Santa Barbara Independent 1/12/23

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Barbara Santa Barbara Bestselling Author Rachel Ignotofsky on Sharing the Wonders of Art and Science Through Design
Santa
by Leslie Dinaberg photos by Thomas Mason
Is
+ + Best-selling Author Rachel Ignotofsky on Sharing the Wonders of Art and Science Through Design JAN. 12-19, 2023 VOL. 37 NO. 887 Drawing Her Own Path to Success Drawing Her Own Path to Success
Storm Wreaks Havoc
MCASB
Reborn Kelly Barsky Is UCSB’s New Athletic Director
2 THE INDEPENDENT JANUARY 12, 2023 INDEPENDENT.COM (805) 893-3535 | www.ArtsAndLectures.UCSB.edu Granada event tickets can also be purchased at: (805) 899-2222 | www.GranadaSB.org 2023 Grammy Nominee
“Riveting show, superbly executed.” – The Evening Standard Tue,
/ 7 PM / Granada Theatre Tickets start at $20 Joyce
Il
Zefira
Marie
An Arts & Lectures Co-commission Presented in
with
and
An Iconic, Groundbreaking Theatrical Tour de Force
Fusing music, movement and theatre, EDEN is a breathtaking, through-performed tour de force from the multi-awardwinning Joyce DiDonato that’s been immediately celebrated as “iconic” and “ground-breaking.” Special appearance by the Music Academy Sing! children’s chorus.
Jan 24
DiDonato, executive producer and mezzo-soprano
Pomo d’Oro, early music ensemble
Valova, conductor
Lambert-Le Bihan, stage director John Torres, lighting designer
association
Community Environmental Council, the Music Academy, Santa Barbara Botanic Garden, Santa Barbara Choral Society
UCSB Department of Music

Die Stadt ohne Juden ( The City Without Jews ) Matthias Pintscher, Music Director/Conductor

Sat, Jan 28 / 7 PM / Lobero Theatre (note new venue)

The world’s greatest contemporary ensemble performs a new score to a 1924 silent movie that predicted the horrors of antisemitism.

Pink Martini featuring China Forbes

Fri, Feb 3 / 8 PM / Granada Theatre Tickets going fast!

– Thomas Lauderdale, bandleader/pianist

Elegant, fun and blessed with flawless musicianship, the globetrotting Pink Martini is a perennial Santa Barbara favorite that guarantees an evening of enchanting international entertainment.

Monterey Jazz Festival on Tour

Christian Sands, Dee Dee Bridgewater, Kurt Elling, Lakecia Benjamin, Yasushi Nakamura, Clarence Penn Sun, Jan 29 / 7 PM / UCSB Campbell Hall

Celebrating 65 years, the illustrious Monterey Jazz Festival sends six of its finest jazz ambassadors – including Grammy-winning vocalists Dee Dee Bridgewater and Kurt Elling – to Santa Barbara as part of its popular touring program.

Cirque FLIP Fabrique

Muse

Sun, Feb 5 / 7 PM

Granada Theatre

Canada’s thrilling FLIP Fabrique explores what it means to be your true self in Muse, a refreshing view of contemporary circus that combines breathtaking artistry and athleticism and challenges gender roles.

INDEPENDENT.COM JANUARY 12, 2023 THE INDEPENDENT 3
Kurt Elling Dee Dee Bridgewater Co-presented with Jewish Federation of Greater Santa Barbara
Ensemble Intercontemporain
“A rollicking around-the-world musical adventure.”
(805) 893-3535 | www.ArtsAndLectures.UCSB.edu Granada event tickets can also be purchased at: (805) 899-2222 | www.GranadaSB.org

art matters lectures

Reimagining the Museum Jan-Lodewijk Grootaers

Independent curator march 2 Ingres’s Creoles (Secrets) Darcy Grimaldo Grigsby

Richard and Rhoda Goldman Distinguished Professor in the Arts and Humanities University of California, Berkeley april 6 School of New York Revisited: 11 + 11 + 1 Karen Wilkin

Independent curator and critic may 4

Men in Pink: Eighteenth-Century French Portraiture

Melissa Hyde

and Distinguished Teaching Scholar University of Florida, Gainesville

thursdays, 5:30–6:30pm

mary craig auditorium Santa Barbara Museum of Art 1130 State Street

Single tickets: $10 sbma Members; $15 Non-Members Free to students with valid ID & Upper Level Members

For more information, visit www.sbma.net/artmatters

Reserve or purchase tickets at the Visitor Services desk in person, by phone 805.884.6423, or online at tickets.sbma.net

Since 2017, Art Matters speakers have been selected, introduced, and mediated by SBMA Deputy Director & Chief Curator, Eik Kahng.

Generous support for Art Matters was provided by the SBMA Women’s Board.

4 THE INDEPENDENT JANUARY 12, 2023 INDEPENDENT.COM
february 2
Professor
Jean-Baptiste Perronneau, Olivier Journu (1724–1783), 1756. Pastel on blue-gray laid paper, laid down on canvas. 227/8 × 181/2 in. (58.1 × 47 cm). Metropolitan Museum of Art, 2003.26. 1130 State Street, Santa Barbara, CA Tuesday–Sunday 11 am–5 pm Thursday 11 am–8 pm www.sbma.net

Drawing Her Own Path to Success

We asked photographer Ingrid Bostrom about her top three Indy assignments of 2022. There’s no way I can isolate my favorites to three but these are high on the list:

1) Portraits with rapper SadBoy Loko. I’m a sucker for people with a gritty past, a hopeful future, and a radiant smile. Given his rapper name, his upbeat spirit and infectious smile were all the more satisfying to witness.

2) Summer Solstice coverage. Of all my assignments this year, this one was what I spent the most time on. I stopped by the Community Arts Workshop site (where costumes and floats were created) numerous times. I absorbed background stories and creative visions. By the time the solstice parade materialized, I was so invested in the process leading up to it. I reveled at the hard work and magic that came together. This was also my first opportunity with the Indy to put words to my observations with an introduction to that cover story.

3) Artist Jane Gottlieb, who embodies the best of this bold and colorful year. I am especially inspired by women unabashedly expressing a unique and powerful voice. Her ultra-bright artwork and home are legendary and were so memorable to photograph.

INDEPENDENT.COM JANUARY 12, 2023 THE INDEPENDENT 5 INSTAGRAM | @SBINDEPENDENT TWITTER | @SBINDYNEWS FACEBOOK | SANTA BARBARA INDEPENDENT NEWSLETTER | INDEPENDENT.COM/NEWSLETTERS SUBSCRIBE | INDEPENDENT.COM/SUBSCRIBE Editor in Chief Marianne Partridge Publisher Brandi Rivera Executive Editor Nick Welsh Senior Editor Tyler Hayden Senior Writer Matt Kettmann Associate Editor Jackson Friedman Opinions Editor Jean Yamamura Arts, Culture, and Community Editor Leslie Dinaberg Calendar Editor Terry Ortega News Reporters Ryan P. Cruz, Callie Fausey Senior Arts Writer Josef Woodard Copy Chief Tessa Reeg Copy Editor Carrie Bluth Sports Editor Victor Bryant Food Writer George Yatchisin Food & Drink Fellow Vanessa Vin Travel Writers Macduff Everton, Mary Heebner Production Manager Ava Talehakimi Art Director Xavier Pereyra Production Designer Jillian Critelli Graphic Designer Jinhee Hwang Web Content Managers Don Brubaker, Caitlin Kelley Columnists Dennis Allen, Gail Arnold, Sara Caputo, Christine S. Cowles, Roger Durling, Marsha Gray, Betsy J. Green, Amy Ramos, Jerry Roberts, Starshine Roshell Contributors Rob Brezsny, Melinda Burns, Ben Ciccati, Cheryl Crabtree, John Dickson,
Garcia, Keith Hamm, Rebecca Horrigan, Eric
Paul Wellman Founding Staff Emeriti Audrey Berman, George Delmerico, Richard Evans, Laszlo Hodosy Honorary Consigliere Gary J. Hill IndyKids Bella and Max Brown, Elijah Lee Bryant, Amaya Nicole Bryant, William Gene Bryant, Henry and John Poett Campbell, Emilia Imojean Friedman, Finley James Hayden, Madeline Rose and Mason Carrington Kettmann, Norah Elizabeth Lee, Izzy and Maeve McKinley Print subscriptions are available, paid in advance, for $120 per year. Send subscription requests with name and address to subscriptions@independent.com. The contents of the Independent are copyrighted 2022 by the Santa Barbara Independent, Inc. No part may be reproduced without permission from the publisher. The publisher assumes no responsibility for unsolicited material. A stamped, self-addressed envelope must accompany all submissions expected to be returned. The Independent is available on the internet at independent.com. Press run of the Independent is 40,000 copies. Audited certification of circulation is available on request. The Independent is a legal adjudicated newspaper court decree no. 157386. Contact information: 1715 State Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101 PHONE (805) 965-5205; FAX (805) 965-5518 EMAIL news@independent.com,letters@independent.com,advertising@independent.com Staff email addresses can be found at independent.com/about-us TABLE of CONTENTS volume 37 #887, Jan. 12-19, 2023 NEWS............................ 7 OPINIONS 15 Angry Poodle Barbecue . . . . . . . . . . . . 15 Letters 19 OBITUARIES 14 THE WEEK.................... 27 LIVING 30 FOOD & DRINK .............. 36 Restaurant Guy . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . . 41 ARTS LIFE 42 ASTROLOGY.................. 45 CLASSIFIEDS 46 ON THE COVER: Rachel Ignotofsky. Photo by Thomas Mason. Design by Xavier Pereyra.
Camille
HvolbØll,
Shannon Kelley, Kevin McKiernan, Zoë Schiffer, Ethan Stewart, Tom Tomorrow, Maggie Yates, John Zant Director of Advertising Sarah Sinclair Marketing and Promotions Manager Emily Lee Advertising Representatives Camille Cimini Fruin, Suzanne Cloutier, Remzi Gokmen, Tonea Songer Digital Marketing Specialist Graham Brown Accounting Administrator Tobi Feldman Office Manager/Legal Advertising Tanya Spears Guiliacci Distribution Scott Kaufman Editorial Interns Ellie Bouwer, Melea Maglalang, Zoha Malik, Sasha Senal, Lola Watts Columnist Emeritus Barney Brantingham Photography Editor Emeritus
THOUSAND WORDS
WORTH A
Best-Selling Author Rachel Ignotofsky on Sharing the Wonders of Art and Science Through Design by Leslie Dinaberg 21 COVER STORY
INGRID BOSTROM 1321 Alameda Padre Serra, SB 93103 | 805-682-2989 | www.sbms.org | Financial-Aid Available IN-PERSON OPEN HOUSE | JANUARY 18, 2023 SANTA BARBARA MIDDLE SCHOOL START TIME AT 6:00 PM | RSVP VIA QR CODE WE SPECIALIZE IN THE MIDDLE SCHOOL YEARS | GRADES 6-9 CREATIVE ARTS & SPORTS INNOVATIVE ACADEMICS POWER OF COMMUNITY OUTDOOR EDUCATION

AN AMERICAN DREAM

FEB 18 | LOBERO THEATRE

Treasured possessions become symbols of lost homes for two women during World War II: a Japanese-American facing incarceration and a German Jewish immigrant preoccupied by those she left behind.

THE LIGHT IN THE PIAZZA

MAR 23-26

| CENTER STAGE THEATRE

This Tony award-winning romantic musical about a mother and daughter touring the Tuscan countryside has been hailed as “the most soulsatisfying score written for Broadway so far this century” by The Chicago Tribune

Music and lyrics by Adam Guettel, book by Craig Lucas

THE VALKYRIE APR 23 | LOBERO THEATRE

Star-crossed lovers Siegmund and Sieglinde provoke the wrath of the Gods of Valhalla, who decree the death of Siegmund. Brünnhilde, the titular Valkyrie, defies her father Wotan, leader of the gods, to rescue Sieglinda and the couple’s unborn child.

6 THE INDEPENDENT JANUARY 12, 2023 INDEPENDENT.COM
operasb.org
Music by Jack Perla, libretto by Jessica Murphy Moo Music by Richard Wagner, adapted by Graham Vick and Jonathan Dove

of the

S.B. in ‘Recovery’ Mode After Monster Storm

County Withstands Record-Setting Rains on Five-Year Anniversary of Deadly 1/9 Debris Flow

Mother Nature knows how to throw a hell of a party. By the time the curtain fell this Monday night, enough rain had fallen to raise the water level in Lake Cachuma by 32 feet. At peak flows, Cachuma was rising at a rate of two feet per hour. Before the recent rains, Cachuma was around 31 percent full; as of press time Wednesday morning, it was at 82.4 percent capacity. Runoff waters were reported flowing into the South Coast’s single most important water source at a rate of 50,000 cubic feet per second. Translated into layperson’s terms, Lake Cachuma experienced a deposit of more than 22 billion gallons.

That was the good news delivered unto the Santa Barbara County Supervisors at a special briefing Tuesday morning on the spate of storms rolling through Santa Barbara and much of California. The other good news was that after record-setting rains, first responders reported no one had been killed by the storm, no one was missing, and no major injuries were sustained.

Given the unprecedented intensity and volume of the deluge 13 inches within 24 hours along San Marcos Pass, six inches along the South Coast, and four inches in Northern Santa Barbara County this information passed as nearly miraculous news.

“That’s a really amazing fact,” Supervisor Das Williams exclaimed.

Williams represents the district that bore the brunt of the historic debris flow that ravaged Montecito precisely and exactly five years ago Monday. Twenty-three people died that day; 500 structures were destroyed and damaged.

Williams said residents of the district were to be excused if they felt “cursed” by the timing of Monday’s pleural pounding. January 9, he said, made the community “more resilient.”

A brand-new debris basin much bigger than the other two in Montecito had been built on Randall Road where seven homes had been destroyed or damaged by the January 9 mayhem in 2018. That debris basin was 30 percent full as of Tuesday, according to Scott McGolpin, County Public Works director. The two smaller debris basins in Montecito were both full, he said. The Santa Monica Debris Basin in Carpinteria, he said, was 80 percent full. McGolpin said he is asking the Army Corp of Engineers to help, and the plan is to remove all the contents of those debris basins and relocate them to Goleta Beach for “beach nourishment.”

According to Public Works Deputy Director Julie Hagen at a press conference held later that day, all of the City of Santa Barbara’s debris basins are full or partially full, and at least 500,000 cubic yards of material will need to be cleared over the next few weeks.

Steel debris nets were installed upslope along Montecito creeks to block potentially deadly rocks and boulders from caroming downstream. Based on all this, Williams concluded, the people of Montecito have grown more resilient not less because of the events of January 9.

“I don’t think we’re cursed,” he stated. “I think we are truly, truly blessed.”

For many in the first-responder universe, now may not be the time for biblical reflection. Other storms are rolling in. Another couple of inches are expected to drop this weekend. Thunderstorms are predicted for the area before that.

“The storm that we just experienced was a significant and powerful weather event, one in a series of storms that have and will continue to hit Santa Barbara County,” Sheriff Bill Brown said at Tuesday’s press conference. “Looks like we will have a break in the weather until this weekend, when another of these atmospheric river storms is forecasted to come into our area.”

The South County was especially affected, Brown added, with “unprecedented and historic rainfall levels over the past

INDEPENDENT.COM JANUARY 12, 2023 THE INDEPENDENT 7 NEWS
WEEK JAN. 5-12, 2023
WEATHER
For the latest news and longer versions of many of these stories, visit independent.com/news
RYAN P. CRUZ, CALLIE FAUSEY, TYLER HAYDEN, NICK WELSH, and JEAN YAMAMURA, with INDEPENDENT STAFF
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CARL PERRY JOHN MACFARLANE @BAYLISSENNS ROADS LESS TRAVELED: A section of East Mountain Drive south of Cold Spring Trailhead (above) was washed away in Monday’s storm, which closed 47 roads across the county. The State Street underpass (above right) was one of many to flood. Some employed alternate means of transportation to navigate Santa Barbara’s waterlogged roadways, such as this kayaker (bottom right)

PUBLIC NOTICE

Pursuant to the Oil Pollution Act of 1990 (33 USC 2714(c)), Ocean Angel VI, LLC as the registered owner and operator of the F/V SPERANZA MARIE (643138) has been designated as the source of a discharge of oil into the Pacific Ocean on or about 15 December 2022 following the vessel’s grounding on or near Santa Cruz Island in the Chinese Harbor area, off the coast of Santa Barbara County. This discharge may have impacted Santa Cruz Island’s Chinese Harbor area, and therefore as the owner/operator of the vessel, Ocean Angel VI, LLC is accepting claims for certain uncompensated damages and removal costs associated with the oil spill.

Removal costs and damages which may be the subject of compensation include removal costs performed in accordance with the National Contingency Plan; damage to natural resources; damage to or loss of real or personal property; loss of subsistence use of natural resources; loss of government revenues; loss of profits and earnings capacity; and increased cost of public services which are attributed to and caused by an oil spill.

Claims are to be submitted in writing, signed by the claimant under a penalty of perjury, for a specified amount (or sum certain); and should include all evidence to support the damages claimed. Claims presented may include claims for interim short-term damages representing less than the full amount to which a claimant ultimately may be entitled. It should be noted that payment of such a claim shall not preclude recovery for damages not reflected in the paid or settled partial claims. Claims should be mailed to the Claims Representative at the following address:

Ocean Angel VI, LLC

C/O Global Risk Solutions

Attention: F/V SPERANZA MARIE Claims

1000 Brickell Avenue Suite 610 Miami, Florida 33131

Claimants may also call (Toll-Free) 866.210.3347 for additional information and to receive a claims form. Office hours are from 9:00 AM to 5:00 PM PST, Monday through Friday, except holidays.

Any claims which are denied, or which are not resolved within 90 days after the date of submission to the Claims Representative may be submitted to:

Director National Pollution Funds Center (CA)

US COAST GUARD STOP 7605

2703 MARTIN LUTHER KING JR AVE SE WASHINGTON, DC 20593-7605

STORM CONT’D FROM P. 7

seven days,” forcing a complete shutdown of local highways in and out of Santa Barbara.

Forty-seven roads Highway 101 and Highway 154 most notably were either blocked off or otherwise rendered impassable this Monday, and more than 100 cars were abandoned due to flooding in city streets. By Tuesday, the 101 was reopened in both directions, but the 154 remained closed as of press time.

Nearly 500 homes were ordered evacuated due to Monday’s storm, including all of Montecito and parts of Carpinteria and the City of Santa Barbara. At Tuesday’s press conference, city and county officials announced the end of all evacuation orders, as well as all shelter-in-place advisories for impacted areas of the Cave Fire and Alisal Fire burn scars and Foxen Canyon/Santa Maria Mesa/Tepusquet areas.

During Tuesday’s press conference, Santa Barbara Mayor Randy Rowse said, “We’ve gone from a public safety stance from search and rescue to recovery mode.”

Rowse joined representatives from Santa Barbara City Fire Department, Police Department, Sheriff’s Office, Public Works Department, and the Santa Barbara County Office of Emergency Management to provide an update on Monday’s storm.

Rowse said that while the worst of the storm has passed, “hazards still exist” and city residents should “stay out of flooded areas if you can.”

The City Fire Department received more than 400 storm-related calls and had more than 250 firefighters from several agencies throughout the state to help with emergencies. Fire Chief Chris Mailes said there were “countless rescues,” in the past two days, including six helicopter rescues, with two helicopter hoist rescues occurring Tuesday morning.

Santa Barbara Police Chief Kelly Gordon said the department received more than 160 calls, and urged residents to stay clear of all areas with standing water or barricades.

“Please don’t go around the barricades. Please don’t move the barricades,” she said.

Paradise Road was closed due to “multiple roadslides,” she said, and Tepusquet Road was impassable. Portions of East

Mountain Drive were washed away near the Cold Spring debris basin, and would be closed for an extended period, along with North Jameson Lane between Sheffield Drive and Olive Mill Road, and Jalama and Gibraltar Roads.

The storm affected many other areas in the city as well. All waste collection was suspended for Tuesday, along with all public schools in the county. Both were set to resume on Wednesday.

After suspending service due to the storm, both the Santa Barbara Metropolitan Transit District (MTD) and Santa Barbara Airport (SBA) began to gradually resume operations this week based on improving weather and flooding conditions. Bus service was expected to resume to a normal weekday schedule on Thursday, January 12, MTD announced Tuesday. SBA, meanwhile, began a phased reopening on Tuesday afternoon and was working to restore service to and from SBA as soon as possible. In the meantime, SBA was advising passengers to check with airlines directly regarding flight status.

Meanwhile, Amtrak’s Pacific Surfliner is currently suspending train service north of Goleta starting January 12 for 10-16 days. Limited services will start operations between Los Angeles and Goleta in both directions.

Gelson’s was forced to close for the day due to many of the employees being unable to travel. At Cottage Hospital, staff were all still in place and more than 50 staff members were provided overnight lodging when they couldn’t get home or stayed to cover their colleagues’ shifts. “All three of our hospitals and emergency rooms have provided uninterrupted care 24/7 throughout the storm,” said hospital spokesperson Maria Zate.

There are pressing infrastructure issues that need to be addressed. Damage was inflicted to both private property and public infrastructure.

In the city of Santa Barbara, for example, reportedly 5,000 gallons of raw sewage got loose; public health officials ordered the public to stay away from West Beach. City residents had apparently sought to expedite the discharge of raging storm waters deep

8 THE INDEPENDENT JANUARY 12, 2023 INDEPENDENT.COM JAN. 5-12, 2023
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Flooding in downtown Santa Barbara on Monday CARL PERRY

Pozole Night to Help Family with Medical Bills

Thursday evening, January 12, Franklin Elementary School will be holding a special Pozole Night to help raise money toward medical bills for Santa Barbara mother Adriana Quintero, who is currently awaiting a liver transplant at UCLA Health.

School staff and parent group Padres Unidos de Franklin helped organize the event, which will include homemade pozole with all the fixings, sodas, and live entertainment from ¡Viva el Arte de Santa Bárbara!, according to Franklin School Principal Casie Kilgore.

Kilgore said the Quintero family has been a part of the Franklin School community for years. Both her sons have attended the school, and their grandmother and great-grandmother also worked for Franklin in the past. As soon as staff and parents at the school heard Quintero was experiencing health issues and would be in need of a liver transplant, Kilgore said they wanted to do anything they could to help the family.

“They’ve always been such a wonderful family, willing to give to those in need,” Kilgore said, “so we wanted to be able to help them.”

Quintero is currently at UCLA Health facilities with her family awaiting a liver transplant, and Kilgore said the family’s insurance does not cover the time leading up to the procedure, leaving the family to pay out of pocket until then. Kilgore hopes this benefit will help relieve some of the financial burden.

ENERGY

The Southern California Gas Company is warning its customers that they can expect to receive “shockingly high” gas bills for January, as prices for natural gas continue to blow up along the West Coast. The explosion in costs for natural gas for both energy companies and consumers natural gas prices have more than doubled since this time last year are reportedly due to high demand and short supply. Below-average winter temperatures in California mean customers are using more heat. Simultaneously, out-of-state natural gas suppliers, which California relies on for 90 percent of its natural gas, have reported pipeline constraints, leading to reduced capacity and lower westbound natural gas flows, according to the U.S. Energy Information Administration.

Although the colder winter months normally come with spikes in energy costs, consumers are really feeling the burn during this January’s peak in price when compared to last year’s. According to SoCalGas, if a customer’s peak winter bill was around $65 last winter, they can

Local parents will be preparing the homemade soup, with all the traditional fixings donated by Franklin’s 6th-grade class, and drinks donated by school staff. UCSB Arts & Lectures donated the entertainment through ¡Viva el Arte! which already had several performances planned throughout the next week and decided to help the school with an hour of traditional music.

The event starts at 5 p.m. and will last until 7 p.m. or until supplies run out. The suggested donation is $10 per bowl, cash only.

For more information, view the school’s Instagram page @franklinschoolsb Ryan P. Cruz

of the Community Environmental Council’s Climate Stewards program are equipped to play an active role in the statewide effort to advance rapid & equitable solutions to the climate crisis. Classes online weekly January 25 – March 22.

expect to see bills closer to $160 this year.

“These increases are primarily due to increases in the price of gas and, to a much lesser extent, increased transportation rates,” SoCalGas said, adding that rates for transportation are set by the California Public Utilities Commission.

SoCalGas and other utility companies have noted that they do not set market prices of natural gas which have more than doubled between December and January nor profit from rising wholesale gas prices, which have quadrupled since January 2022. However, a Los Angeles Times article on the issue pointed out that SoCalGas is owned by the energy giant Sempra, “a big player” in shipping liquefied natural gas to Europe from the U.S., with the shipping of natural gas supply to Europe possibly leading to inventory shortages and contributing to rising energy prices in the U.S.

For tips and tools for lowering energy costs and information on assistance programs, see the longer version of this story at independent.com/shockingly-high-bills

INDEPENDENT.COM JANUARY 12, 2023 THE INDEPENDENT 9 CONT’D NEWS of the WEEK COMMUNITY
‘Shockingly High’ Gas Bills Ahead COURTESY
ENTREPRENEURS AND SMALL BUSINESS OWNERS Get the skills, training and assistance you and your employees need — at SBCC School of Extended Learning, in partnership with EDC’s Small Business Development Center! Short classes and workshops • QuickBooks® & Accounting • MS Word, Excel & Powerpoint • Leadership Skills • Entrepreneurship Certificate • Bilingual Computer Skills • In-person and Zoom options! Expert advisors and resources • Start-up Assistance • Business Planning • Marketing & Branding • E-Commerce & Social Media • Finance & Capital Access • NEW! Satellite centers at Wake and Schott campuses! NO-COST TRAINING AND ASSISTANCE! GET STARTED TODAY! (805) 898-8160 sbcc.edu/smallbiz The Economic Development Collaborative hosts the Small Business Development Center and is funded in part through a cooperative agreement with the U.S. Small Business Administration and a Grant with the Governor’s Office of Economic Development. SBCC School of Extended Learning Adult High School and GED, Career Skills, and English as a Second Language programs are made possible in part by the Santa Barbara Adult Education Consortium. IT’S A NEW YEAR. TIME TO GET TO BUSINESS! IT’S A NEW YEAR. TIME TO GET TO BUSINESS! Learn more and register today! cec.pub/winter2023 Graduates
TAKE ACTION Become a Climate Steward Classes online weekly January 25 -
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Santa Barbara mother Adriana Quintero is awaiting a liver transplant at UCLA Health.
March

enough in some Eastside neighborhoods to ride on kayaks or paddleboards by popping open a few manhole covers, thus inundating the city’s sewage system with volumes far exceeding its capacity to process. According to city water czar Joshua Haggmark, the volume of water flowing into the wastewater treatment plant was five times higher than normal. Some drains were likewise overwhelmed, with jets of water reportedly spouting four feet into the air.

Haggmark, who’d begun his workday at 4:30 a.m. Tuesday, had little time for special briefings; the caretaker for the city’s Gibraltar Reservoir which spilled last Friday morning for the first time since 2018 needed to be dug out so that he could come and go.

With more volatile storms on the horizon, the supervisors heard how it’s not always easy to plan for their arrival. They also heard the challenges this volatility and unpredictability can pose when attempting to communicate evacuation orders to the public. Sheriff Brown described in some detail how approaching one of Monday’s press briefings, he’d been prepared to order everyone living in the burn scar areas of the Thomas, Alisal, and Cave fires to immediately evacuate. But shortly before taking to the podium, Brown said, he learned from the National Weather Service that especially intense flash flooding was imminent. The intensity of the rains hit unprecedented levels. At San Marcos Pass, the rain was coming down at a rate of 1.56 inches per hour. Down lower, it was .6 to .8 inches an hour. It would not be safe to have so many cars on the road, Brown concluded, so he issued shelter-in-place orders instead, with the proviso that the evacuation orders would be soon to follow. Shortly after, however, Brown said, he learned that the flash flood orders wouldn’t be lifted until midnight.

If this was confusing to the public at large, the supervisors were told, it was confusing to the people issuing them as well.

“The storm was more intense than anticipated,” Brown would tell the supervisors more than once.

