Santa Barbara Independent 5/2/24

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Artful Minds Arts Faire for Mental Wellness

Elite Stargazers Celebrate 10 Years will ‘orchard’ housing proposal take root?

MAY
VOL. 38 NO.
Also Inside: McConnell’s Fine Ice Creams Celebrates 75 Years of Scoops Santa Barbara FREE Santa Barbara
2-9, 2024
955
Wine Week Wine Week
Santa Barbara Santa Barbara
The Second Vintage Is Back with Seven Days of $10 Glasses + Bidding Adieu to Bien Nacido’s Vineyard Guru

805.504.1967

Sustainable Heart

Sustainable Heart

Sustainable Heart

Sustainable Heart ~ Transformational Life Counseling ~

Sustainable Heart ~ Transformational Life Counseling ~

Sustainable Heart ~ Transformational Life Counseling ~

~ Transformational Life Counseling ~ Relationships • Occupation and Career • Meditation

Sustainable Heart ~ Transformational Life Counseling ~

~ Transformational Life Counseling ~ Relationships • Occupation and Career • Meditation

~ Transformational Life Counseling ~ Relationships • Occupation and Career • Meditation

Sustainable Heart ~ Transformational Life Counseling ~

Sustainable Heart ~ Transformational Life Counseling ~

Sustainable Heart ~ Transformational Life Counseling ~

Grief and Loss • Major Life Transitions • Anxiety

Grief and Loss • Major Life Transitions • Anxiety

Relationships • Occupation and Career • Meditation

Relationships • Occupation and Career • Meditation

Relationships • Occupation and Career • Meditation

Relationships • Occupation and Career • Meditation

Sustainable Heart ~ Transformational Life Counseling ~

Grief and Loss • Major Life Transitions • Anxiety

Relationships • Occupation and Career • Meditation

Relationships • Occupation and Career • Meditation

Spiritual Issues • Communication • Conflict

Grief and Loss • Major Life Transitions • Anxiety

Grief and Loss • Major Life Transitions • Anxiety

Relationships • Occupation and Career • Meditation

Spiritual Issues • Communication • Conflict

Grief and Loss • Major Life Transitions • Anxiety

Grief and Loss • Major Life Transitions • Anxiety

Sustainable Heart ~ Transformational Life Counseling ~ Relationships • Occupation and Career • Meditation

Spiritual Issues

• Communication • Conflict

Relationships • Occupation and Career • Meditation

Grief and Loss • Major Life Transitions • Anxiety

Grief and Loss • Major Life Transitions • Anxiety

Spiritual Issues • Communication • Conflict

Spiritual Issues • Communication • Conflict

Grief and Loss • Major Life Transitions • Anxiety

Spiritual Issues • Communication • Conflict

Grief and Loss • Major Life Transitions • Anxiety

Spiritual Issues • Communication • Conflict

Grief and Loss • Major Life Transitions • Anxiety

Spiritual Issues • Communication • Conflict

Spiritual Issues

Michael H Kreitsek, MA

• Communication • Conflict

Spiritual Issues • Communication • Conflict

Spiritual Issues • Communication • Conflict

Michael H Kreitsek, MA

Spiritual Issues • Communication • Conflict

Michael H Kreitsek, MA

Michael H Kreitsek, MA

Michael H Kreitsek, MA

Transpersonal Counseling Psychology

Michael H Kreitsek, MA

Michael H Kreitsek, MA

Transpersonal Counseling Psychology

Michael H Kreitsek, MA

Michael H Kreitsek, MA

Michael H Kreitsek, MA

Transpersonal Counseling Psychology

Michael H Kreitsek, MA

Michael H Kreitsek, MA

Transpersonal Counseling Psychology

Transpersonal Counseling Psychology

Transpersonal Counseling Psychology

Transpersonal Counseling Psychology

Transpersonal Counseling Psychology

Transpersonal Counseling Psychology

Transpersonal Counseling Psychology

Transpersonal Counseling Psychology

Transpersonal Counseling Psychology

Counseling with Wisdom and Compassion 805 698-0286 www.sustainableheart.com

Counseling From a Buddhist Perspective 805 698-0286

Counseling From a Buddhist Perspective 805 698-0286

Counseling for Uncertain Times

Counseling From a Buddhist Perspective 805 698-0286

Counseling From a Buddhist Perspective 805 698-0286

Counseling From a Buddhist Perspective 805 698-0286

Counseling with Wisdom and Compassion 805 698-0286

Counseling with Wisdom and Compassion 805 698-0286

Counseling with Wisdom and Compassion 805 698-0286

Counseling From a Buddhist Perspective 805 698-0286

Counseling From a Buddhist Perspective 805 698-0286

Counseling From a Buddhist Perspective 805 698-0286

2 THE INDEPENDENT MAY 2, 2024 INDEPENDENT.COM SANTA BARBARA FAMILY YMCA 36 Hitchcock Way, Santa Barbara, CA 93105 WELLBEING STARTS HERE WELLBEING STARTS HERE EVERYONE IS WELCOME AT THE Y Join June 1 - 16 and pay no join fee! Up to a $ 155 in savings! ciymca.org/2024

teen VOLUNTEER FAIR

Find your next job or volunteer opportunity!

The Teen Job & Volunteer Fair will be hosted at the Eastside Library. Teens will have the opportunity to meet with representatives from local businesses and organizations offerin g summer jobs and volunteer positions. The event will feature a diverse range of opportunities, from part-time jobs in retail a nd food service to internships with local non-profits. Volunteers will also have the chance to explore a variety of causes, such as an imal welfare, environmental conservation, and social justice.

Food and drinks will be available on a first-come, first-served basis.

Eastside Library

1102 E. Montecito Street

Wednesday, May 8, 2024 4 – 6 PM

Scan for more info!

Not feeling confident or needing to polish up on your skills? Visit or call Santa Barbara Public Library at (805) 564-5633 to schedule an appointment with a SBPL Works! staff member.

HOSTED BY:

INDEPENDENT.COM MAY 2, 2024 THE INDEPENDENT 3
Join us! This event is supported by grant funding provided by the Santa Barbara Foundation

May 7

Marine Biologist and Policy Expert Dr. Ayana Elizabeth Johnson What if We Get It Right? Visions of Climate Futures

Tue, May 7 (note new date) / 7:30 PM / UCSB Campbell Hall

Tickets start at $20

FREE for UCSB students (registration required; limited availability)

Marine biologist, policy advisor and writer Dr. Ayana Elizabeth Johnson encourages us to step away from hopelessness and explore what the future would look like if we forged ahead with solutions to address the climate crisis.

May 10

Award-winning Conservation Photographer Cristina Mittermeier

Between Land and Sea: Saving Our Oceans to Save Ourselves

Fri, May 10 (note new date) / 7:30 PM / UCSB Campbell Hall

Tickets start at $20 / $10 all students (with valid ID)

“The ocean isn’t just a victim of climate change – it is our solution.” – Cristina Mittermeier

Working at the intersection of art and science, National Geographic photographer Cristina Mittermeier drives conservation efforts through storytelling and explores how inextricably linked we are to that most sacred element – water.

May 17

2023 Pulitzer Prize Finalist and Bestselling Author Xochitl Gonzalez

Latinx Voices Are American Voices

Fri, May 17 / 7:30 PM / UCSB Campbell Hall

$20 / FREE for UCSB students (registration recommended)

Arrive starting at 5 PM for a LatinXtravaganza Santa Barbara, featuring Mujeres Makers Market, food trucks, DJs, live music and more.

In her acclaimed novels Olga Dies Dreaming and Anita de Monte Laughs

Last as well as her writings for The Atlantic, Xochitl Gonzalez examines class, gentrification and the American Dream with love and wry humor.

“Ayana Elizabeth Johnson embodies and inspires optimism in the fight against climate change, injecting creativity, joy and hope into an issue that often feels dire.”

Time magazine

4 THE INDEPENDENT MAY 2, 2024 INDEPENDENT.COM
(805) 893-3535 | www.ArtsAndLectures.UCSB.edu Earth, Air, Fire, Water Series Sponsors: Patricia & Paul Bragg Foundation, Audrey & Timothy O. Fisher, Justin Brooks Fisher Foundation, and Sara Miller McCune Justice for All Lead Sponsors: Marcy Carsey, Connie Frank & Evan Thompson, Eva & Yoel Haller, Dick Wolf, and Zegar Family Foundation Special Thanks:

“ I’ve never experienced a performer as genuinely talented, exuberant, and captivating as Jacob Collier. ”

“This was the greatest event I have been to, maybe in my life. ”

“Everyone, oldsters to toddlers, loved almost every minute. This guy wants music to be a joyful, inclusive experience, and it was! ”

“ His talent, improvisational piano work, and singing, just everything about the show - he kept the sold-out audience in his rapture the whole evening! ”

“ HAVE HIM BACK!!!! ”

Sun, May 19 / 7 PM / Arlington

INDEPENDENT.COM MAY 2, 2024 THE INDEPENDENT 5 Arlington event tickets can also be purchased at: (805) 963-4408 | (805) 893-3535 | www.ArtsAndLectures.UCSB.edu
Theatre Tickets start at $45
$20 UCSB students Back
Popular Demand
/
by
Santa Barbara raved about Collier’s debut in fall 2023...
6 THE INDEPENDENT MAY 2, 2024 INDEPENDENT.COM *APR= Annual Percentage Rate. The annual percentage rate (APR) is the cost of credit over the term of the loan expressed as an annual rate. Rate, points and APR may be adjusted based on several factors, including, but not limited to, loan amount, loan type, occupancy type, property type, loan to value and your credit score. Your final rate and points may be higher or lower than those quoted based on information relating to these factors, which may be determined after you apply. Fees, costs and monthly payment on your specific loan transaction may vary and could include additional fees and costs. For example, loans with LTVs more than 80% typically require mortgage insurance which will increase both your APR and monthly payment. Home Equity Variable Lines of Credit with Intro Rate. Requires minimum initial draw of $25,000 (or $25,000 plus any balance based on existing Kinecta home equity loan) at time of closing. The initial APR is not based on the index and margin used for later rate adjustments. It is based on an initial rate discount. The initial rate discount will be in effect for 12 months. The variable APR after the initial rate discount is based on The Wall Street Journal Prime Rate (the “index”) plus a margin. This rate may vary with changes in the Prime Rate. As of 09/01/2023 Prime Rate is 8.500%. The minimum floor rate is 4.00% and the maximum APR that can apply is 18.00%, this excludes state of Texas. CLTV up to 80%. The minimum credit limit and loan amount is $25,000, maximum is $500,000. 10-year draw period followed by a 20-year repayment period. $395 loan processing fee waived if (1) automatic payment plan from a Kinecta account is set up at closing; and (2) not replacing an existing Kinecta home equity loan originated in prior 12 months. ©2024 Kinecta Federal Credit Union | All Rights Reserved | Federally Insured by NCUA kinecta.org/heloc 866.983.0196 Goleta Branch 145 Santa Felicia Dr. Spend smart with a home equity line. 6.99%APR* variable intro. rate 8.875% APR after 12 months 01846 - 04/24 Ba nk ︱ Borrow ︱ Insu re ︱ Invest

Editor in Chief Marianne Partridge Publisher Brandi Rivera

Executive Editor Nick Welsh Senior Editor Tyler Hayden Senior Writer Matt Kettmann

Associate Editor Jackson Friedman Opinions Editor Jean Yamamura Arts, Culture, and Community Editor Leslie Dinaberg

Calendar Editor Terry Ortega Calendar Assistant Lola Watts

News Reporters Ryan P. Cruz, Callie Fausey Senior Arts Writer Josef Woodard

Copy Chief Tessa Reeg Copy Editor Nathan Vived Sports Editor Victor Bryant

Food Writer George Yatchisin Food & Drink Fellow Vanessa Vin Travel Writers Macduff Everton, Mary Heebner

Production Manager Ava Talehakimi Art Director Xavier Pereyra

Production Designer Jillian Critelli Graphic Designer Bianca Castro

Web Content Manager Don Brubaker

Columnists Dennis Allen, Gail Arnold, Sara Caputo, Christine S. Cowles, Roger Durling, Marsha Gray, Betsy J. Green, Melinda Palacio, Amy Ramos, Jerry Roberts, Starshine Roshell

Contributors Rob Brezsny, Melinda Burns, Ben Ciccati, Cheryl Crabtree, John Dickson, Camille Garcia, Keith Hamm, Rebecca Horrigan, Eric HvolbØll, Gareth Kelly, Shannon Kelley, Kevin McKiernan, Zoë Schiffer, Ethan Stewart, Tom Tomorrow, Kevin Tran, Maggie Yates, John Zant

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Advertising Representatives Camille Cimini Fruin, Suzanne Cloutier, Bryce Eller, Remzi Gokmen, Tonea Songer Digital Marketing Specialist Graham Brown

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Office Manager/Legal Advertising Tanya Spears Guiliacci Distribution Gregory Hall Interns Riley Burke, Nataschia Hadley, Isabella Leonard, Margaux Lovely, Jack Magargee, Tiana Molony, Claire Nemec, Chloe Shanfeld, Josephine Trilling, Sierra van der Brug

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Founding Staff Emeriti Audrey Berman, George Delmerico, Richard Evans, Laszlo Hodosy, Scott Kaufman Honorary Consigliere Gary J. Hill IndyKids Bella and Max Brown; Elijah Lee, Amaya Nicole, and William Gene Bryant; Henry and John Poett Campbell; Emilia Imojean Friedman; Finley James Hayden; Ivy Danielle Ireland; Madeline Rose and Mason Carrington Kettmann; Norah Elizabeth and Vincent James Lee; Izzy and Maeve McKinley

Print subscriptions are available, paid in advance, for $120 per year. Send subscription requests with name and address to subscriptions@independent.com. The contents of the Independent are copyrighted 2023 by the Santa Barbara Independent, Inc. No part may be reproduced without permission from the publisher. The publisher assumes no responsibility for unsolicited material. A stamped, self-addressed envelope must accompany all submissions expected to be returned. The Independent is available on the internet at independent.com. Press run of the Independent is 25,000 copies. Audited certification of circulation is available on request. The Independent is a legal adjudicated newspaper court decree no. 157386.

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The Second Vintage Is Back with Seven Days of $10 Glasses + Bidding Adieu to Bien Nacido’s Vineyard Guru by Matt Kettmann

McConnell’s Fine Ice Creams Celebrates 75 Years of Scoops

Alameda Park was full of sunshine, booths, live music, green cars, and us at the Earth Day Festival, which took place April 27-28. This past weekend, the Indy staff was out alongside the other 28,000 people the CEC reported to have. Our Independent booth was stocked with stickers, origami, and our Home and Garden issue, and we had a great time connecting with all of our readers who stopped by to say hi!

For Earth Day this year, we focused on ways to reuse and recycle our newspapers. You can reduce waste by sharing our paper with friends and family in our community! You can reuse it for many things wrapping paper, for cleaning, in compost, etc. even origami and newspaper roses, like the ones we had at our booth.

The Indy booth was situated in the public square, which gave us the best of both worlds of great music from the main stage while also hearing important updates on climate action. There were talks about gardening and big oil resistance, poetry readings, and discussions on solar power. The public square stage also hosted talks with multiple councilmembers, supervisors, and Senator Monique Limón.

Our staff had a great time exploring the kids’ corner, checking out the green car show, and trying delicious bites at the food court! And when we weren’t handing out our issue or talking with people who came to our booth, we shopped at the eco marketplace and enjoyed some savory sips at the beer and wine garden.

ARTFUL GIFTS FOR MOTHER’S DAY

Shop online now at www.sbmastore.net. MUSEUM STORE HOURS Tuesday – Saturday 10:30 am – 6 pm • Thursday 10:30 am – 8 pm • Sunday 10 am – 5 pm 1130 State Street • Santa Barbara, CA 93101

INDEPENDENT.COM MAY 2, 2024 THE INDEPENDENT 7 INSTAGRAM | SANTA BARBARA INDEPENDENT • NEWSLETTER | INDEPENDENT.COM/NEWSLETTERS
TABLE of CONTENTS volume 38 #955, May
2024 ON THE COVER: Illustration by Ben Ciccati. Design by Xavier Pereyra. Santa Barbara Wine Week 23 COVER STORY NEWS 9 OPINIONS 17 Letters 17 OBITUARIES 18 In Memoriam 19 THE WEEK 35 LIVING 39 FOOD & DRINK 45 Restaurant Guy 49 ARTS LIFE 51 ASTROLOGY.............................................. 55 CLASSIFIEDS 56
2-9,
30 FEATURE
FESTIVAL FUN
COURTESY

Farmers’ Market’s New Site Raises Concerns at City Council NEWS of the WEEK

Santa Barbara’s new downtown police station is scheduled to break ground this fall, but the city still has one loose end to tie up, since the ground that new station will sit on the commuter lot on Santa Barbara Street is the current home of the city’s Saturday farmers’ market. The city staff and the Santa Barbara Farmers’

HOMELESSNESS

Market Board of Directors decided to move it right to the heart of downtown to the intersection of State Street and Carrillo. Said to be easily accessible by bike, car, or public transit, the space, with two blocks closed off to cars, could easily accommodate the 100 farmers’ booths, their vans, and as many as 5,000 shoppers during peak season.

Your Car Is Your Castle

In response to a steady rise in the number of people living in their cars and vans by about 20 percent a year over the past three years local officials focusing on the issue managed to secure an $8.3 million state grant to “resolve” concentrations of car camping at 21 locations.

The immediate plan is to move about 300 of Santa Barbara’s 600 vehicularly homeless people onto one of the 27 parking lots now controlled by New Beginnings’ Safe Parking Program over the next two years. There, they can sleep in a secure parking lot that’s regularly monitored by Safe Parking staff while enjoying the amenities offered by a nearby porta-potty. The long-term plan is to get as many of these residents into temporary supportive housing a motel, perhaps or something more permanent as quickly as possible.

Based on the most recent Point-in-Time

Count which offers a quick, if imprecise, snapshot showing the relative size of Santa Barbara’s homeless population the number of people living in their vehicles jumped from 611 households last year to 710 by early this January. At any given time, about 200 people are living in their vehicles in one of the 27 parking lots Safe Parking manages.

According to county officials, the biggest jump in this population involved seniors and families with children. According to Kristine Schwartz, New Beginning’s executive director since 2013, Safe Parking has some clients in their nineties.

With the elimination of many emergency tenant protections enacted during the COVID crisis coupled with a rise in Santa Barbara’s already astronomical rents

Schwartz said the uptick in numbers are not surprising. She takes issue with Hollywood depictions like in the movie Nomadland in which van life is seen as

But the new location which would stretch on State Street between Figueroa and Canon Perdido streets, and on Carrillo from Chapala Street to Anacapa Street required the city to authorize a license agreement to operate in the public right of way. On Tuesday, the council approved the agreement, though the city’s fire and police departments, and Mayor Randy Rowse, expressed concerns over potential impacts on emergency services.

Fire Marshal Ryan DiGuilio pointed out that the proposed location is less than a block away from the city’s busiest fire station on Carrillo Street, and the closure would force the engines to make left turns into the busy intersection.

“It is going to impact our capability to respond quickly,” DiGuilio said.

The council voted 5-2 to approve the license agreement, including a $250,000 contract for vehicle gate barriers and storage trailers. Mayor Rowse and Councilmember Alejandra Gutierrez opposed. The approval also directs public safety departments to work with farmers’ market staff and the city administrator on potential safety concerns. The farmers’ market will start at its new location on State Street in September.

a quasi-romantic, if slightly down-and-out, alternative to traditional housing.

“People in our program don’t want to be living in their vehicles,” Schwartz said. “It’s not their choice. They have no options. It’s all about money.”

She said 40 percent of Safe Parking clients work full-time. Many have lived in Santa Barbara for decades but found themselves on hard times because a spouse died, they were fleeing domestic violence, or they faced a medical emergency. Safe Parking, she said, has a policy of not accepting people who just moved to Santa Barbara in hopes of securing a spot in one of her lots.

Schwartz bristles at the suggestion that those who can’t keep up with rising rents should simply move elsewhere. “To tell some 77-year-old man he has to move to Kansas City that’s just not realistic. They have family here. They have friends here. They have medical providers here. You don’t just move.”

Nearly $4 million of the grant will be used to hire about 35 new staff members. Half will do outreach work, connecting with people living in encampments now. The other half will go to housing navigators, people trained

All day on 4/25, students at UCSB joined universities across the country in establishing the “Popular University for Gaza” a “liberated zone” in the campus Student Resource Building. The demonstration and symbolic encampment were in solidarity with Gaza and the Palestinian people and demanding “financial transparency, the defense of Palestinian activists, a declaration of the occupation of the Palestinian people, and a divestment from all companies and partnerships” actively supporting Israel’s military offensive on Gaza, according to National Students for Justice in Palestine. No major incidents, arrests, or citations were reported during the day of demonstrations at UCSB. The university has not released a statement regarding the demands for divestment. Organizers said demonstrations will likely continue on UCSB’s campus until demands are met. UCSB academic workers and researchers against the war were scheduled to hold a walkout on 5/1, after deadline. For more, see independent.com/news

PUBLIC SAFETY

Harbor Patrol officers near Stearns Wharf were flagged down by passersby on 4/29, who said they had found a body near the Dolphin Fountain along Santa Barbara’s waterfront. The individual was deceased, Harbormaster Nathan Aldridge confirmed. City police officers arrived around 6:30 a.m., determining no foul play was apparent. On 4/30, the Sheriff-Coroner’s office announced the woman was Alexandria Grace Farstad, 32, of La Jolla and Riverside, California. According to Sheriff’s spokesperson Raquel Zick, her cause and manner of death are pending.

ENVIRONMENT

Nearly 30 years after the federal government declared the Southern California steelhead trout to be an endangered species, the California Fish and Game Commission declared the species to be officially endangered as well. The commission relied on scientific research papers indicating that over the past 25 years at a time when federal protections were in effect only 177 adult steelhead trout have been documented in any of the many coastal creeks and streams between Santa Maria and the Mexican border. Mark Capelli a steelhead restoration specialist with the National Marine Fisheries Services suggested the additional listing should better integrate considerations about the fish into the planning and review processes involving the many state agencies with projects that might impinge on fish passage.

INDEPENDENT.COM MAY 2, 2024 THE INDEPENDENT 9 APR. 25-MAY 2, 2024 NEWS BR IEFS CITY
For the latest news and longer versions of many of these stories, visit independent.com/news
CALLIE FAUSEY, JACKSON FRIEDMAN, TYLER HAYDEN, NICK WELSH, and JEAN YAMAMURA, with INDEPENDENT STAFF
State Grants $8.3 Million to Move People from Vehicles to Housing
CONT’D ON PAGE 12 CONT’D ON PAGE 11
COMMUNITY
PAUL WELLMAN FILE PHOTO SIERRA VAN DER BRUG
The Saturday farmers’ market is moving from its longtime home at the commuter lot on Santa Barbara Street to the intersection of State and Carrillo streets in September.

TRANSPORTATION

Getting Low-Income Riders on E-Bikes

At a time when e-bike traffic has stirred up an abiding sense of collective consternation in some quarters, the City of Santa Barbara’s electric bike-share franchisee BCycle is expanding its service capacity to better serve lowincome residents with a notable lack of any controversy. Last week, the City Council voted to accept a $1.5 million state grant that will help BCycle and City Hall cover the costs of fielding 50 additional e-bikes and 100 additional bike docks in downtownadjacent neighborhoods. Currently, the company owned by the Trek bicycle company stations 250 e-bikes on the streets of Santa Barbara and 500 docking stations where bikes are picked up and turned in.

The state funding will also help cover the cost of providing vouchers to low-income residents. For residents meeting the income requirements, the vouchers will cost $25 a

year plus sales tax. By contrast, BCycle’s annual pass currently goes for $225 a year.

Although BCycle has already offered special discounts to low-income riders, that program has never gained traction. That program accounts for less than 2 percent of all BCyle rides over the past three years. Councilmembers had high praise for BCycle’s existing program, but also stressed the importance of expanding outreach to the city’s Spanish-speaking populations.

Company officials acknowledge they’ve just scratched the surface so far. Many low-income residents, they noted, lack credit cards, don’t have cell phones, and may not be hooked up to the internet. BCycle is an app-based bike share program that relies on all three as the medium by which all transactions take place.

BCycle launched its Santa Barbara operation just as COVID hit. Its white, pedalassist e-bikes which go no faster than 17 miles per hour are considerably tamer than some of the friskier throttle rockets ridden by young teens, the ones frequently denounced for reckless riding practices and riding without their bike helmets safely strapped.

The state funds paid for with cap-andtrade revenues that allow oil companies and other greenhouse gas emitters to “buy” carbon-free credits are designed to fund a four-year program. Nick Welsh

Public Support Strong to Restore Vintage Aircraft Hangars

Two aircraft hangars said to be the “genesis” of the Santa Barbara Airport got a lot of love at the Santa Barbara City Council meeting on Tuesday, April 30. They were slated to either be demolished, relocated, rebuilt, or some combination of the three, but Kevin Haeberle of the Community Hot Rod Project stepped up to say his group was prepared to fund and restore the buildings through $1.5 million in grants that community members are “ready and willing to donate.” He was followed by a number of residents expressing their equally enthusiastic support.

City staff pegged the cost to restore the vintage hangars where they sit at about $2.1 million. The speakers suggested potential uses spanning from an auto and aviation museum to a place where automotive trades and design could be taught.

The General Western Aero Hangars date back to 1931 and border a section of the airport where a grandstand once viewed the first drag race sanctioned in the United States, Haeberle said. The field also hosted visits from aircraft legends such as Charles

Lindbergh and Amelia Earhart, John Blankenship of the Pierre Claeyssens Veterans Foundation reported. During World War II, the slough to the west of the hangars was filled in, and the airport expanded in that direction. Many indicated the two hangars may be the last of their kind in the United States.

They also sit in a spot prone to flooding from San Pedro Creek, not far from the corner of Hollister and Fairview avenues, and 15-foot storm walls might be necessary. While the corner is in the City of Goleta, the airport property occupies a gerrymandered part of the City of Santa Barbara. Rick Closson told the council that an earlier Airport Commission meeting on the hangars heard strong support from Goletans.

Councilmember Alejandra Gutierrez made the motion to proceed with public outreach on the options, saying she had a personal interest as her father was a mechanic and she grew up in his shop and loved classic cars. The motion passed unanimously. Jean Yamamura

10 THE INDEPENDENT MAY 2, 2024 INDEPENDENT.COM APR. 25-MAY 2, 2024
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CITY

Proposed Parking Rate Changes Punted

Some big changes could soon shake up how drivers pay for parking in downtown Santa Barbara.

The city is expecting at least a $7.1 million deficit in Fiscal Year 2025, and budget deliberations have already revealed some of the city’s plans to counter the dwindling revenues and growing expenses across the board. One of those plans, which according to city staff estimates may help the city save up to $3 million, is a broad restructuring of the Downtown Parking program, including a proposal to charge for onstreet parking for the first time in city history.

According to a report presented to the Finance Committee on Tuesday, the use of downtown’s paid parking lots has “substantially lowered” in recent years, and despite hourly fee increases in both 2023 and 2024 bringing a slight bump in revenue, the continued costs of the Downtown Parking operation and maintenance have forced the city to dip into a deficit and use up reserve funds for several years. And each year, the revenue shortfall grows, and the reserve funds are depleted. By the end of 2025, without any changes, the program’s deficit would exhaust the Downtown Parking Fund’s reserves, and the city would need a “substantial subsidy” from its general fund.

During the Finance Committee discussion, committee members Eric Friedman,

Gutierrez, and Meagan Harmon debated whether the proposal should be moved forward for full council discussion.

The committee had the option to recommend the changes to parking rates as proposed, or to ask the council to approve an alternative option to fund the costs for the Downtown Parking program. This could be through outdoor business facility fees using the general fund for maintenance, and funding capital projects through Measure C.

After much debate, the group decided to move forward with both options to allow the full council to make the decision, with the understanding that the committee wasn’t recommending one or the other.

“We are divided here,” Friedman said. “I think it’s best to let the whole council talk it out and we can make our points rather than trying to force one or the other.”

in the mysterious art of finding affordable units in Santa Barbara’s private housing market.

Another $3 million will be spent on short-term infusions of cash that enable clients to transition from one of Safe Parking’s 27 parking lots to more permanent housing. This fund will cover security deposits, first month’s rent, and other temporary subsidies designed to get someone under a roof and enclosed by four walls. It will also help defray expenses incurred by the myriad of counselors and social service navigators New Beginnings’ provides. Another $700,000 will be set aside for interim shelters through Safe Parking Program lots and hotels.

are plagued with chronic and expensive upkeep issues, Schwartz explained. That can be a problem because New Beginnings requires residents to clear out by 7 a.m. Often people who reside in vintage RVs are less inclined to get off the streets and seek permanent shelter.

Safe Parking is not for everybody, and it doesn’t try to be. For example, it does not accept the big RVs often seen at the public parking lot by Castillo and Carrillo streets in downtown Santa Barbara. They

The Safe Parking program started 20 years ago this summer and has become a much emulated and studied program by other communities dealing with the proliferation of automotive homelessness.

INDEPENDENT.COM MAY 2, 2024 THE INDEPENDENT 11 CONT’D NEWS of the WEEK
Alejandra
n HOMELESSNESS CONT’D FROM P. 9 JEAN YAMAMURA The Safe Parking Program does not accept RVs on its lots, citing their chronic and expensive upkeep issues. PAUL WELLMAN FILE PHOTO Santa Barbara is proposing to change parking rates in city lots. In surface lots, the free period would be cut to 15 minutes, with a $1.50 charge for every 15 minutes afterward. C10-0000293 | C10-0001190 | C10-0001124 farmacyshop.com @farmacy.ca SANTA BARBARA 128 W MISSION STREET (805) 880-1207 SANTA YNEZ 3576 MADERA STREET (805) 693-4685 ISLA VISTA 6555 PARDALL ROAD (805) 454-8473 PREMIUM CANNABIS PRODUCTS AWARD-WINNING CANNABIS SHOPS VISIT OUR WEBSITE FOR MORE DETAILS OUR REALLY BIG DEALS ARE A REALLY BIG DEAL WEEKEND BOGO OFFERS FRI. MAY 3RD - SUN. MAY 5 Not stackable with storewide discounts. Buy any (2) PLUS products Get (2) for just $2 Buy any 3.5g jar Get one for $2 LIMITED TIME ONLY.

YOU’RE INVITED TO SBPL’S

Bike repair +diagnostic

Clothing repair

Bring your bike and clothing, and our volunteers will assist in mending, fixing, and repairing your items at no cost.

Upcycle your clothes and totes with fun stamps!

Bring an empty container and learn about refillable products from Sunkissed Pantry and the IV Food Co-op!

SATURDAY, MAY 11, 2024

COURTS & CRIME

S.B. Embezzler Ordered to Pay $2.4M in Fines, Restitution

It’s not often that the victims of whitecollar crimes get paid back in full. Plus interest.

But that was the case on April 18 when a Santa Barbara judge ordered Adam Pirozzi, a former property manager convicted of embezzlement, to pay $1.3 million in restitution to his victims. He’d stolen approximately half that amount around $650,000 from the owners of the properties he supervised.

Pirozzi, 42, was also ordered to pay $1.1 million in fines to the court, serve five years of probation, and spend 30 days in jail. He had previously pleaded no contest to two felony counts of “embezzlement by a real estate broker” and surrendered his real estate license.

officer who oversaw the department’s union accounts. They also used it in the ongoing matter of Craig Case, a private investigator and TV personality accused of grand theft and fraud.

According to Nelson, Pirozzi started amassing his stolen wealth in 2019 by diverting money from his clients’ trust accounts which held rent payments, security deposits, and owner contributions to a fund only he controlled. He then used the money for his own investments.

In a separate but related civil matter, Pirozzi remains in settlement talks with former business partner and major Santa Barbara landholder Ed St. George over the potential sale of his home in Hope Ranch. He will begin serving his jail sentence next month.

The rare, full recovery of funds was owed to prosecutors freezing Pirozzi’s assets the moment they filed criminal charges against him in 2021. Those assets included multiple bank accounts and property investments, including an office building on De la Vina Street.

Oftentimes, explained lead prosecutor Casey Nelson, white-collar criminals facing charges will quickly liquidate everything they own to avoid paying back victims and the hefty penalties. “A lot of these white-collar guys are predators all the way,” he said.

The California law Nelson utilized to put Pirozzi’s money and properties on ice is an “invaluable tool to recover funds,” he said, a tool the District Attorney’s Office uses often. Prosecutors recently cited it to secure $1.4 million in restitution for the embezzlement victims of Manuel “Ed” Torres, a former deputy probation

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COURTS & CRIME

CONT’D FROM P. 9

Nelson thanked DA investigator Kristin Shamordola for her legwork in the case, including definitively linking Pirozzi to his properties, which he had hidden behind a maze of LLCs. His management company, AMP Core, Inc., operated under several fictitious business names.

Nelson said his office would continue acting quickly when necessary to freeze assets so defendants don’t dodge responsibility. “It speaks to the DA’s Office being able to conduct its own investigations and get on the ground early,” he said.

In large cities like Los Angeles, he explained, suspects are often able to purge their assets in the time it takes police detectives to submit their report and prosecutors to formally file charges. Tyler Hayden

Solvang man Eduardo Andres Sanchez, 23, was arrested 4/28 after a deputy pulled him over on Mission Drive at Pine Street in Solvang and reportedly found he was driving under the influence and in possession of a “loaded, un-serialized short-barreled rifle along with narcotics,” according to Sheriff’s Office spokesperson Raquel Zick. Sanchez was booked into the county’s Main Jail for misdemeanor DUI and felony charges that include transportation of narcotics for sales, possession of a controlled substance for sales, illegal possession of an assault weapon, manufacturing a short-barreled rifle, felon in possession of a firearm, and prohibited person carrying a loaded firearm. His bail is set at $250,000.

S.B. man Andrew Raymond Burgher, 34, pleaded guilty to two counts of second-degree murder for his role in a fatal DUI crash on Cathedral Oaks Road in 2021, according to an announcement by DA John Savrnoch on 4/24. The charges stem from

the 10/26/21, when Burgher was driving his Toyota 4Runner while under the influence, speeding in the direction of Santa Barbara, when he crashed into a 2002 Mustang sedan, killing the Mustang’s driver, Gilberto Arteaga-Gutierrez, 40, of S.B., and passenger, Silvia Velasco, 45, of Lompoc. Burgher is expected to be sentenced to 15 years to life in state prison at his sentencing on 6/13.

In the bankruptcy of the Santa Barbara News-Press , much hinges on the ownership of the company’s two buildings: 715 Anacapa Street downtown and 725 South Kellogg Avenue in Goleta, which were assessed in 2000 at $27.5 million. When the daily paper’s parent company, Ampersand Publishing LLC, went into Chapter 7 last July, it declared it had $116,000 in assets and $5 million in liabilities. The two buildings had been transferred by owner Wendy McCaw to herself in 2014 through two separate LLCs, an allegedly fraudulent transfer that was to be heard at the bankruptcy court 4/24 but was postponed to 6/5. Testimony from the News-Press accountant was also delayed from 4/25 to 6/6. n

12 THE INDEPENDENT MAY 2, 2024 INDEPENDENT.COM APR. 25-MAY 2, 2024
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Victims’ Services Cuts Bleed into S.B.

Major Reductions in Federal Funding for Crime Victim Services Are Being Felt

Hundreds of crime victims’ advocates gathered at the California State Capitol on Tuesday, April 30, rallying to protect critical funding for victim services, now facing severe cuts looming at the federal level.

The Victims of Crime Act (VOCA) backed by fines collected from federal white-collar cases is the largest federal funding source for these services, including rape crisis centers, domestic violence shelters, and child abuse programs. Next year’s proposed funding was cut by nearly $700 million, potentially forcing victim service providers nationwide to lay off staff, cut programs, or even shut their doors.

table. “So we are looking at a decrease in human and financial resources for dealing with the needs of victims in our community,” she said.

In California, this significant shortfall translates to a 43 percent reduction in victim assistance funding, despite an increase in violence rates across the state and rising demand for services. Advocates across California are urging state leaders to allocate $200 million in ongoing funding to preserve these local services.

Santa Barbara County’s victim service providers are scrambling to figure out how to survive. For the North County Rape Crisis and Child Protection Center, the cuts translate into a $183,000 loss that will “directly impact the Center’s staffing and its capacity to provide essential services,” according to Executive Director Ann McCarty.

Combined with a $288,000 cut in funding for Standing Together to End Sexual Assault (STESA) in South County, they are looking at a more than $400,000 loss between just two of the county’s rape crisis centers alone.

“I just don’t know what to do,” said STESA Executive Director Elsa Granados. “These are the funds that we use to pay people to go out in the middle of the night or throughout the day to support a survivor, or to take those crisis calls from survivors or their loved ones.”

The COVID-19 pandemic and rising costs of living have already strained resources and impacted staffing at both rape crisis centers. At STESA, they recently raised their wages to be competitive with nearby areas, “and, still, it looks like we need to raise them more, while at the same time we’re experiencing these cuts,” Granados explained.

“We have savings that we can use, but it’s not sustainable,” she added. “Over time, those savings will be exhausted.”

Referrals to other centers are also off the

Other local victim service organizations, including Domestic Violence Solutions, Child Abuse Listening and Meditation (CALM), and Court Appointed Special Advocates (CASA), will experience similar budget cuts and a reduced capacity to provide comprehensive services.

“When you consider the potential cuts to other critical services the total financial impact is staggering,” McCarty said. “While we’re doing everything we can to avoid layoffs, we might have to leave positions unfilled. This means fewer staff members will be shouldering more responsibilities, potentially increasing unemployment and the need for additional social services. It’s a dire situation, and we’re praying we can navigate these challenges without further harming those we serve.”

ValorUS, a coalition of California rape crisis centers, is actively lobbying both state and federal governments to address the reductions in funding something the federal government indicates may have future solutions, but lacks immediate remedies on the national level.

Two bills are currently making their way through the California Assembly Assembly Bill 1956 and Assembly Bill 2432 to boost funding for victim services by respectively requiring the state to supplement reduced federal funding and create other revenue sources.

However, California’s anticipated steep budget shortfall will likely complicate any current funding proposals to alleviate the federal cuts on the state level. Without solutions, California’s victim service providers will have to make tough financial decisions, and organizations like STESA and the North County Rape Crisis Center expect to rely more heavily on community donations to make it through the next couple of years.

Thu, May 9 / Granada Theatre 4:30-6 PM: Program / 6-7:30 PM: Reception

$200 / $25 UCSB students

Ticket includes digital access to the 2024 Economic Outlook Publication and a one-hour reception

Speakers:

Rick Caruso

Founder and Executive Chairman | Caruso

A Conversation with Rick Caruso

Founder of one of the largest privately held real estate companies in the U.S., Rick will share his experience adopting a successful strategy for development: imaginative retail and mixed-use destinations.

Gene Deering

Principal | Radius Commercial Real Estate State Street: Running of the Bulls

A principal at Radius Commercial Real Estate and a UCSB Economics alum, Gene will bring his nearly two decades of local commercial real estate and business experience to give us the latest on the state of State Street.

