Santa Barbara Independent 1/19/23

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FREE Santa Barbara JAN. 19-26, 2023 VOL. 37 NO. 888 JOYCE DIDONATO BRINGS EDEN TO TOWN
POSTOPERATIC GARDEN OF IDEALISTIC DELIGHTS ANTHONY EDWARDS & CADY HUFFMAN REUNITE FOR COMMUNIFY SBMA SUED OVER NAZI-LOOTED DRAWING IN MEMORIAM: BILL DIAL BIDEN UNLOCKS FEDERAL STORM RELIEF STARSHINE: TIG … BEFORE THE GIG PLUS
2 THE INDEPENDENT JANUARY 19, 2023 INDEPENDENT.COM (805) 893-3535 | www.ArtsAndLectures.UCSB.edu Granada event tickets can also be purchased at: (805) 899-2222 | www.GranadaSB.org 2023 Grammy Nominee
“Riveting show, superbly executed.” – The Evening Standard Tue,
/ 7 PM / Granada Theatre Tickets start at $20 Joyce
Il
Zefira
Marie
An Arts & Lectures Co-commission Presented in
with
and
An Iconic, Groundbreaking Theatrical Tour de Force
Fusing music, movement and theatre, EDEN is a breathtaking, through-performed tour de force from the multi-awardwinning Joyce DiDonato that’s been immediately celebrated as “iconic” and “ground-breaking.” Special appearance by the Music Academy Sing! children’s chorus.
Jan 24
DiDonato, executive producer and mezzo-soprano
Pomo d’Oro, early music ensemble
Valova, conductor
Lambert-Le Bihan, stage director John Torres, lighting designer
association
Community Environmental Council, the Music Academy, Santa Barbara Botanic Garden, Santa Barbara Choral Society
UCSB Department of Music

Die Stadt ohne Juden ( The City Without Jews ) Matthias Pintscher, Music Director/Conductor

Sat, Jan 28 / 7 PM / Lobero Theatre (note new venue)

The world’s greatest contemporary ensemble performs a new score to a 1924 silent movie that predicted the horrors of antisemitism.

Pink Martini featuring China Forbes

Fri, Feb 3 / 8 PM / Granada Theatre Tickets going fast!

– Thomas Lauderdale, bandleader/pianist

Elegant, fun and blessed with flawless musicianship, the globetrotting Pink Martini is a perennial Santa Barbara favorite that guarantees an evening of enchanting international entertainment.

Monterey Jazz Festival on Tour

Christian Sands, Dee Dee Bridgewater, Kurt Elling, Lakecia Benjamin, Yasushi Nakamura, Clarence Penn Sun, Jan 29 / 7 PM / UCSB Campbell Hall

Celebrating 65 years, the illustrious Monterey Jazz Festival sends six of its finest jazz ambassadors – including Grammy-winning vocalists Dee Dee Bridgewater and Kurt Elling – to Santa Barbara as part of its popular touring program.

Cirque FLIP Fabrique

Muse

Sun, Feb 5 / 7 PM

Granada Theatre

Canada’s thrilling FLIP Fabrique explores what it means to be your true self in Muse, a refreshing view of contemporary circus that combines breathtaking artistry and athleticism and challenges gender roles.

INDEPENDENT.COM JANUARY 19, 2023 THE INDEPENDENT 3
Kurt Elling Dee Dee Bridgewater Co-presented with Jewish Federation of Greater Santa Barbara
Ensemble Intercontemporain
“A rollicking around-the-world musical adventure.”
(805) 893-3535 | www.ArtsAndLectures.UCSB.edu Granada event tickets can also be purchased at: (805) 899-2222 | www.GranadaSB.org

OPEN LETTER TO BOARD OF SUPERVISORS

Support Designation of Rocky Nook Park as a Historic Landmark

Dear Members of the Board of Supervisors, Please vote to designate Rocky Nook Park a County Historic Landmark, following the unanimous recommendation of the County Historic Landmarks Advisory Commission. Rocky Nook Park is one of the most historic, scenic, and important places in Santa Barbara County.

Rocky Nook Park features all of the elements of Santa Barbara County’s natural and humanmade environment and history. The Park’s boulders are the largest remaining geological site of the debris flow that resulted in so much sandstone being located in Santa Barbara. The Chumash lived here for millennia. The water of Mission Creek and surrounding sandstone provided material for aqueducts, the mission water works, and the Santa Barbara Mission. Stonework in Rocky Nook Park dates to the Spanish and Mexican periods. In the nineteenth century, American settlers moved to what is now Rocky Nook Park. Rocky Nook was saved by members of the community, who raised the money for its acquisition and deeded it to the County of Santa Barbara for permanent use as a park. Rocky Nook Park became the second county park in 1928, and the first county park on the south coast of Santa Barbara County. During the New Deal, rock fireplaces were built in the Park by the WPA that remain to this day.

Rocky Nook Park is a scenic, historic, and environmental treasure that should be saved for future generations. Thank you for your consideration and service. Sincerely, Committee to Preserve Rocky Nook Park P.S. to the Community--You can help! Write the Board of Supervisors by Monday, January 23, in support of designating Rocky Nook Park a County Historic Landmark at: sbcob@countyofsb.org

4 THE INDEPENDENT JANUARY 19, 2023 INDEPENDENT.COM
SAVE ROCKY NOOK PARK FOR FUTURE GENERATIONS! Paid for by the Committee to Preserve Rocky Nook Park

Meet Alexandra Goldberg, new host and producer of The Indy podcast.

What kinds of stories are you excited to tell for The Indy? Audio storytelling is a wonderful news platform because a podcast can truly capture the essence of a conversation or the natural sounds of a place. I’m most excited to use this medium to really dive into the human-interest aspect of news, getting in-depth interviews about local politics and community activism in the Central Coast. I’m a major foodie, I love to travel, and I’m really into music, so I can’t wait to dive into Santa Barbara arts and culture as well! It’s most important for me to cover what you want to hear, so chat with me at podcast@independent.com.

What podcasts do you personally listen to? I’ve always been an NPR junkie. Keeping with my interest in politics, social justice and environmentalism, my favorite shows are Consider This and The NPR Politics Podcast. Pod Save the World produces some really intriguing episodes on international politics, which inspired me to do some political reporting in Berlin this past summer. I’ve also just recently found the magic in listening to guided meditations on the podcast app.

INDEPENDENT.COM JANUARY 19, 2023 THE INDEPENDENT 5 INSTAGRAM | @SBINDEPENDENT TWITTER | @SBINDYNEWS FACEBOOK | SANTA BARBARA INDEPENDENT NEWSLETTER | INDEPENDENT.COM/NEWSLETTERS SUBSCRIBE | INDEPENDENT.COM/SUBSCRIBE Editor in Chief Marianne Partridge Publisher Brandi Rivera Executive Editor Nick Welsh Senior Editor Tyler Hayden Senior Writer Matt Kettmann Associate Editor Jackson Friedman Opinions Editor Jean Yamamura Arts, Culture, and Community Editor Leslie Dinaberg Calendar Editor Terry Ortega News Reporters Ryan P. Cruz, Callie Fausey Senior Arts Writer Josef Woodard Copy Chief Tessa Reeg Copy Editor Carrie Bluth Sports Editor Victor Bryant Food Writer George Yatchisin Food & Drink Fellow Vanessa Vin Travel Writers Macduff Everton, Mary Heebner Production Manager Ava Talehakimi Art Director Xavier Pereyra Production Designer Jillian Critelli Graphic Designer Jinhee Hwang Web Content Managers Don Brubaker, Caitlin Kelley Columnists Dennis Allen, Gail Arnold, Sara Caputo, Christine S. Cowles, Roger Durling, Marsha Gray, Betsy J. Green, Amy Ramos, Jerry Roberts, Starshine Roshell Contributors Rob Brezsny, Melinda Burns, Ben Ciccati, Cheryl Crabtree, John Dickson, Camille Garcia, Keith Hamm, Rebecca Horrigan, Eric HvolbØll,
Photography Editor Emeritus Paul Wellman Founding Staff Emeriti Audrey Berman, George Delmerico, Richard Evans, Laszlo Hodosy Honorary Consigliere Gary J. Hill IndyKids Bella and Max Brown, Elijah Lee Bryant, Amaya Nicole Bryant, William Gene Bryant, Henry and John Poett Campbell, Emilia Imojean Friedman, Finley James Hayden, Madeline Rose and Mason Carrington Kettmann, Norah Elizabeth Lee, Izzy and Maeve McKinley Print subscriptions are available, paid in advance, for $120 per year. Send subscription requests with name and address to subscriptions@independent.com. The contents of the Independent are copyrighted 2022 by the Santa Barbara Independent, Inc. No part may be reproduced without permission from the publisher. The publisher assumes no responsibility for unsolicited material. A stamped, self-addressed envelope must accompany all submissions expected to be returned. The Independent is available on the internet at independent.com. Press run of the Independent is 40,000 copies. Audited certification of circulation is available on request. The Independent is a legal adjudicated newspaper court decree no. 157386. Contact information: 1715 State Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101 PHONE (805) 965-5205; FAX (805) 965-5518 EMAIL news@independent.com,letters@independent.com,advertising@independent.com Staff email addresses can be found at independent.com/about-us TABLE of CONTENTS volume 37 #888, Jan. 19-26, 2023 NEWS............................ 7 OPINIONS 13 Letters 13 OBITUARIES 14 In Memoriam 17 THE WEEK 25 LIVING 29 FOOD & DRINK 33 Restaurant Guy 35 ARTS LIFE 39 ASTROLOGY 42 CLASSIFIEDS 43 ON THE COVER: Joyce DiDonato. Courtesy photo. Design by Xavier Pereyra. CASTING A WIDE NET Post-Operatic Garden of Idealistic Delight Joyce DiDonato Brings EDEN to Town by Josef Woodard 19 COVER STORY
Shannon Kelley, Kevin McKiernan, Zoë Schiffer, Ethan Stewart, Tom Tomorrow, Maggie Yates, John Zant Director of Advertising Sarah Sinclair Marketing and Promotions Manager Emily Lee Advertising Representatives Camille Cimini Fruin, Suzanne Cloutier, Remzi Gokmen, Tonea Songer Digital Marketing Specialist Graham Brown Accounting Administrator Tobi Feldman Office Manager/Legal Advertising Tanya Spears Guiliacci Distribution Scott Kaufman Editorial Interns Ellie Bouwer, Melea Maglalang, Zoha Malik, Stella Mullin, Sasha Senal, Lola Watts Columnist Emeritus Barney Brantingham
COURTESY
Giving Back to the Community That Made Them by Leslie Dinaberg
2ND FEATURE 23

Peripheral neuropathy is a result of damage to the nerves often causing weakness, pain, numbness, tingling, and the most debilitating bal- ance problems.

This damage is commonly caused by a lack of blood flow to the nerves in the hands and feet which will cause the nerves to begin to slowly degenerate due to lack of nutrient flow.

As you can see in Figure 1, as the blood vessels that surround the nerves become diseased they shrivel up which causes the nerves to not receive the nutrients to continue to survive.

When these nerves begin to “die” they cause you to have balance problems, pain, numb- ness, tingling, burning, and many additional symptoms.

There is a facility right here in Santa Barbara that offers you hope without taking those endless drugs with serious side effects. (see the special neuropathy severity examination at the end of this article)

We can objectively measure the severity of deficit in both small and large nerve fibers prior to start of care.

Charles Sciutto Lac along with NP Kristen Nelson at Santa Barbara Regenerative Health Clinic, will do a neuropathy severity consultation to review peripheral neuropathy history, symptoms and discuss plan of treatment. This consultation will be free of charge and will help determine if our therapy protocol may be a good fit for your needs.

Santa Barbara Regenerative Health Clinic will be offering this neuropathy severity consultation free of charge from now until February 28, 2023.

The amount of treatment needed to allow the nerves to fully recover varies from person to person and can only be determined after a detailed neurological and vascular evaluation.

6 THE INDEPENDENT JANUARY 19, 2023 INDEPENDENT.COM
Figure 1: Notice the very small blood vessels surrounding each nerve. Figure 2: When these very small blood vessels become diseased they begin to shrivel up and the nerves begin to degenerate. Figure 3: The blood vessels will grow back around the nerves much like a plant’s roots grow when watered.
Don’t Hesitate to Act Now! PERIPHERAL NEUROPATHY W ING! Call 805-450-2891 to make an appointment with our team. Medicare and many PPO insurance coverage is available for the treatments offered for peripheral neuropathy at our clinic Santa Barbara Regenerative Health Clinic 1919 State Street, Suite 302 Santa Barbara CA. Our office treatment program is covered by Medicare or other insurance coverage. It will be determined as free of charge, have co-payment, or not be covered prior to start of care. The treatment that is provided at SB Regenerative Health has three main goals: · What’s the underlying cause? · How Much Nerve Damage Has Been Sustained · How much treatment will your condition require 1. Increase blood flow 2. Stimulate small fiber nerves 3. Decrease brain-based pain In order to effectively treat your neuropathy three factors must be determined: School of Extended Learning COME FIND OUT WHAT EXTENDED LEARNING HAS FOR YOU! Saturday, January 21 11:00 AM - 2:00 PM Wake Campus 300 N Turnpike Road Santa Barbara HOUSE OPEN 21 january sbcc.edu/extendedlearning FREE CLASSES & CERTIFICATES! Adult High School/GED® Career Skills & Ready.Match.Hire! English as a Second Language (ESL) Life Enrichment Classes Parenting Lunch and Groceries Provided Facepainting and Henna SBCC Gift Bags and Prizes FREE! Open to All.

of the WEEK

Biden Issues Major Disaster Declaration for Santa Barbara County

President Unlocks Direct Storm Relief for Families and Businesses as County Assesses the Damage Done

For the time being, Mariani said the best portal to FEMA was DisasterAssistance.gov. For those more inclined to pick up the phone, the contact number is 1 (800) 621-3362.

CITY OF S.B. DIGS OUT

COUNTY

Chief Probation Officer Tanja Heitman will begin a new position as assistant county executive officer in March, and a new chief probation officer will be appointed by the Santa Barbara Superior Court, County Executive Officer Mona Miyasato announced on 1/17. Heitman’s new “restructured” position will fulfill the duties of outgoing Assistant County CEO Terri Nisich, along with those of a position previously held by former interim Police Chief Barney Melekian. Among other things, Heitman will oversee and coordinate the county’s Health, Human Services, and Public Safety departments. Heitman will begin the position when Nisich retires in March.

EDUCATION

by Nick Welsh and Jean Yamamura, with Callie Fausey

Late Tuesday, President Joe Biden added Santa Barbara, San Luis Obispo, and Monterey counties to the list of California counties for which he has issued a Major Disaster Declaration. This declaration is of critical help not just for local governments and tribal authorities in making their disaster reimbursement claims with the Federal Emergency Management Agency (FEMA), but for individual homeowners and business owners, as well. For communities that have been bombarded by last week’s lashing rains, floods, mudslides, and debris flows, this declaration qualifies as the pot of gold at the end of the rainbow.

Congressmembers Salud Carbajal who represents all of Santa Barbara and S.L.O counties and Jimmy Panetta of Monterey County have been working behind the scenes and in public lobbying President Biden and FEMA Regional Director Robert Fenton to get this declaration issued. Biden’s decision to make the Major Disaster Declaration for S.B., S.L.O., and Monterey counties now brings the total number of state counties to six. On Saturday, Biden issued such a declaration for Sacramento, Merced, and Santa Cruz counties. Biden, not coincidentally, will be arriving somewhere in the Central Coast sometime this Thursday.

Carbajal spent early this Tuesday morning bending the ear of FEMA Regional Director Fenton before embarking on an assessment tour of northern Santa Barbara County and southern San Luis Obispo County. Carbajal also wrote to Biden, reminding the president that Santa Barbara has experienced “multiple fires including the Thomas and Alisal fires, making the region susceptible to potential debris flows and severe flooding.” And to belabor what’s been made obvious to all Santa Barbara residents, Carbajal wrote in a letter dated January 9, “Five years ago, to this day, the Montecito community experienced a catastrophic debris flow that took the lives of 23 individuals.”

In two letters, Carbajal and Panetta took pains to praise Biden for the steps he’d taken to help thus far. “However, more help is needed,” they wrote. “A major disaster declaration would provide relief, like housing assistance, disaster unemployment assistance, and crisis counseling to individuals impacted by these storms.”

Carbajal’s press liaison, Ian Mariani, stated that Carbajal’s office will be conducting a sustained outreach effort notifying eligible applicants that FEMA aid is available and helping them to apply. Mariani said details on reimbursement formulas would come later, but for right now, his advice was “Just apply. Apply now.”

As Mission Creek rose behind her house during the storm on Monday, January 9, Flavia DeLucia kept an eye on it, until a neighbor called her around 10:30 a.m. to say they were evacuating and that she should, too. “My neighbor saved me,” DeLucia said. The creek had jumped the bridge on the block above hers and water was building up on De la Vina Street at the front of the house where DeLucia lives with her husband near Haley Street. “I was completely shocked. I was paying attention to the wrong side,” she said.

She walked through water nearly waisthigh holding her brother-in-law’s arm to reach his car two blocks away, where he had parked to come rescue her. “It was terrible,” she said. “The water was cold and dark,” so cold that her legs grew numb, she recalled. “It was kind of a horror movie situation. I didn’t know if we were walking on the sidewalk or the street.”

January 9’s storm delivered nearly twice as much water as anyone was expecting, and Santa Barbara’s creeks kept rising, overtopping bridges and banks in some places.

For the blocks of the lower Westside around Haley, De la Vina, De la Guerra, and Bath streets, many homes are dealing with the aftermath of water and mud in gardens, floors, furniture, and walls.

Sharon Byrne is DeLucia’s neighbor and was helping to organize Montecito for the Montecito Association ahead of the January 9 storm. Amid all the evacuation messaging, she suddenly realized that her own home was also at risk for flooding and headed home to evacuate her mother.

By the time she reached De la Vina Street, the creek had jumped the Haley Street bridge.

She shot off a letter to the Santa Barbara City Council, expressing in no uncertain terms the need for help in her neighborhood. “I am pretty upset,” the letter begins, asking

Recently elected county supervisor Laura Capps’s vacant seat on the Santa Barbara Unified Board of Trustees has been filled. William Banning, a former superintendent for the Goleta Union School District before retiring in 2017, was sworn in 1/12 following the completion of candidate interviews. The board voted unanimously to appoint Banning, who will complete Capps’s remaining, at-large elected term on the school board until it ends in November 2024. After that point, the seat will go through an election process and will need to be filled by a candidate residing in Trustee Area 2.

Five elementary schools in Santa Barbara County have been named 2023 California Distinguished Schools by the California Department of Education, the County Education Office announced last week. Among the awardees are three schools in the Goleta Union School District: Foothill Elementary, Kellogg Elementary, and Mountain View Elementary. Santa Barbara Unified’s Peabody Charter School and Cold Spring School District’s Cold Spring School were also awarded. Awardees will hold the title for two years.

COURTS & CRIME

Arman Abrahamyan, 25, of Van Nuys, and Levon Martirosyan, 27, of Glendale, were arrested after 20 catalytic converters, as well as a floor jack and an impact drill, were discovered in their car during a traffic stop in Goleta early 1/17. The pair was charged with felony grand theft, possession of stolen property, and conspiracy, and misdemeanor possession of burglary tools. Victims who have not already reported the theft of a catalytic converter can file an online report at SBSheriff.org or by calling dispatch at (805) 683-2724.

LABOR

As part of a settlement agreement with the state’s Agricultural Labor Relations Board (ALRB), Red Blossom Farms located in Santa Maria has agreed to rehire two workers it fired after they complained about a foreman’s misconduct. It also agreed to pay the pair more than $8,000 in lost wages and “to respect the rights of farm workers to join together to speak up and seek improvements to their working conditions without retaliation,” the ALRB said in a statement. Headquartered in Sacramento, the agency maintains field offices in Santa Rosa, Salinas, Oxnard, Visalia, and Indio.

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JAN. 12-19, 2023
NEWS
n NEWS BRIEFS CONT’D ON PAGE 8  STORM
For the latest news and longer versions of many of these stories, visit independent.com/news
by RYAN P. CRUZ, CALLIE FAUSEY, TYLER HAYDEN, NICK WELSH, and JEAN YAMAMURA, with INDEPENDENT STAFF NEWSOM DROPS IN: Governor Gavin Newsom visited Montecito’s Randall Road debris basin on Friday as part of his tour around recently deluged areas of California after sending a request to Present Biden for an Expedited Major Disaster Declaration, which was granted over the weekend. Full story at independent.com/gavin-newsom-drops-in DON BRUBAKER

STORM CONT’D FROM P. 7

why no one along Santa Barbara’s creeks had been warned to evacuate. In a phone conversation, Byrne said she caught a ride later from Montecito Fire, and the person driving her agreed that her neighborhood looked worse than anything they’d seen in Montecito. The roads were mud-covered from Ortega Street on down. By Friday morning, Public Works backhoes were on lower Westside streets, scooping mud into dump trucks.

DeLucia said it took two days for five men to clear the mud from her home and her yard. She spent another day with three helpers cleaning the interior of her home, putting the furniture outside to wash off. They’ve set fans to dry out the home and the area underneath the home, she said. But what was disappointing is that they’d endured months of noise, dust, and trucks while the Haley and De la Guerra Street bridges were upgraded, DeLucia said. “We thought, finally it’s over, it’s done, and everything is fine.”

The city has set up a bilingual assistance center at the Eastside Library on Montecito Street to answer questions in person and connect residents with available resources, some of which can also be found at the city’s storm recovery resources webpage, santabarbaraca.gov/StormRecovery

COUNTY ASSESSES DAMAGE DONE

As blue skies and sunshine start to reasthemselves in Santa Barbara, county emergency planners are still trying to figure out just how big a hole they’ll have to dig themselves out of in the months ahead.

The good news for Santa Barbara County remains that nobody died, was injured, or went missing in the storms. That’s not to diminish the drama involved in 400 calls for rescue that first responders fielded. Of those, five required a helicopter hoist. Statewide, however, the picture is decidedly different. To date, 20 people have perished in the deluges, floods, mudslides, and debris flows triggered by one of nine atmospheric rivers that have overwhelmed state skies since December 26. Presumably one of those casualties was the 5-year-old boy who was swept away in San Luis Obispo County.

By any reckoning, the final price tag for

repairs and recuperation will be extremely high. Unlike previous disasters that were more locally focused think the Thomas Fire and the 1/9 Debris Flow of 2018 this one was countywide in scope. While Montecito commandeered most anticipatory emergency response focus, the brunt of last week’s atmospheric rivers was felt hardest throughout North County and especially in low-income communities such as Guadalupe.

In Orcutt, a giant sinkhole swallowed a street. The Santa Maria levee failed at a spot near ag fields, though not in the dramatic fashion one conjures when thinking about failed levees. It was fixed within the day. Another levee failed in Guadalupe near 9th Street; this one was privately owned and is believed responsible for much of the damage there.

Paradise Road, Refugio Road, Tepusquet Road, and Gibraltar Road all will require sustained, serious, expensive work. No fewer than 25 roads with a combined estimated length of 120 miles were currently closed as of press time. Most of these, stated county Public Works spokesperson Lael Wageneck, “are under a hard closure or open only for emergency access only.” He added, “There is no estimated time for reopening.”