To the extent any of the supervisors had problems with this, they kept such concerns

to themselves. Supervisor Bob Nelson, who represents the 4th District, expressed vexation that the lion’s share of the public safety resources was dedicated to South Coast communities. Orcutt, which is part of Nelson’s district, took the brunt of the storm up north, he said, and blamed a debris flow for the destruction of two residential properties. Nelson was most upset, however, by the lack of focus he charged that had been placed on evacuating the homeless people living in the Santa Ynez River riverbeds in Lompoc and Santa Maria.

“I’m really disappointed on the lack of emphasis on those individuals of our community,” Nelson stated. “It would seem these people are our most vulnerable.”

Brown stated he’d reached out to the police chiefs of Santa Maria and Lompoc offering to help. Brown said riverbed squatters had, in fact, been notified. Most, he said, had “self-evacuated,” adding, “It would have been impossible for them not to.” Brown said departmental helicopters had been deployed to the riverbed to warn people setting up camps. Nelson was not impressed, noting that those flights had taken place six days before the floods.

“We had a child born in the riverbed the day of the storm,” Nelson added.

Brown was not inclined to back down.

“The proof is in the pudding,” he noted. “There were no fatalities, nobody was missing, and [there were] no major injuries.” Besides, he said, evacuations are not mandated for uninhabitable spaces.

George Chapjian, head of the county’s department of Social Services, sought to assure Supervisor Nelson that county outreach workers had in fact delivered flyers or contacted riverbed residents directly via cell phone texts. But in the moment, Chapjian could not summon to mind Nelson’s name to address him directly as is the protocol despite considerable effort. Supervisor Williams instated as board chair earlier in the meeting sought to alleviate the awkwardness of the moment.

“George, don’t worry about that,” Williams said. “Supervisor Nelson’s new mustache threw me off too.” Nelson is now sporting a cowboy-style handlebar mustache as opposed to the full-beard look he’s worn in recent months.

10 THE INDEPENDENT JANUARY 12, 2023 INDEPENDENT.COM JAN. 5-12, 2023
n
STORM CONT’D FROM P. 8 AFTER THE STORM: Cleanup efforts were underway on Tuesday near De la Vina and Haley streets.
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DON BRUBAKER

Oil Leaks Confound

Inthe face of this month’s pounding rains, the source of two oil leaks one by Summerland, the other along Toro Canyon Creek can’t be either found of plugged. In the case of Toro Canyon Creek, the leak involved an old open-pit mining operation upslope from Highway 192. For reasons still not officially determined, county Public Works officials say 420 gallons of oil and water were released from an oil and water separator and underground storage tank on January 1, 2023. It remains uncertain how much of that has been captured by vacuum trucks dispatched to the site.

“The best way to confine the spread of oil from these types of seeps is capturing the oil and then transporting it to a refinery or oil production facility,” wrote Public Works spokesperson Lael Wageneck. Capping the well, he said, would build up pressure that would result in the oil being pushed out at some other location. By deploying an oil and water separator in conjunction with an underground storage tank, he said, the oil can be directed to just one location.

The separator and underground storage tank in place now was built 25 years ago by the Environmental Protection Agency. Six years ago, it sustained damage during the Thomas Fire. That damage was not discovered until after a previous oil spill at the site that was first reported in August 2020.

The county’s slow response to the spill has been the subject of an ongoing investigation by the Santa Barbara District Attorney’s Office. Although no charges have been filed,

the DA has indicated that a criminal or civil action is possible. Requests for documents by the DA’s Office under the Public Records Act as part of this investigation have been rebuffed by the County Counsel’s office and a private law firm it hired to handle possible criminal prosecution. This, in turn, has triggered a court fight over the release of documents. The county has currently budgeted $1.5 million to bring that system up to current technical specifications.

Meanwhile, the oil sheen spotted in the Pacific Ocean off the coast of Summerland last week was also believed to be the result of an abandoned oil well, but investigators with the Coast Guard and the State’s emergency response office have failed to determine which one. The sheen was also determined to be sufficiently diaphanous and superficial as to defy any of the containment and disbursement strategies common to the arsenal of oil spill first responders.

KCBX Loses Fight for Frequency

After 39 years of programming in Santa Barbara, the local KCBX Public Radio broadcast on 89.5 FM, KSBX, has been taken off the air. The culprit? An atmospheric phenomenon known as “ducting.”

According to Libe Washburn, an oceanographer in UCSB’s Marine Science Institute, atmosphere ducts are regions in the atmosphere near the Earth’s surface that allow radio waves to be received from distant transmitters. The ducts are caused by changes in the lower atmosphere and can affect how radio signals propagate over land and bodies of water. Ducting, in turn, influences how strong a radio signal is and how far it travels.

In a letter to listeners on December 15, KCBX president Frank Lanzone explained that ducting allows “broadcasts on a frequency many miles away to reach new coastlines and interfere with that same frequency locally.”

KCBX was losing the fight for the right to frequency against KPBS in San Diego, a radio station 200 miles away using the same frequency as KCBX’s broadcast on 89.5 FM in Santa Barbara.

“One day, you’re listening to KCBX; the next day it’s KPBS,” Lanzone wrote. “To be clear, this is not a problem that KPBS can fix, and it is not an intentional effort by them to

break into the Santa Barbara radio market.”

Washburn explained that FM radio signals are normally transmitted in straight lines, limited by “line-of-sight,” or direct lines of transmission, for radio reception. However, in atmosphere ducts, Washburn said, radio signals first bend downward and then turn back upward as they reflect off the Earth’s surface. “This process repeats over and over so that the signals follow the Earth’s surface and can be received over long distances,” he said.

Atmospheric ducting does not lead to the end of radio broadcasts very often. In his message to listeners, Lanzone attributed the issue to climate change, a suspect that shouldn’t be entirely ruled out. However, a combination of factors are involved, and Washburn noted that it cannot be said for certain whether global warming is linked to increased atmospheric ducting of radio waves.

In terms of local listeners keeping up with KCBX broadcasting, the letter states that KCBX has “no plans to reduce or limit news reporting and other coverage of the Santa Barbara area.” Lanzone told the Independent that many listeners have already turned to streaming their broadcasts online. “So we’re hopeful that most [listeners] will stay with us.”

INDEPENDENT.COM JANUARY 12, 2023 THE INDEPENDENT 11 CONT’D NEWS of the WEEK ENVIRONMENT
Nick Welsh
MEDIA
PETTY OFFICER 3RD CLASS ALEXANDER GRAY / U.S. COAST GUARD
Consistently hailed as one of the leading orchestras in the world, the Chicago Symphony Orchestra returns to Santa Barbara on Music Director Riccardo Muti’s farewell tour, performing works by Beethoven, Lyadov, and Mussorgsky’s immortal Pictures at an Exhibition
The oil sheen off Summerland Beach on 1/7
CHICAGO SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA Riccardo Muti, Music Director WEDNESDAY, JANUARY 25, 2023, 7:30PM Primary Sponsor: Northern Trust Principal Sponsor: Kum Su Kim & John Perry Sponsors: Alison & Jan Bowlus • Edward S. DeLoreto • Michele Saltoun Co-Sponsors: Bob Boghosian & Beth Gates-Warren Dorothy & John Gardner • The Granada Theatre • Ellen & John Pillsbury Don’t Miss the Classical Concert of the Year! SINGLE TICKETS ON SALE NOW Granada Theatre Box Office ⫽ (805) 899-2222 ⫽ granadasb.org 50% SAVINGS! FOUR CONCERTS MINI-SUBSCRIPTION! (805) 966-4324 ⫽ camasb.org COMMUNITY ARTS MUSIC ASSOCIATION OF SANTA BARBARA Presenting the world’s finest classical artists since 1919 CAMA’S 2022/2023 SEASON 104th Concert Season INTERNATIONAL SERIES AT THE GRANADA THEATRE SEASON SPONSOR: SAGE PUBLISHING RSVP: t.clark@mcssb.org 805-683-9383 x 104 WWW.MCSSB.ORG Montessori nurtures leadership, empathy, responsibility, self-discipline, independence, adaptability, resilience and a curiosity for lifelong learning. OPEN HOUSE SATURDAY, JANUARY 21 • 10 AM – 12 PM
Photo by Todd Rosenberg Photography

Welcome to a celebration of the influences of music of the Americas — with local ties to Santa Barbara. The performance includes Uruguayan born, Grammy©-nominated, American composer Miguel del Águila’s Concerto for Violin and Orchestra, The Journey of a Lifetime (El viaje de una vida), with violin soloist Guillermo Figueroa, and the concert world premiere of the late, Academy©-award winning, American composer and former Santa Barbara resident, Elmer Bernstein’s Toccata for Toy Trains — his score for an animated film by Ray Charles Eames, arranged into a concert piece especially for the Santa Barbara Symphony by the composer’s son, Peter. Antonín Dvorak’s magnificent Symphony No. 9, From the New World, will round out the program.

REPERTOIRE

Elmer Bernstein, arr. Peter Bernstein | Toccata For Toy Trains concert suite

Miguel Del Águila | Concerto for Violin El viaje de una vida

Antonín Dvorak | Symphony No. 9 “from the New World”

12 THE INDEPENDENT JANUARY 12, 2023 INDEPENDENT.COM June 15, 2023 An Evening with Sinatra
Saturday, January 21, 2023 | 7:30 PM Sunday, January 22, 2023 | 3 PM TheSymphony.org YOUR SEATS ARE WAITING! Tickets start at $35 Order online at bit.ly/PTVIND or scan the QR code OR call the Granada Box O ce 805.899.2222
Plains, Trains & Violins
2022/23 SEASON UP NEXT: CONCERT SPONSORS Principal Sponsor Ann Jackson Family Foundation Artist Sponsor Frederic & Nancy Golden Selection Sponsors Jean Rogers Susan & Bruce Worster THE ARTISTS
THE SYMPHONY PRESENTS Feb. 18 & 19, 2023 Transformation Apr. 15 & 16, 2023 Beethoven Dreams May 13 & 14, 2023 Platinum Sounds: The Symphony Turns 70 Mar. 18 & 19, 2023 John Williams: A Cinematic Celebration 2022/23 SEASON SPONSORS 70th Anniversary Season Sponsor: Sarah & Roger Chrisman 70th Anniversary Season Corp. Sponsor: 70th Anniversary Grand Venue Sponsor:
Nir Kabaretti, Conductor Guillermo Figueroa, Violin

Navajo

An attorney speaking for Deborah Schwartz, the three-term city planning commissioner who unsuccessfully ran for Santa Barbara mayor two years ago as a champion of downtown business interests, conceded that Schwartz had taken a small Navajo rug from Star Rug Cleaners in downtown Santa Barbara without the permission of the owner last November and returned it only late last week.

“Deborah made a poor decision that she corrected on her next visit to the store to pay for cleaning several rugs,” said attorney John Thyne III. “She asks for patience and understanding. None of us always gets it right.”

According to Mike Jensen, owner of Star Rug, Schwartz took a small Navajo rug two feet by three feet that he kept on display when she dropped off three rugs to have cleaned on November 15, 2022. When Jensen noticed the rug was missing, he reviewed store security tapes and saw it was Schwartz who took it. In the tape, Schwartz can be seen carefully folding the rug, placing it in her tote bag, and then putting the bag on the ground after the service agent working the front desk left for a back room.

Jensen said he showed the video to a friend to verify that it was Schwartz. He said he also filed a report with the Santa Barbara Police Department. The rug, he said, was worth anywhere from $800 to $1,500. He said efforts to communicate with Schwartz proved fruitless. Only after the security footage got into public distribution, Jensen said, did Schwartz return it.

When she turned it in last Thursday, Jensen said, Schwartz said there’d been a

miscommunication. Thyne took issue with the notion that the video prompted Schwartz to return the rug. She returned the rug, he said, when she picked up the three rugs she’d had cleaned. She brought in another rug for cleaning at the same time.

“Her knowledge of the video was concurrent with her returning the rug, but that was correlation rather than causation.”

He also said, “Deborah has done much to help many throughout our community over the years.”

Jensen said he dropped the charges once the rug was returned. He said he’d have done the same no matter what the income level of the person who took it. “The point was to get the item returned,” he said.

Come share seeds and knowledge with other backyard gardeners, plant lovers, beekeepers, farmers and more.

Be a part of the seed saving movement! Special speakers, exhibitors, children activities, free seeds & live music.

Every year, Santa Barbara County residents chuck an estimated 2,177.74 tons of edible food in the trash; much of that winds up at the Tajiguas Landfill, where it’s composted and converted into methane gas and then electricity. Since January 2022, an estimated 510.417 tons have been diverted from the landfill and donated to a myriad of nonprofit “food rescue” organizations such as the Foodbank or Veggie Rescue. This is all part of a state law that went into effect in 2020 SB 1383 to encourage food rescue, feed the hungry, and keep edible food out of state landfills.

This Tuesday, the county supervisors voted to extend an agreement between the County of Santa Barbara and the cities of Carpinteria, Santa Barbara, Goleta, Buellton, Solvang, and Lompoc for an additional two years. In that time, new requirements of that state law are scheduled to kick in that will expand the number and type of businesses required to donate edible food.

The county’s role in this is not to physically collect the food involved, but to act as a go-between connecting the businesses required to donate the food with

As a planning commissioner, Schwartz was known for being commanding and decisive. But as a mayoral candidate, she chose to run her own campaign and didn’t fare well. She came in fourth out of a field of six. Randy Rowse, then a former city councilmember, won with a plurality of 39 percent.

nonprofits engaged in actual food rescue. As of last count, there were roughly 300 businesses participating countywide, though Kaitlyn Haberlin of the county’s Resource Recovery & Waste Management Division says that number has likely shrunk somewhat since then. Currently, Haberlin said, most of the donating businesses are large retailers like Ralphs and Albertsons and wholesalers like Sysco. As of 2024, she said, the state law will expand its requirement to mandate participation by larger restaurants with seating for 250 or more as well as hospitals, hotels, and school districts.

Given that the estimated capacity of food rescue operations countywide is about three times greater than the quantity of edible foods tossed, Haberlin said that the space required for the next wave of donors should not be a limiting factor. The real question is what people want and what food items move off the shelf. Based on her experience working for the Foodbank, she said meats are very popular, as are packaged snacks and frozen prepared meals with limited time left before their shelf life expires.

INDEPENDENT.COM JANUARY 12, 2023 THE INDEPENDENT 13 CONT’D NEWS of the WEEK COURTS & CRIME JAN. 5-12, 2023
NW
COURTESY
Schwartz Caught Taking
Rug Food Rescue Effort Gets Extended COUNTY
15TH ANNUAL · 2023 SANTA BARBARA COMMUNITY SEED SWAP
Deborah Schwartz
Seed saving is a fun and easy way to connect to the circle of life!
Sunday, January 29 11am – 4pm | FREE Rain or Shine Local Food Hero Award for 2023: Larry Kandarian, Kandarian Organic Farms SB Community Arts Workshop (SBCAW) 631 Garden St. Santa Barbara A community event sponsored by A Celebration to Bring Seeds & People Together SB Annual Community Seed Swap On Facebook 805-962-2571 www.sbpermaculture.org

obituaries

9/2/1935 - 12/25/2022

before moving to Foley, Alabama, to be near family, then back to Hot Springs.

Pat loved camping and hiking, and the Rodriguezes frequently took family camping vacations throughout the western United States. Pat’s sense of adventure would come out when she’d pick any road she saw, usually a dirt road, and urge Art to take it—leading to great surprises or minor disasters.

Patricia Helene Shortall Rodriguez was born on September 2, 1935, in San Francisco, to Dorothy Helene Beaufort and Thomas Joseph Shortall. She died on December 25, 2022, at the Mariposa at Ellwood Shores community in Goleta, CA.

Patricia grew up in the Bay Area of northern California, in San Francisco and San Carlos, where she lived in a house built by her mother at 1379 Geneva Street. She graduated class of 1953 from Sequoia High School in Redwood City.

Patricia, who always loved history, was proud of the fact that her Shortall family included a judge and other prominent citizens in early San Francisco. Her grandfather was a jeweler there, which nurtured her lifelong interest in design, art, fashion, and jewelry. She long remembered her grandmother taking her along to downtown San Francisco to buy diamonds for the family business.

She was an avid reader from childhood. The Nancy Drew and Hardy Boys series sparked her enthusiasm for mysteries, which she continued as an adult, adding historical fiction and romance to her reading repertoire.

In her youth, she loved to go out fishing in the San Francisco Bay with her father on his boat. But “The Duchess” was her pride: a 1950 four-door Ford sedan. She loved to polish her little jewel, as she also called it, and race it around the bay area streets.

On May 29, 1958, Patricia married Arthur Anthony Rodriguez, the love of her life. They had four children together: Steven, Mark, Paul, and Elise, and remained together for more than forty years, until Art’s passing on November 10, 1999. Patricia was also stepmother to Michael Rodriguez, Art’s first son, who lived with them for a few years early in their marriage.

Art’s work took them to La Crescenta near Los Angeles; then Bishop, California; Tonopah in Nevada; Albuquerque, New Mexico; and finally Las Vegas, where the young family lived for many years in a house that Pat and Art designed and built together. With their children grown, they moved again to Albuquerque, before retiring to Hot Springs, Arkansas. After Art passed, Patricia stayed on in Hot Springs for some time

Patricia was foremost a homemaker, but she did work before her marriage for one of the major airlines in the early days of the industry. In the 80s she cultivated her interest in fashion and jewelry through selling cosmetics at Dillard’s in Las Vegas and jewelry in Albuquerque.

A skilled seamstress, Patricia made many of her own and her young daughter’s clothes, as well as a few shirts for her son Paul, including a Western shirt in the days of Urban Cowboy.

Patricia also loved animals all her life. She had many dogs through the years and was knowledgeable about the history and purpose of different breeds. Her last, precious dog Gabby was often by her side during her last days.

In her later years, her loving son Paul and daughter-in-law Dorie encouraged Pat to move back to California, first to Los Alamos north of Santa Barbara to live with them, so they could help take care of her.

At 84 she got to indulge her sense of adventure once more when she soared over Santa Barbara and the surrounding countryside in a real World War II era training plane owned by a local pilot, taking off from the Santa Barbara City Airport where her son Paul worked.

On Valentine’s Day in 2020, Patricia became a resident at Mariposa at Ellwood Shores, where her daughter-in-law Dorie serves as Activities Director and could keep her engaged with all the wonderful amenities of that community. At Mariposa, Pat enjoyed gardening, loved the tea parties, and relished a beer and a good game of bocce ball with her friend Charlie. She also enjoyed the art classes, where she created a beautiful piece from her favorite Southwest color palette in her final class. The family would like to thank all the staff at Mariposa for their attentive and personal care; and extend a special thank you to the nurses at Central Coast Hospice for their wonderful, compassionate care in Patricia’s last days.

From the early years of her marriage, Patricia found fellowship, and took comfort, in sharing her hope as a Jehovah’s Witness.

Patricia is survived by her remaining children Steven, Paul, and Elise; stepson Michael; nephew Paul Shortall; grandchildren Josh, Seth, Gabriel, and

Tabitha; and great grandchildren Kyle, Jessica, Alexis, Ethan, Kaylee, Virginia, and Bodhi.

A memorial was held for Patricia this Saturday, January 7, 2023, at 1 p.m., at Mariposa at Ellwood Shores, 190 Via Jero, Goleta, CA 93117.

A service will be held on January 27 at 12:30 p.m. at the Little Rock, Arkansas, veteran’s cemetery, where her ashes will be laid to rest with her beloved late husband Arthur Anthony Rodriguez.

BERTRAND, David Gilbert

3/21/1929 - 10/18/2022

a landlord he never arbitrarily raised rent just because he could. Many of his former and current tenants became life-long friends. He earned similar loyalty from all the people who worked for him, and all who knew him are better off for having known him. He is survived by his cousins, Adrienne de Ponce Bates; David de Ponce; Michael de Ponce; and Bryan de Ponce, all of Santa Barbara.

No services are planned. A major portion of his estate will benefit Stanford University, The Notre Dame School, and Visiting Nurses. His ashes will be scattered on the property where he resided for many years in Montecito. He will be missed by all who knew him.

work on the cusp of new military technology, as well as working with SBIG to make cameras for amateur and professional astronomers. He received his masters degree at USC in engineering. Stan retired multiple times, and then would go back to work for a different company as a consultant. About twenty years ago, he was diagnosed with Parkinson’s, which progressed slowly. Stan loved his family, music, hiking, his church, and tinkering with so many gadgets. He is survived by Jo, his wife of 60 years, his sons Stephen and Christopher and their families, as well as his sister Julianne Mathews, and nieces and nephews.

A celebration service will held at Goleta Cemetery on January 6, 2023 at 2:00pm. In lieu of flowers, the family requests donations be made to the USO and/or the Free Methodist Church of Santa Barbara.

5/20/1942 - 1/17/1999

on October 18 at the age of 93, and was actively in charge of his business until his very last day. He was born in St. Francis Hospital in Santa Barbara to a family with longstanding roots in the community. His great grandmother settled in Santa Barbara in the 19th century. Gilbert grew up in the jovial and charitable home of his maternal grandparents, John and Gabrielle de Ponce. As a child growing up during the depression, he learned sympathy for those who were struggling to survive from his very compassionate and devoutly Catholic grandmother.

Gilbert’s mother, Henriette Akers, had a life-long career in the jewelry business. For many years she owned Henriette, Inc., a highly respected jewelry store in the upper village with a distinguished clientele. After his mother retired, David kept the shop open for several years. Young Gilbert attended what is now The Notre Dame School when it was known as The Delores School. He later went on to graduate from Stanford with a degree in economics, and received a master’s degree from the Sorbonne in literature. Gilbertwas fluent in three languages and a life-long appreciator of fine French cuisine.

Mr. Bertrand was an astute business man, and during a long career with the California Board of Equalization, he saved his money to invest in properties in order to develop them. He was someone who wanted to contribute to his community by creating worthy projects. The two buildings at 529 and 559 San Ysidro Road are prime examples of his legacy.

David was known as a gentleman with old-fashioned values and considerable integrity. As

Our beloved husband, father, and grandfather LeRoy Stanley Brown passed away into the arms of Jesus on December 21, 2022. Stan lived an exciting life, beginning in St. Helena, California where he was born on November 4, 1937 to Iva and Wilbur Brown. He lived there for 12 years when his family moved to Guam. This time in his life was full of adventure on the island, in the jungle, and in the sea. After high school graduation, he went to Fresno State College, choosing to major in engineering. Stan interspersed his schooling with jobs and going home to Guam for summers and holidays. He joined the Naval Reserve to enlist to serve during the Vietnam War. It was during this time, he met the love of his life, Joan Moffett. They were married in the summer of 1962 after which Stan went to Morocco for two years, as part of his military service. When his stint in the Navy was finished, Stan completed his education at Fresno State. In 1966, they moved to Santa Barbara where Stan taught at Santa Barbara Junior High for two years. Deciding to go into engineering full-time, Stan began a career that spanned Hughes, SBRC, and many places that did

24 years. You’ve been gone from me longer than I had you. I’m old now. Today, I particularly recall my visit to your bar — Mel’s — the week or so after you died. I took a seat at the bar, just inside the doorway and where you would have sat, smoking your Dunhill Blue’s and chewing the fat with anyone who happened to be seated alongside you. Happily, Fran was bartending. At that time, Mel’s was still at Paseo Nuevo, squeezed between the movie theatre and a pizza joint.

I settled in, Fran asking what I’d like. “Brandy.” She then asked what brand. I replied, “Whatever Frank drank.” “Well Brandy.” I remember telling her that must have been because he was always so cheap with himself. (Never others, including the homeless fellow, a five-minute friend he made outside Chicago’s Blackstone one late frosty night. My favorite Frank story.) Fran smiled as she poured: “No. He just didn’t want the bartender to have to work too hard.”

For those who loved him, this simple story reveals pretty much his essence, and why we – students, friends, strangers, me –were thrilled just to ride shotgun alongside the man. Tuesday, rain or shine, I’ll be by to visit you with a bouquet. Eric brings the brandy.

Love, Celeste

14 THE INDEPENDENT JANUARY 12, 2023 INDEPENDENT.COM
To submit obituaries for publication, please
or email obits@independent.com
call (805) 965-5205
Patricia Helene Shortall Rodriguez David “Gilbert” Bertrand died suddenly LeRoy Stanley Brown 11/4/1937 - 12/21/2022
Continued on p.16

READ IT AND R.I.P: Over the years, I’ve been known to shamelessly strain to fabricate some “local hook” for stories national in scope. On watching Kevin McCarthy sell his soul to the Devil so many times that the Devil has sued to get his money back. It turns out it’s only a small claims case.

McCarthy, as we know, was turned down by the hair-on-fire Republican members of the Freedom Caucus in his quest for House Speakership no less than 14 times before finally getting enough votes to get the ball across the finish line. Not since 1859 when Congress was preparing to split the country in two to preserve the inalienable right to own slaves has it taken any Speaker so many tries. To mangle the sports analogy here, McCarthy never actually crossed the goal line. Instead, Republicans used a parliamentary maneuver to effectively shorten the field by about 10 yards. Only then could McCarthy claim as football announcers on TV do that he had “penetrated the plane.” Not to belabor an irrelevant point, but McCarthy needed 218 votes to secure the speakership. He got only 216. Using the funny math by which politics is figured in Washington, McCarthy won because six members of the Freedom Caucus shifted their “no” votes to being merely “present.” And “present” votes are effectively discarded when tabulating totals, thus allowing McCarthy to secure a “majority” with a smaller number.

The last and most vituperatively intransigent holdout against McCarthy was the famously infamous Matt Gaetz, a hair-wavedback MAGA bad boy from the Sunshine State and one of the nation’s leading proponents of high-octane flamethrower politics. Gaetz has explained himself, charging that McCarthy “has sold shares of himself for more than a decade” to assume the throne. He’s got a point.

But that may not be the real reason. McCarthy was notably tepid in coming to Gaetz’s defense when the Department of Justice was investigating Gaetz on charges of paying to have sex with a 17-year-old girl whom he may or may not have moved across state lines in the process. In public remarks, McCarthy kept an open mind that Gaetz also accused of showing nude photos of women he claimed to have slept with to his colleagues on the Congressional floor might be legitimately guilty of criminal sleazeballery. He made a point to acknowledge this possibility when explaining why he wasn’t going to yank Gaetz from any of his committee assignments just yet. Although Gaetz’s alleged “wingman” in this was sentenced to 11 years behind bars, federal prosecutors ultimately recommended against charging Gaetz. It wasn’t that he was innocent so much as the two witnesses upon whom their case would rely suffered serious credibility issues. One of those was the wingman who got 11 years.

I mention all this not because this month is National Sex Trafficking Prevention

Month which it is but because Gaetz has a legit connection to Santa Barbara. In August 2021, when the investigation was still ongoing, Gaetz married a UCSB graduate and Goleta resident named Ginger Luckey, whom he met where else? at Mar-a-Lago, At the time, Luckey the daughter of a major Trump donor worked for an up-andcoming save-the-planet, feed-the-starving high-tech company named Apeel, which has recently undergone a series of layoffs.

Gaetz, true to his convictions, even though he was never charged, was one of only 20 Republicans to vote against an anti–sex trafficking bill last year. Maybe the name the Frederick Douglass Trafficking Victims Prevention and Protection Reauthorization Act struck him as too woke. The $1 billion, five-year bill would set aside $35 million annually to provide shelter for women trying to get out of the business. Gaetz objected it would open a back door to “illegal immigrants.”

About the same time, Gaetz dissed former Vice President Mike Pence as presidential fodder in 2024. “Nice guy; not a leader,” he told a group of conservative teens. Marc Short, a Pence spokesperson, shot back that he fully expected Gaetz to be in prison in 2024 for child trafficking. “I’m actually surprised Florida law enforcement still allows him to speak to teenage conferences like that,” he said. The bill, by the way, passed overwhelmingly

For the record, Gaetz vehemently denies ever having had sex with the 17-year-old in

question who, by the way, had an ID forged by Gaetz’s wingman stating she was 19 or that he’d ever paid for sex. Ever.

