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JAN. 25-FEB. 1, 2018 VOL. 32 ■ NO. 628

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ENTERTAINMENT

cannabis

• #628

' W HE RE S

T H E W E E D?

CANNABIS GOES LEGAL , BUT NO STORES YE T IN S ANTA BARBARA BY KELSEY BRUGGER

SBIFF Kicks Off • Starshine Says # NotMeToo • Muppets Headlining PuppetPalooza INDEPENDENT.COM

JANUARY 25, 2018

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In light of the recent tragic events affecting our entire community, the Santa Barbara Museum of Art is offering free admission through February 28—in the belief that the power of art will provide solace, tranquility of mind, healing, and a source of inspiration going forward. EXHIBITIONS OPENING JANUARY 28:

Brought to Light: Revelatory Photographs in the Santa Barbara Museum of Art Collection Through April 22, 2018

Crosscurrents: The Painted Portrait in America, Britain, and France, 1750–1850 Through May 27, 2018

Crosscurrents: American and European Portrait Photographs, 1840–1900 Through May 27, 2018 Please enter through the Museum Store or Park entrance (near the Library), as State Street entrance is closed. Free admission during February is a gift to our community from Clay Tedeschi and the Charles Bloom Foundation.

For more exhibitions and events, visit www.sbma.net. 1130 State Street, Santa Barbara, CA • Tuesday–Sunday: 11 am–5 pm • Free Thursday Evenings: 5–8 pm

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JANUARY 25, 2018

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Today’s Hottest Young Classical Artists Calidore String Quartet Sun, Feb 11 / 3 PM (note special time) Hahn Hall, Music Academy of the West $35 / $9 UCSB students A Hahn Hall facility fee will be added to each ticket price

“In a scene crowded with excellent young ensembles, the Calidore String Quartet can assert itself with pride.” The New York Times Program

Mendelssohn: String Quartet No. 3 in D Major, op. 44, no. 1 Janáček: String Quartet No. 1 (“Kreutzer Sonata”) Beethoven: String Quartet No. 9 in C Major, op. 59, no. 3 Up Close & Musical Series sponsored in part by Dr. Bob Weinman

Cameron Carpenter featuring the

International Touring Organ Mon, Feb 12 / 7 PM / Granada Theatre Tickets start at $35 / $19 all students (with valid ID) A Granada facility fee will be added to each ticket price

“Carpenter means to drag the organ, along with those who would resist changing it, into the 21st century.” The Wall Street Journal Returning with his monumental self-designed electric instrument, the Juilliard-trained genius combines his “ambition, visual flair, technological savvy, inclusive tastes and bold, boundary-breaking musicianship” (The Wall Street Journal) into a spectacle that leaves the audience as bedazzled as his Swarovski-studded shoes.

For information about a related TLI event visit www.Thematic-Learning.org

The Fab Four of the Classical Music World

Danish String Quartet Fri, Feb 23 / 7 PM / UCSB Campbell Hall Tickets start at $25 / $15 all students (with valid ID) “These Nordic lads possess warmth, wit, a beautiful tone and technical prowess second to none.” NPR Program

Haydn: String Quartet No. 1 in B-flat Major, op. 1, no. 1 Mozart: String Quartet No. 17 in B-flat Major, K. 458 Widmann: Jagdquartett Brahms: String Quartet No. 3 in B-flat Major, op. 67 Event Sponsor: Anonymous Donor

Special Thanks:

(805) 893-3535 Corporate Season Sponsor:

www.ArtsAndLectures.UCSB.edu

Granada event tickets can also be purchased at: (805) 899-2222 | www.GranadaSB.org INDEPENDENT.COM

JANUARY 25, 2018

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Editor in Chief Marianne Partridge Executive Editor Nick Welsh Senior Editors Michelle Drown, Tyler Hayden, Matt Kettmann Editor at Large Ethan Stewart Photography Editor Paul Wellman News Reporters Kelsey Brugger, Keith Hamm Opinions Editor Jean Yamamura Columnists Gail Arnold, Roger Durling, Jerry Roberts, Starshine Roshell

Photos courtesy of Rossignol (Top) Thule (Bottom)

mountainairsports.com

NOW THAT YOU HAVE CONSULTED WITH DR. GOOGLE, COME SEE US FOR A SECOND OPINION!

Executive Arts Editor Charles Donelan Calendar Editor Terry Ortega Arts Writer Richie DeMaria Copy Chief Jackson Friedman Copy Editor Athena Tan Art Directors Ben Ciccati, Caitlin Fitch Digital Editor Brandon A. Yadegari Digital Assistant Chinelo Ufondu Multimedia Interns Adam Cox, Julia Nguyen Sports Editor John Zant Food Writer George Yatchisin Contributors Rob Brezsny, John Dickson, Brandon Fastman, Rebecca Horrigan, Eric HvolbØll, Tom Jacobs, Shannon Kelley, Mitchell Kriegman, Kevin McKiernan, Ninette Paloma, Michael Redmon, Brian Tanguay, Gabriel Tanguay, Tom Tomorrow, Cynthia Carbone Ward, Maggie Yates Editorial Interns Gillian Baldwin, Erika Carlos, Blaze Manzotti Columnist Emeritus Barney Brantingham Founding Staff Emeriti Audrey Berman, George Delmerico, Richard Evans Honorary Consigliere Gary J. Hill Copy Kids Elijah Lee Bryant, Henry and John Poett Campbell, Chloë Bee Ciccati, Izadora and Savina Hamm, Madeline Rose and Mason Carrington Kettmann, Izzy and Maeve McKinley, Miranda Tanguay Ortega, Sawyer Tower Stewart Office Manager/Legal Advertising Tanya Spears Guiliacci Administrative Assistant Gustavo Uribe Accounting Assistant Tobi Feldman Distribution Scott Kaufman Advertising Representatives Camille Cimini Fruin, Suzanne Cloutier, Rachel Gantz, Lynn Goodman, Laszlo Hodosy, Tonea Songer, Brandi Webber Marketing and Promotions Manager Emily Cosentino Production Manager Marianne Kuga Advertising Designers Elaine Madsen, Alex Melton

GET BACK TO YOUR FAMILY, YOUR HOBBIES, AND YOUR LIFE. NATURALLY AND WITHOUT SURGERY.

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The Independent is available, free of charge, limited to one copy per reader. Back issues cost $2 and may be purchased at the office. The Independent may be distributed only by authorized circulation staff or authorized distributors. No person may, without the permission of publisher, take more than one copy of each Independent issue. Subscriptions are available, paid in advance, for $120 per year. Send subscription requests with name and address to subscriptions@independent.com. The contents of the Independent are copyrighted 2018 by the Santa Barbara Independent, Inc. No part may be reproduced without permission from the publisher. The publisher assumes no responsibility for unsolicited material. A stamped, self-addressed envelope must accompany all submissions expected to be returned. The Independent is published every Thursday at 12 E. Figueroa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Advertising rates on request: (805) 965-5205. Classified ads: (805) 965-5208. The Independent is available on the internet at independent.com. Press run of the Independent is 40,000 copies. Audited certification of circulation is available on request. The Independent is a legal adjudicated newspaper — court decree no. 157386.

Contact information: 12 E. Figueroa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101 PHONE (805) 965-5205; FAX (805) 965-5518; CLASSIFIED (805) 965-5208 EMAIL news@independent.com, letters@independent.com Staff email addresses can be found at independent.com/info


Letters / This Modern World  . . . . . . . . . . . . .  19 Voices  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  21

THE WEEK.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 29 LIVING.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 Living Page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 35 Starshine . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37

Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39

23

FOOD & DRINK .. . . . . . . . . . . 41 The Restaurant Guy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47

Dining Out Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49

COVER STORY

Elijah Lee Bryant was welcomed into the world on January 20 at 4:20 a.m. by his proud parents, Brandi Rivera and Victor Bryant. Measuring in at 5 pounds, 12 ounces, and 18 centimeters tall, Elijah arrived eight days before his due date. “No amount of time would have prepared us for the amount of love we feel for this little guy,” said Brandi, who’s also the publisher of the Santa Barbara Independent. She and Victor had decided months ago to name their first-born Elijah, a name that, incidentally, harks back to the prophet born of fire and flood — trials we know all too well. This little guy, however, brightens our world.

BRANDON YADEGARI

Capitol Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  17

KELSEY BRUGGER

BABY LOVE

volume 32, number 628, Jan. 25-Feb. 1, 2018 CAITLIN FITCH

CONTENTS

ONLINE NOW AT

INDEPENDENT.COM

A&E. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 Arts Life  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51 Theater . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53

Classical . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 55

Where’s the Weed?

Reviews . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 56

Cannabis Goes Legal, but No Stores Yet in Santa Barbara

FILM & TV. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59

(Kelsey Brugger)

Feature / Movie Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 59

ON THE COVER: A harvest manager tends to an area cannabis greenhouse. File photo by Paul Wellman.

NEWS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9

ODDS & ENDS. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 18

RECOVERY AND RECKONING

Obituaries  . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  18

Two weeks after the mudslides in Montecito, efforts to rebuild and questions over evacuations

Rob Brezsny’s Free Will Astrology  . . . . . . .  63

OPINIONS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 17 CLASSIFIEDS.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 64

independent.com/montecito-mudslides

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January 22, 2018

Commemorated 45 years

of the Supreme Court’s landmark decision, Roe v. Wade, which affirmed that the constitutional right to privacy includes the right to safely end a pregnancy. Since day one of the current administration, we’ve seen a full-on assault on women’s health and rights, and they’re not letting up. This administration has done everything they can to delay, deny, and defund access to reproductive care, including birth control and abortion. These attacks have only strengthened our resolve. Today, we stand with the majority of Americans who respect an individual’s right to safe and legal abortion. We are raising our voices to say enough is enough. Medical decisions are personal decisions. In 2018, we are watching, we are fighting back, and we will not tolerate attacks on our health or our rights.

We won’t go back. Our Community Partners AAUW Lompoc-Vandenberg Branch

The FUND for Santa Barbara

Santa Barbara Pink Hats Knit Project

CAUSE | Central Coast Alliance United for a Sustainable Economy

Health Care for All - CA, Santa Barbara Chapter

Santa Barbara Rape Crisis Center

League of Women Voters of Santa Barbara

Santa Barbara Women Lawyers

Democratic Club of Santa Maria Valley

Lompoc Valley Democratic Club

Santa Barbara Women’s Political Committee

Democratic Party of Santa Barbara County

Planned Parenthood Generation Action - UCSB

Women’s March Santa Barbara

Democratic Women of Santa Barbara Ruth Ackerman Nancy Alexander Rev. Mark Asman & Bill Wood Carroll & Susanne Barrymore Lexi & Matt Beausoleil Henrietta Bertelsman Ethan Bertrand Leslie Sweem Bhutani Janet Blevins Barbara Bolton LKS Books, LLC E J Borah Eileen Boris BL Borovay & George Relles Lucille Boss Sandy & Bill Boyd Chris & Marell Brooks Mary Ellen Brooks Mary Brown & John Riparetti Laura Capps Lois Capps, Member of Congress (ret.) Congressman Salud Carbajal & Gina Carbajal Alicia Carducci Suzy Cawthon Eloisa Chavez Margaret & Joe Connell Jen Cooper Kim Cowles, Raylene & Jon Crawford Madison Cuneo Roger & Nancy Davidson Danielle De Smeth Susan & Jim Deacon Barbie Deutsch Jill Dexter Dr. Elizabeth Downing & Dr. Peter Hasler Joyce Dudley Barbara Edmison Pat & Chris Ehret Sue Ehrlich Marcia Eichelberger Dorothy Elchoness Darcel Elliott Karen Engberg, MD & Douglas R. Jackson, MD

Luella Engelhart & Dennis Gagnon Susan Epstein, Goleta School Board Member S. Esteban Gina Fischer & Josh Andersen Meganne Forbes Frank & Amanda Frost Camille Cimini Fruin Peter & Bonnie Gerstenfeld Susan Rose & Allan Ghitterman Lisa Giegerich & George Polchin Liora & Cameron Goodman Elsa Granados Jane Gray Kalie Grubb Lisa Guravitz & Mayor Fred Shaw Cheri Gurse & Carol Keator Beth Hamilton Rev. Julia Hamilton Lauren Hanson Gregg Hart Nancy & Larry Harter Supervisor Joan Hartmann Sarah Hearon Richard & Karen Heimberg Cindy Heller Chris & Erin Henson Jesus Herrera Zoe Hinck Caroline Hollister Dr. Beverly Holmes Mary E Howe-Grant, Ph.D. & Peter C. Ford, Ph.D. Joyce Howerton Amanda Hsiung Rob & Vikki Hunt K. Ingraham Martineau Ingraham Hon. Hannah-Beth Jackson & Judge George Eskin Bonnie & Dick Jensen Laura Macker Johnston Joan, Monica & Desmond Jones Deborah Karoff & Anna DiStefano Jane & Randall King Terry Kleid Audrie Krause

Angie Swanson-Kyriaco & James Kyriaco Jr. Elinor & James Langer Kate Lee & Brett Gewirtzman Gary Levin Monique Limón Barbara Lindemann Sheila Lodge Anna M. Lopez Janet Lucy Deborah Longstaff Lynch & Martin Lynch Michal Lynch Christine & Bruce Lyon Sherry & Craig Madsen Sheila Madson & Stefani Golden Peter & Frances Marcuse Carole Marks Frances Shannon Marsh Michelle & Jason McIntosh Marcia Meier & Rob Hunter Ann Micka Julie Mickelberry & Robert Hamm Maricela Morales SB Mayor Cathy Murillo Jennifer Musick, MPH Maddy Myslinski Zahra Nahar-Moore Alex & Ken Palley Mary Beth Parks Mayor Paula Perotte Susan Petrovich Dr. Linda Phillips Beth Pitton-August Christina Pizarro Marguerite Polos Phyllis & Elliot Prager Linda & Thomas Putnam Gail Rappaport Loretta Redd Luz Reyes-Martin Katelyn Rheinschild Hon. Kyle Richards Elena Richardson Jennifer Navarro Rios Carol Rizzo Yolanda Robles Richard & Beth Rogers

Get involved by visiting ppcentralcoastaf.org & follow us on Facebook to keep updated on the latest news and events.

It’s 2018 and we will not stop fighting until every woman and every individual can control their body and their life. 8

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JANUARY 25, 2018

INDEPENDENT.COM

Deborah Rogow & Howard Winant Mary & John Romo Mary Rose Susan Rose & Allan Ghitterman Starshine Roshell Bobbie Ruh Elizabeth Rumelt Molly Russ Sally & Bill Russ Tammy Rutledge Maryan Schall Helene Schneider Dr. Beth Schneider Christina Schowe The Schowe Family Jean K. Schuyler Laura Selken Marian Shapiro Bob & Carole Shapiro Jennifer Smith & Carl Neufeld Terry Smith Kristen Sneddon Lindsay & Ian Soleimani Richard Solomon & Jana Zimmer Gloria Soto Julia & Jerry Springer Judy Stapelmann Melinda Staveley Deborah Steinhoff & Tsuyoshi Hasegawa Catherine Swysen & Robert Sanger Dave & Pam Tambo Gail & David Teton-Landis Jenna & Andrew Tosh Lila Trachtenberg & George Handler Linda A Tuomi Marcos Vargas & Robin Jacobs Carol Vernon & Robert Turbin The Vignocchi-Gallant Family - Tim, Joan, & Liam Margie Weeks & Jack Talbott Toni & Larry Wellen Das Williams Hon. Janet & Harvey Wolf Mary Ellen & Dennis Wylie JoAnne Meade Young & Michael Young Trevor Zierhut


NEWS of the WEEK

JAN. 18-25, 2018

by KELSEY BRUGGER @kelseybrugger, KEITH HAMM, TYLER HAYDEN @TylerHayden1, NICK WELSH, and JEAN YAMAMURA, with INDEPENDENT STAFF

DISASTER

Lost in Translation

NEWS BRIEFS ENVIRONMENT

The State Lands Commission’s $800,000 effort to properly cap Becker Well — a relic oil well that has been leaking onto Summerland Beach for years — has been delayed. The agency had planned on anchoring a barge off Summerland to begin the re-abandonment work this weekend, but water quality remains poor and there’s a large swell in the forecast. The new tentative start date is 2/26.

Mixed Messages Plagued Montecito Disaster Warnings

anta Barbara County officials made great efforts to warn residents of the hazards to life and limb that could result from the predicted January 9 storm. They used exceptionally strong language for government employees—“significant threat,” “critical situation,” “clear and present danger”—to describe how the heavy rains that were forecast to pound the South Coast might trigger flash flooding and mudslides in the Thomas Fire burn scar. Emails, texts, and Facebook messages were sent. Phone calls were made. A press conference was organized. In the end, only 15 percent of residents under mandatory evacuation orders actually left their homes, a startlingly low figure attributed alternately to Thomas Fire evacuation fatigue, a defiance of Mother Nature, or a more general misunderstanding of the awesome power of debris flows. But as we learn more of the circumstances surrounding the deaths of the 21 people confirmed killed in one of the worst disasters in Santa Barbara history, the consistency and accuracy of the official warnings are coming under scrutiny. And as we discover mistakes in the information that authorities disseminated, questions are surfacing as to whether better decisions could have been made. Robert Lewin, director of the county’s Office of Emergency Management (OEM), admitted this week that his department issued conflicting evacuation instructions at 7 p.m. on Sunday, January 7, approximately 30 hours before the storm hit. “Regrettably … I approved a press release and Facebook [post] that had discrepancies with the western boundary of our intended voluntary evacuation area,” he said in a prepared statement. That press release described the voluntary boundaries as Highway 192 to the north, the ocean to the south, Olive Mill Road to the east, and Hot Springs Road to the west. News agencies reported the borders this way, and the Sheriff’s Office posted the same information on its website. However, a map published on the county’s own website included a larger voluntary evacuation zone that extended farther west to Summit Road. The map was accurate, said Lewin; the written description was not. A correction was never issued, and county officials remained unaware of the discrepancy until this Sunday, when reporters inquired about the contradictory information. Fifteen of the 21 Montecito residents who perished in the storm lived in this area — under voluntary evacuation orders, according to the map, but under no evacuation orders whatsoever, according to the county’s official written notification. Two more victims who are still missing and feared dead—17-year-old Jack Cantin and 2-year-

192

IN OR OUT? The county’s written evacuation orders described the western edge of the voluntary zone as Hot Springs Road. However, a map published on the county’s website extended the area farther west to Summit Road. The map was accurate; the written description was not. A correction was never issued. Fifteen of the 21 Montecito residents who perished in the storm — their houses indicated here by black markers — lived in this area of discrepancy. The two people who remain missing (indicated by yellow markers) also lived there.

Tapping public energy during an emergency is the subject of an Environmental Defense Center (EDC) project, which hopes to open the way to volunteers, who appeared in droves after the 2015 Refugio Oil Spill. The effort just got a $7,300 shot in the arm from The Fund for Santa Barbara. Since Refugio, EDC has been looking at weaknesses in emergency preparedness, oil spill response, and community outreach and communications. “Facing new offshore oil leasing threats from the Trump administration and a massive push for new onshore oil drilling in Santa Barbara County,” said Linda Krop, EDC’s chief counsel, “we need to be better prepared for the next inevitable oil spill.”

EDUCATION HOT SPRINGS RD.

Aiming to add another layer of safety and emergency preparedness across its 20 campuses and downtown administrative headquarters, Santa Barbara Unified School District will soon start fielding applications for a newly created management position. Among other duties, the Safety Coordinator will oversee special projects, such as CPR and EpiPen training, for example, and have a hand in all aspects of school safety — from OSHA practices to hazardous-materials disposal — while coordinating emergency preparedness with outside agencies. The application window is expected to open sometime this spring.

CIVIL RIGHTS B R A N D ON YAD E GAR I

S

by Tyler Hayden and Jean Yamamura

old Lydia Sutthithepa—also lived west of Hot Springs Road. Two others lived in the voluntary area described in the January 7 press release. Only four fatalities had lived within the mandatory evacuation borders. The east-west line of Highway 192, below the Thomas Fire burn scar, was used to divide Montecito into two distinct emergency notice regions: Mandatory evacuation orders were issued north of the boundary, and voluntary notices were made below the highway. The 7,000 residents in the mandatory zone were told on January 7 to leave their homes immediately. Sheriff’s deputies went doorto-door the next day to repeat the order. The 23,000 people in the voluntary area were advised to pack their bags, load their cars, and be ready to flee at a moment’s notice. But by the time emergency alerts went out on the night of the storm, it was too late for many to

escape the trains of mud and rock that came crashing through their neighborhoods. The county had never before drawn a flood evacuation map for Montecito, and these evacuation zones were originally developed after the 2009 Jesusita Fire. The Sheriff’s Office, which is responsible for drawing and enforcing emergency-time boundaries, determined it needed a fast way to select easily identifiable areas and the intersections required to keep them closed. “The 192 is the only straight east-west arterial that there was,” said Sheriff Bill Brown in an earlier interview. “Everything else was a winding spaghetti of neighborhood streets.” As a result, the Montecito zones were not drawn to follow the downstream flow of creek channels. In the same January 7 press release, however, Gaviota and Goleta residents living below the Whittier Fire burn scar, along creek channels and canyons, were given mandatory

The history of Pacific Pride Foundation will be archived at the UCSB Library’s Special Research Collections, to preserve and give access to documents capturing Santa Barbara’s gay rights movement. Calling Pacific Pride’s record rich, powerful, and emotional, Executive Director Colette Schabram said her foundation “has been instrumental in the fight against HIV/AIDS, in the struggle for marriage equality, and a leader in dignity and equality for lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and queer people in our community for over 40 years.” UCSB archivist Zak Liebhaber continues to search for records such as press clippings, newsletters, scrapbooks, board minutes, administrative files, correspondence, event and subject files, audiovisual material, and photographs for the collection.

COUNTY A day before a highly anticipated Planning Commission hearing on cannabis, a new 3rd District commissioner was appointed to the seat. John Parke, an attorney who specializes in land-use and trust matters, has lived his entire life in Santa Barbara. He replaces Cerene St. John, who had a

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JANUARY 25, 2018

CONT’D ON PAGE 10 

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21st Mudflow Victim Found W

ith the discovery of Faviola Benitez Calderon’s body on January 20, the death toll inflicted by Montecito’s January 9 avalanche of mud and boulders HASS AVOCADOS has risen to 21. With two persons GOLETA still missing, it’s sure to hit 23. Ave 5757 Hollister Governor In Sacramento, Jerry Brown declared Monday ea. Mahatma 2# a Day of Remembrance and ordered flags flown at half-staff. Among the dead, the governor ROMA TOMATOES noted, were a 3-year-old and an 89-year-old celebrating his NOT FORGOTTEN: Faviola Benitez Calderon and her son Jonathan lb. birthday. Two families lost at least died in the mudflow. lb. three members. Victims, he said, 7# included a teacher, a surgeon, a scoutmaster, organization CAUSE (Central Coast Alliance United for a Sustainable Economy). “Ten and a Korean War veteran. CANTALOUPES Calderon was a 28-year-old mother thousand people lived in Montecito. Many of two and immigrant from Mexico who of these people had maids, housekeepers, worked as a housekeeper and nanny. Her nannies, gardeners, and personal assistants, lb. 10-year-old son, Jonathan, also died; her and many of them were undocumented,” ea. El Pato 7 oz.husband, Victor, who runs a landscaping Zucker said. “As such, they’re not eligible business, and her 2-year-old son, Ian, for FEMA assistance.” CROWN BROCCOLI To fill this gap,  CAUSE  and two managed to survive and are reportedly recuperating at Cottage Hospital. other Central Coast immigrant rights Calderon was described as “a bright light” organizations have just launched  805 lb. by her neighbor Lori Ann Lieberman. “She UndocuFund (805undocufund.org), modeled Folgers 8 oz. was wonderful, kind, gentle, a great cook, a after a similar venture that emerged to lb. gracious hostess, and always had a twinkle provide assistance to undocumented D'ANJOU PEARS in her eye,” recalled Cassie Neumann, whose workers in Northern California in the wake Houston-based family spent the past three of October’s deadly Tubbs Fire. Backing this summers living next to Calderon and her effort with $100,000 in startup seed money extended family. “Our doors were always is Direct Relief. lb. open. Her kids played with my kids. There Suzanne Grimmesey of County Springfield 15 was oz. always GOLETAa basketball hoop in the cul-de- Behavioral Wellness said the Local Recovery Avewere either there or on the and Assistance Center that opened last week 5757 Hollister BROWN ONIONS sac, and the kids lb. trampoline in her yard,” said Neumann.“She — a one-stop-shopping space located in Mahatma 2# Calvary Chapel on Calle César Chávez to was always giving the kids Popsicles.” While Montecito is overwhelmingly connect those in need with the multitude lbs. 99— 92 percent according to the 2010 of state, local, and federal agencies — has $ white lb. census—nearly half the debris-flow victims been taking pains to create a safe space Springfield 8 oz. JIF (16 oz.) were immigrants. And for immigrant for immigrants, regardless of legality. 7# families seeking relief, that’s a serious issue, “FEMA  doesn’t ask about your status,” PEANUT BUTTER said Lucas Zucker with the immigrant rights Grimmesey said. —Nick Welsh lb.

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Campbell had resigned, Chamber of Commerce President Ken Oplinger announced he’d been hospitalized after suffering a heart attack. Minute Maid 59 oz. Oplinger has since been released from St. John’s Medical Center in Oxnard and said he GOLETA 89 $ expects to Hollister be back at Avethe job in a couple of 5757 days. Campbell’s relations with City Hall had Mahatma 2# long been fraught. She was vocal in expressing LONG GRAIN RICE concern that not enough police resources were ¢ 99 $ deployed to deal with aggressive panhandlers; lb. councilmembers, in turn, worried Campbell

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family emergency out of the area, said 3rd District Supervisor Joan Hartmann at a prior meeting. A past member of the Historic Landmarks AdviCommission, Parke said in a statement he 89 $ sory believes agriculture “has proven to be the most constant part of the County’s economy and most Springfield 15 oz. valuable component of our quality of life.” Folgers 8 oz.

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was scaring shoppers away from downtown by accentuating the negative rather than the possible. Campbell couldn’t be reached for comment. Members of the DO board, fearful of possible litigation, explained only, “This is an unresolved personnel matter and we can’t discuss it.” Boardmember Dave Lombardi leads the DO in the interim. Women’s Economic Ventures (WEV) has established a website (relief.wevonline.org/biz disasterrecovery) that collects resource information for businesses, nonprofits, and individuals suffering the aftereffects of the Thomas Fire and subsequent flood. Among the listings are Small Business Administration low-interest disaster loans, WEV’s own loan program, insurance and unemployment help, and where to get updates and advice in English and Spanish. Also, Santa Barbaran Joan Sanger has organized a website (disasterassistmatch.com) for honor-system entries on housing offered or needed, transportan tion, support, errands, and more.


PAU L WELLM AN PHOTOS

NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D MUDFLOW

Open Hearts. Helping Hands. As we all continue to recover from the aftermath of fires, destructive floods and mudslides, GranVida shares its heart with each of you.

ROCKPILE: Heavy equipment works to clear the Cold Spring debris basin, filled by an epic 200-year burst of rain.

From the Fire into the Surf How Montecito Mud Winds Up at Goleta Beach

A

by Melinda Burns

whiff of charred wood comes off the piles of black mud that are dumped daily into the ocean at Goleta Beach State Park, part of the cleanup of Montecito in the wake of the catastrophic January 9 debris flow. It’s mud from the Thomas Fire burn area in the mountains behind the community, and, according to Seth Shank, a senior environmental planner with County Flood Control, it will look like beach sand within 24 hours. “Beach nourishment, that’s what we call it,” he said, noting that there is now a strip of sand at high tide where there had been none in recent years.“You can smell the fire, but it’s really beach-compatible — coarse-grained and sandy without a lot of clay.” The beach may be coming back, but the water’s unhealthy. Swimming and surfing are off-limits at Goleta Beach, Arroyo Burro Beach, Carpinteria State Beach, El Capitan State Beach, Hope Ranch Beach, Leadbetter Beach, Summerland Beach, and Hammond’s Beach because of high levels of bacteria in the water, County Public Health officials said on Wednesday. The county is conducting weekly ocean water sampling along the coast. Since January 11, Shank said, County Public Works crews have dumped between 10,000 and 13,000 cubic yards of mud at Goleta Beach, averaging about 100 truckloads per day. That’s less than the 15,000 cubic yards that were dumped on the beach after a routine cleanup in the Goleta Slough last fall, he said. During the very wet winter of 1995, by comparison, 500,000 cubic yards of mud from the slough were deposited onto Goleta Beach, Shank said. East of Montecito, the sand and silt that poured into the Carpinteria Salt Marsh Reserve from Franklin and Santa Monica creeks on January 9 is being dredged out and dumped into the ocean at Ash Avenue — more than 14,000 cubic yards to date. “Out of an abundance of caution,” a Public Health press release said, the public is barred from walking within 400 feet of the dumping zone there and at Goleta Beach. This week, Shank said, the county began taking random samples of mud from dump

At GranVida Senior Living, we were fortunate to be spared the losses that many of our friends and neighbors in Santa Barbara County have suffered. We opened our doors to victims of the Thomas Fire when their homes were in danger. And while the fires are extinguished, and the rains have subsided, we know there are still many friends and neighbors in need of a warm meal or a shoulder to lean on. GranVida Senior Living is proud to open our heart and our hands to those who still need it most. We welcome you into our home—together, we will rise above. In these moments, we are committed more than ever to providing a great life in our small town.

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MUDDY BOOTS: Lt. General Todd Semonite, who commands the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, toured Montecito’s devastation.

trucks at Goleta Beach and Ash Avenue. The samples are sent to a lab in Santa Maria to be tested for toxins, including heavy metals, gasoline, and polychlorinated biphenyls, or hazardous chemicals that were formerly used in electrical transformers. Testing will be performed at both locations at least once a week as the cleanup continues, Shank said. Tests of mud samples taken in Montecito on January 13-14 by a consulting firm for the county have detected levels of two substances — fecal bacteria from untreated sewage and chemicals found in gasoline and motor oil — that could pose a health risk to cleanup workers. Workers have been advised to wear rubber boots and nitrile gloves and wash their hands often. All dump trucks carrying mud and debris from Montecito must travel first to the Ventura County Fairgrounds, where their loads are sorted into piles of mud, rocks, metal, and woody debris. At Goleta Beach, Shank said, truckloads of mud containing too much trash are turned away. After a load is dumped, bulldozers spread it out on a portion of beach near the upper parking lots. County workers pick out pieces of scorched trees and other debris and throw them into a dumpster. Occasionally, they have found personal effects, Shank said CONT’D ON PAGE 14 

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JANUARY 25, 2018

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PAU L WELLM AN

JAN. 18-25, 2018

BUSINESS

EARN A CSU DEGREE In Santa Barbara BS Business BA Psychology

SEEING GREEN: Supervisor Steve Lavagnino exulted after the board agreed to a menu of cannabis taxes expected to generate $20 million to $40 million.

City and County Talk Pot Taxes

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by Kelsey Brugger and Nick Welsh

fter a successful lobbying effort by the cannabis industry, the Santa Barbara County supervisors voted 4-1 to place a cannabis tax structure on the June ballot that is considerably lower than previously discussed. The decision means county voters must decide whether or not to approve a one percent to 6 percent tax on gross receipts at each step of the supply chain. In total, the county tax could not exceed 8 percent. (Cumulatively, county and state taxes are not expected to exceed 30 percent.)

houses are already occupied, particularly by winemakers. County Supervisor Das Williams quipped, “Maybe it will ease off the pressure we are feeling in Carpinteria.” Williams stressed a reasonable tax rate would pay for county regulators to go after unlicensed operators. A public speaker capped in a purple visor that read “Tepusquet Crisis Committee” agreed. The committee formed to address the drought but transitioned to fight cannabis in their neighborhood. The tax measure could function as a referendum on the county’s proposed ordinance. The county supervisors disagreed

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This translates to $20 million to $40 million in county tax revenue, according to County Supervisor Steve Lavagnino, at a time when local governments throughout California are struggling with high employee pension costs. Santa Barbara County has a roughly $27 million deficit. A chunk of the tax revenue would fund at least 20 new county staff positions for law enforcement and drug treatment. On Tuesday during a four-hour discussion, County Supervisor Janet Wolf raised concerns about land-use and health impacts. “The whole process has been rolling along,” she lamented, adding,“I think we are giving the industry a lot.” The supervisors also expressed concern that they could lose out on tax revenue from cannabis operators who choose to do business in the City of Lompoc, where councilmembers have indicated they do not plan to tax or restrict the industry at all. Wolf, however, noted, “We’re never going to be able to compete with a place like Lompoc.” In any case, Lompoc has a limited availability of real estate. State law restricts cannabis producers from being within 600 feet of a school, wiping out a number of desirable locations. In addition, many ware-

about whether to place a general or special tax on the ballot. A simple majority is all that is required for a general tax while twothirds is needed for a special tax. A special tax would require the supervisors to specify exactly how the money would be spent.