Peter Rupert

Director | UCSB Economic Forecast Project Economic Update

Peter is the director of the Economic Forecast Project and a professor in the UCSB Department of Economics. He is also associate director of the UCSB Laboratory for Aggregate Economics and Finance with Nobel Laureate, Finn Kydland.

INDEPENDENT.COM MAY 2, 2024 THE INDEPENDENT 13 CONT’D NEWS of the WEEK
PUBLIC SAFETY
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INGRID BOSTROM
(805) 893-3535 | www.ArtsAndLectures.UCSB.edu Event Tickets & Information: (805) 899-2222 | www.GranadaSB.org Economic Forecast Project
STESA Executive Director Elsa Granados Rick Caruso Gene Deering Peter Rupert
FOUNDING SPONSOR PLATINUM SPONSOR SPECIAL THANKS TO GOLD SPONSORS UCLA Health American Riviera Bank KEYNOTE SPONSOR 817 State on the Paseo PALLADIUM SPONSOR Deckers Brands
2024 Santa Barbara County ECONOMIC SUMMIT
Featured

Elite Stargazers Celebrate 10 Years

Las Cumbres Observatory Marks a Decade of Achievements and Discoveries

Ten years ago, Las Cumbres Observatory (LCO) flipped the switch on its global network of robotic telescopes. The first and still only network of its kind allows astronomers to continually monitor fleeting celestial events, even as the Earth rotates and night skies give way to day.

Headquartered in Goleta and now boasting 13 telescopes in its network from Texas to China, LCO is a major partner and contributor to the scientific community at large, regularly working with NASA, the European Space Agency, and other leading organizations.

Here, we catalog 10 of the local nonprofit’s biggest discoveries and achievements over the past decade. Much of the information was provided by Dr. Sandy Seale, LCO’s director of development.

We spoke at length as well with technologist and LCO founder Wayne Rosing about what’s next for the network, including its growing education program. That interview can be found exclusively on Independent.com

And be sure to check out LCO’s public open house on Thursday, May 2, at 5:30 p.m. Visit lco.global to register.

1. Proof of Concept: This breakthrough in 2017 proved how invaluable LCO’s global telescope network is to astrophysicists everywhere. The team was part of an international group of scientists who discovered and made some of the first observations of a kilonova, a massive type of celestial explosion caused by two neutron stars swirling together. As soon as LCO received the merge alert, it switched on its robotic network, trained it on the constellation Hydra, and watched the kilonova unfold for five straight days even as the Earth turned, first from its telescopes in Chile, then Australia, and again in South Africa.

2. Solving an Old Mystery: A worldwide team led by LCO discovered the first convincing evidence for a new type of stellar explosion an electron-capture supernova. While they have been theorized for 40 years, real-world examples have been elusive. They are thought to arise from the explosions of massive super-asymptotic giant branch (SAGB) stars, for which there has also been scant evidence. The 2017

findings shed new light on the thousand-year mystery of the supernova in ad 1054 that was seen all over the world in the daytime, before eventually becoming the Crab Nebula.

3. White Dwarf Thief: White dwarf stars are the dead cores of what used to be normal stars, like our sun. The prevailing theory over many years was that supernovae explosions occurred when two white dwarfs spiraled together and merged. A recent report by LCO detailed how one particular white dwarf actually stole matter from a large, living companion star before exploding and destroying both. “We’ve seen a supernova obliterating planets in science fiction, as happened in 2009’s Star Trek,” said LCO staff scientist Andy Howell in announcing the discovery. “That’s nothing! They can wreck nearby stars too. The universe is crazier than science fiction authors have dared to imagine.”

6. New Comet Spotter: Comet 46P/Wirtanen is a greencolored comet that in 2018 passed relatively close to Earth, just 30 times farther away than the moon. The flyby gave scientists the opportunity to collect detailed observations of its coma (the nebulous envelope of gas and dust around its nucleus) and tails that stretch millions of miles. LCO contributed to the worldwide data-gathering by building a new instrument that contained a camera and specialized filters tuned to the specific gasses emitted by comets.

7. The DART Mission: In a mission straight out of a disaster flick, NASA scientists with assistance from LCO and others successfully conducted the Double Asteroid Redirection Test, or DART, during which a spacecraft the size of a vending machine launched from Vandenberg Space Force Base, slammed into a small asteroid at a screaming 14,000 mph, and nudged it from its course. The 2022 test, conducted in the name of planetary defense, proved that if an asteroid were to set its sights on Earth, we might stand a chance.

8. A Chance Alignment: On April 18, 2019, the European Space Agency’s Gaia mission alerted astronomers worldwide to an unusually bright but fleeting celestial event: a gravitational microlensing event called Gaia19bld. The temporary, chance alignment between two unrelated star systems produced twin images of the background star and gave scientists their first opportunity to actually observe the arc-shaped images move in real time, unlocking key information about the phenomena.

4. Global Sky Partners: LCO launched its education program in 2017 by offering 1,000 free hours of observation time on its telescopes to teachers and students around the world. An absolute success, the Global Sky Partners program now works with 37 different schools and institutions with participants many of them high-school age searching for gravitational waves and conducting long-term studies of asteroids, among other projects.

5. The Zombie Star: Over the last century, astronomers have observed thousands of exploding stars, called supernovae. In all cases, they marked the death of the star. LCO staff discovered a remarkable exception: a star that refused to die and detonated multiple times over a period of more than 50 years. “This supernova breaks everything we thought we knew about how they work,” said LCO fellow Iair Arcavi at the time. “It’s the biggest puzzle I’ve encountered in almost a decade of studying stellar explosions.”

9. Double-Detonation Supernova: This January, LCO staff uncovered the origins of an unusual Type Ia supernova, giving insight into what makes them explode in a rare colorshift of red to blue. Type Ia supernovae are nature’s best distance indicators and have been used to map the expansion of the universe, revealing the presence of dark energy. But key details of their origin, including how explosions are triggered, had remained elusive for nearly a century.

10. Rogue Black Hole: Burped out from the collapsing core of a massive star, a lone black hole was spotted for the first time by astronomers in February 2022. Until then, all stellar-mass black holes had been detected in binary systems. This isolated wanderer, aimlessly drifting through space some 5,000 light years from Earth, was finally seen using a technique called “microlensing” that measures the brightness of light bent by gravitational fields. n

14 THE INDEPENDENT MAY 2, 2024 INDEPENDENT.COM SCIENCE APR. 25-MAY 2, 2024
This simulation of a supermassive black hole shows how it distorts its starry backdrop and captures light, producing a black hole silhouette.
NASA/LCO NASA
An LCO and Hubble Space Telescope color composite of the electron-capture supernova 2018zd (the large white dot on the right) and the host starburst galaxy NGC 2146 (toward the left)

HOUSING

Will ‘The Orchard’ Housing Proposal Take Root?

A Goleta Family’s Plan to Bring 1,200 Units of Housing Hits a Wall with County Planners

by Ryan P. Cruz

This week, the county Board of Supervisors will move forward with a plan to rezone at least 16 sites to accommodate more than 7,600 units of housing on the South Coast, including some former agricultural land, school properties, and vacant lots. But a proposal by a Goleta family to transform 60 acres of orchards into a 1,200-unit mixed-income housing development complete with its own parks, daycare, café, and pharmacy was nixed from the list of potential rezones by the county Planning Commission at the last minute. It was a shock to many, including the family that has owned the property for decades.

FAMILY BUSINESS

The Giorgi family has owned and farmed the piece of land at the corner of Hollister Avenue and Ward Drive for decades. Its rows of lemon and avocado trees are one of the last bits of undeveloped land left on Hollister Avenue, sandwiched between Goleta Valley Cottage Hospital and Old Town Goleta, in the county’s unincorporated area.

Stan Giorgi, the latest in a long line of family farmers, now owns the property with his four siblings, all of whom were born and raised in Goleta. After graduating from Dos Pueblos High School, Giorgi studied agriculture management at UC Davis before he returned home to work with his father. But while Stan Giorgi and the fourth generation of the family kept up the farming business, the fifth generation was not interested in farming.

A NEW VISION

The Nelsons got to work on putting together a team of nationally renowned architects and planners to design exactly what the county wanted: a mixed-income development with plenty of amenities for the diverse population. The team produced a refined project that would usually take years of work in only a matter of months.

In November 2023, they filed an application under the “builder’s remedy,” which would allow the project a quick trip through the county review process as long as it promised at least 20 percent affordable units. This application, Jeff Nelson said, was to ensure that the development wouldn’t sit in review limbo like their previous projects, which took up to a decade from application to construction. It would also keep the project alive even if the county refused a rezone as part of the Housing Element.

So, when Giorgi learned that his property might be a prime site for rezoning to accommodate some of the 4,000 units on the South Coast required by the state, he began to envision a “legacy” project that could provide the muchneeded housing but in a responsible way, created by people who lived in and cared for the Eastern Goleta Valley.

Giorgi reached out to father-and-son duo Jeff and Jason Nelson of The Oak Creek Company, a Goleta-based development group that specializes in transforming traditional family properties into new housing communities that they themselves actually want to live in. Their previous projects include the Tree Farm, a former Christmas-tree lot off Patterson Avenue that was owned by the Cavaletto family for decades. Jason Nelson, a San Marcos graduate, now lives there with his family.

When the county hosted a developer workshop in March, which amounted to a beauty contest for the potential rezone sites, Giorgi and Nelson presented their latest vision for “The Orchard,” a 1,177unit mixed-income development promising nearly 40 percent affordable units. This includes 444 units below market-rate, with 264 offered for low-income renters, 120 for moderate-income households, and 60 “workforce” units that would be administered through the South Coast Chamber of Commerce’s housing consortium.

Renderings revealed a new neighborhood of different types of housing apartments, courtyard flats, live-work lofts, and townhomes and every type of community amenity imaginable, including a preschool, market, café/deli, and several publicly available parks throughout.

Jeff Nelson described The Orchard as a community that people where people would want to raise their families. “We wanted something to be proud of,” he said.

They were confident that their site was in the best spot, surrounded by already developed land, Old Town Goleta, and enough water rights. And they had proven themselves willing to be flexible with county requests. After the developer workshop, it seemed that The Orchard was a frontrunner for a county rezone, even though Goleta leaders and residents had expressed reservations about rezoning agricultural land that, once developed, would never return.

FEELING LEFT OUT

On April 1, the county Planning Commission held its final meeting to decide which sites they would recommend to the Supervisors for rezoning. Of the 18 properties considered, including many along Hollister Avenue,

and after much deliberation, the Planning Commissioners cut two from the list. One was The Orchard.

This took the Giorgi team by surprise. Especially since Supervisor Laura Capps, who represents the district in which the project sits, has been encouraging all the developers to include a larger percentage of affordable housing. Most of the projects offered only 20 percent of units as affordable. Only The Orchard promised 37.8 percent.

Goleta City Councilmember James Kyriaco, however, has been opposed to the project for some time. He argued it would be too much of a strain on Old Town Goleta’s resources and would “disproportionately” benefit from the city without contributing toward it.

He also said that the Giorgi family “took advantage” of the city when a planned Goleta roundabout required buying part of the Giorgi property. According to Kyriaco, the City of Goleta had to pay $160,000 to the family to complete the roundabout.

“Which their representatives now tout as a key reason to pick their project,” he said. “We had to pay them to make their project more feasible.”

“As of right now, I would ask that this one project come out,” Kyriaco said. “The other projects provide community benefits and diverse housing options that will enhance and support Old Town without as much risk of gentrification.”

NOT DEAD YET

Despite this setback, The Orchard still has a future. The county Board of Supervisors has the final call during its final rezone hearing on May 3, and it may have to rezone all the potential sites if there still aren’t enough affordable units to meet the state’s goals.

But even if the county refuses to rezone the property, it might come at a cost. The Orchard could use the “builder’s remedy,” albeit with 180 fewer moderate-income units.

INDEPENDENT.COM MAY 2, 2024 THE INDEPENDENT 15 CONT’D NEWS of the WEEK
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Aerial photo of The Orchard property on Hollister Avenue
INGRID BOSTROM COURTESY
Father-and-son developers Jeff and Jason Nelson are hoping to develop nearly 1,200 units near Old Town Goleta with “The Orchard.”

SBPD Declared Exemplary

Use-of-Force Numbers Down, Citizen Complaints Down

The Santa Barbara Police Department got a near standing ovation from members of its Fire & Police Commission, who all praised the police department, its command staff, and Police Chief Kelly Gordon for the department’s “levels of effort, transparency, and data reporting” as being “exemplary.” The commission was revamped in the wake of the George Floyd murder of 2020 to provide a forum for the community to address potential issues of excessive force, police misconduct, and the possibility of ethnically based “bias by proxy.”

According to the first official commission statement, penned by Commission Chair Linda Dozer, there was a 37 percent reduction in use-of-force incidents over the last year, bringing the total from 147 to 93. Last year, the statement noted, there had been 26 complaints of officer misconduct, of which eight were sustained.

So far this year, there have been two. Both are currently under investigation; one was for failure to take reasonable action, and the other was for being disrespectful and discourteous in dealing with a member of the pubic. One of the complaints was filed by a member of the public; the other came from department administrators. “The numbers speak for themselves,” declared Dozer, a former FBI agent.

The commissioners got a significant data dump at last week’s hearing: The ethnic makeup of the police department closely mirrors that of the community at large: 55.5 percent of

the city’s population and 51 percent of the sworn officers in the department are white; 36 percent of the city’s population and 33 percent of the department is Hispanic; 1.5 percent of the city’s population is African American, and 3.38 percent of the department is categorized as either Asian or African American.

Though 75 percent of the sworn officers are male and 24.6 percent are female, the department’s leadership is split 50-50 based on gender; nationally, only 4 percent of leadership positions are held by female officers.

City police detain roughly 850 individuals per month: 47 percent white, 41 percent Hispanic, and 6 percent African American. Of those arrested without a warrant, 10.45 were Black, 13.99 were Hispanic, and 9.9 were white.

Commander Charles Katsapis said the data was examined to determine whether there was evidence of “bias by proxy,” meaning whether members of underrepresented communities were overrepresented when it came to police action. “I don’t see any massive anomalies that are cause for concern.” Commissioner Lizzie Rodriguez said the results should reassure members of the communities inclined to be afraid of police to be “less scared.”

Commission Co-Chair Gary Hill was no less enthusiastic, stating, “I think this is incredible. I think the proof is in the pudding.” Hill had another meeting to attend, so time for greater discussion and dissection of the data was limited.

No mention was made during the meeting that former

police sergeant Brian Larson — once head of the department’s detectives division — would be facing a termination action in front of the city’s Civil Service Commission later this week answering allegations that he created a hostile work environment for female officers under his command. Larson, who enjoyed a reputation as a talented if abrasive detective, had been recommended for termination two years ago after an internal investigation concluded that 11 out of 13 allegations against him had been substantiated. Larson’s Civil Service hearing started behind closed doors this Monday and is scheduled to conclude this Wednesday. The specific details of internal investigations are not shared with members of the commission. n

16 THE INDEPENDENT MAY 2, 2024 INDEPENDENT.COM CONT’D PUBLIC SAFETY APR. 25-MAY 2, 2024 NEWS of the WEEK
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obituaries

Gloria Louise Macartney

7/30/1942 - 3/20/2024

Our beloved mother Gloria L. Macartney passed away peacefully on March 30,2024 surrounded by family at Valle Verde health center.

Gloria was born in Santa Barbara, California, to the late Ralph Frescas and Bertha Ryder (Mata). She is survived by her brother James Frescas (Gloria), her three daughters, Toni Lee Gonzales (Arthur), Nicole Morello (Edward), and Yvette Duarte (Jeronimo), and 13 grandchildren, 26 great-grandchildren and 18 great-great grandchildren. Gloria is preceded by her parents Ralph and Bertha, her son Ralph, grandson Edward, and granddaughter Monique.

Gloria was raised in Santa Barbara and attended the local schools.

Gloria loved her family and was a dedicated daughter, mother, grandmother, auntie, and caregiver. She was always the life of the party and loved to laugh and have a good time. Gloria was known for her small business “Gloria’s Fiesta Dresses” as a seamstress and was involved with Old Spanish Days Fiestas at a young age. Gloria shared this love with her daughters and grandchildren. She made Fiesta dresses for her children and grandchildren as they participated in the Old Spanish Days parades and performed during fiesta. Gloria loved making fiesta dresses for little girls who were in the children’s fiesta parade for many years. If you see little ones in polka dots it’s likely made by our loving mother, Gloria.

Gloria is loved and missed by her loving daughters, family and friends. A celebration of life will be held at Tucker’s Grove, Area 5 Kiwanis Meadows, at 1 p.m. on Saturday May 4th. The family extends this invitation to those who had the honor of knowing Gloria. Our loving mother, grandmother, nana G aka GG is missed by us all. She will live in our hearts forever.

Her daughters wish to thank the leadership team at Valle Verde, specifically Melissa, Jeremiah, Ann and the amazing healthcare team of angels at Valle Verde’s Health Center who took

such great care of our loving mother over the last two years, up until her final days. A special thank you to the loving team at Assisted Hospice Care specifically Aretha, Marianne and Denise. In lieu of flowers please make donations to Valle Verde Foundation Freda Fuller Fund. Valle Verde Retirement Community 900 Calle de los Amigos, Santa Barbara, CA 93105.

John Thomas Burgess Balkwill, Jr. 1/15/1952 - 2/7/2024

John Thomas Burgess Balkwill, Jr., passed away suddenly on February 7, 2024, in Santa Barbara, California. He was 72. John was born in London, Ontario, Canada, to John and Betty (Howe) Balkwill. He emigrated with his family to Detroit, Michigan in 1956, and then moved to Greensburg, Indiana in 1958, where he spent most of his childhood and whose rural, small-town environment would play an important role in shaping John’s attitudes throughout his life. In 1967, John returned to Michigan with his family and graduated from Northville High School in 1970. He attended the University of Notre Dame, where his sophomore year studying at St. Mary’s College in Rome had a profound influence on his life’s direction. After graduating with a Bachelor of Arts in English Literature, John moved briefly to Santa Barbara, where among other jobs he worked as the maitre’d at the Santa Barbara Inn.

After his brief stint in Santa Barbara, John returned to Michigan and took up residence in Ann Arbor, where he would live for nearly a decade, forming many life-long relationships and meeting his future wife, Nina “Kim” Kramer. During this period, John returned frequently to Italy, with Verona as his base of operations, learning to love all things Italian and making a living principally by

importing gold jewelry and selling it to Detroit-area jewelers.

John’s first experience in the book arts was as a bookbinder in Ann Arbor, where he started as an investor in the Bessenberg Bindery with two colleagues in 1982. John’s work in the bindery sparked a deeper interest in the book arts, and ultimately led to his leaving Ann Arbor and pursuing an MFA degree from the University of Alabama’s Institute for the Book Arts in Tuscaloosa. While there, he studied letterpress printing and the art of fine bookmaking with the internationally recognized private press printer Gabriel Rummonds.

After obtaining his MFA, John worked with Harold Berliner’s Type foundry in Grass Valley, California, then helped Greg Peterson start up the Huckleberry Press in Incline Village, Nevada. John also taught book design and printing at the University of Nevada-Reno during this time, where he was the Associate Director of the Black Rock Press.

In 1996, John and Kim moved from Reno to Santa Barbara, where he set up his own business, the Lumino Press, dedicated to producing handprinted and bound limited edition books, prints and other quality materials. John designed and printed limited editions in collaboration with numerous well-known artists and authors including Pulitzer prize-winning writers Gary Snyder, Daniel J. Boorstin and James McPherson, and the Nobel laureate Wole Soyinka. He frequently collaborated on artists’ books and portfolios with Mary Heebner, Jacquelyn McBain, Mark Ryden, and Peter Goin among others, as well as with various galleries and collectors.

Mary Heebner was John’s close friend as well as collaborator. She reflected on their shared artistic pursuits: “Over 25 years, John printed 19 of my artists books, under the imprint Simplemente Maria Press”. He steered me away from the gutter of bad taste, advised me on type, design, and tradition. We laughed, kibitzed, shared tales of past adventures, belted out old 50s songs, snippets of Italian drinking songs, or arias, all the while working together to create discrete objects of beauty. John knew that letters deftly placed to become words, that could signify ideas, set on a page in a beautiful way mattered.”

Mary’s husband, Macduff Everton, added,  “we both depended on him for his input, for the final say on any of our projects. We relied on him for his friendship and acumen. In book design, all

the little suggestions that no one will ever see because they were so right, they don’t call attention to themselves, the whole reason for classic composition and design, to be so right that it simply, elegantly, works. When friends and family came to town, we always included John. He was more family than friend, a fine distinction indeed. He was curious, maybe one of the nicest traits one can hope for in another human being, along with kindness, generosity, and humor. He had all of those.”

Mary also shared the origin of the name of John’s Santa Barbara business, The Lumino Press: “He told me of the epiphanic moment that influenced him to pursue the printer’s art. One afternoon, he sought shelter from a storm under the coffered ceiling of the Pantheon in Rome, still the largest unreinforced concrete dome in the world. The tempest subsided, and a ray of beatific sunlight beamed through the dome’s oculus, open to the heavens. He would name his press The Lumino.”

John was an accomplished print maker, having learned the techniques of wood engraving from John DePol, the dean of American wood engravers, and Japanese woodblock printmaking from Akira Kurosaki, one of the most respected contemporary Japanese printmakers. He also produced and exhibited photomontages, collages and watercolor paintings.

John’s graphic art and limitededition books have been exhibited widely and acquired by numerous private and public collections. His work has been exhibited at the Book Club of California in San Francisco, the University of Michigan Museum of Art, Occidental College and the Nevada Museum of Art. His graphic art is in the permanent collections of Stanford University, the Library of Congress, the University of Michigan, Brown University and the Book Club of California among many others.

John loved everything about Santa Barbara, and appreciated the opportunity his chosen profession there afforded him to cross paths with a diverse and accomplished group of individuals, many of whom would become his friends as well as clients.

While known mostly for his artistic talents, John was also widely admired as a world-class raconteur, a talent predicated both on his genuine interest in everyone he met and his near encyclopedic knowledge on a seemingly endless array of diverse subjects. John loved nothing more than an extended conversation –

and debate – over a shared meal, a long walk, or an aimless drive into the countryside, often relishing the role of devil’s advocate on a controversial topic simply for the pleasure of prodding his friends into exasperation. John also was not bashful about exposing friends to his colorful vocabulary and had a limited tolerance for political correctness, often complaining that “nobody can take a joke anymore”.

John was a sports aficionado who enjoyed watching the occasional baseball, basketball or football game with his friend Macduff Everton, but whose real sporting love was playing tennis, a pastime he enjoyed with his oldest friend Gary Adkins on a near-weekly basis for decades on Santa Barbara’s public courts. He was also a competent, albeit reluctant, golfer. Throughout his life, John remained true to his unpretentious roots, a trait readily observable in his favorite Santa Barbara dining and drinking venues, all of which were invariably “old school”: Arnoldi’s for Italian, the Tee Off or Jill’s Place for steak, Dargan’s for Irish fare, “mom and pop” diners for coffee and breakfast and the Sportsman Lounge or Joe’s Café for a cocktail. While John could be prodded into a meal or drink in the “Funk Zone”, it was seldom his venue of choice. And John’s many sojourns with friends into the small towns of the Santa Ynez/Santa Maria wine country were not complete without a concerted (and usually futile) effort on his part to convince his traveling companions to stop either at Anderson’s for its “famous” pea soup, or some 1950s era Cantonese restaurant with half its neon lights missing and not a single car in the parking lot. He invariably would end those entreaties with one of his iconic catchphrases: “Come on, it’ll be fun”! And, of course, it always was.

John is survived by his sister Susan Rust and her husband Joe, as well as their daughters, Jennifer and Lindsay Rust, who loved “Zio Gio”, and whom he loved in return. He is also survived by his grandnephew, Julian Campbell. John also has many cousins in Canada who will miss him. Perhaps mourning him as much as his family does is his cadre of “Best” friends, including Gary Adkins, Mary Heebner, Macduff Everton, Mark Moran, Beverly Pringle, Barb Wood and so many others he touched with his wit, spirit, gentle demeanor, vast knowledge and immeasurable talent.

John will be buried in Greensburg, Indiana, and a memorial event will be held at a later time not yet determined.

INDEPENDENT.COM MAY 2, 2024 THE INDEPENDENT 17
To submit obituaries for publication, please call (805) 965-5205 or email obits@independent.com

In Memoriam obituaries

Ramon Paul “Moose” Fajardo

3/21/1962 - 4/15/2024

Our beloved “Moose” passed away on April 15, 2024. Ramon was born in Santa Barbara, CA to Simon and Jennie Fajardo on March 21, 1962. He was the fifth of six siblings.

Ramon was a dedicated caretaker to our father, Simon, and a tremendous source of loving support to our mother, Jennie, when she was ill.

Ramon is preceded in death by our parents, Simon and Jennie, and by a niece, Emily Fajardo. Ramon leaves behind his siblings- Guadalupe “Lu” Leader (Steve); Antonia “Toni” Maresjo (Willy); John Fajardo; Rafael “Ralph” Fajardo (Alice); Efren Fajardo (Donna). He also leaves behind 11 nieces and nephews.

Ramon attended Cleveland Elementary School, Santa Barbara Junior High School, and Santa Barbara High School, graduating Class of 1981.

As a child, once during playful wrestling, Ramon sat on his brother, causing Efren to yell out, “Get off me you big moose!” and the nickname endured. To those closest to him, he was Moose.

Moose was quick with a kind word. He was a great listener, which made him our “go-to” person for a conversation without judgement or for just a lively, entertaining chat. His compassion, gentle spirit, and his kindness impacted everyone. He brought warmth and laughter to our lives, and he was always there for anyone who needed him.

Our father started taking us to Dodgers games when the team moved to Los Angeles; so of course, Moose was a big fan. He was also a fan of the Lakers and the LA Kings. Moose developed a passion for bocce and looked forward to league games at Arnoldi’s.

Ramon was a devoted uncle to his nieces and nephews, and

a devoted godfather to his godchildren. Ramon’s love for our family and his impact on those who knew him have enriched our lives and will be a source of comfort for us all. We miss you Moose!

A celebration of life is planned for later this summer.

Howard Cooperman

1/27/1935 - 4/25/2024

Howard Cooperman, age 89 of Santa Barbara, passed away on Thursday, April 25, 2024. He was born on January 27, 1935 in New York to Marcus and Rose Cooperman. After graduating from New York University (NYU), he attended medical school in Lausanne, Switzerland. Together with his wife, Trudy (a blessed memory) they settled in Los Angeles in 1963. He was a renowned colon and rectal surgeon and his medical career spanned over 30 years. He will be remembered for his compassion towards his patients and excellent medical care. He and his wife moved to Santa Barbara in 1998. He is survived by his daughters and son-in laws: Debby Stone (Keith), Laurie Greene (Ray), Jocelyn Silverman (Paul), Stephanie Katzman (Jamie) and ten grandchildren: Ryan (Naomi), Dylan (Nitzan), Kyle, Rachel, Shanen (Danielle), Aryanna (Apurv), Meagan, Zachary, Joshua, Ethan. Spending time with family and friends was Howard’s greatest passion. Howard loved to learn, read, travel the world and truly enjoy life!

The service and internment were held on Tuesday, April 30, 2:00pm at Hillside Memorial Park (6001 W. Centinela Ave., LA).

Donations can be made to American Friends of Magen David Adom www.afmda.org in memory of Howard Cooperman.

Arrangements entrusted to McDermott-Crockett Mortuary. Continued on page 20

Diana Basehart

1934–2024

A Savior of Animals

Our community mourns the passing of an icon. Diana Basehart, longtime animal activist, actress, sculptor, and mother, passed away April 12 at Cottage Hospital, surrounded by family and friends.

Diana’s career as an actress took her from England to New York, and to Los Angeles, where she became a sculptor and an advocate for animal protections, a heartfelt dedication she continued through the Diana Basehart Foundation when life brought her to Montecito.

“Too many times, an elderly person has no choice but to give up their pet sometimes their only friend just because of financial strain,” Diana said. “That is heartbreaking and unacceptable to me. We can provide a lifeline for people and their pets.”

Diana was born May 29, 1934, in London, England, the daughter of Edward and Gwenyth Lotery. In 1939, the family fled to New York to escape WWII. After the war, Diana traveled back to England and realized her dream of becoming an actress. At age 16, she moved to New York City to study under the renowned Sanford Meisner at the Actors Studio. She performed in numerous theatrical productions and believed her career was about to take off. It was then that she decided to try her luck in television and film, and she moved across the country to Los Angeles.

In 1958, in a chance meeting at the Beverly Wilshire hotel, Diana met her future husband, actor Richard Basehart. After a whirlwind romance, they married in 1962. Once Richard came into her life, Diana’s focus shifted to sculpting, and acting took a back seat. She dedicated the next 30 years to her magnificent artwork. Her masterful stone sculptures created by hand have found homes with celebrities ranging from Jacques Cousteau to Angie Dickinson.

Having a successful career in the art world simply did not fulfill her heart’s passion for animals. In 1971, Diana and Richard founded Actors and Others for Animals with the objective to provide proper care for and prevent the inhumane treatment and destruction of animals.

Diana’s passion and exuberance for the cause attracted many of her celebrity friends, including Betty White, Doris Day, Lucie Arnaz, Earl Holliman, Lily Tomlin, Loretta Swit, Jo Anne Worley, and others. With Diana’s never-ending love and dedication to the cause, the group saw its many years of hard work pay off when the California Legislature outlawed the use of decompression chambers.

In 1990, Diana was instrumental in orchestrating The March for Animals, in which tens of thousands of protesters descended on Washington, D.C. It was the first global event that brought together people from every state, and thousands of representatives from other countries, together for the animals.

After Richard’s death in 1984, Diana began working with Last Chance for Animals, working tirelessly with the group until she moved to Montecito in 1990. In her new surroundings, she began drawing beautiful botanical works of art, continuing her magnificent creative journey.

It was about this time that Diana began volunteering at the county animal shelter. There, seeing the need to help people keep their animals, she started her next nonprofit, the Diana Basehart Foundation, along with her close friend Lynne Shaw.

The foundation provided financial help for essential and critical veterinary care to people on low, fixed incomes, including seniors, people with disabilities, and veterans with service animals. The foundation enabled people and their beloved pets to stay together, while also minimizing the number of animals being turned over to shelters due to financial struggles. After four successful years and more than 2,000 animals benefiting from the program, the Basehart team decided to join forces with the CARE4Paws family, and they became the Basehart Lifeline Fund.

With her constant eyes on the welfare of animals, Diana heard the story of a 5-month-old puppy named Davey, who was abused and tortured by his owner and later died. After receiving the devastating news, she knew she had to bring more awareness of animal abuse happening in our own backyard.

“This is not the finish; it’s the beginning,” Diana vowed. “We will continue marching and protesting and will not stop until the laws are changed.”

The March on State Street attracted more than a thousand people and brought awareness to abused and neglected animals here in Santa Barbara County. When a little dog named Floyd was also killed by his owner, again Diana was on the front lines. Along with other animal advocates, Diana showed up to every court hearing. In Floyd’s honor, she partnered with Bud Bottoms and Michele Morrow to erect a statue of Floyd, which now sits in a garden at Elings Park.

Up until the time of her passing, Diana was discussing with friends her next move. Her endless energy, love, and dedication will be greatly missed by all of us. She was one of a kind and a force for positive change in the world.

Diana is survived by her two daughters, Gayla and Jenna Basehart. To make a donation in Diana Basehart’s memory, please consider CARE4Paws (care4paws.org) and Actors and Others for Animals (actorsandothers.com). n

18 THE INDEPENDENT MAY 2, 2024 INDEPENDENT.COM
COURTESY

Profs Support Students

We are retired Sociology and Global Study professors at UCSB. We are movement veterans. We are Jewish. Students across the country are protesting Israel’s war on Gaza, struggling for a path to peace, justice, and equality for all humans in Israel/Palestine. We support that struggle and are appalled by the orchestrated campaign to brand the movement as anti-Semitic.

Students are often social change trailblazers. Back in the day, they created the Student Nonviolent Coordinating Committee (SNCC), the pioneering organization of the Civil Rights movement. They initiated the organization Students for Democratic Society, which was the fulcrum of the anti–Vietnam War movement. Across the world and back through history, students have sparked struggle for peace, freedom, and justice.

The October 7, 2023, terrorist attack by Hamas on Israeli civilians was an unjustifiable atrocity. But so is Israel’s six-month military assault on Gaza, which has reportedly claimed 34,000 lives, three-quarters of them women and children; destroyed more than half of all homes; damaged or destroyed nearly every hospital, health facility, and university; and created mass famine and suffering. While we may not agree with all the demands raised by the many groups involved in the student movement, we support its call for an end to Israel’s assault and for a peaceful solution that provides freedom and equality for all Palestinians.

The rise of anti-Semitic and Islamophobic expression on campuses and in the wider society is evident and emanates from many sources. Student protesters at Columbia and elsewhere have publicly denounced anti-Semitism; indeed, a large number of protesting students are Jewish. Student encampments can be sites for serious debate, discussion, and learning and such learning is crucial because of the complexities of the situation in the Middle East. That learning is evident in the ways that the language and tactics of the protests are evolving.

Nonviolent protest on campus should not be criminalized. Mass suspensions without due process, the banning of speech and of student organizations, calling the police and arresting peaceful protestors these are shocking betrayals of the values academia claims to uphold. Moreover, they backfire, escalating conflict.

We welcome the passionate engagement of students and faculty. The future of democracy depends on continuing organization for justice and peace.

—Richard Appelbaum, Richard Flacks, Harvey Molotch, Howard Winant

Remembering

Fred Hayward

I t was around 1976 that Fred Hayward, manager of his family business in Santa Barbara, hired me as a designer. He initially resisted the recommendation to hire me by Elva Twamley, Montecito’s veteran designer from Buffalo, NY, saying everyone usually starts in the mail room. Ms. Twamley died many years ago, and now, with the passing of Fred, another page in Santa Barbara’s history turns. Fred was so much more than a manager of a store that sold wallpaper, carpeting, furniture, and interior design services. He was an unofficial ambassador to the many residents of our town, offering personal service that is simply unavailable today from any home goods stores, brick-and-mortar or online. Fred’s management style was business-like but also Buddha-like. His respect and caring for his community and the members of his staff, whether Mrs. Gotrocks in Hope Ranch or his installation, workroom, and delivery employees, was demonstrated in his patience and kind demeanor.

Inheriting what is now known as the oldest family business in Santa Barbara was a daunting task, but Fred not only made it thrive, he created a family within the business itself an invaluable quality. I eventually went on to other career choices but will never forget knowing Fred.

For the Record

¶ Last week’s Angry Poodle Barbecue on housing development proposed for La Cumbre Plaza scrambled one significant historical fact. The citywide height limit adopted by Santa Barbara voters in the early 1970s was for 60 feet, not 45 feet as reported in the Poodle. There is, however, a 45-foot height limit over La Cumbre Plaza, but not one imposed by the ballot box. Either way, the developers’ proposal of 76.5 feet at La Cumbre’s tallest point would exceed both. In either case, the new state rules and regula tions designed to promote the development of new housing trump anything adopted by local govern ments whether by ballot or by legislative action.

The Independent welcomes letters of less than 250 words that include a daytime phone number for verification. Letters may be edited for length and clarity. Send to: Letters, Independent, 1715 State St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101; or fax: 965-5518; or email: letters@independent.com sions and more letters appear at independent.com/opinions

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obituaries

Mary Socorro Lopez

7/27/1931 - 3/15/2024

On March 15th 2024, we lost our beloved Mary Socorro Lopez. She was 92 years young and as strong, loving and vivacious as she had been all of her life.

Socorro, as many called her is survived by her five children , Yolanda, Rudy, Arthur Jr., Ray and Raul, as well as many grand children and two great grand children whom she loved and supported the best she could.

Born in 1931, she had been a Goleta girl all of her life and was known by many people as a kind, funny and caring woman. A woman who cherished her family, enjoyed having a good time and loved the glitz and glamour of Las Vegas.

She was truly an original, her cooking could dazzle anyone. Her world class tamales would steal your heart. Her laughter was infectious and joyful, and her charm was truly remarkable. There was no one like her and that’s why she was loved by so many. She was a good friend, a trustworthy confidant, a fighter, a wife and a mother. She was Mary Socorro Lopez, she was my grandmother and she is missed.

-Deanna Socorro Ybarra Vera Claire Van Schaick née Dingman 6/4/1931 - 12/16/2023

Vera Van Schaick passed away on December 16, 2023. Born in Ventura, California, in 1931, she was raised in a loving family with strong local ties. Vera’s grandfather was prominent early Ventura County photographer Waldo H. Dingman, Sr. Her father, Waldo H. Dingman, Jr., was the surviving “Last Man” of the County’s Last Man’s Club – a group of 32 sailors who set off to serve in World War I.

A work of art herself, Vera was an artisan, rarely at rest with her life filled with many talents.

Widely known as a ceramist, she began creating in 1976, in Santa Barbara. With a move to Sonoma County in 1984, her pottery studio, Joy Ridge Pottery, opened with fellow ceramist and husband Jack Van Schaick. While continuing her own craft, Vera opened the studio to others, teaching the art of ceramics. An animal lover, for many years, Vera’s property among the redwoods was home for up to six llamas, with one being an award-winning beauty.

Vera was a modern-thinking lady with grace and manners from a bygone era—her entry to any setting was casually regal, exuding warmth—and her home was open to all with a welcoming atmosphere, comforting meals, and beautiful artistic works.

Vera is survived by her children Allen Main of Mexico, Robert Main (Rose) of Hawaii, Cynthia Main Klante of Ventura, Dyan Scholz of Ventura, and her grandchildren Taryn Reed Applegate (Brian) and Wesley Reed, Mary Beth Main, Chenoa Gundershaug and Maia Black, along with greatgrandchildren Jackson Applegate, Madeline Applegate and Olivia Applegate, Charles Reed and Stephen Reed, Kai Gundershaug and Emmet Gundershaug, Jade Markham and Gemma Markham, and cherished partner Erich Jones. Most recently, pre-deceasing Vera was her husband Jack Van Schaick, granddaughter Jennifer Reed, and her beloved brother David Dingman.

Memories of Vera from her friends, extended family, and others familiar with her, or her lineage, would be valued by her family and may be mailed to 1563 San Nicholas Street, Ventura, CA 93001.

6/8/1932 - 4/21/2024

On the morning of April 21, 2024, Aloysius Anthony Meckelborg passed away peacefully while preparing for Sunday mass. He was

just shy of his 92nd birthday. Al was born June 8, 1932, to Bernard H. and Johanna A. Meckelborg of St. Gregor, Saskatchewan. Raised on a wheat farm, he spoke German as his first language. He attended St. Gertrude School in Muenster, Saskatchewan, through the eighth grade.