Another “local hook” involves Ryan Zinke, former secretary of the U.S. Interior Department under Trump and now the latest member of Congress to be elected by Big Sky State voters. Zinke married Lola Hand, who grew up in Santa Barbara and whose family wellknown especially in the business community still lives here. In fact, Zinke spent so much time visiting Santa Barbara that political opponents back home all but charged he no longer qualified as a bona fide Montana resident. He was all hat, no cattle, they charged, noting that Zinke in a Department of the Interior publicity photo had his park ranger hat on backward. Say what you will about Zinke’s toxic masculinity and numerous ethical breaches, but the guy has a charming arrogance and a winning smile. And a sense of humor. Speaking during the multiple votes on McCarthy’s speakership, Zinke commented, “From the outside, it looks like chaos. From the inside, it is.” Zinke voted for McCarthy.

With McCarthy now ensconced as Speaker, the Matt Gaetzes of the Grand Old Party will now enjoy unfettered veto power That was the deal. To steal a line from Bette Davis in All About Eve, “Fasten your seatbelts; it’s going to be a bumpy night.”

And no, I don’t think there’s a local hook for Bette Davis. —Nick Welsh

INDEPENDENT.COM JANUARY 12, 2023 THE INDEPENDENT 15
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obituaries

Clift Seybert Kinsell

7/25/1923 - 12/31/2022

world travel, bird watching, camping with family and friends, collecting Santa Barbara memorabilia and postcards, learning of the rich history of Santa Barbara and California.

Clift Seybert Kinsell was born in Oakland, CA and moved to Santa Barbara at age three. With this move, commenced a long and fruitful life full of travel. His main love was for his family and service to others.

Sey loved “all things Santa Barbara”. He first attended Roosevelt School, then La Cumbre Jr. High School, Santa Barbara High School and eventually Stanford University. After Stanford he began the practice of medicine.

Sey graduated Stanford Medical School in 1947 and trained first at San Francisco Children’s Hospital, and later at Los Angeles Children’s Hospital. He practiced medicine for 37 years at the Santa Barbara Children’s Medical Clinic and was well known to all as “Doctor Sey”. Dr. Kinsell had a special place in his heart for chronically ill and disabled children. He took care of all patients regardless of their status in life. His practice filled many weekend days and nights and he would often make house calls after hours. He was president of the Alpha Resource Center for six years and received a lifetime achievement award for his service.

He enjoyed a lifelong membership in the Episcopal Church, first attending Trinity Episcopal Church where he was a member of the vestry and he taught Sunday school. Later he was a member of All Saints by the Sea Episcopal Church where he was active every Tuesday morning at communion.

He was active in the Santa Barbara community serving on the Police and Fire Commission for six years and on the Santa Barbara County Parole Board for three years. He was president and a Paul Harris Fellowship recipient of the Santa Barbara Rotary Club which he joined in 1954. He also enjoyed the Chamber of Commerce Governmental Review Committee meeting for many years.

He had many deep interests over the years which included

Retirement changed his emphasis from caring for children to caring for the elderly. He delivered Meals on Wheels and was a long-time bedside volunteer for Hospice/VNA helping people who stayed at home in their last days.

All his life, Sey was enthralled by learning, friendships and sharing life with others. He would say, “Every life has value”. Sey found great pleasure in helping others and he liked almost everything except asparagus, string beans and snakes. His commonplace books are full of favorite quotes, sayings and observations. His favorite quote was, “The time to take a piece of cake is when it is passed – it may never be passed your way again”. He loved writing letters to his children several times a month which have become treasures for each of them. Sey was also partial to the custom of the French peasant giving the dying a sip of champagne to speed them on their way.

Sey is survived by his wife Tamara Kinsell; his children Suzanne (Kinsell) Padrick (Steve), Jeff Kinsell (Marie) and Kirk Kinsell (Carrie); his grandchildren Scott Padrick, Natalie (Padrick) Rodrigue and Ryan Padrick, Amy Kinsell and Pam (Kinsell) Phan, and Kyle Kinsell and Catelyn (Kinsell) Potter; and fourteen great-grandchildren.

Sey was preceded in death by former spouses Shirlee Kinsell, Lilabeth Kinsell and siblings Beverly (Kinsell) Danielson and Henry Kinsell.

A celebration of life will be held in the Spring. In lieu of flowers, charitable contributions may be made to:

Santa Barbara High School Scholarship Fund P.O. Box 6121

Santa Barbara, CA 93160-6121

Or to your favorite charity.

Linda passed away unexpectedly and suddenly on December 30, 2022. Her family and friends will miss her quiet, steady presence and her “always being there” for them, like an angel by their side. She was a fun, light-hearted person, not one to criticize, and was rarely angry. Linda grew up near Los Angeles, first in Wilmington and later in Rancho Palos Verdes. She loved music, and both Linda and her mom played the accordion and the piano throughout their lives. Linda loved anything to do with music, and it was her passion. As a teen when she wasn’t practicing her accordion or piano, she enjoyed the nearby beaches, accompanied by her purple, Bing surfboard.

Linda was the first child of Betty and Robert Gregory, and she had a younger sister, Roberta. Their father worked for North American Rockwell rendering aircraft as a draftsman, and as a Publications Analyst. He later wrote and illustrated cartoons, particularly the Disney character Donald Duck for Dell and Gold Key comics. He was an artist and her mother was a homemaker.

Linda lived a very secure and safe childhood, and will be missed dearly. She was very creative, and her great sense of imagination and wonder permeated throughout her life. She and her childhood best friend were also known for various projects and pranks, which sometimes got them into mild trouble, especially at summer camp. Linda was fortunate as a teen to see the Beatles in their debut at The Hollywood Bowl, sparking her lifelong love of live rock and roll concerts.

Linda attended Rolling Hills High School and graduated from California State College, Dominguez Hills, earning a BA in sociology. She later became the Deputy Clerk for the City of Redondo Beach for many years, also working in Elections. Coming to Santa Barbara in 1990, she served the Juvenile

Probation Dept., applying her sociology degree with a compassion for helping teens.

She was active in the Santa Barbara Accordion Club and played in the local Solstice parades. She also played piano and performed at various events. She was interested in songwriting and took workshops, collaborating with musicians on songs. She had some music published under her own label, called “Gold Coast Records”. Her piano instructor was Renee Hamaty, who teaches locally. She was a supporter for the Santa Barbara Jazz Society, and an avid social dancer (especially Salsa). She attended classes and danced at many local social events.

Linda was a member of the Native Daughters of the Golden West for 31 years and a past President of Tierra de Oro Parlor No. 304. She was the Parlor’s organist for many years. She also played music at official visits with the Grand President. Linda was always willing to attend or assist in a Parlor activity. It had been planned for Linda to play at the Grand President Installation Ceremony this coming June. Linda could frequently be seen with the Native Daughters for the Wednesday Fiesta Pequeña shows every August.

Professionally, Linda worked as a consultant for the City of Goleta since 2003. She initially served as the Recording Clerk for the Planning Commission and the Design Review Board. She continued to do so up until the time of her passing. Her services included clerking at the public hearings of the Goleta Planning Commission and the Design Review Board. She recorded the proceedings, as well as the production of the minutes. She later provided additional services associated with the Planning Department’s Document Imaging Program.

Linda provided approximately 19 years of consultant Services to the City of Goleta. This was a demanding job. Her quiet dedication and steady presence have been much appreciated, and she will be missed. Linda also spent a number of years working for the Santa Barbara County Water Department in the early 1990’s.

Linda regularly attended Catholic church services with quiet faith, and especially enjoyed the Mission. She also performed volunteer work ushering at church programs,

music and film events. She was especially a friend to seniors, and Veterans. She loved animals and had a number of cats and dogs during her lifetime. She was known for her genuine sweetness and kindness.

Just before Christmas 2022, Linda contacted Covid; and combined with other health factors, she shockingly died suddenly within one week of the Covid symptoms onset.

Linda is survived by her sister, Roberta, cousins, aunts, and her two lovely cats, Destiny and Miko who she loved dearly. Linda is also survived by her dear friends in Santa Barbara and Los Angeles, who will miss her daily friendship and cherish her memory always.

Arrangements entrusted to McDermott-Crockett Mortuary www.mcdermottcrockett. com

Rose A. Alexander       3/16/1931 - 12/26/2022

Rosina J. Genovario-Alexander, commonly known as Rose A. Alexander, passed away on Monday, December 26th 2022 at the age of 91. She is survived by her two daughters Eva (& son-in law James Gutierrez) and Victoria (& son-in law Jamie Ochoa) & her two grandchildren Nicholas and Victoria.

Rose was born in Trenton, NJ March 16th, 1931. The second oldest of six children, her parents immigrated to the East Coast from Southern Italy. A graduate of Barbizon Modeling & Acting School, Rose modeled in New York City for several years before marrying her husband Victor.

Married in 1960 to Victor N. Genovario-Alexander, the newlywed couple moved across country to settle in the small beach community of Santa Barbara, CA in 1964. Rose was a devoted wife, mother, grandmother, and friend. You could always count on her to be cooking, baking, or serving the strongest cup of coffee in the city.

In honor of Rose, there will be a Rosary service held at Our Lady of Sorrows Church on Thursday January 12th at 7PM.

16 THE INDEPENDENT JANUARY 12, 2023 INDEPENDENT.COM
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12/30/2022
Linda Gregory

obituaries

6/13/1941 - 12/14/2022

10/2/1956 - 12/24/2022

(Gina), Christina (Peter) and Christie (Michael) into the family.  Grandchildren Elizabeth, Grace, Will and Emma rounded out the group and Bill’s happiest times were when they were all together.  He will truly be missed and will be remembered for sharing his love of sports with everyone.  Fight On!

In lieu of flowers, donations can be made to: Cancer Foundation of Santa Barbara

Gerry was an avid tennis player for many years, and a voracious reader since childhood. A big part of her life was her faith and the many friends she made through Carpinteria Community Church. Gerry had a kind, caring disposition, and always a listening ear, making countless friends of all ages throughout her long life. In her words, her greatest legacy is the deep love she held for her family, and she will be missed greatly.

Arts Camp in Michigan. After graduating from Glenbard High School, she attended the University of Michigan earning her BS/MS in Biology. As a student and Phi Mu Sorority sister Debbie earned extra money washing equipment for the Chemistry Department. It was there that she met her future husband, Bill, who was a graduate student. The couple later settled in Goleta, California and raised four children.

Surrounded by his family and their deep love, Bob Howell peacefully passed away on December 14, 2022, at Serenity House in Santa Barbara. Bob was born June 13, 1941, in Boise, Idaho to S.E. and Mildred Howell. After his father’s unexpected death in 1943, he was fortunate to spend his summers at his grandparents’ farm in southeastern Idaho, where he learned to fly fish – a passion that grew with each successive year.

Just as he was beginning junior high, Bob and his mother moved to California, and after graduating from high school, Bob took a temporary job while in college. That job caused him to set college aside and begin a career of over 40 years in the pest control industry culminating with his becoming the president of the Pest Control Operators of California. After settling in Santa Barbara in 1971 with his wife Sally and their young children Scott and Kathy, he was able to pursue his second passion, golf. He loved spending time with all his family and was so fortunate to have all his grandchildren live nearby from the time they were born.

He and Sally loved their extensive travels – from Nova Scotia to New Zealand and from Switzerland to French Polynesia, taking his golf clubs and flyfishing rods on most every trip. As a young father, Bob and his family would make many lasting memories during their trips to San Diego for summer vacations; and when the kids were older, they would spend countless extended weekends water skiing at Lake Nacimiento. But the best trips were with Sally, their children and grandchildren to Park City for Christmas, to the Grand Tetons and Yellowstone in the summer, and twice to Hawaii –the second time to celebrate Bob and Sally’s 50th wedding anniversary in 2012.

Bob is survived by his loving wife, Sally, his son Scott, his daughter Kathy and her husband David Bleak, and his grandchildren Jason Howell, Delaney Howell, Brad Bleak and Abby Bleak. Private services will be held at a later date. Contributions to Visiting Nurses Association/Serenity House would be welcomed.

Raymond Leonard Pierce, age 66, of Santa Barbara, CA. Passed away on December 24, 2022, after a seven-year battle with sarcoma cancer.

Ray was born on October 2, 1956, in Los Angeles, CA.

Ray had two passions in his life. His family and playing music, he was the bass player in a punk band, The Surging Monkey Preps. He was a DJ at KTYD from 1980 to 1984, better known as the Fearless Leader. In 1987 he opened his own business at 1629 State St. in Santa Barbara, producing/directing/writing radio and TV commercials as Red Rocket Productions.

Ray met Alice Alexander in March 1988. Ray and Alice had one child; Travis Pierce born 7.11. 2000.

He is survived by his wife, Alice, son, Travis, mother, Gloria, and three siblings.

Services will be held on January 18 at 12noon at the Free Methodist church, 1435 Cliff Dr., Santa Barbara, CA

1/25/1948 - 1/2/2023

12/29/2022

Gerry is survived by her daughters, Robin (Jack) Sawaske and Cindy (Alan) Doell; son-inlaw, Rus Arnold; grandchildren, Spencer (Adrienne) and Connor Sawaske, Naomi (Jack), Zachary and Madison (Gabrielle) Arnold; great-grandchildren, Henry and Quincy Sawaske, Sofia Arnold; and many loving nieces and nephews. Gerry was preceded in death by her siblings, husbands, and her daughter, Ann.

Gerry Doell Lea died on December 29, 2022 following a short period of declining health. She lived a long, full life, and touched many people with her gentle, generous spirit.

Born on January 11, 1926 in Electra, Texas, to Charlie and Lola Coffer, she lived her early years on various farms in Oklahoma and Texas, being raised with her 3 siblings, Helen, J.E. and Floye. In 1940, the family moved to Carpinteria, following Gerry’s uncle who was a high goal polo player. Gerry graduated from Carpinteria High School in 1944, and received a full scholarship to study English at UCSB. During her junior year, she and Robert (Bob) Doell, also a junior at UCSB, fell in love and married in June of 1947. Following their college graduations, Bob and Gerry designed and built their first home in 1949-1950 in the new Concha Loma neighborhood in Carpinteria.

Services will be held on Saturday, January 28, 2023 at 11:00 a.m. at Carpinteria Community Church, 1111 Vallecito Rd, Carpinteria.

Donations may be made in her memory to Carpinteria Library, Carpinteria Community Church or your favorite charity.

In 1980, Debbie earned her Ph.D. in Molecular Biology from the University of California, Santa Barbara (UCSB). In collaboration with researchers at the Univ of Oulu Finland, she studied many aspects of green algae. Later she served as the Academic Coordinator at the UCSB Department of Biological Sciences overseeing the Introductory Biology lab. Debbie conducted research on a broad variety of topics, including bird songs, vision, pine roots, and the genetic diversity of the Channel Islands Ironwood trees.

9/27/1941 - 12/27/2022

Bill Viani was born on January 25, 1948 to Ray and Mercedes Viani in Salt Lake City, Utah His parents were from the Bay Area and his father’s job sent him to Salt Lake and then a final move to Southern California when Bill was a toddler.

He grew up in Pasadena and graduated from Loyola University then received his master’s in economics from USC.  He began his career in banking in Los Angeles and met his wife, Marla, on a water skiing trip to Lake Nacimiento with mutual friends.  He was transferred to Santa Barbara where they raised their four children: Gina, Mia, Peter, and Michael.  They happily included their spouses Eric

In 1951, the first of their three girls, Robin, was born, followed by Ann in 1953 and Cindy in 1957. In 1956, Gerry and Bob moved to their home on Foothill Road in Carpinteria where they raised their girls and where Gerry lived for over 66 years. Sadly, Bob died in 1975, leaving a significant void in the family. In 1994, Gerry married Richard Lea and together, they enjoyed working on her house and various travels until his death in 2011.

Throughout her life, Gerry particularly enjoyed helping others, most often in small, quiet ways. When her girls were in elementary school, every year she was a room mother for their classrooms, and she was instrumental in creating the first library at Aliso School.

It is with great sadness that we announce the passing of Deborah Irene Drew Kaska, 81, who died after a fall on December 27, 2022. Debbie’s entire family was with her in her last days celebrating life at the beach. Her children were by her side when she passed. Debbie is preceded in death by her beloved husband William C. Kaska and brother Donald E. Drew.

Debbie was born in Berwyn, Il to Harvey and Irene Drew (nee Genke). She enjoyed playing clarinet and oboe and spent her summers at Interlochen

After retiring from UCSB in 2002, Debbie (affectionately known as, “Maka” to her grandchildren) traveled to visit her family and friends and explored the world. She played oboe with the SB Prime Time Band and volunteered with the SB County Genealogy Society, serving as the board secretary and editor of Ancestors West. She was also skilled in translating old German script and spoke German fluently. Debbie was involved in several organizations, including serving as VP, Patriotic Instructor, and President of Tent 22 for the Daughters of Union Veterans of the Civil War and as Chapter VP for the Colonial Dames of America SB Chapter. She was also a member of the Mission Canyon Chapter of the National Society of the Daughters of the American Revolution. Her community involvement and curiosity never wavered and her friends and neighbors benefitted from her many gifts.

Debbie is survived by her children, Serge Kaska, Kristin Woolley (Douglas), Marya Darabont (Tibor), and Kathleen Perez (James), as well as seven grandchildren. A memorial mass will be held in her honor on Thursday, January 26, 2023, at 10:30 AM at San Roque

Catholic Church, 325 Argonne Circle, Santa Barbara, California with a 12:30 PM reception to follow at the Glen Annie

Golf Club, 405 Glen Annie Rd. Goleta, California. Donations in her honor may be sent to the Prime Time Band, P.O. Box #92055, Santa Barbara, CA 93190.

INDEPENDENT.COM JANUARY 12, 2023 THE INDEPENDENT 17
To submit
or email obits@independent.com
obituaries for publication, please call (805) 965-5205
Raymond Leonard Pierce William Clayton Viani Deborah Irene Drew Kaska
Continued on p.19
INDEPENDENT.COM

obituaries

William K. Dial 2/17/1940 - 1/5/2023

Transformation Interrupted

The development of housing that provides for multiple tiers of income has long been a priority for the City of Santa Barbara. In keeping with this policy, the City of Santa Barbara applied for a grant to develop a “Specific Plan” for the site currently known as La Cumbre Plaza. Zoning for nearly 2,000 residential units was included a number of years ago in our General Plan Update, the largest and most ambitious housing effort in our history. Because of the “transformative” nature of a project of this scale, our grant proposal was recently scored in the top tier of all grant applications. The committee tasked with awarding these grants deemed that this project was appropriate and would truly provide significant housing for our community.

Despite this grant being recommended through normal procedures, it was denied at a meeting of the Santa Barbara County Association of Governments. SBCAG’s Chairperson, Das Williams, stated that the grant committee had erred and that the project “didn’t qualify.” At a preliminary hearing the previous day, Chair Williams had demanded that Santa Barbara City planning staff return with “proof” that a Specific Plan would not delay the project. The next day, he chastised planning staff for not having brought any legal counsel, exhibits, or evidence that it wouldn’t result in delay. This demand of “proof” about a complex planning procedure was unusual and demanded of no other applicant on the grant award list.

Ultimately, the SBCAG board never voted on whether to fund the Specific Plan, as it was taken off the table and the money redistributed to the other grantees. The vote on the entire grant list, the only vote taken, was 10-1 and cannot truly be said to reflect the rejection of the city’s grant award.

Santa Barbara City’s staff, administration, and City Council has, in this past decade, overseen the most robust production of rental housing within the city for more than 60 years. Council has recently formed an “Affordable Housing Trust Fund” in order to support our Housing Authority, Habitat for Humanity, and other affordable housing producers to encourage public funding as well as private philanthropy participation. Labeling our

citizens and staff “anti-housing” was unfair and incorrect. It is not, as was expressed, a matter of simplistic binary thinking where one is “either for or against housing.”

Chair Williams and the developer claim that planning for the entire site, i.e., the “Specific Plan,” would unnecessarily slow down their development, which comprises about one-third of the site, including Macy’s department store. As noted in the media, Macy’s announced that they would be open until 2028 when their lease runs out. A specific plan is estimated to take between 18-24 months to complete. That begs the question: Is there some other element other than “delay” in play here?

The surrounding community deserves deliberate and sustainable planning. A project of this magnitude will have impacts that will transform the north side of the city well into the next century. The common desire is to develop a neighborhood that provides the intended workforce, senior and market-rate housing, while preserving and enhancing our quality of life.

Honest debate over elements of a project this significant is expected and productive. Negative depictions of staff, volunteer citizen design review boards, and neighboring citizens are not. I am confident that the project proposed by the developers can go forward and provide much needed housing and a new neighborhood, without gaslighting honest efforts at good planning. Ideally, it will proceed as a collaborative effort and one that the community will celebrate.

Rowse, Mayor, City of Santa Barbara

So Long, Bob’s

I always loved Bob’s Bikes. A true mainstay in S.B. I got my bikes from Bob’s, and so did my parents. Seeing it go is saddening to see. I hope we can still get great service under new ownership!

The Independent welcomes letters of less than 250 words that include a daytime phone number for verification. Letters may be edited for length and clarity. Send to: Letters, S.B. Independent, 1715 State St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101; or fax: 965-5518; or email: letters@independent.com. Unabridged versions and more letters appear at independent.com/opinions

William K. Dial, 82, died peacefully in Santa Barbara, CA on January 5th, 2023, after succumbing to AML (acute myeloid leukemia). Bill was born in Cincinnati, Ohio on February 17, 1940, to Col. Richard J. Dial and Lucille Keck Dial. He was an army brat who lived everywhere the Army sent his father: Ft. Benning, GA, Ft. Hamilton, NY, in Yokohama, Ft. McPherson, GA., and in Anchorage, Alaska where Bill spent 3 summers. Bill graduated from Andover in 1957 and from Yale in 1961. From June 1961 to June 1964 Bill was in an armored battalion in Germany, 8th Infantry Division as a heavy truck company commander. Bill graduated from law school at Boldt Hall in Berkeley in 1967 and practiced as an attorney for 37 years in various law firms in Los Angeles. He retired in 2008 when he and his life partner, Maureen, moved to Santa Barbara. Bill volunteered for AVP (Alternatives to Violence Project) at San Luis Obispo Men’s Colony and later at Lompoc Federal Prison where he introduced the program into the federal prison system in CA. He was beloved and valued by the incarcerated individuals he worked with.

His brother, Douglas A. Dial died in September 2022. Bill is survived by his life partner, Maureen Murdock, his daughters Kirsten Dial (Jason Spencer) and Karina Dial Bristow (James Bristow), his grandchildren, Tamsin, Imogen and Gareth Dial-Spencer and Alexander and Felix Bristow, and his stepchildren Brendan and Heather Murdock (Paul Gardner), and step grandchildren Ella and Gillian Murdock Gardner. Bill loved to dance, sing, and travel. He was also an avid golfer who played with the Cosmopolitan Club, forming many lasting friendships on and off the course. He was a loving partner, father and grandfather and will be deeply missed for his kindness, fun and gentle soul.

his parents

a

War II. His parents, Ulla and Erik Jorgensen, immigrated to the United States in 1947 with their 3-year-old son, Paul. Living first in Wisconsin where Marilynn was born in 1950 and then Kenny in 1955 completed the family. A family vacation to California in 1957 exposed the Jorgensen family to an environment that stimulated them to advance their dreams! The Jorgensen family of 5 found joy in Santa Barbara and many members have remained in this lovely community.

Paul graduated from San Marcos High School in 1962 and after a series of endeavors found his passion in the field of Oceaneering and Marine Sciences, becoming the first graduating class in the program developed at Santa Barbara City College. He brought his natural inclination of engineering to building & maintaining deep sea equipment, specializing in the diving bell. In the course of his career, he traveled across the United States, Canada and on to Borneo. He returned to take on the Shasta Dam project in order to create an environment to support the survival of the salmon population. His expertise was sought in the diving world from oil wells to salmon! In his later years he supervised his crews with great attention to their safety and success of the assignment.

Paul’s parents died in December of 2017 at Valle Verde. He is survived by his wife, Marilyn of 44 years. They lived in Palo Cedro, California and enjoyed boating, fishing and caring for their canine companions. Paul is also survived by his daughter Natasha Sill, her Mother Lene Shutt and grandchildren Gabrielle and Jacob Sill. His extended family includes in laws through marriage and many wonderful nephews, nieces and their families who we honor.

Family will gather in the Spring of 2023 to honor Paul’s life.

INDEPENDENT.COM JANUARY 12, 2023 THE INDEPENDENT 19
OPINIONS CONT’D Letters “SPEAKER MCCARTHY GAVEL” BY
GRANLUND
DAVE
Paul Erik Jorgensen 3/25/1944 - 12/25/2022
Paul Erik Jorgensen was born in Fredericia, Denmark on March 25, 1944 bringing light to in dark time near the end of World

Maria Ressa How to Stand Up to a Dictator

Thu, Jan 19 / 7:30 PM

UCSB Campbell Hall

An Evening with Amor Towles

Thu, Feb 2 / 7:30 PM

20 THE INDEPENDENT JANUARY 12, 2023 INDEPENDENT.COM
Celebrated for her commitment to free expression and democratic government, journalist and Nobel Peace Prize recipient Maria Ressa tells the story of how democracy dies and offers an urgent cry for us to recognize the danger before it is too late.
Nina Totenberg Dinners with Ruth: The Power of Friendships
Feb
/ 7:30 PM / Granada Theatre
think of Washington as a place of poisonous rivalries, not deep friendships. Nina
and
Major
Dorothy Largay & Wayne Rosing Additional
Understanding (805) 893-3535 | www.ArtsAndLectures.UCSB.edu Granada event tickets can also be purchased at: (805) 899-2222 | www.GranadaSB.org Special Thanks
UCSB Campbell Hall Through his evocative, absorbing novels including Rules of Civility, A Gentleman in Moscow and The Lincoln Highway, Amor Towles has become a critical favorite and a popular success.
Tue,
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Totenberg knows differently.” – Ruth Marcus, editorial page editor, Washington Post Event Sponsor: Sara Miller McCune Presented in association with the Santa Barbara County Bar Association
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Support Provided by the Beth Chamberlin Endowment for Cultural

Drawing Her Own Path to Success

Drawing Her Own Path to Success

on Sharing the Wonders of Art and Science Through Design

Most writers find their way to the page as readers first, but New York Times best-selling author and illustrator Rachel Ignotofsky had a different path. “When I was growing up, reading was always really difficult for me, and it was these super illustrative books that I read in my local library that allowed me to actually see myself as a smart kid and approach reading on my own terms through also looking at the pictures,” she said.

With her books for young readers starting with her first book, Women in Science (2016) kids find that “the illustration has introduced you to the topic and has taught you something before you read a single word. So you’re already going in with knowledge, rather than completely dry,” said the now 33-year-old writer/illustrator, who began her career creating greeting cards for Hallmark.

Even when she was drawing birthday cakes by day, her interest in science piqued her creativity. She started creating “super information-dense posters” about topics like human anatomy and biology that she thought were interesting and used them to get jam-packed, information-focused freelance projects on a Holocaust documentary and with cancer research foundations.

Her breakthrough Women in Science book started out as a personal project. “I started creating this whole poster series

about women and their fields of study that have really inspired me, and everyone was so responsive to it. I started getting these emails from people saying things like, ‘I’m putting this up in my research lab,’ ‘People are stopping at my cubicle to start a conversation,’ and ‘‘I’m sharing these posters with my daughters every night.’”

It became clear to Ignotofsky that the posters needed to be a book. “This is the power that illustration has: It makes you stop, you look, you learn more, you start talking and so I quit my job,” she laughed.

The book, published by the Ten Speed Press division of Random House, was an instant success and was on the New York Times best-seller list for more than 90 weeks. Since then, her work has been enjoyed by readers around the world and translated into 24 different languages. A whole closet in her house on the Mesa is filled with the collection of her books in different languages, shared Ignotofsky with a smile. “It’s just so exciting to see.”

Those titles include an ongoing focus on women’s history. Women in Sports (2017) followed Women in Science, “because what’s the biggest stereotype that women face? It’s that our bodies are inherently weak. And that has been the excuse to prevent us, historically, from going to school, from leadership opportunities, and what better way to break that harmful stereotype and talk about women who have, you know, benchpressed over 350 pounds, who have climbed Mount Everest, who have broken world records?” said Ignotofsky.

