Page 1

IntervIew wIth PresIdentIal hIstorIan Douglas Brinkley jan. 19-26, 2017 VOL. 31 ■ nO. 575

Trump

Santa BarBara In the tIme of

Where D.C. CoulD STrike S.B. FirST

HealtH • environment • immigration • Civil rigHts

P l u s

Calendar of fundraisers a n d

a Practical

Guide to action

ep kte a barbara san

t grean !

agai

inside like hell but do

n’t know wher

e to start?

d get to work. grab a copy, an take a breath,

Want to fight

independent.com

JANUARY 19, 2017

THE INDEPENDENT

1


What’s on tap this month at The Garden

JAN 22nd

The NFL Conference Championships are happening so bring your friends and family for our buy one entree and get a 2nd entree for 50% off promotion during the games!

JAN 28th

Plant yourself at The Garden at 6 pm on Saturday, January 28th for a beer dinner with Allagash Brewing Company! Enjoy a 4 course menu paired w/ the best beers that Allagash has to offer. Tickets are $49/person including tax & gratuity and are available online through Nightout.com or by calling The Garden at (805) 770-7700.

FEB 5th

SUPER BOWL SUNDAY! Make The Garden your spot to watch the Super Bowl and enjoy our buy one entree, get a 2nd entree for 50% off promotion during the game!

FEB 23rd

Save the date for a STONE BREWING TAP TAKEOVER! Come meet Greg Koch from STONE as we pour 25 beers including rare beers that never leave their brewery!

And join us during Happy Hour for $1 off all 12oz or 16oz beers, bar bites, sides, and starters from 3:00pm to 6:00 pm, Monday through Friday. Located inside the Santa Barbara Public Market, The Garden is an urban contemporary beer garden featuring 41 craft beers on tap and an elevated bar menu, open 7 days a week.

Plant yourself at The Garden.

Mon-Wed 11:30am - 10pm Thu-Fri 11:30am - 11pm Sat 9 am- 11pm Sun 9am - 10pm

2

THE INDEPENDENT

JANUARY 19, 2017

independent.com

38 W. Victoria Street (805) 770-7700


Canada’s Ballet BC

Emily Molnar, Artistic Director Featuring Choreography by Crystal Pite and Sharon Eyal Fri, Feb 3 / 8 PM Granada Theatre Tickets start at $35 $19 UCSB students

A Granada facility fee will be added to each ticket price

“This superb contemporary ballet company… is packed with charismatic dancers performing at full-strength.” The Boston Globe Dance Series Sponsors: Annette & Dr. Richard Caleel, Margo Cohen-Feinberg & Robert Feinberg and the Cohen Family Fund, Irma & Morrie Jurkowitz, Barbara Stupay

Award-winning French Canadian Cirque Troupe

The 7 Fingers (Les 7 doigts de la main)

Cuisine & Confessions

Mon, Feb 6 / 7 PM (note special time) Granada Theatre Tickets start at $25 $19 UCSB students (with valid ID) and youths (18 & under) Special Youth Pricing A Granada facility fee will be added to each ticket price

“A delicious evening in every sense of the word. A perfect blend with just the right dose of ingredients, like in the very best recipes.” Huffington Post Event Sponsors: Audrey & Tim Fisher Corporate Sponsor: The Lynda and Bruce Thematic Learning Initiative: Creative Culture

(805) 893-3535 / www.ArtsAndLectures.UCSB.edu Corporate Season Sponsor:

Granada event tickets can also be purchased at: (805) 899-2222 independent.com

www.GranadaSB.org

JANUARY 19, 2017

THE INDEPENDENT

3


Commemorates 44 years

2017

January 22, 2017

of the Supreme Court’s landmark decision, Roe v. Wade, which confirms that the constitutional right to privacy includes the right to make personal pregnancy decisions without government interference. In the face of uncertainty and unprecedented threats to reproductive health care access and rights, we stand in solidarity with the majority of Americans who respect an individual’s right to safe and legal abortion. Together, we’ll fight to ensure our country does not move backward.

We won’t go back. Santa Barbara Pro-Choice Coalition Partners AAUW Lompoc-Vandenberg Branch

Fund for Santa Barbara

Planned Parenthood Generation Action at UCSB

Democratic Club of Santa Maria Valley

League of Women Voters of Santa Barbara

Santa Barbara County Commission for Women

Democratic Service Club of

Lompoc Valley Democratic Club

Santa Barbara Rape Crisis Center

Planned Parenthood California Central Coast

Santa Barbara Women Lawyers

Planned Parenthood Central Coast Action Fund

Santa Barbara Women’s Political Committee

Santa Barbara County Democratic Women of Santa Barbara County Jennifer Adams Nancy Alexander Emily Allen Vicki & Joe Allen Debbie & Greg Armstrong Lauri Baker Susanne & Carroll Barrymore Kristin Bassett Lexi & Matt Beausoleil Kate Belanger Henrietta Bertelsman Leslie Sweem Bhutani & Pat Sweem Lin Black Hillary Blackerby & Daraka Larimore-Hall Janet Blevins & Gary Smith Hon. Marty & Joe Blum Barbara Bolton Borah Family Eileen Boris September & John Bowman Chris & Marell Brooks Mary Brown & Tove Matas John Buttny & Bette Robinson Hon. Laura Capps Hon. Lois Capps Hon. Salud & Gina Carbajal Sarah Carr Camille Cimini Fruin Eloisa Chavez Patrick & Wynn Clevenger Holly & David Cline Charles & Jan Clouse Hon. Margaret & Joe Connell Jen Cooper Rachel Couch Kim Cowles Janean Acevedo Daniels Nancy & Roger Davidson Jean Lange Davis

Shonnie & Lloyd De Armond Danielle De Smeth Jim & Susan Deacon Barbie Deutsch Jill & Ron Dexter Judi Doernberg Hon. Jason & Kaci Domínguez Elizabeth Downing & Peter Hasler Margi & Roger Drue Barbara Edmison Sue Ehrlich & Bill Elliott Karen Engberg, MD & Douglas R. Jackson, MD Luella Engelhart, Dennis D. Gagnon & Helena Gagnon Hon. Susan Epstein Steve Feinberg & Sherry Holland Gina Fischer & Josh Andersen Birthe S. Francis Eric & Julie Friedman Lisa Giegerich & George Polchin Ellen Goldman Liora Goodman Clover Brodhead Gowing Lisa Guravitz & Hon. Fred Shaw Cheri Gurse & Carol Keator Beth Hamilton Hon. Lauren Hanson Hon. Gregg Hart Hon. Joan Hartmann Peter Haslund & Bets Wienecke Sarah Hearon Richard & Karen Heimberg Lee Heller Chris & Erin Henson Beverly Herbert Cecia & Milt Hess Jerry W. Higgins

Tanya & Juan Higuera Shirley & John Hobson Amy Holbrook Deborah Holmes & Craig Park Hon. Grant House Mary Howe-Grant & Peter Ford Hayley Hrehor Amanda Hsiung Alissa Hummer & Michelle Howard Rob & Vikki Hunt Hon. Hannah-Beth Jackson & Judge George Eskin Bonnie & Dick Jensen Deborah Karoff & Anna DiStefano Sandy Kievman Beverly & Hartley King Audrie Krause Elinor & James Langer Nancy Levin Hon. Monique Limón Barbara S. Lindemann Hon. Sheila Lodge Ann Lorimer Deborah & Marty Lynch Christine & Bruce Lyon Martha MacGillivray Laurie & Thad MacMillan Sherry & Craig Madsen Mary Lynn & Mike Mallen Virginia Mariposa & Christina Eliassen Lloyd Frances Shannon Marsh Hon. Gail Marshall Pam McLean, PhD Julie Mickelberry Jeanne S. Morgan Hon. Cathy Murillo Jennifer Musick, MPH Zahra Nahar-Moore

Robin Newman Beatrice T. Oshika Dianne Owens Vaughan Parker Erin R. Parks & Avalon Gagnon Amanda Pelch Hon. Paula Perotte Susan Petrovich Dr. Linda Phillips Lois Phillips & Dennis Thompson Beth Pitton-August Phyllis & Elliot Prager Rikka Rasmussen Hon. Luz Reyes-Martin & Diego Martin Hon. Kyle Richards Elena Richardson Carol Rizzo Yolanda Robles Beth & Richard Rogers Deborah Rogow & Howard Winant John & Mary Romo Susan Rose & Allan Ghitterman Adele Rosen Sybil Rosen Starshine Roshell Patrice Ryan Maryan Schall Tamara Schlagel Jon Scott Schneider Hon. Helene Schneider Anne & Robert Schowe Christina Schowe Jean K. Schuyler Bob & Carole Shapiro Marian & Marty Shapiro Janet Shiers Susan Shields Jennifer Smith & Carl Neufeld

Lindsay & Ian Soleimani Richard Solomon & Jana Zimmer Julia & Jerry Springer Judy & Jack Stapelmann Patricia Reilly Stark Leslie Rogers Steinmetz Ken & Cami Stevens Angie Swanson-Kyriaco & James Kyriaco, Jr. Catherine Swysen & Robert Sanger Gail & David Teton-Landis Sandra A. Thompson C.J. Thomsen Jeremy Tittle & Janet Tran Jenna & Andrew Tosh Bicky Townsend Lila Trachtenberg & George Handler Randolph Trust Linda A. Tuomi Stanley Tzankov Joan Vignocchi, Tim Gallant & Liam Gallant Mary H. Walsh Kat Ward Pat & Jerry Ward Jinny Webber Margie Weeks & Jack Talbott Mary Anne & Joel Weiss Toni & Larry Wellen Joan Wells Hon. Harwood “Bendy” White & Kathy Snow Hon. Das Williams Hon. Janet & Harvey Wolf Mary A. Wood Mary Ellen & Dennis Wylie Lucinda Young & David Sears *Partial list

Show your solidarity by taking these three actions today! #1: Join the Women’s March on January 21 (Los Angeles, Ventura, Santa Barbara, San Luis Obispo). #2: Send a letter to Congressman Salud Carbajal and urge him to protect access to reproductive health care and rights. #3: Share why access to reproductive health care is important to you @ facebook.com/SBPCC.

Santa Barbara Pro-Choice Coalition, PO Box 1356, Santa Barbara, CA 93102 | facebook.com/SBPCC 4

THE INDEPENDENT

JANUARY 19, 2017

independent.com


PASSPORT

$50 OFF FREE A E AV SAV SAVE $50

8” X 8”SOFT COVER PHOTOBOOK SAVE $30

FRE SA AVE AV VE $30

TO PHOTO SAVINGS

E CL AS S

8” X 8”, 20 PAGES SOFT COVER PHOTOBOOK

$300

OFFER ENDS 3/31/16

ORNGTS SP PAPHSOT O SAVI SEE REVERSE FOR DETAILS

TO

$300 WORT

LEA CAME RN HO RA WI W TO TH A USE YO AT SAM Y’S FREE INT UR NE PHOT W OSCH RO CLA OFF OOL. SS SEE ER END

H OF

SAVINGS INSIDE!

FREE

$10 O

ores United St Camera of Samy’s

S 3/3

FOR

WITH EVERY CAMERA PURCHASE YOU’LL RECEIVE A FREE

MAKE YOUR

PASSPORT TO PHOTO SAVINGS COUPON BOOK WORTH UP TO A $300 VALUE!

SAV E $10 ON MAKE YOUR NEX YOU T ME R ME MORY TAL PRI OFF SHINE NT. SEE ER END REV ERSE

PRIVATE INDIVIDUAL PHOTO CLASSES

WO

SAV RTH INGS O INSID F E!

FF

ON A S ERS E FOR 3/31/16 METAL DETA ILS ENLA SA AV AV VE E RGEM $10 ENT

REV

1/16

DETA ILS

APPOINTMENT

SAMYS.COM

TODAY!

CONTACT YOUR LOCAL SAMY’S CAMERA TO SIGN UP

NO TAX ON THESE CANON LENSES! BUY MORE, GET MORE - BUY 2 QUALIFIED LENSES FOR BONUS MAIL-IN REBATES* ALL CANON ADVERTISED MERCHANDISE INCLUDES CANON USA 1 YEAR LIMITED WARRANTY REGISTRATION CARD.

SAVE $150

SAVE $150 SAVE $20

EF 24-70MM

EF 70-200MM F/2.8L IS II USM

$1749

$194900

EF 50MM F/1.2L USM EF 11-24MM F/4L USM F/2.8L II USM EF 50MM F/1.4 USM EF 85MM F/1.8 USM 00 NO TAX! 00 NO TAX! 00 NO TAX! 00 NO TAX! 00 NO TAX! $2999 - $200 INSTANT $1899 - $150 INSTANT

EF-S 10-18MM F/4.5-5.6 IS STM

$27900

SAVE $200

SAVE $100

SAVE $50

SAVE $50

$349

NO TAX!

$2799

$1349

$369

$299 - $20 INSTANT REBATE $399 - $50 INSTANT REBATE $419 - $50 INSTANT REBATE *BUY MORE BONUS $25 *BUY MORE BONUS $50 *BUY MORE BONUS $50

$1449 - $100 INSTANT

REBATE

REBATE

REBATE

*BUY MORE BONUS $100

*BUY MORE BONUS $100

NO TAX!

$2099 - $150 INSTANT REBATE

*BUY MORE BONUS $100

*BUY MORE BONUS $100

ALL NIKON PRODUCTS INCLUDE NIKON INC. USA LIMITED WARRANTY. AUTHORIZED NIKON DEALER, NIKON USA INC.

SAVE $200

SAVE $320

MACRO & PORTRAIT LENS KIT

AF-S DX MICRO-NIKKOR 40MM F/2.8G

AF-S DX MICRO NIKKOR 85MM F/3.5G ED VR & AF-S NIKKOR 35MM F/1.8G DX

$49695

MVP

$27695

$816.95 - $320 INSTANT REBATE

AF-S NIKKOR 200-500MM F/5.6E 35MM F/1.4 DG ED VR HSM ART LENS

$139695

MVP

MVP

$89900

50MM F/1.4 DG HSM ART LENS

$94900

NO TAX!

AT-X 14-20MM F/2 PRO DX

85MM F/1.4 DG HSM ART LENS

NO TAX!

$119900 NO TAX!

$63900

NO TAX!

$839 - $200 INSTANT REBATE

PLUS FREE

VALUE PACK Includes microphone, zoom adapter & SD card

SAVE $450

$159900

1080P

NO TAX!

20.2

W/ 24-105MM LENS MEGAPIXELS 00 NO TAX!

$2099

$2299 - $200 INSTANT REBATE

$2049 - $450 INSTANT REBATE

VALUE

SAVE $700

SAVE $200

1080P W/ 18-135MM LENS VIDEO KIT

$9000

SAVE $470

51200

X-T2 BODY 24.3 4K WIFI $159900

20

ISO SENSITIVITY

W/ 16-80MM LENS 95

$2596

MEGAPIXELS

FREE 32GB MICROSD CARD

MVP

4K

$3066.95 - $470 INSTANT REBATE

SAVE $100 SAVE $200

FDR-AX33

$399

99 NO TAX!

12 MEGAPIXELS

20.6

MEGAPIXELS

4K

1080P VIXIA HF G40

20X

OPTICAL ZOOM

4K ULTRA HD HANDYCAM CAMCORDER FULL HD CAMCORDER

4K WIFI $74800

$848 - $100

NO TAX! INSTANT REBATE

ST .

Samy’s

HA LE Y

CO TA

ST .

W .C AR RI LL O

NEW LOCATION

STA TE ST. CH AP AL AS T. DE LA VIN AS 101 T. FW Y.

MON - FRI: 9AM - 6PM

$239695 $3096.95 - $700

• Form-fitted armor cage • Wooden hand grip • Orientable top handle

24.3

MEGAPIXELS

MVP INSTANT REBATE

ES-T17-A

HANDHELD CAMERA CAGE RIG

$51900

$1099

NO TAX!

SAMY’S MAIL ORDER:

CASH PAID FOR USED EQUIPMENT!

CORPORATE SALES:

TRADE-IN YOUR OLD EQUIPMENT FOR CASH OR STORE CREDIT

(866) 726-9463

SANTA BARBARA

W/24-120MM LENS

FOR SONY ALPHA SERIES

00 NO TAX! $1299 - $200 INSTANT REBATE

(800) 321-4726 SAMYS.COM

1080P

MEGAPIXELS

(805) 963-7269 | 530 STATE STREET

SAT: 9:30AM - 6PM

(RENTAL & FILM DEPT 9:30AM - 3PM)

PRICES GOOD THROUGH JANUARY 25, 2017 EXCEPT WHERE INDICATED. Not responsible for typographical errors. Limited to stock on hand. First come, first served. No rainchecks and no holds. Prices subject to change without notice. Colors of some cameras vary by location. Samy’s pays Sales Tax on select items. Mail Order, samys.com and all Used, Demo or Refurbished purchases are excluded from the “No Sales Tax” Promotion.

SUN: 11AM - 5PM

(RENTAL DEPT CLOSED)

NO INTEREST IF PAID IN FULL WITHIN 6 OR 12 MONTHS* 6 Months* on

purchases of any amount. 12 Months* on purchases of $499 or more with your Samy’s Camera credit card made between January 19, 2017 to January 25, 2017. Interest will be charged to your account from the purchase date if the promotional purchase is not paid in full within 6 or 12 Months or if you make a late payment. Minimum Monthly Payments Required. *Subject to credit approval.

independent.com

JANUARY 19, 2017

THE INDEPENDENT

5


ARE YOU LOOKING FOR A NEW FAMILY DENTIST THIS YEAR? Johnson Family Dental has been Voted “BEST Dentist” on the Central Coast 4 years in a row by Santa Barbara’s Independent! Free F Laugree L augh ing hin Gas g G as

FREE

New Special New Patient Patient Special Includes: Includes: Digital Digital X-Rays, X-Rays, Exam Exam &Second &Second Opinion Opinion

Not valid with any other offers. Must present coupon. Some restrictions apply. Not valid with any other offers. Must present coupon. Some restrictions apply.

Senior Discount

15%OFF

Not valid with any other offers. Limit (1) per patient. Must present coupon. Some Notrestrictions valid with apply. any other offers. Limit patient. Must present coupon. Some Discount does (1) notper apply to past purchases. Cash paying restrictions apply. Discount does not apply patients only.to past purchases. Cash paying patients only.

Op O n pe en

$1,395

Satur Saturdays! days!

$6 $ 0 60 00

Sa av vin S ing s!! gs

Dental Dental Implant Implant Special Special

Cash paying patients only. Must present coupon, cannot be combined with any Cash offers. paying Does patients Must present coupon,orcannot be combined with any other notonly. include crown, abutment bone graft. Some restrictions other offers. Does not Discount include crown, abutment bone graft. Some restrictions . apply. does not apply toorpast purchases apply. Discount does not apply to past purchases.

Expires 2/19/17

CALL NOW NOW TO TO CALL SCHEDULE SCHEDULE AN AN APPOINTMENT APPOINTMENT

805-880-1299

www.johnsonfamilyDental.com www.johnsonfamilyDental.com

Editor in Chief Marianne Partridge Executive Editor Nick Welsh Senior Editors Michelle Drown, Tyler Hayden, Matt Kettmann Editor at Large Ethan Stewart Photography Editor Paul Wellman News Reporters Kelsey Brugger, Keith Hamm Columnists Gail Arnold, Barney Brantingham, Roger Durling, Jerry Roberts, Starshine Roshell Opinions Editor Jean Yamamura Videographers Phyllis de Picciotto, Stan Roden Executive Arts Editor Charles Donelan Assistant Editor Richie DeMaria Arts Writers Tom Jacobs, D.J. Palladino Calendar Editor Terry Ortega Calendar Assistant Savanna Mesch Copy Chief Jackson Friedman Copy Editors Diane Mooshoolzadeh, Amy Smith Art Directors Ben Ciccati, Caitlin Fitch Editorial Designer Megan Illgner Web Producer/Social Media Michael S. Gahagan Web Content Assistant Nya Burke Sports Editor John Zant Food Writer George Yatchisin Contributors Michael Aushenker, Rob Brezsny, Victor Cox, John Dickson, Brandon Fastman, Rachel Hommel, Rebecca Horrigan, Eric HvolbØll, Shannon Kelley, Mitchell Kriegman, Kevin McKiernan, Ninette Paloma, Michael Redmon, Carolina Starin, Tom Tomorrow, Cynthia Carbone Ward, Maggie Yates Editorial Intern Blanca Garcia Founding Staff Emeriti Audrey Berman, George Delmerico, Richard Evans Honorary Consigliere Gary J. Hill Copy Kids Henry and John Poett Campbell, Chloë Bee Ciccati, Miles Joseph Cole, Asher Salek Fastman, Izadora and Savina Hamm, Madeline Rose and Mason Carrington Kettmann, Simone and Zoe Laine, Izzy and Maeve McKinley, Miranda Tanguay Ortega, Avila Paige and Marie Autumn Smith, Sawyer Tower Stewart Office Manager/Legal Advertising Tanya Spears Guiliacci Administrative Assistant Gustavo Uribe Distribution Scott Kaufman Advertising Representatives Camille Cimini Fruin, Suzanne Cloutier, Rachel Gantz, Lynn Goodman, Laszlo Hodosy, Tonea Songer, Brandi Webber Marketing and Promotions Manager Emily Cosentino Production Manager Marianne Kuga Advertising Designers Helene Laine, Alex Melton Chief Financial Officer Brandi Rivera Director of Advertising Sarah Sinclair Publisher Joe Cole The Independent is available, free of charge, limited to one copy per reader. Back issues cost $2 and may be purchased at the office. The Independent may be distributed only by authorized circulation staff or authorized distributors. No person may, without the permission of publisher, take more than one copy of each Independent issue. Subscriptions are available, paid in advance, for $120 per year. Send subscription requests with name and address to subscriptions@independent.com. The contents of The Independent are copyrighted 2017 by The Santa Barbara Independent, Inc. No part may be reproduced without permission from the publisher. The publisher assumes no responsibility for unsolicited material. A stamped, self-addressed envelope must accompany all submissions expected to be returned. The Independent is published every Thursday at 12 E. Figueroa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Advertising rates on request: (805) 965-5205. Classified ads: (805) 965-5208. The Independent is available on the Internet at independent.com. Press run of The Independent is 40,000 copies. Audited certification of circulation is available on request. The Independent is a legal adjudicated newspaper — court decree no. 157386.

Contact information: 12 E. Figueroa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101 PHONE (805) 965-5205; FAX (805) 965-5518; CLASSIFIED (805) 965-5208 EMAIL news@independent.com, letters@independent.com Staff email addresses can be found at independent.com/info

6

THE INDEPENDENT

JANUARY 19, 2017

independent.com


volume 31, number 575, Jan. 19-26, 2017

Letters . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  25 This Modern World . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .  25

the week.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 27 living.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37 Living Page . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 37

Sports . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 39 Food & Drink . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 Dining Out Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 43

Barely making a dent into his third decade of life, Tyler Hayden is taking a bit of teasing from colleagues for his recent promotion to senior editor but a lot more well-deserved pats on the back. Projects like this week’s Keep Santa Barbara Great Again pullout guide — which took weeks of work in addition to Tyler’s regular duties as news editor, and thousands of words’ worth of notes whittled down to a manageable few for print — are all about inspiration, hard work, and some fine writing skills. Asked how he manages to keep his unflappable demeanor, Tyler answered, “Regular walks around the block and a cold beer at the end of the day.”

The Restaurant Guy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 45

CoveR STORY

Santa Barbara in the Time of Trump Where D.C. Could Strike S.B. First

(Indy Indy Staff)

a&e. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47

Arts Life . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 47

Books . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 49

Barney Brantingham’s On the Beat . . . . . .  23

online now at

independent.com

Theater . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 51

Pop, Rock & Jazz . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 53 Reviews . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 54

film & tv. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57 Movie Guide . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 57

news.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 9 odds & ends. . . . . . . . . . . . . . 61

opinions.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 23

paul wellman

12

keeping THE INDY gReat again, too paul wellman

Contents

Rob Brezsny’s Free Will Astrology . . . . . . . 61

Classifieds.. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 62

s.B. QUestionnaiRe

Roger Durling talks opportunity with United Way’s Steve Ortiz (pictured). .........................

independent.com/sbq

oUR woman in d.C.

Kelsey Brugger reports on the Trump inauguration, Women’s March, and more. . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . .independent.com/dc

LAGUNA BLANCA STORY TIME For Art Inspiration

SATURDAY

JANUARY 28 10-11AM

260 SAN YSIDRO RD. A community event offering a morning of stories and art for children ages 3-8.

W W W. L A G U N A B L A N C A . O R G

RSVP to STORYTIME@LAGUNABLANCA.ORG

independent.com

JANUARY 19, 2017

THE INDEPENDENT

7


Specializing in the junior high school years.

open house

LeARnInG hAppens eVeRYWheRe We Go.

SATURDAY, JANUARY 21 3-5 Pm Program begins promptly. We also invite you to take a family tour or spend a day as a student. Applications due February 1, 2017. 1321 Alameda Padre Serra ● Santa Barbara, CA 93103 805.682.2989 ● www.sbms.org ● Financial Aid Available

I AM balanced.

BE YOUR TRUE SELF AT OUR BOUTIQUE YOGA + HEALTH COACHING STUDIO IN THE HEART OF DOWNTOWN. Locally owned and operated Melanee Cooper, Certified 500 RYT & HHC

- come find us! -

430 E. CARRILLO ST. (AT 805-766-8460

THE INDEPENDENT

March 3, 7 a.m. | $125 The President’s Breakfast at Fess Parker’s Doubletree Resort The bestselling author, popular college teacher and revered military officer will discuss the leadership lessons he learned commanding American and international forces in the Middle East.

TO PURCHASE TICKETS: WWW.WESTMONT.EDU/PRESBREAKFAST

THANK YOU TO OUR SPONSORS: Lead Sponsor:

LIVE ST.)

healthyzen.com 8

General Stan McChrystal

JANUARY 19, 2017

independent.com

Gold Sponsors: Davies Public Affairs | Anna and David Grotenhuis | HUB International La Arcada | Carl and Jo Lindros | MATT Construction | Lindsay and Laurie Parton Santa Barbara Capital | Santa Barbara Securities | Peter and Monique Thorrington | V3 Special thanks to Bank of the West, BNP Paribas Group


January 12-19, 2017

NEWS of the WEEK pau l wellm an photos

by Kelsey Brugger @kelseybrugger, Keith hamm, tyler hayden @TylerHayden1, and nicK Welsh, with Independent staff

national

Diane Brewer

Stoked for trump

county

A Chat with Some of the County’s 56,000 Who Voted for the Donald

O

by Kelsey Brugger

his Republican anti-Trump friends initially thought Trump was the only candidate who could lose. But Francisco now believes “he might have been the only kind of guy who won this one.” In Santa Barbara County, Hillary Clinton squashed Trump by 28 percentage points. For Democrats, that was more than in 2012’s 18 percent or 2008’s 23 percent. The comparison is influenced, though, largely by registration numbers, which surged for Democrats in 2016 and 2008. Still, about 56,000 people voted for Trump in the county, or about a third of the voters. Most of those came from North County. The only supervisorial district Trump won was the 4th District, which spans Orcutt, Lompoc, and parts of Santa Maria. There, Trump secured 50 percent of the vote; Clinton won 41 percent. Trump lost, however, the cities of Guadalupe, Lompoc, Santa Maria, and Buellton. Most drastically, in the City of Santa Barbara, Trump got just 18.5 percent of the vote; Clinton won 73 percent. Though collective mourning saturated Santa Barbara on November 9, not everyone wept. Here is a glimpse at two Santa Barbara women who wore their Trump support on their sleeves—or baseball caps. Diane Brewer has always had a job. Wearing a small circular Trump necklace, she explained she must have worked more than 30 places in town—everywhere from McConnell’s to Raytheon — when she attended Santa Barbara City College. At 58, she is now a financial advisor. Her family, who lived on the Eastside, has always valued hard work. Her father was a painter, and her mom was a waitress, bringing home enough cash to put food on the table for her and her nine siblings. Her father’s values left an impression on her, and she recently

returned to town to care for him.“He is sharp in the mind and can tell you everything,” she said, later likening him to Trump.“He doesn’t want anything from anybody,” she said. Brewer expressed sadness that a niece had disowned her because she emphatically supported Trump on social media. “I feel there are people who don’t want to say who they voted for,” she said of Santa Barbarans. She is hosting a celebration party on Inauguration Day, but she texted after our interview to clarify that it is not a “DeploraBall,” as it had been initially described. She largely supported the president-elect because she rejected the regulatory climate under President Obama, and she truly believes Trump will bring jobs. “Judge him on his results, not his personality or his hair color,” she said. “I never went a day without wearing a Trump hat, socks, or T-shirt,” said Celine Dilfer, 32, who is involved with Santa Barbara Young Republicans. Some would high-five her, saying,“It takes a lot of balls to wear that.” Others were more confrontational:“Why are you wearing that in my city?” But before the election, most people laughed. Now, they don’t find it quite so funny. The situation has been particularly bad where she works —at the courthouse law library. She said at times Latinos would refuse her help because of her Trump attire. But, ironically, she is the only one there fluent in Spanish, which she learned growing up in Ecuador, where many in her family live. Asked about Trump’s immigration plans, she said, “I think he’s going to do whatever it takes.” She reasoned that the argument against deporting individuals in the country illegally is about splitting up families. “I think he’ll say it doesn’t matter because these people are already split up by leaving Mexico, which is the number one reason we don’t deport all of the illegals,” n she said. independent.com

national Santa Barbara’s newest congressmember, Salud Carbajal, will attend the inauguration of President Donald Trump even though about 50 members of Congress — including one of Carbajal’s roommates in Washington, D.C. — will boycott it because of strong disagreements with Trump’s politics. “I want him to see the face of a Mexican immigrant newly elected to serve as the first Latino representative from the Central Coast and know that the many groups he has disparaged and attacked over the course of his campaign have a strong voice in our government,” Carbajal declared via press statement.

Celine Dilfer

ne Thursday in October, parked on Anacapa Street was a navy blue Dodge Ram with a Donald Trump sticker and fresh white paint sprayed on every side: “FUCK TRUMP.” The obscenity seemed fitting in a city where the politics are as blue as the sky. Trump supporters are few and far between. Though some prominent Republicans currently on the national stage have ties to Santa Barbara—Tom Barrack, inauguration chair, owns Happy Canyon Winery; Andy Puzder, Trump’s pick for secretary of labor, ran CKE here until recently; Ryan Zinke, the interior nominee, has family in town — most Trump supporters are much less visible. In fact, Republican congressional candidate Justin Fareed danced around the issue of endorsing Trump and eventually revoked his support after the now-infamous Access Hollywood tapes surfaced. Likewise, conservative Bruce Porter declined support from the Santa Barbara County Young Republicans because they endorsed Trump, according to club treasurer Celine Dilfer. But Mike Stoker, former county supervisor and congressional candidate, said he didn’t think the area’s average Trump voters were any less visible than Mitt Romney or John McCain voters were in 2012 or 2008, respectively. “When you know you aren’t going to win, there’s no real reason to be active,” said Stoker, a Trump delegate who is credited for starting the “Lock Her Up” chant at the Republican National Convention in July.“There is no incentive.” Less enthusiastically, Dale Francisco, a former Santa Barbara city councilmember and congressional candidate, said he reluctantly voted for Trump. He explained area Republicans tend to be more moderate like former presidential candidate John Kasich. Many of

news Briefs

The good news is that rainfall year to date is now slightly above average at Lake Cachuma, which typically supplies half the water needs for South Coast residents. The bad news is that Santa Barbara County remains in the throes of what federal meteorologists describe as “extreme drought conditions.” Only 2 percent of the California land mass now fits that category, and Lake Cachuma qualifies as the most distressed reservoir in California. The county experienced a jump in affordable housing when the Santa Ynez Band of Chumash Indians announced completion of a 62-unit apartment project in Buellton that adds 12 low-income housing units to the county’s stock. Tenancy of the three buildings, which sit on three acres on 2nd Street and include barbecue areas and walking paths, is through Pacific Property Management at aveheights.com.

Goleta By the second week of the new year, the City of Goleta lost two of its high-ranking officials. City Attorney Tim Giles resigned on 1/10, and the week before, Jennifer Carman, head of Planning and Environmental Review, said she would be leaving for a similar position up north. Overseeing a dozen planners and technicians since taking the job in 2012, Carman’s last day is 1/26. Giles has been the city’s only in-house attorney since 2008.

Business John MacFarlane, who founded Sonos in 2002, stepped back from running the company at the turn of the year in favor of the company president, Patrick Spence, who came to the privately held company from Blackberry in 2012. Headquartered in Santa Barbara, Sonos is a power player in audio equipment with funding estimated to be around $1 billion by financial media sources. MacFarlane stated that he planned to focus on Sonos’s science and math education programs and music and n tech industries.