He left Canada in 1956 for Santa Barbara, California, intending to apprentice with his Uncle Joe Klinker in carpentry. Instead, he was drafted into the US Air Force, becoming a certified radar technician. He served most of his enlistment in Newfoundland and Labrador, Canada. Upon his discharge in 1960, he returned to Santa Barbara and picked up work as a handyman at Circle Bar B Guest Ranch. There, he met the love of his life, Kathleen (Kitty) Ann McCue, a Brooklyn, New York native, vacationing at the ranch. They were married in New York on January 7, 1961, at St. Sylvester's Catholic Church. Their honeymoon was a cross-country road trip, ultimately settling in Santa Barbara.

Al completed his apprenticeship and became a lifelong member of the International Brotherhood of Electrical Workers (IBEW Local 413), recently receiving his 65-year membership pin. A proud union member, he worked on heavy construction projects at Diablo Canyon Nuclear Power Plant, Vandenberg Space Force Base, various offshore oil rigs, and many local building and housing developments.

Al was a dedicated family man and a devoted parishioner at St. Raphael's Church in Goleta. He actively participated in activities and charity work with the Knights of Columbus Goleta Valley Council 5300 and was a 4th-Degree member of the Junipero Serra Assembly 0044. Al and Kitty were regulars at the Lenten Fish Frys and worked the Fiesta soda booth run by the Knights.

Aside from trips to Canada to visit family and attend reunions, Al and Kitty's favorite vacation was cruising. They completed thirty cruises before Kitty's passing in 2006, traveling extensively in Europe, Australia, Panama, and the Americas.

Al is preceded in death by his brothers Bernard (Ben), Ewald (Wally), Johan (John), and Helmut (Hal) Meckelborg. He is survived by his brother Raymond (Ray) Meckelborg (Bridget) and sister Johanna Anderson (Bert). Al leaves behind his beloved children Ann Marie Meckelborg (Kevin Cheesman), Bryan Meckelborg, Wayne Meckelborg (Heather), and Ian Meckelborg (Shawna). He was blessed with grandchildren

Brendan, Brittany, Ashley, Brock, Amelia, Wyatt, Kelly, Mia, Mason, and Landon.

A special thank you to the incredible staff and residents of Vista Del Monte assisted living, where Al became a popular resident over the past two years. His wit and charm will be missed by all who knew him.

A rosary and vigil will be held Sunday, May 5, 2024, at 5:00 p.m. at Welch-Ryce-Haider Funeral Chapel in Goleta. A Funeral Mass will be held Monday, May 6, 2024, at 1:00 p.m. at St. Raphael's Catholic Church. Burial will follow at Calvary Cemetery, with a reception at the parish hall immediately following. Additional details can be found at the following link: https://www.wrhsb.com/ obituaries/Aloysius-Meckelborg/

In lieu of flowers we would appreciate a donation to St. Jude in Al's honor https://www.stjude.org/ donate/donate-to-st-jude.html

Jeanine Dunn 9/30/1932 - 4/18/2024

Jeanine Dunn passed on peacefully at Heritage House in the morning hours of April 18, 2024, surrounded with love and personalized attention.

She was born in Rochester, NY on September 30, 1932 to Dr. Francis Robinson and his wife, Anne. At an early age and following in her father’s footsteps, Jeannie decided to pursue a career in medicine. After earning her BS from University of Rochester in 1955 and shortly thereafter passing her Boards to become a Registered Nurse, Jeanine headed out of New York State to begin a new life and career in sunny Southern California.

Initially settling in Los Angeles, Jeanine easily found work in both hospital and clinical settings. Ultimately, she crossed professional paths with Robert Dunn, a young physician who specialized in the new field of cochlear implant research and treatment. Their relationship blossomed and in 1960 Jeanine and Robert were married in Los Angeles. On April 20, 1969, Jeanine and Robert welcomed their only child, Michael Francis Dunn into the world.

Following Michael’s birth, the couple headed back East, settling in Sewickley, PA where career

opportunity awaited both Jeanine and Robert. Jeanine worked for 15 years at Allegheny Community College as a Nursing Instructor, where she devoted her days to teaching and holding each of her student nurses to the highest of standards. Tragically, in 1986, when Michael was only 17 years old, he was killed in a farming accident when the tractor on which he was riding overturned. With the loss of their child, Jeanine and Robert’s marriage began to collapse. They separated in 1987 and divorced in 1991. On the heels of divorce, Jeanine was once again ready for a lifestyle change and warmer weather. Striking out solo, she again headed out West. This time, she landed in Santa Barbara. Jeanine made many friends in her new hometown, involving herself in a number of meaningful activities. A life-long Catholic, she became a devout parishioner at St. Raphael’s Church. In her late 60’s, Jeanine began studying martial arts. She dedicated herself fully to the study and discipline of karate, practicing and participating in many events and competitions. These efforts culminated in Jeanine attaining the rank of black belt, which was one of her proudest achievements.

An accomplished pianist and well into her 80’s, Jeanine regularly invited musician friends and neighbors to her home for spirited jam sessions. A lifelong dog lover, Jeanine was never without a loyal companion, the last of whom was Coco, a chihuahua who Jeanine doted on until his death in July 2022.

Jeanine moved from her condominium at Encina Royale to Heritage House in October 2022. There she met new friends and engaged in a variety of social activities. In addition to engaging in activities and events at Heritage House, Jeannine enjoyed regular outings and visits with a number of friends and companions.

Jeanine’s wishes were to be cremated and placed near her beloved son, Michael F. Dunn, in St. James Cemetery in Sewickley, PA. A private service and Catholic Mass will be held for her in the near future.

A Memorial Fund has been established in Michael’s name to benefit seminary students at St. Vincent’s Seminary in Latrobe, PA, outside of Pittsburg.

A special thanks to the Heritage House family, Assisted Hospice and the NODA volunteers, all whom supported and embraced Jeanine as she transitioned from this life, just in time to celebrate Michael’s birthday with him in heaven.

They that love beyond the world cannot be separated by it. Death cannot kill what never dies.

20 THE INDEPENDENT MAY 2, 2024 INDEPENDENT.COM
To submit obituaries for publication, please call (805) 965-5205 or email obits@independent.com
Aloysius Anthony Meckelborg

obituaries

Glen Henry Mitchel, Jr. 4/23/1926 - 4/17/2024

Glen Henry Mitchel, Jr. died peacefully in Santa Barbara on April 17, 2024, six days shy of his 98th birthday. Right up until the end, he was alert, happy, and in loving contact with his extensive family including his four children, who were present when he died, and his thirteen grandchildren.

Glen Henry was born in Los Angeles at the house of his parents, Glen Henry Mitchel and Charlotte Clayton Mitchel, on April 23, 1926. He attended Third Street Elementary School, John Burrough’s Jr. High School, and Los Angeles High School. After serving as an Army officer in Italy in WWII, he studied Engineering at the California Institute of Technology where he earned his degree. His Electrical Engineering license was active throughout his life.

Glen Henry is predeceased by his wife of 23 years, Cynthia Clark Mitchel (divorced), by Martha Chapple Porter Mitchel to whom he was married for 20 years, and by his sister, Louise Mitchel Marlow, of Lexington, Kentucky.

He is survived by his brother, George Clayton Mitchel of Los Angeles. He is also survived by all four of his and Cynthia’s children: Glen Henry (Hank) Mitchel, (Mari), Clark Fleming Mitchel (Carol), Caroline Mitchel Chesebro (Mark), and Cynthia (Mia) Mitchel Ludlow, (Jeff).

Glen Henry is also survived by his thirteen grandchildren and four great grandchildren, as well as by Martha Porter’s children, Gregory (Jane), Claire, and Clark (Katie), and their eleven children.

After graduating from Caltech in 1947, Glen Henry worked as an engineer for two large, industrial corporations before starting his own electrical contracting business in Los Angeles. This firm grew to be one of the largest businesses of its type in California, fulfilling large municipal and corporate contracts throughout the state. He sold this business when he purchased a small company

importing industrial mechanical power transmission products, a business which grew under his leadership and eventually sold to Hitachi Metals International. He later purchased a manufacturer of electrical distribution equipment which sold to Berkshire Hathaway in 1993. Glen Henry was an astute engineer admired for his managerial, technical, and financial leadership.

Glen Henry sat on the board of several publicly held manufacturing companies. He was also known for his philanthropic work throughout Los Angeles and Santa Barbara. He served as Chairman of the Board of Harvard School (now Harvard-Westlake), the Cathedral Corporation of the Diocese of Los Angeles with Bishop Robert Rusack, and as Vice Chairman of The Hospital of the Good Samaritan. In Santa Barbara, he served as a trustee of the Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History; and, in his 90s, Glen Henry, along with his good friend and philanthropist Charles Munger, paid for and oversaw the building of the Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics at the University of California at Santa Barbara, a project of which he was, deservedly, very proud.

Glen Henry was a long-time member of the “Rancheros Visatadores,” an association he treasured for close to 60 years. He traveled widely with friends to join in hunting and fishing expeditions. With friends in the 1950s, he founded and built the Eureka Duck Club in Kern Co. He was a long-time member of Coffee Pot Lodge on the Henry’s Fork in Idaho. He was an avid boater, journeying regularly from Newport Beach, Los Angeles Harbor, or Marina Del Rey throughout the Channel Islands. He was a member of the Los Angeles Yacht Club, the Los Angeles Country Club, and the California Club. In Santa Barbara he was a long-time member of the Valley Club, which he often called his “second home.” Everywhere he went he shared the love, friendship, and admiration of many individuals, both professionally and personally, most of whom he outlived. His Number One priority throughout life was his family, all his Mitchel and Porter children, grandchildren, and great-grandchildren, of whom he was always deeply proud and whom he loved without reservation. He enjoyed a full life, filled

with happiness, for which he was grateful right up to the very end.

A Memorial Service will be held on Wednesday, May 1 at All Saints by-the-Sea Episcopal Church on Eucalyptus Lane in Montecito at 10:30 a.m.

Interment will be at a private, family service at Forest Lawn in Glendale.

In lieu of flowers, donations in Glen Henry’s honor may be offered to the Kavli Institute for Theoretical Physics at UCSB, or to the Santa Barbara Museum of Natural History.

Nancy Melville Lessner

6/26/1928 - 4/14/2024

In a gentle way, you can shake the world.

Mahatma Gandhi

It is with great sadness that we share that Nancy Melville Lessner passed away peacefully at the age of 95 with many family members visiting and calling in her final days. Nancy had an amazing life and in her quiet, understated but effective way she made a significant difference in the world.

Nancy was born in Chicago in 1926 to her mother, mystery writer, Georgiana Craig Rice and her father, newspaper reporter, Arthur John Follows. She was raised in Fort Atkinson, Wisconsin by her great aunt and uncle, Nan and Elton Rice. In her teen years, she moved to California to be with her mother, where she met her first husband, Joe Atwill. Together they had nine children.

In the 1950’s, the family lived in Japan for four years where Nancy studied Japanese language and fine arts. After her divorce from Joe, Nancy earned a Bachelor’s degree in psychology from UCLA and a master’s degree in Marriage and Family Counseling from Loyola Marymount. She met and married her second husband, Murray Lessner, while practicing as a therapist in Los Angeles. Together they moved to Hawaii, where Nancy began an adjunct career as a real estate agent. After several years in Hawaii, they moved to Montecito, California where they lived until Murray’s passing.

Nancy met the love of her life, Paul F. Glenn, when a copy of the Wall Street Journal was delivered to Nancy’s School House Road home. Paul Glenn lived at the same street number on East Valley Road. As this continued to happen Nancy finally hand-delivered the papers to Paul’s residence. By the end of that first conversation Paul had asked her out on a date. Thus began over thirty-five years of adventures together.

Paul and Nancy were inseparable until Paul passed away in 2020. Initially, they lived half of the year together in Arizona and half the year in California, eventually settling full-time in their family home on Lilac Drive in Montecito. They spent many hours working, planning and enjoying the extensive gardens, thereby establishing one of the premier cycad collections in the region. The Lilac house and gardens were the center of family gatherings, weddings, holidays and time spent enjoying the children and grandchildren. The family remembers Paul and Nancy’s love for each other. Many an afternoon Nancy and Paul could be seen waltzing together in the kitchen, or walking the property grounds and the neighborhood. Their Lilac Drive home was a beautiful venue for the numerous fundraisers and events they hosted for the local non-profit organizations Nancy was involved in. During their years together, until his death, Nancy fully supported Paul’s work on his foundation, the Glenn Foundation for Medical Research, which included traveling with Paul to visit institutions where his foundation funded research at USC, Stanford, Princeton, Harvard, the Mayo Clinic and others, and hosting visiting scientists and researchers at their Montecito home.

Nancy had a tremendous impact on the local community and the larger world through her work on the boards of Girls Inc. of Santa Barbara, Planned Parenthood of Santa Barbara and Direct Relief. CNBC recently chose Direct Relief as number one among “the top ten charities changing the world”. During her tenure, both serving on the board and as the board president at Direct Relief, Nancy was instrumental in ensuring the organization’s success as it became a world renown non-profit. Her work

included assisting in the purchase of the warehouse property in Goleta and the hiring of current president and CEO, Thomas Tighe.

Nancy is survived by all nine of her children; Anne Moore, Joe Atwill, Christine Atwill, Tom Atwill, Frank Atwill, Teresa Atwill, Allison Craig Atwill, Anastasia Atwill, Constance Atwill, her grandchildren; Ezra Atwill, Michael Atwill, Beth Moore Reye, Katherine Atwill, Allison Atwill, Isabel Lane, and Kelly Chadwick, her great grandchildren; Colin, Brigit, and Annamarie Reye and predeceased by grandson, Zachariah Reye.

We want to thank the staff at Casa Dorinda medical center and Nancy’s private caregiver, Franny V., for their dedicated, generous and loving care during the last years of her life. We are encouraging people to donate to Direct Relief in her memory. Nancy would appreciate that final gesture as a way of continuing, in a gentle way, to shake the world.

Friday, May 10th  4-8 pm at

Casitas Pass Rd.  Carpinteria Wear Dodger Blue or Packers Green & Gold

INDEPENDENT.COM MAY 2, 2024 THE INDEPENDENT 21
To submit obituaries for publication, please call (805) 965-5205 or email obits@independent.com
Wesley J. Franken 7/9/1948 - 3/31/2024 Celebration of Life for Wesley J. Franken Lions Park
22 THE INDEPENDENT MAY 2, 2024 INDEPENDENT.COM

Santa Barbara Wine Week’s Second Vintage

Santa Barbara Wine Week’s Second Vintage

Santa Barbara Wine Week’s Second Vintage

Seven Days of $10 Glasses from More than One Dozen Establishments

Seven Days of $10 Glasses from More than One Dozen Establishments

WWhatever the root causes, there’s no denying that it’s pricier than ever to enjoy a night out on the town. Meanwhile, rents are skyrocketing, hotel stays are through the roof, and gas can’t seem to dip below $5 per gallon.

But one thing remains the same bargain that it was last year: just $10 for a glass of wine during Santa Barbara Wine Week!

In this second annual iteration of our week-long deal, the Santa Barbara Independent enlisted more than one dozen establishments from the Funk Zone to the Santa Ynez Valley to pour a wide range of bottlings from May 2 to 8. That’s not quite the nearly three dozen partners

we offered in our inaugural promotion, but it’s still more glasses of wine than most people can handle in a given week.

We detail this year’s offerings in the pages that follow, and also present two additional articles. The first is about the career arc of Chris Hammell at Bien Nacido Vineyard, and what his departure after nearly 25 years there tells us about the greater Santa Barbara County wine business. And the second, which was originally published in my Full Belly Files newsletter last month, is about why now is the time to support Santa Barbara County tasting rooms, as visitation numbers continue to struggle.

Enjoy your sips! n

continued>
ALIBECKPHOTOGRAPHY SAMSARA PALIWINECO
WINE WEEK WINE WEEK

WINE WEEK

THROUGH MAY 8 MAY 8 MAY 2 MAY 2

7 DAYS OF $10 GLASSES OF WINE AT PARTICIPATING WINERIES, RESTAURANTS, AND BARS IN SANTA BARBARA COUNTY

7 DAYS OF $10 GLASSES OF WINE AT PARTICIPATING WINERIES, RESTAURANTS, AND BARS IN SANTA BARBARA COUNTY

SNAP. SHARE. WIN.

SNAP. SHARE. WIN.

Snap a photo, share it on instagram using #sbindywineweek then tag @sbindependent and the restaurant for a chance to win a gift card to a participating Wine Week establishment

Bidding Adieu to Bien Nacido’s Vineyard Guru

Bidding Adieu to Bien Nacido’s Vineyard Guru

Bidding Adieu to Bien Nacido’s Vineyard Guru

How

Chris Hammell’s Career and Future Reflects the Arc of Santa Barbara County Wine

When Chris Hammell started at Bien Nacido Vineyard a quarter-century ago, it was already well-known for growing some of the most compelling pinot noir, chardonnay, and syrah on the Central Coast. But the Santa Maria Valley property, which stretches across the mouth of a prominent canyon from steep hillsides to gentle slopes to alluvial flats, was not yet heralded as “the most vineyard-designated vineyard in the world.”

That distinction essentially self-proclaimed, but never disputed means that more winemakers who buy grapes proudly call out “Bien Nacido” on their labels than they do for any other vineyard. Translating such jargon into layman’s terms, the phrase implies that Bien Nacido is one of the most respected places for wine grapes on the planet, and that recognition is a critical reason that Santa Barbara County at large is home to a bustling wine industry at all.

This coming fall, after the last grapes of the 2024 vintage have been picked, Hammell will be leaving his role as Bien Nacido’s ranch manager to embark on his next, as-yet-known adventure. It marks the end of a particularly propitious era in Santa Barbara wine, bridging the pre-Sideways days to the global renown of today, when even celebrated wineries from Champagne and Burgundy are investing in land here.

“Especially after I got with winemakers like Manfred Krankl and Bill Wathen and Adam Tolmach and Jim Clendenen and Bob Lindquist, I got jazzed up about what it would be like to grow grapes at a high level,” said the ever-humble Hammell, giving equal

credit to the Miller family, who owns Bien Nacido, and former colleagues like James Ontiveros and Michael Brughelli, who sold the grapes he grew. “We got to do something a little bit extraordinary, and we kinda hit some highs, and we got good recognition for it. It was just fun to be a part of that. I’m glad they let me put some of my mind to it. I was just part of a big thing that we happened to ride.”

The Miller family who own Bien Nacido as well as the nearby Solomon Hills Vineyard and French Camp in Paso Robles will be sad to see Hammell leave. The news is especially emotional since Hammell has lived on the property since he was hired in November 2000 with his wife, Dayna, who runs the estate’s hospitality program, and their four kids.

“Under his guidance, the vineyard and the wineries we were working with expanded greatly over the last couple decades to the point that it’s being considered one of the greatest vineyards in the world,” said second-generation vintner Nicholas Miller. “That’s a pretty unique thing for a vineyard to transcend regionality.”

“His generational impact on Bien Nacido is pretty profound,” said Marshall Miller, Nicholas’s brother and the family’s COO. “What makes Chris really special is his ability to work with a broad diversity of winemakers stylistically in an appropriate way to command their respect and their deference. Chris has been able to work with people to achieve their vision in winemaking, but in a way, they are prepared to trust and rely on him.”

It was their dad, Stephen Miller, who with his late

24 THE INDEPENDENT MAY 2, 2024 INDEPENDENT.COM
MACDUFF EVERTON
Chris Hammell walks the rows of Bien Nacido Vineyard, where he's worked since November 2000.

brother Bob Miller hired Hammell and, in 2011, built a comfortable home on site for the family. “He’s been a wonderful, wonderful representative of the company,” said the elder Miller, noting that Hammell is special in multiple ways, from his world championship jiu-jitsu practice to his guitar playing in the Tepusquet Tornadoes. They’re looking for a replacement now, but Miller readily admitted, “It won’t be anyone who can create a rock band in his garage the way Chris has.” Hammell’s amicable departure, in the works although mostly secret for more than a year, couldn’t come at a more pivotal time, both for the Miller family and the California wine industry at large.

The industry is facing unprecedented challenges. Vine disease is on the rise, climate craziness is affecting year-round weather, and prices are skyrocketing for everything from glass to labor. Then there’s more competition from other alcohol and cannabis products than ever, and emerging generations of consumers just aren’t drinking as much of anything. Since farming decisions today will affect options decades into the future, vineyard owners are walking a tightrope between supply and demand like they haven’t had to do in a generation.

The Millers are on that exact tightrope. After entering the wine business in the early 1970s as solely grape growers, the Millers shifted their business model over the past 15 years into producing wine, from smallbatch, high-touch estate projects to broadmarket, nationally distributed brands.

Last year, they closed their Central Coast Wine Services facility in Santa Maria, the breeding ground for dozens and dozens of iconic Santa Barbara wine brands. After attempting to make that the home base for their own larger wine production plans, they grew frustrated with the County of Santa Barbara’s strict regulatory environment and are now selling the massive complex outside of the wine industry. They’ll base their winemaking operations elsewhere.

Though they will continue selling grapes into the future, they’re in the midst of massive replanting projects at Bien Nacido now down to about 350 acres of vine from the 900-acre peak and across the Santa Maria Valley at Solomon Hills, where the 100 acres have been scaled down to a mere dozen. Recent drives by Solomon Hills, which sits on Highway 101, recalled a sort of grapevine apocalypse, with piles of ripped plants surrounded by naked, scraped earth.

“In 10 years, farming on the Central Coast is going to look a lot different than it does today,” said Marshall Miller, who believes there will be much more mechanized farming. There will also be increased attention on eliminating grape disease like leaf roll, which is what forced them to rip out so many Bien Nacido vines. “We may be the first to do this at our size, but we do not believe that we are the last,” he said. “This is a cresting wave that is coming, so we are prepared to take dramatic action.”

The Millers will continue some of their artisanal, hand-farming practices, but not all

of their grape customers will be able to keep up with the increased prices required to make those practices pencil out. “There are programs that can hit that bottle price-wise, and there are ones that can’t,” said Miller. “Where we are headed is a narrower set of customers.”

Whereas Hammell was integral to the growth and popularity of Bien Nacido, the future strategy will be more about technology and tightening. “It will be a new version of Bien Nacido,” said Hammell, who believes the Millers will continue to lead the industry on many fronts. “There’s still a lot of room for our industry to grow in how we farm and a lot more progress that we can make on the labor front.”

It’s not the typical wine country love story, but Chris and Dayna Hammell both went to Arroyo Grande High and Cal Poly. They married in 1996, the same year Chris took his first vineyard job at Cambria. When he went north to work at David Bruce Winery in the Santa Cruz Mountains, Dayna stayed at his parents’ house with their first two kids.

“We reunited as a family at Bien Nacido,” she said of Chris being hired there in 2000. “We were thrilled.”

In addition to working for the Millers Dayna started helping with preparing food and organizing hospitality for wine writers, winemakers, holiday parties, and the like in 2004 the Hammells became deeply invested in the Santa Maria Valley. All four kids attended the tiny Blochman School, where Chris coached basketball and Dayna was PTA president.

“It was very special to have been able to raise all four kids in the same place without moving around,” said Dayna, whose youngest graduates from high school this summer. “Twenty-four fast years, right? It seems like yesterday, honestly. It’s crazy to think that we’re at this point, but the timing is right for our family.”

Of all his triumphs, Chris is quite proud of his own small, head-trained vineyard that he planted on Bien Nacido to build his own wine brand called True Believer, which became a cult hit for lovers of powerful grenache and syrah. Yet even after recently sharing many vintages of those wines over a roast pork lunch made by Dayna at the Hammells’ Bien Nacido home, where winemakers and their kids filtered in and out, Chris wasn’t sentimental about his departure.

“I don’t want to get all nostalgic. I just put it in a corner of my mind and don’t deal with it. I don’t know if that’s good. I do that with dead people too,” said Hammell, always sporting a wry smile. “It ran its course and it’s done and I may not do something as good again, or maybe I will. But I’ll never have this experience of meeting with so many winemakers all at once. It was great. I’ll miss the ground.”

The Millers are now actively looking for a new ranch manager, albeit somewhat wistfully. “I think there’s a cognizance that there are other things he wants to accomplish in life, and I respect that,” said Marshall Miller. “I’m sad that he’s come to that conclusion, but I deeply respect why he has.” n

INDEPENDENT.COM MAY 2, 2024 THE INDEPENDENT 25

Now’s the Time to Support Your Santa Barbara Winery

Now’s the Time to Support Your Santa Barbara Winery

Now’s the Time to Support Your Santa Barbara Winery

No

One Knows Exactly Why the Wine Industry Is Struggling

Ever since I started writing about wine back at the turn of the millennium, the industry’s public messaging posture has been relentlessly positive. It took me a few years of hearing “It’s the best harvest ever!” to realize that such outward optimism often hid deeper concerns.

Wine culture is, after all, aspirational by design. Consumers come not just for finely fermented grape juice, but also for the picture and promise of a better life or at least one that’s closer to the seasonal cycles of nature than the digital-dependent rat race so many escape through evening sips and vineyard trips. Pinot noir doesn’t pair well with a side of doom.

The first time that the wine industry really spoke honestly and openly about their troubles was during the COVID pandemic. Like all businesses across the world, they loudly shared the fear that they would not survive. They banded together to promote their regions and request direct support from consumers, and it worked. By and large, many wineries did

much better during the pandemic years than they ever expected quite a few had the strongest sales of their entire careers.

Much has changed in 2024, and there’s a growing sense of concern over slower sales and a dip in tasting room visitation that’s just starting to be publicly discussed. This was very clearly stated by Monte Rio’s N.Y.C. somm-turned-NorCal winemaker Patrick Cappiello, who posted on Instagram that sales were down 20 percent. “American wineries are struggling right now,” he said. “We have a huge amount of inventory and a huge decrease in sales.”

Much of the resulting media attention is being paid to wine regions up north, but you can see plenty of vineyards have been removed in Santa Barbara County just by driving through Los Alamos and the Santa Maria Valley. Certainly, some of this is just the usual cycling out of older, less productive vines, and it’s also true that plenty of vines have been planted recently as well.

26 THE INDEPENDENT MAY 2, 2024 INDEPENDENT.COM
COURTESY Now's a good time to support Pali Wine Co. in the Funk Zone, as they're pouring a couple of different bottles for Wine Week.

But the overall gist is that sales are down, inventories are up, and people are starting to grow worried about the future viability of the California wine industry. This same alarm is starting to be rung, albeit in more hushed tones, by winemakers and wine tour operators here in Santa Barbara.

“Santa Barbara County is not the only wine region experiencing a downturn,” confirmed Alison Laslett, the head of the Santa Barbara Vintners. “Everyone is feeling it across the state.”

There’s lots of wondering as to why. There’s a belief that visitation is down, and that’s slightly true in a historic sense for southern Santa Barbara County. According to studies by Visit Santa Barbara, visitation peaked in 2017 with 7.2 million, which includes day trippers, hotel and short-term rental users, and friends/family visitors. That was down almost 10 percent in 2023, to 6.5 million.

Hotel overnight stats are especially meaningful for wineries, as Visit Santa Barbara’s analysis shows that 15 percent of overnight guests will visit a tasting room, whereas just 7 percent of day trippers do the same. Hotel overnights peaked in 2019, at more than 1.4 million nights, while 2023 was close to 1.3 million. Surely, the still-not-quite-understood COVID decline and rebound plays into all of this, and those visitation differences are fairly minor in the overall scheme of things. So they probably don’t explain the current tasting room slowdown.

In the Santa Ynez Valley, where most of the tasting rooms and wineries exist, the visitation theory holds even less water. “The perception is that visitation is down, but it’s not,” said Shelby Sim, the head of Visit Santa Ynez Valley. He doesn’t count day trippers, but the overnight occupancy that he does track across 1,600 rooms in six communities is only down one percent over the last 12 months. His stats also show that 15 to 17 percent of visitors to the Santa Ynez Valley report visiting wineries and tasting rooms, which is a smaller number than many might expect. But again, no day-tripper data.

So what is it? Many think that the downturn is related to the fact that people can actually travel abroad again, so many would-be winery visitors are spending their money that way instead.

“Now that you can actually go to Europe, we’ve seen some of our international travelers take to the air again,” said Laslett, but she’s optimistic. “Once that bill comes in from the trip abroad, though, Santa Barbara County will return as a significant alternative when you compare the distance from L.A. and the price tag that comes with our wine and hotels. Much

more affordable!”

Others believe that the overall rise in prices of hotels, restaurants, gas, and everything else is forcing people to make harder decisions about how to spend their money once they reach their destination. If you’re spending $500 a night on hotels and more than $200 per dinner, pondered one tour guide I know, maybe you just cut out the tasting room visit. That’s a logical theory.

There are popular social explanations as well. The most common ones are that wine-loving Baby Boomers are dying off while the younger, replacement generations are not yet hooked on traditional wine culture, which is what the tasting room model typically presents. (Thankfully, there are plenty of creative exceptions to the traditional tasting model, especially here in Santa Barbara County.) But the fact is that younger people are drinking less alcohol overall and have way more options than ever before when they do indulge, from hard seltzers to canned cocktails. The popularity of new weight-loss drugs, which appear to reduce cravings for eating out and drinking, is another factor to watch.

The increasing prices of wine itself must play into this. Even though many vintners are still losing money or just breaking even on that $50 bottle of pinot noir, that’s still a lot of money for most people to spend on four glasses of wine. And then there just aren’t enough regionally made cheaper brands or second-label bottlings in the $20 range to draw in these younger generations. Growing those affordable options could be a long-term solution, if someone could figure out the math.

There’s also just a ton of wine out there. While I’ve been excited as a consumer to see so many new brands erupt over the past decade, I’ve been simultaneously befuddled as an industry watcher. Who’s gonna buy all that new wine, even if the economy is steady?

Everything, of course, is cyclical. By the time you read this, a rebound may already be underway. I hope so, because the wine industry has elevated culinary and entrepreneurial culture in Santa Barbara County more than anything else, at least in my 30 years here. It’s even enhanced our longstanding agricultural traditions by elevating eco-minded practices and empowering small farmers of all crops to find direct audiences.

In the meantime, buy Santa Barbara County wine. Spread the news to your friends from out of town how awesome it is. Join more wine clubs. And visit tasting rooms. n

- 4-9pm

INDEPENDENT.COM MAY 2, 2024 THE INDEPENDENT 27
COURTESY Exceptional
Down by the waterfront on Mason Street, Margerum Wine Company is pouring four different wines for Wine Week.
local & Spanish wines, dinner, happy hour 705 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA @galarestaurantsb - galasb.com Tuesday - Saturday

who's pouring

Who's pouring who's pouring

Au Bon Climat: Mondeuse Rosé, Pinot Gris/ Pinot Blanc, G-15 Valdiguié

One of the most important brands in the history of California wine, Au Bon Climat was created back in 1982 by the late Jim Clendenen and continues to craft a massive range of taste-making wines under both Au Bon Climat and Clendenen Family Wines. Now run by the second generation of Isabelle and Knox Alexander Clendenen, their El Paseo outpost is pouring three wines: the crisp mondeuse rosé; the mineral-driven pinot gris/pinot blanc white blend; and the vibrant, complex, maraschinocherry-laced G-15 valdiguié. “It’s a curated collection from both of our labels, perfectly suited for the upcoming summer season,” said tasting room manager Wiktoria Marroquin.

813 Anacapa St., Ste. 5B; aubonclimat.com; @aubonclimat

Dusk Bar: Buttonwood Rosé

“Not only is Buttonwood Winery and Vineyard a companion venture to Dusk, it also produces some of the best wine in the Santa Ynez Valley,” said Michael Wiggins of Dusk, the State Street bar on the bottom floor of the Drift Hotel, whose co-owners purchased Buttonwood last year. This 2022 syrah-based rosé is dry and full of summer fruit notes, and it’s great with spicy fare or by itself on the patio. 524 State St.; drifthotels.co/santabarbara/eat-drink; @duskbarsb Buttonwood Farm & Vineyards, 1500 Alamo Pintado Rd., Solvang; buttonwoodwinery.com; @ButtonwoodWinery

Eureka!: Clayhouse Cab & Tarrica Pinot Gris

This creative burger joint on the backside of Paseo Nuevo doesn’t just sell craft brews and intriguing bourbons. Wine is always on the menu, and very few things pair better than a juicy burger and a big red. They’re pouring two wines this week: the Clayhouse cabernet sauvignon from Paso Robles and the Tarrica pinot gris, also from Paso Robles. Manager Milton Carrillo suggested ordering the Clayhouse with any of their burgers or, for the healthconscious, perhaps the steak salad. 601 Paseo Nuevo; eurekarestaurantgroup.com; @eatdrinkeureka

Fess Parker Winery: Epiphany Rosé

One of the pioneering properties for Santa Barbara County, Fess Parker Winery makes a lot of wines, from pinot noir and chardonnay grown in the Sta. Rita Hills and Santa Maria Valley to the Rhône wines under the Epiphany label, many of which they grow on their own property. “The grenache for this rosé comes from Rodney’s Vineyard, the estate vineyard on the Fess Parker Home Ranch,” said Greer Shull, the director of marketing. She’s proud that the wine is SIP Certified, which is a thirdparty designation for “Sustainable in Practice.”

116 E. Yanonali St., Ste. A; fessparker.com; @fessparkerwinery

Gala: Alamati Riesling

Santa Barbara native Tara Penke, who opened Gala last year after successfully running restaurants in Barcelona for years, is extremely excited to get Alamati’s “Goldie” dry riesling from the 2021 vintages into people’s hands. “Goldie is lean and aromatic with tasting notes of lemon peel, jasmine, and melon,” explained Penke, who’d pair it with Gala’s halibut crudo, Hope Ranch mussels, or baby kale salad with truffle soy vinaigrette. “We wanted to highlight a small, new, and exciting winery like Alamati.”

705 Anacapa St.; galasb.com; @galarestaurantsb

Good Land Wine Shop: Field Recordings Rosé

Doug Trantow opened one of the first new wine shops in years back in 2022 and is hosting a steady series of Tuesday wine tastings that bring celebrated winemakers down to his shop near where Highway 154 runs into State Street. A blend of 95 percent grenache and 5 percent marselan a French hybrid of grenache and cabernet sauvignon this “Soft Eyes Rosé” by Field Recordings from the brand’s So Far Out series “is a beautiful organic wine,” said Trantow. “The nose is bursting with the scent of fresh strawberries, and the palate tastes of tangy raspberry and cranberry with a hint of lemon zest.”

4177 State St.; goodlandwineshop.com; @good_land_wine_shop

La Lieff Wines: Alamo Creek Ranch Rosé

Gretchen Lieff is proudly elevating the status of women in the wine industry at her tasting room in the Funk Zone. She’s pouring this grenache-based rosé from the 2020 vintage grown on her remote property off of Highway 166 just north of the county line in San Luis Obispo County. “This is a beautiful and fun rosé perfect for the springtime and summer,” said General Manager Torrey English. “It has wonderful notes of ripe strawberry, tropical flowers, and banana nectar.”

210 Gray Ave.; lalieffwines.com; @lalieffwines

Longoria: Lovely Rita Pinot Noir, Matinee Rosé

This historic winery founded in 1982 by legend Richard Longoria was purchased two years ago by Brooke and Lindsey Christian, who promptly expanded to a stylish tasting room on State Street. They’re pouring the 2022 edition of Lovely Rita, the brand’s Sta. Rita Hills pinot noir. “The name is an homage to our home and favorite place on Earth for Pinot Noir,” said General Manager Brent Wilson. “It is also a wink toward our music aficionados, as it shares a name with a song by one of the most iconic bands of all time.” They’re also pouring their 2022 Matinee Rosé.

732 State St.; longoriawines.com; @longoriawines

Marriott S.Y.V.’s 555 Lounge & Bar: Buttonwood Rosé

One of the most recognizable, largest, and longest-standing hotels in the heart of Santa Barbara County wine country, the Marriott Santa Ynez Valley sits right off the 101 in Buellton. The 555 Lounge & Bar occupies the lobby area of the hotel and serves a variety of foods that can be prepared in five, 10, or 20 minutes. They’re pouring the Buttonwood Winery & Vineyard’s 2022 rosé, which smells of Red Delicious apple and strawberry and flavors of watermelon and nectarine with an appealing, foodfriendly acidity.

One glass per person. 555 McMurray Rd., Buellton; marriott.com/ sbasy; @syvmarriott

28 THE INDEPENDENT MAY 2, 2024 INDEPENDENT.COM
COURTESY PHOTOS

Margerum Wine Company: Trois Blondes Rhône White

Doug Margerum’s Funk Zone–adjacent tasting room and mini-restaurant is actually serving four different glasses of $10 wine this week but wanted to focus on this 2021 Rhône white blend from the Los Olivos District. “This is a first-time bottling from our estate vineyard,” said tasting room manager Lisa Delanty. “It’s a direct result of how compelling a marsannedominant wine is when combined with roussanne and viognier. There is a potent combination matching the rich, vibrant textures of these grapes with aromatic delight.” She suggests pairing Trois Blondes with their salmon-on-cucumber appetizer or smoked salmon salad. Additionally, the tasting room will be pouring $10 glasses of 2021 Fonte, a blend of chardonnay, pinot gris, and pinot blanc; the 2022 Santa Barbara County grenache; and the 2022 Santa Barbara County syrah. 19 E. Mason St.; margerumwines.com; @margerumwines

Opal Restaurant & Bar: Talley Estate Chardonnay 2021

This ever-popular restaurant next to the Arlington Theatre sports the most New York City bistro vibes out of any place in town. They’re serving this 2021 chardonnay from Talley Vineyards, a seminal property in the Arroyo Grande Valley. “This wine is a perennial favorite of many of our regular guests,” said owner Richard Yates. “Although it usually lacks any obvious or showy oak note in its taste profile, it has no lack of richness.” Because of that, he suggests it with Opal’s chicken piccata pasta, basil fettuccine with sauteed tiger shrimp in smoked mozzarella pesto cream sauce, seafood salads, and fish special of the night. Must be ordered with food. 1325 State St.; opalrestaurantandbar.com; @opal_sb

Pali Wine Co.: Charm Acres Chardonnay

Tower 15: Gamay Noir

WINE WEEK MAY 2-8, 2024

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Though Santa Barbara County is the focus from its Lompoc winery to its longtime presence in the Funk Zone Pali Wine Co. has always sourced grapes from elsewhere, including this 2018 chardonnay from Northern California. “This is a very bright wine,” said Marketing Manager Madison Steinberg. “Our Charm Acres is crafted from chardonnay grapes grown on premium vineyards on the Sonoma Coast in Sonoma County. It’s a very bright wine with Granny Smith apple, honeysuckle, white peach, and beeswax flavors as well as a touch of brioche.”