INDEPENDENT.COM JANUARY 12, 2023 THE INDEPENDENT 21
COVER STORY
CONTINUED >
“The first computer I ever, ever used was when I was 7 years old; it was like a Mac Color Classic,” said author and illustrator Rachel Ignotofsky (above), who parlayed her interest
in computers and technology
into her new book, The History of the Computer. Pictured above right is one of the vintage computers from her collection
that she used as a
reference. Left, a young reader enjoys one of Ignotofsky’s free classroom worksheets.

firstrepublic.com/CD

Santa Barbara 1200 State Street, (805)

She also published Women in Art (2019), about which she said, even though she graduated from Tyler School of Art in Philadelphia, “What’s exciting about this book is that there were honestly names in here that I didn’t know about until I started really deep-dive researching. … With art, you’re talking about social and cultural impact, which you don’t really know if they had until years later.”

The book features beautifully illustrated biographies of 50 graphic designers, illustrators, architects, and fab ric designers some well-known (Georgia O’Keeffe, Frida Kahlo), and some less known (Guan Dausheng, Mary Edmonia Lewis). “People who have just really changed our culture, and have had real impacts for social good, actually, all through the lens of artwork,” said Ignotofsky, adding, “The wanting to make art was just always so strong,” she can’t imagine being anything other than an artist.

An example of one of the stories she found for the book was about Rosa Bonheur, who is widely considered to be the most famous female painter of the 19th century and “was an out lesbian in France, who had to get an actual license from the government to be allowed to wear pants in public,” said Ignotofsky. “Seriously! And she was just so talented that it was kind of like her talent made her undeniable. So she was very successful, made lots of money, and then created basically an artist retreat and bought this huge estate for other queer and lesbian women to come and work in a safe space.”

Earth science is another passion for Ignotofsky, and additional books include The Wondrous Workings of Planet Earth (2018), and What’s Inside a Flower? (2021), which is the first installment of a new picture book series with Random House Kids Still to come are What’s Inside a Caterpillar Cocoon?, which was

22 THE INDEPENDENT JANUARY 12, 2023 INDEPENDENT.COM
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Doing classroom visits all around the country is a big part of Ignotofsky’s life. She loves sharing her passion for science through her books, such as What’s Inside a Flower? below. Member FDIC and Equal Housing Lender

directly inspired by the Ellwood Butterfly Preserve, and What’s Inside of Birds’ Nests?, both of which are designed to align with the elementary school curriculum. To do that, Ignotofsky looks at “what are the terms that the teachers are going to be teaching in class, and then how can I reinforce them as an author, and just make it easy for the teachers, because it’s all about making it easy for everyone.”

She also supports the educational component with free coloring pages and worksheet downloads on her website (rachelignotofskydesign.com/free-downloads), as well as creating a host of other for-sale products such as posters, puzzles, prints, coloring books, and postcards.

With a background in graphic design, “we are trained to take information and make it as simple to read as possible. It’s like graphic designers use their skills all the time to tell stories, and usually it’s to sell things. Whether it’s Coca-Cola, or a brand-new car, how do you get all that information across instantaneously? So you don’t lose someone’s attention? Now, imagine if you took that skill set and then applied it to educational resources.”   Juggling all of the different aspects of her work can be challenging, Ignotofsky said. She’s always promoting a book at the same time she’s writing and illustrating a different book and developing concepts for books to come. Concept development is an intricate researching, storyboarding, and planning process (including defining the style and color palette) that involves creating what she describes as “a little cage for the information.”

In terms of discipline, Ignotofsky said, “Your productivity is so tied to your income when you work for yourself, that you have to kind of throw away the rulebook of the normal nine to five and do what works for you. So CONTINUED >

INDEPENDENT.COM JANUARY 12, 2023 THE INDEPENDENT 23
COVER STORY
“I’m a maximalist; I try to put as much on the page as possible,” said Ignotofsky. This is in evidence with this poster she did of the ecosystem of the Great Barrier Reef.
Foster Families Needed! C.A.R.E.4Paws’ Safe Haven program ensures domestic violence survivors can find safety for their dogs and cats when they leave an abusive situation. 805.968.CARE (2273) foster@care4paws.org care4paws.org A Ken Burns Documentary about the Mental Health Crisis Among Youth in America Hiding in Plain Sight
recommended)
in association with YouthWell (805)
www.ArtsAndLectures.UCSB.edu FREE FILMS
will
each
Special for new students only * May only be used once * 2 L essons For $45 CALL 805.963.6658 TO SCHEDULE
Sketches are an important part of Ignotofsky’s design process.
Tue, Jan 31 / Episode 1: The Storm (1:56 min.) Wed, Feb 1 / Episode 2: Resilience (1:52 min.) 6:30 PM (note special time) / UCSB Campbell Hall / FREE (registration
Presented
893-3535
A panel discussions
follow
screening 8:30 PM / UCSB Campbell Hall / FREE (register at thematic-learning.org/2022-2023) Mental Wellness and Young People: Leadership in Action - Local leaders in mental health share how they are addressing the pressing issue of psychological distress among young people. Learn about how they are addressing current challenges and the actions they are taking to improve access to resources both on campus and in the community.

for me, I’m not a morning person; I’m a night person. Why even try to work before noon? … Sometimes I’ll be drawing ’til like two or three in the morning happily, because that’s when I feel creative. And so it’s like, don’t fight your processes.”

Ignotofsky clearly loves digging into her research and said, “Being an author and illustrator working on nonfiction, it’s just like, it’s not just like your job. It really is like this lifestyle of learning all day.” Luckily, her husband and business partner, Thomas Mason, shares that passion. For their most recent book project, The History of the Computer (2022), Mason scoured the West Coast to curate and create what Ignotofsky called “our own little museum. We started our own vintage computer collection. So we were driving around all over Southern California and also up to San Francisco to get a Commodore PET from 1977, and a 1984 Macintosh, and a bunch of other really cool ones from primary sources. We’re the second owners of these machines, which is really cool.”

A look at our ever-evolving relationship with computers and technology, The History of the Computer spans over 25,000 years of human history and is the first fully illustrated book of its kind, a fact that clearly tickles its author.

“It’s been so exciting,” she said. “With all of my books, you go in your room, and you create them and you make this thing by yourself and you hope that your audience is receptive to it.”

After working on the computer book through the pandemic and lockdown, she was thrilled to be able to visit NASA for an appearance (her second one after Women in Science),

as well as meeting some of her heroes like Lee Felsenstein, founder of the

Computer

where

showed off the first Apple Computer. “Getting to like, sit and have coffee with

in

Park …  there’s not a lot of times that you get to talk to someone who you’re like, ‘Oh, you’re like a certified genius.’ … Getting to pick his brain, but then him wanting to pick my brain about certain things was cool. That was really special.”

As for communicating that enthusiasm to her young readers, Ignotofsky said, “My feeling is you don’t have to want to become a scientist to need to know science, right? A love of science starts with just wanting to know how your world works. And then, by

24 THE INDEPENDENT JANUARY 12, 2023 INDEPENDENT.COM
Homebrew Club, Steve Wozniak him Menlo
WAITING PERIOD JANUARY 21 - MARCH 4 DETAILS & LIVE WEBCAST @ R INCONC LA SS IC . C O M KICK OFF PARTY! FRIDAY JAN 13TH 6-9PM @RINCON BREWERY CARP ANTICOUNI & RICOTTA TRI-COUNTIES’ PREMIER EMPLOYMENT LAW FIRM Santa Barbara · Ventura · San Luis Obispo (805) 845-0864 · anticounilaw.com Workplace Law and Related Litigation on Behalf of Employees and Employers ANTICOUNI & RICOTTA HAS OBTAINED OVER TWO HUNDRED MILLION DOLLARS ($200,000,000.00) FOR CALIFORNIA EMPLOYEES IN CASES INVOLVING: · UNPAID OVERTIME · SEXUAL HARASSMENT · WRONGFUL TERMINATION · WHISTLEBLOWERS · DISABILITY · UNPAID MINIMUM WAGE · MISCLASSIFICATION OF INDEPENDENT CONTRACTORS · MEAL AND REST VIOLATIONS · LEAVES OF ABSENCE ANTICOUNI & RICOTTA HAS REPRESENTED BOTH EMPLOYEES AND EMPLOYERS FOR OVER 43 YEARS. EMPLOYEES – NO FEES UNLESS WE OBTAIN A JUDGMENT OR SETTLEMENT ON YOUR BEHALF. EMPLOYERS – IF YOU HAVE EMPLOYEES, YOU WANT OUR FIRM ON YOUR SIDE. SE HABLA ESPAÑOL
Pages from The History of the Computer

understanding the mechanics of how your world works, you have a better understanding of everything and yourself.”

Describing her work, Ignotofsky said that the art is the fun part and the writing is the work part. “I feel like I have been effortlessly drawing; I just can’t stop myself from drawing since I was a child. Writing has always been something that I do because I love to say what I gotta say. I do that because it is the best way to communicate what you want to say, and have people hear your voice. Drawing I would do if no one was around. … If I’m feel-

ing sick. If I’m feeling sleepy, I can just draw, draw, draw. Which means that I have to really  time manage myself to make sure that I do my writing. And that requires discipline.”

“There’s a lot of authors and artists who welcome you into their mind and their world. I’ve never been that type of person. My work is not about me. It’s about the stuff that I’m interested in. … How can I help create resources that inspire people to learn about the real world, to be more engaged with the world that they live in?”

INDEPENDENT.COM JANUARY 12, 2023 THE INDEPENDENT 25
n COVER STORYCOVER STORY
The Women In series of books
SANTA BARBARA’S PROFESSIONAL THEATER COMPANY ON STAGE FEBRUARY 2-19 “ discover the gut-punch power of this play” — THEATREMANIA etcsb.org Box Office: 805.965.5400
DIRECTED BY
Tickets starting at $40!
Young readers love playing with the vintage computers from Ignotofsky’s collection.
BY
Sylvia Khoury
Nike Doukas
26 THE INDEPENDENT JANUARY 12, 2023 INDEPENDENT.COM TWO CELEBRITIES. ONE MAGICAL EVENING. A PERFECT VALENTINE’S GIFT. OFF THE RECORD: AN INTIMATE CONVERSATION WITH ANTHONY EDWARDS AND CADY HUFFMAN ABOUT HOLLYWOOD & BROADWAY. MODERATED BY DANTE DI LORETO, EXEC. PRODUCER OF GLEE & AMERICAN HORROR STORY. February 4, 2023 at El Encanto, A Belmond Hotel 4:00pm - 5:45pm: The Conversation 6:00pm - 7:30pm: The Private Dinner Tickets are limited. Only 24 tickets include the dinner. The Conversation is $150. The Conversation + Private Dinner is $500. Proceeds from this event benefit CommUnify’s programs to help our neighbors in need. Event Sponsorships are available. CADY HUFFMAN TONY AWARD WINNING ACTRESS ANTHONY EDWARDS STAR OF TOP GUN & ER To buy tickets call (805) 964-8857 Ext. 3, or https://www.communifysb.org/off-the-record

COVID-19 VENUE POLICY

FARMERS MARKET SCHEDULE

THURSDAY

Carpinteria: 800 block of Linden Ave., 3-6:30pm

FRIDAY

Montecito: 1100 and 1200 blocks of Coast Village Rd., 8-11:15am

SATURDAY

Downtown S.B.: Corner of Santa Barbara and Cota sts., 8am-1pm

SUNDAY

Goleta: Camino Real Marketplace, 10am-2pm

TUESDAY Old Town S.B.: 500-600 blocks of State St., 3-7pm

WEDNESDAY

Solvang: Copenhagen Dr. (805) 962-5354 sbfarmersmarket.org

FISHERMAN’S MARKET SATURDAY

Shows on Tap Shows on Tap

1/12-1/15, 1/18: Lost Chord Guitars Thu.: The Storytellers, 7:30-9:30pm. $10. Fri.: Aireene Espiritu, 8-11:30pm. $15. Sat.: Freedom Heartsong, 8-11:30pm. Free; suggested donation: $10. Sun.: Sweet String Sisters, 8-10:30pm. Free; suggested donation: $10. Wed.: Terry Lawless (of U2), 7:30-9:30pm. Free; suggested donation: $5. 1576 Copenhagen Dr., Solvang. Ages 21+. Call (805) 331-4363. lostchordguitars.com

1/12-1/15, 1/17 SOhO Restaurant & Music Club Thu.: Mendeleyev & Sio Tepper, 7pm. $15. Fri.: Plastic Harpoons with Alexandra Riorden and The Warm Glow, Neil Erickson & Friends, 8pm. $12-$15. Ages 21+. Sat.: No Simple Highway, 8pm. $15-$20. Ages 21+. Sun.: Tunnel Vision Sea Dreamin’ Tour with Dubbest, Strange Case, 9pm. $17. Ages 21+. Tue.: Singer/Songwriter Showcase: Connor Muir, 7pm; Paulo Coelho, 8pm; Jenni Alpert, 9pm. $10. 1221 State St. Call (805) 962-7776. sohosb.com/events

1/13: Pali Wine Co. Live music. 6-8pm. 116 E. Yanonali St., Ste. A-1. Free. Ages 21+. Call (805) 560-7254.

urbanwinetrailsb.com/events

1/13: Uptown Lounge The Trio, 5-7pm. 3126 State St. Free. Call (805) 845-8800. uptownlounge805.com/events

1/14-1/15: Cold Spring Tavern Sat.: Grass Mountain, 1:30-4:30pm; Do No Harm, 5-8pm. Sun.: Tom Ball and Kenny Sultan. 1:30-4:30pm. 5995 Stagecoach Rd. Free. Call (805) 967-0066.

coldspringtavern.com

1/12: Crafternoons

at

Art From Scrap Get creative with and inspired by all of the reuse materials in our workshop and see where your imagination takes you. 3:30-5pm. Art From Scrap, 302 E. Cota St. $8. Children must be accompanied by an adult. Call (805) 884-0459 or email info@ exploreecology.org exploreecology.org/calendar

1/12:

Webinar: CEC Climate Action

Webinar: Creating Waves of Change Hear from those who have completed the Climate Stewards Certification Program about community action projects they designed and how they are putting newfound climate knowledge to work within the Central Coast. 6:30pm. Free Call (805) 963-0583. tinyurl.com/CreatingWavesWebinar

1/12:

Pozole Night Fundraiser

The community is invited to enjoy homemade pozole, all the fixings, soda, and entertainment to help raise funds to assist Franklin School mom Adriana Quintero with medical expenses as she awaits a liver transplant from UCLA. 5-7pm. Franklin Elementary School, 1111 E. Mason St. $10/bowl (cash only). Free tinyurl.com/AdrianaQuintero

FRIDAY 1/13

1/13-1/14:

Reading

Launch Pad Amplify

Series 3rd Annual Festival

See one or all four new plays (staged readings) that have been workshopped with a

1/13-1/18: Exhibition Reception: Abstract X 2nd Fridays Art @ SBTC See works from the Abstract 10, an evolving and diverse group of artists whose work connects and conveys individual interpretations of nonobjective art. The works range from nonobjective, fully abstract work to work where some objects or text are recognizable, but the emphasis is on emotion, not message. The exhibition shows through March 1. Thu.: 4:306pm; Fri.-Wed.: 10am-7pm. S.B. Tennis Club, 2375 Foothill Rd. Free. Call (805) 682-4722. santabarbaratennisclub.com/art

SATURDAY 1/14

1/14: SBMM Starts New

1/13-1/14: Fig Mountain Brew Co. (S.B.) Fri.: Warsaw Poland Bros. Sat.: Oddly Straight. 7pm. 137 Anacapa St. Free Call (805) 324-4461. figmtnbrew.com/events

1/13-1/14: Maverick Saloon Fri.: The Robert Heft Band, 8:30-11:30pm. Sat.: Tex Pistols, 8:30-11:30pm. 3687 Sagunto St., Santa Ynez. Free. Ages 21+. Call (805) 686-4785. mavericksaloon.com/eventcalendar/

1/14: M.Special Brewing Co. (Goleta) Sat.: Colonel Angus, 6-8pm. 6860 Cortona Dr., Ste. C, Goleta Free. Call (805) 968-6500. mspecialbrewco.com

1/16: Red Piano Church on Monday: Dave Melton Band, 7:30pm. 519 State St. Free. Call (805) 358-1439. theredpiano.com

1/14: John Tesh: Big Band Live Pianist, composer, and Emmy Award–winning radio and TV host, with 30 years of experience and 50-plus recordings John Tesh will reminisce about his life and career through music, pictures, and anecdotes. 7:30pm. Lobero Theatre, 33 E. Canon Perdido St. $44.25-$109.25. Call (805) 963-0761. lobero.org/events

INDEPENDENT.COM JANUARY 12, 2023 THE INDEPENDENT 27 INDEPENDENT CALENDAR
As always, find the complete listings online at independent.com/events. Submit virtual and in-person events at independent.com/eventsubmit EVENTS MAY HAVE BEEN CANCELED OR POSTPONED. Please contact the venue to confirm the event. Volunteer Opportunity Fundraiser Venues request that patrons consult their individual websites for the most up-to-date protocols and mask requirements for vaccinated and unvaccinated status before attending an event.
.
12-18
VICTORIA SNIDER by & TERRY ORTEGA
Rain or shine, meet local fishermen on the Harbor’s commercial pier, and buy fresh fish (filleted or whole), live crab, abalone, sea urchins, and more. 117 Harbor Wy., 6-11am. Call (805) 259-7476. cfsb.info/sat and 1st St., 2:30-6:30pm
and director.
RSVP
required. Fri.: 4pm:
of
Own
8pm:
; Sat.: 1pm: Dalia Is Dead and Her Dad
; 5pm:
THE talk-back conversation with cast, crew, playwright,
An
is
Wife
Headless Man Investigates Her
Disappearance;
Freedom Hill
Keeps Making Dumplings
Replaced. Performing Arts Theater, UCSB. Free theaterdance.ucsb .edu/news/event/982
Docent Class If you enjoy meeting new people and sharing your love and knowledge of our harbor with visitors, then consider becoming a docent at S.B. Maritime Museum. The first class will be an introduction to the museum’s docent program and how to interpret exhibits. 9-10:30am. S.B. Maritime Museum, 113 Harbor Wy., Ste. 190. Free. Call (805) 456-8748 or email jbaker@sbmm.org. tinyurl.com/SBMMdocents
JAN.
1/14: Star Party at the Museum Use the museum’s telescopes including the 20-inch, state-of-the-art telescope in the Palmer Observatory to get a close-up view of planets, galaxies, nebulae, and more while astronomers from the S.B. Astronomical Unit will share cosmic knowledge and answer your questions. 7-10pm. S.B. Museum of Natural History, 2559 Puesta del Sol. Free. Call (805) 682-4711 or email info@sbnature2.org. sbnature.org/visit/calendar
will
22
three
motifs: trains, cityscapes, and
The
of
trains, San
and Chicago
with
and
will
your
The
will show through January 30. Thu.: 10am-6pm; Fri.-Sat., Tue.-Wed.: 10am-5pm.
S.B. Central Library, 40 E. Anapamu St. Free. Email laladera77@
.
1/13: Beau James Wilding Single Release Show Carpinterian, Cali-based artist Beau James Wilding will release “Set Myself on Fire,” an unfiltered folk-rock single in advance of his third full-length record release, seeing i god, in April 2023. He will be backed by Tom Kenny and there will be an acoustic set by Zach Doiron. 7-9pm. brewLAB, 4191 Carpinteria Ave., Carpinteria. Free Email
. tinyurl.com/BeauJamesWilding
1/12 1/14:Rose Pruning Day at Mission Historical Park The City of S.B. Parks and Recreation Department invites all gardening enthusiasts to bring a pair of gardening gloves and pruning shears and assist in pruning the 1,500 rose bushes. No experience is necessary. 9am-1pm. AC Postel Memorial Rose Garden, 420 Plaza Rubio. Free. Call (805) 564-5433 or email ParksAndRec@SantaBarbaraCA.gov.
1/14: S.B. Music Club Free Concert: Romantic Music for Two Pianos Internationally acclaimed pianist and pedagogue Betty Oberacker and music director of S.B.’s American Dance & Music Performance Group Eric Valinsky will interpret two of the most beloved works from the Romantic Era, the Fantasia in F minor, D. 940 of Franz Schubert and the Hungarian Dances, WoO 1 of Johannes Brahms. 3pm. First United Methodist Church, 305 E. Anapamu St. Free sbmusicclub.org 1/12: Solo Exhibition: Dusk to Dawn Photographer and 60-year S.B. resident Ronald “Ron” Williams
show
curated photographs from
distinct dusk-to-dawn
starscapes.
large metal prints
speeding Amtrak
Francisco,
along
scenes of the Milky Way
the Orion Nebula
take
breath away.
exhibition
Faulkner Gallery,
gmail.com
tinyurl.com/WilliamsDusk-Dawn COURTESY
beauherennow@gmail.com
THURSDAY
tinyurl.com/RosePruning2023
Aireene Espiritu
COURTESY
Pacific Surfliner
CAROL PATTERSON COURTESY