JANUARY 19, 2017

THE INDEPENDENT

9


Beloved Former Host of A Prairie Home Companion and The Writer’s Almanac An Afternoon with

Sun, Jan 22 / 3 PM (note special time) / Granada Theatre Tickets start at $35 / $15 UCSB students SUNDAY! A Granada facility fee will be added to each ticket price

The recipient of Grammy, ACE and George Foster Peabody awards, the National Humanities Medal and elected to the American Academy of Arts and Letters, Keillor will deliver insights and stories from his journey as one of America’s greatest storytellers. Pre-signed books will be available for purchase

Michael Douglas Visiting Artist Tony Award-winning star of Broadway’s Bridge & Tunnel and the hit show Sell/Buy/Date An Evening with

Sarah Jones

“Ms. Jones brings to life more than a dozen characters with such distinctness that each seems to take over her voice, her mind, her very presence.” The New York Times

Tue, Jan 24 / 8 PM / UCSB Campbell Hall Tickets start at $25 / $19 UCSB students TUESDAY! Co-presented with the UCSB Department of Theater and Dance Event Sponsors: Jody & John Arnhold Corporate Sponsor: Part of the Lynda and Bruce Thematic Learning Initiative: Creating a Better World Corporate Season Sponsor:

(805) 893-3535 www.ArtsAndLectures.UCSB.edu Granada event tickets can also be purchased at: (805) 899-2222 www.GranadaSB.org JANUARY 19, 2017

independent.com

rump’s partisans have adopted the meme “deplorables,” and this Thursday and Friday, the nation’s capital will see both a Deplorable Party and a Formal Inaugural DeploraBall to fête the “happy warriors who, without byline or book contract, advanced liberty across the country.” Santa Barbara can keep up with the festivities and marches at independent.com as reporter Kelsey Brugger sends posts from D.C. Here in town, a private version of a DeploraBall is being held in Hope Ranch, and the Santa Barbara Tea Party & Culpepper Society will rewatch Trump’s inauguration at Goleta’s High Sierra Grill in the evening on Friday. On the flip side, the Students Activist Network out at UCSB is joining a nationwide campus walkout on Friday afternoon, and area high school students plan the same. Love Fights Back will gather for a protest at De la Guerra Plaza at 3:30 p.m. on Friday, and in Santa Maria, a United Against Hate rally takes place at the corner of Main and Broadway at 4 p.m. Within hours of Hillary Clinton’s loss on Election Day, the party that was planned in Washington, D.C., to celebrate the expected historic event turned into a referendum on Saturday against Trump’s agenda. Many of the explosives in Trump’s campaign speeches have been slowly defused since November 8, but activists are reminded daily of the wild swing American policy is about to take, with a conspiracy theorist as a national security advisor and an Oklahoman in favor of fracking to lead the Environmental Protection Agency. Called the Women’s March on Washington, the 616 events organized worldwide for January 21 — and more than a million women, men, and children expected to take part — include a giant march in downtown Los Angeles. Santa Barbara Women’s PAC has 10 buses headed from Pershing Park in the wee hours, and The Santa Barbara Independent has chartered four. All are full. Activists in Santa Barbara that day will be holding a noon rally at De la Guerra Plaza that will walk along the sidewalk toward Gutierrez Street at 1 p.m. About 1,200 people have already RSVP’d, said organizer Michal Lynch, who was “very pleased that Santa Barbara is doing a big action, even though we are a small city.” A gathering in Lompoc at Centennial Park at 11 a.m. will march from there. And San Luis Obispo and Ventura also hold Women’s Marches, with transportation to S.L.O. heading out from Santa Maria at 8 a.m. Call 925-1010 —Jean Yamamura or email admin@ccfutureleaders.org to reserve a seat.

mercedes Sprinters trapped in rV Net

E

fforts by City Hall to ban RVs and other vehicles deemed too big from parking on Santa Barbara city streets have sparked a backlash among some owners of the popular Mercedes-Benz Sprinter and other taller SUVs, who showed up at a special meeting last week asking city councilmembers to exempt them from the “oversized vehicle” ordinance the council adopted late last year. The new ordinance — scheduled to take effect this March — bans any vehicle taller than 82 inches from being parked on city streets on the grounds they block motorists’ visibility and constitute a road safety hazard. By the same logic, the new ordinance also bars vehicles longer than 25 feet and wider than 80 inches. City Attorney Ariel Calonne took pains to craft an ordinance that would eliminate RVs based on size of vehicle rather than the socioeconomics — or conduct — of their occupants. In so doing, however, he also effectively outlawed a newer breed of tall van favored by contractors, construction workers, surfers, and paddle-boarders, many of whom showed up last week to voice their concerns at an ad hoc committee presided over by councilmembers Cathy Murillo and Frank Hotchkiss.“We don’t want to be criminals in our own hometown,” said one Sprinter owner. A contractor said four of his employees, all renters, drive oversized vans as part of their job and that the ordinance will impose a serious burden. The ad hoc committee was formed to find locations where RV owners could legally park during daylight hours. From dusk to dawn, the New Beginnings Program operates the Safe Parking program, which manages a finite number of spaces in parking lots throughout the South Coast for people living in RVs, cars, trucks, and vans seeking to transition into more permanent housing. New Beginnings scatters small clusters of clients among the lots, offering them a range of social services. Insurance costs per space are high, about $2,800 a year. Efforts to secure spaces are ongoing and far from fruitful. A couple of RV dwellers announced a willingness to manage a daytime-nighttime location with a capacity of 23 spaces on city-owned property located by the airport, and a private donor has reportedly expressed willingness to underwrite the insurance costs. In the meantime, one longtime RV advocate announced his intention to challenge City Hall’s new ordinance in court. While many other cities have similar sized-based ordinances, none have been subjected to legal —Nick Welsh attack.

pau l wellm an

“Garrison Keillor must be doing something right – millions of Americans consider themselves honorary citizens of his fictive town, Lake Wobegon.” San Francisco Chronicle

THE INDEPENDENT

Inauguration parties and partisans

T

Garrison Keillor

10

January 12-19, 2017


NEWS of the WEEK cont’d

pharmacy tIed to ‘caNdy maN’ cloSeS

health

established 1977

A

pau l wellm an

State Accuses L.M. Caldwell Pharmacist of Oversupplying Powerful Painkillers by Kelsey Brugger

EntErprisE Fish Company

fter 70 years as a Santa Barbara staple, L.M. Caldwell Pharmacist is shutting its doors this week after the state’s tate’s Board of Pharmacy accused the company of routinely oversupplying powerful painkillers. Since taking over his father’s business in 1967, Peter Caldwell has run two shops on State and Pueblo streets. They were the last of the remaining Peter Caldwell few mom-and-pop pharmacies in Santa Barbara, all of which have struggled to epidemic.“It took the authorities a long time compete with CVS and Rite Aid. Sources in to get their act together, and they still don’t the industry said privately that this financial have it together,” he said. reality drove some independent pharmacists While Caldwell claimed “every store in to regularly fill questionable opioid prescrip- town was affected” by Diaz’s overprescribtions at a time when overprescribing was ing, investigators found his Pueblo Street rampant here and across the country. location “filled tens of thousands more conAfter Dr. Julio “Candy Man” Diaz was trolled substances prescribed by Dr. Diaz arrested in January 2012 and then sentenced when compared to neighboring pharmain 2015 to 27 years in prison for overpre- cies” in a two-year time frame. In 2012, years scribing opioids to countless patients, which after Diaz was well known to run a pill mill, authorities believe resulted in multiple over- Caldwell was still filling prescriptions for dose deaths, regulators found many of Diaz’s his patients—12 percent of his total opioid patients regularly picked up their pills from orders—whereas Federal Drug and Rite Aid declined to do so. Caldwell Pharmacist. These patients “habitually engaged in doc“Statistics are statistics,” Caldwell said. tor shopping” and went to multiple different “I suspect the independent pharmacies in pharmacies, the accusation states. Several town filled more prescriptions than the chain patients drove upward of 40 miles and paid stores did in that particular time. Percentagemostly in cash. For instance, one Lompoc wise, it is possible.” man spent $2,500 for 60 milligrams of OxyOther independent pharmacies in town contin. Another patient, who was from Ven- have faced similar scrutiny in various civil tura, received 1,200 tablets of minor pain lawsuits, but the findings have not been so relievers within a month. damning. Dr. Chris Flynn, an emergency In addition, the complaint said, many room doctor at Cottage Hospital who patients had irregular patterns for picking convened an opioid task force, claimed up their prescriptions or returning too fre- Caldwell Pharmacist “violated patient safety quently for refills. The pharmacists failed to standards” by continuing to fill dangervalidate prescriptions by accessing CURES ous prescriptions written by Diaz despite (Controlled Substance Utilization Review overwhelming concern by other pharmacy and Evaluation System) to search patients’ professionals. drug histories.“A review of CURES and their But Caldwell lamented that CURES was own records would have been a red flag,” “inoperable” eight years ago.“I wish it would the allegation reads. Investigators also found have worked when they brought it out,” he sloppy or nonexistent records. In addition, a said. He spoke about the difficult “judgment technician at Caldwell pleaded guilty in 2011 calls” pharmacists must make. Moreover, he to stealing Oxycontin from the pharmacy said pharmacists were “mostly left out of the and selling the drugs to an undercover detec- loop when something became apparent to tive. (Caldwell was forced to pay $15,000 for law enforcement. And it’s been an ongoing the state’s investiation.) challenge to bring us up to the front line,” he Investigators reprimanded Caldwell and said. “The focus should be on improving the his pharmacist Abdul Yahyavi for failing to system, not [whom] can we penalize. It’s like question the “Candy Man’s” prescriptions, waiting for the person to die at an intersecgiven his reputation. In two years, emer- tion before you put up a stop sign,” he said. Caldwell said he knew Diaz, who is 68, but gency room doctors at Cottage Hospital had counted more than 400 patients who he declined to pass judgment on the oncecame through their doors after overdosing beloved doctor who will likely spend the rest on drugs prescribed by Diaz. of his life in prison. “I’m not here to single In an interview last week, Peter Caldwell out any one person or condemn somebody declined to directly address the Board of for what they did or didn’t do,” he said. “My Pharmacy’s accusations but spoke more closing the pharmacy is retiring, and that is generally about the nexus between the phar- just what it is. This is not anything that I am n maceutical industry and the swelling opioid losing sleep over.”

Don’t Forget Valentine’s Day is Tuesday, February 14th! OYSTERS ON THE HALF SHELL*

ReseRve YouR Romantic evening todaY!

225 State Street • 805-962-3313 enterprisefishco.com Parking available at Rey Rd./Montecito St.

independent.com

JANUARY 19, 2017

THE INDEPENDENT

11


Santa BarBara In the tIme of

Trump

cou rtesy

W

ith the election of Donald Trump as president, we have officially entered new and uncharted territory. What happens next is anybody’s guess. And up to now, most of those guesses have been proved wrong. With that caveat acknowledged, The Santa Barbara Independent news team has sought to explore some of the most immediate pressure points in which the push of the new administration could come to shove over local concerns. Health care. The environment. Immigrant rights. These issues are obvious. What’s far from obvious is what happens next.

Looking the Other Way

On Immigration and Sanctuary, Law Enforcement Doesn’t Ask, and the City Doesn’t Want to Tell by Tyler Hayden

T

he term “sanctuary city” makes Santa Barbara’s lead-

ers nervous, and for good reason. President-elect Donald Trump has vowed to cut federal funding to any American community that openly adopts the title and rebuffs his stated intent to round up and deport millions of undocumented immigrants. For the City of Santa Barbara, the complete loss of federal funding would be catastrophic. In any given year, a sizeable portion of its budget comes from the departments of Transportation, Housing, Justice, and others to pay for highway construction, urban development, firefighting equipment, and so on. In fiscal year 2013, for instance, nearly 10 percent of the city’s $271 million budget came from federal sources. But for Santa Barbara’s immigrants, silence from our elected officials in the face of looming mass deportations is just as distressing. They want leaders to help protect a vital yet vulnerable part of the county workforce, and they’re now actively organizing and taking steps toward formal lobbying efforts, first at the county level, with their sights set on the City Council, as well.“There should be the political will for it,” said Lucas Zucker with CAUSE (Central Coast Alliance United for a Sustainable Economy), noting the progressive majority on both the Board of Supervisors and City Council. Zucker’s colleague Frank Rodriguez met with two dozen activists from multiple groups last week to devise a collaborative game plan toward ordinances that go beyond symbolic gestures. “We want language with teeth,” he said. Later this month, La Casa de la Raza’s board of directors will convene to discuss their own strategies. This early momentum has a dauntingly steep hill to climb, as Santa Barbara’s councilmembers are hesitant to fly the sanctuary city flag anytime soon. They feel the city is already effective in shielding its immigrant community from improper federal reach, pointing specifically to Police Chief Lori Luhnow’s public statements shortly after the election that city cops do not actively seek out undocumented immigrants, unless they’ve committed a crime beyond crossing the border without legal papers. “The immigrant status alone of individuals in Santa Barbara is not a matter for police action,” she said at the time. Councilmember Cathy Murillo doesn’t like the idea of putting Santa Barbara on Trump’s radar, even with a ceremonial resolution, like the one adopted by the council this winter in support of Standing Rock protesters. “If we’re already doing everything we can to protect this vulnerable population,” she said, “I would rather not bring the attention to us and jeopardize the federal funds we get. I would be nervous about using that word.” Councilmember Bendy White is similarly against the concept but for different reasons. He feels the political discord 12

THE INDEPENDENT

JANUARY 19, 2017

that would inevitably arise among his colleagues when they debate the issue would threaten the council’s delicate cohesion. “There’s a real price to pay for that,” he said.“These things tend to put fissures in the decision-making process.” It would be unwise for Santa Barbara to rush down the sanctuary city road, said Councilmember Randy Rowse. “A lot of this is reaction to a guy who’s expressed every one of his policies in adjectives and superlatives,” he said. “I think people are taking his inflammatory rhetoric and giving it a credence it doesn’t deserve.” And Rowse, along with Councilmember Frank Hotchkiss, is uncomfortable with actively subverting federal law. “We’re a law-abiding country,” said Hotchkiss. “I would oppose being a sanctuary city, not because of a lack of sympathy, but because it’s a bad idea to encourage people to come here illegally.” Mayor Helene Schneider, Chief Luhnow, and City Attorney Ariel Calonne declined to comment for this story. Congressmember Salud Carbajal said a patchwork of sanctuary cities is hardly an effective solution to the country’s broken immigration system, but he acknowledged, “They are increasing in number across the country due to the dangerous and harmful immigration policies proposed by Presidentelect Trump over the course of his campaign.” This trend underscores the need for Congress to pass comprehensive immigration reform, he said. There is no tidy definition for “sanctuary city.” In general, it’s used by cities that offer political support or practical protections to people who are in the country illegally. Some sanctuary jurisdictions, like Huntington Beach, simply encourage people without legal status to get more involved in local government. Others, such as San Francisco and Los Angeles, are home to far-reaching policies that have fully cut ties with federal immigration officials. Since the election, at least 18 major sanctuary cities have pledged to limit their association with immigration agents. More than 400 jurisdictions across the country have some sort of sanctuary policy. And California, in many ways, is a sanctuary state, thanks to the Truth and Trust acts, which limit immigration holds at local jails and restrict the access of federal agents to undocumented individuals in custody. Santa Barbara Sheriff Bill Brown said his department complies with both state policies, and he stressed his deputies don’t enforce immigration laws. “As local police, we need to gain the trust of those who live in our communities, including undocumented persons,” he said. Brown explained the Sheriff’s Office does cooperate with federal Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) to assist its officers in taking custody of undocumented immigrants who have committed serious crimes. “In fact, experience has shown us that such

independent.com

FRIEND OR FOE? Naming Santa Barbara a sanctuary city wouldn’t stop ICE agents from conducting door-to-door searches, as they were photographed doing here on the Eastside in December. But advocates say it would go a long way in assuring undocumented immigrants that local law enforcement isn’t out to get them.

criminal aliens usually prey on members of the Hispanic community,” he said. City police spokesperson Sergeant Riley Harwood explained that booking sheets filled out by officers don’t ask for a detainee’s immigration status but do include a place-of-birth field. That information is reviewed by County Jail officials and possibly by immigration agents, as well, he said. Every so often, city police will assist federal agents in an arrest. Federal officials are not required to notify the department when operating in the city, but they typically do as a matter of courtesy. In the field, immigration agents identify themselves verbally and on their uniforms as “police,” as that’s the universally understood term for law enforcement, Harwood said. Sheriff’s Office spokesperson Kelly Hoover confirmed ICE has access to the County Jail’s computers. Hoover could not say how many undocumented Santa Barbara inmates are taken into ICE custody on a weekly or monthly basis, referring that question to the federal agency. ICE spokesperson Lori Haley said the agency doesn’t track those figures by county but by its operational field office. Santa Barbara is covered by ICE’s Los Angeles Field Office, which also encompasses Orange, Riverside, San Bernardino, Ventura, and San Luis Obispo counties. It’s our County Jail’s relationship with ICE that CAUSE’s Frank Rodriguez and others want to focus on first. They seek clarity on the dynamic — rumors exist that custody deputies routinely tip off ICE agents when an undocumented inmate is scheduled for release — and what steps Brown is willing to take to further separate his law enforcement efforts with changing federal policies. Rodriguez noted Brown has so far been open n to their discussions.


pau l wellm an photos

cc o v e r s T oorryy

Schools Expanding ‘Safe Zones’ S.B. Unified, UCSB, SBCC All Taking Steps to Protect Students by Keith Hamm

W SUCCESS STORIES: UCSB psychology and sociology major Mario (pictured above), who asked to be identified by his first name only, is enrolled in DACA. He said his generation was more open about their undocumented status because they were mentored by those like Rene Garcia Hernandez (pictured below).

Students on Tenterhooks Their Futures and the DACA Program Hang in the Balance by Kelsey Brugger

F

or Rene Garcia Hernandez, the Trump presidency feels like the “security blanket has been stripped off.” An undocumented 25-year-old who moved to Santa Barbara from Mexico at age 2, Garcia Hernandez is now enrolled in the DACA (Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals) program. He received a bachelor’s degree from Cal State Northridge and now works at Santa Barbara Junior High School. DACA is the policy President Obama initiated by executive order that authorizes young immigrants to work without fearing deportation. Minors in the country for five years who moved here before age 16 are eligible. For those who meet the criteria, they must reapply every two years. The program could be repealed by the stroke of a pen. “If that DACA program is revoked, all of our students who benefit from it would have their ability to work jeopardized,” said Maritza MejiaWilson, who is a founding member of Adsum, a Santa Barbara nonprofit that has been serving undocumented students since 2010. “That is really frightening.” But Mejia-Wilson noted that recently introduced bipartisan legislation known as the BRIDGE Act, which stands for Bar Removal of Individuals who Dream of Growing our Economy, would temporarily shield young immigrants from deportation and allow those eligible for DACA to be legally employed. California has additional laws in place such as the state’s DREAM (Development, Relief, and Education for Alien Minors) Act, which allows undocumented college students to apply for state financial aid. Though Trump said on the campaign trail he would repeal DACA, MejiaWilson asked, “What would that do to our economy?” Nationwide, more than 750,000 people in many sectors are enrolled in the program. Mejia-Wilson also noted that DACA gives the federal government access to participants’ fingerprints and personal

information. “We are advising students who have not applied to wait to see if there is any change. All they are doing is outing themselves and making all of their data accessible.” “It’s very tough,” said Garcia Hernandez. He grew up sharing a bedroom with his brother and his mom on the Eastside. He explained he was born in the generation that did not talk much about immigration status. He didn’t discover he did not have papers until his mom told him in junior high school he couldn’t go on a school field trip to

Washington, D.C. He was deflated; he had never really traveled. In the last decade or so, he was among those who started to fight for rights for undocumented students. After he was accepted into DACA, Garcia Hernandez felt he “just won a million bucks.” “I felt comfortable,” he said. “The first thing I did was smile and start learning how to drive.” The program allowed him to get a license and get a job — “as a matter of fact, five,” he said — which paid his college tuition. “It allowed me to feel as if I were really part of this country.” Garcia Hernandez said he now realizes that security blanket was never “that nice coat we thought it was. It is just a very thin blanket sheltering me right now.”Asked if he was worried about a Trump presidency, he n said,“I’m scared; I’m not fearful.”

ith post-November 8 tension and

confusion poised to come to a head on Inauguration Day, campuses across Santa Barbara — from elementary schools to institutes of higher learning — have already set in place school ground locations dedicated to the quiet safety of its most vulnerable students. Santa Barbara Unified School District’s Board of Trustees spearheaded a resolution on December 13 to “welcome and support children from all backgrounds, including those from undocumented families” and to “keep immigration authorities off our campuses to the fullest extent provided by law.” At the University of California level, the pressure’s real, said third-year Film and Media Studies major Le Tang with UCSB’s Resource Center for Sexual & Gender Diversity. “But since the election, it feels like we’ve been more fired up. And we’ve definitely been seeing more support.” Much of that support has come in the form of more square footage dedicated to so-called “safe zones,” from outdoor public spaces to classrooms and lecture halls, and by professors offering up their office hours. Drop-in safe zones have also opened up at the Pardall Center in Isla Vista, which provides study space, legal resources, and a home for the tenants union, among other services funded by UCSB’s 23,400 students. On November 9, in the midst of campuswide disillusionment, Vice Chancellor for Student Affairs Margaret Klawunn released a statement with a list of newly opened dropin safe spaces and the university hotline for students who “have witnessed or … have been a target of a hate- or bias-motivated incident.” At the community college level, response from the very top of its governing board, headquartered in Sacramento, has informed any established or pending action at Santa Barbara City College. In December, the California Community Colleges Chancellor’s Office, led by newly appointed Chancellor Eloy Oakley, vowed to support all of its 2.1 million students, mincing

few words in its guidance of the system’s 113 campuses in outlining the following strategies: “District police departments should not detain, question or arrest any individual solely on the basis of (suspected) undocumented immigration status; Districts should not cooperate with any federal effort to create a registry … based on religion, national origin, race or sexual orientation; [and] no confidential student records should be released without a judicial warrant, subpoena or court order.” The issue hits close to home for SBCC President Anthony Beebe, whose father was born in the Philippines and brought to the states when he was 12. “We are a nation of immigrants, with some of us getting here sooner than others,” Beebe said. “Undocumented youth, brought to this country under the age of 16 years, are among the most vulnerable populations we have in our society. They are individuals who deserve special discretion, grace, and protection, as their status here is not of their making.” SBCC’s seven-member Board of Trustees has formed an ad hoc committee to explore campus-specific language of that nature. And in the meantime, Luis Giraldo, PhD, the school’s director of equality, diversity, and cultural competency, has hosted get-togethers at the Winslow Maxwell Overlook as “an open, inclusive, supportive environment for students,” according to Communications Director Luz Reyes-Martin. She said the lunchtime gatherings have attracted undocumented students, single moms, and students coping with mental illness. “It’s hard to tell what will happen [after Trump assumes office],” Reyes-Martin said. “We certainly stand behind Chancellor Oakley. As we look to his office to see what’s coming from the top, we’ll continue to reach out to students.” She added that there have been no arrests or reports of vandalism, nor any significant uptick of related on-campus conflicts. “What’s not uncommon are very high emotions, mostly because of uncertainty,” she said. “What will this lead to?” n

HEAR, HEAR! Loud applause greeted the reading of the school district’s safe campus resolution. CONTINUED independent.com

JANUARY 19, 2017

THE INDEPENDENt

13


pau l wellm an f i le photo

Take Control of Your Controller! Save water and money on your bill when you turn down your sprinkler timer.

Plants don’t need as much water in the fall and winter. Turn it Down for Winter! Contact your water provider for help scheduling your sprinkler controller.

WaterWiseSB.org

Join in January

and first month’s dues are just $20.17 Joining fees may apply

SANTA BARBARA FAMILY YMCA 805.687.7727 • www.ciymca.org/santabarbara 14

THE INDEPENDENT

JANUARY 19, 2017

independent.com

GROWING CONCERN: With 25,000 employees at 1,600 farms across 700,000 acres, farmers are Santa Barbara County’s biggest economic contributor. It remains to be seen how Trump’s staunch position against undocumented immigrants will affect agriculture.

The Farmworker Fear

Increased ICE Raids Loom Over Undocumented Field Hands by Keith Hamm

T

rump’s rhetoric is strong and unequivocal—“Anyone who enters the U.S. illegally is subject to deportation,” according to the presidentelect’s website — but it also runs up against his campaign promises to bolster the American economy, especially in terms of agricultural production. In Santa Barbara County, where 700,000 acres of agriculture are the number one contributor to the economy — with a commodities gross of $1.49 billion in 2015 — nearly three-quarters of the estimated 17,000 farmworkers are undocumented. In the past 13 months in Santa Maria, agents with the U.S. Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) — the law enforcement wing of the Department of Homeland Security — carried out two major “paper raids,” checking farmworker Social Security numbers against federal records. The first, in December 2015, reportedly forced Adam Brothers Family Farma, coowned by County Supervisor Peter Adam, to lay off roughly 300 fieldworkers, a number not denied by Adam in a previous interview. The second ICE raid, in March 2016, led to layoffs of 291 farmworkers with Bonita Packing Company, more commonly known as Bonipak. These ICE audits typically occur in response to leads, tips, or complaints and can produce substantial first-offense fines of up to $3,200 for “hiring or continuing to employ” each worker not authorized to work in the United States, according to the agency’s website. Trump, in his “10 Point Plan to Put America First,” said he will “triple the number of ICE agents.” Trump’s hard-line approach on immigration started the day he announced his candidacy and has remained at the top of his priorities. And while there’s no way to know for certain exactly how it’ll translate on the ground,“there’s a massive state of fear among farmworkers throughout the state right now,” according to Lucas Zucker, a policy and communications director with the Central Coast

Alliance United for a Sustainable Economy (CAUSE). While CAUSE sometimes has a tense relationship with growers, the nonprofit — which focuses on social, economic, and environmental justice — does believe that immigration reform could provide a reliable workforce for farms and ranches, now experiencing a severe shortage countywide. Zucker said that Trump could choose to have his cake and eat it too by cracking down on undocumented immigrants while expanding the current H-2A visa program that sets up foreign laborers with seasonal work on farms in the U.S. However, that guest worker program is considered deeply flawed, according to many who track it. Zucker explained that H-2A ought to allow farmworkers to switch employers, for example, and that there have been reports of human trafficking by recruiters. “With H-2A, there’s a lot of potential for abuse,” he said. “We would prefer real reform that leads to real citizenship, if that’s what [the farmworker] wants.” “Real reform” is also on the mind of Tom Nassif, president and CEO of Western Growers, an advocacy group for farmers in California, Arizona, and Colorado, with an office in Santa Maria. Western Growers endorsed Trump, and Nassif serves on the presidentelect’s advisory committee, where he has spoken of issues critical to the fresh-produce industry in the West. “I am confident [Trump] will be … attentive to our labor crisis,” Nassif said in a statement. “I believe the new administration will work to enact policies that ensure the viability of American food production without undermining [Trump’s] determination to secure the border and remove undocumented [criminals].” “The truth is,” Nassif added, “[Trump] is aligned with agriculture on many issues, including the need to balance the regulatory climate. We seek the practical implementation of, and hopeful modifications to, the Endann gered Species Act.”


pau l wellm an f i le photos

cover story WATER WARRIORS: Kayakers, surfers, and boaters head out to Platform Holly in the Santa Barbara Channel to protest oil drilling. (Aug. 22, 2015)

Back by Popular Demand

Joshua Bell, violin Sam Haywood, piano Tue, Jan 31 / 7 PM / Granada Theatre Tickets start at $35 $19 UCSB students

A Granada facility fee will be added to each ticket price

“[Bell’s] technique is full of body – athletic and passionate – he’s almost dancing with the instrument.” The Washington Post

Oil and Environment What Harm Can Be Done by Nick Welsh

O

f the 27 oil platforms in federal development in Santa Barbara County, that’s waters off the coast of California, not reassuring. New technologies such as 18 are located off the coast of Santa hydraulic fracking and oil acidification, she Barbara County. Clearly, there’s said, can extend the life span of platforms lots of oil here. For environmen- well past their anticipated expiration date. talists such as Linda Krop, chief counsel with Offshore fracking, for example, has proved the Environmental Defense Center (EDC), extremely difficult for oil watchdogs to track. this reality, coupled with the imminent ascen- For years, the federal agencies involved in dancy of President-elect permitting such activiDonald Trump, is cause ties denied fracking was for serious concern. “Oil, even happening. It took air, water, eco-system a Freedom of Inforprotection—we have no mation Act lawsuit by idea what this adminthe EDC to bring such activity to light. Krop istration will do,” Krop then sued, arguing that said. “Everything is on the across-the-counter the table.” Specifically, fracking permits disKrop is worried that a pensed by the Bureau Trump White House of Ocean Energy Mancould add tracts under Linda Krop, Environmental Defense Center agement (BOEM), fora recently approved federal leasing proposal that does not expire merly the Minerals Management Service, until 2022. Though no Pacific tracts are cur- violated safeguards requiring environmental rently included, the new administration review. The agency then prepared an envicould amend that plan without congressional ronmental review document that concluded approval. “We feel we’re in the bull’s-eye,” she offshore fracking and acidizing pose no said. “We used to have 40 more leases [tracts significant environmental risks. In recent leased by oil companies from the federal gov- months, the EDC has filed a lawsuit contendernment for oil production] that we had to ing that a conclusion was arrived at without extinguish through litigation. So the interest any consideration of 25 species of endangered offshore sea life. That legal battle will continue is clearly there.” Even if that were to happen, Krop believes into the regime of Donald Trump. any new leasing plans would still face multiple The only oil project in our coastal waters hurdles. Additional environmental analysis that a Trump White House and the prowould be required, public hearings held, legal drilling Congress could affect is Platform findings made, and the California Coastal Irene, located offshore in state—not federal Commission would have to be persuaded. —waters. ExxonMobil has been quietly pushNothing would happen overnight. ing a plan to use slant drilling to extend its Peter Cantle, head of Santa Barbara Coun- drilling straws into federal waters under the ty’s Energy Division — created to focus on federal jurisdiction of Vandenberg Air Force offshore oil permitting issues — said such Base. In the past, U.S. Air Force skepticism activity is driven by the price of oil per bar- and reluctance has kept the project from rel. “It ebbs and flows with political pressure, moving forward. It should be noted that the but mostly it’s market-driven.” According to likely new secretary of state will be Rex Wayne Cantle, there’s no obvious price-per-barrel Tillerson, the former head of ExxonMobil. threshold that activates industry interest. No recent project has drawn such intense “Every project is different. The cost of getting attention as the Phillips 66 oil trains proposal, oil out of the ground varies,” he said. “What which would haul an estimated 2.2 million happens next will be driven by oil markets gallons of treated tar sands from Phillips’s and changes in the price of oil.” existing Nipomo plant three times a week For Krop, who has spent three decades in 80-car trains, 1.5 miles long. Critics have leading the legal charge against offshore oil described the train as a 1.5-mile Molotov CONTINUED

Program Beethoven: Violin Sonata No. 1 in D Major, op. 12, no. 1 Brahms: Scherzo in C Minor, WoO posth. 2 from the F.A.E. Sonata Brahms: Violin Sonata No. 3 in D Minor, op. 108 Kernis: “Air” for Violin and Piano Ysaÿe: Violin Sonata No. 3 in D Minor, op. 27 (“Georges Enescu”) Rachmaninoff: “Vocalise,” no. 14 from op. 34, Fourteen Songs Sarasate: Carmen Concert Fantasy, op. 25

Yuja Wang, piano Leonidas Kavakos, violin

Mon, Feb 13 / 7 PM (note special time) / Granada Theatre

$55 / $45 / $35 / $15 UCSB students A Granada facility fee will be added to each ticket price

“[Wang] eats the world’s greatest keyboard challenges for breakfast with one hand tied behind her back.” Los Angeles Times

“[Kavakos] is a fantastically accomplished player. He brings a shining and sweet tone to these works.” NPR

Program Janáček: Violin Sonata, JW 7/7

Debussy: Sonata in G Major, L. 140

Schubert: Fantasie in C Major, D. 934 Bartók: Sonata No. 1 in C-sharp Minor, Sz. 75

“[Kavakos] is a fantastically Corporate Season Sponsor: accomplished player. He brings a shining and sweet tone to these works.” NPR

(805) 893-3535 www.ArtsAndLectures.UCSB.edu Granada event tickets can also be purchased at: (805) 899-2222 www.GranadaSB.org independent.com

JANUARY 19, 2017

THE INDEPENDENT

15


Oil and Environment cont’d

42385

Is It Time For a Change?

Counseling and Somatic Experiencing® for Individuals and Families with Ryan George, MA, MA • A holistic emphasis, integrating mind and body, focused on recovery and growth

• Specializing in trauma, addiction and life transitions • Compassionate and cost-effective counseling

Call for a free consultation:

Ryan George, MA, MA (805) 395-4533 ryangeorgetherapy@gmail.com 30 W Mission St., Suite 5, Santa Barbara

SANTA BARBARA RAPE CRISIS CENTER CENTRO CONTRA LA VIOLACION SEXUAL

24-Hour Hotline: (805) 564-3696 www.sbrapecrisiscenter.org

THE INDEPENDENT

JANUARY 19, 2017

THE STATE OF THINGS: Federal oversight of pipeline spills, such as Plains All American’s two years ago, proved so sufficiently lax that California agencies have taken over safety jurisdiction.

Affordable Care Act: Here Today, Gone Tomorrow Republican Congress Moves to Kill Obamacare Without Any Trumpcare in Sight by Nick Welsh

F

or those still stunned by November’s election results, Donald Trump shattered any lingering hope of finding refuge in denial, as he made good on his campaign promises to abolish the Affordable Care Act (ACA). A full week before being sworn into office, Trump ordered the Republican leaders in the Senate to begin the process of repealing and replacing the Affordable Care act simultaneously.

more than rape, not only crisis 16

Bob Poole, formerly with Santa Maria Energy and now with the Western States Petroleum Association, said the Santa Barbara coast is well protected from new oil development by state and federal moratoria. (Krop insists the federal moratorium disappeared during the administration of George W. Bush and has never been reinstated; the exclusion of Santa Barbara tracts in federal leasing plans, however, have the same effect.) Poole said California and Santa Barbara have the most stringent environmental protections of any place on the planet, but since the state produces less than 40 percent of the oil it uses — 1.8 million gallons a day — it has a moral obligation to close the gap. “About 30 percent of the oil we use comes from Saudi Arabia and countries that don’t like us very much,” he said. “And they don’t have the environmental safeguards we do. Life is about managing risks. It’s not about just saying no.” Unlike whiskey, oil is not for drinking, but, like water, it is about arguing. So no matter who’s in the White House, as long as the reserves are out there and the price of oil is high enough, there will be a fight. n pau l wellm an f i le photo

cocktail because of volatile chemical additives needed to make the thick tar sands transportable. There is nothing a Trump administration could do to approve this project. That lies with the San Luis Obispo County Board of Supervisors, who must first decide whether to allow the construction of a rail spur that would enable the proposal to move forward. Last fall, the S.L.O. Planning Commission voted to deny Phillips’s request to build the rail spur. Phillips has filed suit challenging that decision and is appealing directly to the S.L.O. County supervisors. Both deliberations promise to be intense, but the outcome will be determined at the local level. Much oil and gas development in the Santa Barbara Channel has been brought to a screeching halt because of 2015’s Plains All American Pipeline rupture and spill. The federal agency responsible for pipeline safety has yet to announce what remediation efforts are required before the pipeline can be reactivated. Until that happens, about 40,000 barrels of oil a day are all dressed up with no place to go. Congress has already passed new pipeline operations safety requirements, and those measures — however improved — are still considerably weaker than those required by a California law passed in response to the El Refugio pipeline spill. The state Fire Marshal will now assume regulatory oversight for the Plains pipelines that failed to function. In addition, Plains still faces criminal charges filed by the California attorney general and the Santa Barbara district attorney. Since 2005, Jeff Kuyper of ForestWatch has been battling the U.S. Forest Service’s plans to expand oil and gas leasing in 52,000 acres of Los Padres National Forest located in Santa Barbara and Ventura counties. A few weeks ago, Kuyper announced the Forest Service agreed to withdraw its proposal and start anew. Kuyper said the retreat announced by the Forest Service was just that — an announcement, not the product of a legally binding court order or stipulated settlement. Because of that, it could be undone with relative ease. Trump has stated he’d like to see oil drilling expanded on public lands, as has the Republican majority in Congress. Since Los Padres is the only forest in California’s federal lands to allow oil and gas drilling, Kuyper believes “we’re just a few degrees of separation from some bureaucrat in Washington and it becoming reality.” He did stress that any additional drilling would be subject to environmental review and a legally defensible public process that he and other advocates would use “to push back if need be.”

independent.com

Within one day, the Senate voted 52 to 48 to begin the process of repeal, even though all the Democratic senators, and one Republican, Rand Paul, voted against it, with most of them vocally protesting the fact that there is no proposed bill to replace it. In fact, any semblance of how to replace health care for the 22 million Americans now covered under the Affordable Care Act is completely unknown. Based on actions taken by the Senate


cover story

pau l wellm an f i le photo

SkiSki Europe this Winter! Europe this Winter

YouYou are are invited to an presentation invited toinformative an informative presentatio January 2017 from 6:00 - 8:00 pmpm January 25, 2017 from 6:00 - 8:00 SKI25, EUROPE THIS WINTER! TravelStore - 1324 State St Suite C, Santa Barba TravelStore - 1324 State St Suite C, Santa Bar *Win a 3 night Club Med trip for 2 people

You are invited to3 annight presentation onvaca **Prize drawing for a Club MedMed vacation **Prize drawing for ainformative 3 night Club Wednesday, January 25 • 6:00 pm - 8:00 pm TravelStore - 1324 State Santa Barbara the Americas forStfor 2Suite people!!** the Americas 2C,people!!** HEAL THYSELF: With the Affordable Care Act on the chopping block and no reprieve in sight, medical planners worry that emergency rooms will experience an acute increase in demand.

and the House, the four key committees that deal with health care have been given until January 27 to come up with plans to cut revenues for key components of the Affordable Care Act. By cutting funding — rather than repealing the act itself — the repealers need marshal only a simple majority to achieve their ends. Given the strong majorities enjoyed by Republicans in both bodies, this route is all but invulnerable to filibuster. Shortly after Trump’s election in November, Sansum CEO Kurt Ransohoff expressed cautious hope that Trump should be taken seriously but not literally. A few weeks later, however, Ransohoff was forced to temper that initial optimism. Trump, he conceded, needed to be taken both seriously and literally. For the 22 million who bought insurance from any of the thousands of health-care exchanges created by the Affordable Care Act, this could prove to be a serious problem. To date, no Republican, neither President-elect Trump nor congressional leaders, has provided any specifics for how to replace the Affordable Care Act — and for good reason. It won’t be easy. It might, in fact, be impossible. Only by making participation mandatory as the ACA does — even for young, healthy adults — would the risks and revenues be balanced out for the insurance companies. Left unanswered are scary multibillion-dollar questions as to how those with pre-existing conditions can be guaranteed coverage outside the rubric of the Affordable Care Act. Without the Affordable Care Act, how will insurance companies be prevented from imposing the lifetime coverage caps that Obamacare eliminated? It’s telling that Santa Barbara’s newly elected congressmember, Salud Carbajal, took on the Republican repealers in his first speech from the House floor.“This is not a game,” he concluded. Forty-five thousand of his constituents, Carbajal said, would lose access to the health care they got only through the Affordable Care Act. To repeal first and replace later, he declared, was “simply reckless governance.” The numbers for Santa Barbara County alone are staggering. Beyond the 45,000 beneficiaries Carbajal alluded to, the Affordable Care Act also extended Covered California and Medi-Cal to 55,000 people in Santa Barbara County who had previously been ineligible. According to area health administrators, this seemingly esoteric bureaucratic adjustment brings in no less than $123 million a year in federal dollars to pay the health-care costs for individuals previous ineligible. Thanks in part to this, the Santa Barbara Neighborhood Clinics — frontline providers for those most challenged accessing the health-care system — have managed to achieve financial stability for the first time in years. Without the primary care services provided by these clinics, Santa Barbara’s emergency rooms will, once again, become dramatically more crowded. For all the problems associated with the Affordable Care Act — with rapidly rising premiums, some plans costing too much and providing too little coverage — it remains to be seen what alternatives the Republican majority will offer. To date, such details have been conspicuous by their absence. In their stead are general references to tax credits, the ability for intrastate insurance competition, vouchers for Medicare, and block grants n for Medicaid.

