 2018. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: EXPONENTIAL PRESS at 3736 Avon Lane, Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Charles A. Ryavec (same address). This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Charles Ryavec. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 23, 2018. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Adela Bustos. FBN Number: 2018‑0000919. Published: Mar 29, Apr 5, 12, 19, 2018. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: PAL 8 MEDIA, INC. at 2580 Sycamore Canyon Road, Santa Barbara, CA 93108; Pal 8 Media, Inc. (same address). This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: Steven Manis, CFO. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 26, 2018. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Melissa Mercer. FBN Number: 2018‑0000936. Published: Mar 29, Apr 5, 12, 19, 2018. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: FRIENDS OF FROZEN YOGURT, FOFY. at 825 De la Guerra Terrace, Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Christopher Faitel (same address). This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Christopher Faitel. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 26, 2018. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Margarita Silva. FBN Number: 2018‑0000935. Published: Mar 29, Apr 5, 12, 19, 2018.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: FACIALS BY KERRI. at 1520 State Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Kerri C. Rollinson (same address). This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Kerri Rolinson. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 20, 2018. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Connie Tran. FBN Number: 2018‑0000857. Published: Mar 29, Apr 5, 12, 19, 2018. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SEAGLASS BOTANICALS at 4772 Calle Camarada, Santa Barbara, CA 93110; Sarah Coffman (same address). This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Sarah Coffman. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 26, 2018. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2018‑0000933. Published: Mar 29, Apr 5, 12, 19, 2018. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: CHOPPA POKE at 7000 Hollister Ave #102, Goleta, CA 93117; Snowcrave XD Inc. 8105 E Emerson Place, Rosemead, CA 91770. This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: David Chen, CEO. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 23, 2018. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Tara Jayasinghe. FBN Number: 2018‑0000918. Published: Mar 29, Apr 5, 12, 19, 2018. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: PIPPUSTUDIO. at 233 Hot Springs Road, Santa Barbara, CA 93108; Hussaya De Armond and Benjamin A. De Armond (same address). This business is conducted by a Married Couple Signed: Hussaya De Armond. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 21, 2018. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Connie Tran. FBN Number: 2018‑0000881. Published: Mar 29, Apr 5, 12, 19, 2018. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: WILLOW STREET FILMS at 474 Scenic Drive, Unit C, Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Stacey D. Rydell (same address). This business is conducted by a General Partnership Signed: Stacey D. Rydell. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 14, 2018. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Connie Tran. FBN Number: 2018‑0000786. Published: Mar 29, Apr 5, 12, 19, 2018. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: L’COUTURE ATELIER at 130 W Victoria Street, Apt. 22, Santa Barbara, CA 93101 ; Liliya Livingston (same address). This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Liliya Livingston. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 23, 2018. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2018‑0000926. Published: Mar 29, Apr 5, 12, 19, 2018. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: SUCCESSREACH LTD at 557 N La Cumbre Road, Santa Barbara, CA 93110; Mary Jean Vignone (same address). This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Mary Jean Vignone. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 14, 2018. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Connie Tran. FBN Number: 2018‑0000785. Published: Mar 29, Apr 5, 12, 19, 2018.