& Lectures is proud

28 THE INDEPENDENT JANUARY 12, 2023 INDEPENDENT.COM JANUARY 19TH-22ND AT CENTER STAGE THEATER REALITY INVADED BY FICTION For tickets visit www.centerstagetheater.org WRITTEN BY PETER FRISCH & SHAY MUNROE Emanuel Ax Leonidas Kavakos Yo-Yo Ma Fri, Jan 27 / 7 PM / Granada Theatre Tickets are going fast! “The superstar trio.” The Boston Globe “An almost supernatural chemistry.” The Washington Post Program Ludwig van Beethoven: Symphony No. 4 in B-Flat Major, op. 60 (arr. Shai Wosner) Ludwig van Beethoven: Piano Trio in B-flat Major, op. 97 (“Archduke”) Praised for its remarkable ensemble cohesion and immaculately refined interpretations, this musical dream team reunites in Santa Barbara for an unforgettable evening of chamber music. Pre-concert Talk by Derek Katz, UCSB Associate Professor of Musicology 6 PM / Granada McCune Founders Room / Free to event ticket holders (805) 893-3535 | www.ArtsAndLectures.UCSB.edu Granada event tickets can also be purchased at: (805) 899-2222 | www.GranadaSB.org Special Thanks WE'RE BACK! J O I N U S . . . MARIACHI GARIBALDI DE JAIME CUÉLLAR D e l i g h t i n g au d i en c e s t h r ougho u t M e x i c o an d t h e U S f o r t h e p a s t 2 6 y e a r s ( an d f e a t u r e d o n Ca m i l a Cab e l l o s ne w s on g , L a Buen a V i d a ! ) F ri day , Janua r y 13 t h | 7 - 8 P M | I s l a V i s t a Schoo l Sa t u r day , Janua r y 14 t h | 7 - 8 P M | G uada l up e C i t y H a l l Sunday , Janua r y 15 t h | 7 - 8 P M | M a rj o r i e Luk e T h ea tr e ¡Viva el Arte de Santa Bárbara! was founded in 2006 on the belief that everyone deserves access to the inspiration and joy of the arts. Each Viva residency starts with cultural programming in schools and after- school programs, and culminates
in FREE performances of music and dance that distinguish our communities’ Latinx heritage at neighborhood venues in Isla Vista, Santa Barbara, and Guadalupe.
¡Viva el Arte de Santa Bárbara! is
&
The
Theatre, and the
in partnership with the Isla Vista School Parent Teacher
FREE WE'RE BACK! J O I N U S MARIACHI GARIBALDI DE JAIME CUÉLLAR D e l i g h t i n g au d i en c e s t h r ougho u t M e x i c o an d t h e U S f o r t h e p a s t 2 6 y e a r s ( an d f e a t u r e d o n Ca m i l a Cab e l l o s ne w s on g , L a Buen a V i d a ! ) F ri day , Janua r y 13 t h | 7 - 8 P M | I s l a V i s t a Schoo l Sa t u r day , Janua r y 14 t h | 7 - 8 P M | G uada l up e C i t y H a l l Sunday , Janua r y 15 t h | 7 - 8 P M | M a rj o r i e Luk e T h ea tr e ¡Viva
everyone deserves access to the
and joy of the arts. Each Viva residency
with
programming
schools and after- school programs, and
in FREE
Arts & Lectures is proud to announce the return of
co-presented by UCSB Arts
Lectures,
Marjorie Luke
Guadalupe-Nipomo Dunes Center,
Association.
el Arte
de Santa Bárbara! was founded
in 2006 on the belief that
inspiration
starts
cultural
in
culminates
performances of music and dance that distinguish our communities’ Latinx heritage at neighborhood venues in Isla Vista, Santa Barbara, and Guadalupe.
¡Viva el Arte de Santa Bárbara! is co-presented by UCSB Arts & Lectures, The Marjorie Luke Theatre, and the Guadalupe-Nipomo Dunes Center, in partnership with the Isla Vista School Parent Teacher Association. FREE WE'RE BACK! J O I N U S . . . MARIACHI GARIBALDI DE JAIME CUÉLLAR D e l i g h t i n g au d i en c e s t h r ougho u t M e x i c o an d t h e U S f o r t h e p a s t 2 6 y e a r s ( an d f e a t u r e d o n Ca m i l a Cab e l l o ’ s ne w s on g , L a Buen a V i d a ! ) F ri day , Janua r y 13 t h | 7 - 8 P M | I s l a V i s t a Schoo l Sa t u r day , Janua r y 14 t h | 7 - 8 P M | G uada l up e C i t y H a l l Sunday , Janua r y 15 t h | 7 - 8 P M | M a rj o r i e Luk e T h ea tr e ¡Viva
deserves access to the
and joy of the arts. Each Viva
with
programming
schools and after- school programs, and
Arts & Lectures is proud to announce the return of
el Arte
de Santa
Bárbara! was founded in 2006 on the belief that everyone
inspiration
residency starts
cultural
in
culminates
in FREE performances of music and dance that distinguish our communities’ Latinx heritage at neighborhood venues in Isla Vista, Santa Barbara, and Guadalupe.
¡Viva el Arte de Santa Bárbara! is
in
FREE WE'RE BACK! J O I N U S . . . MARIACHI GARIBALDI DE JAIME CUÉLLAR D e l i g h t i n g au d i en c e s t h r ougho u t M e x i c o an d t h e U S f o r t h e p a s t 2 6 y e a r s ( an d f e a t u r e d o n Ca m i l a Cab e l l o ’ s ne w s on g , L a Buen a V i d a ! ) F ri day , Janua r y 13 t h | 7 - 8 P M | I s l a V i s t a Schoo l Sa t u r day , Janua r y 14 t h | 7 - 8 P M | G uada l up e C i t y H a l l Sunday Janua 15 M | M rj i Luk e T h ea tr e ¡Viva
access
cultural programming
after- school programs,
FREE
and
our
¡Viva
FREE WE'RE BACK! J O I N U S . . . MARIACHI GARIBALDI DE JAIME CUÉLLAR D e l i g h t i n g au d i en c e s t h r ougho u t M e x i c o an d t h e U S f o r t h e p a s t 2 6 y e a r s ( an d f e a t u r e d o n Ca m i l a Cab e l l o ’ s ne w s on g , L a Buen a V i d a ! ) F ri day , Janua r y 13 t h | 7 - 8 P M | I s l a V i s t a Schoo l Sa t u r day , Janua r y 14 t h | 7 - 8 P M | G uada l up e C i t y H a l l Sunday , Janua r y 15 t h | 7 - 8 P M | M a rj o r i e Luk e T h ea tr e ¡Viva
school
Arts
FREE WE'RE BACK! J O I N U S . . . MARIACHI GARIBALDI DE JAIME CUÉLLAR D e l i g h t i n g au d i en c e s t h r ougho u t M e x i c o an d t h e U S f o r t h e p a s t 2 6 y e a r s ( an d f e a t u r e d o n Ca m i l a Cab e l l o ’ s ne w s on g L a Buen a V i d a ! ) F ri day , Janua r y 13 t h | 7 - 8 P M | I s l a V i s t a Schoo l Sa t u r day , Janua r y 14 t h | 7 - 8 P M | G uada l up e C i t y H a l l Sunday , Janua r y 15 t h | 7 - 8 P M | M a rj o r i e Luk e T h ea tr e ¡Viva
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Arts & Lectures is proud to announce the return of
el Arte de Santa Bárbara! was founded in 2006 on the belief that everyone deserves access to the inspiration and joy of the arts. Each Viva residency starts with cultural programming in schools and after- school programs, and culminates in FREE performances of music and dance that distinguish our communities’ Latinx heritage at neighborhood venues in Isla Vista, Santa Barbara, and Guadalupe. FREE WE'RE BACK! J O I N U S MARIACHI GARIBALDI DE JAIME CUÉLLAR D e l i g h t i n g au d i en c e s t h r ougho u t M e x i c o an d t h e U S f o r t h e p a s t 2 6 y e a r s ( an d f e a t u r e d o n Ca m i l a Cab e l l o ’ s ne w s on g , L a Buen a V i d a ! ) F ri day , Janua r y 13 t h | 7 - 8 P M | I s l a V i s t a Schoo l Sa t u r day , Janua r y 14 t h | 7 - 8 P M | G uada l up e C i t y H a l l Sunday , Janua r y 15 t h | 7 - 8 P M | M a rj o r i e Luk e T h ea tr e ¡Viva el Arte de Santa Bárbara! was founded in 2006 on the belief that everyone deserves access to the inspiration and joy of the arts. Each Viva residency starts with cultural programming in schools and after- school programs, and culminates in FREE performances of music and dance that distinguish our communities’ Latinx heritage at neighborhood venues in Isla
¡Viva el Arte de Santa Bárbara! is co-presented by UCSB Arts & The Marjorie Luke Theatre, and the Guadalupe-Nipomo Dunes Center, in partnership with the Isla Vista School Parent Teacher Association. FREE WE'RE BACK! J O I N U S MARIACHI GARIBALDI DE JAIME CUÉLLAR D e l i g h t i n g au d i en c e s t h r ougho u t M e x i c o an d t h e U S f o r t h e p a s t 2 6 y e a r s ( an d f e a t u r e d o n Ca m i l a Cab e l l o ’ s ne w s on g , L a Buen a V i d a ! ) F ri day , Janua r y 13 t h | 7 - 8 P M | I s l a V i s t a Schoo l Sa t u r day , Janua r y 14 t h | 7 - 8 P M | G uada l up e C i t y H a l l Sunday , Janua r y 15 t h | 7 - 8 P M | M a rj o r i e Luk e T h ea tr e ¡Viva
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FREE WE'RE BACK! J O I N U S . . . MARIACHI GARIBALDI DE JAIME CUÉLLAR D e l i g h t i n g au d i en c e s t h r ougho u t M e x i c o an d t h e U S f o r t h e p a s t 2 6 y e a r s ( an d f e a t u r e d o n Ca m i l a Cab e l l o ’ s ne w s on g , L a Buen a V i d a ! ) F ri day , Janua r y 13 t h | 7 - 8 P M | I s l a V i s t a Schoo l Sa t u r day , Janua r y 14 t h | 7 - 8 P M | G uada l up e C i t y H a l l Sunday , Janua r y 15 t h | 7 - 8 P M | M a rj o r i e Luk e T h ea tr e ¡Viva
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FREE WE'RE BACK! J O I N U S MARIACHI GARIBALDI DE JAIME CUÉLLAR D e l i g h t i n g au d i en c s t h r ougho u t M e x i c o an d t h e U S f o r t h e p a t 2 6 y e a r ( an d f e a t u r d o n Ca m i l a Cab e l l o ’ s ne w s on g , L a Buen a V i d a ! ) F ri day , Janua r y 13 t h | 7 - 8 P M | I s l a V i s t a Schoo l Sa t u r day , Janua r y 14 t h | 7 - 8 P M | G uada l up e C i t y H a l l Sunday , Janua r y 15 t h | 7 - 8 P M | M a rj o r i e Luk e T h ea tr e ¡Viva
Arts
¡Viva el Arte
FREE WE'RE BACK! J O I N U S MARIACHI GARIBALDI DE JAIME CUÉLLAR D e l i g h t i n g au d i en e s t h r ougho u t M x i o an d t h e U S f o r t h e p a s t 2 6 y e a r s ( an d f e a t u r e d n Ca m i l a Cab e l l o ’ s ne w s on g , L a Buen a V i d a ! ) F ri day , Janua r y 13 t h | 7 - 8 P M | I s l a V i s t a Schoo l Sa t u r day , Janua r y 14 t h | 7 - 8 P M | G uada l up e C i t y H a l l Sunday , Janua r y 15 t h | 7 - 8 P M | M a rj o r i e Luk e T h ea tr e ¡Viva
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FREE WE'RE BACK! J O I N U S MARIACHI GARIBALDI DE JAIME CUÉLLAR D e l i g h t i n g au d i en c e s t h r ougho u t M i c o an t h e U S f o r t h e p a s t 2 6 y e a r ( an d f e a t u r e d o n Ca m i l a Cab e l l o ’ s ne w s on g , L a Buen a V i d a ! ) F ri day , Janua r y 13 t h | 7 - 8 P M | I s l a V i s t a Schoo l Sa t u r day , Janua r y 14 t h | 7 - 8 P M | G uada l up e C i t y H a l l Sunday , Janua r y 15 t h | 7 - 8 P | M a rj o r i e Luk e T h ea tr e ¡Viva
Arts & Lectures
¡Viva el Arte de Santa Bárbara! is co-presented by UCSB Arts & Lectures, The Marjorie Luke Theatre, and the Guadalupe-Nipomo Dunes Center, in partnership with the Isla Vista School Parent Teacher Association. FREE WE'RE BACK! J O I N U S . . . MARIACHI GARIBALDI DE JAIME CUÉLLAR D e l i g h t i n g au d i en c e s t h r ougho u t M e x i c o an d t h e U S f o r t h e p a s t 2 6 y e a r s ( an d f e a t u r e d o n Ca m i l a Cab e l l o ’ s ne w s on g , L a Buen a V i d a ! ) F ri day , Janua r y 13 t h | 7 - 8 P M | I s l a V i s t a Schoo l Sa t u r day , Janua r y 14 t h | 7 - 8 P M | G uada l up e C i t y H a l l Sunday , Janua r y 15 t h | 7 - 8 P M | M a rj o r i e Luk e T h ea tr e
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Santa Bárbara! is co-presented by UCSB Arts & Lectures, Marjorie Luke Theatre, and the Guadalupe-Nipomo Dunes Center, partnership with the Isla Vista School Parent Teacher Association.
Vista, Santa Barbara, and Guadalupe. Arts
& Lectures is proud to announce the return of
el Arte de Santa Bárbara! was founded in 2006 on the belief that everyone deserves access to the inspiration and joy of the arts. Each Viva residency starts with
cultural programming in schools and
after-
school programs, and culminates in
FREE
performances of music and dance that distinguish
our
communities’ Latinx heritage at neighborhood venues in Isla Vista, Santa Barbara, and Guadalupe.
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& Lectures is proud to announce the return of
de Santa Bárbara! is co-presented by UCSB Arts & Lectures, The
Marjorie Luke Theatre, and the Guadalupe-Nipomo Dunes Center,
in
partnership with the Isla Vista School Parent Teacher Association.
el Arte de Santa Bárbara! was founded in 2006 on the belief that everyone deserves
to the inspiration and joy of the arts. Each Viva residency starts
cultural programming in schools and
school programs, and culminates in
performances of music and dance that distinguish
communities’
Latinx
heritage at neighborhood venues in
Isla Vista, Santa Barbara, and Guadalupe.
Arts
& Lectures is proud to announce the return of
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el Arte de Santa Bárbara! is co-presented by UCSB Arts & Lectures, The Marjorie Luke Theatre, and the Guadalupe-Nipomo Dunes Center, in partnership with the Isla Vista School Parent Teacher Association.
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& Lectures is proud to announce the return of de Santa Bárbara! is
co-presented by UCSB Arts & Lectures, The Marjorie Luke Theatre, and the Guadalupe-Nipomo Dunes Center,
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partnership with the Isla Vista School Parent Teacher Association.
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performances of music and dance that distinguish
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co-presented by
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el Arte de Santa Bárbara! was founded in 2006 on the belief that everyone deserves access to the inspiration and joy of the arts. Each Viva residency starts with cultural programming in schools and after- school programs, and culminates in FREE performances of music and dance that distinguish our communities’ Latinx heritage at neighborhood venues in Isla Vista, Santa Barbara, and Guadalupe.
is proud to announce the return of ¡Viva el Arte de Santa Bárbara! was founded in 2006 on the belief that everyone deserves access to the inspiration and joy of the arts. Each Viva residency starts with cultural programming in schools and after- school programs, and culminates in FREE performances of music and dance that distinguish our communities’ Latinx heritage at neighborhood venues in Isla Vista, Santa Barbara, and Guadalupe.
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de Santa Bárbara! is co-presented by UCSB Arts & Lectures, Marjorie Luke Theatre, and the Guadalupe-Nipomo Dunes Center, partnership with the Isla Vista School Parent Teacher Association.
FREE

THE SUNDAY 1/15

1/16:

MONDAY 1/16

TUESDAY 1/17

WEDNESDAY 1/18

1/18: 2023 Santa Barbara Dance Theater 46th Anniversary Season Take in a performance from the longest continually operating contemporary dance company in the S.B. area. This concert will feature the work of guest choreographers Helen Simoneau’s Darling and David Maurice’s Partial Adaptation, and a premiere by new Artistic Director Brandon Whited (Assoc. Prof. of Dance/Director of Dance Performance). Performances through January 22. 7:30pm. Hatlen Theater, UCSB. $13-$25. Call (805) 893-2064. theaterdance.ucsb.edu

1/12-1/16:

16th Annual Martin Luther King Jr. Holiday Celebration

The community is invited to begin the Martin Luther King Jr. celebration on Thursday at the Eternal Flame event at UCSB, and on Saturday see the MLKSB student awardees at Congregation B’nai B’rith. Also on Saturday, the community is encouraged to find locations on the mlksb.org website and volunteer for the day. On Sunday, head to De la Guerra Plaza to hear an opening prayer, music, winning essay, and poetry read by students, and a chance to join the beat with World Dance for Humanity. Then stride up State Street from De la Guerra Plaza to the Arlington Theatre to be met with jazz sounds from the David Gorospe Trio in the foyer followed by a 90-minute presentation at the Arlington that will include Mayor Randy Rowse, Congressmember Salud Carbajal, State Senator Monique Limón, and this year’s keynote speaker, Dr. Daina Ramey Berry. Thu.: Noon-1pm. Buchanan Hall Lawn, UCSB. Fri.: 6pm. Service. Congregation B’nai B’rith, 1000 San Antonio Rd. Sat.: various hours: Day of Service; Sun.: various times and locations. Church services. Mon.: 9am: morning program. De la Guerra Plaza; 10am: march; 11am12:30pm: afternoon program. The Arlington Theatre, 1317 State St. Free. mlksb.org

INDEPENDENT.COM JANUARY 12, 2023 THE INDEPENDENT 29
1/15: The History of Rincon Point: From the Chumash Through the Surfers Join Vince Burns and Stephen Bates, area authors of Rincon Point, part of the Images of America series, as they share images and stories of Rincon’s rich and surprising history. 3-4:30pm. Carpinteria Community Library, 5141 Carpinteria Ave., Carpinteria. Free (805) 684-4314. tinyurl.com/RinconPoint 1/17: Pacific Views: Library Speaker Series Presents: Spatial Data Science Solutions for Better Bicycling Professor Trisalyn Nelson (UCSB Geography) will explore the question “What kind of living environment makes us happy?” Nelson will describe how her team develops novel data to map bicycle infrastructure, safety, and ridership as well as highlight projects to improve bicycling data in S.B. 4pm. Pacific View Room, UCSB Library. Free. Call (805) 893-2478. tinyurl.com/BicyclingData Virtual Discussion: Iris Yamashita Join the virtual discussion with Academy Award–nominated screenwriter of 2007’s Letters from Iwo Jima, Iris Yamashita, as she talks about her debut novel City Under One Roof. 7pm. Chaucer’s Books, 3321 State St. Free. Call (805) 682-6787. chaucersbooks.com/event Martin Luther King Jr. Day Celebration ANTHONY MONGIELLO
Welcome to Freedom Management reserves the right to change or cancel promotions and events at any time without notice. Must be 21 or older. Gambling problem? Call 1.800.GAMBLER. THE FAB FOUR FEBRUARY 25 | SATURDAY | 8PM BONNIE RAITT MARCH 11 | SATURDAY | 8PM GEORGE CLINTON MARCH 4 | SATURDAY | 8PM ON SALE JANUARY 13 ICONIC MARCH 18 | SATURDAY | 8PM ALWAYS AMA ZI NG . NEVER ROUT IN E .
COURTESY
COURTESY

7:45.

Puss in Boots* (PG): Fri: 5:00, 7:30. Sat-Mon:12:00, 2:30, 5:00, 7:30.

Tue-Thur: 4:20, 7:00.

The Whale (R): Fri, Tue-Thur: 5:00. Sat-Mon: 1:45.

CAMINO REAL

7040 MARKETPLACE DR GOLETA 805-688-4140

Plane* (R): Fri: 2:10, 4:45, 7:20, 9:55. Sat-Mon: 11:35, 2:10, 4:45, 7:20, 9:55 Tue-Thur: 2:45, 5:30, 8:10.

The Devil Conspiracy (R): Fri-Mon: 1:40, 4:20, 7:10, 9:50. Tue-Thur: 3:00, 5:40, 8:20.

M3GAN (PG13): Fri: 2:00, 4:30, 7:00, 9:30.

Sat-Mon: 11:30, 2:00, 4:30, 7:00, 9:30.

Tue-Thur: 2:20, 5:05, 7:45.

Avatar Way of Water* (PG13): Fri: 1:15, 2:30/3D, 4:00, 5:15, 6:30/3D, 8:00, 9:15/3DSat-Mon: 12:00, 1:15, 2:30/3D, 4:00, 5:15, 6:30/3D, 8:00, 9:15/3D.

Tue/Wed: 2:30/3D, 4:00, 5:15, 6:30/3D, 8:00. Thur: 2:30/3D, 4:00, 6:30/3D, 8:00.

MISSING*: Thur: 4:45, 7:30.

Avatar Way of Water* (PG13): Fri, Sun/Mon: 1:20/3D, 4:15, 5:20/3D, 8:15/3D. Sat: 12:15, 1:20/3D, 4:15, 5:20/3D, 8:15/3D. Sun: 12:15, 1:25/3D, 4:15, 5:30/3D, 8:15/3D. Tue-Thur: 1:20/3D, 4:15, 5:20/3D, 8:15/3D.

M3GAN (PG13): Fri, Mon-Wed: 1:35, 3:00, 4:05, 5:30, 6:45, 8:00. Sat-Mon: 12:30, 1:35, 3:00, 4:05, 5:30, 6:45, 8:00. Thur: 1:35, 3:00, 5:30, 8:00.

MET OPERA: Fedora: Sat: 9:55.

MISSING*: Thur: 5:05, 7:45.

Community living

Poetic Inspiration Is Part of the Martin Luther King Jr. Holiday Celebration

Broken Treasures

Plane* (R): Fri, Tue-Thur: 5:30, 8:05.

Sat-Mon: 12:20, 2:55, 5:30, 8:05.

The Devil Conspiracy (R): Fri, Tue-Thur: 5:40, 8:20. Sat-Mon: 12:25, 3:00, 5:40, 8:20.

House Party* (R): Fri, Tue-Thur: 5:45, 8:15. Sat-Mon: 12:45, 3:15, 5:45, 8:15.

The Menu (R): Fri-Thur: 7:35.

Whitney Houston: I Wanna Dance with Somebody (PG13): Fri, Tue-Thur: 4:20.

Sat-Mon: 1:45.

The Old Way (R): Sat-Thur: 5:05.

Puss in Boots (PG): Fri: 5:15, 7:45.

Sat-Mon: 12:15, 2:45, 5:15, 7:45.

Tue-Thur: 4:45, 7:15.

The Whale (R): Fri, Tue-Thur : 4:45, 7:30.

Sat-Mon: 2:00, 4:45, 7:30.

Empire of Light (R): Fri, Tue-Thur: 4:30.

Sat-Mon: 1:45, 4:30.

Broker (R): Fri-Wed: 7:15.

The Son* (PG13): Thur: 7:15

ARLINGTON

1317 STATE STREET SANTA BARBARA 805-963-9580

Avatar Way of Water* (PG13): Fri-Thur: 3:00, 7:00.

A Man Called Otto* (PG13): Fri, Tue-Thur: 4:30, 7:30. Sat-Mon: 1:20, 4:30, 7:30.

Babylon (R): Fri, Tue-Thur: 4:05, 7:45.

Sat-Mon: 12:30, 4:05, 7:45.

Black Panther: Wakanda Forever (PG13): Fri, Tue-Thur: 8:05. Sat-Mon: 4:15, 8:05.

The Fabelmans (PG13): Fri, Tue-Thur: 4:00, 7:20. Sat-Mon: 12:40, 4:00, 7:20

The Woman King (PG13): Fri:, Tue-Thur 4:40. Sat-Mon: 1:00.

The theme of “Life’s most persistent and urgent question is, ‘What are you doing for others?’ ” from a speech Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. made in Montgomery, Alabama in 1957, will resonate throughout the annual MLK Day celebrations taking place between January 12 through the holiday on January 16.

It’s certainly a message that Lauren Lee connects with. “Helping others and making friends even when it’s hard, it’s like the light and love we bring to our communities. And everyone seems to be out to get something in our society. But true friendship means supporting someone because you want to, not because you need to,” said the Dos Pueblos High School sophomore, whose poem “Broken Treasures” was selected as one of three student poems to be presented on stage at the Arlington Theatre as part of a 90-minute program that begins at 9 a.m. (For more information and the complete schedule of MLK events the first in person after two years of online events see The Week on page 29.)

Lee, who read her poem on the radio station KCBX FM 90 as part of the lead up to the MLK festivities, and previously won a PTA Reflections contest for her poetry, is excited to honor the legacy of Dr. King. “My favorite quote from him is ‘Darkness cannot drive out darkness; only light can do that. Hate cannot drive out hate; only love can do that,’” she shared.

People are like oceans. Layers and layers and layers of feelings. Fears. Strengths. Secrets. Weaknesses. Dreams. Most people only see the surface. The serene Sunlight Zone that says everything’s fine. But others are willing to swim the extra mile. They break past the surface, swimming and swimming and swimming. It’s difficult. It’s worth it. Because treasure isn’t found at the surface. It’s down down down at the very bottom. (hidden) When you find it, it’s precious. Cause you can only find it if they let you. And they only let you find it if you’re willing to dive deep. Take the risks. Face the danger. Swim past the zones of embarrassment. Trauma. Shame. So. When they finally open their chest of broken treasures, don’t take any. Recognize their struggles, their pain, their sorrow.

Appreciate what they’ve gone through. Don’t pity their shattered remains. Instead, help them put themselves back together into something stronger. Because isn’t that what friends are for?

30 THE INDEPENDENT JANUARY 12, 2023 INDEPENDENT.COM
n
Teen Poet
to Help Others
Honors Dr. King’s Call
by Leslie Dinaberg Lauren Lee
225 N FAIRVIEW AVE GOLETA 805-683-3800 FAIRVIEW METRO 4 618 STATE STREET SANTA BARBARA 805-965-7684 LP = Laser Projection FIESTA 5 916 STATE STREET SANTA BARBARA 805-963-0455 The Arlington Theatre PASEO NUEVO 8 WEST DE LA GUERRA STREET SANTA BARBARA 805-965-7451
COURTESY
A Man Called Otto* (PG13): Fri, Tue-Thur: 4:45, 8:00. Sat-Mon: 1:30, 4:45, 8:00. Whitney Houston: I Wanna Dance w Somebody* (PG13): Fri, Tue-Thur: 7:45. Sat-Mon: 4:30,
HITCHCOCK 371 South Hitchcock Way SANTA BARBARA 805-682-6512
Schedule subject to change. Please visit metrotheatres.com for theater updates. Thank you. Features and Showtimes for Jan 13 - 19, 2023 * = Subject to Restrictions on “SILVER MVP PASSES; and No Passes” www.metrotheatres.com
Thur 1/19: Advance Previews PLANE THE WOMAN KING HOUSE PARTY BROKER THE DEVIL CONSPIRACY MISSING
Fri 1/13
THE SON

A Hot Fashion Focus at UC Santa Barbara

At University of California Santa Barbara, strolling across campus may result in more than just a tranquil walk. A student-run Instagram account under the username @hotticket_ucsb has shaken the college’s fashion community, anonymously posting images of students, faculty, and passersby alike in their most stylish outfits, highlighting who, in fact, has the fashionable “hot ticket.”

Student-Run ‘Hot Ticket’ Instagram Account Celebrates Unique Forces of Fashion on Campus

The account, run by UCSB students Cynthia Wong and Laura Witucka, featured its first post in April: an image capturing two passing students in brightly patterned blouses and flare jeans walking in front of the campus’s convenience store The Arbor. Following this post are hundreds of images of passersby in quirky outfits walking around this same location, highlighting the diverse amalgamation of styles found in the UCSB community.

Wong describes the inspiration behind the account: “Hot Ticket was created on a random day Laura and I were sitting on the grass in front of The Arbor. We would sit there almost every day in between classes and just watch people walk by, and sometimes we’d spot cool outfits that we liked, so we made the Instagram account kind of as a joke and for ourselves to document and highlight the different outfits that students and faculty wore.”

Although the account began lightheartedly, it has since reached more than 7,000 followers, with extensive interactions from students regularly recognizing themselves and their outfits in Hot Ticket’s

latest posts. Wong commented on the unexpected influence the account has: “We definitely weren’t expecting the growth and attention that this account gained since last spring…. Even though the account has gained so much attention, we still treat it the same way: We just post the outfits we like and hope that our followers still love it!”

While the account’s rise within the social sphere on UCSB’s campus was inadvertent, Wong notes that their aim is to help “people to take notice of fashion and get inspiration for their own style from their peers.” Hot Ticket is certainly successful in this, with each post representing a slice of the diverse and flowing state of expression that fashion embodies throughout the campus.

The creative process behind what initially appears to be a playful account dedicated to people-watching is more complex than simply snapping a few pictures of pedestrians each day. Wong says, “We usually take a lot of pictures, 100-200, of outfits that we like. Out of all of those outfits, we pick 10 that we like the most, are the most creative or eye-catching, to feature on our account…. We do have a disclaimer posted in our highlights that lets people know that they can message us at any time if they don’t want their picture on our account and that we’ll always take it down!”

In this sense, Hot Ticket is a flowering of the unique voices of fashion throughout the campus, portrayed vibrantly in the candid nature of the posted photographs. Through people-watching and running the account, Wong describes how “people walking by are kind of on a runway, and we can get a good perspective and view of their outfits.”

Look toward the Hot Ticket account to not only spark some creativity when picking out a new outfit, but also as a celebration of fashion and the un-staged beauty of students forging a connection to one another through personal expression.

INDEPENDENT.COM JANUARY 12, 2023 THE INDEPENDENT 31 Fashion
living
n
@HOTTICKET_UCSB PHOTOS
Some of the fashions featured on the @hotticket_ucsb Instagram account

Join Santa Barbara Public Library and the SantaBarbaraIndependent for a Book Club Extravaganza! Hear from SBPL librarians about the new, upcoming Book Club in a Bag sets and get early access to the holds list, learn about the Library’s book club picks for Fiction, Crime, and Romance as well as special book club discussions happening throughout the year. Mix and mingle with other readers, get personalized recommendations for books your book club will love from SBPL librarians, and check out books from the Library on the Go van.

Sports living

Trailblazing Her Way to the Top

Like any woman who has found success in a maledominated profession, Kelly Barsky has proven to be a pioneer worthy of admiration.

Barsky’s ascent from an assistant on former UCSB women’s basketball coach Lindsay Gottlieb’s staff in 2008 to last week’s appointment as permanent Director of Athletics has been a winding road, but according to Barsky, she has been grounded in a focus on serving student athletes, serving the campus and serving the community.

“My journey is certainly a bunch of zig-zags, not a straight line,” Barsky said. “I’ve always been rooted in education and mentorship and the belief that being in academia impacts and changes lives.”

Since the inception of Title IX more than 50 years ago, women have had increased opportunities to pursue athletics at the collegiate level. Barsky herself was a beneficiary, playing point guard on the Keene College women’s basketball team, where she earned bachelor’s degrees in psychology and elementary education while racking up the second most assists in program history.

After spending time as an elementary school teacher, Barsky went on to become a graduate assistant at University of New Hampshire, where she first met Gottlieb, who was an assistant coach at the time.

Barsky relished the opportunity to work with collegiate student athletes.

UCSB’s New Athletic Director Kelly Barsky Is First Woman at the Helm by

“Throughout my career, I’ve always been rooted in the belief in serving student-athletes,” Barsky said. “Using education, mentorship, relationships, and connections as tools to hopefully impact and help others in finding their passion and their inspiration and supporting their own personal journeys.”

Immediately before moving to Santa Barbara, Barsky was an assistant women’s basketball coach at St. Francis College in Brooklyn, New York, under head coach Brenda Milano. She served as a recruiting coordinator and was primarily responsible for guard development, scouting opponents, and monitoring student-athletes’ academic progress.

Meanwhile Barsky and Gottlieb stayed in touch, and when Gottlieb was hired as UCSB’s head women’s basketball coach in 2008, she reached out to Barsky to join her staff.

“I was really excited about what a legacy program I was joining and what a great history and community support UCSB had,” Barsky said. “So to come out and be a part of the women’s basketball team, program, and community was really something special to me.”

After three seasons at UCSB, Gottlieb moved on to become the head coach at UC Berkeley, later becoming the first NCAA Women’s head coach to be hired by an NBA team in 2019, as part of John Beilein’s staff with the Cleveland Cavaliers. Meanwhile, Barsky transitioned to an academic advisor role in the College of Letters and Science, Division of Undergraduate Education.

“Entering UCSB as a basketball coach, I never expected to move up and ascend to be the director of athletics, but what I always knew is that I would be

working in roles that support mentorship and education and serving students,” Barsky said. “Having the opportunity to move into the college of letters and science and work as an academic advisor was really momentous for me. Having the opportunity to serve the campus in a different way, not just studentathletes, but students, staff, and faculty on our campus.”

Barsky was eventually offered a role to come back to the athletic department as the Deputy Athletic Director and Senior Woman Administrator. She provided strategic leadership to the department and oversaw all internal operations while building strong campus and community collaborations to support student-athlete experience and well-being.

In addition, Barsky is the Big West’s liaison for the NCAA Division I Council and is a member of the NCAA Women’s Basketball Oversight Committee.

Despite all of the advancement that has been made in leveling the playing field for women in athletics since Title IX was adopted, the upper echelon of Division I athletic departments are disproportionately dominated by men.

Recent research by  Women’s Leadership in College Sports in partnership with Arizona State University Law Program found that only 15 percent of NCAA Division I Athletic departments had female athletic directors. Those statistics juxtaposed with the fact that nearly half of NCAA Division I athletes are women paints a startling picture of inequality.

Asked about closing the gap, Barsky said, “I think it starts with having these conversations and creating awareness. I’m inspired by so many individuals that are out there publicly and on social media creating awareness and creating systems to help individuals whether its females or underrepresented minorities grow into roles of leadership.”

Well-equipped for her role as a trailblazer, Barsky joins UC Irvine’s Paula Smith as one of two female athletic directors among the Big West Conference’s 12 member institutions.

“We are so proud and so pleased to [introduce] the first woman ever to serve as Athletics Director for the Gaucho athletics teams,” said UCSB Chancellor Henry Yang.

32 THE INDEPENDENT JANUARY 12, 2023 INDEPENDENT.COM
n
Victor Bryant JEFF LIANG UCSB’s new Athletic Director Kelly Barsky
@
(in the
Book Club Extravaganza Book Club Extravaganza JENNIE K. WELSH MEDIATION welshmediation.com (805) 259-8097
TUESDAY, JANUARY31,6PM
SB BIERGARTEN 11 Anacapa St.
Funk Zone!)

Kayaking and Conservation

Hiker, kayaker, lifeguard, island guide, photographer, writer, and all-around outdoorsman extraordinaire Chuck Graham is the featured speaker at the Santa Barbara Maritime Museum on January 19. His presentation, Paddling into a Natural Balance, is from the title of his book, Paddling into a Natural Balance, Stories of Kayaking and Conservation on the Channel Islands National Park, coming out this fall.