Highlights to Include: Highlights to Include: HIGHLIGHTS TO INCLUDE:

Val Thorens - voted the ski resort inworld the world for 2014 Val Thorens - voted the #1 ski#1resort in the for 2014 & 20 • Val Thorens - voted the #1 ski resort in the world for 2014 & 2016 lessons, drink, entertainment all included Lifts,Lifts, lessons, food,food, drink, entertainment all included • Lift tickets, lessons, food, drink, entertainment all included ski resorts covering France, Switzerland and Italy 23 ski23resorts covering France, Switzerland and Italy • 23 ski resorts covering France, Switzerland and Italy Adults and family resorts Adults only only and family resorts • Adults only and family resorts The numbers Children’s clubs starting at 4 months at some resorts Children’s clubs starting at 4 months at some resorts • Children’s clubs starting at 4 months at some resorts for SantaEnjoy Barbara Enjoy a•multi-cultural ski a multi-cultural ski experience! Enjoy a multi-cultural ski experience! experience

County alone are staggering.

CONTINUED

To RSVP for this exciting event please To RSVP forTothis event please call call RSVPexciting for this exciting event please call Douglas Rossi at805-963-6521 805-963-6521 Douglas Douglas RossiRossi 805-963-6521 or email - douglas.r@travelstore.com or email - douglas.r@travelstore.com or email - douglas.r@travelstore.com * Valid at all Club Med locations in the Americas

Is Your Boss Violating Your Rights? Adams Law focuses on Advocating employee rights in claims involving: • Wrongful Termination • Pregnancy Discrimination • Disability Discrimination • Hostile Work Environment • Sexual Harassment • Racial and Age Discrimination

• Misclassified “Salaried” Employees and Independent Contractors

• Working “Off the Clock” • Unpaid Overtime Compensation/Bonuses • Reimbursement for Work-Related Expenses

CALL US TODAY 805-845-9630 Visit our website at www.adamsemploymentlaw.com

Adams Law Serving the Employment Law Needs of California’s Central Coast independent.com

JANUARY 19, 2017

(805) 845-9630

THE INDEPENDENT

17


Join us for an Open House! Saturday, January 28 | 11am-1pm RSVP or Drop by!

The End of Planned Parenthood? Organization Faces Congressional Defunding

I

ncoming President

Montessori Center School

Serving children 18 months - 6th grade

401 N. Fairview Ave. | 805-683-9383 | MCSSB.org

Accepting Lottery Applications for the Affordable Condominiums at Oak Park Collection

City Ventures Homebuilders, LLC and the City of Santa Barbara are pleased to announce the availability of (4) three-bedroom moderate income affordable condominiums located at 240 West Alamar Avenue, Santa Barbara. The units are priced at $334,600. Income and resale restrictions apply. Information Packet and Lottery Application available online at: www.SantaBarbaraCA.gov/Alamar Lottery Application must be hand-delivered to: Oak Park Collection Sales Office 240 West Alamar Avenue, Santa Barbara Hours: Thursday – Sunday 12pm – 5pm Deadline to submit Lottery Application: SUNDAY, FEBRUARY 12, 2017 at 5PM No exceptions City Ventures Homebuilders, LLC and the City of Santa Barbara are committed to providing equal housing opportunity for all people regardless of race, color, national origin, religion, sex, familial status, age, disability, marital status or sexual orientation. If you believe you have been a victim of discrimination, contact the U.S. Dept. of Housing and Urban Development’s Fair Housing Hotline (800-669-9777). 18

THE INDEPENDENT

JANUARY 19, 2017

independent.com

pau l wellm an

by Blanca Garcia

Donald Trump and the Republicancontrolled Congress have placed defunding Planned Parenthood high on their to-do list. Because the national organization offers abortion services, congressional Republicans are determined to stop all federal funding, even though the majority of patients who visit Planned Parenthood clinics are seeking general preventive and reproductive health care. An estimated 5 percent of patients get abortions. If federal funding is successfully blocked, it could have a major impact on CIRCLING THE WAGONS: Planned Parenthood’s Jenna Tosh has good public health across the reason to be concerned about federal funding cuts. nation. Planned Parenthood would be forced to close centers or reduce the number of services recipients and Planned Parenthood patients. it offers, leaving hundreds of thousands of In Santa Barbara, the proposal could leave women without a health-care provider. 8,670 people without access to quality health Planned Parenthood is a not-for-profit services. “It’s a very cruel ploy to interfere organization that offers birth control, can- in health-care access for the most vulnercer screening, sexually transmitted infection able,” said Jenna Tosh, president and CEO of (STI) and pap testing, human papillomavirus PPCCC. vaccines, and other health exams and services. According to Alexandra Snyder, the execIn Santa Barbara, the health center, located utive director of Life Legal Defense Founon Garden Street, has been serving our com- dation, a supporter of defunding Planned munity for 52 years. (It is one of five centers Parenthood, people could just go to primaryoperating within the Planned Parenthood care physicians instead. Planned Parenthood, California Central Coast [PPCCC] partner- she said, doesn’t treat “life-related issues, like ship.) This past year, Santa Barbara’s Planned bronchitis.” However, in California, as across the Parenthood performed 1,160 breast wellness exams, 19,663 STI tests, and 940 cervical can- nation, there is a serious shortage of famcer screenings, in addition to providing con- ily practitioners, which has left community traceptive services to 72 percent of its female clinics overburdened and many individuals without doctors, particularly those from lowpatients. Since California law prevents a woman’s income neighborhoods. “We do know that income from determining whether she has community clinics are already struggling with access to a safe and legal abortion, state fund- serving the patients who are coming to them. ing is available for abortions. But this still … Planned Parenthood is a vital part of the leaves Planned Parenthood relying on federal health-care safety net,” said Tosh. reimbursements to make up approximately Undeterred by Congress’s determination to 80 percent of its budget, mostly through destroy Planned Parenthood, the organization Medicaid payments. For the Central Coast is committed to working in communities that Planned Parenthood clinics, that means as need their help the most. “We are not going much as $10.7 million in federal money has to accept that any of this is inevitable. We are funded the preventive and reproductive focusing all of our efforts on fighting back,” health-care services they provide each year. said Tosh. “We encourage everyone to stay The Republican majority in Congress is informed and get involved.” The dismantling planning to ban Medicaid recipients, who of Planned Parenthood could place the nation make up 87 percent of Planned Parenthood’s in a public health crisis. The state delegation, patients nationally, from choosing the organi- state legislature, and governor of California zation as their health-care provider. Without recognize the danger in such a move and are its Medicaid patients, Planned Parenthood working in partnership with Planned Parentwill be vastly underfunded. Conversely, Med- hood. “We’ve had to fight every step of the icaid patients will be left without access to way,” said Tosh. “We have a history of fighting quality care. The current congressional pro- for progress. This has always been an uphill posal, therefore, effectively targets young battle.” To find out how to help, visit istandwith women from low-income communities, the largest demographic of both Medicaid pp.org. n


cover story

Scott Bradlee’s Postmodern Jukebox

Endangered Species in the Line of Fire?

Feb 14 Valentine’s Day

Tue, Feb 14 / 8 PM / Arlington Theatre Tickets start at $35 / $20 UCSB students

Biologists Fret Over Fate of Condors, Island Foxes, and Steelhead Trout

An Arlington facility fee will be added to each ticket price

by Keith Hamm

S

animals on the planet live along the Santa Barbara mainland, its offshore islands, and the ocean realms in between. And some of the brightest scientific minds have dedicated their life’s work to studying these endangered species, from the back-from-thebrink success stories of the California condor and the Santa Cruz Island fox to the always contentious steelhead trout. While plenty of head-scratching has long been associated with the imminent demise or promising rebound of any federally listed life-form, the past few months — since the election of Donald Trump — have produced particularly vigorous bouts of uncertainty and concern. “There has been a lot of talk about this in the environmental community,” said Maggie Hall with Santa Barbara’s Environmental Defense Center. “There are potentially bigpicture threats to the Endangered Species Act (ESA) at several levels.” Hall broke it down, focusing on the three branches of the federal government. First, legislatively, a Republican-controlled Congress could aim to weaken the ESA without fear of a presidential veto. Second, at the judicial level, Trump’s appointment of one or more justices to the Supreme Court could shift the balance of power toward more conservative opinions. In that respect, Trump has said he admires late Justice Antonin Scalia, whose seat on the highest court has been vacant since February of last year, when he died at the age of 79. The president-elect has said he would pick a replacement with legal views similar to those

pau l wellm an f i le photos

ome of the rarest plants and

EXTINCT IS FOREVER: UCSB ecologist Sam Sweet, an expert on the federally endangered California tiger salamander, said that the Endangered Species Act is “the envy of the world” and has held up against legal challenges over the decades.

endangered species are already stretched thin. The other executive privilege —which ramped up considerably over the past few weeks, heading into the president-elect’s first day on the job — rests with Trump’s cabinet picks and the bureaucratic underlings who carry forth his administrative vision, a perspective of political landscape and governmental role that’s very different from the last eight years through Obama’s prism. None of this is new territory for endangered species and their protections, reminded Hall. “We’ve always had these threats; there’s always been that tension,” she added,“but now the right wing has a lot more power.” Reflecting on the backlash Trump has experienced thus far, longtime UCSB ecologist Sam Sweet expressed cautious optimism and a wholehearted belief in the long-view accomplishments of people “fighting the

“Postmodern Jukebox’s rendition of [Lady Gaga’s] ‘Bad Romance’ will transport you back to the 1920s and have you tapping your toes, wishing you knew how to swing dance.” Time Let this multi-talented group of performers, frequent collaborators, guest vocalists and featured musicians serenade you and your valentine in a live show unlike any other – a must-see for anyone who loves jaw-dropping live performances!

Kamasi Washington and The Next Step

Thu, Feb 16 / 8 PM / UCSB Campbell Hall

Coachella Festival Stand-out

Tickets start at $25 / $15 all students (with valid ID)

We’ve always had these threats; ‘there’s always been that tension, but now the right wing has a lot more power.’ —Maggie Hall, Environmental Defense Center

embodied by Scalia, who once described the Endangered Species Act as unfair “to the point of financial ruin—not just upon the rich, but upon the simplest farmer who finds his land conscripted to national zoological use.” Last, from the executive branch, a Trump administration could focus on two approaches to jeopardize species protected by the ESA. The first is to simply cut funding to agencies working closely on endangered species recovery, particularly when those efforts are then viewed as restricting the sort of economic growth and homeland energy production on which Trump based much of his campaign. “Agency funding is always an issue,” Hall said, adding that many of the biologists and ecologists heading up recovery efforts for

good fight,” he said. “I can’t imagine a push in Congress to repeal the ESA or water it down. My guess is that those sorts of efforts would get tied up. In a lot of cases, it’s who’s hollering the loudest, and right now, NGOs [nongovernmental organizations] are going crazy with fundraising, and lots of people just don’t buy into this stuff [about the ESA being a bad thing].” Sweet did admit that the results of November 8 have left “a lot of people really shellshocked,” he said. “Like, ‘Oh, no! Not this again!’ We’ve all fought these battles before. The feeling is that the coming years will not be good, and it’s safe to say that there’s a great concern among my colleagues. Trouble is, we don’t know yet how great these threats could n be.” CONTINUED

“[Washington] won over [Coachella] without compromising any sort of jazz roots, nailing afro-funk stops, bebop melodies and highflying solos from bassists, turntablists and dueling drummers in a lesson in musicality.” Billboard “The biggest story in jazz” (Los Angeles Times), Washington and his 10-piece band present a masterful brand of jazz for a new generation. Corporate Season Sponsor:

Media Sponsor:

(805) 893-3535 www.ArtsAndLectures.UCSB.edu Arlington event tickets can also be purchased at: (805) 963-4408 independent.com

JANUARY 19, 2017

THE INDEPENDENT

19


I

N

T

E

SALE

R

January 18th thru February 4th

25 – 75% OFF O N S E L E CTED ITEMS

N O S P E C I A L O R D E R S O R L AYAWAY S .

DOORS OPEN 10:00 - 5:30

P. O . B O X 5 6 4 0 1 4 7 0 E A S T V A L L E Y R O A D M O NTECITO, CA • (805)695-02 2 0

How Immigration Policy Has Worked in Santa Barbara by Jean Yamamura

pau l wellm an f i le photo

W

T

he opening of a federal immigration enforcement office in Santa Maria in 2015 raised fears of increased deportation and racial targeting, but officials tried to calm the alarm, saying the decades-old office in Lompoc was dilapidated and that the new facility simply replaced that one. The soon-tobe president’s campaign speeches denigrating illegal immigrants ratcheted fears higher, but immigration officials insist that the only people who get deported deserve to be. And “ICE [Immigration and Customs Enforcement] does not indiscriminately stop and/or apprehend anyone off the street,” said Lori Haley, an ICE spokesperson. The Enforcement and Removal Operations (ERO) part of ICE is responsible for apprehending people who have come into the United States without valid entry and travel documents, such as a visa and passport. ICE has a wider set of tasks, Haley said, which covers public safety and national-security issues including human and child trafficking; guns, money, and drugs; and counterfeit merchandise, cultural treasures, and child porn that cross U.S. borders. The ERO officers train at the Federal Law Enforcement Training Center in Glynco, Georgia, also known as the ICE Academy. Many agents are bilingual. Prisoners are transported in marked vans, but field officers drive unmarked cars. ICE’s Los Angeles Field Office has deportation statistics for the seven counties it oversees: 6,722 individuals in 2016 were repatriated, of whom 5,517 were convicted criminals and 1,205 noncriminals. ICE does not quantify statistics by county, said Virginia Kice, the region’s communications director. For inmates in Santa Barbara County Jail, legal status is not a part of county law enforcement or court procedures, but if fingerprint information turns up an existing deportation order, Kice said, ERO officers receive notice. ICE also keeps a work space at County Jail, said Kelly Hoover, Sheriff’s Office spokesperson. Deportation hearings come under the Department of Justice’s (DOJ) Executive Office for Immigration Review. They take place in Los Angeles, and those prisoners tend to be held in Orange County, said Kathryn Mattingly, a press secretary with the DOJ in D.C. Angie Junck, a supervising attorney with San Francisco’s Immigrant Legal Resource Center who works with

WAY STATION: Santa Maria’s ICE office temporarily holds prisoners, such as Celso Lion-Garcia, on their way to the border and to deportation hearings in Los Angeles.

Santa Barbara advocates for immigrants, said detainees may also be held at Adelanto, L.A., San Diego, or even Arizona if their deportation process is prolonged. Upon arrest, ICE gives immigrants an “alien registration number” to identify them for both DOJ and ICE; that number tracks a prisoner through the federal system rather than a name or Social Security number. The hearings are before a civil administrative court, not criminal, said Mattingly, and detainees have “a right to representation at no expense to the government,” and “statutory rights such as the right to have a reasonable opportunity to examine the evidence against them, present evidence, and cross-examine witnesses.” The judge will weigh evidence such as criminal convictions, as well as the strength of their family ties, when making his ruling. Appeal of that decision can be made within 30 days to the Board of Immigration Appeals. It is too unknown what will change in ICE’s operations after the new administration takes office to speculate, Kice said. “It also depends on who becomes secretary of the Department of Homeland Security and director of Immigration and Customs Enforcement.” At deadline, retired Marine Corps general John Kelly, who has been nominated for the Homeland position, testified Tuesday before the Senate committee. Noted for his tough stance on immigration, his confirmation is all but certain. As Democratic Senator Heidi Heitkamp of North Dakota described the hearings, with no small amount of irony: “It was a lovefest.” n

Knowledge Is Power, Protection

Attorneys Hosting ‘Know Your Rights’ Workshops for Undocumented Immigrants by Tyler Hayden

20

THE INDEPENDENT

JANUARY 19, 2017

independent.com

pau l we llm an

A

special kind of American civics lesson took place last Thursday evening in the Franklin Elementary School gym. Three immigration attorneys walked two dozen Santa Barbara residents through their constitutional rights as people living on United States soil, regardless of their citizenship status. The attorneys talked about protections afforded to all of us by the Fourth and Fifth Amendments: our right to secure ourselves and our homes against unreasonable search and seizure, and our right to remain silent. They also explained what to do — and, more importantly, what not to do — if confronted by federal immigration agents. Franklin Principal David Bautista provided Spanish translation. He said afterward that the fear of deportation among his students and their parents since the election is palpable. At least

LISTEN UP: Attorney Geoff Conner Newlan reviews the Constitution’s Fourth and Fifth Amendments and holds a Red Card that reminds holders of their rights.


cover story one family, convinced they’ll soon be torn apart, decided to move back to their home country. These “Know Your Rights” workshops have existed in Santa Barbara for years, but after Donald Trump promised to deport two to three million immigrants upon taking office, they’ve become much more frequent. La Casa de la Raza and the Central Coast Alliance United for a Sustainable Economy (CAUSE) also organizes them, and events are scheduled at UCSB and the Unitarian Society later this month. The idea is for attendees to take back what they learn to friends and family too nervous to attend public meetings. “There’s so much misinformation on the street,” said attorney Arnold Jaffe. “My cousin said you can do this, my brother-in-law said you can do that. Ninety-nine percent of that information is not helpful and probably not true.” Lucas Zucker with CAUSE said nearly as dangerous as Immigration and Customs Enforcement (ICE) agents are phony “notarios” posing as accredited attorneys and charging high sums for bad advice. Jaffe handed out informational guides on Thursday along with Red Cards created by the San Francisco–based Immigrant Legal Resource Center. On one side is a reminder in Spanish of the rights of every person in the U.S. The other side is intended to be handed to ICE agents, with statements in English that explain the individual is exercising those rights. (A copy can be found on page 18 of this issue’s “Keep Santa Barbara Great Again” pullout guide.) The advice, Jaffe explained to the crowd, is applicable in the event that ICE agents approach them on the street or at their home without a warrant. If they’re taken into custody, another set of rules applies. Regardless of the situation, Jaffe stated, “Don’t run, don’t lie, don’t sign anything, and don’t answer questions without a lawyer.” He provided a list of area attorneys and nonprofit legal organizations that specialize in immigration cases.

Single Tickets on sale now!

MARIA SCHNEIDER ORCHESTRA FEBRUARY

20

“Maria Schneider is a national treasure.” – NPR

JOHN PIZZARELLI QUARTET MARCH

23

Here are additional lessons imparted by Jaffe, CAUSE, and other legal experts to Santa Barbara’s immigrant community:

“A rare entertainer of the old school.” – Seattle Times

If ICE agents come to your home:  Do not open the door, and do not allow the agents inside.

PONCHO SANCHEZ AND HIS LATIN JAZZ BAND

 Ask to be shown a search warrant—slid under the door—and make sure it has your cor-

rect name and address, and is signed by a judge.

 Hand agents your Red Card outside the house, or slip it under the door.  Contact an attorney.

APRIL

21

If ICE agents approach you on the street:  Ask if you are being detained. If you are not, let the agents know you intend to leave.

If you are, exercise your right to remain silent.  Do not answer any questions.  Do not tell the agents where you were born.  Do not sign any documents.  Do not provide false documents.

If you are placed in deportation proceedings:    

You have the right to access a list of legal services. You have the right to be represented by a lawyer. Ask for an interpreter during your hearing. Ask to contact your consulate.

“North America’s (if not the world’s) most popular conguero-bandleader.” – JazzTimes

Subscribe to the series today and save

805.963.0761 or Lobero.org

LOBERO THEATRE ENDOWMENT FOR AMERICAN ROOTS MUSIC

commit to be fit!

If you are a U.S. citizen:  Carry your driver’s license, passport, or state ID with you at all times.

If you are legally permitted to be in the U.S. but are not a confirmed citizen:

is a 9-week fitness program that combines kickboxing, nutrition, flexibility and resistance training with a team of coaches, instructors and fellow teammates that will help you achieve the body that you've always wanted!

 Carry your work permit or green card with you at all times.

If you are an undocumented immigrant:  Do not carry any information that explains your legal status.

next kut starts

Create a file at home with important documents that can be accessed in the event of your deportation:    

The name of your attorney and your emergency contacts A caregiver’s affidavit naming individuals permitted to look after your children Instructions on how to care for sick or elderly family members Birth certificates, marriage licenses, financial records, etc.

More information can be accessed at ilrc.org or causenow.org.

January 28! before

after

"I lost 18 inches and 8 pounds in the first 6 weeks, thanks to the accountability and support of the fellow students and staff at MAFF!" -Martin independent.com

enroll online at:

Martial Arts Family Fitness 122 E Gutierrez St., SB • 963-6233 JANUARY 19, 2017

THE INDEPENDENT

21


EXHIBITIONS ON VIEW

EVENTS

Highlights of the Permanent Collection

Saturday, January 28, 2:30 pm

Ongoing

Lecture by the artist Reserve or purchase tickets at the Visitor Services desks or online at tickets.sbma.net.

David Wiesner: Telling Stories in Pictures

Untitled: Drawing from the Schorr Collection Through February 5

Thursday, February 2, 6–7 pm

FREE ADMISSION THROUGH JANUARY 29

A Movable Musical Feast

For more exhibitions and events, visit www.sbma.net.

Ravishing instrumental and choral music featuring Italian masters of the early Baroque tradition Free

1130 State Street, Santa Barbara, CA Tuesday–Sunday: 11 am–5 pm • Free Thursday Evenings: 5–8 pm

Claude Monet, Villas in Bordighera (detail), 1884. Oil on canvas. SBMA, Bequest of Katharine Dexter McCormick in memory of her husband, Stanley McCormick.

Everybody needs a little help Office based medical treatment for drug & alcohol dependence. Interventional Psychiatry Associates 805-845-8770

Freedom After Divorce 12 Weekly Education & Support Group Meetings

Learn How to Create a New Satisfying Life Feel Strong & Proud Again

Imagine hearing the words,

Overcome Anger, Grief & Fear

Schedule a FREE Informational Interview.

Revel Miller, Ph.D.

Certified Group Psychotherapist Clinical Psychologist 805-448-5053 www.DrRevelMiller.com CA State License: PSY15868

22

THE INDEPENDENT

JANUARY 19, 2017

independent.com

Help families with a child battling cancer.

DONATE TODAY! TeddyBearCancerFoundation.org 805.962.7466


Opinions

on the beat

Sound and Fury in D.C.

CALL IT TREASON? If Donald Trump

actually colluded with the Russians to help swing the presidential election for himself (and Vladimir Putin), he should face charges of treason. But he won’t, of course, and will take the oath of office tomorrow, January 20, even though what’s left of his ethical reputation is in shreds for becoming a Putin patsy. The running joke in Washington, D.C., is that Trump cavorted on camera with hookers peeing on one another — the notorious, kinky “golden showers”— and is so palsy-walsy with Vlad that he was named (this really is a joke) “Kremlin employee of the month.” It’s clear now that the Russians saw him coming years ago, like a rube at a county fair in a checked suit too small for him. Someone to slap on the back, pour the drinks, call in the girls, and turn on the video cameras. Then play the old “compromat” game that the Kremlin worked so well over the years with others, blackmailing him by holding the Trump tapes (how many are there, anyway?) over his head in case he gets hard to handle. Not that the next president of the United States shows anything but admiration for his buddy. In the meantime, Putin’s boys passed on hacked info to make Hillary Clinton look bad

But, ironically, it’s hard to embarrass Trump. He attacked the news media messenger, issued a denial with a wave of his hand, and figured that was that. I have been to D.C. and Moscow, and they’re beginning to sound alike. SWARM OF LOCUSTS: As more

and then voilà! — have Vlad’s boy in the White House. It worked, thanks to help from the poverty-ravaged Rust Belt. Keep a closet of Trump tapes, such as the 2013 golden shower show in the same Moscow Ritz-Carlton bed where Michelle and Barack slept on a prior visit. What a laugh Putin’s guys must have gotten out of that. I have read the 35-page dossier compiled by former British intelligence agent Christopher Steele (available on BuzzFeed) about all this Red Square electioneering and bedroom hanky-panky, and while it’s still unproven and may never be, it doesn’t strain one’s credulity to imagine a man who’ll grab women’s crotches in public would watch a live sex show.

and more of Trump Inc. floods into Washington, D.C., some remind me of the Snopes family, a ruthless, money-grubbing clan from the pages of William Faulkner’s Southern novels. The Snopes are corrupt, poor whites who stop at nothing, including barnburning. There seems to be no end of rapacious Trumps, getting richer by the minute now that they’re seizing the levers of money and power in a 2017 version of Faulkner’s mythical Yoknapatawpha County. The big question in D.C. is: Who has Donald Trump’s ear, whispering the names of weird polluters named as cabinet members and top-dog officials who strike the public as a series of sick jokes? There’s Senator Jeff Sessions, lugging his racist background through the congressional laundromat scrubber to become U.S. attorney general in charge of civil-rights laws, all the better to ignore them.

Barney Brantingham can be reached at barney@independent.com or 965-5205 x230. He writes online columns and a print column for Thursdays.

Crackpots are already circling the White House. Anti-vaccination wackos. Globalwarming deniers. What next? The loonies’ freak show grows by the day. How could a talk-show host and Fox news commentator such as Monica Crowley be proposed as the senior director of strategic communications for the National Security Council when her main claim to fame is a book she’s accused of building with 50 examples of plagiarism? I had to go to college to learn about Keynesian economics, but it seems that all Crowley needed to do was lift a section from a 2009 published article in Investopedia. Isn’t anyone checking the credentials of these people? Crowley’s even accused of employing plagiarism to write her PhD dissertation. The embarrassed publisher of her book What the (Bleep) Just Happened? has now pulled it from the market. Crowley pulled out of the proposed position with Trump this week. It’s been a while since we’ve had a five-star, 100 percent, major-league, full-time prevaricator in the White House. But we will starting tomorrow, and I have a feeling that he actually believes some of this stuff he blurts out. Someone feeds it to him, and it sounds good. In the real world, Trump wouldn’t know a fact from a fart. — Barney Brantingham

Happy Birthday To Us...We’ve Turned 11! We are profoundly grateful to all our clients who have helped us grow to become the biggest medical & day spa in the Tri-Counties. As a thank you for your patronage, we would like to invite you to attend our

11th Anniversary Open House Wednesday, January 25th 3:00 - 7:00 pm • Discounts on all Services & Products (Up to 25% off select treatments)

• Complimentary Mini-Treatments

• Numerous Raffles and Fun Games

• Interactive education on your skin

(Over $5,000 worth of prizes will be raffled plus thousands more in spa services will be won!)

and Mini-Massages

• Free Mineral Make-up Color Matching

Don’t miss this great event!

m e d i c a l Voted “Best Medical Spa” every year since 2007

350 Chapala St. #103

&

d a y

s p a

Terry J. Perkins M.D. - Owner/Medical Director

www.evolutionsmedicalspa.com ww independent.com

805.284.9007 JANUARY 19, 2017

THE INDEPENDENT

23


obituaries

To submit obituaries for publication, please call (805) 965-5205 or email obits@independent.com

CELEBRATION OF LIFE Ralph Denis Goubeaux

Contributions in his memory may be made to SB Wildlife Care Network.

03/31/38-12/14/16

Dr. Bernard Gondos 01/06/35-01/02/17

Saturday, January 28, 2017 at 11am Light refreshments, casual dress. To be held at the old Timbers restaurant. 10 Winchester Canyon Road, Goleta, 93117 Exit Winchester Canyon Road at the North end of Goleta. If you have stories or thoughts about Ralph, you will have a chance to either read them or have someone else read them for you, if you wish. If you are unable to attend please send stories to carboyce@aol.com .

John Barlow Olson 08/22/59-12/25/16

Dr. Bernard Gondos, born in New York, Jan 6, 1935, died unexpectedly on Jan 2, 2017. He was a Pathologist who was an amateur violinist, who played chamber music all over the world. He also played tennis and was a generous donor to The Music Academy and the Camerata Pacifica and several other institutions. He was a happy man who smiled all the time. He will be greatly missed. Bernie was an avid music lover, and loyal supporter of classical music in our community. Celebrate Dr. Gondos memory Tuesday Jan 17th 5:30-7:00 Lehmann Hall, Music Academy of The West.

Ruth Elizabeth Baar

Margaret Ann Harper

Ruth was born the day after Christmas in Suffern, NY to John Holder of Switzerland and Sadye Holder from New York City. Her earliest years were spent in Glen Rock and Patterson, New Jersey. When she was in High School, the family moved to Spring Valley, NY where she graduated in 1941. She then enlisted in the Marines and was stationed at the El Toro base in San Diego. She taught fighter pilots how to use their weapons. While in San Diego she competed in rough water swimming, winning many awards. After the war she returned to Spring Valley for flying lessons and became the first woman in her hometown to solo. She attended business school and worked many secretarial jobs. One of the loves of her life was her Palomino (named Boy) who she would ride down the street to the farm of her future husband. She married her childhood friend Volkert in 1950. They built a home in the nearby town of Nanuet and raised 3 daughters. She continued working as a secretary and was a school bus driver. In 1977 Ruth and Volky packed up and moved to Santa Barbara. Ruth began training at Los Banos Pool and competed in the Masters Program for four decades, earning many medals and ribbons. Her relay team swam a world record when she was in her 80s. She was a member of the Free Methodist Church on the Mesa since 1977 – ministering in many service positions. She is survived by daughters Cathy, Carol (Jeff) and Susan, 8 grandchildren and 2 great-grandchildren. A private family service was held at the Santa Barbara Cemetery.

09/25/22-01/03/17

John Barlow Olson, beloved son, brother, uncle, great-uncle, cousin, friend and long time Santa Barbara resident, passed away on December 25, 2016. John spent his life passionately enjoying nature’s many gifts in Santa Barbara and Lake Tahoe. An avid beach swimmer, biker, kayaker, hiker and lover of music, Frisbee, coffee, Big Sur and all of God’s creatures big and small, John’s appreciation for the beauty of this earth was recognized by all who knew him. He was also very proud to work at SB Public Market doing two of his favorite things, serving great food and sharing conversation with its patrons. John was born at Cottage Hospital On August 22, 1959. He is survived by his two sisters Bobbi Driscoll and Julie Olson, brother-inlaw Mark Driscoll, nieces and nephews Heather Bernardi and husband Anthony Bernardi, Katie Driscoll, Sean Driscoll, Tara Andrews and husband Ryan Andrews, Ryan Driscoll, great-nieces and nephew Ella, Annelise, Layla and James, and cousins Steven, Linda, Kristi, Kent, Ann, Sue, Steph and John. He is preceded in death by his parents, Bob and Ann Olson of Goleta, CA. A memorial service and celebration of his life will be held Saturday, January 21, 2017 at 11a.m. at Calvary Chapel of Santa Barbara. 24

THE INDEPENDENT

of knitted slippers to her church and a care group in Guam. She loved cruising and went on 84 cruises to places all over the world. She was a quiet, aware, and a wonderful wife and mother and was loved by all she knew. She was so good to her husband Walter and there were so many things he still wanted to tell her. She knew he loved her and will treasure her memory till they meet again in Heaven. There will be a Rosary Celebration in San Roque Church on Saturday January 21, 2017 at 2 p.m. In lieu of flowers, donations in Margaret’s name may be made to Direct Relief Organization 27 S. La Patera Lane, Santa Barbara, CA 93117, USA.

Margaret, beloved wife of Walter died of internal medical problems in Cottage Hospital, Santa Barbara on 3rd January 2017 after her admission on 31st December 2016. She requested no medical interventions and just wanted to die peacefully. She received last rites and Holy Communion from Father “Mike” with her family just before her passing. Walter and her family watched over her as she slowly passed away. She leaves three daughters, Wendy, Lucy, Ruth and son Paul, three grandchildren, and two great grandchildren. Margaret was born in Pickering, Yorkshire England on 25th September 1922. She was married to Walter for 70 years. Sadly, their 70th wedding anniversary was 2nd January 2017. She was a long time member of San Roque Church and went to the Rosary meetings every Thursday and attended a small Rosary group meeting in members’ homes every Tuesday morning. She also was on the Prayer “Hot Line” where persons in need could call her for solace. Margaret was a prolific knitter and every year sent about 30 pairs

JANUARY 19, 2017

12/26/22-01/08/17

independent.com

Patricia L. Hickey 09/15/26-12/22/16

Doddie was full of life and will forever be in our hearts and memories. May she rest in peace with her beloved husband in heaven. Survived by Daughter Suzette Reed, Son in law Kirk and family Josh and Kalen Reed. Richard and Corazon Flores. Memorial on January 23, 2017 at 6:00pm McDermott Crockett 2020 Chapala St. Santa Barbara.

Kendall Joseph Schramm 04/26/90-12/15/16

Patricia L Hickey (Patsy Lou) 9-1526-12-22-16. Patsy was born in St. Paul, MN. She and her beloved older brother (deceased) lost their parents at age 4 and 5, but were lovely raised by their grandparents with good Midwestern values. Patsy married and had 3 children - Dennis, Tom, and Kathy. She became a single parent when her daughter was born. She soon became a career Mom, but her main focus was her children. They were the light of her life. Her working career was mostly in sales positions in which she excelled, but had a tough fight back then as women were still not recognized as equal in the job. When the children were raised, Patsy decided to abandon Minnesota and its weather, and she moved to beautiful Santa Barbara. The 3 children soon followed. She again went into sales work until she retired from full time employment, and continued to work part time for another 20 years. Patsy had a truly optimistic attitude, which carried her through life with a big smile. She never complained and was loved and respected by all who knew her. She had a joy for life and was often consulted by friends and family for advice. She was an avid rummy tile player, loved jigsaw puzzles, and playing gin rummy on the computer. She will be dearly missed by family and friends.

Gloria (Doddie) Alvarado

Gloria (Doddie) Alvarado passed Monday January 2, 2017. Doddie was a devoted wife and mother. Married to Albert (Kiko) Alvarado for 50 years. Mother to Gloria Suzette Reed. Doddie grew up in Los Angeles, CA. Daughter of John and Victoria Gonzalez. Oldest of two brothers and one sister. Moved to Santa Barbara, CA 1970’s with her husband and daughter. Doddie enjoyed music and dancing, in addition to many hobbies (arts & krafts, antique collecting and sewing).

Kendall Joseph Schramm, age 26, died unexpectedly in his home in Santa Rosa on December 15, 2016. Born in San Luis Obispo, April 26, 1990, he attended The Laureate preschool, Sinshiemer Elementary, Laguna Middle School, and SLO High School. Kendall graduated from Dos Pueblos High School in Goleta in 2008, and went on to Cabrillo Community College in Santa Cruz and UC Santa Cruz, where he graduated with a Bachelor’s degree in Sociology in 2013. Kendall was very active and often skateboarded, loved snowboarding, writing prose, and working as a DJ at local events. He was passionate about music, and was outspoken for social justice and change in the current political environment. Kendall very much cared for the welfare of others. He had a zest for life and his love was boundless. We will miss him immensely and forever. Kendall is survived by his parents: Kurt Joseph Schramm (Shari) of San Luis Obispo and Laurie Lea Brown of Santa Barbara; Sisters: Emily Schramm of Oakland and Brita Schramm of Carlsbad; loving aunts, uncles, and cousins; and Grandparents: Joseph Schramm of Thousand Oaks, and Sherburne and Marianne Brown of Moraga. May Kendall’s soul and spirit travel the universe with joy, happiness, and love. For those who knew him and were touched by his presence, remember when he showed you love and kindness, and made you smile. Please pay it forward to others in order to honor his life and carry his memory onward, for the greatest loss occurs when we forget.

Death Notices Theresa A. Baran, DOD 01/04/17 (85) Goleta, CA Sylvia Ann Franco, DOD 01/06/17 (76) Santa Barbara, CA Maria Luisa Garcia y Soler de Menzel, DOD 01/09/17 (96) Santa Barbara, CA Audrey Ann Meitz, DOD 01/11/17 (91) Santa Barbara, CA


Opinions

Robert W. Sheffield, MD

cont’d

ANNOUNCES REOPENING OF HIS PRACTICE IN SANTA BARBARA Dr. Sheffield’s practice focuses on less invasive, minimal and non-surgical methods of facial rejuvenation. He and his staff offer a unique perspective to patients in a comfortable, professional environment.