M

eanwhile, members of the Santa Barbara City Council found themselves dancing with two left feet when it came to figuring out how much to tax the burgeoning pot industry as well as how big they wanted that industry to get. Deliberations were anything but pretty, and the council — still missing a key seventh vote — found itself deadlocked along factional lines more than few times. Mayor Cathy Murillo and councilmembers Gregg Hart and Eric Friedman all wanted to reduce the amount of time it will take the new adult recreational dispensaries to get up and operating while in the same breath reducing the tax bite imposed on new operations from what city bean counters had proposed. On the other side were councilmembers Jason Dominguez, Randy Rowse, and Kristen Sneddon. They successfully blocked efforts to accelerate the review and approval process; they also got CONT’D ON PAGE 16 

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JANUARY 25, 2018

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NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D

Westside Council Seat to Go to Voters; Deadlocks Guaranteed

A

PAU L WELLM AN

controversial proposal to build a high-density, threestory, 23-unit apartment complex at the corner of De la Guerra and Santa Barbara streets squeaked through the Santa Barbara City Council Tuesday night on a 3-3 tie. Technically, the vote was whether to uphold an appeal of the project, which had been narrowly approved by the Historic Landmarks WTF: Councilmember Randy Rowse can’t believe the vacant council Commission. Under council seat won’t be filled until a June election. rules, the tie vote meant the previous approval stood. For the new smaller, high-density rentals catering to council, the deadlock vote underscored people making 120 percent of area median the imperative to secure a seventh voting income. Neighbors came out in force, member. That won’t happen, however, until objecting the project doesn’t provide enough parking spaces and is too big and out of this June. The council voted 5-1 to fill the vacancy character with its surroundings. New councilmember Eric Friedman left by former 3rd District councilmember Cathy Murillo’s mayoral win by holding an cast the last ballot in favor of the project election, which will take place five months —and against the appeal—but not before hence. In so doing, the council opted to delivering an anguished monologue. “I have ignore the advice of City Attorney Ariel to make a bet against someone who may be Calonne, who insisted the city charter bluffing,” he said, referring to the developer’s dictated they appoint Murillo’s successor on option to build condos instead. “I just can’t.” the council. District election advocates have Councilmember Jason Dominguez, who disagreed, threatening to sue unless the fate opposed the proposal, said no one has built of the largest minority-majority district in luxury condos in seven years.Councilmember the city is resolved by election. Gregg Hart disagreed, pointing out such Assuming this decision stands, the condos were currently under construction council—split into two even camps—could on outer State Street. Mayor Murillo said even experience chronic deadlock. In the case of though she wanted to dislike the project and the proposed housing project — in which wanted people in the room to like her, she had issues of density and affordability compete to vote against the appeal. “This is one of the with neighborhood compatibility — the worst appeals I’ve ever seen,” she said. After developer already has permits to build six the council deadlocked, she stated, “We did luxury condos, but would prefer to build our job.” —Nick Welsh

S.B. Applicants Re-up for DACA

H

omeland Security is once again accepting renewal applications from those in the DACA (Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals) program, which had stopped when President Trump canceled it in September 2017. At the time, Trump said Congress should pass a law to replace DACA before its protections began to end in March. Since no such provision was included in the recent spending bill, Democratic senators initially refused to vote for it, thus shutting down the government for about 64 hours. Senate leader Mitch McConnell then made a stronger promise to debate DACA by mid-February. The short-term bill, which expires February 8, passed the Senate 81-18. California senators Dianne Feinstein and Kamala Harris voted against it because it did not include DACA guarantees. After passing the House, the president signed it Monday night, tweeting, “Democrats cave on Shutdown.” “Honestly, who knows what’s going on in Washington,” said Diane Martinez at Immigrant Hope, a DACA support organization that is working to make sure current participants know that renewals, due every two

years, are possible again. After Trump terminated the program, California Attorney General Xavier Becerra and several others sued to stop Trump’s executive order. When a federal district court ruled DACA would continue while the suit progressed, the program was restored last week. The administration says it will approach the Supreme Court. DACA applicants were brought across the border as children illegally. Most know no other country or culture but the United States. President Barack Obama created the program by executive order in 2012 after Republicans fought against the 2001 DREAM (Development, Relief, and Education for Alien Minors) Act and all the successive legislative attempts. The Dreamers’ protected status can be revoked at any time, and if arrested, they could face deportation. “Those who are now able to reapply are very relieved,” Martinez said. Immigrant Hope and Importa are Santa Barbara’s two agencies authorized by the Department of Justice to work with DACA applicants. Importa also has an office in Lompoc. —Jean Yamamura

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JAN. 18-25, 2018 PAU L WELLM AN

The Historic Mausoleum at Old Mission Santa Barbara

MUDFLOW CONT’D FROM P. 11

Sacred ˜ Historic ˜ Serene Columbarium Niches for the Inurnment of Cremated Remains JOURNEY’S END: Truckloads from Montecito arrive at a quarry near Buellton.

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— photographs, notebooks, even a china plate—which are saved in hopes of locating the owners. As the cleanup proceeds, county officials said, Montecito roads and culverts are expected to be largely cleared by January 31. Some repairs will take longer, including restoration of the arched bridge at Ashley Road and Highway 192, where the mudflow left a mark 12 feet high on the surrounding trees. (Dramatic drone videos show the bridge before-and-after view at the county’s Facebook page.) The creeks below the Thomas Fire burn area have been cleared so that water can flow down them, said Tom Fayram, deputy director of County Public Works. But the masses

of rock and mud that were scooped out and dumped along the banks must still be removed, and that’s potentially a job for the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers, he said. It will take at least another month, according to Fayram, for the Army Corps to finish cleaning out the 11 debris basins that act as safety checks on the creeks. In the San Ysidro Creek basin, he said, the rocks and debris were piled up 30-40 feet above the rim. Overall, only 40,000 cubic yards of mud, rocks, and dead trees, or 10 percent of the 400,000 cubic yards that dropped into the basins on January 9, have been removed, Fayram said: “It’s indescribable what happened out there.” n

C

Dreamland: America’s Opiate Epidemic and How We Got Here SAM QUINONES Los Angeles-based freelance journalist and author of Dreamland: The True Tale of America’s Opiate Epidemic, winner of the National Book Critics Circle Award for Best Nonfiction Book of 2015 THURSDAY, FEBRUARY 1 | 4:00 PM

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Free and open to the public. Visit www.ihc.ucsb.edu or call (805) 893-2004 for more information. 14

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JANUARY 25, 2018

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altrans workers finally got the better of the debris choking Highway 101 after two weeks of struggle, opening the freeway to traffic as of Sunday at noon. The effort involved 350 workers — state and private contractors—working around the clock with countless trucks, big rigs, and excavators to haul off 105,000 cubic yards of muck, all at a cost of $12 million. About 95,000 motorists use this stretch of road a day, and for 15,000 Ventura County residents, it’s how they get to their jobs in Santa Barbara. For employers large and small, it’s been a significant hardship. UCSB was forced to make do without about 250 workers, while Cottage Hospital put up as many as 200 in area hotels. In the meantime, the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers signified the seriousness with which it’s treating the disaster by dispatching its top commander, Lt. General Todd Semonite, to Santa Barbara last week for a quick tour and press conference. Overflowing with executive energy, Semonite and the Corps are focused on clearing out the 11 debris basins built in the 1960s to protect the South Coast from flood-born mayhem. Should another storm hit, Santa Barbara’s backcountry — scalped and scoured by the Thomas Fire—poses a serious risk to downstream residents.

PAU L WE LLM A N

101 Back in Business

According to Semonite, who was dressed in camo fatigues, about 70 Army Corps staff have been assigned to the task, and that doesn’t count the contractors hired. They’re hauling boulders and other storm-swept debris away at a rate of 500 truckloads a day. According to County Flood Control czar Tom Fayram, that’s 40,000 cubic yards that have been extricated from local catch basins and creek channels. None of that, insisted Semonite, is being dumped at area beaches. Instead, he said, it’s being hauled to a quarry in Buellton, where it’s dumped and sorted. Huddling with Fayram and County Public Works manager Scott McGolpin after a press conference at Earl Warren Showgrounds, Semonite asked that they review the catch basins for possible changes. If none were feasible, he suggested emergency evacuation loudspeakers might be erected to improve the response time of citizens seeking to evacuate. —Nick Welsh


CAITLI N F ITC H

NEWS of the WEEK CONT’D

America’s Premier Jewelry & Bead Faires

GEM FAIRE FEBRUARY

SOLIDARITY: The Women’s March turned into the Women’s Rally when police informed organizers so many officers were working the Montecito recovery that they couldn’t barricade streets for a march.

16, 17, 18

Thousands Rally Against Trump

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early 3,500 people turned out for Santa Barbara’s Women’s March on Saturday, said organizer Michal Lynch, filling De la Guerra Plaza and waving homemade signs. One read, “Grab them by the midterms,” and another quoted Martin Luther King Jr.: “Injustice anywhere is a threat to justice everywhere.” The upbeat rally kicked off with cheers as City Fire Truck 1 drove along De la Guerra Street and many danced along with Janet Reineck and her World Dance troupe. Sojourner Kincaid Rolle swung into her poem “I Am That Woman.” A group of Chumash women offered a prayer, burning sage and tobacco. Though Lynch had originally stated there would be no politicians, both recently elected Santa Barbara City Mayor Cathy Murillo and Goleta School Boardmember Susan Epstein, who is running for the 2nd District supervisorial seat, spoke aptly on getting women into politics. Two who applied to be appointed to Murillo’s 3rd District council seat, Laura Smith, with the reSisters Choir, and Chel-

sea Lancaster, with El Centro, also appeared at the rally. As the gathering extended into a second hour, a couple dozen people, impatient with being unable to march, started an impromptu walk down State Street, shouting, “This is how democracy looks.” They missed much-cheered exhortations on social justice, immigration, sex identification, incarceration, slavery, human trafficking, the obligations of the cis-terhood, Santa Barbara’s history of native repression, Halloween in Isla Vista, and “an overwhelming police presence” by speakers from Planned Parenthood, the American Civil Liberties Union, and Black Lives Matter; an eloquent anarchist; and about a dozen more. With speeches increasingly delivered in angry shouts — one young woman yelled about global injustice, climate change, the devastation in Montecito, and surviving the massive Typhoon Haiyan of 2013—the crowd began to melt away, but organizer Lynch felt optimistic, saying she was glad to have voices that were seldom heard.

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General Michael Hayden

—Jean Yamamura

DISASTER WARNINGS CONT’D FROM P. 9 evacuation alerts. Tecolote, Eagle, Dos Pueblos, and Gato canyons were all in the mandatory zone. No voluntary warnings were issued. Once again, there was a discrepancy between the written press release and the county’s official map for the Gaviota and Goleta area. This time, the wording was right and the map was wrong. Independent reporters alerted authorities to the error on the evening of January 7, and OEM officials corrected the map soon after. While Gaviota and Goleta were spared the storm’s wrath, Montecito felt its full force. At a press conference this Sunday, January 21, Brown claimed that only six Montecito victims lived in the voluntary area, while 11 lived “right on the border,” as outlined on the January 9 map. Those 11 fatalities, however, had lived on the south side of the 192, which that same map clearly described as the voluntary zone. The debris-flow devastation that ran downhill and blasted through the 192 was concentrated along Montecito, San Ysidro, and Romero creeks, with Montecito Creek

hit hardest. The paths of destruction down to the ocean closely mirrored historical surveys of the same geological events and were nearly identical to FEMA’s current floodzone charts, but the county did not use any of these to draft its evacuation map. The north-south routes also followed the same drainage channels highlighted in another map presented by county floodcontrol managers during an earlier, January 5, press conference. Bold swatches of red (for the burn scar) and blue (for the flood routes) previewed the impacts of a 100- or 500-year storm. Thick blue lines stretched down from the mountains, then pooled together between Fernald Point and Butterfly Beach as hypothetical mudslides clogged bridges and overwhelmed catch basins, spilling debris into neighborhoods—the exact scenario that played out in the dreadful morning hours of January 9. The flood map was published on January 5 on the county’s website. It allowed residents to enter their address and determine if they lived in a danger zone. But two days later, on January 7, the county’s OEM replaced

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JANUARY 25, 2018

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CONT’D

CANNABIS TAX CONT’D FROM P. 12

DISASTER WARNINGS CONT’D FROM P.15

the number of recreational retail outlets City Hall would allow reduced from five — approved late last year — to three. That’s in addition to a maximum of three allowed medical dispensaries. (Of those, none are currently in operation.) Ironically, a very large cannabis operator headquartered in Santa Barbara — Canndescent — argued as well that the number of retail outlets should be reduced; if the market gets oversaturated, representatives predicted, there would be a “race to the bottom” in the weed trade. City Hall bean counters initially proposed imposing a 6 percent tax on retail operations and 6 percent, too, on manufacturing operations. Because county supervisors voted Tuesday to drop the manufacturing tax to 3 percent (from 6 percent), Hart argued the city should do likewise or risk losing the lucrative manufacturing business. After considerable back and forth, the council agreed to reduce the taxes on manufacturing, but to maintain the 6 percent tax on retail. In both deliberations, it was council newcomer Sneddon who made the successful motion and also provided the key swing vote to secure the majority needed. By meeting’s end, it was clear to all that the brave new world of legalized recreational pot was still many moons away within city limits. As cannabis entrepreneur Graham Farrar lamented, the net effect of all the city’s rules and regulations was the same as an outright ban. “We’re looking at 2019 before any shops are open,” he complained. Retail applications are due no later than March 20 and will be rated competitively. Final n selection is scheduled for May 20.

that flood map with their evacuation map, which did not display predicted flood paths. Lewin said later he thought making both maps available would confuse residents. In the days leading up to the storm, forecasters said the flood risk was 10 times greater than in a normal year. But they later said they could never have anticipated the record-breaking downpour or the massive size of the debris flows that followed.“The expectation was that rainfall of one inch per hour could kick something loose, but that it wouldn’t go very far,” said Kevin Cooper, a biologist with the U.S. Forest Service, who consulted on the evacuation map.“As slopes lessen, the debris drops out. For something to push all the way out to the ocean like it did, it had to be an extraordinary event.” By the end, Montecito received about 3.3 inches of rain. Of that, a half inch fell within five minutes. According to county records, it was a 200-year event. Some of the victims were dragged more than a mile from their homes. Brown said recovery teams continue to comb the area for the remains of Cantin and Sutthithepa.“It’s very possible that they could be underneath a significant amount of mud that is drying and has to be removed,” he said.“It’s possible one or more of them could have been swept out to sea.” In the days immediately following the disaster, Brown dismissed questions about the adequacy of the evacuation orders. He said trying to identify where in the evacuation zones victims lived and where the majority of the damage was concentrated was “splitting hairs” and a disservice to first responders, whose heroic efforts remain undisputed. In the days before the storm arrived, Lewin continually stressed that all Montecito residents needed to take personal responsibility for their own safety. Sign up for the county’s alerts, he urged. Check the map. Make a plan.“But unfortunately, unlike in the fire, where we could merely say to evacuate ahead of time, sometimes evacuation isn’t the best choice,” he said during the

B R AN DON YADEGAR I

NEWS of the WEEK

DEVASTATION: The four-times-stronger-than-expected storm that hit Montecito on January 9 cost 21 people their lives.

January 5 press conference.“Sometimes the best thing for people to do is to go to their neighbor’s home that’s on high ground to get out of harm’s way. Sometimes the best action is to merely shelter in place.” At 2:46 a.m. on the night of the storm, as the hills started to slide, OEM sent a flash-flood cell-phone alert to Montecito residents registered with the county’s digital emergency notification Aware & Prepare program, saying: “GO TO HIGH GROUND.” Recipients have since complained the directive was unclear. While some interpreted it to mean run outside and head uphill, Eric Boldt, a National Weather Service warning coordination meteorologist in Oxnard, explained such messages in flash-flood situations actually mean stay put. “Go to the highest part of your house,” he said,“an attic or even a countertop.” It makes little sense to try and outrun a debris flow, he went on.“It’s better to evacuate before the storm starts.” Records show that approximately 41,000 Santa Barbara County residents — or just above 10 percent of the total population — have opted into the Aware & Prepare program. Lewin couldn’t say how many of them lived in Montecito. n

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JANUARY 25, 2018

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Opinions

CONT’D

capitol letters

Unintended Consequences In ‘Dump Trump’ Climate, Democrats Flock to Run for Congress — Which May Help GOP

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t first glance, the surprise retirements of two entrenched and embattled Southern California Republican Congress members is terrific news for Democrats, in their desperate bid to seize control of the House in November’s midterm elections. Well, watch what you wish for, Dems. Quick update for those who’ve been focused on more existential matters of fire

directly to Trump, in a field packed with Democrats. A notable example of the kind of Republican profile that could prevail despite anti-Trump sentiment: Assemblymember Rocky Chávez, whose relatively moderate positions on taxes, immigration, and offshore drilling depart from those of our 46 percent 45th president, and who wasted no

It would be a cruel irony if Democrats fail in November because of an abundance of enthusiasm within their party. and flood: In recent weeks, Donald Trump’s overwhelming unpopularity in California inspired representatives Darrell Issa and Ed Royce, a pair of routinely reelected fixtures amid the state’s Republican small congressional delegation, to call it quits. Both longtime incumbents, from San Diego and Orange County, were key targets in an aggressive national Democratic strategy to land the House by ousting GOP members in districts Hillary Clinton won in 2016. In a political paradox, however, California’s top-two primary rules now may make it less likely that Democrats will prevail for the seats. Because so many galvanized party wannabes are signing up to run, chances now increase that newly minted Republicans could finish one-two in the primaries, freezing the Dems out come fall runoffs. “Prior to the retirement announcements, Democrats have been pounding for months on Royce and Issa, yoking the two vulnerable Republicans to a president loathed in this heavily Democratic state,” noted the redoubtable political reporter David Siders.“But with no GOP incumbent in either race—and with Democratic candidates threatening to splinter their party’s share of the vote—Democrats now face the prospect of getting scrubbed entirely from the November ballot.” So motivated are Democrats by their contempt for Trump (66-to-30 percent disapproval in a recent UC Berkeley poll) and his radical right-wing policies, in fact, that nearly 70 party contenders are campaigning in the 14 GOP-held districts in the state — dozens more than ran for those seats in the past three congressional elections combined. In Royce’s 39th District alone, seven viable Democrats are battling each other for party voters, while four already are seeking Issa’s seat in the 49th. Although Clinton defeated Trump in presidential balloting in the districts, Republicans maintain an edge in voter registration—a natural advantage for nonincumbent local GOP candidates not tied

time filing for Issa’s seat about 12 seconds after the nine-term incumbent called it quits. Not only the seats of Issa and Royce but also those of five other pro-Clinton Republican House members in Orange County and the Central Valley are critical to Dem hopes of flipping 24 GOP seats nationally to win the House—and a fragment of Beltway power. In midterm elections, Democratic performance often wanes because of low turnout by their voters, compared to the GOP. It would be a cruel irony if Democrats fail in November because of an abundance of enthusiasm within their party. Election updates. The top-two primary may hinder Dems in some local races, but it doesn’t hurt at all in statewide contests. Two party worthies, Lieutenant Governor Gavin Newsom and former L.A. mayor Antonio Villaraigosa, according to both Berkeley’s Institute of Governmental Studies poll and the Public Policy Institute of California survey, are running well ahead of Republican contenders John Cox and Travis Allen, the latter of whom hold single-digit percentages among likely voters. This sets up scenarios for an allDemocrat runoff in November between Newsom, campaigning as the tribune of the party’s left wing, and the more pro-business Villaraigosa, who’s urging Latinos to make history by electing him. In the U.S. Senate race, Dianne Feinstein holds a comfortable lead over State Senate President Kevin de León. He hopes to capitalize on anti-Trump fever, portraying the moderate incumbent as wishy-washy. However, his institutional connections to Sacramento’s simmering sex harassment scandal will make it tougher to challenge a pioneering woman pol in a #MeToo election year. —Jerry Roberts

Health Education Classes FEBRUARY 2018 Sansum Clinic’s unified, patient-first approach to healthcare is built around you. We provide health education programs at low or no-cost to the community. Learn more at www.SansumClinic.org.

Special Upcoming Program STRESS MANAGEMENT Simple strategies to minimize the effect of stress. Join us to discuss ways to relax, improve communication, sleep well and find more joy in every day. This entertaining and information packed workshop is presented by Jay Winner, MD. 3-part program meets March 5, 12 & 19 from 6:00 to 8:00 pm. Free of charge & open to the community. Space is limited. Registration is required in advance. To RSVP call (866) 829-0909 or visit Calendar.SansumClinic.org ADVANCE DIRECTIVES WORKSHOP Santa Barbara (Free) Mon 2/12 10:00 am – 12:00 Noon Lompoc (Free) Wed 2/7 10:00 am – 12:00 Noon BALANCE & MOBILITY Santa Barbara ($40) Tues 2/6 Weekly thru 2/27 10:00 – 11:00 am BARIATRIC SURGERY ORIENTATION Santa Barbara (Free) Mon 2/12 5:45 pm DIABETES & PRE-DIABETES BASICS Santa Barbara ($15) This is a 3-day program Wed 2/14, 2/21 & 2/28 5:15 – 6:45 pm

DIABETES & PRE-DIABETES BASICS Lompoc ($15) This is a 2-day program Thurs 2/8 & 2/15 5:30 – 7:00 pm HEALTHY PEOPLE, HEALTHY TRAILS Santa Barbara (Free) See HealthyPeople HealthyTrails.org to find easy walks MEDICARE Santa Barbara (Free) Tues 2/20 10:00 am – 12:00 Noon NUTRITION FOR A HEALTHY HEART Santa Barbara ($10) Wed 2/28 5:15 – 6:45 pm

NUTRITION NAVIGATOR Santa Barbara (Free) Wed 2/7 5:15 – 6:45 pm UNDERSTANDING DEMENTIA Santa Barbara (Free) Thurs 2/15 4:30 – 6:00 pm WOMENHEART Santa Barbara (Free) Mon 2/12 4:30 – 6:00 pm

Health Resource Center Visit or call for answers to your health questions. Free of charge & open to the community. 215 Pesetas Lane Santa Barbara (805) 681-7672

CANCER CENTER ONCOLOGY PATIENT SUPPORT PROGRAMS • • • •

Nutrition, exercise, education, support groups, art and more. Resource Library to answer your questions. Open to cancer patients and caregivers in the community. Free of charge.

Visit www.calendar.ridleytreecc.org.

Register Online! For a complete schedule and detailed descriptions of all our Health and Wellness Programs and Events or to register online: https://sansumclinic.org/health-wellness/classes-events Or call toll-free (866) 829-0909 INDEPENDENT.COM

JANUARY 25, 2018

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obituaries

To submit obituaries for publication, please call (805) 965-5205 or email obits@independent.com

Betsy H. Green

08/26/25-01/02/18

Betsy made her entrance in Buffalo and lived here and there, each move an improvement in climate and scenery. Seattle had the University of Washington, skiing, wild mountain blackberries, and William J. Green. That sufficed until she and Bill visited Santa Barbara in 1964. They relocated within a matter of weeks, two kids in tow. On January 2, 2018, at the age of 92, Betsy made her exit in Santa Barbara, in her beloved glass room, with two kids holding her hands. She had a sneaky sense of humor. She was charming and classy. She liked to do for others. She was dependable and nononsense. She made a mean pie. And she had a lethal grip. Betsy was a creature of habit (cocktail hour, Jeopardy!) …but she was no homebody. She volunteered for the Santa Barbara Symphony Music Van, a mobile classroom. She liked to tool around in a classic BMW. Her passion for polar bears led her to the Canadian tundra at age 80. She liked to bask in the sun at the Mesa Café. Perhaps you saw her there, hanging out with her favorite dog, sipping a margarita. Betsy got her degree in music from the University of Washington in 1948. Music was a reliable source of pleasure throughout her life. Even when she couldn’t walk in the last few days of her life, she still tapped her foot to Mel Brooks’ “Recording the Producers” and favorite tracks of Canadian Brass. The Three Tenors’ performance of “Nessun Dorma” gave her a thrill—every time. Betsy and Bill enjoyed success running a local building specialties business. When they closed up shop they did some traveling and made frequent trips to Seattle, where Betsy developed a taste for art glass. Her collection grew by leaps and bounds, neck and neck with her collection of all things polar bear. We’re sorry she didn’t get to see the aurora borealis before she left. Betsy didn’t want a memorial service for herself, but she sure did like a New Orleans–style jazz funeral, especially the second line. As tempting as it would be 18

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to make that happen, we’ll abide by her wishes. Betsy is survived by son Bob Green (Lindsey) of Goleta, and by daughter Barbara Jo Green (Buddy) of Seattle. The family is forever indebted to the team of capable and compassionate caregivers who were always there for Betsy when we couldn’t be: Meredith, Mery, Claudia, Ana, Elena, Nelly, and Bonnie, to name a few. Thank you to Steven H. Young, Jeff Kupperman, and the many kind and dedicated medical professionals who kept her kicking all these years. And finally, much love and appreciation to Karen Freeman and nephew Kevin Murphy, who kept the blackberries coming.

Ruth T. Joel

07/18/33-01/11/18

Ruth Thomas Joel – Dobbs Ferry, NY/ Santa Barbara, CA - passed away peacefully on January 11, 2018, of Alzheimer’s disease. Born July 18, 1933 in Burlington, Vermont, Ruth attended Brandeis University. After graduating college and traveling around Europe she moved to New York City where she joined the Dessoff Choirs. There she met her beloved husband of thirtyfour years, Bert Joel, with whom she raised daughters Sharon and Adele in Dobbs Ferry. Ruth worked as a librarian and practiced yoga and meditation. Throughout their lives Ruth and Bert enjoyed classical and folk concerts, and took many camping trips to National Parks. Friends remember Ruth for her kind nature, outgoing personality and hearty laughter. After being diagnosed with Alzheimer’s, Ruth moved to Santa Barbara to live with daughter Adele and son-in-law Lee Menichella. In her final year Ruth lived at Heritage House, a memory care facility in Santa Barbara. Widowed in 1991, Ruth is survived by daughters Sharon and Adele and grandson Stefan Menichella. She is also survived by her brother George Thomas of Burlingame, CA and her sister Esther Scharfman of Lexington, MA. A celebration was held at Heritage House on Monday, January 22. Donations to Assisted Home Health and Hospice Foundation or Threshold Choir would be appreciated.

JANUARY 25, 2018

Sandra “Sandy” Kaye Garcia 09/07/45-11/27/18

Sandra “Sandy” Kaye Garcia, 72, of Santa Barbara, CA, passed away on Nov. 27, 2017 at Serenity House after a year-long battle with cancer. Born September 7, 1945 in New Orleans to Katherine and Joseph Garcia, Sandy lived for 30 year in Mexico City, Puerto Vallarta, and Lake Tahoe before she settled in Santa Barbara in 2005. Sandy served as a Certified Interpreter at the Santa Barbara Courthouse, where a tree has been dedicated in her honor. Sandy is survived by her mother Katherine Garcia, her sister Patricia Garcia, niece Catherine Mattesich Taylor and nephew Rylan Mattesich, all of Sacramento; sister Lauren Garcia of Bellingham, WA; and her stepchildren Ann M. DeKruyff, of Natick, MA., Juan G. DeKruyff, Jr. of Austin, TX., and Susan E. (DeKruyff) Covarrubia of San Antonio, TX.  She also leaves a trail of friends too numerous to mention, who are spread across the globe. A memorial service will take place at 2:00 on Jan 27th at Chase Palm Park Center, 236 E. Cabrillo Blvd., Santa Barbara, Ca. 93101. In lieu of flowers, donations may be made to CASA at SBCasa.Org. 

Celebration of Life George Sirkin July 21, 1929November 23, 2017

Service to be held Saturday, February 10 at 1:00PM Free Methodist Church 1435 Cliff Drive, SB He lived life to the fullest.

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Naoma Gower Ford

Rebecca May

Naoma Gower Ford, nee Naoma Jean Gower, passed away on January 5th, 2018, at age 88. She was born July 7th, 1929, in Wilkes-Barre, PA, to Granville and Elizabeth Gower (nee Jones). She was preceded in death by her husband of almost 50 years, Lester R. Ford, Jr., and is survived by her brother Philip Gower of Thousand Palms, as well as her nine stepchildren: Diana Tashjian, Barbara Daniels, Pamela Ruggiero, Andrea Crebassa, Randy Ford, Melinda DiMartino, Ilisa Kim, Fred Ford, and Ken Ford, along with their spouses and their many children and grandchildren. Naoma was born in Pennsylvania and moved around a bit before settling in Santa Barbara in 1966, where she met her future husband. She loved animals, especially dogs and elephants, reading, classical music, shopping, and travelling. A celebration of her life will take place on March 17, 2018, at 2:00, at the Valle Verde Ray Schneider Social Room, 900 Calle de los Amigos, Santa Barbara, CA 93105. In lieu of flowers, the family prefers donations to Direct Relief, www.directrelief.org, or to a charity of your choice.

Born in 1950 in Blackfoot, Idaho, “The Potato Capital of the World,” Becky was the eldest of the five children born to Homer and Beverly Adams nee Powell. Becky passed away of heart failure on January 1, 2018 at Cottage Hospital. She is survived by her loving husband of 38 years, Tom (Goleta, CA), and by her stepson Tom of Susanville, CA, stepdaughter Alicia of Greenville, CA, mother Beverly of Provo, UT, brother Mike of Bountiful, UT, sister Kim of Paradise, CA, brother Jeff of Concord, CA and brother Greg of Provo, UT. Becky moved around a lot as a young girl, living in Michigan, Pennsylvania, Santa Ana, and Sunnyvale - her father being a Ford Motor Co. executive who was transferred a lot. When asked as a little girl what she wanted to be when she grew up, she replied “a secretary.” And that is what she did, ultimately becoming the secretary to the last four administrators at the Casa Dorinda. She was attracted to the Casa’s classic beauty and gracious lifestyle. Though devoted to her husband she was also dedicated to her job and was proud to say she worked at the Casa Dorinda, her home away from home. She loved to read and had a large personal library, hundreds of hardcover books filled her office at home. Mostly romance, but mystery, science fiction, and sleuths, too. Her favorite poem was Elizabeth Barrett Browning’s “How Do I Love Thee? Let Me Count the Ways.” She loved the Rodgers and Hammerstein musicals, and almost all TV westerns, Her favorite sports team was the Chicago Bears, while her favorite foods were sharp cheddar cheese and roast beef sandwiches. She was in charge of a large crew of receptionists at the Casa Dorinda. She was particularly solicitous of their welfare, and they returned great loyalty. She was, as her daytime main receptionist said, “one in a million.” She had a Mormon upbringing and it gave her peace of mind to show love and respect for her religion and its people right to the end. So, we see a common thread running throughout Becky’s life — loyalty. To her husband and family. To her employer. And to her religion. God bless you, dear Becky.

07/07/29-01/05/18

Shirley Ann Wirtz 1946-2018

Shirley Ann Wirtz died peacefully on January 15, 2018 in Santa Barbara, California at the age of 72. Shirley was born in Santa Maria, California, and moved to Santa Barbara at the age of nine. One of Shirley’s greatest joys was spending time with her three grandchildren, and tending to her garden. She enjoyed working with her two sons, golfing, laughing and spending time with her friends, as well as attending community events. Shirley is survived by her sons Jim Wirtz Jr., Brian Wirtz, her siblings Robert (Joyce), Raymond (Carol), Gerry (Dave) and Beverly (Rick). She is preceded in death by her husband Jim Wirtz Sr. and her sister Frances Acosta. Services were held Monday, January 22, 2018 at St. Raphael’s Church, followed by interment at Calvary Cemetery. In lieu of flowers donations can be made to Serenity House and/or CALM. Arrangements handled by Welch-Ryce-Haider.

1950-2018


Opinions

obituaries (continued)

CONT’D

Peter Robert Fleurat 06/08/44-01/09/18

letters

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n the future, before anyone in our community snidely and negatively generalizes about the commitment to service among our local government and nonprofit/social-sector employees, please pause and remember these days. Government and bureaucracy are not always perfect, and in that way they reflect humanity well. Recent and prolonged tragic events have given us all a rare glimpse inside the substantial disaster preparation and response systems that most people never see. Those systems have been built and comprise people who care, people who will be there for us in every way they can when we need them most: the firefighter, law enforcement, the search-and-rescue volunteer, the caseworker, the public-health providers, the Spanish and American Sign Language interpreters, the animal services employee, the shelter worker, the public information officer, the Emergency Operations Center staff, the logistics coordinators, the National Guard members, the mappers, the planners, and the weather forecasters. I could go on and on and on. Over the past two months, they have been called heroes and angels many times, and rightfully so, but that is not why they do it. They chose a job of service because they care about people; their fellow man, woman, and child, and furry friends, too. They care about you and your family, without even knowing you. In a time when wealth and possessions and status and fame are often worshiped as the things that matter most in the world, and in a time when so much unnecessarily divides us, let us not lose sight of the fact that most of humanity is, for the most part, still truly good.

For too long we have been told that commuter rail is too hard. However, our leaders have never mobilized the community to help break through whatever barriers have inhibited commonsense progress. In the most literal sense, our community cannot afford stagnation on this issue any longer. The time is now for our elected officials to mobilize our community to fight as hard as possible for a robust commuter rail system on the South Coast.

—Jack Ucciferri, S.B.

For the Record

¶ Our cover story last week on the Montecito disaster stated it was the worst in Santa Barbara history. Arguably, the deaths of 23 sailors at Point Honda in 1923 when seven U.S. Navy ships ran aground were equally calamitous. Also, in last week’s Sports section, an editing error awarded Jeff Farrell his gold medals in the Tokyo Olympics rather than the 1960 games in Rome, where he won two. GAIL ARNOLD

The Public Pact

—Ben Romo, S.B.

Demand Rail Now

I

f our community had pushed hard for the commuter rail system that we pretty much all agree is necessary, Santa Barbara and Goleta would not have been cut off from communities to the south. Critical institutions such as hospitals and schools would have been fully staffed. Local businesses would have received customers and deliveries from the south.

This photo is of Ed (left) and Sue Birch and Scott Reed. The Birches were misidentified as Brooks and Kate Firestone in last week’s Society Matters. The Independent welcomes letters of less than 250 words that include a daytime phone number for verification. Letters may be edited for length and clarity. Send to: Letters, S.B. Independent, 12 E. Figueroa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101; or fax: 965-5518; or email: letters@independent.com. Unabridged versions and more letters appear at independent.com/opinions.