“My talk will be about my kayaking trips around the islands, but many of the photos displayed in my presentation will focus on conservation that has taken place out there since the late 1990s. So island fox and bald eagle recovery, the pinnipeds

Paddling into a Natural Balance with Chuck Graham

on the islands, sharing my tent with three baby elephant seals, the return of common murres, seabird recovery on Scorpion Rock, and the importance of island scrub jays on Santa Cruz and Santa Rosa Islands,” said Graham, a frequent Santa Barbara Independent contributor, who has been paddling and exploring the islands for more than 25 years.

“Kayaking around the Channel Islands

National Park has afforded me countless experiences with the unique web of biodiversity that is found throughout the chain. Kayaking has been the best way to immerse myself with its flora and fauna,” said Graham.

In addition to the upcoming book, which much of his presentation will be focused on, Graham is also the author and photographer of Carrizo Plain, Where the Mountains Meet the Grasslands (2021) and Hike the Channel Islands: The Best Day Hikes in Channel Islands National Park (2022).

Paddling into a Natural Balance takes place at Santa Barbara Maritime Museum on January 19 at 7 p.m., with a members-only reception starting at 6:15 p.m.

See sbmm.org.

Spatial Data Science Solutions for Better Bicycling

Trisalyn Nelson

Professor of Geography, UCSB

Free and open to the public. To register, please visit www.library.ucsb.edu/better-bike

Lack of available data can be a barrier to bicycling and pedestrian research and planning. Nelson will describe how her team develops novel data to map bicycle infrastructure, safety, and ridership. She will also highlight projects her research team is conducting to improve bicycling data locally in Santa Barbara. 4:00

PM Tuesday, January 17

UCSB Library Pacific View Room (8th Floor, Ocean Side) This event is co-sponsored by BikeMaps.org, MoveSBCounty.org, and Santa Barbara Public Library

Outdoors living
Avocado
JAN 17
www.library.ucsb.edu
UC SANTA BARBARA LIBRARY SPEAKER SERIES

Singer-songwriter Colin Hay has had a prolific career, both as the lead singer/principal songwriter for the GRAMMY® Award-winning band Men at Work, and a solo career that spans 25 years and 15 albums. This show will feature songs from his entire catalog, including latest releases, engaging stories, and rare accompaniment by his acoustic band.

34 THE INDEPENDENT JANUARY 12, 2023 INDEPENDENT.COM LOBERO.ORG 805.963.0761 JOHN C. MITHUN FOUNDATION LOBERO THEATRE ENDOWMENT FOR AMERICAN ROOTS MUSIC APR 5 TICKETS ON-SALE TOMORROW 1/13 JUST ANNOUNCED!
As we embark on our 150th Anniversary, join us for our year-long Ovation Celebration with an exciting lineup of memorable events! LANCE BURTON & Friends TIERNEY SUTTON Paris Sessions Trio & Celebrating 30 years of The Tierney Sutton Band FEB 10 MAR 10 MAR 19 APR 8 MAY 12 ARTURO SANDOVAL CHARLES LLOYD 85TH BIRTHDAY CELEBRATION THE DEREK DOUGET BAND FEB 10 One of the world’s most acknowledged guardians of jazz trumpet and flugelhorn, as well as a renowned classical artist, pianist, and composer. The saxophonist finely mixes his Louisiana upbringing with his strong individualism and idiosyncratic voice. “A serious jazz artist who takes the whole enterprise to another level” – The New York Times PRESERVATION HALL JAZZ BAND From the heart of the French Quarter to the world’s stage, Preservation Hall Jazz Band has spread the joyful spirit of true New Orleans jazz since 1961. with Jason Moran, Larry Grenadier, and Brian Blade MAR 3 MILT LARSEN TERRY HILL PRESENTS
INDEPENDENT.COM JANUARY 12, 2023 THE INDEPENDENT 35 JOHN C. MITHUN FOUNDATION LOBERO THEATRE ENDOWMENT FOR AMERICAN ROOTS MUSIC LOBERO.ORG / 805.963.0761 DAVID CROSBY and Friends EARL MINNIS PRESENTS & Wed. Feb 22. 2023 / 7:30 pm Two-time Rock & Roll Hall of Famer and co-founder of the Byrds and Crosby, Stills & Nash, David Crosby, is coming to The Lobero to help celebrate the theater’s 150 th Anniversary. Joining him will be six musical friends – James Raymond (keys), Steve Postell (guitars), Steve DiStanislao (drums), James ‘Hutch’ Hutchinson (bass), James Harrah (guitar), and Christopher Stills (guitar/vocals). Crosby is in the midst of an incredibly creative and powerful period, showcasing his skills as the brilliant singer/songwriter that he is. For this exclusive concert, he will be performing some of his best loved songs and greatest hits from his illustrious career. with special guest Bruce Cockburn The Heart & Rhythm of Santa Barbara for 150 Years! Our Birthday! On-sale Sat. Jan. 21 IN PERSON ONLY at the Lobero Box Office from 10 - 5 pm. Limit 2 per person.

FOOD & DRINK

state street

From Montecito Mudslide to Mezcal and Mexican Food

It took a nightmare for Berkeley “Augie” Johnson to turn his “childhood dream” of owning a restaurant into reality. The night was January 9, 2018, when the wildfirescorched mountains above his Montecito home liquefied under torrential downpours, crushing hundreds of homes and killing nearly two dozen residents.

The Evolving Creation Story of Augie’s of Santa Barbara

“We lost everything that morning,” said Johnson. “We came out of the mud and we had no house, no wallets, no passports, no photos, no computers, nothing. Our whole family was literally muddy.”

The Johnsons knew tragedy, having already lost their son, Nick, to a drowning accident during water polo training in 2014. This was different.

“You start rebuilding your life you get passports; you get driver’s licenses; you just start collecting the debris of life again,” said Johnson, who’s been a financial executive at engineering companies for most of his career. “It gave me a new perspective on the last part of my life. Why not do things that are interesting and creative? In some way, it liberated me.”

THE AGAVE OPENING

While attending wildfire planning meetings, he learned that agave the succulent-like species of lily tradi-

tionally used to make tequila, mezcal, and alcoholic beverages in Mexico was considered an excellent firebreak. He offered to plant agave in anyone’s yard for free. “People raised their hands,” explained Johnson, who’s since planted thousands of agaves in backyards from Carpinteria to Buellton.

Naturally, Johnson became fascinated with the plant’s cultivation and uses, traveling to the Mexican states of Oaxaca (the epicenter of mezcal) and Jalisco (home of tequila). After visiting countless distilleries, Johnson’s engineering experience made him realize that there was an opportunity for more stringent quality control in the tequila-making process. He partnered with a like-minded distillery called Casa Aceves and began producing a reposado called Augie’s Tequila.

That was the easy part. Now he had to sell it, and he thought that opening a bar or restaurant would be the most direct strategy.

Johnson took baby steps in that direction, first backing Los Agaves founder Carlos Luna as a silent partner on Flor de Maiz in 2019. “That was an easy opportunity to get my feet in the restaurant business,” said Johnson, who then invested in the operations of Chris Chiarappa, owner of Mesa Burger, Lighthouse Coffee, and Corner Tap.

“Those guys have been mentoring me over the last couple years,” he said. By 2021, Johnson was ready, explaining, “I finally thought that I had enough understanding to open a restaurant under my name and have it be what I envisioned a restaurant to be.”

SPIRITS & SERVICE

To make his dream come true, Johnson enlisted David Peszek, a ski industry veteran who turned to hospitality following a 2011 knee injury. Together, they opened Augie’s

of Santa Barbara at the corner of State and Ortega streets in October, with the shared goals of quality cuisine, “depth of dining experience,” and solid service. “The number-one thing that was important to me is to have friendly service so that the locals feel comfortable,” said Johnson.

The spirit selection was another priority, as evidenced by a bottom-lit bar of hundreds of bottles that nearly scratch the ceiling. This is Johnson’s ode to the old-school San Francisco bars that he frequented as a Berkeley-raised, fakeID-toting teenager, where a knowledgeable barman would access the shelves by ladder.

“It was important to have a biblioteca feel to the place, where people could come in and learn about agave spirits that maybe they never knew about,” he explained. “But it can be overwhelming when they see that wall. Our challenge is to break that down and get people to share the passion we have for learning about new products and new agave and new ideas.”

The selections, which can be explored in flights, extend past tequila and mezcal into more obscure spirits like sotol, raicilla, bacanora, and, of course, the emerging class of California-grown agave beverages. Curious customers can ask to peruse “the bible,” a one-foot-thick collection of tasting notes that dwarfs the already daunting menu of agave options, many of which are very difficult to find anywhere else in the country.

Within the next few years, Johnson plans to turn his own agaves into pulque, a slightly sweet, somewhat funky beer-like fermentation that must be served fresh. “It’s something the Maya drank thousands of years ago,” said Johnson, who wants to hoist a white flag outside of Augie’s to announce when the latest batch is being poured, like is done in Mexico. “I want to find a horse and buggy and bring pulque in from the field in a ceremony coming down one of the side streets if I can.”

But Augie’s isn’t just about agave, as the bar curates rare,

36 THE INDEPENDENT JANUARY 12, 2023 INDEPENDENT.COM p.36
THE AGAVE WAY: Berkeley “Augie” Johnson became fascinated with agave following wildfires and the Montecito debris flow, and followed that path into making tequila and opening his own restaurant.

top-shelf bottlings from across the distilled universe. “If your buddy is a Scotch lover, they’ll find something too,” said Peszek, before he left the restaurant at the end of December. As much as it looks like a tequila place, he explained, “We want everyone.”

BORN HERE, RAISED THERE

Though not as bibliographic as the beverages, the food at Augie’s is equally well-considered under the direction of Chef Eduardo Gonzalez, who was born in Santa Barbara but raised in Guadalajara. The grandson of a seafood restaurant owner, Gonzalez instantly realized he loved the business while working as a dishwasher in his teenage years, so attended culinary school and then ran his own Italian establishment in that Mexican metropolis for two years.

Seeking a more promising place to raise a family which includes his wife and two daughters, one born just as Augie’s opened Gonzalez returned to Santa Barbara a few years ago and found work at Honor Bar, the Four Seasons Biltmore, and Caruso’s. When he saw that Augie’s was looking for someone to run the kitchen, he realized, “I’m Mexican; I’m a chef; I am the person for this restaurant.”

His résumé and charisma were immediately impressive. “He’s operating at another level,” said Peszek, who felt a similar buzz when scouting for elite alpine racers.

Anyone familiar with global dining trends realizes that Mexico is home to many of the world’s most celebrated chefs and restaurants, including places like Pujol in Mexico City and Alcalde in Guadalajara, which competes for international standing against the finest establishments of Paris and New York City. But the concept of elevated Mexican cuisine remains foreign for many Americans, so Gonzalez wants to change that.

“Many Californians are more familiar with burritos and tacos, or plates with beans and rice and salsa,” said Gonzalez. “But we can have fine dining with Mexican food. My goal is for people in Santa Barbara to know that it’s possible.”

To do so, Gonzalez is melding traditional Mexican preparations and heirloom varieties of corn and beans with the seasonal produce of California. To best understand this story, Gonzalez encourages diners to order multiple courses, progressing from fresh fish and salads into savory hand-held dishes before the entrees.

My own Augie’s experience last fall began with a

Hemingway cocktail, a mezcal-powered riff on the author’s beloved daiquiri, and then shifted to the extensive array of Mexican wines which are trending wildly but hard to find here as my dishes arrived. First up was a truly palate-refreshing amuse bouche of guanabana sorbet with mango and papaya followed by tuna tiradito, in which firm, rectangular cuts of belly were awash in a ginger soda-like mousse alongside crispy plantain chips.

For my second course “I call this the taco course,” said my informed, attentive server, Carina Rivas, who recently became restaurant manager I opted for the pastor negro, as Augie’s is one of the only places I’ve seen with this black sauce. It was served on a thick, just-made tortilla and topped with a sweetly herbal mix of epazote, pineapple, avocado cream, onion, and radish.

This exact taco is no longer on the menu, which was just refreshed in January. In its place is an octopus version, the pulpo al pastor in a recada negro. The popular duck carnitas remain on the new menu, as do the shrimp, and they’ve expanded to a two-taco serving rather than just one.

My entree of tres moles featured three tiny pork chops, one in the familiar mole poblano, one in more a nuttier pipian verde, and the third in a bright pink mole rosa, which sported unique peppercorn and cinnamon flavors. I couldn’t come close to eating it all, in part because those hearty tortillas on the side were so fulfilling. Other entrees on the new menu include beef barbacoa, spicy octopus, cauliflower and mushroom in yellow mole, and steaks grilled in an Guadalajara style.

Dessert was Gonzalez’s ode to his former home, jericalla, but he takes the flan-esque custard to gastronomic extremes, serving it beneath a sugar globe that melted when Rivas poured the accompanying sauce atop the glassy sphere. As I polished that off, the team showed off the end-of-evening beverages, including a clay-pot-aged sticky wine from Villa Creek, an herby agave liqueur called Xila made in Mexico City, the coffee-agave sipper Cantera Negra, and the traditional Mexican coffee cocktail called carajillo, which I opted for shaken in the Guadalajara way. I’m not sure I want to finish a big meal with anything else now.

ADJUSTING ALL THE TIME

Opening in a long-vacant downtown building that opinionated Santa Barbarans have watched for years like bloodthirsty hawks, Augie’s prominent perch on the corner of State and Ortega streets was destined to draw an initial wave of complaints, even with the look handled by

design darling Jeff Shelton. It’s too expensive, said some, or hard to get a table, said others, or too constrained by rigid rules.

In a direct response to that initial feedback, the Augie’s team revamped the menu and chilled-out the vibe earlier this month, in preparation for the official grand opening later in January. The menus were simplified a bit, the lighting was warmed up, and even the napkins got less formal, explained bar manager Ryan Linden, who’s softening the restaurant’s initial hard push on fine dining.

“We want to be a tequila library and modern Mexican restaurant that is equally fun and approachable but refined and flavorful,” said Linden, who attended SBCC 15 years ago and worked for a decade in San Francisco restaurants before coming back to town last August to open Augie’s. “We really want people to have fun.”

He even enlisted Shelton, the architect, to draw designs on the new dessert menus. “Whether you get a dessert or not, you’re gonna wanna look at this menu,” said Linden. “It’s part of the experience.”

Augie's: 700 State St.; (805) 664-0516; augiessb.com

INDEPENDENT.COM JANUARY 12, 2023 THE INDEPENDENT 37 FOOD & DRINK
CA TO MX AND BACK: Born in Santa Barbara but raised in Guadalajara, Chef Eduardo Gonzalez wants to teach California that Mexican food can be just as elegant and creative as the finest cuisines in the world.

NEW YEAR’S BABY

Rose | Goleta

SANTA BARBARA COTTAGE HOSPITAL BABIES

Baby Girls

Buellton

Brooklyn Marie Grossini, 12/9/2022

Goleta

Willow Borbon Charlene Stone, 11/19/2022

Santa Barbara

Lyla Rae Stewart, 10/8/2022

Gabriela Saray Pineda, 11/4/2022

Adelyn Chloe Kubran, 11/5/2022

Adriel Elise Semiatin, 11/10/2022

Julietta Elosie Flores-Orozco, 11/17/2022

Willa Rafaela White, 11/23/2022

Elena Isabel Figueroa, 11/25/2022

Santa Ynez

Hazel Ryan Sexton, 11/19/2022

Baby Boys

Carpinteria

Beau Walker Elizaldi, 11/3/2022

Goleta

Edwin Velasquez Urrutia, 11/3/2022

Lompoc

Kylan Leland Nursement, 11/9/2022

Santa Barbara

Nicolas David Naughton, 11/6/2022

Fabio Gluck, 11/18/2022

Levon Amir Rahimi, 12/7/2022

welcomed

first child, a

into the world at 3:33 a.m. on New Year’s Day at Santa Barbara Cottage Hospital. Rose weighed 6 pounds and was 18.75 inches in length. In 2022, nearly 2,000 babies were born at Santa Barbara Cottage Hospital. From the Birth Center, to the Mother Infant Unit, to Cottage Children’s Medical Center, to Grotenhuis Pediatric Clinics, our staff is privileged to provide care and compassion to children in all stages of their lives. Learn more at cottagehealth.org/childrens

Cottage Children’s Medical Center cares for over 14,000 children a year in our Acute Pediatrics Unit, Haselton Neonatal Intensive Care Unit, Pediatric Intensive Care Unit, Emergency Department, Pediatric Trauma Center and eleven specialized outpatient clinics.

health e baby

Are you expecting or do you have an infant? Sign up for our free newsletter specific to your due date or your baby’s age. cottagehealth.org/healthybaby

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~ Transformational Life Counseling ~ Relationships • Occupation and Career • Meditation Grief and Loss • Major Life Transitions • Anxiety Spiritual Issues • Communication • Conflict

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38 THE INDEPENDENT JANUARY 12, 2023 INDEPENDENT.COM
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13 AT
The
MONDAY, JANUARY
FRIDAY, JANUARY
NOON Advertising Deadline for the January 19 issue is
Independent will be closed on in observance of Martin Luther King Jr. Day.
welcome
Por Soua and Grayson Peters of Goleta their daughter, named Rose Huabci Peters,

There’s nothing new about wine tastings or food halls or pairing menus. But by combining all three at the Santa Barbara Public Market, Jamie Savellano of Valley to the Sea Winery may have just cracked the code on making fine wine work in such an eclectic and bustling space.

“I needed to come up with a new way to taste wines,” said Savellano, a former web developer and stay-athome dad who opened his tasting bar in November 2021 but only recently started the pairing program. “I just wanted to do more than charcuterie, because everyone does charcuterie. I ended up with way more.”

That includes al pastor, butternut squash, and mole tacos from Corazón Cocina; falafel and tabouli, sweet potato falafel and tahini, and pita and hummus from Fala Bar; and a 10-inch pineapple and ham, mushroom and pepperoni, and arugula and olive pizza split (one-third of each type) from Ca’Dario Pizzeria Veloce. Each dish is served alongside a specifically chosen wine, and the pairings can be ordered with all three wines or solo. (You cannot combine restaurants in the same order, at least yet.) The prices are in the $20 range for the single dish and glass of wine, or $40 to $46 for the trio, whose three pours amount to two full glasses of wine.

Once the order is from your seat at Valley to the Sea’s bar or high-top tables, Savellano introduces the selected wines, which range from Santa Rita Hills pinot noir and chardonnay to Ballard Canyon syrah and viognier to Happy Canyon cabernet sauvignon and sauvignon blanc. They’re all made by Matt Brady at Samsara, so they lean toward the brighter, fresher side of things rather than “a big California style,” said Savellano, adding that Samsara’s Lily Hays helped develop the pairing concept.

This evaluation phase also takes a somewhat novel approach, employing samples of grass, raspberry, or peppercorns to explore the aromas in your glass. “These are leaves from the side of a riverbed,” said Savellano as he handed me a glass of dank, muddy duff to sniff before smelling my pinot noir. The similarity was striking, and these sensory lessons are enhanced by aids like the UC Davis aroma wheel and colorful cards that explain each pairing in details that are engaging but not overwhelming.

On my visit last week, I opted for the Corazón tacos, which Savellano said is the “adventurous”

route. (Fala, meanwhile, is the “healthy” one, while the pizza is the most “traditional.”) The al pastor’s cumin, chile rub, and pineapple salsa matched the pinot’s earth and fruit notes, said Savellano, while the butternut squash’s soft quality matched the softness of the syrah. As for the mole with the cab?

“The mole’s baking spices bring out the vanilla in that cab in a really fun way,” he said.

Over the past two decades, I’ve attended all manner of wine and food pairings, and this casual, conversational, and comparably quick format worked as well as any. It’s certainly ideal for those just spreading their wings into wine, but fulfilling and stomach-filling enough that even pros will get a kick out of it. Most importantly, it’s activating connections across the Public Market that should further invigorate the space and lure in future purveyors.

“It’s hard to get people to try new ideas,” said Savellano of what he hopes to do with these pairings. “They have to be willing to believe.”

Located inside the S.B. Public Market, 38 W. Victoria St.; (805) 770-3370; valleytotheseawinery.com

INDEPENDENT.COM JANUARY 12, 2023 THE INDEPENDENT 39
PUBLIC MARKET’S WINE & FOOD PAIRINGS Valley to the Sea Serving Dishes from Corazón, Fala Bar, and Ca’Dario BOTTLES&BARRELS
PUBLIC PAIRINGS: Jamie Savellano is pairing his Valley to the Sea wines with food from the Santa Barbara Public Market, including Corazón tacos (pictured below), pizza from Ca’Dario, and Mediterranean fare from Fala Bar. ASHLY OTHIC MATT KETTMANN FOOD & DRINK 2030 Cliff Dr, Mesa Daily 7am–10pm 966-3863 626 W. Micheltorena, SB Daily 6am–10pm 962-4028 6527 Madrid Rd, IV Daily 7am-11pm 770-3806 DAILY LUNCH SPECIALS $949 VOTED SANTA BARBARA’S BEST BURRITO 27 YEARS IN A ROW! Super CuCaS BREAKFAST BURRITO EVERY DAY! $799 High School Students Receive Free Soda w/ Lunch! (Mon-Fri Only - Micheltorena & Mesa Locations) Santa Barbara® 2018 Best of Runner-Up Santa Barbara 2018 Best of winner Micheltorena & Mesa Locations

FOOD & DRINK

Mony’s Tacos Now Serving Dinner & Drinks

In 2013, Mony’s became the Funk Zone’s go-to spot for hungry folks craving home-cooked authentic Mexican dishes created by Monica “Mony” Diaz. A native of Colima, Mexico, where she started cooking as a child, Diaz brought her handcrafted seasonings and family recipes to Santa Barbara first in a popular food truck and then to their hole-inthe-wall joint on Anacapa Street, around the corner from the neighborhood’s many tasting rooms.

“We try to bring to the menu comfort food that can transport you back to your abuela’s kitchen or introduce you to a cuisine that is often overlooked,” explained Mony’s son Carlos Diaz, the operations manager. “Mony herself has been cooking for the past 20-plus years, but she takes a lot of her recipes from all the women in her life, like her mother, Alida, and mother-in-law, Genoveva, who have

Taquitos de Pollo: Mony’s tender chicken is rolled in corn tortillas, fried to crisp perfection, and topped with chopped lettuce, crema, queso fresco, and a zesty taquito sauce. “We have added a few different menu items that we have had on our dinner menu in the past before COVID,” Diaz explained. These delectable taquitos were on their dinner menu prepandemic, and the team is excited to be bringing this favorite finger food back.

Tacos de Papa: There are few things more comforting than mashed potatoes. Combine those soft, satisfying spuds with the textural contrast of a fried taco shell filled with fresh pico de gallo, chopped lettuce, and queso fresco, and you’ve got a recipe to cure anything that ails you. “We are very excited about introducing our new dinner hours because it allows us to be more creative with the menu,” Diaz explained.

passed on the recipes from their families on to her.”

After hooking Santa Barbarans up with this homestyle fare during breakfast and lunch hours for nearly a decade, Mony’s is now thankfully answering the question we’ve all been thinking: Why isn’t abuela’s kitchen open for dinner as well?

“Everyone has been wishing for Mony’s to be open for dinner,” explained Carlos, so his family finally obliged, now also serving Thursday through Saturday from 4:30 to 8 p.m. (They did offer dinner briefly during the pre-pandemic summers of 2018 and 2019.) With the addition of wine and beer service as well, I could hardly believe that one of my favorite glasses of wine, Dreamcóte rosé, is now being served at the same place as my favorite tacos. Explained Carlos, “We are looking forward to working with local winemakers, and showcasing Mexican winemakers as well.”

Below are a few standout items from their new dinner service, which will only grow in the New Year.

Enchiladas Verdes and Enchiladas Ranchera: “We have added two different styles of enchiladas and if Mony’s is known for something, it’s the sauces!” Diaz explained. “We take a lot of pride and care in not only our distinct salsa flavors like the pistachio, pineapple, and avocado salsa, but also in the sauces that we use to create our dishes like the barbacoa and mole.” These two new enchilada options come in chicken or cheese and are topped with their perfectly balanced-witha-welcome-kick verde or ranchera sauce. They are then topped with queso, chopped lettuce, pico de gallo, and crema and served with Mexican rice and Peruano beans.

Caldos to Come: The dinner menu continues to expand with seasonal caldos (soups/broths) coming soon, like hearty albondigas and traditional pozole. Mony’s also plans to partner with friends at Vega Coffee to create a tasty café de olla available to give guests a little pep in their step with that breakfast burrito. “We are especially excited about the new year because we have a lot of exciting news to share,” Diaz said. We’ll be ready!

Mony's: 217 Anacapa St.; (805) 895-2978; monyssb.com

40 THE INDEPENDENT JANUARY 12, 2023 INDEPENDENT.COM funk zone
More Ways to Enjoy Colima Native’s Homestyle Mexican Food
by Rebecca Horrigan
Mexico, and elsewhere for dinner as well as breakfast and lunch. Highlights include chilaquiles verdes, enchiladas de mole, enchiladas verdes, and numerous types of tacos. INGRID BOSTROM Northern European cuisine. 9am -6pm daily, closed Tuesday. A family owned Landmark for 45 years plus. A nice selection of homemade cakes & desserts, Scandiavian kringle, Strudels, the famous Butterings, & specialty coffees. Breakfast, lunch & dinner. High Tea service for 2 or more. Date night boxes. Dine-In or Take out. Happy hour 3-6 everyday. Events & Special Occasions. Restaurant connection for delivery service. CALL (805) 962-5085 TO ORDER • 1106 STATE ST. STATE & FIG ANDERSENSSANTABARBARA.COM To include your business, email advertising@independent.com or call 805-965-5205. PAID ADVERTISEMENT EATS & DRINKS Santa Barbara FOR OUR FULL LINEUP, PLEASE VISIT SOhOSB.COM 1221 STATE STREET • 962-7776 1/12 7:00 PM MENDELEYEV & SIO SB SINGER-SONGWRITERS 1/13 8:00 PM KCSB PRESENTS: PLASTIC HARPOONS WITH ALEXANDRA RIORDEN & THE WARM GLOW / NEIL ERICKSON & FRIENDS 1/14 8:00 PM NO SIMPLE HIGHWAY THE BEST OF THE GRATEFUL DEAD 1/15 1:00 pm SANTA BARBARA JAZZ SOCIETY FEAT. THE DENNIS BERGER QUINTET, THE MARTINEZ BROTHERS AND JOHN WEBB 9:00 pm NUMBSKULL PRESENTS: TUNNEL VISION SKA/ REGGAE 1/17 7:00 pm SINGER SONGWRITER SHOWCASE: CONNER MUIR, PAULO COELHO, & JENNI ALPERT 1/19 8:00 pm TOMMY ALEXANDER & JACK SYMES ACOUSTIC FOLK
ALL DAY EATS: The team at Mony’s Taqueria in Santa Barbara’s Funk Zone is led by Jose and Monica “Mony” Diaz, who is now serving recipes from her native Colima,

Reader Primetime tells me that The Ellwood, formerly Beachside Bar-Café, was pounded by the recent storm: “Waves that hit with a ‘boom’ damaged a restaurant under construction at Goleta Beach and left the parking lot and recreation areas badly swamped. It happened early Thursday morning when the explosive mix of a high tide and a relentless storm surge arrived without much notice. Debris went flying into the windows at the former Beachside Bar-Café being converted into The Ellwood restaurant in a prime spot next to the Goleta pier. Some of the windows were broken apart and salt water found its way into the building from several locations. That dunked construction plans, supplies, kitchen equipment and turned a dining room into a lake. The building is leased by the county to the restaurant operator who hopes emergency funds can help with the recovery.”

Reader Primetime says that Shoreline Beach Café had a close call: “By inches, the Shoreline Beach Café survives the storm surge at Leadbetter Beach in Santa Barbara. Customers can still watch the action with their feet in the sand or from an elevated deck. A close call. In 1983 it was swamped and palm trees were down all over.”

CAYA RESTAURANT OPENS IN GOLETA: Caya Restaurant has opened at 5650 Calle Real in Goleta, in the former home of The Outpost Restaurant, which closed last November after eight years in business.

AWH Partners has purchased the property where the restaurant resides and Spire Hospitality is the new management company of this facility, formerly known as the Kimpton Goodland, and now known as Leta Santa Barbara. “Leta” is an abbreviation for Goleta. Leta Santa Barbara is part of the “Tapestry Collection by Hilton” brand. Did you catch all that?