SB AESTHETICS

Certified American Board of Plastic Surgery

2320 Bath St. Suite 203/205

805-568-5988

SPA FLOOR MODEL CLEARANCE SALE letters

534 E. Haley

Great Again

H

appy New Year, America. The year 2017 will be a challenging, dangerous, and hopeful one. Optimistically, President Trump will finally confront radical Islam, our economy will come roaring back, and America will regain its place on the world stage. God — Don Thorn, Carpinteria bless America.

Carts, Carts, Carts, Carts ...

I

am sick and tired of seeing my neighborhood desecrated by abandoned shopping carts. I was walking my dog just yesterday and came across not one but five carts left within a one-block area! I think the grocery stores are in serious need of implementing a system with either an alarm that goes off when a cart is stolen or in which one must deposit money in order to borrow the cart — refunded upon return of the cart. Sadly, there are people in our fair city who apparently feel entitled to take these carts home and then let other, more responsible individuals shoulder the burden and the cost of picking them up and returning them to the grocery stores. If we all start writing letters and getting our council people involved, perhaps we can affect some positive change regarding this very tiresome issue. Let’s keep this conversation going! — Jennifer Larsen, S.B.

Commander in Thief

R

ussia, Clinton, Rust Belt concerns—they’re all excuses that serve as distractions from more serious crimes. For instance, voter disenfranchisement through the GOP’s systematic Crosscheck program resulted in more than a million eligible votes not being counted in key swing states. These disenfranchised voters, not coincidentally, were mostly minorities. If votes were counted for the folks who were “crossed off” the voter rolls and provided provisional ballots for dubious

(at salsipuedes)

reasons (e.g., shared a name in common with others who were flagged), it is probable that Donald Trump would not have received sufficient electoral college votes to “win” the election. Trump had to have known since he publicly claimed that people were voting twice, which was one of the key Crosscheck justifications for disenfranchisement. The solutions to this travesty would be multifold. They would include immediate registering of votes for those who were disenfranchised (these records exist) and putting the architects and implementers of the Crosscheck program behind bars. It is quite likely that down-ballot elections were also impacted. We have been dedicated members of government services for close to two decades, and we feel it is the duty of the leaders of our nation to right this wrong; far too much blood and treasure have been invested in the protection of the sanctity of our democracy to accept anything less. When military personnel enter service, they are bound by the following commitment: “I do solemnly swear that I will support and defend the Constitution of the United States against all enemies, foreign and domestic.” We have just experienced a breach of our Constitution (most likely the 14th Amendment) via domestic manipulation of the democratic process.

(805) 963-4747

Village Pool Supply THE ULTIMATE IN POOL & SPA SALES, SERVICE AND REPAIR Parts • Maintenance • rePairs • resurfacing *ask about our free chemical delivery service* lic.# 342321

Ventura’s Best Aquarium Shop Ventura’s Largest Selection of: • • • • •

Saltwater Fish Coral Parking on Freshwater Fish Salsipuedes Live Plants Saltwater and Freshwater Invertebrates. • Aquarium Supplies

— Mark Kram and Mark Morey, Goleta

For the Record

¶ The De la Guerra Plaza rally on January 20 discussed in “Progressive Coalition Reincarnated” last week takes place at 3:30 p.m., not noon. See News of the Week for more. The Independent welcomes letters of less than 250 words that include a daytime phone number for verification. Letters may be edited for length and clarity. Send to: Letters, The Independent, 12 E. Figueroa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101; or fax: 965-5518; or email: letters@independent.com. Unabridged versions and more letters appear at independent.com/opinions.

Schedule an Appointment for an Aquarium Service Today!

Extreme Marine Tropical Fish and Koi

Open Monday-Friday 12-7

Saturday 11-7

Sunday 11-6

1495 Palma Drive, Ventura • 644-FISH (3474) www.xtreme-marine.com

independent.com

JANUARY 19, 2017

THE INDEPENDENT

25


G

et

afty wit r C

Would you like a program Where here it is easy to lose weight? Now Offering! FDA Approved Weight Loss Medications!

Visit Santa Barbara, along with The Santa Barbara Independent and the Museum of Contemporary Art Santa Barbara, called upon local restaurants, bars, and lounges to develop a new, unique drink that best embodies the spirit of Santa Barbara.

25% OFF of Initial Visit! New or Former Patients. Valid now through January 31, 2017

our program offers an effective, safe, affordable, and proven combination of medications which suppress appetite, while maintaining good energy and well-being. our medical expertise and nutritional guidance ensure long term success.

Kathleen Griffin, M.D. 805-682-4772 santa barbara®

Santa Barbara

®

Finalist

Best medical spa

TODAY’S THE LAST DAY TO VOTE! Cast your vote at independent.com/officialdrinkofsb

Cheer on your favorite entries and see which drink/business is crowned as the “2017 Official Drink of Santa Barbara” at the Live Competition

THurSDAY, JAnuArY 26, 6-8pm Doors open at 5:30 pm Tickets available at sbindytickets.com

SANTA BARBARA VINTNERS

26

THE INDEPENDENT

JANUARY 19, 2017

independent.com

Photo courtesy of Blake Bronstad

33 W. Mission, Ste. 204 • www.thegspasb.com


week I n d e p e n d e n T Ca l e n da r

e h T

Jan.

19-25

by Terry OrTega and Savanna MeSch

As always, find the complete listings online at independent.com/events. And if you have an event coming up, submit it at independent.com/eventsubmit.

Friday 1/20

SchOOl Open hOuSeS

1/20: Southside with You Watch the love

1/19: Laguna Blanca Lower School Take a look into life at Laguna Blanca at this child-centric event. Kids and their parents can visit classrooms to explore art, science, music, technology, and cooking as well as take a tour of the school to meet and ask questions of teachers, administrators, and current parents. 3:30-5pm. 260 San Ysidro Rd., Montecito. Free. Call 687-2461.

story of Barack and Michelle Obama come to life in this critically acclaimed feature film. Follow the events of the young couple’s first date on an evening in 1989 in Chicago, where they visit an Afrocentric art exhibit, attend a community organizing meeting, and see a movie. 2pm. Faulkner Gallery, S.B. Central Library, 40 E. Anapamu St. Free. Rated PG-13. Call 564-5641. sbplibrary.org

1/21: S.B. Middle School Visit this unique independent school that feafea tures a dynamic student body centered around community, academics, athletathlet ics, the arts, and outdoor education. 3-5pm. 1321 Alameda Padre Serra. Free. Call 682-2989. sbms.org

Saturday 1/21 USS Indianapolis: The Legacy In this documentary, you will

hear firsthand accounts from survivors of the torpedoed and sunken Portland-class cruiser that brought the first atom bomb to an island in the Pacific. The ship is believed to have claimed the greatest loss of life at sea in the history of the U.S. Navy, and only 300 sailors survived the following four days stranded at sea, fighting off dehydration, saltwater poisoning, and shark attacks. 7-9pm. S.B. Maritime Museum, 113 Harbor Wy. $10-$15. Not rated. Call 456-8747. sbmm.org

1/19: Out of Our Constrictions: Love, Justice, and Imagination for a Broken World Author of The Hip Hop Wars, Long-

mcc.sa.ucsb.edu

1/19: Christopher Buckley The award-winning poet will sign copies of his newest collection, Star Journal Journal, a curated selection of pieces from his 20 previous collections that portray current science, cosmology, facts, and theories with a lyrical underpinning. 7pm. Chaucer’s Books, 3321 State St. Free. Call 682-6787.

knoxschoolsb.org

1/21: The Waldorf School of S.B. Come hear about the school’s acaacademics, which combine the arts, nature, science, and a child’s best self, at an academic fair and special presentation. Parents and kids through 8th grade will have the opportunity to ask questions, take a campus tour, and stop by kinkindergarten for bread-making and crafts. 9:30am-noon. 7421 Mirano Dr., Goleta. Free. Call 967-6656. waldorfsantabarbara.org

penguins and others from around the world. From 11 a.m.-1 p.m., Karen Winnick will sign copies of her book How Lucky Got His Shoe. 10am-3pm. S.B. Zoo, 500 Niños Dr. Free with zoo admission. Call 962-5339.

sbzoo.org

1/19: Astronomy on Tap Learn about the mysterious fog surrounding our galaxy and the mysteriousness of black holes at the first astronomy talk of 2017. There’ll also be updates on astronomy in the news and out-of-this-world prize giveaways. 7:30pm. M8RX Nightclub & Lounge, 409 State St. Free. Ages 21+. Call 957-4111.

m8rxsb.com

1/21: Penguin Awareness Day

q

ing to Tell, and Black Noise, Tricia Rose has sparked dialogue around race, gender, and sexuality through the storytelling nature of hip-hop music and will touch upon the current climate of the U.S. in this talk. 6-7pm. MultiCultural Ctr. Theater, UCSB. Free. Call 893-8411.

only well-born Americans were given access. Professor Michele Ronnick will discuss the black classicists who successfully studied Greek and Latin in an era when few thought black people should have access to such an education. This talk is in conjunction with the new exhibit 14 Black Classicists. 5:30-7pm. AD&A Museum, UCSB. Free. Call 893-2951. www.museum.ucsb.edu

author will sign copies of her new book, How Lucky Got His Shoe, a tale about the Humboldt penguin born at the S.B. Zoo. This true story tells how Lucky was able to walk after Teva, a shoe company based in town, was asked to make him a shoe that allowed him to walk and swim like all the other penguins. 2pm. Chaucer’s Books, 3321 State St. Free. Call 682-6787. chaucersbooks.com

Zookeepers will host informal activities in honor of our flightless friends. Put on your favorite black-and-white clothes, and learn about the special South American Humboldt

chaucersbooks.com

1/19: TED & Conversation Partake in thought-provoking conversation over coffee and tea with others after screening an inspirational 20-minute TED talk. The variety of topics can range from health and nuclear weapons to psychology and more. Participants can suggest topics for the upcoming session planned for the third Thursday morning of each month. 10am. Solvang Library, 1745 Mission Dr., Solvang. Free. Call 688-4214.

In the aftermath of the Civil War, newly freed slaves sought out a classically based liberal arts education when, previously,

1/21-1/22: Adult Literacy Tutor Training If your New Year’s resolution

sbplibrary.org

1/21: Homework Help Volunteer Training Assist students in kindergarten

Stompy Jones

sbplibrary.org

1/19: Black Classicism in the U.S.

you, too, can take part in this great acoustic guitar tradition. Chord dictionary and tabs will be provided, but you must bring your own steel or nylon six-string guitar and tuner, and video or audio recording is encouraged. No experience is necessary. 1:30-4pm. Beatrice Wood Ctr. for the Arts, 8560 Ojai-Santa Paula Rd., Ojai. $40. Call 646-3381. beatricewood.com

is to make a difference in the community, this is the perfect opportunity. Adult literacy tutors help adult learners improve writing and reading skills by volunteering twice a week. Tutors must complete the nine-hour training course offered over the course of two days. 1-5:30pm. Adult Literacy Ctr., S.B. Central Library, 40 E. Anapamu St. Free. Call 564-5619.

Courtesy

thurSday 1/19

1/21: The Knox School of S.B. Parents and children from 1st to 8th grade are invited to learn about the school’s individualized curriculum centered around each individual student’s intellectual curiosity at a presentation by Founder and Director Angela Tanner, followed by classroom tours and refreshrefresh ments. 10am-noon. 1525 Santa Barbara St. Free. Call 222-0107.

1/21: Karen Winnick The children’s

Courtesy

1/19:

lagunablanca.org

1/19:

Swing Dance with Stompy Jones First-time dancers or those in need of a refresher can take a beginner’s lesson on East Coast Swing from Jonathan Bixby before swingin’ the night away to the bluesy, retro sound of live band Stompy Jones. Lesson: 7:30pm; dance: 8:30pm. Carrillo Ballroom, 100 E. Carrillo St. $12-$15. dancesantabarbara.com

1/21: Slack Key Guitar Workshop Jim Kimo West and Ken Emerson, living legends of the Hawaiian slack-key and acoustic steel guitar, will teach participants chords, special techniques, and songs so

through 6th grade with reading, homework, and class assignments two to four days a week. This is a great opportunity to serve the community and work with kids! Teen tutors must be at least 14 years old, maintain at least a B grade average, and provide a letter of recommendation from a teacher. Adults need to complete a background check and a TB test. 1-2:30pm. Island Rm., S.B. Central Library, 40 E. Anapamu St. Free. Call 564-5632.

sbplibrary.org

/sbindependent independent.com

JANUARY 19, 2017

@SBIndpndnt

>>>

THE INDEPENDENT

27


restore. rejuvenate. reneW! exClusive to Rejuvalase Medi Spa in Santa Barbara

Options for the Aging Neck with Quick Recovery Times!

Jan

19-25

As always, find the complete listings online at independent.com/events. And if you have an event coming up, submit it at independent.com/eventsubmit.

arT TOwn

Tighten your neck today. Call for your free consultation and special offers 805-687-6408

collectors will have plenty to choose from in the works for sale. The exhibit shows through March 11. 5-8pm. Art From Scrap, 302 E. Cota St. Free. Call 565-1332.

tinyurl.com/ArtWithoutLimits

The Natural Lift Actual patient of Dr. Keller

1/21: Opening Reception: 100% City, Soft Actor

After

Before

Micro-Endoscopic NeckLift

“Meanwhile” by Mick Reinman

Firm the jawline, minimally invasive

1/19: I Love Trouble: Selected Works by Mick Reinman This artist’s paintings resemble the cinematic imagery of spaghetti western films through cropping, dramatic scenarios, and familiar images. Mick Reinman’s homage to the genre plays with gender stereotypes and narratives and satirizes the hyper-masculinity and hyperbole of Western cinema. Exhibit shows through February 12. Porch Gallery, 310 E. Matilija Ave., Ojai. Free. Call 620-7589.

After

Before

porchgalleryojai.com

Ultherapy without the pain

1/19: Sketching in the Galleries Artists of all skill levels are invited to experience the rich tradition of sketching from original works of art in Highlights of the Permanent Collection. Museum Teaching Artists will provide guidance and materials. 5:30-6:30pm. S.B. Museum of Art, 1130 State St. Free. Call 884-6457.sbma.net

Non-invasive lifting & tightening

1/20: Opening Reception: Art Without Limits A collaboration between nonprofits Art From Scrap and Art Without Limits (AWoL) has produced an eclectic collection of original art from AWoL’s Emerging Artists. From photography and poetry to mixed media and other media of art,

After

Before

1/21: Opening Reception: Lines of a Poem Connie Rohde, the gallery’s artistic director, in collaboration with sculpture artist Albert McCurdy, presents an abstract, semiotic show with triptychs that tell stories much like a poem does. Some works resemble aboriginal art or calligraphy, but all of the minimalist pieces reveal something intensely personal for the artists. Enjoy hors d’oeuvres from Los Alamos food vendors at the opening reception for this exhibit that shows through March 15. 4-7pm. The C Gallery, 466 Bell St., Los Alamos. Free. Call 344-3807.

thecgallery.com

1/21: Walk-through with Michael Westmore Join the man behind the faces of Raging Bull Bull, Rocky Rocky, and his Oscar-winning work in 1985’s Mask for a conversation about working with Martin Scorsese, Robert De Niro, and Sylvester Stallone. Noon-1pm. AD&A Museum, UCSB. Free. Call 893-2951. museum.ucsb.edu

Precise and Safe

1/21: BASSH After Hours: Burlesque Cabaret Show This fundraiser for a longtime S.B. entertainment favorite, BASSH 2017, will feature performances by area dance studios to support the upcoming production in March. Some of the too-hot-to-handle pieces include belly dance, drag, cabaret, tango, burlesque, and more. 7-9:30pm. M8RX Nightclub + Lounge, 409 State St. $10. Ages 21+. Call 450-2498.

After

Before

Silhouette Instalift™

Immediate Results, Minimal to no downtime Patient of Gregory S. Keller

mcasantabarbara.org

tinyurl.com/BasshAfterHours

1/21: Met: Live in HD: Roméo ééo et Juliette Diana Damrau and Vittorio

After

Before

rejuvalase medi spa Gregory s. Keller, md., F.a.C.s. 221 W. Pueblo St., Suite A, Santa Barbara

Grigolo star as literature’s star-crossed lovers in this critically acclaimed, lush adaptation of Shakespeare’s classic tragedy with stunning costumes and vivid 18th-century backdrop. 9:55am. Hahn Hall, Music Academy of the West, 1070 Fairway Rd. $10-$28. Call 969-8787. musicacademy.org

1/21: Winter Bird Count 4 Kids Kids ages 8-16 with an accompanying adult are invited to take part in the annual census of birds in the U.S. Experienced naturalists will guide kids on a walk around the lake and teach them how to identify, record, and tally bird species. Snacks will be provided, and the first 75 kids will receive a free T-shirt. Please leave your dogs at home. 9am-noon. Lake Los Carneros, 304 N. Los Carneros Rd., Goleta. Free. Call 964-1468.

tinyurl.com/WinterBird Count4Kids

1/21:

6th Annual Winter Wine Classic Take part in this California experience by drinking wine on the beach at sunset. Nearly 100 of the Golden State’s winemaking masters will come together for the rare chance to sample the very best of the best as you pair vintage wines with delectable food from area restaurants. Proceeds will benefit the Foodbank of S.B. County. 4-7:30pm. Plaza del Sol, Fess Parker’s DoubleTree Resort, 633 E. Cabrillo Blvd. $90$110. Ages 21+. Call (800) 936-3126. californiawinefestival.com

805-687-6408

www.GregoryKeller.com | www.RejuvalaseMediSpa.com 28

THE INDEPENDENT

JANUARY 19, 2017

independent.com

Need more? Go to independent.com/events for your daily fix of weekly events.

Courtesy rembert e. stokes library

Patient of Gregory S. Keller

Thermi/Laser

Berlin-based artist collective Rimini Protokoll’s U.S. exhibition debut will feature a video installation showcasing his vibrant productions held in 23 cities around the world, where everyday citizens express their views on aging, welfare, migration, and relationships. Artist Bean Gilsdorf’s exhibition Soft Actor employs mixed media to unravel the mythology, dichotomies, and ubiquitous nature of America’s presidential history and, more recently, the electoral events that have led up to the exhibition. Both will show through April 30. 6-8pm. Museum of Contemporary Art S.B., 653 Paseo Nuevo. Free. Call 966-5373.


week

1/21:

Courtesy

e

Th

Underwater Parks Day

Festival Dive into the world of marine protected areas with interactive ocean-themed activities and crafts in celebration of the biodiversity and abundance of animals under the sea. Kids can discover a micro-marine ecosystem, make jellyfish, meet live birds of prey, and more. 10am-3pm. S.B. Museum of Natural History Sea Ctr., 211 Stearns Wharf. Free with museum admission. Call 962-2526 x110.

THURSDAY

sbnature.org

Sunday 1/22 1/22: An Afternoon with Garrison Keillor Writer and humorist Garrison Keillor, known as the host of the beloved live radio variety show A Prairie Home Companion, will share insights and stories from his nearly five-decade-long career as one of America’s greatest storytellers. 3pm. Granada Theatre, 1214 State St. $39-$59. Call 893-3535. Read more on p. 49.

granadasb.org

1/22-1/23: Speaking of Stories: Nothing but Laughs Talented actors will read fun, silly, and downright hilarious stories for a wonderfully fun performance. Join the performers, including Meredith Baxter, after the show for complimentary cookies and milk. Sun.: 2pm; Mon.: 7:30pm. Center Stage Theater, 751 Paseo Nuevo. $18-$28. Call 963-0408.

centerstagetheater.org 1/22: Fin de Fiesta San Francisco’s Camino Flamencos will perform with dancer Andres Peña and singer Manuel Malena from Jerez de la Frontera, Spain, for a special evening of pure flamenco, improvised and joyous from beginning to end. 7:30pm. The New Vic, 33 W. Victoria St. $20-$55. Call 965-5400. etcsb.org

JAN

BOB NEWHART

Monday 1/23 1/23: Ed Roberts Day Celebration Join the Independent Living Resource Center for a celebration of Ed Roberts’s birthday with videos, lively conversation, and light refreshments. Roberts, who contracted polio at age 14 in 1953, was the first student with severe disabilities to graduate from the University of California, Berkeley, cofounded the World Institute on Disability, and is referenced as the father of the independent living movement in the U.S. 4-6pm. Westside Neighborhood Ctr., 423 W. Victoria St. Free. Call 963-0559 x105.

26

THURSDAY

FEB

2

TOWER OF POWER THURSDAY

FEB

JOHNNY MATHIS

tinyurl.com/EdRobertsDay

tueSday 1/24

9

1/24: How to Hide Your Affair: A Short History of Cryptography Learn about the history and art of deciphering secret messages and creating encryption that was first used by ancient civilizations. 9:30am-12:30pm. Goleta Library, 500 N. Fairview Ave., Goleta. Free. Call 964-7878. sbplibrary.org

THURSDAY

FEB CREEDENCE CLEARWATER REVISITED

23

THURSDAY

GEORGE THOROGOOD

MAR

2

AND THE DESTROYERS ROCK PARTY

1/22:

What Was It Like to Be a Samurai Woman in Edo Japan? Professor Luke Roberts from the Department of History at UCSB will present letters and family diaries from the era that provide insight into the daily lives and difficulties faced by the women samurais in power during the Edo Period between 1600 and 1868. 2-3pm. Multipurpose Rm., Goleta Library, 500 N. Fairview Ave., Goleta. Free. Call 964-7878. sbplibrary.org

>>>

BOX OFFICE

CHUM ASHC ASINO.COM

800.248.6274

CHUMASH CASINO RESORT SUPPORTS RESPONSIBLE GAMING. FOR INFORMATION ABOUT PROBLEM GAMBLING, CALL THE PROBLEM GAMBLING HELPLINE AT 1-800-522-4700. MUST BE 21 OR OLDER. CHUMASH CASINO RESORT RESERVES THE RIGHT TO CHANGE OR CANCEL PROMOTIONS AND EVENTS.

independent.com

JANUARY 19, 2017

THE INDEPENDENT

29


T H E S A N TA B A R B A R A S Y M P H O N Y P R E S E N T S

DISNEY

FANTASIA

Live in Concert

Women Golfers of Santa Barbara Thursday nighT The Executive Women’s Golf Association Winter Social

Featuring select scenes from Walt Disney’s Fantasia (1940) and Fantasia 2000 David Lockington, Guest Conductor

January 19th • 5:30 - 7:30 p.m. Santa Barbara Winery - 202 Anacapa St. You owe it to yourself (and to your golf game) to join the most fantastic women’s golf club on the Central Coast! We look forward to sharing a glass of wine, some food, and introducing you to our fabulous aspiring business and professional women members. The

January 28, 2017 8pm I January 29, 2017 3pm I The Granada Theatre Disney shares one of its crown jewels of feature animation with the Santa Barbara Symphony accompanying scenes from Disney’s original Fantasia (1940) and Fantasia 2000, highlighting a selection of both films’ magnificent repertoire. Concert also includes Paul Hindemith’s brilliant Symphonic Metamorphosis.

EWGA Santa Barbara Chapter helps golfers of all skill levels improve their game, make lasting friendships while supporting community organizations. Our home course is the Santa Barbara Golf Club where we play the first Sunday of each month.

For more information or to register log on to www.ewgasb.org or call 455-4979 $10 online or $15 payable at the Winery

(Presentation licensed by Disney Music Publishing and Buena Vista Concerts, a division of ABC Inc. (c) All rights reserved.)

Tickets start at $29 I Student tickets $10 Adults ages 20-29 $20 with ID Sarah & Roger Chrisman Principal Concert Sponsors

Elaine F. Stepanek Foundation Artist Sponsor

The Lampson Team at

Corporate Sponsor

Media Sponsors

For tickets call 805.899.2222 or visit thesymphony.org

EARN A CSU DEGREE

The Rebecca Kleinmann

Trio presents

in Santa Barbara • MBA • BS Business • BA Psychology

Brazilian Classics, Originals and music of Hermeto Pascoal

http://ext.csuci.edu

805-312-6367

Featuring:

Rebecca Kleinmann flutes and vocals

Fabiano do Nascimento 7-string guitar

Julien Cantelm drums

Sunday, January 22 • 7:00pm Extended University & International Programs

Next Info Sessions Join us for Information Session BA & BS - Wed.an Feb. 8 | MBA - Thurs. Feb. 9 30

THE INDEPENDENT

JANUARY 19, 2017

independent.com

SOhO • 1221 State St. $15 Reservations: (805)962-7776 www.rebeccakleinmann.com


Jan

19-25

week

Join Us Today!

e Th

Thurs. jaN 19, 11:30am – 2:00pm for our CoolSculpting Event Learn how to quickly and easily

1/24: Meet the Artist: Favianna Rodriguez Since her days

bandS on Tap T

as a political poster designer in 1990s Oakland, Favianna Rodriguez has used art to address migration, economic inequality, gender justice, and the environment. Chat with the artist about current social issues, and learn about the role art plays in shaping the political narrative in the United States. Stay for a special reception for the center’s winter art exhibit, The Radical Imagination. 6-9pm. MultiCultural Ctr. Lounge, UCSB. Free. Call 893-8411.

1/19-1/21, 1/26: The Brewhouse Thu.: Ventucky, 8:30-11:30pm. Fri.: Zydeco Zippers, 8:30-11:30pm. Sat.: Little Big Here, 8:30-11:30pm. Thu., 1/26: Cool n the Twang, 8:30-11:30pm. 229 W. Montecito St. Free. Call 884-4664. sbbrewhouse.com 1/19-1/25: The James Joyce Thu.: Alastair Greene, 10pm-1am. Fri.: The Kinsella Brothers, 10pm-1am. Sat.: Ulysses, 7:30-10:30pm. Tue.: Teresa Russell, 10pm-1am. Wed.: Victor Vega and the Bomb, 10pm-1am. 513 State St. Free. Ages 21+. Call 962-2688. sbjamesjoyce.com

FreeZe YOur FaT aWaY! Special Pricing • Delicious Refreshments Raffle & Giveaways! 221 W. Pueblo, Suite A • Please RSVP 805-687-6408

STUBBORN FAT HAS MET ITS MATCH!

mcc.sa.ucsb.edu

Courtesy

1/20: Ojai Deer Lodge Crooked Eye Tommy, 10pm. 2261 Maricopa Hwy., Ojai. Free. Ages 21+. Call 646-4256. deerlodgeojai.com 1/20: M8RX Nightclub & Lounge Live DJ: Old School Hip-Hop + R&B. 10pm. 409 State St. Free. Ages 21+. Call 957-4111. m8rxsb.com

Dramatically improve your CoolSculpting® results with Dual-Sculpting, available

1/20-1/21: Maverick Saloon Fri.: Generation Gap, 8pm. Sat.: Big Tweed Band, 8pm. 3687 Sagunto St., Santa Ynez. Free. Call 686-4785. mavericksaloon.org

exclusively in Santa Barbara at Rejuvalase Medi Spa. Dual-Sculpting combines CoolSculpting® with Acoustic Wave technology to give you 22% better results and less discomfort in half the time!

1/20-1/22: Cold Spring Tavern Fri.: Green Flag Summer, 7-10pm. Sat.: John Lyle, 2-5pm; Ruben Lee Band, 6-9pm. Sun.: Tom Ball and Kenny Sultan, 1:154pm; Rainbow Girls, 4:30-7:30pm. 5995 Stagecoach Rd. Free. Call 967-0066. coldspringtavern.com

Call Today for our New Year Dual Sculpting Special

tom rauner

1/25: Blush Restaurant + Lounge Bruce Goldish. 7-9pm. 630 State St. Free. Call 957-1300. blushsb.com

Sarah Jones

1/24: Sam Bennett This highly successful author and public speaker advises we should just focus on the present moment. She will sign copies of Start Right Where You Are, a concise new book of affirmations, meditations, pep talks, and small changes to get you focused on what’s holding you back from your goals. 7pm. Chaucer’s Books, 3321 State St. Free. Call 682-6787. chaucersbooks.com

Say Goodbye to Baldness! NOW Featuring SafeGrafts™ The most advanced technique. Minimal discomfort, no scarring, guaranteed results!

Come in for your complimentary surgical consultation with Dr. Keller

WedneSday 1/25 1/25: Community Conversation Join library staff for a new series aimed at bettering the library’s work in the community. This is not a place for library feedback, but rather an opportunity for the public to voice opinions, concerns, and suggestions for strengthening the community. 5:30-7pm. Faulkner Gallery East, S.B. Central Library, 40 E. Anapamu St. Free. Call 564-5642. sbplibrary.org

1/25: End It: Shine a Light on Slavery The United Nations Asso-

1/24:

An Evening with Sarah Jones The Tony- and Obie-winning

playwright, performer, and activist will perform excerpts from her new off-Broadway solo show, Sell/Buy/Date, which opened to rave reviews in October 2016, for an evening of delightful, witty storytelling. 8pm. Campbell Hall, UCSB. $19-$40. Call 893-3535. artsandlectures.sa.ucsb.edu

ciation of S.B. and Youth for Human Rights International will host a public forum on the issue of modern slavery. Learn how to recognize the signs of human trafficking and what you can do to end slavery — globally and locally. Hear speakers from the DA, the

Continued on p. 35 >>>

Need more? Go to independent.com/events for your daily fix of weekly events.

rejuvalase medi spa Gregory s. Keller, md., F.a.C.s. 221 W. Pueblo St., Suite A, Santa Barbara 805-687-6408 • GregoryKeller.com independent.com

JANUARY 19, 2017

THE INDEPENDENT

31


Historic Mausoleum Columbarium Niches for the placement of urns

A sacred and historic resting place open to all people of faith and good will. For appointments, contact us at (805) 569-5483 or thm@sboldmission.org Please refer to this ad

santa barbara’s only full service lighting store

805-757-7878

1 n. calle cesar chavez #15 (inside Andros Floor Design)

www.lightsantabarbara.com 32

THE INDEPENDENT

JANUARY 19, 2017

independent.com


week

BIG NAMES. SMALL ROOM.

e

Th

HOT TUNA 17 ACOUSTIC

FEBRUARY

Music of Note

Jorma Kaukonen and Jack Casady have remained loyal to the blues, jazz, bluegrass, and folk influences in their current acoustic and electric blues since their days putting together the soundtrack of the 60’s in The Jefferson Airplane.

1/20: King Bee Dance through decades of rock ’n’ roll hits from the ’50s to early ’90s, performed live by this high-energy area cover band. 8:30pm. SOhO Restaurant & Music Club, 1221 State St. $8. Ages 21+. Call 962-7776. sohosb.com

1/20: Camerata Pacifica: Mozart & Gounod Wind Serenades An impressive repertoire of talented musicians from around the world will amaze you with a stellar program of Mysliveček, Mozart, and Gounod pieces. 7:30pm. Hahn Hall, Music Academy of the West, 1070 Fairway Rd. $56. Call 884-8410. musicacademy.org

Terry Hill & Milt Larsen present

IT’S 19 MAGIC!

1/20: Roy Orbison Returns Wiley Ray and the Big O Band will pay tribute to the late, great country rock singer/songwriter Roy Orbison with a collection of hits such as “Oh, Pretty Woman” and “You Got It.” 8pm. Lobero Theatre, 33 E. Canon Perdido St. $39-$59. Call 963-0761. lobero.com

FEBRUARY

Courtesy

1/21: Slackers in Paradise: Ken Emerson, Jim Kimo West Fresh off their stint at the 10th Annual Southern California Slack Key Festival, these masters of Hawaiian slack key and steel guitar will play a rare intimate performance of impressive improvisation and spontaneity while Kumu Rona Koe solo dances the Hawaiian hula. 6:30pm. Logan House, Beatrice Wood Ctr. for the Arts, 8585 Ojai-Santa Paula Rd., Ojai. $25. Call 646-3381. beatricewood.com

Jackshit

Celebrating 20 years at the Lobero Theatre

Santa Barbara’s favorite comedy and magic show returns to the Lobero to dazzle audiences with an all-new lineup of top illusionists direct from exotic showrooms and Hollywood’s famous Magic Castle.

1/21: An Entire Evening of Jackshit & Friends The lineup for this country rock ’n’ roll band sure is impressive. Both drummer Pete Thomas and bass guitarist Davey Faragher, also known for the band Cracker, have shared the stage with Elvis Costello as part of his backing band, while guitarist Val McCallum has toured with the likes of Bonnie Raitt and Jackson Browne. 8pm. Lobero Theatre, 33 E. Canon Perdido St. $40. Call 963-0761. lobero.org

ELAINE F. STEPANEK FOUNDATION

MCALISTER FOUNDATION

BROWN FAMILY FOUNDATION

NICHOLS FOUNDATION

An Evening With

JIM 4 MESSINA with John McFee “Sittin’ In”

MARCH

1/22: The Rebecca Kleinmann Trio Passion-

ate flutist Rebecca Kleinmann will bring her experience as a world-traveling musician with her musical friends for an evening of acoustic world jazz. 7pm. SOhO Restaurant & Music Club, 1221 State St. $15. Call 962-7776. sohosb.com

1/22: Termination Dust, Habit Trail, Little B!tch Anchorage’s Termi-

& Jackson Gillies

Termination Dust

Jim Messina (Loggins & Messina, Poco and Buffalo Springfield) will be joined by special guest John McFee (The Doobie Brothers) “Sittin’ In” with Jim’s band for a terrific evening spanning his entire career!

nation Dust’s namesake comes from the Alaskan term for the snowfall that signals the end of summer, but it counteracts its name with sunny indie pop-rock jams. They’ll play alongside area experimental rock trio Habit Trail and recently formed band Little B!tch. 8pm. Funzone, 226 S. Milpas St. $5. sbdiy.org

A Special Benefit Concert For The William Sansum Diabetes Center LOBERO THEATRE ENDOWMENT FOR AMERICAN ROOTS MUSIC

1/22: Bach at Trinity Don’t miss this

lisa marie mazzuCCo

Itzhak Pearlman

805.963.0761 or Lobero.org

kerry tasker

encore performance of one of the baroque period’s greatest composers, Johann Sebastian Bach, from Cal Poly’s Early Music Ensemble, members of the Cal Poly Symphony, and guest musicians. 3:30pm. Trinity Episcopal Church, 1500 State St. $10-$20. Call 756-4849. tickets.calpoly.edu

1/23: Itzhak Perlman The Emmy Award–winning Israeli-American violinist will revisit his well-known album of klezmer music, In the Fiddler’s House, featuring Hankus Netsky, Andy Statman, members of Brave Old World, and more. 7pm. Granada Theatre, 1214 State St. $59. Call 899-2222. granadasb.org

Continued on p. 35 >>>

Imagine hearing the words,

Help families with a child battling cancer.

DONATE TODAY! TeddyBearCancerFoundation.org 805.962.7466 independent.com

JANUARY 19, 2017

THE INDEPENDENT

33


Hey, Santa Barbara!

Gold’s Gym Is Back

$0 enroLLmenT + free perSonal traininG SeSSion

or

Offer expires 1/31/17

Free 7–DaY a aY paSS*

Offer expires 1/31/17

CALL NOW AND SAVE! • certifieD perSonal trainerS • DeDicateD hot yoGa StUDioS (power vInyasa – Goleta & BIkram method – Uptown)

• • • •

pilateS reformer StUDio kiDS’ clUb GroUp exerciSe claSSeS Free ToweLs

caLL 886.370.0459 or visiT gOLDSgymSOCAL.COm For more inFormaT orma ion on ormaT theSe Special offerS

(GroUp exercIse classes and amenItIes vary By locatIon)

Three LocaTions Downtown • Uptown • Goleta

/GolDSGymSocalGroUp

@GolDSGymSocal

@GolDSGymSocal

GolD’S Gym Socal

*Special Offers Expire 1/31/17. Must be a local resident and at least 18 years of age or older. Local ID required. Offer valid only at Gold’s Gym SoCal Locations. Must be a new member to be eligible. Some restrictions may apply.