Peter Robert Fleurat, born June 8, 1944, lived his life to the fullest, cared well for his family, friends and garden until his life was suddenly taken from him on January 9, 2018 when a mudslide, following the Thomas Fire, tore through his beloved home in Montecito sweeping him away. Peter’s last words to his partner, were “find a branch and hold on.” Peter is survived by Lalo Barajas, his partner of 17 years, who was thrown from the imploding house, then helped to save a neighbor’s life and was thankfully rescued. Peter the son of Helen Volk Fleurat and Joseph Fleurat, was born in Dobbs Ferry, NY and grew up in Hawthorne, NY. He was the oldest of five children and is survived by Connie Goetz, Keith, Christy and Quentin Fleurat and many beloved nieces, nephews and cousins. The Barajas family mourns the loss of their beloved Uncle “Tio” Peter. Peter was curious and adventurous leaving home as a teenager in the 1960s to travel through Europe. He then traveled the US and found his home in the Santa Barbara area in the 1970s where he built a strong community of friends. Peter, caring by nature, became a Nurse and worked at Cottage Hospital and as a Private Duty Nurse. His passions included traveling, hiking, biking and roller blading. His family and friends will always remember the good times shared with him from white water rafting in Colorado to celebrating a wedding in Croatia. He loved art and his masterpiece was his beautiful botanical garden and his koi pond in Montecito. His home was home to many his welcoming “Mi casa es su casa” spirit nurtured all as did his cooking (maybe with too much garlic and hot peppers sometimes). The memorial celebration of Peter Fleurat’s life will be held at the Moose Lodge at 110 West Victoria St in Santa Barbara between 11:00 and 2:00 on Saturday the 3rd of February. Come to celebrate the happy, caring, extraordinary man who was Peter Fleurat.”

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In lieu of flowers, the family requests that memorial contributions be made to help victims of the flood: United Way, Red Cross, Food bank of Santa Barbara and Direct Relief. Peter would ask that you spend more time with those you love, take a walk with them, listen to them well, and share your enjoyment of each sunrise and sunset.

Morgan Christine Corey 11/01/92-01/09/18

To know her was to love ABBA, Alanis, and Alice in Chains. Morgan Christine Corey had her own ideas about everything. She hated exercise but loved monkey bars. She wore a Slayer tee like it was high fashion but wouldn’t be caught dead in pink. She loved making plans and breaking them even more. She had a hat for every occasion, especially the spontaneous ones. Just when you thought you had her pegged, she’d make cookies from scratch and discuss the finer points of the Kardashians. Morgan was the most sophisticated goofball there ever was. She had eight different smiles and a black belt in charades (because there wasn’t a game she didn’t love to win). Every day she drank coffee with butter and walked the line between planning for the future and living in the now. She loved hard and was loved hard in return. Morgan passed away with her sister, Sawyer, in the January 9th mudslide. There will be a silent auction to raise funds for the family at Figuroa Mountain Brewing on Thursday, Jan 25 from 7-9. Donations may also be made to the Morgan, Sawyer and Summer Corey Fund at Fundly. com. Stay spooky, Mo.

JANUARY 25, 2018

THE INDEPENDENT

19


WE ARE FAMILY FRIENDS NEIGHBORS. Our hearts are broken. Our town torn apart. We stand together. We will be stronger. Out of the utmost respect, the Kick Ash Bash Benefit Concert — which was intended to celebrate the Thomas Fire First Responders and their families — has evolved in light of the devastating Thomas Flood. Please join us on February 25, 2018, as we honor the lives that were taken from us far too soon and say “thank you” to the First Responders who continue to be there for us as we put the pieces back together again. The event will be held at the Nesbitt Bella Vista Estate, as planned. Tickets will be available (on-sale date to be announced soon) with an expected 1,000+ in attendance. Prominent entertainers to be announced soon. Please go to www.kickashbash.com for news, updates, and to make a donation. Funds raised will be overseen by representatives from Santa Barbara’s Police, Fire, and Sheriff departments — with money directed to the Santa Barbara Firefighters Alliance (a 501(c)3) and distributed as directed by an executive board of representative agencies. Co-sponsored by:

20

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JANUARY 25, 2018

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CONT’D

voices

JOHN ABRAHAM POWELL

Opinions

FINDING EQUILIBRIUM: Members of Montecito Fire Protection District at the Critical Incident Stress Debriefing

Healing a Community

An Example from Montecito Fire on Dealing with Tragedy

F

BY JOHN ABRAHAM POWELL , Director, Montecito Fire Protection District Board

or first responders, the moment an incident

like the flood goes from “rescue” to “recovery” is when they allow themselves, officially, to begin the process of psychologically and emotionally dealing with what just happened in our community. Until then, the men and women in fire, law enforcement, and many public agencies have put themselves last — and you first. Rescue is no time for processing emotions about what is happening. It is a time of action — completely and relentlessly focused on helping others. For the community, there’s no official dividing line like this. Emotions have run high for most of us since the flames sparked in Santa Paula. This little story about how Montecito Fire is dealing with tragedy could help us all take the next steps. January 16 was when the Critical Incident Stress Debriefing was triggered by the “recovery” transition for Montecito Fire Protection District. When you see these women and men out there, know that all the trauma, all the deaths, injuries, and saves, just landed in their hearts. This experience can be overwhelming. This is the first time they are allowed to just be humans again, to have feelings and to acknowledge that they might have a lot of pain in their hearts. Some do not have a home to go back to, and they are all worrying about their families and friends like the rest of us. Here is a small example of how firefighters understand and support each other during this transition from crisis back into regular life: When Montecito Fire was dispatched to the stress debriefing, another fire agency had to staff our stations to cover any calls and to protect the public. Our fire stations are staffed 24/7/365 no matter what, and firefighters are trained to watch each other’s backs. A strike team from SoCal led by Laguna Beach Division Chief Tom Christopher came in to do that job. While they worked in our station, the team and Chief Christopher personally washed all of our filthy, muck-covered engines, trucks, and cars and then cleaned up the shop so that when our crew came back, the equipment looked brand-new and our shop was clean. This may seem like a small gesture, but given the context, it was a show of tremendous support and

solidarity. Our women and men were coming fresh out of their stress debriefing and were feeling raw. They were also being given leave from the flood zone for the first time since they were all called in two days before the flood. Firefighters don’t ever want to leave a mess in their station. Hours of cleaning muck off of engines right after being told that it’s time to begin the process of dealing with the memories, trauma, and feelings about the two biggest disasters in our community’s history — that is a tough task. Tom Christopher’s team knew this, so they cleaned our stuff before our people got back to the station. By doing that particular chore for our people, at that particular moment, they sent a message loud and clear: “We get it, and we feel you — brothers and sisters.” This is a simple lesson for all of us. We know that we can’t just make this monstrous trauma right for everyone in this time of grief and hardship, but we can all make thoughtful gestures of kindness to the people who are hurting around us. Thoughtfulness is an important part of this approach to kindness. To get it right, you have to empathize and put yourself in the shoes of the person you are trying to help, because some acts of kindness can be overwhelming when people have experienced trauma. In fact, sometimes it is actually not grand gestures that are called for in moments like this. Consistent small kindnesses we can offer each other can be a great comfort to both those giving and those receiving them. The SoCal Strike Team got it just right. I think we can all learn from their example: We can watch each other’s backs and engage in thoughtful acts of kindness to begin the process of healing this wounded community. The Strike Team members were from the cities of Brea, Engine 322 (Captain Williams, Engineer Jones, Firefighters Pitts and Basaites); Anaheim, engines 309 (Capt. Mosman, Eng. Verdica, FFs Ingram and Vaughn), 301 (Capt. Colonelli, Eng. Neuhausen, FFs Collins and Allred), and 310 (Capt. Wood, Eng. Snow, FFs Keith and Ali); Laguna Beach, Engine 302 (Capt. Lether, Eng. Kalscheuer, FF Lazicki); and Laguna Beach, Battalion 3 Division Chief Tom Christopher. INDEPENDENT.COM

JANUARY 25, 2018

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WHERE’S MY WEED? DUDE,

HOW SANTA BARBARA COUNTY JURISDICTIONS ARE DEALING WITH MARIJUANA LEGALIZATION BY KELSE Y BRUGGER

KELSEY BRUGGER

Y

ou couldn’t walk through downtown Santa Barbara on New Year’s Day without smelling weed. Friends out to lunch could be heard casually chatting about it, and teenagers lit up as they strolled down the street. Meanwhile, all across the state, hippies three times their age rejoiced, never having thought they’d live to see the day when marijuana was legalized. Weed was coming out of the shadows. But today, almost a month since the state of California allowed the sale of cannabis for recreational purposes, how far do Santa Barbara residents have to go to find a shop that sells legal marijuana? The answer, at least for now, is Los Angeles County. That’s where I went a few days into the New Year. After a two-hour jaunt down Highway 101, I found myself walking past the Russian bakeries, pawn shops, and bodegas of Santa Monica Boulevard in West Hollywood. A block past Fairfax, I reached Alternative Herbal Health Services, where a man who calls himself “Bird” was perched behind an iPad. He welcomed customers to what he emphatically described as an “adult-use” cannabis shop — dismissing the term “recreational” as “flamboyant”— and took photographs of my license, which he entered into a digital database. Then Bird directed me to a doorway overseen by a security guard who looked as if he were in high school. Inside it looked like a bakery. A glass-covered countertop housed gummies and chocolates and brownies. A six-foottall touch-screen vending machine filled with cannabis sat

HIGH SECURITY: Inside the recreational cannabis retail shop Alternative Herbal Health Services, West Hollywood

in the corner. Vaporizer pens and handblown pipes filled glass display cases. A stack of Green Buds and Hash, a parody of the Dr. Seuss children’s book, sat on a bookshelf. The shop had partnered with the Netflix series Disjointed, so the series played on a big-screen TV in the foyer. I felt like a deer in headlights, overwhelmed by brand names and strains of cannabis. A bud-tender explained the psychoactive effects of sativa, indica, and hybrid strains. “Take your time,” she said patiently as I scanned the products. Card-carrying medical-marijuana patients had their own line and weren’t forced to wait behind the many people who were visiting a dispensary for the first time. I picked out an assortment: one pack of gummies; two prewrapped rolls, Chem Scout and Cali Chem; a gram of Blue Crush; and a gram of Szittlez. (Customers can purchase up to an ounce, which equals 28.3 grams.) The checker packaged the purchase in a champagne-colored, heavy-duty plastic pouch that fastened with a childproof lock. It came out to $77. (Taxes were 25 percent.) By about 11 a.m., more patrons had made their way in. A middle-aged woman wearing purple shoes and a purple jogging jacket, a skinny young kid who must have had a fake ID, and a stocky man in sweatpants awaited their turn with the two female bud-tenders. When I got home, I told my roommate that I had gone to buy weed and said it was like going to the DMV. She laughed, “Buying weed is not even fun anymore.” CONTINUED >

INDEPENDENT.COM

JANUARY 25, 2018

THE INDEPENDENT

23


PAUL WELLMAN

“Gratitude

makes sense of our past for tomorrow.”

~ Melody Beattie

Fire and flood. We’ve been through a rough patch, and the devastating losses suffered by so many have taken their toll on all of us. As a school with two campuses that stood squarely in the path of destruction—and yet were spared—we are beyond thankful. And the emergency responders who showed us by their actions the true meaning of selflessness have our eternal gratitude. We are also thankful for the strength and resilience of our community. The love, caring, and support that flow so freely to the victims of these disasters are welcome expressions of beauty in a time of great sadness.

The Faculty and Staff of Pacifica Graduate Institute

pacifica.edu

Joe Garcia, president of the Lompoc Valley Cannabis Coalition

No, Really, Where’s My Weed? The new state law, which 57 percent of voters approved in November 2016 through Proposition 64, calls on each jurisdiction to adopt its own ordinance, so the rules surrounding recreational cannabis sales differ wildly from city to city and county to county across California. Even in just the microcosm of Santa Barbara County, lawmakers have vastly different ideas about how much cannabis should be grown and how it should be sold in their neighborhoods. County and city officials started navigating this new frontier last year, holding numerous meetings on the topic. But staffers started scratching their heads even more vigorously in November, when state officials released a series of last-minute regulations. Jurisdictions statewide are still scrambling to comply. “My personal opinion is that this is a huge clusterfuck and the state erred in its launch of the industry in the manner it has,” summed up Joe Garcia, president of the Lompoc Valley Cannabis Coalition. Further complicating matters, cannabis cultivators, distributors, and purveyors previously operating under medical-marijuana laws now need new temporary state licenses. So far, 132 tempoCannabis producers have had years of practice developing product lines thanks to the rary cultivation licenses have more than 20 years that medical marijuana been issued in Santa Barbara has been allowed in California, as well as a County, which translates to 30 couple of years of legalization in other states. acres countywide. As one grower explained, In California, people who are at least 21 years “The market has been dead since old can buy an ounce (28.3 grams) at a time. Like alcohol, if you “open” the container, the January 1 for all reputable operalaw requires you to put the product in the tors.” Ironically, more cannabis operators were in compliance trunk of the car. Your options at a pot shop are likely to on December 31 than were on include the following: January 1. To shed light on this dim RAW CANNABIS: There is a baffling array landscape, I’ve spoken to dozens of sativa, indica, and hybrid strains to choose of cannabis-industry players as from. well as politicians, bureaucrats, PRE-ROLLS: These pre-rolled joints take and attorneys, many of whom the hassle out of rolling your own. agreed only to talk off-the-record SHAKE: A less expensive bag of little pieces since cannabis remains a Schedof bud trimmings that can be used to make ule 1 drug under federal law, the same category as heroin. While infused butter or oil, among other things. there’s still a lot up in the air, VAPORIZERS: Cartridge delivery systems here’s a brief rundown of what use vapor rather than smoke, which is less I learned about how the policies harsh. differ from Carpinteria to LomEDIBLES: Gummies, truffles, chocolate poc to Santa Maria and everybars, and much more feature accurate mea- where in between. CAITLIN FITCH

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JANUARY 25, 2018

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CITY OF SANTA BARBARA: For years, Santa Barbara cannabis smokers have ordered weed online.


COVER STORY

PAUL WELLMAN FILE PHOTO

PAUL WELLMAN

Weedmaps.com reveals Sixteen years later, he employs 60 people. He plans to expand his Green Cuisine Delivery cannabis business every year. Santa Barbara, S.B. Alternative Healing, and Ocean Throughout the county, at least Side Express as just a few of 400 acres of cannabis are already being grown, according to selfthe 20 options. It’s easy to do. For new reports submitted to county govpatients, all it takes is a ernment. These plants are under 10-minute Skype interview hoop houses in outdoor fields with a doctor. Within an near Lompoc, indoor warehouses hour, a guy who looks like in Goleta, and, particularly, in an Uber driver arrives at greenhouses in the unincorpoyour doorstep with a sealed rated area of Carpinteria Valley. bag of prewrapped rolls or So where is it all going? MEDS ON MILPAS: Hopeful Santa Barbara cannabis plastic capsules of dried Santa Barbara County growoperator Ryan Howe (left) sits with his attorney, cannabis flowers. You hand ers have sold much of their Peter Candy of Hollister & Brace, at a city hearing. him a wad of cash, and the processed product to medicaldelivery dude is on his way. marijuana dispensaries in Los These services have existed in a gray area for quite Angeles. But temporary state licenses for those to some time, and as of January 1, they remain on the remain open legally are stalled in L.A.’s own regulating black market. Eventually, brick-and-mortar retail com- quagmire. (L.A.’s “social equity program” aims to reverse petition is expected to eradicate this market, if law past war-on-drugs wrongs committed against predomienforcement doesn’t get there nantly black and Latino first. Don’t expect 20 options people by putting those to remain on weedmaps.com with marijuana convicfor long. tions first in line to receive Under the new law, these cannabis-related permits. delivery services legally must The program, however, has be tethered to a retail shop. yet to kick off.) Optimistic operators hope to A bigger hurdle, growopen retail shops in the city as ers say, is that Santa Barsoon as May. Others believe bara County has yet to the first one will not open until issue distribution licenses TENDING THE FARM: Harvest manager Christina Seng 2019. After all, the city adopted that would allow cannabis monitors the plants at an area cannabis greenhouse. an ordinance for retail medical to be transported from marijuana eight years ago, but farms to retail shops. Last year this snafu emerged in Nevada. State regulators no dispensaries have existed for several years. Canopy Club, Ryan Howe’s proposed Milpas Street declared a state of emergency. Without distribution medical-marijuana shop, has come the closest to open- licenses, there was no way for the cannabis to legally ing. Last fall, it was just days away from opening after get to retailers. years of appeals from residents who argued the Eastside The same setback has unfolded here. Santa Barbara corridor was home to many K-12 schools and therefore growers say they used to distribute their own product. unsuitable for pot dens. But then the City Attorney’s But under the new law, they need a distribution permit. Office announced it had investigated a tip from a resi- And according to one grower, the only existing licensed dent that Howe had improperly tried to bring on new distributors are seeking up to 45 percent in fees.“I’m not willing to pay that,” he said. owners without notifying City Hall. At a hearing before Staff Hearing Officer Susan RearDuring this legal limbo, he is worried his own disdon in December, Howe blamed the whole thing on tributors who do not have permits will be stopped by his former attorney, Joe Allen. On January 19, Reardon law enforcement and subject to arrest. He hasn’t made announced her decision not to revoke the permit. The a single sale since the first of the year. He is afraid to decision can be appealed to the Planning Commission. operate outside the law because that could jeopardize Two other proposed medical-marijuana retail shops his ability to get future licenses. — one by Allen on upper State Street and the other by Ihab Ghannam on De la Vina Street—have endured CITY OF GOLETA: Goleta is home to three medical-marijuana years of appeals and public hearings. (Ghannam’s dis- dispensaries that were grandfathered in when the pensary was approved last August, but Allen’s permit Goleta City Council adopted a ban in 2009. These nonwas revoked that same month.) That doesn’t exactly profit collectives have received letters of authorization from the City of Goleta to apply for temporary state licenses, said Winnie Cai, deputy city attorney. The future of recreational cannabis businesses, though, is unclear. There are many bode well for the five potential recreational retail shops warehouses in Goleta that could be converted to space that the S.B. City Council voted in November to allow. for manufacturing, the process by which psychoactive However, recreational shops will not be subject to the elements are extracted from cannabis leaves. City staff same appeals process, according to the city’s cannabis has held multiple hours-long workshops, and the Goleta ordinance. While a public hearing must be held, resi- City Council will address the regulatory issues at a meetdents can merely raise concerns, not continually appeal ing next month. Cannabis advocate Crystal Reyes said the permits. she believes the Goleta City Council will not adopt an ordinance allowing recreational growing, manufacturCOUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA: One of the first Santa Barbara ing, and retail sales within the city limits. But some city County cannabis cultivators to receive a temporary councilmembers have indicated they would support state license used to sell weed when he was 15 years old. retail cannabis sales.

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CITY OF LOMPOC: Lompoc can again be proclaimed “The City of Flowers.” Cannabis operators cheered when the Lompoc City Council voted 4-1 to allow a number of retail shops and cannabis operations in the city limits. Real estate prices of abandoned storefronts and warehouses soared; realtors’ phones were ringing off the hook. “There certainly was a buzz,” said Garcia, president of the Lompoc Valley Cannabis Coalition. The cheering came to a halt last month, when a citizens’ group started gathering signatures to repeal the cannabis ordinance. But the group, led by attorney James Hall, came up 226 signatures short of collecting the 1,626 required. Hall did not return requests for comment about any potential future plans. The cannabis ordinance, therefore, is now effective, and city staff will soon begin accepting applications. Garcia remarked, “A culture that has remained underground for decades now has the opportunity to rise from the ashes of prohibition.” CARPINTERIA VALLEY: What was once a thriving cutflower industry has become the county’s heart of cannabis cultivation. The birth has set off alarms throughout the community, from high school teachers to land-use activists. Further complicating this dynamic is the fact that virtually all of the cannabis is grown beyond the Carpinteria city limits and is therefore outside the control of the Carpinteria City Council. Old, dilapidated greenhouses have become prime real estate. The largest are 150,000 square feet. Men in suits have been sitting at coffee shops in the rustic beach town. Neighbors have grown wary. In the last year, strong, skunky odors have permeated the 805-284-0975 - AAA High School 3712 State at StCarpinteria town. Teachers Santa Barbara, 93105 said they had to arrive toCa work early to air out their classrooms. Visiting sports teams reportedly laughed at the area’s new signature crop. Realtors, bankers, accountants, and school officials declined to talk publicly. But privately, everyone was talking about it. Members of the Carpinteria Valley Association, namely Anna Carrillo, launched a campaign to strengthen regulations to oversee odor and light nuisances. Some of the group had fought the proliferation of greenhouses 15 years ago when Santa Barbara County drafted a community plan. Using the social media website Nextdoor, these activists spread the word about logging complaints with the county’s planning department. County staff got to know them well. Complaints rose considerably about a year ago but more recently have flatlined. Some growers laughed them off. Growing broccoli and garlic smells worse than cannabis, they charged, adding that in the last century, crops have changed. “Now the time has come for cannabis,” declared Wilja Happé, a Dutch grower in Carpinteria, to the county supervisors early last year. In recent weeks, though, many cannabis growers sought to do something to reduce the stench. Fifteen growers installed sophisticated devices — called the Waterless VaporPhase System — that dispense essential oils, surfactants, and reverse-osmosis water to alter

the chemical makeup of the problem odor molecule. Marc Byers of Byers Scientific, which is based in Indiana and developed the system, explained the apparatus is common on landfills. It looks like an air-conditioning unit that connects to six-inch piping that circles the exterior of the greenhouse. The device costs $100,000, plus about $50,000 to replace the fluid every year. On a tour of one greenhouse, stocked with thousands of plants at different stages of life, the scent of fresh cannabis flowers was noticeably less pronounced than it was a few months ago. The growers claim their neighbors have noticed the difference. One school official indicated the stench was reduced by about 30 percent. But many neighbors are not sold. Some described the new smell to be “sickly sweet.” Byers claimed the device produces an odorless scent. If it is turned on too high, dispensing too much liquid product, it could smell like a Laundromat. Carrillo raised the issue of the fluids getting into the groundwater or aquifers. County Supervisor Das Williams finds himself squarely in the middle. Last month, Williams invited growers and neighbors to his living room to have a frank discussion about the skunky smells. The debate does not appear to be simmering down anytime soon. The Carpinteria City Council, meanwhile, has all but threatened to sue the county over its proposed cannabis regulations. It’s worth noting that Carpinteria city councilmembers had privately expressed interest in allowing manufacturing in the city limits so they could collect the tax revenue. But they don’t want cannabis to be grown throughout the valley, where they have no control. SANTA MARIA: The Santa Maria City Council said no to all cannabis.

What Happens to Medical Weed? Four decades ago, Dr. David Bearman of Goleta began to advocate for the medicinal benefits of cannabis. He explained he has always tried to use the word “cannabis” when referring to the plant. He once lazily called cannabis “marijuana” in front of an AfricanAmerican nurse, he recalled. She told him, “Calling cannabis ‘marijuana’ is like calling a black person a ‘n*****.’ ” “I was taken aback and briefly speechless,” he said. “Then the more that I thought about it, the more I realized that she was correct.” Now, Bearman, who just 15 years ago was attacked by the state medical board for prescribing cannabis, is worried medical marijuana could be ignored and “thrown under the bus.” In Washington State, for instance, he said that doctors are required to write down patients’ diagnoses, which he argued was a violation of privacy laws. “What they are doing there is regulating confidentiality,” he said, adding that “they cannot regulate the practice of medicine.” He expressed some faith that that would not happen in California. He said the authors


PAUL WELLMAN

COVER STORY of Prop. 64 assured him medical marijuana would not be affected. Most of the tax revenue would go to law enforcement and research, he added. A medical-marijuana dispensary operator in this region added it is hard to predict exactly what will happen to medical marijuana. The state regulations combine medicinal and adult use into the same program. Patients can, however, apply for state-sponsored Medical Marijuana Identification Cards through the California Public Health Department to become exempt from taxes that adult-use users have to pay.

What About the Feds, Man? Locally, cannabis is defying blue-red politics. Supervisor Steve Lavagnino, a Republican, and Supervisor Williams, a Democrat, have gotten along so well while working on Santa Barbara County’s cannabis ordinance that they are commonly referred to as “The Doobie Brothers” during public hearings. While some California conservatives have voiced skepticism about the drug’s impact on society, many have embraced a laissez-faire attitude: Let people have their pot. Plus, many Santa Barbara County Republican leaders see cannabis tax revenue as a boon for local economies — particularly, they add, as the state becomes increasingly hostile to drilling more oil and gas. The cannabis market is expected to bring in $1 billion in state tax revenue in the first year. [See News of the Week for more on local tax revenue.] But the Donald Trump administration has not budged. Recreational-cannabis advocates’ momentum was deflated four days into 2018, when Attorney General Jeff Sessions reversed the Obama-era Cole memo, which instructed federal prosecutors not to prioritize marijuana cases.“Given the department’s well-established general principles, previous nationwide guidance specific to marijuana enforcement is unnecessary …,” he wrote. While the action was a clear negative gesture to California, many cannabis growers in Santa Barbara did not express much agitation, nor were they surprised by Sessions’s actions. Many say they are not afraid that Drug Enforcement Administration agents are going to raid pot shops as they did in Santa Barbara nearly a decade ago. When Prohibition was repealed in 1933, “local option” rules allowed cities and states to continue to ban alcohol. It was not until 1966 that all states permitted the sale of alcohol. Even now, dry counties exist in states such as Arkansas, Florida, and Alabama. Cannabis prohibition appears to be following the same path. It could be decades before cannabis is legal throughout California and the United States. “Local option” rules will create a hodgepodge of rules, restrictions, and outright bans. So for people in Santa Barbara looking to get high, purchasing recreational cannabis — legally — will still require a two-hour n drive. Bring your buds.

GROWING CANNABIS IN YOUR BACKYARD

The Central Coast’s moderate temperatures and dry conditions make it a good place to grow cannabis in your backyard or on your balcony or rooftop. Under California law, you can have six personal plants, but they must be hidden from public view. Cities can also enact their own rules; the City of Santa Barbara, for instance, allows one outdoor plant, but the rest must be inside. Though cannabis doesn’t quite grow like weeds, it is fairly easy to master, especially if you have experience growing vegetables, particularly tomatoes. There’s an endless amount of information on how to do so on the internet. Here’s a rundown: Where do I start? Dispensaries sell female cannabis clones, which are easier to grow than seeds. You could also cut off a piece from a friend’s cannabis plant — called a “cutting” — and dunk it in cloning solution before planting it in the ground. You can go from seed, too, but be prepared to germinate before planting. What type of soil? Go to your nearest hydroponics store (there are many now) to discuss your plans, and buy the proper soil nutrients. When do I plant? The earlier in the year you start, the bigger the plant gets. If you start in the summer, the plant will have plenty of time to grow tall during its vegetative state. It can get as tall as six feet, but commercial growers usually keep them at about three feet tall. How much water? Water every few days. Too much water is more likely to kill a plant than not enough. When do I harvest? When the sunlight hours start to shrink in the fall, the plant begins to flower. About two months later, as the buds turn cloudy with resin and amber in color, it’s time to harvest. How do I harvest? Cut the whole plant down. Hang it upside down for about 10 days. Once dried, pull off the stems and leaves, and trim the buds. It’s sort of like filleting a fish, said one longtime grower. What about indoors? Growing a plant indoors under lights allows for more control, but it is also more expensive. Outside, the sun does most of the work for you. 

Albrecht Dürer, St. Christopher, 1511. Woodcut. SBMA, Gift of Professor Alfred Moir.

Art Matters is presented by the Santa Barbara Museum of Art and is a premier lecture series intended for continuing adult education in the history of art. Distinguished speakers come from the Santa Barbara area, across the country, and occasionally, abroad. Art historians, curators, and conservators offer fascinating insights into their areas of specialization. This season features Special Topics, in which specialists are given the opportunity to delve into greater depth through consecutive lectures devoted to a particular research area or book project.

WINTER 2018

Thursdays, 10 – 11:30am PETER PARSHALL, Former Curator of Old Master Prints, National Gallery of Art February 1: Printing Matters: The Impact of Printmaking in Europe – Part I February 8: Printing Matters: The Impact of Printmaking in Europe – Part II TODD OLSON, Professor of Early Modern Art, UC Berkeley February 15: Caravaggio – Part I February 22: Caravaggio – Part II ERIC GORDON, Head of Painting Conservation, Walters Art Museum, Baltimore March 8: Conservation Transformations at the Walters Art Museum Mary Craig Auditorium • 1130 State Street Season pass: $60 SBMA Members; $75 Non-Members Subscribe at the Museum Visitor Services desks, by phone at 884.6423, or online at tickets.sbma.net. (Single tickets available the morning of the lecture: $15) For more information, visit www.sbma.net/artmatters. INDEPENDENT.COM

JANUARY 25, 2018

THE INDEPENDENT

27


SUNDAY!

“It’s as if we’re being given a fleeting glimpse into the inner workings of the universe.” The New York Times

Pilobolus Maximus Beyond the Limits of Dance

Sun, Jan 28 / 7 PM (note special time) / Granada Theatre Tickets start at $55 / $19 UCSB students A Granada facility fee will be added to each ticket price

“A peek or two into the crannies of the heart and lots of humor, both awful and sublime.” The New York Times From the irreverence of a wild circus to the physical filigree of their most classical work, Maximus is not only the best of Pilobolus but the most revealing of how diverse and surprising Pilobolus’ work can be.

“An impressive fusion of hip-hop’s pyrotechnics with contemporary dance elements.” The New York Times

Only West Coast Appearance!

Direct from France

Compagnie Accrorap/ Kader Attou Kader Attou, Artistic Director The Roots Tue, Feb 6 / 8 PM / Granada Theatre Tickets start at $35 / $19 UCSB students A Granada facility fee will be added to each ticket price

French-born Algerian choreographer Kader Attou, with his company Accrorap, is one of the foremost representatives of French hip-hop dance. A transformative evening-length performance by 11 exceptional dancers.

Sponsored in part by the Albert & Elaine Borchard Foundation

“There’s the circus, and then there’s Cirque Éloize.” The New York Post

Wed, Feb 7 / 7 PM (note special time) / Granada Theatre Tickets start at $40 / $19 all students (with valid ID) A Granada facility fee will be added to each ticket price

A driving force in the circus art reinvention movement, the Montreal-based circus troupe has been creating award-winning cirque shows for nearly 25 years and ranks among the world’s leading contemporary circuses. In this acrobatic adventure, 11 top-level cast members will perform phenomenal physical feats set to live music featuring songs from Johnny Cash and Patsy Cline.

Event Sponsors: Kay McMillan Susan McMillan & Tom Kenny Mandy & Daniel Hochman

Media Sponsors:

Corporate Sponsor:

Dance Series Sponsors: Annette & Dr. Richard Caleel, Margo Cohen-Feinberg & Robert Feinberg and the Cohen Family Fund, Irma & Morrie Jurkowitz and Barbara Stupay Corporate Season Sponsor:

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THE INDEPENDENT

JANUARY 25, 2018

(805) 893-3535

www.ArtsAndLectures.UCSB.edu

Granada event tickets can also be purchased at: (805) 899-2222 | www.GranadaSB.org

INDEPENDENT.COM


WEEK I N D E P E N D E N T CA L E N DA R

E H T

JAN.

25-31 BY TERRY ORTEGA

As always, find the complete listings online at independent.com/events. And if you have an event coming up, submit it at independent.com/eventsubmit.

THURSDAY 1/25 1/25: A Crimson Holiday: Art for the Heart Around 40 area artists, designers, and authors will donate 20 percent of their sales from this gift gallery to the American Heart Association in support of the Go Red Campaign. This event has special importance as gallery owner Marilyn Dannehower suffered a heart attack six days after the gift gallery opened in November and attributes her recognizing the symptoms to literature donated by the American Heart Association. 5-8pm. La Cumbre Plaza, 121 S. Hope Ave. Free.

1/25: Community Forum: Thomas Fire Aftermath: Debris Flows in Montecito Responding to the emergency in Montecito, Dr. Ed Keller, UCSB professor in the Department of Earth Science and Environmental Studies, and other panelists will discuss what happened in Montecito, future safety mitigation planning, and functional recovery of multiple watersheds.

1/25:

COURTESY UCSB ARTS & LECTURES

many events have been canceled or postponed.* *Due to mudslides, Please contact the venue to confirm the event. Condoleezza Rice

Former Secretary of State and current Stanford professor Condoleezza Rice will share her expertise on global affairs, national security, and education, as well as insight into her 2017 book, Democracy: Stories from the Long Road to Freedom, which offers an extensive look at the global struggle for democracy. 7:30pm. The Arlington Theatre, 1317 State St. $28-$150. Call 893-3535.

Reel Time

artsandlectures.ucsb.edu

Moderator Geoff Green will encourage audience questions. 6:30-8:30pm. Faulkner Gallery, S.B. Central Library, 40 E. Anapamu St. Free. Call 564-5621. sbplibrary.org

Central Library, 40 E. Anapamu St. Free. Ages 12-18. Call 564-5605. sbplibrary.org

SATURDAY 1/27 1/27: 7th Annual Winter Wine Classic Pick up your commemorative crystal

FRIDAY 1/26 1/26: Teen Trivia Night: Kiss 2017 Goodbye! Have fun, eat snacks, win prizes, and test your 2017 pop culture trivia at this night just for teens! 6-7:30pm. S.B.

tasting glass, and enjoy this gathering of California’s ultra-elite winemaking masters, who will pour nearly 100 classic California wines to be paired with gourmet morsels from the region’s most notable chefs. VIP tickets

Cont’d on p. 32

Disaster Relief Events Also performing will be bands Dark Vital Flames, Mulholland, and Slow Down. 8pm. SOhO Restaurant & Music Club, 1221 State St. $8-$10. Call 962-7776. sohosb.com

high school students have come together to put on a benefit concert where all proceeds will be donated to the United Way Thomas Fire and Flood Fund. Enjoy performances by soloists, Jazz Villains, and Dos Pueblos Jazz Choir. 7pm. Elings Performing Arts Ctr., Dos Pueblos High School, 7266 Alameda Ave., Goleta. Donation: $10. Email santabarbarastrong@gmail.com.