205 Anacapa St.; paliwineco.com; @paliwineco and @paliwineco_funkzone

Originally from the Beaujolais region of France, gamay noir is one of the hottest grapes right now. This 2022 Santa Barbara County bottling blends the Sta. Rita Hills estate vineyard of Pali Wine Co., which owns Tower 15, and Nolan Vineyard in Alisos Canyon. “Bold and nuanced, this vintage showcases the full potential of this grape varietal,” said Marketing Manager Madison Steinberg, noting that 20 percent was made in a carbonic style that brings a freshness to the wine. “Intense aromas of dark cherries, blackcurrants, and ripe strawberries are complemented by subtle hints of black pepper and clove.” 205 Anacapa St.; paliwineco.com; @paliwineco and @paliwineco_funkzone

We Want the Funk: Crianza Ribera Del Duero 2018 Tempranillo

We Want the Funk’s owner Ted Ellis, who opened this Funk Zone space for shellfish, flatbread, and good vibes with his wife, Greer, in late 2022, comes from a wine background, so he’s got the pulse on the bottle scene from near and far. The 2018 Crianza Ribera del Duero is a small-production tempranillo from Spain, an estate wine bottled by Antonio Díez Martín. It features a light mouthfeel and notes of black cherry and chocolate, and can be enjoyed chilled or at room temperature. 210 Gray Ave.; (805) 837-8584; wewantthefunksb.com

Yona Redz: Red Wine Sangria

Jonathan “Yona” Estrada turned his Westside birria pop-up into this always bustling spot for quesabirria tacos, birria ramen, vampiros, mulitas, and much more Mexican cuisine on a nightclub-heavy block of State Street. He’s suggesting that guests use this red wine sangria to wash down their birria. 532 State St.; yonaredz.com; @yona_redz n

INDEPENDENT.COM MAY 2, 2024 THE INDEPENDENT 29
COURTESY PHOTOS
SANTA BARBARA INDEPENDENT
WWW.AUBONCLIMAT.COM Reservations Recommended | Call or Text (805)963-7999 JOIN US AT OUR SANTA BARBARA TASTING ROOM 813 ANACAPA STREET, SANTA BARBARA 12PM–6PM MONDAY–FRIDAY 11AM–6PM SATURDAY & SUNDAY Burgundian Style Wines | Private Tastings Available | Extensive Library Experience a Central Coast legacy.

‘We Believe You Should Always Get a Double Scoop’

Santa Barbara’s Homegrown McConnell’s Fine Ice Creams at 75 Years Young

Like many people who grew up in Santa Barbara, myself included, McConnell’s is part of the DNA of Michael Palmer’s childhood. And that lineage has continued. “I used to take my daughter down to Mission Street Ice Cream when she was little and I’d say, ‘You know what, maybe we should buy McConnell’s,’ ” laughed Palmer.

In 2011, Palmer (a longtime marketing executive and winemaker) and his partner/wife Eva Ein (a chef and former co-owner of Stella Mare’s and Le Café Stella, among other restaurants) did just that. Their home had burned down in the 2008 Tea Fire, and rather than rebuild it, they decided to build up something else entirely: an old dairy and the other holdings of McConnell’s Fine Ice Creams, which as Palmer said, “was probably headed toward bankruptcy.”

With an aim toward making the bottom line work while keeping the quality product intact or as Palmer said, “When you see something that wants to be what it always was, you want to protect it” the family rolled up their sleeves and got to work.

It was a LOT of work. If you could look up “labor of love” in the ice cream division, you’d surely find McConnell’s as a top entry.

Now celebrating its 75th anniversary, the iconic ice cream brand is owned by the Palmer/Ein family, only the third family to own it. The brand was founded here in Santa Barbara

by husband and wife Gordon “Mac” and Ernesteen “Ernie” McConnell way back in 1949. With a mindset somewhat similar to Ein and Palmer’s, the entrepreneurial McConnells had recently relocated to the Central Coast and were looking for a business idea when they found it one night in a bowl of vanilla ice cream.

While the food industry at that time was in full industrial mode and dairies and creameries were using artificial flavors, colorings, and sweeteners to make their ice creams, the McConnells decided to start an ice cream company that stuck to the basics, going to regional farms and purveyors for their bounty of ingredients, such as fruit, nuts, produce, and grass-grazed milk and cream. Plus, they’d make their own inclusions and ditch the fillers, stabilizers, and preservatives that everybody else was incorporating with a vengeance.

That ethos of keeping everything as local and as pure as possible and produce “the finest ice creams in the world,” as the McConnells did, is one that today’s owners Michael and Eva continue to stick with.

Mac and Ernie spent months developing an innovative mechanized version of the European French Pot process of making ice cream to go along with their own ice cream recipes.

They opened the first McConnell’s ice cream shop in December 1950. The original location was at Mission and State Street, where Garrett’s Old-Fashioned Restaurant now resides. It was by all accounts an immediate success, and Santa

30 THE INDEPENDENT MAY 2, 2024 INDEPENDENT.COM
Frozen Fun
The McConnell’s crew outside the new Dairy. Owners Michael Palmer and Eva Ein are in the back row on the left. These 75th anniversary pints are made with commemorative packaging in homage to the original pints.

Barbara families flocked to the store. When Mac passed away in 1962, Ernie sold McConnell’s to an aptly named family, the McCoys.

Jim McCoy and his wife, Jeney McCoy, built on the company legacy and expanded distribution to new markets in Southern California. The McCoys purchased The Old Dairy in 1975, which became McConnell’s world headquarters, as it remains.

Built in 1934, The Old Dairy at 835 East Canon Perdido Street was the largest of 10 family-run dairies that once operated in Santa Barbara. For decades, Palmer explained, the dairy’s herd was pastured along San Ysidro Road in Montecito. Raw milk was transported from the farm to the creamery and processed into drinking milk, cream, yogurt, butter, and, of course, ice cream. Production continued at that facility through the McCoy family era, and by the early 1970s, The Old Dairy was focused exclusively on McConnell’s ice cream.

The Old Dairy had a major renovation in 2013 under Palmer and Ein’s ownership, and they created what was then considered state-of-the-art ice cream–making equipment. That same year, McConnell’s returned to where things all started, and the flagship McConnell’s Fine Ice Creams store opened at 728 State Street, less than a mile and a half from Mac and Ernie’s original location.

Additional scoop shops opened, with another Santa Barbara location on lower State Street, as well as in shops in Downtown Los Angeles, Studio City, Pacific Palisades, Santa Monica, Carlsbad, and San Luis Obispo.

But on the manufacturing side, in order to really become a national brand, Palmer realized that the existing dairy space just wasn’t up to the standards required. He began work on a new state-of-the-art facility with 10 times the capacity as The Old Dairy (which remains the company headquarters), just south of Santa Barbara in Oxnard.

It was an inflection point for the company. “Is the policy to lean into history and remain one of the very, very few highend manufacturers that remains a manufacturer? Or is it going to be a co-labeled product like virtually everyone else?” said Palmer. “And so, Eva and I made the decision that for better or for worse at that point in McConnell’s history, and part of what makes the most sense, is that we are being adaptive.”

Also, he explained, “When you’re in the food business, you’re not really in the food business. You’re in the food safety business. We needed a modern facility to achieve what we wanted to achieve.”

Unlike most other ice cream brands, McConnell’s is also the manufacturer meaning it makes the cream and is responsible for the ingredients that go into its products. McConnell’s is now sold in more than 2,000 stores throughout the U.S. and ships products nationwide. They also have a Pint of the Month Club.

While they bought the company for consistency of the product, Palmer continued, “We elevated and honored McConnell’s with every recipe. We take care, and it’s a very risky product and ecosystem, and all we wanted was making sure that our customers of decades recognized that what we provided was McConnell’s. That’s our greatest sort of bang: the product itself.”

The work-in-progress Double Peanut Butter Chip he had me taste before packing was completed is indeed delicious and every bit as creamy as any ice cream I’ve ever had.

On our tour of the dairy facility, Palmer walked me through a bit more of the history. Part of McConnell’s heritage is having

partnerships that go back almost 60 years. One of the longstanding partnerships is with Guittard Chocolate Company, which is another family-run business and in fact is the oldest, continuously family-owned chocolate company in the United States, having opened in San Francisco in 1868.

“They are just as rigorous about their products as we are about ours. So it’s a real partnership, and they make special products for us,” said Palmer, adding, “When we first came in, you know, different products work well in different industry ingredients in the products they’re built into. So one chocolate might work really well in ice cream, but not so well in something else. … So Eva did a blind test. It took us weeks, and we tested 20 or 30 different chocolates. And at the end of that blind test, there were only two chocolates left. And the one she leaned into was the one that McConnell’s had been using for all those years Guittard.”

A quick whiff in the chocolate room of the dairy makes every one of my Charlie and the Chocolate Factory childhood dreams come true.

That Guittard cocoa flavor and aroma also take center stage in McConnell’s Dutchman’s Chocolate ice cream, described as a milk chocolate lover’s ice cream for the age. It’s one of four beloved classic flavors being revived this spring as part of the 75th anniversary celebration, in retro-style pints featuring the iconic original 1949 packaging.

Though, as Palmer explained, old McConnell’s flavors never really die. They have a book of more than 100 flavors, and “part of this 75th anniversary research was going back into the anthology and finding flavors that we hadn’t done in a while that were favorites. And so we have a couple that people always talk about. … Flavors don’t ever get sort of cast aside; it’s more like they kind of go on vacation.”

Additional flavors joining Dutchman’s Chocolate in retrostyle pints are Santa Barbara Strawberry (made with ripe Santa Barbara strawberry preserves); Black Coffee Chip (featuring dark roasted coffee from Handlebar Coffee Roasters); and Sweet Cream, a decadent, pure Central Coast ice cream crafted from grass-fed milk and cream, cage-free eggs, and pure cane sugar.

Offering us straight off the production line samples of the Sweet Cream (it is indeed incredibly rich and good), Palmer says that the high quality of the milk, eggs, and sugar is what makes McConnell’s taste so good. “These three ingredients have been the base for all of our ice cream flavors since 1949.”

In addition to the special anniversary packaging, as an added celebration for locals, McConnell’s is offering 49 percent off at all scoop shop locations on Tuesday, May 7, in commemoration of their 1949 origin date. There’s no better time to try a double scoop. n

SCOOPING UP SOME FUN FACTS ABOUT ICE CREAM

• The ice cream cone, which allowed for ice cream to be more portable and a handheld snack, was first introduced at the World’s Fair in St. Louis, Missouri, in 1904.

• The average American eats roughly 20 pounds of ice cream each year, or about four gallons, according to the International Dairy Foods Association (IFDA).

• According to an IDFA survey, most ice cream companies are family owned and have been in operation for more than 50 years.

• The world record for the tallest ice cream cone is 10 feet, 1.26 inches (3.08 meters) tall, set by Hennig-Olsen Is AS and Trond L. Wøien of Norway in 2015. The cone was made up of a wafer cone, chocolate lining, ice cream, and jam, and was transported by helicopter to be given to people attending the Tall Ships Race in the Port of Kristiansand, Norway.

• Vanilla is by far the most popular ice cream flavor. But chocolate ice cream was actually invented before vanilla.

• Some of the craziest ice cream flavors found around the world are foie gras; ranch dressing; jellyfish; haggis; roasted garlic; mint leaves with sea urchin meringues; mushy peas and fish; octopus; lobster; and mamushi snake. They used to serve avocado ice cream at the Avocado Festival in Carpinteria, which sounds pretty tame by comparison.

• The world record for the most ice cream eaten was 457 grams in under 30 seconds. Canadian Joel Hansen completed this on July 1, 2019.

• The average number of licks to finish a scoop of ice is 50. But Dimitri Panciera of Italy set the world record in 2016 for the single largest scoop of ice cream at six feet, four inches tall and one foot, 10 inches wide. I’m guessing it would require a lot more than 50 licks to finish that one!

INDEPENDENT.COM MAY 2, 2024 THE INDEPENDENT 31
Eva Ein and Michael Palmer High-quality milk, eggs, and sugar are the base for every flavor of McConnell’s ice cream.

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34 THE INDEPENDENT MAY 2, 2024 INDEPENDENT.COM LIVE AUCTION SNEAK PEEK! SUNDAY, JUNE 2, 2024 4-7:30PM The Thacher School’s Pavilion Lawn 5025 Thacher Road, Ojai PURCHASE TICKETS AT OJAIWILD.ORG A WILD AFTERNOON INCLUDING Welcome from Julie Tumamait-Stenslie Presentation by Paul Jenkin Handcrafted Brews & Local Wines Delicious Dinner Co ee Service & Dessert Delectable Lemonade Specially Curated Live and Silent Auctions LIVE AUCTION SNEAK PEEK! ALSO! A vibrant silent auction including premium items and packages from Fox Fine Jewelry, The Canary Hotel, local wineries, and a tour at Return to Freedom Wild Horse Sanctuary. Contact Camden at (805) 770-8696 or camden@lpfw org with any questions Twelve Guest Stay at Casa Puesta Del Sol in Punta Mita, Mexico Week-long Stay at the Pierpont Beach Lodge in Ventura 5-day Retreat to a Lake Arrowhead Mountain Cabin Presented by VADA - The Visual Art & Design Academy of Santa Barbara High School The Friends of VADA: a 501c3 raising awareness of and support for the creative students of SBHS Serious Play: The Making of Hill House Montecito Leading creative thinkers discuss their inspirations, process and perspectives Join us for a dynamic discussion about the power of integrating creativity, serious play and transdisciplinary collaboration. The creators of the Hill House will share how they worked together to break conventional boundaries in design. 7PM - Thursday, May 9, 2024 Fé Bland Forum at Santa Barbara City College 721 Cliff Drive, Santa Barbara, CA 93109 Refreshments and reception to follow. Free admission. RSVP required. Visit www.vadatalks.org A conversation facilitated by Les Firestein Founder & Editor, The RIV Bruce Heavin Artist, Strategist and Entrepreneur Co-founder of Lynda.com Robin Donaldson, AIA Founding Partner Donaldson + Partners Silvia Perea Architect and Curator Architecture and Design Collection UCSB AD&A Museum FREE PUBLIC EVENT THURSDAY, MAY 9 | 4:00 PM McCune Conference Room, 6020 HSSB
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INDEPENDENT CALENDAR

THURSDAY 4/18

5/2: Chaucer’s Book Talk and Signing: Ana Ellickson Local YA author Ana Ellickson will talk about and sign books of her debut novel, The Vanishing Station, which tells the story of an underground magic system in San Francisco and the lengths one girl is willing to go to protect the ones she loves. 6pm. Chaucer’s Books, 3321 State St. Free. Call (805) 682-6787 or email events@chaucersbooks.com chaucersbooks.com/event

5/2: CWC Docs Film Screening: !Women Art Revolution Watch a screening of Lynn Hershman Leeson’s !Women Art Revolution, composed of four decades’ worth of interviews that provide an insightful exploration of the “secret history” of feminist art, with a postscreening discussion with Leeson. 7pm. Pollock Theater, UCSB. Free. Call (805) 893-4637 or email info@carseywolf.ucsb.edu carseywolf.ucsb.edu/events

5/2: Quire of Voyces Celebrate 30 years of transcendent a cappella music from Quire of Voyces, led by Artistic Director Nathan Kreitzer since 1993. 6:30pm. S.B. Museum of Art, 1130 State St. Free. Call (805) 963-4364 or email info@sbma.net sbma.net/events

5/2: Channelkeeper’s Student Art Show Reception and Awards Ceremony High school students from Carpinteria to Goleta will show their works based on the theme “What the Channel Means to Me” with winners to receive cash prizes. 5-8pm. Jodi House Gallery, 625 Chapala St. Free. Email info@sbck.org sbck.org/student-art-show

5/2: S.B. Museum of Art Pop-Up Opera Celebrate Opera S.B.’s season with an unforgettable evening of stunning performances set in the beauty of the museum. 5pm. S.B. Museum of Art, 1130 State St. Free. Call (805) 963-4364 or email info@sbma.net sbma.net/events

5/2:

James Galanos 100th Birthday Tribute: Legendary California Designer Get a rare glimpse into the history of high fashion designer and couturier James Galanos as you view identical dresses in the MET Museum and Philadelphia Museum of Art’s permanent collection, original photographs, press photos, patterns dating back to 1957, and more. 5pm. Workzones, 351 Paseo Nuevo Mall. Free Email contact@couturepatternmuseum.com. couturepatternmuseum.com/events

FARMERS MARKET SCHEDULE

THURSDAY

Carpinteria: 800 block of Linden Ave., 3-6:30pm

FRIDAY

Montecito: 1100 and 1200 blocks of Coast Village Rd., 8-11:15am

SATURDAY

Downtown S.B.: Corner of Santa Barbara and Cota sts., 8am-1pm

SUNDAY

Goleta: Camino Real Marketplace, 10am-2pm

TUESDAY

Old Town S.B.: 500-600 blocks of State St., 3-7pm

WEDNESDAY

Solvang:

Copenhagen Dr. and 1st St., 2:30-6:30pm

(805) 962-5354 sbfarmersmarket.org

FISHERMAN’S MARKET

SATURDAY

Rain or shine, meet local fishermen on the Harbor’s commercial pier, and buy fresh fish (filleted or whole), live crab, abalone, sea urchins, and more. 117 Harbor Wy., 6-11am. Call (805) 259-7476. cfsb.info/sat

As always, find the complete listings online at independent.com/events. Submit virtual and in-person events at independent.com/eventsubmit

FRIDAY 5/3

Alex Cuba

5/2: Satellite S.B. Brett Hunter Band, 6pm. 1117 State St. Free. Call (805) 3643043. satellitesb.com

5/2-5/4: Lost Chord Guitars Thu.: Jeff Berkley, Arwen Lewis, 8pm. $11.59. Fri.: Matt McCarrin, 8pm. Free Sat.: The Popravinas, 8pm. $11.59. 1576 Copenhagen Dr., Solvang. Ages 21+. Call (805) 331-4363. lostchordguitars.com

5/3-5/5: Maverick Saloon Fri.: Jimi Nelson Band, 8:30pm. Sat.: Jimi Nelson, noon. Rebel Heart, 8:30pm. Sun.: Barry McGuire, 1pm. 3687 Sagunto St., Santa Ynez. Free Call (805) 686-4785. mavericksaloon.com/event-calendar

5/2: Ninth Annual Latino Legacy Awards Recognize S.B. community leaders for their accomplishments and support of the Latino community with light refreshments and appetizers. 4pm. Hotel Corque, 400 Alisal Rd., Solvang. $60. tinyurl.com/LatinoLegacyAwards24

5/3: UCSB Percussion Ensemble Presents: Maximums and Minimums Listen to a program of mostly “minimalist” music that will feature composers Steve Reich, Bret William Dietz, Ivan Trevino, Nigel Westlake, Marc Mellits, Paul Smadbeck, UCSB student Leah Graafs, and more. 3pm. Lotte Lehmann Concert Hall, UCSB. Free-$10. Email admin@campuscalendar .ucsb.edu campuscalendar.ucsb.edu

5/3-5/5: S.B. Fair & Expo Presents: Double Thrill, Double Fun Have a blast at the fair with carnival rides, games, creative exhibits, farm animals, live music, magic, hypnotism, and fair food. Fri.: 4pm; Sat.-Sun.: 11am. Earl Warren Showgrounds, 3400 Calle Real. Children: $6; Adults: $10; Carnival Wristband: $30. Call (805) 687-0766. tinyurl.com/DoubleThrillDoubleFun

5/3: Marca MP Take in the sounds of banda, mariachi, and ranchera from the California-based Regional Mexican group Marca MP on their Simplemente Marca Tour 2024 . 8pm. Arlington Theatre, 1317 State St. $49.50-$119.50. Call (805) 963-9580. arlingtontheatresb.com/upcomingevents

5/3-5/4: M.Special Brewing Co. (S.B.) Fri.: Do No Harm, 8pm. Sat.: Walking Coco, 8pm. 634 State St. Free Call (805) 968-6500. mspecialbrewco.com

5/4: M.Special Brewing Co. (Goleta) The Caverns, 6pm. 6860 Cortona Dr., Ste. C, Goleta. Free. Call (805) 968-6500. mspecialbrewco.com

5/4: Arrowsmith’s Wine Bar James Gentry, 7pm. 1539 Mission Dr., Solvang. Free Call (805) 686-9126 arrowsmithwine.com/events

Shows on Tap Shows on Tap

5/5-5/8:

SOhO Restaurant & Music Club Sun.: Boot Juice, The Caverns, 8pm. $15-$20. Ages 21+. Mon.: SBCC Jazz Combos Concert, 7pm. $15. All ages. Tue.: Laguna Blanca School Band Spring Showcase, 7pm. Cover charge at the door. All ages. Wed.: Alex Cuba, 8pm. Concert: $25-$30, Dinner: $69. All ages. 1221 State St. Call (805) 962-7776. sohosb.com

5/4-5/5: Cold Spring Tavern Sat.: McGuire/Moffett Band, 1:30-4:30pm. The Down Yonders, 5-8pm. Sun.: Tom Ball and Kenny Sultan, 1:30-4:30pm. 5995 Stagecoach Rd. Free Call (805) 967-0066. coldspringtavern.com

5/4-5/5: Hook’d Bar and Grill Sat.: Tony Buck and the Cadillac Angels, 4pm. Sun.: Jeff Pine, 1pm. 116 Lakeview Dr., Cachuma Lake. Free Call (805) 350-8351. hookdbarandgrill.com/music-onthe-water

5/5: SAMsARA Winery & Tasting Room Josh Jenkins, 2pm. 6485 Calle Real, Ste. E., Goleta. Free Call (805) 845-8001. samsarawine.com/events

5/6: The Red Piano Ray Jaurique, 7:30pm. 519 State St. Free Call (805) 3581439. theredpiano.com

5/8: Whiskey Richards Punk on Vinyl. 9pm. Whiskey Richards, 435 State St. Free Ages 21+. Call (818) 451-8206. tinyurl.com/punkonvinyl

5/3: Free Astronomy Talk: Satellites in the Crosshairs Learn about satellites and space debris in international space exploration, regulation, cooperation, and conflict from Larry F. Martinez, PhD, professor emeritus of political science at the California State University at Long Beach. 7:30-9pm. Fleischmann Auditorium, S.B. Museum of Natural History, 2559 Puesta Del Sol. Free. Call (805) 682-4711 x164. sbnature.org/calendar

SATURDAY 5/4

5/4: San Marcos Parent-Child Workshop Spring Music Festival This festival will feature food, wine and beer, a silent auction, tractor rides, crafts, a bounce house, and live music and dance performances with proceeds to go toward the Parent-Child Workshop. 11am-5pm. Rancho La Patera & Stow House, 304 N. Los Carneros Rd., Goleta. $10-$40. Call (805) 964-8994. tinyurl.com/SpringMusicFest24

5/4-5/5: The Santa Ynez Valley Chorale Spring Concert: A Journey of Wonder Celebrate 100 years of Disney with music from Beauty and the Beast, The Little Mermaid, Encanto, Frozen, and more. 3pm. Solvang Veterans’ Memorial Hall, 1745 Mission Dr., Solvang. Ages 12 and under: free; GA: $15-$20. Email info@syvchorale.org syvchorale.org

terry ortega Lola watts by & May 2-8
Volunteer Opportunity Fundraiser EVENTS MAY HAVE BEEN CANCELED OR POSTPONED. Please contact the venue to confirm the event. the
RJ RADEMAKER
COURTESY COURTESY COURTESY

mon - SAT: 8am - 5pm Sun: 9am - 3pm

4620 carpinteria ave. in carpinteria

805-566-6500 www.eyeofthedaygdc.com

5/4: Mental Wellness Center’s 28th Annual Arts Faire: Artful Minds This arts faire will showcase the talents of approximately 60 local artists living with mental illness who have produced works in a variety of mediums such as painting, drawing, jewelry, and sculpture. There will be food for purchase and a tile paint zone. 11am. Beachfront across the street from Chase Palm Park, 323 E. Cabrillo Blvd. Free. Call (805) 705-4887. tinyurl.com/ArtfulMindsFaire

5/4: Book Talk with Susan Hayden Author Susan Hayden will discuss her lyrical memoir, Now You Are a Missing Person, a collection of stories and poems that explore how love, grief, and the San Fernando Valley and L.A. have shaped her life, with music journalist Steve Hochman. 3pm. Tecolote Book Shop, 1470 E. Valley Rd. Free. Call (805) 969-4977. tinyurl.com/Susan-Hayden

5/4: Carpinteria Arts & Craft Faire Enjoy and purchase artwork in a wide variety of mediums such as painting, woodwork, glass, fiber arts, and resin pours inspired by the ocean, sand, and sky from more than 22 local artists. 10am-4pm. Lynda Fairly Carpinteria Arts Center, 865 Linden Ave., Carpinteria. Free. Call (805) 684-7789 or email info@carpinteriaartscenter.org. carpinteriaartscenter.org

5/4: Blissful Beauty: A Mother’s Day Spa Experience Join for an exclusive spa event where you can craft a personalized clay facial mask and sugar scrub, followed by a soothing mini facial. Enjoy small bites and mimosas. Session times: 10am and 2pm. Heather Grace Skincare, 1050 Edison St., Ste. B, Santa Ynez. $125. Call (805) 637-9488. heathergraceskincare.com/product/spa

5/4: 11th Annual Buellton Brew Fest There will be more than 55 craft breweries, wineries, and cider, kombucha, and spirit companies on site, food trucks, lawn games, and entertainment. Bring lawn chairs and blankets. Visit the website for information about round-trip transportation to and from the fest ($20-$25 round trip: Goleta, S.B., Lompoc) from Jump on the Brew Bus. VIP: 11:30am-4:30pm; GA: 12:30-4:30pm. River View Park, 151 Sycamore Dr., Buellton. $55-$65; designated driver: $20. Ages 21+. Call (805) 688-7629. buelltonbrewfest.com

SUNDAY 5/5

5/5: Second Annual Young Artist Showcase Listen to classical pianists and guitarists from across S.B. County who have been nominated by their teachers to perform in this honor recital. 3pm. St. Mark’sin-the-Valley Episcopal Church, 2901 Nojoqui Ave, Los Olivos. Free. Call (805) 705-0938. tinyurl.com/YoungArtistsShowcase24

5/5: S.B. Youth Symphony Enjoy a concert by this advanced ensemble that brings together 50 gifted musicians, ages 12-18, from S.B. and Ventura counties to perform works across the orchestral repertoire. 4pm. Lobero Theatre, 33 E. Canon Perdido St. Free. Call (805) 963-0761. lobero.org/whats-on

MONDAY 5/6

5/6: Dance Wave This weekly dance blends rock, soul, and heart-centered grooves to create music that is a soulful alternative to more electronically influenced playlists. 7:30pm. Unitarian Society of S.B., 1535 State St. $15-$20 at the door. Call (805) 563-4904. tinyurl.com/DanceWave24

TUESDAY 5/7

5/7: Theatre Eclectic Presents: The Great Gatsby SBCC School of Extended Learning (Urge to Act/Acting for Older Adults) presents F. Scott Fitzgerald’s classic story about self-made millionaire Jay Gatsby’s pursuit of the wealthy, young, and married Daisy Buchanan in 1920s New York. The play goes through May 16. 7-9pm. SBCC Wake Campus, 300 N. Turnpike Rd. Free tinyurl.com/ Gatsby-May7

5/7: UCSB Arts and Lectures Presents Dr. Ayana Elizabeth Johnson Marine biologist, policy advisor, and writer Dr. Ayana Elizabeth Johnson will discuss her forthcoming book, What if We Get It Right?, which encourages readers to step away from hopelessness and envision possibility in the face of the climate crisis. 7:30pm. Campbell Hall, UCSB. Students: free, GA: $20-$30. Call (805) 893-3535. artsandlectures.ucsb.edu

5/7: Medora’s Book Club: Lush Life Discuss Valerie Rice’s cookbook Lush Life, which delves into the author’s experience as a gardener, cook, and cocktail maker with her no-fuss style and passion for fresh ingredients, and try a specialty cocktail from the book. 6pm. Casa del Herrero, 1387 E. Valley Rd. $50. Call (805) 565-5653. casadelherrero.com/event-calendar

WEDNESDAY 5/8

5/8: Book Signing with Steven Gilbar Join local author Steven Gilbar for a book talk and signing of his novel Montecito Noir: True Tales of Murder & Mayhem in Paradise, which chronicles murder and other malicious misconduct across Montecito. 6pm. Chaucer’s Books, 3321 State St. Free. Call (805) 682-6787 or email events@ chaucersbooks.com chaucersbooks.com/event

5/8: Teen Job & Volunteer Fair Teens will have the opportunity to meet with representatives from local businesses and organizations offering summer jobs and volunteer positions that will feature a diverse range of opportunities, from part-time jobs in retail and food service to internships with local nonprofits. 4-6pm. Eastside Library, 1102 E. Montecito St. Free. Call (805) 963-3727 or email info@sbplibrary.libanswers.com tinyurl.com/TeenJobFairMay8

5/8: Book Talk: Susan Magsamen and Ivy Ross Authors Susan Magsamen, founder and director of the International Arts + Mind Lab, Center for Applied Neuroaesthetics at Johns Hopkins University, and Ivy Ross, the vice president of hardware design at Google, will present a talk about their book, Your Brain on Art: How the Arts Transform Us. 7:30pm. Campbell Hall, UCSB. Free. Call (805) 893-2478. tinyurl.com/BookTalkMay8

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5/4: A Star Wars Cantina Celebration: Renegades, Rebels, and Rogues Enjoy a Star Wars–themed evening of live dance, comedy, musical performances, food and drinks, and more in support of the local nonprofits Hope Refuge and New Hope Creative Alliance. 7pm. Soul Bites, 423 State St. GA: $41.80, VIP: $79.54. tinyurl.com/StarWarsCantina24

MAY THE 4TH BE WITH YOU!

5/4: May the 4th Concert Dress as your favorite Star Wars character to celebrate the day with concert pianist Bryan Tari, whose captivating symphonic arrangements of the Star Wars themes from Episodes 1-6 will take you on a galactic journey with music from Superman and The Godfather to also be featured 3pm. The Granada Theatre, 1214 State St. $16-$36. Call (805) 899-2222. granadasb.org/events

5/5: La Paloma Café Cinco de Mayo Brunch Enjoy endless huevos, a taco bar, mimosas, specialty margaritas, tequila tastings, and more with a sweets station that includes handmade churros and live music. Brunch: 11am-2pm. La Paloma Café, 702 Anacapa St. Adults: $45; kids: $25; unlimited mimosas: $20. Call (805) 966-7029 or email info@lapalomasb.com tinyurl.com/LaPalomaCafe

5/4: La Casa de la Raza’s Cinco de Mayo Festival Listen to S.B.’s favorite local bands, the Caverns, Missbhavn, Freddy & Friends, the New Vibe, Heart & Soul Band, with Cota the Barber from Trejo Music to perform. There will be a talent show, BBQ, Kona ice, and face painting. Proceeds will go toward mental health and gun violence. 11am-8pm. Casa de la Raza, 601 E. Montecito St. Ages 0-12: free; GA: $25. Call (805) 699-5450. tinyurl.com/CasaRaza-Cinco

5/5: Chicano Culture S.B.’s Cinco de Mayo Mural Bike Tour Meet at the Boom Boom Bike Room and casually cycle downtown to visit mural locations with a presentation and vegan tacos provided by Rascal‘s to follow. Meet: 1pm; ride: 1:30pm. Boom Boom Bike Rm., 1924 De la Vina St. Free facebook.com/ChicanoCultureSB

5/5: Cinco de Mayo Taco & Tequila Tasting Enjoy tacos and tequila tastings with Casamigos with music from DJ Danny Welch on a gorgeous rooftop with a view. 4-6pm. Kimpton Canary and Finch & Fork, 31 W. Carrillo St. $20. Ages 21+. Call (805) 689-6764. finchandforkrestaurant.com/events

5/5: Café La Fonda’s Cinco de Mayo Choose from a breakfast buffet brunch menu with bottomless mimosas and margaritas and take in the live mariachi music and Folklórico dancers. 11am-2pm. Café La Fonda, 129 E. Anapamu St. Various prices. Call (805) 335-8364. tinyurl.com/CafeLaFonda-5Mayo

HIGH SCHOOL MUSICALS!

5/2-5/4: SBHS Theatre Presents A Chorus

Line This funny, heartbreaking, and refreshingly honest musical, which won nine Tony Awards and the Pulitzer Prize for drama in 1975, examines one day in the lives of dancers vying for a spot in the “chorus line” of a Broadway musical. Thu.-Fri.: 7pm; Sat.: 2 and 7pm. S.B. High School Theatre, 700 E. Anapamu St. GA: $15; reserved: $25. Call (805) 9669101 or email sbhstheatreboxoffice@gmail.com tinyurl.com/A-Chorus-Line

5/4-5/7: San Marcos High School Theater Presents Singin’ in the Rain This musical based on the 1952 film follows silent screen actors Don Lockwood and Lina Lamont as they transition from silent movies to the talkies with actress and newcomer Kathy Selden, who must be brought in to dub Lina’s shrill voice in songs such as “Moses,”“Good Morning,” “Singin’ in the Rain,” and more. Join the opening night happy hour/VIP on Thursday with food and drinks at Lighthouse Coffee (199 S. Turnpike Rd.), 5:30-6:30pm. The musical goes through May 11. Thu.-Sat.: 7pm; Sun.: 2pm. Marquis Performing Arts Center, San Marcos High School, 4750 Hollister Ave. GA: $10-$15; happy hour: $40. smhstheaterdept.com/event

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Oliver | Santa Barbara

“ Our experience at Cottage was so wonderful — it felt like we were being taken care of by our own family.”

—Alexis, Oliver’s mother

Oliver was born via emergency cesarean section at 31 weeks — weighing only 2 lbs., 6 oz. and was 15.6 inches long.

For the next two months, he was cared for in Cottage’s Haselton Family Neonatal Intensive Care Unit (NICU) where his lungs developed, and he grew stronger and stronger.

These days, Oliver is doing great as a happy eight-month-old who weighs 11 pounds and loves his toys, stroller rides and smiling at his family.

In 2023, nearly 2,000 babies were born at Santa Barbara Cottage Hospital. From the Birth Center, to the Mother Infant Unit, to Cottage Children’s Medical Center and Grotenhuis Pediatric Clinics, our staff is honored to offer care and compassion to children in all stages of their lives. Learn more at cottagehealth.org/childrens.

MUSIC spring festival

SANTA BARBARA COTTAGE HOSPITAL BABIES

Goleta

Silas David Bramsen, 3/16/2024

Ezra Dixon Caudillo, 3/19/2024

Lompoc

Dulce Aurora Crespo, 3/6/2024

Emiliano Aguilar Hernandez, 3/11/2024

Lawrence Arthur Martinez, 3/28/2024

Santa Barbara

Henry Wilder Lynch, 3/10/2024

Alonzo Rizo Patron, 3/13/2024

Nora June Weidl, 3/15/2024

Isaac Joaquín Mendiola-Bailon, 3/16/2024

Julieta Jaramillo, 3/18/2024

Miles Christopher Tavarez, 3/18/2024

Sebastian Jimenez, 3/22/2024

Pharaoh Jude Jennings, 3/25/2024

Cameron Winefred Gimenez Grana, 3/27/2024

Holland Maxwell Yasuhiro Ochi, 3/28/2024

Emara Ramirez, 3/28/2024

Theodore Wesley Forrest Wilson, 3/31/2024

Santa Ynez

Alan Garcia, 3/3/2024

Tehachapi

Alitzel Jasmine Valladares, 3/27/2024

If you are expecting or have an infant, sign up for our free newsletter specific to your due date or your baby’s age. cottagehealth.org/healthybaby

TAI CHI BEGINNING CLASSES

Tuesdays | 10:45 am Thursdays | 10:00 am Saturdays | 10:30 am Oak Park Stage ( Junipero/Calle Real)

38 THE INDEPENDENT MAY 2, 2024 INDEPENDENT.COM SAN MARCOS PARENT CHILD WORKSHOP PRESENTS Purchase your tickets and learn more at smpcw.org/festival Saturday - May 4TH 2024 11AM - 5PM 304 N Los Carneros Rd, Goleta, California
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Community LIVING

PAL Breaks Down Barriers Between Cops and Kids

The Police Activities League (PAL), a local nonprofit that builds relationships between law enforcement officers and youth, has recently benefited from a deepening of its longstanding working relationship with the S.B. Police Department, enabling a greater impact on these teens and their families.

Under Chief Kelly Gordon’s leadership, SBPD created an 11-member PAL Pack, a cadre of officers that oversees the department’s participation in various PAL activities programs in which more than 50 officers and other SBPD employees participate. Gordon has assumed a direct role, meeting quarterly with PAL’s youth leadership group, participating in myriad PAL events, and informally engaging with youth at the PAL Center.

Motivating this outreach is Chief Gordon’s belief in the importance of providing vulnerable youth with the opportunity to get to know officers out of the context of a call for service and the importance of mentoring them. “There is something about that authentic moment, where you are just sharing a hot dog with these kids” or playing tug-of-war, she said. “The little things go a really long way.”

By including the families in much of the programming, Gordon related, the benefits extend to the families as well. She was quick to add that officers benefit too. If she is having a bad day, she shared, all she needs to do is spend 15 minutes at the PAL Center and she walks out with a smile.

At the helm of PAL is Judie Lugo, who grew up with a mistrust of the police and had gang members as friends. At age 19, she came to her PAL interview clad in a black hoodie, just seeking to earn some money. Sixteen years later, she said she doesn’t think she could ever leave PAL because of the complete admiration she has for the organization, which she credits with changing the trajectory of her life.

With PAL not judging her based on her appearance or her circle of friends, Lugo came to realize she had been judging police officers. She came to see that “everybody who is associated with the police department and PAL is an absolutely amazing human being who wants to make a difference.” Now, as executive director, Lugo leads with keen insight into how to relate to the youth, along with a hefty dose of empathy and compassion.

PAL never pushes relationships with police officers, Lugo shared, because nobody ever pushed her. More broadly, remembering how she felt as a youth informs how she leads, and success has ensued. Surveys show that 98 percent of program participants become more trusting of law enforcement.

PAL is housed at 1235 Chapala Street, where until recently it operated an after-school drop-in program that welcomed about 20-25 youth each day and more than 150 unduplicated youth each month. A roof crash last December caused a temporary relocation to the Westside Neighborhood Center, but it is set to return to Chapala Street next month.

PAL offers daily tutoring and recreational opportunities. Its popular Youth Leadership Council (YLC) engages in character building activities, leadership training, and community service projects, with weekly participation by SBPD

Officer Luke Vorster, who even accompanied five youth to the National PAL Youth Summit in Washington, D.C., last year. In recent years, every YLC participant has gone on to college, trade school, or the military. More broadly, every PAL participant has graduated from high school and 94 percent went on to college, trade school, the military, or a job.

While PAL kids are bright, former Board Chair John Van Donge related, they may not have ever had the opportunity, the exposure, or the belief that they could actually go to college. PAL opens their eyes so that they see they can, shared Van Donge.

Commander Charles Katsapis, head of the PAL Pack, runs the Discover Program, which each week immerses youth in a facet of public safety or criminal justice. Through hands-on site visits, the youth gain insight into how systems work and why they work the way they do.

The motorcycle officers were a big hit, Katsapis shared, when they let teens shoot radar guns at cars to see who could record the fastest car. Also popular were outings with Judge Von Deroian, who met with youth in her chamber; and with detectives, who worked with youth on a fake crime scene.

During the summer, there’s an intensive one-week program to give teens a taste of the police recruit experience, including wearing uniforms and doing physical training and classroom instruction. It culminates in a visit to the Ventura County Criminal Justice Training Center. As with the other programs, there is a graduation event for the teens and their families.