34

THE INDEPENDENT

JANUARY 19, 2017

independent.com


Jan

19-25

week

From the Hit PBS Kids Show

e

Th

Sun, Feb 12 / 3 PM & 6 PM Lobero Theatre (note special venue) $25 / $15 children (12 & under)

Music of Note

A Lobero facility fee will be added to each ticket price

Continued from p. 33

1/24: Dix E Hix Band This loveable area band of accordions, guitar, violins, and the banjo will play well-known American classics for kids and parents. 10:3011:15am. Children’s Reading Rm., Goleta Library, 500 N. Fairview Ave., Goleta. Free. Call 964-7878. sbplibrary.org 1/24: Gregory Porter Grammy Award–winning jazz singer/songwriter Gregory Porter will bring his stunning baritone voice to perform timeless, soulful tracks. 8pm. Granada Theatre, 1214 State St. $35-$65. Call 899-2222. Read more on p. 53. marCo borggreve

granadasb.org 1/24: Paul Huang, S.B. Chamber Orchestra This rising violinist will showcase his talent in a performance of Beethoven’s expansive Violin Concerto in D and Schubert’s majestic “The Great” Symphony in C Major. 7:30pm. Lobero Theatre, 33 E. Canon Perdido St. $54-$64. Call 963-0761.

“[Odd Squad’s] weird and wonderful combination of oddness, kids in charge, gadgets and math… offers strong characters, great effects and gadgets and the kind of random humor that has my kids (and me) in stitches.” Forbes

MarkeT

Schedule

lobero.org

1/24: Singer Songwriter Showcase Enjoy original pieces from up-and-coming area musicians. 7pm. SOhO Restaurant & Music Club, 1221 State St. Free. Call 962-7776. sohosb.com

FarMerS THURSDAY

Paul Huang

Live and digital participation allow junior agents in the audience to help work out problems in real time. Designed to help kids ages five to eight build math and indirect reasoning skills with a formula that’s fun for the whole family and easy as Pi!

Goleta: Corner of Storke and Hollister; 7004 Marketplace Dr., inside the Camino Real Shopping Center, 3-6:00pm Carpinteria: 800 block of Linden Ave., 3-6:00pm

With support from our Community Partner the Orfalea Family

FRIDAY

Montecito: 1100 and 1200 blocks of Coast Village Rd., 8-11:15am

Family Fun series Sponsor:

Media Sponsors:

SATURDAY

Downtown S.B.: Corner of Santa Barbara and Cota sts., 8:30am-1pm

SUNDAY

(805) 893-3535 www.ArtsAndLectures.UCSB.edu

Goleta: Corner of Storke and Hollister; 7004 Marketplace Dr., inside the Camino Real Shopping Center, 10am-2pm

TUESDAY

Old Town S.B.: 500-600 blocks of State St., 3-6:30pm

WEDNESDAY

PA M F I S H E R , N . P. , H . H . P.

Solvang: Copenhagen Dr. and 1st St., 2:30-6:00pm

1/25:

Love & Solidarity: James Lawson and Nonviolence in the Search of Workers’ Rights Is a nonviolent revolution

possible in the face of hate? This film poses that question through the lens of African-American Methodist minister and civil rights activist Reverend James Lawson. Follow his story as he recounts working with Martin Luther King Jr. to teaching nonviolent organizing to the black and Latino workers of the recent labor movement in Los Angeles. 6-7pm. MultiCultural Ctr. Theater, UCSB. Free. Call 893-8411. mcc.sa.ucsb.edu

sheriff, and Uffizi Order, and watch a public service announcement produced for Australia and the Red Light District in Amsterdam. 6:30-8pm. Faulkner Gallery, S.B. Central Library, 40 E. Anapamu St. Free. Call 6360475. sbplibrary.org

1/25: Privilege Yvonne Rainer’s sixth feature film, from 1990, is a witty and risky take on menopause, sexual identity, and racial, gender, and economic inequality. Rainer will join Constance Penley, UCSB professor of film and media studies, for a

Certified Naturopath and Holistic Health Practitioner

question-and-answer session about the topics scarcely seen on the screen. 7-10pm. Pollock Theater, UCSB. Free. Call 893-4637. carseywolf.ucsb.edu

Presents: A FREE training on uses of aromatherapy for optimal health and well-being

1/25: 12th Annual AB 540 College Night Learn about how immigrant

Saturday, Jan. 21: 2:30 pm - 4:30 pm

youth can qualify for in-state tuition at California public colleges and benefit from Assembly Bill 540. Families can come to this safe, confidential meeting to learn about eligibility, financial aid, and the California Dream Act application. 6-8pm. La Cumbre Jr. High, 2255 Modoc Rd. Free. ab540coalition.org

Need more? Go to independent.com/events for your daily fix of weekly events.

WHEN

WHERE

Santa Barbara Sheng Zhen Society 20 W. Calle Laureles St. Door prizes Santa Barbara, CA 93105

include: Private Consultation valued at $130 and more! independent.com

MORE INFO

970-379-7967 maryellenroth@gmail.com thehealthycloset.com JANUARY 19, 2017

THE INDEPENDENT

35


Experience your inner wisdom doing The Work with Byron Katie.

REGISTER 805.444.5799 E V E N T S .T H E W O R K . C O M / B E I N G B E I N G W I T H B Y R O N K AT I E . C O M

Real Age = 55 Heart’s Age = 39

9–14 February 2017

Real Age = 58 Heart’s Age = 42

No matter what your heart’s age is, Cottage Heart & Vascular Center offers the most comprehensive heart treatment between Los Angeles and the Bay Area. Our team of nationally recognized physicians specialize in heart valve disease, arrhythmia (Afib), congenital heart disease and coronary artery disease. From prevention and diagnosis to treatment and recovery, you’ll get a partner in managing even the most complex cardiovascular conditions.

FIND OUT YOUR HEART’S AGE FOR FREE IN JUST MINUTES. Visit Cottagehealth.org/heart to take your heart age assessment.

36

THE INDEPENDENT

JANUARY 19, 2017

independent.com

The Center for The Work Ojai, CA ©2017 Byron Katie International, Inc. All rights reserved.


Sarita reliS

Causes

BiRTh Of REAs EA On nECklACE EAs kl klACE suPPORTs PPORTs WOMEn PPORT

living

Service paul wellman

Just in time for the many Women’s Marches happening across the country this Saturday, from Washington, D.C., to De la Guerra Plaza, Santa Barbara artist and grandmother Judi Weisbart is unveiling her Birth of Reason Egg Necklace, a small silver or gold talisman aimed at women who seek “a world where unity, compassion, love, and kindness prevail.” The design was inspired by a Russian egg that Weisbart first held along with Israeli and Palestinian women as they spoke during the Global Women’s Peace Initiative at the United Nations in Geneva in 2002. “My hope is that Oprah, Michelle Obama, Angela Merkel, Madonna, Jane Goodall, and all women of influence will wear this to stand for the new movement of empowered women born to the betterment of all lives on our fragile little globe,” said Weisbart. Necklaces ordered now ($30 each) will deliver in time for International Women’s Day on March 8. See birthofreason.com. —Matt Kettmann

p. 37

Benicia Grace models the necklace.

Early Education

ElinOR OR BRElsfORD lsf ’s Legacy lsfORD

L

paul wellman

Marilyn Statucki (Oaks director 1980-2009) ike any great leader, Elinor Brelsford is quick to recall the contributions of oth- believes Brelsford saved the school. “She is really the ers. Having recently celebrated her 100th one who masterminded getting the program solidibirthday, the retired early-childhood fied,” said Statucki. “She provided the focus. She was educator can still remember the parents who the pivotal point around which the program could helped lay the concrete, paint the walls, and fill run.” While working through the sandbox of The Oaks legal, logistical, and monetary Parent-Child Workshop, the challenges, Brelsford utilized cooperative preschool that all potential resources. “We she led for more than three used to sell persimmons for decades. 10 cents apiece to help raise The Oaks originated out funds,” she said. “The tree was of the postwar baby boom. all black from being burned on Hoff Heights, a large developone side.” ment situated where Adams Once the building was Elementary School now sits, rebuilt and the land permahoused many young families, nently secured, Brelsford’s with limited resources and focus returned to the families, an abundance of children. Elinor Brelsford for whom she prepared eve“The whole area outside those ning presentations on child develhomes was sand,” said Brelsford. Retired Preschool Director opment. “The classes made so “The children didn’t have any place Turns 100, Celebrates much difference with the parents to play. They were just desperate for The Oaks’ 70th Birthday and the relationships they formed something.” with the children,” she explained.   The parents obtained the use by Andie Bridges Brelsford’s many rich and joyof a large hall for the children but ful memories include watching soon recognized the need for a formally trained administrator. So Brelsford, who has an happy children jump from a wooden platform to the advanced degree in child development, took the helm mattress below. “They thought it was hilarious and but never imagined how many lives she’d touch. “I the most fun,” she said. “It just gave them so much thought it was just a temporary position,” she laughed, courage.” Then there was the time a family with 13 children brought their pet monkey to school, where, “and it ended up being 31 years.” In the early days, the adults tied ropes between old of course, it escaped. “He was climbing all over,” she chairs to partition off sections of the hall for tricycle laughed. “We thought we’d never get him back in the riding and block play.“We saw what great things were cage.” Seven decades later, the persimmon tree still happening with the children,” she recalled, “and really stands in front of the school’s office. Preschoolers wanted to keep it going.” Brelsford worked tirelessly to help establish a per- chase each other through its fallen leaves, playing manent home for the school: an old house across the the same pretend games as generations before them, street from Oak Park, only to have the building burn making friends and growing up in a community to the ground before they moved in. “I picked up the established by Elinor’s devotion. phone and heard, ‘This is the fire department. Your house just burned to the ground,’ ” she said. “They The Oaks Parent-Child Workshop’s 37th Annual Auction benefit is on really meant it. Later, they just shoveled the ashes into saturday, March 4, 3-7 p.m., at the Cabrillo Pavilion Arts Center (1118 E. Cabrillo Blvd.). see theoakspcw.org. a truck; it had burned so thoroughly.”

LIFE OF CARE: Glenn Novack was inspired to help seniors with moving when he started caring for his mother full-time 13 years ago. “I’ve been an honorary senior since I’ve been 40,” he says of his time living in his mother’s retirement community.

MOving ving Miss DA D isy Makes Relocating “

M

Smooth for Seniors

y heart is in the right place,” says Glenn Novack, the owner of Moving Miss Daisy, a full-service relocation company that assists seniors in downsizing their homes. “I’m in the right business for myself because I care about the senior community.” Novack began caring for his mother full-time 13 years ago while also running parallel careers designing special events and dealing art and antiques. “I’ve been an honorary senior since I’ve been 40,” he says of his inspirational time living in his mother’s retirement community and partaking in many of her daily activities. Last year, he decided to combine his personal and professional backgrounds to help seniors and their families through the delicate emotional, financial, and logistical transition from bigger spaces to smaller ones. The result is Moving Miss Daisy, which covers all aspects of the shift, starting with valuing their property. “I try to get the most money for them as possible,” he says of arranging the estate sales, auctions, garage sales, and consignments. “A lot of seniors need that because it is very expensive to move into assisted living, or any kind of care facility.” Novack also hires suitable movers for each budget and oversees the transfer of property. He says that, if appropriate, he does his best to help seniors “age in place.” In such cases, he arranges their current home to welcome a live-in caregiver or helps seniors with disabilities convert to current smart technology that makes their lives more manageable and independent. He also sees a social benefit to his endeavors. “I can hire people that are 50-plus because my clients are often looking for people that they can relate to,” he says. “This is a great business for people who are being shut out elsewhere.” Call 448-3788 or visit movingmissdaisy.com. —Carolina Starin

independent.com

JANUARY 19, 2017

THE INDEPENDENT

37


Big Game Challenge

Thursday, January 26 — sunday, February 5

Coming Soon

Make your piCks for a ChanCe to win prizes froM the neighborhood 1st Place: $250 Gift Card 2nd Place: $100 Gift Card 3rd Place: $50 Gift Card

38

THE INDEPENDENT

JANUARY 19, 2017

independent.com


Paul Wellman

Jeff C able

living | Sports

Women’s WAter Polo PoWer Tournament of Champions Brings olympic Dreams to the Pool

A

s high school competitions go, it would be hard to

surpass the quality displayed by the girls’ water polo teams in last weekend’s Santa Barbara Tournament of Champions. The Laguna Beach Breakers swept to the title, defeating San Marcos 15-6 in the semifinals and Mater Dei 11-5 in the final. Laguna Beach senior Aria Fischer was named Most Valuable Player, an honor that often stamps a player as an Olympic prospect, but Fischer was ahead of the game. She missed her junior year with the Breakers to train with the U.S. national team and came home with a gold medal from the Rio Olympics. The road to the Olympics led through Santa Barbara for many other players, including Makenzie Fischer, Aria’s older sister and the tournament MVP in 2014 and 2015; Dos Pueblos High’s brilliant Kiley Neushul, another two-time MVP (2010 and 2011); standout DP goalie Sami Hill (2009); and Santa Barbara High’s powerful Kami Craig (2004), a three-time Olympic medalist. It is no coincidence that the players are getting better at a younger age.“The first few years, it was a big deal to get a kid started [at water polo] in the 8th grade,” said Santa Barbara High coach Mark Walsh, who started the Tournament of

by John

Paul Wellman

Zant

OLYMPIC BLING: The U.S. women’s water polo team wears gold during the awards ceremony at the Rio Olympics. It includes Santa Barbara players Kami Craig (second from right), Kiley Neushul (sixth from right), and Sami Hill (far left). Pictured above is Dos Pueblos High School’s Abbi Hill.

Champions in 2000. “You’d teach swimmers how to play a game, or you’d teach burned-out soccer or basketball players how to swim. Now the age-group programs are developing wanting one of us to play basketball,” said Abbi, a DP sophothem. They’re going on international trips. Somebody like more.“I think we were born to be in the water. It’s a really nice Ryann Neushul may play 500 games before high school.” way to get to college.” The Tournament of Champions brought 24 teams to Santa Ryann, a Dos Pueblos junior, is the third Neushul sister to excel in water polo, following Kiley and Jamie, past and pres- Barbara, making it a destination for college recruiters. A ent All-Americans at Stanford. Both their parents played the coach from Princeton said that 90 percent of the Tigers’ sport, and they have been coached at the club level by their roster hails from California. mother, Cathy Neushul.“This is a water polo town,” Ryann said. “The players and coaches have worked really hard to UCSB TOURNAMENT: The college women’s water polo make it that, to make people really want to be a water polo season gets underway this weekend, January 20-22, at UCSB’s Winter Invitational. Coach Serela Kay’s Gauchos, defendplayer in this town.” Kiley Neushul led Dos Pueblos through a remarkable ing champions of the Big West Conference, will host three of streak of 69 consecutive victories while winning four consec- last year’s top four teams: No. 1 USC, the defending NCAA utive CIF titles. A year ago, Laguna Beach brought a 63-game Champion; No. 3 UCLA, and No. 4 Michigan. The Gauchos winning streak into a match at DP, and Kiley’s younger sister finished the year with a No. 9 ranking after making their first helped the Chargers stop it there with an 11-7 victory. appearance in the NCAA tournament. Among their return“There are great programs in town that provide the expe- ing players is Sophie Trabucco, a defensive specialist out of rience for kids to improve,” said San Marcos High coach Santa Barbara High. Chuckie Roth, citing the Santa Barbara 805 and Santa Barbara Premier water polo clubs. “In this day and age, DONS OF DISTINCTION: The Santa Barbara High Athletic Hall of Fame will be formally launched on Thursday, that’s what you have to do to be good.” San Marcos took third place in the Tournament of Cham- January 26, with the induction of five individuals: Randall pions, its highest finish ever, by topping Dos Pueblos 9-7. Cunningham, a football star who also excelled in track and Paige Hauschild, who scored five goals for the Royals, field; tennis champion Alison Hardey; baseball standout benefited from playing club water polo and making the Ryan Spilborghs; and a pair of graduates who have supU.S. national youth team along with Aria Fischer and the ported the Dons over the years, Peter and Gerd Jordano. Dos Pueblos trio of Ryann Neushul, Abbi Hill, and Jewel Recognition will also be given to dozens of Dons previously Roemer. honored by the booster organization Ye Ole Gang. JanuHauschild, a senior, is committed to play at USC next year. ary 19 is the deadline for reservations to the Hall of Fame “I enjoy all the teams I play on,” she said.“I grow a lot during dinner at the Cabrillo Pavilion. Visit yeolegang.com or call the high school season, not only as a player but as a person. 966-9101 x5006. Brittany Prentice and I are the captains. We’ve taken on the job of helping out the young girls.” Ryann Neushul similarly said John that high school was “a learning experience. It teaches you to be a leader.” 1/21: High School Soccer: San Marcos at Santa Barbara The fourth annual Super Abbi Hill, like Neushul, is folSoccer Showdown between the crosstown rivals is scheduled Saturday at Peabody Stadium, although lowing in the path of two older heavy rain late in the week could prompt a change of venue. Six games are on tap, beginning at 10:30 sisters: Sami, a UCLA graduate, a.m. with freshmen-sophomore teams, followed by junior varsity and varsity. Santa Barbara’s boys, and Kodi Hill, a senior with the 13-1-4 through last week, were ranked No. 4 in CIF Division 1. Proceeds from admission fees and the Bruins. Their mother was a bassnack bar will benefit the Dons’ soccer program. Varsity matches: girls: 5pm; boys: 7pm. S.B. High ketball star at San Marcos and School, 700 E. Anapamu St. $3-$5. Call 966-9101. BYU. “She always talks about

ZAnt’s

San Marcos High School’s Paige Hauschild

independent.com

GAme of the Week

JANUARY 19, 2017

THE INDEPENDENt

39


New Year,

New Career Take the first step to a new career on January 21 at the Pacifica Experience. This one-day introduction to Pacifica’s degree programs is a comprehensive overview of the school’s outstanding academic features and unique approach to graduate education.

> Attend typical class presentations > Learn about each of Pacifica’s masters and doctoral programs

> Get detailed information on scholarships and financial aid

> Tour both Pacifica Campuses > Meet with faculty, alumni, and

Pacifica Graduate Institute’s academically rigorous degree programs apply the tradition of depth psychology to the needs of today’s world. Socially conscious and politically active, the programs provide a superior, personalized education to a diverse student body within a supportive community of like-minded scholars. Blended online/low-residency programs are now enrolling for Spring 2017 Transition to Pacifica—ask about our credit transfer policies at 805.879.7305

2017 The Pacifica Experience

admissions counselors The $35 registration fee includes all activities, lunch, and a $10 gift certificate for the Pacifica Bookstore. Pacifica’s $75 application fee will be waived for Pacifica Experience attendees.

Saturday, January 21 in Santa Barbara Space is limited and registration is required. Register online at pacifica.edu or call 805.879.7305

Drawn to Dream Awaken the Artist Within

Laurie J. Pincus, M.A.

- Over 20 years experience Visual Artist, Art Educator, Depth Psychology Counselor

Discover and Engage the Healing Power of the Imagination Dream Work – Art and Sandplay Therapy

Creativity and Depth Psychology Counseling Individuals (all ages), Couples, Families, Seniors, Workshops

Drawn to Dream Fall and Spring Travel Workshops (805)705-9894

daily

neWsletter Fresh stories from

independent.com every day in your inbox.

sign up today! independent. com/email

Pacifica is accredited by the Western Association of Schools and Colleges. Gainful Employment Information at pacifica.edu.

For current exhibitions, events, membership information or to donate go to:

www.mcasantabarbara.org

Sustainable Heart

~ Transformational Life Counseling ~

Relationships • Occupation and Career • Meditation Grief and Loss • Major Life Transitions • Anxiety Spiritual Issues • Communication • Conflict

Michael H Kreitsek, MA

Transpersonal Counseling Psychology Counseling From a Buddhist Perspective 805 698-0286 40

THE INDEPENDENT

JANUARY 19, 2017

independent.com

805.966.5373 Paseo Nuevo | 653 Paseo Nuevo Santa Barbara | CA 93101


Food &drink

Experience Matters

stabilit y

• • • • • •

paul wellman

Founder Larry Stone

Do Your Feet Hurt? Over 25 years treating: Foot Pain • Neuropathy Ingrown Toenails • Warts Thick Fungal Nails • Bunions Heel pain • Hammertoes Sports Injuries • Painful Corns Patients with & Calluses Diabetes

Dr. Lorie robinson Board Certified ABFAS

5370 Hollister Ave., Suite 7 805-683-5674 University Professional Bldg.

• Wine Guide

haWaiian

Dining Out Guide

W

hen I was in college 20 years ago, noon in their bar to meet Chuck’s owner Chuck’s of Hawaii was the place to Larry Stone, who developed the restaurant in take both your dates and your par- the exact same location back in 1967. Raised ents. The dimly lit, low-ceilinged, mostly in the San Gabriel Valley, Stone studied torch-touting upper State Street engineering at San Jose State and surfing in steakhouse was simultaneously comforting Santa Cruz. Then he headed to Hawai‘i for with a casual island vibe, romantic in a ren- four years post-college, where he worked at dezvous way, serious about their salad bar, the original Chuck’s Steakhouse in Waikiki and meticulous about their meats, ensuring (founded in 1959) in between sailing advena memorable evening for all intents and ages. tures to Tahiti and Australia. When Chuck’s creator Chuck Rolles Little did I know that we were tapping into a formula developed 30 years earlier, one that offered his employees the chance to spread his continues to endure in 2017, as Chuck’s cel- steak and salad bar concept to the mainland, ebrates its 50th anniversary. “We have people Stone took him up on the offer and scoured the California coast for the right who come in in flip-flops and their Hawaiian shirt, sitting location. After considering La Upper State Street’S next to some guy in a suit — Jolla, Laguna, and Palos Verdes, everyone feels comfortable,” Stone decided to brave the Santa Barbara scene.“Everyone said Chuck’s Manager Brad Schuette, who’s been working told me that it was a nice place Celebrates halF Century there since 1980, when he was but you couldn’t make a living,” said Stone (to which Schuette a 15-year-old.“For a big part of quipped,“Nothing’s changed.”). our return customer base, we know what they want before Much was different in Santa by Matt Kettmann they walk in the door.” Barbara then. Downtown His slightly more tenured was dead, recalled Stone, “and colleague Steve Hyslop, who started washing Cabrillo Boulevard was dark all winter — dishes at Chuck’s on Valentine’s Day of 1979, there wasn’t a car down there.” Meanwhile, attributes their steady success to “the rela- going out to dinner was still a formal affair.“All tionships we’ve developed with our staff and of the other restaurants were fancy,” said Stone guests.” Explained Hyslop, who now co-owns of places such as Talk of the Town and Casa de and manages Chuck’s Waterfront Grill in the Sevilla, which required jackets.“I didn’t have a harbor, “We’re seeing four generations right sport coat!” now.” So he took a bet on opening Chuck’s of I joined these two men one recent after- Hawaii as a more casual place on upper State

Food & drink •

ChuCk’s Looks at 50

Medicare, Anthem Blue Cross and Blue Shield accepted

SCIENCE AND CHRISTIANITY International speaker, Mary Alice Rose, a practitioner and teacher of Christian Science healing and a member of the Christian Science Board of Lectureship Presents a free lecture

“The Science of Christianity” Sponsored by First Church of Christ, Scientist Goleta, CA

E = mc2 2x2=4 God = Love Sunday, Jan. 29th, 2017 at 2:00pm Goleta Branch Library – 500 N. Fairview Ave. CHILD CARE PROVIDED For more information see: PrayerThatHeals.org

steakhouse oF dimly lit dinner serviCe

Chuck’s of Hawaii’s 50th anniversary celebration at the upper State Street (3888 State 4·1·1 St.; chucksofhawaii.com) restaurant is already sold out, but the same deals are being offered at Chuck’s Waterfront Grill January 23-26. Call 564-1200 for reservations.

Continued on p. 43 >>>

Lend Us YoUr ears CheCk out our new series of intimate reCording sessions from homegrown & visiting performers

independent.com

/sidenotes independent.com

JANUARY 19, 2017

THE INDEPENDENt

41


Business • Design • Technology

TRAINING for Today! Get a Job Grow Your Business Advance Your Career

powered by

Earn Badges / Explore Certificates Basic Imaging

Powerful Presentations

Basic Office Software Skills

Sales Techniques

Blogging for Business

Web Designer

High Performance Teams

Workplace Essentials

Tuition Free Short Courses

For a complete list of classes, badges and certificates: www.sbcc.edu/csi

Congratulations Certified Clean Creeks Businesses! The City of Santa Barbara congratulates these local businesses for taking important steps to protect creek and ocean water quality by becoming Certified Clean Water Businesses! e-magic carpet cleaning and mobile car wash (805) 680-9463

Santa Barbara Steam Cleaning (805) 680-9463

J Luna’s Mobile Car Wash (805) 692-1000

Santos Carpet Cleaning & Auto Detail (805) 680-9463

Garden Street Academy

OPEN HOUSE January 28, 2017

10:00 AM

LOWER SCHOOL | GRADES K-5 Dynamic environment engages multiple learning styles

MIDDLE SCHOOL | GRADES 6-8 Critical inquiry through projectbased instruction

UPPER SCHOOL | GRADES 9-12 Is your business certified? Learn how you can receive FREE equipment to help protect local water quality! www.sbcreeks.com Funded by hotel visitors through Measure B. 42

THE INDEPENDENT

JANUARY 19, 2017

independent.com

Preparing for a successful university experience

GardenStreetAcademy.org 805-687-3717 x625 admissions@GardenStreetAcademy.org


ChuCk’s Continued from p. 41

noW hiring aLL poSitionS!

Your NOw Assembly OPEN

Street, whose commercial core was growing because it was close to the Hope Ranch and San Roque neighborhoods as well as many motels. He found a vacant spot in a new office building built by the Sumida family and convinced them to let him turn it into a restaurant. (The Sumidas have been supportive landlords ever since.) On day one, they sold 100 meals. “It was a good feeling,” remembered Stone, who was the first cook and spent every day of his life there for one and a half years. In the 1970s, he started opening other restaurants in Idaho, which is where he met his wife and where he lives much of the time. Stone’s restaurant empire also expanded in the Santa Barbara area over the years, including partnerships with the Beachside Café, the now-

shuttered Jasper’s in Goleta, and the Ballard Inn in the Santa Ynez Valley, which he and Hyslop later sold to the Kazali family. In 1999, Stone and Hyslop opened Endless Summer and the Waterfront Grill in the Santa Barbara Harbor; the latter added Chuck’s to its name for familiarity purposes in 2002 to combat the hospitality hit of the 9/11 attacks. Of course, the flagship location endured its own strategic evolution over the years. A seafood menu was launched in the 1980s when pasta was king and beef was considered unhealthy— the halibut still rivals the steaks for popularity — and, more recently, a bar menu was created to respond to the Great Recession when people wanted cheaper options. Such changes have kept the old formula uniquely relevant: Though the Chuck’s of Hawaii chain eventually grew to include 100-plus restaurants nationwide, only a fraction remain, and the Santa Barbara location is the sole survivor in California. The well-considered wine list is a critical part of modern restauBut nostalgia is Chuck’s most rants, but serving premier bottles has been a tradition at Chuck’s powerful bait since much is the of Hawaii for more than 30 years. By the early 1980s, Larry Stone, same as when it opened in 1967. who was friendly with Chris Whitcraft, Fred Brander, and other There’s the salad bar, the iconic pioneering vintners of Santa Barbara, was selling some of the best menus printed on old Lancers wine wines from Napa Valley and Bordeaux, France, including some of bottles (which Stone originally hand-painted himself), the everthe first 100-point wines rated by influential critic Robert Parker. “We were trying to softly educate the clientele,” said Stone, popular mai tais, and those expertly who hosted tastings of Krug and sold loads of Heitz, Mondavi charred steaks. In fact, with tiki bars Reserve, and other now-classic bottlings. “We were probably one back in style and today’s ingredientfatigued diners seeking a return to of the first to have by-the-glass wine.” The tradition continues today with a vibrant list of both straightforward food and authentic regional and global wines, all well priced. “We’re not marking settings, Chuck’s next decade may up bottles three to four times their price,” said Hyslop. There’s be more golden than ever. also a house syrah made by Brander, whose limited-edition 50th“It’s even gotten more casual here,” said Schuette.“But people still anniversary bottling is now available at the restaurant. want quality food and service.” n

Required

3925 State St.

(in the five pointS Shopping center)

Santa BarBara, ca 93105

(805) 681 - 7002

ChuCk’s:

Brazilian Brasil Arts Café offers Brazilian culture by way of food, drink, and dance! Come try our Brazilian BBQ plate or Moqueca (local sea bass in a coconut sauce). Enjoy our breakfast or $9.95 lunch specials or the best açaí bowls in town. Be ready to join in a dance class! www.brasilartscafe.com 805‑845‑7656 1230 State Street french Petit Valentien, 1114 State St. #14, 805‑966‑0222. Open M‑F 11:30am‑3pm (lunch). M‑Sat 5pm‑Close (dinner). Sun $24 four‑course prix fixe dinner. In La Arcada Plaza, Chef Robert Dixon presents classic French comfort food at affordable cost in this cozy gem of a restaurant. Petit Valentien offers a wide array of meat and seafood entrees along with extensive small plates and a wine list specializing

h

advertisement

To include your listing for under $20 a week contact sales@independent.com or call 965-5205.

in amazing quality at arguably the best price in town. A warm romantic atmosphere makes the perfect date spot. Comfortable locale for dinner parties, or even just a relaxing glass of wine. Reservations are recommended. indian Flavor of India 3026 State 682‑6561 $$ www.flavorofindiasb.com Finest, most authentic Indian cuisine is affordable too! All You Can Eat Lunch Buffet $10.95 M‑S dinner combos $9.95+ Specials: Tandoori‑ Mixed or Fish, Chicken Tikka Masala, Shrimp Bhuna. Also: meat, curries & vegetarian.Wine & Beer. Take out. VOTED BEST for 20 YEARS! irish Dargan’s Irish Pub & Restaurant, 18 E. Ortega St. (next to lot 10) SB, 568‑0702. $$. Open 7 days 11:30a‑Close (Food ‘til 10p, 11p on Sat/Sun). AE MC V Disc. Authentic

Irish food & atmosphere in downtown SB. Specialties from Ireland include Seafood & Meat dishes. Informal, relaxed pub‑style atmosphere. Live music Thursday nights. Children welcome. Avail. for private parties. Pool & Darts.

• Wine Guide

Guide

z

paid

Dining Out Guide

dining out

Food & drink •

A Wine List Le LeAder

Isla Vista 888 Embarcadero Del Norte

Mission Street

steak

Rodney’s Grill, 633 East Cabrillo Boulevard at The Fess Parker – A Doubletree by Hilton Resort 805‑564‑4333. Serving 5pm ‑10pm Tuesday through Saturday. Rodney’s Grill is a fresh American grill experience. Enjoy all natural hormone‑free beef, locally‑sourced seafood, appetizers, and incredible desserts. The place to enjoy dinner with family and friends by the beach. Private Dining Room for 30. Full cocktail bar with specialty cocktails. Wine cellar with Santa Barbara County & California’s best vintages by‑the‑glass.

Mission Ice Cream Street & Yogurt Voted Best Ice Cream Store Year After Year & Voted Finalist for Best Yogurt Same Convenient Location • Free Parking Outdoor Patio • Friendly Service • Generous Portions

Mission Street Ice Cream & Yogurt

~ An Independently Owned & Operated Shop since 1986 ~ 201 West Mission St. • 569-2323

independent.com

JANUARY 19, 2017

THE INDEPENDENT

43


SANTA BARBARA 324 W. Montecito St lb.

99 ¢ ¢ IBP 1 69 69 SANTA BARBARA chicken breast top sirloin steaks ea.

49 lb. 59 ¢ $3.98

$1.59 ¢ lb.

89

P Pork

89

Trimmed Beef

tri-tip

¢Fresh Daily grounD beef lb.

79

$3.49

Kerns

11 oz.

ea.

59¢

59¢ ¢

89 7 oz.

89 89 ¢ lb.

lb.

Fuji & Gala

Hidden Valley

ranch anch Dressing 24 oz.

lb.

lb.

lb.

hot toMato sauce

ea. rice -a-roni asst.

79 79$1.49

$4.29

89 89

¢

ea.

¢

Brown

GOLETA onions Ave 5757 Hollister ¢¢ ¢

49 59lb. 59 25¢

lb.

Jalapeno & toMatillos

$ 99 69¢ lb. 1 ¢ 89 ¢ 89heaD D lettuce ea.

¢

ea.

69¢ ¢ 89 $2.49 59 ¢¢ 89 lb.

Kellogg’s

Tina’s

14 oz.

4 oz.

pop tarts t

burritos

4/ 4/$2.00

lb.

89 ¢

LIMITED STOCK ONHAND HAND PRICESEFFECTIVE 7 FULL DAYS LIMITED TO STOCK ONTO HAND • PRICES EFFECTIVE 7 EFFECTIVE FULL DAYS LIMITED STOCK ON • •PRICES 7 FULL DAYS FROM OCTOBER 27TH THROUGH NOVEMBER 2ND FROM OCTOBER 27TH THROUGH NOVEMBER FROM JANUARY 19TH THROUGH2ND JANUARY 25TH

ES EFFECTIVE 7 FULL DAYS GH NOVEMBER 2ND

59 ¢

GOLETA 5757 Hollister Ave

SANTA BARBARA 324 W. Montecito St

89

lb.

49

¢ lb.

¢ 79 1 69January Special $

¢

99

ea.

~ ~ 59 Now featuring fresh bread daily from

59

ea.

Buy one,Rosa get 50% 89 ¢ oFF La Bella Bakery LIMITED TO STOCK ON HANDtreatment! • PRICES EFFECTIVE 7 FULL DAYS Second

¢

lb.

89

lb.

Offer good until January 31, 2017. Not to be combined with any other offers and promotions. Excludes Botox and Latisse.

89

SANTA BARBARA 324 W. Montecito St

¢

¢

lb.

69 ¢

$

99 ea.

ea.

89

¢

lb.

LIMITED TO STOCK ON HAND • PRICES EFFECTIVE 7 FULL DAYSlb. FROM OCTOBER 27TH THROUGH NOVEMBER 2ND

59

79 ¢

ea.

after

No Surgery. No Downtime. Look and Feel Beautiful! for more information and videos visit

216 W. Pueblo St. Ste A www.fabulouslegs.com Santa Barbara THE INDEPENDENT

JANUARY 19, 2017

independent.com

89 ¢

59 ¢

lb.

Now featuring fresh bread daily from 79 Jan 28/29 Now featuring fresh bread daily from La Bella Rosa Bakery La Bella Rosa Bakery

Varicose vein ea. treatments, Now featuring fresh bread daily from spider vein La Bella Rosa Bakery LIMITED TO STOCK ON HAND • PRICES EFFECTIVE 7 FULL DAYS treatments, PrP LIMITED TO STOCK ON HAND • PRICES EFFECTIVE 7 FULL DAYS FROM OCTOBER 27TH THROUGH NOVEMBER 2ND OCTOBER 27TH THROUGH NOVEMBER 2ND FROM skin rejuvenation, dermapen, Botox, and more ¢

805-845-2500

59 ¢

Now featuring lb. fresh bread daily from La Bella Rosa Bakery ¢

¢ lb. call today For your consultation

Before

GOLETA 5757 Hollister Ave

lb.¢

lb.

¢

5949 891¢¢ 79 ¢

89

FROM OCTOBER 27TH THROUGH NOVEMBER 2ND ¢ Any aesthetic treatment, including sclerotherapy

44

59 ¢

ea.

lb.

Now featuring fresh daily breadfrom daily from Now featuring fresh bread lb. LaRosa BellaBakery Rosa ¢ Bakery La Bella

bread daily from sa Bakery

GO 5757 Ho

lb.

¢ 59apples ¢ ¢ $ 99 59 59 69¢ 1lb.

lb.

El Pato

nectars

¢

¢

ea.

ea.

lb.

¢

99

¢ 89 $1.98

59 lb. ¢ $2.98 ¢

butter 1#

49 59¢ ¢

$2.49 1 lb.69 ¢ $

lb.

69

lb.

Mangos

pork choriZo

¢ lb. $1.98

ea.

89 89

Santa Cruz

spare ribs

1 99$ 1 99

69¢ lb.¢

lb.

lb.

89

$

roMa ea. toMatoes

¢

324 W. Montecito St

Springfield

lb.

lb.