1/25: Silent Auction for Corey-Baker Family The Corey-Baker family was devastated by the Montecito mudslides. Morgan (25), twin sisters Summer and Sawyer (12), their mom, Carie, and their house were swept away in the mudslides. Morgan and Sawyer were killed, and Summer and Carie are recovering in Cottage Hospital. The cash and check proceeds raised will go toward funeral costs and medical bills, and any amount beyond what is needed for this family will be donated to other families affected. 7-9pm. Figueroa Mountain Brewing Co., 137 Anacapa St. Free.

tinyurl.com/Corey-BakerAuction

1/26: Metal Concert for Victims of the Thomas Fire and Mudslide Ventura metal band Bone Maggot will headline this concert to raise funds for the recent disasters.

1/25: Shakespeare on Film: Haider Director Vishal Bhardwaj reimagines Shakespeare’s Hamlet as a contemporary crime drama in this 2014 film. The film tells the story of Haider, a young student and poet who discovers his mother and uncle are behind a conspiracy involving his father’s arrest and murder. Priya Jaikumar (Cinema and Media Studies, USC) will join moderator Bhaskar Sarkar (Film and Media Studies, UCSB) for a post-screening discussion. A reservation is recommended in order to guarantee a seat. 7-10:15pm. Pollock Theater, UCSB. Free. Not rated. Call 893-8903. carseywolf.ucsb.edu

1/27: Gaviota: The End of Southern California This documentary is the culmination of a meticulous five-year study of the Gaviota Coast from the bottom of the channel to the peaks of the Santa Ynez. Learn the potential impacts of further development and about the activists who fight against it. A Q&A with director Shaw Leonard will follow the screening. 3pm. Wildling Museum of Art & Nature, 1511-B Mission Dr., Solvang. $5-$10. Not rated. Call 688-1082.

1/27: Santa Barbara Strong Benefit Concert Area

from left: Morgan, Sawyer, and Summer Corey

1/25: The Women and the Waves 2 This documentary follows in the footsteps of the 2009 groundbreaking film The Women and the Waves and continues to explore the culture of surfing in relation to six surfers in and out of the water, proving that surfing is not just a sport but a lifestyle. A Q&A with director/producer Heather Hudson will follow the screening. Reception: 6:15pm; screening: 7pm; Q&A: 8pm. S.B. Maritime Museum, 113 Harbor Wy. $10-$15. Not rated. Call 456-8747. sbmm.org

www.wildlingmuseum.org

1/30: Score: A Film Music Documentary Learn about the power and influence of film scores in this 2016 documentary that highlights the creative struggles of designing a modern film soundtrack from scratch and features some of Hollywood’s premier composers. Producer Robert Kraft will join moderator David Novak (Music, UCSB) for a post-screening discussion. A reservation is recommended. 7-9:30pm. Pollock Theater, UCSB. Free. Rated NR. Call 893-5903. carseywolf.ucsb.edu

1/28: Celebration of Gratitude and Community BBQ In an effort to bring some joy in the wake of the recent devastating events in the community, Bishop Diego High School and the Cardinal Club invite families, friends, and neighbors to come together to share a meal, to find strength in numbers, and to give thanks. All are welcome to this BBQ followed by a brief ceremony in the gym at 6 p.m. 4-6pm. Bishop Diego High School, 4000 La Colina Rd. Free. Call 967-1266 x118.

1/31: 33rd Annual SBIFF Opening Night Film and Gala This year’s opening night film for the S.B. Film Festival will be the public, written, directed, and starring Emilio Estevez. The film follows a group of homeless library patrons who refuse to leave a Cincinnati downtown public library at closing time after learning that emergency shelters are at capacity during a cold front. Screening: 8-10pm; gala: 10pm-1am. The Arlington Theatre, 1317 State St. $100. Read more on p. 59. sbiff.org

1/28: Quire of Voyces: The Mysteries of Christmas: A Healing Concert for Our Community The Quire will sing music that soothes and heals. Firefighters and first responders can receive free tickets. 3pm. St. Anthony’s Chapel, Garden Street Academy, 2300 Garden St. $15-$20. Call 965-5935. quireofvoyces.org/concerts

Cont’d on p. 30 Fundraiser

Volunteer Opportunity

Civil Discourse

>>>

Protest INDEPENDENT.COM

JANUARY 25, 2018

THE INDEPENDENT

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INDEPENDENT CALENDAR

JAN.

25-31

As always, find the complete listings online at independent.com/events. And if you have an event coming up, submit it at independent.com/eventsubmit.

MUSIC of NOTE music producer Alan Parsons will perform his greatest hits at this show. Parsons worked at Abbey Road Studios and went on to work with Paul McCarthy, The Hollies, and Pink Floyd before going on to create the Alan Parsons Project. 8pm. Chumash Casino Resort, 3400 E. Hwy. 246, Santa Ynez. $25-$45. Ages 21+. Call 686-3805. chumashcasino.com

and rock flair as he sings songs that dig deep into life’s questions. Bedouine (a k a Azniv Korkejian), a Hollywood music editor turned recording artist whose ’60s folk meets ’70s country-funk with a glimmer of bossa nova cool, will open the show. 8pm. Campbell Hall, UCSB. $18-$40. Call 893-3535.

artsandlectures.ucsb.edu

CHRISTOFFER ROSENFELDT

1/26: Alan Parsons Live Project British rocker and

1/28: Chamber on the Mountain: Trio Valtorna Internationally renowned ensemble Trio Valtorna — made up of David Jolley on French horn, Ida Kavafian on violin, and Gilles Vonsattel on piano — will delight chamber music lovers with a program that includes pieces by Harbison, Brahms, and Revel. Audience members are invited to stay and meet the artists at a reception immediately following the concert. 3pm. Logan House, 8585 Ojai-Santa Paula Rd., Ojai. $25. Call 646-9951. chamberonthemountain.com

1/28: Wooden Hall Concert: Richard Smith’s Chet Atkins & Jerry Reed Show Richard Smith, virtuoso in classical music, jazz, bluegrass, ragtime, and the blues and protégé of Chet Atkins and Jerry Reed, will present this show dedicated to their work. Don’t miss this National Fingerstyle Guitar Champion and Thumbpicker of the Year. 7:30pm. Alhecama Theatre, 914 Santa Barbara St. $20. sbama.org

1/31: José González, Bedouine Born in Sweden to Argentinian parents, José González weaves together the sounds of his Latin American roots with introspective folk

1/31: Youngr London songwriter, producer, instrumentalist, and vocalist Youngr (a k a Dario Darnell) will bring his sassy and sometimes explicit pop to S.B. in support of his new release, out this month, This Is Not an Album. 9pm. SOhO Restaurant & Music Club, 1221 State St. $15-$18. Call 962-7776.

sohosb.com

Disaster Relief Events Cont’d from p. 29 1/28: Feast for the Children Via Maestra 42 owners Renato and Lisa Moiso will donate an entire sumptuous Italian meal where all of the proceeds will benefit ongoing area disaster-relief efforts in Montecito due to the Thomas Fire and mudslides. Tickets are available in advance at the church office or at the door. Three seatings: 11:30am, 12:30pm, and 1:30pm. First United Methodist Church, 305 E. Anapamu St. $10-$25. tinyurl.com/FeastForTheChildren 1/28: So Cal Strong Concert for Thomas Fire Victims Fund More than eight bands, including the Tearaways, will perform to raise money for victims of the recent fire. 3-11pm. SOhO Restaurant & Music Club, 1221 State St. $25-$200. Call 962-7776. sohosb.com

2/3: Writing for Healing Workshop Join author Diana Raab in writing what’s been going on in your mind, body, and soul, as you reflect what you’ve experienced during the recent disasters. Learn how to set intentions knowing that having compassion for yourself and others can free you to move forward. Journals and pens will be provided. Donations will go toward S.B. Firefighters Alliance. 2-4pm. Yoga Soup, 28 Parker Wy. Donations accepted.

tinyurl.com/WritingForHealing

S.B. Yoga Center Call to find out about the free and discounted services such as yoga, massage therapy, acupuncture, and cupping for first responders and those affected by the Thomas Fire and mudslides. Specific offers continue through January 31 and February 28. 32 E. Micheltorena St. Call 965-6045. ongoing:

Fundraiser 30

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JANUARY 25, 2018

INDEPENDENT.COM

Volunteer Opportunity

Zodo’s Bowling & Beyond Zodo’s is offering free bowling to residents affected by the mudslide in an attempt to provide a safe and uplifting place to spend time with family. Up to six people can share a lane. Show your ID (with zip code) and receive one complimentary game and shoe rental. 5925 Calle Real, Goleta. Call 967-0128.

ongoing:

VNHC Support Station The Visiting Nurse & Hospice Care Support Station is a one-stop shop for assistance from the Thomas Fire and mudslides to provide expert care in counseling, spiritual support, music therapy, and pet therapy. Open through February 3. Mon.-Fri.: 11am6:30pm; Sat.: 10am-2pm. Calvary Chapel, 1 N. Calle César Chávez. Free. Call 308-9602. ongoing:

ongoing: VNHC Services Visiting Nurse & Hospice Care offers free individual counseling, support groups, and referrals for people suffering any kind of loss. Call 308-9602.

vnhcsb.org/dealing-with-disaster-distress

ongoing: 805 Counselor Connect People struggling with the recent tragedies in the S.B. area can talk with volunteer counselors who are either licensed or specially trained. This free call center, generously donated by Evolve IP, will be available to the 805 community. If the counselors are busy, call-backs can be requested. Phone calls are not recorded, and all callers will remain anonymous. Mon.Fri.: 10am-7:30pm; Most Sat.-Sun.: noon-6pm. Call 979-9091.

805counselorconnect.com

Civil Discourse

Protest


WEEK

Art Town

66th Secretary of State

THURSDAY!

An Evening with

Condoleezza Rice Thu, Jan 25 / 7:30 PM / Arlington Theatre Tickets start at $50 / $25 UCSB students An Arlington facility fee will be added to each ticket price

Former Secretary of State and National Security Advisor, Condoleezza Rice will share her unparalleled expertise on global affairs, national security and education. Special Thanks:

Pre-signed books will be available for purchase

Event Sponsors: Ellen & Peter O. Johnson, Loren Booth

Pink Elephant by Suraya Raja 1/26: Herself: Girlhood in Stop Motion Film This exhibit will include stop-motion films that portray girls overcoming their fears, coping with loss, solving problems, and succumbing to/resisting societal expectations by artists Rita Basulto, Laura Krifka, Heidi Kumao, Kirsten Lepore, and Suraya Raja. There will also be stills, production shots, drawings, and sculptural figures on view. The exhibit shows through March 23. 5-7pm. Atkinson Gallery, Humanities Bldg., Rm. 111, SBCC. Free. Ages 12+. Call 965-0581.

Jeffrey Toobin

MONDAY!

Politics, Media and the Law in the Post-Obama Age

gallery.sbcc.edu/upcoming-exhibitions

Mon, Jan 29 / 7:30 PM / UCSB Campbell Hall Tickets start at $20 / FREE for all students

1/27: Altered Images Workshop with Monika Molnar-Metzenthin Artist Monika Molnar-Metzenthin will assist you in taking images and changing them a bit to create your own unique style of art using supplies from the ReUse Store. 10am-noon. 302 E. Cota St. Children ages 6 or younger must be accompanied by an adult. $8. Call 884-0459 x13. exploreecology.org

An unbiased, accessible expert on all matters of American law, CNN analyst and best-selling author Jeffrey Toobin provides invaluable context to today’s events within our judicial, political and media landscapes.

1/27: Valentine’s Cork Craft Reserve your spot to get crafty and turn a blank canvas and wine corks into beautiful wall art. 2:30-4pm. Multipurpose Rm., Goleta Library, 500 N. Fairview Ave., Goleta. Ages: teens and adults. Call 964-7878. sbplibrary.org

Books will be available for purchase and signing

1/28: Exhibit Openings: Cecily Brown: Rehearsal and Bloom Projects Exchange Series: Midori Hirose, Of the Unicorn (and the Sundowner Kids) More than 80 small drawings, large-scale works, and

With support from the Harold & Hester Schoen Arts & Lectures Endowment

sketchbooks will be on view in Cecily Brown’s West Coast debut. Midori Hirose’s first solo museum exhibit will be a room-sized installation of newly commissioned sculptures that traces her explorations into the mythologies, historical accounts, ecologies, and communities of S.B. The exhibits will show through June 3. Museum of Contemporary Art S.B., 653 Paseo Nuevo. Free. Call 966-5373. mcasantabarbara.org

For information about a related TLI event visit www.Thematic-Learning.org

Tony Kushner and Sarah Vowell

1/28: SBMA Exhibit Openings The S.B. Museum of Art will open three exhibitions at once, drawn entirely from the museum’s collection. Brought to Light: Revelatory Photographs in the Santa Barbara Museum of Art Collection consists of more than 60 photographs by 13 photographers (on view through Apr. 22). Crosscurrents: American and European Portrait Photographs, 1840-1900 is assembled from many striking and rarely seen works that showcase how photographic portraiture blossomed in an array of media and formats in the latter six decades of the 19th century (on view through May 27). Crosscurrents: The Painted Portrait in America, Britain, and France, 1750-1850 explores American, British and French portraitists from the Colonial period through the Industrial Revolution (on view May 27). S.B. Museum of Art, 1130 State St. Free. Call 963-4364. sbma.net

The Lincoln Legacy: The Man and His Presidency Tue, Feb 20 / 7:30 PM / UCSB Campbell Hall Tickets start at $20 / $10 UCSB students “Among Abraham Lincoln’s many talents was his skill at bringing disparate parties together for the good of all. So it’s him we have to thank for the odd but inspired pairing of Tony Kushner and Sarah Vowell.” Cleveland Plain Dealer

1/30: Arts for Humanity: Pocket Books Workshop Create a Pocket Book, in which each pocket has art that tells a story in pictures, words, or abstract art, using collage, stamps, drawing, or any combination of these. 4-5:15pm. Council Chambers, Buellton Library, 140 W. Hwy. 246, Buellton. Free. Ages 7+. Call 688-3115. sbplibrary.org

Books by both authors will be available for purchase and signing

Event Sponsors: Eva & Yoel Haller For information about a related TLI event visit www.Thematic-Learning.org

ongoing: Abraham Lincoln as a Boy, John Herd Come see illustrations of Abraham Lincoln’s early days (on view through Apr. 30) and other exhibits, including John Herd’s blended photo/computer graphics. Karpeles Manuscript Library Museum, 21 W. Anapamu St. Free. Call 962-5322.

Media Sponsors:

Corporate Season Sponsor:

>>>

(805) 893-3535 www.ArtsAndLectures.UCSB.edu Arlington event tickets can also be purchased at: (805) 963-4408 INDEPENDENT.COM

JANUARY 25, 2018

THE INDEPENDENT

31


INDEPENDENT CALENDAR

JAN.

25-31

As always, find the complete listings online at independent.com/events. And if you have an event coming up, submit it at independent.com/eventsubmit.

Cont’d from p. 29

BANDS on TAP

include early access at 6 p.m. 7-9:30pm. Fess Parker’s DoubleTree Resort, 633 E. Cabrillo Blvd. $45-$130.

tinyurl.com/7thWinterWineFest ALEX SCHOTTKY

1/25-1/27: Carr Winery Barrel Rm. Thu.: Tony Ybarra. Fri.: Aloud. Sat.: Karlin Ladera Duo. 6-8pm. 414 N. Salsipuedes St. Free. Ages 21+. Call 965-7985. carrwinery.com 1/30: SOhO Restaurant & Music Club Nate Latta, One Hundred Paces, Thomas Hopkins. 7pm. $8. 1221 State St. Call 962-7776. sohosb.com 1/26-1/28: Cold Spring Tavern Fri.: Oddly Straight. 6-9pm. Sat.: Sean Wiggins; 1-4pm. Spoonful; 5-8pm. Sun.: Tom Ball and Kenny Sultan; 1:15-4pm. Paradise Kings; 4:30-7:30pm. 5995 Stagecoach Rd. Free. Call 967-0066. 1/26: Eos Lounge Oliver Nelson. 9pm. 500 Anacapa St. Free-$5. Ages 21+. Call 564-2410. eoslounge.com 1/26-1/27: Figueroa Mountain Brewing Co. (S.B.) Fri.: The Rawhides. Sat.: Soul Machine. 7-10pm. 137 Anacapa St., Unit F. Free. Call 694-2252.

figmtnbrew.com

Kitty Winn and Lawrence Pressman

1/26-1/27: M.Special Brewing Co. Fri.: Echoswitch. 7-9pm. Sat.: Joystix. 6-8pm. 6860 Cortona Dr., Bldg. C., Goleta. Free. Call 968-6500. mspecialbrewco.com

1/26-1/28:

On Golden Pond This funny and touching story of Ethel (Kitty Winn) and Norman Thayer (Lawrence Pressman), who spend each summer at their home on a lake, explores the turbulent relationship between Norman and their grown daughter. This production is codirected by Tony Award–winning Craig Anderson, who directed it on Broadway in 1979-1980. The show runs through February 18. Fri.Sat.: 7:30pm; Sun.: 2pm. Ojai Art Center Theater, 113 S. Montgomery St., Ojai. $18-$75. Call 640-8797.

1/26-1/27,1/31: The Endless Summer Bar-Café Fri.: Dave Vignoe. Sat.: Nax. Wed.: Kylie Butler. 5:30-8:30pm. 113 Harbor Wy. Free. Call 564-1200.

1/26: The James Joyce Ulysses Jasz. 7:30-10:30pm. 513 State St. Free. Ages 21+. Call 962-4660. sbjamesjoyce.com

COURTESY

1/26-1/27: Uptown Lounge Fri.: Out of the Blues. 8-11pm. Sat.: Al Vafa & The Infidels. 8:30-11pm. 3126 State St. Free. Ages 21+. Call 845-8800. sbuptownlounge.com

ojaiact.org/on-golden-pond

1/27: Downtown Alan Brown’s Retirement Party “For he’s a jolly good fellow …” Come celebrate local legend and SOhO engineer Alan Brown with a night of music, entertainment, dancing, toasting, roasting, and love. Wear your favorite Burning Man outfit! 6pm. SOhO Restaurant & Music Club, 1221 State St. $5. Ages 21+. Call 962-7776. Read more on p. 51. sohosb.com

Never Alone: How Spiritual Ideas Work in Us

Recognize God as the source of all good ideas Jesus’ teachings – the best example of how to heal by listening to theses ideas Examples of how this healing approach has transformed lives

2:00 p.m. Sunday, January 28, 2018 Goleta Public Library 500 N Fairview Ave, Goleta, CA For more information see: PrayerThatHeals.org 32

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JANUARY 25, 2018

INDEPENDENT.COM

The Wallows

1/26, 1/28, 1/30: Velvet Jones Fri.: Stomprocket, Retrodemon, 2Faced, Matt Armor, Dogvane. 8pm. $5-$10. Sun.: Neon Dreams, Brdgs. 7pm. $10. Ages 18+. Tue.: The Wallows. 8pm. $14. 423 State St. Call 965-8676. velvet-jones.com

SUNDAY 1/28 COURTESY

A FREE public talk by Melanie Wahlberg, CS

1/27: Dargan’s Irish Pub & Restaurant Rent Party Blues. 10pm12:30am. 18 E. Ortega St. Free. Call 568-0702. darganssb.com 1/27, 1/30: Island Brewing Company Sat.: Big Tweed. 6-9pm. Tue.: Dry and Dusty. 5:30-7pm. 5049 6th St., Carpinteria. Free. Call 745-8272.

islandbrewingcompany.com

1/27: Mercury Lounge Man Mistress, Pet Sympathy, Jamey Geston. 8pm. $7. 5871 Hollister Ave., Goleta. Ages 21+. Call 967-0907.

1/28: Pilobolus Maximus: Beyond the Limits of Dance Pilobolus Maximus takes the most diverse and impactful elements of Pilobolus Dance Theater, some old

Fundraiser

Volunteer Opportunity

Civil Discourse

Protest


WEEK WEDNESDAY 1/31 STEPHEN SHERRILL

and some brand-new, and assembles them in a series of continually changing worlds. From the saucy impertinence of a wild circus to the physical artwork of its most classical work, this show will inspire and surprise you. There will be mature content. 7pm. The Granada Theatre, 1214 State St. $20-$74. Call 893-3535.

artsandlectures.ucsb.edu

A L W A Y S A M A Z I N G. N e v e r r o u t i n e.

MONDAY 1/29 1/29: Jeffrey Toobin: Politics, Media and the Law in the PostObama Age Jeffrey Toobin, senior analyst for CNN and author of books on Patty Hearst, O.J. Simpson, and politics, will provide invaluable context to today’s events within our judicial, political, and media landscape. Books will be available for purchase and signing. 7:30pm. Campbell Hall, UCSB. $10-$35. Call 893-3535.

artsandlectures.ucsb.edu

TUESDAY 1/30

1/31: Still We Rise: A Performance Showcasing Art, Music, Dance, Theater, and Poetry Performed by UCSB students and poet Rick Benjamin, PhD, and choreographed by Professor Monique Meunier, this collaborative performance, dedicated to the UCSB student Dreamers, will be an abstract examination on immigration and DACA that will include a scene from the upcoming Launch Pad play Staging the Daffy Dame. There is one more performance on Thursday, February 1. 5:30pm. Art, Design & Architecture Museum, UCSB. Free. Call 893-2951.

www.museum.ucsb.edu/news

alan parsons live project

FriDAY

Jan

26 8 PM

FRIDAY

steven wright

FEB

2

8 PM

FARMERS

MARKET

SCHEDULE THURSDAY Carpinteria: 800 block of Linden Ave., 3-6pm

FRIDAY

Engelbert Humperdinck: The Prodigal Son Tour

FRIDAY

FEB

9

8 PM

Montecito: 1100 and 1200 blocks of Coast Village Rd., 8-11:15am

SATURDAY

Downtown S.B.: Corner of Santa Barbara and Cota sts., 8:30am-1pm

SUNDAY

Goleta: Camino Real Marketplace, 10am-2pm

TUESDAY

FriDAY

The Isley Brothers

FEB

16

8 PM

Old Town S.B.: 500-600 blocks of State St., 3-6:30pm

WEDNESDAY

1/30:

Tuesday Night Lawn Bowling

The object of the game is to roll the bowls so they rest as close to the jack as possible. If you know what that means, great! If you don’t, come on Tuesday nights for instruction and play. Everyone is welcome! 6pm. Spencer Adams Recreation Park, 1216 De la Vina St. Free. Call 636-9748.

santabarbaralbc.org

Solvang: Copenhagen Dr. and 1st St., 2:30-6pm

FISHERMAN’S MARKET SATURDAY

Rain or shine, meet local fishermen on the Harbor’s commercial pier, and buy fresh fish (filleted or whole), live crab, abalone, sea urchins, and more. 117 Harbor Wy., 6-11am. Call 259-7476. cfsb.info/sat

3 4 0 0 E H I G H WAY 24 6 , S A N TA Y N E Z · 8 0 0 -24 8 - 6 2 74 · C H U M A S H C A S I N O.C O M Chumash Casino Resort reserves the right to change or cancel promotions and events.

INDEPENDENT.COM

JANUARY 25, 2018

THE INDEPENDENT

33


INFORMATIONAL COMMUNITY MEETING FOR THOMAS FIRE AND MONTECITO MUDSLIDE VICTIMS Montecito and surrounding Santa Barbara County communities have suffered tremendous loss as a result of the Thomas Fire and subsequent mudslides and we are deeply committed to standing beside the people of these communities on their road to recovery. We have partnered with respected local law firm, Rogers, Sheffield, & Campbell, LLP to provide a free presentation to the community and our clients following these disasters. Firm attorney David Grokenberger and his family are long time residents of Montecito and were lucky to escape the total destruction of their home at 321 Hot Springs Road. David will share his first-hand experience in dealing with insurance carriers and evaluating claims at the meeting.

Tuesday, January 30, 2018 | 6:30 p.m. – 8:30 p.m. Hyatt Centric Santa Barbara | 1111 E. Cabrillo Boulevard, Santa Barbara, CA 93103 *Parking will be validated on site

TOPICS FOR DISCUSSION WILL INCLUDE, BUT ARE NOT LIMITED TO: • Evacuation and displacement • FEMA – Applying for disaster assistance • Insurance issues – How and when to make a claim • What to do if you are uninsured or underinsured • What to do about your mortgage if your home was destroyed • How to address your property tax if your home was destroyed • Clearing debris and remediate environmental hazards from your property • Address concerns of additional erosion and landslides when the rains return • Potential claims against SCE and/or other third parties responsible for the Thomas Fire

The Informational Community Meeting is intended to serve as a resource for wildfire and mudslide victims seeking guidance on their road to recovery. Representatives will be available after the meeting to answer additional questions and address concerns not discussed publicly.

877.497.3549 | wildfirevictims.com 34

THE INDEPENDENT

JANUARY 25, 2018

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Scene in S.B.

Text and Photos by Caitlin Fitch

living p. 35

PAUL WELLMAN

Outdoors

Romero Canyon

Uncertain Future for

Montecito Trails

Post-Flood Wardrobe Giveaway

T

Ensemble Boutique has been a saving grace for families affected by the floods in Montecito. The project, which provides free, new clothing, shoes, toiletries, and even kids’ toys to anyone in need, is the evolving brainchild of Nikki Vyn (above left) and her mother, Kimberly Vyn (above right). The Vyns realized the ongoing need of displaced families after their friends were evacuated with only two days of clothing and no clear idea as to how long they would be away from home. Now, more than two weeks later, the project has helped countless evacuees, and has transformed into a 501(c)(3) nonprofit with the help of Impact Hub, and its dedicated volunteers (right) are sorting through pallets of new items donated by local businesses. Ensemble Boutique launched in a small space near the lobby of the Hotel Californian, but now it’s located at 1233-A State Street, on the second level of Victoria Court. It’s open 11 a.m.-7 p.m. every day. Anyone looking to volunteer there can visit bit.ly/PopUpShop VolunteerSignUp. n

Community

E

PAUL WELLMAN

Montecito Hub Feeds Folks in Disaster Zone

very day since the January 9 natural disaster, Village Cheese & Wine Store, located in Montecito’s Upper Village, has been open for business. But not in the traditional sense. Owner Patrick Braid, 47, is “not accepting any money,” he said, from first responders, Sheriff’s deputies, utility workers, cleanup crews, and residents still living in the evacuation zone. Since the storm struck, IT TAKES A VILLAGE: Longtime employee Victoria Delgado and Village Cheese Braid’s small deli, which has oper& Wine Store owner Patrick Braid have been giving away groceries to neighbors ated from the same location for and first responders. 43 years, has transformed into an “emergency makeshift grocery store,” he said, giving watt generator donated by Home Depot. Smart & out sandwiches, coffee, pastries, and bags of food, Final, Trader Joe’s, Andersen’s Bakery, and Vons have drinks, and other necessities to anybody who walks also stepped up to help with inventory. Even as the through the door. He’s also been delivering phoned- shop’s bank account continues to drain — he had to in orders to sheltered families running short on sup- close for 10 days during the Thomas Fire — he keeps plies. Braid’s generosity got a shout-out from Santa the bigger picture in mind. “Understanding the scope Barbara County Supervisor Das Williams when he of this disaster, I’m establishing a nonprofit [called] the Montecito Village Recovery Foundation,” he said. appeared on The Ellen Show last week. For the first 36 hours or so, he kept the lights on “We’re going to use this tragedy to effect massive and the refrigerators cold with a brand-new 5,000- change in charitable giving.” —Keith Hamm

he trails of Montecito’s front country have been forever altered by recent fires and mudslides, and it is too soon to say when and how they will reopen. Cold Spring, Hot Springs, Romero, and San Ysidro canyons are inaccessible, and all affiliated trails will remain so indefinitely. “Pretty much every major canyon in the burn area has been carved out— out they are not riparian corridors; they are truly canyons at this point,” said resident trail expert and outdoor columnist Ray Ford during a January 18 talk at Faulkner Gallery. Ford described these now-barren watersheds and their dangerous drop-offs, with washed-out creek beds deepened by 10-15 feet and canyons now devoid of vegetation 20-30 feet above typical water levels. “It’s a little too soon” to say when the trails may reopen or what such an operation would cost, said Los Padres National Forest District Ranger John “Pancho” Smith. “Sociopolitically, I’m not going to start pushing out trail assessments and trail repair in the face of flooding that happened in Montecito. I don’t think that’s right.” Future rains may further contort the canyons and make trail access difficult or even impossible; the Romero Canyon bridge, for example, was destroyed. “It’s so early in this process,” said Los Padres ForestWatch Conservation Director Bryant Baker. “This is just the beginning of the rainy season, and it’s likely to keep changing.” Baker projects that the Thomas Fire burn area will need at least a year to reopen. From the Montecito front country to the entire Matilija Wilderness and elsewhere in Los Padres, “the trails are still a public-safety hazard,” Smith said. “This country is very steep and rugged, and until the hillsides revegetate, there’s not a lot of sense doing a lot of work there.” Any work that would be done in the future would be “on relatively small pieces of the trail for the most part, and … to prevent the trail from either contributing more sedimentation to the area or keep the trail from washing out the parts that have not washed out already,” he said. Prior to the mudslides, Smith met with the Montecito Trails Foundation, the Los Padres Forest Association, and the S.B. Mountain Bike Trail Volunteers, among other groups, to discuss needed trail repairs. Ford said that Romero Canyon and other trails “need to be maintained to more sustainable standards” in the future so as to avoid being in the direct path of water. Some groups, like the Santa Barbara Bloom Project, hope to plant seedlings in areas, such as along San Ysidro Trail, a process that Baker said is more difficult than it would seem. “It’s a little tricky to reseed areas because they’re so dependent on the perfect moisture conditions and light conditions, and different species may be native to our area, but they don’t really grow in that specific canyon,” he said. He suggests the best strategy is to “let the natives come back on their own — they will; they have great seed banks stored up in the soil. We just want to be careful about making sure that the native assemblages come back appropriately.” As far as the backcountry, Smith says he is working on repairing the Romero Camuesa Road, but it is still too dangerous to be opened. “The road has places where the water undercut the pavement. ‘Road closed’ means road closed,” he said. — Richie DeMaria

INDEPENDENT.COM

JANUARY 25, 2018

THE INDEPENDENT

35


BIRTH BUDDIES! BORN ON THE SAME DAY - NOVEMBER 21, 2017

NAME:

Twin Anteater Pups (Names TBD)

BIRTHPLACE:

Santa Barbara Zoo

SEX:

MALE

WEIGHT:

X

FEMALE

1.54 kg and 1.48 kg

While the smaller of the rare twin anteaters is being hand raised, her twin will be carried on her mom’s back for a few months. They will . eventually learn to feed on small insects

NOTES:

NAME:

Colette Louise Drake

BIRTHPLACE: SEX:

WEIGHT:

Santa Barbara Cottage Hospital MALE

X

FEMALE

5 lbs, 2 oz

Colette entered the wor on November 21. Her mom ld and dad expect her to start eating solids in a few months.

NOTES:

Want to name these pups by making a donation to the SB Zoo Foster Feeder Program? Contact donate@sbzoo.org

welcome SANTA BARBARA COTTAGE HOSPITAL BABIES Baby Girls

Baby Boys

Carpinteria Alberto Esquivel Mercado, 9/7 Vera Jo Warner, 10/13 Emmelia Glynn Wright, 11/10

Buellton Chase August Wilson, 1/10 Camarillo Theo Gordon Greene, 10/31 Goleta Bering Moser Brown, 8/9 Matteo Delgadillo, 9/12 Hudson Jude Yuen, 10/27 Lompoc Raymundo Jerry Hernandez-VanBrimmer, 9/14 Ian Damian Robles, 10/30 Jaden James Contreras, 11/13 Asher Ryan Justice, 11/16 Los Alamos Rawlins Robert Deitrich, 11/13 Montecito Bronson Angelo Harper Cordero, 11/17 Thomas Gustave Gauthier, 11/30 Santa Barbara Dylan Davis Stewart, 9/21 Vincent L Chen, 10/6 Finn Thomas Presman, 10/11 Crew Daniel Mercado, 10/16 David Navarrete, 10/19 Cresencio Sebastian Rubio, 10/20 Darian Neiko Bustos-Garcia, 10/23 Nathaniel Alexander Richo, 10/23 Walker Steven Wooten, 11/2 Jameson Douglas Moore, 11/5 Daniel Jacob King, 11/12 Nico Martin Lopez-Hollis, 11/17 Henri Raymond Amoussou, 11/24 Noah Ruben Yaniv, 11/26 Leon George Richardson, 11/29 Emiliano Matei Javier Corona, 12/10 Kyle Troy Crocker, 12/30 Santa Ynez Colby Michael Flores, 12/16 Solvang Anders Kanaan Dunn, 11/3 Mac Burr Eschen, 11/11

Goleta Yatan Zheng, 9/21 Kyler Kaetlyn Murray, 10/6 Liyah Jin, 10/28 Kinsley Quinn Hyman, 11/27 Sonya Ella Ruby Ahlers, 12/15 Lompoc Teagan Lynn Schooter, 10/31 Amaia Gaytan-Lopez, 11/18 Briella Marilin Alcivar, 12/1 Santa Barbara Clio Cleaveland FirestoneFelice, 7/15 Addison James Gladden, 10/1 Shaila Amelia Gutshall, 10/4 Evelyn Quinn Montague, 10/7 Isabel Grace Rose, 10/7 Lilinoe Edith Kahui-Warrecker, 10/16 Raia Marie Deem, 10/28 Avian Kaye Laurabee, 10/31 Alice Elizabeth Celmayster, 11/3 Elissandra James Guzman, 11/9 Jesenia Angeles Lujan, 11/9 Camila Lizette Gallegos, 11/19 Reign Marie Nelson, 11/19 June Louise Haggar, 11/20 Felicity Grace Pearce, 11/25 Virginia Twist Jones, 11/28 Ava Liu, 11/30 Evelyn Leniere Gensolin, 12/5 Charlie Tomo von Hoetzendorff, 12/14 Hattie Renae Hale, 12/19 Daisy Luna Araiza, 1/9 Santa Maria Freya Robin Boncquet, 10/11 Santa Ynez Saylor June Hubbard, 11/5

Is Your Boss Violating Your Rights? Adams Law focuses on Advocating employee rights in claims involving: • Wrongful Termination • Pregnancy Discrimination • Disability Discrimination • Hostile Work Environment • Sexual Harassment • Racial and Age Discrimination

• Misclassified “Salaried” Employees and Independent Contractors

• Working “Off the Clock” • Unpaid Overtime Compensation/Bonuses • Reimbursement for Work-Related Expenses

CALL US TODAY 805-845-9630 Visit our website at www.adamsemploymentlaw.com

Adams Law Serving the Employment Law Needs of California’s Central Coast 36

THE INDEPENDENT

JANUARY 25, 2018

INDEPENDENT.COM

(805) 845-9630

AFFECTED BY THE THOMAS FIRE?