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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: CITIG, CITIG INC. at 347 Chapala St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Channel Islands Technology Integrators’ Group INC. (Same Address). This business is conducted by a Corporation, Signed ELI COATS. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on MAR 28, 2018. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Margarita Silva. FBN Number: 2018‑0000962. Published: April 05, 12, 19, 26, 2018. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: EBP at 3755 San Remo Dr #219, Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Nolan Swain (Same Address). This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Nolan Swain. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on MAR 28 2018. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Margarita Silva. FBN Number: 2018‑0000961. Published: April 05, 12, 19, 26, 2018. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: QORSOFTWARE, SPROCS at 1736 Olive Ave, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Kaytos, LLC (Same Address). This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company, Signed: Cary Dunn, CEO. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on MAR 27, 2018 This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Margarita Silva. FBN Number: 2018‑0000946. Published: APR 05, 12, 19, 26, 2018. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: MISSION MINI MART at 402 West Mission St, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Elmer Prinslow 1144 Crestline Dr, Santa Barbara, CA 93105. This business is conducted by an Individual, Signed: Elmer Prinslow. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on MAR 22, 2018. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Connie Tran. FBN Number: 2018‑0000891. Published: APR 05, 12, 19, 26 2018. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: THUNDER MOON COLLECTIVE at 129 Santa Barbara St STE C, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Nina Brito 123 Arboleda Rd Santa Barbara, CA 93110 This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Nina Brito. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on MAR 28, 2018. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2018‑0000967. Published: APR 05, 12, 19, 26, 2018. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: GRACE HEALTH AND WELLNESS at 802 E Yanonali St, Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Sugar Leaf Wellness Collective: 1929 Caminito ALCALA, Chula Vista, CA 91913. This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: Nicole DiMonda. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on MAR 28 2018. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Tara Jayasinghe. FBN Number: 2018‑0000960. Published: April 05, 12, 19, 26, 2018.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SLEEP AND TMD SOLUTIONS OF SANTA BARBARA, SLEEP SOLUTIONS OF SANTA BARBARA at 1809 Cliff Dr, STE D, Santa Barbara, CA 93109; Walter C. Dukes D.D.S. 4737 San Antonio Court Santa Barbara, CA 93111. This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: WALTER C. DUKES. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on MAR 26, 2018. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Connie Tran. FBN Number: 2018‑0000929. Published: APR 05, 12, 19, 26 2018. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: MESA DENTAL at 1809 Cliff Dr, STE D, Santa Barbara, CA 93109; Walter C. Dukes D.D.S., 4737 San Antonio Court Santa Barbara, CA 93111. This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: WALTER C. DUKES. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on MAR 26, 2018. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Connie Tran. FBN Number: 2018‑0000928. Published: APR 05, 12, 19, 26 2018. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: REVISION LANDSCAPE, REVISION PIPELINE at 116 Palisades Drive, Santa Barbara, CA 93109; Patrick Sada (Same Address). This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Patrick Sada. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on MAR 20, 2018. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Christine Potter. FBN Number: 2018‑0000861. Published: April 05, 12, 19, 26, 2018. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: JOE O’BRIEN PHOTOGRAPHY at 2139 Gillespie Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Joseph O’Brian (Same Address). This business is conducted by an Individual, Signed: Joseph O’brien. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on MAR 29, 2018. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Connie Tran. FBN Number: 2018‑0000971. Published: April 05, 12, 19, 26, 2018. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: R.J. SPANN at 232 Cottage Grove Avenue, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Rick Spann (Same Address). This business is conducted by a Corporation, Signed: Rick Spann. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on MAR 20, 2018. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Adela Bustos. FBN Number: 2018‑0000869. Published: April 05, 12, 19, 26, 2018. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: BEST WESTERN PLUS PEPPER TREE INN RESERVATIONS at 3850 State St, Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Anthony Ibarra (Same Address). This business is conducted by a Limited Partnership Signed: Anthony Ibarra. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on MAR 29, 2018. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Connie Tran. FBN Number: 2018‑0000983. Published: April 05, 12, 19, 26, 2018.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: BEST WESTERN PLUS ENCINA LODGE & SUITES RESERVATIONS at 3850 State St, Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Anthony Ibarra (Same Address). This business is conducted by a Limited Partnership Signed: Anthony Ibarra. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on MAR 29, 2018. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Connie Tran. FBN Number: 2018‑0000984. Published: April 05, 12, 19, 26, 2018. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SUNKISSED, SUNKISSED SB at 1129 State Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Michaelyn Hamm, 1014 Bajada Grande, Santa Barbara, CA 93109; Crystal Lomeli, 733 E Anapamu #4, Santa Barbara, CA 93103. This business is conducted by a General Partnership, Signed: CRYSTAL LOMELI. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on MAR 27, 2018. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Rachel N. Gann. FBN Number: 2018‑0000954. Published: APR 05, 12, 19, 26 2018. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: MEZZA THYME at 20 E Cota ST, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Mezza Thyme LLC (Same Address). This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company, Signed: Hanni Istwani. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on APR 02, 2018. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Margarita Silva. FBN Number: 2018‑0001011. Published: April 05, 12, 19, 26, 2018. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: GRAVITAS at 220 E Cota St, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Crossfit Pacific Coast INC, 203 W. Victoria St, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. This business is conducted by a Corporation, Signed: Dani Russell. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on MAR 28, 2018. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Connie Tran. FBN Number: 2018‑0000959. Published: April 05, 12, 19, 26, 2018. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: HIBBETT SPORTS at 371 Town Center East, Santa Maria, CA 93454; Hibbett Sporting Goods INC, 2700 Milan CT, Birmingham, AL 35211. This business is conducted by a Corporation, Signed: Michael Crump. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on MAR 20, 2018. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Connie Tran. FBN Number: 2018‑0000872. Published: April 05, 12, 19, 26, 2018. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SIERRA LANDSCAPING at 517 N. Alisos St APT 4, Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Jose Antonio Sierra (Same Address); Jesus Martinez, 1520 Eucalyptus Hill Rd, APT 19, Santa Barbara, CA 93103. This business is conducted by a General Partnership, Signed: Jose A. Sierra. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on MAR 16, 2018. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Adela Bustos. FBN Number: 2018‑0000833. Published: April 05, 12, 19, 26, 2018.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: ADOPTED INSURANCE at 3219 Calle Cedro, Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Bryan Petersen (Same Address). This business is conducted by an Individual, Signed: Bryan Petersen. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on MAR 07, 2018. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Connie Tran. FBN Number: 2018‑0000711. Published: April 05, 12, 19, 26, 2018. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: PATHPOINT EMPLOYEES at 315 W. Haley St., Suite 202, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Pathpoint (Same Address). This business is conducted by a Corporation, Signed: Kallie Melkesian. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on MAR 28, 2018. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Connie Tran. FBN Number: 2018‑0000966. Published: April 05, 12, 19, 26, 2018. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: NATURES NOTIONS MEDIA at 4966 La Ramada Drive, Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Calvin Quentin Glosser (Same Address). This business is conducted by an Individual, Signed: Calvin Q. Glosser. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on MAR 30, 2018. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Melissa Mercer. FBN Number: 2018‑0000997. Published: April 05, 12, 19, 26, 2018.