As of Wednesday morning, State Route 154 remained closed, as did SR 166 in Santa Maria; the Old Coast Highway between Salinas Street and Montecito was also closed, as was East Mountain Drive at Cold Springs Trailhead, according to ReadySBC .org, where local road closure information can be found. In the central county, Jalama Road and San Miguelito are both impassible. Closer to home, landslides hide under gigantic blue tarps blanketing some frontcountry hillsides; a very large tree fell across Patterson Avenue Saturday night, taking out the power between Hollister and the 101, and blocking the road until Monday; and a giant crack in the cliff at Shoreline Park in the City of Santa Barbara led to warning signs both at the park and below at Leadbetter Beach. A tall eucalyptus fell across Carillo Street on Wednesday, blocking the road up the hill and taking out the power.

County emergency planners currently estimate that last week’s storms will cost the county $147 million. With Biden having bestowed the highest emergency declara-

THE INDEPENDENT JANUARY 19, 2023 INDEPENDENT.COM JAN. 12-19, 2023
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DON BRUBAKER
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KEEP ON TRUCKING: Soil and rock from the debris basins in the foothills are being trucked to Goleta Beach Park, which is currently closed.

SBMA Sued over Nazi-Looted Drawing

Heirs of Jewish Cabaret Singer Killed in Concentration Camp

The heirs of a Jewish cabaret singer and art collector killed during World War II have sued the Santa Barbara Museum of Art over possession of a prized drawing they say was robbed from their late relative by Hitler’s Third Reich.

“The Nazi regime stole the artwork from [Fritz] Grünbaum while he was in the Dachau Concentration Camp, where the Nazis tortured him and compelled him to sign an unlawful power of attorney giving his wife authority to convey his property, before murdering him,” the lawsuit states. Grünbaum’s wife, Elisabeth, was then forced to liquidate her husband’s assets before she herself was imprisoned and killed.

The heirs Timothy Reif, a judge on the United States Court of International Trade, and David Frankel, a financial services expert are seeking to reclaim the 1915 pencil on paper drawing “Portrait of the Artist’s Wife” by Egon Schiele. Records show the Nazis obtained it in 1939, and while its whereabouts were unknown for many years after that, it resurfaced at a New York gallery in 1956 and remained there until 1966. The Santa Barbara Museum of Art’s website states the piece was a gift from one of its founding members, Wright S. Ludington.

In their complaint, Reif and Frankel note how, following World War II, the U.S. State Department urged museums, universities, and art dealers to be vigilant against acquiring Nazi-looted artwork and to use extra caution around European pieces lacking complete provenances. The museum was specifically put on notice that the piece might be stolen but “failed to exercise appropriate diligence in acquiring the Artwork or to make reasonable efforts to ascertain the true owners of the Artwork prior to taking possession,” the suit alleges.

The complaint also includes a previous ruling by a panel of judges in a similar case involving Nazilooted art. The panel balked at the suggestion by attorneys for a London-based art dealer that Grünbaum’s 449-piece collection had been given up legally and willingly. “We reject the notion that a person who signs a power of attorney in a death camp can be said to have executed the document voluntarily,” the judges wrote.

Museum spokesperson Katrina Carl said she could not comment on the pending litigation but noted the 18-inch-by-12inch drawing “has not been on view for decades.” Reif and Frankel also recently filed suit against the Museum of Modern Art in New York over another piece by Schiele, a painting called “Prostitute.”

Since 2015, Reif has filed at least four other complaints that attempt to reclaim Grünbaum’s lost artworks. In 2019, a New York appellate court upheld a ruling that returned two more pieces by Schiele to the heirs. Grünbaum is believed to have owned at least 80 works by the Austrian expressionist. Those paintings “Woman in a Black Pinafore” (1911) and “Woman Hiding Her Face” (1912) were sold last November at Christie’s for $504,000 and $2,580,000, respectively.

Reif told reporters at the time that the proceeds would be donated to a foundation established in Grünbaum’s memory that supports underrepresented performing artists. “[Grünbaum] made loans to stagehands and musicians in his orchestra,” he said. “He was generous. That is a legacy we want to share.”

Until fairly recently, lawsuits like Rief’s often failed in court due to the statute of limitations over such legal actions. That is, until the federal Holocaust Expropriated Recovery Act was enacted by Congress in 2016, which eased requirements for the recovery of artwork that was lost or stolen through Nazi persecution.

Born in 1880, Grünbaum was a wellknown Viennese entertainer who wrote and performed cabarets, songs, and operettas. He also directed and acted in films. While at Dachau, he often put on shows for his fellow prisoners, giving one last performance on New Year’s Eve, 1941, two weeks before he was killed. n

CHICAGO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA

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STORM

CONT’D FROM P. 8

tion upon the county, the federal government could bail out the County of Santa Barbara to the tune of 75 percent.

Of the $147 million, the largest cost stems from emptying out the county’s debris basins. That alone is $82 million. The cost of the National Guard members who have been working to clear out these basins since last Friday not to mention employees of the Army Corps of Engineers is not included in this sum.

Since January 11, the county has trucked stuff from the Montecito debris basins to the currently closed Goleta Beach Park. An estimated 500,000 cubic yards of dirt, rock, trees, and brush are estimated to be in the basins.

Carpinteria will also begin to see dump trucks bringing to its beaches the material accumulated from the Santa Monica, Gobernador, and Arroyo Paredon. Cobble and mineral sediments, which are to be tested for contaminants, are the prioritized materials for deposition on Carp’s beaches at Ash Avenue.

At last week’s meeting of the Santa Barbara City Council, it was revealed that not one residential structure had been red-tagged because of flood-related damage. Five homes within city limits, it was reported, had been yellow-tagged. Countywide, however, the picture is less sanguine. Forty-three residential units have been rendered uninhabitable, 22 were seriously damaged, and 516 acres of farm fields have been swallowed up by floods at an estimated cost of $13.3 million.

Among the casualties of the storm on January 9, 2023, was the entrance to the Santa Barbara Harbor. By January 17, Pacific Dredge, under contract to the Army Corps of Engineers, was bringing a dredge from San Diego to remove 30,000 cubic yards of sand. It was set to arrive on January 20, said Erik Engebretsen, the harbor operations manager. Once the dredging begins around January 24, “They suspect it’ll take 48 hours to move enough material for vessels to transit,” Engebretsen said. A rock revetment was placed in the Yacht Club parking lot to protect against the wave action, and some pilings needed to be replaced at Stearns Wharf. In total, the dredging, rock, piling replacement, and general cleanup was estimated to amount to about $2.2 million.

WEEKEND STORM REPORT

Santa Barbara’s Storm Number 14 brought slow and steady rains over the weekend, with very little of the unrelenting downpours and floods of Monday, January 9.

The four-day storm beginning last Friday, January 13, brought nearly 5 inches to San Marcos Pass and 1-3 inches to Santa Barbara’s coast. Gibraltar and Jameson reservoirs are above 100 percent full, and Twitchell Reservoir outside Santa Maria grew from 26.9 to 31.7 percent full, an addition of more than 9,000 acre-feet. (Each acre-foot is 325,000 gallons of water.)

Since Friday, Lake Cachuma rose by 4 feet adding 13,000 acre-feet, or 4 billion gallons. Some recalculations showed the runoff was less than estimated, and the spill-

way release, originally set for Saturday, was put on hold, according to Bureau of Reclamation spokesperson Mary Lee Knecht. But while Cachuma may be nearing capacity, the statewide drought is “far from over,” according to Lael Wageneck of County Flood Control. Many reservoirs in the Central Valley are not full, he said. Significantly, groundwater basins, which are the county’s largest source of water, “take far more than one rain event to recharge.” For those essential, and significantly overdrawn, county-wide bathtubs, it will take “several years of above-average rainfall to recharge and fill back up,” he said. (Read more at independent.com/cachuma-fills.)

Out at the Carpinteria Sanitary District, General Manager Craig Murray was headed home a week ago Monday after keeping an eye on the banks of Carpinteria Creek during the big deluge. “A lot of debris was going down the creek,” he said. “Tree trunks had fallen in, and it was all shooting out to the ocean.” When he left at dark, the banks were intact, but when he returned the next day, the grouted rip rap had washed away from the creek bank at the parcel above the waste-water treatment plant. “This left the facility exposed at one corner,” he said. “If it undermined the wall, it’d be a critical emergency, and we had to react.”

The parcel above the plant on 6th Street is where the State Park houses some of its rangers. By Sunday, the park had arranged to have rock delivered, and the work to shore up the creek bank was finishing up this week. Barricades went up for cars on the block, and the Lou Grant Parent-Child Workshop there closed on Tuesday but had arranged for the truck traffic to stop during drop-off and pickup times by Wednesday.

“After all the things that have happened for our families and the school the fires, the floods, COVID closures, and now the storms we have definitely learned to roll with whatever comes our way and land on our feet,” said Director Judy Johnston.

Murray said similar damage happened on CarpSan’s property after the 2018 debris flow. The permanent repair to the facility’s flood wall was completed by 2021, and it held up fine, he said.

For those hoping to shake off the stuckat-home blues by going for a hike, landslides and erosion have destroyed the front-country trails at vulnerable spots up in the foothills and mountains, many have reported. The potential danger has Los Padres National Forest closing the Santa Barbara Ranger District for 60 days, as well as the Lucia, Ojai, and Monterey districts nearby. High winds and rains caused flooding, debris flows, and slope failures; bridges, roads, and trails are out; and both administrative buildings and recreational facilities are a mess, according to a press release on Friday.

The forest supervisor, Chris Stubbs, said the closure was a precaution and a repair strategy was in motion: “I’m asking the public to heed the closure order while these recovery efforts are underway,” Stubbs said.

“My intention is to reopen closed areas as soon as it’s safe to do so.”

10 THE INDEPENDENT JANUARY 19, 2023 INDEPENDENT.COM
JAN. 12-19, 2023
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Success, like beauty, lies squarely in the eye of the beholder. In the case of the six steel nets strung across Montecito creeks designed to prevent another deadly debris flow, the answer will remain decidedly undecided for the time being. “I don’t know that we know,” said county supervisor Das Williams whose district includes Montecito of the steel nets’ impact during last week’s torrential downpours. “But it seems like it was somewhere between successful and very successful.”

What is known for certain, however, is that just one of the six steel nets was filled to the top with rocks and debris after last week’s rains. The other five were not.

Had this material trapped behind a net on the upper reaches of San Ysidro Creek been allowed to continue its downhill trajectory, it would have encountered a second steel curtain further downstream on the same creek. Had it broken free of that one too, the careening mass of boulders, mud, and debris would have likely been swallowed by the new Randall Road debris basin with a holding capacity of about 95,000 cubic yards just completed for exactly this purpose.

Were this massive flow able to overwhelm the new catch basin and keep moving downstream, it would likely make its way to Highway 101, thus blocking the north-south flow of one of the state’s most vital traffic arteries. That’s a lot of ifs.

NETS AND BASINS

Back in 2018 at the time of Montecito’s deadly debris flow, none of the steel nets or the Randall Road basin were even being considered. Thus there was nothing stopping the debris flow’s lethal path on January 9, 2018, which killed 23 people, destroyed or damaged 500 structures, and blocked Highway 101 for weeks.

Hence the impetus behind both the steel nets and the new basin.

Pushing for the construction of the new basin was the county’s Flood Control Department, the federal government’s Army Corps of Engineers, and a handful of Montecito residents willing to sell their properties for considerably less than what the market would bear.

Pushing for the installation of the steel curtains was a group of civic-minded Montecito residents who formed the private nonprofit The Project for Resilient Communities, which raised nearly $6 million to make their dreams of steel netted safety become a reality. (Joe Cole, an investor in the Independent and former publisher, has been an active member of this organization.)

ASSESSING THE DAMAGE

When the recent rains subsided, the new Randall Road basin was roughly half full.

Of the six steel nets two each on three creeks only the one on upper San Ysidro Creek had stopped a significant mass of stones and debris.

According to engineering geologist Larry Gurollo working with the Project the trails and slopes leading up to the upper San Ysidro net were too slippery to traverse. No direct observation, he said, has been possible. Video footage shot by drones from a distance showed, according to Gurollo, the upper San Ysidro net as being “full of debris.”

It was evident, Gurollo said, that the net had been triggered. That he suggested could only have been caused by something of substantial mass that hit the net high, fast, and hard. What was it?

Pat McElroy former Santa Barbara city fire chief and best-known spokesperson for the Project explained, “This year’s rocks were nothing like the rocks we saw in 2018. Back then, we were looking at rocks the size of cars,” he said. “This year, we were looking at rocks the size of basketballs.” Even so, McElroy said, “I think we proved the proof of concept,” he said. Even if this year’s rocks weren’t as big as the debris flow five years ago, McElroy cautioned, “There’s still a lot of

INDEPENDENT.COM JANUARY 19, 2023 THE INDEPENDENT 11 CONT’D NEWS of the WEEK INFRASTRUCTURE
by Nick Welsh
CONT’D ON PAGE 12  Did Steel Nets Help Montecito? It’s Too Early to Say for Sure The ring net at upper San Ysidro Creek on Tuesday, January 10 COURTESY JOHN MACFARLANE FAST&CURIOUS ED Talks from UC Santa Barbara’s Gevirtz School 6 experts x 8 minutes education & psychology research that matters Wednesday, January 25 at 7 pm Faulkner Gallery, Santa Barbara Public Library, 40 E. Anapamu St. Free! EUPHA JEANNE DARAMOLA on Black and Latinx Parent Organizing ERIKA FELIX on Engaging with Policy Makers JOHN GALISKY on Leveraging Career Motivation TANIA ISRAEL on Bisexual Health Policy Advocacy NATALIE LAREZ on Sharing Health Policy Research CAROLYN SATTIN-BAJAJ on Preparing Teachers for Immigrantorigin Students education.ucsb.edu santabarbaraca.gov/library An evening exploring how the Gevirtz School influences policy Spanish language and ASL interpreters available BEAVERS IN THE LANDSCAPE With extended droughts and catastrophic fires plaguing California and the West, Dr. Emily Fairfax, CSU, began focusing her research on the positive impact of beaver in controlling wildfires with the wetlands they create, prompting her to coin the phrase “Smokey the Beaver”. Cooper Lienhart, a recent grad of Cal Poly San Luis Obispo with a degree in Environmental Engineering had concerns about climate change. But when discovering a beavers role in creating wetlands that are an effective carbon sink, he embarked on a new career path working with beaver. CLIMATE, FIRE, DROUGHT. WHO DO YOU CALL? BEAVERS! ECOSYSTEM RESTORATION HEROES Saturday, January 21, 2023 • 6:30–8:30 pm Santa Barbara Community Arts Center (SBCAW) 631 Garden St, Santa Barbara FREE EVENT A Community Event Sponsored by: Santa Barbara Permaculture Network www.sbpermaculture.org Santa Barbara Permaculture Network Presents Cosponsors: San Luis Obispo, Santa Barbara, & Ojai Beaver Brigades An Evening with Dr. Emily Fairfax & Cooper Lienhart

RING NETS

CITY

CONT’D FROM P. 11

stuff up there. And it can still come down. The question is whether these rocks would have picked up speed and gathered more material if they weren’t stopped.”

Could they?

“It’s still premature to say,” McElroy answered.

HISTORY DOES REPEAT ITSELF

Gurollo said his research shows that debris flows happened in Montecito far more frequently than previously recognized. Even if this year’s event was not of the debris flow magnitude, he argued, a subsequent one will be. The choice is not between steel nets or debris basins, Gurollo argued; the solution, he said, is to have both.

The rub, of course, is cost. Thus far, it has cost the organization more than $5 million to research steel nets, secure permission from the property owners involved, buy the nets, and install them. The nets were fasttracked through the permitting process on an emergency basis. As McElroy noted, this is the first time they were permitted in an environment where the Endangered Species Act was an issue. The creeks are habitat for the federally endangered steelhead trout. Even so, the organization managed to secure emergency approvals from the county, the California Department of Fish and Wildlife, and the federal Army Corps of Engineers for just one year. The Project sub-

sequently secured extensions that gave the nets four more years, expiring on December 21, 2023.

McElroy said he’s hoping the county will agree to assume responsibility for the steel nets. “This is really something government should do,” he said. “We’re citizen volunteers and we’re kind of tapped out.” Discussions between the county and the Project, however, are only just now getting underway. “We will be meeting to determine the viability of a plan for next rainy season,” Supervisor Williams said.

And what happens to all the stones and rubbish behind the upper San Ysidro Creek steel net in the meantime? According to the permit conditions, the Project is required to begin removing the rubble within 72 hours of the first inspection. They are required to airlift in a four-person crew and a Spyder excavator to restore the creek flow for the steelhead. All the stones and boulders part of the natural life cycle of creeks will have to remain in the riparian area.

How much all this costs is anyone’s guess. It won’t be cheap. When asked who pays for it, Williams was quick to reply, “The Partnership pays for it.” But Williams was also quick to note that the county supervisors assumed payment for a $1 million bond on behalf of the Project so that they could use their donations to pay for steel netting. “But there is a bond,” Williams noted, “in case they failed.” n

Council Green-Lights Parklet Rates

After three rounds of voting and nearly two hours of discussion over the proposed State Street parklet payment program, the Santa Barbara City Council eventually decided 4-2 to move forward with a tiered-rate system that would start this May.

In the special council meeting on Thursday, January 12, Santa Barbara Downtown Team Manager Brian Bosse outlined two options for a monthly pay rate system that would offset the expenses the city has been subsidizing to maintain the parklets, which he estimated at $515,000 for fiscal year 2023 and $650,000$675,000 for 2024.

The first option would have a flat monthly charge of $5 per square foot for space directly in front of the business and a gradually increasing rate for additional space beyond the frontage. Under this option, the city could have expected as much as $731,000 per year.

The second option, which eventually was selected by the council, is also a monthly charge per square foot, but with a “variable” structure, Bosse said, that would incentivize portability and updated designs by determining the rate “based on facility design and needs.” Under this option, the city would

break even with the projected costs of parklet maintenance.

With the tiered plan, businesses with larger parklets that are built on a platform, have a covered roof, and are not portable will pay the “standard rate” of $5 per square foot with the same gradual rate increases for areas beyond the business frontage. Parklets built on a non-portable platform without roofs would qualify for the middle-tier rate starting at $4.50, and spaces with a movable platform and no roof would pay a starting rate of $4. The smallest, fully portable “ongrade” spaces (no roof, no platform) would pay the lowest rate, starting at $3 per square foot and increasing to $4.50 and $6 for space outside of the business frontage.

Full story at independent.com/parkletrates Ryan P. Cruz

12 THE INDEPENDENT JANUARY 19, 2023 INDEPENDENT.COM CONT’D NEWS of the WEEK
JAN. 12-19, 2023
ERICK MADRID FILE PHOTO

From Dream to Reality

One of my favorite quotes from Dr. King says, “I have a dream that my four little children will one day live in a nation where they will not be judged by the color of their skin but by the content of their characters.”

The recent letters “Time to End Racism” and “We Reject Bigotry” show that Dr. King’s dreams are coming true. Your speaking up is allowing everyone to strive and to be treated with respect.

Thanks to our leaders who signed their names at the end of the “We Reject Bigotry” letter, as it gives me hope that my beautiful grandchildren will be given the opportunity to follow their dreams.

La Cumbre Plaza’s Future

We are deeply concerned by Supervisor Das Williams’s comment regarding our design review committees “running amok.” We assume a longtime elected representative of the people of Santa Barbara would have better understanding of and appreciation for the purpose of our boards and commissions, and their dedication to the preservation of our unique architectural heritage. That heritage is cherished by the people of Santa Barbara, and they want it protected.

As professional architects, landscape architects, and planners practicing for many years in Santa Barbara, we have appeared many times before the design review boards, and we have served as design review board members. We have sat on both sides of the table.

There are clear and thoughtfully crafted ordinances and guidelines for the boards and for applicants to follow. When applicants respect and respond to the city ordinances and guidelines, their projects move smoothly and quickly to approval. When an applicant listens to the board’s comments and then does not respond to them, the approval process is delayed. Findings of project neighborhood compatibility must be made. Since there is apparent disagreement with some of our elected leaders regarding the roles of our design review boards, our city design review community could use this as an opportunity to listen to critics and work to find common ground with our community leaders around planning the future development of La Cumbre Plaza.

The State of California requires every commu-

nity to implement a General Plan, which serves as a guideline for development and infrastructure. A Specific Plan is an additional planning tool that focuses on a neighborhood scale, which we believe is essential for planning the future development of La Cumbre Plaza.

It is disappointing that SBCAG did not approve funding for a La Cumbre Plaza specific plan even though it was rated highly among all the applications. The 31-acre site is in three parcels. It would be irresponsible for the city to allow development of part of the property without a plan in place for the entire site that considers all the ramifications of all three projects, including traffic congestion and impacts on our water services.

This letter is not intended as a critique of the currently proposed projects, but as a request to take the time to consider the potential impacts of the site’s development. The build-out of the site will affect hundreds of properties and thousands of residents in adjacent neighborhoods. There must be consideration of all the development proposed as a whole.

A Specific Plan is absolutely essential for development of such magnitude. —Bob Cunningham, ASLA, landscape architect; Steve Hausz, architect; Cassandra Ensberg, FAIA LEED AP; Tom Jacobs, AIA; Donald G. Sharpe, architect; Dennis Thompson, FAIA LEED AP; Leslie Colasse, architect; Howard Wittausch, AIAE / ASCE; Fred L. Sweeney, AIA, Founding President, Santa Barbara Architectural Foundation; Don Olson, former City Housing Development Supervisor, City Planner, Special Projects Manager

For the Record

¶ After last week’s paper went to press, the Indy learned two events scheduled for January 14 were canceled: The Santa Barbara Music Club at First United Methodist Church and the Star Party at the Natural History Museum. The AC Postel Memorial Rose Garden event for that day moved to Saturday, January 21. Readers are advised to please confirm events before attending.

The Independent welcomes letters of less than 250 words that include a daytime phone number for verification. Letters may be edited for length and clarity. Send to: Letters, S.B. Independent, 1715 State St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101; or fax: 965-5518; or email: letters@independent.com. Unabridged versions and more letters appear at independent.com/opinions

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obituaries

1/1/1935 - 12/16/2022

performing and did so at many locations such as the Old Mission Santa Barbara, the Courthouse, Biltmore Hotel, the Coral Casino, Acapulco, El Paseo Restaurant and many private parties and events. Ernie also performed at Mission La Purisima in Lompoc and Mission Sta. Ynez.

2201 Laguna St. Santa Barbara, CA 93105 or The Poor Clares Monastery, 215 Los Olivos St. Santa Barbara, CA 93105

Ernest J. Pico went home to be with the Lord, Friday December 16, 2022. He was the first child to be born in Santa Barbara on January 1, 1935 at Cottage Hospital. His parents were Ernest and Georgia Pico and his family is one of the founding families of Santa Barbara.

Ernie was also known as Nini or sometimes Pico. He is preceded in death by his parents and his sisters; Sylvia Morales, Rebecca Jimenez and Georgette Estrada.

He attended local schools and graduated from Santa Barbara High School. He attended San Joaquin Delta College and took courses in religion at the University of Notre Dame.

One of his first jobs was as a gardener, a skill he learned from his dad. He worked at the Poor Clares Monastery in Santa Barbara, caring for their landscaping.

In November 1952, he joined the United States Navy Reserves at San Diego, CA. In November 1956, he went active duty in the Navy and became part of Operation Hardtack on the destroyer, USS De Haven. On the De Haven, Ernie served as a cook. The De Haven was in the Pacific and traveled to Hawaii, Midway, the Bikini Islands, the Philippines, Japan and China. He was honorably discharged from the Navy in November 1960.