Relationship building and mentorship are at the heart of these programs. This also goes for the monthly fishing trips with officers, who are out of uniform, volunteering their time. The trips “allow for really organic, awesome interaction between youth and law enforcement,” Katsapis said. It’s not just the kids who benefit, Katsapis added. Officers always enjoy PAL events too. All it takes, Katsapis shared, is for an officer to experience the joy of one outing and they want to come back.

Renting fishing boats at Lake Cachuma is popular and often involves the teens’ families as well. Katsapis beams with joy as he shares a photo a teen recently texted him of the family dinner eating the catch of the day. Alluding to how he felt when he received the text at home, Katsapis remarked, “It doesn’t get any better than that.” Surf outings have been a hit, too. The idea is to do activities that are positive and new for the teens.

An officer’s uniform and gun belt create apprehension for a lot of teens, Katsapis related, and these activities help humanize the badge, enabling real conversations and relationship building. When he’s with the teens, he’s not Officer Katsapis; he’s Charlie.

Gordon heaps praise on Lugo “Judie is very amazing. I don’t know if you would find anyone with a bigger heart or dedication” and expresses huge gratitude not only to Lugo and her staff, but also to the donors of PAL, who make PAL possible. Other than a small grant received through the national organization, all of PAL’s funding comes from private sector community grants and donations.

For more info about PAL, go to sbpal.org.

INDEPENDENT.COM MAY 2, 2024 THE INDEPENDENT 39 p.39
SBPD Builds Relationships with Teens
ZACH MENDEZ
From left: PAL Executive Director Judie Lugo, SBPD Chief Kelly Gordon, and SBPD Commander Charles Katsapis
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Backcountry Ramble

Outdoors

The loud, rolling warble that penetrated the San Rafael Mountains halted the six of us while backpacking the Lost Valley Trail in the Los Padres National Forest. As impressive as that sonic boom was while absorbed by the steep sandstone crags and smothering chaparral, it was soon forgotten just minutes later by a lone California condor soaring directly over us while we traversed the serpentine spine of Hurricane Deck.

Self-Propelled

I’m not much of a step keeper, but over those seven days, I became obsessed with one foot in front of the other, and how many steps were required over the seven-day slog from dense chaparral to those semi-arid grasslands.

• Dec. 1: 9.5 miles 24,271 steps

• Dec. 2: 8.1 miles 20,459 steps

• Dec. 3: 8.4 miles 20,569 steps

• Dec. 4: 10 miles 26,472 steps

• Dec. 5: 14.2 miles 35,821 steps

• Dec. 6: 5.9 miles 15,557 steps

• Dec. 7: 8.3 miles 19,779 steps

• Total steps: 162,928

Backpacking the Santa Barbara backcountry isn’t just an escape. It’s a trek toward the unexpected, where natural wonders potentially lurk around every bend in the trail, every manzanita, river crossing, or sweeping potrero. That solitary condor made several passes over us, but in a sudden instance, North America’s largest flying landbird vanished above lofty ridgetops and a puff of cumulous nimbus.

Six of us Forrest, Solomon, Zack, Alex, Sean, and I a merry band of beach lifeguards from Carpinteria and kayak guides at the Channel Islands National Park, hatched a plan for a winter backcountry trek beginning along Highway 154, and finishing in the sweeping grasslands of the Carrizo Plain National Monument. For a seven-day ramble, the distance wasn’t far, about 70 miles across three mountain ranges and two rivers, with plenty of bushwhacking in between.

Some steps were tougher and steeper than others, some more memorable. Some days, the steps felt like they wouldn’t ease. Yet other days were longer but were filled with sounds of the forest, cool winds whistling through the canyons, and

water streaming through all the seasonal tributaries. It was also the sounds of silence that were evident in the carvedout sandstone cathedrals: wind and water naturally sculpting the rugged topography. These natural wonders had all of us appreciating each step across portions of the Transverse Ranges.

Falling for a River

Fall colors also decorated the lifeblood of the forest. Before reaching the Sisquoc River, its seasonal palette still held true as brilliant yellow, red, and orange hues flushed toward the winter solstice. Fall colors are a natural wonder not readily seen in Santa Barbara County, but on a river on the Wild and Scenic system like the Sisquoc, its steady, uninhibited flow harbored sturdy forests of cottonwood, sycamore, and California bay trees. While the backcountry revealed its annual splendor tucked away in the San Rafael Wilderness, brilliant reflections mirrored in the many tranquil side pools along the Sisquoc, just a backpacker’s trek away.

As we descended the rolling, gritty spine of Hurricane Deck, those fall colors drew us to the South Fork of the Sisquoc. Its cascading flow quenched the thirst of six parched backpackers. As we rinsed off layers of trail dust, the sound of the river also rejuvenated our spirits, our strides suddenly bounding toward the cobbled runnel.

Two nights on the free-flowing river were filled with hikes up and down the Sisquoc and its many side canyons, followed by raucous card games by the fire. After those two nights, all six of us were anxious to continue northeast, ascending the Sweetwater Trail to the Salisbury Potrero. After reaching the spine of another ridgetop, the stage was set for the path ahead. In 24 hours, we would be camped near Caliente Peak, the tallest mountain in San Luis Obispo County at 5,106 feet.

Riders of Rohan

Conveniently perched on a knife ridge in the Caliente Mountains, the views and our perspective of the surrounding region were stunning. To the south was Big Pine Mountain at 6,800 feet, the highest summit in the Dick Smith Wilderness of the Los Padres National Forest. To the east was Mount Pinos, the highest summit in the National Forest at 8,847 feet. The Sierra Mountains loomed on the northern horizon. Just behind us, to the west, was Caliente Mountain. Between the Caliente Mountains and the Temblor Range to the northeast was the last of California’s semi-arid grasslands, the Carrizo Plain National Monument.

The six of us were ensconced in a unique swath of California biodiversity. Before sunrise, as pink and orange hues swept across the eastern horizon, Sean and Zack blasted “The Riders of Rohan” from the epic Lord of the Rings. It felt appropriate while we were swaddled in our sleeping bags, morning dew beading up and rolling into the arid chaparral. The panoramic view was mesmerizing as we trekked toward Soda Lake, the largest natural alkali lake in Central and Southern California. Our ride back to Santa Barbara was awaiting our arrival on the grasslands. We were leaving three mountain ranges and two rivers in our wake, while being swallowed up by the teeming veld. From the coastal range to the plain, we connected with several different backcountry biomes, one melding into the other. It felt far away, but it really wasn’t far at all. n

INDEPENDENT.COM MAY 2, 2024 THE INDEPENDENT 41
LIVING
Trekking with a Group of Carpinteria Lifeguards and Channel Islands Guides Story and photos by Chuck Graham Hurricane Deck, Sierra Madre, Los Padres Forest The hikers’ shoes of choice varied widely.

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Cardio Confidential Hot Stuff, Cool Vibes LIVING

As much as I like to style myself the intrepid fitness reporter, I have something to confess: I’ve avoided hot yoga. A yoga class I took years ago on a muggy summer day in a studio without air conditioning had been unpleasant enough dripping sweat and sliding around on my mat. Why would I go to an intentionally heated yoga class?

Sweating It Out at Power of Your Om

Credit the powers of persuasion of Adrienne Smith, who owns Power of Your Om yoga studio. The world record holder for rowing unsupported from San Francisco to Hawai‘i, she is something of a force of nature.

Even so, my foray into hot yoga began not in the infraredheated Power of Your Om studio but on Stearns Wharf behind the Ty Warner Sea Center, where the studio hosts a bydonation class one Sunday a month, weather permitting. At this first class, after a long hiatus due to all the winter storms, I joined about 30 other adults, a few kids, and a miniature Australian shepherd. We faced the shore, and Smith encouraged us to feel the sun and breeze on our skin. As we did spinal twists and crescent lunges, Smith cued us to turn, twist, or reach toward the restaurants on the wharf, toward Montecito, toward the sailboats bobbing in the ocean. I picked the white stucco square of a house on the Riviera as my drishti point as we alternated lunging with raising a knee. I could hear the ka-thunk, ka-thunk of cars going over the speed bumps on the wharf and, every so often, a sound like a dolphin exhaling that was probably just the Sea Center’s HVAC system.

Inspired by that lovely experience, I arrived for my first class in the studio, where the four narrow double-hung windows frame a beautiful view of the Riviera with sycamore trees and red tile roofs in the foreground. I had decided to ease into hot yoga with a basic class, but “basic” didn’t mean “cooler”: It was 99 degrees in the front of the room where I was. Instructor Ayesha Jetley led us through a robust practice that included Chaturanga, the warrior poses, half-moon,

eagle, lizard, side planks, and more. By the time we got to crow pose, my shorts and lightweight top were both drenched with sweat, and I was pretty sure my knees would slide right off my upper arms if I attempted it.

“If you want to fly,” Smith had said of crow pose at the wharf class, “you have to be willing to eat shit.” I wasn’t willing, so I opted for a yoga squat instead. During savasana, Jetley put a few drops of lavender oil in our upturned palms. But despite Flo Rida’s “Good Feeling” on the playlist, I did not feel good about having to mop my face, chest, and hands repeatedly, and slipping on my mat.

For the Yoga x HIIT class, I made a few adjustments: I got my hair up off my neck and invested in a yoga towel to lay on my mat to absorb the sweat dripping off me. I also set aside vanity and broke out an old floral-pattern bra top that I thought I had retired from public use when I decided it was time to keep my middle-aged midriff covered. Todd McCullough, a former Florida football player, teaches this hybrid “kick-ass class” (his words), which combines traditional yoga asanas and breath work with conventional fitness moves like ab crunches and jumping jacks. The studio is heated to 80-85 degrees for this class. The HIIT segment consisted of four sets of three exercises yoga squat hamstring stretches, plank fireflies, and skate jumps which we followed with a series of sun salutations before finishing with some nice quad stretches. McCullough was more profane than a typical yoga teacher: “Your body’s going to tell you to give up. Tell it to fuck off.” But at the end, he encouraged us to take a moment for our own spiritual practice, even if it was just to express gratitude or think about a friend. I have a friend undergoing treatment for cancer, so that spoke to me.

but at least with the yoga towel, I was no longer sliding around on my mat.

411:

The classes I took at Power of Your Om were all in the weeks leading up to the inaugural Sunsender, a daytime yoga and dance party event Smith was putting on at Santa Barbara City College on April 27. Leaning into the event’s wellness theme, I rode my bike to the SBCC Overlook. The previous day’s howling winds had died down and sunlight glinted on the ocean. As the crowd laid out their mats and applied sunscreen, Billen Ted’s “People Ain’t Dancing” and Dua Lipa’s “Dance the Night” played on the sound system.

Power of Your Om is located at 1221 State Street, #201, Santa Barbara (upstairs in Victoria Court, down the hall from SOhO).

Reserve a spot in a class using a mobile app. Bring mat, water, and towel. Cubbies provided for storing personal items. Makeshift dressing room available; no showers. Parking in adjacent City Lot 5; limited street parking. See powerofyourom.com.

After some brief welcoming remarks and an emotional thanks to the team that helped make Sunsender a reality, Smith led us through a challenging but playful yoga practice making kissy faces at our neighbors, wagging our booties in chair pose, doing frog kicks and handstands. At the end, she had us do backbends and say hello to the person we were facing.

I greeted a glamorous woman in animalprint tights. “This is hard,” I said, and she agreed. “Good job,” we told each other. After the yoga, the festival vibe really kicked in, with young women in diaphanous dusters dancing to the deejay sets by Origami Human and Shallou that followed.

By the time I tried the Hot Vinyasa Yoga class (90-100 degrees) with Smith, I was noticing how much more flexible I felt after a hot yoga class. I still didn’t care for getting so sweaty,

People who had brought swimsuits headed to the changing tents so they could take advantage of the on-site saunas and cold plunges, while others had glitter or permanent jewelry applied. The massage tables were already booked for the rest of the day, so I grabbed a breakfast burrito from the Green Table tent and sampled a non-alcoholic cocktail from Tilden. Then a bearded man named Awe did a chakra and tarot reading for me. Although some of my chakras were blocked, and we had to get my Six of Cups tarot card upright, I’m pleased to report my heart chakra receives and gives a lot of love … and a newfound appreciation for hot yoga. n

INDEPENDENT.COM MAY 2, 2024 THE INDEPENDENT 43
Ramos | Photos by Ingrid Bostrom Writer Amy Ramos learns to enjoy the heat at Power of Your Om. Adrienne Smith at the Sunsender event at SBCC
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FOOD& DRINK

Cuyama Buckhorn Makes the S.B. High Desert a Dining Destination

Timeless Roadside Resort Makes Taste Buds Sing Just a Short Drive Away

“The Pickle Plate” might not sing a siren song from a menu. But if you’re dining at Cuyama Buckhorn Restaurant and Bar, the dish’s simplicity certainly should. Banish any thought of boring retro relish trays. Instead, admire its directness, its delivery of just enough vinegary sour to highlight the vegetables’ intrinsic sugar that’s often easy to ignore. Appreciate texture the snap of carrot, the lush flesh of red pepper, the bristle of broccoli florets. Notice your appetite awaken in fuller ways than it might usually.

It’s both delicious and kind of Zen.

Let’s get even more essential and order what’s basically bread and butter. That’s a Tehachapi rye flour biscuit, a bit homely and hockey puck sized, beside a quenelle of luscious butter, scooped like ice cream, and drizzled with honey like a sundae topping. That rye flour offers hints of malt and sour plus, it comes from a project working with heritage grain, non-GMOs, all the good stuff. It’s both hearty and light at once, and when slathered with some of the rich butter and the sweet honey, you will be

nothing but happy.

In many ways, these two starter plates embody everything about Cuyama Buckhorn and its restaurant. Originally built in 1952 when New Cuyama was a thing (think oil, and we’ll get to that story), the 21-room hotel got a loving revamp starting in 2018. Now it’s a go-to destination for rest and relaxation in the Santa Barbara County high desert, a great base to explore the nearby Carrizo Plain, especially during superbloom months. Every aspect of the property seems thoughtful, peaceful, and designed for pleasure, whether that means poolside reading, playing cornhole, or staring at a wide swath of stars. It’s a perfect spot to find serenity and recalibrate. And eat and drink really, really well.

“Our ambition is to become a destination renowned for its culinary fiber,” says Scott Augat, the property’s general manager, “where food enthusiasts and beverage nerds alike travel to indulge in our locally sourced, thoughtfully crafted dishes that showcase the unique flavors and stories of our region, paying homage to local

indigenous cultures and farmers alike.”

That’s a good thing, given that the Buckhorn is the only game in town as Route 166 snakes through what is billed the Hidden Valley of Enchantment (and earns that puffery, TBH). If you lodge there, you will dine and drink there. Cocktail fans will particularly enjoy their stay, with a creative list that offers classics mellowed out with solera-method barrel aging try the Nouveau Carré of rye, cognac, Lillet Rouge, Benedictine, and bitters and a striking set of four farm-to-glass offerings. These four feature fruit from nearby Rock Front Ranch, such as a take on the Ward 8 with house grenadine from the Ranch’s pomegranates, blended Scotch, lemon, and Xocolatl Mole bitters and a desert-themed cooler featuring cactus fruit (yellow, not the more typical, red-fleshed tuna), mezcal, green Chartreuse, aloe, and spearmint. The second one is as much a good spa day as a cocktail.

Then there’s the surely only partially tongue-incheek-named God’s Country. The bar does a 3H Wagyu beef wash on rye, creates a cordial that starts with Coors Light, and brings the corn with Mexican liqueur Nixta. You can see and feel the fat flecks on this rich, cornforward, very new spin on an old fashioned, a fitting tribute to cattle country. “When you indulge in our offerings, you’re not just tasting ingredients,” Augat says. “You’re experiencing the story of our region, meticulously curated and passionately presented.”

As of February, the head chef has been Hugo Vera, who brings a storied career to this remote outpost. The menu is in the process of starting its shift to match his signature, but Vera got to flex recently at a multi-course dinner for the resort’s fourth annual Wild Flour Weekend, pun very much intended. The first night of our visit, he offered us items currently off-menu to hint at where he’s headed. Meat-eater me relished a beef short rib tender on the inside and grilled crispy on the edges that would have pleased Fred Flintstone, along with an avo-kale salad that seemed super-Californian; while my pescatarian wife adored her decidedly upscale veggie tacos, stuffed with grilled celery root and smoked mushroom. They certainly showed off Augat’s claim that “all our produce is sourced from within a 100-mile radius, celebrating the terroir and the dedication of our local farmers.” He says the Buckhorn is even planning its own farm.

Of course, the cuisine is a mere part of the charm of the space. You certainly can’t mind being stared at while you eat one wall of the bar has numerous deer trophies staring down; up from the bar itself, old-timey mugshots glare from the shellacked surface. Our two-night stay

was enriched by Summer Jones: bartender, waitperson, food runner, phone-answerer for to-go orders, and the one pleasantly fetching a cup for a driver stopping in for a cola for the road. Jones was excellent at serving up not only food, but also those kinds of site-specific stories that merge history and myth, as you’d expect in a spot that’s been open for 75 years.

Speaking of stories, if you crave both unsparing beliefs and killer cabernet sauvignon, book a tasting at relatively nearby Sagebrush Annie’s with about-to-turn-90 owner Larry Hogan. He’s the one who will explain how there’s Cuyama and, not even five miles to the west, New Cuyama when oil was found in the 1950s, ARCO didn’t want to pay Cuyama any tax money, so it made its own town.

Trips like one to Sagebrush Annie’s can be augmented with Buckhorn Baskets rented picnic hampers replete with too much food. Ours, which we enjoyed with a view of a snowcapped Mt. Pinos across the Carrizo Plain, included avocado toast, a BLT, a Cobb salad, an oatmeal cookie, a bacon-jalapeño scone, and house-made corn chips we were too stuffed to eat. Every bite pleased.

Then, in the evening, sitting at a fire pit wrapped in blankets as the desert did its nightly temp drop, we had the s’mores kit kindly awaiting us in our room. We’re talking old-school Hershey’s, not some designer chocolate this is nostalgia and not hankering to be hip in the slightest. As our marshmallows browned on the long, pointy sticks provided, we sipped glasses of red wine Summer Jones helped us choose. All the worry of the world felt far away.

Cuyama Buckhorn room rates run about $300-$360, with dinner entrees in the $15-$30 range. For more information, see cuyamabuckhorn.com

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COURTESY PHOTOS
The smokehouse platter The deer lineup at the bar
FOOD & DRINK COURTESY PHOTOS
Cattle greet guests on the road to Cuyama Buckhorn.

FRIDAY,

46 THE INDEPENDENT MAY 2, 2024 INDEPENDENT.COM @vivaelartesantabarbara @vivaelarte @vivaelartesantabarbara @vivaelarte ¡ENTRADA GRATUITA! FREE Co-presented by The Marjorie Luke Theatre, the Guadalupe-Nipomo Dunes Center and UCSB Arts and Lectures, in partnership with the Isla Vista School After School Grant. @vivaelartesantabarbara @vivaelarte
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A Lunchtime Slice of Paradise

San Ysidro Ranch’s Idyllic Setting Offers New Prix-Fixe Menu Options

The ladies and the gents who love to luxuriate in a leisurely lunch have a nice, newish weekday option at San Ysidro Ranch. The intimate and quite cozy and charming Veranda is the place to be for the new prix-fixe lunch menu created by Executive Chef Matthew Johnson.

“My inspiration for crafting our Veranda prix-fixe menu comes directly from the vibrant flavors found right here on our property,” said Johnson of the menu, which is available Monday through Thursday. “From the earthy richness of freshly harvested vegetables from our garden to the brightness of citrus fruits grown on our land, each ingredient tells a story of our commitment to excellence and sustainable culinary practices. By showcasing these ingredients in every dish, we not only celebrate the bounty of our surroundings but also invite our guests to savor the essence of our unique property with every bite.”

The three-course lunch includes three entree options: the blackened Ōra King salmon salad, a light and colorful concoction with avocado and candied pecans (my lunch date shared a bite, and it was delicious); chicken Milanese, my quite tasty choice, which was crusted with herbs and served with a very substantial salad of wild rocket arugula, pickled red onions, ninja radishes, and Parmigiano Reggiano; and an organic quinoa and garden kale grain bowl, which sounds awfully healthy for a decadent three-course treat, but I’m sure it’s delicious!

Starters include the choice of organic mixed greens, jumbo shrimp cocktail, or a Tuscan melon and yellow tomato gazpacho, which my friend said was excellent. For dessert, we both went for the San Ysidro Ranch Meyer lemon

tart, which was dreamy indeed.

At $49 a person, it’s not something I would do every day (nor is a threecourse lunch usually called for), but for a memorable day in one of our town’s most beautiful settings, it’s a nice way to treat yourself or someone special in your life.

On a side note, if it’s really a special occasion (or you’re there on assignment), the Tableside Smoked Cocktails are definitely a show-stopping treat, as I wrote about in my ON Culture newsletter last week.

While $33 may sound like a lot for a cocktail, it becomes far more palatable when your libation includes a floor show complete with special effects like scents and smoke. We got to try the Smoky Blood Orange Margarita smoked with a combination of white oak and cherry wood which was tart, smoky, and delicious, as promised. There are five other smoked cocktail options the Jack Rose, the Richard Foster, Scotch & Cigar, the Smoking Pig Poke, and Shou Sugi Ban each made with a different kind of wood, adding another kind of coziness entirely to the Veranda’s charming fireplaces, which are both indoors and outside on the patio.

See sanysidroranch.com for reservations and more info.

& DRINK

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The Veranda at San Ysidro Ranch is a cozy spot for a weekday lunch.
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Carpinteria Giovanni’s Closes (For Now)

Last January, Reader Primetime broke the news that Giovanni’s Pizza at 5003 Carpinteria Avenue in Carpinteria in moving to nearby 5205 Carpinteria Avenue, the current home of The Good Plow, which replaced Fosters Freeze in August 2021. I called Giovanni’s at the time and was told that their current building was sold and is scheduled to be demolished. Primetime sent me an update that Carpinteria Giovanni’s served their last meal on April 29. I have not received word yet about their when their reopening will occur down the street.

VIA VAI CLOSES: Last January, I wrote that lease for Via Vai restaurant at 1483 East Valley Road in Montecito is not being renewed. This was a surprise, since the place has always been hopping every time I have dined there and has been open for 30 years. Reader Primetime tells me that Via Vai had their “last supper” over the weekend. The eatery ended lunches on April 1.

CALL IT LA CANTINA: In July 2021, I broke the news that six restaurants were coming to the Turnpike Center next to Vons. Many have since opened, but one previously unnamed eatery, brought to you by Chris Chiarappa, the visionary and inspiration for Mesa Burger and other local eateries, has been under construction since then. Reader Claudia tells me there is a sign up now of the restaurant and that it will be named La Cantina.

CONSTRUCTION STARTED AT MACKENZIE MARKET: In February 2022, I reported that the family behind Omni Catering and Teddy’s by the Sea in Carpinteria bought the building at 3102 State Street, the former home of Mackenzie Market and Yanni’s Greek Deli, which closed February 2021 after 31 years in business. Reader Jay tells me that construction has finally started at the site, which reportedly will be a new restaurant named “Teddy’s on State.”

CINCO DE MAYO AT LA PALOMA: Join Chef Jeremy Tummel and the team at La Paloma Café (702 Anacapa St.) for a Cinco de Mayo brunch on May 5. Brunch is served from 10:30 a.m. to 2 p.m.; to book a reservation, visit tinyurl.com/lapaloma brunch. The bar will offer a special

happy hour of La Paloma’s margaritas, 3-6 p.m. Features for Cinco de Mayo: $45 station brunch plus $20 for unlimited mimosas; $25 for kids; live music, taco bar, specialty margarita pitchers, and complimentary tequila tastings with Nosotros.

MOTHER’S DAY AT BRASS BEAR: Brass Bear Uptown is doing a Mother’s Day Brunch Sunday, May 12, 10 a.m.-2 p.m. The buffet will include sausage quiche, vegetarian quiche, glazed bacon, scrambled eggs, Caesar salad, fresh fruit, breakfast potatoes, smoked salmon with capers and onions, bagels, French toast, and assorted pastries and sweets. Pricing is $45 for adults and $15 for kids 12 and under. Reservations can be made online at brassbearbrewing.com/uptown or by calling (805) 869-4014.

MOTHER’S DAY WITH ACME: Eateries under the umbrella of Acme Hospitality are offering Mother’s Day specials. The Lark celebrates Mother’s Day with their signature brunch, including specials of chai tea French toast with toasted almonds, fresh apricots, and mint; smoked king salmon Benedict with tarragon béarnaise; soft poached egg; pickled shallot; and more. Mother’s Day Brunch at La Paloma Café includes a savory carving station, made-to-order huevos station, salads, and crudo. Chef Elier Rodriguez at Loquita is offering new dishes, including croquetas de cangrejo with Dungeness crab, fennel seed, squid ink aioli, tarragon, and crispy potato nest; gazpacho blanco with soft-boiled egg, sherry vinegar caviar, crispy leek and chive oil, and more. Lucky Penny is having a tiedye event for kids (1-4 p.m.) where children can create their own unique tie-dye T-shirts. Price is $25 per child. Includes complimentary frosé for every mom.

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John Dickson’s reporting can be found every day online at SantaBarbara.com. Send tips to info@SantaBarbara.com READER PRIMETIME ON THE MOVE: Carpinteria Giovanni’s has closed but will reopen soon down the street in the former home of Fosters Freeze. FOOD & DRINK
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ALEX CUBA ISN’T AFRAID OF SOUNDING DIFFERENT

GRAMMY AWARD–WINNING ARTIST GRACES THE SOHO STAGE

Alex Cuba, born Alexis Puentes, thrives on a free-flowing creative process. The Cuban-Canadian singer-songwriter “receives” his inspiration in moments when music is the last thing on his mind. If he’s on a plane and an idea strikes, he’ll retreat to the bathroom and record the melody. “Way up in the sky, you know,” he laughed. “Close to God, I guess.”

Cuba’s commitment to artistic freedom has fueled a remarkable career with nearly 100 million streams and a shelf overflowing with accolades a Grammy, four Latin Grammys, and two JUNO Awards. A talented songwriter, he is also the creative force behind half of Canadian icon Nelly Furtado’s acclaimed Spanish album, Mi Plan. Currently on his national 17-date Paralelo Tour, the singer will perform at SOhO Restaurant & Music Club on Wednesday, May 8. He hopes to share new music while on tour and is excited about his stop in Santa Barbara a place he’s never been.

The 50-year-old is calling in from Canada, where he’s lived since 1999. Originally from Artemisa, Cuba, he shared that music comes from his father’s side. His father, Valentin Puentes, was a music educator in Cuba and taught him how to play guitar when he was 6. He locked himself in his room practicing for so long that his parents sometimes had to remind him to eat. Cuba shared that by the time he was 16, he was the best bass player in his town.

When I asked him to describe his sound, he said that he loves when people ask him that question because it gives him trouble. Sure, he grew up listening to Cuban music and is heavily influenced by it, but his goal as an artist is to explore all sounds. You can’t confine him to a box, nor does he want that. He hopes everyone, Latin or not, can relate to his music. “If I was inside a box, you would have to be a fan of Latin music to understand,” he said. Drawing influence from many different

genres of music, he’s formed a sound that “transcends culture.” Even if you can’t understand what he says, you can feel the beat find meaning in the melody.

He taps into his Cuban roots through percussion instruments like the AfroCuban shekere. “There is no Cuban music without those instruments,” he said. Cuba sings in both Spanish and English and incorporates the sounds of jazz, folk, and funk, making for very groovy melodies.

Authenticity is very important to him. Who is he, if not his true self? “I’m not afraid of sounding original,” he said. “I’m not afraid of sounding different.” He feels most like himself when playing solo shows around Canada. He has immersed himself in Canadian culture and said he feels comfortable playing for an English-speaking audience and being an ambassador of Latin and Cuban culture in Canada.

Cuba’s laughter was contagious throughout our conversation. His positive energy is palpable. While his music is filled with uplifting messages, he readily admits that even positive people get down sometimes, and when that happens, he’s not interested in making music. “But when I’m at peace, when I’m happy, I tell you, it’s like a river coming on me.”

When inspiration does strike, he acts immediately. When the pandemic hit, he turned his living room into a recording studio. The album he recorded there, Mendó, won a Grammy in 2022 for Best Latin Pop as a producer, artist, and engineer. He assures me that he does have a proper studio now.

For artist Malcolm Tuffnell, the Santa Barbara Mental Wellness Center is nothing less than a lifesaver.

“It’s been really kind of a saving grace because I have somewhere to go now. Before, I was pretty lonely. Painting is usually a kind of solitary thing. It wasn’t doing me any good being in the house all day,” said Tuffnell. “So now, at least, I can paint and I can sort of give my gift to other people and show them some things.”

Tuffnell is one of the nearly 60 artists living with mental illness who will be featured in the Mental Wellness Center’s 28th annual Artful Minds Arts Faire on Saturday, May 4, as a part of their ongoing Mental Health Awareness Month initiatives this May.

Tuffnell, a Santa Barbara native, was trained at the Museum of Fine Arts in Boston and specializes in oil and acrylic work. For years, he has painted sensitive and stirring images, primarily of ballet dancers.

“I’ve really been a captive of the magic of ballet since I was very young,” he said. Tuffnell describes being handed down a love for the art form from his father, who was British and used to attend the Royal Ballet at Albert Hall in London. Tuffnell is now a patron of the State Street Ballet, where he does charcoal and pencil sketches of the dancers that he incorporates into his paintings.

With a discography of nine albums, Cuba isn’t slowing down anytime soon. “They have been having a hard time keeping me down,” said Cuba on his work ethic. He is releasing a new album on May 31 called Voices of My Family. This collection of songs is unique from his previous works in that it includes the voice of his aunt from Cuba, who has dementia. During the pandemic, his cousin sent him recordings of her singing a capella. He heard a “beautiful voice that no one in the family knew she had.” He received more recordings and added backing vocals, sound, and harmony. “This album has a strong feeling of love and unity,” he said. —Tiana Molony An Evening with Alex Cuba takes place at SOhO on Wednesday, May 8. Doors open at 6:30 p.m., with his performance scheduled for 8 p.m. To purchase tickets, see sohosb.com.

AN ARTFUL CELEBRATION OF MENTAL WELLNESS

Tuffnell draws much of his inspiration from weather, dance, and artists such as the painter George Ennis or the composer Gustav Mahler. His impressionistic slant with a modern twist makes for unique works, of which more than 20 will be available for purchase at the art faire.

Tuffnell’s connection with the Wellness Center began after he was briefly hospitalized last year while struggling with depression and anxiety. He learned about the center upon release and quickly joined the Fellowship Club. Through the club, he began attending the Wellness Center daily and found support, connection, and a space in which he could paint freely and help others in their artistic endeavors.

“The positive feedback has been great. There’s a lot of different people in the art room at different levels. I’m probably the most conservative in terms of doing landscapes and that kind of thing. Probably the most representational,” he said. “It’s just a lot better to have human contact than to sit alone and feel like what you’re doing is kind of hopeless.”

Along with the artists being shown, the faire will also include a community-led activity in which patrons are invited to share in the afternoon of art by creating a colorful tile as

part of an installation called the “Tile Paint Zone.” The installation will be showcased throughout the month of May at the Mental Wellness Center (617 Garden St). —Riley Burke

The faire is set to take place on Saturday, May 4, from 11 a.m.-3 p.m. on the beachfront opposite Chase Palm Park. To learn more about Mental Wellness Center, and its annual Artful Minds event, visit mentalwellnesscenter.org.

INDEPENDENT.COM MAY 2, 2024 THE INDEPENDENT 51 EMAIL: ARTS@INDEPENDENT.COM
MORE ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT >>>
L I F E PAGE 51
COURTESY
“Sleeping Beauty and the Child Ballerina” by Malcolm Tuffnell
ALVARO NATES WHITE
Alex Cuba

Santa Barbara beachfront opposite Chase Palm Park

Sat 4 May 11am to 3pm

52 THE INDEPENDENT MAY 2, 2024 INDEPENDENT.COM mental wellness center.org
Mental Wellness Center
Art by previous artist participants.
28th
� DRAWINGS � SCULPTURE � JEWELRY � AND MORE
Annual Arts Faire PAINTINGS

DRAWING ON STUDENT TALENTS AND CONCEPTS

SBCC’S ART EXHIBITION CASTS LIGHT ON STUDENT WORK, IN ALL ITS DIVERSITY

Among the three annual student art exhibitions showing up this time of year at Westmont College, Santa Barbara City College (SBCC) and UCSB, SBCC brings on the most generous doses of varietal spice. It is partly a matter of numbers, given the inherently diverse pool of SBCC art students compared to Westmont’s modest senior art class and the intentionally limited group of UCSB MFA candidates.

As expected, this year’s student art exhibition at SBCC’s Atkinson Gallery is rich with diversity of skill levels, media, and artistic intentions. But the show, organized by gallery director John Connelly, manages to avoid the piledhigh, traffic-jam syndrome of some past student shows here. Thanks to judicious use of gallery space and installation logic on the walls and on the sculpture-crowded floor space, the viewing is more inviting than overwhelming.

Thematic- and medium-based grouping helps in the clarifying process. This selection, for instance, is well-populated with charcoal and other drawing works, linked to the Fundamentals of Drawing class. Young artists come to the drawing tradition from different angles, from the detailed and intricate mesh of Victoria Mejia Vega’s suitably titled “Dreamy,” to the soft-edged and almost retro-futurist vision of Molly Tooley’s “Abstract Charcoal.” Tooley’s MC Escher–like sketchy piece “Shadow Box” celebrates its own spatial illogic of staircases going … somewhere.

Manipulating forms is also key in Chelim (Alice) Lee’s “Light Play,” with its smoothly conical and geometric shapes converging in an imagined space. Lizzy Rosales nudges her way into the art-about-art realm with “Studying Hands,” with its varied sampling of hand studies, from crisply drawn hands to a prismacolor mock-glove effect and, for irrational juxtaposition, a melting hand.

Eyeballs are the thing and the operative focus in Austin Meszaros’s acrylic-on-canvas painting “Seeing Blue.” Here we have a psychedelic fantasy vision, in which detached eyeballs become our sensory receptors in some gravity-defying tunnel dimension. Coming back to earth and very close to home in Elyssa Crutchfield’s warmly observed and compositionally graceful untitled oil-on-canvas painting, the subject is

literally in the building: the clay zone at SBCC’s art department in this vast ship-shaped building. Crutchfield coaxes elegance and awareness from a presumably “mundane” scene, but one invested in artistic ambience.

This year’s student art harvest is particularly strong in the three-dimensional art department, and generally in terms of work that busts molds (so to speak) and suspends our expectations. “Yawatxivan,” by the artist known as Luna, serves as an unintentional centerpiece in the gallery, imbued with an indigenous mysticism reflected in a bust festooned with

colorful feathers. Nearby, the artistic point of focus shifts to hands in the form of Allessio Trevisan’s multi-handed mutant sculpture called “Decamani.”

In one corner sits Lucia Rodriguez Clemente’s dry-witted “Can,” a construction of dogmatically and vividly orangecolored cans, wire, iron, and fabric with an effect of pop art revisited and rethought with a 21st-century mind. In the literal opposite corner of the Atkinson gallery, the anomaly of Dain Hollis’s “Sleep” lounges, languid and bittersweet. The lumpy figure, made from reclaimed fabric, stuffing, nails, and wood, embodies disembodiment, while its protruding nails suggest acupuncture in reverse.

“Sleep” is just one of the distinctive characters and sneakily subversive features of a student art show, which handily transcends art of the dryly academic variety. Suffice to say, there are plenty of reasons to make one’s way up to the idyllic and scenically endowed Atkinson before the show closes, on May 10. —Josef Woodard See gallery.sbcc.edu for

information and gallery hours.

INDEPENDENT.COM MAY 2, 2024 THE INDEPENDENT 53 EMAIL: ARTS@INDEPENDENT.COM
more
Luna, “Yawatxivan” Austin Meszaros, “Seeing Blue” Elyssa Crutchfield, “Untitled” Allessio Trevisan, “Decamani”
COURTESY PHOTOS
Dain Hollis, “Sleep”

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FREE WILL ASTROLOGY

WEEK OF MAY 2

ARIES

(Mar. 21-Apr. 19): The world’s record for jumping rope in six inches of mud is held by an Aries. Are you surprised? I’m not. So is the world’s record for consecutive wallops administered to a plastic inflatable punching doll. Other top accomplishments performed by Aries people: longest distance walking on one’s hands; number of curse words uttered in two minutes; and most push-ups with three bulldogs sitting on one’s back. As impressive as these feats are, I hope you will channel your drive for excellence in more constructive directions during the coming weeks. Astrologically speaking, you are primed to be a star wherever you focus your ambition on high-minded goals. Be as intense as you want to be while having maximum fun giving your best gifts.

TAURUS

(Apr. 20-May 20): I don’t casually invoke the terms “marvels,” “splendors,” and “miracles.” Though I am a mystic, I also place a high value on rational thinking and skeptical proof. If someone tells me a marvel, splendor, or miracle has occurred, I will thoroughly analyze the evidence. Having said that, though, I want you to know that during the coming weeks, marvels, splendors, and miracles are far more likely than usual to occur in your vicinity even more so if you have faith that they will. I will make a similar prediction about magnificence, sublimity, and resplendence. They are headed your way. Are you ready for blessed excess? For best results, welcome them all generously and share them lavishly.

GEMINI

(May 21-June 20): In accordance with astrological omens, I recommend you enjoy a celebratory purge sometime soon. You could call it a Cleansing Jubilee, or a Gleeful Festival of Purification, or a Jamboree of Cathartic Healing. This would be a fun holiday that lasted for at least a day and maybe as long as two weeks. During this liberating revel, you would discard anything associated with histories you want to stop repeating. You’d get rid of garbage and excess. You may even thrive by jettisoning perfectly good stuff that you no longer have any use for.

CANCER

(June 21-July 22): Graduation day will soon arrive. Congrats, Cancerian! You have mostly excelled in navigating through a labyrinthine system that once upon a time discombobulated you. With panache and skill, you have wrangled chaos into submission and gathered a useful set of resources. So are you ready to welcome your big rewards? Prepared to collect your graduation presents? I hope so. Don’t allow lingering fears of success to cheat you out of your well-deserved harvest. Don’t let shyness prevent you from beaming like a champion in the winner’s circle. PS: I encourage you to meditate on the likelihood that your new bounty will transform your life almost as much as did your struggle to earn it.

LEO

(July 23-Aug. 22): Ritualist and author Sobonfu Somé was born in Burkina Faso but spent many years teaching around the world. According to her philosophy, we should periodically ask ourselves two questions: (1) “What masks have been imposed on us by our culture and loved ones?” (2) “What masks have we chosen for ourselves to wear?” According to my astrological projections, the coming months will be an excellent time for you to ruminate on these inquiries and take action in response. Are you willing to remove your disguises to reveal the hidden or unappreciated beauty that lies beneath? Can you visualize how your life may change if you will intensify your devotion to expressing your deepest, most authentic self?