FREE Air Filter Replacement (2 standard pleated air filters/system only)

Offering FREE Heater System Inspection Both specials – One visit per home – good thru 2/28/18

Call today to schedule your appointment

805-966-4321


living | Starshine

#ME … NOTSOMUCH?

L

adies, I gotta come clean. From the first time I saw it on a social media post, #metoo has rubbed me the wrong way. And I don’t mean, like, in a #metoo way. The first wave of confessions was powerful—a silent but staggering wail that exposed the shocking pervasiveness of sexual assault and oppressive harassment in a nation that regularly applauds itself for equality. For me, though, the hashtag became a maimed meme when women began tossing unsolicited ass pats and insufferable catcalls into the mix along with the egregious, menacing affronts. Though these may all be evidence of men treating us like property, it feels both insensitive and overly fragile to lump together the rapiest of rape with the old man saying, “Hey, how about a smile, sweetheart?” Then came the naming and shaming, the firing and blacklisting and the systematic picking apart of each public apology like flesh from a carcass. That’s when my hackles went on high alert — and for a couple of good reasons: I distrust a mob mentality, even one that starts with good intentions. When a serial predator like Harvey Weinstein is finally exposed after decades of premeditated perviness, it feels like sweet justice. But when the headlines give way to accusations of male celebs using “sexually explicit language” and trying desperately—even repugnantly—to get laid, it feels a little like dude-hunting season. I’m equally wary of the trial-by-Twitter trend that’s impacting careers while skirting due process. Hanging a proven email: starshine@roshell.com boob grabber or weiner waver in the public square and beating him with a stick may be satisfying, but it doesn’t address the larger systemic problem that made him think that was reasonable behavior. However … it’s entirely possible that the #metoo moment is making me uncomfortable for some lousy reasons, too. Sensitivity is not my strong suit. I don’t suffer from the need to “be nice” that keeps some women from speaking up in the moment when they’re harassed. I’ve said “Don’t call me honey” in professional settings and “Don’t touch me” in social settings. I once slapped a coworker across the face — in the office, in front of people — for his rude remark about how I was dressed, then sat remorseless through the official HR rebuke that followed. I seem to have an acute aversion to victimhood, which — apart from being a privilege enjoyed by women who’ve never been assaulted—may be a generational thing. As Gen-X feminists, my peers and I handled the imbalance of sexual power by ignoring it outright, roaring through both the workforce and the dating world in airtight “you don’t scare me” armor, muttering our mantra on loop until we believed it: They don’t have the power to hurt me … I won’t allow it … I’m tougher than I look. So when young women huddle together in groups to point fingers at men who hurt their feelings, I have to be honest: It doesn’t look like empowerment to me. Neither does anonymously cataloguing every salacious detail of your atrocious date with a sexually aggressive comedian (if she gets to be anonymous, then in my column, so does he). That’s not power as I recognize it. Or as I’ve always known it … and frankly, um, thought I had to embrace it. But zealous conversations with smart, evolved millennial girlfriends are teaching me to think differently about this collective cry of “ENOUGH” that’s emanating from women in every corner of the country. I’ve learned that airtight armor is out of fashion (though I’m gonna feel naked without mine). And I’m warming to the idea that the New Empowerment — the new tougher-than-I-look — might be having the gall to say, “Why should we have to avoid creeps, or pretend they don’t ruffle us? Why can’t we just insist that they not be creeps?” I mean … I honestly didn’t know that was an option. I don’t love some aspects of this movement. But I raise the Crystal Fist of Sisterhood to any hashtagging whippersnapper who dares to dream of lowering our guards and raising our expectations. Me, too.

Join us for an Open House! Saturday, January 27 | 11am-1pm Student Art Showcase / Fun Children’s Activities

RSVP or Drop By!

by Starshine

ROSHELL

Montessori Center School

Serving children 18 months - 6th grade

401 N. Fairview Ave. | 805-683-9383 | MCSSB.org

Santa BarBara Behavioral health can navigate your insurance benefits and quickly connect you with excellent psychiatric care. Our providers are highly trained and experienced, with expertise in a broad range of behavioral health specialties.

starshineroshell.com INDEPENDENT.COM

JANUARY 25, 2018

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37


E ON SAL

Y SAATTU1R1 ADMA

THEARLINGTONTHEATRE.COM / CHARGE BY PHONE 805-963-4408

ATE! D W E N

AT_Indy_180125_v1.indd 1

THURSDAY, FEB. 1, 6:30-8 PM Program begins promptly. We also invite you to take a family tour or spend a day as a student. Applications due February 12, 2018.

Happy 50th Anniversary Jesse and Jeanie Cantu January 27, 1968

- We Love You!

Marc, Kaye, Elliott, Christine, Leandra, and Iliana

JEWELRY COUPLES MARRIAGE Therapeutic Coaching AND The New Rules of Marriage Program (Terry Real) WATCH Are You In Pain About Your Marriage? Is Your Marriage in Crisis? REPAIR From Marriage Tune-up to Last Chance WENDY ALLEN,

Ph.D, MFT 1207 De La Vina Santa BarBara 805-962-2212 www.wendyphd.com #MFC21158

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Intensive Therapy

Fast Paced, Down-to-Earth, No Nonsence Work Promotes Long-Lasting Change

RAPID SERVICE ~ QUALITY WORK

805.569.3393 poshsb.com | info@poshsb.com

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JANUARY 25, 2018

INDEPENDENT.COM

3317 State St. Loreto Plaza - Santa Barbara

DO YOU HAVE A HARD TIME GETTING THE SERVICES YOUR CHILD NEEDS? Do you feel the school district does not listen to you at IEP/504 meetings? Coastal Special Education Advocacy can help. Call 805-588-3863 for a free 30 minute consultation Visit coastalspedadvocacy.com for more info.

1/22/18 5:03 PM


living | Sports

BIGHighCROWDS FOR BIG GAMES School Soccer, UCSB Basketball, and Who’s Talking at

ATHLETES OF THE WEEK

Jan. 7-13

the Women in Sports Luncheon

David Frohling, San Marcos boys’ basketball The senior forward scored 27 points as the Royals got their Channel League season off to a winning start at Dos Pueblos, 77-58.

PAUL WELLMAN PHOTOS

PAUL WELLMAN

G

ood crowds enjoyed strong performances by hometown teams last Saturday night as Santa Barbara, while still heartsick over the wounds wrought by manmade and natural disasters, took itself out to some winter ball games.

S.B. ATHLETIC ROUND TABLE:

HAT TRICK: Santa Barbara High’s Dons, the no.

3–ranked boys’ soccer team in the state, encountered spirited opposition from the San Marcos Royals in the fifth annual Super Soccer Showdown between the crosstown rivals. This one took place Saturday evening at SBCC’s La Playa Stadium, as high surf pounded the nearby shore J.C. GOES FOR THREE: Santa Barbara High’s Juan Carlos Torres (23), known as “J.C.,” knocks the first under a crescent moon. goal of his hat track past San Marcos goalkeeper Bryce Tomlinson. Although the Royals maintained possession of the ball for much of the match, they were unable to crack Santa while Leland King ripped down 14 rebounds. The AnteatBarbara’s final line of defense, and Dons forward Juan Car- ers were leading the nation in total rebounds, but UCSB los Torres made like his favorite topped them by a dozen. player, Luis Suárez, the Barcelona Rebounding and defense, any basketball coach will tell FC striker. you, are the keys to winning. The Gauchos were lax on “He goes for the ball and knows defense in their Big West Conference opener at Cal Poly, when they blew a big lead and lost, 80-79. how to finish,” Torres said. Torres put strong finishing “That was an eye-opener for us,” said Vincent. “It was a touches on three balls served to blessing in disguise.” Since then, Pasternack said, “Our guys him in striking range, and his hat trick lifted the Dons to a have really bought in to the defensive side of the ball.” 3-0 victory.“They set me up good,” Torres said of the crossing That commitment was evident last Thursday, when they passes from Heymar Hernandez, who accounted for two quelled the attack of a high-scoring Cal State Fullerton team and won, 83-64. They also put up a nice offensive display as assists, and Jorge Ochoa. San Marcos threatened on shots lofted by Owen Bates all five starters scored in double figures, led by sophomore and Levi Sheffey, but Santa Barbara goalkeeper Ben Roach guard Max Heidegger (24 points). had the reach to punch them away. The two victories moved the Gauchos to 14-5 overall The Dons are 10-0-3, with nine shutout wins.“Defensively, and 3-2 in the Big West. Their other conference loss was we’re zoned in,” coach Todd Heil said, “and we’re opportu- at Hawai‘i, by a score of 77-76. They were happy just to be playing that game, hours after they had received a monstrous nistic in front of the goal.” In the other varsity match of the Showdown, which raised scare—the inadvertent warning of a nuclear attack on the money for both schools’ soccer programs, a goal by Emily islands. Trujillo gave the San Marcos girls a 1-0 victory over their Hawai‘i will visit Santa Barbara on Thursday, February 1. Santa Barbara counterparts. The Gauchos hope to scare the Rainbow Warriors the oldfashioned way, with a big, noisy, hostile crowd. LATE SHOW: After UCSB’s 70-58 victory over UC Irvine in a nationally televised (ESPNU) men’s basketball game STRONG WOMEN: The Santa Barbara Athletic Round late Saturday night, Gaucho coach Joe Pasternack walked Table has lined up three dynamic public servants to headacross the court and raised a clenched fist toward the stu- line the annual Women and Girls in Sports Luncheon on dents who packed the west grandstand of the Thunderdome. February 5: Santa Barbara Police Chief Lori Luhnow, a “This was an awesome student environment,” Pasternack former college volleyball champion; UCSB Assistant Police said. “We’ve got to keep them coming back. They make the Chief Cathy Farley, who competed in track and field and community want to come as well.” attended the FBI National Academy; and Newport Beach Senior guard Gabe Vincent was grateful for the student Fire Engineer Erin Brown, a Gaucho basketball star in the turnout.“There’s a lot of things people of our age get into on ’90s. Saturday night,” he said. “Gotta love the ’Dome.” It was important for the Gauchos to put on a good show COLUMBIA-BOUND: John Harris, the outstanding runin front of the biggest crowd (3,823) of the season. It was an ning back on Bishop Diego’s state championship football anxiety-inducing back-and-forth battle until the score was team, has made a verbal commitment to attend Columbia tied, 47-47, at which point UCSB unleashed a glorious 12-0 University. Harris, also a strong defensive player, said he’s excited by the Lions’ upward trajectory under head coach run to head for its ninth consecutive home victory. Vincent, 11 months removed from knee surgery, scored 21 Al Bagnoli. They went 8-2 last year and had their highest points. Forward Jalen Canty had 20 points and 11 rebounds, Ivy League finish (second place) in 21 years. n

Milan McGary McGary, San Marcos girls’ basketball

The Royals girls had not won a league game in eight years until McGary, a senior, scored 17 in their 38-31 win at Dos Pueblos.

Jan. 14-20 Juan Carlos Torres, S.B. High boys’ soccer

The senior striker recorded a hat trick in a 3-0 win over San Marcos and was one of six Dons to score in their 6-0 win over Dos Pueblos.

Stephanie Yamada, UCSB women’s tennis

The junior won all her singles and doubles matches against UCLA and USC, helping UCSB beat the Trojans for the first time since 1994.

ERIC ISAACS/UCSB

ZANT

PAUL WELLMAN

by John

JOHN ZANT’S

INDEPENDENT.COM

GAME OF THE WEEK

1/25, 1/27: College Basketball: Hope International and Vanguard at Westmont The good

fortune of being safe from the Montecito mudslides enables Westmont to host a significant slate of games Thursday and Saturday. Hope International’s men (19-1, 5-0 in the Golden State Athletic Conference) have won 17 straight games and are ranked no. 7 in the NAIA. Westmont (14-4, 4-1, no. 20) dropped a close 74-71 decision to no. 4–ranked The Master’s on the road last week. The no. 12 Warrior women (11-5, 4-1) will get their big test Saturday against no. 2 Vanguard (14-1, 4-1). Women: 5:30pm; men: 7:30pm. Murchison Gym, Westmont College, 955 La Paz Rd. Free-$6. Call 565-6010. JANUARY 25, 2018

THE INDEPENDENT

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TH E MOTH

M

a

i

n

S

t

a

g

e

The moth in santa barbara April 4, 7pm @ Lobero Theatre Pre-Party with KCRW DJ Anne litt

Tickets at kcrw.com/themothsb 40

THE INDEPENDENT

JANUARY 25, 2018

INDEPENDENT.COM


atch small b

FOOD &DRINK

p.41

Get to Know These Garagistes FOUR WINE BRANDS YOU’VE NEVER HEARD OF POURING NEXT MONTH IN SOLVANG

D

the single-best place to taste wines from producers you’ve never seen before. Here are four worth your palate’s attention at the grand tasting on February 10, which is preceded by a Q&A with legendary syrah winemaker Bob Lindquist of Qupé at 11:30 a.m. Those seeking more can attend a rare and reserve dinner on Friday, February 9, or explore the passport tasting options on Sunday, February 11. See californiagaragistes.com for details and ticket options ($50-$110).

PHIL KAPLAN @ VELVET BEE MARISA BEVERLY @ BEVELA The niece of renowned Au Bon Climat winemaker Jim Clendenen, Beverly was born into wine. “When I was a child, his wine was brought out on special occasions — my parents didn’t drink alcohol otherwise — so I associated wine with something special and rare,” explained Beverly, who visited Clendenen at least twice a year and decided at age 15 to be a winemaker. She’s been working under his wing since 2008 and started Bevela with her husband, Kris, during the 2010 vintage. How’d you get into making teroldego? Teroldego is a variety that just gets my heart

Born and raised in Downey, Kaplan has been a successful trial attorney for more than 30 years. In 2009, he and his wife, Collette, bought a vineyard in the Santa Ynez Valley. Three years later, Kaplan dove in deep to start his own brand, sourcing Sta. Rita Hills pinot noir, chardonnay, and sauvignon blanc. Did you have a wine epiphany moment? The one that stands out is a visit in

1978 to Navarro Vineyards in Philo. It was the vibe of the Bennetts and staff — firmly stuck in the tie-dyed 1960s, turning out this mind-blowing gewürztraminer. It always stuck with me that if this was ever something that I could do, I would love to make wine. How has your mentor, Joe Davis of Arcadian Winery, influenced your style? The big-

gest factor is restraint. Joe has stopped me on multiple occasions from freaking out, trying to intervene when I shouldn’t, and not letting the pinot noir in the barrel evolve. I have also followed Joe’s lead in picking earlier than many, with a focus on making sure that the acids have not fallen out before the grapes are harvested.

pumping. The size of the clusters, the color of the wine, and the natural acidity — it’s just a stunning, rare Italian variety. It is a wine that opens beautifully over time in the glass and can be paired with a variety of foods. This is a passion project of mine, and I started making teroldego in 2010 from the only vines planted in Santa Barbara County. These vines are grown at Jim’s estate vineyard, Le Bon Climat, and there is a little more than half an acre planted. How’d you get to work with the vines? I have an amazing uncle that was willing to take

a chance on his niece and her dreams of becoming a winemaker. There is also a deep love for Italy in my blood, so I couldn’t pass up this opportunity. Another special aspect of my teroldego is that I started aging it in barrel for five years before bottling. A lot of new winemakers cannot do this, simply because it is not cost-effective for them. I was able to let my wine soften and become more elegant in barrel.

Tell me about the name “Velvet Bee.”

to continue our family tradition of winemaking.

“Velvet Bee” is a tip of the cap to the bees that work our lavender field in front of our house in Los Olivos. “Velvet” is to put you in the mindset of the wine experience we hope to create.

See bevelawines.com.

See velvetbeewine.com.

And you just had a baby? As my uncle provided for me, I hope to inspire my son, Lucius,

• WINE GUIDE

FOOD & DRINK •

Dining Out Guide

Dining Out Guide

COURTESY PHOTOS

[Longer versions of these interviews are online at independent.com/gf18.]

FOOD & DRINK •

• WINE GUIDE

oug Minnick and Stewart McLennan struck gold at the exactly right time when they launched the first-ever Garagiste Festival in Paso Robles back in 2011. Boutique winemaking was on a sharp rise on the Central Coast, so much so that they expanded to host events across the state and even started their own wine labels. (Minnick’s is Hoi Polloi, while McLennan’s is Golden Triangle.) Today, that small-batch winemaking spirit is still booming around these parts, and the upcoming Garagiste Festival: Southern Exposure in Solvang — which, in the Time-Flies Department, marks the sixth time the tasting has come here — is

BY MAT KETTMANTN

Cont’d on p. 43 >>> INDEPENDENT.COM

JANUARY 25, 2018

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Bread, butter & marinated olives $5 Soup du jour $8 Mixed green salad, tomato, red onion, red wine vinaigrette $10 Grilled peaches, roasted beets & whipped lemon goat cheese $10 Kale caesar salad, toasted almonds $8 Artisan cheese board $12.50 Norweigan smoked salmon, capers, red onion, cream cheese $11 Patě maison $12 Frog legs, sauce provencal $11 Crostini of seasonal mushrooms $11 Crab cake, roast garlic sauce $11 Crisp crěpe of escargots, red wine sauce $11 Roasted quail, Turkish fig, grapes and green olives $12

Large plates Petrale sole, lemon & caper sauce $22 Seared salmon, roasted fennel & turmeric grits $22 Grilled shrimp skewers over watermelon, mango, and peaches $22 10 oz. pork loin chop, fig & fennel chutney $22 Seared duck breast, char siu sauce $22 Veal milanese, warm brie & prosciutto $22 Roasted chicken thighs, lemongrass & ginger $22 Flat iron steak, red wine reduction $22 Venison seared rare served with seasonal vegetables, chimichurri $25 *sample menu

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ERIC JOHNSON @ ANN ALBERT WINES COURTESY PHOTOS

Having grown up in Los Banos on a family farm surrounded by apple orchards, Johnson fell in love with wine while a student at Cal Poly. In 2007, he worked as a harvest intern for Talley Vineyards and became winemaker for that pioneering winery in 2010. Ann Albert is his side project with his wife, Cait.

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Did you have a wine epiphany moment? I feel like I have had

What’s Ann Albert all about? Ann Albert is a combination of my

See annalbertwines.com.

MATT VILLARD @ MCV WINES

How’d MCV start? I was working

in Napa at the start of the harvest and ended up hurting my knee. The company replaced me, so I came back down to the Central Coast, where I was living when not away on harvest, and started making phone calls looking for work or grapes. I ended up finding a production facility and four tons of petite sirah, and I started MCV. Why petite sirah? I love petite sirah. It has a unique versatility that

• WINE GUIDE

Originally from Visalia, Villard grew up with parents who were very much into good wine. During his sixth year of winemaking, he found some excellent petite sirah, and launched his label in 2011, focused primarily on inky wines of power and circumstance.

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Dining Out Guide

wife’s and my middle names — I’m the “Albert” and she’s the “Ann.” My wife, Cait, is very passionate about wine and has worked in the wine industry in the past. We love chardonnay, specifically Chablis, and we wanted to make chardonnay in that fresh, vibrant style that we love so much. In 2017, we also brought on gamay from Martian Ranch & Vineyard. We are lucky to have the opportunity to work with it.

FOOD & DRINK •

so many wine epiphanies, but it definitely started with some Raveneau Les Clos that Brian Talley shared with me early on in my career. That’s when I knew what great chardonnay could become. I also remember when I was just 21 having a taste of Sine Qua Non, and the texture blew my mind. I never knew something so grand could be so silky smooth. The greatest epiphany I have ever had, though, was more a conversation I had — while drinking wine, of course — with Frédéric Mugnier in Burgundy. He talked to me about the impact the vintner can have on a wine and kept saying, “You always achieve more when you do less.” Those words have stuck with me ever since. Doesn’t hurt that he makes some of the best red Burgundy in the world.

The Santa Barbara Symphony marks the 100th Anniversary of Leonard Bernstein’s birth with some of his best known-works from Fancy Free, West Side Story and more accompanied by soprano Lisa Vroman and the Santa Barbara Choral Society. Program will also feature American composers Aaron Copland and Robin Frost.

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SAT FEB 10 7:00P “VALENTUNES: AN A CAPPELLA SHOWCASE” The Luke Theatre proudly presents the incredibly talented a cappella groups from UCSB. Featuring performances from BFOM, InterVals, Naked Voices, and VocalMotion. This show will be hosted by hilarious members of UCSB’s premiere improv group, Improvability. For more info and tickets please visit www.lobero.com or call 805-963-0761. Don’t miss this spectacular evening of entertainment!

really allows the winemaker the ability to make it their own. Paso is known for its heavy, dark wine, so working with petite sirah, tannat, and petit verdot makes sense. They also work incredibly well from a wine standpoint. Tannat is a front-palate, acid-retentive black varietal. Petite sirah is a mid-palate structural black grape, and petit verdot is a back-palate structure and age-ability booster. So together, like in my “Black” bottling, they make for a GSM-style wine but utilizing black grapes.

“LA CUNETA SON MACHIN” The Luke Theatre and UCSB A&L present this FREE family show as part of the Viva el Arte SB concert series. Nicaragua’s first artists to be nominated for a Grammy, this dynamic group has created a unique style based on popular folkórico, infused with rock, marimba, cumbia and ska. For more info please visit www.facebook.com/vivaelartesb.

Where do you fit in the current wine landscape of the Central Coast?

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Currently, I feel like we’re still the small, new guys on the block. We’re a family-owned, boutique winery. I do all the production, and my wife, Teresa, runs the tasting room and sales. It’s not uncommon to see our son at the tasting room or events. This really allows us to give our clientele a very personal experience. See mcvwines.com.

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SUN FEB 25 AT 3:30P presents this FREE celebration of a century of Black History, life and culture. This 8th annual event brings the community together and this year’s national theme is “A Tribute to African Americans in Time of War.” For more info please e-mail visionsofhope@cox.net or call 805-455-2765. The Gospel music will bring you to your feet and the spiritual message will give you a vision of hope!

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Sip This r

William Fèvre Chablis 1er Cru ‘Montée de Tonnerre’ 2015

I

f you want to know what separates French chardonnay from American, and you’ve got a spare $50, here’s your bottle. Since 1959, William Fèvre has been making great Chablis, and now it’s one of the area’s biggest landowners. Montée de Tonnerre is one of the domaine’s eight 1er crus, and it’s a balanced, knife-edge of excitement. Unfortunately, hailstorms mean that there is very little of it from this otherwise fine vintage. Like much of Chablis, it features mineral, almost flinty notes, and a racy salinity, but you can’t miss the fantastic fruit notes of lime zest and white peach, too. Refreshing as it is now, it should also age and delight. See williamfevre.fr/en/.

onal and ia tells are so pers gl bi ir B s le ta e h “T just as ble – he’s clearly honest and relata life as the rest of by d se fu n co d an amused t feels like im perform almos h e se to at th – us ine room.” Paste Magaz you’re in his living nd’s d behind My Girlfrie in rm te as m y ed m From the co w One, r Jokes comes The Ne fo d Go k an Th d an Boyfriend in ytelling and stand-up or st of d en bl us rio a hila style. st, self-deprecating ne ho s ’ lia ig rb Bi e ik M

FOOD & DRINK •

Dining Out Guide

r

Eat This

MATT KETTMANN

— George Yatchisin

• WINE GUIDE

Hot Chicken Bao @ Sama Sama

T

here’s no need to go to Nashville for hot chicken. Just head to Sama Sama on State Street, and order the Hot Chicken Bao ($13). Sure, you can order the bun fried, but we recommend you go full-steamed bao ahead. The rule with anything truly hot and spicy is that you need something soft and comforting to contain it. Rather than thick slices of white bread, the steamed bun on this sandwich acts like a pillow to hold the perfectly fried and sauced chicken inside. A honey-cayenne butter coating on the bun along with creamy spicy aioli, arugula, pickles, and pickled onions work together to make this sandwich a real menu standout. This dish, with the combination of spicy, sweet, tangy, crispy, and oh-so-soft, is something you need to wrap your hands around and sink your teeth into. While other fried chicken may be so-called finger lickin’, this steamed hot chicken bao is absolutely teeth-sticking good. The soft, malleable dough will adhere to your chompers in a way that we can only recommend washing down with a swig of a — Carina Ost fancy cocktail at the bar. 1208 State St.; 965-4566; samasamakitchen.com

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the celebration of life for beloved bartender Sunny Quinn, who worked at Mel’s Lounge and Pascucci Restaurant and lost her battle with cancer last December. While talking with several of the hundreds of people in attendance, I was told a few things about the restaurants at San Ysidro Ranch at 900 San Ysidro Lane, which suffered extreme damage from debris flow during the tragic January 9 floods in Montecito. None of the information I received has been confirmed. Though some maps showed otherwise, I was told that The Stonehouse and Plow & Angel building is not destroyed, which would be a relief to many fans of the popular venue. I was also told that San Ysidro Ranch owner, billionaire Ty Warner, is continuing to pay full salary, including tips, to restaurant staff. That is amazing if true. MESA BURGER HELPS EVACUEES: Until the end of Jan-

uary, Mesa Burger at 315 Meigs Road is offering free meals to evacuees of the horrific Montecito floods. Mesa Burger had run an earlier promotion where 50 percent of all proceeds went to Direct Relief. Mesa Burger is open daily, 11 a.m.-9 p.m. HOW TO HELP RESTAURANTS? This just in from reader

Jessica: “A couple nonprofits I’m on the board of

MUNDOS UPDATE: Reader Brendan says that Mun-

dos at Canon Perdido and Milpas (the building with the cow) has a sign on the door that says: “Under the tragedy of the Thomas fire in December that caused us a financial setback, we had to take the difficult decision to close temporarily our lunch starting Monday, January 15.” The sign says they will still be open for dinner MondaySaturday, 5-9 p.m. HARRY’S PLAZA CAFÉ 50TH ANNIVERSARY: Reader Brendan also let me know that Harry’s Plaza Café at 3313 State Street is having an eye-popping deal as a 50th-anniversary special all through the month of January. Any day Sunday-Thursday, you can get a plate of Omaha slow-roasted tri-tip with fries and salad for $8. No substitutions or take-outs. FIRE AT ALPHIE’S: Edhat.com reports that firefight-

Come visit Santa Barbara’s premier destination wine shop. Plenty of space for wine, no room for snobbery...

One block over from our sister establishment Savoy Cafe & Deli! 18 West AnApAmu st • sAntA BArBArA, CA

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• WINE GUIDE

SAN YSIDRO RANCH UPDATE: Last weekend, I was at

would love to help local restaurants. Do you know of any local restaurants that have been particularly hard-hit by the fire/mudslides for which we could provide funds to host a buffet-style meal for evacuees and first responders? Just trying to do the most good!” If you send a message to my email address below, I will forward it to Jessica.

Dining Out Guide

ith the reopening of Highway 101 and Coast Village Road, Stella Mare’s Bistro at 50 Los Patos Way is one of many restaurants in the Montecito area to try to make a comeback after the devastating floods and debris flows. I spoke with Danny Casillas, manager at sister restaurant Café Stella, who told me that owner Philippe Rousseau hopes to be back in business Thursday, January 25. “Thank you to everyone who has reached out to us, and thank you for your support,” said Rousseau.“Stella Mare’s and our staff are all safe, and the restaurant suffered very little damage, but there is so much destruction and personal tragedy around us in our community. Many thanks to the first responders, volunteers, and anyone working so hard since this tragedy occurred. Thank you for their tireless efforts. Our thoughts and prayers go out to all our friends and neighbors! Our staff is anxious to get back to work, and we are looking forward to see all your familiar faces!”

FOOD & DRINK •

Restaurants Begin to Reopen in Montecito

WELCOME BACK: Stella Mare’s reopens after flood-related freeway closures ended all public access to the restaurant.

ers put out a kitchen fire in Alphie’s Restaurant in Old Town Goleta on January 14. I’m told that crews arrived at 5725 Hollister Avenue at 4:35 p.m. after a report of a commercial building fire and discovered smoke and flames in the front of the restaurant, originating in the kitchen. The fire was quickly knocked down, said Santa Barbara County Fire Department Public Information Officer Mike Eliason. No injuries were reported, and an investigator is looking into the cause of the fire. VEGAN RESTAURANT COMING TO UPPER STATE: Here is a

tip from reader Lindsey:“I love your blog and have been following it for the past three years that we’ve lived here. There’s a sign out for a ‘Vegan Green’ restaurant at 3613 State Street, in the old location of Miso Hungry.” THAT’S THE SPIRIT: This just in from reader Tony: “Interesting development: Alcohol license notice at the Metro theaters at the Camino Real Marketplace in Goleta!”

John Dickson’s reporting can be found every day online at SantaBarbara.com. Send tips to info@SantaBarbara.com. INDEPENDENT.COM

JANUARY 25, 2018

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Spanish Beef Stew

Cook This COURTESY

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Ingredients: 4 pounds lean beef 6 quarts water 1 Tbsp salt ¼ tsp black pepper 1 clove garlic 3 stalks celery 2 dried log red chilies 2 turnips 2 carrots 2 cups garbanzo beans, cooked

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IRISH Dargan’s Irish Pub & Restaurant, 18 E. Ortega St. (next to lot 10) SB, 568‑0702. $$. Open 7 days 11:30a‑Close (Food ‘til 10p, 11p on Sat/Sun). AE MC V Disc. Authentic Irish food & atmosphere in downtown SB. Specialties from Ireland include Seafood & Meat dishes. Informal, relaxed pub‑style atmosphere. Live music Thursday nights. Children welcome. Avail. for private parties. Pool & Darts. ITALIAN FINE DINING Actor’s Corner Cafe fine dining restaurant presents: “Cook with Love” the workshop. Each Saturday the workshop starts at 12:00 PM and ends at 4:00 PM. To book your seat please call: 805 686‑2409. More information is available at www.actorscornercafe.com STEAK Rodney’s Grill, 633 East Cabrillo Boulevard at The Fess Parker – A Doubletree by Hilton Resort 805‑564‑4333. Serving 5pm ‑10pm Tuesday through Saturday. Rodney’s Grill is a fresh American grill experience. Enjoy all natural hormone‑free beef, locally‑sourced seafood, appetizers, and incredible desserts. The place to enjoy dinner with family and friends by the beach. Private Dining Room for 30. Full cocktail bar with specialty cocktails. Wine cellar with Santa Barbara County & California’s best vintages by‑the‑glass.

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ETHIOPIAN

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Dining Out Guide

Cut meat into 2-inch cubes; place in a large kettle; add water and bring to a quick boil. Skim until no scum remains, and then add salt and pepper. Add onions, garlic, celery cut into 1-inch pieces, chilies, turnips, and carrots. Simmer for 2 hours. Add the cooked garbanzo beans and let simmer until all vegetables are well done, about 1 hour. Serves 6 generously. — Matt Kettmann

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A scene from last year’s Presidio Pastimes by Candlelight

FOOD & DRINK •

Guide

2 0 1 7

z

PAID

BARBARA’S BEST

IN A ROW!

olonial cuisine takes center stage at the upcoming Presidio Pastimes by Candlelight event at El Presidio de Santa Bárbara State Historic Park on Thursday, February 1, from 5 to 8 p.m., when the old Spanish fort hosts an interactive evening during the monthly 1st Thursday series downtown. Visitors will be able to speak with soldiers dressed in authentic garb, listen and dance to old Californio music, and watch as dishes are prepared with traditional methods while sipping on wine and hot chocolate. One such dish on the menu is Spanish Beef Stew, a recipe adapted from Bess A. Cleveland’s 1965 book, California Mission Recipes. “Beef was a standard source of protein for the 200 residents of El Presidio de Santa Barbara in the late 18th and early 19th centuries,” said Anne Petersen, the S.B. Trust for Historic Preservation’s executive director.“The Spanish fort maintained herds of cattle to support the population, and all parts of the animal were consumed as food or processed for leather and tallow. This recipe is particularly suited to tougher cuts of meat. After simmering for hours, the beef makes a flavorful broth and develops a more tender texture.” In case you miss the event, here’s how to make this easy dish at home.