Ernie was blessed with talent, energy, and he had many, many friends. He was quick witted, funny, and everybody loved him. He loved meeting and helping people. He was a party person and loved to cook.

He loved to dance and began studying ballet at the DeCotta Civic Ballet school in Santa Barbara in 1962. He studied Spanish Classical and learned to play the castanets very well. He also studied Mexican Folklórico. His dance instructors were; Mrs. Evelyn DeCotta and the Tuttle sisters; Beverly, Tricia and Donna.

Ernie danced professionally with Ballet Guerrero and Los Palomos Mexican dance groups. During Santa Barbara’s Old Spanish Days Fiesta, Ernie loved

Ernie shared his love for dance with others and began teaching in 1966 – 1975 at the DeCotta Civic Ballet School. In 1975 – 1977 he taught Mexican Folklórico at La Casa de la Raza.

Ernie also worked at G.M. Delco Electronics. At Kilovac Corporation and Data Communications. He performed administrative duties and worked in the mail room.

He was a man of great faith and entered the Franciscan order in 1975 at Old Mission Santa Barbara. While in the Franciscan order and between 1979 – 1984 Ernie taught dance at Old Mission San Luis Rey Oceanside, CA. At Pala Reservation in San Diego at Old Mission San Miguel and in Oakland and Stockton, CA. He received a Nursing Assistant Certificate and worked in the infirmary at Old Mission Santa Barbara. He left the order in 1984. During the 1990s he joined the staff at Sansum Clinic in records keeping. He also worked at Costal Copy.

After retiring, he continued to dance and worked as a hospice volunteer. He studied massage therapy and became a certified Massage Therapist. He was a member of the Knights of Columbus. He was also an active member in the Native community, served on the board of the Quabajai Chumash Indian Association and volunteered countless hours bringing them food and clothing.

Ernie was diagnosed with Leukemia in 2019 and Parkinson’s in October of 2022. He lived his last months at the Health Center at Valle Verde in Santa Barbara. He delighted all who came in contact with him and continued to practice his castanets.

He is survived by several loving nieces, nephews and cousins.

A Celebration of Life will be held Friday February 3, 2023 at Old Mission Santa Barbara, 2201 Laguna St. at 11:00 AM. A reception will be held in the Friar’s Lounge immediately following the service. Ernie’s wishes for his final resting place is in the state of Idaho.

Those wishing to honor Ernie’s memory may make a donation in his name to:

The Fraternal Care Trust, Care of Old Mission Santa Barbara,

Due to recent weather related events, Dexter Goodell’s Celebration of Life scheduled for Saturday January 21, 12:30 p.m., has been relocated to:

La Cumbre Country Club 4015 Via Laguna Santa Barbara, CA 93110

Dexter John Goodell, of Santa Barbara, California, passed away at Serenity House on November 5, 2022, after a brief battle with cancer. Upon hearing his diagnosis, he stated to his children, “You need to know that I have had a fantastic life!” He celebrated his 84th birthday this year and had recently enjoyed one last adventure to Maine and Canada with a group of his friends.

Dexter was born on August 30, 1938 to Percy and Esther Goodell in Harbor City, California. After graduating from Narbonne High School, he followed his brother Jerome to Santa Barbara, initially attending Santa Barbara City College. Dexter then transferred to the University of California, Santa Barbara and received a degree in Economics in 1961.

During his time at U.C.S.B., Dexter met the great love of his life Erline Elkin. They married in 1961 and were later blessed with three children, Wendy, Delene, and Peter. Dexter and Erline shared a wonderful sense of adventure. From the early years of family camping trips, to traveling to the far corners of the globe, they certainly experienced much that this world has to offer.

After graduation, Dexter landed his first job selling insurance for Allstate, which enabled

him to move back to Santa Barbara. Throughout the years, his many business ventures only served to deepen his connection to the Santa Barbara community. His ability to identify unique opportunities, coupled with his gregarious personality, were key in building the businesses that enabled him to provide for his family as well as those of his investors. In the 1990s, Dexter started Goodell Packing Corporation and was honored to serve numerous years on the Board of Directors of both Sunkist Growers and Fruit Growers Supply Company. In the early 2000s, Dexter “retired” and traveled extensively with his life-long love, Erline. After Erline’s passing in 2016, Dexter continued his exploration of the world with multiple trips domestically and abroad, with memorable weeks spent with “the crew” in Costa Rica!!

During his over sixty years in Santa Barbara, Dexter ran in numerous circles; the early days were spent at the “Y” with the handball players. He also enjoyed racing and the companionship of his Santa Barbara Yacht Club crew, achieving the role of Commodore in 1989. In his next chapter he enjoyed playing golf and cards with his friends at La Cumbre Country Club, where he served as President of the Club as well. Never one to sit idle, Dexter recently began playing bridge through the Santa Barbara Bridge Center.

Dexter was predeceased by Erline, his parents, and his brothers Bruce and Jerome. He is survived by his children Wendy, Delene, and Peter (& Laura), and by he and Erline’s eight grandchildren: Tanner, Austin, Erin, Parker, Elise, Allison, Travis, and Ames. As one of his grandkids stated, “Grandpa wasn’t just there for all of our activities, he was present for each of us and always there when we needed him most. He was a guiding force in all of our lives.”

We would like to thank Dexter’s caregivers and VNA Hospice for ensuring that Dexter’s final days were comfortable.

A Celebration of Dexter’s Life will be held on January 21st, 2023, at 12:30 p.m. at the Santa Barbara Yacht Club.

Dexter and Erline supported the following local organizations and if you are interested, your support in their memory would be greatly appreciated:

– Santa Barbara Scholarship Foundation – The Goodell Family

Scholarship Fund – https://www. sbscholarship.org/donate/ – VNA Health Foundation –https://vna.health/ways-to-give/ – U.C.S.B Promise Scholars Engagement Fund – https://giving.ucsb.edu/Funds/Give?id=359 – Santa Barbara Yacht Club Youth Foundation – https://sbysf. org/donate

Steven Anthony Ybarra

2/19/1971 - 12/6/2022

Steven Ybarra passed on 12/6/2022 at the age of 51.

Steven Anthony Ybarra was born in Santa Barbara, CA to Armando and Virginia Ybarra on February 19, 1971.

Most of Steven’s life was spent on the Eastside of Santa Barbara, being a student at Franklin Elementary, La Colina Jr High and Santa Barbara High School where he excelled in studies and football, playing defense for the SB Dons.

Steven was a member of IBEW Local Union 413 working as an electrician for 25 years.

Steven’s love language was cracking jokes about you or with you. He loved to party and the music had to be loud. He was best friend to many, known to everyone as DeNiro.

Steven was preceded into death by his mother Virginia Louise Limon and stepfather, Joe F Limon and father Armando Ybarra.

He leaves behind his sister, Jennifer Ybarra, his brother Marcos and sister Sara Ybarra and nephews Hector and Jesse Valadez, Aaron Gonzalez, neices Diana and Sophie Ybarra.

Services are planned at Oak Park on January 21, 2023 at 1:00 p.m. All friends and family are welcome for our celebration of his life. He will be missed by all that knew and loved him.

14 THE INDEPENDENT JANUARY 19, 2023 INDEPENDENT.COM
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Dexter John Goodell 8/30/1938 - 11/5/2022

5/9/1929 - 11/22/2022

nia. In lieu of flowers a donation in Paul’s name may be made to: The Aly Christiansen Memorial Scholarship c/o Bishop Manogue High School

110 Bishop Manogue Drive Reno, Nevada. 89511

12/31/1995 - 1/9/2023

Paul E. Christiansen passed away November 22, 2022 in La Quinta, California. Paul was born May 9, 1929 to Everett and Esther Christiansen in Des Moines, Iowa. Paul attended Catholic schools in Des Moines and Ellsworth College. After his military service, he earned his BA degree in economics from UCSB in 1956.

While serving in the US Air Force in the Panama Canal Zone, Paul met Marie Rios, his lifelong friend and companion. They were married on September 12, 1952.

Paul and Marie moved back to Santa Barbara to raise their family. Paul started his professional career with Metropolitan Life Insurance. Later, he became a general insurance broker serving Santa Barbara for over 30 years until his retirement. Paul and Marie enjoyed traveling all over the world – Mexico, Egypt, Europe, the Holy Land and their favorite destination, Scandinavia.

Paul and Marie were proud parishioners of St. Raphael’s Catholic Church. Paul was a member of the Knights of Columbus for 25 years serving as Grand Knight in 1965. Paul was a fantastic husband, dad, grandfather and great-grandfather. Best of all, he was a kind and caring man. He always had a joke or a story for you and was there to help and support whenever he was needed. Everyone who met Paul said the same thing to his family: “What a good guy!”

Paul was proceeded in death by his parents Everett and Esther Christiansen, his step-father John Bridenstine, his wife Marie, his brother-in-law David Rios, and his granddaughter Alyson Christiansen. He is survived by his son, David Christiansen (Kris), his daughter Cathy Wagner (David), and his niece Suzanne Rios Johnson (Hadley). He is also survived by his grandchildren Nicholas Christiansen, Jacquelyn Sinclair (Tommy), Jillyn Wagner, Brian Wagner (Autumn), JT Sampson, Alex Sampson, Sarah Roukey (Chad), and great-grandsons Hayden Sinclair and Zeke Sinclair.

A funeral mass will be held Thursday, January 26, 2023 at 10:00 am at St. Raphael’s Catholic Church in Santa Barbara, Califor-

Tommy Soto, CPA, son, brother, musician & friend; a talented and loving soul, passed away Monday, January 9, 2023 at the age of 27 following a 4 year battle with a rare form of cancer (metastatic myxoid liposarcoma).

Tommy was born on December 31, 1995 in Santa Barbara and is survived by his parents Edward and Sarah Soto and his brother Michael Soto.

He and his girlfriend of 7 years, Maddy Hahn, shared big plans for their future and together faced the daunting diagnosis and treatment.

We invite you to read about Tommy and share stories on the McDermott-Crockett remembrance page here: https:// mcdermottcrockett.com/tribute/ details/309661/Thomas-Soto/condolences.html#content-start

Funeral Mass Thursday, January 19th, 2023, 10:30 A.M. San Roque Catholic Church 325 Argonne Circle in Santa Barbara Interment Immediately Following Mass, Santa Barbara Cemetery, 901 Channel Drive Santa Barbara

A Celebration of life will take place 6-10 p.m. Friday, Jan. 20 at Old Town Coffee, 5877 Hollister Ave., Goleta.

In lieu of flowers, a scholarship has been created in Tommy’s name.

Please donate to The Santa Barbara Scholarship Foundation, https://sfsb.ejoinme. org/MyPages/DonationPage/ tabid/221420/Default.aspx. Please be sure to include Tommy’s name.

Dr. David Wallace Bohn was born October 9, 1930, to Ben and Bertha Bohn in Milbank, South Dakota. He was one of nine brothers and sisters and a devoted family man. With the assistance of his siblings, he was able to graduate from South Dakota State, Pittsburg University, and ultimately Northwestern University Dental School where he specialized in Orthodontics. During the Korean War David served as a Captain for the US Army.

Upon his graduation from Northwestern, David married Mary Joan Sawyer in 1956. Together they traveled across the country to California where they chose to settle down in Santa Barbara, start his Orthodontics practice, and raise their three children, Debi, Lori, and Jeff.

David was a humble, loving man who would take the time to talk with anyone (especially if they were at Starbucks!) and help anyone in need. He was also an avid outdoorsman who loved to travel, golf, sail, bird watch, hike, hunt, alpine ski, backpack, and fish.

David practiced Orthodontics in Santa Barbara for over 40 years and was very active in his community. He served on the Boards for the Santa Barbara Cancer Foundation, the Santa Barbara Symphony, La Cumbre Country Club, and was a proud supporter of the UCSB Athletic Foundation and Flying Doctors of America. David loved to sing, and you would sometimes catch him alone singing a church hymn. He was a member at St. Andrews Presbyterian Church and loved to sing in the church choir.

David passed peacefully with his family at Heritage House. He is survived by his son Jeffrey and daughter Lorine; grandchildren Taylor Schulte, Trevor Goetz, Austin and Alexander Bohn; and great grandchildren Sawyer, Sutton, and Cece Schulte.

A memorial service will be held Friday January 20th at 10:00 AM at St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church, 4575 Auhay Dr., Santa Barbara, CA 93110. In lieu of flowers, his wishes were to have

Karim Chhibbane

3/16/1958 - 12/24/2022

loved his people hard.

We loved him more then he knew. He was always such an example of strength and bravery to live his life the way he wanted to regardless of what life handed him.

Rest in peace Ricky

I wish I could have seen mom and dads face in heaven when you walked to them.

It is with great sadness that i write this obitionary of my close friend & little brother Karim Chhibbane also known to many of you as “chef karim.” I first met him at a party at the American school in Marrakech, Morocco in 1980. We became friends immediately. He had the finest carpets in the souk. I bough so many of his special pieces & still treasure them. So, at first i brought him to the island of ibiza where i was living where he cooked his amazing cous cous. Then we drove from barcelona to amsterdam where he walked everyday just meeting & talking to people. Then to california & finally santa barbara & “chef karims.” He was a amazing chef. Unfortunately he passed away at 64 years of age. He was a very special person & we will miss him greatly. We send him our love.

Michael Shapiro

11/1/1953 - 1/5/2023

Preceded in death by his Mother, Father and brother David Ricky leaves behind his two brothers Larry (Adriana) and Danny (Lorraine). Ricky also leaves behind his nephews Larry JR (Amy), Jonathan(Alisha) and nieces Deanna(Sergio), Christina(Paul)and Chrystal (Trung)

Services will be held at Saint Raphael’s Church in Goleta on Monday January 23 at 10am

Erna Kraemer

7/13/1934 - 12/23/2022

Carl Ricky passed on January 5, 2023 at 69.

Ricky was born in Santa Barbara to Carl and Esperanza ( Vasquez) Urzua of Goleta Beloved brother, uncle, cousin and friend.

Ricky was the most “live your life out loud” that you can get. Even to the point of telling you exactly how he felt or what he thought yet with love.

Ricky was also a man who laughed a lot. Not just a laugh but a throw your head back in laughter. He was also known to make you laugh as well. Often messing around with his brothers and family No one was safe from his pranks and a swing of his crutches He was also a gentle giant. He

Erna was reunited with the love of her life on December 23, 2022.  Her beloved husband of 58 years, Richard, who died in 2015.  She was born in 1934 to Erwin & Marie, in Sheboygan, WI.  She attended Central High School in Sheboygan and then continued her education at Columbia Hospital for Nursing in Milwaukee, WI, graduating in 1955.  She married Richard in 1957 and they moved to Milwaukee.

As soon as she had her first child in, 1959, she was a stay at home mom.  She excelled in every traditional skill of a “homemaker”.  She kept a meticulous house and prepared incredible meals and desserts for her family.  Her hobbies were sewing, reading, bowling, and volunteering for many charities and organizations.

She is survived by her sister Irmgard of Sheboygan, WI, sisterin-law Kathy from Waukesha, WI, her three children: Doug (Sue) of Goleta, CA, Kris (Eric) of Kingwood, TX and Terry (Matt) of Santa Barbara, CA, seven grandchildren: Josh, Brett (Sandy), Daniel (Whitney), Colleen (Rick), Andrew, Jimmy and Anna and two great-grandchildren: Emerson and Richard.

Old Mission Santa Barbara; January 21, 2023 at 1:00 pm.

INDEPENDENT.COM JANUARY 19, 2023 THE INDEPENDENT 15
To submit obituaries for publication, please call (805) 965-5205 or email obits@independent.com
obituaries
Paul E. Christiansen David Wallace Bohn 10/9/1930 - 1/5/2023 donations sent to St. Andrew’s Presbyterian Church or to Santa Barbara Cancer Foundation.
16 THE INDEPENDENT JANUARY 19, 2023 INDEPENDENT.COM FOLLOW US ON FACEBOOK @sbindependent FOLLOW US ON INSTAGRAM @sbindependent FOLLOW US ON TWITTER @sbindynews STAY CONNECTED EXHIBITIONS OPENING SOON Scenes from a Marriage: Ed & Nancy Kienholz Opens January 29 The Iconography of Dread: Symbolism to Surrealism Opens January 29 For more exhibitions and events, visit www.sbma.net. 1130 State Street, Santa Barbara, CA Tuesday–Sunday 11 am–5 pm • Thursday 11 am–8 pm Get advance tickets at tickets.sbma.net.
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Bill was my Tall friend at least three inches taller than me when we met 15 years ago. He got shorter and weighed less during the last six months in his battle with leukemia. Up ’til then, he had never been in the hospital nor taken any meds. He stood tall, but never looked down on anyone.

Bill was my Retired friend. We did not know each other in our professional lives, nor as wage earners, nor as active parents of young children. Though we talked about kids and grandkids frequently, we shared interests well beyond golf. That meant that walking and driving together was often more fun than trying to get the little white ball in the darned hole. As avid readers of the New York Times, we frequently tried to help each other form educated opinions, criticize political antics, and express chagrin at the state of our nation and the world around us. Bill was a student of history and enjoyed the widest range of subjects from arts to theater to business to travel to sports. We joked about Yale, but he was no snob especially loving messy hot dogs and loyally following his Cincinnati Reds.

Bill was an Attorney, though not my attorney. He practiced in Los Angeles for 37 years before retiring and moving to Santa Barbara in 2008. He volunteered for the Alternatives to Violence Project at Lompoc federal prison, where he introduced the program into the federal prison system in California. He was beloved and valued by the incarcerated individuals he worked with.

Bill was my Close friend. He had a wide smile of a grin. For years, it felt like he reserved it for me, but I discovered that he shared his warmth and

friendliness with others. Maureen Murdock was the love of his life, so the fact that she and my wife developed their own close friendship enhanced ours, too. The four of us met in person or on Zoom almost every Sunday since the beginning of COVID. Good food, good drink, good times. Shared intimacy of the highest order.

Bill was my Classiest friend. His zest for life pushed my wardrobe. I never wore a tux like he did, but I was always a little less sloppily dressed when he showed up with a jaunty cap or a bow tie. He danced and crooned and smiled at every opportunity. I learned to count on him for that, too.

Bill invented the three-inch rule, which I have incorporated into my life to overcome adversity. We occasionally failed to hit a golf ball the way we wanted. When that happened, he would drop his left shoulder an inch, move his hands forward one inch, and move his right foot back one inch. Miraculously, this worked almost every time. As Bill explained it, when things aren’t going the way you want, stop repeating what you’ve been doing. Instead make small adjustments it’s the little things that count.

And so, to honor my friend, Bill, I will always lean a little to the left, extend a helping hand, and do whatever is needed to achieve more balance in my life. I will always look up to Bill. He will be my Tall friend, forever.

In memory of Bill Dial, donations can be made to the Santa Barbara Alternatives to Violence Project, PO Box 3294, S.B., CA 93130, or sbavp.org; and to Cottage Hospital, cottagehealth.org, whose nursing staff — all of them, but especially Harmony Dante — helped Bill and his family so much during the last three weeks of his life. n

Join Santa Barbara Public Library and the SantaBarbaraIndependent for a Book Club Extravaganza! Hear from SBPL librarians about the new, upcoming Book Club in a Bag sets and get early access to the holds list, learn about the Library’s book club picks for Fiction, Crime, and Romance as well as special book club discussions happening throughout the year. Mix and mingle with other readers, get personalized recommendations for books your book club will love from SBPL librarians, and check out books from the Library on the Go van.

INDEPENDENT.COM JANUARY 19, 2023 THE INDEPENDENT 17 In Memoriam
Bill
It’s
COURTESY PHOTOS
Dial 1940-2023
the Little Things That Count
Joel Altschul (left) and Bill Dial
TUESDAY, JANUARY31,6PM @ SB BIERGARTEN 11 Anacapa St. (in the Funk Zone!) Book Club Extravaganza Book Club Extravaganza JENNIE K. WELSH MEDIATION welshmediation.com (805) 259-8097

An Evening with Amor Towles

Thu, Feb 2 / 7:30 PM

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Through his evocative, absorbing novels including Rules of Civility, A Gentleman in Moscow and The Lincoln Highway, Amor Towles has become a critical favorite and a popular success.

Nina Totenberg

Dinners with Ruth: The Power of Friendships

Tue, Feb 7 / 7:30 PM / Granada Theatre

“Outsiders think of Washington as a place of poisonous rivalries, not deep friendships. Nina Totenberg knows differently.”

– Ruth Marcus, editorial page editor, Washington Post Event Sponsor: Sara Miller McCune

Thu, Feb 23 / 7:30 PM / UCSB Campbell Hall

FREE (registration recommended)

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Dr. Ainissa Ramirez promotes a love of exploration, making complex scientific processes both clear and mesmerizing to just about everyone while showcasing the scientific impact of people of color and women whose accomplishments have been hidden.

Presented in association with the UCSB Office of Diversity, Equity, and Inclusion

Presented in association with the Santa Barbara County Bar Association and Santa Barbara Women Lawyers (805) 893-3535

18 THE INDEPENDENT JANUARY 19, 2023 INDEPENDENT.COM
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Post-Operatic Garden of Idealistic Delights

School. “Sing!” singers have already graced major stages in town, with the Santa Barbara Symphony and the Santa Barbara Choral Society, but EDEN represents their highest-profile gig yet.

Over her holiday break, between the close of and the relaunch of her EDEN touring, DiDonato kindly consented to an interview. It has been edited for length and clarity. For a fuller interview, see Independent.com

In the life and career trajectory of an operatic singer even those with a reputation for adventurous repertoire parameters of the profession are, by definition, fairly nar row. There will be operas. There will be recitals. There may be crossover projects and other specialty items in the margins. End of story, more or less.

Such an entrenched profile has largely gov erned the stellar career of American mezzosoprano Joyce DiDonato, in the midst of a life in the upper echelon of operatic/recital worlds. But some thing new and uniquely ambitious has come into being within the past year, in the form of her conceptual project known as EDEN, being brought to The Granada Theatre on Tuesday, January 24, by the co-commissioning body, UCSB Arts and Lectures.

It was in the Granada, in fact, that DiDonato made her Santa Barbara debut back in 2018, with a stirringly fine recital. The program demonstrated her innate versatility, ranging from Handel to Rossini and Ravel, with a touching “Over the Rainbow” in honor of her Kansas roots. That versatility both expands and gains a fresh conceptual cohesion with EDEN, whose musical tapestry courses across centuries, from Gluck and Handel to Mahler, Charles Ives, and a newly commissioned, musical-theater-like song by film composer Rachel Portman. Stirred into the concept are elements of theater, movement, lighting, and the early music ensemble Il Pomo d’Oro.

EDEN, the album, was released last February and began its touring life last March, with breaks for DiDonato’s strong, ongoing opera performance schedule. The latest operatic sensation in her storied career was her role in the Metropolitan Opera’s production of Kevin Puts’s adaptation of Michael Cunningham’s novel The Hours, with DiDonato portraying a seminal modernist with a vision of her own Virginia Woolf alongside formidable co-stars Renée Fleming and Kelli O’Hara.