“Inspired by the fresh coastal flavors of Santa Barbara, CAYA restaurant invites everyone to ‘Come As You Are’ for a modern culinary adventure paired with a mood as relaxed and inviting as a California sunset,” says their website. “Embark on a delectable journey through the West Coast with Chef Philip Stein’s seasonal menus influenced by

sustainably sourced local ingredients and global cuisine inspirations. From social gatherings to intimate dinners, indulge in the relaxed and inviting indoor and outdoor atmosphere, while your taste buds savor the culinary traditions of the west through nostalgic homemade dishes and signature craft cocktails.”

Chef Stein graduated from the Western Culinary Institute and interned for Emeril Lagasse at MGM Grand, where he mastered the art of butchery and homemade sauces. He later worked at The Cheesecake Factory, The Tower Club, Ojai Valley Inn & Spa, and Spire Hospitality, where he launched the new Caya Restaurant.

Restaurant hours: Breakfast: MondayFriday 7-10:30 a.m.; Brunch: SaturdaySunday: 8 a.m.-1:30 p.m.; Happy Hour: Monday-Sunday: 4-6 p.m.; Dinner: Monday-Sunday: 5-9:30 p.m. Bar hours: Wednesday-Thursday: 5 p.m.-midnight; Friday-Saturday: 5 p.m.-1 a.m. Call (805) 964-1288 or visit cayarestaurant.com

PLAZA DELI CLOSES: This just in from reader Mark P.: “I found out the Plaza Deli at La Cumbre Plaza is closed. Larry (the owner), who operated this business for 40 years, told me a couple of weeks before Christmas, that he planned on one day just locking up and walking away. He wanted to retire and trying to sell the business fell flat. This closing happened shortly before Christmas. The place looks like just that, he locked up at the end of the day and retired. You can see lights in the soda cooler still on, cases of stacked sodas and the same selection of chips just sitting there gathering dust. Ran into a security guard there a few days ago and he said the place hasn’t been open for a few weeks. Sad to see it go. I’ve been a customer there since 1988.”

SETH SAYS: Reader David P. showed me an Instagram post by actor, comedian, and filmmaker Seth Rogen where he displayed a picture of the cover of the 2022 end-ofyear issue of the Santa Barbara Independent. Rogen highlighted where it says “New Year’s Events and Restaurant Guy” and wrote, “I ASSUME THEY MEANT ‘GUIDE’?”

FOOD & DRINK

INDEPENDENT.COM JANUARY 12, 2023 THE INDEPENDENT 41
Storm Hits Local Restaurants John Dickson’s reporting can be found every day online at SantaBarbara.com. Send tips to info@ SantaBarbara.com
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FLOOD FOR THOUGHT: The former Beachside Bar-Café, currently under construction to become The Ellwood restaurant, was hit by waves and suffered extensive water damage.

HISTORIC THEATER POISED TO REVITALIZE LOMPOC

Adiamond in the rough, the Lompoc Theatre Project (LTP) is poised to breathe new life into a community that’s ready for revitalization. This iconic local building in Lompoc’s Old Town has a long and winding history. Now in its second phase of fundraising under the guidance of the Lompoc Theatre Project Corporation, a registered nonprofit, great things are in the works as we usher in the new year.

It’s easy to fall in love with this theater; a quick glance at the project’s social media presence and website will leave you yearning to quit your day job, roll up your sleeves, and get to work polishing floors, scrubbing walls and fixtures, and combing through its treasure trove of ephemera. Old posters, tickets, and hand-painted promotional signage are regularly unearthed as renovations take place.

The theater has often inspired and elicited an emotional response, with everyone from jazzman Sonny Clay, to Tex-Mex superstar Freddy Fender, R&B legends The Coasters, the Mickey Mouse Club, and Liberace taking the stage. During its opening week in 1927, proprietor Walter Calvert sent an open letter to the local newspapers, which stated, “As an integral part of this community, the new Lompoc Theatre is hereby pledged as a public institution, where daily worries, work, and cares may be obliterated through

the medium of the universal language motion pictures. People of the Lompoc valley, this theater is YOURS.”

The goal of the current $3 million Phase II fundraising effort is to replace a section of roofing over the office building, renovate the facade and upstairs offices, move the historic Land Office from the rear of the property to H Street, and regrade/repave the parking lot, among other upgrades and repairs. The board has already retired all debt and owns the theater free and clear. Additionally, tests have confirmed the building is structurally sound, and they’ve acquired land that expanded their parking lot, and completed Phase I critical cleanup, remediation, and repairs.

Whether you’re a film buff or simply a fan of local history, the theater is an important piece of a puzzle this dormant beauty is at the ready to morph into a state-of-theart community arts and education center.

Executive Director Mark Herrier shared, “Completion of Phase II will enable regular live performances on the Lompoc Theatre stage for the first time in 50 years and enable outdoor events and fundraisers,” He continued, “the theater will be available at no charge for performances from our local

dance studios and high schools.”

When it comes to the area’s youths, elementary school students will be able to enjoy PCPA productions in an actual theater, instead of their cafeterias. Once opened, the LTP will provide after-school programs and student film festivals. Surely, parents and community members alike will benefit from seeing the children of Lompoc thrive with their own cultural arts incubator.

Many other communities throughout the country have restored their downtown theaters and witnessed amazing revitalization in their surrounding areas. Lompoc is ready, as a statement from the theater states: “Vibrant communities have vibrant arts programs.”

Many important cultural traditions in Santa Barbara have emerged from long winters’ naps in the past year, sent into hiding by the pandemic and struggles for recovery. This weekend, the list of returning treasures will include the much-cherished series known as ¡Viva el Arte de Santa Bárbara!, celebrating mostly Mexican regional music and other sounds from south of the border.

As a fitting soundtrack to the series’ first event since 2020, the featured artists will be the respected Mariachi Garibaldi de Jaime Cuellar, returning to town after playing in the series in 2014. The group, led by founding member and Bakersfield-raised multi-instrumentalist Cuellar, will perform Friday through Sunday (January 13-15), in venues around Santa Barbara County Isla Vista School, Guadalupe City Hall, and the Marjorie Luke Theatre, respectively.

Admission is free. Ergo, arrive early. All performances start at 7 p.m.

Launched in 2006 by UCSB Arts & Lectures, in conjunction with other local organizations, ¡Viva el Arte de Santa Bárbara! has been a rewarding fixture on the cultural calendar, lending valuable attention on underserved Latin American music. Until the two-year hiatus, the series hosted significant ensembles and artists for a few days of free-tothe-public concerts along with educational masterclasses and other events during a several-day residency.

Mariachi culture and bands in the upper echelon of that world has accounted for a strong part of the series’ artistic agenda over the years, but other genres and countries other than Mexico have been hosted, as well. Among the highlights have been Cumbia-and-more group Buyepongo, Los Vegas son Jarocho, Puerto Rican band Plena Libre, dance troupe Grandeza Mexicana, and the acclaimed alternative Mexican-American group La Santa Cecilia. A standout in the 2018 season was the bedazzling Guatemalan-in-Los Angeles singer-songwriter Gaby Moreno (who recently wowed the crowd at Campbell Hall as a surprise guest in the Watkins Family Hour show there).

In the spirit of ¡Viva el Arte de Santa Bárbara! and its welcome return to the County, we have to send a shoutout of “¡Viva!” —Josef Woodard

DiPietro

For more information, visit lompoctheatre.org.

For more information, visit artsandlectures.ucsb.edu/learn/ viva-el-arte-de-santa-barbara.

42 THE INDEPENDENT JANUARY 12, 2023 INDEPENDENT.COM
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HISTORIC THEATER POISED TO REVITALIZE LOMPOC TREMENDOUS POTENTIAL FOR A THRIVING ARTS SCENE MORE ARTS & ENTERTAINMENT >>>
I F E
INSPIRED MUSICAL BORDER CROSSINGS
Gathered next to the Lompoc Theatre’s historic Land Office are, from left, Lompoc Theatre Project Executive Director Mark Herrier; state Senator Monique Limón; Lompoc Mayor Jenelle Osborne; Santa Barbara County 3rd District Supervisor Joan Hartmann; and U.S. Congressmember Salud Carbajal. Below, a view inside the theater’s original projection room. SHERRIE CHAVEZ
PHOTOGRAPHY COURTESY
Mariachi Garibaldi de Jaime Cuellar

FORMER 805ERS, ORCHESTRALLY REPRESENTING

For January’s Santa Barbara Symphony edition (the weekend of January 21 and 22), the programming spotlight turns to a pair of composers with strong ties here. Elmer Bernstein, the late, great film composer of note (To Kill a Mockingbird, the jazz-lined Man with a Golden Arm, The Magnificent Seven, Ghostbusters, and hundreds more), not only lived in Santa Barbara for years before the days when long-distance digital workflow was possible for film composers but collaborated with the Santa Barbara Symphony on several occasions.

Uruguayan composer Miguel del Aguila, meanwhile, lived and worked from his home in Oxnard for many years before moving elsewhere, including a stint in Ojai. He has carved out a respectable place in the pantheon of living composers, with Grammy nominations on his mantle and graced by a particular Latin American flavor as in his wily, popular piece “Conga Line in Hell.”

At The Granada Theatre, Del Águila’s “Concerto for Violin,” featuring violinist Guillermo Figueroa, will be on the program. From the old world, Dvořák’s perennial crowd-pleaser New World Symphony wraps up the show.

Also on the program is Bernstein’s music for the Charles and Ray Eames short film Toccata for a Toy Train, newly arranged by his son Peter and which has detrained in Santa Barbara in the past. The Symphony performed it many years ago, and it was also a featured piece/screening at the 1998 UCSB New Music Festival dubbed “Film Composers: The Whole Picture.” On that occasion, the UCSB-connected Corwin Chair holder composer William Kraft invited Bernstein, David Raksin, (Laura, The Bad and the Beautiful) Leonard Rosenman (Fantastic Voyage) and other film composers with tentacles in “concert” music, as well.

Before the original piece was showcased at UCSB’s festival, I spoke to Bernstein about this small, if lesser-known jewel in his oeuvre. “That’s a piece I wrote many years ago,” he said. “It was in connection with a very unusual short film made by Ray and Charles Eames, the designers. I established a relationship with them in the mid ’50s and I worked with them until their death, actually. Their grandson, who runs the office, tells me that I scored about 33 films for them. It seems amazing that I did that many. This was one of them, and it was a film they made just on the journey of a toy train.

“Actually, the piece was written first, and then shot back to the music, which is unusual. We had a scenario about what the trains were going to do and about the progress of the journey. There was a small philosophical introduction in which Charles spoke about the difference between toys and models. From then on, we started with creatures and people gathering to get on the train, and then the train starts and it goes on its journey. It comes to its terminal and the whole thing ends.

“Later on, I re-orchestrated it, when Varujan Kojian was the music director of the Santa Barbara Symphony. I re-orchestrated it for him and I conducted it.”

At the end of our interview, Bernstein addressed the question of whether the busy, in-demand film composers would have liked to work more in the concert music field. “My ego doesn’t run in the direction of being a star in the concert hall,” he said. “I was a concert pianist to start in life, with plenty of being onstage alone in the concert hall. So my ego just doesn’t run in those directions. I feel satisfied. I’ve had a good time.”

UNDEAD AFTER ALL MUSEUM OF CONTEMPORARY ART SANTA BARBARA SPRINGS BACK TO LIFE WITH NEW LEADERSHIP AND EXHIBITS

You can’t keep a good museum down.

Turns out the pandemic wasn’t the final nail in the coffin of the venerable Museum of Contemporary Art Santa Barbara (MCASB). After closing its doors in August 2022  due to ongoing financial strains, the organization which was founded in 1976 as the Contemporary Arts Forum (CAF) is springing back to life this month under new leadership.

With a focus on what new board president Frederick Janka described as “working together for a more equitable arts ecology on California Central Coast, I think our combined impact is really going to support some voices that haven’t been heard.”

Joining Janka, who is the former development director of MCASB and current executive director of the Carolyn Glasoe Bailey Foundation, in leading the rebirth of the organization is another ex-MCASB employee, exhibition designer Arturo Heredia Soto (current lead exhibition designer at UCSB’s AD&A Museum, and cofounder of LUM Art Magazine), as well as LUM Art Magazine editor and cofounder Debra Herrick (current UCSB Associate Editorial Director) and Lila Glasoe Francese (president of the Carolyn Glasoe Bailey Foundation and CEO of OHI Home).

In an exclusive interview with Janka and Herrick, they shared that they have secured initial seed funding and have developed an interim exhibition program for the reopening of the MCASB. They are envisioning a new future with an eye on “finding that beautiful balance between the local, regional, and the national and even international contemporary art,” said Janka. “I think we really want to underscore the regional importance of the institution being THE contemporary art space between L.A. and the Bay Area.”

ing local art. In addition to exhibitions, “there’s also an aspect of supporting local artists through exposure to other relevant artists coming to  the region … and that all contributes to an ecosystem of discovery and critical thinking around art. I think it is really important to keep in mind when we’re talking about how we cultivate a thriving local arts community, it’s not just about keeping it insular, but also about bringing in global, regional, even theoretical or highly philosophical work,” said Herrick.

“Bringing in these currents that are flowing around us, and really kind of crystallizing them so that we can be a catalyst for greater critical thinking in contemporary art, and what that brings to our culture at large which is huge,” said Herrick. “MCA has always served as a place for risk taking, discovery, critical thinking, centering different voices. … That is definitely front of mind for us.”

A free community open house with art, music and refreshments will be held from noon to 4 p.m., on Sunday, January 22. Kicking off the relaunch is a series of monthly video installations, starting with the West Coast debut of Minneapolis-based Cameron Patricia Downey’s (with collaborators: Ize Commers, M Jamison, Cooper Felien) Hymn of Dust opening at the open house. That will be followed by Cannupa Hanska Luger’s New Myth (Mandan, Hidatsa, Arikara, Lakota), opening February 12, and by Guatemala based Antonio Pichillá Quiacaín’s Tejiendo El Paisaje, opening March 12.

Santa Barbara Symphony presents Planes, Trains & Violins at The Granada Theatre on Saturday, January 21, at 7:30 p.m. and on Sunday, January 22, at 3 p.m. For additional information and tickets, visit ticketing .granadasb.org/16749.

Josef Woodard

For the immediate future, starting January 22, the museum will be run by volunteers, with gallery hours Thursday to Sunday, noon to 4 p.m. each day, until new staff is hired.

The gallery will have a dedicated section spotlight-

In addition, two solo exhibitions are planne: UCSB assistant professor of Art in Computational Craft and Haptic Media Sarah Rosalena Brady opening April 9, and Cameron Patricia Downey opening September 17. Both will be the first institutional solo exhibitions for the artists.

Museum of Contemporary Art Santa Barbara (MCASB) is located upstairs at 653 Paseo Nuevo. See mcasantabarbara.org.

INDEPENDENT.COM JANUARY 12, 2023 THE INDEPENDENT 43
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ARTS LIFE
MCASB will open back up at Paseo Nuevo on January 22. PAUL WELLMAN
(FILE)
S.B. SYMPHONY
S.B. Symphony’s Planes, Trains & Violins is at the Granada January 21-22.
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ASTROLOGY

ARIES

(Mar. 21-Apr. 19): Nigerian author Wole Soyinka reworked the ancient Greek play The Bacchae. In one passage, the god Dionysus criticizes King Pentheus, who is supposedly all-powerful. “You are a man of chains,” Dionysus tells him. “You love chains. You breathe chains, talk chains, eat chains, dream chains, think chains. Your world is bound in manacles.” The bad news, Aries, is that many of us have some resemblances to Pentheus. The good news is that the coming months will be a favorable time to shed at least some of your chains. Have fun liberating yourself! Try to help a few others wriggle free from their chains, too. Doing so will aid your own emancipation.

TAURUS

(Apr. 20-May 20): The coming weeks will be a great time to fill your journal with more intense ruminations than you have for many moons. If you don’t have a journal, think about starting one. Reveal yourself to yourself, Taurus! Make conscious that which has been vague, unnamed, or hiding. Here are assignments to help launch your flood of intimate self-talk. (1) Write passionately about an experience you’ve always wanted to try but have never done. (2) Conduct imaginary interviews with people who rouse strong feelings in you. (3) Describe what deity, superhero, or animal you are and how your special intelligence works. (4) Visualize a dream in which you appear as a bolder, more confident version of yourself. (5) Talk about a time you felt rousingly alive and how you plan to feel that way again.

GEMINI

(May 21-June 20): A stranger approached me at Wild Birds Unlimited, a store that sells bird food and accessories. “You write the horoscopes, right?” she asked. “I’m a Gemini, and I want to thank you for helping me tone down my relentless fidgeting. You made me realize I have been secretly proud of tapping my fingers on the table while talking with people, and constantly darting my eyes around the room to check out the ever-changing views. I’d unconsciously believed that stuff was a sign of my incredible vitality. But you’ve been a steadying influence. You’ve shown me ways to settle down and focus my energy better. I can see how restlessness sometimes saps my energy.” I told the woman, “You’re welcome!” and let her know that 2023 will be a favorable time to do much more of this good work. Homework: Meditate on channeling your incredible vitality into being grounded and centered.

CANCER

(June 21-July 22): According to Cancerian author Ronald Sukenick, the writer’s work is “to destroy restrictive viewpoints, notice the unnoticed, speak the unspeakable, shake stale habits, ward off evil, give vent to sorrow, pulverize doctrine, attack and uphold tradition as needed, and make life worth living.” I believe 2023 will be an excellent time for you to carry out those actions, even if you’re not a writer. You will have abundant power to bless and heal through creative rebellion and disruption. You will thrive as you seek out interesting novelty.

LEO

(July 23-Aug. 22): Psychotherapist Ryan Howes has wisdom you’ll benefit from heeding in the coming weeks. “We need to accept our age,” he writes. “We need to accept illnesses and addictions. We need to accept the past. We need to accept others as they are.” He goes on to say that this doesn’t mean we must like all these situations. And we can certainly try to make the best of them. But when we don’t struggle in vain to change what’s beyond our control to change, we have more energy for things that we can actually affect.

a stirring in your gut? It may tell you where to find important and intriguing things that are missing.

LIBRA

(Sept. 23-Oct. 22): “Every animal knows far more than you do,” declares a proverb of the Nimíipuu people, also known as the Nez Percé. Author Russell Banks provides further testimony to convince us we should be humble about our powers of awareness. “There is a wonderful intelligence to the unconscious,” he says. “It’s always smarter than we are.” These are good pointers for you to heed in the coming weeks, Libra. You will have a special power to enhance your understanding of the world by calling on the savvy of animals and your unconscious mind. They will be especially rich sources of wisdom. Seek out their educational input!

SCORPIO

(Oct. 23-Nov. 21): Psychologist Carl Jung said that the whole point of Jesus Christ’s story was not that we should become exactly like him. Rather, we should aspire to be our best and highest selves in the same way that he fulfilled his unique mission. So Jesus was not the great exception, but rather the great example. I bring these meditations to your attention, Scorpio, because I believe life in 2023 will conspire to make you, more than ever before, the hero of your own destiny. You will be inspired to honor only your own standards of success and reject all others’. You will clearly see that you are progressing at your own natural and righteous pace, which is why it makes no sense to compare your evolution to anyone else’s.

SAGITTARIUS

(Nov. 22-Dec. 21): A reader named Mary Roseberry describes her experience of being a Sagittarius: “I hate to be bored. I hate imperfections. I hate to wait. I hate sadness. I hate conflict. I hate to be wrong. I hate tension.” Wow! I admire Mary’s succinct understanding of who she doesn’t want to be and what she doesn’t like to do. I invite you to compose a similar testimony. You would benefit from getting clear about the experiences you intend to avoid in 2023. Once you have done that, write a list of the interesting feelings and situations you will seek out with intense devotion during the coming months.

CAPRICORN

(Dec. 22-Jan. 19): When he was 74 years old, Capricorn author Norman Maclean published his first novel, A River Runs Through It. It became a best-seller. Capricorn film director Takeshi Kitano directed his first film at age 42. Now 75, he has since won many awards for his work in his native Japan. Capricorn activist Melchora Aquino, who was a leader in the Philippines’ fight for independence from Spain, launched her career as a revolutionary when she was in her eighties. She’s known as the “Mother of the Revolution.” I hope these heroes inspire you, dear Capricorn. I believe that 2023 is the year you will get an upgrade in any area of your life where you have seemed to be a late bloomer.

AQUARIUS

(Jan. 20-Feb. 18): According to my analysis of the astrological omens, you will soon be called upon to summon grace under pressure; to express magnanimity while being challenged; to prove that your devotion to your high standards is more important than the transitory agendas of your ego. The good news is that you are primed and ready to succeed at these exact assignments. I have confidence in your power to activate the necessary courage and integrity with maximum poise and composure.

PISCES

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VIRGO

(Aug. 23-Sept. 22): Here’s testimony from musician Pharrell Williams: “If someone asks me what inspires me, I always say, ‘That which is missing.’” Yes! This is an apt message for you, Virgo. The best way for you to generate motivation and excitement in the coming weeks will be to explore what is lacking, what is invisible, what’s lost or incomplete. Check in with your deep intuition right now. Do you feel

(Feb. 19-Mar. 20): “By dying daily, I have come to be,” wrote poet Theodore Roethke. He didn’t mean he suffered literal deaths. He was referring to the discipline of letting go of the past; shedding worn-out habits; leaving behind theories and attitudes that once served him well but no longer did; and killing off parts of himself that were interfering with the arrival of the fresh future. I recommend his strategy to you, Pisces. To the degree that you agree to die daily, you will earn the right to be reborn big-time in a few weeks. Homework: What power will you possess in nine months that you do not yet have? Newsletter.FreeWillAstrology.com Go to RealAstrology.com to check out Rob Brezsny’s EXPANDED WEEKLY AUDIO HOROSCOPES and DAILY TEXT MESSAGE HOROSCOPES The audio horoscopes are also available by phone at 1-877-873-4888 or 1-900-950-7700.

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PERSONNEL COORDINATOR/ CHAIR’S ASSISTANT

DEPARTMENT OF THEATER AND DANCE

DIRECTOR

A wonderful opportunity for someone passionate about human rights, who enjoys engaging the local community, fundraising and outreach. The job entails excellent communication and time management skills, an eye for detail, and data‑driven strategic planning. For more information and to submit an application, please visit https://boards.greenhouse. io/ humanrightswatch/jobs/6416736002

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New Beginning Tai Chi classes with Toni DeMoulin, master instructor, 50+ years experience. The class is half Qigong based on Tai Chi principles and focusing on developing strength, flexibility and improving your energy. With regular practice, these Qigong exercises are proven to be one of the best exercises for people with shoulder and back pain‑especially chronic pains. The second half of the class will be Tai Chi, a slow, soft, meditative series of movements known to help improve balance, arthritis, hypertension, and mental alertness. Tai Chi is considered the #2 best exercise. Contact Toni for times and location. Taichitoni1@ hotmail.com 805‑570‑6194

Provides analytical and administrative support to the Theater/Dance Chair and Chief Administrative Officer. Responsible for assisting the Chair in the duties and responsibilities related to academic appointments, faculty advancement, faculty recruitment, visitor appointments, and a variety of other assignments. Deals with sensitive and confidential information requiring independent judgment and discretion, as well as excellent written, verbal, analytical and interpersonal skills. Reqs: 1‑3 years administrative experience. High school diploma or GED. Note: Satisfactory completion of a conviction history background check. Mon‑Thurs, 8:00am ‑1:00pm, days/hrs. may vary. Budgeted/hiring pay rate/range: $26.09 ‑ $27.32/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 1/20/23. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 47498

verbal and written communication skills. Must be able to work independently or as part of a team. Ability to work with minimal direction and with frequent interruptions to coordinate and execute numerous tasks simultaneously. Must be able to maintain confidentiality and exercise good judgment, logic, tact, and diplomacy while performing the critical duties of the position. Notes: Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record and enrollment in the DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program. Satisfactory conviction history background check. Budgeted Range: $80,388/yr. ‑ $89,900/yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 1/24/23. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #47581

of the University Center Director, the Meetings & Events Manager supervises the UCen Service Manager Program.

CUSTODIAL PROGRAM

MANAGER

RESIDENTIAL OPERATIONS

Under the direction of the Associate Director of Custodial & Landscape Services, the position serves as the Program Manager for the Custodial unit within Residential Operations and collaborates with the Residence Hall Managers, Superintendents, Project Managers, and HDAE department leaders to plan, organize, and manage routine and recurring custodial programs and projects. Prepares annual and projected budgets for operational programs, tracks expenses, and schedules programs that optimize physical staffing and resource needs while minimizing the impact of work on the campus community. Initiates agreements for services and has authority to make purchases within a defined dollar limit. Reqs: Bachelor’s Degree or equivalent combination of years of experience. Minimum 3 years of custodial and/ or grounds supervisory experience in a higher education setting. Strong level of proficiency with spreadsheets, systems, database management and word processing software.

Excellent management, financial, and analytical skills. Knowledge of unique department operations in order to meet procurement needs. Ability to draft requests for proposals and interpret terms and conditions of contracts. Must be detail oriented and be able to work under pressure to meet strict deadlines. Possess excellent

FINANCIAL ASSISTANT DEPARTMENT OF MECHANICAL ENGINEERING

Responsible for purchasing, and other financial transactions for the Mechanical Engineering department, including, but not limited to travel reimbursements, entertainment, federal express and memberships. Ensures compliance to UC policies and procedures. Keeps current on related policies. Reqs: High School Diploma or GED. 1‑3 years administrative experience. Must possess excellent communication, organizational, and computer skills including Microsoft and Google applications. Note: Satisfactory conviction history background check. Budgeted range: $26.09 ‑ $27.90/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 1/19/23. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 47434

Reqs: Provides event planning expertise to clients on and off campus and negotiates contracts and fees. Supervises the UCen Service Managers Program. Generates written reports which analyze performance. Develops and organizes on‑going training programs. Develops, implements, interprets and enforces the policies and procedures of the Service Managers Program. Promotes the use of the UCen facilities by initiating and cultivating contacts with the public and campus communities. Hires and supervises 4‑6 student Audio‑Visual Operators who are responsible for operating AV equipment at UCen events, maintaining AV equipment, and making suggestions for new equipment purchases. Conducts training sessions. Provides leadership, mentoring and guidance. Takes disciplinary action when required. Conducts staff interviews and meetings. Hires and supervises 2 student Conference Coordinators who are responsible for assisting with Corwin event planning and facilitation, invoicing, preparing building operation reports, ensuring event contracts are signed and returned, coordinating off‑campus rentals and other projects as assigned. Establishes and maintains a system of business referrals with University staff, faculty, and local businesses, compiling a systematic listing of all campus and local venders. Initiates open lines of communication with all parties through follow‑up calls, in person meetings or emails. Compiles with all University and Departmental Safety Programs. Keeps an updated Meetings & Event Operating Manual to include all facets of M&E operations. Notes: May work flexible hours/schedule as necessary, including nights and weekends. Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record and enrollment in the DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program. Satisfactory conviction history background check. Budgeted Range: $26.39/hr ‑ $32.00/ hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 1/20/23. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job #47463

Bren School and manages a content calendar. In collaboration with the admissions team, assists with enrollment marketing campaigns and manages relevant website content. Fields communications requests from the media and coordinates research communications. Is responsible for website governance, maintenance, and content strategy for a dynamic website for the Bren School in collaboration with other Bren School staff and faculty. Arranges for photography/videography and

manages school photos and video archives. Builds and maintains strong working relationships at all organizational levels, particularly focused on Recruitment and Admissions, Student Affairs, Career Development, Development, Bren faculty, and UCSB’s Office of Public Affairs. Reqs: Bachelor’s degree or equivalent experience and/ or training in Communications, Marketing or related field. Experience working in and managing media communications, working knowledge

NOW HIRING

of outreach software. Experience with marketing, publicity and social media, working knowledge of marketing analytics and social media platforms.

Notes: Satisfactory conviction history background check. Top candidates will be required to submit examples of their work. Budgeted/Hiring Pay rate/range: $68,700 ‑ $100,600/ yr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for

Inside Sales Administrator

The Independent is seeking an inside sales administrator to join its sales team. This role is responsible for prospecting advertising clients, collecting and processing legal notices, classified ads, open house listings, and maintaining and fulfilling our print subscription database. This position will work full time in our downtown Santa Barbara office, ready to greet and assist our readers and customers.