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SAT JAN 27 8PM

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PILOBOLUS DANCE THEATER SUN JAN 28 7PM

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KENNY LOGGINS & JIM MESSINA

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PAUL WELLMAN PHOTOS

EMAIL: ARTS@INDEPENDENT.COM Alec Mendoza (left) and Brittany Carr, both managers at PuppetPalooza Central, pose with Jack

L I F E PAUL WELLMAN FILE PHOTO

PAGE 51

COURTESY

THE MUPPETS ARE COMING

S

he was born in 1976. She is known for her fashion sense, karate skills, bon mots (e.g.,“Treat the world like your runway, because who says it isn’t?”), and on-and-off relationship with a certain famous frog. She is Miss Piggy, and she’s coming to Santa Barbara— Barbara along with a Muppet entourage that includes Fozzie Bear, Rowlf the Dog, and the aforementioned Kermit, among others—as part of the first-ever PuppetPalooza, a four-day festival taking place around town this spring. Along with the Muppets’ appearance, which falls on the second day of the festival, the city will be filled with all manner of puppets (sock, shadow, marionettes,

BELOVED CHARACTERS TO HEADLINE S.B.’S PUPPETPALOOZA

and bunraku, to name a few) and puppeteers, including luminary Phillip Huber, the Emmy Award–winning marionettist from the film Being John Malkovich, and

Tarish “Jeghetto” Pipkins, the puppeteer from the Missy Elliott and Pharrell music video “WTF (Where They From).” There will also be workshops, pop-up puppet theaters, loads of events for the kiddies, and a Puppetzilla Puppet Slam for folks age 18 and older. While puppet festivals are popular in Europe and have been held in U.S. cities such as Nashville and Chicago, PuppetPalooza is the first West Coast event of its kind, according to Mitchell Kriegman, one of the event organizers. Considering the lineup of notable puppeteers, performances, workshops, and puppet films, PuppetPalooza is bound to bring some much-needed delight and whimsy to our seaside burg.“It’s going to be a frenzy of fun,” said Kriegman. Although the festival proper doesn’t begin until March 1, folks can get a taste of things to come at the kickoff party on Saturday, January 27, 4-7 p.m. at PuppetPalooza Central, a store/museum in Paseo Nuevo. The family-friendly event includes giant bubbles, puppet videos, jugglers, and memorabilia, among other offerings. John Palminteri and his new sidekick, a specially made John Palminteri puppet, will also be on hand. Pop over to Puppet Central store and museum for myriad goings-on from now through March 4. For more information on all festival events, see puppetpaloozasb.com.

CELEBRATING

‘DOWNTOWN’

ALAN

BROWN Chances are that if you have ever attended a concert at SOhO, you’ve enjoyed the sound-mixing artistry of Alan Brown. A wizard behind the boards, Brown has helped thousands of musicians, from the world-famous to the unknown, to realize their goals and reach their potential in a live setting. Known far and wide for his sensitive, intuitive mixes and the extravagant costumes he devises each year for his pilgrimage to the Burning Man festival, Brown has held down the board at SOhO for two decades. Although his final work night was New Year’s Eve, the crew at SOhO have called Brown back for a retirement party on Saturday, January 27, at 6 p.m. The invitation promises face painting, fire spinning, and playa dust, and suggests that guests come attired in their best moon boots, top hats, tutus, goggles, glitter, and glow sticks. When I spoke with Brown last week by phone, he was at home connecting a mixing board to his computer. Asked about his most memorable moments at SOhO, he was quick to answer that there was one thing that always made his night. “Any time I worked with someone who had never played their music through an actual sound system before, that was always special,” he said. “I loved being part of a defining moment for them. Getting up on a real stage and hearing what they could do in that setting for the first time was consistently a thrill. People would come off after their set saying, ‘I can sound like that! How great!’” —Charles Donelan

—Michelle Drown

M O R E A R T S & E N T E R TA I N M E N T > > > INDEPENDENT.COM

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Celebrate Santa Barbara! JAN 31 - FEB 10, 2018

Enjoy films, dining, art, culture, and beauty... Get your tribute and film tickets today! OUTSTANDING

PERFORMERS OF THE YEAR I, Tonya

AWARD MARGOT ROBBIE + ALLISON JANNEY

FEBRUARY 8, 2018

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Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri

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FOR SCHEDULES, TICKETS, OR QUESTIONS CALL OR VISIT OUR WEBSITE

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COURTESY

a&e | THEATER PREVIEW THE UCSB MULTICULTURAL CENTER PRESENTS

Armenian and Middle Eastern Jazz Ensemble

Souren Baronian’s Takism

HELLO, DOLLIES! Brian McDonald stars as Alex More, an actor who takes the job of tending to Barbra Streisand’s private mall, in the comedic one-man show Buyer & Cellar.

A STAR AND HER STUFF

B

arbra Streisand’s fans have cherished hour and 45 minutes without an intermisher eccentricities for decades, but it sion,” adding that, because of the pace of the wasn’t until the 2010 publication of the writing, it “feels fast.”“It’s not a musical, but it’s coffee-table book My Passion for Design that a very musical piece,” said McDonald. And most of them learned of the existence of the although he portrays Streisand, what he does star’s Malibu bunker. Streisand remodeled her is “not an impersonation” but rather the kind waterfront compound to include a basement of vocal representation one might use when arranged as a shopping mall with “stores” telling a story. displaying her various collections of dolls In fact, personal storytelling is part of the and other objects, and here were the pictures premise of Buyer & Cellar, as much of what to prove it. For playwright Jonathan Tolins, Alex says is framed as what he has told his the idea of a whole mall with just one cus- screenwriter boyfriend, Barry, about the tomer naturally suggested that there would latest crazy happenings chez Babs. Accordhave to be at least ing to McDonald, one employee, and this helps the show BRIAN McDONALD MINDS from that kernel he BARBRA STREISAND’S PRIVATE MALL IN to cover topics and extrapolated the onestories that might be man show Buyer & familiar to Streisand’s Cellar, which opens fans, but that require this Saturday, Januby Charles Donelan explanation for the ary 27, at the Rubirest of the audience. con Theatre in Ventura. Brian McDonald “It doesn’t feel like exposition,” according to stars as Alex More, the actor who takes the McDonald, because the character of Barry job of tending to Barbra Streisand’s private allows these topics to “come up in a fun and mall after an unfortunate misunderstanding inventive way.” with his previous employer — Toontown at In the imaginary world of the play, Alex’s Disneyland. job in the mall leads to an intense personal The show was a hit for the Rattlestick Play- relationship with Streisand, and he develops wrights Theater in Manhattan, and it has gone a protective affection for her that tempers the on to receive much acclaim in other produc- show’s tendency toward more biting forms tions all over the country. It will be especially of satire. “It’s about a woman who has surexciting to see what the multitalented actor/ rounded herself with stuff,” said McDonald, director McDonald brings to this role, or “and at the same time she doesn’t know who roles, as in the course of telling his Streisand to trust.” For the actor, the most important story, Alex must assume the parts of four change that Alex goes through is that he other characters, even to the point of speaking “learns what role things play in our lives, and both voices in a dialogue. he shares that lesson with the audience.” In McDonald, who has previously delighted light of the terrible losses our community has audiences with his take on David Sedaris’s suffered in recent weeks, McDonald hopes Santaland Diaries, describes the challenge that this show’s thoughtful brand of light of this new project as a substantial one. comedy will bring us all some relief in the “That was a little over an hour,” he said of form of laughter, and some wisdom about the Sedaris, “while Buyer & Cellar runs one what really matters.

BUYER & CELLAR

4•1•1

Buyer & Cellar opens on Saturday, January 27, and runs through Sunday, February 11, at the Rubicon Theatre (1006 E. Main St., Ventura). For tickets and information, call 667-2900 or visit rubicontheatre.org.

FRI, JAN 26TH, 7:30 PM MUSIC PERFORMANCE/MCC THEATER $5 for UCSB students and youth under 12; $15 for general admission. https://goo.gl/DAi3aV FOR THE FULL WINTER 2018 CALENDAR, VISIT MCC.SA.UCSB.EDU

UCSBMCC

Santa Barbara Human Resources Association presents HARASSMENT AND SEXUAL HARASSMENT IN THE WORKPLACE THE CHALLENGE OF CHANGE

Thursday, February 1, 2018 | 8:30am – 11:30am (Registration begins at 8am)

Marriott Residence Inn | 6350 Hollister Ave | Goleta Harassment doesn’t discriminate. It affects all of our employees: all genders, all ages, all races and religions, and recent headlines and social media movements have increased awareness and incited a call to action! How will you respond? Join the Santa Barbara Human Resources Association for a panel discussion with local experts, followed by a roundtable to share your own experiences, challenges and best practices, and network with one of your most valuable resources, each other!

Industry Experts Include: Jeff Dinkin — Stradling Attorneys at Law, chair of Stradling’s Employment Law practice group, representing management in all aspects of labor and employment law

Jonathan Miller — Tobin Lucks LLP, Attorney with an expertise in Worker’s Compensation

Lois Phillips, PhD — Phillips Consulting Services, Communications Consultant and Coach

Josh Stichter, CIC — HUB International, Certified Insurance Counselor with a specialty in Executive Liability

Following this seminar, you will walk away with a stronger understanding of the new reality of the issue, tips & tools, and a network of people that you can reach out to for assistance in dealing with harassment should it happen within your organization. REGISTRATION Members: $40 / Walk-in: $50 | Non-Member: $55 / Walk-in: $65 Register now at www.sbhra.org INDEPENDENT.COM

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CONCERTS FOR

FRI, FEB 2, 7 PM SAT, FEB 3, 4 PM

RECOVERY

Hahn Hall, 1070 Fairway Road Free admission, advance tickets recommended musicacademy.org/hope

AND

HOPE The Board of Directors, administration, faculty and alumni of the Music Academy of the West are heartbroken about the devastation in the area, lives lost, and neighbors injured. The Academy offers a space and music for people to come together for comfort amidst the neighborhood that was heavily impacted by the winter storm and mudslides. Music Academy of the West faculty and alumni will offer music of peace and joy to help heal our community. All are welcome.

The Work with Byron Katie at the Center

By Donation—1 FEB 2018 213 N. Montgomery St. OJAI, CA

Were you impacted by the Thomas Fire? Let’s do The Work.

Attend on-site: register at the door

Center for The Work, Ojai + live webcast

Attend online: livewithbyronkatie.com ©2018 Byron Katie International, Inc. All rights reserved. BK Photo: Rick Rusing thework.com

54

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JANUARY 25, 2018

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a&e | CLASSICAL PREVIEW

TENSE TIMES CALL FOR POWERFUL PERCUSSION COURTESY

“A

percussion concerto doesn’t have the same set of rules as a piano concerto,” insisted Joseph Pereira. He should know. As principal timpanist of the Los Angeles Philharmonic, he regularly plays such pieces — and sometimes writes them. His latest work, a triple concerto for two percussionists and a timpanist titled Threshold, will premiere this weekend in two locations: Walt Disney Concert Hall and, on Saturday evening, The Granada Theatre. The virtuoso percussion duo Maraca2, plus the composer himself, will be the soloists. The program, conducted by music director Gustavo Dudamel, also includes Brahms’s First Symphony. Pereira, who is in his 10th season with the L.A. Phil (and spent 10 years with the New York Philharmonic before that), is no stranger to Santa Barbara: He joined the Music Academy of the West faculty last year. In a recent interview, he described his new piece and the challenges of being both a composer and a performer. What are you trying to express with this work? I’m trying to capture that feeling of tension and anxiety, no matter which side of the fence, or fences, you are on. It seems like every day there’s something new to deal with. How do you accomplish that? The strings of the orchestra often make percussive sounds. I call it “vertical bowing.” They’re bowing up and down the instrument. This creates an airy echo of a pitch. They’re taking on the character, the sound of the percussion. The actual pitches the piece is built on symbolize physical speech—human interaction. The airy sound symbolizes nature. They represent something bigger than what’s going on now—something bigger than us. There are also repetitive chanting rhythms. To me, they symbolize religion and hope for togetherness. Those three elements helped me to tie everything together. Who are some of your influences as a composer? Bartók is a favorite. I spend a lot of time studying scores. I’m always looking for new pieces. Also, I’ve been playing in orchestras for 20 years now, so I’ve been indirectly influenced by Beethoven and other masters of the standard repertoire. Because of those influences, I’m very particular about the form of my pieces— how they move from one section to the next. I’m very strict about that.

4•1•1

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L.A. PHIL’S

JOSEPH PEREIRA DISCUSSES HIS NEW, ANXIETY-INSPIRED CONCERTO by Tom Jacobs

How much latitude do the soloists have to improvise? There’s quite a bit. This duo likes to play high-energy music that has a groove feel to it. I had to find a way to give them the flexibility to do that when they wanted to. I’m pretty flexible about someone interpreting it, as long as the formal structure is there. There’s a spot where they’re playing on lightly amplified ceramic tiles. Rhythms emerge, and then they go to a section where they create waves of sound by scraping two rocks. I wrote out the big-picture rhythms, but it’s going to be better in the end if they go with the rhythm that’s created by the circular motion of their hands. Do you enjoy playing your own music? I try to separate my composer self from my performer self. I’ll write something and then take a step back to the other side and make it work [for the performer]. I finished this piece just before the holiday break. I then spent the break learning my part. It was strange. I felt like a different person.

CAMA presents the Los Angeles Philharmonic Saturday, January 27, 8 p.m., at The Granada Theatre (1214 State St.). Tickets are $39-$119. Call 899-2222 or see camasb.org. INDEPENDENT.COM

JANUARY 25, 2018

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55


DAVID BAZEMORE

Santa Barbara

& ENTERTAINMENT

REVIEWS 

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Sponsored Locally By

CLASSICAL

Conductor David Robertson

ST. LOUIS SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA

O

DIANE RUSHING

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GAME ON! Kick off your Super Bowl Sunday with a breathtaking 4-mile run/walk along the Santa Barbara waterfront. Wear your favorite team jersey as you’re being cheered through the finish. Super Bowl t-shirts provided for all participants Unique football awards for age group winners Refreshments For more information or to register please go to sbactionprol.com

FEBRUARY 4TH, 2018 56

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JANUARY 25, 2018

INDEPENDENT.COM

n Tuesday night, this large and venerable orchestra earned its first ovation before playing a note. The applause came in response to an announcement that the group had taken the long detour around the closed portion of Highway 101 to be at the Granada in time for the concert. A At The Granada grateful crowd embraced Theatre, Tue., the respite they offered Jan. 16. from the harsh blows dealt our community over the last month, and they were rewarded with an outstanding program of music. First came a relatively recent piece, the orchestral suite that composer Thomas Adès has derived from his 1995 opera, Powder Her Face. It’s a tempestuous, wind-driven affair, and maestro David Robertson coaxed an appropriately Gershwin-esque performance from the players. Next up was another work

out of England, Benjamin Britten’s “Violin Concerto, Op. 15,” dramatically different in tone but similarly sophisticated in its exploitation of the instrumental range of the modern orchestra. Soloist Augustin Hadelich showed supreme control over the course of the work’s many dynamic shifts, and delivered a memorable cadenza in the work’s final passacaglia movement. He capped it off with an encore, the saraband for solo violin of J.S. Bach. The rarely heard Symphony No. 1 in F Minor, Op. 10 of Dmitri Shostakovich rounded out an unusually thought-provoking program by connecting that composer’s imaginative freedom with the expressiveness of such distant followers as Britten and Adès. Listening to the trombone slice through the symphony’s final movement brought us all back to experience further the primordial power of brass. —Charles Donelan

DANCE

SANTA BARBARA DANCE THEATER

T

he first Santa Barbara dance company out of the gates after an unsettling sequence of community natural disasters, Santa Barbara Dance Theater (SBDT) rose to the formidable occasion this past weekend with a poignant and disarming program that juxtaposed personal and political tragedy with vigorous optimism and knee-slapAt UCSB’s Hatlen Theater, Wed., Jan. 17. ping humor. Artistic Director Christopher Pilafian kicked off the evening with “Toggle,” an energetic burst of shapes and embers expertly depicting the vibrancy of the human life force and aided by the rhythmic dexterity of UCSB’s Music Department, before turning it over to the ladies—four guest choreographers whose work leapt off the stage in satisfying ebbs and flows of energy and voice. Miche Wong’s “Apsara” revealed itself slowly with prophetic mysticism, using tribal gestures and the soothing imagery of

artist Mary Heebner, and, without missing a beat, Nancy Colahan’s “Déjà Vu for Strings and Percussion” followed with mounting ferocity, its mesmerizing patterns of movement heightened only by the towering prowess of UCSB dance-company soloist Briana Markovich. Jacqulyn Buglisi’s “Requiem” was a baroque painting come to life, unveiling delicate layers of pain and aching beauty, with luscious costumes cloaking and comforting her five glorious dancers. In Andrea Schermoly’s brilliantly absurdist “Moonscape,” SBDT’s four company dancers flashed their expert range, blazing through sections of quick-witted movement with unmatched confidence. Natalie McCall, Nicole Powell, Lauren Serrano, and Robin Wilson held firmly to individuality while maintaining a unified canvas for Schermoly’s striking technique, dovetailing a program that drove art’s healing properties straight home. — Ninette Paloma


TREVOR NOAH

& ENTERTAINMENT

REVIEWS 

THEATER

COURTESY

W

hen Trevor Noah replaced Jon Stewart as the host of The Daily Show in 2015, most people had no idea who he was. He may have seemed an unusual choice at the time, but Stewart knew what he was doing — Noah is astute, insightful, and wryly funny and has been winning over fans ever since he was anointed. Last Friday, January 19, Noah stepped out from behind his television desk and onto The Arlington At The Arlington Theatre stage for an eveTheatre, Fri., ning of stand-up comJan. 19. edy in which he regaled a capacity audience for just over an hour with stories of his childhood, moving to the United States, and the current presidential debacle. Noah, who was born and raised in South Africa, opened the show recounting a recent holiday he took in Bali. He went on the advice of friends who exclaimed that the island nation was a “unique” place to visit. “White people mean poor when they say ‘unique,’ ” he said, sharing how one tourist offering was a visit to a man’s tiny bedroom/kitchen to marvel at how the Balinese live. Noah also spoke of the differences in culture and language between his country and the United States, highlighting the sketch with a story about tacos, a food he’d never heard of or tried in his native land, as Mexican food

isn’t represented there. Particularly funny was his retelling of an exchange with a taco-truck man who offered Noah a napkin, which in South Africa means “diaper.” The comedian touched on the presidency, saying how complicated things have become for the Republicans since Trump took office. They must miss Obama, he observed, because at least things were clear then. “It was easy — go to work, hate the president, go home,” Noah said. Charming and hilarious, Noah offered a delightful evening of laughter, a much-needed respite during our town’s time of sorrow. — Michelle Drown

COURTESY

POP, ROCK & JAZZ

SPOON

C

onfident, tight, and finessed, its songs spangling with a sheen of shimmering synths, Spoon showed off sterling professional skills and experimental prowess at The Arlington Theatre on January 18. Colorfully atmospheric songs such as “Can I Sit Next to You,” with its snakeAt The Arlington charming string secTheatre, Thu., Jan. 18. tion, and the moody “I Ain’t the One,” propelled by drummer Jim Eno’s rib-rattling pounds, stood their own

along more traditional hits such as “Do You.” At points, Spoon’s relentless perfectionism read as an arena-show distance, and the well-oiled band, good as it was, felt emotionally mechanical. But that’s the price of being a consistently good act; and if all the dancing were any clue, its recipe is working. —Richie DeMaria

ALBUM

BLACK REBEL MOTORCYCLE CLUB Wrong Creatures

I

t’s been a challenging half decade for the rock trio Black Rebel Motorcycle Club (BRMC), which consists of Robert Been, Peter Hayes, and Leah Shapiro. First, Been’s father, Michael Been (of The Call), passed away while on tour with BRMC for its 2010 album, Beat the Devil’s Tattoo. Next, drummer Shapiro unexpectedly needed brain surgery for a Chiari malformation. In solidarity, Been, and Hayes put the band on hiatus until she recovered. Like a phoenix arisen, the band’s

Wrong Creatures, released earlier this month, proves the trio’s ability to transcend adversity and come back stronger, yet tempered by life’s trials. This album is contemplatively spiritual — especially “Echo,”“Question of Faith,” and “All Rise” — but still features stock BRMC washes of sound, distortion, and fuzz, as on the scorching “Little Thing Gone Wild.” All in all, it’s a fine return from one of the best outlaw rock bands still kickin’. —Sean Mageean

Our prayers go out to the victims of the Thomas Fire and Mudslides. We are providing free consultations related to : Insurance Claims Utility Litigation Water/Mud Damage and Repairs

WE WILL REBUILD

John T. Richards, APLC

Civil Trial Attorneys - WILDFIRE LITIGATION TEAM Santa Barbara | 805.869.1979 | 414 Olive St., Santa Barbara, CA john@jtrlaw1.com | johnrichardslawfirm.com INDEPENDENT.COM

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57


10th Annual Santa Barbara Community

SEED SWAP A celebration to bring seeds & people together

Independent - REVISED JANUARY 25 3.667 x 3.667

SUNDAY January 28, 2018 1:30-4:30pm

Free | Rain or Shine! metrotheatres.com

NEW LOCATION!

Trinity Gardens Trinity Lutheran Church 909 North La Cumbre Road Santa Barbara, CA

8 Academy Award Nominations!

3 Days Only: Fri-Sun (1/26-28) Arlington Only: 2:00 4:50 7:45 Independent Jan. 25 1.375 x 10.8336

CONCERT TICKETS

Arlington Theatre www.AXS.com

www.sbpermaculture.org

BILL BURR Arlington

February 15

“WEV’s training gave me the skills I needed to write a successful business plan and become a thriving business owner.”

Information: Fri-Thu Jan. 26 - Feb. 1  = Restrictions on Silver MetroValuePasses (MVP)

THE HITCHCOCK CINEMA 371 Hitchcock Way

6 Academy Award Nominations Daniel Day-Lewis

(R)

PHANTOM THREAD

Fri & Mon-Thu: 2:15 4:50 7:45 Sat/Sun: 11:05 2:15 4:50 7:45

Lisa Gaede

Owner, Carlyle Salon & Style Bar 2012 WEV Start-Up Loan Recipient 2008 WEV Graduate

13 Academy Award Nominations

THE SHAPE OF WATER (R)

JANUARY 25 2x7

Attend a FREE orientation this month!

Fri & Mon-Thu: 2:00 5:10 8:00 Sat/Sun: 11:25 2:00 5:10 8:00

Daily: (PG-13) 12:40 3:50 7:00 10:05

The Santa Barbara Film Festival Opens on Two Screens at Fiesta 5 on Thursday, Feb. 1. Information below is only through Wednesday

 MAZE

RUNNER:

THE DEATH CURE

The Santa Barbara Film Festival Opens on ALL Screens at Metro 4 on Thursday, Feb. 1. Information below is only through Wednesday

7 Academy Award Nominations

THREE BILLBOARDS Fri-Sun: (PG-13) OUTSIDE EBBING, MISSOURI 12:45 3:20 6:40 9:45 Fri-Sun: (R) Mon-Wed: 2:00 5:00 8:00 1:30 4:10 6:50 9:30 Mon-Wed: 2:40 4:50 7:40

5 Aca. Award Nominations

LADY BIRD (R)

Fri-Sun: 8:00 Mon-Wed: 7:50

FOREVER MY GIRL

(PG-13) (2D)

WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE

Fri-Sun: 12:30 3:50 6:30 9:20 Mon-Wed: 2:20 5:10 8:10 Fri-Sun: 12:25 3:00 5:30 Mon-Wed: 2:30 5:20

12 STRONG (R)

DEN OF THIEVES

Fri-Wed: 1:10 3:40 6:15 8:45 Thu: 1:10 3:40 6:15

STAR WARS:

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Daily: 12:45 3:15 6:30 9:45

Starts Thursday, Feb. 1

 WINCHESTER (PG-13) Thu 2/1: 7:10 8:45 9:30

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 HOSTILES (R) Daily: 12:20 3:20 6:20 9:20

THE GREATEST SHOWMAN (PG)

JANUARY 25, 2018

 NOTICE:

RUNNER: JUMANJI:

THE DEATH CURE

THE POST (PG-13)

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618 State Street

Hollister & Storke

 MAZE

Fri-Wed: 12:30 4:00 6:50 9:30 Thu: 12:30 4:00 6:50

58

METRO 4

916 State Street

This Saturday! Jan. 27 - 9:55 am Puccini’s  TOSCA

Metro 4

Starts Thursday February 1

6 Academy Award Nominations

DARKEST HOUR

Fri-Sun: (PG-13) Fri-Sun: (PG) 12:50 3:40 6:30 9:20 CAMINO REAL 1:00 3:30 6:20 8:50 CAMINO REAL MARKETPLACE Mon-Wed: 2:05 4:55 7:30 Mon-Wed: 1:45 4:40 7:30

Fri-Wed: 1:20 4:15 7:10 10:00 Thu: 1:20 4:15 10:00

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FIESTA 5

CC

PADDINGTON 2 (PG)

Fri-Sun: (R) 12:35 3:40 6:50 9:55 Mon-Wed: 1:50 4:35 7:40

12 STRONG (R)

Fri-Sun: 12:55 3:50 6:45 9:40 Mon-Wed: 2:00 5:00 8:00

INSIDIOUS: (PG-13)

THE LAST KEY

Fri-Sun: 2:15 4:45 7:20 9:50 Mon-Wed: 2:20 5:30 8:15

PASEO NUEVO

8 W. De La Guerra Place

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Starts Thursday, Feb. 1

FAIRVIEW

225 N. Fairview Ave.

DEN OF THIEVES

2 Aca. Award Nominations

THE POST (PG-13)

Fri-Sun: 12:40 3:20 6:25 9:10 Mon-Thu: 2:20 5:00 7:40

Fri-Sun: 1:45 4:50 8:00 (R) Mon-Thu: 2:15 4:50 8:00 3 Aca. Award Nominations

PADDINGTON 2 (PG)

Fri-Sun: 12:20 2:50 5:20 7:50 Mon-Thu: 2:20 5:20 7:50

JUMANJI:

(PG-13)

WELCOME TO THE JUNGLE

Fri-Sun: 12:00 2:45 5:30 8:15 Mon-Thu: 2:45 5:30 8:15

I, TONYA (R)

Fri-Sun: 1:00 3:50 6:35 9:45 Mon-Thu: 2:30 4:40 7:50

Academy Award Nominee

THE GREATEST SHOWMAN (PG)

Fri-Sun: 1:10 3:40 6:15 8:45 Mon-Thu: 2:10 5:20 7:30

 WINCHESTER:

THE HOUSE THAT GHOSTS BUILT (PG-13)

Fiesta 5 Camino Real


a&e | FILM & TV

The UCSB MultiCultural Center and the Ethnomusicology Program in the Department of Music present

SBIFF OPENS WITH WORLD-PREMIERE FILM

THE PUBLIC “H

ow do you do a film festival following the

immense tragedy unfolding in Montecito and Southern California?” wrote Santa Barbara International Film Festival Executive Director Roger Durling in an open letter. “Well — the honest answer is that it is needed now more than ever.” Since their invention, movies have served as a way to bring people together for entertainment, reflection, distraction — things the SBIFF offers in spades. It also affords the opportunity for the community to come together and feel “less isolated as they [experience] emotions together,” as Durling noted. To that end, the 33rd annual film festival will kick off on Wednesday, January 31, with the world-premiere screening of The Public, a film by actor/director/writer Emilio Estevez. The film charts the unintended escalation of what is essentially a nonviolent sit-in by homeless folks, who, after seeking shelter from the brutal winter storm inside a Midwestern public library, are told they must leave. A situation eventually turns into a standoff involving riot police, a crisis negotiator, and an ambitious DA. It’s a “David vs. Goliath story [that] puts the spotlight on some of our nation’s most challenging issues: homelessness, mental illness, and drug addiction,” according to the film’s press release. The cast includes such stalwart actors as Alec Baldwin, Jena Malone, Christian Slater, Gabrielle Union, and Jeffrey Wright. The Public screens at 8 p.m. at The Arlington Theatre.

OPENING NIGHT: Director Emilio Estevez’s The Public premieres at The Arlington Theatre to kick off the 2018 Santa Barbara International Film Festival.

The following day, the festival will be off and running with myriad films and events to attend, including the Cinema Vanguard Award honoree Willem Dafoe, who will be celebrated for his role in the film The Florida Project. Other film-fest awardees include Gary Oldman (Darkest Hour), Daniel Kaluuya (Get Out), Gal Gadot (Wonder Woman), Hong Chau (Downsizing), John Boyega (Detroit), Kumail Nanjiani (The Big Sick), Mary J. Blige (Mudbound), and Timothée Chalamet (Call Me By Your Name). These are just some of the offerings slated for the 11-day event. “As Santa Barbara begins to recover, we welcome and encourage film lovers and visitors to gather around our strong, beautiful and resilient community,” said Durling. The festival runs Wednesday, January 31-Saturday, February 10. See sbiff.org. —Michelle Drown

MOVIE GUIDE PREMIERES

Hostiles (135 mins., R) Christian Bale stars as U.S. Army Captain Joseph J. Blocker, who escorts sickly Cheyenne war chief Yellow Hawk (Wes Studi) back to his tribal lands, in this period drama. Rosamund Pike, Ben Foster, and Timothée Chalamet also star. Camino Real/Paseo Nuevo Maze Runner: The Death Cure (142 mins., PG-13)

The third installment of this dystopian trilogy has Thomas (Dylan O’Brien) leading his crew of escaped Gladers on a deadly mission into the Last City, a maze controlled by the WCKD. Thomas Brodie-Sangster, Nathalie Emmanuel, and Kaya Scodelario-Davis also star. Camino Real/Fiesta 5

Winchester (99 mins., PG-13) Academy Award–winning actor Helen Mirren stars in this supernatural horror film about Sarah Winchester, the wife of gun manufacturer William Winchester, who allegedly believed she was being haunted by spirits and so, on the advice of a medium, built her infamous Winchester Mystery House in San Jose, California. Camino Real/Fiesta 5 (Opens Thu., Feb. 1)

SPECIAL SCREENING O Dunkirk (107 mins., PG-13) This year has seen the release of not one but two films about the 1940 evacuation at Dunkirk: Lone Scherfig’s Their Finest and now Christopher Nolan’s Dunkirk. While Scherfig focuses on the morale and publicity the event inspired back home in Great Britain, Nolan keeps the

lens on those who participated on land, by air, and at sea. The result is a surreal and poignant film that not only tells of Operation Dynamo and the civilian efforts to bring a country’s troops home, but also explores what it means to be defeated and stranded, and how people retain humanity during wartime. (JT) Arlington (Fri., Jan. 26-Sun., Jan. 28)

NOW SHOWING 12 Strong (120 mins., R) Based on the nonfiction book by the same name, 12 Strong tells the story of Task Force Dagger, which included CIA officers and U.S. Special Forces Green Beret “horse soldiers” who were sent to Afghanistan after the September 11 attacks to fight the Taliban. Chris Hemsworth, Michael Shannon, and Michael Peña star. Camino Real/Metro 4

OCall Me by Your Name

(132 mins., R)

A different kind of summer-fling tale, in a different time and place and attitude, this is an affecting and invitingly atmospheric saga about same-sex romantic urgings in a rustic northern Italian town, circa the early ’80s. Based on the novel by André Aciman, artfully directed by Luca Guadagnino, and written for the screen by James Ivory (originally slated to also direct, with Shia LaBeouf and Greta Scacchi in the cast), the film subtly traces the slow-burning magnetism between the carnally awakening 17-year-old Elio (Timothée Chalamet) and a visiting graduate student, Oliver (Armie Hammer). Their secret summer flowering is told with a graceful cinematic arc, with Sufjan Stevens’s

eries S c i s W o r ld M u Winter Wednesdays

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in the music department's outdoor music bowl

UCSB Jazz Ensemble WEDNESDAY, JAN. 24TH

suitably dreamy songs, classical music, and a snort of Psychedelic Furs selectively dropped into the sweetly melancholic mise-en-scène. Michael Stuhlbarg quietly shines as the father, who, in a moving, wisdom-dispensing scene later in the film, circles around his son’s gay relationship by suggesting that “nature has cunning ways of finding our secret spot.” Chalamet was selected to receive a Santa Barbara International Film Festival Virtuoso Award. (JW)

Cantando a la Luna / Singing to the Moon with Mariachi Las Olas de SB WEDNESDAY, JAN. 31ST

Traditional Dance Music of Ireland with Dannsair WEDNESDAY, FEB. 7TH

Riviera

Darkest Hour (125 mins., PG-13) Gary Oldman has already garnered critical acclaim — including a Golden Globe Award for best actor and the 2018 Santa Barbara International Film Festival’s Maltin Modern Master Award — for his turn as British Prime Minister Winston Churchill. This biopic focuses on his early days as PM during World War II as Hitler’s army advances toward Great Britain. Metro 4 Den of Thieves (90 mins., R) Gerard Butler stars in this action thriller about an elite unit of the L.A. County Sheriff’s Department and a mastermind bank robbery crew who plan to steal from the city’s Federal Reserve Bank. Jordan Bridges, Pablo Schreiber, and Curtis “50 Cent” Jackson also star. Fairview/Fiesta 5 Forever My Girl (104 mins., PG) After a decade on the road chasing fame and fortune, country music star Liam Page (Alex Roe) returns to his hometown to face what he left behind — namely his fiancée and small-town roots. Fiesta 5

TBA

WEDNESDAY, FEB. 14TH

The Very Lonesome Boys WEDNESDAY, FEB. 21ST

UCSB Gamelan Ensemble WEDNESDAY, FEB. 28TH

UCSB Son Jarocho Ensemble WEDNESDAY, MARCH 7TH

UCSB Gospel Choir WEDNESDAY, MARCH 14TH UCSBMCC

CONT’D ON P. 61 >>>

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Santa Barbara International Film Festival

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a&e | FILM & TV CONT’D FROM P. 59 The Greatest Showman (105 mins., PG)

Hugh Jackman stars as P.T. Barnum in this biopic musical that focuses on the legendary circus master and the lives of the people who form what eventually becomes the Ringling Bros. and Barnum & Bailey Circus. Zac Efron, Michelle Williams, Zendaya, and Rebecca Ferguson also star. Camino Real/Paseo Nuevo

➤ O Happy End

(107 mins., R)

Early in Happy End, the latest film from Austrian master filmmaker Michael Haneke (Amour, Caché, The White Ribbon), there is a long, static shot of a construction site, its languid reverie interrupted by a sudden wall collapsing, taking an occupied porta-potty with it. This tale of dysfunctional family ties is dotted by calamities amid deceptively calm (and visually beautiful) circumstances, often viewed from a distance or offscreen, while internal tension stealthily mounts. As the title slyly implies, suicidal impulses thread through the story — from a preteen heroine to her mother and a grandfather with dementia (Amour’s Jean-Louis Trintignant, who cross-references that film’s plot here). Less claustrophobic than Amour and more of a multicharacter family tapestry, the film nonetheless pales by comparison with Haneke’s earlier masterpiece. But the classic, uncompromising, sentimentality-dodging Haneke touch is well in hand, stylistically, even as Happy End subversively tugs at the heart in ways we often don’t see coming. (JW) Riviera

Insidious: The Last Key (103 mins., PG-13)

The fourth installment of the Insidious franchise, this horror film sees Elise Rainier (Lin Shaye) returning to her childhood home in New Mexico to investigate the supernatural episodes occurring there. Metro 4

➤ O I, Tonya

(119 mins., R)

I, Tonya, directed by Craig Gillespie (Lars and the Real Girl), beautifully blends memory and reality as it explores figure skater Tonya Harding’s role in the 1994 attack on fellow teammate Nancy Kerrigan just prior to the Winter Olympics in Lillehammer, Norway. Margot Robbie (The Wolf of Wall Street, Suicide Squad) gives a riveting performance as Harding, who is both a victim and the instigator of a life fraught with violence and tumult. Filmed in mockumentary style, the story cleaves the testimonies of Harding, her ex-husband Jeff Gillooly (Sebastian Stan), their associate Shawn Eckhardt (Paul Walter Hauser), and Harding’s mother, LaVona Fay Golden (Allison Janney), posing the question: What is truth? The film never really answers that query but rather postulates that truth is a complex combination of perspectives. In a time when “fake news” is commonplace, I, Tonya shows that the “truth” of things often depends on who is telling the story. (NS) Paseo Nuevo Jumanji: Welcome to the Jungle (119 mins., PG-13)

Dwayne Johnson, Kevin Hart, Jack Black, and Karen Gillan star in this comedy/action adventure in which teenagers find the long-lost people-eating game Jumanji and get gobbled up. They can only return home when they

complete the game, which in this iteration means returning a gem called the Jaguar’s Eye to its rightful place and then saying “Jumanji.” Fairview/Fiesta 5

O Lady Bird

WINNER!