Eminent critic Alex Ross, in his New Yorker review in December, questioned the musical content of the piece but was thrilled by DiDonato’s work: “The Hours is still worth seeing for its formidable cast above all, for Joyce DiDonato. The increasingly incomparable mezzo-soprano delivers an astonishing physical impersonation of Woolf, her body language hunched, flinching, but determined: Several times, I had to remind myself who was onstage. DiDonato was last seen at the Met in the flittering, devious title role of Handel’s Agrippina. In The Hours, she adopts a drastically different vocal persona, unleashing foghorn tones in her lower range and searchlight timbres on top.”

Demonstrating still further versatility, DiDonato’s grand project EDEN veers away from tradition in various ways, including the act of giving seed packets to each audience member. The gesture imparts literal and symbolic references to growth and renewal, in a work deeply imbued with ecological and humanistic themes.

In another significant aspect of the presentation, DiDonato has been enlisting children’s choral groups in each city she visits. The Santa Barbara stop features members of the Music Academy of the West–sponsored Sing! program, along with the group Outburst from La Colina Junior High

Is this an exciting moment, on the verge of taking your brainchild back out on the road? I can’t tell you how much I’m looking forward to seeing how EDEN has evolved since we launched her about 10 months ago. It’s a huge undertaking, and one that you never know will truly work until you put it in front of an audience so you can imagine the elation when we felt the tremendous reception.

This is a project, I’m finding, that simply picks up steam and energy as it goes from city to city, so I know it will be something even richer, with more impact than ever

Congratulations on the success of The Hours at the Met. Has the interest in an opera based on Virginia Woolf taken you by surprise? I don’t know if I had a specific expectation. As with any new work, you’re nervous and hopeful, but the verdict remains out until the audience arrives. However, with this piece, from the first rehearsal, it was clear to me that there would be a big emotional impact. I was so overwhelmed to feel such a heartfelt reaction, but more than that, a sense of true solace and comfort that came from this story being sung.

People felt seen and understood, particularly coming out of the challenges of this pandemic. It was an incredibly auspicious, well-timed arrival.

EDEN comes with a strong reputation preceding it, including a Grammy nomination for the album. Can you trace the seeds, so to speak, of how it came into being? I feel that EDEN is really the culmination of my entire career four centuries of music, opera and song, theater, and a strong character/narrative. Perhaps I’ve been working toward this my whole life?

I have always had a strong compulsion to tie what happens on the stage to everyday life, and sometimes in opera we can miss that connection. In developing this project, I began wanting very much to speak about the climate, but EDEN has taken me on a course that seems to embrace the idea of connection more: connection to each other, and to the world around us, but a true connection to ourselves.

INDEPENDENT.COM JANUARY 19, 2023 THE INDEPENDENT 19 COVER STORY
Acclaimed Mezzo-Soprano Joyce DiDonato Returns to Santa Barbara with her Ambitious, Multimedia, Multi-Period Concept Work EDEN
cover
continued »
story
Joyce DiDonato is a colorful performer by any measure.

As I continue learning from this journey, I realize that without a direct connection to the world around us, we will never, ever take care of it. I want EDEN to remind people, or to awaken within them the memory or the realization that we are all connected in the vastness and wonder of nature. That’s all. [Laughs.]

Can you point to past precedents and influences on the project? I feel we flew completely solo on this one. I did pull on the project, In War and Peace, which we did a few years ago, but this project feels quite unique. I think the key was to simply give ourselves permission to let it be whatever it felt it needed to be. With that freedom, we can link music together that perhaps has been off-limits, but I’m finding it helps me hear it all in a completely new and wonderful light.

Woven into the piece is a strong environmental concern and climate crisis awareness. Is this message vital to its mission statement? I would say it is the ambition of EDEN, absolutely. Music lovers garner so much peace and solace from a great concert, but many times that experience stays in the theater, and in their memory. But I find this music so compelling and inspiring, that I think it’s possible the audience can actually begin to imagine that change is truly tangible. And with a strong invitation, and the support of their fellow concertgoers, perhaps they will have the tools to engage and connect a bit more radically when they return home.

You open with Ives’s iconic “The Unanswered Question” with your voice carrying that

haunting four-note motif and resolve with the uplifting contemporary “Seeds of Hope.” Did you envision EDEN almost in narrative terms, working its way to that particular climax? I absolutely did. It begins with a question, and the journey starts in Rachel Portman’s transportive “The First Morning of the World,” and the audience is carried along in this search for understanding. I think many people today certainly since the start of the 21st century are questioning things more aggressively and urgently than ever before. EDEN reflects that but offers a pathway toward hope. As we know, without hope, none of us will act. So perhaps the most valuable seed we offer the audience is one of hope. If I do that, then I’m elated.

You have a natural depth in Handel and Gluck, and your version of Mahler’s “Ich bin der Welt abhanden gekommen” (“I Have Been Lost to the World”) is emotionally gripping in a very different way. Was that a critical component in the program? We knew two things when we started: We would begin with “The Unanswered Question,” and we would end with the Mahler. I find that masterpiece oddly uplifting, for I think it’s the place we all are destined to arrive. It’s an arrival point of wisdom where we finally understand what is lasting and important. If we get that understanding, we live our lives differently.

You incorporate youth chorus elements into the performances, including, in Santa Barbara, the Sing! program. Was it important for you to connect with young musicians

20 THE INDEPENDENT JANUARY 19, 2023 INDEPENDENT.COM
cover story
MELLE MEIVOGEL A dynamic fusion of music, movement, theater, and climate activism, Joyce DiDonato’s EDEN comes to the Granada on January 24.

here especially on a project about hope for the future? It was everything. I am not quite sure how the idea arrived, so in a way I think it was always destined to be.

On a quite literal level, I feel we are passing on the seeds of music and sharing your voice with the world, and I can’t think of a more empowering gift to leave behind. I’m keenly aware of the resources involved in a tour, and looking toward sustainability and impact, I wanted to leave behind something living. And I can tell you, after working with nearly 800 children across 20 cities so far, the impact is real.

It has been a highlight of my career interacting with these amazing children. My hope is that more performing arts organizations and touring artists will include local musicians and kids in their projects.

Are you interested in breaking through to new blends of audiences with EDEN, maybe to intrigue those who wouldn’t normally tune into the still-fairly specialized world of opera, for instance? I think because EDEN is

also a highly theatrical experience, anyone can attend and have a big experience. One of my favorite parts of this project is that we always try to have the children’s choir sit in the hall to experience the piece. Without fail, they love it. And you can’t fool kids! I think it’s an incredible model for building new audiences and performers: Get them front and center to feel the power of music unfolding all around them.

Do you view this as a particularly rich period in the span of your musical life? I have a hard time articulating how fortunate I feel, and how grateful I am for what I am able to do today. I can look at certain achievements (awards, recordings, etc.), but in truth, things like singing with the children around the world, and seeing them connect to the power of music and their voice? That feels like the pinnacle to me.

INDEPENDENT.COM JANUARY 19, 2023 THE INDEPENDENT 21
COVERCOVERSTORYSTORY ZACH MENDEZ PHOTOS
from The Music
in EDEN SANTA BARBARA’S PROFESSIONAL THEATER COMPANY ON STAGE FEBRUARY 2-19 “ discover the gut-punch power of this play” — THEATREMANIA etcsb.org Box Office: 805.965.5400 BY
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Tickets starting at $40! ENTREPRENEURS AND SMALL BUSINESS OWNERS Get the skills, training and assistance you and your employees need — at SBCC School of Extended Learning, in partnership with EDC’s Small Business Development Center! Short classes and workshops • QuickBooks® & Accounting • MS Word, Excel & Powerpoint • Leadership Skills • Entrepreneurship Certificate • Bilingual Computer Skills • In-person and Zoom options! Expert advisors and resources • Start-up Assistance • Business Planning • Marketing & Branding • E-Commerce & Social Media • Finance & Capital Access • NEW! Satellite centers at Wake and Schott campuses! NO-COST TRAINING AND ASSISTANCE! GET STARTED TODAY! (805) 898-8160 sbcc.edu/smallbiz The Economic Development Collaborative hosts the Small Business Development Center and is funded in part through a cooperative agreement with the U.S. Small Business Administration and a Grant with the Governor’s Office of Economic Development. SBCC School of Extended Learning Adult High School and GED, Career Skills, and English as a Second Language programs are made possible in part by the Santa Barbara Adult Education Consortium. IT’S A NEW YEAR. TIME TO GET TO BUSINESS! IT’S A NEW YEAR. TIME TO GET TO BUSINESS!
Joyce DiDonato will perform EDEN at The Granada Theatre (1214 State St.) Tuesday, January 24, at 7 p.m. See granadasb.org.
Young performers
Academy’s Sing! program rehearse for their roles
Sylvia Khoury
Nike Doukas

1:20, 4:20, 7:20.

of Inisherin (R): Fri-Thur: 4:45, 7:30. Puss in Boots (PG): Fri: 2:45, 5:15, 7:45. Sat/Sun:12:15, 2:45, 5:15, 7:45. Mon-Thur: 1:40, 4:30, 7:00. The Whale (R): Fri, Mon-Thur: 2:00. Sat/Sun: 1:45.

Avatar Way of Water (PG13): Fri-Thur: 1:30/3D, 4:15, 5:30/3D, 8:15/3D.

M3GAN (PG13): Fri/Sat: 1:20, 2:30, 3:50, 5:15, 6:40, 8:00, 9:10. Sun-Thur: 1:20, 2:30, 3:50, 5:15, 6:40, 8:00.

Plane (R): Fri-Sun: 1:30, 4:05, 6:45, 9:20. Mon-Thur: 3:00, 5:45, 8:20.

M3GAN (PG13): Fri-Sun: 1:15, 2:15, 4:45, 7:15, 9:45. Mon-Thur: 1:15, 2:20, 5:05, 7:45.

Avatar Way of Water* (PG13): Fri-Sun: 1:00, 2:30/3D, 4:00, 5:00/3D, 6:30/3D, 8:00, 9:00/3D. Mon-Wed: 1:00, 2:30/3D, 4:00, 5:00, 6:30/3D, 8:00. Thur: 1:00, 2:30/3D, 4:00, 6:30/3D, 8:00.

MISSING* (PG13): Fri-Sun: 1:40, 4:20, 7:00, 9:40. Mon-Thur: 2:45, 5:20, 8:10.

Plane (R): Fri, Mon-Thur: 5:15, 7:50. Sat/Sun: 12:05, 2:40, 5:15, 7:50.

House Party (R): Fri, Mon-Thur: 5:45, 8:15. Sat/Sun: 12:45, 3:15, 5:45, 8:15.

Puss in Boots (PG): Fri, Mon-Thur: 5:00, 7:30. Sat/Sun: 12:00, 2:30, 5:00, 7:30.

MISSING* (PG13): Fri, Mon-Thur: 4:50, 7:40. Sat/Sun: 2:00, 4:50, 7:40.

Eveything Everywhere... (PG13): Fri, Mon-Thur: 4:40, 8:00. Sat/Sun: 1:30, 4:40, 8:00.

The Whale (R): Fri, Mon-Thur : 4:45, 7:30. Sat/Sun: 1:30, 4:45, 7:30.

The Son* (PG13): Fri, Mon-Thur: 4:20, 7:15. Sat/Sun: 1:45, 4:20, 7:15.

Avatar Way of Water (PG13): Fri-Thur: 3:00, 7:00.

22 THE INDEPENDENT JANUARY 19, 2023 INDEPENDENT.COM Sign up at independent.com/newsletters A snapshot view of the best of local culture and fun happenings in the worlds of music, theater, visual art, film, dance, books, lectures, and more from Culture Editor Leslie Dinaberg JORGE LOSADA 225 N FAIRVIEW AVE GOLETA 805-683-3800 FAIRVIEW METRO 4 618 STATE STREET SANTA BARBARA 805-965-7684 LP = Laser Projection FIESTA 5 916 STATE STREET SANTA BARBARA 805-963-0455 The Arlington Theatre PASEO NUEVO 8 WEST DE LA GUERRA STREET SANTA BARBARA 805-965-7451 A Man Called
371 South
SANTA
Otto (PG13): Fri-Thur:
Banshees
HITCHCOCK
Hitchcock Way
BARBARA 805-682-6512
Schedule subject to change. Please visit metrotheatres.com for theater updates. Thank you. Features and Showtimes for Jan 20 - 26, 2023 * = Subject to Restrictions on “SILVER MVP PASSES; and No Passes” www.metrotheatres.com
7040 MARKETPLACE DR GOLETA 805-688-4140
CAMINO REAL
ARLINGTON 1317 STATE STREET SANTA BARBARA 805-963-9580
Fri,
Thur 1/26: Advance Preview MISSING THE SON EVERYTHING EVERYWHERE... INFINITY POOL Fri 1/20 Special Event: Now On-Sale 2/2 & 2/3: Fiesta THE CHOSEN SEASON 3: FINALE
In nity Pool* (R): Thur: 8:30. A Man Called Otto (PG13):
Mon-Thur: 4:30, 7:30. Sat/Sun: 1:30, 4:30, 7:30. Babylon (R): Fri-Thur: 7:40. Black Panther: Wakanda Forever (PG13): Fri-Thur: 4:10. The Fabelmans (PG13): Fri, Tue-Thur: 4:10, 7:20. Sat-Mon: 12:40, 4:10, 7:20 The Banshees of Inisherin (R): Fri, Mon-Thur: 8:00, Sat/Sun: 2:00, 8:00. Holy Spider (NR): Fri, Mon-Wed: 5:05, 7:50. Thur: 5:05. Sat/Sun: 1:25, 5:05. 7:50. In nity Pool *(R): Thur: 7:50.

Giving Back to the Community That Made Them

It was another friend from San Marcos CommUnify’s Chief Development Officer Julie Weiner who got fellow Royals Edwards and Huffman to come home to support this worthy cause. “I think when you get to our age, you realize how important it is that you know that we are villages, and these guys need help,” says Edwards, who spends much of his time as the board chair of the nonprofit 1in6, helping other survivors of male sexual abuse or assault. “We were served through the theater, but CommUnify is serving lower-income children and families with challenges economically, and medically, and all the things that go along with not being wealthy in this country. And it’s really important.”

Whether we like to admit it or not, Santa Barbara has become a community of haves and have-nots. Thankfully, we’re also a very generous community for more than 8,000 of our neighbors, the services provided by the nonprofit CommUnify represent the difference between living a life of stability and struggling with constant uncertainty.

Formed in 1964 as the Community Action Commission of Santa Barbara County, and designed to address the causes and conditions of poverty, CommUnify is now one of the county’s largest nonprofits. They work mostly under the radar providing a myriad of services, the most recognizable of which is Head Start and Early Head Start programs for low-income families.

These programs are sustained by a combination of grants from foundations and the government, and individual giving which is where this inaugural fundraising event comes in.

Off the Record: An Intimate Conversation with Anthony Edwards and Cady Huffman promises to be an entertaining and inspiring night with two of Santa Barbara’s homegrown thespians. Edwards, whose list of screen credits is longer than a CVS receipt, is probably best known for playing Goose in the original Top Gun and starring in the long-running TV series ER; while Huffman won a Tony Award for her sexy role as Ulla in The Producers and was nominated for her role in The Will Rogers Follies on Broadway.

On Saturday, February 4, Dante Di Loreto (another local success story; he’s the producer of Glee and American Horror Story) will moderate a cozy conversation with Huffman and his pal Edwards (they met as kids, performing in a professional production of Our Town at the Lobero), followed by an even more intimate dinner for donors at the El Encanto.

Growing up as a “theater kid” in Santa Barbara in the 1970s gave Edwards lots of opportunities to perform and hone his craft. “I probably had done 25 shows by the time I got out of high school,” he says of his time at USC. “People were going to college as theater majors, having done two shows. That’s why I felt super fortunate to have come out of Santa Barbara.”

Huffman also says that by the time she got to Broadway, she knew everything she needed to be a professional performer.

“Apparently, from the moment I exited the womb I was dancing around, and my mom put me into a workshop when I was 6.” She laughs, “We did The Pied Piper of Hamelin. I had one line; I think I said, ‘Here they come.’ And I got my picture in the newspaper. And I said, ‘Well, I think I want to do this.’”

At age 7, she started ballet classes, and she started training for opera at age 9. “It just sort of went on from there. I just found my people and found what I loved,” says Huffman. “And I was very fortunate to have teachers who saw something in me, and even when we couldn’t afford ballet classes, I would clean the studio to pay for them, and just made sure that I could always do it.”

There was so much great theater going on in town in those days. “If you grew up in Indiana, you were into basketball,” says Edwards. “When I was a kid in the ’70s in Santa Barbara, it was like theater central. There was so much going on with Youth Theater, and all the arts programs in junior high and high school. … I feel that I was just kind of like, in the right place at the right time. The theater was an incredible place of acceptance for everybody.”

It was Edwards, in fact, as the lead donor in the renovation of the theater at Santa Barbara Junior High, who named it the Marjorie Luke Theatre to honor the teacher who gave him such a great foundation. He also points to teachers like Jack Nakano and Rick Mokler as examples from that era. “Wherever you were in the community, you’ve had access to really great teachers.”

And when did he know that being an actor would become his career? “It actually started becoming a career at 16. I was obsessed with it; I just didn’t think that I would do anything else, because I just loved it so much,” says Edwards, who started booking commercials at that point. He hit the big screen in 1982 with a small role as one of Sean Penn’s stoner buddies in

“Part of being in the Broadway community is helping out; it’s just something we do,” says Huffman. “It’s a no-brainer. It’s a great organization. There’s no reason not to. And I love Santa Barbara and I love the community of Santa Barbara and I’d love to strengthen it in any way I can. These are the easy choices to make.”

Di Loreto, who recently moved back to town with his partner, Nathan, and twin sons, says, “As soon as I learned about the organization, I was really deeply moved. It’s a privilege to be able to live back in this community, and coming back here, the one thing I want to make sure I make a priority is finding ways to be supportive of the community. And particularly recognizing the range of needs here.”

Off the Record: An Intimate Conversation with Anthony Edwards and Cady Huffman promises to be a unique and lively evening Huffman, who is currently performing as Mae West in the show Dirty Blonde, promises she’ll be “packing my ukulele and always eager to belt out a song.” Guests will hear about their career ups and downs and adventures in Hollywood and on Broadway, the challenges and joys of creating a life in the arts, and of course, the importance of community all in the name of a very good cause.

“The idea, which is nice, is to bridge that gap, because we seem to be a society that is separating, and we need to do the opposite,” says Edwards. “But we can only do that by sharing stories and experiences, and that’s why it’s more than just writing a check it’s actually participating.”

Off the Record: An Intimate Conversation with Anthony Edwards and Cady Huffman takes place on Saturday, February 4, at the Belmond El Encanto (800 Alvarado Pl.), and offers limited seating with two levels of tickets available: the conversation, including the moderated presentation and light refreshments beginning at 4 p.m.; and a private dinner with the stars, beginning at 6 p.m. For more information or to purchase tickets, visit communifysb.org.

INDEPENDENT.COM JANUARY 19, 2023 THE INDEPENDENT 23
Fast Times at Ridgemont High (hilariously, Penn’s other stoner buddy in the movie is Edwards’s real-life San Marcos High School theater buddy Eric Stoltz). UNIVERSAL STUDIOS Cady Huffman and Kim Rozenfeld in the San Marcos High production of Oliver! CADY HUFFMAN
Actors Anthony Edwards and Cady Huffman Come Together for CommUnify
Anthony Edwards, at right, with fellow San Marcos High alum Eric Stoltz, left, and Sean Penn in Fast Times at Ridgemont High
community feature
24 THE INDEPENDENT JANUARY 19, 2023 INDEPENDENT.COM The Angry Poodle Sign up at independent.com/newsletters Start your weekend off right with the Angry Poodle in your inbox on Saturday mornings. TWO CELEBRITIES. ONE MAGICAL EVENING. A PERFECT VALENTINE’S GIFT. OFF THE RECORD: AN INTIMATE CONVERSATION WITH ANTHONY EDWARDS AND CADY HUFFMAN ABOUT HOLLYWOOD & BROADWAY. MODERATED BY DANTE DI LORETO, EXEC. PRODUCER OF GLEE & AMERICAN HORROR STORY. February 4, 2023 at El Encanto, A Belmond Hotel 4:00pm - 5:45pm: The Conversation 6:00pm
7:30pm: The Private Dinner Tickets are limited. Only 24 tickets include the dinner. The Conversation is $150. The Conversation + Private Dinner is $500. Proceeds from this event benefit CommUnify’s programs to help our neighbors in need. Event Sponsorships are available. CADY HUFFMAN TONY AWARD WINNING ACTRESS ANTHONY EDWARDS STAR OF TOP GUN & ER To buy tickets call (805) 964-8857 Ext. 3, or https://www.communifysb.org/off-the-record
-

COVID-19 VENUE POLICY

THURSDAY 1/19

1/19: Virtual Education Spotlight:

Youth Opioid & Fentanyl Epidemic The S.B. County Education Office invites you to join via Zoom or YouTube livestream to this moderated panel discussion with Behavioral Wellness, law enforcement, and the medical community about the youth opioid and fentanyl epidemic that has led to increased rates of adolescent addiction, poisoning, and accidental overdose deaths. There will be interpretation in Spanish, Mixteco, and ASL. 5-6:30pm. sbceo.org/edspotlight

1/19-1/22:

1/19: Paddling into Natural Balance with Chuck Graham Carpinteria-based freelance writer and photographer Chuck Graham will recount some adventures hiking and kayaking the S.B. Channel, Channel Islands National Park, and National Marine Sanctuary as well as share award-winning photographs from the past 30+ years. 6:15-6:45: Pre-lecture for members; 7pm: lecture. S.B. Maritime Museum, 113 Harbor Wy., Ste. 190. Free-$20. Call (805) 962-8404. sbmm .org/santa-barbara-events

FARMERS MARKET SCHEDULE

THURSDAY

Carpinteria: 800 block of Linden Ave., 3-6:30pm

FRIDAY

Montecito: 1100 and 1200 blocks of Coast Village Rd., 8-11:15am

SATURDAY

Downtown S.B.: Corner of Santa Barbara and Cota sts., 8am-1pm

SUNDAY

Goleta: Camino Real Marketplace, 10am-2pm

TUESDAY

Old Town S.B.: 500-600 blocks of State St., 3-7pm

WEDNESDAY

Solvang: Copenhagen Dr.

and 1st St., 2:30-6:30pm

(805) 962-5354 sbfarmersmarket.org

FISHERMAN’S MARKET SATURDAY

Rain or shine, meet local fishermen on the Harbor’s commercial pier, and buy fresh fish (filleted or whole), live crab, abalone, sea urchins, and more. 117 Harbor Wy., 6-11am. Call (805) 259-7476. cfsb.info/sat

DARLING and David Maurice’s Partial Adaptation, and a premiere by new Artistic Director Brandon Whited (Assoc. Prof. of Dance/Director of Dance Performance). Thu.-Sat.: 7:30pm; Sun.: 2pm. Hatlen Theater, UCSB. $13-$25. Call (805) 8932064. theaterdance.ucsb.edu

FRIDAY 1/20

The Producing Unit

Presents The Patient This world premiere of The Patient follows Anna Hughes, a successful New York actress in her thirties who has a month-long breakdown and suffers from a case of Dissociative Identity Disorder and frequently becomes lost in three of the characters she has played in the past. Thu.-Fri.: 8pm; Sat.: 2 and 8pm; Sun.: 3pm (followed by a post-performance discussion). Center Stage Theater, 751 Paseo Nuevo. $22-$31. Call (805) 963-0408 or email cstheater@sbcoxmail.com. Read more on p. 39. centerstagetheater.org/shows