NAME CHANGE IN THE MATTER OF Teresa Murillo ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 18CV00756 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: Teresa Murillo TO: Maria Teresa Zuniga. THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING MAY 09, 2018 9:30 am, Dept 6, Courthouse, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101. A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Published. Mar 15, 22, 29, Apr 5, 2018. IN THE MATTER OF MARISELA GUEVARA ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME CASE NUMBER: 18CV01019 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: Marisela Guevara TO: Kamilla Guevara. THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter

shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must aooear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING MAY 30, 2018 9:30 am, Dept 6, Courthouse, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101. A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Published: Mar 29, Apr 5, 12, 19 2018.

PUBLIC NOTICES CELLCO PARTNERSHIP and its controlled affiliates doing business as Verizon Wireless (Verizon Wireless) is proposing to construct a new telecommunications tower facility located at 1301 Al Tahoe Blvd, South Lake Tahoe, El Dorado County, CA. The new facility will consist of a 115‑foot monopine tower and support equipment. Any interested party wishing to submit comments regarding the potential effects the proposed facility may have on any historic property may do so by sending comments to: Project 6118000852‑JD c/o EBI Consulting, 21 B Street, Burlington, MA 01803, or via telephone at (203) 231‑6643.

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Notice Date: April 5, 2018 NOTICE OF INTENT TO APPROVE Cabrillo Business Park Lot-Line Adjustment April 16, 2018 at 5:00 P.M. Cabrillo Business Park Lot Line Adjustment/Vehicle Trip Allowance Transfer/CEQA Exemption Lots 5, 6, 7, and 9 of Map No. 32,046 Lots South of Navigator Way APNs 073-610-024, -33, -034, 035 Case No. 16-160-LLA-VTA NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Director of Planning and Environmental Review of the City of Goleta intends to take action on a Lot Line Adjustment (LLA), Vehicle Trip Allowance (VTA) and California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) Exemption pursuant to the Cabrillo Business Park (CBP) Specific Plan (City Ord. 13-04), as described below, on April 16, 2018 at 5:00 P.M. Case No. 16-160-LLA-VTA: The project is within the CBP, a 92.25-acre site located at the southwest corner of Hollister Avenue and Los Carneros Road. On May 7, 2007, the City Council approved a Rezone, Development Agreement, Vesting Tentative Map, Development Plan, and Road Naming for the CBP Project. The LLA involves four lots of record, Lots 5, 6, 7, and 9 of Map No. 32,046, totaling 8.426 acres, which was recorded in Book 205, Pages 11-15 of Record Maps in the Office of the Santa Barbara County Recorder on March 15, 2011. The sizes of lots before and after the LLA will maintain the minimum lot area of 1 acre as required by the CBP Specific Plan. All lots are currently vacant at this time. Access to the adjusted Lots 5, 6, 7 and 9 would continue to be provided from Los Carneros Road, Coromar Drive, Discovery Drive, and Navigator Way. Associated with the LLA, the applicant is requesting an administrative approval of VTA transfers of PM Peak Hour Trips (PHTs) between the four subject lots as well as Lot 14. The LLA was filed by Troy White of Dudek, agent, on behalf of Santa Barbara Realty Development, LLC, property owner. ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW FINDINGS: The project is exempt from environmental review pursuant to CEQA Guidelines § 15305 (Minor Alterations in Land Use Limitations). The project site does not have an average slope of greater than 20 percent. The project does not result in any changes in land use or density, as no new structural development is proposed. The project consists of a minor LLA which does not result in the creation of any new parcel. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION: The project plans and associated staff report, findings, conditions of approval, and CEQA exemption may be reviewed at the City of Goleta, Planning and Environmental Review Department, located at 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B, Goleta, CA 93117. Please provide comments to staff, if warranted, before April 16, 2018 to be considered by the Director. The Planning and Environmental Review Department is open from Monday through Thursday from 8:00 a.m. to 4:00 p.m. and on Friday from 8:00 a.m. to noon. For further information please contact Darryl Mimick, Associate Planner, at (805) 961-7572 or via email at dmimick@cityofgoleta.org. APPEALS PROCEDURE: The action of the Director may be appealed to the City of Goleta Planning Commission within ten (10) calendar days following final action. If you challenge the City’s final action in court, you may be limited to raising only those issues you or someone else raised in written or oral testimony and/or evidence provided to Planning and Environmental Review Department prior to final decision-maker action (Government Code § 65009(b)(2)). INDEPENDENT.COM

APRIL 5, 2018

THE INDEPENDENT

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Santa Barbara Independent, 04/05/18  

April 5, 2018, Vol. 32, No. 638

Santa Barbara Independent, 04/05/18  

April 5, 2018, Vol. 32, No. 638