VIRGO

(Aug. 23-Sept. 22): If human culture were organized according to my principles, there would be more than eight billion religions one for every person alive. Eight billion altars. Eight billion saviors. If anyone wanted to enlist priestesses, gurus, and other spiritual intermediaries to help them out in their worship, they would be encouraged. And we would all borrow beliefs and rituals from each other. There

would be an extensive trade of clues and tricks about the art of achieving ecstatic union with the Great Mystery. I bring this up, Virgo, because the coming weeks will be an ideal time for you to craft your own personalized and idiosyncratic religious path.

LIBRA

(Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Hidden agendas and simmering secrets will soon leak into view. Intimate mysteries will become even more intimate and more mysterious. Questions that have been half-suppressed will become pressing and productive. Can you handle this much intrigue, Libra? Are you willing to wander through the amazing maze of emotional teases to gather clues about the provocative riddles? I think you will have the poise and grace to do these things. If I’m right, you can expect deep revelations to appear and longlost connections to reemerge. Intriguing new connections are also possible. Be on high alert for subtle revelations and nuanced intuitions.

SCORPIO

(Oct. 23-Nov. 21): It’s fun and easy to love people for their magnificent qualities and the pleasure you feel when they’re nice to you. What’s more challenging is to love the way they disappoint you. Now pause a moment and make sure you register what I just said. I didn’t assert that you should love them even if they disappoint you. Rather, I invited you to love them BECAUSE they disappoint you. In other words, use your disappointment to expand your understanding of who they really are, and thereby develop a more inclusive and realistic love for them. Regard your disappointment as an opportunity to deepen your compassion and as a motivation to become wiser and more patient. (PS: In general, now is a time when so-called “negative” feelings can lead to creative breakthroughs and a deepening of love.)

SAGITTARIUS

(Nov. 22-Dec. 21): I assure you that you don’t need “allies” who encourage you to indulge in delusions or excesses. Nor do I recommend that you seek counsel from people who think you’re perfect. But you could benefit from colleagues who offer you judicious feedback. Do you know any respectful and perceptive observers who can provide advice about possible course corrections you could make? If not, I will fill the role as best as I can. Here’s one suggestion: Consider phasing out a mild pleasure and a small goal so you can better pursue an extra fine pleasure and a major goal.

CAPRICORN

(Dec. 22-Jan. 19): I invite you to take an inventory of what gives you pleasure, bliss, and rapture. It’s an excellent time to identify the thrills that you love most. When you have made a master list of the fun and games that enhance your intelligence and drive you half-wild with joy, devise a master plan to ensure you will experience them as much as you need to not just in the coming weeks, but forever. As you do, experiment with this theory: By stimulating delight and glee, you boost your physical, emotional, and spiritual health.

AQUARIUS

(Jan. 20-Feb. 18): Aquarian author Lewis Carroll said, “You know what the issue is with this world? Everyone wants some magical solution to their problem, and everyone refuses to believe in magic.” In my astrological opinion, this won’t be an operative theme for you in the coming weeks, Aquarius. I suspect you will be inclined to believe fervently in magic, which will ensure that you attract and create a magical solution to at least one of your problems and probably more.

PISCES

(Feb. 19-Mar. 20): Which would you prefer in the coming weeks: lots of itches, prickles, twitches, and stings? Or, instead, lots of tingles, quivers, shimmers, and soothings? To ensure the latter types of experiences predominate, all you need to do is cultivate moods of surrender, relaxation, welcome, and forgiveness. You will be plagued with the aggravating sensations only if you resist, hinder, impede, and engage in combat. Your assignment is to explore new frontiers of elegant and graceful receptivity.

INDEPENDENT.COM MAY 2, 2024 THE INDEPENDENT 55
HOMEWORK: Tell yourself the truth about something you have not been fully honest about. Newsletter.FreeWillAstrology.com Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES. The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700. Grant House Sewing Center 336 E. Cota St SB 805.962.0929 HaveFunSewing com Notions, Classes, Machines, Service …did we mention FABRIC!!! FOR OUR FULL LINEUP, PLEASE VISIT SOHO SB.COM 1221 STATE STREET • 962-7776 Fri 5/3 9:00 pm *SOLD OUT* NUMBSKULL PRESENTS: RKL PUNK Sat 5/4 3:00 pm PRIVATE EVENT Sun 5/5 8:00 pm BOOT JUICE WITH THE CAVERNS JAM/ROCK Mon 5/6 7:00 pm SBCC JAZZ COMBOS CONCERT Tues 5/7 7:00 pm LAGUNA BLANCA SCHOOL BAND SPRING SHOWCASE Wed 5/8 8:00 pm AN EVENING WITH ALEX CUBA FOLK-FUNK-ROCK (GRAMMY AWARD WINNER) Thurs 5/9 7:30 pm AN EVENING WITH PIERRE BENSUSAN ACOUSTIC GUITAR

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Serves as the Business Continuity Specialist and as a member of the Emergency Operations Team. Develops, maintains and implements business continuity and disaster recovery strategies and solutions, including risk assessments, business impact analyses and documentation of business continuity and disaster recovery procedures. Analyzes impact and risk to essential business functions, including information systems and vendor supply chain risks to identify

resource requirements and to promote mitigations to acceptable recover options. Supports the Emergency Manager to provide coverage for the EOC and coordinate with other department staff to facilitate the delivery of services to the campus community. Serves as EH&S liaison to department safety representatives. Reqs: Bachelor’s Degree. Political acumen, plus demonstrated verbal and written communication skills, to communicate in comfortable and persuasive fashion, with the broad constituency of higher education (top campus leaders, deans, chairs, faculty, senior administrators, department managers, etc.). Familiarity with the organizational culture & administrative practices of higher education. Strong presentation skills to give engaging, persuasive, and effective presentations to large and small audiences. Ability to project competence and credibility in all interactions, including interactions with faculty on issues that relate to teaching and research. Active listening skills and team leadership and group facilitation skills. Project management skills. Process analysis skills: Ability to determine how a process should work and how changes in conditions, operations and the environment affect outcomes. Problem‑solving skills: Strong skills in identifying complex problems and analyzing and synthesizing related information to develop and evaluate options and to prepare sound and relevant proposals. Ability to partner with others to develop creative solutions and new ways of doing business. Computer skills: Word, Excel, PowerPoint, and other common computer applications. Database skills (understanding of database structure, ability to use query tools). Ability to maintain sensitive, highly nuanced interactions with people despite situations that may be complex or unfamiliar. Ability to multi‑task with demanding timeframes Ability to use discretion and maintain confidentiality. Notes: Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record and enrollment in the DMV Employer Pull‑Notice Program. Some night, weekend

response for emergencies required. Satisfactory conviction history background check. Hiring/Budgeted Salary Range: $85,000‑$92,000/yr. Full Salary Range: $74,300‑$134,500/ yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For the University of California’s Affirmative Action Policy, please visit: https://policy. ucop. edu/doc/4010393/PPSM‑20.

For the University of California’s Anti‑Discrimination Policy, please visit: https://policy.ucop.edu/doc/1001004/ Anti‑Discrimination. Open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu

Job #67954

BUSINESS SYSTEMS ANALYST 3

OFFICE OF BUDGET & PLANNING

Supports the development and implementation of mission‑critical financial analysis tools that will be widely used for financial analysis and reporting across UC Santa Barbara. This position serves as a technical resource and works on accounting and data management projects of moderate to advanced complexity where analysis of accounting structure or data structure requires an in‑depth evaluation of various factors. Key responsibilities for this role include the following: Coordinate the design, modification, and implementation of financial systems, data solutions, and related systems and processes. Collaborate with subject matter experts to understand, identify and select available and relevant sources of data for reporting and analyses. Prepare and present comprehensive analyses, proposals,

NOW HIRING

SOCIAL MEDIA COORDINATOR

and recommendations

Reqs: Bachelor’s degree in related area and/or equivalent experience/training. Advanced skills and methodologies using data visualization and analysis tools such as Excel, Tableau, Hyperion, Enterprise Performance Management, Cognos, and PowerBI. Exceptional ability to think analytically and logically with a passion for data and technology to help support organizational challenges. Note: Satisfactory criminal history background check. Hiring/ Budgeted Salary or Hourly Range: The budgeted salary range is $74,300.00 to $104,400.00/year. Full Salary Range: $74,300.00 to $134,500.00/ year. Salary offers are determined based on final candidate qualifications and experience; the budget for the position; and the application of fair, equitable, and consistent pay practices at the University. UC Santa Barbara is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer. All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability, age or protected veteran status. Open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu, Job # 67767

CAMPUS HAZARDOUS WASTE PROGRAM COORDINATOR

ENVIRONMENTAL HEALTH AND SAFETY SERVICES

Coordinates the efforts of the campus Hazardous Waste Program which is responsible for providing cost‑effective hazardous waste management in compliance with federal, state, and local regulations. Provides customer service for chemical pickups, emergency spill response, and assistance on shipping

The Santa Barbara Independent is looking for a social media coordinator to join our expanding Digital Department. This position would be part-time (approx. 20-25 hours/week) with occasional work outside of normal business hours and weekends. The social media coordinator works directly with the web content manager to ensure the Indy’s social media presence is timely and effective. The ideal candidate will have personal experience with various social media platforms, including Instagram, Facebook, and X, as well as an aptitude for technology and willingness to learn. Looking for motivated individuals who have great attention to detail and are ready to collaborate.

The social media coordinator will oversee the creation and scheduling of the Independent’s various social media posts across multiple platforms. Experience with Adobe Suite products (Photoshop and/or InDesign) is a huge plus, as is an eye for graphic design and general writing skills.

The social media coordinator will also be expected to learn various Digital Department procedures and processes such as the creation of newsletters, building of online articles, and general website maintenance. This position is based out of our Downtown Santa Barbara office, while some hours will be remote. Starting Hourly Rate: $16-$19 per hour.

Please submit your résumé to hr@independent.com No phone calls, please. EOE m/f/d/v.

hazardous materials. The Program is also responsible for pollution prevention, regulatory reporting, and maintaining campus emergency response capabilities. Reqs: High School Diploma. At least one year of relevant work experience in the operational aspects of the hazardous waste field including knowledge of applicable federal, state, and local laws and regulations. At least three years of relevant work in the environmental health and safety field or lab/manufacturing operations.

Solid, comprehensive working knowledge / understanding of a hazardous waste field, including related laws and regulations, and general understanding of all EH&S fields. Solid organizational skills to plan, organize, and prioritize multiple projects. Excellent written, verbal, and interpersonal skills to communicate effectively in a diverse environment.

Notes: Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record and enrollment in the DMV Employer Pull‑Notice Program. Satisfactory

Continued on p. 58

NOW HIRING

GENERAL ASSIGNMENT REPORTER

The Independent is seeking a general assignment reporter to join the editorial team. In addition to reporting and writing, the job involves collaboration with editors on assignments, cultivating sources, and a general interest in government and civic issues. Knowledge of Santa Barbara County is preferred. This is a full-time position that requires attention to detail, ability to perform under pressure of deadlines, and strong time management skills. Though specific experience in reporting on Santa Barbara is preferred, this is an entry-level position and dedicated workers with strong writing skills may apply. Starting Hourly Rate: $18-$21

Full-time positions include health, dental, and vision insurance; Section 125 cafeteria plan; 401(k); and vacation program.

Please introduce yourself, outline your reasons for interest, and include a brief summary of your qualifications, along with your résumé and clips, to hr@independent.com. No phone calls, please.

EOE m/f/d/v

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conviction history background check. Hiring/Budgeted Hourly Range: $36.16 ‑$39.99/hr. Full Hourly Range: $32.18 ‑ $57.28/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Open

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crosswordpuzzle

Across

1. Ceremonial act

5. Angry

8. Toy manufacturer in a 2023 movie

14. Even, to Yvette

15. Sugary suffix

16. Kay Thompson’s Plaza Hotel girl

17. Effect of ongoing muscle strain, maybe

19. Gas station brand

20. “God giveth, and the DMV ___ away” (memorable line from 1988’s “License to Drive”)

21. Skirt length

22. “Can I buy ___?” (request to Graham Norton on the U.K.’s “Wheel of Fortune”)

23. Soda concoction that’s not quite cream soda

29. Clothing

31. LAX postings

32. Prepared

33. Seal-hunting swimmers

36. Corned beef dishes

39. Business with wholly owned subsidiaries

43. Medium setting?

44. Alphabetically last Marx brother

45. “32 Flavors” singer DiFranco

46. World of Warcraft beginner, perhaps

48. Clean (up)

52. Description that spares no detail

57. Teachers’ org.

58. Number after sieben

59. Magic Johnson’s real first name

61. Sly question of confirmation

64. Repeat reference, or what the long theme answers demonstrate

66. Longtime Vogue photographer Richard

67. “Beds Are Burning” band Midnight ___

68. Inkling

69. Fit in

70. Thirsty

71. MirÛ Museum architect Jose Luis ___

Down

1. Item for a markdown sale

2. Baja lizard

3. Chatterbox

4. Magazine with a palindromic name

5. Coffeehouse order

6. Mt. St. Helens output (which I was around for)

7. “Don’t Go Breaking My Heart” duettist Kiki

8. High school class with basic welding

9. Echo responder 10. 2004 Britney Spears single 11. Tamera’s “Sister, Sister” sister 12. “Cancel” PC key

Summer sign 18. Dirt bike’s cousin 21. Gp. that publishes a scholarly style manual 24. “Snow Crash” novelist Stephenson

“Crazy stuff going on here”

Workplace-monitoring gp.

Sharp

Crafter’s website

Word before yesterday

“Parks & ___”

Closing into a fist

Guitar intensifier

Identify

Academy in Colorado, briefly

Handout at a restaurant

Leave abruptly

“From Peru to ___ ...” (line from Enya’s “Orinoco Flow”)

10 of 12, for short

Intrude upon

Airport winter need

Pull vigorously on

“Star Wars” character Calrissian

Respond to, as an order

“Hot in Herre” rapper

“QuÈ ___?” (“How’s

INDEPENDENT.COM MAY 2, 2024 THE INDEPENDENT 57 INDEPENDENT.COM MAY 2, 2024 THE INDEPENDENT 57 INDEPENDENT CLASSIFIEDS PHON E 805-965-5205 EMAIL ADVERTISING@INDEPENDENT.COM
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CATERING SOUS CHEF

DINING

CAMPUS

Responsible for planning, prepping, and executing catering events at The Club in conjunction with full‑time kitchen employees and part‑time student staff. Must be able to perform advanced culinary tasks, including all aspects of food preparation, with particular attention to quality control and presentation. Assists the Club Chef with menu item creation, purchasing, inventory, and student supervision as needed. Must be able to work a flexible schedule including mornings, nights, weekends, overtime, and reassignment to other campus catering departments as needed. Reqs: Culinary degree or equivalent combination of education and/or experience. 1‑3 years previous catering experience with a strong command of fundamentals. 1‑3 years demonstrated ability to organize and manage a high volume kitchen as well as produce specially requested menu items. 1‑3 years experience in plated service, baking, appetizers, and hot/ cold food buffets. Detail oriented, specialized in utilizing the freshest of ingredients and producing items from scratch with an artistic and innovative presentation. Knowledge of state and federal safety and sanitation regulations regarding proper handling, storing, cooking and holding temperatures and proper use and cleaning of kitchen equipment. Ability to train others in these areas.

Notes: Satisfactory conviction history background check. Valid driver’s license and clean driving record. Work days and hours will vary, evenings and weekends included. Must be able to lift up to 50 lbs and stand for up to 8 hours a day. Hiring/ Budgeted Hourly Range: $24.53/hr. ‑

$28.18/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Open until filled. Apply online at https:// jobs.ucsb.edu Job #67413

DISABILITIES

SPECIALIST

STUDENT SPECIAL SERVICES

Under the general direction of the Director of Disabled Students, the Disability Specialist independently responds, provides services and follow‑up to students with Learning Disabilities. Ensures appropriate academic accommodations are provided, counsels and advises students regarding disability management, analyzes their need for mental health resources, and responds to students in crisis states. Ensures compliance with federal laws, state regulations, and campus/ UC‑wide guidelines on services and equal access for students with disabilities. Coordinates the following grant‑supported programs: DSP Peer Mentoring and assists with RISE Initiatives Program. May perform other divisional project support duties as assigned. Work is performed with a high level of independence under the general direction of the DSP Associate Director. Independently prioritizes and completes on‑going tasks following established departmental guidelines, University policies and State/Federal laws. Other assignments are made by the Associate Director on a project basis. Work is reviewed periodically with the Associate Director through status reports and individual meetings and when actions necessitate a deviation from standard guidelines. Reqs:

Master’s Degree. Notes: Satisfactory conviction history background check, mandated reporting requirements of Child Abuse. Hiring/Budgeted Range: $75,000‑$80,000/yr. Full Hourly Range: $67,200 ‑ $119,600/ yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For the University of California’s Affirmative Action Policy, please visit: https://policy. ucop. edu/doc/4010393/PPSM‑20. For the University of California’s Anti‑Discrimination Policy, please visit: https://policy.ucop.edu/doc/1001004/ Anti‑Discrimination. Application review begins 5/9/24. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #67691

END USER

TECHNICIAN

ENTERPRISE TECHNOLOGY SUPPORT SERVICES

UCSB is looking for an End User technician! If you have initiative, strong customer service orientation we would like to welcome you to UCSB, a world‑class institution. If you have support experience in an enterprise environment, we encourage you to apply. The End User Support Technician Provides workstation and LAN support for ITS customer departments. Some of these departments may be located off‑campus but in the general vicinity of the UCSB campus. Support environment will include Windows and Macintosh workstations, printers and ethernet LAN equipment. Reqs: 1‑3 years of Technical Support experience in enterprise environment. High School Diploma or GED. Notes: Satisfactory conviction history background check Must maintain a valid CA DL, a clean DMV record, and enrollment in the DMV Pull‑Notice Program.

The full hourly range is $28.64 ‑ $49.41/hr. The budgeted hourly range is $31.48 ‑ $37.17/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For the University of California’s Affirmative Action Policy, please visit: https://policy.ucop.edu/doc/4010393/ PPSM‑20.For the University of California’s Anti‑Discrimination Policy, please visit: https://policy.ucop.edu/ doc/1001004/Anti‑Discrimination. Open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 67182

FACILITIES MANAGEMENT SR. CUSTODIAN

FACILITIES MANAGEMENT

Under the supervision of the working Senior Lead Laborer and/or Lead Laborer, performs a wide variety of cleaning tasks and is responsible for minor maintenance and storage of equipment. Required to comply with the Physical Facilities Safety Program. Reqs: Ability to use and care for janitorial supplies and equipment. Able to observe and use safe working conditions. Ability to understand and apply University and Department policies and procedures to specific situations. Ability to exercise sound judgment in solving problems. Ability to accomplish work within deadlines; may handle more than one project at a time. Able to work effectively in a team environment and needs to receive and follow instruction from supervisors. Notes: May be required to wear an UCSB‑provided

uniform. Days and hours may vary to meet the operational needs of the department. Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record and enrollment in the DMV Employer Pull‑Notice Program. Satisfactory conviction history background check. Hiring/Budgeted Salary or Hourly Range: $23.80/hr. ‑ $24.30/hr. Full Salary Range: $22.00/hr.‑ $28.48/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For the University of California’s Affirmative Action Policy, please visit: https://policy. ucop. edu/doc/4010393/PPSM‑20. For the University of California’s Anti‑Discrimination Policy, please visit: https://policy.ucop.edu/doc/1001004/ Anti‑Discrimination. Open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #67856

GIS DEVELOPER GEOGRAPHY DEPARTMENT

Responsible for designing, implementing, and enhancing GIS web‑based solutions to support the organization’s spatial data needs. Collaborates with cross‑functional teams, including students, faculty, and partners working to deliver high‑quality GIS web applications that facilitate data visualization, analysis, and decision‑making. Key Responsibilities include: developing and maintaining GIS web applications using modern web technologies, frameworks, and GIS libraries. Builds and maintains GIS databases. Designs and implements intuitive user interfaces for GIS web applications, including spatial optimization modeling, ensuring an optimal user experience and responsiveness across different devices. Integrates GIS data from various sources, including databases, APIs, and file formats, into web applications to enable data visualization and analysis. Troubleshoots and resolves technical issues related to GIS web applications, working closely with the development team and end‑users. Conducts thorough testing and debugging of GIS web applications to ensure functionality, performance, and security. Stays updated with emerging trends and advancements in GIS technology and web development practices, recommending and implementing improvements to enhance the GIS web development process. Reqs: Bachelor’s Degree in GIS or other related discipline or equivalent experience and/or training.

4‑6 years of work experience in GIS or related field with a Bachelor’s degree in GIS or a related discipline or equivalent experience and/or training OR 1‑3 years of work experience in GIS or related field, with a Master’s degree in GIS or a related discipline.

Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check The full salary range is $67,200 ‑ $119,600/yr. The budgeted salary rangen is $67,200 ‑ $80,000/yr. UC Santa Barbara is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer. All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability, age or protected veteran status. For more information: University of California’s Affirmative Action Policy University of California’s Anti‑Discrimination Policy Open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 67994

HUMAN RESOURCES

BUSINESS PARTNER

ENTERPRISE TECHNOLOGY SERVICES

Serves as the HR Business Partner for the Office of the CIO (OCIO) and its Information Technology Services (ITS) organization and is the primary point of contact for ITS supervisors/ managers and ITS leadership for HR‑related services. Characterized by a high degree of collaboration and coordination in delivering professional‑level HR services to support OCIO organizational objectives and strategies in partnership with the campus HR office. The position is responsible for the coordination and delivery of HR services; assessing and anticipating OCIO organizational needs; and working with campus HR and OCIO leadership to develop integrated solutions for a high‑performing culture, including implementation of the University of California system, UCSB campus Human Resources, and Associate Vice Chancellor for IT and CIO (or OCIO) specific HR‑related initiatives. The effort assigned to job responsibilities may shift in response to changing goals and objectives and the demands of HR‑related initiatives.

Reqs: 4+ years of significant, progressive generalist experience in the field of Human Resources that demonstrates HR leadership, advanced knowledge of human resources concepts, best practices, risk implications, and compliance requirements of Federal and State laws/regulations across the full scope of HR functions. Bachelor’s Degree in Human Resources Management, Administration or a related field, or an equivalent combination of education and experience. Notes: Satisfactory conviction history background check. Candidates must be legally authorized to work in the United States without the need for employer sponsorship currently or in the future. May be required to report to duty in the event of emergency and may need to help mobilize other staff members during and after an emergency. Work schedule may require occasional evening and weekend work. The full range fis $74,300 to $134,500/yr. The budgeted salary range is $83,330 to 104,400$/yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 68034

INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY ADMINISTRATOR

ASSOCIATED STUDENTS

Under the Direction of the Associate Director of Technology & Strategic Communications, the Information Technology Administrator is responsible for the development, installation, configuration, maintenance and system integrity of the Associated Students’ servers and hosted services. Recommends technical solutions for specialized technical and communication projects in a complex and eclectic environment. Provides second tier troubleshooting and maintenance of primarily MacOS based desktop systems. May assist in software/hardware training for students and staff. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree in related area and/or equivalent experience/training; 1‑3 yrs Experience with Linux based servers and their administration; 1‑3 yrs Familiarity with content management systems including WordPress; 1‑3 yrs Knowledge and experience troubleshooting MacOS, and commonly used software packages; 1‑3 yrs Demonstrated

ability to install software and troubleshoot and repair moderately complex problems with computing devices, peripherals and software; 1‑3 yrs Excellent communication skills, teamwork and customer service; 4‑6 yrs Experience installing, configuring, and documenting new applications. Notes: UCSB Campus Security Authority under Clery Act, satisfactory conviction history background check. The full hourly range is $32.18/hr ‑ $57.28/hr. The budgeted hourly range is $35.11‑$36.88/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For the University of California’s Affirmative Action Policy, please visit: https://policy.ucop.edu/doc/4010393/ PPSM‑20.For the University of California’s Anti‑Discrimination Policy, please visit: https://policy.ucop.edu/ doc/1001004/Anti‑Discrimination. Open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 67859

MANAGER OF ALUMNI PROFESSIONAL ENGAGEMENT

OFFICE OF ALUMNI AFFAIRS

The Manager of Alumni Professional Engagement will spearhead a robust and engaging Gaucho Professionals Program that encompasses diverse program activities including the Gaucho Academy, Professional Digital Engagement through Gaucho Network, LinkedIn, and other digital communication initiatives. The Manager of Alumni Professional Engagement will also coordinate regional and local networking events such as “Launch your Network” and “Welcome to the City.” Using the strategic plan as guide, the Manager of Alumni Professional Engagement will cultivate strategic and collaborative partnerships with various campus departments and student led organizations with the goal of fostering connections between alumni, students, and UCSB. The Manager of Alumni Professional Engagement will create opportunities to showcase the talents of our alumni, build strong network connections between alumni, and align with the goals of campus partners. Success in this position requires highly developed communication and organizational skills, demonstrated leadership capacity, and ability to comprehend, interpret, and communicate policies effectively. The Manager of Alumni Professional Engagement should thrive in working with diverse individuals, excel under pressure, have strong relationship management experience, and independently meet deadlines. As an external facing member of the Programs Team, the Manager of Alumni Professional Engagement will be expected to acquire an extensive knowledge of all Alumni Affairs programming and benefits, and stay abreast of current UCSB news to serve as a valuable resource for interested alumni and campus partners. Acting with Sound judgment and maintaining confidentiality are essential attributes, along with the ability to anticipate job requirements and effectively prioritize and coordinate multiple complex tasks. Flexibility is key, as this role requires frequent travel and availability to work weekends and evenings as needed. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree in related area and/or equivalent experience/training; 1‑3 yrs Program Development and implementation experience, preferably with a focus on professional development, job coaching, recruitment and/or mentorship; 1‑3 yrs Event planning experience; 1‑3 yrs Marketing and communication experience; 1‑3 yrs Collaborative team work experience, preferably in an educational environment; must possess knowledge of MS Office, Google Workspace,

LinkedIn, and ability to quickly learn various software programs. Notes: Satisfactory conviction history background check, must be able to work occasional evenings and weekends at various Alumni Affairs, Institutional Advancement & campus wide events. Hiring/Budgeted Range: $75,000‑$80,000/yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For the University of California’s Affirmative Action Policy, please visit: https://policy.ucop.edu/doc/4010393/ PPSM‑20. For the University of California’s Anti‑Discrimination Policy, please visit: https://policy.ucop.edu/ doc/1001004/Anti‑Discrimination. Application review begins 5/10/24. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #68210

MOBILE CRISIS CLINICIAN 2 OR 3 STUDENT HEALTH

The UCSB Community Safety Response Team (CSRT) is a collaborative effort between Student Health Services (SHS), CAPS, and UCPD to provide a holistic and specialized response for students experiencing a mental health crisis. The co‑response crisis team is designed to implement a vision for campus safety response that is led by trained mental health professionals to transform safety response in a way that advances a culture of trust, respect, and dignity for our diverse campus community. As a member of this team, you will provide multiculturally informed screening/evaluation, wellness checks, de‑escalation, follow up, care coordination and outreach based on the severity and complexity of need. The Mobile Crisis Clinician reports to the Director of Social Work in UCSB Student Health. Mobile Crisis Clinicians who are associates (ASW or AMFT) will perform their duties under the formal clinical supervision of the Social Work Director following the guidelines established by the California BBS. Mobile Crisis Clinicians who are licensed (LCSW or LMFT)will perform their duties independently under their full licensure. Reqs: Master’s Degree in Social Work or in Marriage and Family Therapy from an accredited program. CSW 2: California Associate Clinical Social Worker or Associate Marriage and Family Therapist registration. CSW 3: California Licensed Clinical Social Worker license or Licensed Marriage and Family Therapist. Certified in CPR for healthcare professionals or able to obtain certification within 90 days of hire. CSW 3: 3 years of post‑Masters experience or an equivalent combination of education and experience. Notes: Mandated reporting requirements of Child Abuse Mandated reporting requirement of Dependent Adult Abuse. Student Health requires all clinical staff successfully pass the fingerprint background check and credentialing process before the start date. To comply with Santa Barbara County Public Health Department Health Officer Order, this position must provide evidence of annual influenza vaccination, or wear a surgical mask while working in patient care areas during the influenza season. Shift: Days/Evenings/Swing Shift/ Weekends. Days: Wed.‑Sun. or Sun.‑Wed. Hours: 10‑hour shifts, generally 2:00pm‑12:00am. Must be able to work a variable schedule and to work on‑call. Must be willing to become certified for 5150/involuntary hospitalization. Any HIPAA or FERPA violation is subject to disciplinary action. Student Health is closed between the Christmas and New Year’s Day holidays. Hiring/Budgeted Salary or Hourly Range: CSW 2: $82,885.28/yr. ‑ $87,919.84/yr./ CSW 3: $85,049.44/yr.‑ $88,523.21/ yr. The University of California is an

Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 66073

NETWORK

SERVICES ENGINEER OFFICE OF INFORMATION TECHNOLOGY

We are looking for a self‑motivated network services engineer to join our growing onsite team! You will serve as a leading technical member of the UCSB Network Operations Center to provide network and internet connectivity to campus buildings, the North Hall Data Center, and wireless service supporting all campus academic and business operations. Duties include the design, implementation, evaluation and administration of wired and wireless network systems, including routers, switches, wireless controllers, authentication and accounting systems, and virtual private network servers. Develops scripts and processes for system integration, data collection and reporting, and network monitoring for cloud‑hosted and local environments. Serves as a technical consultant in the planning, design, and operation of network services. Implements and manages change‑control and inventory management system processes. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree in related area and / or equivalent experience / training. Notes: Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record and enrollment in the DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program. Must carry a cell phone and have own transportation for off‑hours response. Position requires occasional work outside of business hours. Satisfactory conviction history background check. The full salary range is $82,300 ‑ $151,700/ yr. The budgeted salary range is $92,710 ‑ $117,000/yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For the University of California’s Affirmative Action Policy, please visit: https://policy.ucop.edu/doc/4010393/ PPSM‑20. For the University of California’s Anti‑Discrimination Policy, please visit: https://policy.ucop.edu/ doc/1001004/Anti‑Discrimination. Open until filled. Apply online at www.jobs.ucsb.edu. Job # 67495

POT WASHER

CAMPUS DINING

Performs essential daily cleaning and sanitation of kitchen equipment, counters, walls, floors and dining room tables and chairs. Washes pots used for cooking by the kitchen production staff, as well as bowls used to serve food that are too large for the dish machine. Must follow strict safety and sanitation rules to include the use of proper chemicals and high temperatures in the cleaning process. Keeps the dish machine clean and ready for use. Utilizes high pressure cleaner to remove grease from equipment, garbage cans, doors and walls. Reqs: Knowledge of safety and sanitation regulations regarding proper cleaning of pots, safe lifting, and ability to train others in this area or equivalent combination of education and experience. Notes: Ability to lift up to 50 pounds and work standing for up to 8 hours per day. Work hours/days may vary. Satisfactory conviction history background check. Hiring/Budgeted

58 THE INDEPENDENT MAY 2, 2024 INDEPENDENT.COM 58 THE INDEPENDENT MAY 2, 2024 INDEPENDENT.COM INDEPENDENT CLASSIFIEDS PHON E 805-965-5205 EMAIL ADVERTISING@INDEPENDENT.COM
filled. Apply online at https:// jobs.ucsb.edu Job #67734
EMPLOYMENT (CONT.)

EMPLOYMENT (CONT.)

Hourly Range:

$19.53/hr. ‑

$20.72/

hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For the University of California’s Affirmative Action Policy, please visit: https://policy. ucop. edu/doc/4010393/PPSM‑20.

For the University of California’s Anti‑Discrimination Policy, please visit: https://policy.ucop.edu/doc/1001004/ Anti‑Discrimination. Open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #68020

Work at a world‑class university!

Join an exciting team in this high impact role as UCSB transitions its data analytics solution to a cloud platform with Snowflake and Power BI. Use your skills as an experienced data management professional with full understanding of industry practices and campus and department methodologies, policies and procedures to resolve complex and wide‑ranging issues where analyses of situations or data requires a review of a variety of factors. You will select methods and techniques to obtain solutions and be responsible for the planning, coordination, technology leadership and management of data analytics and business intelligence solutions. You will also support users in their effort to analyze data, provide training to developers and users on Business Intelligence tools and data, and work with functional departments to analyze their Business Intelligence needs and implement solutions. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree in related area and / or equivalent experience / training.

4‑6 years of experience developing data models, reports and dashboards with Power BI, or comparable Business Intelligence tools. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check

The full salary range is $82,300 to $151,700/yr. The budgeted salary range is $92,700 to $117,000 /yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For the University of California’s Affirmative Action Policy, please visit: https://policy.ucop.edu/ doc/4010393/PPSM‑20.

For the University of California’s Anti‑Discrimination Policy, please visit: https://policy.ucop.edu/doc/1001004/ Anti‑Discrimination. Open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 67618

Responsible for assisting the Senior Superintendents in the leadership and management of the daily operations of the Skilled Craftworkers for the University Center (UCEN), Events Center (ECEN), and Retail Dining. Provides a broad range of technical expertise and supervisory skills for all trades. Provides maintenance services to the UCEN, ECEN and Satellite Retail Dining Facilities. Responsibilities include daily scheduling/adjusting of assignments/ resources/vendors, establishing work priorities, implementation of training programs, adjusting work procedures and priorities to meet schedules

or work demands, meeting with clients and vendors, ordering and inspecting materials, site inventory management, analyzing and resolving work problems, maintaining records, quality control for maintenance work, scheduling and planning for all UCEN and ECEN programs, exercising responsibility for quality of work in all facilities. Reqs: High school diploma and / or equivalent certification / experience / training. 4‑6 years Experience with demonstrated leadership and supervisory responsibility, leading various journey level craft workers, in an institutional facilities maintenance and construction environment. Substantial experience with demonstrated leadership and supervisory responsibility, leading and directing various journey level craft workers, in an institutional facilities maintenance and construction environment. Journey level certification or equivalent education and/or experience in one or more trade specialties. Familiarity with multiple skilled trades including but not limited to: HVAC, electrical, plumbing, locksmithing, carpentry, painting, and hazardous material abatement.

Two years experience managing small to medium size construction and renovation projects. Ability to read and interpret construction drawings and specifications. Excellent verbal and written communication skills. Excellent organizational, analytical, planning, and management skills. Proficiency with Microsoft Word, Excel, Google suite, other management software, and familiarity with a range of modern electronic communication media. Use of emotional intelligence as an effective leadership tool. Ability to assess interpersonal interactions with clients and staff and adjust style to have positive outcomes.

Notes Maintain a valid CA driver’s license and a clean DMV record. Ability to respond to emergency and after hours maintenance calls. Satisfactory conviction history background check. Hiring/Budgeted Salary Range: $93,800/yr. ‑ $103,680/ yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For the University of California’s Affirmative Action Policy, please visit: https://policy. ucop. edu/doc/4010393/PPSM‑20. For the University of California’s Anti‑Discrimination Policy, please visit: https://policy.ucop.edu/doc/1001004/ Anti‑Discrimination. Open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #67986

SENIOR SOFTWARE DEVELOPMENT

ENGINEER IN TEST Sonos, Inc. seeks Senior Software Development Engineer in Test in Santa Barbara, CA. Test smart networking sw tech for streaming audio at home. MS+2yrs. WFH except Hawaii. $152K/ yr‑203K/yr. To apply: contact Carmen Palacios, Immigration Mgr: carmen. palacios@sonos.com (Reference Job code: PB1009)

SENIOR SOFTWARE ENGINEER: Santa Barbara, CA, Sonos, Inc. Resp for sw customers interact w/daily. BS+3 yrs. WFH. $134K/yr‑179K/yr. To apply: contact Carmen Palacios, Immigration Mgr: carmen.palacios@sonos.com (Reference Job code: DK0517)

SR. BUILDING MAINTENANCE WORKER

RESIDENTIAL OPERATIONS

Performs senior building maintenance tasks on a regular and continuing basis and performs custodial work for University owned Residence Halls, Apartments and Dining Commons. May be asked to perform other duties as assigned to meet the operational needs of the department. Reqs: 1‑3 years combination of related

education, experience, and training. Training in the basics of plumbing repairs, patch and painting, simple beginning carpentry repairs, and simple (non‑licensed) electrical repairs. Experience making apprentice level repairs in plumbing, patch and paint, carpentry, and electrical. Basic knowledge of the safe use of maintenance equipment such as drills, saws, cordless screwdrivers, and some drain snakes. Experience as an exceptional customer service representative with the ability to communicate effectively and professionally with diverse student and family clientele. Demonstrated ability to work effectively with others as a team. Notes: Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record and enrollment in the DMV Employer Pull‑Notice Program. Satisfactory conviction history background check. Hiring/Budgeted Hourly Range: $23.41 ‑ $28.53/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For the University of California’s Affirmative Action Policy, please visit: https://policy.ucop.edu/doc/4010393/ PPSM‑20. For the University of California’s Anti‑Discrimination Policy, please visit: https://policy.ucop.edu/ doc/1001004/Anti‑Discrimination. Application review begins 5/13/24. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu

Job #68225

SR. CUSTODIAN (ECEN)

RESIDENTIAL OPERATIONS

Under the supervision of the Custodial Supervisor, performs custodial duties in accordance with established standards and instructions for the UCSB Events Center and for University owned Residence Halls and Apartments. May be required to perform other duties as assigned to meet the operational needs of the department. Promotes a customer service environment to clients and residents. Responsible for completing job duties that demonstrate support for Housing, Dining, & Auxiliary Enterprises. Reqs: Demonstrated ability to work effectively with others as a team. Must have effective communication skills. Ability to interact as a team member with sensitivity towards a multi‑cultural work environment. Working knowledge and experience in utilizing the following equipment: vacuums, conventional and high‑speed buffers, extractors and related custodial equipment desirable (Will train on all equipment and chemicals used.) Experience in a custodial cleaning operation or an equivalent combination of training and experience. Ability to read, writing and follow oral and written instructions. Notes: Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record and enrollment in the DMV Employer Pull‑Notice Program. Satisfactory conviction history background check. Hiring/Budgeted Salary or Hourly Range: $22.00 ‑ $23.80/hr. UC Santa Barbara is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer. All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability, age or protected veteran status. For the University of California’s Affirmative Action Policy, please visit: https:// policy. ucop.edu/doc/4010393/ PPSM‑20. For the University of California’s Anti‑Discrimination Policy, please visit: https://policy.ucop.edu/ doc/1001004/Anti‑Discrimination Open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #66926

SR. CUSTODIAN

RESIDENTIAL OPERATIONS

Performs duties in accordance with established standards and instruction, for University owned Residence Halls, Apartments and Dining Facilities. The Sr. Custodian promotes a customer service environment to residence and clients. Assists with the development and maintenance of a work environment which is conducive to meeting the mission of the organization and supports the EEP. Responsible for completing job duties that demonstrates support for the Operations Team. Completes custodial tasks within an assigned area such as, but is not limited to: Cleans and sanitizes restrooms, hallways, stairways, lounges, public areas, office spaces and building entrances. Replenish restroom supplies. Disposes of trash, may be required to drive a motorized vehicle with trailer to move trash. Utilizes cleaning equipment to perform cleaning duties such as: squirt bottles, dusters, mops, vacuums, broom, power floor buffers, mop buck/ringer, hot water carpet extractor, steam cleaner, wet/dry vacuum, doodle bugs, powered wall cleaning machine. May work on a ladder. Works effectively as a team member. Cleans all surfaces inside/out of buildings maintained and operated by HDAE. During Summer Conference season will provide daily linen change and room service to conferees. Supply amenities to conferees. Maintain stock of all supplies to perform job duties. Reqs: Demonstrated ability to work effectively with others as a team. Working knowledge and experience in utilizing the following equipment: vacuums, conventional and high‑speed buffers, extractors and related custodial equipment desirable. Will train on all equipment and chemicals used. Must have effective communication skills. Ability to interact as a team member with sensitivity towards a multi‑cultural work environment. Notes: Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record and enrollment in the DMV Employer Pull‑Notice Program. May be required to work schedules other than assigned schedule to meet the operational needs of the department. Satisfactory conviction history background check. Hiring/ Budgeted Salary or Hourly Range: $22.00 ‑ $23.80/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For the University of California’s Affirmative Action Policy, please visit: https://policy.ucop.edu/doc/4010393/ PPSM‑20. For the University of California’s Anti‑Discrimination Policy, please visit: https://policy.ucop.edu/ doc/1001004/Anti‑Discrimination. Open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #67890

TECHNICAL PROJECT MANAGER

ENTERPRISE PLANNING & ARCHITECTURE

If you have experience with enterprise‑level projects, including time and resource management, financial planning, scope management, issue and risk management, and project execution, UCSB has an excellent opportunity for you. In this role, you will plan, direct, and monitor the work produced by the extended project team, including planning and implementing appropriate quality assurance activities.You will be responsible for managing stakeholder relationships, including general ongoing communications, negotiation of scope and schedule changes, key risks, issue resolutions, and ongoing

progress reporting. The Technical Project Manager shapes stakeholder expectations and manages the scope and any contracts associated with the project. The Technical Project Manager must have a broad knowledge of industry best practices and be able to proactively identify potential project risks in order to advise and consult with stakeholders on risk identification, analysis, and mitigation strategies. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree in related area and / or equivalent experience / training. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check The full salary range is $101,100 to $192,300/yr. The budgeted salary range is $114,780 to $146,700/yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. For the University of California’s Affirmative Action Policy, please visit: https://policy.ucop.edu/doc/4010393/ PPSM‑20. For the University of California’s Anti‑Discrimination Policy, please visit: https://policy.ucop.edu/ doc/1001004/Anti‑Discrimination. Open until filled. Apply online at www.jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 67466

WEB DEVELOPER ASSOCIATED

STUDENTS Under the direction of the Associate Director of Technology & Strategic Communications, designs, implements and maintains Associated Student’s websites. Works with a team of staff and students to coordinate website planning, create graphics and dynamic elements designed to accommodate student needs and highlight the varied programs of Associated Students. Works directly with users to determine needs and implement web strategies and goals of student groups and projects. Coordinates with department staff to develop informational goals and design various pages to meet each area’s requirements. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree in related area and/or equivalent experience/training; 1‑3 yrs experience with common programming tools; 1‑3 yrs experience with python, html, css, and related web technologies; 1‑3 yrs experience developing digital consumer web and mobile experiences using the agile methodology; 1‑3 yrs experience with media and social media integration; 1‑3 yrs experience of developing web pages using html/ css/javascript; knowledge of secure software development; intermediate skills associated with the design, development, modification and deployment of software, including object‑oriented programming concepts; knowledge of other IT

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related areas; demonstrated software repository skills. Notes: Satisfactory conviction history background check. UCSB Campus Security Authority under Clery Act. Hiring/Budgeted Salary or Hourly Range: The budgeted salary range is $35.11‑$36.88/hr. Full Salary Range: The full salary range is $29.55‑$51.77/hr. Salary offers are determined based on final candidate qualifications and experience; the budget for the position; and the application of fair, equitable, and consistent pay practices at the University. UC Santa Barbara is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer. All qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability, age or protected veteran status. For the University of California’s Affirmative Action Policy, please visit: https:// policy. ucop.edu/doc/4010393/ PPSM‑20.For the University of California’s Anti‑Discrimination Policy, please visit: https://policy.ucop.edu/ doc/1001004/Anti‑Discrimination. Open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #67122

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LEGALS

ADMINISTER OF ESTATE

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF:

JOHN R. DELORETO

Case No.: 23PR00275

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of JOHN R. DELORETO

A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by: CAMILLA LA MER, formerly VICTORIA W. DELORETO in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara

THE PETITION for probate requests that (name): CAMILLA LA MER, formerly known as VICTORIA W. DELORETO be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent.