1/19: Chaucer’s Book-Signing:

Jana Zimmer Local author, artist, and second-generation Holocaust survivor Jana Zimmer will sign copies of her new book, Chocolates from Tangier, about her family’s history and witness testimony that includes illustrations, letters, poems, and her own images. 6pm. Chaucer’s Books, 3321 State St. Free. Call (805) 682-6787. Read more on p. 31. chaucersbooks.com/event

1/19: Fitness Fest & E-Bike Awareness Block Party Join for a variety of fitness activities, including group workout classes, dance demonstrations, and more. There will be an e-bike safety expo, test rides, roller skating, and pumped-up jams provided by emcee DJ Darla Bea. 5-8pm. 700-800 blocks of State St. (Near Paseo Nuevo). Free tinyurl.com/BlockPartyJan19

1/19: UCSB Arts & Lectures Presents Maria Ressa Journalist and recipient of the 2021 Nobel Peace Prize Maria Ressa has spent decades speaking truth to power and challenging corruption and will be in S.B. to speak about her new book, How to Stand Up to a Dictator, which tells the story of how democracy dies by a thousand cuts and how social media is killing our freedoms. 7:30pm. Campbell Hall, UCSB. Students: $10; GA: $20-$35. Call (805) 893-3535 or email info@artsandlectures.ucsb.edu artsandlectures.ucsb.edu/events

1/19-1/22: 2023

Take

Friday show with their psychedelic cumbias (musical rhythms and folk-dance traditions of Latin America), jarocho blues, lowrider, and cuento (folk) sound. Saturday’s show will feature an acoustic only performance by Los Lobos. 7:30pm. Lobero Theatre, 33 E. Canon Perdido St. GA: $10-$30; VIP: $50. Call (805) 963.0761. lobero.org/events

Shows on Tap Shows on Tap

1/19-1/20, 1/25: Lost Chord Guitars Thu.: Nick Justice, 7:30-9:30pm. $10. Fri.: The Dales, 8-11:30pm. $15. Sat.: Walk the Whale, 8pm. $9. Wed.: Arwen Lewis, Jason Achilles, 7:30-9:30pm. $10 suggested donation. 1576 Copenhagen Dr., Solvang. Ages 21+. Call (805) 331-4363. lostchordguitars.com

1/19, 1/21: Eos Lounge Thu.: IV’iza Island. Free Sat.: Chase West. $6.18. 9pm. 500 Anacapa St. Call (805) 5642410. eoslounge.com

1/19-1/23: SOhO Restaurant & Music Club Thu.: Tommy Alexander, Jack Symes, 8pm. $15-$20. Fri.: Area 51, 8:30pm. $10-$12. Ages 21+. Sat.: Banda Night, 9pm. $35. Ages 21+. Sun.: Flamenco S.B. Presents Tablao SOhO, 7:30pm. $25-$35. Mon.: Megan Burtt, Edie Carey, 7:30pm. $18-$20. 1221 State St. Call (805) 962-7776. sohosb.com/events

1/20-1/21: Maverick Saloon Fri.: Flannel 101, 9pm-midnight. Sat.: Pull the Trigger, 8:30-11:30pm. 3687 Sagunto St., Santa Ynez. Free. Ages 21+. Call (805)

686-4785. mavericksaloon.com/eventcalendar/

1/20: Pali Wine Co. Live music. 6-8pm. 116 E. Yanonali St., Ste. A-1. Free. Ages 21+. Call (805) 560-7254.

urbanwinetrailsb.com/events

1/20: Uptown Lounge The Trio, 5-7pm. 3126 State St. Free Call (805) 845-8800. uptownlounge805.com/events

1/20: M.Special Brewing Co. (S.B.) The New Vibe, 8-10pm. 634 State St. Free Call (805) 968-6500 mspecialbrewco .com/state-st-taproom

1/21-1/22: Cold Spring Tavern

Sat.: Brian Kinsella Band, 5-8pm; Green Flag Summer, 1:30-4:30pm. Sun.: Tom Ball and Kenny Sultan. 1:30-4:30pm. 5995 Stagecoach Rd. Free Call (805) 967-0066. coldspringtavern.com

SATURDAY 1/21

1/21:

Underwater Parks Day at the Sea Center Some of the most nutrient-rich waters on the planet are located in the S.B. and Channel Islands region. Meet scientists from the lab and learn about their research, enjoy storytime and other activities upstairs, and meet Sea Center Aquarist Brenna Chang and ask about her work caring for the Sea Center’s many animals. 10am-3pm. S.B. Museum of Natural History Sea Center. Free. Call (805) 962-2526 x108. sbnature.org/visit/calendar

SUNDAY 1/22

1/22:

Chaucer’s Author Reading: Laura VonDracek Author Laura VonDracek will read from her book Jemma and the Mermaid’s Call with illustrations by Matthew Kin about Jemma, a spirited mermaid who takes on a massive island of floating trash as she enlists all sea life together to help her clean up their home. 2-3pm. Chaucer’s Books, 3321 State St. Free. Call (805) 6826787. chaucersbooks.com/event

THEINDEPENDENT.COM JANUARY 19, 2023 THE INDEPENDENT 25 INDEPENDENT CALENDAR
always, find the complete listings online at independent.com/events. Submit virtual and in-person events at independent.com/eventsubmit EVENTS
OR POSTPONED. Please contact the venue to confirm the event. Volunteer Opportunity Fundraiser
request that patrons consult their individual websites for the most up-to-date protocols and mask requirements for vaccinated and unvaccinated status
As
MAY HAVE BEEN CANCELED
Venues
before attending an event. .
19-25
Santa Barbara Dance Theater 46th Anniversary Season in a performance from the longest continually operating contemporary dance company in the S.B. area. This concert will feature the work of guest choreographers Helen Simoneau’s
JAN.
arr.
Toccata for
Trains
suite,
for Violin El viaje de una vida, and Antonín Dvořák’s
No. 9 “From
Sat.: 7:30pm; Sun.: 3pm. The Granada Theatre, 1214 State St. $35-$175. Call (805) 8992222 or email info@granadasb.org. ticketing.granadasb.org/events
1/19: Boogie for Our Bodies Get funky and join in ‘70s-themed dancing (‘70s dress is encouraged), advocacy, and fun all to raise funds for Planned Parenthood to help women gain control of their own bodies, lives, and futures after the SCOTUS decision to end Roe v. Wade. 6:30-9pm. Bobcat Room, Wildcat Lounge, 11 W. Ortega St. $25. Ages 21+. Call (805) 722-7870 or email natalie.smith@ppcentralcoast.org. tinyurl.com/Boogie4OurBodies
1/21-1/22: S.B. Symphony Presents Plains, Trains & Violins With Guillermo Figueroa on violin, Nir Kabaretti wil conduct the symphony in a repertoire of Elmer Bernstein,
Peter Bernstein’s
Toy
concert
Miguel Del Águila’s Concerto
Symphony
the New World.”
COURTESY 1/20-1/21: Lobero LIVE Presents An Evening with Los LobosAmplified, with Rasquache Liberation Front (RLF) and Acoustic Enjoy an evening of amplified music from Los Lobos that embodies the idea of America as a cultural melting pot with styles such as son jarocho (Veracruz sound), Tejano, folk, soul, rock, and more. Their 2021 album Native Sons is a snapshot of L.A.’s musical heritage. RFL will open the
COURTESY COURTESY COURTESY
The New Vibe COURTESY
26 THE INDEPENDENT JANUARY 19, 2023 INDEPENDENT.COM for info and to register go to Free for AWC Members Non-Members: $25 Join AWC-SB panelists Ana Papakhian (Music Academy), Jaime Eschette (SB Botanic Garden), and Gretchen Lieff (La Lieff Wines) as they discuss the whys and hows of rethinking their brands and provide tips for yours. Wed, Feb 1st at 5:30 p.m. 351 Paseo Nuevo, Floor 2 What’s it like to refresh a familiar brand? Emanuel Ax Leonidas Kavakos Yo-Yo Ma Fri, Jan 27 / 7 PM / Granada Theatre Tickets are going fast! “The superstar trio.” The Boston Globe “An almost supernatural chemistry.” The Washington Post Program Ludwig van Beethoven: Symphony No. 4 in B-Flat Major, op. 60 (arr. Shai Wosner) Ludwig van Beethoven: Piano Trio in B-flat Major, op. 97 (“Archduke”) Praised for its remarkable ensemble cohesion and immaculately refined interpretations, this musical dream team reunites in Santa Barbara for an unforgettable evening of chamber music. Pre-concert Talk by Derek Katz, UCSB Associate Professor of Musicology 6 PM / Granada McCune Founders Room / Free to event ticket holders (805) 893-3535 | www.ArtsAndLectures.UCSB.edu Granada event tickets can also be purchased at: (805) 899-2222 | www.GranadaSB.org Special Thanks

1/22:

THE

WEDNESDAY 1/25

1/25: 2023 Homeless Point-in-Time (PIT) Count Volunteers are needed for this count to obtain a snapshot census of people experiencing homelessness in S.B. County, including people living in emergency or transitional housing as well as people staying outside, in vehicles, parks, and abandoned buildings. Volunteers can join as a group or as an individual and select a preferred region. Completion of an online PIT training will be required. Register online. 5-9am. Various locations. Free countyofsb.pointintime.info

1/25: S.B. Audubon Presents Unforgettable Birds of Brazil Program Speakers and birders Satie Airamé, Jeff Chemnick, and Raphael EF Santos will share photographs and offer stories and insights about Brazil, home to 1,971 bird species from the colorful parrots and macaws to hummingbirds and jacamars. 7:30-9pm. Fleischmann Auditorium, S.B. Museum of Natural History, 2559 Puesta del Sol. Free.Call (805) 964-1468. tinyurl.com/BirdsOfBrazil

LAUGH OUT LOUD

MONDAY 1/23

1/23: Edie Carey, Megan Burtt Take in an evening of the blues/pop/folk sound of accomplished musicians and singersongwriters Edie Carey and Megan Burtt. Their poetry, style, lyrics, and voices will take you away. 7:30pm. SOhO Restaurant & Music Club, 1221 State St. $18-$20. Call (805) 962-7776. sohosb.com/events

TUESDAY 1/24

1/24: IHC Event: Jody Enders Join the Interdisciplinary Humanities Center for a dialogue between UCSB professors Jody Enders (French and Italian) and Leo Cabranes-Grant (Spanish and Portuguese, Theater and Dance) about Enders’s two newly edited and translated volumes of medieval French comedies. Refreshments will be served. 4-5:30pm. McCune Conference Room, 6020 HSSB, UCSB. Free. Call (805) 893-3907. ihc.ucsb.edu/event

1/19: Let Loose Comedy Enjoy a lineup that will include headliner and stand-up Jason Collings, L.A.-based comedian Ahmed Al-kadri, and the hilarious Elyssa Phillips and Bee Gutierrez with host Chris Williams. 7:30-9:30pm. S.B. Wine Collective, 131 Anacapa St., Ste. C. $20. Ages 21+. letloosecomedy.com

1/21: No Indoor Voices Presents I’m Speaking! Join No Indoor Voices for a grand opening at their new home with music from Xangie, a reception with Central Coast artist Matt Rodriguez, whose counterculture street art will be available for purchase, and then yuks from an unladylike lineup of Subhah Agarwal, Max Beasley, Claudia Lonow, and Kimmie Dee with host Samantha Ross. 6pm: music; reception: 7-9pm; show: 9-10:30pm. Soul Bites, 423 State St. $15-$20/door, cash only. Ages 21+. tinyurl.com/NoIndoorVoicesJan21

1/21: The Good Good Show Enjoy craft beers while cackling like crazy at this month’s show that will feature Ahmed Bharoocha, Ellen Sugarman, Julie Weidmann, Sara Kay Godot, and Shaun Platt. 7:30-9pm. Night Lizard Brewing Company, 607 State St. $10. Ages 21+. tinyurl.com/GoodGoodShowJan21

1/25: Laugh Therapy Comedy Night There’s no comedy like there is in the Valley. 8pm. Maverick Saloon, 3687 Sagunto St., Santa Ynez. $15. Ages 21+. Call (805) 686-4785. mavericksaloon.com/event-calendar/

1/24:

cial appearance by the Music Academy Sing! children’s chorus. 7pm. The Granada Theatre, 1214 State St. Students and youths: $20; GA: $20-$131. Call (805) 893-3535 or email info@artsandlectures.ucsb.edu. Read more on p. 19. artsandlectures.ucsb.edu/events

1/25: Set List Live: Stand-Up Without a Net Comics Henry Phillips, Rick Overton, and John Hastings will be given a never-before-seen “set list” and perform it as if it were the material they were meant to do with Troy Conrad and Kimmie Dee along for the ride. 8pm. Soul Bites, 423 State St. $15-$20/door, cash only. Ages 21+. tinyurl.com/SetListJan25

INDEPENDENT.COM JANUARY 19, 2023 THE INDEPENDENT 27
UCSB Arts & Lectures Presents Joyce DiDonato: EDEN Fusing music, movement, and theater, EDEN will travel seamlessly through four centuries of music, including a new commission from Academy Award–winning composer Rachel Portman, to explore the individual connection to nature and its impact on our world. There will be a spe-
ROY DUNN COURTESY COMEDY Join Author Maya
• Simple and practical ways for parents to support literacy
Parents
and often La Cumbre Junior High on February 2nd, 2023 5:00-6:00 pm Free Tacos for the first 200 Guests 6:30 pm-8:00 pm Author's Presentation Registration Required: https://bit.ly/GESReading2023 Free Event • Free Childcare Ages 4-12 Questions? gatewaycamps@gmail.com Jan’s family understands that mistakes happen. Missing Staghorn Ferns Phone or text message (Jane): (805) 354-4782 Email: jdwferns@gmail.com If you have any of his ferns (or know someone who does) please use the contact information below to arrange to have them returned. Several of Jan’s Staghorn Ferns were mistakenly gifted or sold after his passing. All responses will be confidential. No questions asked. We greatly appreciate your help. Game The Gin Game Directed by Ken Gilbert and E Bonnie Lewis Starring Ed Giron Starring Kathy Marden by D L Coburn PREVIEW Thurs. Feb. 2 • 7:30 pm, OPENING Fri. Feb. 3 • 7:30 pm Sat. Feb. 4 • 2 pm, Sat. Feb. 4 • 7:30 pm, Sun. Feb. 5 • 2 pm Center Stage Theater, 751 Paseo Nuevo, Santa Barbara Tickets and info: centerstagetheater.org The Pulitzer Prize winning play in which two characters, isolated and lonely, wage a relationship over a game of cards
Roy Dunn: Capturing Imagery of Our Wild Neighbors This gallery talk will feature wildlife photographer and cinematographer Roy Dunn as he will provide a fascinating look behind camera trapping and ethical
wildlife photography. 4-5pm. The Wildling Museum of Nature & Art, 1511-B Mission Dr., Solvang. $5-$10. Call (805) 688-1082. wildlingmuseum.org/programs-events
Payne Smart Reading for Our Lives: A Literacy Action Plan from Birth to Six
are the first and best teachers for children! • Importance of tackling the earliest signs of a reading gap • Six key strategies that can be used early
28 THE INDEPENDENT JANUARY 19, 2023 INDEPENDENT.COM SantaBarbaraIndependent’s Annual Contact your Advertising Representative Today advertising@independent.com Is Weding Publishes Thursday, February 16 Advertising Deadline Friday, February 10 at noon Welcome to Freedom Management reserves the right to change or cancel promotions and events at any time without notice. Must be 21 or older. Gambling problem? Call 1.800.GAMBLER. PAUL ANKA FEBRUARY 11 | SATURDAY | 8PM THE FAB FOUR FEBRUARY 25 | SATURDAY | 8PM AIR SUPPLY FEBRUARY 17 | FRIDAY | 8PM GEORGE CLINTON MARCH 4 | SATURDAY | 8PM ALWAYS AMA ZI NG . NEVER ROUT IN E .

Birding living

A Tale of Two Counts

While birders love the rain as much as anyone after all, water generally means more birds many of us were grousing about the foul conditions on New Year’s Eve, Santa Barbara Audubon’s official Christmas Bird Count (CBC) day. There was hope that the rain would hold off until midmorning, but it wasn’t to be; as dawn slowly glimmered into being, down came the steady rain that only let up for a few minutes at a time all day long.

The Weather Makes All the Difference

Birding in the rain is difficult for many reasons. Birders rely upon hearing calls as one of the best ways to locate birds, and with rain this becomes quite difficult. For those of us looking for land birds, the constant movement of leaves as they were struck by raindrops made finding small birds tricky. Add to this the fogging up of optics and eyeglasses, and you can see the difficulties we faced.

Not only that, but several top-notch out-of-town birders, deterred by the forecast, made a last-minute decision to forego the count this year. We still had more than 150 birders out braving the elements, some birding the mountains where four inches of rain fell, others going out on the ocean in tricky conditions. Despite all these hurdles, we logged 195 species, a little lower than our usual tally in the low 200s, but still remarkably good considering the conditions.

There were some painful misses. A few “stakeout” birds were missed, species that had been seen regularly up to count day (and many of them the day after!). These include the winter wren, tropical kingbird (it was not a good day for flycatchers), American bittern, short-eared owl, and osprey. In the days leading up to the count, I had seen four different black-throated gray warblers in tipu trees, but all were missing in action on count day. I spent more than an hour and a half staring into the tipu trees at the Milpas Post Office, where one of these warblers had been; the trees had been bouncing with warblers during the sunny days before the gloom set in,

but in the rain they were eerily quiet. One “good” bird that did briefly pop into the tipus after an hour’s wait was a Lucy’s warbler, a bird that should be wintering on the west coast of Mexico. I was also delighted to find the rare-in-winter warbling vireo at Bohnett Park, back for its tenth winter at this location.

One of the great values of the annual count is that we are able to census the birds in our area and compare populations from year to year. Unfortunately, because of the weather, many species will have been under-counted this year. The same was not true of the Carpinteria CBC that was held on December 17, a gloriously sunny, warm day. The Carpinteria count is relatively new and doesn’t attract as many contributors. This year’s count, however, had its best species total with 162 seen, four more than the previous best.

As participants in the count, Mark Bright and I had the good fortune to be aboard the Channelkeeper, skippered by Penny Owens. Our job was to census the ocean portion of the count circle, and we had wonderfully calm conditions with which to do it; unfortunately, though, seabirds were few and far between. Things were about to change, however, when we reached Rincon Island at the south end of the circle. Rincon Island is the human-made island, connected to the land by a long pier, which you can see as you drive by Mussel Shoals on the 101. We motored close to the island in search of rocky shorebirds, but as we turned alongside the pier, we noticed a flock of surf scoters, oceangoing ducks, and with them, two larger brown ducks. With an immediately racing heartbeat, I recognized these ducks as eiders, but they and the scoters promptly flew off before we could get good looks and photos, and mild panic briefly ensued.

Eiders are sea ducks of the high Arctic, rarely seen as far south as California. I knew we had to re-find these birds and

get proper documentation. Fortunately, we were in contact with Linus Blomqvist, who was conducting a sea watch with his scope from on top of the island. He soon relocated the birds closer to shore and was able to confirm that the birds were indeed eiders. Penny held the boat in position, and soon the eiders swam back toward us, and Mark and I fired off hundreds of photos. The birds were two female king eiders (the females are colloquially referred to as queen eiders, and the adult males are a spectacular bird do look them up). What a thrill to be in the right place and the right time to see these beautiful birds that were far from their normal Arctic home.

The king eiders were seen irregularly at Rincon Island for a couple of days before they relocated to Ventura Pier, where they remained at the time of writing, feeding on mussels and other invertebrates from the pilings of the pier. They have now been seen by hundreds of birders and have been aged as an adult female and a first winter female; the romantic in me wants to believe they are mother and daughter.

There is an interesting postscript to the story of the eiders: A month before the birds appeared at Rincon, Wyoming, had its first-ever record of king eider, two females that spent a few days on a lake before it froze over. Photographs show that the birds were an adult and a young female. Given that “our” birds and the Wyoming birds appear to be the only out-of-range king eiders seen in the west this winter, and that previous California records have only involved single birds, it seems quite likely to me that these are the same birds embarking on a great winter odyssey.

The Ninth Annual Winter Bird Count for Kids is on January 21 at Lake Los Carneros. For details, visit santabarbaraaudubon.org/ events/wbc4k/

INDEPENDENT.COM JANUARY 19, 2023 THE INDEPENDENT 29 p. 29
Hugh Member of the Santa Barbara Audubon Society The adult female king eider, known as a queen eider, is far from her native Arctic. This Lucy’s warbler was a good find on count day. The two rare king eiders, the young female in the foreground and the adult female at the rear A male summer tanager, photographed at the zoo a few days before the CBC, was also seen on count day. HUGH RANSON PHOTOS

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Weaving Art and Memoir

Attorney and former Coastal Commissioner Jana Zimmer has been making art since 1995. In addition to Chocolates from Tangier, she has published two previous books, Collaboration, with Portland textile artist Sharon Marcus, and Navigating the California Coastal Act, the first “coffee-table law book,” which includes her digital collage as commentary.

Jana Zimmer Talks About ChocolatesfromTangier

Toward the beginning of your new book, Chocolates from Tangier, you quote French neuropsychiatrist and child survivor Boris Cyrulnik, who wrote: “Two great dangers threaten the children of the Shoah. The first is to speak about it; the second is not to speak about it.” Can you talk about why you decided on “not letting go, but holding on, and continuing to remember”? The truth is I never believed I had the option to forget and move on, morally, ethically, or as a matter of personal psychology. I thought I had completed what was needed after I took my art to Prague and the Terezín ghetto in 2006. Honoring my father’s experience was at the heart of that. I thought I was done, again, in 2015, when I exhibited in Germany, where my mother had been a slave laborer. But in the last few years, it has become clear that even if my personal journey in relation to this subject feels complete, my duty continues because Holocaust denial continues, racism continues, anti-Semitism continues, and is becoming, frankly, more terrifying. So, letting go serves the haters.

Considering its subject matter, readers might be surprised to find that Chocolates from Tangier is a strikingly beautiful book, packed with full-color reproductions of your art, as well as photographs of objects and documents. And, appropriately, the book is multi-voiced, featuring writing by your mother and father, your earlier self, and a number of well-chosen quotations. The book’s form came about organically on its own calendar. I’ve been moving back and forth between word and image, between my father’s and my mother’s stories, addressing them in my art, and in my writing, my poetry, even in my legal work, for 40 years. I’m now finally beginning to address my place between them.

You write that you have “an instinct that some elements of the spiritual and emotional memory of the six million can be found in the arrangement of the components of a piece of art, and in the spaces between.” How do your artistic specialties of collage and printmaking reflect the traumas of the Shoah? Jiří Kolář, a Czech poet and collage artist, said it all: “The world attacks us directly, tears us apart through the experience of the most incredible events, and assembles

and reassembles us again. Collage is the most appropriate medium to illustrate this reality.” I also have found that printmaking, creating repetitions, multiples, and variations of the same image and I include here digital prints offered me useful tools to signify the unfathomable numbers, both the enormity and the specificity of our losses.