Qualified candidates must have a positive attitude and need to be self-motivated and highly organized with outstanding written and verbal communication skills. Responsibilities include providing excellent customer service (through email, on the phone and inperson), attending weekly sales meetings, and data entry with strong attention to detail. Must also be able to work under pressure in a deadline-driven environment and have a basic understanding of marketing and sales.

Compensation will be hourly + commission. Full-time positions include health, dental, and vision insurance, Section 125 cafeteria plan, 401(k), and vacation program.

Please introduce yourself, reasons for interest, and a brief summary of your qualifications, along with your résumé to hr@independent.com No phone calls, please. EOE m/f/d/v.

MANAGER, UCEN MEETINGS & EVENTS

UNIVERSITY CENTER

Manages the UCen Meetings & Events Unit. Develops, promotes and implements policies and procedures for the unit. Provides event planning expertise to clients on and off campus and negotiates contracts and fees. Supervises Meetings & Events Coordinators. Oversees maintenance of audio visual equipment and supervises audio visual technicians. Responsible for maintenance of UCen event equipment and facilities.

Ensures that events are presented professionally and safely. Responsible for financial viability of the unit.

Supervises and coordinates events and activities held in and around the UCen. Under the general direction

MARKETING AND COMMUNICATIONS

DIRECTOR

BREN SCHOOL OF ENVIRONMENTAL SCIENCE & MANAGEMENT

Conducts strategic marketing and communications on behalf of the Bren School of Environmental Science & Management. Oversees paid, earned, and organic media campaigns; manages content strategy for the school; creates promotional materials and newsletters; produces and coordinates written content for enrollment marketing, student‑centered stories, and research communications; develops content to enhance the public’s understanding and appreciation of the Bren School. Develops content and manages social media for the

46 THE INDEPENDENT JANUARY 12, 2023 INDEPENDENT.COM 46 THE INDEPENDENT JANUARY 12, 2023 INDEPENDENT.COM INDEPENDENT CLASSIFIEDS PHON E 805-965-5205 EMAIL ADVERTISING@INDEPENDENT.COM
SANTA BARBARA INDEPENDENT
HUMAN RIGHTS WATCH SANTA BARBARA
Continued on p. 48

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INDEPENDENT.COM JANUARY 12, 2023 THE INDEPENDENT 47 INDEPENDENT.COM JANUARY 12, 2023 THE INDEPENDENT 47 INDEPENDENT CLASSIFIEDS PHON E 805-965-5205 EMAIL ADVERTISING@INDEPENDENT.COM crosswordpuzzle By Matt Jones “A Little Pick-Me-Up” ust what I need. LAST WEEK’S SOLUTION: Across 1. Scale in the zodiac 6. Jackal or coyote, e.g. 11. Letters meaning “everything sucks” 14. Rude gazer 15. “Asteroids” producer 16. Italy’s equivalent of the BBC 17. Publishing company that’s all about brevity 19. Comprehensive abbr. 20. “That was an accident!” 21. Base after third 22. Big Greek island 24. 1975 ABBA hit 25. Preceder of X, Y, Z, or Alpha 26. Feeling faint 27. Pool poker 28. Midwest exclamation 30. Tilt a bit 32. #1 song of 1973 and 1996 37. Words before and after “what” in an unrepentant phrase 38. Granola bit 39. Genoa goodbyes 40. Verbal lapse 43. Exciting cry (that’s notas-exciting numbers if you switch the syllables) 44. “Got it!” 45. Amazed DM reaction 46. “Back to the Future” role 48. Stunned disbelief 49. Common URL ending 52. Unaccountable quality? 53. D&D class 55. Item with a combination lock 56. ___-Wan Kenobi 57. She released “Midnights” 60. “Avenue 5” actor Josh 61. Like baked dough 62. Kitchen peeler 63. Labor of love? 64. Nervous 65. Humble dwelling Down 1. Doritos ___ Tacos (legendary menu item) 2. Place to chill out? 3. Radar spots 4. Sports judges 5. Retriever remark 6. What fan fiction is not 7. Molecular matter 8. UFC fighter Diaz 9. Tirade cause 10. Studio 54, for one 11. Game with a lot of staying put 12. One of three Dominican brothers who played for the same team in 1963 13. Tiny parasites 18. Estevez’s brother 23. Deep massage technique 25. Father ___ Sarducci of early “SNL” 26. “Fantastic Mr. Fox” director Anderson 27. Stock graphics 28. Nebraska steak hub 29. Comedian Holmes 31. 11 Wall St. institution 32. Star___ (tuna brand) 33. Capital city since 1966 34. Saved for the future 35. “Pearl” star Mia 36. “___, All Ye Faithful” 41. Wray of “King Kong” 42. Structure in some defense games 47. Aquarium acquisition 48. It’s a big pain 49. Egypt’s largest city 50. Disposed of, gangster-style 51. Mersey measure 52. Order option 53. 1990s point-and-click puzzle game 54. Some are pale 55. Ear cleaner 58. “You Will Be My ___ True Love” (“Cold Mountain” song) 59. Upscale hotel amenity ©2023 Jonesin’ Crosswords (editor@jonesincrosswords.com) For answers to this puzzle, call: 1-900-226-2800, 99 cents per minute. Must be 18+. Or to bill to your credit card, call: 1-800-655-6548. Reference puzzle #1117 Day High Low High Low High Thu 12 1:36 am 3.9 6:32 am 2.7 12:01 pm 4.3 7:07 pm 0.7 Fri 13 2:14 am 4.0 7:53 am 2.6 12:56 pm 3.6 7:39 pm 1.2 Sat 14 2:53 am 4.4 9:29 am 2.2 2:23 pm 3.1 8:15 pm 1.6 Sun 15 3:34 am 4.7 10:56 am 1.5 4:27 pm 2.7 9:02 pm 2.0 Mon 16 4:20 am 5.1 12:00 pm 0.7 6:20 pm 2.8 10:03 pm 2.3 Tue 17 5:08 am 5.6 12:52 pm -0.1 7:33 pm 3.1 11:11 pm 2.5 Wed 18 5:58 am 6.1 1:39 pm -1.0 8:24 pm 3.4 Thu 19 12:14 am 2.5 6:48 am 6.5 2:23 pm -1.4 9:07 pm
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employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 41066.

OPERATIONS

ASSISTANT

EDUCATION ABROAD PROGRAM

LOQ Q

This in‑person position provides day‑to‑day administrative support. Responsible for coordinating incoming phone calls and email messages and routing them to the appropriate person or department. Coordinates and processes the incoming and outgoing mail. Administers all shipping and receiving processes, including training. Responsible for general office procurement through the use of the UCSB Procurement Gateway and Flexcard systems. Ensures all office equipment is properly maintained. Trains new employees on the use of various pieces of equipment. Processes all incoming checks in preparation for daily deposit. Provides training and troubleshooting involving bank issued equipment and the deposit process. Assists with the setup and takedown of on‑site events and meetings. Coordinates storage and destruction of off‑site files through the document storage and destruction vendor. Serves as a member of the Emergency Response Team. Reqs: Two years of related administrative and customer service experience, or an equivalent combination of education/ training and experience. High School Diploma or GED. Notes: Satisfactory conviction history background check. On‑site position at the UCEAP Systemwide Office in Goleta, CA. Not eligible for remote work. May occasionally be offered additional hours to provide absence coverage. The budgeted hourly range that the University reasonably expects to pay for this position is $22.56 ‑ $23.08.

The full hourly range for this position is $22.56 ‑ $31.98. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 1/19/23; open until filled. Apply online at https://jobs.ucsb.edu Job # 47141

trucks. Must have a valid class C CDL, and pass a background check. Work experience demonstrating forklift certification is required. Must be able to lift/move 50 lbs safely. Ability to effectively communicate orally and in writing and work with a diverse clientele and work group. Able to speak English fluently. Excellent customer service and organizational skills. Ability to work effectively both in a group and individually in a service oriented environment subject to frequently changing priorities. Ability to understand and apply University and Department policies and procedures to specific situations. Utilizes modes of office communication such as Google Mail, Docs, Sheets, and Calendar to effectively collaborate with coworkers. Actively aware of their environment, and demonstrates safety conscientiousness and attention to detail at all times. Notes: Maintain a valid CA driver’s license, a clean DMV record and enrollment in the DMV Employee Pull‑Notice Program. Satisfactory conviction history background check. Budgeted Range: $20.44 ‑ $23.50/hr. The University of California is an Equal Opportunity/ Affirmative Action Employer, and all qualified applicants will receive consideration for employment without regard to race, color, religion, sex, sexual orientation, gender identity, national origin, disability status, protected veteran status, or any other characteristic protected by law. Application review begins 1/17/23. Apply online at https://jobs. ucsb.edu Job #47184

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MEDICAL SERVICES

ATTENTION OXYGEN THERAPY

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OPERATOR

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Performs a variety of operational duties in shipping, receiving, distribution, and record keeping and performs manual duties in the loading and unloading of material shipped to and from the campus. Delivers freight shipments, and other types of shipments to campus departments.

Operates a variety of vehicles and material handling equipment on a daily basis. Assists in the receipt of goods. Uses computerized databases and internet. Fills orders, including large janitorial supply order and delivers them to Janitorial and Housing closets around campus. Assists the Physical Resource Coordinator with receiving and stocking merchandise, moves furniture and merchandise to maximize warehouse space, helps with physical inventory count at yearend and oversees the warehouse function in the Supervisor’s absence. Prepares outgoing shipments by using various shipping methods and vendor services. Reqs: Experience in warehouse, shipping and receiving. Experience in a delivery or related role. Minimum one year work experience driving large delivery vehicles/box

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CLASSES/WORKSHOPS

focusing on developing strength, flexibility and improving your energy. With regular practice, these Qigong exercises are proven to be one of the best exercises for people with shoulder and back pain‑especially chronic pain. The second half of the class will be Tai Chi, a slow, soft, meditative series of movements known to help improve balance, arthritis, hypertension, improves immune system and mental alertness. Tai Chi is considered the #2 best exercise (swimming was rated as #1 by Harvard Medical school). Sundays at 10:00. Begins February 5. Contact Toni for location. taichitoni1@ hotmail.com 805‑570‑6194

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LEGALS

LEGAL NOTICESTO PLACE EMAIL NOTICE TO LEGALS@ INDEPENDENT.COM

ADMINISTER OF ESTATE

NOTICE OF PETITION TO ADMINISTER ESTATE OF: MICHAEL L. WILKIE ALSO KNOWN AS MICHAEL LEIGHTON WILKIE.

NO: 22PR00621

To all heirs, beneficiaries, creditors, contingent creditors, and persons who may otherwise be interested in the will or estate, or both of Michael L. Wilkie also known as Michael Leighton Wilkie.

A PETITION FOR PROBATE has been filed by: Grant Leighton Wilkie in the Superior Court of California, County of Santa Barbara.

THE PETITION FOR PROBATE requests that (name): Grant Leighton Wilkie be appointed as personal representative to administer the estate of the decedent.

THE PETITION requests the decedent’s will and codicils, if any, be admitted to probate. The will and any codicils are available for examiniation in the file kept by the court.

THE PETITION requests authority to administer the estate under the Independent Administration of Estates Act. (This authority will allow the personal representative to take many actions without obtaining court approval. Before taking certain very important actions, however, the personal representative will be required to give notice to interested persons unless they have waived notice or consented to the proposed action.)

The Independent administration authority will be granted unless an interested person files an objection to the petition and shows good cause why the court should not grant the authority.

A HEARING ON THE PETITION WILL BE HELD IN THIS COURT AS FOLLOWS: 02/16/2023

AT 9:00 AM, DEPT. 5, SUPERIOR COURT OF CALIFORNIA COUNTY OF SANTA BARBARA, located at 1100 Anacapa Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101. Anacapa Division. Anacapa Courthouse.

IF YOU OBJECT to the granting of the petition, you should appear at the hearing and state your objections or file written objections with the court before the hearing. Your appearance may be in person or by your attorney. IF YOU ARE A CREDITOR OR A CONTINGENT CREDITOR OF THE DECEDENT , you must file your claim with the court and mail a copy to the personal representative appointed by the court within the later of either (1) four months from the date of first issuance of letters to a general personal representative, as defined in section 58 (b) of the California Probate Code, or (2) 60 days from the date of mailing or personal delivery to you of a notice under section 9052 of the California Probate Code.

OTHER CALIFORNIA STATUTES AND LEGAL AUTHORITY MAY AFFECT YOUR RIGHTS AS A CREDITOR. YOU MAY WANT TO CONSULT WITH AN ATTORNEY KNOWLEDGEABLE IN CALIFORNIA LAW.

YOU MAY EXAMINE the file kept by the court. If you are a person interested in the estate, you may file with the court a Request for Special Notice (form DE‑154) of the filing of an inventory and appraisal of estate assets or of any petition or account as provided in Probate Code Section 1250. A Request for Special notice form is available from the court clerk.

Attorney for Petitioner: Laurelle M. Gutierrez, Esq., 415 Mission Street Suite 5600, San Francisco, CA 94105 (628) 218‑3883. Published January 5, 12, 19, 2023.

County of Santa Barbara, Darrel E. Parker, Executive Officer, 12/20/2022 by April Garcia, Deputy.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: ONYX MONDE BEAUTE, 4928 8th Street, Apt C, Carpinteria, CA 93013 ; Zaida Catarino Gallardo (same address) This business is conducted by an Individual SIGNED BY ZAIDA CATARINO GALLARDO, OWNER. Filed in the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on 12/9/2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL). FBN Number: 2022‑0002960. E29. Published: December 22, 29, January 5, 12, 2023.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: ISLA VISTA FOOD CO‑OP 6575 Seville Road, Isla Vista , CA 93117; Isla Vista Food Cooperative (same address). This business is conducted by a corporation.

SIGNED BY LISA OGLESBY, PRESIDENT. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on 12/13/2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL). FBN Number: 2022‑0003001. E30. Published: December 22, 29, January 5, 12, 2023.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: STEVE’S TIRE AND AUTO REPAIR, 254 East Highway 246, Buellton, CA 93427; Buellton Garage Inc, 320 Central Ave, Buellton, CA 93427. This business is conducted by a corporation. SIGNED BY JENNIFER HURNBLAD, CFO/ SECRETARY. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on December 14, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL). FBN Number: 2022‑0003025 E30. Published: December 22, 29, January 5, 12, 2023.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: REFUGIO PATIENT ADVOCACY, 1190 North Refugio Road, Santa Ynez, CA 93460; Ken W. Partch (same address). This business is conducted by an individual.

SIGNED BY KEN PARTCH, ADVOCATE. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on December 15, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL). FBN Number: 2022‑0003035 E30. Published: December 22, 29, January 5, 12, 2023.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person (s) is/are doing business as: SAGE GARDEN CARE, 555 Meadow View Dr, Buellton, CA 93247. Samuel Perez Cardenas (same address). This business is conducted by an individual.

SIGNED BY SAMUEL PEREZ CARDENAS, OWNER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on 12/19/2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL). FBN Number: 2022‑0003062. E30. Published: December 22, 29, January 5, 12, 2023.

LOZANO, OWNER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on 12/16/2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL). FBN Number: 2022‑0003046. E54. Published: December 22, 29, January 5, 12, 2023.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: TRYON GRAPHICS , 1 San Marcos Trout Club, Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Taylor W Cocciolone (same address).This business is conducted by an individual. SIGNED BY TAYLOR COCCIOLONE. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on December 13, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL). FBN Number: 2022‑0003005 E30. Published: December 22, 29, January 5, 12, 2023.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: WHERE THE BROWS STAY, 130 S Hope Ave, Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Magali Resendiz, 3 Calaveras Ave, Goleta, CA 93117. This business is conducted by an individual. SIGNED BY MAGALI RESENDIZ. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on 12/19/2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL). FBN Number: 2022‑0003050. E35. Published: December 22, 29, January 5, 12, 2023.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: SEAGRAPE WINE COMPANY, 2625 Santa Barbara Avenue, Los Olivos, CA 93441; Vintegrated Solutions LLC (same address). This business is conducted by a limited liability company. SIGNED BY KAREN STEINWACHS, MEMBER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on December 7, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0002946. Published: January 5, 12, 19, 26, 2023.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person (s) is/are doing business as: GREAT WRIT RESEARCH , 228 East Victoria Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Gregory G. Rader, 3714 Friar Lane, Santa Barbara, CA 93105. This business is conducted by an individual. SIGNED BY GREGORY G. RADER, PROPRIETOR. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on December 9, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL) by E30. FBN Number: 2022‑0002969. Published: January 5, 12, 19, 26, 2023.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person (s) is/are doing business as: WYLIE MUTT, 1711 Robbins Street, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Alexandria N Keithley (same address). This business is conducted by an individual. SIGNED BY ALEXANDRIA KEITHLEY, OWNER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on December 7, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL). FBN Number: 2022‑0002947 E30. Published: January 5, 12, 19, 26, 2023.

TAI

ELECTRONICALLY FILED Superior Court of California,

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: KEN SYMER AUTOMOTIVE, 421 N Nopal St, Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Christian Lozano, 612 Andamar Way, Goleta, CA 93117. This business is conducted by an individual.

SIGNED BY CHRISTIAN

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person (s) is/are doing business as: Lee and Associates Consulting, 4117 Via Andorra, Apt. B, Santa Barbara, CA 93110; Larry C Lee (same address); Rachel M Lee (same address). This business is conducted by a married couple. SIGNED BY

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EMPLOYMENT (CONT.)

LEGALS (CONT.)

LARRY C LEE. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on December 21, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL).

FBN Number: 2022‑0003080 E30. Published: January 5, 12, 19, 26, 2023.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: TENACITY OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY , 3518 San Jose Lane; Santa Barbara, CA 93105; Megan E Barry (same address). This business is conducted by an individual. SIGNED BY MEGAN BARRY. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on December 28, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL). FBN Number: 2022‑0003114 E30. Published: January 5, 12, 19, 26, 2023.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: WARREN & SELBERT, LLC , 222 East Carrillo Street, Suite 310, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Accufy Analytics, LLC (same address).This business is conducted by a limited liability company. SIGNED BY ERIC C. SEALE, MANAGER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on December 23, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL).

FBN Number: 2022‑0003100 E30. Published: January 5, 12, 19, 26, 2023.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT

The following person(s) is/are doing business as: R.K.M. BOOKS, 1620 Oramas RD; Santa Barbara, CA 93103; Richard K Moser (same address). This business is conducted by an individual. SIGNED BY RICHARD K MOSER, OWNER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on December 16, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL).

FBN Number: 2022‑0003042 E49. Published: January 5, 12, 19, 26, 2023.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT

The following person (s) is/are doing business as: THE EDDY , 137 De La Guerra St, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; 137 E De La Guerra LLC (same address). This business is conducted by a limited liability company. SIGNED BY JENNIFER STEINWURTZEL, OWNER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on December 19, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL).

FBN Number: 2022‑0003052 E35. Published: January 5, 12, 19, 26, 2023.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT

The following person (s) is/are doing business as: BLACK & BLACK ATTORNEYS AT LAW 1114 State St, Ste 272, Santa Barbara, CA 93101; Erik D. Black (same address). This business is conducted by an individual.

SIGNED BY ERIK D. BLACK, OWNER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on January 6, 2023. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL). FBN Number: 2023‑0000040 E30. Published: January 12, 19, 26, February 2, 2023.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: THETASELL, 1933 Cliff Drive, Suite 2, Santa Barbara, CA 93109; Neil D Levinson (same address). This business is conducted by an individual.

SIGNED BY NEIL LEVINSON, OWNER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara

County on December 30, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL).

FBN Number: 2022‑0003135 E30. Published: January 12, 19, 26, February 2, 2023.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: WARP DRIVE TURBO, 521 N. 1st St., Lompoc, CA 93436; Warp Drive Turbo (same address). This is a business conducted by a limited liability company.

SIGNED BY GRANT BORMAN, MEMBER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on December 30, 2022. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL).

FBN Number: 2022‑0003132 E30. Published: January 12, 19, 26, February 2, 2023.

FICTITIOUS BUSINESS NAME STATEMENT The following person(s) is/are doing business as: ISLAND QUALITY SEAFOOD, 7402 San Carpino Dr, Goleta, CA 93117; Randy C Hughes (same address). This business is conducted by an individual. SIGNED BY RANDY HUGHES, OWNER. Filed with the County Clerk of Santa Barbara County on January 4, 2023. This statement expires five years from the date it was filed in the Office of the County Clerk, Joseph E. Holland, County Clerk (SEAL). FBN Number: 2023‑0000014 E28. Published: January 12, 19, 26, February 2, 2023.

NAME CHANGE

IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: ZACHARY NILES ZILLES; SHERRY DIANA ZILLES; CASE NUMBER: 22CV04422.

TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS : A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior Court proposing a change of name(s)

FROM: ZACHARY NILES ZILLES, GABRIEL ALLEN ZILLES, JOAQUIN HENRY ZILLES, SHERRY DIANA ZILLES

TO: ZACHARY NILES HEYWARD, GABRIEL ALLEN HEYWARD, JOAQUIN HENRY HEYWARD, SHERRY DIANA HEYWARD.

THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing.

NOTICE OF HEARING:

JANUARY 25, 2023, 10:00

AM, DEPT: 3, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101, Anacapa Division.

A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. FILED 12/5/22 in Superior Court of California County of Santa Barbara, Darrel E. Parker, Executive Officer by Baksh, Narzalli, Deputy Clerk. 12/4/22 BY THOMAS P. ANDERLE, JUDGE OF THE SUPERIOR COURT. Published December 22, 29, January 5, 12, 2023.

IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: RACHEL EILON COHEN AND ZACHARY COHEN EILON. CASE NUMBER: 22CV04900.

TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS : A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior Court proposing a change of name(s)

FROM: LIBA JULES EILON‑COHEN

TO: LAILA JULES EILON‑COHEN

THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing.

NOTICE OF HEARING:

FEBRUARY 6, 2023, 10:00

AM, DEPT: 5, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101, Anacapa Division.

A copy of this Order to Show Cause shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. FILED 12/16/22 in Superior Court of California County of Santa Barbara, Darrel E. Parker, Executive Officer by Baksh, Narzalli, Deputy Clerk. 12/16/22 BY COLLEEN K. STERNE, JUDGE OF THE SUPERIOR COURT.

Published December 29, 2022, January 5, 12, 19, 2023.

IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: BERNARD LOUIS DURHAM, CASE NUMBER: 22CV04837

TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior Court proposing a change of name(s) FROM: BERNARD LOUIS DURHAM TO: BERNARD LOUIS MARIE.

THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing.

NOTICE OF HEARING FEBRUARY 27, 2023, TIME: 10 A.M. DEPT 5, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101, Anacapa Division. A copy of this ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated: December 28, 2022, Thomas P. Anderle, Judge of the Superior Court. Published January 12, 19, 26, February 2, 2023.

IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: CHARMAINE DEVIENA BRACKINS, CASE NUMBER: 22CV05153

TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior Court proposing a change of name(s)

FROM: CHARMAINE DEVIENA BRACKINS TO: CHARMAINE DEVIENA VON ALVENSLEBEN NEWTON.

THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the

petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing.

NOTICE OF HEARING MARCH 1, 2023, TIME 8:30 A.M. SM3, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 312‑C East Cook Street, Santa Maria, CA 9345. A copy of this ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated: January 4, 2023, Timothy J. Staffel, Judge of the Superior Court. Published January 12, 19, 26, February 2, 2023.

IN THE MATTER OF THE APPLICATION TO SHOW CAUSE FOR CHANGE OF NAME: AMENDED PETITION OF MARIA CELIA HERNANDEZ, CASE NUMBER: 22CV04287

TO ALL INTERESTED PERSONS: A petition has been filed by the above named Petitioner(s) in Santa Barbara Superior Court proposing a change of name(s) FROM: JOSHUA CAMPOVERDE TO: JOSHUA CAMPOVERDE HERNANDEZ.

THE COURT ORDERS that all persons interested in this matter shall appear before this court at the hearing indicated below to show cause, if any, why the petition for change of name should not be granted. Any person objecting to the name changes described above must file a written objection that includes the reasons for the objection at least two court days before the matter is scheduled to be heard and must appear at the hearing to show cause why the petition should not be granted. If no written objection is timely filed, the court may grant the petition without a hearing.

NOTICE OF HEARING: FEBRUARY 22, 2023, TIME: 10 A.M. DEPT 3, SANTA BARBARA SUPERIOR COURT HOUSE 1100 Anacapa St., Santa Barbara, CA 93101, Anacapa Division. A copy of this ORDER TO SHOW CAUSE shall be published in the Santa Barbara Independent, a newspaper of general circulation, printed in this county, at least once each week for four successive weeks prior to the date set for hearing on the petition. Dated: January 5, 2023, Thomas P. Anderle, Judge of the Superior Court. Published January 12, 19, 26, February 2, 2023.

PUBLIC NOTICES

EXTRA SPACE STORAGE will hold a public auction to sell personal property described below belonging to those individuals listed below at the location indicated: 6640 Discovery Drive, Goleta, CA 93117. January 26, 2023 at 3:30 PM

JASON JOHNSON

Personal items, mainly books. Boxes.

ANGEL CATALAN Household items

The auction will be listed and advertised on www. storagetreasures. com. Purchases must be made with cash only and paid at the above referenced facility in order to complete the transaction. Extra Space Storage may refuse any bid and may rescind any purchase up until the winning bidder takes possession of the personal property.

Hybrid

NOTICE OF PUBLIC HEARING Design Review Board

Public Hearing – In Person and via Zoom

Goleta City Hall – Council Chambers 130 Cremona Drive, Suite B Goleta, CA 93117

Tuesday, January 24, 2023, at 3:00 P.M.

ATTENTION: The meeting will be held in person and via the Zoom platform. The public may also view the meeting on Goleta Channel 19 and/or online at https:// www.cityofgoleta.org/goletameetings.

NOTICE IS HEREBY GIVEN that the Design Review Board (DRB) of the City of Goleta will conduct a public hearing for the projects listed, with the date, time, and location of the DRB public hearing set forth below. The agenda for the hearing will also be posted on the City website (www.cityofgoleta.org).

Conceptual/Preliminary

Santa Barbara Metropolitan Transit District Site Improvements 5353 Overpass Road (APN 071-220-010) Case No. 22-0004-SCD/23-0001-DRB

New Single-Family Residence. The project proposes a Modification to reduce the rear yard setback.

225 Ravenscroft (APN 077-183-010) Case No. 21-0002-DRB/22-0001-MOD/20-0021-LUP

New Single-Family Residence. The project proposes a Modification to reduce the rear yard setback.

245 Ravenscroft (APN 077-183-012) Case No. 21-0003-DRB/22-0002-MOD/20-0020-LUP

PUBLIC COMMENT: Interested persons are encouraged to provide public comments during the public hearing in person or virtually through the Zoom webinar, by following the instructions listed on the DRB meeting agenda. Written comments may be submitted prior to the hearing by e-mailing the DRB Secretary, Mary Chang at mchang@cityofgoleta.org Written comments will be distributed to DRB members and published on the City’s Meeting and Agenda page.

FOR PROJECT INFORMATION: For further information on the project, contact Mary Chang, at (805) 961-7567 or mchang@cityofgoleta.org. For inquiries in Spanish, please contact Marcos Martinez at (805) 562-5500 or mmartinez@ cityofgoleta.org. Staff reports and documents will be posted approximately 72 hours before the hearing on the City’s website at www.cityofgoleta.org.

Note: If you challenge the nature of the above action in court, you may be limited to only those issues you or someone else raised at the public hearing described in this notice or in written correspondence delivered to the City on or before the date of the hearing (Government Code Section 65009(b)(2)).

Note: In compliance with the Americans with Disabilities Act, if you need assistance to participate in the hearing, please contact the City Clerk’s Office at (805) 9617505 or cityclerkgroup@cityofgoleta.org. Notification at least 48 hours prior to the hearing will enable City staff to make reasonable arrangements.

Publish: Santa Barbara Independent, January 12, 2023

INDEPENDENT.COM JANUARY 12, 2023 THE INDEPENDENT

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