THE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court.

THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The Independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority.

A HEARING on the petition will be held in this court as follows: 05/17/2024 AT 9:30 a.m. Dept: 4 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, located at 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Anacapa Division.

IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance

may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special notice form is available from the court clerk.

Petitioner: Erik D. Black, Esq. and Angela R. Talbot, Esq. 1114 State Street Suite 272 Santa Barbara CA 93101, (805) 957‑1922

Published Apr 18, 25. May 2 2024. NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: PATRICIA PRUITT, aka PATRICIA CHRISTINE PRUITT, aka PAT PRUITT CASE NO.: 24PR00167 To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of PATRICIA PRUITT, aka PATRICIA CHRISTINE PRUITT, aka PAT PRUITT A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by: DAVID HAMMONS in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara THE PETITION for probate requests that: DAVID HAMMONS be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court.

THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The Independent Administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority.

A HEARING on the petition will be held in this court as follows: 05/23/2024

AT 9:00 A.M. IN DEPT: 5 of the SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Anacapa Division

IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law.

YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special notice

STATE OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA

DEPARTMENT OF PUBLIC WORKS NOTICE TO BIDDERS

Bids open at 2:00 PM on THURSDAY, MAY 30, 2024 for:

form is available from the court clerk. Attorney for petitioner: JEFFREY L. BOYLE, DELWICHE, VON DOLLEN & BOYLE, Attorneys at Law 1114 State Street, Suite 256, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; (805) 962‑8131

Published Apr 18, 25. May 2 2024.

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: ELVA ELAINE GRIMMESEY aka ELAINE GRIMMESEY aka ELVA ELAINE WIGHTMAN GRIMMESEY

Case No.: 24PR00190

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of: ELVA ELAINE GRIMMESEY aka ELAINE GRIMMESEY aka ELVA ELAINE WIGHTMAN GRIMMESEY

A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by: SUZANNE ELAINE GRIMMESEY in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara.

THE PETITION for probate requests that: SUZANNE ELAINE GRIMMESEY be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent.

THE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court.

THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The Independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority.

A HEARING on the petition will be held in this court as follows: 06/06/2024 AT 9:00 a.m. Dept: SB5 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, located

at 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Anacapa Division.

IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special notice form is available from the court clerk.

Darrel E. Parker, Executive Officer 04/10/2024 by Nicolette Barnard, Deputy Attorney for Petitioner: Barrett P. O’Gorman, O’Gorman & O’Gorman, LLP 5901 Encina Rd., Suite B‑2 Goleta CA 93117, (805) 967‑1215

Published: April 18, 25. May 2 2024.

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: CHRISTINE YVONNE HAUPTMAN CASE NO.: 24PR00202

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of CHRISTINE YVONNE HAUPTMAN

A HEARING on the petition will be held in this court as follows: 6/06/2024

AT 9:00 A.M. IN DEPT: FIVE (5) of the SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, ANACAPA DIVISION 1100 Anacapa Street, P.O. Box 21107 Santa Barbara, CA 93121‑1107.

IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special notice form is available from the court clerk.Darrel E. Parker, Executive Officer Date: 04/16/2024 By: Nicolette Barnard, Deputy. Attorney for Petitioner: Margaret V. Barnes, Barnes & Barnes 1900 State Street, Suite M, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; (805) 687‑6660.

Published: Apr 25. May 2, 9 2024.

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: MARY LOU SCHMIDT Case No.: 24PR00220

very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The Independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority.

TAJIGUAS SANITARY LANDFILL PHASE IVA GROUNDWATER PROTECTION SYSTEM IN THE THIRD SUPERVISORIAL DISTRICT

COUNTY PROJECT NO. 828985

General project work description: Install liner system and associated landfill infrastructure improvements.

The Plans, Specifications, and Bid Book are available at https://www.planetbids.com/portal/portal. cfm?CompanyID=43874

Submit bids to the web address below. Bids will be opened and available at the web address below immediately following the submittal deadline.

PlanetBids

https://www.planetbids.com/portal/portal.cfm?CompanyID=43874

Complete the project work within Three-Hundred and Forty-Five (345) Working Days which includes 20 wet weather days.

The estimated cost of the project is $14,500,000.

A mandatory pre-bid meeting is scheduled for this project on Thursday, May 16, 2024 at 9:30am at 14470 Calle Real, Goleta, California.

This project is subject to compliance monitoring and enforcement by the Department of Industrial Relations.

A contractor or subcontractor shall not be qualified to bid on, be listed in a bid proposal, subject to the requirements of Section 4104 of the Public Contract Code, or engage in the performance of any contract for public work, as defined in this chapter, unless currently registered and qualified to perform public work pursuant to Section 1725.5. It is not a violation of this section for an unregistered contractor to submit a bid that is authorized by Section 7029.1 of the Business and Professions Code or by Section 10164 or 20103.5 of the Public Contract Code, provided the contractor is registered to perform public work pursuant to Section 1725.5 at the time the contract is awarded.

Prevailing wages are required on this Contract. The Director of the California Department of Industrial Relations determines the general prevailing wage rates. Obtain the wage rates at the DIR website, https://www.dir.ca.gov/

Inquiries or questions based on alleged patent ambiguity of the plans, specifications, or estimate must be submitted as a bidder inquiry by 2:00 p.m. on the Friday of the week preceding bid opening. Submittals after this date will not be addressed. Questions pertaining to this Project prior to Award of the Contract must be submitted via PlanetBids Q&A tab.

Bidders (Plan Holders of Record) will be notified by electronic mail if addendums are issued. The addendums, if issued, will only be available on PlanetBids https://www.planetbids.com/portal/portal. cfm?CompanyID=43874

By order of the Board of Supervisors of the County of Santa Barbara, this project was authorized to be advertised on March 19, 2024.

Chris Sneddon, PE Director of Public Works

A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by: STEVEN L. HAUPTMAN in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara THE PETITION for probate requests that: STEVEN L. HAUPTMAN be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The Independent Administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority.

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of: MARY LOU SCHMIDT

A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by: FLORIN BANU in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara.

THE PETITION for probate requests that: FLORIN BANU be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent.

THE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court.

THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain

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A HEARING on the petition will be held in this court as follows: 06/06/2024 AT 9:00 a.m. Dept:SB5 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, located at 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Anacapa Division. IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special notice form is available from the court clerk. Darrel E. Parker, Executive Officer 04/23/2024 by Monica Buenrostro, Deputy. Attorney for Petitioner: Cristi Michelon Vasquez, 132 East Figueroa Street, Santa Barbara CA 93101, (805) 882‑2226 Published: April 25. May 2, 9 2024. NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: MATTHEW H. STRUCKMEYER (also known as MATTHEW HENRY STRUCKMEYER) Case No.: 24PR00199

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of: MATTHEW H. STRUCKMEYER aka MATTHEW HENRY STRUCKMEYER A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by: DONALD SKINNER in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara. THE PETITION for probate requests that: DONALD SKINNER be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent.

THE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court.

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THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The Independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority.

A HEARING on the petition will be held in this court as follows: 06/06/2024 AT 9:00 a.m. Dept:SB5 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, located at 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Anacapa Division.

IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a

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LEGALS (CONT.)

copy to the personal representative

appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law.

YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special notice form is available from the court clerk.

Darrel E. Parker, Executive Officer

04/15/2024 by Nicolette Barnard, Deputy Attorney for Petitioner: Dana F. Longo of Fauver, Large, Archbald & Spray LLP, 820 State Street, 4th Floor, Santa Barbara CA 93101, (805) 966‑7000

Published: April 25. May 2, 9 2024. NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: MARY ANNE DONNER Case No.: 24R00186

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of: MARY ANNE DONNER, MARYANNE DONNER

A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by: ANNE DONNER in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara.

THE PETITION for probate requests that: ANNE f/k/a ANNE FRANCES SIMON be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent.

THE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court. THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The Independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority.

A HEARING on the petition will be held in this court as follows: 05/30/2024 AT 9:00 a.m. Dept:5 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, located at 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Anacapa Division.

IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law.

YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special notice form is available from the court clerk.

Darrel E. Parker, Executive Officer 04/19/2024 by Nicolette Barnard, Deputy Attorney for Petitioner: James

P. Griffith, Esq, Howell Moore & Gough LLP 1020 State Street, Suite 108, Santa Barbara CA 93101, (805) 303‑8539

Published: April 25. May 2, 9 2024.

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: ALICIA DEANNE CAST Case No.: 24PR00203

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of: ALICIA DEANNE CAST

A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by: MELISSA CAST‑BREDE in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara.

THE PETITION for probate requests that: MELISSA CAST‑BREDE be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent.

THE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court.

THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The Independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority.

A HEARING on the petition will be held in this court as follows: 06/6/2024 AT 9:00 a.m. Dept: SB 5 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, located at 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Anacapa Division.

IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special notice form is available from the court clerk. Darrel E. Parker, Executive Officer 04/17/2024 by Nicolette Barnard, Deputy Attorney for Petitioner: April M. Lavigne, Law Offices of April M. Lavigne, 7 West Figueroa Street, Suite 300, Santa Barbara CA 93101, (805) 881‑1230. Published: May 2, 9, 16 2024. NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: RONALD D. KALP Case No.: 24PR00254

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of: RONALD

D. KALP A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by: KEVIN ROSS in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara.

THE PETITION for probate requests that: KEVIN ROSS be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent.

THE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court.

THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of

Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The Independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority.

A HEARING on the petition will be held in this court as follows: 06/13/2024 AT 9:00 a.m. Dept:SB 5 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, located at 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Anacapa Division.

IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law.

YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special notice form is available from the court clerk.

Darrel E. Parker, Executive Officer 04/25/2024 by Monica Buenrostro, Deputy. Attorney for Petitioner: Cristi Michelon Vasquez, 132 East Figueroa Street, Santa Barbara CA 93101, (805) 882‑2226

Published: May 2, 9, 16 2024.

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF:

MARGUERITE JACQUELINE DOWNS

Case No.: 24PR00166

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of: MARGUERITE JACQUELINE DOWNS

A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by: PETITIONER JAMES SOMERS in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara.

THE PETITION for probate requests that: JAMES SOMERS be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent.

THE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court.

THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The Independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority.

A HEARING on the petition will be held in this court as follows:

05/23/2024 AT 9:00 a.m. Dept: 5

SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA

COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, located at 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Anacapa Division.

IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent

creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special notice form is available from the court clerk. Darrel E. Parker, Executive Officer 03/28/2024 by Monica Buenrostro, Deputy Attorney for Petitioner: Scott B. Fooks, Esq. Weldon & Hass, 205 East Anapamu Street, Santa Barbara CA 93101, (805) 965‑7014. Published: May 2, 9, 16 2024.

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER

ESTATE OF:

FREDRICK S. FLEET Case No.: 24PR00252

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of:

FREDRICK S. FLEET

A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by: ANNA I. FLEET in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara THE PETITION for probate requests that: ANNA I. FLEET be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent.

THE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examination in the file kept by the court.

THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.)

The Independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority.

A HEARING on the petition will be held in this court as follows: 06/13/2024 AT 9:00

a.m. Dept: 5 SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, 1100 Anacapa Street, P.O Box 21107 Santa Barbara, CA 93102 Anacapa Division.

IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in

person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR or a contingent creditor of the decedent, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. Other California statutes and legal authority may affect your rights as a creditor. You may want to consult with an attorney knowledgeable in California law. YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special notice form is available from the court clerk. Darrel E. Parker, Executive Officer Date:

04/25/2024 By: Monica Buenrostro, Deputy. Attorney for Petitioner: James F. Cote, Esq. 222 East Carrillo Street, Suite 207, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; (805) 966‑1204. Published May 2, 9, 16 2024.

SALE OF THE PROPERTY. THE OPENING

BULK SALE

PUBLIC NOTICE OF SALE ON THURSDAY, MAY 16, 2024, AT 9:00 A.M. AT THE SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT, ANACAPA DIVISION, DEPT. 5, 1100 ANACAPA STREET, SANTA BARBARA, CA 93121, THE REAL PROPERTY LOCATED AT 3139 SEA CLIFF DRIVE, SANTA BARBARA, CA 93109, WILL BE SOLD BY WAY OF A PUBLIC CONFIRMATION AND OVERBID HEARING IN CASE NO. 16PR00064, MATTER OF WILLIAM STEWART LIVING TRUST AND FRED & LILLIAN STEWART TRUST, PETITIONER NORMAN COLAVINCENZO, PURSUANT TO THE TRUSTEE’S PETITION TO CONFIRM THE

MEASURE A PROGRAM OF PROJECTS

Notice is hereby given that the Santa Barbara County Association of Governments (SBCAG) will hold a public hearing on the Draft Fiscal Year 2024/25 Measure A Program of Projects

Santa Barbara County Board of Supervisors Hearing Room 105 E. Anapamu Street, 4th Floor, Santa Barbara, CA 93101

VIRTUAL

Details on how to participate remotely will be published on the SBCAG Board of Directors agenda at least 48 hours prior to the meeting online at www.sbcag.org

The SBCAG board must adopt a program of projects identifying all transportation projects to be funded with Measure A revenues for the next five years, FY 24/25 through FY 28/29. The program of projects is scheduled for adoption at the June 20, 2024, SBCAG Board meeting. Only projects that are included in the approved program of projects are eligible for Measure A funding. Measure A revenues available for allocation are estimated to be $253.8 million during the five-year period with $52 million available in FY 24/25.

Projects identified to receive Measure A revenues for the five-year period include, but are not limited to, improvements on Highway 101 on the South Coast, Highway 166 Safety and Operational Improvements, streets and roads improvements countywide, bicycle, pedestrian and safe routes to school improvements, interregional transit, and reduced transit fares for the elderly and disabled. For more information about the Measure A Program, please visit www.measurea.net

PARTICIPATION NOTICE

Comments on the Draft Fiscal Year 2024/25 Measure A Program of Projects may also be submitted in writing until 5 p.m. on Wednesday, May 15, 2024. Written comments can be submitted via U.S. Postal Service to 260 N. San Antonio Road, Suite B, Santa Barbara, CA 93110; or electronically by emailing info@sbcag.org

SBCAG is committed to providing access and reasonable accommodations for these meetings. In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, accommodation requests should be made 48 hours in advance of public meetings to SBCAG at (805) 961-8900.

INDEPENDENT.COM MAY 2, 2024 THE INDEPENDENT 61 INDEPENDENT.COM MAY 2, 2024 THE INDEPENDENT 61 INDEPENDENT CLASSIFIEDS PHON E 805-965-5205 EMAIL ADVERTISING@INDEPENDENT.COM
BID WILL BE $4,330,000. BIDDERS MUST CONTACT THE TRUSTEE AT LEAST 2 BUSINESS DAYS BEFORE THE HEARING TO PREQUALIFY TO BID BY: (1) SIGNING THE RULES
CONFIRMATION
OVERBID HEARING; (2) PROVIDING PROOF OF FUNDS AS TO THE BIDDER’S HIGHEST BID; (3) PROVIDING A $250,000 DEPOSIT VIA CASHIER’S CHECK, WIRE, OR ACH. ALL UNSUCCESSFUL BIDDERS WILL RECEIVE THEIR $250,000 DEPOSITS BACK FOLLOWING THE HEARING. PREQUALIFIED BIDDERS MAY APPEAR IN PERSON OR REMOTELY VIA ZOOM PREARRANGED THROUGH THE TRUSTEE. CALL RANDY HADEN AT (602) 300‑1271 FOR DETAILS AND TO PREQUALIFY TO BID. 4/25, 5/2, 5/9/24 CNS‑3805189# SANTA BARBARA INDEPENDENT
FOR
AND
PUBLIC HEARING 10 a.m. Thursday,
2024 IN-PERSON
May 16,

LEGALS (CONT.)

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME

STATEMENT The following person(s)

is/are doing business as: STRAEDE

LOW VOLTAGE SYSTEMS 407 W Pedregosa St, Unit 11 Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Straede Consulting Services LLC (Same Address). This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company Filed by: DAVID W

STRAEDE/RESONSIBLE MANAGING

MEMBER with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 4, 2024. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2024‑0000873. Published: Apr 11, 18, 25, May 02 2024.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: BIOMAGNETISMO SANTA

BARBARA 5276 Holliaster Avenue, 307 Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Roberto A Pacheco (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Filed by:

ROBERTO A PACHECO/OWNER with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 8, 2024. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E49. FBN Number: 2024‑0000897. Published: Apr 11, 18, 25, May 02 2024.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: VAN DYK CONSTRUCTION 1402 La Vista Rd Santa Barbara, CA 93110; Van Dyk LLC (same address) This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company Filed by: MATTHEW S. VAN

DYK/MANAGING MEMBER with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 3, 2024. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph

E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E49. FBN Number: 2024‑0000853. Published: Apr 11, 18, 25, May 02 2024.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: ALLIED CENTRAL COAST DISTRIBUTING 815 S Blosser Santa Maria, CA 93458; Harbor Distributing, L.L.C. 6250 N River Road Suite 9000 Rosemont, IL 60018 This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company Filed by: NICHOLAS L. GIAMPIETRO/SENIOR VICE PRESIDENT with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 5, 2024. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2024‑0000888. Published: Apr 11, 18, 25, May 02 2024.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME

STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: BRYANT

Housing Authority Of The County Of Santa Barbara PUBLIC NOTICE

NOTIFICATION IS HEREBY GIVEN that EFFECTIVE May 8, 2024. The Housing Authority of the County of Santa Barbara is CLOSING the following waiting lists for new applications.

Creekside Apartments (with the exception of Joe Serna Farm Workers Preference) this application will be on our website.

Cypress Court Apartments

Golden Inn Village Senior Apartments

Miller Stanley Apartments

Parkside Gardens Apartments

Parkview Apartments

Sandpiper Apartments

Thompson Park Apartments

Ted Zenich Gardens Apartments

West Cox Apartments

Any applications received after May 8, 2024 will not be accepted

Autoridad de Vivienda del Condado de Santa Bárbara AVISO PÚBLICO

POR LO PRESENTE SE NOTIFICA que a partir del 8 de mayo de 2024. La Autoridad de Vivienda del Condado de Santa Bárbara está CERRANDO las siguientes listas de espera para nuevas solicitudes.

Creekside Apartments (con la excepción de Joe Serna Farm Workers Preference) esta solicitud estará en nuestro sitio web.

Cypress Court Apartments

Golden Inn Village Senior Apartments

Miller Stanley Apartments

Parkside Gardens Apartments

Parkview Apartments

Sandpiper Apartments

Thompson Park Apartments

Ted Zenich Gardens Apartments

West Cox Apartments

No se aceptarán solicitudes recibidas después del 8 de mayo de 2024.

COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA BOARD OF SUPERVISORS

STATE OF CALIFORNIA

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING Tuesday, May 14, 2024 In the Board of Supervisors’ Hearing Room 511 E. Lakeside Parkway, Santa Maria, CA

The meeting starts at 9:00 a.m.

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Board of Supervisors of the County of Santa Barbara on Tuesday, May 14, 2024 at 9:00 a.m. or thereafter, in Person at 511 E. Lakeside Parkway, Santa Maria, CA, 93455, and by Remote Virtual Participation, will hold a public hearing to consider an Ordinance to amend County Code Chapter 7A – County Arts Plan.

The draft Ordinance replaces the current fund and policy for works of art, which identifies that all requests for appropriations for construction projects shall include as an item therein an amount equal to one percent of the estimated cost of such project or works of art. Per the amended Ordinance, each Annual Capital Budget request and recommendation presented to the Board of Supervisors shall contain an amount equal to one percent (1%) of the total amount of such Annual Capital Budget to be allocated for Works of Art and related purposes; provided however, that the annual aggregate amount of such Allocation shall not exceed a cap in the initial amount of $200,000, adjusted annually to reflect the percentage change in the California Consumer Price Index.

For current methods of public participation for the meeting of May 14, 2024, please see page two (2) of the posted Agenda. The posted agenda will be available on Thursday prior to the above referenced meeting for a more specific time for this item. However, the order of the agenda may be rearranged or the item may be continued.

The draft Ordinance detailing the amendments to Chapter 7A, staff reports and the posted agenda is available on the Thursday prior to the meeting at http:// santabarbara.legistar.com/Calendar.aspx under the hearing date or contact the Clerk of the Board at (805) 568-2240 for alternative options.

In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you need special assistance to participate in this meeting, please contact the Clerk of the Board of Supervisors by 4:00 PM on Friday before the Board meeting. For information about these services please contact the Clerk of the Board at (805) 568-2240.

If you challenge this project in court, you may be limited to raising only those issues you or someone else raised at the public hearing described in this notice, or in written correspondence to the Board of Supervisors prior to the public hearing.

G.C. Section 65009, 6066, and 6062a.

Mona Miyasato

CLERK OF THE BOARD OF

RANCHES 585 Windmill CT. Solvang, CA 93463; Stephen B BryantPO Box 329 Los Olivos, CA 93441. This business is conducted by a Individual Filed by: STEPHEN BRYANT with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 2, 2024. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2024‑0000841. Published: Apr 11, 18, 25, May 02 2024.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME

STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: RAYO TRANSFERS 426 N Main St Elkhart, IN 46516; Intercambio Express, Inc (Same Address). This business is conducted by a Corporation Filed by: ISAAC P. TORES/PRESIDENT with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 1, 2024. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2024‑0000824. Published: Apr 11, 18, 25, May 02 2024.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME

STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: AGUA

DULCE GARDEN DESIGN 1050 Edison Street Suite D Santa Ynez, CA 93460; Denise M Johns (Same Address). This business is conducted by a Individual Filed by: DENISE JOHNS/PROPRIOTRESS‑LANDSCAPE

ARCHITECT with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 4, 2024. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2024‑0000880. Published: Apr 11, 18, 25, May 02 2024.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME

STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: TRASH VALET 2112 Mountain Ave Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Eve C Mitchell (Same Address). This business is conducted by a Individual Filed by: EVE MITCHELL/ OWNER with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 3, 2024. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2024‑0000859. Published: Apr 11, 18, 25, May 02 2024.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME

STATEMENT

File No. FBN 2024‑0000736

The following person(s) is doing business as:

ALL CAPS MARKETING AGENCY, 4861 OGRAM RD. SANTA BARBARA, CA 93105, County of SANTA BARBARA. JENNY VANSETERS, 4861 OGRAM RD. SANTA BARBARA, CA 93105

This business is conducted by AN INDIVIDUAL.

The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on JAN 22, 2024 /s/ JENNY VANSETERS, OWNER

This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on 03/20/2024. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk 4/11, 4/18, 4/25, 5/2/24 CNS‑3793673# SANTA BARBARA INDEPENDENT

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME

STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: RHODIE WINES 1733 Mountain Ave Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Rhodie Co LLC (Same Address). This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company Filed by: Graeme Lee‑Wingate/Managing Member with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 21, 2024. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2024‑0000749. Published: Apr 11, 18, 25, May 02 2024.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME

STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: FUSE FITNESS at 1213 State St., Suite K Santa Barbara, CA 93101; JKP Enterprises, LLC 6251 Momouth Ave Goleta, CA 93117 This business is conducted by an Limited Liability Company Filed by:

JARRETT KOLICH/OFFICER with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 28, 2024. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2024‑0000797. Published: Apr 11, 18, 25. May 2 2024.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: EL CAPITAN CUSTOM TILE at 771 Las Cruces CT Goleta, CA 93117; Noe A Espinoza (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual Filed by: NOE A ESPINOZA with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 7, 2024. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E47. FBN Number: 2024‑0000591. Published: Apr 11, 18, 25. May 2 2024.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT

File No. FBN2024‑0000864

The following person(s) is (are) doing business as: GERBER COLLISION & GLASS, 57 S. FAIRVIEW AVENUE, GOLETA, CA 93117 County of SANTA BARBARA

Mailing Address: 400 W GRAND AVENUE, ELMHURST, IL 60126 GERBER COLLISION (CALIFORNIA) INC., 400 W GRAND AVENUE, ELMHURST, IL 60126

This business is conducted by a Corporation

The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 4/01/2024. GERBER COLLISION (CALIFORNIA) INC. S/ TIMOTHY J. O DAY, PRESIDENT & CEO

This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on 04/04/2024. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk 4/18, 4/25, 5/2, 5/9/24 CNS‑3802117# SANTA BARBARA INDEPENDENT

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME

STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SANTA BARBARA RUN CLUB 1231 Stonecreek Road, Unit F Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Marla J Bonser (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Filed by: MARLA BONSER with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 28, 2024. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2024‑0000796. Published: Apr 18, 25, May 02, 9 2024.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME

STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: READYMADE CREATIVE 425 Camphor PL Santa Barbara, CA 93108; Shawn Forry (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Filed by: SHAWN FORRY/ OWNER with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 19, 2024. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E47. FBN Number: 2024‑0000709. Published: Apr 18, 25, May 02, 9 2024.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME

STATEMENT

File No. FBN 2024‑0000804

The following person(s) is doing business as:

SANTA BARBARA

INTEGRATIVE THERAPY, 5266

HOLLISTER AVE., SUITE 117

SANTA BARBARA, CA 93111, County of SANTA BARBARA. INTEGRATIVE FAMILY

THERAPY, INC., 7334

HOLLISTER AVE. SUITE M GOLETA, CA 93117

This business is conducted by A CORPORATION.

The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on NOT APPLICABLE /s/ REGINA GRUJOVSKI, PRESIDENT

This statement was filed with the

County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on 03/28/2024. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk 4/18, 4/25, 5/2, 5/9/24

CNS‑3801583#

SANTA BARBARA

INDEPENDENT

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME

STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: ARCADY DISTRIBUTING 100 Adams Road Goleta, CA 93117; Strahan Montanes Enterprises Inc. (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation Filed by: DAVID STRAHAN/ PRESIDENT with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 10, 2024. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2024‑0000921. Published: Apr 18, 25, May 02, 9 2024.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: RAUL’S UPHOLSTERY 2011 State St Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Raul M. Cardenas (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Filed by: RAUL M. CARDENAS/OWNER with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 4, 2024. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2024‑0000866. Published: Apr 18, 25, May 02, 9 2024.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME

STATEMENT

File No. FBN 2024‑0000803

The following person(s) is doing business as:

GAUCHO PIZZA, 6583 PARDALL RD GOLETA, CA 93117, County of SANTA BARBARA. DD BRAEMAR LLC, 486 BRAEMAR RANCH LN SANTA BARBARA, CA 93109, CA

This business is conducted by A LIMITED LIABILITY COMPANY. The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on NOT APPLICABLE /s/ DEBRA BABAI, MANAGING MEMBER

This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on 03/28/2024. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk 4/18, 4/25, 5/2, 5/9/24

CNS‑3802664# SANTA BARBARA INDEPENDENT

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: PACER CORPORATION 5614 Via Ravenna Goleta, CA 93117; Pacific Engineering Research Corporation (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation Filed by: CHRISTOPHER J. BROWN/CEO, CFO, SECRETARY with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 4, 2024. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2024‑0000870. Published: Apr 18, 25, May 02, 9 2024.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME

STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: TRASH BIN CLEANERS EXPRESS 318 Ribera Dr Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Bin Cleaners Express LLC (same address) This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company Filed by: LUKE HILL/ OWNER with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 28, 2024. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2024‑0000798. Published: Apr 18, 25, May 02, 9 2024.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME

STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SBV INSIDER 655 Stoddard Ln Montecito, CA 93108; Elocquinn LLC (same address) This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company Filed by: PATRICE SERRANI/OWNER with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 22, 2024. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by

E30. FBN Number: 2024‑0000758. Published: Apr 18, 25, May 02, 9 2024.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: DERF’S CAFE 2000 De La Vina St santa Barbara , CA 93105; Kent G Storey (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Filed by: KENT STOREY/ OWNER with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on March 14, 2024. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2024‑0000662. Published: Apr 18, 25, May 02, 9 2024.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: MEDINA TRANSLATION & INTERPRETATION 6896 Willowgrove Dr Goleta, CA 93117; Leticia M Pacheco (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Filed by: LETICIA MEDINA PACHECO/OWNER with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 10, 2024. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E57. FBN Number: 2024‑0000917. Published: Apr 18, 25, May 02, 9 2024.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT

File No. FBN2024‑0000747

The following person(s) is (are) doing business as:

1. DELGADO’S MEXICAN FOOD, 2. DELGADO’S MEXICAN RESTAURANT, 4401 CARPINTERIA AVE, CARPINTERIA, CA 93013 County of SANTA BARBARA V. MAGNANIMO, INC., 980 DEBRA DRIVE, SANTA BARBARA, CA 93110

This business is conducted by a Corporation

The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on Nov 13, 2019. V. MAGNANIMO, INC. S/ ARTURO J. CASTELLANOS, CEO

This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on 03/21/2024. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk 4/18, 4/25, 5/2, 5/9/24

CNS‑3802327# SANTA BARBARA

INDEPENDENT

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT

File No. FBN2024‑0000748

The following person(s) is (are) doing business as:

1. PEPE’S MEXICAN FOOD, 2. PEPE’S MEXICAN RESTAURANT 254 ORANGE AVE, SANTA BARBARA, CA 93117 County of SANTA BARBARA V. MAGNANIMO INC., 980 DEBRA DRIVE, SANTA BARBARA, CA 93110

This business is conducted by a Corporation

The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on Nov 13, 2019. V. MAGNANIMO INC. S/ ARTURO J. CASTELLANOS, CEO This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on 03/21/2024. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk 4/18, 4/25, 5/2, 5/9/24

CNS‑3802316#

62 THE INDEPENDENT MAY 2, 2024 INDEPENDENT.COM 62 THE INDEPENDENT MAY 2, 2024 INDEPENDENT.COM INDEPENDENT CLASSIFIEDS PHON E 805-965-5205 EMAIL ADVERTISING@INDEPENDENT.COM
SANTA BARBARA
BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: LA CANTINA 199 S Turnpike Rd, Ste 105/106 Santa Barbara, CA Ca 93111; CC & JW, LLC 201 Santa Cruz Blvd Santa Barbara, CA 93109 This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company Filed by: CHRISTOPHER CHIARAPPA/ MANAGER with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 8, 2024. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E47. FBN Number: 2024‑0000897. Published:
INDEPENDENT FICTITIOUS

LEGALS (CONT.)

Apr 18, 25, May 02, 9 2024.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME

STATEMENT

The following person(s)

is/are doing business as: CALL COAST

LOCKSMITHS SERVICES 272 Orange Ave., Suite 1 Goleta, CA 93117; Avanelle J. Gutow (same address) Schuyler W. Covert (same address) This business is conducted by a General Partnership Filed by: AVANELLE

GUTOW/PARTNER with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 9, 2024. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2024‑0000914. Published: Apr 18, 25, May 02, 9 2024.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME

STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SIGNIWIS TECHNOLOGIES INC. 153 N Kellogg Ave, Apt B Santa Barbara, CA 93111; Signiwis Technologies Inc. (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation Filed by: SARAVANAN

SELVARAJ/MANAGER with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 9, 2024. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2024‑0000912. Published: Apr 18, 25, May 02, 9 2024.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: NEATOGEO

31 San Marcos Trout Club Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Todd R Bryan (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Filed by: TODD BRYAN with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 20, 2024. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2024‑0000735. Published: Apr 18, 25, May 02, 9 2024.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME

STATEMENT

The following person­

(s) is/are doing business as: YETZ’S BAGELS 901 Embarcadero Del Mar Ste 103 Goleta, CA 93117; Dank Bowl Kitchen (same address) This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company Filed by: DANIEL DUNIETZ/ OWNER with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 4, 2024. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2024‑0000865. Published: Apr 25, May 02, 9, 16 2024.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME

STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SEE ME SMILE DENTAL, ORTHODONTICS OF SANTA BARBARA 350 Chapala St 104 Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Omid R Barkhordar DDS, INC. 16461 Whittier Blvd Whittier, CA 90603 This business is conducted by a Corporation Filed by: OMID BARKHORDAR/PRESIDENT with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 16, 2024. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2024‑0000964. Published: Apr 25, May 02, 9, 16 2024.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: VG

PROJECTS/VG ROLL OFF 309 Canada St Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Jesse J Garcia (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Filed by:

JESSE GARCIA/OWNER with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 16, 2024. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E49. FBN Number: 2024‑0000957. Published: Apr 25, May 02, 9, 16 2024.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: OCEAN

ROSE FISHERIES 1231 Embarcadero Way Morro Bay, CA 93442; Ocean Rose Fisheries LLC (same address) This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company Filed by: GARRETT

ROSE/MEMBER/MANAGER with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County

on Apr 17, 2024. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2024‑0000976. Published: Apr 25, May 02, 9, 16 2024.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: BLOOM THERAPY & WELLNESS 216 E Gutierrez Santa Barbara, CA 93101; AUDREY SARTO LICENSED CLINICAL WORKER, BLOOM THERAPY & WELLNESS, PROFESSIONAL COORPORATION 5142 Hollister Avenue #586 Santa Barbara, CA 93111­2526 This business is conducted by a Corporation Filed by: AUDREY SARTO/CEO with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 9, 2024. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E62. FBN Number: 2024‑0000844. Published: Apr 25, May 02, 9, 16 2024.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT

File No. FBN2024‑0000849

The following person(s) is (are) doing business as:

The Behavior Agency, 85 W Highway 246 #1021, Buellton, CA 93427 County of SANTA BARBARA

NFC Behavior Consulting, LLC, 44100 JEFFERSON STREET, SUITE D403, UNIT #1017, INDIO, CA 92201

This business is conducted by a limited liability company

The registrant(s) commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on 03/15/2024.