You mention the Yiddish saying Schwer ist, a Yid zu sein “It’s hard to be a Jew.” That’s obviously there in the horrors of the Holocaust, but as you describe all the challenges your parents faced, and your own journey from Prague to Montreal to San Diego and finally to Santa Barbara, I also had the feeling that being Jewish was … I know “ennobling” is the wrong word. I don’t subscribe to the notion of “Jewish exceptionalism,” so I am uncomfortable with the word “ennobling,” or the idea that suffering can be ennobling, at all. I’m more inclined toward simple, Eastern European Jewish philosophy: “If the Jews are God’s ‘Chosen People,’ please, tell them to choose someone else.” I’d trade a few Nobel Laureates for a world where my grandchildren can live safely as Jews. After reading this book, what I hope people might feel is one word: compassion. Not for my parents, or “the six million,” or even for me. For each other. I want their hearts to break open.

Jana Zimmer will do a book-signing at Chaucer’s Books (3321 State St.) on Thursday, January 19, at 6 p.m. See chaucersbooks.com.

Picasso Reborn as AI

Fifty years after his death, Pablo Picasso is painting once again.

The late Spanish master has been reborn as a form of artificial intelligence (AI), a “neural network” created by two UC Santa Barbara doctoral students to generate original pieces of art in his signature styles.

Inspired by a recent trip to the Picasso Museum in Barcelona, the pair fed their creation hundreds of online images of the artist’s paintings to plot and study, and it has since produced more than 10,000 pieces of its own.

The new works which mirror the evolution of Picasso’s career, from his blue and red periods to his cubist and surrealist years are now available for purchase as NFTs, or non-fungible tokens, for around $5 each by credit card or cryptocurrency at thepicassoproject.org website. A step-by-step explanation of the “minting” process is available there as well.

UCSB Doctoral Students Build Neural Network to Paint Like Late Artist

“In contrast to exhibitions that showcase artist retrospectives, thepicassoproject capitalizes on machine learning to offer our interpretation of Picasso as a prospective,” said the two makers, who emphasize they spearheaded the effort on their own time and on their own dime, completely separate from their PhD studies in UCSB’s materials science department. “Our mission is to create beautifully diverse and original NFT art while simultaneously expanding the notion of generative art.”

Given the “wild and evolving” nature of the involved technologies, the pair explained, they opted to keep their names off the website and asked to be identified in this article only by the pseudonyms architectus and philosopha. But they encouraged anyone curious about their AI-generated collection to engage them directly by emailing team@thepicassoproject.org.

“We want to empower people to educate themselves about these topics in a very straightforward, low-cost way,” said philosopha, who personally gravitates toward the vibrant colors of Picasso’s surrealism period. “We want to spark curiosity, demystify these technologies, and above all pay homage to the artist while re-imagining his genius.”

Too often, continued architectus, who favors the artist’s cubism works, conversations around NFTs have been dominated by high-price purchases of images by celebri-

ties as status symbols. Take, for instance, the Bored Ape Yacht Club craze and the negative press it engendered. By contrast, “Our idea was to create an accessible collection where the barrier to entry was very low but you still get a cool piece of original art out of it,” architectus said.

Most NFT projects emphasize redundancy, relying on minute variances on a common theme, architectus explained. To continue the comparison, only hats, sunglasses, and clothing separate the Bored Apes. Meanwhile, every single piece from thepicassoproject is truly unique. “Each work of art in the collection has intrinsic value on its own.”

The purchased images measure approximately 1,000 by 1,000 kilobytes and can live permanently in your digital wallet, or they can be produced as 12-by-12-inch prints. If the buyer wants a higher-resolution image to make a large print, the pair is happy to upsize the file for free, they said. A portion of their sales will benefit nonprofit organizations that give underserved youth the opportunity to experience and make art.

There may be purists out there who criticize the project as a perversion of human creativity, philosopha acknowledged. But Picasso himself pushed the boundaries of art, playing with different types of media to express a kaleidoscope of emotion. philosopha  sees his open-minded experimentation as “a natural starting point as we continue that ethos.” And heading off at the pass any accusations of “stealing” Picasso’s style, philosopha noted how he borrowed heavily from traditional African art and that almost all artists draw inspiration from others. “I think everyone, whether it’s AI or a person themselves painting, has to determine where that line is,” philosopha said.

The pair is already thinking about building more neural networks to paint like other famous artists. Monet is a possibility. So is Van Gogh. Their only constraint is identifying painters with large enough bodies of work for the machines to accurately learn from. “This is artwork with unlimited possibilities,” said architectus. n

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Influenced by the pictorialist movement of the early twentieth century, Edward S. Curtis set out to create a photo and ethnographic record of Indigenous peoples living in Western regions from the Mexican border to Alaskan shores. 100 years later, Indigenous people still contend with “Indian” stereotypes that are consequences of Edward Curtis’s vision. This exhibit endeavors to present his breathtaking photogravures within the context of American colonialism.

32 THE INDEPENDENT JANUARY 19, 2023 INDEPENDENT.COM ON the Beat ON the Beat Sign up at independent.com/newsletters On the Beat spotlights all-things music and music-adjacent newsletter/column by music and arts journalist-critic Josef Woodard
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Considered Curbside Coffee Offers Something Old, Something New

also make appearances throughout the Santa Barbara International Film Festival in February.

Considered is far from the first mobile food and drink service enterprise in Santa Barbara, and the city’s planners and brick-and-mortar establishments were notoriously hostile to the initial wave of this trend a decade ago, forcing favorites like the Burger Bus and Georgia’s Smokehouse to flee the city. In the wake of this, Beck and her team are navigating fearlessly with the principles to back up their dream and the tenacity to push forward against adversity.

4·1·1

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Entrepreneur Pia Beck Launching Mobile Coffee Business in Santa Barbara

Ever since the first smoldering cup Pia Beck drank on a solo trip through Belize at the tender age of 14, she’s been enraptured in a love affair with coffee.

The UCSB alumna and CEO of consulting firm Curate Well Co. is putting that passion at the forefront with a new venture this month: the Considered Curbside Coffee Bus. The mobile café will serve espressobased drinks out of a 1965 Volkswagen Bus in iconic Santa Barbara locales like the Funk Zone, the Mesa, East Beach, and elsewhere.

Searching the internet for coffee businesses around town lights up the digital map with red pins: Coffee is very common here. But Considered aims to attract connoisseurs, ritual drinkers, and the curious because Beck’s company is about much more than roasted beans.

Her inspiration came, in part, from the word “considered,” which she finds relaxed yet still as reverential as notions like intentionality and attention to detail. “Fundamentally,” she said, “we all want to be seen, heard, considered.”

Everything Considered does, from products to human relationships, will be treated with care, and there are specifically “considered” details at play. They include:

• Donating 5 percent of revenue to causes that work

on issues such as women’s reproductive rights, systemic racism, and homelessness.

• Paying the staff a living wage, and including 15 percent gratuity in the pricing, with more tips welcome.

• Not up-charging for alternative milks so as to not alienate people with different beliefs, health conditions, and personal reservations.

• Running the bus completely on solar and generator power, allowing for greater mobility.

• Partnering with another business to repurpose compressed grounds and offset some of the waste produced by coffee making.

“Coffee shops funnel energy literally and figuratively into communities,” said Beck, who hopes these measures help the people of Santa Barbara rethink what a coffee shop can be for the customer, the employee, and this community. As to the viability of the business itself, she believes that her team’s tech background will lead to better sales forecasting and more efficient coursecorrecting on the financial side, the lack of which is the downfall for many establishments in the food and beverage industry.

Considered’s network of purveyors includes Handlebar Coffee Roasters, Beck’s favorite, and Sarah Klapp of Klapp Ceramics. Their commissary kitchen will be located at Validation Ale in the Funk Zone, where they will serve on Sundays. On Saturdays, Considered will be outside of Villa Wine Bar & Kitchen on Anacapa Street to catch the farmers’ market traffic. They’ve already announced popups, including Kiva Cowork (10 a.m.-noon, Jan. 31) Alice Keck Park for the Centerline Mamas’ maternal support group (9-11 a.m., Feb. 7), and SeaVees (10 a.m.-3 p.m., Feb. 11). Considered will

Culinary Fun to Come

There’s a lot of eating and drinking on the horizon. Here are some events to come:

• Coast to Cuyama: La Paloma Café and the Cuyama Buckhorn are collaborating on a weekend celebration of Santa Barbara County, from the coast to the high desert. There’s a cocktail class, mezcal tasting, Ikejime fish prep seminar, fivecourse dinner, documentary screening, and more January 20-22. See tinyurl.com/ coasttocuyama.

• Garagiste Wine Festival: The best place to learn about small-batch winemakers returns to the Santa Ynez Valley February 10-11. See tinyurl.com/garagistefest.

• Santa Ynez Valley Restaurant Weeks: For the 13th year, the Santa Ynez Valley’s top restaurants are offering special priced menus January 16-31 as part of Santa Ynez Valley Restaurant Weeks. See tinyurl.com/ syvrestaurantweek.

• Lompoc Restaurant Week: Meanwhile, Lompoc is enlisting restaurants right now to participate in its own Restaurant Week, which kicks off on February 20. Register online until January 27 at tinyurl.com/ lompocrestaurantweek.

INDEPENDENT.COM JANUARY 19, 2023 THE INDEPENDENT 33 p.33
FOOD & DRINK
caffeine
Considered Coffee’s public launch will be at We Want the Funk (210 Gray Ave.) on January 22, 10 a.m. See consideredsb.co, text “Coffee” to (805) 387-9157 to get alerts, and follow on Instagram @consideredsb.co.
EB COMBS PHOTOS
BREWIING BIZ: The Considered Curbside Coffee Bus (left) will serve espresso-based drinks out of a 1976 VW bus. At right: owner and UCSB grad Pia Beck.
34 THE INDEPENDENT JANUARY 19, 2023 INDEPENDENT.COM FEBRUARY 8 - 18, 2023 BRENDAN FRASER THE WHALE CATE BLANCHETT TÁR ANGELA BASSETT BLACK PANTHER: WAKANDA FOREVER JAMIE LEE CURTIS EVERYTHING EVERYWHERE ALL AT ONCE 200+ FILMS, TRIBUTES, PANELS, AND FREE EVENTS PASSES & TICKETS AT SBIFF.ORG NINA HOSS TÁR KERRY CONDON THE BANSHEES OF INISHERIN AUSTIN BUTLER ELVIS DANIELLE DEADWYLER TILL JEREMY STRONG ARMAGEDDON TIME JEREMY POPE THE INSPECTION STEPHANIE HSU EVERYTHING EVERYWHERE ALL AT ONCE KE HUY QUAN EVERYTHING EVERYWHERE ALL AT ONCE COLIN FARRELL AND BRENDAN GLEESON THE BANSHEES OF INISHERIN

Mexican restaurant Azul Cocina (not to be confused with popular dining destination La Playa Azul) has opened at 7 East Anapamu Street, the former home of Arts & Letters Café, which closed in April 2015 and was followed briefly by La Cocina, Smithy, and Somerset restaurants.

“Azul Cocina and Cantina delivers Mexican cuisine and mixology with the finest locally sourced ingredients from Santa Barbara County,” says their website (azulcocinasb.com). “Our mission is to deliver an exceptional authentic Mexican cuisine with a modern contemporary twist on flavors and traditions, led by Executive Chef Manny Diaz. Taste the revitalization of Upper State Street Santa Barbara with lively offerings, fresh local ingredients, and incredible seasonal dishes. Pair your cuisine with a unique one-of-kind crafted selection of tequila- and mezcal-flavored cocktails or choose from our array of seasonally selected wines.”

With more than 40 years of experience and mastery, Executive Chef Manuel “Manny” Diaz has worked in acclaimed kitchens in Los Angeles, including DTLA’s Pacific Grille, Nicola, Nucleus Nuance, Rudolpho’s, and the San Antonio Winery. His work has earned him media recognition, including the Los Angeles Times, and he was  honored with the Hero Award by the California State Assembly.

STONEHOUSE WINS AWARD: A Santa Barbara restaurant has joined the ranks of the most celebrated restaurants in North America. The Distinguished Restaurant of North America (DiRōNA) Award one of the most prestigious awards for fine dining, has just added 11 new locations to its list of renowned restaurants.

“We are thrilled to have added such an exceptional group of new restaurants to our awarded list,” said Scott Breard, DiRōNA chair. “Only 686 restaurants in North America have received the DiRōNA Achievement of Distinction. This year’s establishments represent the best in dining excellence and can be found in many beautiful small communities, including Wisconsin Dells, Wisconsin; Roanoke, Indiana; and Kemah, Texas!”

Founded in 1990, DiRōNA was established to promote the fine dining industry and offer recognition to award winners across North America including the United States, Canada, Mexico, and the Caribbean. DiRōNA has become the authority for excellence in distinguished dining.

SPECIALS AT FINCH & FORK: Finch & Fork is having a Zero-Proof Mixology Class for Dry January, taught by Beverage Director Jazz Moralez, and later will partner with Uncle Nearest for Black History Month with Old-Fashioned Menu to raise up to $1 million for Historically Black Colleges and Universities. For every Old Fashioned sold in February, they will be matching Uncle Nearest’s $1 donation.  VALENTINE’S AT CA’ DARIO: Ca’ Dario will be serving a four-course prix fixe dinner for $90 per person at their three locations (Montecito, Santa Barbara, and Goleta) from 4- 9:30 p.m. on February 14. The menu can be viewed online at cadariorestaurants.com or by calling (805) 884-9419.

FOOD & DRINK

INDEPENDENT.COM JANUARY 19, 2023 THE INDEPENDENT 35
John Dickson’s reporting can be found every day online at SantaBarbara.com Send tips to info@SantaBarbara.com.
Cocina Opens Downtown BLUE IS NEW: The new Azul Cocina offers authentic Mexican cuisine in the former home of Arts & Letters Café. COURTESY We are here for you! Need support? 805.964.5245 info@dvsolutions.org dvsolutions.org HAPPY HOUR at Why should kids have all the fun? Thursday, January 26 5:30 PM – 8:00 PM Must be 21+ to attend. Beer + Wine available for purchase. moxi.org/happyhour Tickets: $14 FREE for Members IS BACK! The Nacho Burrito The Nacho Burrito THROUGH FEBRUARY $9.95 3765 SANTA CLAUS LANE M-THURS & SUN 11-8P FRI-SAT 11-8:30P Padarobeachgrill.com
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A founding member of both the Hollies and Crosby, Stills and Nash, the GRAMMY® Award-winning renaissance artist is a two-time Rock ‘N Roll Hall of Fame inductee and was inducted twice into the Songwriters Hall of Fame. He’ll be joined on stage by longtime musical partners Shane Fontayne (guitar/vocals) and Todd Caldwell (keyboards/vocals), performing favorites from across his sixty-year career.

One of the world’s most acknowledged guardians of jazz trumpet and flugelhorn, as well as a renowned classical artist, pianist, and composer.

From the heart of the French Quarter to the world’s stage, Preservation Hall Jazz Band has been spreading the joyful spirit of true New Orleans jazz since 1961.

36 THE INDEPENDENT JANUARY 19, 2023 INDEPENDENT.COM JOHN C. MITHUN FOUNDATION LOBERO THEATRE ENDOWMENT FOR AMERICAN ROOTS MUSIC LOBERO.ORG 805.963.0761 @loberotheatre LANCE BURTON & Friends FEB 10 MAR 10 MAR 19 ARTURO SANDOVAL CHARLES LLOYD 85TH BIRTHDAY CELEBRATION FEB 10
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38 THE INDEPENDENT JANUARY 19, 2023 INDEPENDENT.COM ARE YOU HIRING? Post your Open Positions for free online on independent.com Contact advertising@independent.com for more details and in-print rates Full Belly Files Matt Kettmann’s Full Belly Files serves up multiple courses of food & drink coverage every Friday, going off-menu from our regularly published content to deliver tasty nuggets of restaurant, recipe, and refreshment wisdom to your inbox. Sign up at independent.com/newsletters A Ken Burns Documentary about the Mental Health Crisis Among Youth in America Hiding in Plain Sight Tue, Jan 31 / Episode 1: The Storm (1:56 min.) Wed, Feb 1 / Episode 2: Resilience (1:52 min.) 6:30 PM (note special time) / UCSB Campbell Hall / FREE (registration recommended) Presented in association with YouthWell (805) 893-3535 www.ArtsAndLectures.UCSB.edu FREE FILMS A panel discussions will follow each screening
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BETWEEN CREATIVITY AND INSANITY LIES THEPATIENT

Beethoven-ia, as delivered by the masters, will descend upon the Granada next week. The esteemed Chicago Symphony Orchestra’s concert on Wednesday (January 25) fills half its program with Beethoven, including the Symphony No. 8. Two nights later (Friday, January 27) in the same grand venue, the genuine classical music “super-trio” of Yo-Yo Ma, Emanuel Ax, and Leonidas Kavakos brings on an all-Beethoven program, including a special arrangement of the Symphony No. 4. In a sense, it will be old home week next Friday for the power trio, presented via UCSB Arts & Lectures. The grouping rep-

resents three of the finest players on their respective instruments currently alive, and all three have established strong, ongoing relationships with the hosting organization over the years. Cellist Ma is a rare bird whose fame and accolades including 19 Grammy awards and the Presidential Medal of Honor extends beyond classical circles to “household name” status, and thankfully, he made Santa Barbara a regular stopover for various projects.

Veteran Polish-born pianist Ax, also a regular visitor here, ranks among the premiere pianists of the day. The younger newcomer among Santa Barbara regulars linked

to A&L’s programming agenda is Greek violinist Kavakos, whose duo appearances with pianist Yuja Wang at the Granada and Campbell Hall affirmed his deepening status as an artist of international importance.

At the Granada, the trio will perform Beethoven’s Piano Trio in B-flat Major (“Archduke”) after intermission, following Shai Wosner’s intriguing, radical reductive reconfiguring of the Symphony No. 4 in the first half. Call it an unofficial Beethoven week on State Street.

For more information or to purchase tickets, visit artsandlectures.ucsb.edu

MOTHERHOOD TAKES THE SPOTLIGHT IN NEW ARTS FUND EXHIBIT

Motherhood is such a complicated, Sisyphean task that taking it on as the subject of an exhibition is sure to be complex, thought-provoking, and, most of all, interesting which is why the new show at the Arts Fund Community Gallery is certainly worth a look.

The

“The Kind of Mother is an exhibition designed to force the audience to appreciate and challenge the influences politics and cultural traditions have on mothers of today’s society,” according to a statement from Evangelista. “The curated pieces provide a diverse narrative of the complexities of femininity and motherhood. Femininity, resilience, and nurturing are just a few of the words used to describe the emotion felt from the show. Artists show their vulnerability as a mother, child, and human in a curated show exemplifying the intimate connection with mother.”

On view through March 3, the opening of The Kind of Mother: Coloring Outside the Lines of Motherhood takes place on Friday, January 20, from 5-7 p.m., as part

Peter Frisch, of the local theater company The Producing Unit, has teamed up with actor Shay Munroe to tell a story about one woman’s struggle for mental health. This original play, called The Patient, which they co-wrote, explores the thin line between creativity and insanity. “It’s about the struggle for health that our subconscious mind is engaged in even when our conscious mind isn’t,” says Frisch, who directs the show. This world premiere of The Patient runs at Center Stage Theater for one weekend only, January 19-22.

In the play, Broadway actor Anna Hughes (Munroe) is on stage when she experiences a mental break midscene. She begins seeing a therapist (Brian Harwell), who discovers Anna is cycling through several dissociative identities all characters she’s played in the past. The first is Babe (from Crimes of the Heart), whom Frisch describes as “off the cuff,” a character that brings levity to the serious subject matter. There’s also Ruth, from David Mamet’s The Woods, whom Frisch describes as “kind of airy; completely disconnected from herself.” Finally, there’s Jodine, from Frisch’s own adaptation of Studs Terkel’s American Dreams, a rabble-rouser with an aggressive personality.

Munroe plays all these parts, along with the base character, Anna. “This is probably the most challenging role I’ve played thus far in my life,” says Munroe. “The challenge of quickly adjusting myself physically and vocally lots of times mid-scene has only fed my love of doing this line of work.”

The Sunday-afternoon performance will be followed by a post-show discussion with local psychologists who have a background in the type of therapy featured in the show.

“This story is near and dear to my heart with its wild magical realism, poetic chaos, and its deeper truths around love, loss, death, and life,” says Munroe. “Anna’s journey throughout the play shows the cycle of all of that. With it comes both shattering grief and liberation.”

The Patient is at Center Stage Theater (751 Paseo Nuevo Ctr.) January 19-22. See centerstagetheater.org.

INDEPENDENT.COM JANUARY 19, 2023 THE INDEPENDENT 39 EMAIL: ARTS@INDEPENDENT.COM
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MORE ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT >>>
The Patient, a new play by Peter Frisch and Shay Munroe, has its world premiere at Center Stage Theater Jan. 19-22. COURTESY Kind of Mother: Coloring Outside the Lines of Motherhood features local artists Vanessa Wallace-Gonzales, Meiya Sidney, Hope Okere, Juan D. Mendoza, and Amber Valley Evangelista of Valley in Film, who also curated the exhibition. of the bi-monthly Art Walk at La Cumbre Plaza. Regular gallery hours are SundayWednesday, 11 a.m.-5 p.m. For more information, visit artsfundsb.org. —Leslie Dinaberg
MOUNTAIN
POWER
—Josef Woodard
POWER TRIO ON BEETHOVEN
AT THE GRANADA
TRIO ON BEETHOVEN MOUNTAIN AT THE GRANADA
AMBER VALLEY EVANGELISTA NIGEL PARRY
“Chasing Home” by Amber Valley Evangelista Emanuel Ax, Yo-Yo Ma, and Leonidas Kavakos perform at the Granada on January 27.
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Santa Barbara International Film Festival

Listen, I love me some vulgarity and it ain’t tough to find. Streaming services are flooded with hilarious-if-raunchy comedy specials.

But I have mad respect for comedians who slay who, in fact, leave entire theaters full of adults wiping laugh-tears from their cheeks without ever dipping into dirty.

Clean comedy is harder. And honestly, that’s why Tig Notaro does it.

“I’m with you on enjoying vulgarity, especially if it’s done right,” says the comedian, who’ll perform standup at a sold-out UCSB Campbell Hall show on January 21. “But it doesn’t feel as good to me personally. I don’t feel challenged when I use profanity or vulgarity. It has to feel like I’m earning something, and that doesn’t feel earned to me.”

What she’s earned to date include Emmy and GRAMMY nominations, and a loyal audience for her weekly Don’t Ask Tig podcast, when she and funny guests offer totally unqualified life tips to listeners.

In real life, who does Notaro ask when she needs advice?

“I very much go to my wife, Stephanie, for advice,” she says, “and it’s usually the most solid, reasonable advice.”

Notaro and actress Stephanie Allynne met on the set of the 2013 indie comedy flick In a World... A semblance of their sweet romance plays out on Notaro’s acclaimed autobiographical TV series One Mississippi, which ran from 2015 to 2017.

Notaro hits the airwaves again on season three of Apple TV’s The Morning Show, where shooting has been “really, really fun” if … slightly awkward.

“I always feel like a bit of an imposter in acting roles because it’s not anything I set out to do,” she says. “I identify more as a stand-up comedian, so I always feel a

little fumbly, looking around [for the director] like, ‘Did I do that right? Is that what you needed?’ ”

But vulnerability isn’t new to Notaro. A 2012 set at L.A.’s Largo nightclub in which she riffed on her (then) recent breast-cancer diagnosis is considered legendary by her comedy peers and she’s hit stages topless since then, revealing her mastectomy scars.

Having woven her love life, her health and lately her kids into her act … how does Notaro decide what’s worthy of sharing with an audience?