GOLETA SANTA BARBARA www.santacruzmarkets.com 324 W. Montecito St5757 Hollister Ave

$ Whole

¢

GOLETA 5757 Hollister Ave

¢ ¢ 49 49 Locally Owned and Operated

49 ¢

BARBARA Montecito St

9

GOLETA GOLETA Ave Hollister Ave 5757 Hollister5757

SANTA BARBARA GOLETA SANTA BARBARA 324 W. Ave 5757 324 W.Hollister Montecito St Montecito St

79 ¢

ea.

Moving to 3rd weekend in waiting period

Stay Tuned! for updates! LIMITED TO STOCKRinconclassic.com ON HAND • PRICES EFFECTIVE 7 FULL DAYS FROM OCTOBER 27TH THROUGH NOVEMBER 2ND

SURF HAPPENS SANTA BARBARA’S PREMIER SURF SCHOOL


Dickson hn Jo

Super CuCaS

AURA ST N E

john dickson

The R

Voted Santa BarBara’S BeSt

Burrito 23 yearS

in a row!

T

GUY • b y

BreakfaSt

every day!

Burrito $549

w/ Lunch! ive Free Sodans) ce e R ts n e d tu tio igh School S na & Mesa Loca

H

SHELLFISH IN STYLE: Off the Biltmore’s lobby, lit with glowing Italian onyx and massive hand-blown glass chandeliers, Ty Lounge invites guests to enjoy signature drinks and classic cocktails.

at Four seasons the biltmore

F

ollowing his recent appointment, Executive

Readers Laura and Annie let me know that American Ale, which opened in May 2013 at 14 East Cota Street, has closed and that the owners will soon replace it with a new eatery named Foxtail Restaurant. American Ale 02 is still open at 214 State Street (formerly Union Ale). AHI SUSHI TO BECOME SUN SUSHI: Ahi

Sushi at 3631 State Street closed its doors on November 6, 2016, with plans to reopen under new ownership after a remodel. Reader Foodie Dan tells me that the new restaurant will be named Sun Sushi. PALOMA UPDATE: Readers sent me emails

about Paloma Restaurant & Tequila Bar at 5764 Calle Real in Goleta. I am told that a sign on the door says they are closed for kitchen remodeling, but many readers tell me that the location is closed permanently and has been sold to Los Arroyos. Your call. ISLA VISTA UPDATE: I recently wandered into Isla Vista and discovered a few things:

• HiWi Tropical Fusion restaurant coming to 6555 Pardall Road in Isla Vista had a one-day trial opening recently with free samples and should open full-time any day now. HiWi is a professional operation, with seasoned management and a brand-new building that was constructed

restaurants that are coming to the South Coast, including Luna Grill (3925 State Street), Cajun Kitchen (6025 Calle Real, Goleta), Kyle’s Kitchen (7060 Hollister Avenue, Goleta), and Sharkey’s Woodfired Mexican Grill (7000 Hollister Avenue, Goleta). Of the four, only Cajun Kitchen appears to have started construction, and it appears that they have a long way to go. FOOD LIAISON UPDATE: Reader Annie says

that The Food Liaison at 1033 Casitas Pass Road in Carpinteria is temporarily closed for an expansion/remodel. They are expanding into the space next door. I am told that the tentative reopening date is January 30.

• Wine Guide

AMERICAN ALE TO BECOME FOXTAIL:

UNDER CONSTRUCTION: I visited a few

Dining Out Guide

Chef Marco Fossati has introduced an allnew mussel menu at Ty Lounge on Tuesdays and Wednesdays from 3-10 p.m. Ty Lounge is located in the Four Seasons Resort The Biltmore, 1260 Channel Drive in Montecito. The menu offers variations of seasoned mussels served in cast-iron bowls. Highlights include The Belgium (steamed Belgium ale, Dijon mustard, shallots, and herbs) and the Thai (lemongrass, wine, coconut milk, and red chili), both served with grilled country bread. One order serves two people and costs $38. My wife and I dined at Ty Lounge just before Christmas and thoroughly enjoyed the Belgium and Thai, each served steaming hot in a bowl with a side of fries.

from the ground up. HiWi has one of the largest dining patios in Isla Vista. • OTaco, which opened at 6530 Pardall Road in Isla Vista in April 2015, has closed and another restaurant, which I know nothing about, is preparing to take its place. Since I started this column, 6530 Pardall Road has been the home of OTaco, Angry Wings, Chino’s Rock & Tacos, Eclectic I.V., China Garden, and Kung Pao Kitchen. • Sources tell me that an unnamed poké restaurant is coming to 901 Embarcadero del Mar, the former home of Jimmy John’s.

$5.49

Food & drink •

mussel madness

Micheltore

(Mon-Fri Only -

pm & 3am!

itos Between 10

eakfast Burr Happy Hour Br

ly)

(IV Location On

6

daily

$

lunch

specials

99

2030 Cliff Dr, Mesa Daily 7am–10pm 966-3863 626 W. Micheltorena, SB Daily 6am–10pm 962-4028 6527 Madrid Rd, IV Thurs-Sat 24 hrs/Sun-Wed 7am-3am 770-3806

WEEKLY SPECIALS

With this coupon. Expires 1/25/17.

10% OFF

excluding specials IN STORE ONLY

Ahi Tuna — $14.95 lb Local Ridgeback Shrimp — $6.95 lb Cooked Dungeness Crab — $9.95 lb

117 Harbor Way, Suite A, Santa Barbara, CA 93109 | ph. 805.965.9564 | www.sbfish.com

SANTA YNEZ VALLEY RESTAURANT WEEK:

Known increasingly for its culinary creations as much as its world-class wines, Santa Ynez Valley Restaurant Week returns for a seventh consecutive year on January 22-28, offering foodies an opportunity to enjoy three-course tasting menus for $20.17. Representing each of the Santa Ynez Valley’s six distinct communities, two dozen restaurants — from emerging establishments to longtime favorites—will participate this year. Additionally, select Santa Ynez Valley wineries will offer wine and small-bite pairings in their tasting rooms for $20.17, and special lodging deals are available at numerous hoteliers. Santa Ynez Valley Restaurant Week menus do not include tax, tip, or beverages, and reservations are encouraged. Visit dinesyv.com.

John Dickson’s reporting can be found every day online at SantaBarbara.com. Send tips to info@SantaBarbara.com.

SANTA BARBARA RAPE CRISIS CENTER

INTRODUCING:

FAMILY STYLE PASTA BOWLS,

CENTRO CONTRA LA VIOLACION SEXUAL

24-Hour Hotline: (805) 564-3696 www.sbrapecrisiscenter.org

COME SHARE OUR PASTA DISHES WITH FRIENDS AND FAMILY ANY DAY OF THE WEEK!

HAPPY HOUR M-F 3-5PM HALF PRICE PIZZA, HOUSE WINE & BEER

OPEN EVERYDAY 11 AM TO CLOSE 436 STATE ST. 805.957.4177

more than rape, not only crisis independent.com

JANUARY 19, 2017

bucatini.com

THE INDEPENDENT

45


GRANADASB.ORG

805.899.2222 U P C O M I N G

P E R F O R M A N C E S

UCSB ARTS & LECTURES

UCSB ARTS & LECTURES

BILL T. JONES/ARNIE ZANE COMPANY

JOSHUA BELL & SAM HAYWOOD

FRI JAN 20 8PM

TUE JAN 31 7PM

MATURE CONTENT

UCSB ARTS & LECTURES

UCSB ARTS & LECTURES

GARRISON KEILLOR

CANADA’S BALLET BC

SUN JAN 22 3PM

FRI FEB 3 8PM

UCSB ARTS & LECTURES

UCSB ARTS & LECTURES

ITZHAK PERLMAN

THE 7 FINGERS OF THE HAND

MON JAN 23 7PM

MON FEB 6 7PM

NEDERLANDER PRESENTS

CAMA SERIES

GREGORY PORTER

BRUCKNER ORCHESTRA LINZ

TUE JAN 24 8PM

TUE FEB 7 8PM

SANTA BARBARA SYMPHONY

SANTA BARBARA SYMPHONY

DISNEY FANTASIA LIVE IN CONCERT

ICONIC SCHUBERT & COPLAND

SAT JAN 28 8PM SUN JAN 29 3PM

SAT FEB 11 8PM SUN FEB 12 3PM

T H E

G R A N A D A

T H E AT R E

F I L M

CINE EN DOMINGO

ELMER BERNSTEIN MEMORIAL FILM SERIES

42

ESCUELA DE VAGABUNDOS

THE TEN COMMANDMENTS

SUN MAR 12 3PM

MON APR 10 7PM

MOVIES THAT MATTER WITH HAL CONKLIN

ELMER BERNSTEIN MEMORIAL FILM SERIES

MOVIES THAT MATTER WITH HAL CONKLIN

FOR GREATER GLORY

FAR FROM HEAVEN

AMISTAD

MON MAR 6 7PM

MON MAR 13 7PM

MON FEB 20 7PM

1214 State Street Santa Barbara, CA 93101 Granada Theatre Concert Series & Film Series sponsored by 46

S E R I E S

MOVIES THAT MATTER WITH HAL CONKLIN

THE INDEPENDENT

JANUARY 19, 2017

independent.com

MON APR 17 7PM

Donor parking provided by


email: arts@independent.com

canTor mark childs celeBrates 25 Years

Bill T. jones makes dances of chances perhaps most memorably in the piece “Indeterminacy,” a work of 91-minute stories interwoven with chance musical scores. Jones’s choreography is also orchestrated by the unknown and the unplanned, with randomized and disparate elements creating compositions that are part poetry, part performance art, as he asks the audience to connect the threads of story with the movements of dance. The recipient of a MacArthur “Genius” Award, Kennedy Center Honors, and two Tonys, Jones will lend insights to his craft at a community dance class on Thursday, January 19, at the SBCC Dance Studio (PE 113). Take a chance, and see where the unknown takes you. For more information, visit artsandlectures.sa.ucsb.edu or sbccdance.com. — RD ucsb arts & Lectures

On Friday, January 20, at the Granada Theatre (1214 Bill T. Jones State St.), renowned choreographer and storyteller Bill T. Jones and Arnie Zane Company will ask you to take a chance with the art of dance. In Story/Time, Jones takes a cue from composers such as John Cage as he plays with themes of time and fate, creating an unpredictable composition of dance, music, and 70 of his own stories, arranged entirely afresh at every performance by chance procedure. Reciting one-minute, largely autobiographical stories culled from his family’s traditions, Jones melds the homey with the avant-garde, as his narratives are bound only by interpretive dancers who are unbounded by strict structure or choreography. Jones shares philosophies with mid-century modernists like Cage, who used principles of change and I Ching numeration to compose his works,

l i f e page 47 courtesy photos

o Congregation B’nai B’rith Cantor Mark Childs, there are four m’s that characterize spiritual Jewish music and its power “to create holy moments.” There’s meeting, in the way it brings people together; there’s meditation, in its ability to cause the listener to pause and reflect; there’s the memory it brings, of family traditions and more ancient ones; and there’s a majesty, a power to “move the soul to perceive a greatness beyond itself.” This year marks Childs’s 25th as cantor to the B’nai B’rith congregation, and it comes just as the temple celebrates 90 years of serving Santa Barbara’s Jewish community. Childs’s years as cantor and the B’nai B’rith’s anniversary will be jointly celebrated MUSIC MAN: Over his 25 years at Congregation B’nai B’rith, Cantor Mark Childs has used music to sanctify the at the upcoming Dreamers Ball at the passage of time, from births to bar and bat mitzvahs and weddings. Bacara Resort & Spa on Sunday, January 22. warm person.” Role models like these, he between the ancient musical traditions of Whether aiding transitioning teens said, guided him along his path. He studied chanting Old Testament prayers while being with Torah cantillations or helping a per- sacred music for five years at Hebrew Union inclusive toward contemporary Jewish son through mourning, Childs has aided College, and after receiving a variety of offers music. The music serves, in a way, to chalhis congregation in meeting one another as from synagogues, he found the right one in lenge the worshippers as they give voice to they meet challenges in life. He has orches- Congregation B’nai B’rith. ancient words with new breath. “The end He knew right away it was a special place, goal is a dialogue with God, for getting peotrated meditative sessions, forged celebratory memories, and given the faithful in he said. He didn’t anticipate staying for as ple to struggle with their relationship with the temple a musical route to encounter- long as he did, but through the temple he God. … We tend not to serve spirituality on ing a sense of majesty. “Twenty-five years met his wife, Shari, and started a family, just a platter,” he said. Childs is especially proud of the ways he is considered one generation of time, and as his role “was growing, my family was for me it’s true,” Childs told me. “The kids growing, and there was mutual fulfillment has bridged the congregation’s presence in who were born when I first got here, and we and growth.” He’s seen the congregation the community with those of other faiths. celebrated them coming into the world, I’m through times thick and thin and through “Interfaith dialogue is really important to now celebrating their weddings and their many changes, stresses, and periods of me,” he said of his work with the Interfaith first children. It’s so gratifying.” growth. One of the “greatest joys,” he says, Initiative of S.B. County and with many Childs grew up attending a liberal con- is working with Rabbi Steve Cohen.“There’s choirs around town. gregation in Pittsburgh and remembers respect between us, there’s mutual learning In the coming years, Childs looks forbeing “mesmerized by the sound of the between us, and genuine friendship and ward to using a recent grant to commission organ and the sound of the cantor.” With warmth between us, and that’s kind of rare,” new works by “the best Jewish composthat memory in his ears and a love of the Childs said. ers to create music for the synagogue and Steelers still in his heart, Childs and his famPicking music can be a challenge, as impact the world,” including a new piece to ily moved to Toronto, where he met another Childs must make a repertoire that’s appeal- be debuted at the Bacara on Sunday. Locally inspirational cantor at his synagogue there ing to all ages and multiple generations. A and far and wide, Childs has certainly made — “an amazing artist and a wonderful, typical service means striking a balance an impact. L’chaim! — Richie DeMaria

Jay Farbman

T

B’nai B’rith cantor reflects on two t decades of service

GhosTliGhT ProjecT illuminaT llumina es arT in TrumP era lluminaT

To make a difference, artists and performers must respond to the times in which they live. Given the events of recent months, and in anticipation of the inauguration of President-elect Donald Trump on Friday, actors, musicians, and their supporters will be gathering outside theaters all over the country on Thursday, January 19, a day before the inauguration, for a collective action: the Ghostlight Project. A ghostlight is left on when a theater is empty. It’s a practical safety measure designed to prevent accidents, and it’s a handy metaphor for the intention to keep art alive. The instructions for the Ghostlight Project are simple. At 5:30 p.m. on Thursday in each of the U.S. time zones, groups stationed outside of theaters will be turning on flashlights and holding up cell phones to symbolize their collective intention to shine a light of inclusion, safety, and freedom of expression for the next four years and beyond. Once these torches are lit, there will be a short proclamation to that effect, a song, and the opportunity for participants to inscribe a personal pledge for the project so that they can share and reflect on the many constructive ways in which creative people intend to connect their work and their lives to this moment in history. In S.B., the location is the terrace in front of the Lobero Theatre, and if you’d like to participate, please get there early, and come with a small flashlight. Although the Ghostlight Project is not affiliated with the Lobero’s Ghostlight Society, the Lobero graciously offered the terrace as a public meeting place. Lobero Director David Asbell adds that tonight’s event is something that “the Lobero is happy to do for the performing arts community, and would do for any group of performers who asked, regardless of affiliation.” The Ghostlight Project meets at 5:20 p.m. on Thursday, January 19, at the Lobero Theatre (33 E. Canon Perdido St.). For more information, visit theghost lightproject.com. —Charles Donelan

m o r e a r t s & e n t e r ta i n m e n t > > > independent.com

JANUARY 19, 2017

THE INDEPENDENT

47


WE Thi EkE S ND

Caminos Flamencos Presents

“Fin de Fiesta”

!

Sunday, January 22, 7:30pm at The New Vic Theatre

Featuring

Andres Peña, Dancer from Spain

Manuel Malena and Jose Cortes, Singers from Spain Emmy Award-winning Dancer/Director Yaelisa Jason McGuire “El Rubio,” Guitar A Cast of 9 of the Finest Flamenco Artists

Tickets:

(805) 965-5400 • Reserved Seating ensembletheatre.com/rental-shows/index

FREE CLEANING EXAM, DIGITAL X-RAYS, & FLUORIDE

For Kids! 1/19 - 8:00

Violet Flame karen lytle

Call TODAY

w/ SB MuSic Scene 1/20 - 8:30

king bee 1/21

Roy oRbison comes to life. Dont miss this special performance by Wiley Ray & The Big O Band, a nationally touring musical group paying tribute to one of the greatest singer/songwriters of all time.

PriVate eVent 1/22 - 7:00

rebecca kleinmann trio Featuring FaBiano do naSciMento & julien cantelM 1/23 - 7:30

THIS FRIDAY!

jazz jam w/ jeFF elliott

Thursday, August 18, 2016 1pm-5pm

Appointment ONLY

PARTICIPATING OFFICES:

Solvang 805-688-9999

1/24 - 7:00

kelly rose kellen romano samson 1/25

call club 1/26 - 6:00-8:00

ellis Paul 8:30

The voice remains after the man is gone. Roy Orbison left us with a treasure chest of timeless songs such as Pretty Woman, Crying and many more.

box office 805-963-0761 or lobero.com 48

THE INDEPENDENT

JANUARY 19, 2017

independent.com

the academy

Camarillo 805-987-8782 Ventura 805-643-5026

For our Full lineup, pleaSe viSit

SohoSB.coM 1221 State Street • 962-7776

www.johnsonfamilydental.com


a&e | BOOKS preview

Douglas BriNkley Ponders TrumP Presidential Historian Comes to Town to Talk Environment, Politics by Nick Welsh

N

the way he’s going to play it. So what do you do? You just try to show up and try to get in there with your questions, but meanwhile, just keep digging and following up.

ext Thursday, presidential historian Douglas Brinkley will be in Santa Barbara, ostensibly to describe how U.S. leaders from Teddy Roosevelt to Barack Obama contributed to the National Parks system, a subject about which Brinkley knows well and cares very passionately. He may eventually get around to discussing that topic, but as one of the three best known presidential historians in the country, all anyone wants to hear about is President-elect Donald Trump. Fortunately, that’s a subject about which Brinkley also knows and cares very passionately. I recently got to spend a few minutes on the phone chatting with Brinkley, who has written a new book, Rightful Heritage, detailing Franklin D. Roosevelt’s omnivorous obsession with preserving America’s great open spaces. The subject of that book, somehow, never managed to come up. The following is an edited version of our conversation.

As a historian, how do you react? I’m sad for different reasons. I mean, I really love presidential history, and I feel a lot of traditions are being thrown out the window. Trump doesn’t seem to be that attuned to them because he’s a man of now and the future; he doesn’t really have historical memory. I mean, he admits he doesn’t read books on American history. Harry Truman never went to college, but he was a voracious reader of American history and biography. He certainly turned Russian policy upside down. Well, it’s extraordinary, it’s disappointing, it’s crazy that Russia interfered in our election ... Suddenly, the U.S. and Russia in the 21st century is a big story again. Nobody was talking much about Russia a few years ago, and now it’s everything. FDR loved the Big Three meetings — you know, Roosevelt and Churchill and Stalin during WWII. Trump, I think, likes that idea— idea those larger-than-life, narcissistic leaders, and the idea that they sit in a room and decide the fate of millions of people is very appealing to power mongers. He’s not somebody that enjoys the systems. He’s not a bureaucrat. He’s a deal maker, and he wants to make the deal on the highest level imaginable.

Any immediate thoughts with the inauguration right around the corner? When Franklin Delano Roosevelt [FDR] came in, he wouldn’t even talk to [incumbent president] Herbert Hoover. He denounced Hoover, didn’t want to be seen in the same photo. On the drive to the inaugural in the famous March of 1933 “We have nothing to fear but fear itself” address, Herbert Hoover rode in the car with FDR. But he turned his head away from him and wouldn’t look at FDR or say anything to him. So the prospect of seeing Trump with Hillary Clinton is not as tense in some ways as it was between FDR and Hoover. The point of history is to remind us that our own times are not uniquely oppressive. How much is his election a function of fame and celebrity? The fact of the matter is America is about celebrity. Trump’s been one for decades now and has a brand that he’s built, and there were just enough Americans that bought into it to elect him president. … Trump picks up on the Las Vegas idea in Atlantic City: You may be blue-collar working class, but you too can be rich someday. It’s the opposite of Obama, who was the Horatio Alger story of hard work, and do your homework and work, and be ethical and you’ll rise in America. Trump is about making it big quick. He plays on the fantasy life of certain segments of the population. Is there any broader sense to be made of this election? It’s a global phenomenon. Brexit was a preamble for the Trump election; the European Union is starting to fray. … I think 9/11 and terror attacks in general have created kingdoms of fear in Western Europe and the United States. So Trump is sort of part of a larger global phenomena right now, and it will run its course at some point. Shortly after the election, you were on air with [New Yorker writer] Jeffrey Toobin where you famously told him to take a chill pill, that it wasn’t necessarily the end of the world. When you live in New York and Washington and you’re covering politics as a journalist, every day seems gigantic. But when you look back from the 1,000-year perspective, I have faith in the American economy, American universities, our checks and balances. We’ve seen many dark days in American history, and I think we have to put the Trump victory into perspective and not get unconstructive about it. … I think at the local level there’s still this great American unity. At the same time, our country is divided in a way it hasn’t been since the 1860s. How do you think the story about the Russians spying on him and the dossier with allegations about golden showers played? Walter Cronkite used to say you could make it big in journalism by being the first or you can get it right and have a long career. I think things have sped up a lot, and with so many

How does that translate on a day-to-day to get the trains running on time? Not well. It’s going to create wild confusion. What America stands for, what are we doing in the world? Are we backing NATO? Are we not? It’s going to give all sorts of missed signals to our friends and allies.

You can’t let Donald Trump ‘ get in your head. You just have to stick to

trying to report the facts. It’s all about news and truth, not about Trump. You just can’t let him control your professional or emotional life. —Douglas Brinkley on how the media should cover Trump

different new outlets like BuzzFeed news and others, they want to come first. I’m not sure what’s gained by not hesitating a little bit ’til we get facts down. Anytime a report is not correct, it’s only going to serve Donald Trump’s “fake news” narrative. How should the media respond? You just have to keep digging and keep doing what you’re going to do. … You can’t let Donald Trump get in your head. You just have to stick to trying to report the facts. It’s all about news and truth, not about Trump. You just can’t let him control your professional or emotional life. How would Cronkite have responded? Cronkite had enough gravitas with the American public; by 1981, when he left, there was about a 60-70 percent public approval rating for the media and journalism. It’s down to like 10 percent right now. Why was Walter Cronkite the most trusted man in America and today the media is held in such low esteem? It’s because of the morphing of news and entertainment. We give what Lindsay Lohan does equal footage to our troops in Afghanistan. Cronkite was very worried about that trend. And then Trump has the luxury of calling on Breitbart and on alternative media. “I don’t need to talk to you guys like CNN or MSNBC.” That’s

What do you worry about? I’m concerned that the Trump administration is going to undo climate change. …We just started getting some momentum on the fight on climate change and what it does in the issue of poverty and climate and migrations, dislocations. And we may have an administration that tries to gut all of the climate advancements of the Obama years. So this is not a slight election; this transfer of power from Obama to Trump is quite extreme, and, I mean, you very well could be looking at Donald Trump repealing Obamacare and confusing people on whether they have health care screens covered or not. So far, Trump appears to have defied gravity. You think anything can touch him? Yes. If he fails to deliver manufacturing jobs to the Midwest and the economy goes in the wrong direction. … If the economy goes sideways, then he’s going to be driven out as kind of a fluke moment in American history that historians, when you and I are gone, will be scratching their heads and wondering what the hell Americans were thinking.

4•1•1

Douglas Brinkley will give a talk called Presidents and the National Parks: From Theodore Roosevelt to Barack Obama on Thursday, January 26, 7:30 p.m., at UCSB’s Campbell Hall. Call 893-3535 or see artsandlectures.sa.ucsb. edu.

independent.com

JANUARY 19, 2017

THE INDEPENDENT

49


50

THE INDEPENDENT

JANUARY 19, 2017

independent.com


a&e | THEATER PREVIEW

WORLD MUSIC E

"

S

R

I

E

WINTER 2017

S

"

courtesy a prarie home companion

The UCSB MultiCultural Center and the Ethnomusicology Program in the Department of Music Present

Wednesdays, Noon, Free in the Music Department’s outdoor Music Bowl Held in Music Room 1145 in case of rain.

JAN. 18TH UCSB JAZZ ENSEMBLE JAN. 25TH AFRO-CUBAN MUSIC WITH MIGUELITO Y GRUPO MAFEREFUN FEB. 1ST DIA DE LA CANDELARIA: MUSIC FROM MEXICO FEB. 8TH UCSB BRASS ENSEMBLES PRESENT… FEB. 15TH A CENTURY OF SONG, STILL GOING STRONG : CHARLIE KING & BEV GRANT

Garrison Keillor

Garrison Keillor Comes to town

FEB. 22ND CELTIC MUSIC WITH THREE FOR JOY MAR. 1ST GAMELAN MUSIC FROM INDONESIA MAR. 8TH UCSB GOSPEL CHOIR

W

hat a difference a day can make.As of Novem- he did was so startling, the sort of playground cruelty ber 7, 2016, Garrison Keillor’s distinctive I remember from the ’50s, so odd for a 70-year-old voice, as instantly recognizable on the page multibillionaire. In my grade school, there were several as on the air, retained its signature avuncular children who were easy targets … and the memory of warmth, despite increasingly political subject matter them is painful because even though I was brought up occasioned by the presidential election. By November by good Christian people, I did not leap to the defense 8, 2016, what had been cozy and of these kids. … In childhood, a familiar for decades took on a new person learns empathy from reading emphasis, not because Keillor had imaginative literature — The Ugly changed his tune, but because the Duckling, Black Beauty, The Diary world had shifted around him. Years of Anne Frank, and so on. A child of of the drip-drip erosion of rational privilege, such as Trump, may never standards for political discourse had develop this quality: For him, it’s all finally yielded to an all-out flood about winning. In my line of work, of posturing, fabrication, and lies, you deal with the fact that though leaving the majority of voters feelcomedy involves a degree of cruelty, ing soaked. Since then, primarily the audience does not laugh when a by Charles Donelan through his newspaper columns, certain line is crossed and they feel Keillor has emerged as one of the that the weak and vulnerable are most trenchant critics of the president-elect, indicting being targeted. An audience can go cold very quickly his behavior on the grounds of common decency and in that case. If I make fun of the privileged, tone-deaf, doing so in the simple, straightforward language of his illiterate tycoon, that is cool, but if I make fun of his supporters, that’s different. beloved Midwest. When he comes to town on Sunday, January 22, Keillor will do so as a prime example of the loyal opposi- You recently handed over A Prairie Home Companion to Chris tion, as in those who pledge themselves to resisting the Thile. How are you feeling about that transition? I miss majority in power while at the same time supporting doing the show, and so I find it eases the loss if I don’t the fundamental principles of the government to which listen to the Thile show. But I hear good things about it, that majority has been elected. With a commitment to and I wish him well. I’m working through the transition political satire that extends back to his 1999 novel, Me by by keeping busy. Screenplay, memoir, weekly column, Jimmy (Big Boy) Valente, a takedown of then Minnesota touring, and working on a musical. A man with a warm governor Jesse Ventura, Keillor has thought long and laptop. hard about what to say about a hyped-up, thin-skinned, self-absorbed con man who holds high political office. Apart from all the overtly offensive remarks Trump and his In the following email conversation with Keillor followers have been making in public over the last year or last week, I heard America singing, and it sounded like so, there’s the phenomenon of the so-called “dog whistle” early Elvis Presley. What follows is a transcript of that phrases. Should there be dog whistle phrases for the rest of us? We’re on the outs for the next couple years. Amazexchange. ing, that so few people in Michigan, Pennsylvania, and In your November 9, 2016, Washington Post column titled Wisconsin carry so much power, but they do. I feel a “Trump voters will not like what happens next,” you quoted strong division between left and right in my own family Elvis Presley singing, “Don’t be cruel.” This seems like a funda- —the Trump voters have clammed up about it, don’t mental principle of morality. Could you say a little more on this want to explain themselves, are avoiding the rest of us. I subject? Elvis sang,“Don’t be cruel to a heart that’s true,” think they find him embarrassing and can’t admit it. So and I was proud of Meryl Streep for pointing out again we have to help our friends and allies who feel desperthe terribly indicative moment of Trump mocking and ate right now, and we can do that openly. No need for miming the handicapped reporter for the Times. What dog whistles.

Former

‘Prairie Home ComPanion’ tells stories, speaks truth to power

For more information or assistance in accommodating people of varying abilities, contact the MultiCultural Center at (805) 893-8411.

Live Music

Thurs 1/19 8:30pm ventucky Fri 1/20 8:30pm u Geyser Grate

Sat 1/21 8:45pm Beer! Food! Fun! little biG here sbbrewhouse.com truckinG in from ojai 229 W. Montecito St. 805-884-4664

Santa Barbara Greenland Deliveries

4•1•1

UCSB Arts & Lectures presents “An Afternoon with Garrison Keillor” on Sunday, January 22, at 3 p.m., at the Granada Theatre (1214 State St.). Call 893-3535 or visit artsandlectures.sa.ucsb.edu. For the full interview, see independent.com/garrisonkeillor.

805-570-4886

Wellness brought to your door. For info: www.sbgreenlanddeliveries.com

Qualified medical cannabis recommendation required. independent.com

JANUARY 19, 2017

THE INDEPENDENT

51


ON SALE

F RAT I1D1aAmY

TICKETS AVAILABLE: SB BOWL OR AT AXS.COM / SBBOWL.COM / GOLDENVOICE.COM 52

THE INDEPENDENT

JANUARY 19, 2017

independent.com


a&e | POP, ROCK & JAZZ PREVIEWs shawn peters

GreGory Porter

Brings Take Me To The alley To s.B.

G

etting a Best Jazz Vocalist Grammy nomination never gets old for Gregory Porter. “You can’t line these things up and expect them to happen,” he said of his good fortune. “When they do happen, it’s amazing.” The singer/composer — who won 2014’s Grammy for Best Jazz Vocal Album for Liquid Spirit (2013) —plays the Granada on January 24 in support of his fourth record, Take Me to the Alley. The lyrics on Alley explore navigating romantic relationships: The hard gospel of “Don’t Be a Fool” presents a remorseful cheater dispensing advice to the listener after faking love to the woman who truly loves him. Other songs also revolve around the concept of reappreciating one’s partner. Porter admitted that his lyrics are inspired by his own life but that he “sometimes [switches] the roles to protect the innocent.” Alley possesses many aural pleasures, too, such as when his commanding baritone pounces ahead of his band on “Don’t Lose Your Steam.”“In Fashion” obsesses about a chic lady over a “Bennie and the Jets”–style sonic spine. Born in Sacramento and raised in Bakersfield and Los Angeles, Porter picked up the sax after a shoulder injury curtailed his lineman stint for the San Diego State University Aztecs. Still, Porter emphasized that music has always been in his soul. “Sometimes I was singing in the locker room,” he said. Music also gave him solace as his mother died of cancer when he was 21. Porter’s song “In Heaven” includes “elements from one of my mother’s sermons in the style of that Pentecostal church experience.”

Gregory Porter

Certainly, Alley provides a diversity of stylings. “I’m all over the map,” Porter said of the record. “Some is bebop, some ’70s spiritual era. Hard bop energy definitely fuels “Fan the Flames” and the rollicking “French African Queen.” And while, as expected, New York and San Francisco have been receptive live, he’s also discovered “pockets of love” in unlikely places such as Texas and Iowa.“I have to stop underestimating myself or where the music is finding ears.” he said. And while, at 45, Porter may appear too young to embrace jazz, he scoffs at any notion that the genre is dated.“Jazz is a living music,” Porter said.“The current story has to be told.” Gregory Porter plays Tuesday, January 24, 8 p.m., at the Granada Theatre (1214 State St.). Call 899-2222 or see granadasb.org. For a longer version of this article, visit independent.com/greg oryporter —Michael Aushenker

Switchfoot Plays The arlingTon

S

witchfoot: one word, two definitions.

For most, the term refers to a rock band that just released its 10th album, Where the Light Shines Through (July 2016). But for others, the word means changing footing on a surfboard to get a new perspective. The aforementioned rock band—which was formed in 1996 by brothers Jon and Tim Foreman and drummer Chad Butler and is perhaps best known for its hit “Dare You to Move”—fully embraces the dictionary definition as part Switchfoot of its namesake. The members are surfers themselves, and much of their music is about inspiring hope, which can come with a simple shift in to real life and regardless of people’s backgrounds or viewpoint. On tour for Where the Light Shines Through, beliefs. I think the great thing about our audience is the band will be performing at the Arlington on January [when] I look out and see people of all ethnicities, all 26. I recently spoke with Butler about their music career faiths, all different beliefs singing the same song. That’s and the bandmates’ unbreakable bond. the power of music. Does playing live ever get repetitive? How do you keep the shows fun? We never play the same set twice. Even when we write out a set list, it always changes during the show depending on the energy in the room and how we’re feeling. We have to keep it interesting for ourselves first, to really push ourselves and keep it fresh. I think that’s one of our strengths, that each night is unique. It’s not all about the band; it’s a two-way conversation with the audience. I grew up listening to your music at church. How do you appeal to audiences who may not identify with Christianity? We’ve always just tried to make honest music that relates

TICKETS AVAILABLE: SB BOWL OR AT AXS.COM / SBBOWL.COM / GOLDENVOICE.COM

What do you want people to take away from your music? Hope … The title track of the record is “Where the Light Shines Through,” and here in our country, that’s been something important to find. We live in turbulent times, and everybody is looking for hope. I am just thankful through music we are able to explore the world together and shine a light in dark places. Switchfoot plays with Relient K on Thursday, January 26, at 7 p.m. at the Arlington Theatre (1317 State St.). Call 963-4408 or see thearlingtontheatre.com. For the full interview, see independent.com/switchfoot. —Savanna Mesch

TICKETS: ARLINGTON THEATRE / WALMART / CHARGE BY PHONE 805-963-4408 TICKETMASTER.COM / THEARLINGTONTHEATRE.COM

independent.com

JANUARY 19, 2017

THE INDEPENDENT

53


Richie DemaRia

& entertainment

reviews 

“One of the top ranked young violinists in the U.S.” – Maestro Ohyama

THE GREATS

Headless Household

PoP, Rock & Jazz

HeadLess HouseHoLd

Tuesday, January 24, 2017 / Lobero Theatre 5:30 pm, Supper Club / 7:30 pm, Concert Heiichiro Ohyama, Conductor / Paul Huang, Violin

H

eadless Household’s greatest strength — their versatility— versatility is also their greatest weakness. The many-headed experimental jazz outfit helmed by the brilliant writer-musician Joe Woodard played SOhO At SOhO Restaurant on Wednesday, January & Music Club, Wed., Jan. 11. 11, showcasing abundant talents with an alternatively pleasing and perplexing set that was sometimes spot-on and other

PROGRAM:

Beethoven’s Violin Concerto / Schubert’s “The Great” HAILED BY THE NEW YORK TIMES as a “rising artist” and lauded by The Strad magazine for his “stylish and polished playing,” Paul Huang will showcase his immense talent in a performance of Beethoven’s expansive and groundbreaking Violin Concerto in D. Also featured: Franz Schubert’s much-loved and majestic “Great” Symphony.

Programs and Artists Subject to Change.