Camino Real/Paseo Nuevo

2 0 1 3 T O N Y AWA R D

®

(93 mins., R)

Lady Bird lives up to the hype. The solo directorial debut of Greta Gerwig, the film is a full, honest snapshot of the coming-of-age of Lady Bird (Saoirse Ronan) as she navigates her last year of high school. In a skillful depiction of the pain, beauty, strangeness, and humor of what it means to be a 17-year-old girl, Ronan’s performance is refreshingly nuanced as she gracefully walks the line between daring confidence and acute insecurity. (EW) Fiesta 5 Paddington 2 (103 mins., PG) In this sequel to 2014’s Paddington, the starring bear (voiced by Ben Whishaw) is settled into his home in London’s Windsor Gardens with the Browns. But when Paddington witnesses a robbery for which there is no evidence of another thief, authorities wrongly accuse the bear and lock him up in prison. The Browns mount a defense while Paddington gets into one mishap after another while in jail. The film also stars Sally Hawkins, Brendan Gleeson, Julie Walters, and Hugh Bonneville. Fairview/Fiesta 5

Phantom Thread (130 mins., R) Daniel Day-Lewis stars in director Paul Thomas Anderson’s historical drama set in 1950s London’s world of haute couture. Lesley Manville and Vicky Krieps also star. The Hitchcock

➤ The Post

how to tell a story, and in this case, the story is so interesting that not even he can ruin it. (NW)

(115 mins., PG-13)

With Donald Trump declaring war on the media like no president ever before — count his tweets about “fake news” — it’s touching that Steven Spielberg sought to defend the so-called Fourth Estate with this heroic thriller about the Washington Post, the New York Times, and Post publisher/owner Katherine Graham in particular. What could have been a gripping movie about the role of the press in keeping the government accountable instead left me wishing for a good documentary about what actually happened back in 1971 with the release of the Pentagon Papers. For those tuning in 36 years after the fact, “the Pentagon Papers” refers to a top-secret study commissioned by the Department of Defense to explore the United States’ military involvement in Vietnam from 1945 to 1967. Spoiler alert: The study revealed presidents from Truman to Johnson lied through their teeth to the American people about a war they increasingly understood to be unwinnable. When the New York Times broke the story, the Nixon White House got a gag order to shut it up. When the same documents mysteriously showed up at the door of the Washington Post, Graham (powerfully played by Meryl Streep) and editor Ben Bradlee (played not so perfectly by Tom Hanks) struggled with what to do next: Publish or perish. Only in hindsight is the “right” answer obvious. The actual debate was anything but. Had Spielberg not depicted the winners as so unfailingly heroic and the losers so craven and venal, it would have been a better movie and a better civics lesson, too. That said, Spielberg knows

O The Shape of Water

(123 mins., R)

When a semiaquatic humanoid (Doug Jones) is brought in chains to a Baltimore military research facility sometime during the Cold War, Elisa (Sally Hawkins), a cleaner at the facility who communicates through sign language, finds the nonverbal creature kindred to her nonspeaking self. Their relationship is one of several that anchors Guillermo del Toro’s latest fairy tale, The Shape of Water, whose central characters experience the era’s bright promises in terms of disappointment and disempowerment. Octavia Spencer and Richard Jenkins buttress the film as Elisa’s partners in crime, but they play sketches of postwar life rather than fully fleshedout characters. The ever-delightful Sally Hawkins is The Shape of Water’s big draw; her physically expressive performance style, reminiscent of silentera stars, is well matched to the role of someone who communicates sans speech. Soon, though, I hope actors with disabilities will get their starring turns in major films in which disability is rendered as possibility rather than lack. (AT) The Hitchcock

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O Star Wars: The Last Jedi (152 mins., PG-13)

In the grand Star Wars catalog, The Last Jedi falls squarely into the mid-tryptic model of The Empire Strikes Back. Whereas we meet new characters in the first of each trio and find closure by the third, the second films surround an extended retreat and regrouping. That leaves time to explore the spiritual side of the Force and learn a bit more about the motivations for our beloved gang of star warriors, most of whom we remeet, including many from the original series, as well as Finn, Rey, and Poe from The Force Awakens, within the first 15 minutes. In that vein, The Last Jedi is a successful and pure entry into the catalog and a very entertaining film, and yet, like at the end of Empire, you’re left wanting a bit more. (MK) Camino Real

O Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri (115 mins., R) With a star-studded cast including Woody Harrelson, Sam Rockwell, Peter Dinklage, and up-and-comer Lucas Hedges, the film follows tough-as-nails Mildred Hayes (Frances McDormand) and her quest to drive the Ebbing police department to properly investigate the rape and murder of her daughter. With astute insights into Southern smalltown living, incredible cinematography, and a powerhouse performance from McDormand, Three Billboards Outside Ebbing, Missouri is, without a doubt, the best film I saw last year. (EW) Metro 4

The above films are playing in Santa Barbara FRIDAY, January 26, through THURSDAY, February 1. (NOTE: Due to the S.B. International Film Festival, films at the Metro 4 play through WEDNESDAY, January 31.) Our critics’ reviews are followed by initials: MK (Matt Kettmann), NS (Noah Shachar), AT (Athena Tan), JT (Jordon Thompson), NW (Nick Welsh), EW (Elena White), and JW (Josef Woodard). The symbol O indicates the film is recommended. The symbol ➤ indicates a new review.

“BLISTERING HUMOR” – LOS ANGELES TIMES

STARRING A FILM BY

ISABELLE HUPPERT MICHAEL HANEKE

SHOWING JANUARY 25 - 30

Fri, Mon - Tues 5:00pm / Sat - Sun 2:00pm

“A TRUE STUNNER” LAST E CHANC ! E E S TO

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SHOWING JANUARY 25 - 29 Fri & Mon 7:30pm Sat - Sun 11:00am, 4:30pm, 7:30pm

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a&e | ROB BREZSNY’S FREE WILL ASTROLOGY WEEK OF JANUARY 25 ARIES (Mar. 21-Apr. 19): Anders Haugen competed for the U.S. as a ski jumper in the 1924 Winter Olympics. Although he was an accomplished athlete who had previously set a world record for distance, he won no medals at the games. But wait! Fifty years later, a sports historian discovered that there had a been a scoring mistake back in 1924. In fact, Haugen had done well enough to win the bronze medal. The mistake was rectified, and he finally got his long-postponed award. I foresee a comparable development happening in your life, Aries. Recognition or appreciation you deserved to have received some time ago will finally come your way.

TAURUS (Apr. 20-May 20): In 1899, Sobhuza II became King of Swaziland even though he was less than 5 months old. He kept his job for the next 82 years, and along the way managed to play an important role when his nation gained independence from the colonial rule of the United Kingdom. These days you may feel a bit like Sobhuza did when he was still in diapers, Taurus: not sufficiently prepared or mature for the greater responsibilities that are coming your way. But just as he received competent help in his early years from his uncle and grandmother, I suspect you’ll receive the support you’ll need to ripen.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): In my ideal world, dancing and singing wouldn’t be luxuries practiced primarily by professionals. They would be regular occurrences in our daily routines. We’d dance and sing whenever we needed a break from the numbing trance. We’d whirl and hum to pass the time. We would greet each other with an interpretative movement and a little tune. In schools, dance and song would be a standard part of the curriculum — as important as math and history. That’s my utopian dream, Gemini. What’s yours? In accordance with the astrological omens, I urge you to identify the soul medicine you’d love to incorporate into your everyday regimen. Then go ahead and incorporate it! It’s time for you to get more aggressive about creating the world you want to live in.

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Psychology pioneer Carl Jung believed that most of our big problems can never be fully solved. And that’s actually a good thing. Working on them keeps us lively, in a state of constant transformation. It ensures we don’t stagnate. I generally agree with Jung’s high opinion of our problems. We should indeed be grateful for the way they impel us to grow. However, I think that’s irrelevant for you right now. Why? Because you have an unprecedented opportunity to solve and graduate from a major, long-running problem. So no, don’t be grateful for it. Get rid of it. Say goodbye to it forever.

mercials. The dog, who became mega-famous, was presented as a rich, macho party animal named Spuds MacKenzie. The ad campaign was successful, boosting sales 20 percent. But the truth was that the actor playing Spuds was a female dog whose owners called her Evie. To earn money, the poor creature, who was born under the sign of Libra, was forced to assume a false identity. To honor Evie’s memory, and in alignment with current astrological omens, I urge you human Libras to strip away any layers of false identity you’ve been pressured to acquire. Be your Real Self — to the max.

LEO

SCORPIO

(July 23-Aug. 22): Between now and March 21, you will be invited, encouraged, and pushed to deepen your understanding of intimate relationships. You will have the chance to learn much, much more about how to create the kind of togetherness that both comforts and inspires you. Will you take advantage of this eightweek opportunity? I hope so. You may imagine that you have more pressing matters to attend to. But the fact is that cultivating your relationship skills would transform you in ways that would best serve those other pressing matters.

(Oct. 23-Nov. 21): The giant panda is a bear native to China. In the wild, its diet is 99 percent bamboo. But bamboo is not an energy-rich food, which means the creature has to compensate by consuming 20 to 30 pounds of the stuff every day. Because it’s so busy gathering its sustenance, the panda doesn’t have time to do much socializing. I mention this, Scorpio, because I want to offer up the panda as your anti-power animal for the coming weeks. According to my reading of the astrological omens, you should have a diversified approach to getting your needs met — not just in regard to food, but in every other way as well. Variety is not just the spice of life; it’s the essence.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): In December, mass protests broke out in Mashhad, Iran’s second-largest city. Why? The economy had been gradually worsening. Inflation was slowly but surely exacting a toll. Unemployment was increasing. But one of the immediate triggers for the uprising was a 40 percent hike in the price of eggs. It focused the Iranian people’s collective angst and galvanized a dramatic response. I’m predicting a comparable sequence in your personal future, Virgo. A specific irritant will emerge, motivating you to stop putting up with trends that have been subtly bothering you.

LIBRA

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): You’re the star of the “movie” that endlessly unfolds in your imagination. There may be a number of other lead actors and actresses, but few if any have your luster and stature. You also have a supporting cast, as well as a full complement of extras. To generate all the adventure you need, your story needs a lot of dramatis personae. In the coming weeks, I suggest that you be alert for certain minor characters who are primed to start playing a bigger role in your narrative. Consider the possibility of inviting them to say and do more to advance the plot.

Aurora Winter Master class online at YourMillionDollarMessage.com

Or in person

Jan. 30, noon 1117 State St. Impact Hub Ph 626-636-4328. Register now.

(Jan. 20-Feb. 18): The pawpaw is a tasty fruit that blends the flavors of mango, banana, and melon. But you rarely find it in grocery stores. One reason is that the fruit ripens very fast after being picked. Another is that the pollination process is complicated. In response to these issues, a plant scientist named Neal Peterson has been trying to breed the pawpaw to be more commercially viable. Because of his work, cultivated crops have finally begun showing up at some farmers’ markets. I’d like to see you undertake metaphorically similar labors in 2018, Aquarius. I think you’ll have good luck at developing rough potentials into more mature forms of expression. You’ll have skill at turning unruly raw materials into more useful resources. Now is a great time to begin.

PISCES (Feb. 19-Mar. 20): An iceberg is a huge chunk of ice that has cracked away from a glacier and drifted off into the open sea. Only 9 percent of it is visible above the waterline. The underwater part, which is most of the iceberg, is basically invisible. You can’t know much about it just by looking at the top. This is an apt metaphor for life itself. Most everyone and everything we encounter is 91 percent mysterious or hidden or inaccessible to our conscious understanding. That’s the weird news, Pisces. The good news is that during the next three weeks you will have an unprecedented ability to get better acquainted with the other 91 percent of anything or anyone you choose to explore.

CAPRICORN

(Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Thirty-five miles per hour is typically the highest speed attained by the U.S. Navy’s

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700.

with

AQUARIUS

Çudamani Çudamani

(Sept. 23-Oct. 22): In the late 1980s, Budweiser used a Bull Terrier to promote its Bud Light beer in com-

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Nimitz-class aircraft carriers. That’s not very fast. On the other hand, each ship’s engine generates 190 megawatts, enough to provide the energy needs of 140,000 houses, and can go more than 20 years without refueling. If you don’t mind, I’m going to compare you to one of those aircraft carriers during the next four weeks. You may not be moving fast, but you will have maximum stamina and power.

Homework: Imagine that you’re still alive in 2090. What’s your life like? Testify at Freewillastrology.com.

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JOIN OUR DANCE FAMILY! Voted Best Dance Ensemble in the 2017 Downtown Holiday Parade

CLASS SCHEDULE: CARDIO DANCE

Sat. 9:30am | Wed. 9am

BURLESQUE Tues. 8pm

With traditional Balinese dress, instruments and dance, this 24-member ensemble’s breathtaking, profoundly moving performances weave intricate layers of sound and encompass both new and classical works.

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Wed. 10am

AT SB DANCE ARTS

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Corporate Season Sponsor:

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INDEPENDENT.COM

JANUARY 25, 2018

THE INDEPENDENT

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INDEPENDENT CLASSIFIEDS

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PHONE 965-5205

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E M A I L S A L E S @ I N D E P E N D E N T. C O M

EMPLOYMENT

SATISFACTION FROM MAKING A DIFFERENCE. Come experience it here. Having a positive impact on others, and feeling fulfillment in return, is a cornerstone of the Cottage Health culture. As a community-based, not-for-profit provider of leading-edge healthcare for the Greater Santa Barbara region, Cottage emphasizes the difference each team member can make. It’s a difference you’ll want to experience throughout your entire career. Join us in one of the openings below.

Non-Clinical

Santa Barbara Cottage Hospital Nursing • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Access Case Manager Birth Center Cardiac Telemetry Clinical Nurse Specialist – NICU Clinical Nurse Specialist – Oncology Educator, Lactation Employee Health Nurse Endoscopy – RN Ergonomic Specialist Hematology/Oncology Med/Surg – Float Pool MICU NICU Nurse Educator, Diabetes Orthopedics Peds Psych Nursing RN Eye Center SICU Surgery Surgical Trauma

Allied Health • • • •

Case Manager Psych Services Perfusionist Physical Therapist Speech Language Pathologist – Per Diem

Clinical • • • • • • • • •

Cardiovascular RN CT Tech Patient Care Tech Perfusionist Pharmacist Pharmacy Tech Respiratory Care Practitioner II Unit Care Tech Utilization Review Nurse

• • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • • •

Goleta Valley Cottage Hospital

Catering Set Up Worker Concierge Cook Data Quality Analyst Decision Support Analyst – Patient Care Diet Specialist Director – Care Management Director – Women’s Services Employee Relations Consultant Sr. – Temp Environmental Services Rep Environmental Services Supervisor Environmental Services – Unit Support EPIC Analyst Sr. – Ambulatory EPIC Client + System Administrator Sr. EPIC Clin Doc/Stork Lead EPIC Lead Beaker Analyst EPIC Revenue Cycle Analyst Floor Care Technician Food Services Rep – Cafeteria/Deli IT Business Analyst – HR IT Technical Developer (ERP) Manager – Research Compliance Manager – Service Excellence Patient Finance Counselor II – Part Time Patient Finance Counselor II – Per Diem Research Scientist Room Service Server Sales Associate Security Officer – SBCH/SYVCH Utilization Management Case Manager Workforce Development Program Manager

Santa Ynez Valley Cottage Hospital • • • • •

Patient Fin. Counselor II – Part Time Radiology Tech – Per Diem RN – Emergency RN – Med/Surg Security – Part Time

• • • • • • •

Food Service Rep Physical Therapist Registered Nurse – Emergency Registered Nurse – ICU Registered Nurse – Surgery – Per Diem RT 2 – Ultrasound/Radiology Security Officer

Cottage Rehabilitation Hospital • • • • • •

Lifeguard/Aquatics Instructor – Per Diem Occupational Therapist – Per Diem Patient Care Tech Physical Therapist – Per Diem Prospective Payment Systems Coordinator Speech Therapist – Full Time & Per Diem

Cottage Business Services • • • • • •

Advancement Systems Analyst HIM Coder III HIM ROI Specialist Manager – HIM Manager – Non-Government Billing Patient Financial Counselor

Pacific Diagnostic Laboratories • Certified Phlebotomist Technician – Part-time/Full-time • Clinical Lab Scientist – Core Lab • CLS – Santa Ynez • CLS II – Microbiology • Laboratory Tech – Core Lab • Mobile Cert Phleb Tech – Lab • Sr. Sales Representative • Transfusion Safety Coordinator

• Please apply to: www.pdllabs.com • RENTAL & RELOCATION ASSISTANCE AVAILABLE FOR SELECT FULL-TIME POSITIONS

• CERTIFICATION REIMBURSEMENT

Please apply online at jobs.cottagehealth.org. Candidates may also submit a resume to: Cottage Health, Human Resources, P.O. Box 689, Pueblo at Bath Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93102-0689 Please reference “SBI” when applying. EOE

Excellence, Integrity, Compassion

For volunteer opportunities at Cottage Health, visit: www.cottagehealth.org/volunteer

www.cottagehealth.org

THE INDEPENDENT

JANUARY 25, 2018

UNIVERSITY CENTER FOOD SERVICE Responsible for the daily operation of the Arbor store. The Arbor operates 7 days/week with an annual budget of $2.8M and a staff of 70‑80 part time student employees. Primary responsibilities include Training and Supervision, Purchasing and Inventory Management, Financial Duties, and Safety and Sanitation. Reqs: 3 years of management experience in a food service operation and/ or retail outlet with education in Food Service Management or Retail Store Management or equivalent education/experience in restaurant or retail food service operations. Demonstrated experience in planning and management related to retail operations management including but not limited to financial and labor management, sourcing & procurement, marketing & merchandising, handling and storage, customer service and health & safety. Demonstrated knowledge and experience in food related financial management & reporting. Knowledge in inventory control functions, including experience in physical inventory counts, receiving, and storage of materials. Experience within a customer service oriented environment responding to and meeting/exceeding the needs of the customer. Skills in identifying the customer’s perspective and maintaining a commitment to excellence in customer service. Knowledge of Microsoft Word and Excel. Notes: Fingerprint background check required. Ability to work a flexible schedule including nights and weekends: Sun./Mon./ Thurs‑1pm‑10pm, Fri./Sat.‑10am‑7pm $43,379‑$60,645/yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For primary consideration apply by 2/1/18, thereafter open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #20180025

ASSISTANT MANAGER, STARBUCKS

UCEN DINING Trains and supervises a team of part‑time student employees. Creates and maintains the Starbucks product and store experience for customers. Required to be the floor manager; ensures consistent service, supervision and sanitation. Reqs: 2 years of experience in high volume retail store. Previous supervisory experience. Demonstrated oral and written communications skills. Ability to reason, analyze, and make quick decisions. Notes: Fingerprint background check required. Must be able to work a flexible schedule during midterms and finals. Must become Serv Safe Certified. $20.75‑$23.83/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For primary consideration apply by 2/5/18, thereafter open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #20180027

LEAD ADMINISTRATIVE SERVICES COORDINATOR

RESIDENTIAL & COMMUNITY LIVING Performs administrative services for 3 residential complex offices: Sierra Madre, San Joaquin, and West Campus. Duties include oversight of the resident key/lock system, parking permits, maintenance/custodial work requests, facility scheduling, and supply purchasing. Coordinates staff keys and electronic/computer access for career and contract staff. Reqs: Excellent communication, interpersonal, and analytical skills. Strong organizational skills. Detail oriented with a high degree of accuracy. Knows how to set priorities and work with multiple

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ASSISTANT MANAGER ‑ ARBOR

INDEPENDENT.COM

Corning offers competitive pay & benefits

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demands under tight timelines. Takes initiative and works independently. Works professionally as part of a team. Is able to interact effectively with a wide variety of people with diplomacy, tact, and a customer‑service attitude. Must be able to maintain strict confidentiality. High level of computer literacy, and the ability to learn new programs quickly. Note: Fingerprint background check required. $21.85‑$26.28/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For primary consideration apply by 1/29/18, thereafter open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #20180018

PROGRAM ADVISOR

UC EDUCATION ABROAD PROGRAM (UCEAP) Through international academic experiences, the University of California Education Abroad Program (UCEAP) inspires students to explore and transform their lives, UC, and the world. Since 1962, UCEAP has served as the UC system‑wide study abroad program and provides international education opportunities in over 40 countries to more than 5,000 UC students each year. Provides administrative, academic and operational support to study abroad regional teams. Communicates program information. Handles pre‑departure and academic processes. Reqs: AA degree and minimum of two years previous office/clerical experience or equivalent combination of education, training and experience. Previous customer service experience. Proficiency in MS Office, including Excel. Ability to independently perform detailed and accurate work while meeting critical deadlines. Excellent attention to detail with strong organizational and analytical problem solving skills. Ability to prioritize and adjust to varying workloads, manage a variety of tasks, and meet various deadlines with changing priorities, interruptions, and conflicting deadlines. Excellent oral and written communication skills and ability to communicate effectively with UC staff, students and parents, often over the phone or by e‑mail. Skill in independently researching questions and analyzing information, situations, policies and procedures to define problems, formulate conclusions and recommend solutions. Flexible and able to work both independently and cooperatively in a team environment. Notes: Fingerprint background check required. Full time, on‑site position with a regular schedule, M‑F. Located off‑campus at the UCEAP Systemwide Office in Goleta, CA (near UCSB). $21.85/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For primary consideration apply by 2/5/18, thereafter open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #20180030


INDEPENDENT CLASSIFIEDS

EMPLOYMENT PROGRAM ASSISTANT

GEVIRTZ GRADUATE SCHOOL OF EDUCATION Provides administrative and academic support to department faculty and students as well as primary and back‑up support to the Hosford Clinic Office Administrator. Responsible for aiding faculty with the preparation of instructional materials, advising prospective students through the application process, coordinating and distributing quarterly course evaluation materials, purchasing of department supplies, distributing of approval codes and creating course wait‑lists. Reqs: Must possess excellent communication and organizational skills. Must have good attention to detail, be accurate and professional. Excellent customer service and computer skills. Must be able to work with a variety of customers in a fast paced environment with frequent interruptions. Able to interpret policies and procedures and accurately communicate them to others as needed. Must be sensitive regarding confidential information and exercise good judgment, tact and diplomacy. Must work well in a team environment. Bachelor’s Degree or equivalent combination of education and experience. Notes: Fingerprint background check required. Mandated reporting requirements of Child Abuse. $18.91‑$19.34/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Apply by 1/30/18. Apply online at https:// jobs.ucsb.edu Job #20180019

COMPUTER/TECH

COMMUNICATION AND NETWORK ENGINEER

STUDENT INFORMATION SYSTEMS & TECH The ideal person is an experienced professional who knows how to apply theory and put it into practice, operating as part of a team of specialized system administrators charged with the stewardship of information systems for the Division of Student Affairs. Primary duties are comprised of system administration (change requests, maintenance, audits, etc.) and projects (constructions, implementations, etc.) specific to the networking (switches, routers, and firewalls) and computer (client, server, and security) capabilities of the division. Reqs: Ability to adapt to, navigate and administrate in a mature IT environment that has existent rules, standards, and policies for system changes, projects and security. Solid understanding and familiarity with network technologies such as DHCP, DNS, 802.1x, firewalls, switching, routing, and VLANs. Solid foundational knowledge of the OSI network model, including a good understanding of TCP/IP, UDP and other protocols such as (application layer) HTTP and HTTPS. 5 years of experience supporting Microsoft Windows (Client, Server, and/or Active Directory) in a medium to large environment. Experience supporting and maintaining production systems that have components separated into discrete network zones (such as frontend, database, etc.). Understanding of basic server software and hardware technologies, including but not limited to SANs, RAIDs, and Virtualization. Note: Fingerprint background check required. $63,453‑$75,000/yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex,

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PHONE 965-5205

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E M A I L S A L E S @ I N D E P E N D E N T. C O M

(CONTINUED)

sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For primary consideration apply by 2/1/18, thereafter open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #20180026

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INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY SR. SYSTEMS Reliability Analyst (Goleta, CA): Analyze, improve, monitor & support global, cloud‑hosted comp system infrastructure across data centers using: Windows Server, Linux, IIS, Tomcat, Apache ELK, Graphite, Grafana, Puppet & TeamCity. Deploy toolset to support infrastructure & deliver highly available, scalable services. Work to improve system performance; identify & remediate bottlenecks & potential failures. Adjust to new req’ts, evolving goals/ strategies, & emerging technologies. Suggest improvements for systems stability across entire stack. Train staff & end‑users on system infrastructure. 5 yrs exp as Comp Systems Analyst or related req’d. Resumes: Yardi Systems, Inc. Attn: Rebecca Pendergraft, 430 S. Fairview Ave., Goleta, CA 93117.

MEDICAL/HEALTHCARE

PHLEBOTOMIST

STUDENT HEALTH Performs phlebotomy and laboratory procedure set‑up. Greets patients, instructs them in specimen collection, prepares report forms and prepares patient samples for transport to a referral laboratory. In addition, maintains working levels of laboratory supplies, stock supplies, perform, daily and periodic preventative maintenance, perform the record keeping duties of the reception desk as needed and maintain the cleanliness of the entire laboratory area. Reqs: High School diploma or equivalent combination of education and experience. Must be a current California licensed Phlebotomist. Two years of experience working in a medical office or laboratory. Experience using computers for data entry. Notes: Fingerprint background check required. Credentials verification for clinical practitioner. Mandated reporting requirements of Child and Dependent Adult Abuse. Must provide evidence of annual influenza vaccination, or wear a surgical mask while working in patient care areas during influenza season. Any HIPAA violation may result in a disciplinary action. This is an 11 month 100% position; furlough taken during quarter breaks or during summer session. Ability to stay beyond 5:00 pm depending upon clinical needs. Student Health is closed between the Christmas and New Year’s Day holidays. $22.79‑$25.16/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For primary consideration apply by 2/1/18, thereafter open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #20180022

PROFESSIONAL

ASSISTANT DIRECTOR, RESIDENTIAL DINING BUS & FIN

RESIDENTIAL & DINING CENTRAL FOOD SERVICE Under the general direction of the Director for Residential Dining Services, the Assistant Director of Residential Dining Business & Finance is responsible for all aspects of the business and financial management for the Housing & Residential Dining Services Department. Member of the Senior Management Team in Residential Dining, sharing responsibility for annual operating budget of 21 million representing production and service of 2.7 million meals in all Residential food service facilities and operations. Scope includes four primary Residence Dining Halls, kitchens and bakeries, Athletic and Event Concessions, Special Events Catering and Conference Catering, Retail Stores and the Club & Guest House, serving a community of over 8,500 student, faculty and family residents. Reqs: BA in Finance, Accounting or Business, or equivalent combination of education and experience. At least 3‑5 years of experience in a finance/accounting role. Strong analytical and organizational skills and the ability to multitask. Strong oral and written communication skills. Excellent interpersonal skills and the demonstrated ability to connect and communicate effectively with individuals at all levels. Notes: Fingerprint background check required. Maintain a valid CA driver’s license $4,809.83‑$6,734.33/mo. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #20170533

MARKETING MANAGER

UNIVERSITY EXTENSION Responsible for the production of Extension’s advertising as well as for marketing/public relations communications, implementing public information and marketing plans and campaigns. Writes and pitches campaign concepts to Program Directors and Managers. In conjunction with the artists, provides art direction for campaigns, and maintains the Division brand style sheet. Helps promote our programs to students, businesses, community organizations, and to the general public. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree with experience in E‑Marketing or equivalent combination of education and experience. Comfortable working in a fast paced, collaborative team environment. Comfortable with MS Office software as well as the Adobe suite. Experience managing email campaigns, social media. Excellent project management, interpersonal and organizational skills. Strong writing, analytical, and communication skills. 1‑3 years’ experience in a marketing or business development role. Experience maintaining a website. Demonstrated attention to detail. Notes: Fingerprint background check required. Maintain a valid CA driver’s license. Salary up to $33.53/ hr, commensurate with qualifications and experience. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status,

protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For primary consideration apply by 1/29/18, thereafter open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #20180016

Tide Guide Day

PROGRAM COORDINATOR

UC EDUCATION ABROAD PROGRAM (UCEAP) Through international academic experiences, UCEAP inspires students to explore and transform their lives, UC and the world. The Program Coordinator supports all operational and academic activities as assigned within a specified group or “Region” of UCEAP participants. Collaborates with all regional teams to integrate best practices and works to ensure these processes are as efficient as possible. Communicates as required with faculty Study Center Directors and personnel abroad, campus offices, UCEAP staff, and students, on UC and UCEAP policies pertaining to all routine aspects of students’ programs. Involved in supporting student advising and orientation; placement and selection; pre‑departure preparation; academic records management; and, Study Center operations liaison duties. Reqs: BA/BS degree in related area and two or more years’ experience in student affairs, or equivalent combination of education, training and experience. Excellent oral and written communication skills. Demonstrated ability to listen, learn, and build trust among faculty, staff, and students. Interpersonal skills, multicultural competencies and ability to work with diverse populations. Skill to prioritize assignments to complete work in a timely manner. Ability to apply and/ or adapt current procedures to an increasingly automated environment. Demonstrated knowledge of MS Office Suite or equivalent. Experience in international education and program implementation; Experience in program promotion and information sharing. Multicultural competencies; ability to work with diverse populations. Notes: Fingerprint background check required. Full time, on‑site position with a regular schedule at the UCEAP Systemwide Office in Goleta, CA (near UCSB). Multiple Positions Available. $22.85‑$23.77/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For primary consideration apply by 2/5/18, thereafter open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #20180032

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BREN SCHOOL OF ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE & MANAGEMENT Assists the Student Affairs Manager with admissions, recruitment and student advising. Builds and maintains databases and records of prospective students, current students, and alumni. Updates operating systems and implements new software to improve communication and work flow. Analyzes student progress and alumni placement, compiles reports and presents information, as requested. Plans and manages communications and marketing campaigns. Produces digital and print materials for outreach. Uses social media platforms to connect with students and alumni, and promote the Bren School. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree and/or equivalent combination of education and prior work experience. Minimum of 1‑3 years of experience working with or advising students. Friendly and approachable demeanor

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crosswordpuzzle

s tt Jone By Ma

“Back-Billed” — all the smaller examples.