“It’s still a process that I’m figuring out,” she says. “Whether it’s observational or personal, vulgarity or profanity, it has to feel right.

“When I first started sharing more personal things, and had that [2012] breakthrough, it was kind of like coming out of the closet,” she adds. “But you don’t always have to be coming out or leading with that you can also just kind of go on with your life, and then come out when it makes sense. You work that muscle and you know it’s there and you can visit that as needed.”

One final piece of advice from the Don’t Ask Tig host (we asked): If you don’t have tickets to her Santa Barbara show, the next-best way to get your Tig on this month is with her New York Times best-selling book, I’m Just a Person, or the documentary Tig, about the most harrowing year of her life.

“People seem to really get something from those and feel like they know me better,” says Notaro, who also recommends the podcast she co-hosts with actress Cheryl Hines (Curb Your Enthusiasm) about documentaries: Tig and Cheryl: True Story

“There’s a side of me that’s so ridiculous that Cheryl brings out,” says Notaro, whose favorite episodes feature Allynne, Sarah Paulson, and Sean Hayes as guests. “It’s just me laughing with my friends.”

WINDY CITY ORCHESTRAL MIGHT

If last year’s grand global orchestra concert in town arrived with the flourish that follows the Sir Simon Rattle–led London Symphony Orchestra, last spring, this year’s symphonic concert coup finds us, to quote Led Zeppelin, going back to Chicago, and vice versa. On January 25, the Chicago Symphony Orchestra (CSO), widely considered one of the nation’s — and the world’s finest orchestras, pays a return visit to The Granada Theatre, where it played in 2017, courtesy of CAMA’s venerable International Series. It’s no hyperbole to call the evening a proverbial orchestral “event of the season.” Adding significance to the innately ceremonial grandeur is the fact that famed conductor Riccardo Muti, 81, is stepping down this season from the music director post he’s held since 2010. On the touring program, CSO does a double-shot of Beethoven refreshingly, the lesser-played Eighth Symphony and the Coriolan Overture along with Russian composer Anatoly Lyadov’s 1909 work The Enchanted Lake, and the pictorial splendor of Modest Mussorgsky’s beloved Pictures at an Exhibition, orchestrally “colorized” by Ravel.

In an interview with Muti, before his last show in town, he told me about the origins of the CSO pact, at a time when he had intended to go freelance. “When I came to Chicago,” he said, “after 38 years of absence, it was a completely different orchestra, even if there were still four or five musicians who were in the orchestra in 1973, when I conducted it.

“We made a tour in Europe, and the relationship was immediately very good, very fresh, very honest. I admired the orchestra very much, and they did, too. In fact, after the tour, I received more than 60 individual letters from musicians. They were not just ‘Thank you, maestro,’ but real letters, to thank me for the beautiful tour and hoping to go on, etc. So, when I went back to Chicago for another concert, they asked me officially if I was interested in becoming their music director.

“It was strange, because a few months before, I had said no to the New York Philharmonic. Somebody thought that the choice was a choice based on quality. But that would have been too vulgar for me, to say I prefer this orchestra or that orchestra. Certainly, I love the New York Philharmonic. But I have to admit that, for me and for many critics and music lovers in the world Chicago Symphony is considered the best American orchestra, and one of three greatest orchestras in the world the Chicago Symphony, the Vienna Philharmonic, and the Berlin Philharmonic.”

The Italian-born Muti, whose many associations include a decades-long link to the Vienna Philharmonic, has been an itinerant artist by nature. He has also crossed borders between supposedly frictional factions and nations, such as when he concertized in Iran with Italian musicians, soon after conducting the Israeli Philharmonic. “If you are in Israel,” he noted, “you cannot go to Iran, but I was in Iran. You cannot work with Iranian refugees who live in New York and cannot go back to Iran. But everything is possible in the name of music.

“This is what the governments around the world still don’t understand completely, that music and culture is one of the most important weapons that the western world including the United States has, and should be promoted around the world, just to underline that the United States is not only what many people perceive, as a nation of power. It is also a nation of great culture and great possibilities democratic possibilities.”

Needless to say, what happens in Chicago, symphonically speaking, doesn’t stay in Chicago.

—Josef Woodard

CAMA presents Chicago Symphony Orchestra on Wednesday, January 25, at 7:30 p.m. at The Granada Theatre (1214 State St.) See granadasb.org

INDEPENDENT.COM JANUARY 19, 2023 THE INDEPENDENT 41 ARTS LIFE CONT’D
STARSHINE CHATS WITH THE COMEDIAN AND DON’T ASK TIG HOST — AND ASKS HER ANYWAY
TIG … BEFORE THE GIG
TODD ROSENBERG Maestro Riccardo Muti leads the Chicago Symphony Orchestra on his final tour as music director. Tig Notaro brings her stand-up show to UCSB on January 21. COURTESY

FREE WILL ASTROLOGY

ARIES

(Mar. 21-Apr. 19): Good news, Aries! During the next episode in the age-old struggle between the Impulsive You and the Farsighted You, I predict the latter will achieve a ringing victory. Hallelujah! I also foresee you overcoming the temptation to quit a project prematurely, and instead pushing on to complete it. There’s more! You will refrain from knocking your head against an obstacle in the vain hope of toppling it. Instead, you will round up helpers to help you wield a battering ram that will produce the desired toppling.

TAURUS

(Apr. 20-May 20): You may not have a clear picture of where you’ll be going in the next five years. The detailed master plan that your higher self devised for you before you were born might even be obscure. But I’m here to tell you that in the coming weeks, a new lucidity can be yours. You can summon an acute instinct about which way is forward, if only you will recognize the subtle ways it’s speaking to you. In fact, I believe you will regularly know what move you should make next so as to expedite your long-term evolution. Life will be rewarding you with mysterious step-by-step guidance. Now please write a short statement affirming your intention to love, honor, and obey your intuition.

GEMINI

(May 21-June 20): Do you believe in the existence of guardian angels and spirit guides and ancestors who can intervene in your behalf from the other side of the veil? Do you wonder if maybe your invisible friends from childhood show up in your vicinity now and then to offer you support and kindness? Or how about the animals you loved earlier in your life but who have since passed away? Is it possible their souls have never left you, but are available if you need their affection? Even if your rational mind tells you that none of these possibilities are authentic, Gemini, I suspect you will nevertheless be the beneficiary of their assistance in the coming weeks and months. Their influence will be even more potent if you proceed as if they are real.

CANCER

(June 21-July 22): Among your potential strengths as a human being are empathy, sensitivity, and emotional intelligence. You may or may not choose to develop these natural gifts. But if you do, they can be instrumental in helping you achieve the only kind of success that’s really meaningful for you which is success that your heart and soul love as much as your head and your ego. According to my astrological analysis, you are moving into a phase of your cycle when you will have extra power to ripen your empathy, sensitivity, and emotional intelligence and thereby enhance your ability to achieve the kind of success that’s meaningful for you.

LEO

(July 23-Aug. 22): “Dear Rob the Astrologer: The computer firewall at my youth hostel is blocking your website. I am being told you practice ‘Illegal Folklore and Insurrectionary Fairy Tales.’ What the hell? Can you do anything at your end to get me access to your wonderful horoscopes? Maybe cut back a bit on your Illegal Folklore and Insurrectionary Fairy Tales? Haha. Just kidding. I love that crazy stuff. —Deprived Leo in Ireland.” Dear Deprived: Many of you Leos have lately had problems getting all the Illegal Folklore and Insurrectionary Fairy Tales you need. I hope you will push hard to compensate. In my estimation, you currently have a strong need for dreamy stories that appeal to the Wild Child in you. They’re essential to your mental and spiritual health.

VIRGO

(Aug. 23-Sept. 22): In his book A Million Miles in a Thousand Years: What I Learned While Editing My Life, Donald Miller acknowledges that fear can be a “guide to keep us safe.” Being afraid may indeed have its uses and benefits. But Miller adds that it’s also “a manipulative emotion that can trick us into living a boring life.” In my astrological opinion, Virgo, fear will be of service to you a guide to keep you safe about 9 percent of the time in 2023.

Around 83 percent of the time, it will be a manipulative emotion not worth acting on. For the other 8 percent, it will be neither. Please plan accordingly.

LIBRA

(Sept. 23-Oct. 22): Select two sticky situations in your world that you would love to reinvent. Let other annoyances and glitches just slide for now. Then cultivate a focused desire to do everything in your power to transform the two awkward or messy circumstances. Proceed as if you will have to do all the work yourself that nothing will change for the better unless you take full responsibility. If you’re absolutely sure this involves other people altering their behavior, consider the possibility that maybe your behavior needs to shift as well.

SCORPIO

(Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Three out of four toxic waste dumps in the U.S. are located in predominantly African American or Latino communities. Two million tons of radioactive uranium tailings have been dumped on Native American lands. Three hundred thousand Latino farm workers in the U.S. suffer from pesticide-related sicknesses every year. These travesties make me furious. More importantly, my rage motivates me to mitigate these travesties, like by educating my readers about them and donating money to groups crusading to fix the problems. In the coming weeks, Scorpio, I hope you will take advantage of your astrological potentials by using your anger constructively, too. Now is a favorable time for you to fight fiercely and tenderly for what’s right.

SAGITTARIUS

(Nov. 22-Dec. 21): I predict that love will bring you many AHA! moments in 2023. You can’t fully prepare yourself for them and that’s a good thing! The epiphanies will be brighter and deeper if they are unexpected. Your motivation to learn the available lessons will be wilder and stronger if you enjoy being surprised. So be ready for lots of entertaining rumbles and reverberations, Sagittarius. The adjustments you will be asked to make will often be strenuous and fun. The inspirations you will be invited to harvest will require you to outgrow some of your previous beliefs about the nature of intimacy and togetherness.

CAPRICORN

(Dec. 22-Jan. 19): Some insects are helpful to humans. For example, ladybugs devour aphids, which are highly destructive to crops. Damsel bugs eat the pests called leafhoppers, and lacewings feed on the pernicious nuisances known as mealybugs. I also remind you that some bugs are beautiful, like butterflies, dragonflies, and jeweled beetles. Keep these thoughts in mind, Capricorn, as you contemplate my counsel. Metaphorically speaking, you will have experiences with bugs in the next three weeks. But this won’t be a problem if you ally yourself with the good, helpful, and beautiful bugs.

AQUARIUS

(Jan. 20-Feb. 18): What are “brain orgasms”? Can you seek them out and make them happen, or do you have to wait patiently for them to arrive in their own sweet time? When they occur, what should you do? Surrender into them with all your welcome fully unleashed? Or should you question whether they’re real, be suspicious of their blessings, or dismiss them as irrelevant flukes? I encourage you to meditate on questions like these. That will raise your receptivity to the stream of brain orgasms that life will offer you in the coming weeks.

PISCES

(Feb. 19-Mar. 20): My Piscean pagan friend Valie says God is stealthy yet blatant, like a green chameleon perched on a green leaf. After analyzing the astrological omens, I conclude that this is a helpful, all-purpose metaphor for you to use in the coming weeks. I encourage you to be alert for beauty that is hidden in plain sight. See if you can spy the miracles embedded within the ordinary. Ask life to pleasantly blow your mind over and over again. Here’s your phrase of power: open secret

42 THE INDEPENDENT JANUARY 19, 2023 INDEPENDENT.COM
by Rob Breszny WEEK OF JANUARY 19
Homework: Ask life to bring you an insight that will help you ameliorate a long-running dilemma.
Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700. SPECIAL ISSUE
Advertising Deadline
Self Care THURSDAY, JANUARY 26 From mindfulness to massage, from strength training to skin care, we will explore strategies for mental, emotional, and physical health in this specially themed issue. MONDAY, JANUARY 23 AT NOON Contact your advertising representative or advertising@independent.com today.
Newsletter.FreeWillAstrology.com
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EMPLOYMENT

COMPUTER/TECH

COMPUTER & IT TRAINING

PROGRAM! Train ONLINE to get the skills to become a Computer & Help Desk Professional now! Grants and Scholarships available for certain programs for qualified applicants. Call CTI for details! 1‑877‑806‑0935 (M‑F 8am‑6pm ET). Computer with internet is required. (Cal‑SCAN)

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HEALTH & FITNESS

New Beginning Tai Chi classes with Toni DeMoulin, master instructor, 50+ years experience. The class is half Qigong based on Tai Chi principles and focusing on developing strength, flexibility and improving your energy. With regular practice, these Qigong exercises are proven to be one of the best exercises for people with shoulder and back pain‑especially chronic pains. The second half of the class will be Tai Chi, a slow, soft, meditative series of movements known to help improve balance, arthritis, hypertension, and mental alertness. Tai Chi is considered the #2 best exercise. Contact Toni for times and location. Taichitoni1@ hotmail.com 805‑570‑6194

color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 47498

CUSTODIAL PROGRAM

MANAGER

RESIDENTIAL OPERATIONS

Under the direction of the Associate Director of Custodial & Landscape Services, the position serves as the Program Manager for the Custodial unit within Residential Operations and collaborates with the Residence Hall Managers, Superintendents, Project Managers, and HDAE department leaders to plan, organize, and manage

routine and recurring custodial programs and projects. Prepares annual and projected budgets for operational programs, tracks expenses, and schedules programs that optimize physical staffing and resource needs while minimizing the impact of work on the campus community. Initiates agreements for services and has authority to make purchases within a defined dollar limit.

Reqs: Bachelor’s Degree or equivalent combination of years of experience.

Minimum 3 years of custodial and/ or grounds supervisory experience in a higher education setting. Strong level of proficiency with spreadsheets, systems, database management and word processing software.

Excellent management, financial, and analytical skills. Knowledge of unique department operations in order to meet procurement needs.

Ability to draft requests for proposals and interpret terms and conditions of contracts. Must be detail oriented and be able to work under pressure to

NOW HIRING

meet strict deadlines. Possess excellent verbal and written communication skills. Must be able to work independently or as part of a team. Ability to work with minimal direction and with frequent interruptions to coordinate and execute numerous tasks simultaneously. Must be able to maintain confidentiality and exercise good judgment, logic, tact, and diplomacy while performing the critical duties of the position. Notes:

Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record and enrollment in the DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program. Satisfactory conviction history background check. Budgeted Range: $80,388/yr. ‑ $89,900/yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic

CALENDAR ASSISTANT

The Independent is hiring a part-time calendar assistant to provide support to the calendar editor in getting The Week section to print by curating events and images and writing descriptions. This position assists in maintaining the online calendar and with special issues and guides such as Wedding, Summer Camp, Fiesta, Halloween, and ‘Tis the Season. The calendar assistant helps maintain and contribute to the sbindependent_events Instagram account.

Calendar Assistant skills and abilities include:

• Writing skills and the ability to follow style guidelines

• Ability to communicate with the community via email and phone regarding events

• Ability to create and maintain databases and other documents as needed

• Ability to work on multiple projects and meet deadlines

• Support in daily, weekly, project, and department goals

protected by law. Application review begins 1/24/23. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #47581

software applications to develop, assign, and manage administrative processes of property management.

PROFESSIONAL

ACADEMIC PERSONNEL COORDINATOR/ CHAIR’S ASSISTANT

DEPARTMENT OF THEATER AND DANCE

Provides analytical and administrative support to the Theater/Dance Chair and Chief Administrative Officer. Responsible for assisting the Chair in the duties and responsibilities related to academic appointments, faculty advancement, faculty recruitment, visitor appointments, and a variety of other assignments. Deals with sensitive and confidential information requiring independent judgment and discretion, as well as excellent written, verbal, analytical and interpersonal skills. Reqs: 1‑3 years administrative experience. High school diploma or GED. Note: Satisfactory completion of a conviction history background check. Mon‑Thurs, 8:00am ‑1:00pm, days/hrs. may vary. Budgeted/hiring pay rate/range: $26.09 ‑ $27.32/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race,

• Attention to detail, initiative and follow-through Please email resume and/or questions to hr@independent.com

NOW HIRING

COPY EDITOR

The Santa Barbara Independent is looking for a Copy Editor. This employee will work within the Copy Department to get print and online editorial content ready each week. The ideal applicant is a college graduate or someone with equivalent experience in editing or proofreading. Copy editors will be fact-checking, styling, and maintaining correct grammar, spelling, punctuation, and house style. Though specific experience in editing is preferred, dedicated workers with knowledge of grammar and language may apply. Duties will also include proofreading. Please introduce yourself, and include your availability, reasons for interest, and a brief summary of your qualifications, along with your résumé, to hr@independent.com. This position is currently authorized to work remotely, but some in-person meetings in Santa Barbara are required. No phone calls, please. EOE m/f/d/v.

CUSTOMER

SERVICE COORDINATOR RESIDENTIAL OPERATIONS

The incumbent uses computerized work order systems and other

Schedules work; tracks progress of work using various software programs; coordinates schedules with various outside resources; vendors, staff, and project managers. Utilizes software systems to collect data and create reports. Serves on Project Management Team and provides administrative support and data analyses for Leadership in Environmental & Energy Design

NOW HIRING

certification. Reqs: Work experience demonstrating a strong customer service background. (Min of 3+ years recent customer service experience). Ability to prioritize demands, meet timelines and exercise judgment. Strong communication and organizational skills, including ability to work independently as well as with others. Ability to communicate in person, via telephone and two way radio. Independent judgment, initiative and ability to evaluate

Sales Administrator

Are you a self-motivated, organized individual looking to advance your skills with a creative team? Join the Independent’s advertising team in this full-time customer service and sales position. You will sharpen your skills by client outreach, prospecting, and closing sales opportunities. We will train the right candidate, but applicants will need strong communication skills, attention to detail, and ability to work in a deadline-driven environment. We work with hundreds of local businesses and organizations to advance their marketing efforts and help them reach the community. This position will be integral in advancing current and new projects.

This full-time position will work in our downtown Santa Barbara office and be compensated hourly plus competitive compensation and benefit structure.

If you are ready to learn more, please introduce yourself with your reasons for interest along with your résumé to hr@independent com. No phone calls, please. EOE m/f/d/v.

INDEPENDENT.COM JANUARY 19, 2023 THE INDEPENDENT 43 INDEPENDENT.COM JANUARY 19, 2023 THE INDEPENDENT 43 INDEPENDENT CLASSIFIEDS PHON E 805-965-5205 EMAIL ADVERTISING@INDEPENDENT.COM
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EMPLOYMENT (CONT.)

and analyze data and make recommendations. Demonstrated ability to communicate effectively both verbally and in writing. Ability to work under pressure in a team atmosphere and independently involving deadlines, periodic heavy work cycles and high volume while maintaining extreme attention to detail. Proficiency in Word and Excel. Notes: Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record and enrollment in the DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program. Satisfactory conviction history background check. Budgeted Range: $26.09/hr. ‑ $31.35/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 1/25/23. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #47653

FINANCIAL ASSISTANT

DEPARTMENT OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING

Responsible for purchasing, and other financial transactions for the Mechanical Engineering department, including, but not limited to travel reimbursements, entertainment, federal express and memberships. Ensures compliance to UC policies and procedures. Keeps current on related policies. Reqs: High School Diploma or GED. 1‑3 years administrative experience. Must possess excellent communication, organizational, and computer skills including Microsoft and Google applications. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. $26.09 ‑ $27.90/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 47434

supervises 4‑6 student Audio‑Visual Operators who are responsible for operating AV equipment at UCen events, maintaining AV equipment, and making suggestions for new equipment purchases. Conducts training sessions. Provides leadership, mentoring and guidance. Takes disciplinary action when required. Conducts staff interviews and meetings. Hires and supervises 2 student Conference Coordinators who are responsible for assisting with Corwin event planning and facilitation, invoicing, preparing building operation reports, ensuring event contracts are signed and returned, coordinating off‑campus rentals and other projects as assigned. Establishes and maintains a system of business referrals with University staff, faculty, and local businesses, compiling a systematic listing of all campus and local venders. Initiates open lines of communication with all parties through follow‑up calls, in person meetings or emails. Compiles with all University and Departmental Safety Programs. Keeps an updated Meetings & Event Operating Manual to include all facets of M&E operations. Notes: May work flexible hours/schedule as necessary, including nights and weekends. Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record and enrollment in the DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program. Satisfactory conviction history background check. Budgeted Range: $26.39/hr ‑ $32.00/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #47463

color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 41066.

SENIOR AUTO EQUIPMENT OPERATOR RESIDENTIAL OPERATIONS

Performs a variety of operational duties in shipping, receiving, distribution, and record keeping and performs manual duties in the loading and unloading of material shipped to and from the campus. Delivers freight shipments, and other types of shipments to campus departments.

Operates a variety of vehicles and material handling equipment on a daily basis. Assists in the receipt of goods. Uses computerized databases and internet. Fills orders, including large janitorial supply order and delivers them to Janitorial and Housing closets around campus. Assists the Physical Resource Coordinator with receiving and stocking merchandise, moves furniture and merchandise to maximize warehouse space, helps with physical inventory count at yearend and oversees the warehouse function in the Supervisor’s absence.

Prepares outgoing shipments by using various shipping methods and vendor services. Reqs: Experience in warehouse, shipping and receiving.

working in a kitchen. Ability to organize front of the house food set ups; maintain high standards of food quality on display and food safety. Excellent customer service with the ability to train coworkers, with strong communication skills. Notes: Ability to lift up to 50 pounds and work standing for up to 8 hours per day. Work hours/days may vary. Satisfactory conviction history background check. $19.73‑ $20.52/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #46317

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MANAGER, UCEN MEETINGS & EVENTS

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Manages the UCen Meetings & Events Unit. Develops, promotes and implements policies and procedures for the unit. Provides event planning expertise to clients on and off campus and negotiates contracts and fees. Supervises Meetings & Events Coordinators. Oversees maintenance of audio visual equipment and supervises audio visual technicians. Responsible for maintenance of UCen event equipment and facilities. Ensures that events are presented professionally and safely. Responsible for financial viability of the unit. Supervises and coordinates events and activities held in and around the UCen. Under the general direction of the University Center Director, the Meetings & Events Manager supervises the UCen Service Manager Program. Reqs: Provides event planning expertise to clients on and off campus and negotiates contracts and fees. Supervises the UCen Service Managers Program. Generates written reports which analyze performance. Develops and organizes on‑going training programs. Develops, implements, interprets and enforces the policies and procedures of the Service Managers Program. Promotes the use of the UCen facilities by initiating and cultivating contacts with the public and campus communities. Hires and

MARKETING AND COMMUNICATIONS

DIRECTOR

BREN

SCHOOL OF ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE & MANAGEMENT

Conducts strategic marketing and communications on behalf of the Bren School of Environmental Science & Management. Oversees paid, earned, and organic media campaigns; manages content strategy for the school; creates promotional materials and newsletters; produces and coordinates written content for enrollment marketing, student‑centered stories, and research communications; develops content to enhance the public’s understanding and appreciation of the Bren School. Develops content and manages social media for the Bren School and manages a content calendar. In collaboration with the admissions team, assists with enrollment marketing campaigns and manages relevant website content.

Fields communications requests from the media and coordinates research communications. Is responsible for website governance, maintenance, and content strategy for a dynamic website for the Bren School in collaboration with other Bren School staff and faculty. Arranges for photography/videography and manages school photos and video archives. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree or equivalent experience and/ or training in Communications, Marketing or related field. Experience working in and managing media communications, working knowledge of outreach software. Experience with marketing, publicity and social media, working knowledge of marketing analytics and social media platforms.