NFC Behavior Consulting, LLC S/ Nicole Floyd, CEO

This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on 04/02/2024. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk 4/25, 5/2, 5/9, 5/16/24

CNS‑3803786#

SANTA BARBARA INDEPENDENT

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME

STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: CORTINA

CONSTRUCTION 315 Meigs Rd, Suite A 518 Santa Barbara, CA 93109; Cortina Enterprises (same address) This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company Filed by: DANIEL

CORTINA/OWNER with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 22, 2024. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E57. FBN Number: 2024‑0001014. Published: Apr 25, May 02, 9, 16 2024.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME

STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: HYUNDAI OF SANTA MARIA 1001 E. Battles Road Santa Maria, CA 93454; 24/7 Partners, LLC (same address) This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company Filed by: CECIL ELOY RENFROW/MANAGER with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 22, 2024. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E47. FBN Number: 2024‑0001005. Published: Apr 25, May 02, 9, 16 2024.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME

STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: MONTECITO MANAGEMENT, SAVANT ESTATES 3589 Modoc Road Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Tygan Inc. PO Box 30694 Santa Barbara, CA 93130 This business is conducted by a Corporation Filed by: NATE BRINER/PRESIDENT with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 4, 2024. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2024‑0000879. Published: Apr 25, May 02, 9, 16 2024.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME

STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: CASA REALTY 526 N Milpas St Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Santa Barbara Casa Realty (same address) This business is conducted by a Corporation Filed by: TANIA MARTINEZ‑GIL/PRESIDENT with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 11, 2024. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E57. FBN Number: 2024‑0000934. Published: Apr 25, May 02, 9, 16 2024.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: QUALITY POOL AND SPA SERVICE 1474 La Paloma Carpinteria, CA 93013; John C Jensen (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Filed by: JOHN C JENSEN/OWNER with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 22, 2024. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2024‑0000767. Published: Apr 25, May 02, 9, 16 2024.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME

STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: QING WORKS 3205 Laurel Canyon Rd Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Qing Xue (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Filed by: QING XUE with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 16, 2024. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2024‑0000967. Published: Apr 25, May 02, 9, 16 2024.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: F.V. CONSTRUCTION 418 Coronel St Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Filadelfo Vasquez alvarado (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Filed by: FILADELFO VASQUEZ ALVARADO with the County Clerk

NOTICE

OF

PUBLIC HEARING

Design Review Board

Hybrid Public Hearing – In Person and via Zoom Goleta City Hall – Council Chambers 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B Goleta, CA 93117

Tuesday, May 14, 2024, at 3:00 P.M

ATTENTION: The meeting will be held in person and via the Zoom platform. The public may also view the meeting on Goleta Channel 19 and/or online at https://www.cityofgoleta.org/goletameetings.

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Design Review Board (DRB) of the City of Goleta will conduct a public hearing for the projects listed, with the date, time, and location of the DRB public hearing set forth above. The agenda for the hearing will also be posted on the City website (www.cityofgoleta.org).

Conceptual/Preliminary/Final Review

Corliss Addition and California Environmental Quality Act Notice of Exemption 1001 Via Bolzano (APN 069-391-003)

Case Nos. 24-0007-LUP & 24-0016-DRB

Conceptual

Viajero Battery Storage

Unaddressed on Viajero Lane (APN 079-210-053)

Case Nos. 24-0007-DRB

PUBLIC COMMENT: Interested persons are encouraged to provide public comments during the public hearing in person or virtually through the Zoom webinar, by following the instructions listed on the DRB meeting agenda. Written comments may be submitted prior to the hearing by e-mailing the DRB Secretary, Mary Chang at mchang@cityofgoleta.org. Written comments will be distributed to DRB members and published on the City’s Meeting and Agenda page.

FOR PROJECT INFORMATION: For further information on the project, contact Mary Chang, at (805) 961-7567 or mchang@cityofgoleta.org. For inquiries in Spanish, please contact Marcos Martinez at (805) 562-5500 or mmartinez@ cityofgoleta.org. Staff reports and documents will be posted approximately 72 hours before the hearing on the City’s website at www.cityofgoleta.org In accordance with Gov. Code Section 65103.5, only non-copyrighted plans or plans that the designer has given permission have been published on the City’s website. The full set of plans is available for review at the Planning Counter during counter hours or by contacting the staff member listed for the item 805961-7543.

Note: If you challenge the nature of the above action in court, you may be limited to only those issues you or someone else raised at the public hearing described in this notice or in written correspondence delivered to the City on or before the date of the hearing (Government Code Section 65009(b)(2)).

Note: In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you need assistance to participate in the hearing, please contact the City Clerk’s Office at (805) 961-7505 or cityclerkgroup@cityofgoleta.org. Notification at least 48 hours prior to the hearing will enable City staff to make reasonable arrangements.

Publish: Santa Barbara Independent 5/2/24

of Santa Barbara County on Mar 18, 2024. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E57. FBN Number: 2024‑0000689. Published: Apr 25, May 02, 9, 16 2024.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: LESSONS WITH LEANA 5924 Daley Street, Goleta, CA 93117; Leana Movillion (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Filed by: LEANA MOVILLION with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 27, 2024. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2024‑0000789. Published: May 02, 9, 16, 23 2024.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME

STATEMENT

File No. FBN 2024‑0000887

The following person(s) is doing business as:

VALLARTA SUPERMARKETS #31 1875 N BROADWAY SANTA MARIA, CA 93454, County of SANTA BARBARA.

JALOS FOOD ENTERPRISES, INC., 10147 SAN FERNANDO RD PACOIMA, CA 91331; CALIFORNIA

This business is conducted by A

CORPORATION.

The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on JAN 01, 2024 /s/ ANGELINA GONZALEZ, CFO

This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on 04/05/2024. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk 5/2, 5/9, 5/16, 5/23/24

CNS‑3805252# SANTA BARBARA INDEPENDENT

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME

STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: JOHN VILLANTI AND ASSOCIATES

PRIVATE INVESTIGATIONS 1616 San Andres Santa barbara, CA 93101; John D Villanti (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Filed by: JOHN VILLANTI/OWNER with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 15, 2024. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E63. FBN Number: 2024‑0000945. Published: May 02, 9, 16, 23 2024.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME

MATTHEW JAMES HOPPER with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 23, 2024. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2024‑0001024. Published: May 02, 9, 16, 23 2024.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: DRD ASSOCIATES 14 W. Valerio St., #B Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Daniel K. and Julie B. Michealsen Family Trust (same address) This business is conducted by a General Partnership Filed by: RUSSELL MICHEALSEN/TRUSTEE, MICHEALSEN 2023 CHARITABLE REMAINDER UNITRUST with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 18, 2024. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2024‑0000992. Published: May 02, 9, 16, 23 2024.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: TORRES CONCRETE 1324 Cacique St Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Cesar I Torres (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Filed by: CESAR TORRES/OWNER with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County

STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: SENSATIONAL PETS 3433 State Street, Unit G Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Matthew J Hopper (same address) This business is conducted by a Individual Filed by:

COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA BOARD OF SUPERVISORS

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

ORDINANCE AMENDING CHAPTER 27. PERSONNEL, ARTICLE II CIVIL SERVICE SYSTEM OF SANTA BARBARA COUNTY

Tuesday, May 14, 2024

Joseph Centeno Betteravia Government Administration Building, Board Hearing Room 511 E. Lakeside Parkway, Santa Maria, CA The meeting starts at 9:00 a.m.

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that on May 14, 2024, or as soon thereafter as the matter may be heard, the Santa Barbara County Board of Supervisors will hold a public hearing in the Board Hearing Room at the Joseph Centeno Betteravia Government Administration Building at 511 East Lakeside Parkway, Santa Maria, California, to consider and approve the introduction of an ordinance amending Chapter 27, Article II, Section 27-25 of the Santa Barbara County Code to read as follows, effective June 24, 2024:

Sec. 27-25. - Persons deemed exempt from provisions of this article.

(a)All employees of the county shall be included in the civil service system except the following:

(1) Elected county officers;

(2) Persons serving without compensation;

(3) Public members of boards and commissions;

(4) The county executive officer, assistant county executive officers, and deputy county executive officers;

(5) Appointed department heads, and appointed assistant department heads other than those specified in subdivision (a)(4) of this section;

(6) Persons performing work:

(a) pursuant to Government Code Section 25359, or any similar statute or ordinance; (b) in lieu of incarceration, or in exchange for a reduced period of incarceration;

(c) pursuant to a sheriff’s work release program;

(d) pursuant to a post-conviction sentence or court order; or

(e) as a condition of probation;

(7) Persons rendering professional, scientific, technical, or expert service of a temporary nature;

(8) Persons employed under contract;

(9) Temporary, seasonal, extra help, and limited term employees;

(10) Staff assistants to members of the board of supervisors;

(11) Persons appointed to management level position, unless the board of supervisors has determined the position should be included in the civil service system; and

(12) In accordance with the intent and purposes of this article, any other person appointed to a position the board of supervisors has determined should not be included in the civil service system. (Ord. No. 5131, § 1, 4-6-2021; Ord. No. 5150, § 2, 2-1-2022, Ord. No XX, 5-21-2024)

For additional information, please contact Yvonne Torres at: Email: Ytorres@ countyofsb.org | Tel: (805) 568-3075

For current methods of public participation for the meeting of May 14, 2024, please see page two (2) of the posted Agenda. The posted agenda will be available on Thursday prior to the above referenced meeting for a more specific time for this item. However, the order of the agenda may be rearranged or the item may be continued.

Staff reports and the posted agenda is available on the Thursday prior to the meeting at http://santabarbara.legistar.com/Calendar.aspx under the hearing date or contact the Clerk of the Board at (805) 568-2240 for alternative options. In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you need special assistance to participate in this meeting, please contact the Clerk of the Board of Supervisors by 4:00 PM on Friday before the Board meeting. For information about these services please contact the Clerk of the Board at (805) 568-2240.

If you challenge this project in court, you may be limited to raising only those issues you or someone else raised at the public hearing described in this notice, or in written correspondence to the Board of Supervisors prior to the public hearing. G.C. Section 65009, 6066, and 6062a.

INDEPENDENT.COM MAY 2, 2024 THE INDEPENDENT 63 INDEPENDENT.COM MAY 2, 2024 THE INDEPENDENT 63 INDEPENDENT CLASSIFIEDS PHON E 805-965-5205 EMAIL ADVERTISING@INDEPENDENT.COM

LEGALS (CONT.)

on Apr 25, 2024. This statement

expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E63. FBN Number: 2024‑0001039. Published: May 02, 9, 16, 23 2024.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME

STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: CASSY ANNE, CASSY ANNE BY ERIKA

MONTESANO 1157 Coast Village Road, Suite A Montecito, CA 93108; Cassy Anne, LLC (same address) This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company Filed by: ERIKA

MONTESANO/MANAGER with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 25, 2024. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2024‑0001043. Published: May 02, 9, 16, 23 2024.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/ are doing business as: COASTAL WELL WOMAN 2320 Bath Street, Suite 317 Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Laura M Abrignani 2821 Miradero Drive F Santa Barbara, CA 93105 This business is conducted by a Individual Filed by:

LAURA ABRIGNANI/OWNER/NURSE

PRACTITIONER with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 22, 2024. This statement expires five years

from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2024‑0001013. Published: May 02, 9, 16, 23 2024.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: IGLESIA ZION, ZION CHURCH 1230 Cacique St Santa Barbara, 93103; Zion Church Santa Barbara, Inc (santa Barbara) This business is conducted by a Corporation Filed by: KENNY NAVARRO/ PRESIDENT with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 24, 2024. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2024‑0001037. Published: May 02, 9, 16, 23 2024.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: NAOMI JANE 4698 Granada Way Santa Barbara, CA 93110; Michele A Voigt (santa Barbara) This business is conducted by a Individual Filed by: MICHELE VOIGT with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Mar 27, 2024. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2024‑0000778. Published:

May 02, 9, 16, 23 2024.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME

STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SALT SALON

SB 3609 State Street, A Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Tenaya J Bishop (santa Barbara) This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Partnership Filed by: TENAYA BISHOP/GENERAL

PARTNER with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 15, 2024. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E40. FBN Number: 2024‑0000947. Published: May 02, 9, 16, 23 2024.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME

STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: VIOLETTE

BAKESHOP 419 Donze Ave Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Samantha M Eve (santa Barbara) This business is conducted by a Individual Filed by: SAMANTHA EVE/OWNER with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 22, 2024. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2024‑0001011. Published: May 02, 9, 16, 23 2024.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME

STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: EDUCATED

COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA BOARD OF SUPERVISORS STATE OF CALIFORNIA NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING Tuesday, May 7, 2024

In the Board of Supervisors’ Hearing Room 105 E. Anapamu St., Santa Barbara, CA

The meeting starts at 9:00 a.m.

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that on, May 7, 2024, at 9:00 a.m., or as soon thereafter as the matter may be heard, the Santa Barbara County Board of Supervisors will hold a public hearing in the Board of Supervisors Hearing Room at the County Administration Building Hearing Room at 105 East Anapamu St. 4th Floor, Santa Barbara, California, to consider and approve the introduction of an ordinance to re-adopt and amend the Santa Barbara County Sheriff’s Office Military Equipment Use Policy, pursuant to Assembly Bill 481.

For current methods of public participation for the meeting of May 7, 2024, please see page two (2) of the posted Agenda. The posted agenda will be available on Thursday prior to the above referenced meeting for a more specific time for this item. However, the order of the agenda may be rearranged or the item may be continued.

Staff reports and the posted agenda is available on the Thursday prior to the meeting at http://santabarbara.legistar.com/Calendar.aspx under the hearing date or contact the Clerk of the Board at (805) 568-2240 for alternative options. In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you need special assistance to participate in this meeting, please contact the Clerk of the Board of Supervisors by 4:00 PM on Friday before the Board meeting. For information about these services please contact the Clerk of the Board at (805) 568-2240.

If you challenge this project in court, you may be limited to raising only those issues you or someone else raised at the public hearing described in this notice, or in written correspondence to the Board of Supervisors prior to the public hearing. G.C. Section 65009, 6066, and 6062a.

Mona Miyasato

CLERK OF THE BOARD OF SUPERVISORS

By: Sheila de la Guerra, Deputy Clerk

NOTICE INVITING BIDS

Santa Barbara Unified School District

720 Santa Barbara St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101

Request for Bids FS-2425-02 Food Service Supply & Chemical Products

Notice is hereby given by the Santa Barbara Unified School District acting by and through its Board of Education, hereinafter referred to as the “District”, will receive sealed bids up to but not later than 2:00pm PT, May 30, 2024 for: RFB FS-2425-02 Food Service Supply & Chemical Products.

Sealed bid responses will be received at the District’s Food Services office to the attention of Laszlo Horvath, Purchasing Tech located at Santa Barbara Unified School District, Food Services Department, 720 Santa Barbara St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101 with the corresponding bid response CLEARLY LABELED on the outside of the bid response and will be opened at or after the time and date set for the bid opening.

Documents are available to download from the Santa Barbara Unified School District website or by contacting Laszlo Horvath at lhorvath@sbunified.org

All bids shall be submitted on the forms provided in the bid document and must conform to all bid instructions and any addenda issued.

No Bidder may withdraw their bid for a period of sixty (60) days after the date set for the bid opening.

The District reserves the right to reject any, all, or any part of the proposal. The District may waive any irregularities or informalities, or may sit and act as sole judge of the merit and qualifications of the products and services offered in any proposal, or in the bidding process.

By order of the BOARD OF EDUCATION OF THE SANTA BARBARA UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT.

By: Laszlo Horvath

Purchasing Tech

Published: April 25 and May 2, 2024

TECHNOLOGY CONSUTANTS 7316

Freeman Place Goleta, CA 93117; Ryckman Diversified LLC (santa Barbara) This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company Filed by: TODD RYCKMAN/MANAGER with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 26, 2024. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2024‑0001063. Published: May 02, 9, 16, 23 2024.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME

STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SANTA BARBARA SHREDDING,LIVE SCAN SANTA BARBARA, COMPLETE PROCESS SERVING 411 E Canon Perdido St, Ste 15 Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Lawcopy, Inc. (santa Barbara) This business is conducted by a Corporation Filed by: CHARLES J RAO

JR/PRESIDENT with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 25, 2024. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2024‑0001047. Published: May 02, 9, 16, 23 2024.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME

STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: OFF REGISTER, OFF REGISTER: SANTA BARBARA ART BOOK & PRINT FAIR 3040 State Street, Suite K Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Tzu Ting Tseng (santa Barbara) Garrett Gerstenberger (same address) This business is conducted by a Unincorporated Assoc. Other Than Partnership Filed by: TZU

TING TSENG/PRESIDENT with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 16, 2024. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E49. FBN Number: 2024‑0000959. Published: May 02, 9, 16, 23 2024.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME

STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: GAMEDAY MEN’S HEALTH SANTA BARBARA 13374 Mahogany Cove San Diego, CA 92131; GD Medical Clinic, Inc. (santa Barbara) This business is conducted by a Corporation Filed by: KEELY WATSON/SECRETARY with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 12, 2024. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2024‑0000944. Published: May 02, 9, 16, 23 2024.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME

STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: TUBULAR GEORGE PREFABRICATED INSTALLATION SERVICES 3588 La Entrada Santa Barbara, CA 93105; GKM Home Services Inc. (santa Barbara) This business is conducted by a Corporation Filed by: KATRINA MURDOCH/SECRETARY AND TREASURER with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 25, 2024. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E57. FBN Number: 2024‑0001045. Published: May 02, 9, 16, 23 2024.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME

STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: RED ATHENA, RED ATHENA STUDIOS, RED ATHENA GAMES 7127 Hollister Ave., Suite 25A­250 Goleta, CA 93117­2857; Red Athena LLC (santa Barbara) This business is conducted by a Limited Liability Company Filed by: PRADEEP SEN/MEMBER with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Apr 2, 2024. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2024‑0000845. Published: May 02, 9, 16, 23 2024.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME

STATEMENT

File No. FBN 2024‑0000850

The following person(s) is doing business as:

STAGE CRASH MUSICALS, 5410

PATRICIO DR GOLETA, CA 93111, County of SANTA BARBARA.

THOMAS NEWMAN, 5410 SAN

PATRICIO DR GOLETA, CA 93111

This business is conducted by AN INDIVIDUAL.

The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on NOT APPLICABLE /s/ THOMAS NEWMAN, OWNER

This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on 04/02/2024. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk 4/25, 5/2, 5/9, 5/16/24

CNS‑3803270#

SANTA BARBARA INDEPENDENT

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME

STATEMENT

File No. FBN 2024­0000709

The following person(s) is doing business as:

READYMADE CREATIVE, 425 CAMPHOR PL, SANTA BARBARA, CA 93108, County of SANTA BARBARA.

SHAWN FORRY, 425 CAMPHOR PL, SANTA BARBARA, CA 93108

This business is conducted by AN INDIVIDUAL.

The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on NOT APPLICABLE /s/ SHAWN FORRY, OWNER

This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on 3/19/2024. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk 4/11, 4/18, 4/25, 5/2/24

CNS­3797812#

SANTA BARBARA

INDEPENDENT

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT

File No. FBN 2024­0000681

The following person(s) is doing business as:

Barkentine Ventures, 125 Eucalyptus Hill Cir, Santa Barbara, CA 93103, County of Santa Barbara. Peter F. Hartz, 125 Eucalyptus Hill Cir, Santa Barbara, CA 93103

This business is conducted by An Individual.

The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on Not Applicable /s/ Peter F Hartz

This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on 3/15/2024.

Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk 4/11, 4/18, 4/25, 5/2/24

CNS­3797822#

SANTA BARBARA

INDEPENDENT

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME

STATEMENT

File No. FBN 2024­0000682

The following person(s) is doing business as: Shoreline Systems, 1414 Santa Rosa Ave, Santa Barbara, CA 93109, County of Santa Barbara. Derek Stadmiller, 1414 Santa Rosa Ave, Santa Barbara, CA 93109

This business is conducted by An Individual.

The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on Not Applicable /s/ Derek Stadmiller, Owner

This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on 3/15/2024. Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk 4/11, 4/18, 4/25, 5/2/24

CNS­3797838# SANTA BARBARA

INDEPENDENT

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME

STATEMENT

File No. FBN 2024­0000707

The following person(s) is doing business as:

Hollywood Access Film Festival, 525 San Ysidro Road Suite 107, Santa Barbara, CA 93108, County of Santa Barbara. Myglobalclassroom, Inc., 525 San Ysidro Road #107, Santa Barbara, CA 93108

This business is conducted by A Corporation.

The registrant commenced to transact business under the fictitious business name or names listed above on Not Applicable /s/ Steven Kunes, President

This statement was filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on 3/19/2024.

Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk 4/11, 4/18, 4/25, 5/2/24

CNS­3797804#

SANTA BARBARA INDEPENDENT

NAME CHANGE

IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: TATE

STERLING WARTES

CASE NUMBER: 24CV01806

TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior Court for decree changining name (s) as follows:

PRESENT NAME: TATE STERLING WARTES

PROPOSED NAME: TATE STERLING CAMERON‑SALZMAN

THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING JUNE 7, 2024, 10:00 AM, DEPT , SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101, Anacapa Division. A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. DATED APRIL 9, 2024, JUDGE DONNA D. GECK OF THE SUPERIOR COURT. Published Apr 18, 25. May 2, 9 2024. IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: JEFFREY XIAO YU UN KROSSCHELL CASE NUMBER: 24CV01736 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior Court for decree changining name (s) as follows: PRESENT NAME: JEFFREY XIAO YU UN KROSSCHELL

PROPOSED NAME: XIAO YU LIN JEFFFREY KROSSCHELL THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING JUNE 14, 2024, 10:00 AM, DEPT 4, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101, Anacapa Division. A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. DATED APRIL 9, 2024, JUDGE DONNA D. GECK OF THE SUPERIOR COURT.

Published Apr 25. May 2, 9, 16 2024. IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: DAWN

LEAH MARANTZ

CASE NUMBER: 24CV01667 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior Court for decree changining name (s) as follows:

PRESENT NAME: DAWN LEAH MARANTZ

PROPOSED NAME: DAWN MARANTZ DUNN

THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING JUNE 3, 2024, 10:00 AM, DEPT 5 , SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA OF SANTA BARBARA 1100 Anacapa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101, Anacapa Division. A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. DATED APRIL 9, 2024, JUDGE COLLEEN K. STERNE OF THE SUPERIOR COURT. Published Apr 25. May 2, 9, 16 2024. IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: DILLON ROBERT LYLES CASE NUMBER: 24CV00468 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior Court for decree changining name (s) as follows:

PRESENT NAME: DILLON ROBERT LYLES PROPOSED NAME: AWE WORLD EXPERIENCER THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING MAY 31, 2024, 10:00 AM, DEPT 4 , SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA OF SANTA BARBARA 1100 Anacapa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101, Anacapa Division. A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. DATED APRIL 8, 2024, JUDGE DONNA D. GECK OF THE SUPERIOR COURT. Published Apr 25. May 2, 9, 16 2024. AMENDED IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: KELSEY ELIZABETH MEYER CASE NUMBER: 23CV04934 TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior Court for decree changining name (s) as follows: PRESENT NAME: KELSEY ELIZABETH MEYER PROPOSED NAME: KELSEY ELIZABETH QUIROZ THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing.

NOTICE OF HEARING JUNE 28, 2024, 10:00 AM, DEPT 4 , SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA, COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA 1100 Anacapa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101, Anacapa Division. A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa

64 THE INDEPENDENT MAY 2, 2024 INDEPENDENT.COM 64 THE INDEPENDENT MAY 2, 2024 INDEPENDENT.COM INDEPENDENT CLASSIFIEDS PHON E 805-965-5205 EMAIL ADVERTISING@INDEPENDENT.COM

LEGALS (CONT.)

Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. DATED APRIL 15, 2024, JUDGE DONNA D. GECK OF THE SUPERIOR COURT.

Published Apr 25. May 2, 9, 16 2024. IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: OLIVIA

GRACE SEVERSON

CASE NUMBER: 24CV01548

TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior Court for decree changining name (s) as follows:

PRESENT NAME: OLIVIA GRACE

SEVERSON PROPOSED NAME: OLIVAI GRACE

MCPHERSON

THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF

HEARING MAY 24, 2024, 10:00 AM, DEPT 4, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101, Anacapa Division. A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. DATED MARCH 20, 2024, JUDGE DONNA D. GECK OF THE SUPERIOR COURT.

Published May 2, 9, 16, 23 2024. IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: ISAIAH

MAURICE HICKS

CASE NUMBER: 24CV02009

TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior Court for decree changining name (s) as follows: PRESENT NAME: ISAIAH MAURICE

HICKS

PROPOSED NAME: MAURICE LOPEZ

HICKS

THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING JUNE 12, 2024, 10:00 AM, DEPT 3, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101, Anacapa Division. A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. DATED APRIL 21, 2024, JUDGE THOMAS P. ANDERLE, OF THE SUPERIOR COURT. Published May 2, 9, 16, 23 2024.

IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: NANCY

MCLEOD

CASE NUMBER: 24CV01738

TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior Court for decree changining name (s) as follows: PRESENT NAME: NANCY MCLEOD

PROPOSED NAME: FROG SMITH

THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if

any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING JUNE 3, 2024, 10:00 AM, DEPT 5, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101, Anacapa Division. A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. DATED APRIL 9, 2024, JUDGE COLLEEN K. STERNE, OF THE SUPERIOR COURT. Published May 2, 9, 16, 23 2024.

PUBLIC NOTICES

EXECUTIVE ORDER N‑6‑22 – Russia Sanctions

On March 4, 2022, Governor Gavin Newsom issued Executive Order N‑6‑22 (the EO) regarding Economic Sanctions against Russia and Russian entities and individuals. “Economic Sanctions” refers to sanctions imposed by the U.S. government in response to Russia’s actions in Ukraine, as well as any sanctions imposed under state law. The EO directs state agencies to terminate contracts with, and to refrain from entering any new contracts with, individuals or entities that are determined to be a target of Economic Sanctions. Accordingly, should the State determine Contractor is a target of Economic Sanctions or is conducting prohibited transactions with sanctioned individuals or entities, that shall be grounds for termination of this agreement. The State shall provide Contractor advance written notice of such termination, allowing Contractor at least 30 calendar days to provide a written response. Termination shall be at the sole discretion of the State.

CALIFORNIA REGIONAL WATER QUALITY CONTROL BOARD, CENTRAL COAST REGION, NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the California Regional Water Quality Control Board, Central Coast Region (Central Coast Water Board) will hold a public hearing to consider a non‑ regulatory amendment to the Water Quality Control Plan for the Central Coastal Basin (Basin Plan) to incorporate specific provisions of statewide water quality control plans adopted by the State Water Resources Control Board and which are applicable by law to the Central Coast Water Board, so that the Central Coast Water Board’s Basin Plan contains these specific provisions; and to correct typographical errors in the Central Coast Water Board’s Basin Plan..

HEARING DATE AND LOCATION: June 20‑21, 2024. Prior to this regularly scheduled board meeting, an agenda and additional information about the public comment period and other information will be posted specifying which day the Basin Plan amendment will be considered at: https://www.waterboards. ca. gov/centralcoast/board_info/ agendas/2024/2024_agendas.html. This public hearing will occur via remote presence by video and teleconference and will also occur at a physical meeting location, Gilroy City Council Chambers, 7351 Rosanna St, Gilroy CA 95020, accessible to persons with disabilities. The day may be subject to change, but any such changes will be posted on the foregoing website. Contact Jamie Pratt, 895 Aerovista Place, Suite 101, San Luis Obispo, CA 93401, (805) 549–3761, jamie.pratt@waterboards.ca.gov.

MATERIALS: The proposed Basin Plan amendment Project Report and supporting can be found at: https:// www.waterboards.ca‑gov/centralcoast/ publications_forms/p ublications/

basin_plan/ SUMMONS

SUMMONS (CITACION JUDICIAL)

NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: (AVISO AL DEMANDADO): SMITH AND COMPANY, INC. a California corporation; LAUREL CREEK, II, LP, a California Limited Partnership; LAUREL CREEK, LP, , a California Limited Partnership; and DOES 1 through 10, inclusive, YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF: GW SURFACES (Lo Esta Demandando El Demandante)

NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below.

You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this Summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff.

A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use your for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self‑Help Center(www. courtinfo.ca.gov/ selfhelp), If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money and property may be taken without further warning from the court.

There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www. lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self‑Help Center (www. courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association.

Tiene 30 DIAS DE CALENDARIO despues de que le entreguen esta citacion y papeles legales papa presentar una respuesta por escrito en esta corte y hacer que se entregue una copia al demandante. Una carta o una llamada telefonica no lo protegen. Su respuesta por escrito tiene que estar en formato legal correcto si desea que procesen su caso en la corte. Es posible que haya un formulario que usted pueda usar para su respuesta. Puede encontrar estos formularios de la corte y mas information en el Centro de Ayuda de las Cortes de California (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/ selfhelp/espanol/), en la biblioteca de leyes de su condado o en la corte que le quede mas cerca. Si no puede pagar la cuota de presentacion, pida al secretario de la corte que le de un formulario de exencion de pago de cuotas. Si no presenta su respuesta a tiempo, puede perder el caso por incumplimiento y la corte le podra quitar su sueldo, dinero y bienes sin mas advertencia. Hay otros requisitos legales. Es recomendable que llame a un abogado inmediatamente. Si no conoce a un abogado, puede llamar a un servicio de remision a abogados. Si no puede pagar a un abogado, es posible que cumpla con los requisitos para obtener servicios legales gratuitos de un programa de servicios legales sin fines de lucro. Puede encontrar estos grupos sin fines de lucro. Puede encontrar estos grupos sin fines de lucro en el sitio web de California Legal Services, (www.lawhelpcalifornia.org), en el Centro de Ayuda de las Cortes de California, (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/ selfhelp/espanol/) o poniendose en contacto con la corte o el colegio de abogados locales.

CASE NO: 24CV00018

The name, address, and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney, or plaintiff without an attorney, is: (El nombre, la direccion, y el numero de telefono del abogado del demandante que no tiene abogado es): The name and address of the court is: SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT 1100 ANACAPA STREET SANTA BARBARA, ACA 93121‑1107 (El nombre y direccion de la corte es):James B. Cole

156131/Jeffrey J. Halfen 131403: Slaighter, Regan & Cole, LLP, 625 E. Santa Clara Street, Suite, 101, Ventura, CA 93001 Tel (805) 658‑7800

DATE: Jan 02, 2024. Darrel E. Parker, EXECUTIVE OFFICER

By Preston Frye, Deputy ( Delegado) Published Apr 11, 18, 25. May 5 2024. SUMMONS (CITACION JUDICIAL) NOTICE TO DEFENDANT: (AVISO AL DEMANDADO): SMITH AND COMPANY, A REAL ESTATE INVESTMENT DEVELOPMENT CORPORATION, a California corporation; PATRICK SMITH, aka Patrick Neiland Smith, individually; LAUREL CREEK, LP, a California limited partnership; CPIF CALIFORNIA, LLC, a California limited liability company; WINKLES ENTERPRISES, INC., a California corporation, and dba Winkles Enterprise; FLOOR CONNECTION, INC., a California corporation; ALL WALLS SYSTEMS, INC., a Delaware corporation; PGS –WESTSIDE II, INC., a Georgia corporation, and dba PGS Westside II, Inc. and dba Westside Building Material and dba Westside Building Material Central; US AIR CONDITIONING DISTRIBUTORS, LLC, a Delaware limited liability company, and dba US Air Conditioning Distributors; BUILDER SERVICES GROUP, INC., a Florida corporation, and dba TruTeam of California; EMPIRE ELECTRICAL SOLUTIONS, INC., a California corporation; G W SURFACES, a California corporation, and dba GW Surfaces; CULBERT CONSTRUCTION & PLUMBING, INC, a California corporation; ARNOLD BUILDERS INC., a California corporation; THE SHERWIN‑WILLIAMS COMPANY, an Ohio corporation; LW CONSTRUCTION, INC., a California corporation; COAST ENGINEERING & DESIGN, INC., a California corporation; CONSOLIDATED ELECTRICAL DISTRIBUTORS, INC., a Delaware corporation, and dba California Electric Supply; UNITED RENTALS (NORTH AMERICA), INC., a Delaware corporation; ROBERT NOLAND CHURCH, aka Noland Church, individually, and dba Colortrends Painting & Decorating and dba Colortrends Painting; TRISURA INSURANCE COMPANY, an Oklahoma corporation; and DOES 1 through 75, inclusive YOU ARE BEING SUED BY PLAINTIFF: HOMER T. HAYWARD LUMBER CO., a California corporation (Lo Esta Demandando El Demandante) NOTICE! You have been sued. The court may decide against you without your being heard unless you respond within 30 days. Read the information below.

You have 30 CALENDAR DAYS after this Summons and legal papers are served on you to file a written response at this court and have a copy served on the plaintiff.

A letter or phone call will not protect you. Your written response must be in proper legal form if you want the court to hear your case. There may be a court form that you can use your for your response. You can find these court forms and more information at the California Courts Online Self‑Help Center (www.courtinfo.ca.gov/ selfhelp), your county law library, or the courthouse nearest you. If you cannot pay the filing fee, ask the court clerk for a fee waiver form. If you do not file your response on time, you may lose the case by default, and your wages, money and property may be taken without further warning from the court.

There are other legal requirements. You may want to call an attorney right away. If you do not know an attorney, you may call an attorney referral service. If you cannot afford an attorney, you may be eligible for free legal services from a nonprofit legal services program. You can locate these nonprofit groups at the California Legal Services Web site (www. lawhelpcalifornia.org), the California Courts Online Self‑Help Center (www. courtinfo.ca.gov/selfhelp), or by contacting your local court or county bar association.

NOTE: The court has a statutory lien for waived fees and costs on any settlement or arbitration award

of $10,000 or more in a civil case. The court’s lien must be paid before the court will dismiss the case.

ADVISO! Lo han demandado. Si no responde dentro de 30 dias, la corte puede decider en su contra sin contra escuchar su version. Lea la informacion a continuacion. Tiene 30 DIAS DE CALENDARIO despues de que le entreguen esta citacion y papeles legales papa presentar una respuesta por escrito en esta corte y hacer que se entregue una copia al demandante. Una carta o una llamada telefonica no lo protegen. Su respuesta por escrito tiene que estar en formato legal correcto si desea que procesen su caso en la corte. Es posible que haya un formulario que usted pueda usar para su respuesta. Puede encontrar estos formularios de la corte y mas information en el Centro de Ayuda de las Cortes de California (www.sucorte.ca.gov), en la biblioteca de leyes de su condado o en la corte que le quede mas cerca. Si no puede

pagar la cuota de presentacion, pida al secretario de la corte que le de un formulario de exencion de pago de cuotas. Si no presenta su respuesta a tiempo, puede perder el caso por incumplimiento y la corte le podra quitar su sueldo, dinero y bienes sin mas advertencia. Hay otros requisitos legales. Es recomendable que llame a un abogado inmediatamente. Si no conoce a un abogado, puede llamar a un servicio de remision a abogados. Si no puede pagar a un abogado, es posible que cumpla con los requisitos para obtener servicios legales gratuitos de un programa de servicios legales sin fines de lucro. Puede encontrar estos grupos sin fines de lucro en el sitio web de California Legal Services, (www.lawhelpcalifornia. org), en el Centro de Ayuda de las Cortes de California, (www.sucorte. ca.gov) o poniendose en contacto con la corte o el colegio de abogados locales. ADVISO:Por ley, la corte tiene derecho a reclamar las cuotas

NOTICE INVITING BIDS

y los costos exentos por imponer un gravamen sobre cualquier recuperacion de $10,000 o mas de valor recibida mediante un acuerdo o una concesion de arbitraje en un caso de derecho civil. Tiena que pagar el gravamen de la corte antes de que la corte pueda desechar el caso.

CASE NO: 24CV‑0011

The name and address of the court is: (El nombre y direccion de la corte es): SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA OF SAN LUIS OBISPO 1050 Monterey Street San Luis Obispo, California 93408. The name, address, and telephone number of plaintiff’s attorney, or plaintiff without an attorney, is: (El nombre, la direccion, y el numero de telefono del abogado del demandante que no tiene abogado es): Anne Secker, Esq., NOLAND HAMERLY ETIENNE & HOSS 333 Salinas Street/PO Box 2510, Salinas, CA 93902 Tel (831) 424‑1414 DATE: Jan 04, 2024. By J. Reavey, Deputy ( Delegado) Published Apr 18, 25. May 2, 9, 2024.

Santa Barbara Unified School District 720 Santa Barbara St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101

Request for Bids FS-2425-01 Food Service Grocery Products

Notice is hereby given by the Santa Barbara Unified School District acting by and through its Board of Education, hereinafter referred to as the “District”, will receive sealed bids up to but not later than 2:00pm PT, May 30, 2024 for: RFB FS-2425-01 Food Service Grocery Products.

Sealed bid responses will be received at the District’s Food Services office to the attention of Laszlo Horvath, Purchasing Tech located at Santa Barbara Unified School District, Food Services Department, 720 Santa Barbara St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101 with the corresponding bid response CLEARLY LABELED on the outside of the bid response and will be opened at or after the time and date set for the bid opening.

Documents are available to download from the Santa Barbara Unified School District website or by contacting Laszlo Horvath at lhorvath@sbunified.org

All bids shall be submitted on the forms provided in the bid document and must conform to all bid instructions and any addenda issued.

No Bidder may withdraw their bid for a period of sixty (60) days after the date set for the bid opening.

The District reserves the right to reject any, all, or any part of the proposal. The District may waive any irregularities or informalities, or may sit and act as sole judge of the merit and qualifications of the products and services offered in any proposal, or in the bidding process.

By order of the BOARD OF EDUCATION OF THE SANTA BARBARA UNIFIED SCHOOL DISTRICT.

By: Laszlo Horvath Purchasing Tech

Published: April 25 and May 2, 2024

Get Involved: Apply Now to Serve on a City of Goleta’s Library Advisory Commission or the Historic Preservation Commission Applications due by Thursday, May 23, 2024, at 5:00 P.M.

Here is your chance to give back to Goleta in 2024, by applying to serve on a City of Goleta Board or Commission. The City has vacancies on the Historic Preservation Commission and the Library Advisory Commission. Serving on a Board or Commission is a great way to use your talent and time to make a difference and help shape the future of Goleta. Here is what the positions entail:

The Historic Preservation Commission is a seven-member body that acts as an advisory body to the staff, the Design Review Board, and City Council on all matters pertaining to historic preservation. The Historic Preservation Commission shall meet six times per year or as needed. There are three (3) vacancies and members are appointed to a 4-year term and compensated $75.00 per meeting.

The Library Advisory Commission is a five-member body that advises staff and the City Council on matters affecting the Goleta Valley Library representing the interests of the library’s patrons by recommending programming and services for the library. The Library Advisory Commission shall advise the Library Board of Trustees (Board) and increase community participation in library issues by analyzing the library's needs, considering goals, anticipating future needs and problems, acting as a liaison, acting as a sounding board, and helping to develop consensus for advisement to the Board. There are (3) vacancies:

• 1 Commissioner – Unincorporated Library Area

• 1 Commissioner – Isla Vista Community Services District

• 1 Commissioner – Goleta Incorporated Area

Members are appointed for a three-year term. The Library Advisory Commission shall meet six times per year or as needed. Meetings are held the first Monday of the month, and members are compensated $75.00 per meeting.

Applications for all open Board and Commission vacancies may be submitted online at www.CityofGoleta.org/BoardsCommissions

For additional information, please email cityclerkgroup@cityofgoleta.org

Applications are due by May 23, 2024, at 5:00 p.m.

Thank you for considering this important role in your community.

INDEPENDENT.COM MAY 2, 2024 THE INDEPENDENT 65 INDEPENDENT.COM MAY 2, 2024 THE INDEPENDENT 65 INDEPENDENT CLASSIFIEDS PHON E 805-965-5205 EMAIL ADVERTISING@INDEPENDENT.COM
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