2017 SEASON

Christopher Pilafian, Artistic Director

SANTA BARBARA DANCE THEATER Final weekend

Anima and Animus

paul wellman

Gavin deGraw

CONCERT: $50 – $60 SUPPER CLUB: $50 featuring Via Maestra 42 & Pence Ranch Call 805-966-2441 or 805-963-0761 for tickets. Visit us online at sbco.org. Discount Code SBIND 10% (concert only) PHOTO: MARCO BORGGREVE

times a case of too many cooks. Songs such as “How the Mighty Folly” brought forth saxophonist Tom Buckner’s excellent soloing, while “I Love You, Too” showed Woodard and Nicole Lvoff ’s dark-horse pop writing skills. Other pieces, however, such as the rock-tinged “Hotel Cozy,” were somewhat meandering and inchoate, and in ways the group’s free-form mission came off as disorganized. Intentionally undefined though they are, with a more anchored focus, they could shine all the brighter. — Richie DeMaria

L

ights beamed across the sky, drawing attention to the Kids Helping Kids benefit concert at the Granada Theatre Saturday, January 14. Doors opened at 7:15 p.m., and more than 1,500 fans filed in, eager to see the multiplatinum singer/ songwriter Gavin DeGraw. Internationally acclaimed band Parachute opened the evening, playing a lineup that included “She Is Love,” “Can’t Help,” and “Kiss Me Slowly.” Next up was headliner DeGraw, who kicked off his set with his hit song “Chariot,” which elicited loud approval from the audience. DeGraw’s performance was lively, Presented by Kids joyous, and satisfying Helping Kids. At the and brought people to Granada Theatre, their feet, singing and Sat., Jan. 14. dancing to the beat. Twice during the evening, members of Kids Helping Kids collected donations from the audience; envelopes of money were

Gavin DeGraw

being waved in the air from every inch of the theater in support of the organization. Kids Helping Kids is composed of students in the advanced-placement economics classes at San Marcos High School. They raise money through fundraisers and galas to support kids locally and globally. — Julia Pizza

books

doG TraininG THe american maLe

January 13 - 22, 2017 Hatlen Theater Tickets: theaterdance.ucsb.edu 54

THE INDEPENDENT

JANUARY 19, 2017

independent.com

Photo: ©2016 Phil Channing Painting: Night Venus © Mary Heebner

i

f you are in need of a good laugh (and who isn’t these days?), writer L.A. Knight’s most recent book, Dog Training the American Male,, should do the trick. In Dog Training Training,, Knight, akaa Steve Alten, author of 15 thrillthrill ers — his book Meg is being made into a movie in 2018 starring Jason Statham— shines a spotlight on the Statham pursuit of romance’s most fascinating parts … quite literally. Nancy Beach, PhD, is a relationship counselor with a dull and failing radio show who, like all the other characters, is lonely, seriously maladjusted, in crisis, and in a fever

of continual lust. Add dogs to the plot, and midway through the book it’s clear just how literal the title is. In their goal to train the men in their lives, Nancy and her friends Ruby, a surgically voluptuous woman on the make; Helen, who is married to a gynecologist who takes his work too seriously; and their frustrated female cohorts will go to any length to get their men to stop being the clueless slobs they are and shape up. Suf Suffice it to say that prong collars are involved.


makes the other tick, yet somehow in the & entertainment end they make it work. Dog Training is guaranteed to get your mind off politics, annoying relatives, unappreciative children, and your cat clawing its way up your sofa. It’s a little holiday of fascinated horror and hilarity that will leave you feeling well adjusted by comparison to the characters. —Carol Douglass

reviews 

To read some of Knight’s detailed descriptions requires a love of the revolting: Two of the characters in the book are a raunchy and libidinous couple, and some of the others are getting tucks and tightening procedures one hopes don’t actually exist. Still, the book isn’t entirely about sex — men’s slovenliness and their refusal to put the toilet seat down, as well as women’s raging PMS and insistence on order, also get fair play. The bottom line is that neither gender has a clue about what

Presidents and the National Parks From Theodore Roosevelt to Barack Obama

Douglas Brinkley Thu, Jan 26 / 7:30 PM / UCSB Campbell Hall $20 / FREE for all students (with valid ID)

Pom’s odyssey

i

n the 1960s, Australia needed immigrants, so the Australian government targeted other English-speaking nations, such as Britain, with an advertising campaign to entice people to move Down Under. The price was reasonreason able: 10 pounds. Longtime Santa Barbara resident John C. Holman was a teenager living with his family on a farm in Sus-sex when he decided to join what would become the largest planned migration of the 20th century. Facing limited prospects at home and filled with a young man’s sense of wanderlust, Holman boarded the SS AusAus tralis in 1969 for the long ocean voyage that would change the direction of his life.

And fortunate for us that he did, because one result was Pom’s Odyssey, Holman’s delightful memoir of his journey and life in Australia. Part travel travelogue, part coming-of-age saga, and part love story, Holman’s book recounts his experiences with selfdeprecation and wit, from his shock at going ashore in apartheid Cape Town and working as a deckhand on ferry boats in Sydney harbor to the complexities of making an international telephone call in the era before the wireless revolution. Australia was a rough and rugged place back then, and Pom’s Odyssey is shot through with memorable char characters and touching reminiscences. — Brian Tanguay

Described by CNN as “a man who knows more about the presidency than just about any human being alive,” Brinkley will discuss how U.S. presidents have led the crusade to establish National Parks and National Wildlife Refuges. Books will be available for purchase and signing

Presented in collaboration with Channel Islands National Park and the UCSB Natural Reserve System

Supported in part by:

Media Sponsors:

National Parks series sponsored by: Lillian Lovelace, Sara Miller McCune With support from our Community Partner the Orfalea Family

An Evening with the Visionary Creator of the DaviD bazemoRe

dance

Vietnam Veterans Memorial Maya Lin

2016 Presidential Medal of Freedom Recipient

Mon, Jan 30 / 7:30 PM / UCSB Campbell Hall $25 / FREE for UCSB students (with valid ID) “[Maya Lin] has established herself as a model of what architecture can become in the hands of a woman unafraid to pursue a different path.” New York Review of Books

Christopher Pilafian’s “Mystique”

anima and animus

u

sing Carl Jung’s theory of anima and animus (whereby archetypes of the male and female are said to live among all human beings) as a thematic platform, artistic director Christopher Pilafian kicked off Santa Barbara Dance Theater’s 41st season with a widely diverse and timely study of gender roles; how those intentions might play out on the greater stage is what makes each of the four works so relevantly affecting. At UCSB’s Hatlen In Rebecca Lemme’s Theater, Fri., Jan. 13. Shows Jan. 20-22. “Witnesse,” utilitarianism is the protagonist in a piece rife with unencumbered female strength. Army green jackets tug and conform around three dancers locked in a tribal call to arms, bearing the physical and proverbial weight of responsibility. By stark contrast, Brandon Whited and Shelby Lynn Joyce offer up a whisper-light pas de deux in Whited’s

“Petit Pas,” challenging the yin and yang archetype through quietly fluid and wholly interchangeable movement. In Jane Dudley’s “Cante Flamenco” (restaged here by Nancy Colahan), the seasoned confidence of dancer Christina Sanchez devours the stage’s expanse with poignant steps of intention and a piercing stare, paying homage to Spanish Civil War freedom fighter La Pasionaria, to whom the piece was dedicated. In Pilafian’s “Mystique,” members of his newly formed apprentice program rub shoulders with company dancers in a breathtaking centerpiece work that considers the complexity of the female experience. Alluding to the virtuous gesticulating and constrictive expectations of the male gaze (with dancer Nicole Powell serving as the artist’s muse) before breaking open into a convulsive kaleidoscope of independent expression, Pilafian layers objection and empathy to theatrical effect. — Ninette Paloma

Event Sponsors: Martha & John Gabbert The Lynda and Bruce Thematic Learning Initiative: Creative Culture Corporate Season Sponsor:

(805) 893-3535 www.ArtsAndLectures.UCSB.edu independent.com

JANUARY 19, 2017

THE INDEPENDENT

55


CominG Soon

My e b

alentine

V

G i v e away

January 26 to

February 13 presented by:

Voted “Santa Barbara’s Best Wine Shop” for the past eight years

NOW LOCALLY OWNED The largest selection of carefully chosen Santa Barbara County and Central Coast wines in the area

The finest imported wines Best prices in the United from $7.99 - $1200.00 States on cult, premium, and allocated wines

Great selection of craft beers, ciders, Port, and sake

SPECIAL DISCOUNTS ON 6 AND 12 BOTTLE PURCHASES | ASK ABOUT OUR WINE CLUBS! FREE LOCAL DELIVERY WITH MINIMUM PURCHASE

CONVENIENTLY LOCATED IN LA CUMBRE PLAZA • 3849 STATE ST. SUITE 163 • 805 845-5247 56

THE INDEPENDENT

JANUARY 19, 2017

independent.com


RISK TAKER. RULE BREAKER. GAME CHANGER.

a&e | film & TV

Movie Guide PREmiERES A Dog’s Purpose (120 mins., PG) Director Lasse Hallstrom (Chocolat, What’s Eating Gilbert Grape) helms this film based on W. Bruce Cameron’s bestselling novel about a dog who lives several lives, learning from each one. Josh Gad voices the canine in his/her many incarnations, which include a golden retriever, a German shepherd, a corgi, and a Labrador retriever. Dennis Quaid, Britt Robertson, and Peggy Lipton also star. Fairview/Fiesta 5

MICHAEL KEATON GIVES AN IMPOSSIBLE-TO-STOPWATCHING PERFORMANCE.

A TERRIFIC MOVIE.”

(Opens Thu., Jan. 26)

The Founder (116 mins., PG-13) Michael Keaton stars in this biopic about McDonald’s fast-food-chain founder Ray Kroc. Paseo Nuevo Resident Evil: The Final Chapter (106 mins., R) Milla Jovovich reprises her role as Alice, returning to Raccoon City to take down the evil Umbrella Corporation, which is intent on wiping out any remaining survivors of the apocalypse.

Camino Real/Fiesta 5 (Opens Thu., Jan. 26)

The Resurrection of Gavin Stone (92 mins., PG) Brett Dalton (Agents of S.H.I.E.L.D.) stars as a washed-up former child actor who, after doing community service for a megachurch, discovers Christianity in this faith-based film. Fiesta 5

WOW...

-OWEN GLEIBERMAN

Split out the one personality who will release them. Camino Real/Metro 4 xXx: Return of Xander Cage (107 mins., PG-13)

Vin Diesel returns as Xander Cage for this third installment of the action-film franchise. Cage comes out of hiding to retrieve a weapon known as “Pandora’s Box.” Camino Real/Metro 4

NOW SHOWiNG 20th Century Women (118 mins., R) O Dorothea (Annette Bening) is a nononsense single mother intent on seeing the world through her teenage son’s eyes as he tries to solve the mystery of his village full of feisty females, including an artsy boarder (Greta Gerwig), true-blue pal (Elle Fanning), and his mom, the most puzzling of all. The kid is California dreaming, skateboarding down canyon roads, and soaking up free-spirited Santa Barbara, which, according to our hometown boy (writer/director Mike Mills), thrived in the ’70s thanks to the spiky intelligence of intriguing women played so wonderfully by this dream cast. (JK)

Paseo Nuevo

O La La Land

MICHAEL KE ATON

(128 mins., PG-13)

It’s been a long time since I’ve seen a film that had me sitting upright the whole time, amazed at the magic that Hollywood creates, but La La Land did just that. Emma Stone and Ryan Gosling play young artists trying to make it in the entertainment industry; their chemistry is akin to Fred Astaire and Ginger Rogers, including a delightfully enchanting tap dancing scene. Through song, dance, humor, romance, and heartache, the lovers inspire each other to work for their dreams. Yet the film also reminds the audience that fantasy can be just that — things we desire but may never have. (SM)

Camino Real/Paseo Nuevo

FROM THE DIRECTOR OF

B A S E D

THE BLIND SIDE AND SAVING MR. BANKS O N

T H E

T R U E

STARTS FRIDAY, JANUARY 20 AT THEATERS EVERYWHERE CHECK DIRECTORIES FOR SHOWTIMES • NO PASSES ACCEPTED

Information Listed for Friday 1/20 thru Thursday 1/26

877-789-MOVIE

www.metrotheatres.com

 Denotes ‘SPECIAL ENGAGEMENT’ Restrictions Our offices were closed on Monday for MLK holiday and thus we could not make the Independent’s production deadlines with revised showtimes for this directory. For features and showtimes you can always visit: www.metrotheatres.com. Now Showing and Coming Soon film tabs are on the home page, as well as a LOCATION tab at the top of the home page for individual theatres.... We apologize any inconvenience. BELOW: FRIDAY 1/20 - THURSDAY 1/26

FIESTA 5

PASEO NUEVO

Lion

9 1 6 Sta t e St r e e t - S . B .

8 W. De La Guerra Pl. - S.B.

THE RESURRECTION OF GAVIN STONE (PG) LA LA LAND (PG-13) SING (PG) (2D) 20th CENTURY WOMEN (R) HIDDEN FIGURES (PG) PATRIOTS DAY (R) THE BYE BYE MAN (R) MONSTER TRUCKS (PG) (2D)

 THE FOUNDER (R)

Split (117 mins., PG-13) Director M. Night Shyamalan’s latest horror/thriller tells the story of a man with 24 personalities (James McAvoy) who kidnaps three girls and tortures them psychologically as they try to coax

Lion (118 mins., PG-13) Dev Patel (Slumdog Millionaire, The Best Exotic Marigold Hotel) stars as a man who was adopted from Calcutta when he was a boy by an Australian couple and searches to find his birth family.

Plaza de Oro

Hidden Figures (127 mins., PG-13) Taraji P. Henson, Octavia Spencer, and Janelle Monáe star in the film based on the true story of the women who helped NASA launch its first space mission.

Fairview/Fiesta 5

Live by Night (128 mins., R) Ben Affleck stars in and directs this gritty tale of Prohibition Era–gangsters adapted from Dennis Lehane’s novel. Elle Fanning, Sienna Miller, and Brendan Gleeson also star.

Camino Real/Metro 4

O Manchester by the Sea

(137 mins., R)

This poignant film captures raw human emotion in the wake of tragedy. Not only do Casey Affleck and Michelle Williams shine, but breakout actor Lucas Hedges perfectly portrays how difficult is it to deal with the death of a parent during adolescence. Anyone who has experienced the loss of a family member can find solace in the film’s themes of grief, forgiveness, and learning to let go. (SM) Plaza de Oro

Hidden Figures

CAMINO REAL

CAMINO REAL MARKETPLACE Hollister & Storke - GOLETA

 SPLIT (PG-13)  XXX: (PG-13) (2D)

RETURN OF XANDER CAGE

INDEPENDENT Thusday, January 19

The Resurrection of Gavin Stone

The Bye Bye Man (96 mins., PG-13) Three college students living in an offcampus house are preyed upon by the Bye Bye Man in this supernatural horror film. Fiesta 5

S T O R Y

LA LA LAND (PG-13) PATRIOTS DAY (R) ROGUE ONE: (PG-13) (2D) A STAR WARS STORY

MOANA (PG) (2D) LIVE BY NIGHT (R)

FAIRVIEW

2 2 5 N . F a i r v i e w - G o l e ta

HIDDEN FIGURES (PG) SING (PG) (2D) PASSENGERS (PG-13) (2D) MONSTER TRUCKS (PG) (2D)

RIVIERA

ARLINGTON 1317 State Street

ROGUE ONE: (PG-13) (2D) A STAR WARS STORY

METRO 4

6 1 8 Sta t e St r e e t - S . B .

 SPLIT (PG-13)  XXX: (PG-13) (2D)

RETURN OF XANDER CAGE

SILENCE (R) SLEEPLESS (R) LIVE BY NIGHT (R)

PLAZA DE ORO 3 7 1 H i t c h c o c k Wa y - S . B .

2044 Alameda Padre Serra - S.B.

CLOSED FOR RENOVATION

MANCHESTER BY THE SEA (R) LION (PG-13)

 Starts Thursday, January 26 

Dennis Quaid....  A DOG’S PURPOSE (PG) Matthew McConaughey....  GOLD (R) Milla Jovovich....

 RESIDENT EVIL: THE FINAL CHAPTER

Cont’d on p. 59 >>> independent.com

(R)

www.metrotheatres.com

 THE MET Opera 2017  Saturday, January 21 - 9:55 am

Gounod’s...

ROMEO et JULIETTE

Metro 4 - Santa Barbara

Stadium Seating ‘Live’ - An HD Digital Presentation JANUARY 19, 2017

THE INDEPENDENT

57


OPENING NIGHT FILM WED. FEB, 1ST

SAT. FEB, 11

TH

ARLINGTON THEATRE

8:00PM

CLOSING NIGHT FILM

ARLINGTON THEATRE

8:00PM

TICKETS STILL AVAILABLE AT SBIFF.ORG

58

THE INDEPENDENT

JANUARY 19, 2017

independent.com


a&e | film & TV cont’d from p. 57

Passengers Moana (113 mins., PG) Disney’s latest animated feature tells the story of a young girl named Moana, daughter of a chieftain, who sets sail to find the demigod Maui (Dwayne Johnson) to help her unite her people. During their adventure, she meets a giant crab, a lava witch, and various other characters. Camino Real

game-changing originals — so after the Empire really hits its dark-side stride but before the Alliance blows the Death Star to bits. In terms of appeal, the spinoff, directed by Gareth Edwards, hits right in the middle, too. Interstellar dogfights sizzle above deliciously immersive worlds where sassy androids best storm troopers who still can’t shoot worth a damn. Fun homages abound without being overplayed. But Rogue One tries too hard to cement a new cast of gritty yet lovable rebel warriors, throwing out action and one-liners when a couple more moments of meaningful dialogue would have hit much harder. Still, it’s a ride worth taking. (TH)

Sing (108 mins., PG) Koala bear Buster Moon (Matthew McConaughey) owns a theater that has fallen upon financial difficulties thanks to a series of flops he’s produced. In an attempt to raise funds to save the theater, Moon holds a singing competition, which brings unlikely hopefuls to audition. Reese Witherspoon, Scarlett Johansson, Seth MacFarlane, Taron Egerton, and Jennifer Hudson are just a few of the stars who lend their voices to this animated film. Fairview/Fiesta 5

®

Nabucco N V rdi Ve

SUN, JAN 22, 2 PM

Arlington/Camino Real

O Silence

Moana Monster Trucks (104 mins., PG) Eager to escape life in his small town, high school senior Tripp (Lucas Till) builds a monster truck using scrap metal. When he befriends a strange subterranean creature called Creech, Tripp and his unlikely friend find their freedom. Fairview/Fiesta 5 Passengers (116 mins., PG-13) Jennifer Lawrence and Chris Pratt star in this sci-fi romantic thriller about two passengers on the starship Avalon, which is on course for a 120-year journey to a new planet to colonize. Things go awry when Aurora Lane (Lawrence) and Jim Preston (Pratt) wake up from their hibernation pods just 30 years into the trip. Fairview

Roméo et Juliette

(161 mins., R)

What is the difference between a spiritual truth and a cultural imposition, between divine will and individual will, between meaningful and meaningless suffering? These are some of the deep questions posed in Martin Scorsese’s weighty Silence, a cinematic inquisition centered on two Jesuit missionaries, played by Andrew Garfield and Adam Driver, who travel to Japan to earn converts and find their mentor. Richly shot and patiently paced, it’s as slow and stern as a serious sermon but gripping in its telling, rewarding both in the realism of its depiction and the depth of its discourse. It’s a worthy watch for believers, thinkers, and feelers all. (RD)

Metro 4

Gounod

SAT ATT, A T, JAN 21, 9:55 AM SUN, FEB 26, 2 PM

FR E E PA R K IN G

$1 CONCESSIONS

Sing Sleepless (95 mins., R) Jamie Foxx stars as a corrupt Las Vegas policeman whose criminal life is exposed when he steals cocaine from a drug lord, who then kidnaps his son as retribution. Metro 4

Patriots Day (133 mins., R) Mark Wahlberg stars in Peter Berg– directed account of the 2013 Boston Marathon bombing. John Goodman, Kevin Bacon, J.K. Simmons, and Michelle Monaghan also star.

TICKETS

musicacademy.org/metlive

Follow us on

TwiTTer

Camino Real/Paseo Nuevo

O Rogue One: A Star Wars Story (134 mins., PG-13) In terms of the Star Wars timeline, Rogue One falls between the space opera’s disappointing prequels and its

Vittorio Grigolo and Diana Damrau as Roméo and Juliette

HAHN HALL | 1070 Fairway Road Ticket Office open 1 hour prior to screening

@SBindpndnt #sbindy

Sleepless

The above films are playing in Santa Barbara FRIDAY, January 20, through THURSDAY, January 26. Descriptions followed by initials — RD (Richie DeMaria), TH (Tyler Hayden), JK (John Klein), and SM (Savanna Mesch) — have been taken from our critics’ reviews, which can be read in full at independent.com. The symbol O indicates the film is recommended. The symbol indicates a new review. (NOTE: The Riviera Theatre is closed for renovations.) independent.com

JANUARY 19, 2017

THE INDEPENDENT

59


Jan 28/29

Moving to 3rd weekend in waiting period Stay Tuned! Rinconclassic.com for updates!

SURF HAPPENS

G

SANTA BARBARA’S PREMIER SURF SCHOOL

rafty wit C et

Cheer on your favorite entries and see which drink/business is crowned as the “2017 Official Drink of Santa Barbara” at the Live Competition

ThurSDay, January 26, 6-8pm Doors open at 5:30 pm Tickets available at sbindytickets.com

SANTA BARBARA VINTNERS

60

THE INDEPENDENT

JANUARY 19, 2017

independent.com

Photo courtesy of Blake Bronstad

Visit Santa Barbara, along with The Santa Barbara Independent and the Museum of Contemporary Art Santa Barbara, called upon local restaurants, bars, and lounges to develop a new, unique drink that best embodies the spirit of Santa Barbara.


a&e | Rob bRezsny’s fRee will astRology week of januaRy 19 ARIES (Mar. 21-Apr. 19): Are you more attracted to honing group dynamics or liberating group dynamics? Do you have more aptitude as a director who organizes people or as a sparkplug who inspires people? Would you rather be a chief executive officer or a chief imagination officer? Questions like these will be fertile for you to meditate on in the coming weeks. The astrological omens suggest it’s time to explore and activate more of your potential as a leader or catalyst.

TAURUS (Apr. 20-May 20): An eccentric Frenchman named Laurent Aigon grew up near an airport and always daydreamed of becoming a commercial pilot. Sadly, he didn’t do well enough in school to fulfill his wish. Yet he was smart and ambitious enough to accomplish the next best thing: assembling a realistic version of a Boeing 737 cockpit in his home. With the help of Google, he gathered the information he needed, and ordered most of the necessary parts over the Internet. The resulting masterpiece has enabled him to replicate the experiences of being a pilot. It’s such a convincing copy that he has been sought as a consultant by organizations that specialize in aircraft maintenance. I suggest you attempt a comparable feat, Taurus: creating a simulated version of what you want. I bet it will eventually lead you to the real thing.

GEMINI (May 21-June 20): The weather may be inclement where you live, so you may be resistant to my counsel. But I must tell you the meanings of the planetary omens as I understand them, and not fret about whether you’ll act on them. Here’s my prescription, lifted from Henry David Thoreau’s Walden: “We need the tonic of wildness, to wade sometimes in marshes where the bittern and the meadow-hen lurk, and hear the booming of the snipe; to smell the whispering sedge where only some wilder and more solitary fowl builds her nest, and the mink crawls with its belly Homework: What part of yourself are you scared of? Is it time to give that part a peace offering? Testify at FreeWillAstrology.com.

close to the ground.” And why does Thoreau say we need such experiences? “We must be refreshed by the sight of inexhaustible vigor, to witness our own limits transgressed.”

CANCER (June 21-July 22): Welcome to the most deliciously enigmatic, sensually mysterious phase of your astrological cycle. To provide you with the proper nonrational guidance, I have stolen scraps of dusky advice from the poet Dansk Javlarna (danskjavlarna.tumblr .com). Please read between the lines: (1) Navigate the ocean that roars within the seashell. (2) Carry the key, even if the lock has been temporarily lost. (3) Search through the deepest shadows for the bright light that cast them. (4) Delve into the unfathomable in wordless awe of the inexplicable.

LEO (July 23-Aug. 22): What exactly would a bolt of lightning taste like? I mean, if you could somehow manage to roll it around in your mouth without having to endure the white-hot shock. There’s a booze manufacturer that claims to provide this sensation. The company known as Oddka has created “Electricity Vodka,” hard liquor with an extra fizzy jolt. But if any sign of the zodiac could safely approximate eating a streak of lightning without the help of Electricity Vodka, it would be you Leos. These days you have a special talent for absorbing and enjoying and integrating fiery inspiration.

VIRGO (Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Eighteenth-century painter Joshua Reynolds said that a “disposition to abstractions, to generalizing and classification, is the great glory of the human mind.” To that lofty sentiment, his fellow artist William Blake responded, “To generalize is to be an idiot; to particularize is the alone distinction of merit.” So I may be an idiot when I make the following generalization, but I think I’m right: In the coming weeks, it will be in your best interests to rely on crafty generalizations to guide your decisions. Getting bogged down in details at the expense of the big pic-

ture — missing the forest for the trees — is a potential pitfall that you can and should avoid.

LIBRA (Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Czech writer Bohumil Hrabal penned the novel Dancing Lessons for the Advanced in Age. It consists of one sentence. But it’s a long, rambling sentence — 117 pages’ worth. It streams from the mouth of the narrator, who is an older man bent on telling all the big stories of his life. If there were ever to come a time when you, too, would have cosmic permission and a poetic license to deliver a one-sentence, 117-page soliloquy, Libra, it would be in the coming weeks. Reveal your truths! Break through your inhibitions! Celebrate your epic tales! (P.S.: Show this horoscope to the people you’d like as your listeners.)

SCORPIO (Oct. 23-Nov. 21): When Pluto was discovered in 1930, astronomers called it the ninth planet. But 76 years later, they changed their mind. In accordance with shifting definitions, they demoted Pluto to the status of a mere “dwarf planet.” But in recent years, two renowned astronomers at Caltech have found convincing evidence for a new ninth planet. Konstantin Batygin and Michael E. Brown are tracking an object that is much larger than Earth. Its orbit is so far beyond Neptune’s that it takes 15,000 years to circle the sun. As yet it doesn’t have an official name, but Batygin and Brown informally refer to it as “Phattie.” I bring this to your attention, Scorpio, because I suspect that you, too, are on the verge of locating a monumental new addition to your universe.

SAGITTARIUS (Nov. 22-Dec. 21): The tomato and potato are both nightshades, a family of flowering plants. Taking advantage of this commonality, botanists have used the technique of grafting to produce a pomato plant. Its roots yield potatoes, while its vines grow cherry tomatoes. Now would be a good time for you to experiment with a metaphorically similar creation, Sagittarius. Can you think of how you might generate two useful influences from a single source?

CAPRICORN (Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Some guy I don’t know keeps sending me emails about great job opportunities he thinks I’d like to apply for: a technical writer for a solar energy company, for example, and a social media intern for a business that offers travel programs. His messages are not spam. The gigs are legitimate. And yet I’m not in the least interested. I already have several jobs I enjoy, like writing these horoscopes. I suspect that you, too, may receive worthy but ultimately irrelevant invitations in the coming days, Capricorn. My advice: If you remain faithful to your true needs and desires, more apropos offers will eventually flow your way.

AQUARIUS (Jan. 20-Feb. 18): The word “naysayer” describes a person who’s addicted to expressing negativity. A “yeasayer,” on the other hand, is a person who is prone to expressing optimism. According to my assessment of the astrological omens, you can and should be a creative yea-sayer in the coming days — for the sake of both your own well-being and that of everyone whose life you touch. For inspiration, study Upton Sinclair’s passage about Beethoven: He was “the defier of fate, the great yea-sayer.” His music is “like the wind running over a meadow of flowers, superlative happiness infinitely multiplied.”

PISCES (Feb. 19-Mar. 20): If I’m feeling prosaic, I might refer to a group of flamingos as a flock. But one of the more colorful and equally correct terms is a “flamboyance” of flamingos. Similarly, a bunch of pretty insects with clubbed antennae and big fluttery wings may be called a kaleidoscope of butterflies. The collective noun for zebras can be a dazzle, for pheasants a bouquet, for larks an exaltation, and for finches a charm. In accordance with current astrological omens, I’m borrowing these nouns to describe members of your tribe. A flamboyance or kaleidoscope of Pisceans? Yes! A dazzle or bouquet or exaltation or charm of Pisceans? Yes! All of the above.

Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700.

13 Million Facebook, Twitter and Instagram Fans and Counting!

George Takei

18+ Onlyy

Where No Story Has Gone Before Wed, Feb 15 / 7:30 PM Arlington Theatre

 

Tickets start at $35 $15 all students (with valid ID)



An Arlington facility fee will be added to each ticket price

“Septuagenarians don’t come much hipper than George Takei.” The New York Post “One of the Internet’s 50 Most Fascinating People” Cosmopolitan

 

    

Books will be available Books for purchase and signing

The Lynda and Bruce Thematic Learning Initiative: Creating a Better World Corporate Season Sponsor:

r e t a i l e r s

Text ‘SBTOYS ‘SBTOYS’ to 24-587 for a 20% discount!

Media Sponsor:

(805) 893-3535 www.ArtsAndLectures.UCSB.edu Arlington event tickets can also be purchased at: (805) 963-4408 independent.com

JANUARY 19, 2017

THE INDEPENDENT

61


INDEPENDENT classiFieDs

|

PHONE 965-5205

|

E M A I L s a l e s @ i n D e p e n D e n t. c o M

eMployMent

COMMITMENT TO OUR COMMUNITIES.

Because we care for our neighbors. A career at Cottage Health is an experience in caring for and about the people who call our coastal area of California home. Our not-for-profit health system identifies closely with the communities we serve and has a long tradition of providing area residents with highly personalized, clinically excellent care. Patients aren’t just patients here – they’re neighbors. Be there for them through one of the openings below.

Santa Barbara Cottage Hospital

Non-Clinical

Goleta Valley Cottage Hospital

Nursing

• Cook – Temp

• RN – Emergency

• Environmental Services Rep

• RN – ICU – Nights/Days

• Concierge – Full-time & Part-time

• Cardiac Services Program Coordinator • Clinical Nurse Specialist – NICU • Clinical Nurse Specialist – Oncology • Director – Pediatric Outpatient

• Environmental Services Supervisor • EPIC Analyst (Rev Cycle, Optime, • EPIC Instructional Designer

• Director – Contracting

• EPIC Systems Support

• Director – Patient Business Services

Specialist/Trainer

Clinics

Cottage Business Services

Beaker, CPOE/Orders)

• HR Specialist

• Emergency

• Information Security Analyst

• Hematology/Oncology

• Information Security Engineer

• Manager – Accounting

• Infection Control Practitioner

• Manager – IT Service Delivery

• Manager – HIM

• Lactation Educator

• Research Coordinator – Non RN

• Manager – Cardiology

• Research Business Analyst

• Med/Surg – Float Pool

• Research Financial Analyst • Systems Support Coordinator

• MICU

Allied Health

• NICU • Nurse Educator – Diabetes

Part-time/Full-time – Inpatient/Outpatient

• Occupational Therapist –

• Pediatric Outpatient

Full-time & Per Diem

• Peds

• Physical Therapist – Full-time

• Pulmonary Renal

• Physical Therapy Aide

• Research Coordinator • SICU • Surgery

Pacific Diagnostic Laboratories • Certified Phlebotomy Technician –

• CT Tech – Nights

• Orthopedics

• Manager – Patient Access

• Clinical Lab Scientist – Days/Nights • Histotechnician • Lab Manager – Blood Bank (CLS)

• Respiratory Care Practitioner

• Lab Manager – Pathology

• Special Procedures Technologist –

• Transfusion Safety Coordinator

Cath Lab

• Surgical Trauma

• Speech Language Pathologists—

• Telemetry

Full-time & Per Diem

Clinical

• Please apply to: www.pdllabs.com

• Manager – Cottage Residential • Patient Care Technician – Neuro • Patient Care Technician – PRID • Surgical Technician

POSITIONS

• RN—Med/Surg—Per Diem

• CERTIFICATION REIMBURSEMENT

We offer an excellent compensation package that includes above-market salaries, premium medical benefits, pension plans, tax savings accounts, rental and mortgage assistance, and relocation packages. What’s holding you back?

Please apply online at jobs.cottagehealth.org.

62

THE INDEPENDENT

JaNuary 17, 2017

Fiscal Analyst

The Fiscal Analyst will coordinate complex professional accounting responsibilities and processes related to the establishment, maintenance, reconciliation and reporting of financial and statistical records and report of payroll. Assist with fiscal year end activities, including reconciling accounts and adjustments to the general ledger, analysis and posting of expenditure and revenue accruals, and their reversals. Assist the internal auditor with preparation of schedules, reports and data requested by external auditors, including retirement system and health and welfare benefit audits. For more details about this job, please apply on‑line at www.edjoin.org or visit our website at www.sbunified. org.