Notes: Satisfactory conviction history background check. Top candidates will be required to submit examples of their work. Budgeted/Hiring Pay rate/range: $68,700 ‑ $100,600/ yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race,

Experience in a delivery or related role. Minimum one year work experience driving large delivery vehicles/box trucks. Must have a valid class C CDL, and pass a background check. Work experience demonstrating forklift certification is required. Must be able to lift/move 50 lbs safely. Ability to effectively communicate orally and in writing and work with a diverse clientele and work group. Able to speak English fluently. Excellent customer service and organizational skills. Ability to work effectively both in a group and individually in a service oriented environment subject to frequently changing priorities. Ability to understand and apply University and Department policies and procedures to specific situations. Utilizes modes of office communication such as Google Mail, Docs, Sheets, and Calendar to effectively collaborate with coworkers. Actively aware of their environment, and demonstrates safety conscientiousness and attention to detail at all times. Notes: Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record and enrollment in the DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program.

Satisfactory conviction history background check. Budgeted Range: $20.44 ‑ $23.50/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #47184

Under the general supervision of the Asst Residence Hall Manager or Residence Hall Manager, performs duties in accordance with established standards and instruction, for University owned Residence Halls, Apartments and Dining Facilities.May be required to perform other duties as assigned to meet the operational needs of the department. Promotes a customer service environment to residence and clients. Assists with the development and maintenance of a work environment which is conducive to meeting the mission of the organization and supports the EEP. Responsible for completing job duties that demonstrates support for the Operations Team. Reqs: Working knowledge and experience in utilizing the following equipment: vacuums, conventional and high‑speed buffers, extractors and related custodial equipment desirable. Will train on all equipment and chemicals used. Demonstrated ability to work effectively with others as a team. Must have effective communication skills. Ability to interact as a team member with sensitivity towards a multi‑cultural work environment. Notes: May be required to work other schedules to meet the operational needs of the department. Ability to lift 50 lbs. Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record and enrollment in the DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program. Satisfactory conviction history background check. 3 positions available. Budgeted Range: $21.36/hr.‑$23.11/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 1/26/23. Apply online at https://jobs. ucsb.edu Job #47517

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LEGAL NOTICESTO PLACE EMAIL

NOTICE TO LEGALS@ INDEPENDENT.COM

ADMINISTER OF ESTATE

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: MICHAEL L. WILKIE ALSO KNOWN AS MICHAEL LEIGHTON WILKIE.

NO: 22PR00621

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of Michael L. Wilkie also known as Michael Leighton Wilkie.

A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by: Grant Leighton Wilkie in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara.

THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that (name): Grant Leighton Wilkie be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent.

THE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examiniation in the file kept by the court.

THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.) The Independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority.

A HEARING ON THE PETITION WILL BE HELD IN THIS COURT AS FOLLOWS: 02/16/2023

AT 9:00 AM, DEPT. 5, SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF

SANTA BARBARA, located at 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Anacapa Division. Anacapa Courthouse.

IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney.

IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR OR A CONTINGENT CREDITOR OF THE DECEDENT, you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code. OTHER CALIFORNIA STATUTES AND LEGAL AUTHORITY MAY AFFECT YOUR RIGHTS AS A CREDITOR. YOU MAY WANT TO CONSULT WITH AN

ATTORNEY KNOWLEDGEABLE IN CALIFORNIA LAW.

YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special notice form is available from the court clerk.

Attorney for Petitioner: Laurelle M. Gutierrez, Esq., 415 Mission Street Suite 5600, San Francisco, CA 94105 (628) 218‑3883. Published January 5, 12, 19, 2023.

ELECTRONICALLY FILED

Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara, Darrel E. Parker, Executive Officer, 12/20/2022 by April Garcia, Deputy.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME

STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: THE EDDY 137 De La Guerra St, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; 137 E De La Guerra LLC (same address). This business is conducted by a limited liability company. SIGNED BY JENNIFER STEINWURTZEL, OWNER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on December 19, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL). FBN Number: 2022‑0003052 E35. Published: January 5, 12, 19, 26, 2023.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT

The following person (s) is/are doing business as: R.K.M. BOOKS, 1620 Oramas RD; Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Richard K Moser (same address). This business is conducted by an individual. SIGNED BY RICHARD K MOSER, OWNER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on December 16, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL). FBN Number: 2022‑0003042 E49. Published: January 5, 12, 19, 26, 2023.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: WARREN & SELBERT, LLC, 222 East Carrillo Street, Suite 310, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Accufy Analytics, LLC (same address).This business is conducted by a limited liability company. SIGNED BY ERIC C. SEALE, MANAGER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on December 23, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL).

FBN Number: 2022‑0003100 E30. Published: January 5, 12, 19, 26, 2023.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT

The following person(s) is/are doing business as: TENACITY OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY, 3518 San Jose Lane; Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Megan E Barry (same address). This business is conducted by an individual. SIGNED BY MEGAN BARRY. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on December 28, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL). FBN Number: 2022‑0003114 E30. Published: January 5, 12, 19, 26, 2023.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person (s) is/are doing business as: WYLIE MUTT, 1711 Robbins Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Alexandria N Keithley (same address). This business is conducted by an individual.

SIGNED BY ALEXANDRIA KEITHLEY, OWNER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on December 7, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL). FBN Number: 2022‑0002947 E30. Published: January 5, 12, 19, 26, 2023.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT

The following person(s) is/are doing business as: GREAT WRIT RESEARCH, 228 East Victoria Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Gregory G. Rader, 3714 Friar Lane, Santa Barbara, CA 93105. This business is conducted by an individual.

SIGNED BY GREGORY G. RADER, PROPRIETOR. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on December 9, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0002969. Published: January 5, 12, 19, 26, 2023.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT

The following person (s) is/are doing business as: Lee and Associates Consulting, 4117 Via Andorra, Apt. B, Santa Barbara, CA 93110; Larry C Lee (same address); Rachel M Lee (same address). This business is conducted by a married couple. SIGNED BY LARRY C LEE. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa

Barbara County on December 21, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL). FBN Number: 2022‑0003080 E30. Published: January 5, 12, 19, 26, 2023.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT

The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SEAGRAPE WINE COMPANY, 2625 Santa Barbara Avenue, Los Olivos, CA 93441; Vintegrated Solutions LLC (same address). This business is conducted by a limited liability company. SIGNED BY KAREN STEINWACHS, MEMBER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on December 7, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0002946. Published: January 5, 12, 19, 26, 2023.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: BLACK & BLACK ATTORNEYS AT LAW 1114 State St, Ste 272, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Erik D. Black(same address). This business is conducted by an individual. SIGNED BY ERIK D. BLACK, OWNER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on January 6, 2023. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL). FBN Number: 2023‑0000040 E30. Published: January 12, 19, 26, February 2, 2023.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: THETASELL, 1933 Cliff Drive, Suite 2, Santa Barbara, CA 93109; Neil D Levinson (same address). This business is conducted by an individual. SIGNED BY NEIL LEVINSON, OWNER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on December 30, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL). FBN Number: 2022‑0003135 E30. Published: January 12, 19, 26, February 2, 2023.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: WARP DRIVE TURBO, 521 N. 1st St., Lompoc, CA 93436; Warp Drive Turbo (same address). This is a business conducted by a limited liability company.

SIGNED BY GRANT BORMAN, MEMBER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on December 30, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL). FBN Number: 2022‑0003132 E30. Published: January 12, 19, 26, February 2, 2023.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT

The following person (s) is/are doing business as: ISLAND QUALITY SEAFOOD, 7402 San Carpino Dr, Goleta, CA 93117; Randy C Hughes (same address). This business is conducted by an individual.

SIGNED BY RANDY HUGHES, OWNER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on January 4, 2023. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL). FBN Number: 2023‑0000014 E28. Published: January 12, 19, 26, February 2, 2023.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT

The following person(s) is/are doing business as: TRI‑COUNTY INSULATION AND ACOUSTICAL CONTRACTORS, 910 George Street, Santa Clara, CA 95054; Tri‑County Building Products of California, LLC, 495 South High Street, Suite 50, Columbus, OH 43215 This business is conducted by a limited liability company. SIGNED BY SHELLEY A. MCBRIDE, SECRETARY. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on January 10, 2023. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL). FBN Number:

2023‑0000060 E30. Published: January 19, 26, February 2, 9, 2023.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: NORDSTAR MEDIA,180 Holly Ave. #9, Carpinteria, CA 93013; Gill E.M.E. Fredriksson Lainer (same address).This business is conducted by an individual. SIGNED BY GILL FREDRIKSSON LAINER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on December 28, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL). FBN Number: 2022‑0003111 E29. Published: January 19, 26, & February 2, 9 2023.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: MONTECITO WINE SOCIETY, 1521 E. Valley RD., Unit B, Montecito, CA 93108; Petite Wine Traveler, Inc. (same address). This is a business conducted by a corporation. SIGNED BY JOEL KNEE, SECRETARY. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on Janurary 9, 2023. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL). FBN Number: 2022‑0000054 E30. Published: January 19, 26, February 2, 9, 2023.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: YUKI FINE JEWELRY 6596 El Greco RD, Apt 10, Goleta, CA 93117; Krara LLC (same address). This is a business conducted by a limited liability company. SIGNED BY KRISTEN L IKEDA YOZA, OFFICER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on January 4, 2023. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL). FBN Number: 2022‑0000021 E30. Published: January 19, 26, February 2, 9, 2023.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: HIREUP LEADERSHIP, 6551 Park of Commerce Blvd., Boca Raton, FLA 33487; Ows, LLC (same address). This business is conducted by a limited liability company. SIGNED BY SUSAN E. BALL, SECRETARY. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on January 10, 2023. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL). FBN Number: 2022‑0000063 E29. Published: January 19, 26, & February 2, 9 2023.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: PRESTIGIOUS PROPERTIES & INVESTMENTS, 309 E. Victoria St., #A, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Francis A Berezo (same address). This is a business conducted by an individual. SIGNED BY FRANCES A. BEREZO, BROKER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on January 5, 2023. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL). FBN Number: 2022‑0000030 E49. Published: January 19, 26, February 2, 9, 2023.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: CENTER FOR PSYCHOTHERAPY AND INTEGRATIVE HEALTH, A MARRIAGE AND FAMILY THERAPY CORPORATION, 922 State Street, Suite A2, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Center for Psychotherapy and Integrative Health, a Marriage and Family Therapy Corporation. (same address).This is a business conducted by a corporation. SIGNED BY RUDY RUDERMAN, CEO. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on December 22, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL). FBN Number: 2022‑0003094 E29. Published: January 19, 26, February 2, 9, 2023.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME

46 THE INDEPENDENT JANUARY 19, 2023 INDEPENDENT.COM 46 THE INDEPENDENT JANUARY 19, 2023 INDEPENDENT.COM INDEPENDENT CLASSIFIEDS PHON E 805-965-5205 EMAIL ADVERTISING@INDEPENDENT.COM
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LEGALS (CONT.)

STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SOCCER ABROAD & SOCCER IN SPAIN, 735 State Street, Suite 219, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Maria (Mari) G Hernandez (same address). This is a business conducted by a general partnership company. SIGNED BY MARIA (MARI) HERNANDEZ, FOUNDER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on January 9, 2023. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL). FBN Number: 2022­0000052 E30. Published: January19, 26, February 2, 9, 2023.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: WUNDERKIND, 525 San Ysidro Road, Suite B, Santa Barbara, CA 93108; Wundertoo LLC, 9393 N 90th Street, 102­604, Scottsdale, AZ 85258. This business is conducted by a limited liability company. SIGNED BY JASON HARROW, MEMBER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on January 13, 2023. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL). FBN Number: 2022­0000094 E30. Published: January 19, 26, February 2, 9, 2023.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: MONARCH OFFICE SERVICES, 631 N. Milpas Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Elizabeth E Larios (same address). This is a business conducted by an individual. SIGNED BY ELIZABETH ENRIQUEZ LARIOS, OWNER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on December 6, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL).

FBN Number: 2022­0002939 E30. Published: January 19, 26, February 2, 9, 2023.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: HAIR BY SELENA, 1822 Cliff Drive, Santa Barbara, CA 93109; Selena A Schmidt, 1117 Las Olas Ave, Santa Barbara, CA 93109. This is a business conducted by an individual. SIGNED BY SELENA SCHMIDT. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on January 3, 2023. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL). FBN Number: 2022­00000007 E30. Published: January 19, 26, February 2, 9 2023.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: OPEN DOOR SUPPORT, 606 Alamo Pintado Road, Suite 3­166, Solvang, CA 93436; Patricia A Hecker, (same address). This is a business conducted by an individual. SIGNED BY PATRICIA HECKER, OWNER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on December 30, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL). FBN Number: 2022­0003139 E30. Published: January 19, 26, February 2, 9, 2023.

NAME CHANGE

IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: RACHEL EILON COHEN AND ZACHARY COHEN EILON. CASE NUMBER: 22CV04900.

TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior Court proposing a change of name(s)

FROM: LIBA JULES EILON‑COHEN

TO: LAILA JULES

THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days

before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing.

NOTICE OF HEARING: FEBRUARY 6, 2023, 10:00 AM, DEPT: 5, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101, Anacapa Division.

A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition.

FILED 12/16/22 in Superior Court of California County of Santa Barbara, Darrel E. Parker, Executive Officer by Baksh, Narzalli, Deputy Clerk. 12/16/22 BY COLLEEN K. STERNE, JUDGE OF THE SUPERIOR COURT. Published December 29, 2022, January 5, 12, 19, 2023.

IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CHARMAINE DEVIENA BRACKINS, CASE NUMBER: 22CV05153

TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior Court proposing a change of name(s) FROM: CHARMAINE DEVIENA BRACKINS TO: CHARMAINE DEVIENA VON ALVENSLEBEN NEWTON.

THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing.

NOTICE OF HEARING MARCH 1, 2023, TIME 8:30 A.M. SM3, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 312­C East Cook Street, Santa Maria, CA 9345. A copy of this ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated: January 4, 2023, Timothy J. Staffel, Judge of the Superior Court. Published January 12, 19, 26, February 2, 2023.

IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: BERNARD LOUIS DURHAM, CASE NUMBER: 22CV04837

TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior Court proposing a change of name(s) FROM: BERNARD LOUIS DURHAM TO: BERNARD LOUIS MARIE.

THE COURT ORDERS that all persons

interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING FEBRUARY 27, 2023, TIME: 10 A.M.

DEPT 5, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101, Anacapa Division. A copy of this ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated: December 28, 2022, Thomas P. Anderle, Judge of the Superior Court. Published January 12, 19, 26, February 2, 2023.

IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: AMENDED PETITION OF MARIA CELIA HERNANDEZ, CASE NUMBER: 22CV04287

TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior Court proposing a change of name(s) FROM: JOSHUA CAMPOVERDE TO: JOSHUA CAMPOVERDE HERNANDEZ.

THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing. NOTICE OF HEARING: FEBRUARY 22, 2023, TIME: 10 A.M. DEPT 3, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101, Anacapa Division. A copy of this ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated: January 5, 2023, Thomas P. Anderle, Judge of the Superior Court. Published January 12, 19, 26, February 2, 2023.

IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: PETITIONER JOSHUA RODRIGUEZ, CASE NUMBER: 22CV04943

TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa

Barbara Superior Court proposing a change of name(s) FROM: JOSHUA RODRIGUEZ TO: JOSHUA MARTINEZ‑NAVARRO

THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing.

NOTICE OF HEARING: FEBRUARY 24, 2023, TIME: 10 A.M. DEPT 4, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101, Anacapa Division.

A copy of this ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition.

Dated: January 1, 2023, Donna D. Geck, Judge of the Superior Court. Published January 19, 26, February 2, 9, 2023.

PUBLIC NOTICES

EXTRA SPACE Storage will hold a public auction to sell personal property described below belonging to those individuals listed below at the location indicated: 6250 Via Real, Carpinteria, CA 93013 February 7th at 10AM

Ellen Owen : Chair, Couch, Table, Bags, Boxes, Totes, Desk, Shelves, Lamps, House Decor, Fan, Luggage.

Jean­Paul Garcia : Boxes, Totes, Bags, Personal Documents, Cooler. Erik Betancourt : TV Mount, Chair, Couch, Dresser.

Barbara McKeon : Bags, Boxes, Files, Personal Papers, Suitcases, Wicker Baskets.

Lila Azita Saremi : Six Chairs, Couch, Dresser, Mattress, Table, Art, Paddles, Blow­up Raft, Bags, Pillow, Rug.

Linda Mac Neil : DVD/VCR, Books, 75 Boxes, Files, Personal Papers.

Tamra Stewart : Bags, Boxes, Clothes, Personal Papers, Photographs, Totes, Chair, Hampers.

Adam Cordero : Musical Equipment, Luggage, Deep Sea Fishing Equipment, Ammo Box.

The auction will be listed and advertised on www.storagetreasures. com. Purchases must be made with cash only and paid at the above referenced facility in order to complete the transaction. Extra Space Storage may refuse any bid and may rescind any purchase up until the winning bidder takes possession of the personal property.

NOTICE OF PROVISIONAL APPOINTMENT

NOTICE OF PROVISIONAL APPOINTMENT

NOTICE OF ZONING ADMINISTRATOR HEARING

Hybrid Public Hearing – In Person and via Zoom

Tuesday, January 31, 2023 at 2:00PM

Target Tentative Parcel Map to create 2 lots and adoption of a California Environmental Quality Act Categorical Exemption 6861 & 6865 Hollister Avenue APNs 073-100-033, -034, -035 Case No. 21-0002-SUB

ATTENTION: The meeting will be held in person and via the Zoom platform. The public may also view the meeting online at https://www.cityofgoleta.org/ goletameetings.

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Zoning Administrator of the City of Goleta will conduct a public hearing on the merits of the proposed Tentative Parcel Map (TPM). The date and time of the Zoning Administrator hearing is:

DATE/TIME: Tuesday, January 31, 2023 at 2:00 PM

LOCATION: Goleta City Hall – Council Chambers (In Person and via Zoom) 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B, Goleta, CA 93117

PROJECT DESCRIPTION AND LAND USE DESIGNATIONS: The site is located in the Inland portion of the City and the site has is located within two General Plan/Coastal Land Use Plan (GP/CLUP) Land use designations and two zoning designations, namely Regional Commercial (CR) and Community Commercial (CC). This application is for a two-lot subdivision of a single legal lot of 8.872 acres. The site in question is known as 6861 and 6865 Hollister Avenue and APNs 073100-033, -034, and -035.

The two-lot subdivision would place the Target Store and 457 spaces/88% of the parking lot area on proposed Lot A (7.636 acre lot) and would place the Inline shops and 63 spaces/12% of the parking lot area on proposed Lot B (1.236 acre lot). Proposed Lot A would be located in the CR designated portion of the site and proposed Lot B would be located in the CC designated portion of the site.

No new development or additions are proposed as part of this application. The map would create individual lots for the two buildings and the existing parking and circulation, landscaping, and lighting would also remain.

The Zoning Administrator will be the decision maker for this project unless its decision is appealed to the City Council.

ENVIRONMENTAL REVIEW FINDINGS: Pursuant to the requirements of the California Environmental Quality Act (CEQA) (Public Resources Code, §§ 21000 et seq.), the regulations promulgated thereunder (14 Cal. Code of Regulations, §§ 15000, et seq.), and the City’s Environmental Review Guidelines, the project has been found to be exempt from CEQA and a Notice of Exemption is proposed (Attachment A). The City of Goleta is acting as the Lead Agency for this project.

The proposed parcel map is fewer than four parcels (three parcels). The project is in an urbanized area where all public services and facilities are available and is not located within an environmentally sensitive area. No physical development is proposed. Therefore, the project has been found to be exempt from CEQA pursuant to §§ 15315 (Minor Land Divisions).

CORTESE LIST: The Project site is not listed on the EnviroStor online database of hazardous site records maintained by the California Department of Toxic Substances Control TSC in coordination with the California State Water Resources Control Board consistent with Government Code § 65962.5 (the “Cortese list”).

DOCUMENT AVAILABILITY: The hearing documents and all documents referenced therein may be obtained by contacting the Planner listed below (see the “For Further Information” section). Staff reports, project plans and related materials for the Zoning Administrator hearing will be posted on the City’s website at least 72 hours prior to the meeting.

PUBLIC COMMENT: All interested persons are encouraged to attend the public hearing and to present written and/or oral comments. All letters should be addressed to the Kim Dominguez, Goleta City Hall, 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B, Goleta, CA 93117 or kdominguez@cityofgoleta.org. Letters must be received by Kim Dominguez by 9:00 A.M. the day of the hearing for consideration.

ELECTRONIC PARTICIPATION: Please register for Zoning Administrator Hearing on January 31, 2023 at 2:00 PM at: https://us06web.zoom.us/webinar/register/ WN_NfycDQPSQLatjabYyM_LJA Webinar ID: 846 5956 2067

After registering, you will receive a confirmation email containing information about joining the webinar. You will be connected to audio using your computer’s microphone and speakers (VoIP). A headset is recommended. You can also select the option to use your telephone, but you must use the Zoom software to interact with the meeting. Select “Use Telephone” after joining the webinar to use your telephone. Oral comments during a meeting may be made by electronic participation only.

FOR FURTHER INFORMATION: Additional information including the application and project file can be viewed by contacting Travis Lee, Associate Planner at 805562-5528 or tlee@cityofgoleta.org.

REVIEW PROCESS: The project is subject to approval by the Zoning Administrator (ZA). The next steps include: (1) a public hearing by the ZA on January 31, 2023 to consider the parcel map, (2) a 10-day appeal period following the ZAs decision, and then (3) Condition Compliance/Map Clearance leading to Final Map recordation.

The Santa Barbara Unified School District Governing Board of Trustees has made a provisional appointment to fill a vacancy left by the resignation effective November 30, 2022 of Trustee Laura Capps. On January 12, 2023, the Board appointed Mr. William Banning to fill the vacancy and serve to the next regularly scheduled election for district governing board members, November 2024.

The Santa Barbara Unified School District Governing Board of Trustees has made a provisional appointment to fill a vacancy left by the resignation effective November 30, 2022 of Trustee Laura Capps. On January 12, 2023, the Board appointed Mr. William Banning to fill the vacancy and serve to the next regularly scheduled election for district governing board members, November 2024.

APPEALS: The Zoning Administrator’s decision may be appealed by an applicant or an aggrieved party, pursuant to Goleta Municipal Code Section 17.52.120, as part of an appeal of the Review Authority’s action on the entire project. Appeals must be filed, and associated fees must be paid, within 10 calendar days of the appealable decision.

This appointment shall become effective unless a petition calling for a special election with a sufficient number of signatures is filed with the office of the county superintendent of schools within 30 days of the date of the provisional appointment. (Ed. Code 5091)

Posted: January 13, 2023

This appointment shall become effective unless a petition calling for a special election with a sufficient number of signatures is filed with the office of the county superintendent of schools within 30 days of the date of the provisional appointment. (Ed. Code 5091)

Posted: January 19, 2023

Note: In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you need assistance to participate in this hearing, please contact Deborah Lopez, City Clerk, at (805) 961-7505 or cityclerkgroup@cityofgoleta.org. Notification at least 72 hours prior to the hearing will enable City staff to make reasonable arrangements.

Note: If you challenge the City’s final action on this Project in court, you may be limited to only those issues you or someone else raised in written or oral testimony and/or evidence provided to the City on or before the date of the public hearing (Government Code Section 65009(b) [2]).

Publish: Santa Barbara Independent on January 19, 2023

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