54 Tom Hiddleston’s role in “Thor” 55 Suit accessory 56 Cereal with a rabbit mascot 1 Sedate 6 Any of the Bee Gees brothers 58 Implements first used in the Paleolithic age 10 Chicago-based clown 14 Hashtag inspired by the Harvey 61 Abundant 62 Word before bay, day, or pay Weinstein allegations 63 Little night flyer 15 “The Joy of Cooking” author 64 Quits hedging Rombauer 65 “Benevolent” fraternal order 16 Mess up completely 66 Oboist’s supply 17 “No further detail is needed” 19 Statesman von Bismarck 20 “Man of a Thousand Faces” 1 Put through a refinery Chaney 2 “Danny Boy” voice, usually 21 Play backgrounds 3 Make reparations 22 Forms morning moisture 4 Letters before a monetary 24 Green Day drummer ___ Cool amount 25 That dude’s 5 Where to see corgis compete 26 Krypton, e.g. 6 Core concepts 27 Three, on some clocks 7 Bank offerings, for short 30 “Help!” at sea 8 Songwriter’s publishing gp. 31 Sold out, in a way 9 Statistician’s numbers problem, 33 Statement after reporting sometimes something pleasant, maybe 10 Furrowed body part 35 Genesis brother 11 Reversed, like some shirts or 37 Ab ___ (from the beginning) jackets 38 Italian carmaker that partnered 12 Acne spot with Chrysler 13 “Be My Yoko ___” (Barenaked 39 Water-based tourist attraction Ladies single) in Rome 18 Bank robbery 44 Emulated 23 Abbr. before a cornerstone date 45 Do a marathon 26 Cameroon’s neighbor 28 Birth state of Elijah Wood 46 Go off ___ tangent 29 Part of MIT, for short 47 Banner team? 30 Do what you’re doing right now 48 Stashed away 31 Broadway musical without a 49 Loudly lament storyline 52 Overdue

Across

Down

STUDENT AFFAIRS COORDINATOR

Sunrise 6:58 Sunset 5:25

INDEPENDENT.COM

JANUARY 25, 2018

32 In conclusion, in Paris 33 Question for the stranded 34 Coatroom hangers, maybe 35 Prefix for sphere 36 Fiber source in cereals 40 “Can ___ you in on a little secret?” 41 Savoir-faire 42 Kid’s wheels 43 IRS employee 48 Drivers’ warnings 49 Took illegally 50 De-squeaked 51 Conquers 53 Forest hackers 54 Place for tumblers 56 “The ___ La La Song” (theme from “The Banana Splits”) 57 Ocasek once of the Cars 59 ___ Tuesday (Aimee Mann’s old band) 60 Be behind ©2017 Jonesin’ Crosswords (editor@ jonesincrosswords.com) For answers to this puzzle, call: 1-900-226-2800, 99 cents per minute. Must be 18+. Or to bill to your credit card, call: 1-800-655-6548. Reference puzzle #0859

LAST WEEK’S SOLUTION:

THE INDEPENDENT

65


INDEPENDENT CLASSIFIEDS

EMPLOYMENT with high energy. Excellent written and oral communication skills. High level of initiative and ability to work independently with minimal supervision. Comfortable working one‑on‑one, and with small and large groups. Efficient and detail oriented. Committed to excellent customer service. Ability to effectively and efficiently use software for word processing (Word), data management and analysis (Excel), and visual presentation (Powerpoint). Familiarity with social media platforms, including Instagram, Facebook, LinkedIn and Twitter. Experience with data collection, analysis, synthesis and interpretation; ability to generate professional reports. Notes: Fingerprint background check required. Must be able to work during non‑business hours during special events and to travel periodically. $22.85‑$25.00/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment

$1200 1BD Corner of Hope & San Remo‑N State St‑Barbara Apts Quiet NP 687‑0610 1BD NEAR Cottage Hospital. 519 W Alamar. Set among beautiful oak trees across the street from Oak Park. NP. $1200. Call Cristina 687‑0915 1BD NEAR SBCC & beach @ Carla Apts NP. 530 W Cota $1200 Rosa 965‑3200 2BDS $1620+ & 3BD flat or townhouses $2370. Near UCSB, shops, park, beach, theater, golf. Sesame Tree Apts 6930 Whittier Dr. Hector 968‑2549

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PHONE 965-5205

SKILLED

SR. BUILDING MAIN­TENANCE WORKER

FACILITIES MANAGEMENT May work independently, as part of a team, or as an assistant to a skilled trades person. Performs routine maintenance on portable fire extinguishers, emergency eyewash/

WIFI sound systems. STUDIOS $1200+ & 1BDs $1320+ in beautiful garden setting! Pool, lndry & off‑street parking at Michelle Apartments. 340 Rutherford St. NP. Call Erin 967‑6614 TOWNHOME & parking near UCSB and beach, model open $1400 (LSE) 968‑2011 2 BEDROOMS, 1 bath cottage, near Mission, 1 car garage with storage no dogs. @2475, available now. 330 Junipero Plaza. 805 687‑1853 STUDIO $949 & ROOMS $700 and lower. (or $49 nightly) Util incl. Furn. w/ TV, frg, micro ‑ Patterson/ Magnolia Ctr txt or ph: 805‑452‑4608

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E M A I L S A L E S @ I N D E P E N D E N T. C O M

SERVICE DIRECTORY

(CONTINUED)

without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For primary consideration apply by 1/30/18, thereafter open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs. ucsb.edu Job #20180020

REAL ESTATE for rent

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shower stations, fire alarm systems, and fire sprinkler systems. Reqs: Minimum of two years experience in the performance of semi‑skilled building maintenance work or one year as a building maintenance worker, or an equivalent combination of education and experience. Ability to read, write and perform basic math calculations. Notes: Fingerprint background check required. Days and hours may vary to meet the operational needs of the department. $19.80‑$22.74/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For primary consideration apply by 2/5/18. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #20180028

AUTO

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ADMINISTER OF ESTATE NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: Ann S. Black Case No.: 18PR00011 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of Ann S. Black A PETITION FOR PROBATE: has been filed by:Erik D. Black and Stephen J. Black in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara THE PETITION for probate requests that (name): Erik D. Black and Stephen J. Black be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The Independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held in this court as follows: on 02/22/2018 AT 9:00 a.m. Dept: 5 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, located at 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Anacapa Division. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special notice form is available from the court clerk. Petitioner: Erik D. Black and Stephen J. Black 1114 State Street Suite 272 Santa Barbara CA 93101, (805) 957‑1922 Published Jan 25. Feb 1, 8, 2018. NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: PETER EWANICK NO: 17PR00566 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of PETER EWANICK A PETITION FOR PROBATE: has been filed by: JACK STUSTER in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara THE PETITION for probate

requests that (name): JACK STUSTER be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The Independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held in this court as follows: on 02/01/2018 AT 9:00 a.m. Dept: 5 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, located at 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Anacapa Division. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special notice form is available from the court clerk. Petitioner: Jack Stuster 1516 Marquard Terrace Santa Barbara, CA 93101; (805) 680‑1315. Published Jan 11, 18, 25. Feb 1 2018. NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: EUGENE HENRY ZANDONA NO: 18PR00019 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of Eugene Henry Zandona, deceased A PETITION FOR PROBATE: has been filed by: DOMINC DAL BELLO in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara THE PETITION for probate requests that (name): DOMINC DAL BELLO be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important

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actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The Independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held in this court as follows: on 03/01/2018 AT 9:00 a.m. Dept: 5 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, located at 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Anacapa Division. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for petitioner: Julianna M. Malis, Esq., 1514 Anacapa Street, Suite A, Santa Barbara, CA 93105; (805) 946‑1550. Published 1/25/18, 2/1/18, 2/8/18.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: CHANNEL ISLAND MARINE at 74 Aero Camino Goleta CA 93117. This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Gregory Earl Cooper 2780 Puesta Del Sol Santa Barbara CA 93105. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 10, 2018 This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Connie Tran . FBN Number: 2018‑0000120. Published. Jan 25. Feb 1, 8, 15 2018. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SERENO RELIEF SERVICES at 27 West Anapamu Street #470 Santa Barbara CA 93101. This business is conducted by an Individual Christina Miriam Ketcham 325 East Valerio Street Santa Barbara CA 93101 Signed: Christina Miriam Ketcham. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 23, 2018 This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Tania Paredes. FBN Number: 2018‑0000253. Published. Jan 25, Feb 1, 8, 15 2018.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: MARIACHI ISLA VISTA at 4326 Calle Real #14. This business is conducted by an Individual (same address) Signed: Gonzalo Renoso. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Dec 28, 2017. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Tara Jaywingle. FBN Number: 2017‑000346. Published. Jan 25. Feb 1, 8, 15 2018. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SOUL PATH DOULA at 805 Margo Street Santa Barbara CA 93109. This business is conducted by an Individual (same address) Signed: Kayla Mae Talkington. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 11, 2018 This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2018‑0000137. Published. Jan 25, Feb 1, 8, 15 2018. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: VACATION PROPERTY CONSULTANS at 131 Vernal Avenue Santa Barbara CA 93105. This business is conducted by an Indidual (same address) Signed: Stephanie Olson. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 16, 2018 This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Margarita Silva. FBN Number: 2018‑0000161. Published. Jan 25, Feb 1, 8, 15 2018. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: GARLAND FARMS at 5611 West Camino Cielo Road Santa Barbara CA 9105. This business is conducted by an Individual (same address) Signed: Clayton B. Garland, II 85 West Highway 246 #103 Buellton CA 93427. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 3, 2018 This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2018‑0000032. Published. Jan 25, Feb 1, 8, 15 2018. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: WACKYPARTYPICS PHOTOBOOTH at 870 Amethyst Drive Santa Maria CA 93455. This business is conducted by an Individual (same address) Signed: Laarni K. So Hu. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 12, 2018 This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Marlene Ashcom. FBN Number: 2018‑0000141. Published. Jan 25. Feb 1, 8, 15 2018. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SPORTSMANS LOUNGE at 1226 State Street Santa Barbara CA 93101. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company; 109 San Clemente Street Santa Barbara CA 93109. Signed: Phillip Wright, Member. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Dec 29, 2017 This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Connie Tran . FBN Number: 2017‑0003483. Published. Jan 25. Feb 1, 8, 15 2018.

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: DAILYOM at 8 East Figueroa Street #220 Santa Barbara CA 93101. This business is conducted by a Corporation Daily Media, Inc. 133 East De La Guerra #70 Santa Barbara 93101 Signed: Scott Blum, President. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Dec 21, 2017 This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Connie Tran . FBN Number: 2017‑0003437. Published. Jan 18, 25. Feb 1, 8 2018 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: INTERIOR HARDSCAPE DESIGN, SIMMONS AND COMPANY at 2822 Ben Lomond Drive Santa Barbara CA 93105; Tom C. Simmons (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Tom Simmons This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Dec 29, 2017 This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2017‑0003486. Published. Jan 11, 18, 25. Feb 1 2018. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SB CARES at 325 Santa Barbara Street Santa Barbara CA 93101; Community Shul of Montecito & Santa Barbara; 4598 Camino Molinero Santa Barbara CA 93110 This business is conducted by an Corporation Signed: Karen Schloss Heinberg This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 4, 2018 This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Connie Tran FBN Number: 2018‑0000065. Published. Jan 11, 18, 25. Feb 1 2018. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: FIESTA PEDICAB, PEDICAB EVENTS at 682 San Felipe Drive Santa Barbara CA 93111; MICHELE ANGELO ZARAGOZA (SAME ADDDRESS) and SCOTT J. MYERSON; 2360 Martinez Ave. Martinez CA 94553. This business is conducted by a Joint Venture. Signed: Michele A. ZaragozaThis statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Dec 29, 2017 This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Connie Tran. FBN Number: 2017‑0003485. Published. Jan 11, 18, 25. Feb 1 2018. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: HESTIA PUBLISHING at 516 Alan Road Santa Barbara CA 93109. Marilyn Power Scott (same address). This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Marilyn Power Scott. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 11, 2018 This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2018‑0000135. Published. Jan 18, 25. Feb 1, 8 2018.

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SPRIG TREE SERVICE 1430 Linhere Drive Carpinteria CA 93013; Fredric Dylan Lyle Martin (Same Address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Fredric Dylan Lyle Martin. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 4, 2018 This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2018‑0000088. Published. Jan 18, 25, Feb 1 & 8, 2018. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: OCEAN MESA CAMGROUND at 100 El Capitan Terrace Lane, Goleta CA 93117. El Capitan Ranch, LLC 11560 Calle Real Goleta CA 93117. This Business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company Signed: Diane C. Forman, Secretary. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Dec 29, 2017 This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2017‑0003479. Published. Jan 18, 25. Feb 1, 8 2018. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: ROARK WINE COMPANY at 84 Industrial Way Unit C, Buellton CA 93427. Roark Wine Company, LLC (Same Address) This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company Signed: Ryan Roark, Owner. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Dec 28, 2017 This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Mary Soto. FBN Number: 2018‑0003465. Published. Jan 18, 25. Feb 1, 8 2018. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: BRILLIANT BRIGHTWORK, CT&C CONSULTING GROUP at 1318 Gutierrez Street Santa Barbara CA 93103. Bruce W. Stark (Same Address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Bruce W. Stark. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 10, 2018 This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Margarita Silva. FBN Number: 2018‑0000117. Published. Jan 18, 25. Feb 1, 8 2018. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: TOP ROOF REMOVAL, INC. at 668 Burtis Street Santa Barbara CA 93111. Top Roof Removal Inc (Same Address) This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: Chad McClintock, President. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 09, 2018 This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Connie Tran . FBN Number: 2018‑00000107. Published. Jan 18, 25. Feb 1, 8 2018. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: RXR COLLECTION at 325 Ladera Street #4 Santa Barbara CA 93101. Michael Lemon (Same Address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Michael Lemon. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 3, 2018 This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Rachel N. Gann. FBN Number: 2018‑00000035. Published. Jan 18, 25. Feb 1, 8 2018.

JANUARY 25, 2018

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: EMMADONNA, EMMADONNA TRAVEL at 2435 De La Vina Street #E Santa Barbara CA 93105. Claudia Kapp (Same Address) and Iris Pascua (Same Address) This business is conducted by a General Partnership Signed: Claudia Kapp. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Dec 19, 2017 This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Connie Tran . FBN Number: 2017‑0003417. Published. Jan 18, 25. Feb 1, 8 2018. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: TRUST LEISURE WEAR at 1605 E. Airport Avenue Lompoc CA 93436. Ricky Laverne Rantz (Same Address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Ricky Laver ne Rantz. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 8, 2018 This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Deborah Sanchez. FBN Number: 2018‑0000098. Published. Jan 18, 25. Feb 1, 8 2018. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: KAMARI GEMS at 320 Sylvan Drive Goleta CA 93117. Stephanie M. Boumediene (Same Address). This business is conducted by an Individual (same address) Signed: Stephanie M. Boumediene. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 11, 2018 This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2018‑0000131. Published. Jan 18, 25. Feb 1, 8 2018. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: MACHUCA MAINTENANCE at 7141 Tuolumne Drive Goleta CA 93117. Martin Machuca (Same Address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Elida Gabriela Machuca. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 11, 2018 This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Taria Paredes‑Sadler. FBN Number: 2018‑0000129. Published. Jan 18, 25, Feb 1, 8 2018. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: ANA & SON SERVICES, INC, ANA’S SERVICES #2 at 1511 San Andres Street Suite #A Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Ana & Son Services, Inc. (Same Address) This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: Ana Aguirre. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 10, 2018 This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Rachel N. Gann. FBN Number: 2018‑0000124. Published. Jan 18, 25. Feb 1, 8 2018.

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LEGALS

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: WOLF’S HEAD at 27 1/2 East Victoria Street Santa Barbara CA 93101. Wolf’s Head Trading Company LLC 5782 Alondra Drive Goleta CA 93117 This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company; Signed: Cristian Sagastume, CEO. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 3, 2018 This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2018‑0000045. Published. Jan 18, 25. Feb 1, 8 2018. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: ARCADY DISTRIBUTING at 100 Adams Road Goleta CA 93117. Strahan‑Montanes Enterprises, Inc. (Same Address) This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed:David Strahan, President. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 11, 2018 This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Tania Paredes‑Sadler. FBN Number: 2018‑0000130. Published. Jan 18, 25. Feb 1, 8 2018. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: CLEAR CONSTRUCTION at 6255 Inez Street Unit 1&2 Ventura CA 93003. Clear Construction, Inc (Same Address). This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: Bailey Hochhalter, President. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Dec 19, 2017 This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Connie Tran . FBN Number: 2017‑0003418. Published. Jan 18, 25. Feb 1, 8 2018.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: THE EQWINERIE at 2852 Tapadero Road Los Olivos CA 93441. Catherine Gallegos (Same address) and Victor Gallegos (Same Address) This business is conducted by a Married Couple Signed: Victor Gallegos. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 12, 2018 This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Connie Tran . FBN Number: 2018‑0000144. Published. Jan 18, 25. Feb 1, 8 2018. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: QUILTTERRA, QUILTTERRA MAGAZINE at 1900 Chapala Street Apt. #3 Santa Barbara CA 93101. Maria Dzreeva (Same Address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Dzreeva Maria. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 10, 2018 This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Connie Tran . FBN Number: 2018‑0000116. Published. Jan 18, 25. Feb 1, 8 2018. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: HAAS PROPERTY MANAGEMENT at 5915 Via Lemora Goleta CA 93117. This business is conducted by a Married Couple (same address) Signed: Jerry Zheng and Xiaoning Duan. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 19, 2018 This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Connie Tran . FBN Number: 2018‑0000038. Published. Jan 25, Feb 1, 8, 15, 2018.

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: OLD TOWN GRAPE WRECKING, PACIFIC BRAND WINES, SHINY.WINE at 5290 Overpass Road Suite #226 Santa Barbara CA 93111. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company; Fainer Consulting, LLC (same address). Signed: Lea Fainer, Managing Member 5662 Calle Real #253 Goleta CA 93117. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Dec 22, 2017 This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Connie Tran . FBN Number: 2017‑0003446. Published. Jan 25. Feb 1, 8, 15 2018. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SANTA YNEZ VALLEY HISTORICAL MUSEUM & CARRIAGE HOUSE at 3596 Segunto Street Santa Ynez CA 93460. This business is conducted by a Corporation (same address) Signed: Brian D. Stenfors, Executive Director PO Box 181 Santa Ynez CA 93460. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 22, 2018 This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Rachel N. Gann. FBN Number: 2018‑0000240. Published. Jan 25. Feb 1, 8, 15, 2018. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: 805 RESTORE at 1624 Olive Street Santa Barbara CA 93101. This business is conducted by an Individual (same address): Signed: Taylor Hall PO Box 30363 Santa Bargbara CA 93130. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 22, 2018 This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Connie Tran . FBN Number: 2018‑0000232. Published. Jan 25. Feb 1, 8, 15, 2018.

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

Design Review Board Goleta City Hall – Council Chambers 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B Goleta, CA 93117 Tuesday, February 13, 2018 at 3:00 P.M.

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Design Review Board (DRB) of the City of Goleta will conduct a public hearing on the date set forth above to consider the following new project: Conceptual Review Santa Barbara Honda Façade Improvements 475 S. Kellogg Ave. (APN 071-140-067, 071-140-068) Case No. 17-122-DRB Design Review Fairview Shopping Center Landscape Revisions 139 North Fairview Ave. (APN 077-170-042, 077-170-025 077-170-041) Case No. 18-006-DRB PUBLIC COMMENT: This hearing is for design review only. All interested persons are encouraged to attend the public hearing and to present written and/ or oral comments. All letters should be addressed to City of Goleta, Planning and Environmental Review, 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B, Goleta, CA 93117 or email to mchang@cityofgoleta.org. Letters must be received by Planning and Environmental Review no later than Monday at noon prior to the DRB meeting. Materials received after this time may not be reviewed prior to the DRB meeting. FOR FURTHER INFORMATION: The item in this notice is a new item. The DRB agenda may also include items continued from prior meetings. All persons wanting to review any project applications may do so by contacting City of Goleta, Planning and Environmental Review, 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B, Goleta, CA 93117 or by calling (805) 961-7543. The Agenda, staff reports and project plans will be available approximately one week before the hearing on the City’s website at www.cityofgoleta.org. 68

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FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: DATSU FILMS at 249 Verano Drive Apt. #2 Santa Barbara CA 93110. This business is conducted by an Individual (same address) Signed: Carter Hiyama. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 18, 2018 This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Connie Tran . FBN Number: 2018‑0000191. Published. Jan 25. Feb 1, 8, 15, 2018.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: EPREP SERVICES at 148‑A Aero Camino Goleta CA 93117. This business is conducted by a Corporation; (same address). Signed:Eric M. Gordon, President. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Dec 29, 2017 This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Connie Tran . FBN Number: 2017‑0003478. Published. Jan 25. Feb 1, 8, 15 2018.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: THE RIGHT BRUSH at 7660 Cathedral Oaks Road Unit #10 Goleta CA 93117. This business is conducted by an Individual (same address) Signed: Valentin Cardenas. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 18, 2018 This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2018‑0000212. Published. Jan 25. Feb 1, 8, 15, 2018.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: THE MONEY DANCE at 520 East Arrellaga Street Unit #2 Santa Barbara 93103. This business is conducted by an Individual (same address) Signed: Sharon Cox. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 3, 2018 This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Connie Tran . FBN Number: 2018‑0000046. Published. Jan 25, Feb 1, 8, 15, 2018.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: G&M AUTO at 311 East Gutierrez Street Santa Barbara CA 92101. This business is conducted by an Individual Felipe Gutierrez 4842 San Gordiano Avenue Santa Barbara CA 93101 Signed: Veronica Medina . This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 18, 2018 This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Rachel N. Gann. FBN Number: 2018‑0000202. Published. Jan 25, Feb 1, 8, 15, 2018.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: WANNABEE RESORT WEAR at 3463 State Street Santa Barbara CA 93105. This business is conducted by a Married Couple; Signed: Kimberly L. Thompson and Steve M. Thompson 3700 Cedar Vista Santa Barbara CA 93105. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 17, 2018. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Margarita Silva . FBN Number: 2018‑0000179. Published. Jan 25. Feb 1, 8, 15 2018.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: MV CONSTRUCTION at 229 South Voluntario Street #C Santa Barbara CA 93103. This business is conducted by an Individual (same address) Signed: Erasmo Villapudua PO Box 90835 Santa Barbara CA 93190. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 18, 2018 This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Connie Tran . FBN Number: 2018‑0000201. Published. Jan 25. Feb 1, 8, 15, 2018. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: FLOW CONSCIOUSNESS INSTITUTE at 703 Colina Lane Santa Barbara CA 93103. This business is conducted by a General Partnership (same address) Signed: Justin Faerman and Jaclyn Knechtel. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 19, 2018 This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Melissa Mercer. FBN Number: 2018‑0000227. Published. Jan 25, Feb 1, 8, 15, 2018.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: MERIDIAN GROUP REAL ESTATE MANAGEMENT, INC. at 6290 Overpass Road Building D Santa Barbara CA 93111. This business is conducted by a Corporation (same address) Signed: Robert V. Koogman, President. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 8, 2018. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Connie Tran . FBN Number: 2018‑0000087. Published. Jan 25. Feb 1, 8, 15 2018. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SKILLZ AND KILLZ at 7747 Jenna Drive Goleta CA 93117. This business is conducted by an Individual (same address) Signed: David J. Goss. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 16, 2018. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Rachel N. Gann . FBN Number: 2018‑0000166. Published. Jan 25. Feb 1, 8, 15 2018.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: NORDIC WOODCRAFT at 414 Donze Ave Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Michael Shannon McCray (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Michael McCrary This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Dec 27, 2017 This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Tara Jayasinghe. FBN Number: 2017‑0003461. Published:. Jan 4, 11, 18, 25 2018. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SOUTH COAST COMMUNITY YOUTH CULTURAL CENTER, SOUTH COAST DANCE ALLIANCE, SOUTH COAST WRESTLING CLUB at 1427 San Andres St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101; South Coast Community Youth Cultural Center (same address) This business is conducted by an Corporation Signed: This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Dec 28, 2017 This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin. FBN Number: 2017‑0003466. Published:. Jan 4, 11, 18, 25 2018.

Public Notice BREACH OF PERSONAL HEALTH INFORMATION OF AETNA MEMBERS This serves as public notice that the personal health information of some Aetna members may have been inadvertently exposed in a recent mailing that took place on July 28, 2017. No Social Security numbers, bank account, or credit card information was involved. On Monday, July 31, 2017, Aetna began receiving complaints from members who noted that a reference to filling prescriptions for HIV medication was visible through the window of the envelope in which the mailing was trans-mitted, in addition to their name and address. The company has confirmed that, based on an envelope used by the vendor that carried out the mailing, some members’ personal health information may have been viewable in certain circumstances. Aetna is sending letters to potentially affected individuals to explain the situation. The Company is undertaking a full review of its processes in an effort to prevent this type of incident from ever happening again. If members have any questions they can call 800-326-5608. This phone line is toll-free and operates 24 hours per day, seven days per week.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: RFP ASSOCIATES at 7127 Hollister Ave. #25A‑139 Goleta, CA 93117; Richard F. Parisse 445 Los Verdes Dr. Santa Barbara, CA 93111 This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Richard F. Parisse This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Dec 27, 2017 This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jazmin Murphy. FBN Number: 2017‑0003460. Published:. Jan 4, 11, 18, 25 2018. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: EPIC BREWING COMPANY, TELEGRAPH BREWING COMPANY at 418 N. Salsipuedes St. Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Epic Brewing Company, L.L.C. 825 S. State Street Salt Lake City, UT 84111 This business is conducted by an Limited Liability Company Signed: David W. Cole, Managing Member This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Dec 22, 2017 This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Connie Tran. FBN Number: 2017‑0003450. Published. Jan 11, 18, 25. Feb 1 2018. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: BUELLTON DENTAL at 240 E. HWY 246 Suite 108 Buellton, CA 93427; Melinda R. Oquist, DDS. Professional Dental Corp. 1256 Coast Oak Drive Solvang, CA 93463 This business is conducted by an Corporation Signed: This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 02, 2017 This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Tania Paredes‑Sadler. FBN Number: 2018‑0000019. Published. Jan 11, 18, 25. Feb 1 2018. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SANTA BARBARA UNI at 6 Harborway #118 Santa Barbara, CA 93109; Stephen Jubina 1331 Mountain Drive Santa Barbara, CA 93101 This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Stephen Jubina This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 02, 2018 This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Margarita Silva. FBN Number: 2018‑0000016. Published. Jan 11, 18, 25. Feb 1 2018. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: NASIF, HICKS, HARRIS & CO., LLP at 104 W. Anapamu Street, Suite B Santa Barbara, CA 93101‑3126; Lawrence W. Brown 880 Winthrop Court Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Jody D. Holehouse 4541 Camino Molinero Santa Barbara, CA 93110; Thomas W. Burk 6175 Stow Canyon Road Goleta, CA 93117; William J. Nasif 5108 Cathedral Oaks Road Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Jeffery P. Harris 1137 North Patterson Ave Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Sarah E. Turner 50 Valley Ridge Street Ojai, CA 93023 This business is conducted by an Limited Liability Partnership Signed: This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Dec 15, 2017 This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Connie Tran. FBN Number: 2017‑0003393. Published. Jan 11, 18, 25. Feb 1 2018.


INDEPENDENT CLASSIFIEDS

LEGALS

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: TRI‑ COUNTY PISTACHIOS at 407 State Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Tri‑County Pistachios LLC (same address) This business is conducted by an Limited Liability Company Signed: This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 02, 2018 This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Melissa Mercer. FBN Number: 2018‑0000031. Published. Jan 11, 18, 25. Feb 1 2018. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SANTA BARBARA PISTACHIOS at 407 State Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Santa Barbara Pistachios inc (same address) This business is conducted by an Corporation Signed: This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 02, 2018 This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Melissa Mercer. FBN Number: 2018‑0000030. Published. Jan 11, 18, 25. Feb 1 2018. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: RK MAINTENANCE at 5143 San Anselo Santa Barbarra 93111. This business is conducted by an Individual (same address) Signed: Randy Kordes. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 3, 2018 This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Rachel N. Gann. FBN Number: 2018‑0000038. Published. Jan 11, 18, 25. Feb 1 2018. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SANTA BARBARA STOKED at 1792 Calle Poniente Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Tammy Kennedy Zybura (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 02, 2018 This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Connie Tran. FBN Number: 2018‑0000023. Published. Jan 11, 18, 25. Feb 1 2018. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: GOOD SEED COFFEE, GOOD SEED COFFEE BOUTIQUE, GOOD SEED COFFEE BOUTIQUE, INC. at 1607 Mission Dr. Suites 106 & 106 B Solvang, CA 93463; Good Seed Coffee Boutique Boutique, Inc. (same address) This business is conducted by an Corporation Signed: Leyla William, CFO This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 02, 2018 This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Margarita Silva. FBN Number: 2018‑0000021. Published. Jan 11, 18, 25. Feb 1 2018. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: BETTERMENT FINANCIAL SERVICES at 5637 Kent Place Goleta, CA 93117; Nathan Nienhuis (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Nate Nienhuis This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Dec 14, 2017 This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Tania Paredes‑Sadler. FBN Number: 2017‑0003382. Published. Jan 11, 18, 25. Feb 1 2018.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: Santa BARBARA PEST CONTROL, INC.; 719 E Haley Street, Santa Barbara CA 93103. This business is conducted by a Corporation (same address) Signed: Bruce D. Craig, President. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 5, 2018 This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Christine Potter. FBN Number: 2018‑0000081. Published. Jan 11, 18, 25. Feb 1 2018. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: FLO TEK SEWER & DRAIN CLEANING at 1121 East Gutierrez Street Santa Barbara CA 93103. This business is conducted by a Married Couple Signed: Juan Jose Campos and Norma Victoria Campos 1131 Camellia Street Oxnard CA 93036. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 19, 2018 This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Rachel N. Gann. FBN Number: 2018‑0000221. Published. Jan 25, Feb 1, 8, 15 2018. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: THE DAISY at 1221 State Street,Santa Barbara CA 93101; THISTLE & POPPY, INC.; 925 Chelham Way, Santa Barbara CA 93108 This business is conducted by a Corporation (same address) Signed: Dominic Shiach, President. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 4, 2018 This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Christine Potter. FBN Number: 2018‑0000062. Published. Jan 11, 18, 25. Feb 1 2018. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: PACIFIC SALES DISTRIBUTION at 1101 De La Vina Santa Barbara CA 93101; JEREMIAH GRAY; This business is conducted by an Individual at 407 Stanley Drive Santa Barbara CA 93105 Signed: Jeremiah Gray. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 4, 2018 This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Connie Tran . FBN Number: 2018‑0000055. Published. Jan 11, 18, 25. Feb 1 2018.

NAME CHANGE IN THE MATTER OF Ashley Sarah June Grant ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 18CV00139 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: Ashley Sarah June

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Grant To: Macauley Grant Becker THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING April 4, 2018 9:30 am, Dept 6, Courthouse, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101 A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated Jan 12, 2018. by Darrel E. Parker, Executive Officer; Terri Chavez, Deputy Clerk; Pauline Maxwell, Judge of the Superior Court. Published. Jan 25 & Feb 1, 8, 15 2018. IN THE MATTER OF TAWNI JANETTE JONES ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 17CV04774 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: Tawni Janette Jones To: Tawni Yoko Jones THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed , the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING Feb 21, 2018 9:30 am, Dept 6, Courthouse, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101 A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated Jan 3, 2018. by Darrel E. Parker, Executive Officer; Terri Chavez, Deputy Clerk; Pauline Maxwell, Judge of the Superior Court. Published. Jan 11, 18, 25 & Feb 1 2018.

PUBLIC NOTICES CELLCO PARTNERSHIP and its controlled affiliates doing business as Verizon Wireless (Verizon

W ireless) is proposing to build a 75‑foot stealth s t r u c t u re / m o n o e u c a l y p t u s telecommunications tower in the vicinity of 5400 Block Cathedral Oaks to 600 Block Kellogg Ave., Goleta, CA 93111. Public comments regarding potential effects from this site on historic properties may be submitted within 30‑days from the date of this publication to: Project 6118000125‑MI c/o EBI Consulting, mihle@ ebiconsulting.com, 6876 Susquehanna Trail South, York, PA 17403 or via phone at 443‑866‑1410. SUPERIOR COURT OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA FOR THE COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA IN RE THE MATTER OF THE ADOPTION Case No.: 17FL01653 PETITION OF: ALEXANDER JAUREGUI and JANET JAUREGUI, CITATION TO PARENT THE PEOPLE OF THE STATE OF CALIFORNIA TO: JOSE MOSQUEDA By order of this Court you are hereby advised that you may appear before the judge presiding in Department SM2 of this Court, located at 312‑C East Cook Street, Santa Maria, California 93454 on 02/08/2018, at 9:30 A.M. then and there to show cause, if you have any, why SOPHIE ANAIT OROZCO should not be declared free from parental custody and control for the purpose of freeing SOPHIE ANAIT OROZCO for placement for CITATION TO PARENT adoption. The following information concerns rights and procedures that relate to this proceeding for the termination of custody and control of said minor as set forth in Family Code Section 7860 et seq.:1. At the beginning of the proceeding the court will consider whether or not the interests of the minor child require the appointment of counsel. If the court finds that the interests of the minor do require such protection, the court will appoint counsel to represent the child, whether or not the child is able to afford counsel. The minor will not be present in court unless the minor so requests or the court so orders. 2. If a parent of the minor appears without counsel and is unable to afford counsel, the court must appoint counsel for the parent, unless the parent knowingly and intelligently waive the right to be represented by counsel. The court will not appoint the same counsel to represent both the minor and his 3. The court may appoint either the public defender or private counsel. If private counsel is appointed, he or she will receive a reasonable sum for compensation and expenses, the amount of which will be determined by the comt. The amount must be paid by the real parties in interest, but not by the minor, in such proportions as the court believes to be just. If, however, the court finds that any of the real parties in interest cannot afford counsel, the amount will be paid by the county. 4. The court may continue the proceeding for not more than thirty (30) days as necessary to appoint counsel to become acquainted with the case. 12/22/2017 Date: Clerk By: Deputy Clerk: Darrel E Parker, By Cordelia Gearon Published Jan 11, 18, 25. Feb 1 2018.

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A full-service ticketing platform that specializes in local events.

‘EARTHWALK’ A Breathtaking Multimedia Event Narrated by Orson Welles

February 2, 2018 Marjorie Luke Theatre

Two Screenings - 7pm & 9pm

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GAME ON! Kick off your Super Bowl Sunday with a breathtaking 4-mile run/walk along the Santa Barbara waterfront. Wear your favorite team jersey as you’re being cheered through the finish. Super Bowl t-shirts provided for all participants Unique football awards for age group winners Refreshments For more information or to register please go to sbactionprol.com

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JANUARY 25, 2018

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Santa Barbara Independent, 01/25/18  

January 25, 2018, Vol. 32, No. 628

Santa Barbara Independent, 01/25/18  

January 25, 2018, Vol. 32, No. 628