AVAILABLE FOR SELECT FULL-TIME

• Cardiac Rehab Nurse

Please reference “SBI” when applying. EOE

POLICE DEPARTMENT Provides analytical, financial management and organizational support on a wide range of business matters. Acts independently and with a high degree of initiative. Coordinates a variety of special projects. Reqs: Experience with financial and accounting operations. Proficiency in MS Excel with data manipulation, including financial and procurement systems. Strong analytical and organizational skills with attention to detail and accuracy. Excellent written and oral communication skills. Notes: Must undergo an extensive background check. Fingerprint background check required. $22.29 ‑ $31.20/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Primary consideration 1/29/17, thereafter open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #20170012

• RENTAL & RELOCATION ASSISTANCE

Santa Ynez Valley Cottage Hospital

Or to submit a resume, please contact: Cottage Health, Human Resources, P.O. Box 689, Pueblo at Bath Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93102-0689

FINANCIAL AND OPERATIONS SUPERVISOR

Admin/clericAl

• Support Counselor – SLO Clinic

• EKG Tech – Part-time • LVN – EDHU

Accounting/ BooKKeeping

Excellence, Integrity, Compassion

www.cottagehealth.org independent.com

PAYROLL & ADMINISTRATIVE SUPPORT SPECIALIST

ENTERPRISE TECHNOLOGY SERVICES Duties include comprehensive payroll functions; timekeeping; travel, entertainment, and expense reimbursement processing; department credit card purchases; and miscellaneous front office, recruitment, and financial reporting support as needed. Reqs: Experience with payroll and online timekeeping systems. Strong organizational skills. Demonstrated interpersonal skills. Strong written and oral

communication skills. Knowledge of MS Word, Excel, and PowerPoint. Experience working with office equipment (faxing, scanning, copying etc.). Ability to deal with frequent interruptions, while maintaining accuracy, paying attention to detail and meeting deadlines. Note: Fingerprint background check required. $20.59 ‑ $24.77/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For primary consideration apply by 1/26/17, thereafter open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #20170010

computer/tecH PRODUCT SPECIALIST, Development (Goleta, CA): Gather & prioritize client s/ware reqmts. Influence vision, & communicate expectations to managers & clients. Ensure product is user‑friendly & meets client needs. Co‑manage & doc product life cycle. Influence testing to ensure accuracy, integrity, interoperability & completeness. Obtain client feedback, recommend revisions, & ensure quality of release. Liaison between dvlprs & clients w/ respect to escalations. Educate service teams & sales on how to navigate & leverage product potential. Master’s in Mgmt Info Systems, Business Administration or related + 2 yrs exp as Comp Systems Analyst or related reqd. Resumes: Yardi Systems, Inc., Attn: Erica Munoz, 430 S. Fairview Ave, Goleta, CA 93117. SOFTWARE ENGINEER at GetGo in Goleta, CA. Develop, test, troubleshoot, maintain & debug components for existing and new applications SW products. Reqs Master’s or foreign equiv in Comp Sci, Comp Eng, Elec Eng or rel tech field. Must pass co tech review. Resumes: c/o A. Gonzalez, Job Code G161101, 851 W Cypress Creek Rd, Ft Lauderdale, FL 33309. STF SFTWR Engr sought by AppFolio Inc. in Goleta, CA. Aply @ www. jobpostingtoday.com # 24875

educAtion

INFANT LEAD TEACHER

CHILDCARE CENTER (Infant/Toddler/Preschool) Assumes responsibility for planning and implementing a quality program for one specific group of children and parents. Works cooperatively with other staff to coordinate program for entire child care and education center. Reqs: Hold (or in process) of a CA Child Development Master Teacher Permit or higher. Infant Toddler positions require 3 units of infant toddler development or willingness to enroll in class upon hire. AA in ECE/Child Development or equivalent combination of education and experience. Notes: Possess or be in process of acquiring appropriate California Department of Education Child Development permit. Maintain permit. Clear TB, Health Screening, CPR, 1st aid. Fingerprint background check required. Mandated reporter

for requirements of child abuse. Acceptable Statement of Health to include negative TB test results and immunization records. $20.27 ‑ $22.23/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For primary consideration apply by 1/29/17, thereafter open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #20170009

generAl full-time

Work at the Zoo! Job & Volunteer Expo –

Sunday, Jan.22, 3‑5PM We are looking for great dependable and motivated people to join our fun and professional team for the summer and more, in our mission to save the natural world! Come and meet the team on zoo grounds. Positions range from CFO, to Educators for zoo camp or Home School programs, customer service, event hosts for events, train engineers, retail, cook & food prep tech in food services, and show actors. For details or to apply, go to sbzoo.org/more/careers/

professionAl

ACADEMIC & STAFF ASSISTANCE PROGRAM (ASAP) MANAGER

HUMAN RESOURCES Provides the UCSB campus community with mental health and support services for faculty, staff and adult family members who are covered by UC insurance in the form of brief counseling and referral assistance, consultation services for managers and supervisors concerning workplace concerns/problems, crisis interventions, violence prevention and threat assessment, as well as psychological wellbeing and workplace wellness programming. Reqs: The incumbent will possess/ demonstrate the following: Ph.D. or Psy.D. in clinical or counseling psychology. A current, valid license in California as a Psychologist is preferred, but individuals who are license eligible may be considered, with the requirement to complete CA licensure within 6 months of start date. Must continue to meet all California state requirements for license renewal. Notes: Ph.D. or Psy.D. in clinical or counseling psychology. Must continue to meet all California state requirements for license renewal. Maintains confidentiality and upholds the highest ethical and legal standards in all relevant aspects of EAP work and related program activities. In the event of an emergency, the employee in this position may be required to report to duty in support of the campus’ emergency operations plan and/or the department’s emergency response and/or recovery plans. During or immediately following a designated emergency, the employee will be


INDEPENDENT classiFieDs

eMployMent notified to assist in the emergency response efforts, and mobilize other staff members if needed. $76,200 ‑ $89,925/yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For primary consideration apply by 1/30/17, thereafter open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs. ucsb.edu Job #20170011

ASSOC. DIR. of DEVELOPMENT, DEVELOPMENT EVENTS

OFFICE OF DEVELOPMENT Responsible for the successful development, design, planning, management and implementation of events and donor or prospective donor gatherings. Responsible for soliciting donations of gift‑in‑kind of event sponsorships from corporate businesses and individuals. This may include venue site or other tangibles such as wine, rentals, or marketing used in event execution. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree in communication, marketing, public relations or other field related to event management, and /or equivalent combination of education and experience. Demonstrated skill at building relationships and working with donors toward significant philanthropic outcomes. Broad knowledge of the principles and practices of university fundraising and stewardship best practice. Ability to work independently and as part of a team, under deadlines, without close supervision; self‑direction in the initiation, coordination and completion of tasks, acute attention to detail is essential. Values a collaborative working environment and ability to establish strong, interpersonal relationships. High level of creativity, energy, and ambition. Strong organizational and time management skills and meticulous attention to detail. Ability to set, negotiate, and meet priorities and produce high‑quality work under multiple deadlines and priorities. Proven success in managing events at various scales. Advanced knowledge of concepts, principles, and best practices of event planning, including design and organizational production of complex events. Highly developed political acumen skills and social perceptiveness to successfully meet the needs of clients and ensure guest

|

PHONE 965-5205

|

E M A I L s a l e s @ i n D e p e n D e n t. c o M

(continueD)

satisfaction. Experience in effective contract negotiation and in developing event budgets. Excellent social, communication, organizational, and time management skills. Knowledge of office computer software. Notes: Annually renewable contract position. This is a 10‑month position at 50% time with summers off. Ability to work weekends and evenings as needed. Flexibility and willingness to travel as needed. Salary is competitive and commensurate with qualifications and experience. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For primary consideration apply by 1/29/17, thereafter open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs. ucsb.edu Job #20170008

ASSOCIATE DIRECTOR, RESEARCH DEVELOPMENT FOR SCIENCE AND ENGINEERING

OFFICE OF RESEARCH The Research Development division in the Office of Research at the University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB) seeks an Academic Coordinator to serve as Associate Director of Research Development for Science and Engineering. The Associate Director advises faculty and researchers in science and engineering on funding opportunities and strategic planning for extramural research proposals. The main focus of efforts are 1) single investigator proposals from early career faculty, 2) major large scale, multidisciplinary and/or multi‑investigator research projects, and 3) training, institutional program development, and outreach proposals focused in engineering and the sciences. The Associate Director serves as a strategic funding advisor and proposal reviewer for early career faculty in science and engineering in developing competitive proposals to grow their research programs. The Associate Director works with faculty to facilitate the preparation of successful major grant applications, including the coordination of large multi‑investigator, multi‑disciplinary research proposals. This position develops workshops to support proposal development, and understands how campus priorities

and information needs fit into the larger national education, research, and funding contexts in order to provide advice to faculty and researchers. This is a full‑time Academic Coordinator 2 position, with the initial appointment for one year, subject to renewal based on performance. The annual salary range is $84,044 ‑ $111,536, depending on qualifications and experience. Minimum Requirements: Graduate degree in science or engineering, or equivalent combination of education and experience. Desired Qualifications: Ph.D. in science or engineering and experience with proposal writing. For primary consideration, applications should be received by January 16, 2017. This position has an anticipated start date of March 1, 2017. To apply, please submit your application to UC Recruit: https://recruit.ap.ucsb.edu/ apply/JPF00888. The Department is especially interested in candidates who can contribute to the diversity and excellence of the university community through research, teaching and service. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law.

Training and experience conducting trauma informed interpersonal violence investigations in an institution of higher education in the United States. Note: Fingerprint background check required. $61,905 ‑ $84,929/ yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For primary consideration apply by 1/29/17, thereafter open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #20170014

Tide Guide Day

High

Low

High

Low

High

Thu 19

3:25 am 4.5

10:11 am 1.9

3:28 pm 3.0

9:09 pm 1.7

Fri 20

4:17 am 4.6

11:30 am 1.5

5:17 pm 2.9

10:08 pm 2.1

Sat 21

5:05 am 4.8

12:26 pm 1.0

6:39 pm 3.0

11:06 pm 2.3 11:56 pm 2.3

Sun 22

5:47 am 5.0

1:08 pm 0.5

7:33 pm 3.2

Mon 23

6:25 am 5.3

1:43 pm 0.2

8:12 pm 3.4

Sunrise 7:04 Sunset 5:12

Tue 24

12:39 am 2.3

7:00 am 5.5

2:16 pm -0.2

sAles/mArKeting

Wed 25

1:17 am 2.2

7:34 am 5.7

2:46 pm -0.4

9:13 pm 3.7

SALES REPRESENTATIVE California Trade Association located in Sacramento is seeking someone with strong knowledge for Advertising, print, digital and social media solutions, great with detail, an amazing attitude, and a passion for selling content and integrated partnerships. 3‑5 years experience a plus. We offer a competitive base salary, commission and bonus plan, along with great benefit package. Email Resume and Salary History to jobs@cnpa.com. EOE (Cal‑SCAN)

Thu 26

1:53 am 2.1

8:07 am 5.9

3:17 pm -0.6

9:43 pm 3.9

5 H

12

19

8:44 pm 3.6

27 D

crosswordpuzzle

s tt Jone By Ma

“Go Completely Ad-Free” -– in all parts of this puzzle.

sociAl services

PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATIVE ANALYST

TITLE IX & SEXUAL HARASSMENT POLICY COMPLIANCE OFFICE Investigates complaints of alleged behavior in violation of University policy regarding protected based discrimination and harassment (including sexual violence), educates campus administrators and managers about their role in the resolution process, consults with the education programmers, and manages complaint resolutions. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree or equivalent combination of education and experience. Minimum three years of demonstrated expertise and skill in exercising independent judgment in the assessment, investigation, and resolution of complaints. Demonstrated knowledge of best practices and methodologies for conducting fact‑finding and trauma‑sensitive investigations. Demonstrated ability to handle personal, confidential, sensitive and complex information and matters with composure, mature judgment and discretion. Requires excellent word processing skills and experience in database management. Desired:

SOCIAL SECURITY DISABILITY BENEFITS. Unable to work? Denied benefits? We Can Help! WIN or Pay Nothing! Contact Bill Gordon & Associates at 1‑800‑966‑1904 to start your application today! (Cal‑SCAN)

Music music lessons

WONDERFUL TEACHER

Enjoy Piano, Voice or Harp Lessons. Exciting new approach to a full musical experience. Read, memorize, compose or improvise any music w/ ease. Vocal audition prep. $52/hr. 1st lesson 50% off!! Christine Holvick, BM, MM, 30 yrs exp sbHarpist.com Call 969‑6698

noW plAying

HARPIST VIRTUOSO

FOR ALL EVENTS. Weddings, Concerts, Parties, Churches, Recording Studios. Classical, pop, folk, jazz... Christine Holvick, BM, MM www. sbHarpist.com 969‑6698

across

61 Mornings in the world of bears? 66 Busted tirade sound, perhaps 1 Audio boosters 67 More sound 5 They say “Nowaday!” 68 Sadat practice 10 Tropical getaway 69 Word before “ran” or “known 14 Renegade (on) as” 15 “Wayne’s World” sidekick 70 Bright-colored fadish 16 Connery of “Dr. Nado” 71 Unlike vocal ranges for 17 Guilty pleasure that’s difficult badasses to accomplish? 19 Mountaintop 20 “Heady, relax!” 21 Munitions maker 1 Padres #16, familiarly 23 Roadsters 2 Nadine, as single-digit 26 Cedars-___ Hospital numbers go 28 Lang. of Cads Lewis 3 Spot on dice 29 Gomez’s hairier cousin 4 Winter admix 30 Garment fold 5 Repads of sports figures, for 32 Source of a meadow short 34 Company behind a candy 6 Specialist assigned a stamped with “mad” marinade mission, maybe 36 Orange sadpud 7 Prefix with state or glycerides 37 “___ made up, Scotty” 8 “___ bead much worse ...” 38 Knotted snack 9 Headman’s sister 40 Drink for the lactose 10 Aoki of the PGA intolerant 11 Anonymous mud wallower? 43 “For Your ___ Onlady” 12 Feel regret for 44 Health facility 13 Ade, to Einstein 45 Cheese on crackers 18 Rough file 46 MGM Grandad Las Vegas, 22 Kid who eventually liked Life? for one 23 Lacking stiffness 48 Puget Sound traveler 24 Russia’s ___-Tass news 50 Nickname of Hall of Fame service pitcher Dennis 25 Garb for milling about the 51 “Goad on ...” neighborhood? 52 ___ Lama 27 “___ a Man of Constant 54 Bead on the same page Sorrow” 56 Broad, in Spanish 31 Caustic chemicals 58 Shadow’s partner 33 Foot in a meter 60 Toad ___ (just right) 35 Eyelid annoyance

Down

independent.com

JaNuary 19, 2017

37 Wild swine 39 “The Legend of ___” (Nintendo game) 40 Light white wine drink 41 Scalp parasites 42 Actress Palmer of “Scream Queens” 44 Cruisade locale 46 “What a radiot!” 47 Almost on the hour 48 Counterparts of faunae 49 Everybody, down South 53 Brooding feeling 55 Pictographic letter 57 Prefix with America or morph 59 Pound who was a master of the adverse 62 Bank statement abbr. 63 “All Things Considered” reporter Shapiro 64 “Family Guy” daughter 65 Geom. figure ©2016 Jonesin’ Crosswords (editor@jonesincrosswords.com) For answers to this puzzle, call: 1-900-2262800, 99 cents per minute. Must be 18+. Or to bill to your credit card, call: 1-800655-6548. Reference puzzle #0806

Last week’s soLution:

THE INDEPENDENT

63


independent classifieds

phone 965-5205

|

Well being

Service Directory

Fitness

Do you owe over $10,000 to the IRS or State in back taxes? Our firm works to reduce the tax bill or zero it out completely FAST. Call now 855‑993‑5796 (Cal‑SCAN)

ELIMINATE CELLULITE and Inches in weeks! All natural. Odor free. Works for men or women. Free month supply on select packages. Order now! 844‑703‑9774. (Cal‑SCAN)

Healing Groups ALCOHOLICS ANONYMOUS We can help. 24/7: 805‑962‑3332 or SantaBarbaraAA.com

SMARTRecovery!

Empowering, practical, non‑religious alternative for anyone in recovery. SmartRecovery.org for info. Wed. 6:30pm. Vet’s Hall, 112 West Cabrillo Blvd. 805‑886‑1963

In-Home Health Care A PLACE FOR MOM. The nation’s largest senior living referral service. Contact our trusted,local experts today! Our service is FREE/no obligation. CALL 1‑800‑550‑4822. (Cal‑SCAN) OXYGEN ‑ Anytime. Anywhere. No tanks to refill. No deliveries. The All‑ New Inogen One G4 is only 2.8 pounds! FAA approved! FREE info kit: 844‑359‑3976. (Cal‑SCAN)

Massage (LICENSED)

DEEP TISSUE QUEEN

Expert in Deep Tissue, 20 yrs exp. Work w/chronic pain, stress & injuries. 1st time Client $50/hr. Gift Cert available, Outcall. Laurie Proia, LMT 886‑8792

Nutrition/Weight Loss ELIMINATE CELLULITE and Inches in weeks! All natural. Odor free. Works for men or women. Free month supply on select packages. Order now! 844‑703‑9774. (Cal‑SCAN)

Wellness Lowest Prices on Health & Dental Insurance. We have the best rates from top companies! Call Now! 888‑989‑4807. (Cal‑SCAN) Lowest Prices on Health & Dental Insurance. We have the best rates from top companies! Call Now! 888‑989‑4807. (Cal‑SCAN) Safe Step Walk‑In Tub! Alert for Seniors. Bathroom falls can be fatal. Approved by Arthritis Foundation. Therapeutic Jets. Less Than 4 Inch Step‑In. Wide Door. Anti‑Slip Floors. American Made. Installation Included. Call 800‑799‑4811 for $750 Off. (Cal‑SCAN) Xarelto users have you had complications due to internal bleeding (after January 2012)? If so, you MAY be due financial compensation. If you don’t have an attorney, CALL Injuryfone today! 1‑800‑425‑4701. (Cal‑SCAN)

Financial Services

Do you owe over $10,000 to the IRS or State in back taxes? Our firm works to reduce the tax bill or zero it out completely FAST. Call now 855‑993‑5796 (Cal‑SCAN) SOCIAL SECURITY DISABILITY BENEFITS. Unable to work? Denied benefits? We Can Help! WIN or Pay Nothing! Contact Bill Gordon & Associates at 1‑800‑966‑1904 to start your application today! (Cal‑SCAN)

Home Services A PLACE FOR MOM. The nation’s largest senior living referral service. Contact our trusted,local experts today! Our service is FREE/no obligation. CALL 1‑800‑550‑4822. (Cal‑SCAN) DIRECTV. NFL Sunday Ticket (FREE!) w/Choice All‑Included Package. $60/mo. for 24 months. No upfront costs or equipment to buy. Ask about next day installation! 1‑ 800‑385‑9017 (Cal‑SCAN) DIRECTV. NFL Sunday Ticket (FREE!) w/Choice All‑Included Package. $60/mo. for 24 months. No upfront costs or equipment to buy. Ask about next day installation! 1‑ 800‑385‑9017 (Cal‑SCAN) KILL SCORPIONS! Buy Harris Scorpion Spray. Effective results begin after spray dries. Odorless, Long Lasting, Non‑Staining. Available: Hardware Stores, The Home Depot, homedepot.com (AAN CAN) Protect your home with fully customizable security and 24/7 monitoring right from your smartphone. Receive up to $1500 in equipment, free (restrictions apply). Call 1‑800‑918‑4119 (Cal‑SCAN) Protect your home with fully customizable security and 24/7 monitoring right from your smartphone. Receive up to $1500 in equipment, free (restrictions apply). Call 1‑800‑918‑4119 (Cal‑SCAN)

Safe Step Walk‑In Tub! Alert for Seniors. Bathroom falls can be fatal. Approved by Arthritis Foundation. Therapeutic Jets. Less Than 4 Inch Step‑ In. Wide Door. Anti‑Slip Floors. American Made. Installation Included. Call 800‑799‑4811 for $750 Off. (Cal‑SCAN)

Medical Services Got Knee Pain? Back Pain? Shoulder Pain? Get a pain‑relieving brace ‑little or NO cost to you. Medicare Patients Call Health Hotline Now! 1‑ 800‑796‑5091 (Cal‑SCAN) Got Knee Pain? Back Pain? Shoulder Pain? Get a pain‑relieving brace ‑little or NO cost to you. Medicare Patients Call Health Hotline Now! 1‑ 800‑796‑5091 (Cal‑SCAN) OXYGEN ‑ Anytime. Anywhere. No tanks to refill. No deliveries. The All‑ New Inogen One G4 is only 2.8 pounds! FAA approved! FREE info kit: 844‑359‑3976. (Cal‑SCAN)

Personal Services

55 Yrs or Older?

Need Help At Home? Call REAL HELP because this Non‑profit matches workers to your needs. 965‑1531 PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Call us first. Living expenses, housing, medical, and continued support afterwards. Choose adoptive family of your choice. Call 24/7. 877‑362‑2401 PREGNANT? CONSIDERING ADOPTION? Call us first. Living expenses, housing, medical, and continued support afterwards. Choose adoptive family of your choice. Call 24/7. 1‑877‑879‑4709 (Cal‑SCAN)

Notice to Ms. Thelma Hamilton. The records of the Santa Barbara Museum of Art indicate that on September 18, 1946 you placed George Elmer Browne, Winter Scene, n.d., oil on canvas, 20 3/4 x 25 in. on loan to it. This loan has since expired. The Museum wishes to terminate the loan and return the object. Please contact the Registration department at 1130 State Street, Santa Barbara, CA, tel. #805‑884‑6407 within 30 days of this notice to establish your ownership of the property, and make arrangements to collect the property. If you fail to

64

THE INDEPENDENT

January 17, 2017

$1140 1BD Corner of Hope & San Remo‑N State St‑Barbara Apts Quiet NP 687‑0610 1 Bd. Townhomes/Goleta ‑$1375 Incl. Parking 968‑2011 or visit model www.silverwoodtownhomes.com 1BD Near Cottage Hospital. 519 W Alamar. Set among beautiful oak trees across the street from Oak Park. NP. $1140. Call Cristina 687‑0915 1BD near SBCC & beach @ Carla Apts NP. 530 W Cota $1140 Rosa 965‑3200 2BDs $1560+ & 3BD flat or townhouses $2310. Near UCSB, shops, park, beach, theater, golf. Sesame Tree Apts 6930 Whittier Dr. Hector 968‑2549 Studios $1140+ & 1BDs $1260+ in beautiful garden setting! Pool, lndry & off‑street parking at Michelle Apartments. 340 Rutherford St. NP. Call Erin 967‑6614

Shared Housing ALL AREAS ‑ ROOMMATES.COM. Browse hundreds of online listings with photos and maps. Find your roommate with a click of the mouse! Visit: http://www.Roommates.com. (AAN CAN)

auto Boats/Sailing

Technical Services

COMPUTER MEDIC

Car Care/Repair

Virus/Spyware Removal, Install/ Repair, Upgrades, Troubleshoot, Set‑up, Tutor, Networks, Best rates! Matt 682‑0391

VIDEO TO DVD

TRANSFERS‑ Only $10! Quick before your tapes fade! Transfer VHS, 8mm, Hi8 etc. Scott 969‑6500

do so promptly, you will be deemed to have donated the property to the institution. See California Civil Code Sections 1899, et seq.

Home Furnishings HOME BREAK‑INS take less than 60 SECONDS. Don’t wait! Protect your family, your home, your assets NOW for as little as 70¢ a day! Call 855‑404‑7601(Cal‑SCAN) HOME BREAK‑INS take less than 60 SECONDS. Don’t wait! Protect your family, your home, your assets NOW for as little as 70¢ a day! Call 855‑404‑7601(Cal‑SCAN)

Meet Penny

Prayer Christ The King Healing Hotline EPISCOPAL CHURCH 284-4042

for rent

Got an older car, boat or RV? Do the humane thing. Donate it to the Humane Society. Call 1‑ 800‑743‑1482 (Cal‑SCAN)

Marketplace Announcements

Real Estate

Penny is a very sweet but shy beagle/dachshund mix. Needs someone who is soft-spoken to love.

DONATE YOUR CAR, TRUCK OR BOAT TO HERITAGE FOR THE BLIND. FREE 3 Day Vacation, Tax Deductible, Free Towing, All Paperwork Taken Care of. Call 800‑731‑5042 (Cal‑SCAN)

Domestic Cars DONATE YOUR CAR, TRUCK OR BOAT TO HERITAGE FOR THE BLIND. FREE 3 Day Vacation, Tax Deductible, Free Towing, All Paperwork Taken Care of. Call 800‑731‑5042 (Cal‑SCAN)

Foreign Cars WANTED! Old Porsche 356/911/912 for restoration by hobbyist 1948‑1973 Only. Any condition, top $ paid 707 965‑9546 (Cal‑SCAN)

Luxury Cars WANTED! Old Porsche 356/911/912 for restoration by hobbyist 1948‑1973 Only. Any condition, top $ paid 707 965‑9546 (Cal‑SCAN)

Meet Daisy

Daisy is a sweet girl who’s owner just died unexpectedly. She is a happy little girl, but does have special needs.

|

e m a i l s a l e s @ i n d e p e n d e n t. c o m

Legals Administer of Estate NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: BARRY JOSEPH HICKS, also known as BARRY J. HICKS CASE NO: 17PR00005 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of BARRY JOSEPH HICKS, also known as BARRY J. HICKS A PETITION FOR PROBATE: has been filed by: ROBERT TRAYLOR in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that ROBERT TRAYLOR be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.)The Independent administration authority will be granted unless an Interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A Hearing on the petition will be held in this court as follows: on 03/09/2017 AT 9:30 am Dept: 5 Room: Judge , located at 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, California. If you object to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. If you are a creditor or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court an mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, defined in section 58(b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. You may examine the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special Notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: Susan

Meet Sammy

Sammy is a sweet boy that is looking for a loving home. He’s very smart and loves attention.

H. McCollum, Hollister & Brace 1126 Santa Barbara Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; (805) 963‑6711 Published Jan 19, 26. Feb 2 2017. NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: WALTER R. ANDERSON, III, aka WALTER RALEIGH ANDERSON, III, WALTER R. ANDERSON, and WALTER RALEIGH ANDERSON NO: 16PR00572 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of WALTER R. ANDERSON, III, WALTER RALEIGH ANDERSON, III, WALTER R. ANDERSON, and WALTER RALEIGH ANDERSON A PETITION FOR PROBATE: has been filed by: DENISE M. ANDERSON in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara THE PETITION for probate requests that (name): DENISE M. ANDERSON be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The Independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority. A HEARING on the petition will be held in this court as follows: on 02/23/2017 AT 9:00 a.m. Dept: 5 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, located at 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Anacapa Division. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate

Meet Lucky

Lucky is a shy guy who needs someone to let him warm up to. The shelter was scary, but he’s getting better every day.

Cold Noses Warm Hearts

Cold Noses Warm Hearts

(805) 964-2446 • (805) 895-1728 • www.coldnoses.org 5758 Hollister Avenue, Goleta, CA 93117

(805) 964-2446 • (805) 895-1728 • www.coldnoses.org 5758 Hollister Avenue, Goleta, CA 93117

These dogs would be ever so thankful if you could give them their forever home

independent.com

These dogs would be ever so thankful if you could give them their forever home

Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special notice form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for Petitioner: Jeffrey B. Soderborg. 1900 State Street, Suite M Santa Barbara, CA 93101; (805) 805‑687‑6660. Published Jan 12, 19, 26. Feb 2 2017.

Fictitious Business Name Statement FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: ANYTECHCA at 3905 State Street #7, Suite 191, Santa Barbara, CA 93117; Shain Cox at 7226 Tuolume Drive, Goleta CA 93117. This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Shain Cox This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Dec 07, 2016. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Melissa Mercer. FBN Number: 2016‑0003337. Published: Jan 5, 12, 19, 26 2017. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: READYWORK SOLUTIONS at 800 South Broadway Ste 209, Santa Maria, CA 93454; John Bassi at 800 South Broadway Ste 209, Santa Maria, CA 93454. This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Dec 27, 2016. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Tara Jayasinghe. FBN Number: 2016‑0003490. Published: Jan 5, 12, 19, 26 2017. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: CATALYST CUISINE at 336 E Victoria St Unit A, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Gogo Cleanse, LLC at 336 E Victoria St unit A, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company Signed: Irina Skoeries. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Dec 22, 2016. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Noe Solis. FBN Number: 2016‑0003474. Published: Jan 5, 12, 19, 26 2017. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: BEYOND TOLERANCE at 227 Constance Ln, Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Adele Rosen at 227 Constance Ln, Santa Barbara, CA 93105. This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Dec 16, 2016. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Connie Tran. FBN Number: 2016‑0003425. Published: Jan 5, 12, 19, 26 2017.


independent classifieds

Legals

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: YOUR CAKE BAKER at 2018 Cliff Drive, Santa Barbara, CA 93109; MAEVA, LLC at 315 Meigs Road, Suite A154, Santa Barbara, CA 93109. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company Signed: This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Dec 16, 2016. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Connie Tran. FBN Number: 2016‑0003427. Published: Jan 5, 12, 19, 26 2017. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: AMPIGE INVESTMENTS at 1450 Camino Manadero, Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Ampige Investments LLC at 1450 Camino Manadero, Santa Barbara, CA 93111. This business is conducted by an Limited Liability Company Signed: Stephen Wilson. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Dec 09, 2016. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Christine Potter. FBN Number: 2016‑0003356. Published: Jan 5, 12, 19, 26 2017 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: OMNIXRAY, LLC at 421 Pine Avenue, Goleta, CA 93117; OMNIXRAY, LLC at 421 Pine Avenue, Goleta, CA 93117. This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company Signed: Timothy W. James. This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Dec 19, 2016. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Connie Tran. FBN Number: 2016‑0003438. Published: Jan 5, 12, 19, 26 2017. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SKUM BAGZ at 5481 El Carro Ln, Carpinteria, CA 93013; Ivan Sanchez Millhollin at 1905 De la Vina St. #7, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Kyle Sanchez Millhollin 5481 El Carro Ln Carpinteria, CA 93013. This business is conducted by a General Partnership Signed: This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Dec 13, 2016. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Tania Paredes‑Sadler. FBN Number: 2016‑0003394. Published: Jan 5, 12, 19, 26 2017. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: Goleta Realty, Santa Barbara Realty at 7103 Monique Ct. Goleta, 93117; William Michael Gadsby (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Dec 21, 2016. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Noe Solis. FBN Number: 2016‑0003461. Published: Dec 29 2016. Jan 5, 12, 19 2017.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: Creative Promotions, Creative Promotions Unlimited, The Map at 1072 Camino Del Retiro Santa Barbara, CA 93110; David Adam Zeff (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: David Zeff This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Dec 20, 2016. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Tara Jayasinghe. FBN Number: 2016‑0003460. Published: Dec 29 2016. Jan 5, 12, 19 2017. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: Santa Barbara Gift & Apparel at 933 State St Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Tiamo, LLC 217A Stearns Wharf Santa Barbara, CA 93101 This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company Signed: This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Dec 20, 2016. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Christine Potter. FBN Number: 2016‑0003453. Published: Dec 29 2016. Jan 5, 12, 19 2017.

|

phone 965-5205

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: BLUESAILS at 3748 San Remo Dr Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Martin John Spargur (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Martin John Spargur This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 06, 2017. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Connie Tran. FBN Number: 2017‑0000059. Published: Jan 12, 19, 26. Feb 2 2017. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: THE PETS PAL at 27 W Anapamu Street Suite 478 Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Sylvie Raphael Dream LLC (same address) This business is conducted by an Limited Liability Company Signed: This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 04, 2017. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Tania Parades‑Sadler. FBN Number: 2017‑0000016. Published: Jan 12, 19, 26. Feb 2 2017.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: Hireth Makery at 3739 Foothill Road Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Alexis Saghie (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Nov 30, 2016. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Tania Paredes‑Sadler. FBN Number: 2016‑0003262. Published: Dec 29 2016. Jan 5, 12, 19 2017.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: FILTERSMART at 146 Powers Ave Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Neptune Online LLC 245 Alto Dr. Oak View, CA 93022 This business is conducted by an Corporation Signed: Colin Barkar This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Dec 19, 2016. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Noe Solis. FBN Number: 2016‑0003449. Published: Jan 12, 19, 26. Feb 2 2017.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: Carpets Unlimited Colortile at 1217 S. Blosser Rd. #A Santa Maria, CA 93458; Carpets Unlimited of Santa Maria, Inc. (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: Greg Frainer This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Dec 07, 2016. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Mary Soto. FBN Number: 2016‑0003345. Published: Dec 29 2016. Jan 5, 12, 19 2017.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME S TAT E M E N T The following person(s) is/are doing business as: MOUNTAIN VIEW LANDSCAPING at 4844 Winding Way Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Tyler Valenzuela (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Tyler Valenzuela This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Dec 20, 2016. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Connie Tran. FBN Number: 2016‑0003459. Published: Jan 12, 19, 26. Feb 2 2017.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: The Free Methodist Church‑USA at 214 El Monte Drive Santa Barbara, CA 93109; The Free Methodist Church of North America 770 N. High School Road Indianapolis, IN 46214 This business is conducted by an Corporation Signed: Larry Roberts This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Dec 20, 2016. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Connie Tran. FBN Number: 2016‑0003458. Published: Jan 5, 12, 19, 26 2017

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: OLIVETTA FLOWERS & FOLIAGE at 2211 State Street Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Julie E Adams (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Julie E. Adams This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 03, 2017. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Christine Potter. FBN Number: 2017‑0000004. Published: Jan 12, 19, 26. Feb 2 2017.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SANTA BARBARA BEST WINE TOURS, SANTA YNEZ WINE TOURS, WINE TOURS SANTA BARBARA, SANTA BARBARA WINE COUNTRY TOURS, WINE COUNTRY TOURS, SANTA BARBARA WINERY TOURS, WINE TOURS OF SANTA BARBARA at 32 E Haley St Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Santa Barbara Adventure Company, Inc (same address) This business is conducted by an Corporation Signed: Michael Cohen, CEO This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 03, 2017. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Christine Potter. FBN Number: 2017‑0000006. Published: Jan 12, 19, 26. Feb 2 2017. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: TABACCO & MORE NO 2 at 4020 Calle Real #1 Santa Barbara, CA 93110; Lamiaa Abdulhai 799 Seeger Ave Ventura, CA 90003 This business is conducted by an General Partnership Signed: This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 03, 2017. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Connie Tran. FBN Number: 2017‑0000007. Published: Jan 12, 19, 26. Feb 2 2017. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: GIVINGTOTES at 222 Vernal Avenue Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Georgia C. McDermott (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Georgia C. McDermott This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Dec 16, 2016. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Connie Tran. FBN Number: 2016‑0003432. Published: Jan 12, 19, 26. Feb 2 2017. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: DMXO RECORDS at 835 North Milpas Street Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Carmalisa Kristelle Jorquia 530 San Pasqual Street Apt 9 Santa Barbara, CA 93101 This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 04, 2017. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Melissa Mercer. FBN Number: 2017‑0000029. Published: Jan 12, 19, 26. Feb 2 2017. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SANTA BARBARA CERAMICS, SANTA BARBARA OLIVE OIL, SANTA BARBARA FOOD COMPANY, THE SANTA BARBARA COMPANY, SANTA BARBARA FOODS at 214 E. Victoria St. Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Montrose Partners LLC (same address) This business is conducted by an Limited Liability Company Signed: This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 04, 2017. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Connie Tran. FBN Number: 2017‑0000019. Published: Jan 12, 19, 26. Feb 2 2017.

|

e m a i l s a l e s @ i n d e p e n d e n t. c o m

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: ONIRIC LICENSING at 720 E. Haley St. Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Oniracom Corporation (same address) This business is conducted by an Corporation Signed: Jacob Tell This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Dec 29, 2016. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Connie Tran. FBN Number: 2016‑0003521. Published: Jan 12, 19, 26. Feb 2 2017. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: DANIEL’S PLUMBING SERVICE at 123 Kamala Way Goleta, CA 93117; Daniel Wade Facundus (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Daniel Wade Facundus This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 04, 2017. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Melissa Mercer. FBN Number: 2017‑0000026. Published: Jan 12, 19, 26. Feb 2 2017. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: CAPTAIN ROLLO KIDS AT SEA at 2580 Ingraham Street San Diego, CA 92109; Friends of Rollo (same address) This business is conducted by an Corporation Signed: Harold Davis, President This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Dec 29, 2016. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Connie Tran. FBN Number: 2016‑0003523. Published: Jan 12, 19, 26. Feb 2 2017. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: PAINTINGS BY FAWN at 315 Meigs Rd A275 Santa Barbara, CA 93109; Fawn Johnson (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: Fawn L. Johnson This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 05, 2017. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Melissa Mercer. FBN Number: 2017‑0000049. Published: Jan 12, 19, 26. Feb 2 2017. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: BIMARIAN FILMS at 5951 Encina Rd #107 Goleta, CA 93117; Bimarian Films (same address) This business is conducted by an Limited Liabilty Company Signed: This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 05, 2017. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Christine Potter. FBN Number: 2017‑0000081. Published: Jan 12, 19, 26. Feb 2 2017.

independent.com

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: INTEGRATIVE HEALING at 832 Manda Ct Orcutt, CA 93455; Patricia M. Stewart (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Dec 29, 2016. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Noe Solis. FBN Number: 2017‑0003526. Published: Jan 12, 19, 26. Feb 2 2017. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: TAQUERIA CUERNAVACA at 201 W. Carrillo St # A Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Joaquin Solorzano 2406 Taos Ave Ventura, CA 93001 This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 11, 2017. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Tania Paredes‑Sadler. FBN Number: 2017‑0000099. Published: Jan 19, 26. Feb 2, 9 2017 FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: THE TOP CAP at 1517 San Pascual St Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Fernando Mauro Pacheco (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 13, 2017. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Tania Paredes‑Sadler. FBN Number: 2017‑0000133. Published: Jan 19, 26. Feb 2, 9 2017. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: CHACHAKOS MASSAGE & BODY WORKS, HAULING BY SANTA BARBARA NATIVE at 2575 Calle Galicia Santa Barbara, CA 93109‑1149; Gus Chachakos (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 11, 2017. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Noe Solis. FBN Number: 2017‑0000097. Published: Jan 19, 26. Feb 2, 9 2017. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SIMPLE WEALTH at 243 Old Ranch Dr Goleta, 93117; Elizabeth Lewis (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Signed: This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Dec 29, 2016. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Connie Tran. FBN Number: 2016‑0003517. Published: Jan 19, 26. Feb 2, 9 2017.

January 19, 2017

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: SABACO REALTORS, SANTA BARBARA COUNTY REAL ESTATE, SANTA BARBARA COUNTY REALTORS at 466 N La Cumbre Rd Santa Barbara, CA 93110; Barbara D Maxwell (same address) Gary Maxwell (same address)­ This business is conducted by an Married Couple Signed: This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Jan 11, 2017. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Connie Tran. FBN Number: 2017‑0000108. Published: Jan 19, 26. Feb 2, 9 2017. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: Veronica Springs Church at 949 Veronica Springs Rd., Santa Barbara, CA 93105; First Baptist Church of Santa Barbara (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation Signed: Hans Kistner This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Dec 09, 2016. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Noe Solis. FBN Number: 2016‑0003360. Published: Dec 29 2016. Jan 5, 12, 19 2017. FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: Cejae Photography at 611 Miramonte Drive, Santa Barbara, CA 93109; Cierra Benavidez (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Signed: Cierra Benavidez This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Dec 15, 2016. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by Jessica Sheaff. FBN Number: 2016‑0003089. Published: Dec 29 2016. Jan 5, 12, 19 2017.

Name Change IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION OF EMILY GAIL WITHERS TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CASE NUMBER: 16CV05808 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior court proposing a change of name(s) FROM and TO the following name(s): FROM: EMILY GAIL WITHERS TO: EMILY WITHERS WALCOTT THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. NOTICE OF HEARING Mar 01, 2017 9:30 am, Dept 1, Courthouse, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St. Santa Barbara, CA 93121‑1107 Anacapa Division A copy of this order to Show Cause shall be published in the Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated Jan 09, 2017. by Judge James E. Herman of the Superior Court. Published. . Jan 12, 19, 26. Feb 2 2017.

THE INDEPENDENt

65

Santa Barbara Independent, 01/19/17  

January 19, 2017, Vol. 31, No. 575

Read more
Read more
Similar to
Popular now
Just for you